Issuu on Google+

Know your produce

Ashton Eaton goes for one last NCAA title

Organic? Local? Sustainable? Questions to ask • GREEN, ETC., C1

SPORTS, D1

WEATHER TODAY

MONDAY

Partly cloudy High 70, Low 39 Page B6

• June 7, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

New forest to stay much as it was By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

For the first time in more than 60 years, Oregon will dedicate a new state forest on Friday. The land, located about 45 miles south of Bend, has been privately owned since the early 1950s and has long been used by locals for hunting, horseback riding, hiking and other

outdoor activities. In the winter, the area is a popular spot for snowmobile riding. None of that is expected to change in the near future, according to Doug Decker, state forest project leader for the Oregon Department of Forestry. “You see a lot of state parks that have some pretty elaborate improvements, but I don’t see that happening here. It

will remain pretty pristine,” said Barbara Sullivan, president of the CrescentGilchrist Community Access Team. John Pellissier, the unit forester at the Klamath Lake state forestry district office, said the state’s activities on the land will be about the same as those of the current owners. See Forest / A2

Inside • Gilchrist State Forest: where it is and where it may grow, Page A2 Gilchrist State Forest to be

dedicated

On Friday, the Oregon Depa rtment of Forestry will dedicate 43,235 acres near Gilchrist as the first new state forest in more than 60 years. The state hopes to purchase an adjacent 25,45 3-ac nonprofit Conservation Fund re parcel from the as soon as public funds become available.

KEY: Oregon Department of Forestry, 43,235 acres The Conservation Fund, planned 25,453 acres BLM

46

Davis Lake

Wickiup Reservoir

43

To Bend

La Pine DESCHUTES

DESCHUTES COUNTY KLAMATH COUNTY

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

97

NATIONAL FOREST

46

Deschutes audit lists a few issues, but just a few By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Survivors and supporters celebrate hope

Photos by Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

The annual 5K Heaven Can Wait walk/run has raised more than $640,000 for Sara’s Project, which promotes early breast cancer detection and provides support for women with the disease. Participants, seen here Sunday across from McKay Park, started and finished at Drake Park.

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

K

im Clark, of Bend, couldn’t participate in the first Heaven Can Wait event to support breast cancer programs and research. In 2000, she had just had surgery for cancer, and remembers being barely able to wave at her friends who did walk in the event to support her. But since then Clark, 52, has been back every year. And on Sunday morning she joined thousands of other cancer survivors and their supporters at Drake Park for the start of the 5K walk/run, which benefits Sara’s Project at St. Charles. “It’s a great celebration, and it’s fabulous to see everyone come out,” Clark said. “It’s very touching.”

INDEX Calendar

C3

Editorial

B4

Obituaries

B5

Classified

E1-6

Green, Etc. C1-6

Sports

Comics

C4-5

Local

TV listings

C2

Weather

B6

Crossword C5, E2

B1-6

Movies

C3

MON-SAT

We use recycled newsprint

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

D1-6

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 158, 30 pages, 5 sections

The Heaven Can Wait walk/run started with about 1,000 people and has grown since then, said Charlene Levesque, one of the founders of the event, noting that Sunday’s event could reach close to 4,000 participants. So far, Heaven Can Wait has raised more than $640,000 for Sara’s Project, which promotes early breast cancer detection and provides support for women with the disease. It’s a way to give hope to people going through cancer treatments to see the survivors, who wear denim hats, participating as well, Levesque said. “You can look around the park and see those blue denim caps worn by women who are happy and healthy,” she said. “You can look and say, ‘I can do it.’” See Benefit / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE OIL: Effects to last well into the fall, Coast Guard says, Page A3 TERROR: Two arrested at airport, bound for Somalia, Page A3

Large public construction projects are being well-managed in Deschutes County, but there is room for improvement, according to a recent audit. One of the main concerns raised in the audit was that the primary contractor on a landfill project, Kirby Nagelhout Construction Co., was able to charge higher markups on change orders because one of the subcontractors was another Nagelhout company, KN Exco, said David Givans, the county’s internal auditor, on Friday. Oregon Secretary of State business records show that Kirby Nagelhout is the president of KN Exco. “Since the contract was silent on this, and it was not challenged, they were able to increase their markups from what would have been allowable,” Givans wrote in the audit. “The markups resulted in a 22 percent markup as opposed to 10 percent. Over the 25 change orders, the prime contractor received $8,550 more by this arrangement.” Contractors submit change orders to ask for more money on a project, either because the client has requested additional work or because the contractor believes something will cost more than originally estimated. Givans examined the county’s construction management practices from 2006 to present by looking at three major projects, worth a total of approximately $21 million. The projects examined in the audit were a county RV park in Redmond, a new building for the county 911 dispatch center in Bend, and the expansion of Knott Landfill and construction of new solid waste facilities there. See Audit / A4

What brain scans can tell us about marriage By Tara Parker-Pope New York Times News Service

Mackenzie Winner, left, 22, of Redmond, Alison Challocombe, 53, of Bend, and Afton Winner, 23, of Redmond, take part in the event Sunday.

Inside • Heaven Can Wait results, Page D2

Attached to technology, paying for it in concentration By Matt Richtel New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — When one of the most important e-mail messages of his life landed in his in-box a few years ago, Kord Campbell overlooked it. Not just for a day or two, but 12 days. He finally saw it while sifting

through old messages: A big company wanted to buy his Internet startup. The message had slipped by him amid an electronic flood: two computer screens alive with e-mail, instant messages, online chats, a Web browser and the computer code he was writing. See Multitask / A4

The sudden breakup of Al and Tipper Gore’s seemingly idyllic marriage was the latest and among the sharpest reminders that the only two people who know what’s going on in a marriage are the two people who are in it. The truth is that most marriages, even our own, are something of a mystery to outsiders. Several years ago, a marriage researcher — Robert Levenson, director of the psychophysiology laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley — and his colleagues produced a video of 10 couples talking and bickering. Levenson knew at the time that five of the couples had been in troubled relationships and eventually divorced. He showed the video to 200 people, including pastors, marriage therapists and relationship scientists, asking them to spot the doomed marriages. They guessed wrong half the time. See Brain scans / A2


A2 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin

F / Technology

How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

541-382-1811 NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-633-2157 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804 ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com E-MAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com E-MAIL THE NEWSROOM Business. . business@bendbulletin.com City Desk . . . . news@bendbulletin.com Community Life . . . . . communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports . . . . . . sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Mailing address: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Street address:

Caps on data use worry app makers By Claire Cain Miller and Brad Stone New York Times News Service

For the last two years, unlimited data plans have given app-hungry smartphone users an all-you-caneat buffet. But will customers react to AT&T’s new, limited menu by simply eating less? Some software developers fear they will, and if that happens, the caps on data use that AT&T has imposed could also make consumers lose their appetite for the latest innovations. Some developers worry that customers will be reluctant to download and use the most bandwidth-intensive apps and that developers will cut back on innovative new features that would push customers over the new limits. AT&T, the second-largest carrier in the United States after Verizon Wireless, will move to tiered pricing today and will no longer offer new smartphone buyers

a simple $30 plan for unlimited data use. Customers will have to estimate how much data they are likely to use on their phone, buy an appropriate plan and then make sure not to exceed their limits. AT&T, as well as some developers, say that the new data plans could have the opposite effect and increase data usage by making it more affordable for most people. One of the biggest problems, app developers say, is that people are not sure how much bandwidth they are consuming with an app. AT&T customers will be able to track their data use on the company’s website and receive alerts when they near their quotas, but many customers are in the dark about how much data a particular app or video uses. Video services for phones could take the largest hit in the new metered phone world, and executives at these firms are addressing the changes cautiously.

Gilchrist State Forest to be dedicated

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool 541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black 541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa 541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Director Jay Brandt. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson. . 541-383-0324 Human Resources Sharlene Crabtree . . . . . . 541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even . . . 541-617-7849

TALK TO AN EDITOR At Home, GO! Julie Johnson . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0308 Business Editor John Stearns . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7822 City Editor Richard Coe. . 541-383-0353 Community Life Editor Denise Costa . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0356 Editorials Erik Lukens. . . 541-617-7816 News Editor Jan Jordan. . 541-383-0315 Night City Editor Cathy Kessinger . . . . . . . 541-383-0348 Photo Editor Dean Guernsey . . . . . . . . 541-383-0366 Presentation Editor . . . . 541-383-0315 Sports Editor Bill Bigelow . 541-383-0359

On Friday, the Oregon Department of Forestry will dedicate 43,235 acres near Gilchrist as the first new state forest in more than 60 years. The state hopes to purchase an adjacent 25,453-acre parcel from the nonprofit Conservation Fund as soon as public funds become available. 43

46

Wickiup Reservoir Davis Lake

KEY: Oregon Department of Forestry, 43,235 acres The Conservation Fund, planned 25,453 acres BLM

To Bend

La Pine

DESCHUTES NATIONAL

DESCHUTES COUNTY KLAMATH COUNTY

97

FOREST

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST 46 61

Gilchrist Crescent

LAKE COUNTY

31

58 97

To Klamath Falls

WINEMA NATIONAL FOREST

Source: Oregon Department of Forestry

FREMONT NATIONAL FOREST

MILES

0

6

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

TALK TO A REPORTER Bend Cindy Powers . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7812 Hillary Borrud . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7829 Business David Holley . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0323 Andrew Moore . . . . . . . . 541-617-7820 Tim Doran . . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0360 Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0351 Crook County Lauren Dake. 541-419-8074 Deschutes County Hillary Borrud . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7829 Education Sheila G. Miller . 541-617-7831 Environment Kate Ramsayer . . . . . . . . 541-617-7811 Family Alandra Johnson. . 541-617-7860 Features David Jasper . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0349 Eleanor Pierce . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7828 Health Markian Hawryluk . 541-617-7814 Jefferson County Lauren Dake . . . . . . . . . . . 541-419-8074 La Pine/Sunriver . . . . . . 541-383-0367 Medicine Betsy Q. Cliff . . 541-383-0375 Music Ben Salmon . . . . . 541-383-0377 Redmond/Sisters Patrick Cliff . . . . . . . . . . . 541-633-2161 Public Safety Erin Golden. 541-617-7837 Salem Nick Budnick . . . . 503-566-2839 Washington Keith Chu . . 202-662-7456

REDMOND BUREAU Street address: 226 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond, OR 97756. Mailing address: P.O. Box 788, Redmond, OR 97756 Phone 541-504-2336 Fax 541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month, $11 Print only: $10.50

By mail in Deschutes County: One month, $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month, $18 E-Edition only: One month, $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5809 Advertising fax . . . . . . . . 541-385-5802 Other information. . . . . . 541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints. . . . . . . . . 541-383-0358 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7825 Back issues . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Forest Continued from A1 “Pre-commercial thinning, fuels reduction around the community and young-stand management” will be the priorities, Pellissier said. “The activity level will remain similar to the previous owners, and the number of jobs will remain similar to the previous owners.” Pellissier said he expected to hire the same operators employed by the current owners. The 43,235 acres of newly minted Gilchrist State Forest once belonged to the Gilchrist Timber Co., which practiced selective logging and thinning in the forest, Decker said. “When Gilchrist managed these lands, these lands were a model of multi-age ponderosa pine management. They were really a gem,” he said. “We’re inspired by the way they managed the land from the ’50s through the ’90s. It gives us something to shoot for.” The Gilchrist family sold the land to Crown Pacific in the early 1990s. The new owners clear-cut the majority of the land, Decker said. In compliance with the Oregon Forest Practices Act, Crown Pacific reseeded the area with native species of ponderosa and lodgepole pine. The result, Decker said, is an extremely young and vigorous forest with the average age of most trees hovering between 10 and 20 years old. When a majority of trees in a forested area are the same age, all of them are competing for the same resources, Decker said. As the young trees reach for the sky, they can grow tightly packed together, which increases fire danger. Sullivan said planned thinning was more important to her than adding recreation facilities or marking trails. “I’d like to see the forest just be a healthy forest and try to avoid any forest fires in the near future,” she said. As for the new forest managers from the Klamath Lake state forestry office, Pellissier said, they have their work cut out for them,

even without working to increase recreational use of the land. “We just doubled our land base,” he said, “so there’s quite a bit more of a workload. That’s the hard part with Gilchrist, we won’t be generating a lot of revenue to put back into Gilchrist.” Since the Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for creating revenue from its land holdings in order to maintain those holdings, Pellissier said all the funds needed to run Gilchrist would have to come from other sources until the forest was able to be productive again. It could be 20 to 50 years before Gilchrist State Forest starts earning its keep, Pellissier said. After managing the forest, “one of the things that is important to us about acquiring these lands is to be able to provide access,” Decker said. “We’ve begun a conversation with the community about the vision for the future. There will be no changes for now.” That means the land is open to public use for hiking and camping as long as fire season regulations are followed: No open fires can be lit during fire season. Fireman’s maps can be purchased for $3 at the Walker Range Fire District office and at a number of local businesses around Gilchrist and Crescent. Campers should be aware that there are no designated campgrounds or latrine facilities, and there is no running or standing water in the park. Firewood cutting is allowed in the park in the spring and fall by permit. Up to four cords of dead wood can be cut as long as it is found within 100 feet of the road. Permits can be acquired for no charge at the Walker Range Fire District offices. Hunting is also allowed in the park by permit, excluding the wildlife corridor. Information on hunting zones and seasons are available anywhere permits are sold. Gov. Ted Kulongoski will be present for the dedication ceremony planned for Gilchrist on Friday. Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@bendbulletin.com.

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

Brain scans Continued from A1 “People on the outside aren’t very good at telling how marriages are really working,” he said. Even so, academic researchers have become increasingly fascinated with the inner workings of long-married couples, subjecting them to a battery of laboratory tests and even brain scans to unravel the mystery of lasting love. Bianca Acevedo, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara, studies the neuroscience of relationships and began a search for long-married couples who were still madly in love. Through a phone survey, she collected data on 274 men and women in committed relationships, and used relationship scales to measure marital happiness and passionate love. Acevedo expected to find only a small percentage of long-married couples still passionately in love. To her surprise, about 40 percent of them continued to register high on the romance scale. The remaining 60 percent weren’t necessarily unhappy. Many had high levels of relationship satisfaction and were still in love, just not so intensely. In a separate study, 17 men and women who were passionately in love agreed to undergo scans to determine what lasting romantic love looks like on the brain. The subjects, who had been married an average of about 21 years, viewed a picture of their spouse. As a control, they also viewed photos of two friends. Compared with the reaction when looking at others, seeing the spouse activated parts of the brain associated with romantic love, much as it did when couples who had just fallen in love took the same test. But in the older couples, researchers spotted something extra: parts of the brain associated with deep attachment also were activated, suggesting that contentment in marriage and passion in marriage aren’t mutually exclusive. “They have the feelings of euphoria, but also the feelings of calm and security that we feel when we’re attached to somebody,” Acevedo said. “I think it’s wonderful news.” So how do these older couples keep the fires burning? Beyond the brain scans, it was clear that these couples remained active in each other’s lives.

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

marriage was in a rut? If the answers aren’t exactly what you hoped for, take heart. From a statistical standpoint, your risk for divorce begins to fall once you’ve passed the 10-year mark. According to Betsey Stevenson, an economist at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, recent Census Bureau data show that only about 4 percent of recently ended marriages involved couples married for 40 years or more. And it’s worth noting that the Gores married in 1970s, the beginning of a generation of couples that has consistently struggled with marriage more than any other group. Stevenson calls them the “greatest divorcing generation.” Lost in the discussion about the Gore divorce is the inherent optimism that the decision represents. Coontz recalls living next door to a couple in their 70s who disliked each other so much that during the summer, they sat outside in lawn chairs on the opposite sides of the house. “I think it’s good that people can go ahead and start over before they get to that level of anger and hostility,” she said. Stevenson called the Gore breakup a “glass-half-full story.” “They had 40 years of marriage, and they had what, by many dimensions, should be considered a successful marriage,” she said. “The fact that they both can look forward and see a promising future by not being married — it’s unfortunate that the answer is ‘yes,’ but it’s also somewhat a celebration about how much optimism they have for the rest of their lives.”

The Associated Press file photo

Betsey Stevenson, an economist at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, calls the breakup of Al and Tipper Gore a “glass-half-full story.” “They had 40 years of marriage, and they had what, by many dimensions, should be considered a successful marriage,” she says. Research from Stony Brook University in New York suggests that couples who regularly do new and different things together are happier than those who repeat the same old habits. The theory is that new experiences activate the dopamine system and mimic the brain chemistry of early romantic love. In a new study, the Stony Brook scientists will have couples playing either a mundane or exciting video game together while their brain is being scanned. The goal is to see how sharing a new and challenging experience with a spouse changes the neural activation of the brain. But for those of us without a brain scanner, there are simple ways to find out if your relationship is growing or vexed by boredom. Among the questions to ask yourself: How much does your partner provide a source of exciting experiences? How much has knowing your partner made you a better person? In the last month, how often did you feel that your

REASONABLE gently used furniture, European antiques & great accessories

10-4 Daily

(541)549-6406

100 S.E. Bridgeford

370 E. Cascade, Sisters

ajourneyofdiscovery.net

541-382-7333

License #78462

3:30 PM Kids’ Crit presented by

4:30 - 9:00 PM NWX Criterium Presented by

Participation is FREE and prizes will be awarded for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd places in each age category. Free ice cream for each participant.

Whether you are new to racing, a hard-core cyclist, or a world-class spectator, you won’t want to miss the excitement of racers zooming through the ’hood and down NW Crossing Drive.

4:00 - 8:00 PM Hullabaloo Kid Zone Enjoy laughter and fun with your kids at the Hullabaloo Kid Zone. Face painting, bouncy houses and FREE candy from American Licorice!

5:00 - 10:00 PM Hullabaloo Main Stage Presented by 6:30 - 8:00 PM –

4:00 - 9:00 PM Hullabaloo Food Court With all the Hullabaloo-ing you’ll be doing, you’re sure to work up an appetite. We’ve got you covered with a variety of delicious fare, as well as tasty libations for the over 21 crowd!

Todd Haaby & Sola Via

8:30 - 10:00 PM –

Jonatha Brooke


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 A3

T S 2 seized at N.Y. airport, accused of plotting jihad By William K. Rashbaum New York Times News Service

Two New Jersey men who were bound for Somalia with the stated intention of joining an Islamic extremist group to kill American troops were arrested at Kennedy International Airport late Saturday, authorities said Sunday. The men, Mohamed Mahmood Alessa, 20, and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, 24, were seeking to join Al Shabab, a group that claims ideological kinship with al-Qaida and was thought to have provided a haven to al-Qaida operatives wanted for bombings of United

States embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, prosecutors said. The men were taken into custody as they prepared to take separate flights to Egypt, the first leg of their journey to Somalia to join Al Shabab, according to federal and local officials. The men have been under scrutiny by the FBI since 2006, after the agency received a tip on its website. Beginning last year, an undercover officer from the New York Police Department’s Intelligence Division recorded many meetings and conversations with them, during which they dis-

cussed their plans, according to a criminal complaint. Though the authorities’ statements suggested that Alessa and Almonte would have been incapable of a sophisticated attack, their arrests were seen as a cause for concern. “Even when individuals plan to support terrorist activity abroad, we remain concerned that once they reach their foreign destinations they may be redirected against targets back home, as we’ve seen in the past,” Raymond Kelly, the New York police commissioner, said in a news release.

W  B

2 Afghan security officials replaced KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan President Hamid Karzai removed two of the country’s top security officials — each with longtime ties to American forces — over an attack on a national conference exploring peace with the Taliban. The removals Sunday of the interior minister and intelligence chief surprised U.S. officials and may cause major disruption within Afghanistan’s intelligence and security establishment at a critical juncture — as the U.S. and NATO escalate the war and the Afghan government commits to offering peace to the insurgents. The move is likely to fuel speculation over differences within the Karzai administration over its efforts to reconcile with the Taliban — including the possible release of hundreds of detained militant suspects. “It’s a very significant event. There will be a massive fallout from these resignations both in the Interior Ministry and the NDS as alliances are shuffled,” said Candace Rondeaux, senior analyst on Afghanistan for the International Crisis Group think tank.

that might include international observers or participation, officials said. Israel’s ambassador to the U.S., Michael Oren, told “Fox News Sunday” that Israel was “rejecting an international commission,” an idea floated over the weekend by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Ban suggested a panel headed by former New Zealand Prime Minister Geoffrey Palmer that would include representatives from the U.S., Israel and Turkey, home to more than half of the flotilla’s activists, including eight of those killed when Israel at-

tempted to enforce its three-year blockade of the seaside Palestinian enclave. Israel has rarely submitted voluntarily to U.N. review, saying its enemies dominate the organization and that U.N. probes are one-sided. Israel was furious over a U.N. Human Rights Council panel investigating its Gaza Strip offensive in 2008-09. The so-called Goldstone Commission accused Israel of committing war crimes during the 22-day winter assault. — From wire reports

Why pay retail? 541-385-5950 New Bend Location:

2nd & Greenwood

www.extrafurniture.com Are you sure you are getting the best rates and service on your health insurance?

Israel against international inquiry

George Skene / Orlando Sentinel

A worker installs “pom-poms” to soak up oil at Pensacola Beach, Fla., on Sunday. Oil from the Gulf of Mexico spill was expected to move east Sunday, driven by winds that for three days have been pushing “tarballs” and gooey flecks of crude onto Florida beaches.

Oil to linger into fall, Coast Guard advises By John M. Broder and Clifford Krauss New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Coast Guard commander in charge of the federal response to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico warned Sunday that even if the flow of crude is stopped by summer, it could take well into autumn to deal with the slick spreading relentlessly across the gulf. The assessment came as the sheer volume of oil gushing from the out-of-control well forced BP to temporarily halt its attempts to capture more oil by closing all four vents on a capping device, said a technician working on the operation. Even with three vents still open, the cap is capturing so much oil that the company does not have adequate equipment at hand to process it all. Adm. Thad Allen of the Coast Guard, who oversees the federal response to the disaster, said on “Face the Nation” on CBS that BP officials were working to secure the cap over the wellhead and to gradually increase the amount of oil recovered. But he said the only solution to the problem would be the successful completion of relief wells to finally stop the flow from the bottom of the 18,000-foot-deep well, a job that will not be completed until August at the earliest. Officials said Sunday that they were collecting more than 10,000 barrels a day from the well, but it was impossible to gauge what fraction of the total

BP pays claims, but satisfaction is not included GRAND ISLE, La. — Brian Zito’s 30-foot shrimp boat is called the Lucky 13, but with the BP oil spill keeping it in port here, he is thinking of renaming it the Unlucky 13. Zito is one of thousands on the Gulf Coast in the uncomfortable position of relying on BP, the company that cost them their livelihoods, for money to live on. He got a $5,000 check from BP last month, the standard amount for boat owners. “Oh, I got the money, but it’s a joke,” said Zito, 54, who borrowed thousands of dollars to fix up his boat in time for the season, and who pointed to a wrinkled piece of paper in his truck showing that he was recently paid $1,823 for just one day of shrimping. “This year, I could have made $5,000 in two nights.” As the oil spreads outward from the busted BP well in the Gulf of Mexico, so does the

flow that represented. By nightfall Saturday, the engineers suddenly were forced to deal with another problem: The Discoverer Enterprise drill ship can only handle 15,000 barrels a day, and the capping device was

economic hardship: It is now affecting everyone from fishermen and seafood processors to the owners of vacation rentals who cannot attract guests to oilmarred beaches. In response, BP has opened 25 claims offices across the gulf, and sent $46 million in checks so far to some 17,500 Gulf Coast residents for their lost income. But some boat owners, like Zito, complain that BP is not paying enough. Others say that they have had a hard time getting their claims paid: BP said that another 17,500 claims — about half of all submitted — had yet to be paid because of questions about documentation, which can be hard to come by in a cash industry like fishing. When President Barack Obama visited here on Friday, he said he did not want to hear that BP was “nickeland-diming fishermen or small businesses here in the Gulf who are having a hard time,” while spending billions of dollars on dividends and millions on advertising. — New York Times News Service

trapping almost that amount without the vents shut. BP chief executive’s, Tony Hayward, in a British television interview broadcast Sunday, said another containment device would be deployed by next weekend.

N   B

Midwest storms kill 7, spread destruction MILLBURY, Ohio — A tornado unleashed a “war zone” of destruction in northwest Ohio, destroying dozens of homes and an emergency services building as a line of storms killed at least seven people and briefly threatened the Northeast on Sunday. Storms collapsed a movie-theater roof in Illinois and ripped sid-

ing off a building at a Michigan nuclear plant, forcing a shutdown. But most of the worst was reserved for a 100-yard-wide, 7-mile strip southeast of Toledo littered with wrecked vehicles, splintered wood and family possessions.

Study: Radiation aids prostate cancer survival Doctors are reporting a key advance in treating men with cancer

that has started to spread beyond the prostate: Survival is significantly better if radiation is added to standard hormone treatments. Results of the study were given Sunday at a cancer conference, where other research showed that an experimental drug boosted survival for women with very advanced breast cancer. The drug is being reviewed by the federal Food and Drug Administration. — From wire reports

JERUSALEM — Israeli officials said Sunday that they would reject U.N. pressure to establish an international commission to investigate last week’s deadly raid of a Gazabound aid-supply flotilla. Instead, leaders are leaning toward an Israeli-led probe

Please call Jeff Melville and the award winning customer service staff at High Desert Insurance.

541-388-4242 1543 NE 3rd, Suite 100 Bend, Oregon 97701


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Multitask Continued from A1 While he managed to salvage the $1.3 million deal after apologizing to his suitor, Campbell continues to struggle with the effects of the data deluge. Even after he unplugs, he craves the stimulation he gets from his electronic gadgets. He forgets things like dinner plans, and he has trouble focusing on his family. His wife, Brenda, complains, “It seems like he can no longer be fully in the moment.” This is your brain on computers. Scientists say juggling email, phone calls and other incoming information can change how people think and behave. They say our ability to focus is being undermined by bursts of information. These play to a primitive impulse to respond to immediate opportunities and threats. The stimulation provokes excitement — a dopamine squirt — that researchers say can be addictive. In its absence, people feel bored.

Getting less done while doing more

Photos by Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Dave Graybill, 47, of Phoenix, Ariz., founder of the “Guardians of the Ribbon,” addresses the crowd Sunday while Scott Robson, 49, of Bend, videotapes the start of the annual Heaven Can Wait 5K walk/run event at Drake Park.

Benefit Continued from A1 Ivy Suber, 79, of Klamath Falls, never expected to have to deal with breast cancer, but on Sunday — two months after a mastectomy — she was walking in the event with her family. “Everyone’s supporting grandma,” she said, surrounded by grandchildren from ages 1 to 17. And while she’s new to the race, Suber said she was glad it’s raising money to help those with breast cancer. “It’s supporting the organization that supports the women,” she said. Teams were popular at the Heaven Can Wait event, and many wore T-shirts that expressed encouragement or remembered family and friends. Christian Gladd, 37, stood out with a pink mohawk he had grown and dyed for the event. Gladd was part of a 34-member team to support his motherin-law, Carolyn Stallings, who is currently fighting breast cancer. He ran in last year’s Heaven Can Wait event, just to run it, but now the event takes on a different meaning, he said. “It’s really hitting home,” Gladd said. His daughter Kenzie said she was happy to be supporting her grandmother. “I think she’s honored that we can come out here,” she said. Heaven Can Wait is an occasion to be around people who are going through similar things, said Kimm Roberts, 37, who wore a “Team Linda” baseball-

Audit Continued from A1 The county complied with state contracting and bidding laws on these projects, but staff did not fully document the extent of work they did to ensure bidders met qualifications for the projects, the audit found. The auditor raised concerns about contractors starting some change order work before county officials approved the orders, and the county failed to submit required annual reports listing planned construction projects to Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries in the current fiscal year and the previous year. Givans also identified several good things county staff does to make the bidding process fair, such as opening bids in a public manner and awarding contracts to the lowest bidders, according to the audit. The audit was completed in late May and released last week. “I think it basically says we’re doing things right,” County Administrator Dave Kanner said Friday. “David (Givans) found a couple things that need to be corrected, and they will be corrected.” On all three projects, the county used a method called “designbid-build” that shifts most of the price risk onto the contractor, Givans wrote. The county used a

Malia Barnes, 4, of Bend, sits on the shoulders of her father, Tyler Barnes, 35, on Sunday at the Heaven Can Wait event. style jersey to honor her mother, who died of lung cancer earlier this year. “It just looks like there is some amazing support here,” she said, noting the messages on other people’s shirts. And although Suzi MacLeod, 76, usually runs in events like these, Sunday she said she was honored to walk with her friends. Heaven Can Wait is an unusual event, she said, because it raises money for a local Central Oregon charity. “This one is very local, and very personal,” she said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

While many people say multitasking makes them more productive, research shows otherwise. Heavy multitaskers actually have more trouble focusing and shutting out irrelevant information, scientists say, and they experience more stress. And scientists are discovering that even after the multitasking ends, fractured thinking and lack of focus persist. In other words, this is also your brain off computers. Technology use can benefit the brain in some ways, researchers say. Imaging studies show the brains of Internet users become more efficient at finding information. And players of some video games develop better visual acuity. More broadly, cell phones and computers have transformed life. They let people escape their cubicles and work anywhere. They shrink distances and handle countless mundane tasks, freeing up time for more exciting pursuits. For better or worse, the consumption of media, as varied as e-mail and TV, has exploded. In 2008, people consumed three times as much information each day as they did in 1960. And they are constantly shifting their attention. Computer users at work change windows or check e-mail or other programs nearly 37 times an hour, new research shows. The nonstop interactivity is one of the most significant shifts ever in the human environment, said Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco. Campbell, 43, came of age with the personal computer, and he is a heavier user of technology than most. But researchers say the habits and struggles of Campbell and his family typify what many experience — and what many more will, if trends continue.

“I think it basically says we’re doing things right. (Auditor) David (Givans) found a couple things that need to be corrected, and they will be corrected.” — Dave Kanner, Deschutes County administrator design firm to design the project, develop construction plans and specifications. Then, the county solicited bids and awarded contracts based on these documents. On the RV park project, the original contract was for $2.85 million and change orders added $444,092, or about 15.6 percent, according to the audit. “The reason the RV park went up so much is because we added work to the project,” Kanner said. As of February, the soon-tobe-completed 911 and state police building had $292,620 in change orders, about 4.8 percent on top of the original construction contract for $6.1 million. The original contract for the landfill project was $11.4 million, and $366,454 in change orders added about 3.2 percent to the final cost. Kanner said the double markups Nagelhout charged were an isolated incident, and the county should not have allowed them to happen. “We need to tighten up on change order processing, and it was because I had a concern about change orders that I asked

David to do this audit in the first place,” Kanner said. Another issue Givans brought up on the landfill project was that testing to check a contractor’s work was paid for through the contractor, who submitted change orders for the work and added a markup of $5,008, according to the audit. “Since these services were being performed for the county to assess the quality of services performed by the contractor, it seems less independent for the testing contractor to be paid by the prime contractor,” Givans wrote. “The testing services contractor should have been answering directly to the county.” Kanner said the county’s practice is typically to hire testing firms independently and have them report directly to the county, so he supports Givans’ recommendation to create a manual on construction management so that county staff have a step-bystep guide to the process. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

For him, the tensions feel increasingly acute, and the effects harder to shake. The Campbells recently moved to California from Oklahoma to start a software venture. Campbell’s life revolves around computers. He goes to sleep with a laptop or iPhone on his chest, and when he wakes, he goes online. He and Brenda Campbell, 39, head to the tidy kitchen in their four-bedroom hillside rental in Orinda, an affluent suburb of San Francisco, where she makes breakfast and watches a TV news feed in the corner of the computer screen while he uses the rest of the monitor to check his e-mail. Major spats have arisen because Campbell escapes into video games during tough emotional stretches. On family vacations, he has trouble putting down his devices. When he rides the subway to San Francisco, he knows he will be offline 221 seconds as the train goes through a tunnel. Their 16-year-old son, Connor, tall and polite like his father, recently received his first C’s, which his family blames on distraction from his gadgets. Their 8-year-old daughter, Lily, like her mother, playfully tells her father that he favors technology over family. “I would love for him to totally unplug, to be totally engaged,” says Brenda Campbell, who adds that he becomes “crotchety until he gets his fix.” But she would not try to force a change. “He loves it. Technology is part of the fabric of who he is,” she says. “If I hated technology, I’d be hating him, and a part of who my son is, too.”

Always on As computers have changed, so has the understanding of the human brain. Until 15 years ago, scientists thought the brain stopped developing after childhood. Now they understand that its neural networks continue to develop, influenced by things like learning skills. So not long after Eyal Ophir arrived at Stanford in 2004, he wondered whether heavy multitasking might be leading to changes in a characteristic of the brain long thought immutable: that humans can process only a single stream of information at a time. Going back a half century, tests had shown that the brain could barely process two streams,

and could not simultaneously make decisions about them. But Ophir, a student-turned-researcher, thought multitaskers might be rewiring themselves to handle the load. Ophir, like others around the country studying how technology bent the brain, was startled by what he discovered. The test subjects were divided into two groups: those classified as heavy multitaskers based on their answers to questions about how they used technology, and those who were not. In a test created by Ophir and his colleagues, subjects at a computer were briefly shown an image of red rectangles. Then they saw a similar image and were asked whether any of the rectangles had moved. It was a simple task until the addition of a twist: Blue rectangles were added, and the subjects were told to ignore them. The multitaskers then did a significantly worse job than

the non-multitaskers at recognizing whether red rectangles had changed position. In other words, they had trouble filtering out the blue ones — the irrelevant information. So, too, the multitaskers took longer than non-multitaskers to switch among tasks, like differentiating vowels from consonants and then odd from even numbers. The multitaskers were shown to be less efficient at juggling problems. Other tests at Stanford, an important center for research in this fast-growing field, showed multitaskers tended to search for new information rather than accept a reward for putting older, more valuable information to work.

Sewing & Vacuum Center

As L ow As $149

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend

A Personalized Approach

to Allergy Care!

ClearOne, Medicare & Most other Insurances Accepted

If you are suffering from allergies and have not seen a Board Certified Allergist, you may be incompletely treating your symptoms. Dr. Coutin prides himself on proving a stepwise approach to healthcare, providing the highest level of care in the most cost effective way.

His assessment will include: • A comprehensive review of your symptoms including asthma, sinusitis and skin allergies • Lifestyle and environmental assessment • Most modern, up-to-date skin testing, tailored to your specific need (as needed) • A plan catered to your specific allergies, asthma & skin symptoms Dr. Coutin is a board Certified Allergist and Immunologist who specializes in both Pediatric and Adult care. 15 years experience in Central Oregon and with Pollen Counting.

Allergy,

sthma

ssociates

(541) 382-1221

2239 Doctors Drive, Suite 100, Bend

Dr. David B. Coutin M.D.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 A5

Hear the Difference!

MADE I THE U N SA

NEXT GENERATION NANOSCIENCE HEARING AID

100% INVISIBLE IN THE CANAL. The new OtolensTM hearing aid fits inside The one hearing aid that does it all. your ear canal, so it’s completely invisible. • Now only your hearing professional will know you’re wearing a hearing aid. • The new Otolens™ hearing aid fits comfortably in your ear canal where no one can see it. • Otolens™ is 100% invisible, 100% digital and 100% programmable with all the most advanced hearing aid features.

• Enjoy hearing phone conversations clearly.

• Enjoy virtually no annoying whistling or buzzing. • Enjoy comfortable, customized fit. • Enjoy natural sound quality. • Designed to be removed daily to promote better ear health.

OPEN HOUSE JUNE 8, 9, 10 & 11 Starting at

Starkey All American Hearing and Starkey Laboratories will donate (1) hearing aid to the “So The World May Hear” Hearing Foundation for every (2) that we fit in our office to give underprivileged children in the USA and around the world a chance to hear.

$1,295 ea. Same Technology Popular Open Fit Style

We accept all insurances and workers comp! Low Monthly Financing Available*

Dennis Sell

Hearing Instrument Specialist

REDMOND • (541) 548-5335 974 SW Veterans Way, Suite 2

*On approved credit


A6 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


L

Inside

B OREGON Quilting is therapy for cancer survivors, see Page B2. OBITUARIES John Douglas helped plan 1963 March on Washington, see Page B5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 7, 2010

Eastern farms watching for grasshoppers By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Several hundred people listen to a brief history of Camp Abbot and Sunriver by Tom O’Shea, managing director of Sunriver Resort, bottom left. Meanwhile, the La Pine High School Junior ROTC, top left, displays the flags at the World War II Veterans Historic Highway dedication ceremony in the Sunriver Resort Great Hall on Sunday afternoon.

Veterans highway dedicated By Hillary Borrud

Chuck Sellentin, 87, of La Pine, salutes while being recognized Sunday in the Sunriver Resort Great Hall. Sellentin served in the U.S. Navy and said he was on the USCGC Taney during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The Bulletin

F

or motorists unaware that Sunriver was once a World War II U.S. Army camp, a new sign near the Sunriver exit on U.S. Highway 97 gives them a quick dose of history. “World War II Veterans Historic Highway,” the large, brown sign reads. “Army Camp Abbot 1942-1944.” Camp Abbot was one of eight military training sites along U.S. Highway 97 that prepared more than 100,000 citizen-soldiers during World War II, in what was known as the “Oregon Maneuver, according to a news release from Gov. Ted Kulongoski���s office. Lawmakers passed a bill in 2009 to designate U.S. Highway 97 as the World War II Veterans Historic Highway, and Kulongoski signed it into law later that year. Now, signs are being erected along U.S. Highway 97 to commemorate World War II veterans and others who served in the war effort. On Sunday, several hundred people gathered to celebrate the dedication of the highway at the Sunriver Resort Great Hall, including veterans and their families and friends, oth-

er military members and state officials. The Great Hall served as the Camp Abbot officers’ mess hall, said Tom O’Shea, Sunriver Resort’s managing director. The camp operated from 1942 to 1944 and after it closed, most buildings were removed, with the exception of the Great Hall, O’Shea said. One of the people who advocated for the dedication of Central Oregon’s major highway was John Sherman, 87, of Bend, who served in the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division from 1943 to 1946 and was in the Battle of the Bulge. “I was one of the ones that

May 2010 weather for Bend Daily highs and lows DAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 High temp.

80

59 55 59 55 51 46 55 59 62 62 49 60 63 68 73 74 76 72 65 63 54 50 49 51 53 57 60 57 62 61 66 High temperatures averaged 59.5°F Average temperature H

for May....46.6°

70

40 30 32° F freezing point of water

L

10 Low temp.

Showers may dry up in a few more days The Bulletin

50

0

other attendee at Sunday’s event. Culwell joined the U.S. Navy in 1943 and served as an aviation machinist. Culwell said the signs for the historic highway are “perfect.” Multiple speakers told the veterans they will remember their military service. “I’m here to tell you, we will not forget what you have done,” Brig. Gen. Charles L. Yriarte of the Oregon National Guard told the veterans. Several employees of the Oregon Department of Transportation attended the event, including some who worked on the signs. See Veterans / B5

By Hillary Borrud

60

20

went to Salem with (World War II Medal of Honor recipient) Bob Maxwell to push the signs,” Sherman said. “I think (the signs are) wonderful because in my mind, history is being distorted.” Pearl Harbor survivor Chuck Sellentin, 87, of La Pine, said The Bend Heroes Foundation, which pushed for the highway designation, did a good job on the project. “I think it’s a good idea,” Sellentin said of the signs. “It will be nice for people to see that.” Sellentin served in the U.S. Navy for 12 years, including two years in Korea, he said. A.B. Culwell, 84, was an-

Low temperatures averaged 33.6°F 30 35 27 24 23 23 24 31 33 31 30 31 33 35 39 48 43 45 39 33 33 26 30 26 36 41 40 33 34 37 49

DAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Precipitation total...0.39” (Average precipitation for the month.....0.98") T

Highest temperature

T .2

76° May 17

T T

T

T T

T .02 .15 .02

Lowest temperature

23° May 5, 6

Highest recorded maximum for the month ....93° (2001)

Lowest recorded minimum for the month.......13°(1954)

Average maximum 59.5°

Average minimum

Monthly average maximum through the years*.................65.5°

33.6°

Monthly average minimum through the years*..................35.4°

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department Greg Cross / The Bulletin

The soggy weather that swept over Central Oregon this past weekend will likely return Tuesday, after a brief break today. The National Weather Service is forecasting sun today, but the region might not dry out until Friday. “I would say the latter part of the week is where it will have more of a chance of nice, dry days,” said Ann Adams, an assistant forecaster for the National Weather Service in Pendleton on Sunday evening. “From now through the middle of the week, it will be at least partly cloudy and there will be a chance of showers.” There is currently a stream of moisture across the Pacific Ocean, Adams said, and a lowpressure storm system is “kicking” the moisture into the West Coast in waves. “That’s why it seems like (the rain comes) every day or so,” Adams said. Precipitation is most likely

“I would say the latter part of the week is where it will have more of a chance of nice, dry days.” — Ann Adams, assistant forecaster, National Weather Service in Pendleton expected on Tuesday night, when there is a 50 percent chance of rain in Central Oregon, Adams said. Most areas of Oregon and Washington are also due for rain that day. Local temperatures could be relatively mild overnight on Tuesday, with lows ranging from the high 40s to low 50s, according to the National Weather Service website. In Bend this week, daytime temperatures will be mild with highs in the 60s to 70s and overnight lows in the low 40s. See Weather / B5

The summer of 2010 could be the worst for grasshopper outbreaks the West has seen in more than 30 years, according to adult grasshopper surveys conducted last summer by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Parts of Eastern Oregon, especially areas near Burns in Harney County, which historically have had grasshopper problems, are at risk of seeing outbreaks again this summer. Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties typically don’t face significant grasshopper infestations, and nothing much out of the ordinary is expected there for 2010. Due to some proactive prevention work by ranchers though, Oregon may be better off than much of the West. “Our numbers, contrary to the

other states, actually went down. That’s a good thing,” Helmuth Rogg, entomologist for the Oregon Department of Agriculture, said. “I think at least a big contribution is that the rangers were proactive last year and cut that action off.” With instruction from the ODA, Oregon ranchers in a number of eastern and northeastern counties learned about the best times and locations to look for and spray young grasshoppers. Rogg said the well-timed spraying work of ranchers in Baker County was the primary reason the infestation there in 2009 was less intense than it had been in 2008, when the Oregon Legislature’s Emergency Board voted to approve more than $100,000 in aid to combat the millions of grasshoppers that had descended there. See Infestation / B5

Hot spots for grasshopper infestation This map highlights the areas of the state that have had the most grasshopper infestations from 1953-2009. 1-3 infestations

4-7 infestations

8-14 infestations

Pendleton Portland

The Dalles

La Grande

Salem

Eugene

Bend

Ontario Burns

Klamath Falls Source: Oregon Department of Agriculture

Officials eye alternatives to pay for new school at Warm Springs

Lakeview Eric Baker / The Bulletin

Work to begin on Bend Parkway

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Bulletin staff report

Jefferson County School District officials have made it clear that building a new Warm Springs Elementary School is a priority — but reaching their goal in the near future recently got harder. The district had high hopes that an $18 million impact aid grant through the Oregon Department of Education reserved for construction would fit their project and needs perfectly. But officials were recently told they didn’t receive the grant. Although they have yet to receive the official confirmation, district officials said it’s now time to switch gears and figure out a backup plan. “What is important for us to recognize is that one of our highest building priorities remains a school out at Warm Springs,” said Jefferson County Superintendent Rick Molitor. The current Warm Springs Elementary School building was built in 1938 and is the district’s oldest operating building. The cafeteria isn’t attached to the main building so students have to walk roughly a city block to get to lunch. See School / B5

Construction to improve bridges and overpasses along the Bend Parkway will begin today, according to a news release from the Oregon Department of Transportation. Inside “The con• Map of crete is wearplanned lane ing, and there’s closures, a lot of rutting,” Page B5 said Rex Holloway, community liaison representative for ODOT Region 4. Maintenance crews will apply a wear-resistant surface to the roads of several bridges and overpasses, which will eliminate ruts and make for a smoother surface. “We anticipate the surfacing to last a minimum of five years,” said Holloway. “But it will be interesting to see how long it will last under studded tires.” Construction begins today and extends through June 17 on the bridges over Butler Market Road, Third Street, Division Street, Olney Avenue and Revere Avenue. Resurfacing crews will work Sunday evenings through Thursday mornings from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. According to Holloway, ODOT planned the construction to occur during the evening and early-morning hours to avoid heavy traffic periods. See Parkway / B5


B2 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Quilting therapy helps cancer survivors heal By Rachel Beck

Today is Monday, June 7, the 158th day of 2010. There are 207 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee of Virginia proposed to the Continental Congress a resolution calling for American independence from Britain. ON THIS DATE In 1753, Britain’s King George II gave his assent to an Act of Parliament establishing the British Museum. In 1769, frontiersman Daniel Boone first began to explore present-day Kentucky. In 1929, the sovereign state of Vatican City came into existence as copies of the Lateran Treaty were exchanged in Rome. In 1937, actress Jean Harlow died in Los Angeles at age 26. In 1939, King George VI and his wife, Queen Elizabeth, arrived at Niagara Falls, N.Y., from Canada on the first visit to the United States by a reigning British monarch. In 1948, the Communists completed their takeover of Czechoslovakia with the resignation of President Edvard Benes. In 1967, the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic opened in San Francisco. In 1970, English author E.M. Forster died in Coventry at 91. In 1981, Israeli military planes destroyed a nuclear power plant in Iraq, a facility the Israelis charged could have been used to make nuclear weapons. In 1998, in a crime that shocked the nation, James Byrd Jr., a 49year-old black man, was chained

Lost hikers located by sheriff’s deputies

noon in the area of U.S. Forest Service Road 4610, northwest of Widgi Creek Golf Course, according to a Sheriff’s Office news release. During the hike, they lost a pair of eyeglasses and went back to find them. Although the Sagers found the eyeglasses, they became lost and could not find their way back to their vehicle, accord-

ing to the Sheriff’s Office. They called a friend, who then called 911 at about 8:30 p.m. Sheriff’s deputies drove to the area and while talking to Bruce Sagers on the phone, the deputies used sirens and air horns to successfully locate the pair at about 10:30 p.m. The father and son did not require medical attention.

