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Butch Kovach has 6.2 million vertical feet this season at Bachelor • SPORTS, D1

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• May 11, 2010 50¢

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A beach in Bend? Yep, it’s for volleyball By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

It might be 180 miles from Bend to the ocean, but a group of residents is working to bring the beach — or at least beach volleyball — to Central Oregon. With truckloads of sand from Florence, volunteer labor and some donated space at the Old Mill District, members of the Bend Volleyball Association are working to build courts just south of the Les Schwab Amphitheater. “Bend is the greatest place in the world, but we don’t have a beach,” said Eric Staley, a Bend Volleyball Association board member. “We’re going to try to bring that here.” The goal is to build four courts near the river, where members of the volleyball association as well as the general public can use them. But for now, the group is focusing on building two of the courts before summer, and raising money for the project, which could cost about $15,000. The beach volleyball effort got started about three years ago, Staley said. People were playing at the Mountain View High courts, but the courts were fenced and shut off for most of the public. The beach volleyball players wanted to get more people interested in their sport — and one good way to do that, Staley said, is to have courts in a visible location. See Volleyball / A5

ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

Beside his daughter’s grave, father finds peace Keith Chu / The Bulletin

Steve Ellis sets this bracelet atop his daughter Jessica’s headstone whenever he visits her grave at Arlington National Cemetery.

By Keith Chu • The Bulletin WASHINGTON —

S

teve Ellis was in Washington, D.C., when terrorists flew airplanes into the World Trade Center and Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. At the time,

Jessica Ellis was attending COCC and living in Bend before she joined the Army.

Ellis didn’t know how personally that day would impact him.

“I couldn’t have imagined I’d have a child buried here, and a daughter no

less,” Ellis said on Monday, as he walked through Arlington National Cemetery, where his daughter, U.S. Army Cpl. Jessica Ellis, was buried two years ago.

Beach volleyball courts currently under construction Les Schwab Amphitheater OLD MILL DISTRICT

r ive Deschutes R

Bo nd S

t.

Columb ia St.

Reed Mkt Rd. Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

TOP NEWS INSIDE OIL: Seeking answers to the spill and dispersant safety, Page A3

INDEX C1-6

Steve Ellis kneels by the grave of his daughter, Cpl. Jessica Ellis, Monday at Arlington National Cemetery. Jessica Ellis died two years ago in a roadside bomb attack in Baghdad.

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The recession is technically over, but it could take two years for Deschutes County’s government — one of the largest employers in the county with about 850 full-time employees — to feel the effects of economic recovery. That’s the message in next year’s proposed county budget, which was released Monday and covers the fiscal year starting in July. County officials are scheduled to meet next week to hash out financial priorities, before sending the budget on to the county commission for approval in June. A large portion of the budget will remain a question mark until after the May 18 election, for which residents have already begun voting by mail on whether to approve a $44 million bond to expand the county jail. The budget will be about $310 million if voters pass the bond, and $266 million if they do not, according to the county’s proposed budget. The current county budget is about $287 million. Regardless of whether the bond passes, the county’s payroll next year will include about 10 fewer employees than this year. Some open jobs will not be filled, and the county is also laying off two Department of Solid Waste employees and five employees who work with youths at the county’s juvenile detention center. See Budget / A4

LOOK AT THAT!

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Ensworth Elementary School first-graders, from left, Kaylee Jackson, Anthony Diaz and Evan Swanson, all 7, react to a crayfish using its claws to grab a pencil during a class visit to the Bend Science Station on Monday. The visit was part of a program to enhance science education for Bend-La Pine students. See story, Page C1.

Ancient city mapped in a trice (relatively)

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For a quarter of a century, two archaeologists and their team slogged through wild tropical vegetation to investigate and map the remains of one of the largest Maya cities, in Central America. Slow, sweaty hacking with machetes seemed to be the only way to discover the breadth of an ancient urban landscape now hidden beneath a dense forest canopy. Even the new remote-sensing technologies, so effective in recent decades at surveying other archaeological sites, were no help. Imaging radar by air and from space could not “see” through the trees. Then, in the dry spring season a year ago, the husband-and-wife team of Arlen and Diane Chase tried a new approach using airborne laser signals. See Mapping / A4

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Local

Keith Chu / The Bulletin

Ellis was 24 and serving as a combat medic when she died in a 2008 roadside bomb attack in Baghdad. Jessica Ellis lived in Bend, where she was attending Central Oregon Community College, before she joined the U.S. Army. Steve Ellis is forest supervisor for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest in Baker City. Steve Ellis made a pilgrimage to his daughter’s grave this weekend, as he did last year on the anniversary of her death. He had hoped to see an exhibit honoring Jessica that was scheduled to open at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial, inside of Arlington, but its opening was delayed. Instead, Steve Ellis spent May 9, Mother’s Day sitting by Jessica’s grave. It’s one of the thousands of white headstones, lined up in perfect, endless rows. She’s in Section 60, on the edge of a cluster of trees. On Monday, two bouquets of fresh flowers flanked the headstone, and a stuffed brown bear and pictures of Jessica in uniform made her grave the most decorated in sight. “When I sit there, I’m very much at peace,” Steve said on Monday, when he returned to the cemetery to meet one of her commanding officers, Lt. Col. Miguel Hobbs. Steve said he and his wife, Linda, considered having her buried in Oregon, but her Army friends told them Jessica wanted to be buried at Arlington. “They said this is where she wanted to be,” Ellis said. “That settled that.” In the past two years, Steve Ellis said his family have been overwhelmed by support and good wishes from the soldiers Jessica served with, and military members they’ve met since. See Ellis / A4

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Kagan nomination leaves some longing on left By Peter Baker New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The selection Monday of Solicitor General Elena Kagan to be the nation’s 112th justice extends a quarter-century pattern in which Republican presidents generally install strong conservatives on the Supreme Court while Democratic presidents pick moder-

A N A LY S I S ate candidates who often disappoint their liberal base. Kagan is certainly too liberal for conservative activists, who quickly criticized her nomination on Monday as a radical threat. But much like every other Democratic nominee since

the 1960s, she does not fit the profile sought by the left, which hungers for a full-throated counterweight to the court’s conservative leader, Justice Antonin Scalia. In many ways, this reflects how much the nation’s long war over the judiciary has evolved since Kagan was a child. See Kagan / A5


A2 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

10 16 17 20 23 26 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $5.4 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

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Chinese toy jewelry Senator proposes faces greater scrutiny limiting card fees retailers must pay By Justin Pritchard The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Federal regulators announced another recall of children’s jewelry with high levels of the toxic metal cadmium Monday, also saying they’ve expanded their investigation in an effort to keep dangerous items off store shelves in the first place. A spokesman for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission told The Associated Press its inspectors at 10 of the nation’s largest ports are now screening children’s jewelry — typically imported from China — for cadmium. “Our surveillance and detection program has now been expanded” through the use of special guns that shoot X-rays into jewelry to estimate how much cadmium each item might contain, spokesman Scott Wolfson said. Word of increased scrutiny came as the agency announced the voluntary recall of about 19,000 “Best Friends” charm bracelet sets made in China and sold exclusively at the jewelry and accessories store Claire’s, which has more than 3,000 stores in North America and Europe. Agency scientists confirmed independent test results that were reported by AP in January, which showed high levels of cadmium in the “Best Friends” bracelet. The recall pertains only to such items previously sold at Claire’s; several days after AP’s initial investigation became public, the chain said it would immediately stop selling the item. While the CPSC does not release its results, testing done for the AP revealed that bracelets sold at Claire’s contained up to 91 percent cadmium by weight, and shed alarming amounts during a test that examined how much cadmium children might be exposed to if they accidentally swallow the charms. “Cadmium is toxic if ingested by children and can cause adverse health effects,” the agency said in its recall announcement. Medical research shows that cadmium in high levels is a known carcinogen and can harm kidneys and bones. Consumers should take away from children the bracelets, which were sold for about $12,

MarketWatch

The Associated Press

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has announced a recall of about 19,000 “Best Friends” charm bracelet sets made in China. Tests showed high levels of cadmium. On Monday, the agency announced increased screening of children’s jewelry from China. and return them to Claire’s for a replacement or refund, according to the announcement. The CPSC identified the manufacturer as Dae Yeon Industries Corp., of China. As part of its announcement in January that it was pulling the item from store shelves, the chain released a statement saying the items were safe, but that the decision was made “out of an abundance of caution.” On Monday, Claire’s did not immediately respond to a request for comment, including why it had waited four months to agree to a recall for the “Best Friends” bracelets it had sold in the year before the AP story.

Monday’s recall was the third prompted by AP’s investigation. Before this year, no consumer product in the United States had been recalled because of cadmium. Representatives of jewelry importers and manufacturers have rejected the idea that children’s metal jewelry is unsafe. Michael Gale, the executive director of the Fashion Jewelry and Accessories Trade Association, has told several state legislatures that are considering strict limits on cadmium in jewelry that if those laws pass, it might be impossible to put any lower-priced children’s jewelry on stores shelves where those laws apply.

Abide by these rules of thumb to prosper By Gregory Karp The (Allentown, Pa.) Morning Call

Money rules of thumb can be inaccurate because people’s financial lives differ so much. But they can help us make difficult decisions or give us benchmarks. Here are a few: • Rule of 10: For perspective on big purchases, think about how you will feel about it in 10 days, 10 weeks and 10 years. For a luxury car: In 10 days, I’ll still be excited about the newcar smell and its nice ride. In 10 weeks, it’s just the machine I use to get to work and the supermarket. In 10 years, I’ll barely remember this car. • House payment: Your mortgage, including taxes and insurance, should not exceed 29 percent of your gross monthly income. • Car payment: All vehicle payments should not exceed 15 percent of your take-home pay. • Total debt: Total monthly debt payments should not exceed 36 percent of your gross monthly income. • Car repair: If the auto repair costs less than half of the tradein value, repair it. Otherwise, considering selling it and buying another. • Holiday gifts: Spend no more than 1.5 percent of your gross income on the holidays, including gifts and travel. • Savings: Save 10 percent of your take-home pay. Some would say that should be on top of retirement savings. • Kids’ allowance: Give $1 weekly per grade in school. A fourth-grader gets $4. • Life insurance: Buy a policy worth six to 10 times your gross

years that Durbin has floated proposals aimed at curbing inCHICAGO — Rules govern- terchange fees. MasterCard and ing the price merchants pay Visa have lobbied hard against for consumers’ credit-card any changes, as have the major payments are likely to be de- banks that issue the cards. The bated as part of the sweeping fees represent a key revenue financial reform bill making component for those banks, its way through the Senate. which have seen the CARD Act Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., in- strip away or significantly retroduced three amendments duce other sources of income in to the bank-reform bill to the last year. control how much credit-card Credit unions and community issuers charge merchants banks also object to any changwhen consumers pay with es, which they think will put a credit card. If enacted, the them at a competitive disadvanproposals would sharply dent tage with the big banks. They the more than $40 billion in fear that set prices for the big fees collected banks will leave annually by their customca rd-issuing “Our five-year ers holding debit banks. cards that cost battle to pass Interchange merchants more. fees, also re- swipe-fee reform “The conseferred to as legislation quences of these “swipe fees,” amendments are set by Mas- continues. (Swipe would make it exterCard and fees have a) tremely difficult Visa, and vary for credit unions from mer- devastating and community chant to mer- impact on banks to conchant and card tinue to provide businesses and to card. They valuable and reaverage about are raising costs sponsible debit2 percent for for consumers.” and credit-card c red it- c a rd services to their transactions, — Hank Amour, customers,” Dan and are higher National Association of Mica, chief execfor rewards Convenience Stores utive of the Credit or corporate Union National cards. Association, and Retailers loathe the fees Camden Fine, chief executive because they eat into profits. of the Independent CommuCredit-card issuers, however, nity Bankers of America, said say they’re needed to cover this week in a joint letter to transaction costs, including Congress. losses from consumers who “With government price condon’t pay their bills. trols on debit cards issued by “We’re not saying there big banks, no market mechashould not be an inter- nism will be in place to prevent change fee,” Durbin said on merchants from discriminating the Senate floor this week. against consumers who carry “We are saying it should be the now artificially more exreasonable.” pensive debit cards from credit His amendments, which unions and community banks,” are opposed by major credit- the letter stated. card networks and issuers as Meanwhile, retail groups such well as credit-union and com- as the National Retail Federation munity-bank trade groups, and the National Association of call for allowing merchants Convenience Stores, are urging to offer discounts to consum- members to push legislators to ers who use cash, debit or a support the amendments. particular card network, say “Our five-year battle to pass a MasterCard instead of a swipe-fee reform legislation Visa. continues,” NACS Chief ExAnother amendment, of- ecutive Hank Amour said in a fered as an aid to small busi- letter to members. The internesses, would allow mer- change fees, he said, are having chants to set minimum and a “devastating impact on busimaximum purchase limits nesses and are raising costs for — something major card is- consumers.” suers don’t allow and threatThe amendments have been en to fine businesses that set filed but a spokesman for Durbin them. said they have not been formerly Durbin’s also looking for offered, meaning they could be the lowest rates possible to pulled. A decision will be made apply to government credit- by next week. card transactions, noting that consumers are increasingly using plastic to pay for Why pay retail? such things as tax payments, 541-385-5950 toll fees and dog licenses. He New Bend Location: called the U.S. government a 2nd & Greenwood “major user” of credit cards. This is the third time in two www.extrafurniture.com

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annual income. • Restaurant tipping: To quickly figure a generous tip, double the first digit on your bill. For bills more than $100, double the first two digits. • Emergency fund: Keep a rainy-day fund equal to three to six months of expenses. • Debt payment: Pay debts from highest interest rate to lowest. Or from the smallest amount to largest. • Mutual funds: Be wary of funds with an expense ratio of more than 1 percent. • College borrowing: Don’t borrow more money than you’ll make in your first year working after graduation. • Asset allocation: That’s how you should split your longterm investing between stocks and bonds. A conservative rule of thumb is 100 minus your age goes in stocks, the rest in bonds.

More aggressive is a stock allocation of 110 minus your age. • Organic produce: If it has a thin skin that you eat, such as apples, spend extra for organic. If it has a thick skin that’s discarded — say, bananas — save your money. It’s about exterior pesticide residue. • Choose experiences: In a choice between spending on things or experiences with other people, choose the latter. Research shows it makes us happier. Never: • Carry a credit card balance. • Lend money to friends and family. • Borrow from your 401(k) or cash out early. • Pay fees on a checking account. • Buy an extended warranty. • Buy an investment you don’t understand.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 A3

T S Oil spill swells to 4M gallons as BP casts about for a fix By Harry R. Weber and John Curran The Associated Press Writers

ON THE GULF OF MEXICO — Black Hawk helicopters peppered Louisiana’s barrier islands with 1-ton sacks of sand Monday to bolster the state’s crucial wetlands against an epic oil spill, 4 million gallons and growing, in the Gulf of Mexico. At the site of the ruptured well a mile below the surface, a remotecontrolled submarine shot chemicals into the maw of the massive

undersea leak to dilute the flow, further evidence that BP expects the gusher to keep erupting into the Gulf for weeks or more. Crews using the deep-sea robot attempted to thin the oil — which is rushing up from the seabed at a pace of about 210,000 gallons per day — after getting approval from the Environmental Protection Agency, BP PLC officials said. Two previous tests were done to determine the potential impact on the environment, and the third round of spraying began was to

last into early today. The EPA said the effects of the chemicals were still widely unknown. BP engineers, casting about after an icelike buildup thwarted their plan to siphon off most of the leak using a 100-ton containment box, pushed ahead with other potential short-term solutions, including using a smaller box and injecting the leak with junk such as golf balls and pieces of tire to plug it. If it works, the well will be filled with mud and cement and

abandoned. None of those methods has been attempted so deep. Workers were simultaneously drilling a relief well, the solution considered most permanent, but that was expected to take up to three months. At least 4 million gallons were believed to have leaked since an April 20 drilling rig blast killed 11. If the gusher continues unabated, it would surpass the Exxon Valdez disaster as the nation’s worst spill by Father’s Day.

Blowout preventer on center stage as hearings begin WASHINGTON — Congress will begin grilling executives from BP, Transocean Ltd., and Halliburton today as lawmakers seek an explanation for the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig that killed 11 people and triggered a massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. During the flurry of spillrelated hearings on Capitol Hill, the lawmakers also are set to probe why a crucial backup device, known as a blowout preventer, failed to cut off the oil gushing from crumpled pipe a mile underwater. But they may only get a tangle of finger pointing from the corporate leaders whose companies are being sued for negligence in connection with the Deepwater Horizon disaster. In prepared testimony obtained by Hearst Newspapers, the corporate leaders trade blame over what went wrong, with rig owner Transocean suggesting cement casing by Halliburton was key and Halliburton insisting that BP is the ultimate responsible party. BP America’s chairman, Lamar McKay, is expected to focus on the failure of the blowout preventer, a 450-ton piece of equipment used on oil and gas wells worldwide as a failsafe protection against spills. “All of us urgently want to understand how this vital piece of equipment and its built-in redundancy systems failed and what measures are required to prevent this from ever happening again,” McKay said in prepared testimony that appears to shift blame to Transocean and Cameron, which manufactured the blowout preventer. McKay is expected to pledge to share the findings of BP’s internal investigation. — Hearst News Service

Alex Brandon / The Associated Press

A Blackhawk helicopter prepares to drop sandbags Monday in an effort to dam off part of the marsh on Elmer’s Island in Grand Isle, La. Since April 20, 4 million gallons of oil have escaped from a ruptured deep-sea well.

Attacks in Iraq kill at least 100 in nation’s bloodiest day of 2010 By Rebecca Santana and Lara Jakes The Associated Press

BAGHDAD — A man with explosives strapped to his body blew himself up in a crowd, bombers struck a southern city and gunmen sprayed fire on security checkpoints in attacks Monday that killed at least 100 people — most of them in Shiite areas — in Iraq’s deadliest day this year. Officials were quick to blame insurgents linked to alQaida in Iraq for the shootings in the capital, saying the militants were redoubling efforts to destabilize the country at a time of political uncertainty over who will control the next government. Shiite Vice President Adel Abdul-Mahdi stressed the importance of quickly forming a government that does not exclude any major political group to try to prevent insurgents from exploiting Iraq’s fragile security. “The terrorist gangs perpetrated new assaults today on our people and armed forces,” he said. “We call on all political blocs to work seriously for the benefit of the country and ... start to form a national partnership government including all political parties without marginalizing any one.” More than two months after the March 7 election, Iraq’s main political factions are still struggling to put together a ruling coalition. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s

Shiite bloc has tried to squeeze out election front-runner Ayad Allawi — a secular Shiite who was heavily backed by Sunnis — by forging an alliance last week with another religious Shiite coalition. The union, which is just four seats short of a majority in parliament, will likely lead to four more years of a government dominated by Shiites, much like the current one. Sunni anger at Shiite domination of successive governments was a key reason behind the insurgency that sparked sectarian warfare in 2006 and 2007. If Allawi is perceived as not getting his fair share of power, that could in turn outrage the Sunnis who supported him and risk a resurgence of sectarian violence. The relentless cascade of bombings and shootings — hitting at least 10 cities and towns as the day unfolded — also raised questions about whether Iraqi security forces can protect the country as the U.S. prepares to withdraw half of its remaining 92,000 troops in Iraq over the next four months. The U.S. and Iraq have claimed major blows again al-Qaida in Iraq over the last month — most notably the killings of two militant leaders Abu Omar al-Baghdadi and Abu Ayyub al-Masri in an April 18 raid on their safehouse near Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit.

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Tough call for scientists on safety of oil ‘dispersants’ By Juliet Eilperin The Washington Post

The decision on whether to use chemical dispersants deep below the sea’s surface to break up the Gulf of Mexico oil spill boils down to two central questions: Is it worth taking this unprecedented step to protect the region’s sensitive and ecologically valuable wetlands, even at the potential expense of its marine life? And should federal officials conduct extensive new research before making the leap, since the scientific literature on this question is so sparse? “It’s sort of the devil you know versus the devil you don’t,” said Linda Greer, a senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “It’s really shocking to me how little research has been done into these basic questions.” Responders to the downed Deepwater Horizon rig have already spent days applying more than 253,000 gallons of oil dispersant — Nalco’s Corexit 9500 — to break up the tens of thousands of gallons of oil that have

reached the ocean’s surface. EPA administrator Lisa Jackson said Friday that the government was not yet ready to proceed with widespread subsea chemical dispersants. “So far the sampling is inconclusive or incomplete,” she said. On a basic level these dispersants work the same way dishwashing liquid works on grease: They break up the oil into tiny droplets by attaching to the oil so it’s diluted in the water column. And scientists and policymakers agree that the oil from the spill poses a greater threat to wildlife and vegetation than the chemicals contained in the dispersants. “You’re putting something into the water, it’s less toxic than the oil, so it’s a trade-off,” said Coast Guard Commandant Thad Allen, national incident commander for the BP spill, in an interview. But the question of the broader trade-off — whether these compounds will wreak havoc on the marine system over time — remains unanswered.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Budget

Caracol Archaeological Project via New York Times News Service

An aerial view shows part of the ancient city of Caracol, in Belize. Dense jungle cover for years defeated attempts to map the entire city, one of the greatest of the Maya lowlands.

Mapping Continued from A1 The technology penetrates the jungle cover and is reflected from the ground below. The attempt yielded 3-D images of the site of ancient Caracol, in Belize, one of the great cities of the Maya lowlands. In only four days, a twin-engine aircraft equipped with an advanced version of lidar (light detection and ranging) flew back and forth over the jungle and collected data surpassing the results of two and a half decades of onthe-ground mapping, the archaeologists said. After three weeks of laboratory processing, the almost 10 hours of laser measurements showed topographic detail over an area of 80 square miles, notably settlement patterns of grand architecture and modest house mounds, roadways and agricultural terraces.

‘Blown away’ “We were blown away,” Diane Chase said recently, recalling their first examination of the images. “We believe that lidar will help transform Maya archaeology much in the same way that radiocarbon dating did in the 1950s and interpretations of Maya hieroglyphs did in the 1980s and ‘’90s.” The Chases, who are professors of anthropology at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, had determined from earlier surveys that Caracol extended over a wide area in its heyday, between A.D. 550 and 900. From a ceremonial center of palaces and broad plazas, it stretched out to industrial zones and poor neighborhoods

Ellis Continued from A1 “We always knew this military family was here, but never really felt it until she died,” Ellis said. “Not a week goes by that I don’t get a phone call, letters and cards from her buddies. It never even petered off.” Walking up to Jessica’s grave, Steve Ellis gestured at the three or four new rows of headstones that have been erected since Jessica was buried. “The war continues,” he said. In the packet of pictures Steve keeps with him, Jessica’s always smiling, usually posed with an arm around one of her fellow soldiers. That’s how she was, Hobbs said. “She was always making faces and having a goofy, fun time,” he said. Asked what about Jessica stood out, apart from her famously curly, unruly hair, Hobbs remembered when Jes-

and beyond to suburbs of substantial houses, markets and terraced fields and reservoirs. This picture of urban sprawl led the Chases to estimate the city’s population at its peak at more than 115,000. But some archaeologists doubted the evidence warranted such expansive interpretations. “Now we have a totality of data and see the entire landscape,” Arlen Chase said of the laser findings. “We know the size of the site, its boundaries, and this confirms our population estimates, and we see all this terracing and begin to know how the people fed themselves.” Other archaeologists, who were not involved in the research but were familiar with the results, said the technology should be a boon to explorations, especially ones in the tropics, with its heavily overgrown vegetation, including pre-Columbian sites throughout Mexico and Central America. But they emphasized that it would not obviate the need to follow up with traditional mapping to establish “ground truth.” The years the Chases spent on traditional explorations at Caracol laid the foundation for confirming the effectiveness of the laser technology. Details in the new images clearly matched their maps of known structures and cultural features. When the teams returned to the field, they used the laser images to find several causeways, terraced fields and ruins they had overlooked. The Chases said the new research demonstrates how a large, sustainable agricultural society could thrive in a tropical environment and thus account for the robust Maya civilization in its classic period from A.D. 250 to 900.

“This will revolutionize the way we do settlement studies of the Maya,” Arlen Chase said on returning from this spring’s research at Caracol.

sica was preparing to take a rifle marksmanship test, without her glasses. Hobbs made her retrieve her glasses and she passed the test. A few minutes later, as Steve Ellis squinted at an address before relenting and putting his own glasses on, he acknowledged that she probably got that from him, along with the hair. “I guess it’s genetic,” he said. Jessica was the only member of her battalion to die during their rotation in Iraq, Hobbs said. There were 16 casualties and at least one limb amputation, he said. She died while on patrol with a group of engineers clearing roads of explosives. It was one of the most dangerous assignments in the battalion, Hobbs said. “Because they’re out looking for it, there’s a tendency to run into it a lot,” Hobbs said. She had downplayed the danger of her mission to her parents, Steve Ellis said. He later learned that she had been in several close

calls. “She got blown up a lot,” Ellis said. “We’ve heard that after the fact; she didn’t want to worry us.” One of the last stories Steve told was about the day Jessica died. It was Mother’s Day, and Linda hadn’t gotten flowers or a call. When a bouquet of flowers arrived the next day, Steve and Linda figured they were from friends who had heard about Jessica’s death. They figured wrong. The flowers were from Jessica, ordered before she left on the mission that killed her. “She didn’t forget her mother,” Steve Ellis said. Driving away from the memorial, two years later, Steve said Jessica is never far from his mind. “We think about her every day, a lot.”

Other applications Laser signals breaking through jungle cover are only the newest form of remote sensing in the pursuit of knowledge of past cultures, which began in earnest about a century ago with the advent of aerial photography. Charles Lindbergh drew attention to its application in archaeology with picture-taking flights over unexplored Pueblo cliff dwellings in the American Southwest. NASA recently stepped up its promotion of technologies developed for broad surveys of Earth and other planets to be used in archaeological research. Starting with a few preliminary tests over the years, the agency has now established a formal program for financing archaeological remotesensing projects by air and space. “We’re not looking for monoliths on the moon,” joked Craig Dobson, manager of the NASA space archaeology program. Every two years, Dobson said, NASA issues several three-year grants for the use of remote sensing at ancient sites. In addition to the Caracol tests, the program is supporting two other Maya research efforts, surveys of settlement patterns in North Africa and Mexico and reconnaissance of ancient ruins in the Mekong River Valley and around Angkor Wat. Nothing like a latter-day Apollo project, of course, but the archaeology program is growing, Dobson said, and will soon double to an annual budget of $1 million.

Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from A1 The Community Development Department was prepared to lay off four employees if building activity did not improve, but department Director Tom Anderson said Monday that a higher-than-expected amount of construction in March and April saved those jobs. Now, Anderson expects that the Community Development Department will start the next budget year with about $200,000 more than expected. The Community Development Department has already cut its staff from 77 employees to 41 in response to the housing market downturn. The main area where the public will face “eroded service levels” is at Knott Landfill in Bend and a Redmond waste transfer station, which will close on Sundays starting in July, County Administrator Dave Kanner wrote in a memorandum attached to the proposed budget. “Overall, I think the county is in remarkably sound fiscal condition, particularly in comparison to other jurisdictions around the United States, who are looking at laying off 6 percent of their staffs,” Kanner said Monday. “We’re extremely fortunate to have well-funded reserves that have buffered us from the worst effects of the recession and will probably continue to buffer us at least a couple of years into the future.” The budget would increase savings so the county has more than $7 million set aside in the general fund to make it

through lean years. Due to plummeting real estate values, officials expect tax rolls to grow by only 2.2 percent in the coming year, and the county could face no increase in tax revenue or even a decline in the next two years. However, the only potential tax increase is the jail expansion bond measure. The county Sheriff’s Office is also budgeting for a 3-cent cut to the rate for the special taxing district that pays for its operations across the county. That could save the owner of a $200,000 home about $6 a year, The Bulletin has reported. The tax cut will help draw down the sheriff’s contingency fund, which is currently about 10 percent higher than required under county policy. A financial bright spot is Deschutes County Health Services, where the county will likely add about nine employees thanks to a five-year, $3 million federal grant and more state money from an expansion of the Oregon Health Plan to insure more people. Kanner expects a minimal increase of 1.37 percent in general fund revenues, which come mostly from property taxes and recording fees at the Clerk’s Office. However, the county will also

start the budget year with about $2 million more than expected in its coffers, mostly from one-time revenues from banks and other purchasers paying delinquent taxes on foreclosed properties, and from clerk’s recording fees for notices of default, which begin the foreclosure process. Under county policy, one-time revenues are generally used for one-time purchases instead of ongoing costs, such as personnel. A new program to create a directory of affordable childcare resources is one way the county will likely use about $25,000 of the windfall. Business groups and the county commissioners have identified the lack of affordable childcare “as a major barrier to economic development,” according to Kanner’s budget message. County officials will also likely set aside $303,267 in one-time revenues related to foreclosures in an economic development fund, to provide money Economic Development for Central Oregon can dispense in grants and loans for business expansion and relocation expenses. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Kagan Continued from A1 While the American left back then used the Supreme Court to promote social change in areas like religion, race and abortion, today it looks at it more as a backstop to defend those rulings. The right, on the other hand, remains aggrieved and has waged an energetic campaign to make the court an agent of change reversing some of those holdings. Along the way, conservatives have succeeded to a large extent in framing the debate, putting liberals on the defensive to the point where Sonia Sotomayor extolled judicial restraint in her confirmation hearings last year and even President Barack Obama recently said the court had gone too far in the past. While conservatives have played a powerful role in influencing Republican nominations, liberals have not been as potent in Democratic selections.

Left out? In that vein, then, no Democratic nominee since Thurgood Marshall in 1967 has been the sort of outspoken liberal champion that the left craves, while Scalia has been joined by three other solid conservatives in Chief Justice John Roberts and justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito. By all accounts, Obama did not even consider the candidates favored most by the left, like Harold Hongju Koh, his State Department legal adviser, or Pamela Karlan, a Stanford Law School professor. “Why do the conservatives always get the conservatives, but we don’t get to get the liberals?” Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, recently asked, voicing the frustration of the left before Kagan was selected but when she was known to be the front-runner. “What the hell is that all about?” Kagan addressed the point herself 15 years ago in the University of Chicago Law Review: “Herein lies one of the mysteries of modern confirmation politics: given that the Republican Party has an ambitious judicial agenda and the Democratic Party has next to none, why is the former labeled the party of judicial restraint and the latter the party of judicial activism?” Conservatives reject the notion that what they seek amounts to activism, saying what they want are justices who do not interpret

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 A5

Tornadoes kill 5 in Oklahoma

Kagan’s lack of litigation experience figures to be prime stumbling block Senate Republicans said a lack of litigation experience may be one of the toughest issues confronting Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan, as Democrats predicted she will win bipartisan support and take her place on the court. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Ky., said Republicans want to ensure that Kagan, now the government’s top Supreme Court lawyer, will not be a “rubber stamp” for the administration and won’t have a “preconceived idea of who should win.” They also want to examine whether Kagan, who has never been a judge, has enough experience to serve on the court, he said. “We will carefully review her brief litigation experience,” McConnell said. Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., who will preside over Kagan’s Senate hearings this summer, noted that Chief Justices William Rehnquist and Earl War-

the Constitution and laws to promote a policy agenda. But they said the public has come around to their view that courts have overreached and they have made the issue a potential liability for Democrats. “What does President Obama gain by putting forward an unabashed progressive, liberal judicial activist?” asked Leonard Leo, a conservative leader who helped President George W. Bush confirm Roberts and Alito. “Polling suggests that’s not something that adds a lot of value to his own immediate political objectives.”

Rightward shift The ground began shifting on Supreme Court politics during President Ronald Reagan’s second term when conservatives pushed for candidates who would reverse what they saw as the excesses of the court under chief justices Earl Warren and Warren Burger. In 1986, Reagan appointed Scalia and elevated Justice William Rehnquist to replace Burger. But Reagan’s nomination of Robert Bork a year later was rejected by the Senate after an ideological clash. Only after that vote and another nominee withdrew did Reagan finally pick Antho-

The Associated Press NORMAN, Okla. — Tornadoes ripped through the Southern Plains on Monday as storms that killed five people and injured dozens more.

ren also hadn’t been judges before being named to the court. President Barack Obama on Monday selected Kagan, the first female U.S. solicitor general, to succeed retiring Justice John Paul Stevens. By doing so, he put before the Senate a candidate who just a year ago went through a lengthy confirmation process and won full Senate confirmation on a 61-31 vote. Jon Kyl of Arizona, the second-ranking Senate Republican and a member of the Judiciary Committee, said the administration can’t take for granted that the earlier confirmation signals approval this time. “As I made clear when I supported her confirmation as solicitor general, a temporary political appointment is far different than a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court,” Kyl said in a statement. — Bloomberg News

Volleyball

Susan Walsh / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama, standing with Elena Kagan and Vice President Joe Biden, described Kagan as a “consensus builder” and champion for typical Americans in nominating her to the Supreme Court on Monday.

ny Kennedy, a more moderate conservative. Leery of another such showdown, President George Bush picked a so-called stealth candidate in David Souter in 1990, a move conservatives considered a betrayal after he turned out to be more liberal than expected. A year later, Bush appointed Thomas, who was a favorite of the right, as were the second Bush’s choices, Roberts and Alito. Liberals have had Scalia envy for nearly a quarter-century, only to be let down. They considered President Bill Clinton’s selections of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer to be satisfactory but not satisfying, much like the nomination of Sotomayor last year. While Ginsburg came closest to what they were looking for, given her record of advocacy for women’s rights, she does not go far enough for them on capital punishment and other issues. A 2009 study provided some fodder for Harkin’s argument that

today’s conservative justices are more to the right than the liberals are to the left. Richard Posner, a conservative appeals court judge in Chicago, and William Landes, his colleague from the University of Chicago law school, ranked all 43 justices from 1937 to 2006 by ideology and found that four of the five most conservative justices are on the current court. Even the moderate swing vote, Kennedy, was the 10th most conservative over that period. By contrast, none of the current justices ranks among the five most liberal members and only Ginsburg is in the top 10. Where exactly Kagan would fall on that scale is unclear since she has never been a judge. She has been a forceful critic of the ban on openly gay service in the military, but has argued for strong executive power, a hot-button issue since Sept. 11. Some analysts even say she would actually shift the court somewhat to the right, compared with Justice John Paul Stevens. Obama described her Monday as a “consensus builder” known for “her openness to a wide range of viewpoints.”

Continued from A1 “Some of the coolest places I’ve ever played is where you can drive by, or walk or bicycle,” he said. And with courts open to the public, you can play against different people and improve your game, he added. The volleyball players started talking with the Bend Park & Recreation District about building outdoor courts, but then started to realize that beach volleyball courts should really be in a place where players can feel a breeze off the water, Staley said. He talked with Bill Smith with the Old Mill, and got the OK to use the land until it’s needed for additional developments. It was great for the Old Mill to donate the land temporarily, said Shannon Segerstrom, one of the beach volleyball organizers and owner of inMotion Training Studio. “It’s by the water, it’s beach volleyball, how great is that?” she said. “We’re hoping to make it beautiful, a place to go.” And the courts could be a draw to the area as well, said Noelle Fredland, marketing director with the Old Mill. “It just adds more interest, more reasons to come down here, more community activities,” she said. “It’s great.” With funding help from the Bend Volleyball Association, which pitched in about $6,000, the beach volleyball enthusiasts started building the courts about a month ago. Bend’s Latham Excavation loaned them equipment to create the courts, and West-

Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokesman Jerry Lojka said two people were killed in Oklahoma City and three died in Cleveland County, south of the city.

Learn more For more information about the Bend beach volleyball group, visit its Facebook page at www.facebook. com/pages/Bend-BeachVolleyball/316623476155 or send an e-mail to bendbeachvb@gmail.com.

side Church donated some sand, Segerstrom said. More sand — at $500 a truckload — has been shipped in from the Oregon Coast. In all, the sand alone will cost about $10,000. “We’re getting this stuff, and trying to figure out how to pay for it along the way,” Segerstrom said. The group held a poker tournament last month, and is planning another one for early June — when the available funds for sand will start to dry up. Once the courts are up and running, the group hopes to hold tournaments to raise money to pay for the insurance on the court and upkeep, Staley said. The goal is to keep the courts open to everyone, he said, as long as problems don’t start with vandalism of the nets or other equipment. “If people take care and don’t trash them and abuse it, it looks like we can hopefully share it with everyone,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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N A T ION / WOR L D

A6 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

New laws generally aid rights of immigrants, study finds By Tara Bahrampour The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Despite recent national attention on laws such as the Arizona legislation aimed at cracking down on illegal immigrants, a study released Monday by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars shows that across the country, more laws expanding immigrants’ rights are enacted than those contracting them. The study, Context Matters: Latino Immigrant Civic Engagement in Nine U.S. Cities, found that areas long accustomed to an influx of immigrants tend to focus more on trying to accommodate them rather than restrict them. “The reality is that they’re here already, so most cities and counties are trying to figure out how they can best incorporate these immigrants,” said Andrew Selee, director of the Woodrow Wilson Center Mexico Institute and a coauthor of the report. In states such as Texas, California and Illinois, he said, “There is a sense that immigrants are a productive part of society.” In an analysis of 1,059 immigration-related bills in 50 state legislatures in 2007, 19 percent of 313 bills expanding immigrant rights were enacted, while 11 percent of 263 bills contracting rights were enacted, the report said. Bills contracting immigrant rights included those such as one approved that year in Prince William County, Va., allowing police officers to check people’s immigration status if they had probable cause to believe they were in the United States illegally; the bill was later amended to require a status check for all arrestees. Bills expanding immigrant rights included a measure in New York that eliminated citizenship requirements for occupations such as police officer, firefighter and teacher; a Texas bill making it an offense to obtain labor or services by threatening to report someone to immigration; and a Nevada bill creating new crimes and penalties around involuntary servitude and human trafficking, said Xochitl Bada, an assistant professor in the Latin American and Latino Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a co-author of the report.

AFGHANISTAN

Tribal politics backfire on plan by U.S. military By Joshua Partlow and Greg Jaffe The Washington Post

ACHIN, Afghanistan — U.S. military officials in eastern Afghanistan thought they had come up with a novel way to stem the anger and disillusionment about government corruption that fuels the Taliban insurgency here. Instead, their plan to empower a large Pashtun tribe angered a local power broker, provoked a backlash from the Afghan government and was disavowed by the U.S. Embassy. The struggling U.S. military effort to give the Shinwari tribe more voice in its affairs shows the massive challenges the United States will face this summer in Kandahar province, as it prepares to launch what is being touted as one of the largest and most important military campaigns of the nine-year-old war. One of the main U.S. goals in Kandahar is to reduce the influence of local power brokers, widely seen as corrupt, and to give tribal alliances a stake in how the province is governed and how development contracts are parceled out. But the swirling controversy surrounding the American deal in eastern Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province demonstrates that efforts to alter the existing power structure can have unintended and unsettling effects. The plan involving the 400,000strong Shinwari tribe developed earlier this year when elders told Col. Randy George, a senior commander in eastern Afghanistan, that they wanted to unite to oppose the Taliban and stamp out opium cultivation. As a reward, George offered the Shinwari elders the power to decide how to spend $1 million in U.S.funded development projects. It ended after the local power broker, Gov. Gul Agha Shirzai, a towering and controversial figure in Afghan politics, complained to President Hamid Karzai, who lambasted U.S. Ambassador Karl Eikenberry in a February meeting for meddling in tribal politics. Shirzai accused U.S. officials of turning tribal elders into “little governors.” Soon, the State Department ordered its employees to cease working on the deal. The embassy has drafted, but not yet issued, guidance that no civilians in Afghanistan should be involved in tribal pacts.

Joshua Partlow / The Washington Post

Malik Niaz, a tribal leader in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, says he accepted $10,000 from tribal leaders for U.S.-funded development projects. Niaz said the Interior Ministry gave him pickup trucks, 50 bodyguards and 100 rocket-propelled grenades, and U.S. Special Operations forces helicopters flew in ammunition and food. The American approach had also angered other tribal leaders, who complained that an initial $200,000 allotted for daylabor work hadn’t been distributed equitably. “It really stirred things up,” said one State Department official, referring to George’s approach. “They were basically paying the Shinwaris to do nothing: ‘Congratulations, you get a pony.’ Now other tribes are saying, ‘Why don’t I get a pony?’” Although military officials expected resistance from Shirzai, they were surprised by the blowback from Afghan officials in Kabul and from the State Department, which had been informed about the effort prior to moving forward. “The big worry was that the pact undermined the central government,” said one U.S. official. U.S. military officials rejected the notion that branches of the Shinwari were excluded from the deal. “We did it in a very open way. We announced it in front of 130 tribal elders,” George said. After spending $167,000 on a series of small, labor-intensive initiatives to clean out irrigation canals and build retaining walls, the money stopped flowing. “It’s all been stopped, the money and the projects,” said Shinwari elder Mohammad Usman. One of the main beneficiaries was Malik Niaz, a white-bearded leader of the Khaidar Khel tribe, who said he accepted $10,000 in two installments. Niaz said the In-

W  B Rescuers among dead; Russian mine toll rises MOSCOW — The death toll in a double explosion at a Siberian coal shaft climbed to 43 early today, Russian news agencies reported, and among the dead were many rescuers killed trying to reach trapped comrades. Hope was fading for 47 others caught in a darkened subterranean maze of methane gas and floodwater in what appeared to be the worst Russian mining disaster in three years. “Unfortunately the bodies that have been pulled out and their injuries give us less and less

hope of finding anyone alive,” said Sergei Shoigu, Russia’s emergency situations minister, in a call to President Dmitry Medvedev. As the day wore on in the western Siberian city of Mezhdurechensk, the mine caverns were filling with water and no survivors were being recovered. At least eighteen of the dead were rescuers, Russian officials said.

Aquino opens lead in Philippine vote MANILA, Philippines — The son of Philippine democracy icon

Corazon Aquino had a wide lead early today in presidential elections after campaigning on a promise to restore credibility by prosecuting corrupt officials. Despite glitches with new computerized counting machines and violence that claimed at least nine lives, election officials hailed Monday’s vote as a success in a country where poll fraud allegations have marred previous contests. Sen. Benigno Aquino III was leading the nine-candidate presidential race with 40.19 percent of the votes from about 78 percent of the precincts. — From wire reports

terior Ministry gave him pickup trucks, 50 bodyguards and 100 rocket-propelled grenades, while U.S. Special Operations forces helicopters flew in ammunition and food. A spokesman for Special Operations forces did not address the claims but said none of their forces are currently in Nangarhar or “providing assistance to the Shinwari tribe at this time.” The weapons, food and ammunition were not part of the broader Shinwari deal, military officials said. The new prestige for Niaz and others did not sit well among all Shinwaris. “Before the money, we were all equal,” said Akthar Mohammad, a Shinwari elder from the Ali Sher Khel branch. “They became very selfish, very proud of themselves. They wanted to control the other tribes.”

Karzai arrives for talks in D.C. WASHINGTON — Afghan President Hamid Karzai arrived here Monday for a four-day visit designed to publicly turn the page in the often-testy relationship between his government and the Obama administration and to solidify a working partnership between them. “This is not a trip about deliverables,” such as economic or military agreements, a senior administration official said. Instead, U.S. officials said, they will push Karzai to make good on promises he has made to address government corruption and accountability, and work to influence his plans for a national peace conference late this month. For his part, Karzai is seeking clarification of President Obama’s plans to begin withdrawing U.S. troops from Afghanistan by mid-2011, as well as an outline of a long-term economic and security relationship. — The Washington Post

Britain’s Brown says he will resign to help party New York Times News Service LONDON — Britain’s quest for a new government took a sudden turn on Monday when Prime Minister Gordon Brown announced that he would resign within months as Labour Party leader as part of a bid to lure the Liberal Democrats into rejecting the Conservatives and joining a rejuvenated Labour in a left-ofcenter governing coalition. Speaking to reporters outside No. 10 Downing Street, Brown said he would remain in office to oversee negotiations for a new government, but would stand down as Labour’s leader when a successor was elected sometime before the party’s annual conference in September. Brown has been accused by his critics for years of being in deep denial about his unpopularity, both with Labour voters and more broadly. That chorus intensified after last week’s election, when he led Labour to its worst performance since the 1920s.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,374.67 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +109.03 +4.81%

s

CLOSE 10,785.14 DOW JONES CHANGE +404.71 +3.90%

s

1,159.73 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +48.85 +4.40%

BONDS

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STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Zillow: Area’s home listing prices decline National home values declined 3.8 percent in the first quarter of 2010 compared with the same quarter a year ago, according to Zillow.com’s quarterly Home Value Index released Monday. The index is based on a proprietary company formula that uses listing and sales price data that is also weighted according to population. Bend is not included in the quarterly index, as the index only examines 135 of the nation’s markets, but the online real estate company’s website shows the median listing price in Deschutes County declined 12.59 percent in the first quarter on a year-over-year basis. As of March 2010, the median listing price for a home in Bend was $250,000, compared with $286,000 in March 2009, according to Zillow. On a yearly basis, the median listing price in Redmond also declined in the first quarter from $180,000 in March 2009 to $139,000 in March 2010, or 22.78 percent. The national median listing price in the first quarter of 2010 was $183,700, according to Zillow.

