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STATE TESTING

Explosion guts building

Writing results skewed?

Chances of staying in country were hurt by his false claims of U.S. citizenship

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Pilot Butte Principal Stephanie Bennett started the school year with a goal to improve her students’ state writing test scores. Students worked on the subject throughout the year, but when she received preliminary data on her seventh-graders’ writing assessments, she was shocked to see that the percent of students who met or exceeded state benchmarks had actually decreased. “We were bummed,” she said. Then she got to work with Assistant Principal Teri Friesen, breaking down the tests to figure out why the numbers had changed. The test scores showed a discrepancy; the students who had taken the test with paper and pencil had fared much better on the assessment than those who had taken the test on a computer.

By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

Other schools see dip

TOP NEWS INSIDE BRITAIN: Gunman’s rampage leaves 12 dead, 25 injured, Page A3

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

MON-SAT

Vol. 107, No. 154, 42 pages, 7 sections

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Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend firefighters move a hose in front of the Nosler Inc. ammunition manufacturing building in southwest Bend following a fire and explosion in the facility on Wednesday afternoon. About 100 people inside the building were able to get outside before the blast.

No one injured in Nosler bullet factory fire Inside

Galveston Ave.

Nosler Inc.

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Columb ia

Reed Market Rd.

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Whether he’s convicted of the criminal charges against him or not, Doitchin Krasev’s chances of staying in the United States appear to be negligible. Federa l agents outed the former Oregon Liquor Control Commission agent — who went by the name “Jason Evers” for 14 years Doitchin — as a Bulgar- Krasev ian national last week. He has apparently been in the U.S. illegally since 1994, when he stopped attending college in North Carolina, a move which rendered his student visa invalid. Now he faces one federal count of falsifying a passport application in 2002 and an Ohio charge of stealing the identity of a child named Jason Evers who was murdered there 28 years ago. And regardless of the outcome of those proceedings, he’ll ultimately have to answer to U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, which appears to have a solid case for deporting him and barring his return to the states for at least a decade.

‘A trip in his future’ St.

t.

Simpson Ave.

dS

Bend bullet manufacturer’s underground ballistics testing tunnel. It blew a massive hole in the side of the building, rattled homes and offices several blocks away and drew dozens of police officers and firefighters, who blocked off a large area around the site. But because employees had been able to escape the building after the fire alarm sounded, no one was injured. Police and fire officials remained on scene late Wednesday afternoon, keeping onlookers away from the building. See Explosion / A4

Colorado Ave.

Bon

• Nosler Inc. has been a Bend company since moving here in 1958, Page A4

Wall St.

Seth Reed had just clocked out after his shift at Nosler Inc. and ducked into the restroom when he heard the fire alarm go off and saw a cloud of smoke pouring under the door. “I opened the door and flames shot into the bathroom,” he said. “I thought I should stay in there because I didn’t think I’d be able to make it out.” But he decided to make a run for it and sprinted through the building and out the front door to Southwest Columbia Street. As the company’s employees gathered outside in a designated fire evacuation meeting spot, an explosion rocked the building and debris rained down on the crowd. The blast, which occurred around 2:15 p.m. Wednesday, was believed to have been sparked by a fire in the

Columbia St.

The Bulletin

14th St.

By Erin Golden

Century Dr.

As it turns out, it wasn’t just Pilot Butte Middle School that discovered that theme. Schools around the district and state have reported similar differences between the online and the paper-based test, and now the Oregon Department of Education is planning to analyze the data to figure out what, if anything, has gone wrong. Crystal Greene, a program analyst for the assessment team at the Oregon Department of Education, said the state hasn’t collected all of the scores, so an analysis has not yet been completed. “We do have some districts who have reported lower scores,” she said. “With a new system, it’s not unusual for there to be some score fluctuation.” The tests used the same prompts and were identical. And according to Greene, the writing scorers are trained to read both handwritten and typed essays. Currently, the state doesn’t mandate the online format. Greene said it’s unclear whether the online version will become the only accepted test. See Writing / A4

U.S. likely to deport ‘Evers’

ngto

n Dr . Greg Cross / The Bulletin

“If what I have read in your newspaper is true, I see a trip in his future,” said Portland immigration lawyer Tilman Hasche. That is because, federal investigators say, Krasev has falsely claimed U.S. citizenship in the past — a move that makes him ineligible to stay in the U.S. for almost any reason. See ‘Evers’ / A5

U.N. critical of U.S. drone attacks Nuclear option By Charlie Savage

on the oil spill?

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — A senior U.N. official said Wednesday that the growing use of armed drones by the United States to kill terrorism suspects was undermining global constraints on the use of military force. He warned that the American example would lead to a chaotic world as the new weapons technology inevitably spread. In a 29-page report to the U.N. Human Rights Council, the official, Philip Alston, the U.N. special representative on extrajudicial executions, called on the United States to exercise greater restraint in its use of drones in places like Pakistan and Yemen, outside the war zones in Afghanistan and Iraq. The report — the most extensive effort by the United Nations to grapple with the legal implications of armed drones — also proposed a summit meeting of “key military powers” to clarify legal limits on such killings. In an interview, Alston said the United States appeared to think that it was “facing a unique threat from transnational terrorist networks” that justified its effort to put forward

By William J. Broad New York Times News Service

The chatter began weeks ago as armchair engineers brainstormed for ways to stop the torrent of oil spilling into the Gulf of Mexico: What about nuking the well? Decades ago, the Soviet Union reportedly used nuclear blasts to seal off runaway gas wells, inserting a bomb deep underground and letting its fiery heat melt the surrounding rock to shut off the flow. Why not try it here?

Obama not considering the idea Ann Johansson / The New York Times

From left, Capt. Steve Truhlar, Lt. Thomas Shuler and Adm. Jody Beckenridge talk next to a Predator B aircraft in Palmdale, Calif. legal assertions to make the rules “as flexible as possible.” But that example, he said, could quickly lead to a situation in which dozens of countries carry out “competing drone attacks” outside their borders against people “labeled as terrorists by one group or another.”

“I’m particularly concerned that the United States seems oblivious to this fact when it asserts an everexpanding entitlement for itself to target individuals across the globe,” Alston said in an accompanying statement. See Drones / A4

The idea has gained fans with each failed attempt to stem the leak and each new setback — on Wednesday, the latest rescue effort stalled when a wire saw being used to slice through the riser pipe got stuck. “Probably the only thing we can do is create a weapon system and send it down 18,000 feet and detonate it, hopefully encasing the oil,” Matt Simmons, a Houston energy expert and investment banker, told Bloomberg News on Friday. Or as CNN reporter John Roberts suggested last week, “Drill a hole, drop a nuke in and seal up the well.” See Nuclear / A5


A2 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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F / Education By Thomas H. Maugh II

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES — July is the worst month to check into a teaching hospital because of the influx of inexperienced residents, University of California, San Diego, researchers reported Wednesday. The rate of fatal medical errors spikes in July, increasing by 10 percent compared with the average in other months, they reported in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The increase occurred only in counties with teaching hospitals. Many physicians have long suspected an increased rate of medical errors when new residents join hospitals, a phenomenon commonly referred to as the “July effect.” But hard evidence supporting the possibility

had been hard to come by, said social scientist David H. Phillips of UCSD, because most previous studies had examined small, non-geographically representative samples over a limited time period.

Anesthesia trainees Perhaps the best evidence to date was a five-year study of anesthesia trainees at an Australian hospital that showed an increase in errors in February, the first month of their academic year. Phillips and graduate student Gwendolyn E. C. Barker studied all 62,338,584 U.S. death certificates for the period 1979 to 2006, ultimately focusing on 244,388 deaths linked to medication areas. They found an average in-

crease of 10 percent in medication-linked deaths in July in counties with teaching hospitals but none in other counties. The proportion of such deaths was highest in those counties with the highest number of teaching hospitals. Studying deaths outside the hospital, they found no similar spike in deaths during the period, suggesting that it was not simply a summertime phenomenon. They found no spike in other causes of death in hospitals during July, however. Their findings, they wrote, “provide fresh evidence for 1) re-evaluating responsibilities assigned to new residents; 2) increasing supervision of new residents; (and) 3) increasing education concerned with medication safety.”

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Patrick Major, right, has his dachshund, Sammy Davis, perform some tricks for a third grade class in Hayward, Calif. Patrick brought Sammy to the class to teach the kids how to care for a dog.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

04 09 14 39 43 38 Power Play: 4. The estimated jackpot is $20 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

07 11 12 15 23 45 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $7.4 million for the next drawing.

By SAM DILLON New York Times News Service

The nation’s governors and state school chiefs released on Wednesday a new set of academic standards, their final recommendations for what students should master in English and math as they move from the primary grades through high school graduation. The standards, which took a year to write, have been tweaked and refined in recent weeks in response to some of the 10,000 comments the public sent in after a draft was released in March. The standards were made public at a news conference on Wednesday in Atlanta. Leah Lechleiter-Luke, a Spanish teacher from Mauston, Wis., who is that state’s 2010 teacher of the year, said at the conference that the new standards were preferable to her home state’s. “It’s not that the standards in Wisconsin are so bad, it’s just that there are so many of them,” she said. “These are more user-friendly.” The Obama administration hopes that states will quickly adopt the new standards in place of the hodgepodge of current state benchmarks, which vary so significantly that it is impossible to compare test scores from different states. The United States is one of the few developed countries that lacks national standards for its public schools.

Students have trouble adjusting

REDMOND BUREAU

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Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Report: July is the worst month New standards to check into a teaching hospital announced for public schools

TEACHING THROUGH TRICKS

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Politics derail bid to save teachers’ jobs By David Goldstein McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Congress bailed out Wall Street and the auto industry, but it appears to have drawn the line — at least for now — at rescuing teachers. A Democratic plan to send $23 billion to the states to save the jobs of 100,000 to 300,000 public school teachers, librarians, counselors and other employees slated for layoffs looks dead for the time being. Blame it on election-year politics. The anti-Washington, antispending mood has become so potent even Democrats are antsy about helping teachers, one of their most long-standing and generous allies. “We are in a situation now where a portion of our caucus is rebelling against just about any kind of spending,” said Democratic Rep. Emanuel Cleaver of Missouri. The layoffs already have begun. Advocates for teachers are calling them catastrophic. Critics of the emergency aid say states need to clean up their fiscal acts and make changes. In the meantime, large, populous states such as California and Texas, for example, are each expected to absorb the loss of more than 30,000 teachers and other personnel, according to White House estimates. Schools are cutting staff and programs because the recession has depleted state tax revenues, which pay for public education. Democrats in the House of Representatives had hoped to pass the $23 billion emergency bailout this week as part of a spending bill for the war in Afghanistan that was slated for passage, but fiscally conservative members from tough districts weren’t happy about hav-

“Given the size of the current federal deficit, I have reservations about the federal government taking on greater responsibility for education funding.” — Sen. Claire McCaskill D-Miss.

ing to defend another vote that would increase the deficit. The school aid measure never came to a vote. Nor did it have any more luck in the Senate, where some Democrats were equally jumpy about spending, and the majority couldn’t secure the necessary 60 votes for passage. “Given the size of the current federal deficit, I have reservations about the federal government taking on greater responsibility for education funding,” said Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri.

Democratic voice Teachers have been a powerful voice in Democratic Party politics. The two largest unions gave congressional Democrats more than $4 million in 2008 and have contributed more than $1.7 million so far in this election cycle. Kim Anderson, the director of government relations for the National Education Association, the largest teachers union, said given what schools and students were likely to face in the fall because of the layoffs and cutbacks, “We are struggling to see why people view this as a tough vote. We

view this as a pretty commonsense vote. We really think (the layoffs) will have the most catastrophic impact on education that we have seen since the Great Depression.” Critics say the Education Department already received $100 billion in economic stimulus money and hasn’t spent it all of it, so why should Congress approve more? “Congress should not add to the nation’s burgeoning public debt while states are still sitting on funds that were provided 15 months ago,” said Republican Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas.

Stimulus funds no help Education Department officials said most of the unspent stimulus money couldn’t be used to prevent layoffs because it was obligated to other programs. Education Department spokeswoman Sandra Abrevaya said the administration expected Congress to approve the emergency money after the weeklong Memorial Day recess. A powerful force over the outcome could be the sour political mood, however, across the country and on Capitol Hill. A USA Today/Gallup Poll this week said even as the public was growing optimistic about the economy, anger at the country’s direction and incumbents was extremely high. With a pivotal election in five months, lawmakers in both parties are operating on high alert. A range of issues could be affected, and there will be few hands across the aisle. “We now cannot compromise because each party will react negatively to someone who wants to work with the other side,” Cleaver said.

Students whose families move from New York to Georgia or California, for example, often have difficulty adjusting to new schools because classroom work is organized around different standards. The problem has become worse, since many states have weakened standards in recent years to make it easier for schools to avoid sanctions under the federal No Child Left Behind law. The new standards were written by English and math experts convened last year by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. They are laid out in two documents: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, and Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects. With three appendices, the English standards run to nearly 600 pages.

Polygons, plot, point of view, Pythagoras Under the new math standards, eighth-graders would be expected to use the Pythagorean theorem to find distances between points on the coordinate plane and to analyze polygons. Under the English standards, sixthgrade students would be expected to describe how a story’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes and how an author develops the narrator’s point

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“I’m hopeful that a bunch of states with crummy standards will end up with better ones this way.” — Chester E. Finn Jr., former assistant secretary of education of view. “The standards define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, not how teachers should teach,” the introduction to the new English standards says. “They do not — indeed, cannot — enumerate all or even most of the content that students should learn. The standards must therefore be complemented by a well-developed, content-rich curriculum.” In keeping with those principles, the English standards point to classic poems, plays, short stories, novels and essays to demonstrate the advancing complexity of texts that students should be able to master. On the list of exemplary readaloud books for second and third-graders, for instance, is James Thurber’s “The Thirteen Clocks.” One play cited as appropriate for high school students is “Oedipus Rex,” by Sophocles. Five English texts are required reading. High school juniors and seniors must study the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address. Also, said Susan Pimentel, a consultant in New Hampshire who was lead writer on the English standards, “Students have to read one Shakespeare play — that’s a requirement.” In a joint letter, Joel I. Klein, the New York Schools chancellor, and 54 other big-city superintendents who are members of the Council of the Great City Schools urged adoption of the standards.

Better chances in ‘Race to the Top’ Just how many states will adopt them remains unclear. Texas and Alaska declined to participate in the standardswriting effort. In the Obama administration’s Race to the Top competition, states that adopt by Aug. 2 will stand a higher chance at a piece of the $4 billion in federal grant money to be divided among winning states in September. “I’m hopeful that a bunch of states with crummy standards will end up with better ones this way,” said Chester E. Finn Jr., a former assistant secretary of education who has long called for national standards. But the Obama administration is pressing states to adopt them too fast, he said. His recommendation to states: “Don’t rush to judgment.”

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 A3

T S Israel, denouncing flotilla, braces for en route vessel By Sheera Frenkel McClatchy-Tribune News Service

JERUSALEM — Israel on Wednesday deported hundreds of pro-Palestinian activists who had been detained after its commando attack Monday on a Gaza aid flotilla, and braced for the arrival of at least one more ship attempting to break its naval blockade of Gaza. The MV Rachel Corrie, named for an American activist who was killed in the Gaza Strip in 2003, set off Monday from Malta toward the Gaza Strip. Carrying 15 passengers, including Mairead Maguire, a Northern Irish Nobel Peace laureate, it was expected to arrive in Israel this weekend. Derek Graham, an activist on board, said they would attempt to break the blockade to honor the memory of the nine people killed in the previous flotilla attempt. “It’s more vital than ever that we continue. If we don’t deliver this aid, then those people have died in vain,” he told Irish broadcaster RTE. President Barack Obama and other world leaders urged Israel to ensure that there’s no recurrence of a commando raid like Monday’s. “It’s important to the president and to our country that we don’t see the same kind of events unfold like they did the last time. So we are talking to our partners and are hopeful that we won’t see a repeat,” said Bill Burton, a White House spokesman. However, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called criticism of Israel’s actions “an attack of international hypocrisy”

Israel frees detainees in bid to quell anger JERUSALEM — Israel worked Wednesday to defuse rising international anger by agreeing to a rapid release of all detainees — including those suspected of attacking its soldiers — taken after the deadly nighttime raid of six ships seeking to break its blockade of the Gaza Strip. The release seemed most immediately aimed at repairing dangerously eroding ties with Turkey, Israel’s main ally in the Muslim world, as demands continued to intensify around the world to end a blockade that critics say has kept Gazans isolated and impoverished. And in fact the homecoming seemed to deflate some anger in Turkey, which had made the release of hundreds of its citizens its main demand after at least four Turks were killed by Israeli commandos in the raid. Some news reports said that as few as three activists remained in detention. But despite the somewhat softer words Wednesday, there was no telling if the gesture would be enough to roll back longer-term damage to Israel’s relationships, especially with Turkey, which has grown increasingly angry at Israel. — New York Times News Service

and said Israel would continue to counter any attempt to breach the blockade. “This wasn’t a love ship, it was a hate boat,” he said. “This was not a peaceful operation, it was a terrorist operation.” Despite demands by friends and critics of Israel to end the blockade of Gaza, Netanyahu defended it, saying it had averted possible missile attacks on Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. The Rachel Corrie had been scheduled to leave with the rest of the Gaza-bound flotilla last week, but it was delayed because of technical problems. Activists from the Free Gaza Movement who helped organize the flotilla said a larger group of ships was being assembled to attempt another breach of the

Gaza blockade next month. Israeli naval commandos seized more than 700 activists on six boats as they attempted to reach the Gaza Strip earlier this week. The activists were held in a makeshift detention facility before being moved to Israel’s southern Beersheba prison. Israel’s blockade began in June 2007 as a reaction to Islamist Hamas militants wresting control of Gaza. It has used the siege to pressure Gaza’s population in the hope that residents will turn against Hamas and that it will lead to the return of captive Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit. However, political science experts, such as Bar-Ilan University professor Menachem Klein, say the blockade has failed and Israel should review its policies.

JAPAN POLITICS

Finance chief seen as likely next PM By Malcolm Foster The Associated Press

TOKYO — Japan’s ruling party scrambled today to find a new leader after the prime minister called it quits, with Finance Minister Naoto Kan widely seen as the most likely successor. Major Japanese morning papers nearly all predicted that Kan — a veteran politician with a reputation for speaking his mind and standing up to Japan’s powerful bureaucrats — would take the place of Yukio Hatoyama, who resigned as prime minister Wednesday after just eight months in office amid public disgust with his broken campaign promises. Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada and Transport Minister Seiji Maehara are also seen as likely contenders for the top job, but so far only Kan, 63, has announced he will run in Friday’s Democratic Party of Japan election to choose a new leader. Whoever takes over the premiership faces a tough job trying

“(Naoto Kan is) outspoken, he doesn’t mind stepping on toes, he’s a person who has got a bit of a populist side to him.” — Jeff Kingston, director of Asian studies at Temple University to revive the DPJ’s plunging support ahead of upper house elections that are expected to take place in July. But analysts say Kan — with his reputation as a principled politician who isn’t a political blueblood like Hatoyama and several of the past prime ministers — is probably the best choice to rally voters. A former health minister, Kan gained popularity with voters after exposing a government cover-up of HIV-tainted blood products that caused thousands

of hemophilia patients to contract the virus that causes AIDS. “There will be a bit of a bounce of support” from the public if Kan is named prime minister, predicted said Jeff Kingston, director of Asian studies at Temple University in Tokyo. “He’s outspoken, he doesn’t mind stepping on toes, he’s a person who has got a bit of a populist side to him,” Kingston said. “I think Kan will probably lead the party to a somewhat better, somewhat surprising result in those elections. I don’t think they’ll be quite as catastrophic as some pundits are predicting.” Because the DPJ controls the more powerful lower house of the Diet, or parliament, the party chief will almost certainly become prime minister — a vote that could take place as soon as Friday. The influence of Ichiro Ozawa, who resigned as the party’s No. 2 figure Wednesday — seen as the party’s powerbroker — will be key in determining the next chief.

W  B

Explosions punctuate Afghan peace talks

excesses that had driven people to join them.

in office and kept Bangkok under emergency rule since April 7.

KABUL — President Hamid Karzai’s peace council, called a jirga, came under fire from inside and out on its first day Wednesday. Even as the Afghan president spoke, inviting the Taliban to join in peace efforts, insurgents sent a pair of potential suicide bombers, disguised in women’s clothing, in a failed attempt to disrupt it, and a rocket exploded inside the compound. Inside the sprawling jirga tent, a former president who led antiTaliban warlords was appointed chairman, prompting some prominent delegates to pronounce the deliberations doomed. Other than members of Parliament, many of the 1,600 delegates were handpicked in a process dominated by the president’s staff. Karzai opened the jirga with an address that appealed directly to Taliban insurgents, blaming foreign forces in part for

Thai prime minister wins confidence vote

Iran steps up arrests for ‘immodest’ dress

BANGKOK — Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva on Wednesday won the backing of lawmakers for his handling of an army operation to end two months of anti-government protests in Bangkok in which at least 87 people were killed. Legislators voted 246 to 186 in a confidence vote Wednesday, reflecting the majority he attained in December 2008 after a court disbanded the ruling party linked to former leader Thaksin Shinawatra. During the two-day confidence debate, the government and opposition blamed one another for the protest violence, exacerbating divisions that emerged after the army ousted Thaksin in a 2006 coup. Abhisit has called on the military to end political protests twice during his 18 months

TEHRAN — Iranian authorities have begun police patrols in the capital to arrest women wearing clothes deemed improper. The campaign against loosefitting veils and other signs of modernism comes as government opponents are calling for rallies to mark the one-year anniversary of the disputed presidential election, and critics of the crackdown say it is stoking feelings of discontent. But hard-liners say improper veiling is a “security issue,” and “loose morality” threatens the core of the Islamic republic. Tehran police have been arresting women for wearing short coats, modest veils and even when they were too suntanned. Witnesses report fines up to $800 for dress considered immodest. — From wire reports

Rod Minchin / The Associated Press

Police stand next to a body following a shooting on Duke Street, in the town of Whitehaven in northwest England on Wednesday. British police were investigating the shooting spree that left 12 people dead and about 25 injured in northwest England.

U.K. shooter kills 12 Gunman, 52, kills himself at end of 3-hour rampage By John F. Burns New York Times News Service

LONDON — Britain experienced its worst shooting rampage in years on Wednesday when a 52-year-old taxi driver killed at least 12 people and wounded about 25 others before shooting himself in a remote area of the Lake District, one of the country’s most celebrated beauty spots. The police identified the killer as Derrick Bird, a longtime resident of the area, and said they had found his body in woodlands on the western edges of the Lake District National Park, about 200 miles northwest of London in the county of Cumbria. They said they had also found two guns, one of them a shotgun. Britain claims to have the strongest gun control laws of any country in Europe, adopted after two other mass killings in the past 25 years. But the Home Office, which maintains a registry of licensed weapons, said Wednesday that there were about 1.8 million legal weapons in private hands, including about 1.4 million shotguns and about 400,000 rifles and air guns. Most of the shotguns are owned by farmers and other rural people, and used for hunting. The police said Bird’s threehour killing rampage started in midmorning in the coastal town of Whitehaven and continued as he drove a zigzag route for 25 miles. He headed first to his village of Rowrah, east of Whitehaven, then south along a road running inland from the coast, then headed east up into the hills, driving through towns and villages — Frizington, Egremont, Seascale, Gosforth and Boot, among others — that are a regular part of the Lake District tourist trail. The police said they were investigating 30 crime scenes where shootings occurred. The police said Bird even-

The Associated Press

Derrick Bird, 52, from Rowrah, northwest England, is seen in this photo provided by Cumbria Police. tually abandoned his car, a silver Citroen Picasso, and fled on foot before apparently shooting himself. His body was found near the village of Boot, about 10 miles from Grasmere, where the Romantic poet William Wordsworth spent much of his life.

First victim was a fellow cabbie Newspaper accounts said Bird shot his first victim, another taxi driver, in the head at close range in Whitehaven, a quiet coastal town, before shooting two other drivers and getting into his car and continuing to shoot as he drove south, apparently at random, through the shattered windshield. In several places, witnesses said he stopped the car, got

out and leveled a long-barreled weapon equipped with a sniper’s scope at passers-by. The newspaper The Daily Mail said pedestrians along his route raced frantically for cover as he sprayed the streets with bullets. It said Bird shot a farmer, identified as Garry Purdham, a married father of two in his 30s, as he worked in the field near Gosforth. A 15-year-old girl interviewed by Channel Four television said the gunman stopped beside her, said something to her that she did not catch, then opened fire, missing her, before driving off. Deputy Chief Constable Stuart Hyde, a police commander in Whitehaven, told the BBC that the early investigation had not pinpointed a motive for the killings or determined whether the attack was premeditated. The Daily Telegraph, a national newspaper, reported in its editions today that the rampage was touched off by a dispute over a family will, and the BBC reported that one of the victims was Bird’s brother. Britain’s Press Association news agency quoted a taxi driver in Whitehaven as saying that an argument had erupted on Tuesday between Bird and three other drivers. The unidentified driver, who said he did not know what the argument was about, said Bird “took off in his car and went home” afterward.

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A4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Drones Continued from A1 “This strongly asserted but ill-defined license to kill without accountability is not an entitlement which the United States or other states can have without doing grave damage to the rules designed to protect the right to life and prevent extrajudicial executions,” Alston said. Alston is scheduled to present his findings to the Human Rights Council in Geneva on Thursday. While not legally binding, his report escalates the volume of international concerns over a tactic that has become the Obama administration’s weapon of choice against al-Qaida and its allies. The New York Times reported last week that Alston’s report would call on the United States to stop using Central Intelligence Agency-operated drones and limit the technology to regular military forces because they are open and publicly accountable for their conduct — for example, by investigating missile strikes that kill civilians. Days later, news emerged that a CIA drone strike in Pakistan’s tribal areas was believed to have killed al-Qaida’s third-ranking leader, apparently a major success. In an interview on Wednesday, Alston acknowledged that the United States could make “a reasonable legal argument” that a strike against such a figure in those circumstances was lawful and appropriate, but he argued that the escalating number of drone strikes in Pakistan still

Explosion Continued from A1 Bend Deputy Fire Marshal Jeff Bond said the Oregon State Fire Marshal and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives had been notified and asked to help with the investigation — and provide guidance on how to handle the cleanup at a facility stocked with ammunition. “We’re not going to rush into anything that would put anyone in harm’s way,” Bond said. Zach Waterman, a spokesman for the company, said the area of the building damaged by the explosion housed several offices and the underground tunnel. Around 2 p.m., an employee working in the testing area saw a flash of light and pulled a fire alarm, he said. About 100 employees who were working in the building at the time quickly made their way outside before the fire sparked the explosion. Waterman said he did not know of any past fires in the twobuilding, 80,000-square-foot facility the company has occupied since 1982. The building and its contents were valued at nearly

Writing Continued from A1 Bill Rhoades, who oversees middle-school programs for Bend-La Pine Schools, sent a letter to the state pointing out the testing discrepancy. “The writing results just don’t really match very well with the improvements we’ve seen in reading and mathematics,” he said. “It seems to be a discrepancy in performance in the online test versus taking it with pencil and paper.” Since the issue has been raised by various districts around the state, Rhoades said the state may make an adjustment to the final test results. “I’m optimistic that we might hear something is going to be reported differently,” he said.

A ‘difficult’ justice Rhoades noted that writing can be a difficult subject to score because it’s more subjective than math or reading. Greene said the state is considering two possible reasons for the discrepancy between scores. First, in the written format, students write a draft and then copy it as a final version, and Greene said students might be more likely to catch their errors in that editing process. “In the online version you can just press ‘submit’ and it’s out there,” she said. The other option, Greene said, is that handwriting issues are mitigated with the computer test. “Sometimes if you’re scoring and you’re not totally sure if it’s an ‘e’ or an ‘a’, maybe a scorer will give the student the benefit of the doubt,” she said. “When it’s typed, you know if it’s spelled

KENTUCKY

Senate race puts civil rights back in the spotlight Candidate Paul’s comments highlight issue of segregation at country clubs By Krissah Thompson The Washington Post

Daniel Rosenbaum / The New York Times

Col. Daniel Johnson, center, visits the intelligence center at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Va., in December 2009. raised concerns. The recent strike “is a very convenient one because there you have got a very clearly acceptable target, but we’re not told who the other strikes are against and what efforts are being made to comply with the rules,” he said. The report calls on nations like Pakistan to publicly disclose the scope and limits of any permission granted for drone strikes on their territories. It also calls on drone operators like the United States to dis-

close the legal justification for such killings, the criteria and safeguards used when selecting targets, and the process for investigating attacks that kill civilians. A White House spokesman declined to comment on the report, but pointed to a speech in March by the State Department legal adviser, Harold Koh, that partly outlined the Obama administration’s legal rationale. Koh said the United States obeyed legal limits on the use of force when selecting targets,

Nosler a longtime Bend business Nosler Inc. was founded in 1948 as the Nosler Partition Bullet Company by John Nosler, a former trucker and self-taught mechanical engineer who wanted to create better bullets for hunting big game. The company moved to Bend from Ashland in 1958 and moved into its current facility on Bend’s west side in 1982. It makes bullets and sells them to several ammunition companies, including Illinois-based Winchester Ammunition and Minnesotabased Federal Cartridge Co. It also sells bullets for people who hand-load their own ammunition and produces its own brand of ammunition. Nosler currently employs about 135 people. In 2008, the company’s president and CEO told The Bulletin that his employees were making about 1 million bullets per month. — Erin Golden, The Bulletin

$13 million, but fire officials did not have a loss estimate as of Wednesday evening. Several of the bystanders who lined up along the yellow police tape to check out the damage said they’d heard and felt the explosion and at first thought it was an earthquake or a major car accident. Zachary Dean and Spencer Doak were walking down Southwest Century Drive near Safeway. Dean thought a bomb had gone off. “I thought maybe it was thunder,” Doak said. “But then we got

up close and realized it wasn’t.” Barb Gonzalez was in her house, a couple of blocks from the Nosler building. She said she felt one big boom. “I’m from California, and I’ve been through many earthquakes,” she said. “My house shook like an earthquake.” A few blocks away and across the river, Matt Smith was working at his desk when the screen flickered on and off. “It shook the power on my computer,” he said. “I thought it was lightning.” Michelle Leonardo, who was

wrong or right. In that way it’s a better assessment.” Greene also suggested the discrepancies could be because students are not yet accustomed to the computer format. Those reasons aren’t enough for Rhoades. “Those are fine, but my only question is we’re assuming that the assessments are reliable,” he said. “That is, if you’ve got alternate forms of an assessment, kids should perform equally as well regardless of which form of the assessment they took.” And that definitely didn’t happen. At Pilot Butte Middle School, preliminary results indicate that of the 110 students who took the paper-based test, about 46 percent met or exceeded state benchmarks. But of the 85 seventh-graders who took the computer test, only 19 percent met benchmarks. “We’re not quite sure why,” Bennett said. “We were wondering maybe if grading something that’s printed out versus grading something handwritten, maybe there’s a bias there. Or the errors are so obvious in typed form versus written form. The other thing we’re wondering about is whether students express themselves quite as well on the computer.” Whatever the reason, the results show a big difference. The two groups of students, Friesen said, were heterogeneous. “We knew the state was heading in this direction and we thought it would give staff and kids a snapshot of what it would be like,” Friesen said. “And when the results came back we were quite surprised.” Last year, 38 percent of the school’s seventh-graders passed the writing test; this year, as a result of that computer test, the

pass rate will fall to 33 percent. “It’s kind of deflating,” Friesen said. At Westside Village School, which serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade, Principal Wendy Winchel noticed immediately that something was up with her students’ writing scores. “We had a lot of kids that definitely should have done great who didn’t,” she said. “We’ve asked the state to look into it.” Winchel said she doesn’t measure her students year-to-year, simply because her small school allows her to know students personally.

Comparing examples “What I looked at was which kids passed the fourth-grade test, and then which kids have great work samples that show they can write,” she said. “Then I look and compare those to the state test, and it just doesn’t correlate. I also look at their reading OAKS score and some of those kids just blasted that out of the water, and then their writing test wasn’t great.” Winchel noted that her fourthgrade students, who took the test with paper and pencil, did very well. But the seventh-graders, who were piloting the online program, performed poorly compared to how they’d done in fourth grade. “When you work on a computer you’re used to spell check and grammar check, that’s a whole skill in itself,” she said. “To make them take a test on what is basically like a typewriter, I think that threw them off.” Gayle Vidal, principal at Three Rivers School, said that was her main concern about the online version of the test.

and he defended drone killings as lawful because of the armed conflict with al-Qaida and because of the nation’s right to self-defense. “A state that is engaged in an armed conflict or in legitimate self-defense is not required to provide targets with legal process before the state may use lethal force,” he said. “Our procedures and practices for identifying lawful targets are extremely robust, and advanced technologies have helped to make our targeting even more precise.”

working in an office building next door, was about to head to her car, which was parked in front of the Nosler building, but decided to grab a few things before leaving. She was in the hallway having a conversation and was looking out the window when she saw the Nosler facility begin to crumble. “All I saw was a building coming down,” she said. Police told Leonardo and her co-workers to leave the building. About an hour later, she was able to go around the front of the building and found her Suburban, which had been crushed under a massive slab of concrete. Clif Stuart, a Nosler employee who hadn’t been to work in a few weeks because of a medical issue, got a call from a friend and came to see what was going on. “It was a good day to not be at work,” he said, shaking his head. As many of the Nosler employees gathered in a nearby park, Reed stood near the scene of the explosion, marveling at how his run-of-the-mill day had turned into a frightening escape. “This is pretty crazy,” he said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

All seventh-graders at Three Rivers School in Sunriver took the online version of the writing test this year. Vidal said the teacher who proctored the exam immediately told Vidal she didn’t think the scores would be very good. “She said she was just devastated,” Vidal said. “She knew when they were taking the exam itself that it would not be reflective of what they can do.” Students practice their computer writing on machines equipped with spell-check and a program that automatically changes certain commonly misspelled words, Vidal said. That program was not engaged on the writing test. “There were these little simple mechanical mistakes being made that they were just oblivious to,” she said. “They typed as they always typed.” Vidal said her staff didn’t know the test wouldn’t have a spell-check feature, which she calls a “tool of the trade” with computer writing. Next year, she said, teachers will adjust the way they teach computer writing. In the meantime, Vidal said, she’s frustrated. The school’s preliminary data show that about 30 percent of seventh-graders passed the writing test, down from 52 percent last year. “We understand we’re judged by data and that data is judged in different ways and looked at in different ways,” Vidal said. “I don’t have any objection to that, I think it’s healthy and good. ... According to good test procedure, you should match your test to the way you teach it.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The push to integrate Kentucky’s private social clubs began in the early 1990s with a lone, quiet protest: At lunchtime when the weather was nice, a black preacher and civil rights activist named Louis Coleman would put up a folding card table in front of one of the many unofficially restricted clubs here; set it with a tablecloth, china and candles; and dine on buns and lemonade. Coleman died in 2008, but his efforts drew the attention of the state’s Commission on Human Rights, which opened a decade-long inquiry into Kentucky’s country clubs and men-only dining societies. A 2004 state Supreme Court ruling pushed Kentucky’s remaining segregated clubs to stop the discrimination or risk losing tax deductions. Still, at least one club held out until late last year.

The Senate race But the idea that the government has no right to interfere with membership practices of private businesses and clubs is still prevalent enough here that it has become a point of controversy in this year’s U.S. Senate race in the state. Republican Party nominee Rand Paul caused a stir last month when he said private businesses should not be forced to abide by civil rights laws. Republican Party leaders wanted nothing to do with his comments, and Paul soon backed down, saying he supports the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and would not want it to be repealed. But some in Kentucky welcomed his remarks. For many years, Kentuckians who belong to the state’s most exclusive clubs have made the same argument that got Paul into trouble. Two decades after

country clubs in many other states began to accept their first black members, some here remained segregated, said Gerald Smith, director of African-American studies at the University of Kentucky. It is that social atmosphere that allowed Paul to question an area of civil rights law that most politicians consider beyond debate, Smith said. “The things that we are highlighting as though they are newsworthy are no longer news in a whole lot of places. We are still dealing with ‘first’ stuff.”

Acceptance ‘a privilege’ The Idle Hour Country Club in Lexington is one example. The club, founded in 1924, is known for its pristine 18-hole golf course, clay tennis courts and Southern cuisine. Until seven months ago, it had never had a black member. Phil Scott, chairman of Idle Hour’s board, said he agreed with Paul’s initial view that there is “tension” regarding the rights of private groups and the protections of civil rights law. “We all have the right under the Constitution to meet with people and be with people we want to be with,” said Scott, a trial lawyer. “On the other hand, there are equal protections under the law. The question is: Which is going to prevail?” The prevailing view at Idle Hour has always been: If we don’t want you, we don’t have to take you. “That’s very plain,” Scott said. “There is no right of membership. It’s a privilege.” (And one for the privileged. New members pay a $50,000 initiation fee.) The club accepted its first black member — retired NBA player Sam Bowie, who attended the University of Kentucky — in November. “Sam’s just like everybody else,” Scott said.

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‘Evers’ Continued from A1 “What I can tell you is that, if you make a false claim of citizenship and that is done after September 30, 1996, in most instances, you are toast,” Hasche said. That was the year Congress made sweeping changes to the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act. Those changes included a provision that makes falsely claiming to be a U.S. citizen a deportable offense and one that prevents foreigners from entering the country as well. So when Krasev allegedly applied for a U.S. passport in Portland eight years ago and claimed to be a person born in Ohio in 1979, he essentially eliminated the possibility of staying in America.

Krasev’s immigration to the U.S. When Krasev came to the U.S. two decades ago, he was sponsored by an American diplomat who brought him over for the educational opportunities offered here. Krasev would have been admitted to the states on what is commonly called a student visa. Those documents either state a specific expiration date or are stamped “DS,” meaning a person can stay for the “duration of status” as a student. Either way, the presumption is that individuals entering the U.S. on a student visa will stay until their course of study has been completed and then return to their native countries, Hasche said. In 1994, after attending Davidson College for two years, Krasev dropped out, so he would no longer have been able to stay in America, based on his student visa. “Once you are in that situation, your options for curing that situation without leaving the country are very limited,” Hasche said. In the mid-1990s, Krasev moved to Denver, where he alternatively went by the names “Danny Kaiser” and “Jason Robert Evers.” He assumed Evers’ identity in 1996 by applying for — and receiving — a copy of the real Evers’ Ohio birth certificate, a document he apparently later used to fill out the passport application in question. In 2001, Krasev — now going by the name Evers — moved to Oregon, where, a year later, he allegedly applied for a passport using his new identity. In doing so, he claimed to be a U.S. citizen born in the state of Ohio, according to federal court documents. Krasev also officially claimed to be a U.S. citizen as recently as

Nuclear Continued from A1 This week, with the failure of the “top kill” attempt, the buzz had grown loud enough that federal officials felt compelled to respond. Stephanie Mueller, a spokeswoman for the Energy Department, said that neither Energy Secretary Steven Chu nor anyone else was thinking about a nuclear blast under the Gulf. The nuclear option was not on the table, federal officials said. Government and private nuclear experts agreed that using a nuclear bomb would be not only risky technically, with unknown and possibly disastrous consequences from radiation, but also unwise geopolitically — it would violate arms treaties that the United States has signed and championed over the decades and do so at a time when President Barack Obama is pushing for global nuclear disarmament. The atomic option is perhaps the wildest among a flood of ideas proposed by bloggers, scientists and other creative types who have deluged government agencies and BP, the company that drilled the well, with phone calls

last month. When he was booked into the Multnomah County Jail on May 12, he told officials there his country of birth was the United States, said Lt. Mary Lindstrand of the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office.

Deportation process Krasev is being held without bail in Portland, and faces both a U.S. Marshal hold and a U.S. Immigration hold, according to jail records. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, agents determine whether to place a hold on an individual after an in-person interview, said Lorie Dankers, a spokeswoman for the agency. ICE agents assigned to cover U.S. jails interview foreign-born individuals booked into the facilities to determine if they need to “resolve their immigration status,” Dankers said. If they do, a hold can be placed on the person, which remains in place while any criminal case is resolved. The criminal case, Dankers said, must be disposed of first. Once that is done, ICE takes jurisdiction over the person, who will either be released and ordered to appear in front of an immigration judge or taken into custody by ICE agents. Those considered a risk to public safety or a flight risk are housed at one of nearly two dozen immigration detention centers throughout the U.S., including a 1,500-bed facility in Tacoma, Wash., which generally holds individuals from Alaska, Oregon and Washington, Dankers said. While ICE agents can issue orders to appear and have arrest powers, they do not decide the fate of individuals in their custody. Whether or not someone will be “removed,” or deported, is a decision made by an immigration judge. But removal hearings fall under the purview of civil rather than criminal law, so individuals facing deportation do not have the right to a lawyer, Hasche said. That means individuals who want to be represented by a lawyer must pay the fee themselves. As things currently stand, Oregon has only one immigration judge, which means dockets are backed up, Hasche said. Individuals who are not in custody can wait up to two years for an immigration hearing. Those who are locked up generally come before a judge within 30 days. At a removal hearing, two main questions area addressed; is the person “removable” and, if they are, do they have some form of “relief.”

and e-mail messages. The Unified Command overseeing the Deepwater Horizon disaster features a “suggestions” button on its official website, and more than 7,800 people have responded, according to the site. Among the suggestions: Lowering giant plastic pillows to the sea floor and filling them with oil, dropping a huge block of concrete to squeeze off the flow and using magnetic clamps to attach pipes that would siphon off the leaking oil. Some have also suggested conventional explosives, claiming that oil prospectors on land have used such blasts to put out fires and seal boreholes. But oil engineers say that dynamite or other conventional explosives risk destroying the wellhead so that the flow could never be plugged from the top. Along with the kibitzers, the government has also brought in experts from around the world — including scores of scientists from the Los Alamos National Laboratory and other labs — to assist in the effort to cap the well. In theory, the nuclear option seems attractive because the extreme heat might create a tough seal. An exploding atom bomb

Some individuals may be eligible for asylum, Hasche said, though they have only a year to apply for such status and must show a legitimate reason for it, like political persecution. Krasev, who has been in the U.S. for nearly 20 years and whose parents are intellectuals in Bulgaria, likely does not qualify for such status. Others may be able to stay because they are married to a U.S. citizen who can petition for them to remain in the country. While Krasev is reportedly engaged to a Bend woman, the two are not married, so he does not qualify for that exception either. And in a third category, immigrants who have been in the country for 10 years or more can apply for a “cancellation of removal.” But they must prove they have been of good moral character during their stay and that a relative would suffer “exceptional and extremely unusual hardship” if they left. “He can’t do that because he doesn’t have a qualifying relative,” Hasche said. “And if he filed an application for a passport feigning to be a U.S. citizen when he wasn’t, then he is not likely to be found to be a person of good moral character.”

Barred from returning Assuming Krasev is deported, it is unlikely he’ll be able to return to the U.S. for at least a decade, said Bend immigration lawyer Daniel Larsson. A law enacted in 1997 created a status known as “unlawful presence,” which is subject to penalties beyond deportation. Under the law, individuals who stay in the country illegally for up to six months are barred from returning to the U.S. for three years. And those who stay without a legal status for more than a year cannot come back for 10 years. But Larsson, who has specialized in immigration law for 16 years, cautions against making any final conclusions in the Krasev case until all the evidence has been heard. “Just because the government says things are a certain way doesn’t mean that they are,” he said. Krasev is scheduled for arraignment in Portland on the federal charge against him on June 14. Ohio authorities say they currently plan to go forward with the case filed against Krasev there, but that may change, depending on what happens in Oregon. Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at cpowers@bendbulletin.com.

generates temperatures hotter than the surface of the sun and, detonated underground, can turn acres of porous rock into a glassy plug, much like a huge stopper in a leaky bottle. Michael E. Webber, a mechanical engineer at the University of Texas, Austin, wrote to Dot Earth, a New York Times blog, in early May that he had surprised himself by considering what once seemed unthinkable. “Sea floor nuclear detonation,” he wrote, “is starting to sound surprisingly feasible and appropriate.” Much of the enthusiasm for an atomic approach is based on reports that the Soviet Union succeeded in using nuclear blasts to seal off gas wells. Milo D. Nordyke, in a 2000 technical paper for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., described five Soviet blasts from 1966 to 1981. All but the last blast were successful. The 1966 explosion put out a gas well fire that had raged uncontrolled for three years. But the last blast of the series, Nordyke wrote, “did not seal the well,” perhaps because the nuclear engineers had poor geological data on the exact location of the

Stuck saw delays effort to cap gushing well By Henry Fountain New York Times News Service

The latest procedure to try to contain the oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico hit a snag on Wednesday when a saw that was being used in a crucial part of the operation became stuck, officials said. The diamond-laced wire saw was being used to cut the riser, the mile long pipe that once ran from the wellhead up to the drilling rig and now snakes along the seabed. A technician involved in the effort said that the wire saw had cut less than halfway through the riser when it stopped being effective. The saw was freed later Wednesday afternoon.

The technician, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment on the work, said it appeared that the saw was dulled by material inside the riser — including, perhaps, some of the objects pumped into the well during the failed “top kill” procedure last week. The cut was part of a strategy to place a containment cap over the well and funnel the leaking oil up through a new riser to a ship on the surface. A variation on this tactic was tried several weeks ago with a 98-ton box that was to sit over the worst of the leaks, but it failed when the box became clogged with hydrates,

icelike crystals of gas and water. Officials planned this time to fit a cap snugly over the well to reduce the influx of water. For this to happen, the original riser must be sheared off completely. The technician said that rather than trying again with the saw, the plan now was to use a large shear to cut the riser. The shear, about 20 feet long and nearly 10 feet high, was used to make an earlier cut in the riser about 50 feet away. Because it will not make as clean a cut as the wire saw, modifications will have to be made to the containment cap. The technician said he still expected the cap could be in place today.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 A5

Food stamps use rises to record 40.2 million By Alan Bjerga Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — The number of Americans receiving food stamps topped 40 million for the first time in March as the jobless rate hovered near a 26-year high. Recipients of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program subsidies for food purchases totaled 40.2 million, up 21 percent from a year earlier and 1.2 percent more than in February, the Department of Agriculture said Wednesday in a statement on its website. The number getting the benefit has set records for 16 straight months. Food aid climbed as the unemployment rate stayed at 9.7 percent in March for a third straight month, near levels last seen in 1983, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The rate rose to 9.9 percent in April and may fall to 9.8 percent for May when jobless figures are released on June 4, according to a survey by

“We are in an extended recession, so these programs are urgently needed.” — Kevin Concannon, USDA Food and Nutrition Service Bloomberg News. Food-stamp use will rise as joblessness persists and the government tries to get more eligible families onto assistance, the USDA says. “We are in an extended recession, so these programs are urgently needed,” Kevin Concannon, the head of the department’s Food and Nutrition Service, said last month. An average of 40.5 million people, more than an eighth of the population, will get food stamps each month in the year that began Oct. 1, according to White House estimates. The figure is projected to rise to 43.3

million in 2011. Idaho had the biggest increase in food-stamp participation rates from a year earlier, surging 43 percent, followed by a 42 percent jump in Nevada, according to the USDA. Texas had the most recipients at 3.56 million, followed by California with 3.23 million and New York with 2.75 million. The average monthly benefit for an individual rose to $133.87 in March from $133.28 in February, the department said. The benefit for a household of four was $289.96, up from $289.50 the previous month. Total spending was a record $5.38 billion. To receive full benefits, gross income for a family of four generally must not exceed $2,389 a month. That’s about 30 percent more than the official poverty level, according to the USDA. The maximum monthly allotment declines on a sliding scale as income rises.

Study: Regular coffee drinkers do not feel a buzz, just fending off withdrawal By Rob Stein The Washington Post

Does that cup of coffee, latte or cappuccino that you drink every morning really wake you up? Well, a new study has some surprising findings about what caffeine really does to you. Peter Rogers of the University of Bristol in England and his colleagues studied 379 volunteers, about half of who consumed little or no caffeine on a daily basis and about half of whom consumed medium to high amounts. The researchers asked the volunteers to abstain from consuming any caffeine for 16 hours and then gave them either caffeine or a placebo. Each participant then rated their levels of anxiety, alertness and whether they got a headache. Those who consumed medium to high amounts of caffeine reported they were less alert and more likely to get a

borehole. Robert Norris, an atomic historian and author of “Racing for the Bomb,” noted that all the Soviet blasts were on land and never involved oil. Whatever the technical merits of using nuclear explosions for constructive purposes, the end of the Cold War brought wide agreement among nations to give up the conduct of all nuclear blasts, even for peaceful purposes. The United States, after conducting more than 1,000 nuclear test explosions, detonated the last one in 1992, shaking the ground at the Nevada test site. In 1996, the United States championed the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty, a global accord meant to end the development of new kinds of nuclear arms. Obama is pushing for new global rules, treaties and alliances that he insists can go much further

(Study participants) who got caffeine reported levels of alertness that were no higher than those who typically don’t get much caffeine who received a placebo. That suggests that caffeine only brings coffee drinkers back up to their normal state, probably because they develop a tolerance for its effects over time. headache when they took the placebo but not when they got their caffeine fix, the researchers report in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. Those who got caffeine reported levels of alertness that were no higher than those who typically don’t get much caffeine who received a placebo. That suggests that caffeine only brings coffee drinkers back up to their normal state, probably because they develop a tolerance for its effects over time.

to produce a nuclear-free world. For his administration to seize on a nuclear solution for the gulf crisis, officials say, would abandon its international agenda and responsibilities and give rogue states an excuse to seek nuclear strides. Kevin Roark, a spokesman for Los Alamos in New Mexico, the birthplace of the atomic bomb, said that despite rumors to the contrary, none of the laboratory’s thousands of experts was devising nuclear options for the Gulf. “Nothing of the sort is going on here,” he said in an interview. “In fact, we’re not working on any

The researchers also found that caffeine does not appear to affect those with a genetic predisposition to anxiety. In fact, the study subjects with a variation of a gene that has been associated with anxiety tended to consume slightly more coffee than those without the anxiety gene even though they reported more anxiety. That suggests that a mild increase in anxiety may be part of what most people consider to be the pleasant buzz they get from their daily dose of caffeine.

intervention ideas at all. We’re providing diagnostics and other support but nothing on the intervention side.” Not everyone on the Internet is calling for nuking the well. Some are making jokes. “What’s worse than an oil spill?” asked a blogger on Full Comment, a blog of The National Post in Toronto. “A radioactive oil spill.”

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A6 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Abortion opponents advance cause at state level By John Leland New York Times News Service

At least 11 states have passed laws this year regulating or restricting abortion, giving opponents of abortion what partisans on both sides of the issue say is an unusually high number of victories. In four additional states, bills have passed at least one house of the legislature. In a flurry of activity last week, Gov. Haley Barbour of Mississippi signed a bill barring insurers from covering abortion in the new insurance exchanges called for under the federal health care overhaul, and the Oklahoma Legislature overrode a veto by Gov. Brad Henry of a bill requiring doctors who perform abortions to answer 38 questions about each procedure, including the women’s reasons for ending their pregnancies. It was the third abortion measure this session on which the Legislature overrode a veto by Henry. At least 13 other states have introduced or passed similar legislation this year. The new laws range from an Arizona ban on coverage of abortion in the state employees’ health plan to a ban in Nebraska on all abortions after 20 weeks, on the grounds that the fetus at that stage can feel pain. Fetal pain is a subject of debate in the medical community, and the U.S. Supreme Court has recognized the government’s right to ban abortions only after a fetus becomes viable, which is more than a month later. While opponents of abortion rights hope ultimately to overturn Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court decision that guarantees a woman’s right to an abortion, they have made the most impact at the state level, where laws passed in one state often appear in other legislatures in subsequent years. State laws also have the potential for national consequences by setting off court battles that challenge or limit the scope of Roe. About 370 state bills regulating abortion were introduced in 2010, compared with about 350 in each of the previous five years, and 250 a year in the early 1990s, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that supports abortion rights. At least 24 of this year’s bills have passed, and the final total may reach the high of 2005, when states passed 34 laws, said Elizabeth Nash, a public policy associate at the institute.

Injured vets battle red tape Insurance claim process uneven, sometimes unfair By Mark Brunswick McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MINNEAPOLIS — If the Army needs proof that Ryan Hallberg suffered a loss when he was injured by a roadside bomb in Iraq, it need look no farther than 4 inches below his right knee. Despite an amputation from his injuries, Hallberg has twice been denied a $50,000 insurance benefit because he has been told by the federal insurance office administering the program that “there is not enough medical information to support your loss.” Similar cases are emerging across the country about the same program, established five years ago to address the growing number of troops coming home with traumatic injuries from Iraq and Afghanistan. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat whose office has become involved in Hallberg’s case, called it an example of “government bureaucracy gone amok.” A recent Government Accountability Office audit is critical of how claims from the program have been denied. While one branch of the government has provided Hallberg, who lives in Andover, Minn., with a prosthetic leg and rehabilitation at 90 percent disability, another has denied his claims for a loss. As he heads to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., for three weeks of fitting for a new prosthetic, his expenses have soared as he has taken unpaid time off from his job as a Coon Rapids community services officer. “You’re holding $50,000 from me that I rightfully earned by donating a limb to this nation. So why wouldn’t I fight for it?” said Hallberg, 26, who left the military as a staff sergeant. Hallberg’s plight is rooted in terrible twists of fate. He was riding as a gunner in Iraq, attached to an Army Reserve unit, after taking the place of another soldier who sought a less dangerous assignment. On the day of his injury, March 28, 2006, Hallberg was riding in the second vehicle in the convoy because another soldier was on leave. Hallberg had switched his leave to allow the soldier to go home to witness the birth of his child. The convoy was taking a general to a meeting from Baghdad to Fallujah and had encountered a roadside bomb en route. Hallberg’s unit wanted to spend the night in Fallujah and return the next day after the road had been cleared. Instead, the general ordered the unit to proceed. Hallberg has haunting video of the attack. From a Humvee gun truck several vehicles away, the video shows a plume of black smoke appearing in the middle of the road. Gunfire from the .50calibers begins as the trailing truck passes through the plume, spent cartridges spitting out on the hood. Hallberg’s Humvee can be seen slowing to a stop. A lone

Jerry Holt / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Ryan Hallberg, at his Andover, Minn., home, talks about the day he was injured in Iraq. Hallberg left the Army as a staff sergeant. His military career ended when a roadside bomb exploded next to his Humvee in Iraq. One of his legs was amputated. Now he is struggling to get the benefits he deserves. soldier runs back to the disabled Humvee. Both of Hallberg’s legs had been shattered in the blast, which injured all four passengers. One of the soldiers died en route to medical care. “I started hearing gunfire, so I grabbed the turret walls with my hands and I went to get back up to the turret, and realized that, OK, the command I just gave to my legs didn’t go through,” he said. Much of what happened next remains a medicated blur. Hallberg’s mother, Cheryl Berg Wineman, found herself immersed in the trauma of her son’s injuries — and in the flood of paperwork that followed. Included among the benefits was an insurance plan, Traumatic Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance, an entitlement that members of the military enroll in with monthly premiums.

Readily available funds for injured Congress started the program, known as TSGLI, in 2005. Like commercial accidental death and dismemberment policies for civilians, it was intended to provide a quick lump sum benefit to help address the financial burdens facing service members before they start receiving veterans’ benefits. The benefits can range from $25,000 to $100,000 depending on the type of injury. Hallberg, who earned a Purple Heart for his injuries, qualified for $50,000 in a one-time payment for the damage to his legs. Anxious to return home, he left Walter Reed in early May to return to Minnesota, where his family performed many of the duties the hospital staff had done. Hallberg returned to Walter Reed in mid-June to have the metal halo ring and pins removed from his leg and to begin physical therapy. And that’s where the bureaucratic problems begin. The doctor’s medical chart of the visit has been misplaced, although a social worker and sev-

N  B ‘Most-wanted’ fugitive Former GOP chairman captured in California arrested on 6 felonies LOS ANGELES — U.S. marshals have captured a convicted cop killer and child molester in Merced, Calif., ending his fouryear run as one of America’s most-wanted fugitives, officials said. Paul Clouston, 73, was arrested Tuesday after a viewer tipped off the “America’s Most Wanted” TV show. Clouston had been added to the U.S. marshals’ list of the 15 most-wanted fugitives in November 2006. The marshals’ Central Valley joint fugitive task force made the arrest after learning Clouston had been working as a maintenance man for the past four years in a group home in Merced, said Deputy Marshal Kevin Connolly. Clouston was wanted for unlawful flight to avoid prosecution by the Virginia State Police for failing to register as a sex offender and by the Virginia Division of Probation and Parole for allegedly violating his parole on a conviction for the armed sexual assault of a child. Clouston was convicted in 1973 on second-degree murder in the 1972 killing of a police detective in Buena Park, Calif. He was released from prison in 1982.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Jim Greer, the big-spending former chairman of the Republican Party of Florida, was arrested Wednesday and charged with six felony counts in connection with a secret consulting contract he struck with the party, state police said. Greer, 47, and former party executive director Delmar Johnson used a “shell company” called Victory Strategies to raise money from the party for “personal enrichment,” said Bill Shepherd, Florida’s statewide prosecutor. Greer was charged with money laundering, committing a scheme to defraud and four theft charges. The theft charges carry a maximum five-year prison sentence. The others call for a maximum 30-year prison term.

Globe temperatures hottest on record The global temperature this year reached its warmest on record based on a 12-month rolling average, James Hansen, the top climate change scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, said Wednesday. The mean surface temperature in the year through April

was about 1.17 degree Fahrenheit warmer than the 1951-to1980 mean, according to a graph in a 37-page draft paper on the website of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. That makes it a fraction warmer than the previous peak in 2005.

Porn actor targeted co-worker in rampage LOS ANGELES — A porn actor who went on a rampage at a Van Nuys video production office killed a fellow adult-film performer and injured two other people, according to police and a production company that employed both men. The name of the person killed has not been released by police, pending notification of relatives. But a Glendale, Calif.-based production firm issued a statement on Twitter saying the victim had starred in movies produced by the firm. An employee at the office confirmed the post to the Los Angeles Times. The victim appears to have performed in numerous adult films, including at least two with the suspect. Stephen Hill, 30, allegedly used a machete-style weapon in the attack, which occurred about 10:20 p.m. Tuesday at a video distribution business. — From wire reports

eral other personnel have since recalled Hallberg’s visit. Without the documentation, the Office of Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance denied his claim, which could amount to as much as $50,000 in additional compensation for being unable to perform daily living functions such as dressing or showering. “They wanted documentation. Who was taking care of him when he was home? We were,” Berg Wineman said. After learning of his situation, Klobuchar’s office sought and received a letter from a surgeon at Walter Reed confirming that Hallberg’s condition was such at the time of his recovery that he would have been unable to perform enough of the daily living functions. Still, without actual documentation, the case has stalled. Hallberg’s right leg was amputated a year and a half after the explosion. He hopes one day to become a police officer. As in Hallberg’s case, a 2009 audit from the Government Accountability Office raised several concerns about how the program

was administered and the denial of claims. It found a lack of quality assurance that claims decisions were accurate, consistent and timely, and that the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs, which both administer the program, lacked reliable data for overseeing claims.

No explanation for varied rates It also found no sufficient explanation for why approval rates varied among the branches of services, with the Marines getting

a much higher approval rate than the Army’s — 67 percent for the Marines compared with 53 percent for the Army. Representatives from the Office of Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance said improvements have been made in reviewing claims. For fiscal year 2009, the overall approval rate is 73 percent, with the Marines, Air Force and Navy rates between 73 and 81 percent. The Army, which files the most claims, has an approval rate of 67 percent. There are no incentives for a branch of service to deny or approve claims. “We have an old motto: ‘Pay if you can, deny if you must, but don’t let the cases gather dust,’” said Stephen Wurtz, a deputy assistant director for the Office of Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance. “The inclination is to try to find a way to pay.” Klobuchar has spoken with Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki about the need to make improvements but predicts cases such as Hallberg’s are likely to increase. “More and more soldiers are coming back with injuries. In earlier wars they might have died,” she said. “The good news is that these soldiers are coming home. The bad news is that the government bureaucracy still hasn’t been able to cope with how to give them the benefits they deserve.”

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B

Personal Finance College-bound students may want to keep an eye on savings-plan changes, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,281.07 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +58.74 +2.64%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

s

CLOSE 10,249.54 DOW JONES CHANGE +225.52 +2.25%

s

1,098.38 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +27.67 +2.58%

Aircraft maker Cessna Aircraft Co. dropped the price of the building it owns at Bend Municipal Airport from $7 million to $5.975 million on Tuesday, said Jerry Matson, a broker with Colliers International, which is representing the property. The 204,000-square-foot facility includes office space, airplane hangars and a large warehouse where manufacturing occurred before Cessna moved its operations to Kansas more than a year ago and shifted other work to Mexico. Cessna also owns 14 acres of land that could be included in the deal if a buyer wanted space to expand. “We’re still looking for somebody to take that spot,” said Eric Strobel, business development manager of Economic Development for Central Oregon. “It’s a little tough right now to find aviation companies that are moving or expanding.”

s

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.33 treasury CHANGE +1.22%

By David Holley The Bulletin

A Montana-based nonprofit is studying why Deschutes County has struggled more during this recession than other similarly populated areas that, like Deschutes, saw strong growth before the economic downturn. Headwaters Economics’ study aims to provide an analysis about how the county can better diversify its economy, how it has done so in the past and how it can become more resilient to

recessions. The information gathered by Bozeman-based Headwaters will be used to learn why businesses come to Deschutes County, what keeps them here and the pros and cons of operating a business in the area. Headwaters is interviewing people from a county in Idaho and another in Utah, which had pre-recession growth rates and economic environments similar to Deschutes County, to try to determine why those two counties have suffered less than Deschutes during the recession.

