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Citizen of the Year Upward slope Former Bend funeral home owner lauded • LOCAL, C1

Bachelor sees increases • BUSINESS, B1

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La Pine councilors keeping quiet on meeting St. Charles posts gain of $25M “Originally, I was informed it was ‘charges,’ and then it turned into ‘complaints and concerns.’” — Adele McAfee, La Pine city councilor

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Those who know what will be discussed at a meeting in La Pine on Monday aren’t talking, and the woman at the center of it all says she has little idea what it’s all about. La Pine City Councilor Adele

SUNRIVER

McAfee will be the subject of the meeting, called by other members of the City Council to discuss unspecified allegations of her alleged misconduct. No agenda for the meeting has been released by the city, but an email sent by Administrative Assistant

Patti Morgan on Thursday morning promised a “very special City Council meeting” at 6 p.m. at the Midstate Electric Building on Finley Butte Road, including “discussion of complaints from other councillors against a specific councilor’s conduct.” See La Pine / A7

The hospital system’s increase comes after years of dismal performance

A TELLING PINOCHLE FACE

Murder remains a mystery

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

St. Charles Health System posted a strong gain in 2009, after a couple of years of dismal financial performance. The organization made nearly $25 million on operations in 2009, according to its financial statements, its highest since at least 2005. St. Charles Health System is the nonprofit parent company of hospitals in Bend, Redmond and Prineville. “Our 2009 results showed that we did turn around the organization after not good operations in 2007 and 2008,” said Karen Shepard, chief financial officer. The gain represents about 5 percent of the organization’s total revenue of $477 million. That kind of margin is “healthy,” said Bill Kramer, an independent health care consultant and former chief financial officer of Kaiser Permanente’s Northwest Region. Most hospitals, Kramer said, aim for a margin between 4 and 6 percent. Shepard attributed the strong 2009 performance to an increase in the price of services that pushed up revenue and a reduction in expenses due to costcutting measures taken by the organization in early 2009. See Hospital / A6

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

More than two months after police found the bodies of three family members in a Sunriverarea home, investigators are preparing to close the case — but they still have plenty of unanswered questions. On March 11, a passer-by spotted a man hanging by a rope outside of a garage on Hermosa Road. Police later determined that the man, Joachim Steffan, had strangled his wife, Dagmar, and 7-year-old son, Pascal, and then hanged himself. Detectives searched the scene, interviewed friends and family members and read three notes left by Steffan that indicated the couple was struggling with money and worried about being deported to Germany. They determined that no one else was involved in the deaths and labeled the incident a murder-suicide. But some aspects of the crime still didn’t add up.

Senate, 59-39, approves new Wall Street rules

No signs of struggle Capt. Marc Mills of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office said investigators had some working theories about exactly what happened in the home and hoped toxicology tests of the victims’ blood might help. In particular, he said they were curious about why Dagmar and Pascal did not seem to have struggled before they died. This week, the Sheriff’s Office received the test results from the Oregon State Police crime lab — but Mills said the results were not what detectives were expecting. “There were no indications of any drugs in any of their systems,” he said. “If there was, it would have helped explain some things, some theories that we had. And now, of course, the (questions) that we had, we may not be able to answer.” Mills said officials still aren’t sure exactly when the Steffans died. They were last seen on the afternoon of March 10 and found the next morning. See Murder / A6

By David Herszenhorn New York Times News Service

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Eva Burney, 91, of Bend, covers her smirk with her cards during the Golden Age Club pinochle tournament Thursday in Bend. The club, with 61 members, according to Vice President Dick Williams, 74, plays pinochle every Wednesday through Friday from 12:45 to 4 p.m., with open tournaments on the third Thursday of every other month.

Teen media butterflies may not be such a bad idea By Melissa Healy McClatchy-Tribune News Service

TOP NEWS INSIDE AFGHANISTAN: Four high-ranking NATO officials killed, Page A3

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WASHINGTON — The Senate on Thursday approved a far-reaching financial regulatory bill, putting Congress on the brink of approving a broad expansion of government oversight of the increasingly complex banking system and financial Inside markets. • Sen. Merkley The legislation is intended to derivatives prevent a repeat of the 2008 criamendment sis, but also reshapes the role of fails without numerous federal agencies, and a vote, vastly empowers the Federal RePage C1 serve, in an attempt to predict and contain future debacles. The vote was 59-39, with four Republicans joining the Democratic majority in favor of the bill. Two Democrats opposed the measure, saying it was still not tough enough. See Reform / A6

WASHINGTON — With his gaze fixed on a tiny screen, hearing plugged by earbuds and fingers flying, the average teenager may look like a disaster in the making: socially stunted, terminally distracted and looking for trouble. But look beyond the dizzying array of beeping, buzzing devices and the incessant multitasking, say psychologists, and today’s digital kids may not be such a disaster after all.

Far from hampering adolescents’ social skills or putting them in harm’s way as many parents have feared, electronics appear to be the path by which kids today develop emotional bonds, their own identities, and an ability to communicate and work with others. In fact, kids most likely to spend lots of time on social media sites are not the least well-adjusted, but the psychologically healthiest, suggests an early, but accumulating, body of research.

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 141, 74 pages, 7 sections

In one new study, 13- and 14-year-olds were found to interact on social network sites such as Facebook and MySpace simply in ways that were consistent with their offline relationships and patterns of behavior. And of the 86 percent of kids who used social media sites, participants who were better adjusted in their early teens were more likely to use social media in their early 20s, regardless of their age, gender, ethnicity or parents’ income. See Social / A7

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— Amori Yee Mikami, psychologist

Correction

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“Parents of well-adjusted teens may have little to worry about regarding the way their children behave when using social media. It’s likely to be similarly positive behavior.”

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In updated election results that appeared Thursday, May 20, on Page A4, the winner of the Democratic primary for state treasurer was marked incorrectly. Ted Wheeler won the primary. The Bulletin regrets the error.


A2 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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A new step toward artificial life Woman’s Manmade DNA powers ‘synthetic’ cell By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Scientists announced a bold step Thursday in the enduring quest to create artificial life. They’ve produced a living cell powered by man-made DNA. While such work can evoke images of Frankenstein-like scientific tinkering, it also is exciting hopes that it could eventually lead to new fuels, better ways to clean polluted water, faster vaccine production and more. Is it really an artificial life form? The inventors call it the world’s first synthetic cell, although this initial step is more a re-creation of existing life — changing one simple type of bacterium into another — than a built-fromscratch kind. But Maryland genome-mapping pioneer J. Craig Venter said his team’s project paves the way for the ultimate, much harder goal: designing organisms that work differently from the way nature intended for a wide range of uses. Already he’s working with ExxonMobil in hopes of turning algae into fuel. “This is the first self-replicating species we’ve had on the planet whose parent is a computer,” Venter told reporters. And the report, being published today in the journal Science, is triggering excitement in this growing field of synthetic biology. “It’s been a long time coming, and it was worth the wait,” said Dr. George Church, a Harvard Medical School genetics professor. “It’s a milestone that has potential practical applications.” Following the announcement, President Barack Obama directed the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues he established last fall to make its first order of business a

The Associated Press

This J. Craig Venter Institute image shows negatively stained transmission electron micrographs of aggregated M. mycoides. Institute scientists announced Thursday that they have produced a living cell powered by man-made DNA. study of the milestone. “The commission should consider the potential medical, environmental, security and other benefits of this field of research, as well as any potential health, security or other risks,” Obama wrote in a letter to the commission’s chairwoman, Amy Gutmann, the president of the University of Pennsylvania. Scientists for years have moved single genes and even large chunks of DNA from one species to another. At his J. Craig Venter Institute in Rockville, Md., and San Diego, Venter’s team aimed to go further. A few years ago, the researchers transplanted an entire natural genome of one bacterium into another and watched it take over, turning a goat germ into a cattle germ. Next, the researchers built from scratch another, smaller bacterium’s genome, using off-the-shelf laboratory-

touch can inspire courage

made DNA fragments. Today’s report combines those two achievements to test a big question: Could synthetic DNA really take over and drive a living cell? Somehow, it did. “This is transforming life totally from one species into another by changing the software,” said Venter, using a computer analogy to explain the DNA’s role. The researchers picked two species of a simple germ named Mycoplasma. First, they chemically synthesized the genome of M. mycoides, that goat germ, which with 1.1 million “letters” of DNA was twice as large as the germ genome they’d previously built. Then they transplanted it into a living cell from a different Mycoplasma species, albeit a fairly close cousin. At first, nothing happened. The team scrambled to find out why, creating a genetic version of a computer proofreading program to spell-check the DNA fragments they’d pieced together. They found that a typo in the genetic code was rendering the man-made DNA inactive, delaying the project three months to find and restore that bit. “It shows you how accurate it has to be, one letter out of a million,” Venter said. That fixed, the transplant worked. The recipient cell started out with synthetic DNA and its original cytoplasm, but the new genome “booted up” that cell to start producing only proteins that normally would be found in the copied goat germ. The researchers had tagged the synthetic DNA to be able to tell it apart, and checked as the modified cell reproduced to confirm that new cells really looked and behaved like M. mycoides. “All elements in the cells after some amount of time can be traced to this initial artificial DNA. That’s a great accomplishment,” said biological engineer Ron Weiss of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

By Margaret Shapiro The Washington Post

We know a mother’s touch can make a young child feel secure enough to try new things. It turns out a gentle touch from a woman can evoke that response even in adults, according to new research. In a study published online in “There is a Psychological Sciences, researchers lot of work in assembled a group of developmental undergraduate business students, both psychology men and women, for connecting several experiments maternal-infant in which they were asked to invest money touch to sense with a sure return or of security, take a riskier gamble with a larger payoff. attachment and The students had their consequent risk choices explained by a woman who gave taking. We drew them a light touch on an analogy with the back of the shoulder, by a man who adults.” shook their hand or — Jonathan Levav, by a woman who did professor at Columbia not touch them. The researchers University found that people touched on the shoulder by the woman were more willing to go for the riskier option. They concluded that “certain types of female physical contact reactivate the sensory and perceptual states that are associated with the feelings of security originally evoked by maternal physical contact in infancy” and that this feeling encouraged the risk taking. “There is a lot of work in developmental psychology connecting maternal-infant touch to sense of security, attachment and consequent risk taking. We drew an analogy with adults,” study co-author Jonathan Levav, an associate professor of marketing at Columbia University Business School, wrote in an e-mail. Asked whether some of the participants might have been motivated to make riskier behaviors to show off to the woman lightly patting them, he said, “All the conditions in which women did the touching were paired with control conditions in which the same women were present but did not touch. Thus, the ‘show-off’ effect should be the same in all conditions. What we find is that it is the touch that leads to risk taking, not the mere presence.” Levav and co-author Jennifer Argo of the University of Alberta point out in the study that “the influence of maternal physical contact is so pervasive that its effect is observed even in arachnids; young lycosid spiderlings who experience a greater degree of maternal contact subsequently exhibit more extensive exploratory behavior in a novel open field arena.”

Synthesizing a functional genome A team led by J. Craig Venter has succeeded in creating a synthetic bacterial genome and using it to control a cell. Pieces of DNA

Completed loop of DNA

Bacterial cell

Bacterial colony

join

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ASSEMBLY The team began with small pieces of laboratory-made DNA, then used a new technique to join them together into the largest piece of DNA synthesized so far, a loop 1 million units in length.

INSERTION The loop of DNA was designed to closely replicate the genetic sequence of a species of bacterium. To test the DNA, the team inserted it into an empty cell of a different species of bacterium.

SELF-REPLICATION The synthetic DNA proved accurate enough to take over the bacterial cell and substitute for the cell’s own DNA. The ‘‘synthetic cell’’ then replicated itself to form a bacterial colony. New York Times News Service

Source: Science

Scientists identify calcium-rich class of supernovae By Eryn Brown McClatchy-Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES — Scientists have identified a type of supernova — exploding star — that produces unusually large amounts of calcium — enough, perhaps, to explain the abundance of that element in the universe, and in our bones. Perhaps more significant for astronomers, these calcium-rich exploding stars — eight of which have been identified so far — may also comprise a new class of supernova, according to a study published in the journal Nature on Thursday. “If it’s not a new genus, it’s at least a new species of supernova,” said Alex Filippenko, a professor of astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, and one of the study’s 28 co-authors. “This is not just a variation on a theme.” Understanding how these supernovae were formed could help researchers better describe the chemical evolution of the universe, said David Branch, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Oklahoma who wrote an editorial that accompanied the studies. And, he added, the finding is almost certain to inspire astronomers to ramp up their efforts to detect and understand this variety.

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} www.dukewarner.com REALTOR


THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 A3

TS  4 NATO officers died in Afghan bombing Suicide attack killed 14 others By Dexter Filkins New York Times News Service

KABUL — The suicide bomber who struck in Kabul on Tuesday killed four high-ranking NATO officers who had been on a brief visit, military officials confirmed Thursday. They said the victims included two full colonels, an American and a Canadian, and two American lieutenant colonels. It was the largest number of ranking officers from the American-led forces here killed in any insurgent attack since the Afghan war that ousted the Taliban from power began more than eight years ago. Also Thursday, for the third consecutive day, a Taliban suicide bomber attacked a NATO military target, this time a convoy in the southern province of Kandahar, but the police there said no soldiers were killed. On Wednesday, Taliban suicide bombers in concert with armed insurgents orchestrated a failed attempt to break into the main American military base at Bagram, north of Kabul. None of the

defenders were killed, but at least five American servicemen were wounded, the military said. The attack Tuesday in Kabul came as the officers were driving in a convoy of armored sport utility vehicles during the morning rush. A suicide bomber in a minibus drove into their convoy, killing the four officers, two other American servicemen and 12 Afghan civilians in a passing bus.

Related attack The attack on Thursday also involved a minivan, which exploded close to the American convoy in the Shor Andam area of Kandahar province. The provincial police chief, Sardar Mohammed Zazi, said there were no casualties, other than the suicide bomber, although a local witness said he saw a helicopter evacuating three soldiers. Canadian military officials identified the colonel who was killed Tuesday as Geoff Parker, 42, from Oakville, Ontario, an officer of the Royal Canadian Regiment, and the highest-ranking Canadian to die in the Afghan conflict. He was on an assessment visit when the attack took place. Similarly, the American colonel, whom the Pentagon identified Thursday as John McHugh, 46,

from New Jersey, was also on an assessment visit as part of his assignment for the U.S. Army Battle Command Training Program at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. The two lieutenant colonels, Paul Bartz, 43, of Waterloo, Wis., and Thomas Belkofer, 44, of Perrysburg, Ohio, were both on a familiarization visit in advance of assignments in Afghanistan, according to a spokesman for the American military in Kabul, Lt. Col. Joseph Breasseale. Both officers were stationed at Fort Drum, N.Y., with the Army’s 10th Mountain Division. The other two American soldiers killed on Tuesday were the officers’ drivers, and both had been assigned to Kabul since last fall. The Pentagon identified them as Staff Sgt. Richard Tieman, 28, of Waynesboro, Pa., and Specialist Joshua Tomlinson, 24, of Dubberly, La.; both had previously been stationed in Heidelberg, Germany. The American military also announced Thursday that it had opened a criminal investigation into the involvement of “a small number of U.S. soldiers” in the unlawful deaths of up to three Afghan civilians, according to a news release. One soldier has been detained in the case, the military said.

Jacques Brinon / The Associated Press

Police officers search for clues as they pack up the frames of five stolen paintings outside the Paris Museum of Modern Art, following the report of an art theft there early Thursday morning.

Paintings nabbed from museum Thief makes off with works by Picasso, Matisse By Doreen Carvajal New York Times News Service

PARIS — A lone hooded man who squirmed through a broken window and evaded security alarms stole five paintings by Picasso, Matisse and other artists overnight Wednesday from the Paris Museum of Modern Art in a brash theft of art valued at $114 million to $127 million. Museum officials discovered the theft shortly before 7 a.m. Thursday. They said they had captured video images of the black-clad burglar as he stole into the museum, housed in the Palais de Tokyo, the 1937 Art Deco showpiece that sits across the Seine from the Eiffel Tower. The burglary — which triggered no electronic alarms — immediately raised fresh questions about museum security in the French capital. Last summer, a thief snatched a red sketchbook of 33 Picasso drawings from the Picasso Museum while it was undergoing renovations. Security alarms did not sound in that case, either. The Museum of Modern Art was closed to visitors and cordoned off by investigators on Thursday. The stolen works, part of the

Bridgeman Art Library International

Amedeo Modigliani’s “Woman With a Fan” is one of five paintings stolen by a lone thief. The five are valued at between $114 million and $127 million. museum’s permanent collection, were “Dove With Green Peas by Picasso, “La Pastorale” by Matisse, “Olive Tree Near l’Estaque” by Georges Braque, “Woman With a Fan” by Amedeo Modigliani and “Still Life With Chandeliers” by Fernand Leger. The stature of the paintings would make them extremely difficult to sell in the art market, raising questions about whether the theft was a form of kidnapping to demand ransom from the museum.

The police and museum officials said little about the security failure, particularly about whether the alarm system had malfunctioned or had been disabled. A French newspaper, Le Parisien, quoted an unidentified source from the museum who claimed that the security alarm had not worked for two months and that management had been notified of the problem. But in a hastily called news conference outside the museum, Christophe Girard, the deputy mayor of culture for Paris, told reporters that the museum was equipped with security alarms and that three armed guards who were patrolling the museum on Wednesday night said that they had not noticed anything amiss. Police officers carried out the original frames left behind by the burglar to search for fingerprints, passing them through the broken shards of a museum window. According to the authorities, surveillance images show a hooded man, dressed in black, who smashed through a window and then used bolt cutters to remove a grid. Bertrand Delanoe, the mayor of Paris, expressed his shock and sadness at a “theft that is an intolerable attack on the universal cultural heritage of Paris.” He announced that the museum, which is owned by the city, would remain closed while the investigation continued.


N AT ION / WOR L D

A4 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Calderón pleads with U.S. to fight illegal gun trade By Mary Beth Sheridan The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Mexican President Felipe Calderón, speaking Thursday to a joint session of Congress, pleaded for more help in limiting the flow of weapons to Mexico, saying they were contributing to the devastating drug violence in his country. In a speech punctuated by applause and standing ovations, Calderón emphasized his government’s resolve to confront the narco-traffickers, who have killed more than 20,000 people in Mexico in recent years. But Mexico needs greater U.S. assistance stopping the flow of assault weapons and other deadly arms across the border, he said. “I understand that the purpose of the Second Amendment is to guarantee good American citizens the ability to defend themselves and their nation,” he said. “But believe me, many of these guns are not going to honest American hands.” The Obama administration has won goodwill in Mexico by publicly acknowledging the role of U.S. guns and drug con-

“I understand that the purpose of the Second Amendment is to guarantee good American citizens the ability to defend themselves and their nation. But believe me, many of these guns are not going to honest American hands.” — Felipe Calderón, president of Mexico

sumption in fueling that country’s narcotics trade. President Obama has ordered increased searches of Mexico-bound train cargo and other measures to crack down on the illegal stream of weapons. But Mexican officials have expressed frustration that more progress has not been made. Calderón said his government had seized 75,000 guns in Mexico

in a three-year period and found that 80 percent of those whose origin could be traced were bought in the United States. The Mexican leader also asked lawmakers to “consider reinstating” the assault weapons ban, a 10-year measure passed in 1994. Many Democrats jumped to their feet, clapping. The Obama administration has shown no inclination to take on powerful gun-rights supporters and the National Rifle Association with such a move. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano recently acknowledged that there would be little appetite for it in Congress. Andrew Arulanandam, a spokesman for the NRA, noted that when Attorney Gen. Eric Holder proposed reviving the assault weapons ban last year, 65 House Democrats sent him a letter opposing the idea. Most Republicans in Congress are strong defenders of gun rights. “The answers to Mexico’s drug and violence problems do not lie in stripping away the rights of law-abiding Americans on this side of the border,” Arulanandam said.

U.S. DETAINEES IN IRAN VISIT THEIR MOTHERS

The three hikers detained in Iran talk with their mothers after lunch at the Esteghlal Hotel in Tehran, Iran, on Thursday. From right are Laura Fattal, and her son, Josh Fattal, Sarah Shourd and her mother, Nora Shourd, and Shane Bauer, and his mother, Cindy Hickey. The three Americans jailed in Iran for 10 months hugged and kissed their mothers in an emotional reunion Thursday after the women arrived on a mission to secure the release of their children. In the trio’s first public comments since their arrest, one of the prisoners said they all hoped to go home together. They said they were well-fed, given access to health care and

allowed to watch television, read books and receive mail from their families. A representative of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad told reporters gathered at the Esteghlal Hotel, where the reunion took place, not to ask any questions about politics. Iran clearly hoped to remind the public that there are Iranian prisoners in American prisons. In February, Ahmadinejad said Iran might be willing to negotiate a prisoner exchange, a proposal the Obama administration rejected. The news conference lasted 20 minutes, during which the three described their days. There were strict ground rules for the reunion.

W  B Pakistan widens online ban to include YouTube ISLAMABAD — Pakistani authorities broadened what started as a ban on a social networking site Thursday, blocking YouTube and about 450 individual Web pages over what they described as “growing sacrilegious content.” The Pakistan Telecommunication Authority blocked YouTube after a special Internet monitoring unit within the agency determined that “objectionable content” was increasing, according to a spokesman, Khurram Mehran. The ban, which also included certain pages on the Flickr and Wikipedia sites, occurred a day

after access to Facebook was suspended on orders from a Pakistani court. A group of Islamic lawyers won that injunction, arguing that a contest, started by users for drawings of the Prophet Muhammad and called “Everybody Draw Muhammad Day,” was offensive. Depiction of Muhammad is considered blasphemous by some Muslims.

Gay couple sentenced to 14 years in Malawi BLANTYRE, Malawi — A judge sentenced a couple to the maximum 14 years in prison with hard labor under Malawi’s anti-gay legislation, and crowds jeered the two men as they were driven from the courthouse to

jail Thursday. The sentence for unnatural acts and gross indecency had been expected after the same judge convicted Tiwonge Chimbalanga and Steven Monjeza earlier this week under laws dating from the colonial era. The case has drawn international condemnation and sparked a debate on human rights in this conservative southern African country. Chimbalanga, a 20-year-old hotel janitor, and his unemployed partner were arrested Dec. 27, the day after they celebrated their engagement with a party at the hotel where Chimbalanga worked — an apparent first in Malawi. — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 A5

BP is ordered to use less-toxic oil dispersant By Jennifer A. Dlouhy Hearst News Service

WASHINGTON — Federal environmental regulators on Thursday ordered BP to switch to lesstoxic dispersants to break up oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico, amid fears that the chemical now being sprayed over the sea and injected deep underwater could harm marine life. Under the directive from the Environmental Protection Agency, BP had 24 hours to identify a lesstoxic and potentially more effective option — and must start using it within three days. Although the version BP has been using — two formulations of the brand Corexit — is on EPA’s list of approved dispersants, there are 16 others, many of which fared better in toxicity and effectiveness tests. “BP is using this dispersant in unprecedented volumes and, last week, began using it underwater at the source of the leak — a procedure that has never been tried before,” the EPA said in a statement. “Because of its use in unprecedented volumes and because much is unknown about the underwater use of dispersants, EPA wants to ensure BP is using the least toxic product authorized for use.” The dispersants are detergentlike substances designed to help break down oil into tiny droplets that can be consumed by naturally occurring microbes. The EPA initially allowed BP to spray the

dispersant over oil slicks on the surface of the Gulf — during good weather and water conditions. On May 15, the agency allowed BP to inject the chemicals deep underwater, directly at the site of the gushing oil. At the time, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson described the decision to allow the unprecedented technique as a trade-off between the harm of allowing oil to accumulate and the possible damage to marine life from the detergentlike substance. In the month since the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig, an estimated 655,000 gallons of the Corexit oil dispersant have been sprayed on the sea or at the leak — with an estimated 55,000 gallons being delivered underwater. According to test results logged with the EPA, at least 14 alternative dispersants were less toxic in fish, and seven were less toxic in shrimp. Under the EPA order, BP has to search for alternative dispersants — but can alert federal regulators if it is not “able to identify alternative dispersant products” that are readily available. BP is able to consider what stockpiles are available and how much time it would begin to manufacture and ship a replacement dispersant. In a statement, BP said the company was “conducting ongoing assessment of alternative or supplemental dispersant products.”

Deep-water wells OK’d even hours after rig blast By Joe Carroll Bloomberg News

Anadarko Petroleum Corp., the U.S. oil company that owns a stake in BP’s leaking Gulf of Mexico well, got government permission to drill at another deep-water prospect hours after the explosion that triggered the spill. The Minerals Management Service approved Anadarko’s plan to drill four wells at its Lucius prospect about 250 miles from the Louisiana coast on April 21, less than 24 hours after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded and caught fire at BP’s Macondo well. The blast killed 11 workers and set off leaks that continue to spew oil into the Gulf. The Deepwater Horizon, which London-based BP leased from Transocean, was still in flames and survivors were making their way to shore when Anadarko got approval for its drilling plan, government records showed. The Obama administration imposed a moratorium this month, saying May 6 that no offshore permits would be issued during a review of drilling safety.

Risky? Lucius, discovered in late 2009 and appraised with a second well in January, isn’t as risky as the BP project that went awry, Anadarko spokesman John Christiansen said. Anadarko already understands much of the prospect’s geology, unlike BP, which was drilling its first well at Macondo, he said. “One thing to keep in mind is that this is an appraisal well, it isn’t a wildcat prospect,” Christiansen said in an interview from the company’s headquarters in The Woodlands, Texas. “We’ve already drilled previous wells there, so it’s a known pressure regime.” Caryl Fagot, a spokeswoman for the minerals agency, didn’t respond to telephone messages seeking comment on the timing of Anadarko’s drilling approval. Lucius is a “major discovery,” Bob Daniels, Anadarko’s senior vice president for worldwide exploration, said in a Jan. 27 announcement of successful appraisal work. The field was initially discovered in December 2009.

Federal response Anadarko owns 25 percent of the BP-operated Macondo project. The company has “tremendous liquidity” to weather its share of costs from the spill, Chief Executive Officer Jim

Hackett said Tuesday. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar responded on Wednesday to mounting criticism of the minerals agency’s handling of rig safety by replacing the service with three offices that will split drilling oversight, offshore leasing and fee collection. The top-ranking federal official in charge of offshore safety, Chris Oynes, resigned Monday amid rising scrutiny by Congress and the Obama administration into the minerals agency’s handling of inspections and permits. Oynes had been associate director of the offshore energy and minerals management program since 2007.

Drilling halted Oil producers, including Exxon Mobil and Cobalt International Energy, have had their deep-water Gulf exploration interrupted by the moratorium on new permits imposed in response to the Deepwater Horizon blast. Exxon, the world’s largest company by market value, moved a rig to a site in 6,941 feet of water in anticipation of beginning a well in its Hadrian prospect. The moratorium was imposed before the final permit was issued, forcing Exxon to suspend the project, company spokesman Alan Jeffers said May 18. Cobalt has two deep-water projects on hold pending permit approval, Chief Executive Officer Joseph Bryant said last week. Anadarko has four active drilling projects in Gulf waters at least 1,000 feet deep. Only Europe’s Royal Dutch Shell has more, at seven, Minerals Management Service records showed. Chevron also has four Gulf projects under way. The exploration plan approved on April 21 said Anadarko was scheduled to begin the first of four planned wells at Lucius on May 1 using Noble Corp.’s Noble Amos Runner, a rig built to operate in up to 8,000 feet of water and drill 32,500 feet beneath the sea surface. The first well is scheduled to be finished by July 20, according to Anadarko’s filing with the minerals agency. Three more wells will follow, with the last one scheduled to be completed on March 22, 2011. There are 35 deep-water drilling projects operating in the U.S. section of the Gulf of Mexico, the minerals agency said in a report issued yesterday. Petroleo Brasileiro SA, Brazil’s state-controlled oil company, is overseeing the deepest, Chinook, in 8,850 feet of water.

SYRUPY OIL WASHES INTO MARSHES Black oil shows up on the bottom of roseau cane, with a Gulf drilling rig in the background of Louisiana’s Mississippi Delta on Thursday. The spectacle many had feared for a month finally began unfolding as gooey, rustcolored oil washed into the marshes at the mouth of the river for the first time, stoking public anger and frustration with both BP and the government. Up to now, only tar balls and a sheen of oil had come ashore of Louisiana’s wetlands, home to rare birds, mammals and a rich variety of marine life. There were no immediate reports of any mass die-offs of wildlife. Miami Herald

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A6 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Hospital Continued from A1 In the beginning of 2009, St. Charles bumped prices up 13.5 percent, nearly twice as much as it had in previous years and more than other hospitals at the time. Though commercial insurers, and people with commercial health insurance, pay lower negotiated rates, the price increase extended there as well, Shepard said. “We did make huge efforts with the commercial contracts and renegotiating those commercial contracts for larger price increases. So that helped our revenue for 2009,” Shepard said. When the price goes up for hospital services, there’s a direct link to higher premiums and higher co-pays, said Steve Sause, a provider executive at Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon. Sause would not confirm if the amounts Regence paid to St. Charles had gone up in 2009, citing the confidentiality of the negotiations. In addition to finding ways to add revenue, St. Charles reduced expenses. The total amount spent by the organization increased in 2009, though by less than half the amount it had increased in 2008. St. Charles cut salary costs, its largest expense, by laying off or reducing hours for more than 100 employees in February 2009. It also cut salaries for all nonunion staff members in early 2009; those employees’ full salaries have been reinstated. In another expense cut, the organization reduced pay to some doctors who serve as medical directors for hospital programs, Shepard said, and found ways to reduce the amount paid for various supplies and services. These cuts, as well as the price increases, were necessary to maintain a healthy balance sheet, said Shepard, because the number of patients coming into the hospital has remained flat since the end of 2008, and those who are coming are not staying as long. In 2008, the Bend hospital had 14,367 discharges; in 2009

Reform Continued from A1 Democratic congressional leaders and the Obama administration must now work to combine the Senate measure with a version approved by the House in December, a process that is expected to take several weeks. While there are important differences — notably a Senate provision that would force big banks to spin off some of their most lucrative derivatives business into separate subsidiaries — the bills are broadly similar, and it is virtually certain that Congress will adopt the most sweeping regulatory overhaul since the aftermath of the Great Depression. Passage of the bill would be a signature achievement for the White House, nearly on par with the recently enacted health care law. President Barack Obama, speaking in the Rose Garden on Thursday afternoon, declared victory over the financial industry and “hordes of lobbyists” that he said had tried to kill the legislation. “The recession we’re emerging from was primarily caused by a lack of responsibility and accountability from Wall Street to Washington,” Obama said, adding, “That’s why I made passage of Wall Street reform one of my top priorities as president, so that a crisis like this does not happen again.”

Obama to have hand in final bill The president also signaled that he would take a strong hand in developing the final bill, which could mean changes to the restrictive derivatives provision the Senate measure includes and Wall Street opposes. It is also likely that the administration will try to remove a special exemption passed by the House that would shelter auto dealers from oversight by a new consumer protection agency. Earlier, Obama had criticized the provision as a “special loophole” that would hurt car buyers. The Senate bill, sponsored primarily by Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., and chairman of the banking committee, seeks to curb abusive lending, particularly in the mortgage industry, by creating a powerful Bureau of Consumer Protection within the Federal Reserve to oversee nearly all consumer financial products. In response to the huge bailouts in 2008, the bill seeks to en-

Financial performance of St. Charles Health System St. Charles posted its largest operating income — the amount left after expenses are subtracted from revenue — since at least 2005.

Operating income In millions $30

$25m

25 20

$17m

15 10 $9m 5

$1.1m 0

-$615,000 -5 ’05

’06

’07

’08

’09

Source: St. Charles Health Systems Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

“With the high number of uninsured in Central Oregon, there will be a continued high number of charity care or fewer patients who can pay.” — Bill Kramer, independent health care consultant it had 14,426, according to data from the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. Low patient volumes have prompted the Bend hospital to close its fifth floor, which it does sometimes depending on its patient volume, Shepard said. Also contributing to worries about revenue is the decline in patients with insurance, Shepard said. In 2009, nearly 7 percent of the organization’s patients had no health insurance, compared with 6 percent in 2008. The hospital provided about

sure that troubled companies, no matter how big or complex, can be liquidated at no cost to taxpayers. It would empower regulators to seize failing companies, break them apart and sell off the assets, potentially wiping out shareholders and creditors to avoid any taxpayer expense.

‘Financial stability oversight council’ To coordinate efforts to identify risks to the financial system, the bill would create a “financial stability oversight council” composed of the Treasury secretary; the chairman of the Federal Reserve; the comptroller of the currency; the director of the new consumer financial protection bureau; the heads of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.; the director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency; and an independent member appointed by the president. The bill would touch virtually every aspect of the financial industry. Hedge funds and most other private equity companies would be required to register

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$60 million in 2009 in uncompensated care, debts unpaid and charity care to those deemed too poor to pay. In 2008, the hospital provided about $50 million. Kramer said that the amount of unreimbursed medical care could continue to be a challenge for both the hospital system and the region. “With the high number of uninsured in Central Oregon,” he said, “there will be a continued high number of charity care or fewer patients who can pay.” St. Charles is not unique in its financial position. Hospitals across the state did poorly in 2008, said Kevin Earls, vice president of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, and began to rebound in 2009. Many hospitals trimmed staff and cut other expenses in 2008, said Earls, so that when patient volume and investment income began to increase in 2009, they were positioned to capture the savings. The $25 million the hospital made in 2009 will help make up for its loss in 2008, said hospital spokeswoman Janette Sherman, and will be used to add to the organizations’s store of cash reserves, a critical measure of the financial health of a hospital. That measure, known as days cash on hand, is used by analysts to determine a hospital’s creditworthiness. At the end of 2008, St. Charles had 104 days cash on hand; it now has 134. Shepard said she would like it to reach 169 days cash on hand, the benchmark that may allow the organization to get a better credit rating. Despite the rosy financial picture from 2009, Shepard sounded a cautious note about the future, noting that volumes still have not rebounded, and the number of patients unable to pay is up in 2010 from 2009. “I think the organization as a whole needs to stay focused and disciplined,” she said, “making sure that expenses track with our revenue.”

By Tracy Wilkinson McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MONTERREY, Mexico — With its superhighways, gleaming skyscrapers, fancy art museums and leafy plazas, Monterrey has always been safe — so safe, in fact, that drug lords chose to park their families here. Life in Monterrey represented another Mexico, cozily above the national fray of violence and disintegration. No scruffy border city or remote, drug-infested outpost, Monterrey is Mexico’s wealthiest city, its economic engine, the center of textile, food-processing, beer and construction industries — a modern, sophisticated metropolis where per-capita GDP is twice the national average. Now, however, as drug-trafficking syndicates expand their reach across Mexico, they have brought even Monterrey to its knees. And as authorities lose control, the business elite are worried, ordinary residents panicked. “The tradition of a tranquil Monterrey has ended,” said Gilberto Marcos, a textile manufacturer who belongs to a citizens

Murder Continued from A1 According to a search warrant filed by detectives on March 11, the mother and son were discovered in a bed, covered by a blanket. The family’s dog and two cats were also in the bedroom, their throats cut. After the deaths, friends and neighbors of the family said Joachim and Dagmar, who ran several businesses, including a construction company and a La

Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or at bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

for regulation by the SEC, and the bill would impose a thicket of rules for the trading of derivatives, the complex instruments at the center of the 2008 crisis. With limited exceptions, derivatives would have to be traded on a public exchange and cleared through a third party. Buyers and sellers of derivatives contracts, including existing contracts, would be required to post collateral to protect against potential default, a provision

criticized by Warren Buffet. And, under a provision written by Sen. Blanche Lincoln, DArk., some of the biggest banks would be forced to spin off their trading in swaps, the most lucrative part of the derivatives business, into separate subsidiaries, or be denied access to the Fed’s emergency lending window. The banks are strongly opposed to that provision, and the administration has also said that it sees no benefit in forcing the banks to give up swaps.

“If Monterrey is lost, everything is lost.” — Gilberto Marcos, textile manufacturer board that advises the state on security issues. “And if Monterrey is lost, everything is lost.” Monterrey is perhaps paying the price for tolerating the presence of traffickers for so many years, allowing them to fester and grow amid the shared wealth. “For two decades, our deliberate ignorance and our indolence have made us de facto collaborators” with organized crime, said Father Rogelio Narvaez, head priest in the struggling Our Lady of the Rosary parish. “Legality and the social fabric are in crisis. ... It is easier to get guns than a scholarship.” In the space of a few weeks in recent months, drug gangs repeatedly blocked off city streets, snarling traffic and preventing police and soldiers from patrolling. Regular gun battles in and

Pine coin laundry, had been under financial stress. The couple had problems renewing their visas and worried they’d have to return to their home country of Germany. In the months before the murders, the couple began selling their belongings and put their house on the market. In one of the letters left at the scene, Joachim Steffan wrote that he “didn’t want to start over.” Mills said investigators met with some of the Steffans’ family members who traveled from Ger-

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around Monterrey had claimed 164 lives this year as of May 7, almost the same number as in the two previous years combined. The dead included two popular engineering students caught, apparently, in crossfire at the gates of their prestigious university. Business leaders say extortion and forced payment of “protection money” to gangsters are now routine. U.S. universities have canceled exchange programs with Monterrey institutions. Foreign investment fell by 50 percent last year; unemployment has risen sharply. And so, as in so many other parts of Mexico, the citizens of Monterrey are changing the way they live. They don’t go out at night as much. The frequent shopping trips to McAllen, Texas, have been curtailed; they drive the now-dangerous highway only at certain highnoon hours. They look over their shoulders, viewing one another with suspicion. “Our way of being has changed,” said Marcos, the textile manufacturer. “We saw this from afar, and now the problem is catching up to us.”

many after the deaths. He said it was difficult to tell the family that some questions may never be answered — and frustrating for officials who want to figure out if something could have been done to prevent the situation. “It’s not just the police end,” he said. “We want to be able to help get the resources out there so they can better help the people in need.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Anonymous helpers make website a potent foe of government secrecy By Joby Warrick The Washington Post

BERLIN — For an organization dedicated to exposing secrets, WikiLeaks keeps a close hold on its own affairs. Its Web site doesn’t list a street address or phone number, or the names of key officers. Officially, it has no employees, headquarters or even a post office box. Yet, about 30 times a day, someone submits a sensitive document to this cyber-whistleblower to be posted online for all to see. Politicians’ private e-mails, secret CIA reports, corporate memos, surveillance video — all have been fair game. The 3-year-old group was catapulted into the spotlight last month when it released a U.S. military video of a helicopter at-

La Pine Continued from A1 Mayor Kitty Shields said a meeting has been scheduled, but declined to identify McAfee by name as the councilor in question or discuss the allegations. “The meeting is being called as a result of complaints and concerns raised individually by three councilors, myself included, regarding another councilor’s conduct,” Shields said. “The purpose of the meeting is to provide an opportunity to hear the same complaints, concerns and suggestions for improvement at the same time.” McAfee confirmed Wednesday night that she was the councilor whose conduct prompted the meeting, but said other councilors have declined to tell her what they believe she has done. McAfee has served on the council since April 2009, when she was appointed to fill a vacancy created by the resignation of former Councilor Ken Mulenex. “I have not been informed of anything,” McAfee said. “Origi-

tack on Iraqis – graphic images that drew a worldwide audience. That might have been just the warmup. Newly leaked material is being prepared for release, part of a growing treasure trove of formerly secret documents and recordings that exceeds a million records.

Enabler of citizen activists, journalists The site has provoked official and corporate anxiety for years, but now WikiLeaks is tapping new technology and a growing list of financial backers to move closer to what the group says it has long sought to become: a global foe of excessive government secrecy and an enabler of citizen activists, journalists and others who

nally, I was informed it was ‘charges,’ and then it turned into ‘complaints and concerns.’” In recent months, McAfee raised concerns about the amount of money paid to Bend law firm Bryant Lovelein & Jarvis for the city’s legal services, and intervened in a personnel dispute she said was being mishandled. She said while she’s had some differences with other councilors, she doesn’t believe she’s done anything to warrant a meeting about her conduct. “When I talk, I know I can be direct and pointed, and I have an opinion about things and the way the people of La Pine should be best served,” McAfee said. “I’ve voiced that opinion, and I back it up with facts.” McAfee said Shields called her in early April claiming there were “charges” against her, but did not specify what they were. Multiple e-mails McAfee sent to Shields asking for specifics went unanswered, McAfee said. Shields told a different story and said “the affected party” has been given two or three examples of complaints from other councilors, and that additional

seek to challenge the powerful. WikiLeaks has pioneered an approach that capitalizes on its secretive nature. Lacking a home base or traditional infrastructure, it is almost entirely virtual, relying on servers and helpers in dozens of countries. It is accessible anywhere the Internet goes, yet it is relatively immune from pressure from censors, lawyers or local governments. Its founders say those who submit material to the site typically do so anonymously. The goal, said Daniel Schmitt, one of WikiLeaks’ five core directors, is to make the organization unstoppable. “The message of WikiLeaks to the controllers of information is this: You can either be transparent, or transparency will be brought to you,” he said.

complaints will be raised at the meeting. She said she didn’t want to elaborate on the nature of the complaints until Monday night. “Even if I say something generic like that, someone’s going to latch on to it and make a big deal out of it,” she said. “I just want to avoid all speculation and rumors.” La Pine resident Robert Ray said the scheduling of Monday’s meeting makes him suspect some members of the council have held meetings not open to the public or other councilors. Ray believes McAfee’s friendly relationships with some critics of the city have upset other councilors, but said personality conflicts and differences of opinion are a normal part of any governmental body. “You can’t get five people to agree on anything,” Ray said. “Just because one particular councilor doesn’t agree doesn’t mean they’ve done anything incorrect.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Social Continued from A1 Adolescents are largely using social networking sites to keep in touch with friends they already know, not to converse with strangers, said the author of that research, University of Virginia psychologist Amori Yee Mikami. “So parents of well-adjusted teens may have little to worry about regarding the way their children behave when using social media,” Mikami added. “It’s likely to be similarly positive behavior.” In studies of teenagers and young adults, Cal State L.A. psychology professor Kaveri Subrahmanyam has also found that kids’ online worlds and friendships strongly resemble their relationships offline, with overlapping casts of characters and similar hierarchies of closeness. “I think the majority of kids use it in ways that don’t jeopardize their well-being,” she said. Ultimately, it seems, the digital world is simply a new and perhaps more multidimensional place to conduct the age-old work of adolescence — forming identities separate from those of parents. Just how outsized is digital media’s presence in a child’s life? In January, the Kaiser Family Foundation reported that for more than 7½ hours a day, American children ages 8 to 18 are tethered to computers, plugged into MP3 players, watching TV or playing video, computer or hand-held games — and for much of that time, doing several at once. Add to that tally time spent texting by cell phone, and for most kids, the daily log of media immersion would surpass time spent sleeping. A report by the Pew Research Center released in April found that 72 percent of U.S. teens text-message regularly, one-third of them more than 100 times a day. As a means of keeping up with friends daily, teens are more likely to text than to talk by phone, by e-mail or

THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 A7

E-kids The amount of time U.S. children and teens spend on the computer has tripled in the last 10 years.

On a computer Daily average, ages 8-18

1 hour, 29 min.

1 hour, 2 min. 27 min.

1999

2004

2009

On a cell phone Daily average minutes, by age group

Talking

Texting

150 120 90

1 hr., 51 min. 1 hr., 13 min.

60 30 0 8-10 11-14 years* years

15-18 years

*Texting not available for age group © 2010 MCT Source: Kaiser Family Foundation Graphic: Los Angeles Times

face to face. But a recent study in the journal Developmental Psychology underscores the point that it is largely the kid, not the technology or even the time a kid spends using it, that seems to influence how safely he or she will navigate the digital world. Certainly there are dangers online, says Subrahmanyam, who is also the associate director of the Children’s Digital Media Center in Los Angeles. But the new media “is ultimately a tool” for kids, she says. Most will use it constructively. Those teens who struggle with depression or with aggressive or delinquent behavior are more likely to find the online world to be full of digital land mines. Mikami’s research found that they were more likely to harass, bully and take online risks such as “sexting” or “MIRLing” (text-

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speak for “meeting in real life” a stranger one has chatted with online), or to be vulnerable to others who harass, bully and coerce. In the end, says Mikami, these risk-takers were more likely than healthier kids to abandon public social media sites such as Facebook and MySpace for online scenes such as chat rooms, where their behavior is less subject to scrutiny. All of this research comes on the heels of two task force reports that combed the evidence on kids and their online world and found that, on balance, that world is far less frightening than parents believe. A three-year Digital Youth Project, undertaken by researchers from schools including the University of Southern California and the University of California-Berkeley, urged adults to “facilitate young people’s engagement with digital media” rather than block it, begrudge it or fear it. “The digital world is creating new opportunities for youth to grapple with social norms, to explore interests, develop technical skills and experiment with new forms of self expression,” the group’s 2008 white paper concluded. The second task force, commissioned by state attorneys general to gauge the dangers that kids face in socializing online, found last year that children are far more likely to be bullied or sexually propositioned by peers they know than they are to be preyed upon by a stranger on the Internet. That report, drafted by Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, concluded that on social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook and Friendster, strangers are routinely locked out and readily rebuffed. Where kids do stray into dangerous territory with strangers, it is generally knowingly, in chat rooms and online forums intended for adults.


A8 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,204.01 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -94.36 -4.11%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Home Federal Bank reports $1.6M loss Home Federal Bancorp, the Nampa, Idaho-based parent company of Home Federal Bank, reported Thursday a $1.6 million loss, or 10 cents per diluted share, in its second quarter that ended March 31. The company, which acquired Prineville-based Community First Bank from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. in August 2009 after it was declared insolvent and has seven locations in Central Oregon, blamed the quarterly loss on an increase in nonperforming commercial real estate loans and declining real estate values. However, the company said deposits increased during the quarter, as well as net interest income. The company also said it received $5.9 million in reimbursed losses from the FDIC on former Community First assets that were covered under the loss-share agreement it executed with regulators when it acquired the bank. Shares of the company closed Thursday at $14.57, down 43 cents, or 2.87 percent, in Nasdaq trading.

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CLOSE 10,068.01 DOW JONES CHANGE -376.36 -3.60%

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1,071.59 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -43.46 -3.90%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.26 treasury CHANGE -2.69%

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$1,187.80 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$4.80

Skier visits to Mt. Bachelor jump by 10% By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Steady season-long snowfall helped Mt. Bachelor ski area record a 10 percent increase in skier visits this year over 2008-09, its marketing director said Thursday. The increase seen at Mt. Bachelor, which ended its season Sunday, mirrored the experience of operators across the country. Nationally, skier visits increased more than 4

percent this season over last year, according to preliminary industry figures released earlier this month. Snowfall at Mt. Bachelor began early enough this season to allow the ski area to open on Nov. 20, almost a full week before Thanksgiving, a target opening date ski areas shoot for to take advantage of the four-day holiday weekend. In the 2008-09 season, Mt.

Bachelor opened Dec. 13, and reported about 10 percent fewer skier visits than in 2007-08. Storms passing over the Cascades this year continued to drop amounts in single digits — 1 to 4 inches at a time — instead of developing into massive blasts that clog mountain passes with several feet of snow, said Alex Kaufman, marketing director. See Bachelor / B2

Summer season Mt. Bachelor’s summer activities — chairlift rides for disc golf, hiking, sightseeing and sunset dinners — are scheduled to begin July 1, said Alex Kaufman, marketing director. Sunset dinners also will be offered this year on Sundays, along with Fridays and Saturdays. For more information, visit www.mtbachelor .com/summer/index.html.

MARKETS IN TURMOIL

Google introduces its television service SAN FRANCISCO — Google recruited a solid lineup of high-tech companies on Thursday to help it introduce Google TV, a new service that merges television programming with the Web. Google TV, which the company unveiled at its annual developer conference here, lets people visit any website from their TVs and easily search for programs and Web video. The service will be built into highdefinition TVs and Blu-ray players and a set-top box. Meanwhile Thursday, five days after Google said it had inadvertently collected 600 gigabytes of data from unsecured Wi-Fi networks around the world, privacy lawyers said the company was likely to face fines and suffer damage to its reputation. Data protection officials in Spain, the Czech Republic, France and Germany have started administrative inquiries into the company’s practices. — Staff and wire reports

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.96 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond .$3.00 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville. . . . . . . . . . . .$2.94 • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.96 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 26, Madras. . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 61160 S. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.90 • Texaco, 718 N.W. Columbia St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.96

DIESEL • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond . $3.16 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 26, Madras. . . . .$3.20 • Chevron, 10650 S.E. Division St., Bend . . . . . . .$3.06 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

Robert Stolarik / New York Times News Service

Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange had a harrowing day Thursday as stocks plummeted, including a 376-point decline in the Dow and a 94-point drop in the Nasdaq.

Stocks plunge amid fears Europe’s crisis will spread Broad decline also affects some commodities By Graham Bowley and Christine Hauser New York Times News Service

Fears that the fragile economic recovery in the United States might be threatened by the financial and political crisis in Europe gripped Wall Street on Thursday, sending the stock market into a sharp decline and leaving anxious traders wondering where the pain might stop. The 376-point drop of the Dow Jones Industrial Average punctuated what amounts to a slow-motion crash that began in late April. The Dow has now plunged more than 1,000 points in a matter of weeks, signifying what is known as a market correction — a sort of

Inside • European Central Bank president faces second-guessing, Page B2

mini-bear market characterized by a 10 percent decline in a short period of time. With Thursday’s sell-off, this broad decline gained momentum and quickly spread beyond stocks to commodities like copper and oil, which are considered bellwethers of the industrial economy. See Markets / B2

Lawmakers accuse Toyota of falling short on safety tests for the project or any written specifications for the experiWASHINGTON — Toyota’s ments it intends to run. investigation into the causes of Moreover, the company was unintended acceleration in its hired for the investigation not vehicles appears to have been by Toyota but by a law firm aimed less at identifyhired to represent the ing the root problem company in class-acthan at public relation lawsuits, law60 50 70 tions, congressional makers said. 40 80 investigators said “What we have Thursday. learned is deeply Earlier in the year, troubling,” Rep. HenToyota assured worry Waxman, D-Calif., ried customers and chairman of a comCongress that it was mittee investigating conducting an indeToyota, said at a hearpendent investigation into re- ing Thursday. ports of sudden acceleration, “There is no evidence that which has been linked to as Toyota has conducted extenmany as 52 deaths. sive or rigorous testing of its But on Thursday, the con- vehicles for potential electrongressional investigators said ic defects that could cause sudthe company hired by Toyota den unintended acceleration,” to do the review, Exponent, Waxman said. had offered no written plan See Toyota / B2

By Peter Whoriskey The Washington Post

AUTO NEWS

Toyota buying $50M stake in Tesla Toyota Motor Corp. is acquiring a $50 million stake in Tesla Motors Inc. and will develop electric vehicles with the company, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said Thursday. Tesla will buy a closed Toyota factory in California to build its Model S and other cars, Schwarzenegger said. The companies will cooperate on developing electric vehicles, parts and production systems, and engineering support. Toyota’s investment comes as Tesla prepares to raise about $100 million by selling stock. — Bloomberg News

“There is no sector that is being spared. ... We are having a flight to liquidity. Everybody is trying to get liquid. Gold, oil, silver, financials — every sector is getting hit.” — Anthony Conroy, head equity trader, BNY ConvergEx Group

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Jobless claims take surprise turn for the worse By Jeffry Bartash MarketWatch

WASHINGTON — The number of people applying for unemployment benefits shot up 25,000 in the latest week, indicating continued weakness in the U.S. job market, government data showed. Initial jobless claims rose to 471,000 in the week ended May 15, the highest level in a month, the Labor Department reported Thursday. Economists surveyed by MarketWatch predicted initial claims would drop on the week, falling to a seasonally adjusted 440,000 from last week’s revised reading of 446,000. A Labor Department official said there were no unusual factors to explain the latest increase. The four-week average of initial claims — a better gauge of employment trends than the volatile weekly number — also rose, up by 3,000 to 453,500. “This is horrible,” chief U.S. economist Ian Shepherdson of High Frequency Economics said in an e-mail. See Jobless / B5

Group raising funds to craft economic strategy for Deschutes By David Holley The Bulletin

A small but increasingly outspoken group in Bend is fundraising in hopes of paying North Dakotabased consultants to analyze Deschutes County’s economy and develop a strategy to add jobs. Headed by Lawnae Hunter, owner of Hunter Properties in Bend, a recently formed group called the Deschutes Economic Alliance hopes to hire two consultants from Praxis Strategy Group and California economist Bill Watkins for about $70,000, Hunter said. Hunter and Watkins collaborated in 2009 to establish the Central Oregon Economic Outlook, now an annual event in which Watkins provides a forecast of Central Oregon’s economy. “We want action items that can be implemented in the short term,” Hunter said about the economic alliance, which she plans to operate as a nonprofit without tax-exempt status. See Economy / B5


B2 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

COV ER S T OR I ES

Markets

Mt. Bachelor’s new pricing system, unveiled this season, was based on weather conditions. When conditions allowed skiing and boarding on the whole mountain, daily lift tickets cost $69. When lifts had to be closed, the price dropped to $59 or $49. The Bulletin file photo

Bachelor Continued from B1 That made Mt. Bachelor accessible for the season’s four major holiday periods — Christmas, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents Day and spring break — and decent snow in April brought good conditions for spring skiing, Kaufman said. “It was very friendly snowfall this year,” he said. For the season, Mt. Bachelor reported a total of 458 inches, as of Thursday, compared with 531 inches total in the 2008-09 season, Kaufman said.

New pricing system ‘worked out’ Mt. Bachelor unveiled a new tiered pricing system this season that set prices for adult daily lift tickets based on weather conditions. When conditions allowed skiing and boarding on the whole mountain, daily lift tickets cost $69. When conditions forced officials to close lifts, the price dropped accordingly, to $59 or $49. Out of a 178-day season, Kaufman said, Mt. Bachelor recorded:

Toyota Continued from B1 Waxman said that congressional investigators asked the Exponent engineer overseeing the work to explain the lack of documentation. “He explained that writing down what Exponent does would ‘limit the creativity’ of the engineers working on the project,” Waxman said. “That’s preposterous.” Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Mich., said the company’s response seemed to be focused on public relations and avoiding lawsuits.

“It was very friendly snowfall this year.” — Alex Kaufman, marketing director for Mt. Bachelor • 50 days with lift tickets priced at $49; • 65 days at $59; • 48 days at $69; and • 14 holidays, during which lift tickets were at full price. On opening day, when few lifts were operating, the adult daily lift ticket sold for $39. The tiered pricing, which Mt. Bachelor was the first in the nation to try, worked effectively, Kaufman said, at least for those who bought daily tickets. Visitors headed to the mountain for a day of skiing likely expect to pay full price, he said. Arriving and finding a reduced price based on the weather meant skiing or boarding for less, and on a dozen days when lift tickets cost $59, conditions improved enough to allow officials to open up the summit, giving daily customers more of the mountain at a reduced price. “It worked out to the extent that we’re pretty likely going to do it again next year,” Kaufman said.

“Unfortunately, Toyota appears to have been more interested in messaging than scientific inquiry,” he said. In response, Toyota officials said the company last week presented the congressional committee with a 64-page document outlining the research it is doing on Toyota’s electronics. The company’s U.S. chief, James Lentz, testified in addition that Exponent has completed 11,000 hours of research on the topic. The company and its dealers have also tested 2,000 cars cited in unintended acceleration reports, he said. “Significantly,

Hoodoo and beyond Hoodoo, the ski area atop Santiam Pass about 20 miles west of Sisters, also had a good season, owner Chuck Shepard said last month. It opened a week after Mt. Bachelor and recorded its longest season in about a decade, he said. The number of skier visits at Hoodoo this season — between 95,000 and 96,000 — fell just short of the ski area’s record of 98,000, set in 2007-08, Shepard said in April. Nationwide, ski areas in all regions of the country, except the Northeast, reported an increase in visits, according to preliminary figures released by the National Ski Areas Association, based in Lakewood, Colo. The season’s national total, 59.7 million visits, represented a 4.2 percent increase over the 200809 season, the national organization stated in a news release. Regionally, ski areas in the Pacific Northwest posted a 3 to 4 percent increase in the number of visits by skiers and snowboarders this season over 200809, according to the national association. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

none of these investigations have found that our electronic throttle control system with intelligence was the cause,” he said. Lentz also said the company has completed the previously announced fixes on millions of recalled vehicles. More than 70 percent of the 2.3 million vehicles recalled for sticking pedals have been repaired, he said, and about 30 percent of the 5.4 million vehicles that were recalled for this floor mat entrapment have been fixed. This story includes reports from the Los Angeles Times.

Continued from B1 As traders downgraded their forecasts for economic growth, the price per barrel of crude oil fell roughly 8 percent in intraday trading, before recovering to end more than 2 percent lower, at $68.01. Nagging worries that Europe’s debt crisis could spread, compounded by uncertainties over financial regulation on both sides of the Atlantic, have set investors on edge the world over. “People are learning to think the unthinkable,” said Willem Buiter, chief economist of Citigroup. Many worry that Greece and even other economically vulnerable nations like Spain or Portugal will be unable to pay their debts despite a sweeping rescue effort by the European Union. By the close, the Dow was down 376.36 points, or 3.6 percent, to 10,068.01. In a seesaw period of months this year, the index hit a recent low of 9,908.39 on Feb. 8, climbed to a peak of 11,205.03 on April 26, and then fell back by more than 10 percent since then. The broader Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index closed down 43.46 points, or 3.9 percent, to 1,071.59, the biggest one-day drop since April last year. The Nasdaq composite index dropped 94.36 points, or 4.11 percent, to 2,204.01. The unilateral decision by Germany this week to ban certain speculative trading, a move rebuffed by some other European nations, has unsettled investors.

Continent’s crisis The German government did not consult its partners before issuing the change, adding to the sense that new financial regulations will start arriving piecemeal and that Europe’s leaders are not united in addressing the Continent’s broadening crisis. “Investors are struggling to adjust to a new regime where politics is more important than before,” said Gianluca Salford, a strategist at JPMorgan Chase in London. On Thursday, the Treasury Department announced that Secretary Timothy Geithner would travel to Europe next week to discuss the crisis with Britain’s new chancellor and the president of the European Central Bank. For the first time, there was talk of capital flight from countries like Germany and Britain to perceived safe havens like Swit-

Trichet faces second-guessing For the first time in a long life of technocratic excellence, the president of the European Central Bank, Jean-Claude Trichet, finds his judgment and his credibility in question. The crisis of the euro and the panic of the markets have pushed Trichet, 67, who has run the bank since 2003, into bending the rules, compromising his principles and appearing to give way to political pressure from panicked national leaders. In the past few weeks, as the bank has taken a central role in Europe’s debt crisis, Trichet has reversed himself on buying sovereign bonds from weak euro zone countries; agreed to keep accepting Greek bonds, however downgraded, as loan collateral; and opened himself up to charges that he has weakened the bank’s commitment to low inflation. During an interview in his Frankfurt office, Trichet showed no sign of being rattled by the criticism, though he was aware of it, and aware that his every word was parsed and second-guessed by a small army of analysts, economists and journalists. “When you have the great honor to have enormous responsibility,” he said, “you have to accept that all of your decisions can be criticized.” — New York Times News Service zerland. And across the globe, investors fled from risky currencies, bonds and stocks to safer assets like the dollar, the Japanese yen and U.S. bonds.

Safe haven sought The yield on the 10-year Treasury bond — the benchmark global interest rate — fell to 3.21 percent, its lowest level this year and a clear sign of investors seeking a safe haven. “There has been a flight to quality — a flight to the dollar, investment grade bonds and even

within the stock market toward higher quality companies,” said Matthew Rothman, global head of quantitative equities strategy at Barclays Capital. Traders and analysts said the biggest factor unnerving markets was the continuing prospect that European governments might not have done enough to stem the panic over Greece and other heavily indebted nations, and that their problems might spill into the United States, affecting the pace of the economic recovery.