EXECUTIVE FILE

Finding freedom in watchmaking

Clarification In a column headlined, “A sweet bite of the Apple,” which appeared Sunday, May 9, on Page G1, it was implied that simultaneous voice and data service is specific to the Apple iPhone. That service is available on any AT&T 3G device that has both data and voice capabilities.

Mortgage company needs more money Fannie Mae reported a steep loss in the first quarter and is asking taxpayers for an additional $8.4 billion.

Net income/loss,

in billions 0 -5 -10 -15 -20

-$13.1B -$25 Q4

Q1 ’10

Taxpayer aid

s

$18.530 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.101

A $1T safety net for Europe, with doubts attached Some question wisdom of lending more money to ‘overborrowed’ governments A N A LY S I S

New York Times News Service

Like the giant financial bailout announced by the United States in 2008, the sweeping rescue package announced by Europe eased fears of a market collapse but left a big question: Will it work long term? Stung by criticism that it was slow and weak, the European Union surpassed expectations in arranging a nearly $1 trillion financial commitment for its ailing members over the weekend and paved the way for the European Central Bank to begin purchases of European debt on Monday. Markets rallied around the world in response to the concerted defense of the euro, a package that exceeded in size the U.S.

bank bailout two years ago. Major stock indexes in the United States rose about 4 percent Monday, while a leading index of blue-chip stocks in the euro zone rose more than 10 percent. The premium that investors had been demanding to buy Greek bonds plunged. But as details crystallized of the package’s main component — a promise by the European Union’s member states to back 440 billion euros, or $560 billion, in new loans to bail out European economies — the wisdom of solving a debt crisis by taking on more debt was challenged by some analysts. See Europe / B6

Stocks soar after Europe announces rescue plan debt crisis. Financials received a particular jolt as fears receded, For a day, at least, investors for now at least, of a default on could exhale. Greek sovereign debt that might After a bruising five sessions have hit the balance sheets of last week that erased some big banks. all of the year’s gains “I looked at the num— including a momen- Inside bers and said ‘My goodtary freefall on Thursness, that must be a misday that remains largely • What the print,’” Anthony ConSEC is doing unexplained — stock roy, head equity trader about last indexes roared back on for BNY ConvergEx week’s Monday. Credit markets Group, said of his initial plunge, also recovered from reaction to news of the their malaise. European intervention. Page B5 Fueling the rally was “They are really sending an extraordinary agreea statement that we are ment among European leaders to going to fix the issues and we are provide a rescue package of near- going to fix them now.” ly $1 trillion to stop the spreading See Markets / B5

New York Times News Service

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Keaton Myrick attaches a small toothed gear to the end of a Jacot lathe tool. It’s the beginning of the process of burnishing the pivot of the gear, which is one of the final steps before the gear can be placed inside a watch.

Bend man hopped from job to job until he found his niche By David Holley The Bulletin

It took four tries before Keaton Myrick was able to tie a string of catgut, hardly thicker than a strand of hair, to a short bow he would use to burnish a piece of metal. The piece of metal — the pivot of a toothed gear — is one of hundreds of components in a watch Myrick is restoring. Before Myrick can put the toothed gear in the watch, though, its pivot must be burnished in order to give it strength, and prevent friction and wear when the watch is running. Once he finally had strung the catgut from end to end of the metal bow, Myrick wrapped the center of the string around a small specialty lathe, called a Jacot tool, and moved the bow forward and backward like a saw. That forced the lathe to turn. At the end of the lathe was the toothed metal gear, also spinning, and thus rubbing its pivot against a thin carbide burnisher. Though it was tedious to attach it, the string was necessary to make the burnishing process work. That’s why in watchmaking, patience is not just a virtue, it’s a necessity. “Usually I spend five times as long setting it up as the actual operation,” Myrick said. That Myrick is a patient person isn’t the only reason why he, a 28-year-old Bend resident, was able to become a watchmak-

Quirky device probably won’t be Sony’s savior By David Pogue New York Times News Service

Keaton Myrick uses both computer and hand-craftsmanship in making his custom watches. This one took 8 months to make.

The basics What: KM Independent Watchmaking Who: Keaton Myrick Where: 300 West Hood Ave., Sisters Phone: 541-390-6461 Website: www.kpmwatchcompany.com

er. He more or less stumbled into the field, having picked up a copy of a watchmaking magazine that listed a variety of schools that taught the subject. See Watchmaker / B5

Fannie Mae Freddie Mac

$20 billion

$1200.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$9.60

By Christine Hauser

The Bend restaurant River Mill Grill has posted a message on its website that it was sold and is no longer in operation. Owners Axel Hoch and Mark Perry could not immediately be reached for comment Monday. The restaurant, which was open for nine months, served happy hour specials and a dinner menu. Located at 803 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 202, the restaurant replaced Fireside red, which operated just more than a year, according to a previous article in The Bulletin. — From staff reports

Q2 Q3 2009

t

By Landon Thomas Jr. and Jack Ewing

River Mill Grill sells

Q1

Ten-year CLOSE 3.53 treasury CHANGE +3.22%

As the barrage of advertising should make quite clear, the new Sony Dash is here. What is it? That depends on whether you want to know what it does — or what it represents. First, what it does. The Dash ($200) is a sleeked-up, scaled-up, grown-up Chumby. If that name doesn’t ring a bell, here’s a refresher: The Chumby is a cute little gadget that looks like a beanbag with a 3.5-inch touch screen. You put it on your bedside table, desk or kitchen counter. There, using a wireless network connection, it spends the day spooling through a parade of Internet widgets, like headlines, stock prices, weather, photos, Twitter or Facebook feeds, top 10 lists, e-mail, sports scores and jokes. You can choose from more than 1,000 of these free apps. The

TECH FOCUS

New York Times News Service

Sony’s Dash is a quirky cross between an alarm clock, picture frame, radio and Web viewer. result: an appealing, quirky cross of an alarm clock, picture frame, Internet radio and Web viewer. See Dash / B5

$8.4B 15

NHTSA opens new investigation over Toyota defects

10 5

By Peter Whoriskey The Washington Post

0 Q1

Q2 Q3 2009

Q4

Q1 ’10

Source: Fannie Mae; Federal Housing Finance Agency

AP

WASHINGTON — Federal regulators are opening a second investigation into whether Toyota delayed notifying government authorities of a dangerous defect, this one affecting the steering systems of nearly 1 million sport-utility vehicles and pickup trucks.

The probe by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration comes a little more than a month after the agency fined the automaker $16. 4 million for waiting at least four months before notifying safety officials about a “sticky pedal” defect. That sanction was the largest financial penalty imposed by the U.S. government on an automaker.

The new investigation involves a problem with the steering-relay rod on the Toyota 4Runner, Toyota Truck and Toyota T100s affecting some models made from 1989 through 1998. The rod, which connects the steering wheel to the wheels, can break after wear and tear and cause drivers to lose control. The agency has linked the defect to complaints involving at least 15 crashes,

three deaths and seven injuries. Toyota issued a recall for the steering defect in September 2005. It had issued a similar recall in Japan nearly a year before that, and the company’s critics have said Toyota and NHTSA should have realized more quickly that the same problem existed in the United States. See Toyota / B5


B2 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Android surpasses iPhone in first quarter

B USI N ESS

The calculus of upgrades Moody’s stock Not all frequent flier plans are created equal, experts say

Tim Winship, publisher of Frequentflier .com, says the practice of making only certain fares upgradeable is a “dirty little secret” of the airlines. “There is an incentive to mislead people because it makes the miles look more valuable if you don’t get into much detail before you can upgrade,” he said.

By Geraldine Fabrikant By Dan Gallagher

New York Times News Service

MarketWatch

Accumulating frequent-flier miles used to be relatively straightforward. You could add to your miles by flying or through a credit card affiliated with an airline. Pretty soon, you had enough miles to get free tickets or upgrades to business class, or even first class. But as this summer travel season approaches, anyone hoping to use miles to upgrade to business class to Europe, say, should first read the fine print — and then take out the calculator. Here’s why: Getting an upgrade can involve just cashing in frequent-flier miles or cashing in miles and paying an additional fee — and the amounts vary by airline. Then, you have to consider the type of seat you buy, because airlines differ on which seats can be upgraded. So while all the airlines allow upgrades from economy-class seats, some set a higher hurdle for the kinds of economy tickets you must buy to be upgraded. Some programs, like those of American Airlines and Continental Airlines, appear to offer more flexibility than Delta Air Lines, for example. And benefit programs, even among airlines that are more flexible, may vary. Randy Petersen, who overseas the website of WebFlyer, says that travelers may want to believe that all frequent-flier plans are created equal, but they are not. “The two most important parts are miles and the money to upgrade.” Tim Winship, publisher of FrequentFlier.com, which tracks the frequent-flier business, agreed. “The whole question of which fares are upgradeable is a dirty little secret. The airlines will tell you that if you do your research, it will be disclosed that only such and such a fare base is upgradeable,” he said. “There is an incentive to mislead people because it makes the miles look more valuable if you don’t get into much detail before you can upgrade.”

SAN FRANCISCO — The Android mobile operating system passed the Apple iPhone in terms of U.S. market share during the first quarter, according to a report issued Monday by the NPD Group. According to the study, the Android OS — developed by Google Inc. — ended the period with a domestic market share of 28 percent. That’s up from about 20 percent in the December quarter, and is due mostly to strong sales of handsets such as the Droid and Droid Eris at Verizon Wireless, according to the report. The iPhone from Apple Inc. saw its U.S. share remain relatively flat at 21 percent. The leader in the U.S. remains Research In Motion, whose BlackBerry family of “smart phone” devices has about 36 percent of the market, according to NPD data. “Verizon is putting considerable effort behind promoting Android to its customers,” said NPD analyst Ross Rubin of the latest report. A big part of the boost for the Android platform came from the launch of the Droid handset from Motorola in late 2009. The device racked up strong sales and helped the platform’s market share surge from below 5 percent in the third quarter to end the year around 20 percent, according to NPD data. The data are supported somewhat by a similar report issued from IDC on Friday. Looking at the smart-phone market by vendor, IDC found that Motorola had about 11.7 percent market share in North America in the first quarter, while HTC — another big vendor of Android handsets — had 9.2 percent. Combined, those numbers were ahead of the 17.2 percent market share attributed to Apple. Rubin said much of the growth for Android is likely attributable to the fact that — before the launch of the Droid — Verizon customers had few alternatives to the iPhone at AT&T. “Prior to launch of Droid, there had not been a lot of modern, touch-optimized smart phones available at Verizon,” Rubin said, who added that the majority of smart-phone sales at a carrier typically come from customers who are already signed up to that carrier. Verizon is expected to put heavy promotion behind the latest Android device — the Droid Incredible from HTC — for the next several months.

Other factors There are other factors at work, too. One, for example, is how many seats are available for upgrades, although the airlines keep much of that information private. And much of the choice of frequent-flier programs is dictated by where you live and which airlines dominate your hometown market. For instance, neither United, which has a sliding scale policy related to the price of an economy ticket, nor US Airways, which charges $300 and 30,000 miles each way to upgrade regardless of ticket price, now fly directly to Europe out of New York’s airports. Passengers who choose Delta Airlines instead of American

Genetic testing kits to be sold through Walgreens stores By Andrew Pollack New York Times News Service

Genetic tests that assess a person’s risk of getting various diseases are heading for the corner drugstore. Pathway Genomics, a start-up company, is expected to announce Tuesday that it will sell such a test through most of the nation’s 7,500 Walgreens stores. The tests sold by Pathway, and others by its competitors, look at specific variations in a person’s DNA to derive information about their risk of getting diseases like diabetes, heart disease and various forms of cancer. Such tests have until now been sold directly to consumers through the Internet or through doctors’ offices. By capitalizing on the foot traffic in drugstores, Pathway hopes to gain an edge on rivals 23andMe and Navigenics, which are older and better known. “It’s more consumer awareness than we could get from advertising online,” said Jim Woodman, vice president for corporate strategy at Pathway, which is based in San Diego and is privately held. The personal genomics companies appear to have garnered fewer than 100,000 customers combined since starting nearly three years ago. Pathway, which started last

summer, will not say how many customers it has. The tests, which generally cost $300 or more, have also stirred controversy. Some genetics experts say the tests cannot provide accurate or significant information because not enough is known yet about the genetic causes of disease. Some critics say doctors should be involved in interpreting the tests. New York State considers these medical tests, not consumer information, and requires a license. Since Pathway does not yet have one, its test will not be carried by Walgreens stores in New York. Woodman of Pathway said he did not expect the move into drugstores to stir additional criticism. What Walgreens will be selling, for a price expected to be $20 to $30, is Pathway’s saliva collection kit, packaged in a box that says “Discover Your DNA.” But the testing of the saliva will cost extra — from $79 to as much as $249, depending on how full a set of tests the consumer orders. Consumers would send their saliva sample, which contains their DNA, to the company’s lab. But they would still have to go to Pathway’s website to order the specific test they want and pay an additional fee. They will also receive the test results via the Web.

Stephanie Diani New York Times News Service

or Continental are generally required to buy a more expensive economy-class ticket if they want to become eligible to upgrade to business class for overseas trips. Asked about the comparisons, Paul Skrbec, a Delta spokesman, said: “The description is accurate. We are very clear on what people need to do within our program rules.” Continental and American let passengers upgrade from an economy-class ticket — even the least expensive ones. And even though those airlines charge a fee for the upgrades as well as take miles out of your account, a recent check of upgrade costs on Delta for trips to London from New York and to Rome from Chicago, showed that the out-of-pocket costs on Delta were higher. An upgradeable ticket on a 10day trip from New York to London starting on June 1 would cost $2,356 round trip on Delta. If an upgrade were available, it would require 25,000 miles each way, but there would be no additional charge. A simple economy-class ticket would cost $953.60, but would not allow a passenger to apply for upgrades. The same trip on American turned up the same price, $953.60, for the ticket. To upgrade — if the upgrade were available, and that is an “if” on any airline, would cost $350 and 25,000 miles each way. If a traveler is cleared for upgrade in both directions, the fare would be $1,653.60. For an upgrade in just one direction, the fare would be $1,303.60. Also noteworthy, an American Airlines passenger can request an upgrade for just one leg of the trip. With Delta, on the other hand, a passenger who wants to upgrade in only one direction would still have to pay for the higher roundtrip ticket to qualify for the oneway upgrade (though he or she would use only 25,000 miles). Continental has its own version of the upgrade. On a route from New York to Amsterdam, for instance, where both Delta and

Continental fly direct, an upgradeable Delta ticket was $2,710.40 and would require 50,000 miles to upgrade both ways. Continental has a slightly more complex, but less costly formula. For its lowest fare, for the first week in June, a ticket would cost $1,145 round trip along with $500 to upgrade each way. But Continental takes only 20,000 miles for each upgrade. So a total round-trip upgrade would cost $2,145 and 40,000 miles. Continental also has a sliding scale for the fees. For the traveler who buys a higher-class economy ticket for $1,776.41, the charge for upgrade drops to $250 each way (and 20,000 miles each way). Continental also offers a full-fare economy ticket, for $2,417 round trip, that allows an upgrade for 40,000 miles, without extra fees.

Cost variables Airlines vary as well on the numbers of miles required for each leg of an upgrade. United Airlines, like Continental, charges 20,000 miles for each leg of most upgrades overseas, while both American and Delta charge 25,000. Of course, these fares change frequently; what was true in the summer may not be true in the fall, and pricing gaps between airlines on the same route could shrink or widen. For a round-trip ticket from New York to London leaving on Oct. 1, a recent check showed the price of a Delta upgradeable ticket at $2,376.50, nearly the same as in June. American’s price, meanwhile, jumped to $1,099, from $953.60 in June. Travelers should expect the cost of upgrading to continue to rise. “Between the rebounding of the economy and the cutback in inventory, the airlines have more pricing power, and I expect that to continue for the foreseeable future,” Winship said. “Everything points in the direction of increased ticket prices.”

falls on word of SEC probe By David Segal New York Times News Service

Shares of Moody’s fell sharply on Monday after it disclosed that the Securities and Exchange Commission had warned that it might sue the firm for making “false and misleading” statements as part of its application as a ratings organization. The SEC sent the New Yorkbased company a Wells notice, the regulator’s way of signaling that it was considering legal action against a firm. Moody’s said it received the notice on March 18 and disclosed it in a quarterly filing on Friday. The company said that the notice stemmed from actions by members of a European rating surveillance committee who “may have violated Moody’s professional code of conduct,” according to a spokesman, Michael Adler. Moody’s reported the incident to the SEC in 2008, Adler said in a statement, and has complied with the commission’s subsequent requests for information. “Moody’s policy clearly prohibits the conduct in which these employees engaged,” Adler said, “and we do not believe that a single violation of our policy renders that policy false.” A spokesman for the SEC would not comment on Self Referrals Welcome

Moody’s disclosure. Scrutiny of the ratings agencies is increasing. Moody’s and the other two major ratings agencies — Standard & Poor’s and Fitch — have been widely criticized for the high grades they affixed to billions of dollars of subprime mortgages that were rendered worthless, or nearly so, by the credit crisis. According to Moody’s, the SEC was prompted by a report in May 2008 in The Financial Times. The article stated that in 2007, members of a committee that oversaw a certain type of European derivative — called constant proportion debt obligations — knew that some of the products had been given inflated ratings because of a problem in the company’s risk modeling software. Without that problem, The Financial Times reported, the bonds would have received ratings as many as four notches lower. Moody’s corrected the software error, but the bonds maintained their Triple A ratings until January 2008.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 B3

Thank You To All The Following Businesses For Your Generous Support! B&B Group

FROM OUR PEOPLE

BIG

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Jerry’s Outdoor Power & Outerwear

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US Bank

Car Kare, Inc. 541-382-4896 carkare@rio.com

Bank of the Cascades 541-330-7529 www.botc.com

Texaco Food Mart 541-548-1009 539 NW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Butler Aircraft Company 541-548-8166 1050 SE Sisters Ave., Redmond, OR

Mountain View Heating Inc. 541-389-6714 110 SE 9th St, Bend, OR 97702

Stereo Planet 541-382-9062 www.stereoplanet.com

High Desert Wheelchair Transport 541-385-9238 541-480-6073

Pine Lodge 541-549-5900 www.5pinelodge.com

ATI 800-597-9311 www.ati-sales.com

Wagner Mall 541-382-9423 1900 NE 3rd St., Ste. 200 Bend, OR

The Downtowner Deli/The Summit Restaurant 541-749-2440 125 NW Oregon Ave., Bend, OR 97701

Infocus Eye Care Center, LLC 541-318-8388 2450 NE Mary Rose Place, Bend, OR

LibertyBank 541-693-8560 805 NW Bond St, Bend, OR 97701

William C. Dahling 541-389-2905 2590 NE Country Dr., Ste. 2 Bend, OR 9th Street RV Storage 541-389-6740 169 SE 9th St., Bend, OR 97702

Oregon Wholesale Hardware, Inc. 541-382-3371 653 NE 1st St., Bend, OR 97701

The Pita Pit 541-389-7482 806 NW Brooks St., Ste. 110, Bend, OR Timbers Redmond 541-923-7604 3315 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR Redmond Dairy Queen 541-548-2616 704 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Inovia 541-318-8388 2200 NE Neff Rd., Bend, OR 97701

Scenes From The West 541-385-7794 www.scenesfromthewest.com

R.V. Outfitters, Inc. 541-312-9758 www.rvoutfitters.net

B&B Group, LLC 541-923-8740 PO Box 208, Redmond, OR 97756

Elemental Eyecare 541-323-3937 2736 NW Crossing Dr., Ste. 120, Bend, OR

Dana Signs Custom Designs 541-548-5312 615 SW Umatilla Ave, Redmond, OR

1st Rate Mortgage, Inc. 541-548-8111 www.1stratemortgageinc.com

GFP Enterprises, Inc. 541-549-8167 www.gfpenterprises.com

Public Information Verification 541-548-5306 344 SW 7th, Redmond, OR 97756

Black Butte Ranch 541-595-1235 www.blackbutteranch.com

Certified Personnel Service Agency 541-504-9675 www.cpsagency.com

Subaguru 541-382-6067 www.subaguru.com

McDonald’s Redmond 541-923-1923 2456 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR Mirror Priorities Full Service Salon 541-923-0222 307 SW 7th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Central Oregon Association of Realtors 541-382-3452 2112 NE 4th St., Bend, OR 97701

The Loft of Bend, LLC 541-322-5638 86 SW Century Dr, Bend, OR 97702

Skjersaas 541-382-2154 www.skibend.com

Redmond Surgery Center 541-316-2500 244 NW Kingwood Ave., Redmond, OR Maxine Hoggan Licensed Psychohlogist 541-526-0969 mhogganpsyd@bendbroadband.com

Wal-Mart Redmond 541-923-5972 300 NW Oaktree, Redmond, OR 97756

Tornay Insurance Agency, Inc. 541-388-2136 www.allstate.com/paultornay

Ray’s Food Place 541-318-7297 www.ckmarket.com

Sterling Transportation 800-627-5123 1927 SW 1st St., Redmond, OR 97756

Small Engine Repair of Central Oregon 541-548-4994 2319 SW 58th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Northwest Brain and Spine 541-585-2400 2275 NE Doctors DR, Bend, OR 97701 U.S. Bank 541-388-8804 www.usbank.com

College Excel 541-389-2905 www.collegeexcel.com

Northwest Premiere Builders 541-383-1721 nwpremierebuilders@bendbroadband.com

Energy Efficient Construction, LLC 541-316-1426 eeci@bendbroadband.com

Juniper Paper & Supply 541-312-4070 1028 SE Paiute Way, Bend, OR 97702

Northern Energy Propane 541-383-1721 www.northernenergy.com

Stormwater Services 541-548-4049 www.stormwateroregon.com

Mill Point Dental Center - Marika Stone, DDS 541-388-0078 715 SW Bonnett Way, Ste. 100, Bend, OR Ponderosa Heating & Cooling 541-948-1853 www.ponderosaheating.com

Victorian Café 541-480-1989 1404 NW Galveston Ave., Bend, OR

Red Robin 541-382-9234 www.redrobin.com

Grocery Outlet 541-389-3095 www.groceryoutlets.com

Tumalo Therapeutics 541-420-8577 Marian McCall & Laurie Mason

Law Offices of Scott H. Terrall 541-388-0709 65965 Gerking Market Rd., Bend, OR TNT Performance 541-815-3923 tntperformance@q.com

Avion Water Company 541-382-5342 60813 Parrell Rd., Bend, OR 97701 Pacific Power 888-221-7070 www.pacificpower.net

Exceptional Real Estate 541-317-8909 62472 Eagle Rd., Bend, OR 97701

Joe A. Lochner Insurance Agency, Inc. 541-548-6023 www.joelochner.com

Twin Rivers Plumbing 541-923-3096 www.twinrp.com

High Desert Disaster Restoration 541-312-2999 61386 Parrell Rd., Bend, OR 97702

Cart-Tek Golf Carts 541-330-0405 www.cart-tekgolfcarts.com

Samual A. Ramirez, Attorney at Law 541-5361408 51470 Highway 97, Lapine, OR 97739 Lapine Community Health Center 541-536-3435 P.O. Box 3300, Lapine, OR 97739

Newhouse Manufacturing Company, Inc. 541-548-1055 www.newhouse-mfg.com

Desert Valley Equine Center 541-504-5299 21199 NW Spruce Ave., Redmond, OR

Central Oregon Ranch Supply 541-548-5195 www.centraloregonranchsupply.com Hip Chicks Salon 541-419-7213 322 NW 7th St., Redmond, OR 97756

China Doll 541-312-9393 547 NE Bellevue Dr., Ste. 113, Bend, OR Computer Heroes 541-312-2300 frank@compheroes.com Big R Stores 541-548-4095 3141 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR

Lazerquick Copies 541-317-5577 1245 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702

Ewing Bookkeeping Services 541-389-0357 smartzse@hotmail.com

Deschutes Insurance 541-389-8785 225 SW Scalehouse Loop, Bend, Or 97702 Gould and Associates Realty 541-536-2900 P.O. Box 14, Lapine, OR 97739

The Law Offices of Bryan W. Gruetter, PC 541-585-1140 www.gruetterlaw.com

Midstate Electric Cooperative 541-536-2126 P.O. Box 127, Lapine, OR 97739

Fluid Images Inc. & Bob Johnson 541-815-0818 69687 West Meadowpark Way, Sisters, OR Cascade Insurance Center 541-382-7772 www.cascadeinsure.com

CS Construction, LLC 541-617-9190 www.cscdllc.com

Marathon Business Machines 541-548-5248 302 SW Evergreen, Redmond, OR 97756 Bryant, Lovlien, & Jarvis 541-382-4331 www.bljlawyers.com

Brian T. Hemphill, Attorney at Law 541-382-2991 339 SW Century Dr., Ste. 101, Bend, OR

Taco Time 541-388-1964 40 NW Pine Crest CT, Bend, OR 97702 FlickFive Films 541-317-5055 20020 Glen Vista, Bend, OR 97702 Central Oregon Electronic Medical Records 541-585-2580 www.coemr.com Woodside Development, LLC 541-318-0500 60025 E. Ridgeview Dr, Bend, OR 97702

Butch’s Place 541-923-7677 1515 N. Highway 97, Redmond, OR Brookman Revere, LLC 541-389-3288 19479 Bounty Lake Ct., Bend, OR 97702 Smolich Motors 541-389-1178 www.smolichmotors.com

Merrill Lynch 541-382-4373 755 SW Bonnett Way Suite 2200, Bend, OR

Arco AM/PM 541-318-5110 61112 S. Highway 97, Bend, OR 97702 CA Rowles Engineering 541-585-2207 720 SE Business Way, Ste. 200, Bend,

John L. Scott Lapine Real estate 541-536-1188 P.O. Box 796, Lapine, OR 97739

Artisan Outdoor Living & Landscape 541-383-2551 www.artisanbend.com

Middleton Septic Pump Service 541-475-5322 2876 SW Hwy 97, Madras, OR 97741 Stan R. Stieben Agency - All State Insurance 541-318-8536 612 NE Savannah Dr., Ste. 1, Bend, OR

High Desert Aggregate & Paving 541-504-8566 8500 NW Lone Pine Rd., Terrebonne, OR Gregg Geser Construction 541-549-9434 68990 N. Pine St., Sisters, OR 97759 Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic 541-923-1638 2630 S. Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR

All Position Welding 541-548-6329 308 SW Evergreen, Redmond, OR 97756

Quality Coat Asphalt Maintenance 541-480-6655 P.O. Box 1574, Bend, OR 97709

Aeries Mini Storage, LLC 541-383-3365 1300 2nd. Ave., Bend, OR 97701

Impact Graphix & Signs, Inc. 541-548-8544 www.impactgraphixandsigns.com

Jody’s Drive In Restaurant 541-923-5639 807 SW 14th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Powers of Automation, Inc. 541-330-1687 61533 American Lp., Ste. 1, Bend, OR

Animal Land, Inc. 541-548-1007 338 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756 RE/MAX Town & Country Realty 541-549-3333 www.sistersoregonproperties.com

Aspen Homes, Inc. 541-385-9633 www.aspenhomesoforegon.com

Lakeside Lumber Company 541-382-3693 1320 Armour Dr, Bend, OR 97702

A Greener Cleaner 541-318-7153 210 SE 3rd St., Bend, OR 97702

Accurate Mold, LLC 541-279-9572 2040 SW Quartz Ave, Redmond, OR

The Pony Express 541-549-1538 160 S. Oak, Sisters, OR 97759

In Tune 541-923-1636 1614 SW Veterans Way, Redmond, OR

Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate 541-382-4123 486 SW Bluff Dr., Bend, OR 97702

Lodge at Suttle Lake 541-595-2628 www.thelodgeatsuttlelake.com

Central Oregon Pathology 541-389-7490 1348 NE Cushing, Ste. 200, Bend, OR Redmond Community Church 541-923-1782 www.redmondcc.org

Centwise True Value 541-548-2334 433 SW 5th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Robinson & Owen, Inc. 541-549-1848 750 Buckaroo Trail, Sisters, OR 97759 Redmond A&W 541-923-8881 1501 SW Highland Ave., Redmond, OR

The Rental Connection 541-383-1780 60970 Alpine Ln., Bend, OR 97702

Piloto Ranch 541-504-4602 www.pilotoranch.com

Powell’s Sweet Shoppe 541-617-9866 818 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701

Etrix Group 541-0354 20756 High Desert Ct. # 6, Bend, OR 97701 Longboard Louie’s Inc 541-383-5889 62080 Dean Swift Rd, Bend, OR 97701

Valentine Ventures Your $12.99 Store 541-549-2059 216 West Cascade, Sisters, OR 97759 TK Jacobson Investments, Inc. 541-383-8502 23451 Butterfield Trail, Bend, OR 97702 Real Time Research, Inc. 541-382-3836 52 SW Roosevelt Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Scott Hatcher River Guide & Ocean Charter 541-317-8474 www.scotthatcherfishing.com Salvation Army 541-389-8888 www.salvationarmybendoregon.org The Brew Shop 541-323-2318 www.homesuds.com William Delgado MD-Bend Dermatology 541-382-5712 www.bendderm.com Western Title & Escrow Company 541-389-5751 www.westerntitle.com Trimble, Everton, Farrens, & Mode 541-385-0534 15 SW Colorado, Ste. 220, Bend, OR Century West Engineering Corporation 541-322-8962 www.centurywest.com Strictly Organic Coffee Company 541-383-1570 www.strictlyorganic.com El Burrito Restaurant 541-382-2177 335 NE Dekalb, Bend, OR 97701 JICA Construction, LLC 541-548-5012 2316 Xero Ln., Redmond, OR 97756 Century Insurance Group, LLC 541-382-4211 695 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR Cascades Biosciences 541-588-6209 69215 Singletree, Sisters, OR 97759 Celebrating the Sacred - Wendy Schechter 541-504-3151 www.celebratingthesacred.com Action Typesetting & Printing 541-388-1480 www.actiontype.com Microsemi 541-382-8028 www.microsemi.com Bladt’s Custom Woodworking Inc. 541-408-4095 21575 Bear Creek, Bend, OR 97701 Redmond Gymnastics Academy 541-923-3513 www.RGAGymnastics.com B&R Continuous Guttering Company, Inc. 541-389-8008 8276 SE Business Way, Bend, OR Robert E. Rufener, CPA, PC 541-475-7228 ruf@madras.net PGC Building & Design 541-771-9199 www.PGCBuilding.com Madras Sanitary Service 541-475-2071 www.madrassanitary.com Coldwell Banker - Dick Dodson Realty 541-475-6137 www.liveinmadras.com Central Oregon Nutrition Consultants 541-388-0694 61456 Elder Ridge St., Bend, OR Central Lake Marine 541-385-7791 61076 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702 Miller Lumber 541-382-2022 www.miller-lumber.com Alpine Pest Management 541-389-4942 www.alpinepest.com HSW Builders 541-388-9898 www.hswbuilders.com Home Comfort Design & Drafting 541-923-6719 69765 Goodrich Rd., Sisters, OR 97759 Dutch Pacific Properties 541-588-9226 P.O. Box 3500 TMB 303, Sisters, OR Baptista Tile & Stone Gallery 541-382-9130 www.baptistatile.com Umpqua Bank - NW Crossing 541-312-4811 www.umpquabank.com

Shlesinger & DeVilleneuve - Attorneys 541-749-4255 www.sgilletusfightforyou.com

Veloski Sports 541-318-5053 www.veloski.com

Greenridge Physical Therapy & Wellness 541-549-3534 325 N. Locust St., Sisters, OR 97759 Bend Surgery Center, LLP 541-318-0858 www.bendsurgery.com

Law Office of Foster Glass 541-317-0703 339 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Patrick Casey & Company 541-322-2142 796 SW Bradbury Way, Bend, OR 97702 Susan Daly Sterns Esq. 541-306-6753 www.stearnstmlaw.com

Central Oregon Audiology & Hearing Aid Clinic 541-389-6669 www.centraloregonaudiology.com

Cold Stone Creamery 541-382-5466 63455 N. Highway 97, Bend, OR 97701 H2O To Go Opal Springs Water Company 541-389-1773 www.opalspringswater.com

Key Constructors Inc. 541-389-9952 18781 Kuhlman Rd, Bend, OR 97701 Outback Steakhouse 541-383-8104 269 SE Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR

Starting Small 541-388-2072 1929 NE Neff Rd, Bend, OR 97701

Sisters Dental 541-549-9486 P.O. Box 1027, Sisters, OR 97759

Bush Animal Clinic, Inc. 541-382-7671 www.bushanimalclinicinc.com

Centro Print Solutions 541-382-3534 www.centroprintsolutions.com

Bell-Air Motel 541-382-1885 8790 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR

South Valley Bank & Trust 541-330-1894 www.southvalleybank.com

Jiffy Lube 541-383-1513 525 S 3rd St, Bend, OR 97702

Lowes Group 541-312-2113 www.lowes-group.com

Bend Research 541-322-9002 www.bendres.com

Del Taco 541-322-8702 612 SE 3rd St., Bend, OR 97702

Advanced Cabinets 541-447-7024 2853 SW high Desert Dr, Prineville, OR

Lumbermen’s Insurance 541-382-2421 965 SW Emkay Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Johnson Benefit Planning 541-382-3571 516 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702

Lapaw Animal Hospital 541-389-3902 www.lapaw@wvi.com

CanalBargeCruises.com, LLC 541-504-6264 www.CanalBargeCruises.com

MST Corporation 541-416-9000 1659 SW Baldwin Rd., Prineville, OR Van Handel Automotive 541-549-0416 127 W. Sisters Park Dr., Sisters, OR Commercial Ceramics 541-323-2902 20554 Builders Ct., Bend, OR 97701 Seventh Mountain Resort 541-419-7902 www.seventhmountain.com

Caudell Landscapes 541-548-7077 www.caudell-landscapes.com

Trailer World 541-389-9849 64601 Bailey Rd., Bend, OR 97701

Sunriver Resort 800-801-8765 www.sunriver-resort.com

Kelly J. Witt Construction 541-408-5683 19430 Apache Rd., Bend, OR 97702 R&H Construction Company 541-312-2961 www.rhconst.com

First Oregon Title Company 541-475-0125 116 SE D St., Madras, OR 97741

Cascade Gypsum & Building Supply 541-389-1054 689 Glenwood, Bend, OR 97702

Moffit Investigations 541-388-1477 560 NE Greenwood Ave., Bend, OR Three Sisters Backcountry, Inc. 541-549-8101 info@threesistersbackcountry.com

Barb’s Helping Hands 541-536-2180 15960 Green Forest Rd., La Pine, OR Bend Veterinary Specialists 541-312-2114 www.bendvetspecialists.com

ADG Bookkeeping Inc 541-317-8389 2994 NE Sady Dr, Bend, OR 97701 Agnes’s Alterations 541-389-9587 1271 NW Wall St, Bend, OR 97701 Affordable Auto Repair 541-548-2991 347 SW 2nd St, Redmond, OR 97756 Allan Clark, LLC 541-771-5535 www.allanclarkllc.com

The Ski Inn Restaurant 541-447-1338 310 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters, OR 97759 Juniper Rock Products 541-447-3534 P.O. Box 119, Prineville, OR 97754

Village Interiors Design 541-549-3431 www.villageinteriorsdesign.com

Gary’s Small Engine & Tool Repair 541-388-3380 61568 American Lane, Bend, OR 97702 McMurray & Sons Roofing 541-385-0695 www.mcmurrayandsons.com

Westside Bakery & Café 541-382-3426 www.westsidebakeryandcafe.com

The Lady Bug Flowers & Gifts 541-548-6188 527 NW Elm St., Suite 2, Redmond, OR O’Keefe’s Company 541-549-1479 www.okeefescompany.com

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory 541-383-1718 61334 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702

Northwest Crossing 541-382-1662 www.northwestcrossing.com

Alert Safety Supply 541-548-6155 416 SE Jackson, Unit 7, Redmond, OR Midstate Fertilizer 541-548-2311 120 SW Glacier Ave., Redmond, OR Gravity Labs Bike Park 541-480-5252 201 NE 2nd St., Bend, OR 97701 Eagle Crest 800-682-4786 www.eagle-crest.com Del Barber Excavation, Inc. 541-504-1100 1686 SW Veterans Way, Redmond, OR Heights Assisted Living Center 541-923-5452 3000 SW 32nd St., Redmond, OR 97756 HCT Contracting, Inc. 541-548-6942 2388 SW Pumice Ave., Redmond, OR 1st Rate Mortgage, Inc. 541-548-8111 www.1stratemortgageinc.com Gerdes Electric 541-548-8426 2602 SW 1st St., Redmond, OR 97756 Cascade Door 541-548-2215 www.cascadedoor.com Century 21 Gold Country Realty 541-548-2131 www.century21centraloregon.com Mid Oregon Credit Union 541-382-1795 www.midoregon.com Tesoro Moe’s Food Mart 541-548-1225 516 SW 5th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Highland Veterinary Hospital 541-548-6114 839 SW Highland, Redmond, OR 97756 CoEnergy Propane 541-738-6733 www.coenergy.net

Bend Garbage & Recycling 541-382-2263 www.bendgarbage.com

Rimrock Trails Adolescent Treatment Services 541-447-2631 1333 NW 9th St., Prineville, OR 97754 Aspect 541-389-4667 1009 NW Galveston Ave., Bend, OR Steve the Appliance Dr. 541-382-7205 86 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 244 NE Franklin Ave., Bend, OR 97701 Secure Storage 541-389-1382 www.securestorage.com Snap Fitness at Brookswood Meadow Plaza 541-389-2550 19550 Amber Meadow Dr., Bend, OR Snap Fitness at Northwest Crossing 541-389-2550 2753 NW Lolo Dr., Bned, OR 97701 White Star Enterprises 541-318-1447 www.wsplaster.com Coactive Partners 541-388-1590 www.easypaywest.com Wright Design Studio 541-389-9178 915 NW Gasoline Alley, Bend, OR 97701 Brightwood Corporation 541-475-2234 335 NW Hess Rd., Madras, OR 97741

Sisters Mainline Station- Chevron 541-549-5400 1001 Railway, Sisters, OR 97759

Leading Edge Aviation Inc 541-383-8825 www.leadingedgeavn.com

Arctic Circle, LLC 541-447-5075 318 NW 3rd St, Prineville, OR 97754 Creative Experiences Salon 541-322-0156 www.creativeexperiencessalon.com R & W Engineering 503-292-6000 www.rweng.com

Jerry’s Outdoor Power & Outerwear 541-382-8947 61561 American Ln Bend, OR 97702 Central Oregon Community College 541-383-7700 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR www.cocc.edu Big Country RV 541-330-2495 63500 N Highway 97, Bend, OR www.bigcrv.com Advantage Dental Services 541-504-3901 442 SW Umatilla Ave. #200, Redmond advantagedental.com Schnitzer Steel Industries 541-382-8471 110 SE 5th St, Bend, OR 97702

Central Oregon Insurance, Inc 541-475-2215 www.centraloregonins.com

Ryder Graphics 541-382-5934 370 SW Columbia St, Bend, OR 97702 Original Pancake House 541-317-0380 1025 SW Donovan Ave, Bend, OR 97702 Severson Plumbing and Mechanical Inc. 541-382-3720 220 SE Davis Ave, Bend, OR 97702 Potter’s Piano Service 541-382-5411 61592 SE Orion Dr, Bend, OR 97702 Soothing Hand Massage, OR Lic# 12423 541-389-2865 19142 Choctaw Rd, Bend, OR 97702 Premier Printing Solutions 541-617-9899 2474 NW Monterey Pines, Bend, OR

Far West Real Estate, LLC 541-447-6294 www.farwestrealestatellc.com

Remax Town and Country Realty 541-549-2500 178 S Elm St, Sisters, OR 97759 Ascent Capital Management 541-382-4847 www.ascentcap.com At Your Site Storage 541-280-6363 P.O. Box 7948, Bend, OR 97708 Active Towing, LLC 541-416-8003 www.activetowingllc.com

Apple Peddler Restaurant 541-416-8949 1485 NE 3rd St, Prineville, OR 97754 Bend Fencing 541-382-4400 www.bendfencing.com Bend Pawn and Trading Co. 541-317-5099 61420 S Highway 97, Bend, OR 97702 Newport Market 541-382-3940 www.newportavemarket.com Three Creeks Computing, Inc. 541-504-1649 6227 SW Buckskin Lane, Bend

To everyone listed, Thank You, and thanks to your support, our local Newspapers In Education Program can continue to deliver newspapers to most Central Oregon schools. Thank you to all of our generous sponsors. If you would like to donate to the local Newspapers In Education Program, please call 385-5800. We thank you, our Central Oregon teachers thank you, and our Central Oregon students thank you.