N  R CIVIL SUITS Filed May 26

Andy Cripe / The (Corvallis) Gazette-Times

LuAnn Kessi, right, shows off a recent creation to fellow instructor Virginia Gregory last month during their “Permission to Play� class at JanniLou Creations Quilt Shop in Philomath. is really positive.� Kessi easily persuaded fellow quilters to be instructors. “We couldn’t pass it up,� said Kathi Borrego, a Harlan neighbor of Kessi. Soon the class was in full swing and an obvious hit. The group now goes by the name “Permission 2 Play,� because, Kessi said, so many students remarked that it was the one day marked on their calendar when they gave themselves “permission to play.�

Kathy Haywood, of Corvallis, has been in the class since the beginning. Last week was her two-year anniversary of surgery for metastatic, invasive breast cancer. It’s officially five years of being cancer-free before she can call herself a survivor, so she has dubbed herself a “pre-vivor.� But for the most part, cancer and everything related to it doesn’t come up during class. “We just don’t talk about it,� she said. “We play, and we have fun.�

U.S. orders Microsoft breakup in 2000 The Associated Press

Compiled from Bulletin staff report

Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies found a father and son in good condition Saturday night, after the pair became lost during a hike. Bruce Sagers, 56, and his son Kris Sagers, 15, both of Bend, went for a hike Saturday after-

The (Corvallis) Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — About an hour into her first “Permission to Play� class, Caroline Lupoli was laughing heartily — and eerily in sync with — her “new best friend,� instructor Cindy McNutt-Kaestner. “We’re not gonna let her go,� McNutt-Kaestner said. Lupoli, who lives in Sweet Home, seemed nothing like a newcomer to the class. But when everyone around the table has been touched by cancer, maybe that’s not a surprise. About two years ago, LuAnn Kessi started a group called Living Well with Cancer and Healing Through Quilting. The Harlan resident has three aunts who are cancer survivors, and all had been making things to sell to raise money for cancer research. But she felt moved to do more. “You knew that you were doing something good, but we just wanted to help in a more personal way,� she said. She decided to start a quilting class for those who have cancer. Lou Shafer, who owns Philomath’s JanniLou Creations quilt shop with her sister, Jan Bressler, had long wanted Kessi to teach classes there and happily donated the space. “We were thrilled to have them here,� Shafer said. “The energy

L B  

T O D AY IN HISTORY to a pickup truck and dragged to his death in Jasper, Texas. (Two white men were later sentenced to death for the crime; a third received life.) TEN YEARS AGO U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson ordered the breakup of Microsoft Corp., declaring the software giant should be split into two because it had “proved untrustworthy in the past�; Microsoft vowed to appeal. (An appeals court later threw out the breakup order; the Justice Department, under the Bush administration, said it would no longer seek a breakup of Microsoft.) FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, meeting at the White House, embraced a tentative plan to forgive the debt of poor African nations. General Motors Chairman Rick Wagoner announced plans to close plants and eliminate 25,000 manufacturing jobs in the United States by 2008. ONE YEAR AGO Extreme-right parties gained in European parliamentary elections, including the first seats won by the all-white British National Party. Roger Federer completed a career Grand Slam, winning his first French Open title by sweeping surprise finalist Robin Soderling 6-1, 7-6 (1), 6-4. The British musical “Billy Elliot� won 10 Tony Awards, including best musical and a unique best

actor prize for the three young performers who shared the title character: David Alvarez, Trent Kowalik and Kiril Kulish. Pop vocalist, musician and songwriter Kenny Rankin died in Los Angeles at 69. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Movie director James Ivory is 82. Actress Virginia McKenna is 79. Singer Tom Jones is 70. Poet Nikki Giovanni is 67. Actor Ken Osmond (“Leave It to Beaver�) is 67. Former talk-show host Jenny Jones is 64. Actress Anne Twomey is 59. Actor Liam Neeson is 58. Actress Colleen Camp is 57. Singer-songwriter Johnny Clegg is 57. Author Louise Erdrich is 56. Actor William Forsythe is 55. Record producer L.A. Reid is 54. Latin pop singer Juan Luis Guerra is 53. Singer-songwriter Prince is 52. Rock singer-musician Gordon Gano (The Violent Femmes) is 47. Rapper Ecstasy (Whodini) is 46. Rock musician Eric Kretz (Stone Temple Pilots) is 44. Rock musician Dave Navarro is 43. Actress Helen Baxendale is 40. Actor Karl Urban is 38. Rock musician Eric Johnson (The Shins) is 34. Actor-comedian Bill Hader is 32. Actress Anna Torv (TV: “Fringe�) is 31. Actress Larisa Oleynik is 29. Tennis player Anna Kournikova is 29. Actor Michael Cera is 22. Actress Shelley Buckner is 21.

10CV0452AB: Asset Acceptance LLC v. Albert B. King, complaint $11,634.39 10CV0453ST: Andrea M. Patterson v. Aetna Life Insurance Co., complaint, $12,076.41 Filed May 27

10CV0454ST: Ray Klein Inc. dba Professional Credit Service v. Elyse L. Rudolph aka Lisa L. Rudolph, complaint, $23,454.27 10CV0455MA: Judy Johnson v. Sunriver Resort Limited Partnership dba Sunriver Lodge & Resort, complaint, $142,949.20 economic damages, $200,000 noneconomic damages 10CV0456ST: Stahancyk Kent Johnson & Hook P.C. v. Tamey J. Austin fka Tamey J. Layton; Jay E. Layton; Matthew C. Layton; Taylor Layton; John and Jane Does I-IV, complaint, $84,691.32 10CV0457MA: Tammy Hoxie v. Austin Tile & Marble Inc., dba Austin Tile Design Studio & Gallery; Austin & Austin Investments LLC, complaint, $114,680.78 10CV0458ST: Randall Marchington v. Roth-Sachry Heating Inc., dba Roth Heating, complaint, $189,691

10CV0459AB: Nicole Rushton v. Timothy E. Robitshek, complaint, $30,000 economic damages, $100,000 noneconomic damages Filed May 28

10CV0460MA: Sharla Harris v. Max W. Higbee, DMD, PC abn Redmond Dental Group; Dr. Tony L. Parsley, DMD; Dr. Max W. Higbee, DMD; Dane E. Smith, DDS, PC; and Dr. Dane E. Smith, DDS, complaint $71,892.09 economic damages, $350,000 noneconomic damages 10CV0461AB: LVNV Funding LLC v. Patricia Marze, complaint, $24,788.02 10CV0462AS: Midland Funding LLC v. Rosario Rodriguez aka Rosario R. Tamez, complaint, $15,885.91 10CV0463ST: American Express Centurion Bank v. Randy A. Kemnitz aka Randy A. Kemwitz, complaint, $38,611.75 Filed June 1

10CV0464ST: Jeffery and Carol Rank v. Diamond Built Homes LLC, complaint, $1,160,000 10CV0465MA: Tracy A. CainMacLean v. Daryl Buerger and Small Engine Repair of Central Oregon, complaint, $4,810,000 10CV0466ST: Aurora Loan Services LLC v. Kerry M. Liliedahl, individually and as

trustee of the Kerry M. Liliedahl Revocable Living Trust; JP Morgan Chase Bank NA and Chase USA NA, complaint, $533,030.85 10CV0467ST: Discover Bank v. Gay E. Rose, complaint, $11,378.74 10CV0468ST: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Jennifer L. White, complaint, $28,423.61 10CV0469AB: Cach LLC v. Tamera L. Thayer, complaint, $11,274.86

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

Got a D.U.I.I. ? Want to save hundreds of dollars?

CALL NOW Pfeifer & Associates State Licensed/DUII Treatment Services

541-383-4293

FURNITURE OUTLET “WE MAKE IT EASY!â€? 541-385-0373 • 1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend

www.furnitureoutletbend.com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com Treating all Foot Conditions

BendSpineandPain.com

541.383.3668

(541) 647-1646

www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The history of the world shows that when a mean thing was done, man did it; when a good thing was done, man did it.� — Robert G. Ingersoll, American lawyer and statesman (1833-99)

We’ve just made finding garage sales a BREEZE! Now you can visit www.bendbulletin.com/garagesales to find out exactly where a garage sale is located.

6/18/10.

We can show you the fastest way to the local garage sales.

Save time & money and go to www.bendbulletin.com/garagesales

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL

541-385-5800

6/18/10.

JUNE 18, 2010

BEND 541-389-3381

ALBANY 541-223-5537

SPRINGFIELD 541-393-2659

SALEM 503-400-6215


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 B3

O New Astoria film museum Search for missing Portland boy expands holds ‘Goonies’ gathering By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

The Associated Press ASTORIA — The grand opening of the Oregon Film Museum in Astoria attracted “Goonies” fans from all over. More than 100 Goonies fans showed up for the opening on Saturday morning. That’s because the museum chose the 25th anniversary celebration of the movie “The Goonies” for its grand opening. Instead of your typical ribbon-cutting ceremony, Mac

Burns, the Clatsop County Historical Society executive director, had the ribbon cutters line up with the clappers used in filming that signal the beginning of a take. Then actors re-created the jail break scene from the film. They dashed into the getaway car and raced around the block, only to be chased back to the museum by Thomas Phillips of the Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office, driving his squad car.

Lane County wins lawsuit filed by mental health unit The Associated Press EUGENE — A jury has sided with Lane County in a dispute over funding being stopped to a Springfield mental health agency. The Lane County Circuit Court jury determined that the county did not improperly break its contract with SAFE Inc., a nonprofit agency that operated Valia Health Resources and treated about 150 people with mental illnesses. Attorneys representing SAFE filed the lawsuit in April 2009. The move came after county officials announced they would discontinue the agency’s Medicaid coverage after two years of alleged mismanagement at Valia. Lane County government administers the federal Medicaid program, which, among other things, pays for mental health services for low-income individuals. In the lawsuit, the agency accused the county of breach-

ing the contract by refusing to provide a pre-termination hearing. But county officials argued that they provided the required hearing and acted in good faith throughout the contract. The jury agreed last week. “We are very gratified by this verdict,” said Karen Gaffney, the county health department’s assistant director. “It aptly reflects our view of both the facts and the law on the issues the jury was asked to decide.” Valia was one of the first fullservice, peer-run mental health providers in Oregon funded by Medicaid. More than half of its dozen or so employees had previously been treated for mental issues. The county discontinued Medicaid coverage to the agency after saying that regulators found repeated instances of client assessments that lacked documentation, inadequate clinical supervision and treatment goals that did not address issues that qualified for Medicaid reimbursement.

PORTLAND — The FBI has joined the search for a 7-yearold boy who vanished after his stepmother left him at his Northwest Portland elementary school on Friday morning. Detectives on Sunday interviewed parents and students at Skyline Elementary School to glean any possible clues into the whereabouts of Kyron Horman. The boy and his stepmother, Terri Moulton Horman, attended a science fair at the school early Friday. She last saw him walking down a hallway toward his classroom about 8:45 a.m. Police say Kyron did not return home on the bus as scheduled, and the family called the school. The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office was contacted about 4 p.m. Authorities have been searching the school and the surrounding area since then. The FBI has dispatched its Child Abduction Rapid Deployment Team. Multnomah County Sheriff Dan Staton said he was “not prepared” to call the boy’s disappearance a kidnapping, and

there were no suspects at this time. In addition to Multnomah County deputies, Portland, Gresham and Fairview police, as well as the Oregon State Patrol and Multnomah County Search and Rescue were taking part in the search. A search of the two miles between the school and Kyron’s home did not turn up any clues, police said. “The mission is the same as last night; that being to locate Kyron Horman,” police spokeswoman Lt. Mary Lindstrand said. The FBI also dispatched a profiler from the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit. FBI spokeswoman Beth Anne Steele said in an e-mail that this type of team is often dispatched when a young child disappears, and its presence does not mean that law enforcement has determined the child has been abducted. Kyron is described as 3-foot8 and 50 pounds with brown hair and blue eyes. He was last seen wearing a “CSI” T-shirt and dark cargo pants. Kyron’s father, Kaine Horman, works at Intel. The boy’s mother, Desiree Horman,

LAND MOWING FIRE SUPPRESSION

lives in Medford and came to Portland following Kyron’s disappearance. Relatives were distributing fliers with the boy’s picture on Sunday. Authorities also began interviewing students and their families individually at the school. At a news conference on Sunday afternoon at Brooks Hill Historical Church, Staton said the investigators were working to determine a detailed timeline as to the boy’s movements on Friday morning.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com

In addition to interviews with students and families, authorities were reviewing photos and videos taken at the school that morning of the science fair. The last photo of Kyron shows the boy smiling in front of his project on the red-eyed tree frog.

541-388-4418

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

FALL SOCCER IN BEND ALL PLAYERS AND TEAMS WELCOME ‘Kick It’ with Oregon Rush September and October! 2010 Central Oregon Soccer League for 5–13 year olds Existing teams and groups from all leagues stay together

TOTAL COST PER PLAYER: $85 Online registration now open at oregonrush.com (Questions? Contact Keith at keith@oregonrush.com)

Teams will be found for all individually registered players Appropriate levels of play for all Fees include Nike uniform and fun pre-season jamboree

Meet Fire Code Standards and Weed Control for vacant lots, fields, and pastures

G.A. Mowing 541-923-5776 or 541-410-3833 (cell)

Now Available in Central Oregon… …The Fat Melting Laser you’ve heard about ..As seen on, “The Doctors”, “Rachael Ray” and “CNN”

BODY BY LASER

Lose inches in only 2 weeks HERE’S WHAT PATIENTS ARE SAYING: “I am a 51 year old woman. I have worked out for years, and have struggled to lose those bulges around my middle. Wow what a difference how my clothes fit!! I have lost 8.25 inches! I have told so many people about how wonderful the Body by Laser program is. I recommend this to anyone that struggled with losing those last few inches. Just got back from Maui and loved being in my bikini!!!” — Susan, Redmond “My initial treatment was astonishing - over 8 inches lost! It was better than I had even dreamed. My “muffin top” is nearly gone, and my clothes fit and look much better. I’ve been following a nutrition and exercise program for the last year before hitting a plateau. This program is just the thing to re-invigorate my motivation and keep me going on my quest to be healthier and look better!” — Cathy, Redmond

Transform your body without the risk from a dangerous surgery, or a painful procedure. The Amazing “Lazy Man’s Way” to melt away stubborn fat that even years of controlled dieting or over-the-top exercise can’t touch.

Healthy adipose cells

Fat Droplets seeping across Adipose cell membrane

Complete collapse of adipose cellemulsification

Here’s what is happening in the pictures above. You can actually see the real time effect of the laser, seeing the droplets of fat pour out of the fat cell. And, after the treatment is over you can witness the collapse of the fat cell.

FREE CONSULTATION - FREE BOOK Be one of the first 20 people to call and get a FREE BOOK and FREE CONSULTATION! Jan Cutter, Licensed Clinical Aesthetician

Call Now (541) 923-2019


B4 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Finding fault with generosity

O

regon’s economy is struggling, and lawmakers have steadily choked off state funding for higher education. So, when Nike billionaire Phil Knight offered to

build a 100,000-square-foot addition to the Casanova and Moshofsky athletic centers — with construction and job creation to start within months — what did the Board of Higher Education do? On Friday, much to its credit, the board said “yes.” This decision would not be noteworthy — it’s a no-brainer — if union officials hadn’t found cause to complain. The arrangement would allow a Knight-backed private group, Phit LLC, to lease from the university the property on which the addition would sit, build the addition, then give the whole thing back to the school. Because it would be built privately, various documents, including the building’s price tag, would not become public records. However, Knight has agreed to abide by the state’s prevailing wage law, which provides artificially inflated compensation on publicly funded projects. The process may be a bit unusual, but what’s not to like? The university gets a free building worth tens of millions, and lots of people get jobs.

This is, in essence, a significant, privately funded stimulus project. Yet according to The (Eugene) RegisterGuard, an official with the plumbers and steamfitters union — whose members surely stand to benefit from Knight’s generosity — wanted the board to mandate extra conditions. These include a prohibition on subcontractors who’ve violated wage laws in the past and a requirement that the project meet stringent energy-efficiency standards. Currently, higher standards are recommended. The board gave these demands the cold shoulder they deserved. Meanwhile, UO President Richard Lariviere said what most board members must have been thinking: “This is an act of astonishing generosity. And instead of celebrating that generosity, we’re analyzing it to a level of scrutiny one doesn’t expect for something such as this.” He couldn’t be more right.

Obama betrays clean pledge with job offers

T

hough it may not be unusual for a president to do what he can to help supporters win elections to Congress, it’s far from the clean, open government Barack Obama promised the American people during his own campaign two years ago. Thus it was disappointing to learn that the Obama administration had tried to persuade at least two candidates in two states to pull out of primary elections in favor of candidates the administration liked better. Most notably, the administration, with the help of former President Bill Clinton, asked Joe Sestak of Pennsylvania to withdraw from the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate seat held by Arlen Specter. In exchange, Sestak would be given the chance to serve on an unpaid government or presidential advisory board, and Specter, the Republicanturned-Democrat who has supported Obama on several important occasions, would have a clear shot at winning his new party’s primary contest. Sestak turned down the offer and proceeded to beat Specter by nearly 100,000 votes out of just over a million votes cast in last month’s election. The administration didn’t stop with the Specter-Sestak race, however. Though each party says the

(This behavior) does nothing to enhance the image of a president who likes to portray himself as a reformer whose principles place him above politics as usual. other made the initial request, the White House also discussed a job for Andrew Romanoff of Colorado if he withdrew from the Democratic primary race for the seat held by Sen. Michael Bennet of that state. Like Sestak, Romanoff turned down the offer, and he and Bennet will square off in Colorado’s August primary. Despite the howls from some quarters, this behavior doesn’t warrant the appointment of a special prosecutor and a full-blown investigation. Nevertheless, it does nothing to enhance the image of a president who likes to portray himself as a reformer whose principles place him above politics as usual. In fact, it smacks more of what most Americans have come to expect from a Chicago-area politician, which, in fact, Obama is. The nation Obama leads deserves better.

How about a public school bailout? WASHINGTON — hile the nation remains preoccupied by the drama of the oil leak in the Gulf, which consumes an inordinate portion of time and attention in the media, a struggle of potentially greater consequence for most American families is taking place with far less publicity. I am referring to the scenarios being enacted in legislatures across the land as the final strokes are being placed on state budgets, and the fate of literally thousands of teachers and pupils is being decided. As noted here more than once, the arguments over taxes and borrowing that have become louder and more pointed in Washington are nothing compared with the fiscal mayhem in capitals from Sacramento to Boston. State economies have barely begun to recover from the wreckage of the Great Recession. And since taxes are mostly collected retroactively, after individual incomes are earned and spent, it will be well into 2011 or more likely 2012 before state and local budgets can be restored to their pre-recession levels — when more people are working. Meanwhile, state after state is wrestling with the dilemma posed by their schools, the largest single item in most of their budgets. They were given a year’s grace when President Obama dedicated a large slice of the 2009 fiscal rescue package of $787 billion to staving off the cuts that otherwise would have taken place in school budgets for this year. That saved an estimated 300,000 or

W

DAVID BRODER more teaching slots. But there is currently no second-year funding coming from Washington for another rescue mission. Liberal Democrats, led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, are trying to assemble such a package, but they have encountered resistance not only from Republicans but from moderate and conservative Democrats, well aware that the voters are becoming more and more worried about the deficits and debts this nation is incurring. Of all the dilemmas Obama faces, this may be the cruelest. The arguments on each side — for averting teacher layoffs and for avoiding even more ruinous debt — are entirely convincing. But they collide. In an ideal world, the president and his party would respond by passing a budget resolution providing an immediate rescue package for the states and committing to longer-range economies and revenue adjustments that would assure bond markets and financial circles that, with recovery, deficits will soon start to shrink. But as they talked among themselves before the Memorial Day recess, the Democrats could not muster the will, or the courage, even to attempt to pass a budget resolution. Instead, they pre-

fer to leave the hard trade-offs to the commission on deficit reduction that Obama has appointed, which will not report its recommendations until after Election Day. The irony of ironies is that while these thousands of teachers are left twisting in the wind, the states, in a rare act of courage, have committed to each other to stiffen their requirements in English and math — the most heartening step in education reform in many years. This bipartisan movement, encouraged by the administration but not led or forced by it, has won voluntary backing from the vast majority of states. That is a powerful statement from grass-roots America about the willingness to improve the education of our children so they can measure up to international competition. But we cannot commit to raising standards in one breath, and turn around and issue layoff notices to thousands of teachers in the next. That would be as unconscionable as vowing to rid Afghanistan of the Taliban, while simultaneously pulling out the increment of NATO troops. As the days before the midterm reckoning dwindle, the inevitable paring of the Obama agenda will proceed at a faster pace. He will not be able to satisfy all the demands cascading on him. But when he looks at his young daughters, it should be clear to him that saving the schools is one promise he must keep. David Broder is The Washington Post’s senior political writer.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Obama’s approach to education focused on opportunities

S

ometimes it seems as if we’re doomed to fight a new culture war between orthodox liberals who have lavish faith in the power of government and orthodox conservatives who have almost no faith at all. But occasionally a politician comes along with a more measured vision of a limited but energetic government. Recently, for example, I read a speech by a politician who gave examples of both when government had failed (the old welfare system) and when it had succeeded (the railroad legislation under Lincoln, the bank reforms under FDR and the highway system under Eisenhower). “Our government shouldn’t try to guarantee results,” this politician said, “but it should guarantee a shot at opportunity for every American who’s willing to work hard.” That sentence struck me as a pretty good foundation for a political philosophy. It was delivered by President Barack Obama at the University of Michigan commencement last month. Obama administration policies haven’t always hewed to this limited but energetic approach. But there is one area where they sure have: education. The Obama

approach to education could serve as a model for anybody who wants to build a center-out governing majority. Over the past decades, federal education policy has veered between the incredibly intrusive to the appallingly supine. The Obama administration, however, has used federal power to incite reform, without dictating it from the top. First, Obama and the Education secretary, Arne Duncan, set up a contest. They put down $4.5 billion in Race to the Top money. They issued some general guidelines about what kind of reforms states would have to adopt to get the money. And then they fired the starting gun. Reformers in at least 23 states have passed reform laws in hopes of getting some of the dough. Some of the state laws represent incremental progress, and some represent substantial change. The administration has hung tough, demanding real reform in exchange for dollars. Over all, there’s been a tremendous amount of movement in a brief time. This is not heavy-handed Washington command and control. This is Washington energizing diverse communities of reformers, locality by locality, and giv-

DAVID BROOKS ing them more leverage in their struggles against the defenders of the status quo. Second, the Obama administration used the power of the presidency to break through partisan gridlock. Over the past decade, teacher unions and their allies have become proficient in beating back Republican demands for more charters, accountability and choice. But Obama has swung behind a series of bipartisan reformers who are also confronting union rigidity. In Rhode Island, the Central Falls superintendent, Frances Gallo, fired all the teachers at one failing school. The unions fought back. Obama sided with Gallo, sending shock waves nationwide. If the president had the guts to confront a sacred Democratic interest group in order to jolt a failing school, then change was

truly in the air. Gallo got the concessions she needed to try to improve that school. Third, the president has better aligned the education system with American values. In every other job in this country, people are measured by whether they produce results. For decades, that didn’t apply to schools, where people were rewarded even as student achievement stagnated. This administration has sided with reformers who want to change that — by measuring teacher performance. In the District of Columbia, for example, Chancellor Michelle Rhee is on the verge of getting a teacher contract that would enable her to better measure teacher performance and do something about those teachers who lag behind. Fourth, the administration has encouraged local officials to raise educational standards. The feds are not imposing national standards. But the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers have come up with blueprints of what kids should be learning in math and English. According to the Thomas Fordham Foundation, an authoritative source on these things, the new standards are tough, rigorous and

practical. The feds are offering incentives to states to embrace these goals. Fifth, the administration is opening the door for more fundamental reform. Andy Smarick of the American Enterprise Institute and others have piled up data showing that it’s nearly impossible to turn around failing schools. Once mediocrity infects a school culture, it’s nearly always best to simply replace the existing school with another. The administration has a program called School Improvement Grants, which is helping a few remarkable local reformers, like Joel Klein of New York City, to close miserable schools and put new ones in their place. In short, Obama’s activism isn’t overbearing. It’s catalytic. The administration hasn’t defeated the forces of the status quo, but in state after state, you’re seeing reformers moving forward. So, why don’t we use a similarly light but energetic, decentralized but forceful reform approach when it comes to health care, transportation, energy or environmental policy? David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 B5

O

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

By Timothy R. Smith The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — John Douglas, a lawyer who helped organize the 1963 March on Washington and was involved in the release of prisoners after the Bay of Pigs invasion, died June 2 at the Grand Oaks assisted living facility in Washington. He was 88 and had complications from a stroke. Appointed by President John F. Kennedy in 1963, Douglas was assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s civil division, which represents federal employees, including members of Congress and the Cabinet, in legal disputes. He became the Kennedy administration’s point man for the August 1963 March on Washington. He worked closely with march leaders and had a White House mandate to keep the demonstration peaceable. “Douglas’s team assisted the march planners in thinking through the day’s details, down to the adequacy of toilet facilities on the Mall,” Seattle lawyer Drew Hansen wrote in “The Dream: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Speech that Inspired a Nation” (2003), a book on King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered Aug. 28, 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial. Douglas “shares historic

Weather Continued from B1 Tonight could be the coldest night, with a predicted low of 37 degrees under partly cloudy skies, the National Weather Service website predicts. Madras will likely have simi-

credit for the orderliness and smoothness and joy of that day,” Victor Navasky wrote in “Kennedy Justice” (1971), his history of Robert F. Kennedy’s Justice Department. Douglas had made a name for himself in Kennedy circles in late 1962, when he helped negotiate the release of prisoners held by Cuban leader Fidel Castro. The previous year, the CIA had sponsored an ill-fated attempt to overthrow Castro. More than 1,500 anti-communist Cuban exiles went ashore at the Bay of Pigs, on Cuba’s southern shore. The exiles were roundly defeated in three days, and most were taken prisoner. Douglas was part of a fourman committee, including future attorney general Nicholas Katzenbach, that eventually negotiated a $53 million foodand-medicine swap for 1,113 prisoners. John Woolman Douglas was born Aug. 15, 1921, in Philadelphia. He graduated from Princeton University in 1943 and served in the Navy during World War II. He received a law degree from Yale University in 1948. After law school, Douglas attended Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar and received a postgraduate degree in politics, philosophy and economics.

lar weather, with sun expected today and a chance of rain from Tuesday through Thursday. Temperatures should be in the 60s to 70s during the day and drop to the low 40s overnight; drier weather could be headed to Madras starting Friday. Prineville’s forecast is also for sun today, then rain begin-

He worked briefly for the Washington law firm Covington & Burling, where he specialized in civil litigation. In 1951 and 1952, he clerked for Supreme Court Justice Harold Burton. After his clerkship, he returned to Covington. Douglas resigned from the Justice Department in 1966 to work on the unsuccessful reelection campaign of his father, Sen. Paul Douglas, D-Ill. In 1968, he became a strategist for the presidential campaign of Kennedy, D-N.Y. Afterward, he returned to Covington & Burling and in 1974 and 1975 was president of the D.C. Bar. In 1989, Douglas became an election observer in Namibia, which was separating from South Africa. He was an official observer of the 1994 election of Nelson Mandela as president of South Africa. Politics was his first love, followed closely by music, said his daughter, Kate Douglas Torrey, of Chapel Hill, N.C. He was an accomplished pianist and had composed songs while at Princeton. He married Mary St. John in 1945. She died in 2007. In addition to his daughter, survivors include a son, Peter Douglas, of New York; a brother; a half sister; four grandchildren; and one great-grandson.

ning Tuesday and continuing through Thursday. Temperatures will be similar to the rest of Central Oregon, with highs in the 60s to 70s and overnight lows in the 40s. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

ODOT will be resurfacing bridges and overpasses through July 1. Beginning today, workers will apply a wear-resistant surface to preserve the concrete decking on bridges and overpass structures along the Parkway. The resurfacing will also eliminate the ruts, smooth the travel surfaces and be matched with the paving completed last year. Single-lane closures in the work zones are planned throughout the monthlong project. 97

97 20

Today through June 17

BUS 97

Butle

r Ma

rket

Rd.

Third St.

Joan Marie Peterson peacefully passed away from Alzheimer's on April 14, 2010, in Harrisburg, Oregon. She was born March 1, 1930, in Ogden, Utah, to Merle Wiley McMillan and Jessie Elizabeth Smith McMillan. She grew up on a Joan Marie ranch in Peterson Hotchkiss, Colorado, and moved to Longview, Washington, at the age of 14. Joan attended Washington State College where she studied Fine Arts and Home Economics. She married her high school sweetheart, the love of her life, Lawrence Eugene Peterson July 31, 1949. His career moved them across the United States, but they always wanted to return to the Northwest. Upon returning to Portland Oregon, Joan became a Laubach and Oregon Literacy Tutor, a strong belief of hers to wipe out illiteracy. She was active in St. Andrews Presbyterian church, serving as a deacon. Joan enjoyed the camaraderie of belonging to a painting club along with hostessing family & friends to many fine meals. Activities Joan enjoyed pursuing were fishing, gardening, golfing, and skiing. After retirement, Joan & Larry built their dream home in Sisters, Oregon, where they enjoyed exploring unique places in central Oregon. Joan used these landscapes as inspiration as she pursued her love of watercolor painting. Joan took daily walks with their Airedale terrier companions through the woods surrounding their home. Joan and Larry both served as volunteer forest-fire lookouts for the Sisters Ranger District at Green Ridge. They also both served on the Sage Meadow Homeowners Association Board. Joan was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Lawrence, who passed away August 7, 1999, a week after their 50th wedding anniversary. She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Pamela Lee and Daniel Kromer of Oregon City; and daughter and son-in-law, Rebecca Lee and Robert Kinyon of Harrisburg, Oregon. She is also survived by three grandsons, Wiley James Kinyon, Matthew Lars Kinyon and Christian Edward Kinyon; and one greatgranddaughter, Brighton Bela Kinyon. Joan will be forever in the hearts of those who loved her. There will be a memorial service at 2:00 pm, Saturday, June 12, 2010, at Steele Chapel at Longview Memorial Park, 5050 Mt. Solo Rd., Longview, WA 98632. Steele Chapel at Longview Memorial Park and Crematory is in charge of arrangements.

Lane closures planned for Bend Parkway

Crews will be working Sunday evenings through Thursday mornings from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. on the following bridges: Butler Market, Third Street, Division, Revere and Olney.

Revere Ave. Olney Ave.

June 21 through July 1 Greenwood Ave.

20

Franklin Ave. Third St.

March 1, 1930 - April 14, 2010

John Douglas helped plan 1963 March on Washington

Bend Parkway

Joan Marie Peterson

Colorado Ave.

97

Crews will be working Mondays through Thursdays from 3 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the following bridges: Greenwood, Franklin, Colorado and a railroad bridge near Colorado.

BUS 97

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Parkway Continued from B1 Additional work will occur from June 21 through July 1 on the Greenwood Avenue, Franklin Avenue and Colorado Avenue bridges. A railroad bridge near Colorado Avenue also will undergo resurfacing. Crews will work Mondays through Thursdays from 3 a.m. to 3 p.m. on

these bridges. “The really important thing is that we need dry surfaces to allow materials to dry,” said Holloway, citing the unusually rainy start to June. “So the construction is really dependent on how the weather goes.” Single-lane closures in the work zones are planned throughout the month, and ODOT asks that motorists travel safely through the work zones.

School

bombs onto airplanes during World War II. James R. Dodd died in 1991. Tod LaFrance, 47, of Bend, is a sign coordinator for the agency and volunteered along with his son Adam, 18, and nephew Jeremy Giraldes, 17, to work on the sign project. LaFrance said it was “just a way to pay back”

the veterans for their service. For the state employees who know the importance of U.S. Highway 97 in transporting people from one point to another, the sign project was an opportunity to learn about another facet of the route. “It’s been a rare opportunity for us to pause and reflect on

the historical significance of the routes we maintain on a daily basis,” said Bob Bryant, manager of the state transportation agency’s Central Oregon region.

Continued from B1 The school also has about seven modulars set up around it to accommodate growing numbers over the years. Molitor had hoped the grant would allow them to build the school within a year. Now, he said the district will continue to look for other grant opportunities. Several years ago, the district started looking for funds for a new building, but the project was put on hold because of the economy. This time, Molitor said, he hopes that won’t happen. Just Friday morning, he said, he received an e-mail pointing out other possible grant opportunities. He believes the construction cost would be around $18 million to $20 million. Another possibility is asking the voters for help and trying to get a bond passed. “The time frame is — it needs to be done,” he said. “The longer we put it off, eventually we need to build a new building. It’s a given ... We would like it to be sooner rather than later.”

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

damage,” Rogg said. The cold, wet spring may make this harder than usual, since the grasshoppers are out there hatching right now, and ranchers may not have been able to reach them because of the bad weather. “In the few weather breaks that we had,” Rogg said, “our guys are seeing numbers that are fairly high.” This could be discouraging news for nearby Harney County, where the problem is expected to be significant this summer. Another part of the problem, according to Dustin Johnson, the Harney County agent for the Oregon State University Extension program, is that it’s been awhile since the last major grasshopper outbreak there. Many ranchers and growers don’t remember the last big outbreak, according to Johnson, who said he was not yet working in Harney County at that time

either. “There’s not a clear understanding — I don’t even have a clear understanding — of what environmental conditions lead up to a huge outbreak,” Johnson said. “That information’s just not out there real readily.” Training sessions on pest prevention — led by Rogg with a focus on grasshoppers — were held in Harney County in April, but they were not particularly well attended, Johnson said. It’s not too late to spray for baby grasshoppers though, Rogg said. This week is likely to be the end of the youth phase for the rapidly maturing insects. That’s the best time to spray Dimilin, an insect growth regulator the ODA recommends for grasshopper elimination, because it interferes with their molting system. Normally, a young insect would shed its skin a number of

times before forming its adult outer shell. Dimilin stops that process, and the sprayed insects become stuck and die inside their too-small skins. Rogg said the pesticide is ideal because “it doesn’t affect native pollinators or honey bees.” When the grasshoppers are hatching in the spring, Rogg said, other native pollinators “are adults, and they don’t molt.” According to studies done for the USDA and regulatory agencies in other states, Dimilin has been found to be nontoxic to humans, wildlife (other than insects) and plant life. One study done for the Virginia Department of Health found the substance does not easily vaporize or stay suspended in water, which lowers the chances of ingestion for humans. Dimilin is highly toxic to some water life, and some state agencies, such as the New Jersey Department of

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ron Ochs, of Madras, an F-86 Air Force fighter pilot who flew missions following the Korean War, flies his 1944 Navy N3N pilot training biplane over Sunriver Resort, while a crowd watches on the lawn outside the Great Hall during the World War II Veterans Historic Highway dedication ceremony Sunday afternoon.

Veterans Continued from B1 Ken Dodd, 55, of Redmond, who works on the department’s sign crew, brought an old blackand-white photo of his father, James R. Dodd, who served in the U.S. Army and loaded

Infestation Continued from B1 Grasshoppers lay their eggs in 2- to 3-acre clusters, Rogg said. This means when grasshoppers hatch, there can be hundreds of thousands of baby grasshoppers in a very small area for about four weeks. After that, the grasshoppers begin to grow into winged adults, and can spread far and wide very quickly. That can be a big problem, Rogg said. While grasshoppers are an important part of grassland ecology, he said, when there are too many of them they can devour and dehydrate grazing and crop lands in no time. This happens cyclically, he said. The goal is not to eliminate grasshoppers, but “to suppress the populations when there’s an outbreak to a level where there’s not economic

Environmental Protection, have banned the use of the chemical. Even though the cold may have prevented ranchers from getting out to spray, it could also potentially limit the chances of a summer outbreak since cold, wet weather can promote fungus and other insect-specific pathogens, Rogg said. Grasshoppers hatch over the course of a few weeks though, so the recent cold weather “may cut (the outbreak) down, (or) it may just delay it for a couple of weeks,” Rogg said. “We’re kind of in a wait-andsee mode,” Johnson said from his Harney County office. “If we’d had a warm spring, I’d be really worried. But I’m not sure what we’re going to see this summer because of the spring weather we’ve had.” Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JUNE 7

TUESDAY

Today: Partly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

70

39

Western Ruggs

Condon

70/48

66/46

73/48

57/37

60s Warm Springs

Marion Forks

71/44

70/47

Willowdale 70/43

Mitchell

Madras

63/43

70/43

Camp Sherman 72/45 Redmond Prineville 70/43 Cascadia 70/43 71/44 Sisters 67/38 Bend Post

70s

70s

70/39

Oakridge Elk Lake 72/45

67/43

65/40

67/38

68/40

68/38

Fort Rock

Vancouver 63/50

70/45

64/33

Chemult 65/34

Seattle

60s Missoula

Portland

68/43

70s

Eugene Skies will be partly cloudy 70/46 today with increasing Grants Pass clouds tonight. 77/49 Eastern

Bend

Helena 73/52

Elko 80/51

Salt Lake City

Reno

A few isolated thunderstorms are possible in the northeast.

58/37

60s

Idaho Falls 70/48

67/32

70/41

68/43

Boise

70/39

88/61

Christmas Valley

Crater Lake

New

First

Full

Last

June 12 June 18 June 26 July 4

85/57

San Francisco

83/59

80s

68/54

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 61/53/0.24 . . . . . 62/49/pc. . . . . . 62/54/pc Baker City . . . . . . 71/53/0.44 . . . . . 67/43/pc. . . . . . . 69/46/c Brookings . . . . . . 57/55/0.38 . . . . . 59/51/pc. . . . . . 59/53/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 72/54/0.00 . . . . . 68/45/pc. . . . . . . 70/45/c Eugene . . . . . . . . 70/57/0.15 . . . . . 70/46/pc. . . . . . 74/51/pc Klamath Falls . . . 70/52/0.00 . . . . . 71/43/pc. . . . . . 72/47/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 66/54/0.00 . . . . . 70/43/pc. . . . . . 68/47/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 70/46/0.00 . . . . . 67/38/pc. . . . . . 68/40/pc Medford . . . . . . . 76/59/0.00 . . . . . 77/50/pc. . . . . . 78/52/pc Newport . . . . . . . 59/55/0.41 . . . . . 60/49/pc. . . . . . 60/53/pc North Bend . . . . . . 61/57/NA . . . . . 60/48/pc. . . . . . 60/51/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/59/0.12 . . . . . 75/53/pc. . . . . . 75/56/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 67/56/0.05 . . . . . 74/49/pc. . . . . . 76/53/pc Portland . . . . . . . 63/57/1.35 . . . . . 69/52/pc. . . . . . . 74/55/c Prineville . . . . . . . 69/53/0.00 . . . . . 70/43/pc. . . . . . 71/46/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 72/53/0.01 . . . . . 70/43/pc. . . . . . 73/46/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 77/60/0.04 . . . . . 71/50/pc. . . . . . 72/52/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 65/56/0.18 . . . . . 71/49/pc. . . . . . 74/53/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 68/51/0.04 . . . . . 67/38/pc. . . . . . 69/45/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 71/59/0.13 . . . . . 76/50/pc. . . . . . 77/55/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

6

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70/52 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 in 1931 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.16” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 in 1963 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.18” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.12” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.59” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.01 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.44 in 1941 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Low Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine................................Low Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

LOW

66 42

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

HIGH

63 41

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

City

HIGH

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:26 a.m. . . . . . .6:57 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:57 a.m. . . . . .11:22 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:18 a.m. . . . . . .1:04 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:02 a.m. . . . . . .1:59 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:38 p.m. . . . . . .2:10 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:00 a.m. . . . . . .2:00 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Redding

Silver Lake

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:23 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:46 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:47 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:06 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:02 p.m.

LOW

60/43

68/39

66/38

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 77° Roseburg • 51° Meacham

69/52

Burns

60s Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy, chance rain showers.

67 43

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

72/45

La Pine

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Paulina

Brothers

LOW

77 50

67/49

65/41

Sunriver

Skies will be partly cloudy today with increasing clouds tonight. Central

HIGH

THURSDAY

Partly cloudy.

Scattered showers will affect northwest Washington. Partly cloudy skies are expected elsewhere.

STATE

Maupin

Government Camp

Partly cloudy, warmer.

Tonight: Partly cloudy.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled today by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44,525 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148,070 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 72,799 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,871 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153,860 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 764 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,450 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,430 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 2,219 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1,427 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,730 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

90s Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .97/75/0.00 . 96/73/pc . . 96/74/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .75/63/0.49 . . .72/47/s . . 71/56/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .75/60/1.24 . 72/48/pc . . 72/48/pc Albuquerque. . .101/74/0.00 . . .97/68/t . . . 99/67/s Anchorage . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .62/48/c . . . 60/45/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 86/65/pc . . 89/71/pc Atlantic City . . . .95/74/0.01 . . .75/55/s . . 76/58/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .95/76/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . . .92/75/t Baltimore . . . . . .91/72/0.06 . . .79/56/s . . 78/59/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .69/52/0.00 . . .72/51/t . . . .77/52/t Birmingham . . . .88/72/0.00 . 88/64/pc . . 91/73/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .75/51/sh . . 78/50/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .69/59/0.17 . . .73/52/c . . . 75/55/c Boston. . . . . . . . .82/64/0.28 . 74/56/pc . . 73/54/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .82/69/0.42 . . .72/53/s . . 72/57/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .62/53/2.16 . . .70/50/s . . 71/54/pc Burlington, VT. . .59/53/1.19 . 66/46/pc . . 69/46/pc Caribou, ME . . . .58/51/0.55 . .64/43/sh . . . 62/41/c Charleston, SC . .92/75/0.00 . . .87/67/s . . 87/71/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .89/74/0.00 . 85/59/pc . . . 86/66/c Chattanooga. . . .87/71/0.02 . 86/61/pc . . 90/69/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .79/52/0.07 . . .87/53/t . . . 75/54/c Chicago. . . . . . . .76/59/0.00 . 71/56/pc . . 70/59/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .79/70/0.28 . . .76/56/s . . . .74/62/r Cleveland . . . . . .78/64/0.72 . . .70/49/s . . 72/58/pc Colorado Springs 87/56/0.00 . 94/59/pc . . 83/59/pc Columbia, MO . .81/62/0.00 . . .84/67/t . . . .84/70/t Columbia, SC . . .93/74/0.00 . 90/62/pc . . 90/70/pc Columbus, GA. . .89/71/0.10 . 91/67/pc . . . 92/71/s Columbus, OH. . .76/69/0.02 . . .74/54/s . . 72/60/pc Concord, NH . . . .71/62/1.19 . 74/41/pc . . 73/47/pc Corpus Christi. . .90/78/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . . .88/78/t Dallas Ft Worth. .98/77/0.00 . 98/79/pc . . 98/77/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .76/66/0.04 . . .73/55/s . . . .72/60/t Denver. . . . . . . . .92/55/0.00 . 92/57/pc . . 85/59/pc Des Moines. . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .75/60/t . . . .76/62/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .69/59/1.10 . . .71/51/s . . . 72/59/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .59/48/0.32 . 60/49/pc . . . .60/50/t El Paso. . . . . . . .109/72/0.00 . .103/74/t . . 104/73/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .57/51/0.02 . 70/50/pc . . . .72/50/t Fargo. . . . . . . . . .74/52/0.00 . .69/56/sh . . . 80/55/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .90/51/0.00 . . .87/48/s . . . 84/46/s

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 63/50

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 60/43

S

Saskatoon 61/52

Seattle 67/49

S Winnipeg 69/48

S

S

Thunder Bay 68/44

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 60/46

Halifax 63/46 Portland Billings Bismarck To ronto (in the 48 Portland 70/49 72/51 75/51 St. Paul 66/47 69/52 contiguous states): Green Bay Boston 72/60 69/51 Boise 74/56 Buffalo Rapid City 73/52 70/50 75/53 New York • 111° Detroit 79/57 71/51 Salt Lake Des Moines Needles, Calif. Philadelphia Columbus City Omaha 75/60 Chicago 74/54 79/57 • 35° 83/59 79/64 71/56 Cheyenne San Francisco W ashington, D. C. 87/53 Cut Bank, Mont. 68/54 Kansas City 79/57 Denver 85/72 Louisville • 2.16” 92/57 80/61 Las St. Louis Buffalo, N.Y. Charlotte Vegas 83/68 85/59 Albuquerque Los Angeles 110/83 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 97/68 69/60 98/76 85/63 95/75 Phoenix Atlanta 110/80 Honolulu 86/65 Birmingham 87/74 Dallas Tijuana 88/64 98/79 71/56 New Orleans 92/77 Orlando Houston 92/76 Chihuahua 91/78 104/70 Miami 95/77 Monterrey La Paz 95/72 95/63 Mazatlan Anchorage 86/74 62/48 Juneau 67/45

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .69/59/0.01 . . .70/50/s . . 69/57/pc Green Bay. . . . . .68/53/0.00 . 69/51/pc . . 68/55/sh Greensboro. . . . .89/72/0.00 . 82/60/pc . . 82/69/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .82/68/0.01 . . .77/50/s . . . 76/54/s Hartford, CT . . . .86/71/0.10 . 77/52/pc . . 74/52/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .72/44/0.00 . . .68/43/t . . 73/47/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .85/74/0.00 . .87/74/sh . . 86/75/sh Houston . . . . . . .95/78/0.00 . . .91/78/t . . . .93/78/t Huntsville . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . 86/63/pc . . 88/72/pc Indianapolis . . . .79/62/0.55 . . .74/59/s . . . .69/63/t Jackson, MS . . . .92/71/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . 96/75/pc Madison, WI . . . .74/54/0.00 . 72/55/pc . . 68/55/sh Jacksonville. . . . .94/73/0.08 . . .91/70/t . . 89/71/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .67/41/0.00 . .67/45/sh . . 60/45/sh Kansas City. . . . .85/60/0.00 . . .85/72/t . . . .88/68/t Lansing . . . . . . . .81/58/0.13 . . .70/50/s . . 70/57/pc Las Vegas . . . . .110/82/0.00 . .110/83/s . . 106/82/s Lexington . . . . . .79/69/0.05 . 77/57/pc . . . .78/62/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . . .84/66/t . . . .80/61/t Little Rock. . . . . .96/73/0.00 . 95/75/pc . . 94/75/pc Los Angeles. . . . .70/62/0.00 . 69/60/pc . . 68/60/pc Louisville . . . . . . .82/76/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . . .80/65/t Memphis. . . . . . .91/74/0.00 . 90/71/pc . . . .94/78/t Miami . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.21 . . .95/77/t . . . .91/77/t Milwaukee . . . . .75/58/0.00 . 66/54/pc . . 66/56/sh Minneapolis . . . .78/57/0.00 . 72/60/pc . . 74/59/sh Nashville . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . 85/63/pc . . . .88/70/t New Orleans. . . .92/73/2.58 . . .92/77/t . . 94/78/pc New York . . . . . .89/72/0.02 . . .79/57/s . . 77/62/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .94/73/0.00 . . .79/56/s . . . 78/61/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .95/78/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . . 80/65/c Oklahoma City . .88/72/0.00 . 98/76/pc . . . 97/74/s Omaha . . . . . . . .84/60/0.00 . . .79/64/t . . . .79/61/t Orlando. . . . . . . .94/75/0.00 . . .92/76/t . . 93/73/pc Palm Springs. . .107/79/0.00 . .111/73/s . . 104/71/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . 77/60/pc . . . .76/64/t Philadelphia . . . .93/75/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . 79/59/pc Phoenix. . . . . . .109/83/0.00 . .110/80/s . . 107/78/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .75/67/0.02 . . .72/47/s . . 70/55/pc Portland, ME. . . .66/57/1.01 . 70/49/pc . . 65/52/pc Providence . . . . .82/70/0.01 . 77/58/pc . . 76/55/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . 83/59/pc . . . 83/69/c

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .75/53/t . . . 73/52/c Savannah . . . . . 94/75/trace . . .89/67/s . . 88/70/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .88/60/0.00 . . .85/57/c . . 84/53/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .61/54/0.32 . .67/49/sh . . . 68/51/c Richmond . . . . . .96/73/0.15 . 82/58/pc . . . 82/63/c Sioux Falls. . . . . .75/56/0.00 . . .70/57/t . . 77/54/pc Rochester, NY . . .62/54/1.70 . . .71/49/s . . 73/54/pc Spokane . . . . . . .61/47/0.08 . 67/47/pc . . 70/52/pc Sacramento. . . . .94/62/0.00 . 89/59/pc . . 86/57/pc Springfield, MO. .82/66/0.00 . 87/69/pc . . . .88/73/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .83/67/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . . .82/73/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .91/82/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . 91/75/pc Salt Lake City . . .89/59/0.00 . . .83/59/c . . 80/62/pc Tucson. . . . . . . .106/72/0.00 . .106/74/s . . 103/71/s San Antonio . . . .93/77/0.00 . . .93/74/t . . . .90/77/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .88/76/0.00 . 92/76/pc . . 96/74/pc San Diego . . . . . .67/63/0.00 . 69/61/pc . . 67/62/pc Washington, DC .91/75/0.03 . . .79/57/s . . 79/60/pc San Francisco . . .73/59/0.00 . 68/54/pc . . 66/55/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .87/69/0.00 . . .94/76/t . . 93/71/pc San Jose . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . 81/56/pc . . . 78/57/s Yakima . . . . . . . .65/53/0.09 . 75/46/pc . . 75/49/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .94/62/0.00 . 93/57/pc . . . 96/59/s Yuma. . . . . . . . .106/76/0.00 . .110/76/s . . 107/73/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .77/57/0.00 . .67/50/sh . . . .69/52/t Athens. . . . . . . . 73/62/trace . 79/59/pc . . 77/57/pc Auckland. . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .60/51/sh . . 61/49/sh Baghdad . . . . . .114/86/0.00 . .105/79/s . 107/80/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .93/79/0.71 . . .95/80/t . . . .93/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .90/63/0.00 . . .89/63/s . . 88/64/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . . .77/65/s . . . .72/65/t Berlin. . . . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . 73/56/pc . . 75/59/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .68/52/0.22 . 72/52/pc . . . .69/50/t Budapest. . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . . .76/52/s . . 75/63/pc Buenos Aires. . . .70/52/0.00 . 65/39/pc . . . 67/40/s Cabo San Lucas .84/68/0.00 . . .90/71/s . . 92/72/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . .100/73/0.00 . 95/66/pc . . . 86/60/s Calgary . . . . . . . .66/41/0.01 . .60/43/sh . . 62/46/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . 90/80/pc . . 88/78/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/50/0.46 . .63/51/sh . . 66/52/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .55/50/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 64/50/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .72/55/t . . 74/56/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . . 69/41/s Hong Kong . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .85/73/c . . . .88/75/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .73/66/0.44 . .70/55/sh . . 72/58/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .86/67/0.00 . 85/65/pc . . . 80/63/s Johannesburg . . .70/46/0.00 . . .69/46/s . . . 69/43/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . 74/62/pc . . 77/63/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .76/60/s . . 74/61/pc London . . . . . . . .75/59/0.04 . 70/53/pc . . 71/55/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .84/57/s . . . 87/63/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . .92/79/t . . . .93/80/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .109/86/0.00 . .106/78/s . . 108/78/s Mexico City. . . . .86/54/0.00 . 84/59/pc . . . .85/60/t Montreal. . . . . . .54/52/0.24 . . .60/46/c . . 62/44/pc Moscow . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . 63/41/pc . . 68/49/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . 76/59/pc . . . .73/57/t Nassau . . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . 90/79/pc . . 92/80/pc New Delhi. . . . . .98/80/0.00 100/80/pc . . 103/81/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . 80/62/pc . . 76/61/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . . .68/52/c . . 67/51/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .55/50/0.18 . . .61/45/c . . 67/44/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.14 . 69/51/pc . . 66/52/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .75/68/0.00 . . .77/61/s . . . 76/62/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . 82/61/pc . . 79/60/pc Santiago . . . . . . .68/36/0.00 . . .68/40/s . . . 69/43/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . . .73/53/s . . 75/55/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .52/52/0.00 . . .73/57/s . . 77/58/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . 85/62/pc . . 79/64/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .81/65/s . . 79/64/sh Singapore . . . . . .91/79/0.86 . . .90/79/t . . . .89/80/t Stockholm. . . . . .70/48/0.00 . 64/42/pc . . . 59/43/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .58/49/s . . 61/45/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . 85/72/pc . . . .86/74/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . 81/67/pc . . . 77/66/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .80/60/s . . 77/59/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .64/54/0.82 . 66/47/pc . . 72/52/pc Vancouver. . . . . .61/55/0.00 . .63/50/sh . . 63/54/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .75/59/sh . . . .77/60/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .73/49/s . . 68/55/pc

Fund pays when businesses fail

B A L L O O N S INSPIRE COLORFUL CREATIONS IN BEND RIGHT: Tony Hicks, 32, left, and Will Nash, 40, both of Bend, put the finishing touches on their sidewalk murals in the Old Mill District at the annual “Balloons Over Bend” event Sunday. Sunday’s hot-air balloon launch was cancelled due to weather conditions, according to the event’s website.