“They were even higher fliers than you guys,” Ben Alexander, associate director of Headwaters Economics, said about Washington County, Utah, and Kootenai County, Idaho. “They did not fall as hard in the current recession. Why is that?” Headwaters identifies itself as an independent organization funded with money from federal governmental agencies, partnerships with organizations such as universities or state governments, charitable organizations, and contract work with nonprofits, according to its website. See Study / B2

Investors’ deal with Bend bank extended Bend-based Cascade Bancorp, parent company of the Bank of the Cascades, announced Wednesday that two potential investors have again agreed to extend their securities purchase agreements through June 30. East Coast investor David Bolger and New York Citybased private equity fund Lightyear Capital both pledged last October to invest $20 million and $45 million, respectively, in the bank if the company could raise another $85 million from other sources. The agreements originally expired Dec. 31, 2009, but were extended to May 31. The bank, hammered by loan losses stemming from declining real estate values in Oregon and Idaho, is trying to raise at least $150 million to bolster its capital, per an August 2009 order from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. “We are encouraged by a heightened level of activity in the capital markets as we seek to complete our capital raise,” Cascade Bancorp President and CEO Patricia Moss said in a written statement. “The continued support of Lightyear and Mr. Bolger are sincerely appreciated, as is their shared confidence in our company.” Cascade Bancorp shares closed Wednesday at 58 cents, down 1 cent. Based on that closing price, the bank will be unable to meet a Nasdaq requirement that its shares close at or above $1 for 10 consecutive days by June 15 to avoid possible delisting. Cascade Bancorp said in December that if it did not comply with the minimum bid price rule by June 15, Nasdaq would provide another written notice on potential delisting. At that time, the company may appeal the delisting determination to a Nasdaq panel. — From staff reports

Going beyond paper and ink 3-D printers may be the future of manufacturing – in your home By Nathan Olivarez-Giles Los Angeles Times

H

Photos by Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Using a computer and free software, 3-D printers make products out of layers of heated plastic. The MakerBot is catching on with tech lovers like those at CrashSpace, in Culver City, Calif. Above, Brian Isdale, 14, and his father Jerry, rear right, work out some kinks in their printer.

ome computer printers gave people the ability to produce bank statements, concert tickets, holiday cards and party invitations at the touch of a button. But what if you wanted to “print out” a dinner plate, the leg of an armchair or an eyeglass frame? It may sound far-fetched and futuristic, but plastic extrusion machines that can do this — popularly known as 3-D printers — are poised to enter the home electronics market. “Tonight Show” host Jay Leno has an industrial version in the warehouse-sized Burbank, Calif., garage that houses his collection of more than 200 cars and motorcycles. His mechanics design hard-to-find parts on a laptop computer and then use the machine to make

them real. “It’s a bit like when I was a kid and I watched ‘The Jetsons’ and they’d walk up to a machine and press a button and get a steak dinner with the baked potato sitting next to it,” Leno said. “But instead of a steak dinner, you’re getting an old car part.” Leno’s machine is as big as a refrigerator and costs about $27,000. But home models with more limited capabilities have begun to make their way into the consumer market, with some units selling for as little as $750. Although now mostly celebrated by geeks and hobbyists, consumer 3-D printers that can make jewelry, toys, tools and kitchen appliances from downloaded designs will be commonplace one day, people in the field believe. See Printers / B5

“My hope is that people, instead of going to the store, will just go online and download what they need and print it out.” — Bre Pettis, MakerBot Industries

Home sales rise Pending U.S. home sales index

THE MERCURY IS FALLING

Seasonally adjusted annual rate

110.9

115

End of the line for mid-range Ford brand

105

By Dee-ann Durbin and Tom Krisher

95

The Associated Press 85

75 2009

2010

Source: National Association of Realtors AP

t

$1,220.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$4.20

t

$18.304 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.236

County’s economic woes BMW rally put under a microscope will get bikes, Study looks at Deschutes’ struggles during recession

Price falls on Cessna’s Bend building

B

DEARBORN, Mich. — Ford Motor Co. will cease production of its 72-year-old Mercury brand by the end of 2010 after years of declining sales. Mercury’s death is the latest in a string of casualties as Detroit carmakers try to cut costs and invest more heavily

in fewer offerings. By shedding a mid-range brand that was more and more irrelevant to buyers, the automaker can focus on accelerating sales of Ford and beefing up its luxury Lincoln brand. Ford plans to expand its Lincoln lineup to make up for lost Mercury sales and support Lincoln-Mercury deal-

ers who will suddenly lose a brand. Derrick Kuzak, Ford’s product development chief, said Lincoln will have seven new or revamped vehicles in the next four years, including the brand’s first compact car. The automaker’s board of directors approved ending the brand Wednesday morning. See Mercury / B2

Related • Despite Mercury’s demise, new vehicle sales beat forecasts in May, Page B2

bucks rolling through region

Fair & Expo Center event likely will draw thousands to Central Oregon By Tim Doran The Bulletin

REDMOND — Area residents will likely notice thousands of BMW motorcycles traveling through the region in mid-July. But they probably will not hear the bikes as they converge on the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center for the 38th annual BMW Motorcycle Owners of America International On the Web Rally. For more Unlike those who travel information in recreational vehicles, about the BMW motorcycle riders generMotorcycle ally cannot haul large Owners of America amounts of food, drinks International rally, and other provisions revisit www quired for a road trip. .bmwmoa.org/ So those attending the rally10. rally will be dining in area restaurants and shopping for supplies in local stores, said Ray Zimmerman, executive director of the BMW Motorcycle Owners of America. “You’ll see us everywhere …,” Zimmerman said. “But you won’t hear us. BMWs are very quiet.” Zimmerman and rally organizers met Wednesday with officials from the fairgrounds and the Redmond Chamber of Commerce to discuss the rally, which is scheduled from July 15-18, one of several big events taking place this summer around Central Oregon. See BMW / B5

Submitted photo

A rider navigates around tires in this 2009 photo provided by the BMW Motorcycle Owners of America. The group will hold its annual rally July 15-18 at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. Activities include a trials event, where riders travel at slow speed over and around obstacles.

PRINEVILLE

FAA grant to help taxiway project get off the ground By Adrianne Jeffries The Bulletin

The Federal Aviation Administration will grant the Prineville Airport the $180,000 it needs to extend a taxiway to match a runway extension that is already under way. The Prineville Airport received FAA funding weeks ago to build a 750-foot runway extension and started construction in April. But that $655,628 grant was not enough to cover the cost of extending the taxiway, which runs parallel to the runway. Without a taxiway extension and new connection to the runway, planes would have to drive to the end of the shorter taxiway, cross over to the runway, drive to the end of the runway and then turn around before they could take off. This maneuver is a safety hazard, airport officials said. See Runway / B5

Corrections In the Business Calendar that ran Wednesday, June 2, on Page B6, two events were listed on incorrect days. “Ride to Real Estate Bike Tour” will be Saturday and “Getting the Most out of Schwab. com” will be June 10. The Bulletin regrets the errors. In a story headlined “High velocity,” which appeared Wednesday, June 2, on Page B1, the home country of sky diver Felix Baumgartner was misidentified. He is from Austria. The Bulletin regrets the error.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

New vehicle sales top forecasts Major automakers — with the exception of Toyota — have a better May than expected By Nick Bunkley New York Times News Service

DETROIT — New-vehicle sales in the United States rose more than expected in May, as every major automaker except Toyota Motor reported increases of at least 17.5 percent on Wednesday. In contrast, Toyota’s sales were up just 6.7 percent, another sign that the company still is struggling to overcome its recalls of more than 8 million vehicles to resolve a problem with unintended acceleration. Toyota said it would expand previous offers of no-interest financing on 2011 models, including the Camry sedan, whose sales dropped 6.5 percent last month after dealers began running out of the 2010 version.

May was a much better month for the Detroit automakers than a year ago, when Chrysler was operating in bankruptcy protection and General Motors was preparing its own Chapter 11 filing. Chrysler sales rose 32.7 percent in May and surpassed 100,000 units for the first time since March 2009, before its bankruptcy. At the Ford Motor Co., sales rose 22 percent, marking six consecutive months of increases greater than 20 percent. GM sales rose 17.5 percent in total and 31.8 percent excluding the four brands it is selling or shutting — Hummer, Pontiac, Saab and Saturn. Sales for the four active brands — Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet and GMC — have increased for eight consecutive months.

Holiday weekend has an effect Automakers saw a surge in demand over the long Memorial Day weekend — Toyota said that was its best weekend of the year — but analysts said some consumers were scared away from dealerships as the financial markets turned lower in May. “May could have been a great month if it wasn’t for the volatility of the financial markets,” said Jesse Toprak, vice president for industry trends at TrueCar.com, which tracks vehicle pricing and sales. “It just shows that recovery in the market isn’t as easy as projected. Consumers are still hesitant and they’re very influenced by market forces.” Total industry sales rose 19.1 percent in May, and the seasonally adjusted, annualized selling rate increased to 11.63 million, reported Autodata, which tracks sales. So far in 2010, the average

How the Industry Fared Cars

Most Popular Cars and Trucks

Light Trucks

488,045

437,879

925,924

MAY 2010

566,955

535,944

1,102,899

CHANGE

+16.2%

+22.4

+19.1%

5.65

11.63

5.98

How the Automakers Fared May 2010 Sales

Change

GENERAL MOTORS

223,410

+17.5 %

20.3 %

FORD MOTOR

196,671

+22.0

17.8

TOYOTA

162,813

+ 6.7

14.8

HONDA

117,173

+19.1

10.6

CHRYSLER

104,819

+32.7

9.5

83,764

+24.1

7.6

NISSAN

49,045

HYUNDAI

+32.8

Change from May May 2010 Sales 2009 sales

Total

MAY 2009

ANNUAL SELLING RATE (MILLIONS)

selling rate is about 11.3 million, a step up from last year’s sales of 10.4 million vehicles. Most analysts projected 2010 sales of about 12 million vehicles, a 15 percent increase from 2009, and expect the rate to increase in the second half of the year. Year to date, Ford sales are up more than 30 percent, as are sales by GM’s four active brands. The GM increase represents 206,994 units, which is nearly twice as many sales as the carmaker lost by shutting down Hummer, Pontiac and Saturn and agreeing to sell Saab. “We’re a much leaner and more nimble company that can take advantage of these shifts in consumer tastes as they occur,” Steve Carlisle, GM’s vice president of U.S. sales operations, said on a conference call. “We’ve moved from our back foot to our front foot in terms of competitiveness and started to play some pretty good offense.”

Market Share

Figures for the United States

BIGGEST GAINER +91.7%

Hyundai Sonata

Toyota Camry/Solara

BIGGEST LOSER –6.5%

4.4

FORD

F-Series

49,858

+49.4 %

CHEVROLET

Silverado

33,690

+ 7.1

TOYOTA

Camry/Solara

29,295

– 6.5

HONDA

Civic

28,458

+37.3

HONDA

Accord

27,835

+23.2

TOYOTA

Corolla/Matrix

26,953

+14.3

FORD

Fusion

22,381

+13.1

NISSAN

Altima

21,950

+19.2

CHEVROLET

Malibu

21,722

+54.1

HYUNDAI

Sonata

21,195

+91.7

CHEVROLET

Impala

20,623

+10.2

FORD

Escape

19,203

+17.2

HONDA

CR-V

17,820

+22.5

Ram

17,298

+11.5

VOLKSWAGEN

32,899

+20.7

3.0

DODGE

KIA

31,431

+20.6

2.8

FORD

Focus

16,931

+12.6

SUBARU

23,667

+35.2

2.1

CHEVROLET

Cobalt

16,173

+26.7

New York Times News Service

Source: MotorIntelligence.com

Mercury Continued from B1 Ford Americas President Mark Fields said the decision was made this spring as part of an annual business review. He said Mercury’s sales make up such a small percentage of North American market share — less than 1 percent, compared with Ford brand’s 16 percent — and that the profile of Ford and Mercury shoppers is so similar, it makes more sense to focus on Ford and Lincoln. Mercury was the No. 1 brand that was also considered by Ford buyers, said Aaron Bragman, an analyst for the consulting firm IHS Global Insight. Ford said it will offer discounts through the summer on Mercury vehicles to shed inventory. Ford shares rose nearly 4 percent to close at $11.85.

What about dealers? Ford has 1,712 dealerships currently selling Mercurys, although none are stand-alone

Mercury dealers. All sell either Lincolns, Fords or all three brands. Ford expects some of its 276 Lincoln-Mercury dealers will continue as stand-alone Lincoln dealerships and it will try to consolidate others into existing Ford dealerships. All dealers will be eligible for compensation, although Fields wouldn’t say how much they will be offered. Bob Tasca Jr., who owns two Mercury dealerships in Rhode Island and Massachusetts and is the head of Ford’s Lincoln-Mercury Dealer Council, said many dealers will get through the Mercury closure and do well selling Lincolns. But he said the closure is still emotional, because dealers will have to lay off staff and, in some cases, close showrooms. “From a financial standpoint, it was the only decision Ford Motor Company could make,” Tasca said. Ford didn’t say how much it expects to pay to shutter the brand, but Fields said the closure doesn’t affect the company’s forecast that it will be solidly

AT&T ‘data hogs’ to pay more New York Times News Service They spend hours watching video on their phones, downloading songs, browsing the Web, sending photos to friends and generally using mobile devices as full-fledged computers. They are the data hogs. On Wednesday, AT&T pulled away the trough. AT&T said it would no longer offer an unlimited data plan to new users of iPhones and other smartphones. The decision, in-

dustry analysts said, could signal a shift away from an era in which U.S. wireless carriers sought to attract customers with simple, allyou-can-eat pricing plans. The trouble for AT&T was that a fraction of users — fewer than 2 percent — made such heavy use of the network that they slowed it down for everyone else. Starting Monday, AT&T will offer tiered pricing. People will pay based on what they use, which the company says is fairer to everyone.

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profitable this year. The company also doesn’t plan to lay off any workers at its Dearborn headquarters.

Mercury’s story Mercury got its start in 1935, when Henry Ford’s son Edsel Ford began designing a more upscale car he planned to call the Ford Falcon. But he didn’t think it fit with the brand’s other offerings, so he created a new brand named for the winged Roman god. The first Mercury, the 1939 Mercury 8, went into production in 1938. It sold for $916 and boasted a 95-horsepower V-8 engine. More than 65,800 were sold the first year. For many years, Mercury remained the mid-range option between the no-frills Ford brand and the luxury Lincoln brand. But it struggled to find a niche. It tried importing some vehicles from Europe under the Merkur name in the late 1980s, but buyers weren’t ready for the advanced design and higher prices.

In recent decades, it has struggled to differentiate itself as Ford moved upmarket and the two brands’ vehicles became almost indistinguishable. The company also failed to give Mercury new products or advertising support. There is no Mercury version of the hot-selling Ford Focus, for example, or the Ford Edge crossover. Mercury currently has four models: The Milan sedan and Mariner small SUV and their hybrid versions. The Ford brand has nine. Mercury’s sales peaked in 1978 at more than 580,000 vehicles. Just over 92,000 Mercurys were sold last year. Even though some of its products such as the Milan have received strong reliability scores from Consumer Reports magazine and other outside groups, Mercury’s sales have never come close to Ford’s Fusion, which is nearly an identical car. While Ford sold more than 75,000 Fusions and Fusion hybrids through April of this year, it sold just 11,800 Milans and Milan hybrids.

Study Continued from B1 Alexander said Headwaters is funding the study at a cost of about $15,000, with money from its own accounts and its supporters. He said the Deschutes County study will be useful to more than Central Oregon’s business and government leaders. It will serve Headwaters’ purpose of public education and can show other communities how to diversify their economies, he added. “If I write this up, and I post this on our website … it’s very helpful for me,” Alexander said. “I hope it’s helpful for other people, too.” Economic Development for Central Oregon is working with Headwaters, which focuses on small communities in the Western United States and released a report in 2007 about what is now the Badlands Wilderness east of Bend. The 2007 report said making the Badlands a federally protected wilderness area could propel economic growth in Central Oregon because protected natural areas draw businesses, residents and tourists, according to a previous article in The Bulletin. The 30,000 acres was designated as a wilderness area in 2009.

About the study In addition to the two peer counties that had pre-recession similarities to Deschutes, Headwaters plans to study two other counties that have economies Deschutes County might aspire to: Boulder County in Colorado and Ada County in Idaho. Alexander said Headwaters will research what those two counties, which house Boulder and Boise, respectively, have done to survive the economic downfall, as well as what they have done to become “more mature, modern, urban economies.” In late May, Headwaters spent time interviewing business owners in Redmond, Bend and Sisters on topics such as why they came to Deschutes County, why they stay and what has hindered their growth. Eric Strobel, EDCO’s Bend manager, will finish the process by interviewing La Pine businesses. Strobel said Headwaters proposed to do the study after noticing how hard the recession had hit Deschutes County,

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

and wanting to find out what draws business owners to certain areas. Because much of Headwaters’ work deals with federal government departments such as the Bureau of Land Management, questions it sometimes asks deal with the impact of public land amenities, such as lakes or hiking trails, in attracting new residents and business owners. “(Headwaters) saw the recession hit here pretty hard and wanted to find out more about how businesses are coming out of it, and what they’re looking for as a place to relocate,” Strobel said. “This study kind of takes all that into account.”

A guide to future economic growth? Revealing details about why Deschutes County has been so devastated by the recession may emerge when Headwaters compares information from Deschutes County with data gathered from the four other counties, Alexander said. It also may provide a guide for what EDCO should do to provide economic growth opportunities, he said. Alexander said it’s more difficult for business owners in Deschutes County to access capital than those living in larger cities, in part because regional banks were harder-hit by the recession. He said there also are limits on the skill level of the labor force in the county, which means businesses often recruit from out of the area. Employees agree to move here for a job, Alexander said, because of the high quality of life, a reason many business owners also choose to locate in Deschutes County. But for some employees, if a job he or she came here for falls through, there may not be a comparable replacement, he said. People also like Deschutes County because of its lower crime rates, compared with larger cities. But the county also has lower wages and a higher cost of living than other Oregon cities, he said. “Basically you’re being asked to take a pay cut to come to Bend,” Alexander said. More details will be available when the study is completed toward the end of June. Alexander plans to release the report and present it during EDCO’s annual meeting in July. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.


B

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 B3

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P F   BILL MAKING ITS WAY THROUGH CONGRESS

Saving for college? Keep an eye on 529 rules Temporary changes on investment periods and coverage may become permanent

Six personal finance tips for new college grads

By Alice Truong

By Jennifer Waters

MarketWatch

MarketWatch

WASHINGTON — Parents are busy prepping their highschool graduates for college — that should include catching up on the latest rules for 529 plans. For the time being, you can tap your student’s 529 college savings plan to pay for tuition costs, room and board, books and a computer. But if you wait till next year to buy that computer, you might find the plan won’t cover it anymore. Families have invested about $134 billion in more than a hundred different 529 plans sold throughout the nation, according to the College Savings Plans Network, a nonprofit association that advocates for the plans. The 529 plan gets its name from the relevant section of the Internal Revenue Service code. The stimulus bill in 2009 included a provision that allowed students to use 529-plan money to pay for computers and other equipment. Separately, the stock-market downturn prompted the U.S. Treasury Department to tweak 529-plan rules to allow for two investment changes per year, rather than just one, but that was a temporary rule change that ended in 2009. A college-savings bill currently in the House Ways and Means committee — the Savings Enhancement for Education in College Act, or H.R. 1351 — would make permanent the rules regarding computers

CHICAGO — College graduates entering the job market will find there’s much to learn about managing their personal finances, but taking immediate steps to budget and save, and maintaining those good habits, will help protect them should a spate of bad luck come their way. The average college student graduates with about $20,000 in debt and is looking at an average starting salary of $47,673. That average annual paycheck is down 1.7 percent for the Class of 2010 compared with last year’s grads, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers. That makes it challenging for grads to save money as they pay off debt — the two most important factors in building financial security — but it’s not impossible. “Carving out money to save is good and is a habit that once you start, you’ll benefit from for as long as you keep it up,” said Dan O’Malley, chief executive of PerkStreet, an online bank. Here’s your first financial tip: • Put 10 percent or more of your income into long-term savings. “Make sure you save,” O’Malley said. “It just grows and grows and grows. And get into any kind of matching program with an employer.” Here are five other must-do tips:

The Associated Press file photo

University of Iowa sophomore Adam Freese leads a tour of the UI campus for prospective students last month. The Savings Enhancement for Education in College Act would change some of the rules for popular 529 college-savings plans, including coverage of certain expenses. and the number of investment changes allowed, plus expand the current Saver’s Credit to apply to college savings. Backers of the college-savings bill, which is sponsored by Democratic Rep. Earl Pomeroy of North Dakota, say allowing two changes per year is important, given the market’s volatility. “While we don’t want people to move their money all the time, having two times when they can seems reasonable,” said Joan Marshall, executive director of College Savings Plans of Maryland, who also sits on the board of the College Savings Plans Network.

The saver’s credit offers lower-income savers a tax credit as a reward for putting money aside, but currently it applies solely to retirement savings contributions. Marshall said that giving this same credit to families who contribute to college savings would encourage low- and moderate-income families to save for college. Jacquelyn Williams, director of the college savings initiative at the New America Foundation, a nonprofit and nonpartisan public policy organization, said that simply having money stashed away for college can make a difference in whether or

Taking a vacation doesn’t have to bust your budget By Claudia Buck McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Hitting the road

Whether you’re driving, flying or hanging at home, this week marks the start of the summer travel season. And it can quickly become a budget-buster. “It’s easy to underestimate the cost of a vacation,” said Dave Jones, president of the Association of Independent Consumer Credit Counseling Agencies. When theme parks charge gazillions and cheap airfares are harder to come by, maxing out a credit card can happen all too quickly. The average family of four will spend $4,000 on a vacation this summer, according to a recent American Express survey of 2,000 U.S. consumers. Only half of those surveyed — 51 percent — planned to take a summer getaway, but the vast majority said they’re devising strategies to cut costs while traveling. Here are some how-to tips:

among dozens of carriers. Compare those prices with your favorite airline’s reservations site. Before booking, be sure your comparisons include all taxes and fees, and take into account the number/duration of stops.

Know what it costs

Beyond the box

Don’t get blindsided by the daily parking-lunch-souvenirdrinks-dinner-nightlife routine. If you haven’t set aside vacation savings, try planning a trip you can pay off completely within three months, recommends Jones. That way, you’re not dipping into your emergency reserves or overloading credit cards.

Look for alternatives to pricey hotel rooms: vacation cabins, staying with friends or family, bed-and-breakfast inns, even a local hostel. For instance, if you’re visiting Seattle near the University of Washington campus, a single room at the European-style College Inn — breakfast included, bathroom down the hall — is only $55 to $60 a night. Another option is renting a vacation home with family or friends from sites like VacationRentals. com or Vacation Rentals By Owner (www.vrbo.com), which lists homes, condos, apartments and cabins. If you’re a B&B enthusiast, sites like BedandBreakfast.com let you sign up for free, weekly e-mail alerts for last-minute, discounted B&B rooms.

Getting there For a family of four, traveling by car will almost always be cheaper than flying. But distances and logistics don’t always make that possible. If you’re making airline reservations, take note that planes are flying fuller and filling up faster. If your travel time is flexible, booking flights during offpeak hours or midweek can be a money-saver. Try websites such as Airfarewatchdog.com or Kayak.com, which search for the lowest rates

Eighty percent of those surveyed in April by American Express say they’re stretching their travel dollars this summer. Here’s how: • Driving instead of flying: 33 percent • Planning a shorter stay: 30 percent • Spending less on activities: 27 percent • Hunting for hotel/airfare deals: 24 percent • Downgrading accommodations: 12 percent

Gas up and go Sites like www.traffic.com show you real-time traffic conges-

tion and give estimates on your arrival time at destinations within major cities. The AAA website, www.csaa.com, shows travel tips and driving routes across the country with the nearest stops for lodging, restaurants, gas stations and more. GasBuddy.com lets you find the nearest, cheapest gas stations in cities nationwide.

Limit food spending If you’re driving, bring a cooler and ice packs that you can refreeze. If you’re staying in a hotel, try booking one with a kitchenette or complimentary breakfast. If it has a fridge, a stash of fruit, cereals and breakfast snacks can be a huge savings over eating out every morning. Whether it’s in a new city or a foreign country, the local grocery store often yields affordable foodie finds, including local breads, coffees, wines and baked goods. And loading up at a supermarket salad bar can be just as filling — not to mention healthier — than the nearby fast-food joint. For an alternative to expensive dinners, look for happy-hour deals that offer small plates at enticing prices. Or eat your bigger meal of the day at lunch, rather than off the pricier dinner menu.

Backyard getaway? Taking a “staycation” may sound trite, but vacationing in your hometown can be a refreshing, low-cost way to get away without going far. Check your local newspaper and online listings for free fairs, outdoor events and low-cost shows. Local visitor bureaus have free travel guides, often with discount cards. Or explore your local trails, bike paths and waterfronts. Involve the kids, suggests Jones. Have them look up free things they’d like to see or do in your region: The winner for a given day is the youngster who finds “the most fun thing to do” that’s the cheapest.

not a child matriculates in postsecondary education. At a House discussion in midMay, she said children with college funds are four times more likely to go to college. Still, many families are hesitant to invest in 529 plans because of misperceptions, Marshall said. For instance, she said, some mistakenly believe that money stashed in a 529 plan can only be used for tuition at four-year colleges, but those funds can be used at any accredited institution that accepts federal aid, including community colleges, technical schools and graduate schools.

• Make a budget. You can’t save for a car, a house or the future if you don’t know how much you’re making and spending. There are plenty of online sites like Mint. com or Kiplinger.com that offer budgeting tools. LearnVest. com has a 2010 college grad financial survival guide. • Don’t spend money you don’t have. That is, live within your means. If you can take public transportation, for example, don’t buy a car. If you can comfortably and peacefully live at home with your parents for a while, do it. • Consolidate school loans. Many students will be graduating with a handful of them that should be rolled together with one interest rate attached to it. • Build your credit history carefully. It is tough to get on in this world without a credit card, but that doesn’t mean you have to use it wildly. Use it only when you have to, like to rent a car or pay a hotel bill, and pay it off every month. Your payment history is the most important element of your credit score, accounting for 35 percent of your score. • Have a health-care plan. Figure out when your coverage ends and be sure you have another one lined up. A new law that goes into effect in September will allow you to stay on or return to your parents’ health insurance plan until you turn 26.

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How about 70,000 good reasons. Every day The Bulletin delivers new, and in-depth insight into your community through local news, business, sports and entertainment. Plus, every week we deliver local coupons, special offers, shopping inserts and more worth over $100 every week. Add it all together and it’s easy to see why The Bulletin is read by 70,000 local readers every day, more than any other locally produced print product, and that’s why so many businesses trust us to deliver their advertising message to Central Oregon and deliver results for their advertising dollars. So if you’re looking for a good reason try local advertising, remember, The Bulletin has 70,000 good reasons every day.

Want to know more? Call and ask for your FREE marketing consultation. We can help you review all your advertising options and maximize your local advertising dollars, in the newspaper and on the web. Call our Advertising Manager, Sean Tate at 541.383.0386


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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7.81 +.33 18.87 +.48 0.44 17.18 +.49 1.26 49.33 +.77 18.70 +.14 7.96 +.15 9.85 +.38 1.12 44.64 +1.51 28.43 +.79 1.76 36.66 +.84 0.20 14.94 +.84 33.39 +2.27 1.12 25.65 +.54 8.66 +.50 8.20 +.63 20.98 +.49 0.27 29.28 +1.18 1.68 24.78 +.45 9.24 +.52 3.94 +.01 0.09 9.47 -.01 1.53 +.14 0.18 13.69 +.14 0.05 20.10 +.41 1.57 +.03 1.76 47.48 +.54 0.70 35.26 +.61 0.42 6.11 +.18 9.80 +.37 46.18 +2.17 2.55 +.05 54.38 +3.57 0.72 18.27 +.47 0.75 36.83 +.12 6.74 +.07 6.20 +.25 28.58 +.98 36.70 +1.58 0.15 10.81 +.24 0.04 20.16 +.72 4.38 -.05 16.50 +.25 2.96 +.07 0.52 23.82 +.27 32.94 +.81 0.36 27.81 +1.40 0.25 4.48 -.02 0.24 51.35 +.98 3.64 +.18 3.22 +.08 12.65 +.56 8.54 +.40 0.08 4.21 +.05 6.29 +.43 2.30 +.09 25.07 +.51 0.04 23.03 +.91 5.79 +.23 12.00 +.60 28.39 +.93 1.60 +.03 0.04 29.61 +.82 71.05 +2.31 21.13 +1.30 6.61 +.18 3.17 -.03 32.22 +.74 0.18 59.85 +2.00 0.11 55.34 +1.81 1.96 69.12 +1.70 5.62 +.20 0.40 9.41 +.09 0.88 62.80 +.80 5.90 +.32 41.27 +1.77 .85 +.03 3.14 +.19 49.93 +3.75 0.86 8.62 +.35 0.56 42.85 +1.31 0.34 27.55 +.37 2.60 +.07 0.12 11.48 +.29 3.95 142.45 +2.85 1.26 31.66 +.83 1.40 65.82 +1.57 52.34 +3.50 14.77 +.39 11.94 +.48 0.60 20.21 +.58 0.72 52.73 +1.79 0.20 59.87 +1.22 70.42 +2.09 4.12 +.08 0.48 7.88 +.03 1.58 32.20 +.65 67.75 +.15 2.50 -.06 19.29 +.59 7.31 +.48 19.44 +1.15 0.80 30.22 +.56 .95 -.01 37.29 +3.03 0.40 5.56 +.02 1.44 6.90 +.17 .54 +.02 0.20 23.83 +.76 0.40 18.38 +.40 12.22 +.39 1.40 20.38 +.26 0.07 5.66 +.22 20.47 +.82 2.16 +.02 2.30 97.63 +2.98 0.28 13.19 +.25 2.65 -.01 126.31 +3.07 1.24 +.07 27.69 -.06 49.92 +1.50 1.54 24.56 +.59 37.13 +1.06 1.22 48.67 +1.16 1.60 +.06 9.10 +.63 1.35 26.12 +.44 5.70 27.17 +.58 5.22 +.10 0.40 12.76 +.07 1.68 31.85 +.65 0.08 9.56 +.46 0.72 40.97 +1.78 0.55 28.06 +.78 0.56 22.96 +.69 6.38 9.13 -.07 35.06 +.81 22.91 +.52 6.67 +.67 3.00 31.03 +.87 41.45 +1.61 0.84 20.22 +.20 21.13 +.45 0.72 40.30 +1.51 0.32 31.73 +.92 0.42 18.05 +.43 0.24 41.53 +1.32 56.09 +5.33 6.78 +.33 0.06 41.95 +.90 19.66 +.57 16.78 +.57 0.36 44.36 +2.26 4.03 +.09 2.49 -.10 0.88 29.81 +.94 14.45 +.11 0.17 42.83 +1.28 0.53 49.06 +1.53 46.99 +.80 20.79 +.13 2.69 17.25 +.41 1.30 +.02 44.16 +.75 1.65 +.04 .97 -.02 1.08 6.81 +.14 0.60 39.65 +1.02 9.35 +.54 0.60 89.04 +3.62 0.40 21.04 +.58 0.33 13.71 +.44 51.47 +.07 1.12 10.29 +.34 263.95 +3.12 1.41 +.05 0.60 27.67 +.75 0.28 12.85 +.26 11.02 +.22 0.60 39.85 +.79 0.58 17.33 +.12 5.83 +.12 0.75 29.98 +1.13 73.14 +1.13 0.40 21.93 +1.55 0.60 25.56 +.56 19.68 -1.12 3.23 +.18 33.80 +2.45 1.40 13.69 +.55 3.74 +.19 15.28 +.65 0.12 22.72 +.05 0.11 11.28 +.38 36.06 +.84 3.69 +.07 10.93 +.18 26.41 +.30 1.50 +.03 3.65 +.05 30.61 +.66 0.24 18.64 +.17 13.82 +.78 15.20 +.87 12.67 +.23 7.57 -.08 0.60 52.47 +1.40 21.54 +.95 0.60 24.49 -.03 3.46 -.23 0.04 13.62 +.58 0.68 13.60 -.10 0.64 35.72 +1.10 0.18 16.42 +.83 0.52 15.03 +.51 2.30 43.59 +1.28 25.39 +1.99 34.60 +1.91 53.17 +3.23 30.93 +1.96 10.04 +.40 5.07 +.07 1.34 27.10 +.64 26.38 +.62 1.85 -.10 4.92 +.17 20.48 +.84 1.28 +.10

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D 29.24 +.68 1.20 49.45 +2.27 1.36 41.47 +.98 192.65 +1.19 29.06 +1.12 21.11 +.72 3.57 97.48 +1.38 2.52 +.11 0.80 33.77 +.72 11.49 +.25 1.00 19.36 +.57 27.77 +.46 0.88 26.12 +.26 0.84 30.42 +.92 0.68 10.99 +.21 0.60 30.73 +.96 1.74 30.49 +.80 27.14 +1.05 0.37 6.28 +.10 1.66 64.90 +2.26 1.66 55.15 +1.91 24.90 +1.56 39.79 -.09 37.22 +.81 3.36 37.66 +1.14 5.00 +.13 1.50 40.18 +.63 0.06 13.15 +.47 1.40 +.05 75.98 +2.42 0.60 39.63 +3.76 0.68 36.09 +1.62 0.40 50.32 +1.87 41.37 +.86 1.34 49.20 +1.03 0.59 10.27 +.27 0.76 17.05 +.55 0.82 10.03 +.20 0.20 10.56 +.44 2.67 64.49 +3.02 0.88 19.63 +.63 0.04 15.89 +.46 9.10 +.33 2.16 24.68 +.16 1.80 48.28 +1.16 5.05 +.32 2.80 60.71 +1.62 0.36 27.29 +.79 1.96 48.92 +1.87 1.78 -.12 37.39 +.24 21.96 +.44 61.46 +2.01 0.22 17.63 +.18 88.51 -1.62 28.87 -1.32 0.68 81.39 +1.49 1.00 18.47 +.07 0.32 18.31 +.29 0.40 43.10 +.51 7.84 +.47 1.16 41.81 +.27 2.16 30.97 +1.14 .38 +.01 20.57 +.48 4.81 +.05 0.10 6.55 -.05 0.72 58.29 +.58 1.48 72.40 +1.69 45.27 +1.08 0.20 25.56 +.28 7.17 +.27 0.92 28.63 +.66 18.26 +.46 0.28 27.72 +.65 72.25 +1.99 0.30 31.28 +2.24 0.56 40.20 -.52 35.25 +.49 32.80 +1.98 23.09 +.59 7.01 +.25 48.35 +1.13 20.01 +.83 0.56 17.26 +.56 6.44 +.48 0.38 14.83 +.22 1.44 28.79 +.85 1.28 10.60 +.14 40.21 +.63 4.00 164.77 +1.57 0.90 9.71 -.10 1.20 11.89 -.19 0.37 3.81 -.02 1.82 9.89 -.13 0.40 10.53 +.30 0.60 16.14 +.31 .34 +.01 .23 +.00 22.38 +1.23 46.78 +1.00 2.02 27.42 -.02 1.68 64.34 +1.39 5.75 -.04 2.95 +.02 1.57 -.11 38.95 +2.51 0.04 7.33 +.39 2.00 76.18 +.27 6.11 +.14 0.22 11.08 +.07 12.15 +.26 0.70 29.01 +.65 0.60 11.59 +.33 20.01 +1.31 0.02 12.35 +.61 1.50 14.99 +.12 21.84 +.84 0.44 20.88 +.81 17.89 +1.49 7.40 +.18 0.56 17.70 +.42 0.40 22.29 +.02 1.28 23.00 -.02 32.05 +.93 3.07 62.48 +1.34 0.32 35.36 +1.33 0.56 18.81 +.01 2.56 +.34 5.40 +.11 3.58 +.14 17.41 +.32 0.52 24.34 +.83 0.56 14.84 +.39 0.34 9.92 +.29 8.17 +.20 0.31 19.58 +.22 0.28 16.15 -.10 1.20 56.98 +1.90 12.54 +.38 0.05 17.03 +.52 11.74 +.51 0.80 35.88 +1.02 0.10 53.73 +4.29 0.42 36.85 +1.50 0.92 49.15 +1.01 0.25 19.74 +.60 0.16 19.91 +.28 15.77 +.66 0.80 14.34 +.58 0.20 14.63 +.55 2.11 +.05 0.40 67.67 +1.73 15.48 -.16 1.00 58.12 +1.29 0.04 33.76 +.90 37.26 +1.06 0.24 12.39 +.12 4.88 -.12 1.00 26.55 +.64 4.60 322.92+11.29 0.60 14.61 +.29 26.62 +.66 25.40 +.74 5.63 +.24 5.16 160.38 +6.93 0.96 53.50 +1.97 0.26 15.19 +.92 0.34 9.73 +.07 0.35 35.20 +.86 16.47 +.08 0.40 25.08 +.71 0.12 35.32 +2.39 45.96 +.03 7.14 -.14 6.64 +.15 5.04 +.18 0.80 34.21 +.94 0.30 10.23 +.06 1.02 11.63 +.03 0.63 8.21 +.11 14.78 +.68 0.04 8.30 +.26 5.45 +.40 13.41 +.28 4.06 -.37 1.80 45.76 +.79 0.28 24.12 +.82 34.28 +2.39 1.10 36.42 +.76 3.48 69.71 +2.76 1.08 58.90 +1.54 0.30 35.40 +2.00 1.08 55.85 +1.45 10.17 -1.69 .66 +.04 41.45 +.88 0.10 16.62 +.14 0.20 41.75 +1.27 0.04 4.56 +.20 2.18 11.43 +.18 1.14 -.01 0.72 68.35 +3.67 0.78 35.00 +1.09 6.86 +.18 .47 +.00 12.78 +.14 25.90 +.84 0.68 8.63 -.05 28.27 +.80 0.64 39.78 +.76 21.88 +.74 0.40 37.04 +1.37 0.72 38.51 +2.26 17.95 +1.49 30.25 +.24 0.34 36.39 +.05 0.14 36.69 +1.32 37.77 +.02 1.68 60.86 +1.59 0.04 11.25 +.63 27.62 +.86 .51 -.00 0.20 28.67 +1.26 7.15 +.28 9.15 +.29 53.62 +1.74 .36 +.02 3.22 26.18 +.98 6.57 +.24 0.43 10.88 +.60

Nm

D

Cemig pf 0.86 13.63 -.06 CenovusE n 0.80 28.00 +1.21 Centene 22.08 -.24 CenterPnt 0.78 13.58 +.30 CnElBrasil 1.56 12.59 +.20 CentEuro 25.39 +.78 CEurMed 26.33 +1.69 CFCda g 0.01 15.07 -.01 CenGrdA lf 9.50 +.41 CenPacF 2.24 -.03 CentAl 10.31 +.60 CntryLink 2.90 34.97 +.81 Cenveo 7.10 +.26 Cephln 59.53 +2.08 Cepheid 18.24 +1.01 Cerner 83.93 +2.03 ChRvLab 33.98 +.62 ChrmSh 4.45 +.15 ChkPoint 30.76 +.35 Cheesecake 25.52 +.67 CheniereEn 2.68 +.03 ChesEng 0.30 23.32 +1.70 Chevron 2.88 74.13 +1.84 ChicB&I 19.24 +.92 Chicos 0.16 11.83 -.12 ChildPlace 48.31 +1.45 Chimera 0.54 3.98 +.13 ChinAgri s 12.30 +.55 ChiArmM 4.17 +.14 ChinaAuto 18.49 +.89 ChinaBAK 2.02 -.04 ChinaGreen 10.40 +.12 ChiINSOn h .39 -.01 ChinaInfo 5.25 +.21 ChinaLife 1.54 65.82 +1.84 ChMarFd n 5.72 -.11 ChinaMda 12.93 +.25 ChinaMed 0.55 10.16 -.01 ChinaMble 1.81 47.61 +1.00 ChinaNepst 1.78 3.50 -.06 ChinaPet 2.64 76.89 +2.05 ChinaSecur 4.82 +.21 ChinaUni 0.23 12.02 +.04 ChinaYuch 0.35 15.79 +.84 ChinaCEd 6.33 +.10 ChipMOS 1.73 +.02 Chipotle 147.61 +6.36 Chiquita 11.84 +.25 ChrisBnk 0.24 8.60 -.09 Chubb 1.48 50.50 +1.25 ChungTel 1.42 19.20 +.28 ChurchDwt 0.56 67.18 +1.22 CIBER 2.91 +.09 CienaCorp 15.29 +.42 Cimarex 0.32 78.66 +4.32 CinciBell 3.22 +.17 CinnFin 1.58 27.43 +.76 Cinemark 0.72 14.61 -.01 Cintas 0.48 25.86 +.49 Cirrus 14.58 +.45 Cisco 23.35 +.35 Citigp pfJ 2.13 24.90 +.15 Citigrp 3.92 +.07 CitiTdecs n 7.50 118.44 +1.24 CitizRepB 1.06 +.02 CitrixSys 44.41 +1.25 CityNC 0.40 59.15 +1.82 Clarcor 0.39 35.74 +.89 ClaySInsid 0.28 27.45 +.75 ClayGSol 6.59 +.18 CleanEngy 15.64 +1.76 CleanH 66.33 +.15 ClearChOut 9.38 +.11 Clearwire 8.07 +.20 Clearw rt .29 -.00 CliffsNRs 0.56 54.35 +3.05 ClinicData 16.57 +.48 Clorox 2.20 63.52 +.80 CloudPk n 15.00 +.89 Coach 0.60 41.60 +1.33 CobaltIEn n 7.28 +.76 CocaCE 0.36 25.93 +.03 CocaCl 1.76 52.41 +1.12 Coeur 15.15 +.58 CogdSpen 0.40 7.03 +.40 Cogent 9.06 +.39 Cognex 0.24 18.71 +.06 CognizTech 50.99 +1.85 CohStInfra 0.96 12.88 +.09 CohStQIR 0.37 6.74 +.13 Coinstar 55.06 +2.04 ColdwtrCrk 5.94 +.04 ColgPal 2.12 78.22 +1.29 CollctvBrd 20.00 -1.55 ColonPT 0.60 15.19 +.21 ColBnkg 0.04 22.35 +.49 ColumLabs 1.15 -.01 CombinRx 1.51 Comcast 0.38 18.38 +.36 Comc spcl 0.38 17.40 +.28 Comerica 0.20 38.57 +1.31 ComfrtS 0.20 10.36 -.03 CmcBMO 0.94 37.33 +1.08 CmclMtls 0.48 16.03 +1.17 CmclVehcl 12.23 +.97 ComScop 27.15 +.55 CmtyBkSy 0.96 23.03 +.97 CmtyHlt 39.99 +1.86 CommVlt 23.40 +1.14 CBD-Pao 0.37 63.80 +1.27 CompssMn 1.56 75.60 +2.62 Compellent 12.90 +.45 CompPrdS 13.45 +.79 Comptn gh .70 +.01 CompSci 0.60 49.55 +1.61 Compuwre 8.15 +.22 ComstkRs 29.92 +1.62 Con-Way 0.40 33.28 +.35 ConAgra 0.80 24.56 +.54 Concepts 16.80 +.19 ConchoRes 57.18 +5.26 ConcurTch 42.70 +1.26 Conexant 2.77 +.10 ConocPhil 2.20 52.49 +2.16 ConsolEngy 0.40 37.10 +2.88 ConEd 2.38 42.55 +.80 ConstellA 16.42 +.30 ConstellEn 0.96 35.73 +1.07 CtlAir B 22.54 +2.25 ContlRes 49.56 +4.26 Cnvrgys 10.49 +.03 ConvOrgan .83 -.01 CooperCo 0.06 37.13 +1.08 Cooper Ind 1.08 47.76 +1.33 CooperTire 0.42 19.11 +.83 CopanoEn 2.30 24.38 +.69 Copart 36.38 +.97 Copel 0.92 18.42 +.35 CoreLogic 19.56 +.82 CorinthC 13.07 +.22 CornPdts 0.56 33.74 +.93 CornellCos 27.04 +1.14 Corning 0.20 16.83 +.43 CorpOffP 1.57 38.34 +1.43 CorrectnCp 20.38 +.61 Cosan Ltd 8.86 +.34 Cosi Inc .86 -.03 Costco 0.84 58.95 +.97 Cott Cp 7.46 +.12 Cntwd pfB 1.75 21.29 -.01 CousPrp 0.13 7.60 +.09 Covance 53.07 +1.01 CovantaH 15.12 +.47 CoventryH 21.22 +.67 Covidien 0.72 41.48 +.24 CrackerB 0.80 49.91 +1.27 Crane 0.80 33.11 +1.26 Cray Inc 4.93 +.18 Credicp 1.70 89.78 +.31 CSCush30 20 18.58 +.33 CredSuiss 1.85 38.90 +1.23 Cree Inc 67.37 +2.00 Crocs 10.30 +.40 CrosstexE 6.52 +.49 CrosstxLP 9.55 +.65 CrwnCstle 36.91 +.97 CrownHold 23.80 +.86 Crystallx g .56 -.00 Ctrip.com s 39.91 +1.88 CubistPh 21.57 +.59 CullenFr 1.80 54.73 +1.17 Cummins 0.70 69.78 +3.69 Curis 3.25 +.20 CurEuro 122.11 +.08 CurAstla 2.37 84.25 +.91 CurrCda 95.84 +1.43 CurtisWrt 0.32 33.15 +.72 Cyberonics 18.76 +.94 CybrSrce 25.71 +.08 Cyclacel 2.11 +.06 Cymer 30.78 +.86 CyprsBio 4.18 +.11 CypSemi 11.43 +.32 CytRx .95 -.06 Cytec 0.05 42.68 +1.81 Cytokinet 2.89 +.09 DCT Indl 0.28 4.68 +.01 DJSP Ent 5.89 -.06 DJSP wt 1.61 -.11 DNP Selct 0.78 8.95 +.24 DPL 1.21 25.18 +.55 DR Horton 0.15 12.13 +.36 DST Sys 0.60 37.77 +.16 DSW Inc 26.81 -.61 DTE 2.12 45.62 +.71 Daimler 50.73 +1.58 Daktronics 0.10 8.12 +.04 DanaHldg 11.11 +.67 Danaher 0.16 81.21 +2.43 Darden 1.00 44.11 +1.00 Darling 7.99 +.34 DaVita 64.78 +1.78 DeVry 0.20 57.42 +.82 DeanFds 10.82 +.28 DeckOut 149.54 +8.04 DeerCon s 8.16 +.04 Deere 1.20 60.07 +2.94 DelMnte 0.20 14.76 +.19 Delcath 15.95 +.41 Dell Inc 13.12 +.03 DelphiFn 0.40 26.65 +.90 DeltaAir 14.09 +.55 DltaPtr 1.15 +.03 Deltek 7.96 +.13 Deluxe 1.00 21.10 +.68 DenburyR 16.54 +.79 Dndreon 43.16 +.75 Dennys 3.00 -.03 Dentsply 0.20 33.00 +.97 DeutschBk 0.93 59.47 +1.68 DBGoldDL 32.66 -.06 DeutTel 1.05 11.39 +.30 DevelDiv 0.08 11.53 +.38 DevonE 0.64 65.05 +3.42 Dex One n 21.17 +.99 DexCom 10.25 +.45 Diageo 2.36 63.25 +1.47 DiamondF 0.18 39.46 -.19 DiamMgmt 0.36 10.32 +.42 DiaOffs 0.50 60.14 +1.63 DiamRk 0.03 9.10 +.34

Nm

D

DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DirxTcBear DrxEMBll s DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DirREBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DitechNet DivX DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DoublTake DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR Drew Inds DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy rs

1.08 1.92 0.16 7.03 5.77 0.15 7.35 0.04 3.08 4.85 8.22 5.18 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.13

1.83 1.00 0.48 1.04 0.40 1.04 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.32 0.96 0.68 1.40

Nm 13.66 +.35 8.64 +.41 27.99 +.15 29.08 +.88 58.91 +2.59 26.53 +.20 27.29 -.20 32.08 +1.20 38.56 +1.10 32.61 +2.08 8.37 -.61 23.76 +2.24 47.68 -5.52 14.60 -1.32 24.42 +1.82 49.55 +1.43 7.11 -.48 42.77 +2.42 6.85 -.64 47.39 +3.74 15.48 -1.27 48.38 +3.52 11.85 -1.69 29.05 +3.26 13.47 +.29 39.07 +1.99 32.69 +1.46 .44 20.94 +.48 34.74 +1.41 1.33 +.01 8.79 +1.84 30.33 +.90 11.66 -.11 66.14 +1.14 9.00 -.06 31.36 +.82 46.47 +.32 62.03 +.34 39.72 +1.13 13.07 +.29 61.52 +4.67 43.98 +1.08 18.68 +.36 2.98 -.18 10.42 +.12 15.33 +.24 45.16 +1.44 26.46 +.86 37.94 +.29 6.09 +.02 29.59 -.47 26.70 +.04 33.10 +1.87 21.58 +1.22 4.04 -.03 43.89 +2.94 3.44 +.09 4.55 +.16 36.19 +.95 25.55 +.36 15.96 +.26 12.00 +.46 72.57 +.90 2.56 +.12 2.73 +.16 9.51 +.19 1.80 +.07 16.95 +.05 4.96 +.07

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch ETFGold n ev3 Inc EagleBulk EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV TxAd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo Eclipsys Ecolab EdisonInt EducMgt n EducRlty EdwLfSci s ElPasoCp ElPasoEl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElizArden EBrasAero Emcore Emdeon n EMS EmergBio EmersonEl EmployH Emulex EnbrEPtrs Enbridge EnCana g s EncoreEn EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyPtrs n EnrgyRec EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO EnsignGp Entegris Entercom Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT Entravisn EntreMd h EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr Esterline EthanAl Euronet Evercore EverestRe EvergrnEn EvgIncAdv EvrgrSlr ExcelM ExcelTr n ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScripts ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FPL Grp FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr FannieMae Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferrellgs Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird Finisar rs FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCalifFn FstCashFn FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FstMarblhd FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FlushFn FocusMda FEMSA

0.25 14.81 +.72 14.99 +.79 21.25 +.29 13.52 +.89 18.69 +.20 23.91 +.31 2.84 37.63 +.95 0.62 107.75 +6.92 0.88 39.55 +1.72 8.24 +.20 122.03 -.19 22.24 +.02 4.66 +.16 0.10 5.03 -.17 0.64 8.44 +.05 0.04 16.82 +.56 1.76 60.65 +2.35 5.44 +.10 2.00 70.64 +2.52 0.64 30.27 +.95 1.29 14.25 +.10 1.62 11.65 +.14 1.53 10.42 +.17 19.27 +.29 0.62 47.59 +.94 1.26 32.44 +.93 21.31 +.61 0.20 6.18 -.03 53.23 +1.14 0.04 11.24 +.43 19.46 +.21 5.72 +.09 0.05 17.37 +.27 16.37 +.28 16.58 +.39 0.72 21.56 +.61 1.04 +.02 13.50 +.19 55.71 +2.09 15.53 +.39 1.34 46.89 +1.29 0.24 15.46 +.26 10.31 +.13 4.01 49.23 +.97 1.70 46.09 +1.79 0.80 32.64 +2.14 2.00 15.94 +.84 1.26 3.47 -.03 21.21 +.49 1.00 36.88 +.91 3.61 -.05 0.52 44.85 +1.75 56.21 +.89 5.28 +.16 12.00 -.02 3.47 2.16 30.67 +.58 3.58 43.96 +.99 15.01 +.87 0.10 6.19 +.20 2.16 22.32 +.86 0.68 19.07 +.38 22.61 +.83 0.14 36.18 +1.73 0.20 17.94 +.47 5.30 +.26 12.43 +.21 3.32 74.27 +1.04 2.27 33.41 +.77 2.60 41.08 +.75 2.70 -.08 .51 +.04 10.77 +.44 9.24 +.25 0.16 29.83 +.49 91.46 +2.73 0.88 17.40 +.58 1.35 44.51 +.18 0.28 10.26 +.26 4.13 103.28 +1.25 0.55 58.69 +.77 52.77 +.31 0.20 19.12 +.17 13.05 +.05 0.60 30.42 -1.41 1.92 72.16 +1.20 .16 -.02 1.02 9.08 +.09 .89 5.89 +.39 12.52 +.41 0.12 17.90 +1.56 5.10 +.21 2.10 37.92 +.27 7.24 +.22 4.27 +.23 0.28 21.35 +.35 0.40 38.67 +1.27 14.31 +.07 103.91 +3.40 25.12 +1.06 0.23 14.75 +.35 2.86 +.11 1.76 60.77 +1.52 18.46 +.60 69.28 +1.52 28.80 +.78 0.50 61.41 +2.72 51.11 +1.78 0.48 8.41 +.37 2.00 49.66 +1.22 4.24 +.01 42.52 -.24 0.92 68.40 +.99 0.08 22.55 +.75 9.83 +.08 0.62 40.09 -.16 .96 +.03 0.80 51.79 +2.12 0.44 83.32 +2.03 2.64 74.27 +1.74 0.24 6.62 +.29 0.96 21.58 -.02 6.78 +.26 2.00 23.46 +.19 8.52 +.07 15.77 +.48 0.72 14.15 +.16 0.20 27.56 +.26 1.28 11.52 +.37 0.04 13.05 +.65 14.90 +.52 0.16 16.05 -.28 14.48 +.38 1.36 +.01 2.90 -.07 21.68 +.83 0.04 5.30 +.34 0.40 15.87 +.36 0.80 12.58 +.46 6.40 +.05 2.77 +.07 0.04 13.82 +.71 0.56 13.09 +.15 110.98 +3.87 0.08 16.71 +1.08 2.20 34.82 +.79 0.64 18.39 +.34 47.16 +.64 4.39 -.22 6.53 +.18 1.45 +.08 0.70 24.78 +.42 1.16 92.54 +3.13 0.50 45.60 +1.17 0.52 13.60 +.21 15.44 +.02 0.32 43.53 +1.60

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredMac FredsInc FMCG FresKabi rt FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GTx Inc GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h Gensco Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp Geokinetics GaGulf rs Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp Gibraltar Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GlblScape Globalstar GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrIT n vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns Greenhill Group1 GrubbEl h GpTelevisa Guess GulfMrkA GulfportE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HRPT Prp HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HartFn pfA HrvrdBio HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HaupgDig HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HlthTroncs HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HiTchPhm Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HollyCp Hologic HomeDp HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl HorMan Hormel

D 0.60 14.71 +.26 4.21 +.01 11.85 +.44 4.56 +.29 13.20 +.47 25.75 +.26 28.03 +2.61 12.75 +.57 16.00 +.27 4.11 +.13 0.76 48.16 +1.47 37.52 +1.29 24.08 +1.16 1.90 19.20 +.59 0.88 97.88 +2.39 1.24 +.04 0.16 13.18 +.03 1.20 69.02 +2.53 .14 +.00 1.00 8.15 +.24 13.69 +.48 1.40 34.90 +3.10 28.05 +.58 2.13 +.11 0.28 21.54 +.88 0.12 10.12 +.28 8.92 +.28 7.31 +.23 1.12 28.52 +.82 0.20 6.25 +.25 4.28 +.04 6.91 +.69 28.71 +.76 5.44 +.12 2.33 +.25 1.68 15.84 -.02 0.14 12.05 +.48 1.28 24.70 +.33 22.13 +.27 7.48 +.15 0.16 14.80 +.30 0.40 21.93 +.54 0.20 45.75 +1.92 1.50 33.10 +1.03 25.00 +.95 26.21 +.90 18.79 +.91 5.41 +.25 30.38 +.84 1.68 67.92 +1.18 0.40 16.35 +.37 14.10 +.12 0.50 6.95 +.25 1.96 74.30 +2.30 3.65 +.24 2.65 +.12 .42 +.02 31.56 +1.02 0.18 17.29 +.50 0.44 19.71 +.38 27.89 +.95 1.64 41.05 +1.11 .60 -.01 15.66 +.74 49.59 +1.48 21.07 +.68 4.51 -.16 17.05 +.10 11.07 +3.90 0.21 13.82 +.59 5.65 +.33 12.16 +.29 30.48 +1.02 36.00 +.57 0.52 15.99 +.56 0.36 11.04 +.36 1.98 34.81 +1.15 3.52 0.40 6.83 -.03 8.06 +.23 4.97 +.14 0.08 41.58 +.14 2.08 +.33 1.94 -.02 0.40 11.85 +.42 0.17 13.96 +.25 0.18 44.16 +.94 4.18 1.40 144.83 +2.97 1.08 68.97 +1.60 12.50 +1.24 11.84 +.44 493.37+11.00 1.60 25.24 -.28 25.29 +1.05 0.80 31.93 +1.14 16.76 +.72 2.16 103.10 +2.88 1.43 +.06 5.34 +.34 25.04 +.32 0.52 28.18 +.14 3.31 +.18 5.22 +.17 1.76 +.09 0.07 5.95 +.08 0.83 17.41 +.34 24.14 +.60 11.55 +.74 1.80 68.45 +1.01 27.95 +1.72 1.33 +.02 1.19 18.81 +.25 0.64 36.38 +.67 26.63 +1.13 12.37 +.45 44.47 +.54 0.54 25.25 +.84 1.86 32.31 +.96 0.48 6.77 +.11 1.70 46.75 +1.12 26.31 +1.10 22.21 +.93 0.36 23.68 +2.53 7.15 +.06 27.37 +.63 2.13 -.10 1.00 43.65 +.77 2.16 +.02 39.30 +.84 18.31 +.76 0.40 29.41 +.23 32.93 +1.16 5.84 +.11 0.06 9.82 +.11 0.88 47.78 +2.44 0.82 26.99 +.65 0.20 25.49 +1.06 1.81 24.18 +.66 3.80 +.33 8.02 +.68 1.00 40.30 +.94 4.65 28.24 +.61 2.53 -.19 1.24 21.91 +.23 7.24 +.21 3.77 -.03 2.72 42.77 +.41 8.98 +.33 1.20 22.56 +.37 25.62 +1.18 19.89 +.68 17.55 +.62 4.70 +.15 0.08 15.23 +.11 5.32 +.11 5.43 +.19 1.80 44.93 +.84 10.74 +.74 0.20 38.09 +2.23 .63 +.02 57.06 +1.64 0.80 46.55 +2.16 2.63 +.07 0.20 4.81 +.18 1.28 48.70 +.70 10.69 -.09 0.40 52.13 +1.64 37.03 +.37 0.32 47.27 +1.69 16.27 +.87 28.58 -1.64 22.90 +.33 25.77 +.71 1.70 29.01 +.16 0.41 27.84 +.36 0.75 23.41 -.19 0.60 25.77 +.73 14.72 +.09 0.95 33.87 +.33 2.32 47.40 +.57 26.22 +.91 30.20 +.16 1.21 42.93 +1.03 0.32 15.15 +.30 0.84 40.76 +.70

Nm Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HuanPwr HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hyatt n Hypercom

D

1.80 0.04 0.28 1.23 1.44 0.60 1.12 0.48 0.04 0.40

14.33 +.69 9.74 +.31 51.87 +1.23 22.56 +.64 14.80 +.65 5.38 +.01 6.15 +.18 21.54 +.29 32.26 +2.06 43.57 +1.12 12.88 +.49 19.20 +.57 26.22 +1.36 47.43 +1.91 34.35 +.86 6.17 +.25 10.02 +.43 39.16 -.94 5.09 +.11

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IESI-BFC gn iGateCorp ING GRE ING ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph iPass iShCmxG iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShIsrael iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iShEMBd iSSPGth iSSPGlF iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iShMnSC iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBar3-7 iSR3KV iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iSMCVal iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSv iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOE iShDJOG iShEur350 iSSCVal iSMsciG iShSCGrth iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IDEX ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte IndiaFd Inergy Infinera InfoLgx rsh InfoSpace Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InsightEnt InsitTc Insmed InspPhar Insulet IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntractDat IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune InterNAP IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntlSpdw InterntCap InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntervalLs IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare inVentiv Invernss Invesco InvMtgC n InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IrvinSens IsilonSys Isis IsleCapri ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g

23.19 +.16 17.23 36.80 +1.32 20.68 +.88 12.93 +.74 6.46 +.13 7.97 +.29 2.13 21.61 +.70 0.33 5.48 +.03 5.06 +.15 0.48 1.18 +.01 119.85 -.08 27.59 +.40 0.66 20.06 +.58 2.72 64.77 +2.11 0.33 26.72 +.86 1.05 30.38 +1.02 0.55 19.40 +.40 0.38 14.86 +.30 0.14 9.53 +.06 0.32 45.07 +1.58 0.24 11.24 +.13 0.70 49.32 +1.22 0.33 11.07 +.32 1.43 37.33 +1.14 2.08 57.32 +2.77 0.50 23.74 +1.06 0.21 11.36 +.19 0.42 14.43 +.37 0.54 45.83 +1.75 0.78 49.46 +1.19 17.98 -.04 1.04 50.12 +1.26 1.65 44.42 +1.07 3.80 105.25 -.11 0.70 52.54 +1.67 0.55 39.53 +1.05 0.95 79.12 +2.27 2.22 110.66 +2.82 3.93 105.45 -.11 0.58 38.71 +1.31 5.52 105.30 +.37 0.55 40.00 +1.20 0.82 33.45 +.83 5.73 101.23 -.48 0.82 56.34 +1.43 0.83 41.72 +1.20 0.36 32.79 +1.47 0.75 43.94 +1.35 1.20 53.35 +1.31 3.72 95.93 -.92 3.82 92.43 -.53 1.25 83.71 -.06 1.44 49.12 +1.28 0.72 38.91 +1.07 0.39 46.89 +1.31 1.22 86.20 +2.47 0.41 75.63 +1.26 0.93 76.30 +2.06 8.00 84.00 +.43 82.61 +2.91 1.93 58.41 +1.15 1.22 57.80 +1.56 0.69 49.02 +1.08 1.06 60.99 +1.49 1.00 62.15 +1.79 3.71 103.17 -.08 0.42 71.55 +2.07 0.75 66.07 +1.83 3.04 113.16 -.37 1.55 75.85 +2.05 0.15 110.20 +.01 2.79 36.72 +.34 1.12 65.27 +1.67 1.28 68.98 +1.78 0.73 19.72 +.57 1.86 50.06 +1.08 0.09 13.19 +.21 0.46 54.37 +1.49 0.68 53.18 +1.44 0.48 30.41 +1.22 0.54 58.29 +1.58 0.79 58.11 +2.00 0.32 37.96 +2.49 0.24 51.68 +2.80 1.00 33.25 +1.00 0.84 62.19 +1.43 1.16 50.22 +1.39 0.30 60.70 +1.69 5.85 +.09 1.00 48.03 +.73 100.65 +2.76 28.32 +.41 16.36 +.45 1.20 33.03 +.50 0.60 30.78 +.90 1.24 46.43 +1.27 42.93 +1.44 16.65 -.08 19.82 +.54 9.05 +.47 3.55 +.18 20.97 -.14 13.28 +.63 29.34 +.99 2.78 36.00 +.22 6.72 +.02 4.59 -.49 8.02 +.10 26.30 +.73 0.56 58.47 +1.90 0.28 38.51 +1.03 16.70 +.18 0.57 8.09 +.05 14.77 +.34 19.66 -.13 .82 +.03 5.76 +.26 15.01 +.53 5.71 +.01 9.62 +.64 2.72 45.14 +.96 0.63 21.81 +.63 16.97 +.33 0.80 32.74 +.52 121.40 +5.57 25.79 +.50 0.04 11.72 +.32 10.90 +.32 9.09 +.35 5.07 +.21 0.34 19.76 +.80 2.60 127.41 +3.07 4.20 +.22 1.00 44.92 +1.19 0.24 19.30 +.18 0.50 22.97 +.73 20.68 +.32 0.16 27.09 +.63 8.60 +.57 47.33 +1.54 8.12 +.20 0.48 13.28 +.35 14.23 +.96 24.50 +.63 36.43 +1.19 334.12 +9.95 0.05 23.71 +.35 24.95 +.05 34.38 +.76 0.44 18.85 +.71 2.44 20.85 +.24 0.33 4.51 +.01 16.92 +.48 0.69 8.86 +.26 9.25 +.54 0.25 24.33 +.46 .30 +.01 14.02 +.52 10.24 +1.17 10.81 +1.52 0.55 19.26 +.73 67.45 +1.93 2.33 +.15 13.86 +.52 0.06 0.53 0.50 0.11 0.54

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm JCrew JA Solar JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfB JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JavelinPh JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KAR Auct n KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KC Southn KapStone Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KidBrands KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KirbyCp Kirklands KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LIN TV h LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Layne Lazard LeapWirlss LearCorp n LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LithiaMot Littelfuse LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn n LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g

D

0.20 1.79 1.80 1.68 0.28 0.38

0.04 0.33 0.30

2.16 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70

0.25 0.20 0.40 0.60

1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.28 0.10 0.24 0.24 0.08

1.16 0.38 1.60 0.33

0.18 0.04

0.50 2.08 0.16 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40 0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 0.04 0.92 2.52 0.20