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n ARCA bio ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AboveNet s Abraxas AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom Adaptec AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntlGp rs AIntGr62 AmLorain n AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Ameriprise AmeriBrg s AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev AnglogldA ABInBev n Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenics Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEnerg ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap ArgonSt AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AspenTech AspenBio AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Aurizon g AutoNatn Autobytel Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw

9.21 +.59 0.44 18.56 +1.12 1.24 51.54 +1.00 7.90 +.28 10.65 +.76 1.12 49.75 +5.48 34.55 +1.59 1.76 39.39 +1.86 0.20 16.24 +.74 1.12 27.57 +2.10 9.14 +1.05 6.97 +.29 23.54 +1.78 4.89 +.61 0.27 31.58 +1.97 1.68 25.67 +.57 15.72 +.93 3.94 +.01 0.09 11.09 +.39 1.25 +.10 0.18 14.35 +.33 4.10 +.42 0.05 21.30 +.74 1.76 49.69 +.97 0.70 42.38 +3.25 0.42 6.40 +.20 47.30 -1.71 2.79 +.33 1.57 +.18 0.72 18.54 +1.28 0.75 41.05 +.73 7.54 +.46 6.30 +.07 0.23 18.01 +1.85 26.21 +2.26 36.02 +1.56 0.15 10.89 +.33 0.04 22.09 +.93 4.51 0.52 42.64 +2.63 18.55 +1.28 3.12 +.18 34.28 +1.86 0.36 26.74 +1.17 0.25 4.74 +.10 0.24 45.11 +1.35 3.34 +.26 12.70 +.67 8.99 +.61 0.08 4.87 +.36 6.33 +.27 2.30 27.38 +.98 0.04 24.67 +1.28 6.72 +.83 13.07 +1.16 28.96 +1.71 1.93 +.25 0.04 29.46 +1.17 79.89 +5.80 6.69 +.56 3.94 +.23 34.19 +2.32 0.18 63.15 +.35 0.11 59.05 +1.65 1.96 72.59 +1.61 5.36 +.41 0.40 11.03 +1.31 0.88 63.46 +1.77 5.21 +.19 0.20 32.39 +2.25 38.38 +2.67 2.61 +.22 43.45 +2.42 0.86 7.95 +.30 0.56 42.65 +3.42 0.34 26.42 +.60 2.61 +.09 0.12 12.59 +.59 3.95 151.36 +4.31 1.40 69.76 +4.75 52.32 +2.07 17.26 +.74 11.98 +.38 0.60 20.60 +.65 0.72 55.60 +4.80 0.20 62.95 +3.64 75.98 +4.48 4.93 +.13 1.20 13.26 +.52 0.48 7.93 +.05 2.16 30.66 +1.29 1.58 33.27 +1.50 78.16 +.16 3.60 +.57 19.01 +.93 0.80 43.74 +.53 3.92 +.42 7.09 +.38 19.37 +.78 0.80 33.32 +1.52 44.52 +3.56 5.73 +.24 1.44 8.49 +.36 .61 -.04 0.20 24.44 +.97 1.40 21.58 +.82 0.07 6.18 +.54 23.86 +1.85 2.80 +.17 2.29 98.83 +5.82 131.29 +6.31 1.50 +.12 30.77 +.96 55.13 +1.08 1.54 25.20 +1.00 35.03 +1.82 1.22 50.48 +2.53 9.28 +.43 1.35 27.65 +1.39 5.70 27.50 +.97 5.85 +.72 0.40 16.35 +.54 1.68 33.14 +1.22 0.08 10.30 +.85 0.72 43.09 +2.49 0.55 28.58 +1.64 0.56 24.06 +1.87 40.98 +2.28 1.93 19.88 +.63 3.38 +.13 21.19 +1.01 6.43 +.33 3.66 -.03 27.30 +2.25 40.86 +2.00 0.84 21.93 +1.22 22.89 +1.27 0.72 45.65 +3.11 0.32 31.06 +1.15 0.42 18.80 +.40 0.24 42.58 +2.36 55.58 +1.12 6.81 +.29 0.06 45.25 +2.78 17.50 +.44 0.36 57.63 -1.25 4.53 +.27 2.33 0.80 29.18 +1.44 0.17 41.81 +.80 0.53 49.89 +4.09 52.77 +2.73 23.74 +1.42 2.69 16.30 +.50 1.44 +.11 44.98 +2.12 1.60 +.07 1.10 +.16 1.08 6.46 +.08 0.60 42.34 +1.21 9.70 +.07 0.60 98.27 +4.74 0.40 22.42 +1.19 .30 +.01 55.24 +.83 1.12 11.37 +.79 253.99+18.13 1.45 +.10 0.60 28.93 +1.83 0.28 13.19 +.69 10.70 +.87 0.58 18.03 +.64 5.58 +.33 0.75 37.00 +3.20 74.47 +1.49 0.40 25.36 +1.52 0.60 26.61 +.67 21.55 +.82 3.20 +.28 32.28 +.20 1.40 14.52 +.65 24.49 +.74 3.71 +.26 13.40 +.69 0.12 28.44 +1.31 0.11 11.04 +.81 3.60 +.15 11.80 +.30 29.37 +1.88 1.35 +.06 4.12 +.18 0.24 20.74 +1.40 12.05 +1.25 15.38 +1.35 14.48 +1.17 8.48 +1.02 0.30 57.22 +3.87 24.87 +1.68 0.60 26.82 +.67 11.27 +.95 3.45 -.07 0.04 14.00 +.94 0.68 13.41 +.41 0.60 36.54 +1.89 0.18 19.98 +2.31 0.52 16.36 +.80 2.30 42.55 +1.32 28.58 +1.13 37.02 +2.42 53.19 +3.74 33.10 +2.86 13.09 +.53 5.49 +.26 1.34 28.13 +.80 31.27 +1.22 5.35 -.07 20.14 +1.11 1.07 +.02 32.40 +2.34 1.20 51.72 +4.21 1.36 42.48 +.92 183.15 +7.07 32.74 +.45 20.74 +1.45 3.57 103.49 +5.75 2.72 +.16 0.80 37.69 +2.04 4.57 -.05

Nm AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BMP Sunst BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s Baidu Inc BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BankFla BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkCrAll2 BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkGlbOp BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blockbst h BlckbsB h Blount BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BonTon BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker BrinksHSec BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownFB BrukerCp h Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing C&D Tch CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNOOC CNX Gas CPI Intl CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR CalAmp Calgon Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CalumetSp CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CascadeB h Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CedarF CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf s CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt

D 12.53 +.79 29.67 +2.18 0.88 29.51 +.92 2.24 +.23 0.84 30.48 +.71 0.68 10.61 +.62 0.60 34.02 +1.78 1.74 30.11 +.84 26.81 +1.67 0.37 6.41 +.60 1.66 70.27 +4.29 1.66 59.33 +4.06 37.50 +.57 36.85 +1.63 5.19 +.25 3.36 48.75 -.31 6.01 +.39 1.50 41.93 +2.94 0.06 12.70 +.92 694.78+55.29 0.60 47.15 +2.90 0.68 37.11 +3.49 0.40 51.52 +2.03 44.11 +2.21 12.60 +.67 1.34 45.24 +2.21 0.59 12.36 +2.04 0.76 18.13 +1.24 0.82 12.09 +2.26 0.20 11.40 +1.18 0.88 21.29 +1.10 0.04 17.30 +1.12 2.05 24.93 +.11 9.87 +.68 3.93 +.21 2.16 25.72 +.30 .74 -.04 1.80 52.46 +1.80 8.58 +1.19 2.80 58.89 +2.59 0.36 31.57 +1.51 1.96 50.21 +2.05 2.25 +.01 0.04 5.21 +.27 39.26 +.52 24.46 +.68 66.37 +4.43 2.03 25.00 +1.12 0.22 19.59 +2.98 80.30 -7.06 25.08 -4.17 0.68 84.55 +1.58 1.00 21.00 +1.17 0.32 19.89 +1.60 0.40 43.91 +1.09 8.88 +1.16 1.16 46.29 +1.17 2.16 31.36 +1.39 .37 -.01 21.36 +1.44 5.61 +.66 0.10 7.72 +.26 0.72 61.46 +1.34 1.48 75.57 +1.91 46.11 +3.20 0.20 27.52 +1.73 7.78 +.62 0.92 28.58 +.88 20.60 +1.09 0.24 27.34 +.88 78.23 +3.82 0.30 32.09 +1.93 0.56 43.55 +2.52 36.88 +1.97 2.86 +.05 31.53 +1.57 7.45 +.33 5.52 -.20 2.49 +.50 51.13 +.74 20.78 +.98 0.56 17.87 +1.18 .42 +.01 2.24 +.15 7.52 +.20 0.38 16.64 +.83 1.44 30.70 +1.32 1.28 10.65 +.43 39.65 +.38 4.00 176.57 +4.45 0.90 9.95 +.34 0.37 3.99 +.14 0.98 8.45 +.44 2.28 19.21 +1.77 0.17 2.00 +.05 1.82 10.60 +.61 1.09 11.96 +.58 1.20 13.18 +1.01 0.60 18.00 +.82 .39 +.01 .31 +.04 11.23 +.54 29.95 +2.03 2.02 28.15 +.71 1.68 71.00 +4.28 6.42 +.44 14.37 +.32 2.96 +.02 2.43 +.23 40.44 +3.35 0.04 7.62 +.60 2.00 80.73 +4.64 6.60 +.22 0.22 11.22 +.21 12.39 +.42 0.60 12.65 +.77 0.44 21.92 +1.14 17.90 +1.47 7.98 +.38 0.56 18.27 +.63 41.73 +1.01 1.28 24.14 -.20 35.70 +2.54 0.32 33.88 +1.89 3.48 +.06 0.56 22.25 -.42 3.11 -.08 6.34 +.30 21.06 +1.36 0.52 25.26 +.50 0.56 15.60 +.81 9.35 +.56 0.31 19.46 +.45 1.20 57.26 +2.10 14.05 +.84 0.05 20.63 +2.14 0.80 35.71 +1.87 0.10 56.98 +4.62 0.42 34.23 +1.00 37.43 -.42 0.84 51.90 +.42 0.25 20.15 +.84 1.34 +.15 0.16 21.14 +.65 16.80 +1.60 0.80 14.94 +1.24 0.20 15.34 +1.13 2.60 +.20 0.40 76.12 +2.82 1.00 60.68 +2.85 0.04 32.65 +1.26 38.57 +2.87 0.24 12.38 +.17 1.00 27.04 +1.05 4.60 333.00+17.81 0.60 15.50 +.43 27.14 +1.46 28.83 +2.38 5.16 168.48 +9.42 38.25 +.12 15.72 +2.67 0.96 55.25 +2.58 0.26 15.34 +1.04 0.34 10.41 +.61 0.35 36.17 +1.31 20.03 +.27 0.40 24.05 -.59 0.72 29.91 +1.74 0.12 33.68 +1.80 48.02 +.86 6.81 +.22 5.63 -.02 0.63 8.63 +.32 2.10 -.01 15.12 +.95 10.24 -.16 0.04 8.98 +.49 5.92 +.97 13.84 +.69 1.82 18.31 +.83 4.66 +.18 1.80 49.73 +3.89 0.28 24.36 +.88 35.99 +.41 1.10 35.80 +.76 1.08 59.31 +3.63 0.60 72.28 +3.20 0.99 57.90 +3.97 15.17 +1.06 45.46 +1.67 0.20 44.20 +2.06 2.09 +.14 0.04 4.85 +.28 2.18 10.75 +.30 1.17 +.03 0.72 67.43 +4.40 0.78 34.96 +1.17 7.60 +.45 8.79 +.39 .52 +.04 11.55 -.07 26.63 +.47 30.00 +1.07 0.64 38.99 +2.49 23.75 +1.52 0.40 39.21 +2.53 0.72 40.72 +2.27 20.09 +.97 31.50 +1.24 .81 +.06 0.34 37.15 +.97 0.14 36.70 +1.56 41.66 +1.93 1.68 66.69 +4.59 0.04 12.90 +.98 26.87 +1.70 15.77 +.65 13.73 +.03 .64 +.03 0.20 28.44 +1.67 6.98 +.29 9.79 +.47 58.86 +1.37 .54 +.05 3.09 28.95 +1.76 7.73 +.23 0.40 11.40 +1.15 0.86 15.94 +1.29 0.80 27.94 +1.69 22.09 +1.06 0.78 14.14 +.39

Nm CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChiElMot n ChinaFire ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChinaInfo ChinIntE n ChinaLife ChMarFd n ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNG n ChNEPet n ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTel ChinaUni ChinaYuch ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp Citigrp pfZ CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC ClayBRIC ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH ClearChOut Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs CogdSpen CogentC Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR CohStRE Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg ColumLabs CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica Comeric wt ComfrtS CmcBMO CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh CompSci Compuwre CmstkHme ComstkRs Comverge Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrgan CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CrescntB h Crocs CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurrCda CurJpn CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CytRx Cytec Cytokinet Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DWS EnCm Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB Cap pf DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo

D 0.03 15.97 +1.30 1.56 13.40 +1.12 30.04 +3.85 26.70 +2.32 0.01 15.16 -.14 2.55 +.29 12.53 +1.20 2.90 33.66 +.63 8.04 +.89 60.80 +1.42 18.36 +1.35 9.18 +.34 84.96 +2.99 2.93 +.32 31.01 +.57 5.25 +.36 20.16 +1.42 32.58 +.65 26.41 +1.22 3.72 +.36 1.70 17.01 +1.22 0.30 23.10 +1.19 2.88 79.89 +2.79 21.05 +2.08 0.16 14.91 +1.04 43.95 +2.78 0.54 4.00 +.18 14.61 +1.06 4.84 +.29 20.62 +1.72 1.96 +.16 8.56 +1.48 13.90 +1.37 11.57 +1.11 3.05 +.24 5.75 -.32 10.48 +.82 1.54 67.49 +2.86 6.58 +.40 11.50 +.54 1.81 49.04 +1.82 7.69 -.71 7.05 +.41 2.64 77.94 +3.66 1.95 +.15 5.38 +.22 4.15 +.33 1.10 47.09 +3.88 0.23 12.37 +.60 0.35 18.58 +1.77 1.83 +.32 136.92 +8.09 14.15 +.46 1.48 51.74 +1.52 1.42 19.62 +.35 0.56 69.40 +2.63 3.34 +.41 16.61 +.51 0.32 67.10 +5.91 3.50 +.16 1.58 27.63 +1.05 0.72 17.75 -.23 0.48 26.90 +1.36 11.98 +1.46 26.13 +1.42 2.13 24.95 +.15 4.22 +.22 1.74 20.22 +.02 1.15 +.09 46.96 +3.34 0.40 61.34 +3.63 0.51 40.95 +2.86 7.71 +.59 15.54 +1.47 62.53 +2.40 10.73 +.55 7.80 +.17 .24 +.00 0.35 61.18 +5.06 2.00 63.51 +2.01 14.12 +.38 0.60 41.07 +2.79 9.21 +.83 0.36 27.39 +1.55 1.76 54.04 +1.37 17.04 +.68 0.40 7.50 +.50 9.64 +.46 9.26 +.19 51.80 +4.28 0.96 13.71 +.71 0.37 7.35 +.58 0.80 11.97 +.82 49.18 +1.77 6.73 +.38 2.12 83.18 +2.97 21.85 +1.15 0.60 15.48 +.81 0.04 22.38 +.63 1.10 +.07 1.59 +.10 0.38 18.03 -.33 0.38 17.12 -.36 0.20 42.63 +2.34 17.25 +1.01 0.20 11.10 +.17 0.94 40.15 +1.30 0.48 15.30 +.78 29.33 +1.46 40.60 +2.41 20.86 +1.57 0.67 68.18 +5.21 1.36 13.57 +.45 1.56 78.79 +3.29 11.85 +.14 14.32 +1.12 .83 +.01 51.16 +1.58 8.10 +.39 2.55 +.33 30.39 +2.01 11.26 +.17 0.40 36.66 +2.09 0.80 24.36 +.78 18.51 +.73 53.73 +4.68 41.22 +1.37 2.93 +.21 2.20 56.67 +1.99 6.05 +.73 0.40 41.70 +3.36 2.38 44.80 +1.06 22.24 +.09 17.41 +.70 0.96 36.10 +1.62 20.18 +1.57 47.91 +4.21 12.02 +.34 1.12 +.03 0.06 36.73 +.48 1.08 48.28 +1.50 0.42 20.22 +1.09 1.09 52.89 +1.02 2.30 24.62 +.80 36.56 +1.83 0.92 20.59 +1.14 14.77 +.50 0.56 34.75 +1.18 0.20 18.41 +.87 0.44 31.54 +1.11 1.57 40.90 +2.39 20.04 +.68 9.51 +.66 5.50 +.70 0.84 57.52 +.21 7.98 +.20 0.13 7.90 +.34 54.94 +1.51 16.59 +.56 21.68 +.58 0.72 44.87 +1.18 1.85 43.29 +3.07 0.32 2.91 +.11 72.72 +6.26 2.30 +.70 10.21 +.37 7.89 +.45 9.88 +.38 37.34 +1.54 25.11 +.91 .49 +.05 37.13 +4.20 20.60 +.45 1.80 58.55 +2.03 0.70 72.13 +6.82 3.16 +.25 127.51 +.55 97.16 +1.82 106.29 -2.14 25.61 +.11 2.17 +.15 34.35 +2.43 11.89 +.52 1.15 +.04 0.05 45.81 +3.17 2.99 +.08 .72 +.05 5.44 +.05 0.28 5.57 +.42 0.78 9.19 +.23 1.21 27.41 +1.24 0.15 13.94 +.88 0.60 40.89 +.81 29.41 +2.29 2.12 47.40 +1.71 0.14 8.75 +.34 48.39 +2.84 12.28 +.85 0.16 84.16 +4.35 1.00 44.38 +1.77 9.02 +.58 64.01 +2.86 0.20 61.49 +1.92 10.47 -4.16 2.71 +.10 136.15 +8.80 8.93 +.30 1.12 59.43 +3.05 0.20 14.90 +.77 13.24 +1.29 15.38 +.37 0.40 28.06 +2.11 12.30 +.60 1.42 +.16 1.00 21.19 +1.29 6.00 -.03 17.34 +.56 43.82 -.09 1.44 +.05 3.50 +.27 0.20 35.71 +1.90 3.70 +.30 0.70 65.55 +6.40 1.90 23.88 +1.07 2.01 24.82 +.80 31.45 -.37 1.05 11.18 +.33 0.08 12.80 +.97 0.64 67.82 +3.24 9.52 +.25 2.36 64.89 +2.42

Nm

D

DiaOffs DiamRk DiamMgmt DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigiIntl DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DirxTcBear DrxEMBll s DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DrxFBull s DrMCBll3x s DirREBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DoublTake DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuneEn rs DyaxCp Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy

0.50 75.42 +2.52 0.03 10.61 +.81 0.36 9.10 +.47 14.07 +1.07 28.36 +1.77 1.08 30.55 +1.63 9.39 -.11 1.92 60.00 +4.42 28.15 +1.59 0.16 26.81 +3.62 36.32 +2.43 20.89 +1.45 37.45 +1.56 7.03 36.95 +4.94 7.78 -1.34 5.77 28.97 +4.76 43.41-12.01 12.48 -2.33 0.15 31.28 +4.23 5.77 38.85 +5.19 0.04 6.40 -1.65 3.08 52.68 +8.95 15.63 -3.71 6.34 -1.26 4.85 55.69 +8.04 13.74 -2.19 8.22 57.22 +6.79 9.90 -1.42 5.18 38.05 +4.23 0.08 14.87 +.79 37.75 +2.50 31.71 +1.83 .47 2.00 21.88 +.58 0.35 35.29 +1.88 0.13 26.67 +1.37 67.80 +4.01 27.72 +.53 48.99 +.98 60.36 +1.63 1.83 41.91 +1.69 13.46 +.89 1.00 66.81 +5.87 0.48 44.77 +2.73 1.04 20.31 +.94 2.96 +.16 9.37 +.37 0.40 16.58 +.95 1.04 50.94 +2.91 0.60 27.44 +1.94 0.60 36.62 +.90 5.51 -.50 37.50 +.67 28.99 +1.48 32.94 +1.30 0.52 4.13 +.14 57.93 +2.93 3.53 +.32 5.42 +.33 1.64 38.24 +2.01 0.32 23.39 +1.44 0.96 16.90 +.35 0.68 13.56 +.78 1.40 76.64 +2.54 .29 3.10 +.09 1.74 +.05 16.78 -.02 1.35 +.16

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EV Engy ev3 Inc EagleBulk EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc s Eclipsys Ecolab EdisonInt EducMgt n EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc h ElPasoCp Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EBrasAero Emcore EmersonEl Emulex EnbrEPtrs Enbridge EnCana g s EncoreEn Encorm rsh EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entergy EnteroMed EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EthanAl Euronet EverestRe EvergrnEn EvgIncAdv EvrgrSlr ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScripts ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FBR Cap FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FPL Grp FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr FannieMae Fastenal FedExCp FedAgric FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FiberTw rs FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird Finisar rs FinLine FstAmCp FstBcpPR FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FstMarblhd FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FstStBcp h FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstrB h Flextrn FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortress FortuneBr

0.25 15.62 +1.24 1.61 +.11 22.33 +.85 18.76 +.68 26.77 +1.31 2.84 42.02 +3.07 0.62 106.49 +5.65 0.88 42.12 +2.34 3.02 30.92 +.56 18.94 +1.68 5.24 +.45 0.10 6.03 -.06 0.64 8.72 +.22 0.04 17.58 +.88 1.76 65.44 +3.79 5.88 +.44 2.00 74.82 +4.57 0.64 33.76 +2.20 1.39 15.62 +.39 1.80 16.50 +.33 1.29 15.05 +.86 1.23 13.05 +.87 1.62 12.97 +.90 1.53 11.60 +.67 1.56 12.46 +.71 1.60 13.83 +.76 15.26 +.56 19.31 +.45 0.62 49.03 +1.29 1.26 33.90 +.87 21.91 +.81 0.20 6.93 +.37 100.91 +3.44 1.22 +.01 0.04 12.04 +.98 6.23 +.21 16.18 +.15 18.24 +.61 0.72 22.90 +.96 1.25 +.19 1.34 50.85 +2.38 11.88 +.21 4.01 48.82 +1.69 1.70 47.56 +1.13 0.80 31.43 +1.15 2.00 17.22 -.37 3.78 +1.38 1.47 +.16 3.65 +.02 21.87 +.81 1.00 36.50 +1.42 3.58 +.16 27.63 +.81 0.52 45.40 +1.80 58.14 +3.36 6.51 +.63 4.61 +.33 2.16 32.13 +.84 3.58 46.88 +1.33 16.46 +.46 0.10 6.95 +.34 2.16 22.82 +.56 0.68 19.39 +.49 24.16 +1.50 0.14 43.03 +1.59 5.73 +.44 3.32 76.66 +1.70 .42 +.01 2.27 33.96 +1.21 2.60 43.05 +2.35 4.91 +.31 10.25 +.18 0.16 32.97 +1.39 98.38 +6.93 1.35 47.00 +3.57 0.28 10.49 +.43 4.13 108.60 +6.05 0.55 62.82 +4.29 0.20 20.50 +1.87 15.31 +.07 1.92 77.10 +2.75 .22 +.01 1.02 9.19 +.11 1.06 +.06 5.94 +.31 0.12 16.34 +.69 5.32 +.43 2.10 42.60 +1.06 7.17 +.67 4.85 -.02 0.28 23.65 +1.65 0.40 41.16 +2.53 104.37 +7.22 26.19 +1.29 0.23 15.92 +.87 3.18 +.19 1.76 65.23 +1.53 17.39 +1.22 19.30 +1.00 68.57 +5.24 4.01 +.03 29.98 +1.54 0.50 64.56 +1.76 65.45 +6.18 0.48 8.96 +.55 2.00 52.62 +1.40 3.53 +.42 40.85 +1.43 0.80 73.46 +2.90 0.08 22.19 +.32 10.51 +.48 0.62 39.64 +.68 1.07 +.04 0.80 53.48 +3.26 0.44 87.72 +4.58 0.20 20.80 +1.64 2.64 78.30 +4.77 0.24 6.74 +.21 0.96 23.81 +.28 8.02 +.58 10.34 +1.32 4.93 +.45 18.59 +1.68 0.72 14.81 +.58 0.20 29.63 +.87 1.28 12.83 +.78 0.04 14.38 +1.07 13.92 +.92 0.16 15.67 +1.11 0.88 35.01 +.52 1.70 +.06 0.04 5.94 +.48 0.80 13.82 +.40 7.71 +.54 3.07 +.27 0.04 15.50 +1.38 0.56 13.50 +.40 130.18 +7.63 .59 -.01 0.08 17.33 +.94 2.20 35.93 +.87 0.64 21.47 +.76 52.70 +1.68 .56 +.02 7.25 +.28 0.70 26.46 +.53 1.16 111.64 +8.14 0.50 48.96 +3.01 16.15 +1.01 0.32 44.41 +2.24 0.60 14.80 +.86 4.62 +.35 12.15 +.64 4.73 +.44 15.07 +1.10 27.18 +.61 26.78 +.87 13.85 +.20 4.85 +.52 0.76 49.58 +2.73

Nm

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrkStPrp FredMac FMCG FresKabi rt FDelMnt FrontrD g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h Genoptix Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GaGulf rs Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GladstnCap GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GloblInd GlobPay Globalstar GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GrubbEl h GpTelevisa Guess GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HRPT Prp HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarbrBio h HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HlthTroncs HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelicosBio HelixEn HellnTel HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HilltopH HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HoustWC HovnanE

D 37.86 +3.91 26.56 +2.15 1.97 20.58 +1.37 0.88 110.98 +6.46 0.76 13.27 +.57 1.34 +.05 1.20 72.50 +4.91 .12 +.01 20.86 +.22 5.50 +.14 1.00 7.72 +.22 14.53 +.66 0.90 33.55 +3.09 28.33 -.47 2.58 +.23 0.28 22.40 +1.34 0.12 10.28 +.41 9.00 +.23 7.98 +.47 11.04 +1.09 1.12 31.63 +1.32 0.20 6.52 +.32 2.98 +.26 6.79 +.26 27.09 +2.14 5.32 +.31 0.44 5.06 +.21 1.68 17.38 +.38 0.14 13.42 +1.26 1.28 25.19 +.90 23.30 +.72 7.24 +.16 0.16 16.04 +.99 0.40 23.75 +1.48 0.20 48.71 +2.71 1.50 35.60 +1.34 23.62 +1.03 .42 +.02 4.47 -.02 27.59 +1.86 45.60 +1.42 21.33 +1.84 5.50 +.28 31.95 +2.84 1.68 73.11 +2.61 0.40 18.04 +1.16 14.77 +.70 0.50 7.68 +.58 1.96 71.93 +2.26 3.99 +.42 3.40 +.21 .36 -.01 29.80 +1.91 0.18 16.22 +.74 0.44 20.80 +1.01 1.64 42.54 +2.85 .64 +.04 16.37 +1.84 51.89 +.12 21.23 +.97 18.00 +.77 7.99 +.56 0.16 15.22 +1.05 5.38 +.31 0.18 7.33 +.23 2.35 -.07 28.49 +2.06 38.38 +.01 0.52 17.57 +1.01 0.84 12.08 +.63 1.94 35.29 +1.09 0.40 6.95 +.45 5.58 +.37 0.08 41.61 +1.13 1.62 +.08 0.40 12.72 +1.19 0.17 12.96 +.38 0.18 43.50 +.72 4.18 +.18 1.40 143.83 +.84 1.08 74.20 +3.81 14.47 +.45 12.83 +.72 521.65+28.51 27.70 +2.13 0.80 34.56 +2.13 16.74 +1.65 2.16 110.71 +5.77 2.69 +.41 5.52 +.38 0.52 31.35 +1.96 3.47 +.22 3.57 +.07 6.10 +.16 1.73 0.07 5.90 +.67 0.83 18.52 +.48 74.85 +3.40 13.36 +1.08 13.49 +.94 1.80 78.48 +2.48 29.81 +3.00 1.70 +.13 1.19 19.25 +1.02 0.64 41.72 +4.11 12.76 +1.03 .93 +.04 44.20 +1.01 0.54 26.20 +1.49 1.86 33.72 +2.70 0.81 149.62+10.87 0.48 7.55 +.44 1.70 49.78 +3.00 27.78 +1.33 19.59 +1.09 0.36 27.59 +.08 7.45 +.36 27.72 +1.38 2.34 +.18 1.00 44.30 +.32 2.50 +.22 38.60 +1.25 20.34 +1.81 .47 +.01 0.40 32.98 +2.80 39.88 +1.11 5.66 +.24 0.06 9.41 +.05 0.88 49.72 +2.92 11.56 +.56 0.82 27.23 +.85 0.20 27.02 +1.72 1.00 40.80 +1.83 4.65 25.98 +.95 1.24 23.08 +.96 7.17 +.05 5.07 +.32 2.72 42.89 +2.34 9.21 +.65 1.20 24.26 +1.83 22.50 +.08 20.57 +.79 16.16 +.67 4.80 0.08 16.25 +.67 5.49 +.07 5.83 +.27 1.68 46.39 +1.44 .63 +.07 14.32 +1.33 0.53 5.37 +.27 0.20 36.97 +1.30 .70 +.04 59.22 +2.22 0.80 46.93 +1.05 3.34 +.25 0.80 9.45 +.14 0.20 5.26 +.47 1.28 47.92 +1.50 12.92 +.91 0.40 59.95 +3.21 38.89 +1.21 0.32 49.10 +2.37 16.05 +1.05 27.52 +1.16 1.70 32.19 +2.23 0.41 30.49 +.56 0.75 25.14 +1.11 11.27 +.20 0.60 26.40 +1.77 16.21 +.39 0.95 35.29 +1.86 33.25 +2.12 2.32 49.66 +2.58 28.26 +2.43 33.13 +.68 1.21 46.07 +2.55 0.84 41.20 +.98 21.28 +1.44 10.79 +.93 53.89 +1.79 1.80 25.11 +1.20 0.04 16.04 +1.30 0.28 6.70 +.29 0.34 11.99 -.44 6.99 +1.04

Nm HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hyatt n Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 1.44 45.29 +2.17 0.60 13.12 +.39 24.99 +2.53 45.95 +1.60 0.48 35.11 +1.07 0.04 6.49 +.48 0.40 10.77 +.85 5.54 +.07 40.98 +1.28 4.38 +.18 1.20 +.28

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ING GRE ING GlbDv ING ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph iShCmxG iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShNeth iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShBRIC iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iSSPGth iSSPGlbEn iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShDJTch iShREst iShDJHm iShInds iShFnSv iShDJRBk iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOE iShDJOG iShEur350 iSRsMic iSSCVal iShSCGrth iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed IconixBr IdenixPh IDEX iGo Inc Ikanos ITW Illumina Imax Corp ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImperlSgr Incyte IndBkMI h IndiaFd IndoTel Inergy Infinera infoGRP Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE Innophos InovioBio Insmed InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntractDat IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune InterNAP IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InterntCap InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare inVentiv Invernss Invesco InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IsilonSys Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng

21.47 +.86 0.06 17.83 +.16 0.46 42.43 +4.07 0.54 7.20 +.37 1.50 11.67 +.60 8.84 +1.79 2.13 22.80 +1.91 0.31 5.74 +.16 5.80 +.48 117.59 -.76 0.66 22.43 +1.59 2.72 69.17 +5.27 0.33 27.51 +1.15 1.05 32.52 +2.83 0.55 20.19 +1.02 0.38 15.35 +.53 0.14 10.22 +.28 0.32 49.89 +3.00 0.24 11.99 +.48 0.70 51.60 +2.83 0.43 19.14 +1.58 0.33 11.75 +.60 1.43 40.72 +2.50 2.08 57.37 +3.30 2.05 38.27 +4.86 0.50 24.69 +2.18 0.21 12.35 +.51 0.42 15.06 +.77 0.40 43.95 +3.10 0.84 57.70 +5.28 18.11 +.11 1.04 52.92 +2.13 1.65 46.40 +1.83 3.63 105.87 -.30 0.55 40.35 +2.11 0.95 81.87 +4.16 2.22 116.51 +5.05 3.91 104.40 -.01 0.58 40.94 +2.75 5.57 105.80 +.66 0.55 41.95 +2.20 0.82 35.97 +2.02 0.82 59.17 +2.60 0.75 34.06 +1.36 0.36 34.74 +1.56 0.75 46.21 +3.02 1.20 56.28 +2.26 3.70 93.60 -1.98 3.83 91.22 -.70 1.39 83.58 -.11 1.44 52.40 +3.19 0.72 40.91 +2.07 0.39 48.64 +2.32 1.22 90.01 +4.43 0.93 79.52 +4.01 8.07 86.06 +1.58 85.26 +2.71 1.93 61.93 +4.12 1.22 61.05 +2.71 0.51 85.31 +4.25 0.69 51.31 +2.20 1.06 64.15 +2.80 1.00 65.76 +3.65 3.84 103.50 +.20 0.42 73.50 +3.61 0.75 69.03 +3.67 0.19 110.16 -.01 2.81 36.89 +.95 1.12 68.57 +2.95 0.73 19.55 +.61 0.25 57.81 +2.78 1.86 52.88 +3.27 0.09 14.65 +1.10 0.78 59.13 +3.06 0.46 59.11 +3.07 0.33 25.92 +1.38 0.68 57.22 +3.01 0.48 33.08 +1.26 0.54 61.07 +3.10 0.79 61.38 +3.19 0.32 43.73 +2.15 0.24 53.81 +2.51 1.00 35.09 +2.49 0.30 44.74 +2.45 0.84 65.81 +3.45 0.30 62.73 +2.90 6.63 +.44 1.28 52.53 +2.25 1.00 52.41 +2.42 104.34 +3.15 17.38 +.99 3.61 +.04 0.60 32.89 +2.01 1.48 -.16 2.43 +.14 1.24 50.24 +2.53 41.89 +1.97 18.21 +.85 8.59 +.45 3.36 +.19 18.51 +1.85 0.08 13.95 -.80 13.10 +1.51 1.01 +.05 31.15 +1.86 1.28 34.35 +1.62 2.78 36.17 +1.32 8.18 +.31 7.93 +.02 24.28 +.99 0.56 60.00 +3.52 0.28 37.61 +2.37 18.02 +.59 0.57 9.15 +.48 0.68 30.13 +1.77 1.28 -.03 .93 +.04 6.22 +.13 5.83 +.18 10.68 +1.06 2.72 48.02 +1.75 0.63 22.55 +1.24 16.96 +.22 0.80 33.00 +.28 123.39 +8.71 26.81 +.87 0.04 13.28 +.89 11.95 +.60 10.37 -.73 5.52 +.37 0.34 21.76 +1.37 2.60 126.27 +4.17 4.59 +.26 1.00 47.04 +1.94 0.24 21.18 +1.21 0.50 24.79 +1.63 22.12 +.96 9.23 +.80 60.00 +3.68 8.36 +.64 0.48 14.34 +.64 26.55 +1.37 35.71 +1.70 344.44+20.12 0.05 25.69 +.14 25.11 +.11 37.97 +1.30 0.44 21.52 +1.41 16.89 +.27 0.69 8.88 +.39 7.97 +.36 0.25 25.11 +1.22 13.51 +1.17 9.69 +.31 0.55 21.30 +1.69 75.79 +3.80 2.80 +.32 16.20 +1.57 10.34 +.80 46.45 +3.53 23.35 +.71 6.42 +.47 27.58 +1.06 11.68 +1.23 0.20 41.95 +1.19 13.91 +.59 1.77 30.02 +.86 1.68 23.31 +.56 0.28 15.40 +1.31 0.38 25.16 +.70 23.12 +1.02 1.89 +.14 45.16 +2.81

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0.04 0.33 0.30 2.16 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70

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1.60 0.31

0.18 0.04 0.50

0.16 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

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0.29

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0.60 1.96 0.60 0.04 0.92 2.52

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10.16 +.19 2.94 +.35 18.65 +1.34 12.98 +.87 29.10 +1.30 2.19 +.01 9.06 +.86 25.10 +.62 5.68 +.36 2.15 +.05 64.75 +1.44 31.88 +2.20 20.41 +1.53 78.97 +6.19 5.44 +.61 53.28 +3.75 28.18 +1.45 6.83 -.54 9.05 -.11 46.03 +4.35 17.56 +1.26 21.39 +1.18 12.53 +.17 8.16 +.66 32.69 +1.55 21.69 +.74 38.72 +2.79 10.56 54.25 +1.41 30.36 +1.98 5.70 +.38 10.10 +.74 8.35 +.47 34.36 +2.15 62.93 +1.93 16.35 +1.34 64.54 +2.04 56.69 +1.64 42.63 +1.59 9.53 -.06 17.37 +.01 41.07 +1.80 5.19 +.72 15.10 +.59 20.83 +.93 13.57 +.62 3.64 +.15 56.55 +2.87 4.03 +.19 14.51 +1.28 16.04 +.87 30.52 +.45 12.46 -.79 3.78 +.13 22.21 +.66 7.51 +.41 10.06 +.76 7.71 +.26 89.26 +2.74 18.61 +1.06 6.96 +.78 19.91 +1.27 6.91 +.16 19.74 +1.11 5.80 +.33 3.20 +.28 12.65 +.79 1.18 +.02 76.86 +1.63 4.59 +.14 1.29 +.08 39.04 +2.08 33.64 +2.16 44.08 +1.84 23.25 +2.06 24.84 +2.00 5.29 +.56 7.55 +.37 36.35 +1.77 14.93 +.67 5.32 +.51 75.49 +2.99 29.95 +2.17 23.85 +1.63 36.14 +1.21 19.76 +2.27 44.44 +3.11 24.12 +1.25 1.26 +.03 1.41 +.04 6.97 +.50 37.21 +2.12 10.00 +.05 1.30 +.10 4.65 +.23 24.99 +.93 24.80 +.99 13.93 +.06 41.17 +2.62 54.24 +2.64 33.24 +2.02 52.27 +2.41 36.95 +1.74 35.40 +1.35 1.66 +.06 35.33 +.93 8.41 +.13 35.15 +.53 4.11 +.18 26.92 +1.99 45.71 +1.61 29.34 +2.70 29.49 +1.26 24.75 +.76 5.12 +.47 6.91 +.35 14.82 +1.02 7.13 -.10 6.61 +.11 3.61 +.41 8.32 +.49 83.62 +2.35 34.98 +1.38 15.34 +.71 31.61 +2.78 79.56 +3.35 10.13 -.19 26.70 +1.39 89.17 +4.53 2.00 -.26 39.09 +3.27 29.47 +1.45 16.37 +.04

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MI Homes MKS Inst MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr MaidenBrd ManTech MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco

2.80 88.46 +4.39 0.04 24.52 +1.51 9.33 +.60 0.11 5.85 +.35 1.00 34.57 +1.94 8.64 +.14 0.63 19.00 +.53 6.99 +.74 12.45 +.91 8.29 +.17 0.96 7.13 +.29 0.58 6.53 +.12 9.59 +1.00 14.00 +.88 14.40 +2.60 20.19 +.62 33.75 +1.32 2.00 44.12 +3.37 1.80 34.80 +2.05 15.39 +.18 0.20 23.97 +2.03 2.84 44.60 +1.09 3.19 +.17 0.18 71.94 +2.81 4.90 +.41 3.14 +.44 21.80 +.87 43.47 -.15 0.23 2.09 +.11 0.08 13.64 +1.25 6.52 +.27 0.74 52.36 +3.26 0.52 18.15 +.85 1.00 31.58 +1.14 11.90 +1.12 23.50 +.75 0.11 50.14 +1.01 0.98 62.58 +4.63 0.08 31.71 +3.05 28.27 +1.10 0.42 41.11 +1.53 0.45 44.53 +3.43 0.31 35.86 +2.97 2.56 29.39 +.79 0.16 35.80 +2.46 0.80 23.01 +.72 0.04 9.06 +.99 6.26 +.47 1.60 93.66 +5.52 19.89 +1.03 0.30 15.13 +1.47

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D 2.00 24.85 +1.12 0.24 35.77 +2.77 11.82 +.99 0.60 230.31 +7.22 0.75 22.49 +1.04 4.16 +.33 0.80 19.02 +.52 4.90 +.20 1.04 39.30 +1.35 25.12 +1.62 2.20 70.58 +2.57 0.94 29.15 -1.13 0.48 66.49 +2.76 11.07 +.44 33.75 +1.13 0.90 51.03 +2.72 0.92 25.52 +.82 24.84 +3.72 7.90 +.40 58.32 +1.61 5.68 +.41 0.80 9.84 +.73 7.54 +.29 0.24 24.20 +1.22 32.24 +1.86 11.12 +.27 59.51 +1.19 0.82 42.73 +1.48 4.25 +.43 0.36 23.30 +1.76 8.63 +.54 49.95 +3.94 4.49 +.09 1.52 34.25 +.76 2.59 +.21 0.76 18.83 +.54 .29 +.03 23.76 +2.48 12.30 +.36 5.93 +.50 0.62 22.64 +1.81 0.74 44.11 +3.40 7.84 +.69 3.54 +.36 0.14 11.12 +.61 1.37 28.87 +1.07 6.11 +.13 9.09 +.52 35.03 +2.08 16.50 +.90 0.52 28.94 +.73 2.98 +.24 2.46 55.24 +2.72 .13 +.01 .34 +.01 0.09 20.00 +.51 7.24 86.51 +6.80 106.15 +.34 0.20 35.00 +1.02 9.35 +.42 9.27 +.15 11.54 +1.04 5.12 +.14 3.57 -.05 21.46 +1.91 60.00 +4.98 0.61 22.02 +1.48 0.61 18.50 +1.11 1.12 42.90 +.94 11.77 +.78 2.97 +.37 1.06 59.16 +.07 16.99 +1.29 0.36 16.23 +.87 0.42 21.77 -1.59 0.20 28.86 +1.11 1.10 14.89 +.69 7.51 +.76 0.20 48.73 +.57 6.94 +.34 2.06 +.06 0.07 4.91 +.35 1.00 55.34 +2.64 21.82 +.48 1.75 17.98 +.48 5.44 +.36 38.65 +.75 11.54 +1.16 12.20 +.48 0.60 15.09 +.50 0.30 6.99 +.50 38.32 +2.50 3.26 +.17 6.71 +.55 22.07 -.57 0.44 12.42 +.47 1.20 30.73 +1.44 20.19 +1.28 0.14 24.14 +1.03 10.50 +1.03 19.62 +.50 0.31 3.07 +.40 14.40 +1.44 1.34 51.02 +3.65 0.40 41.35 +2.24 0.04 7.38 +.61 1.50 22.94 +1.23 0.32 14.70 +.82 1.80 35.53 +1.97 2.16 23.16 +1.31 0.24 6.43 +.43 1.66 16.59 +1.28 50.50 +3.83 13.83 +.88 15.03 +1.09 10.91 +.67 29.51 +1.52 33.93 +2.46 33.64 +1.52 13.50 +1.37 97.51 +6.42 2.42 +.09 2.90 +.33 3.23 +.33 2.52 +.04 22.85 +.70 12.93 -.09 3.08 +.18 .11 -.00 5.81 +.14 93.30 +6.02 1.00 16.13 +.82 9.36 +.42 0.28 12.37 +.17 3.39 +.11 0.20 16.63 +.94 54.78 +3.70 0.40 55.49 +2.10 7.04 +.62 0.15 14.66 +.99 0.15 17.05 +1.03 0.20 22.68 +.93 .41 +.01 .38 +.01 0.92 15.84 +.48 1.08 9.82 +.51 1.02 9.20 +.58 1.86 41.77 +1.41 1.08 76.65 +6.04 14.74 +.51 20.14 +.13 3.98 -.01 0.20 36.78 +1.00 0.72 73.07 +2.27 0.56 11.23 +.48 6.67 +.14 1.45 29.68 +1.40 0.64 43.25 +3.19 1.36 58.79 +3.57 4.22 +.28 1.36 27.84 +.90 1.03 26.33 +.80 15.29 +1.50 1.12 55.11 +3.31 3.12 +.05 1.72 64.88 +2.04 0.40 4.11 +.16 0.40 12.02 +.34 8.34 +.65 1.99 48.51 +1.45 6.00 -.09 2.72 +.37 5.43 +.18 25.18 +1.25 1.41 79.00 +.75 1.60 36.22 +1.25 0.50 29.94 +2.96 40.66 +1.70 17.38 +.96 1.44 46.57 +1.67 0.70 21.72 +.23 0.75 8.01 +.35 0.65 7.31 +.18 14.56 +.60 13.21 +.75 1.45 38.49 +1.75

D

OReillyA h 48.37 +2.02 OSI Phrm 57.46 +.96 OcciPet 1.52 84.16 +3.55 Oceaneer 58.11 +3.40 OceanFrt h .65 +.03 Och-Ziff 0.72 17.26 +.81 Oclaro rs 12.30 +.64 OcwenFn 11.64 +.43 OdysMar 1.39 +.11 OfficeDpt 6.68 +.50 OfficeMax 18.47 +1.85 OilSvHT 1.81 113.83 +3.79 OilStates 45.55 +2.60 Oilsands g .84 +.04 OldDomF h 36.52 +2.41 OldNBcp 0.28 13.00 +.50 OldRepub 0.69 14.17 +.81 Olin 0.80 19.76 +.92 OmegaHlt 1.28 19.46 +1.31 OmniEnr 2.25 +.18 Omncre 0.09 26.78 +1.03 Omnicom 0.80 41.21 +1.99 OmniVisn 16.98 +.79 Omnova 7.48 +.42 OnSmcnd 7.82 +.21 1800Flowrs 2.83 +.28 ONEOK 1.76 48.46 +2.47 OnyxPh 25.56 +1.01 OpenTxt 44.22 +2.58 OpnwvSy 2.39 +.06 Opnext 2.28 +.05 optXprs 16.61 +.13 Oracle 0.20 24.39 +.98 OrbitalSci 17.49 +.84 Orexigen 6.32 +.36 OrientEH 12.42 +.69 OrientFn 0.16 14.79 +1.40 OriginAg 8.40 +.80 OrionMar 17.05 +.96 OrmatTc 0.20 29.70 +1.78 Orthovta 3.39 +.06 OshkoshCp 38.72 +2.41 OvShip 1.75 43.40 +2.78 Overstk 23.19 +1.29 OwensM s 0.71 30.16 +.97 OwensCorn 35.35 +2.84 OwensIll 32.79 +2.34 PDL Bio 1.00 5.98 +.03 PF Chng 0.17 43.79 +2.61 PG&E Cp 1.82 44.23 +1.06 PHH Corp 21.90 +1.73 PMC Sra 8.36 +.35 PMI Grp 4.71 +.61 PNC 0.40 67.84 +3.70 PNC wt 19.29 +1.67 PNM Res 0.50 12.82 +.67 POSCO 1.71 107.10 +5.32 PPG 2.16 67.09 +3.30 PPL Corp 1.40 25.55 +.81 PSS Wrld 22.96 +.69 PacWstBc 0.04 22.18 +.62 Paccar 0.36 44.77 +3.19 PacerIntl 7.18 +.74 PacCapB 2.35 -.09 PacEthan 1.04 +.04 PacSunwr 4.79 +.40 PackAmer 0.60 22.73 +.59 Pactiv 24.66 +1.06 PaetecHld 4.49 +.25 Palatin .32 +.01 PallCorp 0.64 37.63 +2.45 Palm Inc 5.69 -.01 PanASlv 0.05 25.90 +.73 Panasonic 0.13 13.90 +.15 PaneraBrd 78.22 +3.91 ParPharm 27.04 +.36 ParagShip 0.20 4.46 +.24 ParamTch 17.42 +.78 ParaG&S 1.77 +.14 Parexel 23.09 +1.57 ParkDrl 4.83 +.30 ParkerHan 1.04 67.69 +5.44 PrtnrCm 3.89 18.74 +1.41 PartnerRe 2.00 74.67 +1.96 PatriotCoal 19.48 +1.86 Patterson 0.40 30.82 +1.32 PattUTI 0.20 14.09 +.71 Paychex 1.24 30.38 +1.43 PeabdyE 0.28 44.60 +3.67 Pearson 0.55 14.72 +.70 Pebblebk n 19.30 +.70 Pegasys lf 0.12 32.80 +1.66 Pengrth g 0.84 10.41 +.39 PnnNGm 28.00 +1.22 PennVa 0.23 22.90 +1.03 PennVaGP 1.56 17.66 +.57 PennWst g 1.80 18.74 +.90 PennantPk 1.04 9.85 +.83 Penney 0.80 29.62 +2.01 PenRE 0.60 14.80 +.75 Penske 14.32 +1.01 Pentair 0.76 33.97 +1.93 PeopUtdF 0.62 14.97 +.58 PepcoHold 1.08 16.81 +.52 PepsiCo 1.92 66.41 +1.84 PerfectWld 32.80 +.53 Perficient 11.66 +.86 PerkElm 0.28 23.46 +1.23 PermFix 1.99 +.03 Prmian 0.99 18.29 +1.24 Perrigo 0.25 61.98 +4.41 PetMed 0.40 19.93 -.39 PetChina 3.72 115.44 +6.43 Petrohawk 19.85 +1.28 PetrbrsA 1.34 34.25 +2.29 Petrobras 1.34 38.67 +2.18 PetroDev 20.00 +1.15 PtroqstE 6.07 +.26 PetsMart 0.40 32.94 +1.65 Pfizer 0.72 17.00 +.54 PFSweb 4.24 +.45 PhmHTr 7.52 63.60 +1.54 PharmPdt 0.60 26.62 +1.01 Pharmacyc 6.95 +.72 PhaseFwd 16.81 +.10 PhilipMor 2.32 48.35 +1.93 PhilipsEl 0.95 32.30 +3.25 PhlVH 0.15 59.58 +4.78 PhnxCos 2.71 +.21 PhotrIn 4.90 +.34 PiedNG 1.12 26.84 +.59 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.81 +.38 Pier 1 8.16 +1.13 PilgrmsP n 9.35 +.48 PimCpOp 1.38 15.63 +.38 PimIncStr2 0.70 9.04 +.24 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.34 +.70 PinnclEnt 13.41 +.67 PinnGas h .32 -.01 PinWst 2.10 35.50 +.36 PionDrill 5.64 +.16 PioNtrl 0.08 63.89 +5.39 PitnyBw 1.46 24.91 +1.38 PlainsAA 3.74 55.38 +2.03 PlainsEx 25.50 +.73 Plantron 0.20 31.18 +1.14 PlatGpMet 2.46 +.20 PlatUnd 0.32 37.32 +1.27 PlumCrk 1.68 39.17 +1.97 Polaris 1.60 58.39 +3.82 Polo RL 0.40 89.59 +6.85 Polycom 30.55 +1.35 PolyMet g 2.00 +.07 PolyOne 10.40 +.98 Polypore 20.49 +.81 Poniard h 1.27 +.23 Popular 3.48 +.18 PortGE 1.02 19.50 +.42 PortglTel 0.77 9.59 +1.21 PositiveID 1.22 +.02 PostPrp 0.80 27.89 +1.38 Potash 0.40 103.76 +3.79 Potlatch 2.04 36.75 +2.15 PwrInteg 0.20 36.15 +1.27 Power-One 7.74 +.74 PSCrudeDS 67.57 -2.66 PwshDB 23.22 +.44 PS Agri 24.34 +.24 PS Oil 27.11 +.73 PS Gold 42.89 -.25 PS BasMet 20.36 +.43 PS USDBull 24.64 -.06 PS USDBear 25.48 +.06 PwSClnEn 9.47 +.60 PwSWtr 0.12 17.40 +.97 PSTechLdr 0.10 20.61 +1.23 PSFinPf 1.36 16.53 +.54 PwShPfd 1.04 13.47 +.29 PShEMSov 1.65 25.95 +.67 PSIndia 0.13 22.36 +1.29 PowerSec 9.36 +.57 PwShs QQQ 0.21 47.77 +2.36 Powrwav 1.71 +.02 Pozen 8.26 +.09 Praxair 1.80 81.30 +2.42 PrecCastpt 0.12 123.70 +6.70 PrecDril 6.90 +.29 PrmWBc h .80 +.06 Prestige 9.61 +.32 PriceTR 1.08 55.04 +2.53 priceline 249.75+24.36 PrideIntl 27.62 +.85 PrinFncl 0.50 30.23 +2.56 PrivateB 0.04 14.05 +1.02 ProShtDow 49.56 -2.08 ProShtQQQ 41.09 -2.17 ProShtS&P 49.52 -2.39 PrUShS&P 30.87 -3.10 ProUltDow 0.53 47.03 +3.51 PrUlShDow 26.25 -2.34 ProUltMC 0.11 49.83 +4.66 PrUShMC 17.36 -1.98 ProUltQQQ 63.70 +5.78 PrUShQQQ 16.66 -1.84 ProUltSP 0.41 41.10 +3.32 ProUShL20 43.04 +1.72 PrUSCh25 rs 40.98 -5.33 ProUSEM rs 50.54 -8.63 ProUSRE rs 25.25 -3.81 ProUSOG rs 60.24 -5.02 ProUSBM rs 36.77 -4.61 ProUltRE rs 0.50 45.21 +5.31 ProUShtFn 18.51 -2.27 ProUFin rs 0.30 67.51 +6.65 PrUPShQQQ 55.48 -9.43 ProUltSemi 0.19 34.68 +3.50 ProUltTech 0.01 52.67 +4.77 ProUltO&G 0.22 33.62 +2.34 ProUBasM 0.15 33.00 +3.30 ProUShEur 23.55 -4.77 ProShtR2K 38.97 -2.28 ProUltPQQQ 105.86+13.74 ProUSR2K 19.19 -2.43 ProUltR2K 0.04 34.18 +3.46 ProSht20Tr 47.05 +.99 ProUSSP500 29.64 -4.47 ProUltSP500 0.23 166.39+19.10 ProUltCrude 11.75 +.58 ProUShCrude 13.19 -.74 ProSUltSilv 63.52 +.69 ProUltShYen 21.09 +.80