The Associated Press

Photos by Tyler Roemer The Bulletin

LEFT: Renee Sanchez, 30, of Bend, works on a sidewalk mural in the Old Mill District at the annual “Balloons Over Bend” event on Sunday.

SALEM — Even amid companies closing in the struggling economy, an Oregon program that pays workers wages lost from shuttered employers is not seeing an increase in demand. Officials think it’s because not many people know about the program. The Statesman Journal reports that Oregon is one of a few states that have dedicated funds to cover unpaid wages when a company fails or doesn’t have the money for payroll. State Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian says the state was expecting a spike in claims, but those never materialized. “It might be because Oregon workers don’t know the fund exists,” Avakian said. The state provides a maximum of up to $4,000 in wages. It does not include sick leave or vacation. Last year the average payout was $1,048 per worker. In the nearly 25 years

the fund has existed, more than $16 million have been paid to more than 16,000 workers. The money is funded by a tax on employers. The balance in the Wage Security Fund at the moment is more than $2.3 million. The Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries attempts to recover a reimbursement from the failed company or its successor,

and the bureau — also known as BOLI — often succeeds in recovering tens of thousand of dollars. That money is returned to the Wage Security Fund, but sometimes there is nothing left to recover. Workers from the restaurant industry have the most claims, at more than 740 claims in the past five years.

CASCADE MEDICAL IMAGING In conjunction with Central Oregon Radiology Assoc. Has been awarded the accreditation of

BREAST IMAGING CENTER OF EXCELLENCE By the American College of Radiology

FREE COMMUNITY EDUCATION SERIES

Dental Implants Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

HAS YOUR NEW CAR DEALER CLOSED? I have access to thousands of new and used vehicles through Oregon’s largest dealer networks at the lowest possible pricing!

J oin Dr. Kelley Mingus to discuss the latest advances in computer guided dental implant procedures. • Noninvasive • Painless Precision Placement • No Sutures or Swelling Date: Thursday June 10, 2010 Time: 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm Cost: Free Refreshments & hors d’ oeuvres provided

Location: 1475 SW Chandler Ave, suite 201, Bend RSVP: 541-382-6565

Special financing & shipping included!

LES JONES Fleet Manager

Put my 35 years of automotive experience to work for you!

DR. KELLEY MINGUS

Call me at 541-280-3515 lesj@hertznw.com

541-382-6565 1475 S.W. Chandler Ave., Suite 201, Bend, OR www.bendcosmeticdentist.com

As the only imaging center in Central Oregon to achieve the breast Imaging Center of Excellence designation, CMI is continuing its commitment to high quality care in women’s imaging services.

1460 NE Medical Center Dr., Bend, Oregon 97701 To schedule your appointment today, call: 541-382-9383 For all other business: 541-382-6633


G

C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

Screens of summer

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

See what your TV has in store this season, Page C2

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 7, 2010

GREEN

Is that

food

If it’s not certified, don’t be afraid to ask questions

Bend company helps steer birds clear of planes Precise Flight’s pulsating-light system reduces the number of bird strikes By Andrew Moore The Bulletin

organic?

In January 2009, Capt. Chesley Sullenberger famously ditched a US Airways flight in the Hudson River with no loss of life after the plane’s two engines lost power following the ingestion of Canada geese shortly after takeoff from New York’s LaGuardia Airport. Last month, the National Transportation Safety Board, spurred by its investigation into US Airways Flight 1549, issued a safety recommendation that the U.S. Department of Agriculture “develop and implement, in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration, innovative technologies that can be installed on aircraft that would reduce the likelihood of a bird strike.” According to the May 21 recommendation, the NTSB concluded that “research on the use of aircraft systems such as pulsating lights, lasers and weather radar may lead to effective methods of deterring birds from entering aircraft flight paths and,

On the Web Precise Flight: www.precise flight.com therefore, reduce the likelihood of a bird strike.” For Scott Philiben, vice president of Bend-based Precise Flight, the recommendation was tantamount to his own “Miracle on the Hudson.” Since the mid-1990s, Philiben has been spearheading Precise Flight’s efforts to have its pulsating-light technology — originally designed for enhanced aviation visibility — accepted as a viable, onboard bird-strike deterrent. “I was thrilled to death,” Philiben said upon learning of the recommendation. “This was probably the crowning point of my career in improving aviation safety. It’s a glowing recommendation for the effort we’ve placed in this technology, and it makes a significant impact on improving safety for the flying public.” See Planes / C6

OTECH

Submitted photo Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Connie Hanson, of Prineville, looks through a stand of organic produce at Groundwork Organics during the Bend Farmers Market on Wednesday in Drake Park. Hanson regularly makes the trip from Prineville to Bend for the market. “It’s such a delight it’s back,” she says.

By Kate Ramsayer • The Bulletin

L

ooking over the cherries at a Bend Farmers Market stand on Wednesday, Tara Wiche, of Bend, had one question for the vendor. “Are these all spray-free?” she asked. Buying organic and locally grown produce brings her to the farmers market, she said — and if something’s not labeled as organic, she at least wants to make sure it’s free of pesticides.

Kathy Shean-Jones knows people who ask about pesticides, but she just usually goes by the signs at the market and heads for the organic producers — especially since she usually has a couple of children in tow. “I definitely want local, and I want organic,” she said. As the farmers market season kicks off, bringing fresh fruits, vegetables and other products to Drake Park and other sites around Central Oregon, many shoppers seek out the most environmentally friendly produce. But to check whether products are certified as organic, or to find out more about a farm’s other sustainable practices, market-goers can do a little more digging. One easy question customers can ask producers is which organization certifies their farm as organic, said Chris Schreiner, executive director of Oregon Tilth, which certifies about 350 organic farms in Oregon and 375 more nationwide and internationally. “A lot of our farms, they’ll make a photocopy of their organic certificate that we issue them just to show they’ve gone through the certification process,” Schreiner said. Oregon Tilth’s website, www.tilth.org, also has a database of certified farms for people to check themselves. See Organic / C6

In an experiment last summer, biologists strapped some of Precise Flight’s pulsating lights to a model airplane and flew it over a pen of geese. In a number of passes, the geese noticeably reacted to the plane.

A $2.7 BILLION MARKET

Seed companies are racing to produce drought-tolerant corn By Jack Kaskey and Antonio Ligi Bloomberg News

Easter egg radishes from Groundwork Organics are displayed Wednesday at the Bend Farmers Market. While some customers gravitate toward certified organic produce, others can find out about sustainable practices by asking growers a few questions.

The nutritional factor: Is organic better for you? Thursday in Health

Lance Russell’s neighbors aren’t used to seeing corn growing in the fields around Hays, Kansas, where the plants tend to wither and keel over in the hot, dry summers. They may be in for a surprise this summer. Russell is planting DuPont Co.’s droughttolerant corn, one of the seeds heading to market next year that’s designed to thrive where water is scarce. An experimental plot in 2009 improved on the economics of the sorghum crop “by a landslide,” Russell said. Monsanto Co., DuPont and Syngenta AG are vying for a similar windfall. After battling for a decade to corner the $11 billion market for insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant tech-

nologies, the world’s biggest seed companies are vying to develop crops that can survive drought. At stake is a new global market that may top $2.7 billion for the corn version alone. “It’s a race at the moment,” said Juergen Reck, an analyst at Macquarie Group Ltd. “They must see market potential.” The technology will have wide-ranging effects, from helping farmers draw less irrigation water to lowering insurance premiums and boosting land values in drought-prone regions, agricultural economists say. The seeds also may increase corn plantings in the Great Plains at the expense of wheat and sorghum while altering the market for biofuels. See Seeds / C3

SCIENCE


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Creative gift comes from the heart, not the wallet Dear Abby: I am sending along a gift suggestion for Father’s Day for the dad who doesn’t “need or want anything.” I recently celebrated a major birthday and my four dear adult children, all living in different parts of the country, collaborated electronically to record some of their favorite memories of their years at home — some humorous, some touching, some surprising. These were written on tiny bits of paper, carefully folded or scrolled and packed into a small wooden box. There were 365 in all — one a day for a year. I was so taken with the delight of reading them, however, that I read them all in two weeks! My heart will be warmed for a very long time. — Dear Old Dad in Maine Dear Dad: What a wonderful idea — and bless you for sharing it. Readers, listen up! It’s a gift that costs little but time and thought, and is brimming with true meaning. Dear Abby: My wife and I have done many things over the years to help out our son and daughterin-law, “Cathy,” including sending money, clothing, diapers, food and baby-sitting our grandchildren. Our son expresses appreciation, but Cathy is another matter. We send clothing for the babies, but there is no acknowledgment that it even arrived. When we take them gifts in person, without a word of thanks she asks if we have the receipts so she can return them. Cathy will eat or drink in our presence but offer us nothing. She is insensitive, self-centered and often just plain rude. She seems to have no clue about how to be gracious. My wife is near tears at the end of every visit. It drives us nuts to be treated like this. I am afraid our grandchildren will grow up imitating their mother’s rude and disrespectful behavior. My wife does not want me to speak with our son about this because she’s afraid we’ll never see

DEAR ABBY

Surf report: Grab the remote and ride the waves of new series and seasons By Robert Lloyd

the grandchildren again. Can you give us some guidance as to what we should do? — Cleveland Reader Dear Reader: Yes. Speak privately with your son and tell him how hurt his mother is at the treatment she has received. While it’s possible that Cathy was raised having learned none of the social graces, it is disconcerting that your son would sit silently by and watch it happen. He should insist that his parents be shown more respect, and if necessary, explain and demonstrate for her exactly what that means. Dear Abby: Several couples recently spent a week together on an excursion with each couple paying for their own lodging and meals. One couple complained at every meal about the cost. These meals were not overly expensive, and the couple can well afford everything they spent. Is there a kind way to express that the rest of us were not comfortable with this behavior (often the wait staff overheard, and it was embarrassing) or should we just exclude them in the future? — Mealtime Adventure Dear Mealtime Adventure: This couple may not have the money you assume they have, or they may prefer to spend it in other ways than at restaurants. Obviously, what wasn’t overly expensive to you was more than they had planned on spending for their meals or they wouldn’t have spoken up. Rather than telling them that it made you uncomfortable, invite another couple whose values more closely mirror your own to accompany you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Los Angeles Times

Cowabunga, channel surfers! The summer is almost here — and with it a rising tide of new and returning summer series. Time to kick back and catch a few cathode rays. Like the season that contains it, the TV summer has traditionally been a time of relaxed ambitions, of transitory simple pleasures. If the shows the networks mount in these months lack star power and substantial budgets, they also represent a kind of vacation from the anxiousness of fall, winter and spring, with their constantly fragmenting and desperately shuffled schedules. You know where you stand in the summer. Here’s a not completely complete guide to the goodies, and the not-so-goodies.

NBC Already running, but not for long, is “100 Questions,” a standard singles sitcom, whose 13episode order was cut to six. In “Persons Unknown” — Pirandello by way of Agatha Christie by way of “Lost,” from the writer of “The Usual Suspects” — a group of strangers wind up trapped in a house together, as if they had auditioned for “Big Brother” without knowing it. “Friday Night Lights” has episodes through July. People who want the world to see that thing they can do are currently competing in “America’s Got Talent” and will soon vie to be the next “Last Comic Standing” (tonight).

full of dark secrets, but these secrets are strictly supernatural. In “Scoundrels” (June 20), Virginia Madsen tries to keep her brood of small-time crooks out of trouble after dad goes to jail. “Rookie Blue” (June 24) is “Grey’s Anatomy” with guns; persuasive Missy Peregrym your wide-eyed way in. “Downfall” (June 22) is a trivia game played atop a skyscraper; losers apparently go over the edge. “Bachelor Pad” (Aug. 9) repurposes losers from “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette” (now in progress). Returning are “Wipeout” (June 22), the obstacle course game and “Shaq Vs.” (Aug. 3), in which Shaquille O’Neal attempts to beat other athletes at their own games.

Fox Old-school/new-school oddcouple cop show “The Good Guys” gets its official premiere tonight; like “Life on Mars” without the time travel. “Lie to Me,” which can always boast that it stars Tim Roth, brings forth new episodes at a new time (tonight); and Gordon Ramsay once again opens the gates to “Hell’s Kitchen” (Tuesday night), to his own chagrin, doubtlessly; in “Masterchef” (July 27) he teases pro chops from amateur cooks.

PBS “Masterpiece! Mystery” has returning seasons of “Poirot” (July 11), including “Murder on the Orient Express,” and “Inspector Lewis” (Aug. 29), Kevin Whately not quite erasing memories of old boss Inspector Morse, but a believable boss in his own right.

ABC In “The Gates” (June 20), not for the first time do we see a new police chief arrive with family in a town

Also coming: a seasonally appropriate replay of “Baseball: A Ken Burns Film,” verite virtuoso Frederick Wiseman’s three-hour “Le Danse: Le Ballet de l’Opera de Paris” (June 16) and an “American Masters” profile of Merle Haggard, “Learning to Live With Myself” (July 21).

HBO No new series from the 800pound gorilla of premium cable, but here comes the third season of the gothic soft-core horror soap “True Blood” (June 13); Season 2 of “Hung,” what I suppose could be called the “original” big-penis TV comedy (June 27); and a seventh season of “Entourage” to mark the inexorable passing of time.

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

You will Slash Your Golf Score in 60 Minutes

GUARANTEED! No matter what level you currently play.

Bring a 7 Iron Everyone will lower their score in this REVOLUTIONARY 60 minute GOLF CLINIC. With this PROVEN METHOD you will discover the PERFECT SWING. You will learn how to recognize any breakdown and how to easily correct it!!

AMC The fourth-season return of “Mad Men” (July 25) is as good a

Bring a Friend Free with this ad

Clinic Cost: $18 June 8, 9 & 10

Tues & Thur. Ladies Only 10-11 Wed. - Everyone welcome 10-11 Missing Link Family Golf Center 1401 NE Maple Ave Redmond

oc al

541-389-9252

541-546-9081

Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd. Redmond • 1332 SW Highland Ave.

2019 SW Park Lane • Culver

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

“The Big C” stars redoubtable Laura Linney as a woman who decides to live large in the face of cancer; producing methamphetamine is probably not on her bucket list. (Oliver Platt and Gabourey Sidibe make this date feel extra special.) “The Green Room With Paul Provenza” (Thursday) features the host in roundtable raps with other comics, including Roseanne Barr, Eddie Izzard and Jonathan Winters; “The Real L Word” (June 20) follows “real-life, hot and happening lesbians in their daily lives at work and play in Los Angeles.” And “Weeds” is back Aug. 16, more trouble for Mary Louise Parker, I ’spect.

TURF • TREES SHRUBS • FERTILIZER

1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312

Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

s Turf, Inc.

cPh

W e s p e c i a li z e i n “ l

www.educate.com

ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD

Showtime

RYn” E S R w NU ly g ro

M

candidate as any for TV Event of the Summer, but I otherwise have no special knowledge to share with you. “Rubicon” is the network’s new show this summer, a conspiracy thriller with James Badge Dale (“The Pacific”) as the ordinary guy in over his head, and the attractive presences of Miranda Richardson and Arliss Howard, who should be in everything.

Call for reservations

Classes, Private Lessons Available

(541) 772-4472 www.ultimategolfswing.net BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

MONDAY PRIME TIME 6/7/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News (5:01) Judge Judy Inside Edition America’s Funniest Home Videos According to Jim Malcolm-Mid. Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Wolf: Travels Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Be a Millionaire Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Smart Travels This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Access Hollyw’d Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

11:00

The Bachelorette The men must maximize their time. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:02) True Beauty The Secret ‘14’ KATU News at 11 Last Comic Standing Auditions begin in Los Angeles. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Persons Unknown Pilot (N) ’ ‘PG’ News How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Big Bang Theory (10:01) CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å News The Bachelorette The men must maximize their time. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:02) True Beauty The Secret ‘14’ Inside Edition Lie to Me Beat the Devil (N) ’ ‘14’ The Good Guys Bait & Switch ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ King of the Hill News Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Carole King -- James Taylor Live at the Troubadour ‘G’ Dr. Christiane Northrup: Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom ‘PG’ Å Last Comic Standing Auditions begin in Los Angeles. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Persons Unknown Pilot (N) ’ ‘PG’ News One Tree Hill ’ ‘14’ Å Gossip Girl Enough About Eve ‘14’ Married/ Children Married... With Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Hometime ‘G’ Gardenstory Sewing-Nancy Dewberry Shw Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Daisy Cooks! Carole King -- James Taylor Live at the Troubadour ‘G’ Dr. Christiane Northrup: Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom ‘PG’ Å

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline My Name Is Earl South Park ‘14’ Italy: Southern Jay Leno Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Thai Cooking Italy: Southern

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Intervention Marci ‘14’ Å Intervention Shane ‘14’ Å Hoarders Claudie ‘PG’ Å Paranormal State Paranormal State 130 28 8 32 Cold Case Files ’ ‘14’ Å (5:15) ››› “Out of Sight” (1998, Crime Drama) George Clooney, Jennifer Lopez, Ving Rhames. A U.S. marshal falls for an es- ›› “You’ve Got Mail” (1998, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Parker Posey. Premiere. Two bitter (10:45) ›› “You’ve Got Mail” (1998) Tom Hanks. Two bitter 102 40 39 caped con she must capture. Å business rivals conduct an online love affair. Å business rivals conduct an online love affair. Å Animal Cops Houston Trinity ’ ‘PG’ Animal Cops Houston Flood (N) ‘PG’ River Monsters Demon Fish ’ ‘PG’ Whale Wars ’ ‘14’ Last American Cowboy (N) ’ ‘PG’ Whale Wars ’ ‘14’ 68 50 12 38 Animal Cops Houston Cry ’ ‘PG’ Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ 137 44 Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Hughes Family ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Negotiator” (1998) Samuel L. Jackson. A top police negotiator is accused of committing murder. 190 32 42 53 Trading Spouses: Meet-Mommy American Greed Mad Money Inside American Airlines: A Week in the Life Paid Program Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Inside American Airlines: A Week in the Life Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å RENO 911! ‘14’ RENO 911! ‘14’ RENO 911! ‘14’ RENO 911! ‘14’ Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Com.-Presents The Buzz Bend City Edition PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Trading Desk RSN Movie Night PM Edition Deschutes Cty. 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Hannah Montana ›› “Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London” Å Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ MythBusters Car stereos. ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Pain tolerance. ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters Mythssion Control ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Pain tolerance. ’ ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Philadelphia Phillies (Live) Å SportsNation Å Football Live SportsNation Å NASCAR Now Å Drag Racing 22 24 21 24 College Softball NCAA World Series Championship, Game 1: Teams TBA (Live) Å Russo & Steele Car Auction Å PBA Bowling PBA Bowling AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball 1987 Navy at Kentucky From Jan. 25, 1987. 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Candelo vs. Garcia ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen ››› “Mean Girls” (2004) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Secret Life of American Teen Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Challenge Disney Celebration Cakes Unwrapped Unwrapped Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive-Ins Diners, Drive-Ins Good Eats Unwrapped Salty 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. (Live) (4:30) ›› “27 Dresses” (2008) Katherine Heigl, James Marsden. ››› “Men of Honor” (2000) Robert De Niro. The U.S. Navy’s first black diver battles a crippling setback. The Good Guys Pilot ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “Rules of Engagement” (2000) 131 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ Å House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters My First Sale ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters Selling New York My First Place 176 49 33 43 Divine Design ‘G’ Get It Sold ‘G’ American Pickers Mole Man ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Top Shot The Long Shot ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 American Pickers Back Breaker ‘PG’ Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å “Accused at 17” (2009) Cynthia Gibb, Nicole Gale Anderson. Å Drop Dead Diva Would I Lie? ‘PG’ 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Meeks/Hoover ’ ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show Hardball Å Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann True Life Jealousy in relationships. True Life Couples prepare to marry. When I Was 17 When I Was 17 2010 MTV Movie Awards At Gibson Amphitheatre in Universal City, Calif. Hard Times Going Out, Him 192 22 38 57 True Life I Can’t Leave My Boyfriend SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum SpongeBob Family Matters Family Matters Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Malcolm-Mid. Malcolm-Mid. 82 46 24 40 iCarly ‘G’ Å CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ Ways to Die Ways to Die (8:07) ›› “The Transporter” (2002, Action) Jason Statham, Shu Qi, François Berléand. ’ Entourage ‘MA’ (11:05) Entourage (11:39) Entourage 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer Slow Burn ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer Demon Child ‘PG’ “Street Fighter Alpha” (1999, Action) 133 35 133 45 Ghost Whisperer Body of Water ‘PG’ Change-Nation Mark Chironna Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Van Impe Pres Changing-World The Forbidden Book 205 60 130 The Office ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Neighbors Family Guy ‘14’ Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›› “Never a Dull Moment” (1950) Irene Dunne. A songwriter (10:15) ››› “No Sad Songs for Me” (1950, Drama) Margaret (11:45) ››› “Our ››› “Tomorrow Is Forever” (1946, Drama) Claudette Colbert, Orson Welles. A hus- ›› “The Green Promise” (1949, Drama) Walter Brennan. A 101 44 101 29 band resurfaces many years after he is presumed dead. stubborn farmer nearly ruins his land and family. weds a rancher with two lively daughters. Sullavan, Wendell Corey, Viveca Lindfors. Very Own” Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Little People Little People Little People Little People Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Mega Bites (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Little People Little People 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Gay marriage. ’ ‘14’ Bones Two Bodies in the Lab ‘14’ Bones The Woman in the Tunnel ‘14’ Bones Counterfeiting ring. ‘14’ Å Saving Grace (N) ‘MA’ Å The Closer Maternal Instincts ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order School Daze ’ ‘14’ Amazing Spiez! Chowder ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Misadv. Flapjack Chowder ‘Y7’ 6TEEN (N) ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Å 84 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Dhani Tackles the Globe (N) ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Yosemite: America’s Treasure ‘G’ Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford and Son Sanford and Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show Loves Raymond Loves Raymond ››› “48 HRS.” (1982, Action) Nick Nolte, Eddie Murphy. Premiere. 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Hide and Seek ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Twilight ’ ‘PG’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW Viewer’s Choice night where fans choose the matches and the stipulations. ’ Å (11:05) Burn Notice ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Behind the Music 50 Cent ‘14’ Å Behind the Music Lil Wayne ’ ‘14’ Behind the Music DMX (N) ’ ‘PG’ 2010 Hip Hop Honors (N) ’ ‘14’ Dad Camp ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 Behind the Music T.I. T.I. ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:40) ››› “Fargo” 1996 Frances McDormand. ‘R’ (6:20) › “10 Things I Hate About You” 1999 ‘PG-13’ ›› “The Sandlot” 1993 Tom Guiry. ’ ‘PG’ Å (9:45) ›› “Big Trouble” 2002 Tim Allen. ‘PG-13’ Å (11:15) ›› “Christine” 1983 ’ ‘R’ ››› “Lucas” 1986, Comedy-Drama Corey Haim. ‘PG-13’ Å “The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother” After Film School ›› “Revenge of the Nerds III: The Next Generation” 1992, Comedy › “Omen IV: The Awakening” 1991 Insane Cinema Surfing The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Insane Cinema Props Å Insane Cinema Props Å The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Insane Cinema Bubba’s World Weekly Update Captain & Casey Haney Project Haney Project Haney Project Haney Project The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Haney Project Haney Project The Golf Fix Golf Fitness Learning Center M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Touched by an Angel ’ ‘PG’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å “Our House” (2006, Drama) Doris Roberts, Judy Reyes. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (3:15) ›› “The ›› “Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs” 2009, Comedy Voices of A Family Is a Family Is a Family: A Real Time With Bill Maher Environmen- “Smash His Camera” 2010 Ron Galella. The life and work of ›› “Away We Go” 2009, Comedy-Drama John Krasinski, Maya HBO 425 501 425 10 Express” 2008 talist Van Jones. ’ ‘MA’ Å Ray Romano, Denis Leary. ’ ‘PG’ Å Rosie O’Donnell Celebration ’ ‘G’ paparazzi photographer Ron Galella. ‘NR’ Å Rudolph. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Get Shorty” 1995, Comedy John Travolta, Rene Russo. ‘R’ Å ›› “Kingdom of the Spiders” 1977 William Shatner. Jon Dore Show Whitest Kids Henry Rollins ››› “A Fish Called Wanda” 1988, Comedy John Cleese. ‘R’ Å IFC 105 105 (4:45) ›› “Flashdance” 1983 Jennifer Beals. A female welder (6:20) ›› “Fast & Furious” 2009, Action Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, (8:15) ››› “Big” 1988, Fantasy Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins. A wishing machine ›› “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian” 2009 Ben Stiller. Exhibits come MAX 400 508 7 enjoys a nighttime dancing career. ’ ‘R’ Å Michelle Rodriguez. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å turns boy into a man with a job and girlfriend. ’ ‘PG’ Å to life at one of the world’s largest museums. ’ ‘PG’ Paranatural Chupacabra ‘PG’ Paranatural (N) ‘14’ Expedition Great White ‘PG’ Paranatural Chupacabra ‘PG’ Paranatural ‘14’ Expedition Great White ‘PG’ Bloods and Crips: L.A. Gangs ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Back, Barnyard Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Ren & Stimpy ’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Top Truck Chal Ride to Adv. Destination ATV World Hunt Adv Zumbo Outdrs Western Extreme Best of the West Top Truck Chal Destination Baja Unlimited Roll With It ATV World Ride to Adv. OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “How to Lose Friends & Alienate People” 2008 Simon Pegg. A British journalist in ›› “Yonkers Joe” 2008, Drama Chazz Palminteri, Christine Lahti, Tom Guiry. iTV Nurse Jackie ’ The Tudors The king’s health is weakNurse Jackie (N) ’ United States of United States of SHO 500 500 New York offends those he seeks to impress. ‘R’ Å Premiere. A con man’s family gets in the way of a scheme. ‘R’ ened. ’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Tara (N) ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å Ultimate Factories Winnebago ‘G’ Fast Track to Fame (N) The Racing Chef NASCAR Ultimate Factories Winnebago ‘G’ Fast Track to Fame The Racing Chef NASCAR NASCAR Smarts NASCAR Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:40) ›› “Angels & Demons” 2009 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:10) ››› “Cadillac Records” 2008, Drama Adrien Brody. ’ ‘R’ Å › “Obsessed” 2009, Suspense Idris Elba, Ali Larter. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:50) › “Pandorum” 2009 ’ ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:55) “Wushu Warrior” 2008 Matt Frewer. A man unwittingly (6:20) ››› “No Man’s Land” 2001, War Branko Djuric, Rene ›› “The Original Kings of Comedy” 2000, Documentary Cedric the Entertainer. Direc- › “Superhero Movie” 2008 Drake Bell. A dragonfly bite turns a ››› “The Bank TMC 525 525 kidnaps the daughter of a brutal lord. ‘PG-13’ Bitorajac, Filip Sovagovic. ’ ‘R’ tor Spike Lee films a comedy concert tour. ’ ‘R’ Å teen loser into a hero. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Job” 2008 Whacked Out ››› “Field of Dreams” (1989, Fantasy) Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan, James Earl Jones. The Daily Line (Live) WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å Whacked Out Whacked Out The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Where Are They Now? Bridezillas Andrea & Ivy ‘14’ Å Best of Amazing Wedding Cakes Bridezillas Andrea & Ivy ‘14’ Å My Fair Wedding With David Tutera Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å The Wedding Place ‘G’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell local produce, crafts and prepared foods; with live music and activities; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com. THE SPEAKEASY: Guy J. Jackson hosts an open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; June’s theme is “The Light at the End of the Tunnel: Stories About Making It to the Other Side”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541977-5677.

TUESDAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-6339637. HUNGER PREVENTION MEETING: Panelists talk about issues relating to access to adequate food supply and food assistance; registration requested; free; 4-5:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-410-9910 or info@ hungerpreventioncoalition.org. TALK OF THE TOWN: Jamie Christman of COTV hosts a discussion of “Banking Challenges: Local to National”; reservations required; free; 6:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@ bendbroadband.com or www .talkofthetownco.com. FIRE WHISKEY: The Santa Cruz, Calif.based punk rock band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace .com/silvermoonbrewing.

WEDNESDAY HEROES BREAKFAST: Celebrate heroes and pay tribute to returning Central Oregon military personnel; $20; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Armory, 875 S.W. Simpson Ave.; www .mountainriver.redcross.org. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. DANGERMUFFIN: The Folly Beach, S.C.-based roots rock and Americana act performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical .org. GRÁINNE HAMBLY AND WILLIAM JACKSON: The renowned European harpists perform; $12; 7:30 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-382-6866. POETRY SLAM: A live poetry reading open to competitors and spectators; $3; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/bendpoetryslam.

THURSDAY SISTERS RODEO SLACK PERFORMANCE: Featuring roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; free; 8 a.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-5490121. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT READ: Read and discuss “The Princess Bride” by William Goldman; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1064. WINE TASTING AND YAPPY HOUR:

With wine, appetizers, a silent auction and more; proceeds benefit Greyhound Pet Adoption Northwest; $20; 6-8 p.m.; Eastside Bend Pet Express, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive; 800-767-5139, ext. 2 or www .gpa-nw.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Tommy Gaffney reads from his poetry collection “Whiskey Days”; with presentations by Suzanne Burns, Jonathan Ludwig and Cassie Moore; free; 7 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-3236134. TERRY TEMPEST WILLIAMS: The author and public speaker talks about finding beauty in a broken world, with local authors; proceeds benefit the High Desert Journal; $20; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541419-9836. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical .org. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www .bendticket.com. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www .clear1017.fm. HOLUS BOLUS: The California-based psychedelic loop show performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON WILDFLOWER SHOW: Peruse and buy wildflower specimens, and speak with experts; with lectures on the environment, gardening and landscaping; $5, $2 ages 2-12 and nature center members; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. TOYZ FOR FOOD: A sale of outdoor recreation gear, games, toys, puzzles, sports equipment and more; proceeds benefit Bend’s Community Center’s Feed the Hungry program; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-4084998 or http://bendfarmersmarket .com. CAMP FIRE USA CAMP MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “The Parent Trap” followed by “Meatballs”; with a raffle, auction and treats; ages 21 and older only for the “Meatballs” screening; proceeds benefit Camp Fire USA; $10, $6 students, $100 VIP package; 6 p.m. “Parent Trap,” 9:30 p.m. “Meatballs”; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “ODD FROST”: Guy J. Jackson and David Finch perform works from their spoken-word and piano collaboration; free; 7 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sujatha Hampton talks about her book “As It Was Written”; free; 7 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

HIGH & DRY FUNDRAISER: Featuring performer Steve Spurgin; tickets must be purchased via the website; proceeds benefit the High & Dry Bluegrass Festival; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; 541-382-7456 or http:// highanddry bluegrassfestival.com. SISTERS RODEO: A PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12, free ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-5490121. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. BEST OF BENDFILM SHORTS 20052008: A screening of short films from the 2005-2008 festivals; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www .jcld.org.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON DRESSAGE CLASSIC: Watch more than 60 horses and riders in a nationally recognized dressage show; donations benefit NeighborImpact; donations of nonperishable food requested; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-617-7872 or www.centraloregondressage.com. COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE: Proceeds benefit Sparrow Clubs USA and local Sparrow child Mia Wennerth, a 2-year-old in need of a heart and lung transplant; 8 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Seven Peaks School, 19660 S.W. Mountaineer Way, Bend; 541-382-7755. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541280-4097. CENTRAL OREGON WILDFLOWER SHOW: Peruse and buy wildflower specimens, and speak with experts; with lectures on the environment, gardening and landscaping; $5, $2 ages 2-12 and nature center members; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. ELKS GARAGE SALE: A sale of clothes, glassware, dishes, pictures and more; proceeds benefit local charities; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541330-9662. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@rconnects.com. PARKING LOT FUNDRAISER: A sale of gently used items; proceeds benefit missions; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Living Purpose Church, 541 N.E. DeKalb Ave., Bend; 541-728-0305 or livingpurposechurch@mac.com. BENEFIT POKER RIDE AND TACK SWAP MEET: Featuring an auction, tack swap meet, food and poker; registration requested; food donations benefit St. Vincent de Paul; $3 or three cans of food, $6 per hand; 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Ghost Rock Ranch, 148800 Beal Road, La Pine; 541-536-1335, swendsens@yahoo .com or www.ghostrockranch.com. GUNFIGHT IN THE BADLANDS: A two-day cowboy action shooting event, featuring a parody of “The Three Amigos,” dancing and shooting; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range, U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24, Millican; 541-593-7438,

palaverp@cmc.net or www .pinemountainposse.com. TOYZ FOR FOOD: A sale of outdoor recreation gear, games, toys, puzzles, sports equipment and more; proceeds benefit Bend’s Community Center’s Feed the Hungry program; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. BAZAAR BENEFIT AND TRUNK SHOW: Featuring a variety of vendors, food, drink, community art projects, a petting zoo, live music, belly dancing and a raffle; raffle ticket sales benefit Mary’s Place and Family Access Network; free admission; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Nashelle Showroom, 61511 American Lane, Suite 1, Bend; 541-728-0332. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Darin Furry talks about his book “Beyond Sagebrush” and discusses Central Oregon geology; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a parade and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 9:30 a.m. parade, 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121. “PETER PAN”: Academie de Ballet Classique and Dance Velocity present a full-length ballet based on the classic tale; $10 in advance, $12 at the door, free ages 5 and younger; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541382-4055. BAGS OF BEND BOUTIQUE: Shop for gently used handbags, scarves, jewelry and more; proceeds benefit Philanthropic Education Organization; free; 2-5 p.m.; Discovery Park Lodge, 2868 NorthWest Crossing Drive; 541-3063242. “FROM CHEYENNE TO PENDLETON”: A screening of the documentary about the rise and fall of the rodeo cowgirl, with filmmaker Steve Wursta; free; 3 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541312-1032 or www.dpls.us/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sujatha Hampton talks about her book “As It Was Written”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. RODEO KICKOFF: A steak dinner and Western-style dance; $11 in advance, $12 at the door, $5 after 7 p.m.; 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; $10; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541215-0516 or www.actorsrealm.com. ELEVEN EYES: The Eugene-based jazz band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing. HELLZAPOPPIN: The sideshow review features sword swallowing, fire eating, a bed of nails, blade box illusions, contortionists and more; $13; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com.

SUNDAY CENTRAL OREGON DRESSAGE CLASSIC: Watch more than 60 horses and riders in a nationally recognized dressage show; donations benefit NeighborImpact; donations of nonperishable food requested; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-617-7872 or www.centraloregondressage.com.

M T For Monday, June 7

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) Noon, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 12:10, 2:30, 5, 8 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:45 a.m., 3:05, 7:30 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:15, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:15, 7:15 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 12:25, 2:55, 5:25, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 1:55, 5:15, 8:05, 10:20

GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5:20, 8, 10:35 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 10:50 a.m., 1:15, 4, 6:35 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:05, 4:55, 7:45, 10:40 KILLERS (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:35, 4:05, 6:40, 9:20 MARMADUKE (PG) 11:40 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:20, 9:35 PRINCE OF PERSIA: SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 11 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 1:45, 2:20, 4:30, 5, 7:10, 7:50, 9:55, 10:30 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 12:05, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) Noon, 1:20, 3:35, 4:40, 6:50, 8:10, 9:25, 10:15 SHREK FOREVER AFTER 3-D (PG) 10:45 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 3:50, 4:50, 6:30, 7:30, 9:15, 10:10 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG)

11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:40 SPLICE (R) 10:55 a.m., 1:25, 4:10, 7:25, 10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 5:30 CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 8:15

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15, 8:45 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 5, 8 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 5 MARMADUKE (PG) 5:15, 7:45 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 5, 7:30 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 7 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 7:30 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 5

REDMOND CINEMAS

PINE THEATER

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 4, 7

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

Larry W. Smith / Bloomberg News

Lance Russell, left, and his father Harold Kraus unload bags of DuPont Co.’s drought-tolerant Pioneer corn seeds on Russell’s farm near Hays, Kan. The world’s biggest seed companies are vying to develop corn and other crops that can survive drought.

Seeds Continued from C1 Perhaps most importantly for farmers, corn yields may climb. DuPont says seed being tested on 5,000 acres this year is expected to boost yields in dry environments by at least 6 percent. Syngenta is targeting yield increases of at least 10 percent for its corn. Both companies used conventional breeding to develop the seeds for sale next year, with biotech versions due later in the decade. The seeds will be a “big market” for Syngenta of Switzerland, Chief Executive Officer Michael Mack said. “Farmers around the world are going to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to technology providers in order to have this feature.” Monsanto is moving directly to a biotech version that it says will increase corn yields 6 to 10 percent. The company’s seed, developed with BASF SE, may be put on sale in 2012 and become the first product genetically engineered to tolerate drought. The Monsanto-BASF partnership, created in 2007, aims to have its drought genetics in 55 million acres of U.S. corn by 2020. In comparison, Monsanto had at least one biotech trait in 82 percent of the nation’s 86.5 million acres of corn last year. Monsanto and BASF are also developing drought-resistant versions that can serve as insurance for growers who normally have adequate rainfall or access to irrigation. The seeds may generate annual sales of almost $1 billion, assuming the trait retails on average for $18 an acre, according to Ludwigshafen, Germany-based Germany BASF, the world’s largest chemicals company. “All players expect blockbuster potential,” said Patrick Rafaisz, an analyst at Bank Vontobel AG.

Thirsty crops The global market for droughttolerant corn may reach 150 million acres, DuPont said in a February presentation, without providing a time frame. That implies a market of $2.7 billion, based on BASF’s $18-per-acre projection. In comparison, global sales of all seeds in 2008 were $26 billion, including $9 billion of corn, Edinburgh-based industry consultant Phillips McDougall said in a December report. Agriculture accounts for 70 percent of global fresh-water

use, Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant said. Reducing irrigation not only contributes to more sustainable farming, it’s a “game changer” that will boost profits and help feed a rising world population, he said. “The biggest single issue in farming going forward is water, use of water, water availability in many parts of the world, so I think it will be a significant product,” Grant said. Monsanto also is engineering crop seeds, including cotton, wheat and sugar cane, for drought tolerance, and the company and BASF are donating drought-resistant corn technologies to farmers in sub-Saharan Africa through the African Agricultural Technology Foundation in Nairobi.

Corn critics The prospect of drought-resistant seeds isn’t winning over opponents of genetically modified foods, who say the latest technology may taint conventional corn supplies and allow large companies to perpetuate an industrial agricultural system that harms water resources. “Their approach is that the market system of expansion we have is just fine, and we can use technology to adapt to any problems and make money at the same time,” Maude Barlow, chairwoman of Food and Water Watch, said in e-mailed responses to questions. “We are also very concerned about the possibility of this genetically engineered corn contaminating the stock,” she wrote. The technology will expand the U.S. corn-growing region westward while helping the country’s farmers cut their irrigation bill, said Kevin Dhuyvetter, an agricultural economist at Kansas State University. The trait may reduce farmers’ insurance premiums and ultimately boost land values in waterstarved regions of Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma, he said. “If you are in the drylands, this is a big deal,” Mark Gulley, an analyst at Soleil Securities, said. It certainly is for Russell, the Kansas farmer who said DuPont’s drought-tolerant corn outperformed other varieties by 15 percent last year when the weather was relatively moderate. “Honestly, I wouldn’t mind a dry, hot year where I can really test these varieties,” Russell said.


C4 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 7, 2010: This year, you experience an unusual amount of drive and focus. As a result, you could fulfill some critical goals or long-term desires that you might have thought were impossible. Don’t fuss with roommates or family. The possibility of a move or remodeling your home becomes a distinct reality. If you’re single, you might be surprised by how active your social life becomes. If you are attached, work with your significant other to make a dream a reality. ARIES always remains your friend, though they sometimes can be brutality honest. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Your energy changes substantially. Suddenly, you change from a dynamic thinker to someone who is a stickler on the details. Others simply don’t know what to make of this change in attitude. Just go with the flow. Tonight: Do you need to exercise more? TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Though you could feel out of sorts, before you know it, you’ll be a lot better. Share more of yourself on an individual level. A child or new friend could become extremely assertive. This attitude won’t last forever. Tonight: Use your imagination. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Zero in on what you need and want. You could be overwhelmed by recent

events. Rethink a situation more openly. Friends have a lot to share. At the moment, don’t count on anyone but yourself. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your ability to express the depth of your feelings makes a big difference. Some people might not be comfortable hearing some of what you choose to share. You will need to take the lead on a project. Tonight: A must appearance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Reach out to someone at a distance. You can and will make quite a difference. Your ability to flex and understand could prove to be invaluable. Use care with spending, no matter how solid your budget is. Tonight: Check in with a friend at a distance. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Mars, the planet of energy (and sex), moves into your sign . Focused, you could change a lot in the next few months. Please note that you also could be a bit quarrelsome. Don’t hesitate to say what you feel. Tonight: A quiet conversation. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Others know they are right; don’t make the mistake of challenging them too much. You are so far beyond what they are thinking, and see the ramifications. Sometimes, do understand that people need to figure out what works for themselves. Tonight: Follow the crowd. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Your efforts pay off in a very strange way. You know where

you are going and why. Many don’t understand your behavior, and push beyond reason to get feedback. Refuse to be too “Scorpionic” with those people. Tonight: Slow down, please. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH A boss or authority figure becomes touchy. Unfortunately, you are seeing the beginning of a pattern that could impact you for several months. How you engage this person, as well as if you even do, could be far more important than you realize. Tonight: Use your imagination. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You are being pushed to get past certain profound judgments you make. If you can understand how your thinking might not have been valid, you’ll let go of sometimes prejudicial feelings. Tonight: Home is your castle. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You most definitely are a communicator. It appears as if you will let nearly everyone know what you are thinking, no matter what the topic might be. Be careful with some people. You could trigger several months of disagreements. Choose your words with care. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s weekend. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Though you might have no intention of triggering difficulties with a partner, you do just that. Issues surround spending and your budget. Go overboard, and you will be hearing about this behavior for a long time. Do you want that? Tonight: Gather your bills first. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

“The aviation community now realizes that birds are a significant and real threat to aviation.”