American exports Some economists warn, for example, that weakness in Europe’s economies combined with the current appreciation of the dollar against the euro could hurt American exports. Major American industrial companies whose prospects are intertwined with that of the global economy took a hit to their share prices on Thursday. General Electric, for example, closed 5.79 percent lower; Caterpillar shares were down 4.51 percent; and Boeing was off 4.85 percent. The S&P 500 index broke below its 200-day moving average. To technical analysts of the stock market, that was seen as a sure signal of a bearish mood among investors. “There is no sector that is being spared,” said Anthony Conroy, head equity trader at the BNY ConvergEx Group. “You have heard the phrase ‘flight to quality’? We are having a flight to liquidity. Everybody is trying to get liquid. Gold, oil, silver, financials — every sector is getting hit.” Buiter of Citigroup said many big investors were questioning whether they could continue to rely on the euro as a safe longterm investment, given Europe’s troubles. “Many pension funds and other long-term holders have to, for regulatory reasons, hold a fraction of their investments in safe assets. Euro debt used to fit the bill,” he said. “It no longer does. People are wondering about it.” But some other investors said that despite the market correction there had not yet been a fundamental shift in long-term investment strategies.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 B3

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Twin Rivers Plumbing 541-923-3096 www.twinrp.com

High Desert Disaster Restoration 541-312-2999 61386 Parrell Rd., Bend, OR 97702

Cart-Tek Golf Carts 541-330-0405 www.cart-tekgolfcarts.com

Samual A. Ramirez, Attorney at Law 541-5361408 51470 Highway 97, Lapine, OR 97739 Lapine Community Health Center 541-536-3435 P.O. Box 3300, Lapine, OR 97739

Newhouse Manufacturing Company, Inc. 541-548-1055 www.newhouse-mfg.com

Desert Valley Equine Center 541-504-5299 21199 NW Spruce Ave., Redmond, OR

Central Oregon Ranch Supply 541-548-5195 www.centraloregonranchsupply.com Hip Chicks Salon 541-419-7213 322 NW 7th St., Redmond, OR 97756

China Doll 541-312-9393 547 NE Bellevue Dr., Ste. 113, Bend, OR Computer Heroes 541-312-2300 frank@compheroes.com Big R Stores 541-548-4095 3141 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR

Lazerquick Copies 541-317-5577 1245 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702

Ewing Bookkeeping Services 541-389-0357 smartzse@hotmail.com

Deschutes Insurance 541-389-8785 225 SW Scalehouse Loop, Bend, Or 97702 Gould and Associates Realty 541-536-2900 P.O. Box 14, Lapine, OR 97739

The Law Offices of Bryan W. Gruetter, PC 541-585-1140 www.gruetterlaw.com

Midstate Electric Cooperative 541-536-2126 P.O. Box 127, Lapine, OR 97739

Fluid Images Inc. & Bob Johnson 541-815-0818 69687 West Meadowpark Way, Sisters, OR Cascade Insurance Center 541-382-7772 www.cascadeinsure.com

CS Construction, LLC 541-617-9190 www.cscdllc.com

Marathon Business Machines 541-548-5248 302 SW Evergreen, Redmond, OR 97756 Bryant, Lovlien, & Jarvis 541-382-4331 www.bljlawyers.com

Brian T. Hemphill, Attorney at Law 541-382-2991 339 SW Century Dr., Ste. 101, Bend, OR

Taco Time 541-388-1964 40 NW Pine Crest CT, Bend, OR 97702 FlickFive Films 541-317-5055 20020 Glen Vista, Bend, OR 97702 Central Oregon Electronic Medical Records 541-585-2580 www.coemr.com Woodside Development, LLC 541-318-0500 60025 E. Ridgeview Dr, Bend, OR 97702

Butch’s Place 541-923-7677 1515 N. Highway 97, Redmond, OR Brookman Revere, LLC 541-389-3288 19479 Bounty Lake Ct., Bend, OR 97702 Smolich Motors 541-389-1178 www.smolichmotors.com

Merrill Lynch 541-382-4373 755 SW Bonnett Way Suite 2200, Bend, OR

Arco AM/PM 541-318-5110 61112 S. Highway 97, Bend, OR 97702 CA Rowles Engineering 541-585-2207 720 SE Business Way, Ste. 200, Bend,

John L. Scott Lapine Real estate 541-536-1188 P.O. Box 796, Lapine, OR 97739

Artisan Outdoor Living & Landscape 541-383-2551 www.artisanbend.com

Middleton Septic Pump Service 541-475-5322 2876 SW Hwy 97, Madras, OR 97741 Stan R. Stieben Agency - All State Insurance 541-318-8536 612 NE Savannah Dr., Ste. 1, Bend, OR

High Desert Aggregate & Paving 541-504-8566 8500 NW Lone Pine Rd., Terrebonne, OR Gregg Geser Construction 541-549-9434 68990 N. Pine St., Sisters, OR 97759 Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic 541-923-1638 2630 S. Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR

All Position Welding 541-548-6329 308 SW Evergreen, Redmond, OR 97756

Quality Coat Asphalt Maintenance 541-480-6655 P.O. Box 1574, Bend, OR 97709

Aeries Mini Storage, LLC 541-383-3365 1300 2nd. Ave., Bend, OR 97701

Impact Graphix & Signs, Inc. 541-548-8544 www.impactgraphixandsigns.com

Jody’s Drive In Restaurant 541-923-5639 807 SW 14th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Powers of Automation, Inc. 541-330-1687 61533 American Lp., Ste. 1, Bend, OR

Animal Land, Inc. 541-548-1007 338 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756 RE/MAX Town & Country Realty 541-549-3333 www.sistersoregonproperties.com

Aspen Homes, Inc. 541-385-9633 www.aspenhomesoforegon.com

Lakeside Lumber Company 541-382-3693 1320 Armour Dr, Bend, OR 97702

A Greener Cleaner 541-318-7153 210 SE 3rd St., Bend, OR 97702

Accurate Mold, LLC 541-279-9572 2040 SW Quartz Ave, Redmond, OR

The Pony Express 541-549-1538 160 S. Oak, Sisters, OR 97759

In Tune 541-923-1636 1614 SW Veterans Way, Redmond, OR

Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate 541-382-4123 486 SW Bluff Dr., Bend, OR 97702

Lodge at Suttle Lake 541-595-2628 www.thelodgeatsuttlelake.com

Central Oregon Pathology 541-389-7490 1348 NE Cushing, Ste. 200, Bend, OR Redmond Community Church 541-923-1782 www.redmondcc.org

Centwise True Value 541-548-2334 433 SW 5th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Robinson & Owen, Inc. 541-549-1848 750 Buckaroo Trail, Sisters, OR 97759 Redmond A&W 541-923-8881 1501 SW Highland Ave., Redmond, OR

The Rental Connection 541-383-1780 60970 Alpine Ln., Bend, OR 97702

Piloto Ranch 541-504-4602 www.pilotoranch.com

Powell’s Sweet Shoppe 541-617-9866 818 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701

Etrix Group 541-0354 20756 High Desert Ct. # 6, Bend, OR 97701 Longboard Louie’s Inc 541-383-5889 62080 Dean Swift Rd, Bend, OR 97701

Valentine Ventures Your $12.99 Store 541-549-2059 216 West Cascade, Sisters, OR 97759 TK Jacobson Investments, Inc. 541-383-8502 23451 Butterfield Trail, Bend, OR 97702 Real Time Research, Inc. 541-382-3836 52 SW Roosevelt Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Scott Hatcher River Guide & Ocean Charter 541-317-8474 www.scotthatcherfishing.com Salvation Army 541-389-8888 www.salvationarmybendoregon.org The Brew Shop 541-323-2318 www.homesuds.com William Delgado MD-Bend Dermatology 541-382-5712 www.bendderm.com Western Title & Escrow Company 541-389-5751 www.westerntitle.com Trimble, Everton, Farrens, & Mode 541-385-0534 15 SW Colorado, Ste. 220, Bend, OR Century West Engineering Corporation 541-322-8962 www.centurywest.com Strictly Organic Coffee Company 541-383-1570 www.strictlyorganic.com El Burrito Restaurant 541-382-2177 335 NE Dekalb, Bend, OR 97701 JICA Construction, LLC 541-548-5012 2316 Xero Ln., Redmond, OR 97756 Century Insurance Group, LLC 541-382-4211 695 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR Cascades Biosciences 541-588-6209 69215 Singletree, Sisters, OR 97759 Celebrating the Sacred - Wendy Schechter 541-504-3151 www.celebratingthesacred.com Action Typesetting & Printing 541-388-1480 www.actiontype.com Microsemi 541-382-8028 www.microsemi.com Bladt’s Custom Woodworking Inc. 541-408-4095 21575 Bear Creek, Bend, OR 97701 Redmond Gymnastics Academy 541-923-3513 www.RGAGymnastics.com B&R Continuous Guttering Company, Inc. 541-389-8008 8276 SE Business Way, Bend, OR Robert E. Rufener, CPA, PC 541-475-7228 ruf@madras.net PGC Building & Design 541-771-9199 www.PGCBuilding.com Madras Sanitary Service 541-475-2071 www.madrassanitary.com Coldwell Banker - Dick Dodson Realty 541-475-6137 www.liveinmadras.com Central Oregon Nutrition Consultants 541-388-0694 61456 Elder Ridge St., Bend, OR Central Lake Marine 541-385-7791 61076 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702 Miller Lumber 541-382-2022 www.miller-lumber.com Alpine Pest Management 541-389-4942 www.alpinepest.com HSW Builders 541-388-9898 www.hswbuilders.com Home Comfort Design & Drafting 541-923-6719 69765 Goodrich Rd., Sisters, OR 97759 Dutch Pacific Properties 541-588-9226 P.O. Box 3500 TMB 303, Sisters, OR Baptista Tile & Stone Gallery 541-382-9130 www.baptistatile.com Umpqua Bank - NW Crossing 541-312-4811 www.umpquabank.com

Shlesinger & DeVilleneuve - Attorneys 541-749-4255 www.sgilletusfightforyou.com

Veloski Sports 541-318-5053 www.veloski.com

Greenridge Physical Therapy & Wellness 541-549-3534 325 N. Locust St., Sisters, OR 97759 Bend Surgery Center, LLP 541-318-0858 www.bendsurgery.com

Law Office of Foster Glass 541-317-0703 339 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Patrick Casey & Company 541-322-2142 796 SW Bradbury Way, Bend, OR 97702 Susan Daly Sterns Esq. 541-306-6753 www.stearnstmlaw.com

Central Oregon Audiology & Hearing Aid Clinic 541-389-6669 www.centraloregonaudiology.com

Cold Stone Creamery 541-382-5466 63455 N. Highway 97, Bend, OR 97701 H2O To Go Opal Springs Water Company 541-389-1773 www.opalspringswater.com

Key Constructors Inc. 541-389-9952 18781 Kuhlman Rd, Bend, OR 97701 Outback Steakhouse 541-383-8104 269 SE Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR

Starting Small 541-388-2072 1929 NE Neff Rd, Bend, OR 97701

Sisters Dental 541-549-9486 P.O. Box 1027, Sisters, OR 97759

Bush Animal Clinic, Inc. 541-382-7671 www.bushanimalclinicinc.com

Centro Print Solutions 541-382-3534 www.centroprintsolutions.com

Bell-Air Motel 541-382-1885 8790 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR

South Valley Bank & Trust 541-330-1894 www.southvalleybank.com

Jiffy Lube 541-383-1513 525 S 3rd St, Bend, OR 97702

Lowes Group 541-312-2113 www.lowes-group.com

Bend Research 541-322-9002 www.bendres.com

Del Taco 541-322-8702 612 SE 3rd St., Bend, OR 97702

Advanced Cabinets 541-447-7024 2853 SW high Desert Dr, Prineville, OR

Lumbermen’s Insurance 541-382-2421 965 SW Emkay Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Johnson Benefit Planning 541-382-3571 516 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702

Lapaw Animal Hospital 541-389-3902 www.lapaw@wvi.com

CanalBargeCruises.com, LLC 541-504-6264 www.CanalBargeCruises.com

MST Corporation 541-416-9000 1659 SW Baldwin Rd., Prineville, OR Van Handel Automotive 541-549-0416 127 W. Sisters Park Dr., Sisters, OR Commercial Ceramics 541-323-2902 20554 Builders Ct., Bend, OR 97701 Seventh Mountain Resort 541-419-7902 www.seventhmountain.com

Caudell Landscapes 541-548-7077 www.caudell-landscapes.com

Trailer World 541-389-9849 64601 Bailey Rd., Bend, OR 97701

Sunriver Resort 800-801-8765 www.sunriver-resort.com

Kelly J. Witt Construction 541-408-5683 19430 Apache Rd., Bend, OR 97702 R&H Construction Company 541-312-2961 www.rhconst.com

First Oregon Title Company 541-475-0125 116 SE D St., Madras, OR 97741

Cascade Gypsum & Building Supply 541-389-1054 689 Glenwood, Bend, OR 97702

Moffit Investigations 541-388-1477 560 NE Greenwood Ave., Bend, OR Three Sisters Backcountry, Inc. 541-549-8101 info@threesistersbackcountry.com

Barb’s Helping Hands 541-536-2180 15960 Green Forest Rd., La Pine, OR Bend Veterinary Specialists 541-312-2114 www.bendvetspecialists.com

ADG Bookkeeping Inc 541-317-8389 2994 NE Sady Dr, Bend, OR 97701 Agnes’s Alterations 541-389-9587 1271 NW Wall St, Bend, OR 97701 Affordable Auto Repair 541-548-2991 347 SW 2nd St, Redmond, OR 97756 Allan Clark, LLC 541-771-5535 www.allanclarkllc.com

The Ski Inn Restaurant 541-447-1338 310 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters, OR 97759 Juniper Rock Products 541-447-3534 P.O. Box 119, Prineville, OR 97754

Village Interiors Design 541-549-3431 www.villageinteriorsdesign.com

Gary’s Small Engine & Tool Repair 541-388-3380 61568 American Lane, Bend, OR 97702 McMurray & Sons Roofing 541-385-0695 www.mcmurrayandsons.com

Westside Bakery & Café 541-382-3426 www.westsidebakeryandcafe.com

The Lady Bug Flowers & Gifts 541-548-6188 527 NW Elm St., Suite 2, Redmond, OR O’Keefe’s Company 541-549-1479 www.okeefescompany.com

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory 541-383-1718 61334 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702

Northwest Crossing 541-382-1662 www.northwestcrossing.com

Alert Safety Supply 541-548-6155 416 SE Jackson, Unit 7, Redmond, OR Midstate Fertilizer 541-548-2311 120 SW Glacier Ave., Redmond, OR Gravity Labs Bike Park 541-480-5252 201 NE 2nd St., Bend, OR 97701 Eagle Crest 800-682-4786 www.eagle-crest.com Del Barber Excavation, Inc. 541-504-1100 1686 SW Veterans Way, Redmond, OR Heights Assisted Living Center 541-923-5452 3000 SW 32nd St., Redmond, OR 97756 HCT Contracting, Inc. 541-548-6942 2388 SW Pumice Ave., Redmond, OR 1st Rate Mortgage, Inc. 541-548-8111 www.1stratemortgageinc.com Gerdes Electric 541-548-8426 2602 SW 1st St., Redmond, OR 97756 Cascade Door 541-548-2215 www.cascadedoor.com Century 21 Gold Country Realty 541-548-2131 www.century21centraloregon.com Mid Oregon Credit Union 541-382-1795 www.midoregon.com Tesoro Moe’s Food Mart 541-548-1225 516 SW 5th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Highland Veterinary Hospital 541-548-6114 839 SW Highland, Redmond, OR 97756 CoEnergy Propane 541-738-6733 www.coenergy.net

Bend Garbage & Recycling 541-382-2263 www.bendgarbage.com

Rimrock Trails Adolescent Treatment Services 541-447-2631 1333 NW 9th St., Prineville, OR 97754 Aspect 541-389-4667 1009 NW Galveston Ave., Bend, OR Steve the Appliance Dr. 541-382-7205 86 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 244 NE Franklin Ave., Bend, OR 97701 Secure Storage 541-389-1382 www.securestorage.com Snap Fitness at Brookswood Meadow Plaza 541-389-2550 19550 Amber Meadow Dr., Bend, OR Snap Fitness at Northwest Crossing 541-389-2550 2753 NW Lolo Dr., Bned, OR 97701 White Star Enterprises 541-318-1447 www.wsplaster.com Coactive Partners 541-388-1590 www.easypaywest.com Wright Design Studio 541-389-9178 915 NW Gasoline Alley, Bend, OR 97701 Brightwood Corporation 541-475-2234 335 NW Hess Rd., Madras, OR 97741

Sisters Mainline Station- Chevron 541-549-5400 1001 Railway, Sisters, OR 97759

Leading Edge Aviation Inc 541-383-8825 www.leadingedgeavn.com

Arctic Circle, LLC 541-447-5075 318 NW 3rd St, Prineville, OR 97754 Creative Experiences Salon 541-322-0156 www.creativeexperiencessalon.com R & W Engineering 503-292-6000 www.rweng.com

Jerry’s Outdoor Power & Outerwear 541-382-8947 61561 American Ln Bend, OR 97702 Central Oregon Community College 541-383-7700 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR www.cocc.edu Big Country RV 541-330-2495 63500 N Highway 97, Bend, OR www.bigcrv.com Advantage Dental Services 541-504-3901 442 SW Umatilla Ave. #200, Redmond advantagedental.com Schnitzer Steel Industries 541-382-8471 110 SE 5th St, Bend, OR 97702

Central Oregon Insurance, Inc 541-475-2215 www.centraloregonins.com

Ryder Graphics 541-382-5934 370 SW Columbia St, Bend, OR 97702 Original Pancake House 541-317-0380 1025 SW Donovan Ave, Bend, OR 97702 Severson Plumbing and Mechanical Inc. 541-382-3720 220 SE Davis Ave, Bend, OR 97702 Potter’s Piano Service 541-382-5411 61592 SE Orion Dr, Bend, OR 97702 Soothing Hand Massage, OR Lic# 12423 541-389-2865 19142 Choctaw Rd, Bend, OR 97702 Premier Printing Solutions 541-617-9899 2474 NW Monterey Pines, Bend, OR

Far West Real Estate, LLC 541-447-6294 www.farwestrealestatellc.com

Remax Town and Country Realty 541-549-2500 178 S Elm St, Sisters, OR 97759 Ascent Capital Management 541-382-4847 www.ascentcap.com At Your Site Storage 541-280-6363 P.O. Box 7948, Bend, OR 97708 Active Towing, LLC 541-416-8003 www.activetowingllc.com

Apple Peddler Restaurant 541-416-8949 1485 NE 3rd St, Prineville, OR 97754 Bend Fencing 541-382-4400 www.bendfencing.com Bend Pawn and Trading Co. 541-317-5099 61420 S Highway 97, Bend, OR 97702 Newport Market 541-382-3940 www.newportavemarket.com Three Creeks Computing, Inc. 541-504-1649 6227 SW Buckskin Lane, Bend

To everyone listed, Thank You, and thanks to your support, our local Newspapers In Education Program can continue to deliver newspapers to most Central Oregon schools. Thank you to all of our generous sponsors. If you would like to donate to the local Newspapers In Education Program, please call 385-5800. We thank you, our Central Oregon teachers thank you, and our Central Oregon students thank you.


B4 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMR AOL n ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio Aarons s AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcadiaPh Accenture AccretvH n Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom Adaptec AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaSol Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom AlbnyIn Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliFibO AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AlldDefen AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs AlpGlbDD AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev AmTrstFin Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AFnclG34 AGreet AIntlGp rs AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Ameriprise AmerisBc AmeriBrg s AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev AnglogldA ABInBev n Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenics Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEnerg ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AspenBio AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw

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Nm AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BWAY Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp Ballanty BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BankFla BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden BellMicro Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett BioRef s Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioSphre BioTime n Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkGlbOp BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blockbst h BlckbsB h BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw Braskem BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp h Brunswick BrshEMat BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNX Gas CNinsure CRH CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapGold n CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt

D 10.42 -.93 1.00 19.72 -.71 27.36 -1.01 0.88 26.33 -.88 1.93 -.17 0.84 29.61 -1.16 0.60 30.42 -1.87 1.74 28.78 -1.39 25.25 -1.92 0.37 5.73 -.16 1.66 59.10 -3.92 1.66 50.32 -3.13 37.62 -1.33 .74 -.08 36.03 -1.44 3.36 44.58 -.69 9.26 89.35 -3.95 4.81 -.40 1.50 38.34 -2.37 0.06 12.02 -.52 19.77 -.06 67.58 -2.55 0.60 40.71 -3.02 0.68 33.26 -1.43 0.40 48.96 -1.75 7.55 -.47 41.00 -2.09 0.59 10.49 -.39 0.76 15.64 -.65 0.82 10.41 -.42 0.20 10.02 -.85 0.88 19.50 -.93 0.04 15.30 -1.01 2.05 23.90 -.79 8.41 -.85 3.23 -.35 2.16 24.08 -.73 .60 +.15 1.80 46.75 -1.81 5.70 -1.26 2.80 55.56 -2.97 0.36 27.65 -1.13 1.96 45.68 -2.53 1.91 -.25 36.93 -.52 20.81 -.96 40.15 -.29 58.44 -2.15 2.03 23.05 -.55 0.22 16.37 -.62 94.85 +6.88 34.07 +4.22 0.68 80.18 -2.81 1.00 18.58 -1.19 0.32 18.20 -1.51 0.40 41.00 -1.70 7.89 -.89 1.16 41.55 -1.05 2.16 28.66 -1.12 .36 -.01 19.24 -1.59 4.96 -.43 0.10 6.64 -.33 0.72 57.01 -.82 1.48 71.65 -2.08 43.31 -.64 0.20 24.74 -1.51 6.93 -.01 6.96 -.61 0.92 28.48 -.98 18.11 -.97 0.28 26.44 -.78 72.28 -3.55 0.30 28.49 -2.73 0.56 40.75 -1.33 34.91 -1.14 2.85 -.01 31.51 -.88 21.85 -1.02 7.04 -.58 4.91 -.62 49.25 -1.21 19.07 -.74 0.56 15.70 -1.17 .42 -.03 1.90 -.05 4.25 -.02 5.85 -.39 0.38 15.01 -.79 1.44 28.99 -1.27 1.28 9.70 -.51 37.35 -.76 4.00 160.10 -7.85 0.37 3.68 -.09 0.98 7.87 -.36 2.28 15.87 -.68 0.17 1.85 -.06 1.82 9.61 -.36 1.09 10.57 -.80 0.40 11.00 -.55 0.60 16.06 -.77 .34 -.01 .29 +.01 27.22 -1.78 2.02 26.86 -.63 1.68 63.00 -3.21 5.65 -.48 2.94 -.01 2.23 -.21 34.60 -1.14 0.04 6.52 -.78 2.00 72.72 -3.33 6.34 -.36 0.22 11.00 -.07 12.03 -1.27 0.60 11.05 -.70 0.02 10.98 -.12 0.44 20.91 -1.57 14.08 -1.58 7.30 -.63 0.56 17.31 -.57 0.40 22.53 -.74 1.28 23.09 -.62 31.64 -3.01 0.32 31.78 -.80 3.32 -.22 0.56 19.92 -.80 2.75 -.13 5.87 -.19 17.80 -.86 0.52 23.21 -1.17 1.10 15.33 -.82 0.56 13.86 -.82 0.34 9.93 -.46 0.31 19.07 -.56 0.28 16.18 -.97 1.20 55.04 -2.37 12.31 -.40 0.05 18.45 -.90 24.29 +.90 11.86 -1.00 0.80 34.82 -.07 0.10 47.37 -2.66 0.42 33.87 -1.65 36.21 -1.12 0.84 48.07 -1.94 0.25 18.71 -.65 0.16 19.68 -.79 14.10 -1.01 0.80 13.62 -1.26 0.20 13.88 -1.03 2.03 -.19 0.40 66.54 -3.82 1.00 57.03 -2.31 0.04 32.63 -1.11 34.88 -1.79 0.24 12.05 -.34 1.00 26.82 -.39 4.60 303.00 -7.69 0.60 14.74 -.56 24.90 -1.31 24.86 -2.21 4.99 -.49 5.16 151.82 -5.96 38.14 -.01 0.26 20.84 -3.31 0.87 22.07 -.98 0.96 49.76 -3.36 0.26 13.09 -1.22 0.34 9.69 -.48 0.35 33.86 -1.09 16.29 -.60 0.40 22.22 -1.54 0.72 27.60 -.70 0.12 30.74 -2.14 47.50 -.95 6.39 -.30 5.57 -.28 0.63 8.00 -.40 14.10 -.93 19.58 -.39 0.04 8.03 -.43 5.16 -.56 12.86 -.49 3.75 -.27 1.80 43.55 -2.59 0.28 23.52 -.98 34.53 -1.98 1.10 34.96 -.66 3.48 68.13 -2.87 1.08 54.70 -2.85 0.60 63.62 -3.20 0.99 51.38 -3.02 12.29 +.29 41.13 -1.47 3.19 -.18 0.20 41.33 -1.05 0.90 7.10 -.60 0.04 4.15 -.32 2.18 10.51 -.11 1.01 -.15 0.72 63.64 -2.88 0.78 32.93 -1.21 .46 -.03 11.75 -.21 24.71 -.64 29.21 -1.46 0.64 37.64 -1.36 21.79 -.99 0.40 35.12 -1.90 0.72 34.46 -2.60 16.83 -1.35 30.56 -1.60 0.34 35.68 -1.13 0.14 35.37 -1.48 1.68 58.67 -2.77 0.04 11.12 -1.18 25.05 -.79 .54 -.03 0.20 26.46 -1.50 7.16 -.28 8.81 -.29 55.81 -2.48 .44 -.05 3.22 27.29 -.91 7.68 -1.25 0.40 10.01 -.57 0.86 14.16 -.76 0.80 24.92 -1.23 21.69 -1.35 0.78 13.27 -.49

Nm CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Ceradyne Cerner ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaArch ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChinaGreen ChinaInfo ChinIntE n ChinaLife ChMarFd n ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNG n ChinaNepst ChNEPet n ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChinaYuch ChinaCEd ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco CitiTrends Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g ClayChinSC ClayBRIC ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH ClearChOut Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs CogdSpen CogentC Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh CompSci Compuwre CmstkHme ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrgan CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr CumbPh n Cummins Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurBrit CurrCda CurJpn CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CytRx Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply DeutschBk DB Cap pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold

D 0.03 14.12 -.44 1.56 11.74 -.47 23.18 -1.04 22.45 -1.51 0.01 14.36 -.25 2.32 -.15 9.60 -1.21 2.90 32.93 -.92 6.98 -.57 59.18 -1.85 17.30 -1.19 20.97 -1.77 80.89 -2.61 31.99 -.45 4.87 -.26 31.12 -.90 25.50 -1.20 2.69 -.12 1.70 14.14 -1.55 0.30 21.02 -1.08 2.88 73.60 -3.00 17.43 -1.28 0.16 11.98 42.59 +1.09 0.54 3.66 -.16 11.83 -1.09 .81 -.04 4.08 -.44 15.54 -1.97 1.74 -.13 14.16 -.84 5.48 -1.00 1.33 -.07 10.04 -.53 4.86 -.30 7.93 -1.17 1.54 62.68 -2.22 5.59 -.30 11.70 -1.11 1.81 46.48 -1.05 7.24 +.07 1.78 4.48 -.04 5.25 -.59 1.62 -.14 4.40 -.28 3.65 -.23 2.75 +.49 0.23 11.09 -.50 0.35 14.32 -1.28 6.62 -.25 1.64 -.22 133.84 -5.07 12.72 -.36 1.48 49.38 -1.76 1.42 18.92 -.20 0.56 64.90 -1.75 15.01 -.65 0.32 62.95 -4.22 3.24 -.12 1.58 26.63 -1.03 0.72 15.70 -1.18 0.48 25.51 -1.15 12.22 -.93 23.31 -.95 31.92 +1.43 2.13 23.30 -.89 3.63 -.18 7.50 111.43 -4.14 .95 -.07 44.00 -.75 0.40 56.32 -2.61 1.01 -.05 0.03 22.55 -1.31 0.51 35.79 -1.58 6.46 -.21 14.51 -.69 61.51 -2.90 8.81 -.62 7.62 -.34 .24 -.04 0.56 47.35 -3.56 2.20 62.80 -1.11 13.83 -.48 0.60 37.81 -1.02 7.89 -.82 0.36 25.05 -.71 1.76 51.54 -1.58 14.48 -1.47 0.40 6.61 -.25 8.99 -.39 8.70 -.42 46.98 -1.55 0.96 12.40 -.76 0.37 6.34 -.44 52.77 -1.75 5.81 -.43 2.12 80.30 -1.85 20.49 -.14 0.60 13.85 -.89 1.48 -.08 0.38 16.79 -.79 0.38 16.03 -.74 0.20 37.74 -2.91 0.94 36.52 -1.60 0.48 14.38 -.59 27.21 -.74 37.89 -2.01 22.03 -1.36 0.37 58.91 -3.22 1.36 13.59 -.69 1.56 74.74 -2.71 12.08 -.69 12.32 -.99 .70 -.05 0.60 47.88 -1.23 7.27 -.37 2.29 -.28 28.45 -1.57 0.40 31.79 -2.12 0.80 24.40 -.43 17.07 -.86 46.88 -3.51 39.79 -.47 2.65 -.10 2.20 50.93 -2.43 0.40 33.73 -2.31 2.38 42.96 -.86 20.48 -1.20 16.43 -.93 0.96 32.86 -1.82 18.69 -1.07 41.21 -3.22 11.16 -.35 .82 -.04 0.06 35.09 -1.20 1.08 45.33 -1.61 0.42 18.31 -1.13 2.30 22.58 -1.58 34.97 -1.21 0.92 18.28 -1.04 0.48 133.46 -6.45 14.68 -.93 0.56 32.03 -1.60 0.20 16.81 -.73 1.57 36.18 -2.00 19.80 -.49 7.95 -.50 0.84 56.59 -1.18 7.16 -.34 1.75 20.10 -.33 0.13 7.39 -.42 51.69 -1.42 15.02 -1.00 20.55 -.81 0.72 41.91 -1.67 4.44 -.30 0.80 48.52 -1.82 0.80 30.67 -2.22 1.85 38.65 -1.73 0.32 2.61 -.19 65.13 -6.14 8.96 -.92 6.10 -.68 9.00 -.38 34.82 -1.18 23.25 -.89 .51 -.03 34.96 -3.04 20.65 -.67 1.80 54.32 -2.12 6.50 -.32 0.70 63.70 -4.77 3.26 -.10 124.75 +1.25 2.25 82.28 -2.42 143.35 -.19 93.19 -2.12 110.57 +2.25 25.60 -.05 1.77 -.20 30.45 -1.64 11.25 -.35 .98 -.07 0.05 39.90 -2.39 4.32 -.43 0.28 4.82 -.28 4.04 -.36 0.78 8.70 -.17 1.21 25.02 -.91 0.15 12.14 -.53 0.60 37.04 -1.19 2.12 45.10 -1.39 47.75 -2.60 9.90 -.98 0.16 78.54 -2.19 1.00 41.93 -1.66 8.06 -.20 61.33 -2.37 0.20 61.54 -.92 15.94 -.39 10.34 -.19 1.65 -.19 124.69 -6.09 7.65 -.40 1.12 56.67 -2.20 0.20 14.31 -.70 13.19 -1.11 14.32 -.66 12.91 -.72 1.11 -.11 1.00 20.46 -1.43 16.00 -.73 40.91 -1.50 1.22 -.04 2.96 +.02 0.20 32.85 -1.50 0.70 58.50 -1.96 1.90 21.62 -.50 30.54 -.46 11.86 +.15 1.05 10.97 -.09 0.08 10.55 -1.07 0.64 61.50 -3.08 10.22 -.71 2.36 60.69 -2.26 0.18 40.21 -.52 0.50 67.90 -1.11 0.03 8.96 -.72 12.80 -.64 26.74 -.57 1.08 28.75 -.80

Nm

D

DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DirxTcBear DrxEMBll s DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrMCBll3x s DirREBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DoublTake DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWt n Duoyuan n DyaxCp Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy

Nm

1.92 52.92 -2.39 26.12 -.91 0.16 25.57 -1.11 31.46 -1.61 18.87 -.85 36.53 -1.26 7.03 29.91 -3.55 9.31 +.89 5.77 19.84 -3.30 61.23 +7.87 16.94 +2.00 0.15 22.19 -3.40 7.35 46.69 -3.22 5.77 29.99 -4.38 0.04 8.79 +1.18 3.08 36.69 -6.72 20.70 +2.00 7.68 +1.01 4.85 43.99 -7.84 17.05 +1.75 8.22 45.13 -5.84 12.94 +1.53 5.18 28.42 -4.17 0.08 13.04 -.56 35.79 -1.26 30.22 -.82 .49 -.02 2.00 20.81 -1.34 0.35 31.99 -1.40 0.13 26.93 -1.03 60.60 -2.65 9.44 -.40 29.03 -.67 44.71 -3.10 61.68 +2.01 1.83 39.24 -1.19 12.75 -.53 1.00 56.29 -3.80 0.48 41.62 -2.16 1.04 18.27 -1.23 2.28 -.33 10.26 -.06 0.40 14.72 -.91 1.04 44.21 -2.97 0.60 25.70 -.84 1.00 36.27 -1.80 5.34 -.29 34.91 -.40 27.02 -.59 29.81 -1.63 0.52 3.84 -.14 51.38 -3.22 3.04 -.12 4.55 -.42 1.64 35.71 -1.11 0.32 22.01 -1.33 0.96 15.97 -.52 0.68 11.48 -1.00 1.40 72.42 -2.34 19.95 -.98 7.35 -.86 2.89 -.17 1.77 -.23 16.58 -.44 1.11 -.10

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade eBay EFJohnson EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch ETFGold n ETF Pall n EV Engy ev3 Inc EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV FltRt EV LtdDur EV TxAd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc s EchelonC Eclipsys Ecolab EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EBrasAero Emcore Emdeon n EmersonEl EmpIca Emulex EnbrEPtrs Enbridge EnCana g s EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 Energen Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entergy EnteroMed EntPrPt Enterra gh EnterPT EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr Esterline EthanAl Euronet EverestRe EvergrnEn EvgIncAdv EvrgrSlr ExcelM ExcelTr n ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScripts ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FPL Grp FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr FannieMae FMae pfS Fastenal FedExCp FedAgric FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird Finisar rs FinLine FstAmCp FstBcpPR FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FstMarblhd FMidBc FstNiagara FstPotom FstSolar FT ConDis FT Engy FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstrB h Flextrn Flotek h FlowInt FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda

0.25 13.59 1.43 20.81 1.01 17.68 24.80 2.84 38.10 0.62 96.29 0.88 37.70 7.54 118.05 41.86 3.02 27.16 18.04 4.59 0.40 28.63 0.10 5.31 0.64 8.55 0.04 15.98 1.76 58.15 5.27 2.00 67.59 0.64 30.40 0.98 14.03 1.39 14.88 1.29 13.57 1.23 11.69 1.62 11.18 1.53 9.83 1.56 11.37 1.60 12.76 14.01 8.03 18.80 0.62 45.55 1.26 31.75 0.20 6.15 96.16 0.04 10.72 20.46 1.52 25.97 5.62 0.05 15.59 16.37 0.72 21.23 1.02 13.99 1.34 46.01 8.78 11.14 4.01 46.20 1.70 43.90 0.80 29.45 1.40 3.55 20.66 1.00 36.52 3.01 0.52 43.73 55.78 5.57 3.99 2.16 28.15 3.58 42.65 13.50 0.10 6.43 2.16 20.74 0.68 18.45 23.69 0.14 36.84 4.92 3.32 74.74 .37 2.27 31.68 1.88 2.60 38.51 2.05 4.83 10.17 0.16 30.11 92.27 0.88 16.78 1.35 42.28 0.28 9.78 4.13 101.33 0.55 58.05 50.19 0.20 19.10 13.58 1.92 73.65 .21 1.02 8.47 .92 5.28 11.77 0.12 15.10 5.22 2.10 39.31 6.10 4.41 0.28 21.67 0.40 38.01 14.74 99.51 24.44 0.23 14.02 2.81 1.76 60.33 16.87 17.76 64.73 27.91 0.50 58.88 55.41 0.48 8.23 2.00 50.15 2.70 38.80 0.92 68.09 0.08 21.79 9.71 0.62 40.24 .90 1.05 0.80 49.21 0.44 81.10 0.20 13.54 2.64 68.35 0.24 6.36 0.96 22.28 6.16 8.92 15.07 0.72 14.06 0.20 25.81 1.28 11.38 0.04 12.51 13.86 0.16 14.83 0.88 33.31 1.41 0.04 5.56 0.40 15.83 0.80 12.54 6.45 2.58 0.04 13.74 0.56 12.53 0.80 13.91 109.62 0.07 15.83 0.04 15.05 0.08 15.53 2.20 34.71 0.64 18.49 46.89 .43 6.36 1.34 2.43 0.70 25.91 1.16 93.66 0.50 45.30 15.10

-.95 -.12 -.83 -.02 -.52 -1.25 -1.24 -5.94 -1.87 -.53 -.86 -4.06 -2.34 -.98 -.33 -1.64 -.62 -.30 -1.07 -3.16 -.33 -2.78 -1.98 -.56 -.64 -.73 -.70 -.68 -.68 -.56 -.65 -.64 -.44 -.54 -1.94 -1.16 -.39 -3.48 -.61 -.73 -.83 -.34 -.93 -.75 -1.01 -.08 -.31 -.82 -.58 -.56 -1.59 -1.46 -1.60 -.06 -.46 -.72 -.20 -.23 -1.88 -.68 -.18 -.30 -1.38 -.87 -.99 -.33 -1.41 -.52 -1.32 -1.41 -.28 -2.06 -.04 -1.29 -.31 -2.83 +.12 -.12 -.58 -1.53 -4.57 -.82 -2.22 -.46 -5.32 -2.03 -2.77 -.96 -.58 -2.57 -.01 -.41 -.04 -.36 -.54 -.57 -.42 -1.28 -.43 -.06 -.97 -1.74 -.11 -4.26 -1.40 -.91 -.08 -2.12 +.09 -1.16 -3.92 -1.42 -1.85 -3.61 -.81 -1.87 -.21 -1.60 -3.42 -.80 -.09 -1.09 -.04 +.01 -3.05 -2.99 -1.46 -3.54 -.52 -.83 -.63 -1.03 -.80 -.57 -1.20 -.67 -.79 -.48 -.83 -.41 -.15 -.56 -1.16 -.53 -.46 -.25 -1.34 -.79 -1.00 -.38 -.62 -.85 -.94 -1.02 -.76 -1.87 -.06 -.31 -.16 -.13 -.63 -5.19 -2.98 -.56

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrTmpLtd FredMac FredMac pfZ FMCG FresKabi rt FDelMnt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h GenesWyo GenesisEn Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay Globalstar GlbSpMet n GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS GoldS pfA GoldS pfD Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Griffon Group1 GrubbEl h GpTelevisa Guess GulfRes n GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HRPT Prp HSBC HSBC cap HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HarteHnk HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HaupgDig h HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HlthTroncs HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HellnTel HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HimaxTch

D 0.32 40.73 -1.43 0.60 13.44 -.22 4.23 -.13 10.80 -.75 3.80 -.45 3.25 43.00 -2.00 13.10 -.93 26.05 -1.11 24.20 -2.03 18.01 -.99 12.94 -.66 16.22 -.31 4.01 -.29 0.76 45.36 -1.82 36.34 -1.48 23.68 -1.33 1.90 19.14 -.21 0.88 99.05 -4.73 0.91 11.80 -.43 1.19 -.09 1.00 1.20 63.62 -4.07 .13 -.00 21.05 -.70 5.15 -.20 1.00 7.73 -.20 13.66 -.88 0.90 29.11 -2.25 26.52 -.85 2.10 -.23 0.12 9.71 -.35 8.01 -.46 7.03 -.81 9.39 -.75 1.12 28.65 -1.39 0.20 5.70 +.03 4.30 -.05 6.64 -.43 26.06 -1.08 5.43 +.12 0.72 12.10 -.65 0.44 4.50 -.31 1.68 15.71 -.73 0.14 11.08 +.25 1.28 24.43 -.47 20.62 -.65 6.91 -.14 0.16 14.88 -.42 0.40 21.74 -.60 0.20 44.55 -2.09 1.50 33.44 -.82 23.40 -.86 .36 -.01 24.24 -1.89 18.61 -.39 4.89 -.46 29.48 -1.05 1.68 66.30 -3.38 0.40 16.26 -1.00 12.75 -.67 0.50 6.79 -.54 1.96 71.52 -2.03 3.28 -.31 2.75 -.31 .38 -.04 33.81 -1.84 1.47 16.99 -.55 0.18 15.75 -.17 0.44 18.96 -.76 1.64 39.45 -1.33 .50 -.03 13.83 -1.09 49.49 -1.56 20.58 -.96 7.04 -.35 0.21 12.24 -.81 5.07 -.22 0.18 7.09 -.06 2.53 -.21 27.95 -.94 36.97 -2.03 0.52 16.24 -1.03 0.36 11.62 -1.05 1.98 33.33 -.95 0.40 6.20 -.41 13.76 -.78 5.38 -.41 0.08 41.02 -1.31 1.68 -.04 10.99 -.45 0.40 11.27 -.91 0.17 12.65 -.34 0.18 40.85 -1.51 4.06 -.20 1.40 136.10 -4.00 0.93 16.25 -.90 0.99 16.60 -.90 1.08 68.35 -3.99 12.75 -1.32 11.21 -.76 475.01-19.42 24.25 -1.87 15.06 -.65 2.16 100.14 -4.77 1.89 -.09 4.78 -.28 25.30 +.22 0.52 31.41 -1.78 3.18 -.12 2.69 -.53 5.65 -.28 1.62 -.09 0.83 17.41 -.73 23.06 -.72 10.46 -.77 12.92 -1.26 11.82 -1.45 26.15 -1.36 1.35 -.03 1.19 18.01 -.36 0.64 35.41 -.87 8.06 -1.18 12.53 -.92 .76 -.07 44.75 +.35 0.54 24.62 -.92 1.86 30.01 -1.63 0.48 6.62 -.53 1.70 44.92 -1.49 2.03 25.00 -.25 24.68 -1.10 21.09 -.56 0.36 26.22 -.90 6.46 -.61 26.11 -.98 1.91 -.13 1.00 43.75 -.77 2.12 -.09 38.65 -.85 17.61 -1.23 0.40 30.21 -1.98 30.56 -1.17 5.53 -.25 0.06 9.24 -.43 0.88 45.78 -2.09 10.87 -.43 0.82 25.32 -1.45 0.30 13.54 -1.38 0.20 23.64 -1.78 7.10 -.73 1.00 39.77 -1.31 4.65 24.84 -.33 3.29 +.19 1.24 21.84 -.56 6.77 -.16 3.80 -.34 2.72 40.00 -1.08 8.85 -.34 1.20 21.31 -1.24 22.93 -.66 19.65 -.32 16.84 -.71 4.78 -.01 0.08 15.77 -.91 5.16 -.15 5.11 -.46 1.68 45.83 -.89 11.57 -1.20 0.53 4.06 -.13 0.20 33.42 -2.21 .65 -.04 55.27 -1.94 0.80 43.64 -2.63 2.75 -.24 0.80 8.83 -.50 0.20 4.40 -.40 1.28 46.63 -1.16 10.23 -.97 0.40 51.52 -3.48 36.55 -.95 0.32 45.95 -1.05 14.75 -.87 25.84 -.78 1.70 28.73 -1.59 0.41 29.55 -1.31 0.30 2.75 -.02

Nm HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon HutchT Hyatt n Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.60 25.55 14.84 0.95 32.89 33.63 2.32 45.11 24.56 30.79 1.21 41.79 0.84 40.21 17.70 9.36 50.14 1.80 21.47 0.04 13.36 0.28 5.88 0.02 9.65 6.05 0.60 12.64 1.12 17.72 22.92 44.34 0.48 33.19 0.04 5.85 0.40 8.72 21.85 4.98 36.58 4.64 1.00

-1.50 -.77 -1.49 -1.87 -1.80 -1.78 -1.36 -2.07 -.47 -1.45 -.66 -2.09 -1.81 -1.05 -.65 +.35 -.12 -.46 -.84 -1.20 -1.90 -2.09 -.30 -.81 -.53 -.21 -1.58 -.14 -.03

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ING GRE ING GlbDv ING ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph iShCmxG iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iSR2KG iShR2K iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iSMCVal iShDJTel iShDJTch iShREst iShDJHm iShInds iShFnSv iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOE iShDJOG iShEur350 iSRsMic iSSCVal iShSCGrth iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Iberiabnk IconixBr Idacorp IDEX ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Incyte IndoTel Inergy Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm InsitTc Insmed InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntractDat IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune InterNAP IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit IntSurg inVentiv Invernss Invesco InvMtgC n InvTech InvRlEst IowaTel IridiumCm IronMtn IsilonSys Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g JCrew j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph

21.48 -.82 0.06 16.05 -1.05 0.53 35.12 -1.45 0.54 6.23 -.50 1.50 10.35 -.66 7.75 -.53 2.13 21.12 -.73 0.31 5.34 -.14 5.03 -.67 115.88 -.88 26.65 -.84 0.66 18.47 -1.26 2.72 58.61 -2.96 0.33 25.20 -1.29 1.05 29.45 -1.06 0.55 19.09 -.57 0.38 14.32 -.43 0.43 14.00 -.54 0.14 9.66 -.15 0.32 43.30 -2.97 0.24 11.16 -.35 0.70 46.03 -2.25 0.33 10.82 -.38 1.43 34.72 -2.14 2.05 33.06 -1.24 0.50 21.67 -1.39 0.21 11.23 -.44 0.42 13.57 -.57 0.54 42.48 -2.72 17.35 -.52 1.04 49.01 -1.94 1.65 43.70 -1.64 3.63 106.09 -.01 0.70 50.12 -2.53 0.55 37.02 -1.35 0.95 75.45 -3.76 2.22 107.93 -4.21 3.91 105.45 -.09 0.58 36.17 -1.90 5.57 106.49 -.24 0.82 54.92 -2.11 0.36 31.51 -1.51 0.75 40.27 -1.83 1.20 52.01 -2.19 3.70 98.33 +2.03 3.83 93.39 +.90 1.39 83.89 +.10 1.44 47.46 -1.71 0.72 37.45 -1.82 0.39 45.22 -1.75 1.22 82.86 -3.77 0.93 73.87 -3.28 8.07 82.64 -2.54 80.87 -3.31 1.93 55.13 -2.92 1.22 56.09 -2.42 0.51 79.57 -3.36 0.69 47.91 -1.70 1.06 59.44 -2.30 1.00 60.49 -3.46 0.42 69.22 -3.29 0.75 64.12 -3.42 0.19 110.20 +.01 2.81 35.01 -.89 1.12 63.48 -2.58 1.28 66.85 -3.16 0.73 19.07 -.75 0.25 54.09 -2.02 1.86 47.24 -2.40 0.09 13.13 -.64 0.78 54.15 -2.59 0.46 52.51 -2.54 0.68 51.24 -2.52 0.48 30.21 -1.37 0.54 57.05 -3.02 0.79 54.92 -2.70 0.32 38.88 -2.30 0.24 48.79 -2.58 1.00 32.08 -1.04 0.30 41.31 -2.48 0.84 61.28 -3.54 0.30 59.00 -2.73 5.67 -.36 1.00 47.75 -2.14 109.64 -1.69 1.36 55.10 -3.48 15.80 -.97 1.20 32.55 -1.52 0.60 30.06 -1.60 1.24 45.12 -2.38 39.47 -1.11 17.46 -1.59 19.98 -.64 8.71 -.55 3.34 -.28 19.65 -1.00 0.44 37.34 -1.62 12.00 -.94 1.28 32.05 -.92 2.78 34.01 -1.26 7.15 -.40 25.00 -1.25 0.56 55.18 -1.71 0.28 35.50 -1.55 16.91 -.57 0.57 7.92 -.45 1.15 -.03 20.98 -1.69 .82 -.03 5.80 -.24 5.63 -.22 8.80 -.95 2.72 45.94 -1.82 0.63 20.79 -.81 16.40 -.55 0.80 32.02 -.57 109.52 -4.50 24.66 -1.31 0.04 12.08 -.68 11.75 -.52 9.30 -.70 4.90 -.53 0.34 19.27 -1.63 2.60 123.80 -5.06 3.78 -.27 1.00 43.26 -1.69 0.24 19.17 -1.23 0.50 21.76 -.76 19.96 -1.11 46.90 -4.32 7.58 -.32 0.48 12.91 -.65 24.16 -1.12 33.75 -1.82 311.91-16.87 24.81 -.31 33.88 -2.03 0.44 18.58 -1.26 2.44 19.08 -.89 16.31 -.28 0.69 8.45 -.30 1.62 16.28 -.32 8.65 -.15 0.25 23.95 -1.21 12.68 -1.02 8.84 -.48 0.55 17.56 -.63 65.40 -2.68 2.15 -.11 12.80 -1.01 42.82 -.98 23.42 -.29 4.80 -.32 26.00 -1.25 10.37 -.82

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Nm JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g JkksPac Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JavelinPh Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KAR Auct n KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digit n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KirbyCp KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LIN TV h LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold LillyEli Limited Lincare LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM Loews Logitech LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy lululemn g

D 0.20 37.83 12.95 1.79 27.94 0.28 12.86 0.38 23.45 22.11 1.70 40.79 8.66 14.79 2.66 15.40 0.04 11.02 0.33 27.45 1.85 0.30 23.05 5.45 8.47 40.28 1.99 2.16 60.55 0.52 27.68 0.20 18.59 0.20 69.29 55.84 0.70 45.76 25.58 14.27 39.47 0.25 15.09 0.20 20.57 11.75 0.40 7.19 0.60 29.86 19.14 33.77 10.35 1.92 24.83 1.50 53.76 0.48 26.13 4.48 9.14 0.04 7.47 1.40 30.88 2.64 61.23 0.64 13.80 4.28 60.05 4.28 51.98 14.46 41.20 8.47 0.10 16.59 37.81 0.24 4.34 14.05 0.20 20.25 2.96 51.02 3.57 13.01 14.95 1.16 29.13 3.50 0.38 21.51 6.56 8.55 7.22 1.60 82.62 0.33 17.80 5.64 16.67 6.12 17.50 5.27 2.56 11.18 1.02 75.98 4.14 37.04 29.01 0.18 41.79 19.85 0.04 21.04 4.57 7.40 0.50 31.89 16.44 5.14 66.29 2.08 19.22 0.16 29.53 1.04 22.54 0.40 33.31 0.16 17.44 0.60 41.62 21.01 1.25 1.53 0.40 6.15 34.85 .60 0.29 4.19 23.34 23.07 12.29 38.45 1.90 29.71 48.73 33.80 34.15 1.51 0.60 31.61 1.96 33.34 0.60 23.88 45.21 0.04 25.58 0.92 27.25 2.52 22.71 4.75 6.84 12.00 6.07 5.90 1.43 3.15 2.52 77.55 0.25 31.31 13.72 29.77 4.00 75.44 7.85 0.36 23.70 1.44 79.76 1.30 36.72

-1.55 -.45 -1.03 -.74 -1.22 -.69 -.14 -2.28 -.36 -.82 -.22 -1.17 -.76 -1.09 +.03 -1.36 -.33 -1.28 -2.23 -.10 -1.67 -1.03 -.89 -4.87 -2.40 -2.34 -1.29 -.67 -2.27 -.70 -1.18 +.35 -.79 -.84 -1.18 -2.78 -.33 -.98 -1.41 -1.91 -.39 -1.04 -.32 -1.65 -.77 -.89 -1.89 -2.09 -1.55 -1.21 -.37 -.75 -2.00 -.51 -.37 -1.07 -.45 -1.51 -.16 -.69 -1.11 -1.16 -.24 -.97 -.46 -.96 -.07 -3.65 -.42 -.24 -1.30 -.66 -.75 -.14 -.22 -.76 -.09 -1.73 -.37 -1.17 -2.11 -2.01 -1.90 -1.55 -.34 -.40 -1.74 -.54 -.39 -3.23 -1.24 -1.57 -1.06 -1.37 -.71 -1.64 -1.24 -.03 -.07 -.45 -1.16 -.09 -.24 -1.48 -1.74 -.60 -2.86 -1.40 -2.48 -1.85 -.54 -.08 -2.14 -.52 -.61 -1.37 -2.16 -.76 -1.42 -.46 -.01 -.80 -.43 -.31 -.15 -2.95 -1.81 -.78 -.83 -3.16 -.59 -1.12 -4.26 -.24 -1.87

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MI Homes MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MSG n MagelMPtr MagelPt Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT

2.80 79.70 -3.69 0.04 21.79 -1.11 6.81 -.72 0.11 5.15 -.39 1.00 31.40 -.69 1.01 -.01 8.25 -.35 0.63 17.98 -.63 10.94 -.21 7.96 -.16 0.96 6.87 -.17 0.58 6.49 -.07 8.22 -.74 11.77 -1.00 11.24 -.93 2.51 -.36 29.75 -1.71 2.00 39.48 -2.06 1.80 31.29 -1.42 12.96 -.86 0.20 20.35 -1.00 20.69 -1.14 2.84 41.50 -1.95 1.59 -.14 2.76 -.23 0.18 67.75 -2.22 3.85 -.48 22.68 -1.14 0.23 1.90 -.12 0.08 11.07 -.69 4.94 -.29 0.74 44.03 -4.15 0.52 15.74 -1.13 1.00 31.41 -1.12 21.24 -1.00 0.11 47.05 -2.40 0.98 51.71 -3.61 0.08 27.69 -2.04 25.00 -1.71 0.42 36.52 -2.09 0.45 38.11 -1.54 0.31 29.50 -1.76 2.56 27.21 -1.45 0.16 32.24 -1.45 0.80 21.41 -.84 0.04 7.61 -.66 5.77 -.32 1.60 89.00 -3.87 17.84 -.67

Nm Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MeridBio MeritMed Meritage Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MidAApt MillerHer Millicom Millipore MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt MS India MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Res NII Hldg NIVS IntT NRG Egy NTTDoCo NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetSolTc h NetwkEng NBRESec NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NJ Rscs NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource NichACv NichACv2 Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm

D 0.30 13.33 -.74 2.00 22.81 -.70 0.24 29.96 -1.39 11.85 -.43 0.60 205.50 +3.05 0.75 21.36 -.75 3.93 -.27 0.80 17.60 -.57 4.22 -.26 1.04 38.50 -.66 21.96 -.84 2.20 67.66 -1.74 0.94 28.07 -1.20 0.48 67.64 -2.22 9.18 -.82 31.83 -.62 0.90 47.61 -3.89 0.92 23.31 -.90 19.95 -1.00 6.60 -.49 22.79 -1.08 55.07 -2.24 5.16 -.23 0.80 8.95 -.68 7.29 -.25 0.24 22.42 -1.09 29.28 -1.62 10.86 -.13 55.85 -2.54 0.82 40.32 -1.44 3.56 -.34 22.83 +.43 0.36 21.05 -1.11 8.56 -.43 46.33 -2.75 4.45 -.09 1.52 31.82 -.80 0.76 18.03 -1.53 15.73 -.54 20.93 -1.00 4.56 -.37 .66 -.04 0.62 20.01 -.31 0.74 37.88 -2.64 8.54 -.28 0.14 10.38 -.40 1.37 26.84 -.85 8.74 -.22 32.48 -1.95 15.57 -.75 0.52 27.11 -1.13 2.34 -.15 2.50 -.24 2.46 52.05 -2.66 0.09 18.95 -.51 7.24 79.90 -3.75 105.75 -.29 0.20 29.12 -.68 7.80 -.90 8.67 -.46 11.77 -.61 4.92 -.01 3.46 -.13 18.43 -.58 11.27 -1.09 55.40 -3.83 0.61 20.42 -1.04 0.61 17.01 -1.02 1.12 41.33 -1.78 11.93 -.99 2.65 -.15 19.32 -.71 1.06 53.98 -2.36 14.58 -1.35 0.36 15.61 -.50 0.42 21.21 -.30 0.20 25.64 -1.40 1.10 14.02 -.70 20.75 -.54 6.02 +.01 0.20 44.97 -1.89 6.70 -.11 1.83 -.16 0.07 4.23 -.26 1.00 51.31 -2.57 19.44 -.79 1.75 18.26 -.34 5.24 -.43 32.83 -1.30 10.74 -.84 12.11 -.40 22.69 -1.11 0.60 13.90 -.71 1.07 -.08 34.35 -1.78 2.20 -.14 21.51 -.98 0.54 15.28 +.09 0.44 11.77 -.35 1.20 27.42 -1.30 17.27 -1.10 0.14 22.15 -1.23 9.96 -1.06 7.98 -.26 18.08 -1.04 0.31 2.50 -.13 12.99 -.92 1.34 47.34 -2.43 2.89 41.06 -3.66 0.40 35.39 -2.17 0.04 7.12 -.54 1.50 21.07 -.90 0.32 13.74 -.34 1.80 31.60 -1.39 0.24 5.46 -.36 1.66 14.81 -.75 51.90 -1.72 12.20 -.37 2.75 -.26 13.90 -.72 9.54 -.47 26.61 -.60 32.56 -.99 30.03 -1.08 13.11 -.88 94.99 -5.62 2.20 -.21 .82 -.03 2.67 -.17 0.24 3.29 -.18 21.56 -.61 13.43 -.57 2.70 -.04 .10 -.00 5.35 -.42 1.36 35.59 -2.12 4.13 -1.17 1.00 15.31 -.90 8.65 -.46 0.28 11.74 -.44 2.76 -.30 0.20 15.70 -.57 46.60 -3.47 0.40 52.07 -2.44 6.22 -.16 0.15 12.73 -.66 0.15 14.96 -.83 0.20 20.74 -.63 .36 -.03 .32 -.04 0.92 14.80 -.56 1.08 8.43 -.51 1.02 7.97 -.46 1.86 40.21 -1.63 1.08 70.31 -1.94 14.22 -.42 21.36 +.41 18.10 +.09 0.20 31.33 -1.64 0.72 60.36 -3.73 0.56 10.03 -.18 6.11 -.13 7.66 -.97 1.45 27.76 -1.34 0.80 37.26 -1.15 1.36 53.41 -2.57 3.02 -.38 1.03 25.98 -.63 6.85 -.75 12.37 -.71 1.12 50.10 -2.25 2.80 -.16 1.88 60.02 -2.25 0.40 3.09 -.43 0.40 11.39 -.41 6.60 -.63 1.99 44.63 -1.43 5.85 -.17 2.28 -.18 5.91 -.12 24.23 -.32 1.41 75.34 -2.29 1.60 34.70 -1.26 0.50 26.91 -1.55 40.75 -1.52 15.42 -.46

D

Nucor 1.44 42.71 -1.85 NustarEn 4.26 52.86 -1.82 NutriSyst 0.70 21.09 -.88 NuvFloat 0.61 10.29 -.62 NvMulSI&G 0.75 7.07 -.24 NvMSI&G2 0.75 7.43 -.30 NuvQualPf 0.58 6.22 -.25 NuvQPf2 0.65 6.79 -.25 Nvidia 12.46 -.30 O2Micro 5.89 -.29 OCharleys 6.91 -.42 OGE Engy 1.45 35.24 -2.02 OReillyA h 47.77 -1.01 OSI Phrm 57.33 -.02 OcciPet 1.52 77.66 -1.88 Oceaneer 51.05 -2.91 OceanFrt h .51 -.06 Och-Ziff 0.72 15.05 -1.49 Oclaro rs 11.00 -.82 OcwenFn 11.51 -.59 OdysMar 1.27 -.05 OfficeDpt 5.78 -.41 OfficeMax 16.10 -1.02 OilSvHT 1.74 100.82 -5.72 OilStates 38.85 -2.65 Oilsands g .69 -.07 OldDomF h 34.56 -2.71 OldNBcp 0.28 11.92 -.69 OldRepub 0.69 12.93 -.93 Olin 0.80 18.09 -1.16 OmegaHlt 1.28 18.51 -.89 Omncre 0.09 24.70 -1.20 Omnicom 0.80 38.14 -1.82 OmniVisn 16.84 -.62 Omnova 7.29 -.44 OnSmcnd 7.27 -.23 ONEOK 1.76 42.90 -2.37 ONEOK Pt 4.44 55.95 -2.61 OnyxPh 23.61 -.91 OpenTxt 42.67 -1.53 OpnwvSy 2.27 -.06 optXprs 16.49 -.16 Oracle 0.20 22.35 -.84 OrbitalSci 16.27 -1.14 Orexigen 5.60 -.41 OrientEH 10.13 -.86 OrientFn 0.16 12.98 -.53 OriginAg 7.13 -.72 OrionMar 14.00 -1.17 OrmatTc 0.20 27.06 -1.97 OshkoshCp 33.98 -2.39 OvShip 1.75 37.07 -2.33 OwensM s 0.71 29.68 -1.17 OwensCorn 30.30 -2.61 OwensIll 28.24 -2.00 PDL Bio 1.00 5.51 -.18 PF Chng 0.17 42.10 -2.15 PG&E Cp 1.82 41.55 -1.32 PHH Corp 20.82 -1.30 PMC Sra 8.01 -.18 PMI Grp 3.92 -.48 PNC 0.40 60.55 -2.23 PNM Res 0.50 12.08 -.48 POSCO 1.71 88.78 -6.45 PPG 2.16 61.56 -2.80 PPL Corp 1.40 24.78 -1.07 PSS Wrld 22.82 -.53 Paccar 0.36 39.17 -2.83 PacerIntl 7.72 -1.12 PacCapB 1.59 -.07 PacEthan .66 -.08 PacSunwr 4.49 -.36 PackAmer 0.60 21.28 -1.16 Pactiv 28.80 -.99 PaetecHld 4.05 -.38 Palatin .25 PallCorp 0.64 33.34 -1.52 Palm Inc 5.64 -.03 PanASlv 0.05 23.93 -1.36 PaneraBrd 75.34 -1.56 ParPharm 26.25 -.96 ParagShip 0.20 4.01 -.20 ParamTch 16.70 -.82 ParaG&S 1.50 -.08 Parexel 21.10 -1.32 ParkDrl 4.52 -.13 ParkerHan 1.04 59.70 -3.93 PartnerRe 2.00 73.07 -2.36 PatriotCoal 14.83 -1.23 Patterson 0.40 29.35 -.57 PattUTI 0.20 12.81 -.52 Paychex 1.24 28.92 -.68 PeabdyE 0.28 36.07 -2.42 Pengrth g 0.84 8.97 -.50 PnnNGm 25.13 -1.79 PennVa 0.23 21.00 -1.59 PennWst g 1.80 18.30 -.82 PennantPk 1.04 9.51 -.60 Penney 0.80 26.00 -.51 PenRE 0.60 13.54 -1.14 Penske 12.68 -.52 Pentair 0.76 31.66 -1.79 PeopUtdF 0.62 14.29 -.36 PepBoy 0.12 11.10 -.88 PepcoHold 1.08 15.67 -.59 PepsiCo 1.92 63.86 -2.18 Peregrne rs 3.07 -.62 PerfectWld 25.05 -.95 Perficient 10.34 -1.17 PerkElm 0.28 22.03 -1.03 Prmian 1.08 16.16 -1.32 Perrigo 0.25 56.05 -2.25 PetChina 3.72 101.92 -4.76 Petrohawk 17.83 -.93 PetrbrsA 1.30 29.26 -1.99 Petrobras 1.30 33.40 -1.86 PtroqstE 5.81 -.29 PetsMart 0.40 31.66 -.68 Pfizer 0.72 15.23 -.59 PhmHTr 7.44 58.98 -1.88 PharmPdt 0.60 25.38 -1.50 Pharmacyc 6.44 -.21 PhaseFwd 16.70 -.02 PhilipMor 2.32 44.55 -1.71 PhilipsEl 0.95 29.16 -1.68 PhlVH 0.15 51.41 -2.89 PhnxCos 2.40 -.29 PhotrIn 4.72 -.12 PiedNG 1.12 25.87 -.92 Pier 1 6.90 -.55 PilgrmsP n 8.42 -.58 PimCpOp 1.38 14.64 -.30 PimIncStr2 0.70 8.75 -.28 PimcoHiI 1.46 10.55 -.64 PinnclEnt 11.62 -1.17 PinWst 2.10 35.10 -1.20 PionDrill 5.36 -.35 PioNtrl 0.08 56.40 -3.13 PitnyBw 1.46 22.08 -.66 PlainsAA 3.74 54.81 -.95 PlainsEx 21.79 -1.35 Plantron 0.20 29.49 -2.34 PlatGpMet 1.99 -.15 PlatUnd 0.32 36.56 -1.42 PlugPwr h .51 +.03 PlumCrk 1.68 34.32 -.78 Polaris 1.60 56.62 -.76 Polo RL 0.40 85.01 -3.09 Polycom 29.66 -1.65 PolyMet g 1.68 -.12 PolyOne 9.55 -1.18 Polypore 18.72 -.81 Poniard h 1.06 -.08 Pool Corp 0.52 24.37 -.48 Popular 2.98 -.22 PortGE 1.04 18.81 -.72 PostPrp 0.80 23.59 -1.66 Potash 0.40 96.97 -3.36 Potlatch 2.04 34.26 -1.22 PwrInteg 0.20 32.33 -1.23 Power-One 6.67 -.36 PwshDB 21.26 -.45 PwShCurH 21.97 -.61 PS Agri 23.54 -.23 PS Oil 23.38 -.99 PS BasMet 18.53 -.20 PS USDBull 25.09 -.13 PwSClnEn 8.45 -.40 PwSFoodBv 0.26 15.30 -.53 PwSIntlDv 0.47 12.63 -.54 PwShMda 0.05 12.06 -.63 PwSWtr 0.12 15.92 -.78 PSTechLdr 0.10 18.67 -.93 PSFinPf 1.35 15.28 -.48 PSETecLd 0.11 13.18 -.67 PwShPfd 1.03 12.88 -.27 PSIndia 0.13 19.95 -.74 PwShs QQQ 0.21 44.35 -1.71 Powrwav 1.61 -.02 Pozen 7.71 -.52 Praxair 1.80 74.27 -2.27 PrecCastpt 0.12 112.87 -4.70 PrecDril 5.85 -.21 PrmWBc h .63 -.06 Prestige 7.30 -.24 PriceTR 1.08 48.97 -2.82 priceline 181.00 -9.11 PrideIntl 24.23 -.91 PrinFncl 0.50 26.13 -2.03 PrivateB 0.04 13.10 -.89 ProShtDow 52.87 +1.80 ProShtQQQ 44.14 +1.62 ProShtS&P 53.41 +1.97 PrUShS&P 35.77 +2.52 ProUltDow 0.53 41.01 -3.16 PrUlShDow 29.72 +1.89 ProUltMC 0.11 42.84 -3.93 PrUShMC 19.93 +1.58 ProUltQQQ 54.88 -4.27 PrUShQQQ 19.16 +1.31 ProUltSP 0.41 35.12 -2.91 ProUShL20 38.81 -1.72 ProShtEM 42.81 +1.97 ProUShBrz 32.62 +2.78 PrUSCh25 rs 48.24 +3.17 ProUSEM rs 63.85 +5.73 ProUSRE rs 31.20 +2.70 ProUSOG rs 71.67 +5.88 ProUSBM rs 45.19 +3.92 ProUltRE rs 0.50 35.77 -3.85 ProUShtFn 22.75 +1.91 ProUFin rs 0.30 54.02 -5.34 PrUPShQQQ 67.17 +5.98 ProUltSemi 0.19 29.72 -2.05 ProUltTech 0.01 45.96 -3.51 ProUltO&G 0.22 27.97 -2.72 ProUBasM 0.15 26.32 -2.73 ProUPR2K 95.38-17.26 ProUShEur 28.33 +1.84 ProShtR2K 41.76 +2.03 ProUltPQQQ 85.22 -9.59 ProUSR2K 21.95 +2.04 ProUltR2K 0.04 29.37 -3.31 ProSht20Tr 44.71 -.96 ProUSSP500 36.80 +3.78 ProUltSP500 0.23 130.90-16.95 ProUltCrude 8.77 -.73 ProSUltGold 50.92 -.73 ProUSGld rs 42.39 +.58 ProUSSlv rs 37.38 +1.96 ProUShCrude 17.40 +1.29

