Page 1

Fearless swimmer

Ice cream — treats made simple

Casandra Shaffer, 10, to compete in national dwarf games • SPORTS, D1

AT HOME, F1

WEATHER TODAY

TUESDAY

Mostly sunny High 80, Low 46 Page C6

• June 22, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Still seeking a 4-year university, locals take plan to state

Shout for summer! (For real this time?)

Skateboard fatality at popular, steep spot

By Sheila G. Miller

It’s a reminder of the danger of Bend’s bigger hills, police say

The Bulletin

Central Oregon’s education community hopes to establish a freestanding, four-year university in the next 20 to 30 years, and even though there’s not yet funding for it, the group is taking its first steps to make that dream reality at a meeting next month. The Higher Education Assessment Team will present its final 44-page recommendation on college in Central Oregon to the State Board of Higher Education at a meeting in July. If the plan is accepted, administrators will get to work putting it into action. Oregon State University-Cascades Campus Vice President Becky Johnson said the board will vote on whether to accept the report. “If they accept it, then it would be up to those of us on the ground to start implementing those things,” she said. “It certainly doesn’t mean they give us money.” Di Saunders, the communications director for the Oregon University System, said the board’s support for the proposal doesn’t necessarily mean any funding for the project. “Even if the Board approves a recommendation, the (Oregon Legislature) still has to approve funding for it next year in the 2011 session, if funding is needed to fulfill the recommendation,” she wrote in an e-mail. “Thus, any funding from the state noted in the report is contingent upon state approval.” HEAT, a committee composed of 22 people including representatives from Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, made its goal to increase the education offerings and opportunities for students in the region, and to increase enrollment at OSU-Cascades. See University / A5

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

The death of a 30-year-old skateboarder who lost control on a hill in northwest Bend is a reminder of the risks of a popular summertime activity, police and a skateboard instructor said Monday. Jacob Austin Vinson, of Bend, crashed and hit his head while skating on Northwest Stonepine Drive on Awbrey Butte late Sunday night or early Monday morning. A newspaper carrier passing through the area found Vinson in the middle of the street about 5 a.m. on Monday. Bend Police Lt. Ben Gregory said investigators found scuff marks in the road from the skateboard but no sign that a vehicle was involved in the crash or that it was anything other than an accident. “It’s fairly steep, and it is has a sharp curve where this occurred,” he said. Vinson was not wearing a helmet at the time of the crash. Gregory said police expect to get a full medical examiner’s report within the next few weeks. The hills of northwest Bend are among the top spots for local skateboarders, but many — including some very experienced skaters — avoid the steepest streets, said Gabe Triplette, a teaching professional at the Truck Stop Skate Park in Bend. See Death / A4

Photos of alleged shoplifters are displayed at Chung Fat Supermarket in New York. Chang W. Lee New York Times News Service

‘Pose and pay’ tests rights as it stops theft By Corey Kilgannon and Jeffrey E. Singer

TOP NEWS INSIDE

New York Times News Service

BOMB: Times Square suspect pleads guilty, calls it war, Page A3

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

SUPREME COURT: Ban on advising terror groups upheld, Page A3

Adrian Pinto, 21⁄2, from Bend, plays in one of the water fountains at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center on Monday, the first day of summer. It was his first trip to the pool this year. Today should bring more sunny skies and temperatures in the upper 70s, possibly reaching into the low 80s, said Diana Hayden, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pendleton. But temperatures could get a little less summer-like after that — a weather system is forecast to move in

Wednesday night, she said. That could bring a few more clouds and some wind on Wednesday, with temperatures in the upper 70s, before a slight chance of rain on Thursday and a drop in temperature to the lower 70s. The skies should start to clear up again on Friday, Hayden said. Saturday is expected to bring clearer skies and warmer temperatures — in the mid to upper 70s — before the next system comes through the area Sunday, she said. For a full forecast, see Page C6.

NEW YORK — The A&N Food Market on Main Street in Flushing, Queens, has an almost entirely Chinese clientele. The inventory includes live eels, turtles and frogs, frozen duck tongue and canned congee. These goods, like products sold in every neighborhood of the city, attract their share of shoplifters. But A&N Food Market has an unusual way of dealing with the problem. First, suspected shoplifters have their identification seized. Then, they are photographed holding the items they are accused of trying to steal. Finally, workers at the store threaten to display the photographs to embarrass them and to call the police — unless the accused thieves hand over money. See Theft / A4

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

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Vol. 107, No. 173, 42 pages, 7 sections

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Lessons for Gulf spill found Disappointing law school grades? in unlikely place: the Ozarks Wait a bit; they may get better By Todd C. Frankel

By Catherine Rampell

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

New York Times News Service

land oil spill in U.S. history. Until recently, the spill had VIENNA, Mo. — From his been largely forgotten. But backyard deck, Guy memories of the inWittler only has to cident have flooded look at the Gasconade Inside back with the Gulf’s River running below to • More oil spill deepwater catastrosee something familiar phe. And parallels becoverage, in the Gulf of Mexico tween the two spills, Page A4-5 oil spill. despite vast differencA massive pipeline es in size, are striking ruptured on Wittler’s — offering possible property nearly 22 years ago hints of what is to come later and spewed more than 860,000 in the Gulf’s still-unfolding gallons of crude oil into the drama. Gasconade. It was the worst inSee Oil / A5

New York Times News Service

Law schools that don’t inflate grades are trying other ways to help their students. Zachary Burd is benefiting from a Southern Methodist University program that pays firms to try out its graduates.

One day next month every student at Loyola Law School Los Angeles will awake to a higher grade-point average. But it’s not because they are all working harder. The school is retroactively inflating its grades, by tacking on 0.333 to every grade recorded in the past few years. The goal is to make its students look more attractive in a competitive job market. In the last two years, at least 10 law schools have changed their

grading systems to make them more lenient. These include law schools like New York University and Georgetown, as well as Golden Gate University and Tulane University, which just announced the change this month. Some law firms keep track of these changes and consider them when interviewing, and some do not. Law schools seem to view higher grades as one way to rescue their students from the tough economy — and perhaps more to the point, to protect their own reputations. See Grades / A4


A2 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

2

3

4 24 40 48

Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $9 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

F / Consumer

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

Lease fees are down, but proceed with care By Jerry Hirsch Los Angeles Times

Auto leasing deals abound these days. The offers often seem too good to be true. How about a well-equipped Honda Accord for $250 a month with no down payment or any other drive-off fees? Or better yet, $199 a month for a Chevrolet Malibu? So, what’s the catch? There isn’t any if you know what you’re getting into. There are always details. You need top-tier credit to qualify. You pay a penalty if you turn that Honda in with more than 36,000 miles. And the payment is not $250 a month because of that little matter of tax. It is more like $275, depending on where you live. After driving into a ditch during the recession, auto leasing is back in a big way, with Toyota, Honda and others all battling for customers with enticing lease offerings. But to get the best deal you need to learn the arcane art of the lease transaction. There’s complicated lingo to understand and some basic steps to take. Leasing can get you into a new car for less upfront money, but remember this: It is a long-term rental contract, not a purchase. At the end of the lease, you hand the keys back to the dealer and walk away, regardless of how much money you put into monthly payments and upkeep. Before stepping into a showroom, get a good idea of how much you drive annually. Leases aren’t for people who pile up the miles because they typically limit the use of a car to an average of 10,000 to 12,000 miles a year for the term of the contract. You will pay penalties if you turn in the car with more miles than allowed. Now determine whether you’re an auto flipper who yearns for the next hot vehicle about the time the new-car smell fades or you’re the practical sort who puts 150,000 miles on a car even if the dashboard vinyl is cracked. Beverly Rumfola of Whittier, Calif., has leased her last three autos because “I like having a new car and I like having it always under warranty. Financially, it is better to buy a car and keep it for 10 years, but this works for us.” At the other end of the spectrum is Michael Pranivong, a computer programmer from Fort Worth, Texas, who recently decided against a lease after checking out deals for a new Lexus IS 250 sports sedan he was looking at to replace his 1999 BMW 328, which has 145,000 miles on the odometer. With a lease, “you really have to watch your miles,” Pranivong said. And he was concerned about charges he could incur if he put a lot of wear and tear on the car.

What to get? Next step for the prospective lessee: Decide what type of vehicle you want. Is it a luxury sports sedan like a BMW 5 series? A midsize family vehicle such as the Ford Fusion? Or a practical, fuel-efficient transport and hauler such as the Honda Element? Test-drive several vehicles in the class you are considering to determine what you like and how you would like it equipped. Read reviews at consumer-friendly publications and websites such as Consumer Reports, Edmunds. com and Kelley Blue Book to learn what the experts are saying. Resist the urge to drive a car and immediately sign a contract. Patience and research can save you hundreds to thousands of dollars over the term of the lease. Now that you have a target vehicle and its options, go to the manufacturer’s website and see if there are any special deals on the vehicle. Don’t waste time going back to the showroom. From here there are two ways to go. The simplest is to use the advertised lease deal offered by the manufacturer and compare multiple dealers to see who might go lower. E-mail or call the Internet or fleet managers at four or five dealerships. They have more negotiating power than the typical salesperson and are used to dealing with buyers remotely. For example, in the case of the Honda Accord, ask if they can do the deal for $250 a month, in-

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Toys R Us launches Christmas Savers Club ... in June By Sandra M. Jones Chicago Tribune

Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Beverly Rumfola sits with her dogs in the Honda Crosstour she leases in Whittier, Calif. “I like having a new car and I like having it always under warranty. Financially, it is better to buy a car and keep it for 10 years, but this works for us,” she says.

Leasing terminology Before you shop for an auto lease, familiarize yourself with these terms so that you understand what’s being negotiated. • Allowable mileage: How many miles you can drive the vehicle over the life of the lease. There’s often a substantial penalty for exceeding the mileage. • Capitalized cost: The negotiated price of the car if you were to purchase it outright. Negotiating this price down will lower your lease payments. • Capitalized cost reduction: The amount of an incentive or cash the automaker is willing to put into the deal to sell the car. The customer will also sometimes make a cash down payment, which is a form of capitalized cost reduction. • Close-ended lease: This protects you from a drop in the resale value of the vehicle during the term of the contract. You return the car and walk away without owing a penny, regardless of what has happened to the car’s value. You still will be liable for unusual wear and tear and any excess miles. • Depreciation: The amount of value the car loses during the course of the lease. This is directly related to your lease payment. • Drive-off fees: How much cash you will have to pay to drive the vehicle off the dealer’s lot. • Early termination: A penalty or fee that must be paid to get out of the lease before the term is up. • Excess wear and tear: Wear and damage to the vehicle beyond what would be considered normal for its mileage and age. • Gap insurance: It covers the difference between the actual value of the vehicle and the contracted residual value. It is especially important if the car is in an accident and the amount your auto insurance pays out is less than the expected residual value of the auto. • Invoice: A number often inaccurately cited as a dealer’s cost for a vehicle. It typically represents what a dealer might pay the manufacturer for the car before subtracting volume credits, incentives and other discounts. • Lessee: The consumer who is leasing the auto. • Lessor: The party — typically a bank or finance company — that is leasing the car to you. • Money factor: This is the interest rate you are paying on the car. It is expressed in a fraction of a percentage point. You can convert a money factor to an interest rate by multiplying by 2,400 regardless of the length of the loan. • Monthly payment: What a consumer pays to a finance or lease company for the vehicle each month. In leasing, be sure to include monthly taxes in that payment calculation. Taxes are sometimes omitted when the dealer quotes you a price. • MSRP: Manufacturer’s suggested retail price — the sticker price for the vehicle before any additional options or expenses a dealer might add on. • Open-ended lease: A lease in which the vehicle operator holds the risk for what the auto will be worth at the end of the term. • Payoff amount: This is how much you would have to pay at the end of the lease to purchase the vehicle from the lessor. • Residual value: The estimated amount the vehicle will be worth at the end of the lease term. Vehicles with high residual, or resale, values typically have lower lease payments than other autos in a similar price range. • Sales tax: The state and local tax paid. In a sale transaction it is based on the entire purchase price. When you lease a vehicle in California, you pay sales tax only on the monthly payment amount. Often, advertisements quote lease payments before the sales tax is added, making the payment seem lower than it actually is. • Security deposit: This is usually equal to one monthly payment. • Term: The length of the lease, typically expressed in months.

cluding taxes. That change would save you about $800 over the term of a three-year lease. And, if you talk down one dealer, take that offer and call or e-mail the others again to see if they’ll beat it. Be sure your list includes some highvolume dealers. When all but one drops out, you probably have a good deal. “It is the last vestiges of horse trading,” said Larry Katzke, an incentives manager at American Honda Motor Co. When you compare bids, make sure that the monthly payment, length of the lease, drive-off cost (if any) and number of miles allowed over the contract term are the same, said Philip Reed, senior consumer advice editor for Edmunds.com. Dealers should provide a worksheet with this information. A change in any one of those variables means you are no longer comparing apples to apples,

and that could cost you money, he said. Experts say you can sometimes obtain a better lease by breaking the deal into its components and negotiating each point. Start with the capitalized cost of the vehicle, which is simply the negotiated price of the car if you were to purchase it outright. Edmunds.com, Kelley and TrueCar.com all are useful sites that can help you figure out the lowest price for the vehicle. The next piece of the puzzle is what’s called the “money factor.” Jesse Toprak, an analyst at TrueCar.com, says that this is just a different way of expressing an interest rate and is “designed to confuse consumers.” The money factor on this Honda deal is 0.00137. It seems pretty meaningless, but if you multiply it by 2,400 (this always works regardless of the number) you get 3.29 percent, or the true interest

rate on the deal. Now you know if that component of the transaction is competitive with what you might get from a bank or credit union and whether it is in line with your own credit rating. It never hurts to ask for a better rate. (In this instance, American Honda says lease customers must accept this money factor to take advantage of a popular option of having their first monthly payment waived.)

Those residual values The next piece of the puzzle is listed in the lease as the residual value of the vehicle, an estimate of what the car will be worth at the end of the lease. New vehicles with high residual, or resale, values typically have lower lease payments than other autos in a similar price range. Manufacturers will disclose the residual value in the lease offer, but it is usually stated as the dollar amount you can pay to purchase the car at the end of the contract. You have to convert it to a percentage of the sticker price to be able to compare to other offers. Honda says the Accord’s purchase option is $13,539, which translates to a 60 percent residual. Residuals vary depending on the lender funding the transaction. Remember, you want the residual to be as high as possible and the capitalized cost and interest rate to be as low as possible. Other factors that affect the contract include how much cash, if any, the manufacturer puts into the deal as an incentive, the size of any down payment you might make, the length of the lease and the miles allowed. Edmunds.com has a handy lease calculator that lets you alter variables to see how different residual, money factor and capitalized cost numbers change the contract. In any deal, make sure the contract includes gap insurance, which covers any difference in what an insurance company will pay out if a car is destroyed in an accident and the value the lease company has assigned to the vehicle. Many manufacturers automatically wrap that into the transaction, but you should never sign a contract without checking that it includes this coverage.

CHICAGO — Summer has just officially begun, and yet the mad dash for Christmas cash is under way. In a nod to the fragile state of the modern consumer, Toys R Us is trotting out an old-fashioned idea: its first Christmas Savers Club — in June. The program marks an unusually early kickoff to the holiday season and signals the unease that is moving through the retail industry as high unemployment and financial worries continue to weigh on consumer spending. “We know that parents and extended family are still challenged from a budget standpoint and consumers are still very value-conscious,” said Greg Ahearn, senior vice president of marketing and e-commerce at Toys R Us Inc. While Ahearn declined to discuss his predictions for the Christmas season, the shortlived U.S. retail sales revival this spring suggests retailers are heading into a lukewarm holiday shopping season. Encouraging shoppers to put money away early in a Toys R Us account allows the company to lock in sales before holiday toy price wars begin. For the past four holiday seasons, Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the nation’s largest toy seller, launched price cuts on popular toys before Halloween. And Target Corp. and Amazon.com Inc. followed suit. Toy merchants in particular count on the last three months of the year for a large chunk of their annual sales. During the last three years, Toys R Us generated more than 39 percent of its sales and a “substantial portion” of operating earnings in the fourth quarter. Toys R Us has been doing its best to regain ground from Wal-Mart since 2005 when a group of high-profile investors bought the distressed toy store chain and hired former Target Vice Chairman Gerald Storch to run it. Since then, Toys R Us has expanded its private label program and worked with vendors on exclusive toys to make it difficult for shoppers to compare products solely on price. Now the company is pushing the limits of Christmas creep. The practice of promoting holiday sales before the official start of the season on Thanksgiving weekend has been around for years, but it went into overdrive when the U.S. entered a recession in late 2007. Retailers from Walgreens to Neiman Marcus began urging shoppers to think about Christmas gifts earlier each year. In 2006, Wal-Mart unveiled holiday toy deals in October. In 2007, L.L. Bean mailed its holiday catalog in September. Last year, Sears launched its Christmas Lane shop in July.

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 A3

T S Car bomb High Court backs ban suspect on advising terrorists pleads guilty, says it was war Bulletin wire reports

By Tom Hays and Larry Neumeister The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Calling himself a Muslim soldier, a defiant Pakistan-born U.S. citizen pleaded guilty Monday to carrying out the failed Times Square car bombing and left a sinister warning that unless the U.S. leaves Muslim lands alone, “We will be attacking U.S.” Faisal Shahzad entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Manhattan just days after a federal grand jury indicted him on 10 terrorism and weapons counts, some of which carry mandatory life sentences. He pleaded guilty to them all. Widely circulated snapshots of Shahzad — a U.S.-trained financial analyst and married father of two — show him with a neatly trimmed beard, all smiles and looking carefree behind sunglasses or with his American wife. When led into court Monday, he had on a white skull cap and prisoner’s uniform; his beard was shaggy and his demeanor serious. U.S. District Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum challenged Shahzad repeatedly with questions such as whether he looked at the people in Times Square, especially the children, to see who they were or whether he really built the bomb by himself. He repeatedly insisted he acted without help from others in the U.S. and built the bomb “all by myself.” “One has to understand where I’m coming from,” Shahzad said calmly. “I consider myself ... a Muslim soldier.” The 30-year-old described his effort to set off a bomb in an SUV he parked in Times Square on May 1, saying he chose the warm Saturday night because it would be crowded with people he could injure or kill. He said he conspired with the Pakistan Taliban, which provided more than $15,000 to fund his operation and five days of explosives training late last year and early this year, just months after he became a U.S. citizen. The judge repeatedly interrupted Shahzad, including when he said his plot was to retaliate against the U.S. and the forces of up to 50 other countries that had “attacked the Muslim lands.” Cedarbaum said: “But not the people who were walking in Times Square that night. Did you look around to see who they were?” “Well, the people select the government,” Shahzad said. “We consider them all the same. The drones, when they hit....” Cedarbaum interrupted again: “Including the children?” Shahzad answered: “Well, the drone hits in Afghanistan and Iraq, they don’t see children, they don’t see anybody. They kill women, children, they kill everybody. It’s a war, and in war, they kill people. They’re killing all Muslims.”

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that human rights advocates led by a University of Southern California professor could be prosecuted if they offer advice to a foreign terrorist group, even if the advice is to settle disputes peacefully. The 6-3 decision upholds the 1996 law that makes it a crime for Americans to provide “material support” to a designated foreign terrorist group, including by offering its members expert advice or training. Chief Justice John Roberts said the need to combat terrorism trumped the concern over restricting freedom of speech. The court, he said, agreed with Congress and the president that “providing material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization — even seemingly benign support — bolsters the terrorist activities of that organization.” Roberts was joined by the court’s conservatives — Jus-

tices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Samuel A. Alito Jr. — as well as its most liberal member, retiring Justice John Paul Stevens. Justice Stephen Breyer took the relatively unusual step of reading his dissent from the bench, saying the court had abandoned its role of protecting individual liberties under the First Amendment because of national security threats Congress did not adequately justify. “In such cases, our decisions must reflect the Constitution’s grant of foreign affairs and defense powers to the president and to Congress but without denying our own special judicial obligation to protect the constitutional rights of individuals,” Breyer said. Monday’s ruling sends a warning to international aid groups and charities that even good-will measures could ensnare them in a criminal prosecution. Until now, the government has used this law mostly to prosecute those who sent

New York Times News Service

JOHANNESBURG — New mining in Zimbabwe has quickly yielded millions of carats of diamonds and could help catapult the nation into the ranks of the world’s top diamond producers, according to the head of a group of experts for the U.N.-backed effort to stop the trade in conflict diamonds. But the new wealth has provoked fears that the riches will be used to subvert attempts to bring democracy to a country that has long suffered under authoritarian rule. “This is a world-class deposit,

WASHINGTON — Ruling in favor of Monsanto Co., the Supreme Court Monday overturned a judge’s ban on the planting of alfalfa seeds engineered to be resistant to the company’s Roundup herbicide. The 7-1 ruling shifts the focus of the environmental dispute to the Agriculture Department, which under Monday’s ruling now can consider allowing limited planting. That would be an interim measure while the USDA finishes an environmental impact statement that could clear the way for unrestricted planting. The justices said a federal judge in San Francisco went too far when he placed a nationwide ban on so-called Roundupready alfalfa seeds because of the possibility they would contaminate other plants. Monday’s decision may affect a similar fight being waged over Monsanto’s Roundup-tolerant sugar beet seeds. — Bloomberg News

Dave Weaver / The Associated Press

A sample ballot is posted at a polling station Monday as Fremont, Neb., residents voted on a proposed municipal ordinance that would ban hiring or renting property to illegal immigrants. The measure passed with about 57 percent support.

Nebraska city bans hiring or renting to illegal aliens By Josh Funk The Associated Press

Alexander Zemlianichenko / The Associated Press

Kyrgyz soldiers on an armored personnel carrier conduct a patrol Monday of the ethnic Uzbek side in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh. Kyrgyz government forces swept into an ethnic Uzbek area Monday, beating men and women with rifle butts in an assault that left at least two dead and 25 wounded, witnesses said.

Kyrgyz forces batter Uzbek enclave By Ellen Barry New York Times News Service

MOSCOW — A military sweep ended in bloodshed Monday in an area of the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh where residents’ protective barricades had been removed by force, with two residents dead and about two dozen hospitalized with injuries from beatings. Over the weekend, Kyrgyz troops removed the barricades, which residents had built during four days of ethnic violence that started June 10. At dawn on Monday, security forces began a house-to-house sweep of the area, the Uzbek village of Nariman, demanding information about a Kyrgyz police official

who was killed there earlier this month. Witnesses said the troops kicked men and severely beat them with rifle butts during interrogations. One died of a gunshot wound, another died later of his injuries, and 25 were hospitalized, said Telman Badalov, a supervising doctor in the local hospital. Regional officials at first denied that there were any casualties, but at a news conference later in the day, they acknowledged that two residents had been killed and 23 wounded, saying that troops had opened fire because they faced armed resistance and that their actions were justified. A law enforcement official told

Vast Zimbabwe diamond deposit may boost oppressive Mugabe By Celia W. Dugger

money to a terrorist group or who traveled abroad to undergo training at an al-Qaida camp. “All this ruling does is it continues to marginalize Americans. It doesn’t marginalize terrorist groups,” said Amjad Atallah, co-director of the Middle East Task Force at the liberal New America Foundation in Washington. “It tells Americans you can’t be engaged in conflict resolution in these areas.” The suit challenging the law was filed 12 years ago by USC professor Ralph Fertig, a founder of the Humanitarian Law Project in Los Angeles. Fertig wanted to advocate for the Kurdish people before a U.N. tribunal, but feared he might make contact with members of the Kurdistan Workers Party, known as PKK, which has been designated as a terrorist group by the State Department. He argued that the words “advice” and “training” should not be read broadly to cover those who advised others to steer away from violence and terrorism.

Monsanto alfalfa ban overturned

no doubt about it,” said the expert, Mark Van Bockstael. He described the concentrations of diamonds in the Marange fields in eastern Zimbabwe as among the highest in the world: “The deposit is a freak of nature.” The steady accumulation of stones has already emboldened President Robert Mugabe, 86, to consolidate control over the Marange fields to prolong his 30year grip on power, members of his inner circle said. Although Mugabe now officially governs under a tenuous power-sharing agreement with his longstanding rivals, the diamond fields are guarded by an

army that reports to him and are overseen by a ministry run by his party, ZANU-PF, giving him and his allies lopsided control over a desperately needed economic boon. “This is ZANU-PF’s salvation,” said one of Mugabe’s closest confidants, on the condition of anonymity because his conversations with the president were supposed to be confidential. Diamonds are being sold on the black market for partisan and personal gain, he said, with some party leaders gaining and others being cut out: “The looting has intensified over the past six months.”

the Interfax news service that seven men were arrested on suspicion of being “hired snipers.” But the list of confiscated weapons released by the Osh regional superintendent’s office — two grenades, 40 rifle cartridges and two Molotov cocktails — included no firearms. The episode underlines how close to the surface violence remains. Hundreds of ethnic Uzbeks were killed during the violence earlier this month, and more than 100,000 fled to the Uzbek border or crossed it. Many witnesses told reporters that uniformed Kyrgyz troops had taken part in the violence. Anna Neistat, a researcher from Human Rights Watch, said

that Nariman’s barricades were breached on Sunday and that troops entered at 6 a.m. Monday. She said troops faced no resistance as they went from house to house demanding passports and information about the killing of the local police chief. “Many people told us they opened their doors — they didn’t believe they would be beaten into a pulp,” Neistat said, after interviewing residents.

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FREMONT, Neb. — Voters in the eastern Nebraska city of Fremont on Monday approved a ban on hiring or renting property to illegal immigrants, the latest proposal in a series of immigration regulations taken up by communities around the country. About 57 percent of voters in Fremont supported the proposal, according to unofficial results that still must be certified by the election commissioner. The measure is likely to face a long and costly court battle. The American Civil Liberties Union says it will try to block the measure before it even goes into effect. The town of about 25,000 people has watched as its Hispanic population surged in the past two decades, largely due to the jobs available at the nearby Fremont Beef and Hormel meatpacking plants. The city also has an enviably low unemployment rate that matches the Nebraska rate of 4.9 percent. Nonetheless, residents worry that jobs are going to illegal immigrants who they fear could drain community resources. Proponents of the ballot measure collected enough signatures and fought in the Nebraska Supreme Court to put the question to a public vote. Supporters say the measure is needed to make up for what they see as lax federal law enforcement. Opponents say it could fuel discrimination.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Theft

Death

Continued from A1 “We usually fine them $400,” said Tem Shieh, 60, the manager, who keeps track of customers on 30 video monitors in the store’s surveillance system. “If they don’t have the money, then we usually hold their identification and give them a chance to go get it.”

Continued from A1 He said the high speed that comes with flying down a hill on wheels can be a lot of fun but also very difficult to control. Once the skateboard tops about 20 mph, he said, it’s almost impossible to jump off and run. On some of the steepest hills on the west side of Bend, he said it would be easy for a skateboarder to be rolling at 45 mph. Triplette said anyone who attempts to skate down a steep hill should be prepared in terms of both practice and equipment. He suggested that skaters wear a helmet, face mask and leather clothing. “With hill bombing, no matter what, you should have full pads,” he said. “If you reach the threshold of speed, more times than not you’re going to get yourself in trouble unless you’re seasoned enough to know exactly how much speed to take.” He said people who skate down hills tend to use longer boards, allowing the skater to maintain more control. Police said Vinson was riding a short board. It’s not clear if he was an experienced skater. Steve Esselstyn, the Bend Police Department’s community liaison, said skateboarding in the street is legal, as long as skaters follow the rules of the road. Like cyclists, people on skateboards must follow traffic signs and signals and yield for other vehicles. Skateboards are not allowed on sidewalks, and state law requires skateboarders younger than 16 to wear helmets. Esselstyn said some skateboarders tend to weave back and forth across the street, which can create problems for passing drivers who can’t predict the skater’s next move. “It’s one of the hazards you really have to be watching for, and as the season gets warmer, there are more out there,” he said. Skaters can be cited for creating a hazard or impeding traffic, but Esselstyn said officers tend to give warnings, rather than tickets, and he didn’t know of any recent citations. “It’s a lot of fun, no doubt about it,” he said. “But you have to be careful and don’t tick off a lot of drivers, because you’re going to lose.” Triplette said Vinson’s death came at an unfortunate time; Monday was Go Skateboarding Day, an international event aimed at promoting the activity. He said people interested in getting involved should take the time to ask for advice about technique and equipment. “Somebody that has never skateboarded should at least find somebody who has been skateboarding for a while, ask a few questions and get some solid information,” he said.

Tactic from China The practice of catching suspected shoplifters and demanding payment is an import from China, several experts in retail loss prevention said, where there is a traditional slogan that some storekeepers post: “Steal one, fine 10.” Whether this practice is legal in the United States is open to interpretation. New York state law allows “shopkeepers’ privileges” that fall somewhere between the prerogatives of the police and a citizen’s arrest. The law also details “civil recovery statutes,” by which retailers may use the threat of a civil lawsuit to recover substantial settlements for even minor thievery. But threatening to report that someone has committed a crime can be considered a form of extortion. Neither the Police Department nor the Queens district attorney’s office said any complaints about the practice had been received. But its critics argue that the accused shoplifters are deprived of basic civil rights and the usual assurances in public legal proceedings, like the right to a lawyer and freedom from coercion, and are not being held by adequately trained security officials with proper oversight. “If a store owner says he’ll call the police unless you pay up, that’s extortion, that’s illegal,” said Steven Wong, a community advocate in Chinatown, sitting in his office above a restaurant on Chatham Square. “And putting up pictures in public, calling someone a thief who has never even been formally charged, that’s a violation of their civil rights.” It is unclear exactly how widespread this practice is, and whether threats of arrest are always used, but it is used in certain predominantly Chinese neighborhoods around the city. Many accused shoplifters plead poverty. But they usually manage to come up with money to pay their way out of being publicly shamed and arrested, Shieh said, often after calling upon friends and relatives for the cash.

Grades Continued from A1 Once able to practically guarantee gainful employment to thousands of students every year, the schools are now fielding complaints from more and more unemployed graduates, frequently drowning in student debt. They have come up with a number of strategic responses. Besides the usual career counseling measures, many top schools have bumped up their on-campus interview weeks from the autumn to August, before the school year even starts, because they want their students to have a chance to nab a job slot before their counterparts at other schools do. Others, like Duke and the University of Texas at Austin, offer stipends for students to take unpaid public interest internships. Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law even recently began paying profit-making law firms to hire its students. “For people like me who have good grades but are not in the super elite, there are not as many options for getting a job in advance,” said Zachary Burd, 35, who just graduated from SMU. A Dallas family law firm will receive $3,500 to test drive him this August. “They’ll get me for a month or two, for free, to try me out,” he said. “It’s safer for them, and it’s a good foot in the door for me.”

Grades going up But the tactic getting the most attention — and the most controversy — is the sudden, deliberate and dubiously effective grade inflation, which had begun even before the legal job market softened. “If somebody’s paying $150,000 for a law school degree, you don’t want to call them a loser at the end,” says Stuart Rojstaczer, a former physics professor at Duke who now studies grade inflation. “So you artificially call every student a success.” Unlike undergraduate grading, which has drifted northward

Chang W. Lee / New York Times News Service

At the Chung Fat Supermarket in New York, the practice of catching suspected shoplifters and demanding payment or else putting their photos up on the store’s wall is an import from China. Whether this practice is legal in the United States is open to interpretation. Fears of being deported often color their panicked responses. “Two weeks ago, a woman tried to take two bags of grapes worth maybe $10,” he said, speaking in Chinese. The woman first said she had no money but somehow found some. “She came back with eight new $50 bills,” Shieh said. At the Chang Jiang Supermarket on Kissena Boulevard in Flushing, where hawkers of fresh produce in sidewalk bins continuously yell out specials in Chinese, credit cards are accepted from accused shoplifters for payment to avoid arrest, said the manager, Wu Jian Si. “They just say, ‘Run the credit card,’” said Wu, 30, speaking in Chinese. “They have money.” Fliers posted in the store display images of accused shoplifters and of a man being escorted by the police, along with warnings in Chinese and English that say, “If we catch, we will take your photo for records and your fine will be $400 or you go to prison.” The fines are necessary, Wu said, because the police do not always arrest the accused shoplifters. And even if they do, Wu said, “The most they’ll get is 24 hours.” Many of the accused shoplifters are immigrants who have a heightened fear of authority, and they often are in the country illegally, said Jason Sanchez, 24,

who has worked as a security guard at several Chinese markets in Flushing. “They figure they’ll be deported, so they’ll do anything to get the money,” Sanchez said. “Some stores ask for $400, or some ask for $200 — it becomes a negotiation.”

over the years because most undergraduate campuses do not strictly regulate the schoolwide distribution of As and Bs, law schools have long employed clean, crisp, bell-shaped grading curves. Many law schools even use computers to mathematically determine cutoffs between a B+ and a B, based on exam points. The process schools refer to as “grade reform” takes many forms. Some schools bump up everyone’s grades, some just allow for more As and others all but eliminate the once-gentlemanly C. Harvard and Stanford, two of the top-ranked law schools, recently eliminated traditional grading altogether. Like Yale and the University of California, Berkeley, they now use a modified pass/fail system, reducing the pressure that law schools are notorious for. This new grading system also makes it harder for employers to distinguish the wheat from the chaff, which means more students can get a shot at a competitive interview. Students and faculty say they are merely trying to stay competitive with their peer schools, which have more merciful grading curves. Loyola, for example, had a mean first-year grade of 2.667; the norm for other accredited California schools is generally a 3.0 or higher. “That put our students at an unfair disadvantage, especially if you factor in the current economic environment,” says Samuel Liu, 26, president of the school’s Student Bar Association and the leader of the grading change efforts. He also says many Loyola students are ineligible for coveted clerkships that have strict GPA cutoffs. “We just wanted to match what other schools that are comparably ranked were already doing,” he said. Nearby University of California, Los Angeles, made its grading curve more lenient in the fall of 2005, in part to keep up with “nationwide shifts in grading,” said Elizabeth Cheadle, its dean of students. The University of Southern California and the University of

California Hastings College of the Law responded by increasing their own curves last school year. What’s more, USC’s law school dean, Robert Rasmussen, said he was partly inspired by the school where he previously worked, Vanderbilt University Law School, which had also changed its curve a few years ago. These moves can create a vicious cycle like that seen in chief executive pay: If every school in the bottom half of the distribution raises its marks to enter the top half of the distribution, or even just to become average, the average creeps up. This puts pressure on schools to keep raising their grades further. Loyola Law School’s dean, Victor Gold, said he has already received a plea for advice from a student group at Chapman University School of Law, which will have the toughest grading curve in California after Loyola acts. One notable school has managed to maintain the integrity of its grades through an idiosyncratic grading rubric. The University of Chicago Law School grades its students on a scale of 155-186, a system so bizarre that employers are unlikely to try to match it against the 4.0 scale or letter grades used almost everywhere else.

‘Walk of shame’ Some of these enforcement policies have recently come under fire. Last month, two Chinese immigrants spoke out publicly after being wrongly accused of shoplifting at the New York Supermarket, a store under the Manhattan Bridge in Chinatown that posts photographs of accused shoplifters next to the cashier, behind the live crabs and eels. One of those immigrants, Li Yuxin, said that after being falsely accused of thievery, she began weeping in front of a crowd of shoppers. The other immigrant, Liang Huanqiong, a 60-year-old home attendant, also said that false accusations of theft damaged her reputation and caused mental anguish. The episodes made headlines in Chinese-language newspapers, and store officials apologized to the women and said they would train employees to better recognize thievery and use more sensitivity in approaching suspected shoplifters, the articles reported.

Does it help? It is unclear whether grade inflation is particularly effective at helping students get jobs, especially because many large firms adjust their expectations accordingly. Many hiring partners say they read Above the Law, a legal

Both women are being advocated for by Wong, who is critical of the practices despite the apparent vagueness of the law. The police declined to discuss the legality of the practice because they had not investigated it. In New York state, a retailer may sue a thief (who has stolen any type of item, costly or not) for the item’s retail price up to $1,500 if the item cannot be resold, along with a penalty of $75 to $500, depending on the item’s price. Usually, the retailer threatens legal action and settles for a sum in the hundreds of dollars, experts in loss prevention said. This process is separate from criminal prosecution and can take place without arrest or conviction, and even if the case is criminally tried and thrown out. Richard Hollingera sociologist and criminologist at the University of Florida, said a shopkeeper demanding money on the spot was a version of the legal process of civil recovery outside the law. He said it could veer into extortion, which New York law defines in partas demanding payment by making a person fear he will be accused of a crime or charged with one. Sanchez, the security guard, said some stores paraded the shoplifting suspect up and down the aisles, announcing the attempted theft to customers. “It is truly the walk of shame,” he said.

blog, that gleefully reports (and mocks) grade changing efforts — from leaked student memos — even when schools themselves don’t announce the changes. Employers say they also press law schools for rankings, or some indication of GPAs for the top echelon of the class. And if the school will not release that information — many do not — other accolades like honors and law journal participation provide clues to a student’s relative rank. “Every year we do our homework,” says Helen Long, the legal recruiting director at Ropes and Gray, a firm with more than 1,000 lawyers. “And besides, if a school had a remarkable jump in its GPAs from one year to the next, we receive a big enough group of resumes every year that we’d probably notice.” Smaller firms, however, may not have the resources to research every school’s curve, and may see too few students from any given school to track changes from year to year. James Wagner, the hiring partner at the 29-lawyer Boston firm Conn Kavanaugh Rosenthal Peisch & Ford, said he hasn’t noticed any grade inflation in the last couple of years. But he has noticed something else new from applicants. “About a third to half of the resumes I’ve been getting now profess a love of the Red Sox,” he chuckles, wondering if the students had been coached by their schools. “But I’ll bet that if you compared resumes for those same candidates,” he says, “when they apply to New York firms they love the Yankees, and for Chicago firms, it’s the Cubs.”

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Poll finds multiple concerns on economy and energy By John M. Broder and Marjorie Connelly New York Times News Service

Overwhelmingly, Americans think the nation needs a fundamental overhaul of its energy policies, and most Americans expect alternative forms of energy to replace oil as a major fuel source within 25 years. Yet a majority are unwilling to pay higher gasoline prices to help develop new sources of energy. Those are among the findings of the latest nationwide New York Times/CBS News poll. The poll, which examines the public’s reaction to the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico, highlights some of the complex political challenges the Obama administration faces. And in that regard, President Barack Obama does not fare well: 54 percent of the public say he does not have a clear plan for creating jobs, while only 34 percent say he does, an ominous sign heading into this fall’s midterm elections. They are also impatient with Obama’s response to the oil disaster in the gulf, by a large margin, and blame the spill on risks taken by BP and its partners in the failed well, according to the poll, which was conducted by telephone from June 16 to 20 with 1,259 adults. The survey included an indepth look at the attitudes of people most directly affected by the oil spill — those living in counties in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi that border the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf Coast residents are more likely than other Americans to support increased drilling off the U.S. coastlines. By a large margin, the public overall thinks more regulation of offshore drilling to protect the environment is needed, but they are also more likely to attribute the BP accident to a failure of the federal government to enforce existing rules than to a lack of adequate regulation. Two months after the rig explosion and fire, just 18 percent of Americans think that BP will be able to stop the leak in the next month.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 A5

Head of spill fund pledges fast payout

Oil Continued from A1 “It’s a lot of stupidity once again,” said Sherry Bingaman, who lived along the Gasconade during the 1988 spill. The oil turned the Gasconade’s clear-green waters a sickly black. And just like the current situation, the oil company’s estimates of the spill’s size kept rising like the tide. There was finger-pointing over who was at fault. The cleanup, assumed to take just a few weeks, dragged on for months and was criticized for mistakes. Government officials and the oil company battled every step of the way. The oil company ended up pleading guilty to environmental crimes. Two decades later, the Gasconade seems to have recovered, due in part to lucky circumstances. But Wittler worries the Gulf will not turn out so well. “How are they going to do any of this,” he said, waving at the scrubbed, narrow river, “on that scale?” It was Christmas Eve 1988 when the underground pipeline erupted on Wittler’s lush land in the Ozark foothills, 25 miles north of Rolla. The 22-inch steel line, operated by a division of Shell Oil, carried crude 435 miles from Oklahoma to a refinery in Wood River, Ill. A long, thin crack dumped oil into the Shoal Creek tributary and then the Gasconade, a swift waterway that meanders north through 10 counties before emptying into the Missouri River. Wittler had just finished a Christmas Eve turkey dinner at his father’s home in Kirkwood, a suburb of St. Louis, when the phone rang. The call was from a hog farmer living next to the Ozark property. He said the river was black. Oil smelled like it was hanging in the air. He suspected a pipeline had burst. When Wittler drove up to the property two hours later, the fumes were so heavy he could barely breathe. “I was lucky I wasn’t smoking,” he said.

Early confusion But Shell initially did not know the pipeline was spewing oil, according to a subsequent federal investigation. A Shell worker in Oklahoma failed to notice the pipeline’s plummeting pressure gauges for at least two hours. The delay made the spill four times worse, the report concluded. Even more oil escaped because the pipeline valve nearest the leak could not be closed automatically. It had to be turned by hand. Shell eventually dispatched clean-up crews to Vienna that night. But the company was later criticized for failing to immediately notify state regulators. Meanwhile, the Gasconade was struggling to choke down a 15-mile-long plume of oil, more than a foot thick in places. Just as in the Gulf, floating boom lines were laid across the banks and ahead of the spill. And just as in the Gulf, there were reports of oil overtopping the booms. Vacuum-equipped trucks and a skimmer barge tried to suck oil from the water. Within days, the plume thinned out into patches of tar balls, heavy chunks and a greasy sheen. The oil slid into the Mississippi River, reaching St. Louis within a week and then Cape Girardeau. Water treatment plants in the St. Louis area braced to deal with potential oil contamination. The AnheuserBusch brewery in St. Louis was shut down, and 2,000 workers were laid off for several days after a brewery taster noted an oily smell in the water. Shell downplayed the severity

University Continued from A1 Currently, the OSU-Cascades campus offers a 2+2 model, in which students take their first two years of undergraduate classes at COCC or some other community college, then take their third and fourth years at OSU-Cascades. If HEAT’s recommendation is approved, that will begin to change. The long-term goal is a freestanding university that offers four years of instruction to be developed in 20 or more years. That university could be moved off COCC’s campus, depending on capacity and space issues. In the meantime, the branch campus would improve its relationship with Central Oregon Community College and create a hub-and-spoke model, in which OSU-Cascades’ Bend campus is a hub that offers all its degrees,

By Michael Kunzelman The Associated Press

St. Louis Post-Dispatch file photos

Workers skim oil from Shoal Creek near the Gasconade River on Jan. 5, 1989. The creek is near a Shell Oil pipeline that ruptured on Christmas Eve. It was the largest inland spill in the nation’s history. ally did,” said Vienna Mayor Leslie Darr, who was a deputy sheriff during the spill.

In the courts

Workers clean oil sludge from the Gasconade River near its confluence with the Missouri River on Dec. 29, 1988. The men, employees of Riedel Environmental services of St. Louis, vacuumed the oil into tank trucks.

“You wouldn’t think anything would recover from that. But it did.” — Guy Wittler, on the Gasconade oil spill

of the spill. At first, it said only 120,000 gallons of oil escaped. Then it would only comment on how much oil it recovered — about 300,000 gallons, estimating that accounted for 90 percent of the spill. The state Department of Natural Resources threatened a subpoena before Shell admitted the oil spill was at least 840,000 gallons, a number that would rise again. Shell said it delayed reporting a figure only because it wanted to be accurate. Shell also tightly controlled the flow of information about the spill. “It was a typical oil company response, much like you’re seeing now,” said attorney Patrick Flachs, who was a U.S. Department of Justice environmental crimes prosecutor during the Gasconade spill. Shell blamed a pipe manufacturing defect for the spill. But a federal report, while noting the pipe’s flaw, placed the blame on a pressure surge caused by a Shell worker who abruptly shifted the pipeline’s flow. The report noted that the lone Shell employee working Christmas Eve had not been trained to handle a crisis.

Worse than first thought In early 1989, after learning of problems with the clean-up, then-Gov. John Ashcroft railed that Shell was guilty of “at best, incompetence” and “at worst, an attempted cover-up.” Shell had been widely applauded for its efforts until then. It kept adding workers until about 500 people and 40 boats were deployed to scrub oil from 100 miles of the Gasconade and parts of the Missouri River.

with other satellite campuses offering some distance learning. The satellite campuses would be COCC’s education centers in Redmond, Prineville and Madras. According to Johnson, a committee is being formed to create a first-year experience for students entering OSU-Cascades and give a four-year experience feel to the Bend campus. “Our interim steps are to try to develop a four-year feel to the university until we can get to that point,” Johnson said. “That includes things like having a residence hall on campus and then having a pathway for students through COCC who know they want to get a four-year degree.” The goal is to have that firstyear experience program ready to go by fall 2011. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Then, state investigators found a hidden pool of oil on a sandbar that was supposedly clean. Someone else turned up several pairs of coveralls buried in the river by clean-up workers. The mood changed. Support for Shell withered. Two state officials had been monitoring the cleanup process. That number was beefed up to 10. Ashcroft was one of many public officials who voiced a renewed anger — a note familiar in the words of today’s politicians as the BP clean-up drags on. “We will not tolerate sloppiness, incompetence or subterfuge,” Ashcroft said in 1989. “We will not tolerate claims that a cleanup is too expensive. ... We’ll see that no stone is left unturned as we work to ensure that Shell’s oil is removed from our rivers.” The clean-up dragged on. Shell said it would be done by April. Then more oil was discovered sitting in backwater channels. Finally, after 10 months and $14 million, regulators and Shell agreed the Gasconade was clean. “They did a great job, they re-

It took three years, but in 1992 a top executive with Shell subsidiary Shell Pipe Line Corp. appeared in the federal courthouse in St. Louis. He was there to plead guilty on behalf of the company to a misdemeanor violation of dumping refuse into a waterway. Shell and Texaco Pipeline Inc., which jointly owned the pipeline, also paid a $7 million fine. The prosecutor, Flachs, said the oil spill had been caused by “out and out negligence.” Shell did not respond to calls for comment. But its former top executive, Robert McMahan, once offered advice to others in the oil business based on his experience with the Gasconade spill. “There are no secrets. When you have bad news of this magnitude, don’t try to hide it,” he said at a 1990 industry conference in Evanston, Ill. “Break the news to the press and work with them to inform the public. Environmental problems can take many years and much effort to resolve. It is better in the long run to prevent them from occurring in the first place.” Even years after the spill, Wittler still found hints of oil in the Gasconade. He would step onto a sandbar, and the water would develop an oily sheen. Only in the last few years has that sheen disappeared, he said. And the hillside where the pipe burst and oil once rained down into the river, its vegetation killed off by the oil’s black blanket, has fully regrown. “You wouldn’t think anything would recover from that,” Wittler said. “But it did.” The successful cleanup is not the only reason the Gasconade spill has been forgotten. The incident also was quickly overshadowed. Just three months after the Ozarks oil spill, the Exxon Valdez supertanker crashed in Alaska.

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NEW ORLEANS — The administrator of a $20 billion fund to compensate Gulf oil spill victims pledged Monday to speed payment of claims as a federal judge considered whether to lift a six-month moratorium on new deepwater drilling. Kenneth Feinberg, who has been tapped by the White House to run the fund, said many people are in desperate financial straits and need immediate relief. “We want to get these claims out quicker,” he said. “We want to get these claims out with more transparency.” Feinberg, who ran the claim fund set up for victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, said BP has paid out over $100 million so far. Various estimates place total claims so far in excess of $600 million. BP said it has spent $2 billion fighting the spill for the last two months and compensating victims, with no end in sight. It’s likely to be at least August before crews finish two relief wells that are the best chance

of stopping the flow of oil. The British oil giant released its latest tally of response costs, including $105 million paid out so far to 32,000 claimants. That figure does not include the $20 billion fund BP PLC last week agreed to set up for residents and businesses hurt by the spill. Also Monday, the government sent BP a $51.4 million bill for the response effort. BP has already paid two other bills totaling $70.9 million. Shares of BP, which have lost about half their value since the April 20 oil rig disaster that killed 11 workers, fell nearly 3 percent Monday in New York trading to $30.86. The rig was owned by Transocean Ltd. but run by BP. BP chief executive Tony Hayward canceled a scheduled appearance today at a London oil conference, citing his commitment to the Gulf relief effort. The last-minute pullout followed stinging criticism of Hayward’s attendance at a yacht race on the Isle of Wight off the coast of southern England on Saturday.

Drilling moratorium protested as judge weighs legal points Los Angeles Times NEW ORLEANS — Inside New Orleans’ federal courthouse Monday, a judge was deliberating the points of law that could determine the fate of the Obama administration’s six-month moratorium on deep-water drilling. Outside, Lucy Lailhengue was marching up and down Poydras Street with a sign that offered a more blunt line of reasoning: “If you support the moratorium, stop using oil and gas!” Lailhengue, 52, says she can smell the spilled oil in the Gulf of Mexico from her home in suburban Chalmette, and she worries about the crude despoiling nearby wetlands. Yet on the whole, the oil industry has been good to Lailhengue — very good. With a highschool degree, she pulls down white-collar money as a title analyst for a drilling company. It’s a common story in a state where the offshore oil and gas industry alone has an estimated $3 billion economic impact. “I just think it’s ridiculous to shut down a whole industry and ruin thousands of lives to

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punish one company,” she said. That argument, echoed by Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, the oil industry, and a multitude of regular Gulf-dwelling folk living close to the disaster, is at the heart of a lawsuit challenging the moratorium. The plaintiffs, led by marine company Hornbeck Offshore Services LLC, argue that the government overstepped its bounds in issuing the May 28 moratorium that halted work on 33 deep-water rigs. They also argue that there is nothing to suggest that deepwater drilling “is more dangerous today than it was on the day immediately preceding the tragic incident involving the Deepwater Horizon.” In a two-hour hearing Monday, U.S. District Judge Martin Feldman weighed those arguments as well as rebuttals from environmental groups. He is expected to decide whether to issue an injunction overturning the moratorium by Wednesday morning.

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A6 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

W  B Little hope for 40 lost Colombian miners BOGOTA, Colombia — Colombian rescuers have retrieved the bodies of 34 miners killed in last week’s coal mine explosion. About 40 workers are still underground, Antioquia state disaster coordinator John Rendon said Monday. Officials hold out little hope any are still alive. Rescuers carried out 13 bodies Sunday from deep inside the 1.2-mile access tunnel at the San Fernando mine. They found two more Monday. The blast occurred Wednesday. Rendon said debris and the persistent buildup of methane and carbon monoxide gases continue to impede rescue efforts. The exact cause of the explosion is unknown, but the mine’s records indicate it lacked a methane ventilation pipe and gas-detection device.

Dolphin-hunting film will be shown in Japan TOKYO — Six Japanese movie theaters will screen an Oscarwinning documentary about dolphin hunting in Japan, the film’s Japanese distributor said Monday, after free-speech advocates pleaded with them to resist pressure from nationalists campaigning to block the film’s release. A fringe nationalist group, which calls the film anti-Japanese for criticizing what it calls a timehonored tradition, has staged rallies in and around Tokyo to press theaters to cancel screenings. But six will start showing the documentary, “The Cove,” on July 3, and 16 more are considering screening it, said Takeshi Kato, president of the Japanese distributor, Unplugged. “The theaters have taken a stand,” Kato said. “But protests are continuing, and we cannot let our guard down yet.” “The Cove” includes scenes, many filmed surreptitiously, of dolphin hunts in the coastal village of Taiji, southwest of Tokyo, where fishermen corralled dolphins, selected a few to capture alive to sell for aquariums and used harpoons to kill the rest for meat. — From wire reports

U.N. stresses urgency of easing Israeli blockade

Opiate use spikes in Afghanistan, with scant therapy

By Karin Laub The Associated Press

By Heidi Vogt

NUSSEIRAT, Gaza Strip — Students in this refugee camp study in stifling hot metal shipping containers, and there’s no space in the crammed U.N. classrooms for thousands of incoming first-graders because Israel’s blockade of Gaza has kept out supplies for building schools. At Gaza’s largest hospital, dialysis patients live in fear of frequent power cuts, and the CT scanner is used only for the most urgent cases because there are no spare parts to fix its failing cooling system. Since the violent 2007 takeover of Gaza by Hamas — an Islamic militant group responsible for firing thousands of rockets at Israeli border communities — Israel has let in only limited humanitarian supplies, including basic foods and medicine. Construction materials, which Israel maintains Hamas could use to make weapons and build bunkers, were barred; the vast majority of Gaza’s 1.5 million people could not travel; and a ban on trade has wiped out tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs. Now that Israel is promising, under international pressure, to ease the restrictions, aid officials say urgent action is needed. Israel must move “within days, not months,” Gaza’s top U.N. aid official, John Ging, said Monday. During the three-year blockade, the U.N. has been forced to put nearly $110 million worth of construction projects on hold, including six schools, five clinics and 2,300 apartments for Gaza’s poorest and those made homeless by past Israeli military operations. Signaling a change of course, Israel’s Cabinet said Sunday it would allow all goods into Gaza, except for weapons and items deemed to have military uses. Israel insists on maintaining its sea blockade and inspecting overland cargo to keep

The Associated Press

Khalil Hamra / The Associated Press

A Palestinian boy turns around last week as he walks toward a primary school housed inside United Nations Relief and Works Agency containers, in Nusseirat, central Gaza Strip. During a three-year Israeli blockade, the U.N. has been forced to put nearly $110 million worth of construction projects on hold, including six schools, five clinics and 2,300 apartments. weapons and missiles out of the hands of Gaza militants. Israel remained vague Monday about how and when it expected to deliver more goods to Gaza. Officials outlined procedures that suggested a slow pace, despite a White House call for quick changes in the blockade policy.

Steps forward In coming days, Israel will review building projects with representatives of international organizations, including the U.N., said Maj. Guy Inbar, a Defense Ministry official. If there are no security concerns, talks will begin on how much material is needed, he said. Such a procedure was in place during the blockade, but only one U.N. construction project was ever approved and then only after the direct intervention by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Cement and other building materials were delivered only last month. Now the pace is expected to pick up, Inbar said. Israeli TV stations showed

footage Monday of trucks entering Gaza with building materials, and government spokesman Mark Regev pledged quick movement of goods. But many questions remain unanswered, including whether Israel will allow full trade, seen as key to reviving industry and creating jobs. Israel currently operates only one land crossing, but the government said it will open others if needed and if security concerns are addressed. In the Nusseirat refugee camp, the U.N. turned 17 shipping containers into a school for nearly 900 middle school boys at the start of the 2009-2010 school year. Principal Hamdan al-Hor said parents initially did not want to send their children there, but conditions became more tolerable when he mounted fans to circulate the stifling hot air. Welders cut openings for doors and windows and whitewashed the metal walls, transforming the containers into classrooms, as well as a small science lab, a library and a computer rooms. A sandy lot serves as a playground.

KABUL, Afghanistan — Drug addicts as young as a month old. Mothers who calm their children by blowing opium smoke in their faces. Whole communities hooked on heroin with few opportunities for recovery treatment. Use of opiates such as heroin and opium has doubled in Afghanistan in the last five years, the U.N. said Monday, as hundreds of thousands of Afghans turn to drugs to escape the misery of poverty and war. Nearly 3 percent of Afghans ages 15 to 64 are addicted to opiates, according to a study by the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime. The U.N. defines addicts as regular users. That puts Afghanistan, along with Russia and Iran, as the top three countries for opiate drug use worldwide, according to Sarah Waller, an official of the U.N.’s drug office in Kabul. She said a 2005 survey found about 1.4 percent of Afghan adults were opiate addicts. The data suggest that even as the U.S. and its allies pour billions of dollars into programs to try to wean the Afghan economy off of drug money, opium and heroin have become more entrenched in the lives of ordinary Afghans. That creates yet another barrier to international efforts to combat the drug trade, which helps pay for the Taliban insurgency. “The human face of Afghanistan’s drug problem is not only seen on the streets of Moscow, London or Paris. It is in the eyes of its own citizens, dependent on a daily dose of opium and heroin above all — but also cannabis, painkillers and tranquilizers,” said Antonio Maria Costa, executive director of the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime. Afghanistan supplies 90 percent of the world’s opium, the main ingredient in heroin, and is the global leader in hashish production. Drug crops have

Afghan drugs Opium cultivation in Afghanistan declined for a second-straight year in 2009, but the number of users has grown since 2005. Opium cultivation in acres 500,000 400,000

Converted from hectares.

300,000 200,000 100,000 0 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09

Number of regular drug users Opium

’05 ’09

Heroin

’05 ’09

150,000 230,000 50,000 120,000

Source: U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime AP

helped finance insurgents and encourage corruption, particularly in the south, where the Taliban control cultivation of opium poppies and smuggling routes. The Afghan government and its international backers have made a massive effort in recent years to discourage farmers from growing opium poppy, and its cultivation dropped 22 percent last year. Some of the drop is likely due to lower market prices, but the government has said it also shows that the Afghan war on drugs is having some success. Twenty of the country’s 34 provinces were declared poppy-free in 2009. Yet almost 1 million Afghans — 8 percent of the 15-to-64 age group — are regular drug users, addicted to opiates, cannabis and tranquilizers, according to the report, which was based on surveys of about 2,500 drug users, community leaders, teachers and doctors. By comparison, 0.7 percent of the population in neighboring Pakistan and 0.58 percent of Americans aged 15-64 were regular opiate users, according to the most recent U.N. data.


B

Tech Focus Swiping instead of typing, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,289.09 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -20.71 -.90%

t

CLOSE 10,442.41 DOW JONES CHANGE -8.23 -.08%

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1,113.20 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -4.31 -.39%

s

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.24 treasury CHANGE +.62%

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$1239.70 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$17.50

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Catheter company OK’d to sell in Europe Clear Catheter Systems, a medical device company based in Bend and Cleveland, announced Friday it has received an important approval from European regulators allowing its PleuraFlow device to be sold in European markets. The PleuraFlow device, which prevents blood clots from blocking drainage tubes placed in patients after heart and lung surgeries, is already approved for sale in Canada, and an application with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is pending, according to the company. The company, formerly named PleuraFlow, won the Bend Venture Conference’s first $100,000 investment award in 2006.

EXECUTIVE FILE

The neighborhood bicycle merchant

SEC accuses firm of defrauding investors Beginning a new stage in the government’s investigations of the mortgage industry, the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday accused a New York firm that managed complex mortgage securities of defrauding investors and misleading the American International Group, the governmentcontrolled company that insured some of the firm’s deals. Two of the four mortgage deals in the SEC complaint were bought by the New York Federal Reserve in 2008, in its bailout of AIG, Goldman Sachs and UBS, which were not named in the complaint, received payouts from the Fed for those deals. The case examines a firm that managed complex deals known as collateralized debt obligations after they were created by banks. The firm, ICP Asset Management, used the four CDOs, sold under the name Triaxx, like a piggy bank to enrich itself by diverting millions of dollars from investors, the commission said in the complaint.

Regulators target risk-friendly pay Bank regulators have told the nation’s largest financial firms to move faster in changing pay practices that could encourage dangerous risk-taking, officials said Monday. The Federal Reserve has completed an initial review of compensation policies at 28 large banks it oversees and has been giving them confidential feedback on areas where they must change. On Monday, the Fed and other federal regulators issued final guidelines, stressing the need for policies that do not give executives, traders, and other bank employees incentives to make overly risky investments that might earn them huge bonuses in the short run while leaving the bank exposed to losses in the long term. — From staff and wire reports

Foreclosure-aid plan struggles In March 2009, the Obama administration began a foreclosure-prevention program. Since then, about 436,000 borrowers have dropped out. Loan modifications under the housing plan, to date 500 thousand Permanent modifications 400

Canceled modifications*

300 200 100 0

J

F

M

A

M

*Includes permanent and trial modification loans

Source: Treasury Department

AP

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

At his shop on Northeast Second Street, Bend Velo owner Eric Power recycles older bicycle parts into commuter bikes with the brand name J. Livingston.

Bend Velo owner says he’d like to see people riding his ‘retro rebuilds’ to the farmers market By Tim Doran The Bulletin

t Bend Velo, bikes and their parts seemed to be everywhere on Friday. In front of the shop on Northeast Second Street, a repair stand held a bike frame. Two used bikes sat parked in a nearby rack. In the showroom, another stand held a nearly completed bike; frames hung from the wall, wheels and tires from the rafters, and a side room contained more bike frames and parts. Bend Velo owner Eric Power, 49, plans to turn them all into custom bicycles. Power, Bend Velo’s owner and only employee, refurbishes used bicycle parts and turns them into “retro rebuilds,” which he also calls practical bikes. Oth-

A

B

ers might refer to them as commuters. These bikes have fenders, fat tires, baskets, kickstands, new powder coating and cork hand grips wrapped with hemp. Power plans to outfit some with dynamo lighting systems. The bikes get dated with the year produced, and they even have a brand name: J. Livingston, the name of one of Power’s friends and an inspiration to start the shop, which opened in January. Livingston bicycles look like models from the 1960s, or something a professor might be seen riding around a college campus. To emphasize the classic look, Power used a typewriter font for the Livingston logo, which also has an abstract im-

t

$18.802 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.373

Startups get tips on ‘smart growth’ By David Holley The Bulletin

One person may be all it takes to start a business, but owners looking to grow need well-versed advisers and a strong executive management team. That was the sentiment expressed by a group of panelists who spoke to local business owners Thursday about winning investors’ confidence at the Central Oregon PubTalk, a monthly event hosted by Economic Development for Central Oregon. The panelists said startup business owners should build a small board of advisers who have experience finding investors and building up companies. “That’s a way companies can bring on high-level talent” when they are in early stages of development, Elicia Putnam, president of 14 Hands marketing agency and an angel investor, said Monday. She said having advisers with recognizable names — such as angel investors, business owners or other business professionals — brings credibility to a business, and helps make investors more comfortable. That seems to be working for Lisa Flynn and whippersnappers studio, a Bend photo studio with four franchises in three states. Flynn had three meetings earlier this month with venture capitalists and angel investors in San Francisco who are interested in buying into her business. See Startups / B5

The basics What: Bend Velo Where: 1631 N.E. Second St. Suite B, Bend Employees: One Phone: 541-382-2453 Web site: http://bendvelo.com/

age of a seagull, a reference to the 1970 book by Richard Bach that many people over age 35 will recall. Bend has plenty of shops that sell bicycles, Power said, but many cater specifically to high-performance road riders or mountain bikers. Bend Velo makes bikes for the masses from recycled parts. Power, who wants to be like the town butcher or cobbler once found in nearly every city, wants to get people out of their cars and onto bicycles. See Bend Velo / B5

Exporters optimistic on China’s policy shift on currency By Steven Greenhouse and Stephanie Clifford New York Times News Service

Paying to keep patients out of hospital Insurers taking the long view and investing in primary care with an eye toward prevention By Reed Abelson New York Times News Service

Like a lot of doctors, Patrick Kilduff has too many patients and too little time. He and the five other physicians in Shavertown, Pa., oversee the care of about 12,000 people, and a typical office visit lasts just 15 minutes. Because health insurers pay him as little as $45 per visit, Kilduff and his colleagues say they have little choice but to squeeze as many patients as they can into their day. That makes it virtually impossible to spend time explaining to patients the importance of keeping their blood sugar under control or how to take their medicine. But the insurers’ penny-wise approach can lead to as much as $1 million in hospital bills if a person with undertreated diabetes has a heart attack. That is why some of the nation’s insurers are now trying to avoid those high medical bills by taking the longer view. They are giving primary care doctors more help — and more money — to take care of the sickest patients and help prevent them from becoming sicker.