1.43 2.52 0.25

4.00 0.44 1.44 0.50

45.51 +1.18 4.67 +.05 11.00 +.31 39.55 +1.01 29.19 +.62 26.40 +.22 23.53 +.22 13.63 +.72 24.13 +.58 22.17 +.22 1.75 -.01 42.58 +2.35 9.05 +.26 2.35 +.08 15.58 +.63 10.45 +.37 28.48 +.58 1.52 -.08 8.14 +.57 23.47 +.69 6.48 +.31 45.36 +1.12 2.19 +.02 59.73 +.97 28.91 +.95 19.25 +.44 75.80 +3.73 2.02 +.14 62.96 +2.32 52.45 +4.19 25.29 +.46 14.00 -.01 41.17 +1.92 14.01 +.28 20.73 +.20 8.23 +.24 30.85 +.92 19.16 +.32 39.40 +1.32 10.75 +.13 54.94 +1.35 28.65 +1.74 4.97 -.05 9.89 +.75 8.24 +.35 8.15 -.16 32.09 +.28 61.10 +.64 14.48 +.41 63.12 +1.31 41.74 +1.59 8.14 -.18 17.40 +.24 40.23 +1.72 21.23 +.14 4.91 +.06 14.48 +.37 19.87 +.50 14.90 +.63 3.27 +.19 51.62 +.86 3.54 +.16 14.01 +.72 13.63 29.53 +.63 3.71 +.21 20.06 +.19 7.05 +.33 7.37 +.22 82.24 +.60 18.96 +.55 5.82 +.21 18.15 +.51 30.83 +.71 6.31 -.05 18.27 +.35 5.42 +.24 3.35 +.08 11.58 +.16 1.18 +.06 76.58 +1.58 4.27 +.10 1.47 -.01 39.57 +2.30 28.69 +.72 41.67 +.64 24.25 +1.23 21.99 +.15 5.01 +.26 8.26 +.17 26.56 +2.82 31.51 +.87 15.05 +.43 67.52 +.72 21.66 +.07 31.33 +1.91 23.47 +.47 33.80 +.20 16.55 +.22 44.81 +.82 21.50 +.78 1.28 +.02 1.50 +.10 5.99 +.05 38.33 +.79 9.87 -.03 4.30 -.03 26.20 +.86 26.12 +.79 13.04 +.57 43.55 +.96 31.04 +.82 50.28 +1.00 36.77 +1.16 35.24 +.69 1.57 +.09 33.00 -.11 33.21 +.66 4.50 +.08 25.95 +.87 48.71 +2.05 26.92 +1.28 28.30 +.77 24.88 +.88 5.35 +.14 7.01 +.18 7.92 +.32 36.33 +.47 11.83 +.14 6.52 +.47 5.91 +.10 3.34 +.01 8.32 +.84 79.80 +.63 32.63 +.76 14.68 +.69 26.41 +.94 32.77 +1.06 72.58 +1.20 8.17 +.37 24.43 +.14 88.81 +2.67 40.67 +1.07 41.46 +1.63

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAP Phm MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagelPt Magma MagnaI g MagHRes Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVCoal

2.80 79.67 +2.14 14.19 +.13 0.04 21.78 +.99 6.93 -.01 0.11 5.28 +.24 1.00 30.46 +.35 8.70 +.20 0.63 18.35 +.57 11.20 +.62 7.32 -.27 0.96 7.45 +.19 0.58 6.60 -.02 8.55 +.03 12.47 +.30 5.06 +.19 2.94 +.09 0.80 52.38 +1.24 30.14 +.72 2.00 40.35 +.42 1.80 32.64 +.61 0.20 22.40 +.52 41.34 +.76 2.84 43.63 +1.02 1.83 +.08 3.00 +.02 0.18 69.24 +1.79 4.65 +.19 0.08 11.75 +.48 5.70 +.33 0.74 44.21 +.43 0.52 17.16 +.51 1.00 31.33 +1.14 9.64 +.18 21.38 +1.45 0.11 50.67 +.86 0.98 58.49 +3.91 0.08 30.39 +1.43 27.57 +.72 0.42 38.06 +.99 0.31 32.30 +1.59

Nm MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel MaximIntg MaxwllT McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio Meritage Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom Millipore MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MobileTel s Modine ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Momenta MoneyGrm Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Res NII Hldg NIVS IntT NN Inc NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NovoNord Novogen

D 2.56 29.25 +1.06 0.16 33.50 +.62 0.80 21.73 +.45 0.04 8.12 +.28 18.26 +.29 5.65 -.05 1.60 93.91 +2.08 19.52 +.87 0.30 12.90 +.39 2.00 22.08 +.37 0.24 32.27 +2.10 11.13 +.19 0.60 201.02 +.63 0.75 21.67 +.41 0.80 17.83 +.28 13.21 +1.44 4.41 +.07 1.04 39.33 +.91 22.12 +1.12 2.20 67.77 +1.41 0.94 28.04 +1.02 0.72 70.25 +1.44 10.65 +1.17 32.49 +1.46 0.90 49.28 +.39 0.12 8.90 +.56 0.92 23.82 +.79 21.55 +.87 7.50 +.36 22.88 +.50 57.77 +.65 6.43 +.16 0.80 9.35 +.19 8.28 +.14 0.24 22.78 +.45 32.06 +2.05 11.90 +.62 57.02 +2.06 0.82 39.08 +.78 4.38 -.05 24.64 +1.15 0.36 20.63 +.22 8.86 +.12 53.30 +2.31 5.36 +.11 1.52 34.36 +.83 0.92 33.91 +1.07 0.76 17.35 +.14 21.08 +.84 4.92 +.30 .68 -.01 0.62 20.88 +.86 0.74 41.58 +1.74 8.61 4.07 +.04 0.14 10.93 +.22 1.37 27.96 +.61 6.21 +.41 9.18 +.52 34.22 +.37 15.65 +.44 0.52 26.46 +.57 2.46 53.86 +.46 .60 0.09 19.50 +.41 7.24 80.88 +3.95 106.35 +.47 0.20 29.41 +.78 9.05 +.37 9.02 +.35 12.03 +.03 4.87 +.03 19.92 +1.05 11.08 +.06 7.53 +.11 55.20 +1.32 0.61 20.60 +.15 1.12 41.70 +1.23 13.61 +.47 2.67 +.16 1.06 50.37 +1.60 14.44 +.57 0.36 15.33 +.30 0.42 19.90 +.60 0.20 27.18 +1.05 7.00 -.10 0.20 46.30 +1.69 6.85 +.15 2.12 +.10 0.07 4.20 +.08 1.00 51.73 +.65 18.95 +.01 1.75 18.46 +.62 5.70 +.29 33.70 +.33 12.78 +.04 22.14 +.15 0.60 14.35 +.09 1.24 +.17 37.88 +2.42 2.50 -.08 6.10 -.02 6.97 +.60 22.81 +.63 0.44 11.87 +.27 1.20 28.66 +1.00 19.81 +1.15 0.14 22.01 +.34 11.02 +.72 8.01 +.67 18.73 +.34 0.31 2.55 +.20 0.72 17.77 +.78 13.76 +.23 1.34 48.84 +1.66 2.92 40.03 +.38 0.40 35.36 +1.46 0.04 6.96 +.35 1.50 22.11 +.47 0.32 14.22 +.47 1.80 35.51 +.66 16.78 +.71 11.70 +.02 0.24 5.90 +.22 53.79 +1.23 12.53 +.39 2.64 -.08 14.01 +.09 10.17 +.24 29.41 +1.54 38.95 +1.33 31.20 +.89 12.87 +.35 110.78 +3.49 2.24 -.05 4.45 +.45 21.03 +.18 12.96 +.32 3.12 +.02 6.41 +.12 1.36 35.07 +.53 89.96 -.59 3.61 -.19 1.00 16.23 +.58 9.02 +.27 0.28 11.69 +.19 2.87 -.05 0.20 17.04 +.38 51.39 +1.92 0.40 55.71 +1.07 6.30 +.53 0.15 13.32 +.55 0.15 15.43 +.49 0.20 22.23 +.96 .34 -.01 .33 -.00 0.92 14.91 +.35 1.86 40.81 +1.09 1.08 73.00 +1.82 14.83 +.09 20.48 +.08 0.20 28.14 +1.10 0.72 60.15 +3.92 0.56 10.15 +.13 6.12 -.06 1.45 29.22 +1.22 0.80 40.25 +1.00 1.36 56.69 +1.66 3.46 +.19 1.36 26.37 +.81 1.03 25.88 +.58 7.07 +.19 14.42 +1.07 1.12 51.11 +1.29 2.95 +.07 1.88 60.82 +1.28 0.40 3.13 +.14 0.40 11.57 +.27 7.21 +.19 1.99 45.97 +1.04 6.22 +.22 2.43 +.16 5.85 +.09 26.12 +.81 1.41 79.28 +3.52 1.07 -.60

D

NSTAR 1.60 35.06 +.64 NuSkin 0.50 27.18 -.85 NuVasive 39.12 +.77 NuanceCm 16.86 +.55 Nucor 1.44 42.76 +1.33 NustarEn 4.26 55.92 +1.87 NutriSyst 0.70 22.21 +.59 NuBldAm n 0.12 20.02 +.00 NvEPOp 1.34 12.39 +.15 NuvQPf2 0.65 7.25 +.13 Nvidia 12.72 +.14 OGE Engy 1.45 36.53 +.96 OM Group 28.67 +.15 OReillyA h 51.39 +.77 OSI Phrm 57.42 -.01 OcciPet 1.52 81.85 +1.78 Oceaneer 43.85 +3.48 OceanFrt h .54 +.04 Och-Ziff 0.72 15.21 +.57 Oclaro rs 13.24 +.64 OcwenFn 11.74 +.15 OdysseyHlt 26.54 +.10 OdysMar 1.12 +.01 OfficeDpt 5.67 +.24 OfficeMax 17.57 +.09 OilSvHT 1.74 94.96 +5.50 OilStates 39.73 +3.24 Oilsands g .75 +.04 OldDomF h 35.84 +.97 OldNBcp 0.28 11.48 +.32 OldRepub 0.69 13.70 +.47 Olin 0.80 18.84 +.38 OmegaHlt 1.28 19.81 +.45 Omncre 0.09 25.12 +.53 Omnicom 0.80 37.94 +1.16 OmniVisn 19.66 +.12 OnSmcnd 7.27 +.12 ONEOK 1.76 44.76 +1.93 ONEOK Pt 4.44 59.00 +.46 OnyxPh 22.78 +.65 OpnwvSy 2.11 +.05 OplinkC 14.20 +.80 Opnext 1.89 -.01 OptimerPh 10.17 +.10 Oracle 0.20 22.64 +.44 Orbitz 4.97 +.09 Orexigen 5.32 +.10 OrientEH 9.22 -.67 OriginAg 9.16 -.05 Orthovta 3.08 +.13 OshkoshCp 36.10 +.68 OvShip 1.75 39.41 +1.96 OwensM s 0.71 29.93 +.58 OwensCorn 33.62 +.94 OwensIll 30.39 +1.55 PDL Bio 1.00 5.44 +.22 PF Chng 0.17 44.34 +.86 PG&E Cp 1.82 41.58 +.86 PHH Corp 21.19 +.34 PimShMat 0.34 100.16 -.01 PMC Sra 8.27 +.42 PMI Grp 4.20 +.12 PNC 0.40 63.69 +2.53 PNM Res 0.50 12.26 +.22 POSCO 1.71 97.10 +4.60 PPG 2.16 64.73 +2.19 PPL Corp 1.40 25.78 +.51 PSS Wrld 23.10 +.36 Paccar 0.36 41.42 +1.21 PacerIntl 8.33 +.50 PacCapB 1.42 -.09 PacEthan .84 +.06 PacSunwr 3.50 -.25 PackAmer 0.60 21.91 +.64 Pactiv 28.55 +.97 PaetecHld 4.01 +.06 Palatin .26 PallCorp 0.64 34.25 +.77 Palm Inc 5.71 +.05 PanASlv 0.05 25.49 +.43 Panasonic 0.13 12.85 +.18 PaneraBrd 82.34 +1.82 PapaJohns 24.98 +.38 ParPharm 27.68 +.32 ParagShip 0.20 4.05 +.10 ParamTch 16.04 -.01 ParaG&S 1.52 -.01 Parexel 23.55 +1.12 ParkDrl 4.39 +.15 ParkerHan 1.04 61.68 +2.18 PartnerRe 2.00 72.89 +1.44 PatriotCoal 16.67 +1.37 Patterson 0.40 30.08 +.95 PattUTI 0.20 13.85 +.21 Paychex 1.24 28.86 +.64 PeabdyE 0.28 39.26 +2.79 Pengrth g 0.84 9.33 +.23 PnnNGm 25.98 +.68 PennVa 0.23 21.95 +1.18 PennVaGP 1.56 16.21 -.92 PennVaRs 1.88 20.03 -.59 PennWst g 1.80 19.83 +.80 PennantPk 1.04 10.10 +.44 Penney 0.80 27.14 +.57 PenRE 0.60 14.65 +.58 Penske 12.89 +.45 Pentair 0.76 34.16 +.65 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.98 +.14 PepBoy 0.12 11.96 +.02 PepcoHold 1.08 15.82 +.17 PepsiCo 1.92 63.46 +1.18 PerfectWld 25.88 +.40 PerkElm 0.28 22.73 +.51 Perrigo 0.25 57.49 +.97 PetDRx h .33 +.07 PetMed 0.40 19.10 -.25 PetChina 3.72 109.59 +3.93 Petrohawk 19.29 +1.39 PetrbrsA 1.30 32.30 +1.33 Petrobras 1.30 36.80 +1.17 PetroDev 21.12 +1.21 PtroqstE 6.44 +.53 PetsMart 0.40 31.78 +.54 Pfizer 0.72 15.20 +.21 PhmHTr 7.44 59.84 +1.00 PharmPdt 0.60 25.85 +1.07 Pharmasset 31.51 +2.16 Pharmerica 16.10 +.09 PhaseFwd 16.66 +.06 PhilipMor 2.32 45.05 +1.08 PhilipsEl 0.95 29.90 +.57 PhlVH 0.15 53.27 +1.13 PhnxCos 2.72 +.10 PhotrIn 5.08 +.14 PiedNG 1.12 25.76 +.90 PiedmOfc n 1.26 18.71 -.11 Pier 1 7.41 +.11 PilgrmsP n 7.78 +.03 PimCpOp 1.38 15.63 +.04 PimIncStr2 0.70 8.90 -.05 PimcoHiI 1.46 11.31 +.08 PinnclEnt 10.98 -.27 PinWst 2.10 35.53 +.81 PionDrill 5.94 +.46 PioNtrl 0.08 65.78 +4.04 PitnyBw 1.46 22.27 +.44 PlainsAA 3.74 58.39 +1.16 PlainsEx 21.50 +2.16 Plantron 0.20 29.31 +.47 PlatUnd 0.32 36.86 +.83 Plexus 33.80 +.88 PlugPwr h .42 +.02 PlumCrk 1.68 35.66 +1.45 Polaris 1.60 60.06 +2.18 Polo RL 0.40 85.84 +1.29 Polycom 30.40 +.99 PolyOne 9.21 -.23 Polypore 21.12 +.62 Poniard h 1.06 -.02 Pool Corp 0.52 24.12 +.75 Popular 2.95 +.12 PortGE 1.04 18.92 +.43 PortglTel 0.77 10.67 -.28 PostPrp 0.80 24.70 +.23 Potash 0.40 99.08 +2.41 Potlatch 2.04 34.77 +1.52 PwrInteg 0.20 33.17 +.05 Power-One 7.73 +.19 PwshDB 21.81 +.26 PS Engy 23.53 +.61 PS Agri 23.51 -.02 PS Oil 24.58 +.49 PS Gold 43.68 -.06 PS BasMet 18.63 +.03 PS USDBull 25.34 -.01 PS USDBear 24.67 PwSClnEn 8.76 +.23 PwShHiYD 0.34 7.91 +.06 PSFinPf 1.35 16.18 +.20 PSBldABd 0.64 25.94 -.06 PSVrdoTF 0.16 25.00 +.01 PwShPfd 1.03 13.52 +.11 PSIndia 0.13 21.31 +.80 PwShs QQQ 0.21 46.25 +1.07 Powrwav 1.63 +.04 Pozen 7.79 +.44 Praxair 1.80 78.04 +1.79 PrecCastpt 0.12 115.75 +2.33 PrecDrill 7.33 +.55 PrmWBc h .65 +.02 Prestige 7.57 +.01 PriceTR 1.08 50.09 +1.38 priceline 189.83 +4.82 PrideIntl 23.26 +1.05 PrinctnR 2.35 +.07 PrinFncl 0.50 27.55 +1.25 PrivateB 0.04 13.27 +.61 ProShtDow 51.77 -1.17 ProShtQQQ 42.12 -1.10 ProShtS&P 51.90 -1.39 PrUShS&P 33.70 -1.84 ProUltDow 0.53 42.52 +1.83 PrUlShDow 28.52 -1.34 ProUltMC 0.11 45.38 +2.14 PrUShMC 18.51 -1.01 ProUltQQQ 59.46 +2.78 PrUShQQQ 17.47 -.88 ProUltSP 0.41 36.82 +1.80 ProUShL20 40.40 +.81 PrUSCh25 rs 41.66 -2.36 ProUSEM rs 54.54 -4.07 ProUSRE rs 27.23 -1.26 ProUSOG rs 68.84 -6.17 ProUSBM rs 39.66 -3.10 ProUltRE rs 0.50 40.00 +1.66 ProUShtFn 20.79 -1.20 ProUFin rs 0.30 57.80 +3.01 PrUPShQQQ 59.13 -4.52 ProUltO&G 0.22 28.30 +2.15 ProUBasM 0.15 29.19 +1.99 ProUShEur 25.36 -1.80 ProShtR2K 40.32 -1.20 ProUltPQQQ 94.76 +6.23 ProUSR2K 20.37 -1.25 ProUltR2K 0.04 31.03 +1.65 ProUSSP500 33.52 -2.86 ProUltSP500 0.23 140.15 +9.96 ProUltCrude 9.63 +.36 ProUSSlv rs 34.66 +.26 ProUShCrude 15.56 -.61 ProUShEuro 25.04 -.04

Nm

D

ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProlorBio ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp PPrIT

1.93 61.74 +.58 2.48 38.42 +.49 32.27 +.65 0.16 19.62 +.57 0.60 11.03 +.23 6.09 +.10 1.64 10.36 +.33 0.62 36.38 +.93 6.71 +.41 0.56 21.83 +.99 0.72 7.08 +.19 0.70 58.95 +2.23 0.61 16.58 +.05 32.48 +.17 1.37 31.12 +.84 3.20 92.87 +1.68 10.74 +.28 0.68 6.37 +.07

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h Quaterra g QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadientPh RadioShk RailAmer n Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn RegeneRx Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisLrn RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RetailVent RexEnergy ReynldAm RigelPh RightNow RINO Int n RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prT RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubyTues Ruddick RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW RdxSPVal Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SLMCpi17 SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrEMSmC SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SP IntTip SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SS&C n STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SabaSoftw SABESP lf Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SJuanB SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc Schulmn SchwUSLgC Schwab SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeacorHld SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy Seanergy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous SenoRx Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShoeCarn SiderNac s Siemens SigmaDsg SigmaAld

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 B5

T OR I ES

Printers

BMW

Continued from B1 “We’re sort of like the guys in the garage building PCs in the ’70s,” said Sean Bonner, a founder of a Culver City, Calif., tech club, Crash Space, that bought a 3-D printer for its members to use. “Except there are thousands of people doing this across the world, in clubs or at universities or in their basements, and we can all communicate online to move this technology forward by creating and improving the software to run the 3-D printers, to design things and share our designs online,” Bonner added.

Continued from B1 Facial hair aficionados will gather in Bend on Saturday for the USA National Beard and Moustache Championships. From June 22-27, the USA Cycling Junior, U23 & Elite Road Racing National Championships return to Bend. And the Family Motor Coach Association will hold its annual convention at the fairgrounds, for the fourth time since 2001, from Aug. 11-14. BMW rally organizers expect this year’s event to draw between 5,800 and 6,400 participants and pump $6 million to $8 million into the economy, Zimmerman said. The rally is open to BMW Motorcycle Owners of America members and their guests. Members also raise money during their rallies for a local charity, which this year will be the Sparrow Clubs USA. Typically, BMW Motorcycle Owners of America members raise between $10,000 and $12,000, said Deb Lower, the 2010 rally chairwoman. When the group held its rally at the fairgrounds in 2001, it attracted about 6,600 partici-

The cutting edge The $750 model, which comes in kit form, is the CupCake CNC. It can’t produce objects as large or finely finished as the machine Leno owns. Mostly it’s used for novelty items — figurines, shot glasses, funky eyeglass frames, chess set pieces and snap-together pieces for a Gothic cathedral model — designed or downloaded from enthusiast sites on home computers. The home production of truly useful objects will come in the future, adherents believe. “My hope is that people, instead of going to the store, will just go online and download what they need and print it out,” said Bre Pettis, co-founder of Brooklyn, N.Y.-based MakerBot Industries, which makes the CupCake CNC. “That’s where this is going, whether it’s a new doorstop or the little wheels in your dishwasher.” The CupCake CNC, which is primarily made of wood, is in the shape of a box with windows cut out so that its working parts can be seen. Hovering over the top is an extruder that heats up ABS plastic — a material used to make lightweight, rigid objects — and then moves in patterns directed by a computer. MakerBot has sold nearly 1,000 of the kits, which has so outstripped the small company’s capacity that in a Frankensteinlike twist, it has called upon current CupCake CNC owners to help make parts for new units. The company could get com-

Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Comedian Jay Leno holds a starter switch bezel for his 1956 Packard Caribbean in his Burbank, Calif., garage last month. Leno owns an industrial-quality 3-D printer and uses his garage to make prototypes of rare car parts.

“The technology is there to allow consumers to make any product they want, exactly how they want it. We saw that void in the marketplace, and we’re filling it.”

printer. Then the designer sets the retail price. It’s a made-to-order business — an item isn’t manufactured by Shapeways until an order for it comes in. The designer gets the money marked up from the cost of manufacturing, minus a 3.5 percent fee that goes to Shapeways. The website, which was launched in 2008, has featured items by 30,000 people. “There is a group that really wants to know about 3-D printing and how it works, but there is also even a bigger group that just wants the end result,” Weijmarshausen said. “In the end it doesn’t really matter to the end user how we make it,” he added. “It only matters that they can get their custom product.” But at Crash Space, club members don’t mind if their creations come out a little rough. For them, the attraction is largely that they can envision an item, design it and then push a button to make it real. “You don’t have to build hundreds of one item to justify the manufacturing costs,” said club member Jerry Isdale, a 51-yearold unemployed software engineer. “You don’t have to own a factory. This can change the way things are built.”

— Peter Weijmarshausen, head of Royal Philips Electronics’ Shapeways unit petition in the future from firms in the 2-D printer business.

Industry giants moving in One of the giants in the field, Hewlett-Packard Co., began selling industrial 3-D models in Europe this month. Although they carry the HP brand, the machines were manufactured by Stratasys Inc., the company that made Leno’s machine. “Not to underestimate the efforts start-ups like MakerBot are putting forth, but I think it’s just bridging the gap,” said Terry Wohlers, a consultant to companies using 3-D printing. Eventually, he believes, major consumer firms will develop more sophisticated machines, at lower cost, for home use. “The document printers, all of them, I can tell you for a fact have looked at this at some level.” Royal Philips Electronics, a Dutch company that played key

roles in the development of compact discs and other technologies, has moved into the consumer 3-D printer world. But it doesn’t manufacture the machines. Philips has established a website, at www.shapeways.com, where budding inventors can sell 3-D-printer-made products from their own designs. “This was sort of an experiment for Philips,” said Peter Weijmarshausen, who heads the Shapeways unit that the company established in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. “The technology is there to allow consumers to make any product they want, exactly how they want it. We saw that void in the marketplace, and we’re filling it.”

Made to order A designer from anywhere in the world can submit an item, and if it’s accepted Shapeways will determine the cost of manufacturing it on an industrial 3-D

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Continued from B1 The airport learned Wednesday that the FAA will fund the taxiway expansion by giving the airport an advance on money it would have received next year, said Bob Daly, a member of the commissioners that oversees airport operations and answers to Crook County. That means the airport may not get any money from the FAA next year, he said. Additional money became available because bids on projects at other airports were lower than expected, freeing up some of the money that was allocated to Oregon, said Bryan Condon, an engineer working for the airport on the project. The runway and taxiway are being extended to 5,750 feet, longer than the 5,200-

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pants. Police reported no problems at the time, not even a traffic citation. The BMW Motorcycle Owners of America returned to Redmond because they like the fairgrounds, which was built in 1999. Redmond will be only the third location to host an annual rally a second time in 38 years, Zimmerman said. The others are Oshkosh, Wis., and Missoula, Mont While the rally officially runs from Thursday through Sunday, some members will be arriving early for an off-pavement Adventure Ride, scheduled for July 13-14, on logging roads in the Cascades. Nonmembers with proper gear and equipment can take part in the ride, which requires a donation of $50 per day to the group’s foundation. Others will tour the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum in McMinnville on July 14, and many will make the rally part of an extended road trip, touring other parts of the state and region. “We’re all about the riding,” Zimmerman said. “We love to ride. … We’re a big family.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360, or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

foot runway at the Bend Municipal Airport but shorter than the 7,000-foot runway at Redmond Airport. The expansion is not expected to result in more traffic at the airport or larger airplanes using it, Condon said. But Prineville City Manager Steve Forrester said he hopes the expansions will pave the way for more business development at the airport. Adrianne Jeffries can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at ajeffries@bendbulletin.com.

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14 13 76 ... 39 ... ... 25 21 33 20 13 37 20 ... 10 56 ... 13 ... 14

YTD Last Chg %Chg 49.93 19.36 15.89 13.62 64.34 .58 33.88 51.34 58.95 3.95 28.80 47.27 15.08 21.81 8.24 20.06 5.01 8.17 18.35 8.86 26.46

+3.75 +.57 +.46 +.25 +1.39 -.01 +2.99 +.98 +.97 ... +.78 +1.69 +.23 +.63 +.35 +.19 +.26 +.37 +.57 +.12 +.57

+44.5 -10.3 +5.5 +10.8 +18.9 -14.7 +23.2 +31.5 -.4 +64.6 -12.0 -8.2 +13.3 +6.9 +48.5 -2.3 +85.6 +17.0 -22.2 +.3 -13.2

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80f 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .48f .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

21 19 16 45 96 ... 36 18 ... 74 20 9 27 21 ... 22 ... 12 ... ...

Market recap 73.00 40.25 44.18 17.57 41.42 1.92 35.66 115.75 22.25 46.88 77.25 43.31 26.58 6.97 12.68 23.99 17.43 29.18 2.85 42.45

+1.82 +1.00 +.69 +.09 +1.21 +.01 +1.45 +2.33 +.11 +.68 +.85 +1.78 +.88 +.27 +.41 +.70 +.41 +.95 +.09 +1.09

+10.5 +7.1 -1.9 +38.5 +14.2 -31.7 -5.6 +4.9 +4.5 -1.7 +25.3 +8.2 +15.3 +16.2 -5.4 +6.6 -9.9 +8.1 +35.7 -1.6

Precious metals Metal

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm iShEMkts BP PLC

5252459 1883104 1222234 990325 867636

3.92 +.07 110.33 +2.80 15.89 +.46 38.71 +1.31 37.66 +1.14

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Gerdau g USEC BrasT C n Resolute wt DirxEnBull

Last

Chg %Chg

11.07 +3.90 +54.4 5.79 +.72 +14.2 9.84 +1.20 +13.9 2.54 +.31 +13.9 29.05 +3.26 +12.6

Losers ($2 or more) Name DirxEnBear Chemspec n DrxSOXBr DirEMBr rs GpoRadio

Last

Chg %Chg

11.85 -1.69 -12.5 7.12 -.88 -11.0 32.50 -3.88 -10.7 47.68 -5.52 -10.4 6.87 -.76 -10.0

$1222.00 $1220.60 $18.304

Pvs Day $1225.00 $1224.80 $18.540

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

JavelinPh NwGold g GoldStr g NovaGld g LibertyAcq

26873 23327 21143 20533 19135

Name

1.52 6.41 4.18 7.21 9.87

SiriusXM PwShs QQQ Microsoft Intel Cisco

-.08 +.12 ... +.19 -.03

Gainers ($2 or more) Chg %Chg

Name

GlblScape AmO&G CCA Inds PyramidOil PionDrill

2.08 6.67 5.90 4.41 5.94

+.33 +18.9 +.67 +11.2 +.50 +9.3 +.36 +8.9 +.46 +8.4

Jingwei DivX JksvlBcFl IsleCapri Calavo

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last 3.51 4.06 5.19 3.23 18.98

2,663 444 76 3,183 31 22

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

755617 699027 627320 597278 444762

1.00 -.01 46.25 +1.07 26.46 +.57 21.81 +.63 23.35 +.35

Last 6.93 8.79 11.25 10.81 18.20

Chg %Chg +2.28 +1.84 +1.80 +1.52 +2.45

+49.0 +26.5 +19.0 +16.4 +15.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

-.34 -.37 -.32 -.20 -.97

-8.8 -8.4 -5.8 -5.8 -4.9

ZionO&G wt DJSP un CdnSolar SptChalB CdrsVlly

Last

313 170 48 531 5 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Versar CAMAC n Arrhythm Barnwell SDgo pfA

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Name

Diary

Price (troy oz.)

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Indexes

Chg %Chg

2.80 -.96 -25.4 8.50 -2.50 -22.7 10.17 -1.69 -14.2 2.53 -.37 -12.8 7.35 -.81 -9.9

Diary 2,182 529 86 2,797 25 67

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,988.88 338.37 5,552.82 1,451.26 1,727.05 869.32 8,900.27 473.54

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,249.54 4,364.63 360.50 6,839.61 1,831.52 2,281.07 1,098.38 11,540.54 660.52

+225.52 +131.85 +7.48 +178.51 +40.87 +58.74 +27.67 +294.74 +19.56

YTD %Chg %Chg +2.25 +3.12 +2.12 +2.68 +2.28 +2.64 +2.58 +2.62 +3.05

52-wk %Chg

-1.71 +6.46 -9.42 -4.81 +.36 +.53 -1.50 -.07 +5.62

+18.15 +32.89 +5.36 +13.35 +13.51 +24.93 +17.88 +20.73 +26.36

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

322.56 2,464.25 3,501.50 5,151.32 5,981.20 19,471.80 31,411.91 19,183.13 3,018.89 9,603.24 1,630.40 2,727.57 4,403.70 5,590.06

+.42 s -.07 t -.05 t -.23 t ... -.13 t +.53 s -.50 t -1.17 t -1.12 t -.66 t +.45 s -.74 t +.58 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.8368 1.4648 .9619 .001873 .1463 1.2238 .1283 .010849 .077869 .0320 .000822 .1281 .8652 .0309

.8379 1.4658 .9519 .001874 .1463 1.2253 .1283 .010961 .077519 .0321 .000837 .1279 .8649 .0309

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.38 +0.41 -0.2 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.49 +0.11 -0.6 GrowthI 22.00 +0.55 -0.2 Ultra 19.13 +0.47 -1.7 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.45 +0.35 -0.9 AMutlA p 22.73 +0.49 -1.2 BalA p 16.14 +0.24 +0.1 BondA p 12.03 -0.02 +3.6 CapWA p 19.66 -1.1 CapIBA p 45.18 +0.66 -4.8 CapWGA p 30.74 +0.68 -9.4 EupacA p 34.69 +0.77 -9.5 FdInvA p 31.62 +0.79 -3.0 GovtA p 14.31 -0.02 +3.6 GwthA p 26.55 +0.64 -2.9 HI TrA p 10.65 -0.01 +3.3 IncoA p 15.06 +0.19 -1.8 IntBdA p 13.33 -0.02 +2.6 ICAA p 24.83 +0.56 -3.8 NEcoA p 21.54 +0.50 -4.2 N PerA p 24.08 +0.55 -6.1 NwWrldA 45.36 +0.85 -3.9 SmCpA p 31.85 +0.66 +1.0 TxExA p 12.21 +3.1 WshA p 23.93 +0.54 -2.3 American Funds B: CapIBB t 45.14 +0.67 -5.1 GrwthB t 25.68 +0.62 -3.1 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 25.53 +0.36 -9.6 IntlEqA 24.90 +0.35 -9.7 IntEqII I r 10.54 +0.15 -10.5 Artisan Funds: Intl 17.97 +0.42 -13.0 MidCap 26.38 +0.76 +3.2 MidCapVal 18.03 +0.43 +0.3 Baron Funds: Growth 43.25 +1.07 +4.7 SmallCap 20.15 +0.52 +4.6 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.55 -0.02 DivMu 14.54 TxMgdIntl 13.33 +0.23 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 15.26 +0.38 GlAlA r 17.34 +0.19 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.17 +0.18 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 17.43 +0.19 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 43.76 +0.77 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 25.57 +0.67 AcornIntZ 32.84 +0.53 ValRestr 40.84 +1.37 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.27 +0.16 USCorEq2 9.44 +0.26 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.24 +0.80 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.58 +0.82 NYVen C 29.18 +0.78 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.34 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMktV 29.48 +0.71 IntSmVa 14.06 +0.18 LargeCo 8.68 +0.22 USLgVa 17.70 +0.53 US Micro 11.46 +0.33 US SmVa 21.16 +0.60 IntlSmCo 13.59 +0.19 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 15.26 +0.29 Glb5FxInc 11.31 -0.02 2YGlFxd 10.22 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 63.71 +1.39 Income 13.18 -0.01 IntlStk 29.31 +0.70 Stock 94.73 +2.85 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.32 +0.45

+4.1 +2.3 -12.8 -3.2 -3.1 -3.4 -3.0 -1.6 +3.6 -4.1 -4.5 -8.4 +3.5 -2.4 -2.3 -2.7 +2.6 -6.2 -6.8 -0.6 +4.0 +8.6 +7.8 -4.4 +0.5 -10.4 +2.9 +0.8 +0.1 +2.9 -8.0 -1.1 -2.3

NatlMunInc 9.72 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 16.37 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.57 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.03 FPACres 24.67 Fairholme 31.97 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.61 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.10 StrInA 12.06 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.27 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.43 FF2015 10.35 FF2020 12.39 FF2025 10.22 FF2030 12.14 FF2035 10.01 FF2040 6.98 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.38 AMgr50 13.84 Balanc 16.52 BlueChGr 38.24 Canada 49.76 CapAp 22.43 CpInc r 8.59 Contra 57.96 DisEq 20.79 DivIntl 25.02 DivGth 23.83 EmrMk 21.22 Eq Inc 39.09 EQII 16.20 Fidel 27.93 GNMA 11.70 GovtInc 10.62 GroCo 69.92 GroInc 15.83 HighInc r 8.38

+4.3 +0.45 -2.2 +0.12 -4.2 +1.8 +0.25 -0.6 +0.50 +6.2 +0.12 -1.1 +0.39 -0.6 -0.01 +1.3 +0.39 -0.5 +0.14 +0.12 +0.18 +0.16 +0.21 +0.19 +0.13 +0.32 +0.15 +0.26 +1.02 +1.44 +0.71 +0.04 +1.33 +0.52 +0.49 +0.68 +0.47 +1.11 +0.47 +0.75 -0.03 +1.94 +0.44 -0.01

-0.6 -1.0 -1.4 -1.9 -1.9 -0.5 +0.3 +1.5 +0.8 +2.6 +4.7 +2.2 -0.4 -1.0 -10.6 +0.7 -6.1 +0.2 -0.5 -1.3 +4.3 +3.2 +1.4 -1.3 +1.9

Indepn 20.22 +0.68 +1.5 IntBd 10.39 -0.02 +3.9 IntmMu 10.27 +2.6 IntlDisc 27.14 +0.45 -10.6 InvGrBd 11.56 -0.03 +3.8 InvGB 7.24 -0.01 +4.3 LgCapVal 11.12 +0.30 -1.1 LatAm 47.02 +1.33 -9.3 LevCoStk 23.89 +0.76 +4.2 LowP r 32.86 +0.67 +2.9 Magelln 63.12 +1.65 -1.7 MidCap 24.86 +0.74 +6.1 MuniInc 12.67 +0.01 +3.5 NwMkt r 15.08 +0.04 +2.7 OTC 46.39 +1.37 +1.5 100Index 7.75 +0.18 -2.3 Ovrsea 27.12 +0.49 -12.3 Puritn 16.18 +0.24 +1.3 RealE 22.64 +0.51 +12.7 StIntMu 10.68 +1.4 STBF 8.39 -0.01 +1.8 SmllCpS r 16.52 +0.60 +3.6 StratInc 10.76 -0.01 +1.5 StrReRt r 8.57 +0.03 +0.7 TotalBd 10.71 -0.02 +3.9 USBI 11.29 -0.02 +3.5 Value 59.16 +1.71 +3.9 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 46.17 +0.80 +8.7 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 32.03 +0.93 +6.4 500IdxInv 39.00 +0.99 -0.7 IntlInxInv 29.45 +0.46 -11.9 TotMktInv 31.63 +0.83 +0.5 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 39.00 +0.99 -0.7 TotMktAd r 31.63 +0.82 +0.6 First Eagle: GlblA 39.83 +0.22 -0.4 OverseasA 19.32 -0.06 -0.7 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.89 +0.01 +3.2 FoundAl p 9.39 NA HYTFA p 10.12 +4.8

IncomA p 1.99 +0.01 USGovA p 6.77 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 1.98 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.01 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.03 +0.33 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.79 +0.07 GlBd A p 12.98 +0.09 GrwthA p 15.36 +0.31 WorldA p 12.79 +0.24 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.00 +0.09 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 35.87 +0.99 GMO Trust III: Quality 18.07 +0.35 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.57 +0.31 Quality 18.07 +0.34 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.87 -0.01 HYMuni 8.54 +0.01 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.56 -0.01 CapApInst 31.81 +0.75 IntlInv t 48.59 +1.09 Intl r 49.09 +1.10 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.52 +0.68 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 29.47 +0.67 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 35.88 +0.92 Div&Gr 17.18 +0.43 Advisers 17.57 +0.27 TotRetBd 10.98 -0.01 HussmnStrGr 13.24 -0.03 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.56 +0.31 CmstkA 13.33 EqIncA 7.72 +0.13

-0.4 +4.0 +4.0 -0.4 -0.7 -0.2 -11.6 +3.8 -8.6 -8.4 +3.7 -2.7 -6.6 -5.6 -6.5 +2.2 +6.7 +3.9 -3.5 -10.7 -10.5 -3.8 -3.7 -2.0 -2.1 +0.6 +3.8 +3.6 -3.1 NA -0.4

GrIncA p 16.47 HYMuA 9.38 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 20.39 +0.37 AssetStA p 20.93 +0.39 AssetStrI r 21.09 +0.39 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.34 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.33 -0.02 HighYld 7.67 -0.01 IntmTFBd 10.96 ShtDurBd 10.92 USLCCrPls 18.00 +0.48 Janus S Shrs: Forty 30.06 +0.69 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 25.54 +0.58 OvrseasT r 41.57 +1.07 PrkMCVal T 20.04 +0.47 Twenty T 58.64 +1.39 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 10.51 +0.26 LSBalanc 11.75 +0.17 LSGrwth 11.34 +0.21 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 20.38 +0.69 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 17.64 +0.40 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 17.88 +0.41 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.98 +0.02 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.60 +0.62 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.50 +0.04 StrInc C 14.01 +0.04 LSBondR 13.46 +0.04 StrIncA 13.94 +0.05 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 11.89 +0.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.12 +0.31 BdDebA p 7.30

NA NA -6.4 -6.1 -6.0 +3.7 +3.7 +2.5 +2.1 +1.5 -1.0 -4.6 -2.7 -2.2 +1.2 -4.8 -2.4 -1.0 +2.8 -2.1 -2.2 +3.1 +6.3 +3.7 +3.1 +3.7 +3.4 +4.0 -0.8 +1.8

ShDurIncA p 4.57 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.01 +0.18 ValueA 20.31 +0.49 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.41 +0.49 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.62 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.25 +0.06 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 18.56 +0.34 MergerFd 15.52 +0.06 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.27 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.27 -0.01 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 26.41 +0.30 GlbDiscZ 26.74 +0.30 QuestZ 16.82 SharesZ 19.19 +0.33 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 37.78 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 39.22 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.57 +0.41 Intl I r 16.17 +0.26 Oakmark r 37.71 +0.80 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.20 +0.04 GlbSMdCap 12.73 +0.32 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 37.74 +1.09 DvMktA p 28.14 +0.75 GlobA p 50.81 +1.09 IntBdA p 6.12 +0.01 MnStFdA 27.56 +0.60 RisingDivA 13.55 +0.33 S&MdCpVl 26.66 +0.74 StrInA p 4.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.30 +0.30 S&MdCpVl 22.98 +0.64 Oppenheimer C&M:

+2.5 +0.1 -1.9 -1.8 +2.6 -10.7 -3.5 -0.1 +5.9 +5.9 -1.2 -1.1 NA NA NA +0.1 -4.0 +1.8 +1.8 -0.3 -5.5 -2.2 -4.2 -2.7 -2.0 -2.6 +0.3 NA -2.9

RisingDvC p 12.26 +0.30 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.17 -0.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 27.85 +0.74 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.09 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.80 -0.01 ComodRR 7.39 -0.01 HiYld 8.76 -0.02 InvGrCp 11.04 -0.06 LowDu 10.42 RealRet 11.42 -0.07 RealRtnI 11.03 -0.03 ShortT 9.85 TotRt 11.09 -0.01 TR II 10.71 -0.03 TRIII 9.82 -0.02 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.42 RealRtA p 11.03 -0.03 TotRtA 11.09 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.09 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.09 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.09 -0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 39.94 +0.30 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 35.02 +0.86 Price Funds: BlChip 32.40 +0.87 CapApp 18.56 +0.29 EmMktS 28.35 +0.64 EqInc 21.09 +0.52 EqIndex 29.68 +0.75 Growth 27.21 +0.71 HlthSci 26.46 +0.85 HiYield 6.38 IntlBond 9.21 -0.02 IntlStk 11.66 +0.28 MidCap 50.21 +1.45

-2.9 +4.7 -2.0 +3.9 +3.6 -8.5 +3.0 +3.5 +2.0 +5.2 +3.3 +0.7 +4.0 +3.6 +4.0 +1.9 +3.2 +3.8 +3.5 +3.9 +3.9 +3.3 -1.7 -1.1 +2.2 -5.8 +0.9 -0.8 -1.1 +1.1 +2.5 -5.7 -7.5 +5.7

MCapVal 21.25 N Asia 15.74 New Era 39.67 N Horiz 27.32 N Inc 9.45 R2010 14.01 R2015 10.68 R2020 14.58 R2025 10.57 R2030 15.03 R2040 15.03 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 28.93 SmCapVal 31.20 SpecGr 15.12 SpecIn 11.81 Value 20.62 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.76 VoyA p 19.91 RiverSource A: DEI 8.58 DivrBd 4.91 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.84 PremierI r 16.98 TotRetI r 11.23 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 32.93 S&P Sel 17.23 Scout Funds: Intl 26.75 Selected Funds: AmShD 36.54 AmShS p 36.53 Sequoia 117.34 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.12 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 43.11 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.20 IntValue I 23.72 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 20.88

+0.51 +0.29 +1.73 +0.76 -0.01 +0.20 +0.17 +0.27 +0.22 +0.32 +0.35 -0.01 +0.86 +0.80 +0.39 +0.02 +0.55

+2.6 -2.5 -9.1 +6.8 +3.6 +0.4 +0.1 -0.1 -0.4 -0.6 -0.8 +1.4 +7.4 +5.8 -1.1 +1.8 +0.7

+0.30 -1.7 +0.53 +0.9 +0.24 -2.2 -0.01 +3.7 +0.25 +4.1 +0.37 +4.1 +0.24 +4.2 +0.85 -0.2 +0.44 -0.6 +0.58 -8.2 +0.96 -1.9 +0.97 -2.0 +2.19 +6.8 +0.20 -11.3 +1.08 -6.9 +0.30 -6.5 +0.31 -6.3 +0.15 -1.5

Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.02 CpOpAdl 67.29 EMAdmr r 32.04 Energy 102.01 500Adml 101.54 GNMA Ad 10.89 HlthCr 47.82 HiYldCp 5.38 InfProAd 25.17 ITsryAdml 11.38 IntGrAdm 49.80 ITAdml 13.61 ITGrAdm 9.83 LtdTrAd 11.07 LTGrAdml 9.08 LT Adml 11.09 MuHYAdm 10.47 PrmCap r 59.34 STsyAdml 10.78 ShtTrAd 15.93 STIGrAd 10.67 TtlBAdml 10.56 TStkAdm 27.43 WellslAdm 49.74 WelltnAdm 49.16 Windsor 39.89 WdsrIIAd 41.00 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.01 CapOpp 29.13 DivdGro 12.88 Energy 54.32 EqInc 18.03 Explr 60.16 GNMA 10.89 GlobEq 15.07 GroInc 23.34 HYCorp 5.38 HlthCre 113.30 InflaPro 12.81 IntlGr 15.65 IntlVal 27.00 ITIGrade 9.83

+1.96 +0.78 +4.49 +2.57 +0.95 -0.01 -0.08 -0.05 +0.93 -0.04 -0.07

+1.77 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 +0.70 +0.28 +0.73 +1.14 +1.02 +0.40 +0.85 +0.26 +2.39 +0.41 +1.70 +0.31 +0.60 -0.01 +2.24 -0.04 +0.29 +0.47 -0.04

+3.4 -3.0 -5.9 -9.0 -0.7 +4.2 -4.8 +1.7 +2.7 +4.4 -7.8 +2.6 +4.7 +1.3 +4.3 +2.9 +3.6 -3.8 +1.6 +0.7 +2.3 +3.6 +0.3 +1.7 -0.7 -0.8 -2.5 +2.2 -3.0 -2.2 -9.0 -0.5 +5.0 +4.1 -3.8 -0.2 +1.6 -4.8 +2.6 -7.9 -11.8 +4.7

LifeCon 15.31 LifeGro 19.47 LifeMod 17.83 LTIGrade 9.08 Morg 15.24 MuInt 13.61 MuLtd 11.07 MuShrt 15.93 PrecMtls r 19.58 PrmcpCor 11.95 Prmcp r 57.17 SelValu r 16.66 STAR 17.44 STIGrade 10.67 StratEq 15.78 TgtRetInc 10.72 TgRe2010 20.71 TgtRe2025 11.28 TgtRe2015 11.37 TgRe2020 19.97 TgRe2030 19.15 TgtRe2035 11.48 TgtRe2040 18.81 TgtRe2045 11.87 USGro 15.76 Wellsly 20.53 Welltn 28.46 Wndsr 11.82 WndsII 23.09 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 101.52 Balanced 19.58 DevMkt 8.45 EMkt 24.35 Europe 22.10 Extend 34.54 Growth 26.88 ITBnd 11.03 MidCap 17.12 Pacific 9.22 REIT r 16.44 SmCap 29.25 SmlCpGth 17.81 SmlCpVl 13.96

+0.15 +0.38 +0.26 -0.07 +0.39

+0.48 +0.36 +1.70 +0.38 +0.25 -0.01 +0.46 +0.06 +0.23 +0.20 +0.16 +0.32 +0.37 +0.25 +0.41 +0.25 +0.41 +0.12 +0.42 +0.34 +0.57

+1.7 -0.5 +0.8 +4.3 -0.2 +2.6 +1.3 +0.6 -4.2 -1.3 -3.8 +4.5 -0.6 +2.2 +3.3 +1.8 +0.9 -0.4 +0.5 +0.1 -0.8 -1.2 -1.3 -1.2 -4.3 +1.7 -0.7 -0.8 -2.5

+2.57 -0.7 +0.28 +1.7 +0.14 -11.3 +0.59 -6.0 +0.44 -14.8 +1.00 +5.7 +0.72 -1.4 -0.05 +4.7 +0.51 +4.7 +0.09 -4.8 +0.34 +11.6 +0.82 +6.4 +0.53 +5.8 +0.37 +6.9

STBnd

10.52 -0.02 +2.0

TotBnd

10.56 -0.02 +3.6

TotlIntl

12.94 +0.23 -10.2

TotStk

27.42 +0.70 +0.3

Value

18.58 +0.45 +0.2

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

19.59 +0.29 +1.8

DevMkInst

8.38 +0.13

NS

ExtIn

34.57 +1.00 +5.8

GrwthIst

26.89 +0.72 -1.3

InfProInst

10.25 -0.03 +2.7

InstIdx

100.86 +2.55 -0.7

InsPl

100.87 +2.55 -0.7

InsTStPlus

24.79 +0.64 +0.3

MidCpIst

17.17 +0.51 +4.7

SCInst

29.28 +0.82 +6.5

TBIst

10.56 -0.02 +3.6

TSInst

27.44 +0.71 +0.3

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

83.88 +2.13 -0.7

STBdIdx

10.52 -0.02 +2.0

TotBdSgl

10.56 -0.02 +3.6

TotStkSgl

26.48 +0.69 +0.3

Victory Funds: DvsStA

13.37 +0.33 -4.2

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.81

+0.5

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.54 -0.02 +6.2


B6 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-617-7822, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY “MANAGING CUSTOMER SERVICE�: Learn about behaviors that create good customer service and find ways to promote and maintain high company standards; $80; 8 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. “GIMME A BREAK, WHERE IS BUSINESS LENDING GOING?�: Opportunity Knocks, Economic Development for Central Oregon and Risk Management Association will host a panel of banking experts. Lunch provided; $25 through May 24, $30 after May 24; 11:15 a.m.1 p.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way, Bend; 541-318-4650 or info@oppknocks.org. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com. “CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY’S BEND MBA INFO NIGHT�: Individuals interested in learning about Concordia’s Bend MBA are invited to an information and networking event which will include details about Concordia’s admission requirements and a chance to meet faculty, current students and MBA alumni; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 503-280-8501 or www .concordiamba.com. SUSTAINABLE BUILDING ADVISER INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Learn about Central Oregon Community College’s 9-month specialized sustainable building program. The course begins in October. Preregistration is recommended; free; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; PremierWest Bank, 875 S.W. Rimrock Way, Suite 100; 541-923-5191 or www .visitredmondoregon.com. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. “INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS�: Learn the basics of small website building, uploading images, writing for the Web and blogging using WordPress; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www .alpineinternet.com/locals. “WRITING SEARCH ENGINE FRIENDLY PAGES�: Learn to write good copy for Web visitors. Includes keyword research and planning,

SCENTED BILLBOARD

Cooking up a unique ad campaign McClatchy-Tribune News Service CHARLOTTE, N.C. — There’s something in the air along a busy local road, and it’s not just exhaust fumes: It’s the smell of grilled steak, courtesy of what appears to be the nation’s firstever scented highway billboard. The Bloom grocery chain, part of Salisbury, N.C.-based Food Lion, is aiming to catch shoppers by the nose by wafting black pepper and charcoal smells from the base of a sign in Mooresville. Bloom fired up the grill-board Friday to promote its new line of beef, and it will emit scents from 7 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. every day until June 18, spokeswoman Christy Phillips-Brown said. The billboard shows a towering fork piercing a giant piece of meat. A high-powered fan attached to the bottom of the billboard pole disperses the aroma by blowing air over cartridges loaded with fragrance oil, marketing director Murray Dameron said.

inverted pyramid writing techniques and using meta tags; free; 11 a.m.noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-3124704, support@alpineinternet.com or www.alpineinternet.com/locals. “THE FRESH WEB�: A short review of Web news intended to help Web authors and managers understand the ever changing Web environment; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www .alpineinternet.com/locals. “CENTER STAGE REVIEW�: Learn to manage a Web site using Alpine Internet Solution’s Content Management System, which is designed to simplify engine optimization; free; 12:15-1 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. RIDE TO REAL ESTATE BIKE TOUR: Hosted by Megan Power, broker for Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate. Call 541-610-7318 for more information and to RSVP; free; 10 a.m.; Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend..

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 49 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY TALK OF THE TOWN: Jamie Christman of COTV hosts a discussion of “Banking Challenges: Local to National�; reservations required; free; 6:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@ bendbroadband.com or www .talkofthetownco.com.

WEDNESDAY “BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM�: Jamie Christman with COTV will moderate an interactive session about the art of sales; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave.; 541-389-0803. “LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS�: Business owners learn how to develop a working plan. Preregistration required; $49; 6 p.m.9 p.m., and class continues June 23 and July 7 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY June 10 TRAINING FOR HOMEOWNER ASSOCIATION TREASURERS: Luncheon sponsored by the Central

Oregon Regional Council of the Community Association Institute. Networking at 11:30,lunch at noon; $20 for members, $25 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.; Awbrey Glen Restaurant, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 503-531-9668 or knguyen@caioregon.org. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS�: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Preregistration required; $15; noon-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Learn to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage your finances with account features. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior of Charles Schwab & Co. Registration required by June 8; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 531-318-1794. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com. “BEING GREEN IS SO EASY THE WHOLE FAMILY CAN DO IT�: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www .buildinggreencouncil.org. CONTRACTOR EDUCATION: In a class approved by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board, prepare for the test to become a licensed contractor in Oregon. Registration fee includes the Oregon Contractor’s Reference Manual. Prepayment required. Class continues June 11-12, 8:30 am - 5 p.m.; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu. PAYING FOR EDUCATION: Learn strategies to save for your children’s or grandchildren’s education. Hosted by Mark Schang of Edward Jones. RSVP required by June 8; free; 6 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-6178861.

FRIDAY June 11 COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Goody’s Soda Fountain and Candy Store, 515 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-923-1807. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. RIBBON CUTTING: Barbecue sponsored by the Redmond Chamber of Commerce; free; 11 a.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-548-4428.

B  B  SATURDAY June 12

TUESDAY

Mark Lennihan The Associated Press

June 15 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Free; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Redmond Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 1242 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-382-3221 or www .bendchamber.org. “INTERMEDIATE DREAMWEAVER�: Preregistration required; $89, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through June 29 from 69 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 16 “BEGINNING EXCEL 2007�: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 1-4 p.m., and class continues June 23 from 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit .cocc.edu.

THURSDAY June 17 “LEAD PAINT, RENOVATION, REPAIR AND PAINTING�: Hosted by Parr Lumber, and led by The Connor Institute of Baltimore, this all-day seminar will teach contractors to become compliant with the EPA’s new lead paint law. Register and pay online; $175. (includes lunch); 7:15 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Parr Lumber Company, 1311 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend; www.andersenrrptraining. com/Events. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. ETFS EXPLAINED: Learn why exchange-traded funds are a growing investment option. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior of Charles Schwab & Co. Registration required by June 15; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 531-318-1794. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com.

Buffett defends credit ratings agencies

and lay the groundwork for a possible initial public offering.

NEW YORK — Billionaire investor Warren Buffett told a congressional panel Wednesday that if he didn’t see the housing bust coming, he can’t blame the credit ratings agencies much for missing it, either. Ratings agencies came under more fire for their role in the economic crisis as the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission questioned former and current executives at the ratings firm Moody’s as well as Buffett, chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway, Moody’s biggest shareholder. The hearing focused on how agencies wound up assigning high ratings to complex financial products packed with risky mortgages. Buffett, who declined to testify until he received a subpoena, said the ratings agencies weren’t the only ones blindsided by the crisis. “Looking back, they should’ve recognized it,� he said, “but, like I said, I didn’t recognize it, and nobody I know recognized it.�

Wells Fargo to pay $30M to nonprofits

Facebook advertisers quadrupled since 2009 SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook says its advertisers have more than quadrupled since the start of 2009 as marketers aim to get their products before a growing global audience. The world’s largest social-networking site doubled its number of salespeople last year from 2008, according to an e-mailed statement. The company didn’t disclose the number of advertisers or salespeople. Facebook, which has more than 500 million users, counts Procter & Gamble Co., Toys “R� Us Inc. and Virgin America Inc. among its customers. It’s relying on ads to maintain sales growth

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Wells Fargo & Co. must pay $30.1 million to four Minnesota nonprofits that claimed the bank marketed a risky securities-lending program as safe and blocked them from getting out of the investments, a jury said Wednesday. The Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Reinsurance Association and three charitable foundations sued in 2008, claiming the bank failed to disclose the deteriorating value of the investments until it was too late. A St. Paul state court jury awarded $30.1 million in compensatory damages and will consider punitive damages in a second phase set to begin. today.

U.S. loses ground on Internet speeds WASHINGTON — After ranking third in the world a decade ago, the United States has dropped to 15th in the proportion of citizens receiving fast Web service, or broadband, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. South Korea, Iceland and Germany are among the countries that ranked higher in 2009, the Paris-based group says. The FCC is proposing to spend $16 billion in the next decade to close the gap. By boosting wireless service, shifting federal subsidies and encouraging investment, the FCC National Broadband Plan aims to give 100 million homes the same connection speeds available today in Portugal and Japan. — From wire reports

NEWS OF RECORD Trail, Bend, $562,888.50

PERMITS City of Redmond

Hayden Enterprises Giving Fund, 1433 S.W. 27th St., $115,071 Deschutes County

Fraser Family Trust, 61481 Skene

Newberry Habitat for Humanity Inc., 16678 Conifer Court, La Pine, $131,989.96 Newberry Habitat for Humanity Inc., 16674 Conifer Court, La Pine, $131,989.96

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

Sewing & Vacuum Center

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett testifies before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission on Wednesday in New York.

BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO WORKSHOP: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

541-322-CARE

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

As L ow As $149

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend

ENTER TO WIN A GETAWAY TO THE OREGON COAST! Sign up for our AUTO-RENEW PAYMENT PROGRAM and be entered to WIN A $400 LODGING PACKAGE to the Elizabeth Street Inn on the Oregon Coast!

Plus, you’ll receive a FREE OREGON COOKBOOK with recipes from around the state. The Bulletin’s Auto-Renew Payment Plan is our most convenient and environmentally friendly method of payment. No mailed statements. No envelopes or stamps. No monthly reminders.

BUT HURRY, COOKBOOK SUPPLIES ARE LIMITED, OREGON COAST WINNER WILL BE DRAWN JULY 1ST

TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE BULLETIN OR TO SIGN-UP FOR THE AUTO RENEW PAYMENT PROGRAM, CALL 541-385-5800 Black out periods apply for coastal package. Winner is responsible for any taxes. Must not have been enrolled in the Auto-Renew Payment Plan within the last 30 days. Cookbooks are limited to stock on hand.


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Inside

OREGON Portland high-rise evacuated due to fire, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010

REDMOND

Coyote Ranch only bidder on airport bar

A MOVEABLE PETUNIA PATCH

Kitzhaber campaigns in region Ex-governor stops in Bend after visiting Pendleton, La Grande

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

By Scott Hammers

Redmond may finally have found someone to run a bar at the city’s airport. Redmond’s $40 million airport expansion increased the terminal size from 23,000 square feet to 140,000 square feet. Though the city now looks likely to have a bar proprietor, a 3,200-squarefoot restaurant space remains unfilled. The city expects to have a plan ready for the larger area, which sits near the airport’s entrance, by next week. The city received just one proposal — from Coyote Ranch owner David Shurtleff — in its latest attempt to fill a now-vacant 700-square-foot space on the terminal’s second floor. If the city signs a lease with Shurtleff, that would bring to close a tumultuous few months. In February, Shurtleff pointed out that the city’s pending deal for Deschutes Brewery to open in the space should be revisited because Redmond had not issued a request for proposal. Then, in March, the city issued an RFP for one company to run both the bar — in the secured area — and a restaurant outside security. When no one bid on that project, the city issued a bar-only RFP. See Airport / C5

The Bulletin

Former Gov. John Kitzhaber was in Bend on Wednesday, meeting with business and community leaders as part of his campaign to become the first Oregon governor to win a third term in office. Kitzhaber, a Democrat who served as governor from 1995 until 2003 and defeated former Secretary of State Bill Bradbury in the May primary, will face off against Republican candidate and former NBA basketball player Chris Dudley in November. Meeting with about a dozen Central Oregon residents at the OSU-Cascades Campus, Kit- John Kitzhaber zhaber spent an hour fielding questions on the state’s budget difficulties, tax policy, land use laws and more. It was a brief stop in Central Oregon for the candidate — Kitzhaber spent the morning in La Grande and Pendleton, held a fundraiser Wednesday evening in Bend, and is scheduled to depart today. See Kitzhaber / C5

ELECTION

Crook County developing rules for solar projects

Redmond may cut last 3 days of school year

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

K

erry Morf reaches to water a row of flower baskets Wednesday morning at Landsystems Nursery on Bend’s east side. The nursery is providing 100 baskets of petunias that will be placed throughout downtown Bend this summer.

City employees started hanging the baskets this week, and are expected to finish the job by early next week. Landsystems Nursery planted the petunias in late March, and they are expected to bloom until late September.

Lots of rainy days, but not a lot of moisture After a colder-than-usual May, the steady showers show no signs of slowing down

High and low temperatures for May Recorded temperatures, Fahrenheit 80º 70

Average high, 1977-2000

2010 high

By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

60 50 40 30 20

2010 low 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Average low, 1977-2000

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Precipitation for May 2010 Inches of rainfall per day 0.2in

Trace 1

2

3

4

5

6

T 7

8

0.15in

T T

T

T T

T

0.12in

0.02in

0.20 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00

0.02in

The Redmond School District plans to cut the last three days from the end of the current school year as it attempts to overcome a $3.7 million budget shortfall for next year. If the district’s two employee unions approve the proposal, the school year will end on Thursday, June 10, instead of Wednesday, June 16, a district news release said. Union members will begin voting today on the shortened school year and other concessions for next year. Until last week, the district thought it had to overcome a more than $1 million shortfall. If the teacher’s union approved a freeze on cost-of-living raises, the district would have covered that deficit. But the state recently announced across-the-board 9 percent budget cuts, which translates to a $2.6 million loss for Redmond schools, according to a district news release. The district can save about $170,000 for each day it cuts, according to spokeswoman Stephanie Curtis. After cutting nearly 60 teaching positions last year, the district is apprehensive to make more staff cuts and so is considering salary and schedule reductions, Curtis said. The district hopes to cut only non-student contact days. The district, Curtis said, was apprehensive to cut this year’s calendar, but the last few days of a school year tend not to be academic. “Generally, the last three days of school has the least amount of impact on the students,” Curtis said.