Nm

D

ProUltEuro ProUShEuro ProceraNt ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh ProtectOne ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal n PulteGrp PMIIT PPrIT

1.93 2.48 0.16 0.60 1.64 0.62 0.56 0.72 0.44 0.70 0.61 1.37 3.20 0.64 0.68

Nm 23.86 +.15 23.02 -.18 .51 +.03 62.42 +2.11 40.05 +1.22 32.43 +.41 20.44 +.89 12.23 +1.10 10.98 +.66 39.53 +1.44 15.43 23.46 +2.24 7.45 +.26 12.86 +.77 62.62 +4.47 16.32 +.32 30.83 -.25 31.42 +.72 98.41 +5.45 9.25 +.46 12.23 +1.05 5.98 +.25 6.46 +.25

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN Qlogic Qualcom QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QkslvGs QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RHI Ent h RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadNet RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadioShk RailAmer n Ralcorp Rambus Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResrceCap RetailHT RetailVent RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RigelPh RINO Int n RioTinto s RiskMetric RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RofinSinar RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RosettaStn RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prL RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Rdx In2xSP Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF SpdrBiot Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrSemi SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro SVB FnGp SABESP lf Safeway StJoe StJude StMaryLE Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Schlmbrg Schnitzer SchwUSMkt SchUSSmC SchwIntEq Schwab SchMau SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy s Seanergy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SelectvIns SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech SenHous SenoRx Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr SiderNac s Siemens SierraWr

21.84 +.89 19.56 +1.06 0.76 37.37 +.87 0.12 18.71 +.71 20.60 +.93 2.79 +.19 .66 +.00 0.40 54.93 +.43 17.08 +.64 0.52 46.21 +2.51 8.74 +.14 1.56 17.80 -1.25 12.60 +.34 12.98 +.06 5.22 +.44 0.32 5.16 +.08 3.64 +.26 14.49 +.12 5.29 +.30 .23 -.00 0.82 20.84 +1.10 3.99 +.33 8.30 +.91 25.85 +1.71 17.48 +1.02 3.23 -.09 0.01 10.26 +.86 14.53 -.20 1.01 +.07 0.25 20.73 +.98 12.65 +.82 61.40 +.39 23.74 +1.43 0.17 82.40 -.97 0.16 48.29 +4.44 .83 +.13 0.44 29.66 +1.41 2.00 48.33 +2.71 1.50 56.59 +1.42 4.09 +.13 1.72 31.88 +1.64 28.90 +1.41 24.21 +.35 1.00 15.38 +.70 0.68 62.20 +4.50 0.72 16.42 +.52 1.85 41.75 +2.81 1.78 21.37 +.72 24.65 +1.07 0.59 88.78 +4.55 0.04 8.51 +.52 0.16 18.54 +.89 31.52 +2.19 0.48 50.27 +3.33 0.40 48.01 +2.93 1.00 55.58 +1.52 7.28 +.67 25.36 +1.15 1.18 +.02 .79 +.05 1.37 22.19 +2.37 5.92 +.22 0.76 30.00 +1.05 66.91 +1.99 66.42 +2.79 1.00 6.89 +.62 1.54 102.13 +3.72 10.02 +.62 12.19 +.13 1.93 -.04 3.60 54.01 +1.84 7.27 +.17 14.47 +.88 0.45 49.83 +3.90 22.20 +.36 0.40 21.29 +.68 1.34 +.05 28.53 +1.94 0.52 27.30 +1.74 0.60 51.35 +3.22 1.16 60.04 +3.50 0.96 63.58 +3.43 27.08 +1.68 25.56 +.61 1.28 35.03 +.61 0.38 61.08 +3.60 22.63 +1.63 24.69 -.25 0.64 53.86 +2.36 36.98 +1.88 27.31 +1.04 2.00 58.61 +2.17 15.28 +2.01 1.44 14.88 +.78 32.59 +3.12 3.36 54.57 +2.27 3.36 56.53 +2.39 0.36 49.59 +.49 3.77 +.16 27.11 +3.87 10.40 +.47 4.77 +.41 26.13 +1.53 1.00 44.81 +2.35 0.52 42.69 +2.10 50.01 -4.81 0.12 20.77 +1.62 5.96 +.15 17.43 -.11 0.67 45.46 +1.68 33.78 +1.17 1.90 38.22 +1.44 0.18 22.11 +.65 8.10 +1.02 17.64 +.44 0.40 64.85 +5.60 12.06 +1.02 2.47 108.00 +4.22 117.57 -.70 0.18 25.94 +1.36 1.67 144.50 +7.10 2.21 116.16 +4.90 55.57 +2.05 1.67 49.15 +1.85 0.13 18.39 +1.29 0.25 27.25 +1.55 0.46 40.62 +2.60 0.36 47.71 +2.32 1.79 57.78 +3.67 4.76 38.75 +.73 0.50 23.96 -.02 0.02 45.86 0.36 27.10 +1.45 0.50 42.11 +2.32 0.25 42.63 +2.11 0.37 54.89 +3.17 1.00 65.90 +3.22 21.69 +.60 13.54 +.67 0.28 8.60 +.48 49.48 +3.69 1.87 38.53 +2.75 0.40 23.88 +.58 30.61 +.35 38.24 +1.09 0.10 42.29 +3.52 9.30 +.75 85.49 +7.97 36.38 -.05 9.76 +.78 .60 +.01 41.54 +3.93 6.31 +.06 5.15 +.14 16.51 +1.24 1.63 33.06 +2.16 3.17 +.17 0.35 9.98 +.35 0.44 13.89 +.45 1.19 38.25 +2.39 2.67 +.25 5.30 +.44 11.47 -.34 0.84 66.83 +3.97 0.07 54.48 +3.70 0.17 27.67 +1.19 0.13 30.03 +1.48 0.04 24.63 +1.55 0.24 18.13 +.91 0.60 57.09 +2.08 3.39 +.06 11.55 +.24 0.50 47.29 +1.58 0.30 46.20 +2.11 8.95 -.29 32.45 +1.70 2.21 23.83 +1.97 18.48 +.73 0.48 21.46 +.88 3.55 +.04 1.40 +.12 110.19 +4.71 0.40 11.16 +1.02 12.20 +1.59 9.70 +.20 0.52 16.11 +.80 0.45 28.39 +1.39 4.71 +.35 1.56 47.48 +1.04 17.95 +.87 1.44 22.09 +1.30 10.81 -.06 0.80 29.14 +.75 5.09 +.35 0.16 8.74 +.44 6.99 +.71 44.44 +.79 36.06 +2.08 1.44 79.45 +3.50 1.20 19.09 +1.64 0.34 64.37 +1.75 9.43 +.43 0.19 16.86 +1.44 2.41 94.25 +7.73 7.95 +.34

SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SilganH s SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp SimpsnM Sina Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers SkillSoft SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithIntl SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWds n Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SncWall SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SpanBdc h SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StMotr StdPac StanBlkDk Stanley Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT n StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stereotaxis Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden s StewEnt StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker SturmRug SuccessF SunCmts SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupEnrgy SuperWell Supvalu support.cm SusqBnc SwRCmETR SwRCmATR SwftEng Sybase SykesEnt Symantec Symetra n Symmetry Synaptics Syngenta Syniverse Synnex Synopsys Synovus Sysco TAM SA TBS IntlA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisB n TalismE g Tanger TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData Technitrl TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelItalia TelefEsp TelMexL Telestone TeleTech Tellabs TelmxIntl TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium TerNRoy n Terremk TerreStar TescoCp Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textron Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co 3Par TianyinPh TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany THorton g Timberlnd TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk Toro Co TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi Toyota TractSupp TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransDigm Transocn TravelCtrs

D

0.64 0.42 0.28 0.08 2.40 0.40

0.16

0.78 0.48 1.60 1.20 0.62

0.25

1.12 0.27 0.20 1.82 1.16 0.60 0.02 1.00

0.80 0.52 0.53 0.73 0.41 1.00 0.20 0.59 0.31 1.26 0.20 1.32 0.36 0.40 0.20 0.33 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16

0.44 0.06 0.07 0.12

0.60 0.37 2.52 1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04 0.35 0.04

1.13

0.04 1.00 0.90 0.20 0.82 0.28 0.71 0.60

0.46

0.25 1.55 2.07 0.68 0.13 1.66 0.10 0.40 1.27 1.40 2.93 0.76 0.68 4.78 1.33 0.08 0.25 0.44 0.54 0.86

0.68 0.30 0.48 0.08

1.16 0.28 2.10 0.10 1.00 0.80 0.52 1.60 0.85 0.36 0.02

0.60 0.72 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.28 0.56 1.60 0.80 7.65

Nm 7.37 +.37 11.50 +.55 57.25 +2.83 29.15 +1.05 3.62 +.23 47.02 +1.96 6.20 +.30 19.37 +.51 19.20 +.76 8.02 +.35 90.33 +4.65 32.19 +2.41 34.49 +1.75 6.85 +.41 5.35 +.32 1.08 +.07 38.11 +.94 36.33 +2.24 11.13 14.13 +.00 15.78 +.77 6.15 +.13 6.40 +.33 7.57 +.77 4.21 -.01 50.32 +2.58 44.87 +2.99 9.91 +.37 18.29 +1.27 58.92 +.49 46.51 +3.01 35.40 +1.74 45.77 +1.58 7.71 +.60 19.29 +1.10 38.27 +1.52 15.74 +.76 6.34 +.39 10.79 +.77 11.57 +.53 11.27 +.28 9.52 +.63 32.80 +1.80 2.39 +.17 34.31 +1.41 33.14 +3.82 19.37 +.44 .74 +.14 34.87 +.95 29.72 +2.30 23.15 +.75 12.96 +.57 39.24 +2.08 1.75 +.17 22.52 +1.23 4.64 -.01 21.39 +1.43 7.62 +.38 4.04 +.20 12.10 -.10 45.29 +2.79 32.61 +1.48 30.52 +.80 27.52 +.78 33.86 +1.68 57.34 +2.35 15.93 +.84 31.75 +1.72 22.75 +1.00 30.00 +.90 8.41 +.51 5.92 +.53 61.23 +5.11 36.61 -.18 22.54 +.88 1.78 +.07 27.04 +1.59 50.72 +3.73 18.50 +.63 43.28 +1.94 22.57 +1.18 15.72 +.85 7.63 +.33 1.13 +.04 4.06 +.04 57.64 +2.11 32.86 +.80 5.67 +.17 .85 +.03 16.87 +1.58 34.87 +1.61 6.34 +.42 55.66 +2.48 16.04 +1.67 15.36 +1.14 5.93 +.62 56.86 +2.74 16.74 +.16 20.31 +.98 30.09 +1.49 29.21 +1.34 31.84 +1.26 .94 +.02 31.11 +2.00 15.29 +.94 13.51 +.76 4.77 +.45 12.68 +1.20 11.73 +1.24 29.10 +1.64 25.58 +1.53 14.04 +1.21 13.76 +.36 3.93 +.23 10.42 +.75 6.12 +.20 7.13 31.32 +1.34 41.80 +2.26 19.11 +.17 16.21 +.59 12.72 +.30 11.10 +.24 28.59 +.95 49.13 +2.50 19.94 +1.04 27.79 +1.65 21.99 +.66 2.99 +.21 30.26 +.83 16.36 +1.29 7.32 -.47 17.78 +.87 19.14 +.84 16.12 +.64 13.83 +.27 6.57 +.21 25.86 +2.28 45.76 +2.09 33.60 +3.52 11.49 +.42 16.94 +.89 10.30 +.41 10.54 +.71 16.45 +.83 17.95 +.54 17.14 +1.06 42.73 +2.70 25.05 +.64 56.67 +2.37 5.35 +.35 4.65 +.24 19.70 +2.11 42.48 +2.71 41.14 +1.64 4.41 +.30 38.53 +3.62 24.96 +1.87 11.41 +.70 15.10 +.51 6.04 +.14 14.15 +.60 7.73 +.29 13.08 +1.27 63.67 +6.53 14.48 +.59 12.22 +1.69 15.47 +.43 8.68 +.52 19.00 +.85 21.26 +1.70 9.44 +.30 33.53 +3.15 39.07 +2.33 5.61 +.29 23.25 +1.91 30.89 +1.48 11.87 +.86 25.01 +2.46 39.14 +3.81 12.07 +.59 7.70 +.45 .60 +.02 11.99 +.69 12.79 +.47 19.09 +.59 23.66 +1.21 11.76 +.96 59.18 +2.00 36.10 +2.17 25.82 +1.08 14.45 +.79 22.39 +2.01 14.75 +.35 54.20 +2.79 40.80 +1.93 11.26 +.41 37.66 +1.57 33.71 +2.04 40.78 +1.97 85.97 +3.34 9.69 +.45 3.02 +.04 11.47 +.60 49.92 +1.48 46.62 +3.07 32.87 +1.25 21.33 +.98 49.67 +.20 31.49 +1.24 32.29 +2.18 11.57 +.67 16.60 +1.20 16.49 +.88 22.38 +1.68 53.15 +4.05 52.70 +.86 72.04 +3.26 51.46 +3.75 15.52 +.57 21.55 -.80 1.61 +.23 76.75 +1.86 66.77 +3.69 7.93 +.34 34.92 +1.33 48.14 +1.75 3.73 +.07 54.10 +3.25 66.34 -1.67 3.29 -.19

D

Travelers TreeHse n Trex TriValley TricoMar TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Triumph TrueRelig TrstNY Trustmk TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

1.44 50.09 +.83 44.83 +.41 23.13 +1.36 1.29 +.22 1.60 -.03 1.75 +.18 29.80 +1.33 22.19 +2.26 0.32 23.52 +2.27 6.99 +.36 0.16 72.80 +3.54 27.83 +1.88 0.25 6.91 +.39 0.92 23.66 +1.16 5.19 +.58 1.00 47.41 +3.91 0.66 14.73 +.78 0.64 29.55 +1.57 0.80 37.77 +1.11 0.16 18.24 -.38

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp URS US w U G U G U U G U W w U m U U Um U m U N U U U U U G U M U O U U R U U U NG U O U U U U W U G U H U U mG U mR U O

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Watchmaker

detent tourbillon, which is one of the most complicated pocket watch designs. The world’s best watchmakers charge close to $85,000 for a tourbillon, Myrick said. His would retail for about $75,000, he estimated. While working on the new watch in his spare time, Myrick supports himself by buying, restoring and selling high-quality antique watches, or by servicing watches for customers. His repair work ranges from $175 to a few thousand dollars, and he works for both commercial businesses and private individuals. Myrick’s shop is located inside Beacham’s Clock Co. on West Hood Avenue in Sisters. It is something that worked to Myrick’s benefit, because he is able to use Beacham’s lathe — an expensive and useful device for manufacturing watch parts — among other tools. Many of the watches that come across Myrick’s desk are the best brands in the world, such as Hamilton or Rolex. But many people who own those brands, Myrick said, think the watches never need servicing because the best watches will keep running, despite having never been serviced. But without having maintenance done every five to seven years, Myrick said, the metals in a watch will grind into each other and wear. “Would you go 25,000 miles without changing your oil?” he said. Though the most common image of a watchmaker is that of an elderly man bent over a table, with a large magnifying glass to his eye, that image will soon be changing, Myrick said, except for the magnifying glass, that is. “You’re going to see a new generation of watchmaker coming out,” he said. Gresseth, the horology instructor, agreed, adding that

Continued from B1 With his watchmaking certificate in hand, he opened a repair and manufacturing business, KM Independent Watchmaking, in Sisters more than a year ago. There, he refurbishes and repairs old watches, and occasionally finds time to work on creations of his own. “This is the first thing I found that I can’t stop doing,” said Myrick, who graduated from Bend High School 1999. “I have the complete freedom of creation.” Not everyone who loves something is able to practice it professionally. Luckily for Myrick, he has the steadiness of a surgeon’s hands, as well as ambidexterity. While burnishing the gear’s pivot, he made the gear rotate with his left hand and rocked the carbide burnisher back and forth on top of the pivot with his right hand. “It’s kind of like patting your head and rubbing your belly,” Myrick said. The phrase “watchmaker” is somewhat of a misnomer in the U.S., according to Erik Gresseth, an instructor in the horology (watchmaking) department at North Seattle Community College in Washington. Although watchmakers in Europe do actually manufacture watches — the best known are the Swiss — most watchmakers in the U.S. are primarily repairmen, Gresseth said. “The American terminology has always kind of referred to someone who works on watches,” Gresseth said. Myrick hopes to be the exception to that. He has made one watch, a prototype that he manufactured while in school in Pennsylvania. Now he’s working on another: a one-minute spring

Dash

Continued from B1 The United States indexes opened sharply higher and stayed there. The Dow Jones industrial average soared 404.71 points, or 3.9 percent, to 10,785.14. It was the largest point gain since March 23, 2009, when the Dow closed up 497.48 points as it was recovering from lows that month. The Standard & Poor’s 500stock index rose 48.85 points, or 4.4 percent, to 1,159.73, and the Nasdaq composite index climbed 109.03 points, or 4.81 percent, to 2,374.67. After rallies in Asia and Europe on Monday, Wall Street was primed for a rowdy opening. Traders said they returned to their desks early on Monday and were deluged with orders. Phones rang nonstop. Market strategists held conference calls with institutional investors and reset their portfolios. Treasuries sold, the financial sector rallied, and market indexes jumped. “We were busy at 6:30, already busy trading,” Conroy said, adding, “Normally there would be just a couple of orders, but this morning, multiply that exponentially.” The rally in the United States was preceded by renewed market confidence in Europe, where

Q:

What made you want to go to watchmaking school and work in the field professionally? I was challenged by it. Before I went to watchmaking school, I was changing jobs every couple of months. I don’t want to bus tables. I don’t want to carry your golf bag. ... This is an industry that you don’t get into because you need money. You get into it because you’re passionate about it.

A:

SEC says exchanges agree to new rules NEW YORK — The major securities exchanges put aside some of their differences Monday and agreed to coordinate trading rules to prevent stock plunges like last week’s historic dive. The Securities and Exchange Commission said the six exchanges agreed in principle during a meeting with regulators to a uniform system of “circuit breakers.” Those are restrictions that would curb trading when a stock index or individual stock or other security rises or falls to a specified level in the course of a trading day. Four days after the plunge that sent the Dow Jones industrials down to a loss of nearly

1,000 points in less than 30 minutes, regulators were still saying publicly that they did not know the exact reason for the drop. But there is a growing belief that the varying trading rules on different exchanges contributed to the intensity of the selling and the size of the market’s slide. People familiar with the situation said regulators believe the disruption was caused by the way different exchanges manage their trades and rapid price swings. A definitive answer could take weeks because regulators are going through information from across the market by hand, said the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the investigation. — The Associated Press

shares jumped on word of the nearly $1 trillion support package from the European Union and the International Monetary Fund, which was followed by a pledge by the European Central Bank to intervene in the bond markets. The moves also took the pressure off the euro, which bounced back from 14-month lows. Some investors said they were

still waiting on the sidelines, fearful that European leaders had just papered over the growing problems in Greece, Portugal and Spain, using new debt to cover old debt. “At least for the moment it puts aside any concerns,” said one cautious investor, Marc Harris, cohead of global research at RBC Capital Markets.

Continued from B1 Automakers are required to notify the NHTSA within five working days of learning that their vehicles have a safety defect. Toyota explained at the time that the first recall was issued only in Japan because the company had no similar information

regarding the defect in the United States. Moreover, the company said, it thought the problem was unlikely to appear in the United States because Japanese drivers do more close-quarters maneuvering, such as for narrow parking spaces, that would put more stress on the steering. On Friday, according to the NHTSA, the agency was alerted to 41 complaints filed by U.S. consumers prior to the 2004 recall in

Japan, indicating that Toyota had information at the time indicating a recall was necessary. “NHTSA has taken swift action since first receiving copies of these complaints on Friday,” NHTSA Administrator David Strickland said. Toyota said in a statement that it “is reviewing the information request from NHTSA and will cooperate with the agency’s investigation.”

new audio and video widgets, too. If you’re a Netflix member, you can watch all your Instant movies right on the Dash. Music from Pandora and Slacker, Amazon Video On Demand, YouTube and others are available, too. Your instinct may say, “But why do I need this? Don’t I already have a TV, a phone and a computer?” But as Sony points out, people said the same thing about the Apple iPad (first month sales: 1 million units). And if the Dash were that quick and satisfying to use, it, too, might change your mind about having a fourth screen in your house. Unfortunately, the Dash is

not quick or satisfying. Actually, “unfortunately” isn’t the word. Considering how much of Sony’s future is riding on the Dash’s puny shoulders, “tragically” might be more apropos. Apparently, electronics companies still haven’t realized that Slow Chip + Balky Touchscreen = Consumer Buzzkill. You know the drill: You touch the screen, but there’s no immediate response and no progress indicator, so you’re not sure if the thing “heard” you. It’s not a recipe for delight in your new purchase. Software problems haunt the Dash in other ways, too. The Dash’s screen still huffily directed me to the Dash’s poorly

designed website to register, even an hour after I had done so. When you try Pandora, the Dash screen directs you to sign up at a Web address that doesn’t exist. Over and over again, you run into places where Sony apparently forgot that the Dash has a touch screen. Sony is well aware of the Dash’s problems. “The experience, to be completely frank with you, is good,” says a product manager, “but it needs to be much better. That’s a 24/7 commitment from this company to make that happen.” He swears that software fixes will come early and often. If he’s right, the Dash could be great someday.

What about it do you like?

I have the complete freedom of creation. And there’s no rules. There’s no rules here. I can do what I want. I can create how I want. It’s just like music. It’s this freedom. This is who I am, and this is how I’m playing. At the end of the day, if the hands go around the dial at the right speed, that’s the only rule.

Toyota

David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

with company managers. “Sony has missed a lot of transitions — from the Walkman to the iPod and so on,” conceded one. “We have recently struggled to be fast and innovate in such a big company.” The Dash is supposed to represent the new Sony Way. It was designed in California, not Japan. It didn’t meander through years of hidebound committee meetings. Instead, it was fasttracked by a nimble, independent team of “very young executives, as a skunkworks project,” says the company. More products like it are on the way. The Chumby seems like a peculiar poster child for this new

Continued from B1 (A second Chumby model is now available for $120 with builtin FM radio and optional battery — minus the beanbag.) The Sony Dash is a bigger, nicer-looking update of this bizarre little gadget. That’s what it does. What it represents, though, is rather eyebrow-raising: Apparently, the Dash is the foundation of Sony’s new design pipeline. The Dash, in fact, is so important to Sony that reviewers were not permitted to see it without first enjoying a conference call

Markets

Rolex invested $1 million into North Seattle Community College’s horology program in 2000. He said the company began investing similarly in colleges nationally, in order to promote interest in the field. Myrick, who worked mostly service jobs before attending horology school in Pennsylvania, worked for Rolex for a year before moving back to Central Oregon to start KM Independent Watchmaking. He said he loves the area and sharing the shop with the Beachams. After all, the watchmaker’s world doesn’t take up all that much space. “My entire world is about a square foot,” he said. The Bulletin asked Myrick the following questions:

Q: A:

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 B5

way of doing things, but hey — whatever floats Sony’s boat. The real question is: How is it? It looks great. It’s a glossy black wedge with a much bigger touch screen (7 inches) than the Chumby. If you lay the Dash on its back, the picture flips around to remain upright even in this new wedge mode. The big rubber Menu button on top doubles as a Snooze button when the Dash is your alarm clock. The Chumby requires that you choose your preferred widgets on your computer, from a website; but you can also do that right on the Dash’s screen, which is terrific. Sony has added some great

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

12 14 82 ... 44 ... ... 26 22 52 21 14 37 21 ... 11 59 ... 14 ... 15

YTD Last Chg %Chg 43.45 20.85 17.30 15.00 71.00 .81 33.07 53.87 57.52 2.60 29.98 49.10 15.21 22.55 8.35 22.21 5.29 10.13 19.00 8.63 28.94

+2.42 +.61 +1.12 +.52 +4.28 +.06 +4.41 +2.11 +.21 ... +1.54 +2.37 +.53 +1.24 +.47 +.66 +.56 -.19 +.53 +.54 +.73

+25.7 -3.4 +14.9 +22.1 +31.2 +19.1 +20.3 +38.0 -2.8 +8.3 -8.4 -4.7 +14.3 +10.5 +50.5 +8.2 +95.9 +45.1 -19.5 -2.3 -5.1

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

22 22 17 47 ... ... 40 19 ... 86 21 10 27 21 ... 25 ... 13 ... ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1200.00 $1200.40 $18.530

Pvs Day $1210.00 $1210.00 $18.429

Market recap 76.65 43.25 45.05 18.47 44.77 2.27 39.17 123.70 23.88 54.48 79.45 45.29 27.04 6.99 13.20 26.54 18.99 32.97 3.05 47.43

+6.04 +3.19 +1.55 +1.85 +3.19 +.04 +1.97 +6.70 +.58 +3.70 +3.50 +2.79 +1.59 +.36 +.59 +1.39 +1.15 +2.15 +.03 +2.76

+16.0 +15.1 ... +45.5 +23.4 -19.2 +3.7 +12.1 +12.2 +14.2 +28.9 +13.2 +17.3 +16.5 -1.6 +17.9 -1.8 +22.2 +45.2 +9.9

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm iShEMkts SPDR Fncl

Vol (00)

Last Chg

10030877 3428229 2556952 1776409 1693157

4.22 +.22 116.16 +4.90 17.30 +1.12 40.94 +2.75 15.93 +.84

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

MLSel10 5-12 8.23 +2.03 ING 8.84 +1.79 BcoSantand 12.09 +2.26 OwensC wtB 4.10 +.77 MI Homes 14.40 +2.60

+32.7 +25.4 +23.0 +22.9 +22.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name DeanFds BkA BM RE DirEMBr rs DirLatBear DirREBear

Last

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g NwGold g Rentech NovaGld g CFCda g

Last Chg

41830 4.18 38444 5.81 34196 1.18 33464 8.34 28449 15.16

+.18 +.14 +.02 +.65 -.14

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Last Chg

PwShs QQQ SiriusXM Intel Microsoft Cisco

1256982 1091186 1031339 815504 718207

47.77 +2.36 1.08 +.07 22.55 +1.24 28.94 +.73 26.13 +1.42

Gainers ($2 or more) Name ChiGengM NewConcEn HawkCorp GenMoly US Gold

Last

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.26 +.46 +25.6 4.44 +.49 +12.4 23.52 +2.57 +12.3 3.99 +.42 +11.8 3.65 +.38 +11.6

Name

-28.4 -23.9 -21.7 -21.3 -20.5

LucasEngy PernixTh TravelCtrs ASpecRlt s EngySvcs

3,012 175 31 3,218 57 7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Name

Last

Tongxin wt BioFuelEn RockAgs FstFrnkln ProPhaseL

Chg %Chg

2.25 +.50 +28.6 2.49 +.50 +25.1 4.12 +.75 +22.1 13.00 +2.30 +21.5 2.24 +.39 +21.1

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

2.00 3.44 3.29 12.10 3.55

-.26 -11.5 -.42 -10.9 -.19 -5.5 -.68 -5.3 -.14 -3.8

Primoris un PrUPShQQQ SecNtl lf TowrFin QCR Hld

Last

407 95 34 536 9 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

10.47 -4.16 2.42 -.76 43.41 -12.01 38.92 -10.52 6.40 -1.65

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

9.31 -1.79 -16.1 55.48 -9.43 -14.5 2.35 -.40 -14.5 6.25 -.81 -11.5 11.59 -1.37 -10.6

Diary 2,458 328 69 2,855 38 15

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,971.98 325.67 5,552.82 1,419.58 1,664.19 869.32 8,900.27 470.37

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,785.14 4,535.83 381.65 7,257.62 1,866.22 2,374.67 1,159.73 12,148.67 689.61

+404.71 +237.71 +10.80 +341.44 +73.85 +109.03 +48.85 +527.99 +36.61

YTD %Chg %Chg +3.90 +5.53 +2.91 +4.94 +4.12 +4.81 +4.40 +4.54 +5.61

52-wk %Chg

+3.42 +10.64 -4.11 +1.01 +2.26 +4.65 +4.00 +5.20 +10.27

+28.11 +40.79 +9.89 +24.08 +25.26 +37.17 +27.55 +30.50 +37.39

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

Dollar vs:

Exchange Rate

335.24 2,511.98 3,720.29 5,387.42 6,017.91 20,426.64 32,276.92 20,971.21 3,170.62 10,530.70 1,677.63 2,880.48 4,622.20 5,720.34

+7.33 s +9.37 s +9.66 s +5.16 s +5.30 s +2.54 s +2.50 s +11.28 s +.37 s +1.60 s +1.83 s +2.10 s +2.55 s +4.25 s

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9014 1.4881 .9756 .001894 .1464 1.2804 .1285 .010742 .079898 .0328 .000868 .1329 .9021 .0317

Pvs Day .8883 1.4808 .9585 .001876 .1464 1.2731 .1285 .010946 .077948 .0327 .000875 .1302 .9017 .0315

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.30 +0.73 +5.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.75 +0.20 +3.3 GrowthI 22.97 +1.04 +4.2 Ultra 19.95 +0.87 +2.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.37 +0.70 +4.6 AMutlA p 23.69 +0.79 +2.9 BalA p 16.73 +0.40 +3.8 BondA p 12.04 +3.5 CapWA p 19.87 +0.22 -0.1 CapIBA p 46.88 +1.45 -1.2 CapWGA p 32.61 +1.64 -3.9 EupacA p 36.65 +1.98 -4.4 FdInvA p 33.27 +1.42 +2.0 GovtA p 14.21 -0.05 +2.7 GwthA p 27.90 +1.14 +2.1 HI TrA p 10.89 +0.08 +5.1 IncoA p 15.59 +0.41 +1.7 IntBdA p 13.31 -0.03 +2.2 ICAA p 26.25 +1.03 +1.7 NEcoA p 22.63 +1.10 +0.6 N PerA p 25.25 +1.12 -1.5 NwWrldA 47.28 +2.26 +0.2 SmCpA p 33.29 +1.47 +5.6 TxExA p 12.16 -0.01 +2.4 WshA p 25.28 +0.90 +3.2 American Funds B: CapIBB t 46.86 +1.45 -1.5 GrwthB t 26.99 +1.09 +1.8 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 26.98 +1.30 -4.5 IntlEqA 26.32 +1.27 -4.5 IntEqII I r 11.17 +0.61 -5.2 Artisan Funds: Intl 18.85 +1.14 -8.8 MidCap 27.18 +1.53 +6.3 MidCapVal 18.65 +0.77 +3.7 Baron Funds: Growth 44.40 +1.85 +7.5 SmallCap 20.78 +1.02 +7.9 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.60 -0.01 +4.2 DivMu 14.48 -0.01 +1.7 TxMgdIntl 14.28 +0.82 -6.5 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.04 +0.61 +1.8 GlAlA r 17.92 +0.46 +0.2 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.72 +0.42 -0.1 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.00 +0.45 +0.2 CGM Funds: Focus 28.86 +1.77 -3.0 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 45.81 +1.75 +3.0 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.92 +1.33 +8.1 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.70 +1.37 +8.2 AcornIntZ 34.77 +1.48 +1.5 ValRestr 43.52 +2.17 +1.8 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.90 +0.54 -2.2 USCorEq2 9.91 +0.46 +8.6 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.76 +1.34 +2.5 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.10 +1.35 +2.6 NYVen C 30.65 +1.28 +2.2 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.47 +0.03 +3.6 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.44 +1.04 +1.2 EmMktV 31.49 +1.91 +0.2 IntSmVa 15.13 +0.72 +0.3 USLgVa 18.57 +0.81 +9.1 US Micro 11.91 +0.62 +12.8 US Small 18.56 +0.95 +12.7 US SmVa 22.54 +1.32 +14.9 IntlSmCo 14.45 +0.61 +1.6 Fixd x 10.33 -0.01 +0.5 IntVa 16.33 +1.05 -4.1 Glb5FxInc 11.28 -0.02 +2.7 2YGlFxd 10.21 +0.7 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.05 +2.09 +3.8

Income 13.14 IntlStk 31.18 Stock 99.66 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.36 NatlMunInc 9.72 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 17.41 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.96 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.01 FPACres 25.41 Fairholme 34.35 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.79 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.71 StrInA 12.24 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.88 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.76 FF2015 10.63 FF2020 12.80 FF2025 10.60 FF2030 12.63 FF2035 10.45 FF2040 7.29 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.91 AMgr50 14.20 Balanc 16.97 BlueChGr 39.72 Canada 50.95 CapAp 22.83 CpInc r 8.86 Contra 60.00 DisEq 21.59 DivIntl 26.69 DivGth 25.14 EmrMk 22.37 Eq Inc 41.40 EQII 17.18 Fidel 29.39

+2.6 +1.80 -2.1 +4.26 +4.0 +0.72 +4.0 -0.01 +4.0 +0.72 +4.1 +0.29 -0.7 -0.01 +1.7 +0.44 +2.4 +1.20 +14.2 +0.24 +2.8 +0.77 +2.9 +0.05 +2.5 +0.77 +3.0 +0.30 +0.26 +0.38 +0.35 +0.45 +0.41 +0.28

+2.7 +2.7 +2.7 +2.7 +2.6 +2.5 +2.5

+0.53 +0.34 +0.46 +1.94 +2.26 +1.10 +0.13 +2.64 +0.97 +1.50 +1.26 +1.39 +1.95 +0.81 +1.33

+4.1 +2.9 +4.2 +4.7 +5.1 +6.5 +5.0 +3.1 +2.8 -4.7 +6.2 -1.1 +6.1 +5.6 +3.8

GNMA 11.60 GovtInc 10.57 GroCo 72.01 GroInc 16.77 HighInc r 8.61 Indepn 21.01 IntBd 10.39 IntmMu 10.23 IntlDisc 28.93 InvGrBd 11.55 InvGB 7.23 LgCapVal 11.72 LatAm 49.16 LevCoStk 25.10 LowP r 34.29 Magelln 66.45 MidCap 26.16 MuniInc 12.63 NwMkt r 15.29 OTC 47.69 100Index 8.19 Ovrsea 29.04 Puritn 16.67 RealE 24.00 StIntMu 10.65 STBF 8.40 SmllCpS r 17.08 StratInc 10.91 StrReRt r 8.78 TotalBd 10.74 USBI 11.24 Value 62.86 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 45.91 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 33.30 500IdxInv 41.10 IntlInxInv 31.45 TotMktInv 33.24 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.10 TotMktAd r 33.24 First Eagle: GlblA 41.33

-0.02 +3.2 -0.04 +2.6 +3.58 +4.4 +0.78 +4.5 +0.06 +4.2 +1.21 +5.5 -0.02 +3.6 -0.01 +2.0 +1.72 -4.7 -0.02 +3.5 -0.01 +3.9 +0.47 +4.2 +3.16 -5.2 +1.30 +9.5 +1.40 +7.4 +3.23 +3.4 +1.44 +11.7 -0.01 +2.9 +0.20 +3.8 +2.27 +4.3 +0.32 +3.3 +1.69 -6.1 +0.46 +4.3 +1.60 +19.4 +0.9 -0.01 +1.8 +0.94 +7.2 +0.04 +2.6 +0.12 +3.2 +3.9 -0.03 +2.8 +3.25 +10.4 +0.94 +8.1 +1.67 +10.6 +1.73 +4.7 +1.68 -5.9 +1.44 +5.7 +1.73 +4.7 +1.44 +5.7 +0.96 +3.4

OverseasA 20.07 +0.35 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.87 -0.01 FoundAl p 9.61 HYTFA p 10.11 -0.01 IncomA p 2.04 USGovA p 6.72 -0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.03 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.05 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.71 +0.70 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.17 +0.35 GlBd A p 13.41 +0.36 GrwthA p 16.31 +0.78 WorldA p 13.60 +0.62 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 16.31 +0.77 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.43 +0.36 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 37.73 +1.53 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.01 +0.58 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.33 +0.76 Quality 19.01 +0.57 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 31.68 +1.68 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.03 +0.03 HYMuni 8.59 -0.02 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.50 +0.01 CapApInst 33.20 +1.59 IntlInv t 51.43 +3.00 Intl r 51.95 +3.03 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.91 +1.26 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 27.55 +1.11 Hartford Fds Y:

+3.1 +2.7 NA +4.3 NA +2.9 +7.0 NA NA +3.4 -5.8 +6.9 -3.0 -2.6 -2.9 +6.7 +2.4 -1.7 +0.6 -1.7 +9.3 +4.0 +6.9 +3.4 +0.7 -5.4 -5.3 +0.7 +0.5

CapAppI 30.86 +1.25 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.64 +1.70 Div&Gr 18.13 +0.67 Advisers 18.16 +0.49 TotRetBd 10.95 -0.02 HussmnStrGr 12.80 -0.19 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.31 +0.48 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.11 +0.53 AssetStA p 21.66 +0.55 AssetStrI r 21.82 +0.55 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.30 -0.03 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.30 -0.02 HighYld 7.91 +0.06 IntmTFBd 10.91 -0.01 ShtDurBd 10.92 -0.01 USLCCrPls 18.84 +0.83 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 26.66 +1.13 OvrseasT r 43.83 +2.39 PrkMCVal T 20.92 +0.78 Twenty T 61.80 +3.12 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.04 +0.53 LSBalanc 12.12 +0.33 LSGrwth 11.78 +0.41 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.55 +1.20 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.63 +0.98 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 18.89 +1.00 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.02 +0.03 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.25 +0.98 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.79 +0.12 StrInc C 14.33 +0.14 LSBondR 13.74 +0.12 StrIncA 14.26 +0.14

+0.8 +2.8 +3.3 +3.9 +3.5 +0.2 +1.9 -3.1 -2.8 -2.7 +3.0 +3.1 +4.9 +1.3 +1.3 +3.6 +1.5 +3.1 +5.7 +0.3 +2.5 +3.2 +2.9 +8.7 +3.4 +3.3 +3.0 +9.0 +5.5 +5.0 +5.4 +5.3

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.06 +0.05 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.79 +0.49 BdDebA p 7.49 +0.07 ShDurIncA p 4.59 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.46 +0.30 ValueA 21.47 +0.84 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.57 +0.84 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.71 +0.02 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.87 +0.34 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.29 +0.79 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.33 TotRtBdI 10.33 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 12.52 +0.59 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.31 +1.04 GlbDiscZ 27.65 +1.06 QuestZ 17.61 +0.57 SharesZ 19.87 +0.70 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.07 +1.65 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 41.60 +1.71 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.31 +0.65 Intl I r 17.10 +0.84 Oakmark r 39.46 +1.52 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.43 +0.14 GlbSMdCap 13.24 +0.61 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 39.51 +1.75 DvMktA p 28.86 +1.47 GlobA p 53.42 +2.55 IntBdA p 6.24 +0.08 MnStFdA 28.80 +1.19 RisingDivA 14.24 +0.53

+5.0 +5.8 +4.0 +2.7 +3.4 +3.7 +3.8 +3.6 -3.1 +0.3 +6.2 +6.2 -3.8 +2.2 +2.3 +2.1 +3.5 +6.1 +6.0 +3.0 +1.5 +6.5 +5.1 +3.7 -1.1 +0.3 +0.8 -1.1 +2.4 +2.4

S&MdCpVl 28.15 +1.35 StrInA p 4.07 +0.03 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.94 +0.49 S&MdCpVl 24.28 +1.17 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.89 +0.48 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.27 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 28.56 +1.45 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.10 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.92 +0.06 ComodRR 7.82 +0.10 HiYld 8.97 +0.06 InvGrCp 11.21 +0.01 LowDu 10.46 +0.03 RealRet 11.48 -0.05 RealRtnI 11.12 -0.01 ShortT 9.88 +0.01 TotRt 11.10 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.12 -0.01 TotRtA 11.10 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.10 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.10 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.10 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.66 +0.57 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.08 +1.56 Price Funds: BlChip 33.93 +1.67 CapApp 19.18 +0.52 EmMktS 29.77 +1.65 EqInc 22.33 +0.89 EqIndex 31.28 +1.32 Growth 28.43 +1.43 HlthSci 26.91 +1.06 HiYield 6.54 +0.04

+5.9 +5.5 +2.1 +5.7 +2.1 +5.6 +0.5 +3.8 +4.7 -3.2 +4.9 +4.7 +2.3 +5.4 +3.9 +1.0 +3.9 +3.7 +3.7 +3.4 +3.8 +3.8 +5.1 +4.0 +3.5 +5.6 -1.1 +6.8 +4.6 +3.3 +2.8 +4.6

IntlBond 9.39 IntlStk 12.33 MidCap 52.12 MCapVal 22.18 N Asia 16.49 New Era 42.84 N Horiz 28.14 N Inc 9.44 R2010 14.43 R2015 11.05 R2020 15.14 R2025 11.01 R2030 15.70 R2040 15.74 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 30.11 SmCapVal 32.74 SpecIn 11.99 Value 21.75 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.46 VoyA p 21.07 RiverSource A: DEI 9.03 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.27 PremierI r 17.75 TotRetI r 11.67 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.63 S&P Sel 18.15 Scout Funds: Intl 28.20 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.33 AmShS p 38.32 Sequoia 120.37 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.15 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 44.06 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.09 IntValue I 24.62 Tweedy Browne:

+0.01 -4.0 +0.70 -2.1 +2.51 +9.7 +0.95 +7.0 +0.69 +2.2 +2.12 -1.8 +1.35 +10.0 -0.01 +3.2 +0.39 +3.4 +0.34 +3.6 +0.53 +3.7 +0.42 +3.8 +0.64 +3.8 +0.69 +3.9 +1.4 +1.55 +11.8 +1.54 +11.1 +0.08 +3.1 +0.89 +6.2 +0.49 +4.2 +0.96 +6.8 +0.37 +2.9 +0.47 +8.7 +0.80 +8.8 +0.47 +8.3 +1.48 +5.0 +0.76 +4.7 +1.37 -3.2 +1.61 +2.9 +1.61 +2.8 +4.47 +9.5 +1.04 -6.0 NA +1.04 -2.9 +1.07 -2.8

GblValue 21.51 +0.72 VALIC : StkIdx 23.31 +0.98 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 14.30 +0.50 EqIncA p 8.05 +0.22 GrInA p 17.91 +0.68 HYMuA p 9.34 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.98 -0.01 CpOpAdl 70.86 +2.92 EMAdmr r 33.81 +1.91 Energy 109.13 +4.83 500Adml 107.01 +4.51 GNMA Ad 10.79 -0.02 HlthCr 48.90 +1.09 HiYldCp 5.50 +0.02 InfProAd 25.22 -0.04 ITsryAdml 11.29 -0.06 IntGrAdm 52.42 +2.86 ITAdml 13.54 -0.01 ITGrAdm 9.87 -0.02 LtdTrAd 11.04 LTGrAdml 9.11 -0.06 LT Adml 11.05 -0.01 MuHYAdm 10.44 -0.01 PrmCap r 62.32 +2.53 STsyAdml 10.76 -0.02 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.73 TtlBAdml 10.52 -0.03 TStkAdm 28.86 +1.25 WellslAdm 50.65 +0.71 WelltnAdm 50.86 +1.22 Windsor 41.99 +1.77 WdsrIIAd 43.53 +1.65 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.60 +0.59 CapOpp 30.67 +1.26 DivdGro 13.54 +0.44 Energy 58.11 +2.57 EqInc 18.95 +0.71 Explr 62.26 +3.09 GNMA 10.79 -0.02

+1.5 +4.6 +3.9 +3.9 +4.1 +4.5 +2.8 +2.1 -0.7 -2.6 +4.7 +3.0 -2.6 +3.4 +2.9 +3.4 -3.0 +1.9 +4.8 +0.9 +4.3 +2.2 +3.0 +1.1 +1.3 +0.5 +2.6 +3.0 +5.6 +3.6 +2.8 +4.5 +3.6 +5.0 +2.1 +2.8 -2.7 +4.6 +8.7 +3.0

GlobEq 15.85 GroInc 24.48 HYCorp 5.50 HlthCre 115.86 InflaPro 12.84 IntlGr 16.47 IntlVal 28.86 ITIGrade 9.87 LifeCon 15.60 LifeGro 20.28 LifeMod 18.34 LTIGrade 9.11 Morg 15.92 MuInt 13.54 MuLtd 11.04 MuShrt 15.91 PrecMtls r 20.39 PrmcpCor 12.53 Prmcp r 60.05 SelValu r 17.25 STAR 18.00 STIGrade 10.73 StratEq 16.54 TgRe2010 21.21 TgtRe2025 11.71 TgtRe2015 11.70 TgRe2020 20.65 TgRe2030 19.98 TgtRe2035 12.02 TgtRe2040 19.70 TgtRe2045 12.44 USGro 16.60 Wellsly 20.91 Welltn 29.44 Wndsr 12.44 WndsII 24.52 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 106.99 Balanced 20.12 DevMkt 9.01 EMkt 25.70 Europe 23.41 Extend 35.92 Growth 28.21

+0.71 +0.99 +0.02 +2.57 -0.02 +0.90 +1.60 -0.02 +0.27 +0.73 +0.48 -0.06 +0.77 -0.01

+1.20 +0.54 +2.43 +0.75 +0.49 +0.87 +0.46 +0.39 +0.31 +0.63 +0.75 +0.48 +0.80 +0.51 +0.74 +0.30 +0.70 +0.52 +0.93

+1.1 +4.7 +3.3 -2.6 +2.8 -3.1 -5.7 +4.8 +3.7 +3.7 +3.7 +4.3 +4.3 +1.8 +0.8 +0.4 -0.2 +3.5 +1.0 +8.2 +2.6 +2.6 +8.2 +3.4 +3.4 +3.4 +3.5 +3.5 +3.4 +3.4 +3.5 +0.9 +3.6 +2.7 +4.5 +3.5

+4.51 +4.6 +0.49 +4.5 +0.48 -5.5 +1.45 -0.8 +1.53 -9.8 +1.81 +10.0 +1.23 +3.5

ITBnd 10.97 -0.05 +3.9 MidCap 17.87 +0.93 +9.2 Pacific 9.93 +0.30 +2.6 REIT r 17.43 +1.14 +18.3 SmCap 30.63 +1.60 +11.4 SmlCpGth 18.50 +0.94 +9.9 SmlCpVl 14.74 +0.79 +12.9 STBnd 10.52 -0.01 +1.9 TotBnd 10.52 -0.03 +3.0 TotlIntl 13.76 +0.74 -4.5 TotStk 28.85 +1.25 +5.5 Value 19.61 +0.80 +5.8 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 20.13 +0.50 +4.6 DevMkInst 8.94 +0.48 NS ExtIn 35.95 +1.81 +10.0 GrwthIst 28.22 +1.23 +3.6 InfProInst 10.27 -0.02 +2.9 InstIdx 106.29 +4.48 +4.7 InsPl 106.30 +4.49 +4.7 InsTStPlus 26.08 +1.13 +5.5 MidCpIst 17.92 +0.93 +9.3 SCInst 30.66 +1.60 +11.5 TBIst 10.52 -0.03 +3.0 TSInst 28.86 +1.25 +5.5 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 88.39 +3.72 +4.7 STBdIdx 10.52 -0.01 +1.9 TotBdSgl 10.52 -0.03 +3.0 TotStkSgl 27.85 +1.20 +5.5 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.30 +0.53 +2.4 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.4 Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.62 +0.04 +6.6


B USI N ESS

B6 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING ADVISER INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Learn about Central Oregon Community College’s 9-month specialized sustainable building program. The course begins in October. Preregistration is recommended; free; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. “BANKING AND BUDGETING”: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn how to form a positive relationship with a financial institution. Preregistration required; free; 6-8 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@ neighborimpact.org. “CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW”: Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty Bend hosts a live Internet show to discuss things that go wrong with real estate transactions and how to avoid them. Visit the website and click on the show icons; free; 7 p.m.; www.ExitRealtyBend.com.

THURSDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Preregistration required; $15; 10 a.m.-noon; Crook County School District, 471 N.E. Ochoco Plaza Drive, Prineville; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “SELECTING HEALTHY AND SAFE PRODUCTS”: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www. buildinggreencouncil.org. “INTERMEDIATE EXCEL 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 6-9 p.m., and class continues May 20 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “CREATE YOUR PERSONAL RETIREMENT ANALYSIS”: Define retirement goals, income distribution and tax strategies. Taught by Chad Staskal. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY “FREE SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS FOR HOME AND WORK”: Learn how to run a home or business using free software. Preregistration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Prineville COIC

Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “INSURANCE BILLING — BEYOND THE BASICS”: Designed for health care professionals and those in the medical field who want to learn about billing insurance companies. Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING”: Learn how to select and write grant applications for nonprofit organizations. Taught by professional nonprofit fundraiser Laura Pinckney. Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-noon, and class continues May 21 from 9 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. “POWERPOINT 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-noon, and class continues May 21 from 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or www.cocc.edu. CREATING A RESUME IN WORD: Learn to create a resume using Microsoft Word. Prerequisites: “Getting Started with Computer Software” or familiarity with Microsoft Office programs. Registration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or jenniferp@deschuteslibrary.org. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. “INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS”: Learn the basics of small website building, uploading images, writing for the Web and blogging using WordPress; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals. “DISCOVERING YOUR KEYWORD NICHE”: Learn to optimize keyword search-ability, and cover changes made in Google’s search engine algorithm; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. “THE FRESH WEB”: A short review of Web news intended to help Web authors and managers understand the ever changing Web environment; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals. “CENTER STAGE REVIEW”: Learn to manage a Web site using Alpine Internet Solution’s Content Management System, which is designed to simplify engine optimization; free; 12:15-1 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO WORKSHOP: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY “PATS AIR TESTING AND SEALING”: Prepares students to evaluate air leaks in a house, seal air leaks and create an energy-efficient home. Performance Air Testing & Sealing certification available. Registration required by May 7; $295; 8 a.m.-2 p.m., and class continues May 18 from 8 a.m.-noon followed by an optional certification test; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or www.cocc.edu. “WORD 2007 — BEYOND THE BASICS”: Learn about common and more advanced features of Microsoft Word 2007. Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; Mondays through March 1 from 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4-9 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. INTERMEDIATE FLASH ANIMATION CLASS: Preregistration required; $59; Mondays through May 24 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY May 18 “EMPLOYMENT BEYOND THE RECESSION”: WorkSource Oregon Employment Department will provide an economic update and analysis. Economists will discuss Oregon’s work force trends, regions that are likely to grow the fastest, the new “normal” for housing and recently completed reports, including one that analyzes Oregon’s green jobs. Registration required by May 11; $50, includes breakfast; 7:30 a.m.-noon; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-6024 or Denise. A.Pollock@state.or.us. “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; Discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. USING ONLINE DATABASES: Learn about electronic databases and how to search the library’s full-text magazine database Magazines Online. Registration is required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. “FROM HERE TO NET ZERO”: Discover strategies for achieving highly efficient homes and powering homes through renewable energy. Learn about incentives and tax credits available to those who build to high performance standards. Oregon CCB credits are available. Registration required by May 17; general $25; Earth Advantage builders and certified professionals $15; 5:30-7 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-480-7303.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Michael Yablonsky and Karla Lorentson, River Canyon Estates No. 3, Lot 223, $235,000 John G. and Renee S. Houston to Washington Trust Bank, Estates at Pronghorn Phase 2, Lot 127, $500,000 Montagne Development Inc. to Umpqua Bank, Partition Plat 199916, Parcel 2, $3,819,468.67 David A. Montagne to Umpqua Bank, Caldera Springs Phase One, Lot 150, $3,819,468.67 Mark and Laura J. Davis to Home Savings of America, The Willows Phase One, Lot 20, $220,210 Mark A. and Millicent Mellinger to Bonnie J. Berry, Providence Phase Seven, Lot 17, Block 3, $175,000 Kenneth T. and Joy L. Krumdieck to Darryl E. and Arlene L. Nelson, Watership Down, Lot 2, $305,000 Darryl E. and Arlene L. Nelson to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc., Watership Down, Lot 2, $244,000 SCAP 09 5080 LLC to Jeffrey L. and Lisa Rawlins, Angus Acres Phase One, Lot 2, $183,000 Jessie-Lea Abbott to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Glaze Meadow Homesite Section Tenth Addition, Lot 294, $417,000 Jessie-Lea Abbott to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Glaze Meadow Homesite Section Tenth Addition, Lot 294, $338,100 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to THS Properties LLC, Hawksflight Air Park,

Lot 4, $244,371.55 Christine A. Kosydar, trustee to WBCMT 2007 C33 Disk Drive LLC, Partition Parcel 1994-47, Parcels 1-3, $4,900,000 Thomas G. Sanders, Jr. to Thomas G. Sanders, Jr. and Carly A. Auten, Larch Meadows, Lot 13, $151,000 Grant Burke and Brooke Collins to Garrett C. Erickson, trustee of Kerr Pacific Commodities Inc. Profit Sharing Plan, River Rim Planned Unit Development Phase One, Lot 45, $185,500 Alan B. and Rhonda R. Eriksen to Chris and Leslie Edwards, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top Phases 7 and 8, Lot 111, $299,000 Chris and Leslie Edwards to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. and Hyperion Capital Group LLC, Skyline Summit at Broken Top Phases 7 and 8, Lot 111, $295,027 Fidelity National Title Insurance Co., trustee, to Western Capital Partners LLC, T 14, R 13, Section 08, $220,100 Andrew M. and Keli L. Timm, to Alexander Ooi, Sun Meadow No. 4, Lot 111, $280,000 Alexander Ooi to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. and Pinnacle Capital Mortgage Corp., Sun Meadow No. 4, Lot 111, $224,000 Dennis G. and Dianne A. Guthrie to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Lake Park Estates, Lot 6, Block 1, $156,750 E. Trade Bank to Kathleen M. Jones, Roanoke Avenue RePlat, Lot 4, $299,900 Regional Trustee Services Corp, trustee to Federal National Morgage Assoc., Abbot House, Unit 7, $235,371.55

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-617-7822, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

Europe Continued from B1 “Lending more money to already overborrowed governments does not solve their problems,” Carl Weinberg, chief economist of High Frequency Economics in Valhalla, N.Y., said in a note. “Had we any Greek bonds in our portfolio, we would not feel rescued this morning.” Such concerns may be part of the reason the euro fell back when American markets opened. after surging in Asian and European trading, to end the day at about $1.28. Another big issue is whether bailing out economies creates moral hazard. Other countries may continue to skirt the kinds of actions that would lower their budget deficits and debt loads — steps painful to the public and dangerous to politicians — because they too can expect to be rescued.

A theoretical rescue It is clear that Europe’s fund will require the sustained support of the 27 nations that form the European Union — not to mention its richest member, Germany, which has until now deeply opposed a bailout. Indeed, for all the excitement about the scale of the effort, it is important to remember that the core fund does not now exist. The fund, known as a special purpose vehicle, would raise money by issuing debt and making loans to support ailing economies. The European countries would guarantee that fund. So the package is merely a commitment for the vehicle to borrow money if a large economy like Spain, which represents 12 percent of the output in the euro zone, asks for assistance. The International Monetary Fund is pledging 250 billion euros to support the effort. Sixty billion euros under an existing lending program pushes the total to near $1 trillion. The fund is therefore more a theoretical construct than the Troubled

Asset Relief Program that was created in the United States, and that is where things get tricky. By definition, if Spain came to a point where it could no longer finance itself, interest rates would be on the rise. The several hundred billion euros for the fund would not only come at a high cost, but would bring additional pain to already indebted countries like Portugal, France, Italy and the United Kingdom, which back the special purpose entity, thus compounding the region’s debt woes. For Dominique Strauss Kahn, the IMF’s ambitious managing director, the program is a hardearned victory that allows the fund to assume a central role in pushing for economic reform in Europe. Greece’s Cabinet on Monday approved major changes in its pension system, including an increase in the early retirement age to 60 and the broader retirement age to 65, as part of a three-year package of reforms imposed by the fund and the European Union.

Skepticism Yet some fund staff members have pointed out that, if anything, the rescue package and the IMF commitment to support it might give countries like Spain an excuse to retreat a bit from the tough measures that have distinguished Ireland’s and Greece’s austerity efforts. “It shows that Europe can come together,” said a banker with close ties to the fund who was not authorized to speak on the record. Though it takes the pressure off Spain, “it does not address structural pressure in Europe.” In effect, Germany and other wealthier European countries are assuming responsibility for the creditworthiness of Greece, Portugal and the other debt delinquents. But the European central government is weak and must invent new structures to administer the promised aid. “The debt crisis will change

the nature of European monetary union,” Jorg Kramer, chief economist at Commerzbank, wrote in a note Monday. “The euro zone has moved away from a monetary union and toward a transfer union.” Kramer warned that the shift could “undermine political support for the euro zone in the long run. After all, it is unlikely that the countries receiving support will let others permanently dictate their economic policies. Moreover, voters in the countries giving support will not be willing to permanently give financial support to other countries.”On Monday, Jean-Claude Trichet, president of the European Central Bank, warned European governments, all of which will probably miss the budget deficit goals they agreed to when they created the euro, that they must continue to cut government spending. At a time when economies, from Romania and Hungary to Britain and Spain, are struggling to meet their deficit goals, Trichet’s warning took on extra resonance. Romania and Hungary are operating under IMF programs, while Britain and Spain are trying desperately to convince markets that they will not experience the financing problems that have forced so many countries in Europe to seek assistance. “For us, what is absolutely decisive is the commitment of governments of the euro area to take all measures needed to meet their fiscal targets this year and in the years ahead,” Trichet told reporters at a press conference in Basel, Switzerland. But after 10 years of mostly missing fiscal guidelines during a worldwide economic boom, it remains uncertain if more fingerwagging by Trichet and a new fund backed by the IMF will be enough to return European nations to fiscal health as their economies stagnate and social pressures build.

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How about 70,000 good reasons. Every day The Bulletin delivers new, and in-depth insight into your community

Fidelity National Title Insurance Co., trustee, to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee, Arrowhead Phases I-IV, Lot 10, $255,929.06 Gary E. and Julie K. Randall to Kirsten and Thomas Giacomini, Fairway Crest Village Phase III, Lot 15, Block 15, $299,000 HSBC Bank USA NA, trustee to Harrison Street Properties Group LLC, Miller Heights Phase II, Lot 57, $259,000 Pahlisch Homes Inc. to Duncan S. and Kathleen A. MacLeod, Bridges at Shadow Glen Phase I, Lot 16, $320,000 Aaron and Jodi Oxenreider to Stephen and Donna Spangler, Oakview Phase IX, Lot 20, $155,000 Calwestern Reconveyance Corp., trustee to Jason A. Mendell and Jennifer Abernathy, River Canyon Estates No. 3, Lot 228, $220,001 Gary D. Tandy and Renee Hammond to William L. Robinson, trustee and William & Gail Robinson Family Trust, Deschutes River Tract, Lot 20, $500,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Kip W. Hjorth, Partition Parcel 2008-38, Parcel 1, $165,000 HSBC Bank USA NA, trustee to Jeff H. Robertson, Partition Parcel 2002-75, Parcel 2, $260,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Jeffrey G. and Lesley A. Barr, Majestic Phase 3, Lot 24, $170,100 Bend Equity Group LLC to Don K. and De Ann Crenshaw, Brookland Park, Lot 7, $150,000 John M. and Tamela J. Gerritz to Brian J. and Denise M. Larson, Ridge at Eagle Crest 11, Lot 33, $182,000

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L

Inside

OREGON Supporters to lease old base for smokejumpers museum, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Music executive Bob Mercer dies at 65, see Page C5. THE WEST Northern Rockies face big fire year, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

Program gets kids interested in science By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Attention, photographers! Submit your own examples of good composition at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot and we’ll pick the best for publication next week in this space. No doctored photos, please!

Picture-taking advice from The Bulletin’s professional photographers

Well, sh ot!

Installment 18:

Composition

Most 7-year-olds do not have a favorite arthropod. Evan Swanson prefers the crab. The Ensworth Elementary first-grader learned about arthropods, animals with exoskeletons and jointed limbs, in a session at the Bend Science Station on Monday. At first, he admitted, he was frightened to touch the various animals, but they grew on him. “I like learning about bugs and animals,” he said. “I like the crab. I like how they pinch.” That’s just what David Bermudez wants to hear. Bermudez, who heads up the Bend Science Station, taught the Ensworth students as part of a program to increase science literacy for Bend-La Pine Schools students. It’s experiences like Evan’s that Bermudez hopes will pique an interest in the sciences and lead to more engaged science students in the future. See Science / C5

By Pete Erickson The Bulletin

Bend High golfer aids Columbia River rescue By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A Bend High golfer’s curiosity — and impeccable timing — helped lead to the rescue of a boater from the middle of the Columbia River on Monday. The school’s golf team was in The Dalles for a tournament, and after the event was over for the day Coach Rusty Clemons decided to take the golfers to a lookout high above the Columbia River. “I thought, what a great thing to do after the tournament, before we eat,” Clemons said. He had a small pair of binoculars with him, typically used to track golf balls flying through the air. But at the lookout, the players spotted something else — what looked like a fisherman in a little rowboat. “He just had one oar,” Clemons said. “We just watched him for about half an hour.” It was an odd sight, said Ryan Crownover, 15, a freshman at Bend High. “We were kind of thinking it was funny,” he said. “There was a guy in a little tiny boat in the middle of the Columbia, with one tiny little paddle.” And when the golf team was leaving, Crownover wanted to get one last look. “We were in the car, buckling up, and I said I wanted to go see if he made it across the river,” Crownover said. “When I went back out, I saw all blue, and no guy.” See Rescue / C5

Life without parole no longer a choice The Bulletin

Photos by Pete Erickson

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Guzek jurors’ options narrow By Erin Golden

I shot this photo during a riot in Los Angeles in 1996, and it’s still a favorite. The line of pepper spray connecting the fellow on the left with the cop, mixed in with the use of fill flash on the subject and the action in the background all work together to make this a winner.

Ensworth first-grader Nayeli Lopez-Melton, 7, looks at krill Monday at the Bend Science Station.

C

Light, composition and emotion are the cornerstones of a great news photo. I repeat those words in my mind when working; they’re my photographic mantra. Composition — lines, shadows, shapes and background — is a part of every photo. Lines and shapes can be associated with what’s called the Golden Mean: four imaginary lines cutting the rectangular frame into thirds vertically and horizontally. Where the lines intersect is roughly

where you want your points of interest to be located. Diagonal lines, real or imaginary, going from one point to another, an S-shaped line, a circle or an imaginary triangle with ends at three points are all strong compositional elements. Using shadows to emphasize the subject works well. No photo exists without a background. A bad background can kill a picture; a good background can help a picture. I call a good background “clean” and a bad background “garbage.” My editor never sees the photos accidentally shot with bad backgrounds. People in a photo are challenging because they’re

moving around constantly and they’ll tell you to stop taking photos after awhile. You have to move with them and work your way into the center of the action for the best pictures. Don’t stay in one place and hope someone comes into the frame. Watch the backgrounds when doing people pictures. Practice on your friends and family. Keep doing pictures even after they tell you to stop. Watch the continuously changing compositions and flow with them, shooting constantly. Now go pick up your camera and repeat after me: Light. Composition. Emotion.

The 12 jurors who decide the fate of convicted murderer Randy Lee Guzek in an upcoming sentencing trial will now have to choose between just two options: the death penalty or a life in prison with the possibility of parole. In 1987, Guzek and two other men shot Rod and Lois Houser in the Randy Lee couple’s Terre- Guzek bonne home. The sentencing trial, scheduled to begin next week in Deschutes County Circuit Court, was initially expected to end with the jury deciding if Guzek should get the death penalty, life without parole or a life sentence with the possibility of parole. But in April, with just over a month to go before his trial would begin, Guzek filed a request to take the life without the possibility of parole option off the table. And on Monday, Lane County Circuit Court Judge Jack Billings, who is presiding over the case, agreed to narrow the jury’s options from three to two. Though Guzek asked to have the option removed, his lawyers argued he needed more time to consider the potential impact on the jurors and the trial before deciding if it was in his best interest. See Guzek / C5

CROOK COUNTY

I love the combination of action, diagonal line of the rope going from horse to guy on the ground and the action in the background filing the frame to make a complete picture of the Sisters Rodeo a couple of years ago. This picture never ran because I accidentally got the wrong names of the guys in pink shirts.

The racer made a break and came out in front just in time to be framed with the road and in front of the peloton. I like the leading line framing the racer.

The axe and hands of the firefighter aren’t hitting the tree, there’s smoke behind the firefighter separating him from the trees, there’s an imaginary line between the fire and the firefighter, and there’s action in the photo. These all work together to create a compelling, clean image.

Equipment corner FOR BEGINNERS With your point-andshoot, get closer to the people in the frame. Fill that picture with your friends. If doing a picture of people standing in front of something, have the people stand in front of the camera and have “the something” way in the background.

FOR INTERMEDIATES Go practice doing pictures with shallow

depths of field and watch your backgrounds. Start putting lines, shadows and shapes into the pictures to make them interesting.

FOR ADVANCED Never light your people with a direct flash on camera. Learn to bounce the flash and use natural light. Really pay attention to the backgrounds and start putting your subjects in three-dimensional compositions. Study the work of my two favorite photojournalists: Sebastiao Salgado and Eugene Richards.

Here’s the lineup

April 27 Flash

Today Composition

May 25 Emotion

Each installment will feature tips from The Bulletin’s photographers, followed the next week by the best of readers’ submitted photos.

June 8 Lines

June 22 Shadows

July 6 Shapes

July 20 Black & white

Aug. 3 Color

Celebration at dog park to inform, offer shots By Diane S.W. Lee The Bulletin

Dog owners in Prineville have had a 3-acre dog park since last fall, but the Crook County Parks & Recreation District is throwing a celebration of the park on Saturday. There will be a pet adoption agency, a lowcost rabies and microchip Inside clinic on-site • Map of the and more. The dog park, Crook County Page C5 Sheriff’s Office will also use the event to tell people about the county’s new animal ordinance. “This event is a great opportunity to explore a number of resources in the area,” said Troy Clarke, the county’s parks recreation coordinator. “If you don’t have a rabies shot for your dog or your dog’s vaccination is expiring soon, it’s a good opportunity to renew that vaccination at a very low cost.” Humane Society of Ochocos will bring about 10 dogs and 15 cats to the event to put them up for adoption. Prineville Veterinary Clinic will offer a $10 rabies vaccination and a $20 microchip for dogs. The Sheriff’s Office will have an information booth to educate the public about the animal ordinance that will take effect July 1. See Dog park / C5


C2 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Glacier National Park created in 1910

L B  

T O D AY IN HISTORY

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

ON THIS DATE In 1996, an Atlanta-bound ValuJet DC-9 caught fire shortly after takeoff from Miami and crashed into the Florida Everglades, killing all 110 people on board.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A bird bath was reported stolen at 12:58 p.m. May 5, in the 20900 block of Sage Creek Drive. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 2:02 p.m. May 5, in the 1500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 3:52 p.m. May 5, in the 1900 block of Northeast Lotus Drive. DUII — Theresa Kay Donavan, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:03 p.m. May 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Northeast Purcell Boulevard. DUII — Darwin Wadell Holm, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:41 p.m. May 5, in the 2000 block of Monterey Avenue. DUII — Eric Raymond Shipp, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:02 a.m. May 6, in the area of Northwest Revere Avenue and Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 1:45 a.m. May 6, in the 1100 block of Northwest Federal Street. DUII — Jaime Maureen MandeliasMinor, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:14 a.m. May 6, in the area of Northwest Harriman Street and Northwest Oregon Avenue. DUII — Jonathan David Britt, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:53 a.m. May 6, in the area of North U.S. Highway 97 and Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 6:59 a.m. May 6, in the 20200 block of Meyer Drive. Theft — A dog was reported stolen at 1:33 p.m. May 6, in the 62600 block of Hawkview Road. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 3:13 p.m. May 6, in the 2100 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 5:32 p.m. May 6, in the 600 block of Southeast Reed Market Road. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 6:39 p.m. May 6, in the 1800 block of Northeast Division Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:40 a.m. May 7, in the 1200 block of Northeast Dawson Drive. DUII — Brandon M. McGraw, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:21 a.m. May 7, in the 2500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:45 p.m. May 7, in the area of Southwest 23rd Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:20 p.m. May 7, in the 3000 block of Southwest Juniper Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:24 p.m. May 7, in the 700 block of Southwest 14th Street. DUII — Benet Leigh, 60, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:04 p.m. May 7, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Quartz Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:30 p.m. May 7, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street and West Antler Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:01 p.m. May 7, in the 1600 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — Cash was reported stolen at 11:07 a.m. May 7, in the 3500 block of Southwest Canal Boulevard. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:29 a.m. May 7, in the 1100 block of Northwest 22nd Place. Theft — A theft was reported at

9:40 a.m. May 7, in the 3000 block of Northwest Eighth Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 9:02 a.m. May 7, in the 300 block of Northwest Seventh Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 7:04 a.m. May 7, in the 800 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 11:24 p.m. May 8, in the 2500 block of Southwest 29th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:25 p.m. May 8, in the 2900 block of Southwest 25th Street. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 3:08 p.m. May 8, in the 800 block of Northwest Fifth Street. Theft — Hardwood floor supplies were reported stolen at 12:22 p.m. May 8, in the 1800 block of Southeast First Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:18 a.m. May 8, in the area of Southwest 35th Street and Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:16 a.m. May 8, in the area of Southwest Obsidian Avenue and Southwest Rimrock Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:04 a.m. May 8, in the 1500 block of Southwest 22nd Place. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:40 a.m. May 8, in the 1500 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:16 a.m. May 8, in the 3000 block of Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:03 a.m. May 8, in the 1100 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 9:29 a.m. May 8, in the 1000 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 12:29 a.m. May 8, in the 100 block of Northwest 10th Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 4:58 p.m. May 9, in the 2300 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:40 p.m. May 9, in the 2600 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 1:05 p.m. May 9, in the 1400 block of Southwest 17th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:19 a.m. May 9, in the 2000 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:13 a.m. May 9, in the 1400 block of Northeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:07 a.m. May 9, in the 800 block of Northeast Nickernut Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 9:46 a.m. May 9, in the 1400 block of Southwest 17th Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 1:39 a.m. May 9, in the 400 block of Southwest Glacier Avenue. Black Butte Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:52 p.m. May 8, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 West near milepost 94. Prineville Police Department

DUII — Jarrod Biddle, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:30 p.m. May 8, in the area of Northwest Claypool Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 5:32 p.m. May 9, in the area of North Elm Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Mitchell Alan Rickart, 48, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:02 p.m. May 7, in the area of Hamby Road and U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:46 p.m. May 7, in the 16400 block of First Street in La Pine.

Theft — A watch was reported stolen at 3:52 p.m. May 7, in the 23100 block of Chisholm Trail in Bend. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 1:35 p.m. May 7, in the 63300 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:14 a.m. May 7, in the 16000 block of Pine Drop Lane in La Pine. DUII — Eric Christian Tippett, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:56 p.m. May 8, in the 1400 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond. DUII — Randi Beasley, 36, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:59 p.m. May 8, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 135 in Bend. DUII — Kyle Stevens Skinner, 57, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:31 p.m. May 8, in the area of Northwest Coyner Avenue and Northwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:05 p.m. May 8, in the area of Northwest Helmholtz Way and Northwest Tetherow Road in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:27 a.m. May 8, in the area of Northwest 43rd Street and Northwest Ice Avenue in Terrebonne. DUII —Zachary Elias Lillebo, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:40 a.m. May 8, in the 800 block of Northwest Negus Lane in Redmond. DUII — Lester Troy Cardwell, 44, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:11 a.m. May 8, in the area of Southwest 23rd Street and Southwest Highland Avenue in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:10 a.m. May 9, in the 300 block of East Cascade Avenue in Sisters. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen May 3, in the 700 block of Center Ridge Drive in Culver. Burglary — A burglary was reported May 3, in the 600 block of Northwest Glass Drive in Madras. Theft — Tools were reported stolen May 5, in the area of Northwest Elm Lane and Northwest Columbia Drive in Madras. Theft — Agricultural equipment was reported stolen May 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 26 and U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and CD player stolen May 5, in the 200 block of Southwest Second Street in Culver. DUII — Aaron Paul James Jr., 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants May 6, in the area of Jefferson Avenue and Fourth Street in Metolius. Oregon State Police

DUII — Darrell Harvey Simmons, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:04 p.m. May 7, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 146. DUII — Mervyn Mitsuo Abe, 58, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:49 a.m. May 8, in the area of Northeast Fifth Street and Northeast Greenwood Avenue in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:30 a.m. May 8, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 174. DUII — Cynthia Irene Stigall, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:33 p.m. May 8, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and State Recreation Road in La Pine. DUII — Anabel Quintana, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:03 a.m. May 9, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 131. DUII — Brian Yukio Yamamoto, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:30 a.m. May 10, in the area of Brookswood and Pinebrook boulevards in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10 p.m. May 9, in the area of Skyline Ranch Road in Bend.

Crook County Landfill Director Alan Keller was placed on paid administrative leave Monday afternoon pending an Oregon State Police

James Monroe Shank, 30, a transient, was arrested Sunday evening after he ran from his car during a traffic stop. At about 8 p.m. Sunday, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office received a call about a red car driving outside of its lane. A deputy saw the car heading west on U.S. Highway 20 toward Bend and pulled it over. Then Shank fled, according to a news release from the Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff’s Office, including its K-9 unit, and Oregon State Police set up a perimeter to search for the man, who was

District Attorney JUSTICE NOT POLITICS

Paid for by Flaherty for DA

Downtown Bend lane closures Window washing of the Franklin Crossing Building will mean lane closures on Franklin Street and on Bond Street, adjacent to the building, most of today. The work is scheduled to begin at 6 a.m. and conclude at 6 p.m. Ne

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found after a resident called 911 and reported an unknown person in a guest house. When officers arrived, they found Shank hiding under a bed, according to the release. When his car was searched, officers found about 25 grams of heroin, the release stated. Shank was charged on suspicion of attempt to elude, burglary and possession, manufacture and delivery of heroin, according to the Sheriff’s Office, and was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail, where he was as of Monday evening.

Mom: Qigong massage helps autistic son By Keri Brenner The (Dalles) Chronicle

THE DALLES — Two years ago, Karen Erikson was praying for relief from the hell her life had become since her youngest child Jake was diagnosed with autism. “He would sit in a corner rocking, banging his head against the wall, biting himself, screaming uncontrollably,� recalled Erikson, 41, who lives in the Columbia River Gorge town of Lyle, Wash. “Jake was withdrawn, detached from the world. He didn’t speak and he wouldn’t allow anyone to touch him.� A lot has changed in two years. Erikson sat on the living room couch during a recent interview and beamed as 3 1/2-year-old Jake — now talkative and friendly — played with his toys and ran up to guests to chat. “Are you hungry?� Jake asked a visitor, displaying one of his toys for inspection. He bounded off to romp around on the floor with another guest. “He would have never been able to tolerate this many people in a room before,� Erikson said. A notice in a December 2008 edition of the White Salmon Enterprise newspaper led Erikson to apply for Jake to take part in a research project on the use of qigong massage to treat childhood autism. “They were seeking 65 kids from the Portland area and one from the gorge,� Erikson said of the Qigong Sensory Training study — run by a Western Oregon University research team led

by Dr. Louisa Silva. Supervising Jake would be Pam Tindall, of Possibilities Consulting in White Salmon, Wash., a Silva-trained qigong massage therapist. Results of the study, published in The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, are promising. For Jake, the results were nothing short of miraculous. “I used to think, ‘Will he ever be able to have a normal life?’� Erikson said. “Now I see him, hanging out with other kids at preschool, and he just blends in.� Qigong massage works on the premise that the primary problem in autism is a blockage of sensory information. Exactly why the blockage happens in the first place is a matter of national debate, but the WOU research study just deals with the matter at hand — releasing the blocked energies. “Open the sensory pathways with qigong massage and the

child quickly begins to receive coherent data from the senses,� Silva said. State education officials have yet to form an opinion on the treatment. “This is something that is new, and we do not have a position on it,� said Eric Richards, director of operations for the Oregon Department of Education’s special education division. During the five-month study that began in March 2009, Tindall worked on Jake twice a week for about 30 minutes per session. She also taught Erikson to do a daily 15-minute protocol at home. Qigong massage sessions generally run about $50 each. Tindall said she also offers a sliding scale.

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The Oregon State Police is asking for the public’s help in the shooting of a bald eagle in April, according to a news release Monday. On April 30, an injured bald eagle was found by two horseback riders near the western portion of Dibblee Point Beach on the Columbia River near Rainier. OSP troopers captured the bird and brought it to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast, where it was discovered that the eagle had multiple wounds. Nearly three dozen shotgun BBs were found throughout its body, including about seven in the bird’s head. Currently, the eagle is recovering from the injuries and has been moved to an outside flight pen. Information about the eagle’s recovery progress will be posted at www.coastwildlife. org. Anyone with information to help in the investigation is asked to contact Trooper Tim Schwartz at 503-397-0325, extension 42.

investigation. Crook County Judge Mike McCabe said he could not give many details while the investigation is ongoing, but he said the county is cooperating with the police. “There are some allegations that have been made that the state police are following up on,� McCabe said. The landfill brings in about $500,000 to a million dollars a year for the county, according to McCabe. It employs seven people. McCabe said he hopes by the end of this week more details will be made public. Keller first started working for the county in July of 1995.

dS t.

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 11, 1910, Glacier National Park in Montana was established.

Authorities seek tips in bald eagle shooting

Wa ll S t.

Today is Tuesday, May 11, the 131st day of 2010. There are 234 days left in the year.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Comedian Mort Sahl is 83. Rock singer Eric Burdon (The Animals; War) is 69. Actress Frances Fisher is 58. Country musician Mark Herndon (Alabama) is 55. Actress Martha Quinn is 51. Country singer-musician Tim Raybon (The Raybon Brothers) is 47. Actor Jeffrey Donovan is 42.

Bo n

The Associated Press

(541) 322-7430 www.livingwellco.org

Living Well is brought to you in partnership by:

Deschutes County Health Services HealthMatters Central Oregon Oregon Department of Human Services PacificSource Health Plans Northwest Health Foundation St. Charles Health System Jefferson County Health Department Clear One Health Plans Mountain View Hospital Mosaic Medical Crook County Health Department Pioneer Memorial Hospital


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 C3

O Poll fails to support UO union EUGENE — A survey conducted by the executive committee of the University of Oregon Senate shows little support for a new labor union that could represent faculty and some administrators. Those taking part in the e-mail poll opposed a union by a 2-to-1 ratio. The Register-Guard newspaper reports that 45 percent of the 2,307 people who received a survey responded to it. Biology professor Nathan Tublitz, president of the UO Senate, said turnout was higher than expected. He acknowledged the poll did not follow the random sampling methods used to prepare a statistically valid survey. He called it “just a snapshot of views.” Union supporters dismissed the results and said an organiz-

ing effort will continue. “I don’t think we’re any wiser after the poll,” said history professor David Luebke. “It is what it is. My sense from talking with my colleagues wouldn’t have produced the same result at all.” The idea of a bargaining unit to represent faculty members and midlevel administrators has been around since 2007, though visible efforts to organize only began last fall. Several informational meetings have been held and union representatives have set up an office near campus. The organizing group is called United Academics of the University of Oregon. The poll shows a higher level of opposition than a similar one last year that attracted significantly fewer responses. Some

believe support is fading because faculty members are optimistic about Richard Lariviere, the new university president. Economics professor Bill Harbaugh, who opposes the union, thinks that’s the case. A critic of former UO President Dave Frohnmayer, Harbaugh said the atmosphere has changed since Lariviere’s arrival. “The faculty just want to teach and do our research. We will suffer a lot of bad administration before we get involved. And suffer we have,” he said. “But now we’ve got a new president, he’s finally made some concrete improvements and honestly, I think this union idea is now toast. But the organizers should be praised for stepping up to the plate on this; they obviously made a difference.”

O  B Gun from 1970 theft returned to man, 90 PORTLAND — A 90-yearold Oregon man has reclaimed a handgun that was stolen from him 40 years ago. The Oregon State Police says eight rifles, two shotguns and a Remington handgun were stolen from the Clackamas County home of Warren Schafer in October 1970. State troopers took the initial report, but never made an arrest. A Los Angeles Police Department gang unit alerted Oregon authorities last month that it had recovered the handgun. Schafer got it back Monday in Portland. The retired dentist noted that one of the stolen rifles was recovered in Las Vegas about a decade ago.

TriMet changing 3 Portland bus routes PORTLAND — TriMet has scheduled changes Monday on three Portland bus routes to eliminate or reduce the risks of left-hand turns. KGW reports the three routes serve Portland State University. TriMet also is looking at a policy change that would require drivers to honk before turning left. The changes are a response to the April 24 crash in which a turning bus killed two pedestrians and injured three others.

Not guilty plea in 1996 Medford slaying MEDFORD — A 30-year-old man has pleaded not guilty to a murder charge in the slaying of a teenage girl who disappeared while walking to a church meeting nearly 14 years ago. William Simmons’ public defender, Andy Vandergaw, entered the plea for his client Monday in Jackson County Circuit Court in Medford. Simmons has long been considered a suspect in the slaying of 15-year-old Kaelin Rose Glazier. The sophomore at South Medford High School was last seen Nov. 6, 1996. Her body was

Oregon State Police via The Associated Press

Warren Schafer, 90, reclaims a handgun that was stolen from him 40 years ago. discovered in 2008 near where Simmons lived in 1996.

when Jabbie started dating Washington’s longtime girlfriend.

Man gets death penalty Tuition grant pool for killing witness shrinks for students OREGON CITY — A Gresham man has received the death penalty for the revenge killing of an immigrant from Sierra Leone. Mike Washington Jr. did not speak at the hearing Monday in which Clackamas County jurors announced their decision. The Oregonian newspaper reports a judge will formally sentence Washington next week. Washington was convicted last month of aggravated murder in the death of Mohamed Jabbie. Prosecutors say Washington assaulted Jabbie in July 2004 and shot him to death two months later after Jabbie testified against him before a grand jury. Jabbie legally immigrated to the U.S. in 1996 and worked as a medical transport assistant. Jabbie and Washington crossed paths in early 2004,

EUGENE — It will be a tougher landscape for college students seeking an Oregon Opportunity Grant to help pay tuition. So many students applied for aid this year that the agency in charge of state grants ended up awarding more aid than it was supposed to. That leaves $10 million less than planned for next school year. The Register-Guard reports the amount could shrink further if the state’s legislative Emergency Board decides not to direct $5 million to the program later this month. With less money to award, the number of students receiving grants in the coming school year is expected to decline by more than half — from 43,000 grants to about 21,000. — From wire reports

Supporters to lease old base for smokejumpers museum By Jeff Duewel The Daily Courier

GRANTS PASS — They were a tight bunch of young men who worked summers jumping out of airplanes to fight forest fires in remote locations in Southern Oregon. From 1943 to 1981, they were based at the Siskiyou Smokejumper Base south of Cave Junction. The dream to preserve the heritage of the base took a huge step closer to reality last week when Josephine County commissioners agreed to let museum-backers lease the premises, now part of the Illinois Valley Airport, for 10 years. A few details in the lease agreement need to be worked out before its signing, said Roger Brandt, secretary of the nonprofit Siskiyou Smokejumper Base Museum board. Project backers have $13,000 saved up, exhibits in the works and high hopes of making a new tourist attraction in the Illinois Valley. The old buildings are already on the National Register of Historic Places. The group also has close to 3,000 photos on file, said board President Gary Buck, a former smokejumper. “It’s been a long time coming, but everybody’s on a really positive track right now,” said Brandt, a local historian who is pursuing grants for the project. “Hopefully, by June, we can have some minimum services in place.” Former smokejumper Wes Brown, also on the board, said there are visions of restoring an old smokejumper plane for the site. “It’s got real historical interest, not just for this area,” said Josephine County Commissioner Dave Toler. “It’ll be a one-of-a-kind in the nation. It

could be a boon to the airport and the community. “We fully anticipate signing (the lease agreement) within the next month,” Toler said. The lease also calls for selfguided waysides, a gift shop and deli, and requires the museum to be open at least 520 hours a year. A previous stumbling block was the Federal Aviation Administration’s classification for the airport, which required instrument approach clearance standards. But last fall the airport was downgraded to a B1 status, which made wingspan clearances smaller and allowed about 20 parking spots to remain in front of the old buildings of the base, said Alex Grossi, Josephine County airports director. Proponents envision a day when private pilots can fly into the airport, grab a burger and check out the smokejumper museum. Currently, only two or three planes land each day at the airport, which has a 5,200-foot runway but no on-site fuel station. The proposed lease gives exclusive use of the old office building and the mess hall or restaurant building, and non-exclusive use of restrooms, picnic area and parking. It also calls for the museum to handle all maintenance of the facilities. The old office building was built in the 1930s at the Forest Service ranger station in Cave Junction and hauled out to the base in 1943. The most interesting building is the parachute loft, where jumpers sewed their parachutes and hung them in a special two-story end of the building. That building is beALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

ing leased by Jack McCornack, owner of Kinetic Vehicles, which supplies parts for lightweight doit-yourself sportscars. He’s also created vehicles for James Bond films, including the sleek glider with retractable wings seen in “Die Another Day” and the ultralight hybrid snowmobiles with parachutes in “The World is Not Enough.” But the museum has first right to the lease if and when McCornack leaves the loft building. The lease calls for $440 a month in rent to the county, plus payment of all utilities and taxes on any improvements. But museum backers also get credit toward rent for work done on buildings, which is already $17,000, Brandt said. Old smokejumpers spent a week working on buildings last year and will do another week in June following the National Smokejumper Association reunion in Redding, Calif., set for June 11-13. “By the end of the lease agreement we figured we will have donated $50,000 back to the county,” Brandt said. Backers are optimistic it will be a success. “We’ve got old smokejumpers who jumped in the ’40s and ’50s, who are 85 years old, sending us money to protect it, save it and honor it,” Buck said. “We’ve got support from around the nation.”