Laura Pedrick / New York Times News Service

Nurse Mary Solomon, right, goes over health specifics with patient Marie Jones while Dr. Richard Martin stops by to check in at the Geisinger Health System office in Lake Scranton, Pa. Geisinger Health System, which operates a network of clinics and hospitals in Pennsylvania, now pays the salaries of extra nurses in doctors’ offices to make sure patients’ care is carefully coordinated by a doctor and staff, with particular attention given to chronically ill patients. Otherwise, insurers know they risk being overwhelmed by rising health care costs as an older, sicker population copes with serious chronic conditions. “The essential business model

of medical insurance will have to change,” said Dr. Glenn Steele Jr., chief executive of Geisinger Health System, which operates a network of clinics and hospitals in Pennsylvania.

Geisinger is known nationally for its innovative approaches to delivering high-quality care at lower cost. It also owns a health insurance plan that covers about 250,000 people — including many of Kilduff’s patients in Shavertown. As an insurer, Geisinger now pays the salaries of extra nurses in doctors’ offices, whose fulltime job is to help patients with chronic diseases stay on top of their conditions and, ideally, out of the hospital. The doctors, including Kilduff, help hire the nurses, who work closely with the doctors to oversee the patients’ care. The nurses make sure patients who need quick appointments are squeezed in, and they alert the doctors to any early indications of trouble by keeping in close contact with the patients and looking out for the results of patients’ lab tests. One of Kilduff’s patients, Rose Ann Cox, 69, began working a few years ago with a Geisinger-paid nurse, Karen Thomas, to control her diabetes, talking by phone at least once a week. See Insurer / B5

Embracing China’s decision to let its currency move more freely, American businesses said Monday that the move would make it easier to compete against Chinese companies and would help reduce the U.S. trade deficit. They cautioned, though, that the rise in the currency, the renminbi, is expected to be gradual, even if many American economists say it is 20 percent to 40 percent undervalued. SGI, a California company that makes servers and data storage equipment, looks forward to extra business. “It’s a real opportunity for SGI and other American companies to expand sales to China,” said Mark Barrenechea, the chief executive. “Although this will increase some costs for American businesses that source in China, it also means that Chinese businesses can more readily afford American exports.” Trade experts said the winners would be American companies like General Electric and Caterpillar that export to China, while companies like Wal-Mart and Target that rely on China as a low-cost export platform may be squeezed by rising costs. In fact, costs have already been rising this year because of demands for higher wages among Chinese workers, who are balking at the coastal jobs once coveted as a way out of rural poverty. See China / B2


B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY “BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM”: Bob Phillips, president and CEO of RW & Associates, will speak about influential leadership styles; $25 for chamber members, $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437. “REALIZING THE AMERICAN DREAM”: Learn about the process of shopping for and buying a home, including the basics on budgeting, credit and getting a mortgage loan. Registration required. Class continues June 23, 5:30 pm - 9:30 pm; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506 ext. 109. DENTAL RADIOLOGY: Learn the fundamentals of oral radiology. Lectures on Tuesday and Thursday 5:30-8 pm, June 22 - July 22. Labs on Friday and Saturday 8:30 am - 3:30 pm, June 25-26 and July 9-10. Registration required. Fee does not include required text; $649; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “BUILD A BASIC BUDGET , THE FIVE-STEP SPENDING PLAN”: Learn to create a spending plan, set realistic goals and track your spending. Refreshments will be served. Call to reserve your seat; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795.

WEDNESDAY HOME ENERGY ANALYST TRAINING: Three-day heating and cooling training for building professionals. Registration required by June 11; $549; June 23-25 from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. “2010 SUMMER OREGON BUILDING CODES FORUM”: Oregon energy efficiency specialty code introduction and discussion; free; 1-5 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-312-4901 or bmandal@ci.bend.or.us. “CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW”: Jeromy Cockrell, broker with Exit Realty Bend, hosts a live Internet show to discuss “The Hazards of Lead Base Paint in Your Home.” Go to www. ExitRealtyBend.com and follow the show icons; free; 7 p.m.; www. ExitRealtyBend.com.

THURSDAY “2010 SUMMER OREGON BUILDING

CODES FORUM”: Oregon fire code update; $40; 8 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-312-4901 or bmandal@ci.bend.or.us. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction requirements. Successful completion results in an ODOT credential for flaggers. Preregistration required; $69; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. “CENTRAL OREGON WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS BUSINESS RESOURCE LUNCHEON”: Central Oregon Association of Realtors Government Affairs Director Bill Robie will speak. Registration requested; $20 for members, $25 for nonmembers; 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-480-6808 or joy@ bendproperty.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB: Learn to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage your finances with account features. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior of Charles Schwab & Co. Registration required by June 22; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. “2010 SUMMER OREGON BUILDING CODES FORUM”: Oregon mechanical code update; $40; 1-5 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-312-4901 or bmandal@ ci.bend.or.us. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com. “GREEN DRINKS”: Central Oregon’s monthly networking for business and sustainability; free; 5-7 p.m.; Brilliant Environmental Building Products, 327 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-6908, ext. 11 or www. envirocenter.org. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB: Learn to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage your finances with account features. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior of Charles Schwab & Co. Registration required by June 22; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. “CREDIT ABILITY, BUILD A STRONG CREDIT HISTORY”: Learn who needs to build good credit, the significance of your credit report and credit score, how to establish credit and more. Refreshments will be served. Call to reserve your seat; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795.

FRIDAY “2010 SUMMER OREGON BUILDING CODES FORUM”: OSSC nonstructural update; $40; 8 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-312-4901 or bmandal@ ci.bend.or.us. COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-1807. “2010 SUMMER OREGON BUILDING CODES FORUM”: OSSC structural update; $40; 1-5 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-312-4901 or bmandal@ci.bend.or.us. “FREE HELP WITH FINANCIAL AID APPLICATIONS”: The Oregon Student Assistance Commission is hosting FAFSA Friday, online training that helps students and parents complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. To register, e-mail contactus@AspireOregon.org; 2 p.m...

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO WORKSHOP: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining. com.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining. com.

WEDNESDAY June 30 “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or www.cocc. edu. “CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW”: Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty Bend hosts a live Internet show to discuss why real estate agents should choose the Exit Realty model. Visit the website and click on the show icons; free; 7 p.m.; www.ExitRealtyBend.com.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Wayne T. and Kelly J. King to Jeb Horn, Awbrey Park Phase Three, Lot 88, $362,000 Fidelity National Title Insurance Company to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, T 17, R 12, Section 27, $552,500 Sean P. and Kathyrn A. Miner to James P. and Patricia D. Gowgiel, Creekside, Lot 13, $425,000 Joseph F. Atkinson Jr. and Deborah S. McMahon, trustees of Joseph F. Atkinson Jr. & Lillian Meyers Restated Residence Trust to Daniel L. and Dwight Stroud, Wyndemere, Lot 5, Block 4, $372,500 Bank of America NA to Chell and Rebecca Williams, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top Phase 10, Lot 248, $655,500 Recontrust Company NA to Elizabeth and R. Mark Elling, T 18, R 12, Section 22, $353,000 Branch Banking & Trust to Harold and Peggy Ashford, Partition Plat 2005-62, Parcel 3, $340,000 Recontrust Company NA,

trustee to K3 Inc., Edgecliff, Lot 14, Block 1, $202,501 Jeffrey S. and Sara E. Lillesve, trustees of Sara E. Lillesve Revocable Trust to Andy and Wendy Laakmann, trustees of Laakmann Living Trust, Golden Butte Phase 2, Lot 65, $680,000 D.R. Horton Inc.-Portland to Gene R. Mast and Kathleen M. Mastroieni, Summit Crest Phase I, Lot 64, $181,434 D.R. Horton Inc.-Portland to George L. and Ellen S. Crocker, Summit Crest Phase I, Lot 23, $195,000 Recontrust Company NA, trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Starlight Estates, Lot 1, $172,235 Washington Federal Savings to Bobby J. and Toni L. Thompson, Amber Springs, Lot 39, $150,480 Nancy Balding to D. C. Brooks, Riverrim Planned Unit Development Phase I, Lot 11, $159,900 Nancy C. Burgon, trustee of Ted & Nancy Burgon 1990 Trust to Dale W. and Anita L. McGrew, trustees of Dale W. and Anita L. McGrew Family Trust, Oregon Water Wonderland, Lot 19, Block 1, $412,000

Calwestern Reconveyance Corporation, trustee to PNC Mortgage, Jacobsen’s Third Addition, Lot 24, $224,006.85 Bank of America NA to Gregg White, Estates at Pronghorn Phase 3, Lot 250, $244,900 Andrew and Melody Lessar to John A. and Karen F. Macy, Redmond Heights, Lot 1, Block 11, $350,000 Daniel Livny and Antoinette Vanneste to Jeffrey S. and Ellina L. Campbell, T 16, R 11, Section 6, Lot 6, $780,000 Dennis Welch to Jerry R. Huntley, trustee of the Jerry R. Huntley Revocable Living Trust and Carol B. Fent-Huntley, trustee of the Carol B. Fent-Huntley Revocable Living Trust, Ridgewater II Planned Unit Development, Lot 50, $180,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to James D. and Patricia G. Bradbury, Hollow Pine Estates Phases III and IV, Lot 77, $295,000 Allen and Jolie Heinly to Mark L. and Dianna L. Weaver, Summer Meadows Estates Phase 1, Lot 8, $155,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Sean and Francessa Moneymaker, Howells Hilltop Acres, Lot 3, Block 6, $153,000

Tentative deal reached to limit debit card fees By Binyamin Appelbaum New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — House and Senate Democrats announced a tentative agreement Monday to impose new limits on debit card fees, which would resolve a main difference between the two chambers as they race to complete financial legislation before the Fourth of July. The agreement largely preserves the Senate’s language, instructing the Federal Reserve to limit the fees that banks collect from merchants when custom-

ers swipe debit cards. That is expected to save merchants billions of dollars, some of which could be passed on to customers in the form of lower prices. The acquiescence of House Democrats, after modest changes to limit the scope and soften the impact, may set a pattern for the week ahead. The conference committee of members from both chambers appointed to develop a final version of the legislation must complete its work this week to maintain the schedule set by Democratic

leaders. Key remaining issues include how to regulate derivatives trading, the extent of restrictions on banks investing their own money, and whether to require stronger buffers against unexpected losses. The Senate’s version is tougher on the banks, in part because it finished work months after the House and public sentiment turned against banks in the interim, creating a political argument for the House now to embrace that tougher line.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com.

China Continued from B1 Even though Caterpillar has tractor-making factories in China to serve the local market, the company was quick to praise the country’s decision, struck just days ahead of a crucial Group of 20 meeting of nations. That is because along with what it produces there, Caterpillar sells China some of its most sophisticated, and therefore expensive, American-made equipment, including giant bulldozers, large mining trucks and gas turbines. “Presumably, a stronger currency will increase their buying power, and if their economy remains strong, that will inevitably lead to more exports,” said Jim Dugan, a Caterpillar spokesman. As China’s goods become more expensive, goods produced in the West will become relatively more attractive, not just in China but around the world.

Moving factors Fred Hochberg, chairman of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, said it was hard to predict how much China’s currency increase could bolster American exports. “It depends on how they implement it, what rate of speed and how much it is really market-driven,” he said. American companies and global companies that count on China to produce goods at a low cost, however, may be hurt by the currency’s rise just as they have been suffering from rising labor costs. John Frisbie, president of the United States-China Business Council, cited companies with low-end products, like apparel, shoes and toys, as among those most affected. Wages have risen recently in China to help workers keep up with inflation and in response to labor unrest, most notably strikes at several Honda plants and 11 worker suicides at Foxconn Technology’s mammoth electronics factory in Shenzhen. Mitch Free, chairman of MFG.com, a company based in Atlanta that helps secure manufacturing for Black & Decker, Whirlpool and Motorola, said Chinese manufacturing prices had risen by 8 percent in the last year, largely because of labor costs. He expects the trend to continue. “They’re proactively giving some wage increases,” Free said. “We’re seeing people sending messages to the buyers, through the system, saying that they’re revising a price or can only hold a price for a short time because they’re anticipating wage increases.” How much American exports increase depends in part on how much China allows its currency to rise. C. Fred Bergsten, director of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, predicted that if the renminbi rose by 20 percent over the next two

Caterpillar via New York Times News Service

Trade experts say that companies that export to China, such as Caterpillar, will benefit, and discounters that rely on China as a low-cost export platform may be squeezed. or three years, and if adjacent countries like Taiwan and Malaysia similarly let their currencies rise, the United States would lop $100 billion to $150 billion a year from its current account deficit and create up to 1 million American jobs. “Most of that change would be in exports, not just exports to China, but to Bangladesh, Vietnam and even Mexico,” Bergsten said. Frisbie was more skeptical about the impact on the trade deficit. Neither a stronger renminbi nor higher wages would have much effect on major companies like GE or Boeing that have made large investments in China to sell to local consumers, he said.

An opportunity For companies that make products in China for sale elsewhere, however, there will be an incentive to reconsider where their factories are. “They’re the ones who are strategizing to consider other locations,” Frisbie said. “They’re the companies that will be impacted most. They’re looking at other places with low labor costs, like Vietnam.” Other Asian countries could well let their currencies rise along with the renminbi, reducing the potential benefit of transferring operations out of China. Still, some companies may decide to continue diversifying their suppliers, said Hana BenShabat, who oversees A.T. Kearney’s global-retail index.

“Companies will spread their bets among different countries instead of being so attached to getting a large proportion of their goods out of China,” she said. She said she did not expect a wave of moves to lower-wage countries because labor costs make up only 15 percent to 20 percent of apparel costs. “Cost of labor in Bangladesh is way lower than China,” she said, but given other costs like shipping, “the same garment could cost much more out of Bangladesh than in China.” At one big company, Li & Fung, which does work for WalMart and Liz Claiborne, among others, the president, Bruce Rockowitz, said China was still attractive. “This is not the end of China, but it’s the end of lower prices,” he said. Clyde Prestowitz, president of the American Strategy Institute and author of “The Betrayal of American Prosperity,” said he expected no rush out of China by American companies. “In fact, I see important guys going in, like Intel and Applied Materials,” both semiconductor manufacturers, he said. “Foreign companies are obviously concerned, but I haven’t seen anybody except Google talk seriously about getting out. It’s a big market that’s going to get bigger.” Self Referrals Welcome

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 B3

S I N E S S

T F Amazon, Barnes & Noble slash prices on e-readers By Jeffry Bartash MarketWatch

Photos by Stuart Isett / New York Times News Service

Cliff Kushler developed Swype, software that allows users to glide a finger across the virtual keyboard to spell words, rather than tapping out each letter.

Startup hopes to replace keyboard taps with swipes

WASHINGTON — Amazon. com on Monday slashed the price of the Kindle to $189 from $259 just hours after Barnes & Noble cut the cost of its competing electronic book reader. The latest round of price cuts reflects growing competition in the e-reader category, a trend that’s putting more pressure on market leader Amazon. The introduction of Apple Inc.’s small iPad tablet computer has also given consumers another option. Earlier Monday, Barnes &

Swype’s software detects where a finger pauses and changes direction as it traces out the pattern of a word. Capitalization and double letters can be indicated with a pause or squiggle, while spacing and punctuation are automatic. Swype estimates that the software can improve a text-messager’s pace by 20 to 30 percent.

New York Times News Service

SEATTLE — Back in the 1990s, typing out “hello” on most cell phones required an exhausting 13 taps on the number keys, like so: 44-33-555-555-666. That was before inventor Cliff Kushler, based here in Seattle, and a partner created software called T9, which could bring that number down to three by guessing the word being typed. Now there is a new challenge to typing on phones. More phones are using virtual keyboards on a touch screen, replacing physical buttons. But pecking out a message on a small piece of glass is not so easy, and typos are common. Kushler thinks he has a solution once again. His new technology, called Swype, allows users to glide a finger across the virtual keyboard to spell words, rather than tapping out each letter. Kushler developed Swype with a fellow research scientist, Randy Marsden. While many smart phones have features that auto-complete words, correct typos on the fly and add punctuation, Kushler is aiming for the next level. “We’ve squeezed the desktop computer, complete with keyboard and mouse, into something that fits in a pocket. The information bandwidth has become very constricted,” Kushler said. “I thought, if we can find a better way to input that information, it could be something that would really take off.”

Huge potential Kushler says Swype is a big breakthrough that could reach billions of people. That’s not as ambitious as it sounds. To date, the T9 technology has been built into more than 4 billion devices worldwide. In 1999 its creators sold it to AOL for a reported $350 million; it is now owned by the speech-recognition company Nuance. Swype’s software detects where a finger pauses and changes direction as it traces out the pattern of a word. The movements do not have to be precise because the software calculates which words a user is most likely trying to spell. Capitalization and double letters can be indicated with a pause or squiggle, while spacing and punctuation are automatic. Kushler, who is chief technology officer of Swype, estimates that the software can improve even the nimblest text-messager’s pace by 20 to 30 percent. Swype is now being used on seven smart phones in the United States, across all major wireless carriers, including the HTC HD2 and the Samsung Omnia II. By the end of the year, the company says its software will be on more than 50 models worldwide. It does not have a deal with Apple, the king of touch-screen phones, but it is tinkering with software for the iPhone and the iPad and hopes to show it to Apple soon. To make money, Swype charges phone makers a licensing fee

for each device sold. It also sees opportunity in add-ons. “We could have custom dictionaries for doctors or lawyers,” said Mike McSherry, chief executive of the company. Swype’s appeal goes beyond mobile phones, said Won Park, director of U.S. technology sourcing at Samsung. “It could become the de facto standard for tablets, next-generation TVs or next-generation remote controls,” Park said. “It has tremendous potential.” Swype’s executives also see its reach extending into public kiosks, smart home appliances, video game consoles and in-car navigation systems.

Not just phones Some older input methods for mobile devices were based on scribbled gestures, like Palm’s Graffiti. Using Graffiti was slower than typing and forced people to learn an entirely new handwriting format to produce accurate results, said Gavin Lew, co-founder of User Centric, a consulting firm that studies user experiences with mobile devices. “Swype-like applications rely on a well-known layout, the full qwerty keyboard,” he said. “One simply needs to target a specific letter rather than relying on a memory of how to draw a letter.” As cell phones take on the functions of personal computers, Lew said, the need increases to quickly enter and search for information on them. “These devices aren’t just phones anymore, which is why you’re seeing all these new technologies emerge,” he said. “The more we use them in our daily lives, the greater the need to be more efficient at inputting information.” Kushler began experimenting with input methods in 2001, guided in part by his earlier work in helping people with disabilities use technology. He took note of the popularity of devices like those from Palm that used a

stylus for input, but he saw room for improvement. He worked with Marsden to fine-tune the Swype software — which took a laborious seven years. “The most important thing was that it could accurately figure out which word you wanted to spell,” Kushler said. “It needed to work no matter what.”

The competition Swype is not the only start-up hoping to profit from innovations in this area. Many companies are trying to improve the way people type on touch screens, which are proliferating swiftly. The research firm Gartner expects global sales of touch-screen devices to reach 326.7 million in 2010, an increase of 97 percent from last year. SlideIT, a start-up with offices in the United States and Israel, sells applications for touch screen text input with a finger or stylus for Symbian, Windows Mobile and Android-based phones. The company says that since February its software has been downloaded more than 500,000 times. Nuance, a company best known for speech recognition software, acquired a start-up called ShapeWriter that matches patterns traced onto a touchscreen keyboard with those of commonly written words. It is negotiating with phone makers to use its software, called T9 Trace. Google is trying to let people skip the screen entirely by developing voice- and image-recognition technologies. Its Goggles application can analyze a photo of some text and translate it into a different language — no typing required. Meanwhile, Swype is moving ahead with its own voice recognition feature, which it expects to add to smart phones this summer. “We’re all about improving how people input information into their phones, whether through swiping or speaking,” McSherry said.

Barnes & Noble slashed the price of its Nook from $259 to $199. New York Times News Service

to cut prices several times since the original Kindle first went on sale in late 2007 at $399. Despite falling e-reader prices, the cost of electronic books has remained flat or actually risen slightly as publishers seek a bigger piece of the pie. Amazon has said its main focus is on selling electronic books. The company even gives away software that allows customers to read e-books on personal computers, iPhones and BlackBerrys. Later this year, Amazon reportedly will issue the next major update to the Kindle. The third version of the device is expected to be lighter than the current 10.2-ounce model and feature faster page turning, among other things.

Connecticut to lead multistate investigation into Google’s gathering of personal data By John Letzing MarketWatch

By Jenna Wortham

Noble reduced the price of its ereader, the Nook, by 23 percent. The new price is $199, down from $259. B&N also introduced a new Wi-Fi-only version for $149. Hours later Amazon responded with an even deeper price cut of 27 percent. Although Amazon is the leading seller of e-book readers, a handful of companies including B&N and Sony Corp. now offer similar devices. The resulting competition has spurred Amazon

SAN FRANCISCO — Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal said Monday that “a significant number” of states will be conducting an investigation into Google Inc.’s gathering of personal data via wireless networks. Blumenthal said in a statement that his office will lead a probe into Google’s gathering of information about the data being transferred over unsecured wireless networks with its Street View cars — which Google has said was inadvertent. Google’s Street View cars gather data including photos for the company’s Internet mapping services. Last month, Google

disclosed that the cars had also been gathering so-called “payload” data about the sites being visited over wireless networks, due to a software glitch. Blumenthal said that “more than 30 states” participated in a recent conference call held to discuss the Google investigation. News of the states’ interest in Google’s data collecting surfaced last week. Google’s disclosure that it had mistakenly gathered payload data over wireless networks has also captured the attention of lawmakers on Capitol Hill. In May, members of Congress wrote to Google Chief Executive Eric Schmidt expressing concerns about the data gathering, and Rep. Joe Barton, R.-

Tex., has called for a hearing on the matter. Google has responded to the lawmakers with a letter stating that it believes its data gathering was unfortunate, but legal. Google’s initial disclosure about the wireless network data gathering was prompted by a request from a German privacy regulator. Google’s Street View service has garnered a great deal of attention from privacy advocates, particularly in Europe.

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B4 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power 8.56 -.13 AAR 18.16 -.34 ABB Ltd 0.44 18.93 +.32 ABM 0.54 22.67 -.04 ACE Ltd 1.26 53.36 +.28 ADC Tel 7.92 -.07 AES Corp 10.54 +.03 AFLAC 1.12 44.45 +.05 AGA Med n 12.63 -.51 AGCO 29.16 -.21 AGL Res 1.76 38.00 +.08 AK Steel 0.20 14.26 +.36 AMAG Ph 34.78 -.57 AMB Pr 1.12 26.53 -.17 AMR 8.24 -.22 AOL n 22.98 +.24 APACC 6.07 -.03 ARYxTh h .46 +.01 ASML Hld 0.27 30.72 -.19 AT&T Inc 1.68 25.44 +.01 ATP O&G 11.79 +.34 ATS Med 3.93 -.04 AU Optron 0.09 9.68 +.18 AVI Bio 1.79 AVX Cp 0.18 14.20 +.11 AXT Inc 4.87 +.01 Aarons s 0.05 19.37 -.40 AbtLab 1.76 48.30 -.47 AberFitc 0.70 34.51 -.82 AbdAsPac 0.42 6.22 +.01 Abraxas 2.83 -.14 AcaciaTc 15.83 +.04 AcadiaPh 1.23 -.04 AcadiaRlt 0.72 18.95 +.12 Accenture 0.75 38.81 -.12 AccoBrds 5.25 -.09 Accuray 6.95 +.01 Acergy 0.23 16.88 +1.13 AcetoCorp 0.20 6.65 -.01 AcmePkt 29.23 -.62 AcordaTh 32.56 -.84 ActivsBliz 0.15 11.54 +.07 Actuant 0.04 20.48 -.65 Actuate 4.58 +.24 Acuity 0.52 45.01 +.06 Acxiom 15.78 +.09 Adaptec 3.07 +.02 AdobeSy 33.13 -.39 AdolorCp 1.38 +.01 Adtran 0.36 28.16 +.07 AdvAmer 0.25 4.38 +.11 AdvAuto 0.24 51.34 -.25 AdvBattery 3.52 -.06 AdvEnId 14.22 -.05 AMD 8.80 -.03 AdvSemi 0.08 4.30 +.14 AdvOil&Gs 6.81 -.24 AecomTch 24.95 -.31 AegeanMP 0.04 22.95 -.31 Aegon 6.20 +.08 AerCap 11.86 -.02 Aeropostl s 29.15 -.53 AeroViron 24.65 -.12 AEterna g 1.18 Aetna 0.04 29.91 -.52 AffilMgrs 70.60 +.85 Affymax 7.18-15.83 Affymetrix 6.51 +.07 AgFeed 3.23 -.02 Agilent 32.43 -.18 Agnico g 0.18 62.53 -2.25 Agrium g 0.11 52.46 +.21 AirProd 1.96 71.15 -.39 AirTrnsp 5.41 -.09 Aircastle 0.40 9.79 -.07 Airgas 0.88 63.22 -.54 AirTran 5.24 -.16 Aixtron 0.18 27.70 +.16 AkamaiT 45.27 -.45 AkeenaSol .76 Akorn 3.14 +.14 AlskAir 51.72 -.87 AlaskCom 0.86 8.99 +.04 Albemarle 0.56 42.97 +.24 AlbertoC n 0.34 28.04 -.07 AlcatelLuc 2.78 -.06 Alcoa 0.12 11.72 +.61 Alcon 3.95 151.83 +1.11 AlexBld 1.26 32.63 -.15 AlexREE 1.40 71.87 -1.31 Alexion 54.38 -.01 AlignTech 15.20 +.45 Alkerm 12.72 +.07 AllgEngy 0.60 21.94 -.34 AllegTch 0.72 52.31 +.24 Allergan 0.20 61.49 +.22 AlliData 69.04 -1.46 AlliancOne 3.85 -.15 AlliBGlbHi 1.20 13.63 +.18 AlliBInco 0.48 8.06 +.05 AlliBern 2.16 29.19 -.21 AlliantEgy 1.58 33.13 -.41 AldIrish 2.74 -.20 AlldNevG 20.38 -1.45 AlldWldA 0.80 46.38 -.28 AllisChE 2.46 +.01 AllosThera 6.50 -.15 AllscriptM 15.84 -.34 Allstate 0.80 30.27 -.27 AlnylamP 15.12 +.20 AlphaNRs 38.98 +.49 Alphatec 5.25 +.10 AlpGlbDD 1.32 8.63 -.16 AlpGPPrp 0.40 5.89 +.03 AlpTotDiv 1.44 7.45 +.01 AltairN h .45 -.01 AlteraCp lf 0.20 25.77 -.19 AlterraCap 0.40 19.63 -.05 Altria 1.40 20.06 +.04 Alumina 0.07 5.82 +.20 AlumChina 20.78 +.80 AmBev 2.30 107.89 +3.12 Amazon 122.55 -3.28 AmbacF h .77 -.03 Amdocs 28.05 -.18 Amedisys 46.09 -.38 Ameren 1.54 25.32 -.22 Amerigrp 35.95 -1.01 AMovilL 1.22 50.76 +.16 AmApparel 1.89 +.16 AmAxle 9.30 -.06 AmCampus 1.35 28.43 -.14 ACapAgy 5.60 28.47 +.17 AmCapLtd 5.66 +.12 AmDefense .27 +.01 AEagleOut 0.44 12.62 -.39 AEP 1.68 33.87 -.19 AEqInvLf 0.08 10.17 -.03 AmExp 0.72 42.60 +.57 AFnclGrp 0.55 28.66 +.02 AGreet 0.56 21.52 -.06 AIntGr pfA 6.38 9.81 +.26 AIntlGp rs 38.76 +.85 AmItPasta 52.66+10.93 AmerMed 23.35 +.05 AmO&G 6.85 -.25 AmOriBio 2.71 -.12 AmSupr 31.47 +.54 AmTower 45.12 +.05 AmWtrWks 0.84 21.45 -.29 Americdt 20.08 +.38 Amrign 7.84 +.17 Ameriprise 0.72 39.75 -.01 AmeriBrgn 0.32 32.42 -.14 AmCasino 0.42 16.78 -.37 Amgen 56.52 +1.32 AmkorT lf 6.65 -.06 Amphenol 0.06 42.57 -.07 Amylin 19.44 -.36 Anadarko 0.36 43.45 +.88 Anadigc 4.68 +.10 AnalogDev 0.88 30.28 -.24 Ancestry n 17.95 +.44 AnglogldA 0.17 43.76 -1.03 ABInBev n 0.53 51.01 -.24 Anixter 46.77 +.19 AnnTaylr 19.28 -1.22 Annaly 2.61 17.82 -.07 Anooraq g 1.21 +.07 Ansys 43.64 -.19 AntaresP 1.81 -.14 Antigenics .95 -.02 Anworth 1.08 7.10 +.05 Aon Corp 0.60 39.56 -.18 A123 Sys n 8.57 -.18 Apache 0.60 95.55 -2.02 AptInv 0.40 21.88 -.37 ApogeeE 0.33 13.15 +.10 ApolloG g .34 +.01 ApolloGrp 48.01 -.38 ApolloInv 1.12 10.07 -.24 Apple Inc 270.17 -3.90 ApldEnerg 1.33 -.05 ApldMatl 0.28 13.26 -.08 AMCC 11.87 -.03 AquaAm 0.58 17.72 -.05 ArQule 5.15 -.10 ArborRT 5.48 +.22 ArcelorMit 0.75 31.69 +1.24 ArchCap 77.17 -.76 ArchCoal 0.40 22.82 +.17 ArchDan 0.60 27.16 -.03 ArchD pfA 3.13 37.83 +.01 ArcSight 23.88 -.22 ArenaPhm 2.89 -.06 ArenaRes 35.11 -1.20 AresCap 1.40 13.58 +.06 AriadP 3.35 -.04 Ariba Inc 16.64 -.21 ArkBest 0.12 21.23 -.46 ArmHld 0.11 12.58 -.28 ArmstrWld 32.69 +.33 ArrayBio 3.34 +.05 Arris 10.92 -.04 ArrowEl 25.47 -.28 ArrwhdRsh 1.26 -.04 ArtTech 3.87 +.20 ArtioGInv n 0.24 17.62 -.15 ArubaNet 15.23 -.33 ArvMerit 15.59 +.24 AsburyA 11.82 -.42 AshfordHT 8.28 +.20 Ashland 0.60 56.79 +.39 AsiaInfo 24.35 +.28 AspenIns 0.60 25.92 -.35 AspenBio 1.18 -.14 AsscdBanc 0.04 13.42 -.09 Assurant 0.64 37.00 -.05 AssuredG 0.18 14.40 -.46 AstoriaF 0.52 14.90 +.03 AstraZen 2.30 44.87 -.62 Astrotech 1.50 -.23 athenahlth 23.57 -.36 Atheros 32.17 -.47 AtlasEngy 33.02 -.70 AtlasPpln 11.14 +.04 Atmel 5.11 -.15 ATMOS 1.34 28.59 -.08 AtwoodOcn 27.25 -.37

Nm Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autobytel Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BiPNG Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioTime n Biovail BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blockbst h BlckbsB h Blount BlueCoat BluDolp BlueNile BobEvn Boeing Boise Inc BonTon BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostBeer BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp h Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CPI CSX CTC Media CTS CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalmsAst CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardiacSci CardnlHlt s Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CascadeFn Caseys CastleBr CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CatoCp CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom

D 1.68 -.12 4.91 -.22 20.67 -.51 1.20 -.05 29.00 -.24 1.20 52.12 +.62 1.36 41.70 -.58 194.85 -.46 25.32 -.38 22.99 -.05 3.57 103.14 -.86 2.77 -.02 0.80 34.55 -.64 3.79 -.01 11.21 +.01 27.91 -.01 0.88 28.65 -.09 2.07 +.09 0.84 31.77 -.24 0.60 29.43 -.14 1.74 30.43 -.09 27.60 -.20 0.37 5.55 -.03 1.66 69.41 +1.58 1.66 58.92 +1.47 25.09 -.54 39.53 -.13 37.53 -.18 30.33 -1.43 4.82 -.17 1.50 41.26 -.36 0.10 14.60 +.09 76.36 +2.27 0.60 44.09 -.58 0.68 40.07 -.36 0.40 55.57 +.43 1.79 -.01 36.73 -1.13 1.34 51.37 +.67 0.59 11.40 -.10 0.51 17.75 +.30 0.81 11.46 -.07 0.20 11.56 -.24 0.88 18.93 +.02 0.04 15.79 -.03 1.80 49.86 +.76 1.04 4.18 -.12 2.80 61.54 +.17 0.36 26.42 -.16 1.96 50.28 +.27 1.67 +.11 0.04 2.70 22.99 -.10 65.61 +1.06 11.20 -.52 0.22 18.43 -.12 83.61 +.52 25.48 +.41 0.72 81.02 +.72 1.00 16.53 -.54 0.40 44.80 -1.58 8.91 +.13 1.16 42.36 +.35 2.16 33.62 +.02 .32 19.00 -.38 4.01 -.04 0.10 6.46 -.18 0.72 60.63 +.38 1.48 71.48 +.16 41.30 -1.19 7.13 0.92 29.16 -.19 17.85 -.13 0.28 27.51 -.38 79.81 -.12 0.30 32.21 -.40 0.56 37.08 -.75 34.30 -.26 2.90 -.04 35.24 -.88 6.39 -.14 49.49 -.37 20.18 +.03 0.60 17.76 -.37 1.89 -.20 7.04 -.14 0.38 16.67 +2.07 1.28 10.07 41.18 -.54 4.00 157.92 -.85 0.35 3.80 +.02 1.36 9.32 +.06 1.09 11.99 +.05 0.40 10.37 -.06 0.60 15.70 -.10 .28 -.01 .25 10.92 +.05 22.60 -.50 .43 +.04 51.07 -1.44 0.72 27.00 -.76 1.68 67.97 +.01 6.25 +.02 10.16 -.74 2.97 1.60 -.01 41.82 +.51 72.79 +.07 0.04 6.62 +.03 2.00 79.39 -.70 6.18 -.15 0.22 11.22 +.02 10.54 -.29 0.60 11.86 -.12 20.59 -.31 0.44 20.28 -.25 17.65 -.17 7.84 0.56 15.64 -.30 0.40 20.26 -.42 1.28 25.44 -.34 31.62 +.01 0.32 35.52 +.11 0.56 19.78 -.06 2.63 -.05 5.53 +.09 4.34 +.10 16.53 -.02 0.52 24.78 +.25 0.56 14.81 +.02 0.34 9.75 -.02 8.18 +.12 0.31 20.12 -.09 0.28 17.68 +.17 1.20 59.74 +.27 13.57 -.19 0.05 16.78 -.16 0.80 33.84 -.63 0.10 50.65 -.03 0.42 38.74 -.75 38.89 -1.07 0.92 54.04 +.80 0.25 18.16 -.11 0.16 20.06 -.05 15.39 -.17 0.80 14.27 +.03 32.04 +1.03 0.20 14.78 -.15 2.19 -.12 0.40 63.99 -.26 15.91 -.08 1.00 59.11 +.05 0.04 35.21 38.05 +.29 0.24 12.47 +.02 1.00 26.76 -.32 4.60 307.30 +.16 0.60 15.46 -.08 26.55 +.22 5.82 -.13 5.16 176.89 +2.15 0.26 27.50 +.41 1.00 22.46 -1.83 0.96 55.99 +1.04 0.26 16.40 -.10 0.12 10.18 -.14 0.34 10.22 -.07 0.35 31.78 -.65 16.08 -.21 0.40 25.06 -.15 0.72 28.11 -.04 0.12 35.92 -.51 44.45 -.63 6.46 +.01 6.23 +.10 0.30 10.11 +.14 0.63 8.21 -.06 15.14 -.19 16.83 -2.06 0.04 6.48 -.02 6.55 -.30 13.73 -.04 1.80 46.25 -.83 0.28 23.38 -.45 37.23 -.74 1.10 37.11 -.04 3.48 73.60 +.25 1.08 62.73 +.24 0.30 37.02 -.32 1.08 60.57 +.28 11.62 -.17 42.45 +.66 4.00 +.10 0.20 43.33 +.69 0.04 4.95 +.06 0.24 5.31 -.13 1.96 11.38 -.07 1.04 +.04 0.72 75.44 -1.06 1.28 +.16 0.78 35.56 -.21 8.01 -.21 6.98 -.06 .41 -.05 12.64 -.32 24.55 -.13 26.74 -.26 0.64 39.34 -.57 20.37 -.30 0.40 34.74 -.67 0.72 38.32 +.27 18.79 -.27 30.29 -.88 .89 -.20 0.40 35.92 +.20 .32 +.04 36.99 -.50 1.76 66.07 +.22 0.04 11.28 +.04 0.74 23.49 -.80 27.25 -.58 0.36 6.59 -.11 .51 -.02 0.20 28.92 +.10 7.02 -.04 9.06 -.11 54.88 -.47 .45 -.03 3.22 27.52 +.34

Nm CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentGold g CenPacF CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChinaInfo ChIntLtg n ChinaLife ChMarFd n ChinaMda ChinaMed ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC Clarcor ClayChinSC ClayBRIC ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur Cogent CognizTech Cohen&Str CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica ComfrtS CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl ComScop CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil Conolog ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgan CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copel CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Cowlitz rs CrackerB Cray Inc Credicp CredSuiss Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Cryolife Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurrCda CushTRet Cyberonics CybrSrce Cyclacel CyprsBio CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DltaPtr DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiamMgmt DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip

D 4.94 -.09 0.43 11.16 +.07 0.86 14.87 +.21 0.80 29.16 -.26 23.43 -.23 0.78 13.99 -.02 0.03 16.36 -.11 1.56 13.93 -.06 25.05 +.14 23.10 -.25 0.01 15.03 -.27 48.28 -.15 2.01 -.07 10.84 +.80 2.90 34.95 -.02 6.47 -.25 59.66 -.21 17.92 -.23 79.51 -1.11 3.25 -.22 36.55 -.30 3.90 -.20 31.53 +.04 24.45 -1.04 3.08 -.12 1.70 17.20 +.05 0.30 24.49 -.12 2.88 75.72 +.20 20.59 -.27 0.16 10.63 -.46 46.55 -1.95 0.63 3.87 -.02 13.30 +.31 3.88 +.23 20.45 +.30 1.88 +.04 14.03 +.18 10.49 -.07 2.61 +.04 5.55 +.06 3.00 +.05 1.54 68.46 +1.10 4.76 +.09 11.67 -.14 0.55 11.15 -.35 1.81 50.60 +.73 1.78 3.33 +.11 2.64 82.68 +1.76 1.53 -.10 5.29 -.06 3.96 -.04 2.72 +.01 0.23 13.36 +.80 0.35 17.45 -.05 151.59 -1.15 13.03 -.55 1.48 52.75 -.22 1.42 20.13 +.38 0.56 66.66 +.14 2.82 -.10 14.56 -.01 0.32 77.50 -2.16 3.42 -.12 1.58 27.69 -.20 0.72 15.62 -.57 0.48 25.78 -.32 17.23 -.59 23.34 -.15 4.02 +.01 .89 +.02 46.21 +.12 0.40 56.71 -.19 0.39 38.19 -.40 0.03 25.58 +.57 0.51 40.92 +.72 7.27 -.03 16.70 -.45 69.31 -1.02 7.43 -.19 .01 -.08 0.56 57.89 +1.67 14.35 -.15 2.20 64.86 -.21 14.41 -.27 0.60 42.16 -.95 7.98 +.15 0.36 26.98 -.06 1.76 52.48 +.17 16.25 -.55 9.18 +.03 53.34 -.23 0.40 22.93 -.26 0.96 13.30 +.02 0.37 6.92 +.02 47.36 -1.59 3.81 -.24 2.12 81.16 +.57 17.98 -1.06 0.60 15.49 -.20 1.08 -.04 1.51 -.13 0.38 18.35 -.16 0.38 17.41 -.17 0.20 39.03 -.19 0.20 10.50 -.05 0.94 37.01 -.48 0.48 15.69 +.04 12.05 +.03 26.63 +.07 0.96 23.49 +.08 34.72 -2.01 23.63 +.30 1.56 77.55 -.70 13.50 -.43 14.79 -.13 .75 -.05 0.60 50.27 -.26 8.59 -.08 32.66 -.42 0.40 32.41 -.05 0.80 24.94 -.03 16.83 -.32 58.72 -.89 44.19 -.89 2.40 2.20 55.80 -.21 1.17 -.02 0.40 39.12 +.01 2.38 44.69 -.20 22.62 -.20 16.32 +.02 0.96 36.36 -.28 24.31 -.46 49.72 -.75 3.69 -.39 10.37 -.21 .82 -.01 0.06 40.90 +1.10 1.08 49.64 +.42 0.42 21.26 +.57 1.09 50.54 +.07 2.30 25.49 -.03 0.92 19.61 +.31 18.16 -.58 11.21 -.34 0.56 31.90 -2.95 0.20 18.42 +.19 0.44 27.65 -.21 1.57 39.55 -.61 21.14 +.01 10.01 -.02 0.84 57.78 -.43 6.92 -.25 0.16 7.50 -.13 55.18 -.71 1.50 17.74 -.88 20.18 -.19 0.72 43.24 +.51 3.82 -.90 0.80 49.10 -1.39 6.43 +.10 1.70 97.56 +3.17 1.85 41.14 +.06 67.78 -1.43 11.54 -.36 .11 6.75 -.08 38.98 -.27 25.39 -.18 5.90 -.29 .45 45.80 +3.25 21.10 +.25 1.80 54.16 -.18 0.70 74.97 +.67 1.76 -.06 122.78 -.58 2.37 87.89 +.73 97.11 -.31 0.90 8.50 +.20 24.96 +.66 25.71 +.01 1.69 +.02 2.70 -1.64 11.44 -.07 2.40 14.24 +.09 .86 -.04 0.05 45.26 -.14 3.99 -.15 0.28 5.14 +.05 40.22 +.57 0.78 9.25 -.04 1.21 25.59 -.02 0.15 10.54 -.21 0.60 38.93 -.27 24.69 -.53 2.12 48.03 -.32 0.10 8.09 -.26 11.89 -.10 0.08 40.52 -.19 1.00 42.92 -1.56 7.74 -.24 64.92 -1.71 0.20 56.58 -.65 10.66 -.14 160.33 -4.59 10.06 +.84 1.20 60.45 +1.19 0.36 14.61 -.10 8.95 -.11 13.95 -.09 13.49 -.22 1.06 6.82 +.62 17.24 -.24 36.83 -1.72 2.75 -.05 0.20 31.46 -.26 2.86 -.14 0.93 61.42 -.56 32.97 -1.33 10.94 +.46 0.08 11.78 +.07 0.64 69.01 -.91 11.46 -.01 2.36 65.43 -.46 0.18 38.53 -.44 0.36 11.10 0.50 64.74 +.87 0.03 9.08 +.11 12.59 +.01

Nm

D

DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DirxTcBear DrxEMBll s DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DirREBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DoublTake DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DuneEn rs DuoyGWt n DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy rs

1.08 1.92 0.16

7.03 5.77 0.15 7.35 0.04 3.08 4.85 8.22 5.18 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 0.48 1.04 0.40 1.04 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.24 0.96 0.68

Nm 27.91 -.50 29.31 -.36 61.94 -.70 25.95 -.92 32.39 -.61 18.89 -.02 37.39 -.04 33.32 -.93 7.90 +.21 26.70 +1.16 40.12 -2.19 14.22 +.08 24.09 -.10 46.88 +.40 6.26 +.10 45.33 -1.03 15.87 +.06 6.56 +.18 46.72 -1.48 14.58 +.16 49.84 -.59 9.76 +.05 33.48 -.20 13.99 -.01 39.37 +.11 33.64 +.60 .24 -.01 21.04 -.27 35.06 -.09 7.70 -.25 31.34 +.65 66.83 -.41 10.77 -.23 29.63 -.52 44.46 -.27 63.05 +.03 41.82 -.18 12.36 -.49 58.65 +3.38 44.67 18.08 -.12 2.78 -.10 10.45 +.04 16.01 +.02 46.32 +.69 26.96 -.04 38.14 +.18 6.37 +.07 27.95 -.05 25.41 -.64 34.45 -.08 4.18 +.02 48.95 -.03 3.43 +.01 3.96 -.04 38.31 -.05 26.93 +.53 12.03 +.02 16.59 -.05 12.25 -.04 .18 -.01 20.61 +.61 2.62 -.06 9.25 -.08 1.89 -.03 17.33 +.01 4.85 -.07

E-F-G-H E-House 0.25 15.38 +.85 ETrade rs 13.98 +.15 eBay 21.87 -.29 EFJohnson 1.41 +.38 EMC Cp 19.24 -.11 EMCOR 24.44 -.26 ENI 2.84 39.64 -.01 EOG Res 0.62 110.61 +.39 EQT Corp 0.88 40.42 -.55 ETFGold n 122.80 -2.41 ETF Pall n 49.19 +.37 EV Engy 3.02 32.68 +.35 ev3 Inc 22.31 -.02 EagleBulk 4.79 +.07 EagleMat 0.40 27.60 +.44 EaglRkEn 0.10 5.25 +.05 EagleRk rt 3.35 +.10 ErthLink 0.64 8.40 -.03 EstWstBcp 0.04 16.80 +.15 EastChm 1.76 62.36 -.31 EKodak 5.15 -.20 Eaton 2.00 74.32 EatnVan 0.64 30.23 -.07 EV LtdDur 1.39 16.02 +.08 EVRiskMgd 1.80 16.21 -.11 EV TxAG 1.23 12.66 -.16 EV TxDiver 1.62 11.74 -.01 EVTxMGlo 1.53 10.43 -.05 EVTxGBW 1.56 11.96 -.10 EVTxBWOp 1.60 13.84 -.26 Ebix Inc s 15.66 -.06 EchelonC 7.07 -.46 Eclipsys 17.59 -.54 Ecolab 0.62 46.98 -.02 EdisonInt 1.26 34.11 -.24 EducMgt n 17.47 -.49 EducRlty 0.20 6.75 +.02 EdwLfSci s 55.04 -.01 8x8 Inc h 1.41 -.12 ElPasoCp 0.04 12.68 ElPasoPpl 1.52 28.63 +.13 Elan 4.78 -.13 EldorGld g 0.05 17.79 -.58 ElectArts 15.78 -.25 EBrasAero 0.38 22.53 +.08 Emcore .98 -.05 Emdeon n 13.28 +.03 EMS 56.13 +.17 EmersonEl 1.34 47.64 +.17 EmployH 0.24 16.22 +.13 EmpIca 9.91 +.12 Emulex 10.27 -.08 EnCana g s 0.80 34.32 -.14 EncoreCap 21.81 +.26 EncoreEn 2.00 17.46 -.19 EndvrInt 1.12 -.06 EndvSilv g 3.51 -.09 EndoPhrm 22.23 +.07 EndurSpec 1.00 39.72 -.71 Ener1 3.53 +.02 EnerNOC 31.20 +.55 Energen 0.52 48.18 -.50 Energizer 54.69 -1.36 EngyConv 4.66 -.09 EngyTsfr 3.58 45.80 +.10 EgyXXI rs 17.65 +.23 EnergySol 0.10 5.72 -.13 Enerpls g 2.16 23.39 -.10 Enersis 0.68 20.67 +.06 EnerSys 23.81 -.25 Ennis Inc 0.62 16.17 +.39 ENSCO 0.14 40.74 -.08 Entegris 4.44 -.23 Entergy 3.32 77.38 -.72 EnteroMed .29 -.01 EntPrPt 2.27 34.79 -.03 EnterPT 2.60 41.88 -.50 EntropCom 6.27 -.39 EnzonPhar 11.30 +.17 Equifax 0.16 29.87 -.44 Equinix 85.07 +.20 EqtyOne 0.88 16.93 -.14 EqtyRsd 1.35 45.56 -.20 EricsnTel 0.28 11.27 -.26 EssexPT 4.13 107.28 -.83 EsteeLdr 0.55 58.98 -.96 Euronet 13.42 -.02 EverestRe 1.92 75.09 -.79 EvergrnEn .14 +.00 EvgIncAdv 1.02 9.49 +.01 EvrgrSlr .86 +.01 ExactSci h 4.68 -.24 ExcelM 5.31 +.24 ExcoRes 0.12 16.91 -.53 Exelixis 3.84 -.74 Exelon 2.10 40.75 -.49 ExeterR gs 6.80 -.30 ExideTc 5.46 -.20 Expedia 0.28 20.44 -.53 ExpdIntl 0.40 38.52 -.10 Express n 16.94 -.01 ExpScrip s 51.71 -.31 ExterranH 27.75 -.07 ExtraSpce 0.23 14.75 -.14 ExtrmNet 2.86 -.11 ExxonMbl 1.76 63.13 +.03 Ezcorp 18.91 +.26 F5 Netwks 74.22 +.41 FLIR Sys 28.86 +.02 FMC Corp 0.50 62.53 +.09 FMC Tech 54.99 -.16 FNBCp PA 0.48 8.74 -.05 FSI Intl 4.81 -.12 FTI Cnslt 44.46 -.48 FactsetR 0.92 71.87 +.52 FairIsaac 0.08 24.15 -.17 FairchldS 9.78 +.07 FamilyDlr 0.62 39.04 -.36 FannieMae .41 +.06 FMae pfS .51 -.03 Fastenal 0.80 54.72 +.05 FedExCp 0.48 78.58 -.12 FedAgric 0.20 15.36 -.35 FedRlty 2.64 74.65 -.66 FedSignl 0.24 6.59 -.07 FedInvst 0.96 22.01 -.14 FelCor 5.52 +.05 Ferro 8.41 -.05 FibriaCelu 17.00 +.02 FidlNFin 0.72 13.57 -.11 FidNatInfo 0.20 27.64 +.16 FifthStFin 1.28 11.68 +.16 FifthThird 0.04 13.53 -.05 Finisar rs 15.89 -.21 FinLine 0.16 15.16 -.56 FstAFin n 0.24 13.29 -.19 FstBcpPR 1.00 -.09 FstCwlth 0.04 5.18 -.07 FstHorizon 0.75 12.03 +.04 FstInRT 6.27 +.16 FMidBc 0.04 13.60 -.08 FstNiagara 0.56 13.23 +.01 FstPotom 0.80 15.41 -.26 FstSolar 122.45 -1.23 FTNDXTc 0.01 21.55 -.21 FTDJInet 25.98 -.40 FT ConDis 0.07 16.40 -.20 FT Tech 18.62 -.16 FT RNG 0.08 17.53 -.20 FirstEngy 2.20 37.75 -.72 FstMerit 0.64 18.06 -.05 Fiserv 48.49 -.39 FiveStar 3.22 -.12 FlagstB rs 4.34 +.10 Flextrn 6.61 -.11 FlowInt 2.71 -.39 FlowrsFds 0.80 25.21 -.08 Flowserve 1.16 95.14 +.53 Fluor 0.50 46.32 -.15 FocusMda 16.85 +.24 FEMSA 0.32 46.79 -.19 FootLockr 0.60 13.90 -.46

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredMac FredM pfW FredMac pfZ FMCG FresKabi rt FDelMnt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelTech FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Funtalk n Fuqi Intl lf FuriexPh n FurnBrds GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GSI Tech GT Solar G-III GTx Inc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenFin rt vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h Genoptix Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GaGulf rs Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp Gerova wt GettyRlty GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GloblInd GlobPay GlbShip wt Globalstar GlbSpMet n GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns Greenhill Greenlight Greif A Group1 GrubbEllis GpTelevisa Guess GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HRPT Prp HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn Hasbro HatterasF HaupgDig HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HlthTroncs HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelicosBio HelixEn HellnTel HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp

D 4.34 +.09 11.53 +.07 4.16 +.05 13.10 +.04 27.19 -.11 30.81 -.47 18.50 -.01 11.04 -.26 17.05 -.09 3.60 -.12 0.76 44.62 -.53 40.11 -.41 25.19 -.28 1.90 18.74 -.23 0.88 93.58 +.28 .47 +.07 .40 -.02 .50 -.04 1.20 68.08 +2.18 .14 -.00 21.73 +.12 6.21 -.02 1.00 7.86 +.03 14.06 -.08 1.40 35.75 -.07 27.98 +.22 6.07 -.49 1.72 +.02 0.28 22.44 -.03 0.12 10.22 -.02 7.55 +.49 8.82 -.25 10.17 +.50 6.48 +.08 1.12 28.78 -.32 0.20 5.78 4.36 +.01 7.72 -.28 30.80 -.18 6.47 -.11 5.96 +.05 25.15 -1.43 2.68 -.02 0.44 4.72 1.68 16.47 +.03 0.14 13.03 +.01 1.28 25.81 +.15 18.86 -.35 6.18 0.16 16.56 -.09 0.40 20.94 -.30 1.50 32.03 +.06 25.53 -.45 .40 26.56 -.49 16.41 -.32 4.72 -.25 30.65 +.14 1.68 66.78 -.12 0.40 16.10 +.15 .00 -.00 14.57 -.06 0.50 6.82 +.06 0.98 37.95 -.59 3.51 -.02 2.85 +.01 .35 16.29 -.38 0.18 17.05 -.16 0.44 19.82 -.08 28.25 +.42 1.64 41.65 -.03 .50 -.01 15.11 -.17 53.34 +.46 20.66 -.43 16.97 -.46 11.03 -.05 0.21 14.42 +.25 5.12 +.04 .73 -.02 1.90 23.42 +.21 0.18 7.28 +.04 31.86 -.14 36.10 +.08 0.52 15.59 -.14 0.36 11.89 +.07 1.98 35.20 -.29 2.99 +.02 0.40 6.93 +.06 5.41 -.37 0.08 38.89 -3.72 .01 +.00 1.72 -.02 11.50 +.34 0.40 13.04 -.19 0.17 13.59 -.45 0.18 44.35 -1.51 4.22 -.19 1.40 137.74 -.44 1.08 71.15 -.02 14.52 -.37 12.29 +.30 488.56-11.47 23.81 +.06 16.70 +.10 2.16 107.86 -.40 1.86 +.18 5.29 -.04 24.49 -.13 0.52 27.02 -.29 3.02 +.20 4.35 -.17 1.85 0.07 6.31 -.03 0.83 17.83 -.02 27.25 -.05 12.20 -.58 1.80 63.91 +.43 26.31 +.26 1.68 60.26 +1.81 25.31 -1.17 1.13 -.05 0.52 18.97 +.02 0.64 33.86 -.18 13.88 .91 +.03 44.53 -1.03 0.54 25.46 -.08 1.86 32.50 -.22 0.81 154.60 +4.10 0.48 6.74 -.09 1.70 48.38 +.33 25.01 +.11 22.39 -.37 0.36 27.05 +.07 7.28 +.07 27.64 -.92 1.69 -.08 39.97 +.44 18.10 +.03 0.40 26.33 -.48 35.01 +.81 5.76 -.02 0.06 10.14 -.18 0.88 47.85 -.64 13.42 -.45 0.82 25.89 -.10 0.20 24.78 -.34 1.00 42.21 -.67 4.65 29.70 +.04 2.38 -.25 1.24 23.44 +.09 6.15 -.19 3.41 -.10 2.72 43.05 -.28 8.16 -.34 1.20 22.40 -.24 27.51 +.01 19.80 -.22 17.30 -.21 4.84 0.08 15.26 +.02 0.04 17.37 -.21 5.08 -.16 5.63 -.26 1.80 46.01 -.24 .48 -.05 12.11 -.15 0.12 4.02 +.23 0.24 41.81 -.70 .56 -.02 56.81 +.39 0.80 48.95 -.39 2.98 -.08 0.20 5.09 -.05 1.28 49.32 -.90 10.34 +.07 0.40 56.01 -.17 36.95 -.10 0.32 47.51 -.47 17.00 +.04 25.38 -.80 26.46 -.11 14.80 -.35 1.70 30.73 -.53

Nm Hill-Rom Hoku Corp HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hyatt n Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.41 31.67 3.48 0.60 27.07 15.01 0.95 31.43 40.19 2.32 49.86 30.38 1.21 42.93 0.20 4.22 0.84 41.89 15.56 8.31 56.65 1.80 22.97 0.04 15.37 0.28 5.30 0.02 13.07 4.04 0.60 13.24 1.20 21.44 26.58 49.26 0.48 34.56 0.04 6.05 0.40 9.69 39.60 4.66 1.12

-.12 +.08 -.34 +.03 -.51 -.81 +.13 +.63 +.01 +.09 -.26 +.58 -.09 +.26 -.05 -.14 -.25 -.59 -.16 -.14 -.01 -.86 +.01 -.44 +.03 +.01 -.17 +.02

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 23.51 -.15 IAMGld g 0.06 18.03 -.94 ICICI Bk 0.53 38.97 +.87 ICO Glb A 1.50 -.02 IDT Corp 10.31 -.32 IESI-BFC g 0.50 21.73 +.58 iGateCorp 0.11 14.76 +.67 IHS Inc 59.01 -.49 INGAsiaPD 1.70 17.48 -.06 ING GRE 0.54 6.92 -.05 ING GlbDv 1.20 10.91 +.10 ING 8.49 -.01 ING 8.5cap 2.13 21.90 -.02 INGPrRTr 0.33 5.66 +.08 ION Geoph 4.73 -.16 iShCmxG 120.48 -2.44 iShGSCI 28.94 +.06 iSAstla 0.66 21.46 +.23 iShBraz 2.72 67.92 +.72 iSCan 0.33 27.51 -.11 iShEMU 1.05 31.67 -.12 iShGer 0.55 20.24 +.02 iSh HK 0.38 15.61 +.21 iShJapn 0.14 9.76 +.07 iSh Kor 0.32 48.89 +.97 iSMalas 0.24 11.91 +.27 iShMex 0.70 52.39 +.11 iShSing 0.33 11.76 +.16 iSPacxJpn 1.43 39.69 +.63 iSSpain 2.05 35.93 -.39 iSTaiwn 0.21 11.90 +.19 iSh UK 0.42 14.66 -.09 iShChile 0.60 59.42 +.13 iShBRIC 0.40 44.07 +.83 iShSilver 18.33 -.42 iShS&P100 1.04 50.64 -.11 iShDJDv 1.65 45.59 -.18 iShBTips 3.80 106.31 +.06 iShAsiaexJ 0.70 55.57 +.99 iShChina25 0.68 41.60 +1.40 iShDJTr 0.95 80.28 -.11 iSSP500 2.22 112.27 -.34 iShBAgB 3.93 106.28 +.23 iShEMkts 0.58 40.61 +.69 iShiBxB 5.52 106.77 +.27 iSSPGth 0.82 57.44 -.24 iShNatRes 0.36 34.14 -.22 iShSPLatA 1.22 45.19 +.57 iSSPVal 1.20 53.85 -.19 iShB20 T 3.72 97.41 -.28 iShB7-10T 3.82 93.47 -.07 iShB1-3T 1.25 83.90 +.01 iS Eafe 1.44 50.60 -.01 iSRusMCV 0.72 39.69 -.18 iSRusMCG 0.39 47.52 -.28 iShRsMd 1.22 87.55 -.54 iSSPMid 0.93 76.86 -.64 iShiBxHYB 8.00 86.58 +.31 iShNsdqBio 82.18 -1.19 iShC&SRl 1.93 60.25 -.42 iSR1KV 1.22 58.64 -.13 iSR1KG 0.69 49.62 -.20 iSRus1K 1.06 61.81 -.24 iSR2KV 1.00 62.09 -.62 iShBarc1-3 3.71 103.76 +.16 iSR2KG 0.42 71.60 -.78 iShR2K 0.75 66.11 -.69 iShBShtT 0.15 110.22 +.02 iShUSPfd 2.79 37.09 -.12 iShDJTel 0.73 19.85 -.12 iShREst 1.86 51.46 -.37 iShDJHm 0.09 12.09 -.17 iShFnSc 0.68 53.41 -.11 iShDJBkr 0.15 26.09 -.14 iShUSEngy 0.48 32.06 -.12 iShSPSm 0.54 58.17 -.55 iShBasM 0.79 59.53 +.32 iShDJOG 0.24 54.23 -.51 iShEur350 1.02 33.56 -.22 iSMsciV 1.49 45.07 -.13 iSMsciG 1.16 52.04 +.01 iStar 5.50 +.12 ITC Hold 1.28 54.72 -.14 ITT Corp 1.00 48.44 -.09 ITT Ed 93.42 -1.46 icad h 2.06 +.03 Icon PLC 29.49 -.31 IconixBr 15.73 -.32 IdenixPh 4.98 -.02 IDEX 0.60 31.45 -.12 ITW 1.24 46.14 +.88 Illumina 44.58 +.07 Imax Corp 16.46 +.31 Immucor 20.07 -.25 ImunoGn 9.63 +.09 Imunmd 3.34 -.14 ImpaxLabs 21.30 -.10 Incyte 12.89 -.28 IndepBkMI .53 -.14 IndiaFd 31.03 +.56 IndiaGC 1.13 +.03 IndoTel 1.28 34.82 -.69 Infinera 7.19 -.12 infoGRP 7.93 +.01 InfoLgx rsh 5.97 +.05 Informat 26.98 -.28 InfosysT 0.54 63.23 -.19 IngerRd 0.28 39.99 +.57 IngrmM 17.21 -.23 Inhibitex 2.76 -.07 InovioPhm 1.05 -.03 InsightEnt 14.70 -.31 InsitTc 21.96 -.56 Insmed .72 -.02 InspPhar 5.22 +.07 IntgDv 5.56 -.03 ISSI 9.15 -.57 IntegrysE 2.72 46.44 -.32 Intel 0.63 21.19 -.21 IntractDat 0.80 32.90 +.08 IntcntlEx 121.48 -.69 InterDig 25.75 -.07 InterMune 9.38 -.43 InterNAP 5.09 -.07 IBM 2.60 130.65 +.50 Intl Coal 4.34 -.03 IntFlav 1.00 46.05 -.17 IntlGame 0.24 18.11 -.24 IntPap 0.50 26.31 +.58 IntlRectif 20.90 -.22 InterOil g 52.57 -1.07 Interpublic 8.31 -.01 Intersil 0.48 13.30 -.21 IntPotash 21.44 -.98 Intuit 37.20 -.36 IntSurg 351.29 +1.39 inVentiv 25.50 -.02 Invernss 29.05 +.29 Invesco 0.44 19.30 +.09 InvMtgC n 3.18 21.16 +.16 InvVKDyCr 1.03 11.82 InVKSrInc 0.33 4.67 +.03 InvTech 17.18 -.17 InvRlEst 0.69 8.88 -.01 IridiumCm 9.74 +.01 IronMtn 0.25 24.02 -.32 IsilonSys 14.96 +.41 Isis 9.14 -.22 IsleCapri 12.31 +.02 ItauUnibH 0.55 19.93 +.22 Itron 67.63 +.05 IvanhoeEn 2.24 -.04 IvanhM g 15.18 +.30 JCrew 41.47 -2.19 JA Solar 5.08 +.04