Planes Continued from C1 In the long term, it hopefully means more business and more jobs at Precise Flight, which is based at Bend Municipal Airport and employs 22 workers. But in the short term, it’s validation for Philiben and his company, which has been funding its own research. With the NTSB recommendation, Philiben hopes the U.S. government will soon pick up the tab for further research. The goal, he said, is for the FAA to require pulsating-light technology on commercial aircraft. But a number of general aviation manufacturers as well as commercial airlines, including Qantas Airways Ltd., Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air, already have implemented Precise Flight’s Pulselite technology. Philiben said Qantas has reported a 30 percent decrease in the number of bird strikes it records since installing the Pulselite system on its planes. “That’s huge,” Philiben said. “That’s three more rolls of the dice.” Bird strikes happen every day in the world of aviation. According to the FAA, there was an average of 20 reported wildlife strikes per day between 2004

Organic Continued from C1 The term “organic” is regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, he said, so only farms that are certified are supposed to use that term. However, if a farm grosses less than $5,000 in sales of organic products, it can follow the guidelines for organic farming and call itself organic without being certified. As part of the certification, farmers submit plans for how they manage nutrients in the soil, control insects and weeds, where they get seeds and more, Schreiner said, and then inspectors visit the farm to ensure the plan reflects what’s happening on the land. “It just adds authenticity, or verification, to the claims that the products are organic,” he said. But many local farmers don’t undergo the organic certification process, said Dana Martin, small-farms agent with the Oregon State University Extension Service in Redmond. “A lot of our producers are not so hung up on the organic certification process,” she said. “It’s more about the relationship with the farmer (and the customer), following the principles to produce good, safe food.” Expense could be one reason some farmers don’t opt for organic certification, Martin said. At Oregon Tilth, the initial certification costs $624, and after that the annual certification cost varies based on the farm’s gross sales from organic products. Farms reporting sales of less than $5,000 pay $299 a year, while those with more than $2 million in sales pay about $3,900 or more. And other farmers might feel they don’t need the organic label, Martin said. “Perhaps some have that, ‘Hey, we don’t need that stamp to say we are growing good food. Our customers, our clients who are working with us know us and believe we’re doing good,’” she said. But customers unfamiliar with a market vendor can ask questions about his or her farming practices, she said. If someone isn’t certified organic, people can ask how the soil is managed and how the crops get nutrients, Schreiner said. “The idea is healthy soils will lead to healthy plants, which will lead to healthy people,” he said. As a general rule, nonsynthetic fertilizers are allowed in organic farming, while synthetic ones are not, he said, although there are some exceptions. Nonsynthetic fertilizers are ones that are found naturally, like some mined minerals, while synthetic ones are created and chemically altered by people. And fertilizers with really high levels of nutrients that give plants a quick jolt — almost like an energy drink — are not a preferred option. Customers can listen for whether farmers try to cycle nutrients, he said. Farmers can rotate produce with cover crops like clover, grasses or legumes that take in nitrogen from the air and, when they’re tilled back into the soil, return nutrients to the ground. People also can ask farmers personal questions, said Jim Fields of Fields Farm in Bend.

— Richard Dolbeer, former USDA scientist at the National Wildlife Research Center

Submitted photo

Precise Flight’s Pulselite system has been installed by a number of manufacturers and commercial airlines, including Qantas Airways Ltd., Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air. and 2008. Rarely, however, does a bird strike bring down an airplane. But the US Airways incident “really changed the landscape,” Richard Dolbeer, a former USDA scientist at the department’s National Wildlife Research Center in Sandusky, Ohio, said during a Jan. 12, 2010, interview on the Fox News Channel. “The aviation community now realizes that birds are a significant and real threat to aviation, and are capable of bringing

down a large plane,” Dolbeer said in the interview. Philiben said he knew an incident like Flight 1549 would happen eventually. But until something like that occurred, it was hard to keep people’s attention, he said. In 1984, Precise Flight invented its Pulselite technology, which enables a plane’s powerful landing lights to flicker at regular intervals. It’s primarily a safety feature that gives an aircraft greater visibility both on the

“There’s a lot of different ways of measuring it all. You can measure the miles to market, measure whether it’s organic or not, you can measure the energy used to grow it.” — Chris Schreiner, Oregon Tilth Those include how long they’ve been growing sustainably, what kind of crop rotations they practice and whether they use compost. His farm, for example, uses compost from local food waste, farm waste, and waste from the beer and coffee industries. “The deeper question is, ‘How is the soil taken care of?’” Fields said. Another area people can inquire about is how the crops are treated to deter insects, fungus and other pests. That can be a harder question, Schreiner said, since it takes a familiarity with farming or research about the different pesticides. But in general, organophosphates are a type of pesticide to avoid, he said of the chemically related pesticides, which can interfere with the nervous system, linger in the environment and harm insects that don’t damage crops. Although some pesticides are allowed in organic farming, the emphasis is on creating an environment that discourages pests and helps prevent disease, Schreiner said. That could involve planting vegetation elsewhere to lure insects away from crops, pruning vines to increase air flow or other strategies. “If you’re at the farmers market ... one of the things to listen for would be if the grower is talking about other practices or other things they’re doing besides applying anything,” Schreiner

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

said. “Anyone interested in a more sustainable approach to farming is applying substances as just one component of a holistic strategy.” And while many customers might simply be looking for fresh food picked that day, others can base buying choices on whatever might be important to them. “There’s a lot of different ways of measuring it all,” he said. “You can measure the miles to market, measure whether it’s organic or

ground and to other pilots in the air. Some of the early adopters of the Pulselite technology were float-plane operators in the Pacific Northwest, who started to report a decrease in bird strikes. In the mid-1990s, Precise Flight began funding research asking why, and in 1999 began collaborating with the USDA’s National Wildlife Research Center. The most recent experiment occurred last summer. A team of government and university biologists strapped some of Precise Flight’s pulsating lights to a large model airplane and flew it at a pen of captive geese. In a number of passes, the geese noticeably reacted to the airplane with squawks and defensive behavior. A video of the experiment is posted on YouTube (search “Pulselite” at www.youtube.com). USDA biologist Bradley Blackwell said he and his colleagues are writing up a report on the

trick, therefore, is to “marry the eagle eye with the bird brain.” “Using the properties of light, you can use subtle combinations to get a knee-jerk reaction out of the birds,” he said. The best results with the Pulselite system seem to come in the early morning and late afternoon, when the ambient light is low, Philiben said. Also, those are generally the times of day birds are most active, as the low light makes it harder for predators to find them, he said. But predators, knowing their prey are most active at those times, are on the hunt. As a result, Philiben believes one reason pulsating lights might work is because they interfere with a bird’s ability to detect predators, hence triggering a behavioral response to move away from the offending lights. Though scientists would like to do more research, Philiben is actively marketing Precise Flight’s Pulselite technology as an onboard bird-strike deterrent system. Philiben said his company recently made a presentation on the technology to American Airlines, and also flew to Brazil to discuss the technology with TAM Airlines and Embraer, the largest manufacturer of regional aircraft. Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at amoore@bendbulletin.com.

www.OasisSpaofBend.com not, you can measure the energy used to grow it.” Fields previously had his produce certified as organic with Oregon Tilth, which was a way to demonstrate that he was using the best farming methods, he said. But when he downsized the farm and took a year off, he stopped the annual certification process because of the expense — although he said that as the farm is growing up again, he’s probably going to certify it next year. “Whether I’m certified or not, I’m going to use the same farming practices,” Fields said. At the Bend Farmers Market on Wednesday, Shannon Overbaugh, one of the owners of the organic Winter Green Farm, said

Find It All Online

she gets questions from customers about farming practices, whether the farm makes its own compost, how long it’s been operating, where it sells produce and more. And Connie Hanson, of Prineville, who drives to Bend regularly in the summer for the market, said she likes the freshness of the produce at the market, and has visited some of the farms to see how they grow the fruits and vegetables. “It’s kind of fun — everyone has their own tactics,” she said.

Art Sales Picture Framing and Design

541-382-6293

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS 541-389-7365 CCB# 18669

www.bobcatsun.com

bendbulletin.com

College Prep Classes Sylvan Small Group Seminars

Skin Cancer?

• • • •

Let Allison Dermatology give you Peace of Mind

Advanced Speed Reading Skills: July 19-23 • M-F 2-4pm • Grades 8-College • $299 (includes materials fees) • Min 4-Max 12

WILL DEVELOP SKIN CANCER IN THE COURSE OF A LIFETIME

Increase rate of speed by as much as 300% while maintaining comprehension!

Writing the College Essay: July 26-30 • M-F 2-4pm Grades 10-12 • $249 • Min 4-Max 10

Early detection is key. Diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer Mole Evaluation and removal Acne, Eczema & Rashes

a fun approach to learning located in your neighborhood at Sylvan taught by caring, certified teachers who love to teach in small groups, so every child receives individual attention

2010 Sylvan Summer Camps

1 IN 5 AMERICANS

Warts & Lesions Parisian Peel® Microdermabrasion Skin Rejuvenation Products/ Sunscreens, M.D. Forte

Allison Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center Dawn S. Allison, M.D.

Cassidy Juda

Board Certified Dermatologist Mayo Clinic Trained

PA-C

Call

Teaching the purpose and process of writing a high quality college application essay.

SAT Prep Math Section: August 9-13 • M-F 1-4pm Grades 10-12 • $349 (includes book fee and full-length practice test • Min 4-Max 10 SAT Prep Verbal Section: August 22-27• M-F 1-4pm Grades 10-12 • $349 (includes book fee and full-length practice test • Min 4-Max 10 Other classes offered: College Writing 101, ACT and Study Skills Classes All classes offered are for high school credit. INDIVIDUAL PROGRAMS OFFERED AS WELL!

“The Skin Cancer Specialists” today!

541-322-9000

1510 SW Nancy Way, Suite 1 | On Bend’s west side

Every Friday

data they collected during the experiment. In short, the results look promising for pulsatinglight technology, even though the researchers can’t definitively say why it works, Blackwell said. “We can’t demonstrate it, but there is definitely something going on,” said Blackwell, who has previously published two peerreviewed papers on pulsatinglight technology as a bird-strike deterrent. Steve Lima, a biology professor at Indiana State University, who flew the model airplane used in the July 2009 experiment, agreed that more work needs to be done to understand why it works, but that it generally does work. “(The geese) didn’t always react, but sometimes they did react, and it was an obvious early reaction,” Lima said. According to Lima, birds have become accustomed to planes the same way geese have become accustomed to humans. However, a plane with flickering lights might seem abnormal to a bird, triggering a flight response. Or the wavelength of the light may just irritate them, he said. “I personally found the lights very irritating,” Lima said. Philiben said birds have incredible vision and that much of their brain responds to visual stimuli. The flip side is they don’t have much in the way of cognizant processing capacity. The

(Near the Century/Colorado roundabout)

(541) 389-9252 2150 NE Studio Rd, Ste 10 • Bend www.tutoring.sylvanlearning.com

ENTER TO WIN A GETAWAY TO THE OREGON COAST! Sign up for our AUTO-RENEW PAYMENT PROGRAM and be entered to WIN A $400 LODGING PACKAGE to the Elizabeth Street Inn on the Oregon Coast!

Plus, you’ll receive a FREE OREGON COOKBOOK with recipes from around the state. The Bulletin’s Auto-Renew Payment Plan is our most convenient and environmentally friendly method of payment. No mailed statements. No envelopes or stamps. No monthly reminders.

BUT HURRY, COOKBOOK SUPPLIES ARE LIMITED, OREGON COAST WINNER WILL BE DRAWN JULY 1ST

TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE BULLETIN OR TO SIGN-UP FOR THE AUTO RENEW PAYMENT PROGRAM, CALL 541-385-5800 Black out periods apply for coastal package. Winner is responsible for any taxes. Must not have been enrolled in the Auto-Renew Payment Plan within the last 30 days. Cookbooks are limited to stock on hand.


S

D

NHL Inside Blackhawks win on home ice, now one win from Stanley Cup, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JUNE 7, 2010

LOCAL RUNNING More than 1,000 take part in Bend’s Heaven Can Wait 5K Just over a thousand runners and walkers finished the Heaven Can Wait 5K on Sunday morning at Bend’s Drake Park. Lauren Fleshman, the 2006 United States champion in the 5,000 meters, was the first overall finisher out of 1,069 competitors in a time of 16 minutes, 20 seconds. Fleshman plans on competing in the 5,000 meters at the USA Track and Field Championships in Indianapolis on June 25. Walter Jones, of Redmond, was the first men’s finisher in 18:56. Ron Deems, of Bend, finished just a second behind to take second place in the men’s division, and Shane Cochran, of Bend, was another second back in third place, in a time of 18:58. Lisa Nye, of Bend, was second in the women’s race in 18:57, while Kristina Trygstad-Saari, of Bend, was third, in 19:04. Heaven Can Wait is a benefit for Sara’s Project, a program supporting breast screenings to promote the early detection of breast cancer. See Page D2 for complete results. — Bulletin staff report

P R E P S P O R T S C O M M E N TA RY

A look back at the season in C.O. sports A

nd another prep sports year is in the books. When Madras lost a 5-4 heartbreaker to Ashland last Tuesday in the Class 5A state baseball semifinals, the 2009-10 athletic year for our local high schools officially ended. This was my third year covering preps here in Central Oregon, and it may have been the most memorable. Here is a look at some of my

BEAU EA STES

favorite prep stories from the past academic year.

Cowgirls win title on shoestring budget

Last summer, Crook County volleyball coach Rosie Honl and her team literally collected cans to help pay for their 2009 season. Facing yet another budget crisis, the Crook

County School District cut all funding for athletics during the 2009-10 academic year. It didn’t faze the Cowgirls, though, as Crook County went on to win its fourth consecutive Class 5A state volleyball title. Senior Casey Loper led a scrappy bunch of underclassmen — Loper was one of only two seniors on the team — to a state championship in Crook County’s final year at the 5A classification. Starting this fall, the Crook County athletic programs will compete among smaller schools in Class 4A. See Prep sports / D5

TRACK AND FIELD

COLLEGE SPORTS

Commish of Pac-10 gets authority to expand conference By Josh Dubow The Associated Press

LOCAL BASEBALL Bend Elks kick off season tonight The Bend Elks play their first game of the season tonight at 5:30, a nonleague road contest against the Seattle Studs at the University of Puget Sound. The Elks, who compete in the West Coast League, will be a bit short-handed for their opener as eight players expected to play in Bend this summer are still playing in the NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament. The Elks are on the road until Friday, June 18, when they will host the Moses Lake Pirates at Bend’s Vince Genna Stadium. — Bulletin staff report

INSIDE

Ben Margot / The Associated Press

One more? Bend’s Ashton Eaton, a University of Oregon senior, will try to win his third national title in the decathlon NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships

By Mark Morical

GOLF

Justin Rose celebrates a birdie putt on Sunday.

England’s Rose takes The Memorial 21-year-old Fowler fades in final round, see Page D3

The Bulletin

Ashton Eaton still has some unfinished business before he moves on to a career as a professional decathlete and begins preparing for the 2012 London Olympic Games. A University of Oregon senior from Bend, Eaton is the overwhelming favorite to win what would be his third straight national collegiate decathlon title when the 2010 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships come to Eugene’s Hayward Field this week. The championships run Wednesday through Saturday, and the decathlon is scheduled for Thursday and Friday. Eaton, a 2006 graduate of Bend’s Mountain View High School, will cap one of the most memorable careers of any Oregon track and field athlete when he competes as a collegian for the final time this week. See Eaton / D5

HIGH GEAR

Where: The University of Oregon’s Hayward Field in Eugene When: Wednesday through Saturday; the decathlon will take place on Thursday and Friday (see Page D5 for the complete decathlon schedule)

Eaton, by the numbers 4: National titles won by Eaton in his college career: two outdoor decathlons and two indoor heptathlons 8,154: Personal best by Eaton in the decathlon, which he recorded in this year’s Pac-10 Championships. The collegiate record is 8,465 points.

NBA FINALS

Allen lights up Lakers, Celtics steal one in L.A.

Hamlin picks up fourth win of 2010 NASCAR driver moves up to third in Sprint Cup standings with Pocono victory, see Page D6

By Greg Beacham The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D3 Golf ............................................D3 Tennis ........................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 College baseball ........................D5 High Gear ................................. D6

Chris Carlson / The Associated Press

Boston’s Ray Allen shoots in front of Los Angeles’ Kobe Bryant during the second half of Game 2 of the NBA finals in Los Angeles on Sunday.

LOS ANGELES — The Boston Celtics evened the NBA finals with Ray Allen shredding the Lakers from the three-point line — and Rajon Rondo doing everything else from everywhere else. Allen scored 27 of his 32 points in the first half with a record-setting threepoint shooting display, Rondo completed a triple-double down the stretch and the Celtics handed the Los Angeles Lakers their first home loss of the postseason,

103-94 Sunday night in Game 2. Allen hit a finals-record eight threepointers in a dazzling effort for the Celtics, including seven before halftime. Rondo then took charge after Allen cooled down, racking up 19 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists in his fifth playoff triple-double. “An entire team effort,” Rondo said. “Ray carried us through the first half. Second half, we got in a little slump but we stuck with it, stayed together and got a victory.” See NBA / D5

SAN FRANCISCO — The Pac-10 concluded its meetings Sunday by giving commissioner Larry Scott the authority to pursue any possible expansion, while not committing the conference to adding any more schools. Scott addressed the chancellors and presidents on the final day of the weekend meeting about possible expansion scenarios and was given permission to move ahead with the process without having to go back to the board for approval. “What direction that process takes still could go in different directions,” Scott said. “Everything from remaining as we are as a Pac-10 that has some very bright days ahead of it, to a bigger conference foot print. I have the authority to take it different directions depending on various scenarios and discussions we will have.” The conference will decide its future plans by the end of the year before negotiating a new television contract for the 2012-13 academic year. See Pac-10 / D3

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Oregon tops UConn before elimination from regionals The Associated Press NORWICH, Conn. — Sherman Johnson hit a two-run homer in Florida State’s four-run third inning as the Seminoles advanced to the super regionals with a 5-3 victory over Oregon on Sunday night in the Norwich Regional. Oregon (40-24), in its second season since having the program reinstated, was eliminated from the postseason with the loss. Tyler Holt also homered in the fourth inning for the ACC champion Seminoles (45-17), who will face the winner of today’s game between Louisville and Vanderbilt in the super regionals. It will be Florida State’s 10th appearance in the super regionals since the NCAA went to the current format in 1999. The Ducks scored all three runs in the third inning and left the tying run stranded in the eighth. Oregon managed just six hits in the game, and benefited from four Florida State errors. Catcher Eddie Rodriguez led the offense with two hits. The Ducks advanced to the night game after defeating Connecticut 4-3 earlier in the day. See Oregon / D5

Jessica Hill / The Associated Press

Oregon’s Jack Marder lays down a sacrifice bunt against Florida State during an NCAA regional game in Norwich, Conn., on Sunday.


D2 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at Philadelphia Phillies, ESPN. 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, FSNW.

SOFTBALL 5 p.m. — College, NCAA World Series, Championship, Game 1, UCLA vs. Arizona, ESPN2.

TUESDAY SOFTBALL 5 p.m. — College, NCAA World Series, Championship, Game 2, UCLA vs. Arizona, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA finals, Game 3, Los Angeles Lakers at Boston Celtics, ABC.

RADIO TUESDAY BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA finals, Game 3, Los Angeles Lakers at Boston Celtics, KICE-AM 940.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

I B Golf • Augusta State wins first NCAA title: Augusta State won its first NCAA Division I men’s golf national championship after Oklahoma State’s Kevin Tway missed a 3-foot putt on a playoff hole to hand Mitch Krywulycz the match and the Jaguars a 3-1-1 victory in Chattanooga, Tenn. Tway held a 4-up lead after 11 holes but bogeyed the 12th. Krywulycz answered with birdies on the next three to make the match all square at the 15th hole. The pair matched par for par for the rest of the match, sending it to the 19th hole, where Krywulycz made par and Tway bogeyed. • Wong earns Nicklaus Award as player of the year: Eugene Wong from Oregon, North Alabama’s Brett Munson, Tain Lee of Claremont McKenna, Malone’s Justin Lower and Odessa College’s Abraham Ancer have been named the 2010 Jack Nicklaus Award recipients as the Golf Coaches Association of America Collegiate Players of the Year. A sophomore from North Vancouver, B.C., Wong was the Division I Nicklaus Recipient. Wong was previously named to the PING AllAmerica First-Team, the Pac-10 Co-Golfer of the Year and firstteam All-Pac-10.

Softball • Arizona, UCLA to meet for NCAA softball title: Stacie Chambers and K’Lee Arredondo each hit a two-run homer, and Brigette Del Ponte provided the go-ahead RBI single in the fifth inning as Arizona beat Tennessee 5-2 on Sunday night to move into the Women’s College World Series finals. The 10th-seeded Wildcats avenged a blowout loss to the Lady Vols (50-14) earlier in the World Series by sweeping a pair of rematches to set up a best-of-three showdown against longtime rival UCLA beginning tonight. The finals will feature college softball’s two historic powerhouses. UCLA has 11 NCAA titles, including one that was later vacated, and Arizona (5212) has taken home the trophy eight times. This time, the Wildcats needed to win four straight games to reach the championship after losing 9-0 to Tennessee in their World Series opener.

Cycling • Carrara wins Tour of Luxembourg; Armstrong 3rd: Italian Matteo Carrara won the Tour of Luxembourg, with Lance Armstrong finishing third Sunday. The fourth and last stage of the race was won by Spaniard Gorka Izaguirre in a sprint shortened by torrential rain. Carrara claimed his first major win, beating 2009 winner Frank Schleck of Luxembourg. Armstrong was competing as part of his preparations for the Tour de France. The 38-year-old Texan, who crashed last month at the Tour of California, next races at the Tour of Switzerland from June 12-20. — From wire reports

SCOREBOARD RUNNING HEAVEN CAN WAIT 5K Sunday In Bend Overall results 1, Lauren Fleshman, 16:20, Springfield. 2, Walter Jones, 18:56, Redmond. 3, Ron Deems, 18:57, Bend. 4, Lisa Nye, 18:57, Bend. 5, Shane Cochran, 18:58, Bend. 6, Kristina Trygstad-Saari, 19:04, Bend. 7, Christopher Gassner, 19:11, Bend. 8, Jason Townsend, 19:32, Bend. 9, Mike Herzog, 19:39, Bend. 10, Dylan Randolph, 19:49, Bend. 11, Cass, 20:28, Bend. 12, Suzanne King, 20:34, Bend. 13, Chris Bernard, 20:52, Redmond. 14, Randy McClellan, 21:00, Prineville. 15, Jessica Cornett, 21:01, Bend. 16, Dave Magness, 21:09, Bend. 17, Jennifer Sventek, 21:11, Bend. 18, Zach Patterson, 21:12, Bend. 19, Ken Reiswig, 21:13, Bend. 20, Kevin Cornett, 21:18, Bend. 21, Miriam Seeley, 21:21, Redmond. 22, Patrick Devlin, 21:21, Bend. 23, Keith Bleyer, 21:22, Bend. 24, Tim Harroun, 21:34, Bend. 25, Olivia Brooks, 21:38, Bend. 26, Rod Thompson, 21:42, Bend. 27, Owen Sutton, 22:02, Bend. 28, Jen Newton, 22:04, Bend. 29, Brant Babich, 22:07, Bend. 30, Christopher Shultz, 22:09, Bend. 31, Mike Fisher, 22:11, Bend. 32, Ryn Patterson, 22:11, Bend. 33, Mollie Hogan, 22:15, Bend. 34, Tom Brannan, 22:15, Bend. 35, Taylor Westlund, 22:18, Bend. 36, Carisa Thomason, 22:27, Bend. 37, Cameron Ruddell, 22:31, Bend. 38, Sarah Peterson, 22:32, Bend. 39, Melanie Mangin, 22:35, Bend. 40, Mack Amodeo, 22:35, Bend. 41, Jeff Holden, 22:36, Bend. 42, Matt Hecker, 22:39, Bend. 43, Amy Anderson, 22:40, Bend. 44, Melissa Morris, 22:42, Bend. 45, Camden Stoddard, 22:46, Bend. 46, Monte Hawkins, 22:47, Bend. 47, Julie Sandvall, 22:50, Bend. 48, Craig Snyder, 22:51, Bend. 49, Mackenzie Naffziger, 22:52, Bend. 50, Wyatt Gladden, 22:54, Bend. 51, Deb Shaffer, 22:54, Redmond. 52, Kari Manhire, 22:59, Spring Creek. 53, Logan Bilyeu, 23:00, Bend. 54, Cindy Naffziger, 23:03, Bend. 55, Nate Wyeth, 23:04, Redmond. 56, Lori Thomason, 23:05, Bend. 57, Mark King, 23:05, Bend. 58, Sue Matschner, 23:06, Merritt Island. 59, Cole Abbott, 23:08, Redmond. 60, Michael Peters, 23:10, Bend. 61, Abe Richmond, 23:13, Albany. 62, Coggin Hill, 23:18, Bend. 63, Trina Grube, 23:22, Bend. 64, Delaney Butler, 23:26, Sunriver. 65, Shana Purvis, 23:26, Bend. 66, Amy Beyerlein, 23:27, Bend. 67, Minam Cravens, 23:28, Bend. 68, Ragnar Schmidt, 23:29, Bend. 69, McKenzie Goeman, 23:31, Bend. 70, Jace Hansen, 23:33, Bend. 71, Matt Shaffer, 23:38, Redmond. 72, Kyle Wells, 23:39, Bend. 73, Noe Carrick, 23:40, Bend. 74, Russell Wells, 23:40, Bend. 75, James Jaggard, 23:41, Bend. 76, Curtis Jensen, 23:44, Bend. 77, Ryan Sanders, 23:48, Grayson, Ky. 78, David Rhine, 23:50, Bend. 79, Cindi Eielson, 23:52, Bend. 80, Amy Clark, 23:53, Bend. 81, Jason Kropf, 23:56, Bend. 82, Arnold Jones, 23:57, Manchaca, Texas. 83, Ty Abbott, 23:58, Redmond. 84, Amber Cooley Rose, 23:59, Bend. 85, Jeannie Chieda, 23:59, Bend. 86, Tiffani Snyder, 24:01, Bend. 87, Amanda Phillips, 24:02, Portland. 88, Scott Wendling, 24:04, Nampa, Idaho. 89, Allison Crace, 24:06, Hillsboro. 90, Laurence Thissell, 24:08, La Pine. 91, Don Stearns, 24:09, Bend. 92, Christian Voeller, 24:10, Bend. 93, Lindsay Valentine, 24:12, Bend. 94, Shawna Aaland, 24:14, Bend. 95, Julie Levesque, 24:16, Bend. 96, Gina Guss, 24:18, Bend. 97, Jack Moore, 24:18, Bend. 98, Mandie Cook, 24:20, Bend. 99, McKenzie Bell, 24:23, Bend. 100, Josh Willis, 24:25, Sunriver. 101, Lucas Decastilhos, 24:27, Bend. 102, Josh Newton, 24:28, Bend. 103, Sandra Seeley, 24:31, Redmond. 104, Jacob Fritz, 24:35, Bend. 105, Laura Fritz, 24:35, Bend. 106, Noah Haines, 24:40, Bend. 107, John Anderson, 24:40, Bend. 108, Niko Crosse, 24:40, Bend. 109, Hayley Palmer, 24:49, Sisters. 110, Sunshine Willis, 24:50, Sunriver. 111, Jacqueline Wursta, 24:52, Bend. 112, Kenneth Goode, 24:54, Bend. 113, Steve Pinnell, 24:59, Portland. 114, Russell Taylor, 25:04, Bend. 115, Tavia Lopez, 25:04, Council, Idaho. 116, Kiley Rucker, 25:05, Bend. 117, Breah Bollom, 25:05, Bend. 118, Beckie Scott, 25:09, Bend. 119, Ian Katz, 25:10, Bend. 120, Drew Rasmussen, 25:11, Bend. 121, Kirstin Bundy, 25:11, Bend. 122, Raquel Jeter, 25:13, Bend. 123, JD Haynes, 25:16, Bend. 124, Abbey Tozer, 25:17, Bend. 125, Zachary Hayward, 25:17, Bend. 126, Matthew Dimond, 25:17, Bend. 127, Shelley Tozer, 25:17, Bend. 128, Erin Shelley, 25:19, Bend. 129, Briaunna King, 25:20, Bend. 130, Ellery Roth, 25:21, Bend. 131, Scott Knoll, 25:23, Redmond. 132, Andrea Kerkoch, 25:25, Bend. 133, Ryan Timm, 25:26, Bend. 134, Mike Vetteriok, 25:26, Redmond. 135, Lauerman Michelle, 25:27, Bend. 136, Anne Walker, 25:30, Bend. 137, Sadie Evans, 25:30, Bend. 138, Dawnelle Roth, 25:31, Bend. 139, Clyde Dunithan, 25:31, Bend. 140, Frank Carrillo, 25:35, Bend. 141, Russell Green, 25:36, Redmond. 142, Jared Buck, 25:41, Bend. 143, Bill Warrick, 25:42, Bend. 144, Mary Radzinski, 25:46, Culver. 145, Jason Womack, 25:48, Brookings. 146, Victor McGinnis, 25:48, Bend. 147, Lori Willis, 25:48, Bend. 148, Lisa Ensworth, 25:50, Bend. 149, Lorre Jones, 25:55, Bend. 150, Pete Vandeuser, 25:55, Bend. 151, Whitney Drew, 25:58, Bend. 152, Ron Hanson, 25:58, Bend. 153, Brian Barber, 25:58, Bend. 154, Jessica Foster, 25:59, Bend. 155, Nichole Patrick, 26:01, Bend. 156, Rita McClellan, 26:01, Prineville. 157, Dawn Laplaca, 26:02, Bend. 158, Brian O’Sullivan, 26:05, Bend. 159, Justin Norris, 26:05, Bend. 160, Dan Russell, 26:06, Bend. 161, Denise Roberts, 26:07, Bend. 162, Trinity Combs, 26:08, Bend. 163, John-Paul McKernon, 26:10, Bend. 164, Randy Stutzman, 26:11, Bend. 165, Ryan Schukart, 26:14, Bend. 166, Renee Van Matre, 26:15, Bend. 167, Carson Perl, 26:15, Bend. 168, Karen Eberle, 26:21, Bend. 169, Kari Jo Starr, 26:24, Bend. 170, Audra Green, 26:25, Redmond. 171, Meghan Day, 26:27, Bend. 172, Gretchen Hawkins, 26:27, Bend. 173, Jeffrey Timm, 26:28, Bend. 174, Megan Cornett, 26:28, Bend. 175, Martha Rhine, 26:29, Bend. 176, Susanna Abrahamson, 26:29, Bend. 177, Heather Deibele, 26:30, Tualatin. 178, Sherri Katz, 26:33, Bend. 179, Patrick Brady, 26:35, Sisters. 180, Lisa Caine, 26:40, Bend. 181, John Nason, 26:41, Bend. 182, Taylor Bernard, 26:43, Redmond. 183, Holly Myers, 26:45, Bend. 184, Ellyn Lindquist, 26:46, Bend. 185, Sara McQuillin, 26:46, Bend. 186, Rachael Uri, 26:47, Bend. 187, Grace Iverson, 26:48, Bend. 188, Leslie Veenstra, 26:50, Bend. 189, Deborah Schluter, 26:51, Bend. 190, Leah Schluter, 26:52, Bend. 191, Ryan Bales, 26:57, Redmond. 192, Vanessa Polvi, 27:00, Bend. 193, Stacy Cox, 27:00, Bend. 194, Carmen Milashouskas, 27:03, Happy Valley. 195, Cindy Murphy, 27:03, Bend. 196, Mike Roe, 27:03, Bend. 197, Susan Foster, 27:09, Bend. 198, Angie Hubler, 27:09, Bend. 199, Megan Darby, 27:17, Bend. 200, Orrin Bigelow, 27:17, Bend. 201, Karen Stanard, 27:20, Bend. 202, Mariah Young, 27:20, Bend. 203, Sabe Wyllie, 27:20, Bend. 204, Stephanie Krause, 27:24, Bend. 205, Sarah Hash, 27:25, Bend. 206, Ryan Decastilhos, 27:25, Bend. 207, Laurel Weiland, 27:27, Bend. 208, Daniel Parker, 27:28, Sunriver. 209, Christian Bayless, 27:29, Bend. 210, Micaela Martin, 27:30, Bend. 211, Tiffany Stevens, 27:33, Bend. 212, Aspen Jeter, 27:34, Bend. 213, Bob Kavanaugh, 27:34, Bend. 214, Sarah Boadway-Mcconn, 27:36, Hood River. 215, Megan Davis, 27:36, Bend. 216, Peter Harris, 27:37, Bend. 217, Chet Davis, 27:37, Bend. 218, Ryan Magee, 27:38, Bend. 219, Lucas Shaffer, 27:38, Redmond. 220, Laurie Martin, 27:38, Bend. 221, Melissa Leiphart, 27:38, Bend. 222, Tanner Combs, 27:39, Bend. 223, William Baber, 27:39, Bend. 224, Nicole O’Neill, 27:41, Bend. 225, Kym Johnson, 27:42, Bend. 226, Nikki Cheney, 27:43, Bend. 227, Nancy Archer, 27:43, Bend. 228, Tyler Whitson, 27:43, Bend. 229, Mike Baxter, 27:44, Bend. 230, Piper Tozer, 27:46, Bend. 231, Morgan Caldwell, 27:46, Bend. 232, Dominic Ficco-Juslen, 27:48, Bend. 233, Shelly Himler, 27:50, Bend. 234, Matt Lachance, 27:50, Bend. 235, Olivia Mohan, 27:50, Bend. 236, Jill Mercer, 27:53, Bend. 237, Tayler Hinds, 27:54, Bend. 238, Stacey Donohue, 27:55, Bend. 239, Yvonne Lineiro, 27:56, Bend. 240, Kasey Corwin, 27:57, Bend. 241, Margaret Rucker, 27:59, Redmond. 242, Mary Bowman, 28:05, Redmond. 243, Theresa Gregg, 28:05, Powell Butte. 244, Casey O’Neill, 28:06, Bend. 245, Anne Sjogren, 28:06, Bend. 246, Jeff Bowman, 28:06, Redmond. 247, Noah McQullin, 28:07, Bend. 248, Hannah Fraser, 28:07, Bend. 249, Knute Buehler, 28:07, Bend. 250, Zach Druckrey, 28:08, Bend. 251, Kaylie McQuillin, 28:09, Bend. 252, Josh Barclay, 28:09, Bend. 253, Galvin Foley, 28:09, Bend. 254, Darlene Arruda, 28:11, Sisters. 255, Dani Wyeth, 28:13, Redmond. 256, Tom Barber, 28:13, Bend. 257, Lorissa Hemmer, 28:15, Bend. 258, Guy Carrion, 28:15, Bend. 259, Katie Callanan, 28:16, Bend. 260, Mark Fisher, 28:16, Bend. 261, Colin Balentine, 28:17, Bend. 262, Patty Buehler, 28:17, Bend. 263, Kristin Campbell, 28:18, Bend. 264, Amanda Ring, 28:19, Bend. 265, Stacy Trapanese, 28:19, Portland. 266, Allison Timms, 28:22, Bend. 267, Sava Murphy, 28:22, Bend. 268, Jackson Murphy, 28:22, Bend. 269, Brenda Timms, 28:23, Bend. 270, Ira Hayward, 28:26, Bend. 271, Kathe Beardsley, 28:27, Bend. 272, Sadie Ann Gorman, 28:29, Bend. 273, Sarah Prudhomme, 28:29,

Bend. 274, Catherine Blue, 28:31, Bend. 275, Ed Weiland, 28:32, Bend. 276, Grace Boyle, 28:32, Bend. 277, Marilyn Kjobech, 28:35, Bend. 278, Vanessa Blood, 28:37, Bend. 279, Taylor Smith, 28:38, Bend. 280, Brandy O’Sullivan, 28:38, Bend. 281, Brian Staudinger, 28:39, Bend. 282, Robert Patterson, 28:40, Bend. 283, Eva Cihow, 28:40, Bend. 284, Jenniffer Smith, 28:41, Bend. 285, Kindra Harms, 28:41, Bend. 286, Mike Altishin, 28:42, Las Vegas. 287, Marla Meadows, 28:43, Redmond. 288, Hillary Williams, 28:44, Bend. 289, Norah West, 28:45, Sunriver. 290, Flavio Decastilhos, 28:48, Bend. 291, Angelina Anello-Denn, 28:49, Bend. 292, Annie Miller, 28:51, Bend. 293, Sara Wiener, 28:51, Bend. 294, Sean Gleason, 28:51, Bend. 295, Frank Gibson, 28:52, Bend. 296, Steve Dean, 28:53, Bend. 297, Emma Brooks, 28:54, Bend. 298, Rachel Mavis, 28:55, Bend. 299, Katie Emerson, 28:55, Bend. 300, Lana Wittmer, 28:56, Sisters. 301, Ryan Tiktin, 28:56, Bend. 302, Juliahee Stretchko, 28:56, Bend. 303, John Keston, 28:56, Sunriver. 304, Matt Wittmer, 28:56, Sisters. 305, Kellie Tichenor, 28:57, Bend. 306, James Porzelius, 28:58, Bend. 307, Holly Hesse, 28:58, Bend. 308, Christine Scott, 28:59, Bend. 309, Danette Elliott-Mull, 28:59, Bend. 310, Julia Webb, 29:00, Bend. 311, Kayla Nagelhout, 29:01, Bend. 312, Kyriel Butler, 29:02, Sunriver. 313, Laura Bales, 29:03, Redmond. 314, Louis Bennett, 29:04, Sunriver. 315, A.J. Weichman, 29:04, Bend. 316, Lori Weichman, 29:04, Bend. 317, Kimberly Bales, 29:05, Bend. 318, Margaret Reid, 29:05, Bend. 319, Pam Hurzeler, 29:05, Bend. 320, Danni Weeks, 29:09, Bend. 321, Desera Lopez, 29:09, Council, Idaho. 322, John Gardner, 29:09, Oak Grove, Calif. 323, Young Hersch, 29:10, Bend. 324, Linda Hickmann, 29:15, Bend. 325, Cat Addison, 29:16, Bend. 326, Beth Wickham, 29:16, Bend. 327, Ashley Goering, 29:17, Redmond. 328, Chris Gladd, 29:20, Bend. 329, Troy Whitson, 29:20, Bend. 330, Kalie McGrew, 29:21, Redmond. 331, Esme Rhine, 29:22, Bend. 332, Kelle Jones, 29:23, Bend. 333, Chad Bettesworth, 29:29, Bend. 334, Ashlyn Clason, 29:29, Bend. 335, Corrinne Bettesworth, 29:29, Bend. 336, Megan Gibson, 29:29, Salem. 337, Malia Ward, 29:29, Bend. 338, Cynthia Humble, 29:34, Redmond. 339, April Watkins, 29:35, Bend. 340, Josie Hanneman, 29:36, Sunriver. 341, Tristyn Combs, 29:37, Bend. 342, Nancy Morris, 29:37, Redmond. 343, Madeline Hueske, 29:39, Bend. 344, Mary Evjen, 29:41, Bend. 345, Emma Strobel, 29:43, Bend. 346, Brooke McGrath, 29:43, Bend. 347, Tom Condon, 29:44, Bend. 348, Liv Downing, 29:45, Bend. 349, Valerie Walkley, 29:45, Bend. 350, Christina Paria, 29:46, Bend. 351, Julie Downing, 29:46, Bend. 352, Sue Carroll, 29:46, Bend. 353, Russ Fetrow, 29:48, Black Butte Ranch. 354, Cathy McGrath, 29:49, Bend. 355, Boston Szymanski, 29:51, Redmond. 356, Rebecca Whitson, 29:54, Bend. 357, Davinie Fiero, 29:54, Redmond. 358, Jody Stott, 29:54, Redmond. 359, Bruce Hill, 29:54, Bend. 360, Cindy Sloan, 29:55, Joseph. 361, Robin Laughlin, 29:55, Bend. 362, Laurel Fields, 29:56, Bend. 363, Tessie Alcantar, 29:58, Bend. 364, Ann Marie Sweeney, 30:00, Bend. 365, Sarah Dildine, 30:01, Bend. 366, Sam Tiller, 30:06, Bend. 367, Susan Flanagan, 30:08, Bend. 368, Marianne Prodehl, 30:08, Bend. 369, Shelby Tiller, 30:08, Bend. 370, Alissa Maxwell, 30:10, Bend. 371, Cheri Kropp, 30:10, Bend. 372, Kelsey Bell, 30:11, Bend. 373, Darlene Paterson, 30:11, Bend. 374, Gordon Iverson, 30:12, Bend. 375, Karlie Hansen, 30:13, Bend. 376, Kim Hansen, 30:14, Bend. 377, Eileen Dodson, 30:16, Bend. 378, Andrea Malone, 30:16, Bend. 379, Katrina Groutage, 30:16, Killeen, Texas. 380, Sandi Perl, 30:17, Bend. 381, Lila Reinecke, 30:19, Bend. 382, Alek Mauldin, 30:20, Bend. 383, Bette Butler, 30:22, Sunriver. 384, Ray Murphy, 30:24, Bend. 385, Dannielle Ramos, 30:25, Prineville. 386, Renee Brodock, 30:26, Bend. 387, Jessica Harvey, 30:27, Keizer. 388, Carolyn Gayley, 30:28, Salem. 389, Dawn Lincoln, 30:29, Sweet Home. 390, Patti Widmer, 30:31, Bend. 391, Laura Speidel, 30:34, Portland. 392, Katie Kuehnast, 30:34, Bend. 393, Lisa Corrigan, 30:34, Bend. 394, Jolin Loleit, 30:35, Bend. 395, Jami Tate, 30:35, Bend. 396, Zack Logsdon, 30:36, Bend. 397, Keli Mumford, 30:37, Portland. 398, Kimberly Niles, 30:44, Bend. 399, Garth Fuller, 30:44, Bend. 400, Mallory Larranaga, 30:45, Bend. 401, Efren Larranaga, 30:45, Bend. 402, Alexis Abell, 30:45, Bend. 403, Camille Fetzer-Lockh, 30:46, Bend. 404, Kevin Bauer, 30:48, Redmond. 405, Kathrine Keegan, 30:49, Bend. 406, Jessica Keegan, 30:51, Bend. 407, Molly Connors, 30:55, Bend. 408, Hailey Dodson, 30:56, Bend. 409, Caine Jordan, 30:56, Bend. 410, Mike Van Meter, 30:57, Bend. 411, Henri Brown, 30:59, Bend. 412, Martha Iverson, 31:00, Bend. 413, Dee Dee Cochran, 31:01, Bend. 414, Katie Brandow, 31:02, Bend. 415, Brett Cody, 31:06, Bend. 416, Ethan Schultheis, 31:06, Bend. 417, Erin Villano, 31:10, Bend. 418, Janine Drgastin, 31:10, Bend. 419, Gay Fletcher, 31:11, Bend. 420, Nikki Shemesh, 31:11, Bend. 421, Allie Patterson, 31:12, Bend. 422, Elizabeth Randleman, 31:12, Bend. 423, Michelle Wainwright, 31:14, Bend. 424, Bruce Cody, 31:16, Bend. 425, Aubrie Murray, 31:18, Redmond. 426, Jess Stroup, 31:18, Soldotna, Alaska. 427, Becky Fuller, 31:18, Bend. 428, Zack Weishaupt, 31:19, Bend. 429, Margi Robberson, 31:20, Bend. 430, Kelly Schukart, 31:21, Bend. 431, Robyn Knox, 31:21, Bend. 432, Stacey Morrical, 31:21, Albany. 433, Amanda Sloan, 31:22, La Pine. 434, Lora Athitan, 31:23, Bend. 435, Shelby Miller, 31:25, Bend. 436, Sarah Kellogg, 31:28, Sunriver. 437, Kristee Chick, 31:29, Bend. 438, Amy Smith, 31:30, Kirkland, Wash. 439, Erin MacMillan, 31:30, Bend. 440, Matt Ludi, 31:32, Redmond. 441, Jennifer Abernathy, 31:37, Bend. 442, Nathan Zavala, 31:38, Sisters. 443, Ryan Rasmussen, 31:39, Bend. 444, Galit Miller, 31:40, Bend. 445, Jason Mendell, 31:40, Bend. 446, Konnie Handschuch, 31:42, Bend. 447, Teri Fields-Wieselma, 31:43, Bend. 448, Angie Ludi, 31:49, Redmond. 449, Jennifer Villano, 31:49, Bend. 450, Michelle Adrianson, 31:50, Bend. 451, Sharyn Fetrow, 31:51, Black Butte Ranch. 452, Emily Barnes, 31:51, Bend. 453, Kathryn Eng, 31:52, Bend. 454, Ashton Rennegarbe, 31:53 Gig Harbor, Wash. 455, Melissa Bagwell, 31:54, Bend. 456, Steve Marik, 31:55, Salem. 457, Erica Nyden, 31:55, Bend. 458, Abbey Selover, 31:56, Bend. 459, Betsy Gascon, 31:57, Bend. 460, Michael Lafey, 31:57, Bend. 461, Donna Cook, 31:58, Bend. 462, Travis O’Shea, 31:58, Bend. 463, Sarah Holtzclaw, 32:03, Bend. 464, Holly Low, 32:04, Bend. 465, Nicci Ferguson, 32:06, Redmond. 466, Marcy Anderson, 32:09, Bend. 467, Laura Pederson, 32:10, Bend. 468, Amy Hacker, 32:11, Bend. 469, Carol Radd, 32:13, Redmond. 470, Mary Diehl, 32:14, Bend. 471, Andrei Dragos, 32:15, Bend. 472, Katie Duvall, 32:17, Redmond. 473, Carrie Cohen, 32:19, Bend. 474, Kurt Boudette, 32:19, Portland. 475, Heather Walker, 32:19, Bend. 476, Helenka Marcinek, 32:20, Bend. 477, Gregg Jones, 32:22, Bend. 478, Sydney Mansour, 32:22, Bend. 479, Renee Mansour, 32:23, Bend. 480, Robin Fallon, 32:24, Bend. 481, Bill Martin, 32:26, Bend. 482, Holly Jackson, 32:26, Bend. 483, Melissa Durham, 32:27, Bend. 484, Christi Haynes, 32:27, Bend. 485, Amber Newton, 32:28, Bend. 486, Chelsea Ortega, 32:29, Bend. 487, Deb Riehle, 32:29, Bend. 488, Joe Filicetti, 32:30, Bend. 489, Karly Wade, 32:34, Bend. 490, Kay Case, 32:35, Bend. 491, Jamie McCright, 32:36, Bend. 492, Jessie Joyner, 32:38, Bend. 493, Katelyn Anderson, 32:39, Redmond. 494, Laurie Cima, 32:41, Bend. 495, Tina Corwin, 32:44, Redmond. 496, Beverly Joubert, 32:48, Bend. 497, Jerry Joubert, 32:48, Bend. 498, Rainie Carson, 32:50, Bend. 499, Maura Dennis, 32:50, Bend. 500, Kristin Hansen, 32:51, Bend. 501, David Bernard, 32:52, Redmond. 502, Drew Herron, 32:53, Bend. 503, Dana Sanders, 32:53, Grayson, Ky. 504, Regan White, 32:54, Bend. 505, Jodi Nelson, 32:54, Sisters. 506, Mary Casas, 32:54, Portland. 507, Lynne Beck, 32:56, Bend. 508, Cassie Dodge, 32:58, Redmond. 509, Sarah Thorsen, 32:59, Bend. 510, Terri Brown, 33:00, Sisters. 511, Allie Kasari, 33:04, Bend. 512, Serene Gribskov, 33:05, Redmond. 513, Tami Bernard, 33:05, Redmond. 514, Anna Borger, 33:05, Bend. 515, Kara Collins, 33:06, Redmond. 516, Candice McCann, 33:07, Bend. 517, Crystal Deed, 33:08, Bend. 518, Sean Simonson, 33:09, Lake Oswego. 519, Amy Kasari, 33:09, Bend. 520, Jennifer Mucha, 33:10, Bend. 521, Charles Marik, 33:10, Salem. 522, Melissa Geary, 33:10, Bend. 523, Michelle Herron, 33:11, Bend. 524, Connie Austin, 33:11, Bend. 525, Elise Herron, 33:11, Bend. 526, Valerie Johnson, 33:11, Bend. 527, Alicia Flint, 33:12, Bend. 528, David Gentry, 33:13, Sisters. 529, Dawn O’Connor, 33:14, Redmond. 530 Chad Amodeo, 33:15, McMinnville. 531, Torree Abrams, 33:15, La Pine. 532, Ona Larsell, 33:15, La Pine. 533, Alisha Goering, 33:15, Bend. 534, Tracy McChesney, 33:16, Bend. 535, Eric Hansen, 33:18, Bend. 536, Kymme MacKelvie, 33:18, Gresham. 537, Janet Truselo, 33:20, Bend. 538, Tracy Newton, 33:20, Bend. 539, Bob Boadway, 33:20, Gresham. 540, Craig McConnell, 33:21, Hood River. 541, Carly Swisher, 33:22, Bend. 542, Lynnette Braillard, 33:24, Redmond. 543, Murphy McFarland, 33:24, Bend. 544, Katherine W. Lemmon, 33:24, Bend. 545, Elizabeth Strausbaug, 33:24, Bend. 546, Erika David, 33:25, Albany. 547, Robin Bowman, 33:25, Bend. 548, Kim-Sue Knight, 33:26, Bend. 549, Josephine Fraser, 33:26, Bend. 550, Gary Logsdon, 33:27, Bend. 551, Regan Roberts, 33:32, Sisters. 552, Samantha Rowden, 33:33, Bend. 553, Don Rowden, 33:33, Bend. 554, Rebecca Beal, 33:35, Bend. 555, Megan Craig, 33:37, Bend. 556, Louise Caldwell, 33:37, Bend. 557,