PRINEVILLE — Crook County Commissioner Lynn Lundquist wants to know if county residents would mind a commercial solar farm in their backyard. “This is a major deal, and I think the big issue in my mind is we would like to have (solar farms) but in the right spot,” Lundquist said during the Crook County Court meeting on Wednesday. “I don’t know, Judge (Mike McCabe), you might not want this next to your subdivision.” At least two commercial solar farms have expressed interest in building in Crook County. For several months, county staff has been working to develop an ordinance giving companies guidelines of what would be necessary to put in a commercial farm. Crook County could be the first county to put an ordinance in place. But at Wednesday’s meeting, Lundquist wanted to give the process another couple of weeks to determine how far the setback should be in the ordinance. Right now, in the proposed ordinance the setback is 100 feet, but Lundquist said it might be wiser to increase that distance. He pointed to the fact that solar panels take up all the land they are on and can be an eyesore. In Christmas Valley, where at least three companies have bought or are leasing about 1,300 acres, residents have been vocal against the solar farms going in near alfalfa fields and farmland. See Solar / C5

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Source: National Weather Service Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

May has been unusually cold, but not particularly wet, according to a report by the National Weather Service released on Tuesday. While this is the ninth coldest May on record in Bend (records have been kept since 1901), there has actually been less rain than is normal for this time of year. If that’s a little hard to believe, it might be because there have been 13 days of precipitation in May instead of the normal five. Most of those days resulted in only trace amounts of rain — less than one-hundredth of an inch. Usually, it rains more, but the rain is concentrated on few-

er days. For example, there was more rain in May of 2009 (0.73 inch) than in May of 2010 (0.51 inch) but there were only four days of precipitation last year, compared to this year’s 13. Though temperature predictions are tracking at normal or above normal for June, the steady moisture is not expected to stop. Since mid-May, the Pacific Northwest has been buffeted by a continuous plume of moisture coming out of Southeast Asia, according to Dennis Hull, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service office in Pendleton. The stream of moisture does not show any signs of slowing, Hull said. See Weather / C5


C2 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B  

N  R

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Competition displays skills of police dogs A competition to showcase the abilities of police dogs and to raise money for active and retired police canines will be held Saturday at Mountain View High School from noon to 3 p.m., according to a news release from the Bend Police Department. The fifth annual Central Oregon Police K-9 Trials will feature police canines from across the state competing in five events including agility, area search, handler protection, fastest dog and an apprehension call off. Awards will be handed out to the top three dogs in each event, and the overall top dog will receive a special award.

Man accused of driving on Prineville ball field Prineville Police arrested an 18-year-old male Tuesday night, on suspicion he damaged the turf at Ward Rhoden Stadium by driving a vehicle on it the evening before. Tyler Peirce, of Prineville, was briefly lodged in the Crook County jail on a charge of first-degree criminal mischief, but was released due to overcrowding. Damage to the turf at the stadium is estimated to be at least $1,400. Police are continuing their investigation and are trying to determine whether the incident at the stadium is connected to vandalism at Crook County High School the same night.

Prevention is best way to keep state’s waters clean, report says By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — The state of Oregon has decided that the best way to keep a long list of toxic and long-lasting pollutants out of waterways, and ultimately away from people, is to stop them at the source, according to a state report released Wednesday. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality report suggests phasing out some household and industrial chemicals and pesticides in favor of safer alternatives, banning others, and developing incentives and regulations to control stormwater runoff and erosion that carries them into rivers and bays. “This issue affects all Oregonians in some way, and we can all — individual consumers as well as industries and municipalities — play important roles to help reduce the presence of these harmful pollutants in our environment so we can have a more

“This issue affects all Oregonians in some way, and we can all — individual consumers as well as industries and municipalities — play important roles to help reduce the presence of these harmful pollutants in our environment so we can have a more livable Oregon.� — Dick Pedersen, director, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality livable Oregon,� department Director Dick Pedersen said in a statement. Jennifer Wigal, department manager for water quality standards and assessments, said it was cheaper and more effective to stop pollutants from getting loose than it was to try to clean them up, especially once they get into rivers and bays. Under legislation adopted by the 2007 Legislature, Oregon is the first state in the nation de-

veloping a comprehensive plan to control 118 different flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, metals, and household and industrial chemicals that take a long time to break down in the environment. Aimee Code, of the Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, said the ambitious undertaking should have been done at the federal level. “I am really pleased with how DEQ took this on,� she said.

“They are focusing on solving the problem, not cleaning up the effects of the problem.� Teresa Huntsinger, of the Oregon Environmental Council, said the DEQ alone cannot solve the problem, and that the departments of Agriculture, Forestry and Transportation will have to control their uses of pesticides for the goal to be reached. The next step is for Oregon’s 52 largest municipal wastewater treatment systems to send water samples to the department for testing, to see just how much of the different pollutants are in the state’s waters. Those communities have until July 1, 2011, to develop plans for dealing with them. The report also suggests more restrictions on open burning in forests, farm fields and even homes. It calls for teaching people not to contribute to the problem, and creating more community events to collect pollutants.

Poem ‘Casey at the Bat’ published in 1888 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, June 3, the 154th day of 2010. There are 211 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 3, 1808, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was born in Christian County, Ky.

by Valerie Solanas, an actress and self-styled militant feminist. In 1983, Gordon Kahl, a militant tax protester wanted in the slayings of two U.S. marshals in North Dakota, was killed in a gun battle with law-enforcement officials near Smithville, Ark. In 1989, Iran’s spiritual leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, died. Chinese army troops began their sweep of Beijing to crush student-led pro-democracy demonstrations. SkyDome (now called Rogers Centre) opened in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton held talks in Moscow with Russian President Vladimir Putin on topics including missile defense. Former Treasury Secretary and onetime “energy czarâ€? William Simon died in Santa Barbara, Calif. at age 72. FIVE YEARS AGO U.S. military officials said no guard at the GuantĂĄnamo Bay prison for terror suspects had flushed a detainee’s Quran down the toilet, but disclosed there were instances in which Qurans were abused by guards, intentionally or accidentally. The child molestation case against Michael Jackson went to the jury after the defense concluded its closing argument (Jackson was acquitted).

ONE YEAR AGO New Hampshire became the sixth state to legalize same-sex marriage. The Organization of American States cleared the way for Cuba’s possible return to the group by lifting a 47-year ban on the country. Death claimed Koko Taylor, 80, the “Queen of the Blues,� in Chicago and Las Vegas saxophonist Sam Butera, 81, who’d teamed with Louis Prima and Keely Smith. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Tony Curtis is 85. TV producer Chuck Barris is 81. Author Larry McMurtry is 74. Rock singer Ian Hunter (Mott the Hoople) is 71. Singer Eddie Holman is 64.

Musician Too Slim (Riders in the Sky) is 62. Rock musician Richard Moore is 61. Singer Suzi Quatro is 60. Singer Deniece Williams is 59. Singer Dan Hill is 56. Actor Scott Valentine is 52. Rock musician Kerry King (Slayer) is 46. Rock singer-musician Mike Gordon is 45. CNN host Anderson Cooper is 43. Country singer Jamie O’Neal is 42. Singers Gabriel and Ariel Hernandez (No Mercy) are 39. Tennis player Rafael Nadal is 24. Actress-singer Lalaine is 23. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Money can’t buy happiness, but it can make you awfully comfortable while you’re being miserable.� — Clare Boothe Luce, American author, politician and diplomat (1903-87)

Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:38 a.m. June 1, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — Irrigation pump wire valued at $6,000 was reported stolen at 1:50 p.m. June 1, in the 63000 block of Sherman Road. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 3:59 p.m. June 1, in the 62000 block of Northeast Nates Place. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 4:02 p.m. June 1, in the 1500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Jordan Michael Deboise, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:08 p.m. June 1, in the 1500 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. DUII — Richard Todd Wilkerson, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:37 p.m. June 1, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Deschutes Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:33 p.m. June 1, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:41 a.m. June 1, in the 600 block of West Antler Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:18 a.m. June 1, in the 500 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 9:09 a.m. June 1, in the 700 block of Southwest Sixth Street.

Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft with a loss of $1,000 was reported at 9:06 a.m. June 1, in the area of Southeast Sixth Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 12:07 p.m. June 1, in the area of Southeast Garner Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:02 p.m. June 1, in the area of Southwest Rimrock Road. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11 p.m. June 1, in the 51400 block of Lasso Lane in La Pine. DUII — George Tamlyn Koester, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:05 p.m. June 1, in the area of Northwest Coyner Avenue and Northwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:15 p.m. June 1, in the 64400 block of Collins Road in Bend. DUII — Kerri Nicole Mandich, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:49 p.m. June 1, in the area of China Hat Road near milepost six. Theft — A theft with an arrest was reported at 12:24 p.m. June 1, in the 51500 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at noon June 1, in the 21400 block of Gift Road in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:37 a.m. June 1, in the 51300 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:37 p.m. June 1, in the area of state Highway 126 near milepost seven.

Change of venue possible for Condon murder case The Associated Press ROSEBURG — Attorneys for the man accused of killing 14-year-old Stephanie Condon want the trial moved out of Douglas County. The Riddle girl disappeared Oct. 30, 1998, while baby-sitting her cousin’s twin toddlers. The missing-person case generated extensive publicity in southwest Oregon before a hiker found the girl’s remains near Glide in March 2009 and Dale Wayne Hill was arrested. Mark Sabitt, one of two attorneys representing Hill, said there was too much publicity for the case to be tried in Roseburg. “It is a case that has been investigated by state, federal and international agencies for 10½ years,â€? Sabitt said at a court hearing Tuesday. Hill, 40, has pleaded not guilty to murder and kidnap-

ping. He has been held without bail at the county jail as he awaits a trial tentatively set to start in February. Hill wore a light-blue, plaid dress shirt and navy slacks at Tuesday’s hearing. Throughout most of the hearing, Coos County Judge Richard Barron helped attorneys establish deadlines for court motions to be filed and heard. Aside from the change of venue, Sabitt asked the judge to compel the prosecution to provide more evidence to defense attorneys. Barron set the week of Sept. 20 to hear pre-trial motions.

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ON THIS DATE In 1621, the Dutch West India Company received its charter for a trade monopoly in parts of the Americas and Africa. In 1888, the poem “Casey at the Bat,� by Ernest Lawrence Thayer, was first published, in the San Francisco Daily Examiner. In 1935, the French liner Normandie set a record on its maiden voyage, arriving in New York after crossing the Atlantic in just four days. In 1937, the Duke of Windsor, who had abdicated the British throne, married Wallis Warfield Simpson in Monts, France. In 1948, the 200-inch reflecting Hale Telescope at the Palomar Mountain Observatory in California was dedicated. In 1963, Pope John XXIII died at age 81; he was succeeded by Pope Paul VI. In 1965, astronaut Edward White became the first American to “walk� in space, during the flight of Gemini 4. In 1968, pop artist Andy Warhol was shot and critically wounded in his New York film studio, known as “The Factory,�

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

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The Central Oregon Partnerships for Youth is asking for volunteers to mentor children with incarcerated parents in Central Oregon. COPY, which is a program of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, offers specialized training for volunteers to prepare them for becoming a mentor to at-risk children. The volunteers commit a few hours each week to a youth in the community who has an incarcerated parent, with the goal of having a positive impact on the child’s life. Women are especially encouraged to volunteer as a mentor, because there are many girls on the waiting list for the program. Volunteers are asked to commit at least one year to the program, and will have to pass a background check to be eligible. They

The public is encouraged to attend the event, though attendees are asked to leave their own dogs at home.

POTTERY

A man was seriously injured and had to be taken by AirLink to St. Charles Bend on Tuesday after crashing his all-terrain vehicle into the shoulder of 19th Street in Terrebonne. Authorities were notified of the crash at 4 p.m. Travis J. Edwards, 35, of Terrebonne, had been driving his Honda 450 ATV southbound on 19th Street when, according to the news release, he failed to make a clean left-hand turn. The ATV hit the gravel shoulder of the road, where Edwards lost control of the ATV and struck a Juniper tree head-on. Edwards was ejected from the vehicle, and landed on the pavement of the road. According to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Edwards was not wearing a helmet. Authorities are continuing to investigate the accident.

must also be at least 21 years old. Those interested in becoming a mentor should call 541-388-6651 of visit http://sheriff.deschutes. org/Volunteers/copy-program/.

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:01 a.m. June 1, in the 1300 block of Southwest Kalama Avenue.



Mentor children with incarcerated parents

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

Terrebonne man hurt in ATV crash

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 C3 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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O Wife of late UO coach Bowerman dies at 96

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The Associated Press FOSSIL — The wife of the late University of Oregon track coach and Nike co-founder Bill Bowerman has died at age 96. Son Jon Bowerman confirmed that Barbara Bowerman died Saturday at Haven House Retirement Home in the north-central Oregon community of Fossil. Born May 4, 1914, in Chicago, she later moved with her family to Medford, meeting Bill Bowerman at Medford High School. They married in 1936. Bill Bowerman died in December 1999, not long after the couple moved to Fossil. Jon Bowerman says his mother spent much of her final years gathering the history of her husband’s ancestors in the town. Survivors include her sons, Jon Bowerman of Fossil, Jay Bowerman of Bend and Tom Bowerman of Eugene. At her request, there will be no memorial service.

I am Dr. David Herrin, DC. I run the only Non-Surgical Decompression Center of its kind in Central Oregon. I see people reduce pain medications, avoid surgery, and get their life back -- every day... and all that without surgery. Yes, you heard me right. I specialize in disc degeneration, herniated discs, bulging discs, spinal stenosis, and sciatica. Discover What The Pro Athletes Are Using To Get Out Of Pain -- Without Surgery If you haven’t heard of non-surgical decompression yet, it’s a shame. People all over the country are embracing this therapy. There are PGA pros, professional football players, and people just like you getting back to their old self -- Fast! Here is the “conventional” procedure for back pain patients. “Take these drugs and get some rest. Let’s see what happens in a month.” When that doesn’t work there’s always the option of getting a needle filled with steroids placed directly into your back. Down the road when it’s finally bad enough you may need surgery. This might seem like a good plan for some. I work with those who want to get their old life back without going under the knife.

Army: Guardsman not billed for gear The Associated Press PORTLAND — The Army says a former Oregon National Guard soldier has not been billed for gear lost when he was wounded in Iraq. Joint Base Lewis-McChord spokesman Joe Piek issued a statement in response to television news reports that the government has been docking Gary Pfleider’s disability checks to pay a $3,000 bill for gear he was wearing when he was shot by a sniper in 2007. Piek said the bill is for something else, but he declined to say what unless Pfleider signs a waiver of his privacy rights.

If you have fallen for that trap and are in desperate need of relief of back pain, you should read on. Forgive Me For Expressing My Opinion About Surgery -- I Hated

To See My Grandma Suffer Don Ryan / The Associated Press

People evacuate the World Trade Center in downtown Portland as firefighters prepare to ascend the stairwell Wednesday. A small fire caused smoke to spread throughout the building. Power was cut off to the upper portion of the high-rise. No injuries were reported. The fire was called in at about 2:15 p.m. and was out within minutes. Power was restored,

but building officials advised tenants to leave for the day because of lingering smoke. Among the tenants are the Portland office of U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and The Associated Press. The high-rise also is headquarters of the electric utility Portland General Electric. The Portland Fire Department said it hadn’t yet determined the cause of the fire.

O  B ‘Cable Guy’ visits sawmill for TV show CAVE JUNCTION — Comedian Dan “Larry the Cable Guy” Whitney has spent a day with the real-life blue-collar guys at the Rough and Ready Lumber mill outside Cave Junction. The Grants Pass Daily Courier reports that Whitney, who found fame as a member of the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, brought along a film crew to do an episode for the History Channel show “Only in America with Larry the Cable Guy.” Mill co-owner Link Phillippi says Whitney got a real taste for logging and mill work one day last week. “Most of the crew enjoys his humor,” Phillippi added.

Man charged in fatal Eugene-area crash EUGENE — An Oregon man has been charged with manslaughter and assault resulting from a January crash near Eugene that killed a young girl. Lane County sheriff’s deputies said they arrested 26-year-old Shea Schuyler Neverick of Veneta on Tuesday night. Deputies said Neverick was speeding along a rural road the afternoon of Jan. 11 when his car crashed into another car driven by 38-year-old Stephanie Schiffgens of Veneta. Her 3-year-old daughter, Elari, died in the wreck, and Schiffgens was hospitalized with injuries she suffered. Neverick was being held at the Lane County Jail.

Coos Bay bans smoking in downtown park COOS BAY — Smokers in Coos Bay will have to curb their habit when visiting Mingus Park. The World newspaper reports

the Coos Bay City Council voted Tuesday to ban smoking in the downtown park, including the sidewalks next to the skatepark. They also banned smoking around playgrounds in five other city parks. Mayor Jeff McKeown cast the deciding vote. He says he did not like voting to limit personal freedom, but decided to support the ban after seeing people walking through the park coughing from secondhand smoke. City Councilor Stephanie Kramer says she received more calls on this issue than any other since she joined the council in 2006. No-smoking signs should be up by the Fourth of July.

Infant killed in rollover west of La Grande LA GRANDE — Oregon State Police say a 3-month-old girl died in a rollover crash on Interstate 84 west of La Grande. Trooper Grant Jackson says a pickup driven by Salavat Mechenko of Willow Springs, Mo., failed to negotiate a curve Tuesday evening and rolled in the median. Three-month-old Alice Mechenko was ejected and later died at a local hospital. Salavat Mechenko and his wife, Anna, sustained injuries described as serious.

Man accused of siccing dog on rabbit in park SALEM — An Oregon man has been charged with animal abuse after ordering his dog to attack a rabbit at a Salem city park in front of children. Police said 33-year old Luke Kishpaugh of Salem told his Doberman Pinscher to go after the rabbit while a group of four young girls were watching it play in the grass at Woodmansee Park.

One parent who was with the girls told Salem police she saw the man get a “smirk” on his face, and other witnesses saw him laughing when the dog captured the rabbit and tossed it into the air before killing it as the children cried. Police said the man later taunted a 3-year-old child in the parking lot and was also heard praising his dog. Kishpaugh was charged with aggravated animal abuse and animal abuse. He was also ordered to stay out of city parks.

Chetco River on list of 10 most threatened GRANTS PASS — The Chetco River in southwestern Oregon is on the list of 10 most endangered rivers in the country compiled annually by the conservation group American Rivers. The group Tuesday cited plans by Seattle developer David Rutan to mine gold on the river under authority of the 1872 Mining Act as the reason for listing it seventh on the list. American Rivers President Rebecca Wodder said the nation cannot let the antiquated mining law stand in the way of protection for a river that is an important economic resource for the region. The Chetco flows out of the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest and reaches the ocean at Brookings. It is part of the national Wild and Scenic Rivers System, and home to salmon and steelhead runs.

Thieves hit Salem Habitat for Humanity SALEM — A pickup truck, two construction trailers and tools were stolen over the Memorial Day weekend from the Habitat for Humanity office in Salem.

The Statesman Journal reports the theft was discovered Tuesday when executive director Dave Kamrath returned to the office. Also stolen were three laptop computers and a large roll of carpet. The loss could be in the tens of thousands of dollars.

4 missing teens were headed for the beach MEDFORD — Four Southern Oregon teens who went missing after going out for lunch and a movie told investigators they were headed for the beach in Southern California. The Mail Tribune newspaper reports that after one of the teens turned himself in to police in Garden Grove, Calif., early Wednesday, he said their goal had been Newport Beach, Calif. But with little but a car and the clothes on their backs, they decided they would rather go home. The teens had met at a church youth group, and told their parents on Monday they were going out for lunch and a movie. They then turned off their cell phones. They were identified as Emily Taylor Probst, of Medford, and Jacob Anderson, Devan Savage, and Christion Bradley, of Rogue River.

Property from thefts to be sold in Salem SALEM — The state’s surplus property program is holding a special sale Saturday to clear its northeast Salem warehouse of property turned over from theft cases. Among the items up for sale will be hundreds of nail guns, chain saws, weed whackers and other items seized as evidence during the investigation of stolen property kingpin Ivan Cam. — From wire reports

How many surgeries does it take to get it right? Two, three, four ... my sweet Grandma had seven before it was a success. Talk about suffering. Maybe you see why I believe surgery should be a last resort. Do you have that kind of time? I have a better solution. People in my office get out of pain fast, and can be back doing the things they love while they are being treated. And you don’t have to feel like you are a drug addict to feel good. The New Solution -- Fast And Long-Lasting Relief We have a non-surgical, non-drug solution. And it’s fast and effective. It’s called non-surgical spinal decompression. Let me give you the low down on this groundbreaking technology. This is a computerized decompression machine that stretches the spine in a unique way. It creates negative pressure deep in the diseased disc. The negative pressure acts like a vacuum that pulls the disc material away from the spinal cord and spinal nerves. Eliminating pain and symptoms. And at the same time the negative pressure pulls nutrients, water and oxygen into the disc. You see with disc diseases, the disc is actually sick! It’s dehydrated. And shrinking. That is how many of our patients regain their life.

Do Any Of These Case Studies Sound Familiar To You? Case #125. Darlene D. After her surgery she was left in some serious pain. This pain lasted 32 years. She came in to us and in three weeks she was out of pain. In five weeks she was on her roof working with her husband. Do you see what we can do for you? We are offering a solution to your pain. To get your life back, FAST! Case #89. Bruce F. After a traumatic car accident, Bruce was left in pain. He went here and there but didn’t find relief. So he came to see us. The treatments were painless. He got out of pain. He now runs, walks the beach, and plays with his kid. All without pain. Does your current therapy offer you this kind of relief? What are you waiting for? Case #320. John M.’s MRI said, “Annular Tear,” Ouch! His episodes of pain put him on his back for two weeks every couple months. He began treatment and his pain decreased almost immediately. Over the course of treatment his back felt stronger and more flexible. No episodes to this day. Do you want to improve the quality of your life? Are your current therapies doing that for you? Case #25. Kevin. Headaches every day of his life since an accident. Headaches gone after first treatment. Peace could be defined as finding a solution to a problem that has you feeling completely crazy. Imagine how Kevin must have felt, and how he feels now! You don’t need a referral to see me. In fact, I want all to come and see me. You are invited to be evaluated by me. I will cover the cost. There is a catch -- you have to qualify. You see, I will not take anyone. I will only treat those I can help.

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C4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Prepare for more wolf conflicts

I

f you don’t count talk radio hosts and congressional leaders, the most polarizing creature in North America is likely to be the wolf, whose numbers are increasing thanks to legal pro-

tections and reintroduction efforts. As far as wildlife officials know, the Beaver State’s wolf population hasn’t reached 20. Yet the animals, though few in number, have cut quite a swath through Oregon’s northeast corner, bringing a bloody dose of reality to those of us who like the idea of wolves roaming the woods. In Wallowa County, wolves belonging to a pack of 10 killed nearly half a dozen calves during May. They did so despite the efforts of wildlife managers to scare them away using helicopters and noisemakers. Big mistake. By chowing down on so much veal, the wolves met the threshold for lethal removal under the state’s management scheme. If all goes according to plan, two of them will soon visit the great stockyard in the sky. The presence of wolves in remote areas certainly makes Oregon a more interesting place. Problem is, they’re predatory animals that occasionally insist on eating things nobody wants them to. Not that you can blame them. Beef does taste good, and calves aren’t known for their defensive skills. Neither, however, can you blame ranchers for reacting angrily. The animals the wolves eat are their livelihood. If you had to sit idly by while animals raided your workplace and took chunks out of your paycheck, you’d probably be mad, too, no matter how much you might like the perpetrators in the abstract. So diametrically opposed are the interests of wolves and ranchers

By chowing down on so much veal, the wolves met the threshold for lethal removal under the state’s management scheme. that the goal of the state’s wolf plan (“to ensure the conservation of gray wolves ... while protecting the social and economic interests of all Oregonians”) seems like a punch line. But the people on either side of the wolf debate don’t seem very amused these days. A member of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association said wildlife managers should respond to events in Wallowa County by killing four wolves, not two. Meanwhile a member of Oregon Wild objected to killing even two, arguing that even such a small number represents a large percentage of the state’s wolf population. Oregon is currently conducting a five-year review of its wolf plan. But no tweaks, regardless of how favorable to ranchers, will eliminate the fundamental incompatibility of wolves and livestock. If a pack of 10 animals managed to kill five calves in a single month, imagine what five or six packs containing 50 or 60 wolves will do. Eventually, of course, no one will have to imagine anything. Wolves — and wolf battles — are well on their way. Might as well get used to it.

Tax for paying interns

T

he state of Oregon really must hate paid internships. Why else would it punish companies for hiring people on a short-term basis? The punishment is doled out through the unemployment insurance tax. The state raises money for unemployment claims by taxing employers, who generally pay a certain amount for each worker on their payrolls. When workers are laid off, those who are eligible for unemployment benefits tap into a fund set aside for their benefit. In its most basic outlines, this arrangement is fairly straightforward and logical. But there’s a twist. A company’s tax rate hinges in part on its “experience rating,” which reflects the frequency with which its former employees collect unemployment. A company that generates a lot of successful unemployment claims will generally pay a higher tax rate than a comparably sized company that generates few such claims. Which brings us to paid interns. They’re usually hired for short periods, yet under some circumstances they may turn around after their employment periods end and collect unemployment. Because successful claims

erode employers’ experience ratings, they face tax hikes merely for hiring interns. Under the perverse logic of state law, the act of hiring an intern is, by its very nature, a punishable offense against employment. Go figure. In reality, of course, it’s just a money grab. The state is, in effect, using paid internships as an excuse to jack up tax rates on well-meaning employers. This is an abusive practice that lawmakers should end. Given the hostility to business the Legislature has exhibited in recent sessions, the likelihood of this happening probably isn’t great. Neither, however, is it unprecedented. State law currently contains a number of related exceptions, including caddies, certain kinds of log-hauling services, newspaper correspondents, various professions paid by commission and, believe it or not, people paid on a temporary basis to distribute food samples in stores. If nothing else, the Legislature should bar officials from basing tax hikes on unemployment claims filed by temporary interns. Not only is the practice unfairly punitive, but it makes no sense.

My Nickel’s Worth Challenge Day

Arizona immigration

Read the law

I had an extraordinary experience recently as an adult volunteer at Challenge Day at Mountain View High School. While some of us got through unscathed, most of us remember our high school years with at least some amount of pain. And it’s apparently gotten much worse. Challenge Day is a one-day program led by trained staff of Challenge Day, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. With the help of local adult volunteers, about 100 students participate in a process that helps to build connection and empathy. Part of the process of Challenge Day is to break down the barriers and stereotyping that separate people. Students were amazed to find out they aren’t the only ones who, for example, feel lonely or rejected, suffer from low self-esteem or depression, grieve the loss of a parent, or feel bad about how they look. What was so startling for me, however, is that many — way too many — students shared stories of bullying, addiction, poverty, abuse or violence at home. As the day went on, facades and arrogance gave way to humility and empathy. Students began to see how their own behavior, positive or negative, can profoundly affect others. Our kids need this kind of healing and support. Challenge Day is good stuff, and I urge you to support efforts currently under way by the Serendipity West Foundation, here in Bend, to bring this program into all of our middle and high schools. Barbara Stoefen Bend

Wow. That describes how I felt after reading Alan Pachtman’s letter on Arizona “profiling.” You don’t see that sort of blatant condescension printed in a newspaper very often. It moved me to take my funny tea party hat off, turn on my spell check (which I don’t use on my tea party signs) and respond. I guess I shouldn’t worry about offending him since that would require him reading this. Obviously, reading isn’t at the top of his to-do list. Otherwise he would have read the Arizona bill and known it prohibits random stops. It’s very carefully worded to avoid racial profiling of any sort. If an officer does engage in that sort of activity, he or she could be sued and subject to jail time. In Pachtman’s defense, the truth in this matter is rarely given by his likely news sources (NBC, MSNBC, The Huffington Post, President Obama, etc.). It’s simpler to make this a racial issue than to enforce existing federal laws. It’s also easier to vilify Arizona than to look at its situation to seek to understand. Arizonans live in a state where people are gunned down by illegals. Where Phoenix is the nation’s No. 1 ransom kidnapping city (and No. 2 in the world). Where the financial burden of illegals puts a massive strain on resources. For politicians to actually deal with the problem of illegals, they would have to risk losing some votes. Not to mention a huge voting bloc in the future once illegals are granted amnesty. Jeff Kennedy Bend

Alan Pachtman’s May 20 letter lambasting Arizona’s new immigration law gave me quite a few laughs. It is obvious that he, like Attorney General Eric Holder and Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano, has never read that which he criticizes. He claims Arizona cops will be wrong four out of five times for randomly stopping someone who “looks like an illegal alien.” Excuse me? There is absolutely nothing in the law that allows random stops. The law specifically follows the principle of probable cause in stopping someone before asking for documents. The law specifically bars officers from considering race in deciding whose immigration status to check. With his stereotypes about the tea party and Fox News, it appears Pachtman is more concerned with parroting liberal sound bites than dealing with facts. The Arizona law is not about Hispanics. It is not about civil rights. It is not about government intrusion. It is about the failure of President Barack Obama to enforce existing immigration laws. It is about the $2.7 billion annual cost of illegal immigration Arizona endures. Arizona has no choice when Obama ignores his sworn responsibility to secure our borders and enforce our laws. For Pachtman to throw down the race card is intellectually dishonest and ignores reality. Greg Franklin Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Wyden’s eastside forest bill not protective enough By Larry Pennington Bulletin guest columnist

L

ast December’s introduction by Sen. Ron Wyden of the Oregon Eastside Forest Restoration, Old Growth Protection and Jobs Act of 2009 initiated a discussion of how best to accomplish forest and wildlife restoration and create jobs in Oregon. While there are honest differences of opinion about the bill among many interests and organizations, we are all dedicated to making Oregon a better place to live. The Sierra Club strongly believes that science should be the basis for forest health policy, and we believe the best comprehensive scientific evaluation of east-side forests is the 1994 Eastside Scientific Panel’s report to the president and Congress. While Sen. Wyden’s bill incorporates some of the report’s recommendations, such as protecting large-diameter old-growth trees, it is silent on several of its key components. In short, the bill does not adequately protect roadless areas, riparian areas and important old-growth stands from many harmful logging impacts. It focus-

es too heavily on producing sawlogs for mills while mandating annual acreage targets that far exceed those necessary to maintain forest health, extending these activities into healthy backcountry forests where there is no imminent threat to human communities by wildfire. Too much emphasis on mechanical activities that remove large amounts of sawlogs and biomass from the forest can actually set back restoration goals by causing lasting damage to soils and water quality, increasing fire risk, and impeding the recovery of threatened fish and wildlife. The Sierra Club believes there is a better way to restore our forests and provide jobs for Oregonians. Economists are increasingly realizing that our forests have value as sources of clean water, clean air, salmon and wildlife habitat, recreation, and carbon storage. Further, the recent boom-and-bust cycle of the housing market and lack of demand for timber reminds us that focusing on increasing logging as the primary way to create jobs in rural Oregon is not the way to rebuild resilient rural

IN MY VIEW economies. A 2009 study published by the University of Oregon’s Ecosystem Workforce Program demonstrated that non-timber-oriented watershed and road restoration work, and other labor intensive restoration activities such as manual thinning, tree planting and brush removal, can produce more jobs per million dollars invested than more mechanized and logging-focused restoration activities. In short, the focus of a bill designed to create jobs through restoration should be on deliberately creating a diversity of restoration jobs by setting benchmarks for improving fish passage, restoring degraded riparian areas, reducing the dense road network, removing invasive species, and replanting and thinning where appropriate using sustainable, labor-intensive, light-on-the-land practices. Within the wildland-urban interface, we must focus on thinning and removing brush and small diameter trees. Outside of those interfaces, we should

recognize and manage fire as a natural forest process, while addressing the crumbling road network and restoring depleted fish runs. In addition to the need for the bill to focus on the broad spectrum of forest restoration needs, we recommend the following additional changes to Sen. Wyden’s bill that will help ensure implementation of more scientifically supported restoration approaches: eliminate annual mandated acreage targets and allow science to guide such acreage based on site-specific forest health and species recovery needs; incorporate all recommendations of the 1994 Eastside Scientific Panel Report; better define and depoliticize the selection of the new scientific panel created by the legislation; remove the precedent-setting prohibition on resolving disagreements through administrative appeal, since we believe this will result in more litigation, not less; strengthen riparian protection by making the requirements to protect buffers along fish-bearing streams the mandatory minimum; avoid construction of so-called “temporary” roads,

since the environmental impacts of such roads are not temporary on forest and watershed health; and require decommissioning any “temporary” roads as an intrinsic part of restoration projects, not a hoped-for later add-on. Our fellow conservation organizations in Oregon do great work, and we all see the benefits of that work as we travel our east-of-the-Cascades Oregon home. Some fully support Sen. Wyden’s legislation, while others recognize there are key problems that need to be fixed in order for it to accomplish its stated restoration goals and not tip the scales toward more unsustainable logging. While the Sierra Club has concerns that are causing us to recommend key changes to the bill, we are dedicated to working with any and all who promote a healthy environment and making central and eastern Oregon a better place to live and work. Larry Pennington, of Crooked River Ranch, is chair of the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club’s east-side forest subcommittee.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 C5

O    Jeffrey Reid Ingalls Ross Everett Curry

D N Audrey Marie Bennett, of Bend May 16, 1927 - May 29, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Private family services are being held.

Esther A. Zobie, of Bend April 6, 1925 - May 29, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 Services: Services will be held at a later date.

Norman ‘Norm’ Thaddeus Welch, of Bend Feb. 24, 1953 - May 30, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Services are pending and will be announced in the Bulletin at a later date.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Beverly Ann (Anderson) McBride

March 10, 1951 - May 27, 2010

Oct. 13, 1925 - May 30, 2010

Jeffrey Reid Ingalls, a 17-year resident of Bend, Oregon, died Thursday, May 27, 2010 at the age of 59 after a 14 month battle with cancer. A Celebration of Life will be held on Tuesday, June 8, 2010, at 4:00 pm, at Nativity Lutheran Church, located at 60850 Brosterous Road, Jeffrey Reid in Bend, folIngalls lowed by a Potluck reception. Jeff was born in Denver, Colorado on March 10, 1951, the son of Robert Bolognese and Atha Jane (Deffenbaugh) Ingalls. He graduated from Utah State University with a Bachelors Degree in Fisheries Biology and on July 9, 1986, married Kathy Pazera in Juneau, Alaska. Prior to his death, Jeff held a current position with DEQ Environmental Specialist in the Hazardous Waste Program. Before locating to Oregon in 1992, Jeff served as Manager of the Alaska Hazardous Waste Program. During his career he received Special Commendations for his outstanding work in Hazardous Waste Enforcement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the states of Alaska and Oregon. Jeff was a highly respected member of the Environmental Agency Community. Jeff coached youth soccer for many years and always enjoyed the outdoors, especially camping, fishing, hiking and canoeing. Other interests included a love of cooking and making stained glass pieces. Jeff will always be remembered for his wit and humor and his capacity to connect with others. His passion and reverence for nature was evidenced in the way he embraced life. Survivors include his wife of 23 years, Kathy Pazera of Bend, OR; his stepfather, Frank Hatch of UT; a son, Forrest Ingalls of Bend, OR; and a brother, Mark Ingalls of Salt Lake City, UT. Memorial contributions may be made in Jeff's memory to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. Bend, OR 97701 and Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, P.O. Box 3533, Sunriver, OR 97707. Baird Funeral Home of Bend, Oregon, is in charge of arrangements, (541) 382-0903.

Ross E. Curry, 84 years, died of natural causes at his home. Ross, was born in Sidney, Ontario, Canada, to Samuel and Elizabeth Weese Curry. He moved to Powell Butte, OR, with his family in 1972. He had been a general contractor in home construction. On November 27, 1987, Ross Everett he married Curry Kay Mishey, they enjoyed their retirement years in Powell Butte and spending winters in AZ. Following Kay’s death he moved to Redmond. He loved Old Tyme Fiddlers, feeding the ducks daily with his companion, Pat, going out for drives, gardening, being with his family and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents; three brothers, Vernon, Gerald and Norman; two sisters, Lena and Letha; and his wife, Kay. Surviving are son, Daren (Pam) Curry of Powell Butte; daughter, Theresa (Ed) Harrod of Kennwick, WA; step-daughter, Susan (Dave) Johnson of San Francisco, CA; sister, Marjorie Sherwin of Ontario, Canada; and grandkids, Garret and Sammi Curry and Jordan Flores; and companion, Pat McAndie. Celebration of Life service will be held on Saturday, June 5, 2010, at the Deschutes Memorial Mausoleum, at 10:30 am. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society c/o Deschutes Memorial Chapel. To leave online condolences visit www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Airport Continued from C1 City officials had believed the bar-only option would draw more proposals because it should be a more basic and profitable operation than running both spaces. The bar, which is inside security, should have a captive audience of people waiting for their flights. “I am actually a little surprised,” City Manager David Brandt said. “I thought we’d have more interest, but in this economy people are more skittish. But you only need one (response).”

“There’s no magic pot of money out there that’s going to allow us to duck the hard choices. We can’t tax our way out of this.” — John Kitzhaber, candidate for Oregon governor

Kitzhaber

sentencing requirements voters approved with Measure 11 in 1994. “Somebody’s got to move those big rocks, or else the rest of it doesn’t really matter,” Fish said. Kitzhaber said the current recession presents an opportunity to force the Legislature and the public to seriously consider the long-term consequences of current policies. The prosperous late ’90s and the relatively shallow recession of 2002 made it easy to put off a discussion of such issues during his time as governor, he said. “It’s very difficult to get people to look at fundamental systems changes when money keeps coming in over the transom, which to a large extent is what was happening in the ’90s,” he said. Roger Lee of Economic Development for Central Oregon said it’s becoming more difficult to operate businesses in Oregon, and tax policy is deterring high-income individuals from moving to the

state. Kitzhaber said tax hikes adopted with the approval of Measure 67 in January could harm high-volume, low-profit businesses, but the state also has an unfairly earned image as a bad place to do business. “There’s a real piece of this, and kind of a perceptual piece with the bad press we’ve been getting,” he said. “And I think the governor has to be the lead cheerleader and say yes, Oregon is open for business.” Following the meeting, Kitzhaber said he’s heard similar concerns at every meeting he’s had with business leaders during the campaign. People feel state government is inflexible and blind to the unintended consequences of policy decisions, he said, a sense that’s amplified by the poor economy. “There’s always a little bit of that drumbeat, but you hear it a little louder in times like these,” Kitzhaber said.

Continued from C1 “I’ve talked to some Realtors, and they have lost sales because of proposed solar sites,” Lundquist said. “They aren’t tall, but aesthetics are on people’s mind. ... A major issue is the lifestyle and culture we have here.” Commissioner Ken Fahlgren and Judge Mike McCabe said they would like to move forward with the ordinance, but they would give it until the next

County Court meeting to add a qualifier on the setback. Crook County Planning Director Bill Zelenka also wanted to move forward. “I could get an application (for a solar farm) tomorrow,” he said. “And I don’t have anything to go by ... I have no standards to apply. What we’re doing, we’re responding to an actual demand, and I’m trying to get ahead of the curve.” Zelenka said he would work on language that added a qualifier such as the minimum setback is 100 feet, “unless sur-

rounding development necessitates a greater distance.” One company has expressed interest in building an approximately 45-acre solar array in the Juniper Canyon area. “We’re taking a major step forward that we’re going to live with for a long time,” Lundquist told the court. The next Crook County Court meeting is scheduled for June 16.

Brandt said city officials expect to finish vetting Shurtleff’s proposal today and if everything is in order will begin lease negotiations soon. Redmond City Council could see a contract by the end of this month, Brandt said. In his proposal, Shurtleff said he hoped to open the bar by Sept. 1. That assumes contract negotiations go quickly, he said. The space, which is bare now, must be remodeled and Shurtleff hopes to give it a similar look to Coyote Ranch, which is Western-themed. He hasn’t finalized a name yet, but Coyote Pub and Little Coyote

Ranch are both in the running, he said. The walls will be covered with historical photos of Central Oregon and other Western memorabilia, Shurtleff said. The menu will share some menu items with Coyote Ranch, a steak house. The menu won’t offer steaks but will include several options, including barbecue sandwiches and salads. “What (travelers) are going to find is a miniature Coyote Ranch at an airport location,” Shurtleff said. Shurtleff plans to offer several local beers, something a single brewer probably would not. That variety will give travelers

a better feel for what the region has to offer, Shurtleff said. “We will represent Central Oregon and not just one brewery,” Shurtleff said, and added that his restaurant has nine local beers on tap. After pushing the city to open the bid process, Shurtleff was thrilled to be the only bidder. He hopes to have a signed contract soon. “It’s been a long process, but I think I’ve pretty much proven I’m serious about opening up there,” Shurtleff said.

Continued from C1 The former governor painted a gloomy picture of the state’s current prospects, with 10 percent unemployment, a half-billion dollar shortfall in the current biennial budget and a state Legislature firmly divided along partisan lines. Getting Oregon on the right track will almost certainly require additional reductions in state services and the number of state-funded employees, he said. “There’s no magic pot of money out there that’s going to allow us to duck the hard choices,” said Kitzhaber. “We can’t tax our way out of this.” Gary Fish, the founder and president of Deschutes Brewery, told Kitzhaber he hoped the next governor would be willing to take a fresh look at past decisions that now consume a large share of the state’s budget, like the Public Employee Retirement System and the mandatory minimum

Solar

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

August 21, 1936 - May 30, 2010 Beverly Ann (Anderson) McBride was born August 21, 1936, in Crosby, ND, to Ray & Bertha Anderson, and passed away on May 30, 2010, in Bend, OR. On June 30, 1953, she married Eugene McBride and they had two children. Beverly loved crocheting, fishing and traveling. She was a very caring and loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend. She is preceded in death by her sisters, Arlene Wasson and Phyllis Bergstralh. Beverly is survived by her husband, Eugene; children, Deborah Farmer, Jeffrey McBride; grandchildren, Amanda DeVicente, Angela Farmer, Nicole Chapanar, Kim McBride, Amy McBride, Christopher McBride, Justin McBride; great-grandchildren, Britney, Brianna, Kaley Chapanar; sisters, Evelyn Miller, Delores Stills, Pam Gibson. A Funeral Service will be held at 10:30 am, Friday, June 4, 2010, at Niswonger-Reynolds Chapel, 105 NW Irving Ave., Bend. Interment will follow at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Bend. If so desired, memorials preferred to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is honored to serve the family. 541.382.2471. Please visit and sign the online guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Image courtesy Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

This satellite image shows the continuous plume of moisture that is coming out of Southeast Asia and traveling across the ocean to the Pacific Northwest, bringing damp weather with it.

Weather Continued from C1 “That’s just the pattern,” Hull said. “It’s a jet stream aloft — that means the upper winds at 20,000 to 30,000 feet. That’s where storms generally develop all across the world.” It’s too early to tell how the unusual cold and steady damp might affect Central Oregon’s crops, according to Richard Afeldt, a crop scientist for Oregon State University Extension Service. “There are some pests that like the cool damp conditions we’ve had,” Afeldt, who specializes in grass and vegetable seed crops said, “like powdery mildew, which is a disease we have in Kentucky bluegrass grown for seed.” Though grass crops have been developing slowly this spring,

Afeldt said, a week or so of hot weather next month could be enough to bring everything back on track. Rod Nichols, the information officer for the Oregon Department of Forestry, said wet spring weather may have an impact on the fire season. “When we have a dry spring, that concerns everyone,” Nichols said. “On the other hand, when we’re having a wet season, we’re growing a lot of fuel. It really gets down to what the weather is like during the summer when we really get down to fire conditions.” Nichols said the lush grass and shrubs growing right now could certainly be fuel that could ignite later on. However, whether it will actually catch fire has more to do with summer conditions than spring conditions, he said. One upshot

“When we have a dry spring, that concerns everyone. On the other hand, when we’re having a wet season, we’re growing a lot of fuel. It really gets down to what the weather is like during the summer when we really get down to fire conditions.” — Rod Nichols, Oregon Department of Forestry of the wet weather this spring, Nichols said, has been the moderation of early predictions that this coming summer could be particularly prone to fires due to the lower than average snowpack. One of the concerns with a colder than usual spring is that it may keep people from taking advantage of the Bend area’s many outdoor attractions. Ryan Thompson, the chief financial officer of Hoodoo

Recreation Services, which is in charge of running the Deschutes National Forest campgrounds, said there had been no significant drop off in campers this spring. Thompson said Memorial Day weekend, despite being blustery, was busy and most of the campsites that were open were full. Not all of the U.S. Forest Service campgrounds are open yet, but Thompson said that’s pretty normal. “It’s fairly standard

that snow prevents a number of campgrounds from opening until June. This year is actually not as bad as last year,” he said. Mike Volk owns www. SmithRock.com, a website that works with Smith Rock State Park to provide information for the popular rock climbing site just north of Terrebonne. Volk said the steady rain had not slowed climber traffic at Smith Rock since the steady off and on sprinkles haven’t been enough to make the rock too wet to climb. He also said the cooler temperatures are actually good for climbing. “As far as the local crowd goes,” Hull said, “it’s the same as it’s always been.” Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JUNE 3

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE



66/51

Ruggs

Condon

65/51

60/48

53/39

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

67/57

62/47

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

69/52

66/55

Camp Sherman 60/47 Redmond Prineville 66/50 Cascadia 65/51 65/51 Sisters 63/49 Bend Post 66/50

Oakridge Elk Lake 63/49

64/47



63/46

Seattle

City

Missoula

61/47



64/43

Helena

Bend

68/45

66/50

Boise

Idaho Falls

72/54

67/49

65/48

57/40

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Redding

66/49

Silver Lake

62/44

63/49

Partly to mostly cloudy with showers south today. Chance of rain tonight.

Crater Lake 50/43

Reno

79/62



Elko

79/57

76/48

San Francisco 66/57





LOW

Salt Lake City 76/56

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Last

June 4

New

First

Full

June 12 June 18 June 26

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 57/51/1.04 . . . . . 61/51/pc. . . . . . 58/49/sh Baker City . . . . . . 63/52/0.05 . . . . . 64/51/pc. . . . . . 64/42/sh Brookings . . . . . . 56/54/3.60 . . . . . 57/53/sh. . . . . . 58/53/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 61/52/0.25 . . . . . 65/49/sh. . . . . . 64/42/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 65/57/0.78 . . . . . 66/54/sh. . . . . . 63/50/sh Klamath Falls . . . 64/52/0.05 . . . . . 63/49/sh. . . . . . 61/45/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 61/52/0.00 . . . . . 65/48/sh. . . . . . 61/47/sh La Pine . . . . . . . . 57/50/0.02 . . . . . 63/46/sh. . . . . . 62/38/sh Medford . . . . . . . 63/57/0.19 . . . . . 69/54/sh. . . . . . 67/53/sh Newport . . . . . . . 57/54/1.84 . . . . . . 63/53/c. . . . . . 58/49/sh North Bend . . . . . . 59/55/NA . . . . . 62/53/sh. . . . . . 58/52/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 64/57/0.31 . . . . . . 74/56/c. . . . . . 73/53/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 68/54/0.54 . . . . . 68/52/pc. . . . . . 70/48/sh Portland . . . . . . . 65/57/0.67 . . . . . 67/56/pc. . . . . . . 63/53/r Prineville . . . . . . . 64/55/0.03 . . . . . 65/51/sh. . . . . . 65/44/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 64/57/0.00 . . . . . . 64/49/c. . . . . . 65/41/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 64/59/0.44 . . . . . 70/55/sh. . . . . . 65/51/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 61/59/1.00 . . . . . . 67/55/c. . . . . . 64/51/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 60/52/0.16 . . . . . 63/49/sh. . . . . . 62/42/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 66/57/0.40 . . . . . 69/53/pc. . . . . . 68/50/sh

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

7

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64/55 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.02” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 in 1986 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.02” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 in 1976 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.06” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.98” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.47” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.79 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.42 in 1993 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Low Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine................................Low Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

LOW

73 43

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy, seasonable temps. HIGH

71 43

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:27 a.m. . . . . . .6:39 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:49 a.m. . . . . .11:21 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:23 a.m. . . . . . .1:15 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:17 a.m. . . . . . .2:12 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:53 p.m. . . . . . .2:25 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:15 a.m. . . . . . .2:15 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 67/38

Eugene Partly to mostly cloudy 66/54 with showers south today. Grants Pass Chance of rain tonight. 69/54 Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

58/45

67/56

Burns

63/46

62/45



Vancouver

Portland

65/48

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:24 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:43 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:24 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:44 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:42 a.m. Moonset today . . . 11:52 a.m.

MONDAY Mostly cloudy.

69 41

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

64/47

La Pine

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Paulina

Brothers

LOW

There will be a few showers in the south, while high pressure rules over much of the region.

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 71° Hermiston • 48° Rome

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy.

66 40

65/50

64/48

Sunriver

54/38

Partly to mostly cloudy with showers south today. Rain likely tonight. Central

68/56

HIGH

50

Western Maupin

Government Camp

Mostly cloudy, light rain ending by afternoon.

LOW

66

Bob Shaw

SATURDAY

Tonight: Overcast skies, light rain showers, mild.

Today: Mostly cloudy, late evening rain developing.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FRIDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled today by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43,852 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147,160 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 70,448 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,799 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149,482 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 278 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 904 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,557 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.58 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 58/45

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 67/38

Portland 67/56

Billings 72/49

Boise 72/54

• 101° Wink, Texas Leadville, Colo.

• 3.60”

Saskatoon 61/44

Seattle 65/50

(in the 48 contiguous states):

• 30°

S

San Francisco 66/57

Brookings, Ore.

Las Vegas 97/76

S

S

Winnipeg 69/48

St. Paul 78/62

Albuquerque City 92/60 Oklahoma 90/69

Houston 90/73

Chihuahua 96/63

Anchorage 63/44

La Paz 95/62 Juneau 59/45

To ronto 73/54

Green Bay 73/51

Little Rock 92/72 Dallas 95/74

Tijuana 74/55

Mazatlan 88/71

S

S S

Quebec 69/47

Bismarck 75/54 Rapid City 79/52

S

Thunder Bay 69/49

Phoenix 100/74

Honolulu 87/71

S

Des Moines 79/62 Chicago 74/58 Cheyenne Omaha 78/63 81/53 Denver Kansas City St. Louis 86/58 82/64 85/66

Salt Lake City 76/56

Los Angeles 70/62

S

Detroit 75/59

Buffalo

72/56 Columbus 81/60

Portland 77/54 Boston 82/64 New York 88/71

Halifax 69/54

Philadelphia 90/70 Washington, D. C. 92/73

Louisville 85/65

Nashville 90/69

Charlotte 87/68

Atlanta 87/69 Birmingham 88/68

New Orleans 87/75

Orlando 92/74 Miami 91/78

Monterrey 96/73

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .90/68/0.51 . 95/70/pc . . 100/74/s Akron . . . . . . . . .80/58/0.23 . . .78/59/t . . 76/59/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .85/56/0.00 . .81/61/sh . . 81/55/pc Albuquerque. . . .86/59/0.00 . . .92/60/s . . . 95/58/s Anchorage . . . . .66/49/0.00 . .63/44/sh . . 65/45/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .85/69/0.50 . . .87/69/t . . . .87/69/t Atlantic City . . . .84/64/0.02 . . .82/68/t . . . .78/66/t Austin . . . . . . . . .96/68/0.00 . . .90/69/t . . . 95/73/s Baltimore . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .93/70/t . . . .86/67/t Billings. . . . . . . . .74/49/0.00 . . .72/49/t . . . .72/52/t Birmingham . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .88/68/t . . . .88/68/t Bismarck . . . . . . .71/39/0.00 . .75/54/sh . . 76/50/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .69/57/0.06 . .72/54/sh . . 70/49/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .69/60/0.00 . . .82/64/t . . . .71/59/t Bridgeport, CT. . .81/62/0.00 . . .77/66/t . . . .77/61/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .79/56/0.01 . .72/56/sh . . 78/59/pc Burlington, VT. . .84/53/0.00 . .74/57/sh . . 79/55/pc Caribou, ME . . . .73/52/0.48 . .61/49/sh . . 70/51/pc Charleston, SC . .89/72/0.97 . . .85/73/t . . . .86/74/t Charlotte. . . . . . .88/66/0.85 . . .87/68/t . . . .89/68/t Chattanooga. . . .87/70/0.00 . . .88/67/t . . . .90/67/t Cheyenne . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . 81/53/pc . . . 79/56/c Chicago. . . . . . . .77/65/0.96 . 74/58/pc . . . .78/59/t Cincinnati . . . . . .85/64/0.01 . . .82/63/t . . 82/64/pc Cleveland . . . . . .86/63/0.08 . . .75/56/t . . 78/58/pc Colorado Springs 73/51/0.00 . 82/54/pc . . 85/57/pc Columbia, MO . .82/63/1.01 . 83/65/pc . . 88/67/pc Columbia, SC . . .91/70/0.02 . . .89/70/t . . . .91/70/t Columbus, GA. . .80/69/0.48 . . .89/70/t . . . .88/72/t Columbus, OH. . .88/64/0.00 . . .81/60/t . . 80/61/pc Concord, NH . . . .84/51/0.00 . .81/60/sh . . 75/55/pc Corpus Christi. . .92/75/0.00 . . .91/76/t . . . 93/78/s Dallas Ft Worth. .96/75/0.00 . 95/74/pc . . 99/78/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .84/68/0.66 . . .79/62/t . . 80/63/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . 86/58/pc . . 89/59/pc Des Moines. . . . .79/64/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . . .80/63/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .77/65/0.27 . 75/59/pc . . 79/60/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . 66/49/pc . . . .63/51/t El Paso. . . . . . . . .92/71/0.00 . . .96/70/s . . 101/71/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .77/47/0.00 . 75/51/pc . . 65/49/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .72/42/0.00 . 76/58/pc . . 74/53/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .74/37/0.00 . . .79/42/s . . . 80/43/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .75/64/0.97 . 76/56/pc . . . .76/57/t Green Bay. . . . . .66/57/0.12 . 73/51/pc . . . .70/56/t Greensboro. . . . .86/68/0.04 . . .87/68/t . . 87/68/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .85/63/0.00 . . .88/67/t . . 84/62/pc Hartford, CT . . . .85/62/0.00 . . .83/65/t . . . .79/61/t Helena. . . . . . . . .64/44/0.01 . 68/45/pc . . 68/48/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .87/71/s . . . 86/72/s Houston . . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .90/73/t . . 93/77/pc Huntsville . . . . . .87/68/0.29 . . .89/69/t . . . .90/69/t Indianapolis . . . .83/66/0.05 . . .80/65/t . . 84/63/pc Jackson, MS . . . .88/68/0.02 . . .88/70/t . . . .89/74/t Madison, WI . . . .80/62/0.58 . 76/54/pc . . . .74/55/t Jacksonville. . . . .92/71/0.00 . . .89/73/t . . . .89/73/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .67/42/0.00 . .59/45/sh . . 67/46/sh Kansas City. . . . .79/62/1.00 . 82/64/pc . . 87/69/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .73/63/0.52 . 75/57/pc . . 76/57/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .97/76/s . . 100/77/s Lexington . . . . . .87/68/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . 85/64/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .77/60/0.11 . 79/63/pc . . . .84/65/t Little Rock. . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .92/72/t . . 93/72/pc Los Angeles. . . . .68/60/0.00 . . .70/62/s . . . 73/64/s Louisville . . . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . .85/65/t . . . .83/65/t Memphis. . . . . . .92/72/0.00 . . .91/72/t . . . .92/72/t Miami . . . . . . . . .90/74/0.00 . . .91/78/t . . . .92/78/t Milwaukee . . . . .74/55/0.09 . 69/54/pc . . . .73/58/t Minneapolis . . . .73/58/0.01 . 78/62/pc . . . .77/61/t Nashville . . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . . .90/69/t . . . .90/71/t New Orleans. . . .87/75/0.00 . . .87/75/t . . . .90/76/t New York . . . . . .87/67/0.00 . . .88/71/t . . . .83/66/t Newark, NJ . . . . .84/69/0.00 . . .87/71/t . . . .82/65/t Norfolk, VA . . . . .86/72/0.15 . . .87/72/t . . . .87/73/t Oklahoma City . .92/72/0.00 . 90/69/pc . . 95/76/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .76/61/0.01 . 78/63/pc . . . .83/64/t Orlando. . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .92/74/t . . . .91/75/t Palm Springs. . . .96/68/0.00 . .103/74/s . . 105/77/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.71 . 79/59/pc . . 80/64/pc Philadelphia . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .90/70/t . . . .85/67/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .97/71/0.00 . .100/74/s . . 103/79/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .81/59/0.79 . . .79/59/t . . 81/60/pc Portland, ME. . . .67/53/0.00 . .77/54/sh . . 72/55/pc Providence . . . . .81/62/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . . .76/60/t Raleigh . . . . . . . .88/71/0.01 . . .89/70/t . . . .88/69/t

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .70/50/0.13 . . .79/52/t . . . 79/55/c Savannah . . . . . .90/71/0.00 . . .87/72/t . . . .87/72/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .76/52/0.00 . . .79/57/c . . . 77/55/c Seattle. . . . . . . . .62/55/0.37 . 65/50/pc . . . .60/49/r Richmond . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .88/71/t . . . .89/72/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .71/53/0.00 . 76/59/pc . . . .78/61/t Rochester, NY . . .85/54/0.00 . .73/55/sh . . 78/58/pc Spokane . . . . . . .59/50/0.38 . 62/50/pc . . . .62/44/r Sacramento. . . . .86/56/0.00 . . .80/62/c . . . 78/61/c Springfield, MO. .89/70/0.00 . . .84/65/t . . 88/70/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .82/66/0.27 . . .85/66/t . . 89/68/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .89/76/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .89/77/t Salt Lake City . . .77/53/0.09 . . .76/56/c . . . 78/57/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .94/63/0.00 . . .97/67/s . . 101/69/s San Antonio . . . .92/75/0.00 . . .92/73/t . . . 97/76/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .87/70/t . . 94/76/pc San Diego . . . . . .69/60/0.00 . . .70/62/s . . . 73/64/s Washington, DC .88/71/0.00 . . .92/73/t . . . .86/69/t San Francisco . . .70/55/0.00 . . .66/57/c . . . 65/58/c Wichita . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . 92/71/pc San Jose . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . .77/62/c . . . 77/60/c Yakima . . . . . . . .71/55/0.07 . 67/50/pc . . 68/47/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .85/45/0.00 . . .85/52/s . . . 89/55/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .96/69/0.00 . .100/72/s . . 102/74/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 74/51/s Athens. . . . . . . . .77/62/0.00 . 78/63/pc . . 79/62/pc Auckland. . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . 64/45/pc . . . 65/45/s Baghdad . . . . . .114/82/0.00 . .111/84/s . . 112/85/s Bangkok . . . . . . .97/77/0.09 . . .96/81/c . . . .97/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .77/63/1.57 . . .83/64/s . . . 87/65/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . . .85/69/s . . . 87/68/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .69/54/sh . . . 70/51/s Bogota . . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .69/54/sh . . 71/53/sh Budapest. . . . . . .61/50/0.16 . . .65/50/c . . 68/52/sh Buenos Aires. . . .63/46/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . 62/42/pc Cabo San Lucas .88/73/0.00 . . .91/72/s . . . 93/72/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . . .96/70/s . . . 97/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . .66/41/0.00 . .67/38/sh . . 66/45/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . 90/77/pc . . 89/77/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . 65/49/pc . . 67/49/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . 65/44/pc . . 69/47/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .66/52/0.04 . 72/53/pc . . 77/55/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . . .69/50/s . . . 70/49/s Hong Kong . . . . .77/70/4.19 . .84/71/sh . . 84/70/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . 79/57/pc . . 79/56/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . . .91/63/s . . . 93/65/s Johannesburg . . .61/41/0.00 . . .63/40/s . . . 60/38/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . 72/63/pc . . . 73/64/c Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .87/67/s . . . 86/65/s London . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . .71/51/s . . . 72/53/s Madrid . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . 89/61/pc . . 93/62/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .92/79/t . . . .94/80/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .117/86/0.00 . .112/84/s . . 111/83/s Mexico City. . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .86/57/s . . 86/58/pc Montreal. . . . . . .81/63/0.52 . 69/51/pc . . . 76/50/s Moscow . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . 81/59/pc . . . .80/60/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . 78/61/pc . . . .78/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .91/79/0.53 . . .91/80/t . . 90/77/pc New Delhi. . . . .107/93/0.00 104/79/pc . . . .98/77/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . .80/61/t . . 80/62/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . 64/45/pc . . . 65/45/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .79/61/0.11 . 69/49/pc . . . 75/48/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.26 . . .73/53/s . . 74/55/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .75/64/0.00 . .76/60/sh . . 78/61/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .72/56/sh . . 77/60/pc Santiago . . . . . . .50/46/0.00 . 59/38/pc . . . 64/40/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . .74/56/sh . . 70/56/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . .64/53/sh . . . 66/53/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . 79/53/pc . . 83/55/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . .78/63/s . . . 79/63/s Singapore . . . . . .88/77/1.80 . . .91/78/t . . . .90/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .73/41/0.00 . 67/44/pc . . 63/41/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .63/54/sh . . 64/53/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . .80/71/sh . . 81/72/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . 84/65/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . .75/59/s . . 75/58/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .73/54/t . . 75/54/pc Vancouver. . . . . .64/54/0.33 . .58/45/sh . . 59/48/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .54/50/1.35 . .65/53/sh . . 69/55/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .72/59/sh . . . 68/45/s

Ashland Creek tainted by illegal dumping of paint By Hannah Guzik Ashland Daily Tidings

ASHLAND — City officials are trying to determine who dumped cream-colored paint into a storm drain, clouding a swath of Ashland Creek and highlighting the problem of illegal dumping in the city. The city’s public works and police department are investigating the illegal dumping, which could have occurred in any of dozens of storm drains that snake through downtown and empty into the creek. As of Tuesday afternoon, officials hadn’t discovered who was

responsible for the pollution, said John Peterson, the city’s street supervisor. “So far, it looks like it was dumped in one of the basins and finally made it through the storm system,” he said in an e-mail message. The person responsible could be cited by the city for illicit dumping and by Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality for polluting the waters of the state, Peterson said. The incident was a reminder that many residents don’t realize the water in the city’s storm drains flows directly to creeks

without being treated first, said Dan Gunter, a city utility worker who was investigating the polluted creek. “Most people don’t realize that what you put in your storm drain actually flows to the creek,” he said. The city is working to educate residents about illegal dumping. Last month volunteers began signing up to help affix metal placards to all 3,000 storm drains in Ashland, as part of a DEQ mandate. The 4-inch labels that say “No Dumping, Drains to Stream,” have been affixed only on Oak Street so far.

“A lot of people think that those storm drains go to the treatment plant,” said Linda Chesney, stewardship coordinator at the North Mountain Park Nature Center, which is organizing the volunteer effort. “I think if people knew there was a direct connection to the creeks, most would probably not be putting the paint or whatever in the storm drains.” Police responded to reports of a white substance flowing from a storm drain behind Munchies restaurant on at 1:30 p.m. Monday. “It looked like pancake dough,” said Ellen Grush, who was walk-

ing near the creek with her husband, Owen. “It was obvious something was in the creek that shouldn’t have been there,” Owen Grush said. By about 3 p.m., the cloudy substance had largely stopped flowing into Ashland Creek, which leads to Bear Creek and then to the Rogue River, Gunter said. It was unclear how much of the substance had flowed into the creek. Initial lab tests of water samples suggest the milky substance was paint, Peterson said. Paint can irritate, clog or destroy fish’s gills; poison other

animals and plants; contaminate soil and groundwater; and prevent light from entering the water, hindering plant photosynthesis and animals’ ability to gather food, according to the city. Many people are misinformed about the dangers paint, oil or antifreeze pose to riparian ecosystems, Chesney said. “There are still people that aren’t aware that it’s not OK to dump things,” she said. “I get people who ask, ‘What if it’s environmentally friendly paint?’ Well, it’s still paint, and if you were a fish, you wouldn’t want that in your gills.”