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JavelinPh JazzPhrm Jefferies JesupLamt JetBlue JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digit n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KaiserAlu KC Southn KA MLP Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KirbyCp KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn Ladish LamResrch LamarAdv LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LearCorp n LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold Lihua Int n LillyEli Limited Lincare s LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LithiaMot LiveNatn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn n LongtopFn LoopNet Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lubys LucasEngy lululemn g LumberLiq LunaInn h

D

0.20 1.79 0.28 0.38

0.04 0.33 0.30 0.16

2.16 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70 0.25 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.96 1.92 1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.28

0.10 0.24 0.24 0.70

1.16 0.38

1.60 0.33

0.04 0.50 0.16 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40 0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 0.04 0.92 2.52 0.20 1.45 2.52 0.25

4.00 0.44 1.44

23.40 -.65 11.47 -.15 38.87 -.31 12.85 -.40 30.57 +.03 13.75 -.21 24.79 -.49 21.26 -.19 1.48 -.02 41.66 +.04 9.75 -.36 2.36 -.28 18.31 -.07 10.15 -.07 30.29 -.10 1.41 -.01 8.13 -.30 22.87 -.03 .17 -.05 6.24 -.27 41.24 -2.55 2.17 -.13 59.13 -.05 28.89 +.02 18.76 -.77 72.62 -.75 1.60 -.15 59.09 -1.74 56.44 +.80 24.95 -.55 42.42 +1.07 12.08 -.22 22.90 +.02 10.19 -1.01 8.10 -.13 31.55 +.75 19.89 +.03 1.00 -.04 39.04 -.01 40.78 -.33 25.97 +.18 53.96 -.51 28.34 -.56 4.10 -.09 10.80 -.02 8.44 +.07 33.76 -.16 62.69 -.09 15.21 +.04 65.50 +.05 15.84 +.08 41.83 +.78 8.11 -.03 18.08 -.62 41.05 -.20 4.89 -.08 14.90 -.21 21.63 -.12 19.05 +.97 3.55 -.20 51.97 -.73 3.36 -.08 14.23 +.25 15.69 -.33 29.94 -.07 3.56 -.10 19.91 -.15 7.94 -.24 10.27 +.05 8.32 +.14 81.39 -.22 19.76 +.09 6.07 -.11 18.00 +.56 19.78 +.02 5.21 -.06 3.33 -.07 9.27 -.28 .98 -.03 80.22 -.03 4.35 +.05 1.50 -.11 28.13 +1.02 41.87 -.12 27.14 -.73 27.03 +.27 23.68 -.17 4.94 -.18 8.24 -.04 30.73 -1.00 14.82 -.81 72.61 +.51 32.51 +.51 22.51 33.37 -.30 14.57 -.17 44.41 +1.06 21.44 -.17 1.17 -.04 1.35 -.04 6.21 +.05 38.22 -.04 9.90 +.01 4.38 +.02 26.43 -.26 26.41 -.29 12.56 +.21 43.95 +2.17 52.35 -.07 31.25 -.30 51.31 -.28 37.15 -1.04 33.04 -1.10 1.50 -.01 37.66 -.42 8.64 -.06 34.66 +.05 24.14 -.52 30.76 +.26 27.64 -.17 29.13 -.36 26.46 +.27 4.87 -.25 7.00 -.06 7.36 -.37 11.31 -.69 5.03 -.12 3.34 -.03 80.07 -.62 4.44 -.36 33.77 -.13 15.39 +.09 27.26 -1.99 35.05 -.12 11.94 -.39 75.42 +.43 7.67 -.18 22.51 -.11 90.26 -.46 4.24 -.06 2.62 -.48 43.47 -.72 26.47 -.71 2.42 +.27

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MSG n MagelPt Magma MagnaI g MagHRes Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC

2.80 94.45 +3.74 6.25 -.20 0.11 5.40 -.02 1.00 27.41 -.41 .99 -.04 8.59 +.07 0.63 18.99 -.14 8.33 +1.10 11.64 -.12 6.38 -.20 0.96 7.60 +.02 0.58 6.64 -.05 8.56 -.28 12.23 +.20 5.17 -.11 20.88 +.10 3.18 -.18 30.12 +.15 2.00 42.27 -.64 1.80 33.00 -.37 14.83 -.43 0.20 20.74 -.72 21.34 -.14 2.03 -.01 3.12 -.01 0.18 67.74 -.22 4.56 -.14 0.08 11.05 +.08 5.66 -.22 0.74 45.50 +.32 0.52 16.39 +.09 1.00 34.11 +.32 7.97 -.56 23.10 -.14 0.11 52.52 -1.54 0.98 59.38 +1.29 0.08 31.01 +.69 28.75 -1.60 0.42 39.05 +.14 0.45 45.87 +.21

Nm D MktVCoal 0.31 33.76 +.62 MarkWest 2.56 32.49 +.50 MarIntA 0.16 35.25 -.05 MarshM 0.80 23.09 -.05 MarshIls 0.04 7.65 -.23 Martek 23.52 +.91 MStewrt 5.67 -.15 MartMM 1.60 92.61 +.44 MarvellT 18.53 -.51 Masco 0.30 12.33 +.01 Masimo 2.00 24.98 +.02 MasseyEn 0.24 32.05 +.75 Mastec 10.20 -.03 MasterCrd 0.60 223.34 +9.08 Mattel 0.75 22.33 -.17 Mattson 4.23 -.20 MaximIntg 0.80 17.95 -.15 McClatchy 4.61 +.01 McCorm 1.04 39.90 -.64 McDermInt 24.55 +.27 McDnlds 2.20 69.92 +.04 McGrwH 0.94 29.97 -.13 McKesson 0.72 69.83 -.26 McMoRn 12.59 -.11 McAfee 32.86 -.06 MeadJohn 0.90 53.44 -.95 MdbkIns 0.12 8.93 -.02 MeadWvco 0.92 24.18 -.16 Mechel 22.03 +.96 Mechel pf 7.11 +.05 MedAssets 23.89 -.84 MedcoHlth 58.69 -1.36 Mediacom 6.77 -.08 MedProp 0.80 9.90 +.06 MediCo 7.89 +.04 Medicis 0.24 22.99 -.21 Medifast 27.49 -.93 Medivation 9.94 -.55 Mednax 59.05 +.08 Medtrnic 0.82 38.68 -.19 MelcoCrwn 4.42 +.03 MensW 0.36 19.66 -1.16 MentorGr 9.48 -.12 MercadoL 60.63 +1.40 Merck 1.52 35.12 -.55 Meredith 0.92 34.93 -.42 Meritage 17.25 -.28 Metalico 4.72 +.06 Metalline .70 +.07 Methanx 0.62 22.07 +.17 MetLife 0.74 41.22 +.23 MetroPCS 8.95 -.16 Micrel 0.14 11.50 -.07 Microchp 1.37 29.33 -.37 Micromet 7.13 +.03 MicronT 9.92 -.08 MicrosSys 34.26 +.26 MicroSemi 15.28 -.13 Microsoft 0.52 25.95 -.49 Micrvisn 3.29 +.11 MidAApt 2.46 53.07 -.59 MillerHer 0.09 20.06 -.07 MillerPet 6.94 +.33 Millicom 7.24 85.58 -1.71 Millipore 106.60 -.01 MindrayM 0.20 31.63 +.55 Mindspeed 8.46 -.64 Minefnd g 9.21 +.47 MinTch 0.20 52.52 +1.19 Mirant 12.21 -.27 MitsuUFJ 4.69 +.03 MizuhoFn 3.44 -.02 MobileTel s 20.24 +.14 Modine 8.61 -.18 Mohawk 51.88 -.45 MolecInsP 1.80 -.17 Molex 0.61 20.58 -.17 MolsCoorB 1.12 43.99 -.56 Momenta 13.43 -.75 MoneyGrm 2.42 -.14 MonroMuf 0.36 36.16 -1.35 Monsanto 1.06 49.96 -.43 MonstrWw 13.09 -.14 Montpelr 0.36 15.57 -.42 Moodys 0.42 21.21 +.11 MorgStan 0.20 25.61 -.09 MS China 4.26 27.73 +1.01 MS India 22.69 +.34 Mosaic 0.20 43.59 +.13 Motorola 7.17 -.09 Motricity n 9.26 Move Inc 2.30 -.08 MuellerWat 0.07 4.28 +.11 MurphO 1.00 55.64 -.06 MyersInd 0.26 8.00 -.05 Mylan 17.97 -.66 MyriadG 16.23 -.32 NABI Bio 5.45 -.13 NBTY 36.42 -.11 NCI Bld rs 9.87 +.02 NCR Corp 12.93 -.22 NFJDvInt 0.60 14.57 +.04 NGAS Res 1.26 -.03 NII Hldg 37.70 -.20 NIVS IntT 2.44 -.03 NMT Med .78 +.05 NRG Egy 23.60 -.04 NTTDoCo 0.54 15.08 +.10 NV Energy 0.44 12.49 -.10 NYSE Eur 1.20 29.63 -.21 Nabors 21.20 -.31 NalcoHld 0.14 22.45 -.05 Nanomtr 10.88 -.98 NaraBncp 8.45 -.34 NasdOMX 19.00 -.17 NBkGreece 0.31 2.46 +.05 NatlCoal h .29 -.03 NatFnPrt 11.32 +.02 NatFuGas 1.38 51.29 -.45 NatGrid 7.17 37.87 -.81 NOilVarco 0.40 37.34 -.76 NatPenn 0.04 6.70 +.07 NatRetPrp 1.50 21.99 -.28 NatSemi 0.32 14.61 -.12 NatwHP 1.80 35.97 -.56 Navios 0.24 5.54 -.08 Navistar 55.57 -1.32 NeenahP 0.40 21.34 +.99 NektarTh 12.77 -.35 Net1UEPS 14.89 -.18 NetServic 10.62 -.30 NetLogic s 29.97 -.04 NetApp 40.53 -.69 Netease 33.33 +2.98 Netezza 14.41 -.13 Netflix 118.99 -7.43 Netlist 2.73 -.17 NetwkEng 2.97 -.16 NBRESec 0.24 3.56 Neurcrine 5.70 +.20 NeuStar 21.58 +.09 NeutTand 11.89 -.06 Nevsun g 3.61 -.39 NwGold g 6.44 -.39 NewOriEd 102.65 +1.29 NY&Co 2.70 -.02 NY CmtyB 1.00 16.08 -.06 NY Times 10.13 +.35 NewAlliBc 0.28 11.75 -.06 Newcastle 3.00 -.26 NewellRub 0.20 16.48 -.51 NewfldExp 55.97 +.46 NewmtM 0.40 59.48 -1.77 NewpkRes 6.76 -.40 NewsCpA 0.15 13.81 -.19 NewsCpB 0.15 15.84 -.20 Nexen g 0.20 22.14 -.10 NextEraEn 2.00 51.93 -.58 NiSource 0.92 15.48 -.06 Nicor 1.86 42.74 -.20 NightwkR 2.83 -.17 NikeB 1.08 74.35 -.59 99 Cents 14.12 +.08 NipponTT 20.15 -.05 NobleCorp 0.20 31.35 -.21 NobleEn 0.72 65.29 -.69 NokiaCp 0.56 8.70 -.20 Nomura 5.79 -.10 NordicAm 1.45 29.61 -.13 Nordstrm 0.80 37.73 -.93 NorflkSo 1.36 59.97 +.88 NoAmEn g 10.45 -.05 NA Pall g 3.52 -.06 NoWestCp 1.36 27.49 -.41 NoestUt 1.03 26.65 -.22 NDynMn g 7.36 -.09 NthnO&G 14.15 +.08 NorTrst 1.12 49.39 -.91 NthgtM g 3.04 -.09 NorthropG 1.88 61.24 -.84 NStarRlt 0.40 2.96 -.07 NwstBcsh 0.40 11.78 -.14 NovaMeas 4.55 -.31 NovaGld g 7.08 -.28 Novartis 1.99 48.89 +.14 NovtlWrls 5.94 -.06

Novavax h Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NustarEn NutriSyst NvMSI&G2 NuvQualPf NuvQPf2 Nvidia O2Micro OGE Engy OReillyA h OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysseyHlt OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF h OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt OmegaNav Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncothyr ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTable OpnwvSy Oracle OrbitalSci Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OriginAg Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMA Cap PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacerIntl PacCapB PacEthan PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld Palatin PallCorp Palm Inc PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd Pantry ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pebblebk n Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennVaGP PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PerfectWld PerkElm PermFix Prmian Perrigo PetMed PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhaseFwd PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimCpOp PimIncStr2 PimcoHiI PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd Plexus PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Poniard h Popular PortGE PortglTel Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS USDBull PS USDBear PwSClnEn PSFinPf PSBldABd PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ PSS&PBW Powrwav Pozen Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PrmWBc h PriceTR priceline PrideIntl Primerica n PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltMC PrUShMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltO&G ProUltHC ProUBasM ProUShEur ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude

D 2.28 6.01 -.11 28.07 -.38 1.41 85.32 +.87 1.60 35.94 -.25 0.50 27.02 -.06 39.64 -.50 17.29 -.11 1.44 41.77 +.28 4.26 56.73 -.34 0.70 22.87 -.55 0.75 7.94 -.20 0.58 6.89 -.03 0.65 7.37 12.01 -.29 6.62 -.07 1.45 37.57 -.32 49.66 -.27 15.73 -.23 1.52 85.80 -1.18 48.45 +.65 1.22 -.02 13.24 -.31 10.51 -.19 26.84 +.08 1.07 -.04 5.05 -.13 15.71 -.69 2.66 104.21 -.79 44.41 -.98 .73 +.01 36.83 -.30 0.28 11.14 -.12 0.69 13.12 -.13 0.80 20.63 -.08 1.28 20.19 -.30 2.12 -.17 0.09 25.50 -.25 0.80 37.88 -.19 22.31 -1.09 7.46 -.29 7.14 -.04 3.47 -.18 1.76 46.98 -.02 23.34 -.02 43.99 -1.46 2.15 -.11 0.20 23.09 -.11 16.14 +.05 4.33 -.17 4.10 -.22 9.14 -.13 8.54 -.31 2.60 +.04 35.26 1.75 44.30 +1.24 0.71 28.92 +.15 33.37 +.27 30.40 +.18 .48 -.08 1.00 5.68 -.04 0.17 45.45 -.76 1.82 43.01 -.17 19.90 -.48 6.95 -.03 8.04 -.09 3.78 -.21 0.40 61.87 -.91 0.50 12.05 -.14 1.71 103.76 +6.51 2.16 66.81 +.15 1.40 25.66 -.40 22.34 +.04 0.36 44.48 +.83 7.69 +.12 .92 -.13 .76 -.05 3.25 -.33 0.60 23.51 +.24 29.14 -.42 3.65 +.05 .26 +.01 0.64 37.20 -.05 5.69 +.01 0.05 26.63 -1.08 0.13 13.63 +.18 82.41 -1.60 14.51 +.39 26.85 -.16 0.20 3.87 -.02 17.27 +.05 1.45 -.05 23.22 +.06 4.39 +.11 1.04 61.03 +.17 2.00 74.22 -.83 16.20 +.30 0.40 30.63 -.12 0.20 14.76 -.17 1.24 28.15 -.18 0.28 42.32 +1.06 19.06 +.04 0.84 10.12 +.06 25.80 -.72 0.23 23.49 -.46 1.56 17.96 -.37 1.80 20.95 +.03 1.04 10.38 -.09 0.80 25.37 -.79 0.60 14.46 +.03 12.49 -.20 0.76 34.03 -.28 0.62 14.66 +.12 0.12 9.32 -.14 1.08 16.50 -.24 1.92 64.02 -.06 25.16 +1.20 0.28 22.90 +.18 1.81 -.16 1.16 19.24 -.20 0.25 59.97 +1.20 0.40 17.58 +.12 3.72 116.85 +2.34 21.12 -.23 1.30 33.34 +.32 1.30 38.66 +.37 8.34 +.01 0.50 31.68 -.26 0.72 15.10 -.11 7.49 60.72 -.33 0.60 26.50 6.74 -.12 14.74 -.37 16.61 -.03 2.32 46.29 +.38 0.95 32.40 +.03 0.15 53.57 -1.36 2.50 +.08 4.97 -.08 1.12 26.83 -.20 7.29 -.49 7.29 -.44 1.38 16.83 +.09 0.70 9.89 +.09 1.46 12.05 +.07 10.99 -.50 2.10 37.46 -.17 6.66 -.03 0.08 71.03 -.62 1.46 22.98 -.25 3.74 58.41 -.06 23.69 -.19 0.20 32.11 -.08 1.89 -.19 0.32 38.41 -.38 30.43 -.19 .55 +.05 1.68 37.06 -.24 1.60 60.04 -.81 0.40 79.88 -.57 32.17 +1.10 1.39 -.11 9.60 -.14 22.59 -.08 .82 -.01 3.01 +.01 1.04 19.38 -.12 0.77 10.72 -.13 0.40 98.59 -.77 2.04 38.78 -.85 0.20 35.57 +.18 7.48 +.03 70.48 +.44 22.31 -.09 24.17 +.07 25.10 -.05 25.03 +.09 24.89 -.08 8.98 -.15 1.34 16.33 -.01 0.76 25.80 -.07 1.04 13.55 -.04 1.66 26.07 +.12 0.11 22.55 +.39 0.26 46.60 -.40 0.29 20.55 -.06 1.60 -.03 7.26 -.25 1.80 81.83 +.66 0.12 115.74 +.98 7.55 -.20 .50 +.01 1.08 48.76 -.58 189.25 -3.84 25.12 +.07 21.49 +.10 0.50 26.07 -.28 0.04 11.76 -.29 50.60 +.02 41.59 +.37 50.96 +.15 32.42 +.17 0.53 44.10 -.04 27.19 +.01 0.11 46.02 -.66 17.94 +.24 60.58 -.89 16.95 +.27 0.41 37.80 -.21 38.81 +.16 36.17 -2.72 48.75 -1.78 25.23 +.32 60.77 +.39 37.02 -.41 0.50 41.88 -.68 20.31 +.06 0.30 58.05 -.20 56.01 +1.42 0.22 31.33 -.21 0.68 45.32 -.47 0.15 30.43 +.33 23.12 +.18 40.02 +.39 96.35 -2.60 19.95 +.37 0.04 30.90 -.66 44.76 +.15 31.55 +.28 0.23 144.86 -1.43 10.41 -.07

Nm

D

ProSUltGold ProUSGld rs ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUShEuro ProctGam 1.93 PrognicsPh ProgrssEn 2.48 ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp 0.16 ProLogis 0.60 ProlorBio ProspctCap 1.21 ProspBcsh 0.62 Protalix ProtLife 0.56 ProvET g 0.72 Prudentl 0.70 Prud UK 0.61 PsychSol PSEG 1.37 PubStrg 3.20 PudaCoal n PulteGrp PMIIT 0.64 PPrIT 0.71

Nm 54.79 -2.21 38.85 +1.48 32.42 +1.33 14.11 +.07 63.59 -3.21 24.63 +.22 61.10 -.20 5.94 -.12 40.22 -.12 33.25 +.08 19.77 -.38 11.59 +.05 7.51 -.42 10.14 -.73 35.99 -.68 6.89 +.43 21.88 +.04 7.55 +.05 58.79 -.26 16.80 +.11 32.62 +.11 33.08 -.54 92.83 -.99 9.00 -.40 9.15 -.21 6.31 +.03 6.48 +.03

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN QLT Qlogic Qualcom QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadientPh RadioOneD RadioShk Ralcorp RAM Engy Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaptorPh n RaserT h RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepFBcp RepubSvc ResCare RschFrnt RschMotn ResMed ResrceCap RetailHT RetailVent RexahnPh ReynldAm RINO Int n RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RosettaStn RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues RushEntA RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SABESP Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SJuanB SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer SchwUSLgC Schwab SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy Seanergy SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedH n SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous SenoRx Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignatBk SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware

20.70 +.15 5.77 -.12 17.95 -.13 0.76 35.64 -.05 0.16 18.88 -.52 22.57 -.28 2.34 -.11 .59 -.01 0.40 53.09 19.40 -.16 0.52 49.00 -.58 10.89 -.55 13.08 -.19 12.40 +.05 4.66 -.10 0.32 5.43 +.03 2.03 -.09 14.82 +.02 4.63 -.06 0.16 14.60 -.13 0.82 18.88 -.16 4.37 -.14 26.98 -.15 19.49 -.04 0.01 9.02 -.41 1.09 -.06 2.35 -.09 0.25 21.62 -.44 57.28 -4.89 2.22 -.08 19.02 +.08 0.65 10.79 +.27 0.17 95.05 +.07 0.16 48.11 -.78 2.88 -.38 .61 -.02 0.44 27.29 -.20 2.00 46.61 -.04 1.50 53.19 -.06 3.61 -.14 1.72 31.74 -.35 31.58 -.34 19.26 -.60 1.00 15.80 -.08 0.68 62.77 -.36 0.72 14.38 -.25 1.85 38.15 +.09 25.67 -.44 0.54 79.04 -.33 0.04 7.17 +.02 0.16 17.54 +.13 0.48 48.12 -.17 0.40 43.63 -.18 1.00 58.19 -.62 6.37 -.12 22.33 -.78 1.02 -.01 .43 +.01 1.15 21.99 -.02 6.25 -.01 2.02 -.36 0.76 31.29 -.23 10.57 +.07 4.25 +.55 58.84 -2.19 63.65 +.28 1.00 6.26 +.08 1.73 93.34 -1.45 8.60 -.21 1.42 -.11 3.60 52.96 +.20 13.82 -.47 0.45 50.71 +1.24 0.40 20.06 -.42 1.04 -.06 29.84 +.13 0.17 22.84 -.13 0.52 25.04 +.32 0.60 54.21 -1.04 1.40 53.95 +.12 0.96 58.34 -.23 25.53 -.38 1.28 36.43 -.18 0.38 60.30 -.32 24.49 +.08 24.50 -.16 0.64 56.39 -.92 37.41 +.03 25.27 +.01 2.00 53.69 -.31 13.60 -.27 29.52 +.07 3.36 52.35 +.04 3.36 54.44 -.21 0.36 53.35 -.44 3.58 -.31 31.82 -1.09 9.82 -.53 15.01 -.01 4.62 27.36 -.33 1.00 44.21 -.28 0.54 41.19 -.19 0.12 15.87 -.87 17.77 -.22 0.67 45.93 -.28 35.14 -.19 1.90 37.50 -.11 0.20 21.28 -.07 6.37 +.01 15.64 +.19 0.40 61.51 -1.12 12.00 +.08 0.10 47.17 -.38 2.51 104.45 -.04 120.39 -2.44 1.65 139.37 -.49 2.22 111.41 -.32 1.66 47.65 -.24 0.12 15.61 -.21 0.16 24.82 -.02 0.44 38.22 -.32 1.72 55.57 -.32 4.67 38.71 +.14 0.49 24.05 +.02 0.01 45.85 -.01 0.32 24.84 -.04 0.56 38.57 -.84 0.23 43.51 -.48 0.35 52.15 +.54 1.00 58.16 +.59 13.00 +.31 0.28 8.58 -.07 20.63 -.05 44.39 -.48 1.87 39.02 -.17 0.48 20.37 -.46 23.91 -.63 37.48 +.09 9.12 -.13 95.41 -.31 36.67 -.17 8.13 -.05 .59 -.01 1.27 26.45 -.58 0.60 51.43 -.09 48.04 -.98 6.55 -.31 15.50 -.27 1.63 30.53 +.09 2.49 -.08 0.35 10.71 -.04 0.44 14.68 -.10 1.19 38.78 +.82 2.73 -.01 5.08 +.09 12.74 +.05 16.27 -.63 0.84 60.33 -.20 0.07 44.47 +.47 0.24 26.39 -.10 0.24 15.29 -.16 10.11 -.15 0.50 44.80 -1.09 0.30 44.92 -.40 8.70 +.21 33.96 -1.04 1.57 +.07 1.70 20.84 +.14 14.87 -.48 0.48 21.40 -.12 2.96 +.02 1.24 -.01 74.65 -1.20 12.78 -.18 10.35 +.11 7.64 +.03 0.47 28.20 -.26 1.56 49.33 -.77 17.74 -.25 1.44 21.07 -.32 10.96 +.01 18.34 +.28 6.07 -.14 0.16 8.36 -.08 5.43 +.01 40.37 +.71 37.43 +.87 1.44 76.44 +.26 1.32 19.39 +.04 0.34 63.54 -.51 24.78 +.69 0.58 15.48 +.33 2.41 96.50 +.84 10.26 +.09 0.64 53.25 +.04 38.05 +.62 30.96 -1.15 0.42 29.15 -.20 3.73 -.14 44.87 -.56 0.28 5.97 +.22

SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithIntl SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M Sohu.cm SolarCap n Solarfun SolarWinds Solera Solutia Somantc Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SncWall SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwtGas SwstnEngy SpartnMot Spartch SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StMotr StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden s StewEnt StewInfo StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupEnrgy SuperWell Supvalu support.cm SusqBnc SwERCmTR SwftEng Sybase Sycamre rs Symantec Synaptics Syngenta Syniverse Synnex Synopsys Synovus Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots Talbots wt TalecrisB n TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData Technitrl TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelItalia Teledyne TelefEsp TelMexL TelData Telestone Telik Tellabs TelmxIntl TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tengsco Tennant Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Terremk TerreStar Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textron The9Ltd Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co 3Par TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMach TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros TomoThera Trchmrk Toro Co TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerSemi TowersWat Toyota TractSupp TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransGlb Transocn Travelers TreeHse n TriValley TricoMar TridentM h TriMas h TrimbleN TrinaSol s

D

0.08 2.40

0.16

0.78 0.48 1.60 1.20 0.62 2.40 0.25

1.12 0.27 0.20 1.82 1.16 0.60 0.02 1.00 0.10 1.00

0.80 0.52 0.55 0.75 0.42 1.00 0.17 0.59 0.31 1.26 0.20 1.32 0.36 0.40 0.20 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.44 0.06 0.15 0.12 0.05

0.60 1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04 0.35 0.04

1.13

0.04 1.00 0.90 0.20 0.82 0.28 0.71 0.60

0.46

0.25 1.55 2.07 1.00 0.32 1.66 0.10 0.40 1.27 1.18 2.93 0.84 0.68 4.78 1.36 0.45 0.08 0.25 0.44 0.54 0.68 0.56

0.68 0.30 0.48 0.08

1.16 0.28 2.10 1.00 1.00 1.60 0.85 0.52 0.02

0.60 0.72 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.30 0.56 1.60 0.84

1.44

Nm 18.33 -.81 20.34 -.66 7.05 -.45 88.86 -.55 38.44 +.26 6.84 +.20 4.26 1.08 +.04 36.69 +.06 42.51 -1.34 13.50 -.01 17.49 -.39 4.33 +.03 6.37 -.36 7.32 -.02 4.13 -.08 47.76 -1.48 41.00 -.18 10.91 -.01 15.43 -.36 61.87 -.23 43.70 -.07 34.20 -.77 44.54 +.51 19.38 -.02 8.01 -.20 18.54 -.33 36.59 -.36 15.05 +.07 24.91 +.03 4.64 -.36 8.75 -.42 9.29 -.15 8.46 -.54 11.35 +.04 32.06 -.20 2.83 +.01 28.40 +.47 31.70 -1.18 21.43 -.49 .29 +.01 33.92 -.19 31.01 +.69 23.49 -.08 12.20 -.06 31.34 +.15 43.76 -.32 4.98 -.14 11.35 -.31 21.60 -.09 4.04 -.10 20.71 +.04 9.77 +.23 4.50 -.09 11.57 -.23 44.65 -.30 31.14 +.19 29.50 -.05 26.59 -.07 32.21 -.26 55.49 -.12 14.81 -.02 30.05 +.05 22.17 -.16 29.87 -.21 8.56 -.58 3.69 -.08 55.27 -.72 21.61 -.37 1.69 -.05 28.02 -.07 48.05 -.24 37.17 -.03 21.36 -.09 14.11 +.14 7.64 +.19 .98 -.04 65.27 -.17 32.59 5.08 -.06 .72 +.04 15.54 +.72 33.89 -1.42 5.51 9.22 -.13 44.78 +.22 13.84 +.31 13.95 -.18 4.76 -.04 51.58 -.24 22.29 -.30 .26 -.01 29.84 +.25 33.70 -.13 .56 -.02 34.98 -.03 4.63 -.26 14.51 -.35 13.03 -.22 3.60 -.01 11.57 +.17 10.02 -.11 25.85 -.35 20.88 -.01 16.83 -.18 12.35 -.51 4.62 +.14 8.89 -.06 7.15 32.12 +.05 64.71 -.02 17.33 +.13 14.96 -.20 29.27 +1.23 47.72 +.25 19.73 -.16 26.42 -.24 22.23 -.18 2.90 +.03 30.88 -.23 14.95 -.04 16.92 -.10 16.79 -.35 16.20 +.01 13.12 +.12 4.83 -.14 27.76 -.25 45.08 -.88 32.98 +.32 10.00 +.18 17.64 -.11 10.36 +.16 9.98 -.09 11.43 -.70 2.48 -.20 21.41 +.09 17.25 -.13 41.81 -.26 4.83 -.07 24.65 -.19 52.89 -.78 5.07 +.03 4.01 -.14 18.21 +.18 42.64 -.49 39.83 -.87 3.30 +.11 35.81 +1.04 29.14 +.11 12.01 -.20 14.17 4.69 -.03 15.82 +.05 6.73 +.09 11.88 -.10 40.16 +.75 60.19 +.08 14.42 +.08 31.87 -.31 9.98 +.03 .75 +.01 6.90 -.07 18.02 +.14 23.34 -.11 9.70 35.79 +.78 38.19 +.42 4.74 -.16 .49 +.04 37.42 +.63 25.52 +.24 33.66 -.32 11.60 -.20 22.06 +.19 8.52 -.09 .47 +.01 12.19 -.11 18.00 -.09 21.40 10.52 -.10 52.75 -.46 32.66 +1.05 25.25 -.20 14.22 -.49 20.01 -.02 4.07 +.26 15.00 -.04 53.63 -.03 40.38 +.27 10.27 +.24 38.44 -.17 25.20 -.34 46.43 +.13 81.47 +.29 10.36 -.09 11.79 -.07 42.63 -.56 43.99 -.45 19.06 +.01 1.02 -.02 55.00 -.16 32.54 -.42 29.26 -.16 11.91 +.21 14.33 -.15 20.43 +.43 7.88 -.10 17.63 -.32 2.78 -.01 52.69 -.17 55.69 +.31 71.98 +.09 49.69 -.13 14.64 -.21 1.56 +.08 43.26 -.54 71.86 +.41 65.91 -1.28 36.00 -.06 49.19 -.27 3.33 -.19 7.83 -.07 53.91 -.70 51.17 -.18 48.11 -1.88 1.03 -.05 .62 -.03 1.70 +.03 12.28 +.08 30.44 -.03 19.40 +.67

D

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0.32 21.40 6.90 0.16 71.39 12.08 26.02 0.92 21.23 0.60 15.47 4.63 1.00 40.32 0.66 13.46 0.64 29.37 0.83 38.89 0.16 18.12

+.02 -.17 +.32 -.04 -.86 -.44 +.29 -.10 -.68 -.06 +.55 +.08 -.20

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp URS US Airwy US Geoth USGlobInv US Gold USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Ultratech Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr Unifi UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdThrp s UtdhlthGp UnvAmr UnivDisp UnivFor UnvHlth s UnivTravel UnumGrp Uranerz UraniumEn UranmR h UrbanOut Uroplasty VF Cp VaalcoE Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceTc ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValVis A ValueClick VanceInfo VandaPhm VangSTBd VangTotBd VangEMI VangGrth VangSmCp VangTSM VangValu VangREIT VangDivAp VangAllW VangEmg VangEur D M m G

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0.40 1.88 0.20 0.20 1.70 0.50 0.40 0.20 0.37

2.40 0.52 0.52 0.20 0.88 0.72 0.64

2.03 3.06 0.49 0.61 0.65 1.15 1.25 1.85 0.93 0.86 0.55 1.

8.11 -.07 23.24 -.56 14.27 -.09 20.43 -.39 27.04 +.54 43.01 +.05 10.00 -.44 .96 +.01 5.72 -.17 4.53 -.29 5.23 +.10 15.01 -.36 14.50 -.05 2.20 +.30 25.55 -.63 49.54 -1.13 16.10 -.60 .08 -.01 12.52 -.04 36.67 -.83 4.20 +.04 28.78 +.20 28.15 +.06 76.83 +.46 22.04 -.75 46.18 -.48 4.59 +.04 3.34 +.23 6.36 -.14 62.17 -.33 12.23 -.25 23.67 +.10 8.25 -.28 35.33 -.08 44.97 +1.56 69.37 +.19 53.62 -.71 31.15 -.18 15.77 -.21 17.85 -.86 31.99 +.65 40.26 -1.07 6.85 -.01 23.44 -.14 1.12 -.02 2.82 -.06 .52 -.10 35.77 -.76 5.89 -.60 78.57 -.59 5.87 -.08 36.57 -.55 27.73 +.85 23.64 +.70 46.90 +1.03 .88 -.03 18.14 +.15 24.65 -.27 14.32 -.01 32.39 +.13 2.15 +.17 12.05 -.03 23.96 +1.20 6.72 -.04 80.57 +.03 80.64 +.02 45.85 -.36 52.97 -.19 61.34 -.59 57.12 -.22 48.41 -.17 50.83 -.40 47.16 -.10 41.08 +.11 40.80 +.74


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Bend Velo

nicons, which can cost between $3,000 and $4,000, amazing machines. But building bikes from recycled parts has been popular, he said. Customers like the idea of reusing old parts in a new bike, and those who do not keep up with the latest equipment or bike racing feel less intimidated at Bend Velo, he said. Power agreed to answer some additional questions from The Bulletin.

Continued from B1 “The problem is that we have a lot of bikes that are specific for certain sports,” he said. “We have mountain bikes. We have road bikes. But we don’t have practical bikes that can carry things.” Along with building bikes from the ground up using recycled parts, Bend Velo will help customers redesign and retrofit their old bikes, for example turning a mountain bike into a more comfortable road bike. Prices vary from about $200 to $400 but can climb to nearly $800, depending on how they’re outfitted. Bend Velo also sells one line of new bikes, Bionicon mountain bikes, which have a unique on-the-fly air suspension system that allows them to morph from cross-country to downhill bike. On his website, Power calls Bio-

Q: A:

Why did you decide to start a bike shop? I’ve been into bikes my whole life. I worked in bike shops as a kid. I have been a bike racer. I embrace the whole racer scene. Where I thought Bend was lacking was (in the needs of the) practical cyclist. We need a shop like this as an alternative.

Q:

Insurer

What is mission?

Bend

Velo’s

year. The doctors involved in the Geisinger experiment say they would not hesitate to hospitalize a patient if necessary. Part of the nurses’ work is to keep tabs on anyone who is admitted and make sure a treatment plan is in place when a patient is discharged. Many other insurers are also trying new, similar ways of rewarding primary care doctors. “What we’re trying to do is get doctors off the traditional fee-for-service hamster wheel,” said Dr. Gus Manocchia, chief medical officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Rhode Island, a nonprofit insurer that started a program similar to Geisinger’s earlier this year. “A lot of the Blues plans are at least thinking about this, if they haven’t started it already.”

Continued from B1 Cox had gone to the emergency room with low blood sugar, but she has not been in the hospital for about three years. “You don’t always think you should call the doctor,” Cox said. But she has no qualms about reaching out to the nurse.

The medical home The initiative is part of an overall effort by Geisinger and other insurers to create a socalled medical home — the place where patients’ care is carefully coordinated by a doctor and staff, with particular attention given to the chronically ill. Geisinger began experimenting with this approach 3½ years ago and now uses it in 37 practices, most of which are part of its own network of doctors’ offices. Five of the medical offices, including Kilduff’s, are independent practices that accept Geisinger as one of several insurance plans. Under the arrangement with the outside doctors, Geisinger pays for the nurses and shares with the doctors any savings they can achieve by reducing medical expenses. Geisinger says it is pleased with the early results. In an unpublished review of 2008 data, Geisinger experienced an 18 percent drop in hospital admissions; overall medical expenses fell 7 percent. Geisinger expects to publish a study on its results later this

Patient trust WellPoint, Aetna and Cigna, which are some of the nation’s largest for-profit insurers, are also flirting with the concept. In one case, in Texas, a nurse whose salary is paid by Cigna discovered that a diabetic patient was missing checkups and not filling his prescriptions because he had lost his job. He was insured through his wife, but the couple could no longer afford to pay his share of the cost of prescriptions or the copayments for the office visit without his income. The nurse worked with the doctor to find cheaper medicines for the man and arranged for

A:

We need to get more people on bikes. To start riding your bike as basic transportation can truly be a life-changing experience.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 B5

unexpected? The shop really has a social cause as well (because of the recycled parts becoming new bikes). The social aspect was unforeseen. But it’s really become a driving force in why I keep going.

A:

Q: A:

What is different about your bikes? People can build the bikes, pick the color bike, pick matching fenders. It’s a recycled bike, but it’s custom, to meet the rider’s needs.

Q: A:

How do you see the business evolving? We’re hoping to get (a type of group bicycle rides known as) tweed rides going here. (Riders) get on their Livingstons, Raleigh three-speeds. The men look like Sherlock Holmes. The women look like Dutch ladies on bikes. My dream is that when I go to the farmers market in Bend, I see people who have ridden there on J. Livingston bikes to buy their produce.

Q: A:

Why did you name the bikes after your friend John Livingston? I was having a conversation with John Livingston, and he asked, ‘What makes your $1,000 bike any better than my $75 (bike, which Livingston built himself)?’ I was hard-pressed to give him a good answer. I went to work thinking of the J. Livingston design. My friends and I got together and compared ideas. Has starting this business led to anything

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360, or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

Q:

him to pay back his share of the cost of office visits over time. By getting this patient’s diabetes under control, the insurer very likely avoided paying what could have been a $500,000 or $1 million claim to treat a heart attack or start kidney dialysis, said David Toomey, Cigna’s general manager for north Texas, where the insurer is starting to experiment with such programs. The same patient had been ignoring telephone calls from Cigna representatives, responding only when someone called from the doctor’s office. “They trust their doctor, and there’s a level of distrust with the insurance company,” Toomey said.

or hospitals cannot,” said Paul Ginsburg, president of the Center for Studying Health System Change, a nonpartisan health research group in Washington. But Ginsburg says insurers with many customers in a geographic market — like Blue Cross of Rhode Island, which covers two-thirds of those who are privately insured in the state — are also in a position to team with local doctors to provide better care. Geisinger’s willingness to share the savings generated when patients stay out of the hospital may also be rare. But doctors say it is important. “Two to three thousand dollars just doesn’t do it,” said Mark Stephens, chief executive of InterMountain Medical Group, the medical practice of 52 physicians where Kilduff works. Geisinger offered InterMountain Medical at least half of any money saved from preventing readmissions to the hospital, among other measures. “The upside was so strong that it just got everyone’s attention,” Stephens said. His group, which cared for 900 patients insured by Geisinger, received $320,000 last year, which he said was divided among the entire staff, even the receptionists. The reward was based, too, on various measures of the quality of care delivered. “We wanted the team to succeed,” said Janet Tomcavage, a nurse who helps oversee the program for Geisinger. “We wanted to put the dollars on the table that are meaningful.”

A model insurer? Even though such experiments seem promising, more evidence is needed to show that this model works, said Dr. Jaan Sidorov, a former Geisinger insurance executive who is now a consultant. “We need some research and some outcomes,” he said. Others also worry that Geisinger, often cited as a national model for health care delivery, may be a tough act to follow. By investing heavily in technology, Geisinger has developed an unusually sophisticated way of tracking patients, and its own doctors — unlike many around the nation — have long made use of electronic health records. “Because Geisinger has a health plan, because of its system, they have the ability to do things that a lot of other insurers

Startups Continued from B1 Flynn credits her advisory board of about a half dozen people for those meetings, which she believes may turn into capital investment. Local and regional professionals ranging from attorneys to high-tech engineers to investors, including Putnam, are on Flynn’s board of advisers, and receive a portion of the company’s equity in exchange for their time. “The advisory board was the biggest move in the right direction,” said Flynn, who met most of her advisers by pitching at a PubTalk in February. “I think the key was pitching to a room of people who were all really well-connected.” The panel said advisers are also useful when picking a management team, giving additional objective insight. Anne McDonald, president of the recruiting firm the McDonald Group, said an important aspect of hiring an executive management team is recognizing when you, the founder, aren’t the right person to continue leading the company. That could be because it has grown beyond the founder’s grasp, or because the leader needs a different skill set, such as people management or marketing ability, McDonald said. The type of company plays a large role in the kind of managers it needs, Putnam said. A company that is based around a brand, such as a specific clothing line, might want a person who knows marketing and another who knows how to manage people, while a biotech company might want a scientist, an Internet technician and a person who knows operations at the helm, she said.

Management Companies also need to be able to grow at the right speed, Putnam said. That means possibly holding off on hiring a slew of people when sales initially take off. “I wouldn’t say slow growth, but smart growth,” she said. One aspect that Putnam said often is overlooked is the chemistry of the management team. She said people in the management team must like one another. “More and more women are becoming investors, and they notice these things,” Putnam said. “That kind of chemistry is everything.” Some investors might be

turned away if there’s too much chemistry, like a married couple, Putnam said. She said investors sometimes shy away from husband-wife teams without good reason. “I think it’s just residual stuff, sort of old boys network.... Frankly, I think there’s discomfort with women being on a management team,” she said. “I think that’s something that will take care of itself in the next 10 years.” Flynn said she and her husband, KC, have faced that issue. But now, with as many as three investors potentially interested in whippersnappers, she has her sights set on expansion: a goal of 300 franchises nationwide within five years and 150 new employees in Central Oregon in the next three to handle the growth. If her company does grow at that rate, Flynn expects she’ll no longer be CEO, but may step into a lower position. She said it’s important to have the advisory board, which may help her pick her future boss. “You can’t continue to do everything if you want to grow,” Flynn said. “You have to prepare for that as a founder, and you have to know where your strengths are.”

Due diligence Jon Napier, an attorney at Karnopp Petersen, said business owners should always keep track of documents, both for investors and for hiring executives. Napier said investors want to see that a company has performed its due diligence on things such as taxes and state filings. Document things like employment contracts up front, he said. “If you deal with the hard questions up front, that can give you some calm seas going forward,” Napier said. Many startup companies, in order to attract highly skilled executives, offer a combination of stock options and cash when they can’t offer highpaying salaries, the panelists said. Flynn said business owners shouldn’t be worried about selling more than 50 percent of their company to investors, especially if the deal is right, and they really want to see the business grow. “You can’t do it by yourself,” she said. “If you won’t even consider giving up majority share, you might have 100 percent of nothing.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .20f .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

15 13 75 ... 42 ... ... 25 21 35 20 13 33 19 ... ... 55 ... 14 ... 13

YTD Last Chg %Chg 51.72 20.37 15.79 13.25 67.97 .59 41.73 51.13 57.78 4.14 28.86 47.51 13.70 21.19 8.44 19.91 4.94 7.67 18.99 9.48 25.95

-.87 -.17 -.03 -.12 +.01 +.04 -.28 -.83 -.43 -.06 +.02 -.47 -.30 -.21 +.07 -.15 -.18 -.18 -.14 -.12 -.49

+49.7 -5.7 +4.8 +7.8 +25.6 -13.7 +51.8 +31.0 -2.3 +72.5 -11.8 -7.8 +2.9 +3.9 +52.1 -3.0 +83.0 +9.9 -19.5 +7.4 -14.9

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80f 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .48f .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

21 18 17 40 ... ... 37 18 ... 71 20 10 28 21 ... 22 ... 11 ... ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1235.00 $1239.70 $18.802

Pvs Day $1259.00 $1257.20 $19.175

Market recap 74.35 37.73 45.73 15.71 44.48 1.72 37.06 115.74 20.37 44.47 76.44 44.65 28.02 6.90 12.52 23.67 17.15 27.94 2.91 39.45

-.59 -.93 -.39 -.69 +.83 -.09 -.24 +.98 -.46 +.47 +.26 -.30 -.07 -.17 -.04 +.10 -.56 -.13 -.04 +.20

+12.5 +.4 +1.5 +23.8 +22.6 -38.8 -1.9 +4.9 -4.3 -6.8 +24.0 +11.6 +21.5 +15.0 -6.6 +5.2 -11.3 +3.5 +38.6 -8.6

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm iShEMkts SPDR Fncl

5429599 1969286 1068386 948441 821095

Last Chg 4.02 111.41 15.79 40.61 14.81

+.01 -.32 -.03 +.69 -.02

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CitiAmUSEq CapTr12 pf Biovail MS S&P8-10 E-TrcGld

Last 8.65 3.16 16.67 10.91 38.07

Chg %Chg +1.22 +.41 +2.07 +1.05 +3.24

+16.3 +14.9 +14.2 +10.6 +9.3

Losers ($2 or more) Name WNS Hldg Goldcp wt GlobPay AmbacF pfZ Vonage

Last

Chg %Chg

10.79 -1.86 -14.7 5.96 -.83 -12.2 38.89 -3.72 -8.7 9.59 -.90 -8.6 2.46 -.23 -8.6

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g NA Pall g NwGold g LucasEngy NovaGld g

43329 41034 36315 29357 26173

Name

4.22 3.52 6.44 2.62 7.08

PwShs QQQ SiriusXM Cisco Microsoft Intel

-.19 -.06 -.39 -.48 -.28

CKX Lands Ever-Glory AlldDefen HMG Protalix

Last

Vol (00)

1,296 1,812 104 3,212 105 9

890788 585091 542778 521087 473717

Last Chg 46.60 1.08 23.34 25.95 21.19

13.25 +1.54 +13.1 3.14 +.34 +12.1 2.55 +.23 +9.9 5.60 +.45 +8.7 6.89 +.43 +6.7

Name

Last

AmItPasta UTStrcm LeCroy USecBcCA Ulticom n

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

52.66 +10.93 2.20 +.30 5.25 +.64 4.87 +.56 9.20 +.94

+26.2 +15.8 +13.9 +13.0 +11.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

LucasEngy Barnwell SuprmInd Nevsun g Continucre

2.62 3.26 2.16 3.61 3.69

-.48 -15.5 -.49 -13.1 -.24 -10.0 -.39 -9.8 -.39 -9.6

Affymax CyprsBio NthValB Exelixis WaccaBk

7.18 -15.83 2.70 -1.64 2.06 -.59 3.84 -.74 2.25 -.40

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-.40 +.04 -.15 -.49 -.21

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg -68.8 -37.8 -22.3 -16.2 -15.1

Diary 190 293 38 521 11 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

891 1,800 97 2,788 78 47

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,988.88 342.02 5,552.82 1,497.10 1,727.05 869.32 8,900.27 473.54

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,442.41 4,433.60 380.27 6,978.86 1,875.10 2,289.09 1,113.20 11,682.74 660.03

-8.23 ... -3.09 -9.38 -8.60 -20.71 -4.31 -54.76 -6.89

YTD %Chg %Chg -.08 ... -.81 -.13 -.46 -.90 -.39 -.47 -1.03

52-wk %Chg

+.14 +8.15 -4.46 -2.87 +2.75 +.88 -.17 +1.16 +5.54

+25.22 +44.44 +8.09 +21.90 +21.10 +29.61 +24.65 +27.98 +33.93

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

341.04 2,549.84 3,736.15 5,299.11 6,292.97 20,912.18 32,882.00 20,810.44 3,068.25 10,238.01 1,739.68 2,885.64 4,632.70 5,737.19

+1.48 s +.83 s +1.33 s +.92 s +1.22 s +3.08 s +.21 s +.28 s +.68 s +2.43 s +1.62 s +1.84 s +1.28 s +1.12 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.8777 1.4762 .9774 .001887 .1471 1.2324 .1286 .010991 .080079 .0324 .000828 .1294 .8998 .0313

.8705 1.4799 .9783 .001878 .1464 1.2364 .1284 .011022 .079713 .0322 .000825 .1291 .9011 .0311

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.61 -0.06 +1.2 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.55 -0.02 +1.0 GrowthI 22.22 -0.10 +0.8 Ultra 19.37 -0.08 -0.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.49 -0.08 -0.2 AMutlA p 22.99 -0.10 +0.5 BalA p 16.24 -0.03 +1.3 BondA p 12.10 +0.01 +4.4 CapWA p 19.82 +0.01 -0.3 CapIBA p 45.79 +0.02 -2.6 CapWGA p 31.34 +0.01 -6.5 EupacA p 36.08 +0.13 -5.9 FdInvA p 32.25 -0.11 -0.7 GovtA p 14.39 +4.3 GwthA p 26.98 -0.10 -1.3 HI TrA p 10.77 +0.04 +4.9 IncoA p 15.21 -0.01 +0.3 IntBdA p 13.37 -0.01 +3.0 ICAA p 25.09 -0.11 -2.3 NEcoA p 21.89 -0.06 -2.7 N PerA p 24.80 -0.04 -3.3 NwWrldA 47.16 +0.30 -0.1 SmCpA p 32.63 -0.02 +3.5 TxExA p 12.12 +2.5 WshA p 24.29 -0.07 -0.2 American Funds B: CapIBB t 45.82 +0.02 -2.9 GrwthB t 26.08 -0.10 -1.6 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 26.56 +0.22 -5.9 IntlEqA 25.89 +0.20 -6.1 IntEqII I r 11.00 +0.10 -6.6 Artisan Funds: Intl 18.73 +0.05 -9.3 MidCap 27.13 -0.07 +6.1 MidCapVal 18.28 -0.13 +1.7 Baron Funds: Growth 43.79 -0.55 +6.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.64 +0.01 +5.0

DivMu 14.48 TxMgdIntl 13.76 +0.04 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 15.62 -0.02 GlAlA r 17.72 +0.01 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.52 +0.01 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 17.82 +0.02 CGM Funds: Focus 27.51 -0.07 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 44.46 -0.23 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 25.68 -0.19 AcornIntZ 33.77 +0.15 ValRestr 42.15 +0.06 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.52 +0.02 USCorEq2 9.48 -0.05 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.68 -0.08 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.02 -0.08 NYVen C 29.58 -0.09 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.39 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMktV 30.90 +0.51 IntSmVa 14.37 LargeCo 8.78 -0.03 USLgVa 17.85 -0.05 US Micro 11.37 -0.14 US Small 17.71 -0.18 US SmVa 21.07 -0.21 IntlSmCo 13.98 -0.01 Fixd 10.34 IntVa 15.75 +0.06 Glb5FxInc 11.26 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.23 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.31 -0.15 Income 13.27 +0.01 IntlStk 30.53 +0.06 Stock 95.68 -0.34

+2.0 -9.9 -0.9 -1.0 -1.3 -0.8 -7.5

+4.2 +0.4 -1.4 -4.7 +4.2 -1.0 -0.9 -1.3 +3.4 -1.1 -3.8 +0.8 +5.3 +7.8 +7.7 +7.4 -0.7 +0.6 -6.2 +3.1 +0.9 +1.0 +3.6 -4.1 -0.1

Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.52 NatlMunInc 9.61 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 16.56 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.76 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.05 FPACres 25.12 Fairholme 31.97 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.72 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.42 StrInA 12.21 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.59 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.59 FF2015 10.49 FF2020 12.58 FF2025 10.39 FF2030 12.35 FF2035 10.19 FF2040 7.11 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.54 AMgr50 14.05 Balanc 16.72 BlueChGr 38.60 Canada 51.01 CapAp 22.54 CpInc r 8.75 Contra 59.10 ContraK 59.11 DisEq 21.06 DivIntl 26.00 DivrsIntK r 26.00 DivGth 24.04 EmrMk 22.20 Eq Inc 39.49 EQII 16.31 Fidel 28.20 GNMA 11.77

-0.04 -0.8 -0.01 +3.4 -0.04 -0.6 +0.03 -2.5 +2.0 -0.01 +1.2 -0.01 +6.2 -0.01 +1.3 -0.09 +1.2 +0.03 +2.8 -0.10 +1.3 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.01

+1.3 +1.3 +0.9 +0.6 +0.3 -0.1 -0.1

-0.04 +0.9 +1.8 -0.03 +2.7 -0.21 +1.7 -0.19 +5.2 -0.22 +5.2 +0.05 +4.4 -0.33 +1.6 -0.33 +1.6 -0.06 +0.2 +0.05 -7.1 +0.05 -7.1 -0.13 +1.6 +0.33 -1.8 -0.14 +1.2 -0.06 +0.2 -0.07 -0.4 +5.1

GovtInc 10.68 GroCo 70.44 GroInc 16.02 GrowthCoK 70.45 HighInc r 8.52 Indepn 20.37 IntBd 10.43 IntmMu 10.22 IntlDisc 28.25 InvGrBd 11.63 InvGB 7.28 LgCapVal 11.22 LatAm 49.16 LevCoStk 23.95 LowP r 33.21 LowPriK r 33.24 Magelln 63.61 MidCap 24.83 MuniInc 12.60 NwMkt r 15.33 OTC 46.36 100Index 7.83 Ovrsea 28.04 Puritn 16.35 SCmdtyStrt 10.15 StIntMu 10.65 STBF 8.41 SmllCpS r 16.68 StratInc 10.90 StrReRt r 8.69 TotalBd 10.78 USBI 11.36 Value 59.58 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 48.12 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 39.56 IntlInxInv 30.65 TotMktInv 32.04 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 39.56 TotMktAd r 32.04 First Eagle: GlblA 41.39

-0.64 -0.06 -0.64 +0.05 -0.11

+0.08

-0.06 +0.30 -0.12 -0.15 -0.15 -0.46 -0.19 +0.06 -0.50 -0.03 +0.07 -0.02 -0.03

-0.18 +0.03 -0.01 +0.01 -0.33

+3.9 +2.1 -0.1 +2.2 +4.0 +2.3 +4.5 +2.3 -6.9 +4.6 +5.1 -0.2 -5.2 +4.5 +4.0 +4.0 -1.0 +6.3 +3.1 +4.7 +1.4 -1.3 -9.3 +2.3 -8.2 +1.2 +2.2 +4.6 +3.1 +2.1 +4.8 +4.3 +4.6

-1.08 +13.3 -0.15 +0.7 +0.10 -8.3 -0.15 +1.8 -0.16 +0.7 -0.15 +1.9 +0.06 +3.5

OverseasA 20.18 +0.09 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.83 FoundAl p 9.77 +0.03 HYTFA p 10.05 IncomA p 2.05 +0.01 USGovA p 6.81 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.04 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.07 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.37 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.05 +0.06 GlBd A p 13.23 +0.14 GrwthA p 15.81 +0.04 WorldA p 13.13 +0.06 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.26 +0.14 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 36.20 -0.09 GMO Trust III: Quality 18.21 -0.06 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.13 +0.22 Quality 18.22 -0.06 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.98 +0.03 HYMuni 8.46 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.66 +0.01 CapApInst 32.24 -0.17 IntlInv t 51.23 +0.15 Intl r 51.77 +0.16 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.85 -0.03 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 29.81 -0.03 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 36.25 -0.11 Div&Gr 17.43 -0.05 Advisers 17.64 -0.07 TotRetBd 11.07 +0.01

+3.7 +2.7 -0.5 +4.3 +2.6 +4.6 +6.4 +2.7 +2.3 +1.6 -7.6 +6.2 -5.9 -6.0 +6.1 -1.8 -5.8 -1.1 -5.8 +4.2 +6.0 +4.7 -2.2 -5.8 -5.6 -2.7 -2.6 -1.0 -0.7 +1.0 +4.7

HussmnStrGr 13.26 -0.03 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.71 -0.06 CmstkA 13.86 -0.05 EqIncA 7.77 -0.02 GrIncA p 17.05 -0.06 HYMuA 9.32 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.02 +0.27 AssetStA p 21.59 +0.28 AssetStrI r 21.75 +0.28 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.40 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.40 HighYld 7.81 +0.03 IntmTFBd 10.91 ShtDurBd 10.94 USLCCrPls 18.25 -0.08 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 25.90 -0.11 OvrseasT r 43.82 +0.28 PrkMCVal T 20.33 -0.13 Twenty T 59.08 -0.36 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 11.94 -0.01 LSGrwth 11.55 -0.01 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 20.57 -0.16 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.57 +0.22 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 18.82 +0.23 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.85 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.02 -0.06 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.67 +0.03 StrInc C 14.19 +0.03 LSBondR 13.62 +0.03 StrIncA 14.12 +0.03 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.01 +0.01 Lord Abbett A:

+3.8 -2.1 +1.1 +0.7 -0.6 +5.0 -3.5 -3.1 -3.0 +4.2 +4.4 +4.4 +1.6 +1.6 +0.4 -1.4 +3.1 +2.7 -4.1 +1.7 +0.9 +3.8 +3.1 +3.0 +2.5 +8.0 +5.1 +4.4 +4.9 +4.8 +5.0

AffilA p 10.21 -0.03 BdDebA p 7.40 +0.03 ShDurIncA p 4.59 +0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.14 -0.02 ValueA 20.53 -0.09 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.63 -0.09 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.69 +0.02 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.67 +0.03 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.77 +0.43 MergerFd 15.64 -0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.32 TotRtBdI 10.32 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.15 +0.08 GlbDiscZ 27.49 +0.08 QuestZ 17.36 +0.03 SharesZ 19.53 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 39.34 -0.23 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 40.84 -0.23 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.83 -0.06 Intl I r 16.98 +0.03 Oakmark r 37.87 -0.10 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.34 +0.04 GlbSMdCap 13.11 -0.03 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 38.28 -0.19 DvMktA p 29.60 +0.38 GlobA p 52.59 -0.12 IntBdA p 6.22 +0.01 MnStFdA 28.05 -0.12 RisingDivA 13.82 -0.03 S&MdCpVl 27.20 -0.16 StrInA p 4.07 +0.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.54 -0.02

+0.1 +3.5 +3.2 +1.1 -0.9 -0.8 +3.9 -5.5 +2.8 +0.6 +6.6 +6.7 +1.6 +1.7 +0.7 +1.8 +4.2 +4.1 +1.1 +0.8 +2.2 +3.8 +2.7 -4.1 +2.9 -0.8 -0.9 -0.3 -0.6 +2.3 +6.4 -1.0

S&MdCpVl 23.43 -0.14 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.50 -0.03 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.09 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 29.31 +0.39 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.17 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.85 +0.02 ComodRR 7.50 +0.01 HiYld 8.91 +0.04 InvGrCp 11.13 +0.02 LowDu 10.47 +0.01 RealRet 11.61 +0.01 RealRtnI 11.14 +0.01 ShortT 9.86 TotRt 11.17 +0.01 TR II 10.79 +0.01 TRIII 9.90 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.47 +0.01 RealRtA p 11.14 +0.01 TotRtA 11.17 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.17 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.17 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.17 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.47 -0.18 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 35.51 -0.03 Price Funds: BlChip 32.66 -0.16 CapApp 18.75 -0.03 EmMktS 29.96 +0.47 EqInc 21.34 -0.05 EqIndex 30.10 -0.12 Growth 27.60 -0.09 HlthSci 26.52 -0.20 HiYield 6.46 +0.03 IntlBond 9.31 -0.02

+2.0 -1.0 +4.0 +3.1 +4.8 +5.4 -4.7 +5.2 +4.6 +2.6 +7.1 +4.5 +0.9 +4.9 +4.4 +5.0 +2.4 +4.3 +4.7 +4.3 +4.8 +4.8 +4.7 -0.4 -0.3 +3.2 -0.4 +2.1 +0.6 +0.3 +1.3 +4.3 -4.5

IntlStk 12.10 MidCap 50.89 MCapVal 21.37 N Asia 16.68 New Era 41.45 N Horiz 27.47 N Inc 9.50 R2010 14.21 R2015 10.84 R2020 14.81 R2025 10.74 R2030 15.29 R2040 15.29 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 29.09 SmCapVal 31.34 SpecIn 11.92 Value 20.86 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.84 VoyA p 20.08 RiverSource A: DEI x 8.74 DivrBd 4.95 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.90 PremierI r 17.04 TotRetI r 11.29 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 33.39 S&P Sel 17.48 Scout Funds: Intl 27.82 Selected Funds: AmShD 37.10 AmShS p 37.08 Sequoia 118.88 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.11 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.01 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 44.47 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.25

+0.07 -0.37 -0.12 +0.35 -0.01 -0.28 +0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.31 -0.28 +0.01 -0.03

-4.0 +7.2 +3.1 +3.3 -5.0 +7.4 +4.4 +1.9 +1.6 +1.4 +1.2 +1.1 +0.9 +1.7 +8.0 +6.3 +3.0 +1.9

-0.05 -0.8 -0.07 +1.8 -0.05 -0.1 +0.01 +4.7 -0.08 +4.8 -0.13 +4.5 -0.08 +5.2 -0.14 +1.2 -0.06 +0.8 +0.11 -4.5 -0.09 -0.4 -0.09 -0.5 -0.09 +8.2 +5.2 +0.18 -6.7 +0.52 -4.0 +0.21 -2.2

IntValue I 24.79 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.57 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.91 CpOpAdl 67.12 Energy 106.25 500Adml 103.01 GNMA Ad 10.96 HlthCr 48.53 HiYldCp 5.47 InfProAd 25.42 ITsryAdml 11.45 IntGrAdm 52.10 ITAdml 13.50 ITGrAdm 9.89 LtdTrAd 11.04 LTGrAdml 9.17 LT Adml 11.00 MuHYAdm 10.41 PrmCap r 59.94 STsyAdml 10.80 ShtTrAd 15.90 STIGrAd 10.69 TtlBAdml 10.61 TStkAdm 27.79 WellslAdm 50.46 WelltnAdm 49.84 Windsor 40.06 WdsrIIAd 41.42 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.34 CapOpp 29.05 DivdGro 13.05 Energy 56.57 EqInc 18.36 Explr 60.49 GNMA 10.96 GlobEq 15.46 GroInc 23.76 HYCorp 5.47 HlthCre 114.99 InflaPro 12.94 IntlGr 16.37

+0.21 -2.1 +0.19 +1.7 -0.01 -0.58 -0.26 -0.39 -0.16 +0.03 +0.02 -0.01 +0.34 +0.01 -0.01

-0.22

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IntlVal 28.02 ITIGrade 9.89 LifeCon 15.49 LifeGro 19.82 LifeMod 18.10 LTIGrade 9.17 Morg 15.46 MuInt 13.50 MuLtd 11.04 MuShrt 15.90 PrecMtls r 20.57 PrmcpCor 12.08 Prmcp r 57.75 SelValu r 16.84 STAR 17.67 STIGrade 10.69 StratEq 15.95 TgtRetInc 10.84 TgRe2010 20.99 TgtRe2025 11.46 TgtRe2015 11.53 TgRe2020 20.28 TgRe2030 19.48 TgtRe2035 11.69 TgtRe2040 19.15 TgtRe2045 12.09 USGro 15.91 Wellsly 20.82 Welltn 28.86 Wndsr 11.87 WndsII 23.33 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 102.98 Balanced 19.79 EMkt 25.67 Europe 23.04 Extend 34.71 Growth 27.24 ITBnd 11.11 MidCap 17.41 Pacific 9.57 REIT r 16.89 SmCap 29.35 SmlCpGth 17.89

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SmlCpVl

14.00 -0.12 +7.2

STBnd

10.55

+2.4

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10.61

+4.3

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13.51 +0.08 -6.2

TotStk

27.78 -0.13 +1.6

Value

18.87 -0.07 +1.8

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19.80 -0.05 +2.9

DevMkInst

8.72 +0.02

NS

ExtIn

34.74 -0.30 +6.3

GrwthIst

27.25 -0.11

InfProInst

10.36 +0.01 +3.8

InstIdx

102.32 -0.39 +0.8

InsPl

102.33 -0.39 +0.8

InsTStPlus

25.12 -0.11 +1.7

MidCpIst

17.47 -0.10 +6.5

SCInst

29.39 -0.27 +6.9

TBIst

10.61

TSInst

27.80 -0.12 +1.6

+4.3

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

85.09 -0.33 +0.8

STBdIdx

10.55

+2.5

TotBdSgl

10.61

+4.3

TotStkSgl

26.82 -0.13 +1.6

Victory Funds: DvsStA

13.44 -0.07 -3.7

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.81

+0.5

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.64 +0.01 +7.5


B6 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A GIFT TO THE COMMUNITY PRESENTED EXCLUSIVELY BY

& For more than 30 years The Bulletin has presented the 4th of July Fireworks, and now with

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Watch The Bulletin’s 4th Of July Fireworks Display broadcast live on KOHD NEWS.