Nm

D

ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgsvCp ProLogis ProlorBio ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal n PulteGrp PureBio PPrIT

1.93 2.48 0.16 0.60 1.64 0.62 0.56 0.72 0.44 0.70 0.61 1.37 3.20

0.68

Nm 57.86 19.47 24.01 61.61 38.28 19.36 11.18 4.71 9.97 36.11 6.11 19.72 6.76 12.01 54.60 14.58 32.12 30.49 87.03 8.05 10.76 3.05 5.92

-3.34 -.84 -.54 -1.61 -1.00 -.92 -.43 -.76 -.43 -1.92 -.49 -1.81 -.40 -.66 -3.84 -.58 -.19 -.94 -3.77 -1.16 -.52 -.33 -.30

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h Quaterra g QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadientPh RadioShk Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon ReachLoc n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn ResrceCap RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RINO Int n RioTinto s RiskMetric RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubyTues Ruddick rue21 n RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW RdxInv2xF RdxSCVal Rdx In2xSP Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SORL SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrSemi SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrOGEq SpdrMetM SPX Cp STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp Safeway StJoe StJude StMaryLE Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SJuanB SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer SchwUSMkt Schwab SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy s Seanergy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech Senesco SenHous Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicGrIn SilicnImg

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D 0.28 0.08 2.40 0.40

0.16

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1.12 0.27 0.20 1.82 1.16 0.60 0.02 0.10 1.00

0.20 0.80 0.52 0.53 0.73 0.41 1.00 0.20 0.59 0.31 1.26 0.20 1.32 0.36 0.20 0.40 0.20 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.44 0.06 0.15 0.12

0.60 0.37 1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04

0.35 0.04

1.13 0.04 1.00 0.90 0.20 0.82 0.28 0.71 0.60

0.46

0.25 1.55 2.07 0.68 0.13 1.66 0.10 0.40 1.27 1.90 1.18 2.93 0.84 0.68 4.78 1.36 0.08 0.25 0.44 0.54 0.86

0.68 0.30 0.48 0.08

1.16 0.28 2.10 0.10 1.00 1.00 1.60 0.85 0.52 0.02

0.60 0.72 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.28 0.30 0.56 1.60 0.80 7.65 1.44

0.32

Nm 44.02 5.47 17.19 17.71 6.49 81.09 28.68 34.28 6.06 4.08 .97 34.64 34.22 11.17 14.46 14.23 6.13 5.48 6.02 4.20 46.25 39.40 16.74 2.80 56.31 42.19 32.22 43.26 19.90 6.00 18.45 35.02 13.70 5.52 9.29 10.87 11.50 30.81 2.45 30.67 29.47 17.98 .27 33.41 26.19 20.92 11.67 36.35 4.76 19.37 4.22 18.94 8.78 4.32 11.85 14.20 41.58 29.64 28.73 26.52 31.18 52.16 14.25 29.01 21.31 28.49 8.10 4.73 54.22 36.58 21.38 2.57 1.20 25.10 44.15 39.01 20.31 13.57 7.82 .94 56.91 31.87 5.43 .70 13.23 31.93 5.90 51.50 12.08 12.93 4.19 53.88 15.38 20.01 .34 27.15 28.51 .86 27.78 4.80 11.75 10.38 3.90 10.06 9.68 26.21 2.43 21.75 13.27 12.86 8.85 6.83 27.21 64.00 14.76 11.22 28.70 44.57 18.84 21.05 2.63 1.95 29.38 13.61 15.65 17.53 14.85 13.02 5.78 24.49 43.44 26.75 2.42 16.58 9.63 10.69 14.53 3.81 16.79 15.82 39.44 4.43 22.05 52.78 4.68 4.52 15.93 37.97 39.48 3.97 29.79 24.04 17.79 10.50 14.18 5.56 14.35 6.61 11.86 57.34 13.41 8.77 8.34 17.46 19.15 9.35 30.82 35.17 5.18 19.97 30.96 10.54 20.63 29.78 9.80 7.16 .44 12.00 17.47 22.12 10.20 54.48 34.61 24.26 14.01 19.41 13.02 49.83 37.97 9.07 34.61 30.64 40.19 79.58 8.98 2.79 11.09 42.90 41.76 19.22 1.15 48.93 29.74 27.89 10.13 15.00 8.84 20.31 49.44 6.32 47.50 65.81 46.45 14.30 21.63 1.40 47.48 74.00 65.20 7.27 32.37 46.50 2.99 51.82 58.01 48.42 1.59 1.62 28.50 17.33 19.86

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D

TriQuint TrueRelig TrstNY Trustmk TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

6.42 26.62 0.25 6.37 0.92 21.89 5.09 1.00 42.11 0.66 12.34 0.64 27.40 0.83 36.00 0.16 16.97

-.42 -1.44 -.31 -1.24 -.33 -2.21 -.63 -.85 -1.67 -.83

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp URS US Airwy US Geoth US Gold USEC USG UTStrcm UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdOnln U U R U U NG U O U U U U G U H U mG U U m U mR U O

R

N m D m G M m G M R D W m N R

M D M m G

m m m M m R

G m Mw

M W& O WG H WM W W O W W R W M W W W W W W M W R W WR W W M W W W W W W WW W R W W W W W W W W W H W H O WD W G W R W U W W W W W W W H W W Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W m W W W W D W W WW W W W W W W W m W OM O m R M R Ww m G m N mm w

m w mG

0.10 0.72 1.00

0.20 0.67 0.67 1.32

7.73 17.71 13.17 19.20 25.25 44.49 6.84 .75 3.54 4.00 17.28 1.86 42.74 .14 12.35 30.51 27.11 26.76 67.94 22.14 37.86 4.76 3.06

-.50 -1.13 -.74 -1.08 -.90 -2.35 -.56 -.07 -.20 -.37 -1.59 -.19 -2.54 -.01 -.80 -.88 -.64 -.52 -3.64 -1.74 -1.89 -.26 -.21


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Economy

Lawnae Hunter met Bill Watkins nearly a decade ago, while they both lived in Santa Barbara, Calif. She was on the board of directors for the University of California, Santa Barbara’s Economic Forecast Project when Watkins was hired as its executive director in the early 2000s. Watkins has since left UCSB, and now works at California Lutheran University as the executive director of the Center for Economic Research and Forecasting . Watkins is the connection between Hunter and Praxis Strategy Group, a group that specializes in consulting with small- to medium-sized cities and is based in Grand Forks, N.D. At the 2009 Central Oregon Economic Outlook, Watkins brought Joel Kotkin with him as a second speaker. Watkins said he met Kotkin, an author and speaker, while both were speaking at an event around the year 2002. Kotkin, who works for Delore Zimmerman, co-founder of Praxis, runs a blog called The New Geography (named after one of his books), on which both Watkins and Zimmerman contribute. The Central Oregon Economic Outlook has been well-received locally. Between 300 and 400 people have attended the event each of the last two years it has been held, paying a fee of between $75 and $110. For more information on the Deschutes Economic Alliance, visit www.deschutesalliance.org. The organization plans to hold a news conference that is open to the public at 10 a.m. Monday at The Oxford Hotel in downtown Bend. “Getting the outside perspective is the smart thing to do,” Hunter said. “It would be foolish of us to not take advantage of it.” Additionally, Praxis has experience, she said. One of a dozen case studies listed on Praxis’ website is work the firm did in the late 1990s in Wenatchee, Wash., the site that Internet search engine Yahoo picked to build a data center earlier this decade. Allison Williams, executive services director for the city of Wenatchee, said Zimmerman provided the city a list of 16 economic strategies in the late 1990s that it still uses today in its economic plans. Those strategies pushed the city to revitalize itself, Williams said, by investing money in a community center and starting a leadership conference, among other actions. It also, in part, led to Yahoo and other high-tech firms building in the area, Williams said. “He got committees working on projects before he was finished with his work,” she said. “We really came out of our process with a focus on technology.” That could be one area that is a focus of Praxis’ work in Bend, too. One of multiple subcommittees the alliance is forming, which will gather business owner and citizen information for Praxis to use, is focused on technology. It is being headed by Michael Taus, whose Bend company, Code Benders, does software and business development for high-tech companies. Taus said he would like to see the alliance’s analysis lead to a type of business incubator

EDCO’s primary task Economic Development for Central Oregon, founded in 1983, has the primary task of economic development and job creation in Central Oregon. EDCO develops an economic strategic plan every three years, and released its plan for 2010 to 2012 earlier this year. Hunter said the Deschutes Economic Alliance did not participate in EDCO’s latest planning because the alliance had not yet formed. She said the point of the alliance is not to be an organization like EDCO, but to tap consultants that she believes are world-class. “(We want to) bring in the most brilliant economic development minds that can work with our community, and the people of our community, to give us some suggestions and ideas and implementable items that can begin to change the course” of the economy, Hunter said. In addition to EDCO, Hunter said there are multiple other groups in the area that work on economic development. She said the alliance is meant to provide an outside analysis of Deschutes County.

Bill aims to expand jobless benefits

“(We want to) bring in the most brilliant economic development minds that can work with our community, and the people of our community, to give us some suggestions and ideas and implementable items that can begin to change the course (of the economy).”

The Bill Watkins connection

Continued from B1 The Deschutes Economic Alliance is looking for recommendations from the consultants about what the county should do to increase jobs and improve the economy — anything from creating business incubators and research centers to focusing on attracting employers from specific industries, such as the technology sector. Delore Zimmerman, co-founder of Praxis Strategy Group, said he is currently studying data from the past decade to understand what Deschutes County has experienced. He, Watkins and Joel Kotkin, a senior consultant with Praxis, will visit Bend next week to talk with residents in an initial effort to understand the community and develop a plan that reflects it, Zimmerman said. “I happen to believe that a lot of the best ideas are there locally,” he said. His job, he added, is to figure out, “How do you turn them into reality?” With the economy and employment as they are today — Deschutes County’s unemployment rate was 13.3 percent in March, higher than the state rate at 10.6 percent and national rate at 9.7 percent — economic development is a hot topic locally and is by no means a new issue.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 B5

By Stephen Ohlemacher The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — People who are out of work for long stretches would get expanded unemployment benefits through the end of the year under a bill Democratic lawmakers plan to pass next week. The bill would also extend, for a year, about 50 popular tax cuts that expired in January. The bill would be paid for, in part, by tax increases on investment managers and some U.S.-based multinational companies. In response to the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the bill would increase taxes on oil companies by $10.9 billion over the next decade to finance the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. House leaders said they plan to vote on the bill early next week, leaving just a few days for the Senate to act before Congress goes on a weeklong vacation for Memorial Day. House leaders had planned to vote this week, but they were still waiting for

— Lawnae Hunter, head of the Deschutes Economic Alliance chutes Economic Alliance. “EDCO is laser-focused on creating jobs in Central Oregon and has a specific strategy in place that is always a work in progress,” Powderly said. “We encourage every member of the community and every organization to help us with our mission to create jobs in Central Oregon.” Hunter said if Zimmerman’s group develops something that could be implemented by EDCO, or another economic development organization or group, she imagines there would be no need for the Deschutes Economic Alliance to continue. She said she had no personal reasons to instigate the project, adding that she receives no financial benefit from it or the annual forecast she hosts with Watkins. Praxis will be paid with donations from businesses and individuals, Hunter said, noting that donations will be capped at $5,000. She estimated about 20 to 25 groups or individuals have donated, or plan to, so far. She said she saw high unemployment and underemployment rates in the area, and wanted to develop a project that focused on more than the traded sector, which is EDCO’s primary focus and refers to markets to which goods and services are sold with international or national competition, according to Oregon Revised Statutes. That way, if another recession hits, the area will be better prepared, she said. “If we’re diversified, we won’t suffer the consequences we have in this one,” Hunter said. “That’s why I really think that it takes a unified effort from everybody in this community.”

that would help people convert a business idea into reality. He said a few tech companies in Bend have built strong roots since their startup days, but he’d like to see that happen more. “I’ve yet to see any new seedlings fall from those trees and spawn new enterprises,” Taus said. EDCO already has a goal — the second of five goals in the organization’s strategic plan — to target the software/information technology industry, one of eight broad sectors it’s targeting to bring to Central Oregon to better diversify the economy. The other seven are: renewable/alternative energy, aviation/aerospace, recreational equipment, biosciences/medical devices, data centers, wood products and higher education/training.

Cooperative effort Taus doesn’t think Zimmerman’s work would duplicate EDCO’s. He thinks it can be used cooperatively alongside EDCO’s strategic plan. Hunter said that’s the project’s mission: to develop something that can be implemented by a local agency, such as the county, city of Bend or EDCO. Darren Powderly, a member of EDCO’s board of directors and a partner in Compass Commercial Real Estate Services, said EDCO welcomed input from everyone in the community when it developed its strategic plan late last year. He said additional outside input on EDCO’s main goal, creating jobs, is always welcome from organizations like the Des-

Jobless Continued from B1 “One bad week does not make a trend, though, and we need to see much more data before we can be sure.” While initial claims have fallen 25 percent from 12 months ago, they are now 3.6 percent higher compared with the end of 2009 in a reflection of the scarcity of new jobs. Most economists say claims need to fall below 400,000 to signify accelerating job creation. About 8.2 million Americans lost jobs during the trough of the recession in 2008 and 2009, and many have not been able to find work. Although the economy has added about half a million jobs in the first four months of 2010, the pace of hiring is still unusually slow by historical terms — and some of those new jobs are temporary slots associated with the U.S. Census. Nevertheless, most economists believe a U.S. recovery is underway and that, barring a major domestic or global crisis, the economy should continue to heal. “The recovery, both in the labor market and more generally, was never going to happen in a

David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

some cost estimates, and a few issues were unresolved. Delays in extending the tax breaks have left thousands of businesses unable to plan for their tax liabilities. Delays in passing a long-term extension of emergency unemployment benefits have forced thousands of laid-off workers to live month to month with no certainty of income. Unemployment benefits for many will start to run out June 2, unless Congress acts. The bill would extend unemployment benefits for up to 99 weeks in many states, at a cost of $47 billion. Laid-off workers would continue to get subsidies to buy health insurance through the COBRA program through the end of the year, at a cost of $7.8 billion. States would get $24 billion to states to help cover Medicaid costs. The overall cost of the bill will top $150 billion and could approach $200 billion.

straight line, and temporary setbacks are not uncommon,” wrote economist Omair Sharif of RBS. “So we would brush this figure off unless we see further confirmation of a sustained pickup in layoffs.” Altogether, 9.95 million people were collecting some type of unemployment benefits in the week ended May 1, down from 10.15 million. The numbers are not seasonally adjusted. The number of people who continue to receive regular unemployment checks declined by 40,000 to a seasonally adjusted 4.63 million in the week ended May 8. That’s the most recent data available. Those receiving extended federal benefits declined to 5.34 million from 5.41 million in the week ended May 1, not seasonally adjusted. Extended benefits are offered to some workers after they use up eligibility for state unemployment compensation, usually 26 weeks. Congress has extended benefits for up to 99 weeks in the states hardest hit by the recession. Economists say the decline likely reflects the exhaustion of benefits and doesn’t indicate a sudden availability of new jobs.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

12 13 73 ... 39 ... ... 24 22 28 19 13 36 19 ... 11 51 ... 13 ... 14

YTD Last Chg %Chg 42.34 19.72 15.30 13.82 63.00 .58 33.70 49.04 56.59 3.36 27.91 45.95 14.57 20.79 7.47 21.51 4.57 7.85 17.98 8.56 27.11

-3.08 -.71 -1.01 -.63 -3.21 -.04 -1.50 -.94 -1.18 -.03 -1.42 -1.05 -.43 -.81 -.32 -.97 -.34 -.59 -.63 -.43 -1.13

+22.5 -8.7 +1.6 +12.4 +16.4 -15.0 +22.6 +25.6 -4.4 +40.0 -14.7 -10.8 +9.5 +1.9 +34.6 +4.8 +69.3 +12.5 -23.8 -3.1 -11.1

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80f 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .48f .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

20 17 17 41 91 ... 35 17 ... 71 20 9 25 19 ... 22 ... 11 ... ...

Market recap 70.31 37.26 44.41 16.10 39.17 1.96 34.32 112.87 22.63 44.61 75.40 41.58 25.10 6.42 12.35 23.21 17.67 28.69 2.68 41.94

-1.94 -1.15 -1.84 -1.02 -2.83 -.20 -.78 -4.70 -1.06 -3.89 -2.53 -1.72 -1.09 -.42 -.80 -.94 -1.06 -1.39 -.11 -1.96

+6.4 -.9 -1.4 +26.9 +8.0 -30.2 -9.1 +2.3 +6.3 -6.5 +22.3 +3.9 +8.8 +7.0 -7.9 +3.1 -8.6 +6.3 +27.6 -2.8

Precious metals Metal

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl iShEMkts

Vol (00) 11209477 4631025 2961292 2073302 1675773

Last Chg 3.63 107.54 15.30 14.25 36.17

-.18 -4.22 -1.01 -.70 -1.90

Gainers ($2 or more) Name DirREBear PrUPShR2K DirxSCBear DirEMBr rs BarVixShT

Last

Chg %Chg

8.79 56.36 7.68 61.23 34.07

+1.18 +7.46 +1.01 +7.87 +4.22

+15.5 +15.3 +15.2 +14.7 +14.1

Losers ($2 or more) Name NY&Co BkIrelnd Wabash GrayTelev ProUMex n

Last

-1.17 -1.26 -1.59 -.53 -4.33

$1188.00 $1187.80 $17.694

Pvs Day $1193.00 $1192.60 $18.091

Vol (00)

NA Pall g NovaGld g NwGold g GoldStr g Taseko

83065 73244 63408 44575 40666

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

3.02 6.60 5.35 4.06 4.68

PwShs QQQ Intel ETrade Cisco Microsoft

1755770 1047144 988850 962799 864708

44.35 20.79 1.43 23.31 27.11

-.38 -.63 -.42 -.20 -.46

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Engex Gerova un StreamGSv EntreeGold CCA Inds

Last

4.43 +.53 +13.6 18.00 +1.47 +8.9 5.95 +.37 +6.6 2.05 +.12 +6.2 5.85 +.33 +6.0

Name

Last

-22.1 -18.1 -17.9 -16.5 -15.6

AlldDefen BioTime wt ProlorBio KodiakO g PudaCoal n

3.40 -.62 3.60 -.59 4.71 -.76 2.96 -.45 8.05 -1.16

166 3,013 36 3,215 7 94

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-1.71 -.81 -.12 -.95 -1.13

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

ChinaTcF Iridium un WSB Hldgs ZionO&G wt PrUPShQQQ

Chg %Chg

2.75 +.49 +21.7 11.00 +1.71 +18.4 3.61 +.55 +18.0 3.90 +.40 +11.4 67.17 +5.98 +9.8

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-15.4 -14.1 -13.9 -13.2 -12.6

Wowjnt un WaccaBk CentrueF CelldexTh SyntaPhm

9.00 -2.00 -18.2 2.69 -.46 -14.7 2.40 -.40 -14.3 7.68 -1.25 -14.0 3.11 -.50 -13.9

74 434 27 535 5 20

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Last Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

4.13 5.70 7.27 2.69 23.40

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Price (troy oz.)

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Indexes

Chg %Chg

Diary 224 2,550 61 2,835 10 155

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,971.98 325.67 5,552.82 1,451.26 1,677.54 869.32 8,900.27 473.54

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,068.01 4,160.51 359.83 6,653.00 1,721.84 2,204.01 1,071.59 11,225.70 640.04

-376.36 -214.33 -11.56 -274.21 -65.97 -94.36 -43.46 -472.74 -34.36

YTD %Chg %Chg -3.60 -4.90 -3.11 -3.96 -3.69 -4.11 -3.90 -4.04 -5.09

52-wk %Chg

-3.45 +1.49 -9.59 -7.40 -5.65 -2.87 -3.90 -2.80 +2.34

+21.42 +37.86 +9.98 +15.09 +13.08 +30.01 +20.63 +23.56 +33.00

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

314.86 2,386.49 3,432.52 5,073.13 5,867.88 19,545.83 30,368.08 19,282.05 3,111.42 10,030.31 1,600.18 2,753.51 4,342.40 5,519.35

-2.05 t -1.91 t -2.25 t -1.65 t -2.02 t -.17 t -2.02 t -1.69 t -.34 t -1.54 t -1.83 t -.76 t -1.63 t -1.85 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.8299 1.4432 .9400 .001833 .1463 1.2575 .1281 .011098 .076953 .0319 .000859 .1268 .8719 .0310

Pvs Day .8435 1.4426 .9561 .001820 .1464 1.2387 .1282 .010921 .077322 .0325 .000864 .1279 .8673 .0311

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 15.96 -0.64 -2.8 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.41 -0.18 -1.9 GrowthI 21.33 -0.83 -3.2 Ultra 18.48 -0.68 -5.1 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.18 -0.57 -2.5 AMutlA p 22.28 -0.74 -3.2 BalA p 15.98 -0.37 -0.9 BondA p 12.09 +4.0 CapWA p 19.78 +0.01 -0.5 CapIBA p 44.50 -0.99 -6.3 CapWGA p 29.96 -1.02 -11.7 EupacA p 33.54 -1.10 -12.5 FdInvA p 30.65 -1.15 -6.0 GovtA p 14.36 +0.05 +3.9 GwthA p 25.79 -0.96 -5.6 HI TrA p 10.68 -0.11 +3.3 IncoA p 14.87 -0.34 -3.0 IntBdA p 13.38 +0.02 +2.8 ICAA p 24.46 -0.84 -5.3 NEcoA p 20.89 -0.76 -7.1 N PerA p 23.33 -0.82 -9.0 NwWrldA 43.52 -1.46 -7.8 SmCpA p 30.73 -1.29 -2.5 TxExA p 12.20 +0.01 +2.9 WshA p 23.60 -0.81 -3.7 American Funds B: CapIBB t 44.47 -0.99 -6.5 GrwthB t 24.95 -0.93 -5.9 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 24.67 -0.95 -12.6 IntlEqA 24.06 -0.93 -12.7 IntEqII I r 10.16 -0.41 -13.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 17.33 -0.52 -16.1 MidCap 25.00 -1.04 -2.2 MidCapVal 17.52 -0.70 -2.6 Baron Funds: Growth 41.57 -1.69 +0.6 SmallCap 19.32 -0.86 +0.3 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.64 DivMu 14.53 +0.01 TxMgdIntl 12.97 -0.44 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 14.91 -0.56 GlAlA r 17.07 -0.40 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 15.92 -0.38 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 17.16 -0.40 CGM Funds: Focus 25.82 -1.16 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 42.79 -1.13 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 24.05 -1.09 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 24.78 -1.12 AcornIntZ 31.85 -1.08 ValRestr 39.09 -1.90 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.03 -0.30 USCorEq2 9.15 -0.42 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 29.28 -1.13 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 29.60 -1.14 NYVen C 28.25 -1.10 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.44 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 16.52 -0.79 EmMktV 28.04 -1.37 IntSmVa 13.75 -0.45 USLgVa 17.02 -0.82 US Micro 11.14 -0.61 US Small 17.26 -0.93 US SmVa 20.62 -1.24 IntlSmCo 13.24 -0.41 Fixd 10.34 IntVa 14.83 -0.49 Glb5FxInc 11.37 +0.02 2YGlFxd 10.23 +0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 62.27 -1.85

+4.6 +2.1 -15.1 -5.4 -4.6 -4.9 -4.5 -13.2 -3.8 +0.3 +0.4 -7.0 -8.6 -10.8 +0.3 -5.5 -5.4 -5.8 NA -9.3 -10.8 -8.9 +5.5 +4.8 +5.1 -6.9 +0.6 -12.9 +3.5 +0.9 -2.2

Income 13.20 IntlStk 28.40 Stock 91.84 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.89 NatlMunInc 9.74 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 15.94 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.45 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.03 FPACres 24.51 Fairholme 31.06 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.40 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 16.44 StrInA 12.10 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 16.60 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.25 FF2015 10.20 FF2020 12.16 FF2025 10.01 FF2030 11.87 FF2035 9.76 FF2040 6.81 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 10.98 AMgr50 13.65 Balanc 16.20 BlueChGr 36.64 Canada 46.83 CapAp 21.28 CpInc r 8.54 Contra 55.68 DisEq 20.13 DivIntl 24.36 DivGth 23.00 EmrMk 19.88 Eq Inc 37.96 EQII 15.74 Fidel 27.09

+0.01 +3.1 -1.06 -10.8 -3.77 -4.2 -0.67 -4.9 +4.3 -0.67 -4.7 -0.22 -5.3 +1.8 -0.39 -1.2 -1.54 +3.2 -0.20 -5.6 -0.58 -4.5 -0.07 +1.5 -0.59 -4.4 -0.24 -0.20 -0.30 -0.27 -0.35 -0.32 -0.22

-1.4 -1.5 -2.4 -3.0 -3.6 -4.3 -4.3

-0.44 -0.25 -0.38 -1.52 -2.04 -0.88 -0.16 -2.00 -0.84 -0.81 -1.07 -1.01 -1.60 -0.66 -1.14

-4.0 -1.1 -0.5 -3.5 -3.4 -0.7 +1.4 -4.3 -4.2 -13.0 -2.8 -12.1 -2.7 -3.3 -4.3

GNMA 11.71 GovtInc 10.67 GroCo 66.88 GroInc 15.38 HighInc r 8.41 Indepn 19.18 IntBd 10.45 IntmMu 10.26 IntlDisc 26.41 InvGrBd 11.63 InvGB 7.28 LgCapVal 10.79 LatAm 43.25 LevCoStk 22.83 LowP r 32.16 Magelln 61.09 MidCap 23.70 MuniInc 12.67 NwMkt r 15.01 OTC 44.12 100Index 7.59 Ovrsea 26.41 Puritn 15.88 RealE 21.40 StIntMu 10.68 STBF 8.42 SmllCpS r 15.57 StratInc 10.80 StrReRt r 8.50 TotalBd 10.76 USBI 11.34 Value 57.28 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 42.91 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 30.83 500IdxInv 38.02 IntlInxInv 28.84 TotMktInv 30.77 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 38.02 TotMktAd r 30.77 First Eagle: GlblA 39.56

+0.02 +0.04 -2.75 -0.65 -0.10 -0.91 +0.02 +0.01 -0.91 +0.03 +0.02 -0.47 -1.93 -1.12 -1.12 -2.47 -1.26 +0.02 -0.14 -1.92 -0.30 -0.86 -0.40 -1.07 +0.01 +0.01 -0.75 -0.05 -0.10

+4.3 +3.6 -3.0 -4.1 +2.0 -3.7 +4.3 +2.4 -13.0 +4.3 +4.7 -4.0 -16.6 -0.4 +0.7 -4.9 +1.2 +3.3 +2.1 -3.5 -4.3 -14.6 -0.6 +6.5 +1.3 +2.1 -2.3 +1.7 -0.1 +4.2 +0.03 +3.8 -2.74 +0.6 -1.95 +1.1 -1.52 -1.54 -0.85 -1.29

+2.4 -3.2 -13.7 -2.2

-1.54 -3.2 -1.29 -2.2 -0.74 -1.1

OverseasA 19.41 -0.17 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.91 +0.01 FoundAl p 9.63 HYTFA p 10.13 +0.01 IncomA p 1.99 -0.04 USGovA p 6.79 +0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 1.98 -0.04 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.01 -0.04 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 18.61 -0.60 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.67 -0.15 GlBd A p 12.74 -0.29 GrwthA p 15.04 -0.52 WorldA p 12.49 -0.42 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 15.05 -0.51 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.76 -0.29 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 34.97 -1.40 GMO Trust III: Quality 17.89 -0.55 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.96 -0.58 Quality 17.90 -0.55 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 29.04 -1.47 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.91 -0.06 HYMuni 8.57 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.57 +0.01 CapApInst 30.64 -1.11 IntlInv t 46.91 -1.56 Intl r 47.38 -1.58 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.58 -1.14 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 25.47 -1.02 Hartford Fds Y:

-0.3 +3.0 NA +4.7 -1.0 +4.0 +2.0 -1.0 -1.2 -2.4 -13.4 +1.9 -10.5 -10.6 -10.4 +1.7 -5.1 -7.5 -10.6 -7.4 +0.2 +2.5 +6.8 +3.9 -7.1 -13.8 -13.7 -6.8 -7.1

CapAppI 28.53 -1.14 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 34.63 -1.46 Div&Gr 16.85 -0.64 Advisers 17.28 -0.47 TotRetBd 11.02 HussmnStrGr 13.14 +0.12 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.39 -0.50 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 19.51 -0.73 AssetStA p 20.02 -0.75 AssetStrI r 20.17 -0.75 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.40 +0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.40 +0.03 HighYld 7.75 -0.08 IntmTFBd 10.96 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.95 +0.01 USLCCrPls 17.43 -0.68 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 24.78 -0.93 OvrseasT r 39.62 -1.62 PrkMCVal T 19.66 -0.70 Twenty T 56.58 -2.47 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 10.16 -0.41 LSBalanc 11.54 -0.28 LSGrwth 11.06 -0.35 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 19.79 -1.08 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 16.74 -0.81 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 16.97 -0.83 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.95 -0.02 Longleaf Partners: Partners 24.72 -0.73 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.49 -0.16 StrInc C 14.00 -0.17 LSBondR 13.44 -0.16 StrIncA 13.93 -0.17

-6.8 -5.4 -4.0 -1.1 +4.2 +2.8 -4.2 -10.4 -10.1 -10.1 +3.9 +4.0 +2.8 +1.8 +1.6 -4.1 -5.6 -6.8 -0.7 -8.1 -5.7 -1.7 -3.4 -0.2 -7.1 -7.2 +2.7 +2.6 +3.2 +2.6 +3.1 +2.9

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 11.94 -0.08 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.82 -0.43 BdDebA p 7.32 -0.08 ShDurIncA p 4.58 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 12.89 -0.28 ValueA 19.84 -0.75 MFS Funds I: ValueI 19.93 -0.75 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.66 -0.03 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.23 -0.19 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 17.81 -0.72 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.35 TotRtBdI 10.34 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 11.53 -0.32 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 25.88 -0.75 GlbDiscZ 26.20 -0.76 QuestZ 16.72 -0.48 SharesZ 18.76 -0.61 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 37.63 -1.57 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 39.06 -1.64 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.11 -0.68 Intl I r 15.85 -0.52 Oakmark r 36.78 -1.34 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.15 -0.14 GlbSMdCap 12.31 -0.44 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 36.43 -1.31 DvMktA p 26.36 -1.16 GlobA p 49.52 -1.79 IntBdA p 6.13 -0.03 MnStFdA 26.70 -1.09 RisingDivA 13.26 -0.46

+4.0 -3.7 +1.9 +2.6 -1.0 -4.2 -4.1 +2.7 -11.0 -7.4 +6.5 +6.5 -11.4 -3.1 -3.1 -3.0 -2.2 -0.3 -0.5 -1.7 -5.9 -0.7 +1.1 -3.6 -8.8 -8.3 -6.6 -2.7 -5.1 -4.7

S&MdCpVl 26.03 -1.15 StrInA p 4.02 -0.03 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.04 -0.42 S&MdCpVl 22.44 -0.99 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.00 -0.42 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.26 -0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 26.09 -1.14 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.14 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.82 -0.07 ComodRR 7.35 -0.09 HiYld 8.81 -0.08 InvGrCp 11.21 -0.01 LowDu 10.44 -0.01 RealRet 11.51 -0.01 RealRtnI 11.09 -0.03 ShortT 9.86 -0.01 TotRt 11.14 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.09 -0.03 TotRtA 11.14 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.14 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.14 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.14 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 39.32 -0.56 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 34.14 -1.34 Price Funds: BlChip 31.19 -1.25 CapApp 18.22 -0.49 EmMktS 26.62 -1.32 EqInc 20.66 -0.81 EqIndex 28.93 -1.17 Growth 26.06 -1.05 HlthSci 25.37 -1.08 HiYield 6.40 -0.07

-2.1 +4.4 -5.0 -2.3 -5.0 +5.7 -8.2 +4.2 +3.8 -9.0 +3.3 +4.8 +2.2 +5.8 +3.7 +0.8 +4.3 +3.6 +4.2 +3.9 +4.2 +4.3 +1.7 -4.2 -4.8 +0.3 -11.5 -1.2 -3.3 -5.3 -3.1 +2.6

IntlBond 9.35 IntlStk 11.20 MidCap 48.27 MCapVal 20.67 N Asia 15.08 New Era 38.24 N Horiz 26.42 N Inc 9.50 R2010 13.79 R2015 10.48 R2020 14.25 R2025 10.30 R2030 14.61 R2040 14.57 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 28.04 SmCapVal 30.53 SpecIn 11.84 Value 20.01 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.51 VoyA p 19.21 RiverSource A: DEI 8.38 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.55 PremierI r 16.52 TotRetI r 10.97 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 32.05 S&P Sel 16.80 Scout Funds: Intl 25.86 Selected Funds: AmShD 35.33 AmShS p 35.32 Sequoia 114.21 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.75 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 41.11 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 22.44 IntValue I 22.94 Tweedy Browne:

+0.08 -0.42 -2.04 -0.82 -0.67 -1.98 -1.19 +0.01 -0.31 -0.27 -0.42 -0.33 -0.51 -0.55 -1.36 -1.45 -0.07 -0.87

-4.3 -11.1 +1.6 -0.2 -6.6 -12.4 +3.3 +4.0 -1.1 -1.8 -2.4 -2.9 -3.4 -3.8 +1.7 +4.1 +3.6 +1.9 -2.3

-0.47 -3.8 -0.86 -2.6 -0.34 -4.5 -0.45 +1.1 -0.68 +1.3 -0.44 +1.8 -1.31 -2.8 -0.67 -3.1 -0.86 -11.3 -1.37 -5.2 -1.37 -5.3 -3.14 +3.9 -0.45 -13.2 -2.05 -11.2 -0.59 -9.5 -0.59 -9.4

GblValue 20.60 -0.35 VALIC : StkIdx 21.56 -0.87 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 13.28 -0.51 EqIncA p 7.61 -0.22 GrInA p 16.54 -0.68 HYMuA p 9.37 +0.01 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.02 +0.02 CpOpAdl 65.66 -2.59 EMAdmr r 30.20 -1.46 Energy 98.77 -4.53 500Adml 98.99 -4.00 GNMA Ad 10.90 +0.02 HlthCr 47.01 -1.26 HiYldCp 5.41 -0.05 InfProAd 25.27 -0.01 ITsryAdml 11.46 +0.08 IntGrAdm 47.69 -1.85 ITAdml 13.59 +0.01 ITGrAdm 9.94 +0.02 LtdTrAd 11.06 LTGrAdml 9.31 +0.06 LT Adml 11.09 +0.01 MuHYAdm 10.47 PrmCap r 57.77 -2.19 STsyAdml 10.80 +0.01 ShtTrAd 15.92 STIGrAd 10.73 TtlBAdml 10.62 +0.03 TStkAdm 26.70 -1.12 WellslAdm 49.65 -0.55 WelltnAdm 48.66 -1.12 Windsor 38.66 -1.69 WdsrIIAd 40.16 -1.60 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 21.64 -0.49 CapOpp 28.42 -1.12 DivdGro 12.68 -0.45 Energy 52.60 -2.41 EqInc 17.70 -0.66 Explr 57.84 -2.61 GNMA 10.90 +0.02

-2.8 -3.3 -3.5 -1.8 -3.9 +5.0 +3.3 -5.4 -11.3 -11.9 -3.2 +4.2 -6.4 +1.9 +3.1 +5.0 -11.8 +2.4 +5.7 +1.1 +6.8 +2.7 +3.5 -6.3 +1.8 +0.6 +2.7 +4.1 -2.3 +1.6 -1.7 -3.8 -4.4 +0.5 -5.4 -3.7 -11.9 -2.3 +0.9 +4.1

GlobEq 14.64 GroInc 22.71 HYCorp 5.41 HlthCre 111.39 InflaPro 12.86 IntlGr 14.99 IntlVal 26.15 ITIGrade 9.94 LifeCon 15.18 LifeGro 19.05 LifeMod 17.56 LTIGrade 9.31 Morg 14.72 MuInt 13.59 MuLtd 11.06 MuShrt 15.92 PrecMtls r 17.88 PrmcpCor 11.57 Prmcp r 55.67 SelValu r 16.11 STAR 17.18 STIGrade 10.73 StratEq 15.22 TgRe2010 20.46 TgtRe2025 11.05 TgtRe2015 11.20 TgRe2020 19.62 TgRe2030 18.73 TgtRe2035 11.20 TgtRe2040 18.35 TgtRe2045 11.58 USGro 15.26 Wellsly 20.49 Welltn 28.17 Wndsr 11.46 WndsII 22.62 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 98.97 Balanced 19.31 DevMkt 8.26 EMkt 22.96 Europe 21.43 Extend 33.26 Growth 26.14

-0.55 -0.91 -0.05 -2.99 -0.01 -0.58 -0.91 +0.02 -0.22 -0.60 -0.39 +0.06 -0.57 +0.01

-0.72 -0.39 -0.33 -0.25 -0.51 -0.61 -0.40 -0.65 -0.42 -0.64 -0.23 -0.65 -0.49 -0.90

-6.6 -2.9 +1.9 -6.4 +3.0 -11.8 -14.6 +5.6 +0.9 -2.6 -0.7 +6.7 -3.6 +2.3 +1.1 +0.5 -12.5 -4.5 -6.3 +1.0 -2.1 +2.7 -0.4 -0.3 -2.4 -1.0 -1.7 -3.0 -3.6 -3.7 -3.7 -7.3 +1.5 -1.7 -3.8 -4.5

-4.01 -0.44 -0.25 -1.10 -0.69 -1.65 -1.04

-3.2 +0.3 -13.3 -11.4 -17.4 +1.8 -4.1

-1.01 -0.45 -2.10 -0.64 -0.39

ITBnd 11.13 +0.06 MidCap 16.40 -0.75 Pacific 9.13 -0.26 REIT r 15.52 -0.81 SmCap 28.34 -1.46 SmlCpGth 17.20 -0.85 SmlCpVl 13.58 -0.73 STBnd 10.56 +0.02 TotBnd 10.62 +0.03 TotlIntl 12.54 -0.44 TotStk 26.69 -1.12 Value 18.11 -0.77 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 19.32 -0.44 DevMkInst 8.19 -0.26 ExtIn 33.29 -1.65 GrwthIst 26.15 -1.03 InfProInst 10.29 -0.01 InstIdx 98.33 -3.98 InsPl 98.33 -3.98 InsTStPlus 24.13 -1.01 MidCpIst 16.45 -0.76 SCInst 28.38 -1.45 TBIst 10.62 +0.03 TSInst 26.70 -1.12 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 81.77 -3.31 STBdIdx 10.56 +0.02 TotBdSgl 10.62 +0.03 TotStkSgl 25.77 -1.08 Victory Funds: DvsStA 13.24 -0.50 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.63 -0.03

+5.5 +0.3 -5.7 +5.3 +3.1 +2.2 +4.0 +2.3 +4.0 -13.0 -2.4 -2.3 +0.4 NS +1.9 -4.0 +3.1 -3.2 -3.2 -2.3 +0.3 +3.2 +4.1 -2.4 -3.2 +2.3 +4.1 -2.4 -5.2 +0.4 +6.9


B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-6177822, e-mail business@bendbulletin .com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com.

BUSINESS CALENDAR

D I SPATC H E S

coaches Joan Dudley and Michelle Barry Franco will debut a new audio program and a self-study guide; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541647-1363.

Kelly Walker and Curtis Hagner, of Bend, have teamed with Tonia Meyer, of Denver, to create Incyte Marketing, with offices in Bend and Denver. The full-service ad agency integrates traditional marketing, such as print, radio and TV, with cutting-edge “on-demand” strategies like mobile and e-mail marketing, search engine optimization and social media. Walker has worked in Central Oregon advertising, marketing and branding for the past decade, spearheading branding, marketing and advertising campaigns for numerous corporate and nonprofit organizations. Hagner has high-level domestic and international experience working with corporate clients such as Sony, Intel and IBM. Meyer has 15 years of corporate and nonprofit experience in areas of organizational leadership, including marketing, product development, management and operations. For more information, contact Walker at Incyte at 541-419-9976, or Kelly@incyte marketing.com. Standard Paint and Abbey Carpet in Bend has announced the opening of its new location on the corner of Third Street and Greenwood Avenue. Previously known as Bend Color Center, Standard Paint and Abbey Carpet specializes in paint and floor coverings. Product selections include Benjamin Moore and Coronado Paints, and carpet, tile, hardwood, laminate and vinyl flooring from major manufacturers. The store also is the local Parex Stucco distributor. Standard Paint and Abbey Carpet is open 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Beaver Coach Sales and Service has added three new diesel motorcoach lines: Holiday Rambler by Monaco RV, Itasca by Winnebago, and Forest River, a Berkshire-Hathaway Co. The dealership also has been designated a factory-authorized service and repair facility for Monaco, Winnebago, Itasca, Holiday Rambler, Forest River and Newmar. For more information, contact Beaver Coach sales at 800-382-2597 or service at 800-843-2967, or visit www .beavercoachsales.com. Karnopp Petersen and Central Oregon Independent Practice Association have partnered to offer specialized legal services for COIPA members. The new partnership fulfills COIPA’s goal of serving its membership, which is composed of approximately 600 health care providers in Central Oregon and the Columbia Gorge, by giving members access to Karnopp Petersen’s legal services. In addition to providing counsel and legal services to COIPA’s members, Karnopp Petersen will conduct educational seminars throughout the year on subjects of interest to the physician community. To learn more, visit www.karnopp .com. and www.coipa.org.

TODAY “REFINE YOUR RESOURCES”: Learn about the viability of benefit auctions as a fundraising tool, and how to make donation and sponsorship requests to media, corporations, restaurants and retailers. RSVP required; free; 811:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-480-8700. “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. “PAIN MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE”: This course is geared toward health care professionals who are required to complete pain management education through Senate Bill 885. Preregistration required; $119, includes lunch; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit .cocc.edu. CREATING A BUDGET SPREADSHEET WITH EXCEL: Learn to create, edit and save a budget spreadsheet. Prerequisites: “Getting Started with Computer Software” or familiarity with Microsoft Office programs. Registration is required; free; 910:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121055. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. “INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS”: Learn the basics of small website building, uploading images, writing for the web and blogging using WordPress; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www .alpineinternet.com/locals. “THE FRESH WEB”: A short review of Web news intended to help Web authors and managers understand the ever-changing Web environment; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www .alpineinternet.com/locals. “CENTER STAGE REVIEW”: Learn to manage a website using Alpine Internet Solution’s Content Management System, which is designed to simplify engine optimization; free; 12:15-1 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www .alpineinternet.com/locals.

SATURDAY “DERIVED SYSTEMS”: Continuing education for licensed electricians to learn about separately divided systems and the specific code sections related to the installation of these systems. Preregistration required; $75, continuing education units available; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “BEGINNING EXCEL 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining .com.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4-9 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. “LAUNCHING SOUL”: Business

TUESDAY “SPRING TUNEUP”: Learn to use Craigslist and other media to attract the best tenants. Sponsored by Central Oregon Rental Owners Association; 5:30-8 p.m.; includes a light supper. For more information, call Becky Ozrelic, Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-693-2020. ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNET SEARCHING: Perform an advanced search using terms, filters and specific phrases. Learn to evaluate websites and information. Registration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. “BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM”: CPAs from Jones & Roth will explain five basic financial statements; $25 for chamber members, $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541382-7437. “BOOKKEEPING FOR PROFESSIONALS”: Develop basic bookkeeping and accounting skills. Preregistration required; $239, continuing education units available; Tuesdays and Thursdays through July 15 from 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “INTERMEDIATE PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS”: Go beyond the basics to perfect photos with sophisticated editing options. Enhance photos using special layer effects and filters to create what you imagine. Registration required; $59; class continues June 1, 6 -9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pioneer Building, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. “MAXIMIZE YOUR MONEY”: Learn tips on how to use credit cards to your advantage. Call to reserve a seat; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 305 N.E. Hickey Farms Road, Prineville; 541-382-1795 or www.midoregon .com. “TAKE CHARGE, WISE USE OF CREDIT CARDS”: Learn the benefits and costs of credit cards, how to build a good credit history, the warning signs of having too much debt, how to avoid credit card fraud, and how to get and read your credit report and credit score. Light refreshments will be served. Call to reserve a space; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 305 N.E. Hickey Farms Road, Prineville; 541-382-1795.

WEDNESDAY “BOARD FUNDRAISING — STORIES FROM THE FIELD”: Training series for leaders of local nonprofits. Sponsored by Nonprofit Network of Central Oregon, Bank of the Cascades and TACS; $25 or $125 for the series of eight sessions; 8-10 a.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; www.tacs.org. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: RSVP by May 25. As a special offer, any Bend chamber member may join Crosswater Club through June 30 with no initiation fee. www.crosswater.com; free; 5-7 p.m.; Crosswater Golf Course, 17600 Canoe Camp Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Preregistration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW”: Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty Bend hosts a live Internet show to discuss his “How to Sell Your Home in One Week” program. Visit the website and click on the show icons; free; 7 p.m.; www.ExitRealtyBend.com.

LAND MOWING FIRE SUPPRESSION

THURSDAY “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Maureen Quinn of Central Oregon Community College’s Business Development Center will present information about starting your own business. Light refreshments will be served. Call to reserve a seat; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-3821795 or www.midoregon.com. “INTERMEDIATE EXCEL 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 6-9 p.m., and class continues June 3 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY May 28 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. WORKING WITH EXCEL SPREADSHEETS: Expand your understanding of Excel and spreadsheets. Prerequisites: “Creating a Budget Spreadsheet with Excel” or familiarity with Microsoft Office systems and Microsoft Excel. Registration required; free; 910:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121055.

TUESDAY June 1 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. “ADVANCED TROUBLESHOOTING FOR MAC”: Learn to diagnose userspecific versus systemwide issues, how to resolve startup and Internet connectivity issues, nonresponsive applications and more. Class continues June 8; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Sky View Middle School, 62555 18th St., Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 2 HOME ENERGY ANALYST TRAINING: Three-day envelope training for building professionals. Registration required by May 19; $549; June 2-4 from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY June 3 “MANAGING CUSTOMER SERVICE”: Learn about behaviors that create good customer service and find ways to promote and maintain high company standards; $80; 8 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

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Inside

OREGON Incumbent Susan Castillo hangs on in schools race, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Hank Jones, versatile jazz pianist, dies at 91, see Page C4.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010

Merkley’s financial reform idea out Amendment would have banned banks from investing their own funds in most risky products By Keith Chu The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Paul Reynolds, left, is congratulated by Ron Henderson after being named 2010 Bend Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year on Thursday evening at The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center in Bend. Reynolds is the former owner of Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home.

WASHINGTON — The maneuvering of U.S. senators debating a financial regulations overhaul rivaled Wall Street financial products in obscurity and complexity this week, as Oregon’s senators saw firsthand. U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., saw his prized amendment fail without a vote on Thursday, after two days of back-and-forth strategizing that showed a mastery of Senate rules is

just as important as political support when it comes to passing legislation. “I must say I can’t believe the Senate is afraid to have a debate on fundamental financial reforms,” Merkley said in a floor speech, just after learning that his amendment would fail. Merkley and U.S. Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., proposed banning banks from investing their own funds in most risky products, including stocks and more complicated financial instruments. It also would have

outlawed financial companies from betting against investments they market. That practice caused the Securities and Exchange Commission to sue Goldman Sachs last month. For most of the past two weeks, the debate over financial regulatory reform had been civil, especially compared to the scorched-earth conflict over health care reform. The financial bill passed on Thursday evening, 59-39. But Merkley’s amendment, which proposed much more stringent rules on how banks could use their money, became the focal point of a battle of arcane procedures. The first shot came Tuesday after-

noon, when U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., announced that another Republican had objected to a vote on Merkley’s amendment, essentially filibustering it. “I believe my colleagues who planned to vote no maybe didn’t want to vote,” Merkley said, talking to reporters in the U.S. Capitol. Large banks and, at one point, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, opposed the rule. Banking lobby groups, including the Financial Services Roundtable, said the rule would restrict healthy banks from making money, without strengthening the financial system. See Financial / C5

Reaching out for spring

Paul Reynolds is chamber’s citizen of year By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

Former Bend Mayor Paul Reynolds, 74, was honored Thursday night as the 2010 Bend Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year. “Even though we’ve retired and lived at Lake Tahoe most of the time, I always say that Bend is home,” he said at the chamber’s award ceremony at The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center in Bend. Reynolds grew up in Bend, married his high school sweetheart, Ann, in 1953, and raised his three sons here. In addition to serving as mayor from 1964 to 1965, Reynolds has served on Bend’s City Council, the Oregon Judicial Council and as a member of the Bend Planning Commission, among other appointments. Reynolds moved to Bend with his mother, Ida, when he was only 21 months old. Ida Reynolds grew up in Bend as Ida Niswonger. She married Floyd Reynolds in Bend in 1922 and attended Willamette University with him. After her husband’s death in 1937, Ida returned to Bend with her young son, where they lived with her father, Charles P. Niswonger, who owned the Niswonger Funeral Home. In 1960, Paul Reynolds purchased a portion of the interest in his grandfather’s business, which was then renamed the Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home. Reynolds and his wife operated the funeral home until selling it in 1996 when they retired to North Lake Tahoe. The funeral home is still in operation and today is owned by Jerome and Dawna Daniel. See Citizen / C5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A

tree’s blossoming flowers extend toward the afternoon sun as pedestrians pass by Thursday at Drake Park in Bend. Weather on Thursday ranged from snow to rain to sunshine, and chilly weather is forecast for today.

Senior housing Manhunt in Warm Springs seeks Personnel project may get changes will suspects who opened fire on police help from Sisters save $240,000 REDMOND SCHOOLS

Bulletin staff report

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

SISTERS — A Bend-based company is working to bring affordable housing for senior citizens to Sisters. The company behind the project, Pacific Crest Affordable Housing, is a for-profit company that builds housing with reduced rents. It has several projects in Central Oregon, including in La Pine and Bend. The proposed 26-unit building would be the company’s first in Sisters and be located in McKenzie Meadows, 30 acres of land near Sisters High School. The property’s owners are donating 3 acres of the 30-acre parcel to the affordable housing project. On the remainder of the property, several projects are planned, including an assisted-living facility and other independent housing for seniors. The project is in the preliminary stage. The developers have not filed any site plans or building permit applications. During a meeting Thursday morning, city staff outlined more than a dozen issues that must still be resolved. The more local support the project receives, the better chance it has of receiving state funding. That support can come in several forms, including tax breaks, money, labor and property. The developer is hoping to get 10 percent of the more than $4 million of the project’s value. Though city councilors did not vote on the project and probably won’t until summer, some expressed support for the idea. “We’re doing everything we can to make this project feasible for the benefit of our community,” Councilor Pat Thompson said. On Thursday, the council discussed several ways it could contribute to the project. The McKenzie Meadow property owners, MMV LLC, will donate the land, which could be worth around $300,000, according to a Sisters staff report. See Seniors / C5

for district Bulletin staff report Several changes to Redmond School District’s administration for the 2010-11 school year will help save the district a total of $240,000, according to a news release Wednesday. Several changes will occur in principal administration at various schools, as well as several changes in administrative positions at the district office. At Redmond High School, Brian Lemos has been named principal. Currently the principal at Lynch Elementary, Lemos will replace Jon Bullock who will become director of strategic planning for the district. Desiree Margo, currently assistant director of student services, will become principal at Lynch Elementary. At Terrebonne Community School, Tom Yahraes has been named principal. Formerly the assistant principal at the school, Yahraes will replace Mike McIntosh, who will take the position of director of operations with the district. Sandra Harris will take over as principal at Obsidian Middle School. Currently the assistant principal at Obsidian, Harris will replace Shay Mikalson, who will become the district’s interim superintendent. At the district office, the positions of assistant superintendent and assistant director of student services will be cut, saving the district approximately $240,000. All changes to district personnel will become effective July 1.

Law enforcement officials from eight police agencies searched the Warm Springs Reservation near the KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on Thursday for two men they believe fired shots at police officers in two earlymorning incidents. Late ThursThe FBI is day, police seeking Wayidentif ied lon McKie a person of Weaselhead, interest in 21, as a the case. person of Around interest. 12:40 a.m., the driver of a vehicle that was stopped by a Madras Police officer near Sixth Street sped away, and suspects in the vehicle fired several shots at police officers, according to a news release from Oregon State Police. A Warm Springs police officer tried to stop a white Ford Explorer — which officials now believe to be the same vehicle involved in the Madras stop — around 7 a.m. on state Highway 3 in Warm Springs. When the officer turned on his lights, the Explorer sped away, and some-

Submitted photo

The Warm Springs police officer driving this vehicle was uninjured when a yet-unidentified suspect fired several shots at his vehicle during a traffic stop on state Highway 3. one in the vehicle fired several shots at the patrol car. One of the shots went through the car’s front windshield, but the officer was not wounded, the release said. The officer followed the vehicle on Highway 3 and onto state Highway 8, where it turned onto Charley Canyon Road. The Explorer continued for several miles until it had to stop because of rough road conditions, and two suspects took off on foot. One suspect was carrying a rifle and again fired sev-

eral shots at police. One Warm Springs police officer returned fire. The two suspects — one wearing black shorts and a green shirt and the other wearing black pants and a black shirt — escaped from the scene into an area police describe as rugged, with deep ravines. Officials set up a perimeter around the area Thursday and were searching for the suspects in vehicles, in the air and with the help of police dogs. See Manhunt / C5


C2 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Bend Memorial Clinic in Redmond relocates Bend Memorial Clinic will hold a grand opening on Saturday to mark its move to a new location in Redmond. The new clinic, at 865 S.W. Veterans Way, replaces a smaller office on Canal Boulevard. The grand opening is between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and will offer food, live entertainment and activities for all ages. New specialty services offered by the expanded clinic include allergy, gynecology, nutrition, rheumatology and travel medicine. A pediatrics practice is scheduled to open in the fall.

Commencement for OSU-Cascades Campus The 2010 commencement ceremony for Oregon State University-Cascades Campus will take place June 12 at 2 p.m. in Drake

Park, according to a news release. The keynote address will be delivered by James Lussier, a former CEO of Cascade Healthcare Community for 15 years and a consultant for international hospitals and health care systems. Lussier has also served as president of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education. The commencement ceremony will celebrate the graduation of 259 students from OSU-Cascades. More than 1,000 people are expected to attend the ceremony.

Bend man arrested in rape of relative A Bend man was arrested this week on suspicion of more than 200 counts of rape and coercion following a four-month investigation by the Bend Police Department. Detectives believe Donald E. Smith, 35, repeatedly threatened

a female relative and forced her to have sexual contact with him, according to a news release from the department. From February to September 2009, Smith allegedly threatened that a person close to the victim would be killed if she didn’t comply with his demands. Smith was lodged in the Deschutes County jail on $500,000 bail. He remained in custody on Thursday, according to jail records.

Mountain View Hospital food drive a success Staff at Mountain View Hospital in Madras announced Thursday they have collected 893 pounds of food for the Jefferson County Food Bank. The food was collected during the week of May 10 to mark National Hospital Week and topped donations collected in 2009 by nearly 400 pounds.

Charles Lindbergh lands his plane, Spirit of St. Louis, in Paris in 1927 The Associated Press Today is Friday, May 21, the 141st day of 2010. There are 224 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 21, 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed his Spirit of St. Louis near Paris, completing the first solo airplane flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 33½ hours.

seven years and eight months in prison; he ended up serving five years and committed suicide in 1985.) In 1980, Ensign Jean Marie Butler became the first woman to graduate from a U.S. service academy as she accepted her degree and commission from the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. TEN YEARS AGO Nineteen people were killed when a charter plane crashed in the Pocono Mountains in Pennsylvania. “Dancer in the Dark� won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival; the Grand Prize went to “Devils on the Doorstep.� Death claimed actor Sir John Gielgud at age 96 and author Dame Barbara Cartland at age 98. FIVE YEARS AGO Afleet Alex regained his footing and his drive after being cut off by Scrappy T in a frightening collision and breezed home to win the Preakness Stakes; Kentucky Derby winner Giacomo finished third. The Belgian film “The Child� won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Comedic actor Howard Morris died in Hollywood at age 85. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama made his case for closing the Guantanamo prison camp, de-

nouncing what he called “fearmongering� by political opponents; Obama made his case moments before former Vice President Dick Cheney delivered his own address defending the Bush administration’s creation of the facility. Former Pfc. Steven Dale Green, convicted of raping a 14-year-old Iraqi girl and killing her and her family, was spared the death penalty after jurors in Paducah, Ky., couldn’t agree unanimously on a punishment. A 66-year-old woman with terminal cancer became the first person to die under Washington state’s new assisted suicide law. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Rhythm-and-blues singer Ron Isley (The Isley Brothers) is 69. Rock musician Hilton Valentine (The Animals) is 67. Actor Richard Hatch (“Battlestar Galactica�) is 65. Musician Bill Champlin is 63. Singer Leo Sayer is 62. Actress Carol Potter is 62. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) is 59. Actor Mr. T is 58. Actor Judge Reinhold is 53. Actor-director Nick Cassavetes is 51. Actress Lisa Edelstein is 42. Actress Fairuza Balk is 36. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Ideals are like stars; you will not succeed in touching them with your hands. But like the seafaring man on the desert of waters, you choose them as your guides, and following them you will reach your destiny.� — Carl Schurz, American politician (1829-1906)

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:48 a.m. May 18, in the 2200 block of Northeast Daggett Lane. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:12 p.m. May 18, in the 500 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 3:41 p.m. May 18, in the 1000 block of Southeast Fourth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:02 p.m. May 18, in the 1400 block of Northwest College Way. Burglary — Snowboards and helmets were reported stolen at 6:39 a.m. May 19, in the 300 block of Northwest Delaware Avenue. Redmond Police Department

DUII — John Lewis Weyland III, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:03 p.m. May 19, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and East Antler Avenue in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:05 p.m. May 19, in the 3300 block of Southwest 33rd Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:39 a.m. May 19, in the 2000 block of Southwest 27th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 1:53 p.m. May 19, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:12 a.m. May 19, in the 1300 block of Southwest Canal Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:23 a.m. May 19, in the 2100 block of Southwest 28th Street.

PETS

DUII — Thomas Joseph Pedersen, 61, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:08 p.m. May 19, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 145. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:34 p.m. May 19, in the area of Southeast 15th Street and Southeast Reed Market Road in Bend. Theft — Hand guns were reported stolen from a vehicle at 7:05 a.m. May 19, in the 16500 block of Reed Road in La Pine. DUII — Jordan Marie Lebeda, 18, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:45 a.m. May 19, in the area of Southwest 39th Street and Southwest Canal Boulevard in Redmond. DUII — Kyle Timothy Winger, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:22 a.m. May 19, in the area of Northeast Sixth Street and Northeast Franklin Avenue in Bend.

The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www.humane societyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the Website at www .redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic medium-haired cat — Adult male, flame point; found near Terrebonne. Greyhound — Adult male, tan, leather collar; found near Northwest Canyon Drive.