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NHL Inside Flyers win in overtime against Blackhawks, cut Stanley Cup finals lead to 2-1, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010

GOLF

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Bend golfer solid in NCAA second round

Griffey Jr. calls it a career

After a rocky start to the tournament, Bend’s Andrew Vijarro bounced back Wednesday with a 1under-par 71 in the second round of the NCAA Division I Men’s Golf ChamAndrew Vijarro pionship in Ooltewah, Tenn. The University of Oregon sophomore, who shot a 4-over 76 on Tuesday, carded three birdies against two bogeys to jump 35 places into a tie for 68th place out of 156 golfers in the field at The Honors Course. Vijarro’s round was the best of the day for the top-seeded Ducks, who struggled to 6 over and fell to a tie for ninth place with Arizona State at 2 over par for the tournament. Oregon State is 10 shots behind Oregon and in a tie for 23rd place out of 30 teams. Nine teams, all of which are behind UO, were not able to finish play Wednesday because of darkness. UO and OSU have work to do to advance to this weekend’s match play, which will determine the national champion. The NCAA Championships begin with 54 holes of stroke play, ending with today’s final round. An individual medalist is then crowned, and the top eight teams from stroke play advance to single-elimination match play, concluding with Sunday’s championship match. The Ducks are one shot behind a tie for seventh place between Washington and Clemson. — Bulletin staff report

Mariner retires at age of 40 with 630 home runs By Bob Condotta The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — One morning during what turned out to be his final spring training, Ken Griffey Jr. watched the retirement news conference of another notable player on a television above and shook his head. His retirement notice, he said, would

arrive as quietly as possible. A simple announcement would be sent to the media and then he’d be gone. So it was Wednesday as Griffey — the greatest player in Mariners history and one of the greatest in the history of the game — said goodbye to baseball. His name was on the lineup card, as a reserve, posted outside the office

of manager Don Wakamatsu for the game against the Twins when the club held a hastily called news briefing on the field to announce that Griffey had retired. “This has been on my mind recently, but it’s not an easy decision to come by,” Griffey said in a statement released by the team. Griffey wasn’t at Safeco Field and it’s uncertain when he will speak to the media. See Griffey / D5

Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

Seattle Mariners’ Ken Griffey Jr., left, and Milton Bradley share a laugh on Tuesday in Seattle. Griffey retired on Wednesday.

BASEBALL

Detroit pitcher was one out away from perfection By Tyler Kepner New York Times News Service

FOOTBALL Ideas aplenty at forum on NFL and brain injuries WASHINGTON — Some of the brightest minds available spent much of the day Wednesday discussing football and brain injuries with NFL doctors, trainers and players. Their conclusion: They’ve still got a lot to learn. “The fairly unanimous feeling today was that we needed new studies,” said Dr. Constantine Lyketsos of Johns Hopkins University. Concussions in the NFL have become a major topic of concern over the past year. The league has implemented new return-to-play guidelines for when players get concussions in practice or a game, and each team must have an independent neurologist who is consulted when a player has a head injury. Whereas the NFL might have appeared less pro-active regarding concussions in the past — and at odds with independent research or the players’ union — the league’s representatives say that tone has changed. “I think your key is ‘in the past,’ ” said Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, a co-chairman of the NFL’s revamped head, neck and spine medical committee. “I think going forward, we are walking lock step. We have a very audacious goal in front of us.” That goal, according to Ellenbogen, is to change the culture among NFL players, who have tendency to downplay head injuries. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Auto Racing ...............................D2 Golf ............................................D3 Tennis ........................................D3 Horse racing ..............................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Hunting & Fishing ............ D5, D6

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Jordan Dupuis, 13, of Bend, hangs onto a flopping fish at the Pine Nursery Pond located in northeast Bend on Saturday.

Youth on the pond Pine Nursery Pond in Bend is a new fishing resource for families By Mark Morical The Bulletin

My 2-year-old son threw rocks into the pond as I cast out my line, hoping to give him an early introduction to fly-fishing. Maybe it’s still a little too early, but he seemed to watch me intently — before discovering the rocks. The fishing pond at Pine Nursery Community Park in northeast Bend is open to family fishing, so I didn’t have to feel as if I was sneaking a few casts on a pond intended for kids. Several parents and their kids were positioned around the two-acre pond on Monday, hoping for bites from the rainbow trout and bluegill that had recently been stocked there.

HUNTING & FISHING Other fishing ponds in Central Oregon, including Shevlin Pond in Bend, Fireman’s Pond in Redmond, and the Prineville Youth Pond, are open to youth only. But that does not mean that adults can’t teach their kids how to fish on those ponds. “Even if it is designated as ‘youth only,’ if there’s a 7-year-old with them, and their mom or dad is casting their pole, that’s OK,” Brett Hodgson, a Bend-based fisher-

ies biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, said this week. “What the regulation is trying to curb is folks going out there, catching a bunch of fish, and taking the opportunity away from the kids.” I wasn’t doing exactly that on Monday, as my nymph pattern did little to tempt any fish. According to other anglers, PowerBait and worms seemed to be the food preference for the trout and bluegill that morning. The Pine Nursery Pond, which opened last summer, is nestled in the 159-acre park among ponderosa trees and newly planted grass and landscaping. See Youth / D6

NBA FINALS

Lakers, Celtics chasing history when they meet in the finals By Greg Beacham

NBA finals

the second time in his career, while Pierce’s Celtics get LOS ANGELES — When • Game 1, their first chance when the Boston Celtics Kobe Bryant joined the Lakers NBA finals begin tonight at Los Angeles at Staples Center. and Paul Pierce landed with the Lakers Celtics in the late 1990s, they “It’s going to mean evboth learned most of what they • When: Today, erything for my career, needed to know about their because a lot of guys 6 p.m. franchises’ histories and expechave won one, and tations simply by looking at the • TV: ABC not many have won forests of fabric high above the a couple,” Pierce court. said Wednesday These teams only hang banners for before Boston practiced at championships, and they’re usually in big Staples Center. Pro basketball’s groups. most successful franchises are Multiple titles are the only metric of together in the NBA finals for the success, the only validation still interest- second time in three years and the ing to Bryant and Pierce. Bryant is trying 12th time overall. to accomplish the rarest of NBA feats for See NBA / D5 AP Sports Writer

When history is in your grasp, the easy thing to do is embrace it. With two outs in the ninth inning in Detroit on Wednesday, the first-base umpire, Jim Joyce, could have called the C l e ve l a nd Indians’ Jason Donald out on a close play at first base. Detroit pitchMake a fist, er Armando raise a fore- Galarraga arm, and retired the first A r m a n d o 26 batters beGa la r raga fore losing a becomes the perfect game. 21st pitcher — and third in the last four weeks — to throw a perfect game. The courageous call is the one Joyce made. It was so obviously wrong that Joyce, a major league umpire since 1989, clearly had no desire to help Galarraga make history. He simply called the play as he saw it. The problem, of course, is that Joyce’s decision is easily the most egregious blown call in baseball over the last 25 years. The last call that was so important and so horribly botched was in the ninth inning of Game 6 of the 1985 World Series, when another first-base umpire, Don Denkinger, called Jorge Orta of the Kansas City Royals safe at first. Replays showed that St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Todd Worrell had touched the bag, with ball in hand, before Orta reached base. Three outs from clinching a title, the Cardinals fell apart and lost the World Series the next night. See Perfect / D5

Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, left, and Celtics forward Paul Pierce will meet tonight for game 1 of the NBA finals.


D2 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

Football ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 7:30 a.m. — PGA European, Wales Open, first round, Golf. 9:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Prince George’s County Open, first round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Memorial Tournament, first round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Principal Charity Classic, first round, Golf.

TENNIS 5 a.m. — French Open, men’s quarterfinals, ESPN2. 10 a.m. — French Open, women’s semifinals, Tennis channel.

SOFTBALL 10 a.m. — Women’s college, NCAA World Series, game 1, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA World Series, game 2, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA World Series, game 3, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA World Series, game 4, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA finals, Boston Celtics at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Oakland Athletics at Boston Red Sox, MLB network. 5 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Chicago White Sox, MLB network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

FRIDAY TENNIS 5 a.m. — French Open, mixed doubles final, Tennis Channel (same-day tape). 4 a.m. — French Open, men’s semifinals, NBC. 11 a.m. — French Open, men’s semifinals, NBC.

GOLF 7:30 a.m. — PGA European, Wales Open, second round, Golf. 9:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Prince George’s County Open, second round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Memorial Tournament, second round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Principal Charity Classic, first round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 2 p.m. — IndyCar, IZOD Firestone 550K, qualifying, VS. network. 4:30 p.m. — Nationwide Series, Federated Auto Parts 300, final practice, ESPN2.

SOFTBALL 4 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA World Series, game 5, ESPN. 6:30 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA World Series, game 6, ESPN.

BOXING 7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Yudel Johnson vs. TBD, light middleweights, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 7 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA finals, Boston Celtics at Los Angeles Lakers, KICE-AM 940.

FRIDAY BASEBALL 10 a.m. — College, NCAA regionals, Oregon State vs. Florida Atlantic, KICEAM 940, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B

Saturday Track and Field — Oregon Elite Meet at Summit, 11 a.m.

27. Joe Ozaki 30. Michael Allen 31. Bill Glasson 32. Jay Haas 33. Scott Hoch 34. Jeff Sluman 34. Bob Tway 36. Andy Bean 37. Robin Freeman 37. Andy Oldcorn 39. Mark Wiebe 40. Gene Jones 41. Hal Sutton 42. Fred Funk 42. Mark James 44. Phil Blackmar 44. Bobby Clampett 46. Tim Simpson 47. Blaine McCallister 48. Lonnie Nielsen 49. Olin Browne 50. Larry Nelson

IN THE BLEACHERS

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— PLAYOFF GLANCE STANLEY CUP FINALS x-if necessary Chicago 2, Philadelphia 1 Saturday, May 29 Chicago 6, Philadelphia 5 Monday, May 31 Chicago 2, Philadelphia 1 Wednesday, June 2 Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3 (OT) Friday, June 4 Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Sunday, June 6 Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 9 x-Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday, June 11 x-Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m.

BASEBALL College NCAA DIVISION I BASEBALL REGIONALS All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary Friday, June 4 At Senator Thomas J. Dodd Memorial Stadium Norwich, Conn. Game 1 — Central Connecticut State (33-21) vs. Florida State (42-17), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Oregon (38-22) vs. Connecticut (47-14), 4 p.m. Charlottesville, Va. Game 1 — Virginia Commonwealth (34-24-1) at Virginia (47-11), 1 p.m. Game 2 — St. John’s (40-18) vs. Mississippi (38-22), 5 p.m. At Jim Patterson Stadium Louisville, Ky. Game 1 — Illinois State (31-22) vs. Vanderbilt (41-17), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Saint Louis (33-27) at Louisville (48-12), 3 p.m. At Carolina Stadium Columbia, S.C. Game 1 — The Citadel (42-20) vs. Virginia Tech (3820), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Bucknell (25-33) at South Carolina (43-15), 4 p.m. At BB&T Coastal Field Myrtle Beach, S.C. Game 1 — Stony Brook (29-25) vs. Coastal Carolina (51-7), 10 a.m. Game 2 — N.C. State (38-22) vs. College of Charleston (42-17), 4 p.m. At Russ Chandler Stadium Atlanta Game 1 — Elon (38-22) at Alabama (37-22), noon Game 2 — Mercer (37-22) at Georgia Tech (45-13), 4 p.m. At McKethan Stadium Gainesville, Fla. Game 1 — Oregon State (31-22) vs. Florida Atlantic (35-22), 10 a.m. Game 2 — Bethune-Cookman (35-20) at Florida (4215), 4 p.m. At Mark Light Stadium Coral Gables, Fla. Game 1 — Florida International (36-23) vs. Texas A&M (40-19-1), 9 a.m. Game 2 — Dartmouth (26-17) at Miami (40-17), 1 p.m. At Plainsman Park Auburn, Ala. Game 1 — Southern Mississippi (35-22) vs. Clemson (38-21), noon Game 2 — Jacksonville State (32-24) vs. Auburn (4019), 4 p.m. At Baum Stadium Fayetteville, Ark. Game 1 — Grambling State (22-30) at Arkansas (40-18), 12:05 p.m. Game 2 — Kansas State (36-20) vs. Washington State (34-20), 5:05 p.m. At L. Dale Mitchell Park Norman, Okla. Game 1 — Oral Roberts (35-25) at Oklahoma (44-15), 11 a.m. Game 2 — North Carolina (36-20) vs. California (2923), 5 p.m. At UFCU Disch-Falk Field Austin, Texas Game 1 — Louisiana-Lafayette (37-20) vs. Rice (38-21), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Rider (36-21) at Texas (46-11), 4:30 p.m. At Lupton Baseball Stadium Fort Worth, Texas Game 1 — Arizona (33-22) vs. Baylor (34-22), noon Game 2 — Lamar (35-24) at TCU (46-11), 5 p.m. At Goodwin Field Fullerton, Calif. Game 1 — New Mexico (37-20) vs. Stanford (31-23), 4 p.m. Game 2 — Minnesota (30-28) at Cal State Fullerton (41-15), 7 p.m. At Jackie Robinson Stadium Los Angeles

$199,547 $240,800 $74,767 $229,191 $115,200 $243,843 $235,338 $217,533 $89,840 $54,000 $152,404 $138,775 $151,937 $143,119 $116,193 $157,160 $83,895 $157,851 $96,917 $73,969 $193,407 $139,785

Game 1 — UC Irvine (37-19) vs. LSU (40-20), 2 p.m. Game 2 — Kent State (39-23) at UCLA (43-13), 6 p.m. At Packard Stadium Tempe, Ariz. Game 1 — Hawaii (33-26) vs. San Diego (36-20), 2 p.m. Game 2 — Wisconsin-Milwaukee (33-24) at Arizona State (47-8), 7 p.m.

SOFTBALL College All Times PDT ——— NCAA Division I Softball World Series At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium Oklahoma City All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary Today, June 3 Game 1 — Missouri (51-11) vs. Hawaii (49-14), 10 a.m. Game 2 — UCLA (45-11) vs. Florida (48-8), 12:30 p.m. Game 3 — Arizona (48-11) vs. Tennessee (47-13), 4 p.m. Game 4 — Georgia (48-11) vs. Washington (50-7), 6:30 p.m. Friday, June 4 Game 5 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 4 p.m. Game 6 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 6 p.m. Saturday, June 5 Game 7 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 9 a.m. Game 8 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 11 a.m. Game 9 — Game 5 loser vs. Game 7 winner, 4 p.m. Game 10 — Game 6 loser vs. Game 8 winner, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 6 Game 11 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 10 a.m. Game 12 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 10 winner, noon x-Game 13 — Game 11 winner vs. Game 11 loser, 4 p.m. x-Game 14 — Game 12 winner vs. Game 12 loser, 6 p.m. NOTE: If only one game is necessary, it will be played at 4 p.m. Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, June 7: Game 1, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 8: Game 2, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 9: Game 3, 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL NBA National Basketball Association All Times PDT ——— NBA FINALS x-if necessary Boston vs. L.A. Lakers Today, June 3: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 6: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 8: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 10: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 13: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 15: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, June 17: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

WORLD GOLF RANKING Through May 30 Rank. Name Country 1. Tiger Woods USA 2. Phil Mickelson USA 3. Lee Westwood Eng 4. Steve Stricker USA 5. Jim Furyk USA 6. Ernie Els SAf 7. Ian Poulter Eng 8. Paul Casey Eng 9. Luke Donald Eng 10. Rory McIlroy NIr 11. Anthony Kim USA 12. Martin Kaymer Ger 13. Robert Allenby Aus 14. Padraig Harrington Irl 15. Camilo Villegas Col 16. Zach Johnson USA 17. Geoff Ogilvy Aus 18. Retief Goosen SAf 19. Hunter Mahan USA 20. Lucas Glover USA 21. Y.E. Yang Kor 22. Tim Clark SAf 23. Henrik Stenson Swe 24. Charl Schwartzel SAf 25. Sean O’Hair USA 26. Kenny Perry USA 27. Dustin Johnson USA 28. Angel Cabrera Arg 29. Nick Watney USA 30. Stewart Cink USA 31. Robert Karlsson Swe 32. Matt Kuchar USA 33. Alvaro Quiros Esp 34. Ross Fisher Eng 35. Sergio Garcia Esp 36. K.J. Choi Kor 37. Francesco Molinari Ita 38. Adam Scott Aus 39. Ben Crane USA 40. Edoardo Molinari Ita 41. Ryo Ishikawa Jpn 42. Miguel Angel Jimenez Esp 43. Peter Hanson Swe 44. Graeme McDowell NIr 45. Scott Verplank USA 46. Kevin Na USA 47. Yuta Ikeda Jpn 48. Louis Oosthuizen SAf 49. Thongchai Jaidee Tha 50. Michael Sim Aus 51. Oliver Wilson Eng 52. Rickie Fowler USA 53. Brian Gay USA 54. J.B. Holmes USA 55. Rhys Davies Wal 56. Soren Kjeldsen Den 57. Hiroyuki Fujita Jpn

Rating 10.41 9.50 7.65 7.50 6.91 5.85 5.82 5.68 5.48 5.34 5.05 4.86 4.73 4.47 4.27 4.21 4.12 4.09 3.91 3.84 3.79 3.71 3.63 3.63 3.61 3.46 3.40 3.34 3.31 3.31 3.22 3.15 3.15 3.11 3.09 3.01 2.92 2.90 2.89 2.73 2.55 2.49 2.47 2.42 2.41 2.38 2.37 2.37 2.36 2.34 2.33 2.23 2.22 2.18 2.18 2.17 2.16

Champions Tour

WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 6 1 .857 Connecticut 3 2 .600 Washington 4 3 .571 New York 2 2 .500 Indiana 2 3 .400 Chicago 2 4 .333 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 6 1 .857 Phoenix 2 3 .400 San Antonio 2 3 .400 Tulsa 2 3 .400 Minnesota 2 5 .286 Los Angeles 1 4 .200 ——— Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Game San Antonio at Indiana, 7 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour

GB — 2 2 2½ 3 3½ GB — 3 3 3 4 4

SCHWAB CUP LEADERS Through May 30 Points Money 1. Fred Couples 1,367 $1,225,317 2. Tom Lehman 1,095 $740,875 3. Bernhard Langer 818 $888,977 4. Nick Price 613 $615,102 5. Mark O’Meara 558 $569,899 6. David Frost 491 $367,682 7. Dan Forsman 466 $580,784 8. Tom Watson 437 $491,883 9. Joey Sindelar 407 $421,382 10. Tommy Armour III 370 $409,463 11. John Cook 343 $407,305 12. Chien Soon Lu 314 $363,750 13. David Peoples 267 $274,046 14. Corey Pavin 249 $316,700 15. David Eger 240 $393,791 16. Tom Kite 217 $318,785 17. Ronnie Black 211 $303,165 18. Mike Reid 202 $292,892 19. Jay Don Blake 199 $144,440 20. Larry Mize 186 $245,505 21. Tom Pernice, Jr. 167 $182,650 22. Russ Cochran 162 $280,533 23. Mike Goodes 161 $318,839 24. Keith Fergus 145 $236,444 25. Hale Irwin 143 $212,510 26. Loren Roberts 141 $337,900 27. Peter Senior 136 $334,530 27. Brad Bryant 136 $216,888

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 6 1 3 21 16 New York 6 5 0 18 13 Toronto FC 5 4 1 16 15 New England 3 6 2 11 13 Chicago 2 3 4 10 12 Kansas City 2 5 2 8 9 Philadelphia 2 5 1 7 10 D.C. 2 8 0 6 7 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 9 0 2 29 18 Real Salt Lake 6 3 1 19 21 San Jose 5 3 2 17 15 Colorado 5 3 1 16 10 Houston 5 6 1 16 17 FC Dallas 2 2 6 12 11 Seattle 3 5 3 12 9 Chivas USA 3 7 1 10 13 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Games New York 2, Houston 1 San Jose 2, Columbus 2, tie Saturday’s Games Columbus at Colorado, 11 a.m. Houston at Los Angeles, noon Kansas City at Toronto FC, 1 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Chivas USA at New York, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. New England at Seattle FC, 7:30 p.m

GA 10 16 14 17 13 13 17 20 GA 2 11 12 7 15 11 14 17

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Claimed RHP Shane Lindsay off waivers from the New York Yankees and optioned him to Kinston (CAR). Transferred OF Grady Sizemore from the 15-day to the 60-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES—Activated C Jorge Posada from the 15-day DL. Optioned 1B-DH Juan Miranda to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). SEATTLE MARINERS—Announced the retirement of OF Ken Griffey Jr. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Acquired RHP Ronald Uviedo from the Pittsburgh Pirates in exchange for LHP Dana Eveland. National League PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Promoted RHP Jimmy Barthmaier from Bradenton (FSL) to Altoona (EL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Reinstated OF Scott Hairston from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Luis Durango to Portland (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association TORONTO RAPTORS—Named P.J. Carlesimo assistant coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ST. LOUIS RAMS—Named La’Roi Glover director of player programs. Declined to sign S Oshiomogho Atogwe, making him an unrestricted free agent. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Signed D Sheldon Brookbank to a two-year contract. BUFFALO SABRES—Signed F Jacob Lagace. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Signed G Cory Schneider. COLLEGE NCAA—Suspended Louisville baseball coach Dan McDonnell three games for inappropriate conduct a Big East tournament semifinal game against St. John’s. METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE—Approved the contract extension of commissioner Richard J. Ensor through June 30, 2013. Named Fairfield president Rev. Jeffrey von Arx and Saint Peter’s president Dr. Eugene Cornacchia chair and vice chair, respectively, of the Council of Presidents through June 2012 and Niagara athletic director Ed McLaughlin and Rider associate athletic director/senior woman administrator Karin Torchia chair and vice chair, respectively, of the Committee on Athletic Administration for the 2010-11 academic year. ARIZONA STATE—Announced has taken away the interim tag from baseball coach Tim Esmay. ST. BONAVENTURE—Announced G Malcolm Eleby has left the basketball program.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 3,275 251 159 48 The Dalles 2,875 292 39 9 John Day 2,065 150 30 7 McNary 1,148 109 9 0 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 247,698 12,863 10,125 2,757 The Dalles 184,363 11,071 2,522 1,350 John Day 169,746 10,962 2,633 1,460 McNary 139,296 7,924 2,381 1,251

AUTO RACING: NASCAR

The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Martin Truex Jr. moved to another team this season for a better opportunity. He left behind an open seat at Earnhardt-Ganassi Racing that Jamie McMurray was eager to fill. After just a third of the season, both drivers seem far better off following their moves. The two drivers head to Pocono Raceway this weekend thick in the hunt for one of the 12 Chase for the Sprint Cup championship berths. Truex is 14th in the standings, just 14 points out of Chase contention, and McMurray is 15th in the standings and 26 points out. “I think our chances are really good,” Truex said of his Michael Waltrip Racing team. “I feel like we’re getting stronger each week as a team. We’ve done a good job of being consistent up to this point. We’re constantly working on trying to be

more competitive, be quicker each week.” MWR courted Truex heavily last season, which was an odd year for the driver. He was in the final year of his contract with Dale Earnhardt Inc., and that deal was absorbed in the offseason merger with Chip Ganassi Racing. Truex had to make a decision fairly early if he was going to give the new organization a chance or test the free agent market. The opportunity at MWR, which was offering team owner Waltrip’s seat and sponsor, led Truex to make a change. So far, he has no regrets about taking over the No. 56 Toyota and pairing with crew chief Pat Tryson, who was lured away from Penske Racing. Truex won the Sprint Showdown qualifying race to earn a spot in last month’s All-Star race, and he’s got four top-10 finishes this season. He had just six top-10s all of last year.

“Hardest part about it was making the decision, pulling the trigger to do it,” he said. “Everything has been going really well. The team has done a great job. They’ve got great leadership. Pat has done a great job. He’s been easy to work with. He’s been a lot of fun. He’s very smart about his race cars. “We’ve been having a good time with it.” Same goes for McMurray, who found himself the odd man out when Roush-Fenway Racing had to drop a team at the end of last season to meet NASCAR’s four-car mandate. By the time the decision was made to let McMurray go, Truex’s old seat with Ganassi was the only attractive job still available. McMurray had been down that road before: Ganassi hired him in 2002 and McMurray spent the first three years of his Cup career with that organization. He twice just missed making the Chase, and

• Krzyzewski not leaving Duke: While Mike Krzyzewski is flattered by all the reports linking him to various NBA jobs, he insists he’s not leaving Duke. Krzyzewski admitted Wednesday that “it’s more of a compliment — it’s not an insult” to hear his name mentioned for several NBA coaching vacancies. But he also reaffirmed what he’s been saying for years, every time those rumors pop up: He isn’t going anywhere. “You just can’t take it further than that, because then you’re trying to milk the situation for the wrong thing,” he said. “So I’d rather nip it right away and move on.” • Jordan to headline NBA video game: Basketball superstar Michael Jordan will help develop the upcoming “NBA 2K11” video game and will be on its cover. Players will be able to play Jordan’s character to vicariously slam-dunk their way to victory from the comfort of their couch. The game will go on sale Oct. 5.

Auto racing • IndyCar announces new engine strategy: The IndyCar Series is drastically changing its engine strategy, opening up the process to a variety of manufacturers and configurations for the 2012 season. The new platform calls for the ethanolfueled engines to be up to six cylinders, allow turbocharging and produce between 550 and 700 horsepower. Current engines are eight cylinders and Honda is the only manufacturer. The changes were made based on recommendations by the ICONIC committee, which was created earlier this year to advise the series its 2012 chassis and engine packages. IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard said the series plans to have a decision on its new chassis by June 30.

Cycling • Armstrong off to solid start in Luxembourg: Lance Armstrong finished tied for fourth place in the Tour of Luxembourg prologue on Wednesday. The seven-time Tour de France champion finished the 1.66-mile ride in 3 minutes, 51 seconds according to the provisional results. Jimmy Engoulvent of France, who finished 10 seconds ahead Armstrong, took the race leader’s jersey. Armstrong said he “felt pretty good” and added he was able to ride at “absolute power” when needed. Armstrong, who is competing in his first race since crashing last month at the Tour of California, is using the five-day event as part of his Tour de France preparations. • UCI to look into alleged hidden motors: The International Cycling Union will examine so-called “mechanical doping” at a meeting next week with bike manufacturers. UCI president Pat McQuaid said Wednesday he did not believe rumors sweeping the sport that racers were cheating by getting extra power from battery-powered motors hidden in their bike frames. But he said the subject is on the agenda of a routine meeting between the UCI and industry representatives next Monday. Motors that can be attached to a bicycle have been commercially available for several years, but existing models require a battery carried visibly in a saddle bag. McQuaid said the UCI has no knowledge of motors that could be hidden inside the tubes of a frame.

Horse racing • Ice Box is 3-1 favorite for Belmont Stakes: For a change, Hall of Fame trainer Nick Zito has the favorite for the $1 million Belmont Stakes. A two-time Belmont winner with long shots Birdstone in 2004 and Da’ Tara in 2008, Zito has two of the three top choices for Saturday’s final leg of the Triple Crown: Ice Box is the 3-1 morning-line choice and his other starter Fly Down is the 9-2 third choice. A field of 12 was entered Wednesday for a Belmont that will be run without Derby winner Super Saver or Preakness winner Lookin At Lucky. Florida Derby winner Ice Box staged a sensational rally to finish second in the Derby despite a troubled trip, and Fly Down was a sixlength winner in the Dwyer Stakes at Belmont last month. Preakness runner-up First Dude is the 7-2 second choice.

Golf

McMurray, Truex having good seasons in new rides By Jenna Fryer

• D.C. wants Super Bowl: Now that the New York area is getting a cold weather Super Bowl, Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder is going to try to do the same for the nation’s capital. Snyder said Wednesday he doesn’t think it’ll be long before a Super Bowl comes to Washington. He’s anticipating a “great experience” for the NFL in 2014 at the Meadowlands. He thinks that will spur the league to give other nontraditional Super Bowl cities a chance. The 2014 Super Bowl will be the first to be played outdoors in a cold-weather city. The league made an exception to its usual temperature rule and awarded the game to the Giants’ and Jets’ new stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.

Basketball

SOCCER MLS

TENNIS French Open Wednesday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $21.1 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Quarterfinals Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (19), Spain, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (3), 6-4. Jurgen Melzer (22), Austria, def. Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, 3-6, 2-6, 6-2, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Women Quarterfinals Jelena Jankovic (4), Serbia, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-4. Sam Stosur (7), Australia, def. Serena Williams (1), United States, 6-2, 6-7 (2), 8-6.

136 132 128 125 115 113 113 111 108 108 106 102 93 79 79 75 75 66 63 56 51 47

fled for Roush’s team in 2006 with the expectation of running for a championship. That never materialized and a frustrated McMurray needed a fresh start this year. He sure got it, winning the seasonopening Daytona 500 in his first race back with Ganassi. Although his consistency has not been there this season, McMurray has three runner-up finishes, including Sunday night in the Coca-Cola 600 — a race he might have won if not for a late caution. “Every race that we’ve actually finished without an issue, we’ve had a top-five car,” McMurray said. “We run second one week and 30th the next. It’s just about being a little bit more consistent.” Both drivers are clearly ahead of where they were this time last season — Truex was 19th this time last year, while McMurray was 22nd — and both are pleased with their current situations.

• Nicklaus makes it hat trick of cups for Muirfield: Jack Nicklaus has left his bear tracks in golf for more than 50 years. He figures his last major involvement will be when the 2013 Presidents Cup is played on the course he built. The PGA Tour announced Wednesday that the Presidents Cup will be played at Muirfield Village in Ohio the next time it’s held on American soil, a tribute to the player that commissioner Tim Finchem said has played a big role in the growth of the matches. “When you fast forward 45 or 50 years and look back on the history of the Presidents Cup, you will be able to point to Jack’s involvement early on as a real impetus to bringing the world class attention that it gets today,” Finchem said. • Singh gets U.S. Open exemption: Vijay Singh won’t have to go through qualifying to play in the U.S. Open in two weeks at Pebble Beach. The U.S. Golf Association granted Singh an exemption on Wednesday. He was scheduled to play in the 36-hole qualifier on Monday, a day after the final round of the Memorial Tournament. The USGA cited Singh’s battle against several injuries in giving him the exemption. “I’m finally back to good health and really looking forward to competing at Pebble Beach,” said Singh. “I can’t wait to tee it up.” Singh will be playing in his 64th consecutive major, the longest current streak. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 D3

GOLF

N H L : S TA N L E Y C U P F I N A L S

TENNIS

Woods moves on without a coach

Serena exits French Open with loss to No. 7 seed Stosur

By Doug Ferguson

By Howard Fendrich

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

DUBLIN, Ohio — Tiger Woods is the defending champion at Memorial and a four-time winner at Muirfield Village. It just doesn’t seem that way. He arrived at the course that Jack Nicklaus built — the one that Woods at times seems to own — with his game as unpredictable at ever. Woods is coming off a neck injury that he said now feels good enough to practice and play. He no longer has a swing coach, having split with Hank Haney three weeks ago, and has no plans to find another one anytime soon. Since returning to golf in April, he has completed only one tournament, a tie for fourth in Masters. That takes on even greater significance with the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach only two weeks away. “Maybe this time I’ll get four rounds in and get ready for the Open,” Woods said Wednesday. He remains as capable as ever, and Woods wasted no time showing that in the Memorial Skins Game. Playing in the second group of five players, he hit a towering shot out of the right rough behind a tree on the 10th hole to about 18 feet and rolled in the quick putt for a birdie to win a skin. Next up came the par-5 11th, where he followed a pure tee shot with a 4-iron to just outside 4 feet for eagle. Easy game, right? Everything else has been a struggle, starting with the upheaval in his personal life, seeping into his game. When last seen in public, Woods leaned his head against the locker at the TPC Sawgrass, eyes closed and looking lost, after withdrawing from the final round of The Players Championship with what he feared was a bulging disc. Turns out it was inflammation of a joint in his neck, which he treated with massage, anti-inflammatory medicine and rest. “My neck feels pretty good,” he said. “Still not where I want it to be, but the inflammation has calmed down. I’ve got a range of motion again. It’s a little bit sore after a good, hard day of practice. But I can recover for the next day, which is good.” As for the coach? Woods doesn’t feel as though he needs one. Even when he left Butch Harmon sometime in 2003, he had been friends with Haney through Mark O’Meara, and they often discussed swing thoughts and strategy even before they began working together. Now, Woods’ coach is a video monitor. “That’s the great thing about technology,” Woods said. He’ll find out what kind of swing he brings to the course today when the Memorial gets under way with some compelling story lines, not all of them involving Woods. Phil Mickelson, for the third straight tournament, has a chance to replace Woods at No. 1 in the world ranking. He was in position at The Players Championship with Woods out of the way, but went the wrong direction in the final round. At the Colonial last week, Mickelson missed the cut. Perhaps his time is coming. He won all nine skins in his group, which featured Nicklaus, during the Wednesday game. “It would be cool,” Mickelson said about the ranking. “I don’t want to discount it. Right now, my goal is to play well here and get ready for the Open next week.” Nicklaus was told that oddsmakers still list Woods as the favorite at the U.S. Open. He was not surprised. Neither was he convinced. “Six to one?” Nicklaus said, repeating the odds. “That will drop very quickly.” Then he paused with some uncertainty. “A lot will depend on what he does this week,” Nicklaus said. “I don’t know how is health is. I don’t know how he’s playing. I think a lot will depend on his preparation, and I think that’s why he’s here. He struggled at Augusta, even though he played pretty well. He struggled from not having played. “This is a big week for him.”

PARIS — Serena Williams is usually the one who saves match points, not wastes them. Who seizes control of an exchange, not cedes it. Who turns up her game at Grand Slam time. Except at the French Open, the lone major tournament she’s won only once and where she’s now gone seven years without even reaching the semifinals. The No. 1-ranked Williams dropped 17 consecutive points during one stretch, climbed all the way back to within a point of victory, then faded late and lost to No. 7 Samantha Stosur of Australia 6-2, 6-7 (2), 8-6 on Wednesday in the Roland Garros quarterfinals. “Had I played better for two minutes, maybe the result could have been different. But it didn’t work out,” said Williams, who missed a forehand by an inch or so when she held a match point at 5-4 in the final set. “Just wasn’t playing well today. Last year, I choked. I guess it’s a redundant story with me.” The upset was Stosur’s second in a row — she eliminated four-time champion Justine Henin in the fourth round — and came a day after men’s No. 1 and defending champion Roger Federer was stunned by Robin Soderling. “It’s not over yet,” said Stosur, a tour-best 19-2 on clay this season and a 2009 French Open semifinalist. “I want to definitely try and keep going.” In keeping with the run of surprises at this wide-open French Open, No. 22 Jurgen Melzer of Austria came back to beat No. 3 Novak Djokovic 3-6, 2-6, 6-2, 7-6 (3), 6-4 in the last men’s quarterfinal. Melzer, at 29 the oldest man left, never before won a match after losing the first two sets — and never made it beyond the third round at any Grand Slam tournament in 31 previous tries. His reward? A semifinal Friday against four-time champion Rafael Nadal, who eliminated No. 19 Nicolas Almagro 7-6 (2), 7-6 (3), 6-4. Nadal, who lost to Soderling in last year’s fourth round, extended his current winning streak on clay to 20 matches. In one women’s semifinal today, Stosur will play No. 4 Jelena Jankovic, who got past unseeded Yaroslava Shvedova of Kazakhstan 7-5, 6-4. No. 5 Elena Dementieva will face No. 17 Francesca Schiavone in the other. For the first time at any Grand Slam tournament since the 1979 Australian Open, none of the four female semifinalists owns a major title. Williams has 12, with five at the Australian Open — including this year — and

Mel Evans / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Flyers right wing Claude Giroux watches his game-winning goal against Chicago Blackhawks goalie Antti Niemi head toward the net in overtime of Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals Wednesday in Philadelphia. The Flyers won 4-3.

Flyers knock off ‘Hawks in overtime the Flyers, helping them win a game they desperately needed to avoid their second PHILADELPHIA — Twice, the Phila- • Stanley Cup 3-0 hole of the playoffs. Michael Leighfinals, Game delphia Flyers needed video replay to deton made 24 saves for the Flyers. cide if a goal counted. Giroux’s goal was the only shot in OT 4, Chicago One did, one didn’t. for the Flyers. Niemi stopped 28 shots in Blackhawks at Claude Giroux didn’t need the officials the third straight thriller in the series. Philadelphia to check his winner. Duncan Keith, Brent Sopel and PatFlyers; Giroux scored 5:59 into overtime to rick Kane scored for the Blackhawks. Blackhawks give the Flyers a 4-3 victory over ChiThe Blackhawks had won 10 of 11 and lead series 2-1 cago in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals swept the Western Conference finals to Wednesday night, cutting the Black- • When: storm into the series busting with conhawks’ series lead to 2-1. Game 4 is Frifidence. They won two games at home Friday, 5 p.m. day night in Philadelphia. without a point from Kane and had the • TV: VS. Giroux scored on a redirection off road success to make them believe they network Matt Carle’s pass, beating Antti Niemi to would win twice in Philadelphia. They’re decide the third straight one-goal game now guaranteed a trip home. in the series. “Right now it looks like they have the “I tried to get a stick on it, and it just trickled in,” momentum in the series,” Kane said. “But if we Giroux said. “Our line started playing well, so any- take Game 4, then we put ourselves in a great positime your line’s going you just play better I think. tion to go back and play in front of our home crowd The whole team just showed up tonight, and we re- and hopefully win it there.” ally wanted that win. The Flyers were the beneficiary of replay to win “Desperation was the key word, I think. It’s al- this one. The Flyers heard the goal horn twice on most do or die.” one goal midway through the second period to go The Flyers already rallied to win a series after up 2-1. Chris Pronger’s power-play slap shot was dropping the first three games to Boston in the deflected by Hartnell, trickled through Niemi and Eastern Conference semifinals. While they talked eked past the red line. Blackhawks defenseman all week about having faith they could do it again, Niklas Hjalmarsson diving stab at the puck cleared the Flyers won’t have to try. it back onto the ice as the goal horn sounded. Flyers coach Peter Laviolette said Giroux, who The Blackhawks didn’t reel off the second-lonhas nine postseason goals, was loose all day. gest road winning streak in NHL playoff history by “He was smiling all day, came to the arena and wilting when the game got tough. had a great game. Talented kid,” Laviolette said. Sopel blasted a shot past Leighton from inside The Blackhawks, trying to win their first Stan- the point to make it 2-2 — a shot the goalie likely ley Cup title since 1961, snapped a seven-game never saw because of an ill-timed screen by Flyers winning streak and a seven-game road winning defenseman Lukas Krajicek who was standing in streak. front of him. Giroux ended the game moments after Simon Chicago and Philadelphia swapped goals 20 secGagne thought he scored the winner, only to have onds apart to make it 3-3 early in the third. Kane replay officials rule the puck didn’t cross the goal was all alone on a breakaway when he beat Leighline. ton stick side for his first goal of the Stanley Cup The game kept going — but not for long. final and Chicago’s first lead, 3-2. It was the second time replay was needed to Leino revived a suddenly hushed crowd when determine a Flyers’ goal. They went one for two his rebound off Giroux’s shot tied it 3-all. — but, oh, how huge that one was for the Flyers in “It’s a tough way to lose, especially in OT when their first Stanley Cup home game since 1997. you work as hard as you did,” Blackhawks center Scott Hartnell had a no-goal overturned by re- Jonathan Toews said. “We had the lead in the third play to spark the Flyers to their first Cup win since and they kind of came right back and took the mo1987. Danny Briere and Ville Leino also scored for mentum away.”

By Dan Gelston

The Associated Press

Next up

Michel Spingler / The Associated Press

Serena Williams reacts after being defeated by Australia’s Samantha Stosur during a quarterfinal match at the French Open on Wednesday. three apiece at the U.S. Open and Wimbledon. The one at the French Open came in 2002, and she was a semifinalist in Paris the following year, but not since. “Maybe she was trying to get over that hump,” said Williams’ mother, Oracene Price. “That might have been on her mind.” Williams never hid her frustrations against Stosur, who wore her usual white baseball cap and red-rimmed wraparound shades as the sun finally returned after several days of clouds and rain. Williams admonished herself aloud, sometimes muttering, sometimes screaming. She shook her head and put a hand on her hip. She crouched and rolled her eyes. Her own serve was a friend — accumulating 13 aces — and a foe — yielding nine doublefaults. The rest of Williams’ strokes were a mixed bag, too: She finished with more winners than Stosur, 39-30, and nearly twice as many unforced errors, 46-24. “I definitely was nowhere near my best today,” Williams said, then added: “But she played really well.” About an hour after that loss, Williams went back on court to team with her older sister Venus and reach the women’s doubles final by beating Liezel Huber and Anabel Medina Garrigues 2-6, 6-2, 6-4. That victory means Serena Williams will top the WTA rankings in singles and doubles as of next week. The younger Williams isn’t accustomed to getting pushed around on a court, but that’s exactly what Stosur managed to do, commanding points with deep groundstrokes lathered with spin. “I didn’t want to let her try and dictate the points early on, so I tried to do that straight back to her,” said Stosur, who recently switched to the same sort of synthetic racket strings Nadal uses. “You can’t give her much.”

H O R S E R AC I N G C O M M E N TA RY

Final leg of Triple Crown has a lack of class, drama By John Rowe McClatchy-Tribune News Service

ELMONT, N.Y. — The Belmont Stakes always has been at the mercy of the Triple Crown’s first two races. What happens at Churchill Downs and Pimlico in May often has a profound effect on what happens at Belmont in June. Especially this year. Not only did two horses win the first legs of thoroughbred racing’s holy grail, thus denying Belmont the drama of a Triple Crown possibility, but the owners of Kentucky Derby winner Super Saver and Preakness winner Lookin at Lucky decided not to enter the longest race of the Triple Crown campaign. For the first time since 2006, and only the third time since 1970, neither the Derby nor Preakness winner will run in the Belmont. For a reeling business in need of a pick-me-up, the defections of Super Saver and Lookin at Lucky are double shots to the stomach. Casual racing fans might be more interested in the sixth race at Monmouth than the Belmont. And who could blame them? This field is devoid of class. First

1 4 2 N D B E L M O N T S TA K E S

Ice Box leads Belmont field Twelve 3-year-olds will start Saturday’s Belmont Stakes, with Ice Box listed as the early 3-1 favorite. PP HORSE

ODDS

1. Dave in Dixie

20-1

2. Spangled Star

30-1

3. Uptowncharlybrown

10-1

4. Make Music for Me

10-1

5. Fly Down 6. Ice Box 7. Drosselmeyer

9-2 3-1 12-1

8. Game On Dude

10-1

9. Stately Victor

15-1

10. Stay Put

20-1

11. First Dude

7-2

10. Interactif

12-1

Weights: 126 pounds •Distance: 1 1/2 miles • Purse: $1 million • First place: $600,000 • Second place: $200,000 • Third place: $110,000 Post time: 3:32 p.m. PDT AP

Dude is the only one of the 12 horses who ran in the Preakness, and Ice Box is the 3-1 morning-

line favorite off his second-place showing in the Derby. The best horse on the grounds Saturday will be Super Saver, standing in trainer Todd Pletcher’s barn. “If NASCAR doesn’t have Jimmy Johnson, NASCAR isn’t as popular,” said Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas. “We have lost the pizazz of the Triple Crown by not getting everyone back together.” Horse racing has lost a lot over the years, from too much of its clientele to its standing in the sports world. As quality-filled as the Breeders’ Cup is every fall, horse racing still boils down to the Triple Crown races for the occasional fan, and when the Belmont is as watered down as this one, the interest peaks with the Preakness. This Belmont is a horse race, not a classic. “With horses like Ice Box, Fly Down and my horse, it’ll be a good race,” said Dale Romans, trainer of First Dude. Belmonts should be more than good. That’s why Saturday’s crowd should be less than half the record 120,139 fans who showed up for Smarty Jones’ failed Triple Crown bid in 2004.

You can’t fool serious horse racing fans, although the inept New York Racing Association has been trying for years. A $25 million loan from the state legislature has bailed out the NYRA for another year, but just because there’s a 142nd Belmont Stakes doesn’t mean there will be a 143rd. In these times of budget tightening, the NYRA and New York Off-Track Betting, havens for political patronage, are on many legislators’ hit lists. Although Richard Migliore, the New York-based jockey who announced his retirement Wednesday because of a broken neck suffered in a January spill, calls Belmont “the Taj Mahal of American racing,” the track that straddles Queens and Long Island is systematic of what ails the industry: a shrinking fan base, no help from casino revenues and gross mismanagement. Casino money can cure a lot, but horse racing needs to be more image conscious. The sport does not do a good job of promoting itself. Hall of Fame trainers Nick Zito, who’ll saddle Ice Box and 9-2 choice Fly Down, and Bob Baffert, who’ll ship in 10-1 shot Game On Dude, weren’t present

for Wednesday’s post-position draw, the biggest pre-race media gathering. But there’s nobody to tell Zito and Baffert they needed to be present. Unlike team sports that have commissioners, horse racing, like boxing, another spot in decline, is the Old West. Everybody has a gun and can shoot it whenever they please. So appreciate Bud Selig, baseball fans. He sure beats not having somebody in charge. Appointing a racing czar might be the first big step in reviving the sport of kings. In what has become his annual call for a national racing commissioner, Lukas said at the Preakness: “Look at the New York Racing Association. I bet you can’t name three executives, and if one of them called a congressman, he wouldn’t get a call back because the guy wouldn’t even know who he was.” The same could be said of most of the horses in the Belmont. What once was billed as “the test of the champion” has been reduced to a race with little more than a bigger purse than normal. What a shame.


D4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M A JOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Angels 7, Royals 2

STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 36 18 .667 — New York 33 20 .623 2½ Boston 31 23 .574 5 Toronto 31 24 .564 5½ Baltimore 15 38 .283 20½ Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 31 22 .585 — Detroit 27 25 .519 3½ Chicago 22 30 .423 8½ Kansas City 22 32 .407 9½ Cleveland 19 32 .373 11 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 28 24 .538 — Oakland 28 26 .519 1 Los Angeles 27 28 .491 2½ Seattle 21 31 .404 7 ——— Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 9, Baltimore 1 Detroit 3, Cleveland 0 Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 3 Boston 6, Oakland 4 L.A. Angels 7, Kansas City 2 Texas 9, Chicago White Sox 5 Seattle 2, Minnesota 1, 10 innings Today’s Games Baltimore (Millwood 0-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3), 10:05 a.m. Cleveland (D.Huff 2-6) at Detroit (Porcello 4-5), 10:05 a.m. Oakland (Bre.Anderson 2-1) at Boston (Wakefield 1-3), 10:35 a.m. L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 4-2) at Kansas City (Greinke 1-6), 11:10 a.m. Texas (C.Lewis 4-3) at Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 4-3), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 5-5) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-4), 7:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Boston at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Tampa Bay at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m. Minnesota at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 31 22 .585 — Philadelphia 28 24 .538 2½ Florida 27 27 .500 4½ New York 27 27 .500 4½ Washington 26 28 .481 5½ Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 31 23 .574 — St. Louis 31 23 .574 — Chicago 24 29 .453 6½ Milwaukee 22 31 .415 8½ Pittsburgh 22 31 .415 8½ Houston 19 34 .358 11½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 32 21 .604 — Los Angeles 31 22 .585 1 San Francisco 28 24 .538 3½ Colorado 28 25 .528 4 Arizona 20 34 .370 12½ ——— Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 2, Philadelphia 1 L.A. Dodgers 1, Arizona 0, 14 innings San Diego 5, N.Y. Mets 1, 11 innings Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, ppd., rain Milwaukee 7, Florida 4 Houston 5, Washington 1 St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 1 San Francisco 4, Colorado 1 Today’s Games Washington (J.Martin 0-1) at Houston (Moehler 0-2), 11:05 a.m. Milwaukee (Capuano 0-0) at Florida (Jo.Johnson 5-2), 4:10 p.m. Atlanta (Medlen 2-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-3), 7:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Cincinnati at Washington, 4:05 p.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Florida at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Houston, 5:05 p.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Mariners 2, Twins 1 (10 innings) SEATTLE — Ryan Langerhans scored from second base on an infield single by Ichiro Suzuki with two outs in the bottom of the 10th and Seattle won its first extrainning game of the season over Minnesota. On the 11th pitch of the at-bat from reliever Jose Mijeras, Suzuki hit a ground ball up the middle. Matt Tolbert made a diving stop and attempted to force Josh Wilson at second base. But his flip to shortstop J.J. Hardy was late and Langerhans never stopped rounding third and scored easily. Minnesota Span cf Hardy ss Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Kubel dh Delm.Young lf Tolbert 2b Punto 3b a-Thome ph B.Harris 3b Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 0 34

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 2

SO 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 8

Avg. .281 .226 .319 .372 .279 .227 .265 .250 .214 .233 .163

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf M.Sweeney dh Bradley lf Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b 1-Langerhans pr Ro.Johnson c b-Alfonzo ph Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 4 4 3 0 3 1 4 35

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 2 1

SO 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

Avg. .343 .218 .294 .258 .222 .239 .196 .227 .160 .500 .295

Minnesota 000 000 100 0 — 1 5 0 Seattle 000 010 000 1 — 2 8 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Punto in the 10th. b-flied out for Ro.Johnson in the 10th. 1-ran for Kotchman in the 10th. LOB—Minnesota 5, Seattle 6. 2B—Morneau (19). HR—Cuddyer (7), off Cl.Lee. RBIs—Cuddyer (29), I.Suzuki (12), Kotchman (21). SB—Bradley 2 (3). CS—Tolbert (1). SF—Kotchman. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (Kubel 3); Seattle 2 (M.Sweeney, Ro.Johnson). Runners moved up—Morneau. GIDP—Kotchman. DP—Minnesota 1 (Tolbert, Hardy, Morneau). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Slowey 7 5 1 1 1 3 97 3.84 Crain 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 5.09 Guerrier L, 0-1 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 21 1.80 Mijares 0 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.61 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cl.Lee 8 5 1 1 1 8 112 2.91 Aardsma 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 4.15 League W, 5-5 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.94 Mijares pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Mijares 2-1. PB— Ro.Johnson. T—2:47. A—20,414 (47,878).

e-Carter ph Valdes p Cora 2b H.Blanco c J.Santana p Feliciano p Dessens p Matthews Jr. rf Totals

THE ALMOST PERFECT GAME

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Torii Hunter homered and drove in three runs, and Scott Kazmir bounced back from a rocky previous start to lead Los Angeles to a win over Kansas City. Hunter had a two-run single off Kyle Davies (4-4) in the first inning and added his eighth homer in the seventh to end a four-for-26 slump. Los Angeles AB R H M.Izturis ss 4 1 0 H.Kendrick 2b 5 1 1 B.Abreu rf 4 1 2 Tor.Hunter cf 5 2 3 H.Matsui dh 4 0 2 1-Quinlan pr-dh 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 5 1 1 J.Rivera lf 2 1 1 Willits lf 3 0 1 Frandsen 3b 4 0 2 Bo.Wilson c 4 0 1 Totals 40 7 14 Kansas City Podsednik lf Aviles 2b DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b a-Betemit ph Y.Betancourt ss Bloomquist cf Kendall c b-B.Pena ph Totals

AB 5 3 3 4 2 2 1 4 4 3 0 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2

BI 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 7

BB 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .224 .262 .279 .278 .240 .000 .261 .232 .256 .440 .118

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 7 2 5

SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 6

Avg. .291 .305 .300 .335 .248 .292 .000 .282 .185 .287 .111

Los Angeles 300 210 100 — 7 14 0 Kansas City 001 000 001 — 2 7 1 a-struck out for Callaspo in the 9th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Kendall in the 9th. 1-ran for H.Matsui in the 9th. E—Aviles (4). LOB—Los Angeles 9, Kansas City 8. 2B—B.Abreu (17), Tor.Hunter (15), J.Rivera (8). HR—Tor.Hunter (8), off V.Marte. RBIs—Tor.Hunter 3 (32), H.Matsui (28), Napoli (21), J.Rivera (23), Frandsen (1), DeJesus (22), B.Pena (2). SF—B.Pena. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 5 (H.Matsui, Napoli, H.Kendrick 2, Willits); Kansas City 2 (B.Butler, Y.Betancourt). Runners moved up—M.Izturis, Callaspo. GIDP—Napoli, Aviles, B.Butler. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Frandsen, H.Kendrick, Napoli), (H.Kendrick, M.Izturis, Napoli); Kansas City 1 (Callaspo, Aviles, B.Butler). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kazmir W, 4-5 5 2-3 5 1 1 4 2 103 5.86 F.Rodriguez 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 Bulger 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 4.34 S.Shields 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 6.62 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies L, 4-4 4 8 6 6 2 0 80 5.49 V.Marte 3 3 1 1 0 2 45 4.70 Thompson 2 3 0 0 1 0 38 6.41 Davies pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—F.Rodriguez 2-0, V.Marte 2-1. T—2:54. A—12,718 (37,840).

Paul Sancya / The Associated Press

Detroit Tigers pitcher Armando Galarraga covers first base as Cleveland Indians Jason Donald hits the bag and first base umpire Jim Joyce looks on in the ninth inning of a baseball game in Detroit on Wednesday. Joyce called Donald safe and Galarraga lost his bid for a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning on the disputed call at first base. Detroit won 3-0. (5). HR—Cano (12), off Albers. RBIs—Wigginton (33), Swisher 3 (31), Cano 2 (42), Granderson 2 (10), Cervelli (24), Gardner (17). SF—Gardner. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 6 (Ad. Jones, Markakis 2, Wieters 2, C.Patterson); New York 4 (A.Rodriguez, Teixeira, Jeter, Russo). Runners moved up—Swisher, Teixeira. GIDP—Cervelli. DP—Baltimore 2 (C.Izturis, Wigginton), (Wigginton). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bergesen L, 3-4 2 1-3 7 6 6 2 1 69 6.75 Hendrickson 2 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 32 5.08 Albers 2 3 2 2 0 1 31 5.25 Mata 1 2 1 0 0 1 18 0.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hughes W, 7-1 7 6 1 1 1 7 101 2.54 Gaudin 2 3 0 0 1 0 32 7.43 Inherited runners-scored—Hendrickson 3-1. HBP— by Bergesen (Cervelli). WP—Mata. T—2:49. A—44,465 (50,287).

Rangers 9, White Sox 5

Red Sox 6, Athletics 4

CHICAGO — Matt Treanor homered and drove in a career-high four runs, and Texas beat Chicago after losing Vladimir Guerrero to an eye injury during batting practice.

BOSTON — David Ortiz hit a two-run homer to help Boston rally for the second straight game, and Daisuke Matsuzaka settled down to beat Oakland. The Red Sox spotted the A’s three runs in the top of the first and then scored the next six.

Texas Andrus ss M.Young dh Kinsler 2b Hamilton lf Dav.Murphy rf Smoak 1b Treanor c A.Blanco 3b Borbon cf Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 5 3 4 3 5 39

R H 1 1 2 3 0 0 2 3 1 2 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 9 12

Chicago Pierre dh Vizquel 3b Rios cf Konerko 1b An.Jones lf Pierzynski c Quentin rf Al.Ramirez ss Beckham 2b a-Kotsay ph Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 2 4 3 4 3 1 32

R 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 3 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 9

BB 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 5

SO 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 7

Avg. .307 .325 .274 .297 .271 .185 .221 .195 .233

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 3 4 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 4

Avg. .243 .241 .319 .276 .227 .217 .208 .247 .200 .196

Texas 321 021 000 — 9 12 0 Chicago 200 001 020 — 5 8 0 a-grounded into a double play for Beckham in the 9th. LOB—Texas 10, Chicago 4. 2B—Andrus (6), M.Young 2 (16), Treanor (3), Vizquel (3), Rios (14), Pierzynski (12). HR—Treanor (3), off Floyd; Konerko 2 (16), off Feldman 2. RBIs—M.Young 3 (33), Hamilton 2 (29), Treanor 4 (14), Vizquel (5), Konerko 4 (39). SB—Pierre (20). SF—Treanor. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 4 (Borbon 2, M.Young, Kinsler); Chicago 2 (Quentin, Beckham). Runners moved up—Kinsler, Smoak, Borbon, Quentin. GIDP—Vizquel, An.Jones, Kotsay. DP—Texas 3 (Kinsler, Andrus, Smoak), (Kinsler, Andrus, Smoak), (Kinsler, Andrus, Smoak). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Feldman W, 3-5 8 8 5 5 3 3 114 5.82 Strop 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Floyd L, 2-6 2 2-3 8 6 6 3 1 64 6.64 T.Pena 2 1-3 1 2 2 2 1 47 4.34 Williams 2 2 1 1 0 1 32 5.66 Linebrink 1 0 0 0 0 3 18 4.22 Jenks 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 6.00 Inherited runners-scored—T.Pena 1-0. HBP—by T.Pena (A.Blanco). WP—Feldman, Floyd, Linebrink. T—2:51. A—19,516 (40,615).

Yankees 9, Orioles 1 NEW YORK — Nick Swisher and Curtis Granderson hit two-run doubles in the second inning to back another stingy start by Phil Hughes, and New York handed Baltimore its seventh straight loss. Baltimore AB R C.Patterson lf-cf 5 0 M.Tejada 3b 4 1 Lugo 2b 0 0 Markakis rf 4 0 Wigginton 1b 3 0 Scott dh 3 0 Wieters c 4 0 Ad.Jones cf 3 0 Montanez lf 1 0 S.Moore 2b-3b 4 0 C.Izturis ss 4 0 Totals 35 1 New York Jeter ss R.Pena ss Swisher rf Thames rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Russo 3b Cano 2b Posada dh Granderson cf Cervelli c Gardner lf Totals

AB 3 1 5 0 5 4 1 4 3 4 3 3 36

H BI BB 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 9 1 2

R H 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 3 0 0 2 1 9 14

BI 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 1 9

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .247 .264 .225 .305 .282 .272 .240 .249 .143 .077 .230

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

Avg. .303 .227 .320 .303 .215 .297 .214 .373 .326 .260 .302 .300

Baltimore 000 001 000 — 1 9 1 New York 042 000 21x — 9 14 0 E—S.Moore (2). LOB—Baltimore 9, New York 7. 2B—M.Tejada 2 (10), Markakis (14), Scott (10), C.Izturis (4), Swisher (11), Granderson (6), Gardner

Oakland R.Davis cf Barton 1b R.Sweeney rf K.Suzuki c Cust dh M.Ellis 2b Gross lf A.Rosales 3b Pennington ss b-Kouzmanoff ph Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 38

R H 0 0 1 2 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 4 12

BI 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 1 2 0 10

Avg. .260 .284 .311 .254 .229 .297 .300 .273 .207 .251

Boston Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b D.Ortiz dh Youkilis 1b J.Drew rf Beltre 3b Hermida lf a-Hall ph-lf Varitek c D.McDonald cf Totals

AB 5 5 2 4 4 4 3 0 4 3 34

R H 2 3 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 6 10

BI 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 3

Avg. .271 .252 .275 .302 .269 .335 .203 .218 .269 .273

Oakland 300 000 001 — 4 12 0 Boston 200 020 11x — 6 10 0 a-walked for Hermida in the 8th. b-homered for Pennington in the 9th. LOB—Oakland 8, Boston 8. 2B—Barton (15), R.Sweeney (11), Scutaro (11), Pedroia (17), D.Ortiz (10), D.McDonald (6). 3B—J.Drew (1). HR—K.Suzuki (5), off Matsuzaka; Kouzmanoff (4), off Papelbon; D.Ortiz (12), off Sheets. RBIs—R.Sweeney (25), K.Suzuki 2 (20), Kouzmanoff (26), Scutaro (11), Pedroia (26), D.Ortiz 2 (33), Youkilis 2 (32). SB—Pennington (7), Hall (2), D.McDonald (3). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 2 (Barton, K.Suzuki); Boston 5 (Beltre, Scutaro, Varitek, J.Drew, Pedroia). GIDP—R.Davis. DP—Boston 1 (Beltre, Youkilis). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sheets L, 2-4 6 7 4 4 1 1 97 5.00 Ziegler 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 20 2.49 Breslow 1 1 1 1 2 1 24 2.74 T.Ross 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 5.97 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matszka W, 4-2 6 2-3 10 3 3 0 7 109 5.49 D.Bard H, 12 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.91 Papelbon S, 13 1 2 1 1 0 1 11 3.13 Inherited runners-scored—Breslow 2-0, T.Ross 2-0, D.Bard 2-0. IBB—off Ziegler (D.Ortiz). HBP—by Matsuzaka (Barton). T—2:53. A—37,783 (37,402).

Rays 7, Blue Jays 3 TORONTO — David Price became the American League’s first eight-game winner, Carl Crawford hit a grand slam and Tampa Bay rallied in the ninth inning again, beating Toronto. Tampa Bay B.Upton cf Crawford lf Longoria 3b W.Aybar dh S.Rodriguez 2b Zobrist 1b-rf Kapler rf a-Jaso ph C.Pena 1b D.Navarro c Brignac ss Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 5 4 2 1 0 3 4 38

R H 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 7 12

BI 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 7

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

Avg. .225 .316 .316 .247 .239 .307 .230 .304 .176 .204 .299

Toronto AB R H F.Lewis lf 4 1 2 A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 Lind dh 3 0 0 V.Wells cf 4 0 1 J.Bautista rf 4 0 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 1 1 Overbay 1b 4 1 3 J.Buck c 3 0 2 Encarnacion 3b 3 0 0 Totals 33 3 11

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 5

Avg. .310 .188 .221 .306 .247 .264 .228 .269 .203

Tampa Bay 000 010 006 — 7 12 3 Toronto 110 000 001 — 3 11 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Kapler in the 9th.

E—Crawford (1), B.Upton (3), Brignac (6), J.Buck (1). LOB—Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 5. 2B—B.Upton (13), S.Rodriguez (8), Brignac (10), V.Wells (21), Overbay 2 (13). HR—Crawford (5), off S.Downs. RBIs—Crawford 5 (30), D.Navarro (5), Brignac (22), J.Bautista (42), Overbay (25), J.Buck (29). CS—V.Wells (1), J.Bautista (2). S—D.Navarro. SF—J.Buck. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 2 (S.Rodriguez, W.Aybar); Toronto 3 (F.Lewis, J.Bautista, J.Buck). Runners moved up—Longoria. GIDP—F.Lewis, A.Hill, V.Wells. DP—Tampa Bay 3 (S.Rodriguez, Brignac, Zobrist), (Longoria, S.Rodriguez, Zobrist), (Longoria, S.Rodriguez, Zobrist); Toronto 1 (J.Bautista, J.Bautista, J.Buck).

St. Louis 000 102 10x — 4 9 0 a-struck out for C.Miller in the 8th. b-flied out for Rhodes in the 8th. c-sacrificed for C.Carpenter in the 8th. LOB—Cincinnati 3, St. Louis 10. 2B—O.Cabrera (10), B.Ryan (7). 3B—B.Ryan (2). HR—Holliday (6), off Ondrusek. RBIs—Rolen (37), Schumaker (13), Ludwick (27), Holliday (24), B.Ryan (11). SB—Pujols 2 (5), Holliday (4). S—B.Phillips, Jay. SF—Schumaker. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 1 (Stubbs); St. Louis 8 (Rasmus 4, Holliday, C.Carpenter, Pujols, Ludwick). GIDP—Ludwick. DP—Cincinnati 1 (O.Cabrera, B.Phillips, Votto); St. Louis 1 (B.Ryan, Freese).

Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price W, 8-2 8 9 2 0 0 3 111 2.29 R.Soriano 1 2 1 1 0 2 19 1.61 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marcum L, 5-2 8 1-3 10 5 4 0 2 112 2.77 Frasor 0 0 1 1 1 0 5 5.06 S.Downs 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 15 3.24 Frasor pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Frasor 2-0, S.Downs 3-3. HBP—by Price (Lind), by Marcum (Kapler). T—2:55. A—13,517 (49,539).