Listen to the synchronized, soundtrack accompanying The Bulletin’s fireworks on these great radio stations.

A VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR SUPPORT OF THIS COMMUNITY EVENT: PILOT BUTTE SCENIC VIEWPOINT • OREGON STATE PARKS • OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY • CITY OF BEND POLICE DEPT • CITY OF BEND FIRE DEPT • BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA • DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST


L

Inside

OREGON Ranchers charged with starting wildfires, see Page C3. OBITUARIES NASCAR legend Raymond Park dies at 96, see Page C5. NORTHWEST Summer off to a cold, wet start, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

Gas tax opponents unrelenting in Sisters Association to take its fight to Oregon Court of Appeals

WARM SPRINGS

Attention, photographers! Submit your own photography at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot and we’ll pick the best for publication next week in this space. No doctored photos, please!

Picture-taking advice from The Bulletin’s professional photographers

Well, sh ot!

Installment 21:

Shadows

By Andy Tullis The Bulletin

From light comes shadows, the dark mirrors of reality. Including shadows in your images can add an extra dimension of visual interest. Some photo shoots have obvious shadow play, but at other times the photographer must search for locations and angles that allow him to capture and emphasize the shadows in the frame. Viewers of your images will identify with the shadows in them. The viewer of a shadow sees a copy of the real scene. The vagueness of the information that the shadow reveals opens up the infinite possibilities for interpretation, giving the viewer a sort of fill-in-the-blank exercise for the brain. Because shadows create added interest and draw the viewer into

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

An opponent of the 3-cent gas tax in Sisters said Monday he will continue the legal fight to strike down the tax. Paul Romain, executive director of the Oregon Petroleum Association, said he plans to appeal a Deschutes County Circuit judge’s ruling to the Oregon Court of Appeals. The controversy dates to August 2009, when the Sisters City Council passed a 3-cent gas tax. The tax was referred to voters, who approved it during a March election. But the tax’s opponents argued the measure was invalid because voters approved it after a September deadline set by the state Legislature. The city councils in Redmond and Madras also passed 3-cent gas taxes last year, but voters in both cities overwhelmingly rejected the proposed tax. That left Sisters alone in Central Oregon to defend the tax. Backed by the Oregon Petroleum Association, a gas dealer sued Sisters. But a recent decision in that case by Deschutes County Circuit Court Judge Alta Brady upheld the Sisters tax. Once Romain and his clients file the appeal, the case could take more than a year to reach the court, Romain said. Romain plans to use the same argument as he did in Deschutes, that the March vote came too late for the tax to take effect. “I still feel very confident about it,” Romain said. Romain also lost a case in Washington County, in which he argued the new 2-cent gas tax in Cornelius should be repealed. See Gas Tax / C5

the image, they’re timeless, forever interesting and unique. Here are some tips for how to shoot them: In natural light, shoot in the morning or evening for the best chance at capturing large and detailed shadows. In the studio, lights allow for more direct manipulation of angle and intensity of the shadows you create. The shadows you create in the studio will draw you in as a photographer. It is then up to you to manipulate and capture what you’re trying to show. Whether shooting in the studio or in natural light, big, clean backdrops work best when trying to create strong shadows. Experiment with natural and or studio lights to get shadow images you like, and let your imagination go wild.

In 2001 I was shooting a friend’s wedding at Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood when I noticed this great possibility. I shot it while we were hiking up a trail behind the lodge to capture the mountain sunset in the background of my wedding photos. This image works on a couple of levels: The pathway frames the bride and groom, and the greenery adds interesting points around them. Photos by Andy Tullis

BEND

Weather forces parkway crews to start later Bulletin staff reports Cold overnight weather conditions have affected construction work scheduled for the Bend Parkway, and will force crews to adjust work hours for later in the day this week, according to a news release from the Oregon Department of Transportation. Construction crews applying wear-resistant materials on the Colorado Avenue and Burlington Northern Santa Fe railway overpasses will work from 5 a.m. to 3 p.m. Originally, the construction on the bridges was scheduled to be done between the hours of 3 a.m. and 3 p.m. to minimally affect traffic. However, due to freeze warnings and unusually chilly weather around Central Oregon during the past weeks, construction efforts are being rescheduled. Today, the southbound lanes of the Colorado overpass and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe overpass will undergo renovations. Northbound lanes will be worked on during the second half of the week. Single lane closures in the work area are planned for the project. Signs will be posted to alert motorists to the construction. The monthlong project, which began June 7, is set to eliminate ruts and smooth out the surface of overpasses along the Bend Parkway by applying a wear-resistant surface to the road. The construction along the parkway is scheduled to be finished by July 1.

C

While out on the hunt for an interesting picture a few years back, I came across this BMX rider on a quarterpipe next to a youth center in Madras. I used flash to pop him with a bit of light. While shooting a few frames, I began to notice his shadow appearing on the wall beside him while he was airborne.

Playing in the shadow light, my son and I made this picture together during a recent warm evening. Shadows can bring out the child in all of us. Stretching out your arms to see your distorted shadows below can even make an old curmudgeon giggle. Using photography for fun times like this helps with your creative process. Let go a bit and allow the shadows to help direct your photography.

Charles Campbell, 79, of Bend, and his shadow were connected during a noxious weed cleanup in Bend. I turned my camera to focus on the shadow, making his actual body a small part of the image. Instead , I zoomed in on his connection to the earth and his shadow emulating his movement. I made this image with a Canon EOS 1-D Mark II body, 35mm lens, ISO 200, f/2.8, and a shutter speed of 1/1250 of a second.

Equipment corner FOR BEGINNERS

FOR INTERMEDIATES

When starting out, turn your automatic flash function off. Shooting without your camera’s flash will allow you to see the tonal variations of the shadows and more realistically capture the scene as you see it. If, after shooting for a while, you realize you need a bit of flash to light part of you image, try covering the flash with layers of tissue paper to soften the effect.

Try using a wider-angle lens. A wider perspective will help the photographer get in close to the shadows to focus on the contrasting dark and light forms.

FOR ADVANCED Use the camera’s manual exposure settings to search for the right shutter speed, aperture

Here’s the lineup

April 27 Flash

May 11 Composition

May 25 Emotion

(f/) and ISO combination. This can be tricky, but shooting more images and continuing to change settings while taking notes throughout will allow you to eventually produce a shadow masterpiece.

Each installment will feature tips from The Bulletin’s photographers, followed the next week by the best of readers’ submitted photos.

June 8 Lines

Today Shadows

July 6 Shapes

July 20 Black & white

Aug. 3 Color

Housing authority under federal scrutiny By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Federal criminal investigators are looking into possible misconduct at the Warm Springs Housing Authority, according to a former tribal official who spoke with the investigators. Former Warm Springs Chief Financial Officer Ray Potter said he was recently fired by the tribal government only days after speaking with federal investigators from the U.S. Housing and Urban and Development Department’s Office of Inspector General. “Unfortunately, there were people who thought the tribe needed to go a different direction financially, and decided that I wasn’t the CFO that they wanted to have in that office anymore,” Potter said in an interview with The Bulletin. “It did happen two days after I met with federal investigators over an OIG criminal investigation. That’s all I can say at this point.” In recent months, the Warm Springs Housing Authority has been under scrutiny by HUD, which has threatened to fine the authority for widespread safety problems and a history of financial mismanagement. In late March, HUD issued a warning letter, noting that the tribes had failed to make progress on eight of 10 major violations of federal regulations flagged in a January 2009 report on the tribes’ $1.4 million annual Indian Housing Block Grant. The grant is intended to pay for houses and apartments for lowincome residents of the Warm Springs Reservation. Potter declined to elaborate on what he discussed with federal officials because it was part of an ongoing investigation. See Housing / C5

Volunteer fireman accused of driving fire engine drunk, cursing campers By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A volunteer firefighter was arrested Sunday morning after allegedly driving a firetruck recklessly through a campground at Lake Billy Chinook, yelling obscenities at campers, while under the influence of alcohol. Kristopher Wood, 34, of Redmond, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol, reckless driving, first-degree criminal mischief, disorderly conduct and failure to perform the duties of a driver. Shortly after 6:30 a.m., the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office got a call from Cove Palisades State Park staff, said Sgt. Bryan Skidgel.

‘Screaming at campers’ “They reported that it appears to be an intoxicated firefighter in the Three Rivers (Rural Fire Protection District) firetruck, screaming at campers,” Skidgel said. They couldn’t understand what the firefighter was saying, Skidgel added. Deputies arrived on scene and took Wood into custody. Deputies reported that Wood had rolled his personal car earlier within the Three Rivers area, which is between the confluence of the Metolius and Deschutes rivers. Wood was due to work a shift at the fire district, Skidgel said. He went to the station and took a firetruck. See Volunteer / C5


C2 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

‘TWI-HARDS’ ASSEMBLE

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

The Bend branch of the Boys & Girls Club will extend its summer session by one week, according to a news release from the organization. The branch, which has seen a jump in its enrollment for the summer session, will extend the program through Sept. 3. It has instituted a waiting list to deal with high attendance rates. Currently, more than 540 students are enrolled in the Boys & Girls clubs in Bend, Redmond and Terrebonne. The summer session, which began Monday, aims to promote character and leadership development through events and programs for kids in the community. The program is accepting donations of money and supplies for the summer months. For more information about the club, or to donate, visit www. bgcco.org.

Today is Tuesday, June 22, the 173rd day of 2010. There are 192 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 22, 1940, during World War II, Adolf Hitler gained a stunning victory as France signed an armistice eight days after German forces overran Paris.

Matt Sayles / The Associated Press

Katherine Ramirez, 14, of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., reads while camping out Monday in Nokia Plaza in Los Angeles ahead of the “Twilight Saga: Eclipse� world premiere on Thursday. The film opens everywhere Wednesday, June 30.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Redmond Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:25 p.m. June 18, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A purse was reported stolen from a vehicle at 3:21 p.m. June 18, in the 700 block of Northwest Fifth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:20 p.m. June 18, in the 800 block of Southwest Deschutes Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief to a fence was reported at 12:54 p.m. June 18, in the 1100 block of Northwest 22nd Place. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 10:51 a.m. June 18, in the 500 block of Southwest Fourth Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and recovered at 10:10 a.m. June 18, in the 400 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:33 a.m. June 18, in the 1900 block of Northwest Elm Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:39 a.m. June 18, in the area of Northwest 19th Street and Northwest Cedar Avenue. Theft — A hammock was reported stolen at 8:44 p.m. June 19, in the 2800 block of Southwest Indian Avenue. Theft — A purse was reported stolen at 8:18 p.m. June 19, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:48 p.m. June 19, in the 100 block of Southeast Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:05 p.m. June 19, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A game system and games were reported stolen at 3:17 p.m. June 19, in the 2800 block of Southwest Quartz Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:39 a.m. June 19, in the 2500 block of Southwest Xero Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:43 p.m. June 20, in the area of Southwest 31st Street and Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:39 a.m. June 17, in the area of North Main Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:28 a.m. June 17, in the area of Northeast Seventh Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:07 p.m. June 17, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Robert Joseph McCool, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:11 p.m. June 18, in the area of Erickson and Neff roads in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:27 p.m. June 18, in the 8100 block of 11th Street in Terrebonne. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:18 p.m. June 18, in the 6700 block of Southwest Quarry Avenue in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:48 a.m. June 18, in the

55300 block of Gross Drive in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:21 a.m. June 18, in the 19800 block of Eighth Street in Tumalo. DUII — Angela Kate Nixon, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:40 a.m. June 18, in the area of Northwest Nashville Avenue and Northwest Columbia Street in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:20 p.m. June 19, in the area of Burgess and Dorrance Meadow roads in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:03 p.m. June 19, in the 51400 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. DUII — Christopher John Surgeon, 49, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:53 p.m. June 19, in the area of Northwest Revere Avenue and Northwest Wall Street in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:33 p.m. June 20, in the 56200 block of Black Duck Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:06 p.m. June 20, in the 17000 block of Whitney Road in La Pine. Theft — A purse was reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:08 a.m. June 20, in the 62600 block of Bunchgrass Place in Bend. DUII — Melissa Anne Leahy, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:10 a.m. June 20, in the area of Cooley Road and North U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Unauthorized use — An attempted carjacking was reported at 5:50 p.m. June 14, in the area of Haystack Reservoir. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 7:48 p.m. June 14, in the 1000 block of Southwest Belmont Lane in Madras. Burglary — A burglary was reported June 15, in the 16300 block of Southwest Quail Road in Crooked River Ranch. DUII — Thomas Walsh, 61, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:59 p.m. June 15, in the area of U.S. Highway 26 near milepost 107. Theft — A wallet, iPod and cell phone were reported stolen from a vehicle June 18, in the area of Lower Deschutes Day Use area at The Cove Palisades State Park. Theft — Two 1200 gallon water

tanks were reported stolen at 2:44 p.m. June 19, in Three Rivers. Theft — Armor, swords, shields and books were reported stolen June 20, in the Culver City Park. Oregon State Police

DUII — Christopher Lee Graves, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6 p.m. June 18, in the area of State Highway 126 near milepost 108. DUII — Jessica J. Post-Goldblum, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:05 a.m. June 19, in the area of Industrial Way and Colorado Avenue.

BEND FIRE RUNS Thursday 8:54 a.m. — Natural vegetation fire, adjacent to Charleswood Lane. 22 — Medical aid calls. Friday 4:26 p.m. — Confined cooking fire, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive. 21— Medical aid calls. Saturday 10:39 a.m. — Unauthorized burning, 19238 Baker Road. 6:03 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 19600 Brookswood Blvd. 9 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 1:16 p.m. — Confined cooking fire, 144 S.E. Dorrie Ct. 9 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the Website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the Website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s Website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Boxer – Labrador Retriever mix — Adult male, black and white; found near Foot Hill Loop South in Sisters. Boxer — Adult male, brown and white; found near Foot Hill Loop South in Sisters. Domestic short-haired cat — Adult female, calico; found in the 1000 block of Southwest Cascade Avenue.

TEN YEARS AGO The state of Texas executed Gary Graham for the 1981 killing of a man in a holdup outside a Houston supermarket; Graham insisted to the end that he was innocent. Independent Counsel Robert Ray ended his investigation of the 1993 firings in the White House travel office, issuing no indictments but saying he’d found “substantial evidence� that First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton played a role in the dismissals. FIVE YEARS AGO White House adviser Karl Rove set off a political firestorm with a speech to the New York state Conservative Party in which he said, “Liberals saw the savagery of the 9/11 attacks and wanted to prepare indictments and offer therapy and understand-

T O D AY I N HISTORY ing for our attackers� while conservatives, he said, “saw the savagery of 9/11 and the attacks and prepared for war.� Federal drug agents launched a wideranging crackdown on medical marijuana providers in northern California. ONE YEAR AGO Nine people were killed when a Washington D.C. commuter train crashed into the rear of another during afternoon rush hour. President Barack Obama signed the nation’s toughest anti-smoking law, aiming to keep thousands of teens from getting hooked. Chris Brown pleaded guilty to felony assault of ex-girlfriend Rihanna (he was later sentenced to probation and community labor). Lucas Glover won the U.S. Open at Bethpage Black. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Ralph Waite is 82. Singer-actor Kris Kristofferson is 74. Movie director John Korty (“The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman�) is 74. Actor Michael Lerner is 69. Broadcast journalist Brit Hume is 67. Singer Peter Asher (Peter and Gordon) is 66. Actor Andrew Rubin is 64. Actor David L. Lander is 63. Singer Howard “Eddie� Kaylan is 63. Singer-musician Todd Rundgren is 62. Actress Meryl Streep is 61. Actress Lindsay Wagner is 61. Singer Alan Osmond is 61. Actor Murphy Cross is 60. Actor Graham Greene is 58. Pop singer Cyndi Lauper is 57. Actor Chris Lemmon is 56. Rock musician Derek Forbes is 54. Actor Tim Russ is 54. Rock musician Garry Beers (INXS) is 53. Actorproducer-writer Bruce Campbell is 52. Rock musician Alan Anton (Cowboy Junkies) is 51. Actress Tracy Pollan is 50. Rock singer-musician Jimmy Somerville is 49. Author Dan Brown is 46. Rock singer-musician Mike Edwards (Jesus Jones) is 46. Actress Amy Brenneman is 46. Rock singer Steven Page is 40. Actress Mary Lynn Rajskub is 39. TV personality Carson Daly is 37. Rock musician Chris Traynor is 37. Country musician Jimmy Wallace is 37. Actor Donald Faison is 36. Actress Alicia Goranson is 36. TV personality/actor Jai Rodriguez is 31. Actress Lindsay Ridgeway is 25. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Study men, not historians.� — President Harry S. Truman (1884-1972)

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Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:44 a.m. June 18, in the 500 block of Northwest Wall Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:52 a.m. June 18, in the area of Northwest Franklin and Northwest Broadway avenues. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and tattoo equipment stolen at 1:53 p.m. June 18, in the 800 block of Northeast Watt Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:04 p.m. June 18, in the 61300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — Golf clubs were reported stolen at 4:59 p.m. June 18, in the 20400 block of Whistle Punk Road. DUII — Yod Q. Branch, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:43 a.m. June 19, in the area of Northwest Oregon Avenue and Northwest Wall Street. DUII — Jacob Matthew Bedlion, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:38 a.m. June 19, in the area of Northwest Greenwood Avenue and Northwest Wall Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:47 a.m. June 19, in the 1200 block of Southeast Third Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:25 a.m. June 19, in the 700 block of Northeast First Street. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:38 a.m. June 19, in the 1800 block of Northeast Carson Way. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 12:19 p.m. June 19, in the 2500 block of Northeast Twin Knolls Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:46 p.m. June 19, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 1:06 a.m. June 20, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. DUII — Joseph Kim, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:26 a.m. June 20, in the 800 block of Southeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:30 a.m. June 20, in the 700 block of Northwest Columbia Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:38 a.m. June 20, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:43 a.m. June 20, in the 3000 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:49 a.m. June 20, in the 600 block of Northwest Drake Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and tools and GPS stolen at 9:35 a.m. June 20, in the 1600 block of Northeast Heavenly Drive. Burglary — Cash and checks were reported stolen at 9:56 a.m. June 20, in the 900 block of Southeast Armour Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1 p.m. June 20, in the 20500 block of Painters Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:02 p.m. June 20, in the 100 block of Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Theft — Climbing gear and power tools were reported stolen at 1:22 p.m. June 20, in the 1300 block of Southeast Wilson Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was

reported entered and wallet and GPS stolen at 1:54 p.m. June 20, in the 300 block of Southeast Fifth Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 3:26 p.m. June 20, in the 600 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:29 p.m. June 20, in the 60800 block of Country Club Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:01 p.m. June 20, in the 3000 block of Northwest Craftsman Drive Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:25 p.m. June 20, in the 600 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive.

ON THIS DATE In 1807, a British frigate, the HMS Leopard, attacked and boarded the American ship USS Chesapeake off the Virginia coast in search of Royal Navy deserters. In 1870, the United States Department of Justice was created. In 1911, Britain’s King George V was crowned at Westminster Abbey. In 1941, Germany invaded the Soviet Union during World War II. In 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the “GI Bill of Rights.� In 1945, the World War II battle for Okinawa ended with an Allied victory. In 1969, singer-actress Judy Garland died in London at age 47. In 1970, President Richard Nixon signed an extension of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The extended act lowered the minimum voting age to 18. In 1977, John N. Mitchell became the first former U.S. Attorney General to go to prison as he began serving a sentence for his role in the Watergate cover-up. (He was released 19 months later.) In 1993, former first lady Pat Nixon died in Park Ridge, N.J. at age 81.

BIRDBATHS  FREE ESTIMATES

A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held July 13 to celebrate the accreditation of MountainStar Family Relief Nursery by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, according to a news release. The ceremony, which will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. at the nursery facility at 2125 N.E Daggett Lane, is open to the public. Currently the only accredited early childhood program in the area, the nursery provides crisis intervention and therapeutic classrooms for at-risk children in the community. The association measured the nursery’s programs and services against official program standards and certified that the nursery met all the requirements for a high-quality children’s program. For more information about the nursery and its programs, visit http://mountainstarfamily. org/.

The Associated Press

POTTERY

Boys & Girls extend summer session



MountainStar plans accreditation event

Minimum voting age lowered to 18 in 1970

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 C3

O Agencies critical of Columbia fuel barge response Ranchers charged with arson and threats The Associated Press

PORTLAND — State and federal response officials said they should have been notified earlier after a fuel barge became grounded in the Columbia River last year, according to documents released by the Coast Guard. No fuel spilled after the New Dawn, owned and piloted by Tidewater Barge Lines of Vancouver, Wash., ran aground on an uncharted mud shoal near the Hood River shortly after 3 a.m. on July 9, 2009. But spill response officials from Washington, Oregon and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said in a debriefing weeks later that they should have been told sooner and that the response should have been more aggressive. Documents compiled from the debriefing were released after the Coast Guard completed its accident investigation. “We have a protocol with the Coast

“We have a protocol with the Coast Guard that vessel incidents that present a potential for spill should be treated the same as an actual spill, and that didn’t happen in this case.” — Ron Holcomb, Washington Department of Ecology

Guard that vessel incidents that present a potential for spill should be treated the same as an actual spill, and that didn’t happen in this case,” Ron Holcomb, a spill responder with the Washington Department of Ecology, told The Oregonian in a recent interview. The Coast Guard and Tidewater, citing the soft river bottom and the barge’s double hull, judged spill risk as very low and treated the grounding as a simple “salvage operation.” “We don’t see a barge soft aground,” Holcomb said. “We see a million gallons of gasoline in a place

where it’s not supposed to be.” The 1,500-foot safety zone established around the 282-foot barge would have been too small if a leak occurred, the spill response agencies said in the debriefing. The agencies were late to establish a unified command center, so Tidewater assumed the “primary leadership role” and set up the command center in Vancouver rather than near the accident site. And there was “limited coordination between agencies on response and management issues,” the documents said. The documents underscore the

complexity of spill response on the Columbia, which relies on multiple federal and state agencies as well as local officials. Officials from Tidewater and the Coast Guard have since agreed to notify the spill response agencies even if there’s only potential for a spill, Tidewater officials and regulators said. “Going forward, if there’s a fuel barge grounding, the expectation is that immediately, in addition to a salvage component, there has to be a spill prevention component,” said John Pigott, assistant to Tidewater’s president. Richard Franklin, the EPA’s Portland-based spill response coordinator, said the agency regularly drills with barge companies, the Coast Guard and spill responders. The Coast Guard has already notified EPA more quickly in subsequent incidents in the Columbia and off the coast, he said.

SPOOKING THE HERD

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Scores of sheep flock together and head in the same direction after they are spooked by a nearby crop-dusting helicopter at a farm on Sauvies Island in Portland on Friday.

Audit: Errors fill Milwaukie utility bills The Associated Press MILWAUKIE — An audit has shown that city utility bills in the Portland suburb of Milwaukie have been riddled with errors for at least the past three years. The internal audit examined all of Milwaukie’s 628 commer-

cial and multi-unit residential accounts. It concluded that 20 percent of the city’s utility customers since 2007 have been undercharged or overcharged. Among the 128 commercial accounts that were billed incorrectly, the audit found total under-

charges of more than $345,000 and total overcharges of about $37,000. Milwaukie Mayor Jeremy Ferguson said the city will work with its utility customers to fix the mistakes and restore confidence in the system.

O  B Groups argue against more forest logging PORTLAND — Fishing and conservation groups want the Oregon Board of Forestry to reconsider its decision to increase logging on two state forests in the northwestern corner of the state. The groups filed a formal petition Monday arguing that the board ignored an analysis by state scientists that found increasing clearcutting on the Clatsop and Tillamook state forests over the next 20 years would be bad for salmon. Bob Van Dyk of the Wild Salmon Center says watersheds on the two forests are home to some of the strongest salmon runs in the state and need to be protected.

Mother of abandoned baby allegedly abused PORTLAND — An attorney for a woman who pleaded guilty to abandoning her dead infant in a trash can 20 years ago says her client was sexually victimized as a teenager. Stacey Quintero faces up to

20 months in prison when she is sentenced Aug. 9 in Salem. Quintero pleaded guilty Friday to one count each of negligent homicide and concealing the birth of an infant. Salem attorney Jon Weiner said today that Quintero was 15 when she was impregnated by a 25-year-old man. The infant died soon after birth in April 1990. Last year, detectives linked Quintero to the death through DNA evidence.

Restaurant owner shot after stabbing wife HILLSBORO — A couple killed at a Hillsboro restaurant last week have been identified as the owners. Police said 46-year-old Jocelyn Pabingwit was found by an officer behind a counter bleeding from stab wounds before her 51-year-old husband, Diosdado Pabingwit, came at the officer with a bloody knife and was shot when he refused to drop it. The couple lived in Hillsboro and owned JP Cuisine, the restaurant where the incident oc-

curred last Thursday. Police believe it was a case of domestic violence but are continuing to investigate.

Sergeant charged in motorcycle thefts PORTLAND — An Oregon Air National Guard senior master sergeant has been charged with stealing three motorcycles from the military and selling them on Craigslist. Federal prosecutors said Monday that 33-year-old Adam Monticelli of Vancouver, Wash., was indicted on three counts of theft of government property. The federal grand jury indictment alleges Monticelli stole three Suzuki motorcycles that were property of the Department of Air Force, 125th Special Tactics Squadron, Oregon Air National Guard, where he was assigned on active duty. Theft of government property carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Trial was set for Aug. 24 in U.S. District Court in Portland. — From wire reports

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

Father and son responsible for wildfires dating back to 1982, federal officials say By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — Two Oregon ranchers, a father and son described by friends as “the salt of the earth,” have been indicted on charges they set a series of range fires going back to the early 1980s because they were frustrated with the time it took for the government to permit controlled burns to improve cattle grazing. The 19-count federal indictment released Monday charges Dwight L. Hammond Jr., 68, and his son, Steven D. Hammond, 41, with setting at least eight late-summer fires on federal lands on the flanks of Steens Mountain since 1982. Most fires were under 250 acres, but one in 2006, called the Granddad, was 46,000 acres. The Hammonds, who run a large cattle ranch, were not taken into custody. Arraignment was set for July 6 in U.S. District Court in Eugene on charges that include conspiracy, arson, depredation of federal property, threatening federal officers and tampering with a witness. The charges carry penalties up to 20 years in prison and $250,000 in fines. The family ranch, on private and leased federal lands, is in the remote rural community of Diamond in Harney County, where cattle outnumber people and ranchers have long been at odds with conservationists over grazing on public lands. The investigation started in August 2006, after a U.S. Bureau of Land Management firefighter spotted Dwight Hammond in an area on Steens Mountain where fires started, Assistant U.S. Attorney Kirk Engdall said. The indictment mentions physical evidence that includes a boot print and a tire track from a military-style Jeep. The men were arrested in 2006 by local authorities but never formally charged, Engdall said. As the investigation continued last August, the indictment alleges the Hammonds threatened a BLM rangeland manger in Burns, Joe Glascock, that they would put the blame for the biggest of the fires on him if he did not make the problem “go away.” “We understand the need for prescribed burns,” which can improve the quality of grazing in sagebrush country when done with proper precautions, Engdall said from Eugene. “Wildland fires, however, are extremely dangerous when they are uncontrolled and have the potential to cause great harm to the rangeland. Anyone that is potentially setting fires without first making preparations that the fires will be controlled puts everyone at risk. Our hope with the prosecution of this case is, one, to bring that to the attention of the general public, and two, to bring accountability for the alleged wrongful acts of the Hammonds.”


C4 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

The OLCC needs a house-cleaning

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fter investigating the Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s Bend office last year, the state Department of Justice issued a highly unflattering report. The DOJ found,

among other things, that local decision-making “appeared abrupt and punitive in nature or over-zealous.” The then-regional manager, meanwhile, engaged in behavior “that is not acceptable nor even consistent with OLCC policy guidance.” None of this was news to local licensees. But OLCC Executive Director Steve Pharo sure seemed surprised that such problems existed in his agency. After all, he wrote in his response to the audit, the “OLCC is charged with supporting economic viability for Oregonians. Business people applying for new or renewed licenses often have their livelihoods at stake.” That’s the OLCC’s public position, anyway. But privately, the OLCC doesn’t seem to care about business people whose livelihoods hinge upon the timely processing of license applications. So suggests a 2009 internal audit of the OLCC’s licensing function. (That audit, by the way, was released just weeks before Bend officials sent a letter to Gov. Ted Kulongoski complaining about the regional office’s hostility to local licensees.) According to the audit, the OLCC’s Portland regional office — one of five such offices statewide — had a backlog of 415 license applications as of April 1, 2009. New license applications took more than three times as long to process in Portland than they did in Bend and a whopping 20 times as long as in Salem. One application was still open after 18 months. You’d think such dismal performance would have shocked agency officials into action. After all, livelihoods were at stake. But, no. In fact, officials in the Portland office weren’t even interested in gauging their office’s performance. Managers had tools at their disposal to monitor the license process, according to the audit, but they simply chose not to use them. One of these is known as the Annual Pending Application Audit, but the official who oversees the Portland office said he didn’t even look at the 2008 edition “because he was busy with other things.” As a result, “no one in Portland has been held accountable for ensuring that licenses are investigated and issued in a timely manner.” Maybe they didn’t get Pharo’s protecting-livelihoods memo. Ignoring the applications-pending audit, however, was far from the only accountability problem in the Portland office. Another was simple absence of supervision. In theory, the agency’s licensing servicing manager supervised the Portland office’s license investigators. But in reality, he “does not assign cases or monitor the case load of investigators,” who “are self-managed and can select their own cases from the queue of backlogged applications.” No wonder the Portland office was the only one with an application backlog. Why in the world would supervisors allow inspectors in a barely functional office to manage themselves? The auditor of the 2009 report asked

According to the audit, the OLCC’s Portland regional office ... had a backlog of 415 license applications as of April 1, 2009. New license applications took more than three times as long to process in Portland than they did in Bend and a whopping 20 times as long as in Salem. One application was still open after 18 months. You’d think such dismal performance would have shocked agency officials into action. After all, livelihoods were at stake. But, no. this very question, according to a Sunday Bulletin story by reporter Nick Budnick. Licensing Manager Dan McNeal told the auditor that they “used to do this but stopped a year ago because there was a near revolt with the investigators.... The investigators did not like having someone give them assignments or have them report weekly to.” In other words, the OLCC failed miserably to do its job because its employees persuaded their managers to quit managing them. The 2009 audit — titled “Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s Licensing Function Lacks Accountability and Effective Oversight” — confirms many unflattering government stereotypes. The agency is ineffective and inefficient. Worse, its managers come across as uninterested in discovering, much less correcting, glaring problems. And, really, should a public agency of the OLCC’s stature need an auditor to suggest that inspectors from other field offices pitch in to reduce the Portland backlog? The Legislature will be under incredible pressure next year to cut costs and increase efficiency. It cannot ignore the OLCC. Allowing the agency to stumble along as if the past couple of years hadn’t happened would be, in effect, to condone the agency’s mismanagement. Sending this message would be particularly damaging, as the OLCC embodies the sort of selfserving arrogance that an increasingly angry public suspects may be widespread in state government. At the very least, a thorough housecleaning is in order. The OLCC must be staffed by people who recognize without being told that their actions — and their inaction — affect people’s livelihoods and the state’s economy.

My Nickel’s Worth Don’t criticize teacher

Helping kids

Cartoon Constitution

Janet Schloesser (“Zinn history book spreads anti-American distortions,” June 8) may feel she is doing the community a favor by publicly criticizing her daughter’s history teacher. I am only reminded of the mind-deadening history class I experienced in high school and what a breath of fresh air I felt entering college where we were asked to think, to question, to explore; where we did not accept the status quo, but dug deep for answers to complicated and troubling questions. In an honors class, minds should be stimulated to do the same. I applaud this teacher who knows, no doubt, that if we do not understand, have never questioned history, we are bound to repeat it. And repeat it we have. Time and time again we ignore the lessons of the past and charge forward in arrogance and ignorance. I am reminded of a song by Melvina Reynolds. “Any idea that we do not comprehend we’ll put the handcuffs on and that will be the end. And anything that grows, we’ll cover in cement.… And any problem that you meet, you’ll roll it in barbed wire, and get it off the street.” We seem to be in an atmosphere of trying to repress ideas, go back to where it is “safe.” The students I know who cherish this history teacher are deep-thinking, positive, civic-minded students. They are interested not merely in “what’s in it for them” but in “what they can do for others.” She must be doing something right. Thiel Larson Bend

My skin crawls when I see articles about adults abusing young children. As a parent and a retired teacher, my template for parent/child relationships is that parents should be loving, attentive, empathetic and nurturing. I wish it were always true. As a classroom volunteer and board member at MountainStar Family Relief Nursery, I can tell you there are young children in our community that need our help. MountainStar is a local program that steps up to the challenge of keeping children safe, parents successful and families together. We all know having young children can be stressful. I can’t imagine also dealing with risk factors facing families today — poverty, unemployment, history of family violence, substance abuse or health issues. The first point of contact for a family with a child under 5 that contacts MountainStar for help is the Safety Net program. The staff makes a home visit to assess the safety of the environment and relationship between the parent and child, offer parenting instruction and child development tools, and connect families to community services. There is ongoing support for families, including respite classes for children. Enrollment is currently 138 children with 90 on the waiting list for more intensive services such as the therapeutic classroom. Kathrine Edwards and Robyn Melton-Lopez, the Safety Net coordinators at MountainStar, deserve our acknowledgement and appreciation for doing a very difficult job. Karen Cox Bend

If it were just a comic strip propagating a false understanding of a current issue, I suppose it would be harmless. But a recent “Non Sequitur” cartoon reflects a misconception that I’ve heard expressed by a number of “serious” pundits and columnists. A man asks, “Would you like to sign our petition to return to the ORIGINAL Constitution?” The woman answers, “OK, but how about this time we make it legal for black people to own white people, and only women have the right to vote?” But the issue is not whether the Constitution should ever change. It’s whether or not the changes need to be made following the procedures set forth in the Constitution itself. Corollary to this issue are these questions: Should judges cross the line from interpreting law to making law, and just where is that line? I have never encountered anyone who advocated repealing all the amendments to our Constitution. Those who call for strict adherence to the Constitution recognize the validity of the 27 amendments, including the ones that abolished slavery and enfranchised women and non-landholders. Politicians and journalists who mischaracterize the nature of this debate over the Constitution seem to be intelligent and well-informed people, so my conclusion is that the deceptiveness is deliberate. I’ll try to give the author of the “Non Sequitur” comic strip the benefit of the doubt. Marshall McBride Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Geothermal project creates earthquake risks, uses too much water By Robert Fouse Bulletin guest columnist

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ltaRock Energy was forced to shut down its enhanced geothermal project in California because the so-called “tiny earthquakes” were not as tiny as its engineers had envisioned. AltaRock explained that it goofed down at the geysers project by drilling its test well into a fault line. Another of the projects was shut down in Switzerland because of damage to a small town. Goofing up like this is not a good sign. We are told that everything here will be fine, not to worry. I would like to remind everyone that we live in a geologically active area. South Sister still has a growing bulge. That means something. Is the magma rising? I am not a geologist, so I can’t say that with any degree of professionalism. I do remember from the study of earth science that when magma moves, deformities appear in the earth’s

crust. At any rate, something is happening under South Sister. Could these maybe-not-so-tiny, tiny earthquakes disturb things in our area to the point that the bulge becomes something more, or maybe becomes “all it can be?” When AltaRock first drilled, it did not find the hot water that was needed to power a geothermal plant. It did find hot rocks. So now the company wants to start cracking the rocks to see if it can produce enough steam to power a plant with injected water. The company is going to do this right up close to Newberry Crater. I don’t think that is a good idea. What if the “tiny earthquakes” cracked the rocks in such a fashion that the East Lake and Paulina Lake became the water source necessary for the operation of the future plant? AltaRock is going to use the wastewater from the La Pine sewer plant to inject and fracture the hot rocks. A short distance away will be a return well to

IN MY VIEW measure the amount and temperature of the returned steam. So, I suppose great flatulence will spread over Sunriver and south Bend. Worse yet is the fact that we already have nitrate issues in the south county. Will the injection of the wastewater exacerbate that issue? I am glad I live in north Bend. I will assume that all goes as planned. The wastewater is pumped into the hole. Great flatulence spreads over the south county, the earthquakes are tiny and the demonstration project is a success. Good on them. I will assume things don’t go so well. The “tiny earthquakes” aren’t so tiny and the project triggers something we are not prepared for. The South Sister bulge accelerates and becomes all it can be. East Lake and Paulina Lake start to drain into the tiny cracks. I really don’t want to

think about the worst, waking the sleeping Newberry Volcano. Bad on them. I like my first assumption better and maybe you do, too. There is one thing that keeps bothering me about this project. You understand that if the demonstration project is a success, the next thing AltaRock and Davenport Power will want to do is install a power plant out there, requiring more infrastructure, lines, substation towers and so forth. The plant will also require our most precious resource, water. Just a short time back we told Duke Energy it could not build a gas-fired plant out toward Gray Butte because we could not supply it with the 30 million gallons of water every day that it needed for the operation. Can anyone tell me where the water is going to come from to operate this enhanced geothermal project after the “tiny earthquakes?” These kinds of projects get started and funded without anyone taking a

serious look at the end product. We, the folks in Central Oregon, cannot afford — nor should we support — this project any further, no matter whether or not you think it is a “green power” project. It would be one thing if the project were being built to supply our own power, but that’s not the case. The power would be trans-shipped and sold off to maybe California, Nevada or elsewhere. Is that what we want to spend our water for? AltaRock and Davenport Energy should return the $21.5 million of your and my money to the stimulus program and go play someplace else where water is not such a precious resource. BLM should say not only no, but hell no. Where is our leadership? I think projects such as this are worthy of our county commissioners’ attention, much more than building a 19th Street or Keith Cyrus getting his resort. Robert Fouse lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 C5

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N   Doris Dedlow, of Bend April 8, 1925 - June 15, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A memorial service will be held on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 at 2 p.m. at the United Methodist Church, Bend. There will be a reception in the Fellowship Hall downstairs following the service.

Emery R. Miller, of Eugene, OR Oct. 24, 1945 - June 19, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private memorial gathering will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Gloria Jean Scavinsky, of Redmond July 3, 1940 - June 15, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfuneral.net Services: Celebration of Life, at 2:30pm, Tues., August 3, 2010, St. Thomas Catholic Church, 1720 NW 19th, Redmond, OR

Marianna Marie Duncan, of Redmond March 15, 1941 - June 20, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: 1:00 pm, Friday, at Highland Baptist Church, 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond, followed by 2:30 pm, graveside at Redmond Memorial Cemetery, 3545 S. Canal Blvd., Redmond.

Patricia Beth Smith, of Sisters March 9, 1930 - June 16, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 Services: Memorial services will be held at a later date.

Robert Milton Blanks, of Bend Feb. 21, 1917 - June 5, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private urn placement at Acacia Memorial Park in Seattle, WA, at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Emiley Corchran Puckett

NASCAR legend Parks dies at 96

Aug. 18, 1913 - June 17, 2010 Emiley Corchran Puckett died peacefully on June 17, 2010, in her apartment at Bend Villa Court. Emiley was born August 18, 1913, in the township of Medford, Minnesota to Charles Corchran and Jessie (Lee) Corchran. After graduating high school in Medford, she worked in the medical field, starting at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and later in Newport, California. She moved to Bend in 1980, to be with her sister. She married Walter (Skee) Puckett in Waukon, Iowa on June 29, 1940. She was predeceased by her parents, four brothers, one sister and her husband. Emiley was an active member of United Methodist Church Rice circle and always participated in making crafts for their annual Christmas bazaar. She had a great love for underprivileged children and supported charities for them. In the past, Emiley served on the board of the Salvation Army in Bend. She enjoyed her family and her many friends. Emiley was blessed to have caregivers that not only gave her great care but loved her dearly. She was an avid Seattle Mariners fan and it was not wise to call her during a game. Emiley had a zest for life and enjoyed visiting with young and old alike. A celebration of Emiley’s life will be held at Bend Villa Court, on Thursday, June 24, 2010, at 2:00 pm, with Pastor Thom Larson officiating. Autumn Funerals is in charge of arrangements.

Volunteer Continued from C1 He drove to the gated entrance of the Three Rivers community, but didn’t stop at the closed barrier. “He decided to go through it,” Skidgel said. Wood then drove to the Lower Deschutes Campground, located on the shores of Lake Billy Chinook in Cove Palisades State Park. Manager Dave Slaght, who lives in the park, woke up to a siren about 5:30 a.m., he said. But didn’t think too much of it. However, 45 minutes later the volunteer park host called him to report a disturbance — an intoxicated man driving around a campground in a fire engine. “Sure enough, there was the fire engine, there was the guy,” Slaght said. The driver had stopped by the time Slaght got there, and was yelling at the campers and park host. There are about 100 campsites at the Lower Deschutes Campground, Slaght said, and about 60 sites worth of people were gath-

still dry and business remained good for Parks, who eventually oversaw a fleet of cars running liquor without having paid federal taxes. But he could not outrun the authorities forever, and he served a nine-month federal prison term in the mid-1930s.

By Richard Goldstein New York Times News Service

Raymond Parks, who got to know fast cars while transporting moonshine along Georgia’s back roads and went on to become a pioneering figure in NASCAR as the owner of its first championship team, died Sunday at his home in Atlanta. He was 96. His death was announced by NASCAR. In December 1947, Parks was among some three dozen racing figures who gathered at the Streamline Hotel in Daytona Beach, Fla., to create the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing under the direction of the driver and race promoter Bill France Sr. Parks was the last survivor of that group, whose groundwork turned a loosely organized Southern sport run on dirt tracks into a national sports spectacle and a marketing powerhouse. Parks’ driver, Red Byron, backed by crew chief Red Vogt, captured the championship of NASCAR’s first series: the 1948 events for “modified” cars, models built before World War II and extensively altered for racing. NASCAR’s modern championship series, now called the Sprint Cup, got under way in 1949 when it turned to “strictly stock” autos, models built after the war that more closely resembled those that people could buy from a showroom, having been altered only modestly for speed. Byron, who overcame severe leg wounds sustained while a tail gunner in World War II, won the ‘49 series, driving an Oldsmobile for Parks. Whatever his rough-hewn past in illegal liquor, Parks pre-

Sponsored races

Jeff Siner / The Charlotte Observer

NASCAR legend Raymond Parks looks out over the fans walking along the track at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla., in February 2009. sented a classy aura. He attended races in a woolen suit and a fedora, and he insisted that dents in his cars be repaired before they raced again.

Started out as a booze runner But he did not make much money in NASCAR’s fledgling years. The 1949 championship prize was $5,800. Raymond Dawson Parks was

“Obviously Mr. Wood Wood had been with the volunteer Three Rivers Fire Protecwas not authorized to tion District since March 2009, be in the fire station in said Don Colfels, the district fire an intoxicated state, let chief, and had not caused problems before. alone steal a vehicle.... It was a complete Zero tolerance surprise to me.” “Quite frankly I was absolutely — Don Colfels, district chief, Three Rivers Fire Protection District ered around, upset. “I’ve never seen a campground that alive, that early in the morning,” he said. Witnesses said they heard Wood yelling at someone, Skidgel said, telling them to back off, and possibly getting into a fight.

Investigation The Sheriff’s Office is still investigating the incident, he said, and anyone with additional information, or who came into contact with Wood on Saturday night or Sunday morning is asked to call the Sheriff’s Office at 541-4756520 or 541-475-2201.

floored,” Colfels said of Sunday’s incident, “because he would be one of the last people I would consider to have that type of behavior.” The district has a “zero tolerance” policy for alcohol and drug use, he said, and Wood is no longer with the district. “Obviously Mr. Wood was not authorized to be in the fire station in an intoxicated state, let alone steal a vehicle,” Colfels said. The truck was the type used to fight wildland fires. Wood had worked on Saturday as well, Colfels said. He noted that Wood sometimes helped train other volunteers. “It was a complete surprise to me,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

born in Dawnsonville, Ga., on June 5, 1914, the oldest of 16 children. As a youngster, he was caught buying Prohibitionera corn whiskey for his father and spent three months in jail. He left home at 14 to work at a still near Atlanta and later went into business for himself, bringing liquor from Dawsonville to Atlanta restaurants, hoping his cars could elude the police. Although Prohibition ended in 1933, parts of the South were

Parks began sponsoring race cars in the late 1930s, fought in the Battle of the Bulge during World War II, then returned to the racing scene. He left auto racing in the mid-1950s and pursued real estate ventures, owned liquor and convenience stores and gas stations in Atlanta, and supplied bars with jukeboxes and cigarette and pinball machines. Parks is survived by his wife, Violet; his brothers, Virgil, John and Walter; his sisters, Lucile, Aileen, Louise, Mary, Corene, Lorene, Genevieve, Gertie, Sally and Betty; three grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and five great-great grandchildren. Parks’ name may have faded from memory, but in his later years, he was befriended by NASCAR figures like Dale Earnhardt and Richard Petty. He was sitting in Earnhardt’s box when Earnhardt was killed driving in the 2001 Daytona 500. By then, NASCAR was a multimillion-dollar enterprise, a world apart from its hardscrabble days. As recounted by Neal Thompson in “Driving With the Devil” (2006), a history of NASCAR’s roots, Parks told a friend back in the late 1940s how to make a small fortune: “You take a huge fortune, and then you go racing.”

Russian mathematician dies at 72 Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — Vladimir Arnold, a Russian mathematician who pioneered work on the arcane field known as catastrophe theory and whose work on the KAM theory led to a better understanding of the motion of planets in the solar system and a host of other applications, died of peritonitis in Paris on June 3. He was 72. He was highly honored, receiving the Crafoord Prize in 1982, the Shaw Prize in 2008, and the Wolf Prize, which some consider the mathemat-

ics equivalent of a Nobel, in 2001. He should have received the equally prestigious Fields Medal in 1974, but the Soviet government refused to let him accept it. Vladimir Igorevich Arnold was born June 12, 1937, in Odessa in what is now Ukraine to a family of several generations of scientists.

DESCHUTES MEMORIAL CHAPEL & GARDENS Where Every Life is Celebrated Visit our website to view obituaries and leave condolence messages www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com Mike Garcia, Funeral Director

541-382-5592 63875 N. Highway 97 • P.O. Box 5992 • Bend

Locally Owned and Operated by the Daniel Family

Gas Tax Continued from C1 Romain hopes to combine the two cases on appeal, a move he said would save money. In Cornelius, two station owners have also filed to put an initiative on the next ballot. If approved, the initiative would repeal the Cornelius tax once a scheduled 6-cent increase to the state’s gas tax goes into effect in 2011. No such initiative has been filed in Sisters, Romain said.

Housing Continued from C1 He also declined to discuss most other aspects of his work with the tribal government. A spokesman for the Housing and Urban and Development Department’s Office of Inspector General would not confirm that Potter spoke with OIG officials. “We can neither confirm nor deny the existence of an investigation,” said Office of Inspec-

“They wanted to have a double-barrel thing,” Romain said of his Cornelius clients. Even before winning the case in Deschutes court, Sisters began collecting the tax from local stations. So far, the city has collected about $7,000 from the five stations in Sisters. Over a full year, Sisters expects to collect about $126,000 to put toward road maintenance and snow removal. Romain maintains that if the city eventually loses the case, it will have to refund all the tax revenues. City Manager Eileen

Stein disagrees and said the city will continue collecting the tax. Once Romain files an appeal, the Sisters City Council will have to decide whether or not to continue with the fight, Stein said. The city is confident that it will again prevail. “I believe that’s the council’s intent,” Stein said. “I haven’t gotten any indication otherwise. We’ve prevailed already, so why wouldn’t we keep going?”

tor General spokesman Michael Zerega. The 2009 HUD audit found that 91 percent of housing authority rental units had health and safety violations, including no working smoke detector in 63 percent of the rental units, poor-quality work such as unsafe water heater installation in 42 percent of the units, and major maintenance issues, including fire damage, exposed wiring and electrical shorts, in 64 percent of the units. Earlier HUD audits, dating

back to 2003, had uncovered misuse of federal funds, such as staff and board members claiming travel expenses without receipts, although HUD gave credit to tribes for improving financial oversight over the past three years. Most recently, the tribes improperly accounted for $1.4 million in federal funds, according to HUD investigators. The tribes disputed that finding.

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Luella Mary “Lou” Nolan Lou Nolan of Circle City, Arizona, passed away at her home on Tuesday, May 18, 2010, from complications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Lou was born in Dover, Idaho, October 29, 1933 to George and Bertha Lee Solberg.The Solberg family later moved to Prineville where Lou attended school. She married Daniel Nolan in 1962 and lived in Redmond where they were business owners for over 25 years. On retirement, they traveled for a few years, settling in Arizona where they lived for the past 15 years. Lou’s special joy in life was spending time with her friends and family. She loved to travel and enjoyed living in Arizona where she made many good friends. She enjoyed her home and especially enjoyed her life with Danny. Lou is survived by her husband of 48 years, Daniel Nolan, daughters Peggy Jorgenson, Donna Allen (Jim), Debbie Luster (Kevin), son Steve (Nicki), grandchildren Dan, Casey, Jenny, Amber, Emma, Chloe, Jennifer and Michelle; sister Hilda Bertram of Vancouver and many adored nieces and nephews. The family invites friends to join in a celebration of Lou’s life with a special memorial service to be held on Monday, June 28, 2010 at 2:00 PM at Redmond VFW, 1836 SW Veterans Way, Redmond, Oregon.


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JUNE 22

WEDNESDAY

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

80

46

STATE Western

83/52

80s Warm Springs

Marion Forks

81/53

76/43

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

80/46

68/34

Sunriver 78/43

Vancouver 66/55

Partly cloudy skies and seasonably warm today.

77/44

70s

Chemult 77/40

72/48

75/43

80s Helena

Eugene 77/51

Bend

80/57

Idaho Falls Redding

Elko

95/65

Christmas Valley

76/44

78/45

Silver Lake

Reno

78/46

Partly cloudy skies and seasonably warm today.

Crater Lake 68/44

74/48

Boise

80/46

Grants Pass 84/52

Eastern

Hampton

Fort Rock

Missoula

Portland 74/56

Burns

60s

70/56

79/44

71/36

Calgary

Seattle

78/43

77/42

Crescent 77/41

BEND ALMANAC

72/45

70s

87/56

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

66/53

79/59

90s

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:52 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:23 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:52 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:40 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 2:13 a.m.

LOW

Last

New

First

June 26 July 4

July 11

July 18

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 64/53/0.00 . . . . . . 65/53/c. . . . . . . 66/53/c Baker City . . . . . . 65/44/0.00 . . . . . 77/49/pc. . . . . . 81/51/pc Brookings . . . . . . 73/50/0.00 . . . . . 67/52/pc. . . . . . 64/54/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 67/38/0.00 . . . . . . 77/52/s. . . . . . 81/49/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 71/52/0.00 . . . . . 77/51/pc. . . . . . 76/51/pc Klamath Falls . . . 74/36/0.00 . . . . . 79/48/pc. . . . . . 76/47/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 70/36/0.00 . . . . . . 78/50/s. . . . . . 76/48/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 75/33/0.00 . . . . . . 80/42/s. . . . . . 79/44/pc Medford . . . . . . . 81/45/0.00 . . . . . 85/54/pc. . . . . . 82/54/pc Newport . . . . . . . 61/52/0.00 . . . . . . 62/51/c. . . . . . . 62/50/c North Bend . . . . . . 63/48/NA . . . . . 63/50/pc. . . . . . . 62/52/c Ontario . . . . . . . . 74/50/0.00 . . . . . . 84/57/s. . . . . . 87/60/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 72/53/0.00 . . . . . 81/53/pc. . . . . . 87/56/pc Portland . . . . . . . 66/54/0.00 . . . . . 74/56/pc. . . . . . . 76/57/c Prineville . . . . . . . 68/39/0.00 . . . . . . 79/47/s. . . . . . 83/50/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 74/37/0.00 . . . . . 79/47/pc. . . . . . 79/46/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 77/51/0.00 . . . . . 81/53/pc. . . . . . 77/54/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 71/48/0.00 . . . . . 76/54/pc. . . . . . 77/53/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 73/38/0.00 . . . . . . 79/45/s. . . . . . 80/47/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 75/57/0.00 . . . . . 83/53/pc. . . . . . 84/56/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

MEDIUM

0

2

4

HIGH 6

8V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72/43 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 in 1970 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.32” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 in 1947 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.57” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.28” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.98” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.08 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.75 in 1967 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

LOW

78 41

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Mostly sunny, mild. HIGH

75 42

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

HIGH

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:55 a.m. . . . . . .8:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .8:30 a.m. . . . . .11:16 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:02 a.m. . . . . .12:22 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .1:07 a.m. . . . . . .1:09 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .12:41 p.m. . . . . . .1:11 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:02 a.m. . . . . . .1:02 p.m.

Moon phases Full

SATURDAY Mostly sunny, comfortable temps.

75 45

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Paulina

Brothers

HIGH

NORTHWEST

72/52

78/44

LOW

80 47

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 81° Medford • 33° La Pine

FRIDAY Partly cloudy, very slight chance of showers.

High pressure will promote dry conditions across much of the Pacific Northwest today.

Central

La Pine

80/42

HIGH

83/48

Camp Sherman 76/43 Redmond Prineville 80/46 Cascadia 79/47 79/47 Sisters 79/45 Bend Post 60s Oakridge Elk Lake

Partly cloudy skies and seasonable today.

82/52 80/51

Crescent Lake

79/51

76/51

59/44

77/45

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

Sunny start, increasing cloud cover late.

Tonight: Mostly clear, not as cool.

Today: Mostly sunny, seasonable temps.

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled today by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42,259 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138,995 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 75,366 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,955 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148,209 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 408 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,240 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,856 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 66/55

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 72/52

S

Saskatoon 75/52

Seattle 70/56

S Winnipeg 75/61

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 81/55

Thunder Bay 73/57

Halifax 73/54 P ortland Billings P ortland (in the 48 77/60 78/53 74/56 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston Rapid City 86/66 To ronto 81/65 Boise 82/66 80/55 72/61 Buffalo 80/57 81/67 Chicago Detroit New York • 108° 89/71 86/70 86/70 Mesa, Ariz. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 81/50 89/73 89/71 Des Moines • 26° San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 92/71 66/53 Omaha Bryce Canyon, Utah City 92/74 Las 92/71 Denver Louisville 79/59 Vegas • 2.96” Kansas City 89/60 95/73 St. Louis 98/73 96/78 Charlotte Kokomo, Ind. 99/79 95/72 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 94/65 71/60 97/77 96/75 98/75 Phoenix Atlanta 106/77 Honolulu 94/73 Birmingham 87/75 Dallas Tijuana 95/72 99/77 69/57 New Orleans 88/78 Orlando Houston 93/75 Chihuahua 95/76 94/75 Miami 92/81 Monterrey La Paz 96/68 98/66 Mazatlan Anchorage 85/77 61/50 Juneau 57/48 Bismarck 83/58

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .98/72/0.00 . . .99/73/s . . 97/73/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .84/69/t . . 88/68/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . 84/67/pc . . . .83/67/t Albuquerque. . . .95/68/0.00 . 94/65/pc . . 94/68/pc Anchorage . . . . .68/46/0.00 . .61/50/sh . . 64/51/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . 94/73/pc . . . .93/72/t Atlantic City . . . .92/70/0.01 . 80/72/pc . . 86/72/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .95/71/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . 96/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . .94/71/0.00 . . .91/73/t . . 96/75/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . 78/53/pc . . . 80/56/s Birmingham . . . .95/70/0.00 . 95/72/pc . . 93/72/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .81/60/0.00 . . .83/58/t . . 80/56/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . 80/57/pc . . 87/57/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .85/72/0.00 . 82/66/pc . . . .81/65/t Bridgeport, CT. . .89/69/0.00 . 81/67/pc . . . .82/69/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .80/61/0.00 . . .81/67/t . . 80/69/pc Burlington, VT. . .80/64/0.00 . 83/65/pc . . . .76/63/t Caribou, ME . . . .80/61/0.00 . 81/58/pc . . . .73/55/t Charleston, SC . .90/73/0.00 . 89/75/pc . . 89/75/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .94/68/0.00 . 95/72/pc . . 95/70/pc Chattanooga. . . .95/71/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . 95/72/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . 81/50/pc . . 77/53/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .85/67/0.01 . 89/71/pc . . . .83/70/t Cincinnati . . . . . .87/70/0.32 . 92/72/pc . . 94/74/pc Cleveland . . . . . .83/62/0.00 . . .83/70/t . . . .88/69/t Colorado Springs 91/54/0.00 . 89/55/pc . . 81/55/pc Columbia, MO . .90/73/0.00 . 97/75/pc . . 95/71/pc Columbia, SC . . .96/72/0.00 . 96/74/pc . . 96/75/pc Columbus, GA. . .98/71/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . 95/72/pc Columbus, OH. . .87/67/0.14 . . .89/73/t . . 92/75/pc Concord, NH . . . .86/58/0.00 . 82/59/pc . . . .82/63/t Corpus Christi. . .93/74/0.00 . 93/74/pc . . 92/75/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .99/80/0.00 . 99/77/pc . . . .98/76/t Dayton . . . . . . . .80/67/0.57 . . .89/73/t . . 92/73/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .89/61/0.00 . 89/60/pc . . 82/59/pc Des Moines. . . . .84/66/0.57 . 92/71/pc . . . .86/65/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .86/70/t . . . .87/68/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.31 . . .73/55/t . . 74/54/pc El Paso. . . . . . . .103/76/0.00 103/76/pc . 102/75/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .72/53/0.03 . 74/49/pc . . 74/49/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .85/67/0.00 . . .80/62/t . . 78/60/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .78/37/0.00 . . .82/42/s . . . 85/43/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .83/61/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . . .84/64/t Green Bay. . . . . .78/58/0.00 . 81/65/pc . . . .77/61/t Greensboro. . . . .91/71/0.00 . 93/72/pc . . 93/70/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .87/67/0.00 . . .88/70/t . . 93/73/pc Hartford, CT . . . .90/66/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . . .85/66/t Helena. . . . . . . . .69/45/0.08 . . .74/48/t . . 82/52/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .86/74/0.01 . . .87/75/s . . . 88/76/s Houston . . . . . . .98/75/0.00 . 95/76/pc . . . .94/76/t Huntsville . . . . . .96/70/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . 97/72/pc Indianapolis . . . .84/71/0.51 . . .90/71/t . . 91/72/pc Jackson, MS . . . .96/74/0.00 . 96/74/pc . . . .94/75/t Madison, WI . . . .81/63/0.04 . 84/69/pc . . . .84/65/t Jacksonville. . . . .92/70/0.81 . . .92/72/t . . . .93/73/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .57/48/r . . . .59/47/r Kansas City. . . . .91/68/0.00 . 96/78/pc . . . .96/72/t Lansing . . . . . . . .83/59/0.00 . 85/67/pc . . . .85/64/t Las Vegas . . . . . .96/74/0.00 . . .98/73/s . . 101/77/s Lexington . . . . . .91/70/0.08 . 94/72/pc . . 93/72/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .86/64/1.45 . . .95/72/t . . . .91/65/t Little Rock. . . . . .99/76/0.00 . 98/75/pc . . 97/76/pc Los Angeles. . . . .68/60/0.00 . . .71/60/s . . . 72/60/s Louisville . . . . . . .95/80/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . 97/75/pc Memphis. . . . . . .98/76/0.00 100/79/pc . . 99/79/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .93/83/0.00 . . .92/81/t . . . .91/79/t Milwaukee . . . . .75/62/0.00 . 78/69/pc . . . .79/65/t Minneapolis . . . .79/69/0.07 . . .86/66/t . . . .82/62/t Nashville . . . . . . .96/70/0.00 . 96/75/pc . . 94/73/pc New Orleans. . . .96/79/0.00 . . .88/78/t . . . .89/77/t New York . . . . . .87/71/0.00 . 86/70/pc . . . .90/73/t Newark, NJ . . . . .91/73/0.00 . 87/69/pc . . . .92/73/t Norfolk, VA . . . . .88/74/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 95/75/pc Oklahoma City . .92/73/0.00 . 97/77/pc . . 98/76/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .86/66/0.48 . . .92/71/t . . . .88/65/t Orlando. . . . . . . .92/74/0.32 . . .93/75/t . . . .92/75/t Palm Springs. . . .98/67/0.00 . .101/70/s . . 105/72/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .85/69/0.20 . 93/74/pc . . 90/70/pc Philadelphia . . . .90/75/0.00 . 89/71/pc . . 95/75/pc Phoenix. . . . . . .105/77/0.00 . .106/77/s . . 109/81/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .85/69/t . . 86/68/pc Portland, ME. . . .85/62/0.00 . 77/60/pc . . . .74/60/t Providence . . . . .88/68/0.00 . 83/66/pc . . . .83/68/t Raleigh . . . . . . . .93/69/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . 96/72/pc

By Maura Dolan Los Angeles Times

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

An elephant bathes at the Oregon Zoo in Portland on Monday.