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ON THIS DATE In 1542, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto died while searching for gold along the Mississippi River. In 1832, the first Democratic National Convention got under way, in Baltimore. In 1881, Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross. In 1910, a year-old Jewish settlement near the port city of Jaffa adopted the name Tel Aviv (Hebrew for “Hill of Spring�). In 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean as she landed in Northern Ireland, about 15 hours after leaving Newfoundland. In 1956, the United States exploded the first airborne hydrogen bomb over Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. In 1979, former San Francisco City Supervisor Dan White was convicted of voluntary manslaughter in the slayings of Mayor George Moscone and openly gay Supervisor Harvey Milk; outrage over the verdict sparked rioting. (White was sentenced to

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 C3

O MAN ARRESTED AFTER STANDOFF ON COAST

Incumbent Susan Castillo hangs on in schools race By Tim Fought

Maurer said the ballots counted late Tuesday and Wednesday produced “a huge swing” in his favor that hadn’t seemed possible. “I’m a pragmatist,” he said Thursday. “Let’s just see where the voters are, and we’ll go from there.” The schools office is officially nonpartisan, like those of judges, but in practice it’s treated as if it were partisan. Under Oregon law, a candidate must get a majority, not just a plurality, to win a nonpartisan race in a primary election. If there are more than two candidates in the race, for example, or if there are only two candidates and a lot of write-in votes, it’s mathematically possible that no candidate gets a majority — forcing a general election runoff. In the Castillo-Maurer race, there are more than 2,000 write-in ballots. Elections officials said the number of ballots yet to be counted is not especially large this year. But such ballots gain outside attention only when the counting on election night doesn’t produce decisive margins. It’s likely some of the 19,000 untallied ballots don’t have votes for the office Castillo has held for eight years. Of the statewide total of 821,245 ballots tallied so far, about 84 percent contained votes for the office. Hamilton and Multnomah County Elections Director Tim

The Associated Press

Lou Sennick / The (Coos Bay) World)

Police and sheriff’s deputies move into the front yard of a home in the coastal town of North Bend on Wednesday after a gunman surrendered. Officers responded to the scene Wednesday after receiving a report of a suspect with a gun and a possible hostage. Fifteen officers surrounded the home before a woman

came out and said her boyfriend had been using some sort of drug and had been acting bizarrely. Police arrested Steven Tellei, 28, of North Bend, after a two-hour standoff in which they repeatedly asked him to put down a rifle he held beneath his chin. He has been charged with assault and kidnapping.

O  B Report: Oregon facing a decade of deficits SALEM — A task force appointed by Gov. Ted Kulongoski has released a report saying the state will confront a decade of multibillion-dollar deficits unless lawmakers control state spending. The report analyzes spending growth and economic activity in Oregon for the next decade. It says even an economic turnaround won’t substantially brighten the dark outlook. Kulongoski formed the task force last September to advise him about the state’s budget vulnerabilities and long-term effects from the national economic downturn. In a statement, the governor said the magnitude of the budget problem must be understood by the public and decision-makers alike, and there isn’t just one solution.

Cottage Grove man found dead at rest stop KLAMATH FALLS — The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office

says an Oregon man died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at a Northern California rest stop. Radio station KFLS of Klamath Falls reports a California Highway Patrol officer discovered the body of 63-year-old Revatinatha Dasa on Wednesday after the Cottage Grove man’s unoccupied rental car was found off Highway 96 north of Yreka. The car was unlocked and contained personal items and prescription medications.

Report: OK to play in Portland Harbor PORTLAND — A report that looked at hundreds of samples from the Willamette River says the Portland Harbor is safe for swimming and boating, but people shouldn’t eat certain fish. The harbor was designated a federal Superfund site in 2000 because of heavy industrial pollution. Oregon Public Health says the fish to avoid eating included bass, carp and catfish — but not salmon, steelhead or lamprey.

The main chemicals found in the harbor that accumulate in fish are polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Health officials on Thursday also warned that people should avoid drinking river water because of possible bacterial infection.

Lake Oswego police chief dies at 55 LAKE OSWEGO — Lake Oswego Police Chief Dan Duncan has died from an apparent heart attack. The Oregonian newspaper reports the 55-year-old Duncan was found dead at his home Thursday morning — the day before his retirement party. Duncan had been with the department for 25 years and was chief for the last seven. City Manager Alex McIntyre says Duncan was admired for his integrity, honesty, vitality and humor, and his passing is “truly a community loss.” McIntyre named Capt. Don Forman the interim chief. — From wire reports

PORTLAND — The candidates for Oregon’s top education post thought the race was over on election night. Instead, it’s turned into a cliffhanger. Democrat Susan Castillo had a thin lead Thursday as elections officials throughout the state worked to count ballots such as those Oregonians had mismarked, doodled on or dropped into puddles. The secretary of state’s office said that as of midday Thursday, Castillo had 50.1 percent of the vote and a 3,436-vote lead over Republican state Rep. Ron Maurer, of Grants Pass. But 17,000 ballots statewide remained to be tallied, said Don Hamilton, spokesman for the secretary of state’s office. So there’s still a chance Maurer could surpass Castillo or, more likely, that the two might go into a runoff election in the fall. On election night, Maurer’s camp sent out a concession statement on Facebook, and Castillo gave interviews on the assumption she’d won, her campaign spokeswoman said. Both said Thursday they’re now waiting for county clerks to mop up the final ballots; they have to do so by June 7. “Just like many others around Oregon, I am waiting for the final ballots cast to be counted,” Castillo said in a statement. Spokeswoman Jayme Rabenberg said Castillo was in meetings Thursday afternoon and unavailable for comment.

Scott described four kinds of ballots yet to be counted: • Travelers’ ballots. Voters are allowed to drop off their ballots outside their home counties. Those have to be mailed to the home counties for tallying. • Contested ballots. When elections officials determine the ballot signature doesn’t match the voter’s registration card, they call the voter, who has until 10 days after the election to sign a new card. • Unscannable ballots. These are the printouts and faxes from overseas travelers, members of the military and people with disabilities. Duplicates are prepared for scanning. • Confusing ballots. Scanning machines can get puzzled when voters change their minds and erase votes, fill in an oval too lightly or pencil in a political rant along the margins. Or ballots won’t go through the scanners, as when Oregon’s signature weather causes problems for the state’s signature allmail voting system. “Water has a pretty seriously bad effect on the ballots,” Scott said. Ballots can be fixed by, for example, darkening an oval or using a white sticker to cover extraneous marks, Scott said. Or a new ballot can be filled out for scanning and tallying.

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C4 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O D N   Dale Spencer, of Bend (formerly of Madras) May 27, 1933 - May 18, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592 www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Services are pending.

Frances Holly Brookshire, of Bend Nov. 3, 1919 - May 18, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A Graveside Service will be held at 11:30 a.m., Friday, May 21, 2010 at Pilot Butte Cemetery, Bend. A Celebration of Life Service will be held at 1:00 p.m., Saturday, May 22, 2010 at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 NW 19th St., Redmond. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice or Community Presbyterian Church.

Gloria Tinfrow Jones, of Bend Oct. 29, 1922 - May 14, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No public services are scheduled at this time.

Harley Jene ‘Pappy’ Gates, of Bend Sept. 6, 1922 - May 17, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private celebration of life will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701, www.partnersbend.org

James Paul Diner, of Sunriver Feb. 22, 1945 - May 14, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 Services: Private Family services will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Rolling Dog Ranch Animal Sanctuary, 400 Rolling Dog Ranch Lane, Ovando, Montana 59854.

Jean Anne Dockter, of Crooked River Ranch Oct. 20, 1942 - May 19, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A gathering and release of ashes will be held for family and friends at Crooked River Ranch at a date yet to be determined.

Jessie M. Martin, of Bend May 5, 1916 - May 15, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No public services are scheduled at this time.

Martin Wayne Hall, formerly of Redmond Feb. 12, 1958 - May 11, 2010 Arrangements: Franzen-Davis funeral Home, 118 N. 3rd St., Livingston, Montana. (406) 222-2531. Services: Private services were held.

Mary Lee Roy, of Bend Dec. 28, 1928 - May 17, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No public services are scheduled at this time.

Steven Andrew Arnold Rock, of Redmond Dec. 2, 1983 - May 16, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Celebration of Life 12:30pm Sat. May 22nd at the City Center Four Square Fellowship, 549 SW 8th St., Redmond. Contributions may be made to:

Steven Rock Memorial Fund at any Bank of America location.

Wallace Stanley Bailey, of Sisters May 7, 1935 - May 18, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A private service will be held at a later date.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Frances Holly Brookshire November 3, 1919 - May 17, 2010 Frances Holly Brookshire died on May 17, 2010, in Bend, OR. She was born in Lewisburg, TN, on November 3, 1919 to Eskell & Frances (Ownby) Holly. On May 19, 1946, she married Lester Brookshire. In 1992, they moved to Klamath Frances Falls, OR. Brookshire Frances was a member of Community Presbyterian Church in Redmond, OR, and the Klamath County Dental Auxiliary. She enjoyed reading, word scrambles, and spending time with her family. She was preceded in death by her husband; parents; brother, Bob.

Frances is survived by her daughters, Vicki Kerr of Bend, Michele Steward of Bend; sisters, Tina Caldwell, Gladys Miodragovic both of Nashville, TN; grandchildren, Holly Stumvoll, Sheldon Steward, Landon Steward. A graveside service will be held at 11:30 a.m., Friday, May 21, 2010, at Pilot Butte Cemetery, Bend, OR. A Celebration of Life Service will be held at 1:00 p.m., Saturday, May 22, 2010, at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 NW 19th St., Redmond. If so desired memorials may be directed to Partners In Care Hospice or Community Presbyterian Church. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is honored to serve the family. (541) 382.2471. Please visit and sign the online guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Richard Craig Plows

Gloria Tinfow Jones

March 10, 1945 - May 13, 2010

October 29, 1922 - May 14, 2010

Dick passed away peacefully on May 13, 2010, at the age of 65, after a yearlong battle with cancer. He was born on March 10, 1945, in Des Moines, Iowa. His family moved to Richland, WA, in 1950, where Dick Richard Craig graduated from RichPlows land High School in 1963. Dick worked for JC Penney for 28 years and “retired” in 1997. He truly embraced “retirement” life with Marcia by living on a boat in the San Juan Islands, owning and operating a small boat accessory business, and eventually following his love of the water to being an outstation manager for the Seattle Yacht Club, on Henry Island, in the San Juan’s. Dick’s humor, quick wit, and genuine nature drew people to him. His eye rolls, wise cracks, and crooked smile will be missed by all. Dick married Marcia Bailie in June, of 1972, and together they raised their two daughters, Kelli and Dana. Dick was a loving husband, an amazing father, and the “best Poppie in the world” to his granddaughters, Samantha and Sydney. Dick is survived by his wife, Marcia; daughters, Kelli Bruckert and Dana Munn and Dana’s husband, Rob; and granddaughters, Samantha and Sydney. There are numerous nieces and nephews, including his special niece, Teresa Howe. Dick was preceded in death by his father and mother, Jack and Dorotha Plows; and sister, Reesa Howe. At Dick’s request, there will be a private family service. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to Sunrise Inn (housing during treatments), PO Box 1376, Mt. Vernon, WA 98273; Skagit Hospice, 819 S. 13th St., Mt Vernon, WA 98274; San Juan Eagles or the Soroptimist of Friday Harbor (which provided transportation to treatments), PO Box 611, Friday Harbor, WA 98250. Arrangements are in the care of Evans Funeral Chapel and Crematory, Inc., Anacortes, WA, and the San Juan Islands. To share memories of Dick, please sign the online guest register at www.evanschapel.com.

Gloria T. Jones of Morehead City, formerly of Raleigh, NC, died May 14, 2010, at the age of 87. Gloria served as an Information Specialist at N.C. State University for 11 years, writing news releases for publication in local and national papers. She attended Women's College and UNC Chapel Hill. During WWII, she worked as a reporter for the Raleigh Times, where she started writing the column, "Looking Backward." Following the war, she was a photographic assistant and writer for the State News Bureau in Raleigh, and authored a book on statistics on North Carolina's 100 counties. She also worked as a secretary for the fledgling Institute of Statistics at N.C. State under Gertrude Cox. She retired from NCSU and moved to Atlantic Beach with her husband, Charles B. Jones in 1980. She served as secretary for the Bogue Banks Friends of the Library from 1996-1999. She is survived by her children, Candace Chipman of Santa Fe, NM, Christopher Jones of Plush, OR, Vicki Yurko of Charlotte, NC; grandchildren, Michael Chipman of Oakland, CA, Eden Chipman of Bend, OR, Tyler Jones of New York City, Mackenzie Jones of Bend, OR. No formal services have been scheduled at this time. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is honored to serve the family, 541-382-2471. Please visit and sign the online guest book at

Coke bottler John Lupton created empire By Peter S. Goodman New York Times News Service

John Lupton, who transformed his family bottling business into a big piece of the Coca-Cola soft drink empire and then helped revitalize his native city, Chattanooga, Tenn., died Sunday at his home in Lookout Mountain, Tenn. He was 83. Lupton died after a long illness, said his son, Cartter, of Sullivan’s Island, S.C. The bottling business that secured Lupton a place on the Forbes list of the wealthiest Americans was started by his grandfather and a pair of partners in 1889 — they paid a dollar for the right to bottle CocaCola — and then handed down to his father. What became the JTL Corp. grew over the decades into one of the largest bottling operations in the world, mostly through sales of a single brand: Coca-Cola. After his father died in 1977, Lupton assumed the chairmanship of JTL, leading the company on an aggressive expansion campaign as he acquired bottling plants in Florida, Texas, Colorado and Arizona. When none of his four children showed interest in taking over the family business, Lupton sold it to Coca-Cola in 1986 for about $1.4 billion.

www.niswonger-reynolds.com.

James Burnett led effort to ban drinking by train operators By Emma Brown The Washington Post

James Burnett Jr., a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board who led efforts during the 1980s to prohibit train operators from drinking on the job, died May 15 in Clinton, Ark., from complications related to diabetes. He was 62. Burnett had been a municipal judge in Arkansas and a Republican Party activist when he was appointed to the safety board by President Ronald Reagan in December 1981. The board was known best for investigating airplane crashes, and Burnett — whose previous experience in transit matters was limited to presiding over traffic court — learned how to manage such inquiries right away. Five days after he was confirmed by the Senate as the board’s chairman in January 1982, Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into a bridge over the Potomac River, killing 78 people. “That reinforced my moral courage,” he said later. “I knew that I never wanted to feel I had not done everything I could to prevent that kind of carnage.” The safety board is an advisory group that cannot make regulations of its own; it can only badger other agencies into taking action. When a freight train carrying hazardous chemicals derailed in 1982, the safety board’s investigation revealed that two drunk crew members responsible for operating the locomotive had turned over the controls to a sober clerk who didn’t know how to drive a train. It was not illegal at the time for railroad crew members to take a nip of whiskey while working. Burnett mounted a campaign to ban alcohol and drug use by crew members. Burnett’s efforts resulted in a requirement that all transportation workers undergo testing for drugs and alcohol.

New York Times News Service file photos

One of the most respected jazz pianists of the postwar era, Hank Jones plays the piano on June 27, 1989. Jones, 91, died Sunday in New York.

Hank Jones, versatile jazz piano virtuoso as a great accompanist. He had such command of all the asHank Jones, a jazz piano vir- pects of jazz piano. He was just tuoso who had a remarkably remarkable until the very end.” prolific career over eight deHenry William Jones Jr. was cades and accompanied a range born July 31, 1918, in Vicksof performers, including Char- burg, Miss., and grew up in the lie Parker, Marilyn Monroe and Detroit suburb of Pontiac, Mich. Captain Kangaroo, died May 16 His father, a Baptist deacon at a care facility in the with 10 children, had Bronx, N.Y. He was 91. resettled the family ManagerJean-Pierre when he found work in Leduc confirmed the the auto industry. death and said Jones Their home was had prostate cancer. steeped in music, mostJones, who received ly the gospel of Sunday a Grammy lifetime church services and achievement award the radio broadcasts of last year and the Na- Hank Jones the Detroit Symphony tional Medal of Arts Orchestra. in 2008, was the last Hank Jones told the surviving brother of an illustri- publication DownBeat that he ous musical family. Two of his did not enjoy being the eldest younger siblings were Thad son of parents who valued muJones, a trumpeter, composer sical training. “I never did sit and bandleader, and Elvin down and practice of my own Jones, whose beat modeled on volition,” he said. “I always had African drumming drove the to be forced. They’d say, ‘Hey, innovative 1960s quartet led by you practice that lesson! Teachsaxophonist John Coltrane. er’s coming next week and you In a career underscored by got four pages to go.’” his versatility and unflagging excellence, Hank Jones was one of the last stalwarts of the Jazz connection big-band swing era still actively However, he was immediately performing. drawn to jazz upon hearing TaReviewers described Jones tum on Detroit radio broadcasts. in rapturous language, not- Against his father’s wishes, he ing that he played with nearly began a professional career at everybody and that his music 13. One of his bandmates from evoked the tasteful swing piano this period, tenor saxophonist of Teddy Wilson and the rapid- Eli “Lucky” Thompson, who fire brilliance of Art Tatum. went on to earn a coveted spot “His approach is such a deep- in the Count Basie Big Band, running distillation of jazz urged the young pianist to move piano,” New York Times jazz to New York. critic John Wilson once wrote On Thompson’s recommenof Jones, “that endless fascina- dation, Jones won a job in 1944 tion can be found in anything with a jazz group led by trumhe plays.” peter Oran “Hot Lips” Page at the Onyx Club on 52nd Street in Manhattan. Accompanied many From the minute he arrived in New York, Jones said, he knew leading artists that musical tastes were shiftAs a younger man, Jones ing and that the avant-garde backed singer Ella Fitzgerald bebop style would soon became for six years and proved a gift- the rage in jazz circles. ed interpreter of the harmoniThe pianists Al Haig and Bud cally intricate bebop jazz style Powell were on the bebop vanon recordings with saxophonist guard, and Jones rigorously Parker. tried to study their techniques Jones mastered bebop lan- while retaining his own refined guage, but he was not confined voice on the keyboard. Jones to it. He deftly accompanied was said to be a lyrical player many of the leading artists of in contrast to the more percusthe day, including Artie Shaw, sive approach favored by many Miles Davis and Cannonball bebop pianists. Adderley, each of whom were Jones’ ability to play mainwildly distinct jazz players. stream jazz and bebop propelled In the 1960s and 1970s, Jones his career in the late 1940s. He was a studio musician for participated in the prestigious CBS-TV, anonymously back- Jazz at the Philharmonic coning guest artists who appeared cert series, toured Europe with on programs such as “The Ed saxophonist Coleman Hawkins Sullivan Show” and “Captain and made several recordings Kangaroo.” with Parker, who channeled all Jones collected a steady pay- of his discipline into his music check from his studio work and and very little into his personal did not become worn down by life; Parker died of a drug overthe assignments. In his later dose in 1955. years, he was still providing efIn contrast, Jones said he “alfortlessly brilliant musical sup- ways tried to live cleanly. I didn’t port to contemporaries such as fall into the bad habits a lot of pianist Tommy Flanagan and the guys got into: the smoking, jazz greats half his age, includ- the drinking, the narcotics. I’ve ing saxophonist Joe Lovano on tried to take care of myself.” the albums “I’m All For You” For all the thousands of dates and “Joyous Encounter.” Jones played over the years, In short, Jones could play most interviewers were interwith almost anyone successful- ested in one: the May evening in ly while retaining the highest 1962 at Madison Square Garden standards of musicianship. when he backed actress Marilyn Jazz scholar Dan Morgen- Monroe as she sang birthday stern called Jones “one of the wishes to President John F. Kengreatest piano players that nedy. The actress commanded we’ve ever had. He had a pro- much of the attention that night file as a piano stylist in his own — and ever since — for her sulright and could do everything try delivery of “Happy Birthday — stride, bebop, swing, serve to You.”

By Adam Bernstein The Washington Post


C OV ER S T OR I ES

DANCERS CELEBRATE ALASKA MUSEUM ANNIVERSARY

Canadian man arrested with rifles and ammunition in Washington By Gene Johnson The Associated Press

Kodiak Alutiiq Dancers perform outside of the Alutiiq Museum last weekend as part of the museum’s 15year celebration. The museum of native heritage, culture and art was originally funded by a $1.5 million grant the Kodiak Area Native Association received from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council.

SEATTLE — Federal agents said Thursday they have arrested a Canadian gun dealer who kept a stash of sniper rifles and ammunition at a Washington storage unit near the U.S. northern border. Oliver King — who also uses his given name, Hamid Malekpour — was arrested Wednesday in Ferndale, which is about 10 miles south of the Canadian border. He made an initial appearance Thursday at U.S. District Court in Seattle on charges of making false statements to a government agency and being an alien in possession of firearms. A hearing was set for next Wednesday to determine whether he should continue to be detained pending trial.

Financial

Citizen

Louis Garcia / Kodiak (Alaska) Daily Mirror

Continued from C1 Initially, Merkley said, he thought the amendment was dead, since Democratic leaders weren’t willing to take the week of floor time needed to overcome a filibuster. Then, “we found an unusual parliamentary procedure,” Merkley said. To get around the filibuster, Merkley refiled his amendment as an add-on to an unrelated proposal by U.S. Sen. Sam Brownback, R-Kan. In Senate lingo, that’s a “second-order amendment.” Under Senate rules, Merkley’s second-order amendment couldn’t be filibustered. Coincidentally, U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., railed against political gamesmanship by Republicans after one of his amend-

ments was killed by the controversial second-order amendment that was filed on his proposal. Wyden’s amendment would have made it harder for senators to anonymously block legislation. Brownback’s amendment was one of the top Republican priorities for changing the financial regulation bill. It would have exempted auto dealers from oversight by a new consumer protection agency created in the financial bill. The procedural wrangling was still ongoing at 3 p.m. Thursday, Merkley said, as Democrats and Republicans negotiated a compromise over the dueling amendments. In a break from lobbying other senators, Merkley said he thought his amendment was still on track to receive a vote. But by the early evening, it

became apparent Republicans would rather sacrifice Brownback’s amendment than allow a vote on Merkley’s. Top Democrats, including Sen. Chris Dodd, of Connecticut, and Majority Leader Harry Reid, of Nevada, huddled on the Senate floor. Merkley arrived a few minutes later to learn that he’d lost. Afterward, Merkley said Reid promised to advocate for the amendment in the conference committee, where the House and Senate will resolve differences between their financial reform bills. If that doesn’t work, Merkley said he hadn’t identified his next step. “I haven’t even thought about down the road,” Merkley said. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 C5

Continued from C1 Reynolds has been a certified pilot since the mid-’70s. For years he used his plane to fly as far as the East Coast from Bend for his business. Reynolds also began volunteering his time and his plane to transport people needing medical care outside of Central Oregon but who were unable to afford the cost of a flight. He continues to do this work as a pilot for the nonprofit organization, Angel Flight West. Reynolds keeps a hangar in Bend and still comes home regularly to visit friends and family. “He is still very active in outdoor recreation and in this community,” said Taffy Gleason, last year’s winner of the award. “He believes strongly in family, faith and a willingness

According to a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Seattle, he entered the U.S. at Blaine the previous night and lied when he said he was going to pick up his wife at a Bellingham mall. The Iranian native also lied about why he had a new Canadian passport just issued that morning, the complaint said. He told border guards that his old one had gone through the wash, but agents found it during a secondary inspection — with no water damage. The old one, which was not set to expire until 2013, had been canceled, but it was not immediately clear why. It had three visas for Iran, two issued last year and one issued this year. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents tailed King as he left the border crossing. He drove to McMinnville,

to help others.” Reaching his 70s has not slowed Reynolds down; he remains an active hiker, fisherman and biker. At the age of 72, Reynolds rode 100 miles in the Reach the Beach ride that winds from Portland to Pacific City to raise awareness for the American Lung Association of Oregon. Though Reynolds has done the ride a number of times, in 2008 he rode in honor of his oldest son, Brian Reynolds, who died of cancer in late 2007. Reynolds has been attracted to leadership and public service from an early age. He was listed as the Master of Ceremonies for a Mother’s Day celebration at the First Methodist Church in Bend in 1949; Reynolds would have been 14. Reynolds continues to stay active in his new community in North Lake Tahoe. He has worked on the

where he went to a gun shop and loaded his car with four guns and 480 rounds of .50-caliber ammunition. Agents say he then drove north to the Ferndale storage unit, where he had $30,000 worth of sniper rifles, handguns and ammo. When asked about the weapons in his car, King said he was a hunter, according to the complaint. Amir Zarandi, who owns the Oregon gun shop, McMinnville Hunting and Police Supplies, said King is a consultant and has bought weapons there for years. Zarandi said King also manufactures ammunition, is well known in the business and “doesn’t do anything illegal.” “He’s a good person,” Zarandi said. “I’m sure this is just a technicality sort of thing.”

town’s recycling program and supports Red, White and Tahoe Blue, the organization that coordinates North Lake Tahoe’s Fourth of July celebrations. “His favorite quote is ‘service to the community is the rent we pay to live in the community,’” Gleason said. Reynolds’ dedication to community service has worn off on his family. Reynolds’ middle son, Bruce Reynolds, lives in Baltimore with his family, and his youngest son, Mark Reynolds, is an electrical engineer here in Bend. Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@bendbulletin.com.

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Manhunt Continued from C1 Tactical officers from the Oregon State Police and FBI were working with police from Warm Springs, Madras and Bend, and sheriff’s deputies from Jefferson,

Seniors Continued from C1 Bill Willitts, one of the property owners, said donating the land met several needs. When Sisters annexed the 30-acre property into the city, the owners agreed to offer some affordable housing, and this project fulfills that agreement. But, Willitts said, the city’s older residents need affordable housing options. “We have some radical financial demographics here,” Willitts said. “Some seniors are living in poverty.” Deschutes County donated the land for Little Deschutes Lodge, Pacific Crest’s La Pine development. With the land donation, the developers would still have to find contributions worth more than $100,000. If the city waived all building permit fees, for example, that would be worth about $35,000, ac-

Wasco and Clackamas counties. Thursday evening, the FBI announced it is attempting to locate a person of interest, 21-year-old Waylon McKie Weaselhead, in connection with the incidents. A tribal member, Weaselhead is approximately 5 feet 7 inches tall and 175 pounds. He has tat-

toos on both arms, a tattoo reading “5150” on his chest, and the words “weasel head” on his back. Anyone with information about Weaselhead’s whereabouts or the incidents involving shooting at police is asked to contact the Warm Springs Dispatch Center at 541-553-1171.

cording to Planning and Community Development Director Eric Porter. Forgiving the project’s property taxes for 20 years would equal about $5,000. It isn’t yet clear how much the city would have to contribute to the project, but staff is looking at all the options, City Manager Eileen Stein said. “There are a lot of different ways to demonstrate contributions,” Stein said. During the meeting, Rob Roy, Pacific Crest’s operating manager, said the tax breaks would make the affordable rents and entire project possible. “If you want affordable housing, I can’t guarantee it, but I’d say it won’t get built if (the tax break) is not going to happen,” Roy said. Pacific Crest’s most recent project, Discovery Park Lodge, is on Bend’s northwest side. The 53unit building has one- and twobedroom apartments, all but one of which are occupied. For each apartment, at least one

resident must be 55 or older and the income limits are set at 60 percent of median household income, or about $30,000, according to the lodge’s website. Monthly rents at the lodge range from $476 for a one-bedroom to $636 for a two-bedroom. Willitts said rents in the Sisters project could top out at more than $500. Councilor Bill Merrill said the city should request help from Deschutes County on the proposed project. People outside of Sisters, he said, might apply to live at the development and so city residents should not be left with the entire bill. “We’re asking residents of the city, through their tax dollars, to provide for this facility. But there’s not a way to keep non-city people from occupying (the apartments),” Merrill said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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C6 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Ron Wyden plays Jekyll and Hyde on campaign finance

I

n most professions, anyone possessed of multiple personalities would be at a serious disadvantage. But in politics, which is nothing like most professions, such a person is simply called

“senator.” Over the years, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., has done some excellent work. On health care, he’s been a refreshingly independent thinker, if not an independent voter. He’s also been very responsive to the needs of Central Oregon. For those and other reasons, we’ve endorsed him in the past, most recently in this month’s primary. But the Sen. Wyden we’ve seen recently is something of a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde character, at least when it comes to matters of campaign finance. Late last month, Sen. Wyden and four colleagues announced they are sponsoring a bill called DISCLOSE (“Democracy is Strengthened by Casting Light on Spending in Elections”). Among other things, the proposed act would force organizations that make political expenditures to disclose their donors — you know, the people behind the people. In a joint press release found on Sen. Wyden’s website, co-sponsor Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., brags that “our bill will follow the money. In cases where corporations try to mask their activities through shadow groups, we drill down so that the ultimate funder of the expenditure is disclosed.” Presumably, Wyden agrees with Schumer and would love nothing more than to drag big-money interests out of the shadows. That’s Sen. Wyden in Dr. Jekyll mode. For a glimpse of Sen. Wyden in Mr. Hyde mode, consider a fundraising letter distributed recently by his campaign. It has his picture on the top and his signature on the bottom, so one can only assume that he “stands by it,” as the saying goes. This is the very same letter that contains the much-ridiculed claim that “deep-pocketed, right wing ideologues are working overtime to defeat me.” As Jim Huffman, Wyden’s Republican opponent, has pointed out, Wyden’s fundraising machine has steamrolled Huffman’s so far. The person crying poor is, in fact, the one with the deep pockets. But the most interesting part of the letter, it seems to us, is the following sentence, which offers a “special reason” to contribute promptly: “a group of my strongest supporters has committed to match every dollar we raise with this mailing between now and May 21 on a one-to-one basis.” May 21 is today. Wyden’s campaign doesn’t have to disclose the identities of these “strongest supporters” until they actually cough up the promised money. But you’d think the Dr. Jekyll Wyden, who presumably values complete transparency and loathes

Wyden’s campaign doesn’t have to disclose the identities of these “strongest supporters” until they actually cough up the promised money. But you’d think the Dr. Jekyll Wyden, who presumably values complete transparency and loathes shadows, would be happy to share their names. shadows, would be happy to share their names. After all, Wyden’s campaign obviously believes their offer will have an influence on campaign contributions. The secret cadre of moneybags is, in effect, a lever Wyden’s using to pry contributions from less generous supporters. Besides, Wyden’s letter proclaims that “far-right Republicans are pouring out-of-state money into Oregon and lining up a candidate against me.” And for potential contributors who missed the message in the body of the letter, the main points are reiterated in a post script: “Contribute today so I can fight back against their out-of-state money. And remember, your contribution will be doubled if you respond quickly!” Naturally, we wondered who Wyden’s shadowy supporters are and whether they’re prepared to throw around inherently tainted “out-of-state money.” So we called his campaign and asked. Campaign manager Jake Weigler told us the identities of Wyden’s matching-fund brigade are “proprietary campaign strategy.” Though their contributions will be reported when they’re made, their names will remain in the shadows until then. What’s the rationale for this secrecy? “This would be part of our campaign strategy,” said Weigler. “You don’t typically show your opponents your play book before the campaign starts.” Could he at least tell us whether any of them are out-of-staters? “I think I already answered your question.” Draw your own conclusions. We’ve certainly drawn ours. First, as with all politicians, Wyden’s commitment to transparency has its limit (namely, the point at which real transparency hurts a politician more than his overhyped support of transparency helps him). Second, we’re going to see a lot more of Sen. Wyden’s Mr. Hyde side before November.

My Nickel’s Worth Time to compromise Revolt in the air? Though there are good reasons by average citizens, a word of caution before wasting time and resources: There is only one way to achieve enduring reforms nationwide. Primary grievances must be shared by a clear majority — conservative, moderate and liberal. Lesser, more controversial issues must be set aside and compromised. Groups that include extremist factions that could gain control must be watched and restrained. Exploitative leaders and other profiteers of divisiveness, such as talk show agitators preying on fear, distract from genuine mutual concerns and must be ignored. Examples of unifying grievances in dire need of correction by citizenship: ever-increasing corporate domination, tax exemption and shelters provided to wealthy, non-accountability of leadership, escalating health care costs from exemption from anti-trust laws and remaining loopholes, taxpayer subsidization of big business, petroleum, mining, agriculture, etc. The root: legalized bribery labeled as campaign contributions. We’ve allowed politicians to keep us apathetic and divided from a misconception of powerlessness and partisan tactics (hyping differences). Whether conservative or liberal, we must realize we’re all going to go down together regardless of party loyalty or special interest if we don’t start seeing the larger

picture, realize both conservative and liberal views in moderation complement one another, rise above extremists and work for the country as a whole. Leadership will respond to fear of not being re-elected when receiving consistent contacts from constituents. Otherwise, little or non-action by the common citizen will require far greater future cost and effort. Brad Kalita Chiloquin

about 37 years, I find it not uncommon for both lanes of traffic to stop and let me bike from a stop sign onto the next street. Instead of thinking, “Don’t hold me up. I need to get there now,” these special drivers have an open mind that leads to compassionate action. To me, it is like motorists are reaching out with a helping hand. James Delp Bend

OLCC missteps

Don’t blame La Pine

The May 4 Bulletin editorial castigating the Oregon Liquor Control Commission was rather good, especially the “true expertise in denial” phrase used to describe the OLCC director’s response to criticism of his agency. In Hamlet’s “To be or not to be?” soliloquy, Shakespeare lists “insolence of office” as one of the “whips and scorns of time” and “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” one suffers in life. It is enough to drive you to drink. Hamlet decided to stay around because of conscience and the unknown “ills” on the other side. Dick Winkle Sunriver

I hear many stories on television and radio about crimes committed by individuals who are said to be from La Pine. This is a small town with a population under 2,000. My gripe with the media is that they need to get their geography straight before they give our little town a bad name. Properties just north of La Pine State Park Road have a 97707 zip code. This area also has a telephone prefix of 598 or 593. These are Sunriver phone numbers, not La Pine residents’. Is the media protecting the precious namesake of a high-dollar resort area where golf and skiing seem to be more important than the truth, or are they just wanting to give a small town a bad name? I ask you to review where the person or persons involved in a news story reside before slamming this small town. Lynn Bettelyoun La Pine

Cyclists welcome In recent years, drivers have shown amazing actions of caring as I bike on the streets of Bend. After biking about 25,000 miles in and around Bend over

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Why many young voters decline to participate I

f Tuesday’s election was like the special election in January, those at the young end of the electorate were the least likely to have voted, though, arguably, they have the most at stake in the outcome. If the three young voters in my home are typical (one voted; two did not), there are some surprising and not-so-surprising reasons for the drop from a Barack Obama-driven high of two years ago. The not-so-surprising reasons are the ones we all have when we fail to do something we know we should. We’re too busy, for one thing. I’ll admit that the two nonvoters in my household are, as cookbook author Peg Bracken once described it, “up to their hips in Chicken Calypso” right now, working pretty much from daylight to nightfall on the dozens of chores it takes to get a large garden up and running in the spring. In that, they’re taking after Anna’s father, a cattle rancher, whose days on the job

continue to be driven by the amount of available light. They come in at night, tired, dirty and hungry, and I suspect the last thing they’ve wanted to worry about is what the impact of a jail bond levy will have on their pocketbooks a decade from now, assuming they’re still living around here. That last offers a hint at another reason young people might be more likely to sit out an election than their elders. For many of us what gets us really interested in civic life are home ownership and children, and young voters are most likely to be missing one or both. There’s an old truism that says there’s nothing like owning your home to make you a conservative, and that may be true. Equally true, there’s nothing like home ownership to make you realize just what it costs to live in a civil society. Virtually every Oregonian who lives away from Mom and Dad pays prop-

JANET STEVENS erty taxes, of course, but for renters that fact may be far from clear. Their landlords receive and pay their property tax bills and divvy up their costs among their tenants as part of the rent. Thus the owner of a small apartment complex in northeast Bend must shell out more than $14,000 a year in property taxes on the place. Assuming there are 20 apartments, that bill adds about $700 annually to the rent on each. It’s unlikely that the tenants in that complex know that their rent might be lower if property taxes were lower or that it might go up if the landlord’s tax burden jumped as the result of approval of

new building bond measures. What surprises me is the belief, at least at my house, that unless you know just about everything about the candidates and bond and ballot measures being decided at a particular election, you should sit it out. It smacks of an excuse, I admit. With extensive newspaper coverage, a voter’s pamphlet, television and even live appearances by candidates and debates on issues available, there should be plenty of information available to any voter. Choosing to read or see or hear it is another matter, of course. The argument does raise an interesting question, however: Just how much information does it take to become an informed voter? The biggest surprise at my house, however, was this: One young voter, an independent, didn’t realize until a few days ago that there would be anything on the ballot she could vote on. That’s understandable on one level — prima-

ry elections are, after all, party affairs and if you’ve paid party politics little or no mind, you might not be aware of the number of nonpartisan races and other measures on even a primary election ballot. I suppose I could blame the child or her education on her ignorance, and both most likely played a role. But I also think this and other newspapers, television stations, radio and the like may have failed to fill that particular information gap adequately. We in the news business are often political junkies of sorts, and we may be too quick to assume that our readers, viewers and listeners may share our fascination with the process. Many do not, and perhaps we would serve them better if we bothered, from time to time, to explain clearly such things as nonpartisan races, ballot measures and the like. Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


T H E W EST

U .S. ARMY RESERVE SOLDIERS RETURN TO UTAH Soldier Patrick O’Leary is reunited with his wife, soldier Alexa O’Leary, and three boys Colby, Austin and John, from left, on Thursday in Salt Lake City, as the last 45 U.S. Army Reserve soldiers deployed with the 96th Sustainment Brigade return to Utah after a nine-month deployment to Taji, Iraq. A total of 317 U.S. Army Reserve soldiers with the brigade have been mobilized since July 2009. Tom Smart Deseret News

Stalking order granted against VA psychiatrist By Paul Fattig (Medford) Mail Tribune

WHITE CITY — A U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ social worker has requested and been granted a temporary stalking protective order against the chief of psychiatry at the VA’s Southern Oregon Rehabilitation Center and Clinics. In the complaint filed May 3 with the Jackson County Sheriff’s Department, the 43-yearold female social worker alleges that psychiatrist Beverly Kay Young, 45, had made repeated unwanted sexual advances toward her. Jackson County Circuit Court Judge Dan Harris granted the temporary stalking protective order on May 4, and has set a hearing for June 21. Michael Steadman, the Medford attorney representing Young, has requested a June 14 dismissal hearing on the civil case. Noting the two women’s work invariably brings them in contact via e-mail, Steadman has filed a request with the court for an allowance of incidental contact between Young and the plaintiff. Steadman declined to comment on the case when contacted by the Mail Tribune. The plaintiff did not return a call from the paper. SORCC spokeswoman Anna Diehl also declined to comment, saying it was a private matter unrelated to the women’s professional work. Both continue to work at the facility, she said. “That’s outside the realm of the VA. We would have no comment,” Diehl said of the alleged charges in the civil case. According to the complaint filed with the court, the issue was continued unwanted sexual advances. “Petitioner states respondent (Young) repeatedly approaches

Klamath Falls man sentenced in 2007 slayings The Associated Press KLAMATH FALLS — A Klamath Falls man has been sentenced to seven years in prison for encouraging another man to kill two people in 2007. Prosecutors say the slaying involved a drug debt dispute. Peter Lugo Covarrubias was sentenced Thursday in Klamath County Circuit Court. He had pleaded guilty earlier to solicitation to commit murder. District Attorney Ed Caleb says Covarrubias was present when David Kitts and Marrissa Orlow were shot and killed in an apartment. Caleb says Covarrubias encouraged Matthew Avina-Norris to shoot them by saying he would move up in a gang if he did. Avina-Norris has yet to face trial on murder charges.

her for the purpose of engaging in sexual contact; respondent has been asked multiple times by petitioner and petitioner’s supervisor and respondent’s supervisor (to stop),” sheriff’s deputy Jason Penn wrote in his report. “However, the unwanted contact has continued.” It is unclear where the alleged harassment occurred. But in a May 3 letter addressed to Young that is among the court papers, Dr. David Donnelly, the SORCC’s chief of staff, reiterated that “concerns were raised by (plaintiff) last fall that you had contacted her outside the normal work environment and that she had felt uncom-

fortable with that.” His letter continued, “At that time you and I had a conversation and I verbally counseled you to keep your contact with (plaintiff) purely work-related.” That discussion was around Nov. 1 of last year, he wrote. Since then, no one, including the plaintiff, had contacted him about a reoccurrence of the issue, he stressed in the letter. “If anyone wishes to inquire of me, I am happy to give them my impression that you pose no threat or concern to (plaintiff),” he wrote, adding, “It is unfortunate that she perceives differently.” Dr. Randall Nelson, associ-

ate chief of staff for primary care, submitted a May 3 letter to the court strongly supporting Young. “I have had the privilege of working with Dr. Beverly Young over the past several years both as a physician dealing with challenging patients and as a fellow supervisor managing staff,” he wrote. “Dr. Young continually behaves in a professional, caring and ethical manner setting the standard for those qualities. “She is a dedicated, hardworking, conscientious physician and supervisor who is respected and appreciated by patients and staff,” he added.

peak SEasy

A

n evening of nostalgia featuring a 1920’s four course meal at one of Bend’s Finest restaurants. Great Gatsby. Bonnie and Clyde. Smooth jazz and gambling. Gangsters and flappers. Moonshine and Model A’s. So much fun it should still be illegal... visit the Historical Museum website for more details! www.deschuteshistory.org $65 per person + cocktails and gaming Gratuity and $10.00 “funny” money for gambling included

Sunday, May 23rd at Staccato at the Firehall For Reservations call: 541-312-3100 By reservation only. Reservations times available between 5:00 - 8:00 pm Acknowledgements: Presented and hosted by Staccato at the Firehall, Monte Carlo Style gaming “speakeasy” provided by Team Casino and generously sponsored by Deschutes Brewery and The Bulletin

THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 C7


W E AT H ER

C8 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MAY 21

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE



Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

51/34

47/28

56/32

35/28

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

53/36

48/26

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

55/31

Camp Sherman 45/26 Redmond Prineville 52/29 Cascadia 50/30 51/30 Sisters 48/28 Bend Post 52/29

49/28

40/17

Showers likely with snow above 3,000 feet today and tonight. Central

54/35 52/34

Oakridge Elk Lake

48/26

49/25

Burns 51/27

46/25

Hampton Fort Rock



47/26

Chemult 44/23

Vancouver 55/46

Seattle

City

Missoula 57/36

Helena

55/40

Grants Pass

Bend

55/37

59/37



Salt Lake City

Reno



36/19

61/37

59/30

52/28

Crater Lake

Idaho Falls Elko

64/41

Cloudy with a chance of showers today. Rain and snow showers tonight.

59/36

Boise

52/29

Redding

46/26



54/43

Eugene

59/33

San Francisco 60/48

LOW

Last

May 27 June 4

New

First

June 12 June 18

69/43





Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 57/45/0.19 . . . . . 53/43/sh. . . . . . 55/42/sh Baker City . . . . . . 51/35/0.01 . . . . . 50/32/sh. . . . . . 46/35/rs Brookings . . . . . . 55/44/0.17 . . . . . 53/40/sh. . . . . . 56/45/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 53/31/0.00 . . . . . 50/30/sh. . . . . . 45/30/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 57/43/0.40 . . . . . 55/40/sh. . . . . . 55/40/sh Klamath Falls . . . 52/32/0.00 . . . . . 48/26/sh. . . . . . 46/27/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . 54/30/0.00 . . . . . .46/27/rs. . . . . . 42/31/rs La Pine . . . . . . . . 50/31/0.00 . . . . . .46/25/rs. . . . . . 50/28/rs Medford . . . . . . . 60/42/0.00 . . . . . 55/37/sh. . . . . . 55/36/sh Newport . . . . . . . 57/48/0.31 . . . . . 53/43/sh. . . . . . 54/42/sh North Bend . . . . . . 57/45/NA . . . . . 52/41/sh. . . . . . 55/41/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 64/44/0.00 . . . . . 60/39/sh. . . . . . 53/39/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 56/41/0.02 . . . . . 57/37/sh. . . . . . 56/40/sh Portland . . . . . . . 56/44/0.22 . . . . . 57/45/sh. . . . . . 58/45/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 49/31/0.01 . . . . . .50/30/rs. . . . . . 52/30/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 52/33/0.00 . . . . . 52/28/sh. . . . . . . 51/29/r Roseburg. . . . . . . 59/44/0.08 . . . . . 55/40/sh. . . . . . 55/45/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 58/44/0.36 . . . . . 56/43/sh. . . . . . 57/42/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 52/30/0.02 . . . . . .48/28/rs. . . . . . 49/31/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 61/46/0.00 . . . . . 58/41/sh. . . . . . 58/44/sh

TEMPERATURE

LOW 0

MEDIUM

2

4

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 in 1928 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.23” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 in 1959 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.57” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.82” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.08” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.11 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.02 in 1998 *Melted liquid equivalent

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

2

LOW

65 37

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Moslty cloudy, chance of rain showers.

61 32

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:43 a.m. . . . . . .6:12 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:27 a.m. . . . . .11:11 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:38 a.m. . . . . . .1:52 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .3:03 a.m. . . . . . .2:53 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:45 p.m. . . . . . .3:17 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .3:06 a.m. . . . . . .3:04 p.m.

Moon phases Full

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 60/36

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:33 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:31 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:32 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:32 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:45 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:54 a.m.

TUESDAY Mostly cloudy, slightly warmer.

55 30

BEND ALMANAC

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 64° Ontario • 30° Lakeview

MONDAY Mostly cloudy, unseasonably cool.

51 27

Portland

Cloudy with a chance of showers today. Rain and snow showers tonight. Eastern

Mostly cloudy, breezy, chilly, mixed LOW showers.

NORTHWEST

51/27

43/19

HIGH

57/45

Brothers

Sunriver

44/24

LOW

SUNDAY

Upper-level low pressure will provide clouds and wet weather with some mountain snow.

50/26

La Pine

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chance of snow showers, cold.

29

Paulina

50/27

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Today: Mostly cloudy, breezy, chilly, mixed showers.

52

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

SATURDAY

HIGH

V.HIGH

6

8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . no report . . . . . 90-140 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Vancouver 55/46

S

S

Calgary 60/36

S

Saskatoon 70/44

Seattle 54/43

S Winnipeg 73/46

S

S

Thunder Bay 76/45

Bismarck 69/54

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 68/40 Halifax 58/37

Portland To ronto 67/45 73/45 Boston Green Bay 70/53 69/54 Boise Buffalo 59/37 • 101° Chicago Detroit 78/60 New York 69/59 Rapid City 84/61 Des Moines 68/57 El Centro, Calif. Salt Lake 66/52 Philadelphia Columbus 69/55 City 72/62 • 26° 85/60 Cheyenne 69/43 Omaha San Francisco Washington, D. C. 68/47 76/58 Grand Canyon, Ariz. 60/48 83/61 Denver Louisville • 2.69” Kansas City 79/49 75/63 74/62 St. Louis Mount Ida, Ark. Charlotte Las 73/58 81/61 Nashville Vegas Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City 79/64 90/64 87/56 Little Rock 68/56 88/69 85/65 Birmingham Atlanta 83/66 Honolulu 79/66 Phoenix 86/74 Dallas Tijuana 101/71 93/74 71/55 New Orleans Orlando 88/71 91/69 Houston Chihuahua 91/73 98/60 Miami 88/76 Monterrey La Paz 98/72 98/63 Mazatlan 93/69 Anchorage 62/44 Juneau FRONTS 56/43 (in the 48 contiguous states):

Portland 57/45

Billings 63/43

St. Paul 70/58

ONE HAPPY DOG

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .85/63/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . 92/70/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .75/59/t . . . .73/57/t Albany. . . . . . . . .83/44/0.00 . . .80/55/s . . 76/55/pc Albuquerque. . . .83/50/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . . 85/53/s Anchorage . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .62/44/s . . 54/43/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .79/66/t . . . .86/67/t Atlantic City . . . .75/52/0.02 . . .70/57/s . . 67/62/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . 93/70/pc . . 91/71/pc Baltimore . . . . . .83/52/0.00 . . .83/60/s . . . .74/60/t Billings. . . . . . . . .77/55/0.02 . . .63/43/c . . 62/44/sh Birmingham . . . .85/65/0.03 . . .83/66/t . . . 87/65/s Bismarck . . . . . . .77/44/0.00 . .69/54/sh . . . .76/52/t Boise . . . . . . . . . .60/48/0.05 . .59/37/sh . . 51/37/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .84/53/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . 68/54/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .74/51/0.00 . . .70/54/s . . 68/55/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .69/52/0.00 . 78/60/pc . . . .74/60/t Burlington, VT. . .81/45/0.00 . . .74/50/s . . 77/56/pc Caribou, ME . . . .73/50/0.26 . . .64/40/s . . 76/52/pc Charleston, SC . .84/62/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . . .84/67/t Charlotte. . . . . . .80/62/0.00 . . .81/61/t . . . .78/61/t Chattanooga. . . .83/58/0.00 . . .79/65/t . . 87/65/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .62/46/0.02 . 68/47/pc . . 76/45/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .74/47/0.01 . .68/57/sh . . 75/61/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .73/51/0.01 . . .73/63/t . . 79/61/pc Cleveland . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . .74/60/sh . . . .74/57/t Colorado Springs 71/42/0.00 . 78/49/pc . . . 81/47/s Columbia, MO . .66/57/0.59 . 72/57/pc . . . 87/68/s Columbia, SC . . .84/62/0.00 . . .86/64/t . . . .84/62/t Columbus, GA. . .84/59/0.00 . . .84/66/t . . 90/67/pc Columbus, OH. . .78/46/0.00 . .72/62/sh . . . .76/57/t Concord, NH . . . .84/42/0.00 . . .76/44/s . . 76/51/pc Corpus Christi. . .89/75/0.00 . 89/75/pc . . 89/76/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .87/73/0.00 . 93/74/pc . . 94/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . . .72/62/t . . 76/59/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . 79/49/pc . . . 85/48/s Des Moines. . . . .64/57/0.18 . 69/55/pc . . 83/67/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . .69/59/sh . . 71/60/sh Duluth . . . . . . . . .76/47/0.00 . . .65/48/c . . 71/54/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .92/57/0.00 . . .96/65/s . . . 94/64/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .65/51/0.00 . 71/47/pc . . 76/49/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .83/51/0.00 . 77/56/pc . . 85/61/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .73/32/0.00 . . .74/46/s . . . 68/40/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .80/48/0.00 . . .69/59/c . . . 73/55/c Rapid City . . . . . .68/42/0.00 . .66/52/sh . . 74/49/pc Savannah . . . . . .89/61/0.00 . 84/66/pc . . . .85/67/t Green Bay. . . . . .81/48/0.00 . . .69/54/c . . 74/56/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .70/47/0.00 . 59/33/pc . . 51/33/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .56/44/0.04 . .54/43/sh . . 57/43/sh Greensboro. . . . .79/58/0.00 . 82/60/pc . . . .76/62/t Richmond . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .85/61/s . . . .78/63/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .77/45/0.00 . 74/57/pc . . 84/66/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .83/59/s . . 74/59/sh Rochester, NY . . .80/49/0.00 . 79/59/pc . . . .77/59/t Spokane . . . . . . .56/39/0.01 . 54/36/pc . . 57/39/pc Hartford, CT . . . .84/51/0.00 . . .81/54/s . . 74/52/pc Sacramento. . . . .76/45/0.00 . 69/46/pc . . 66/45/pc Springfield, MO. .73/57/0.34 . 75/57/pc . . . 85/66/s Helena. . . . . . . . .58/41/0.01 . .59/36/sh . . 55/36/sh St. Louis. . . . . . . .63/59/0.35 . .73/58/sh . . . 86/67/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . .91/73/t . . 91/72/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .85/72/0.00 . . .86/74/s . . . 86/74/s Salt Lake City . . .65/50/0.00 . 69/43/pc . . 55/39/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .94/59/0.00 . . .98/65/s . . . 94/63/s Houston . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . 91/73/pc . . 91/74/pc San Antonio . . . .83/74/0.00 . 92/73/pc . . 92/73/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .76/60/0.00 . 83/67/pc . . . 90/73/s Huntsville . . . . . .86/60/0.03 . . .80/65/t . . . 89/65/s San Diego . . . . . .71/58/0.00 . . .65/58/s . . . 63/55/s Washington, DC .83/54/0.00 . . .83/61/s . . . .75/62/t Indianapolis . . . .69/51/0.02 . . .72/59/t . . 79/61/pc San Francisco . . .65/50/0.00 . 60/48/pc . . . 59/47/s Wichita . . . . . . . .64/57/0.04 . 78/64/pc . . 86/71/pc Jackson, MS . . . .89/71/0.00 . . .89/69/t . . . 90/68/s San Jose . . . . . . .70/49/0.00 . 65/47/pc . . . 63/45/s Yakima . . . . . . . .61/38/0.00 . . .56/37/c . . 59/41/pc Madison, WI . . . .77/45/0.00 . .68/54/sh . . 79/62/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .81/39/0.00 . . .83/44/s . . . 79/45/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .99/67/0.00 . . .99/65/s . . . 92/59/s Jacksonville. . . . .89/67/0.00 . . .87/66/t . . . .88/66/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .71/37/0.00 . 56/43/pc . . . 63/44/s Kansas City. . . . .61/56/0.44 . 74/62/pc . . . 87/71/s Amsterdam. . . . .66/43/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . 70/44/pc Mecca . . . . . . . .109/88/0.00 . .109/82/s . . 107/81/s Lansing . . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . .68/58/sh . . 72/55/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .71/51/0.00 . .66/58/sh . . 73/59/sh Mexico City. . . . .84/57/0.00 . 84/56/pc . . 81/55/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .94/69/0.00 . . .90/64/s . . . 79/56/s Auckland. . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . .63/56/sh . . . 65/49/s Montreal. . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 70/42/pc . . . 74/51/c Lexington . . . . . .71/47/0.00 . . .73/60/t . . 81/60/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . . .98/76/s . . . 98/75/s Moscow . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . 67/47/pc . . 72/51/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .58/55/0.79 . 76/58/pc . . 86/70/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . .95/80/t . . . .96/80/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . 79/59/pc . . 81/60/pc Little Rock. . . . . .76/63/1.00 . 85/65/pc . . 91/68/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .95/55/0.00 . 93/58/pc . . . 87/55/s Nassau . . . . . . . .82/75/0.00 . 88/74/pc . . 88/75/pc Los Angeles. . . . .69/57/0.00 . . .68/56/s . . . 66/53/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . .78/63/s . . 81/65/pc New Delhi. . . . .105/91/0.00 . .112/84/s . . 110/83/s Louisville . . . . . . .72/55/0.01 . . .75/63/t . . 83/65/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .68/43/sh . . 67/43/sh Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/68/0.25 . . .83/64/s . . 79/63/pc Memphis. . . . . . .81/66/0.01 . . .86/69/t . . . 91/73/s Bogota . . . . . . . .70/54/0.46 . . .67/54/t . . . .69/54/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .67/48/s . . . 67/49/c Miami . . . . . . . . .88/74/0.00 . 88/76/pc . . 88/76/pc Budapest. . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .62/49/sh . . 73/51/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . 71/43/pc . . . 73/49/c Milwaukee . . . . .73/49/0.00 . .63/55/sh . . 74/60/pc Buenos Aires. . . .64/54/0.00 . .67/47/sh . . 66/49/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . . .71/44/s . . . 73/45/s Minneapolis . . . .82/53/0.00 . .70/58/sh . . 81/68/pc Cabo San Lucas .90/70/0.00 . . .94/71/s . . . 92/70/s Rio de Janeiro. . .75/70/0.00 . .77/61/sh . . 80/62/pc Nashville . . . . . . .75/53/0.41 . . .79/64/t . . 85/66/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .90/65/s . . 99/66/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .68/56/c . . . 69/56/c New Orleans. . . .90/75/0.00 . 88/71/pc . . 90/72/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .59/45/0.01 . 60/36/pc . . 56/40/sh Santiago . . . . . . .72/39/0.00 . . .64/36/s . . 62/32/pc New York . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .84/61/s . . 74/60/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .86/73/0.45 . . .86/74/t . . . .85/74/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .75/55/sh . . 78/57/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .83/60/s . . 75/60/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . 70/49/pc . . 72/48/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .57/54/0.39 . .67/56/sh . . 70/56/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .78/59/0.00 . . .81/64/s . . . .76/63/t Edinburgh . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .63/49/c . . 68/42/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .85/60/s . . . 86/61/s Oklahoma City . .77/57/0.00 . . .88/69/s . . 91/70/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . 69/46/pc . . . 72/47/s Shanghai. . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . . .83/71/c . . . .77/68/r Omaha . . . . . . . .62/56/0.54 . 76/58/pc . . 85/68/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . 74/57/sh Singapore . . . . . .93/81/0.19 . . .90/80/t . . . .91/80/t Orlando. . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . .91/69/t . . 91/69/pc Hong Kong . . . . .86/73/1.01 . . .85/76/t . . . .84/75/t Stockholm. . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .68/51/sh . . 67/48/pc Palm Springs. . .100/68/0.00 . . .94/64/s . . . 84/58/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/59/0.02 . .64/53/sh . . 66/54/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .64/54/sh . . 64/53/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .62/55/0.52 . .69/55/sh . . 82/63/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .78/48/0.00 . . .82/56/s . . . 93/65/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .90/77/c . . . 92/78/c Philadelphia . . . .82/56/0.00 . . .85/60/s . . 77/62/pc Johannesburg . . .68/46/0.00 . 70/49/pc . . . 72/50/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .80/64/s . . . 87/70/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .98/68/0.00 . .101/71/s . . . 95/66/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . 72/63/pc . . 70/62/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . . .84/65/s . . 80/63/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . 79/59/pc . . . .73/59/t Lisbon . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . .85/56/s . . 85/55/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .82/55/0.00 . 73/45/pc . . 70/52/sh Portland, ME. . . .82/46/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . 69/51/pc London . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .68/47/c . . 72/48/pc Vancouver. . . . . .55/48/0.08 . .55/46/sh . . 57/45/pc Providence . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . .73/52/s . . 70/53/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . .85/52/s . . . 85/53/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .57/46/0.02 . .65/48/sh . . 67/51/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .79/58/0.00 . 84/60/pc . . . .79/63/t Manila. . . . . . . . .97/84/0.00 . 98/82/pc . . 96/81/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .73/52/0.06 . 72/50/pc . . . .70/53/t

INTERNATIONAL

Only minor changes sought on Columbia Basin salmon By Abby Haight The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The Obama administration has made no major changes to a plan to protect endangered wild salmon runs in the Columbia River Basin, dismaying salmon advocates who say they expected more. The government on Thursday submitted revisions for a 2008 Bush-era biological plan to U.S. District Judge James Redden in Portland. Redden said in February that the plan likely violated the Endangered Species Act, but he gave the government three months to review new science that might strengthen it. The National Oceanic and At-

mospheric Administration recommendations include studying salmon migration, monitoring water temperatures and other effects of climate change, and creating a team of fisheries managers to resolve potential harm to wild salmon runs by hatchery fish. “After we reviewed all the information we’ve accumulated over the last three months, only modest changes were necessary,” said Bruce Suzumoto, NOAA Fisheries assistant regional administrator for hydropower. “The actions are more along the lines of study, research.” Proponents of the government’s plan urged court approv-

al to end years of fighting over salmon recovery. “It is time for the federal court to approve this plan and for the region to begin the process of implementation,” said a statement from Scott Corwin, executive director of the Public Power Council. Redden twice before had found that federal plans to balance cheap hydroelectric power against the survival of wild salmon violated the Endangered Species Act. With the revisions, Redden could issue an order or invite further review. Opponents said they likely would fight the government’s plan if Redden approves it.

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Snicker Doodle runs leash-free earlier this week at the Las Cruces Dog Park in Las Cruces, N.M., as her owner, Juliette Vigil, plays fetch with the 1½-year-old canine. The Las Cruces woman said she has been coming to the park with her dog regularly since becoming aware of it a little over one week ago. The park has been open for one year.

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NHL Inside Canadiens finally score, win first game of conference finals, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010

PREP SPORTS IMC track meet opens today in Bend The Intermountain Conference track and field championships get under way today at Bend High School. The meet begins at 3:30 p.m. Local teams from Mountain View, Summit, Crook County and Madras, as well as the host Lava Bears, will join teams from The Dalles-Wahtonka, Pendleton and Hermiston in competition for berths at next week’s Class 5A state championships at Hayward Field in Eugene. Scheduled on the track today are preliminary heats in the sprints in addition to the finals of the boys and girls 3,000-meter races. Field events today include the boys long jump, discus, high jump and pole vault. Today’s girls field events are the long jump, javelin and shot put. On Saturday, field events resume at 11 a.m. and sprint finals are scheduled to start at 1 p.m. The top two placers in each event at the IMC district meet automatically advance to the 5A state meet. Individuals who do not finish in the top two at districts can also advance to state by meeting certain state-qualifying standards. Admission for the IMC championship meet is $5 per day for adults and $3 per day for students. —Bulletin staff report

C Y C L I N G C O M M E N TA RY

Confession from Landis can’t be taken as gospel Cyclist finally admits to drug use, implicates Armstrong By Jim Litke The Associated Press

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hould you buy a used confession from this man? The short answer: Not all of it.

Inside • Lance Armstrong crashes at Tour of California, withdraws from rest of stage race, Page D5

Floyd Landis’ decision to come clean about his own drug use — and throw dirt on Lance Armstrong and others in the bargain — sounds like something boxing promoter Bob Arum once famously said trying to set the record straight: “I’m telling the truth today. I was lying to you yesterday.” Landis now admits he rode dirty. Every day for the last four years, he swore he was clean. See Landis / D5

Miguel Riopa / The Associated Press file

This Feb. 19, 2004, file photo shows Lance Armstrong, left, and Floyd Landis riding side-by-side during the Tour of the Algarve in Portugal.

PREP BOYS TENNIS

ADVENTURE SPORTS

Summit advances players at state Bulletin staff report

NBA Celts guard against overconfidence in conference final

Shevlin Park Shevlin Park loop trail Tumalo Creek loop trail Footbridge

Editor’s note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoor writer Mark Morical, features different trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

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ometimes on our quests for longer and more arduous adventures, we forget what is near and dear to us. For me, a typical mountain bike ride through Shevlin Park consists of getting quickly to the Mrazek Trail, without taking time to enjoy the diverse old-growth forest that envelopes the park or the beautifully babbling Tumalo Creek that runs through it. On a recent cold and windy but sunny Wednesday morning, I decided that Mrazek — a long, singletrack trail that runs west all the way to the Tumalo Falls area — would have to wait. I was determined to focus on the scenic trails of Shevlin Park, encompassing about 650 acres in northwest Bend. See Shevlin / D6

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

COLLEGE BASEBALL

In second season of return, UO establishes itself By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Scoreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 Prep Sports ...............................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 MLB .................................. D4, D5 Cycling ......................................D5 Adventure Sports...................... D6

Shevlin Park trails Tu m

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INDEX

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL GUIDE

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Boston’s Kevin Garnett (5) and Brian Scalabrine celebrate after Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals.

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Jaramie Duke, 33, leads a ride with his daughter Elise, 4, and wife Jenni Duke, 31, all from San Diego, on the Shevlin Park trail system in Bend on Tuesday afternoon.