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Intolerance wins on park board

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long with “excellence” and “environmental sustainability,” the Bend Park & Recreation District claims to value “inclusiveness.” But good intentions have their limits, it

seems. Which is why the district’s newly updated rules and regulations target people who use even smokeless tobacco products. Henceforth, then, if you have webbed feet, feathers and a beak, you may defecate in public parks with complete impunity. But if you have toes, wear clothes and support public parks with your taxes, you may not use chewing tobacco — even if you spit in a cup in order to provide clean sidewalks for the geese to defecate on. The creepiness of the new tobacco-use policy isn’t lost on one board member, thank goodness. During the ordinance’s first reading in April, Scott Asla pointed out that using smokeless tobacco affects no one but the user himself. According to the minutes of that meeting, “Asla stated the use of smokeless tobacco is a personal right and the district does not have the right to ban that use.” By doing so anyway, he said, “we are taking away the inclusive opportunities for those citizens to use our trails and parks.” He’s exactly right. But board member Ruth Williamson, who has her own peculiar sense of inclusiveness, promptly defended the comprehensive tobacco ban. By prohibiting spitting as well as smoking, “we are making our public spaces safe, wholesome and inclusive for everyone ...” Well, almost everyone. A desire to mandate wholesomeness, of course, is the heart of the new policy. We happen to think the fear of open-air cigar and cigarette use borders on hysteria, but bystand-

ers can, in fact, inhale tiny amounts of second-hand smoke. Chewing tobacco has no similar impact. So why ban it? Because “we are in the business of promoting healthful behaviors and activities,” said board member Ted Schoenborn, according to the April minutes. But is that true? Do we really elect park board members to enforce a healthy-lifestyle ideology on property owned by thousands of taxpayers? Maybe we’re old-fashioned, but we thought the board’s role was more basic than that. What’s wrong with letting taxpayers do what they want on their own property subject to common-sense rules that protect assets and prevent park users from hurting each other? If people want to engage in unhealthy behavior, whether by chewing tobacco or scarfing down half a dozen cheese dogs, that ought to be their business. Asla, sadly, was the only board member to oppose the district’s new rules in April, and again last week. That makes him the only one to support toleration and inclusiveness in its truest sense. His colleagues, on the other hand, seem to believe they’ve been elected to serve as healthy lifestyle czars, regardless of whether the behaviors they target affect innocent bystanders at all. There’s snobbery at work here as well as intolerance, and the people who own Bend’s parks deserve better.

Campaign nerves for Ron Wyden? W

hen it comes to matters of campaign finance, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., projects himself as a model of rectitude. Just last month, in fact, he and several colleagues announced legislation that would force the heads of organizations sponsoring campaign advertisements to appear in them and take responsibility for their content. The legislation, if nothing else, shows how badly politicians will torture titles in the service of catchy acronyms. The DISCLOSE Act, as it’s known, stands for “Democracy Is Strengthened by Casting Light On Spending in Elections.” When it comes to raising money for his own campaign, however, Wyden doesn’t seem to be quite so scrupulous. In a recent letter, he all but panted to potential donors that “deep-pocketed, right wing ideo-

logues are working overtime to defeat me.” Wyden, of course, has no serious competition in this month’s Democratic primary. And in November, he’s likely to face former Lewis & Clark Law School Dean Jim Huffman, whose campaign “war chest” looks like a match box compared to Wyden’s. As of late last week, Huffman had raised less than $350,000. “It’s pretty odd,” he wrote in response to Wyden’s letter, “that someone with $3.7 million in the bank would accuse his opponents of having deep pockets.” Huffman said he was “bemused” by Wyden’s over-the-top claim, and that may be so. But he also should be encouraged. It looks to us like Wyden, despite being a widely respected incumbent, is scared. All incumbents, good and bad, deserve such competition.

My Nickel’s Worth Save Friendship Park A big question faces Madras voters: Should the city build a new city hall and police station on the only park on the poorer, west side, or should Friendship Park be preserved for recreational use? Two well-funded anti-park political action committees stepped up to change the question. One argues that the democratic process is not legitimate. Is this true for all ballot measures or just those it opposes? Another PAC is changing the subject to the reality-challenged idea that the existing memorials will be moved because they are not recreational. This idea ignores that Friendship Park will be dedicated to our veterans. Memorials have centuries of history supporting their recreational role. The most popular tourist attraction in all of Washington, D.C., is the Vietnam Memorial. Finance is another important issue. The park was assessed at $2 million in 2007. It is now probably worth about half that. (By the way, the assessed value of New York’s Central Park is over $500 billion. The city of Bend and struggling developers could make a killing off Drake Park with a similar bailout!) The Madras city budget is already in crisis thanks to the city’s failed Yarrow gamble, millions more borrowed against future growth and a $4 million hangar (68 percent over budget). Madras families are already paying dearly for the city’s pre-crash specu-

lations. We have needs that are more pressing than another big-ticket bailout to prop up downtown developers. Madras voters should vote yes for Friendship Park. Steve Fisher Madras

Elect Flaherty What qualities make a good district attorney? The District Attorney decides who is prosecuted and for what. Therefore, he must have good judgment and enough experience to have developed a keen sense of what cases should be prosecuted and how they should ultimately be resolved. It’s not just a matter of whether a case can be won, but what’s in the best interest of society and yields a just result. The district attorney has been described as the “gatekeeper” of the criminal justice system. The public depends on him to prosecute the guilty and to protect the innocent. Even though this is an elected position in Oregon, it is nonpartisan and not “political” in the sense of a legislator or county commissioner. The district attorney is a professional person, an attorney, specializing in criminal law. As the former district attorney for Deschutes County (1983-1987) and with approximately 14 years as a prosecutor here and several other places, I think I have a good understanding of the role of the office and the kind of person who should fill that role. In my opinion, Pat Flaherty has the experience and good judgment to be our district attorney.

I’ve known Pat as a colleague and I’m aware of his reputation in the legal and law enforcement community. He’s described as an honest, straightforward guy who is an excellent trial attorney. We would be very lucky to have him as our district attorney. Tom Howes Bend

Re-elect Dugan This May, Deschutes County voters should re-elect one of Oregon’s most respected district attorneys: Mike Dugan. For 24 years, Dugan has served the people of Central Oregon as the chief prosecutor for Deschutes County. His record is remarkable, and Oregon crime victims have few defenders as reliable and loyal. When I was elected district attorney in Sherman County, Dugan offered me his advice and counsel. He is one of Oregon’s most experienced prosecutors, so his wisdom was invaluable to me when I entered public service. Dugan’s willingness to mentor district attorneys throughout Oregon makes his continued presence as a district attorney critical for the public safety of Deschutes County and all of Oregon. I now serve as co-director of the Oregon Anti-Crime Alliance political action committee. The Oregon AntiCrime Alliance PAC is proud to support Dugan for Deschutes County district attorney for the May primary election. Tara Lawrence Salem

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Republicans shouldn’t be eager to compromise principles By Jonathan Kahnoski Bulletin guest columnist

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n a recent column, Janet Stevens, deputy editor of The Bulletin, argued that the Oregon Republican Party must change if it is to have any hope of electing its candidates to statewide office. Stevens suggested two items in particular Republicans should reconsider. Stevens suggests Republicans must “… demonstrate they can play nicely with others, be willing to listen to differing points of view, and, horror of horrors, compromise with the other side from time to time.” This sounds great. It ignores, however, that for decades our nation has been assaulted by those on the left who want to remake America into a European-style socialist nation, and who believe in the rightness of their goals with almost religious fervor. They have come to dominate Oregon government and the major metropolitan areas of Oregon. They do not want to “play nicely” or to compromise. They want to win. Recent news stories about Democrat legislative leaders threatening

those who opposed Measures 66 and 67, the tax increases, are the latest example. Today, unfortunately, we live in an era of great ideological passions that do not accommodate playing nicely. With her other suggestion for Republicans — that they should leave “family values” concerning such sensitive issues as abortion and gay marriage “… where they belong, within the family” — Stevens politely tells most Republicans to keep their moral convictions out of politics. She forgets the Republican Party was founded first and foremost on the religious conviction that slavery was wrong. The party’s founders believed this so strongly they divided the nation and suffered a terrible war rather than abandon their convictions. That too was an era of great ideological passions with great consequences. The notion of keeping “family values … within the family,” that is, private, long has been the curtain behind which evil has flourished. Once, some argued that whether or not a man owned a slave was a private matter. Later, many argued how a husband treated (abused)

IN MY VIEW his wife or children was a private family matter. Today, you still hear some argue how they treat their animals (mere property, you see) is a private matter. Fortunately, American society is evolving away from such notions of what is a private matter. Today, both Democrats and Republicans appeal to moral convictions in support of their preferred government policies. Democrats insist a “moral society” must tax itself to pay for Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, welfare, food stamps and a host of other government programs. Republicans argue a “moral society” incorporates into law a respect for each and every human life — elderly, challenged or unborn. Democrats claim a progressive income tax is “fair,” and Republicans claim only a flatrate income tax is “fair,” each defining fair based upon their moral convictions. Both are injecting their morality into politics. Resolving the gay marriage issue

would be easy: Get the government out of the business of marriage. This can be done. How is the topic for another time? One wonders, however, if gays would accept such a compromise. Abortion is tougher. If you believe the unborn child is merely an inconvenient appendage of the mother’s body, like the appendix, you have no issue with a procedure terminating a pregnancy for any reason. If, however, you find persuasive that the unborn child’s DNA is different from its mother’s, and therefore cannot be considered merely a part of the mother, then we are dealing with a separate human being, one with legitimate claims to its own inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, rights the government was established to protect. Thus, one must conclude abortion is something to be tolerated only in the most rare and extreme circumstances, if ever. Just as early Republicans refused to sweep slavery under the rug, many Americans refuse to sweep abortion — and other threats to life — under the rug. A political party must have convic-

tions to exist, principles that inspire not only its own members but those who have not committed to any party. To inspire the electorate, Republicans cannot be just the party of green eyeshades and bean counters, just of taxes and spending. They cannot just pander to the voter fad of the day. Rather, Republicans must hold fast to their convictions and principles such as individual life and liberty and responsibility, free enterprise and private property, a strong national defense and American leadership in a dangerous world. Republicans must work tirelessly, patiently making arguments both factual and logical, to persuade the great majority of voters that Republicans are right. Then, they will win elections. Some, like Stevens, may find this very uncomfortable and choose to abstain from the Republican Party. That is their decision, and God bless them. However, they have no right to suggest Republicans abandon principle to accommodate them. Jonathan Kahnoski lives in Sunriver.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 C5

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Contributions may be made to:

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Glenn Albert Hutchinson, of Redmond April 22, 1913 - May 7, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond (541) 504-9485 Services: Memorial to be held at a later date.

Joshua Martin Ketel, of Redmond Sept. 4, 1977 - May 6, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Redmond, 541-504-9485 Services: Celebration of Life, Saturday, 5/15 at 1 p.m. at Terrebonne Roping Club, 9249 NW 31st St., off of Lower Bridge Way.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Ramon Robinson January 17, 1935 – April 26, 2010 Ramon Robinson was born in Upland, California, to Walter & Lillie (Bornemann) Robinson on January 17, 1935. Ramon graduated from Chaffe High School. He married Cindy A. Tigner in Upland, California, in 1989. Ramon was an electrical conRamon tractor; he Robinson retired in 1988. Ramon loved racing, dune buggies, fishing, boating. Ramon is survived by his wife, Cindy Robinson of La Pine, Oregon; sons, Steve and David Robinson; daughter, Linda La Rocque; three brothers, and one sister, sixteen grandchildren, three great-grandchildren. Ramon was preceded in death by his mother and father, one brother and one sister. Autumn Funerals has been entrusted with arrangements.

Bob Mercer, a music executive who signed the Sex Pistols, helped Jimmy Buffett set up his own record company and oversaw the popular compilation series “Now That’s What I Call Music!,” died Wednesday in Los Angeles, where he lived. He was 65. The cause was lung cancer, EMI, one of the labels behind the “Now” series, said in a statement. Mercer was born in Preston, England, and began his career at General Foods before being hired in the early 1970s as a

Dog park Continued from C1 The ordinance will help the Crook County Sheriff’s office to enforce state law, which requires all dogs to be licensed with a rabies vaccination. Crook County Sheriff’s Cmdr. Russ Wright estimates there are currently 300 dogs licensed out of the 6,000 to 7,000 dogs living in Crook County. Wright said the county does not have the resources to run around and check for dog licenses, but the new ordinance will help deputies to enforce dog licensing during complaints. Currently, deputies can only issue a citation if a complaint happens in their presence, and people who complain have to sign their names on the citation. Wright said the new ordinance will allow deputies to sign the citations instead. Wright said deputies will address complaints by educating pet owners to get a license and a rabies vaccination for their dogs. If there is a repeat complaint, then deputies may issue a citation costing between $25 and $250, he said. A license costs $10 per year for a spayed and neutered dog or $25 per year for one that isn’t. “Licensing gives us the ability to know how many and what types of animals we have,” said

Science Continued from C1 The Bend Science Station, located in west Bend, was founded in 2002 and provides science education to students through camps and classes. The program in the schools began at Highland School during the 2008-09 school year after the station received funding from two donors. Wanting to grow the program, the station enlisted Steve Hill at Miller Elementary, who in turn convinced Ensworth Elementary to get on board as well. This year, the three elementary schools’ programs were funded by more than $50,000 in grants, mostly from the Juan Young Trust, the Cow Creek Umpqua Indian Foundation, Starview Foundation and the Ward Family Fund, part of the Oregon Community Foundation. PTOs also raised money for schools to participate. The funds allow every student at the three schools to visit the Bend Science Station at least once. The older students get, the more time they spend at the station. Subjects vary by grade level, with kindergartners studying liquid nitrogen, first-graders looking at arthropods and second-graders learning about magnetism. Third-grade classes learn about force and older grades study chemistry. On Monday, first-graders from Savanna Sloter’s class were at the Bend Science Station to learn about arthropods, animals with exoskeletons. The Ensworth students watched a video of a molting horseshoe crab, then were able to hold a variety of molted exoskeletons. This elicited groans, screams and other exclamations. That was just the first 15 minutes. Then came fossils, a tarantula exoskeleton and a cup full of swimming krill. After further discussions about exoskeletons and jointed legs, the kids were treated to some time with live fiddler crabs, walking sticks and crayfish. They finished out the hour viewing a hissing cockroach. The time with the live creatures was nearly too much for some students. They gasped and fidgeted, yelled and squealed. They also learned quite a bit. At the end of the hour,

26 Cro ok ed Ochoco State 126 Wayside

company, EMI Films, and also managed Paul McCartney and Roger Waters. In the early 1990s he relocated to Nashville, Tenn., and helped Buffett establish his own imprint, Margaritaville Records. Mercer was known for his skill in using television to market music, which helped “Now” become one of the most successful album series in history. Following a long-established formula, each “Now” CD has a uniform design and about 20 current hits, aimed at young fans as well as older listeners who want a handy snapshot of the charts.

Third St.

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marketing executive at EMI in London, “forsaking snap and crackle for pop,” he once said. He rose to managing director at EMI, and under his watch the label’s signings included Queen, Kate Bush and Olivia Newton-John. Not all of its artists were to Mercer’s own taste, however. In October 1976 he approved a deal with the Sex Pistols despite an aversion to the group’s music; by January 1977, after the band had scandalized Britain by swearing on live television, it was released from its contract. After leaving EMI in 1980, Mercer worked for a related

Main St.

Arla Betty Frazier, of Bend

By Ben Sisario

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Music executive oversaw ‘Now’ series

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Wright, adding that embedded microchips help locate the animals and reunite lost dogs with their owners. Wright said his top priority is not enforcement, but education. He wants to make sure pet owners understand and comply with the ordinance. The office handles about 7,200 calls for service every year, which include crime, traffic crashes and animal complaints, Wright said. About 600 calls were dog complaints in 2009, he said. Diane S.W. Lee can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dlee@bendbulletin.com.

Sloter’s students were all repeating information about arthropods and getting excited to tell other Ensworth students what they’d seen Monday. “The cockroach was cool because it hisses,” said Michelle Ortman, 6. “We’re learning about insects. I like insects.” Her lab partner, Kayliegh Robinson, 7, had a different favorite. “I liked the stick bug because it was really cute,” she said. “I want to find one really bad.” Bermudez believes the more students he provides with handson science experiences, the more they will be interested in the subject for the rest of their lives. “We want to get to kids early,” he said. “You know it’s working when you hear the oohs and the ahhs.” Currently, more than half of the funds used to operate the three-school program come from foundations not located in Central Oregon. Bermudez said he’s hopeful he can expand the program with more local funding. Bend-La Pine Schools does not pay for the program. “We’re really supportive of that work but it’s not a districtwide program at this point,” said Lora Nordquist, a chief academic officer with the district. “We’re continuing to work on it. ... We’re always looking for ways to get to fund hands-on science because we know how important that is.” In the long term, Bermudez wants to see whether running the program over four years at four schools will show an improvement in students’ feelings about science and increase their scores on the state science tests. He believes if that correlation can be proved, it could bring larger grant funding. “We hope we can continue to grow this program and have every kid in the district be a part of it,” he said. Last spring, Bend Science Station collected surveys from

teachers and students, and both groups were overwhelmingly pleased with the program. Lisa Bermudez said this spring the data are even more positive. When asked in 2009 whether teachers would want to return, all 12 surveyed said they would. Miller Elementary Principal Steve Hill knew when he became principal he wanted to involve the Bend Science Station. His son participated in science camps at the station and with Miller’s focus on the environment and sciences, he thought it would be a nice addition to the curriculum. “I wanted to see if we could extend the classroom into a laboratory atmosphere so we called (Bermudez) and worked together,” he said. A Miller parent wrote a grant for the program, and the funds allowed Ensworth to participate as well. “It’s been outstanding,” Hill said. “It’s one of those things you can’t replicate in a classroom environment or a school environment. It’s a real lab.” Although the school focuses on science, Hill said having a real scientist running the show makes a difference. “I think every child in BendLa Pine should go if we could figure out a way,” he said. Highland Principal Paul Dean was also enthusiastic about the program. “You’re able to see the enthusiasm students have while they’re there, and after when they’re coming back and showing the science to other students and taking it home,” Dean said. “It puts it in a context that is outside of school and kids can see the impact that science can have throughout the community rather than just as an exercise in the classroom.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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Rescue Continued from C1 The boat had tipped over, Crownover said, and the man was in the water. “I was like ‘Wow, that’s crazy,’ I thought he was going to be gone,” he said. The man somehow managed to flip the boat back over, but it was full of water. The Bend High team called 911 to report the accident, and watched as a helicopter arrived at the scene, followed by a rescue boat. The man was rescued from the water and his boat recovered as well, the dispatcher with the Klickitat County Sheriff’s Office in Washington said Monday evening, but no further information was available at that time. The man must have been in the water for about 45 minutes, Clemons recalled, and the team watched as he was pulled out. The Klickitat sheriff called the team back later to thank them for alerting authorities and to let

Guzek Continued from C1 Billings said Guzek needed to make a decision or he’d let the original request stand. When defense attorneys couldn’t come up with an answer, Billings opted to do away with the option of life without the possibility of parole — in part because it was not a sentencing option when the crime was committed more than two decades ago. Hundreds of potential jurors filled out questionnaires last week that said life sentence without the possibility of parole could be an option. Guzek’s attorneys said the last-minute change of plan could confuse jurors and potentially violate Guzek’s rights. Defense attorneys made several other arguments about potential problems in the trial proceedings, including a requirement that Guzek wear a “stun belt” which can provide an electric shock, similar to a Taser. J. Kevin Hunt, one of the lawyers, said the belt rubs up against his client’s back and is uncomfortable. In addition, he said the law enforcement monitoring required for the belt makes private meetings difficult. “We’ve taken photographs to show the welts are left on him (by the belt,”) he said. “The entire proceeding is going down a road that’s completely denying him a fair trial.” Billings, calling the defense attorneys’ arguments about an unfair trial because of the jury questionnaire “pretty serious hyperbole,” denied all

them know that the man would probably be OK. But it was a random series of events that the golf team was even there to witness the accident, Clemons said. He had just heard from the Summit High golf coach about the spot, and decided to go check out the view and the spring wildflowers. “It’s one of those butterfly effect things,” Clemons said. “This guy, he could be down at the bottom of the river, being fish food, without Ryan getting out of the car, out of his seat belt.” Crownover said he was just glad he could be there to help. “It’s pretty crazy,” he said. And Clemons said that after the day’s events, the golfers — who didn’t play as well as they wanted on Monday — figure that maybe their luck will change. “Everyone’s thinking, ‘Hey that’s good karma, we’ll shoot in the 70s tomorrow,’” Clemons said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

of the motions for a mistrial or to delay the proceedings. “If the idea is that we’re going to somehow seriously contemplate that this case is not going forward this morning, that will not be the case,” Billings said. Guzek, wearing a suit and red shirt, sat quietly at a table between his attorneys, sometimes taking notes. Four sheriff’s deputies were posted around the courtroom. Monday was the first day of what is expected to be a full week of jury selection. Unlike many cases, in which groups of potential jurors are called in together for questions from attorneys and the judge, potential jurors were called in one at a time. Billings and attorneys on both sides of the case took turns asking questions about jury candidates’ ability to serve for a trial that is expected to last about a month, their knowledge of the case, and their feelings on the death penalty. Jurors who said they could not opt for the death penalty in any situation were dismissed. The twelve people selected for the trial will be the fourth jury to consider Guzek’s sentence. His initial death sentence was overturned in 1990 by the Oregon Supreme Court because of a procedural issue in the trial. Two new juries convened in 1991 and 1997 both found that he should receive the death penalty, but both decisions were reversed because of evidence-related issues. In 2005, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that witnesses who could testify to an alibi for Guzek could not appear at the fourth sentencing trial. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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C6 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MAY 11

HIGH Ben Burkel

Today: Isolated AM showers, mostly cloudy, cool, breezy.

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western



Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

59/40

54/38

63/38

44/30



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

61/37

53/27

Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman 51/27 Redmond Prineville 57/30 Cascadia 56/31 56/31 Sisters 54/29 Bend Post 57/30

54/29

45/18

Vancouver

Sunriver 53/27

54/26

Portland

Burns 52/28

52/27

Chemult 52/24

60/36

Helena

60/38

Bend

59/41

61/41



Idaho Falls

Redding

48/30



45/35 56/37

San Francisco Partly to mostly cloudy 62/50 with a chance of showers  today.

42/28

52/35

Reno

 

Crater Lake

Elko

72/47

53/29

Silver Lake

56/34

Boise

57/30

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley



Salt Lake City 52/40

HIGH

New

Full

Last

May 13 May 20 May 27 June 4

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

PLANET WATCH

First

HIGH

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 56/46/0.25 . . . . . 58/42/pc. . . . . . 59/46/pc Baker City . . . . . . 50/31/0.08 . . . . . 54/38/sh. . . . . . 62/37/pc Brookings . . . . . . 51/43/1.10 . . . . . 57/47/pc. . . . . . . 60/46/c Burns. . . . . . . . . . 51/37/0.21 . . . . . 52/32/pc. . . . . . 62/34/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 59/45/0.16 . . . . . 60/38/pc. . . . . . 67/42/pc Klamath Falls . . . 46/33/0.25 . . . . . 49/32/pc. . . . . . 62/36/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 39/32/0.15 . . . . . 45/31/sn. . . . . . 59/33/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 49/35/0.08 . . . . . 53/26/pc. . . . . . . 63/31/s Medford . . . . . . . 52/45/0.07 . . . . . 59/43/pc. . . . . . 71/45/pc Newport . . . . . . . 55/45/0.31 . . . . . 56/42/pc. . . . . . 57/46/pc North Bend . . . . . . 52/45/NA . . . . . 56/44/pc. . . . . . 58/45/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 69/38/0.00 . . . . . 63/43/pc. . . . . . 70/43/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 54/41/0.27 . . . . . 63/42/sh. . . . . . 71/44/pc Portland . . . . . . . 61/46/0.14 . . . . . 62/45/pc. . . . . . 68/47/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 50/39/0.24 . . . . . 56/31/pc. . . . . . . 64/37/s Redmond. . . . . . . 52/41/0.04 . . . . . 55/30/pc. . . . . . 65/35/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 52/46/0.40 . . . . . . 59/44/c. . . . . . 70/44/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 61/46/0.06 . . . . . 62/42/pc. . . . . . 69/44/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 49/40/0.06 . . . . . 54/29/pc. . . . . . 63/34/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 66/48/0.32 . . . . . 65/43/pc. . . . . . 75/45/pc

TEMPERATURE

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48/39 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.03” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 in 1936 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 in 1953 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.27” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.62” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.78” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.81 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.78 in 1980 *Melted liquid equivalent

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

3

LOW

72 42

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, warm.

73 40

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:08 a.m. . . . . . .6:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:17 a.m. . . . . .10:54 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:52 a.m. . . . . . .2:21 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .3:39 a.m. . . . . . .3:24 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:25 p.m. . . . . . .3:57 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .3:44 a.m. . . . . . .3:42 p.m.

Moon phases

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:44 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:20 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:42 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:22 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:05 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:19 p.m.

City

Missoula

Eugene

56/28

48/20





LOW

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

62/45

Hampton Fort Rock

64/47

55/27

53/26



BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 69° Ontario • 28° Meacham

SATURDAY Partly cloudy, warm.

71 38

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Seattle

Any lingering showers will end early, otherwise becoming partly cloudy. Eastern

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Paulina

Brothers

LOW

67 36

62/45

FRIDAY Partly cloudy, mild.

Skies will gradually become partly cloudy today as an upperlevel trough moves off to the east.

Central

La Pine 52/25

HIGH

30

62/36

55/28

Crescent

Crescent Lake

LOW

60/32

59/35

Oakridge Elk Lake

Skies will become partly cloudy today.

59/36

THURSDAY

Partly cloudy, significantly warmer.

Tonight: Partly cloudy.

57

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . 110-130 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 120-125 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 125-168 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . 1 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . no report . . . . 101-150 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 62/45

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 62/36

S

Saskatoon 61/35

Seattle 64/47

S Winnipeg 51/36

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 48/26

Thunder Bay 48/28

Halifax 50/31 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 60/45 55/38 51/41 62/45 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 45/37 44/39 Boise 58/44 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 61/41 50/44 New York 49/36 • 103° 55/45 57/46 Des Moines Fort Stockton, Texas Cheyenne Philadelphia 56/40 42/30 Chicago Columbus 58/49 • 20° Omaha San Francisco 70/55 60/46 Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 57/39 62/50 Stanley, Idaho City 60/54 Las Denver Louisville 52/40 Kansas City Vegas • 2.09” 53/35 78/63 68/54 St. Louis 72/54 Charlotte Harrison, Ark. 77/58 74/63 Los Angeles Nashville Albuquerque Little Rock 67/51 83/66 85/68 78/44 Oklahoma City Atlanta 88/70 Phoenix Honolulu 77/65 Birmingham 85/73 Dallas 81/57 Tijuana 84/67 92/72 65/54 New Orleans 86/72 Orlando Houston 87/67 Chihuahua 90/75 99/60 Miami 86/74 Monterrey La Paz 102/71 95/64 Mazatlan Anchorage 91/67 52/40 Juneau 54/40 Bismarck 55/36

FRONTS

Northern Rockies face big fire year

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .59/31/0.00 . . .51/40/r . . 58/46/pc Green Bay. . . . . .56/32/0.00 . . .44/39/r . . . .54/42/t Greensboro. . . . .66/40/0.00 . . .67/62/c . . . 84/64/c Harrisburg. . . . . .62/38/0.00 . .52/49/sh . . 75/46/sh Hartford, CT . . . .59/41/0.00 . 62/44/pc . . 51/42/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .59/29/0.00 . . .56/34/c . . 60/35/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .85/73/0.00 . . .85/73/s . . . 85/72/s Houston . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 90/75/pc . . 90/74/pc Huntsville . . . . . .58/49/0.19 . 84/67/pc . . 86/66/pc Indianapolis . . . .62/42/0.00 . . .71/55/t . . 71/58/pc Jackson, MS . . . .82/55/0.00 . 87/69/pc . . 89/69/pc Madison, WI . . . .60/33/0.00 . . .49/38/r . . . 54/45/c Jacksonville. . . . .80/54/0.00 . 84/66/pc . . 86/67/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .56/36/0.00 . . .54/40/c . . . .49/38/r Kansas City. . . . .54/48/0.58 . 68/54/pc . . . .66/49/t Lansing . . . . . . . .58/30/0.00 . . .52/42/r . . 58/45/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .78/56/0.00 . 72/54/pc . . 77/58/pc Lexington . . . . . .62/38/0.00 . . .75/62/t . . . .76/61/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .53/48/0.43 . 60/41/pc . . . .53/39/t Little Rock. . . . . .71/53/0.65 . . .85/68/t . . 87/69/pc Los Angeles. . . . .65/51/0.00 . . .67/51/s . . . 70/55/s Louisville . . . . . . .65/46/0.00 . . .78/63/t . . . .79/62/t Memphis. . . . . . .61/52/1.17 . 88/72/pc . . 89/71/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .87/79/0.00 . 86/74/pc . . 85/76/pc Milwaukee . . . . .53/37/0.00 . . .48/39/r . . . 50/43/c Minneapolis . . . .58/48/0.00 . .45/37/sh . . 53/42/sh Nashville . . . . . . .57/46/0.10 . 83/66/pc . . 85/65/pc New Orleans. . . .85/63/0.00 . . .86/72/s . . . 87/72/s New York . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . . .57/46/c . . 55/44/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .63/40/0.00 . . .59/47/c . . 56/44/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .65/51/0.00 . .69/61/sh . . . .84/62/t Oklahoma City . .86/54/0.19 . . .88/70/t . . 85/59/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .54/48/0.46 . 57/39/pc . . . .52/40/t Orlando. . . . . . . .83/66/0.00 . 87/67/pc . . . 88/68/s Palm Springs. . . .83/57/0.00 . . .78/57/s . . . 88/60/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .62/44/0.00 . . .68/46/t . . 66/55/pc Philadelphia . . . .63/42/0.00 . .58/49/sh . . . 65/49/c Phoenix. . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . 84/59/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .59/31/0.00 . . .60/55/t . . . 70/49/c Portland, ME. . . .53/38/0.00 . 60/45/pc . . 54/46/sh Providence . . . . .60/39/0.00 . 60/46/pc . . 54/46/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .68/42/0.00 . . .68/62/c . . . .86/65/t

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .48/43/1.74 . . .49/36/c . . 44/35/sh Savannah . . . . . .78/54/0.00 . 80/64/pc . . 84/66/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.06 . 56/37/pc . . 67/40/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .55/45/0.18 . 64/47/pc . . 66/48/pc Richmond . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . .66/57/sh . . . .85/61/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .51/44/0.61 . 51/36/pc . . . .49/40/r Rochester, NY . . .55/32/0.00 . . .51/43/c . . . 53/38/c Spokane . . . . . . .66/37/0.00 . 67/45/pc . . 68/45/pc Sacramento. . . . .60/45/0.22 . . .72/47/s . . 79/53/pc Springfield, MO. .53/46/1.11 . 77/61/pc . . . .82/65/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .63/52/0.25 . 77/58/pc . . . .79/66/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . 88/71/pc . . . 89/71/s Salt Lake City . . .59/45/0.13 . .52/40/sh . . 54/40/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .74/59/0.00 . . .85/51/s . . . 80/53/s San Antonio . . . .86/74/0.00 . 92/74/pc . . 93/73/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .73/51/0.03 . . .81/67/t . . 83/58/pc San Diego . . . . . .66/58/0.00 . . .64/55/s . . . 68/57/s Washington, DC .66/43/0.00 . .60/54/sh . . . .79/56/t San Francisco . . .59/50/0.11 . . .62/50/s . . . 65/50/s Wichita . . . . . . . .67/50/0.03 . 74/57/pc . . . .80/46/t San Jose . . . . . . .61/50/0.09 . . .67/47/s . . . 74/49/s Yakima . . . . . . . .57/46/0.05 . 67/42/pc . . 73/46/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .73/32/s . . 62/34/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . . 86/60/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .50/34/0.00 . .50/41/sh . . . 56/47/c Athens. . . . . . . . .80/55/0.00 . 83/56/pc . . . 85/58/s Auckland. . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .69/58/c . . 65/57/sh Baghdad . . . . . .100/75/0.00 104/79/pc . . 104/77/s Bangkok . . . . . .102/88/0.00 . . .97/79/t . . . .95/78/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .66/47/s . . . 68/48/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .78/64/s . . . 79/65/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . 60/49/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .68/54/t . . 69/53/sh Budapest. . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .71/50/c . . . .68/55/t Buenos Aires. . . .63/37/0.00 . .65/47/sh . . . 68/49/s Cabo San Lucas .95/68/0.00 . . .95/66/s . . . 93/65/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . . .89/62/s . . . 92/63/s Calgary . . . . . . . .50/28/0.03 . 62/36/pc . . . 66/38/s Cancun . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .91/76/s . . . 90/77/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .50/36/0.04 . . .51/40/c . . 50/40/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . .46/37/sh . . 46/33/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .68/50/0.11 . .59/48/sh . . 58/49/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .79/58/s . . 80/60/pc Hong Kong . . . . .81/72/2.49 . . .83/75/t . . . .82/75/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . 77/62/pc . . 80/63/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .96/68/0.00 . . .85/59/s . . . 87/60/s Johannesburg . . .70/55/0.31 . 70/51/pc . . 69/48/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . 80/67/pc . . 81/68/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .64/55/sh . . 62/54/sh London . . . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . . .52/42/c . . . 51/42/c Madrid . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .65/53/sh . . 63/51/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .97/84/0.00 . 96/81/pc . . 95/79/pc

BOISE, Idaho — The northwestern United States enter the wildfire season with drierthan-normal conditions following a mild winter that left little snow. Robyn Heffernan, a deputy fire weather program manager at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, blames the El Niño weather pattern that suggests higher-than-normal wildfire potential for the northern Rocky Mountain states. That includes Montana, Idaho,

Cajun Kate, a female American alligator, suns on a rock Monday at the Los Angeles Zoo’s gator pond, in Los Angeles. Damian Dovarganes The Associated Press

Show off your high school grad in our special edition of CENTRAL OREGON

Tigard auto dealer fined about the damage history of “totaled” vehicles. Marlin created a new dealership in his wife’s name, but Kroger says the same type of misconduct continued. Kroger says motorcycles advertised as “never crashed” had actually been totaled. The Marlins were ordered to pay the maximum fine under Oregon’s Unlawful Trade Practices Act.

The Associated Press TIGARD — A Marion County judge has ordered a Tigard auto dealership to pay $650,000 in fines for deceiving consumers about the damage history of vehicles for sale. Attorney General John Kroger said Monday that Matt Marlin lost his dealership license to operate Marlin Motorworks after acknowledging he forged title documents to deceive consumers

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Mecca . . . . . . . .106/81/0.00 108/80/pc . 103/77/pc Mexico City. . . . .86/57/0.09 . . .85/54/s . . . 84/54/s Montreal. . . . . . .52/32/0.03 . 49/28/pc . . . 52/27/s Moscow . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .72/55/sh . . 74/55/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .77/58/t . . . .77/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .89/73/s . . . 89/74/s New Delhi. . . . .104/80/0.00 . .107/76/s . . 108/78/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .68/61/0.46 . .67/53/sh . . 66/51/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .43/30/0.01 . . .42/30/c . . 46/31/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .52/32/0.00 . 50/29/pc . . . 53/27/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . .51/42/sh . . . 50/41/c Rio de Janeiro. . .77/68/0.00 . .73/63/sh . . . .75/64/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . .65/55/sh . . . .69/56/t Santiago . . . . . . .82/41/0.00 . . .78/43/s . . . 77/41/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . . .70/62/t . . 74/58/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .45/45/0.00 . . .56/47/c . . 55/49/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . .65/49/c . . 65/48/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . . 76/55/s Singapore . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .91/77/t . . . .90/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .48/39/0.00 . .45/30/sh . . 45/37/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 74/53/pc . . 61/47/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .83/73/sh . . . 84/73/c Tel Aviv . . . . . . .104/72/0.00 . . .83/62/s . . . 84/63/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .63/57/sh . . 64/52/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .55/34/0.00 . .51/41/sh . . 55/33/pc Vancouver. . . . . .59/48/0.00 . . .62/45/s . . 63/45/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .67/51/sh . . . .66/53/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . . .65/55/c . . 70/56/sh

SOAKING UP SOME SUN

parts of eastern Washington, northwestern Wyoming and southcentral Oregon, as well as northeastern California. Though Nevada had a dry winter, it’s also had a dry spring, meaning desert grasses aren’t growing as quickly. It should see below-normal fire activity. While El Niño left the northern Rocky Mountains dry, it deposited heavy snow and rain on Arizona, New Mexico and southern Utah and Colorado, meaning those areas could also see belownormal fire activity.

The Associated Press

• • • • •

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .95/65/0.00 . . .94/71/s . . 89/62/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .58/33/0.00 . . .61/51/t . . . .66/48/t Albany. . . . . . . . .56/32/0.00 . 58/40/pc . . 50/38/sh Albuquerque. . . .74/56/0.00 . . .78/44/s . . 69/43/pc Anchorage . . . . .53/44/0.00 . . .52/40/r . . 54/39/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .71/51/0.00 . 77/65/pc . . 84/67/pc Atlantic City . . . .63/39/0.00 . .55/51/sh . . . 60/53/c Austin . . . . . . . . .89/73/0.00 . 91/74/pc . . 91/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . .64/35/0.00 . .61/52/sh . . . .77/52/t Billings. . . . . . . . .56/40/0.01 . . .55/38/c . . 56/35/pc Birmingham . . . .59/50/0.00 . 84/67/pc . . 89/67/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .53/35/0.00 . . .55/36/c . . 53/38/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .67/39/0.00 . .61/41/sh . . 67/42/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .59/40/0.00 . 58/44/pc . . 51/44/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .61/40/0.00 . 58/47/pc . . 54/45/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .54/33/0.00 . . .50/44/r . . . 53/38/c Burlington, VT. . .52/34/0.00 . 58/39/pc . . . 54/33/c Caribou, ME . . . .41/34/0.00 . 52/32/pc . . . 55/35/c Charleston, SC . .75/54/0.00 . 78/63/pc . . 81/65/pc Charlotte. . . . . . 67/50/trace . . .74/63/c . . 83/63/pc Chattanooga. . . .58/51/0.11 . 79/65/pc . . 86/65/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .59/42/0.01 . . 42/30/rs . . 34/25/sn Chicago. . . . . . . .58/41/0.00 . . .60/46/r . . . 59/49/c Cincinnati . . . . . .63/35/0.00 . . .74/59/t . . 73/61/pc Cleveland . . . . . .55/35/0.00 . . .63/49/t . . 60/49/pc Colorado Springs 69/53/0.00 . 54/33/pc . . 45/29/sh Columbia, MO . .52/48/0.67 . 72/53/pc . . . .75/62/t Columbia, SC . . .75/52/0.00 . . .79/65/c . . 87/64/pc Columbus, GA. . .76/51/0.00 . 83/66/pc . . 89/66/pc Columbus, OH. . .62/35/0.00 . . .70/55/t . . 69/56/pc Concord, NH . . . .56/36/0.00 . 61/40/pc . . 53/40/sh Corpus Christi. . .87/77/0.00 . 91/77/pc . . 90/77/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .88/61/0.00 . 92/72/pc . . 89/65/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . . .72/54/t . . . .69/57/t Denver. . . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . .53/35/sh . . .43/32/rs Des Moines. . . . .55/49/0.16 . .56/40/sh . . . .53/45/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .56/37/0.00 . . .55/45/t . . 59/45/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .58/31/0.00 . .41/39/sh . . 43/38/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .91/62/s . . . 83/55/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . . .57/37/c . . 59/41/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .58/48/0.00 . .49/38/sh . . 53/41/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . . .52/25/s . . 56/27/pc

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NBA Inside Lakers, Magic complete sweeps, see Page D2.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

L O C A L LY

HEATHER CLARK

2010 Pole Pedal Paddle sets record for racer numbers The 34th annual U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle will be the biggest yet. According to race officials, by late afternoon Monday 2,946 participants had registered to compete in this Saturday’s multisport race. That surpasses last year’s total of 2,936, then a PPP record. Competitors in the event — which includes alpine skiing, nordic skiing, biking, running, boating and sprinting on a course from Mount Bachelor to Bend — race as individuals, pairs or teams. Monday was the final day to register, and participants had until midnight to sign up. “The way they’re coming in, we should easily reach 3,000,” said Chuck Kenlan, executive director for the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, which runs the PPP as its primary annual fundraiser. —Bulletin staff report

Got pain? A medical bike fit may be for you

Y

ears of 20-hour training weeks and highlevel bike racing finally got the best of Ben Thompson. Six years into a love affair with mountain bike, cyclocross and road racing, the pro/elite-level rider from Bend was suffering from Achilles tendinitis and constant low-back pain. The repetitive motion of turning pedals over and over with his body in a haphazard position on the bike could no longer be ignored. Thompson, one of the fastest non-pro riders in Oregon (and by nonpro, I mean a riderwho-races-and-also-has-a-family-and-a-fulltime-career guy), overlooked what many other cyclists — both competitive and recreational — also ignore: a proper-fitting bike. “I had never had (a bike fit) professionally done before,” says Thompson, now 33, a computer programmer, a husband, and father to a 2year-old. “I just got on a bike and started riding a lot, and it eventually caught up to me.” Two years ago, when Thompson’s chronic pain became intolerable, he went to see Timmy Evens, a physical therapist at Rebound Physical Therapy in Bend. Evens, an elite-level mountain biker himself, specializes in treating cyclists with overuse injuries and chronic pain. His medical expertise allows him to take a wholebody approach to a conventional bike fit, which emphasizes proper body alignment, pedaling efficiency and aerodynamic position. His twostep method involves assessing and treating an injured rider off the bike, followed by an on-thebike analysis and fitting. See Bike / D5

Bend golfer reaches U.S. Open sectional AURORA — Chadd Cocco was the lone Central Oregon golfer to advance Monday to the sectional stage of qualifying for the U.S. Open. Cocco, a pro golfer from Bend who turns 25 today, shot a 2-under-par 69 at the 18-hole local qualifier at Langdon Farms to finish in a three-way tie for fourth place in a field of 88 golfers. That was good enough to earn one of the local tournament’s six spots in a sectional qualifier. Bend’s Chris van der Velde (72) and Andrew Vijarro (73), Sisters’ Christian Green (72) and Michael English (78), and Redmond’s Andrew Fitch (75) all fell short of advancing. Nearly 9,000 golfers are attempting to get through the U.S. Open’s qualifying process. Local qualifying will take place until May 20 at 111 sites in the U.S. and beyond. The top golfers from each site advance to sectional qualifying, which is played over 36 holes at 13 sites in the U.S. and at two international sites. The top golfers from each of the 15 sectional sites earn berths in the 2010 U.S. Open, set for June 17-20 at Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links. —Bulletin staff report

INSIDE NHL Philadelphia Flyers ....................... 4 Boston Bruins ............................... 0 • Bruins lead series, 3-2 Montreal Canadiens ..................... 4 Pittsburgh Penguins..................... 3 • Series tied, 3-3

Canadiens, Flyers extend series NHL playoffs roundup, see Page D3

BASEBALL C O M M E N TA RY

Andy Tullis/The Bulletin

Butch Kovach, 62, who has a mid-week pass, pauses briefly at the top of The Summit chairlift, before hiking up into the bowl for another run at Mount Bachelor Tuesday morning. Kovach has been riding Bachelor since before The Summit chairlift existed.

Mondo vertical When it comes to snowboarding, Bend’s Butch Kovach, 62, keeps going and going — for more than six million vertical feet this season By Katie Brauns

COMMUNITY SPORTS

The Bulletin

The man has long been magnetized to — perhaps even mesmerized by — cruising down mountains. One might even say that when it comes to snowboarding, Butch Kovach cannot be stopped. “The first time I started riding here, I always wanted to ride top to bottom first thing — very first run of the day,” Kovach (pronounced KO-vak) says while riding the Pine Marten chairlift on a recent bluesky day at Mt. Bachelor ski area.