Summer starts cool, cloudy in Northwest The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The unusually damp, dark weather this month is testing even the most die-hard Northwest native accustomed to rain and clouds. The first day of summer in Washington, Oregon and Idaho opened with a cloudy forecast, a chance of showers and weather colder than average for this time of month. Seattleites this year have gone their longest stretch ever without a 75-degree day. Temperatures have yet to hit that mark at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, making it an all-time record, said Nick Bond, the Washington state climatologist. “My tomatoes aren’t very happy. My lawn is doing great, but so are the slugs,” said Bond, a University of Washington research meteorologist. In Portland, residents are

experiencing a wet June, with the most rainfall recorded at Portland International Airport since 1940, said meteorologist Bill Schneider with the National Weather Service there. “Oregon and Washington have had a similar weather pattern,” Schneider said. “It’s been colder and much wetter than normal, because of a persistent pattern of low-pressure systems.”

‘June-u-ary’ It’s been no different in southwestern Idaho, where the region’s average temperature since April 1 has been nearly three degrees colder than the 40-year average, said Valerie Mills, meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Boise. It’s also wetter than usual, she said. Forecasters say low tempera-

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .64/48/0.00 . 68/49/pc . . . 69/50/c Athens. . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .90/68/s . . . .88/66/t Auckland. . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . . .58/46/s . . 55/43/sh Baghdad . . . . . .107/86/0.00 . .112/85/s . . 108/83/s Bangkok . . . . . . .97/81/0.07 . . .95/77/t . . . .93/76/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . 93/73/pc . . 94/71/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . .84/70/s . . . 85/68/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . 68/51/pc . . . 71/50/c Bogota . . . . . . . .66/50/1.96 . . .63/51/t . . . .62/52/t Budapest. . . . . . .70/61/0.86 . .68/53/sh . . . 69/52/c Buenos Aires. . . .50/34/0.00 . 54/44/pc . . . 53/43/s Cabo San Lucas .95/79/0.00 . 89/73/pc . . 90/74/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . .109/81/0.00 . .109/78/s . . 102/77/s Calgary . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . .72/52/sh . . 72/53/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . 90/78/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . .65/47/c . . . 60/48/c Edinburgh . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .61/51/c . . 60/52/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . 63/45/pc . . 68/46/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . . .68/42/s . . . 68/48/s Hong Kong . . . . .93/84/0.00 . . .83/79/t . . . .84/79/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .86/72/0.62 . . .90/70/t . . . .89/69/t Jerusalem . . . . .102/74/0.00 . . .99/77/s . . . 97/75/s Johannesburg . . .63/37/0.00 . . .59/39/s . . . 59/40/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . 73/59/pc . . 74/60/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .85/66/s . . . 79/60/s London . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 72/50/pc . . 76/53/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . . .86/55/s . . . 87/59/s Manila. . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .90/75/t . . . .89/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .122/86/0.00 . .112/85/s . . 114/85/s Mexico City. . . . .81/59/0.00 . 77/53/pc . . 76/54/pc Montreal. . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .77/59/sh . . 82/64/pc Moscow . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . 81/59/pc . . . 82/58/c Nairobi . . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . 70/57/pc . . 69/57/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .90/80/t . . . .90/81/t New Delhi. . . . .111/89/0.00 112/87/pc . 109/89/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .81/73/0.07 . . .80/68/t . . 79/67/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . 64/42/pc . . 68/48/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .73/55/sh . . 79/61/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . 69/51/pc . . 73/53/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .81/64/0.00 . .78/60/sh . . 78/59/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.15 . . .70/57/c . . 72/59/pc Santiago . . . . . . .52/41/0.00 . 54/32/pc . . 53/33/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .75/60/sh . . 72/61/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .73/64/0.05 . 73/62/pc . . 70/58/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . .82/60/sh . . . 83/61/s Shanghai. . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . 86/73/pc . . . 87/75/s Singapore . . . . . .90/82/0.00 . . .89/76/t . . . .88/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .63/48/0.00 . 60/46/pc . . 66/48/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . 64/53/pc . . 64/51/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .87/78/t . . . .86/78/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . .102/75/0.00 . . .94/74/s . . . 93/70/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . . .82/69/t . . 81/68/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .72/61/t . . 77/64/sh Vancouver. . . . . .63/54/0.00 . 66/55/pc . . . 66/57/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .61/52/0.09 . 64/56/pc . . 66/57/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .69/56/sh . . 70/57/sh

California judge full of surprises in state’s same-sex marriage case

BATH TIME AT THE ZOO

By Phuong Le

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . .80/55/t . . 81/56/pc Savannah . . . . . .94/72/0.23 . . .91/74/t . . 90/74/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .80/49/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . 88/56/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .63/51/0.00 . . .70/56/c . . . 71/55/c Richmond . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 97/74/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .81/62/1.29 . 88/66/pc . . 82/60/pc Rochester, NY . . .78/62/0.00 . . .82/68/t . . 82/67/pc Spokane . . . . . . .55/49/0.39 . 73/52/pc . . 80/56/pc Sacramento. . . . .90/52/0.00 . . .94/62/s . . . 90/61/s Springfield, MO. .93/74/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . . 95/73/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .95/78/0.00 . 99/79/pc . . . .97/72/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .93/72/1.65 . . .92/77/t . . . .92/77/t Salt Lake City . . .78/53/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . . 86/62/s Tucson. . . . . . . .103/73/0.00 . .104/72/s . . 107/76/s San Antonio . . . .93/76/0.00 . 95/75/pc . . 95/75/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . 98/77/pc . . 97/76/pc San Diego . . . . . .65/60/0.00 . . .68/60/s . . . 69/60/s Washington, DC .93/76/0.00 . . .92/74/t . . 96/75/pc San Francisco . . .71/53/0.00 . . .66/53/s . . . 67/53/s Wichita . . . . . . . .94/76/0.00 . 98/76/pc . . 97/73/pc San Jose . . . . . . .85/53/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . . 82/55/s Yakima . . . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . 80/52/pc . . 83/57/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .94/51/0.00 . 91/53/pc . . 89/56/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .101/71/0.00 . .103/69/s . . 105/75/s

tures this week will be mostly in the 50s with highs reaching the low 70s in Western Washington and 80s in Eastern Washington. “Summer is not going to come,” said a despondent Ayelet Winer while on a lunch break in downtown Seattle. In the Portland area, the weather has been so dismal that people are calling the month “June-u-ary.” Dina Gross, manager of the Cedar Mill farmers market outside Portland, said attendance on rainy days is down by about one-third compared with last year. Vendors “just tough it out,” Gross said. At the Astro Services Station in The Dalles, attendant Vincent Manzella said the weather has been brutal. “That cold wind just beats us to death every day,” he said. “We’re halfway through June and it’s freezing.”

LOS ANGELES — Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker was supposed to be a bit player in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, a federal constitutional challenge of the Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage. Lawyers on both sides of the case viewed his federal courtroom in San Francisco as little more than a launching pad where they would argue fine points of constitutional law before the case moved to the appeals bench and eventually to the Supreme Court. But the iconoclastic U.S. District Court judge had something else in mind: a fullblown nonjury trial to test assumptions about whether gays make inferior parents, whether same-sex marriage would hurt straight marriage, and whether sexual orientation is changeable. Walker’s intentions took lawyers on both sides by surprise, but those who know the lanky, silver-haired jurist said it was fitting that he would want to gather facts on an issue that tends to be viewed with considerable emotion. The Republican appointee will soon fire the first volley in the federal legal battle over same-sex marriage. Walker’s written decision, based on testimony he has heard, will become the foundation on which higher courts build. Initially dubious about a trial, gay rights lawyers quickly saw advantages to Walker’s plan. Indeed, the 2 1/2 weeks of often moving testimony in January substantially bol-

stered opponents of Proposition 8. The confidence that gay rights lawyers expressed at testimony’s end — closing arguments were held Wednesday — belied the anxiety some activists expressed when Walker was randomly chosen last year to oversee the case. “People were saying that this assignment should leave no one resting easily,” said Kate Kendell, who heads the National Center for Lesbian Rights. Although openly gay, Walker, 66, was considered a traitor by some gay activists for having represented the U.S. Olympic Committee in a trademark lawsuit against the Gay Olympics, Kendell said. Gay rights groups and liberals

opposed Walker’s nomination by President Ronald Reagan and later by President George H.W. Bush. But after his confirmation, Walker surprised critics. He has been an independent judge, skeptical of government and protective of individual freedom. He favors the decriminalization of drugs, and he recently ruled against Bush administration policies in a major wiretap lawsuit. Lawyers defending Proposition 8 have refused to discuss Walker’s sexual orientation and have not made an issue of it. They have complained that his pretrial rulings hurt their side and that the trial was irrelevant.

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Tennis Inside Roger Federer avoids being upset on the opening day of Wimbledon, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

CYCLING

CYCLING: R OA D N AT I O N A L CHAMPIONSHIPS

COMMUNITY SPORTS

A call for volunteers who are needed for local cycling events

In his big brother’s bike tracks

Approximately 120 volunteers were still needed as of Monday afternoon for the USA Cycling Elite, U23 and Junior Road National Championships, which start today and continue through Sunday in Bend. Volunteers must be age 18 or older. Traffic directors, water station managers, and set-up and break-down staff are among the volunteer positions remaining to be filled. For more information or to volunteer, contact Renee Mansour at 541-771-1094 or rmansour@bendbroadband. com, or go to www.visitbend. com. — Bulletin staff report

Like his older sibling Ian before him, Bend’s Austin Boswell is rising fast in the cycling world By Mark Morical The Bulletin

WORLD CUP T O D AY Results Group G Portugal 7, North Korea 0 (North Korea eliminated) Group H Chile 1, Switzerland 0 Spain 2, Honduras 0

Highlights Simao Sabrosa, Hugo Almeida and Tiago scored over an eight-minute span in the second half, part of a six-goal spree in the period as Portugal routed North Korea 7-0. It was the biggest output by any team in the 2010 World Cup. Raul Meireles assisted on Simao’s goal in the 53rd minute, which went through the legs of North Korea goalkeeper Ri Myong Guk. Almeida scored three minutes later from a powerful header, and Tiago knocked home a pass from Cristiano Ronaldo in the 60th.

Star of the Day David Villa, Spain, scored both goals as the European champion righted itself with a 2-0 victory over Honduras. Villa highlighted a revitalized attack after a 1-0 loss to Switzerland last week.

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Casandra Shaffer, 10, of Bend, swims at the Juniper Pool on Friday Morning. Shaffer will compete in swimming events at the Dwarf Athletic Association of America National Games in Nashville, Tenn.

Not afraid to try Following in her mother’s footsteps, Casandra Shaffer is set to compete in national dwarf games By Katie Brauns The Bulletin

Want proof that good things really DO come in small packages? Check out Casandra Shaffer. She is shorter and physically less developed than most of her Bend Swim Club teammates. And she finishes last in almost all of her swim races. But despite her disadvantages, 10-year-old Casandra has big dreams. She says she started swimming because she wants to continue a fam-

ily tradition by one day competing in the Paralympic Games — an Olympics-style international sports event for athletes with physical disabilities. Casandra’s mother, Jody Shaffer, competed in swimming in the Paralympics in 1992. Taking a good first step in the right direction, Casandra is planning to compete in the Dwarf Athletic Association of America National Games, July 3-7, in Nashville, Tenn. Casandra and her mother have achondroplasia, a bone-growth disor-

Bend cyclist Ian Boswell is 19 years old and seems to be reaching new heights in his sport with each race he enters. Just this past weekend in Northern California, for example, he won the prestigious Nevada City Classic. But Boswell, a member of both the Bissell Pro Cycling Team and the U23 U.S. National Team, takes greater pleasure in the achievements of his younger brother. After taking up bike racing just last fall, Austin Boswell, 16, won the overall title in the Category 3 race at the Mt. Hood Cycling Classic earlier this month. He went from Category 5 (beginner) to Cat 2 (advanced) — a leap that commonly takes multiple years to make — in just seven months. “It’s almost more enjoyable watching his success than my own,” Ian says of Austin. Both brothers will race in the USA Cycling Elite, U23 and Junior Road National Championships this week in Bend — Ian in the U23 division, Austin in the Junior 17-18 division. See Boswell / D5

der that causes dwarfism. Casandra is 3 feet, 6 inches tall and probably will not grow much taller than that. About two years ago, Casandra took up an interest in competitive swimming. She joined the swim club and ever since has trained three days a week, year-round. When Casandra competes in USA Swimming-sanctioned events, her goals are to finish each race, to beat her own times, and to support her teammates. See Shaffer / D6

Lookahead Argentina, Mexico and Uruguay need only draws in their final opening-round matches to advance. The Mexicans and Uruguayans meet in Rustenberg (7 a.m. PDT), so a tie will get both teams through from Group A. Argentina, which is on top of Group B, faces Greece at Polokwane ( 11:30 a.m.) and, even if they lose, the Argentines could reach the next round. Looking on and hoping for help are France and South Africa (7 a.m. at Bloemfontein) in Group A. South Korea is in better shape in Group B and with a victory over Nigeria (11:30 a.m. at Durban), it has a strong chance to stay alive. — The Associated Press

INSIDE MLB

Bend golfer leads Oregon Amateur Bulletin staff report CANBY — Bend golfer Andrew Vijarro must feel comfortable at the Oregon Amateur Championship. Vijarro, who won the 2009 Oregon Amateur, shot a 6-under-par 66 Monday during the first round of stroke play to take the lead for medalist honors at the 101st Oregon Amateur. Vijarro, who recently completed his sophomore season at the University of Oregon, is one of 10 Central Oregon golfers — six men and four women — competing in the men’s Andrew Vijarro and women’s Oregon Amateur tournaments this week at Willamette Valley Country Club. The 20-year-old Vijarro has a one-stroke advantage over Justin Kadin, a University of Idaho golfer from Corvallis. The Oregon Amateur begins with 36 holes of stroke play. Sixty-four of the 116 golfers in the men’s field will advance to match play, which begins Wednesday, and will be seeded based on their finish in the stroke-play rounds. Thirty-two of the 40 golfers in the women’s field advance. See Golfer / D5

D’backs jump early to beat Yankees

Vijarro qualifies for Public Links PORTLAND — Bend golfer Andrew Vijarro was the medalist over the weekend in a 36-hole qualifier for the U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship. Vijarro shot a 5-under-par 139 in a 36-hole qualifier at Eastmoreland Golf Course. That was two shots better than runner-up Marcus Potter, who plays golf for Tualatin High School. Vijarro, a Bend High graduate who will be a junior this fall at the University of Oregon, earned one of two berths in the APL Championship awarded from Eastmoreland. The APL is limited to amateur golfers who are bona fide public-course players with a United States Golf Association handicap index of no more than 4.4. The APL Championship will be held July 12-17 at Bryan Park Golf & Conference Center in Greensboro, N.C. — Bulletin staff report

WORLD CUP

Three home runs in the first inning off A.J. Burnett allowed Arizona to take a 10-4 win over New York, see Page D4

Is U.S. ready to advance? Donovan believes it is so By Ronald Blum The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 World Cup .................................D3 NBA ...........................................D3 College Baseball........................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Community Sports ................... D6

Elise Amendola / The Associated Press

Landon Donovan loosens up during training in Pretoria, South Africa, Monday. The U.S. will play Algeria on Wednesday.

IRENE, South Africa — Landon Donovan thinks the best is yet to come for the U.S. soccer team. Yes, 2006 was a disappointment and even the quarterfinal finish in 2002 wasn’t completely satisfying. “The two World Cups I’d been a part of, we hadn’t strung together three consecutive good results and good performances,” he said Monday. “I think this

team has the experience and the ability to do that, and we’ll find out on Wednesday night.” By beating Algeria, the Americans would reach the group phase for the first time in eight years. Even with a draw against the Desert Foxes, the U.S. could advance as long as England fails to beat Slovenia and doesn’t gain a point and wipe out the American advantage in goals scored. See Donovan / D3

Submitted photo

Austin Boswell, 16, left, and Ian Boswell, 19, both of Bend, will take part in the USA Cycling Elite, U23 and Junior Road National Championships this week in Bend.

HEATHER CLARK

Local athletes pairing up for paracycling road nationals

O

ne of Central Oregon’s better-known female athletes is accustomed to making news in the winter. She’s a professional sled-dog racer who was, at 15, the youngest musher ever to finish a 500-mile sled-dog race. In 2009, she made headlines around the world as the first legally blind musher to complete Alaska’s famed Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, and she did so in weather conditions that were considered by many to be the most challenging in 30 years. So why are we talking about Rachael Scdoris in June? Because the 25-year-old from Alfalfa is set to compete this week in the U.S. Paralympics Road Cycling National Championships, which are being held in Bend in conjunction with the 2010 USA Cycling Junior, U23 and Elite Road National Championships. See Nationals / D5


D2 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY TENNIS 4 a.m. — Wimbledon, Day 2, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — Wimbledon, Day 2, ESPN2.

SOCCER 7 a.m. — World Cup, France vs. South Africa, ESPN2. 7 a.m. — World Cup, Mexico vs. Uruguay, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — World Cup, Greece vs. Argentina, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — World Cup, South Korea vs. Nigeria, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 1:30 p.m. — College, NCAA World Series, Game 7, South Carolina vs. Arizona State, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at Chicago White Sox, MLB Network. 6 p.m. — College, NCAA World Series, Game 8, Oklahoma vs. Clemson, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — MLB, Chicago Cubs at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

WEDNESDAY TENNIS 4 a.m. — Wimbledon, Day 3, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — Wimbledon, Day 3, ESPN2.

SOCCER 7 a.m. — World Cup, Algeria vs. United States, ESPN. 7 a.m. — World Cup, England vs. Slovenia, ESPN2. 11:30 a.m. — World Cup, Australia vs. Serbia, ESPN2. 11:30 a.m. — World Cup, Germany vs. Ghana, ESPN.

BASEBALL 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Cincinnati Reds at Oakland Athletics, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB, Detroit Tigers at New York Mets, ESPN. 4 p.m. — College, NCAA World Series, game 9, Florida State vs. TCU, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — MLB, Chicago Cubs at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. — West Coast League, Walla Walla Sweets at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7.

WEDNESDAY SOCCER 7 a.m. — World Cup, Algeria vs. United States, KICE-AM 940.

BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. — West Coast League, Walla Walla Sweets at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Basketball • Blazers, Warriors swap second-round picks: The Portland Trail Blazers are paying the Golden State Warriors to move up 10 spots in the second round of the draft. The Warriors announced Monday that they traded the 34th overall pick to Portland for the 44th pick and cash considerations. Golden State also has the sixth pick in the first round. Portland has the 22nd pick in the first round. • Cabbie attacked after Lakers win gets $10,000: The apologetic president and CEO of Staples Center owner AEG on Monday gave a $10,000 check to a cabbie whose taxi was burned by a mob when violence erupted near the arena after the Los Angeles Lakers won the NBA championship last week. “On behalf of all the knuckleheads, we apologize and hopefully that helps you get on your feet a little bit,” Tim Leiweke told Abraham Teferi during the presentation at AEG offices. Teferi, a 41-year-old Ethiopian immigrant with limited English, said the attackers shook his cab to try to turn it over. • Rivers: Wallace said he plans to retire: Boston Celtics coach Doc Rivers says that center Rasheed Wallace is probably going to retire. Rivers said on WEEI-AM on Monday that Wallace told him before Game 7 of the NBA finals that he believed it was the last game of his career. Wallace has two years left on the contract he signed with the Celtics last summer. The 35-year-old would finish with 15,860 points and 7,321 rebounds in a 15-year career. The volatile big man was also the most ejected player of his era, with 30 ejections since such records started being kept in 1992.

Swimming • USA Swimming partners with child welfare group: USA Swimming has teamed with a national children’s group to help protect athletes from sexual abuse, a move that did little to placate critics of the embattled governing body. A statement issued Monday by USA Swimming is touting its partnership with the Child Welfare League of America, which will help develop new programs and conduct an annual audit to ensure enough is being done to prevent coaches from sexually abusing athletes. But attorneys suing USA Swimming say the Child Welfare League appears to be primarily a trade association that lobbies for improvements in the nation’s foster care system. Their spokesman, Ed Vazquez, says the organization has “no credible experience working in youth sports to stop the molestation and abuse of young athletes.”

Football • Panthers WR Smith breaks arm playing flag football: Pro Bowl receiver Steve Smith broke his left arm playing flag football over the weekend, and the Carolina Panthers star will miss the start of training camp. The Panthers said Monday that Smith had surgery Sunday night. It’s the same arm the four-time Pro Bowl receiver broke late last season against the New York Giants. The team says it’s uncertain when Smith will be able to return, but that he’ll definitely miss the start of training camp.

Golf • Prime time helps push U.S. Open rating: NBC says its preliminary rating for the final round of the U.S. Open was up 35 percent over last year, and was the highest in nine years for a U.S. Open that Tiger Woods did not win. The overnight rating was 6.9 with a 15 share, compared with a 5.1/12 a year ago at Bethpage Black, in which only the third round was completed Sunday because of rain. NBC was helped by the final round pushing into prime time on the East Coast because it was played at Pebble Beach, where Graeme McDowell won his first major. — From wire reports

IN THE BLEACHERS

SOCCER World Cup All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND GROUP A GP W D L GF GA Uruguay 2 1 1 0 3 0 Mexico 2 1 1 0 3 1 France 2 0 1 1 0 2 South Africa 2 0 1 1 1 4 Friday, June 11 South Africa 1, Mexico 1 Uruguay 0, France 0 Wednesday, June 16 Uruguay 3, South Africa 0 Thursday, June 17 Mexico 2, France 0 Tuesday, June 22 At Rustenburg, South Africa Mexico vs. Uruguay, 7 a.m. At Bloemfontein, South Africa France vs. South Africa, 7 a.m. ——— GROUP B GP W D L GF GA Argentina 2 2 0 0 5 1 South Korea 2 1 0 1 3 4 Greece 2 1 0 1 2 3 Nigeria 2 0 0 2 1 3 Saturday, June 12 South Korea 2, Greece 0 Argentina 1, Nigeria 0 Thursday, June 17 Argentina 4, South Korea 1 Greece 2, Nigeria 1 Tuesday, June 22 At Durban, South Africa Nigeria vs. South Korea, 11:30 a.m. At Polokwane, South Africa Greece vs. Argentina, 11:30 a.m. ——— GROUP C GP W D L GF GA Slovenia 2 1 1 0 3 2 United States 2 0 2 0 3 3 England 2 0 2 0 1 1 Algeria 2 0 1 1 0 1 Saturday, June 12 England 1, United States 1 Sunday, June 13 Slovenia 1, Algeria 0 Friday, June 18 United States 2, Slovenia 2 England 0, Algeria 0 Wednesday, June 23 At Port Elizabeth, South Africa Slovenia vs. England, 7 a.m. At Pretoria, South Africa United States vs. Algeria, 7 a.m. ——— GROUP D GP W D L GF GA Ghana 2 1 1 0 2 1 Germany 2 1 0 1 4 1 Serbia 2 1 0 1 1 1 Australia 2 0 1 1 1 5 Sunday, June 13 Ghana 1, Serbia 0 Germany 4, Australia 0 Friday, June 18 Serbia 1, Germany 0 Saturday, June 19 Australia 1, Ghana 1 Wednesday, June 23 At Johannesburg Ghana vs. Germany, 11:30 a.m. At Nelspruit, South Africa Australia vs. Serbia, 11:30 a.m. ——— GROUP E GP W D L GF GA x-Netherlands 2 2 0 0 3 0 Japan 2 1 0 1 1 1 Denmark 2 1 0 1 2 3 Cameroon 2 0 0 2 1 3 x-advanced to round of 16 Monday, June 14 Netherlands 2, Denmark 0 Japan 1, Cameroon 0 Saturday, June 19 Netherlands 1, Japan 0 Denmark 2, Cameroon 1 Thursday, June 24 At Rustenburg, South Africa Denmark vs. Japan, 11:30 a.m. At Cape Town, South Africa Cameroon vs. Netherlands, 11:30 a.m. ——— GROUP F GP W D L GF GA Paraguay 2 1 1 0 3 1 Italy 2 0 2 0 2 2 New Zealand 2 0 2 0 2 2 Slovakia 2 0 1 1 1 3 Monday, June 14 Italy 1, Paraguay 1 Tuesday, June 15 New Zealand 1, Slovakia 1 Sunday, June 20 Paraguay 2, Slovakia 0 Italy 1, New Zealand 1 Thursday, June 24 At Johannesburg Slovakia vs. Italy, 7 a.m. At Polokwane, South Africa Paraguay vs. New Zealand, 7 a.m. ——— GROUP G GP W D L GF GA x-Brazil 2 2 0 0 5 2 Portugal 2 1 1 0 7 0 Ivory Coast 2 0 1 1 1 3 North Korea 2 0 0 2 1 9 Tuesday, June 15 x-advanced to round of 16

Pts 4 4 1 1

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Pts 4 2 2 1

Pts 6 4 1 0

Ivory Coast 0, Portugal 0 Brazil 2, North Korea 1 Sunday, June 20 Brazil 3, Ivory Coast 1 Monday, June 21 Portugal 7, North Korea 0 Friday, June 25 Portugal vs. Brazil, 7 a.m. North Korea vs. Ivory Coast, 7 a.m. ——— GROUP H GP W D L GF GA Pts Chile 2 2 0 0 2 0 6 Spain 2 1 0 1 2 1 3 Switzerland 2 1 0 1 1 1 3 Honduras 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 Wednesday, June 16 Chile 1, Honduras 0 Switzerland 1, Spain 0 Monday, June 21 Chile 1, Switzerland 0 Spain 2, Honduras 0 Friday, June 25 Chile vs. Spain, 11:30 a.m. Switzerland vs. Honduras, 11:30 a.m. ——— SECOND ROUND Saturday, June 26 Game 49 At Port Elizabeth, South Africa Group A winner vs. Group B second place, 7 a.m. Game 50 At Rustenburg, South Africa Group C winner vs. Group D second place, 11:30 a.m. Sunday, June 27 Game 51 At Bloemfontein, South Africa Group D winner vs. Group C second place, 7 a.m. Game 52 At Johannesburg Group B winner vs. Group A second place, 11:30 a.m. Monday, June 28 Game 53 At Durban, South Africa Group E winner vs. Group F second place, 7 a.m. Game 54 At Johannesburg Group G winner vs. Group H second place, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 29 Game 55 At Pretoria, South Africa Group F winner vs. Group E second place, 7 a.m. Game 56 At Cape Town, South Africa Group H winner vs. Group G second place, 11:30 a.m. ——— QUARTERFINALS Friday, July 2 Game 57 At Port Elizabeth, South Africa Game 53 winner vs. Game 54 winner, 7 a.m. Game 58 At Johannesburg Game 49 winner vs. Game 50 winner, 11:30 a.m. Saturday, July 3 Game 59 At Cape Town, South Africa Game 52 winner vs. Game 51 winner, 7 a.m. Game 60 At Johannesburg Game 55 winner vs. Game 56 winner, 11:30 a.m. ——— SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 6 At Cape Town, South Africa Game 58 winner vs. Game 57 winner, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 7 At Durban, South Africa Game 59 winner vs. Game 60 winner, 11:30 a.m.

TENNIS Wimbledon Monday Wimbledon, England Purse: $20.3 million (Grand Slam) Singles Men First Round Michal Przysiezny, Poland, def. Ivan Ljubicic (17), Croatia, 7-5, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Daniel Brands, Germany, def. Igor Andreev, Russia, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4), 7-5. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 7-5, 6-4, 6-3. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, def. Carsten Ball, Australia, 6-2, 6-0, 3-6, 7-6 (5). Ilija Bozoljac, Serbia, def. Nicolas Massu, Chile, 7-6 (3), 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7). Mardy Fish, United States, def. Bernard Tomic, Australia, 6-3, 7-6 (8), 6-2. Gael Monfils (21), France, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-1, 7-6 (9), 6-2. Rainer Schuettler, Germany, def. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3. Brendan Evans, United States, def. Jesse Huta Galung, Netherlands, 6-3, 7-6 (12), 6-3. Jurgen Melzer (16), Austria, def. Dustin Brown, Jamaica, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 5-7, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (1), 6-0. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1. Albert Montanes (28), Spain, def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Marin Cilic (11), Croatia, 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (1). Nikolay Davydenko (7), Russia, def. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 3-6, 6-7 (3), 7-6 (3), 7-5, 9-7. Marsel Ilhan, Turkey, def. Marcos Daniel, Brazil, 6-7 (4), 4-6, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1. Victor Hanescu (31), Romania, def. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (3), 6-3, 1-6, 7-5. Karol Beck, Slovakia, def. Santiago Ventura, Spain, 6-3, 6-1, 4-6, 6-2. Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Ryan Sweeting, United States, 5-7, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4. Michael Llodra, France, def. Jesse Witten, United States, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3. Evgeny Korolev, Kazakhstan, def. Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, 6-1, 7-6 (8), 4-6, 6-2. Tomas Berdych (12), Czech Republic, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-2. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Stanislas Wawrinka (20), Switzerland, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 2-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Andy Roddick (5), United States, def. Rajeev Ram, United States, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2. Taylor Dent, United States, def. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, 6-3, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (3), 7-5. Peter Luczak, Australia, def. Tommy Robredo (30), Spain, 2-6, 7-6 (3), 6-2, 7-5. Teimuraz Gabashvili, Russia, def. Ramon Delgado, Paraguay, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2. Arnaud Clement, France, def. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5. Philipp Kohlschreiber (29), Germany, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-0. Feliciano Lopez (22), Spain, def. Jesse Levine, United States, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. Lleyton Hewitt (15), Australia, def. Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 5-7, 6-0, 6-2, 6-2. Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 4-6, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Women First Round Kim Clijsters (8), Belgium, def. Maria Elena Camerin, Italy, 6-0, 6-3. Nadia Petrova (12), Russia, def. Tatjana Malek, Germany, 6-4, 6-3. Maria Kirilenko (27), Russia, def. Stefanie Voegele,

Switzerland, 2-6, 6-4, 7-5. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, def. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, 6-0, 6-2. Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Elena Baltacha, Britain, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3. Shenay Perry, United States, def. Anastasiya Yakimova, Belarus, 6-2, 4-6, 9-7. Karolina Sprem, Croatia, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-3, 6-4. Marion Bartoli (11), France, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, 6-4, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (21), Russia, def. Nuria Llagostera Vives, Spain, 6-4, 6-1. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-4, 6-1. Yaroslava Shvedova (30), Kazakhstan, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-1, 6-4. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, def. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, 7-5, 7-5. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, def. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, 6-3, 6-2. Jelena Jankovic (4), Serbia, def. Laura Robson, Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (5). Alisa Kleybanova (26), Russia, def. Sandra Zahlavova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-3. Vera Dushevina, Russia, def. Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, 6-7 (0), 7-5, 6-1. Regina Kulikova, Russia, def. Melanie South, Britain, 6-1, 6-2. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, def. Anna Lapushchenkova, Russia, 6-0, 7-6 (7). Varvara Lepchenko, United States, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-4, 7-5. Yanina Wickmayer (15), Belgium, def. Alison Riske, United States, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3. Alicia Molik, Australia, def. Zuzana Kucova, Slovakia, 6-2, 7-5. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Stephanie Dubois, Canada, 6-4, 6-4. Kristina Barrois, Germany, def. Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-4. Angelique Kerber, Germany, def. Sania Mirza, India, 6-4, 6-1. Jarmila Groth, Australia, def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-3. Melanie Oudin (33), United States, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, 6-3, 6-0. Justine Henin (17), Belgium, def. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, 6-4, 6-3. Venus Williams (2), United States, def. Rossana de los Rios, Paraguay, 6-3, 6-2. Shahar Peer (13), Israel, def. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, 6-3, 6-4. Greta Arn, Hungary, def. Kateryna Bondarenko (34), Ukraine, 7-6 (1), 3-6, 6-3. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Agnes Szavay, Hungary, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Alona Bondarenko (28), Ukraine, def. Katie O’Brien, Britain, 6-3, 6-7 (10), 6-4.

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE Standings (through Sunday’s results) West Division W L Bend Elks 7 4 Kitsap BlueJackets 7 4 Bellingham Bells 7 8 Cowlitz Black Bears 4 5 Corvallis Knights 4 6 East Division W L Wenatchee AppleSox 9 4 Walla Walla Sweets 4 5 Kelowna Falcons 5 8 Moses Lake Pirates 3 6 Monday’s Games Bellingham 5, Kelowna 0 Kelowna 1, Bellingham 0 Wenatchee 9, Cowlitz 2 Today’s Games Walla Walla at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Cowlitz at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Bellingham at Kelowna, 7:05 p.m. Corvallis at Moses Lake, 7:35 p.m. ———

Pct. .636 .636 .467 .444 .400 Pct. .692 .444 .385 .333

College NCAA COLLEGE WORLD SERIES At Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— Saturday, June 19 Game 1 — TCU 8, Florida State 1 Game 2 — UCLA 11, Florida 3 Sunday, June 20 Game 3 — Oklahoma 4, South Carolina 3 Game 4 — Arizona State (52-8) vs. Clemson (43-23), ppd., weather Monday, June 21 Game 4 — Clemson 6, Arizona State 3 Game 5 — Florida State 8, Florida 5 Game 6 — UCLA 6, TCU 3 Tuesday, June 22 Game 7 — South Carolina (48-16) vs. Game 4 loser, 1:30 p.m. Game 8 — Oklahoma (50-16) vs. Game 4 winner, 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 23 Game 9 — Game 9 — Florida State (48-19) vs. TCU (52-13), 4 p.m. Thursday, June 24 Game 10 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 loser, 4 p.m. Friday, June 25 Game 11 — UCLA (50-14) vs. Game 9 winner, 1:30 p.m. Game 12 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Saturday, June 26 x-Game 13 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 11 a.m.

x-Game 14 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 4 p.m. Championship Series Best-of-3 Monday, June 28: Game 11 or 13 winner vs. Game 12 or 14 winner, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 29: Game 11 or 13 winner vs. Game 12 or 14 winner, 4:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 30: Game 11 or 13 winner vs. Game 12 or 14 winner, 4:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Connecticut 8 3 .727 Atlanta 9 4 .692 Indiana 8 4 .667 Washington 7 4 .636 New York 4 6 .400 Chicago 4 8 .333 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Seattle 11 2 .846 Phoenix 5 7 .417 San Antonio 4 7 .364 Minnesota 4 9 .308 Los Angeles 3 8 .273 Tulsa 3 8 .273 ——— Today’s Games Chicago at Connecticut, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 4:30 p.m.

GB — — ½ 1 3½ 4½ GB — 5½ 6 7 7 7

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES—Called up OF Colin Curtis from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Designated C Chad Moeller for assignment. TEXAS RANGERS—Agreed to terms with C Brett Nicholas. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Designated 3B Edwin Encarnacion for assignment. Reinstated RHP Scott Richmond from the 60-day DL and optioned him to Dunedin (FSL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Recalled OF Cole Gillespie from Reno (PCL). Optioned INF Ryan Roberts to Reno. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Selected the contract of RHP Joel Peralta from Syracuse (IL). Optioned LHP John Lannan to Harrisburg (EL). Transferred RHP Garrett Mock to the 60-day DL. Reinstated LHP Ross Detwiler from the 60-day DL and optioned to Harrisburg. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DENVER NUGGETS—Made a qualifying offer to F Linas Kleiza. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS—Agreed to terms with TE Dennis Pitta and DL Arthur Jones on three-year contracts. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Released DE Bobby McCray. Waived CB Glenn Sharpe. NEW YORK GIANTS—Waived P Jy Bond, DB Vince Anderson, TE Carson Butler, LB Lee Campbell and LB Micah Johnson. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Released S Kevin Ellison, DT Ian Scott, FB Cory Jackson and WR Jordyn Jackson. HOCKEY National Hockey League MINNESOTA WILD—Acquired RW Brad Staubitz from San Jose for a 2010 fifth-round draft pick. PHOENIX COYOTES—Re-signed LW Taylor Pyatt to a two-year contract. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Named Claude Noel coach of Manitoba (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS—Named Douglas Quinn president and chief executive officer. SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES—Acquired M Sam Cronin from Toronto FC for allocation money. COLLEGE GEORGETOWN—Named Robert Kirby men’s assistant basketball coach and Darryl Prue men’s basketball director of operations. MIDDLE TENNESSEE—Announced junior basketball F LaRon Dendy is transferring from Iowa State. OHIO STATE—Announced WR Duron Carter has left school and enrolled at enrolled at Coffeyville (Kansas) Community College. RUTGERS—Named Eric Murdock men’s basketball director of player development. ST. BONAVENTURE—Announced the resignation of Michael Adams, men’s assistant basketball coach. VILLANOVA—Announced redshirt sophomore F Taylor King has voluntarily withdrawn from the basketball program.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 3,445 577 1,037 343 The Dalles 3,402 423 341 110 John Day 1,703 194 123 29 McNary 769 134 110 24 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 291,322 18,384 17,604 4,987 The Dalles 221,796 15,237 4,651 1,777 John Day 202,231 14,367 4,177 1,892 McNary 170,917 10,902 3,199 1,439

Federer escapes major upset at Wimbledon B y Howard Fendrich T h e Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England — The situation was so unfamiliar to Roger Federer, so “uncomfortable,” to use his term. On a surface he rules, at a tournament he owns, against an opponent he dominates, Federer found himself in serious trouble Monday: He dropped the first two sets against 60th-ranked Alejandro Falla of Colombia, then was a mere three points from losing in the first round of Wimbledon. “I had Federer against the ropes,” Falla would say later. Eventually, the unheralded Falla succumbed to some jitters, and sixtime Wimbledon champion Federer called upon his experience, summoned his customary excellence, overcame the daunting deficit and pulled away to win 5-7, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (1), 6-0 in the event’s opening Centre Court match. “You definitely feel, you know, uncomfortable, because if you’re used to being down the whole time, your whole life, it’s something that’s kind of normal. For me, it’s not normal to be down two-sets-to-love, especially at Wimbledon and early on in Grand Slams. It’s something I’m not quite used to,” said the top-seeded Federer, who hampered himself with seven double-faults. “But still, I was able to find a way. That’s most important right now. Doesn’t matter how I felt out there. Didn’t feel great, that’s for sure.”

TENNIS Had Falla finished off Federer, it would have been one of the most stunning upsets in the history of tennis — perhaps THE most stunning, taking into account the participants, the setting and the round. Not sure? Consider the players’ resumes entering the day: • Federer was 92-13 for his career on grass, including 76-2 since 2003; Falla was 7-11. • Federer was 51-5 for his career at Wimbledon, with those six championships and a record seven consecutive final appearances; Falla was 3-5 and never got past the second round at the All England Club. • Federer was 199-28 with a record 16 titles in Grand Slam action and reached the final at 18 of the past 20 major tournaments; Falla was 11-14, only once making it as far as the third round at a Slam. All of that is why this match was the talk of Day 1 at the grass-court Grand Slam tournament, with players gathering around televisions in the locker rooms to catch a glimpse. “I don’t think anyone expected it,” said No. 5 Andy Roddick, a three-time Wimbledon runner-up who beat Rajeev Ram of Carmel, Ind., 6-3, 6-2, 6-2 later Monday. “Everyone was pretty surprised, especially when it became very, very real there in the latter stages.”

Anja Niedringhaus / The Associated Press

Roger Federer gestures with his finger after defeating Alejandro Falla at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, Monday. Indeed, Falla’s near-defeat of Federer generated much more buzz than any of the upsets that actually occurred. The seeded men who exited were No. 11 Marin Cilic, No. 17 Ivan Ljubicic, No. 20 Stanislas Wawrinka and No. 30 Tommy Robredo. No. 3 Novak Djokovic, the 2008 Australian Open champion, appeared on his way to joining them, but he came back to beat Olivier Rochus of Belgium 4-6, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 in a match that finished at about 11 p.m., with the Centre Court roof

closed and the lights on. There was one surprise of significance in the women’s draw: No. 5-seeded Francesca Schiavone lost 6-7 (0), 7-5, 6-1 to 47th-ranked Vera Dushevina of Russia, making Schiavone only the second reigning French Open women’s champion to lose in the first round at Wimbledon in the 42-year Open era. “I didn’t have a lot of energy today,” said Schiavone, who became Italy’s first female Grand Slam champion two weeks and two days ago. “It was very close, but she took advantage of her chances, and I didn’t.” The only other time a French Open champ bowed out in her opening Wimbledon match was in 2005, when it happened to Justine Henin. The Belgian began a 20month hiatus from tennis in 2008, and returned to Wimbledon for the first time in three years Monday, advancing with a 6-4, 6-3 victory over Anastasija Sevastova of Latvia. Also returning: Kim Clijsters, who hadn’t played at the All England Club since 2006. The twotime U.S. Open champion, away from the tour entirely for 2½ years while getting married and having a daughter, had no problems in beating Maria Elena Camerin of Italy 6-0, 6-3. Not surprisingly, Henin and Clijsters — neither of whom has won Wimbledon — were thrilled to be back.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 D3

Donovan

NBA DRAFT

WORLD CUP

Big names on outside looking in

Portugal dominates with 7-0 rout

By Jon Krawczynski The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — Omar Samhan’s throwback dropsteps in the post and new-age candor with the media made him one of the breakout stars of the NCAA tournament in March. The outspoken center captivated fans with his skills on the court and drew belly laughs in the press room with sharp one-liners while leading little St. Mary’s to the round of 16 for the first time in more than 50 years. The 6-foot-11 Samhan averaged 30.5 points and 9.5 rebounds in victories over Richmond and Villanova in college basketball’s marquee event, but is finding NBA executives and scouts much more difficult to charm. Most mock drafts forecast that Samhan will not be drafted on Thursday. “The politically correct answer would be, ‘Oh you know, it happens, that’s the way it is,’” Samhan said after a workout with the Minnesota Timberwolves this month. “I think it’s crap, to be blunt with you. I feel like I do a lot for my team, for my school and still just don’t get a lot of credit, a lot of love.” College stars like Villanova All-American Scottie Reynolds, Kansas point guard Sherron Collins and Notre Dame forward Luke Harangody are deemed second-round picks at best. Xavier’s Jordan Crawford may fall out of the first round, even after averaging 29 points a game in the Musketeers’ run to the round of 16. “You can look at it like, ‘What more do you want me to do?’” said Crawford, who left after his sophomore season. “But you still have to come out here and show what you can do and that you’re worth a first-round pick.” Many of college basketball’s best players have used the bright lights of the postseason to increase their draft stock. Jonny Flynn’s performance in Syracuse’s epic six-overtime win over Connecticut in the Big East tournament in 2009 helped propel him up the draft board, where the Timberwolves took him at No. 6. Butler’s Gordon Hayward lifted himself into lottery consideration this year after leading the Bulldogs on an improbable run to the NCAA title game. But there are plenty of decorated college careers drawing yawns from NBA talent evaluators. Collins led the Jayhawks to a national title as a junior and bypassed a chance at the NBA to return for one final season with Kansas this year, a remarkable run that ended with an upset loss to Northern Iowa. And there’s the 6-foot-2 Reynolds, who struggled at first with the slights from the pros, Villanova coach Jay Wright said. “But I think he looked at it and said that’s what the NBA is. It’s size, it’s speed, it’s length,” Wright said. “He was the underdog coming out of high school and now he’s going to be an underdog making the NBA and he’s taking on that challenge. I don’t think he’s disappointed about it anymore. I think he’s realistic about it. He’s taking it as a great challenge.” In some scouts’ eyes, Reynolds and Crawford are a little too short, Collins a little too thick, Harangody a black hole on offense. And Samhan? “I’m a slow white guy, so I understand,” Samhan said. “It’s all part of the process. It’s what makes me a good player. People are constantly doubting me and I want to prove them wrong. I use it as motivation instead of letting it get me down.” The best thing these players can do, according to NBA scouting director Ryan Blake, is criscross the country, working out with as many teams as possible in hopes someone will give them a chance in the draft or on a summer league team. “They’ve done everything they can. Everybody knows about them,” Blake said. “People will want to see them. They have great skills. They need to lay all their cards on the table and not worry about where they’re going to land and do the best they’re can do right now.”

By Bradley S.Klapper

North Korea watches live as team loses big

The Associated Press

CAPE TOWN, South Africa — Cristiano Ronaldo finally scored. So did Raul Meireles, Simao Sabrosa, Hugo Almeida, Liedson and Tiago (twice). Portugal put on the most dominant performance of the World Cup on Monday, knocking in a flurry of second-half goals and routing North Korea 7-0, a win that puts Portugal on the brink of advancing to the round of 16 and means the Koreans won’t make it out of group play. “It was a great day for Portugal and Portuguese football,” coach Carlos Queiroz said “The players are really happy with the way they played, the attitude for the game, the beautiful football, the beautiful goals.” Those goals came in bunches. Simao, Almeida and Tiago all scored early in the second half, after Meireles’ 29th-minute goal gave Portugal the lead. Liedson, substituting for Almeida started another run with a goal in the 81st. Ronaldo ended his goalless streak the 87th minute, and Tiago added his second goal two minutes later. One of the world’s best and most highly paid players, Ronaldo had not scored for his nation in a non-friendly match since the 2008 European Championship. “To score seven goals in a World Cup is not easy,” said Ronaldo, who gave his man-ofthe-match award to Tiago. “My teammates played very well.” The win moves Portugal into second place in Group G with four points, two behind Brazil. The Ivory Coast has one point, and North Korea can’t advance in the tournament after two straight losses. “This is a great result for us,” Portugal coach Carlos Queiroz said. “We have to continue now.” North Korea had early chances, but trouble began when Meireles latched on to a clever pass by Tiago and gave Portugal its first goal of the tournament. The score seemed to deflate the Koreans, while the Portuguese finally began to show some of the Latin flair that has made them an outside favorite to win their first championship.

Kin Cheung / The Associated Press

Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo, left, and Miguel Veloso, back left, celebrate their 7-0 win at the end of the World Cup Group G soccer match between Portugal and North Korea in Cape Town, South Africa, Monday. “Tactically speaking, we fell apart and we couldn’t block their attacks,” North Korea coach Kim Jong Hun said. “It was my fault for not playing the right strategy and that is why we conceded a lot of goals.” Meireles assisted on Simao’s goal in the 53rd minute, which went through the legs of North Korea goalkeeper Ri Myong Guk. Almeida scored three minutes later from a powerful header, and Tiago knocked home a pass from Ronaldo in the 60th. Liedson scored off a defensive error, before Ronaldo ended a 16month goal drought for his country with a simple finish after the ball fell to him. “It was important to score goals today,” Tiago said. Played in a steady downpour,

the wet field at Green Point Stadium caused errant passes as many players lost their footing. North Korea named the same lineup as the one that impressed in a 2-1 loss to Brazil, while Queiroz made four changes from the team that was held to 0-0 draw by Ivory Coast. Tiago replaced the injured Deco in midfield, with Almeida and Simao joining Ronaldo up front. Miguel Brito was chosen ahead of Paulo Ferreira at right back. The win gives Portugal a massive goal advantage if it ends up tied with Ivory Coast on points after the last match Friday. Portugal plays Brazil, which has already qualified for the second round, while Ivory Coast plays North Korea.

CAPE TOWN, South Africa — North Korea picked the wrong moment to allow its people to see a bit more of the outside world. The authoritarian regime was so proud of its soccer team in the World Cup that it allowed an unprecedented live broadcast back home of the match against Portugal — a rarity for the communist nation that normally exerts strict control over the media. What ensued was a different sort of history: North Koreans, used to seeing only positive news about their reclusive country, watched as their soccer team received the worst drubbing so far in this year’s tournament and was prevented from advancing to the next round. As the 7-0 loss to Portugal concluded, the North Koreans quickly halted Monday’s coverage. “The Portuguese won the game and now have four points,” the Korean Central Broadcasting commentator said. “We are ending our live broadcast now.” It then cut to factory workers and engineers praising North Korean leader Kim Jong Il. Dejected and dispirited, the North Korea team quickly left the stadium in Cape Town with heads bowed. Star forward Jong Tae Se dropped to his knees as the game ended. He said he was upset they had made so many errors and apologized to his nation for failing to fulfill its World Cup hopes. The normally loquacious Jong later slipped out another entrance. Portugal’s Tiago, who scored two goals, wished the North Koreans well in their final game against Ivory Coast but said he wasn’t sorry about the lopsided score, since getting lots of goals can help a team advance to the next round. “It’s just football,” he said. — The Associated Press

WORLD CUP ROUNDUP

Spain takes 2-0 victory over Honduras The Associated Press JOHANNESBURG — Now that looked like a championship team. David Villa scored two goals as Spain got its World Cup pursuit back on track with a 2-0 victory over Honduras on Monday. Villa beat three defenders in the 17th minute before goalkeeper Noel Valladares got a touch to the Spain striker’s rising shot but not enough to keep it out. Villa scored his 40th international goal in the 51st when his shot from the edge of the area deflected off a defender to go over Valladares. But Villa missed a penalty kick in the 62nd at Ellis Park, sending it wide right. Spain has three points and can still win Group H with a victory over Chile, which earlier

beat Switzerland 1-0 to lead with six points. Switzerland has three points and Honduras has zero. “We think this first group is very difficult and we have a tough game against Chile,” Villa said. “Being world champions is a long way down the road, there’s a long time to go, and many matches as well.” Spain’s win eased the disappointment of an opening 1-0 loss to the Swiss. “I think the other day we also (played well) but the result wasn’t so good,” Villa said. “We had a lot of possession, a lot of chances we just didn’t score.” This time, Villa single-handedly took the pressure off Spain, the European champion and a favorite coming to South Africa,

with a superb individual effort. He dribbled between Honduras players before cutting past Osman Chavez to send a right-footed shot into the far corner of the net as he slipped to the ground. Jesus Navas picked Villa out for the second goal, with the striker’s shot glancing off Chavez into the top of the net. Villa’s fifth career goal tied him with four Spain players as the country’s leading scorer in World Cup play and moved him within four goals of Raul Gonzalez’s record 44. But he shot No. 41 wide on a penalty kick in the 62nd after Navas was tripped inside the area. “Our loss to Switzerland is water under the bridge,” Villa said. “Today, we played in the same style, we attacked with short

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Bruins score 6-3 win over TCU The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — Gerrit Cole struck out 13 and carried a onehitter into the seventh inning, and Cody Regis and Jeff Gelalich homered to lead UCLA to a 6-3 victory over TCU in a winners’ bracket game at the College World Series on Monday night. The win gives UCLA control of Bracket 1 and three days off. The Horned Frogs will play Florida State in an elimination game Wednesday, with the winner meeting the Bruins on Friday. The Bruins (50-14) went ahead 5-0 in the third inning on Regis and Gelalich’s home runs against TCU starter Kyle Winkler (12-2). Regis’ two-run homer was his ninth of the season, with all coming since May 7. Two batters later, Gelalich followed with his second homer. The Horned Frogs (52-13), who came into the game hitting

a CWS-best .341, scored three runs on four hits in the seventh inning off Cole (11-3). The New York Yankees’ 2009 first-round draft pick allowed Matt Curry’s base hit to right leading off the second and didn’t give up another until Jason Coats’ hard grounder past first baseman Justin Uribe with one out in the seventh. After Curry and Jantzen Witte followed with singles to load the bases, the pro-TCU crowd rose as Cole ran the count full against Taylor Featherston. Featherston fouled one off before ripping a two-out triple beyond the reach of diving center fielder Beau Amaral. The ball rolled to the wall in left-center, and the Frogs were within 5-3. In other Monday games: Clemson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Arizona State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 OMAHA, Neb. — Casey Har-

man pitched six strong innings for Clemson, which handed top-seeded Arizona State’s Seth Blair his first loss of the season in an opening-round game. The Tigers tagged Blair (121) for five runs and seven hits with five walks in 4 1⁄3 innings to advance to a winner’s bracket game against Oklahoma today. The Sun Devils (53-8) meet South Carolina in an elimination game today. Florida State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OMAHA, Neb. — Mike McGee hit a tie-breaking three-run homer in the third inning and picked up the save after Florida made things interesting in the ninth, leading Florida State to a victory in a College World Series elimination game. The Gators (47-17) lost for the fourth time in five meetings this season with their instate rival.

passes and we had some very good chances.” Honduras barely remains alive in the tournament after also losing to Chile 1-0 last week. Also on Monday: Chile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Switzerland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa — Substitute Mark Gonzalez scored on a header in the 75th minute as Chile beat 10-man Switzerland to move closer to a spot in the final 16 at the World Cup. Gonzalez headed home a pass from fellow sub Esteban Paredes, who had gotten around the staunch Swiss defense and crossed to Gonzalez at the back post. Gonzalez’s downward header beat goalkeeper Diego Benaglio.

Continued from D1 Algeria, coming off a 1-0 loss to Slovenia and a 0-0 tie with the English, can advance only with a victory. That likely means wide-open play. “Their approach to the game would likely be an aggressive approach to try to get a goal and win the game,” Donovan said. “A lot of our guys play with or have played with or against their players. As a team, collectively, they can be unpredictable and on their day they are a very, very good team.” On the first day of winter in South Africa, the U.S. held its last practice at Pilditch Stadium before the match. Because FIFA wants to preserve the field at Loftus Versfeld, the site of the match, Tuesday’s training was moved to Eersterust Stadium in Pretoria. In many ways, the Americans know Algeria much better than Slovenia. Center back Madjid Bougherra is a teammate of DaMarcus Beasley and Maurice Edu on the Glasgow Rangers; midfielder Karim Matmour plays alongside Michael Bradley on Borussia Moenchengladbach; midfielder Adlane Guedioura plays on Wolverhampton with Marcus Hahnemann; midfielder Riad Boudebouz is at Sochaux with injured American forward Charlie Davies; and defender Nadir Belhadj and midfielder Hassen Yebda play for Portsmouth, where they regularly face the U.S. Premier League contingent. “They have a lot of guys who are skillful on the ball and who like to get the ball in dangerous areas and run by guys or be creative in their own way and get shots,” Bradley said. “Certainly Karim is good at that — his ability to use his speed to run by defenders and to get shots and crosses. I know that well. I play with him every week. So that’s something that we need to keep an eye on. But when you look at their whole team, they have a lot of different threats.” With both teams facing elimination, it figures to be a fiercely fought game. “Today’s football is very physical. Skill is just for the final meters,” Matmour said. “I’m quite happy to see everybody play the most simple game possible.” Algeria reached the World Cup for just the third time, following first-round elimination in 1982 and 1986. Egypt forced a tiebreaker playoff by beating Algeria 2-0 in Cairo, a match Algeria’s Rafik Halliche and Khaled Lemmouchia played wrapped with head bandages after their team bus was pelted with stones. Four days later, Les Fennecs qualified by beating Egypt 1-0 in a tiebreaker playoff in Sudan. The Americans have been toughened in a different way. Needing a three-goal victory over Egypt to reach last June’s Confederations Cup final — and doing just that — taught them they can overcome adversity. That lesson was intensified in this World Cup, when the U.S. rallied to tie England 1-1 and then came back from a two-goal halftime deficit to tie Slovenia 2-2. The Americans nearly won that one, too, but Maurice Edu’s 85th minute goal was disallowed for reasons that are still unclear since referees don’t have to explain their decisions.

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D4 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M AJ O R L E AGUE BA SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 43 27 .614 — Tampa Bay 42 27 .609 ½ Boston 43 28 .606 ½ Toronto 38 32 .543 5 Baltimore 19 50 .275 23½ Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 40 29 .580 — Detroit 38 30 .559 1½ Chicago 34 34 .500 5½ Kansas City 29 42 .408 12 Cleveland 26 42 .382 13½ West Division W L Pct GB Texas 41 28 .594 — Los Angeles 39 33 .542 3½ Oakland 34 38 .472 8½ Seattle 28 41 .406 13 ——— Monday’s Interleague Games Washington 2, Kansas City 1 Cincinnati 6, Oakland 4, 10 innings Arizona 10, N.Y. Yankees 4 Today’s Interleague Games Cleveland (Talbot 7-5) at Philadelphia (Moyer 7-6), 4:05 p.m. Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-4) at Baltimore (Guthrie 3-8), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (Lerew 0-0) at Washington (Atilano 5-4), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 6-3) at Toronto (Cecil 7-3), 4:07 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 8-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 4-2), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Latos 7-4) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 5-7), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 0-5) at Texas (Tom.Hunter 2-0), 5:05 p.m. Atlanta (Hanson 7-3) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 6-5), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 6-5) at Milwaukee (Narveson 5-4), 5:10 p.m. Boston (Lester 8-2) at Colorado (J.Chacin 3-6), 5:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 8-2) at Arizona (Haren 7-5), 6:40 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 6-3) at Oakland (Braden 4-6), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 7-3) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 6-5), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 5-5) at Seattle (J.Vargas 5-2), 7:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati at Oakland, 12:35 p.m. Kansas City at Washington, 1:35 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Florida at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. St. Louis at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Detroit at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. San Diego at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. Minnesota at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. Boston at Colorado, 5:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.

Atlanta New York Philadelphia

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L 42 28 39 30 35 32

Pct GB .600 — .565 2½ .522 5½

NICE CATCH

Florida Washington

33 36 .478 8½ 32 39 .451 10½ Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 38 31 .551 — Cincinnati 38 33 .535 1 Chicago 31 38 .449 7 Milwaukee 29 40 .420 9 Houston 26 44 .371 12½ Pittsburgh 25 44 .362 13 West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 40 29 .580 — San Francisco 38 30 .559 1½ Los Angeles 38 31 .551 2 Colorado 36 33 .522 4 Arizona 28 43 .394 13 ——— Monday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games San Francisco (Lincecum 7-2) at Houston (Oswalt 5-8), 5:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games San Francisco at Houston, 5:05 p.m.

Clippard H, 15 1 1 0 0 0 Capps S, 21-25 1 2 0 0 0 WP—Chen. T—2:40. A—13,592 (41,546).

OAKLAND, Calif. — Ramon Hernandez hit a tiebreaking leadoff home run in the 10th inning, Joey Votto and Scott Rolen added back-to-back shots and Cincinnati snapped out of its offensive slump long enough to beat Oakland.

Diamondbacks 10, Yankees 4

New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Posada c Granderson cf Gardner lf A.J.Burnett p a-Curtis ph Gaudin p b-Huffman ph Park p d-Cervelli ph Totals

AB 3 4 5 4 4 2 4 4 0 1 0 1 0 1 33

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 0 0 2 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 3

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .280 .296 .225 .276 .365 .287 .234 .324 --.000 --.143 --.290

Arizona K.Johnson 2b S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Montero c C.Young cf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b G.Parra lf R.Lopez p c-Ryal ph Rosa p Totals

AB 5 5 3 5 4 4 2 4 2 1 0 35

R 1 0 4 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 10

H 1 0 3 3 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 13

SO 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 8

Avg. .265 .271 .256 .413 .278 .258 .217 .269 .091 .297 ---

Braves’ Jason Heyward

BI 0 0 4 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 10

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3

Ross D. Franklin / The Associated Press

New York Yankees’ Curtis Granderson makes a diving catch on a line drive hit by Arizona Diamondbacks’ Chris Young during the second inning of a baseball game Monday in Phoenix. Arizona won 10-4.

New York 001 002 001 — 4 9 0 Arizona 510 100 03x — 10 13 0 a-flied out for A.J.Burnett in the 5th. b-flied out for Gaudin in the 7th. c-struck out for R.Lopez in the 8th. dflied out for Park in the 9th. LOB—New York 8, Arizona 6. 2B—A.Rodriguez (17), Montero (6), G.Parra (9). 3B—Swisher (3). HR—J.Upton (12), off A.J.Burnett; Ad.LaRoche (10), off A.J.Burnett; M.Reynolds (17), off A.J.Burnett; J.Upton (13), off Park. RBIs—Swisher 2 (44), A.Rodriguez (45), Posada (25), J.Upton 4 (38), Montero 2 (10), Ad.LaRoche 3 (45), M.Reynolds (48). SB—Gardner (23), J.Upton (11), M.Reynolds (4). S—A.J.Burnett, R.Lopez. SF—Swisher, Posada. Runners left in scoring position—New York 4 (Teixeira 3, Swisher); Arizona 5 (R.Lopez 2, C.Young, K.Johnson 2). Runners moved up—Jeter, Cano, Cervelli. GIDP— Montero. DP—New York 1 (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira). New York IP H R ER A.Burnett L, 6-6 4 9 7 7 Gaudin 2 1 0 0 Park 2 3 3 3 Arizona IP H R ER R.Lopez W, 3-6 8 8 3 3 Rosa 1 1 1 1 HBP—by Gaudin (J.Upton). T—2:59. A—47,229 (48,633).