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WALTHAM, Mass. — Two wins away from the NBA Finals, the Boston Celtics have plenty of reasons to be confident. But overconfident? Don’t count on it, no matter what Paul Pierce said. Before leaving the court after the Celtics took a 2-0 lead over the Orlando Magic on Tuesday night, Pierce looked straight into the camera and said in a live, 60-second television interview, “We’re coming home and close it out.” Coach Doc Rivers wasn’t pleased. “I didn’t like it,” he said Thursday. “I don’t mind the confidence part. That’s good. You’ve got to have confidence, but we want to be humble and we haven’t achieved anything. I think that’s what he was trying to say. ... I wish they had taken the mike away (before) the last couple of words.” The Celtics’ 95-92 win in which Pierce scored 28 points sent them home with a chance to sweep the bestof-seven Eastern Conference finals by winning Saturday and Monday nights. “We still haven’t played our best basketball,” Pierce said. “This team is real humble. We’re not taking these games that we won in Orlando for granted, knowing that they beat us here a couple of times during the season.” — The Associated Press

BEAVERTON — Summit High kicked off its defense of the Storm’s 2009 state championship with a pair of wins Thursday during the opening round of the Class 5A boys state tennis championships at the Tualatin Hills Tennis Center. Summit sophomore Paxton Deuel, the tournament’s No. 4 seed in singles, cruised to a 6-3, 6-4 first-round victory over Ashland’s Quincy Briscoe. “We like his draw a lot,” said Storm coach Josh Cordell. Deuel faces freshman Jonathan Colner of Portland’s Cleveland High today in a quarterfinal match, one which Cordell calls “a big one.” In doubles, the Storm pair of Conor Hegewald and Sterling Dillingham topped Cleveland’s Jasper Degens and Neil Alexander 6-1, 6-2 in their first-round matchup. The two face a tough quarterfinal match against No. 1 seed Connor Horne and Matt Walker of Churchill High in Eugene. “I do think they’re the two best teams in doubles, so we knew they’d meet,” Cordell said. “We were just hoping it’d be in the finals. “But, we’ll take it when it happens,” he added. “We’re excited about it, it’s definitely a winnable one.” Despite having just two entrants in the state tournament, Cordell figures his squad has a chance at repeating as state champs if both Deuel and the doubles team of Hegewald and Dillingham can make it to the state finals. At the end of the first round of play, Cleveland, with six points, held a two-point lead over Summit and Churchill, which were tied for second with four points apiece. Mountain View’s Kevin Kyger and Matt Larraneta stumbled in a first-round doubles match, falling 6-0, 6-1 to Ashland’s Chase Barnard and Jeff Laskos. In singles play, Cleveland’s Alex Rovello, the three-time defending state champion, bested Bend High’s Jeff Windsor in straight sets, 6-0, 6-0, and Century’s Dexter Hoang defeated Crook County’s Trevor Brown 6-0, 6-2. The 5A state tournament resumes today, highlighted by championship quarterfinal and semifinal round play.

Last season, when coach George Horton was about to usher back the first Oregon baseball team in 28 years, he said the trick was to convince his young team they could compete. For the players, it was convincing Horton to let go of his past. The work on both sides has obviously worked: In just the team’s second season, Horton — who built a reputation for winning at Cal State Ful-

lerton — has the No. 22 Ducks vying for a spot in the postseason. Oregon reached the 35-win benchmark with a 4-2 victory over the University of Portland earlier this week, positioning itself for an NCAA at-large bid. “The great news is that we control our own destiny,” Horton said. “We’ve got seven games left and unless we fall flat on our face, I would be shocked if they don’t invite us.” Having Horton at the helm probably helps. He

coached at Fullerton for 11 seasons, going to the College World Series six times. The Titans team won the national title in 2004, and he was twice the national coach of the year. Lured away by the Ducks, Horton built a program from the ground up in just 17 months, starting with 20 freshman on a roster of 35. He had full support of the university, which built an $18 million ballpark in the shadow of Autzen Stadium. See UO / D6

Ranked Ducks • Oregon has been in the Baseball America top 25 for several weeks; the Ducks are No. 22 now


D2 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA European Tour, BMW PGA Championship, second round, Golf. 10 a.m. — LPGA Tour, Sybase Match Play Championship, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Byron Nelson Championship, second round, Golf.

TRACK & FIELD 11 a.m. — College, Pac-10 Men’s and Women’s Championships, FSNW (taped).

CYCLING 2 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 6, VS. network.

SOFTBALL 2:30 p.m. — College, NCAA Tournament, regional, Auburn vs. Oregon, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — College, NCAA Tournament, regional, Jacksonville State vs. Georgia Tech, ESPN.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, conference finals, San Jose Sharks at Chicago Blackhawks, VS. network.

BOXING 7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Ameth Diaz vs. Ji-Hoon Kim, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 7 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

SATURDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, BMW PGA Championship, third round, Golf. 11 a.m. — LPGA Tour, Sybase Match Play Championship, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Byron Nelson Championship, third round, CBS.

AUTO RACING 8 a.m. — IndyCar, Indianapolis 500, qualifying, day 1, VS. network. 5 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA O’Reilly Auto Parts Summer Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

SOFTBALL 9 a.m. — NCAA Tournament, regional, teams TBD, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — College, NCAA Tournament, regional, teams TBD, ESPN. 2 p.m. — College, NCAA Tournament, Regional, teams TBD, ESPN.

LACROSSE 11 a.m. — Major League Lacrosse, Chesapeake Bayhawks at Toronto Nationals, ESPN2.

SOCCER 11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, final, Bayern Munich vs. Inter Milan, Fox. Noon — MLS, San Jose Earthquakes at Seattle Sounders FC, FSNW. 3 p.m. — United States vs. Germany, ESPN2.

HOCKEY Noon — NHL, conference finals, Philadelphia Flyers at Montreal Canadiens, NBC.

BASEBALL 2 p.m. — College, Oregon at Washington, Comcast SportsNet. 2 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Arizona State, FSNW (taped). 4 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at New York Mets, Fox. 7 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

CYCLING 3:30 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 7, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Orlando Magic at Boston Celtics, ESPN.

SUNDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, BMW PGA Championship, final round, Golf. 11 a.m. — LPGA Tour, Sybase Match Play Championship, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Byron Nelson Championship, final round, CBS.

BASEBALL 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Philadelphia Phillies, TBS. 1 p.m. — College, Oregon at Washington, Comcast SportsNet. 1 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners, FSNW. 5 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at New York Mets, ESPN. 10 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Arizona State, FSNW (taped).

AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. — Drag racing, NHRA Get Screened America Pro Modified series, ESPN2 (taped). 9 a.m. — IndyCar racing, Indianapolis 500, qualifying, day 2, VS. network. 4 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA O’Reilly Auto Parts Summer Nationals, final eliminations, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

ON DECK Today Baseball: Class 6A state playoffs, first round: Redmond vs. Lincoln at Gabriel Park in Portland, 4:30 p.m.; Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Liberty at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Class 4A state playoffs, first round: Sisters at Cascade, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Class 6A state playoffs, first round: Wilson at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Crescent Valley at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Track: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championships in Salem, 4 p.m.; Intermountain Conference championships at Bend High, 3:30 p.m.; Class 2A, 1A state championships at Western Oregon in Monmouth, 11 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Portland Tennis Center, 8 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m. Boys tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton, 8 a.m.; Class 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m. Boys lacrosse: Oregon High School Lacrosse playoffs, Bend at Oregon Episcopal School, TBA

Ken Duke Michael Letzig

IN THE BLEACHERS

Saturday Track: Intermountain Conference championships at Bend High, 11 a.m.; Sisters, La Pine at Sky-Em League championships in Cottage Grove, 11 a.m.; Class 2A, 1A state championships at Western Oregon in Monmouth, 1 p.m. Boys tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m.

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— WARSAW OPEN Thursday Warsaw, Poland Singles Quarterfinals Li Na (3), China, def. Sara Errani, Italy, 6-2, 6-1. Zheng Jie (5), China, def. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, 6-3, retired. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 7-5. Greta Arn, Hungary, def. Alona Bondarenko (6), Ukraine, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4. STRASBOURG INTERNATIONAL Thursday Strasbourg, France Singles Quarterfinals Kristina Barrois, Germany, def. Anastasija Sevastova (7), Latvia, 6-1, 7-5. Vania King, United States, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-4, 7-5. Maria Sharapova (1), Russia, leads Julia Goerges, Germany, 3-2, susp., rain. Anabel Medina Garrigues (5), Spain, leads Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-2, susp. rain

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— OPEN DE NICE Thursday Nice, France Singles Quarterfinals Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Marcos Baghdatis (5), Cyprus, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Fernando Verdasco (2), Spain, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-4. Potito Starace, Italy, def. Gael Monfils (3), France, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Richard Gasquet, France, def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 6-4, 6-2. WORLD TEAM CUP Thursday Duesseldorf, Germany Red Group United States 1, Czech Republic 0 Sam Querrey, United States, def. Jan Hajek, Serbia, 6-3, 7-5. Spain 2, Australia 0 Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, 6-1, 6-3. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Peter Luczak, Australia, 6-3, 6-2. Blue Group France 1, Argentina 1 Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 6-3, 6-4. Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Germany 1, Serbia 0 Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 7-6 (1), 6-4.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— x-if necessary PLAYOFF GLANCE CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Philadelphia 2, Montreal 1 Sunday, May 16: Philadelphia 6, Montreal 0 Tuesday, May 18: Philadelphia 3, Montreal 0 Thursday, May 20: Montreal 5, Philadelphia 1 Saturday, May 22: Philadelphia at Montreal, noon x-Monday, May 24: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.

x-Wednesday, May 26: Philadelphia at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Friday, May 28: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 2, San Jose 0 Sunday, May 16: Chicago 2, San Jose 1 Tuesday, May 18: Chicago 4, San Jose 2 Today, May 21: San Jose at Chicago, 5 p.m. Sunday, May 23: San Jose at Chicago, noon x-Tuesday, May 25: Chicago at San Jose, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 27: San Jose at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Saturday, May 29: Chicago at San Jose, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 5 0 2 17 13 New York 5 4 0 15 9 Toronto FC 3 4 1 10 11 Chicago 2 3 3 9 11 Kansas City 2 3 2 8 8 New England 2 5 2 8 10 Philadelphia 1 5 1 4 7 D.C. 1 7 0 3 4 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 8 0 2 26 16 Real Salt Lake 4 3 1 13 15 San Jose 4 2 1 13 11 Houston 4 4 1 13 12 Colorado 4 3 1 13 9 Seattle 3 3 3 12 9 FC Dallas 2 2 5 11 10 Chivas USA 3 5 1 10 10 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Games Columbus 3, New York 1 Los Angeles 1, FC Dallas 0 Saturday’s Games D.C. United at Houston, 10 a.m. New England at Toronto FC, 10 a.m. San Jose at Seattle FC, noon Real Salt Lake at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.

GA 6 12 13 12 8 14 15 16 GA 2 9 7 10 7 12 10 12

BASEBALL College All Times PDT ——— PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 16 5 .762 43-6 UCLA 13 8 .619 38-11 Washington State 11 10 .524 28-18 California 11 10 .524 27-19 Stanford 11 10 .524 28-20 Oregon 10 11 .476 35-18 Arizona 10 11 .476 31-18 Oregon State 9 12 .459 27-19 Washington 9 12 .429 26-24 USC 5 16 .238 25-28 Today’s Games UCLA at California, 2:30 p.m. USC at Washington State, 5:30 p.m. Oregon at Washington, 6 p.m. Stanford at Arizona, 6p.m. Oregon State at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m

GOLF PGA Tour HP BYRON NELSON CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday At TPC Four Seasons Resort Irving, Texas Purse: $6.5 million

Yardgae: 7,166; Par 70 (35-35) Parital First Round Jason Day 34-32—66 Joe Durant 31-35—66 Dustin Johnson 33-34—67 Jay Williamson 33-34—67 Marc Leishman 33-34—67 Mark Hensby 35-33—68 Briny Baird 34-34—68 Rory Sabbatini 35-33—68 Shaun Micheel 38-30—68 James Nitties 37-31—68 Steve Wheatcroft 34-34—68 Tom Pernice, Jr. 32-37—69 Arjun Atwal 34-35—69 Michael Bradley 36-33—69 Brad Faxon 33-36—69 J.J. Henry 33-36—69 Garth Mulroy 37-32—69 Brent Delahoussaye 34-35—69 Jason Schultz 35-34—69 Rod Pampling 33-36—69 Ryuji Imada 35-35—70 Scott Verplank 35-35—70 Y.E. Yang 34-36—70 Kenny Perry 35-35—70 Derek Lamely 34-36—70 Brett Wetterich 34-36—70 Mathew Goggin 34-36—70 Joe Ogilvie 34-36—70 Harrison Frazar 35-35—70 Greg Chalmers 34-36—70 Kevin Johnson 35-35—70 Jerod Turner 35-35—70 Craig Bowden 35-36—71 Graham DeLaet 36-35—71 Kevin Streelman 37-34—71 Lee Janzen 37-34—71 Jeff Quinney 35-36—71 Will MacKenzie 36-35—71 Roland Thatcher 38-33—71 Bill Lunde 34-37—71 John Mallinger 33-38—71 J.P. Hayes 35-36—71 Kevin Sutherland 34-37—71 Matt Bettencourt 37-34—71 Jimmy Walker 35-36—71 Tom Gillis 36-35—71 Henrik Bjornstad 38-33—71 Cameron Tringale 37-34—71 Spencer Levin 36-35—71 Chris Riley 38-33—71 Bryce Molder 33-38—71 Cliff Kresge 35-37—72 John Huston 38-34—72 Jeev Milkha Singh 35-37—72 Brian Gay 37-35—72 Justin Leonard 35-37—72 D.J. Trahan 36-36—72 Stuart Appleby 38-34—72 Chris DiMarco 38-34—72 Skip Kendall 36-36—72 Steve Lowery 34-38—72 Rocco Mediate 38-34—72 Chris Tidland 35-37—72 Andrew McLardy 35-37—72 Roger Tambellini 36-36—72 Charles Warren 37-35—72 Yuta Ikeda 38-35—73 Jeff Maggert 34-39—73 Carl Pettersson 37-36—73 John Rollins 36-37—73 John Senden 36-37—73 Daniel Chopra 36-37—73 Todd Hamilton 37-37—74 Troy Matteson 36-38—74 Bob Estes 38-36—74 Matt Jones 36-38—74 Christopher Brown 36-38—74 Garrett Willis 35-39—74 George McNeill 36-39—75 Mark Calcavecchia 39-36—75 Ted Purdy 37-38—75 Martin Flores 37-38—75 Troy Merritt 39-36—75 Nicholas Thompson 37-39—76 Cameron Percy 38-38—76

40-37—77 44-39—83

Failed to complete first round Steve Elkington Hunter Mahan Jarrod Lyle Tommy Armour III Nathan Green Chris Smith Parker McLachlin Michael Sim Alex Prugh Robert Garrigus Vance Veazey Blake Adams Sean O’Hair Heath Slocum Jeff Overton Brandt Jobe Corey Pavin Tim Wilkinson Johnson Wagner James Driscoll Billy Mayfair Greg Owen D.A. Points Alex Cejka Aron Price Chris Wilson Jordan Spieth Trevor Fisher Jr Josh Teater Colt Knost Chad Campbell Jeff Gove Webb Simpson Ryan Palmer Stewart Cink Pat Perez Andres Romero Cameron Beckman Paul Stankowski Charley Hoffman Kris Blanks Michael Connell Wil Collins Matt Weibring Rickie Fowler Tim Herron J.B. Holmes Vijay Singh Ben Crane Chris Couch Martin Laird Chez Reavie Brian Davis Ricky Barnes Chad Collins Charlie Wi Omar Uresti Brenden Pappas John Merrick Brian Stuard Mathias Gronberg Richard S. Johnson Brendon de Jonge Gary Woodland Justin Bolli Jason Gore Rich Barcelo Bobby Hutcherson David Lutterus

DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF DNF

Leaderboard at time of suspended play SCORE THRU 1. Steve Elkington -4 16 1. Hunter Mahan -4 15 1. Joe Durant -4 F 1. Jason Day -4 F 1. Jarrod Lyle -4 11 6. Dustin Johnson -3 F 6. Jay Williamson -3 F 6. Nathan Green -3 15 6. Marc Leishman -3 F 6. Chris Smith -3 11 6. Tommy Armour III -3 16

LPGA Tour SYBASE MATCH PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday At Hamilton Farm Golf Club Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,585; Par 72 (Seedings in parentheses) First Round Sophie Gustafson (19) def. Na On Min (63), 5 and 4. Morgan Pressel (14) def. Jimin Kang (56), 20 holes. Amy Yang (30) def. Michele Redman (39), 19 holes. Juli Inkster (35) def. Suzann Pettersen (3), 21 holes. Sandra Gal (46) def. Katherine Hull (22), 1-up. Haeji Kang (61) def. In-Kyung Kim (11), 1-up. Jee Young Lee (27) def. Christina Kim (40), 4 and 2. Shi Hyun Ahn (48) def. Anna Nordqvist (6), 2-up. Kristy McPherson (18) def. Meena Lee (47), 3 and 2. Catriona Matthew (15) def. Grace Park (64), 1-up. M.J. Hur (31) def. Hye Jung Choi (60), 1-up. Ai Miyazato (2) def. Jeong Jang (51), 4 and 3. Pat Hurst (41) def. Brittany Lang (23), 19 holes. Angela Stanford (10) def. Amy Hung (59), 4 and 3. Amanda Blumenherst (55) def. Stacy Lewis (26), 1-up. Karrie Webb (7) def. Eunjung Yi (36), 4 and 3. Maria Hjorth (20) def. Shanshan Feng (45), 2 and 1. Inbee Park (13) def. Laura Diaz (58), 4 and 3. Candie Kung (29) def. Natalie Gulbis (44), 5 and 4. Yani Tseng (4) def. Wendy Ward (43), 2 and 1. Momoko Ueda (21) def. Vicky Hurst (37), 3 and 1. Song-Hee Kim (12) def. Nicole Castrale (52), 2 and 1. Sun Young Yoo (28) def. Karen Stupples (34), 3 and 2. Cristie Kerr (5) def. Meaghan Francella (53), 4 and 3. Azahara Munoz (54) def. Se Ri Pak (17), 3 and 2. Beatriz Recari (62) def. Brittany Lincicome (16), 1-up. Hee-Won Han (32) def. Mika Miyazato (38), 2 and 1. Jiyai Shin (1) def. Kyeong Bae (42), 3 and 2. Eun-Hee Ji (24) def. Janice Moodie (49), 22 holes. Karine Icher (57) def. Na Yeon Choi (9), 4 and 3. Hee Young Park (25) def. Ji Young Oh (33), 19 holes. Michelle Wie (8) def. Stacy Prammanasudh (50), 2-up.

BASKETBALL NBA

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT x-if necessary ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 2, Orlando 0 Sunday, May 16: Boston 92, Orlando 88 Tuesday, May 18: Boston 95, Orlando 92 Saturday, May 22: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Monday, May 24: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 26: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 28: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 30: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers 2, Phoenix 0 Monday, May 17: L.A. Lakers 128, Phoenix 107 Wednesday, May 19: L.A. Lakers 124, Phoenix 112 Sunday, May 23: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 25: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 27: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. x-Saturday, May 29: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 31: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 2 0 1.000 Washington 2 0 1.000 Connecticut 1 0 1.000 New York 1 0 1.000 Chicago 0 2 .000 Indiana 0 2 .000 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 2 0 1.000 Phoenix 1 0 1.000 San Antonio 1 1 .500 Minnesota 1 2 .333 Los Angeles 0 2 .000 Tulsa 0 2 .000 ——— Thursday’s Game San Antonio 83, Tulsa 74 Today’s Games New York at Washington, 4 p.m. Connecticut at Atlanta, 4 p.m.

GB — — ½ ½ 2 2 GB — ½ 1 1½ 2 2

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL MLB—Announced that Minnesota Twins minor league OF Michael Harrington has received a 50-game suspension after testing positive for the performanceenhancing substance Andarine, a Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator (SARM), in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Selected the contract of INF Angel Sanchez from Pawtucket (IL). Designated LHP Scott Schoeneweis for assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS—Optioned RHP Jeff Manship to Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed C Jorge Posada on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of C Chad Moeller from Scranton-Wilkes-Barre (IL). Recalled INF-OF Kevin Russo from Scranton-Wilkes-Barre. Optioned RHP Mark Melancon to Scranton-Wilkes-Barre. Transferred DH Nick Johnson to the 60-day disabled list. Announced the extension through the 2014 season of their Player Development Contract (PDC) with the Scranton/WilkesBarre Yankees, their Triple-A affiliate in the International League. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Recalled RHP Vin Mazzaro from Sacramento (PCL). Optioned RHP Henry Rodriguez to Sacramento. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Agreed to terms with RHP Luis Ayala on a minor league contract. HOUSTON ASTROS—Waived INF Kazuo Matsui for the purpose of giving him his unconditional release. Selected the contract of INF Oswaldo Navarro from Round Rock (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed LHP Jack Taschner on the 15-day DL. Activated RHP Brendan Donnelly from the 15-day DL. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Placed OF Kyle Blanks on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 18. Recalled RHP Adam Russell from Portland (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Suspended referee Joe DeRosa for one game for throwing a ball to a fan at halftime of Game 2 of the Eastern Conference Finals on May 18. FOOTBALL National Football League GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed QB Graham Harrell. Released QB Chris Pizzotti. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed LB Zach Thomas and announced his retirement. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Promoted Trent Baalke to vice president of player personnel. Named Joel Patten director of college scouting. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Waived QB Mike Teel.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,219 231 117 25 The Dalles 1,986 402 14 4 John Day 2,388 449 20 6 McNary 3,100 553 18 9 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 225,976 10,329 8,824 2,443 The Dalles 165,378 8,724 2,264 1,116 John Day 152,350 8,693 2,486 1,421 McNary 121,193 5,225 2,215 1,203

TENNIS 9 a.m. — French Open, day one, ESPN2.

GOLF ROUNDUP

HOCKEY Noon — NHL, conference finals, San Jose Sharks at Chicago Blackhawks, NBC. 10 am. — College, NCAA Tournament, regional, teams TBD, ESPN.

Aussie has a good day, shares lead in Texas

12:30 p.m. — College, NCAA Tournament, regional, teams TBD, ESPN.

The Associated Press

SOFTBALL

CYCLING 3:30 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 8, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Los Angeles Lakers at Phoenix Suns, TNT.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Arizona State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SATURDAY BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Arizona State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Arizona State, KICE-AM 940, KRCOAM 690.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Los Angeles Lakers at Phoenix Suns, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

IRVING, Texas — Jason Day’s stomach was acting up while he was on the driving range Thursday morning, an angry reaction to antibiotics that are supposed to wipe out a lingering, often-misdiagnosed sinus infection. He was thinking about withdrawing from the Byron Nelson Championship. Then he realized it looked like rain and he’d left his umbrella in the car. Walking to the parking lot, Day pictured himself getting behind the wheel and heading to his home in Fort Worth. He ended up toughing it out, and “it was probably a good idea,” he said with a smile. Day birdied four of his first six holes on his way to a 4-under 66 for a share of the first-round lead when play was suspended late Thursday. The threatening skies that sent Day fetching his umbrella never actually drenched the TPC Four Seasons course, but the radar looked so scary there was a delay of 3 hours, 44 minutes. Joe Durant finished with an eagle and a birdie to match Day at 66. Steve Elkington, Hunter Mahan and Jarrod Lyle were still on the course with scores of 4-under.

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

Jason Day chips onto the ninth green during the first round of the Byron Nelson golf tournament Thursday in Irving, Texas. Day is in a tie for the lead. Elkington will have two holes left, Mahan three and Lyle seven when play resumes at 7:15 a.m. local time today, pushing back the start of the second round by an hour. Thursday’s late starters are the first to go off today, which means it will be a long day for them.

Among those working overtime will be 16-year-old Jordan Spieth, a high school junior from Dallas and the reigning U.S. Junior Amateur champion. He’s the first high schooler to get a sponsor’s exemption into this event since Tiger Woods in 1993, and he showed he belongs by shooting even par through 11 holes. Spieth woke up nervous and held his emotions in check during the delay by playing table tennis, shopping for souvenirs and putting. After a raucous ovation at his introduction, he ripped his tee shot down the middle, beyond his two playing partners. He parred the first four holes, then dropped in a birdie. He finished with a par putt and walked away saying, “I wanted to keep playing, I didn’t care how dark it was.” Dustin Johnson was part of a group tied for second at 3-under, one shot behind. He’s No. 9 on the season’s money list, the top earner in this field. Defending champion Rory Sabbatini was among a pack at 68. Vijay Singh and Rickie Fowler got off to poor starts in their quests to qualify for the U.S. Open. Both need to be near the top of the leaderboard to get into the top 50 in the world rankings by Monday’s deadline, but

both were stopped at 2-over. Fowler had two holes left, Singh three. Also on Thursday: Wie advances in match play GLADSTONE, N.J. — Michelle Wie survived a tight opening match against Stacy Prammanasudh in the Sybase Match Play Championship, taking the lead with a 30-foot birdie putt on the par-3 16th and winning 2-up with a conceded birdie on 18. The eighth-seeded Wie will face Hee Young Park, a 19-hole winner over Ji Young Oh, in the second round Friday at Hamilton Farm. Top-seeded Jiyai Shin and No. 2 Ai Miyazato also advanced, while 49-year-old Juli Inskter rallied to beat third-seeded Suzann Pettersen in 21 holes. Willett leads by one WENTWORTH, England — Danny Willett set a course record by shooting 6-under 65 in the BMW PGA Championship on Thursday for a one-stroke lead over Richard Green. Ross Fisher was among a group of four players who shot 67, joining Richie Ramsay, S.S.P. Chowrasia and Steve Webster. Top European player Lee Westwood shot a 1-under 70, making double bogey on the 10th.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

S  B

Basketball • Ref suspended for throwing ball at fan: Referee Joe DeRosa has been suspended without pay for throwing a ball at a fan during halftime of an NBA playoff game in Orlando. DeRosa will miss the next game he would have been scheduled to work. At halftime of Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals between Orlando and Boston, DeRosa was walking to the scorer’s table to get the warm-up jackets for his crew. A fan behind the table approached DeRosa, gesturing with his arms and appearing to be shouting at the veteran official. DeRosa flipped the game ball to the fan, who tossed it back. • NCAA mulling options for bigger March Madness: After a meeting last week, the Division I men’s basketball committee met is reviewing various options for the four opening-round games that will take place before the round of 64, and members said they are receptive to concerns that the same leagues would be penciled in for those slots year after year. The NCAA has approved a 68-team format for the men’s tournament, beginning next March, and there are three basic plans under consideration for the opening games. One would slot the bottom eight teams in the tournament into the opening round and have them play for the right to move on to the round of 64 — an expanded version of the current format. Another option would put the last eight at-large teams to make the field into the play-in games. There’s also talk of a hybrid plan that could include both at-large teams and automatic qualifiers. • 76ers agree to terms with Collins: The Philadelphia 76ers agreed to terms with TV analyst Doug Collins to become their new coach, two people familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The people spoke Thursday on condition of anonymity because the announcement has not been made public. An official announcement was likely to come today. One of the people familiar with the deal said Collins agreed to a four-year contract. Collins is 332-287 in coaching stints with Chicago, Detroit and Washington. The 76ers made him the No. 1 overall pick in the 1973 draft, and he played eight seasons with the team.

should stay out of the college football business. BCS executive director Bill Hancock responded Thursday to a letter from two U.S. Senators who are unhappy about the way the sport determines its champion. Hancock wrote that “decisions about college football should be made by university presidents, athletics directors, coaches and conference commissioners rather than by members of Congress.” Hancock went on to respond to the senators’ questions about how the BCS operates. His answers are unlikely to satisfy Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch, who home state team didn’t get to play for the national title at the end of the 2008 season despite going undefeated.

Auto racing • Rain ends Indy 500 practice early: Tony Kanaan ran a fast lap of 226.775 mph Thursday before rain ended Indianapolis 500 practice about 45 minutes early. Paul Tracy had the second-fastest lap at 226.322 mph, Hideki Mutoh was third at 226.230 and Marco Andretti was fourth at 226.108. Scott Dixon had the fastest lap the previous two days, but was just the 13th-fastest on Thursday. There were only a couple hours of action before a 2-hour, 14 minute delay. Drivers got about another hour of work before track officials ended the session.

Horse racing • Dublin no longer a Belmont prospect: Trainer D. Wayne Lukas says Dublin will not be entered in the Belmont Stakes, eliminating the chance of any horse running in all three Triple Crown races this year. Dublin finished seventh in the Kentucky Derby behind Super Saver and fifth in the Preakness behind Lookin At Lucky. The trainers of Super Saver and Lookin At Lucky have already said their colts are bypassing the Belmont on June 5. The other Derby-Preakness runners Jackson Bend and Paddy O’Prado are not being considered, either. It will be the first time since 2006 that no horse competes in all three classics and that neither the Derby nor Preakness winner runs in the Belmont. Top Belmont contenders include Derby runner-up Ice Box and Preakness runner-up First Dude.

Football

Prep sports

• Jets coach says Super Bowl should be in N.Y.: Rex Ryan thinks it’s time for a coldweather Super Bowl. The New York Jets coach said Thursday there should be no question whether the NFL’s showcase event should be played at the new Meadowlands Stadium in 2014. The league’s owners are voting on the site next week at their meetings in Dallas. “The game should be played here,” Ryan said, “and it would be a great Super Bowl.” If the owners vote in favor of the joint bid by the Jets and Giants, it would be the first Super Bowl to be played outdoors in a cold-weather locale. Miami and Tampa, Fla., which have hosted 14 Super Bowls between them, also bid. • Favre: He’ll return to NFL if team returns to CWS: Brett Favre says he still isn’t sure what he’s doing next season, but he may have given some indication after visiting with the Southern Miss baseball team. The Minnesota Vikings quarterback told the Golden Eagles on Thursday morning that if they can make it back to the College World Series for the second straight year, he will return for one more season in the NFL. Southern Miss players have a lot of work to do if they want to force Favre into action. They are 30-20 and need wins to earn a postseason invitation. • Las Vegas Bowl on through 2013 season: The Las Vegas Bowl has been licensed through the 2013 season by an NCAA committee. The decision by the NCAA Football Issue Committee was announced Thursday. Tickets for the 19th Las Vegas Bowl go on sale June 2. The game will be played Dec. 22 in Sam Boyd Stadium. This year the game will feature teams from the Mountain West Conference and Pac-10. In the 2009 game BYU beat Oregon State 44-20. • BCS head: Colleges, not Congress, should run sport: The head of the Bowl Championship Series is standing firm in his belief that Congress

• Congress urges more attention to H.S. concussions: Young people who suffer concussions are at greater risk of long-term physical and mental consequences, lawmakers were told Thursday at a House Education and Labor Committee hearing on head injuries to high school athletes. Last October the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on head injuries in football, but the focus there was on life-altering injuries to professional football players. “It was clear to us that if the NFL was paying attention to concussions at the professional level, we should be doing the same at the high school level,” said Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., chairman of the education committee.

Hawks in first after opening day of Sky-Em track and field meet Bulletin staff report COTTAGE GROVE — La Pine is in first place in the boys track standings after launching a successful start to the Sky-Em League district championships in Cottage Grove on Thursday. “It’s a great place to be,” said Hawk coach Gary Slater. Action resumes Saturday after today’s rest day, and marks the second and final day of the district showdown. Ty Slater recorded the day’s best mark in the discus, taking the win for the Hawks. La Pine claimed the top two spots in the pole vault as Jake Logan cleared 14 feet to take first and Deion Mock took second with a vault of 13-6. Competitors finishing in first or second place qualify for next week’s Class 4A state meet at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field in Eugene. Sisters, which finished the day in second-place overall, trails La Pine by 4 1⁄2 points entering Saturday’s finals. “We’re battling for second (place),” said Sisters coach Bob Johnson, who calls the Marist boys, with more than 40 kids at the district meet, the “clear favorite.” “They just outnumber us,” he added, noting that Sisters has only 18 boys at the seven-team meet. Parker Bennett grabbed a win in the 3,000-meter race for the Outlaws — his fourth victory of the season in the event — finishing 11 seconds ahead of teammate Taylor Steele, who took second after shaving eight seconds off his previous personal best.

On the girls side, Sisters ended Thursday in third with 36 points while La Pine finished fourth with 30 points. Marist finished the first day of the league meet with 47 points, giving the Spartans a two-point lead over current runner-up Cottage Grove (45 points). For the Hawks, Kassi Conditt tallied a win in the shot put while Laura Jackson just missed qualifying for state in the 3,000, finishing third. The Outlaws advanced two girls to state in field events as Sara Small won the pole vault and Annie Mutchler placed first in the triple jump. In other prep action Thursday: TRACK AND FIELD Panther boys in first at CVC meet SALEM — Redmond High ended the opening day of the Central Valley Conference district meet in first place in the boys standings. The Panthers will go into today’s second and final day of competition at Sprague High with 53 points, eight points more than first-day runner-up South Salem (45 points). Ron Perkins, Tanner Manselle and Matt Miyamoto all qualified for next week’s Class 6A state meet with their performances on Thursday. Perkins placed second in the shot put, Manselle recorded a runner-up finish in the javelin and Miyamoto finished second in the pole vault. Redmond’s girls team ended the first day of competition in sixth place with 14.5 points. South Salem led the seven-team field with 53 points. Haley Jordan was the lone Panther to post a state-qualifying finish on the girls side Thurs-

day. Jordan finished second in the javelin. The CVC district meet continues today at 4 p.m. GIRLS TENNIS Redmond doubles falls into consolation round BEAVERTON — The Redmond High doubles team of Karli Christensen and Kayla Woychak was knocked into the consolation round of the Class 6A state tournament after a firstround loss at the Portland and Tualatin Hills tennis centers. In round one, the team was defeated by Riley Stevenson and Molly Morgan of Central Catholic 7-6, 6-0. Today, Christensen and Woychak will play Mackenzie Fraser and Lauren Mann of Sprague in the first round of the consolation bracket. Storm doubles advance to 5A state quarterfinals BEAVERTON — Hannah Shepard and Jesse Drakulich of Summit battled into the quarterfinal round of the doubles bracket at the Class 5A state championship at the Tualatin Hills Tennis Center. The duo rallied to win a pigtail matchup against Heidi Niu and Stephanie Wang of Crescent Valley (4-6, 6-3, 7-5) before claiming a 6-2, 6-3 victory against Chloe Deckwar and Katie Patton of Ashland. The Storm duo will face Elizabeth Patterson and Hannah Rondeau of Corvallis today for a state semifinal berth. The Storm’s other doubles team at state, Mackenzie Sunborg and Natalia Harrington, fell to Catherine Miolla and Gretchen Jernotedt of Wilsonville 6-4, 2-6, 6-2 in Thursday’s pigtail round. Crook County’s doubles team of Braiden Johnston and Katie

Brown, the tournament’s No. 2 seed, lost their first-round match against Patterson and Rondeau (5-7, 6-4, 6-4), but will face Deckwar and Patton in today’s consolation round. In singles play, Bryn Oliveira of Bend High slipped into the consolation round after losing to Charlotte Fisher of Crescent Valley 1-6, 6-2, 6-3 in the first round. Today, Oliveira will face Intermountain Conference rival Sydney Hege of The Dalles-Wahtonka in consolation play. Courtney Lindgren of Madras also lost her first match of the state tournament, falling to Anna Braun of West Albany (6-1, 6-0) in the pigtail round of play. In another pigtail matchup, Crook County’s Erin Crofcheck lost to Liberty High’s Ayaka Terakawa. Outlaw advances in small-school tourney EUGENE — Playing a pigtail match at the University of Oregon in the Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships, Sisters senior Marine Tresnie defeated Kellie Hodges of Umatilla 6-0, 6-0 to advance to today’s first round. Tresnie will face Ontario senior Sarah Bond for a shot at the state quarterfinals. BOYS TENNIS Sisters senior wins opener at state EUGENE — Sisters’ Ben Fullhart won his pigtail match against Jordan Curtis of Baker 7-6 (7), 6-1 at the Class 4A state championships at the University of Oregon and will advance to play in today’s first round. Fullhart, a senior, will play La Salle Prep’s Maximilian Hey for a berth in the 4A quarterfinal round.

N H L P L AY O F F S

Canadiens finally score, win in East finals By John Wawrow The Associated Press

MONTREAL — Michael Cammalleri and the Montreal Canadiens finally solved Michael Leighton. Cammalleri scored in the first period to end Montreal’s twogame drought against Leighton, leading the Canadiens to a 5-1 win over the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference final on Thursday night. Tom Pyatt and Dominic Moore had a goal and assist apiece for Montreal, which earned its first win in the series. Brian Gionta and Marc-Andre Bergeron also scored as Leighton’s shutout streak was snapped at 172:05. “It’s a big deal for us, don’t get me wrong,” Cammalleri said. “But for us, we like the way we play, and we thought the goals were going to come.” Philadelphia’s Simon Gagne

foiled Jaroslav Halak’s shutout bid by scoring 8:22 into the third period. Leighton stopped 33 shots. The Flyers had won six straight, dating to their secondround series win over Boston during which they overcame a 30 series deficit. It was Leighton’s first loss in five starts since taking over after Brian Boucher hurt his knee. Cammalleri got it started with his team-leading 13th goal, opening the scoring 7:05 into the game. Halak finished with 25 saves. The eighth-seeded Canadiens are proving to be very resilient this postseason. Montreal already

has rallied to eliminate top-seeded Washington and Pittsburgh. “We are a much better team when our backs are against the wall,” Gionta said. “We’ve dealt with it all year.” The seventh-seeded Flyers know something about bouncing back, too, after rallying to beat Boston in the second round. Referring to the loss to the Canadiens as “a wake-up call,” Flyers defenseman Chris Pronger said it’s their turn to respond. “I don’t think you want to forget it. I think you need to use it and feed off it,” Pronger said. “They answered the bell, and now it’s our turn to get back at it

in Game 4.” The best-of-seven series resumes on Saturday in Montreal. Playing their first game at home in 10 days, the Canadiens outshot Philadelphia 28-13 in building a 3-0 lead on Moore’s goal midway through the second period. Moore’s score sent the raucous sellout crowd of 21,273 into a fury.

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Baseball • Mariners LHP Bedard may not debut until late June: The Mariners are tempering their optimistic hopes for Erik Bedard’s return. Seattle manager Don Wakamatsu on Thursday described a plan for the former Baltimore ace that suggests his season debut following shoulder surgery may not come until late June. The Mariners had been so excited about Bedard’s progress that they had raised the possibly of him returning this month. But he had a setback last week when he felt discomfort while throwing 30 pitches in a simulated game.

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Cycling • Italian takes Giro stage: Filippo Pozzato won the 12th stage of the Giro d’Italia on Thursday, while Richie Porte of Australia maintained the overall lead. The Italian national champion edged French duo Thomas Voeckler and Jerome Pineau in a sprint finish. Pozzato finished the 128-mile stage from Citta Sant’Angelo to Porto Recanati in 5 hours, 15 minutes, 50 seconds. Porte leads David Arroyo Duran of Spain by 1 minute, 42 seconds. — From wire reports

1 8 6 5 N E H i g h w a y 2 0 , B e n d • M o n – S a t 9 –7 | S u n 1 0 – 6 • 5 Expires Sunday, May 23, 2010.

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D4 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 30 11 .732 — New York 25 16 .610 5 Toronto 25 18 .581 6 Boston 22 20 .524 8½ Baltimore 13 29 .310 17½ Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 24 17 .585 — Minnesota 24 17 .585 — Kansas City 17 25 .405 7½ Chicago 16 24 .400 7½ Cleveland 15 24 .385 8 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 24 18 .571 — Oakland 20 22 .476 4 Los Angeles 20 23 .465 4½ Seattle 15 26 .366 8½ ——— Thursday’s Games Kansas City 9, Cleveland 3 Detroit 5, Oakland 2 Seattle 4, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 8, N.Y. Yankees 6 Boston 6, Minnesota 2 Texas 13, Baltimore 7 L.A. Angels 6, Chicago White Sox 5 Today’s Interleague Games Baltimore (D.Hernandez 0-5) at Washington (Olsen 2-1), 4:05 p.m. Boston (Lackey 4-2) at Philadelphia (Hamels 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-2) at Cleveland (Westbrook 2-2), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 2-4) at N.Y. Mets (Takahashi 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Lilly 1-3) at Texas (C.Lewis 3-2), 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Garza 5-1) at Houston (Myers 2-3), 5:05 p.m. Colorado (Hammel 1-2) at Kansas City (Bannister 2-3), 5:10 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 4-2) at Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 2-5), 5:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Bush 1-4) at Minnesota (Blackburn 4-1), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Pineiro 3-4) at St. Louis (Penny 3-4), 5:15 p.m. Toronto (Morrow 3-3) at Arizona (Haren 4-3), 6:40 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 6-1) at Oakland (Cahill 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Detroit (Willis 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 4-2), 7:10 p.m. San Diego (LeBlanc 2-1) at Seattle (Cl.Lee 1-2), 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Philadelphia 25 15 Florida 22 20 Atlanta 21 20 Washington 21 21 New York 20 22 Central Division W L St. Louis 24 18 Cincinnati 23 18 Chicago 19 23 Pittsburgh 18 23 Milwaukee 16 25 Houston 14 27 West Division W L San Diego 24 17 Los Angeles 23 18 San Francisco 22 18 Colorado 20 21 Arizona 18 24 ——— Thursday’s Games Philadelphia 5, Chicago Cubs 4 Atlanta 10, Cincinnati 9 St. Louis 4, Florida 2 Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 3 N.Y. Mets 10, Washington 7 Colorado 4, Houston 0 Arizona 8, San Francisco 7 L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 1

Pct GB .625 — .524 4 .512 4½ .500 5 .476 6 Pct .571 .561 .452 .439 .390 .341

GB — ½ 5 5½ 7½ 9½

Pct GB .585 — .561 1 .550 1½ .488 4 .429 6½

AL ROUNDUP SEATTLE — Ken Griffey Jr.’s game-winning, pinchhit single in the ninth inning capped Seattle’s three-run rally off AL saves leader Kevin Gregg and gave the Mariners a victory over Toronto. Seattle snapped a five-game skid and Griffey’s teammates mobbed him between first and second base. Nine days ago the Mariners rallied to his defense following a report he was unavailable to pinch-hit in an earlier loss because he was sleeping in the clubhouse. Gregg (0-1) had 12 saves in 13 chances before he allowed singles to Mike Sweeney and Jose Lopez then walked Milton Bradley to begin the ninth. He walked Casey Kotchman on a fullcount to make it 3-2. Toronto AB R F.Lewis cf 3 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 Lind lf 4 0 Reed lf 0 0 V.Wells dh 4 0 Overbay 1b 4 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 1 J.Bautista rf 2 1 Encarnacion 3b 1 0 J.Molina c 3 0 Totals 29 3

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 5 3 3

SO 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .283 .171 .226 .250 .301 .200 .267 .242 .200 .256

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf M.Sweeney dh 1-M.Saunders pr Jo.Lopez 3b Bradley lf Kotchman 1b J.Bard c Jo.Wilson ss a-Griffey Jr. ph Totals

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 8 4 5

SO 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .349 .190 .286 .226 .267 .217 .221 .200 .333 .239 .191

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 4

ARLINGTON, Texa — Nelson Cruz had a threerun homer and drove in four runs in his first career four-hit game, and Texas ran its winning streak to four games. Rangers starter Scott Feldman (2-4) had the benefit of early run support to win for the first time since April 11 despite allowing a career-high 12 hits over six innings. Baltimore C.Patterson lf Wigginton 2b Markakis rf M.Tejada 3b Scott 1b Wieters c a-Tatum ph Ad.Jones cf Montanez dh C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 5 5 4 6 4 4 1 5 5 3 42

R H 1 1 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 3 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 7 15

BI 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 7

BB 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 6

SO 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 1 1 10

Avg. .278 .305 .304 .268 .283 .262 .190 .250 .150 .229

Texas AB R H Andrus ss 5 1 2 M.Young 3b 5 2 2 Kinsler 2b 5 2 2 Guerrero dh 5 1 2 1-Borbon pr-dh 0 1 0 Hamilton cf 5 1 2 N.Cruz rf 5 3 4 J.Arias 1b 3 0 0 Smoak 1b 1 1 1 Dav.Murphy lf 5 0 3 Treanor c 5 1 2 Totals 44 13 20

BI 0 0 1 2 0 1 4 0 1 1 3 13

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3

Avg. .324 .312 .319 .342 .227 .284 .330 .304 .184 .238 .214

Baltimore 030 010 012 — 7 15 2 Texas 421 100 05x — 13 20 0 a-singled for Wieters in the 9th. 1-ran for Guerrero in the 8th. E—Wigginton (7), Scott (1). LOB—Baltimore 15, Texas 9. 2B—C.Patterson (3), M.Tejada (8), Scott 2 (8), Ad.Jones (5), M.Young (8), N.Cruz (9). HR—N.Cruz (8), off Matusz; Guerrero (9), off Matusz; Treanor (2), off A.Castillo. RBIs—C.Patterson 2 (4), Wigginton (27), Markakis (14), M.Tejada (20), Scott (20), Ad.Jones (10), Kinsler (8), Guerrero 2 (35), Hamilton (25), N.Cruz 4 (30), Smoak (11), Dav.Murphy (15), Treanor 3 (10). SB—C.Izturis 2 (4), Andrus (15). S—J.Arias. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 9 (Wieters 2, M.Tejada 3, C.Izturis 2, Montanez, Scott); Texas 6 (Treanor, J.Arias, Kinsler 2, M.Young 2). Runners moved up—Markakis, M.Tejada, M.Young, Hamilton. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matusz L, 2-4 2 1-3 8 7 7 1 2 63 5.26 Berken 4 1-3 7 1 1 0 0 74 1.52 Meredith 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 11 5.54 A.Castillo 2-3 4 4 4 0 1 27 12.79 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Feldman W, 2-4 6 12 4 4 1 5 112 5.90 Nippert 1 1 1 1 1 1 20 5.32 Oliver 1 0 0 0 2 2 26 1.66 Moscoso 2-3 2 2 2 2 2 26 27.00 N.Feliz 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.38 Nippert pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Berken 1-0, Meredith 2-0, A.Castillo 1-1, Oliver 1-1, N.Feliz 3-0. HBP—by Moscoso (C.Izturis). WP—Berken, A.Castillo. T—3:34. A—17,304 (49,170).

Angels 6, White Sox 5 CHICAGO — Ervin Santana pitched seven solid innings and Juan Rivera hit a two-run homer for Los Angeles. Kendry Morales had three hits and drove in two runs for the Angels, who have won five of seven.

Mariners 4, Blue Jays 3

AB 3 3 4 3 0 3 3 3 2 3 1 28

Valbuena 2b Marson c Totals

Rangers 13, Orioles 7

Toronto 000 020 100 — 3 5 0 Seattle 001 000 003 — 4 8 0 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for Jo.Wilson in the 9th. 1-ran for M.Sweeney in the 9th. LOB—Toronto 3, Seattle 7. 2B—Ale.Gonzalez (16), J.Bard (2). HR—J.Bautista (12), off J.Vargas. RBIs—J.Bautista 2 (33), Encarnacion (8), Figgins (12), Kotchman (17), J.Bard (1), Griffey Jr. (7). CS—I.Suzuki (5). S—I.Suzuki, Figgins. SF—Encarnacion, J.Bard. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 2 (J.Molina 2); Seattle 3 (F.Gutierrez, Figgins, Jo.Wilson). GIDP—Lind, J.Molina, Bradley. DP—Toronto 1 (R.Romero, Ale.Gonzalez, Overbay); Seattle 2 (Jo.Lopez, Figgins, Kotchman), (Jo.Wilson, Kotchman). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Romero 6 2-3 4 1 1 3 5 101 2.71 Frasor H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 5.00 S.Downs H, 12 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 10 2.70 Camp H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.22 Gregg L, 0-1 1-3 3 3 3 2 0 25 3.26 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Vargas 6 2-3 5 3 3 2 2 100 3.08 Texeira 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 15 3.94 Kelley W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.63 Inherited runners-scored—Frasor 1-0, Camp 1-0, Texeira 2-0. IBB—off J.Vargas (J.Bautista). T—2:35. A—20,452 (47,878).

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf K.Morales 1b H.Matsui dh J.Rivera lf Bo.Wilson c Frandsen 3b a-Willits ph Br.Wood 3b Totals

AB 5 5 5 3 4 3 2 4 3 1 0 35

R H 1 3 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 3 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 11

BI 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 3 2 1 0 9

Avg. .241 .271 .269 .284 .282 .226 .256 .000 .333 .200 .162

Chicago Pierre lf Pierzynski c 1-J.Nix pr R.Castro c An.Jones cf Konerko 1b Kotsay dh b-Rios ph Quentin rf Teahen 3b Al.Ramirez ss Beckham 2b Totals

AB 5 5 0 0 4 5 2 1 4 3 4 4 37

R H 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 5 12

BI 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .264 .220 .174 .125 .239 .262 .183 .297 .205 .224 .235 .187

Los Angeles 202 002 000 — 6 11 1 Chicago 000 010 040 — 5 12 0 a-struck out for Frandsen in the 9th. 1-ran for Pierzynski in the 8th. E—Frandsen (3). LOB—Los Angeles 6, Chicago 10. 2B—B.Abreu (14), Tor.Hunter (14), Pierzynski (7). HR— J.Rivera (6), off Peavy. RBIs—K.Morales 2 (31), H.Matsui (20), J.Rivera 2 (19), Pierzynski 2 (13), Beckham 3 (9). SB—E.Aybar (6). CS—E.Aybar (5). SF—H.Matsui. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (J.Rivera, Bo.Wilson); Chicago 4 (Teahen, Al.Ramirez, An.Jones 2). Runners moved up—Beckham. GIDP—B.Abreu, Quentin. DP—Los Angeles 1 (E.Aybar, H.Kendrick, K.Morales); Chicago 1 (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santana W, 3-3 7 7 1 0 3 6 106 3.75 Jepsen 2-3 3 4 4 1 1 27 6.00 Rodney H, 4 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 13 2.60 Fuentes S, 6-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 5.91 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy L, 3-3 6 8 6 6 2 8 103 5.74 Williams 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 22 3.86 T.Pena 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 31 5.21 Inherited runners-scored—Rodney 2-2, T.Pena 1-0. HBP—by E.Santana (Quentin). WP—T.Pena. T—3:00. A—23,515 (40,615).

Royals 9, Indians 3 CLEVELAND — Luke Hochevar pitched a complete game to finally beat Cleveland and Alberto Callaspo hit a three-run homer, sending Kansas City to the win. Hochevar (4-2) gave up four hits to go the distance for the third time in his career. Kansas City Podsednik lf Bloomquist lf Aviles 2b DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b Maier cf Y.Betancourt ss Kendall c Totals

AB 3 0 5 5 3 4 4 3 4 4 35

R H 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 9 12

Cleveland Crowe cf Donald ss Choo rf Hafner dh Peralta 3b Branyan 1b LaPorta lf

AB 4 4 2 4 4 4 3

R 0 1 1 0 1 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 1 1 8

BB 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .302 .114 .375 .265 .337 .259 .309 .237 .279 .285

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 2 0 0 1 0 0

Avg. .333 .182 .288 .269 .246 .197 .215

3 0 3 0 31 3

0 0 4

0 0 3

0 0 2

1 .152 2 .213 7

Kansas City 024 000 300 — 9 12 0 Cleveland 100 002 000 — 3 4 1 E—Choo (2). LOB—Kansas City 3, Cleveland 3. 2B—B.Butler 2 (12), Choo (8). HR—Callaspo (7), off Talbot; J.Guillen (9), off Ambriz; Peralta (3), off Hochevar. RBIs—J.Guillen 3 (28), Callaspo 3 (28), Y.Betancourt (16), Kendall (7), Hafner (13), Peralta 2 (17). SB—Choo (9). CS—Podsednik (4). Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 1 (Podsednik); Cleveland 3 (Branyan 2, Hafner). Runners moved up—Hafner, Peralta. GIDP—DeJesus, J.Guillen, Kendall. DP—Cleveland 3 (Peralta, Valbuena, Branyan), (Valbuena, Donald, Branyan), (Valbuena, Branyan). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO Hochevr W, 4-2 9 4 3 3 2 7 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Talbot L, 5-3 6 8 6 6 3 1 R.Perez 1-3 2 2 2 0 1 Ambriz 2 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Ambriz 1-1. T—2:25. A—13,953 (45,569).

NP 107 NP 104 11 27

ERA 5.37 ERA 3.88 8.18 3.97

Rays 8, Yankees 6 NEW YORK — Carlos Pena homered twice and Ben Zobrist and B.J. Upton also connected as Tampa Bay won its sixth straight. A day after tagging A.J. Burnett, the majors’ best team came out swinging against Andy Pettitte (5-1). Tampa Bay Bartlett ss Crawford lf Zobrist 2b-rf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf W.Aybar dh D.Navarro c Kapler rf a-Brignac ph-2b Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 2 2 34

R H 2 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 8 11

BI 0 2 3 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 8

Avg. .248 .316 .289 .323 .194 .224 .235 .184 .250 .263

New York Jeter ss Gardner cf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Swisher rf Miranda dh Cervelli c Winn lf Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 35

R H 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 3 2 0 0 1 1 6 10

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

SO 0 0 1 3 2 2 0 0 1 9

Avg. .275 .321 .214 .288 .338 .291 .250 .357 .190

Tampa Bay 300 121 010 — 8 11 1 New York 021 100 002 — 6 10 1 a-struck out for Kapler in the 7th. E—J.Shields (3), Swisher (1). LOB—Tampa Bay 2, New York 5. 2B—Bartlett (10), Jeter (8). 3B—Miranda (1). HR—Zobrist (1), off Pettitte; B.Upton (5), off Pettitte; C.Pena (6), off Pettitte; C.Pena (7), off Park; Miranda (2), off J.Shields. RBIs—Crawford 2 (20), Zobrist 3 (20), C.Pena 2 (26), B.Upton (19), Jeter 2 (25), Miranda 2 (4), Winn (8). SF—Zobrist, Winn. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 1 (Longoria); New York 3 (Cano 2, Gardner). GIDP—C.Pena, Gardner. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Zobrist, Bartlett, C.Pena); New York 1 (A.Rodriguez, Jeter, Teixeira). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields W, 5-1 7 1-3 8 4 3 1 7 108 3.08 Wheeler 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.98 Choate 1-3 1 2 2 1 0 11 7.15 R.Soriano S, 11 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.50 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pettitte L, 5-1 5 9 7 6 2 3 103 2.68 D.Robertson 2 0 0 0 0 4 23 7.24 Park 2 2 1 1 0 1 27 7.27 Pettitte pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Choate pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Wheeler 1-0, Choate 1-0, R.Soriano 2-2. WP—Pettitte. T—3:07. A—45,483 (50,287).

Red Sox 6, Twins 2 BOSTON — Kevin Youkilis hit a three-run homer and added an RBI double to help Jon Lester earn his fourth straight victory. Lester (4-3) allowed two runs — one earned — six hits and zero walks, striking out nine for his fifth career complete game. Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Kubel dh Delm.Young lf B.Harris ss Punto 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 3 3 31

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 0

SO 1 1 1 3 1 0 0 1 1 9

Avg. .271 .281 .344 .362 .265 .217 .250 .200 .234

Boston AB R D.McDonald cf 3 0 Pedroia 2b 3 1 V.Martinez c 4 2 Youkilis 1b 4 1 Lowell dh 4 0 Beltre 3b 3 2 J.Drew rf 4 0 Van Every rf 0 0 Hall lf 4 0 Ang.Sanchez ss 3 0 Totals 32 6

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 3

SO 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 6

Avg. .264 .281 .248 .324 .242 .316 .271 .211 .197 .000

Minnesota 000 000 011 — 2 6 0 Boston 013 011 00x — 6 8 1 E—Pedroia (1). LOB—Minnesota 3, Boston 5. 2B—Morneau (10), Cuddyer (7), V.Martinez 3 (9), Youkilis (11), Beltre (11). HR—Beltre (3), off Liriano; Youkilis (8), off Liriano. RBIs—Mauer (20), Delm.Young (16), Youkilis 4 (26), Beltre (22). SB—D.McDonald (2). SF—Delm.Young. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 2 (Delm. Young, Cuddyer); Boston 5 (Youkilis, Ang.Sanchez, Lowell 3). Runners moved up—Mauer, Kubel, J.Drew. GIDP— Mauer, Punto. DP—Boston 2 (Ang.Sanchez, Pedroia, Youkilis), (Ang.Sanchez, Pedroia, Youkilis). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano L, 4-3 4 2-3 5 5 5 3 6 98 3.25 Manship 1 1-3 1 1 0 0 0 20 2.45 Crain 1 2 0 0 0 0 22 6.88 Rauch 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.69 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester W, 4-2 9 6 2 1 0 9 103 3.47 Inherited runners-scored—Manship 1-0. WP—Liriano. PB—Mauer. T—2:32. A—38,144 (37,402).

Tigers 5, Athletics 2 OAKLAND, Calif. — Miguel Cabrera and Magglio Ordonez both drove in two runs for Detroit, and Jeremy Bonderman won for the first time in over a month. Cabrera snapped an 0-for-12 streak with a single in the third, then added a two-run homer in the fifth. Ordonez singled home two runs in the third, and Ramon Santiago had an RBI single in the fourth to help the Tigers win for the fourth time in five games Detroit A.Jackson cf

AB R 4 1

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 1 1 .329

Damon lf Kelly lf Ordonez dh Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch rf C.Wells rf Inge 3b Avila c Santiago ss Worth 2b Totals

4 1 4 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 37

1 2 0 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 5 12

Oakland Pennington ss Barton 1b R.Sweeney rf K.Suzuki c Cust lf Kouzmanoff 3b E.Chavez dh A.Rosales 2b R.Davis cf a-E.Patterson ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 0 32

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 5

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 8

.290 .256 .315 .340 .354 .222 .224 .164 .250 .400

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 5 2 6 12

Avg. .232 .277 .300 .256 .316 .258 .234 .266 .243 .222

Detroit 002 120 000 — 5 12 0 Oakland 001 000 100 — 2 5 0 a-walked for R.Davis in the 9th. LOB—Detroit 7, Oakland 10. 2B—Damon (11), Pennington (8), Kouzmanoff (7). HR—Mi.Cabrera (9), off Mazzaro. RBIs—Ordonez 2 (26), Mi.Cabrera 2 (38), Santiago (7), Barton (16), K.Suzuki (15). SB—Avila (1). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 2 (Inge, Mi.Cabrera); Oakland 4 (Cust 2, A.Rosales, R.Sweeney). Runners moved up—Boesch. GIDP—A.Jackson, Mi.Cabrera. DP—Oakland 2 (Pennington, A.Rosales, Barton), (Mazzaro, A.Rosales, Pennington, Barton). Detroit IP H R ER Bndrmn W, 2-2 6 3 1 1 Coke 1 1-3 2 1 1 Perry H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 Valverde S, 11 1 0 0 0 Oakland IP H R ER T.Ross L, 1-2 4 7 3 3 Mazzaro 5 5 2 2 HBP—by Bonderman (K.Suzuki). T—2:50. A—24,146 (35,067).

BB 4 0 0 2 BB 1 1

SO 8 1 2 1 SO 4 4

NP 103 17 9 24 NP 78 89

ERA 4.43 3.54 2.60 0.48 ERA 4.39 6.75

NL ROUNDUP Braves 10, Reds 9 ATLANTA — Brooks Conrad hit a pinch-hit grand slam to cap a seven-run ninth inning that gave the Braves a stunning victory over Cincinnati Reds/ The Braves fell behind 8-0 against rookie Mike Leake and were still down 9-3 heading to the ninth. Four straight hits, including Nate McLouth’s two-run single, gave the Braves hope. A walk to David Ross loaded the bases with no outs, bringing the potential tying run to the plate. Martin Prado hit a grounder to third that looked like a double play, but Miguel Cairo could not get the ball out of his glove — Cincinnati’s fourth error. Jason Heyward struck out against Arthur Rhodes, and Cincinnati turned to closer Francisco Cordero (1-3), who served up the home run to Conrad. The ball deflected off the glove of left fielder Laynce Nix and over the wall. Cincinnati O.Cabrera ss Cairo 3b Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf R.Hernandez c L.Nix lf Stubbs cf Leake p b-Owings ph Lincoln p Masset p Rhodes p Cordero p Totals

AB 4 4 4 5 3 5 5 4 3 1 0 0 0 0 38

R H 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 2 1 3 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 13

BI 0 1 4 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BB 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .271 .182 .311 .258 .264 .280 .217 .194 .353 .111 ---------

Atlanta Prado 2b Heyward rf C.Jones 3b Kimbrel p d-Conrad ph McCann c Venters p c-Infante ph-3b Glaus 1b Hinske lf Y.Escobar ss McLouth cf Hanson p J.Chavez p a-Me.Cabrera ph D.Ross c Totals

AB 5 5 4 0 1 3 0 1 4 4 4 3 0 1 1 1 37

R 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 10

BI 1 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2

SO 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 7

Avg. .322 .276 .225 --.250 .254 --.306 .289 .355 .200 .208 .059 .000 .200 .200

H 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 10

Cincinnati 080 010 000 — 9 13 4 Atlanta 001 020 007 — 10 10 1 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for J.Chavez in the 5th. b-struck out for Leake in the 7th. c-popped out for Venters in the 8th. dhomered for Kimbrel in the 9th. E—Cairo (2), O.Cabrera (3), Bruce (1), Leake (2), Glaus (4). LOB—Cincinnati 8, Atlanta 4. 2B—L.Nix (2), Leake (1), Prado (12). HR—Votto (10), off Hanson; L.Nix (2), off J.Chavez; Conrad (3), off Cordero. RBIs—Cairo (3), Votto 4 (31), R.Hernandez (8), L.Nix 3 (6), Prado (19), Heyward (30), Conrad 4 (9), McLouth 2 (13). Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 6 (Bruce, Stubbs 2, O.Cabrera, Owings, B.Phillips); Atlanta 2 (Y.Escobar, McCann). GIDP—Votto, B.Phillips, L.Nix, McCann, Y.Escobar. DP—Cincinnati 2 (O.Cabrera, B.Phillips, Votto), (Votto, O.Cabrera, Leake); Atlanta 3 (C.Jones, Prado, Glaus), (Y.Escobar, Glaus), (Y.Escobar, Glaus). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 6 5 3 1 1 6 99 2.91 Lincoln 2 4 4 4 0 0 33 5.87 Masset 0 0 2 1 1 0 9 7.32 Rhodes H, 10 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.55 Cordero L, 1-3 0 1 1 1 0 0 6 3.60 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hanson 1 2-3 8 8 8 2 2 55 4.18 J.Chavez 3 1-3 2 1 1 0 3 42 7.23 Venters 3 3 0 0 2 3 48 1.08 Kimbrel W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 2.70 Lincoln pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. Masset pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Cordero pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Masset 2-1, Rhodes 3-0, Cordero 3-3, J.Chavez 1-0. HBP—by Hanson (Votto). T—2:59. A—21,621 (49,743).