Will Andrews, 33:37, Bend. 558, Sharon Rexford, 33:37, Bend. 559, Robert Andrews, 33:37, Bend. 560, Sara Crosswhite, 33:38, Redmond. 561, Maggie Simonson, 33:39, Lake Oswego. 562, Michelle Martin, 33:39, Bend. 563, Amber Harper, 33:39, La Pine. 564, Dan Broadley, 33:40, Redmond. 565, Elizabeth Marik, 33:40, Salem. 566, Patti Brown, 33:44, Redmond. 567, Kevin Coombe, 33:46, Redmond. 568, Rose Paxton, 33:46, Bend. 569, Evelyn Kagey, 33:52, Bend. 570, Susan Dodson, 33:53, Bend. 571, Matea Fish, 33:54, Bend. 572, Sarah Fraser, 33:56, Bend. 573, Natalie Morrone, 33:56, Bend. 574, Rachel Gilg, 34:01, Bend. 575, Jon Fiero, 34:02, Bend. 576, Dawn Roberts, 34:03, Bend. 577, Hunter Spor, 34:05, Sisters. 578, Ryan Karjala, 34:07, Sisters. 579, Kathie Barber, 34:07, Bend. 580, Teresa Santos, 34:08, Sisters. 581, Kathryn Thier, 34:08, Bend. 582, Barb Davies, 34:10, Bend. 583, Alex Martin, 34:10, Bend. 584, Chelsea Davies, 34:10, Bend. 585, Heather Robertson, 34:11, Bend. 586, Marcia Filicetti, 34:11, Bend. 587, Abby Edwards, 34:12, Bend. 588, Larissa Bruno, 34:13, Bend. 589, Jami Smith, 34:13, Bend. 590, Annica Balentine, 34:13, Bend. 591, Johnny Tellis, 34:14, Bend. 592, Brandi Thill, 34:15, Burlington, Vt. 593, Mark Lemmon, 34:18, Bend. 594, Amber Minney, 34:18, Crooked River Ranch. 595, Jenelle Neumann, 34:18, Bend. 596, Jessica Malinowski, 34:19, Bend. 597, Julia Hager, 34:20, Bend. 598, Tate Valentine, 34:20, Bend. 599, William Valentine, 34:20, Bend. 600, Maggie Saslow, 34:20, Sisters. 601, Lisa Fetters, 34:26, Bend. 602, Karlyn Hetzler, 34:26, Bend. 603, Patty Neumann, 34:26, Bend. 604, George Stephan, 34:27, Bend. 605, Pamella Talley, 34:28, Bend. 606, Linda Steiner, 34:33, Bend. 607, Angela Chase, 34:33, Bend. 608, Julie Alberts, 34:36, Bend. 609, Gordon Phillips, 34:36, Bend. 610, Linda McCormick, 34:37, Bend. 611, Steve Sloop, 34:37, Bend. 612, Jane Strell, 34:37, Bend. 613, Ashley Pearson, 34:38, Bend. 614, Owen Buehler, 34:38, Bend. 615, Anastasia McDonald, 34:38, Bend. 616, Patty Medeiros, 34:39, Bend. 617, Carolyn Boyle, 34:39, Bend. 618, Clare O’Shea, 34:39, Bend. 619, Darcy O’Shea, 34:39, Bend. 620, Alice Lezin, 34:42, Bend. 621, Michele Wyman, 34:43, Bend. 622, Daryl Peterson, 34:43, Bend. 623, Holly Peterson, 34:43, Bend. 624, Maega MacKelvie, 34:45, Bend. 625, Justin Mohan, 34:47, Redmond. 626, Christine Cook, 34:50, Bend. 627, Astacia Christenson, 34:50, Bend. 628, Andy French, 34:56, Bend. 629, Tanner Ensworth, 34:56, Bend. 630, Jordan Kropf, 34:58, Bend. 631, Rene Libolt, 34:58, Bend. 632, Hilarie McCulloch, 34:59, Bend. 633, Ana Gomez Castro, 35:00, Bend. 634, Honore Richards, 35:01, Bend. 635, Joan Winchel, 35:03, Bend. 636, Dillion Wirfs, 35:04, Redmond. 637, Eric Wirfs, 35:04, Redmond. 638, Kim Forsythe, 35:07, Bend. 639, Tracy Lombardo, 35:07, Bend. 640, Libby McKnight, 35:07, Bend. 641, Walter McKnight, 35:07, Bend. 642, Becky Nagle, 35:08, Bend. 643, Savannah Stalker, 35:09, Bend. 644, Monica Burt, 35:10, Bend. 645, Janaya Wetzell, 35:10, Bend. 646, Deb White, 35:12, Bend. 647, Annette Benedetti, 35:12, Bend. 648, Helen McKee, 35:14, Portland. 649, Sarah Sperbeck, 35:14, Portland. 650, Candace Wheeler, 35:15, Bend. 651, Lisa Gladden, 35:16, Bend. 652, Alexis Chapman, 35:17, Bend. 653, Jerry Beaver, 35:19, Bend. 654, Melissa Beaver, 35:19, Bend. 655, Mark Prokop, 35:20, Bend. 656, Jill Zertuche, 35:20, Bend. 657, Kristi Hartrich, 35:20, Bend. 658, Robbi Chapman, 35:20, Bend. 659, Caitlin Brown, 35:22, Bend. 660, Cheryl Morgen, 35:23, Bend. 661, Nicole Morgen, 35:23, Bend. 662, Pamm Barclay, 35:24, Bend. 663, Scott Barclay, 35:25, Bend. 664, Nancy Lumpkin, 35:32, Bend. 665, Kate Papworth, 35:34, Bend. 666, Andi Freeman, 35:34, Bend. 667, Christina Bailey, 35:35, Portland. 668, Lucie Umenhofer, 35:35, Bend. 669, Julie Story, 35:37, Bend. 670, Kristina Mills, 35:37, Bend. 671, Dana Buchendahl, 35:41, Bend. 672, Lisa Crocker, 35:42, Bend. 673, Emma Romero, 35:43, Bend. 674, Amy Romero, 35:43, Bend. 675, Campbell Crocker, 35:43, Bend. 676, Cassandra Dungey, 35:44, Redmond. 677, Samuel Timms, 35:45, Bend. 678, Gary J. Timms, 35:46, Bend. 679, Courtney Beaulieu, 35:48, Bend. 680, Pat Oren, 35:48, Bend. 681, Hannah Mavis, 35:49, Bend. 682, Dave Jewett, 35:51, Bend. 683, Bree Bergen, 35:52, Bend. 684, Christina Lowe-Campi, 35:52, Bend. 685, Pat Bergen, 35:52, Bend. 686, Taylor Smith-Bedswor, 35:54, Bend. 687, Brady Bedsworth, 35:54, Bend. 688, Juli Chambers, 35:54, Bend. 689, Jodie Hueske, 35:56, Bend. 690, Theresa Gray, 35:57, Bend. 691, Robin Ordway, 35:58, Fossil. 692, David Presland, 35:59, Bend. 693, Kimberly Savarese, 35:59, Bend. 694, Sandy Shaffer, 35:59, Bend. 695, Kate Singer, 36:00, Bend. 696, Genna Callicott, 36:00, Bend. 697, Jb Nye, 36:03, Bend. 698, Jody Ramos, 36:05, Redmond. 699, Annie Schrader, 36:08, Bend. 700, Heidi Bauer, 36:08, Redmond. 701, Sheila Wilton, 36:10, Bend. 702, Cristine Keever, 36:12, Madras. 703, Stephanie Paris, 36:13, Bend. 704, Susie Rossi, 36:15, Bend. 705, Francesca Rossi, 36:15, Bend. 706, Melanie Widmer, 36:16, Madras. 707, Scott Gilbride, 36:17, Bend. 708, Skyler Gilbride, 36:17, Bend. 709, Charlotte Gilbride, 36:17, Bend. 710, Sonja Verbrugge, 36:17, Madras. 711, Charles Kingsbaker, 36:18, Bend. 712, Brenda Eberle, 36:19, Bend. 713, Cathy Freyberg, 36:21, Bend. 714, Lori Norris, 36:23, Bend. 715, Drew Norris, 36:23, Bend. 716, Diane Vosick, 36:26, Bend. 717, Terri Rood, 36:29, Sisters. 718, Matt Stoneberg, 36:30, Bend. 719, Lisa Lee, 36:32, Bend. 720, Deanna Haake, 36:36, Bend. 721, Andria Woodellquinn, 36:40, Bend. 722, Kellie Fletcher, 36:44, Bend. 723, Jonathan Bossert, 36:45, Bend. 724, Tara Fritz, 36:45, Bend. 725, Wendy Schultheis, 36:47, Bend. 726, Madison Brown, 36:50, Bend. 727, Adam Huddart, 36:56, Bend. 728, Erika Vu, 37:03, Bend. 729, Kerrie Madson, 37:04, Bend. 730, Andrea Roa, 37:07, Portland. 731, Debbie Parker, 37:07, Bend. 732, Amanda Rose, 37:09, Bend. 733, Amy Ruddell, 37:12, Bend. 734, Carole Loving, 37:14, Bend. 735, Jim Wilson, 37:17, Bend. 736, Alissa Norris, 37:21, Bend. 737, Linda Roepke, 37:24, Bend. 738, Athena Peterson, 37:29, Bend. 739, Rich Peterson, 37:29, Bend. 740, Ella Peterson, 37:29, Bend. 741, Susan McCampbell, 37:33, Bend. 742, Renee May, 37:33, Sisters. 743, Joie Cook, 37:34, Bend. 744, Andreia Todd, 37:34, Bend. 745, Susan Cook, 37:35, Bend. 746, Ann Schlossnagle, 37:35, Bend. 747, Weston Baldwin, 37:36, Bend. 748, Gina Hersch, 37:37, Bend. 749, Wyatt Baldwin, 37:37, Bend. 750, Wendy Jackson, 37:37, Bend. 751, Gayle Tompkins, 37:38, Bend. 752, Allen Baldwin, 37:39, Bend. 753, Candice Baldwin, 37:39, Bend. 754, Lisa Wade, 37:41, Pasco, Wash. 755, Ashley Joyce, 37:44, Bend. 756, Katie Diez, 37:46, Sisters. 757, Ruth Longstroth, 37:46, Redmond. 758, Steve Radd, 37:47, Redmond. 759, Lisa Miller, 37:48, Bend. 760, Lindsay Knight, 37:50, Bend. 761, Wendy Knight, 37:52, Bend. 762, Faren Anderson, 37:55, Bend. 763, Lindsay Galloway, 37:55, Sunriver. 764, Melissa Maurer, 37:56, Bend. 765, Larry Wirfs, 37:56, Redmond. 766, Gary Unze, 37:58, Bend. 767, Emily Del Rio, 37:59, Bend. 768, Valerie Warren, 38:02, Bend. 769, Sybil Bauer, 38:06, Bend. 770, Teresa Cravens, 38:06, Bend. 771, Roberta Johnson, 38:06, Bend. 772, Debora Crawford, 38:08, Sisters. 773, Ryker Bourdo, 38:09, Bend. 774, Amanda Fearell, 38:10, Bend. 775, Grace Gilmore, 38:15, Bend. 776, Dianne Logsdon, 38:16, Bend. 777, Amanda Crawford, 38:17, Sisters. 778, John Gilmore, 38:20, Bend. 779, Grace Lester, 38:25, La Pine. 780, Marian McCall, 38:28, Bend. 781, Laurie Mason, 38:29, Bend. 782, Susan Tank, 38:30, Sisters. 783, Sydney Sventek, 38:35, Bend. 784, Kayla Sheasby, 38:35, Bend. 785, Perry Valentine, 38:35, Bend. 786, Jessica Valentine, 38:36, Bend. 787, Lani Chroninger, 38:40, Bend. 788, Nicole Dale, 38:40, McMinnville. 789, Wendy Mahaney, 38:41, Sunriver. 790, Amanda Mahaney, 38:41, Sunriver. 791, Mary Jo McDermott, 38:48, Bend. 792, Skylar Lester, 38:49, La Pine. 793, Dawson Cole Lester, 38:50, La Pine. 794, Becky Allen, 38:50, La Pine. 795, Curtis Shaffer, 38:51, Redmond. 796, Callan Valentine, 38:52, Bend. 797, Emma Gilmour, 38:53, Bend. 798, Diana Cole, 38:53, Bend. 799, Lisa Uri, 38:53, Bend. 800, Jessica Meyer, 38:58, Redmond. 801, Sandy Sinton, 38:59, Bend. 802, Debbie Toolan, 39:01, Bend. 803, Marley Weedman, 39:03, Bend. 804, Matthew Walkley, 39:09, Bend. 805, Marsha Eckstine, 39:17, Bend. 806, Julie Childress, 39:23, Bend. 807, Mary Kittelson, 39:32, Powell Butte. 808, Brett Olson, 39:34, Bend. 809, Lisa Clausen, 39:34, Bend. 810, Erin Weaver, 39:34, Bend. 811, Jeannie Thorp, 39:41, La Pine. 812, Kristy Scheer, 39:42, Bend. 813, Catherine Hardy, 39:43, Bend. 814, Tami Eckstine, 39:45 Dorena, Ky. 815, Jill Richmond, 39:48, Albany. 816, Anita Dick, 39:51 Welches. 817, Brandi Gilmore, 39:54, Redmond. 818, Alisha Mascarenas, 39:55, Bend. 819, April Bays, 39:55, Redmond. 820, Marilyn Karnopp, 40:01, Bend. 821, Margie Hoag, 40:09, Yamhill. 822, Maureen Curran, 40:10, Los Osos, Calif. 823, Jacob Mageau, 40:11, Bend. 824, Vicky Demoss, 40:12, Bend. 825, Cameron Marijosius, 40:13, Bend. 826, Wendy Andrick, 40:21, Bend. 827, Renae Gibbons, 40:22, Bend. 828, Mike Toolan, 40:24, Bend. 829, Vivian Rubenstein-Fr, 40:26, Bend. 830, Brooklynn Anderson, 40:32, Bend. 831, Kristina Miller, 40:36, Bend. 832, Joann Hand, 40:45, Bend. 833, Charlene Lester, 40:45, La Pine. 834, Julie Spor, 40:46, Sisters. 835, Karma Crafton, 40:48, Prineville. 836, Janara Ludwig, 40:57, Bend. 837, Tesla Gillmann, 41:15, Redmond. 838, Nadean Murray, 41:19, Sisters. 839, Molly Brundage, 41:21, Bend. 840,

Karri Salas, 41:22, Redmond. 841, Jariya Womack, 41:26, Brookings. 842, Emily Tuma, 41:26, Bend. 843, Jaiden Womack, 41:27, Brookings. 844, Aimee Jones, 41:29, Bend. 845, Claudia Williams, 41:35, Sisters. 846, Cheyanne Nance, 41:38, Bend. 847, Stacy Nance, 41:42, Bend. 848, Kary Shemesh, 41:53, Bend. 849, Ely Shemesh, 41:53, Bend. 850, Amy Harper, 41:56, Bend. 851, Kim Atwater, 41:56, Bend. 852, Susan Beyer, 41:58, Bend. 853, Pamela Seiffert, 42:03, Bend. 854, Stephen Leary, 42:17, Bend. 855, Julie Anderson, 42:19, Bend. 856, Kali Booher, 42:25, Bend. 857, James Beyer, 42:33, Bend. 858, Roberta Huber, 42:33, Bend. 859, Papa Morris, 42:39, Sisters. 860, Lisa Clark, 42:40, Bend. 861, Kaitlen Chapman, 42:42, Bend. 862, Nate Chapman, 42:43, Bend. 863, Brittany Demianew, 42:58, Bend. 864, Bill Brittain, 43:05, Redmond. 865, Jacy Hoover, 43:06, Redmond. 866, Lenora James, 43:07, Bend. 867, Marjorie Thomson, 43:12, Juneau, Alaska. 868, Natalia Harrington, 43:21, Bend. 869, Emma Putnam, 43:25, Bend. 870, Zoe Villano, 43:25, Bend. 871, Deborah Putnam, 43:26, Bend. 872, Chanda Villano, 43:26, Bend. 873, Devin Mast, 43:28, Bend. 874, Maddie Olsen, 43:28, Bend. 875, Mika Mast, 43:28, Bend. 876, Lori McCoy, 43:30, Redmond. 877, Natalie Hill, 43:30, Redmond. 878, Emily Weidner, 43:32, Bend. 879, Ted Winchel, 43:33, Bend. 880, Catherine Amberg, 43:39, Bend. 881, Olivia McGean, 43:44, Bend. 882, Laura Gardiner, 43:50, Bend. 883, Mike Bourdo, 43:53, Bend. 884, Debbie Young, 44:15, Bend. 885, Chris Tapp, 44:22, Bend. 886, Luke Cody, 44:23, Bend. 887, Jamie Sullivan, 44:28, Bend. 888, Jeffery Flores, 44:29, West Linn. 889, Jeffery Flores, 44:29, West Linn. 890, Sallie Tapp, 44:31, Bend. 891, Andrea Harrild, 44:32, Bend. 892, Carrie Presland, 44:32, Bend. 893, Diane Harrild, 44:33, Bend. 894, Lynette Patterson, 44:35, Bend. 895, Dianna Bourdo, 44:37, Bend. 896, Gale Putman, 44:59, Bend. 897, Donna Emerson, 45:11, Bend. 898, Chloe Devine, 45:16, Bend. 899, Cynthia Liebelt, 45:17, Redmond. 900, Melinda Devine, 45:17, Bend. 901, Ellie McCann, 45:18, Bend. 902, Amy McCann, 45:21, Bend. 903, Engracia Diez, 45:32, Sisters. 904, Tyndal Longstroth, 45:32, Redmond. 905, Amy Herauf, 45:33, Bend. 906, William McCampbell, 45:57, Bend. 907, Susan Stanley, 45:59, Bend. 908, Karen Sigworth, 46:00, Tigard. 909, Mary Cooper, 46:20, Mesa, Ariz. 910, Margaret Washburn, 46:29, Bend. 911, Angie Ellsworth, 46:53, Bend. 912, Theresa Pennington, 47:16, Bend. 913, Shanette Menegus, 48:03, Bend. 914, Zola Dickerson, 48:06, Bend. 915, Terri Storey, 48:10, Salem. 916, Jody Warrick, 48:23, Bend. 917, Gail Gumpert, 48:37, Bend. 918, Melisa Weishaupt, 48:43, Bend. 919, Deann Atkinson, 48:45, Bend. 920, Brianna Barrons, 48:59, Bend. 921, Reece Marshall, 49:00, Bend. 922, Cindy Oestreich-Tann, 49:10, Bend. 923, Marianne Allen, 49:16, Sisters. 924, Kathy Fiero, 49:17, Bend. 925, Cia Hutto, 49:20, Bend. 926, Janae Wiseman, 49:32, Bend. 927, Alice McKnight, 49:44, Bend. 928, Sha Brown, 49:44, Bend. 929, Joe Bernardi, 49:59, Bend. 930, Melissa Carrion, 50:28, Bend. 931, Madison Mahaney, 50:30, Sunriver. 932, Kaura Spears, 50:36, Bend. 933, Secily Luse, 50:57, Bend. 934, Peyton Sventek, 51:12, Bend. 935, Vicki Clark, 51:13, Bend. 936, Jason Townsend, 51:15, Bend. 937, Kym Johnson, 51:15, Bend. 938, Carley Dangona, 51:32, Bend. 939, Merrilee Bartel, 51:32, Bend. 940, Guy Havice, 51:38, Medford. 941, Ivy Havice, 51:43, Medford. 942, Edith Lukens, 51:46, Bend. 943, Sherry Kavanaugh, 51:48, Bend. 944, Deborah Baker, 52:11, La Quinta, Calif. 945, James Kissell, 52:35, Bend. 946, Jeannie Unverzagt, 52:36, Bend. 947, Steve Unverzagt, 52:37, Bend. 948, Jill Neider, 52:38, Bend. 949, Bethany Dafoe, 52:43, Bend. 950, Robin Rodriguez, 52:44, Bend. 951, Rober Sheasby, 52:48, Bend. 952, Selena Sluga, 52:49, Bend. 953, Cheyenne Hopkins, 52:49, Bend. 954, Danielle Chamness, 52:50, Bend. 955, Jill Leonard, 52:51, Bend. 956, Mikaela Guthrie, 52:53, Bend. 957, Caitlin Kelly, 52:55, Bend. 958, Hallie Womack, 53:26, Brookings. 959, Mariah Womack, 53:32, Brookings. 960, Nicole Dafoe, 53:34, Bend. 961, John Dafoe, 53:34, Summerland, Calif. 962, Keilee Hoag, 53:40, Bend. 963, Kacy Hageman, 54:00, Bend. 964, Wendi Matlock, 54:01, Bend. 965, Gladys Higginbottom, 54:48, Bend. 966, Joni Cloud, 55:13, Sunriver. 967, Kiersten Brown, 55:30, Sisters. 968, Sonya Keeney, 55:34, Bend. 969, Nicole Johansen, 55:35, Bend. 970, Taylor Makela, 55:59, Bend. 971, Kimberly Makela, 55:59, Bend. 972, Anita Moore, 56:15, Bend. 973, Carly Moore, 56:19, Bend. 974, Kaylie Nelson, 56:20, Bend. 975, Megan Jewett, 56:43, Bend. 976, Christine Walker, 56:58, Sunriver. 977, Alex Fierar, 56:58, Bend. 978, Frances Austin, 57:03, Bend. 979, Roger Austin, 57:04, Bend. 980, Michele Higgins, 57:07, Bend. 981, Laurar Ramos, 57:13, Madras. 982, Becky Smallwood, 57:25, Bend. 983, Helen Romine, 57:30, Bend. 984, Maria Boell, 57:36, Bend. 985, Jacklyn Heidtke, 57:37, Bend. 986, Jenny Fahrenthold, 57:49, Bend. 987, Luci Charlton, 57:57, Bend. 988, Jace Marshall, 58:28, Bend. 989, Chelsea Callicott, 58:41, Bend. 990, Leanne Simpson, 59:03, Terrebonne. 991, Eric Spor, 59:09, Sisters. 992, Brandi Palmer, 59:16, Sisters. 993, Ashley Crawford, 59:20, Sisters. 994, Brittany Crawford, 59:21, Sisters. 995, Norma Pledger, 59:35, Sisters. 996, Carol Packard, 59:36, Bend. 997, David Makela, 59:44, Bend. 998, Diane Concannon, 1:00:05, Redmond. 999, Andrea Andrus, 1:00:11, Bend. 1000, Maisy Andrus, 1:00:11, Bend. 1001, Ashley Glass, 1:00:12, Redmond. 1002, Alvina Whitman, 1:00:12, Prineville. 1003, Mia Montoya, 1:00:18, Bend. 1004, Julie Montoya, 1:00:19, Bend. 1005, Wally Kropf, 1:00:40, Bend. 1006, Leanne Kropf, 1:00:47, Bend. 1007, Roberta Shirley, 1:00:54, Terrebonne. 1008, Kathy Winther, 1:00:56, Redmond. 1009, Ken Simonds, 1:01:46, Redmond. 1010, Jill Dubisar, 1:01:58, Redmond. 1011, Tracie Stone, 1:02:31, Bend. 1012, Hannah Buehler, 1:02:48, Bend. 1013, Angelina Roble, 1:02:48, Bend. 1014, Kristin Shaw, 1:03:08, Bend. 1015, Stacey Price, 1:03:09, Bend. 1016, Heidi Ewing, 1:03:12, Bend. 1017, Kendra Anderl, 1:03:14 Plum,. 1018, Chris Kentera, 1:03:15, Bend. 1019, Matt Falkenstein, 1:03:19, Bend. 1020, Francee Bassford, 1:03:23, Bend. 1021, Trevor Riley, 1:03:25, Bend. 1022, Kristy Knoll, 1:03:25, Redmond. 1023, Roberty Gilmore, 1:03:25, Bend. 1024, Karen Siewert, 1:03:35, Bend. 1025, Aedin Wright, 1:04:14, Bend. 1026, Kenna Leis, 1:04:16, Bend. 1027, Melinda Halpern-Coll, 1:04:32, Bend. 1028, Katherine Smith, 1:04:48, Bend. 1029, Kristina Bradbury, 1:05:00, Bend. 1030, Nicole Wells, 1:05:24, Redmond. 1031, Alicia Mehlis, 1:05:47, Bend. 1032, John Mehlis, 1:05:50, Bend. 1033, Mardi Bruce, 1:06:47, Bend. 1034, Brandy Freeling, 1:07:18, Bend. 1035, Mona Brittain, 1:07:19, Redmond. 1036, Corina Wirfs, 1:07:20, Redmond. 1037, Linea Young, 1:07:24, Redmond. 1038, Brandee McGinnis, 1:07:29, Bend. 1039, Renee Stone, 1:07:47, Bend. 1040, Alisha Fiory, 1:08:51, Bend. 1041, Charla Meyer, 1:09:29, Bend. 1042, Joy Tonole, 1:10:07, Bend. 1043, Steven Nichols, 1:10:23, Aloha. 1044, Lori Nichols, 1:10:34, Aloha. 1045, Ann Reitan, 1:10:54, Bend. 1046, Ron Stoltz, 1:11:53, Sun City, Ariz. 1047, Albertna Lopez, 1:12:21, Bend. 1048, Jayne Faulkner, 1:14:23, Albany. 1049, Jen Collins, 1:15:31, Bend. 1050, Suzanne Knox, 1:15:51, Bend. 1051, Teaghan Knox, 1:15:54, Bend. 1052, Tamie Hoover, 1:15:58, Bend. 1053, Michele Gottschalk, 1:16:03, Bend. 1054, Kiana Gottschalk, 1:16:05, Bend. 1055, Janice Newson, 1:16:37, Bend. 1056, Stephanie Lamp, 1:18:07, Bend. 1057, Sandra Anderson, 1:19:18, Bend. 1058, Elen Mana, 1:21:36, Bend. 1059, Katie Kenney, 1:23:19, Bend. 1060, Lani Dunithan, 1:24:57, Bend. 1061, Edith C. Neff, 1:25:01, Salem. 1062, Robin Moon, 1:25:01, Roseburg. 1063, Sally Neff, 1:25:03, Salem. 1064, Kelly Hanson, 1:26:37, Bend. 1065, Brian Tompkins, 1:32:43, Bend. 1066, Victoria Tompkins, 1:32:46, Bend. 1067, Christine Hanson, 1:35:07, Bend. 1068, Trudy Cutrone, 1:35:34, Bend. 1069, Tudor Gilmour, 1:39:36, Bend.

GOLF PGA Tour THE MEMORIAL Sunday At Muirfield Village GC Dublin, Ohio Purse: $6 million Yardage: 7,366; Par 72 Final Round FedExCup points in parentheses Justin Rose (500), $1,080,000 65-69-70-66—270 Rickie Fowler (300), $648,000 65-66-69-73—273 Bo Van Pelt (163), $348,000 70-69-68-69—276 Ricky Barnes (163), $348,000 70-71-62-73—276 Ryan Moore (100), $219,000 70-69-70-68—277 Phil Mickelson (100), $219,000 67-71-70-69—277 Tim Petrovic (100), $219,000 69-66-68-74—277 Matt Kuchar (83), $180,000 71-68-69-70—278 Stewart Cink (83), $180,000 70-67-71-70—278 Jim Furyk (73), $156,000 68-67-72-72—279 Rory McIlroy (73), $156,000 72-68-68-71—279 Rory Sabbatini (59), $117,600 67-73-70-70—280 Vijay Singh (59), $117,600 71-72-66-71—280 Jeff Overton (59), $117,600 69-70-68-73—280 Brendon de Jonge (59), $117,60071-69-65-75—280 Sean O’Hair (59), $117,600 68-71-68-73—280 Steve Stricker (54), $93,000 69-70-71-71—281 Kenny Perry (54), $93,000 71-68-68-74—281 Pat Perez (51), $75,300 71-70-71-70—282

Steve Marino (51), $75,300 Thongchai Jaidee (0), $75,300 Tiger Woods (51), $75,300 Chad Collins (46), $53,400 Andres Romero (46), $53,400 D.A. Points (46), $53,400 Y.E. Yang (46), $53,400 Bryce Molder (46), $53,400 Alex Cejka (41), $40,800 J.B. Holmes (41), $40,800 Ben Curtis (41), $40,800 Carl Pettersson (41), $40,800 Camilo Villegas (41), $40,800 Dustin Johnson (35), $30,375 Adam Scott (35), $30,375 Tom Pernice, Jr. (35), $30,375 Bubba Watson (35), $30,375 Jason Day (35), $30,375 Spencer Levin (35), $30,375 Kevin Streelman (35), $30,375 John Senden (35), $30,375 Tom Lehman (28), $21,600 Tom Gillis (28), $21,600 Bill Haas (28), $21,600 Geoff Ogilvy (28), $21,600 Nathan Green (28), $21,600 Peter Hanson (0), $21,600 Jerry Kelly (22), $15,864 Aaron Baddeley (22), $15,864 Zach Johnson (22), $15,864 Greg Chalmers (22), $15,864 Woody Austin (22), $15,864 Davis Love III (18), $14,160 K.J. Choi (18), $14,160 Fredrik Jacobson (18), $14,160 J.P. Hayes (14), $13,560 Brett Quigley (14), $13,560 Kevin Sutherland (14), $13,560 Kevin Stadler (14), $13,560 Tim Herron (14), $13,560 Henrik Stenson (10), $13,020 Vaughn Taylor (10), $13,020 Martin Laird (10), $13,020 D.J. Trahan (10), $13,020 Matt Jones (7), $12,660 John Merrick (7), $12,660 Mark Calcavecchia (5), $12,480 Brian Davis (4), $12,360 Charley Hoffman (3), $12,180 Tim Clark (3), $12,180 Brett Wetterich (1), $12,000 Erik Compton (0), $11,880

68-71-71-72—282 71-70-69-72—282 72-69-69-72—282 73-72-68-71—284 67-75-70-72—284 73-71-68-72—284 70-74-67-73—284 74-71-71-68—284 71-67-74-73—285 68-74-71-72—285 73-72-69-71—285 69-70-76-70—285 77-68-70-70—285 72-69-73-72—286 70-70-75-71—286 72-67-70-77—286 69-73-74-70—286 67-69-72-78—286 68-68-71-79—286 70-73-74-69—286 73-72-73-68—286 70-73-70-74—287 71-72-71-73—287 73-70-71-73—287 65-77-69-76—287 72-72-67-76—287 71-71-74-71—287 72-70-72-74—288 71-71-71-75—288 73-68-73-74—288 74-70-70-74—288 71-73-72-72—288 72-72-69-76—289 69-74-71-75—289 68-75-73-73—289 72-70-72-76—290 70-70-75-75—290 72-72-72-74—290 69-75-72-74—290 71-73-74-72—290 73-70-72-76—291 75-69-71-76—291 72-71-73-75—291 73-69-77-72—291 70-71-73-78—292 73-72-73-74—292 72-72-74-75—293 71-73-73-77—294 72-71-72-80—295 70-71-75-79—295 71-74-77-74—296 73-72-72-82—299

Champions Tour PRINCIPAL CHARITY CLASSIC Sunday At Glen Oaks Country Club West Des Moines, Iowa Purse: $1,725,000 Yardage: 6,879; Par: 71 Final Nick Price (259), $258,750 67-65-67—199 Tommy Armour III (152), $151,800 63-69-71—203 John Cook (114), $113,850 69-69-66—204 Loren Roberts (114), $113,850 70-66-68—204 Jeff Sluman (60), $60,375 68-68-69—205 Chip Beck (60), $60,375 69-66-70—205 Bruce Vaughan (60), $60,375 68-66-71—205 Dan Forsman (60), $60,375 66-68-71—205 Russ Cochran (60), $60,375 66-68-71—205 Don Pooley (60), $60,375 68-65-72—205 Fred Couples, $35,535 70-70-66—206 Bernhard Langer, $35,535 67-70-69—206 Mike Reid, $35,535 67-70-69—206 Olin Browne, $35,535 67-69-70—206 Peter Senior, $35,535 69-67-70—206 Tom Kite, $23,783 72-69-66—207 D.A. Weibring, $23,783 71-70-66—207 Larry Mize, $23,783 70-69-68—207 Bobby Clampett, $23,783 71-67-69—207 Fred Funk, $23,783 73-64-70—207 Brad Bryant, $23,783 71-66-70—207 Ted Schulz, $23,783 69-68-70—207 Mark James, $23,783 69-67-71—207 Blaine McCallister, $17,681 70-69-69—208 Mike Goodes, $17,681 67-68-73—208 Tom Purtzer, $15,353 72-66-71—209 Kirk Hanefeld, $15,353 67-71-71—209 Mark O’Meara, $15,353 67-69-73—209 Gene Jones, $15,353 67-68-74—209 Gary Hallberg, $13,283 68-71-71—210 Jay Haas, $13,283 71-68-71—210 David Peoples, $11,644 70-71-70—211 Joe Ozaki, $11,644 71-70-70—211 Ronnie Black, $11,644 67-72-72—211 Fulton Allem, $11,644 72-67-72—211 Peter Jacobsen, $9,167 74-69-69—212 Morris Hatalsky, $9,167 71-70-71—212 Scott Simpson, $9,167 72-67-73—212 Lonnie Nielsen, $9,167 67-72-73—212 Corey Pavin, $9,167 69-70-73—212 Eduardo Romero, $9,167 71-68-73—212 Gary Koch, $9,167 71-67-74—212 Hal Sutton, $7,073 76-69-68—213 David Eger, $7,073 71-71-71—213 Jim Roy, $7,073 73-67-73—213 Steve Haskins, $7,073 73-67-73—213 James Mason, $7,073 70-68-75—213 David Frost, $5,520 70-73-71—214 Gil Morgan, $5,520 69-74-71—214 Bobby Wadkins, $5,520 74-68-72—214 Wayne Levi, $5,520 71-72-71—214 Tim Simpson, $3,726 77-72-66—215 Bob Gilder, $3,726 73-73-69—215 Tom Jenkins, $3,726 71-75-69—215 Bruce Fleisher, $3,726 74-71-70—215 Keith Fergus, $3,726 72-71-72—215 Bruce Summerhays, $3,726 71-71-73—215 Chris Starkjohann, $3,726 70-72-73—215 Jay Don Blake, $3,726 71-70-74—215 John Harris, $3,726 73-67-75—215 Fuzzy Zoeller, $3,726 69-67-79—215 John Ross, $2,588 74-73-69—216 Joey Sindelar, $2,588 76-69-71—216 Keith Clearwater, $2,588 73-69-74—216 Vicente Fernandez, $2,156 74-71-72—217 Dave Eichelberger, $2,156 73-72-72—217 Jodie Mudd, $1,748 75-71-72—218 Jack Ferenz, $1,748 73-73-72—218 Larry Nelson, $1,748 74-71-73—218 Bruce Lietzke, $1,466 76-70-73—219 Allen Doyle, $1,466 74-72-73—219 Mark Wiebe, $1,259 70-74-76—220 Andy Bean, $1,259 69-73-78—220 Tom Wargo, $1,139 71-76-74—221 Denis Watson, $1,035 74-76-76—226 Ken Schall, $1,035 70-77-79—226 Graham Marsh, $932 79-75-76—230

PREP SPORTS Baseball STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday’s Game In Keizer Class 3A Championship Santiam Christian 17, Valley Catholic 1 Today’s Game In Keizer Class 2A/1A Championship Heppner vs. Knappa, 2 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— PLAYOFF GLANCE STANLEY CUP FINALS x-if necessary Chicago 3, Philadelphia 2 Saturday, May 29: Chicago 6, Philadelphia 5 Monday, May 31: Chicago 2, Philadelphia 1 Wednesday, June 2: Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3 (OT) Friday, June 4: Philadelphia 5, Chicago 3 Sunday, June 6: Chicago 7, Philadelphia 4 Wednesday, June 9: Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. x-Friday, June 11: Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m.

TENNIS French Open Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $21.1 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4.

BASEBALL College NCAA DIVISION I BASEBALL REGIONALS All Times PDT ———

Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— Norwich, Conn. Sunday, June 6 Oregon 4, Connecticut 3, UConn eliminated Florida State 5, Oregon 3, Florida State advances Charlottesville, Va. Sunday, June 6 St. John’s 20, Mississippi 16, Mississippi eliminated St. John’s 6, Virginia 5 Today, June 7 Virginia (49-12) vs. St. John’s (43-19), 3 p.m. Louisville, Ky. Sunday, June 6 Vanderbilt 10, Illinois State 4, Illinois St. eliminated Vanderbilt 7, Louisville 0 Today, June 7 Louisville (50-13) vs. Vanderbilt (44-18), 3 p.m. Columbia, S.C. Sunday, June 6 Virginia Tech 4, The Citadel 3, Citadel eliminated South Carolina 10, Virginia Tech 2, South Carolina advances Myrtle Beach, S.C. Sunday, June 6 Coastal Carolina 25, Stony Brook 7, Stony Brook eliminated Coastal Carolina 8, College of Charleston 7 Today, June 7 College of Charleston (44-18) vs. Coastal Carolina (54-8), 10 a.m. Atlanta Sunday, June 6 Alabama 5, Mercer 3, Mercer eliminated Alabama 8, Georgia Tech 1 Today, June 7 Georgia Tech (47-14) vs. Alabama (40-23), 4 p.m. Gainesville, Fla. Sunday, June 6 Florida Atlantic 11, Oregon State 7, OSU eliminated Florida 15, Florida Atlantic 0, Florida advances Coral Gables, Fla. Sunday, June 6 Texas A&M 4, Dartmouth 3, Dartmouth eliminated Texas A&M 11, Miami 7 Today, June 7 Miami (42-18) vs. Texas A&M (43-20-1), 4 p.m. Auburn, Ala. Sunday, June 6 Auburn 17, Southern Miss 8, Southern Miss eliminated Auburn 11, Clemson 10 Today, June 7 Clemson (40-22) vs. Auburn (44-19), 4 p.m. Fayetteville, Ark. Sunday, June 6 Washington State 9, Kansas State 6, KSU eliminated Washington State 10, Arkansas 7 Today, June 7 Arkansas (42-19) vs. Washington State (36-21), 5:05 p.m. Norman, Okla. Sunday, June 6 North Carolina 12, Oral Roberts 4, Oral Roberts eliminated Oklahoma 3, North Carolina 2, Oklahoma advances Austin, Texas Sunday, June 6 Rice 9, Louisiana-Lafayette 1, La.-Lafayette eliminated Texas 4, Rice 1, Texas advances Fort Worth, Texas Sunday, June 6 Baylor 4, Arizona 2, Arizona eliminated TCU 9, Baylor 0, TCU advances Fullerton, Calif. Sunday, June 6 Cal State Fullerton 11, New Mexico 3, New Mexico eliminated Cal State Fullerton 7, Minnesota 2 Today, June 7 Minnesota vs. Cal State Fullerton, 8 p.m. Los Angeles Sunday, June 6 UC Irvine 4, LSU 3 UCLA 6, UC Irvine 2, UCLA advances Tempe, Ariz. Sunday, June 6 Hawaii 12, San Diego 9, San Diego eliminated Arizona State 8, Hawaii 4, Arizona State advances

SOFTBALL College NCAA DIVISION I SOFTBALL WORLD SERIES At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium Oklahoma City All Times PDT ——— Double Elimination x-if necessary Sunday, June 6 UCLA 5, Georgia 2, Georgia eliminated Arizona 8, Tennessee 0 Arizona 5, Tennessee 2, Tennessee eliminated Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, June 7: Game 1, UCLA (48-11) vs. Arizona (52-12), 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 8: Game 2, UCLA vs. Arizona, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 9: Game 3, UCLA vs. Arizona, 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 7 2 .778 Connecticut 5 2 .714 Indiana 5 3 .625 Chicago 4 4 .500 Washington 4 4 .500 New York 2 4 .333 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 8 1 .889 Phoenix 3 4 .429 Tulsa 3 4 .429 San Antonio 2 5 .286 Minnesota 2 7 .222 Los Angeles 1 6 .143 ——— Sunday’s Games Connecticut 81, San Antonio 68 Indiana 89, Minnesota 51 Seattle 97, Phoenix 74 Today’s Games No games scheduled

GB — 1 1½ 2½ 2½ 3½ GB — 4 4 5 6 6

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT Wednesday’s Games Colorado at Chicago, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Thursday’s Games Philadelphia at Kansas City, 5 p.m. D.C. United at Seattle FC, 7 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS—Designated SS Adam Everett for assignment. Recalled INF Danny Worth from Toledo (IL). SEATTLE MARINERS—Placed RHP Doug Fister on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 1. Recalled LHP Luke French from Tacoma (PCL). National League WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Optioned RHP Craig Stammen to Syracuse (IL).

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,866 219 178 57 The Dalles 2,792 265 102 31 John Day 2,286 224 33 9 McNary 2,540 203 22 6 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 259,376 14,061 10,860 2,955 The Dalles 195,338 12,059 2,740 1,224 John Day 179,446 11,794 2,758 1,498 McNary 146,964 8,589 2,449 1,265


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 D3

GOLF ROUNDUP

N H L : S TA N L E Y C U P

Rose rallies for Memorial win

Blackhawks take a 3-2 series lead over Flyers

The Associated Press DUBLIN, Ohio — Winless for more than two years, so far down the world ranking that he was in danger of being forgotten, Justin Rose decided to stop being obsessed with results and think only about the shot in front of him. It led to a result that was long overdue. With a flawless final round to overcome a four-shot deficit, Rose had one-putt greens on eight consecutive holes Sunday and closed with a 6-under 66 to win the Memorial Tournament for his first title in America. “I’ve had a few close calls over time, and you start to sometimes wonder why you can’t get it done,” Rose said. Rose ran off three straight birdies before the turn, made a 20-foot par putt to keep his momentum, then seized control when Rickie Fowler took a double bogey with a tee shot into the water on the 12th hole. Fowler shot 73 to finish three shots behind. When he tapped in for par on the final hole, Rose thrust his fist in the air slammed it down, as joyful as he was when he burst onto the golf scene 12 years ago as the 17-year-old amateur who tied for fourth in the 1998 British Open. It was the second straight year the Memorial winner came from four shots behind. Tiger Woods did it a year ago, and Rose was equally impressive in playing without a bogey on a course made tough by the strong gusts. Even his 16-month-old son Leo approved. As Rose held him aloft in his arms, the infant clapped his hands. Then came a handshake from the tournament host, Jack Nicklaus, who told the 29year-old Englishman two years ago he would win the Memorial one day. “To win here at the Memorial, at Jack’s tournament, I couldn’t think of a better place to win my first tournament,” Rose said. Fowler, the 21-year-old rookie trying to become the youngest winner at Muirfield Village, was atop the leaderboard for 48 consecutive holes until his 5-iron to the par-3 12th bounded off the side of a slope and into the water for a double bogey. “I just made a bad swing and paid for it,” said Fowler, a runnerup for the second time this year. Rose had finished second or third in several of the 161 tournaments he had played on the PGA Tour, enough to have doubts about his ability to close. He put them away with a putt on the 16th hole that wasn’t as important as he thought at the time. Rose had seen Fowler, playing in the group behind him, hitting

Jay LaPrete / The Associated Press

Justin Rose tees off on the 18th hole during the final round of the Memorial golf tournament at Muirfield Village Golf Club Sunday in Dublin, Ohio. Rose won the event by three strokes. from the drop area on the 12th. But he heard cheers behind as Fowler tried to catch up, and one of the loudest roars of the day came from the 15th hole. Rose knew it was an eagle, and he heard the fans screaming out, “Ricky.” Rickie Fowler was playing in the same group as Ricky Barnes. He wasn’t sure who they were cheering, but he assumed it was Fowler. Turns out it was Barnes. “I thought, ‘OK, here we go. This is dead even.’ So I knew putt that I made a 16 was key, and that was the only sort of fist pump that I showed all day,” Rose said. “Because I just felt like it swung the momentum back my way.” Only when he reached the 18th green did Rose realize he was three shots clear. It was his seventh victory

TENNIS: FRENCH OPEN

Nadal gets his fifth title in Paris Yes, Nadal most definitely is back, and he is PARIS — Scurryas good as — or perhaps ing along the baseline even better than — ever. as only he can, sliding “He has more or less through the red clay one game,” Soderling he rules, Rafael Nadal said, “but he does it so stretched to somehow well.” dig the ball out of a cor- Rafael Nadal Nadal is 38-1 over his ner and fling it back over career at Roland Garthe net — once, twice, ros and, three days after three times — during a 14-stroke his 24th birthday, stands just one exchange that ended when Robin French Open title shy of Bjorn Soderling sailed a shot long. Borg’s record of six. For the secThe French Open final was all ond time in three years, Nadal of seven points old, and the mes- won the tournament without lossage was unmistakable: Nadal’s ing a set. knees are fine now, which means As former No. 1 Andy Roddick he is an entirely different player posted on Twitter: “rafa nadal from the one Soderling stunned best ever on clay.... period.” at Roland Garros in 2009. That Put simply, Nadal was far suwas the first loss of Nadal’s ca- perior in every aspect, from start reer at this tournament, and it to finish, in improving to 38-4 remains the only one. with four titles this season, both His body sound, his mind at tour bests. ease, Nadal played his unique He saved all eight break points brand of relentless, perpetual- he faced. He returned well, too, motion tennis to handily beat the against a guy who tops 140 mph, No. 5-seeded Soderling of Swe- managing to hit the same numden 6-4, 6-2, 6-4 Sunday. Nadal ber of aces Sunday, seven apiece, won his fifth French Open cham- even though Soderling had topionship, his seventh Grand taled 75, and Nadal only 12, Slam title overall, and earned a through the semifinals. He made return to No. 1. only 16 unforced errors, 29 fewer “I lost last year because I was than Soderling. not well-prepared, and I had very Most significantly, he never low morale last year, as well,” allowed his big-swinging foe to said Nadal, who will supplant dictate points the way Soderling Roger Federer atop the rankings did during his pair of career-detoday. fining upsets — against Nadal “But this time, I’m back,” said in last year’s fourth round, and Nadal, who covered his face with against defending champion and a red towel and sobbed at match’s top-seeded Federer in this year’s end. “I’m back — and I win.” quarterfinals.