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeCure L, 1-1 5 1-3 6 3 3 4 4 106 3.97 D.Herrera 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.00 Ondrusek 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 9 11.88 Rhodes 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.40 Del Rosario 1 1 0 0 1 0 13 3.00 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carpentr W, 7-1 8 4 1 1 0 4 112 2.76 McClellan S, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.93 Ondrusek pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—D.Herrera 3-1, Ondrusek 2-1. HBP—by LeCure (Y.Molina, Pujols), by C.Carpenter (Gomes, Votto). WP—LeCure. T—2:39. A—39,295 (43,975).

Tigers 3, Indians 0 DETROIT — Armando Galarraga of the Detroit Tigers lost his bid for a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning on a call that first base umpire Jim Joyce later admitted he blew. Cleveland AB R Crowe cf 4 0 Choo rf 3 0 Kearns lf 3 0 Hafner dh 3 0 Peralta 3b 3 0 Branyan 1b 3 0 Grudzielanek 2b 3 0 Redmond c 3 0 Donald ss 3 0 Totals 28 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .240 .275 .282 .258 .243 .235 .283 .220 .280

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon lf Kelly lf Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch dh C.Guillen 2b Inge 3b Avila c Santiago ss Totals

H BI BB 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2 0

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .332 .277 .277 .307 .351 .319 .265 .232 .192 .239

AB 4 4 0 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 31

R 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 1 1 Detroit 010 000 02x — 3 9 0 E—Choo (3). LOB—Cleveland 1, Detroit 4. HR— Mi.Cabrera (15), off Carmona. RBIs—Ordonez (35), Mi.Cabrera (49). SB—A.Jackson (8). Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 1 (Crowe); Detroit 2 (Damon, Inge). GIDP—Damon, Inge. DP—Cleveland 2 (Carmona, Donald, Branyan), (Peralta, Grudzielanek, Branyan). Cleveland IP H R ER Carmona L, 4-4 8 9 3 2 Detroit IP H R ER Galarrga W, 2-1 9 1 0 0 T—1:44. A—17,738 (41,255).

BB 0 BB 0

SO 3 SO 3

NP 96 NP 88

ERA 3.53 ERA 2.57

NL ROUNDUP Cardinals 4, Reds 1 ST. LOUIS — Chris Carpenter beat Cincinnati for the eighth straight start, allowing four hits in eight innings as St. Louis pulled into a first-place tie with the Reds in the NL Central. Matt Holliday homered and Skip Schumaker, Ryan Ludwick and Brendan Ryan all had two hits and an RBI. Cincinnati AB O.Cabrera ss 4 B.Phillips 2b 3 Votto 1b 3 Rolen 3b 4 Bruce rf 3 Gomes lf 2 Stubbs cf 3 C.Miller c 2 a-R.Hernandez ph-c 1 LeCure p 2 D.Herrera p 0 Ondrusek p 0 Rhodes p 0 b-L.Nix ph 1 Del Rosario p 0 Totals 28

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0

SO 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .267 .280 .320 .289 .266 .303 .233 .000 .300 .000 ------.224 ---

St. Louis Schumaker 2b Ludwick rf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Rasmus cf Freese 3b Y.Molina c B.Ryan ss C.Carpenter p c-Jay ph McClellan p Totals

AB 3 5 3 2 4 3 3 3 3 0 0 29

R 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 2 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 5

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 4

Avg. .249 .292 .318 .310 .272 .315 .259 .211 .042 .302 1.000

Cincinnati

000 000 100 — 1

4 0

Astros 5, Nationals 1 HOUSTON — Carlos Lee hit a two-run home run and Houston’s Wandy Rodriguez snapped his three-game losing streak. Rodriguez (3-7) pitched out of bases-loaded jams in the fourth and fifth innings to secure his first victory since May 12. He struck out a season-high eight over five innings. Washington AB Morgan cf 5 C.Guzman 2b 4 T.Walker p 0 c-Alb.Gonzalez ph 1 A.Dunn 1b 4 Zimmerman 3b 2 Willingham lf 2 Desmond ss 4 Morse rf 3 Nieves c 4 Lannan p 3 A.Kennedy 2b 1 Totals 33

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 7 1 3 13

Avg. .260 .316 .000 .304 .280 .302 .272 .265 .263 .203 .045 .246

Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Berkman 1b Ca.Lee lf Pence rf P.Feliz 3b Manzella ss Quintero c W.Rodriguez p W.Lopez p a-Michaels ph Byrdak p Daigle p b-Sullivan ph G.Chacin p Totals

R 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 2

Avg. .271 .303 .241 .208 .277 .222 .206 .233 .250 --.200 ----.191 1.000

AB 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 34

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Washington 100 000 000 — 1 7 3 Houston 002 001 20x — 5 9 1 a-flied out for W.Lopez in the 6th. b-flied out for Daigle in the 8th. c-flied out for T.Walker in the 9th. E—Desmond 3 (14), Quintero (1). LOB—Washington 10, Houston 7. 2B—A.Dunn (16), Desmond (8). 3B— Pence (1). HR—Ca.Lee (6), off Lannan. RBIs—A.Dunn (28), Ca.Lee 2 (23), Pence 2 (26). SB—Morgan (12). CS—Morgan (9). Runners left in scoring position—Washington 5 (Desmond 3, Lannan 2); Houston 4 (Ca.Lee, W.Rodriguez, Michaels, P.Feliz). Runners moved up—Keppinger, Berkman. GIDP— Ca.Lee. DP—Washington 1 (C.Guzman, Desmond, A.Dunn). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lannan L, 2-3 6 1-3 8 5 2 2 2 99 4.79 T.Walker 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 18 3.81 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodrigz W, 3-7 5 5 1 1 3 8 115 5.07 W.Lopez H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.66 Byrdak H, 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 14 6.39 Daigle H, 1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 17 0.00 G.Chacin 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.69 Inherited runners-scored—T.Walker 2-2, Daigle 1-0. HBP—by W.Rodriguez (Willingham). WP—W.Rodriguez. Catchers’ interference—Quintero. T—2:47. A—26,736 (40,976).

Padres 5, Mets 1 (11 innings) SAN DIEGO — Adrian Gonzalez hit a grand slam with one out in the 11th inning to lift San Diego. It was the third career grand slam and second career gamewinning home run for the All-Star first baseman, coming on a 1-1 pitch from Raul Valdes (2-2). New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan cf Bay lf I.Davis 1b D.Wright 3b Francoeur rf F.Rodriguez p

AB 4 5 4 5 5 3 0

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0

SO 1 3 0 2 3 0 0

Avg. .248 .293 .295 .255 .267 .253 ---

1 0 5 3 3 0 0 1 39

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 11

.263 .571 .205 .286 .160 ----.190

San Diego AB R H Hairston Jr. ss 5 1 1 Eckstein 2b 5 1 1 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 6 1 4 Headley 3b 4 0 2 Hundley c 4 0 0 Hairston cf-lf 4 0 0 Salazar lf 2 0 1 b-Venable ph-rf 2 0 0 Denorfia rf-lf 2 0 1 c-Gwynn ph-cf 2 1 2 Richard p 1 0 0 a-Zawadzki ph 1 0 0 Gregerson p 0 0 0 Adams p 0 0 0 H.Bell p 0 0 0 d-Stairs ph 1 0 0 R.Webb p 0 0 0 f-Garland ph 1 1 0 Totals 40 5 12

BI 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .241 .287 .276 .285 .298 .235 .254 .227 .304 .197 .125 .222 ------.186 --.105

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 7

New York 000 100 000 00 — 1 6 0 San Diego 000 000 001 04 — 5 12 0 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for Richard in the 6th. b-struck out for Salazar in the 8th. c-singled for Denorfia in the 9th. d-struck out for H.Bell in the 9th. e-grounded out for F.Rodriguez in the 11th. f-grounded into a fielder’s choice for R.Webb in the 11th. LOB—New York 9, San Diego 12. 2B—Pagan (8), Bay (13), Ad.Gonzalez (8), Gwynn (4). HR—Ad.Gonzalez (10), off Valdes. RBIs—Francoeur (28), Eckstein (15), Ad.Gonzalez 4 (32). SB—Jos.Reyes (13), Bay (8), Gwynn (9). S—Richard. Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Pagan, J.Santana 2, Bay, I.Davis); San Diego 6 (Hundley, Hairston Jr. 2, Hairston 2, Venable). Runners moved up—Hairston. GIDP—Denorfia. DP—New York 1 (Jos.Reyes, Cora, I.Davis). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Santana 7 5 0 0 5 3 123 2.76 Feliciano 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 2.18 Dessens H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.08 Rodriguez BS, 3 1-3 3 1 1 1 4 46 2.22 Valdes L, 2-2 1-3 3 4 4 0 0 12 5.34 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard 6 4 1 1 4 5 109 2.87 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 1.57 Adams 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.96 H.Bell 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 1.13 R.Webb W, 2-1 2 1 0 0 0 3 27 1.15 Feliciano pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Dessens 1-0, F.Rodriguez 1-0. HBP—by Valdes (Eckstein). T—3:48. A—15,880 (42,691).

Dodgers 1, Diamondbacks 0 (14 innings) LOS ANGELES — Garret Anderson hit an RBI single with two outs in the 14th inning and Los Angeles handed Arizona its 10th straight loss. A day after the Dodgers won 1-0 on Matt Kemp’s home run in the 10th, Los Angeles won another pitchers’ duel. Arizona K.Johnson 2b R.Roberts lf S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b 1-Ojeda pr-3b Ryal 3b-1b C.Young cf Hester c b-C.Jackson ph Snyder c E.Jackson p Heilman p f-G.Parra ph Rosa p g-M.Reynolds ph C.Valdez p Totals

AB 6 6 5 5 3 2 5 5 2 1 2 3 0 1 0 1 0 47

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1

SO 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .261 .111 .284 .249 .267 .130 .314 .267 .171 .220 .217 .160 --.234 --.224 .000

Los Angeles AB J.Carroll ss-2b 5 Kemp cf 5 Ethier rf 6 Loney 1b 6 G.Anderson lf 6 Belliard 3b-2b 2 Schlichting p 1 DeWitt 2b 2 Ju.Miller p 0 c-Man.Ramirez ph 1 Broxton p 0 Belisario p 0 d-Furcal ph-ss 2 A.Ellis c 3 e-R.Martin ph-c 1 Monasterios p 1 Troncoso p 0 a-Blake ph-3b 4 Totals 45

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 3 0 1 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 1 5 11

Avg. .299 .281 .360 .282 .157 .258 .000 .257 --.283 ----.289 .217 .249 .200 .000 .275

Arizona 000 000 000 000 00 — 0 8 0 L.A. 000 000 000 000 01 — 1 7 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-fouled out for Troncoso in the 6th. b-struck out for Hester in the 8th. c-struck out for Ju.Miller in the 8th. d-popped out for Belisario in the 10th. e-popped out for A.Ellis in the 10th. f-struck out for Heilman in the 11th. g-popped out for Rosa in the 13th. 1-ran for Ad.LaRoche in the 10th. E—G.Anderson (1). LOB—Arizona 9, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Loney (15). RBIs—G.Anderson (8). SB—J.Carroll (3). CS—S.Drew (1). S—Ryal. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 5 (C.Young 2, Hester, Snyder, Ryal); Los Angeles 3 (Ethier, R.Martin, J.Carroll). Runners moved up—Ryal, Loney. GIDP—J.Upton, Kemp. DP—Arizona 2 (K.Johnson, S.Drew), (Ryal, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche); Los Angeles 2 (A.Ellis, A.Ellis, Belliard), (Belliard, J.Carroll, Loney). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Jackson 9 3 0 0 3 6 123 5.33 Heilman 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 3.09 Rosa 2 0 0 0 0 3 24 3.52 C.Valdez L, 1-2 1 2-3 3 1 1 1 1 39 6.23 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Monasterios 5 2 0 0 0 3 81 1.87 Troncoso 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.56 Ju.Miller 2 1 0 0 0 2 41 0.00 Broxton 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 1.11 Belisario 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 5.79 Schlctng W, 1-0 4 3 0 0 1 1 60 0.00 HBP—by Ju.Miller (S.Drew, Ad.LaRoche). WP— E.Jackson, C.Valdez. T—4:16. A—35,355 (56,000).

Braves 2, Phillies 1 ATLANTA — Omar Infante, replacing the injured Chipper Jones, lined a twoout, run-scoring single in the eighth inning to back Derek Lowe’s best outing of the season, leading Atlanta to its eighth straight win over Philadelphia. Philadelphia Werth cf W.Valdez ss Utley 2b Howard 1b B.Francisco rf Ibanez lf c-Victorino ph Dobbs 3b Schneider c K.Kendrick p a-Gload ph Contreras p J.Romero p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 3 1 3 2 2 1 0 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

Atlanta Prado 2b

AB R 4 1

H BI BB 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 2

SO 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .296 .259 .270 .280 .214 .242 .251 .148 .200 .056 .211 -----

H BI BB SO Avg. 2 0 0 2 .324

Heyward rf 3 C.Jones 3b 2 Infante 3b 2 McCann c 4 Glaus 1b 3 Hinske lf 3 Wagner p 0 Y.Escobar ss 3 McLouth cf 1 D.Lowe p 1 b-Me.Cabrera ph-lf 0 Totals 26

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 4

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 5

.287 .240 .317 .254 .278 .326 --.217 .178 .111 .235

Philadelphia 001 000 000 — 1 6 0 Atlanta 100 000 01x — 2 6 0 a-grounded out for K.Kendrick in the 8th. b-sacrificed for D.Lowe in the 8th. c-struck out for Ibanez in the 9th. LOB—Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 5. 2B—Glaus (5). RBIs—Werth (34), Infante (11). S—Schneider, Me.Cabrera. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 3 (Utley 2, W.Valdez); Atlanta 1 (McCann). Runners moved up—Gload. GIDP—Utley, Ibanez, Heyward, C.Jones. DP—Philadelphia 3 (Utley, W.Valdez, Howard), (K.Kendrick, W.Valdez), (W.Valdez, Utley, Howard); Atlanta 2 (Prado, Y.Escobar, Glaus), (Y.Escobar, Glaus). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB K.Kendrick 7 5 1 1 2 Contrrs L, 2-2 2-3 1 1 1 2 J.Romero 1-3 0 0 0 0 Atlanta IP H R ER BB D.Lowe W, 8-4 8 6 1 1 1 Wagner S, 9-11 1 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—J.Romero Contreras (Heyward), off D.Lowe (Werth). T—2:28. A—26,309 (49,743).

SO NP ERA 4 89 4.62 1 23 1.08 0 3 2.25 SO NP ERA 7 119 4.44 1 18 1.69 2-0. IBB—off

Brewers 7, Marlins 4 MIAMI, Fla. — Milwaukee’s Yovani Gallardo hit his second homer of the season and won his sixth straight decision. Gallardo (6-2) gave up two runs in seven innings with four strikeouts. He hit a solo homer in the seventh inning — the sixth of his career — to help halt the Brewers’ three-game skid. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Axford p Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Hart rf Gomez cf Kottaras c Gallardo p a-Edmonds ph Villanueva p Counsell 2b A.Escobar ss Totals

AB 4 0 5 4 5 3 4 4 2 1 0 1 5 38

R H 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 0 0 2 2 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 7 12

Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b H.Ramirez ss Cantu 3b Uggla 2b C.Ross rf-cf R.Paulino c Maybin cf Sosa p T.Wood p b-Lamb ph Sanches p Volstad p Tankersley p B.Carroll rf Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 2 4 4 3 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 34

R 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 7

BB 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .249 --.317 .270 .297 .263 .266 .233 .192 .289 .000 .280 .249

H BI BB 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 4 5

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 5

Avg. .242 .267 .295 .286 .266 .294 .308 .227 ----.217 --.167 --.197

Milwaukee 000 001 132 — 7 12 1 Florida 101 000 011 — 4 7 0 a-doubled for Gallardo in the 8th. b-struck out for T.Wood in the 8th. E—McGehee (7). LOB—Milwaukee 11, Florida 9. 2B—Edmonds (9), Coghlan (7), H.Ramirez (11). HR— Gallardo (2), off Tankersley; Kottaras (5), off Sosa; Fielder (9), off Sanches. RBIs—Fielder (21), Gomez 2 (15), Kottaras 2 (14), Gallardo (5), Counsell (12), H.Ramirez (28), Cantu 2 (42), R.Paulino (20). SB—Gomez (7), Kottaras (2), Coghlan (7). SF—Cantu. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 7 (Gomez 2, Kottaras 2, Braun 2, A.Escobar); Florida 6 (C.Ross 2, Uggla, H.Ramirez, Lamb, Cantu). Runners moved up—Hart, Coghlan, G.Sanchez, R.Paulino. DP—Florida 1 (Volstad, G.Sanchez). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 6-2 7 4 2 1 4 4 114 2.64 Villanueva H, 8 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 11 3.62 Axford S, 3-3 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 25 2.79 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volstad 5 2-3 4 1 1 3 4 93 4.08 Tnkrsly BS, 1-1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 8 4.50 Sosa L, 1-1 1 2-3 3 3 3 1 1 45 6.23 T.Wood 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 9 5.14 Sanches 1 3 2 2 1 1 34 4.05 Tankersley pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Axford 2-1, Tankersley 20, T.Wood 1-0. HBP—by Volstad (Gallardo). WP—Volstad. PB—Kottaras. T—3:26. A—11,468 (38,560).

Giants 4, Rockies 1 SAN FRANCISCO — Aaron Rowand hit a goahead two-run double in the fifth inning and San Francisco again backed starter Matt Cain with enough offense, beating Colorado to avoid a sweep. Colorado AB R C.Gonzalez cf 4 0 S.Smith lf 4 0 Helton 1b 4 0 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 Hawpe rf 4 0 Iannetta c 4 0 Stewart 3b 3 0 J.Herrera 2b 2 0 Francis p 0 0 R.Flores p 0 0 a-Spilborghs ph 1 0 Daley p 0 0 F.Morales p 0 0 Totals 30 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 3

SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .303 .260 .253 .308 .280 .143 .275 .000 .000 --.220 -----

San Francisco Torres rf-lf F.Sanchez 2b Sandoval 3b Uribe ss B.Molina c A.Huff lf Schierholtz rf Posey 1b Rowand cf Cain p Br.Wilson p Totals

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 2

SO 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .286 .327 .286 .274 .252 .298 .278 .474 .230 .050 .000

AB 4 3 3 4 3 3 0 3 3 3 0 29

R 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4

Colorado 000 100 000 — 1 4 0 San Francisco 000 022 00x — 4 8 0 a-flied out for R.Flores in the 7th. LOB—Colorado 5, San Francisco 3. 2B—Sandoval (15), Rowand (8). HR—Tulowitzki (7), off Cain. RBIs— Tulowitzki (27), Sandoval (22), B.Molina (12), Rowand 2 (22). CS—Uribe (2). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 1 (S.Smith); San Francisco 1 (Cain). Runners moved up—Uribe. GIDP—Hawpe, Sandoval, Rowand. DP—Colorado 3 (Tulowitzki, J.Herrera, Helton), (Tulowitzki, J.Herrera, Helton), (Iannetta, Iannetta, J.Herrera); San Francisco 1 (Posey, Uribe). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO Francis L, 1-2 5 2-3 8 4 4 1 3 R.Flores 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Daley 1 0 0 0 0 0 F.Morales 1 0 0 0 1 3 San FranciscoIP H R ER BB SO Cain W, 4-4 8 4 1 1 3 5 Wlson S, 13-14 1 0 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—R.Flores 1-0. T—2:16. A—30,697 (41,915).

NP 81 4 9 28 NP 114 8

ERA 3.70 3.97 3.44 3.75 ERA 2.36 2.01


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 D5

Griffey Continued from D1 Griffey, 40, said his diminished role with the team helped force his decision. He was batting .184 with no home runs in 33 games and 98 at-bats and had just one plate appearance since May 23, his last start. That came Monday when he grounded into a fielder’s choice against Jon Rauch as a pinchhitter in the ninth inning of a 5-4 loss to the Twins. “While I feel I am still able to make a contribution on the field, and nobody in the Mariners front office has asked me to retire, I told the Mariners when I met with them prior to the 2009 season and was invited back, that I will never allow myself to become a distraction,” Griffey said in the statement. “I feel that without enough occasional starts to be sharper coming off the bench, my continued presence as a player would be an unfair distraction to my teammates, and their success as a team is what the ultimate goal should be.” Mariners president Chuck Armstrong said he was “caught off-guard Wednesday with the swiftness of the decision,” and that it was solely Griffey’s call. Asked if Griffey was at peace with retirement, Armstrong said yes. Armstrong said Griffey’s relationship with the team would remain strong and Griffey’s statement said “I look forward to a continued, meaningful relationship with them for many years.” Griffey has said previously, however, that he would not envision a full-time coaching job

Perfect Continued from D1 Galarraga will never get his perfect game back. His center fielder, Austin Jackson, had saved the game for him on the first pitch of the top of the ninth, racing on a full sprint to the distant warning track at Comerica Park, fully extending his left arm for a twisting, over-the-shoulder catch. After Mike Redmond grounded out to shortstop, Donald bounced a ball between first and second. Miguel Cabrera fielded it and threw to Galarraga covering. The ball got there in time. So did Galarraga. He seemed to catch the ball near the top of the webbing; perhaps Joyce did not hear the telltale thwack of ball meeting leather before he heard Donald’s foot cross the base. He spread his arms — safe, an infield single. The record will show that Donald reached base, even advancing as far as third while Galarraga pitched from the windup and Cabrera yelled at Joyce. Galarraga retired the next hitter to complete a 3-0 shutout, the first of his rather ordinary major league career. The Tigers swarmed Joyce after the game, howling in protest, but they have

NBA Continued from D1 These teams will have won 33 of the league’s 64 titles when they finish a potentially fascinating series with plenty of modern subplots. “We’re always focused on winning a championship,” Bryant said. “And when you do it, you want to do it again and again.” Bryant is enjoying a dynamic postseason despite hobbling through injuries during a third straight finals run by his remarkably steady Lakers, who are 8-0 at home in the playoffs and haven’t even trailed in a series. Boston’s swift rise from a 50win regular season as a No. 4 seed has been even more surprising, with Rajon Rondo making a quantum leap into stardom during what might be the last stand for Boston’s Big Three of Pierce, Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen. But on the biggest scoreboard of all, the one these players claim they seldom check, it’s Celtics 17, Lakers 15. Don’t expect fans in either basketball-crazy city to forget that score when their team takes it all again. And just in case the Staples Center fans didn’t have enough reason to go crazy in Game 1, Pierce threw out the first volley against his own hometown. “Our fans are, I want to say, a little bit more knowledgeable to the game,” said Pierce, a Lakers fan growing up in Inglewood. “I think a lot of celebrities come here to get out of the house (rather) than to watch a game — to see the other celebrities. It’s an interesting crowd, whereas I think

anytime soon. Griffey leaves with the most home runs in Mariners history (417) and the fifth-most in majorleague history (630) behind only Barry Bonds, Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth and Willie Mays. He hit 398 of those home runs during his 11-year run with the Mariners from 1989-99 when he quickly became the face of the franchise after being taken with the first overall pick in the 1987 draft. That Seattle stint ended in the fall of 1999 when he was traded to Cincinnati, citing a desire to be closer to his family. The highlights of his first Seattle career were many — including back-to-back 56 home run seasons in 1997 and 1998. One, however, will always stand out — his beaming smile at the bottom of the pile of happy teammates after scoring the winning run from first base on a double by Edgar Martinez to beat the Yankees in Game Five of the 1995 American League Division Series. That run to the playoffs came during a season when local officials were embroiled in a debate over whether to build a new stadium to keep the team. Griffey’s exploits helped seal the deal to eventually construct Safeco Field. “They say in New York that Yankee Stadium is the house that Ruth built,” said Armstrong. “In Seattle, Washington, we say that Safeco Field is the house that Ken Griffey Jr. built.” It was that legacy the team honored in 2009 when it made the decision to bring him back at age 39 for what many figured would be one last triumphal run. It developed almost better

than anyone hoped as Griffey hit 19 home runs, and with his effervescent personality helped reshape a previously sullen clubhouse to turn the Mariners into one of the surprise teams in the game, improving from 61 wins to 85. The season ended with Griffey carried off on the shoulders of teammates. Many figured that would be it for Griffey. Instead, he decided to return for one more season, and the team obliged. But time had begun to dim his skills and his struggles mirrored that of a team that began the night 20-31. Speculation that the end was near grew in May and included a report in The (Tacoma) News Tribune that Griffey had been asleep and missed a pinch-hitting opportunity in a game, a charge Griffey and the team denied. Mariners general manager Jack Zduriencik said there was no regret over bringing Griffey back. “What we hoped for is this would be a real good year for everyone, for Kenny,” he said. The team honored Griffey before Wednesday night’s game with video highlights of his Mariners career and drawing his number 24 into the infield dirt. Mariners officials said a more elaborate celebration will be held later. “It’s always tough for great superstars like Ken, or anyone else, to make a decision to retire,” said Mariners chairman and chief executive officer Howard Lincoln. “This has been his life for so many years. But he has made his decision.” In the manner he said he would.

Safari Challenge teaches discipline, survival skills

no recourse; instant replay is allowed only for home runs. Galarraga became the 10th pitcher in history to lose a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning and the first since the Yankees’ Mike Mussina in 2001. The last perfect game to be lost under similar circumstances was in 1972, when the Chicago Cubs’ Milt Pappas walked Larry Stahl of the San Diego Padres on a 3-2 pitch. Bruce Froemming was the plate umpire at Wrigley Field that day who called ball four. Pappas flew into a rage, and though he got a no-hitter, he has never wavered in criticizing Froemming, who retired in 2007 after a 37-year career. “The pitch was outside,” Froemming said Wednesday night in a telephone interview. “I didn’t miss the pitch; Pappas missed the pitch. You can look at the tape. Pappas, the next day, said, ‘I know the pitch was outside, but you could have given it to me.’ That pitch has gotten better over the years. That pitch is right down the middle now.” In the next day’s Chicago Tribune, Pappas was quoted as saying, “The pitches were balls. They were borderline but balls. Froemming called a real good game.” Pappas has since said he was being diplomatic to avoid a fine for criticizing an umpire.

In a 2007 interview with ESPN, Pappas suggested that Froemming should have given him the benefit of the doubt, for the sake of history. “I still to this day don’t understand what Bruce Froemming was going through in his mind at that time,” Pappas said. “Why didn’t he throw up that right hand like the umpire did in the perfect game with Don Larsen?” He added: “It’s a home game in Wrigley Field. I’m pitching for the Chicago Cubs. The score is 8-0 in favor of the Cubs. What does he have to lose by not calling the last pitch a strike to call a perfect game?” What Froemming would have lost is integrity, even if only he knew. Umpires can show no bias, to a team or to a situation. Froemming never worked the plate for a perfect game, but he never manufactured one, either. As badly as Joyce missed his call in Detroit on Wednesday, he also did what he thought was right. That is the umpire’s job, even if it was no consolation to Joyce. “I just cost the kid a perfect game,” Joyce told reporters in Detroit. “I thought he beat the throw. I was convinced he beat the throw, until I saw the replay. It was the biggest call of my career.”

bows and arrows, pocket knives, videos, hats and books. Outdoor Chef Kurt and his wife Anita cooked hamburgers, hot dogs and french fries for over 200 kids, parents and volunteers. The Challenge is an annual presentation of the High Desert Safari Club in cooperation with COSSA, Bend Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Back in town, Xboxes and iPods, the Internet and the Wii, traveling soccer tournaments and incoming texts compete for a kid’s attention. Out on the range, the only electronic device that mattered was the timer in Pecos Bill’s hand. Seventy-five kids, and not one of them could be seen with a cell phone under callused thumbs. From BB guns to big bore cowboy rifles and fire rings, it was a journey in fine motor

N B A

GARY LEWIS

A

s far as anyone can tell, the word safari is rooted in Swahili. It means “the journey.” It is also, I am told, taken from the Persian word “sefaret,” for embassy. Picture a caravan of camels laden with gifts for a far country and you get the idea. As anyone knows, those first 18 years of life are a journey. Five years ago, my wife, Merrilee, returned from a Safari Club-sponsored Adventure Wilderness Leadership School in Jackson Hole, Wyo., with an idea. We held our fifth Youth Safari Challenge in the desert east of Bend on Saturday. Two-hundred people gathered at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range. A few, like Jonathan and Nathan Wright, from Lincoln City, traveled across the mountains to shoot safari-style targets and learn survival skills. Kids ages 5 to 10 were issued Small Game Licenses and older children, ages 11 to 19, were handed Big Game Licenses. Events were geared to each age group — the 22 Rimfire Varmint Shoot and BB Gun Warthog were reserved for the youngest and least experienced, while older kids tried Wingshooting, Cowboy Lever Action Rifle and Archery Antelope. Leon Pantenburg taught FireMaking to keep kids interested while their peers were on the firing line. With flammables and sparks, he was never without an audience. Out on the shotgun range, Jeff DuPont, of Youth Outdoor Adventures in Grass Valley, ran the wingshooting stage where the clay pigeons climbed straight away, like guinea fowl flushed in the mopane scrub. Station 5 was the most difficult event this year. Here, under the tutelage of the Horse Ridge Pistoleros — Mojave Mick, the Commodore, Slow Lee and Pecos Bill — a youngster learned the safe operation of a lever-action or pump-action rifle chambered for 45 Long Colt. Then, with six rounds in the tube, the young cowboy or cowgirl stepped up to meet the black-hatted, fearsome Pooney Bill and pound him with five rounds to his headgear, gloves and boots, then shoot the steel buffalo at 40 yards out. Twelve-year-old Kid Bailey ran the course in 8.32 seconds for top score, while Josiah Alexander and Connor Briggs finished second and third. Door prizes were laden on all participants. Gifts included binoculars, BB guns, air rifles,

F I N A L S

Title game reignites rivalry The NBA’s most storied franchises are at it again as the defending champion Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics meet in the NBA finals for the second time in three years, and the 12th time overall. Team comparison

Season series • 1-1

Playoff statistics Per-game average

Kobe Bryant made the go-ahead jumper with 7.3 seconds left in the Lakers’ win, but missed rematch with a sprained ankle.

Points Opponents PPG Field goal pct. Free throw pct. Rebounds 3-point pct. Turnovers Opponents TO

105.7 101.7

96.6 91.4

.477 .748 43.1 .348 12.1 11.9

.461 .749 39.1 .384 14.0 16.4

Jan. 31 Lakers at Celtics

90 89

Feb. 18 Celtics at Lakers

87 86

KEY MATCHUP

Pau Gasol vs. Kevin Garnett Two year’s ago, Garnett, that season’s defensive player of the year, led a powerful interior defense that bullied the Lakers’ frontcourt. Gasol is much tougher now, and has a chance to prove it this time.

Gasol SOURCE: NBA

Garnett Prediction: Lakers in six

our fans really come to watch the actual game.” L.A. should be fully focused on this historic matchup, however. Most players on both teams already have jewelry after Boston beat Los Angeles in six games in 2008, and the Lakers routed Orlando last season. But just one ring isn’t enough now — not for the veterans who appreciate the rare opportunity to go for two. “If you look at the great players in Celtic history, the great teams, they’ve all won a couple of championships at least,” said Pierce, who dumped his baseball dreams for basketball mostly because of this rivalry’s irresistible pull in the 1980s. “I want to

AP

be mentioned up there with the great Celtics of all time, cement my name in history with the group by winning more than one championship. ... To win another one, and to come close to it, is pretty impressive.” Celtics coach Doc Rivers subtly emphasized this point all season at Boston’s training complex with a blank banner hanging above their practice court, right next to the 2008 banner. Rivers claimed it was put there by the late Red Auerbach, whose coaching record for NBA titles was broken by Lakers coach Phil Jackson last year. Jackson wasn’t quite so explicit in his gym, although the

banner for a 16th title would fit neatly in a spot on the east wall. “It’s very rare that you have this occasion when a team has won a championship, another team (went) off and won a championship, and now you have the renewal of the rivalry,” Jackson said. “It’s a special thing. I mentioned that to the players, that it’s a special thing for us — not so much about the (Bill) Russell era, or the (Dave) Cowens era, or the (Larry) Bird and Magic era.” Only nine NBA teams have won more than one title, and just five franchises besides the Lakers and Celtics repeated as champions within the same half-decade, further winnowing the ranks in which this season’s champions will find themselves after the series. Bryant is in his seventh NBA finals, winning his first three and then losing twice. He was the 2008 regular-season MVP, yet Pierce outplayed him in that meeting, winning the finals MVP award. Bryant responded by propelling the Lakers to last season’s title, and his current playoff run has been even more impressive — 29.4 points, 6.2 assists and 5.1 rebounds per game despite having his knee drained during the first round. “I don’t think there’s any doubt that this is one of the great playoff performances,” Jackson said. “This year particularly stands out simply due to a lot of speculation at the end of the season, and how he’s really recovered and led this basketball team during this playoff. This is an outstanding performance up to this point.”

Chris Smith / Submitted photo

Mark Fero instructs Yvea Smith, of Bend, in the proper care and feeding of a .22 rifle. The Youth Safari Challenge drew 75 participants to the COSSA Range on Saturday. skills, focus and single-minded concentration. Down on the ground with a diminutive rifle, faced off against a paper ground squirrel, the grit under the elbows and the wind made it real. Now was the time to focus, to pay attention to fundamentals, to apply a shooter’s control to the task at hand — disciplines that serve a person well in later life. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.


H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG Youth fishing ponds in Central Oregon

Pine Nursery Pond Cooley Rd.

18th St. Butler

d.

Purcell Blvd.

BEND

Yeoman Rd.

Pine Nursery Community Park

Mk

Shevlin Park, Bend Ryan Brennecke / For The Bulletin

Aspen Hall

Kingery’s Dry Ice Drake, courtesy Orvis at the Old Mill.

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Shevlin Pond

Airport

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ee

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y Wa Redmond ort

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97

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Fireman’s Pond

Dr.

126

ing ton

Sixth St.

97

d. e R Lak Veterans Way

d.

126

Highland Ave.

Empire Ave.

t. R

Bend Parkway

Fireman’s Pond, Redmond Antler Ave.

Pine Nursery Pond

97

Deschutes Mkt. Rd.

A number of fishing ponds in Central Oregon are open to youth only. Parents and guardians can assist their children in fishing on these ponds. Pine Nursery Pond in Bend is open to family fishing, meaning adults can fish right along with their kids.

FLY-TYING CORNER

e Sh

m Tu

BEND

REDMOND

ve.

Skyliners Rd.

Prineville Youth Fishing Pond eil

PRINEVILLE

26

Hw

y.

Ochoco State Wayside

Third St.

Meadow Lakes Golf Couse

126 To Redmond, Bend

Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

26

First St.

Main St.

O’N

Deer St.

Continued from D1 Designers with the Bend Park & Recreation District and the ODFW took care to create a natural setting for the man-made pond, even if the parking lot and ball fields are just a few steps away. Several rock outcroppings allow anglers to access deeper water, as does a gravel walkway that juts out into the middle of the pond. Twelve feet at its deepest, the pond is filled with irrigation water from nearby canals. Hodgson said biologists are still experimenting with how to optimize angler opportunity at Pine Nursery Pond. The trout, he explained, can have difficulty surviving in the warmer irrigation water of summer. “We did run into problems last year with trout survival,” Hodgson said. “The current plan is to have trout during the spring and fall, but also bluegill and bass (which are better suited to warmer water) to provide opportunity for the summer months. We also are purchasing some fish from private trout vendors (for stocking). We’ll experiment with the stocking program and see what works best.” This past Saturday, the ODFW hosted a free youth fishing clinic at Pine Nursery Pond. Trout and bluegill, most in the 8- to 9-inch range, were stocked in the pond two days prior to the clinic. Fishing was “red hot” during the event, according to Hodgson. “We were pleased with the turnout,” he said. “Everybody

had a really good time … a lot of young kids and parents.” PowerBait and worms lowered to near the bottom of the pond were most effective for hooking fish, Hodgson said. While many young anglers have already wet a line on Pine Nursery Pond, Hodgson said the pond’s popularity will only increase over time. “A lot of people simply aren’t aware of the pond,” he said. “Once more and more people discover it, it’ll be a great resource to the city of Bend and the community.” A new youth fishing pond in Madras, near the Jefferson County Fairgrounds, is also in the works. Plans call for it to be operational by fall, Hodgson said. Pine Nursery Pond and the pond in Madras are part of ODFW’s new emphasis on recruiting new anglers. As the popularity of fishing continues to decline among young people, according to Hodgson, the agency is seeking to promote the sport to youngsters, hoping to make lifelong anglers out of them. “There’s a lot of other distractions in society, and we are losing our angler base,” Hodgson said. “One way we can turn that trend around is to provide more and better opportunities for kids in urban areas. Not only do we want to get today’s youth fishing, but we want to keep them fishing. “And there’s nothing like a tug on the end of the line to get them excited.”

Can al

Youth

Boyd Acres Rd.

D6 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Fifth St.

27 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

ARCHERY STICK AND SAGE 3-D SHOOT: June 5-6, 9 a.m. Saturday to 10 a.m. Sunday; site is 7 miles west of Bend at the corner of Century Drive and Forest Road 41; traditional/primitive bows only; hosted by the Traditional Archers of Central Oregon; 40-target 3-D trail shoot and kids 3-D course; $15 weekend/$10 day; camping available Friday and Saturday nights; 541-4106835 or ferris@bendbroadband.com.

FISHING FLY-FISHING TECHNIQUES ON THE CROOKED RIVER: June 19-20, 9:30 a.m. to noon and 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; general overview of equipment and terminology, then meet on the Crooked River to fish and implement new casting skills; fishing license required; $16 payable to instructor at first class for flies and leader; $175 fee; 541-3837270 or noncredit.cocc.edu. YOUTH FLY-FISHING CAMP: June

21-23, 9 a.m. to noon at Bend’s Shevlin Park; for ages 9-13, the camp teaches fly-fishing basics; must bring own equipment; space is limited; cost is $60 for in-district residents, $81 otherwise; 541-389-7275. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION:

Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Stafford Inn, 1773 N.E. Third St., Prineville. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: New 13-station 100-target course and 5-Stand open Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 6 p.m., weekdays available for groups of five or more with reservations; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Trap, skeet, and sporting clays fields; rifle/pistol ranges; open to the community; training programs

CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: The reservoir has been restocked with 8-inch rainbow trout and is open to public fishing for the first time since it was chemically treated in October 2009. These fish will be able to take advantage of the vacant habitat and ample food supply and should grow quickly. BIG LAVA LAKE: Anglers are having good success for rainbow trout. The fish are in great condition ranging in size from 11-14 inches. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Fishing at Crane Prairie is very good with anglers catching larger fish up to 5 and 6 pounds. CRESCENT LAKE: Boat launching access to the lake is available at the Crescent Lake Lodge and the USFS boat launch at Crescent Lake Campground. There is currently good opportunity for lake

FISHING REPORT trout, brown trout and kokanee. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Flows on the Crooked River are gradually decreasing and are currently around 400 cfs. Fishing is good and will improve more as flows level out. CULTUS LAKE: Cultus is open and anglers have had success catching lake trout and a few rainbow trout. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Northern Boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): Good hatches of the legendary golden stone and salmonflies are occurring from Maupin to Warm Springs. This is the best time of the year to catch Deschutes trout on large dry flies. Spring chinook anglers should still grab your gear and head out to Sherars Falls on the lower Deschutes. Fishing has been steady and anglers continue to catch bright spring chinook. EAST LAKE: The ice is off the lake and the Hot Springs boat ramp is open. HOOD RIVER: A few bright summer steelhead and spring chinook are being reported by anglers. Water

temperatures continue to be colder than normal. Anglers should watch for warming water temperatures because fishing will pick up when the water warms a few degrees. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Trout fishing has improved over the last two weeks. Several legal-sized bull trout (greater than 24 inches) have been caught, but most bull trout being reported are in the 16- to 20-inch range. Kokanee angling is improving with most fish ranging from 11-13 inches. NORTH TWIN: Recent angler reports are that anglers are catching rainbow trout in the 10- to 14-inch range. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Shore fishing has been good between the boat ramp and the dam. Opportunities for 12- to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather. ODELL LAKE: The kokanee angling at Odell has turned on and anglers are having excellent success. Lake trout angling should also be good. Please note that all bull trout must be released unharmed. PAULINA LAKE: Paulina Lake is ice-free

Prior to the green drake hatch, the nymph can be matched with olive-colored flies in sizes No. 8-12. When you see adults on the surface, switch to a dry fly. Look for a hatch anytime between late May and the end of July. You may see the bugs anytime between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Overcast days are the best bet, but an angler can find green drakes on sunny days as well. With its dark wings and tail, Kingery’s Dry Ice Drake

and competition; families welcome; www.rrandgc.com. “WILD BUNCH” SHOOTOFF: Using the guns of the famous 1969 movie; public welcome on June 4-6 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Central Oregon Sports Shooting Association on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; 541408-7027 or www.hrp-sass.com. FREE SHOOTER’S CLINIC: Examine, learn about, and fire the guns of Cowboy Action Shooting on Saturday, June 19, from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; 541923-3000 or www.hrp-sass.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

with boat access currently at Paulina Lake Lodge. Anglers are having some success catching kokanee in the 10- to 11-inch range along with some rainbow trout and brown trout. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Anglers continue to report good fishing and have reported catching larger trout than in recent years. SOUTH TWIN LAKE: The fishing at South Twin has been fair. Anglers are catching rainbow trout ranging from 8 to 10 inches with a few larger fish up to 20 inches. SUTTLE LAKE: A few kokanee are being caught though the fish are reported to be quite small. The brown trout angling is reported to slow. WALTON LAKE: The U.S. Forest Service will be renovating the Walton Lake Campground and its surrounding roads throughout the summer of 2010. All access to the reservoir will be closed as a safety precaution to Forest users. Please contact Ochoco National Forest at 541-416-6500 for more information. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: Fishing has been fair, with some folks catching kokanee and others catching a few brown trout. Anglers after brown trout and kokanee should get on the water early.

Outdoor Life magazine has ranked Bend No. 6 among its list of “Top 20 Towns for Sportsmen” in 2010. The publication announced on Wednesday its third annual ranking, which appears in its June/July issue, now available at newsstands. According to a news release, Outdoor Life scored 200 towns on their “sporting opportunities and quality-oflife issues” to create the magazine’s list of “America’s Top 200 Towns for Sportsmen.” Rapid City, S.D., is ranked No. 1 on the list, followed in order by Pocatello, Idaho; Page, Ariz.; Lewiston, Idaho; and Kanab, Utah. Bend is the only Oregon town to make Outdoor Life’s “Top 20” list. The magazine credited “year-round trout and steelhead fishing” for the high ranking received by Bend, which did not make the publication’s “Top 200” list for 2009. “Outdoorsmen want worldclass hunting and fishing, but like everyone else, they also

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want to have a high quality of life,” Outdoor Life senior editor John Taranto said in the release. “The towns on this list offer the best of the outdoors as well as decent homes and schools and good-paying jobs. They are truly dream towns for sportsmen.” Other Oregon towns making Outdoor Life’s “Top 200” list for 2010 are Klamath Falls (No. 49), Eugene (55), John Day (62), Maupin (63), Medford (75), Hood River (82), Tillamook (92), Joseph (101), Redmond (154), Baker City (160) and Grants Pass (195). For details on all 200 towns in the ranking, visit OutdoorLife. com/besttowns.

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has the contrast and profile to tempt big Metolius and Deschutes rainbows to the surface during the middle of the day. Consider running a small No. 12 green nymph as a dropper off the bend of the hook. Tie this pattern on a No. 8-14 dry-fly hook. For the tail, use dark elk hair. Build the body with insect green Ice Dub and rib with mono or a V-Rib. Tie in two dark dun hackle tips for the wings and finish with a two-feather coachman and a dark dun hackle.

Bend ranked high on list of top sportsmen’s towns Bulletin staff report

Success for kokanee reported on Paulina Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

For The Bulletin

Youth fishing pond at Rimrock Park

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

By Gary Lewis

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‘Curb: The Discussion’

OUTING

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010

Before you hit the trail, grab your raincoat By David Jasper The Bulletin

The snow line continues to recede like hair from a balding man’s dome, and unlike Rogaine, the warm rainfall of late isn’t doing much to slow the process. “The snow line is rising, but it’s not setting any records right now,” says Chris Sabo, Deschutes National Forest trails specialist. “Most summer trailheads above the 5,000-foot level are either fully blocked by snow, or varying degrees of snow, at the trailhead and up the trails.” For those still seeking snow, Dutchman Flat has about a 5foot base, with good access to high-country destinations such as Moon Mountain. Although Cascade Lakes Highway has been open for more than a week, trailheads and other recreation sites are still blocked by snow, Sabo says. One exception to the snow-at-higherelevations rule is Black Butte, which is mostly snow-free, with just a few patches left near the top of the trail. Horse Butte-area trails, which had been drying out and dusting up over the past few weeks, will benefit from the current rainy conditions. “Some new rain will only help those trails out there,” Sabo says. Absent the freeze-thaw pattern seen earlier in the year, Phil’s Trail and Deschutes River Trail each have enough of an established tread that a little rain won’t hurt — much. See Trails / E3

TRAIL UPDATE

Lava it or leave it

ABOVE: Kids, including Lilly Jasper, 7, enjoy checking out lava logs — molds of trees downed by pahoehoe lava in an eruption 6,000 years ago — at Lava Cast Forest, located near Sunriver.

Sun unriver

To Bend

S.. Century Dr.

97

9720

Newberry

Lava Cast Forest perfect stop for even the not-so outdoorsy By David Jasper • The Bulletin love the outdoors as much as the next guy — unless the next guy happens to drive a Suburban or F250 to which he affixes a boat or trailer every weekend, winter included. That guy is in a committed relationship with the outdoors. I’m more a friend who benefits from the outdoors. Anything that requires the help of a third party just to go in reverse or entails possible jackknifing seems like more trouble than I need. I don’t mean to sound judgmental. In the parking lot of the grocery store I frequent, I often see Jeep Cherokees and Chevy Suburbans, rear axles straining under the load of outdoors gear, and the people ascending the running boards usually look happy. For me, there’s an inverse proportional relationship between the amount of gear required for an activity and my interest level in doing said activity. Generally speaking, I’d rather sleep than hike, hike than bike, bike than kayak, kayak than canoe. And so forth. Fortunately, for a simple outing to Lava

I

Cast Forest, not much more than the transportation there is required — perfect for us outdoor obligation-phobes who think relaxing activities shouldn’t require propane gas, diesel fuel or much elbow grease. A couple of weekends back, my wife, three kids and the new family mutt took a short trip, packing some trail mix, watermelon and granola bars into a backpack and filling up a few water bottles to head south on U.S. Highway 97 from Bend. It would be just our second trip to the forest, part of Newberry National Volcanic Monument in the Deschutes National Forest. The first time we went, the kids were toddlers, so now that their legs are more functional, they should be able to handle the one-mile-loop trail without having to be carried, which is nice. See Outing / E3

If you go What: Lava Cast Forest Getting there: From Bend, travel south on U.S. Highway 97 for 14 miles to Forest Road 9720 and proceed 8.6 miles east to Forest Road 950 and parking area. Difficulty: Easy. One-mile loop trail is paved and relatively flat, but Deschutes National Forest warns that the physically challenged must take care on steep hairpin turns near trail’s end. Cost: Northwest Forest Pass Contact: 541-593-2421

SPOTLIGHT Weed pulls scheduled Hoping to stop the spread of noxious and non-indigenous plant species, Let’s Pull Together is seeking volunteers to pull weeds at various locations in Bend, La Pine, Prineville and Redmond on June 12 and in Sisters on June 19. The family-friendly event runs from 9 to 11:45 a.m., followed by a complimentary barbecue lunch. Gloves, instructions and bottled water will be provided. Personal yard tools and shovels are recommended. For a complete list of designated sites, visit www.letspull together.com. Volunteer waivers are also available on the organization’s website or you can register the day of the event. Contact: 541-815-5558.

Pie sales support senior center

Photos by David Jasper / The Bulletin

Twisted snags like this old Juniper tree grow in the area of Lava Cast Forest, south of Bend.

Have a special occasion coming up? It’s hard to think of a finer way to celebrate than with a handmade “granny pie.” Stop by the La Pine Senior Activity Center (16450 Victory Way) from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays to order a pie, which will be ready in two to three days. Cost per pie starts at $10, depending on the pie. The “grannies” will take requests, from apple to pumpkin to lemon merengue. All proceeds benefit the nonprofit senior center. Phone orders will not be accepted. Contact: 541-536-6065. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Advocacy group protests Jesus cartoon By Matea Gold Los Angeles Times

Dear Abby: My wife, “Alana,” and I have been married for 14 years. In many ways our marriage is good, but our sex life is horrible. In my opinion, it has never been good. As time passes, I feel more and more anger toward her. Alana is attractive and physically fit; I don’t understand her lack of desire. When the subject of sex comes up, it makes us both clam up. I have been thinking of leaving her. We have become more like best friends than husband and wife. Our two boys would be crushed if we split. I have not — and would never consider — an affair. What do you think about this? — Troubled Husband In Missouri Dear Troubled: Good sex is all about open communication. If the subject makes you and your wife both clam up, it’s no wonder your sex life has faltered. Before you and Alana can get on the same wavelength, you need to understand how each of you defines a good sex life. The reason sex therapy has become a medical specialty is that so many couples have the same problems you’re experiencing. Before deciding to call it quits, ask your doctor for a referral to a sex therapist. Dear Abby: I am going to be a sophomore in college next year. I played basketball in high school and was offered a full scholarship to play at the college I attend now. I played ball during my freshman year, and I do not want to do it again next year. My heart is no longer in it. My biggest fear is letting my parents down. I know having my education paid for has helped them out, but don’t I have a right to do what makes me happy? Please help me come up with a way to convince them that I’m making the right decision. — Dropping The Ball In Iowa Dear Dropping The Ball: Before you make a final decision, you need to know what penalties

DEAR ABBY there may be for dropping your athletic scholarship. You should also check to find out what academic scholarships or loan programs you might qualify for, and if there are any part-time jobs available in case your parents are unable to foot the entire bill for your education. You should also keep in mind that, in a sense, your athletic scholarship is a job that’s getting you through college, and it doesn’t have to be your heart’s desire to be a means to an end. Dear Abby: I am writing to thank the schoolteachers, librarians and counselors who were kind to me when I was an at-risk child. My mother was mentally ill, my father was absent, and the school was my haven. I often wish I could tell some of those adults who helped me along the way that I did make it, that I turned out OK, and that I’m so grateful for the little and big ways they intervened in my life. To all who serve children: Please know that even very small kindnesses give hope and strength to the child who doesn’t receive them elsewhere. — Turned Out OK Thanks To You Dear Turned Out OK: You have written a beautiful letter, one that could have been written by many students to the educators and other adults who, by their acts of kindness, made a positive difference in their lives. If we think back, I suspect that most of us have had at least one. I know I have, and I, too, am grateful to them. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Self Referrals Welcome

NEW YORK — Conservative and religious groups that have long complained about the irreverent treatment of Christianity on Comedy Central have a new target: an animated series about Jesus Christ living in modern-day New York. It’s unclear whether the show — one of 28 projects the network listed last month on its slate of potential programs for the coming season — will ever make it out of script

development. But that hasn’t stopped a coalition of media watchdog groups from launching an effort to persuade advertisers to boycott the project, if it ever comes to fruition. Here’s a description of the show from Comedy Central: “A half-hour animated show about JC (Jesus Christ) wanting to escape his father’s enormous shadow and to live life in NYC as a regular guy. A lot has changed in 2000 years and he is the ultimate fish out of water. Meanwhile his all-powerful yet apathetic father would rather be

as well as radio talk show host Michael Medved. “After we reveal the vile and offensive nature of Comedy Central’s previous characterizations of Jesus Christ and God the Father, we expect these advertisers to agree wholeheartedly to end their advertising on Comedy Central and discontinue their support for unabashed, anti-Christian discrimination,” said Brent Bozell, president of the Media Research Center. Comedy Central had no comment.

‘Curb’ sparks debate in encore run By Lynn Elber The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Larry David’s eye-poppingly brash behavior on “Curb Your Enthusiasm” is now worthy of debate. That’s how the TV Guide Network sees it, adding a celebrity panel discussion to its encore airing of the HBO comedy that began Wednesday with episode No. 1 from October 2008. David Mandel, one of the executive producers of “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” offered a tongue-in-cheek rationale. “We’re treating it like sacred text,” he said. “There is a great tradition among the Jewish peoples, of which I count myself, that you have text and you spend the rest of your life debating the text.” The “wise men” (as Mandel dubs them, women included) brought in for the task include Jon Hamm and Jerry Seinfeld, guided by “Curb” cast member Susie Essman, who proves an adroit moderator. “We all have social mores

we live by, and Larry just shoes. throws it into the wind. “Curb Your EnthusiHe doesn’t care about that asm” also stars Cheryl stuff,” Essman said. Hines as David’s wife, A markedly agreeable Cheryl. Jeff Garlin David lauded the netplays his manager, Jeff work’s decision to expand Greene, who is marhis 30-minute sitcom into ried to Essman’s Susie an hour’s worth of pro- Larry David, Greene. gramming by adding the creator and Alan Berg, another panels, but the “Seinfeld” star of “Curb” executive proco-creator professed “Curb Your ducer, said they recogsurprise at some inter- Enthusiasm” nized comic value in pretations of his “Curb” the idea of a dissection alter ego’s behavior. The of the show and Dadiscussions were pre-taped for vid’s cantankerous behavior. broadcast. “There’s something amusing The second-episode panel that we take ourselves so seri“started to get into a discussion ously that we think it merits ofabout how I was after Mary ficial and scholarly debate,” Berg Steenburgen, that I wanted to said. have an affair with her,” David The inspiration for panels was said. “I love Mary and, yes, in life more mundane: to avoid cutting I would go after her and take her “Curb” to fit into a half-hour slot away from (husband) Ted Dan- with commercials that weren’t son, if I could. part of the original HBO telecast. “But that wasn’t the intent in the episode,” added David, who was depicted on the show getting miffed after a bowling date with Steenburgen and Danson because he discovers another customer had taken off with his

The show’s nudity and profanity were also edited. The approach allows us “to give the full story line,” said network Chairman Allen Shapiro. “If we had to take eight minutes out (for commercials), you just won’t see what Larry set out to do.” TV Guide Channel and TV Land jointly acquired basic cable rights to air the series, with TV Land expecting to begin showing it by 2013 after the run on TV Guide Network. In April, HBO announced that it will bring “Curb” back for an eighth season, with 10 new episodes set to debut in 2011.

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playing video games than listening to JC recount his life in the city. JC is a playful take on religion and society with a sprinkle of dumb.” Citizens Against Religious Bigotry plans to hold a conference call today with reporters to denounce the show, which it decried as “an abomination purported to be entertainment.” The coalition includes the Media Research Center, the Family Research Council, the Catholic League, the Parents Television Council and the American Alliance of Jews and Christians,

CENTRALOREGON

Couple’s good marriage undermined by bad sex

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Weird, True Weird, True Yellowstone: Battle For Life ’ ‘G’ Å Weird, True Weird, True 68 50 12 38 Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Venom 911 ’ ‘G’ Å Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC What Happens Housewives/NYC 137 44 Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Voisine Family The team rebuilds. ‘PG’ ››› “Lethal Weapon 2” (1989, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci. ’ Urban Cowboy 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents ’ ‘14’ Biography on CNBC Frank Perdue How Much-Dead Body? Mad Money Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s Biography on CNBC Frank Perdue Fast Cash ‘G’ Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Toxic Childhood Larry King Live Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å Toxic Childhood 52 38 35 48 Toxic Childhood (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Com.-Presents Tosh.0 Å Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Beverly Hills Cop The Buzz Bend City Edition PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon RSN Extreme RSN Presents RSN Movie Night PM Edition Health-Home 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Hannah Montana “Stuck in the Suburbs” (2004) Danielle Panabaker. ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Factory Made ‘G’ Factory Made ‘G’ Deadliest Catch: Best of Season 3 Deadliest Catch: Best of Season 3 Deadliest Catch ’ ‘PG’ Å Deadliest Catch: Best of Season 3 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ NFL Live Å 30 for 30 Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 SportsCenter NCAA Update College Softball NCAA World Series, Game 4 -- Georgia vs. Washington Baseball Tonight (Live) Å NFL Live (N) Football Live NBA Fastbreak 2009 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 College Softball College Football 1988 Oklahoma at Oklahoma State From Nov. 5, 1988. 30 for 30 AWA Wrestling Å College Football 1981 Ohio State at Michigan From Nov. 21, 1981. Å 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Casamayor vs. Castillo ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ›› “The Pacifier” (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham. Å America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Scene in a Mall ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record-Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity On the Record-Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Luau menus. Good Eats Good Eats (N) Iron Chef America Flay vs. Stone Ace of Cakes Ace of Cakes Good Eats Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Minnesota Twins at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. The Final Score Bellator Fighting Championships 20 45 28* 26 Air Racing From Perth, Australia. That ’70s Show That ’70s Show › “Just Married” (2003) Ashton Kutcher, Brittany Murphy, Christian Kane. ›› “27 Dresses” (2008, Romance-Comedy) Katherine Heigl, James Marsden. ›› “27 Dresses” (2008) Katherine Heigl. 131 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ Å House Hunters House Hunters My First Place My First Sale ‘G’ Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Income Property Bang, Buck MonsterQuest China’s Wildman ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Carbon ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å Modern Marvels Cotton ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Doors (N) ‘PG’ Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Clash of the Cavemen ‘PG’ Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å Grey’s Anatomy Stand by Me ‘14’ Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å “Joy Fielding’s The Other Woman” (2008, Drama) Josie Bissett. Å Will & Grace ‘14’ Will & Grace ‘14’ 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 MTV Cribs MIMS. ››› “Bad Boys” (1995, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith, Tea Leoni. ’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Pranked (N) ‘14’ Pranked (N) ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 When I Was 17 iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å Family Matters Family Matters Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Malcolm-Mid. Malcolm-Mid. 82 46 24 40 iCarly ‘G’ Å CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘14’ TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Half Pint Braw. Action: A-Team 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ Moonlight Love Lasts Forever ‘14’ ›› “Stephen King’s The Tommyknockers” (1993, Horror) Jimmy Smits, Marg Helgenberger. An unearthly force sweeps through a Maine town. ‘14’ Moonlight The Mortal Cure ’ ‘14’ 133 35 133 45 Moonlight Sleeping Beauty ’ ‘PG’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land Best of Praise Grant Jeffrey Changing-World The Quickening 205 60 130 The Office ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Madea’s Family Reunion” (2006) Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood. Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ››› “Babbitt” (1934) Guy Kibbee, Aline MacMahon. A tale of ›› “Ann Vickers” (1933) Irene Dunne, Walter Huston. A social ›››› “Dodsworth” (1936) Walter Huston. A European voyage (9:45) ››› “Arrowsmith” (1931, Drama) Ronald Colman, Helen Hayes. Dr. Arrowsmith ››› “Cass Timber101 44 101 29 middle-class social struggle in a small town. worker fights for the rights of female convicts. brings change to a retiree and his wife. and his wife fight bubonic plague in the West Indies. Å lane” Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Mall Cops Mall Cops Police Women of Memphis ’ ‘14’ Police Women of Memphis (N) ‘14’ Mall Cops Mall Cops Police Women of Memphis ’ ‘14’ 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) Bones ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton. Å ››› “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order All My Children ’ ‘14’ Amazing Spiez! Chowder ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Misadv. Flapjack Adventure Time 6TEEN ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Europe’s Largest Aquarium ‘G’ Million Dollar Planes ‘PG’ Å Fantastic Houseboats ‘G’ Å Million Dollar Yachts ‘PG’ Å Super Yachts ‘G’ Å Luxurious Log Homes ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Man-Carnivore Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford and Son Sanford and Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:33) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ Burn Notice Partners in Crime ‘PG’ Burn Notice Good Intentions ‘PG’ Burn Notice Devil You Know ‘PG’ Burn Notice (N) ‘PG’ Å Royal Pains Spasticity (N) ‘PG’ Å White Collar Bad Judgment Å 15 30 23 30 Burn Notice Enemies Closer ‘PG’ What Chilli Wants Tough Love Couples ’ ‘PG’ 40 Greatest Pranks 2 ’ ‘14’ The OCD Project ’ ‘14’ The OCD Project ’ ‘14’ The OCD Project ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 Brandy & Ray J PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:05) › Mallrats (5:45) ›› “The Sandlot” 1993, Comedy-Drama Tom Guiry. ’ ‘PG’ Å In the House ›› “Bedtime Stories” 2008 Adam Sandler. ‘PG’ Å (9:45) ››› “The Rock” 1996, Action Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage, Ed Harris. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “My Cousin Vinny” 1992, Comedy Joe Pesci. ‘R’ Å After Film School ››› “Raising Arizona” 1987 Nicolas Cage. ‘PG-13’ (9:15) ›› “Down Periscope” 1996 Kelsey Grammer. ‘PG-13’ Å After Film School Revnge-Nrds 4 Surfing Surfing The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Red Bull X-Fighters Calgary Surfing Surfing The Daily Habit Weekly Update Stupidface Å Check 1, 2 Amer. Misfits Thrillbillies Å Memorial Clinic PGA Tour Golf Memorial Tournament, First Round From Dublin, Ohio. Golf Central Memorial Clinic Memorial Clinic Planet Jack Planet Jack PGA Tour Golf M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å “Always and Forever” (2009) Dean McDermott, Rena Sofer. Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) › “12 Rounds” 2009, Action John ››› “Cast Away” 2000, Drama Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt, Nick Searcy. A courier company executive is ma- › “Jumper” 2008 Hayden Christensen. A young man has the Treme Smoke My Peace Pipe Albert Real Sex 24 ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 Cena. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å rooned on a remote island. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ability to teleport himself anywhere. ‘PG-13’ Å makes a stand. ’ ‘MA’ Å (5:15) Fabulous! The Story of Queer Cinema ‘14’ Å (6:45) ›› “Wild Tigers I Have Known” 2006 ‘NR’ Å Jon Dore Show (8:45) Advantage ›› “The Gate” 1987 Stephen Dorff. ‘PG-13’ Å Monty Python Whitest Kids Henry Rollins IFC 105 105 (4:40) ››› “Twins” 1988 Arnold Schwarzenegger. A genetically ›› “17 Again” 2009 Zac Efron. A 37-year-old man miraculously (8:15) ›› “Virtuosity” 1995, Action Denzel Washington, Kelly Lynch. A former police- ›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” 2008, Science Fiction Keanu “Erotic Traveler: Lost MAX 400 508 7 enhanced man seeks his shortchanged twin. transforms into a teenager. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å man must stop a computer-generated killer. ’ ‘R’ Å Reeves. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å in Ecstasy” Naked Science ‘G’ World’s Toughest Fixes (N) Known Universe Stellar Storms ‘PG’ Naked Science ‘G’ World’s Toughest Fixes Known Universe Stellar Storms ‘PG’ Lockdown ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Penguins Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Ren & Stimpy ’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt Archer’s Choice Magnum TV Whitetails Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Zumbo Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Wild Outdoors Beyond the Hunt Trophy Quest Outdoors Trophy Hunt Expedition Safari OUTD 37 307 43 (3:40) “The Ama(5:20) “The Deal” 2008, Comedy William H. Macy. iTV. A movie ›› “War, Inc.” 2008, Comedy John Cusack, Hilary Duff, Marisa Tomei. iTV. An under- ››› “In the Loop” 2009, Comedy Peter Capaldi, Gina McKee. iTV Premiere. Politicos Nurse Jackie ’ United States of SHO 500 500 teurs” 2005 ‘R’ is on hold until its star can be rescued. ’ ‘R’ cover hit man must organize a pop star’s wedding. ’ ‘R’ look for opportunity as the U.S. prepares for war. ’ ‘NR’ ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Caterpillar ‘G’ Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Caterpillar ‘G’ NASCAR Smarts NASCAR Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Starz Studios ‘14’ (5:20) ›››› “L.A. Confidential” 1997 Kevin Spacey. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:45) ›› “Josie and the Pussycats” 2001 Rachael Leigh Cook. ‘PG-13’ › “Fired Up” 2009 Nicholas D’Agosto. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Party Down ‘MA’ ›› Con Air ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:50) › “Reunion” 2009, Drama Brett Cullen. Members of a (6:25) ›› “Love and Other Disasters” 2006, Romance-Comedy › “Money Train” 1995, Action Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Jennifer Lopez. A “Rob Zombie Presents: The Haunted World of El Superbeasto” › “Student Bodies” TMC 525 525 Yale secret society reunite in New York. ‘NR’ Brittany Murphy. ’ ‘R’ Å transit cop’s foster brother plans a subway robbery. ’ ‘R’ 1981 ‘R’ 2009 Voices of Tom Papa. ‘R’ Å Whacked Out ››› “Tin Cup” (1996, Comedy) Kevin Costner, Rene Russo, Cheech Marin. The Daily Line (Live) WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 20/20 Medical Mysteries ‘G’ Å 20/20 Medical Mysteries ‘PG’ Å 20/20 Medical Mysteries (N) ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å The Locator ‘PG’ The Locator ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY GOLF BENEFIT: Play 18 holes of golf; must register for tee time; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; $49; 6:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-923-4653. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Sparrow” by Mary Doria Russell; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: R. Gregory Nokes speaks about his book “Massacred for Gold: The Chinese in Hells Canyon”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541388-6999 or www.clear1017.fm. THE HELIO SEQUENCE: The Portlandbased electro-rock duo performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $15 plus service charges; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. CLUMSY LOVERS: The Canadian roots-rock band performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. SYNRGY: The Northern Californiabased reggae act performs; $5; 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

FRIDAY BALLOONS OVER BEND: The eighth annual event includes a balloon launch and breakfast; free; 6-7:30 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-323-0964 or www.balloonsoverbend.com. HOLY REDEEMER PATIO SALE: A benefit for the Holy Redeemer Church’s altar society; lunch available; free; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-306-0641. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. “ANNIE JR.”: Trinity Lutheran School’s theater department presents the Broadway musical about an orphan and her optimistic outlook on life; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-382-1850. BELLUS VOCIS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The Central Oregon Community College choirs perform a spring concert, under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-383-7510. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL YOUNG ARTIST SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT: A showcase of the top 2010 Young Artist Scholarship recipients; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-593-9310 or www.sunrivermusic.org. “INVICTUS”: A screening of the PG13-rated 2009 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

“LEND ME A TENOR”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE LARAMIE PROJECT”: The Rever Theatre Company presents the story of a young gay man found tied to a fence outside Laramie, Wyo; $12, $10 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-788-6555, revertheatreco@ gmail.com or www. revertheatreco. ticketleap.com. BEARD TEAM USA PREPARTY: Featuring a performance by As The Devil Dances; ages 21 and older; $5, free with a ticket to the beard and moustache championships; 8 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-323-0964. HERMAN’S HERMITS STARRING PETER NOONE: The retro musicians perform; ages 21 and older; $20-$30; 8 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-5531112 or http://kahneeta.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5 to 9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend.. TYRONE WELLS: The California-based rock/ pop musician performs, with Eric Tollefson; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.bendticket.com. WHISKEY REBELLION: The Richmond, Va.based Americana band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.myspace. com/silvermoonbrewing.