Mets 10, Nationals 7 WASHINGTON — David Wright hit a three-run double and had four RBIs for New York, and Raul Valdes filled in admirably for injured starter John Maine for five innings. Wright put the Mets ahead 3-0 with a double but in the bottom of the first Maine threw just five pitches — a walk to Nyjer Morgan — before Mets manager Jerry Manuel removed him. Maine, who has had problems with his

right shoulder, left the game “for precautionary reasons,” the Mets said. He will see a doctor today. New York AB Jos.Reyes ss 5 Cora 2b 4 Bay lf 5 I.Davis 1b 5 D.Wright 3b 4 Pagan cf 3 Barajas c 5 Francoeur rf 5 Maine p 0 Valdes p 2 Acosta p 0 b-Matthews Jr. ph 1 Mejia p 0 Feliciano p 0 e-Tatis ph 0 F.Rodriguez p 0 Totals 39

R 1 0 2 3 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

H 2 0 3 3 1 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 15

BI 1 1 0 0 4 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

BB 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .216 .217 .281 .289 .262 .271 .276 .225 .000 .500 --.189 ----.220 ---

Washington AB Morgan cf 3 Batista p 0 c-Gonzalez ph-2b 0 A.Kennedy 2b 4 d-C.Guzman ph-rf 1 Zimmerman 3b 4 A.Dunn 1b 5 S.Burnett p 0 Willingham lf 4 I.Rodriguez c 2 Nieves c 2 Bernadina rf 2 Walker p 0 a-W.Harris ph-cf 3 Desmond ss 5 Atilano p 1 Morse rf-1b 1 Totals 37

R H 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 7 12

BI 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 7

BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7

SO 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 7

Avg. .255 .000 .297 .255 .333 .311 .261 --.262 .333 .216 .281 .000 .183 .277 .091 .250

New York 300 052 000 — 10 15 0 Washington 010 002 031 — 7 12 3 a-singled for Walker in the 6th. b-singled for Acosta in the 7th. c-walked for Batista in the 8th. d-singled for A.Kennedy in the 8th. e-walked for Feliciano in the 9th. E—Walker (1), Desmond 2 (9). LOB—New York 9, Washington 10. 2B—I.Davis 2 (7), D.Wright (9), A.Dunn 2 (12), Willingham (6), Nieves (3). 3B—I.Rodriguez (1). HR—Barajas (10), off Walker. RBIs—Jos.Reyes (12), Cora (8), D.Wright 4 (30), Barajas 2 (24), Francoeur 2 (23), C.Guzman (15), Zimmerman (25), Bernadina (8), W.Harris 3 (13), Desmond (19). SB—Francoeur (4). S—Valdes. SF—Cora, D.Wright. Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Barajas, Pagan, Cora, Bay, Jos.Reyes); Washington 5 (Bernadina, Zimmerman, Morgan, A.Dunn 2). Runners moved up—Valdes, Nieves, W.Harris 2. GIDP—Jos.Reyes, D.Wright. DP—New York 1 (Cora, I.Davis); Washington 3 (Atilano, A.Dunn), (A.Kennedy, Desmond, A.Dunn), (A.Kennedy, Desmond, A.Dunn). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maine 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 6.13 Valdes W, 2-1 5 7 3 3 1 6 80 3.20 Acosta 1 1 0 0 2 1 23 3.27 Mejia 1 2-3 2 3 3 2 0 38 3.79 Feliciano 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 14 1.50 F.Rodriguez 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 2.18 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Atilano L, 3-1 4 1-3 9 7 6 3 1 91 5.06 Walker 1 2-3 4 3 2 0 1 23 5.06 Batista 2 2 0 0 0 0 27 5.55 S.Burnett 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.84 Maine pitched to 1 batter in the 1st. Valdes pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Valdes 1-0, Acosta 2-2, Feliciano 3-2, Walker 3-3. IBB—off Atilano (Jos.Reyes, Pagan). WP—Mejia. T—3:31. A—23,612 (41,546).

Rockies 4, Astros 0 HOUSTON — Ubaldo Jimenez allowed one hit over seven innings and Troy Tulowitzki had a three-run homer for Colorado, which broke a three-game losing streak. The only hit Jimenez (8-1) allowed was Humberto Quintero’s single to start the third inning. Jimenez, who improved his major leaguelow ERA to 0.99, struck out four and walked two. Colorado AB R C.Gonzalez cf-lf 5 1 S.Smith lf 4 0 Corpas p 0 0 Helton 1b 2 2 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 Hawpe rf 4 0 Olivo c 4 0 Stewart 3b 4 0 Barmes 2b 4 0 Jimenez p 3 0 Belisle p 0 0 c-Fowler ph-cf 0 0 Totals 34 4

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 2 3 1 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 4 6 11

Avg. .311 .255 .000 .289 .300 .342 .274 .271 .207 .125 .500 .228

Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Berkman 1b Ca.Lee lf Pence rf P.Feliz 3b Manzella ss Quintero c Oswalt p a-O.Navarro ph G.Chacin p W.Lopez p b-Sullivan ph Fulchino p Totals

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2

Avg. .290 .274 .227 .197 .250 .215 .196 .243 .231 .000 ----.211 ---

AB 4 4 3 4 3 2 3 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Colorado 300 000 010 — 4 6 0 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 a-struck out for Oswalt in the 6th. b-flied out for W.Lopez in the 8th. c-walked for Belisle in the 9th. E—P.Feliz (5), Oswalt (2). LOB—Colorado 9, Houston 4. 2B—Helton (6), Hawpe (10). HR—Tulowitzki (2), off Oswalt. RBIs—Tulowitzki 3 (19), Hawpe (13). SB— C.Gonzalez (5), Fowler (6). CS—Fowler (4). S—Oswalt. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 5 (Hawpe, Stewart 2, Barmes, Tulowitzki); Houston 1 (Keppinger). Runners moved up—Bourn. GIDP—Pence. DP—Colorado 1 (Tulowitzki, Helton). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO Jimenez W, 8-1 7 1 0 0 2 4 Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 2 Corpas 1 1 0 0 0 0 Houston IP H R ER BB SO Oswalt L, 2-6 6 3 3 2 3 8 G.Chacin 1 3 1 1 0 1 W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 0 Fulchino 1 0 0 0 3 2 G.Chacin pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—W.Lopez 2-0. T—2:42. A—25,932 (40,976).

NP 92 15 13 NP 106 30 7 30

ERA 0.99 2.67 2.63 ERA 2.66 2.08 5.25 4.91

Cardinals 4, Marlins 2 ST. LOUIS — Adam Wainwright dominated after a shaky start and Matt Holliday got his first two RBIs in four games since moving to third in the order for the Cardinals. Wainwright (6-2) allowed the first two first-inning runs against him this season, but he settled down to go seven innings. He allowed six hits and struck out eight. Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b H.Ramirez ss Cantu 3b Uggla 2b C.Ross rf Maybin cf Hayes c N.Robertson p

AB 4 3 3 4 2 4 4 3 1

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0

SO 1 0 0 3 2 2 1 1 0

Avg. .231 .276 .303 .273 .291 .299 .241 .300 .154

a-Petersen ph Pinto p Sanches p c-Helms ph Totals

1 0 0 1 30

0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 6

0 0 0 0 2

0 0 .071 0 0 --0 0 --0 1 .279 4 11

St. Louis F.Lopez 2b Ludwick rf Holliday lf Pujols 1b Freese 3b Y.Molina c Mather cf B.Ryan ss Wainwright p McClellan p b-Stavinoha ph Franklin p Totals

AB 3 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 31

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 4

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Avg. .246 .290 .300 .323 .302 .263 .190 .167 .083 1.000 .324 .000

Florida 200 000 000 — 2 6 0 St. Louis 130 000 00x — 4 8 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for N.Robertson in the 7th. b-popped out for McClellan in the 8th. c-struck out for Sanches in the 9th. LOB—Florida 7, St. Louis 8. 2B—Coghlan (3), Ludwick (10), Holliday 2 (12), Pujols (13). RBIs—H.Ramirez (22), Uggla (28), Ludwick (17), Holliday 2 (16), Freese (26). SB—Holliday (3). S—N.Robertson, Wainwright. SF—Uggla. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 2 (Coghlan, G.Sanchez); St. Louis 4 (Y.Molina, Freese 2, Mather). Runners moved up—Holliday. GIDP—Coghlan. DP—St. Louis 1 (B.Ryan, F.Lopez, Pujols). Florida IP H R ER BB SO Robertsn L, 4-4 6 6 4 4 4 0 Pinto 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 Sanches 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Wnwrght W, 6-2 7 6 2 2 3 8 McClellan H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 Franklin S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 1 2.45 Inherited runners-scored—Sanches 1-0. T—2:26. A—37,866 (43,975).

NP 105 26 2 NP 111 11 1

ERA 4.56 1.98 0.96 ERA 2.49 1.96 12

Brewers 4, Pirates 3 PITTSBURGH — George Kottaras, playing only because of an injury, doubled in a run and Milwaukee rallied from a three-run deficit to end a nine-game losing streak. The Brewers came back from 3-0 deficit in the first with two two-run innings. Milwaukee Weeks 2b A.Escobar ss Fielder 1b Braun lf McGehee 3b Hart rf Villanueva p Zaun c Kottaras c Stern cf Narveson p a-Gallardo ph Axford p Inglett rf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 0 1 2 3 2 1 0 0 31

R 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 3

SO 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 8

Avg. .243 .241 .272 .333 .325 .270 .000 .265 .244 .000 .300 .150 --.343

Pittsburgh AB R Milledge lf 3 0 Crosby 2b 4 1 Karstens p 0 0 Ja.Lopez p 0 0 Donnelly p 0 0 A.McCutchen cf 4 0 G.Jones rf 4 1 Pearce 1b 3 1 An.LaRoche 3b 4 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 Jaramillo c 3 0 c-Doumit ph 0 0 Maholm p 2 0 b-Young ph-2b 2 0 Totals 33 3

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 2

SO 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4

Avg. .246 .237 .200 .000 --.327 .267 .280 .264 .238 .258 .282 .000 .210

Milwaukee 020 200 000 — 4 5 0 Pittsburgh 300 000 000 — 3 7 0 a-struck out for Narveson in the 7th. b-struck out for Maholm in the 7th. c-was hit by a pitch for Jaramillo in the 9th. LOB—Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Kottaras (5), Milledge (9), An.LaRoche (5). 3B—Hart (2), Pearce (1). RBIs—Hart (20), Zaun (14), Kottaras (10), Stern (1), Pearce 2 (4), An.LaRoche (10). Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 2 (Fielder, Narveson); Pittsburgh 1 (Cedeno). Runners moved up—A.Escobar, Zaun, Stern. GIDP— Stern, Delw.Young. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Weeks, A.Escobar, Fielder); Pittsburgh 1 (Maholm, Cedeno, Pearce). Milwaukee IP H R Narvesn W, 4-1 6 7 3 Axford H, 1 2 0 0 Villanueva S, 1 1 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R Maholm L, 3-4 7 4 4 Karstens 2-3 0 0 Ja.Lopez 1-3 1 0 Donnelly 1 0 0 HBP—by Villanueva (Doumit). T—3:02. A—13,975 (38,362).

ER 3 0 0 ER 4 0 0 0

BB 1 1 0 BB 3 0 0 0

SO 2 2 0 SO 7 0 0 1

NP 111 39 12 NP 111 4 7 8

ERA 5.17 2.25 2.91 ERA 4.50 5.24 2.20 6.30

Phillies 5, Cubs 4 PHILADELPHIA — Raul Ibanez hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the eighth inning, Jimmy Rollins hit a threerun homer and Chase Utley also went deep for the Phillies. Jose Contreras pitched out of a jam in the ninth for his second save in two tries. He’s is filling in as the closer with Brad Lidge and Ryan Madson on the disabled list. Chicago AB R Fukudome rf 4 1 Theriot 2b 4 0 D.Lee 1b 4 1 Byrd cf 4 0 A.Soriano lf 2 2 Fontenot 3b 4 0 S.Castro ss 4 0 K.Hill c 2 0 a-Colvin ph 0 0 J.Russell p 0 0 Stevens p 0 0 Grabow p 0 0 f-Ar.Ramirez ph 1 0 Dempster p 2 0 b-Nady ph 1 0 Soto c 1 0 Totals 33 4

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 4 1

SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 6

Avg. .310 .310 .226 .325 .323 .304 .375 .200 .295 ------.166 .235 .208 .286

Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Rollins ss Ibanez lf Gload rf c-B.Francisco ph Bastardo p Baez p e-J.Castro ph Contreras p Hoover c Blanton p d-Werth ph-rf Totals

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 3 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 5 4

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

Avg. .262 .311 .307 .304 .342 .246 .222 .200 ----.261 --.333 .250 .324

AB 4 4 2 3 3 4 2 1 0 0 1 0 3 2 1 30

R 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Chicago 000 010 210 — 4 7 0 Philadelphia 100 003 01x — 5 7 1 a-hit a sacrifice fly for K.Hill in the 7th. b-popped out for Dempster in the 7th. c-singled for Gload in the 7th. d-flied out for Blanton in the 7th. e-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Baez in the 8th. f-struck out for Grabow in the 9th. E—Polanco (3). LOB—Chicago 5, Philadelphia 5. 2B—A.Soriano (15), Polanco (10). HR—D.Lee (5), off Blanton; Fukudome (6), off Bastardo; Utley (10), off Dempster; Rollins (2), off Dempster. RBIs—Fukudome (21), D.Lee (18), S.Castro (10), Colvin (11), Utley (23), Rollins 3 (7), Ibanez (19). SB—Fontenot (1). SF—Col-

vin. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 4 (Byrd, Nady, Soto 2); Philadelphia 1 (J.Castro). Runners moved up—Fontenot, Howard. GIDP— K.Hill, Hoover. DP—Chicago 1 (S.Castro, Theriot, D.Lee); Philadelphia 1 (Utley, Rollins, Howard). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Dempster 6 5 4 4 2 3 J.Russell 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 Stevens 1 0 0 0 0 0 Grabow L, 0-3 2-3 1 1 1 2 0 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO Blanton 7 5 3 3 1 3 Bastardo BS, 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 Baez W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Contreras S, 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 Bastardo pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Stevens 1-0. Contreras (A.Soriano). T—2:38. A—45,325 (43,651).

NP 89 6 10 22 NP 71 4 11 31

ERA 3.73 2.70 0.00 8.44 ERA 5.06 2.84 5.00 0.63

HBP—by

Diamondbacks 8, Giants 7 PHOENIX — Conor Jackson scored the tie-breaking run on a wild pitch with two outs in the eighth inning and Arizona completed a two-game sweep of San Francisco. Mark Reynolds hit his 100th career home run and had three RBIs, and Stephen Drew drove in two runs for the Diamondbacks. San Francisco Rowand cf F.Sanchez 2b Sandoval 3b A.Huff 1b B.Molina c Runzler p Mota p Affeldt p e-M.Downs ph Uribe ss Bowker lf Lincecum p a-Ishikawa ph Romo p Whiteside c Torres rf Totals

AB 5 3 4 4 4 0 0 0 0 5 3 2 0 0 1 4 35

R H 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 7 11

Arizona K.Johnson 2b C.Jackson lf S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b G.Parra cf c-Ryal ph Heilman p Qualls p Snyder c R.Lopez p Rosa p b-T.Abreu ph Vasquez p d-C.Young ph-cf Totals

AB 4 2 5 3 4 5 2 1 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 1 32

R 1 2 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BI 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 5

Avg. .264 .286 .283 .282 .309 ----.000 .265 .277 .231 .143 .211 .000 .333 .280

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 3 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 9 7 9

SO 0 0 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .260 .253 .304 .252 .274 .221 .237 .344 ----.228 .095 --.311 .000 .282

San Francisco 100 105 000 — 7 11 0 Arizona 000 050 21x — 8 9 1 a-walked for Lincecum in the 6th. b-grounded out for Rosa in the 6th. c-popped out for G.Parra in the 7th. d-doubled for Vasquez in the 7th. e-walked for Affeldt in the 9th. E—M.Reynolds (5). LOB—San Francisco 8, Arizona 10. 2B—Rowand (6), Sandoval (10), A.Huff 2 (10), Bowker (3), C.Jackson (5), Ad.LaRoche 2 (13), M.Reynolds (6), C.Young (10). 3B—S.Drew (4). HR—Uribe (5), off R.Lopez; Bowker (3), off R.Lopez; M.Reynolds (11), off Lincecum. RBIs—F.Sanchez (1), Sandoval (14), A.Huff 2 (20), Uribe (25), Bowker 2 (8), S.Drew 2 (19), J.Upton (22), M.Reynolds 3 (33), C.Young (29). SB—C.Jackson (3). S—F.Sanchez. SF—F.Sanchez, Bowker, J.Upton. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 5 (B.Molina 3, Torres 2); Arizona 7 (J.Upton 2, Snyder, S.Drew, K.Johnson 2, M.Reynolds). Runners moved up—Rowand, A.Huff, G.Parra. DP—Arizona 1 (G.Parra, Ad.LaRoche). San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincecum 5 5 5 5 5 6 100 2.35 Romo H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 2 0 19 3.50 Runzler H, 3 2-3 2 2 2 0 1 13 4.96 Mota BS, 1-2 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 13 1.29 Affeldt L, 2-3 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 2 19 2.65 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Lopez 5 10 6 6 2 1 80 4.42 Rosa BS, 1-1 1 1 1 1 1 0 16 6.00 Vasquez 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.11 Heilman W, 1-1 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 28 3.44 Qualls S, 7-10 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 6.91 R.Lopez pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Runzler 2-0, Mota 11, Affeldt 2-0, Rosa 2-2, Qualls 1-0. IBB—off Affeldt (J.Upton), off Rosa (Sandoval). WP—Mota, Affeldt. T—3:14. A—18,607 (48,633).

Dodgers 4, Padres 1 LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw pitched 7 1⁄3 gritty innings to win his third straight start and Garret Anderson delivered the go-ahead run with a sacrifice fly for Los Angeles. Kershaw (4-2) allowed a run and seven hits, struck out seven and walked two. He has given up no more than two runs in seven of his last eight starts. San Diego AB R Venable rf 3 0 Eckstein 2b 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 Torrealba c 4 0 Salazar lf 4 0 Hairston Jr. 3b 4 0 Denorfia cf 4 0 E.Cabrera ss 4 1 Correia p 1 0 a-Headley ph 1 0 A.Russell p 0 0 C.Ramos p 0 0 b-Stairs ph 1 0 Totals 33 1

H BI BB SO 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 1 2 10

Avg. .250 .287 .268 .284 .200 .230 .333 .205 .214 .290 ----.167

Los Angeles AB Martin c 3 Paul rf 3 Kemp cf 4 Loney 1b 4 Blake 3b 4 G.Anderson lf 3 1-Re.Johnson pr-lf 0 DeWitt 2b 3 J.Carroll ss 3 Kershaw p 2 Belisario p 0 Broxton p 0 Totals 29

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 2

Avg. .268 .282 .281 .297 .263 .141 .258 .274 .290 .000 -----

R 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 2 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

San Diego 001 000 000 — 1 8 1 Los Angeles 010 003 00x — 4 9 0 a-grounded out for Correia in the 7th. b-struck out for C.Ramos in the 9th. 1-ran for G.Anderson in the 8th. E—Correia (2). LOB—San Diego 8, Los Angeles 7. 2B—E.Cabrera (5), Martin (5), DeWitt (8). RBIs—Venable (15), G.Anderson (7), J.Carroll 2 (10). SB—Venable (12). CS—Denorfia (1). S—Correia, Paul, Kershaw. SF—G.Anderson, J.Carroll. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 4 (Ad. Gonzalez, E.Cabrera, Torrealba, Stairs); Los Angeles 4 (Kershaw 2, Paul, Loney). Runners moved up—Eckstein, E.Cabrera. San Diego IP H R ER BB Correia L, 4-4 6 7 4 4 2 A.Russell 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 C.Ramos 2-3 1 0 0 0 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB Kershaw W, 4-2 7 1-3 7 1 1 2 Belisario H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 Broxton S, 8-10 1 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Belisario Correia (DeWitt). WP—Correia. T—2:39. A—38,856 (56,000).

SO NP ERA 4 93 4.57 2 16 0.00 1 12 9.82 SO NP ERA 7 106 3.23 2 7 5.25 1 13 1.08 1-0. IBB—off


THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 D5

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

CYCLING

Stellar pitching Armstrong denies new doping accusations highlights first quarter of season By Tim Reynolds

The Associated Press

By Jon Krawczynski The Associated Press

From Dallas Braden’s perfect game to Hanley Ramirez’s loafing, it’s been an eventful first quarter of the baseball season. In the chilly months of April and May, it often takes the hitters a little longer to get warmed up than the pitchers. That trend appears to be continuing this year, with the first quarter of the season being highlighted by the guys on the mound. There have already been two no-hitters and a handful of onehitters in the first 40 games of the regular season. As of Thursday morning, eight pitchers, including three in the heavy-hitting American League, had earnedrun averages under 2.00. Fifteen pitchers have ERA’s better than 2.50 and a whopping 30 starters are under 3.00. Here’s a look at some of the stars, slumps and surprises through the first quarter of the year.

Stars • Ubaldo Jimenez, RHP, Colorado Rockies: Jimenez is making pitching cool for the first time at Coors Field. Threw the first nohitter in franchise history at Atlanta on April 17 and topped the majors with seven victories and a 1.12 ERA. • Andre Ethier, RF, Los Angeles Dodgers: Leading the majors with .392 batting average and 38 RBIs. His 11 HRs are second-best in NL. Also has two walkoff hits this season, including a grand slam to beat Milwaukee on May 6. Went on DL with broken finger on Tuesday. • Braden, RHP, Oakland Athletics: Season numbers of 4-4 with a 3.45 ERA are pedestrian, but one of those wins was anything but. Threw 19th perfect game in MLB history on May 9 against the best team in baseball — the Tampa Bay Rays. • Justin Morneau, 1B, Minnesota Twins: Hitting behind Joe Mauer, Minnesota’s $184 million man, Morneau is making his $80 million contract look like a bargain. Leads AL with a .365 batting average and is third with 11 HRs. • Honorable mention: Several players are enjoying resurgent starts, including Chicago White Sox slugger Paul Konerko (leads majors with 14 HRs), Giants LHP Barry Zito (6-1, 2.15 ERA) and Toronto CF Vernon Wells (.309, 11 HRs, 32 RBIs).

Slumps • Trevor Hoffman, RHP, Milwaukee Brewers: One of best closers ever, the 42-year-old Hoffman has blown five of 10 save chances this year, prompting manager Ken Macha to bench him for two games. He is 1-3 with a 13.15 ERA with 7 HRs allowed. • Aramis Ramirez, 3B, Chicago Cubs: Hitting .167 with 4 HRs and 20 RBIs for the struggling Cubs, who hope his walk-off homer in the 11th inning to beat Colorado on Monday night was a sign of things to come. • Ken Griffey, Jr., DH, Seattle Mariners: Another aging star who appears on his way out. Seattle icon was hitting .183 with 0 HRs and 6 RBIs in first 30 games. Team closed ranks after report that Griffey was sleeping in the clubhouse during a game. • Josh Beckett, RHP, Boston Red Sox: Was 1-1 with a 7.29 ERA with 29 earned runs allowed in his previous 27 innings before being put on DL with back problems. Signed a fouryear, $68 million extension in

April. • Managers on hot seat: Kansas City’s Trey Hillman was the first manager to be fired this season, and other jobs are in jeopardy, including Macha, Baltimore’s Dave Trembley and New York Mets’ Jerry Manuel. Marcio Jose Sanchez / The Associated Press

Nice surprises • The Tampa Bay Rays, Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres are all off to good starts. Rays (30-11) are off to best start for a big league team since Boston in 2002. Tampa is 17-4 on the road this year. The Reds, who now trail St. Louis by half a game, are using pitching and small ball in a quest for first winning season in 10 years. They were in first place in the NL Central this late in the season for the first time since 2006. “We’ve been trying to put this thing together for a couple years now,” manager Dusty Baker said. “Everybody wants it built already, but it takes time to build things.” The Padres have used strong pitching from Jon Garland, Clayton Richard and Heath Bell while waiting for Adrian Gonzalez and the offense to heat up.

Lance Armstrong is helped up after crashing during the fifth stage of the Tour of California cycling race Thursday.

Lance crashes, gets stitches VISALIA, Calif. — Lance Armstrong crashed during the Tour of California on Thursday, sending him to the hospital for precautionary X-rays on the day he was accused of doping by former teammate Floyd Landis. The cyclists were on a twolane road outside Visalia a few miles into the race when a rider in the main group skidded on some gravel and fell, causing others, including Armstrong, to crash. Armstrong resumed riding but had to quit the race because of his injuries. “I tried to give it a go but my eye was swollen so I couldn’t see properly and the pain in the elbow prevented me from hold-

ing the bars for the remainder of the stage,” Armstrong said. “It was a relief to learn there were no breaks. I will take a few days to recover and be on the bike as soon as possible.” Michael Rogers of Australia moved into the overall lead with his second-place finish in the 121.5-mile fifth stage that ran from Visalia to Bakersfield. Dave Zabriskie was third in the stage and second overall.Levi Leipheimer, the three-time defending race titlist, is third in the standings, trailing by 10 seconds. Peter Sagan of Slovakia won the stage in 4 hours, 52 minutes and 58 seconds, and is fourth, 15 seconds back. — The Associated Press

With the cycling season kicking into high gear, the strongest doping allegations yet against Lance Armstrong surfaced Thursday in a barrage of detailed messages from Floyd Landis, the disgraced rider and former teammate who finally confessed to years of cheating himself. In a series of e-mails sent to sponsors and sports officials, Landis alleged Armstrong not only joined him in doping but taught others how to beat the system and paid the former president of the International Cycling Union to keep a failed test quiet. “We have nothing to hide,” Armstrong said at an impromptu news conference before the fifth stage of the Tour of California. “Credibility,” the seven-time Tour de France winner said in Visalia. “Floyd lost his credibility a long time ago.” In two e-mails obtained by The Associated Press, Landis also admitted for the first time what had long been suspected — that he was guilty of doping for several years before being stripped of his 2006 Tour de France title. “I want to clear my conscience,” Landis told ESPN.com. “I don’t want to be part of the problem any more.” Neither Landis nor his family returned repeated messages from the AP. The Wall Street Journal first reported the details of the e-mails on its website early Thursday. Landis alleged that Armstrong

and longtime coach Johan Bruyneel paid former UCI president Hein Verbruggen to cover up a test in 2002 after Armstrong purportedly tested positive for the blood-boosting drug EPO. The UCI denied changing or concealing a positive test result. In an e-mail Landis sent to USA Cycling chief Steve Johnson, he said Armstrong’s positive EPO test was in 2002, around the time he won the Tour de Suisse. Armstrong won the Tour de Suisse in 2001 and did not compete in 2002. “We’re a little confused,” Armstrong said. The e-mail to Johnson also said: “Look forward to much more detail as soon as you can demonstrate that you can be trusted to do the right thing.” Landis also implicated at least 16 other people in various doping acts, including longtime Armstrong confidant George Hincapie, Olympic medalist Levi Leipheimer and Canadian cyclist Michael Barry. Landis said he was asked at one point to stay in an apartment where Armstrong was living in 2003 and check the temperature in a refrigerator where blood was being stored for future transfusions. Landis is part of a long list of former Armstrong teammates and former U.S. Postal Service riders who have either acknowledged or been caught doping. Landis competed in last year’s Cascade Cycling Classic in Central Oregon.

Bad surprises • The Los Angeles Angels, Milwaukee Brewers and Seattle Mariners. The Angels have won five of the last six AL West titles, but John Lackey, Chone Figgins and Vlad Guerrero left big holes to fill and the Angels (20-23) were in third place in the West. Starting pitching again is a big problem for the Brewers (16-25), and Hoffman’s struggles contributed to the early struggles. The Mariners remade their roster and were a trendy pick to unseat the Angels in the AL West this year. But Cliff Lee started the season on the DL and the last-place Mariners (1526) were the worst in the AL in runs and HRs and second-tolast in batting average.

Memorable moments • Braden vs. A-Rod: Yankees star Alex Rodriguez infuriated Braden when he trotted across the mound in a game in April. The Oakland pitcher yelled at Rodriguez, who later chided Braden for his short resume. Braden’s perfect game came a few weeks later. • Phillies fan stunned by authorities: A 17-year-old fan got more than he bargained for when he ran onto the field during a game earlier in May. A Philadelphia policeman used a Taser on Steve Consalvi in a use of force that drew a lot of attention. • Hoodiegate: MLB originally told Rays manager Joe Maddon he could not wear his preferred hoodie on the bench. Days later, the league reversed its decision, earning Maddon a note and gift from the “Head Hoodie” himself: Bill Belichick. • Hanley’s hustle: Marlins manager Fredi Gonzalez benched star Hanley Ramirez after he showed little effort in chasing down a ball that got away from him. Ramirez at first criticized Gonzalez, then apologized to the team. • Angel Pagan’s historic night: The Mets CF became the first player in 55 years to hit an inside-the-park HR and take part in a triple play when he did it against the Nationals on Wednesday night. The Mets lost 5-3.

Nick Wass / The Associated Press

The New York Mets’ Angel Pagan, left, had an inside-the-park home run and started a triple play in the same game Wednesday.

Landis Continued from D1 Nobody likes a rat, especially one whose motives and timing are this suspicious. Despite writing a book titled “Positively False” to protest his innocence and raising nearly $1 million from well-intentioned suckers to mount a defense, Landis is now desperate, largely discredited, mostly out of work, and running out of things to sell. So if nothing else, expect to see a sequel titled: “Maybe True.” Landis said he came forward now because he was tired of living a lie. He said the only way to prove he isn’t lying now is to provide all the details about his use of performance-enhancing drugs, no matter who gets hurt in the telling. Then again, Landis said many of the same things while he was still living the lie. And back then, he stood idly by after his manager tried to blackmail former Tour de France champion Greg LeMond — who had confided his history as an abused child to Landis — into testifying favorably on Landis’ behalf. All this proves is that he’s good at throwing heat. And light? Not so much. Anyone who listened to Landis’ varied and occasionally hilarious explanations for his positive test should have known better. Yet a few things he’s detailed jibe with what we already believe about cyclists and doping — that anyone from the guy at the back of the peleton to several former champions could very well be juicing.

But he also knows the only one most people outside the sport care about is Armstrong. Without his name in the mix, Landis’ revelations would still be languishing somewhere in the sports briefs instead of the headlines. And barring some proof, that’s likely where they will be relegated soon. I’ve written this before, but it bears repeating: I have no idea whether Armstrong is clean, despite having interviewed him at length a handful of times and witnessed his first Tour de France win in 1999 and his last three in person. Common sense suggests anybody who wins seven titles in the dirtiest sport of all — sorry, baseball — must be dirty. Several former riders on Armstrong’s teams have been caught doping and then there was his long association with Michele Ferrari, an Italian doctor who’s managed to stay out of jail despite several drug-related scrapes back home. Still, Armstrong has never been busted for a positive test in a sport that catches more cheaters — including the stars — than any other. He was already a worldclass triathlete at 15, and that was before cancer and arguably the toughest training regimen undertaken by a human transformed

him into something resembling a cyborg. He also boasted the most money, best team, best support staff (including lawyers), biggest sponsors, state-of-the-art equipment and a pain threshold his oncologist still marveled at years after Armstrong left his care. In short, Armstrong availed himself of every advantage the rule book allowed, often in triplicate. And whether that was enough only he knows. But know this, too: You do not want to get into a he-said, he-said with the man. Whether as plaintiff or defendant, Armstrong has won every court case he fought, a point he made again Thursday. He’s also survived questionable attempts to nail him by French anti-doping authorities, several damaging books written about him and all those shady associations — and won just about every case he’s contested in the court of public opinion, too. He summed up his defense in this case with flawless logic during a hastily arranged news conference at the Tour of California. “If you said, ‘Give me one word to sum this all up,’ credibility,” Armstrong said. “Floyd lost his credibility a long time ago.” Maybe not with Armstrong’s

detractors. They will see the new details — especially those about the seven-time Tour winner teaching others how to beat the system — as more pieces of a puzzle that has yet to be solved. They keep insisting that with all the smoke surrounding Armstrong, there has to be a fire somewhere. So here’s a fresh take on the subject, provided by Emory University sports medicine physician R. Amadeus G. Mason: “A lot of these people have been caught ... and always point the finger at Lance Armstrong. The tough thing is that he’s been subject to the same testing that they have, and they’re telling us that he’s using the same kind of drugs but he has not been caught. “There’s a reason for that. To me, that’s saying that either he’s using something super that they’re not using or he’s not using.” Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ ap.org.

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D6 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

ALPINE SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING MBSEF FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD SUMMER CAMP: June 17-22 with High Cascade Snowboard Camp and Windell’s at Mount Hood; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINE HIGH SCHOOL SKI CAMP: June 19-26 at Mount Hood; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINE SKI CAMP FOR AGES 13 AND YOUNGER: June 21-24 at Mount Hood; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org.

BIKING REBOUND SPORTS PERFORMANCE OUTDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Instructed by professional cyclists Brig Brandt and Bart Bowen, these outdoor cycling classes will develop aerobic fitness as well as focus on riding skill and tactics; classes will meet every Wednesday at noon and every Thursday at 5:30 p.m.; info@reboundspl.com or 541-585-1500. ROAD & FREERIDE CYCLING CAMP: May 29-30; Road: for ages 12-23; riders will preview each course from this year’s National Championships, coming to Bend June 23-27; must be able to ride four hours each day and have some racing experience; Freeride: for kids who have experience jumping, but want progress quickly and safely; freeride cycling includes dirt jumping, riding on enhanced terrain and spending time with both wheels in the air; cost is $55 per day or $100 for the weekend; lunch included; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org/camp; Bill Warburton at 541-335-1346.

SISTERS STAMPEDE: New mountain bike race in Sisters; Sunday, May 30; starts near Three Creeks Brewing Company; course follows Peterson Ridge Trail system; mail-in registration until May 20; race-day registration available; $20-$40; www.SistersStampede. com; Sisters Cycling, PO Box 1421, Sisters, OR, 97759. HIGH DESERT BMX: Regular races are Mondays and Wednesdays, with registration and open practice from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., races begin at 6:30 p.m.; 541-815-6208 or www.highdesertbmx.org. MBSEF SUMMER CYCLING PROGRAM: Mountain and road bike session II begins May 31 from 4:30 to 6 p.m.; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE/COG WILD MIGHTY BIKES: An introduction to the basics of mountain biking for ages 8-12; choose between cross-country mountain biking and freeride mountain biking; Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 22-Aug. 27; cross-country meets from 9-11 a.m.; freeride meets from 3:45-5:45; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org; 541-678-3865 DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@deschutesbrewery.com.

HORSEBACK RIDING BACK COUNTRY HORSEMEN OF OREGON STATE RIDE: Annual membership ride and campout hosted by Columbia Gorge Chapter; free; June 12-13; Cyrus Horse Camp, Crook River National Grasslands, Madras; 541-544-2023; possumlodge@hughes.net; www.bchocolumbiagorgechapter.blogspot.com.

MISCELLANEOUS THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS

and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-962-2862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

MULTISPORT FRESHAIRSPORTS TIME TRIAL AND DUATHLON SERIES: Thursday, June 3 and June 10, 6 p.m. at Miller Elementary School on Skyliners Road; 12-mile time trial, with optional 3-mile trail run; 6-mile TT for juniors, 1.5 run option; adult TT $12, adult duathlon $15, Junior TT or Du $7; www.freshairsports.com; register on site 5-6 p.m.; heather@freshairsports.com. DUEL IN THE DESERT DUATHLON & 5K RUN: Saturday, June 5, 10 a.m. at Summit High School in Bend; duathlon consists of 5K run, mountain or road bike option and 5K run; also a 5K run only will be held; register at FootZone in downtown Bend or online at www.active.com (search duel).

NORDIC SKIING MBSEF SUMMER NORDIC CAMP: June 18-22, for kids age 8-18 and for seniors and masters; with elite skiers Torin Koos, Lars Flora, Kristina Strandberg, Dan Simoneau, and Tim Gibbons; there will also be a Memorial Day Camp May 29-31; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org.

PADDLING INTERMEDIATE PADDLE DAYS: Ages 10 and older; explore the class III whitewater throughout Central Oregon via kayak; Current Experience’s instructors will lead the course; Friday, June 4, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; $110; gear and transportation included; www.raprd.org; 541-548-7275. YAKATAK KIDS KAYAK CAMP: For ages 8–16 to learn whitewater kayaking skills; two four-day camps this summer: Mondays-Thursdays, July 12–15 or Aug. 9–12; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursdays; bring lunch; all kayaking equipment is provided and the camp meets at Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe; $225; Geoff Frank at 541-317-9407 or geoff@aldercreek.com. PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407.

RUNNING STORM THE STAIRS: A 2-mile run/walk (300 stairs) or 3-mile ultimate challenge run (450 stairs); at Central Oregon Community College in Bend; Thursday, May 27, 5:30 p.m. at COCC track; entry forms are available in the Mazama building in the club sports office or register from 4:30-5:15 p.m. on the day of the event; $3-$6; free for COCC and OSU-Cascade students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. REGISTRATION FOR SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: Half Marathon scheduled for Saturday, July 10; 5K and 10K also offered; starts and finishes at Smith Rock State Park in Terrebonne; online registration at www.smithrockrace.com; also register at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. CASCADE LAKES RELAY REGISTRATION: Now open for the team relay running event from Diamond Lake to Bend, set for July 30-31, 2010; race is 216 miles long; www.cascadelakesrelay.com.

Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe’s Pickin’ and Paddlin’ series gets under way Wednesday with the first of five nights of live music and boat demos on the lawn behind the store in Bend’s Old Mill District. From 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Tumalo Creek’s fleet of 50 demo boats will be available to try for free, and paddling experts will be on hand to answer questions. The music series and demo days are a fundraiser for the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance (BPTA), and donations are encouraged. Music starts at 7 p.m. Other

UO Continued from D1 But the Ducks floundered, going 14-42 overall and 4-23 in the Pac-10 last season. Horton said his team didn’t adopt the “culture� of hard work and attitude that he was trying to instill. “We tried very hard at the end of the first year to change it (the culture) and didn’t get rewarded. It was devastating to me because they finally started doing the things I asked them to do and the scoreboard wasn’t rewarding us,� he said. “That was dangerous because they’ll never trust you if you don’t start seeing results.� Something intangible was obviously missing. So during Oregon’s road trip to open this season in Southern California, the Ducks paid a visit to a sport psychologist. Horton shakes his head in surprise over what happened next: Several players courageously told

Breaking down the trail: Shevlin Park

Continued from D1 From the Park Commons trailhead just off Shevlin Park Road, trails flow west and south down into Shevlin Park. That area is a favorite starting point for mountain bikers and a place from which I soaked in dramatic views of North Sister before ducking into deep forest along the Shevlin Park Loop Trail. This six-mile trail runs along the rim of the canyon above Tumalo Creek and is probably the best trail for biking in the park. The 2½-mile Tumalo Creek Trail runs closer to the stream and is often more crowded with hikers and runners. Fact is, every trail in the park — Bend’s largest — is popular among all types of outdoor enthusiasts. Yet no trail in Shevlin Park is closed to bikes, according to Steve Jorgensen, planning manager for the Bend Park & Recreation District. “It’s such a shared-use place,â€? Jorgensen told me this week. “You should be cognizant of other people and be on your toes. There’s some pretty blind corners on the west side (of the park). You can’t go blazing around corners because there could be somebody there.â€? But Jorgensen added that he knows of no major incidents between user groups, and that Shevlin Park remains a place where high numbers of trailrunners, hikers and mountain bikers coexist peacefully. I received nothing but friendly smiles and greetings from runners and dog-walkers along the east side of the Shevlin Park Loop. The east side of the loop is one of my favorite sections of trail in Central Oregon: Tumalo Creek flows far below as the biker must negotiate a cliff side and a couple of quick technical sections and steep hills. Just above that trail is Forest Road 4606, which leads south to Skyliners Road and the Phil’s Trail complex. But Shevlin Park has more elements to

DIRECTIONS From Bend, head west on Newport Avenue, which becomes Shevlin Park Road. Turn left onto Park Commons Drive and make an immediate right for parking at the preferred mountain biking trailhead. Bikers can also start from the parking lot at the park’s main entrance, just a half-mile to the west off Shevlin Park Road.

LENGTH The Shevlin Park Loop is about six miles, but bikers can ride a total of about 10 miles of trail in the park.

RATING Technically easy and aerobically easy.

TRAIL FEATURES Several loop options through Bend’s largest park, which includes Tumalo Creek and a diverse old-growth forest. make it perhaps a more pleasing close-to-town ride. “It’s a lot more interesting than Phil’s and some other trails,� Jorgensen said. “There’s a lot more scenery at Shevlin. And there’s definitely less bikes than at Phil’s.� At the south end of the Shevlin Park Loop Trail I crossed a wooden footbridge over Tumalo Creek and into the dark shade of ponderosa pines. From that location, bikers have seemingly endless choices: continue south to Mrazek, head on to the west side of the Shevlin Park Loop Trail, or take the Tumalo Creek Trail north into the heart of the park. “There’s offshoots everywhere,� Jorgensen said. A couple more left turns would take me to the Mrazek Trail, which starts with a steep, rocky climb. But instead, I turned onto a trail marked by an up-arrow sign, which took me up a hill to the west side of the Shevlin Park Loop. That section of the trail is above the paved road running through the middle of the park. It was there that I saw the only other mountain biker I would see during my entire outing — most of the trail users I encountered were hikers or runners. The fast and easy trail goes all the way to the parking lot

at Shevlin Park Road. I made a turn down into the park before reaching the parking lot and crossed a bridge at an area called Larch Grove. Singletrack there leads back up the east side of the canyon to the Park Commons area. My ride took about an hour and 20 minutes, including ample time to stop for photos. Riders who want a longer experience can take on multiple loops or try all the different trails in the park. “You can stay up on the rim on the east side and find trails that cut down to the Tumalo Creek Trail,� Jorgensen said. “There’s chances to extend it. You could ride, without doubling back, about 10 miles of trail if you just wanted to stay in the park.� And while it may be a shorter route and, to some riders, less challenging, staying in the park is an extremely rewarding experience. It reminds us that we don’t have to venture far from Bend to find an idyllic setting with state-of-the-art trails. Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

A S   B  Kayak shop to demo boats on Wednesday

Shevlin

dates for live music and boat demos are June 30, July 28, Aug. 25 and Sept. 22. Contact: www.tumalocreek. com or www.bendpaddletrailalliance.org.

The Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA) will host the 11th annual Spring Fling trail work party this Saturday. This event will be held at Wanoga Sno-Park southwest of Bend from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Volunteers can meet at the former Mt. Bachelor park-andride in Bend at 9 a.m. to carpool

to the trail projects. The work party will focus on expanding the new Wanoga trail network. COTA will supply tools, direction and refreshments. An afterparty is scheduled at Pine Mountain Sports in Bend. Visit www.cotamtb.com for more information. The second annual Bend Bicycle Film Festival will be held in conjunction with COTA’s Spring Fling. Films are scheduled for 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday at Bend’s Tower Theatre. Tickets are $10. Visit www.bendbicyclefilmfestival.com for more information. — Bulletin staff reports

him that the team needed him to change his approach. Namely, he had to stop talking about the Titans. “It’s hard, because I use examples from where I came from,� he said. “But now I try very hard not to say that word ‘Titans’ in front of them. Because I’m not a Titan. I’m the Ducks coach now.� Oregon had dropped baseball after the 1980-81 season because of budget constraints. For many years, the Ducks were the only Pac-10 school without baseball. This season, they are holding their own in the middle of the conference, which is dominated by Arizona State, ranked No. 3 by Baseball America. The only other Pac-10 schools ranked in the poll are Oregon and Washington State at 24. After being swept in three games by in-state rival Oregon State, the Ducks have won five straight going into a series this weekend against Washington. Oregon is 35-18 overall. Horton credits the Southern

California breakthrough for the team’s success. “From that point forward the relationship has been almost magical. We still have some family feuds and some blowups, some kids going out on their own. But I would say we have a baseball culture here now,� he said. “I am very proud of this group. Instead of coaching some young guys who want to be winners, I’m coaching a group of men who are doing the work to be winners.� Catcher Paul Eshleman put it more succinctly: “You’ve got to believe. We believe.� Whether it will be enough to land the Ducks a postseason bid remains to be seen. The discussion is kind of the elephant in the room. “You don’t want to jinx it, but in my first meeting the very first year we talked about going to the playoffs, going to the World Series,� Horton said. “Heck, if you don’t talk about the goal, even if the goal is unrealistic, how do you attain it?�

Trail work party set for Saturday

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HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE New shows, old favorites

Inside

CBS to unleash five new shows this fall, including “Hawaii Five-O,” Page E2

FAMILY

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Smokey Bear to visit museum Children and families visiting the High Desert Museum this weekend will get the chance to meet Smokey Bear and Woodsy Owl during “Fun in the Forests” from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Families can check out demonstrations of leave-no-trace camping, visit a hands-on program about forest fires and meet forest firefighters. Families can also investigate the historic High Desert Ranger Station and listen to retired members of the U.S. Forest Service discuss wildfire prevention. Contact: 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

AAP revises advice on drowning prevention The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated advice for parents about how to prevent drowning deaths for children. While drowning deaths have declined steadily from 2.68 deaths per 100,000 children in 1985 to 1.32 deaths per 100,000 children in 2006, it remains the second-leading cause of death among children ages 1-19. The AAP has long recommended that children ages 4 and older should learn to swim. The group is now also opening up the idea of swimming lessons to children ages 1-3. Previously the group had recommended against swimming lessons for that age group because of a concern that the parents would become less vigilant regarding supervision for children who had taken lessons. New research, however, indicates children this age may be less likely to drown after obtaining formal swimming instruction. The AAP is not recommending mandator swim lessons for this age group because the studies are small and do not indicate the type of classes. The new guidelines recommend parents base the decision on a child’s emotional development, how frequently the child is exposed to water, his or her physical abilities and any health concerns. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN Details, Page E3

Japanese Festival The Taiko drum performance and Japanese fashion show at Bend’s Mountain View High School on Saturday will also include plenty of family-friendly activities.

Spanish celebration Kids and parents can check out this carnival celebrating Spanish language and Latino culture at Bend’s Summit High School on Saturday.

Celebrate trails Nature lovers of all ages can celebrate the opening of the Peterson Ridge Trail system with a short parade and trail exploration starting at the Village Green Park in Sisters on Saturday.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Kenwood School, shown here from Newport Avenue in Bend, is now home to Highland Magnet School. The school community will celebrate the school’s 90th anniversary with special events today.

RELIVE KENWOOD

Submitted photo

This photo shows the school not long after it was built, featuring open corridors in a U-shape. The photo is from the back of the school, looking north to Newport Avenue.

Bend school to celebrate 90th birthday today and you’re invited By Alandra Johnson • The Bulletin

A

caged porcupine used to sit in the school’s hallway. The school closed just for an afternoon because the circus came to town. Sheep once grazed in the outdoor courtyard, and students assisted when the animals gave birth to lambs. The furnace burned sawdust (and only occasionally caught fire). The Bend school, now known as Highland Magnet School but still called Kenwood by many, is filled with Inside stories. Ninety years • “If you go” info of stories to be exact. on Kenwood Today, the school comschool event, munity will honor that see Page E6 longevity and give former teachers, students and parents a chance to share memories during an anniversary celebration. Marie Gammond, 10, feels a special connection to the school as a fourth-grader. Her grandmother Patsy Gammond, 75, also attended elementary school there and the pair studied in the same classrooms, although decades apart. Marie Gammond really likes her school and thinks it’s unique. She also likes the connection she shares with her grandmother. “I think it’s pretty cool. Not many people can say that,” she said. (Although Marie Gammond has yet to see a caged porcupine in the hallway, as her grandmother did). See Kenwood / E6

Rob Kerr/ The Bulletin

Redmond resident Pat Gammond, 75, attended Kenwood School in the 1940s. Her granddaughter Marie Gammond, 10, studies at the school now (known as Highland Magnet School) and has had classes in the same rooms her grandmother once did.

Being a parent can do a number on Promote exploration the way you relate to childless friends K I D C U LT U R E

with cool, smart toys

By Heidi Stevens Chicago Tribune

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids.

a baby uses fine-motor skills and hand-eye coordination to fill up a fishbowl with soft Dr. Seuss’ red, green, yellow and blue fish and then dump One Fish Fishbowl them out. Each fish makes By Manhattan Toy, $28 a different sound including Appropriate for a rattle, crinkle, bell ages 9 months and and squeaker. The older fabric base of the Toy tips: A wide-mouth bowl Fun: B+ can easily stand on Movement: A a high-chair tray or Thinking: B+ floor for easy Personality: B parent Social interacand child tion: B+ play. With this toy, See Toys / E3 Submitted photo

CHICAGO — Krista Rogers still remembers the day, six years ago, when her friend told her she was going to have a baby — and she wouldn’t let it change their friendship. “I remember sitting on the floor of her living room and, in the back of my mind, I couldn’t help but think, one: impossible, and two: it was just fear of change and her raging hormones speaking,” Rogers said. Kids can do a number on friendships — eating up the time previously reserved for lengthy phone calls, girls’ night out, basketball with the guys. When a circle of friends starts having kids around the same time, the pals tend to give each other a pass. But when one friend has kids and the other doesn’t, the dynamics of that friendship get trickier. “Both people in the relationship have to want

to work at it equally,” said Rogers, an assistant vice president at a Manhattan real estate firm. “I am sad to say most of my friendships have faded when kids have entered the picture.” The time differential is the most obvious challenge. The child-rearing friend and the childfree friend are likely both busy, but often at opposite times of the day: 8 p.m. for one friend means winding down homework and gearing up for bedtime, while the other friend may just be heading out for dinner. For parents, weekends are a time to reconnect with their kids after a week of school and work. For nonparents, weekends are for hanging with pals. But schedules are only part of it. Previously inseparable friends often start to feel like they live on different planets. Your buddy wants to fill you in on his latest dating conquests, and you’re lucky to schedule “date night” once every few months. See No children / E6


T EL EV I

E2 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Mom mistaken for a cougar resents the growls she gets Dear Abby: I’m an athletic, youthful-looking 58, and my son, “Barry,” is 24. We go out alone for dinner quite often because my husband (Barry’s father) doesn’t enjoy eating in restaurants. My problem is the angry stares my son and I get from younger — and older — women who mistake me for a “cougar” out on a date with my “cub.” The other night when I left our table to use the restroom, a woman approached Barry, told him he was “disgusting,” and asked, “Why don’t you date girls your own age?” He informed her that I was his mother, but even if I wasn’t, it was none of her business. Another time, a girl Barry’s age asked him why he was out with “an old hag” and said, “How can you want her over me?” This happens every time we go out. I dress well and look like I could be in my 40s, but I have to wonder about the rudeness and ignorance of someone insulting my son without knowing the circumstances of the situation. Interestingly, young men who have commented thought it was “awesome” that Barry could be out with a cougar. It’s only the females who have a problem with us. Can you comment on this? — Happily Married Mom In Ohio Dear Mom: Some thoughts do come to mind: Women who are happy in their personal lives don’t approach strangers with snide remarks like those you have repeated. The women were rude, presumptuous, probably envious — and I’ll bet they were also alone, because it’s hard to imagine a woman with a date doing something so outrageous. I’m not surprised that younger men might think it was “awesome” that your son could be out with a cougar. When the subject was raised in my column, the men who commented said what attracted them to older women was that they are confident, relaxed, comfortable with

DEAR ABBY themselves and fun to be around — while younger women didn’t bother to be subtle about their preference for men with money. And one more thing: You must be quite a knockout to attract the kind of attention you’re getting. Dear Abby: I am a 19-year-old guy who doesn’t know what I want to do with my life. I know I’m still young and shouldn’t stress out about what my career in life will be, but nothing seems to interest me. I don’t want to be a doctor or an astronomer like some do. I can’t cook or play any instruments, and I’m not very good with numbers. I don’t want to do something I will hate for the rest of my life, but I’m afraid that’s what will happen. I have been to three different counselors and none was able to help me. I’m hoping you can offer me some advice. — Hopeless In Chandler, Ariz. Dear Hopeless: You aren’t the first person to panic because he (or she) is afraid of being stuck in a career slot that doesn’t fit. The good news is one of the realities of today’s workplace is that in many cases, jobs no longer last a lifetime. Workers can expect to change jobs and be retrained several times — or more — during their working years. I hope this relieves some of your anxiety. Although you have decided what jobs do not interest you, nowhere have you mentioned any areas in which you excel. For that reason I’m advising you to go to your nearest community college career counseling center and ask to take some aptitude tests. People usually enjoy doing something they’re good at. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

SION

CBS goes ‘$#*!’ in prime time 5 new shows in fall lineup

CBS’ prime time lineup for fall New shows are in uppercase:

By Scott Collins Los Angeles Times

NEW YORK — CBS, a network that typically changes at a glacial pace, will dramatically shake up its fall schedule as it hunts for the next generation of hits. For the first time in more than 40 years, the network will run back-to-back comedies in the 8 p.m. hour on Thursdays, with “The Big Bang Theory” and the new “$#*! My Dad Says” with William Shatner. The last time CBS ran comedies in that Thursday slot was during the 1965-66 season, with “Gilligan’s Island” and “My Three Sons.” That means the “Survivor” franchise will be sent packing to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, the time slot where a comedy block failed this season. That in itself marks the end of an era; “Survivor” has been a Thursday mainstay since fall 2001, when CBS threw it against NBC’s smash sitcom “Friends” in a much-discussed showdown. And that’s not all. The network has also downgraded both of its “CSI” spinoffs — which have been 10 p.m. weeknight anchors since 2004 — to the weekends. “CSI: Miami” is moving to Sundays, and its old Monday slot going to a new remake of “Hawaii Five-O.” And “CSI: NY” will land in the suddenly competitive zone of 9 p.m. Fridays, its Wednesday slot cleared for a new legal drama, “The Defenders.” “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” will remain in its 9 p.m. Thursday berth — for now. Another new cop drama, “Blue Bloods” with Tom Selleck, is slotted for 10 p.m. Fridays. CBS executives tried to

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY

8 p.m. “How I Met Your Mother” 8:30 p.m. “Rules of Engagement” 9 p.m. “Two and a Half Men” 9:30 p.m. “MIKE & MOLLY” 10 p.m. “HAWAII FIVE-O”

8 p.m. “Survivor” 9 p.m. “Criminal Minds” 10 p.m. “THE DEFENDERS”

TUESDAY 8 p.m. “NCIS” 9 p.m. “NCIS: Los Angeles” 10 p.m. “The Good Wife”

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SATURDAY

THURSDAY 8 p.m. “The Big Bang Theory” 8:30 p.m. “$#*! MY DAD SAYS” 9 p.m. “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” 10 p.m. The Mentalist”

FRIDAY 8 p.m. “Medium”

Detective Steve McGarrett (Alex O’Loughlin), left, and Detective Danny “Danno” Williams (Scott Caan) bring back “Hawaii Five-O.” CBS via The Associated Press

put the best face on the wave of cancellations that preceded the schedule shifts, including the Friday dramas “The Ghost Whisperer” and “Numb3rs” and the Julia Louis-Dreyfus sitcom “The New Adventures of Old Christine.” “We love ‘Old Christine,’” CBS chief Leslie Moonves told reporters at a media breakfast Wednesday morning. “But that hour, the numbers were a 1.7 and a 1.8 (rating) and not heading in the right direction. That was not a good place for the No. 1 network in television to be at. ... This is about improving time periods.” “Nothing is setting the world on fire Thursdays at 8,” added Kelly Kahl, CBS’ scheduling chief. “The best time to change gears is when you already have the strongest hand.” In fact, although CBS is indeed the most-watched network again

this season, it will lose out to Fox once more among young adults, the category deemed most important by advertisers. More important, its signature franchises, “Survivor” and “CSI,” have continued to erode this season, and the heat is on the programming team to find new hits before the ebbing numbers start knocking CBS’ market share and the network loses more of its older-skewing audience to cable outlets such as TNT. Having ripened as it heads into its fourth season, “Big Bang Theory” will likely make big trouble for NBC’s “Community,” which was looking fragile as it was. “$#*!!

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8 p.m. “Crimetime Saturday” 9 p.m. “Crimetime Saturday” 10 p.m. “48 Hours Mystery”

SUNDAY 7 p.m. “60 Minutes” 8 p.m. “The Amazing Race” 9 p.m. “Undercover Boss” 10 p.m. “CSI: Miami” My Dad Says” (with CBS insisting that its expletive be written in unpronounceable characters but uttered as “bleep”; it’s the fall show most in need of a name change) could be a broader alternative to the critical darling “30 Rock.” But it’s probably not the best lead-in for “CSI,” which has stumbled anyway from age and the departure of William Petersen. CBS’ other new comedy, “Mike & Molly,” has been given the plum 9:30 Monday spot after “Two and a Half Men,” which is returning after an eleventh-hour negotiation with star Charlie Sheen. “Hawaii Five-O,” meanwhile, will steer right into a pile-up of crime shows at 10 p.m. Mondays, opposite NBC’s “Chase” and ABC’s “Castle.” It’s a similar tale on Wednesdays, when viewers can overdose on courtroom theatrics with CBS’ “The Defenders” squaring off against two other new entries, ABC’s “The Whole Truth” and NBC’s “Law & Order: Los Angeles.”