BB 2 1 0 BB 2 1

SO 4 1 3 SO 2 0

NP 90 30 36 NP 103 28

ERA 4.83 6.89 6.86 ERA 4.59 6.35

Nationals 2, Royals 1 WASHINGTON — Mike Morse and Cristian Guzman

Marlins’ Mike Stanton

hit solo home runs, Livan Hernandez pitched seven strong innings and Washington beat Kansas City. Hernandez (6-4) had his longest outing since May 9, giving up one run and eight hits to help the Nationals snap a six-game losing streak. Matt Capps struck out the side — all on called strikes — in the ninth for his major league-leading 21st save in 25 chances. Kansas City Podsednik lf Kendall c DeJesus cf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen rf 1-Bloomquist pr Callaspo 3b Aviles 2b Y.Betancourt ss Chen p a-Betemit ph Tejeda p b-Maier ph Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 0 4 4 3 1 1 0 1 33

R H 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 11

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 9

Avg. .293 .261 .323 .330 .269 .190 .273 .323 .268 1.000 .438 --.262

Washington Morgan cf C.Guzman 2b Zimmerman 3b A.Dunn 1b Capps p Willingham lf I.Rodriguez c Morse rf Clippard p A.Kennedy 1b Desmond ss L.Hernandez p Bernadina rf Totals

AB 2 3 1 4 0 3 3 3 0 0 3 2 1 25

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 2 5

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 6

Avg. .250 .300 .283 .275 .000 .265 .316 .390 1.000 .238 .256 .125 .286

Kansas City 001 000 000 — 1 11 0 Washington 010 001 00x — 2 4 0 a-struck out for Chen in the 7th. b-struck out for Tejeda in the 9th. 1-ran for J.Guillen in the 9th. LOB—Kansas City 8, Washington 5. 2B—Podsednik (5), B.Butler (23). HR—Morse (3), off Chen; C.Guzman (1), off Chen. RBIs—Kendall (23), C.Guzman (20), Morse (6). CS—Podsednik (7), Aviles (3), Morgan (11). S—Kendall, Chen, Morgan. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 5 (Aviles, DeJesus, Kendall, B.Butler, Maier); Washington 2 (I.Rodriguez, A.Dunn). Runners moved up—Kendall. GIDP—C.Guzman. DP—Kansas City 1 (Aviles, Y.Betancourt, B.Butler). Kansas City IP Chen L, 3-2 6 Tejeda 2 Washington IP Hrnndez W, 6-4 7

Indians’ Carlos Santana

H 3 1 H 8

R 2 0 R 1

ER 2 0 ER 1

BB 4 1 BB 1

SO 3 3 SO 5

NP 96 33 NP 98

ERA 3.96 3.93 ERA 2.82

Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b Janish ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf L.Nix lf Stubbs cf Heisey rf a-Bruce ph-rf Cairo dh R.Hernandez c Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 4 1 4 3 2 4 3 40

R 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 6

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 9 6 2 14

Avg. .300 .227 .313 .299 .287 .239 .238 .267 .267 .275 .293

Oakland R.Davis cf Barton 1b C.Jackson lf K.Suzuki c R.Sweeney rf Kouzmanoff 3b Cust dh M.Ellis 2b Pennington ss Totals

AB 5 4 3 5 5 5 4 3 2 36

R 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 7 4 7

Avg. .271 .275 .333 .271 .299 .293 .278 .278 .234

SO 0 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 6

Cincinnati 100 000 001 4 — 6 9 0 Oakland 000 010 001 2 — 4 7 2 a-singled for Heisey in the 9th. E—R.Davis (2), Pennington (10). LOB—Cincinnati 7, Oakland 9. 2B—Votto (11), R.Sweeney (16). HR—R.Hernandez (3), off Wuertz; Votto (15), off Bowers; Rolen (15), off Bowers; Kouzmanoff (8), off F.Cordero. RBIs—Votto 3 (46), Rolen (46), Bruce (31), R.Hernandez (16), C.Jackson (3), R.Sweeney (31), Kouzmanoff 2 (38). SB—Stubbs (15), Pennington (9). S—Janish. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 3 (B.Phillips, Cairo, Bruce); Oakland 5 (C.Jackson, Cust 2, M.Ellis, R.Davis). Runners moved up—R.Sweeney, Kouzmanoff. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 6 5 1 1 4 2 96 2.92 Masset 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 23 6.46 Rhodes 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.29 Cordero W, 3-3 1 1 3 3 3 1 33 4.36 D.Herrera H, 9 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.92 J.Smith S, 1-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.93 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA G.Gonzalez 7 4 1 0 1 9 105 3.89 Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.84 A.Bailey 1 1 1 1 1 2 21 1.86 Wuertz L, 2-1 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 5 7.71 Bowers 2-3 2 2 2 0 2 21 5.00 F.Cordero pitched to 2 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—D.Herrera 2-1, Jor.Smith 2-1, Bowers 1-1.

Rangers’ Justin Smoak

T—3:05. A—11,088 (35,067).

LEADERS

Reds 6, Athletics 4 (10 innings)

INTERLEAGUE PHOENIX — Justin Upton, Adam LaRoche and Mark Reynolds homered off struggling A.J. Burnett in the first inning and Arizona went on to beat New York in the opener of their threegame interleague series. Upton, who added a threerun homer in the eighth, reached base five times, had four RBIs and scored four runs.

1 13 1.61 3 15 3.06

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Prado, Atlanta, .339; Byrd, Chicago, .320; Ethier, Los Angeles, .318; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .315; Polanco, Philadelphia, .313; Votto, Cincinnati, .313; AdGonzalez, San Diego, .310. RUNS—BPhillips, Cincinnati, 53; Prado, Atlanta, 51; Kemp, Los Angeles, 49; Uggla, Florida, 49; KJohnson, Arizona, 47; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 47; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 45; JUpton, Arizona, 45; Utley, Philadelphia, 45. RBI—Glaus, Atlanta, 55; Hart, Milwaukee, 53; DWright, New York, 53; Howard, Philadelphia, 51; Pujols, St. Louis, 50; Gomes, Cincinnati, 49; CYoung, Arizona, 49. HITS—Prado, Atlanta, 101; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 84; Braun, Milwaukee, 83; Byrd, Chicago, 83; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 81; Loney, Los Angeles, 79; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 78; Howard, Philadelphia, 78. DOUBLES—Byrd, Chicago, 24; Werth, Philadelphia, 24; KJohnson, Arizona, 22; Loney, Los Angeles, 22; Prado, Atlanta, 21; Braun, Milwaukee, 20; Dunn, Washington, 20; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 20; Torres, San Francisco, 20. TRIPLES—Victorino, Philadelphia, 7; SDrew, Arizona, 6; AEscobar, Milwaukee, 5; Morgan, Washington, 5; JosReyes, New York, 5; 10 tied at 4. HOME RUNS—Hart, Milwaukee, 18; Reynolds, Arizona, 17; Dunn, Washington, 16; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 15; Pujols, St. Louis, 15; Rolen, Cincinnati, 15; Votto, Cincinnati, 15. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 21; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 18; JosReyes, New York, 17; Victorino, Philadelphia, 16; Morgan, Washington, 15; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 15; Pagan, New York, 14; Theriot, Chicago, 14. PITCHING—Jimenez, Colorado, 13-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 10-4; Pelfrey, New York, 9-2; DLowe, Atlanta, 9-5; Carpenter, St. Louis, 8-1; Silva, Chicago, 8-2; JoJohnson, Florida, 8-2; Clippard, Washington, 8-3; Halladay, Philadelphia, 8-6. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Cano, New York, .365; Morneau, Minnesota, .340; Hamilton, Texas, .337; ISuzuki, Seattle, .336; Beltre, Boston, .336; Ordonez, Detroit, .333; Butler, Kansas City, .330. RUNS—Youkilis, Boston, 58; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 56; Cano, New York, 52; MiCabrera, Detroit, 50; Gardner, New York, 49; Hamilton, Texas, 48; Teixeira, New York, 48. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 60; Guerrero, Texas, 57; Hamilton, Texas, 52; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 52; Konerko, Chicago, 51; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 50; Cano, New York, 49. HITS—Cano, New York, 100; ISuzuki, Seattle, 95; Hamilton, Texas, 91; Butler, Kansas City, 90; Beltre, Boston, 89; MYoung, Texas, 89; DeJesus, Kansas City, 86. DOUBLES—Butler, Kansas City, 23; Pedroia, Boston, 23; VWells, Toronto, 23; DeJesus, Kansas City, 22; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 22; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 22; Markakis, Baltimore, 22; MYoung, Texas, 22. TRIPLES—Crawford, Tampa Bay, 6; Borbon, Texas, 4; Gardner, New York, 4; Span, Minnesota, 4; 14 tied at 3. HOME RUNS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 19; JBautista, Toronto, 18; Konerko, Chicago, 17; Hamilton, Texas, 16; VWells, Toronto, 16; Guerrero, Texas, 15; Morneau, Minnesota, 15; DOrtiz, Boston, 15; CPena, Tampa Bay, 15. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Chicago, 27; RDavis, Oakland, 26; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 24; Gardner, New York, 23; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 21; Podsednik, Kansas City, 20; Rios, Chicago, 20; ISuzuki, Seattle, 20. PITCHING—PHughes, New York, 10-1; Price, Tampa Bay, 10-3; Buchholz, Boston, 10-4; Lester, Boston, 8-2; Pettitte, New York, 8-2; FGarcia, Chicago, 8-3; Lackey, Boston, 8-3; Sabathia, New York, 8-3; Verlander, Detroit, 8-4; Pavano, Minnesota, 8-6.

Nationals’ Stephen Strasburg

Welcome to The Show: Baseball’s rookie revolution By Mike Fitzpatrick The Associated Press

It was a Friday night in Florida and 20year-old Mike Stanton had been in the major leagues for less than two weeks. Still looking for his first home run, he pulled his uniform pants up high and socked a grand slam against Tampa Bay that drew a curtain call from Marlins fans. Pretty special moment for any young player, but Stanton was far from the only rookie making a big splash. Over in Houston, Justin Smoak homered and drove in four runs to lead firstplace Texas past the Astros. Up in Pittsburgh, Carlos Santana reached base four times and hit an RBI double to help Cleveland snap a four-game skid. And, oh yeah, in the nation’s capital, some pitcher named Stephen Strasburg set a strikeout record before another sellout crowd that included President Barack Obama. All on one night that belonged to baseball’s new kiddie corps. And there are plenty more to come. “There is a lot of young talent coming into the league,” Washington manager Jim Riggleman said. Stanton, Smoak and Santana are just three fresh-faced examples in the string of hotshot prospects who’ve been called up from the minors recently. At the plate, there’s Giants bopper Buster Posey, White Sox infielder Dayan Viciedo and Mets first baseman Ike Davis. On the mound, Cincinnati’s Mike Leake, St. Louis lefty Jaime Garcia and Rangers closer Neftali Feliz are enjoying astounding success. Add them to Strasburg and 20-yearold Braves slugger Jason Heyward, the two phenoms who have generated the biggest buzz all season, and it’s easy to see that baseball’s baby boom has produced a bumper crop of rookies. “Each club knew when the time was right. When they came they were going

to be impact players,” Atlanta general manager Frank Wren said. “That’s not always the case with young players. That’s why this is a rare, quality group.” The next big thing in baseball? There’s a bunch of them out there right now. This year’s summer blockbuster is the rookie revolution — coming to a ballpark near you. “You can see the fearlessness in the young players,” Dodgers manager Joe Torre said. “Jason Heyward, we struck him out five times one day. He didn’t come back not swinging the next day. You can see the confidence in these young guys.” Some of them aren’t even old enough to drink, such as 20-year-old Chicago Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro. But that doesn’t mean they can’t play. Heyward has a .383 on-base percentage with 11 homers and 44 RBIs. Detroit outfielder Austin Jackson (23) is batting .308 and making highlight-reel catches in center. Leake (22) went straight from Arizona State to the majors and won his first five decisions. “When you’re that young, I mean it’s crazy, man. It’s crazy!” said Mets shortstop Jose Reyes, who made his major league debut one day before his 20th birthday in 2003. “If you can play on this level it doesn’t matter if you’re 15 or 20 or 35.” Exhibit A is the 21-year-old Strasburg, who used his 100 mph fastball — and nasty off-speed pitches — to strike out an unprecedented 32 batters through his first three starts. He headlines a deep rookie class that certainly stacks up with those of 2006 (Hanley Ramirez, Justin Verlander, Prince Fielder, Ryan Zimmerman, Jonathan Papelbon, Josh Johnson, Andre Ethier, Francisco Liriano, Dan Uggla, Matt Cain, Jered Weaver, Ian Kinsler) and 2001 (Albert Pujols, Ichiro Suzuki, CC Sabathia, Roy Oswalt, Jimmy Rollins, Alfonso Soriano, Adam Dunn, Da-

“They’re just more experienced. They know the game a lot better and they’re not overwhelmed by the bright lights,” Braves closer Billy Wagner said. “When I came up it was, ‘Wow! I’m facing Barry Bonds!’ Now it’s, ‘Billy Wagner? I’m not worried about him.’ ” — Atlanta closer Billy Wagner vid Eckstein). “The thing I see is the colleges have really stepped up in getting you ready,” Torre said. “It’s nothing to bring a pitcher up from Double-A ball. This has been an amazing year for young pitchers.” Why the sudden influx of twentysomething talent? For one thing, cost-conscious teams often wait until around June to bring up premier prospects because that delays their eligibility for salary arbitration and free agency. Also, struggling squads like the Pirates, Astros and Orioles have committed to youth movements after falling far behind in the standings. “Colleges are getting better at developing talent just as we are at the minor league level and that just raises the level of competition,” Tigers general manager Dave Dombrowski said. “Talent moves quickly and organizations are more open than they used to be to develop players at the major league level. Many years ago, you wanted players to be as finished of a product as they could be before they got to the majors. Due to costs, many more young players are

getting a chance to play in part because they balance salaries.” Indeed, many of these newcomers sailed through the minors with minimal seasoning. For example, with Houston set to call up catcher Jason Castro today, six of the top 11 picks from the June 2008 draft will be in the majors. Plus, three of last year’s first 10 selections have already reached the big leagues, led of course by Strasburg. Several other elite prospects, such as Cincinnati pitcher Aroldis Chapman and Toronto slugger Brett Wallace, aren’t far behind. “It seems like guys are maybe maturing quicker,” Astros manager Brad Mills said. So while the Major League Baseball draft may never offer as many immediate rewards as its NFL and NBA counterparts, gone are the days when it took half a decade or more for most high picks to pay dividends on the diamond. “Players are just better than they used to be,” Atlanta pitcher Tim Hudson said. “I think high school ball and travel ball and stuff like that, kids have more opportunities at a younger age. They’re almost playing professional schedules at 10. They’re playing a lot of baseball. They have a chance to get a lot better at a younger age. The overall package is better: mechanics are stronger, a better idea of the game, the patience at the plate is a lot better, too.” And that means they’re not intimidated when they make it to The Show. “They’re just more experienced. They know the game a lot better and they’re not overwhelmed by the bright lights,” Braves closer Billy Wagner said. “When I came up it was, ‘Wow! I’m facing Barry Bonds!’ Now it’s, ‘Billy Wagner? I’m not worried about him.’ ” Starved for offense, the San Francisco Giants wanted Posey’s big bat in their lineup so badly they brought him up

May 29 to play first base — even though he’s a catcher. The fifth overall pick in the 2008 draft out of Florida State, Posey went six for nine with four RBIs in his first two games and soon took off on a 10-game hitting streak. The Giants still consider him their catcher of the future, probably starting next season after Bengie Molina’s contract expires. “He’s quite an athlete,” Oakland manager Bob Geren said. “Definitely adds more of an offensive dimension to a team.” Sure, some highly touted prospects have stumbled out of the gate, such as Pittsburgh third baseman Pedro Alvarez. But others who drew less attention are opening eyes, like St. Louis third baseman David Freese and Tigers outfielder Brennan Boesch (.337, 10 homers, 36 RBIs). “It’s all about where you come from and what path you took to develop. How seriously you took it coming up,” Heyward said. “I learned at a very young age, nine or 10, as far as the cutoff man or taking a lead. I was fortunate to have that early start.” In the prove-it-to-me game of baseball, veterans often are skeptical of the hyped-up prospects who pass through the clubhouse every year. But this season, even perennial All-Stars are impressed with the rookie class of 2010. “You can see guys with more refined skills,” Atlanta slugger Chipper Jones said. “The guys that throw 95, 96 (mph), those guys are a dime a dozen but their skills are not refined. Hitters up here can time a jet plane. But you’ve got to be able to locate, you’ve got to be able to change speeds, you’ve got to be able to make the fastball four-seam, two-seam, all that kind of stuff. “You’re seeing guys, especially coming out of the college level, that are already refined,” he added. “They’re sinking it, they’re cutting it, curveballs, changeup. They’re ready.”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 D5

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Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL ADVANCED SUMMER CAMP: For 12U and 14U baseball players; 30 hours of organized workouts are planned with Bend Elks Baseball Club coaches and Elks college players; eight hours per week, two hours each day, four consecutive days at Vince Genna Stadium and the Fieldhouse; first session June 17-20; second session June 28-July 1; third session July 8-11; fourth session July 16,17,18; www.bendelks.com.

BASKETBALL BEND HIGH SCHOOL LADY LAVA BEARS BASKETBALL CAMP: Four days, held this Thursday and June 25, July 1 and 2; for girls in grades 4 through 8 and run by coaches and current varsity players; $40; register at Bend High’s athletic office or contact coach Todd Ervin at todd.ervin@ bend.k12.or.us or 541-385-3159. OUTLAW BASKETBALL CAMP: June 28-July 1 at Sisters High School; morning sessions for grades 2-5 (9-11:30 a.m.), afternoon session for grades 6-9 (12:30-3:30 p.m.); individual and small group instruction, competitions, games and prizes; $65; Justin Nicklous at 541-633-3539 or nicklousfamily@bendbroadband.com. COBO LITTLE DRIBBLERS: For ages 6-12; at Mountain View High School and Cascade Middle School; June 28-July 1 and July 12-15, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; $74-100; 541-389-7275; https://register.bendparksandrec.org. COBO “GIRLS ONLY�: For girls ages 8-14 at Mountain View High School; June 28-July 1; July 12-15, 9 a.m. to noon; $74-100; 541-389-7275; https://register.bendparksandrec.org.

BIKING COGWILD SUNRIVER SHUTTLE: Wednesdays, 3 p.m.; starts this Wednesday; leaves from Cog Wild, 255 S.W. Century Drive; current drop-off location is Sunriver Mall; $10; to reserve seat, call 541385-7002; www.cogwild.com. COGWILD WEDNESDAY SWAMPY SHUTTLE: Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; starts this Wednesday; leaves from the Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; current drop-off location is Swampy Sno-park; $10; call 541-385-3062; www.cogwild.com. HULLABALOO: This Friday, 4-10 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing on N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; features a cycling race; registration for races opens at 3:30 p.m.; event also includes a street festival with food, drinks, a kids area, an art stroll, live music and more; registration required to participate in races; www. nwxhullabaloo.com; 541-382-1622; valerie@brooksresources.com. CYCLING READY 101: Tuesday, July 6, from 6-7:30 p.m. at REI in Bend; the clinic will cover preparation before riding, clothing options, nutritional needs, and bike requirements; 541-385-0594; www.rei.com/stores/events/96. HIGH DESERT OMNIUM ROAD RACE: Race details and links to registration at www.highdesertomnium.com; three-stage event takes place July 1011 in Bend; criterium and time trial on July 10, and a road race on July 11. BEND ENDURANCE/COG WILD MIGHTY BIKES: An introduction to the basics of mountain biking for ages 8-12; choose between cross-country mountain biking and freeride mountain biking; Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 22-Aug. 27; cross-country meets 9-11 a.m.; freeride meets 4-6 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865.

HIKING SUTTLE LAKE LOOP: Ages 13 and

Briefs Continued from D6

Tennis • Local tennis teams reach league championships: Several local tennis teams will be competing in Sunriver this week in the United States Tennis Association Senior League Championships and starting Sunday in the USTA League Pacific Northwest Super Senior Section Championships. The Central Oregon teams include the Senior Women’s 4.5 and Senior Men’s 3.5 and 4.5 teams from Athletic Club of Bend, along with the Super Senior Men’s 8.0 team from Sage Springs Club in Bend. A total of 100 teams and 600 players are expected to compete in either the Senior League Championships or the Section Championships. The tournament fields will include the best teams from throughout Oregon, Washington and Alaska. Competing teams, which represent various tennis clubs and facilities, have finished at the top of their local leagues and will now play for a United States Tennis Association Pacific Northwest (USTA/PNW) Section title. Seniors are players age 50 and older. Super Seniors are

older; an easy, scenic hike around Suttle Lake (1.5 hours); transportation provided from RAPRD Activity Center; this Thursday, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

MISCELLANEOUS ACROVISION TAE KWON DO: Ages 6 and up; martial arts training; starts today; Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 29-July 22, 7-8 p.m. at RAPRD Activity Center; $69; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. YOGA FOR YOUNG LADIES: Ages 14-17; foundations of yoga asana, relaxation, stress reduction, balance and strength will be taught; Wednesdays, June 23-Aug. 25; 3:15-4 p.m. at Yoga Heart Studio in Redmond; $99; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. TWEENS YOGA: Ages 9-13; learn yoga fundamentals, body awareness, breathing techniques; Fridays, June 25-Sept. 3, 2-3 p.m. at the Yoga Heart Studio in Redmond; $99; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ROCK CLIMBING AT SMITH ROCK: Ages 7 and older; this Saturday, 2-6:30 p.m.; for novice to intermediate rock climbers; equipment provided; waivers and release forms necessary; meet at Smith Rock State Park in Terrebonne; $60; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. OPEN HORSE SHOW: Western, English, Reining, Trail; this Sunday; 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Diane’s Riding Place, 65535 Cline Falls Highway, Bend; $8 per class or $50 all day; registration is required; 541-3857933; bendhorseride.com. JR. ROLLER DERBY SUMMER CAMPS: For girls ages 9-17; Lava City Roller Dolls will teach team building, communication and how to roller skate; Mean Satine at sshinemoon@ gmail.com; $125; session 1 is June 28-July 1; Session 2 is Aug. 9-12; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each day. BEND SUMMER READING PROGRAM IN THE PARK WALKING ON WATER: For ages 12 and older; July 8, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend. Join Hank, Tumalo Creek’s paddleboarding instructor, to learn about the newest sport to hit the river; dress for the water; registration required; April at 541-617-7079. ARTFULLY WORKING WITH YOUR HORSE: Saturday, July 10, 10 a.m. at Rolling M Ranch, 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; instructors will work on getting horse’s Attention, gaining Respect and Trust; $30; register by June 26 at http:// rollingmranch.com/2010/03/16/ registration-instructions/. SUMMER READING PROGRAM IN THE PARK DISC GOLF WITH THE HYZER REBELS: For ages 12 and older; July 11, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Bend Library; Central Oregon’s disc golf league demonstrates the ins and outs of disc golf; discs provided; registration required; April at 541-617-7079. WAKEBOARD AND WATER SKI CONTEST: July 17-18 at Lake Billy Chinook on the Crooked River Arm by the bridge; wakeboarding on July 17 and water-skiing on July 18; registration 7 a.m. each day; events start at 10 a.m.; $30 with T-shirt or $25 without T-shirt; all ages and skill levels welcome; Russ Brewer at 541-480-0410 or Aspect Wakeboards at 541-389-4667.

MULTISPORT RUN/CYCLE/RUN & CORE FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 5:15-6:40 p.m. at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; outside warm-up run, form work and drills, then indoor cycle/run intervals, then core work; $6.50 or current fitness pass; 541-389-7665;

players 60 and older. Each age category is grouped into three different ability levels. Play consists of the best of three doubles matches, and the outcome is decided by team scoring.

Rugby • Memorial rugby match Saturday at Big Sky in Bend: Chambers Cup XII, a memorial rugby match dedicated to former Bend Rugby Club player Charlie Chambers, will take place this Saturday at Big Sky Sports Complex in east Bend. The match, between the Bend Rugby Club Roughriders and the Portland Steelheads, begins at 1 p.m. Admission is free to spectators. The event is being billed as an “old timersâ€? match, as all participating players will be age 35 or older. Chambers also played on rugby teams in Portland. He was an air-race pilot who died in a plane accident near Bend Municipal Airport 13 years ago.

Multisport • Pacific Crest team raising funds for MS research: Team DefeatMS, a group of athletes working toward raising money for multiple sclerosis research, will compete in various events in the Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival this weekend in Sunriver.

www.bendparksandrec.org. YOUTH MULTISPORTS CAMP: For ages 7-14; basketball, baseball and soccer will be the focus; June 21-25, 12:30-2:30 p.m. at Elton Gregory Middle School; $60: 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. TYKES MULTISPORTS CAMP: For ages 4-7; an introduction to a vary of sports in a noncompetitive atmosphere; basketball, baseball and soccer; June 21-25, 9-11 a.m.; $45; call 541-548-7275 for location; www.raprd.org. PACIFIC CREST WEEKEND SPORTS FESTIVAL: This Friday through Sunday in Sunriver. Event offers 10 races, including a long-course triathlon, an Olympic-distance triathlon, a marathon, a five-kilometer run/walk and children’s races; cost varies; www.racecenter.com/pacificcrest.

PADDLING FULL IMMERSION KIDS’ KAYAK CAMP WEEKENDS: This Saturday and Sunday; for ages 8-16; instructors will teach safety, paddle strokes, bracing, rescues and hydrology; two full days on the river; all gear provided; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407.

RUNNING BEND BEER RUN: This Saturday, noon; begins and ends at Bite of Bend (corner of Minnesota Avenue and Bond Street in downtown Bend); travels in and around Drake Park with beer stops at mile 1 and 2, and a ticket for a beer at the Bite of Bend; must be 21 to participate (ID required at packet pickup); download registration form online at www.thebiteofbend.com or register at Footzone, Fleet Feet, or WRP Training Studio at 2753 N.W. Lolo, Bend; proceeds to Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; 541-350-3929.

SOCCER HAPPY FEET SOCCER: Ages 3 and 4; basics of soccer; parents are required to participate; tennis shoes required; this Wednesday, 1-1:45 p.m. at RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

SOFTBALL BEND SHOWDOWN ASA FAST PITCH: Four tournaments scheduled for this spring and summer; 12U and 14U B League this Saturday and Sunday; hosted by Bend Park and Recreation District; $350 per team; 541-3897275; greg@bendparksandrec.org.

SWIMMING WATER POLO INSTRUCTIONAL LEAGUE: At Juniper Swim & Fitness Center; for grades 6-8 and grades 9-12; learn individual skills, teamwork; Tuesday and Thursday evenings; grades 6-8 from 5:30-7 p.m. and grades 9-12 meet 6:45-8 p.m.; starts today; June 22-Aug. 12; $80-108; www. bendparksandrec.org to register. PRE-COMP KIDS: Grades 1-8; advanced swim-lesson program; meets Tuesday and Thursdays, June 29-July 22, 5:30-6:15 p.m.; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

TENNIS BLACK BUTTE RANCH: Junior and adult NTRP matches will take place; starts this Friday; June 25-27; Lloyd Rodgers 541-447-1209.

VOLLEYBALL BEND HIGH SCHOOL ALLSKILLS VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For grades 6-8 and freshman; June 28-July 1, 9-11:30 a.m. at Bend High School Gym; skills include passing, setting, spiking, digging, serving and an introduction to blocking; $50; Head Coach Kristin Cooper at kristin.cooper@bend. k12.or.us; 541-306-3235 .

So far, the Portland-based Team DefeatMS has raised $140,000 for MS research. For 2010, Team DefeatMS members aim to raise $25,000 for the Oregon Chapter of the National MS Society as well as for national MS research. To donate, visit www.PacificCrestDefeatMS.com.

Baseball • Boys baseball team wins tourney: The Mountain View Junior Cougars 10U baseball team based in Bend won the Dallas Invitational hosted by the Junior Baseball Organization held this past weekend in Dallas. The Junior Cougars started off the tournament with a win against Wilsonville, 17-7. The Cougars then beat Lebanon 6-3 in extra innings. On Sunday, the Cougars defeated the home team, Dallas, 9-2 and went on to win the Championship game 12-3 against Lebanon. The 10U Junior Cougars team members include Logan Todd, Matty Scarborough, Jake Domings, Shandon Malikowski, Dann Blanchar, Hayden Love, Eli Weatherman, Colton Douglas, Kohl Yetter, Kaden Perkey, Carson Anderson, Colt Jolly and Landon Dean. The team is coached by Nick Dean. — Bulletin staff report

Nationals Continued from D1 Scdoris will be paired on a tandem bicycle with another renowned local female athlete, Bend’s 35-year-old Sarah Max, an elite cross-country skier who is also better known for her accomplishments on snow. The team is scheduled to compete in today’s Tetherow Circuit Race and in the Skyliners Time Trial on Thursday. This is the second year in which the paracycling road national championships have been staged together with the junior, U23 and elite version — a pairing that U.S. Paralympics spokeswoman Beth Bourgeois says streamlines the event and makes sense logistically. “We do that with a lot of our sports,� says Bourgeois, speaking from U.S. Paralympics headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colo. “It’s not uncommon to integrate able-bodied with Paralympic athletes.� This week in the Bend championships, more than 50 paracyclists from across the country are scheduled to participate. That marks an increase of nearly 70 percent over last year’s turnout. Whereas last year the only national paracycling title up for grabs was in the time trial, the higher turnout in 2010 means organizers can offer additional championship events. “Last year, we started just with the time trial,� recalls Craig Griffin, head coach of the U.S. Paracycling national team. “We didn’t quite have the critical mass (of riders) needed to put on a road race and criterium. This year we’ve seen a huge increase in participation at our domestic events, and we’ve expanded our national championship program to include three disciplines.� Top finishers in the paracycling time trial at this week’s nationals are eligible for selection to the 2010 Para-cycling Road World Championships, to be held in Canada in August. Griffin attributes increased visibility of Paralympic sports, as well as awareness surrounding disabled servicemen and servicewomen returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, as key factors in paracycling’s rapid growth. Paracycling is a competitive avenue for a diverse group of riders, including those with spi-

Boswell Continued from D1 The Boswells begin competition on Thursday in the Skyliners Time Trial, and both plan to race in the Downtown Bend Criterium on Friday night and in the Awbrey Butte Circuit Races on Saturday and Sunday. “It’s cool to have it in our hometown,� Austin Boswell says of the road nationals. “This is my first year (racing). I just kind of picked it up. I saw my brother was doing it, and I didn’t really want to play basketball anymore.� Austin races for Hot Tubes, the same team for which Ian raced before he signed with Bissell. Ian missed the road nationals last year because he was racing in the Junior World Championships in Moscow. No longer a junior, this week he will be competing in the U23 category, which is loaded with talented cyclists — some as much as three years older than Ian.

Golfer Continued from D1 Tim Sundseth, a former Redmond High School standout and current assistant men’s golf coach at Oregon State University, and Redmond’s Alex Fitch, a junior-to-be at Linfield College, are in an eight-way tie for 10th place after each fired an evenpar 72 on Monday. Andrew Fitch, 23, is a stroke back of his brother, Alex, and in an eight-way tie for 18th place. Bend’s Brad Mombert (77) is in a tie for 61st place and five strokes ahead of Sunriver’s Christopher Neef, who is in a tie for 94th place. On the women’s side, Bend’s Kailin Downs, the 2002 Oregon Amateur champion, shot a 4-over 76 to finish the first round tied for seventh place, four strokes behind a three-way tie for first place. Portland State golfer Tiffany Schoning, a former standout

Food, Home & Garden In AT HOME Every Tuesday

nal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries and cerebral palsy, in addition to amputees and riders like Scdoris, Rachael who are visuScdoris ally impaired. Riders are grouped into disability classification so that “athletes with like disability or similar functionality compete toSarah Max gether,� Griffin explains. As of Monday afternoon, the Scdoris-Max team had yet to receive the tandem bike on which they are hoping to compete, and they had not ridden together in almost a year. Scdoris first paired up with Max last summer, when Scdoris was in need of a training partner as she prepared for a 1,000-mile tandem ride from Anchorage, Alaska, to Cancun, Mexico. She would go on to complete the trek in four months last summer and fall with Mexican adventurer Diego Gonzalez-Joven. The epic transcontinental ride caught the eye of U.S. paracycling coaches, who earlier this year invited Scdoris to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs for testing. “She’s definitely someone we’re looking at for future development,� offers Griffin. “She’s still involved in sled-dog racing, but I believe that there’s the possibility of integrating cycling into her repertoire, which can only enhance her as an athlete.� The challenge that Scdoris and Max have faced this year is finding a race-ready tandem bike that fits two 5-foot-8-inch riders. “In an ideal world, Rachael and I would have been riding together since the snow melted,� says Max, a two-time winner of Central Oregon’s annual Pole Pedal Paddle multisport race and an avid cyclist during skiing’s offseason. Lately, both riders have been preparing on their own, Max on a single bike and Scdoris on a spin bike. Luckily, last week the duo managed to secure a proper race mount from Co-Motion Cycles, a Eugene-based manufacturer

of custom-made tandem bicycles. The bike was expected to be delivered to Central Oregon by Monday evening, and Max hoped the pair could “take it for a spin before the sun goes down� and again this morning before the road race begins. As the team’s captain, or sighted pilot, Max is responsible for steering and communicating information about what’s happening ahead — such as shifting, turning, slowing, or bumps in the road — with Scdoris, the team’s stoker. Max says Scdoris’ visual impairment seems to have little influence on their partnership. “I actually don’t feel that it has any impact at all,� offers Max. “In talking to people who regularly ride and race tandems, they say it’s really important to communicate, and I know we’d be doing that anyway. “If anything, she’s pretty fearless,� Max continues. “She’s not the person to say, ‘Slow down,’ and she doesn’t back-seat drive. And I think that comes from dogsledding. There’s that element of relinquishing control to your dogs, and that translates well to a tandem bike.� Even though this week’s paracycling national championship will mark the first bike competition for Scdoris, she has already begun thinking about her future in cycling, which includes training toward — and attempting to qualify for — the 2012 Paralympics in London. “One reason why Sarah and I work so well together is that we’re both SO competitive,� Scdoris admits. “We’ll do the nationals this week and get into as many races as we can over the summer and we’ll see how it goes.� Scdoris insists that she has no plans to put sled-dog racing on hold. Rather, she will compete seasonally and continue to train for both sports year-round. If she meets certain qualifying standards this week, Scdoris could earn a spot on one of U.S. Paracycling’s three levels of national development, which would qualify her for coaching, training, and modest financial support. “I think she’s a big talent,� says Griffin. “And I think she’s got a great future ahead of her.� Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com.

Ian Boswell wins Nevada City Classic NEVADA CITY, Calif. — Bend’s Ian Boswell won the 50th annual Nevada City Classic bike race on Sunday, claiming a last-lap sprint against four other cyclists. The 90-minute race on a hilly 1.1-mile circuit through the Northern California town each year attracts some of the country’s top cyclists. Competing in the Nevada City Classic for the third time, Boswell won the race just three days after a hard crash in the Tour de Nez prologue, according to www.velonews.com. “This is my favorite race in the country, so I had motivation to dig a little deeper,� Boswell was quoted on the VeloNews website. “It’s a dream come true for me.� — Bulletin staff report Most U23 riders are hoping to eventually race in Europe with the best in the world. “There’s a lot of kids who are making the transition to pro,� Ian Boswell says. “(U23) is another level. It’s been a big step.� Austin, meanwhile, is trying not to become too wrapped up in competitive cycling — at least not yet. “I think my long-term goal is just to enjoy it and be outdoors, take it seriously but not to the point where you get burnt out,�

at Bend’s Summit High, and Chelsey Lind, a former star at Bend’s Mountain View High and current Oregon State University golfer, are each two strokes behind Downs and in a tie for 13th place. Amy Mombert carded a 7-over 79 to place in a tie for 18th place, a stroke ahead of former Bend High teammate Lisa Schmidt, who is in a tie for 21st place. Both sides of the Oregon AmaHospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Austin says. The Boswell boys’ mother, Dina Boswell, says Ian and Austin would race in “little time trials� on roads near their Bend home when they were about 9 or 10 years old. “It’s nice they’re great friends and brothers, too,� Dina says. “It’s kind of like a little training camp here all the time.� Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

teur, the oldest and most prestigious amateur tournament in the state, will end Saturday with 36-hole championship matches. For complete results, visit www. oregonamateur.org.


C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D6 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Local Special Olympians heading to nationals Bulletin staff report Two High Desert Special Olympians have been selected to the Oregon track and field team for the 2010 Special Olympics USA National Summer Games, to be held next month in Nebraska. Red mond’s R e b e c c a Simms, 54, and Lorna Wynn, 37, both won gold medals in their 2009 events, qualifying them Rebecca for a drawing Sims among other female gold medalists from Oregon for the right to compete at nationals. Simms and Wynn both were selected in the drawing. Lorna Wynn Simms will compete at nationals in the 50- and 100-meter walks and the softball throw. Wynn’s events are the 100- and 400-meter dashes and the long jump. Two other athletes have been selected to the Oregon team: Jeremy Petty, of Hermiston, and Duane Means, of Marion. The Oregon team will be coached by Doug Trice, of Union. Competition in the USA National Summer Games will be held July 18-23 at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln and in the surrounding area. Special Olympics Oregon will be sending a delegation of 30 participants (17 athletes, four volunteers, six coaches and three additional staff) to the national games. The second annual Special Olympics USA National Summer Games are expected to draw 3,000 Special Olympics athletes from across the United States, as well as more than 1,000 coaches and official delegates.

I B Watersports • Wakeboard, water-ski contest coming soon: Sundance Watersports Club will hold a family wakeboard and water-ski contest July 17-18 at Lake Billy Chinook, in Jefferson County west of Madras. All ages and skill levels are welcome. Wakeboard events will be held July 17 and will include the following divisions: 12 and under, women’s open, novice, intermediate, advanced, expert/outlaw, and wake skate. Water-skiing events will be held July 18 and include novice, intermediate, expert and open divisions. Register on the day of the event from 7 to 9 a.m. Events start at 10 a.m. The entry fee is $25, and T-shirts are $5. For more information, contact Aspect Wakeboards at 541389-4667 or Russ at 541-4800410.

Swimming • Bend Swim Club swimmers off to Junior Nationals: Bend Swim Club’s Brandon Deckard broke the Oregon 13-14 boys record in the 400-meter individual medley at the TYR Meet of Champions, held June 10-13 in Mission Viego, Calif. Deckard finished in a time of 4 minutes, 38.99 seconds, and placed 11th. His time qualified him for USA Junior Nationals. Deckard also placed ninth in the 200-meter breaststroke (2:11.05). BSC teammate Kevin Jackson, 16, qualified for USA Junior Nationals in the 800-meter freestyle in a time of 8:34.65 (10th place). In the 1,500-meter freestyle, Jackson placed 12th in a time of 16:22.00. Anne Souther, 15, finished strong in the girls 200-meter backstroke, placing 11th in a time of 2:23.44. For complete BSC results, see Community Sports Scoreboard on Page D6. See Briefs / D5

Shaffer Continued from D1 “If they don’t hear anyone cheering for them, then it might hurt their feelings and they might slow down in the race because they are sad about it,” says Casandra, still wearing her swim cap shortly after finishing a recent morning practice in the outdoor pool at Bend’s Juniper Swim & Fitness Center. Casandra is constantly improving in the pool. Kendra Anderson, Casandra’s Bend Swim Club coach, says Casandra recently shaved 20 seconds off of a 100meter individual medley time. “And I cut 17 seconds off my 100 breast(stroke) time,” Casandra adds. While Casandra is proud of all her personal bests, she does not have a mantel full of trophies and ribbons. Instead she has memories — of the moments when everyone at a swim meet stops what they are doing to watch and cheer as she finishes. “She never quits a race, she swims to the end. … She gives it her all to the end,” says Anderson. “That’s why she is a crowd favorite. “She is one of the most encouraging kids on the team. … We are lucky to have her on our swim team.” “It has become more apparent as time goes on, and as she ages up, that there is a big difference (between Casandra and the other swimmers),” says Jody Shaffer of her daughter. “When people see her swimming, they

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Casandra Shaffer swims the butterfly at the Juniper pool on Friday. According to her coach, Kendra Anderson, Shaffer had to work harder than most to be able to swim the butterfly. But bucking the odds, Shaffer competes in the 100-meter individual medley and other challenging events at USA Swimming-sanctioned meets. understand that it’s a lot more work for her. … When she finishes, there’s usually always a big cheer.” Anderson observes a resilience in Casandra and knows how hard she tries. “I don’t know if a lot of kids could come out every day and be the last ones in their lane every day, and be the last (finisher) at a swim meet almost every time and be super excited to do it,” says the swim coach. “So it definitely shows that she has lots of

confidence.” Mastering certain swim strokes is difficult for Casandra, according to Anderson. “Butterfly is way harder for her, because it requires so much upper body and she is just so much smaller,” says the coach. “But she can swim it. … And diving (to start a race), she is always going to be physically the furthest behind because she is shorter. But it’s not a problem. She has been able to swim through it all.”

As Casandra looks ahead to the DAAA National Games, she has her sights set on one thing. “I want to get a big trophy,” she says. “What if it’s just a medal?” her mom asks. “That’s good — but it has to be gold,” Casandra answers as she swings her goggles in the air and smiles. At the National Games, Casandra will get a rare opportunity to compete against other little people.

“This will be a great meet for her because she will be able to see where she is at with people of her same ability level,” says Casandra’s mother. “And once that happens, I think she will be really excited about what else she can compete in after that.” Jody Shaffer once competed in the DAAA National Games in swimming, which eventually led her to the 1992 Paralympic Games in Barcelona. When she was younger, she also played volleyball and golf competitively. “I just always took on ANYTHING,” says the former Jody Houston, who graduated from Bend High School in 1991. “It didn’t matter to me.” Like her mother, Casandra has a “Can do attitude,” says Anderson. Casandra has watched her younger sister, 7-year-old Sarah, who does not have achondroplasia, win swimming events and work her way to meets that require qualifying times. And rather than being jealous, Casandra says she is proud of her sister. “My sister is one of the best swimmers in my group,” says Casandra of her training group. Casandra says she is proud of all of her teammates and their success. She sets her own goals and — above all — is not afraid to try. “You can do whatever you want,” says her mother. “We’ll always try.” Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at kbrauns@ bendbulletin.com.

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD SWIMMING TYR MEET OF CHAMPIONS In Mission Viejo, Calif. June 10-13 Anne Souther: 11th, 200-meter backstroke, 2:23.44; 23rd, 100m back, 1:09.19. Brandon Deckard: 9th, 200m backstroke, 2:11.05; 11th, 400m individual medley, 4:38.99 (state record 13-14 boys); 17th, 100m back, 1:01.45; 18th, 200m I.M., 2:14.47. Kevin Jackson: 23rd, 200m backstroke, 2:17.54; 19th, 400m freestyle, 4:11.83; 12th, 1500m free, 16:22.00; 10th, 800m free, 8:34.65

SOFTBALL BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT As of June 21 Men’s Competitive C American W L Red Cloud 6 2 Mtn. View Heating 6 2 The Krew 5 3 Warm Springs Ridaz 5 2 Summit 4 4 Falling Waters 3 5 Sidelines 3 5 Newman Brothers 3 5 Nugent Strangleholds 3 4 D&D Down & Dirty 1 7 Men’s Competitive C National Good Wood 8 1 Brew Crew 7 2 Amerititle/Summit El 7 1 Antioch 5 3 Big Ballers 4 5 East Cascade Sec. 4 5 Cable Guys 4 5 Eastmont Eagles 2 7 Copia 2 7 Choke Up 1 8 Coed Competitive Mtn’s Edge 7 1 Rockchucks 7 1 Courtesy Flush 7 1 Meyer Media 5 3 DE/Ventures 4 3 Seven 3 5 BAM 2 6 Southwest Swingers 1 7 Phoenix 0 9 Men’s Competitive A & B Mtn’s Edge 7 3 Knights 7 3 All Options 6 4 Advantage 5 5 10 Barrel Brewing Co 4 6 Bend Research 1 9 Men’s Competitive D Next of Kin 8 1 US Bank Dress Sox 8 1 Cascade Thunder 6 3 Westside Church #1 6 3 The Bucks 5 4 Palmers Cafe 5 4 Northwestern Hm Loan 3 6 Westside Church #2 2 7 Calvary Chapel Bend 1 8 Selco Blues 1 8 Senior Men’s Competitive Clear One 8 1 Line-X 6 3 Eagle Wealth Mgt. 6 3 Bend Riverside Motel 5 4 Bear Prints Sr. 4 5 Sidelines 3 6 Kozak 2 7 Southside P.T. 2 7

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Women’s Competitive Bear Prints 10 Mikes Fence Center 8 Fire & Ice 7 Elevation Events 5 Ron’s Auto Body 4 On Tap 4 Knife River 1 Ogre Knights 1

0 2 3 5 6 6 9 9

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BASEBALL DESCHUTES NABA BASEBALL Scores June 15 Desert Reds 7, Slammers 6 June 16 Trojans 9, Knights 1 June 17 Legends 5, Slammers 4 June 18 Lumbermen 10, Knights 5 Met Life 7, Desert Reds 6 June 20 Desert Reds 4, Legends 3 Trojans 6, Lumbermen 1 Met Life 12, Slammers 2 Standings W Lumbermen 4 Trojans 4 Desert Reds 3 Met Life 3 Legends 2 Slammers 1 Knights 0

L 1 1 2 2 3 4 4

TENNIS SUNRIVER SUMMER SOLSTICE ADULT NTRP June 18-20 In Sunriver Matches played on June 20 NTRP Men’s Open Singles (Final Round) — Leif Nordlund, Palm Desert, Calif., def. Trevor Brown, Powell Butte, 6-2; 6-0. NTRP Men’s 3.5 Singles (Final Round) — Philip Wu, Hillsboro, def. Brett Stav Seattle, Wash., 6-2; 6-0. NTRP Men’s 4.0 Singles (Final Round) — David Wilson Spokane, Wash., def. Timothy Hendrix, Eugene, 6-2; 6-1. NTRP Women’s 3.0 Singles (Round Robin) — Laury Lee-Tosh, Medford, def. Jennifer Neahring, Salem, 6-1; 6-2. Miranda McCall, Redmond, def. Aja Neahring, Salem, 7-6; 7-5. NTRP Women’s 4.0 Singles (Round Robin) — Melanie MacRae, Coldstream, B.C., def. Catherine Brown, Powell Butte, 6-2; 6-1. Melanie MacRae, Coldstream, B.C., def. Jodi Rich, The Dalles, 8-4. Catherine Brown, Powell Butte, def. Kathleen Weatherholt-Englert, Ben Lomond, Calif., Def (ns). NTRP Combined Men’s Open Doubles (Final Round) — Andres Chong / Ryan Cruz def. Mikhail DeWolf / Leif Nordlund, 6-3; 7-6. NTRP Combined Men’s 6.0 Doubles (Round Robin) — Ken Gatter / Alex Gatter def. Dan Wright / Tom Wright. 6-2; 6-0. NTRP Combined Men’s 7.0 Doubles (Final Round) — Keet Curtis / Steven Curtis def. Caleb Hermans / Jesse Rapp

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6-2; 6-1. NTRP Combined Men’s 8.0 Doubles (Round Robin) — Sam Brown / Jim Fisher def. Benjamin Fullhart / Colby Gilmore, 8-4, Ramon Locsin / Lee Wiegand def. Ronald Kurz / James Murphy 8-4. NTRP Combined Women’s 6.0 Doubles (Round Robin) — Sandra Merrigan / Jennifer Sands def. Laury Lee-Tosh / Jadee Kirkham Def (ns). Margaret Collier / Kimberly Ladkin def. Kami Fraley / Andi Sillers Def, (ns). NTRP Combined Women’s 7.0 Doubles (Final Round) — Lydia Reiner / Debra Reiner def. Deborah Hill / Margery Jones 7-5; 6-1. NTRP Combined Women’s 8.0 Doubles (Round Robin) — Melanie MacRae / Haley Younger def. Julianne Wimberly / Denise Wolfe 6-2; 4-6; 1-0(7). NTRP Combined Mixed Open Doubles (Semifinal Round) — Graham Hausler / Jillian White def. Melanie MacRae / Leif Nordlund 6-3; 6-2. NTRP Combined Mixed Open Doubles (Final Round) — Andres Chong / Bryn Oliveira def. Graham Hausler / Jillian White 3-6; 6-4; 1-0(7). NTRP Combined Mixed 6.0 Doubles (Final Round) — Gabrielle Tousignant / Chris Wood def. Kimberly Ladkin / Craig Ladkin 6-3; 3-6; 1-0(6). NTRP Combined Mixed 7.0 Doubles (Semifinal Round) — Judy Rowan / Lee Wiegand def. Ann Breedlove / Kim Breedlove, 6-7; 6-3; 1-0(2). Margaret Collier / Cris Mercer def. Lydia Reiner / Russ Reiner, 6-7; 6-3; 1-0(4). NTRP Combined Mixed 7.0 Doubles (Final Round) — Margaret Collier / Cris Mercer def. Judy Rowan / Lee Wiegand 6-4; 6-3. NTRP Combined Mixed 8.0 Doubles (Final Round) — Thomas Rocher / Katy Rocher def. Jim Fisher / Jillian White 3-6; 6-3; 1-0(8). SUNRIVER SUMMER SOLSTICE JUNIOR CHALLENGER June 18-20 In Sunriver Matches played on June 20 Boys’ 14 Singles (Semifinal Round) — Jordan Gorman (2) Springfield, def. Chris Wood Tacoma, Wash., 6-0; 6-3, AJ Bartko Eugene, def. Mitchell Law, Portland, 1-6; 6-2; 1-0(6). Boys’ 14 Singles (Final Round) — Jordan Gorman (2), Springfield, def. AJ Bartko, Eugene, 6-2; 6-1. Boys’ 14 Singles Consolation (Semifinal Round) — Keet

Girls 10 Singles (Round Robin) — Anna Lowy Bellingham, Wash., def. Phoebe Wu, Hillsboro, 6-2; 6-3. Kyla Collier, Bend, def. Sierra Cassaro, Redmond, 6-2; 6-3. Boys 16 Doubles (Round Robin) — Austin Kische / Parker Nichols def. Jim Deitz / Alex Gatter 6-0; 6-0. Boys 14 Doubles (Round Robin) — Keet Curtis / Mitchell Law def. AJ Bartko / Jordan Gorman, 6-2; 3-6; 1-0(10) — Philip Atkinson / Seth Atkinson def. Casey Collier / Thomas Wimberly 6-4; 6-4. Boys 12 Doubles (Round Robin) — Brian Sands / Kylar Tosh def. Logan Blair / Jonah Lovell 6-3; 6-1. Barrett Titus / Ethan Wu def. Jacob Gage / William Price 3-6; 7-5; 1-0(9). Boys 10 Doubles (Round Robin) — Parker Price / Keigin Tosh def. Scott Bundy / Jasper Ladkin 6-7; 7-5; 1-0(4). Girls 18 Doubles (Round Robin) — Bryn Oliveira def. Jane Fortner / Gabrielle Tousignant, 7-5; 6-1. Gretchen Jernstedt / Catherine Miolla def. Chloe Christensen / Karlee Hight 8-3. Girls 16 Doubles (Round Robin) — Jessica Creger / Savannah Fellers def. Leslie Teater / Abby Cranston 6-2; 7-5. Allison Daley / Kaylee Tornay def. Catherine Brown / Elsa Harris 7-6; 3-6; 1-0(6). Girls 12 Doubles (Final Round) — Olivia Dozois / Camille Dozois def. Andalucia Curtis / Hannah Schandelmeier-Lynch (2) 8-2. Girls 12 Doubles Consolation (Final Round) — Ruby Ladkin / Sierra Winch (1) def. Elisabeth Hastings / Paige Price 6-2; 6-7; 1-0(3). Boys 16 Singles (Final Round) — Matt Larraneta (2), Bend, def. Anthony Croteau, Newberg, 6-4; 6-3. Boys 16 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Parker Nichols, Bend, def. Anthony Richey (1), Klamath Falls, 7-6; 6-2. Boys 18 Singles (Final Round) — Benjamin Fullhart, Sisters, def. Austin Kische, Yreka, Calif., 6-1; 6-0. Boys 18 Singles Consolation (Semifinal Round) — Dylan Lowes, Bend, def. Colby Gilmore, Sisters, 4-6; 6-4; 1-0(9). Boys 18 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Aaron Chriss, Bend, def. Dylan Lowes, Bend, 6-3; 6-3.

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Curtis (1), Bainbridge Island, Wash., def. Philip Atkinson (3), Bend, 7-6; 6-2. Casey Collier, Bend def. Tavin Boynton, Saint Helens, 3-6; 6-2; 1-0(5). Boys 14 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Keet Curtis (1) Bainbridge Island, Wash., def. Casey Collier Bend, 6-0; 6-1. Boys 12 Singles (Final Round) — Logan Hausler, Bend, def. Kylar Tosh, Medford, 6-1; 6-1. Boys 12 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Jonathan Wimberly, Bend def. Nikita Moroz Sammamish, Wash., 7-5; 5-7; 1-0(4). Boys 10 Singles (Final Round) — Jonathan Wimberly (1), Bend def. Jasper Ladkin (2), Bend, 6-0; 6-2. Boys 10 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Parker Price, Portland def. Keigin Tosh, Medford, 6-1; 6-0. Girls 18 Singles (Final Round) — Catherine Miolla (1), Wilsonville def. Gretchen Jernstedt, Wilsonville, Wo (ill). Girls 18 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Jane Fortner, Corvallis def. Taylor Gleffe, Corvallis, 6-1; 6-0. Girls 16 Singles (Semifinal Round) — Erin Crofcheck (3), Prineville def. Blair Dozois (2), Lake Oswego 6-3; 6-2. Haley Younger (1), Bend def. Hannah Anderson, West Linn, 6-0; 6-1. Girls 16 Singles (Final Round) — Haley Younger (1), Bend def. Erin Crofcheck (3), Prineville, 6-3; 6-3. Girls 16 Singles Consolation (Semifinal Round) — Haley Burns, Portland def. Alex Cutler, Sherwood, 6-2; 6-0. Jessica Creger, Sherwood def. Chloe Christensen, West Linn, 6-7; 7-5; 1-0(5). Girls 16 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Haley Burns, Portland def. Jessica Creger, Sherwood, 2-6; 6-2; 1-0(3). Girls 14 Singles (Round Robin) — Olivia Dozois, Lake Oswego, def. Doone Williams, Wilsonville, 6-1; 6-4. Elsa Harris, Prineville, def. Julie Meunier, Corvallis, 6-1; 6-2. Girls 12 Singles (Semifinal Round) — Camille Dozois, Lake Oswego def. McKenna Stephenson, Grants Pass, 7-5; 6-3. Sierra Winch (1), Sunriver def. Abi Johnson, Grants Pass, 7-5; 7-6. Girls 12 Singles (Final Round) — Camille Dozois, Lake Oswego def. Sierra Winch (1), Sunriver, 7-6; 6-2. Girls 12 Singles Consolation (Semifinal Round) — Riley Hanks, Redmond def. Paige Price, Portland, 6-0; 6-3. Hannah Schandelmeier-Lynch (2), Coos Bay def. Andalucia Curtis, Bainbridge Island, Wash., 6-0; 6-0. Girls 12 Singles Consolation (Final Round) — Hannah Schandelmeier-Lynch (2), Coos Bay def. Riley Hanks, Redmond, 6-3; 6-1.

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A new ‘Beat’ Jason Lee sheds his “Earl” mustache for the TV crime drama “Memphis Beat,” Page E2

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

SPOTLIGHT Spectators welcome at kennel club dog show The 28th Annual Mt. Bachelor Kennel Club All Breed Dog Show will be held July 2-4 at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. Gates will open at 8 a.m. Parking and admission for spectators is free. Agility trials will be held all three days; obedience, rally and conformation events will be held July 3-4. Vendors will also be on hand, selling a variety of specialty pet products. Only dogs entered in the competition are allowed on show grounds. Contact: 541-385-5537 or www.mbkc.org.

Farmers market in Madras seeks vendors CHS Garden Center’s farmers market (60 N.W. Depot Road) in Madras is seeking vendors. The market is 3:30-6:30 p.m. each Wednesday at the garden center. Any local producer of fruits, vegetables or other farm-fresh products can apply. There is no cost to become a vendor, and the market will run through the summer. Contact: info@chsgardencenter .com.

Sisters ranch to host horse workshop Rolling M Ranch (69516 Hinkle Butte Drive) in Sisters will host a workshop at 10 a.m. July 10 on “ARTfully” working with your horse. The ART, or Attention, Respect and Trust, course is a hands-on clinic that focuses on understanding why a horse behaves the way it does and then fixing misbehavior. The class is open to all levels of riders who want to learn about communicating with their horses and developing a leadership position. The clinic costs $30 per horse. Participants must register by June 26. The course is open to spectators; the cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Gates open at 9:30 a.m. Contact: 541-549-6962 or shari@rollingmranch.com.

Coming full circle Bend woman among older adults honoring faith through Jewish rite of passage By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin As a girl growing up in Alabama, Ceil Hermann knew she was Jewish, but that was about it. As a member of one of only three Jewish families in town, she didn’t go

Redmond food bank seeks teen volunteers

to temple or study the faith. Now, at age 92, Hermann feels she is coming full cir-

The Redmond St. Vincent de Paul Food Bank (1610 N.W. Veterans Way) is seeking teen volunteers to help serve the hungry. The food bank is open Wednesdays and Thursdays.It feeds nearly 1,000 people each month. Students are asked to commit at least four hours a month. Those interested should contact the food bank. Contact: 541-923-5264.

cle. She is preparing to go through a bat mitzvah as part of a group of adults at Temple Beth Tikvah. “This is the crowning jewel of my Jewish life,” said Hermann. Members of her family from across the country are coming to Bend to attend Saturday’s ceremony, which will include the group members leading the service and congregation in prayer and reading in Hebrew from the Torah. Hermann isn’t shy about calling this moment a big deal in her life. Being part of the group has energized her. It’s also proven something to her. “No matter how old you are, you can always learn something new,” Hermann said. See Hermann / E6

Photos by Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Ceil Hermann reviews a portion of a Jewish prayer in Hebrew. She will read the prayer aloud Saturday as part of the bat mitzvah to be held at Temple Beth Tikvah in Bend.

CinderCone offers free pottery time

Lines drawn in the sand over dog cleanup on beach By Jennifer A. Kingson New York Times News Service

EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. — If you go down to Wiborg Beach on the early side — say, 7:30 a.m. — the first person you might run into is Steven Gaines, the author, who arrives with his dog Shepsil. “I’m here every single day of the year, even if there’s a snowstorm,” he said. By 8 a.m., more dogs arrive, accompanied by owners wielding coffee cups and tennis-ball flingers. If it’s a summer weekend, several dozen dogs will be frolicking on the sand and in the water. Nearly every person carries a Mutt Mitt, a plastic bag for removing waste. “It’s a way to meet people,” said Mark Stearns, who drives with his wife and two French bulldogs from Philadelphia to East Hampton every weekend,

year-round. “We’ve met a lot of people because of the dogs.” Just before 9 a.m., the dogs and their owners trek to the parking lot, complying with a law that bans dogs from the beach after 9 a.m. and before 6 p.m. during the summer season. By day, the families with their children trickle in, setting down towels on the sand that the dogs have vacated. This is where the conflict comes in. “There’s poop out there everywhere, and when it gets hot out here, it stinks so bad,” said Suzzanne Fokine, a yearround resident who uses the beaches daily for exercise and meditation. “We wouldn’t let our kids poop on the beach, so why do we let dogs poop on the beach?” +See Dogs / E6

Yana Paskova / New York Times News Service

Steven Gaines, right, and his dog, Shepsil, not pictured, join others on the beach in East Hampton, N.Y., in May. There’s a feud in East Hampton lately between dog owners and other beachgoers, who say they do not pick up after their pets.

CinderCone Clay Center will open up its studio from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday nights through Oct. 28. During the free sessions, the public can help make bowls for NeighborImpact’s November Empty Bowls fundraiser. Community members can try their hand at wheel-thrown or hand-built bowls and help with glazing. A potter will be available for assistance. Registration each week will be limited to about 12 people; RSVP requested. CinderCone is located at 50 Scott Street, next to Sparrow Bakery, in Bend. Contact: 541-279-0343 or http:// cinderconeclaycenter.com.

Golf tourney to help Camp Fire USA Camp Fire USA is hosting a Charity Golf Challenge on July 10 at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. The event includes 18 holes of golf, a golf cart, continental breakfast and a barbecue lunch. Cost is $140 per person, $560 per team of four. Proceeds benefit the programs and services of the Camp Fire USA Central Oregon Council. Game sponsors and donations for the raffle and auction are needed. Contact: 541-382-4682 or www.campfireusaco.org. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

B oyfriend’s Valentine roses got a joyful second bloom Dear Abby: “Grinched in Iowa” (April 14) was upset that his girlfriend gave his Valentine roses to a stranger after he spent more than $82 on them. Several years ago, when my father was ill with cancer, he sent a beautiful bouquet of flowers to my mother. When I saw them, I commented on how pretty they were and, half-jokingly, asked if they wanted to make another person as happy as they had made my mom. I explained that my friend Patty was having a hard time coping with the fact her dad and mother-in-law both had cancer. My parents said, “Take them!” Patty burst into tears when she saw me arrive with the flowers. I think “Grinched” should quit being such a grouch and be thankful for having a compassionate, caring girlfriend. — Shelley In Muskegon, Mich. Dear Shelley: Thank you for reminding me to “smell the roses.” While I sympathized, in part, with “Grinched,” readers’ responses heavily favored his girlfriend. Read on: Dear Abby: Whether that guy spent $8 or $82, the flowers will die in a week. Sending flowers is an expression of love, and it is the ACT that brings joy to the recipient. Whether the bouquet or the memory of his generosity continues to bring joy is immaterial. He should be thrilled to have a girlfriend who is so full of love and joy she wanted to share that feeling and bring the same happiness to another couple. “Grinch’s” girlfriend should now decide if she wants to be with a guy who is more concerned about the money than the sentiment. — Peeved With Him In Canada Dear Abby: “Grinched’s” girlfriend is too dumb to have thought about what you suggested. (“She could have given the stranger one or two of the roses ...”) He should drop her quicker than petals drop from a rose! — Jon In St. Paul, Minn. Dear Abby: You should have

DEAR ABBY

Jason Lee loses Earl’s mustache to make way for Elvis’ moves in ‘Memphis Beat’ By David Martindale

set “Grinched” straight instead of coddling him. If he had any brains he would have married his girlfriend on the spot. Any woman who is so selfless she would give her gift to another person in need is someone he should hang onto and never let go. Perhaps he is too blind and emotionally insecure to realize this loving woman would treat HIM the same way. — Randy In Troy, Mich. Dear Abby: Maybe she was trying to tell him she did not want any roses. Could it be time for a ring? — Jill In Eugene, Ore. Dear Abby: “Grinched’s” gift did what it was supposed to do — show his girlfriend he cared. When the roses were passed along to another person, his gift benefited three people instead of just one. In this day and age, we need more kindness. — Lisa In Akron, Ohio Dear Abby: The roses had already served their purpose. The girlfriend was able to see how much he cared for her, as were her co-workers. (Why else would he send them to her at work?) Once she took them home, the roses would have sat in a vase until it was time to throw them out. Instead, they brought joy a second time, and she proved herself to be a compassionate, sensitive person who knew how to embrace the true spirit of Valentine’s Day. — Maureen In Manchester, N.H. Dear Abby: Roses: $82. Groceries: $37. A relationship with someone who would reach out with concern to someone in need: Priceless! — Harley In Las Cruces, N.M. D ea r Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘Memphis Beat’

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Earl Hickey of “My Name Is Earl” lived by a simple code of karma: “Do good things,” he’d say, “and good things happen.” Actor Jason Lee is a beneficiary of good karma, too. After four seasons of doing good work — no, make that great work — in one of the best and most uplifting comedies of the past decade, Lee has landed another juicy role on another promising TV series. It’s a crime drama for TNT called “Memphis Beat,” premiering at 10 tonight. Lee plays Dwight Hendricks, a dedicated Memphis police detective who loves his city, his mama and Elvis Presley. It’s a top-to-bottom makeover for Lee. Earl’s trademark big mustache, his unruly hair and his redneck wardrobe are all gone, replaced by a cleanshaven face, a slick haircut and a sharp suit. But perhaps even more remarkable about Lee’s transformation is the ease with which he inhabits this new character. He’s one of those lucky actors who can make his work on screen look effortless. Oh, and did we mention that Dwight moonlights as an Elvis impersonator? “It’s fun to kind of stop and think, ‘Wow, who knew after ‘Earl’ got canceled that I would go from that to playing a detective and singing Elvis songs on a stage in Memphis?’ ” Lee said. “But that’s the beauty of acting. You never know what’s going to come next.” We chatted with Lee about starting a new show, playing a detective and performing as Elvis.