By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

worldwide — Rose has won on five of the six major tours in the world — but his first on the PGA Tour. He joined an English revival in golf this year, with Lee Westwood rising to No. 3 in the world, Ian Poulter winning his first World Golf Championship, and Luke Donald reaching the top 10 in the world with a victory in Spain. “Until you win over here, you don’t feel like you’ve really achieved all you want to in the game,” Rose said. “But it’s about winning worldwide, too.” As he finished signing autographs, he bumped into Fowler, who stopped to congratulate him. “Your time is coming,” Rose told Fowler. Dressed in orange from his cap to his shoes, Fowler showed

Pac-10 Continued from D1 The Pac-10 administrators arrived in San Francisco this weekend to a report that the conference was ready to invite Texas, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Baylor from the Big 12 to create a 16-team megaconference. There has also been a report that Baylor could replace Colorado in that scenario or the Pac10 could choose to keep the status quo or add only two teams in a smaller move. “We probably have contemplated or are contemplating almost everything you’ve read about,” Scott said. “The Pac-10 is in a very fortunate position. We have tremendous prospects exactly as we are. We also have some potentially exciting opportunities regarding expanding the footprint of the conference.” Scott, the former head of the Women’s Tennis Association, took over the conference last July. In February, he said the window for possible expansion would be until the end of 2010 before the conference negotiated a new television deal. Since then, speculation has grown about if the Pac-10 would choose to expand, and if so, what teams it would seek to add.

great poise and hit great shots — including a 4-iron into the wind and over the water to 2 feet on the sixth — to stay in control. A brief lapse was all it took. He drove into a bunker on No. 10 for bogey, took birdie out of the equation on the par-5 11th by laying up into the rough, and found the water on No. 12. Barnes shot a 73 and tied for third with Bo Van Pelt, who missed a short par putt on the final hole and had to settle for a 69. Woods, the defending champion and a four-time winner, closed with a 72 and tied for 19th to finish 12 shots behind. It was his worst finish at the Memorial since 2002, although he found one highlight. “I’m capable of playing four rounds in a row,” said Woods, who has done that only once this year, at the Masters. He missed the cut at Quail Hollow and withdrew from The Players Championship in the final round with a sore neck. It was not an inspiring performance, especially with the U.S. Open two weeks away at Pebble Beach. Also on Sunday: Price scores four-stroke victory WEST DES MOINES, Iowa — Nick Price won the Principal Charity Classic, shooting a 4-under 67 to beat Tommy Armour III by four strokes for his second Champions Tour win of the year and third overall. The 53-year-old Price, a threetime major champion, finished at 14-under 199 on the Glen Oaks Country Club course. Price won after coming up short the previous two years in Iowa after taking at least a share of the lead in the final round. McDowell gets fifth win in Europe NEWPORT, Wales — Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell won the Wales Open for his fifth PGA European Tour title, closing with an 8-under 63 for a threestroke victory over Welshman Rhys Davies. McDowell finished at 15-under 269 on Celtic Manor’s Twenty Ten Course, the site of the Ryder Cup matches in October. Gainey tops Nationwide field COLLEGE PARK, Md. — Tommy Gainey won the Prince George’s County Open for his first Nationwide Tour title, closing with a 6-under 65 for a onestroke victory over Frank Lickliter II (66) and Jin Park (69). Gainey two-putted the final hole for birdie, rolling in a 3-footer to finish at 17-under 267 on the University of Maryland course. He earned $108,000 to jump from 18th to second on the money list with $191,640. The final top 25 will earn 2010 PGA Tour cards.

The Pac-10 had perhaps been the conference most resistant to change in recent decades. While all of the other five major football conferences had either expanded or swapped teams since the start of the 1990s, the Pac-10 has been in its current format since adding Arizona and Arizona State in 1978. With five pairs of natural rivals, the Pac-10 has been able to hold down travel time and costs and play a full roundrobin in football and home-andhomes against each team in basketball. A major motivation for the expansion talk is to increase revenues for the schools under a new media contract that begins in the 2012-13 academic year. Negotiations will start early next year and could lead the development of a Pac-10 network similar to what the Big Ten has successfully done. Pac-10 teams make considerably less from television and bowl deals. Big Ten schools reportedly receive about $22 million each from television and bowl deals and SEC school each get at least $17.3 million. Pac-10 teams, meanwhile, reportedly only get about $8 million to $10 million each from the conference deals. Scott said the reason for expansion would be that it could

By Rick Gano The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Big Buff got bumped from a struggling top line and responded with a performance that has lifted the Chicago Blackhawks to within one win of the Stanley Cup. Dustin Byfuglien scored two goals and had a pair of assists as Chicago got off to a quick start and beat the Philadelphia Flyers 7-4 on Sunday night for a 3-2 lead in the Stanley Cup finals. The 257-pound Byfuglien, who had eight goals in the first three rounds of the playoffs but none in the first four games against a tough Flyers defense, had a power-play goal in the second period and added an empty netter in the closing seconds. “Getting down there two games in their building, we had to come back with some fire and get on them and show them we weren’t going to quit. Right from the get-go we moved our feet and were physical,” Byfuglien said. Byfuglien’s top line that had included Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews was split up for Game 5, a strategy that worked for coach Joel Quenneville. They had combined for just one goal and four assists in the first four meetings with Philly. Kane also had a goal and an assist, and Toews added an assist Sunday. Brent Seabrook added a power-play goal, and Dave Bolland, Kris Versteeg and Patrick Sharp also scored for the Blackhawks. Chicago can capture the Stanley Cup for the first time since 1961 with a victory Wednesday night in Philadelphia in Game 6. A Flyers win would send the series back to Chicago for a decisive Game 7 on Friday night. “We’re not going to think about that now. We have to keep levelheaded and go into that building with the same mindset and have fun,” Versteeg said of Wednesday’s chance to wrap it up. All five wins in the series have come on home ice. Scott Hartnell, Kimmo Timonen, James van Riemsdyk and Simon Gagne scored for the Flyers. Gagne’s goal with 2:36 left made it 6-4, but a half-minute later Byfuglien converted the empty-netter. “We got outworked pretty good,” Flyers coach Peter Laviolette said. The Blackhawks blitzed goalie Michael Leighton with three goals in the final 7:43 of

create “exponential” growth in terms of money and exposure. “I can’t say for sure sitting here today that there are options that will achieve these goals where the Pac-10 can stay true to its DNA and its special values,” Scott said. “But there are some very exciting possibilities out there. That’s why we’re investing so much time and effort.”

Nam Y. Huh / The Associated Press

Philadelphia left wing Scott Hartnell (19) dives for the puck as Chicago center Patrick Sharp (10) heads down the ice in the first period of Game 5 of the Stanley Cup finals on Sunday in Chicago. the first period, and the United Center erupted as Chicago quickly found the offensive game that had helped it make the finals. Leighton was pulled — for the second time in the series in favor of Brian Boucher — after giving up three goals on 13 shots in the first period. “We weren’t very good in the first period,” Laviolette said, adding he didn’t know who would start in goal for Game 6. Trailing 3-0, the Flyers wasted little time in getting one of the goals back as Ville Leino took the puck to the side of the net and tried to stuff it in. But after hitting goalie Antti Niemi, the puck sat just off the line before Hartnell came in and knocked it home just 32 seconds into the period. Kane, who had been with Byfuglien on a struggling Blackhawks first line that Quenneville split up, got his second goal of the finals on a nice pass from Andrew Ladd. Ladd had his shot blocked by Flyers defenseman Chris Pronger, recovered the puck and passed it to Kane, who streaked to the net uncovered to beat Boucher for a 4-1 lead. Pronger finished with a miserable minus-5 rating in Game 5. As they have done throughout the series, the gritty Flyers responded quickly to a Chicago goal with one of their own. Timonen converted from the left circle after Niemi had gone down making a save seconds earlier, and it was 4-2. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

CREATIVE LIGHTING 541-382-0968 635 SE BUSINESS WAY • BEND, OR 97702

A Club for Everyone • Golf • Family & Kids Activities • • Learning Center • Pool & Fitness • • Dining & Much More! •

No monthly dues until July 1, 2010 and No Membership Fees until June 30, 2011 In addition you will receive a $25 to $50 monthly credit to your member account for up to 18 months beginning July 1, 2010. (Preview Members Only) Other memberships are available for as low as $145 per month with Membership Fees beginning at $1,200. Contact Keith Kessaris in the Membership Department for more details. 541-385-6011 or keith@awbreyglen.com 2500 NW Awbrey Glen Drive | Bend | www.awbreyglen.com | 541-385-6011


D4 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M A JOR L E A GUE B A SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 37 20 .649 — New York 35 22 .614 2 Boston 33 25 .569 4½ Toronto 33 25 .569 4½ Baltimore 16 41 .281 21 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 33 24 .579 — Detroit 29 27 .518 3½ Chicago 24 32 .429 8½ Kansas City 24 34 .414 9½ Cleveland 21 34 .382 11 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 30 26 .536 — Los Angeles 31 28 .525 ½ Oakland 30 28 .517 1 Seattle 22 34 .393 8 ——— Sunday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Toronto 3 Baltimore 4, Boston 3, 11 innings Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 7 Kansas City 7, Detroit 2 Tampa Bay 9, Texas 5 Oakland 5, Minnesota 4 L.A. Angels 9, Seattle 4 Today’s Games Boston (Matsuzaka 4-2) at Cleveland (Carmona 4-4), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Cl.Lee 3-2) at Texas (Feldman 3-5), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Kazmir 4-5) at Oakland (Sheets 2-4), 7:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Boston at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 33 24 .579 — Philadelphia 30 25 .545 2 New York 30 27 .526 3 Florida 28 30 .483 5½ Washington 27 31 .466 6½ Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 33 24 .579 — St. Louis 33 24 .579 — Chicago 25 31 .446 7½ Pittsburgh 23 33 .411 9½ Milwaukee 23 34 .404 10 Houston 22 35 .386 11 West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 33 23 .589 — Los Angeles 33 24 .579 ½ San Francisco 30 25 .545 2½ Colorado 29 27 .518 4 Arizona 22 35 .386 11½ ——— Sunday’s Games N.Y. Mets 7, Florida 6 Cincinnati 5, Washington 4, 10 innings San Diego 6, Philadelphia 5, 10 innings San Francisco 6, Pittsburgh 5, 10 innings Houston 6, Chicago Cubs 3 L.A. Dodgers 5, Atlanta 4, 11 innings Colorado 3, Arizona 2 Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 3, 10 innings Today’s Games Chicago Cubs (Silva 7-0) at Pittsburgh (Eveland 0-0), 9:35 a.m. San Diego (LeBlanc 2-4) at Philadelphia (Hamels 5-4), 4:05 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 6-2) at Cincinnati (Cueto 5-1), 4:10 p.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 3-7) at Colorado (Hammel 2-3), 5:40 p.m. Atlanta (D.Lowe 8-4) at Arizona (Haren 5-4), 6:40 p.m. St. Louis (Walters 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Monasterios 2-0), 7:10 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Florida at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Washington, 4:05 p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 5:40 p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.

NL ROUNDUP Padres 6, Phillies 5 (10 innings) PHILADELPHIA — Adrian Gonzalez homered and drove in three runs, Chase Headley had four hits and San Diego beat Philadelphia on pinch-hitter Oscar Salazar’s two-out infield single in the 10th inning. Nick Hundley also homered for the Padres. Headley opened the 10th with a single off Danys Baez (2-2) and advanced to third on a sacrifice and a grounder. San Diego Hairston rf-lf Hairston Jr. ss Ad.Gonzalez 1b Headley 3b Hundley c Stairs lf Venable rf Gwynn cf Zawadzki 2b Adams p g-Salazar ph H.Bell p Correia p Gallagher p b-Denorfia ph R.Webb p c-Eckstein ph-2b Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 4 1 4 3 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 42

R H 1 1 1 3 1 3 2 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 16

BI 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 6

Avg. .227 .246 .283 .291 .306 .191 .228 .209 .217 --.250 --.158 .000 .288 --.286

Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf Schneider c 1-W.Valdez pr-ss J.Castro ss e-B.Francisco ph Baez p Blanton p a-Dobbs ph Durbin p J.Romero p Contreras p d-Gload ph Lidge p f-C.Ruiz ph-c Totals

AB 4 5 5 6 5 4 4 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 41

R H 2 1 1 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 11

BI 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

SO 0 0 1 3 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .260 .316 .265 .286 .284 .229 .241 .262 .227 .233 --.308 .145 .000 ----.200 --.307

San Diego 300 110 000 1 — 6 16 2 Philadelphia 140 000 000 0 — 5 11 0 a-struck out for Blanton in the 5th. b-struck out for Gallagher in the 6th. c-grounded out for R.Webb in the 8th. d-grounded out for Contreras in the 8th. e-singled for J.Castro in the 9th. f-grounded out for Lidge in the 9th. g-singled for Adams in the 10th. 1-ran for Schneider in the 9th. E—Ad.Gonzalez (3), Zawadzki (2). LOB—San Diego 9, Philadelphia 15. 2B—Hairston (3), Headley (9), Schneider (1). HR—Ad.Gonzalez (11), off Blanton; Hundley (4), off Blanton. RBIs—Ad.Gonzalez 3 (36), Hundley (20), Stairs (7), Salazar (6), Polanco 2 (23), Howard 3 (40). SB—Stairs (2), Zawadzki (1), Victorino (12). S—Hundley, Zawadzki, J.Castro. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 6 (Gwynn 3, Hairston Jr., Headley, Eckstein); Philadelphia 11 (Werth 2, Ibanez 2, Utley 2, Victorino, J.Castro, Howard, C.Ruiz 2). Runners moved up—Stairs, Venable, Utley, Howard. GIDP—Hundley. DP—Philadelphia 2 (J.Castro, Utley, Howard), (Polanco, Howard, Howard, Polanco).

San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Correia 1 2-3 4 5 4 3 1 66 5.03 Gallagher 3 1-3 2 0 0 2 4 61 5.19 R.Webb 2 1 0 0 0 2 24 1.02 Adams W, 1-1 2 2 0 0 1 1 39 2.73 H.Bell S, 15-18 1 2 0 0 1 1 19 1.08 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blanton 5 11 5 5 0 3 99 6.07 Durbin 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 20 2.96 J.Romero 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 1.93 Contreras 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.02 Lidge 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.42 Baez L, 2-2 1 2 1 1 1 0 16 4.13 Inherited runners-scored—Gallagher 2-0, Contreras 1-0. IBB—off Baez (Gwynn). HBP—by Gallagher (Victorino). T—3:41. A—44,852 (43,651).

Giants 6, Pirates 5 (10 innings)

Dodgers 5, Braves 4 (11 innings)

San Francisco AB Torres rf-cf 5 F.Sanchez 2b 4 Sandoval 3b 5 A.Huff lf 3 Uribe ss 5 B.Molina c 4 Posey 1b 3 1-Schierholtz pr-rf 0 Rowand cf 4 Runzler p 0 Mota p 0 c-Burrell ph 0 Br.Wilson p 0 S.Casilla p 0 Lincecum p 3 b-Ishikawa ph-1b 2 Totals 38

R H 2 2 2 2 1 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 12

Pittsburgh A.McCutchen cf N.Walker 2b Doumit c G.Jones rf Milledge lf Clement 1b An.LaRoche 3b Cedeno ss Ohlendorf p Carrasco p a-Iwamura ph Donnelly p Ja.Lopez p Meek p d-Delw.Young ph Dotel p Totals

R 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5

LOS ANGELES — A.J. Ellis hit an RBI single in the 11th inning to give Los Angeles a victory over Atlanta and a split of their fourgame series. Pinch-hitter Russell Martin drew a leadoff walk from Jesse Chavez (0-0), advanced on Blake DeWitt’s bunt and came home when Ellis stroked a 1-2 pitch to left for his seventh RBI of the season. Atlanta Prado 2b Infante 3b Heyward rf McCann c Glaus 1b Hinske lf G.Blanco lf Y.Escobar ss Me.Cabrera cf T.Hudson p O’Flaherty p Moylan p c-Conrad ph Venters p d-McLouth ph J.Chavez p Totals

AB 6 6 5 5 5 3 0 4 5 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 44

R H 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 12

BI 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .328 .308 .272 .253 .274 .313 1.000 .252 .226 .258 ----.278 --.176 .000

Los Angeles AB Furcal ss 4 J.Carroll 3b 5 Ethier rf 5 Loney 1b 5 Kemp cf 5 G.Anderson lf 3 Broxton p 0 Belisario p 0 e-R.Martin ph 0 DeWitt 2b 3 A.Ellis c 4 Ely p 1 a-Belliard ph 1 Ju.Miller p 0 b-Man.Ramirez ph 1 Kuo p 0 Jef.Weaver p 0 Re.Johnson lf 1 Totals 38

R H 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 10

BI 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .292 .293 .353 .285 .279 .146 ----.243 .273 .222 .067 .264 --.277 --1.000 .298

Atlanta 001 030 000 00 — 4 12 2 Los Angeles 000 130 000 01 — 5 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-fouled out for Ely in the 5th. b-grounded out for Ju.Miller in the 6th. c-doubled for Moylan in the 9th. dflied out for Venters in the 11th. e-walked for Belisario in the 11th. E—Glaus (5), Infante (7). LOB—Atlanta 11, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Infante (7), Glaus (6), Conrad (4), Ethier (14). HR—Prado (5), off Ely; McCann (6), off Ely; Furcal (1), off T.Hudson. RBIs—Prado (28), Heyward (39), McCann 2 (24), Furcal (13), Loney 2 (35), DeWitt (15), A.Ellis (7). SB—Conrad (2), Loney (8). CS—DeWitt (1). S—G.Anderson, DeWitt, A.Ellis. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 6 (McCann, T.Hudson, Y.Escobar, Heyward, Me.Cabrera 2); Los Angeles 6 (J.Carroll, A.Ellis 3, G.Anderson, Furcal). Runners moved up—Heyward, DeWitt, Man.Ramirez. GIDP—McCann, A.Ellis. DP—Atlanta 1 (Y.Escobar, Glaus); Los Angeles 1 (DeWitt, Furcal, Loney). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Hudson 7 9 4 3 2 1 102 2.44 O’Flaherty 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.31 Moylan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.63 Venters 2 0 0 0 0 4 23 1.11 J.Chavez L, 0-1 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 12 7.33 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ely 5 9 4 4 2 2 93 3.00 Ju.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Kuo 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 1.13 Jef.Weaver 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 3.63 Broxton 1 1 0 0 0 3 23 1.03 Belisario W, 1-0 2 2 0 0 1 2 33 5.24 T.Hudson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—O’Flaherty 1-0, Moylan 1-0. WP—Belisario. T—3:37. A—37,944 (56,000).

Rockies 3, Diamondbacks 2 PHOENIX — Ubaldo Jimenez became the first 11-game winner in the majors, though his scoreless innings streak ended after a franchise-record 33, and Colorado held on to beat Arizona. Colorado C.Gonzalez cf S.Smith lf Tulowitzki ss Hawpe rf Olivo c Helton 1b Stewart 3b Barmes 2b Jimenez p R.Betancourt p b-Giambi ph Corpas p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 2 0 1 0 34

R H 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 10

Arizona K.Johnson 2b C.Jackson lf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b C.Young cf G.Parra rf Snyder c Ojeda ss c-S.Drew ph R.Lopez p a-Ryal ph C.Valdez p d-R.Roberts ph Totals

AB 5 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 1 2 1 0 1 34

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .308 .261 .304 .271 .309 .250 .272 .212 .091 --.218 .000

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 3

SO 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 9

Avg. .268 .232 .261 .215 .271 .243 .207 .154 .285 .107 .302 .000 .250

Colorado 000 021 000 — 3 10 1 Arizona 000 000 020 — 2 7 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for R.Lopez in the 7th. b-grounded out for R.Betancourt in the 9th. c-grounded out for Ojeda in the 9th. d-popped out for C.Valdez in the 9th. E—Tulowitzki (5), Snyder (1). LOB—Colorado 6, Arizona 8. 2B—C.Gonzalez (8), K.Johnson (18), Ojeda (1). 3B—G.Parra (2). HR—Tulowitzki (8), off R.Lopez; C.Jackson (1), off Jimenez. RBIs—C.Gonzalez 2 (36), Tulowitzki (29), C.Jackson 2 (9). SB—Hawpe (1). S—Jimenez. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 4 (Olivo, Stewart, S.Smith, Giambi); Arizona 5 (C.Young 2, R.Lopez, Snyder 2). GIDP—Tulowitzki, C.Young. DP—Colorado 1 (Barmes, Tulowitzki, Helton); Arizona 1 (Ojeda, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP Jimnz W, 11-1 7 6 2 2 3 8 118 R.Betancourt 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 Corpas S, 6-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP R.Lopez L, 2-4 7 9 3 3 1 6 92 C.Valdez 2 1 0 0 0 0 24 Jimenez pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Betancourt WP—C.Valdez. T—2:40. A—20,793 (48,633).

ERA 0.93 5.85 2.67 ERA 4.27 5.59 1-0.

PITTSBURGH — Freddy Sanchez hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning after failing to drive in the go-ahead run two innings earlier, and San Francisco bounced back from pinch-hitter Delwyn Young’s tying homer to beat Pittsburgh.

AB 5 3 5 3 5 5 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 38

BI 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

SO 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

Avg. .292 .371 .283 .298 .276 .248 .433 .278 .225 ----.250 .000 --.120 .259

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 9 5 4

SO 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .313 .333 .281 .266 .246 .189 .244 .240 .091 .000 .182 --.000 --.250 ---

San Francisco 101 010 002 1 — 6 12 0 Pittsburgh 000 201 002 0 — 5 9 2 a-doubled for Carrasco in the 7th. b-singled for Lincecum in the 8th. c-hit a sacrifice fly for Mota in the 9th. d-homered for Meek in the 9th. 1-ran for Posey in the 8th. E—Ja.Lopez (1), G.Jones (4). LOB—San Francisco 14, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Torres (16), Sandoval (16), Uribe 2 (8), G.Jones (12), Iwamura (5). HR—G.Jones (8), off Lincecum; Delw.Young (2), off Br.Wilson. RBIs— F.Sanchez (9), Sandoval (23), A.Huff (26), Uribe 2 (33), Burrell (1), G.Jones 2 (35), Milledge (16), Delw.Young 2 (11). SB—Torres 2 (11), A.Huff 2 (3), Rowand (1). CS— G.Jones (2). SF—F.Sanchez, Sandoval, Uribe, Burrell. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 9 (Uribe 3, Lincecum, B.Molina, Torres, F.Sanchez 2, Ishikawa); Pittsburgh 6 (An.LaRoche 3, N.Walker, Clement 2). Runners moved up—B.Molina, Milledge 2. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (N.Walker, Cedeno). S. Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincecum 7 6 3 3 2 6 113 3.20 Runzler 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 4.03 Mota 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.33 Wilson W, 2-0 1 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 35 2.55 S.Casilla S, 1-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 1.80 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ohlendorf 6 8 3 3 3 2 110 4.30 Carrasco 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.82 Donnelly 1 2 0 0 1 1 27 5.40 Ja.Lopez 1-3 1 2 0 2 0 16 1.64 Meek 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.83 Dotel L, 2-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 31 5.40 Inherited runners-scored—Mota 1-0, S.Casilla 2-0, Meek 3-1. IBB—off Ja.Lopez (B.Molina), off Ohlendorf (A.Huff). HBP—by Carrasco (A.Huff). WP—Lincecum, Ja.Lopez, Dotel. T—3:41. A—24,068 (38,362).

Reds 5, Nationals 4 (10 innings) WASHINGTON — Drew Stubbs hit a two-out single in the 10th inning, driving in Jay Bruce and helping Cincinnati beat Washington. Bruce sparked the decisive rally with a single off Doug Slaten (2-1). After Laynce Nix singled, Miguel Batista replaced Slaten, and Stubbs sent another single to right. Cincinnati O.Cabrera ss Cairo 3b F.Cordero p Masset p Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf L.Nix lf Stubbs cf C.Miller c b-Gomes ph R.Hernandez c Arroyo p c-Rolen ph-3b Totals

AB 5 4 0 0 5 5 5 5 5 3 1 0 2 2 42

Washington AB C.Guzman 2b 4 Morgan cf 4 Zimmerman 3b 5 A.Dunn 1b 4 A.Kennedy 1b 1 Willingham lf 4 Bernadina rf 3 Desmond ss 5 Nieves c 3 d-Alb.Gonzalez ph 1 Burke c 0 Stammen p 2 Storen p 0 a-W.Harris ph 1 Clippard p 0 Capps p 0 e-Morse ph 1 Slaten p 0 Batista p 0 Totals 38

R H 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 1 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 5 14 R 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .267 .277 ----.318 .285 .266 .257 .241 .000 .304 .297 .231 .288

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 4

SO 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .313 .258 .306 .271 .243 .277 .260 .277 .180 .298 --.273 1.000 .182 1.000 .000 .333 --.333

Cincinnati 100 000 003 1 — 5 14 0 Washington 100 100 002 0 — 4 9 0 a-struck out for Storen in the 7th. b-doubled for C.Miller in the 9th. c-homered for Arroyo in the 9th. dstruck out for Nieves in the 9th. e-doubled for Capps in the 9th. LOB—Cincinnati 10, Washington 9. 2B—O.Cabrera (13), Stubbs (6), Gomes (10), C.Guzman (9), Morgan (10), Desmond (9), Morse (1). HR—Rolen (14), off Capps. RBIs—Votto (36), Stubbs (27), Gomes (36), Rolen 2 (39), Zimmerman (32), Desmond (30), Morse 2 (2). SB—Willingham (5), Desmond (4). S—Cairo, Arroyo, Morgan. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 5 (O.Cabrera 2, Votto, Rolen 2); Washington 5 (Nieves, W.Harris, A.Dunn, Morgan, Desmond). Runners moved up—Cairo, Zimmerman, Nieves.

(4-3) pitched well into the seventh inning, scattering eight hits while allowing only two earned runs and striking out six. Chicago Fukudome rf Colvin lf D.Lee 1b Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b Fontenot 2b Cashner p a-Nady ph Howry p S.Castro ss K.Hill c R.Wells p Theriot 2b Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 3 3 0 1 0 3 4 2 2 36

R H 0 2 0 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 3 12

Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Berkman 1b Ca.Lee lf Michaels lf Pence rf Blum ss Lindstrom p P.Feliz 3b Cash c Myers p W.Lopez p Lyon p Manzella ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 0 3 2 0 4 3 3 0 0 0 31

R 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 6

Avg. .288 .294 .238 .313 .169 .310 --.269 --.280 .250 .222 .281

H BI BB 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 6 3

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3

Avg. .279 .302 .266 .217 .191 .277 .237 --.230 .189 .038 ----.194

Chicago 010 100 010 — 3 12 0 Houston 300 003 00x — 6 9 0 a-singled for Cashner in the 8th. LOB—Chicago 8, Houston 4. 2B—Byrd (21), K.Hill (2). HR—Ca.Lee (8), off R.Wells. RBIs—Nady (14), S.Castro (13), K.Hill (6), Berkman (27), Ca.Lee 2 (28), Pence (27), P.Feliz 2 (19). SB—Pence (6). SF—S.Castro. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (D.Lee, Colvin 2); Houston 2 (Myers, P.Feliz). Runners moved up—Fukudome, Colvin, Byrd, Ar.Ramirez, Fontenot. GIDP—Colvin. DP—Chicago 1 (S.Castro, D.Lee); Houston 1 (Manzella, Berkman). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Wells L, 3-4 5 1-3 9 6 6 2 2 92 4.86 Cashner 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 21 0.00 Howry 1 0 0 0 1 0 18 7.91 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Myers W, 4-3 6 2-3 8 2 2 1 6 103 3.01 W.Lopez H, 3 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 3.92 Lyon H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.42 Lindstrom 1 2 0 0 0 0 12 3.20 Inherited runners-scored—Cashner 2-0, W.Lopez 20, Lyon 1-0. IBB—off R.Wells (Blum). T—2:33. A—29,493 (40,976).

Mets 7, Marlins 6 NEW YORK — Jeff Francoeur hit a tying, three-run homer in the seventh inning and New York rallied to beat Florida, running its home winning streak to eight games. Florida AB R H H.Ramirez ss 2 1 0 Coghlan lf 5 1 2 Uggla 2b 5 1 1 Cantu 3b-1b 4 1 2 R.Paulino c 4 1 1 C.Ross rf 5 1 2 G.Sanchez 1b 3 0 1 1-Barden pr-3b 0 0 0 Maybin cf 3 0 1 Nolasco p 2 0 0 T.Wood p 0 0 0 c-Lamb ph 1 0 0 Hensley p 0 0 0 Totals 34 6 10

BI 0 0 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .284 .262 .268 .289 .308 .300 .267 .250 .225 .087 --.200 .000

New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan cf Bay lf I.Davis 1b D.Wright 3b Barajas c Francoeur rf Cora 2b Takahashi p Mejia p a-Carter ph Igarashi p b-Tatis ph Dessens p Feliciano p F.Rodriguez p Totals

BI 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .241 .291 .292 .261 .279 .267 .268 .209 .111 --.286 --.213 -------

AB 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 35

R H 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 3 2 2 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 12

Florida 000 104 100 — 6 10 0 New York 000 003 31x — 7 12 2 a-singled for Mejia in the 6th. b-walked for Igarashi in the 7th. c-flied out for T.Wood in the 8th. 1-ran for G.Sanchez in the 8th. E—Barajas (3), Pagan (1). LOB—Florida 9, New York 10. 2B—Maybin (4), Barajas (10), Francoeur (10). HR—Uggla (13), off Takahashi; C.Ross (6), off Takahashi; Francoeur (6), off T.Wood. RBIs—Uggla (34), Cantu (43), R.Paulino (24), C.Ross 3 (33), Pagan 2 (25), Francoeur 3 (33), Carter (5). SB—Pagan (10). S—Maybin, Nolasco. SF—R.Paulino. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 6 (Coghlan 2, Nolasco, C.Ross 3); New York 5 (Takahashi 2, Cora, I.Davis, Bay). Runners moved up—Uggla, R.Paulino, Francoeur. GIDP—I.Davis. DP—Florida 1 (H.Ramirez, Cantu). Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nolasco 5 1-3 8 3 3 3 2 82 4.60 T.Wood BS, 2-3 1 2-3 3 3 3 2 0 38 5.60 Hensley L, 1-2 1 1 1 1 1 0 19 1.76 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Takahashi 5 1-3 6 5 5 2 5 90 3.80 Mejia 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.92 Igarashi 1 1 1 1 2 0 32 10.97 Dessens 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 13 1.42 Felicno W, 2-2 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 2.11 F.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 2.08 Inherited runners-scored—T.Wood 3-2, Feliciano 2-0. IBB—off Nolasco (Cora), off Dessens (H.Ramirez), off Igarashi (Cantu). T—3:20. A—36,612 (41,800).

Brewers 4, Cardinals 3 (10 innings) ST. LOUIS — Rickie Weeks homered early and Corey Hart hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning, lifting Milwaukee to a victory over St. Louis. Manny Parra struck out a career-high 10 in 5 1⁄3 innings and Milwaukee overcame Albert Pujols’ 14th home run to snap a three-game skid.

Astros 6, Cubs 3

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Fielder 1b Braun lf McGehee 3b Hart rf A.Escobar ss Kottaras c M.Parra p Bush p Loe p Villanueva p c-Counsell ph Braddock p Axford p Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 3 4 5 3 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 38

R H 2 2 1 1 1 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10

HOUSTON — Carlos Lee hit a two-run homer and Pedro Feliz added a tworun single, helping Houston beat Chicago. Brett Myers

St. Louis F.Lopez 3b B.Ryan ss Pujols 1b Holliday lf Ludwick rf Y.Molina c

AB 4 5 3 5 4 4

R 0 0 1 0 1 0

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo 8 6 2 2 1 5 115 4.65 Cordero W, 2-3 1 2 2 2 2 3 28 3.86 Masset S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 6.66 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stammen 6 2-3 7 1 1 0 1 66 5.43 Storen H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.93 Clippard H, 12 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 25 1.66 Capps BS, 4-22 2-3 3 3 3 0 1 20 3.62 Slaten L, 2-1 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 11 1.93 Batista 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 15 4.05 Inherited runners-scored—Storen 1-0, Batista 2-1. IBB—off F.Cordero (C.Guzman). T—3:05. A—27,202 (41,546).

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 3

BI 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .251 .257 .276 .314 .291 .251 .247 .217 .125 .077 .000 .000 .271 -----

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1

SO 3 2 1 0 1 1

Avg. .260 .211 .317 .305 .290 .253

Rasmus cf 2 Winn cf 1 Miles 2b 2 a-Schumaker ph-2b3 J.Garcia p 2 b-Freese ph 1 McClellan p 0 Franklin p 0 d-Stavinoha ph 1 Motte p 0 Totals 37

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 7

1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 12

.293 .000 .200 .240 .227 .314 1.000 .000 .298 .000

Milwaukee 201 000 000 1 — 4 10 1 St. Louis 001 001 010 0 — 3 7 2 a-struck out for Miles in the 6th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for J.Garcia in the 6th. c-grounded out for Villanueva in the 9th. d-singled for Franklin in the 9th. E—Kottaras (3), F.Lopez (3), B.Ryan (9). LOB—Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 11. 2B—Ludwick (16). HR—Weeks (10), off J.Garcia; Rasmus (10), off M.Parra; Pujols (14), off M.Parra. RBIs—Weeks (33), McGehee (43), Hart (37), Pujols (44), Rasmus (29), Winn (1). SB—Pujols (6), Holliday (6). SF—McGehee, Hart, Winn. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (M.Parra, Hart 2, A.Escobar); St. Louis 5 (Rasmus, Freese 2, Holliday 2). Runners moved up—Y.Molina. GIDP—Braun. DP—St. Louis 2 (Pujols, B.Ryan), (Miles, B.Ryan, Pujols). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Parra 5 1-3 4 2 2 4 10 101 3.96 Bush H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.97 Loe H, 1 1 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 25 1.50 Villanueva 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.30 Bradck W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 6.00 Axford S, 4-4 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 3.00 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Garcia 6 8 3 2 2 4 103 1.47 McClellan 2 0 0 0 0 0 25 1.71 Franklin 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.71 Motte L, 2-2 1 2 1 1 1 2 26 2.70 Inherited runners-scored—Bush 3-0, Loe 3-0, Villanueva 1-1. WP—M.Parra. T—3:36. A—40,467 (43,975).

AL ROUNDUP Angels 9, Mariners 4 SEATTLE — Mike Napoli had four hits, including a two-run homer that snapped a seventh-inning tie and lifted the Angels to their fifth straight victory. Joel Pineiro (4-6) got plenty of help from Erick Aybar and Napoli, who both went four for five. Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf H.Matsui dh Napoli c J.Rivera lf Frandsen 3b Quinlan 1b Totals

AB 5 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 47

R H 2 4 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 2 3 4 1 1 0 1 1 3 9 18

BI 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 1 8

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .256 .261 .265 .287 .263 .269 .234 .417 .158

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b Tuiasosopo 2b F.Gutierrez cf Jo.Lopez 3b Bradley dh Jo.Wilson ss Kotchman 1b Alfonzo c M.Saunders lf Totals

AB 3 2 3 5 5 5 5 4 4 2 38

R H 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 4 12

BI 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 4

BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4

SO 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 7

Avg. .358 .220 .176 .289 .242 .211 .301 .194 .389 .222

Los Angeles 100 111 203 — 9 18 0 Seattle 300 001 000 — 4 12 2 E—Jo.Lopez (6), Tuiasosopo (5). LOB—Los Angeles 12, Seattle 11. 2B—E.Aybar (13), Tor.Hunter (19), J.Rivera (9), Quinlan 2 (2), I.Suzuki (11), F.Gutierrez (9), Bradley (6), Jo.Wilson (5). 3B—H.Kendrick (1), Jo.Wilson (2). HR—H.Matsui (9), off J.Vargas; Napoli (9), off Kelley. RBIs—E.Aybar (10), H.Kendrick (36), Tor. Hunter (39), H.Matsui (33), Napoli 2 (25), J.Rivera (25), Quinlan (1), I.Suzuki (15), Jo.Lopez (24), Bradley (21), Jo.Wilson (12). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 8 (H.Matsui 2, Quinlan, H.Kendrick 3, B.Abreu 2); Seattle 7 (Kotchman, Tuiasosopo 3, Jo.Wilson 2, I.Suzuki). Runners moved up—J.Rivera, Frandsen, Jo.Lopez, M.Saunders. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineiro W, 4-6 6 9 4 4 3 5 107 5.23 Jepsen H, 12 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 5.85 Rodney H, 7 1 1 0 0 1 0 21 2.82 F.Rodriguez 1 2 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Vargas 6 10 4 3 0 4 106 3.06 Kelley L, 3-1 2-3 4 2 2 0 1 32 4.09 Olson 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 6 7.36 League 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.69 Aardsma 2-3 3 3 3 0 0 23 5.21 French 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Olson 2-0, French 1-1. IBB—off Pineiro (I.Suzuki). T—3:25. A—33,076 (47,878).

Athletics 5, Twins 4 OAKLAND, Calif. — Gio Gonzalez struck out four in seven innings to win his third straight decision, and the Athletics scored all of their runs with two outs against the Twins. Jack Cust and Kevin Kouzmanoff hit back-to-back RBI singles in the first to stake Gonzalez (6-3) to an early 2-0 lead. Minnesota Span cf Tolbert 2b Mauer dh Kubel rf Delm.Young lf Valencia 3b a-Thome ph 1-Hardy pr-ss B.Harris 1b Punto ss-3b Butera c b-Morneau ph Totals

AB 5 3 3 3 4 3 1 0 4 4 3 1 34

R 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 2

Oakland R.Davis cf Barton 1b R.Sweeney rf K.Suzuki c Cust dh Kouzmanoff 3b Gross lf M.Ellis 2b Pennington ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 34

R H 1 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 3 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 13

BI 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 5

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 7

Avg. .264 .143 .311 .225 .275 .214 .245 .217 .162 .225 .147 .370

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 3

Avg. .256 .281 .309 .264 .295 .261 .276 .304 .207

Minnesota 011 000 020 — 4 8 1 Oakland 212 000 00x — 5 13 1 a-doubled for Valencia in the 8th. b-struck out for Butera in the 9th. 1-ran for Thome in the 8th. E—Delm.Young (2), Kouzmanoff (5). LOB—Minnesota 6, Oakland 8. 2B—Thome (8), R.Davis (9), R.Sweeney (12). 3B—Span (4). HR—Delm.Young (6), off T.Ross. RBIs—Tolbert (2), Delm.Young 2 (34), R.Sweeney (26), Cust (5), Kouzmanoff (30), M.Ellis (12), Pennington (19). SB—Punto (5). CS—R.Davis (4). S—Gross. SF—Tolbert. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (Butera, Span, B.Harris); Oakland 4 (Gross, R.Davis, Cust, Pennington). Runners moved up—Valencia, K.Suzuki. Minnesota IP Blackbrn L, 6-3 2 2-3 Duensing 2 1-3 Mahay 2 Al.Burnett 1 Oakland IP Gonzalez W, 6-3 7 Breslow H, 2 2-3 T.Ross 0 Blevins H, 6 1-3 Wuertz S, 1-1 1

H 10 2 1 0 H 6 0 1 1 0

R 5 0 0 0 R 2 1 1 0 0

ER 5 0 0 0 ER 2 1 1 0 0

BB 1 0 0 0 BB 1 1 0 0 0

SO 0 1 1 1 SO 4 0 0 1 2

NP 67 35 18 7 NP 117 10 3 9 19

ERA 5.21 1.52 5.52 2.30 ERA 3.58 2.84 6.14 4.79 6.30

T.Ross pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Duensing 2-0, T.Ross 1-1. HBP—by Blackburn (R.Davis). T—2:45. A—20,059 (35,067).

Rays 9, Rangers 5 ARLINGTON, Texas — John Jaso drove in five runs, Matt Garza won for the first time in a month and the Rays avoided a weekend sweep. Jaso had a tworun homer, a two-run single and an RBI double as the designated hitter from the leadoff spot. Tampa Bay Jaso dh Crawford lf Longoria 3b Zobrist rf C.Pena 1b Shoppach c D.Navarro c S.Rodriguez 2b Brignac ss B.Upton cf Totals

AB 5 6 3 3 5 3 1 5 5 4 40

R H 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 9 13

BI 5 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 9

BB 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 6

SO 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 3 1 0 9

Avg. .307 .299 .312 .314 .175 .231 .202 .245 .299 .229

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Kinsler 2b Guerrero dh Dav.Murphy rf Smoak 1b Treanor c Gentry lf a-Hamilton ph-lf Borbon cf Totals

AB 5 5 3 4 4 4 2 2 2 4 35

R H 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 10

BI 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 5

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 11

Avg. .304 .317 .262 .335 .248 .212 .236 .227 .301 .256

Tampa Bay 002 111 031 — 9 13 0 Texas 010 102 001 — 5 10 2 a-singled for Gentry in the 6th. E—M.Young (9), Andrus (8). LOB—Tampa Bay 11, Texas 6. 2B—Jaso (5), B.Upton (14), Guerrero (11). HR—Jaso (3), off Harden; C.Pena (9), off Harden; Treanor (4), off Garza; Treanor (5), off Benoit. RBIs—Jaso 5 (24), Longoria (44), Zobrist (28), C.Pena (34), B.Upton (22), Dav.Murphy (16), Smoak (18), Treanor 2 (16), Hamilton (33). SB—Jaso (1), Brignac (2), B.Upton (17). CS—Andrus (9), M.Young (2). Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 6 (C.Pena 2, Crawford 3, Shoppach); Texas 3 (Gentry, Borbon, M.Young). Runners moved up—Crawford, Brignac, Dav.Murphy 2. GIDP—Shoppach. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (D.Navarro, D.Navarro, S.Rodriguez); Texas 1 (Kinsler, Andrus, Smoak). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza W, 6-4 5 2-3 6 4 4 2 4 108 3.31 Wheeler 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.00 Choate H, 6 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 6.00 Balfour H, 5 2 1 0 0 0 4 32 1.78 Benoit 2-3 2 1 1 0 2 21 0.71 R.Soriano 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.59 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harden L, 3-2 5 4 4 3 3 6 111 5.34 Nippert 2 3 1 1 2 1 37 4.82 F.Francisco 2-3 3 3 3 0 1 25 4.68 O’Day 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.42 Ray 1 2 1 1 1 1 25 3.70 Wheeler pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Wheeler 1-0, Choate 2-1, R.Soriano 1-0, O’Day 1-1. HBP—by Wheeler (Treanor), by O’Day (Longoria). WP—Garza. T—4:06. A—26,932 (49,170).

Royals 7, Tigers 2 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Brian Bannister won his career-high fifth straight start, Jose Guillen hit a three-run homer and the Royals roughed up Jeremy Bonderman. Bannister (6-3) improved to 20-8 in day games and is 5-2 with a 2.16 ERA in nine starts against the Tigers. Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch lf C.Guillen 2b Kelly 3b Avila c Santiago ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 32

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 1 2

Kansas City AB R H Bloomquist lf 5 0 1 Kendall c 5 0 2 DeJesus rf 4 1 2 B.Butler 1b 4 1 1 J.Guillen dh 3 1 1 a-Betemit ph-dh 1 0 1 Callaspo 3b 4 1 1 Aviles 2b 4 1 2 Maier cf 3 1 2 Y.Betancourt ss 3 1 2 Totals 36 7 15

BI 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 6

Avg. .325 .274 .312 .351 .339 .274 .246 .202 .248

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

Avg. .200 .299 .307 .330 .247 .500 .282 .308 .253 .285

Detroit 000 100 010 — 2 6 0 Kansas City 320 002 00x — 7 15 0 LOB—Detroit 5, Kansas City 7. 2B—Boesch (13), Kelly (1), Betemit (1), Aviles (4), Y.Betancourt 2 (13). HR—J.Guillen (13), off Bonderman. RBIs—Ordonez (41), Bloomquist (9), Kendall (16), J.Guillen 3 (38), Y.Betancourt 2 (23). SB—Damon (4), Kendall (5). CS—Maier (1). SF—Y.Betancourt. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 2 (Ordonez, Kelly); Kansas City 5 (B.Butler, Kendall 3, Callaspo). Runners moved up—C.Guillen, Avila, Bloomquist. GIDP—Ordonez, B.Butler. DP—Detroit 1 (Kelly, C.Guillen, Mi.Cabrera); Kansas City 1 (Y.Betancourt, Aviles, B.Butler). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bondrmn L, 2-4 5 2-3 11 7 7 1 2 89 4.40 Perry 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 5.82 Thomas 2 4 0 0 0 0 25 4.76 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Banistr W, 6-3 7 1-3 5 2 2 1 5 98 4.50 Bl.Wood 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 12 3.38 Soria 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.49 Inherited runners-scored—Perry 2-0, Bl.Wood 1-0. IBB—off Bonderman (Maier). WP—Bannister. T—2:16. A—22,240 (37,840).