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5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News (5:01) Judge Judy Inside Edition (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos According to Jim Malcolm-Mid. Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Rudy Maxa Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Be a Millionaire Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Expeditions Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Smart Travels Expeditions Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Access Hollyw’d Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Wife Swap Laid-back mom. (N) ‘PG’ Friday Night Lights (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Ghost Whisperer (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Wife Swap Laid-back mom. (N) ‘PG’ House Open and Shut ‘14’ Å News Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Friday Night Lights (N) ’ ‘14’ Å America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ Hometime ‘G’ Gardenstory Washington W’k BBC Newsnight

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Primetime: What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC A man is found stabbed to death. (N) ’ Å Medium It’s a Wonderful Death ‘14’ Miami Medical (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Primetime: What Would You Do? (N) 20/20 (N) ’ Å Kitchen Nightmares (N) ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Need to Know (N) Dateline NBC A man is found stabbed to death. (N) ’ Å America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ Married... With Married... With Sewing-Nancy Dewberry Shw Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Need to Know (N)

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman Inside Edition (N) (11:35) Nightline King of the Hill My Name Is Earl South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Austin City Limits Pearl Jam ’ ‘PG’ News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Austin City Limits Pearl Jam ’ ‘PG’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

CSI: Miami Backstabbers ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Poison ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds True Night ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Lucky ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Penelope ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Scared to Death ‘PG’ 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami Come As You Are ‘14’ ›››› “The Untouchables” (1987, Crime Drama) Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Robert De Niro. Incorrupt- ›› “The Hunted” (2003, Action) Tommy Lee Jones, Benicio Del Toro, Connie Nielsen. ›› “They Live” (1988, Science Fiction) Roddy Piper, Keith David, Meg Foster. A drifter (2:30) ››› “Sil102 40 39 verado” Å ible government agents move against Al Capone. Å A retired combat-trainer searches for a killer in Oregon. uncovers an alien plot to control mankind. Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å Maneaters Bears ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters Congo Killer ’ ‘14’ River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Pit Bulls and Parolees Crisis ’ ‘PG’ Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC ››› “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004) George Clooney. Premiere. Indebted criminals plan an elaborate heist in Europe. ››› “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004) 137 44 Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? (7:12) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ’ ‘PG’ Å How’d They Do That? (9:16) Gator 911 Danger Coast (N) (10:16) ›› “Road House” (1989) Patrick Swayze. ’ 190 32 42 53 Trading Spouses: Meet-Mommy Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part Mad Money The Celebrity Apprentice The two finalist are determined. ’ ‘PG’ Å Paid Program Paid Program 51 36 40 52 The Celebrity Apprentice The two finalist are determined. ’ ‘PG’ Å Larry King Live (N) ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 Black or White: Kids on Race (N) Å Larry King Live ‘PG’ Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Comedy Central Comedy Central 135 53 135 47 Comedy Central The Buzz Bend City Edition PM Edition Blazer Profiles RSN Extreme RSN Presents RSN Movie Night RSN Extreme PM Edition Health-Home 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Hannah Montana Phineas and Ferb Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab: Dark Construction Intervention (N) ‘PG’ Killer Aliens Invasive species in Florida. ’ ‘PG’ Å Moose Attack! (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Killer Aliens ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å NBA Fastbreak Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Softball NCAA Tournament -- Georgia Tech vs. Jacksonville State Who’s Number 1? Best Boxers Boxing Friday Night Fights (Live) Å NFL Live (N) SportsNation Å Boxing Boxing Friday Night Fights Å 22 24 21 24 SportsNation Å Boxing MLB Baseball 2005 NLCS Game 5 -- St. Louis Cardinals at Houston Astros AWA Wrestling Å AWA Wrestling Å Boxing: Hatton vs. Tszyu Boxing: 2007 Peter vs. Toney 23 25 123 25 Boxing ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos ’ ‘PG’ Å The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record-Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record-Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Villain Cakes Chopped Diners, Drive-Ins Diner, Drive-In Private Chefs of Beverly Hills (N) Good Eats Rachael Vaca. 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Athlete 360 Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners 20 45 28* 26 Triathlon That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ›› “My Super Ex-Girlfriend” (2006) Uma Thurman, Luke Wilson. ›› “Night at the Museum” (2006) Ben Stiller. Museum exhibits spring to life when the sun goes down. Justified The Hammer ‘MA’ 131 Holmes on Homes Pasadena 911 ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Bang, Buck House Hunters House Hunters Battle on the Block ‘G’ Å 176 49 33 43 Divine Design ‘G’ Get It Sold ‘G’ Gangland ‘14’ Å Modern Marvels Rolling mills. ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Mackinac Bridge ‘G’ Gangland Phoenix. ‘14’ Å Gangland A Killer’s Revenge (N) ‘14’ Gangland Devil’s Fire ‘14’ Å 155 42 41 36 Gangland Boston. ‘14’ Å Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “Amber Frey: Witness for the Prosecution” (2005) ‘PG’ Å The Trial of Scott Peterson ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: New Mexico Lockup: New Mexico Lockup: Raw Lockup: Raw Nothing left to lose. Lockup: Raw Life and death. 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Parental Control Hired (N) ’ Cribs Wildest Antics ’ Å True Life Compulsive shopping. ’ True Life The Hamptons. ’ ››› “American Pie” (1999) Jason Biggs, Shannon Elizabeth. ’ 192 22 38 57 “My Super Psycho Sweet Sixteen” SpongeBob SpongeBob Big Time Rush Big Time Rush Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 ››› “The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie” (2004, Comedy) ’ Å CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Turn, Turn, Turn ‘14’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ (9:36) 1,000 Ways to Die ’ ‘14’ (10:22) When Good Pets Go Bad ’ ‘14’ Å 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Warehouse 13 Breakdown ‘14’ Å Warehouse 13 Nevermore ‘14’ Å Warehouse 13 MacPherson ’ ‘14’ Stargate Universe Subversion (N) ’ Merlin The Sins of the Father (N) ’ Stargate Universe Subversion Å 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis Travelers ’ ‘PG’ Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Dodger Stadium Crusade With Matt & Laurie Crouch and the Osteens Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Christian Celeb First to Know 205 60 130 The Office ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ ››› “Mean Girls” (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. (11:10) ››› “Charlie’s Angels” 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ (8:15) ›› “Panama Hattie” (1942, Musical) Ann Sothern, Dan (9:45) ››› “The Fallen Sparrow” (1943) John Garfield, Maureen O’Hara. U.S.-based › “Poor Pretty Ed›› “The Duke Is Tops” (1938) Ralph Cooper. Lena Horne made ›› “Cabin in the Sky” (1943) Ethel Waters. Emissaries from 101 44 101 29 her screen debut in this musical romance. heaven and hell vie for a gambler’s soul. Å Dailey Jr., Red Skelton. Nazi hounds tormented Spanish Civil War veteran. Å die” (1973) Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order The Brotherhood ‘14’ Bones Fraternity brother. ‘14’ Å Bones Judas on a Pole ‘14’ Å ››› “Men in Black” (1997) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. Å ››› “Men in Black” (1997) Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Prejudice ’ ‘14’ Amazing Spiez! Chowder ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Generator Rex Star Wars Clo. Would Happen King of the Hill King of the Hill Venture Bros. American Dad ’ 84 Bizarre Foods With A. Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Most Haunted Brinkburn Priory (N) 179 51 45 42 Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife ‘G’ Å Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford and Son Sanford and Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Road Kill ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Lt. Jane Doe ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Ducky is kidnapped. ‘PG’ Å NCIS An Eye for an Eye ‘PG’ Å NCIS Ravenous ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Bring It On” (2000) Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Greatest One-Hit Wonders Greatest One-Hit Wonders Greatest One-Hit Wonders Greatest One-Hit Wonders Greatest One-Hit Wonders Stone Temple Celeb Scandals 191 48 37 54 Tough Love Couples ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:45) Redbelt ‘R’ ››› “Black Hawk Down” 2001, War Josh Hartnett, Ewan McGregor. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Reign of Fire” 2002 Christian Bale. ‘PG-13’ Å (9:45) ›› “Broken Arrow” 1996, Action John Travolta. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› Desperado (5:07) ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves. ‘R’ Å Fox Legacy (7:37) ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves. ‘R’ Å Fox Legacy (10:07) ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves. ‘R’ Å Amer. Misfits Skate 2009 The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Tracking Eero Pororoca Amer. Misfits Skate 2009 The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Insane Cinema: On the Pipe 4 Å Built to Shred Warped Tour LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf HP Byron Nelson Championship, Second Round From Irving, Texas. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf HP Byron Nelson Championship, Second Round From Irving, Texas. M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘PG’ Å “The Valley of Light” (2007, Drama) Chris Klein, Gretchen Mol. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) ›› “The Golden Compass” 2007 ››› “Shrek” 2001 Voices of Mike Myers. Animated. A monster (7:45) The Pacific Part Ten Leckie returns home. ’ (Part 10 of The Ricky Gervais The Life & Times of Real Time With Bill Maher Author Ayaan Real Time With Bill Maher Author Ayaan HBO 425 501 425 10 Nicole Kidman. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å and a donkey make a deal with a mean lord. 10) ‘MA’ Å Show ‘MA’ Tim ‘MA’ Å Hirsi Ali. ’ ‘MA’ Å Hirsi Ali. ’ ‘MA’ Å Penny Dreadful (5:45) “Open Water 2: Adrift” 2006, Suspense Susan May Pratt. ‘R’ Å Ideal ‘MA’ Å Food Party ‘14’ Jon Dore Show ›› “Hard Candy” 2006 Patrick Wilson. ‘R’ Å Sarah Jane Whitest Kids Henry Rollins IFC 105 105 (3:00) ››› “Casino” 1995, Crime Drama ››› “Spider-Man” 2002, Action Tobey Maguire, Willem Dafoe. A bite from a mutant ›› “Inkheart” 2009, Adventure Brendan Fraser, Paul Bettany. A bookbinder acciden- ››› “Gran Torino” 2008, Drama Clint Eastwood, Christopher Carley, Bee Vang. A MAX 400 508 7 Robert De Niro. ’ ‘R’ Å spider gives a teen unusual powers. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tally brings an evil storybook character to life. ’ ‘PG’ Å veteran faces his longtime prejudices. ’ ‘R’ Å Dog Whisperer Tobi & Riley ‘G’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Deadly Dozen Ocean Killers ‘PG’ Dog Whisperer Tobi & Riley ‘G’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Deadly Dozen Ocean Killers ‘PG’ The Real Amelia Earhart ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Wolverine Wolverine Fantastic Four Fantastic Four Speed Racer Speed Racer Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action League Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Offshore Advt. Monster Fish Classic Patterns Fish TV Strike King Pro Big Water Adven. Adventure Gui. Ron and Raven Monster Fish Big Water Adven. Outdoor Channel Familiar Waters Fishing Step Outside OUTD 37 307 43 (4:30) › “Money Train” 1995, Action Wesley Snipes. A transit (6:25) ›› “Trucker” 2008 Michelle Monaghan. iTV. A truck driver The Tudors Henry restores his daughters. Nurse Jackie P.O. United States of Gina Yashere: Skinny B...tch The comic Strikeforce Challenger Series Kevin SHO 500 500 ’ ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å cop’s foster brother plans a subway robbery. ‘R’ has to take in her estranged son. ’ ‘R’ Box ’ ‘MA’ discusses weight loss. ‘MA’ Casey vs. Matt Lindland (iTV) NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: North Carolina Education Lottery 200 (Live) Trackside At... (N) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Showdown and All-Star Qualifying NCWTS Setup NASCAR Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) ›› “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” 2009 Michael Sheen. ’ ‘R’ (6:50) ›› “G-Force” 2009 Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å (8:22) ›› “Year One” 2009 Jack Black. ‘PG-13’ Å Party Down ‘MA’ Gravity ’ ‘MA’ “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” STARZ 300 408 300 (4:10) ›› “Beyond the Gates” 2005, (6:10) ›› “The Village Barbershop” 2008, Drama John Ratzenberger. A cantankerous › “Witless Protection” 2008, Comedy Larry the Cable Guy, Ivana (9:40) ›› “The World Is Not Enough” 1999, Action Pierce Brosnan, Sophie Marceau, Robert Carlyle. Bond TMC 525 525 Docudrama John Hurt. ’ ‘R’ barber must hire a woman or risk losing his shop. ’ ‘R’ Milicevic, Yaphet Kotto. ’ ‘PG-13’ protects the daughter of a late friend. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å NHL Hockey San Jose Sharks at Chicago Blackhawks (Live) Hockey Central Cycling Tour of California, Stage 6 The Daily Line (N) Whacked Out Whacked Out The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 Girl Meets Gown ‘G’ Å Girl Meets Gown Julie, Kelly, Rita ‘G’ Girl Meets Gown ‘G’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer The Vanishing ‘PG’ Plat. Weddings Plat. Weddings WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P’ G   M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. TODAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art and more; this month’s theme is “Wily Weasels”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 329, or www.highdesertmuseum.org. KENWOOD SCHOOL CELEBRATION: Celebrate the school’s 90th anniversary with an open house, tours, music and historical displays; bring memorabilia to share; free; 1 p.m. open house, 2:30 p.m. performances, 4 p.m. reunion; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-383-6220. SPRING CELEBRATION: Featuring a Nepali and Indian dinner, a silent auction, live music, children’s activities and more; proceeds benefit Ten Friends; $10, free ages 12 and younger; 5:30 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-390-1419. IRISH CELTIC JAM: Bring an instrument to join a jam session of Celtic music, or come and listen; free; 6-9 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. “GREASE”: The Sisters High School drama department presents the musical about a girl falling for a boy from the wrong side of the tracks; $10, $6 seniors and students; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4045. “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. SUSAN SINGS BROADWAY: Susan Rahmsdorff sings a selection of Broadway tunes, with accompanist Donna Jacobsen; proceeds benefit Family Kitchen; donations accepted; 7-8:30 p.m.; Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-382-5542. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beatonline.org.

SATURDAY REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495 or http://redmondgrange.org. GREAT STRIDES: A 5K walk-a-thon for cystic fibrosis; donations accepted; 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. walk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-4806703, greatstrides.redmond@ gmail.com or www.cff.org. FUN IN THE FORESTS: Meet Smokey Bear and Woodsy Owl, meet firefighters and more; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: 9:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. at High Desert Museum; see Today’s listing for details. TRAIL ALLIANCE CELEBRATION: Celebrate the opening of the Peterson Ridge Trail system with a speech, a short parade and trail exploration; free; 11 a.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St., Sisters; 541-549-8049. WOODEN BOAT GATHERING: See more than 30 works of floating art; barbecue available; proceeds from raffle benefit the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-771-2147. JAPANESE FESTIVAL: Featuring Taiko drum performances, a Japanese

Toys Continued from E1

Aquafier By Everley Consultants LLC, $9.95 Appropriate for ages 9 and older Toy tips: B+ Fun: B+ Movement: B Thinking: A

Courtesy DreamWorks

Shrek (voiced by Mike Meyers) asks for the help of Rumpelstiltskin (voiced by Walt Dohrn) in “Shrek Forever After.” See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine.

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘Shrek Forever After’ Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin file photo

Captain Hook, played by Daniel Bradley, left, of Crooked River Ranch, battles with Peter Pan, played by Una Wagner, 13, of Redmond, during a rehearsal for “Peter Pan” put on by the Redmond High School. The play is one of many student productions taking place this weekend.

SUNDAY

Story times, library youth events for May 21-27 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday. • MUSICAL ADVENTURES: With the Cascade Community School of Music; ages 3-6; 10:30 a.m. Monday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Saturday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLER STORY TIME: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • TEEN LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 5 p.m. Monday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: • Story times resume in June.

SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • Story times will resume in June. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • TEEN TERRITORY GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. • TEEN GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 10 a.m. Wednesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

FUN IN THE FORESTS: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at High Desert Museum; see Saturday’s listing for details. “GREASE”: 2 p.m. at Sisters High School; see Today’s listing for details. CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring flute soloist Kyle Ruggles; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-2712, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org. FREIBOTH FAMILY FUNDRAISER: Featuring live music by 41 East, a raffle and a taco bar; proceeds benefit the Freiboth family; Jason Freiboth is battling melanoma; $8, $5 ages 12 and younger; 4-7 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-749-2137 or kathy.thompson@hdesd.org. RELAY FOR LIFE FUNDRAISER: Featuring food, drinks and live music by the Quons; proceeds benefit Relay for Life; donations accepted; 4-7 p.m.; Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-728-4378 or www.bendrelay.com. SPAGHETTI FEED: Meal supports the World War II Memorial Highway fund collected by the Bend Heroes Foundation; $10; 4-6 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-419-6021. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: 7:30 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details.

MONDAY “GREASE”: 7 p.m. at Sisters High School; see Today’s listing for details.

TUESDAY No family event listings.

fashion show, a silent auction and family-friendly activities; proceeds benefit Mountain View and Summit high schools’ Japanese exchange program; $5, $12 per family; noon-4 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-322-3211. “PETER PAN”: 1:30 and 7 p.m. at Redmond High School; see Today’s listing for details. “FOOLS”: 2 and 7 p.m. at Summit High School; see Today’s listing for details. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jeff Davis talks about his book “Weird Oregon”; free; 2 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 2690 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242. HOT HERO’S CHILI COOK-OFF: Sample chili prepared by police, firemen and military personnel; proceeds benefit Safety Outreach for Seniors and the families of fallen law enforcement officers; $5 for five tastes, free ages 5 and younger; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Villa Retirement, 1801 N.E. Lotus Drive; 541-389-0046. “YOUR LAND, MY LAND”: Veronica Dujon talks about using and preserving Oregon’s natural resources; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177040 or www.dpls.us/calendar. SPANISH AND LATINO CELEBRATION: Featuring a carnival celebrating Spanish language and Latino culture; free admission; 4-6 p.m.; Summit

Personality: B Social interaction: B For science enthusiasts, this simple kit constructs a magnifying lens from water. The kit includes two plastic, fiber-opticquality domes and a sturdy rubber band to hold them together. Water is required. Once assembled, it uses the ‘Refractive Index’ principle of science as the cornerstone of functionality. This is ideal for

High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3229. ELVIS IMPERSONATOR: Featuring a performance by Medford-based Elvis entertainer Clint Ingbretson; $10; 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Lava Lanes Bowling Center, 1555 N.E. Forbes Road, Bend; 541-318-5656, amy@ lblm.net or www.lavalanesbend.com. “YOUR LAND, MY LAND”: Veronica Dujon talks about using and preserving Oregon’s natural resources; reservations requested; free; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: 7:30 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. YOUTH CHOIR OF CENTRAL OREGON: Premiere and Debut choirs perform a spring concert; preceded by a gala with a silent auction and hors d’oeuvres; $10, $35 for gala and concert; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; gala begins at 5:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-385-0470 or www.ycco.org. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY BOUT: The coed roller derby league presents a bout with guest skaters from around the region; $10, free ages 10 and younger; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; nicholecp@hotmail. com or www.renegadesor.com.

WEDNESDAY PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes kayak, canoe and boat gear demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by bluegrass act The Prairie Rockets; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 4 p.m. demonstrations, 7 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. RACE NIGHT BARBECUE: Dragsters and circle-track cars gather for a car show and to talk about upcoming seasons at Madras Drags and Madras Speedway; with live music; free admission; 5:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-0118. “LUCKY DOLLAR — PRIVATE EYE”: The Bend Theatre for Young People presents a comic mystery about a detective hired to investigate a disappearance; $6, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-771-9761.

THURSDAY No family event listings.

concentration, fine-motor skills and hand-eye coordination. It’s best to do this project with an adult the first time.

Submitted photo

classroom study and home schooling. Assembly and use requires

Recommendations from Marianne M. Szymanski, publisher of www.toytips.com, Toy Tips Magazine and coauthor of “Toy Tips: A Parent’s Essential Guide to Smart Toy Choices.”

Rating: PG for mild action, some rude humor and brief language. What it’s about: Shrek sees what his world would be like if he’d never lived and must win Fiona all over again to set things right. The kid attractor factor: The friendly green ogre does battle with witches and Rumpelstiltskin, and deals with diapers and Donkey. Good lessons/bad lessons: Never sign a contract without reading the fine print. Violence: Cartoon clashes. Language: Mild-mannered profanity. Sex: Nope. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: More kidfriendly (fewer adult jokes) than previous “Shrek” sequels, suitable for kids ages 5 and older.

‘Just Wright’ Rating: PG for some suggestive material and brief language. What it’s about: Plane-Jane physical therapist falls for the NBA star she is trying to rehab. The kid attractor factor: Queen Latifah, Common, the NBA. Good lessons/bad lessons: Men of substance will choose character over arm candy. Violence: None. Language: A teensy bit of profanity. Sex: Suggested. Drugs: Party situations. Parents’ advisory: The basketball background will be more interesting to kids than the romance at the center of this. Best for kids ages 13 and older.

‘Letters to Juliet’ Rating: PG for brief rude behavior, some language and incidental smoking. What it’s about: A young woman tracks down the author of a letter and tries to help her find her long-lost love. The kid attractor factor: Amanda Seyfried, who specializes in moist-eyed, chaste romances for kids old enough to appreciate them. Good lessons/bad lessons: Sometimes, first love is the great love and the one that counts.

Violence: None. Language: A smidge of profanity. Sex: Not really. Drugs: A little wine. Parents’ advisory: Not enough comedy or action to keep kids younger than 12 interested.

‘Robin Hood’ Rating: PG-13 for violence including intense sequences of warfare, and some sexual content. What it’s about: Robin Hood is “created” in the turmoil of 12th century England. The kid attractor factor: An action picture with swords, bows and boiling oil. Good lessons/bad lessons: Civil rights have to be fought for and won. Violence: Intense swordfights, and arrow impalings. Language: Occasionally bawdy. Sex: Some discreet wenching. Drugs: Mead, and lots of it. Parents’ advisory: The darkest, most violent “Robin Hood,” it’s a bit intense for kids only used to the Disney version, suitable for kids 10 and older.

‘Babies’ Rating: PG for cultural and maternal nudity throughout. What it’s about: We follow babies from four different cultures through their first year of life. The kid attractor factor: Seeing how babies entertain themselves in places without “Little Einsteins” DVDs. Good lessons/bad lessons: Actually, it really does “take a village” to raise a child. Gadgets help, too. Violence: None. Language: Almost dialog free. Sex: Infant and mother nudity. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: A little childhood development and a lesson in the diversity of cultures, all in one kid-friendly documentary.

‘Iron Man 2’ Rating: PG-13 for sequences of intense sci-fi action and violence, and some language. What it’s about: Iron Man has new foes to fight, new friends to help him fight them. The kid attractor factor: A comic book adaptation with action and a little edge. Good lessons/bad lessons:

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly


E4 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

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PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, May 21, 2010: This year, attempt to break past self-imposed mental barriers. You might be surprised by how many doors could open up. Understand where you develop your ideas from. Retest them. Emphasize your ingenuity and ability to revitalize stale ideas and projects. If you are single, make sure you want to say goodbye to that status. You will have many opportunities to do so. If you are attached, the two of you could start acting like newlyweds with a little more open thought. VIRGO often helps you relax. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Plunge into work. Communication flourishes if the topic is work, business or money. Stay focused on your day-to-day life rather than the big picture. Even if you feel that someone might not hear it, share your perspective. Tonight: Make plans that work for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Your enormous resourcefulness emerges in a discussion about funds. Keep the big picture in mind when dealing with others. Others might not grasp the ramifications of some of their thoughts. Tonight: Christen the weekend right! GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH If you can take a personal day or head home early, do. You need some downtime to

visit with a roommate or family member. You hear news that might force you to take a stand. Tonight: You don’t have to go far. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Keep conversations moving and incorporate someone’s changing views. Your ability to adapt and flex proves to be most complimentary to several key people. A meeting provokes some questions. Ask. Tonight: Where it is happening. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Weigh the pros and cons of an investment involving your innate skills. One could look at the situation in many different ways. Listen and then decide what you want to do. A respected person has very strong opinions. Tonight: Treat a friend or two to munchies after work. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH You peak in a workrelated situation. You listen well, revise thinking when need be and move in a new direction. Express your unusual practicality and grounded perspective. A late-day meeting could become a social happening. Tonight: Whatever knocks your socks off. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Much goes on in your mind and behind closed doors. Though you might want to get an impression from a key person, you wonder how discreet he or she may be. That person might know more than you think. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Zero in on what works.

A meeting helps broadcast news and draws many people’s support. You could be surprised by everything that you hear. A new slant on an issue opens up communication. Tonight: Lead the TGIF celebrations. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You are in the limelight. Others seek you out for financial advice on work-related issues. Don’t step beyond your boundaries. You don’t want to be blamed for bad advice. Be open to different ideas. Tonight: Invite an associate or two to join you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Do necessary research. Return calls. With some help, you might find that there is a lot more to a story than you were aware of. Note what would be most effective in making someone listen to your position or belief. Tonight: Try a different type of happening. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH A partnership increases in importance as you see how easily you can work with this person. One-on-one relating in general proves to be more efficient than usual. Your worries might not be justified. Tonight: Continue the theme. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Others might continue to seek you out en masse. Your ability to understand what is going on with others grows. Ask questions. Exchange ideas. Stay open to a better route or a more successful method or path. Tonight: Sort through invitations. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Kenwood

No children

Continued from E1

Continued from E1 The key is owning up to those feelings, say experts. Admit — early and often — that the friendship has changed, but that doesn’t mean it has to end. “No relationship is perfect and neither are friendships,” said Irene S. Levine, author of “Best Friends Forever: Surviving a Breakup with Your Best Friend” (Overlook Press). “Kids are always a challenge that upsets the balance, but if you talk about it you can often work it out.” Levine says to focus on the things you still have in common, whether it’s where you grew up, where you work or a shared hobby. “The more ties people have, the closer they remain usually,” Levine said. “If the friendship was tenuous to start with, the baby could be the Achilles heel that kills it.” Amy Trapp, an online business developer in St. Louis, has one child in preschool and another still at home. “I think the biggest challenge is remembering to make the time to reach out to friends regularly,” she said. “And this goes for any friend — with or without a kid. “We all need to respect one another’s feelings and evolving priorities,” said Trapp, 35. Try to live on each other’s planet, in other words. “Girlfriends remind us who we are before we had kids,” said Dawn Bertuca, co-owner of GirlfriendCelebrations.com, a Web site that encourages women to cultivate their friendships. “You’re trying to have adult time, trying to maintain the person you’ve always been. Children add another dimension, but you should still try to relate to your friends in pretty much the same way.” For guys, who tend to relate less through phone calls and emails and more through shared pursuits, face time with friends becomes even more important. Which is partly why Trapp and her husband established a weekly routine that answered a number of friendship challenges. “My best girlfriend, who is kidfree, and I started ‘Survivor’ night, where every Thursday night during the ‘Survivor’ season, we alternated who was responsible for dinner and we all got together at my house,” Trapp said. Bertuca says standing dates — whether it’s a weekly class or a weekly TV show — are ideal. “You have to put it on the calendar and make it a priority,” she said. “It has to be scheduled.”

Original features Kenwood School is a traditional-looking brick building with a separate gym that sits on Newport Avenue, west of the Deschutes River. It has been a school since opening for the 1919-20 school year. School office manager Barbry Hogue has worked hard to coordinate and organize anniversary festivities. She has dug up old photographs, newspaper articles and original building plans. “It’s the oldest school building in the district that’s been in continual use as a school,” said Hogue. The district’s administration office and Reid School, which now houses the Des Chutes Historical Society, are older, but haven’t been used as schools in some time. It’s understood that the school was designed by an architect from California, which explains the original plans. As conceived and built, the school was a U-shape with hallways entirely open to the air and elements. Each hallway was lined with archways that opened out onto a giant courtyard. No walls blocked the snow, rain and ice from hitting students and teachers walking from class to class. In 1923, after a few years of staff and students enduring the cold, the archways were blocked off and sealed (although visitors can still see the architectural details of the arches in the school hallways), according to Hogue. A few years after that, the district built a fourth side to the U-shape, giving the school a box shape. The building continued to feature a large courtyard in the center of the school. The school’s gym, which is in a separate building, was finished in 1950. In the 1970s, part of the courtyard was covered over by the creation of a library.

History For many years, the school’s May Day celebrations were elaborate and attracted numerous community members. Patsy Gammond remembers them being big, fancy events. This was just one of many ways in which the school was a central source for entertainment and gathering. “Especially in the early years, the school was really a community focus,” said Hogue. And she quickly discovered the just about anything going on at the school in those early years ended up in the newspaper. The Bulletin chronicled when students from Kenwood were quarantined due to scarlet fever in 1922 and then when the school closed after a student contracted polio in 1935. In 1938, the school closed for happier reasons: The circus came to town. The story in the Bulletin reads: “No one will play hookey from school tomorrow afternoon to see the circus, for the simple reason that there will be no school.” According to the story, the Al G. Barnes-Sells Floto circus came to town on the Great Northern railroad and included more than 700 people, scores of horses, herds of elephants and caravans of camels. In 1936, neighbors protested when workers felled a giant tree on the school property by mistake. The tree was thought to be more than 500 years old. During World War II, neighbors planted victory gardens in the lawn, according to Hogue. Patsy Gammond remembers bringing a dime or quarter to school every Friday to buy a war

Submitted photo

This photo shows Kenwood School from the back of the building, after the fourth wing was created, although the archways were still open to the air.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Students in teacher Jack Ensworth’s room used to sign their names inside this closet.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

The archways inside the school’s hallways today mark the arches that used to open on to a large courtyard.

If you go What: Celebrating Kenwood School: 90 Years of Stories When: • 1 p.m. — Open house with student-led or self-guided school tours • 2:30 p.m. — School assembly (public invited) with performances from students singing songs from the 1920s- 40s and a slide show • 4-7 p.m. — Reunion, including opening remarks from Bruce Reynolds, refreshments, old photographs and socializing (people are encouraged to bring Kenwood memorabilia or photos) Where: 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-383-6220

1940s. While the cafeteria looks the same, she used to walk home every day for lunch because the school didn’t serve lunch (except on Fridays when the Pep Club sold hot dogs). She remembers the playground was mostly dirt, the swings sat on a high tripod 10 feet off the ground and there was plenty of room to play marbles. She is just happy to see the building still a school. “I think it’s wonderful they’re still using it.” Marie is excited for the anniversary celebration. She and fellow fourth and fifth graders are going to sing several older songs, including “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” She is going to wear her grandmother’s vest and shield from her days as member of the safety patrol.

Ensworth bond stamp. When the new gym at Kenwood opened in 1950, the event was marked with square dancing from the music of the Corn Poppers. When built, the gym was the largest floor in Bend. In 2000, the school started a special magnet program in six classrooms dedicated to the Scottish story-line model. In 2006, the entire school took on the magnet program, and is now known as Highland Magnet School. Patsy Gammond likes to share stories about Kenwood with her granddaughter. Another granddaughter, Kaitlinn Moody, 20, also attended Kenwood, although none of Patsy Gammond’s children did because the family moved out of the area. Knowing her grandchildren are in the same classrooms she was in is special. “I thought it was just wonderful.” She says the building looks the same for the most part, with a few minor changes, as it did during her time there in the

Jack Ensworth started teaching at Kenwood in the late 1950s and didn’t leave until the early 1980s. In 1973, he was named the National Teacher of the Year. Ensworth — for whom Ensworth Elementary School is named — plans to attend the anniversary celebration today and is looking forward to sharing some of his many stories with former students and colleagues. Ensworth, now 84, used to teach in Room 11, which once served as a stage. The room includes a long cloak room that used to be storage for the stage. Ensworth caught a boy writing his name in the cloak room and paddled the youngster for defacing public property. But soon afterward, he realized that many

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Marie Gammond, 10, points to a postcard showing the back of Kenwood School, when it was exposed to the weather.

kids were signing their names in the closet. Eventually he decided to go along with the practice, and since then hundreds of children have signed their names in the closet. When many former students return to the school, the first thing they want to do is go to the room and search for their name. Ensworth enjoyed introducing children to animals. He brought sheep to graze in the courtyard. “The kids helped me deliver the lambs out there,” said Ensworth. He remembers pulling on a pair of legs to pull out the lamb, when a student pointed out the legs were different colors. Turns out, the ewe was having triplets. He also raised pigs in the courtyard one year. He regularly took children to nearby caves for exploration. Ensworth believed children learned about nature and being responsible through these experiences. He also used animals as a reward. Students who were doing well got to take a turn and feed a lamb a bottle or got to keep Mr. Big, a hamster, in their desk. But poor Mr. Big came to a sad end. A boy had created a leash and collar for the hamster and was walking him down the hall when there was a bit of pushing and Mr. Big ended up crushed. The class had to write obituaries, and they buried the hamster in the courtyard. A few years later, the library was built on top of Mr. Big’s grave. “Well, that’s progress,” joked Ensworth. He loved being a teacher at the school and put on numerous musicals and puppet productions. A Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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local mortician, whose child was in Ensworth’s class, donated many coffin boxes, which the teacher put to use in all sorts of productions, creating castles and props for the “Wizard of Oz.” He also liked to create items — like a giant spider for Miss Moffit — out of papier-mâché. He often dried the items down by the furnace, which burned saw dust. “Every so often we’d get a fire down there,” said Ensworth. The sawdust wasn’t really safe, but it did a good job drying out the papier-mâché. “I have a lot of really good positive memories about Kenwood School,” said Ensworth. “We had more fun.” Community members who want to relive their favorite memories of the school old or new, can join Ensworth and other former teachers, students and parents at the school today. Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

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18,977

$

Stk# 9435, VIN: 1YVHZ8BH1A5M23274 • After $0 Factory Rebate, RFS Disc. $1,490, MSRP $22,205, 42 Mo. Lease, $0 cash or trade equity plus rebate down. $168 Ore. Lic. & Title fees, $0 security deposit, $50 admin fee, plus $595 acquisition fee totalling $0 due at inception plus rebate. Total lease charge $11,298 plus rebate and deposit. Residual $12,212. $0 termination fee. 12,000 miles per year. On approved credit.

NEW 2010 Mazda Tribute i Touring 4x4

• Moonroof • Leather

20,977

• 26 MPG • Full Power Options • Premium Alloys • 7-Speaker CD Stereo

2009 FORD EXPEDITION EL 4X4

• Eddie Bauer Package • Heated Leather Seats WAS $ 44,998

VIN: A12908, STK# UC9624P

robberson.com

20,977

0

DOWN PAYMENT 1st PAYMENT SECURITY DEPOSIT DUE AT SIGNING

VIN: 531912, STK# UT9619P

2008 FORD TAURUS X SEL

• AWD • 3rd Row Seat WAS $ 24,998

$

• Privacy Glass • Alloy Wheels

robberson.com

$

VIN: A78532, STK# UT9685P

SERVICE DEPARTMENT Mon. - Fri. 7am - 11:30pm Sat. 8am - 5:30pm

Bend, Prineville and www.Robberson.com Main Showroom: 2100 NE 3rd St. Bend • Preowned: On Butler Market & 2nd St.

East

Bend River Promenade

Butler Mkt. Rd. Izzy’s

1

AT

robberson.com

800-588-1084

$

• 7-Passenger Seating • Moonroof

38,977

382-4521

ROBBERSON FORD Underwood

541-

$

• Leather • Premium Wheels

VIN: L86499, STK# UC9639P

26,998

$

NEW 2010 MAZDA6 i Sport

WAS $ 15,998

NEW 2010 FORD F150 XLT 4X4 1 AT

11,977

VIN: 010360, STK# UC9601T

• Premium Surround • Rear Spoiler

• 26 Miles Per Gallon • Full Power Options • Sync Activated • Premium Wheels

Stk#9544; VIN: C30396 • MSRP $26,915-$2,000 Factory Rebate-$917 RFS Disc.

$

• Rear Spoiler • Custom Alloy Wheels

VIN: 108370, STK# UC9707MW

NEW 2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4 1 AT

11,977

• Full Power Options • Traction Control WAS $ 15,998

19,998

• 31 Miles Per Gallon • Power Glass Moonroof • Custom Rear Spoiler • 2010 Car of the Year!

Stk#9536; VIN: 310612 • MSRP $24,015-$2,000 Factory Rebate-$2,017 RFS Disc.

$

• Off-Road Tires • Alloy Wheels

y

1 AT

MPG

rk wa

Stk#1664; VIN: 130682 • MSRP $17,570-$2,500 Factory Rebate-$500 FMCC Rebate-$572 RFS Disc.

33

2006 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GT

3rd St.

$

2005 DODGE RAM 1500

Pa

1 AT

X

ROBBERSON PRE-OWNED SUPERSTORE

North

*Must qualify and finance with FMCC, On Approved Credit, in lieu of special APR. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures may vary from actual vehicles. Not all buyers will qualify. Must be present at dealership to purchase advertised vehicle. No dealers or brokers. Special APR in lieu of rebates. Sale vehicles may have scratches or dents. Offer good through 5-24-10. Thanks for buying at Robberson and reading the small print.

22,998

Stk# 9574, VIN: 4F2CY9C74AKM07828 MSRP $26,095 - $3,097 RFS Discount

Come in for a test drive today!

ROBBERSON MAZDA 2100 NE 3rd St., Bend 800-588-1084 • 541-382-4521 Vehicles subject to prior sale. Illustrations may not be identical to actual vehicles. Ask about our creative financing plans. *On approved credit. Minimum 680 Beacon Score, must finance w/MAC. License, title, and doc not included in price. Offers good through 5-24-10.


F2 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

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General Merchandise

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

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The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

CHIHUAHUA-POODLE one female, black, 8 wks, adorable, $500. 425-830-0016.

Kittens & cats ready to adopt! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, 1-5 Sat/Sun, call re: other days. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. 65480 78th St., Bend, 389-8420. Info & photos at www.craftcats.org.

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Want to Buy or Rent PAYING CASH FOR old watches, old military items, old motorcycle helmets any condition, Central Oregon. 541-706-0891 Wanted: All the things in YOUR garage you would like to see go. Please call 541-480-8322 WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006

AKC BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG puppies. DOB 1/16/10 Good markings & personalities. $1500 $1700 541-383-4578 trinityfarms@bendtel.net Australian Shepherd female, red merle, spayed & rescued $50. (541)576-3701 Basset Hounds, born 3/18, 5 females, 2 males, $400, parents on-site, 541-350-4000.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

Bengal Kitten Mix, Silver, 1 left, vet checked, wormed $150. Call for info. 541-923-7501. We Want Your Junk Car!! Bernese/Newfie puppies, 2 We'll buy any scrap metal, wks., 4 male 1 female ready batteries or catalytic conin 4 wks. Dew claws reverters. 7 days a week call moved and vet checked. 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 $500 per pup $150 deposit call 541-279-7914 205 BLUE HEELER PUPS! Very nice Items for Free dogs! family raised, lots of herd, great with kids. these Hot Spring Spa, Prodigy Model litters go FAST! 150.00 first req. crane to lift off deck. shots and dewormed. TuFree. 541-593-2308 malo 503-871-7440

Chihuahua

Puppies, 4

males, asking $350/ea. Call for more info., 541-604-6736

Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317

Chihuahuas (2) tiny babies, looking for new families, $250, 541-419-6445 Cockatiels, babies and adult pairs, w/ cages, $20 and up. 541-548-0501

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Springer Spaniel Puppies, 8 weeks, liver & white, absolutely beautiful, last 2 are ready to go, $300, call 541-633-9755.

Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org

Lhasa Apso Pups, beautiful colors, exc. personality, $300, Madras, 503-888-0800.

Toy Aussie Blue Merle Female, 4yr, retired, potty trained, sweet yet shy, 360-609-3639

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each 541-325-3376. English Mastiff pups, Purebred, 7 wks. Fawns & Bridles. 2 males, 4 females. $600/ea., Redmond 541-410-0186 **FREE** 1 Year old beautiful Calico cat, free to a good home. 541-389-1007. FREE Lab Mix, very sweet 10 mo. male, loves kids and other animals. 541-350-4163

BOXER PUPPIES extra large litter. Purebred. $150 each. 541-815-5999. Cat breeding season has begun! Please have your cats spayed and neutered before our shelters become overcrowded with unwanted litters. Adult female or male cats, $40. Bring in the litter under 3 months and we’ll alter them for free! Call Bend Spay & Neuter Project for more info. 541-617-1010. Cavalier Spaniel Puppies. 8 weeks old, 1st shots. $150 Call for pics . 541-475-3410

Toy Poodle Puppies for sale. “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” They are ready for their new The Humane Society of Redhomes. HURRY they won't mond now offers low cost last for my affordable prices. spays and neuters, Cat spay Call Cindy at 541-771-3195. starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at Working cats for barn/shop, companionship, FREE! Fixed, $55.00. For more informashots. Will deliver! 389-8420. tion or to schedule an appointment, please call 541-923-0882 YORKIE, must sell, 5 year spayed female, micro Maremma Guard Dog pups, chipped. $100 OBO. purebred, great dogs, $300 541-504-4586 each, 541-546-6171. Mini Dachshund Puppies, 7 weeks old. Two silver dapple females, 1 black/tan male and 1 black male. $400 each. Call 503-863-9172. I'm in Redmond.

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889.

Hound Puppies, blacks & tans, 4 males, 3 females, $50/ea.. 541-508-6883

PUG MIXES, 2 males, first shots, wormed, ready to go! $200 each. 389-0322

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537

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Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Estate Sales

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

ESTATE SALE IN TOLLGATE, SISTERS, Fri.-Sat., 9-4, Consolidating 2 households. All QUALITY new or gently used. King & queen bed sets, Drexel chinoiserie furniture, Henredon sofas, antique armoire, china cabinet, wall art, decorator accessories, TVs, DVD players, mowers & garden equip., office furniture & equip., gas BBQ,books, DVDs, more. 14853 Crupper. Weather permitting. (No children's items) 541-549-8422

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Look What I Found!

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ESTATE SALE, FRI, MAY 21 ONLY, 8am-4pm. 63672 Ranch Village Dr. Northwest Bend off of Cooley Rd. Tools, antiques, furniture, kitchen items, yard tools and much more.

ESTATE

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

SALE

Huge Sale ... house packed full of all kinds of quality furniture Antique/mid-Century/Modern. King bed, several dressers, dining set with hutch, several sideboards, many side tables, retro & modern lamps & tables, bookcases, pictures and paintings, lots of antique crystal & glassware. fine china, Lenox dinnerware set, Louisville stoneware dishes, lots of stemware, Fenton cranberry glass, Victorian silver tea set and other silver, antique quilts, cast iron & crockery, vintage furs/hats & purses, fine & costume jewelry, KitchenAid, loads of quality never-used kitchen & cookware, great books & cookbooks, lots of ladies clothing, sewing items, Serger, Singer commercial sewing machine, office items & files, patio set, outdoor items, holiday, loads of misc.,

Fri. & Sat., May 21 & 22, 9 -4 Numbers Fri. at 8 a.m.

4 Seasons Mobile Home Park 64100 N. Hwy 97, Space 9, a few miles north of Bend. Please park carefully, parking is difficult. Attic Estates & Appraisals, 541-350-6822 for pictures go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

Huge Estate Sale/ Moving / Divorce. Large inventory from everyday household goods, tools to high end merchandise. Something for everyone. Friday May 21 Thru Sunday May 22, starts at 8am. 64460 Rock Springs Rd. Follow the signs from Tumalo Feed Company. 541.410.6067. Credit Cards Accepted with small fee.

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

PARROT CAGE, deluxe, exc. cond., $125 or trade for gun. 541-382-8973.

Goldendoodle Pups, sweet, kid conditioned, beautiful, Pit Bull Blue female puppy, ready now, parents UKC reg., health guarantee, ready 5/28 pics avail! $200. Taking deposits, $500/ea. 541-325-1391 541-548-4574/541-408-5909

Heeler

210

www.thebierwagens.com/puppies

Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, 7 weeks old, males & female avail., $400-$500. 541-447-4399

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802

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Antiques & Collectibles

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Bed -Beautiful Custom King Size Barn Wood Bed, $1000. Spotting Scope, Cabella’s 60x80, Call 541-548-5657. Furniture Titanium case, tripod, accessories, $200, 541-550-0444. Card Tables (2) no chairs, $25 each, call for more info. Stevens single shot 20 ga. shot 541-317-4636. gun, like new, $200. Childs Headboard, solid wood, 541-595-0941 Visit our HUGE home decor single bed frame, $75. consignment store. S&W M29 4”, 1st yr., 99 % in 541-388-8198 New items arrive daily! box, $1595; Colt Cobra 4” Dining Set -Maple, 55 yrs old, 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 22LR, ANIB, $1250; others. fixtures, drop leaf w/pads, 2 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 541-389-1392 large extenders, good cond., www.redeuxbend.com $350. 541-416-1051 Tikka Model T3 22-250, Nikon 3x9, composite stock, $550. Dryer, Maytag, in good cond., Jenny Linn Bed, head/foot 541-382-7840 $95 OBO. Call for more info., board, side rails, wood, full 541-388-2854 size, mattress, box spring, 253 good cond., $175 cash. Dryer, Newer Amana HD, extra TV, Stereo and Video 541-389-3622 large capacity, runs great, $100, call 541-550-0444. Loveseat, Floral Print beige and TV, 55” Mitsubishi, w/oak endarker brown, good cond. tertainment center, $1195, Freezer, Upright, older but $60 OBO. 541-317-4636. e-mail pics, 541-548-5516 works great $100 OBO. 541-317-4636 Secretary Bookcase, Mahogany, 255 drop front, Maddox brand, GENERATE SOME excitement in 1940’s period, exc. shape, Computers your neigborhood. Plan a gaarched top, serpentine front rage sale and don't forget to drawers, must see, $399 THE BULLETIN requires comadvertise in classified! OBO. 541-536-7408 puter advertisers with mul385-5809. tiple ad schedules or those Table, Oak top, base is old selling multiple systems/ treadle sewing matching software, to disclose the cabinet $200. OBO. 317-4636 name of the business or the 215 term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are Coins & Stamps defined as those who sell one KitchenAid Stainless Steel computer. WANTED TO BUY Fridge., 21.9 cu. ft., auto water/icemaker, $325 US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & 257 Currency collect, accum. Pre 541-388-4324 or Musical Instruments 1964 silver coins, bars, sizemore@bendcable.com rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Log Furniture, lodgepole & coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex juniper, beds, lamps & tables, & vintage watches. No colmade to order, lection to large or small. Bed541-419-2383 rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 1910 Steinway Model A Mattresses good Parlor Grand Piano burled 242 quality used mattresses, mahogany, fully restored in & discounted king sets, Exercise Equipment out, $46,000 incl. profesfair prices, sets & singles. sional West Coast delivery. FREE WEIGHTS, 20 lb., solid 541-408-7953. 541-598-4643. piece, 2 @$10 each. Micro, large size, GE, 1 yr. new 541-388-1533. Hammond Organ, the Auwhite, $200 or best offer, IRONMAN ultimate arm workrora Classic. Model # 541-317-4636. out, compact 2’x2” thick, 132114 – Purchased new Mirror, large, 57.5”x41.5”, exc $20. 541-388-1533. in 1980. Only used in a cond., unframed, $45. home setting. Interested SCHWINN 430 ELLIPTICAL. 541-389-9707 parties only - Please call like new, 16 levels of resisi541-617-1020 tance, LCD display, all bookMODEL HOME lets, $300. 541-848-9967 FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, Weight Machine, Weider Pro 260 sectionals, fabrics, leather, 9930, $100, please call Misc. Items home office, youth, 541-389-6420. accessories and more. Bedrock Gold & Silver 245 MUST SELL! BUYING DIAMONDS & (541) 977-2864 Golf Equipment R O L E X ’ S For Cash 208 www.extrafurniture.com 541-549-1592 Pets and Supplies Callaway women’s golf Recliners, La-Z-Boy, 1 blue, 1 BUYING DIAMONDS clubs with bag. Short set. tan, $75 each., call Rat Terriers, Rescued, 9 mo. to FOR CASH Like new. $375. Phone 541-550-0444. 4 years, blue merle to cameo, SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-788-4844. 2 females, 2 males, $200 ea. SOFA good quality leather 541-389-6655 541-576-3701, 541-576-2188 88” wide x 3’ deep. $200 OBO. 541-390-6570. Golf Cart , elec. w/split windBUYING Shi/Malt Pup, male, 6 weeks, shield, full curtains, exc. Lionel/American Flyer trains, bouncy and happy boy! $300. Check out the accessories. 408-2191. cond., must see! 388-2387 541-419-3082 classifieds online CHAINSAWS! New & Like New! 246 www.bendbulletin.com Stihl! Husqvarna! Echo! Up to Guns & Hunting Updated daily $200 off! 541-280-5006.

Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 3 black & 3 chocolate males, 2 chocloate females $400-$500 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Dusty Needs a New Home. Red Heeler cross, spayed female 4 - 5 years old. Great with kids & other animals. Loves to be outside & have room to run. Small Adoption re-homing fee. 541-390-7115

210

Furniture & Appliances

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

and Fishing

44 REMINGTON MAG, 7½” Ruger Redhawk with holster. $600. 541-815-4114. A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

BERETTA AL391 Teknys 12 ga. GOLD TRAP: adjustable comb, hard case, 7 choke set. Very good cond. $1600. Kent, 541-923-6723. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

Colt AR-15 with Burris Optic, full case, $2000. 541-788-1731, leave msg.

211

Extremely Rare Steyr-Aug SA, .223, pre-ban, only 1500 imported into U.S., original box, manual, & test target, rarely fired, $3800 OBO, 541-410-0922

Children’s Items BABY/TODDLER PORT-A-CRIB, 40x27, in good cond., $25. 541-382-7241

212

Antiques & Collectibles Antique Rocker, over 100 years old, needs some work $100 OBO. 541-317-4636. Antique, small size wooden drop leaf table, dark wood $50 OBO. 541-317-4636.

ANTIQUES PARKING LOT SALE Sat. June 5. Antiques, Collectibles, Glassware, Furniture. 20 Area Dealers Participating! 5th & Evergreen Downtown Redmond.

Fly Rod, 6-piece, hand made, graphite, $200 OBO, 541-550-0444.

GUN

SHOW

MAY 29th & 30th Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 Wall to Wall Tables $8 Admission good both days. OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120 H & H FIREARMS Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352

Ocean Charters Salmon/Halibut $100, Tuna $200. Guaranteed www.southernoregonfishing. com 541-982-4339.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishing, marbles, wood furniture, beer cans. 541-389-1578

Single person pontoon. Bucks Bags 11' Bronco Extreme. $1650 new. For sale: $1000 Please call 541-312-8837.

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*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

QUEEN MATTRESS, New, retail $599, asking $500 OBO. Call 541-420-8318. RUGS - 2 quality matching sets, + 2 other misc. sizes. From $50-$150. 541-390-6570. The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 7 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised equals $25 or Less • One ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months Call 385-5809 fax 385-5802 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

261

Medical Equipment Lift Chair Recliner, exc. cond., all auto, push button controlled, $400, 541-408-2227.

263

Tools ARC WELDER, 220 single Phase, $100. 541-504-4588 Generator, Campbell Hausfeld, 5200W, emergency power, $200, 541-550-0444. GENERATOR: Campbell Hausfeld Professional 5500 Watt gas generator 240V & 120V. MINT Cond. Used less than 20 hrs., $450. 541-475-6537 Rabetting-Jointer, 1 hp, 1 ph, 110V, 7", never used, spare blades, Central Machinery, mounted on casters, $150 OBO. 503-799-3580. Shindaiwa power broom, near new, shoulder strap & owners manual incl., $500, 541-385-1884, 541-419-3153 Shop Heater, John Deere, Turbo Style, 40,000 BTU, $200, 541-550-0444.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 Electrolysis Epilator & Table + supplies, instructions, books incl., $900, 541-317-5154. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . PLUMBING MATERIAL and tools, ABS, PVC, COP, GAL, BLK fittings. Assorted repair parts. Pumps, gas valves, pressure switch. Rigid Dies, cutter, reamer, C.I. cutters. Make offer for all. 541-504-4588.

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Yard Sale. 5/22-5/23. 1656 NW Elgin Ave. 9-4. Stamping supplies, tables, clothes, trolling motor, futon, skis, snowboard, std. tires, more.

Yard Sales: Fri.-Sun., 9-?, 1247 N. Hwy 97, (W. of Buggy Stop Mkt.) all units participating, but 4 #9, husband died & left his shop tools, new, used, household, holiday, more, All Must Go!

284

Sales Southwest Bend Fantastic Multi-family Moving Sale. Fri. & Sat., 9-1. SW Brookside Loop, Bend. Children clothing/toys, house wares, furniture, refrigerator, electronics, office. FREE Canoe and stuff. Multi Family Sale, furniture, camping gear, movies, A/C, much more. 59878 Navajo Rd. Fri. & Sat., 9am-4pm.

Large Multi-Family Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat., 9am-4pm. 22819 Buckskin Ct. near Bend Airport. Lots of scrapbooking!

2 HOUSE YARD SALE, Sat May 22nd, 8:00am - 4:00pm. 20721 & 20728 Will Scarlet Lane.

3-Family Garage Sale: Fri.Sun. 9-5, 2955 SW 49th, off Wickiup/Hemholtz,furniture, lawn table, tools, misc.

SCRAPBOOKING.

Indoor Estate Sale, freezer, king size bed, dressers, 2002 Buick Century & misc., 1001 SE 15th St., #65. Fri. & Sat., 8am-3pm. No early sales.

Alley Garage Sale: Sat. 9-5, 1406 SW 12th St, at W. Newberry.

Final former consultant pre-retirement sale. Additional inventory now available for sale. Saturday 5/22 - 9:00 am to 2:00 pm ONLY. CASH SALES. 1869 NE Snowbird Court, Bend, Oregon. 541-389-5075 Yard/Moving Sale, Sat. only, 9am-3pm 438 NE Greeley Ave. behind 3rd St. Safeway. Toys, furniture & much more.

MOVING SALE Sat. & Sun., 9-3 lots of furniture, children’s items and much, much more. 20564 Dylan Loop. MULTI-FAM., Sat. & Sun. 8-3. 60275 Ridgeview Dr. E. Furn., household, toys, collectibles, rec. equip., etc.

Marie & Gary Billings - MOVING

SALE

286 Elsie Billings - ESTATE SALE MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE: 8-3 SAT. ONLY MAY 22, Sales Northeast Bend 3006 Christina Lane 61592 Orion Drive, corner of FRI. May 21 W SAT. May 22 Reed Mkt. and Orion. 4 Family Treasures. Collect9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Crowd control admittance ables, kids clothes & toys, numbers issued at 8:00 a.m. Friday. 282 misc items. Fri., 21 & Sat., Outside will open at 8:00 am 22. 2021 NE Bluebird Ct., Sales Northwest Bend 8:00-5:00. Follow signs. Inside home will be 9:00 a.m. HUGE MOVING SALE BIG BIG BIG 3 Family Ga- (Take Butler Market Rd. to Purcell, turn south and follow to Lynda Lane, turn east on Lynda Lane to Christina Ln.) May 22 & 23 from 8:00 am rage Sale! Sat. 5/22, 8-1. Huge Variety Sale: Oak china Cabinet; 3-section enter4:00 pm 20968 Lava Flow Lane, Kids tainment center; Bose CD Audio Visual plug-ins unit with Everything from A to Z... Applitoys, books & clothes; jog speakers; Two recliners; Sofa with double end recliners; 8' by ances, Books, Clothing, stroller & Pak n’ Play; house10' rugs'; Two oak barstools Queen bed, complete; Triple Camping Gear, Furniture, wares; Stylish women’s dresser with mirror and tall chest of drawers; New Kirby Holiday Decorations, Kitchen clothes & jewelry; Dog Crate; vacuum; Futon; New roll-top desk; Hundreds of men's and laitems, Office equipment, Teak bench; Electronics. dies clothing; ladies med. petite; size 7 shoes; men's large to Sporting equipment, Toys, DON’T MISS IT! XXL and size 11 shoes and boots; Pots and pans; Mikasa Tools and everything inbeFabulous Annual Garage Sale, dishes; Newer Maytag washer and Maytag GAS DRYER; Potween. Fri. & Sat., 8-? Nuttail Ct. off laris 400 Scrambler quad, needs work; Remington model 742 Follow signs to: 27th in Oak Tree. New rifle-30-06; Winchester Model 37shotgun 12 gauge; Brazilian 1215 NW 18th Street - Bend women’s access. at low 22 rifle and BB gun; Kenmore sewing machine; Ten telephones; Newport Hills prices, upscale clothes, home Japanese maple tree and other plants; Patio table; Camper decor, quilting books, Kohler mattress; sleeping bags; Tools; Computer items: monitor, LARGE GARAGE SALE, sink and more! printer, etc; Lots of hardware; building materials; Yard art; Foosball table, large solid fountains; Small chest freezer; Old car parts; scrap iron; huncherry dining table, micro, HUGE GARAGE SALE ! Sat.dreds of other items! Presented by .... Sun. 8-?, kid’s stuff, crib, fridge., tons of kids stuff, Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC high chair, etc., Aire kayak, household, skiis, and much camping gear, outdoor furn., www.deedysestatesales.com more. Sat. only, 8am-3pm. 2955 NE Red Oak Drive. 541-419-2242 days W 541-382-5950 eves 3068 NW Duffy Dr.

Garage Sale 1 Day Only! Sunday May 23rd. 8am-2pm. Furniture, Outdoor Power Tools, Clothes, Shoes, Sporting Equip, Electronics, Dogs Kennels, & much more. 1545 NW Spruce Place Redmond Huge Yard Sale, something for everyone! Mens items, furniture, baby clothes, misc. 6756 NW 17th St., Terrebonne. Fri.-Sun., 8am-4pm. Indoor Moving Sale, Fri.-Sun. 9-2, 1655 NW 74th St., quality items, art,garden,tools, furniture, photo gear, new golf bag, life vests,bike racks, awning, elect., work bench, home decor, books, antiques.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Large Estate/Shop Sale, Fri. Sun., 9am-3pm. Tools, household, antique glass ware, furniture, way too many items to list. Hwy 126 to Cline Falls Rd., follow signs past Eagle Crest. CASH ONLY! REDMOND MOBILE HOME PARK YARD SALE in Several Spaces. Fri. Sat. Sun., 5/22. 23, 24, 1247 NW 6th.

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Sales Other Areas LaPine Garage Sale! Fri. & Sat., 9am-4pm. Please no early birds. Clothes, horse tack/ equip., furniture, bikes, toys & various other treasures. 52276 Lechner Ln., off W. Burgess Rd.

No Junk Yard Sale - Gently used bedroom & livingroom furniture, 25 & 50" TV's, entertainment center, Canister Vac, Steam Vac, Collector Bears, Dolls, Nascar items, Queen comforter set, linens, household, lamps, tables, RV items, 8' lighted Christmas Tree and etc., tools, shoes sz 10, clothing and too much to list. Thurs May 20th - Sat May 22 8-4pm NO EARLY BIRDS. 15876 6th Street, La Pine 541-536-9222

Tollgate Multi-Family Garage Sale (Sisters). Friday & Saturday, May 21 & 22, from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Drive around Tollgate and stop at the homes with garage sale signs in front of their home, indicating homes with items for sale.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 266

269

Heating and Stoves

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Arborvitaes, 12’+/-, make a green screen, will deliver, or your dig. 541-280-1227.

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Riding Lawnmower, mechanics special, $250. Call for more info., 541-385-9350. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found FOUND: 5 Baby kittens, all dark in color, approximately 4 weeks, call 541-389-2098.

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

FOUND: Large collection of CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes Market Rd. 541-408-2973. FOUND: Money, identify amount and where you lost it, 541-382-3837

Firewood For this year and next year $150 a cord, please call 541-610-6713.

J & C Firewood • Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195.

Lodgepole, Year

Found Cat: OB Riley Rd, Black rimmed eyes, tiger striped 541-383-2124,541-383-2124

End

Special $130 a cord split & delivered, $100 a cord for rounds 541-610-6713. Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

announcements The La Pine Community Health Center (La Pine) is requesting proposals for the acquisition of a direct radiography (dr) digital u-arm imaging system. The proposal shall include all ordinary and necessary cost for the purchase, installation (including site alteration) and testing of the equipment, training of La Pine staff on the proper use and maintenance of the equipment, and equipment warranty. Complete proposal details, including the required proposal format, the minimum content of response, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, are available by e-mail request at gugenberger@lapinehealth.org. A walk-through of the facility will be held on Tuesday May 18, 2010 at 10:00 a.m., to examine the site for equipment installation. If you are interested in a walk-through other than the date and time provided please contact us at 541-536-3435 ext. 209. The building is located at 51600 Huntington Road, La Pine Oregon 97739. Proposals will be accepted until 3:00 p.m. (Pacific Standard Time), Friday, June 4, 2010, at which time proposals received will be opened. Proposals shall be on the forms required, sealed and the supplied return label affixed. La Pine will not consider or accept any proposal received after the date and time specified above.

Found on 5/18, set of keys, along Butler Mkt Rd, near Hamby Rd. Call to identify. 541-350-3748 LOST black neutered cat, May 19, Boonesborough. Reward. 541-389-7500 or 389-8042.

LOST diamond ring, sometime in last 2 mo. very expensive. Reward! Call 541-536-3383 Lost Dogs: Coon Hound, Black & tan, and small black poodle, DRW, 5/9, 541-410-2303. LOST: Mens wallet, in Fred Meyer $200 reward no questions asked. 541-777-0909 LOST: Old silver & turquoise Navajo Squash Blossom, sentimental gift, REWARD! Lost Sunday afternoon, after 2:30pm. S. handicap parking lot & S. door of East side Safeway. Please call 541-389-6761, in no answer, please leave message. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

275

Auction Sales No Minimums - No Reserves

PUBLIC

AUCTION

9AM - WEDNESDAY - MAY 26 Preview 8-4, Tuesday, May 25 WALLOWA FOREST PRODUCTS 75100 Lower Diamond Rd, Wallowa, OR Morbark Debarker; (3) Cutoff Saws; Step Feeders; Klamath Headrig; Salem Resaw; Carriage; MaxiMill End Dogger; (3) Edgers; Planer; Stud Stackers; Banding Station; Hog; (3) Chippers; Chip & Shavings Bins; Screens; Vib Conveyors; Compressor; Blowers; Boiler System; (3) Kilns; PET Trimmer; Filing/ Grinding Room Equip; Log Decks; Hauls, Conveyors; Mill Electrics; Mill Bldg; Plymouth Loco; Crane; (3)Log Loaders; Tractor; (5)Forklifts; Dump Truck; Much More!! 10% Buyers Premium Terms: Cash, Cashiers Check, MC/Visa Cards Persons Under 12 Not Admitted ILLUSTRATED BROCHURE James G. Murphy Inc. 425-486-1246 www.murphyauction.com WA Auctioneer Lic #1960 Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Employment

300 400 308

421

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training

Cacti, already planted in gallon pots, $6/ea+. Crooked River Ranch, 541-548-0501.

• Receipts should include,

A-1 Quality Red Fir & Tamarack $185/cord. Ponderosa Pine and Specialty orders avail. Dry & Seasoned. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407

Farm Market

THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 F3

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

MASSEY-FERGUSON 1240 4x4 27 HP tractor with 1246 hydraulic loader, $8950. 541-447-7150.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc, hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton Eric 541-350-8084 Barn Stored Orchard Grass and grass mix,70 lb. bales, $150/ ton, Delivery available. 541-548-2668. Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $135 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $75 per ton. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731. Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Quality Orchard Grass Hay, Tumalo, small bales, clean no rain $150 per ton. Kennor Farms 541-383-0494

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581 Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377. June 6, 2010 Healthy Horse Day. 10am-6pm, Demos all day & raffle prizes, go to www.ridinginstyle2.com Click on events, scroll to June 6th for more info. 541-617-9243

RED TAG SALE Every Saturday At The OL'E TACK ROOM 7th and Cook , Tumalo. Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $2500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 29 daily newspapers, six states and British Columbia. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond area, flexible daytime hrs., household assistance, affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Livestock & Equipment

Administrative Assistant Assist a tax negotiations attorney in casual Bend office. Client contact and clerical support. Clerical or legal support experience and college degree a plus. Benefits after 90 days. Fax cover letter, resume and salary requirement to: 541-330-0641.

READY TO WORK, Yearling Angus Bulls, range raised in trouble free herd, $1100/ea. Delivery avail. 541-480-8096

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 A very productive 12-acre irrigated pasture is for rent. Will carry 15 pair or equivalent. $450. 541-389-6793.

476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Art Picture Yourself Here! Busy frame shop looking for an artistic, friendly, and hardworking part-time salesperson. Art background, outstanding customer service skills and a flexible schedule are required. Submit resume to The Great Frame-Up, 61535 S. Hwy 97, Suite 4, Bend, OR 97702. tgfubend@msn.com

Emergency Shelter Monitor Part time, shelter is seeking an individual to act as support and release staff. Fri. & Sat., 8 hour shifts. With additional relief hours as req. Persons applying must be flexible, adaptable and comfortable in challenging environments. For listing of specific req., email resume to cac@bendcable.com. No calls please.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin

Experienced Line Cooks & Servers

is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Painter Needs Work: 20 years exp. in Central OR, fast & friendly, 541-977-8329.

345 Feeder Steers Ready for Pasture 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

476

Employment Opportunities

Fast paced Resort Property is looking for experienced fine dinning AM & PM Line Cooks, Banquet Cooks, Lunch & Dinner Servers. 2 years experience preferred. EOE. Apply in person Monday May 24th 1-5 pm. The Lodge at Suttle Lake, 13300 Hwy 20 Sisters Oregon.

Silverado Jewelry Gallery is now accepting resumes for a full time, lead floor sales position. Must have retial exp. and be a positive, self motivating person who enjoys jewelry and fashion. Please bring your resume to 1001 NW Wall St. Attn: Harmony, Fire Patrol who will be avail. Fri.-Tue. For a logging co. Must walk 10am.-5pm. trails/drive roads to spot fires. Must communicate with operators, physically fit, CAUTION READERS: have DL. Prefer camper, ability to operate machinery. N. Ads published in "Employment CA 530-258-3025 Opportunities" include employee and independent poFood Service sitions. Ads for positions that Busy breakfast & lunch restaurequire a fee or upfront inrant in Bend seeks full time vestment must be stated. cook. Hard working, team With any independent job player, min. 2 year egg & grill opportunity, please investiexp. Apply in person, 62910 gate thoroughly. O.B. Riley Rd. General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

Bilingual Customer Service Representative (English/Spanish) Bend company seeks Bilingual Customer Service Representative to process orders, prepare correspondence, and fulfill customer needs to enVIEW the Classifieds at: sure customer satisfaction. www.bendbulletin.com Ability to work in high stress environment while dealing patiently and professionally with problems is a must. Verbal communication and Club Full & listening skills are especially Health Part-time Staff Positions: important. Advanced knowlRenew Fitness, concentratedge of Microsoft Office reing on low impact, 40+ adult quired. Bachelor’s degree fitness, hiring at Bend & preferred, high school diRedmond locations. Fax reploma required, and a minisume to 503-513-9262, email mum of 5 years customer keith@renewfitness.com, service related experience www.renewfitness.com. needed. Salary DOE. Please send resume’s to agsales@suterra.com. Medical Phlebotomy Business Opportunity: Certification Workshop Do you have a sales back1-Day, 100% Hands-On ground? Interested in doinfo@cvas.org ing contracted job develop1-888-308-1301 ment for State of Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services? Millworkers If so, call to find out more inBRIGHT WOOD formation and meet with CORPORATION Cheryl. (541) 388-6336, ask for Jamy. If you are experienced in the following positions we are CLERK/Gas attendant/Subway looking for cutters, fingerMust be 18+ yrs. Full-time joint operators, lamination and Part-time. Apply at: operators, moulder operRiverwoods Country Store, aters, fingerjoint feeders and 19745 Baker Rd., Bend. lamination feeders in our Madras facility. Starting CRUISE THROUGH Classiwage DOE. Apply at our fied when you're in the headquarters office in Mamarket for a new or used dras at 335 NW Hess St., car. Madras OR 97741 541-475-7799. EOE/On site pre-employment drug screening required.