When: 10 tonight Where: TNT

ous character was so closely associated with the word and the concept? No, I’d power through it, man. I might even look at it as a good thing, a sign of sorts. The beauty of that show, it was a silly sitcom, but it had a genuine heart to it. And you couldn’t help but think about how important it is at the end of the day just to try to do the right thing and love your fellow man.

A.

NBC via The Associated Press

From left, Randy Hickey (Ethan Suplee), Joy Turner (Jaime Pressly) and Earl Hickey (Jason Lee) appear in a scene of “My Name is Earl.” Lee will star in the promising crime drama “Memphis Beat,” which premieres tonight on TNT.

Q. A.

What most attracted you to this show? We’re kind of making an old-school cop show. I think “Memphis Beat” feels like it could have been a cop show from the ’70s, like “The Rockford Files” or “The Streets of San Francisco,” which is cool.

Q. A.

How much of “Memphis Beat” is filmed in Memphis? We’re going to Memphis every couple of weeks to get some key stuff. But most of it is done in New Orleans. Both places are heavy in music and food and culture. The sense of overwhelming pride is so infectious. Then you add the heat and the humidity to each day, and it gives us a lot to work with.

Q.

If your career as an actor ever takes a downturn, do you think you could make it in Las Vegas as an Elvis impersonator?

A.

I hate to burst your bubble, but my voice didn’t quite cut it. When we started recording, somebody else had to step in. Would I like to be doing the singing myself? Absolutely. It would be fun. But at least I get to do half of it. I get to play a guitar onstage, and I get to at least look like I sing. It’s my job as an actor to make it feel right. If I can accomplish that, then it’s a good thing.

Q.

That said, are you happy that you don’t have to wear the Earl Hickey mustache anymore? I’m very happy to have lost the mustache. It was one of the best choices I’ve ever made as an actor, deciding to have that thing, because I knew it would just make that character, and absolutely it did. But with the death of Earl came the death of the ’stache.

A.

Q.

Hypothetically, if the word “karma” were in a script, would you be leery about referencing it, given that your previ-

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Denise Fainberg talks about her book “Oregon: An Explorer’s Guide”; free; 6 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. PEANUT BUTTER, JELLY AND GOLD-MEDAL PICNIC: Meet Olympic gold medalist Kristin Armstrong and her cycling team and discuss cycling; with food, drinks and a kids bike rodeo obstacle course; free; 6 p.m.; WebCyclery, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 20, Bend; 541-318-6188.

WEDNESDAY LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7085 or www.dpls.us/calendar. TALES OF WHALES: The Oregon Coast Aquarium presents a program about whales, with puppets, songs and more; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; heatherm@deschuteslibrary.org or www.dpls.us/calendar. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. CROOKED RIVER ROUNDUP CATTLE DRIVE & CHILI FEED: Event includes a chili feed and a cattle drive through downtown Prineville, with 5K and 10K runs; donations accepted, entry fee for runs; 5-8 p.m. chili feed, 5:30 p.m. runs, 5 p.m. cattle drive; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.crookedriverroundup.com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Countryfied performs as part of the summer concert series; vendors available; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com. VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian dish with a list of its ingredients and learn about making nutritious green smoothies; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, ROMEO ET JULIETTE”: Starring Placido Domingo, Anna Netrebko and Roberto Alagna in an encore presentation of Shakespeare’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “My Abandonment” by Peter Rock; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1032. TALES OF WHALES: The Oregon Coast Aquarium presents a program about whales, with puppets, songs and more; free; 6:30 p.m.; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; heatherm@deschuteslibrary.org or www.dpls.us/calendar. KPOV BIRTHDAY BASH: Featuring performances by the Moon Mountain Ramblers, Frank Fairfield, and Pokey LaFarge and The South City Three; event also includes food, drink and a silent auction; proceeds benefit KPOV; $7, $5 for KPOV members; 7 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541322-0863 or www.bendticket.com. STEPHANIE SCHNEIDERMAN: The pop musician performs; free; 7 p.m.;

McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles, records and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. CROOKED RIVER ROUNDUP KICKOFF PARTY: Featuring live music, cowboy poetry, a barbecue and a silent auction; $8, $4 ages 11 and younger; 5-9 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-4479 or www. crookedriverroundup.com. “JAWS”: A screening of the 1975 Spielberg film; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1064. RICHARD GREEN: The San Luis Obispo, Calif.-based folk-pop singersongwriter performs; free; 7-10 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.bendticket.com. LAST BAND STANDING: Semifinals for a battle of the bands, which compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www. clear1017.fm. THE VOODOO FIX: The Los Angeles area-based blues-rock act performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY CROOKED RIVER ROUNDUP: Slack rodeo performances, followed by PRCA rodeo; $14, $10 ages 12 and younger, slack performance free; 8 a.m. slack, 7 p.m. PRCA; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-5638 or www.crookedriverroundup.com. BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles, records and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. HULLABALOO: Event features a street festival with food, drinks, a kids area, an art stroll, bicycle racing, live music featuring Jonatha Brooke and more; registration required to participate in bike races; free; 4-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-3821622, valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxhullabaloo.com. USA CYCLING CHAMPIONSHIPS BLOCK PARTY: With live music, food and drink in celebration of the 2010 USA Cycling Road Racing National Championships; begins on Minnesota Avenue; free; 4-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-771-0003. DAN BALMER QUARTET: The Portland-based jazz act performs; part of the Live at the Ranch summer concert series; $15 in advance, $17 day of concert, $8.50 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 6 p.m.; Lakeside Lawn at Black Butte Ranch, 12934 Hawks Beard, Sisters; 877-290-5296

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

or www.BlackButteRanch.com/ Concerts. “AN AFTERNOON IN THE LIBRARY”: The Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a recital featuring favorite books brought to life through ballet, jazz, modern dance, tap, hip-hop and musical theater; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-5351. FUN-RAISER FOR DUDLEY’S: With live jazz and auctions; donations accepted; 7-11 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541749-2010. RICHARD GREEN: The San Luis Obispo, Calif.-based folk-pop singersongwriter performs; free; 7-10 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; $10; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516 or www.actorsrealm.com. RIGHT ON JOHN: The rootsy, junkyard blues singer performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY THREE SISTERS OPEN WOMEN’S GOLF TOURNAMENT: Quota International of Central Oregon presents a tournament for all experience levels; proceeds benefit scholarships for disadvantaged women and children; $100, includes breakfast and lunch; 8 a.m.; Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive; 541-382-8234. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Benefits Bend Genealogical Society; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541280-4097. COUNTRY QUILT SHOW: Themed “Crazy About ...,” with prizes, demonstrations, awards and more; $2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6728. HIGH LAKES SHOW-N-SHINE: Classic car show with all types of models from the 1920s through 1975; with food and a DJ; free for spectators, $20 preregistered entries, $25 day of show; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-5691. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-4893239 or annsnyder@rconnects.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. CROOKED RIVER ROUNDUP: Rodeo parade in downtown Prineville, followed by PRCA rodeo; $14, $10 ages 12 and younger, free parade; 10 a.m. parade, 7 p.m. PRCA; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-5638 or www.crookedriverroundup.com. FREE SHRED DAY: Bring personal documents to shred; donations of diapers, wipes and clothing for children ages 5 and younger accepted for MountainStar Family Relief Nursery; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.;

South Valley Bank & Trust, 735 N.E. Purcell Boulevard, Bend; 541-385-0485. MASTER GARDENER PLANT SALE: A sale of a variety of vegetables, perennials and annuals; proceeds benefit the OSU greenhouse project; free admission; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; OSU Extension Service, 3893 S.W. Airport Way , Redmond; 541-383-3905. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. RELAY FOR LIFE: A luau-themed 24-hour walking event with food, vendors and a silent auction; proceeds benefit Relay for Life; free; 10 a.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-536-5013. BEND PRIDE FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, a performance by Micah Hogan, belly dancing by Sahara’s Dream, live painting and stilt walking; vendors on-site; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-385-3320. BITE OF BEND: Food festival includes local food booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a Top Chef competition, a children’s area and live music; proceeds benefit KIDS Center; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-323-0964, info@layitoutevents.com or www.thebiteofbend.com. MINING DAY: Experience the life of a placer miner, stake a claim and pan for gold; $2 panning fee, plus museum admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BEND BEER RUN: Race travels around Drake Park, with beer stops along the way; in conjunction with the Bite of Bend; ages 21 and older only; registration required; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; $25; noon; downtown Bend; 541-350-3929 or www.thebiteofbend.com. “AN AFTERNOON IN THE LIBRARY”: The Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a recital featuring favorite books brought to life through ballet, jazz, modern dance, tap, hip-hop and musical theater; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-5351. RICHARD GREEN: The San Luis Obispo, Calif.-based folk-pop singer-songwriter performs; free; 7-10 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541548-4220. WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: “Chasing Legends” tells the story of Team HTC Columbia’s experience at the Tour de France; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; $10; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516 or www.actorsrealm.com.

SUNDAY BITE OF BEND: Food festival includes local food booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a Top Chef competition, a children’s area and live music; proceeds benefit KIDS Center; free; 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-323-0964, info@layitoutevents.com or www. thebiteofbend.com.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 12:15, 3:35, 7:40 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:45, 3:05, 5:25, 8:15 MUPPETS FROM SPACE (G) 10 a.m. PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 10 a.m. PLEASE GIVE (R) 12:55, 3:15, 5:20, 7:30 PRINCESS KAIULANI (PG) 12:40, 3, 5:30, 8:05 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 12:20, 3:45, 7:45 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 12:30, 3:25, 5:40, 7:55

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 1:35, 2:25, 4:15, 5:10, 7:20, 8:05, 10:10, 10:45

THE BIG FOUR: ANTHRAX, MEGADETH, METALLICA, SLAYER (no MPAA rating) 7:30 CORALINE (PG) 10 a.m. DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 9:20 GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 5, 8, 10:40 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 4, 6:50, 9:45 JONAH HEX (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:35, 5:05, 7:45, 9:55 THE KARATE KID (PG) Noon, 1:30, 4:05, 4:35, 7:10, 7:40, 10:15, 10:40 KILLERS (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 5:25, 8:10, 10:35 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) Tue night/Wed morning: 12:01 a.m. MARMADUKE (PG) 11:25 a.m., 1:40, 4:10, 6:40 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 4:45, 7:35, 10:20 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 12:15, 3:50 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:30, 6:45, 9:25 THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX (G) 10 a.m.

TOY STORY 3 (G) 11:45 a.m., 1:20, 2:20, 3:55, 4:55, 6:30, 7:30, 9:10, 10:05 TOY STORY 3 3-D (G) 11:15 a.m., 12:10, 1:50, 2:45, 4:25, 5:20, 7, 7:55, 9:35, 10:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 JONAH HEX (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 10:15 a.m., 12:15, 2:15 TOY STORY 3 (PG) 10:15 a.m., 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 8 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 5:30

THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 5, 7:45 JONAH HEX (PG-13) 5:45, 8 KARATE KID (PG) 7 MARMADUKE (PG) 5 TOY STORY 3 (G) 5:15, 7:45

REDMOND CINEMAS

PINE THEATER

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 11

N   N  Jackson expresses faith in L.A. justice system LOS ANGELES — M ic h ael Jackson’s youngest brother says his family is disappointed in a recent ruling allowing a doctor charged in the pop singer’s death to Randy keep his medi- Jackson cal license, but they have faith in the judicial process. Randy Jackson released a statement Monday, a week after a Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled he didn’t have the authority to suspend the license of Dr. Conrad Murray. Murray faces an involuntary manslaughter charge in Jackson’s death nearly a year ago. Randy Jackson had to be hospitalized after experiencing chest pains the day after last week’s court hearing. His statement says he is feeling “much better, invigorated and spiritually strong,” but does not address what happened to him.

Michael Jackson’s mom: His kids will go to school LONDON — Michael Jackson’s mother Katherine is quoted as saying that the late pop star’s children will attend school for the first time later this year. The 80- Katherine year-old told Jackson Britain’s Mail on Sunday tabloid that Jackson’s three children — Prince, 13, Paris, 12, and Blanket, 8 — have had private lessons up until now. The paper quoted Katherine Jackson as saying that the children would go to an unidentified private school starting in September. The children have been in their grandmother’s care since the singer died in June.

Showbiz news veteran Rona Barrett to tell all

M T For Tuesday, June 22

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 4, 7

LOS ANGELES — She spent a career getting close to showbiz legends — then became one herself. Enter ta i nment-reporting veteran Rona Barrett is sharing that story Rona Barrett with live-theater audiences in the one-woman show “Nothing But the Truth,” which debuted this weekend at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills, Calif. It offers a look back at the work and life of one of the media’s pioneering women. Long before there was Oprah, Barrett had her own multimedia empire: newspaper and magazine columns, her own magazine, TV specials. “There was a real difference between that which we saw on the screen and that which existed inside a person,” Barrett said. “I used to say, ‘I have to know who the r-e-a-l is, because I know who the r-e-e-l is.”

Barrett got particularly real with Cher in a mid-’70s interview chosen as a career standout by Barrett herself. “When I went to interview (Cher),” Barrett recalled, “I said, ‘Where would you like to do this?’ And she said, ‘How ‘bout my bedroom?’ And I said, ‘Your bedroom? Fine!’ And she jumped on her bed and I sat there, too. And then we had this, just, frank conversation that most people just never had at that time.” Barrett, 73, has been out of the showbiz-reporting game for nearly two decades — in 1991 moving to Santa Barbara County and forming the Rona Barrett Lavender Co., a small producer of lavender bath, beauty, food and aromatherapy products. She now works full time on the Rona Barrett Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the aid and support of senior citizens in need.

Attorney takes exception to ‘Team Levi’ blog JUNEAU, Alaska — Levi Johnston’s attorney is taking exception with a blog kept by his client’s sister, Mercede. Rex Butler says that while Mercede Johnston is free to write what she wants, she won’t be privy to information from anyone with “Team Levi.” And Butler said Levi’s team isn’t sharing information with her about his plans, movements or other actions. Mercede Johnston couldn’t immediately be reached for comment. Her blog has gotten widespread attention of late, purporting to answer questions about Sarah Palin’s family and her own. Levi Johnston and Palin’s oldest daughter, Bristol, have a son together. Last week, Johnston’s manager said the two were spending more time together for the child’s sake but were not a couple.

Robert Downey Jr. earns Renaissance Award CHICAGO — The Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago has honored actor Robert Downey Jr. with its Ren a i s s a nc e Award. The Academy AwardRobert nominated Downey Jr. actor was in Chicago on Saturday to accept the award. The center says it chose to honor the 45-year-old Downey because he is “one of the most respected and versatile actors of his generation.” Downey gave an interview to director Todd Phillips, saying three of his movies are the “most representative” of his work, “Tropic Thunder,” “Sherlock Holmes” and “Iron Man.” He won a Golden Globe for “Sherlock Holmes.” The actor also says he’s moved on from drug and alcohol abuse. Downey is to star in the Phillips-directed movie “Due Date” as a first-time dad trying to make it home in time for the birth of his baby. — From wire reports


E4 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, June 22, 2010; This year, you will be exhausted by all the opportunities that appear. Don’t get too tired; you could miss the most important one. Learning to pace yourself will keep you more alert and open. Others often want to be close to you — you seem to have an unusual warmth. If you are single, you could enjoy meeting quite a few perspective suitors. The right person could be among them. If you are attached, the two of you will bond on an even deeper level. SCORPIO draws you in. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Deal with a partner directly; you will get more of the story. Your way of looking at a situation could change radically once you really pull apart the issue. Your communication remains key. Tonight: Dinner and a chat. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Do something very differently from how you have in the past. You might not have the only answer, it is clear. Defer to others, and let them talk. You will get a better concept of what is going on. Tonight: Though you might go along with another’s plans, you still might need to talk about the issue. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Plug into work and get as much done as possible. Someone might keep interrupting you, but that is because he or she cares. Try to screen your calls. Explain that you

have much to do. Others will listen. Tonight: Gather your bills first. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You are much more upbeat than you have been in a long while. Use care when lavishing attention on a child or loved one. If it is possible, you could make someone feel too secure, thus causing yourself a problem ultimately. Funnel your creativity where it counts. Tonight: As you like. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Your best efforts count with a family member. Carefully price a new article, job or purchase to improve your living situation. Ask yourself if it is really worth the cost in the long run. Give yourself space to distance yourself from impulsive buying. Tonight: Happy to be home. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Your words draw quite an audience. Though you are probably expressing more of yourself than you have in a long while, the receiver might not get how vulnerable and open you are. Just the same, avoid internalizing another person’s comments. You are very sensitive right now. Tonight: Hook up with friends. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Pressure builds, and you feel as if you must perform in some sense. You open up to change but also look to financial benefit from a key associate or tie. Review how much you need to spend in order to make more money. Is image everything? Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You are all smiles and

feel sure of yourself. Treat a boss as he or she expects to be treated, even if you know more than he or she does. Your graciousness does make a difference ultimately. Trust your sixth sense. Tonight: Think “vacation.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Use your instincts with someone you relate with frequently and directly. What you pick up could surprise you to no end. You don’t need to have an open confrontation, but you do need to understand what is going on. Tonight: Talk over dinner. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Where friends are is where you want to be, or, if you’re at meetings, at least with associates. You could have difficulty with a partner or friend. You really have very different ideas. Respect and learn from your differences. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Your ability to move through an issue presents a unique set of circumstances. You might not feel comfortable with the same procedures. A boss might seem conservative, but can go with new ideas if he or she sees the logic. Tonight: Working late. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Others might not appreciate how your creativity is blending with your intellect. As a result, you might not be likely to follow through on a project with ease. On another level, you see how easily your ideas manifest. Use this energy well. Tonight: Allow your mind to roam. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


COV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Dogs Continued from E1 Forget the artists-versus-writers softball game or the quest for a reservation at Nick & Toni’s. The real battle line in East Hampton lately has been the continuing feud between dog owners, who say they are diligent about picking up after their pets, and other beachgoers, who point to evidence that belies them. It’s as much a clash of mindsets as it is of beach manners. “I think the people who are dog owners and dog lovers are not really good at seeing the other side,” said Steven Ludsin, who frequents Georgica Beach and wishes that dogs did not. “They sort of feel like, ‘Why don’t you love my adorable little dog?’ ” The controversy grew acute over the winter, when officials in the Village of East Hampton floated the idea of cutting back the hours for dogs on the beach — say, from 7 p.m. to 8 a.m. in the high season. This prompted many residents to do what they do best when they are outraged: write letters to The East Hampton Star, the weekly newspaper. It also led some to form a committee (another of the village residents’ strong suits). Kathryn Staley, who has a Cairn terrier, and Maureen Bluedorn, who has two Cairn terriers, organized a group called BeachDogs11937 — referencing the ZIP code — to oppose any new restrictions. “You know how it is in New York City — some people just spoil it for everybody,” said Staley, who commutes between Manhattan and East Hampton.

Mark Stearns, of Philadelphia, holds Capri, one of his two French bulldogs, on Wiborg Beach in East Hampton, N.Y. Stearns and his wife visit the beach every weekend.

Dogs play on Wiborg Beach in East Hampton, N.Y., in late May. A feud between dog owners and beach manners has grown strong enough for the formation of BeachDogs11937. The group has been campaigning with ads, T-shirts, etc. to coax people to pick up after their dogs.

Yana Paskova New York Times News Service

“There are some people who just never pick up after their dogs and always keep them unleashed. Most of us abide by the rules and clean up the beach as we walk.” During the off-season, BeachDogs11937 worked amicably with officials, and the upshot was that beach rules for dogs were not altered. And owners agreed to hold beach cleanups every month this summer and to start a campaign — with T-shirts, pamphlets and radio ads — to coax people to pick up after their dogs. Larry Cantwell, the village administrator, is the point person for complaints about beaches, which he calls the “crown jewels of the village.” He fielded all the angry e-mails from the dog lovers worried about rule changes. “When you have a conflict between people going to the beach and enjoying it with their children and dogs that spoiled the beach, it’s a serious matter,” he said. “When you receive a phone call from a parent whose child has picked up dog feces on the beach, we take that seriously.” Which leads us to the story of

Yana Paskova New York Times News Service

Gordon Grant / New York Times News Service

Matt Norklun, a longtime East Hampton resident, favors stricter enforcement of dogs and their owners while on the beach. Norklun stands next to the signs at Georgica Beach in East Hampton, N.Y., on June 6. Matt Norklun. A longtime East Hampton resident, Norklun has seen it all: dogs biting joggers, attacking birds, killing a seal, soiling on people and their belong-

Hermann Dedication

Camaraderie “We’ve been each other’s cheerleaders,” Schindel said. Hermann decided to join the group after seeing a picture of a few ladies from Cleveland. The women were in their 90s and had gone through a bat mitzvah. Hermann felt inspired. “I never really thought much about it,” she said. “I just kind of went for it.” Learning Hebrew has been tricky for Hermann. She says so many letters look alike, and the

One thing both sides agree on: the summer people — make that, the “citiots” — are a problem. “On a Friday evening, they drive out from the city and go straight to the beach,” Norklun said. “They’re like, ‘OK, here we are at the toilet, let the dog out.’ A lot of times they don’t even get out of the car.” He complains that the police department turns a blind eye. “They hand out thousands of parking tickets every day, and they can’t get one kid to go to the beach?” Norklun said. Actually, an officer patrols the beach by car every morning. “It’s one of our top priorities,” said Gerard Larsen Jr., the village po-

Bend resident Ceil Hermann, 92, has studied with a group from Temple Beth Tikvah for a bat mitzvah that will be held Saturday.

Continued from E1 Bar or bat mitzvahs typically take place when a person turns 12 or 13 as a rite of passage in the Jewish faith. A bar or bat mitzvahs (bar mitzvahs are for boys, bat for girls) signifies that the individual is now considered an adult member of the religious community. The terms bar mitzvah and bat mitzvah mean son or daughter of the commandments. But it isn’t simply a matter of ceremony. The event will mark the culmination of much hard work and dedication. For about a year, the Bend group of nine women and one man has met once a week to study Hebrew and examine questions of Judaism. Most of the other members are in their 50s or 60s. The decision to form the group was made after members of the temple attended a bat mitzvah for a 13-year-old and the adults realized that they, too, wanted to go through the process. Kathy Schindel, a member of the group who helped offer Hebrew instruction, says it isn’t terribly unusual for older adults to decide to go through a bat or bar mitzvah. Rabbi Alan Berg offered instruction once a month. Group members worked on their own the other weeks. Berg and the group discussed religious ideas and personal experiences. While the preparation is the same at all ages, Berg believes that for adults the “experience is wholly different than it is for a 13-year-old.” Adults are able to work on the religion issues on a whole different level. Berg says they talk about big questions such as, “What are we here for?” and “What is the purpose of my life?”

ings. “At Georgica Beach, people wash their dogs in the hot showers with soap that are meant for humans,” he said. In 2008, he grew so exasperated that he took a Mutt Mitt, collected samples at Georgica Beach, and left it on the steps of Village Hall. Cantwell, who had to clean it up, was not amused, and Norklun was fined $500 for littering. Norklun said his fine was paid by neighbors who support his crusade but want to remain anonymous. “I’m not anti-dog,” he said. “It’s just there’s a place for everything, and the beach is not a place for dogs. Imagine a kitty-litter box: Would you put your hand in it?”

lice chief. But “we can’t be everywhere all the time, and it’s probably a small percentage of the people who aren’t cleaning up.” Last year, enforcement was stepped up, with beach patrol starting at 7 a.m. rather than 9 a.m., but to little avail. “I don’t think we’ve issued one summons yet for people not cleaning up,” Larsen said. “It’s like driving enforcement: When the cops are there, everybody slows down.” Most beaches in the nation don’t allow dogs, period. In East Hampton’s olden days — perhaps the 1980s — when Main Street and Newtown Lane were dominated by mom-and-pop stores, the issue was less pressing, because there were so fewer people and dogs. But now that the village has enough people to attract the biggest names in retail — Hermes! Gucci! Tiffany! — the matter has come to a head. According to the village government’s website, the population of East Hampton village — which is a subset of the Town of East Hampton— is 1,388. But on summer weekends, that swells to an inestimable number. On a Saturday night in August, 1,388 may represent the population of the movie theater plus those trying to get a table at Rowdy Hall. The crowds were back on Memorial Day weekend, when BeachDogs11937 held its inaugural cleanup at Wiborg Beach. “This is really the friendly, happy beach,” said Gaines, who chronicled the excesses of the Hamptons in his book “Philistines at the Hedgerows.” Gesturing to the crowd of people and dogs, he said, “This is a very important part of living here.”

Tyler Roemer The Bulletin

pronunciation is complicated. Also, written Hebrew is read from right to left. And when group members read from the Torah, they will be voicing words that, on paper, contain no vowels. She’s gone over and over and over her Torah portion. “The hardest part is just learning it, period.” Berg knows learning Hebrew hasn’t been easy for Hermann, but he thinks she’s mastered it. Berg says it is unusual for people in their 90s to go through this. “Her personality is of someone who is much, much younger,” Berg said. Hermann says her friends in the group kept her going. “My classmates wouldn’t let me quit. They kept encouraging me.” Through this process, they all became good friends and share a strong connection. “We’re really proud she’s part of us,” said Schindel, who calls Hermann “amazing.” “We all say we want to be Ceil when we grow up.”

Hermann Hermann married a Jewish man and moved to Cleveland after World War II. They were members of a congregation, and that was how she learned more about her faith. “It was good to know

about something I was supposed to be a part of,” Hermann said. She has two children. Her son had a bar mitzvah when he was 13. Her daughter, Ann Rosenfield, who lives in Bend, had her bat mitzvah when she was in her 40s. Berg explains the event didn’t become commonplace for girls until the 1980s. This is one of the reasons why Hermann didn’t experience a bat mitzvah until now. Hermann, who used to work as an executive vice president for a legal publishing company, moved to Bend seven years ago to be near her daughter. Hermann is excited to have her family come to the service. Her son from Montana, a granddaughter from New York and a grandson from Seattle will attend. “My family is very proud of me,” she said. Hermann sees the bat mitzvah as the culmination of her faith journey. “I went from really no Jewish life to a full and exciting (one).” Although the process hasn’t always been easy, she is very happy she has done it. “I think it’s important when you’re older, to do things.” Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

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H O M ES , GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTR A L ORE GON

AH S a y‘oooohh’

F

Long-lasting loaves Martha Stewart’s tips for storing fresh bread, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010

AT THE MARKET

FOOD

By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

I

Easy, spectacular desserts from store-bought ice cream

n her mouthwatering cookbook, “The Scoop: How to Change StoreBought Ice Cream into Fabulous Desserts,” author Lori Longbotham boldly declares that “nowadays, store-bought ice cream is almost always better than homemade. Ice creams, gelatos, frozen yogurts, sorbets, etc., are among the best storebought products we have.” So let’s just go with that thought, even if you make the world’s best homemade ice cream. More power to you, but most of us don’t have a desire to make our own. We don’t want an electric ice cream maker, nor will we invite bursitis with an old-fashioned hand-crank model. But we do want to serve desserts that make people “ooh” and “aah.” In “The Scoop,” Longbotham’s message is to enjoy life more by taking storebought ice cream, which is already delicious, and turning it into something even better with a few simple steps. “I think ice cream makes things special, and I just want people to enjoy wonderful desserts. I don’t believe you have to suffer to enjoy good desserts. With store-bought ice cream, you don’t have to work hard to make a cake, pie or sundae. It can be very special with very little work,” she said in a phone interview from her home in Jackson Heights, N.Y. (www .lorilongbotham.com). We should listen to Longbotham. She’s the unofficial “Queen of Desserts,” having authored “Luscious Lemon Desserts,” “Luscious Chocolate Desserts,” “Luscious Creamy Desserts,” “Luscious Coconut Desserts” and “Luscious Berry Desserts,” all from Chronicle Books. See Ice cream / F2

Tips • Soften ice cream or sorbet in the fridge for 15-20 minutes before scooping. Don’t put it on the counter because it’ll soften unevenly. • If serving a crowd, scoop all the ice cream you’ll need in advance and put it on a wax paper-lined baking sheet. Cover it tightly and freeze until ready to use. You can also roll the scoops in toasted coconut, chopped

• FRITTATA WITH GOAT CHEESE AND VEGETABLES, F2 • COOKIE CRUMB ICE CREAM CAKE, F2 • TARTUFOS, F2 • 3-LAYER SORBET PIE, F2 • CAIPIRINHA, F3 • SALSA CRIOLLA, F3

Tough year for Oregon’s strawberries

At the Market is a weekly look at produce available at local farmers markets.

By Julie Johnson The Bulletin

It’s been a rough year for farmers. Regionally, heavy spring rain has meant drowned fields and damp produce, not exactly a recipe for success for those trying to grow one of Oregon’s most celebrated crops — strawberries. Many early-season crops were washed out by the rain, said Sophie Bello of Junction City’s Groundwork Organics farm. But some growers raced the rain recently to harvest among the first Oregon strawberries of the season. If you see them at local farmers markets, you should jump at the chance to buy some, because the strawberry harvest this year is likely to be thinner than in previous seasons, and you really don’t want to miss out on these gems. Forget what you know about grocery store berries when you head to the farmers market. Oregon berries won’t be the behemoth, pale specimens you may be accustomed to seeing from large-scale farms in Mexico or California. Those berries are grown for size and longevity, as their road-weary flavor can attest. Oregon berries, though, are small, perfectly red and bursting with sweetness. They are allowed to ripen slowly on the plant, resulting in maximum sugar content and a depth of flavor you won’t find in strawberries grown to withstand a week before purchase and a 500-mile truck ride. It’s unlikely anyone needs help figuring out how to enjoy a delightful Oregon strawberry. In my family, we’re lucky if the berries survive the ride home from the market. By the way, strawberries aren’t true berries, which are fleshy fruits produced by a single ovary of the plant and surrounding the plant’s seed or seeds (such as a grape). Strawberries are false fruits or accessory fruits produced by tissues adjacent to the ovaries. The true fruit of the strawberry plant are the achenes, or small “seeds” on the outside of the fruit.

GARDEN

1

2

3

Source: “The Scoop” by Lori Longbotham, Random House, Inc., Villard Books, 2003

Nuts for ice cream • The U.S. is the top ice cream-consuming

• CHIMICHURRI, F3 • BUTTERFLIED LEG OF LAMB, F3 • CILANTRO-LIME BLACK BEAN SALAD, F3 • PASTA WITH PEAS, PROSCIUTTO AND LETTUCE, F6 • CAKE MIX COOKIES, F6

Julie Johnson The Bulletin

Julie Johnson can be reached at 541-383-0308 or at jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.

nuts, crushed candy, etc., before freezing. • Rubber and metal spatulas are indispensable for making ice cream desserts, especially for smoothing layers.

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S

Eat ’em while you can

Jean Paul Vandenbroucke, owner of Sunshine Window Cleaning, loads his cleaning bucket into his truck. Andy Tullis The Bulletin

country in the world. U.S. citizens ate 14 pounds of ice cream per capita in 2007. • Vanilla takes the lead (28.7 percent) followed by chocolate (10.4 percent), cookies ’n’ cream (4.4 percent), strawberry (3.9 percent) and mint chocolate chip (3.3 percent). Sources: USDA Economic Research Service Report; National Ice Cream Retailers Association and NPD Group’s National Eating Trends Services

For top tomatoes, learn the secrets of pruning Photos by Tyler Roemer The Bulletin

A Purple Cow float is made with vanilla ice cream and grape soda and is a sure hit with kids. 1) Lemon sorbet is served in small balls made with a melon baller. 2) Oval ice cream “petals” of raspberry sorbet were created with two large dinner spoons, then arranged on a plate and drizzled with chocolate sauce. 3) Half-and-half spheres of chocolate and pistachio ice cream dress up dessert for something a little more fanciful.

By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

I have a different view than most of a long flight, perhaps because I do it only once a year. This year’s trip took me to Toronto, and such a long trip is a good excuse to purchase a spendy gardening magazine. The best part is I can read the magazine Inside from cover to cover with• When and how to out interruptions; every prune and stake, paragraph, every article, Page F5 even all the ads. Little did I realize at the time I purchased “Grow — Fine Gardening’s Guide to Vegetable Gardening” that I was going to find some answers to the age-old question of to prune or not to prune tomatoes? See Tomatoes / F5

Proper tools, spotless windows By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

An important part of annual cleaning is doing the windows. After a winter and H O spring of snow and rain, the panes are probably streaked and spotted, and the cleaning job won’t be complete until they shine. Anybody can wash windows, but

the right tools and cleaning techniques can eliminate a lot of the toil and drudgery. To wash your windows and M E make them sparkle, the tools are more important than the glass cleaner, says Jean Paul Vandenbroucke, owner of Sunshine Window Cleaning in Bend. See Windows / F4


F2 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Fun food A meal in a wrap — cooking in foil.

COVER STORY

The frittata, the Italian version of an omelette, is quick and simple to make — mix eggs with favored ingredients and then cook over low heat until set. Ingredients to add to the eggs are fairly wide open. Refrigerator leftovers ranging from cooked chicken to vegetables all make good additions.

Ice cream

Bill Hogan Chicago Tribune

An omelette made simple By Bill Daley

FRITTATA WITH GOAT CHEESE AND VEGETABLES

Chicago Tribune

It was Julia Child who transformed me into an omelette boy, offering — by her TV example — ways to experiment with all sorts of fillings and flavors. I dived in, vigorously swirling batch after batch of beaten egg in a shiny skillet set over high heat. It took Julia’s influential editor, Judith Jones, and her thoughtful book, “The Pleasures of Cooking for One,” to get me to slow down and let the eggs do their thing unmolested, as in the frittata, the Italian omelette. Simply mix into the eggs the ingredients you want, pour into a hot skillet and cook over low heat until set. Jones’ recipe was for one, of course; here I’ve expanded her frittata proportion to serve four. • Tips: Look to your refrigerator and pantry for filling inspirations, such as leftover chicken, sliced green olives, grilled shrimp, cubed boiled potato. Experiment. Use a nonstick skillet if you can. If not, add a bit more butter to the pan to ward off any sticking. Resist lifting up the edges

Makes 4 servings. 2 TBS butter 2 shallots, sliced 1 pkg (8 ounces) sliced mushrooms ¾ lb asparagus, chopped

8 eggs ½ tsp salt Freshly ground pepper 3 oz goat cheese, in chunks 1 TBS minced parsley

Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter in an oven-safe skillet over medium-high heat. Cook shallots until wilted, 2 minutes. Stir in mushrooms; cook, stirring often, until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Remove mushrooms from skillet with slotted spoon. Add asparagus to the skillet, adding more butter if necessary. Cook, stirring, until crisp-tender, 3 minutes. Remove asparagus. Wipe skillet clean with paper towel. Heat broiler. Mix eggs, salt and pepper to taste in a bowl. Return skillet to stove over low heat. Melt remaining 1 tablespoon of the butter; pour in the beaten eggs. Arrange the cooked vegetables over the eggs. Cover; cook until the eggs are set, 10-12 minutes. Crumble goat cheese over top; broil until cheese is lightly browned, 2 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley. Cut into wedges. Nutrition information per serving: 309 calories, 63 percent of calories from fat, 22 g fat, 11 g saturated fat, 455 mg cholesterol, 8 g carbohydrates, 21 g protein, 557 mg sodium, 2 g fiber. of the egg mixture to peak underneath; the eggs let go of the pan when the bottom is properly golden brown. • Beverage suggestion: A glass

of sparkling wine is always welcome at brunch; prosecco here, perhaps, because of the Italian theme. Substitute mineral water spritzed with fresh lemon.

10 TWO BIG WEEKENDS

July 16, 17, 18 & 23, 24, 25

COOKIE CRUMB ICE CREAM CAKE I especially like this with gingersnap crumbs and strawberry ice cream. You can also substitute about ¾ cup crushed amaretti and ¼ cup ground hazelnuts for the cookie crumbs. — Lori Longbotham

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when you can make a root beer float or a purple cow (grape soda and vanilla ice cream). Continued from F1 “I love root beer floats. They “The Scoop,” (Villard Books make the day, and they’re so from Random House, Inc., 2003), easy. You can use low-fat ice is out of print, but still available cream, or you can use premium online and in used bookstores ice cream,” Longbotham said on and libraries. the phone. Here’s a small taste of the Her recipe calls for one cup of ideas she includes for jazzing up vanilla ice cream and a bottle of grocery store ice cream: root beer. Simply pour ¼ cup of • Use a melon baller to make root beer into a tall glass, add ¼ little ice cream balls. Freeze cup of ice cream and stir to comthem, and then arrange them in bine. Slowly pour in more root a dish or on a lovely plate. beer to fill the glass half full, • Use an oval scoop or two and then a scoop of ice cream large dinner spoons to create and more root beer if there’s ovals of ice cream, then arrange room. them in a dish. Add some fresh Longbotham includes the hisfruit, and drizzle it tory and manufacall with raspberry turing techniques or chocolate sauce “I love root beer of ice cream in and a sprinkle of floats. They make her book, stortoasted hazelnuts. age and handling • Make tartu- the day, and tips, and a list fos (see recipe). they’re so easy. of ingredients to They’re chocolatehave in the pancovered ice cream You can use lowtry to make quick or gelato balls fat ice cream, and beautiful ice with a nut hidden cream creations. or you can use in the center. Her simple • Ice cream premium ice recipes for sauces pies take minutes and toppings, flacream.” to assemble when vored syrups and you use a store- — Lori Longbotham, slightly sweetbought crust and author, “The Scoop: ened whipped sauces. Layer two creams will equip How to Change Storeor three differyou for a lifetime ent flavors of ice Bought Ice Cream into of desserts. Fabulous Desserts” cream or sorbet. When asked • S p r e a d about her favorNutella (hazelite brands of ice nut-chocolate spread) between cream, Longbotham admitted the layers of an ice cream pie or a fondness for Breyers French cake. “Sprinkle crushed candies, vanilla and Haagen-Dazs’ line cookies or meringues between called “Five,” which includes carthe layers of ice cream to add amel, strawberry, lemon, mint, textural interest. Good preserves ginger, coffee, vanilla bean, pasare also wonderful,” writes sion fruit and milk chocolate Longbotham. — all made with only five ingre• Wow your family and dients: milk, cream, sugar, eggs friends with flaming ice cream. and flavor. “Say you have a skillet of cherAs you think about crafting ries and just put a little kirsch perfect ice cream sundaes at in there and tip the skillet a little home, Longbotham cautioned (if you have a gas stove, or use a that there’s a perfect ratio of match if not) and the flame will sauce to ice cream. go, and it’s stunning,” she said on “You think it’ll be better if you the phone. In the book, she writes put three cups of hot fudge sauce that you can flambé a sundae by on top, and it isn’t. It’s not the soaking one sugar cube per sun- right balance,” she said. dae in alcohol that’s at least 70 Longbotham said the best proof. “Place the cubes on top taste results from two scoops of of the sundaes, light them with ice cream to three or four tablea match, and take the sundaes spoons of sauce or fruit topping. to the table — carefully — while “You don’t want all the sauce they’re still flaming.” to be gone before the ice cream • Consider making ice cream is, but you don’t need a big sandwiches, croissant ice cream puddle of the sauce in the dish sandwiches, bombes, terrines, when you’re finished with the snowballs, parfaits, fruit splits, ice cream, either,” Longbotham milkshakes, floats and more writes in “The Scoop.” with any kind of store-bought ice It’s time to stop serving plain cream you like. dishes of ice cream for dessert • Use a round ice cream scoop and start turning store-bought to make half-and-half ice cream ice cream into something balls: Scoop one kind of ice special. cream, then level off the scoop “Turn it into something unwith a knife. Remove the ice expected. It takes very little to cream and repeat with a con- make ice cream very satisfying, trasting variety. Stick the two and it always makes everybody types of ice cream together to smile around the table,” Longform a sphere, and freeze until botham said. firm. When you read “The Scoop,” Alison Highberger can be you realize it’s just sad to serve reached at ahighberger@mac a dish of plain vanilla ice cream .com.

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1½ C chocolate wafer cookie crumbs 2 pints chocolate ice cream, slightly softened 1 pint vanilla ice cream, slightly softened

1 pint coffee ice cream, slightly softened Slightly sweetened whipped cream, chocolate whipped cream or coffee whipped cream

Generously butter the bottom and sides of a 9-inch springform pan. Sprinkle the bottom evenly with ½ cup of the cookie crumbs. Freeze for at least 30 minutes. Spoon the chocolate ice cream in small pieces over the crumbs, filling in any large holes, then spread it evenly with a warm rubber spatula. Sprinkle evenly with 1⁄3 cup of the cookie crumbs. Freeze for at least 30 minutes, or until firm. Spoon the vanilla ice cream in small pieces over the crumbs, filling in any large holes, then spread it evenly with a warm rubber spatula. Sprinkle evenly with another 1⁄3 cup of the cookie crumbs. Cover tightly and freeze for at least 30 minutes, or until firm. Spoon the coffee ice cream in small pieces over the crumbs, filing in any large holes, then spread it evenly with a warm rubber spatula. Sprinkle evenly with the remaining 1⁄3 cup of the cookie crumbs. Cover the pan tightly with foil. Freeze for at least 6 hours or up to 2 weeks. To serve, let the cake stand at room temperature for 5 to 10 minutes. Run a table knife around the inside of the pan, release the side of the pan, and remove it. Spread the whipped cream evenly over the top of the cake, and cut into wedges. — “The Scoop” by Lori Longbotham, Random House, Inc., Villard Books, 2003

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TARTUFOS Tartufo means “truffle” in Italian, but these only look like truffles. They’re chocolate-covered gelato or ice cream balls with a treat buried in the center. They don’t have to be perfectly round spheres; in fact, they shouldn’t be. 1 pint vanilla ice cream or gelato, slightly softened 4 toasted whole hazelnuts, plus ¼ C finely chopped toasted hazelnuts 2 oz bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped Slightly sweetened whipped cream or chocolate whipped cream Place a plate lined with wax paper in the freezer for 10 minutes. Working quickly, with a large scoop, scoop a ball of the gelato or ice cream, using ½ cup. With the gelato still in the scoop, gently press a whole hazelnut into the center of the ball, and then reshape the ball around the hazelnut. Place the ball on the wax paper-lined plate and repeat to make three more balls. Freeze for 30 minutes or until firm. Stir together the chopped hazelnuts and chocolate on a plate. Roll the gelato balls in the mixture to coat completely, return them to the waxed paperlined plate, cover and freeze for at least 1 hour or up to 2 days. To serve, mound the whipped cream in the centers of four chilled plates. Top with the tartufos, and serve immediately. — “The Scoop” by Lori Longbotham, Random House, Inc.,

THREE-LAYER SORBET PIE Transfer the pie from the pan to a serving plate or cake stand, if you like. This is also exquisite made with fruit ice creams and served with a fruit topping or sauce, or try cinnamon, pumpkin and vanilla ice creams with a gingersnap crust. One 9-inch cookie crumb pie or tart crust, made with sugar cones, or storebought shortbread crust, baked according to package directions 1 pint raspberry sorbet, slightly softened 1 pint lime sorbet, slightly softened 1 pint mango sorbet, slightly softened Slightly sweetened whipped cream Finely chopped mangoes tossed with fresh raspberries and fresh lime juice, optional Freeze the crust for 30 minutes. Scoop the raspberry sorbet into the crust and spread it evenly with a rubber spatula. Freeze for at least 30 minutes, or until firm. Scoop the lime sorbet into the crust and spread it evenly with a rubber spatula. Freeze for at least 30 minutes, or until firm. Scoop the mango sorbet into the crust, and spread it evenly with a rubber spatula. Cover the pie with wax paper and then with aluminum foil. Freeze for at least 5 hours, or up to 2 weeks. About 20 minutes before serving, spread the whipped cream over the pie, leaving a 1-inch band of sorbet showing around the edge. Top with the fruit, if using, and serve or refrigerate for up to 15 minutes. Cut into wedges to serve. Note: To slightly soften the sorbet (or ice cream), transfer it to the refrigerator 15 to 20 minutes before you’ll need to use it. Thawing it in the refrigerator allows the ice cream to soften more uniformly than it would on the counter, where it’s likely to get soft on the outside while remaining hard in the center. Or thaw it briefly in the microwave — a couple of minutes on the defrost setting, or a minute on full power — then leave it at room temperature for five minutes or so. The higher the “overrun,” or the more air there is in the ice cream, the less time it will take to soften. So premium ice cream will take longer to soften than a store brand. — “The Scoop” by Lori Longbotham, Random House, Inc., Villard Books, 2003


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 F3

F A cup full of flavors, fútbol front and center By John Tanasychuk (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) Sun Sentinel

Ask a hard-core soccer fan if eating is an important part of game watching and you’re likely to get an interesting answer: Who has time to eat? During the once-every-fouryears World Cup, which started June 11 in South Africa, food is just plain secondary to soccer. “You watch every frame of the TV, and everybody’s on their toes, even if they’re sitting down,” says Lillo Teodosi, chef and co-owner of Caruso Ristorante in Boca Raton, Fla., who left his native Italy more than 30 years ago. Of course, there’s always before and after the game. Fans gather at home or in eateries and, depending on their nationality, there are bound to be certain foods and beverages present. “When the game is playing, you go to bars where everyone is gathered — the more the merrier,” Teodosi says. “The drink of preference (in Italy) is espresso. Sometimes two or three per person.” The beer of choice typically is Nastro Azzurro, he says, made by Peroni Brewery. “I’m from Rome, where there are two clubs: Roma and Lazio. It’s like the Cubs and White Sox in Chicago,” says Teodosi, who lived in the Windy City. “There are rivalries, and espresso bars are quite a destination in Italy.” While his restaurant doesn’t have a big bar, he had satellite TV installed in time for the monthlong tournament, just to help build camaraderie among fellow Italy fans.

South Africa What will fans of World Cup host South Africa be sampling. “We would be having a braai,” says Siegi Lindsay, who left South Africa shortly after graduating from culinary school in 1985 and owns a Fort Lauderdale home accessories store called Acacia. “A braai is a barbecue, and South Africans love to barbecue.” They’re not big on gas grills, either, she says. Instead, they use firewood sold on the side of the road. “They sell firewood made from old wine vines. It’s a very good wood for a fire,” she says. South Africans might grill boerewors, sausages made from pork, beef or lamb. Lindsay remembers chutney on grilled boerewors eaten on rolls. Rod Wiggill, owner of Meal in a Pie, a South African specialty store in Fort Lauderdale, says some people eat them on hot dog rolls with ketchup, mustard and onion. He makes the sausages in his shop using a special blend of spices from South Africa. The key ingredient is coriander. Lindsay says any authentic South African soccer party wouldn’t be complete without another specialty item known as biltong, a cured meat similar to beef jerky. Perhaps because of her culinary training, Lindsay would also serve grilled lamb.

Argentina Claudio Kojusner says soccer in Argentina is difficult to explain to someone who hasn’t witnessed it. It’s everywhere. “You can play it in the streets, you can play it at the corner, or you can play on a team,” says Kojusner, owner of La Estancia Argentina, a specialty food store with locations in Miramar, Aventura and Coral Gables. When he left Argentina for New York in 1986, he begrudgingly stopped trying to keep up with games. But all these years later, TV has brought soccer to

Michael Laughlin (above); Cary Wagner (left) / Sun Sentinel

ABOVE: Claudio Kojusner, owner of La Estancia Argentina, an Argentine market and cafe with locations in Aventura, Miramar and Coral Gables, Fla., displays a popular barbecue item called choripan, a grilled sausage served on a baguette, and the popular beer Quilmes. LEFT: Frank Reider, owner of Gol! The Taste of Brazil in Delray Beach, Fla., will be serving his recipe for a caipirinha, the national cocktail of Brazil, during the World Cup. The drink is a mixture of Sagatiba brand Cachaca (made from fermented sugar cane), lime juice and rind, and sugar.

GOL! THE TASTE OF BRAZIL’S CAIPIRINHA Frank Reider, owner of Gol! The Taste of Brazil in Delray Beach, offers his recipe for a caipirinha, the national cocktail of Brazil. Makes 1 cocktail. 2 oz Sagatiba brand Cachaca (see note) ½ oz freshly squeezed lime

juice Lime rind, cut into small pieces

In a cocktail shaker, muddle (crush) the ingredients together and then shake well. Strain the liquid into a glass of ice. The more authentic Brazilian way is to pour the mixture into

a rocks glass of ice and serve unstrained with the lime rinds. Note: Cachaca is made from fermented sugar cane.

LA ESTANCIA ARGENTINA’S SALSA CRIOLLA Claudio Kojusner, owner of La Estancia Argentina in Miramar, Aventura and Coral Gables, Fla., shared recipes for classic Argentine sauces that are served as condiments with grilled meats. His chimichurri, made with garlic, oil and parsley, and Salsa Criolla, made with tomatoes and peppers, are perfect on the grilled choripan, or sausage, sold in his stores. Use this on any grilled meat. Makes about 4 cups. 1 tsp salt 1 C white vinegar 1 C olive oil 1 med onion, minced ½ red bell pepper, chopped ½ green bell pepper,

chopped 2 green onions, diced 2 tomatoes, cubed Black pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper, to taste

In a medium bowl, stir salt into white vinegar until dissolved. Stir in oil and vegetables. Season with pepper. Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving.

LA ESTANCIA ARGENTINA’S CHIMICHURRI Serve this with any grilled meat. Makes about 1 ¾ cups. 1 TBS diced fresh garlic 1 C chopped fresh Italian parsley 1 tsp salt

½ tsp black pepper ¾ C white vinegar ¾ C vegetable oil 1 bay leaf

Mix ingredients in a small bowl. Remove bay leaf before serving. Chimichurri will keep in the refrigerator for 2 weeks.

fans everywhere. For this World Cup, Kojusner installed televisions in his Aventura and Coral Gables stores. “Here, Super Bowl is the best day of the year for pizza,” he says. “In Argentina, soccer is a very big day for pizza or empanadas.” While Argentines love to

½ to 1 tsp sugar (or sugar substitute), depending on taste

grill all kinds of meat, the choripan, a simple pork or beef sausage, is a main attraction at soccer gatherings. Kojusner says there’s nothing unique about the content of these sausages, but when he went into business in 2004, he hired a retired Argentine butcher to teach his team the tricks. The

sausages are preservative-free, seasoned simply with salt, pepper and garlic and made in his Aventura facility. Many people cut them in half lengthwise to form what is called a mariposa — butterfly in English — and serve it on a baguette. Chimichurri is optional. Argentina’s beer of choice is a cold Quilmes.

Brazil Frank Reider is such a big soccer fan that he named his Delray Beach steakhouse, Gol! The Taste of Brazil. Born in New York, Reider says he first went to Brazil as a member of the Peace Corps. After law school, he was hired by Chase Manhattan Bank and sent to Rio de Janeiro, where he lived for more than three decades. “I love soccer, but I had to learn it,” he says. “I played soccer in high school but it ... wasn’t anything like playing in Brazil or in Europe. The plan of attack is similar to basketball, but you do it with 11 people instead of five, and you do it with your feet.” He misses the fever that inevitably came with soccer in Brazil. “It’s hard to describe the passion that’s in it for Brazilians, Argentines and Italians,” he says. “During a World Cup game in Rio, the streets are empty. No one’s on the beach. It could be the most beautiful day.” Reider hopes to bring a bit of that passion to Delray. His restaurant will show every game and serve up Brazilian appetizers such as calamari salad, sliced sir-

Use a little gelatin to keep your whipped cream stable By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

You can’t beat the collective wisdom of cooks. A question about how to keep whipped cream stable while taking a banana cream pie to the office

brought a reminder of an old tip using unflavored gelatin, shared by several cooks. To do it, sprinkle a little gelatin powder over a small amount of water, usually ½ teaspoon gelatin over 1 tablespoon water for 1 cup

cream, 1 teaspoon gelatin and 2 tablespoons water for 2 cups of cream. Either warm the water and gelatin over simmering water in a saucepan, or warm it in a microwave until the gelatin melts. Set the dissolved gelatin aside to cool.

Whip the cream until it is just barely holding peaks, then beat in the dissolved gelatin. You also can beat in confectioner’s sugar to sweeten the whipped cream. The cornstarch in powdered sugar also helps to stabilize whipped cream.

SIEGI LINDSAY’S BUTTERFLIED LEG OF LAMB Makes 6 servings. 1 (3.3-lb) boneless butterflied leg of lamb LAMB MARINADE: ½ C buttermilk 2 tsp sea salt ¾ tsp fresh ground black pepper, or more to taste 1 TBS fresh rosemary, minced BASTING SAUCE: 1 stick butter, melted 2 cloves garlic, fine chopped 1 teaspoon sugar Juice of 1 lemon Mix buttermilk and rosemary in a small bowl. Place marinade and lamb in sealed plastic bag and marinate in refrigerator overnight. Remove from refrigerator, pat dry with paper towels and season generously with salt and pepper. Bring meat to room temperature. Preheat grill to medium heat and sear on each side, about 15 minutes total, until nicely browned, then turn over with a pair of tongs. Baste the cooked side with the basting sauce. When the second side is nicely browned, turn the meat and baste the freshly cooked side. Do not overcooked the meat. Cooking time varies from 1 to 1½ hours, depending on the thickness of the meat. (For medium rare, an instant-read thermometer should read 145 degrees.) Carve the meat into thin slices and serve. Nutrition information per serving: 597 calories, 65 percent calories from fat, 43 grams total fat, 20 grams saturated fat, 193 milligrams cholesterol, 2 grams carbohydrates, 0 grams total fiber, 2 grams total sugars, 2 grams net carbs, 46 grams protein, 545 milligrams sodium.

loin steak and chicken wrapped in bacon.

Spain “In Barcelona, people go to the bars and drink beer and watch the game together,” says Marc Vidal, chef at the modern Spanish restaurant, Solea, at the W South Beach. “We drink more than we eat,” says Vidal, 32, who moved to Miami four years ago. Luckily, he says, there are lots of bars in Barcelona. If food is served, it’s simple fare such as canned mussels or hot-pressed pork sandwiches. Vidal is in Spain for the World Cup and can’t wait to experience the camaraderie of soccer, Spanish-style. “For the first time, Spain has a chance to do something important. We have a great team, and if we don’t win something this year, I don’t think we ever will.”

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Tangy and light, this salad’s a keeper By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick Special to The Washington Post

Crunchy, cool celery and a tangy dressing make this dish light, fresh and summery. It is perfect for warm-weather entertaining or just a weeknight dinner. The salad looks and tastes good when served right away, but overnight refrigeration makes the flavor even better.

CILANTRO-LIME BLACK BEAN SALAD Makes eight 1⁄2 C servings. ⁄2 bunch cilantro (tough stems discarded; 1 C packed) Finely grated zest and juice of 2 limes (2 tsp zest and 2 TBS juice) 2 TBS white wine vinegar 3 TBS olive oil 1 ⁄2 tsp salt, or more to taste 1 tsp sugar 3 C cooked black beans (rinsed and drained, if using no-salt canned) 2 or 3 ribs celery, cut into 1 ⁄4 - to 1⁄2 -inch dice (1 C) 3 large scallions, white and light-green parts, finely chopped ( 1/2 C) 1

Combine the cilantro, lime zest and juice, vinegar, oil, salt and sugar in a blender; process to form a pureed dressing. Combine the beans, celery and scallions in a large bowl; add the dressing and mix well. Let sit for 15 minutes, then stir again and taste; add salt as needed. Serve; or cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 12 hours. Mix well before serving. Nutrition information per serving: 140 calories, 6 g protein, 17 g carbohydrates, 5 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 160 mg sodium, 6 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar

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F4 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Next week: Stay cool Learn how to get the right ceiling fan for your home.

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... SCRUB ...

Windows Continued from F1 “We use ordinary dishwashing soap for the glass cleaner, and we put just enough in the water to make is sudsy,” he said. “But you need the right tools to do a good job.” These items include a bucket to hold soapy water, a quality squeegee (not the cheap kind found at the gas station), a good soft-bristle brush and a nonabrasive, absorbent cloth for catching drips and wiping the squeegee edge, he said. “A good squeegee will cost about $12 to $15 and should have a replaceable rubber blade,” Vandenbroucke said. “Replace the blade when it gets a nick in it, or the corners get worn, and it starts to streak.” Virtually any brush will work, he added, and the cloth can be any soft material. The pros use squeegees because they get a window completely dry so there are no streaks. Make sure the size of the window is considered before buying a squeegee, Vandenbroucke advises, especially if your windows have small panes. Clean the outside windows first. It’s generally a bigger job, and you may decide to do the inside windows later. It is also easier to see smudges and streaks from the inside. Start with the screens; your windows won’t look clean if the screens are dirty. It is probably easiest to remove the screens from the inside, and take them outside to scrub them. (Label the screen frames as they are removed so you are sure to get them back in the correct windows.) Even though the traditional method of cleaning screens is to spray with the garden hose, Vandenbroucke said that technique alone won’t get them clean.

Jean Paul Vandenbroucke scrubs a window with a soft scrubbing pad. A scrub brush will do the job, too.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

By Liana B. Baker MarketWatch

... AND SQUEEGEE

SUDS ... Plain dish soap, diluted with water, is a great window cleaner. “Use the bucket of soapy water and a brush, and scrub them down,” he advises. “Rinse the screens well, then snap or pop them with a towel. The screen won’t get clean unless you get all the excess water off.” While the screens are off, tackle the outside windows. Start with a dry broom and sweep off any spider webs, dirt and bugs. Vacuum and clean the sliding glass or patio door channels. The fastest and easiest way to clean the windows is to use the brush and squeegee with a bucket. Dip the brush in the bucket of soapy water and scrub the glass, then squeegee it dry. Wipe the blade after each pass across the glass. The right technique can save a lot of time, and Vandenbroucke recommends the “pulldown” method. “Scrub the window, then dry the edges,” he advises. “Then, go to the top right corner of the window and pull down with the squeegee,” he said. “Dry the blade, then pull down, with the

Vandenbroucke uses a squeegee to clean windows. Pros use a complex technique with the squeegee to dry the glass, but novices could simplify the process with the “pull-down” technique of making adjacent swipes from the top to the bottom.

blade at an angle, so the high side is pointing to the wet part. Wipe the blade after each pull.” If your outside windows are difficult to reach from the exterior, Vandenbroucke said, it may be possible to clean them from inside.

“You may have one fixed window and the other side slides,” he said. “Usually, the sliding window can be shoved completely open, and removed, to be cleaned.” The fixed outside window can probably be washed by leaning from the inside, Vandenbroucke

said, “as long as you have something sturdy to hang on to.” After the outsides of the windows are clean and dry, tackle the inside. Place towels below the glass to protect the window sill or floor from dripping water. As in all do-it-yourself projects, common sense should be factored into a window-washing project. “The professionals charge between $3 and $4 per pane to wash both sides of a window,” Vandenbroucke said. “Don’t climb a ladder to wash a window if you’re uncomfortable with it. It may be a better idea, and safer, to hire a pro.” Leon Pantenburg can be reached at lpantenburg@ bendbroadband.com.

Detoxing a home: What’s it take? By Penelope Green New York Times News Service

When Matthew Waletzke appeared at the door of my East Village apartment to evaluate my home for what he calls “toxic exposure” — the alternative world’s catch-all phrase for potential health hazards like mold, indoor air pollution, household chemicals and electromagnetic radiation (beware your Wi-Fi!) — I half-expected to see a guy in an “Andromeda Strain”-era hazmat suit. Waletzke, however, was dressed casually enough, in a T-shirt and blue jeans. But the aluminum suitcase he carried was all business, filled with an impressive array of meters, probes and other devices that he proceeded to unpack onto my dining room table. Waletzke is a “building biology” consultant, which means he has trained for a year with the Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology, a Florida-based, mostly online school that teaches its students to test water, air and building materials for a checklist of toxins and then prescribe a cure. (They will also vet the cleaning products under your sink, and the lotions and cosmetics in your medicine chest.) Pollution, we’re learning, is personal. Each year brings reports of a new domestic horror, from the medical waste in the municipal water to the carcinogenic bacteria sprouting in your shower head. Your child’s sippy cup is leaching the endocrine disrupter BPA into his milk (let’s not even think about his nonflammable pajamas), and there are phthalates in your shampoo. And if your (bleached, pesticide-soaked cotton) bedding doesn’t kill you, your clock radio just might, say those who classify electromagnetic frequencies as carcinogens.

Evan Sung / New York Times News Service

Matt Waletzke, a building biology consultant, inspects an apartment AC unit for possible toxic elements last month in New York. Waletzke’s home detox looks for environmental stressors on the human body, including toxic and electromagnetic pollutants. Books like “Clean,” a “detox” lifestyle guide out last year, blurbed by Gwyneth Paltrow and Donna Karan and written by Alejandro Junger, a telegenic Uruguayan cardiologist, prescribe a course of juice fasting and something more: a whole home detox, with filtered air, filtered water, organic cotton sheets and bleachfree cleaning products.

‘Guinea pigs’ Junger, whose own tale of chemically induced irritable bowel syndrome and depression will curl your hair, is certainly not the only home-detox evangelist. In “Slow Death by Rubber Duck: The Secret Danger of Everyday Things,” out in January, the authors Rick Smith and Bruce Lourie, Canadian environmentalists, embarked on a road test of self-contamination, eating food microwaved in plastic containers, scarfing tuna and drinking out of Smith’s son’s baby bottles, then testing their blood for levels of phthalates, mercury and other toxins, all of which spiked. “We have all become guinea

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pigs in a vast and uncontrolled experiment,” they write, referring to daily life in the average home. “At this moment in history, the image conjured up by the word ‘pollution’ is as properly an innocent rubber duck as it is a giant smokestack.” Which brings us back to Waletzke, a 35-year-old triathletein-training with a degree in psychology, who turned to building biology as a way to “detox” Simply Vibrant, his Rockville Centre, N.Y., wellness center. He was treating a lot of autistic children, he said, and after learning that some studies indicate their immune systems have a difficult time processing toxins, he wanted to create as benign an environment as possible there. And for the last year, as a building biology consultant (healthydwellings.com), he has been seeing couples with autistic children, couples with infants who are eager to make a “safe” environment for their young families and clients like Gary Tuerack, 38, who lives in Hoboken in an apartment building that recently installed cell phone antennas on the roof and was worried about his health.

Waletzke charges $375 for an in-home evaluation, which takes about three hours and includes a written report and detox prescription. “The percent of the population that’s chemically sensitive is increasing,” he said ominously, unpacking his bag of tricks, as he called his aluminum suitcase. Its contents perked me up: a multidirectional radio frequency meter with a fetching orange bulb; a combustible gas meter, in fire-engine red, had an anthropomorphic “Lost in Space” look and a cute silver probe; a simple compass that will vet your mattress for magnetism.