Yankees 4, Blue Jays 3 TORONTO — Robinson Cano hit a tiebreaking, tworun single in the eighth inning and the Yankees rallied past the Blue Jays to avoid a three-game sweep. Vernon Wells’ two-run homer in the sixth was the only hit allowed by Yankees starter Javier Vazquez (5-5) in seven innings. New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b R.Pena 3b Cano 2b Posada dh Granderson cf Cervelli c Gardner lf Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 0 4 2 3 3 2 32

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4

Toronto AB R F.Lewis lf 4 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 Lind dh 2 1 V.Wells cf 4 1 J.Bautista 3b 3 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 0 Overbay 1b 3 0

H BI BB SO 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 6 3 5 11

Avg. .300 .305 .211 .294 .227 .363 .299 .250 .282 .311

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .291 .186 .210 .306 .250 .262 .230

SO 2 0 2 0 2 1 1

Reed rf J.Molina c Totals

3 0 2 1 29 3

0 1 3

0 0 3

0 1 .167 1 1 .294 4 10

New York 000 000 040 — 4 6 0 Toronto 000 002 010 — 3 3 0 LOB—New York 8, Toronto 3. 2B—Jeter (13), Cano (18), J.Molina (2). 3B—Gardner (3). HR—V.Wells (15), off Vazquez. RBIs—Jeter (34), Cano 2 (45), F.Lewis (17), V.Wells 2 (40). Runners left in scoring position—New York 6 (Granderson 2, Swisher, Cervelli 2, Teixeira); Toronto 1 (Reed). Runners moved up—Jeter. GIDP—A.Hill. DP—New York 1 (Cano, Jeter, Teixeira). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vazquez W, 5-5 7 1 2 2 4 9 106 5.63 Chamberlain 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 6 5.26 D.Marte H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.27 Rivera S, 13-14 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 1.40 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morrow 7 4 1 1 1 8 109 5.48 S.Downs L, 1-5 0 1 2 2 0 0 6 3.81 Frasor BS, 3-6 2-3 1 1 1 2 2 18 5.09 R.Lewis 1 1-3 0 0 0 2 1 23 3.24 Morrow pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. S.Downs pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—S.Downs 1-1, Frasor 2-2, R.Lewis 2-0. IBB—off Frasor (Teixeira, Posada). HBP—by S.Downs (Gardner), by Morrow (Cervelli). WP—Vazquez, Morrow, Frasor. T—3:01. A—33,622 (49,539).

Orioles 4, Red Sox 3 (11 innings) BALTIMORE — Baltimore ended its 10-game losing streak in dramatic fashion, getting an RBI single from slumping Nick Markakis in the 11th inning to defeat Boston. The victory was the first for interim manager Juan Samuel, who was promoted when Dave Trembley was fired Friday. Boston Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b D.Ortiz dh Youkilis 1b V.Martinez c 1-Reddick pr Varitek c Beltre 3b Hall lf a-J.Drew ph-rf Cameron cf D.McDonald rf-lf Totals

AB 5 5 4 3 3 0 1 4 4 1 3 3 36

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 8 3 6

SO 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 9

Avg. .277 .261 .252 .320 .294 .222 .254 .332 .242 .269 .280 .277

Baltimore Lugo 2b M.Tejada dh Markakis rf Wigginton 1b Scott lf 2-Montanez pr-lf Ad.Jones cf S.Moore 3b Tatum c C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 3 1 5 5 3 4 38

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 4

H BI BB 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 9 4 8

SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .211 .256 .288 .274 .272 .140 .247 .227 .212 .225

Boston 020 000 001 00 — 3 8 2 Baltimore 020 000 010 01 — 4 9 0 One out when winning run scored. a-flied out for Hall in the 10th. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 8th. 2-ran for Scott in the 8th. E—Scutaro (8), Pedroia (2). LOB—Boston 11, Baltimore 13. 2B—M.Tejada (11), Scott (11), S.Moore (1). HR—V.Martinez (8), off Matusz. RBIs—Pedroia (28), V.Martinez 2 (29), Lugo (4), Markakis (18), S.Moore (3), C.Izturis (10). SB—Pedroia (4), S.Moore (1). S—D.McDonald 2, Lugo 2. SF—Pedroia. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 6 (Hall 2, Youkilis 2, D.Ortiz, Pedroia); Baltimore 4 (Wigginton 2, M.Tejada, Lugo). GIDP—Beltre, Hall, C.Izturis. DP—Boston 1 (Pedroia, Scutaro, Youkilis); Baltimore 2 (C.Izturis, Lugo, Wigginton), (C.Izturis, Wigginton). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lackey 7 7 2 2 3 2 124 4.72 Delcarmen 1-3 1 1 1 2 0 13 2.67 R.Ramirez 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.82 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 3.00 Okajima L, 2-2 1 1-3 1 1 1 2 0 23 5.30 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matusz 5 2-3 4 2 2 4 7 117 5.10 Albers 1 0 0 0 2 0 22 5.00 Hendrickson 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.65 Berken 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 2.15 Ohman BS, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 20 3.38 Hernndz W, 2-5 2 1 0 0 0 1 41 4.81 Hendrickson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Ramirez 2-0, Albers 3-0, Hendrickson 2-0, Berken 3-0. IBB—off Okajima (M.Tejada), off Matusz (V.Martinez). HBP—by Hendrickson (D.Ortiz), by Da.Hernandez (Youkilis). WP—Da.Hernandez. T—4:20. A—27,774 (48,290).

White Sox 8, Indians 7 CHICAGO — Paul Konerko hit a two-run homer and Carlos Quentin added a go-ahead two-run single in the seventh inning to lead the White Sox to a comeback victory. J.J. Putz (1-2) struck out two in a scoreless seventh to get the win. Cleveland AB R H Crowe cf 3 0 2 Choo rf 5 1 2 Kearns lf 4 2 3 Peralta 3b 5 1 2 Duncan dh 5 0 1 Grudzielanek 2b 4 0 0 Donald ss 1 0 0 Valbuena ss-2b 3 1 0 LaPorta 1b 4 1 2 a-Branyan ph 1 0 0 Marson c 4 1 1 Totals 39 7 13

BI 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 7

BB 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 1 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 0 9

Avg. .261 .283 .309 .250 .286 .273 .231 .179 .218 .246 .195

Chicago Pierre lf Vizquel 3b Rios cf Konerko 1b Kotsay dh Quentin rf Pierzynski c Al.Ramirez ss Beckham 2b Totals

BI 0 1 1 2 1 3 0 0 0 8

BB 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

Avg. .253 .239 .318 .272 .195 .209 .218 .257 .203

AB 4 2 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 31

R H 1 2 1 0 3 2 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 8 11

Cleveland 303 000 010 — 7 13 0 Chicago 200 130 20x — 8 11 0 a-struck out for LaPorta in the 9th. LOB—Cleveland 10, Chicago 6. 2B—Kearns 2 (15), Duncan (2), Rios (15). HR—Marson (1), off Buehrle; Konerko (17), off Westbrook. RBIs—Peralta 3 (29), Duncan (6), Marson 3 (10), Vizquel (6), Rios (29), Konerko 2 (41), Kotsay (13), Quentin 3 (32). SB—Crowe (5), Kearns 2 (4). CS—Al.Ramirez (4). S—Pierre, Vizquel. SF—Vizquel. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 6 (LaPorta, Peralta, Choo 2, Grudzielanek 2); Chicago 2 (Quentin, Pierzynski). Runners moved up—Grudzielanek, Kotsay. GIDP— Choo. DP—Chicago 1 (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrook 4 2-3 7 6 6 2 1 97 4.84 Herrmann 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 16 0.00 Sipp L, 0-2 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 11 6.53 J.Lewis 0 0 1 1 2 0 12 4.40 R.Perez 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 26 5.68 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle 3 8 6 6 3 3 95 5.40 T.Pena 3 3 0 0 1 2 45 3.94 Putz W, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.75 Thornton H, 5 1 2 1 1 1 1 26 2.10 Jenks S, 9-10 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 5.14 J.Lewis pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Herrmann 2-0, J.Lewis 1-0, R.Perez 3-2. T—3:17. A—27,577 (40,615).


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 D5

Oregon

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Continued from D1 Andrew Mendenhall came on as a defensive replacement for Oregon in the ninth inning and made a leaping catch to rob the Huskies of a potential game-tying hit. UO’s Madison Boer struck out UConn’s George Springer with a runner on second to end the game and earn his fifth save. Billy Ferriter and John Andreoli — UConn’s No. 8 and 9 hitters — hit consecutive singles to open the ninth, but Mendenhall climbed the wall in left to rob Pierre LePage of at least a double. Connecticut (48-16) put runners on the corners with no outs in the eighth, but Scott McGough settled down and struck out the side. K.C. Serna went three for three with two runs for Oregon. Danny Pulfer knocked in two runs, while Steven Packard and Shawn Peterson had three hits each for the Ducks. The Ducks won an at-large invitation to the tournament in just the team’s second season since reviving baseball after a 28-year hiatus. The Ducks last visited the postseason in 1964, when the team went to the District VIII playoffs. Horton made his 12th postseason appearance after advancing 11 times as coach at Cal State Fullerton. Horton, who is now 5627 in the postseason, led the Titans to the 2004 College World Series Championship. Florida State coach Mike Martin praised Horton. “I wouldn’t know what to do starting a program. Can you imagine just going out there and for a full year recruiting, getting organized, hiring a staff. It is unbelievable what he accomplished,” Martin said. “Just two years and to be in the final of a regional and to beat a very good Connecticut team in their state, it was quite an accomplishment.”

Eaton Continued from D1 Sizing up the NCAA decathlon field, Eaton said Sunday by phone from Eugene that he is optimistic about his chances of winning. “I’ve competed against every single one of these guys before,” said Eaton. “I feel very confident. If I do everything right, it will go very well.” The 22-year-old Eaton, who is also entered in the long jump at the NCAAs, last month won Pac-10 titles in the decathlon, the long jump and the 110-meter hurdles at the conference championship meet. He was second in the long jump at the NCAA West Regionals, in which decathlon is not contested. Eaton scored a personal-best 8,154 points in winning the Pac10 decathlon. “Ashton will go down as one of the best student-athletes ever in Pac-10 history, not just track and field, and that’s really saying something,” said Vin Lananna, Oregon associate athletic director and head of the UO track and field program, after Eaton’s Pac10 decathlon victory. Eaton will take his last final exam of the year on Wednesday, the day before the NCAA decathlon competition begins. He said he plans to graduate this coming fall with a degree in psychology. In March, Eaton set a world record in the heptathlon (6,499 points), breaking Dan O’Brien’s 17-year-old mark in the sevenevent discipline at the NCAA Indoor Championships in Fayetteville, Ark. “This year has been a summation of everything I’ve worked for,” Eaton said. “I didn’t expect I would get the world record so soon. I figured I’d have a shot at it later in my career. That set me up well for outdoors. I’ve just been doing the same thing I’ve done since I got here with training, and the scores just come.” But Eaton acknowledged that his goals have become more ambitious since setting the heptathlon world record. “Once I got the record, I

Oregon State bounced from regionals by Florida Atlantic By Mark L ong The Associated Press

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Florida Atlantic coach John McCormack nearly benched Eddie Cassidy against Oregon State on Sunday. McCormack considered giving outfielder Andy Mee a defensive break and making him the designated hitter in the NCAA elimination game, a change that would have left Cassidy on the bench. Fortunately for FAU, Mee asked to stay in the field. It was the best call of the day. Cassidy homered three times, driving in seven runs, and the Owls eliminated the Beavers with an 11-7 victory in the Gainesville Regional. “Sometimes the best moves you make are the ones you don’t make,” McCormack said. The Owls (37-23) advanced to play Florida later Sunday, but lost 15-0 as Florida advanced to the NCAA super regionals. The Beavers (32-24) head home after being let down by starting pitching for the second straight day, possibly a byproduct of pregame weather delays. Florida roughed up Sam Gaviglio on Saturday, and the Owls battered Tyler Waldron (4-6) for six runs in the first inning Sunday. “Our pitching was not where it should be, and we’re not going to win a lot of games when we have to score 11 runs to win a game, or 12 or 13,” Oregon State coach Pat Casey said. “We knew that coming in.” Waldron’s brief appearance included a hit batter, two walks and four hits. Cassidy’s

Schedule A look at the times for the events of the decathlon at the NCAA championships:

THURSDAY 10 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . 100 meters 10:45 a.m.. . . . . . . . . long jump Noon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .shot put 1:05 p.m. . . . . . . . . . high jump 4 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . 400 meters

FRIDAY 10 a.m. . . . . 100-meter hurdles 10:55 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . discus 12:55 p.m. . . . . . . . . pole vault 4 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . javelin 6:15 p.m.. . . . . . . .1,500 meters

Qualifiers Decathlon qualifiers for nationals, In ranked order: 1. Ashton Eaton . . . . . . Oregon 2. Nick Adcock . . . . . . Missouri 3. Lars Rise. . . . . . . . . Missouri 4. Mateo Sossah . . N. Carolina 5. Gray Horn . . . . . . . . . Florida 6. Miller Moss . . . . . . Clemson 7. Michael Morrison California 8. Trinity Otto . . . . Texas A&M 9. Robert Robinson. .Northridge 10. Jeremy Taiwo . .Washington 11. Cory Holman. . . . . . Georgia 12. Daniel Keller . . . N. Carolina 13. Bjorn Johansson . . . Akron 14. Moritz Cleve . . . .Kansas St. 15. Wesley Bray . . . . . Houston 16. Kurt Felix . . . . . Boise State 17. Philip Adam. . . . . . . . . .Rice 18. Nick Trubachik .Portland St. 19. R.J. McGinnis. . .Minnesota 20. Frank Shotwell . . .Michigan 21. Sean Smith . . . Connecticut 22. Dave Grzesiak. . . Wisconsin 23. Marshall Ackley . . . Oregon 24. Daniel Kinsey . . . . . . Akron bumped up what score I wanted in outdoors: 8,400 or 8,500,” Eaton said. “That is my goal. There are guys my age in Europe who are scoring that much.” Eaton has good reason to keep tabs on international competi-

Prep sports Continued from D1

Mountain View vs. Goliath Maybe it was no shock that Mountain View advanced to the finals of the Class 5A state basketball tournament. The Cougars cruised into the championship game with a 23-1 record. But no one expected “a bunch of kids from a snowboarding town,” as Mountain View coach Craig Reid called his team, to push nationally regarded Jefferson High of Portland to the brink in the title game. The Cougars held the Democrats and their star forward, Kentucky-bound Terrence Jones, in check for most of the game and led 38-36 after three quarters. Jefferson rallied to win 57-48, but Mountain View earned a standing ovation from the crowd at the University of Oregon’s McArthur Court before the final buzzer. I’m not sure I can emphasize the shock factor here enough. The Cougars’ 38-33 semifinal win over Crescent Valley was a bit un-

three-run blast to right field highlighted the big inning. The junior added a two-run shot in the second and another one in the seventh, both off reliever Kraig Sitton. Trailing 11-4, Oregon State answered with three runs of its own in the bottom of the seventh, but just couldn’t overcome the eight-run hole it dug in the first two innings. The big deficit was problematic for a team that had scored more than eight runs just once in its previous 30 games. “It was hard to look up at the scoreboard and know that we were going to have to do a lot of work to get back in it,” outfielder Rob Folsom said. “We fought back and felt like there was still some life, but we never could capitalize on some of the opportunities that we had.” The Beavers sliced the 8-0 lead in half with four runs in the third. Danny Hayes had a twoout, two-run double down the right-field line off starter R.J. Alvarez, and Folsom followed three batters later with a two-run single. With all the momentum, Oregon State surely wanted to keep playing. But a brief rain storm prompted a 38-minute delay that may have slowed the Beavers. It was the fourth delay in three games for Oregon State. It meant the Beavers waited around a total of 6 hours, 25 minutes after earning a No. 3 seed in the regional and have to travel cross-country. “We spent a lot of time at the ballpark,” Casey said. “That is not a reason for us to not be able to pitch in the first inning.”

tion. After the NCAA Championships, he will look to turn professional and begin preparing for the world stage. “I think after college track, pro track is definitely the next step,” Eaton said. “You get an agent and you get a sponsor. Right now, I don’t know who or what they will be. I’m open to anything after college.” Eaton began running cross country in fifth grade at La Pine Elementary School. In sixth grade he moved to Bend with his mother, Roslyn Eaton. He went on to claim state championships for Mountain View in the long jump and the 400 meters, and he was a standout running back on the Cougar football team. “Pretty amazing, a kid from La Pine has the opportunity to make a living in track and field,” said Tate Metcalf, Eaton’s track coach at Mountain View and his longtime mentor. “And he’s just as cool and humble as he was in high school. We always knew the potential was there, it just came to the surface quicker than expected.” Eaton is focused solely on this week’s NCAA Championships, but he and Metcalf have discussed his future as a professional decathlete. “Nothing to jeopardize what’s going on now or think too far ahead, but it’s hard not to — he’s at that level,” Metcalf said. “He’s world-class. “He’ll work with coaches and look to hire an agent and turn professional. Decathlon only comes around once every four years (during the Summer Olympics) in most people’s eyes. But he’ll be able to make a good living at it.” Roslyn Eaton says her son is now focused only on wrapping up his collegiate career and not so much on his future as a professional. “He will jump over that bridge — maybe literally — when that happens,” she joked. “It’s been so amazing and I’m just so happy for him. He’s had some really good bench marks that he’s made — that’s always exciting when you see your child’s

derwhelming, while Jefferson, which earlier in the season played a nationally televised game on ESPN2, was coming off an 83-57 victory over Silverton. No one in the building — outside of the Mountain View locker room — thought the Cougars had a chance. Several reporters on press row at Mac Court suggested before the game that it might be the most lopsided state final in history. Instead, Mountain View came within one quarter of pulling off the biggest boys basketball upset in Oregon history.

Schueler’s superb ending Summit senior Kellie Schueler ran into the history books over Memorial Day weekend in Eugene, winning her 13th, 14th, 15th and 16th career state track and field titles and becoming just the second Oregon prep athlete ever to do so. While claiming 16 state championships in itself is an accomplishment of epic proportions, it was the way Schueler did it that thrilled the near-capacity crowd at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field. After winning the Class 5A 200 meters, her 15th state title, Schueler limped to the

dreams come true. He has a goal and then he just does it.” Eaton is a four-time NCAA champion, twice in the decathlon and twice in the indoor heptathlon. He is a three-time Pac-10 champion in the decathlon. In his formative days with the Ducks, Eaton worked primarily with assistant coach Dan Steele, now the head coach at Northern Iowa. Before the 2008 Olympic Trials, Steele called Eaton “the one to beat in (the) 2012 (Olympics).” Last summer, Eaton finished second to Trey Hardee in the decathlon at the U.S. Championships while 2008 Olympic gold medalist Bryan Clay nursed a hamstring injury. Eaton went on to finish 18th at the World Championships in Berlin. In 2008, he was fifth at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Eugene, missing the Beijing Games by two spots. The addition of Eaton to the elite ranks, with Clay and Hardee, could give the historically dominant United States a decathlon Dream Team for the London Olympics. Americans last swept the event in the 1952 Helsinki Games, when Bob Mathias, Milt Campbell and Floyd Simmons won the gold, silver and bronze medals, respectively. “I think first I’m thinking about (the World Championships) next year, because that’ll be the first time I’m not a collegiate and may not be expected to do too well,” Eaton said. “I think that’ll set me up with where I stand for the Olympics.” But first, Eaton wants a strong finish to his career at Oregon, and to help his teammates. The Ducks are contenders for the men’s team title, and they will likely battle Florida and Texas A&M for the championship. “It’s pretty sentimental — my last meet as a Duck,” Eaton said. “That’s just a bonus to have it at Oregon. I definitely think I’ll have all the fans behind me, for sure.” M a rk Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

awards podium. She had aggravated her left hamstring in the 200, and she was not sure if she would be able to compete in the 1,600meter relay — or if she would be able to run all-out. Sure enough, though, Schueler was in her usual anchor spot at the start of the race. When Schueler took the baton from teammate Hillie Teller, the Storm were in second place, about 10 meters behind Glencoe. After testing the hamstring for the first 100 meters, Schueler chased down Glencoe junior Melissa Baller for the win. The victory gave Schueler her 16th title and clinched Summit’s fourth consecutive 5A girls team championship. Most of the coaches and other reporters with whom I watched the race from the infield were surprised to see Schueler even line up for the final relay, let alone turn in a 55.8-second split and chase down the girl with the fourth-best 400 time in the state. The rumble from the Hayward crowd as Schueler came down the last 100 meters was spine-tingling. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-3830305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

NBA Continued from D1 Game 3 is Tuesday night in Boston. Kobe Bryant scored 21 points while battling more foul trouble for the Lakers, who couldn’t catch up to Boston’s dynamic guards in Los Angeles’ first home playoff loss since last season’s Western Conference finals. Pau Gasol had 25 points and eight rebounds for the Lakers, and Andrew Bynum added 21 points and six rebounds. The teams traded the lead throughout the period, but Rondo’s heady layup put the Celtics ahead for good with 3:21 to play. The play was vintage Rondo, scooting in to collect a shot blocked by Gasol and scoring before Gasol could react. Kevin Garnett then hit a jumper, and after another possession of stifling defense, Rondo hit another jumper, celebrating with a swing of his arm in the mostly silent Staples Center. Rondo has grown into possibly the Celtics’ biggest offensive threat in these playoffs, but his 10-point fourth quarter looms among his largest achievements. After the Lakers’ whistleplagued 102-89 victory in the opener, both teams again struggled under the weight of foul trouble. Garnett and Bryant both spent extra time on the bench, with Bryant picking up his fifth foul early in the fourth. Garnett had just six points, and Paul Pierce never got going, scoring 10 on two-of-11 shooting. The Celtics also struggled against the Lakers’ low-post game. Allen’s scoring staked the Celtics to a six-point halftime lead, but the Lakers stayed in it with an inside game generating 41 free throws — 15 more than Boston — and strong efforts from Gasol and Bynum. The Celtics essentially were a two-man show all night. Rondo sliced up the Los Angeles defense with slick drives after playing a tentative opener, while Allen was relentless from the perimeter, hitting his fourth, fifth and sixth threepointers in a two-minute span midway through the second quarter. Bryant’s vaunted defense didn’t help much after switching onto Allen, and Kobe didn’t even get his second field goal of the game until Allen already had 22 points. Bryant spent most of the first Self Referrals Welcome

NBA SCOREBOARD SCHEDULE NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT x-if necessary ——— NBA FINALS L.A. Lakers 1, Boston 1 Thursday, June 3: L.A. Lakers 102, Boston 89 Sunday, June 6: Boston 103, L.A. Lakers 94 Tuesday, June 8: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 10: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 13: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 15: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, June 17: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

SUMMARY Sunday’s Game ——— CELTICS 103, LAKERS 94 FG FT Reb BOSTON Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Pierce 40:01 2-11 6-6 1-4 4 3 10 Garnett 23:43 2-5 2-2 0-4 6 5 6 Perkins 31:47 4-7 4-6 1-6 3 4 12 Rondo 41:58 8-18 2-5 4-12 10 2 19 RAllen 43:30 11-20 2-2 1-3 2 3 32 Davis 18:10 4-13 0-1 5-7 1 4 8 Wallace 18:07 3-5 0-0 1-7 1 4 7 TAllen 12:29 0-2 2-2 0-0 1 2 2 Williams 4:13 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 2 0 Robinson 6:02 2-2 2-2 0-0 0 0 7 Totals 240:00 36-84 20-26 13-44 28 29 103 Percentages: FG .429, FT .769. 3-Point Goals: 11-16, .688 (R.Allen 8-11, Robinson 1-1, Rondo 1-1, Wallace 1-3). Team Rebounds: 12. Team Turnovers: 14 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Davis, Pierce, Rondo). Turnovers: 13 (Rondo 3, R.Allen 2, Perkins 2, Pierce 2, Williams 2, Davis, Wallace). Steals: 6 (T.Allen 2, Rondo 2, Davis, Pierce). Technical Fouls: None. FG FT Reb L.A. LAKERS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Artest 40:31 1-10 3-8 2-5 1 6 6 Gasol 41:58 7-10 11-13 3-8 3 3 25 Bynum 39:00 6-10 9-12 3-6 0 5 21 Fisher 34:40 2-8 2-2 1-7 4 3 6 Bryant 34:18 8-20 3-3 0-5 6 5 21 Odom 14:38 1-3 1-1 0-5 1 5 3 Vujacic 6:59 1-1 0-0 1-1 1 0 3 Farmar 12:52 3-7 0-0 0-0 1 1 7 Brown 15:04 0-2 2-2 0-2 1 1 2 Totals 240:00 29-71 31-41 10-39 18 29 94 Percentages: FG .408, FT .756. 3-Point Goals: 5-22, .227 (Bryant 2-7, Vujacic 1-1, Farmar 1-4, Artest 1-6, Gasol 0-1, Odom 0-1, Fisher 0-2). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 15 (17 PTS). Blocked Shots: 14 (Bynum 7, Gasol 6, Brown). Turnovers: 15 (Bryant 5, Artest 3, Bynum 2, Farmar 2, Fisher, Gasol, Odom). Steals: 8 (Bryant 4, Artest 2, Farmar, Gasol). Technical Fouls: None. Boston 29 25 18 31 — 103 L.A. Lakers 22 26 24 22 — 94 A—18,997 (18,997). T—2:51. Officials—Monty McCutchen, Mike Callahan, Ken Mauer.

half’s final minutes on the bench after picking up his third foul on a charging call drawn by Allen, who hit his seventh three late in the half. Yet Bryant returned with a steal and a dramatic three-pointer with two-tenths of a second left before halftime, trimming Boston’s lead to a very manageable 54-48.

541-322-CARE

WE OFFER ONLY THE FINEST PRODUCTS IN THE WORLD FOR WORK, OUTDOOR AND TRAVEL.

Les Newman’s QUALITY FOOTWEAR & OUTDOOR CLOTHING

126 NE Franklin Ave., Bend

541-706-6900

541-318-4868


H IGH G E A R

D6 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NASCAR

NHRA

Hamlin scores fourth win at Pocono

Dixon wins Route 66 nationals

By Will Graves The Associated Press

LONG POND, Pa. — Denny Hamlin is so enamored with the No. 11 Toyota he won in Sunday at Pocono that he’s asked team owner Joe Gibbs if he can keep it when it’s finally taken out of the rotation. After watching Hamlin celebrate a little too giddily following another triumph at the quirky 2.5-mile oval, Gibbs isn’t certain Hamlin can foot the repair bill. Hamlin whooped it up after collecting his fourth win at the track, doing a lengthy burnout that ended up with Hamlin smacking the wall. Oops. “Obviously I wouldn’t want to damage car that I’m a future owner of,” Hamlin said with a sheepish grin while sitting next to Gibbs. “I’m not so sure you can afford it,” Gibbs interjected. Then again, if Hamlin can keep finding his way to Victory Lane, Gibbs probably won’t mind picking up the tab. Hamlin’s fourth win of the season vaulted him to third in the standings. Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle Busch finished second in his 200th Cup start. Tony Stewart was third, followed by points leader Kevin Harvick and four-time defending series champion Jimmie Johnson. The ease of Hamlin’s victory played in stark contrast to the chaos that surrounded the finish at one of NASCAR’s normally sleepy stops. While Hamlin was smoking the

Mel Evans / The Associated Press

Denny Hamlin (11) leads Kyle Busch (18), Clint Bowyer and Kasey Kahne on his way to winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at Pocono Raceway on Sunday in Long Pond. Busch finished in second. tires, teammate Joey Logano was on pit road confronting Harvick after Harvick knocked Logano out of contention on lap 198. The outburst from the normally reserved 20-year-old turned heads in the garage and caught NASCAR’s attention. Logano went to speak to series officials after the race to talk things over. He didn’t go without taking a dig at Harvick first. “It’s probably not (Harvick’s)

fault,” said Logano, who finished 13th. “His wife wears the firesuit in the family, tells him what to do, so it’s probably not his fault.” Harvick’s crew chief Gil Martin claimed Logano sped toward Harvick’s pit box and nearly slammed into several crew members before coming to a stop. “If his foot had slipped off the brake right there he would have crushed about three people’s legs,” Martin said. “If that were to

happened, it would have been an all-out brawl on pit row.” It would have mimicked what was happening on the track over the last 40 laps, when a series of cautions shuffled the field and led to the kind of aggressive driving typically seen at Daytona or Talladega. Stewart was clearly frustrated despite his best finish since early spring. He called the racing off the restarts “idiotic” and

left little doubt that he’ll seek payback starting next week in Michigan. “I’ve seen some of the worst driving I’ve ever seen in my life in a professional series right here today,” he said. “So for anybody that’s looking for drama for the next couple races, start looking because I can promise I’m going to start making the highlight reel.” The start was delayed 90 minutes by rain then another 10 minutes or so while officials patched a pothole at the end of pit road inadvertently opened up by a jet dryer. Once the rain cleared, Hamlin dominated. He led 88 laps in all and appeared to have the race well in hand with just over a lap to go in regulation. But his two-second lead was wiped out when Harvick nudged Logano into the wall. Hamlin couldn’t quite reach the start/finish line for the white flag before the caution came out, sending the race into a two-lap overtime. Hamlin debated on which lane to pick for the restart, and opted to go inside in front of Busch. The two haven’t exactly been friendly of late, with Busch saying he wanted to “kill” Hamlin following a run-in at the All-Star race two weeks ago. There was no drama this time. Hamlin easily drew free of Busch and Stewart, cutting Stewart off as they exited the first turn and cruising from there.

The Associated Press JOLIET, Ill. — Larry Dixon beat defending Top Fuel series champion Tony Schumacher on Sunday night in the rain-delayed Route 66 NHRA Nationals. Matt Hagan, Mike Edwards and LE Tonglet also won their divisions in the NHRA Full Throttle Drag Racing Series event at Route 66 Raceway. Dixon drove his dragster to a 3.823-second run at 323.12 mph to edge Schumacher for his fifth win of the season and 53rd of his career. In Funny Car, Hagan not only stopped runner-up finisher Robert Hight’s winning streak, but set the national record for time in the process. Hagan drove his Dodge Charger R/T to a 4.035 at 312.78, which was just enough to back up his semifinal time of 4.022 seconds to set the national record and pick up 20 extra points in the process. It was Hagan’s second career win.

IRL

IndyCar committee ready to examine designs By Carlos Mendez McClatchy-Tribune News Service

It already has a reputation for fast racing, but the IndyCar Series wants more speed — yet at a lower cost for the car owners. The committee put in charge of finding a way to make that happen promised Saturday that it would. “With or without competition, our goal is to significantly reduce the cost of participation to our owners right now,” said committee member Brian Barnhart, the IndyCar Series president of competition and operations. “I think we’ll be able to achieve that

whether it’s a sole supplier or competitive environment. There will be a significant reduction.” The main strategy for reducing costs is finding engine manufacturers to compete with Honda, the league’s sole supplier for engines, and Dallara, its only chassis maker. The committee was scheduled to hear chassis presentations for three days starting Sunday in Indianapolis and will make a decision by month’s end. But the committee already knows what it’s looking for in a new engine. It wants an ethanol-powered, turbo-charged machine with

a maximum of six cylinders, a maximum displacement of 2.4 liters and 550 to 700 horsepower that leaves it versatile enough for road courses and for ovals. Today’s IndyCar engine generates 600 horsepower. TMS president Eddie Gossage, also a committee member, said fan surveys have told the committee it’s important for the IndyCar series to stay fast. “The fans want great performance, and they expect highquality performance out of the IndyCar Series,” he said. “What we realized is we wanted to maintain the speeds on the ovals

and increase the speeds on the road courses. That’s how we wound up, in part, with the formula we’ve got.” Former Indy 500 winner Gil de Ferran represents the team owners on the committee. He said it wasn’t hard to understand what they wanted. “The team owners are a very diverse group,” he said. “What’s interesting is that the two key things that came across were that they all desired, to some extent, a level of participation for the engine manufacturers and the issue of being more cost-effective.”

RACING SCOREBOARD DRAG RACING Local MADRAS DRAGSTRIP ——— May 29 Results Junior Lightning — W: Kyleah Taylor, Salem, 7.953, 80.65 (7.92 dial). R/U: Jeffrey Taylor, Salem (2005 T&A), 8.209, 76.14 (8.14 dial). Sportsman — W: Patrick Arnott, Redmond (1972 Vega), 8.305, 76.27 (8.27 dial). R/U: Clif Stuart, Bend (1966 Cutlass Supreme), 10.498, 69.34 (10.46 dial). Semis: Jim Piper, Bend (1981 Chevy PU); Lydia Smith, Bend (1969 Skylark). Bike/Sled — W: Cody Cumpton, Vancouver, Wash., 6.37, 105.39 (6.3 dial). R/U: James Taylor, Salem (1985 Honda), 7.924, 91.09 (7.77 dial). Semis: Buffy Taylor, Salem (1991 Yamaha 1000); Kyleah Taylor, Salem (sled). Pro — W: Denny Robbins, Beaver Creek (1968 Nova), 6.723, 100.67 (6.74 dial). R/U: Jerry Bugge, Bend (1964 Dodge 330), broke. Semis: Cab Burge, Bend (1971 Duster); Brian Glaab, La Pine (1969 Chevelle). High School — W: McKenzie Zimmerman, Golden, Colo. (2010 Camaro), 9.32, 78.12 (9.22 dial). R/U: Kyleah Taylor, Salem, broke. Suepr Pro — W: Brad Halvorson, Madras (1983 Chevy S-10), 7.016, 97.83 (6.99 dial). R/U: Rod Gregg, Madras (1963 Dodge). Semis: David Regnier, Bend (1966 Nova). ——— May 30 Results HR1 — W: James Love, Bend (1972 Buick Skylark), 8.397, 78.81 (8.37 dial). R/U: Kris McIsaac, Hubbard (2006 Pontiac GTO), 9.103, 77.72 (9 dial). Semis: Donald McLaughlin, Kent, Wash. (2006 GTO); Loy Petersen, Madras (1940 Buick). HR2 — W: Dave Kennedy, Bonney Lake, Wash. (1965 GTO), 7.597, 88.58 (7.50 dial). R/U: Jim Taylor, Escondido, Calif. (1964 Tempest), broke. Semis: James Steen, Selah, Wash. (1964 Tempest); Michael John, Snohomish, Wash. (1970 GTO). Jackpot — W: Patrick Neveu, Yakima, Wash. (1973 Ventura), 6.996, 89.11 (6.88 dial). R/U: Damian Strickland, Molalla (1964 Tempest), 7.486, 93.17 (7.41 dial). Semis: Chad Hepler, Oregon City (1970 LeMans); Butch Leppert, Klamath Falls (1967 GTO).

NHRA 66 NATIONALS Sunday At Route 66 Raceway Joliet, Ill. Final Results Top Fuel—Larry Dixon, 3.773 seconds, 321.65 mph def. Tony Schumacher, 3.823 seconds, 323.12 mph. Funny Car— Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 4.035, 312.78 def. Robert Hight, Ford Mustang, 4.069, 311.92. Pro Stock Motorcycle—LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 6.935, 190.38 def. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.966, 186.46. Pro Stock— Mike Edwards, Pontiac GXP, 6.594, 208.49 def. Jason Line, GXP, 6.599, 209.30. Top Alcohol Dragster—Monroe Guest, 5.482, 260.26 def. Jared Dreher, 5.498, 252.85. Top Alcohol Funny Car—Frank Manzo, Chevy Monte Carlo, 5.459, 264.75 def. Mickey Ferro, Monte Carlo, foul. Competition Eliminator—James Caro, Dodge Stratus, 8.124, 162.35 def. David Rampy, Roadster, 7.342, 152.00. Super Stock—Gary Emmons, Pontiac Firebird, 10.050, 130.72 def. Brad Plourd, Chevy Cavalier, 8.741, 155.56. Stock Eliminator—Peter Biondo, Chevy Camaro, 10.482, 120.35 def. Dan Fletcher, Camaro, 10.354, 121.30. Super Comp—Don Higgins, Dragster, 8.920, 160.75 def. Ray Miller, Dragster, 9.020, 165.42. Super Gas—Steve Furr, Chevy Camaro, 9.886, 161.81 def. Gale Wallace, Camaro, foul. Super Street—Wayne Christopher, Chevy Monte Carlo, no time was unopposed.

NASCAR Sprint Cup GILLETTE FUSION PROGLIDE 500 Sunday At Pocono Raceway

Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 204 laps, 144.3 rating, 195 points, $212,875. 2. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 204, 124.7, 175, $220,854. 3. (6) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 204, 98.2, 165, $163,146. 4. (22) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 204, 113.2, 165, $153,249. 5. (25) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 204, 110.1, 155, $150,243. 6. (4) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 204, 81.5, 155, $146,196. 7. (13) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 204, 107.9, 146, $123,488. 8. (7) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 204, 93.8, 142, $117,654. 9. (2) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 204, 119.7, 143, $88,150. 10. (17) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 204, 93, 134, $118,149. 11. (19) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 204, 84.2, 135, $85,975. 12. (26) Carl Edwards, Ford, 204, 80.8, 127, $112,846. 13. (12) Joey Logano, Toyota, 204, 94, 124, $112,138. 14. (9) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 204, 76.5, 121, $107,177. 15. (29) David Reutimann, Toyota, 204, 68.4, 118, $103,154. 16. (33) Paul Menard, Ford, 204, 56.4, 115, $79,850. 17. (15) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 204, 76.1, 112, $116,399. 18. (24) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 204, 64.9, 109, $78,800. 19. (3) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 204, 81.6, 106, $78,450. 20. (31) Scott Speed, Toyota, 204, 61.2, 103, $89,246. 21. (11) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 204, 61.7, 100, $97,433. 22. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 204, 46.6, 97, $90,483. 23. (23) Casey Mears, Toyota, 204, 54.3, 94, $107,971. 24. (43) David Stremme, Ford, 204, 52.6, 91, $82,900. 25. (27) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 204, 75.6, 88, $68,625. 26. (35) David Ragan, Ford, 204, 54.5, 85, $76,975. 27. (8) Kasey Kahne, Ford, accident, 203, 91.9, 82, $108,363. 28. (28) Greg Biffle, Ford, accident, 203, 77.2, 79, $75,675. 29. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, accident, 203, 66.2, 76, $85,025. 30. (16) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, accident, 203, 67, 73, $92,496. 31. (21) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 203, 52.8, 70, $72,725. 32. (10) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 203, 84.2, 67, $112,449. 33. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 202, 38.9, 64, $80,421. 34. (20) Max Papis, Toyota, 200, 36.7, 61, $64,150. 35. (42) Kevin Conway, Ford, 199, 34.4, 58, $66,000. 36. (18) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 167, 57.9, 55, $101,952. 37. (36) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, brakes, 40, 34.6, 52, $63,600. 38. (41) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, electrical, 32, 31.9, 54, $63,475. 39. (32) Michael McDowell, Toyota, brakes, 27, 33.4, 46, $63,350. 40. (34) Dave Blaney, Toyota, overheating, 24, 34.6, 43, $63,200. 41. (40) Geoff Bodine, Chevrolet, rear gear, 23, 31.5, 40, $63,045. 42. (39) Chad McCumbee, Toyota, rear gear, 22, 27.3, 37, $62,890. 43. (30) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, transmission, 11, 27.5, 34, $63,276. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 136.303 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 44 minutes, 30 seconds. Margin of Victory: Under Caution. Caution Flags: 7 for 26 laps. Lead Changes: 14 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: Ky.Busch 1-4; D.Hamlin 5-17; B.Labonte 18; Ky.Busch 19-37; C.Bowyer 38-77; D.Hamlin 78-79; C.Bowyer 80-98; Ky.Busch 99-100; K.Harvick 101-105; D.Hamlin 106158; Ky.Busch 159-165; D.Hamlin 166-168; Ku.Busch 169-171; S.Hornish Jr. 172-187; D.Hamlin 188-204. Top 12 in Points: 1. K.Harvick, 2,063; 2. Ky.Busch, 2,044; 3. D.Hamlin, 1,927; 4. M.Kenseth, 1,893; 5. Ku.Busch, 1,881; 6. J.Johnson, 1,849; 7. J.Gordon, 1,827; 8. J.Burton, 1,803; 9. C.Edwards, 1,729; 10. G.Biffle, 1,727; 11. M.Martin, 1,711; 12. C.Bowyer, 1,686.

9. (24) Richie Pallai, Jr., Yorktown Heights, N.Y., Chevrolet, 204, $2,000. 10. (29) Wade Cole, Riverton, Conn., Chevrolet, 204, $1,900. 11. (20) Jason Myers, Walnut Cove, N.C., Ford, 204, $1,400. 12. (1) Frank Fleming, Mount Airy, N.C., Ford, 204, $1,300. 13. (30) Danny Knoll, Jr., Buffalo, N.Y., Chevrolet, 204, $1,200. 14. (35) Jake Marosz, Middletown, Conn., Chevrolet, 200, $1,100. 15. (8) Ron Silk, Norwalk, Conn., Chevrolet, 198, fuel pump, $1,575. 16. (6) Ryan Preece, Berlin, Conn., Chevrolet, 197, $1,550. 17. (17) Kevin Goodale, Riverhead, N.Y., Chevrolet, 190, clutch, $1,425. 18. (2) Ted Christopher, Plainville, Conn., Chevrolet, 189, $1,500. 19. (33) Johnny Bush, Huntington Station, N.Y., Chevrolet, 173, $1,400. 20. (5) Andy Seuss, Hampstead, N.H., Chevrolet, 171, accident, $1,400. 21. (27) L.W. Miller, Dushore, Pa., Pontiac, 162, power steering, $1,000. 22. (15) Chris Pasteryak, Lisbon, Conn., Chevrolet, 161, accident, $1,400. 23. (14) Ed Flemke, Jr., Southington, Conn., Chevrolet, 161, accident, $1,400. 24. (21) Eric Goodale, Riverhead, N.Y., Chevrolet, 160, accident, $1,600. 25. (11) Chuck Hossfeld, Ransomville, N.Y., Chevrolet, 142, trans-

mission, $1,400. 26. (19) Renee Dupuis, Glastonbury, Conn., Chevrolet, 132, $1,400. 27. (12) Erick Rudolph, Ransomville, N.Y., Chevrolet, 126, accident, $1,500. 28. (36) Bryan Dauzat, Midland, N.C., Chevrolet, 108, accident, $1,000. 29. (7) George Brunnhoelzl, III, W. Babylon, N.Y., Chevrolet, 106, $1,400. 30. (26) Jimmy Blewett, Howell, N.J., Chevrolet, 100, accident, $1,500. 31. (18) Rob Fuller, Boylston, Mass., Ford, 91, suspension, $1,000. 32. (13) Rowan Pennink, Huntingdon Valley, Pa., Chevrolet, 72, engine, $1,500. 33. (25) Jamie Tomaino, Howell, N.J., Chevrolet, 47, oil leak, $1,000. 34. (34) Gary McDonald, Ronkonkoma, N.Y., Chevrolet, 43, power steering, $1,000. 35. (37) Jonny Kievman, Deerfield Beach, Fla., Chevrolet, 33, accident, $1,000. 36. (32) Glenn Tyler, Hampton Bays, N.Y., Chevrolet, 29, accident, $400. 37. (22) Zach Brewer, Winstom-Salem, N.C., Chevrolet, 27, fuel pump, $0.

o t e b i r c Subs n i t e l l u B The t a o fl l l ’ and we EE you a FR ! p i r t t f a r value) 7 (that’s a $4

Start a 3-month subscription to The Bulletin and get ONE FREE raft trip down BIG EDDY, courtesy of Sun Country Raft Tours! Look to The Bulletin for everything to do and see this summer. From summertime movies to mountain biking, The Bulletin has your summertime fun covered ... Including a FREE RAFT TRIP!

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL 541-385-5800 MENTION PROMO CODE: RAFT2010 Three-month print or Web subscriptions apply. Raft trip has no redeemable cash value. Must not have been a Bulletin subscriber in the past 30 days to receive offer. For official rules visit www.bendbulletin.com/raft2010

Whelen Modified Tour MADE IN AMERICA WHELEN 200 Sunday At Martinsville Speedway Martinsville, Va. Lap length: 0.526 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (4) Bobby Santos, Franklin, Mass., Dodge, 204 laps, 52.917 mph, $7,000. 2. (16) Justin Bonsignore, Holtsville, N.Y., Chevrolet, 204, $3,800. 3. (10) Todd Szegedy, Ridgefield, Conn., Ford, 204, $3,000. 4. (9) Mike Stefanik, Coventry, R.I., Pontiac, 204, $4,100. 5. (23) Burt Myers, Walnut Cove, N.C., Ford, 204, $1,950. 6. (28) James Civali, Meriden, Conn., Pontiac, 204, $2,900. 7. (3) Eric Beers, Northampton, Pa., Chevrolet, 204, $2,200. 8. (31) Woody Pitkat, Stafford, Conn., Chevrolet, 204, $4,350.

Isn’t it time to float

BIG EDDY AGAIN? 531 SW 13th St., Bend 541-382-6277 suncountrytours.com

Rediscover all the fun for as little as $47 a trip!


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

LEGAL NOTICES

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies Cockapoo puppies, males born 3/23, shots, dewclaws, docked $275 each. 541-567-3150,503-779-3844

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

Wanted Anvil, Also blacksmithing tools and standing vise. Call Peggy at (206) 972-4481

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

AKC English Bulldog Puppies! Accepting deps. Now, ready for forever homes mid July. $1800 each, (541) 388-3670 "Available for Adoption" The Humane Society of Redmond has 18 wonderful small dogs available for adoption. If you are looking for a chihuahua or chihuahua mix we have several to chose from. Also a cocker spaniel and a terrier mix. These dogs were all rescued from California and are eagerly awaiting there new forever home. Come by and visit them or give us a call at 541-923-0882.

WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Mo- Basset Hound AKC pups, 4 torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, weeks, $350 & $375, health ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! guarantee 541-922-4673. 541-280-6786. Beagle Puppies! 8 wks on 6/9. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for First shots given. Parents on old vintage costume, scrap, site. $250. 541-416-1507. silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277

205

Items for Free FREE LLAMA MANURE, you haul, call for more information 541-389-7329. Free Scrap iron, tin and aluminum. You haul. 541-948-0810. Interior Door, glass, 10’, windows & misc., FREE. 541-350-8674

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

1 7 7 7

Bichon Friese/Pom Pups, 6 wks. vet checked, shots, wormed, $300 541-977-4686

Black Lab & ?, 12 week old. 1st shots & wormed. $50. 541-382-7567 Black Lab pups, AKC, Dew claws removed, first shots, 60 days free pet insurance, hip guarantee. Grand sire has Wesminster Kennel Club champion. Males $300 and Females $350. Larry 541-280-5292 Black Lab/Retriever/Border Collie mix, male, 1 yr,to good home, $75, 541-550-0174.

Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org Dog Run, portable, 6x6x6, with gate, chain link, $150 OBO, call 541-385-7671. ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each 541-325-3376. English Pointer Puppies Hunting Parents, Wonderful pets Call Janice 541892-1381 Foster homes needed for kittens & special needs cats! Rescue group provides food, supplies, vet support; you provide a safe & nurturing home for 4 to 8 wks. Help kittens get a good start in life. 390-0121 or 317-3931, craftfostercats@gmail.com. FREE CAT, 6 mo. old female tabby, shots/neutered, active & curious. 541-389-9239

S . W .

Cat, adult female, unaltered; also 4 kittens, $30 each, Golden Retriever Puppies, AKC, wormed & shots, great displease call 541-678-5205. position, parents OFA cert., Cat breeding season has begun! refs. avail., 541-420-1334. Please have your cats spayed HAVANESE Black/Tan Boys and neutered before our 3yrs & 11mths, Non-Allergy, shelters become over$900. 541-915-5245, Eugene crowded with unwanted litters. Adult female or male Heeler Pups, $150 ea. cats, $40. Bring in the litter 541-280-1537 under 3 months and we’ll http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com alter them for free! Call Bend Spay & Neuter Project for Jabez Standard Poodle Pups 6 males & 2 females, chocomore info. 541-617-1010. late, black, apricot & cream Chihuahua Puppy, 7 weeks, 1st $800 & $750. 541-771-0512 shots, Pom Puppy, 8 weeks, Jabezstandardpoodles.com 1st shots, $250/ea. Kittens & cats ready for homes! 541-977-4686 1-5 PM Sat/Sun, other days Chi-Pom Pups, 2 females, 1 by appt. Altered, shots, ID black & white, 1 sable, chip, more! 65480 78th St, healthy, 1st shots, $200 ea., Bend, 541-389-8420. Info/ 541-383-5829,541-280-0049 photos at www.craftcats.org.