SATURDAY BALLOONS OVER BEND: The eighth annual event includes dozens of hot-air balloons, live music, juggling, face painting, vendors, a night glow in Riverbend Park and more; free; 6 a.m. balloon launch and breakfast in Riverbend Park, 10 a.m. festival opens, 8:30 p.m. night glow; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive; 541-323-0964 or www. balloonsoverbend.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; free; 7 a.m.-2 p.m.; 824 N.W. Stonepine Drive, Bend; 541-3882192 or www.kurerafund.org. AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free for spectators; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646. HOLY REDEEMER PATIO SALE: A benefit for the Holy Redeemer Church’s altar society; lunch available; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-306-0641. VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with hash browns, sausage, ham, eggs, biscuits, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. UNITARIAN YARD SALE: Buy household goods, books, dishes and more; proceeds benefit the Unitarian Universalists of Central Oregon; free; 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-3853908 or uufco@yahoo.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

BENEFIT POKER RIDE: Featuring an auction, tack swap meet, food and poker; proceeds benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; $3 or three cans of food, $6 per hand; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Ghost Rock Ranch, 148800 Beal Road, La Pine; 541536-1335, swendsens@yahoo.com or www.ghostrockranch.com. HIGH DESERT RHUBARB FESTIVAL: Dutch oven cooking clubs prepare a variety of dishes that include rhubarb; with vendors selling antiques, crafts, rhubarb and more; proceeds benefit St. Charles Foundation and Community Assistance for Neighbors with Cancer; free admission, $1 per sample; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; L & S Gardens and Land Clearing, 50792 S. Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-536-2049. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-4893239 or annsnyder@rconnects.com. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: A sale of gently used items, with a bake sale, cake walk, barbecue and games; proceeds benefit Camp Sunrise; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Redmond-Sisters Hospice, 732 S.W. 23rd St.; 541-548-7483. LARKSPUR FESTIVAL: Featuring a plant sale, family activities, games, craft and gift sales, live entertainment, dance demonstrations, food and more; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Larkspur Park, 1700 S.E. Reed Market Road, Bend; 541-388-1133. SAGEBRUSH SOLDIERS: An encampment of Civil War soldiers from 1860, muskets blazing; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 seniors, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. STREAM STEWARDSHIP DAY: Join the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council for a day of stewardship activities to keep local rivers and streams healthy; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-382-6103, kyake@ restorethedeschutes.org or www.restorethedeschutes.org. LOCAL FOOD POTLUCK: Bring a dish and enjoy live music, local products and services, and educational material; free; noon-5 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-279-0841. “ANNIE JR.”: Trinity Lutheran School’s theater department presents the Broadway musical about an orphan and her optimistic outlook on life; $10; 2 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-382-1850. “FOOD FIGHT”: A screening of the documentary, followed by a Q&A with director Chris Taylor; proceeds benefit Harvest of Hope and Smart Food Initiative; $5; 2 and 6 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-480-8555, aimee@ bendeventco.com or www.bendeventco.com. “THE LARAMIE PROJECT”: The Rever Theatre Company presents the story of a young gay man found tied to a fence outside Laramie, Wyo; $12, $10 students and seniors; 2 and 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-788-6555, revertheatreco@gmail.com or www. revertheatreco.ticketleap.com. NATIONAL BEARD AND MOUSTACHE CHAMPIONSHIPS: Watch bearded and mustached competitors compete for top honors, with live music by El Loco; preceded by a procession down Bond Street; $10 plus fees for the competition, procession free; 2 p.m. judging begins, 1 p.m. procession and doors open; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; http://beardteamusa. org or www.bendticket.com.

BINGO BASH: Play bingo in support of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; ages 18 and older; $65; 3 p.m.; Bingo Benefitting Boys & Girls Clubs, 531 S.W. Elm St., Redmond; 541-526-0182. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: R. Gregory Nokes talks about and presents a slide show from his novel “Massacred for Gold”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. BEACH-VOLLEYBALL POKER TOURNAMENT: Play poker and support the building of public beachvolleyball courts in the Old Mill District; $30 buy in; 6 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-419-9699. LUAU ON THE HIGH DESERT: Featuring dinner, dancing by The Hokulea Dancers, an auction and a DJ; proceeds benefit the Redmond Panther Booster Club; $50 per couple; 6 p.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-419-5150. NIGHT OF POSSIBILITIES: With live and silent auction, appetizers and live music by Lino; proceeds benefit The Opportunity Foundation’s Life Skills Program; $35, $65 per couple; 6:30-9 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-548-2611, smichaels@ ofco.org or www.ofco.org. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: Featuring songs by top gospel choirs; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www. freewebs.com/bendgospel. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. CHICHARONES: The Portlandbased hip-hop act performs, with Jukebot, Mindscape and Capture the Flag; $10; 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. myspace.com/bendistillery. WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock act performs, with Anastacia; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

SUNDAY BALLOONS OVER BEND: The eighth annual event includes dozens of hot-air balloons, live music, juggling, face painting, vendors and more; free; 6 a.m. balloon launch and breakfast in Riverbend Park, 10 a.m. festival opens; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive; 541-323-0964 or www.balloonsoverbend.com. AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free for spectators; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646. HEAVEN CAN WAIT: 5K walk and run to benefit Sara’s Project; $20-30, $40 on race day; 7:30-8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. race begins; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-389-0756 or www.heavencanwait.org. ALL-HOBBY SWAP MEET: Local clubs representing a range of hobbies sell their wares; barbecue available; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; D’s Hobbies, 757 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3891330 or dshobbies@bendcable.com. SAGEBRUSH SOLDIERS: An encampment of Civil War soldiers from 1860, muskets blazing; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 seniors, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org.

M T For Thursday, June 3

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) Noon, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 12:10, 2:30, 5, 8 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:45 a.m., 3:05, 7:30 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:15, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:15, 7:15 THE SECRET OF KELLS (no MPAA rating) 12:25, 2:55, 5:25, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 11:55

a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 8:05, 10:15 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 3:55, 6:40 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 10:50 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 2:25, 4:45, 5:15, 7:45, 8:15, 10:35 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 11:20 a.m., 2, 5:05, 7:35, 10 MACGRUBER (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:15, 9:35 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 2:10, 4:20, 4:50, 7:10, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) Noon, 4, 7:20, 9:30, 10:25 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 10:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1, 1:30, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 6:50, 7:30, 8, 10:05, 10:40 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 11:10 a.m., 12:05, 1:50, 2:40, 4:30, 5:25, 7, 8:10, 9:40, 10:45 SHREK FOREVER AFTER 3-D (PG)

10:40 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:15, 2:20, 3:50, 5, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15, 8:45 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 5, 8 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 5:30 HOT TUB TIME MACHINE (R) 8:15

Photos by David Jasper / The Bulletin

Lava Cast Forest affords great views of Mount Bachelor, seen here, as well as Newberry Volcano. Lava Cast Forest’s fivesquare-mile geologic area is the site of three separate eruptions.

Outing Continued from E1 The trip down from Bend is surprisingly short and scenic. En route, one passes by Lava Butte, as well as the turnoff for Lava River Cave, a perfect stop on a hot summer day, should we ever again encounter one. The well-marked turnoff for Lava Cast Forest Road is just 14 miles south of Bend, less if you’re lucky enough to live at the south end of town. Once you’re off the highway, it’s an eight-mile drive on bumpy Forest Road 9720. Hint: If you plan on going to Lava Cast Forest, don’t bother with a car wash between now and then. On our way there, we passed a few cars heading the opposite direction, and had the place all but to ourselves. One other family was just returning to the parking lot from the loop trail’s end. My family and the dog took off ahead of me as I locked up the car. As I went to catch up, my three girls came running back toward me. I figured something bad had happened, but not yet: They then pelted me with miniature snowballs, one of which went directly in my ear. There’s nothing like an earful of snow to start off an outing. Once we were on our way, we stopped at each of the 12 markers on the trail, and took turns reading their descriptions in the trail guide (available at the trailhead). We were like nerds in an outdoor museum, if you will. Not much had changed in the six or seven years since we’d last visited, which is to be expected with geologic features thousands of years old. This particular feature, according to the trail guide, is home to three discrete lava flows that took place during an eruptive phase of Newberry Volcano’s Northwest Rift Zone. The Lava Cast Forest formed about 6,000 years ago. Both Lava Cast Forest and Lava Butte are situ-

A textbook example of a tree mold, formed when flowing lava pushed up against tree trunks.

ated along this zone, one of several such fissures that radiate outward from the mountain’s center. When the volcanic activity occurred, plant life of the time, much the same as today’s, was smothered by smooth pahoehoe lava. The lava eventually turned to rock, leaving tree molds where once trees stood, and lava logs where trees, held in place by roots, refused to budge with the flowing lava. On a clear day, one gets great views of Newberry Volcano and, from the latter stages of the loop, Mount Bachelor. Kids will have a blast imagining the sizzle of trees succumbing to lava while they’re peaking their heads into the lava molds. The walk takes about 45 minutes, depending on how many stops you make to stick your head down in the lava casts. And at the end, if you’re like us, there are snacks to be had, a fitting reward for less than an hour of being outdoorsy. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 7:30 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 5:15 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 5, 7:30 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 7 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 5, 7:30 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 5

REDMOND CINEMAS

PINE THEATER

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 4, 7

Trails Continued from E1 “Some rain is going to make them a little sloppy, and there will be puddles and water may be running down some of them, but those are going to be in pretty good shape, except for getting rained on. It’ll be a wet ride or hike,” says Sabo. “Take a rain-

coat. I’d definitely suggest that.” Good news for trail lovers: About 100 people from around the state will attend a trail-work training in the Sisters area this weekend, “So we’ll get more volunteers trained up on maintenance,” Sabo says. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, June 3, 2010: This year, you discover the power of imagination, luck and a willingness to transform. This is a powerful mix, allowing you to live out some of your dreams. You also might be drawn to a cause of some sort. A key relationship or partnership plays an instrumental role in your year. This person expects a lot, and you are willing to meet his or her standards. If you are single, this person could be a new sweetie. If you are attached, the two of you become an even stronger team. A special event or trip bonds you even closer. PISCES demands a lot from you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Get started early, as you are a veritable whirlwind in the a.m. Use the afternoon for work or a responsibility that demands reflection. Someone is changing in front of your very eyes. Make a needed adjustment. Tonight: Get some beauty sleep. (We all need it.) TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH A plan or project comes to fruition, and you greet success. A meeting carries more significance than you are aware of. A partner has a similar perspective to yours. You can discuss a problem openly. Tonight: Where the action is. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Thought and needed research come together in a

project. Step up to the plate in the p.m. Understanding will evolve to a new level if you work with a key person. This person is more expressive than he or she has been in a while. You could be extremely relieved. Tonight: Could be late. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH A discussion sinks in, and suddenly you realize the dynamics a good deal later. You see new potential that you haven’t been witness to for a substantial time. Imagine the possibilities. Make calls. Tonight: Follow the music. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Someone proves to be inspirational, even if you completely disagree with him or her. You could be questioning the hows and whys of a problem. Work with a key individual, and resolve what could be a major hassle. Tonight: Togetherness works. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Remain mellow and centered in your dealings. You might wonder why you are doing certain things or acting out. Stay on top of a problem, and refuse to let it get to you. Midday, people pop up with great ideas. Make it OK to have your schedule waylaid. Tonight: Say “yes” to someone you care about. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might be slightly amused by a difficult situation. What you decide to do with it is, of course, your call. You might not be sure what to do, and are unlikely to do anything. Still, enjoy the interaction. Tonight: Getting extra work or errands done.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH If you can, get a clean start. You might need to handle a personal matter directly. Your choices here are reflective of who you are. Don’t worry so much. Your sense of fun stimulates creativity later today. Tonight: Consider starting the weekend early. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might want to attempt a conversation with a sometimes-difficult associate this morning. Let it go too late, and you might not have the same energy on the matter. Tonight: Be spontaneous while heading home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Deal with a financial matter first thing in the morning. You might feel as if you cannot clear up a misunderstanding. A discussion in the afternoon could be more important than you realize. Tonight: Visit with a friend or loved one. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Your best time is in the a.m., when the winds blow in your direction. Don’t postpone anything; get as much accomplished as you can. This afternoon, give serious thought to your budget. Tonight: Your treat. (Give yourself permission to treat just yourself.) PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You bloom midday. What you might have associated the word “impossible” with, you discover is quite doable. A friend helps you revamp your thinking. Listen to his or her impressions. Tonight: Zero in on what you want. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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ORGANIZATIONS TODAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-3392. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF DESCHUTES COUNTY: 541-389-6990. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SONS OF NORWAY: Scandinavian heritage; 7:30 p.m.; Fjeldheim Lodge Hall, Bend; 541-382-4333. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30-5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Social hour; 4:15 p.m.; 541-388-4503. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org.

BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m. to noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@bendbroadband. com or 541-306-4171. DESCHUTES COUNTY BALLROOM DANCE CLUB: 8-10 p.m.; 175 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-322-0220 or www.deschutes countyballroom.com. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. PEACE VIGIL: 4 to 5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 3 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. OPEN DANCE: 7-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363. RICE COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee

Roasters, Redmond; 541-447-0732.

ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-385-9198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-389-0663. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE: 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. VFW DEXTER FINCHER POST 1412: 7 p.m.; Veterans Hall, Prineville; 541-447-7438. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AGILITY DOG CLUB: 541-385-6872 or 541-385-5215. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS: 3-4 p.m.; Deschutes Services Building, Bend; 541-815-0482. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT CORVETTES CLUB: 6 p.m.; Johnny Carino’s, Bend; 541-923-1369. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. HIGH DESERT SADDLE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-923-2605. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799.

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: 6:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, Bend; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. PRINEVILLE EAGLES BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge, Prineville; 541-447-7659. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; 657 S.W. Glacier Ave., Redmond; 541-323-7413. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Prineville Soroptimist Senior Center; 541-447-6844. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. WOMEN’S GROUP (GRUPO DE MUJERES): 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366.

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30 p.m.8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 4 p.m.-close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CASCADES MOUNTAINEERS: 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental

Center, Bend; 541-549-1322. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY GAY/STRAIGHT ALLIANCE NETWORK SUPPORT GROUP: 6-8 p.m.; office@humandignitycoalition.org or 541-385-3320. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. EFT CIRCLE: 7 p.m.; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Airport; 541-419-5496 or www.eaa1345.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT AMATEUR RADIO GROUP (HIDARG): 11:30 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-388-4476. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. MOMS CLUB OF BEND: 10:3011:30 a.m.; First United Methodist Church, Bend; 541-389-5249 or www.momsclubofbendor.org. NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: Hospitality coffee for women; 10 a.m.; RSVP required; 541-330-1654. OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.; China Sun Buffet, Bend; 541-382-7969. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. SOCIETY FOR CREATIVE ANACHRONISM (SCA): 6:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; www.corvaria .antir.sca.org. TRI-COUNTY WOMEN IN BUSINESS: 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Redmond; 541-548-6575.

October. The silver 1964 Aston Martin DB5, dubbed by car auctioneers RM Auctions as “the world’s most famous car,� is expected to fetch at least $5 million. It comes with Bond gadgets

including fake machine guns, revolving number plates and smoke screen. The model is being sold by U.S. radio broadcaster Jerry Lee, who bought it for $12,000 in 1969. — From wire reports

WEDNESDAY

N    N  Dion pregnant at last — with twins LOS ANGELES — Celine Dion’s struggle to have one more baby has more than paid off. She’s pregnant with two.

Publicist Kim Jakwerth told The Associated Press in an email Sunday that the 42-year-old Canadian songstress is 14 weeks pregnant with twins, and she plans to find out the sex of the babies next month.

Dion and her husband and manager, Rene Angelil, have one son, 9-year-old Rene Charles. She had undergone several rounds of in vitro fertilization in an attempt to get pregnant again.

James Bond’s Aston Martin on block LONDON — The Aston Martin driven by Sean Connery in the James Bond movies is going on sale at a London auction in


H

F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Nutrition Processed foods are everywhere, but are they ‘real’? Learn all about natural foods, plus a healthy recipe, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2010

“We’re exercising our whole being. Our mind, our body and our spirit. You can’t separate them.” — Eileen Fahlgren, Fit for The King instructor at City Center Church in Redmond

Eileen Fahlgren, below, leads her class through an exercise during the Fit for The King exercise class at City Center Church in Redmond. The class incorporates Christian principles into a strength- and flexibility-building routine.

Lisa Gladden, a family nurse practitioner, checks the blood pressure of Eileen Andrewson during the last day of a wellness class at Seventh-day Adventist Church.

fit

Physically, spiritually

Karen Wilson measures the height of Sally Pfeifer during the final day of a wellness class at Seventh-day Adventist Church. The workshop is one of the most-intense church-run wellness programs locally.

Local churches provide wellness classes for members and nonmembers alike By Betsy Q. Cliff • Photos by Ryan Brennecke • The Bulletin

F Dietitian Lori Brizee, center, supervises as Edward and Daisy Sarrano prepare a tasty and low-calorie meal at First Presbyterian Church in Bend.

rom its first moments, it’s obvious that Fit for The King is no ordinary exercise class. First, there’s the name. Then, instructor Eileen Fahlgren reads several verses from the Bible before class. Christian rock begins playing. Fahlgren commands the class: “Focus on your core (abdominal muscles) and Jesus as your core spiritually.” F I T N There are about seven women in the class, which meets every Wednesday morning at City Center Church in Redmond. It’s one of a number of fitness or wellness classes run through churches in Central Oregon. Focusing on the connection between body and spirit, these classes aspire to improve the physical health of participants in order to make them better able to serve God and the community.

“We’re exercising our whole being,” said Fahlgren. “Our mind, our body and our spirit. You can’t separate them.” Fitness classes have become an increasingly popular offering of churches across the nation in the past decade. Some churches, particularly in poor or inner-city neighborhoods, run programs because there are no E S S other places nearby to exercise. Others respond to member surveys asking for exercise as part of the church. Still others target specific groups, kids or adolescents or seniors, in their programs. A 2007 survey by the National Council of Churches USA, which represents 105,000 individual congregations, found that about one quarter of churches offered exercise classes. See Church / F4

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Care Gout patients to see increase in drug cost Compassionate For The Most Difficult Steps In By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

Patients taking prescription drugs know to expect some unintended side effects. But few were on the lookout for something like this. New regulations encouraging M O pharmaceutical companies to test older, previously unapproved medications have resulted in a fifty-fold increase overnight in the price of a drug used for centuries to treat gout. As a result, patients with no drug coverage could see the cost of colchicine rise from

9 cents a pill to $4.85 a pill, while insured patients will likely face higher co-payments now that the drug is available only as a brand-name product. The price increase comes as a result of an initiative by the Food and Drug AdN E Y ministration to urge the testing of drugs that have never gone through the approval process. The use of colchicine predates the establishment of the FDA in 1938, and its sale was grandfathered in when the agency was created. But in 2006, the FDA announced an initiative aimed at removing such unapproved

drugs from the market. The agency offered additional incentives for manufacturers to take their drugs through the approval process. Philadelphia-based URL Pharma, one of 21 manufacturers that had been producing unapproved colchicine, completed a clinical trial of its colchicine product and submitted the data to the FDA. In July, the agency approved the drug under the brand name Colcrys to treat acute flare-ups of gout, and granted the company three years of marketing exclusivity. See Gout / F6

Life’s Journey.

INSIDE

FITNESS

MEDICINE

Exercise tips

Celebrity medicine

The lunge strengthens the glute and leg muscles, Page F4

Bret Michaels has a hole in his heart, but it’s a fairly common occurrence, Page F5

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Experts in Chronic and Terminal Care Serving 24 Hours Everyday. A local, non-profit, mission-driven organization for over 30 years

Call or visit our website at:

541.382.5882

www.partnersbend.org


F2 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H D

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SUPPORT GROUPS AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-548-0440 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541-3828274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-382-7504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEAT CANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-4202759 or 541-389-6432. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR

Submitted photo

Camp Fire USA members and their families run laps at a Family Fun Run at High Desert Middle School in 2008. See the Classes listing for details on this year’s race. SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DOWN SYNDROME PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-317-0537. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-318-9093. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133. HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-350-1915 or HLACO@ykwc.net. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399.

LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MLS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT):

541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541-322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-3885634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

CLASSES CAMP FIRE USA FAMILY FUN RUN: Run as many laps as possible in 30 minutes and celebrate your health; with games and snacks; $12, $35 for a family of four; 8:30 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. run Saturday; Cascade Middle School, 19619 S.W. Mountaineer Way, Bend; 541-3824682 or www.campfireusaco.org. PARENTING NOW: Learn about parenting; for those with children ages birth to 6; $30, $50 per couple; 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning June 15 through July 27; Family Resource Center, 1130 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; 541-389-5468. PHYSICAL FITNESS CHALLENGE: Complete two minutes of pushups, two minutes of sit-ups and a twomile run; followed by a barbecue; donations accepted to benefit Caring for Troops; free for students, staff and military; 9 a.m. Friday; Central Oregon Community College, Mazama track, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3143 or dgreenwood@cocc.edu to register.

• ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731.

• ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Center for Health & Learning; 541-706-6390 or www.cascadehealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395.

Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

Is coconut water the new miracle drink of choice? By Jennifer LaRue Huget Special to The Washington Post

Zico brand coconut water is billed as “Nature’s Sports Drink,” but is coconut water really the best beverage for the job? Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, noted that coconut water is fine, “if you like the taste” (which, I have to say, I don’t). As for “the hype that it will cure everything from cancer to hypertension,” Giancoli said,

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“there is no miracle food. Every time we ‘miracle-ize’ a food, we lose sight of its real benefits.” And those benefits are? “Coconut water is lower in calories than a Gatorade or juice,” Giancoli said. Better yet, it’s a really good source of potassium, delivering nearly 700 milligrams per serving. Giancoli said, “Most people don’t exercise heavily enough to need a sports recovery drink. Water is just fine for most people.”

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• IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-306-1672 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND HEALING YOGA: Sante Wellness Studio, 541-390-0927 or www.redmondhealingyoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STEPPING SENIORS/STEPPING SENIORS TOO: Bend Senior Center; 541-728-0908. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA FITNESS: Latin rhythms dance-based fitness classes; 541-610-4598.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 F3

N DID YOU KNOW? These dishes may look and sound tasty, but watch out for the calories Headed out for a meal? You may not realize how many calories you’re eating with some restaurant dishes. The Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nutrition watchdog organization, recently released its annual Xtreme Eating Awards, given to the unhealthiest choices on restaurant menus. See if you can guess the calorie content of a few of this year’s winners. The California Pizza Kitchen 1. Tostada Pizza with Steak has how many calories? a) 1,350 b) 840 c) 1,680 eat a P.F. Chang’s Pan2.IfFriedyouNoodle Combo, how

many calories will you slurp in? a) 1,440 b) 1,900 c) 1,820

3.

Which of the following meals has the most calories? a) Olive Garden’s Fettuccine Alfredo b) California Pizza Kitchen’s Pesto Cream Penne c) Olive Garden’s Spaghetti & Meatballs How many calories are in the 4. Cheesecake Factory’s Pasta Carbonara with Chicken (pictured below)? a) 1,900 b) 2,500 c) 1,200 — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin Answers: 1. c) 1,680; 2. c) 1,820; 3. b) California Pizza Kitchen’s Pesto Cream Penne (1,350); Olive Garden’s Fettuccine Alfredo has 1,220 calories and the Spaghetti & Meatballs has 1,110 calories; 4. b) 2,500 Source: Center for Science in the Public Interest

Photo courtesy Center for Science in the Public Interest

Gastric bypass surgery is a tough answer to obesity By Barbara Quinn The Monterey County Herald

Quick. Multiply your weight in pounds by 703. Divide that number by your height in inches. Divide that number by your height in inches again. That number is your BMI … Body Mass Index. If your BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9, your weight is considered “normal.” BMI 25.0 to 29.9 is “overweight.” And a BMI of 30 or more is termed “obese.” “Super-obesity” — BMI greater than 40 — affects an estimated 250 million people worldwide. And along with this excess weight often comes a poor quality of life, chronic disease, and early death, according to recent article in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Over the past 20 years, gastric bypass or bariatric surgery has emerged as one of the most effective ways to treat extreme obesity. It’s not for the faint of heart, however. The most common procedure, called “Rouxen-Y”, rearranges the digestive system to “bypass” most of the stomach and creates a new and much smaller stomach “pouch.” Food intake is severely limited after gastric bypass, resulting in dramatic weight loss — as much as half of one’s excess weight within the first year after surgery. Chronic conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure are often radically improved after this type of surgery as well. “Bariatric surgery,” says one author, “forces participants to undergo a volatile dietary adjustment.” Which means? Food choices must be permanently changed. Food must be chewed to liquid to avoid getting “stuck” in the much smaller new stomach pouch. High fat or high sugar foods can cause nausea, diar-

rhea, or a particularly unpleasant side effect called “dumping.” And, as might be expected when you bypass a major digestive organ (the stomach), gastric bypass surgery can create major nutrition complications. Patients who undergo this procedure must commit to a lifetime of high nutrition eating and daily intake of dietary supplements — especially iron, calcium, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. Unfortunately, like many other weight loss tools, even gastric bypass, over time, can be … bypassed unless accompanied by changed health habits. As many as 20 percent of gastric bypass patients regain much of the weight they lost in the years following surgery. A recent study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association notes some factors that are associated with successful long-term weight loss in these patients: Younger age. Thirty-something females were more successful than 40-something females at losing excess weight after bariatric surgery. Continued low-calorie intake. Even several years after surgery, the most successful losers were eating about 1,600 calories a day compared to an average 1,900 calories for less successful patients. Exercise. Patients who reported taking more than 7,000 steps a day were four times more likely to maintain weight loss goals than those who did not. Barbara Quinn is a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula.

Next week Studies fail to find nutritional benefits from organic foods.

Are you eating ‘real’ food? Book’s authors say it’s time to get real about processed, packaged foods By Jennifer LaRue Huget Special to The Washington Post

Packaged guacamole makes the cut. Pop Tarts do not. The difference? The first is “real” food, the second not so much. That’s according to Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough, whose new book, “Real Food Has Curves: How to Get Off Processed Food, Lose Weight, and Love What You Eat” (Gallery), is a guide to what should be a natural, intuitive activity: feeding ourselves. Connecticut couple Weinstein (a trained chef) and Scarbrough (a former English professor) have written 17 cookbooks together over 11 years and write for Weight Watchers, Cooking Light and, on occasion, The Washington Post. (Weinstein is also known for his book and blog about knitting for men.) In “Real Food,” they walk us through a seven-step process of weaning ourselves from packaged and processed foods, starting by selecting and tasting — really tasting — a fresh peach and ending with committing to “treat yourself well” by bettering your breakfast, enjoying midday snacks and relishing dessert. Along the way, readers learn to view foods in terms of how close they are to “real.” In the authors’ paradigm, freshly squeezed orange juice is “real,” orange juice not made from concentrate “almost real,” orange juice from concentrate “barely real” and bottled orange-flavored drink “not real.” Wherever your typical diet falls in this range, the authors suggest you “take one step to the left,” closer to the “real” end. “As you go about your day,” they write, “think about what’s real and what’s not, what’s almost real food and what’s barely so, what’s been shellacked with additives, what’s wonderful in its natural state.” Eating in this fashion will probably help you lose weight, say the authors, who both shed pounds when they shifted toward “real” food. But it will also make your diet

INGREDIENTS

¼ C flour, preferably unbleached 1 oz unsweetened or baking chocolate, finely chopped 2 tsp vanilla extract ¼ tsp salt

2 large eggs 2 C low-fat milk 1 ⁄3 C packed light brown sugar ¼ C unsweetened cocoa powder

STEPS

more healthful and satisfying, they promise. Grocery shopping with the couple, as I got to do last week, is an exercise in discretion and label reading. Just back from a business trip, they needed to restock their larder. Scarbrough assured Weinstein that they still had plenty of homemade granola; what they needed were ingredients to make the week’s lineup of vegetable-and-grain-based lunch salads, which include wheat berries, quinoa, roasted corn and red peppers, baby artichokes, cucumbers and celery. (You can find recipes on their blog: www .realfoodhascurves.com.) The two are wary of ingredients such as “flavoring” and “spices,” which really don’t pin down what you’re putting in your mouth. They nixed bottled coleslaw dressing (whose first ingredient is sugar) but approved of pre-sliced, packaged purple onions in the refrigerator section. If you use those onions, Weinstein says, “you are cooking; you’re just not chopping.” Tofu makes the grade, but not tofu-based vegetarian chorizo sausage. If your dietary restrictions preclude your eating a certain food, Scarbrough suggests, “don’t get something fake instead.” If you’re gluten intolerant and can’t eat a pizza, he says, better to forgo “fake,” wheat-free pizza crusts and opt instead for a plate of nachos with (“real”) melted cheese. Weinstein bakes bread at home, but for convenience’s sake he buys store-baked bialies. That’s in keeping with Scarbrough’s advice that “convenience shouldn’t be discounted,

By Rob Stein The Washington Post

Vitamin D has been in the news a lot lately because of research indicating that many Americans may be suffering from deficiencies of the “sunshine vitamin.” Well, there’s some cautionary new research that suggests that taking vitamin D could have some unexpected downsides. Kerrie Sanders of the University of Melbourne in Australia and colleagues studied 2,256

1. Have four 6-ounce ramekins or custard cups at hand. 2. Whisk the eggs in a large bowl until they are smooth and creamy, with no remaining floating bits of translucent egg white. 3. Combine the milk, brown sugar, cocoa powder, flour, chocolate, vanilla extract and salt in a large saucepan over medium heat; whisk until the chocolate melts and the mixture just begins to bubble. Cook for 30 seconds, whisking, while the mixture thickens considerably. Remove from the heat. 4. Whisk half of the warm chocolate mixture into the eggs in a slow, steady stream, until smooth and well incorporated. Then return the combined mixture to the remaining chocolate mixture in the saucepan and place over low heat. (If you’re using an electric range, it may be helpful to have a second burner set on low.) Whisk constantly over low heat for 2 minutes, reaching into the edges of the pan and letting the pudding come to only the barest bubble. If the pudding starts to bubble, reduce the heat as needed or take the pan off the heat and keep whisking for a few seconds to cool it down. The consistency will be silky, with body. 5. Transfer to the individual ramekins or custard cups. Cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface to keep a skin from forming, if desired. Refrigerate for about 1 hour, or until well chilled and set. NUTRITION Per serving: 260 calories, 11 g protein, 36 g carbohydrates, 9 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 115 mg cholesterol, 260 mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 18 g sugar — Jennifer LaRue Huget Photo by Jennifer Beeson Gregory / The Washington Post

just examined.” As for the common wisdom that the most healthful food lies along the grocery store’s perimeter, Scarbrough asserts that some approved foods can be found among the boxes, bags and cans in the center aisles. Shelf-stable vacuum boxes of milk pass muster, for instance, as do some canned tomatoes and rice. Still, the grocery shelves are stacked against those seeking “real” food. In the syrup aisle, Scarbrough pointed out that the only “real” sweeteners there, the honey and real maple syrup, are on the top shelf, out of reach. And they are more expensive than

the front-and-center pancake toppers whose first ingredients are corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup, with not a drop of maple in the mix. As we left the store, Scarbrough mentioned that he and Weinstein “almost called the book ‘Chocolate Pudding Will Save Your Life.’” To these two, the difference between pudding made at home with a few simple ingredients and the additive-riddled kind in boxes or tubs is emblematic of their approach. “If you have ‘real’ chocolate pudding,” Weinstein says, “it will change the way you think about everything.”

women age 70 and older to see if giving them a huge dose of vitamin D once a year would reduce their risk of falls and fractures. That’s a big problem for the elderly, and there’s plenty of good evidence that vitamin D is vital for strong bones. So the researchers were surprised to discover that the women who got the vitamin D experienced 15 percent more falls and 26 percent more fractures than those who got a placebo, according to a report

in last week’s issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The researchers speculate that the reason may be the dose of vitamin D used in the study. It’s the largest total annual dose of vitamin D — 500,000 international

units — used in any large study like this. There might be something about giving that much vitamin D all at once that causes the body to produce less vitamin D, which ends up weakening bones, causing more falls and fractures, the researchers say.

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Makes about 2½ cups (4 generous servings) This simple version takes minutes to prepare. It has an intense chocolate flavor: not sweet so much as satisfying, with a silky, luxurious texture. Adapted from “Real Food Has Curves,” by Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough.

Vitamin D may have its downsides, too

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Real Chocolate Pudding

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F4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F EXER C ISE TIPS PROPER TECHNIQUE

L unge

Morri Stewart, a trainer at the Athletic Club of Bend and Energize Fitness, demonstrates the correct way to perform some of the classic strengthening exercises. Doing these with the proper form helps prevent injury and maximize benefit. This exercise can be done individually or you can try all nine, which have been published every other week in The Bulletin from Feb. 11 through today.

Lunges strengthen the glute and leg muscles. How to do it: This move can be done with or without free weights. Stand up straight (1). Step forward and bend knees, keeping hips faced forward (2). To protect your knees, do not let the knee get in front of the ankle. Keep shoulders back. Come up slowly and alternate legs. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

Tracy A. Woodward / The Washington Post

Stacey Thompson, right, gets her co-workers dancing at Summit Health Institute for Research and Education, one of the first Washington, D.C., workplaces pushing to establish a daily 10-minute exercise break. The Instant Recess workouts promote health for adults by making exercise a group activity.

Instant Recess This isn’t your ordinary coffee break By Vicky Hallett The Washington Post

At precisely 1:05 p.m., Stacey Thompson announced, “OK. It’s time!” Within seconds, a dozen co-workers in her downtown Washington, D.C., office had gathered by the reception desk to march in place, roll their shoulders and prepare to dance. The employees of Summit Health Institute for Research and Education (SHIRE), a nonprofit organization that fights obesity, are fittingly among the first in the city to embrace Instant Recess, a nationwide push to establish a daily 10-minute exercise break. Think coffee break or cigarette break, but good for you. “This is hard for folks to ignore. You can’t say, ‘I didn’t know it was happening.’ And if your boss has time to do it, so do you,” said SHIRE’s executive director, Ruth Perot, who removed her purple blazer to participate (but kept her pearls on). Vigorous moves such as lifting your arms and kicking your legs back elevate the heart rate, but the routines are accessible to everyone, from the 20-something interns to 79-year-old senior project associate Canary Girardeau. Even a woman who wandered into the office to ask a question joined in for a minute. There’s no doubt this ritual looks weird — just ask the delivery guy who stood outside the office window snickering. But it shouldn’t. And it won’t, predicts UCLA professor Toni Yancey, who created Instant Recess and has a forthcoming book on the topic. “In five years, Instant Recess will be in Congress, churches, waiting rooms,” she says. “Once the opportunity is available, people will take it.” It’s about to become more available, as Instant Recess is the calling card for the new National Physical Activity Plan. Announced this month by a coalition of 20 partners from the public and private sectors, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, YMCA and AARP, the plan aims to change our national culture to make exercise part of everyone’s lives. The strategies include encouraging programs at workplaces and schools, mak-

ing physical activity a “vital sign” that doctors discuss with patients, and integrating activity into transportation plans by prioritizing sidewalks, bike lanes and trails. “There’s no single action that can solve this problem,” says the University of South Carolina’s Russell Pate, chairman of the plan. For too long, experts have clung to the idea that if you tell people they need to exercise, they will. But when many of them hear recommendations that they should be active for an hour a day or walk 10,000 steps, they get overwhelmed. “We’ve learned the hard way that giving people advice and encouragement isn’t getting it done,” he says. So instead of targeting individuals, the plan is going after society. As Shellie Pfohl, the newly named executive director of the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, puts it: “We’ve engineered exercise out of our daily lives. Now we have to engineer it back in.” That means little changes, such as keeping stairwells well lit — and maybe having some inspiring music pumped in — to make climbing more attractive than riding the elevator. It also means bigger changes, such as making neighborhoods safer for strolling. Ensuring that the wonders of the outdoors are readily available to everyone is particularly important to National Recreation and Park Association chief executive Barbara Tulipane, who’s also on board with the plan. “I’m excited to get people to understand that it’s not that hard. You don’t have to wear a heart rate monitor,” she says. “It’s as simple as taking a walk in the park.” (And getting more funding for park and recreation programs.) What also makes the plan stand out is that it’s not just kids’ stuff. Most of the attention these days has been focused on childhood obesity, and while that’s a critical concern, people of all ages have grown too sedentary. So it’s vital to let adults know that they’re not a lost cause, especially because they’re the ones who can shape society — and a whole lot of bodies while they’re at it.

Church Continued from F1 Churches used to run more activities, such as bowling or softball leagues, said the Rev. Eileen Lindner, a minister and consultant to the National Council of Churches, who supervised the 2007 study. They got away from that, said Lindner, “and are now coming back.” Most churches, Lindner said, see physical health as fitting into the larger ministry. “Christianity does teach that the body is the temple for the spirit,” said Lindner. “That’s the theological planking underneath this.”

Fit for God The number of fitness or wellness programs has blossomed in Central Oregon in the past few years. Fit for The King started about five years ago. This spring, the First Presbyterian Church in Bend put together a wellness program, called Healthy Minds, Healthy Bodies, Healthy Spirits. It tested the class in a pilot program and plans to offer a class open to the congregation soon. That class focused on teaching people how to take care of their bodies through both nutrition and fitness, and particularly how to lose weight. The church took a survey of the congregation, said Elizabeth Stephan, the church’s care ministry coordinator. “One of the chief (issues) was control. That’s what this is addressing.” Stephan said she sees the class as having components that went beyond some of the commercial weight-loss programs. “I think there’s a lot of people in emotional pain and sometimes that’s reflected in how they care or do not care for their bodies,” she said. Society sometimes gives people the message that they are not lovable, she said, “and that you need to look a certain way to feel good about yourself. That’s a very spiritual issue.” She said the class focuses on teaching people good fitness and nutrition habits, but also on acceptance. Even if people sign up because of the weight-loss component, Stephan said, she wanted them to come away with the notion that physical and spiritual health were tied together. The church plans to offer the class as four two-hour sessions and to charge $75 to cover the cost of materials.

Spiritually fit, physically fat Many church classes target specific groups. The National Council of Churches survey

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Marcia Houston, right, shows Edward Sarrano, 10, how to cut beets for a salad as Lori Brizee demonstrates for Daisy Sarrano, 16, how to cut bell peppers during a fitness and wellness class at Bend’s First Presbyterian Church. found that seniors, in particular, tended to inspire much of the new fitness programs. “This is not your father’s senior citizen program where you come play bingo, have a nice lunch and then go home,” Lindner said. “Yoga, tai chi and other forms of exercise are very prominent and very frequent. That’s a real evolution taking place.” In Bend, the First United Methodist Church runs a balance class strictly for seniors. “It’s one of the main problems for people over 65,” said instructor Doris Lilly. She said that sometimes a fall can immobilize a senior enough that that alone causes them to need care in a nursing home. Lilly has been teaching balance classes at the church for about three years. In her classes, she said, she has seniors practice walking tall, walking with their head turned to the side and walking in a straight line. She’s seen some great success stories. “One man who was fairly frail, he was falling almost every week,” she said. “Since he joined our class, he hasn’t fallen. We’re pretty pleased, and he’s pleased, too.” The class is open to anyone and does not have a set cost; the church asks for a donation but doesn’t require it. The class has been a success, said Lorraine Zachary, the parish nurse, because seniors may be more willing to come to church than to a gym. “What I have found out over quite a few years in this position is that people just feel very comfortable in this building,” she said. They know others, she said, and “they feel at ease.” It may be that churchgoers, in particular, are not as comfortable in gyms. Rob Killen, a founder of Church Fitness, a

Therapy for depression should focus on thoughts, not behavior By Shari Roan Los Angeles Times

Cognitive behavioral therapy can be effective for even severely depressed people, but the therapy should focus on changing how people think instead of focusing on how they behave, according to a new study. Encouraging behavior changes to improve mood appears to make a lot of sense. Depressed people are often advised to go for a walk, visit friends and schedule activities. But it may be more helpful for therapists to work with patients on their thought processes, such as challenging negative thoughts and replacing those thoughts with more positive and realistic ideas. Researchers at Ohio State University studied 60 patients with severe depression. Various therapists treated the patients and the sessions were analyzed

to rate how much the therapists relied on cognitive and behavioral methods of therapy. The patients completed questionnaires to track their depression. The study found that patients improved when therapists focused on cognitive techniques but didn’t improve when therapists focused on behavioral techniques. The effects of cognitive techniques were strongest in the first few weeks of therapy. The patients who improved the most also were the ones who collaborated with the therapist on a treatment plan and who followed the plan. “If you’re a patient and willing to fully commit to the therapy process, our data suggest you will see more benefit,” the lead author of the study, Daniel Strunk, said in a news release. The study is published online in the journal Behaviour Research and Therapy.

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“Most (churches) want to grow and expand their membership. This is a tool that allows people to connect to the church.”

Virginia-based company that helps churches set up fitness facilities, cited a study that found that people who attend church regularly are not as fit as those who do not. He said that including physical fitness in a church’s mission could be a way to change that. “A lot of the churches we talk to have expansion plans (that) include fitness,” he said. “It’s neat that churches are starting to address the physical as well as the spiritual.”

a revamping of most participant’s diets. The class, which costs $250 per person ($350 for a couple) for four weeks, is made up of 80 to 90 percent community members who do not attend the church. It’s offered to the full community because sharing knowledge is considered part of the ministry, said Lisa Gladden, the coordinator for the program. “I think of it as a whole package,” she said. “Spiritual health, mental health, physical health. I think God wants all of it for us.” For Fahlgren at City Center Church, it allows people to connect to the church in a different way, exercising their body and spirit at the same time. And, practically, she said, it can be hard to fit God into a busy schedule. “Time is an issue,” she said. “We try to put it all in one class. You get the physical and the spiritual.”

New programs, new members

Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

— Rob Killen, a founder of Church Fitness in Virginia

Fitness programs, too, can be used as tools to get community members into the church. Even if they don’t become regular congregation members, they will at least get the exposure. “Most (churches) want to grow and expand their membership,” said Killen. “This is a tool that allows people to connect to the church.” One of Central Oregon’s most intense church-run wellness programs is the Coronary Health Improvement Project, or CHIP program, run by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Bend. Once a year, the church puts together a five-week program that includes blood testing, more than 30 hours of class time, exercise competitions and

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 F5

M CELEBRITY M EDICINE Hole in heart is common and usually won’t need treatment Bret Michaels, the former lead singer symptoms and don’t need treatment. of the rock group Poison and a recent Some doctors believe the hole could increase contestant on the reality TV show “The the risk for strokes, but the evidence is far Celebrity Apprentice,” continues to rack up from conclusive. The theory is that tiny clots diagnoses. After undergoing treatment for of blood from veins in the lower abdomen and appendicitis and a pair of strokes, Michaels legs, which typically lodge in the lungs and learned that he also has a hole in his heart. dissolve, may be able to bypass the lungs by Known as a patent foramen ovale, the hole passing through the hole in the heart. If they exists between the right and left upper travel to the brain and lodge there, they could Bret Michaels block an artery and cause a stroke. chambers of the heart. All babies are born with the hole, but it usually seals itself in Michaels’ doctors indicated the singer was the first or second year of life. In at least 25 percent of on blood thinners to prevent further strokes and faces people, however, the hole never closes, allowing blood surgery to close the hole in his heart. to flow back and forth from the heart’s right and left — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin atria. Most people who have the hole don’t have any Source: Mayo Clinic

Corey Lowenstein / Raleigh News & Observer

Biotechnology scientist Donna Needham works with blood samples at Galaxy Diagnostics in Durham, N.C. Dr. Edward Breitschwerdt and Ricardo Maggi of North Carolina State University founded Galaxy Diagnostics to cultivate the Bartonella bacteria.

The pain of Bartonella Scientists study bacteria known to cause trench, cat scratch fever By Sarah Avery McClatchy-Tribune News Service

RALEIGH, N.C. — A bacterial infection typically spread by fleas, lice and biting flies could be more prevalent than many think, and may have been transmitted from a mother to her children at birth, scientists from N.C. State University say. Dr. Edward Breitschwerdt, an infectious disease veterinarian and one of the world’s leading researchers of bacteria called Bartonella, has for the first time documented evidence that the pathogen may have been passed between family members. Although more studies are needed to back up his findings, Breitschwerdt and colleagues describe the case of a mother and father who began battling chronic aches, fatigues and other symptoms soon after they were married. When their twins were born in 1998, the daughter died after nine days from a heart defect, and the son developed chronic health problems. Using tissue from the daughter’s autopsy and blood from the surviving family members, Breitschwerdt’s team discovered that the entire family was infected with the same species of Bartonella bacteria, despite having no shared exposures to flea or lice infestations. Bartonella is known to causes such illnesses as trench fever and cat scratch disease, and it is increasingly suspected of triggering a variety of aches and inflammations that doctors have been unable to diagnose. “I think we have stumbled across something that is of monumental medical importance,” said Breitschwerdt, whose findings were published recently in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. Proving the mother-child transmission could be difficult, however. Little funding is available for such research because the bacteria are still not considered a major source of human disease. Dr. Michael Kosoy, who heads the Bartonella laboratory for the Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention in Fort Collins, Colo., said scientists are only beginning to build evidence that Bartonella infections may be more common than previously thought. “Bartonella are circulated around the world in many animals, but there are different Bartonella species, and the question is how can they be transmitted to humans?” Kosoy said, noting that most known cases have been transmitted from biting insects. He said the NCSU findings about the potential family transmission is compelling but inconclusive.

Dozens of strains At least 26 strains of Bartonella have been named worldwide, and the list is growing. The most notorious Bartonella infection is cat scratch disease, a fever illness passed to humans from flea-infected cats. Fleas are the primary hosts, and they spread the bacteria in their feces. Other Bartonella strains spread more serious diseases. Kosoy is studying how often heart inflammation is caused by a Bartonella that thrives among rat fleas in Thailand. He has already established that about 25 percent of unexplained fever illnesses among a group of patients there were caused by Bartonella. “This is not limited to cat scratch,” Kosoy said. “That’s just the tip of the iceberg.” Breitschwerdt said he thinks the bacteria may be the hidden cause behind a host of chronic symptoms — muscle aches, neurological problems, fatigue, arthritis — that defy diagnosis. About two years ago, Breitschwerdt began testing blood samples from a doctor in Maryland, who was curious whether Bartonella infections might be causing problems for some of his patients. “There are lab tests showing inflammation,” but no discernible cause, said Dr. Robert Mozayeni, a Yale-educated rheumatologist who practices in Rockville, Md. Mozayeni contacted Breitschw-

erdt and his NCSU colleague, Ricardo Maggi, who together developed a more sensitive test for Bartonella. Routine blood tests fail to detect Bartonella because they search for antibodies that the body is slow to produce. Instead, Breitschwerdt and Maggi figured out how to cultivate the bacteria in the laboratory from blood samples of infected people. They founded a company called Galaxy Diagnostics to handle the laboratory volume. Of Mozayeni’s mystery patients tested at the lab, nearly 20 percent had Bartonella infections. “I suspect this is going to be one of the causes of rheumatoid arthritis and a few other things, but it’s too speculative right now to say,” Mozayeni said.

PROTECTION WITH A PRICE?

Safety of sunscreen for kids in question By Julie Deardorff Chicago Tribune

Sunscreen can help prevent those painful episodes of childhood sunburn, a risk factor for skin cancer later in life. But although sunscreen is recommended for infants older than 6 months by everyone from the National Institutes of Health to the American Academy of Pediatrics, there’s growing concern by advocacy groups, parents and some doctors that some of the chemicals in the products are endocrine disruptors and may pose risks to children. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which drafted sunscreen safety standards in 1978, is expected to issue the final rules in October. But for the last three decades, “it has been a Wild West on the market,” said Jane Houlihan, senior vice president of research for the advocacy group Environmental Working Group. “Parents need to be careful what they’re using, as well as follow other sun-safety measures, in-

cluding wearing protective clothing and sunglasses,” she said. EWG recommends against using any product containing the ingredient oxybenzone. Though oxybenzone is approved by the FDA, “we know it’s absorbed significantly into the body,” said Dr. Alan Greene, the author of “Raising Baby Green: The EarthFriendly Guide to Pregnancy, Childbirth and Baby Care” (Jossey-Bass). What concerns Greene is that the tests evaluating oxybenzone have been done on healthy adults in the middle of life. But the data are preliminary. Moreover, “absorption alone isn’t enough to justify any posture,” said Dr. Michael Smith, director of pediatric dermatology at Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt University. “We are very comfortable with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide agents,” said Smith, chair of the AAP section on dermatology. He added that he’s unaware of compelling data showing that par-

Sunscreen tips Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide-based sunscreens that do not contain nanoparticles are generally thicker and whiter than those that do. Avoid nanosprays or powders altogether, especially near the face because the particles can be inhaled into the lungs, said Dr. Alan Greene, author of “Raising Baby Green.” Once your baby is 6 months old, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends products with a rating of SPF 30 or more with a broadspectrum sunscreen, or one that protects against both ultraviolet A and B rays.

ents need to be concerned about any ingredients in current FDAapproved sunscreens, including oxybenzone. Experts caution that there is little, if any, data on the potential impact on children’s health.

Human testing More studies are needed, and Mozayeni said he has now joined Breitschwerdt and Maggi in the diagnostic company to oversee human testing. “Certainly, the prevalence of Bartonella infection in people with chronic illness is higher than I would have ever guessed, but we still don’t know what that means,” Breitschwerdt said. Among the biggest unknowns is how to treat people who have been infected. The effectiveness of antibiotics depends on which strain of Bartonella is at work, and with so many strains, treatments can be hit or miss. Breitschwerdt said the family in his most recent study declined to comment about their experience. He said they were having difficulty finding a doctor to treat them. “It is very difficult to find a physician who wants to see someone with a chronic illness that is poorly defined,” he said, adding that many such patients often think they have Lyme disease, a tick-borne bacterial infection with similar symptoms — and stigma. “With an unexplained illness, it becomes problematic.”

Health Heroes Awarded for H1N1 and Dental Services The Deschutes County Public Health Advisory Board* awarded two Health Heroes for the 2009-2010 fiscal year. Dr. Richard Fawcett, private practice clinician and medical officer for the H1N1 event in Deschutes County, and the Medical Teams International Dental Van are award recipients. In addition, a number of agencies in the community worked together to provide a robust and effective response to the H1N1 Pandemic. Deschutes County would like to thank them and their committed employees for their collaborative efforts to protect the health of our citizens. Local medical providers, hospitals, EMS/fire departments, schools and pharmacies are essential partners in the local response effort. You are all Public Health Heroes!

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Deschutes County Public Health Advisory Board Chair Aylett Wright, Dental Van volunteer Dr. Spencer Krueger, Dr. Richard Fawcett, Dental Van volunteer Dr. David Dunscombe, Dental Van Coordinator Debbie Stumbaugh.

Deschutes County Health Services (541) 322-7400 *The Deschutes County Public Health Advisory Board advises Deschutes County Health Services in public health strategic and programming matters.

Deschutes County Health Services. Be well. Stay well. We’ll help you get there.


F6 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M Gout

Next week Unique Oregon Health Plan benefit structure riles some doctors.

Gout’s resurgence

Continued from F1 It was also approved for the treatment of familial Mediterranean fever, a genetic disorder that affects only about 100,000 patients worldwide. Under the Orphan Drug Act, a law designed to encourage companies to develop treatments for rare conditions, URL received seven years of marketing exclusivity. The company then filed a lawsuit seeking to prevent any other colchicine from being sold in the U.S., and raised the price for its product. According to Dr. Stanley Cohen, president of the American College of Rheumatology, the price increase would raise the cost for patients taking colchicine twice daily from $6 a month to $300 a month. The cost may eventually be borne by insurance companies and public health care programs as well as patients. According to a recent commentary in the New England Journal of Medicine, state Medicaid programs had paid about $1 million for colchicine prescriptions in 2007. States might now pay as much as $50 million. Rheumatologists complained about the price hike to the FDA and urged them to allow the continued marketing of the other colchicine products. “The removal of an inexpensive, safe and effective drug used to treat acute gout patients will have a costly effect on these patients’ access to a drug therapy,” Cohen wrote in a letter to the FDA. Many rheumatologists questioned whether URL had done sufficient research and added enough to the understanding of the benefits and risks of colchicine to earn such a profitable reward at the expense of patients and taxpayers. “They seemed to have gotten away ridiculously cheaply for what they stand to gain for it,” said Dr. Dan Fohrman, a rheumatologist with Deschutes Rheumatology in Bend. “To raise the price 50 times seems unconscionable.” The FDA explained in a letter to the rheumatology group that URL had submitted study data showing that a lower dose of colchicine was more effective at treating flare-ups, and that the company was the sole colchicine manufacturer to take “the clinically responsible step of seeking approval for unapproved colchicine.” As part of the approval process, FDA also reviewed 169 deaths of patients taking colchicine over the years and identified the risk for severe interactions with certain drugs. “Without this review by FDA, outdated assumptions of what is safe and effective for treatment with oral colchicine would have remained unchecked and patients would have continued to suffer from adverse reactions such as severe gastrointestinal complications — and even death — needlessly,” Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, told the rheumatology group. Woodcock also stressed that inaccurate information about

As many nations’ populations become older and heavier, painful gout, a type of arthritis, is becoming more common.

What happens • Uric acid builds up in the blood • Uric acid forms as food containing purines is digested • With too much uric acid, needle-like crystals form and accumulate in joints • Joints become inflamed, red, swollen, painful

Normal joint

• Repeated gout attacks may permanently damage joint

High-purine foods • Organ meats (kidneys, liver) • Oily fish (anchovies, herring, sardines) • Beer and wine

Risk factors

Big toe most common site for gout

Obesity, being over age 40 and male, family members with gout, taking certain medications, eating high-purine foods, alcohol

Long-term side effect • Tophi are lumps formed by uric acid deposits in cartilage, tendons, soft tissue

• Can also appear under the skin, most often the ears

Famous gout sufferers • King Henry VIII • Benjamin Franklin

• Theodore Roosevelt • Sir Isaac Newton

• Leonardo da Vinci • Thomas Jefferson • Karl Marx

Source: Arthritis Research Campaign (UK), NYU Langone Medical Center © 2010 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

a drug’s proper use and its side effects can cost patients and the health care system money. “These studies uncovered serious, potentially life-threatening interactions with commonly used treatments such as hypertension drugs and antibiotics,” said Dr. Richard Roberts, URL’s president and CEO. “Our research represents a major therapeutic step forward for patients and provides important new guidelines for physicians on the safe and appropriate use of colchicine.” Drug approval also means the company will have to adhere to FDA’s strict manufacturing standards, as would any approved generic drug. Unapproved colchicine, although considered a generic by doctors and insurance companies, is manufactured with no oversight. But because no other form of colchicine can be marketed, doctors will have no choice but to prescribe Colcrys off-label for its more common uses. Until another company comes forward and applies for an indication for those other uses, URL will have cornered the market for all uses of colchicine. And patients or their insurance companies will have to pay the higher price. Gout occurs when there is too much uric acid in the body, partially due to diet but mainly when the body overproduces it. When the kidneys can’t remove uric acid fast enough, it can build up and form crystals in the joints. Patients often experience painful attacks in their joints, most commonly in the big toe and at night. “If you’re using four tablets for an acute attack, you know you’ll pay that extra money,” Fohrman said. “But when you’re using it months at time, that’s where the money is going to add up.”

Colchicine is rarely used for acute flare-ups of gout anymore because it has significant side effects. Its main use is as a preventive measure to prevent flare-ups that can occur while other medications work to reduce the level of uric acid in the body. Although URL was approved only for acute attacks, there is no other colchicine product that doctors can use for maintenance therapy, which can last anywhere from a month to a year. If they’re willing to jump through a few hoops, though, most patients could avoid paying huge costs for the medication. URL created one of the broadest patient-assistance programs in the industry to date. Individuals with income up to three times the poverty level — about $66,000 for a family of four — can get a supply of colchicine for $5 a month. And individuals in households making $132,000 could still get a month’s supply for $25 a month. The program is also available to patients on Medicare and Medicaid, which is rarely the case for such programs. “We have worked closely with physicians and patients to ensure this program meets the needs of those with gout and (familial Mediterranean fever), and we are proud that our program is among the most generous patient assistance programs ever offered by any pharmaceutical company,” Roberts said. “Patients can now be assured of receiving an FDA-approved colchicine that meets all modern standards of safety, efficacy, purity and consistency, with no financial barriers to access.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

• Child wellness exams • Free H1N1 immunization vaccines • Chronic condition workshops • Affordable birth control • Nutrition programs for women & children • Annual exams and prenatal care These services offered on a sliding scale based on ability to pay.

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Deschutes County Health Services. Be well. Stay well. We’ll help you get there.

How to protect your voice By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Singers aren’t the only people who struggle with vocal problems. Here are tips from doctors on keeping your voice healthy and strong: Don’t strain. If your voice sounds hoarse or raspy, limit talking until it returns to normal. Avoid trying to yell over background noise and use a microphone when speaking in larger settings. Avoid cigarette smoke. Smoke not only puts you at risk for throat cancer, it dries out your vocal cords. Breathe right. Inhale deeply from your diaphragm, the muscle that separates your chest and abdomen, to reduce strain on your voice box. Your stomach should push in and out as you breathe. Don’t cradle phones. Tilting your head toward your shoulder will strain muscles in the neck. Don’t gargle with mouthwash. Rinses that contain alcohol or other chemicals can irritate vocal cords and surrounding mucus membranes. If you need to gargle, use warm water mixed with salt or baking soda. Exercise and eat right. Good muscle tone and posture promotes good breathing, which in turn protects your voice box. Fruits, vegetables and whole grains have several types of vitamins that help keep mucus membranes in the throat healthy. Limit damaging food and drink. Too much alcohol and caffeine dry out throat tissues, while spicy foods increase the production of stomach acids that may travel to the throat. Drink plenty of water. See a doctor if needed. If your voice is consistently hoarse or becomes noticeably deeper, or if you’re straining to talk, have frequent sore throats or are constantly clearing your throat, consult an otolaryngologist (a specialist in the ears, nose and throat). Problems can include growths cancerous and noncancerous acid reflux and upper respiratory infections.

VITAL STATS Financial incentives Financial incentives Although experts believe we’ll need more primary care physicians in the future, doctors are increasingly choosing specialties that pay more than primary care medicine. A recent analysis of career earnings, taking into account costs such as taxes, education and living expenses, found that primary care physicians will accumulate on average half the wealth of cardiologists.

Career wealth $6M

$5,171,407 $4M

$2,475,838 $1,725,171

$2M

$846,735 $340,628 0

Cardiologist

Primary care physician

Source: Health Affairs

MBA graduate

Physician assistant

College graduate

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

College students can benefit from new health care law leges and universities who’s based in Fort Collins, Colo. Aaron Smith is learning the In some important ways, the hard way that student health in- new law has the potential to stiffsurance has limits. After break- en the backbone of student plans. ing his wrist snowboarding Starting in October, all health in 2008 and twisting his knee plans, including college ones, playing soccer last year, the 28- must eliminate lifetime limits on year-old Georgetown coverage and most anUniversity law student nual limits as well. The racked up $925.69 law also requires health in medical bills, his plans to spend 80 to share of the cost under 85 percent of the preGeorgetown’s Unitedmiums they collect on HEALTH Healthcare student clinical services startCARE health plan. Smith, who ing next year, or give heads up the Young InREFORM consumers a rebate. vincibles, an advocacy It can’t happen organization that aims soon enough. Insurto protect the health care inter- ance plans don’t typically limit ests of young adults, says his coverage for conditions, and experience is not unusual for most have maximum coverage people in that age group. limits overall of $1 million or The new health overhaul law more. But a Government Acis expected to help a lot of young countability Office report found people, whether students or not. that nearly all of the 194 student One widely publicized provision plans reviewed had maximum taking effect in October will al- benefit limits, mostly on a perlow young adults to stay on their condition basis; and the typical parents’ health insurance until plan paid a maximum lifetime age 26. Many insurers have said benefit of $25,000 per illness or they’ll implement it in time for injury. students graduating this spring. All students should carefully But for students who, like evaluate their school plans and Smith, are older than 26, and for compare them to other options. those who can’t take advantage Look at the deductible and outof the law because their parents of-pocket spending limits to don’t have coverage or for other understand how much you may reasons, student health plans owe in addition to premiums, may be the only option. And un- says Sara Collins, vice president fortunately, many college plans of the Commonwealth Fund, a offer limited protection, even health care research group. It’s for this generally healthy group. also a good idea to eyeball spe“Sixty percent of the plans out cifics that often affect young there are pure junk,” says Ste- adults, including emergency phen Beckley, a health care care, maternity coverage and management consultant for col- mental health benefits, she says.