Water, scents and gas “Here’s something people don’t think about,” Waletzke said, flattening himself in front of my fridge. “Typically there’s a drip or drain pan in there, filled with water and all sorts of gunk, which the refrigerator fan blows right out into the room.” Sadly, he couldn’t reach my drip pan. “I can see it, though,” he said. He checked under my sink for leaks, and behind the washing machine. “Your dryer hose is broken,” he noted. In the shower, his moisture meter squeaked where the tiles need regrouting. An inspection of my air conditioners revealed grimy filters. (I’d forgotten to clean them for, hmm, maybe four years?) He didn’t approve of my candles, which aren’t soy-based (a cleaner burn than wax), though he allowed as how the smell “was really nice.” But, he added sternly, “my general rule is, on a regular basis, candles aren’t good for air quality. Most fragrances have a chemical component.” Finally, he took up his bright red gas meter, which ticks like a Geiger counter. “It’s not just combustible gases that set it off,” he said, “it’s products with high VOCs.” He turned on my gas stove and

the meter began ticking like crazy. Reaching under my sink, he extracted a bottle of floor cleaner and stuck its silver probe inside. It keened again, and I nearly applauded, until I realized the thing was indicting my cleaning solution. Municipal water supplies like New York’s are typically treated with chlorine and fluoride, which are possible carcinogens and show trace amounts of arsenic and other metals. Waletzke couldn’t instantly test my water for these ingredients — that has to be done in a lab and takes two to four weeks, he said, but he offered to do a dissolved solids test. “Basically, that’s particulates in the water, like rust or dirt.” Mine wasn’t terribly high, he said, at 52 parts per million. “One of the concerns in old buildings like yours is lead-based solder in the pipes.” Could he test for that? No, that needs an expert, he said, as does a test for radon or asbestos. Waletzke urged a water filter on the shower, “at the very least,” he said. “Your liver is going to detox what’s in the drinking water, but there is a school of thought that says since your skin is the largest organ in your body, you need to protect it. It doesn’t have its own filter.” Electromagnetic radiation is a toxic star to building biologists like Waletzke, “but it’s the one thing that people can’t see, feel or touch, and so it’s often overlooked,” he said. He ticked off some sources. Did I have a cordless phone? Wireless Internet? Dimmer switches? Cell phones and cell phone antennas nearby? Yes, yes and yes. But research on electromagnetic radiation can take you down a rabbit hole. While doctors like CNN’s Sanjay Gupta have said they will not use cell phones without a headset because of the danger of brain and other cancers, studies linking these devices to cancers have been interpreted every which way.

CHICAGO — For many homeowners, electricity use is highest during the summer — that means steeper energy bills are just around the corner. But a lot of the energy you’re paying for is squandered through air leaks around doors and windows, or through cable boxes and appliances that sap energy when no one is around. Before you shell out the cash for a professional home-energy audit, however, here are some do-it-yourself ways to measure — and then curb — your energy use.

Measure it The average household will spend about $2,140 on residential energy consumption in 2010, according to the Washington-based Alliance to Save Energy. What’s running up that bill? A home power monitor is one way to find out, said Tom Simchak, a research associate at the Alliance to Save Energy. Simchak said he purchased one — The Energy Detective, or TED (see the site at The EnergyDetective.com) — for about $200. It’s connected to his circuit-breaker box and to his Internet router. The monitor records and calculates the cost of his electricity use and sends that information (current and projected consumption, plus cost) to a box with an LCD display that he keeps in his living room. The monitor also sends the information to his laptop, where TED’s proprietary software lets Simchak assess his energy-use history and projected use in greater detail. In addition, the monitor uploads the data to Google PowerMeter, a free online homeenergy monitoring tool. A cheaper alternative that does give you information on specific devices’ energy consumption is a kilowatt meter, which measures the energy use of any device plugged into it. You plug the meter into a wall socket and then plug the device into the meter.

Curb it — and save Whether or not you decide to shell out for energy-measurement devices, you can save money on your utility bill with some simple steps to reduce your home’s energy use. A smart strip, for instance, eliminates vampire energy — the energy devices consume when they’re switched off. Smart strips, which retail for about $30, plug into the wall and also work as surge protectors. The strip’s sensor cuts the power to devices plugged into it when they’re switched off.

Little things help Some other low-cost or free energy-saving moves: Put thicker curtains around windows in summer (including in an unfinished attic) to keep out the sun. Regularly dust off the coils under your refrigerator so it doesn’t have to work as hard to stay cool. Check out Microsoft-Hohm .com. The website details the average energy use of homes nationwide. Simchak said these energysaving steps don’t require technical know-how. “I haven’t done anything a normal person can’t do,” he said. “It takes a little time and effort. But with all these products available, regular folks can do them just fine.”

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 F5

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Next week: Keep it clean Outdoor showers are a popular trend.

COVER STORY

Tomatoes Continued from F1 With county fairs just around the corner, and considering all the unpredictable weather we have had, we need all the help we can get. The article was written by Frank Ferrandino, an associate scientist at the Connecticut Agricultural Station in New Haven, Conn. Ferrandino refers to a tomato plant as being a solarpowered sugar factory with all the sugar produced in the first month going to new leaf growth. Tomato plants double their size every 12 to 15 days, according to Ferrandino. Eventually the plants make more sugar than the main leader can use, which triggers the plant to produce new branches and to start flowering. The plants usually have 10 to 13 leaves and are 12 to 18 inches tall at this point. Within a few weeks, the plants will undergo massive changes, with side branching, increased flowering and the formation of the “sucker” leaf between the main stem and the side branches. It is especially important at this stage of growth that the plants be supported, especially if you are growing indeterminate varieties (climbing types, usually cherry tomatoes). Because of their multi-stemmed growth habit, indeterminates are usually staked rather than supported in a tomato cage. A vigorous indeterminate plant can easily cover a 4-foot-square ground area and become an unsightly, diseaseridden mess at season’s end. An unruly plant produces fruit two to three weeks later than a pruned and staked plant, plus the fruit is smaller. Although indeterminate tomatoes can have many stems, Ferrandino recommends limiting the branching to four. For a multistemmed plant, let a second stem grow from the first node above the first fruit. Allow a third stem to develop from the second node above the first set fruit, and so forth. Keeping the branching as close to the first fruit as possible means those side stems will be vigorous but will not overpower the main stem. I know eyebrows are going up, and I am with those of you who don’t prune. My rationale has always been, “I want all I can get and don’t care about the size.” However, after reading the article, I think I will do some trials and compare the results. The leaves of a properly pruned and supported determinate (single-stemmed, bush variety) have better access to the sun, and most of the sugar produced goes directly to developing fruit. If secondary stems are allowed to develop, some of the sugar production goes into the new growing tips at the expense of ongoing developing fruit. Consequently, the fruit will be smaller, and it will be produced later in the season. Usually we don’t have to worry about too much moisture, but who knows what the summer will bring. The leaves of a pruned and supported plant dry off faster, reducing the risk of bacterial and fungal diseases. As a tomato plant grows, suckers form in the axils between the

Pruning and staking indeterminate tomatoes There are two main types of tomato plant; determinate and indeterminate. Determinate plants have a predetermined number of stems, leaves and flowers programmed into their genetic structure. Pruning will eliminate fruit-producing limbs that will not be replaced by the plant, limiting your harvest. Indeterminate plants continue to produce and grow new limbs, leaves and flowers as long as they are alive. Pruning weak or extra limbs results in a stronger plant and a fruitful harvest.

Bees need us, and we need them. In your yard, plant a succession of spring, summer and fall flowering plants so bees have a continual source of nectar. In return, they help pollinate plants in our home vegetable gardens and farm fields. To further help bees, create simple houses for orchard mason bees in celebration of National Pollinator Week June 21-27. Orchard mason bees, smaller than a honey bee and a shiny dark blue in color, do not live in a nest like other bees. They live in wooden blocks but do not drill holes and destroy things like some bees. Instead, the bees use holes that are already available. The male orchard mason bee cannot sting, and the female rarely stings. Here’s how to build a bee house, according to the National Wildlife Federation: Drill it. With drill bits of various sizes, 5/16 of an inch works best for an orchard mason bee, simply take some scrap lumber and drill holes 3 to 5 inches

Staking tomatoes Tie a soft twine such as jute to the stake first, then loop around the vine loosely and tie close to the stake. This allows the tomato vine to grow upward without restricting it.

Knot close to stake

Loose loop

Pinching or cutting suckers Tomatoes will produce an extra limb in the crotch between the stem and a main limb. Pinching or cutting these “suckers” off will encourage stronger fruit production on the main limbs.

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deep but not all the way through the wood block. For example, get a 4-inch square piece of wood and drill holes that are 3 ½ inches deep. Protect it. Cover the holes with chicken wire to help keep birds away from the bee house. Place it. Securely place the bee house on the south side of buildings, fence posts or trees. Then scatter some of the houses through your community. Bee house tips: • Do not move bee houses after they are in place until at least November. • Do not spray strong insecticides on or around bee houses. • If you build your own bee house, do not use treated wood. To help pollinators: • Plant native, nectar-producing flowers. Go to http://pollinator .org/guides.htm and type in your ZIP code to receive information about pollinators in your area, plus a list of pollinator plants.

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Cutting off limbs that are too close to the ground Although limbs that are close to the ground may produce fruit, the fruit will usually be rotted by contact with the ground or lost to insects.

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

main stem and side branching. These suckers grow just like the main stem and produce flowers and fruit. The farther up on the plant a sucker develops, the weaker it is because the sugar concentration gets lower the higher up you go. To encourage a strong main stem, Ferrandino keeps tomatoes free of suckers below the first flower cluster on both determinate and indeterminate varieties. The only method of removing suckers that I am familiar with is called “simple” pruning. It is the method of grabbing the base of a small and succulent sucker

between the thumb and forefinger and snapping it off. Avoid using a knife or scissors unless the sucker is too large and thick to snap off easily. In the “Missouri” pruning method, which is favored by Ferrandino, you pinch out just the tip of the sucker, letting one or two leaves remain. The advantage to this method is that the plant has more leaf area that helps protect developing fruit from sunscald. In addition to initiating a pruning practice, I need to think differently about the end-of-season process. That is really hard to think about when you have yet

By Kath y Van Mullekom NEWPORT NEWS, Va. — Shane Emmett believes vegetable gardens should be as attractive and easy as they are nutritional and healthy, and he’s launched a venture to prove his case. He and his business partner and childhood friend, Ivan Fehrenbach, started the United States of Food, which custom builds and installs raised vegetable gardens sized and suited for homes and businesses, especially restaurants. “I initially conjured the concept when I was living in California years ago, and I read the ‘Omnivore’s Dilemma’ while simultaneously killing basil plants in my yard,” says Emmett, 32, now a lawyer living in Richmond, Va.

By Kathy Van M ul l ek om Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

to savor the first ripe tomato. The article stresses the importance of the last pruning late in the season, but before the last frost. Pruning directs the carbohydrates to the fruit rather than to the growing tips. That final pruning will make the difference between hard, green fruit left to ripen or sometimes rot in a paper bag or a few more tasty ripe ones. Isn’t it amazing? There is always another tidbit of gardening information to learn from and share. Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

Custom gardens, installed at home Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Create simple houses for orchard mason bees

Resources • United States of Food at www.unitedstatesoffood.com or 804-925-8763 • Southern Exposure Seed Exchange at www.southernexposure.com/ index.html • Johnny’s Selected Seeds at www.johnnyseeds.com • A Thyme to Plant at www.athymetoplant.com “Michael Pollan suggests growing your own food to get to truly understand food policy. I tried, and it took me weeks to realize that I was planting the poor herbs in rocks. I thought there must be a way to help people grow their own food. “We are here to make the experience easier to the gardening neophyte. Also, the gardens just look great in a yard — they are works of art.” United States of Food operates from Fehrenbach’s 20-acre

property just outside Williamsburg, Va. Fehrenbach, 32, is a contractor who built his home while living in a tent for a year. During that time, he mostly ate what he grew in a large garden there. Now, the land supports a small composting operation, poultry, vegetables, specialty plants, turkeys, peacocks and goats. They mix their soil blend, and build the garden frames in a carpentry shop. Saturdays, they set up shop at the Williamsburg Farmers Market.

In Williamsburg to install a culinary garden at Berret’s Seafood Restaurant, Emmett shows visitors how the gardens are designed to fit individual needs and how they enhance the landscape for visitors walking by. Each plank of cedar is individually cut, trimmed with a router and treated with tung oil. Thin copper wire that glistens like art in the summer sun is used for trellising. The raised beds are filled with a mixture of compost, leaf mulch and vermiculite. Drip hoses operated by timers ensure watering is easy; a deer netting system is available. “It looks almost like a piece of lawn furniture when it’s complete,” says Emmett. “We’ve been amazed and pleased with how well everything grows in these gardens.”

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F6 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Let them eat cookies made from cake mix By Julie Rothman

RECIPE FINDER

The Baltimore Sun

Evan Sung / New York Times News Service

Prosciutto briefly cooked in oil adds textural contrast and a meaty kick to a dish of pasta, peas and lettuce.

Pasta with veggies, and a meat garnish By Mark Bittman New York Times News Service

Since I began eating more plants and less meat, I’ve experimented with using small amounts of meat in ways that exploit its flavor without making it central to the dish. In this recipe — pasta with spring vegetables — the meat is literally a garnish, but one with huge impact. That meat is prosciutto, and it’s briefly cooked in a bit of oil, which accomplishes two things: It intensifies the ham’s salty, meaty flavor, and it makes the prosciutto crisp, turning it into a nice textural foil for the tender pasta, peas and lettuce. You do need three pans to make this dish — a small skillet, a large skillet and a large pot for the pasta — but it’s so fast that a

Mary Cronkhite, of Bend, was looking for a recipe that her mother used to have for making a chocolate chip bar cookie using yellow cake mix, chocolate chips and honey. Patricia Finnegan, of Towson, Md., sent in a recipe she has been using for a long time for making a simple and easy treat that her kids absolutely love. She says this recipe has come in handy many times for those last-minute requests for bake sale contributions or classroom snacks. Her recipe uses a yellow cake mix with chocolate chips, but I think the variations would be limited only by what you have on hand in your pan-

try. Next time I make these, I might try adding some nuts or butterscotch chips, but the tasters in my house, young and old, loved them just the way they were. RECIPE REQUEST Maria Scheufele, of Baltimore, has been searching for a recipe for the traditional “Rainbow” or ribbon cake that is made with several multicolored layers and frosted with chocolate. The cakes are still available in local bakeries and Jewish delicatessens, but she has been unable to find a recipe

CAKE MIX COOKIES Makes 16 to 20 bars. 1 pkg yellow cake mix 1 ⁄3 C vegetable oil 2 eggs

2 TBS honey ½ C chocolate chips

Mix all ingredients, except chocolate chips, with a mixer. Once mixed, stir in chips. Batter will be very thick. Spread batter into a greased and floured 9-inch x 13-inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes until lightly browned. Cool and cut. Nutrition information per serving: 180 calories, 8 grams fat, 2 grams saturated fat, 25 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams protein, 1 gram fiber, 180 milligrams sodium, 22 milligrams cholesterol for making it at home. If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St.,

Baltimore, MD 21278. Names and cities must accompany recipes for them to be published. Please list the ingredients in order of use, and note the number of servings each recipe makes.

little extra cleanup seems worth the trouble. While the prosciutto is crisping and the pasta water is coming to a boil, you make the sauce — a quick, gentle braise of shallots, peas and lettuce in broth or wine. Here, the lettuce acts as a tender green, like spinach or watercress. It wilts quickly, in about the same amount of time it takes the peas to cook through, and, as long as you don’t overcook it, it contributes a delicate sweetness to the pasta. When the vegetables and pasta are ready, toss them together with a little Parmesan, sprinkle the crispy prosciutto on top and serve. Even staunch meat eaters will enjoy this dish. But conveniently, if you’re serving vegetarians, you can just leave off the garnish.

PASTA WITH PEAS, PROSCIUTTO AND LETTUCE Ruby Washington / Martha Stewart Living

To prevent a fresh loaf of bread from going stale, keep it in its paper bag, which should then be wrapped in plastic or a larger cloth bag. For long-term storage, park it in the freezer.

Makes 4 servings. Salt 3 TBS olive oil 2-3 oz thinly sliced prosciutto, cut crosswise into 1⁄2 -inch-wide strips 1 lb pasta 2 TBS butter 1 shallot, minced Black pepper to taste

2 C peas, fresh or frozen 1 head Bibb or Boston lettuce (about 6 oz), cored, leaves cut into 3⁄4 -inch slices 1 ⁄2 C chicken or vegetable stock or dry white wine, more as needed 1 C finely grated Parmesan cheese

Bring a large pot of water to boil and salt it. Meanwhile, put one tablespoon oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add prosciutto and cook, turning occasionally, until crisp, about 4-5 minutes; set aside. When water boils, add pasta and cook until just tender; drain pasta, reserving some cooking liquid. Meanwhile, melt butter with remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add shallot and sprinkle with salt and pepper; cook until shallot begins to soften, about 5 minutes. Add peas, lettuce and stock or wine to skillet and cook until peas turn bright green and lettuce is wilted, about 5 minutes. Add pasta to pan and continue cooking and stirring until everything is just heated through, adding extra stock or some reserved cooking liquid if needed to moisten. Toss with Parmesan cheese, garnish with prosciutto, adjust seasoning to taste and serve.

To preserve lasagne: Freeze and then bake By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q:

A friend and I are making lasagne for a neighbor who had surgery. If we want to give our neighbor the option of freezing the lasagne, should we cook it or leave it uncooked? Search this one on the Internet and you’ll come up with as many opinions as there are entries for the word “lasagne.” Personally, I prefer to assemble, freeze and then bake. This has a couple of advantages. First, the pasta doesn’t get as mushy. In fact, if you use enough sauce and make sure the noodles are well-covered, you don’t even have to boil them first. Second, it saves a step because you don’t have to thaw the lasagne. You can bake it straight from the freezer. Just add a little extra time to the baking, maybe 15 minutes. And third, the National Pasta Association website agrees with me: Freeze, then bake. A couple of tricks make it easier. First, line the baking pan with foil. After the lasagne is frozen, remove it, wrap it well and store it in the freezer in a large resealable freezer bag. That frees up your lasagne pan. If you deliver it in a disposable pan, your neighbor won’t have to fuss with returning a dish. If you use ricotta in your reci-

A:

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pe, drain it well and make sure to use whole-milk ricotta, to keep it from getting watery.

Extend your bread’s life Martha Stewart Living

Q:

What is the best way to store a loaf of freshly baked bread? The ones I buy seem to go stale overnight. Keep the bread in its paper bag, and slip that into a larger cloth bag or wrap it in plastic. The bags I buy are long enough for baguettes and can be sealed with a twist tie. Fresh Italian or French bread generally does not last longer than one day, unless you freeze it. When you take the bread out of the freezer, leave it wrapped until it comes to room temperature. Once it has defrosted, heat it in the oven for a few minutes.

A:

Q:

I’d like to hang an antique print in my bathroom. Is there a way to safeguard it against moisture damage? With fluctuations in humidity and temperature, a bathroom is no place for your finest art. Moisture causes paper to swell, which can lead to buckling or wrinkling. It

A:

also increases the risk of mold and foxing, a term for spots caused by a type of chemical degradation. If the print is rare or of sentimental value, forgo the bathroom and hang it in a stable environment, such as a hallway or a powder room. Better yet, have a digital reproduction made on antique paper, and subject this to the elements. If the print is inexpensive and worth the gamble, take it to a reputable framer. In skilled hands, the artwork can be protected to minimize damage. You might want to trade glass for Plexiglas, which is less prone to condensation buildup, says April Hann, of the Chicago Conservation Center (chicago conservation.com). The print should be set back from the glass, either with a thick mat or with spacers resting on the rabbet, or lip, of the frame. Hann suggests then encapsulating all the layers — backing board, mount board, art, mat or spacers, and Plexiglas — into a

sealed unit by binding together the edges with archival tape. As a final touch, attach rubber surface protectors to the paper backing to encourage air circulation behind the frame. Ventilation is also important: Open the window and run the fan for 15 to 20 minutes after bathing to air out the room.

Q:

I’d like to pickle watermelon rinds this summer. How do I store the rinds until I have enough to pickle? Watermelon rind, pickled with sugar and spices such as cloves and cinnamon, is a traditional condiment in the South. With a sweet-and-sour flavor and slight crunch, it serves as a bright counterpoint to pork and other rich meats. Most recipes call for the rind of a large watermelon. If the entire fruit won’t be eaten at one sitting, cut the rind from each piece before it’s served, and then rinse it and wrap it tightly with plastic wrap. Refrigerate the rinds for up to a week. Freez-

A:

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ing is not recommended — high water content leads to ice-crystal damage, which makes the rinds mushy once thawed. (If you serve the watermelon with the rind intact, do not leave it in the sun; doing so accelerates bacteria growth and shortens shelf life.) Follow standard pickling procedures, such as sterilizing jars with boiling water. The rind should keep for up to a year in a cool, dark place. For recipes and more information on pickling and canning, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation’s website, http://uga.edu/ nchfp. Questions for Martha Stewart can be e-mailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; for more information on the topics covered in this column, visit www.marthastewart.com. Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.

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PUG MIXES: 2 males, 1 female, 1st shots, wormed, ready to go! $150 ea. Exc. Ovens, (2), White GE Profile, companions. Call for pic30” Self Cleaning, works tures, 541-389-0322 perfect, $150, 541-318-3354. SHIH-POO adorable toy hypo-allergenic puppies, 4 The Bulletin males, 2 females left. $350. recommends extra caution Call Martha at 541-744-1804. when purchasing products or services from out of the Standard Poodle Jabez Pups, 6 area. Sending cash, checks, males & 2 females, chocoor credit information may late, black, apricot & cream be subjected to F R A U D . $800 & $750. 541-771-0513 For more information about Jabezstandardpoodles.com an advertiser, you may call WELSH CORGI PUPPIES, purethe Oregon State Attorney bred 7 wks., 1st shots, $300 General’s Office Consumer obo; Keith 541-480-3099. Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392. Wolf Hybrid Pups, $250 parents on site, exc. markings, only 1 female & 3 males left! 541-977-2845. Yellow Lab, Female, AKC, 5 mos. Local breeder. Early training started, housebroken. $350, 541-410-3033.

Ruger SR9C 9mm,

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Colt 1911 A-1. .45 semi -auto. Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi WWII issue. Very clean. audio & studio equip. McIn- CRUISE THROUGH classified Good condition. Shoots well. tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, when you're in the market for also have us military leather Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, a new or used car. Dresser, antique oak, oval holster from WWII. $600 NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 1910 Steinway Model A mirror, $250, antique secOBO. Call 541-420-0801 Parlor Grand Piano burled retary desk, bookcase on Looking for your next mahogany, fully restored in & top, 2 drawers underneath, Fausti/Elegant 2010 Ducks employee? out, $46,000 incl. profesLOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY Unlimited Banquet 12 ga. $250, 382-6400 after 4 p.m. Place a Bulletin help sional West Coast delivery. LODGEPOLE, delivered in $850 OBO, 541-480-3884 Dryer, Amana, like new, $200, wanted ad today and 541-408-7953. Bend $950, LaPine $1000, please call 541-550-0444 for Gun Cabinet, Oak, Mule Deer, reach over 60,000 Redmond, Sisters & PrinevPiano, Must Sell, Baldwin info. readers each week. $350, call 541-382-6400 afille $1100. 541-815-4177 Baby Grand, built circa Your classified ad will ter 4 p.m. 1970, fitted w/mute & QRS also appear on Furniture Log Truck loads of dry LodgeGUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade player, asking $10,995, call bendbulletin.com which pole firewood, $1200 for call for more information. 541-475-0309. currently receives over Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 541-728-1036. 1.5 million page views or 541-536-3561 for more PIANO & STOOL, every month at information. H & R .32 auto, extra ammo, $50 OBO. no extra cost. perfect concealed size for a Visit our HUGE home decor Call 541-382-7556. Bulletin Classifieds SEASONED JUNIPER lady, $325, 541-420-2026. consignment store. Get Results! $150/cord rounds, New items arrive daily! Call 385-5809 or place $170/cord split. Remington .270 win 7400 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE your ad on-line at Delivered in Central Oregon. model Bushnell scope com3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 bendbulletin.com Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg. posite stock, excellent cond, www.redeuxbend.com $500 541-536-4218 Tamarack & Red Fir Split & 263 Delivered, $185/cord, GENERATE SOME excitement in Remington 700 Sendero 300 Win Mag, matte blue, Rounds $165, Seasoned, Tools your neigborhood. Plan a gaPine & Juniper Avail. $825; Win 1892 Octogon rage sale and don't forget to 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407 Air Compressor, Crafstman, 30 Rifle 357, $850, advertise in classified! gal., 220V, $50, call 385-5809. 541-610-3732. 541-385-9350. FIND IT! Log Furniture, lodgepole & Ruger 44 Redhawk w/scope, BUY IT! juniper, beds, lamps & tables, $395. Ruger 44 Carbine-DerDrill Press, American Machine, SELL IT! made to order, slayer model, $395. 5-spd., industrial model, The Bulletin Classifieds 541-419-2383 541-475-1202 $225, 541-385-9350.

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449

Lawn Tractor, Craftsman, 15HP, 43” deck, bagger, needs rebuilt eng. $175, 541-389-8348 Riding Lawnmowers (6) Sears, JD, Troybuilt, call for sizes and models 541-382-4115, 280-7024. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found Dog: Male Mini Aussie, 6/20, Waldron Trail near Innes Mkt, 541-383-8223. Found Horse Tack, between Sisters/Black Butte Ranch on Hwy 20, May, 541-771-5633. FOUND: Leatherman Wave Knife in Walmart parking lot provide ODL #. 317-9185. Found Sanddisk 512mb camera card, 6/17, Powerline Trail at Paulina Lake, 541-383-0882. FOUND: Young Parakeet, 27th & Bear Creek area on 6/14. To identify, 541-382-8636 LOST: 6/16 Female Cat in West Bend Phil’s Loop area. Long haired, black & white, very friendly if found please call 541-521-8400. LOST: Dog, Boxer/Pit Bull mix, male, 2 yrs., CRR near Steelhead Falls on 6/14. Wearing brown collar. 541-977-4018 LOST: Rx Glasses, in Kohl’s parking lot on 6/10, on disability, cant afford another pair! Help! 541-923-4235

LOST: Womans’ ring, $2000 Reward. Between April/May? Handed down 3 generations, any information for its return, no questions asked. 541-536-3383

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

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Estate Sales DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702


G2 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

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Schools and Training

Horses and Equipment

1986 Circle J 3 horse trailer. Open inside, just 13 ft.. New everything. Hi tie $2800 541-420-6644

Logan

Coach, Malibu edition, 2 horse trailer, very low miles, front tack area, excellent condition. $2,500 541-548-2407

Special Low 0% APR Financing

Financing on approved credit.

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond

Wanted to purchase: 60-70HP used tractor to pull hay rake, quote lowest price, 541-549-3831.

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com Mares, 2 Reg AQHA, Grey, w/foals by side, up to date w/vaccines, 541-388-2706.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Livestock & Equipment

1st Cutting 2010 Season, Orchard Grass, Orchard/Timothy or alfalfa, small bales, delivery avail., 5 ton or more, $150/ton, 541-610-2506.

BEEF CALVES 300-800 lbs., pasture ready, vaccinated, delivery avail. 541-480-1719.

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831

Quality black feeder steers, 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

READERS:

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825 APT. ASSTISTANT MANAGER Part-Time Fox Hollow Apts. 541-383-3152 Cascade Rental Management

Automotive Part Person Needed.

Experience is a necessity, must be a quick learner and a team player. Send resume to: P.O. Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708. Automotive Service Advisor Needed.

Energetic? Thorough? Looking for Opportunity? Money to be made and a great benefit package to boot. Send resume to: P.O. Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708. Bend Body Tech. Exp only. Established Bend Body Shop. Full Time. Commission Shop. Start Now. Frame Exp Needed. Responsible For All Aspects Of Repair. Not Entry Level. 541-389-5242 Cabinetmaker / Installer Lead: Growing custom shop seeks experienced and skilled self-starter w/knowledge of all phases of European construction & installation. Positive attitude, clean & professional, with ability to stay on task unsupervised. Pay DOE, verifiable references req. Box 16194554, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020,Bend, OR 97708

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dental Scheduling Coordinator: Are you looking to make a difference in people’s lives? If you looking to be a valued team member, we would love for you to join our fun, caring dental team. Come work in a state of the art Redmond dental practice where you and patients are treated like family. Seeking a motivated, positive, team player who wants an enjoyable career. Contact John at 503-810-4122, or send resume to, jloslc@yahoo.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Drivers– COIC is recruiting for on-call drivers to operate the Cascades East Transit buses based in Redmond. Individuals will operate an 8-28 passenger bus transporting passengers from their homes to a variety of locations within Central Oregon. Starting salary $11.84 per hour. Application, complete job description and hiring requirements are available on the COIC website www.coic.org, at local COIC offices or at Administration – 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, OR 97756. In order to be considered for this position, a completed application must be received by 5:00 p.m., Friday, July 2, 2010, in the Redmond Administration office. Faxed applications will be accepted (541) 923-3416. COIC is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request for individuals with disabilities. Dry Cleaners - Counter Person Needed. Top pay, no exp. needed. 30+ hrs./week. Apply in person Mon.-Fri. before noon. Mastercraft Cleaners, 722 NE Greenwood Ave., Bend.

Entertainment WANTED EXOTIC DANCERS for club in Roseburg. Call 541-677-9004 for an audition.

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Hay Is Expensive! Protect your investment Let KFJ Builders, Inc. build your hay shed, barn or loafing shed. 541-617-1133. CCB 173684.

New Crop, 1st Cut horse hay small

Farmers Column

H Supplement Your Income H

Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969. Custom Haying, Farming and Hay Sales, disc, plant, cut, rake, bale & stack, serving all of Central Oregon, call 541-891-4087.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

HVAC TECHICIAN - NE Oregon Co. looking for Tech w/ at least 2 years of exp. Refrigeration and installation experience a plus. Clean driving record and certification req. Benefits after probation period. Call (541) 963-4316 Mon.-Fri.

Incredible

Earning Opportunity!! Avon is offering Free sign-ups and training to be an Avon Representative! Work your own hours and be your own boss, unlimited earning potential! 541-410-5151 carlathornton@avon.com

Land Surveyor Anderson.Perry & Associates, Inc., a La Grande, OR based engineering firm, is seeking to hire a Professional Land Surveyor. Please see www.andersonperry.com for more information. Media Technician - Mix audio, facilitate & operate multi media services in support of worship & rehearsals, plus special events. First Presbyterian Church of Bend. 230 NE Ninth Street. 541-382-4401. Resume and letter of interest to: Administrator. blevet@bendfp.org

Medical Assistant needed for Mid-Level Provider. Experienced, full-time in busy clinic setting. Benefits, PTO, 401K plan. Fax resume to 541-385-8589.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions 476

476

486

Employment Opportunities

Independent Positions

Medical RCM Position RN with knowledge of MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, 541-447-7667. dns@ochococare.com Natural Resource Specialist Anderson.Perry & Associates, Inc., a La Grande, OR based engineering firm, is seeking to hire a Natural Resource Specialist. Please see www.andersonperry.com for more information.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Medical - LPN/RN Charge Nurse part time position avail., swing shift. Contact Kim Carpenter, Ochoco Care Center, Prineville, 541-447-7667.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

541-383-0386

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

Spa Receptionist

The Spa is accepting applications for a year round Receptionist. Experienced, exceptional customer service required. Must enjoy a fast paced environment. Ability to multi-task and a take charge with a positive attitude is a must! Advanced computer skills and retail sales necessary. Must be able to work weekends. Benefits include med/dent/life, paid vacation, 401k. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE. Summer Work! Customer Sales / Service, $12.25 base/appt. Apply at: www.workforstudents.com or call 541-728-0675.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts Trucking JOHN DAVIS TRUCKING in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: Maintenance Mechanics and CDL Class A Drivers. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For application, please call 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or website www.jdt3d.net

Independent Contractor Sales

358 A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Food Service We are currently accepting applications for positions of Fine Dining Cooks during our summer Sunset Dinners. Hours are 30-40 hours per week at $10 $13 per hr. Please refer to www.mtbachelor.com for more information.

Independent Contractor

347 Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

bales, $125 a ton loaded. 541-480-8739 or 541-546-2431

Due to new equipment line our company has a massive growth & expansion openings. Various positions for full time & long term employment. $300 Week paid training provided. Call 541-617-6109 ask for Jason.

The Bulletin

325

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

20-30 Individuals Wanted Immediately

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Sale Price $12,900

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23 HP Was $14,000

Tractor, 1947 Allis Chalmers, runs, needs TLC, $800, 541-382-0890.

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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1989

SWATHER DOLLY, $500; Baler NH 282, PTO, twine, $1500; Bale Wagon, NH1010 $2000; Swather Hesston 6400, $3500; J D Swather, Cab, A/C, diesel, A300 Twin Knife header, $5500; all field ready, Prineville, 541-419-9486

400

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Montana Tractor 4x4, 45 hp. Lightly used, new quick attach motor $15,000 Call 541-475-3459. New Holland 216 V Rake, good cond., good teeth, only used 2 seasons, 10,500. 541-325-3377

Employment

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities

Sell an Item

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Rentals

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex, 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex, 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval, reduced to $550/mo. 541-389-9901.

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! 604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $90/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 605

Roommate Wanted Bend, $300+utils, cute, cozy, 3 bdrm. house, 1 room avail., no smoking, 541-788-3429.

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. $ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

630

Rooms for Rent Adult foster home has large room avail., accepts state or private, 541-382-9334. Awbrey Butte Incredible Views. Master Bedroom. Walk to COCC. $500/mo. Gary 541-306-3977. Bend furnished downstairs living quarters, full house access, $450+utils, please call 541-306-6443

Female preferred $350+util. own bath. Full house access, Artists Pueblo. 541-388-2159 Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $25/night. Incl. guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365

Quiet, private entrance studio, $450 mo. incl. util., sep. bath and kitchenette. No pets or drugs. 541-728-7804.

631

Rent a Resort

1 MONTH FREE with 1 yr. lease on select apts.

2 Bdrm, 1 bath, $675 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, $725 2 Heated Pools, A/C, W/D in each apt. Paid W/S/G Covered Parking 2 Recreation Centers 24-hour fitness, computer labs with internet & more! Call

STONEBRIAR APTS. 541-330-5020 Stone.briar.apts@gmail.com Managed by Norris & Stevens

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Condominiums & Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. PriTownhomes For Rent vate Balcony and lower Patio, Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

storage W/S/G paid $675 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

$99 1st Month! 1 & 2 bdrms avail. from $525-$645. Limited # avail. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. 100% Subsidized: Crest Butte Apts is now accepting applications for fully remodeled 1 & 2 bdrm. units. Units to incl. brand new appl, A/C. Amenities incl. new on site laundry facilities & playground, great location next to hospital, BMC & many other medical/dental offices. 5 min. to downtown & Old Mill District. Apply today, 541-389-9107 or stop by office at 1695 NE Purcell Blvd between 9-2.This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

1/2 Off 1st month! 3 bdrm., 2 bath duplex at 1707 NE Lotus, #2. Garage, fenced yard, new carpet, W/D & W/S/G incl.,$725 mo.+ dep. Pets okay! 541-389-0932 (eves), 541-317-3285 (days).

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave., $600 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl., W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Have You Had a Spiritual Experience? Free discussion on Out of Body Experience, Dreams, etc. June 26th, at 2 pm., Redmond Library, 827 Deschutes Ave., 389-5457.

personals Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. J.D.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend $595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D in unit. front balcony, storage, no pets. 1558 SW NANCY, 541-382-6028.

$99 Move-In Special Only $250 deposit! Finally the wait is over, new units available in Bend’s premiere apartment complex. Be the first to live in one of these fantastic luxury apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $495. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. & parking. 541-389-2389 for appt. On The River, 1562 NW 1st starting at $540. W/S/G + cable paid, laundry/parking on site, no pets/smoking, call 541-598-5829 until 6pm.

541-322-7253

Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Call about our Specials Studios, and 2 & 3 bdrm units from

$395 to $550 • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Houses for Rent General Crooked River Ranch, 5 acres horse property fenced, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, $825 plus deps. 541-548-4158,209-586-6578

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

RIVER FALLS APARTMENTS LIVE ON THE RIVER WALK DOWNTOWN

2 Bdrm. patio apt. $760 & $660 dep. Nice pets OK. 1556 NW 1st St. 541-382-0117 SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688. Westside Condo, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, W/D, A/C, garage, in quiet 4-plex, at great westside location, $800, 1737 SW Knoll, 541-280-7268

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, NOTICE: Summerfield location, close All real estate advertised to 97, fresh interior paint, here in is subject to the Fedfully fenced. 1st & dep., $850 eral Fair Housing Act, which mo. 503-997-7870. makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 discrimination based on race, bath duplex in Canyon Rim color, religion, sex, handicap, Village, Redmond, all appl., familial status or national incl,. Gardener W/D, $795 origin, or intention to make mo.. 541-408-0877. any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We Eagle Crest, 2700 sq.ft., big & beautiful, 3 bdrm., 2.5 will not knowingly accept any bath, den, O-sized triple . advertising for real estate garage on golf course, garwhich is in violation of this dener paid, 55+commulaw. All persons are hereby nity $1100. 541-604-5534 informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. Newer Home In Terrebonne area, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, The Bulletin Classified nice neighborhood, $850+ dep., credit refs. req., call Bill SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. at 541-548-5036. garage, RV parking, fenced, cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn Need help fixing stuff care incl., $995/mo. around the house? 541-480-7653 Call A Service Professional

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm. 2 bath, fenced yard, double car garage. $850/mo. A Superior Property Management Co. 541-330-8403 www.rentaroundbend.com Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near shopping & hospital dbl. garage, large fenced yard w/ sprinklers, $950/mo., pets neg. 541-390-2915

and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, W/S/G incl., OWWII, $895/ mo. + dep., no smoking, please call 503-651-1142 or 503-310-9027.

652

30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

Houses for Rent NW Bend WESTSIDE, 1 bdrm., fenced front & back yard, large outdoor & indoor storage, near town & groceries, $650/mo. water incl. 541-330-7379

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 654 Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 Houses for Rent on-site laundry rooms, storSE Bend age units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping cen- 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage, appl., fenced yard, 1 yr. ter and tennis courts. Pet lease, near shopping, $760 friendly with new large dog mo. + dep., 470 SE McKinrun, some large breeds okay ley, call 541-350-9889. with mgr. approval.

A CLEAN 1 bdrm. in 4-plex next to Park, 2 decks, storage, laundry on site, great location, W/S/G paid, no dogs, Studio 1/2 off 1st mo. great $550/mo. 541-318-1973 location/price 613 SW 9th, $400 W/S/G +cable pd., A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1.5 onisite laundry/parking, no bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, pets/smoking. 541-598-5829 $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. 648 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

2 Bdrm. Duplex, gas fireplace, back yard, $825/mo. incl. yard maint & water, no smoking, pet okay, 1225 NE Dawson Dr. 402-957-7261

announcements

Duplex near Old Mill, 2 bdrm. 1 bath, garage, wood stove, fenced yard, pet neg., W/D hookups, $590, 529 SE Wilson, 541-419-1115.

June Special!

Apt./Multiplex General

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

$680. Near Old Mill off Wilson. Washer/Dryer included, fenced backyard, single car garage. Pets accepted. $720 deposit. Call 541-280-3164

Ask Us About Our

632

634

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 G3

• Available Now• Cute 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., all appl. $795/mo. 437 SE Roosevelt Ave. 541-306-5161

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale Well established business for sale. $60,000. Motivated! Call for more info. Dawn Ulrickson, Broker 541-610-9427 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.HomesCentralOregon.com

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft.,

Retail Space, 118 NW Minnesota, 900 sq.ft., $1.75/ sq.ft. + common area maintenance fees, call 541-317-8633. Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $650 a month. 541-923-7343

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

$350 MOVE-IN SPECIALS EXTENDED ONE MORE WEEK For Apts. & Multi-plexes at: COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •FURNISHED Mt. Bachelor Condos - 1 bdrm/1 bath with Murphy bed. $595 mo. includes W/S/T Wireless •SPACIOUS APTS. 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, near Old Mill Dist. $525/mo. Includes Cable + W/S/T - Only 1 Left! • NICE APTS. 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Near hospital. On-site laundry and off-street parking. $525 WST included. • SITS AT BASE OF PILOT BUTTE - 2 bdrm, 1.75 bath. Unique floorplan. Skylight. Carport. Fenced backyard. W/D included. $695 mo. • SPACIOUS CONDO w/ 2 masters +SO MUCH MORE incl. Pool +Tennis courts. Only $750 mo. 1/2 Off 1st Mo! • CLOSE TO PIONEER PARK - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, upstairs, Apts. W/On-Site Laundry & Off Street Parking. Cute Balconies. $495/mo. Includes W/S/G. • MUST SEE! Private SW Home 3 bdrm, 2 bath with new carpet and hardwood floors, utility, dbl. garage. RV parking. Wood stove. $875 per mo. • 2 MASTERS in this NE Townhome + single garage and laundry room. Gas fireplace. Gas forced air. $625 mo. W/S •COUNTRY HOME on the Canal off Hwy 20. 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 2 fireplaces. Detached garage/shop. Has irrigation. See to appreciate. . $750 mo. •REFURBISHED TOWNHOME near hospital. 2 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, with untility Room &garage. $625 mo. W/S •LOVELY 3 bdrm, 3.5 bath NE home. Large bonus room. Triple garage. Jacuzzi tub + walk-in shower in master. Corner lot. 3000 sq. ft. $1375 mo. • 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, SW home in Rim Rock. Prestigious location . $975 mo. • CHARMING HOME W/ CHARACTER. 1348 Sq.ft., 2 + Bdrm, 1 bath, Laundry Room, Fireplace, Large yard, Close in SE Side. $725 mo.

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Domestic Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Decks

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Excavating

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS Cows get out? Neighbors get in? Call Bob anytime, He’ll come running! 541-420-0966. CCB#190754

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Yard Debris/Clean Up, Hauling Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903

541-385-5809 FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 100+ Homes / Auction: 7/10 Open House: 6/26, 6/27, 7/3 REDC / View Full Listings www.Auction.com RE Brkr 200712109

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

CCB#180571

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585 Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Roof-Foundation

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

750

763

Redmond Homes

Recreational Homes and Property

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 753

Northeast Bend Homes

35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, raises 85 ton of hay & pasture for 10 cows, sacrifice for $425,000, 541-447-1039

771

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

773

5 Acres of amazing mountain views, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 992 sq. ft. home, detached office, great shop, between Bend & Sisters, near NF, Sisters Schools, needs interior finish, comes w/preliminary plans for major addition, $238,000, www.sistersviewhome.com, 541-595-3064

Acreages

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., quiet cul-de-sac, dbl. garage, fenced yard, $119,900, broker owned, Randy Schoning, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

764

Farms and Ranches

Sisters Homes

755

748

Remote 80 Acres Deschutes County Recreation Investment property, fenced, water, Rimrock, buttes, trees, great views, 541-548-3408.

2004 'Like New' Home on 1.09 acres in La Pine. Make offer. Terms Avail. Contact Steve at 503-986-3638

762

Homes with Acreage

Featured Home! 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home on 1.47 Acres+/-, 24X36 Detached Garage/ shop, U-Drive with Added RV Southeast Bend Homes Parking, PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver Area, $224,900 Call 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., Bob Mosher, 541-593-2203. living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, Silver Lake: Dbl. wide, 3 dbl. garage, on a big, fenced bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy w/covered RV storage, town Schoning, Broker, Owner, block w/multiple hookups, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. $169,000, 541-576-2390.

749

14 ACRES, tall pines bordering Fremont National Forest, fronts on paved road, power at property. Zoned R5 residential, 12 miles north of Bly, OR. $45,000. Terms owner 541-783-2829. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

7 mi. from Costco, secluded 10 acres and end of road, lots Juniper w/ mtn. views, power & water near by, asking $250,000. 541-617-0613

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Move-In Ready! Homes start at $8999. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

Smith Rock Mobile Park, Space 17. 55+ Park. 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, A/C, awning, storage, RV parking. $15,000 OBO. 541-499-2845,541-475-2891

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

CHECK OUT OUR NEW MAP FEATURE ONLINE @

WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM /GARAGESALES

***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website (REDMOND PROPERTIES, TOO!) www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

We c your SECTION!!!the f to yo Call 541-385-5809 to gara advertise and drive traffic to

DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

your garage sale today!!

(This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Masonry

Remodeling, Carpentry

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

745

385-5809

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Homes for Sale

The Bulletin Classified ***

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization Award Winning Design

541-389-4974 springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507 Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance

Sell an Item

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

FAST!

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

MASONRY Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Garage Sales

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Painting, Wall Covering

Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678 CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Ex/Interior, Paint/Stain Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Nelson Landscape Maintenance • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Get your business GRO W

ING

With an ad in

The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional" Directory


G4 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

800 850

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 860

870

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Honda Trail Bikes: 1980 CT110, like new, $2400, 1974 CT90, great hunting bike, $900, both recently serviced, w/new batteries, call 541-595-5723.

Snowmobiles

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040 Harley Davidson 2007, Road King, 56K, 103 in 6 spd. $15,500. 541-598-4344.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930. Interested Buyer for older motorcycles, scooters, etc., instant cash, Please contact Brad @ 541-416-0246. Kawasaki 900 Vulcan Classic 2006, always garaged, never down, lots of custom accessories, low miles, great bike over $9000 invested will sell for $4000. 541-280-1533, 541-475-9225.

Kawasaki KLR 2009 dual purpose 650 cc, 890 mi., excellent condition $4,500. 541-815-8744. YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4750. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics.

ATVs

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $16,500. 541-693-3975.

Honda

Shadow

Aero

Loader Trailer, used twice, pole holder & folding seats. $2200. 541-617-0846.

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

$550 OBO! 818-795-5844, Madras

14 Ft. Smokercraft, EZ Load trailer, 15 hp. Merc .motor, trolling motor, fishfinder, downriggers & more. $2500. Please call 541-548-5055.

walk thru windshield, Johnson 55 hp., Minnkota 50 hp trolling motor Hummingbird fishfinger, new carpet, electrical, newly painted trailer, new wheel bearings, & spare tire, motor in good running condition., $1795. 541-389-8148

880

881

882

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen., & much more $60,000. 541-948-2310

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510 Boat Loader, Eide, w/fifth wheel rack, $600; Eide Slip Up Transom Wheels & Tow Bar, $150, 541-410-9423,541-536-6116 Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $500 OBO, 541-548-3711.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Watercraft Two Bombardier '97 Waverunners, 2 seaters, plus trailer, all excellent condition, $3500 firm, 971-244-2410.

880

Motorhomes

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha 250 Bear Cat 1999, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $1700 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamahas, 700 Raptor 2008 & 450 Wolverine 2008 w/ trailer, sand paddles, only 20 hrs., must see to appreciate, $16,000/both. 541-504-4284

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Adco Tyvek RV cover, 30-33 ft., #22825, used $145. 541-318-1697.

Beaver Patriot 2000, hot water heat, diesel elec. motor, Walnut cabinets, solar, passengers foot rest, no smoking, no children, Bose stereo, Corian countertops, tils floors, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, 16’ Seaswirl 1985, open W/D, exc. cond., beautiful! bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, $119,000. 541-215-0077 exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily 18’ Spectrum 1995, with trailer, call for details, $9000, 541-923-2595.

750 2004, 5100 miles, garaged, like new. Large windshield, sisbar, luggage rack, saddle bags. $3900. 541-419-5212.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

12 Ft. like new 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft, new EZ

870

Boats & Accessories

Hard to find 32 ft. 2007 Hurricane by Four Winds, Ford V10, 10K mi., 2 slides, 2 Color TV’s, backup cam, hydraulic jacks, leather, cherry wood and many other options, Immaculate condition, $63,900. (541)548-5216, 420-1458

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Tioga TK Model

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Nash 22’ 2011, queen walk around bed, never used, $19,500, call 541-317-1448. Springdale 35’ 2007, Model 309RLLGL, like new, one owner, 1000 mi., $16,000, 541-977-3383.

Antique and Classic Autos

900

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

916

INTERNATIONAL 1981 TRUCK, T-axle-300 Cummins/Jake Brake, 13 spd. transmission, good tires & body paint (white). Also, 1993 27’ step deck equipment trailer T-axle, Dove tail with ramps. Ready to work! $9500 takes both. 541-447-4392 or 541-350-3866.

882

Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, incl. TV. Other extras. was $13,000 now reduced at $10,000.Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Ameri-Camp Bunkhouse 32’ 2005, w/gen., pristine! $24,000, 541-504-0502.

Cobra Sierra 5th Wheel 27’ 1996, 27’ awning, sleeps 6, $18,000. 541-382-6310 after 4pm. COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Chevy

Wagon

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Montana Keystone 2955RL 2004, 2 slides, loaded, 2 TV’s, CD, Queen bed, all appl., full bath, hitch incl., exc. cond., hardly been used, $21,500. 541-389-8794

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9 Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

Sierra 18’ 1995, sleeps 5-6, queen bed, storage rack, gen., $4000, 541-771-0512.

Wilderness 21 ft. 1992, exc. cond., full bath, micro., incl. Honda gen., call eves. to see, $3500. 541-549-8155

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Flatbed Utility Trailer, 8 ft., steel frame, treated 2x6 decking, lights and sideboards $450. 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

885

Canopies and Campers

Arctic Fox 811 2007, Silver Fox Edition,fully loaded, 1 slide, gen, A/C, flatscreen TV, sleeps 4, exc. cond., garaged in winter, $18,700, 541-536-1789,760-219-2489

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Iron Eagle Utility Trailer 2007, swing Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $18,500 541-610-9900.

rear gate, 5x8, 24” sides, $1150, 541-325-2684.

VW Cabriolet 1981,

Utility trailer, 4X10, 6” Steel I-beam frame, w/lights, add your deck, $200,541-550-0444

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Utility Trailers

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $29,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

925

Fifth Wheels

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2

Chevrolet Chevelle 1971 355 SBC Turbo 400 4500 stall conv w/ trans brake, much more, turn key, ready to race, $18,500. Call Nick 541-408-5899

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

FIND IT! BUY IT! Fleetwood Prowler Regal SELL IT! 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., The Bulletin Classifieds solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST Mustang MTL16 2006 Weekend Warrior Toy SEE! 541-410-5251 Skidsteer, on tracks, inHauler 28 ft. 2007, Gencludes bucket and forks, erator, fuel station, sleeps Grand Junction 39’ 540 hrs., $21,000. 8, black & gray interior, 2008, 3 slides, 2 A/C 541-410-5454 used 3X, excellent cond. units, central vac, fireplace, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Corian, king bed, prepped Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, for washer/dryer & gen., clean, runs good -$8,500. non-smoker owned, imWilderness 25 ft. 2004 with Austin Western Super 500 maculate, $42,500, Call little use. Many extras and Grader - All wheel drive, low 541-554-9736 upgrades. Winter use packhours on engine - $10,500. age. Licensed to 2012 1986 Autocar cement truck $8500. 541-923-0268 Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $82,000. 541-848-9225.

932

Autos & Transportation

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948

slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

1979, took in as trade, everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $2000 firm, as is. Needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat 300, clean w/many options A Must See! $63,500. 541-279-9581. Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $95,000. 541-382-1721

warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

15’ Crestliner, tri hull

865 Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 932

935

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $4800 call 541-388-4302.

933

Pickups

Chevy 2500 X-Cab 1992 4WD, V-8, 99,600

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

mi., new battery, exc. tires, trailer brake & hitch, $4000, call 541-382-7792. Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Chevy Cheyenne 350 C20 1974, automatic, dual gas tanks, 169,000 miles, maintained & used since purchased. Lots of extras. $2950, 541-549-5711 Chevy Silverado 1500 2000, regular cab, long bed, 4WD, V-6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto, A/C, CD, tow pkg., dual air bags, recent tune-up, tires, brakes, bedliner, very good cond. in & out, runs & drives exc., 175K miles, non smoker owned, $5600 OBO 541-633-6953

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$22,600 W/O winch $21,750. 541-325-2684

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Mazda 3 i 2008, sePorsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

dan, 4-cyl., auto, 20,300 mi., mostly hwy., like new, still under factory warranty, $12,295, 541-416-1900.

DODGE PICKUP 3/4 TON DIESEL 1998, X-cab, leather, loaded, 5th wheel hitch & tailgate, 120K, exc. cond., $9800. Call 541-408-2719.

Dodge 1999

Caravan

w/56,967 mi., wheel chair lift, 6-cyl, auto, pwr. windows & seats, cruise, A/C, Braun 10” lowerd floor conversion, 1 owner, $10,000, call 541-410-8640

Dodge Ram 2001, short

Ford F250 1992, A/C, PS, 5 spd., 5th wheel hookups, $4000. 541-382-6310 after 4pm.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

975

Automobiles

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Sport Utility Vehicles

BMW 733i 1982 blue

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

sedan, 4 door, body excellent condition, engine runs great, 20 mpg, $2500 firm. 971-244-2410

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Ford Excursion XLT 2000, 4WD, V-10, runs great, 4” lift, $9000 OBO, 541-771-0512.

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Mercedes-Benz SL500 1999, V-8, w/hard & soft tops, low mi. at 44K, like new, $24,000, 541-923-2595.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., leather, navigation system, alloy wheels, Bose sound, rear spoilers, $22,950, 541-388-2774.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107. Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Camry Hybrid 2007, white w/ sunroof, perfect cond., $16,500. 541-549-8600

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, all avail. options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 180K hwy. mi. $8,000 541-410-7586. Ford Explorer 2004, 4X4, XLT, 4-dr, silver w/grey cloth interior, 44K, $14,750 OBO, perfect cond., 541-610-6074

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530 Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4500. 541-617-1888.

VW Bug 1969, yellow, sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

1000

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE SHERIFF OF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY

A public hearing will be held on June 23, 2010, at 9:00 a.m. in the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office MAC Center, 63333 W Hwy 20, Bend, Oregon for the purpose of oral and written comments to Deschutes County's and City of Bend's proposed use of the 2010 Justice Assistance Grant funds. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Deschutes County conducts public meetings in locations which are wheelchair accessible. Deschutes County also provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. For persons who are deaf, or who have hearing or speech impairments, dial 7-1-1 to access the State transfer relay service for TTY. At meetings of the Sheriff the County will provide an interpreter for hearing impaired persons who give at least 48 hours notice of the request. Written information will be made available in large print or audio format. To request these services, please call (541) 388-6571.

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., Chrsyler Sebring Convertauto, ible 2006, Touring Model new tires, 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy exc. tires, almost new top, mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 Best offer! 541-462-3282 or 623-399-0160.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Diana Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or

conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: #1 U.S. Currency in the amount of $8,798.00, Case #10-03-01484 seized 03/05/10 from Jorge A. Chagollan. IN THE MATTER OF: #2 U.S. Currency in the amount of $6,000.00, Case # 10-03-01217 seized 02/22/10 from Salvador Mares. IN THE MATTER OF: #3 1999 Dodge Dakota Pickup silver in color, VIN 1B7GG22Y9XS244771, ID license 7BB3175 seized 02/05/10 from James Jeffrey Taylor. IN THE MATTER OF: #4 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1894.00, Case #10-0436 03/17/10 from Whitney Marks.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1436 T.S. No.: 1276447-09.

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

SUBARUS!!! BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

935

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

1000

Legal Notices

Find It in Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631. bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

1000

Legal Notices

LARRY BLANTON, SHERIFF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON

940

Vans Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 G5

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jessica M. Erickson and Jason C. Erickson, Wife And Husband, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated September 19, 2005, recorded September 22, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-63985 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 12 of Black Hawk Phase 2, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2824 S.W. Metolius Avenue Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $974.41 Monthly Late Charge $39.81. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $141,540.75 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 13, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 16, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-316605 06/08, 06/15, 06/22, 06/29

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6332 T.S. No.: 1269378-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-95286 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MARISA CHAPPELL AND PATRICIA B. ALVAREZ, NOT AS TENANTS IN COMMON, BUT WITH RIGHTS OF SURVIVORSHIP, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/13/2006, recorded 6/16/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-41725, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 17, GALLATIN, PHASES I AND II, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61546 TALL TREE COURT BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 18, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,459.64 each $5,838.56 (02-01-10 through 05-18-10) Late Charges: $291.92 Beneficiary Advances: $11.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $6,141.48 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $280,249.97, PLUS interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 20, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/18/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3575341 06/01/2010, 06/08/2010, 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-95580 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, FELIPE DE LA TORRE SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 12/21/2007, recorded 12/31/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-66629, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TEN (10), HAYDEN ACRES PHASE 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 829 NORTHWEST SPRUCE PLACE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 18, 2010 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2009 10 payments at $1,322.56 each $13,225.60 5 payments at $1,341.78 each $6,708.90 (03-01-09 through 05-18-10) Late Charges: $810.60 Beneficiary Advances: $3,981.90 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $24,727.00 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $180,008.83, PLUS interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from 02/01/09 to 1/1/2010, 5.875% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 20, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/18/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3576564 06/01/2010, 06/08/2010, 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert Dunn, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 16, 2006, recorded August 21, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-57313 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot four (4), Cambria P.U.D., recorded June 1, 2006, in cabinet G, page 1151, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61543 Baptist Way Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,263.00 Monthly Late Charge $185.19. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $592,614.75 together with interest thereon at 7.500% per annum from September 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-95478 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, VINH TRAN, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR THE MORTGAGE STORE FINANCIAL, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 9/9/2005, recorded 9/23/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-64270, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2006-A3CB, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-C under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated March 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 16 OF JUNIPER GLEN NORTH, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2916 SOUTHWEST INDIAN CIRCLE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 24, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 963.85 each $ 3,855.40 (02-01-10 through 05-24-10) Late Charges: $ 218.85 Beneficiary Advances: $ 11.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 4,085.25 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $101,738.16, PLUS interest thereon at 7.750% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 24, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/24/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

R-320545 06/22, 06/29, 07/06, 07/13

ASAP# 3583713 06/01/2010, 06/08/2010, 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010


G6 Tuesday, June 22, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-95439

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5959 T.S. No.: 1277651-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Drew R. Logan and Stacy M. Logan Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 12, 2009, recorded March 17, 2009, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2009-11024 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot five (5), block ninety-seven (97), Deschutes River Recreation Homesites Unit 8 Part 11, recorded July 5, 1967, in cabinet A-137, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 15781 Lava Dr. La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,263.70 Monthly Late Charge $50.55. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $185,882.51 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 29, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 25, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 30, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-319421 06/22, 06/29, 07/06, 07/13

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1664 T.S. No.: 1277767-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JACOB STANLEY HERROLD AND RONNI ANN HERROLD, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF ORE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 9/9/2005, recorded 9/14/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-61807, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 17 OF SHEVLIN CREST, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2023 NORTHWEST SHIRAZ COURT BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 21, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $2,292.68 each $9,170.72 (02-01-10 through 05-21-10) Late Charges: $802.41 Beneficiary Advances: $44.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $10,017.13 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $581,370.77, PLUS interest thereon at 3.281% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 23, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/21/2010 Regional Trustee Services Corporation, Trustee, By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-95447 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TONYA D. MOORE AND ROBIN C. MOORE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF ORE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 3/29/2006, recorded 3/30/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-21921, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to- wit: LOT 33 OF QUAIL CROSSING, PHASE I, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 63288 STONEWOOD DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 24, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 2,068.13 each $ 8,272.52 (02-01-10 through 05-24-10) Late Charges: $ 598.41 Beneficiary Advances: $ 11.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,881.93 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $364,050.00, PLUS interest thereon at 4.250% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 24, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 512412010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3583701 06/01/2010, 06/08/2010, 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010

ASAP# 3581191 06/01/2010, 06/08/2010, 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-96213 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRIAN D. STEVENS, A MARRIED MAN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 2/6/2007, recorded 2/14/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-09469, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1, PONDEROSA VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1644 SOUTHEAST RIVIERA DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 3, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2009 18 payments at $ 1,314.71 each $ 23,664.78 (01-01-09 through 06-03-10) Late Charges: $ 558.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 4,088.15 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 28,310.93 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $198,400.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.75% per annum from 12/01/08 to 7/1/2010, 6.75% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 6, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/3/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3596763 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010, 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-96446

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-96115 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRENNA AILEEN WALKER AND KELLY JOHN WALKER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as beneficiary, dated 1/17/2007, recorded 1/23/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-04573, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 39, RIVERRIM P.U.D., PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19489 FISHHAWK LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 28, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2009 1 payments at $ 1,438.02 each $ 1,438.02 7 payments at $ 1,889.02 each $ 13,223.14 (10-01-09 through 05-28-10) Late Charges: 719.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 3,544.15 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 18,924.31 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $221,830.63, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 09/01/09 to 11/1/2009, 6.375% per annum from 11/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 30, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word ‘grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/28/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION TrusteeBy CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA98104Phone: (206) 340-2550Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3591076 06/08/2010, 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010, 06/29/2010

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Phyllis F. Hawes and Brian R. Hawes, Wife And Husband, as Grantor to First American Title Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Meridias Capital, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 05, 2006, recorded April 11, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-24682** covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 10 of Renwick Acres, City of Bend, Deschutes County, re-recorded again on 5/08/2006 as inst.# 2006-31582. Commonly known as: 162 Southeast Dorrie Court Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,269.81 Monthly Late Charge $51.93. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $191,723.00 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 08, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LAURIE INACY DOTSON AND JOHN A. DOTSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to TICOR TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR NOVASTAR HOME MORTGAGE, INC. ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 4/1/2005, recorded 4/6/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-20572, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by The Bank of New York Mellon, as Successor Trustee under NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2005-2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 6 OF SADDLEBACK WEST, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 63330 PINE KNOLL CIRCLE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 14, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2009 8 payments at $2,478.81 each $19,830.48 4 payments at $2,483.69 each $9,934.76 (07-01-09 through 06-14-10) Late Charges: $1,966.58 Beneficiary Advances: $353.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $32,084.82 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $245,961.37, PLUS interest thereon at 7.45% per annum from 06/01/09 to 3/1/2010, 7.45% per annum from 3/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/14/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-96233 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHAEL D. MAYNARD AND LETICIA A MAYNARD HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to LANDAMERICA LENDER SERVICES, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 10/4/2007, recorded 10/19/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-55819, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 58 OF HAYDEN ACRES, PHASE 2, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 832 NORTHWEST QUINCE PLACE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 3, 2010 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2009 14 payments at $1,555.36 each $21,775.04 1 payments at $2,165.09 each (04-01-09 through 06-03-10) $2,165.09 Late Charges: $1,244.32 Beneficiary Advances: $4,187.90 Suspense Credit: $-286.72 TOTAL: $29,085.63 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $224,536.82, PLUS interest thereon at 7.25% per annum from 03/01/09 to 6/1/2010, 7.25% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 6, 2010, at the hour of 11:00AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/3/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com STATE OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF KING I certify that I am an authorized representative of trustee, and the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. Authorized Representative of Trustee

R-321412 06/22, 06/29, 07/06, 07/13

ASAP# 3612475 06/22/2010, 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010

ASAP# 3596785 06/15/2010, 06/22/2010, 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010


Bulletin Daily Paper 06/22/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday June 22, 2010

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