Pharmacy

Technician

Full or part time, experience preferred, in Madras, Cashier also needed. 541-325-1059. Pressmen $10/hr., exp. with manual, auto. preferred. Must be personable and be able to talk to clients. Call 541-385-3104.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Receptionist Full time, Tues.-Sat. Appointment Scheduler Full time, Mon.-Fri.

Qualified candidates must be computer literate and be able to multi task, responsibilities include but not limited to check in, check out, appointment scheduling, telephones & patient care, exp. in health care setting preferred. Apply online at www.lapinehealth.org or fax application & resume to 541-536-8047 or mail to Human Resources, PO BOX 3300, LaPine, OR 97739.

Advertise in 29 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington, Utah & British Columbia. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

Domestic Services

Excavating

Handyman

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

We Clean Houses & Offices: Over 10 years of experience, good references, best service for the least cost, 541-390-8073.

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

Handyman

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Thomas Carey Construction 35 yrs. exp. in Central Oregon Custom homes, all phases or remodeling, small jobs, window replacement. 541-480-8378 • CCB#190270

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Decks

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Drywall

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Summertime baby sitter avail. on June 1st, could continue into Fall. Ages 3-12. Redmond area. Call Carol for more info., 541-279-1913.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

CCB#180420 Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 AVM CONSTRUCTION • Carpentry • Home Repair • Expert Painting • Stain • Decks • Pergolas • Foreclosure Restoration 541-610-6667 CCB #169270

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years! FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

541-389-4974

Fire Fuels Reduction

springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Volunteers needed! Gain valuable experience by helping abandoned animals. Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, www.craftcats.org, 389-8420

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

Waitstaff

Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Salesperson Don’t miss out on the unique opportunity to work in the Ranch’s newly renovated Pub and Restaurant facilities. Do you enjoy working with people, and have a “customer first” attitude? We are looking for enthusiastic, customer service oriented individuals to join Team BBR. There are just a few openings left for the following positions: •Servers •Bussers •Host/ Hostess Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Rare opportunity for a professional individual to join the Sales Team at Bob Thomas Car Company. Exp. preferred, but not required. Excellent continuous training program, low pressure atmosphere, great potential for long term success. Must pass driving/background/drug screens. Please apply in person - see Kelly or Bruce at 345 NE Third Street, Bend. No phone calls, please.

Teacher Therapeutic Boarding School for girls ages 10-15, seeks a full time Certified Classroom Teacher preferably with a Special Ed endorsement and emphasis on elementary eduction. Position is open mid August. Competitive salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefit package. Fax resume to: Carol. 541-388-8465.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

Call Today &

&

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Award Winning Design

Ask us about

Landscaping, Yard Care

Weekly Maintenance

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

OF BEND The Perfect Central Oregon vehicle Is Here. Totally redesigned for 2010 models are on the ground. The all New Outback & Legacy design will increase sales dramatically. We are looking for People who enjoy all that Central Oregon has to offer and want to show other Central Oregonians why there isn’t a more perfect vehicle than the "NEW" All Wheel Drive Subarus. We offer the most aggressive pay program in Central Oregon, Guaranteed Income, Profit sharing, Medical Benefits, a mentoring program, and an above average income. No Phone Calls Please. Apply in person at Subaru of Bend, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

(This special package is not available on our website)

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Roof-Foundation

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

The Bulletin Classifieds

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Landscape Maintenance

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Randy, 541-306-7492 Child Care Services

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

J. L. SCOTT

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Excavating

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Retail Sales

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

SALES

Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

Masonry MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099 COOKS CREATIVE MASONRY Stone projects of all types 23 yrs experience. Wayne, 541-815-1420. L#119139 www.cookscreativemasonry.com

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

541-322-7253

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

• Siding Replacement/Repair • Door/Window Replacement • Drywall Repair/Painting • Decks/Fencing • Shade Structures • Patios/Sidewalks Call David - 541-678-5411 CCB#187972 • 25+Yrs. Exp. COBA Member

D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998. RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Tile, Ceramic

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Remodeling, Carpentry

Chad L. Elliott Construction

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. BIG RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714 Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Wweekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Painting, Wall Covering

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Tree Services Exterior/Interior, Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


F4 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

476

638

652

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $90/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 605

Roommate Wanted Room, with private bath, garage, storage, nice house in Old Mill, $500/mo., split some utils, 541-390-2161

616

Want To Rent WANTED: 22’+ trailer to rent at the Cove Palisades for 7 days in June. Non smoking, refs., insured, 360-844-5789

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 486

Independent Positions CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Finance & Business

500 507

630

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. REDMOND TOWNHOUSE DUPLEX APARTMENT On cul-de-sac, N IC E 1400 sq. ft., 2-story 2 bedroom, 1½ bath, single car garage, small back yard. $725 mo. includes w/s/g. No smoking, no pets. 541-420-5927.

632

Apt./Multiplex General Desert Garden Apts., 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. 62+/Disabled The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments W/D included, gas fireplaces 339 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com Ask Us About Our

May Special!

MAY

SPECIALS!

658

Houses for Rent Redmond $200 off 1st mo. 3/2, fenced back yard, new appl., dog OK, $800+security dep., 1617 SW 33rd, 541-948-2121, tmenergyrates@gmail.com

Deluxe Newer 3/2.5, 2245 sq. ft., huge fenced yard. $995/mo. lease to own. or $1095 lease only, 1615 SW Sarasota Ct. 541-350-2206. Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908.

New Duplex, nice neigh$100 Move In Special Like borhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, gaBeautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet rage, fenced yard, central complex, covered parking, heat & A/C, fully landscaped, W/D hookups, near St. $700+dep. 541-545-1825. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. 648

Move In Special! 1/2 price first full month 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., gas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car garage, no pets. $775+dep. w/ 6 mo lease. Viking Property Management 541-416-0191

ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, $850, Jim, 541-388-3209.

Duplex in nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, single garage, deck, fenced yard, new paint, carpet & Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., flooring, no pets/smoking, $695/mo. 1st, last. No in$625 per month + dep. side pets. Mtn. views. Please call 541-447-6390. 503-829-7252, 679-4495 Incentive Move-in 1/2 off 1st month rent! SW Red- Cute, clean 2/1, single garage, W/D hookups, nice yard, mond duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, great in town location, $695 garage, fenced back yard, all rent + $670 dep., 156 SW kitchen appl., W/D hookup, 8th St., 541-548-0932. $650 + dep. 541-480-7806.

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

541-322-7253

$395 to $415

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, double garage, storage, dishwasher, W/D hookup, excellent location, $850 mo. plus dep. Pet neg. Avail. June 541-382-8399. A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq.ft., gas fireplace, great room, newer carpet, oversized dbl. garage, $995, 541-480-3393/541-610-7803

705

850

Real Estate Services

Snowmobiles

REAL ESTATE WANTED. Commercial land in Sisters or house close to downtown, priced under $200,000. Phone 503-827-3995 Phyllis

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

HORSE PROPERTY, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 acres, storage, small shop, private well, CRR near entrance, lease, option possible, $875, 541-771-7750

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CL AS S I F I E DS Upscale Home 55+ Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, triple garage, gardener paid, $1400 +security dep of $1400. 541-526-5774.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver Cozy, Quiet 2/1, fridge., W/D, fenced yard, $625/mo. + last & $450 dep. Pets? Avail. 5/10. 54789 Wolf St. 805-479-7550 Nicely updated 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near Sunriver, vaulted ceiling, gas stove & fireplace, owners residence, very peaceful, small dog okay, $875/mo. Call Randy at 541-306-1039.

660

Houses for Rent La Pine

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D hookup W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz 209 NW Portland: Quiet 2 bdrn., DW, W/S/G paid, oak cabs., carport, laundry facilities, extra large living room, $670 $500 dep., 383-2430. Awbrey Butte Townhome, garage, A/C, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #4. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 On The River, In Town! 1 & starting at $540. W/S/G + cable paid, laundry/parking on site, no pets/smoking, call 541-598-5829 until 6pm. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

(Private Party ads only) When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

748 MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Mfd. Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, appls., decks, 10x20 wood shop $12,950. 530-852-7704

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes 4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053. BY OWNER, Clean older home in great neighborhood. $107,000. 1429 SW 11th. (503) 440-5072 (503) 717-0403 Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes FSBO: COZY 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks & lots of windows, hot tub, wood stove & gas heat, near Lodge, $275,000, 541-617-5787.

757

Crook County Homes Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

762

Homes with Acreage

Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833.

Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda VTX 1800R 2003. Low miles, xlnt cond. $4999. 541-647-8418 YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $5000. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade, everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $200 firm, as is. Needs work, must sell 541-610-6713 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $21,000. 541-389-1413

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

541-385-5809

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Classic 2007, 4K mi, windshield, saddle bags, garaged, senior owned, as new cond, $5300 OBO, 541-312-3098,619-306-1227

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

865

ATVs

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

Chiloquin: 700 Acres reduced to $600,000 Millican: 270 Acres great horse property only $575,000 160 Acres: Outside of Hines hunting & more reduced to $449,000. Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521.

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $88,000. 541-848-9225.

881

2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $34,900, 541-480-4059.

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Move-In Ready! Homes start at $10,000. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fridge, range & large storage shed incl., $4500 or $500 down, $175/mo.+ space rent. 541-383-5130.

Yamaha YFZ 450 2006, Special Edition, only ridden in the sand, paddle steer tires, pipe, air cleaner, jetted, ridden very little, $5000, 541-410-1332. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

870

Boats & Accessories 12 Ft. Sea King Boat and Trailer, $400 call for more info. 541-389-4411.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext.

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $12,500 Call 541-589-0767.

warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834 Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Dutchman 26’ 2005, 6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498. Fleetwood Pioneer 2006 Travel Trailer, 22 ft., Sleeps 6. IMMACULATE condition! $11,400. Call 541-575-4392 or 541-620-2149, John Day.

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Beaver Patriot 2000, 37’, 44K mi., w/options. $119,000. 541-382-9755,541-215-0077 Beaver Thunder 2000, 40’, 2 slides, 425 HP Cat, loaded, exc. cond., time limited price, $98,000, Cell: 480-357-6044.

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437. Keystone Cougar 2003 33 ft. 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 8, 2 bdrms., elec./gas stove, large rear storage, outside util. shower, full kitchen & micro $12,500. Incl. skirting, very clean, located near Bend. 541-383-0494

Terry 250RKS 26' 2006 $15,250.00. Downsizing forces sale. Equipped with almost every option available. Please contact 541-480-1445

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Houseboat 38X10 with triple axle trailer. Includes private moorage with 24/7 security at Prinville resort. $24,500. Call 541-788-4844.

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo, fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Travel Trailers

880 Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

882

Fifth Wheels

The Bulletin Classifieds

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

875

Acreages

CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $140,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

773

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

1985,

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

Northeast Bend Homes

126 NW Adams. Private downtown 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath town home, garage, W/S/G pd., W/D incl., no smoking, $800/mo. 541-771-4824.

sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Seaswirl

open bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920.

Southwest Bend Homes Best Price in Bend: 3 Brdm., 2 bath, on .88 acre, 1728 sq.ft., 60283 Cinder Butte, limited time, $129,000 By Owner, Cell, 480-357-6044.

Curves, womens fitness franchise for sale, Bend, $40,000, Redmond, $35,000. Serious inquiries please. 541-617-1533

573

Business Opportunities

16’

747

A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 29 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

881

Travel Trailers

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

FSBO: $10,000 Down and Take over Payments on a real Log Cabin, 1+1+loft & Garage, on 1.5 acre wooded landscaped lot,541-617-5787

Near Bend High School, 4 Own A Park 1.47 Acres+/- 2 bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Bdrm 1 Bath Home. Finished sq. ft., large carport, no 3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, Detached Garage/shop, Hospital & Costco, garage, smoking, $995/mo. + deps. on 1 acre, RV carport, no gaCircle Drive w/RV Parking, yard maint., W/D, W/S, 541-389-3657 rage, $650/mo. Pets? 16180 PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1. Newer, spacious 3 Bdrm/2 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. Area. $224,900 Call Bob $725/mo. 541-420-0208 Bath, oversized garage, 541-745-4432 Mosher 541-593-2203. fenced yard, cool great room, $ Pick Your Special $ 661 quiet neighborhood! $950/ 764 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 mo. Call Kurt 541 350-5552 Houses for Rent Farms and Ranches Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! Prineville NOTICE: 35 acre irrigated hay & cattle FOX HOLLOW APTS. All real estate advertised farm, close to Prineville, (541) 383-3152 here in is subject to the Fed- 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, pond & super private well, 75 dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. eral Fair Housing Act, which year old owner will sacrifice lawn, fenced backyard. $800 makes it illegal to advertise for $425,000. 541-447-1039 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet any preference, limitation or SUBSIDIZED UNIT neg. 541-923-6961 discrimination based on race, 2 bdrm (upstairs) 771 color, religion, sex, handicap, available at this time. 687 Lots familial status or national 62 & over and/or Disability origin, or intention to make Commercial for Multi-Family Housing/ Aspen Lakes, 1.25 Acres, any such preferences, limitaProject-based Rent/Lease Lot #115, Golden Stone Dr., tions or discrimination. We Greenwood Manor Apts private homesite, great view, will not knowingly accept any Light Industrial, various sizes, 2248 NE 4th Street gated community $350,000 advertising for real estate Bend, Oregon 97701 North and South Bend locaOWC. 541-549-7268. which is in violation of this (541) 389-2712. tions, office w/bath from law. All persons are hereby WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Guardian Management informed that all dwellings SE Bend. Super Cascade Corporation is committed to advertised are available on Mountain Views, area of nice “Equal Housing an equal opportunity basis. homes & BLM is nearby too! Opportunity” The Bulletin Classified Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. 636 Have an item to Scott, 541-480-3393. Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

Homes for Sale

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

880

Motorhomes

mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

713

Real Estate Wanted

870

Boats & Accessories

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100

745

Studios & 1 bdrm • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. •Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

$99 1st Month!

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

Boats & RV’s

700 800

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S SELLERS of real esCLEAN, large older 2 bedroom, AND $700 mo. + last + dep. No tate in Central Oregon. To pets. See at 1977 NW 2ND, place an ad call 385-5809 Bend and call # off sign for appointment to see.

Chaparral Apts.

1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719

Duplex 2/1, fully updated W/D hookup, W/S paid, patio, fully fenced, garage w/opener $650 +dep. No smoking/pets 503-507-9182.

3 Bdrm., W/D, dishwasher, dbl. garage, fenced backyard, quiet neighborhood, W/S/G & gas heating paid, $1150/mo. 541-382-4868 A Newly Remodeled 1+1, vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, small yard, w/fruit trees, dog area/garden, utils incl., $750, 541-617-5787.

244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

A Better Place to Live, May Free • Near Hospital 2/2, A/C, from $750-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199.

2 Bdrm., 2 bath, Lower West Hills, with great view & deck, W/D & garage, $895/mo., gas, water, & elec. $100 flat rate, 541-420-7357.

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient non656 smoking units, w/patios, 2 Houses for Rent on-site laundry rooms, storSW Bend age units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping cen- An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., ter and tennis courts. Pet wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot friendly with new large dog in DRW on canal $695, run, some large breeds okay 541-480-339 610-7803. with mgr. approval.

634

Real Estate Contracts $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

STONE CREEK APARTMENTS

Real Estate For Sale

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $98,000. 541-382-1721

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

885

Canopies and Campers

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $22,500 541-610-9900.

Canopy, fits standard pickup, $75, 541-385-7630.

size call

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Lance 820 Lite 2004, 8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking or pets $17,500 pics available (541)410-3658.

“WANTED” RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kamper & Kars

541-923-1655 Washer/Dryer Set, Maytag, stackable, gas dryer, $175 OBO, call 541-385-7630.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service 2800 Sq.ft. home on 2 acres at Sisters Airport, with airport access and room for owner hanger on property. Priced for quick close at $369,000, 15821 Kitty Hawk Ln, 541-280-9378.

932

933

935

975

975

975

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Toyota Tundra 2006,

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

933

Smolich Auto Mall

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, new tires, all service records since new, great value, $16,999 OBO, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Smolich Auto Mall

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

916

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

Pickups Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 F5

Chevy X-Cab 2004 4X4, Low Miles, and Great Condition! Vin #120459

Only $13,888

Smolich Auto Mall

925 smolichmotors.com

HYUNDAI

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Car Hauler, 32’ Pace, top cond., $7000 OBO. Call for more info., 541-536-8036

Audi A6 2001, 2.8 Wagon, 74K, AWD, leather, 1 owner, moon roof, Bose 7 CD, ABS, garaged, all pwr., heated seats $10,325. 541-385-7770

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

366

Dodge 3/4 Ton 1991, 4WD, runs good, $3000 OBO;4 rims, 8-hole, $5 ea, 541-382-6966 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Chevy Tahoe 2008 3rd Seat, 4X4, New Wheels & Tires, Low Miles! VIN #100767

Only $30,998

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep Grand Limited Cherokee 2005 Managers Demo, Like New! 5.7 Hemi & Loaded! VIN #698994

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $21,995

Only $14,995

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

***

Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

LEXUS ES300 1999 152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

$6900 OBO

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Dodge Ram 2500 1999, gas, auto, pd, pw, air, lift, rollbar, Piaa lights, pioneer stereo, $7500 OBO (541)-604-4239 Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Smolich Auto Mall

931

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Only $11,995

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042 Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

Mazda Tribute 2005 Very Affordable and Good Equipment! Vin #M08818

4X4, Custom Wheels, Like New! VIN #A60699

Only $16,888

smolichmotors.com Ford F150 XCab 1994, 4WD, 88K mi., goose neck hitch, exc. cond., $3900. 541-728-7188

Chevy Trailblazer 2005 Only $14,648

Only $11,995 Porsche Carrera 1999, black metallic, 43K careful mi., beautiful, upgrades, Tiptronic $20,000. 610-5799.

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Ford F150 XLT 2009, matching canopy, always garaged, seat covers, Line-X bed liner, 10K, just like new, $27,950. Call Randy, 541-306-1039

Wagon

1957,

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Call 541-549-0757, Sisters. Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Mercedes 300D 1976, 5 cyl., diesel, 145K +/-, great cond., original grey paint, my mothers car, one owner, one dent in rear 1/4 panel, must see, great collectors car, $2000 OBO. 541-536-7408 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MGB GT 1971, Valued at $4000, MGD Roadster 1973, Valued at $6000, MGA Roadster, Valued at $18,000, Great Collectors Cars, Make offer, 541-815-1573

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

AS LOW AS

2.9

%

FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS

*On Approved Credit

Hurry in!! Ends May 31, 2010

LX, Leather, ABS, CD Vin #165601

Nissan Murano 2006 AWD! Premium Wheels! ABS! Vin #529998

Only $18,978

Only $9877

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Automatic

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

1 AT

$

19937

Dodge Durango 2007 4X4, Fully Loaded, Local Trade! VIN #551428

Only $22,568

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

366

Ford Focus ZTS 2004,

Smolich Auto Mall

5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 FJ Cruiser 2007, auto, A/C, PS/PB, 38k mi. $24,000 OBO. 541-475-0109, 8 a.m - 8 p.m.

Nissan Rogue 2008

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

NISSAN

Model AJB-01 SALE PRICE $17,975 MSRP $19,190. Cap Reduction $1,279. Customer Cash Down $1,478.37. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $10,554.50. 42 Months, 12,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 505521 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium

$ 1 AT

mo.

42 Month Lease

Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

28980

Model ADC-01 SALE PRICE $23,999 MSRP $25,290. Cap Reduction $1,775. Customer Cash Down $2,064.80. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 51% $12,897.90. 42 Months, 12,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 363893

SL, AWD, Moonroof, Bose & More! Vin #110180

Only $22,448

366

1 AT

$

22940

mo.

36 Month Lease

RTL crew cab 4WD, V-6, leather, moonroof, tow pkg, $23,495 VIN#H508037 DLR 0225 541-598-3750

541-389-1178 • DLR

mo.

42 Month Lease

smolichmotors.com

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $13,800, Call 541-390-7780 .

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4800. 541-617-1888. Honda CRV 99, Black, Tow pkg., dual bike rack, 2010 studs, runs great. $5,500. 541-325-6000

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

940

Vans

Hyundai Sante Fe GLS

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Model AAC-02 SALE PRICE $21,249 MSRP $22,384. Cap Reduction $1,700. Customer Cash Down $1,929.40. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 59% $13,206.56. 36 Months, 12,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 244901 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

Hyundai GLS 2006, 4 cyl. 5 spd., 32 MPG, alloy wheels, new tires, snow tires/rims, 41K, like new, $8950. Call Randy, 541-306-1039.

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X 1 AT

$

22948

mo.

42 Month Lease

Smolich Auto Mall

2009 AWD, power window/ locks, tilt, cruise, 20,000 miles. KBB retail $23,670 AAA Price … $19,160 VIN#h266491 DLR 0225 541-598-3750

Nissan Titan 2007

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Crew Cab, 4X4, ABS, & More!! Vin #217287

Only $19,897

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

975

Smolich Auto Mall

Model AFA-21 SALE PRICE $20,625 MSRP $21,690. Cap Reduction $1,700. Customer Cash Down $1,929.48. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $11,929.50. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 783956 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

Hyundai Santa Fe GLS 2009 AWD, Better than New! Power Pack and More! Vin #271169

Only $23,995

Automobiles NISSAN

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

541-385-5809

Smolich Auto Mall

NISSAN

HONDA RIDGELINE 2007

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

NISSAN

$11,500. 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,000, w/o winch $23,000, 541-325-2684

smolichmotors.com

FORD F350 1997 4x4 V-8, 7.5L, long bed, with 8’ Boss Power-V snow plow. 35K miles by orig. owner, new tires, exc. cond, with all maint. history avail.,

Chevy

366

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Chrysler Sebring 2008 541-389-1178 • DLR

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

Ford F-150 EX Cab 2005

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

360 Sprint Car

The Bulletin Classifieds

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

4X4, Moonroof, Leather, Premium Wheels. Vin #223182

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories ARE Canopy with full windows, white, lumber rack, both are off 2000 Dodge Dakota, 541-419-2383.

4X4, Really Low Miles and Nicely Equipped! Vin #424193

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9000 541-504-2878.

VW Bug 1969, yellow, TIME TO BUY! Great car for the graduate, 2001 Honda Prelude, $6500. 541-728-7651, or 503-440-5072

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Smolich Auto Mall

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Trailblazer 2002

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Find It in

541-749-4025 • DLR

smolichmotors.com

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 55K mi., 4 cyl.,

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

(541) 520-8013.

smolichmotors.com

Chevy

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

HYUNDAI

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

366

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

SUBARUS!!!

Sporty and Equipped Right! Vin #266412

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Car Trailer, covered tilt, winch inside, 92 in. x 21 ft. w/tie downs 541-548-2156.

Utility Trailers

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Hyundai Tiberon 2008

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Only $26,875

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 never pay for gas again, will convertible, 2 door, Navy run on used vegetable oil, with black soft top, tan insunroof, working alarm systerior, very good condition. tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch $5200 firm. 541-317-2929. start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer Saturn SC2 1994, sun roof, refused, $2900 OBO, call all leather, 5 spd., snow tires. 541-848-9072. exc. engine $1200. 408-8611

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 2008 Diesel, Hard to Find, Local Trade!! VIN #164571

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

Acura 3.2 CL-S Coupe 2001, RARE. Black, 260 HP V-6, auto., NAV, leather, moonroof, CD. 1 owner. Exc. 126K. $7999. 541-480-3265 DLR.

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Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through May 24, 2010.


F6 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

In the Matter of the Estate of VIRGINIA M. PETERSON

In the Matter of the Estate of Robert W. Buxton Deceased. No. 08-PB-0162-BH

Case No. 10PB 0047ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Notice: The Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, for the County of Deschutes, has appointed Stephen P. Peterson as Personal Representative of the Estate of Virginia M. Peterson, deceased. All persons having claims against said estate are required to present the same, with proper vouchers to Stephen P. Peterson c/o Holbrook & Seifert LLC, Douglas R. Holbrook, PO Box 2087, Newport OR 97365 within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the Attorney for the Personal Representative. Dated and first published May 21, 2010. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of SUSAN V. BUMGARNER Deceased. No. 07-PB-0052-SF NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Dwayne Bumgarner has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to Dwayne Bumgarner the Personal Representative c/o Lawrence W. Erwin, Attorney at Law, 221 NW Lafayette Avenue, Bend, OR 97701-1927, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Dwayne Bumgarner. Dated and first published May 21, 2010.

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the David Glassow has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o Lawrence W. Erwin, Attorney at Law, 221 NW Lafayette Avenue, Bend, OR 97701-1927, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, David Glassow. Dated and first published May 21, 2010. LEGAL NOTICE Legal Notice 1330-10 Commissioning Agent for Health Careers Building Central Oregon Community College Request for Proposals for Commissioning Agent for the Health Careers Building. COCC requests sealed proposals to be received no later than 2:00 p.m., current local time, Tuesday, June 8, 2010 in Purchasing Office, Metolius Hall, Room 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR. An electronic copy of the building schematic design set will be made available upon request. Requests for a complete RFP package shall be directed to Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator, Central Oregon Community College, 541-383-7779 or by email at jmosier@cocc.edu. Specific questions shall be directed to the attention of Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator. Sealed proposals shall be received at: Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center Building, Room 116, Bend, Oregon 97701. Construction of the new Health Careers Building is expected to begin late 2010. The Health Careers Building will be a 46,000 sq ft structure located on the Central Oregon Community College Awbrey Butte Campus. One responsibility of the Commissioning Agent is to work with the design team to facilitate

a design that will adhere to standards required to obtain Earth Advantage Commercial Gold certification. It will be the Commissioning Agent's responsibility to detect and correct deficiencies during design and while the contractors are on site. All travel related expenses are to be included in the lump-sum bid as there will not be a separate travel reimbursement line item. The College may waive any or all informalities and irregularities, may reject any Proposal not in compliance with all prescribed public procurement procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause, any Proposal upon a finding of the College that it is in the public interest to do so. Central Oregon Community College, a Community College District created within the context of Oregon Revised Statutes, is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minority and Women-Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in this solicitation. The RFP Coordinator is the sole point of contact for this procurement. All communication between the Offeror and the College regarding this solicitation shall be in writing, submitted by email, to the RFP Coordinator at the email listed above. Proposers are to rely on written statements issued exclusively by the RFP Coordinator. Any other communication will be considered unofficial and non-binding. Communications directed to other then the RFP Coordinator will have no legal bearing on this RFP or the resulting contract(s). Central Oregon Community College, a Community College District created within the context of Oregon Revised Statutes, is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minority and Women-Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in this solicitation. Publication Dates: May 21st, 2010 Bend, Bulletin

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Rita Ege and Linda Medlock have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives for the Estate of Brenda K. Middlekauff, Deschutes County Case No. 07-PB-0083-AB. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to Rita Ege and Linda Medlock the Co-Personal Representatives c/o Lawrence W. Erwin, Attorney at Law, 221 NW Lafayette Avenue, Bend, OR 97701-1927, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the co-personal representatives, or the attorney for the co-personal representatives, Rita Ege and Linda Medlock at 221 NW Lafayette Ave., Bend, OR 97701. Dated and first published May 21, 2010. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Roger Jones has been appointed Personal representative for the Estate of Donald Crume Jones, Deschutes County Case No. 08-PB-0006-ST. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to Roger Jones the Personal Representative c/o Lawrence W. Erwin, Attorney at Law, 221 NW Lafayette Avenue, Bend, OR 97701-1927, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred.

LEGAL NOTICE Request for Qualifications/ Proposal The City of Redmond is requesting a Statement of Qualifications and Proposals (RFQ/P) from a qualified consultant to deliver plans, specifications and estimate, as well as bid period and construction period services for replacement of three existing traffic signals at SW 5th Street/SW Evergreen Ave, SW 6th Street/SW Evergreen Ave, and SW 6th Street/SW Black Butte Blvd. as well as construction of a new traffic signal at SW 5th Street/SW Black Butte Blvd. Copies of the RFQ/P can be downloaded from the City's website at www.ci.redmond.or.us. Email the Statement of Qualifications/Proposal to Chris Doty, Public Works Director by 4:00 PM, June 4, 2010. Direct all other questions or inquiries to: Chris Doty Director of Public Works City of Redmond Redmond, Oregon 97756 Telephone: (541) 504-2001 FAX (541) 548-0253 Email: chris.doty@ci.redmond.or.us PUBLISH: Bulletin Friday, May 21, 2010 Daily Journal of Commerce Once the week of May 17, 2010

All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Roger Jones at 221 NW Lafayette Ave., Bend, OR 97701. Dated and first published May 21, 2010.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

LEGAL NOTICE River Forest Acres Special Road District will hold its annual meeting at the Sunriver Library on Saturday, May 22nd at 10:30 am. All River Forest Acres property owners are invited to attend. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031157415 T.S. No.: 10-09144-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JILL J. BLUME, MICHAEL L. BLUME as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on June 30, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-45135 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 111580 A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (E1/2NE1/4SW1/4) OF SECTION SIXTEEN {16), TOWNSHIP EIGHTEEN (18) SOUTH, RANGE THIRTEEN (13), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS PARCEL 2, OF MINOR LAND PARTITION MP90-46 AND FILED MARCH 1, 1991, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, AS PLAT PARTITION 1991-14 Commonly known as: 22970 SUPERIOR COURT. BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,632.72 Monthly Late Charge $116.22 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 804,988.68 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.71000 % per annum from July 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE SALE REFERENCE IS MADE to that certain Deed of Trust (the "Trust Deed") recorded September 17, 2008 as Document No. 2008-38139 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon by and among Jeff Korish/Kortay Northwest, Inc. as the Grantor, Western Title & Escrow Company as the Trustee and Columbia River Bank, an Oregon corporation, as the Beneficiary. The Trust Deed covers the real property legally described as: Lot 7, Block 4, VIEW ACRES, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon The undersigned successor trustee, Bennett H. Goldstein, hereby certifies that (i) no assignments of the Trust Deed by the trustee or the beneficiary and no appointments of successor trustee have been made, except as recorded in the official records of the county or counties in which the above-referenced real property is situated, and including specifically the appointment of Bennett H. Goldstein, attorney, as successor trustee, and (ii) no action has been commenced or is pending to recover the debt or any part of it now remaining which is secured by the Trust Deed. Columbia State Bank is the successor in interest to the beneficiary by operation of law. The beneficiary has elected to sell the real property described above to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. Pursuant to ORS 86.735(3), a Notice of Default and Election to Sell was recorded on April 2, 2010 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Document No. 2010-13422, as amended. There are presently one or more defaults by the grantor owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions in the Trust Deed which authorize sale in the event of default under such provisions. The defaults for which foreclosure is made are grantor's failure to cure past-due payments under a promissory note in the original principal sum of $ 1 Loan No. 95495, between grantor as debtor and beneficiary as creditor. By reason of such defaults, the beneficiary has declared and hereby does declare all sums owing on the obligations secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable. Such sums are as follows: Principal:$112,005.84 Interest to 03/19/10:$17,719.19 Late charges through 03/19/10$563.20 Foreclosure guarantee$362.00 Per diem interest from and after 03/19/10:$56.00 Title fees:$712.00 Attorneys' fees, costs and other sums necessary to protect beneficiary's interests as provided by law and contract. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned successor trustee will on August 16, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.1 10, on the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described real property which grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by the grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest grantor, or grantor's successor in interest, acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and the expenses of the sale, including the compensation due to the successor trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of the attorneys for the successor trustee. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have the foreclosure proceeding terminated and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, and by curing any other default described herein if such default is capable of cure by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed and the obligation secured by the Trust Deed, plus payment of all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Trust Deed and the obligation it secures and all fees of the successor trustee and of attorneys as provided by ORS 86.753. Other than as shown of record, neither the beneficiary nor the successor trustee has any actual notice of (i) any person having or claiming to have any lien upon or interest in the real property described herein subsequent to the interest of the trustee, the grantor, or any successor in interest to either of them, or (ii) any lessee or person, other than grantor, in possession of or occupying the real property. All references herein to "grantor," "trustee" and "beneficiary" shall be deemed to include their successors in interest, if any. Date: April 4, 2010. /s/ Bennett H. Goldstein Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee STATE OF OREGON) )ss. County of Multnomah) The undersigned hereby certifies that he is the successor trustee named above and that the foregoing is a duplicate original of the Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Bennett H. Goldstein Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee Direct inquires to: Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee 1132 SW 19th Ave., No. 106 Portland, Oregon 97205 Email: bhgoldatty@aol.com Telephone: (503) 294-0940 Telecopy: (503) 294-7918 FAIR DEBT COLLECTION NOTICE The following information and notice is required by and is provided pursuant to federal law (15 USC § 1692g(a)). This letter is sent in connection with or for the purpose of collecting a debt owed to Columbia River Bank. The debt owed is in the original principal amount of $112,500.00 under a secured promissory note, plus accrued and accruing interest. Unless you notify me within 30 days of the date of your receipt of this letter that the validity of the debt, or any portion of it, is in dispute, I will assume the debt is valid. If you send written notice to me that you dispute the debt, or any portion of it, within 30 days after your receipt of this letter, I will, as required by law, send proof of the debt to you. Columbia River Bank is the original creditor of the debt. Columbia State Bank is the successor in interest to the beneficiary by operation of law. The fact that you have 30 days from your receipt of this letter to dispute the debt will not prevent the commencement of efforts or proceedings to collect the debt within that time. However, if you request proof of the debt within 30 days of your receipt of this letter, I will, as required by law, suspend my efforts to collect the debt until I have mailed the requested information to you. /s! Bennett H. Goldstein Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee 1132 SW 19th Ave., No. 106 Portland, Oregon 97205 Email: bhgoldatty@aol.com Telephone: (503) 294-0940 Telecopy: (503) 294-7918

Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on September 10, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time

prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 14, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lorena Enriquez, Authorized Signor ASAP# 3572347 05/21/2010, 05/28/2010, 06/04/2010, 06/11/2010

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541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-61089-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LEVI R. GILKISON AND HAYLEE F. GILKISON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-25-2006, recorded 05-31-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-37746 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 120635 LOT 4, BLOCK 3, VINTAGE FAIRE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61558 CAMELOT PLACE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 10/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, IN-

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: D508802 OR Unit Code: D Loan No: 1044501897/WELCH Investor No: 4000370837 AP #1: 184638 Title #: 4377478 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MARK W. WELCH as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN as Beneficiary. Dated June 1, 2005, Recorded June 7, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-35699 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN (214), CASCADE VIEW ESTATES PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 11/01/09 TO 02/01/10 @ 1,639.54 $6,558.16 4 L/C FROM 11/16/09 TO 02/16/10 @ 81.98 $327.92 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $73.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$6,959.58 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 3661 S.W. VOLCANO AVENUE, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $249,834.68, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 28, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 02/17/10 DAVID A. KUBAT, OSBA #84265 By DAVID A. KUBAT, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 898239 PUB: 05/14/10, 05/21/10, 05/28/10, 06/04/10

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5950 T.S. No.: 1273658-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Danielle M. Lee, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Hyperion Capital Group, LLC, A Limited Liability Company, as Beneficiary, dated June 22, 2006, recorded June 28, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-44444 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 280 in Foxborough Phase 6, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61372 SE Woodbury Lane Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay when due liens and charges Superior hereto; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,526.73 Monthly Late Charge $65.85. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $207,254.35 together with interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is XXX, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

P u b lished 5-21-10

R-307686 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, May 21, 2010 F7

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/22/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3501020 05/21/2010, 05/28/2010, 06/04/2010, 06/11/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No.: 1717040162 T.S. No.: 7100941 Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason D. Powell and Rebecca A Powell, Husband and Wife as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, dated 4/30/2007, recorded 5/9/2007, in the official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-26590 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to wit: A portion of Lot Two Hundred Fourteen (214), River Canyon Estates No. 3, in the Northeast One-quarter (NE1/4) of Section Thirteen (13), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Eleven (11) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the northeast corner of said Lot 214; thence North 81º44'35" West along the north line of said Lot 214, a distance of 51.83 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 05º58'02" West, a distance of 88.94 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the south line of said Lot 214; thence South 86º56'32" East along the south line of said

TEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE, Monthly Payment $1,809.45 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $242,673.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8.13% per annum from 09-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon: and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereat notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 8-31-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the

grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELIT-

YASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: April 20, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST SEC ASAP# 3543268 05/07/2010, 05/14/2010, 05/21/2010, 05/28/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0470448671 T.S. No.: OR-241623-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GINA R. WENDELIN AND JEREMY W. WENDELIN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 9/6/2006, recorded 9/12/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-62123 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 200503 LOT ONE HUNDRED (100), RED-BAR ESTATES PHASE 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OR-

EGON. Commonly known as: 1726 NORTHEAST 8TH STREET REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $198,300.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 7/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,331.70 Monthly Late Charge $55.77 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $198,300.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 6/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OR-

EGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/10/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time

Lot 214, a distance of 49.50 feet to the southeast corner of said Lot 214; thence North 07º29'48" East, a distance of 84.38 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 60970 Snowbrush Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's failure t o: Make the monthly payments of $1,307.49 each, commencing with the payment due on 2/1/2010 and continuing each month until this trust deed is reinstated or goes to trustee's sale; plus a late charge of $65.37 on each installment not paid within fifteen days following the payment due date; trustee's fees and other costs and expenses associated with this foreclosure and any further breach of any term or condition contained in subject note and deed of trust. By the reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The principal sum of $278,931.52 together with the interest thereon at the rate 5.625%

per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 9/17/2010 at the hour of 11:00 A.M., Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the Front Entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured (and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee). Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes; has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8873 T.S. No.: 1273812-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7063 T.S. No.: 1274944-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6746 T.S. No.: 1270250-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jane T. Menefee, as Grantor to Regional Trustee Services Corp., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Gn Mortgage, LLC., as Beneficiary, dated August 26, 2004, recorded September 13, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-54773 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 62, Awbrey Village, Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3042 NW Craftsman Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,875.90 Monthly Late Charge $57.62. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $442,499.99 together with interest thereon at 3.125% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Larry W. Scarth, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For American Home Mortgage Acceptance, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 21, 2005, recorded July 27, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-48494 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot eleven (11) of Wishing Well Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20813 Cross Court Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $858.24 Monthly Late Charge $34.71. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $147,626.32 together with interest thereon at 3.875% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 31, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Richard C. Herget and Connie M. Herget Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated January 26, 2009, recorded January 30, 2009, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2009-04328 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 16, block L, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 59870 Cheyenne Rd. Bend OR 97702.. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,425.64 Monthly Late Charge $57.03. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $217,762.04 together with interest thereon at 5.000% per annum from August 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 31, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 7, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-307689 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21

R-312711 05/21, 05/28, 06/04, 06/11

R-307090 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6569 T.S. No.: 1274147-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-AGF-108232

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0377 T.S. No.: 1273621-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jack R. Lane and Marilyn K. Lane, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated January 22, 2007, recorded January 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-04947 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6, block 1, Whispering Pines, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16861 Whittier Dr. Bend OR 97707-2663. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $886.59 Monthly Late Charge $37.97. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,714.58 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from August 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 10, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 11, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, WILLIAM H. HOLMES & KARRIE K. HOLMES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., as beneficiary, dated 8/16/2007, recorded 8/17/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-45413, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT NINETEEN (19), BLOCK TWO (2), SHERWOOD ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 12310 NW 29TH COURT TERREBONNE, OR 97760 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 3, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 7 payments at $1,117.85 each $7,824.95 (11-01-09 through 05-03-10) Late Charges: $ 30.00 TOTAL: $ 7,854.95 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 11/1/2009 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $100,326.64, PLUS interest thereon at 9.150% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying ail costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor' includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 5/3/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877) 237-7878 Sale Information Line: (714) 730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Chancellor L. Colter, An Unmarried Person and Lisa Della-rose, An Unmarried Person, as Grantor to Fidelity Service Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Action Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated June 30, 2005, recorded July 01, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-42191 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 9 of Sterling Pointe, Phase 1, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2707 NW 22nd Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,496.04 Monthly Late Charge $58.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $189,826.52 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from August 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-307694 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21

ASAP# 3556195 05/07/2010, 05/14/2010, 05/21/2010, 05/28/2010

R-307684 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21


F8 Friday, May 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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3/22/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3501721 05/21/2010, 05/28/2010, 06/04/2010, 06/11/2010

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING Council of Governments

said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed; the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/15/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee C/O Max Default Services Corporation 43180 Business Park Drive, Ste. A103 Temecula, CA 92590 (619)465-8200 DENNIS CANLAS ASAP# 3573036 05/21/2010, 05/28/2010, 06/04/2010, 06/11/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359052076 T.S. No.: OR-241619-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LYNN LARKIN as Grantor to FIRST AMMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 7/13/2004, recorded 7/16/2004, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2004-42109 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 240020 LOT 47 OF QUAIL PINE ESTATES PHASE VIII, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61309 OSPREY NEST PLACE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $132,200.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments,

plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $925.43 Monthly Late Charge $30.98 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $132,200.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum from 7/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/10/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated:

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING Council of Governments A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, Deschutes County, State of Oregon to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 and Supplemental Budget for 2009 2010 will be held at 2363 S.W. Glacier Place, Redmond, Oregon. The meeting will take place on the 3rd day of June 2010 at 3:30 p.m. The purpose is to receive and to approve the budget document.

A public meeting of the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC), Deschutes County, State of Oregon will be held on June 3, 2010 at 5:30 p.m. at 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, Oregon. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss and adopt the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 and Supplemental Budget for 2009 - 2010 as approved by the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council Budget Committee. A copy of the budget may be inspected or obtained on or after June 3, 2010 at 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, Oregon between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. This is a public meeting. Any person may appear and present arguments for or against any item in the budget document.

This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee. A copy of the budget may be inspected or obtained on or after June 3, 2010 at 2363 S.W. Glacier Place, Redmond, Oregon during regular business hours.

PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council Professional Services Project Management Services The Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) is seeking experienced and qualified Project Manager to oversee and manage the process of identifying employers for profiling, reviewing job profiles, managing consultants and providing strategic guidance to the development of the "Green Skills Bank". Proposals will be accepted until, but not after, 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 10, 2010 at the office of Andrew Spreadborough, Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, Oregon, 97756. Copies of the complete RFP may downloaded from the COIC website: http://www.coic.org/publicmeetingnotices.htm or be obtained from Andrew Spreadborough at the above address, telephone (541) 504-3306, or email aspreadborough@coic.org. Andrew Spreadborough is the project contact person. COIC may reject any proposal not in compliance with prescribed procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause any and all proposals upon a finding of COIC that it is in the public interest to do so.

PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council Professional Services Certified Job Profiler The Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) is seeking experienced and qualified certified Job Profiler to provide Job Profiling services on the Green Job Profiles & Occupational Analysis Project, including the profiling of 30 jobs in Oregon. Proposals will be accepted until, but not after, 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 10, 2010 at the office of Andrew Spreadborough, Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, Oregon, 97756. Copies of the complete RFP may downloaded from the COIC website: http://www.coic.org/publicmeetingnotices.htm or be obtained from Andrew Spreadborough at the above address, telephone (541) 504-3306, or email aspreadborough@coic.org. Andrew Spreadborough is the project contact person. COIC may reject any proposal not in compliance with prescribed procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause any and all proposals upon a finding of COIC that it is in the public interest to do so.

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LEGAL NOTICE Department of the Treasury-Internal Revenue Service NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION SALE Under the authority in Internal Revenue Code section 6335 of the Internal Revenue Code, the property described below will be sold at public sale. The United States seized this property under provisions of Section 6331.The sale will be held by public auction. Date of Sale: June 3, 2010 Time of Sale: 11:00 AM - Registration begins at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 Description of Property: 2380 Cardinal Ct., Redmond OR 97756 2556 sq. ft. with 3 bedrooms and 2+ baths on .49 acre lot Legal description: Lot Thirty-Four (34) of Eagle Crest Plat XIII, Deschutes County, Oregon Property may be inspected at: Drive by only 2380 Cardinal Ct., Redmond, OR Nature of Title: The right, title, and interest of the United States in and to the property described above. The property is offered subject to any prior outstanding mortgages, encumbrances, or other third parties which are valid. Upon request, the Internal Revenue Service furnishes information regarding possible encumbrances which may be useful in determining the value of the interest being sold. Anyone who has not received such information is advised that other bidders present may have obtained it. The property will be sold "as is" and "where is" and without recourse against the United States. The Government makes no guaranty or warranty, express or implied, as to the validity of the title, quality, quantity, weight, size, or condition of the property or its fitness for any use or purpose. No claim will be considered for allowance or adjustment or for rescission of the sale based upon failure of the property to conform with any representation, express, or implied. Notice of sale has been given in accordance with requirements of law. Payment Terms: 20% of high bid upon acceptance of the bid remaining monies due no later than June 24, 2010. Form of Payments: All payments must be by cash, certified check, cashiers or treasurer's check or by United States postal, bank, express, or telegraph money order. Make check or money order payable to the United States Treasury. Name: Mary Snoddy Title: Property Appraisal Liquidation Specialist Address for information about the sale: Internal Revenue Service 500 W 12th Street Vancouver WA 98660 (951)201-6919 Cell. Email Mary.M.Snoddy@irs.gov www.irssales.gov

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: PAMELA ANN FITZMARTIN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., successor by merger to WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A., fka WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, fka WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Eighteen (18), Block One (1), INDIAN FORD RANCH HOMES, INC, PLAT NUMBER ONE, recorded August 6, 1962, in Cabinet A, Page 93, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: December 12, 2007. Recording No. 2007-63661. Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $2,175.18 each, due the first of each month, for the months of April 2009 through February 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $426,621.92; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 1, 2009; plus late charges of $707.68; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: July 15, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 15, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30623). DATED: February 26, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: MICHAEL A. HIPPENHAMMER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., successor by merger to WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST, N.A., fka WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, fka WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: As described on the attached Exhibit A. Exhibit A: Lot Twenty-four (24), Block XX, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, recorded March 22, 1962, in Plat Book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon, according to the official plat thereof, and a portion of Lot Twenty-five (25), Block XX, being described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Lot 25; thence South 78°24'06" East along the Southerly right of way line of Tuscarora Lane, a distance of 29.00 feet; thence leaving said right of way line South 19°36'43" West, 202.34 feet; thence North 11°30'53° East, 200.31 feet to the point of beginning and there terminating. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a portion of Lot 24, Block XX, being described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 24; thence North 78°33'a2^ West, 29.00 feet; thence North 19°36'43" East, 202.34 feet; thence South 11°30'53" West, 200.30 feet to the point of beginning and there terminating. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: May 24, 2006. Recording No. 2006-35773. Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $891.28 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of August 2009 through February 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $158,499.47; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from July 15, 2009; plus late charges of $597.36; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: July 15, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 15, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30626). DATED: February 26, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Kelly Oberst, as Grantor, to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of the Cascades Mortgage Center, as Beneficiary, dated February 3, 2003, recorded February 10, 2003, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2003-09443, covering the following described real property: The South 12-1/2 feet of Lot Two (2), all of Lots Three (3) and Four (4) in Block One (1) of BEND VIEW ADDITION to the City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon, EXCEPT the South Half (S1/2) of said Lot 4. Together with that portion of vacated Panama Street that inured to said property by vacation Ordinance NS-1477, recorded August 15, 1991, in Book 242, Page 1742, Deschutes County Records. The Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed, and Notice of Default was recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's failure to pay: Regular monthly payments of principal, interest and escrow collection in the amount of $914.87, from December 1, 2009, through December 31, 2009, and $925.28 from January 1, 2010, through present, together with late fees, escrow collection for taxes, insurance, and other charges as of February 22, 2010, as follows: Late Fees: $91.92l; Escrow Collection: (-$494.08); and other charges to be determined. Due to the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: 1. Principal: $93,614.16, plus interest thereon at the rate of 5.7500% per annum from February 22, 2010, until fully paid; 2. Accrued Interest: $1,655.40 (as of February 22, 2010); 3. Late Charges: $91.92 (as of February 22, 2010); 4. Escrow Collection: (-$494.08) (as of February 22, 2010); and 5. Other Costs and Fees: To be determined. NOTICE: The undersigned trustee, on July 27, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with ORS 187.110, on the Front Steps of Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, the City of Bend, the County of Deschutes, the State of Oregon, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of said trust deed, together with any interest that the Grantor or Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. NOTICE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753, and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under said trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter; singular includes the plural; the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed; and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED this 15th day of March, 2010. Kyle Schmid, Karnopp Petersen LLP, Successor Trustee 1201 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701 TEL: (541) 382-3011 STATE OF Oregon, County of Deschutes ) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above-named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Kyle Schmid, Attorney for Trustee

Published 5-21-10


FINE ARTS: Mountain Trio at the Tower, PAGE 12

MOVIES: ’Shrek Forever After’ and two others open, PAGE 25

EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN MAY 21, 2010

HORSE

FEATHERS

PAGE 3


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010

inside

REPORTERS Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Eleanor Pierce, 541-617-7828 epierce@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

PRESENTATION EDITOR Anders Ramberg, 541-383-0373 aramberg@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a Web site, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Cover photo submitted; photo illustration by Althea Borck / The Bulletin

RESTAURANTS • 10 • A review of Olive Garden Italian Restaurant

FINE ARTS • 12

MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: Horse Feathers kicks off new music series • Feedback checks out Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars • Mindscape CD-release show • Runner Runner at Silver Moon • Tribal Seeds bring reggae back • 5 for Fido supports pets! • Back from the Dead plays at The Annex • NightSounds hosts Blowin’ Smoke • Jade’s Jazz Lounge gets in the groove • Last Band Standing update

• Mountain Trio caps High Desert Chamber Music season • Film casts extras Saturday in Sisters • Artist plans workshop • Art show, sale supports program for at-risk families • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8

541-382-1811

• Guide to area clubs

• Learn something new

OUT OF TOWN • 21 • Astoria celebrates all things “Goonies” • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 24 • Review of “Alan Wake” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

ADVERTISING

TALKS, CLASSES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES • 20

• “Shrek Forever After,” “The Secret of Kells” and “MacGruber” open in Central Oregon • “Extraordinary Measures,” “Invictus,” “The Messenger,” “The Spy Next Door” and “Valentine’s Day” are out on DVD and Blu-ray • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

MUSIC RELEASES • 9 • Take a look at recent releases

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • Make your plans for later on

LOOKING FOR A GOOD REASON TO ADVERTISE IN THE BULLETIN?

How about 70,000 good reasons. Every day The Bulletin delivers new, and in-depth insight into your community through local news, business, sports and entertainment. Plus, every week we deliver local coupons, special offers, shopping inserts and more worth over $100 every week. Add it all together and it’s easy to see why The Bulletin is read by 70,000 local readers every day, more than any other locally produced print product, and that’s why so many businesses trust us to deliver their advertising message to Central Oregon and deliver results for their advertising dollars. So if you’re looking for a good reason try local advertising, remember, The Bulletin has 70,000 good reasons every day.

Want to know more? Call and ask for your FREE marketing consultation. We can help you review all your advertising options and maximize your local advertising dollars, in the newspaper and on the web. Call our Advertising Manager, Sean Tate at 541.383.0386


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010

PAGE 3

music

J u s t i n Ringle started Horse Feathers after moving from Idaho to Portland in the mid-2000s. Photos courtesy Tarina Westlund

new energy Horse Feathers brings its lush folk-pop to Bend’s Tower Theatre By Ben Salmon • T h e B u llet in

A

sk just about any band, and they’ll tell you they have no interest in making the same kind of record over and over again. It’s a natural way to feel. Try too hard to replicate early successes, and you’ll be called stagnant. Also, circumstances change. Sometimes, life, love or loss make it impossible to revisit the same creative places. Never mind most artists’ innate desire to grow and explore new things. For Justin Ringle, who’ll bring his Portland folk-pop quartet Horse Feathers to Bend on Tuesday (see “If you go”), it was a little bit of each of those that informed “Thistled Spring,” the band’s fine new album released

earlier this year on the influential Kill Rock Stars label. (Tuesday’s show kicks off the new PDXchange Program. For more on the series, see Page 4.) “I kind of felt like I had two … quiet records under my belt, and I had toured on those for a long time,” Ringle said last week in a telephone interview from somewhere in Kentucky. “It’s typically not that planned,” he said. “The music is just kind of what comes out, and it just so happened that some of (‘Thistled Spring’) definitely has a different kind of energy to it than stuff from the past.” To call Horse Feathers’ first two albums “quiet” is like saying Portland is overcast in

the winter. Both “Words Are Dead” (from 2006) and “House with No Home” (2008) gained attention and compliments from critics for their intimate, whispered folk tunes, highlighted by Ringle’s gentle voice and memorable melodies, plus gorgeous chamber-style playing by violinist Peter Broderick and his sister, cellist Heather Broderick. The Stylus online magazine praised the “sparse yet melodious acoustic idylls” that fill the debut, and the A.V. Club website described Horse Feathers’ sophomore effort as “stately and melancholy.” In the past couple of years, though, things have changed for Ringle. Continued nex t page

If you go What:Horse Feathers, with The Sweet Harlots, Jenny Harada of Moon Mountain Ramblers, and members of Central Oregon Symphony When:8 p.m. Tuesday, doors open 7 p.m. Where:Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend Cost:$15 plus service fee, available through the Tower Contact:541-317-0700, www.towertheatre.org or www.pdxchangeprogram.com


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PDXchange Program kicks off, integrates locals Horse Feathers’ appearance Tuesday at the Tower Theatre is the first show of the new PDXchange Program, which Bend’s Henry Abel hopes will be a long-running concert series that brings Portland-based indie rock to the venue. Opening the show will be local folk-pop group The Sweet Harlots, with a guest appearance by Jenny Harada of Moon Mountain Ramblers. Also, members of the Central Oregon Symphony have been learning some Horse Feathers material and will accompany the band on a few numbers. That kind of local participation is in keeping with Abel’s vision for PDXchange, which is not only to bring Portland bands to Bend, but to incorporate Central Oregon musicians wherever possible. “The Tower is not a very affordable or practical venue for a lot of our local bands to play at. I see some amazing music in this

From previous page He moved from one part of Portland to another. He changed band members; both Brodericks left the band, replaced by Nathan Crockett (violin), Catherine Odell (cello) and multi-instrumentalist Sam Cooper. Then there’s the confidence Ringle has gained in the years since he moved from Idaho to Portland and ditched rock bands in favor of acoustic music. “Any types of changes you have in your life … usually find their way into what you make. There’s no way around it; even if you try for it to not be there, it will be there,” Ringle said. “I just tried to be sensitive to that, because my life’s changed quite a bit … and I tried to embrace some of those things that were happening in my life … in the music. I think that’s where the little evolution comes in (and) this record sounds different.” Indeed, “Thistled Spring” is Horse Feathers’ pop record, in a relative sense. Ringle’s still a master of legato beauty, but one spin through lush songs such as “Belly of June,” “Starving Robins” and “Vernonia Blues” reveals a band that has stepped it up in terms of confidence, clarity and production.

town at a bar or restaurant where only some of the people can hear or are really paying attention,” Abel said. “For a musician that can be a real drag. I realized that as long as I’m going broke renting the Tower, I want to let as many local musicians take advantage of it as possible. “I can’t pay much to my local openers, but I’m requiring my Portland bands to give them some amazing opportunities,” he continued. “And the resulting collaboration just adds an element of surprise and excitement to it for everybody involved. Everybody benefits, especially the audience.” Abel’s second show is scheduled for June 3 and will feature electro-pop duo The Helio Sequence, with Bend’s Empty Space Orchestra opening. He’s also working on booking more shows for later in the summer. For more information, visit www. pdxchangeprogram.com. — Ben Salmon, The Bulletin

“Thistled Spring” finds Ringle singing louder and more clearly. New instruments flutter about, giving the songs a pleasantly surprising heft. And, to put it simply, the whole record just sounds better. Ringle acknowledges that things have changed on “Thistled Spring,” though he’s quick to point out that he doesn’t think “it sounds like it’s from another planet.” He’s right. But it does sound like a big step for a band that has the kind of charm and substance to make a pretty big leap in terms of audience and exposure, especially if fans of Ringle’s previous work are as willing to follow his muse as he is. “Maybe people expected it to be super, super quiet or whatever, but I didn’t want to live in that territory forever because I feel like doing something a little bit different gives me more license to do what I want to do in the future, as opposed to just putting out records with the same mood,” he said. “I just wanted to kind of try out some different things.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars brought the audience to its feet Tuesday at the Tower Theatre.

Living the highlife Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars start a dance party

W

hen it comes to selling concert tickets, more is almost always better for the performer. The more people that show up, the more ears you reach, and the more CDs and Tshirts you might sell, the more money you might make and the more word-of-mouth buzz promoters you might create. So in that respect, Tuesday’s show by Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars at the Tower Theatre in Bend might not have been a raging success. The room wasn’t empty, but it wasn’t exactly packed, either. But here’s the silver lining: That crowd was all about quality over quantity. And sometimes, that’s a good thing, too. How do I know about the quality of Tuesday’s audience? Their response to the music, of course. These people loved what the All Stars did; they loved their energy, and they gave it right back to them. By the time the opening number, “Gbrr Mani,” reached its growly dancehall bridge, a small segment of the audience had broken out of their chains — er, assigned seats — and started a dance party right in the aisle of the Tower. Pretty soon, there was an-

Feedback BY BEN SALMON other party in the aisle on the opposite side of the room. And not long after that, a small dance faction formed in one of the balconies. Meanwhile, the original boogie bunch had quadrupled in size, and spread from the aisle into the rows of seats. The dancers’ expanding empire reminded me of that computer game “Minesweeper,” where you try to avoid the mines and, if you’re successful, you gain more safe territory. Slowly, the kinetic energy in the two downstairs aisles devoured the space in between. Those same folks clapped and hooted and hollered wildly whenever head All Star Reuben Koroma asked aloud, in his thick African accent, “Are you happy?” Their voices were few, but their answer strong in its conviction: Yes, they were happy. It was hard not to be. Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars’ story is well-known. The band came together in a refugee camp in Guinea, where they’d fled after

being driven from their home country by civil war. In the camp, they were discovered; a documentary was made, which led to an album, world tours and, just this year, a second album called “Rise & Shine.” The All Stars have some moves and some charisma, but they are not the most dynamic performers I’ve ever seen. Koroma interacted with the crowd some, and occasionally, he and a couple of his mates danced in ways I’d have thought were physically impossible, if I hadn’t seen them with my own eyes. But mostly, they stuck to making music, and that music was, for the most part, beautiful. The band bounced back and forth between rootsy reggae and African pop music, drawing out their tunes into extended jams that were at times mellow and meditative, but mostly lively, colorful and coursing with joy. The All Stars play reggae and African music, so repetition — of guitar riffs, percussion parts, lyrics — was an integral part of the stew. Time after time, the band built a polyrhythmic bed that would make a dead man shake it, and the twin guitarists and a rotating cast of vocalists would decorate that bed with glorious ribbons of melody. Continued next page


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010

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music

MAKE THE BULLETIN’S MUSIC BLOG A DAILY STOP ON YOUR CYBER-JOURNEY! There, you’ll find news about the local scene, concert photos and reviews, free downloads from local and national artists, random musings by Bulletin music writer Ben Salmon. It’s all at ...

WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM/FREQUENCY

Mindscape returns with ‘Typical Night Life’ Y

ou can’t take a trip through a hip-hop album these days without running into countless “features,” or verses and hooks by guest MCs. Features are status symbols, really. Rappers collect them to show off their big-name friends. Which makes “Typical Night Life” — the new solo album from local MC Mindscape — atypical. At 15 tracks long, “Night Life” is very much in the same vein as Mindscape’s first solo album, 2007’s “Points of View,” but for one major difference: Whereas the debut featured several guests, the new one only has one. Some background: Mindscape is also known as Mike Fischer, one of the founding members of local hip-hop mega-group Person People. And the guest spot on “Night Life” belongs to fellow PP member Sorski, aka Garrett Wasson, at the end of the song “Skate Tape.” The two men have known each other for 17 years; they grew up together in Bend, skateboarding and listening to hip-hop. So when Wasson didn’t appear on “Points of View,” Fischer made a point to make sure he was the only non-Mindscape voice on the new record. “He’s kinda been my closest partner in all this throughout the years,” Fischer said. Wasson, who’d rather freestyle than write rhymes, said he was inspired by the song’s subject. “He had an idea for it, and … it was about us growing up and stuff, so I was like, ‘Oh yeah, I can throw something down for that,’” Wasson said. “I had no idea it was actually gonna be on the album, and then one day he called me up (to record it). “I thought it was just something we were messing around with,” he said.

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Mindscape Submitted photo

The tracks on “Night Life” include beats by Person People DJs A-Bomb, Barisone and Mez, plus Imagecaust from San Diego. Also, “Get It” is the producing debut from Fischer himself. Two of the tracks are new songs written to beats held over from “Points of View,” but tweaked a bit. Fischer calls them “sequels.” Overall, the record took more than two years to make, slowed in part by Fischer’s other projects, including Person People. The delay worked out, though; the MC believes his vocal delivery has improved over the years. Wasson thinks “Night Life” is an improvement, too: “It’s fantastic,” he said. “I think it’s better than the first one, and I listened to the first one so much I had to make myself stop listening to it.” Mindscape CD release, with Mosley Wotta, Doc & Wyatt, A-Bomb and Sorski; 9 p.m. Saturday, doors open 8 p.m.; $5, or $10 for admission and CD; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.myspace .com/fishdaddykilla01. — Ben Salmon

BEND’S THEATRE Intimate, Affordable, Local

July 20 OTTMAR LIEBERT Nouveau Flamenco Guitarist

July 27 LEON RUSSELL JUST ADDED! Available to members NOW General public June 1 Not a member? Join at TowerTheatre.org TODAY

From previous page The highlight of the night, for me, were the cascading guitars on “Kele Mani,” a wonderful example of the African highlife style that brought to mind a dancing fountain; when one melody began to fade, another took its place, gracefully and right in time. Other standouts included the slow-simmering funk of “Jah Mercy,” a ultra-bouncy pop tune

called “Soda Soap,” and the murky, psychedelic feel of a song that’s named “P. Malontone” on the set list. For the life of me, I can’t seem to figure out its real name. By the end of the night, the crowd had dwindled further, though the dance throng continued its wiggling ways, leaving a gap in the middle of the theater where those who were seated before had either headed home or

joined the fray. With the crowd parted, you could see the seats had become a sea of discarded jackets, worn to the theater to guard against the Central Oregon spring, but shed, one by one, as the All Stars brought some homeland heat to the High Desert. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

May 25 .............................................HORSE FEATHERS May 28 ................................................ HEP CAT’S BALL June 3................................................HELIO SEQUENCE

541.317.0700

towertheatre.org And at the Ticket Mill!


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music