A v e . ,

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

208

208

210

257

266

270

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Musical Instruments

Heating and Stoves

Lost and Found

Shih Tzu/Lhasa Apso Puppies, born 3/25/10. Absolutely adorable! Raised with kids! $250. 541-908-0681. "Kittens, Kittens, Kittens" Kittens are available at the Humane Society of Redmond. Adoption includes spay/neuter, microchip, first set of vaccinations and a free health exam with a local Veterinarian. For more information call 541-923-0882. Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317 Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 2 black females & 1 chocolate female, 1 chocolate female $400-$500 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Shih Tzu Puppy, male, 10 weeks, black/white, $325, 541-548-2295,541-788-0090 Staffordshire Terrier Pups. 8 weeks, $200 each. 541-318-6997. Wolf Hybrid Pups, parents on site, $250 , taking deps. on 2 litters, ready to go on 6/17 & 7/7, 541-977-2845.

Working cats for barn/shop, companionship, FREE! Fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420 Yorkie Pups, 3 males, 1 female, 8 weeks, $500-$600, can deliver, Mt. Vernon, 541-792-0375.

Yorkie/Schipperke Male, Pup, 8 weeks, 1st shot, $200 cash, 541-678-7599 Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Labradoodles, born 5/19, choc. & black, multi-generation Movie Stars! 541-647-9831. “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at $55.00. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 541-923-0882 Miniature American Eskimo Pup, 8 weeks, male, $325, 541-548-2295,541-788-0090

Miniature

Dachshund

Yorkie/Shi-Tzu Mix pups, shed/ allergy free, ready 6/29, will stay small, 5 males, $400, reserve now, can deliver, 541-433-5261.

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

Puppies, Purebred, Shots, Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! A-1 Washers & Dryers wormed, & heavily champi$125 each. Full Warranty. oned bloodlines. $250, regFree Del. Also wanted W/D’s istered $300. Call any time dead or alive. 541-280-7355. 541-678-7529 Miniature Pincher, AKC Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. OverMale, cropped, shots, $500, stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s 541-480-0896. Maytag, 541-385-5418 Miniature Schnauzer puppies, tails, 1st shots. $300-$350. Find exactly what 541-771-1830. you are looking for in the Mini-Aussie Pups, 1 will be toy CLASSIFIEDS size, 3 Black Tries, 1 Blue Merle, 1st shots, Ready 6/14 $250. 541-420-9694 Chair, dark wood w/upholstered light green seat, exc. cond. $25. 541-905-9773 Mini Aussie/Yorkie mix 3months, tri-colored male. Dining Set -solid Birch, 55 yrs Housebroken. Comes with old, 6 chairs, drop leaf soft portable kennel. $300 w/pads, 2 lg extenders, good or best offer. 541-678-2297 cond., $300. 541-633-3590.

Nonprofit animal rescue group seeking donations of items Free Papillion, to good home. NOW for huge yard/barn sale Very small, 2 yrs., on 6/19-20. All proceeds go 541-548-2295,541-788-0090 to vet care. May be able to pick up items. Also seeking FREE to good home 4 male deposit cans/bottles, it all neutered kittens, moving helps! info@craftcats.org, cannot take. Current shots. 1 78-4178, www.craftcats.org. domestic short hair orange & white tabby, 2 domestic Pembroke Welch Corgi short hair orange tabbys, 1 Pups, AKC reg., 3 males, 2 domestic short hair, tabby females, $500, 541-475-2593 w/white chest & stockings. Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, (256) 690-8546, Redmond. 1st shots/worming, 8 weeks French Bichon Frise Pups, small, old, males & female avail., health guaranteed, delivery $400-$500. 541-447-4399 avail. $800+ 541-659-8037 Pomeranian/Chihuahua Pups, 2 females, 1 mo. old, Frenchie Faux Male, per1 silver & white, $325, 1 fectly marked, ready, go to: black w/very little white, www. pinewoodpups.com $275, 541-416-1878. 541-447-0210 German Shepherd purebred, parents from Germany, black 3 mo. female $500 OBO. 541-389-8447.

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Pomeranian Puppies, 4 beautiful Wolf Sable boys great personality & exc. coat $400 ea. 541-480-3160. POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889. Poodles, standard, cafe color, 2 males, born Easter Sunday. $250 each. 541-647-9831.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

TV ARMOIRE, oak, $150; Oak coffee table with slate insert, $150. Recliner, maroon with heat & massage. $85. Multi-stripe couch, $125. 541-504-1813. Washer and Dryer, Maytag Neptune front loading, gas, $800. 541-815-3558.

211

Children’s Items Highchair, Evenflow, adjustable, like new, $40. 541-317-5154

212

Antiques & Collectibles

Cowgirl Up! Gently used western wear. Boots, bags & jackets, Double D, Patricia Wolf- Native American Turquoise, Sisters 541-549-6950 Table, heavy, oak, beautiful cond., $175. Call for more info., 541-788-5841

215

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY

juniper, beds, lamps & tables, made to order, 541-419-2383

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

ORIENTAL RUGS: Four 5x8, one 8x10. $50-$100. 541-390-6570.

Remodel dictates sale: Maytag Wall Oven 30" 1998. $200 Maytag Range 2009 Transferrable warranty valid through 2014. $900 SCHIPPERKE & ChihuaMaytag Over the Range Microhua Puppies, 5 females wave, 2007, $150 left, 10 weeks old. Will only get to about 5 lbs.$200 OBO. Maytag Built in dishwasher, 1998, $150 black, tan & some white. 541-536-5013,541-678-2732 Whirlpool Top Mount Refrigerator $200 SHIH-POO adorable toy PACKAGE DEAL AT $1300.00 hypo-allergenic puppies, 4 All appliances in excellent conmales, 2 females left. $350. dition. Call Martha at 541-744-1804. Call 541 593 7483

260

Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. CHAINSAWS! New & Like New! Stihl! Husqvarna! Echo! Up to $200 off! 541-280-5006. Curbing equip. complete set up, incl. mason trailer w/ mixer, Lil Buba curbing machine, molds, stamps, lawn edger and more. $10,950 or trade. 541-923-8685 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre www.bendbulletin.com 1964 silver coins, bars, or rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Call Classifieds at coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & 385-5809 dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bed- The Bulletin reserves the right rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The 240 Bulletin Internet website.

Crafts and Hobbies

Awesome Fabric Clean Out Sale, 1000’s of yards of fabric, fat quarters, remnants & bolts, cutting tables, QUILTER’S DREAM SALE. See Garage Sales, 6/11 & 6/12.

241

Bicycles and Accessories

Dryer, Newer Amana, com- Recumbent Sun Bicycle, funcpletely rebuilt, new parts, tional usage, $375. $200, call 541-550-0444. Call 360-775-7336. ROAD BIKE, mens’ GENERATE SOME excitement in Red Specialized , $60. your neigborhood. Plan a ga541-385-5514. rage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 246 385-5809.

Log Furniture, lodgepole &

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Guns & Hunting and Fishing .380 Ammo, $25/box. 9 boxes avail. Other ammo avail. Call 541-728-1036. A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. Death forces sale, Yugo AK-47, $800; HK 91 308, $2500; HK 93, $2000; HK 94, $4000. Many extras. 541-593-3072 Fly Rods, (1) 6-piece, handmade, graphite; 1 factory made, $200 ea., 541-550-0444. Stoeger Condor 12 gauge O/U, like new, exc. cond. $300 OBO. 541-647-8931. Taurus Raging Bull .454 Casull Revolver Call for pics $750 541-647-7212

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER LOST in Sisters Tuesday Since September 29, 1991, 05/25. Women's white gold advertising for used woodanniversary band with instoves has been limited to laid diamonds. Generous models which have been reward for return. certified by the Oregon De541-549-1340 partment of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protec- L O S T : W o m a n s ’ r i n g , $1000 tion Agency (EPA) as having Reward. Between April/May? met smoke emission stanHanded down 3 generations, dards. A certified woodstove any information for its recan be identified by its certiturn, no questions asked. fication label, which is per541-536-3383 manently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Shop Heater, John Deere, Turbo Style, 40,000 BTU, $200, 541-550-0444.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

$2,500. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . Recycled Bleacher Boards, approx. 4000 sq.ft., long leaf Southern Yellow pine, clear grade 16 ft. lengths, 3/4-5/4 inch thick. Scott Lanfield Tsunami Books Eugene, Oregon. 541-345-8986.

Tiles, tiles, tiles! Need a small backsplash or shower install? Beautifully hand-painted decorative tiles. Sat. June 5, 9-3 and Sat June 12, 9-3. 20512 Nels Anderson Pl. behind the U-Haul on N. Hwy 97, Bend.

280 DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

J & C Firewood • Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195. LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177 Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg. Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered, $185/cord, Rounds $165, Seasoned, Pine & Juniper Avail. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449 Riding Lawnmowers (6) Sears, JD, Troybuilt, call for sizes and models 541-382-4115, 280-7024.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Estate Sales

263

Tools

LOST: Wonen’s Ring 6/3, Studio Rd, Sylvan Learning Center, REWARD. 382-7377.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found

281

Fundraiser Sales Community Service Center SDA Fundraiser, Sunday, June 13, 3 Sisters School Gym, 21155 Tumalo Rd., 8am-3pm.

286

Sales Northeast Bend Tiles, tiles, tiles. Need a small backsplash or shower install? Hand-painted tiles. Come see to appreciate! Sat June 5, 9-3 and Sat June 12, 9-3. 20512 Nels Anderson Pl. Behind the U-Haul on N. Hwy 97, Bend.

288

Sales Southeast Bend Multifamily yard and Moving sale. Friday, June 4th; Saturday, June 5th; Sunday, June 6th. 8:30am to 6:00pm, Friday and Saturday. 9:00am to 4:00pm Sunday. Location 20425 Ahha, Bend, Oregon.

290

Sales Redmond Area Lost Black & White Boston Terrier. Name is Curley Moe. Lost on 26th St. & Pumice Ave. Contact 541-693-4550. He has a medical condition, that requires medication. Generous cash reward upon return. LOST: CAT, 5/23, Boonesborough area, small grey/ black striped female cat, REWARD. 541-382-7641 or 541-788-8378

Huge Yard Sale Great Prices 6316 South Hwy. 97 Redmond Sat. & Sun 9AM- ? All week. After 12PM. Need something specific? We Have It All! 541-923- 8200.

292

Sales Other Areas BASEMENT SALE Seventh Day Adventist Church 8:30 to 4, June 6 thru 8. 66 SE “H” Street, Madras


E2 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery JD 2420 Swather, 12’ 300 Header, cab w/A/C, ready to cut, $5000; 1967 International 2-ton truck, diesel, hoist, 4’ sides, $1250, ATV, Honda Recon 2005, $1950, 541-771-6919,541-475-6919 leave msg.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

341

476

476

476

Horses and Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

ESSAY CONTEST Chance to win 2 yr. old filly, crop out Paint, great disposition. For entry form email steeldust2@gmail.com or call 541-419-3405

Employment

400

Mare & Colt Paint, need a good home, gentle and sound. Make offer. 541-382-2899 Morgan Stallion, 11 yr. old, never used for breeding, papers on mom & pop, $1800; Miley Goosneck Horse Trailer, 16’, $900, 541-934-2521.

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454 READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond area, flexible daytime hrs., household assistance, affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161. Painter Needs Work: 20 years exp. in Central OR, fast & friendly, 541-977-8329.

316

Irrigation Equipment

476

Employment Opportunities

Pipe Elbows, galavanized, 30”x90 degree, never used, 3 at $150 ea. 541-421-3222.

RED TAG SALE Every Saturday At The OL'E TACK ROOM 7th and Cook , Tumalo. Reg. 7 yr. “Alves” Quarter Mare w/3 month foal. $1550 OBO. 541-617-5872

325

Hay, Grain and Feed

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

345

Livestock & Equipment Babydoll Southdown Sheep. Small starter flock available. Please call 541-385-4989. Feeder Steers Ready for Pasture 541-382-8393 please leave a message. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Llamas/Exotic Animals

541-385-5809 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

347 Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Experience is a necessity, must be a quick learner and a team player. Send resume to: P.O. Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Automotive Service Advisor Needed.

Energetic? Thorough? Looking for Opportunity? Money to be made and a great benefit package to boot. Send resume to: P.O. Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708. CNA Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center the premier skilled nursing facility in Central Oregon is seeking an experienced Certified Nursing Assistant to work full-time on our night shift (10:00pm-6:00am). We offer vacation, sick, health and 401k benefits for full-time employees. Please apply if you are certified and eligible for a background check. Please come by and apply at Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center at 1876 NE HWY 20, 541-382-5531 located near Pilot Butte State park. EOE

541-617-7825

Independent Contractor

Delivery Driver/Warehouse Medical Coder (Certified) Bedmart is currently lookAre you a dynamic and taling for Delivery Drivers with ented certified medical coder a clean driving record and who is looking for a full time apprearance, must be avaliposition? We are seeking a able weekend and holidays detailed and thorough Certicome apply at 2220 NE fied Medical Coder to join our Hwy. 20, Bend. billing team in La Pine, Oregon. Qualified candidates Garbage Truck Driver/ must have comprehensive Laborer for Cascade current knowledge of ICD-9 Disposal , must have CDL, and CPT coding and excelclean driving record and one lent typing and 10 key skills. plus year of CDL driving, Current certification is a recompetitive pay, family benquirement, responsibilities efits, 401K, vacation, year include, but not limited to: round work. Apply online Verify and insure the accuwww.wasteconncetions.com racy completeness, specificor call Lance at 360-281-9919. ity and appropriateness of procedure diagnosis codes based on services rendered. General Develops and provides codDO YOU NEED A ing training to clinic staff. GREAT EMPLOYEE FQHC knowledge a plus. We RIGHT NOW? offer comprehensive benCall The Bulletin before efits plus competitive wages. noon and get an ad in to If interested please fax your publish the next day! resume to: 541-536-8047 or 385-5809. mail to: Human Resource, PO Box 3300 VIEW the Classifieds at: LaPine, OR 97739. www.bendbulletin.com

Healthcare Contract Specialist

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Classifieds

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Sous Chef

500

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

H Supplement Your Income H

Independent Contractor Sales

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Registered Nurse Full-time and Part-time 8 hour, day shift, openings for RN's. Requires 2+ years experience and ability to take after hours call in these areas: •Surgery •Day Surgery/PACU •Home Health Join our excellent nursing team. We offer competitive wages and benefits. Apply HR, Good Shepherd Medical Center 610 NW 11th, Hermiston, OR 97838. Call 541 667-3413 for information, or e-mail ksanders@gshealth.org

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Position responsible for assisting with contracting functions including negotiation with physicians/physi541-383-0386 cian groups, facilities and vendors. Must be familiar The Bulletin Classifieds is your with contract analysis inEmployment Marketplace cluding both language and Front Desk financial and regulatory as- Motel Call 541-385-5809 today! Part-time position Apply in pects. Must be willing to loperson at Sugarloaf Mouncate in the Bend/Deschutes tain Motel at 62980 N Hwy SALES- 10 Sharp people County area For more deneeded to work/travel with 97. Bend. tailed information or to unique business group. See apply visit Remember.... the entire US, two weeks www.trilliumchp.com Add your web address to paid training, return trip /careers.html your ad and readers on guaranteed. If 18+, call Mail resumes/applications to The Bulletin's web site will Tisha, 1-800-479-4147. P.O. Box 11740 Eugene, OR be able to click through au97440-1740 attn: HR tomatically to your site. Installers The Bulletin Seeking experienced DISH Residential Coach is your Therapeutic Boarding School Network satellite technician Employment Marketplace for girls ages 10-15, seeks a for Deschutes County. full time Residential Call 541-382-1552. Coach/House Parent responsibilities include: Supervision 541-385-5809 of students and oversight of to advertise! daily program, experience with youth required, experiwww.bendbulletin.com ence with at risk youth preferred. Position may include overnight shifts, benefits included. Fax resume to: Jennifer at 541-318-1709.

358

Farmers Column

Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.

341

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Hay Is Expensive! Protect your investment Let KFJ Builders, Inc. build your hay shed, barn or loafing shed. 541-617-1133. CCB 173684.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

READERS:

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc, hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831

#1 Superb Sisters Grass Hay no weeds, no

CAUTION

Automotive Part Person Needed.

Certified Supply Aide Good Shepherd Medical Center seeks experienced CS Aide. Must be certified or have six months experience in sterile processing. Come join our excellent team in busy surgical department. We offer competitive wages and benefits. Apply, Human Resources, GSHCS, 610 NW 11th, Hermiston, OR 97838. (541)-667-3546. mhans@gshealth.org

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

507

Real Estate Contracts The Ranch is accepting applications for a full time Sous Chef. Need dedicated individual who possesses good supervisory and leadership skills that has an extensive knowledge of food preparation. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

486

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY, $50,000-$500,000, 6% return secured by 1st trustee, John, 541-815-5000.

573

Business Opportunities PICTURE FRAMING BUSINESS FOR SALE. All equipment, supplies and materials for sale with or without business name and/or location. Contact Mike (541) 389-9196

Independent Positions CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 634

Rentals

600

$ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

604

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

(541) 383-3152

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $90/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

541-385-5809

SUBSIDIZED UNIT 2 bdrm (upstairs) available at this time. 62 & over and/or Disability Multi-Family Housing/ Project-based Greenwood Manor Apts 2248 NE 4th Street Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 389-2712. TDD 800-735-2900 Guardian Management Corporation is committed to “Equal Housing Opportunity”

636 605

Roommate Wanted Sunriver: Friendly music house has private room w/ small bath avail. NOW on forest MMP farm. Horse/pet? $400 includes util. 541-598-8537 christenha@hotmail.com.

630

Rooms for Rent $350 mo. plus util. room/bath. Full house access, artists pueblo. 541-389-4588.

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1 Bdrm. $420+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D hookup W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

$595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D in unit. front balcony, storage, no pets. 1558 SW NANCY, 541-382-6028.

$99 Move-In Special Only $250 deposit! Finally the wait is over, new units available in Bend’s premiere apartment complex. Be the first to live in one of these fantastic luxury apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

June Special!

541-322-7253

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Newer Townhome in quiet neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, garage w/opener, deck, W/S paid, no smoking, $650. 541-389-3020,541-771-4517

1st Month Free 6 month lease!

Ask Us About Our

Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928.

$395 to $550 • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

100% Subsidized: Crest Butte Apartments is now accepting applications for fully remodeled 1 & 2 bdrm. units. Units to include brand new appl. & A/C. Amenities incl. new on site laundry facilities & new playground, great location next to hospital, BMC & many other medical/dental offices. 5 minutes from downtown & Old Mill District. Apply today, call 541-389-9107 or stop by office at 1695 NE Purcell Blvd between 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

1/2 OFF 1ST MO! 2 bdrm., 1 bath in 4-plex near hospital. Laundry, storage, yard, deck, W/S/G paid. $625+dep. No dogs. 541-318-1973.

2 Bdrm. Duplex, gas fireplace, back yard, $825/mo. incl. yard maint & water, no smoking, pet okay, 1225 NE Dawson Dr. 402-957-7261

LIVE ON THE RIVER WALK DOWNTOWN

2 Bdrm. patio apt. $760 & $660 dep. Nice pets OK. 1556 NW 1st St. 541-382-0117 SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Small cute studio, all utilities paid, close to downtown and Old Mill. $450/mo., dep. $425, no pets. 330-9769 or 480-7870. West Hills Townhouse 2/1.5, TV cable & W/S/G incl. newly redecorated, $575 mo. 951 NW Portland Ave. 541-480-2092.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex, $680. Near Old Mill off Wilson. Washer/Dryer included, fenced backyard, single car garage. Pets accepted. $720 deposit. Call 541-280-3164

Real Estate For Sale

Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near shopping & hospital dbl. garage, large fenced yard w/ sprinklers, $950/mo., pets neg. 541-390-2915

Clean 2 bdrm., 1 bath, close to schools, parks, Boys & Girls Club, yard, garden area, pet considered, $675, $600 dep., 541-771-9109.

700

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

• Providence • 3/2, 1200 sq.ft., RV, close to hospital, big yard, $895/mo. 3059 NE Tahoe Court 541-306-5161

Find It in

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend A Clean 1500 Sq. Ft., 3 Bdrm., 2 Bath, dbl. garage, open floor plan, landscaped, fenced, private drive, close to Jewell School, no smoking, pets neg., avail. 7/1. $965/mo. + dep. 541-477-5699

656

541-385-5809 648

Houses for Rent General 2700 Sq.Ft. triple wide on 1 acre, Sun Forest Estates in LaPine, 3/3, exc. shape lots of room $800, 1st & last +$250 dep. 503-630-3220.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908.

Lease, avail. 6/15, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, yard maint. & appl. incl., no pets, $900/mo. + $250 dep. 3558 SW Salmon Ave., 541-815-9218

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver Nicely updated 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near Sunriver, vaulted ceiling, gas stove & fireplace, owners residence, very peaceful, small dog okay, $875/mo. Call Randy at 541-306-1039.

660

Houses for Rent La Pine

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! 3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no gaThe Bulletin Classifieds rage, $650/mo. Pets? 16180 SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. garage, RV parking, fenced, 541-745-4432 cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn DESCHUTES RIVER HOUSE care incl., $995/mo. near Wickiup Reservoir! 541-480-7653 Remote, peaceful and private. Beautifully furnished, rents Looking for your next by night or month. employee? www.deschutesriverhouse.com Place a Bulletin help tolemac@uci.net wanted ad today and 503-881-5008 reach over 60,000 readers each week. NEWER stick built 2 bedroom, Your classified ad will 1 bath, large garage, forced also appear on air heat pump. on 6 acres, bendbulletin.com which $700 month. 541-815-8884. currently receives over 1.5 million page views 661 every month at Houses for Rent no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Prineville Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, your ad on-line at dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice bendbulletin.com lawn, fenced backyard. $800 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet neg. 541-923-6961 652

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonHouses for Rent smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storNW Bend age units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard On 10 Acres between Sisters & park, ball field, shopping cenBend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 ter and tennis courts. Pet sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ friendly with new large dog wood stove, all new carpet & run, some large breeds okay paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, with mgr. approval. fenced for horses, $1095, Chaparral Apts. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. 244 SW Rimrock Way Southwest Adobe-style with full 541-923-5008 Cascade Views. 3/2 + office, www.redmondrents.com 2700 sq. ft., garage/shop. 4.5 treed acres, $3000 mo. Call about our Specials 541-388-2159. Studios, and 2 & 3 bdrm units from

RIVER FALLS APARTMENTS $100 Move In Special

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

NOTICE:

(Private Party ads only)

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Near Bend High School, 4 Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., sq. ft., large carport, no $695/mo. 1st, last. No insmoking, $995/mo. + deps. side pets. Mtn. views. 541-389-3657 503-829-7252, 679-4495

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

$99 1st Month! 1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo., $250-$450 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719

$100 OFF 1ST MONTHS RENT! Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $495. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

The Bulletin is now offering a Avail. Now, 1020B NW Portland Ave, 1 bdrm. upstairs in LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE duplex, W/D incl., water Rental rate! If you have a paid, $575 mo., $700 dep. home to rent, call a Bulletin 541-410-4050,541-410-4054 Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad Awbrey Butte Townhomes, started ASAP! 541-385-5809 garage, A/C, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, 634 $825-$850, 541-633-9199

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

640

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-339 610-7803. PARK & MTN. VIEWS! 4 bdrms, 3½ bath, 2450 sq. ft., hardwood floors, open floorplan, desirable westside location. , $1395 mo., 19432 SW Brookside Way. 541-408-0086. ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, $850, Jim, 541-388-3209.

705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Find exactly what Pahlisch home, 3/2.5 heat you are looking for in the pump, community pool, large CLASSIFIEDS open park area in front, Dbl. garage $850 mo. Avail. 7/1 541-416-0104,541-420-1634 John Day: 2003 3 bdrm., 2.5 baths, 1920 sq. ft., w/stove, 676 f/a heat, vaulted living room, silestone counters/stainless Mobile/Mfd. Space appl., master suite/wic, dbl. garage, .92 acres fenced, Full hookups w/ 25x25 dog decks/views. PUD $289,500. kennel, nice secluded spot, 541-575-0056 $375/mo.+$250 dep., neg upon interview. Please call Advertise your car! Dan, 541-420-2441 Add A Picture!

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Retail Space, 118 NW Minnesota, 900 sq.ft., $1.75/ sq.ft. + common area maintenance fees, call 541-317-8633.

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin online FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 30+ Homes / Auction: 6/13 Open House June 5, 12, 13 www.auction.com REDC/ brkr 200712109

Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $650 a month. 541-923-7343

Decks

Handyman

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Child Care Services Summertime baby sitter avail. on June 1st, could continue into Fall. Ages 3-12. Redmond area. Call Carol for more info., 541-279-1913.

Debris Removal

Excavating

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Roof-Foundation Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

747

Southwest Bend Homes 3 Bdrm. + den, 2.5 bath, 1825 sq.ft., master bdrm. on main, near Old Mill, walking trails, schools, upgraded throughout, landscaped, A/C, great neighborhood, ready to move in, great value at $296,000, 425-923-9602, 425-923-9603 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

773

Acreages 762

Homes with Acreage Featured Home! 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home on 1.47 Acres+/-, 24X36 Detached Garage/ shop, U-Drive with Added RV Parking, PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver Area, $224,900 Call Bob Mosher, 541-593-2203.

749

Southeast Bend Homes

750

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

14 ACRES, tall pines bordering Fremont National Forest, fronts on paved road, power at property. Zoned R5 residential, 12 miles north of Bly, OR. $45,000. Terms owner 541-783-2829.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 1993 Silver Crest, 1508 sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bath, den, dbl. garage, all appl., forced air & central A/C, $92,500 OBO. 27th St., Snowberry Village, Bend. 541-317-0879

764

Redmond Homes

Farms and Ranches

4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053.

35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, pond & super private well, 75 year old owner will sacrifice for $425,000. 541-447-1039

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent

Will Finance, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fireplace, incl. fridge, range, washer & dryer, new paint & flooring, $8900, $1000 down, $200/mo., 541-383-5130.

Handyman

CCB#180420

Crook County Homes Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

PRINEVILLE Eleven 1 acre lots w/public water, Four 5 acre lots w/wells. Lots have trees, views, septic approvals, power & are approved by county. Dead-end cul-de-sac road needs constructed. Engineering is complete. 3 miles from town. Will sell or trade for income property or timberland. Dave, 541-350-4077

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

757

1 Acre Corner Lot Sun Forest Estates, buildable, standard septic approved $49,000 or trade, owner financing? 503-630-3220..

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

Fencing

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appl., incl,. Gardener W/D, $795 mo.. 541-408-0877.

FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS Cows get out? Neighbors get in? Call Bob anytime, for He’ll come running! 541-420-0966. CCB#190754

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Houses for Rent Redmond

Domestic Services

I DO THAT!

771

Lots

Move-In Ready! Homes start at $8999. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

750

Redmond Homes

Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

Barns

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

745

Homes for Sale

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

658

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Building/Contracting

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

The Bulletin Classifieds

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Nelson Landscape Maintenance ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Painting, Wall Covering

• Siding Replacement/Repair • Door/Window Replacement • Drywall Repair/Painting • Decks/Fencing • Shade Structures • Patios/Sidewalks Call David - 541-678-5411 CCB#187972 • 25+Yrs. Exp. 5% Discount to New Customers

Ex/Interior, Paint/Stain

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Award Winning Design

541-389-4974

CCB#180420

Fire Fuels Reduction

springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

Same Day Response

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Randy, 541-306-7492 Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates.

• Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998. RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

The Bulletin

D Cox Construction

Tile, Ceramic

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Remodeling, Carpentry

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Ask us about

Fertilizer included with monthly program

382-3883

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Weekly Maintenance

“YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

(This special package is not available on our website)

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993


E4 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 860

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

865

Motorcycles And Accessories

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Honda Magna V65 1984, 58,530 miles, very clean, runs excellent $3000, Call weekends 1-541-589-3492.

Honda

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Shadow

Aero

750, 2004. 5100 miles, garaged, like new. Blue/black. SisBar, Lug rack, bags. $4000. (541) 419-5212

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda Trail 90. 1973, 3600 miles. Like new! Collectors item. $1800. 541-593- 7483

Honda Trail Bikes: 1980 CT110, like new, $2400, 1974 CT90, great hunting bike, $900, both recently serviced, w/new batteries, call 541-595-5723.

ATVs

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo, fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

Yamaha 250 Bear Cat 1999, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $1700 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

870

Boats & Accessories

12 Ft. like new 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft, new EZ Loader Trailer, used twice, pole holder & folding seats. $2200. 541-617-0846.

2003. Low miles, xlnt cond. $4999. 541-647-8418 Harley Davidson Duece 2001, very low miles of 1258, corbin seat. Why buy new, only $11,900. Call 541-771-2020

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Classic 2007, 4K mi, windshield, saddle bags, garaged, senior owned, as new cond, $5300 OBO, 541-312-3098,619-306-1227

870

880

880

881

882

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Houseboat 38X10 with triple axle trailer. Includes private moorage with 24/7 security at Prinville resort. $24,500. Call 541-788-4844. Kawasaki KLR 2009 650 cc, 290 mi., excellent condition $4,500. 541-815-8744.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $21,000. 541-389-1413

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Folbot Greenlander II Tandem Folding Kayak. Stores in 2 bags. Motor mount. $1200. 541-633-7142

EXPEDITION Limited Edition 2001, 36’, very clean, 2 slides, satellite system. $49,995. 541-312-4183. Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $95,000. 541-382-1721 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen., & much more $60,000. 541-948-2310 Hard to find 32 ft. 2007 Hurricane by Four Winds, Ford V10, 10K mi., 2 slides, 2 Color TV’s, backup cam, hydraulic jacks, leather, cherry wood and many other options, Immaculate condition, $63,900. (541)548-5216, 420-1458

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

Winnebago Aladdin II 32 ft., 1979 exc. cond., ready for the road, propane or gas, 80 gal. propane tank, 72K mi., call for more info. $5000. 541-306-8205.

Motorhomes

882

Fifth Wheels Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $82,000. 541-848-9225.

880

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

881

Honda VTX 1800R YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4995. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics.

870

Boats & Accessories

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 20’ Seaswirl 1992, Hummin- Beaver Patriot 2000, hot water heat, diesel elec. motor, bird fishfinder Matrix 27 w/ Walnut cabinets, solar, pasgps, rebuilt OMC outdrive, sengers foot rest, no smok497 hours on motor, new top ing, no children, Bose stereo, less than year old, 2007 9.9 Corian countertops, tils Mercury outboard tilt and floors, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, trim, remote steering, stainW/D, exc. cond., beautiful! less steel, & many extras. $119,000. 541-215-0077 Purchased in 2002 for fishing Bounder 34’ 1994, J Model, enjoyment. November 2009 immaculate, only 34K miles, purchased dream and now no rare private bdrm., walk longer need this boat. Dual round queen island bed, awaxle trailer is included with nings on all windows, 6.5 purchase. Call Gen., garaged, like new in/ 541-815-1948 out, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakemany options to list, $17,500, board boat, ballast, tower, 350 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

818-795-5844, Madras

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

4 HP Evinrude outboard motor, standard shaft, new (no running hours), $475. 541-385-3950

$550 OBO!

15’ Crestliner, tri hull walk thru windshield, Johnson 55 hp., Minnkota 50 hp trolling motor Hummingbird fishfinger, new carpet, electrical, newly painted trailer, new wheel bearings, & spare tire, motor in good running condition., $1795. 541-389-8148

16’ Seaswirl 1985, open bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920.

Harley Davidson 2007, Road King, 56K, 103 in 6 spd. $17,000. 541-598-4344.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Travel Trailers

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

$19,500. 541-549-4834

Excellent condition, large slide, sofa bed, table and chairs, non-smokers. Must see to appreciate. $12,90obo. 541-382-6455.

6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498. Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $2000 firm, as is. Needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Montana Keystone 2955RL 2004, 2 slides, loaded, 2 TV’s, CD, Queen bed, all appl., full bath, hitch incl., exc. cond., hardly been used, $21,500. 541-389-8794

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444 Nash 28.5’ Bunk Bed Model, 2002, sleeps 8, exc. cond. $12,000 OBO, 541-536-1572

885

Canopies and Campers

Dutchman 26’ 2005,

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade,

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat 300, clean w/many options A Must See! $63,500. 541-279-9581.

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000.

runs great, $800, call , 541-588-0097.

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 541-788-0338 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. Cougar 5th wheel--2003 27', warranty, always garaged

Chevy Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Holiday Rambler Neptune 2004 36’ diesel pusher, low mi., fully serviced, very clean, outstanding cond., 2 slides, rear camera, $69,000. Much much more! 541-447-8006.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $18,500 541-610-9900.

Host Tahoe 2007 10.5 DS. Save thousands. Almost new. Must see to appreciate interior. $31,500. (541)306-7905

Lance 11.5’ 1992, A/C, micro, elec. jacks, awnings on both sides & back, good cond., clean, $6000 OBO. 541-408-4974.

Lance 820 Lite 2004, 8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking or pets $17,500 pics available (541)410-3658.

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

CHECK OUT OUR NEW MAP FEATURE ONLINE @ WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM /GARAGESALES

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

We can show your customers the fastest way to your garage sale.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!


THE BULLETIN • Monday, June 7, 2010 E5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

932

935

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

900

VW Super Beetle 1974,

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service 2800 Sq.ft. home on 2 acres at Sisters Airport, with airport access and room for owner hanger on property. Priced for quick close at $369,000, 15821 Kitty Hawk Ln, 541-280-9378.

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $21,000. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Utility Trailers

Pickups

Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Interstate 2007 20'x102" Cargo Trailer, like new only 350 miles, $4,500 OBO. 541-306-9888

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Ford F150 XLT 2009, matching canopy, always garaged, seat covers, Line-X bed liner, 10K, just like new, $27,250. Firm Randy, 541-306-1039

FORD F350 1997 4x4 V-8, 7.5L, long bed, with 8’ Boss Power-V snow plow. 35K miles by orig. owner, new tires, exc. cond, with all maint. history avail.,

$11,500.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$22,600 W/O winch $21,750. 541-325-2684

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

GMC Sierra 2500HD 2001 4x4 SLT

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Automobiles

DLR 0225

HONDA RIDGELINE 2007

RTL crew cab 4WD, V-6, leather, moonroof, tow pkg, $23,495 VIN#H508037 DLR 0225 541-598-3750

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

932

Antique and Classic Autos

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Toyota Tundra 2006, 360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4700. 541-617-1888.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931. Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

Jeep CJ7 1981, all original, tow bar, hard top, auto, dependable, very nice oldy! $3000, 541-815-4214

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160. Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

1000

Legal Notices

Mazda 3 i 2008, se-

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

dan, 4-cyl., auto, 20,300 mi., mostly hwy., like new, still under factory warranty, $12,295, 541-416-1900.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $21,500 541-788-8626

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 55K mi., 4 cyl.,

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

KEYBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AKA KEY BANK, NA, Plaintiff, v. PETER K. PURDY, Defendants. Case No. 10CV0062 ST SUMMONS

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by Plaintiff, KeyBank National Association AKA Key Bank NA. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons.

Hyundai GLS 2006, 4 cyl. 5 spd., 32 MPG, alloy wheels, new tires, snow tires/rims, 41K, like new, $7450. Firm. Call Randy, 541-306-1039.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

/s/ Lani Rogers Lani Rogers, Administrator

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Estate of GEORGIANA E. COLLINS, Deceased. Case No.: 10-PB-0034-MA

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Theresa Drake, undersigned, has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at the Albertazzi Law Firm, 44 NW Irving Ave., Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred.

If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636.

All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Anthony V. Albertazzi.

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7.

Dated and first published May 24, 2010.

ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By: John M. Thomas, Attorney, OSB # 024691 Attorneys for Plaintiff 11830 SW Kerr Parkway, Ste. 385 Lake Oswego, OR 97035-1249 (503) 517-7180, Fax (425) 457-7369 jthomas@rcolegal.com

Theresa Drake Personal Representative

NOTICE Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act: If you are the consumer who originally contracted the debt or if you assumed the debt, then you are notified that: 1. As of the date of the Complaint herein, the principal balance owed is $31,893.19. Because of interest, late charges, and other charges that may vary from day to day, the amount due on the day you pay may be greater. Hence, if you pay the amount shown above, an adjustment may be necessary after we receive your check. For further information, write or call Routh Crabtree Olsen, P.C. 2. The creditor to whom the debt is owed is KeyBank National Association AKA Key Bank NA. 3. Unless within 30 days after receipt of this notice you dispute the debt or any portion of it, we will assume the debt to be valid. 4. If you notify us in writing within 30 days after receipt of this notice that you dispute the debt or any part of it, we shall obtain verification of the debt and mail it to you. 5. If you so request in writing within 30 days after receipt of this notice, we will provide you with the name and address of the original creditor, if different from the current creditor. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

By: John M. Thomas, OSB # 024691 Attorney for Plaintiff

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of JOHN ALLEN ROGERS Deceased.

VW Convertible 1984, 5 spd., very low mi., exc. cond., set up for tow behind motorhome, $2695. 541-546-6920

Dated and first published on March 31, 2010.

You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days (or 60 days for Defendant United States or State of Oregon Department of Revenue) along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff.

CASE No. 10PB0066ST

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Paul B. Heatherman.

You are hereby required to appear and defend the Complaint filed against you in this case within 30 days from the date of the service of this summons upon you. If you fail to appear and defend, the Plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

VW Bug 2001, silver, 5 spd., 87K, only 2 owners, runs great $4000. 541-788-3624.

barred.

TO THE DEFENDANT: Peter K. Purdy.

VW Beetle Turbo Diesel, 2001, 40+ mpg, 64K, exc. cond, spoiler, chrome wheels, $10,000 OBO, 541-480-8868.

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

1000

Legal Notices

I hereby certify that the within is a true copy of the original summons in the within entitled action.

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818. 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

1000

Legal Notices

Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

541-598-3750

Utility Trailer, 4X10, 6” Steel I-beam frame, factory w/ lights, $200, 541-550-0444.

Wheels & Tires, aluminum, off Ford Ranger, great cond., $150. 541-408-1676

1000

Legal Notices

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

VIN#E327113

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

1000

Legal Notices

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9000 541-504-2878.

975

931

$6900 OBO (541) 520-8013.

940

Vans

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

'"DURAMAX DIESEL" , leather, running boards, tow pk g., low miles. $18,995 Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

Jeep Wrangler 1995, 133K, towable, 3 tops, extras, $6750. 541-318-1697.

Ford F150 XCab 1994, 4WD, 88K mi., goose neck hitch, exc. cond., $3900. 541-728-7188

Call 541-549-0757, Sisters.

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

LEXUS ES300 1999

933

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o Paul Heatherman PC, PO Box 8, Bend, Oregon 97709, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be

Albertazzi Law Firm 44 NW Irving Ave. Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 317-0231

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE: The regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Directors of Arnold Irrigation District has been changed for the month of June. June's meeting will be held on Tuesday, June 8, 2010 at 3:00 pm at 19604 Buck Canyon Rd., Bend, OR.

num from 5/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the

costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/15/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3488788 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010

541-322-7253

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7442331807 T.S. No.: OR-155167-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LUCAS A MADDOX as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE IN FAVOR OF HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC, as Beneficiary, dated 11/6/2006, recorded 11/9/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-74660 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251700 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWELVE (112) HUNTINGTON MEADOWS PHASES 5 AND 6, RECORDED FEBRUARY 21, 2006, IN CABINET G, PAGE 1061, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON Commonly known as: 16485 RILEY DRIVE LA PINE, Oregon 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $141,507.69; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2008 plus late

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx9082 T.S. No.: 1239626-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Marion G. Gilpin, as Grantor to Chicago Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated March 09, 2004, recorded April 01, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-17752 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-one (21), in block four (4) of Oregon Water Wonderland, Unit 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 55684 Big River Drive Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 4, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $292.42 Monthly Late Charge $14.62. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $40,869.57 together with interest thereon at 6.100% per annum from September 04, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 13, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 16, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-316599 06/07, 06/14, 06/21, 06/28

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx7200 T.S. No.: 1276559-09. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441838471 T.S. No.: OR-241117-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JORDAN JUDSON AND MELISSA JUDSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERI TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 7/26/2006, recorded 7/28/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-51894 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133294 LOT FOUR (4) IN BLOCK ONE (1) OF GLACIER VIEW, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 64941 GLACIER VIEW DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $455,862.25; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $3,147.88 Monthly Late Charge $137.70 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $455,862.25 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per an-

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Mark A. Andrews And Jennifer C. Andrews, Husband And Wife., as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated June 17, 2005, recorded June 21, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/ microfilm/reception No. 2005-38840 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15 of Ridgepointe, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3616 SW Salmon Ave. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,367.84 Monthly Late Charge $53.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $174,647.64 together with interest thereon at 5.375% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 13, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 16, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-316611 06/07, 06/14, 06/21, 06/28


E6 Monday, June 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,114.48 Monthly Late Charge $45.69 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $141,507.69 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75% per annum from 8/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/27/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired

after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/17/2010 LSI Title Com-

pany of Oregon, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3494887 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602371802 T.S. No.: OR-241301-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RICHARD W. YORK as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WEALTHBRIDGE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, AN OREGON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 5/22/2009, recorded 5/29/2009, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2009-22727 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111016 LOT TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN (211) IN BLOCK PP OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY. OREGON. Commonly known as: 19330 GALEN ROAD BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $152,809.33; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,095.89 Monthly Late Charge $34.38 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $152,809.33 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/5/2010 at

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8525 T.S. No.: 1278492-09.

prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/16/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3493068 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-94392

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): Grantor: Alvin Gene Brock and Rita Leah Brock. Trustee: AmeriTitle. Beneficiary: American General Financial Services (DE), Inc. Date: September 20, 2006. Recording Date: September 21, 2006. Recording Reference: 200664120. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Successor Trustee is Miles D. Monson and the mailing address of the Successor Trustee is: Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, Anderson & Monson, P.C., 10700 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy., Suite 460, Beaverton, OR 97005. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, ("the Property"): Lot Twenty-Five (25), Block Nine (9), NEWBERRY ESTATES PHASE II, Deschutes County, Oregon. The default for which foreclosure is made is: The Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly installments of $957.48 beginning July 1, 2009 through the installment due December 1, 2009, less a partial payment credit of $327.52, plus late charges of $10.00. The sum owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures (the "Obligation") is: $98,556.45, together with interest of $6,301.73 through December 14, 2009, plus interest on the principal sum of $98,556.45 at the rate of 9.75 percent per annum from December 15, 2009 until paid, together with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed. The Property will be sold to satisfy the Obligation. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: July 7, 2010. Time: 1:15 P.M. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, Front West Entrance, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes and State of Oregon. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 7, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included in the next paragraph. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and phone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide phone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636 or you may visit its Website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs that provide legal help to individuals at no charge, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org and to http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html RIGHT TO CURE: The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier's checks for the foreclosure sale must be made payable to Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee. DATED: February 18, 2010./s/ Miles D. Monson. Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, 10700 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy. #460, Beaverton, Oregon 97005, (503) 646-9230. STATE OF OREGON) ) ss. County of Washington) I, Miles D. Monson, certify that I am the Successor Trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee

the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, WILLIAM P. CARAM III AND ABBY L. CARAM, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 3/1/2006, recorded 3/3/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-14955, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, SOLELY AS TRUSTEE AND NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY FOR THE HOME EQUITY MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED TRUST, SERIES INABS 2006-C UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 15, SECOND ADDITION TO RIVER FOREST ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 16377 BATES STREET BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 20, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2008 19 payments at $ 1,394.74 each $ 26,500.06 (10-01-08 through 04-20-10) Late Charges: $ 615.76 Beneficiary Advances: $ 4,371.25 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 31,487.07 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $219,500.00, PLUS interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from 9/1/2008, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 23, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/20/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3567676 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1922 T.S. No.: 1276061-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Constance C. Cronin and Phillip G. Cronin, Wife And Husband, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin Financial Corp., An Op. Sub. of Mlb&t Co., Fsb, as Beneficiary, dated March 28, 2007, recorded March 30, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/ microfilm/reception No. 2007-18784 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 11 of Traditions East, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 21350 Livingston Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,822.32 Monthly Late Charge $91.12. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $260,081.93 together with interest thereon at 8.250% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 16, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 17, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lawrence Forbis and Cecilia Forbis, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Loancity, as Beneficiary, dated April 27, 2006, recorded May 03, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-30659 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: beginning at a point being the southeast corner of lot 2 in block 4 of View Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence south 89°42' west, 135.00 feet; thence north 0°24' west, 75.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence south 89°42' west, 135.00 feet; thence north 0°24' west, 75.00 feet; thence north 89°42' east, 135.00 feet; thence south 0°24' east, 75.00 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 2602 SW 24th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,099.99 Monthly Late Charge $46.46. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $147,795.31 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 01, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 26, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 02, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-316976 06/07/10, 06/14, 06/21, 06/28

R-313084 05/24, 05/31, 06/07, 06/14

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FBU-94478 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, PATRICK E. COLLET, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as grantor, to ESTHER SANTOS, as Trustee, in favor of BANKUNITED, FSB, as beneficiary, dated 4/18/2006, recorded 4/25/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-28435, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANKUNITED, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 25, THREE SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20054 DOANNA WAY BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 5, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,639.76 each $6,559.04 (02-01-10 through 05-05-10) Late Charges: $172.95 Beneficiary Advances: $25.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $6,756.99 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $321,734.99, PLUS interest thereon at 3.375% per annum from 01/01/10 to 12/1/2010, 3.375% per annum from 12/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 7, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/5/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3559875 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-BVS-108255 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KIP S. SCHONING, as grantor, to MARK H. PETERMAN, as Trustee, in favor of QUALITY MORTGAGE USA, INC., as beneficiary, dated 12/23/1994, recorded 1/4/1995 in Volume 362, page 1942, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. 95-00248, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWO (2), BLOCK TWENTY-ONE (21), BOULEVARD ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1084 NW FEDERAL STREET BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 3, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 5 payments at $640.10 each $3,200.50 (01-01-10 through 05-03-10) Late Charges: $387.04 TOTAL: $3,587.54 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior Hens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $41,886.03, PLUS interest thereon at 12.490% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: DATED: 5/3/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line: (714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3556203 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-96054 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRIAN D. STEVENS, A MARRIED MAN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 2/6/2007, recorded 2/14/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-09468, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 7, SUMMERFIELD PHASE IV, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2808 SOUTHWEST REINDEER AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 27, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2009 17 payments at $967.50 each $16,447.50 (01-01-09 through 05-27-10) Late Charges: $483.80 Beneficiary Advances: $5,509.40 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $22,440.70 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $172,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.75% per annum from 12/01/08 to 7/1/2010, 6.75% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 29, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/27/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3588863 06/07/2010, 06/14/2010, 06/21/2010, 06/28/2010


Bulletin Daily Paper 06/07/10