By Michelle Andrews

Special to The Washington Post


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

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T h e

B u l l e t i n :

General Merchandise

205

Items for Free

241

260

267

270

308

Bicycles and Accessories

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH

J & C Firewood

Farm Equipment and Machinery

FOSTER HOMES needed for kittens & moms w/kittens! Rescue group provides food, supplies & vet support & you provide a safe & nurturing environment for about 4 to 8 weeks so young kittens can get a good start in life. Contact 541-390-0121 or craftfostercats@g.mail.com. FREE CAT, 6 mo. old female tabby, shots/neutered, active & curious. 541-389-9239

Goldendoodle Pups, sweet, kid conditioned, beautiful, health guarantee, ready 5/28 Taking deposits, $500/ea. 541-548-4574/541-408-5909 Golden Retriever Puppies, AKC, wormed & shots, great disposition, parents OFA cert., refs. avail., 541-420-1334.

Heeler

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Kittens & cats ready for homes! 1-5 PM Sat./Sun, other days by appt. Altered, shots, ID chip, more! 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Info/ photos at www.craftcats.org. AKC BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG puppies. DOB 1/16/10 Good Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. markings & personalities. Central Oregon Largest $1500 $1700 541-383-4578 Selection. 541-408-3317 trinityfarms@bendtel.net Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 3 black & 3 chocolate AKC Tiny Yorkie Boys ~ males, 2 chocloate females $700-$900 each www. $400-$500 541-536-5385 saguarovalleyyorkies.com www.welcomelabs.com (541) 408-0916 BASSET HOUND, 1 year old, female, large kennel, bed, house broke & kennel trained, $200. 541-914-4331

Bengal Kitten Mix, Silver, 1 left, vet checked, wormed $100. Call for info. 541-923-7501.

Bichon Friese/Pom Pups, 6 wks. vet checked, shots, wormed, $300 541-977-4686

Black Lab & ?, 12 week old. 1st shots & wormed. $50. 541-382-7567 Black Lab pups, AKC, Dew claws removed, first shots, 60 days free pet insurance, hip guarantee. Grand sire has Wesminster Kennel Club champion. Males $300 and Females $350. Larry 541-280-5292

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Beagle Puppies! 8 wks on 6/9. First shots given. Parents on site. $250. 541-416-1507.

O r e g o n

Furniture & Appliances

Pets and Supplies

Basset Hound AKC pups, 4 weeks, $350 & $375, health guarantee 541-922-4673.

B e n d

208

Free full size mattress, box spring and head board. You haul. 541-388-0153.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies

Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006

541-390-6577/541-948-5277

C h a n d l e r

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200

We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call

S . W .

Pets and Supplies

Cat breeding season has begun! Please have your cats spayed and neutered before our shelters become overcrowded with unwanted litters. Adult female or male cats, $40. Bring in the litter under 3 months and we’ll 202 alter them for free! Call Bend Want to Buy or Rent Spay & Neuter Project for more info. 541-617-1010. Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central loca- Chihuahua Puppy, 7 weeks, 1st shots, Pom Puppy, 8 weeks, tion in Bend. 541-350-8917. 1st shots, $250/ea. 541-977-4686 Wanted Anvil, Also blacksmithing tools and Companion cats free to seniors! standing vise. Call Peggy at Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. (206) 972-4481 389-8420, www.craftcats.org Wanted: Anything you would ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each like to see go. 541-480-8322 541-325-3376. Rhyans91@gmail.com WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Mo- English Mastiff pups, Purebred, 7 wks. Fawns & Brindles. 2 torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, males, 4 females. $600/ea., ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! Redmond 541-410-0186 541-280-6786.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

1 7 7 7

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Labradoodles, born 5/19, choc. & black, multi-generation Movie Stars! 541-647-9831. Love cats & kittens? No-kill, nonprofit rescue group needs help at sanctuary with chores, cat grooming, small projects, adoptions, event planning. Even a couple of hours a week would make a big difference! Huge yard sale/fundraiser on June 19-20, need help with pricing, setting up & at the sale. info@craftcats.org, 389 8420 www.craftcats.org, 728-4178 “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at $55.00. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 541-923-0882

Miniature

Dachshund

Mini-Aussie Pups, 1 will be toy Dining Set -solid Birch, 55 yrs size, 3 Black Tries, 1 Blue old, 6 chairs, drop leaf Merle, 1st shots, Ready 6/14 w/pads, 2 lg extenders, good $250. 541-420-9694 cond., $300. 541-416-1051 No-kill, nonprofit rescue group Dryer, Newer Amana, comseeks donations of items for pletely rebuilt, new parts, a huge yard/barn sale! All $200, call 541-550-0444. proceeds to go towards vet costs. May be able to pick up GENERATE SOME excitement in your items. Also seek deyour neigborhood. Plan a gaposit cans/bottles, it all rage sale and don't forget to helps! info@craftcats.org, advertise in classified! 728-4178, www.craftcats.org 385-5809. Pembroke Welch Corgi Pups, AKC reg., 3 males, 2 Log Furniture, lodgepole & juniper, beds, lamps & tables, females, $500, 541-475-2593 made to order, Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, 541-419-2383 1st shots/worming, 8 weeks old, males & female avail., Mattresses good $400-$500. 541-447-4399 quality used mattresses, Pomeranian/Chihuahua discounted king sets, Pups, 2 females, 1 mo. old, fair prices, sets & singles. 1 silver & white, $325, 1 541-598-4643. black w/very little white, $275, 541-416-1878. MODEL HOME Pomeranian Puppies, 4 beautiFURNISHINGS ful Wolf Sable boys great Sofas, bedroom, dining, personality & exc. coat $400 sectionals, fabrics, leather, ea. 541-480-3160. home office, youth, POODLES, AKC Toy accessories and more. MUST SELL! or mini. Joyful tail waggers! (541) 977-2864 Affordable. 541-475-3889. www.extrafurniture.com ORIENTAL RUGS: Four 5x8, one 8x10. $50-$100. 541-390-6570. Sponsors needed for vet costs for Cimarron, who was abandoned with badly injured eyes that must be removed. He's tame & will also need a quiet forever home when well. Donations are tax deductible. Nonprofit Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, 389-8420, Box 6441, Bend 97708, www.craftcats.org.

The Humane Society of Redmond will be opening a new Thrift and Gift shop in early June. We are asking for donations of quality new and used goods to help stock our shelves. Donations are gratefully accepted at the store located on Hwy 97, across from Safeway, South Redmond , Tuesday – Sunday, 10:00AM to 5PM. Proceeds from the store go to support the Humane Society and the animals in our care. Wanted: Live-In Dogsitter for occasional trips for 3 large well-mannered dogs. Must be kind, responisbile reliable and love dogs. 541-633-7682.

WELSH CORGI PUPPIES, 6 weeks old, first shots, 3 males, $350; 1 black female $600. Keith, 541-480-3099. Wolf Hybrid Pups, parents on site, $400, taking deps. on 2 litters, ready to go on 6/17 & 7/7, 541-977-2845.

Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE! Fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

TV ARMOIRE, oak, $150; Oak coffee table with slate insert, $150. Recliner, maroon with heat & massage. $85. Multi-stripe couch, $125. 541-504-1813.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUES PARKING LOT SALE Sat. June 5. Antiques, Collectibles, Glassware, Furniture. 20 Area Dealers Participating! 5th & Evergreen Downtown Redmond.

Cowgirl Up! Gently used western wear. Boots, bags & jackets, Double D, Patricia Wolf- Native American Turquoise, Sisters 541-549-6950

Classic 1979 Raleigh 3 spd., yellow chrome rims, like new, $175. 541-382-2707 Recumbent Sun Bicycle, functional usage, $375. Call 360-775-7336.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191.

242

CHAINSAWS! New & Like New! Stihl! Husqvarna! Echo! Up to $200 off! 541-280-5006.

Exercise Equipment Weight Machine, Weider Pro 9930, $100, please call 541-389-6420.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing .380 Ammo, $25/box. 9 boxes avail. Other ammo avail. Call 541-728-1036. A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Colt AR-15 with Burris Optic, full case, $1750. 541-788-1731, leave msg. Colt Python .357 magnum, S&W 629 Classic .44mag and others. Call 541-610-8370 Fly Rods, (1) 6-piece, handmade, graphite; 1 factory made, $200 ea., 541-550-0444. GLOCK Mdl 27 40 cal., sub compact, w/2mags, case & ammo. $500. 541-647-8931. Qualify For Your Concealed Handgun Permit. Sat. June 5th, LaPine Newberry Station. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information. Ruger SR-556 (piston-driven AR-15). Quad-Picatinny rail, combat sights, collapsible stock, Like-new w/ mil-dot scope, mags, case, & ammo. $1,500. Savage .308 police/sniper bolt-action, stainless fluted bull-barrel, synthetic black Choate stock, Harris bi-pod, mil-dot scope, & ammo. $800. Saiga-12 (semi-auto 12-gauge AK47), like-new w/ 5 and 10-round mags, & ammo. $600. 541-322-6861

S&W M29 44 mag., 4”, 1st yr., 99 % in box, $1595; Colt Cobra 4” 22LR, ANIB, $1250; OBO! Others. 541-389-1392 Taurus Raging Bull .454 Casull Revolver Call for pics $750 541-647-7212 Tent, 14x16 Premium Canvas Wall Tent+Frame, sod cloth, stove jack, zipper door, bought May 2010, used 5 nights, must sell, paid $750, Sacrifice, $650, 541-593-9702

Furniture

Computers

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Puppies, Purebred, Shots, wormed, & heavily champi- Appliances, new & recondiBlack Lab/Retriever/Border tioned, guaranteed. Overoned bloodlines. $250, regCollie mix, male, 1 yr,to good stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s istered $300. Call any time home, $75, 541-550-0174. Maytag, 541-385-5418 541-678-7529 Pincher, AKC Dining room table w/leaf & 4 Cat, adult female, unaltered; Miniature Male, cropped, shots, $500, also 4 kittens, $30 each, chairs, light oak top, white 541-480-0896. please call 541-678-5205. legs $50 OBO. 541-905-9773

215

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Coins & Stamps

257

WANTED TO BUY

Musical Instruments

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

240

Crafts and Hobbies Sewing Machine: HQ Long arm Quilter, 16 Handy Quilter, w/ 12’ wood table, auto shutoff, bobbin winder, support plate, pattern laser & new leaders, $4750; 541-382-8296.

DINING TABLE & 3 chairs, $35; couch/loveseat, rose & beige, $30. 1920s Mink collar $75 OBO. 541-382-7556. The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

261

Medical Equipment Bed, automatic single, head, foot, knees raise & lower, exc. cond. $450 408-2227.

263

Tools Generator, Coleman 1750W, portable, mint cond., $375, 541-318-6108.

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177 Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

541-322-7253

Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered, $185/cord, Rounds $165, Seasoned, Pine & Juniper Avail. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Found Dog Shock Collar: Mammoth St., SW Bend, 5/24, call 541-678-5717

Snow Removal Equipment

Lost Black & White Boston Terrier. Name is Curley Moe. Lost on 26th St. & Pumice Ave. Contact 541-693-4550. He has a medical condition, that requires medication. Generous cash reward upon return. LOST: Cat, 5/23/10, Boonesborough area, small grey/ black striped female cat, reward. 541-382-7641 or 541-788-8378 LOST in Sisters Tuesday 05/25. Women's white gold anniversary band with inlaid diamonds. Generous reward for return. 541-549-1340 LOST: Womans’ ring, $1000 Reward. Between April/May? Handed down 3 generations, any information for its return, no questions asked. 541-536-3383

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Farm Market

BarkTurfSoil.com

Lost and Found

300

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . Recycled Bleacher Boards, approx. 4000 sq.ft., long leaf Southern Yellow pine, clear grade 16 ft. lengths, 3/4-5/4 inch thick. Scott Lanfield Tsunami Books Eugene, Oregon. 541-345-8986.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

FOUND: Large collection of CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes Market Rd. 541-408-2973. LOST A HEARING AID on May 16, at some location in Bend. Please call 541-389-3522

New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23 HP Was $14,000

Sale Price $12,900 Financing on approved credit.

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

316

Irrigation Equipment Pipe Elbows, galavanized, 30”x90 degree, never used, 3 at $150 ea. 541-421-3222.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc, hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton Eric 541-549-3831

#1 Superb Sisters Grass Hay no weeds, no

Farm Equipment and Machinery

rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581

JD 2420 Swather, 12’ 300 Header, cab w/A/C, ready to cut, $5000; 1967 International 2-ton truck, diesel, hoist, 4’ sides, $1250, ATV, Honda Recon 2005, $1950, 541-771-6919,541-475-6919 leave msg.

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

Consigned Farm Machinery & Equipment Auction 2 Day Sale Saturday & Sunday June 5th & 6th 2010 At: 9:00 AM Sharp

Woodburn Auction Yard 1/2 mile south of Woodburn, Oregon on HWY 99E

Saturday, June 5th Small amounts of miscellaneous tools, approximately 50 tractors, forklifts, & of various sizes. Approximately 70 cars, trucks, pick ups & trailers. Customers purchasing vehicles must have current proof of insurance before the purchase of a vehicle - no exceptions!!! All titled vehicles need to be checked in by 4:00PM on Friday, June 5th, with the titles in the consignors name. Dealers need updated certificates.

Sunday, June 6th Misc. farm equipment Everything sold on an as is basis Loading facilities & hauling available. Some items may have a reserved bid Consignments accepted until 5:00pm on Friday, June 4th NO RECEIVING OR LOADING OUT ON TUESDAYS PLEASE NOTICE: There is a 5% buyers fee added to all purchases. Terms of sale are cash,credit card, debit card (not over $500.00) No credit card checks, or credit union checks. All personal checks will be direct deposited with ID. Note: 9% buyers fee on Visa, Mastercard, Discover, with ID on the day of the sale. All bills must be pd for the day of the sale. Lunch on Grounds • Not Responsible for Accidents No children under the age of 13 please. Children 13 and older are welcome but must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Auctioneers:

Skip Morin, Emery Alderman, Chuck Boyce Sale Conducted by: CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Special Low 0% APR Financing

308

Found Keys, DRW, Cheyenne & Cinder Butte, fish lure, baseball bat, 5/7, 541-385-5685.

260

Misc. Items

• Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195.

Shop Heater, John Deere, Turbo Style, 40,000 BTU, $200, 541-550-0444.

Spotting Scope, Cabella’s 60x80, Titanium case, tripod, accessories, $200, 541-550-0444.

255 Yorkie/Schipperke Male, Pup, 8 weeks, 1st shot, $200 cash, 541-678-7599

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

Woodburn Auction Yard Inc. Phone: (503) 981-8185 ext. 1 Fax: (503) 982-7640 WOODBURNAUCTION.COM woodburnauction@aol.com

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377. NEW Rubber Mats 4X6' 3/8" thick, Heavy Duty $28/each CASH 541-728-7004/7200

RED TAG SALE Every Saturday At The OL'E TACK ROOM 7th and Cook , Tumalo. Reg. 7 yr. “Alves” Quarter Mare w/3 month foal. $1550 OBO. 541-617-5872 Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $2500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

345

Livestock & Equipment Babydoll Southdown Sheep. Small starter flock available. Please call 541-385-4989. Feeder Steers Ready for Pasture 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.


G2 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

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Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond area, flexible daytime hrs., household assistance, affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Painter Needs Work: 20 years exp. in Central OR, fast & friendly, 541-977-8329.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Food Service

Front Desk Clerk

Medical Coder (Certified) Are you a dynamic and talented certified medical coder who is looking for a full time position? We are seeking a detailed and thorough Certified Medical Coder to join our billing team in La Pine, Oregon. Qualified candidates must have comprehensive current knowledge of ICD-9 and CPT coding and excellent typing and 10 key skills. Current certification is a requirement, responsibilities include, but not limited to: Verify and insure the accuracy completeness, specificity and appropriateness of procedure diagnosis codes based on services rendered. Develops and provides coding training to clinic staff. FQHC knowledge a plus. We offer comprehensive benefits plus competitive wages. If interested please fax your resume to: 541-536-8047 or mail to: Human Resource, PO Box 3300 LaPine, OR 97739.

Sous Chef

Vacation Sales Agent

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Automotive Service Advisor Needed.

Energetic? Thorough? Looking for Opportunity? Money to be made and a great benefit package to boot. Send resume to: P.O. Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708. CNA Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center the premier skilled nursing facility in Central Oregon is seeking an experienced Certified Nursing Assistant to work full-time on our night shift (10:00pm-6:00am). We offer vacation, sick, health and 401k benefits for full-time employees. Please apply if you are certified and eligible for a background check. Please come by and apply at Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center at 1876 NE HWY 20, 541-382-5531 located near Pilot Butte State park. EOE

The Ranch is accepting applications for food service attendants to work in our Lake Side Bistro next to the Lodge swimming pool. Responsibilities include pizza and grilled burger preparation, serving and bussing tables. The service provided to our homeowners and guests will be of high quality and fast and courteous. These self starters must be able to work weekends. A valid Deschutes Count Food Handler permit is required. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Employment Opportunities

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

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Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Estate Sales

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

ESTATE

SALE

1st of 3. This sale - house only June 3rd, 4th, 5th, 8-5. 2858 NW Grimes Rd., Prineville. Amazing lifetime collection (200+) crystal chandeliers; floor, table & kerosene lamps. Antique furniture: armoire, library and parlor tables, side board, dressers, tea cart, needlepoint chairs, hall tree, vanity, bed, drop front secretary, & more; 2 couches, 2 loveseats, swivel chairs, coffee/end tables and dressers; large collection of framed art, mirrors, 200+ pieces of purple glass, 100+ toys, chenille bedspreads & glass shoes; Franciscan Desert Rose, jewelry, Christmas collectibles, linens & enamelware. NO EARLY SALES!

NANETTE’S ESTATE & MOVING SALES

ESTATE

SALE

Large home full!

Dining set with china cabinet, quality oak dining set with rolling chairs, several like new sofas, loveseats & side chairs, tables & lamps, beds & dressers, newer Kirby, lots of retro items, newer large screen TV, room full of taxidermy African mounts, loads of kitchenware and dishes. Over 40 pieces of Fenton glassware, collectibles, knick-knacks & décor, Louis L'Amour books, western boots and hats, men's & ladies clothing some new, rock collection, linens, old crocks and canning supplies, garage full of misc., large shop full of power and hand tools of all kinds, riding mower, guns, fishing items, 21' 1981 Glasply boat with new rebuilt engine, yard and outdoor items, loads of misc.

Fri. & Sat., 9 -4 Crowd Control Numbers Fri. at 7:30 a.m. SHOP OPENS FRI. 8 a.m.

9047 13th St., Terrebonne Hwy 97 to Smith Rock Way, go 1 block to 11th St. left, then go east on F, to 13th Attic Estates & Appraisals, 541-350-6822

for pictures go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Moving Sale, Sat. & Sun. 9-6, 17053 Sacramento Road., Bend. Everything Must Go! Bring alot cash!

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Sales Northwest Bend Awbrey Butte Estate Sale: 3181 NW Fairway Heights Dr., Sat. 9 am., no early birds. AWBREY BUTTE SALE, Sat. only, 8am-12. 3146 NW Fairway Heights Dr. Washer & dryer, custom bar stools, 24 formal dresses (sizes 2-8), beautiful wedding gown (10) w/ 5 bridesmaid dresses, never worn, misc. household items, and much more.

Fairway Heights off Mt. Washington Dr. Fri. & Sat., 8am-12 Ladders, tools, household items, furniture, and more.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

Medical

Motel

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Front

Desk

Part-time position Apply in person at Sugarloaf Mountain Motel at 62980 N Hwy 97. Bend.

The Bulletin Classifieds

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Advertise your open positions.

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Real Estate Contracts The Ranch is accepting applications for a full time Sous Chef. Need dedicated individual who possesses good supervisory and leadership skills that has an extensive knowledge of food preparation. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Signature Gatherer GATHER SIGNATURES FOR A BETTER OREGON Democracy Resources is looking for motivated individuals to be team leaders and signature gatherers on two statewide ballot measures. Open interviews on Friday, June 4th from 12:30pm to 4pm at Di Lusso in downtown Bend -the corner of Franklin and Bond. Contact Kyndall kyndall@democracyresources.com to set up an interview

Phlebotomy Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

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If you are experienced in the following positions we are looking for cutters, fingerjoint operators, lamination operators, moulder operaters, fingerjoint feeders and lamination feeders in our Madras facility. Starting wage DOE. Apply at our headquarters office in Madras at 335 NW Hess St., Madras OR 97741 541-475-7799. EOE/On site pre-employment drug screening required.

Screen Printing Pressmen $10/hr., exp. with manual, auto. preferred. Must be personable and be able to talk to clients. Call 541-385-3104.

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Installers Seeking experienced DISH Network satellite technician for Deschutes County. 541-382-1552.

BRIGHT WOOD CORPORATION

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

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ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Ranch is accepting applications for Front Desk Clerks. Responsibilities include checking guests in/out, processing access passes, assisting the group coordinator, and effectively communicating with housekeeping and maintenance. The ideal candidate will be experienced in Parr Springer Miller Systems, Point of Sale, Microsoft Office, Outlook, and Navis. Must be able to work nights, weekend and holidays. PT/FT seasonal positions available. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Millworkers

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

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The Ranch is accepting applications for Vacation Sales Agents. Responsibilities include making reservations utilizing the Navis system, and using sales techniques to increase revenue and cross sell all Ranch amenities. This candidate will assist front desk clerks as needed, communicate effectively and efficiently and stay calm and collected in a fast paced environment being able to manage difficult guest situations. The ideal individual will be experienced in hospitality and/or sales, knowledge of Parr Springer Miller Systems, Navis, Microsoft Office, Multi-line Phone Systems and Outlook. Must be able to work nights, holidays and weekends. PT and FT seasonal positions. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

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Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

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Business Opportunities PICTURE FRAMING BUSINESS FOR SALE. All equipment, supplies and materials for sale with or without business name and/or location. Contact Mike (541) 389-9196

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Huge Neighborhood Sale, SE Ramsay Rd. just a block south of Bear Creek roundabout, Fri. & Sat. 8-4.

PLANT SALE, Sat. June 5th, Zion Lutheran Church Parking Lot, 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. 8:30am-2pm. Sponsored by Central Oregon Retired Educators Association. Many perennials and annuals, low prices! Proceeds to benefit The Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon.

Fri., Sat. & Sun. 9-4, 64756 Old Bend/Redmond Highway, Fishing items, household and much much more.

GOOD

STUFF

Multi-Family Garage Sale, Mt Washington and Regency St, Fri. 6/4 & Sat. 6/5, 8 am to 2 pm, 541-617-9028 HUGE NEIGHBORHOOD SALE-10+Houses NW Knoxville, NW Rockwood, NW Stannium. Patio sets, furniture, kids clothing/toys, bike parts, tools, luggage, gardening supplies, Sac Kings & sports memorabilia, Louis L’Amour (+more) books, women’s brand name clothes, home decor, men’s suits, sporting good & much more Sat. Only 8-2. No Early Birds. lottaviano@hotmail.com

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com Saturday, 8am - 3pm. LOTS of Bargains! High chair, double stroller, 3 in 1 printer, external DVD-CD burner, clothes, much misc. 2348 NW Summerhill Dr.

Saturday Only 9-4 Girls bikes & clothes. Snowbds, toys, hi-chair, car seats, books, household goods. 2029 NWJuniper St

Shevlin Ridge/Meadows Multi Family Garage Sale, Fri. 8-4, Sat. 8-1. Head West toward NW Newport Ave, go through 3 round-a-bouts exiting on Shevlin Park Rd., turn left on Shevlin Meadows or Chardonnay, follow arrows to all the fun and funky sales!

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4 Family Yard Sale, Sat. only 9-4, 1345 NE Watson, furniture, dbl. bed, books, luggage, tools, 1-10 volt dryer, too much to list!

American Cancer Society Super Sale, Fri. & Sat., 7am1pm. Corner of Bear Creek & 27th.

Sales Southwest Bend Annual Fundraiser Yard SaleMulti Family, Sat. 9-3, 20081 Doanna Way (Powers/Brookswood) housewares, collectibles, DVD’s. 318-8471.

Sat 6/5 & Sat 6/12 8am 3pm Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Rd Bend, Proceeds Support Youth Missions Trip to New Orleans.

FIND IT! A TO Z MULTI FAMILY GABUY IT! RAGE SALE, Friday and Saturday, 8 to 5. 22110 Butler SELL IT! Market Rd. 541-480-9041 The Bulletin Classifieds Dan & Debbie Price

MOVING SALE 64090 Deschutes Market Rd. FRIDAY, June 4th & SATURDAY, June 5th 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 a.m. Friday. (Take Butler Market Rd. to Deschutes Market Rd., go north 3 miles to sale site.) 2800 sq.ft. Manufactured home and 5 acres also for sale. Ford F700-1985 Truck-goose neck hitch; Oak dining set with padded chairs on rollers; Nice sofa, Hide a bed; La-Z Boy recliner; Antique and collectible items include: Double kerosene lamp with brass and marble; Unique library bookcase unit; Armoire; Folding Screen; Made in Germany #8 Doll; Over 200 pieces of Pfaltzgraf dinnerware-blue & white; Prints and paintings; Five mantel clocks; Two cuckoo clocks; Glassware; 10 gal. crock; Two silver halters; Part of a still; Trunk; 1950s blonde bedroom set; Bed Warmer; Eastlake table; Lyre base table; Unusual oil painting with 3-D effect; Mirrors; Daffodil pattern silverware set; Star Trek videos; Breyer horses in boxes. Misc. Items: Pickup lumber rack; California King bed; Lots of prints and pictures; Costume jewelry; Pentax and Canon cameras; Four bar stools; Older Kenmore sewing machine; Variety of tires and chrome rims; Lawn tractor tow behind sweeper and de-thatcher; Older radial arm saw; Misc. garden chemicals and tools; Lots of other items. Presented by .... Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days W 541-382-5950 eves

AWBREY BUTTE: Antiques, pianos, bikes, furn, nordic trac, generator, tools, kitchen, etc. 6/3 & 6/4 9-4pm 1137 NW Clark Ct. (No Early Birds) Everything Must Go! Inside, Sat. Only 9-4, 1205 NE 2nd. Next to Design Lighting, something for everyone! Fri. & Sat. 9-4:30 63427 Deschutes Market Road entertainment, household items, clothes, come and see Garage & Moving Sale, Fri. Sun., 9am-5pm. 21081 Country Squire Rd. Household, yard stuff, tools, more. GARAGE SALE - Fri, Sat and Sun 10am - 3pm. Everything must go....61835 Avonlea Circle. Huge Sale, Sat. only, 8am-4pm, sail boat, tools, household, new items. 2590 NE Ravenwood Dr. off Butler Mkt. MOVING SALE-20754 Valentine, Cascade Village Park queen bed, stereo system, washer/dryer, lawn mower, bike, TV, ladders, garden & decor. E on Cooley off N. 97. Follow signs park. Fri. & Sat 9 a.m - 4 p.m. 541-728-7868.

Lots of infant-toddler clothing, baby gear, some auto. & household accessories. Sat. only, 7am-3pm. 20634 White Dove Ln. off Brosterhous.

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Valleyview HOA - Annual Yard Sale, June 5 & 6, 9:00AM to 6:00PM. Various yards within the Valleyview subdivision. BIG MULTI-FAMILY SALE: Fri. Cross streets: Valleyview & Sat., 9-5, NW 19th to Fir, Drive and 37th, Redmond. follow signs, patterns, new chairs, A/C, TV, luggage rack, 292 men’s clothes, shoes, misc.

Sales Redmond Area

ESTATE/MOVING SALE June 4 & 5, 9-3. Vintage/ant. furn., yard/maint. tools, some of everything. 701 NW 20th St. HUGE BARN SALE! 6 mi. N. of Terrebonne on Hwy. 97, watch for sign 1 mi. N. of Maragas Winery, misc. beyond description, small antiques, quilts, tools, household, garden items, baked foods. Sat. only, 8:30-4

Moving Sale - Crazy low prices, Fri. & Sat. 8:00 a.m., 2741 NE Red Oak, off Tuscon. Saturday, June 5, 3 FAMILY Yard Sale 7:00am-3:00pm. Items for whole family! ALL ITEMS MUST GO!! 63666 N Hunter's Circle 541-617-0245 Shop & Garage Sale Saturday 7 to 3 at 62980 Boyd Acres Rd. Hand tools, power tools, ladders, chains, compressor, welder, fire hose and a variety of office and house hold items & toys. All must be sold!

Moving Sale, Fri, June 4 and Sat, June 5, 8 AM to 2 PM. 7390 NW Poplar Dr. Redmond. North of Hwy 126 off 74th.

Sales Other Areas

A SHOPAHOLICS sale! 18 mi. S. of Bend, 54995 Tamarack Rd. across from Thousand Trails, follow signs. HUGE SALE! Fri/Sat. 7-3 MILLER FORD-MERCURY DEALER/EMPLOYEES & KIDS CLUB OF MADRAS GARAGE SALE! Items incl. discontinued Ford & Nissan parts and accessories, shop tools & literature, also various family & household items. Sat., 6/5, 9am-2pm. 1733 SW Hwy 97, Madras. Call for details, 541-475-7204

Sat. & Sun. 8-4 603 SE Elm Prineville. Camping Fishing Hunting Household & more lots of camping 447-1129


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Roommate Wanted Sunriver: Friendly music house has private room w/ sm bath available NOW on forest MMP farm. Horse/pet? $400 includes util. 541-598-8537 christenha@hotmail.com.

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Want To Rent Need small, clean, furnished apt. or condo near downtown. must have 1 parking. Will need for 6 to 8 months. 360-921-0640 Senior seeks furnished or unfurnished studio or efficiency lock-off in home. Call 360-775-7336.

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Rooms for Rent $350 mo. plus util. room/bath. Full house access, artists pueblo. 541-389-4588. Tumalo Studio: 2 rooms, own bath & kitchen, separate entrance, util., wi-fi, & satellite TV incl., $475, avail. 5/15, 541-389-6720.

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Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

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Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo., $250-$450 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

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Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent Redmond

Real Estate For Sale

2700 Sq.Ft. triple wide on 1 acre, Sun Forest Estates in LaPine, 3/3, exc. shape lots of room $800, 1st & last +$250 dep. 503-630-3220.

Lease, avail. 6/15, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, yard maint. & appl. incl., no pets, $900/mo. + $250 dep. 3558 SW Salmon Ave., 541-815-9218

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Avail. Now, 1020B NW Portland Ave, 1 bdrm. upstairs in duplex, W/D incl., water paid, $575 mo., $700 dep. 541-410-4050,541-410-4054 Awbrey Butte Townhomes, garage, A/C, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, $825-$850, 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

RIVER FALLS APARTMENTS LIVE ON THE RIVER WALK DOWNTOWN

2 Bdrm. patio apt. $760 & $660 dep. Nice pets OK. 1556 NW 1st St. 541-382-0117 SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688. West Hills Townhouse 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G incl. newly redecorated, $575 mo. 951 NW Portland Ave. 541-480-2092.

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Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex, $680. Near Old Mill off Wilson. Washer/Dryer included, fenced backyard, single car garage. Pets accepted. $720 deposit. Call 541-280-3164

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Apt./Multiplex SW Bend $595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D in unit. front balcony, storage, no pets. 1558 SW NANCY, 541-382-6028.

$99 Move-In Special Only $250 deposit! Finally the wait is over, new units available in Bend’s premiere apartment complex. Be the first to live in one of these fantastic luxury apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

Spacious Townhouses: big bedrooms, 1½ baths, w/d hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. w/g/s pd. Rents start at $495. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162

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The Bulletin is now offering a Find exactly what LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE you are looking for in the Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin CLASSIFIEDS Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad Home 55+ started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Upscale Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 650 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, Houses for Rent triple garage, gardener pd., NE Bend $1100 mo.+$1400 security dep 541-526-5774. Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near shopping & hospital dbl. ga659 rage, large fenced yard w/ Houses for Rent sprinklers, $950/mo., pets Sunriver neg. 541-390-2915

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

• Providence • 3/2, 1200 sq.ft., RV, close to hospital, big yard, $895/mo. 3059 NE Tahoe Court 541-306-5161 SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV parking, fenced, cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn care incl., $995/mo. 541-480-7653 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

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1st Month Free 6 month lease!

Houses for Rent NW Bend

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

Duplex, 1 bdrm, 1 bath, single car garage, fenced yard, $550 per mo., Water & Sewer paid, Please Call Rob, 541-410-4255

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Houses for Rent SW Bend

$ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

June Special!

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. A quiet, beautiful garden style 55+ community, near hospital, 2/2, A/C, from $750-$850. 541-633-9199. www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

SUBSIDIZED UNIT 2 bdrm (upstairs) available at this time. 62 & over and/or Disability Multi-Family Housing/ Project-based Greenwood Manor Apts 2248 NE 4th Street Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 389-2712. TDD 800-735-2900 Guardian Management Corporation is committed to “Equal Housing Opportunity”

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Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1 Bdrm. $400+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902. 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D hookup W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Ask Us About Our

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Chaparral Apts.

244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Call about our Specials Studios, and 2 & 3 bdrm units from

$395 to $550 • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties NICE DUPLEX on cul-de-sac, 1400 sq. ft., 2-story 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, sgl. car garage, small back yard. $725 mo. incl. w/s/g. No smoking, no pets. 541-420-5927.

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Houses for Rent Redmond A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appl., incl,. Gardener W/D, $795 mo.. 541-408-0877.

Redmond Homes

Snowmobiles

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053.

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Houses for Rent La Pine

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

Real Estate Wanted

3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE on 1 acre, RV carport, no gaC O N D O , ski house #3, end rage, $650/mo. Pets? 16180 unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, comEagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. plete remodel $197,000 541-745-4432 furnished. 541-749-0994. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Homes for Sale

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CHECK YOUR AD

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice lawn, fenced backyard. $800 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet neg. 541-923-6961

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Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Retail Space, 118 NW Minnesota, 900 sq.ft., $1.75/ sq.ft. + common area maintenance fees, call 541-317-8633.

Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $650 a month. 541-923-7343

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Office/Retail Space for Rent

Clean 2 bdrm., 1 bath, close to schools, parks, Boys & Girls Club, yard, garden area, pet considered, $675, $600 dep., 541-771-9109.

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908.

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

The Bulletin

BY OWNER, Clean older home in great neighborhood. $107,000. 1429 SW 11th. (503) 440-5072 (503) 717-0403 Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

745 ***

757

Crook County Homes Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes in762 structions over the phone are misunderstood and an error Homes with Acreage can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please Featured Home! 2 Bdrm 1 Bath contact us the first day your Home on 1.47 Acres+/-, ad appears and we will be 24X36 Detached Garage/ happy to fix it as soon as we shop, U-Drive with Added RV can. Deadlines are: WeekParking, PUD Water/Sewer, days 12:00 noon for next Sunriver Area, $224,900 Call day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for SunBob Mosher, 541-593-2203. day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please 764 call us:

385-5809

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Decks

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Child Care Services Summertime baby sitter avail. on June 1st, could continue into Fall. Ages 3-12. Redmond area. Call Carol for more info., 541-279-1913.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Handyman

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

The Bulletin Classified *** John Day: 2003 3 bdrm., 2.5 baths, 1920 sq. ft., w/stove, f/a heat, vaulted living room, silestone counters/stainless appl., master suite/wic, dbl. garage, .92 acres fenced, decks/views. PUD $289,500. 541-575-0056 Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, pond & super private well, 75 year old owner will sacrifice for $425,000. 541-447-1039

747

Southwest Bend Homes 3 Bdrm. + den, 2.5 bath, 1825 sq.ft., master bdrm. on main, near Old Mill, walking trails, schools, upgraded throughout, landscaped, A/C, great neighborhood, ready to move in, great value at $296,000, 425-923-9602, 425-923-9603

Excavating

Roof-Foundation

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

CCB#180420 Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

DMH & Co.

I DO THAT!

Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Landscaping, Yard Care Fire Fuels Reduction

J. L. SCOTT

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Weekly Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years! FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

Harley Davidson Duece 2001, very low miles of 1258, corbin seat. Why buy new, only $11,900. Call 541-771-2020

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Shadow

Aero

750, 2004. 5100 miles, garaged, like new. Blue/black. SisBar, Lug rack, bags. $4000. (541) 419-5212

12 Ft. like new 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft, new EZ Loader Trailer, used twice, pole holder & folding seats. $2200. 541-617-0846.

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda Trail Bikes: 1980 CT110, like new, $2400, 1974 CT90, great hunting bike, $900, both recently serviced, w/new batteries, call 541-595-5723. Honda VTX 1800R 2003. Low miles, xlnt cond. $4999. 541-647-8418 YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4995. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Classic 2007, 4K mi, windshield, saddle bags, garaged, senior owned, as new cond, $5300 OBO, 541-312-3098,619-306-1227

$550 OBO! 818-795-5844, Madras

16’

Seaswirl

1985,

open bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily 19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

865

ATVs

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $21,000. 541-389-1413

771 1 Acre Corner Lot Sun Forest Estates, buildable, standard septic approved $49,000 or trade, owner financing? 503-630-3220..

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Will Finance, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fireplace, incl. fridge, range, washer & dryer, new paint & flooring, $8900, $1000 down, $200/mo., 541-383-5130.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo, fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of May 31, 2010

Business Opportunity ALL CASH vending! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 1-888-776-3071. LOOMIX FEED supplements is seeking dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Kristi @ 800-870-0356/ kboen@ loomix.com to find out if there is a dealership opportunity in your area.

Employment COMPANY DRIVERS- (solos & Hazmat teams). Great pay. Great miles. CDLrequired. New to trucking? We will train. Variety of dedicated positions available. Call 866-692-2612. Swift. SLT NEEDS CDl A team drivers with Hazmat. $2,000 bonus. Teams split $.68 for all miles. Solo flatbed owner operators need for West Regional. 1-800-8359471, 1-877-253-2897.

Miscellaneous NEW NORWOOD sawmills. LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mill boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-661-7746 ext 300N.

Real Estate STEEL ARCH buildings. Huge savings on some of our summer clearance buildings. Selling for balanced owed, plus repos. 16x20, 20x24,25x30 etc. Supplies won’t last!!! 1-866-339-7449.

(This special package is not available on our website)

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

Ask us about

Randy, 541-306-7492

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Weed free bark & flower beds

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Spring Clean Up

CCB#180420

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

Honda

Lots

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade PUBLISHER'S Mountain Views, area of nice NOTICE homes & BLM is nearby too! All real estate advertising in Only $199,950. Randy this newspaper is subject to Schoning, Broker, John L. the Fair Housing Act which Scott, 541-480-3393. makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or 773 discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, Acreages familial status, marital status or national origin, or an in- 14 ACRES, tall pines bortention to make any such dering Fremont National Forpreference, limitation or disest, fronts on paved road, crimination." Familial status power at property. Zoned R5 includes children under the residential, 12 miles north of age of 18 living with parents Bly, OR. $45,000. Terms or legal custodians, pregnant owner 541-783-2829. women, and people securing custody of children under 18. Call The Bulletin At This newspaper will not 541-385-5809. knowingly accept any adverPlace Your Ad Or E-Mail tising for real estate which is At: www.bendbulletin.com in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed 775 that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are availManufactured/ able on an equal opportunity Mobile Homes basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., at 1-800-877-0246. The toll 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in free telephone number for great shape, vacant & ready the hearing impaired is to move from Redmond, 1-800-927-9275. $29,900, 541-480-4059. Trade your Bend Area Move-In Ready! Homes start Home for my 6 yr. 4 bdrm., at $8999. Delivered & set-up 2.5 bath, Central Point home, start at $26,500, on land, planned development, nice $30,000, Smart Housing, views, 541-941-6915. LLC, 541-350-1782

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

Honda Magna V65 1984, 58,530 miles, very clean, runs excellent $3000, Call weekends 1-541-589-3492.

Farms and Ranches

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100

The Bulletin Classifieds

NEWER stick built 2 bedroom, 1 bath, large garage, forced air heat pump. on 6 acres, $700 month. 541-815-8884.

An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-339 610-7803.

Starting at $500 PARK & MTN. VIEWS! 4 bdrms, for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 3½ bath, 2450 sq. ft., hardClean, energy efficient nonwood floors, open floorplan, smoking units, w/patios, 2 desirable westside location. , on-site laundry rooms, stor$1395 mo., 19432 SW Brookage units available. Close to side Way. 541-408-0086. schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping cen- ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 ter and tennis courts. Pet Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 friendly with new large dog bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, run, some large breeds okay A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, with mgr. approval. $850, Jim, 541-388-3209.

Real Estate Services

850

740

Houses for Rent Prineville

Boats & RV’s

750

705

660

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

870

Boats & Accessories

800

REAL ESTATE WANTED. Commercial land in Sisters or house close to downtown, priced under $200,000. Phone 503-827-3995 Phyllis

Reach thousands of readers!

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Nicely updated 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near Sunriver, vaulted ceiling, gas stove & fireplace, owners residence, very peaceful, small dog okay, $875/mo. Call Randy at 541-306-1039.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

749

Southeast Bend Homes

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

Rentals

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 G3

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Award Winning Design

Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering

D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Ex/Interior, Paint/Stain Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Remodeling, Carpentry

Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

541-389-4974 springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

Masonry

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Remodeling, Carpentry

• Siding Replacement/Repair • Door/Window Replacement • Drywall Repair/Painting • Decks/Fencing • Shade Structures • Patios/Sidewalks Call David - 541-678-5411 CCB#187972 • 25+Yrs. Exp. 5% Discount to New Customers

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


G4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

870

880

882

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

20’ Seaswirl 1992, Humminbird fishfinder Matrix 27 w/ gps, rebuilt OMC outdrive, 497 hours on motor, new top less than year old, 2007 9.9 Mercury outboard tilt and trim, remote steering, stain- Holiday Rambler Neptune 2004 36’ diesel pusher, low mi., less steel, & many extras. fully serviced, very clean, outstanding cond., 2 slides, Purchased in 2002 for fishing rear camera, $69,000. Much enjoyment. November 2009 much more! 541-447-8006. purchased dream and now no longer need this boat. Dual axle trailer is included with purchase. Call 541-815-1948 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744. Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

4 HP Evinrude outboard motor, Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, standard shaft, new (no rundining/kitchen slide out, rear ning hours), $475. queen suite, queen bunk, 541-385-3950 sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, Ads published in the "Boats" rear camera, lots of storage, classification include: Speed, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684 fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please Tioga TK Model see Class 875. 541-385-5809 1979, took in as trade, everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $2000 firm, GENERATE SOME excitement in as is. Needs work, your neigborhood. Plan a gamust sell rage sale and don't forget to 541-610-6713 advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

Houseboat 38X10 with triple axle trailer. Includes private moorage with 24/7 security at Prinville resort. $24,500. Call 541-788-4844.

Winnebago Aladdin II 32 ft., 1979 exc. cond., ready for the road, propane or gas, 80 gal. propane tank, 72K mi., call for more info. $5000. 541-306-8205.

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Folbot Greenlander II Tandem Folding Kayak. Stores in 2 bags. Motor mount. $1200. 541-633-7142

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $82,000. 541-848-9225.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Bounder 34’ 1994, J Model, immaculate, only 34K miles, rare private bdrm., walk round queen island bed, awnings on all windows, 6.5 Gen., garaged, like new in/ out, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, $17,500, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Chevy Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $800, call , 541-588-0097.

Travel Trailers

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $98,000. 541-382-1721 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen., & much more $60,000. 541-948-2310

900

VW Super Beetle 1974,

2800 Sq.ft. home on 2 acres at Sisters Airport, with airport access and room for owner hanger on property. Priced for quick close at $369,000, 15821 Kitty Hawk Ln, 541-280-9378.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

916

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4700. 541-617-1888. Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Ford F150 XLT 2009, matching canopy, always garaged, seat covers, Line-X bed liner, 10K, just like new, $27,250. Firm Randy, 541-306-1039

V-8, 7.5L, long bed, with 8’ Boss Power-V snow plow. 35K miles by orig. owner, new tires, exc. cond, with all maint. history avail.,

$11,500. Car Hauler, 32’ Pace, top Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, cond., $7000 OBO. Call for 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy more info., 541-536-8036 w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Interstate 2007 20'x102" Cargo Trailer, like new only 350 miles, $4,500 OBO. 541-306-9888

Smolich Auto Mall

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Utility Trailer, 4X10, 6” Steel I-beam frame, factory w/ lights, $200, 541-550-0444.

931

Wheels & Tires, aluminum, off Ford Ranger, great cond., $150. 541-408-1676

Antique and Classic Autos

360 Sprint Car

Dutchman 26’ 2005, 6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

Hyundai Santa Fe GLS 2009 Power Window, Low Miles!! Vin #271169

Only $22,872

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Nash 28.5’ Bunk Bed Model, 2002, sleeps 8, exc. cond. $12,000 OBO, 541-536-1572

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Smolich Auto Mall

4X4, Reliable, Extra Touches. VIN #568546

885

Canopies and Campers

Only $4,995. 541-317-0857

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $18,500 541-610-9900.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Wagon

1957,

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking or pets $17,500 pics available (541)410-3658.

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

366

975

Jeep CJ7 1981, all original, tow bar, hard top, auto, dependable, very nice oldy! $3000, 541-815-4214

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Nissan 1995, canopy, A/C, good cond., low miles, $2195 OBO. 541-526-1604

Toyota Tundra 2006,

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

LEXUS ES300 1999 152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

$6900 OBO (541) 520-8013.

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107. Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

Mazda 3 i 2008, sedan, 4-cyl., auto, 20,300 mi., mostly hwy., like new, still under factory warranty, $12,295, 541-416-1900.

Smolich Auto Mall

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Smolich Auto Mall

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Mazda CX9 2007 AWD, moonroof, Only 12K Miles!! Vin #119417

Subaru Outback 2001 AWD, Well Equipped, Manager Special. VIN #653683

Only $23,397

Only $9995

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$22,600 W/O winch $21,750. 541-325-2684

366

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

Smolich Auto Mall

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Smolich Auto Mall Mazda Tribute 2005

Chrysler Sebring 2008

HYUNDAI 366

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $10,857

Mini Cooper 2003 Sporty, Plus Very Low Miles! Vin #E14182

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Only $10,995

366

Smolich Auto Mall Nissan XTerra 2008

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

366

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Smolich Auto Mall

Toyota RAV4 2007 Good Package, Low Miles! VIN #018797

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

Volvo S80 T6 2004. Great car, fun to drive. Loaded. Maintenance done at recommended intervals. Includes extra set of mag wheels for traction tires. 121,000 miles. $8000. 541-923-6255

Dodge Magnum R/T 2005 Moonroof, Leather, Low Miles! VIN #641033

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

Auto, ABS, Traction Control! Vin #165601

NISSAN

Only $20,877

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

Smolich Auto Mall

4X4, V6, Auto, Moonroof! Vin #M08818

935

Chevy S10 Blazer 1993, 144K, 4x4, V6 auto., very clean, full power, almost new tires, same owner for 8 yrs., $2100. 541-388-2275, 541-420-7736

Only $14,995

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

NISSAN

Chevy Equinox AWD LT 2006 asking $14,800 below BB book of $16,100, every option available, sandstone metallic w/ leather interior, mint mint condition. (541) 815-1849 or (541) 330-1766

541-385-5809

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Automobiles

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

4X4, Premium Wheels, Factory Nissan Certified! Vin #540498

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

366

Hard to Find! Great Shape! Vin #266412

541-749-4025 • DLR

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Lance 820 Lite 2004, Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Hyundai Tiberon 2008

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Only $16,478

541-389-1178 • DLR

HYUNDAI

541-749-4025• DLR

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Canopy, top of line ARE, less than 1 year old, fits 2000 to Karman Ghia 1970 con2007 GM short bed, silver vertible, white top, Blue birch, paid $1900 new, askbody, 90% restored. $10,000 ing $1180. 541-389-2270 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Host Tahoe 2007 Convertible, blue color, new 10.5 DS. Save thousands. tires, cloth top & fuel pump, Almost new. Must see to call for details 541-536-3962 appreciate interior. OLDS 98 1969 $31,500. (541)306-7905 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Very Nice! Won’t Last at this Price! Vin #546969

Auto, CD, ABS! Vin #206503

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Sport Utility Vehicles

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Toyota Sienna LE 2006

Nissan Altima 2008

smolichmotors.com

HYUNDAI

Only $9,995

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

Honda Ridgeline 2006

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Chevy

Smolich Auto Mall

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

Hyundai GLS 2006, 4 cyl. 5 spd., 32 MPG, alloy wheels, new tires, snow tires/rims, 41K, like new, $7450. Firm. Call Randy, 541-306-1039.

smolichmotors.com

366

Only $19,995

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Only $16,857

smolichmotors.com

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036 Montana Keystone 2955RL 2004, 2 slides, loaded, 2 TV’s, CD, Queen bed, all appl., full bath, hitch incl., exc. cond., hardly been used, $21,500. 541-389-8794

Only $10,978

541-389-1178 • DLR

Automotive Parts, MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, Service and Accessories $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

4X4, ABS, Off-Road, Tow Package Vin #B24910

NISSAN

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local. Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Smolich Auto Mall

Call 541-549-0757, Sisters.

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

FORD F350 1997 4x4

Ford Ranger 2002

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $13,800, Call 541-390-7780 .

Pickups

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Ford F150 XCab 1994, 4WD, 88K mi., goose neck hitch, Grader - All wheel drive, low exc. cond., $3900. hours on engine - $10,500. 541-728-7188 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Utility Trailers

Smolich Auto Mall

933

925

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat 300, clean w/many options A Must See! $63,500. 541-279-9581.

975

Automobiles

932

KIT COMPANION 1997 22’ travel trailer, sleeps 6, excellent condition, only used about 10 times, like new! Fully loaded, everything goes with it! Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

975

Automobiles

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

881

880

Beaver Thunder 2000, 40’, 2 slides, 425 HP Cat, loaded, exc. cond., time limited price, $98,000, Cell: 480-357-6044.

940

Vans

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

541-322-7253

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

932

Antique and Classic Autos

908

(Private Party ads only) 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Autos & Transportation

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

Only $15,873

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford Focus ZTS 2004, 5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354 Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Mitsubishi Gallant 2009 Well equipped and affordable. VIN #014786

VW Beetle Turbo Diesel, 2001, 40+ mpg, 64K, exc. cond, spoiler, chrome wheels, $10,000 OBO, 541-480-8868.

Only $13,670 VW Bug 1969, yellow,

smolichmotors.com

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Only $19,988 Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 55K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9000 541-504-2878.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, June 3, 2010 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Matter of the Estate of ELIZABETH A. ALDOUS, Deceased. CASE NO.: 10 PB 0060 MA NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS The undersigned have been appointed co-personal representatives of the estate of ELIZABETH A. ALDOUS, Deceased, by the Circuit Court of the state of Oregon, probate number 10 PB 0060 MA. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same with proper vouchers within four (4) months after this date to the undersigned or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned or the attorney.

Date first published: May 20, 2010. MYRA L. SKIDGEL P.O. Box 160 Sumpter, OR 97877 LOREN E. ALDOUS 1510 NW Ice Avenue Terrebonne, OR 97760 Co-Personal Representatives EDWARD P. FITCH, OSB #782026 P O BOX 457 REDMOND OR 97756 Telephone: 541-548-2151 Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031047194 T.S. No.: 10-08966-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN A SHORT as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on May 5, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-31327 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes

County, OR to-wit: APN: 142034 LOT TWENTY-NINE (29), IN BLOCK FIVE (5), OF LAPINE ACRES, RECORDED AUGUST 14, 1962, IN CABINET A, PAGE 94, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 15751 RIM DRIVE, LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $929.19 Monthly Late Charge $46.46 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 256,054.25 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.05300 % per annum from January 1, 2009 until

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8952 T.S. No.: 1274791-09.

paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on September 1, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the

foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the

masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 13, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Javier Vasquez, Jr. ASAP# 3570735 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031342470 T.S. No.: 10-09223-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GABRIELLE M. ERICKSON as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 11, 2006, as Instrument

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Lot One Hundred Eighty-three (183), Awbrey Village, Phase 5, Bend, Oregon, recorded June 19, 2001, in Cabinet E, Page 642, Deschutes County, Oregon. Chris Hatfield of Hurley Re, P.C., 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR 97702, was appointed Successor Trustee by the Beneficiary on March 16, 2010. Both the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and this Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due principal payment of $158,967.44 plus accrued interest in the amount of $21,513.32 through March 1, 2010, and a late charge in the amount of $23,820.00 through March 1, 2010. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The principal sum of $158,967.44, plus accrued interest in the sum of $21,513.32 through March 1, 2010 and continuing to accrue at the rate of 6% per annum until paid, plus a late charge in the amount of $23,820.00 through March 1, 2010 and continuing to accrue at the rate of $20.00 per day until paid, plus attorneys fees, foreclosure costs, and sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said Trust Deed. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned Successor Trustee will, on August 9, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, which is the hour, date and place last set for the sale, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by Grantor of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Deed of Trust reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal and interest as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Deed of Trust, together with Trustee’s and attorneys fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this Notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “Grantor” includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, and the words “Trustee” and “Beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: March 22, 2010 Chris Hatfield, OSB No. 872426 Successor Trustee Telephone: 541-317-5505

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by James W. Lovelace and Catherine M. Lovelace, as grantor to Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Fidelity Mortgage, as Beneficiary, dated October 26, 2006, recorded November 8, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 74148, beneficial interest having been assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Indenture Trustee for the registered Noteholders of Renaissance Home Equity Loan Trust 2006-4, as covering the following described real property: Lot Fifteen (15), Block Three (3), North Pilot Butte Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1323 N.E. Drost Drive, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3): the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,378.44, from December 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,381.03, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $170,419.59, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.89% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 19, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of die sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term tease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 20, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right lo apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR, 16037 S.W. Upper Bonnes Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, Phone (503) 620-0222, Toll-free 1-800-452-8260 Website: http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs: http://www.oregonlawhelp.org The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 4-16-2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone:(360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104064

Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Mark R. Loy and Tiffany N. Loy, husband and wife, as grantor, to Chicago Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of First Franklin Financial Company, as beneficiary, dated 11/25/98, recorded 12/02/98, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 98-54556 and subsequently assigned to Nations Credit Home Equity Services Corporation by Assignment recorded as Vol: 1999 Page: 34824, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Seven (7), Block One (1), Providence Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. More accurately described as: Lot Seven (7), Block One (1), Providence Phase I, recorded December 31, 1991, in Cabinet C-602, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3010 Northeast Waverly Court Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,242.66 beginning 11/01/09; plus late charges of $48.63 each month beginning 11/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $406.23; plus advances of $270.72; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $103,504.16 with interest thereon at the rate of 9.5 percent per annum beginning 10/01/09; plus late charges of $48.63 each month beginning 11/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $406.23; plus advances of $270.72; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 1, 2010 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 2, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800)452-8260) and ask for lawyer referral service. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Dated: April 26, 2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. By: Chris Ashcraft Assistant Vice President, Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No. 7236.22353/Loy, Mark and Tiffany State of Washington, County of King) ss: I, the undersigned, certify that the foregoing is a complete and accurate copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. By Authorized Signer THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

ASAP# 3536318 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010

ASAP# 3546180 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010, 06/17/2010, 06/24/2010

R-311852 05/20, 05/27, 06/03, 06/10

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-104064

of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 313,415.77 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.48000 % per annum from November 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on September 23, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real prop-

erty which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tender-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9406 T.S. No.: 1276084-09.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND ELECTION TO SELL Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Dennis Szigeti, as Grantor, to AmeriTitle, Trustee, in favor of Mary Frances Laier, as Beneficiary, dated February 1, 2005, recorded on February 3, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-06888, Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in Douglas County Oregon:

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Darryl P. Koerschgen and Sarah N. Koerschgen, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated April 26, 2006, recorded April 28, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/ microfilm/reception No. 2006-29406 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Parcel 1 of partition plat no. 2002-1, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1062 SW 18th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,314.38 Monthly Late Charge $58.76. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $156,700.00 together with interest thereon at 9.000% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 26, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 21, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

No. 2006-61735 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 246089 LOT FORTY-EIGHT (48), SOUTH VILLAGE, RECORDED OCTOBER 13, 2004, IN CABINET G, PAGE 469, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 20198 LORA LANE, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,070.91 Monthly Late Charge $44.60 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lonn Sweers and Cindy Sweers, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Loancity.com Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 23, 2004, recorded March 29, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-16382 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 11 in block 106 of Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 8, Part II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 15958 Sparks Drive La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,480.86 Monthly Late Charge $50.77. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $165,237.93 together with interest thereon at 5.375% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 02, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 03, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-313335 05/27, 06/03, 06/10, 06/17

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. DAVID M. COLLINS; MARIKA S. COLLINS; GENE ROEDIGER; DOROTHY ROEDIGER; JAMES LEVOE; GERALDINE LASSNER; DONALD ALUMBAUGH; ANN ALUMBAUGH; PHILIP J. ONORI AND LOUISE A. ONORI, TRUSTEES OF THE PHILIP J. ONORI AND LOUISE A. ONORI FAMILY TRUST; Occupants of the Premises; and any and all persons claiming an interest in the Property, Defendants. Case No. 09CV0861ST SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: DAVID M. COLLINS AND ANY AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is May 13, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: PARCEL ONE (1) OF A PARTITION PLAT NO. 2003-63, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 19100 Couch Market Road, Bend, OR, 97701. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by , its successors in interest and/or assigns, plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 3535 Factoria Blvd. SE, Suite 200 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com NOTICE Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act: If you are the consumer who originally contracted the debt or if you assumed the debt, then you are notified that: 1. As of the 24th day of May, 2010, the total amount owed is $825,739.50. Because of interest, late charges, and other charges that may vary from day to day, the amount due on the day you pay may be greater. Hence, if you pay the amount shown above, an adjustment may be necessary after we receive your check. For further information, write or call Routh Crabtree Olsen, P.S. 2. The creditor to whom the debt is owed is BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. 3. Unless within 30 days after receipt of this notice you dispute the debt or any portion of it, we will assume the debt to be valid. 4. If you notify us within 30 days after receipt of this notice that you dispute the debt or any part of it, we shall obtain verification of the debt and mail it to you. 5. If you request validation of the debt within 30 days after receipt of this notice, we will provide you with the name and address of the original creditor, if different from the current creditor. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. I hereby certify that the within is a true copy of the original summons in the within entitled action. By: Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorney for Plaintiff


G6 Thursday, June 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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ing the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated; May 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lorena Enriquez, Authorized Signor ASAP# 3587380 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010, 06/17/2010, 06/24/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031243165 T.S. No.: 10-09222-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TIMMOTHY N. COLLINS as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS. INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on July 10, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-47212 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 125571 LOT NINETY-SEVEN (97), BLOCK THIRTY-ONE (31), OREGON WATER WON-

DERLAND UNIT 2, RECORDED MARCH 18, 1970, IN CABINET A, PAGE 365, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 56060 SNOW GOOSE COURT, BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $1,177.70 Monthly Late Charge $44.21 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 312,006.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.29400 % per annum from December 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on September 23, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse,

1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-359187-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAMES D. CAMPBELL AND ERIN Q. CAMPBELL, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR BANK OF THE WEST, A CALIFORNIA STATE BANKING CORP. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 4/29/2008, recorded 4/29/2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. - fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2008-18833, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 253250 LOT 21 OF PARKWAY VILLAGE, PHASES 1, 2, AND 3, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20544 AVRO PLACE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 1/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,602.55 Monthly Late Charge $80.13 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $196,808.94 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.2500 per annum from 12/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/17/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 9/17/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one- year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/18/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 5/14/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3573390 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010, 06/17/2010

the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lorena Enriquez, Authorized Signor ASAP# 3587209 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010, 06/17/2010, 06/24/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6558 T.S. No.: 1276514-09.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-95184 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CHRISTOPHER M. RAMSEY AND DEBRA LOUISE RAMSEY AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 11/21/2007, recorded 11/29/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-61787, rerecorded under Auditor's/Recorder's No. 2009-31358, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 8 IN BLOCK 18 OF LAKE PARK ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3834 NORTHEAST 40TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 17, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 1,933.82 each $ 9,669.10 (01-01-10 through 05-17-10) Late Charges: $ 750.69 Beneficiary Advances: $ 164.50 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 10,584.29 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $327,242.11, PLUS interest thereon at 5.375% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 16, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/17/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee, By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3573453 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010, 06/17/2010

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert Calkins and Christine P. Calkins, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Loancity, as Beneficiary, dated May 05, 2006, recorded May 11, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-32728 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4 in block 1 of Eastwood Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1665 NE Shepard Road Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,997.05 Monthly Late Charge $86.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $267,625.64 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 07, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 8, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-314527 05/27/10, 06/03, 06/10, 06/17

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE FOREGOING INSTRUMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE NOTICE, PURSUANT TO ORS 86.740, THAT THE GRANTOR OF THE TRUST DEED DESCRIBED BELOW HAS DEFAULTED ON ITS OBLIGATIONS TO BENEFICIARY, AND THAT THE BENEFICIARY AND SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST DEED HAVE ELECTED TO SELL THE PROPERTY SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain deed of trust dated August 15, 2008, and recorded on January 5, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-00182 in the property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, wherein JOHN V. MCCLEAN, an Individual, and MCCLEAN DEVELOPMENT CORP., an Oregon corporation is the Grantor, and WESTERN TITLE is the original Trustee, and HOME FEDERAL BANK, as successor in interest to COMMUNITY FIRST BANK, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lots 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26, SIX PEAKS-PHASE 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. Also commonly described as: 1336, 1348, 1360, 1368 & 1376 SW 27th Street, Bend, OR 97701. The tax parcel number(s) are: 242766 (Lot 22), 242765 (Lot 23). 242764 (Lot 24), 242763 (Lot 25), and 242762 (Lot 26). The undersigned hereby certifies that he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DAVID W. CRISWELL, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: David W. Criswell, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: (1) The Loan secured by the Deed of Trust matured on August 15, 2009, at which time the entire principal balance owed together with all accrued interest plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses was immediately due and payable by Grantor to Lender. Grantor has failed to pay to Lender a total of not less than $680,528.68 (the "Indebtedness") which total amount is comprised of an unpaid principal balance of $600,902.00 together with accrued and unpaid interest through and including February 19, 2010 of $79,483.68 plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and collection expenses of not less than $143.00. Interest on account of the unpaid principal portion of the Indebtedness continues to accrue from and after February 19, 2010, at a rate that is currently 18% percent per annum or $296.34 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. (2) As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT: Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments. Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure: Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real Property are paid current. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of February 19, 2010: $600,902.00; Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of February 19, 2010: $79,483.68; Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses to February 19, 2010: $143.00; TOTAL DUE: $680,528.68. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $680,528.68, as of February 19, 2010, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on July 15, 2010, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 15, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. DATED February 22, 2010 By: David W. Criswell, OSB 92593, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219, Telephone: (503) 228-2525, Facsimile: (503) 295-1058, Email: dcriswell@balljanik.com.

Bulletin Daily Paper 06/03/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday June 3, 2010

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