“I knew it was all a matter of conditioning. So I conditioned myself to go top to bottom, nonstop, day in and day out. … You gotta ease into this. … I’m tired at the end of the day.” As of the end of last week, Kovach has logged more than 6.2 million (6,244,422) vertical feet of snow-

PREP BOYS GOLF

Storm has early lead at districts Montreal Mike Cammalleri salutes the crowd after being named the star of the game.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NBA ...........................................D2 Prep Sports ...............................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Community Sports ................... D6

Bulletin staff report THE DALLES — The first day of district tournament golf is often tense, but good scores make things less stressful. Summit’s Jesse Heinly, playing in the day’s first group, fired an even-par 71 at The Dalles Country Club on Monday and helped relieve some of that first-day pressure. Behind Heinly’s strong first day of play, the Storm hold a commanding 29-stroke lead in the Intermountain Conference boys golf district tournament heading into today’s second and final round. “The first day in a tournament like district or state is huge, because there’s a lot of nerves,” said Summit coach Mark Tichenor. “If you can find a way to have a good first day, that can make the difference.”. See Golf / D3

boarding on Mount Bachelor with a mid-week pass this season. That’s an average of 30 lift rides a day, five days a week. He snowboards nonstop from open to close with no breaks, no lodge visits, no lunch, no bathroom visits (he uses the trees). “When you’re as old as I am, you don’t have to eat — your metabolism slows down,” he says. “I eat breakfast and then I eat a big meal when I get home. … I don’t waste any time going into the lodges. I never have.” See Vertical / D6

Mariners’ Griffey takes a nap and loses credibility By Larry Stone The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — t turns out the end game is the only one Ken Griffey Jr. hasn’t mastered. Not that he’s alone. Every athlete says they’ll know when it’s time to walk away, but few ever do. Which is why we have the painful images of Willie Mays stumbling in the outfield during the World Series, and Steve Carlton getting shelled on five different teams in his last season-plus, and a shadow of Shaun Alexander in a Washington Redskins uniform. Now add the mournful vi- Ken Griffey sion of Griffey sound asleep in Jr. reportedly the Safeco clubhouse late in a fell asleep in recent game, when the Mari- the clubhouse ners could have called upon during a rehim as a pinch-hitter. cent Mariners As anyone who monitored game. Twitter knows, Griffey instantly became a punch line. You snooze, you lose your credibility. And that’s just downright sad for a player who will go down, rightfully, as one of the all-time greats, the only recent member of the 600-homer club to do it with his integrity intact. See Griffey / D5

I

EYE ON THE BALL

Bend High’s Bryn Oliveira makes a return against The DallesWahtonka’s Ciara Buchanan during their singles quarterfinal match at the Intermountain Conference girls tennis tournament at Juniper Park on Monday. Results for the tournament were not available because of weather delays. The tournament’s championship bracket is scheduled to resume today at 9 a.m. at Bend High. Pete Erickson / The Bulletin


D2 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

Baseball ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers, TNT.

HOCKEY 6:30 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks, VS. network.

WEDNESDAY HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Montreal Canadiens at Pittsburgh Penguins, VS. network. TBD — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Boston Bruins at Philadelphia Flyers, VS. network.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles, FSNW.

BOWLING 5 p.m. — USBC Women’s U.S. Open, ESPN2.

THURSDAY BASEBALL 9:30 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers, ESPN.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks, VS. network (if necessary).

SOCCER 6 p.m. —MLS, Houston Dynamo at Real Salt Lake ESPN2. 7 p.m. —USSF, Crystal Palace Baltimore at Portland Timbers, FSNW.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Today Boys golf: Central Valley Conference district tournament at Trysting Tree in Corvallis, noon; Bend, Intermountain Conference district tournament at The Dalles Country Club, 10 a.m.; Sky-Em League district tournament at Tokatee in McKenzie Bridge, 8 a.m. Girls golf: Central Valley Conference district tournament at Quail Valley Golf Course in Banks, noon; Intermountain Conference district tournament at Big River Golf Course in Hermiston, TBA; Sky-Em League district tournament at Middlefield Golf Course in Cottage Grove, noon Boys tennis: Intermountain Conference districts at Pendleton; Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district tournament in Medford, 8 a.m. Girls tennis: Intermountain Conference district tournament at Bend High and Juniper Park, 8 a.m. Baseball: La Pine at Cottage Grove, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Cottage Grove at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Bend at Mountain View, 5 p.m.; Summit at Sisters, 5 p.m.

SCHEDULE

CONFERENCE FINALS WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers vs. Phoenix Monday, May 17: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 19: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

SUMMARIES Monday’s Games ——— LAKERS 111, JAZZ 96 FG FT Reb L.A. LAKERS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Artest 35:13 2-8 0-2 2-4 3 1 5 Gasol 40:20 12-18 9-11 7-14 2 0 33 Bynum 25:07 2-6 2-2 2-7 1 5 6 Fisher 40:24 3-8 3-3 1-5 1 3 10 Bryant 42:09 11-23 10-12 0-3 4 3 32 Odom 25:30 2-4 5-6 0-5 1 4 10 Brown 17:31 5-10 0-0 1-3 0 3 12 Walton 1:45 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Farmar 8:29 1-3 0-0 0-0 2 0 3 Powell 3:32 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 Totals 240:00 38-83 29-36 13-42 14 21 111 Percentages: FG .458, FT .806. 3-Point Goals: 6-17, .353 (Brown 2-4, Odom 1-1, Farmar 1-2, Artest 1-3, Fisher 1-4, Gasol 0-1, Bryant 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 6 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Bynum 2, Gasol 2, Odom). Turnovers: 6 (Bryant 3, Brown, Fisher, Gasol). Steals: 7 (Fisher 3, Artest, Brown, Bryant, Farmar). Technical Fouls: None. FG FT Reb UTAH Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Miles 35:48 6-12 1-2 0-2 4 5 15 Boozer 36:46 4-11 2-2 1-14 0 6 10 Fesenko 30:10 2-4 0-0 3-12 1 4 4 Williams 43:14 7-18 7-10 2-4 9 3 21 Matthews 37:45 5-10 1-2 1-4 0 4 12 Millsap 24:49 8-14 5-6 4-6 1 3 21 Kirilenko 12:29 1-3 1-1 0-0 0 1 3 Korver 10:55 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 2 Price 3:07 0-2 1-2 1-1 1 1 1 Koufos 1:39 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Jeffers 1:39 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Gaines 1:39 3-3 0-2 1-2 0 0 7 Totals 240:00 37-81 18-27 13-45 16 28 96

7. South Carolina 8. Georgia Tech 9. CS Fullerton 10. Florida St. 11. Louisville 12. Texas Christian 13. UCLA 14. Arkansas 15. Mississippi 16. Oklahoma 17. San Diego 18. Auburn 19. California 20. Connecticut 21. Virginia Tech 22. Pittsburgh 23. Rice 24. Vanderbilt 25. Fresno St. 26. Clemson 27. Southern Miss. 28. Kansas St. 29. Texas St. 30. U.C. Irvine

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Baseball: Sprague at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at The DallesWahtonka, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at Sprague, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at The Dalles-Wahtonka, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Track: Summit, Mountain View and Bend at City Meet at Bend High, 3:30 p.m. Girls tennis: Sisters hosts Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district tournament at Black Butte Ranch, 9 a.m. Friday Softball: Pendleton at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m. Baseball: Pendleton at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: CVC district tournament in Salem, 9 a.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at CVC Districts in Salem, 9 a.m.; Girls tennis: Sisters hosts Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district tournament at Black Butte Ranch, 9 a.m. Track: Crook County at Walt Ciochetti Invitational in Cottage Grove, 2 p.m.; Culver at Tri-River Conference district tournament in Salem, 2 p.m. Saturday Softball: Pendleton at Bend (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Madras (DH), 11 a.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Baseball: Pendleton at Bend (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Madras (DH), 11 a.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Track: Culver at Tri-River Conference district tournament in Salem, noon; Gilchrist at Mt. Skyline district meet in Winston, 10:15 a.m.

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— MADRID MASTERS Monday Madrid, Spain Singles First Round Peng Shuai, China, def. Victoria Azarenka (10), Bulgaria, 3-0, retired. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, def. Zheng Jie, China, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Nadia Petrova (16), Russia, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 6-2. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, def. Agnes Szavay, Hungary, 5-2, retired. Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, def. Virginia Ruano Pascual, Spain, 6-3, 6-2. Li Na (13), China, def. Beatriz Garcia Vidagany, Spain, 6-0, 6-2. Sam Stosur (8), Australia, def. Gisela Dulko, Argentina, 7-6 (3), 7-5. Flavia Pennetta (14), Italy, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-1, 1-6, 6-1. Caroline Wozniacki (2), Denmark, def. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-2. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, def. Dinara Safina (3), Russia, 7-6 (1), 7-6 (3). Second Round

36-11 39-9 30-14 36-12 40-8 36-10 34-10 37-11 34-15 35-13 30-16 33-15 27-17 37-10 34-15 34-12 30-17 35-13 30-20 31-17 29-17 32-15 30-16 29-16

479 478 476 474 472 469 468 466 465 462 459 455 452 451 449 448 445 442 440 439 436 431 427 425

Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Vera Dushevina, Russia, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5), 7-6 (5). Francesca Schiavone (15), Italy, def. Sybille Bammer, Austria, 6-2, 6-1. Venus Williams (4), United States, def. Vera Zvonareva, Russia, 7-5, 6-3.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— MADRID MASTERS Monday Madrid, Spain Singles First Round Oleksandr Dolgopolov Jr., Ukraine, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-3, 6-4. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 6-2, 2-6, 6-4. Gael Monfils (12), France, def. Stephane Robert, France, 6-2, 7-5. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 6-7 (9), 7-5, 6-4. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-3, 6-3. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 6-1, 7-6 (3). Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Carlos Moya, Spain, 6-0, 6-2.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— PLAYOFF GLANCE CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Pittsburgh 3, Montreal 3 Friday, April 30: Pittsburgh 6, Montreal 3 Sunday, May 2: Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 1 Tuesday, May 4: Pittsburgh 2, Montreal 0 Thursday, May 6: Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2 Saturday, May 8: Pittsburgh 2, Montreal 1 Monday, May 10: Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3 Wednesday, May 12: Montreal at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Boston 3, Philadelphia 2 Saturday, May 1: Boston 5, Philadelphia 4 (OT) Monday, May 3: Boston 3, Philadelphia 2 Wednesday, May 5: Boston 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, May 7: Philadelphia 5, Boston 4, OT Monday, May 10: Philadelphia 4, Boston 0 Wednesday, May 12: Boston at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. x-Friday, May 14: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 3, Vancouver 2

Saturday, May 1: Vancouver 5, Chicago 1 Monday, May 3: Chicago 4, Vancouver 2 Wednesday, May 5: Chicago 5, Vancouver 2 Friday, May 7: Chicago 7, Vancouver 4 Sunday, May 9: Vancouver 4, Chicago 1 Today, May 11: Chicago at Vancouver, 6:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 13: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. San Jose 4, Detroit 1 Thursday, April 29: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Sunday, May 2: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Tuesday, May 4: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Thursday, May 6: Detroit 7, San Jose 1 Saturday, May 8: San Jose 2, Detroit 1

BASEBALL College BASEBALL AMERICA TOP 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through May 9 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pv 1. Virginia 40-9 1 2. Texas 41-8 2 3. Arizona State 39-5 3 4. Florida 33-12 4 5. Florida State 36-12 5 6. Coastal Carolina 41-6 7 7. Texas Christian 36-10 8 8. South Carolina 36-11 6 9. Louisville 40-8 9 10. Cal State Fullerton 30-14 10 11. UCLA 34-10 12 12. Arkansas 37-11 14 13. Miami 36-11 13 14. Mississippi 34-15 11 15. Virginia Tech 34-15 16 16. Georgia Tech 39-9 17 17. Oklahoma 35-13 18 18. Auburn 33-15 19 19. San Diego 30-16 22 20. Connecticut 37-10 20 21. Rice 30-17 25 22. Oregon 30-18 15 23. Vanderbilt 35-13 NR 24. Pittsburgh 34-12 NR 25. Stanford 25-18 NR COLLEGIATE BASEBALL POLL TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through May 9, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pv 1. Texas 41-8 494 1 2. Arizona St. 39-5 493 2 3. Virginia 40-9 492 3 4. Coastal Carolina 41-6 487 5 5. Miami, Fla. 36-11 484 7 6. Florida 33-12 481 6

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Thursday’s Game Houston at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Optioned INF Robb Quinlan to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHP Trevor Bell from Salt Lake. National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Activated OF Brad Hawpe from the 15-day DL. Placed OF Carlos Gonzalez on the bereavement list, retroactive to May 9. FLORIDA MARLINS—Activated LHP Dan Meyer from the 15-day DL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed RHP Charlie Haeger on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP John Ely from Albuquerque (PCL). NEW YORK METS—Placed C Henry Blanco on the bereavement list. Recalled C Josh Thole and OF Chris Carter from Buffalo (IL). Designated OF Frank Catalanotto for assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Activated RHP Ross Ohlendorf from the 15-day DL. Designated RHP Brian Bass for assignment. FOOTBALL National Football League ST. LOUIS RAMS—Traded OT Alex Barron to Dallas for LB Bobby Carpenter.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 7,306 797 115 26 The Dalles 5,532 471 29 12 John Day 5,456 405 6 5 McNary 4,179 196 8 8 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 194,901 4,450 7,540 2,182 The Dalles 132,659 2,571 2,069 1,055 John Day 118,766 2,463 2,308 1,350 McNary 90,165 1,532 2,079 1,136

NBA ROUNDUP

Percentages: FG .457, FT .667. 3-Point Goals: 4-16, .250 (Miles 2-4, Gaines 1-1, Matthews 1-3, Kirilenko 0-1, Williams 0-7). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 13 (17 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Miles 3, Williams 2, Fesenko, Matthews, Millsap). Turnovers: 13 (Boozer 4, Williams 4, Fesenko, Matthews, Miles, Millsap, Price). Steals: 4 (Williams 2, Matthews, Millsap). Technical Fouls: Williams, 3:31 fourth. L.A. Lakers 29 29 22 31 — 111 Utah 24 17 26 29 — 96 A—19,911 (19,911). T—2:31. Officials—Dan Crawford, Bill Kennedy, Tom Washington. ———

Lakers finish off Jazz in a sweep

MAGIC 98, HAWKS 84 FG FT Reb ORLANDO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Barnes 24:00 3-7 0-0 0-5 3 3 6 Lewis 31:09 6-10 1-1 0-6 5 4 17 Howard 42:45 5-5 3-6 1-8 1 4 13 Nelson 29:52 7-11 1-4 0-3 9 3 16 Carter 40:23 7-12 4-6 0-4 3 2 22 Pietrus 24:00 4-8 0-0 0-2 1 2 12 Anderson 14:24 1-6 0-0 2-8 0 2 3 Redick 7:37 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 1 0 JWilliams 18:08 2-4 0-0 0-0 4 1 6 Gortat 7:42 1-1 1-2 0-1 0 1 3 Totals 240:00 36-65 10-19 3-37 27 23 98 Percentages: FG .554, FT .526. 3-Point Goals: 16-37, .432 (Carter 4-7, Lewis 4-7, Pietrus 4-8, J.Williams 2-4, Anderson 1-4, Nelson 1-4, Barnes 0-3). Team Rebounds: 14. Team Turnovers: 16 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Howard 4, Carter, Lewis). Turnovers: 15 (Howard 7, Anderson 2, Nelson 2, Redick 2, Barnes, Lewis). Steals: 4 (Nelson 2, Howard, Lewis). Technical Fouls: Howard, 3:41 third. FG FT Reb ATLANTA Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS MWilliams 22:36 1-5 0-0 0-1 0 1 2 JosSmith 36:01 6-13 4-7 3-8 3 3 16 Horford 38:52 5-11 3-3 1-6 2 5 13 Bibby 11:14 2-3 0-0 0-1 2 1 4 JJohnson 44:09 5-15 3-5 1-4 5 3 14 Crawford 39:52 5-15 8-11 0-0 3 1 18 Evans 24:34 3-7 0-0 0-3 0 3 8 Pachulia 17:01 2-3 2-2 3-6 1 5 6 Teague 3:51 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 Morris 1:50 1-1 1-1 0-1 0 0 3 Totals 240:00 30-74 21-29 8-30 17 22 84 Percentages: FG .405, FT .724. 3-Point Goals: 3-12, .250 (Evans 2-3, J.Johnson 1-6, Bibby 0-1, Crawford 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 8 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Pachulia, Jos.Smith). Turnovers: 7 (Horford 2, J.Johnson 2, Bibby, Crawford, Pachulia). Steals: 6 (Bibby 2, Jos.Smith 2, Crawford, Pachulia). Technical Fouls: None. Orlando 34 19 22 23 — 98 Atlanta 23 22 21 18 — 84 A—18,729 (18,729). T—2:32. Officials—Bennett Salvatore, Bill Spooner, Derrick Stafford.

SALT LAKE CITY — The Los Angeles Lakers played more like they were trying to avoid a sweep rather than complete one. The Lakers stormed out to a 22-point lead in the first half, then withstood a brief surge by Utah in the third quarter before regaining control in the fourth and winning 111-96 on Monday night, sweeping the second-round series and advancing to the Western Conference finals for the third straight year. “With close-out games, you have a tendency to lose focus,” said Kobe Bryant, who scored 32 for the Lakers. “We kept our concentration and paid attention to detail.” Pau Gasol added 33 points and 14 rebounds for the Lakers, who are off until hosting the Phoenix Suns next Monday in Game 1 of the West finals. The Lakers quickly ended Utah’s hopes of extending the series by dominating the second quarter both offensively and defensively, holding Utah to just 17 points in the period. Utah’s push in the third made it at least competitive and exciting for a little while, but the Jazz couldn’t sustain the comeback against the defending NBA champions. “We’re a playoff team and they’re a championship team. They’re just better than we are,” said Deron Williams, who had 21 points and nine assists for the Jazz. The Lakers made very few mistakes and didn’t give the Jazz many chances to rally. Los Angeles had just six turnovers and made 29-of-36 foul shots while knocking Utah out of the playoffs for the third straight year. “We had one of our better games tonight,” Lakers coach Phil Jackson said. “This is the first really consistent game

LEADERS

Boozer, UTA Noah, CHI Gasol, LAL Howard, ORL Camby, POR Duncan, SAN Horford, ATL Bynum, LAL

4 9 12 8 10 11 15 14 13 17 23 24 18 16 21 20 28 — — — — 27 29 30

All Times PDT ——— PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 14 4 .789 40-5 UCLA 10 8 .556 34-10 Stanford 10 8 .556 25-18 California 11 10 .523 27-18 Arizona 9 9 .500 30-16 Washington State 9 9 .500 25-17 Oregon 10 11 .476 30-18 Washington 8 10 .444 25-22 Oregon State 7 11 .389 24-18 Southern California 5 13 .278 23-24 Monday’s Games Washington State 9, Cal 4 x-San Diego 4, Oregon State 1 x-Santa Clara at Stanford, ccd. rain x-Arizona State 14, BYU 0 x-nonconference

Wednesday Boys tennis: Central Valley Conference district tournament at Redmond, 9 a.m. Girls tennis: Central Valley Conference district tournament in Salem, 9 a.m. Softball: Madras at Summit, 4:30 Track: La Pine at South Salem, 3:15 p.m.

NBA SCOREBOARD NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Cleveland 2, Boston 2 Saturday, May 1: Cleveland 101, Boston 93 Monday, May 3: Boston 104, Cleveland 86 Friday, May 7: Cleveland 124, Boston 95 Sunday, May 9: Boston 97, Cleveland 87 Today, May 11: Boston at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Thursday, May 13: Cleveland at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, May 16: Boston at Cleveland, 12:30 p.m. Orlando 4, Atlanta 0 Tuesday, May 4: Orlando 114, Atlanta 71 Thursday, May 6: Orlando 112, Atlanta 98 Saturday, May 8: Orlando 105, Atlanta 75 Monday, May 10: Orlando 98, Atlanta 84 WESTERN CONFERENCE Phoenix 4, San Antonio 0 Monday, May 3: Phoenix 111, San Antonio 102 Wednesday, May 5: Phoenix 110, San Antonio 102 Friday, May 7: Phoenix 110, San Antonio 96 Sunday, May 9: Phoenix 107, San Antonio 101 L.A. Lakers 4, Utah 0 Sunday, May 2: L.A. Lakers 104, Utah 99 Tuesday, May 4: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 103 Saturday, May 8: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 110 Monday, May 10: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 96

S   B

PLAYOFFS Through Sunday’s Games REBOUNDS PER GAME G OFF DEF TOT AVG 9 32 86 118 13.1 5 20 45 65 13.0 9 35 82 117 13.0 7 21 61 82 11.7 6 16 44 60 10.0 10 30 69 99 9.9 10 27 66 93 9.3 9 25 57 82 9.1

The Associated Press

we have played, except for a six-minute stint in the third quarter. We controlled the game and forced our will on our opponent.” Carlos Boozer had 10 points and 14 rebounds, and Kyrylo Fesenko added 12 rebounds for Utah, which was swept for the first time in 21 years. The Jazz lost the first three games by single digits but never found a way to slow down Bryant, who scored 30 or more in all four games. The Lakers finally got a blowout in the final game and by doing so earned a week of rest. Shannon Brown scored 12 and Lamar Odom added 10 points for the Lakers. C.J. Miles scored 15, Wesley Matthews had 12 and Paul Millsap scored 21 off the bench. Also on Monday: Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 ATLANTA — Vince Carter scored 22 points to lead another dominating performance by Orlando, which finished off its second straight playoff sweep. Orlando won the four games by a total of 101 points, the largest margin ever in a four-game sweep of an NBA playoff series. The Magic, who lost to the Lakers in last year’s NBA finals, have won 14 in a row — the last eight in the playoffs — and 28 of 31 games. They will face either Boston or Cleveland in the Eastern Conference finals. Hawks star Joe Johnson finished off a miserable series by scoring only 14 points on five-of-15 shooting. He was booed by the home crowd at the start of the game and got the same treatment when he went to the bench with 3:51 to play. The fans were still miffed that he said didn’t care if they “showed up or not” after they heckled the team in a 30point loss on Saturday.

• Beavs lose: Stefen Romero hit his third home run in four games, but the Oregon State baseball team lost to No. 19 San Diego. 4-1, Monday night in a nonconference game at Goss Stadium in Corvallis. Kraig Sitton scattered five hits and two runs in 5 2⁄3 innings in his first career start. But the Beavers managed only Romero’s 12th home run of the season in the loss, which sent them to 24-18 on the year, and stopped a potential four-game win streak after Oregon State swept Oregon this past weekend.

Football • Player in Oregon dies of head injury: Eastern Oregon University officials are trying to learn why an apparently normal play during a spring football scrimmage led to the death of a freshman player from a head injury. They also are watching to make sure that teammates and coaches are getting emotional support as they grieve the loss of 21-year-old Dylan Steigers, a former high school star from Montana who leaves behind a 2-year-old daughter. A couple hundred spectators were at Community Stadium on Saturday for the Mountaineers’ annual Blue-Gold Scrimmage. Steigers’ family members were there to cheer him on.

Bowling • Tennessee boy, 12, earns money at PBA event: A 12-year-old boy has become the youngest bowler to earn money at a Professional Bowlers Association event — but he can’t spend that cash right away. Kamron Doyle of Brentwood, Tenn., finished 30th in the PBA’s Canton (Ga.) Open Regional tournament Sunday, receiving $400 that will be deposited into a scholarship account. Bowling as a non-PBA member, he had a 2,797 13-game pinfall total for a 215.1 average. The sixth-grader was competing against a 94-player field that included some of the top regional and national tour professional players from the organization’s South region.

Tennis • Serena wins marathon at Madrid Masters: Serena Williams saved a match point before beating Vera Dushevina of Russia 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5), 7-6 (5) Monday in the longest match of her career to reach the third round of the Madrid Masters. Her sister Venus had an easier time in beating Vera Zvonareva of Russia 7-5, 6-3, while second-seeded Caroline Wozniacki won her first-round match against Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic 6-4, 6-2. However, defending champion Dinara Safina was upset by Czech qualifier Klara Zakopalova in the first round, losing 7-6 (1), 7-6 (3). In the men’s first round, qualifier Oleksandr Dolgopolov Jr. of Ukraine beat Italy’s Andrea Seppi 6-3, 6-4 and will meet Rafael Nadal in the second round.

Golf • Woods says neck injury not related to crash: Tiger Woods insists there’s “zero connection” between the neck spasms playing havoc with his golf swing and his Nov. 27 car accident. Woods said during a news conference Monday that his neck started bothering him two weeks before the Masters, his first competition in five months. He brushed it off as “no big deal” and believed he could play through the pain. That changed on Sunday at The Players Championship, where Woods’ creaky neck locked up. That prevented him from making his usual forceful turn on the ball on even a routine shot, and he was forced to withdraw after six holes. “I’m at a point now where I just can’t go anymore,” he said. “I want to practice, I want to play, I want to compete, but this is not allowing me to do the things that I need to do on my golf swing to hit the proper shots. I need to get to where I can do that again.”

Horse racing • Lookin At Lucky headed to Preakness: Lookin At Lucky will be looking for redemption at the Preakness. Trainer Bob Baffert plans to enter the 3-year-old colt in Saturday’s second leg of the Triple Crown, hoping his talented star can avoid the disastrous trip that sent him to a sixth-place finish in the Kentucky Derby. “We just felt like we owed it to him,” Baffert said Monday after watching his horse gallop at Churchill Downs. Lookin At Lucky went off as the 6-1 favorite in the Derby despite starting on the inside of a crowded 20-horse field.

Cycling • Belgium’s Weylandt wins stage at Giro: Wouter Weylandt edged Graeme Brown of Australia in a sprint finish Monday to take the third stage of the Giro d’Italia in the Netherlands. The Belgian broke away from the main pack in the final meters to finish the flat 139-mile stage from Amsterdam to the southern town of Middelburg in 5 hours, 6 seconds. Cadel Evans, hoping to become the Giro’s first Australian winner, lost the overall lead to Alexandre Vinokourov of Kazakhstan. Today is a rest day. The 21-stage event resumes Wednesday back in Italy. The grueling 2,133-mile race ends May 30 in Verona. For the second year in a row, American Christian Vande Velde was forced to withdraw from the race after crashing Monday. Vande Velde broke his collarbone in the crash and will undergo surgery today.

Basketball • Judge orders Wade’s wife taken into custody: A judge in Chicago ordered sheriff’s deputies to take Miami Heat star Dwyane Wade’s estranged wife into custody after she failed to show up for a Monday divorce hearing. Siohvaughn Wade will have to post $10,000 bond to be released, Cook County Circuit Judge Marya Nega said. The sheriff’s department couldn’t immediately say when the order would be carried out. Dwyane Wade’s attorney had planned to ask Monday that his client be given physical custody of the couple’s two boys, ages 8 and 2.

Track and field • Eaton earns Pac-10 honor: Ashton Eaton, a University of Oregon senior from Bend, was named Pac-10 Conference field athlete of the week for the week of May 3-9. Eaton successfully defended his Pac-10 decathlon title with a career legal-best 8,154 points to claim the multiple-events title last weekend at Berkeley, Calif. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

N H L P L AYO F F R O U N D U P

Summit girls golf takes big lead at district tournament

Canadiens defeat Pens, force Game 7

REACHING OUT

Bulletin staff report UMATILLA — Summit cruised to a 37-stroke lead during the first day of the Intermountain Conference girls district golf tournament Monday, posting a team score of 329 at the par-70 Big River Golf Course. Hermiston was second after Monday’s round with a 366 and Bend High was third at 375. Storm freshman Madison Mansberger ended the day with an 11-over-par 81, which put her in second place heading into today’s final round. The Dalles-Wahtonka’s Nadia Telles leads the field after posting a 3-over 73. Summit’s Stacey Patterson and Bend’s Kayla Good both shot 82s, which put them tied for third, while the Storm’s Kristen Parr and Marlee Barton and Crook County’s Kirsti Kelso all ended Monday tied for fifth with matching 83s. “It’s good punching them in all together,” Summit coach Jerry Hackenbruck said about four of his golfers finishing the first day of competition among the top five. “The weather was pretty rough — it rained and there was a really strong wind — but we settled down and played well.” Play resumes today at the Umatilla golf course at 9:30 a.m. The top two teams from the IMC advance to next week’s Class 5A state tournament in Banks as well as the top three individuals not on the two state-qualifying teams. In other prep events Monday: BOYS GOLF Panthers take six-stroke lead into final day of CVC tourney CORVALLIS — Paced by Andy Rodby’s 1-under 71, Redmond held a six-stroke lead over West Salem, 302-308, after the first day of the Central Valley Conference district tournament. Competing at Trysting Tree Golf Club, which will also be the site of Class 6A state tournament, the Panthers had three players shoot in the 80s on Monday. In addition to Rodby, Landon Moore posted a 74 and Jared Lambert ended the day with a 76. Moore’s 74 put him tied for second with West Salem’s Casey O’Sullivan heading into today’s final round. Sisters second after first day MCKENZIE BRIDGE — Jonathan Standen birdied the 12th hole and carded an 80 to help boost Sisters into second place (343) after the first day of the SkyEm League district tournament on the par-72 Tokatee Golf Club. Marist (315) — buoyed by solid efforts from the day’s co-leaders Joey Souza and Brent Pollock — leads the six-team competition. Souza finished 3 under par on the back nine to record a 74, and Pollock shot an even-par 37-37—74 to tie his Spartan teammate. La Pine (388), led by Travis Night’s 86, is in sixth place after the opening day. GIRLS GOLF Panthers finish day one in fourth BANKS — Redmond finished

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Crook County’s Erin Crofcheck reaches for the return in a match against Mountain View High School’s Ally Kercher during the Intermountain Conference girls tennis tournament at Bend’s Juniper Park on Monday. Results for the tournament were not available because of weather delays. the first day of the Central Valley Conference district tournament at Quail Valley Golf Course in fourth place with a team score of 408, 54 strokes behind leader West Salem. South Salem was in second at 376 and Sprague ended Monday’s round in third with a 402. The top two teams advance to next week’s Class 6A state tournament. Rachel Westendorf paced the Panthers with a score of 100, while Rheannan Toney had a 101. Cole shoots 99 to lead Outlaws COTTAGE GROVE — Marist’s Tierney Werner recorded an 81 to take the lead over her Sky-Em League competition after the first day of the two-day district meet held at the Middlefield Golf Course. Stephanie Cole led a two-person Sisters team with a 99 on the par-67 course. Marist posted a team-low 340, Cottage Grove (425) is in second and La Pine slots into third going to the second and final day of competition. BOYS TENNIS Storm second, Lava Bears third

after first day of IMC tourney HERMISTON — Host Hermiston ended the first day of the Intermountain Conference district tournament in first place with 16 points and was followed by Summit (12 points) and Bend High (10). In the singles championship bracket, Summit’s Paxton Deuel will play Hermiston’s Joey Burns in one semifinal match, while Crook County’s Trevor Brown will face Bend High’s Jeff Windsor. In the doubles bracket the Storm tandem of Conor Hegewald and Sterling Dillingham will meet Hermiston’s Rylie Smith and Ben Millard in one semifinal, while Mountain View’s Matt Larranetta and Kevin Kyger will compete against Hermiston’s Ryan Parsons and Connor McMichael in the other. All semifinal participants have earned spots at next week’s Class 5A state tournament. The IMC meet, which was plagued with weather delays Monday, will resume today at 8 a.m. at Hermiston High. Sisters boys rained out

MEDFORD — The Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district tournament, which included Sisters High, was rained out on Monday and will be played today and Wednesday. GIRLS TENNIS Rain forces delay of day-one competition The first day of the two-day Intermountain Conference district meet faced delays and lastminute venue changes as rain forced play late into the night at Bend Golf and Country Club’s indoor courts. In doubles play, Summit’s Hannah Shepard and Jessie Drakulich advanced to today’s semifinal round and will meet the Hermiston duo of Madison Garcia and Mary Hawmen. Crook County’s Catherine Brown and Braiden Johnston will face Summit’s Austin Hill and Natalia Harrington in another semifinal doubles match. Singles results and full scores were not available at press time. All championship semifinal matches are scheduled for Bend High today at 9 a.m.

PREP SCOREBOARD BOYS GOLF Monday’s Results ———

Class 6A CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE DISTRICT MEET Day 1 At Trysting Tree Golf Course in Corvallis Par 72 Team scores — Redmond 302, West Salem 308, Sprague 318, South Salem 334, North Salem 355, McNary 362 Day-one leader — Andy Rodby, Redmond, 71 REDMOND (302) — Andy Rodby 36-35—71, Landon Moore 34-40—74, Jared Lambert 40-36—76, Mason Rodby 4140—81, Colton Henshaw 39-43—82. ———

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE DISTRICT TOURNAMENT Day 1 At The Dalles Country Club Par 71 Team scores — Summit 311, Pendleton 340, Crook County 349, Hermiston 352, Mountain View 363, The Dalles-Wahtonka 364, Bend 371, Madras 390

Day-one leader — Jesse Heinly, Summit, 71 SUMMIT (311) — Jesse Heinly 38-33—71, Dylan Cramer 42-34—76, Jordan Schiemer 39-41—80, Cole Ortega 43-41— 84, Anders Hansen 43-47—90. CROOK COUNTY (349) — Dillon Russell 40-41—81, Caleb Henry 44-37—81, Ben McLane 45-48—93, Jared George 47-47—94, Kurt Russell 46-52—98. MOUNTAIN VIEW (363) — Paul Coduti 43-42—85, Jacoby Donaca 47-43—90, Cameron Mackenzie 46-45—91, Skyler Laughlin 45-52—97, James Harper 50-49—99. BEND (371) — Carter McGowan 41-48—89, Ryan Crownover 49-45—94, Martin Marquez 47-46—93, Jaired Rodmaker 51-44—95, Robbie Wilkins 56-50—106. MADRAS (390) — Rabe Clements 45-43—88, Nick Johnson 43-45—88, Jasper Gerhardt 45-46—91, Drew Pennington 64-54—118, Sloan Bush 58-65—123. ———

Class 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE DISTIRCT MEET Day 1 At Tokatee Golf Club in McKenzie Bridge Par 72 Team scores — Marist 315, Sisters 343, Junction City 328, Cottage Grove 364, Elmira 378, La Pine 388. Day-one leaders — Joey Souza, Marist, 41-33—74; Brent Pollock, Marist, 37-37—74.

Golf Continued from D1 Summit golfers held the top three spots after the opening day of competition on the par-71 course. Dylan Cramer — who sank a 40-foot birdie putt on hole No. 18 — enters today in second place behind Heinly after carding a 1-under 34 on the back nine for a 76. Jordan Schiemer ended Monday’s round hot on his teammates’ heels with an 80. And

SISTERS (343) — Jonathan Standen 39-41—80, Jeff Fought 42-41—83; Cody Farr Benziger 41-49—90; Aaron Simundson 44-46—90; Zach Cummings 45-45—90. LA PINE (388) — Travis Night 43-43—86; Niko Cummings 48-43—91; Drew Smith 47-46—93; Jacob Watkins 5464—118.

GIRLS GOLF Monday’s Results ———

Class 6A CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE DISTRICT MEET Day 1 At Quail Valley Golf Course in Banks Par 72 Team scores — West Salem 364, South Salem 376, Sprague 402, Redmond 408, McNary 455, North Salem 495 Day-one leader — Ashlee Pickerell, West Salem, 77 REDMOND (340802) — Rachel Westendorf 49-51—100, Rheannan Toney 49-52—101, Alex Toney 53-49—102, Chelsea Driggers 52-53—105. ———

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE

Cole Ortega starts today’s round in 10th with an 84. Crook County pushed a couple golfers into the top five as Dillon Russell and Caleb Henry both carded 81s and slotted in at fourth and fifth, respectively. The Cowboys are in third place with a team score of 349 and trail second-place Pendleton (340) by nine strokes. The top two teams at the IMC district tournament advance to next week’s Class 5A state tournament as well as the top three

DISTRICT TOURNAMENT Day 1 Big River Golf Course in Umatilla Par 70 Team scores — Summit 329, Hermiston 366, Bend 375, Mountain View 376, Crook County 380, The Dalles-Wahtonka 405, Madras 423, Pendleton 453 Day-one leader — Nadia Telles, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 73 SUMMIT (329) — Madison Mansberger 41-40—81, Stacey Patterson 40-42—82, Kristen Parr 42-41—83, Marlee Barton 4242—83, Rebecca Kerry 47-46—93. ———

Class 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE DISTRICT MEET Day 1 At Middlefield Golf Course in Cottage Grove Par 67 Team scores — Marist 340, Cottage Grove 425, La Pine 439, Creswell incomplete, Elmira inc., McKenzie inc., Sisters inc., Sweet Home inc. Day-one leader — Tierney Werner, Marist, 39-42—81. LA PINE (439) — Haley Clark 47-54—101, Samantha McPherson 50-49—99, Ashley Ferns 61-60—121, Bridget McDonald 54-64—118, Breanna Cram 58-72—130. SISTERS (incomplete) — Stephanie Cole 48-51—99, Trish Erickson 47-57—104.

golfers not on one of the two state-qualifying teams. Paul Coduti shot an 85 to lead fifth-place Mountain View (363) during the opening day. Rabe Clements and Nick Johnson posted Madras’ best scores, with both golfers carding 88 to put them in a tie for 15th after the first day. The White Buffaloes shot 390 as a team. And Carter McGowan of Bend High (371) recorded an 89, good for 17th after Monday’s round, to lead the Lava Bears. Action resumes today at 10 a.m.

The Associated Press MONTREAL — The Montreal Canadiens’ improbable playoff run has reached a decisive seventh game for a second series in a row. Michael Cammalleri scored his second goal of the game midway through the second period and Jaroslav Spacek netted the go-ahead tally 2:30 later for the Canadiens, who forced a Game 7 in the Eastern Conference semifinals with a 4-3 victory over the Pittsburgh Penguins on Monday night. Maxim Lapierre also scored 11:03 into the third to give Montreal a 4-2 lead. Bill Guerin deflected Sergei Gonchar’s slap shot from the right point past Jaroslav Halak with 1:24 remaining to draw Pittsburgh within one. But the Canadiens held on to set up Game 7 in Pittsburgh on Wednesday. “For us, it’s the reality,” Cammalleri said. “If you pinch yourself, you’re beat. I remember when you first come in the league if you start sitting around staring in awe and catching flies you’ll be out pretty quick. Now we belong. We’re having fun. For us, hey, we’ve got an opportunity to knock these guys off in Game 7. Let’s go enjoy it and I’ll say the same thing I’ve said every game: ‘Let’s see if we can’t go and play a great game.’” Halak stopped 34 shots for the eighth-seeded Canadiens, who came back to beat Washington in the first round after falling into a 3-1 series hole against the Presidents’ Trophy-winning Capitals. They now have an opportunity to end the reigning Stanley Cup champions’ run of five straight playoff series wins. “We know it’s going to be a great challenge for us,” Lapierre said. “We know what to expect from them, from their fans, and we just need a good start in Pittsburgh.” Penguins captain Sidney Crosby scored his first goal in seven games in the first period. Crosby earned an assist for his 19th point in 12 games when Kris Letang scored for a second game in a row early in the second. That made it 2-1 for Pittsburgh, which had closed out each of its five previous playoff series with a road win. Cammalleri, who opened the scoring 1:13 in, drew the Canadiens even 10:45 into the middle period when he put a backhand past goalie Marc-Andre Fleury from the slot for his second of the game. He has 11 goals in 13 games. Spacek, who returned to the lineup after missing nine games with a virus, drove a slap shot from the point past Fleury at 13:15 to touch off a thunderous ovation from the crowd.

Boston mayor confuses city’s sports moments BOSTON — Boston Mayor Thomas Menino might need to brush up on his city’s sports history before he publicly salutes any more of its “ionic” moments. The mayor made a doublebarreled gaffe Monday at a ceremony to unveil a statue of Boston Bruins legend Bobby Orr. It depicts the Hall of Fame defenseman soaring through the air after being tripped as he scored the winning goal of the 1970 Stanley Cup finals. Menino said: “In Boston, we have an amazing set of remarkable athletes whose actions in the moment have become ionic in sports.” He mentioned a few, including: “Varitek splitting the uprights.” He meant to praise Adam Vinatieri, who kicked the winning field goal for the New England Patriots in the 2002 Super Bowl. Instead, he named Boston Red Sox catcher Jason Varitek. — The Associated Press Fleury made 21 saves. “They were facing elimination,” Penguins left wing Pascal Dupuis said. “They were a desperate hockey team. They came hard. They have some guys who are putting the puck in the net right now. Cammalleri’s playing really well for them right now and at the same time they’re in their building, they played well and we’ve just got to go back home and win at home.” Game 7 could prove to be the final game at Mellon Arena, the Penguins’ longtime home. The defending champions, who haven’t lost a playoff series since falling to Detroit in six games in the 2008 Stanley Cup finals, will move into the new Consol Energy Center next season. Also on Monday: Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 BOSTON — Michael Leighton came off the bench after Brian Boucher was injured and made 14 saves to complete the combined shutout, leading Philadelphia to a victory over Boston and helping the Flyers avoid elimination in Game 5 of the best-of-seven Eastern Conference semifinals. Simon Gagne, who scored in overtime to win Game 4, scored two goals, and Ville Leino had a goal and an assist to help the Flyers force the series back to Philadelphia for a sixth game on Wednesday night. If they win, it’s back to Boston for a decisive Game 7.


D4 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M A JOR L E AGUE BA SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 22 10 .688 — New York 21 10 .677 ½ Toronto 19 15 .559 4 Boston 17 16 .515 5½ Baltimore 9 23 .281 13 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 21 11 .656 — Detroit 18 14 .563 3 Chicago 13 19 .406 8 Cleveland 11 18 .379 8½ Kansas City 11 21 .344 10 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 18 14 .563 — Oakland 17 15 .531 1 Los Angeles 15 19 .441 4 Seattle 12 19 .387 5½ ——— Monday’s Games Detroit 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Boston 7, Toronto 6 L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 4, 11 innings Today’s Games N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 1-3) at Detroit (Porcello 2-3), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Cl.Lee 0-1) at Baltimore (D.Hernandez 0-4), 4:05 p.m. Toronto (Eveland 3-1) at Boston (Matsuzaka 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Cahill 1-1) at Texas (C.Lewis 3-1), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 1-2) at Minnesota (Slowey 4-2), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (Westbrook 0-2) at Kansas City (Bannister 12), 5:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Niemann 2-0) at L.A. Angels (Kazmir 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 10:10 a.m. Toronto at Boston, 10:35 a.m. N.Y. Yankees at Detroit, 4:05 p.m. Seattle at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 4:05 p.m. Oakland at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 20 12 .625 — Washington 18 14 .563 2 New York 17 15 .531 3 Florida 15 17 .469 5 Atlanta 14 18 .438 6 Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 20 12 .625 — Cincinnati 17 15 .531 3 Milwaukee 15 17 .469 5 Pittsburgh 14 18 .438 6 Chicago 14 19 .424 6½ Houston 10 21 .323 9½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 19 12 .613 — San Francisco 18 12 .600 ½ Colorado 15 17 .469 4½ Los Angeles 15 17 .469 4½ Arizona 14 19 .424 6 ——— Monday’s Games Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 1 Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Florida 4, Chicago Cubs 2 Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 2 Philadelphia 9, Colorado 5 L.A. Dodgers 7, Arizona 3 Today’s Games Cincinnati (Cueto 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Morton 1-5), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Olsen 2-1) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 2-2) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 3-1), 5:05 p.m. Atlanta (T.Hudson 2-1) at Milwaukee (Bush 1-2), 5:10 p.m. Houston (Myers 1-2) at St. Louis (Penny 3-2), 5:15 p.m. Philadelphia (Halladay 6-1) at Colorado (Cook 1-3), 5:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ely 0-1) at Arizona (Haren 4-1), 6:40 p.m. San Diego (LeBlanc 2-0) at San Francisco (Zito 5-0), 7:15 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 9:35 a.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 10:10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. Florida at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 12:10 p.m. Houston at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Tigers 5, Yankees 4 DETROIT — Johnny Damon hit a homer in his first game against the team that didn’t re-sign him, helping Detroit beat New York. Austin Jackson, a former Yankees prospect, gave Detroit a three-run lead in the second inning. Mark Teixeira’s two-run home run pulled New York within a run in the third inning. New York

AB R

H BI BB SO Avg.

Jeter ss Swisher rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Posada c 1-Cervelli pr-c Thames dh Gardner cf Winn lf Totals

5 3 5 4 3 2 0 4 3 4 33

0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

0 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 8

0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 4

0 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 7

1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

.286 .306 .202 .286 .353 .280 .400 .378 .333 .200

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch lf Kelly lf Inge 3b S.Sizemore 2b Laird c Everett ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 3 0 4 3 3 3 30

R 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

H BI BB 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 8 5 5

SO 2 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 9

Avg. .360 .295 .286 .377 .340 .172 .244 .233 .147 .191

New York 002 000 020 — 4 8 1 Detroit 210 010 10x — 5 8 0 1-ran for Posada in the 8th. E—A.Rodriguez (2). LOB—New York 9, Detroit 7. 2B—Mi.Cabrera (12). 3B—Boesch (1). HR—Teixeira (6), off Thomas; Damon (2), off Mitre. RBIs—Teixeira 2 (22), Thames (5), Gardner (10), A.Jackson (10), Damon (15), Boesch 3 (14). SB—Everett (2). CS—A.Rodriguez (2). S—Everett. Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Winn 3, Teixeira, Jeter); Detroit 4 (Damon, Inge 2, A.Jackson). Runners moved up—Cano, A.Jackson. GIDP—Teixeira, Ordonez. DP—New York 1 (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira); Detroit 1 (Bonine, Everett, Mi.Cabrera). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mitre L, 0-1 4 1-3 5 4 3 2 4 69 3.86 D.Robertson 1 2-3 2 0 0 1 2 36 10.61 Logan 1 1 1 1 2 0 18 3.38 Chamberlain 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.45 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Thomas 3 3 2 2 3 0 68 5.49 Bonine W, 3-0 2 1-3 2 0 0 2 1 34 1.02 Zumaya H, 6 1 2-3 3 2 2 2 1 33 2.25 Coke H, 4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 1.69 Perry H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.38 Valverde 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 0.61 Zumaya pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Zumaya 2-0, Coke 3-1, Perry 2-0. IBB—off D.Robertson (Boesch). WP— D.Robertson, Bonine. T—3:16. A—34,365 (41,255).

Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 6 BOSTON — Brandon Morrow set a Toronto record by walking five batters in one inning as Boston scored four runs in the second and went on to a win. Toronto AB R F.Lewis lf 5 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 Lind dh 5 0 V.Wells cf 4 0 Overbay 1b 3 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 2 J.Bautista 3b 2 2 J.Buck c 4 1 Snider rf 4 0 Totals 35 6

H BI BB 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 2 2 2 0 1 1 0 8 6 4

SO 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 7

Avg. .300 .190 .221 .328 .172 .270 .216 .258 .226

Boston Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b V.Martinez c Youkilis 1b D.Ortiz dh Beltre 3b Hermida lf D.McDonald cf Van Every rf Totals

H BI BB 1 0 2 2 2 1 1 3 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 8 6 7

SO 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 2 1 9

Avg. .285 .299 .250 .305 .185 .325 .247 .230 .214

AB 3 4 5 4 4 3 3 4 3 33

R 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 7

Toronto 040 020 000 — 6 8 2 Boston 241 000 00x — 7 8 1 E—Ale.Gonzalez (7), A.Hill (1), Scutaro (4). LOB— Toronto 6, Boston 9. 2B—Ale.Gonzalez (13), J.Buck (9), Pedroia (12). HR—J.Bautista (7), off Lackey. RBIs— F.Lewis (12), J.Bautista 2 (23), J.Buck 2 (20), Snider (9), Pedroia 2 (23), V.Martinez 3 (17), D.Ortiz (11). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 3 (V.Wells 2, Lind); Boston 3 (Hermida 2, Youkilis). Runners moved up—Lind. GIDP—Snider. DP—Boston 1 (Scutaro, Pedroia, Youkilis). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO Morrow L, 2-3 1 2-3 3 6 6 6 4 Roenicke 2 1-3 3 1 0 1 3 R.Lewis 3 1 0 0 0 2 Janssen 1 1 0 0 0 0 Boston IP H R ER BB SO Lackey W, 4-1 6 8 6 6 3 6 Okajima H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 Bard H, 7 1 0 0 0 1 0 Papelbon S, 9-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Roenicke 2-0. T—3:06. A—37,332 (37,402).

NP 67 44 39 25 NP 95 6 14 13

ERA 6.69 5.40 3.24 5.40 ERA 4.60 5.23 3.00 1.69

Angels 5, Rays 4, 11 innings ANAHEIM, Calif. — Juan Rivera’s sacrifice fly in the 11th inning led Los Angeles to a victory over Tampa Bay after closer Brian Fuentes blew a three-run lead in the ninth. Tampa Bay

AB R

H BI BB SO Avg.

STEALING HOME

Pittsburgh 7. 2B—O.Cabrera (4), Rolen 2 (6), L.Nix (1). HR—Cedeno (3), off Arroyo. RBIs—Rolen (14), L.Nix (3), Cedeno (9). S—Arroyo, Iwamura. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 4 (Stubbs, Votto, O.Cabrera 2); Pittsburgh 3 (Doumit, A.McCutchen, Cedeno). GIDP—L.Nix. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Meek, Cedeno, Clement).

Bartlett ss Crawford lf Zobrist rf-cf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b Jaso c Burrell dh Brignac 2b-rf Kapler rf S.Rodriguez cf a-W.Aybar ph-2b Totals

5 6 4 6 3 5 5 3 2 2 3 44

1 1 0 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 4 12

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf K.Morales 1b H.Matsui dh 1-Willits pr-dh J.Rivera lf H.Kendrick 2b Napoli c B.Wood 3b Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 2 0 4 4 3 4 36

R 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 5

0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

1 3 0 2 2 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 12

.246 .301 .267 .325 .179 .350 .221 .279 .233 .200 .277

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 8 5 1 10

Avg. .246 .263 .276 .291 .233 .150 .236 .271 .225 .165

Tampa Bay 000 000 013 00 — 4 12 2 Los Angeles 101 200 000 01 — 5 8 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-fouled out for S.Rodriguez in the 7th. 1-ran for H.Matsui in the 8th. E—Jaso (2), Brignac (3), J.Rivera (2). LOB—Tampa Bay 12, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Longoria 2 (11), H.Kendrick (7). HR—W.Aybar (3), off Fuentes; Tor.Hunter (4), off Garza; Napoli (2), off Garza. RBIs—Longoria 2 (25), Jaso (12), W.Aybar (8), Tor.Hunter 2 (18), J.Rivera (15), Napoli 2 (6). CS—Kapler (1), E.Aybar (4), K.Morales (1). S—Willits. SF—Tor.Hunter, J.Rivera. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 6 (Longoria, Brignac, Bartlett, Burrell, Jaso 2); Los Angeles 1 (E.Aybar). GIDP—Zobrist. DP—Tampa Bay 2 (Jaso, Jaso, Longoria), (Jaso, Jaso, Bartlett); Los Angeles 1 (E.Aybar, K.Morales). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza 7 2-3 7 4 4 1 7 117 2.49 Wheeler 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 21 1.64 Choate 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 7.27 Balfour L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 2.45 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineiro 6 1-3 5 0 0 1 7 112 4.50 Jepsen H, 9 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.05 Rodney 1 3 1 1 1 0 29 2.87 Fuentes BS, 2-6 1 3 3 3 1 1 30 7.04 Bulger 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 32 4.50 T.Bell W, 1-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Wheeler 1-0, Jepsen 2-0, T.Bell 1-0. HBP—by Garza (Napoli), by Fuentes (C.Pena). WP—Balfour, Pineiro 2, Rodney, Fuentes. Catchers’ interference—Jaso. T—4:04. A—36,798 (45,285).

NL ROUNDUP Braves 8, Brewers 2 MILWAUKEE — Martin Prado hit a grand slam, Tommy Hanson got plenty of run support in eight scoreless innings and scuffling Atlanta snapped a pair of power droughts in a win over Milwaukee. Atlanta AB R Infante ss 3 1 Prado 2b 5 1 C.Jones 3b 3 0 1-Conrad pr-3b 0 1 Glaus 1b 4 1 McCann c 4 0 Me.Cabrera rf 4 1 M.Diaz lf 4 0 McLouth cf 4 2 Hanson p 3 1

H BI BB 0 0 2 2 5 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0

SO 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1

Avg. .275 .315 .230 .133 .262 .229 .194 .171 .169 .063

J.Chavez p Totals

0 0 34 8

0 7

0 6

---

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Inglett rf Braun lf Gerut lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Edmonds cf A.Escobar ss Kottaras c D.Davis p M.Parra p a-Counsell ph C.Vargas p Totals

AB 4 4 2 1 4 4 4 4 2 2 0 1 0 32

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1 10

Avg. .274 .333 .359 .200 .260 .310 .250 .214 .235 .000 .500 .315 .000

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 8

0 8

Atlanta 000 016 001 — 8 7 0 Milwaukee 000 000 002 — 2 6 2 a-grounded out for M.Parra in the 8th. 1-ran for C.Jones in the 6th. E—Weeks 2 (3). LOB—Atlanta 9, Milwaukee 5. 2B— Me.Cabrera (4), Inglett (2). HR—Glaus (3), off D.Davis; Prado (2), off M.Parra; McGehee (7), off J.Chavez. RBIs—Prado 5 (12), Glaus (19), M.Diaz (5), McLouth (6), McGehee 2 (30). S—Hanson. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 2 (McCann, McLouth); Milwaukee 2 (Edmonds, Fielder). GIDP—D.Davis. DP—Atlanta 1 (McCann, Infante, Glaus). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hanson W, 3-2 8 4 0 0 1 8 109 2.30 J.Chavez 1 2 2 2 0 2 17 5.65 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Davis L, 1-4 5 2-3 3 6 3 6 4 113 7.56 M.Parra 2 1-3 2 1 1 1 2 35 3.63 C.Vargas 1 2 1 1 1 0 23 5.65 Inherited runners-scored—M.Parra 3-3. IBB—off D.Davis (M.Diaz). HBP—by Hanson (Braun), by D.Davis (McCann). T—2:51. A—24,365 (41,900).

Nationals 3, Mets 2 NEW YORK — Adam Kennedy and Ryan Zimmerman hit consecutive homers to support a sharp outing by rookie Luis Atilano, and Washington beat New York. Washington Morgan cf A.Kennedy 2b-1b Zimmerman 3b A.Dunn 1b 1-Taveras pr-lf-rf Willingham lf Alb.Gonzalez 2b I.Rodriguez c Bernadina rf Bruney p Batista p Desmond ss Atilano p Slaten p Walker p S.Burnett p W.Harris lf Totals

AB 5 3 4 3 1 4 0 4 4 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 1 35

R H 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 11

New York Pagan cf L.Castillo 2b Jos.Reyes ss Cora ss Bay lf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Francoeur rf Barajas c Maine p Takahashi p a-Matthews Jr. ph Feliciano p

AB 5 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 0 1 0

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .275 .247 .321 .252 .133 .267 .281 .393 .212 --.000 .255 .125 --.000 --.189

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 2 0 2 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0

Avg. .269 .270 .237 .182 .248 .277 .311 .241 .244 .000 .333 .136 ---

Mejia p 0 0 0 0 b-Catalanotto ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 2 12 2

0 0 --0 0 .160 2 11

Washington 002 000 010 — 3 11 0 New York 000 000 101 — 2 12 0 a-struck out for Takahashi in the 7th. b-grounded out for Mejia in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 8th. LOB—Washington 10, New York 11. 2B—A.Dunn (8), I.Rodriguez (9), Barajas (3). HR—A.Kennedy (2), off Maine; Zimmerman (6), off Maine; Pagan (2), off Batista. RBIs—A.Kennedy (12), Zimmerman (16), I.Rodriguez (13), Pagan (13), L.Castillo (8). SB—Morgan 2 (8), A.Kennedy (5), I.Rodriguez (2), Pagan (4). S—Maine. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 6 (Willingham 2, Atilano, Bernadina, Desmond, Taveras); New York 7 (I.Davis 3, L.Castillo, Jos.Reyes, Barajas 2). GIDP—Desmond. DP—Washington 1 (Zimmerman, A.Dunn); New York 2 (Francoeur, L.Castillo, I.Davis), (L.Castillo, Cora, I.Davis). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Atilano W, 3-0 5 1-3 5 0 0 2 5 102 3.57 Slaten H, 1 1 1-3 3 1 1 0 1 20 6.75 Walker H, 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 14 5.29 S.Burnett 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 4.70 Bruney H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.74 Batista S, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 2 18 5.85 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maine L, 1-2 6 7 2 2 4 5 114 5.45 Takahashi 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.05 Feliciano 1-3 3 1 1 0 1 16 1.88 Mejia 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 21 2.35 S.Burnett pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Slaten 2-0, Walker 2-0, S.Burnett 1-0, Bruney 2-0, Mejia 2-0. IBB—off Maine (Desmond), off Mejia (Zimmerman). WP—Bruney. PB—I.Rodriguez. T—3:23. A—29,313 (41,800).

Reds 2, Pirates 1 PITTSBURGH — Bronson Arroyo limited Pittsburgh to one run over seven-plus innings, Scott Rolen and Laynce Nix doubled in runs and Cincinnati held off the Pirates. Cincinnati O.Cabrera ss B.Phillips 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b Bruce rf L.Nix lf Stubbs cf Hanigan c Arroyo p Rhodes p b-Gomes ph Cordero p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 0 1 0 32

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 4

SO 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .269 .248 .304 .260 .250 .175 .185 .391 .063 --.274 ---

Pittsburgh Iwamura 2b An.LaRoche 3b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf Doumit c Milledge lf Clement 1b Cedeno ss Ohlendorf p Ja.Lopez p Meek p a-Delw.Young ph Hanrahan p Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 3 3 4 4 1 1 0 1 0 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 3

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .182 .304 .325 .230 .273 .245 .181 .238 .000 .000 --.267 ---

Cincinnati 000 100 010 — 2 7 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 010 — 1 5 2 a-singled for Meek in the 8th. b-singled for Rhodes in the 9th. E—Doumit (1), An.LaRoche (6). LOB—Cincinnati 8,

0 0 0 0 3

1 0 0 0 4

1 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 6 12

.423 .235 .125 .259

ERA 5.36 0.69 2.95 ERA 3.00 2.57 0.86 6.35

CHICAGO — Nate Robertson pitched six solid innings, Ronny Paulino homered and Florida beat Chicago after dropping five of six.

Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Billingsley 5 1-3 3 2 2 4 7 90 4.82 Belisario H, 3 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 33 6.52 Kuo H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.86 Troncoso 1 1 1 1 1 1 13 4.08 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Lopez L, 1-2 7 7 4 4 5 3 102 4.30 Howry 1 2-3 2 3 3 1 0 36 8.16 Vasquez 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 11 6.10 Inherited runners-scored—Belisario 2-1, Vasquez 22. IBB—off Howry (Man.Ramirez). WP—Billingsley. T—2:59. A—19,863 (48,633).

NP 103 12 18 NP 84 28 16 18

Marlins 4, Cubs 2

Charles Rex Arbogast / The Associated Press

1 4 2 2 30

Los Angeles 011 020 003 — 7 11 0 Arizona 010 001 001 — 3 4 0 a-popped out for R.Lopez in the 7th. b-popped out for Belisario in the 8th. c-singled for Vasquez in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 10, Arizona 6. 2B—Ethier 2 (8), J.Upton (6), S.Drew (10). HR—Loney (3), off R.Lopez; C.Young (5), off Billingsley. RBIs—Ethier 2 (34), Man. Ramirez (13), Loney 2 (21), Blake (18), DeWitt (9), C.Young (26), Gillespie (4), Ryal (4). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Loney, DeWitt, J.Carroll); Arizona 3 (S.Drew, Snyder 2). Runners moved up—Gillespie. GIDP—C.Jackson. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Blake, Loney), (J.Carroll, DeWitt, Loney).

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Arroyo W, 2-2 7 5 1 1 1 2 Rhodes H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cordero S, 11-13 1 0 0 0 2 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO Ohlendorf L, 0-1 4 3 1 1 4 3 Ja.Lopez 2 1 0 0 0 1 Meek 2 1 1 0 0 0 Hanrahan 1 2 0 0 0 0 Arroyo pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Rhodes 1-0. T—2:48. A—9,045 (38,362).

Florida Marlins’ Cody Ross, left, steals home on Chicago Cubs catcher Geovany Soto during the seventh inning of a baseball game Monday at Wrigley Field in Chicago.

c-Ryal ph Snyder c R.Lopez p a-C.Jackson ph-lf Totals

Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b Hensley p b-Petersen ph Nunez p H.Ramirez ss Cantu 3b-1b Uggla 2b R.Paulino c C.Ross cf B.Carroll rf N.Robertson p a-Maybin ph Sanches p Helms 3b Totals

AB 4 4 0 1 0 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 1 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 2

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

Avg. .208 .260 .000 .125 --.298 .266 .273 .316 .280 .235 .091 .236 --.333

Chicago Theriot 2b Byrd cf D.Lee 1b Nady rf-lf Ar.Ramirez 3b A.Soriano lf Marmol p Soto c S.Castro ss Lilly p Zambrano p Fukudome rf Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 0 3 2 3 0 1 34

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 2 3

SO 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 8

Avg. .331 .344 .211 .186 .163 .340 --.342 .286 .000 .000 .315

Florida 000 001 300 — 4 7 0 Chicago 010 001 000 — 2 9 3 a-singled for N.Robertson in the 7th. b-struck out for Hensley in the 9th. E—S.Castro 3 (4). LOB—Florida 7, Chicago 8. 2B—Coghlan (1), Nady (2), A.Soriano (10). HR— R.Paulino (2), off Lilly. RBIs—Coghlan (5), R.Paulino 2 (9), A.Soriano 2 (20). SB—Coghlan (4), C.Ross 2 (2), Maybin (4). S—N.Robertson 2. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 5 (Coghlan 2, H.Ramirez, Petersen 2); Chicago 5 (Lilly 4, Nady). Runners moved up—B.Carroll. GIDP—Byrd, Nady. DP—Florida 2 (H.Ramirez, G.Sanchez), (Cantu, Uggla, G.Sanchez). Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA N.Robertson W, 3-3 6 7 2 2 3 5 86 4.54 Sanches H, 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 Hensley H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.96 Nunez S, 6-8 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.68 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lilly L, 1-3 7 5 4 3 0 1 92 4.88 Zambrano 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 6.49 Marmol 1 1 0 0 2 3 29 0.61 IBB—off N.Robertson (S.Castro). WP—N.Robertson. T—2:24. A—38,266 (41,210).

Dodgers 7, Diamondbacks 3 PHOENIX — Andre Ethier had three hits, including a two-run double, and James Loney homered and drove in two for Los Angeles in a victory over Arizona. Los Angeles Martin c Kemp cf Ethier rf Man.Ramirez lf Troncoso p Loney 1b Blake 3b DeWitt 2b J.Carroll ss Billingsley p Belisario p b-G.Anderson ph Kuo p Re.Johnson lf Totals

AB 3 5 5 4 0 4 4 4 5 3 0 1 0 0 38

R H 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 11

Arizona K.Johnson 2b J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b S.Drew ss C.Young cf Gillespie lf Howry p Vasquez p

AB 4 4 2 3 3 2 3 0 0

R 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0

BI 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .255 .275 .393 .380 .000 .310 .255 .279 .265 .167 --.122 --.241

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 3 1 2 2 1 0 1 0 0

Avg. .272 .220 .255 .224 .304 .298 .265 --.000

Phillies 9, Rockies 5 DENVER — Carlos Ruiz had four hits, including a homer in the sixth inning and a tiebreaking single off Manny Corpas in the ninth that sent Philadelphia past mistake-prone Colorado. Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf C.Ruiz c W.Valdez ss d-Gload ph J.Castro ss K.Kendrick p J.Romero p Herndon p b-Dobbs ph Baez p e-B.Francisco ph Contreras p Totals

AB 3 4 5 4 3 4 5 4 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 37

R H 3 2 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 1 1 0 2 4 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 12

BI 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 8

Avg. .250 .300 .302 .278 .348 .243 .354 .152 .273 .258 .000 --.000 .185 --.211 ---

Colorado AB R H S.Smith lf 5 3 3 Fowler cf 2 2 0 Hawpe rf 4 0 2 Giambi 1b 4 0 3 Mora 2b 5 0 1 Stewart 3b 4 0 1 Olivo c 4 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 1 G.Smith p 2 0 0 Daley p 0 0 0 a-Rogers ph 1 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 R.Flores p 0 0 0 c-Spilborghs ph 1 0 1 Corpas p 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 12

BI 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .257 .243 .370 .192 .278 .290 .228 .226 .364 --.000 .000 .500 --.240 .000

Philadelphia 100 022 004 — 9 12 0 Colorado 101 020 100 — 5 12 2 a-grounded out for Daley in the 6th. b-flied out for Herndon in the 8th. c-singled for R.Flores in the 8th. d-homered for W.Valdez in the 9th. e-struck out for Baez in the 9th. E—Hawpe (1), S.Smith (1). LOB—Philadelphia 10, Colorado 9. 2B—Werth (17), S.Smith (3), Giambi (2), Stewart (5). 3B—Victorino 2 (4), S.Smith (2). HR—C.Ruiz (2), off G.Smith; Gload (1), off Corpas. RBIs—Polanco (18), Howard (21), C.Ruiz 2 (11), Gload 3 (5), Hawpe (8), Giambi 3 (4). S—K.Kendrick, Fowler. SF—Polanco, Giambi. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 5 (Ibanez 2, Polanco, C.Ruiz, Utley); Colorado 4 (G.Smith, Mora 2, S.Smith). Runners moved up—Utley, Ibanez, Fowler. GIDP— W.Valdez, Giambi, Mora. DP—Philadelphia 2 (Howard, W.Valdez, Howard), (Utley, W.Valdez, Howard); Colorado 1 (Barmes, Mora, Giambi). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA K.Kendrick 6 8 4 4 2 1 99 5.89 J.Romero 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 15 6.75 Herndon 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.76 Baez W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 6.43 Contreras 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 0.77 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA G.Smith 5 2-3 8 5 4 4 6 114 6.35 Daley 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.76 Beimel 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 15 0.77 Belisle 1 0 0 0 1 0 23 2.57 R.Flores 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 Corpas L, 1-2 1 2 4 4 1 1 31 3.18 Inherited runners-scored—Herndon 2-0, Daley 1-1, Belisle 2-0, R.Flores 2-0. IBB—off Corpas (Ibanez). HBP—by Baez (Barmes), by Corpas (Howard). WP— Daley, Corpas. Balk—K.Kendrick. T—3:37. A—30,403 (50,449).

MLB teams take scouting to new level By Ben Walker The Associated Press

Ron Washington flips the pages of his three-ring notebook, filled with inside info on the other team’s pitchers and hitters. The Texas manager gets to the back of the black binder, reaches into the pocket and pulls out another scouting report — on that night’s home plate umpire. It’s a color-coded computer printout showing his strike zone — how he tends to call balls and strikes — and whether he usually gives the pitcher a break if the ball sails just off the corner of the plate. In this ump’s case, the calls on the edges are too inconsistent to be predictable. “We do have their tendencies in the dugout on the wall. The name of the umpire and his tendencies, what they call and what part of the zone they call strikes,” Washington said. “When I was playing, we just knew he was a high-ball umpire or a low-ball umpire, whether he was a pitcher’s umpire or a hitter’s umpire,” he said. The difference now? “Technology,” Washington said. For years, baseball teams have scouted the opposition — which

pitch is most effective against a certain batter, which catcher has a strong throwing arm, and the like. Now teams are taking it to a different level by scouting the umpires — compiling information on how consistently they call balls and strikes, how quick they are to eject someone arguing a call, where the crew comes from, the next time they’re next in town. The Rangers aren’t the only ones taking advantage, either. Several teams track umpires on a daily basis and provide their players with the detailed reports. Here’s how one team assessed Hunter Wendelstedt: “Inconsistent zone, both in-game and from game-to-game, seemingly losing focus at times by balling pitches over middle and calling strikes on pitches well off plate. Seems to want hitter to put ball in play.” Or this look at Gerry Davis: “Hesitates to punch hitters out. Towards the top of the league in umpire ERA in 2009, with low K and low BB rate in 2009 and has continued in 2010. Need to earn strikes with him behind the plate.” In other words, the report says Davis is reluctant to call strike three when a batter doesn’t swing.

Some teams attach headshots of the crew, along with a short bio about each of the four umpires. Such as this nugget on Marty Foster: “Attends as many Wisconsin Big Ten football games as possible.” And this about Ed Hickox: “Is a sworn police officer in offseason, working as a detective for the Daytona Beach Shores Police Dept.” “It’s just more of a reference to get to know them better, a communication tool,” Oakland manager Bob Geren said. “We like to get the players to know who’s going to be there, get to know them and give them a little bit of background, so the players can say hello.” “We keep umpire media guides in the dugout. Guys feel uncomfortable if they go out and don’t know who they are — and we have a lot of young players,” he said. Advance scouts sometimes prepare the reports. Other clubs rely on watching video. Stat services and websites also compile the numbers. “There’s so much more data on umpires and it’s much easier to track their balls-strikes calling. Guys have more specific reputations because the data is better,”

Oakland director of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi said. Exactly how many teams do it is hard to say — at least a couple of clubs declined to directly answer whether they scout umpires, or they dodged the question. At Fenway Park last week, longtime crew chief John Hirschbeck shook his head when shown a team’s scouting report on a different set of umpires. “I’m surprised, but I guess I’m not surprised,” he said. “Everyone is looking for an edge.” “We try to call every pitch the same way. The stats, those can depend on the matchup, who’s pitching that day,” he said. “Luck of the draw.” Even though baseball’s rule book precisely defines the strike zone, umpires could vary in how they interpret it — not easy in a game where the pitch frequently comes in at more than 90 mph and can dip several inches at the last split second. To James Hoye, the personal tidbits and pictures made more sense than the strike zone tendencies. He’s working his first full season as a major league umpire, with Wally Bell and Laz Diaz on Hirschbeck’s crew. “Instead of asking Wally the

name of the guy who’s at second base, they can see for themselves,” Hoye said. Atlanta manager Bobby Cox said the Braves don’t chart the umps. But he could understand why a team would: “If it helps to win one ballgame a year, it’s not a waste of time. Might get you to the playoffs.” It could come down to a single pitch, and how it’s handled. Here’s what one team posted about Jerry Layne: “Seems very influenced by a catcher’s receiving.” That refers to a catcher’s practice of subtly moving his mitt back into the strike zone after catching a close pitch. Here’s a line from the report on how umpire Fieldin Culbreth reacts on a full-count: “Seems to expand zone on 3-2, as he punches out hitters he normally calls a ball in different counts.” Asked for comment on the practice of scouting, Culbreth, who is on the board of directors of the umpires’ union, the World Umpires Association, said: “I’d rather not get involved in that. It doesn’t matter.” Los Angeles Dodgers bench coach Bob Schaefer said such reports could result in information overload.

“I mean, it’s tough enough for a hitter to look at a pitcher and see what the pitcher’s trying to do to him. So you’d clog everything up if you worry about the umpire,” he said. The Toronto Blue Jays certainly keep tabs. “Every umpire that comes into town, whether at home or on the road, we have their tendencies. We know what type of umpires they are,” hitting coach Dwayne Murphy said. “They have that information. I’m not sure which site or where we get it from, but that information is there. They all have it,” he said. That’s news to many people. “I never heard of that. That’s very interesting,” Detroit manager Jim Leyland said. Wondered Florida manager Fredi Gonzalez: “Do people do that? Maybe I’m missing the boat; you tell me. I haven’t. Who has done that? I want to ask them. Maybe it’ll help us win another game or two.” Washington pitcher Craig Stammen’s first reaction was: “Huh? That’s smart.” Nationals teammate Livan Hernandez got wide-eyed. “I never heard of that,” the pitcher said.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 D5

Griffey Continued from D1 The siesta scenario, first revealed Monday by Larry LaRue of the Tacoma News Tribune, is such a powerful (and poignant) metaphor for the decline and fall of the 40year-old lapsed superstar that it’s no wonder it is getting national attention. Griffey has had a tendency to catch clubhouse catnaps throughout his career, and it has always been viewed as one of his lovable idiosyncrasies. But when he’s struggling, with two extra-base-hits all season, the team is struggling desperately to score runs, and it’s late in a tense game, he really needs to be alert and on call. The bigger issue, however, is what happens to Griffey now. LaRue suggests that Griffey’s departure, either by retirement or release, could happen this month. It has become increasingly apparent that if Griffey doesn’t pick up his offense— the Rangers’ Julio Borbon and Angels’ Brandon Wood are the only American League players with at least 75 at-bats with a lower OPS (on-base plus slugging) than Griffey’s .499 — the Mariners will have to make a tough call on Griffey. It’s the decision they’ve dreaded from the moment Griffey expressed his desire to return to Seattle before the 2009 season. The Mariners have always hoped the Griffey story would not have a messy ending. They didn’t want to be put in the position of having to cut loose their franchise icon, a person that team president Chuck Armstrong has an especially close relationship with. Last year, they never had to face that problem. Though Griffey didn’t exactly remind anyone of Prince Fielder—or vintage Ken Griffey Jr.—he hit just enough to make a contribution, and was universally regarded as a positive influence in improving what had been a toxic clubhouse. His comeback season was regarded as a huge success. But this year, the need to make the hard call is approaching rapidly. Mariners executives declined to comment Monday on the story that Griffey was dozing during a game. Asked if Griffey’s days with the team were numbered, general manager Jack Zduriencik replied, “Any issues involving the team and the roster are issues we talk about internally and evaluate internally. I wouldn’t read into or speculate on anything. What we’re concerned about is we’re going on a road trip, and our concern is we want to win baseball games.� Asked about Griffey’s ongoing struggles, he said: “We have several players on this club struggling right now offensively. We’re trying to do some things to help all of them. I would never single out any individual player. The players are well aware of what we’ve done, and what we can do. We’re trying to get better and help the club get better. Yesterday (Sunday) was a nice day. We have a new hitting coach, and we’ll see where it all ends up, and where it takes us.� Brian Goldberg, Griffey’s agent, declined to comment because he hadn’t had a chance to talk with Griffey, who was traveling with the team to Baltimore for a threegame series. When Griffey is on the Hall of Fame podium in Cooperstown, all this will be forgotten, just as few remember Jerry Rice or Franco Harris in their waning days as Seahawks. Mays’ stature was hardly diminished by the way his career ended. Still, it’s painful to watch any great athlete’s skills erode. Would Griffey voluntarily walk away, as Mike Schmidt did in May of 1989 when his average dropped to .203? I believe he would, if he believed his tank was truly empty, and if that’s what the Mariners wanted him to do. I’ve been a strong Griffey supporter. But I’m not blind. Anyone watching the Mariners has to eventually come to the painful realization that Griffey is a faded version of his old self. He’s far from the only player struggling on this team, but he’s the only one who’s 40 years old and coming off back-to-back knee surgeries. Perhaps Griffey will start raking the ball this week, but he hasn’t shown any signs of it. It appears more likely that the ending the Mariners dreaded might be coming to a reality.

C S   C 

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD DUATHLON

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BADMINTON BEND BADMINTON CLUB: Public play, Tuesdays and Sundays through winter; rackets, instruction available; cost is $7.50. Tuesdays, 7 to 9 p.m.; Sundays, 4 to 6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Mt. Bachelor Drive; 541-382-4994.

BASEBALL REDMOND PANTHERS BASEBALL CLUB: Seeking players ages 710 (by April 30) and interested in learning to play baseball while having fun; 541-788-8520, dmerisman@ bendbroadband.com; www. leaguelineup.com/redmondbluesox.

BASKETBALL OPEN FULL AND HALF COURT: Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; West Bend Tennis Center, 1355 W. Commerce (off NW Century Dr.); $5 per person; reservations encouraged; 541-3302112; http://reservemycourt.com. JAY’S STAR SHOOTER CAMP: Open to grades 5-12; Saturday, May 22 at Redmond High School; grades 5-7, 8:30 a.m.-noon; grades 8-12, 1-4:30 p.m.; $42; www. starshooter.net; Coach Dustin Porter at dustin.porter@redmond.k12. or.us; 541-923-4800 ext. 2143.

BIKING HIGH DESERT BMX RACES: Race registration and practice 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, races at 6:30 p.m.; helmet, long-sleeved shirt and pants required; one-day free membership and gear available; at Big Sky Park, 21690 Neff Road; 541-815-6208, www.highdesertbmx. org; renegade_sjane@hotmail.com. BLAZING PEDALS FUN BIKE RIDE: Saturday, May 22; Sign up and depart 7-9 a.m.; rides will be through Juniper Flat, Maupin, Tygh Valley and Wamic areas; four distances to choose from: 84, 65, 40 and 20 miles; $35; fees will be used for firefighter incentives and awards; support vehicles provided; helmets required; e-mail Blazingpedalsjf@yahoo.com.

SISTERS STAMPEDE: New mountain bike race in Sisters; Sunday, May 30; starts near Three Creeks Brewing Company; course follows Peterson Ridge Trail system; mail-in registration until May 20; race-day registration available; $20-$40; www. SistersStampede.com; Sisters Cycling, PO Box 1421, Sisters, OR, 97759. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Competition Lite Cycling through Aug. 11, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. MBSEF’S SUMMER CYCLING PROGRAM SESSION II: Begins May 31 from 4:30-6 p.m.; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

HIKING HIKING ORIENTATION: Prepare to hike with slide show and orientation; guided hikes geared towards those ages 50 and older; today, 5-6:30 at Bend Library; 541-383-8077; strideon@silverstriders.com. SAGEBRUSH COUNTRY WILDFLOWERS HIKE: Trip leader,

Bike Continued from D1 “Typically, when you look at someone in the clinic setting you test strength and balance and make estimates on what they’re doing on the bike,� Evens explains. “We look directly at what they’re doing on the bike as well as what they’re doing off the bike and combine the two.� Injuries can stem from an existing biomechanic or orthopedic issue that is exacerbated on the bike, or from an improperly fitted bike, or from some combination of the two. “We used (Evens’) physical therapy skills initially to do the assessment,� Thompson recalls, “and then he translated that into my bike fit and helped straighten things out. He helped me bodywise, and then he set up my bike so that it wouldn’t happen again.� According to Evens, recreational riders are just as susceptible to overuse injuries as those who make their living at riding bikes. Generally, though, it’s a quicker fix to bring a recreational rider back to good health. “We have people who just ride their cruiser bike to the store,� he says. “And every time they want to ride around town and pull their kids in a basket, their legs go numb. “In professional-level athletes, the details of what’s wrong with them are much smaller and more difficult to tease out,� Evens goes on to explain, “whereas it’s typically much easier to treat someone who is a recreational rider,

Reid Schuller, has 35 years of experience in plant inventory, ecology and conservation management; classroom orientation Friday, May 28, 6:30-8 p.m., field trip Saturday, May 29; $29; 541-3837270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OVERNIGHT HIKING TRIP OUTBACK TREK: Crack-in-the-ground, Black Hills botanical area, Native American rock art and Derrick cave stay at Lodge at Summer Lake; June 2-3; Silver Striders Guide Service; 541-383-8077 or strideon@silverstriders.com.

MISCELLANEOUS WEST POWELL BUTTE EQUESTRIAN: Western and English riding taught to all levels ages 7 and older; horses and tack provided; at Powell Butte estates from 10 a.m. to noon, Friday, May 28; $50 per session; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m., Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m., Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. and Sundays, 1- 4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Every Wednesday; 6-9 p.m.; every Sunday, 2-5 p.m. (set-up half hour before) at 1355 N.W. Commerce (off Century Drive), Bend; drop-in fee, $5; Brett Yost 541-318-8997, bendtabletennis@ yahoo.com; www.bendtabletennis.com. OPEN HORSE SHOW BUCKLE SERIES: First of a series of six with high point buckle presentation at series final show in October; May 15, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; practice and fine tune showing skills, registration forms at www.ghostrockranch.com; $5-7; 541-536-1335; swendsens@yahoo. com; www.ghostrockranch.com. RICHARD SHRAKE’S RESISTANCEFREE SEMINAR: An equestrian class teaching the fundamentals of patient, peaceful horse training; get certified to teach Resistance Free Training; May 18-21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day; $1,195; at McCall Ranch in Prineville; richard@ richardshrake.com; 541-593-0321. BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: A fundraising event; taking submissions from local filmmakers and photographers; must have cycling and local components; Film festival on May 22 at Tower Theatre; part of a weekend of biking activities to benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance and Bend Endurance Academy; www.BendBicycleFilmFestival. com; Paul at 541-420-5777; bendbicycleff@yahoo.com.

MULTISPORT POLE, PEDAL, PADDLE PREP CLINIC: The focus of the clinic will be on the bike and the importance of a good bike fit to achieve maximum aerodynamics, power and comfort; this Wednesday, 7 p.m. at Rebound Physical Therapy, 155 S.W. Century Drive; Gina Miller at 541-585-2540 POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Hosted by MBSEF; Saturday, May 15; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. KIDS’ MINI POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Hosted by MBSEF; Sunday, May 16; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. RUN/CYCLE/RUN & CORE FOR

because (the problem) is usually rather glaring.� According to Chuck Brockman, a physical therapist and owner of Therapeutic Associates in Bend, knee pain and lowerback pain are the two most common overuse injuries that occur among cyclists. Brockman says he performs approximately 120 bike fits a year, about half of which he classifies as medical bike fits (patients with a chronic injury referred to him by a doctor). The other half, he says, are riders, possibly with a new bike, who need help dialing in an efficient riding position. Evens notes that many cyclists struggle with weaknesses in their hips as well as uneven or improper pedaling stroke. “A real consistent one I see is people thinking it’s proper to drive with their heels, which gets beat into their heads in spin class,� Evens explains. “That’s really not the proper way. It forces them to fire their quadriceps and it uses much less hamstring and calf (muscles). We end up seeing them really jerking around on their bike.� Physical therapists like Evens and Brockman who treat cyclists both on and off the bike focus on a number of variables when analyzing a rider’s position. In their off-bike rider analysis, the therapists take stock of a rider’s flexibility limitations, muscle imbalances or muscle weaknesses — factors that influence body position once the rider is on the bike. (Of course, a good PT will also give cyclists recommendations on how to improve on the above.) With the cyclist back on

ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 5:15-6:40 p.m. at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; outside warm-up run, form work and drills, then indoor cycle/run intervals, then core work; $6.50 or current fitness pass; 541-3897665; www.bendparksandrec.org. DUEL IN THE DESERT DUATHLON & 5K RUN: Saturday, June 5, 10 a.m. at Summit High School in Bend; duathlon consists of 5K run, mountain or road bike option and 5K run; also a 5K run only will be held; register at FootZone in downtown Bend or online at www.active.com (search duel).

PADDLING INTERMEDIATE PADDLE DAYS: Ages 10 and older; explore the class III whitewater throughout Central Oregon via kayak; Current Experience’s instructors will lead the course; Friday, June 4, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; $110; gear and transportation included; www.raprd.org; 541-548-7275.

RUNNING BAREFOOT RUNNING 101: Today, 6-8 p.m. at REI in Bend; learn how to run barefoot or in your Vibram FiveFingers; led by Michael Sandler, author of Barefoot Running: How to Run Light and Free; event is free; 541-385-0594; www.rei.com/stores/events/96. WEEKLY TRI TRACK AND HILL WORKOUTS: Thursdays, 6 p.m.; speed work at your own pace; intervals, pacing and more; $5; contact for location; joanne@inmotionbend.com. FLEET FEET’S NO BOUNDARIES 5K TRAINING: Run or walk a 5K (3.1 miles) for the first time; meets 8:30 a.m. on Saturdays through May 29; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com/5k. FLEET FEET’S 10K TRAINING: All ability levels are welcome, first-time 10K runners to longtime runners; Sundays, 8 a.m., through June 20; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-389-1601; www.fleetfeetbend.com/10k. WATER RUNNING CLINIC: Sunday, May 16, 4-6 p.m.; designed with athletes in mind, water running is a good way to stay injury free and improve fitness with less training time; register at www.bendparksandrec. org; $40; 541-389-7665. JUNGLE RUN/WALK: A 2- or 4-mile race at Central Oregon Community College track; Thursday, May 20, 5:30 p.m.; course includes singletrack trails, mud bogs, steep hills and log crossings; day of event registration from 4:30-5:15 p.m. $5; free for COCC and OSU-Cascades students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. STORM THE STAIRS: A 2-mile run/ walk (300 stairs) or 3-mile ultimate challenge run (450 stairs); at Central Oregon Community College in Bend; Thursday, May 27, 5:30 p.m. at COCC track; entry forms are available in the Mazama building in the club sports office or register from 4:30-5:15 p.m. on the day of the event; $3-$6; free for COCC and OSU-Cascade students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; local running star Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; run up to seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; three to five miles. Two groups; one pace is 10-plus-minute miles, other is 8- to 9-

the bike, the therapists measure the rider’s cleat alignment, foot position and hip angles, and use video to examine body positioning and pedaling stroke and efficiency. For Thompson, his saddle position was much too low, which prevented his legs from achieving full extension during his pedal stroke. And that, he says, translated to low-back pain. In many cases, medical insurance will cover the physical therapy appointment and corresponding bike fit for riders with chronic pain or overuse injuries, says Brockman, whose fits can last up to two hours and cost $175 if paid for out of pocket. Evens says that the cyclists he sees are typically those who are having pain or discomfort both on and off the bike. He notes that Rebound Sports Performance Lab is a good choice for otherwise healthy riders who are looking to increase power and performance. Brockman adds that local bike shops are good places to start for cyclists getting fitted to a new bike. But if a rider “is having pain on the bike and it’s not been resolved, they should come in and see us,� says Brockman. Thompson’s struggles with Achilles tendinitis and low-back pain have been resolved for nearly two years. But he is not about to risk a flare-up. Now, every time he replaces a bike in his garage, he calls up Evens to schedule a bike fit. “It took an injury for me to find the correct resource for getting my bike fitted,� Thompson says. “I think it’s something that’s of-

minute-per-mile pace; 541-389-1601. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles at slower pace; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Mondays; locations vary; group accommodates seven- to 11-minute mile pace; Jenny@footzonebend.com.

SKIING BEND ENDURANCE NORDIC SUMMER TRAINING: Coaching for nordic skiers ages 14-23 including strength training, rollerskiing, hiking, running, and exploring all summer long; Tuesdays-Saturdays; June 1-Aug. 22; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865.

SOCCER OREGON RUSH SOCCER CLUB TRYOUTS: For competitive soccer; ages 9-13; May 10-13; www.oregonrush.com; John O’Sullivan at 541-977-5494; josullivan@oregonrush.com. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Ages 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $5; every Friday night; Coed from 6-8 p.m., Men’s 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com.

SOFTBALL BEND SHOWDOWN ASA FAST PITCH: Four tournaments scheduled for this spring and summer; 12U Open May 15-16, 14U Open May 22-23, 16U Open June 12-13 and 12U and 14U B League June 26-27; hosted by Bend Park and Recreation District; $350 per team; 541-3897275; greg@bendparksandrec.org.

SWIMMING KID’S NIGHT OUT AT JUNIPER: Saturdays, through May, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend; for ages 3-11; swimming, games, movies; the facility is closed to other patrons while the program is in session; registration required by noon each Saturday; $8-$10; https://register.bendparksandrec. org; Jen Avery at 541-389-7665. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only; Saturday, May 22, 8-10 p.m.;Cascade Swim Center in Redmond; must have student identification; ost is $2.50. 541548-7275, www.raprd.org.

TENNIS TENNIS FOR ADULTS: For ages 18 and older; Saturdays, May 8-29, 12:30-2 p.m. at Sam Johnson Tennis Courts, Redmond; $40; 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. LITTLE STARS TENNIS: For ages 3-5 years; helps build hand/eye coordination; Monday-Thursday, May 17-20, 2-2:30 p.m. at Redmond Activity Center; $15; parents must attend; 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. ADULT TENNIS CLINIC: For ages 18 and older; beginner clinic meets on Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; intermediate to advanced clinic meets on Wednesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; May 25-June 9 at Sam Johnson Park in Redmond; $30 or $15 per day; 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. BPRD SPRING TENNIS CLASSIC: Junior matches and adult NTRP matches will take place; June 4-6 and 11-13; Kevin Collier, 541-7066123; kevin@bendparksandrec.org.

ten overlooked.� Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com.

Up the Crooked River Duathlon May 9 10K Run, 40K Bike, 10K Run 1, Joel Vergona, Bend, 1:37:12. 2, Fred Boos, Bend, 1:44:27. 3, Kevin Lair, Bend, 1:45:14. 4, Jim Rantala, Bend, 1:45:33. 5, Ericka Luckel, Bend, 1:46:42. 6, Jake Akerburg, Prineville, 1:47:00. 7, Team Hatch, Prineville, 1:48:13. 8, Tawnie McDonald, Bend. 1:49:28. 9, Alan Dale, Camp Sherman, 1:49:33,10. 10, Dave Pickhardt, Powell Butte 1:50:05. 11, Dan Droyles, Redmond, 1:52:19. 12, Bill Cooley, Prineville, 1:53:10. 13, Team Munn & Wisseman, Prineville, 1:55:49. 14, Chris Vergona, Bend, 1:57:55. 15, Steve Fiero, Redmond, 2:03:52. 16, Michael Crampton, Prineville, 2:04:46. 17, Rod Thompson, Bend, 2:06:09. 18, David Feeney, Vancouver, WA, 2:06:54. 19, Kevin Luckini, Sisters, 2:12:18. 20, Thomas Womack,Sisters, 2:12:32. 21, Michelle White, Bend, 2:13:15. 22, James Richardson, La Pine, 2:13:45. 23, Sheri Philpott, 2:16:41. 24, Grant Hanson, Bend, 2:17:00. 25, Monique Davis, Prineville, 2:22:18. 26, Liam Pickhardt, Powell Butte, 2:23:33. 27, Kim Luckini, Sisters, 2:30:14. 28, John Marsh, Prineville, 2:36:00. 29, Karyn Williams, Bend, 2:38:41. 30, Tammy Shelton, Prineville, 2:40:37. 31, Lauri Armstrong, John Day, 2:44:10. 32, Bob Armstrong, John Day, 2:44:11. 2 Mile Walk, 10 Mile Bike, 2 Mile Walk 1, Kim Addison, Sisters, 1:46:06. 2, Marti Dale, Camp Sherman, 1:59:39. 3, Chip Dale, Camp Sherman, 1:59:40. 4, Amy Cavallaro, Bend, 2:09:19. 5, Patti Ledwig, Hood River, 2:09:20. 6, Therese Bauer, Eugene, 2:15:47. 7, Lynn Lary, Eugene, 2:15:48. 8, April Stricklan, La Pine, 2:18:19. 9, Kim Barrett, 2:18:23. 10, Jake Hogan, Portland, 2:22:49. 11, Melissa Guila, Portland, 2:22:50. 12, Michelle McMichael, Prineville, 2:40:02. 13, Haily McMichael, Prineville, 2:40:03. 14, Garrett McMichael, Prineville, 2:40:04.

SOFTBALL Bend Park & Recreation District As of May 7 Team standings Men’s Competitive C American W L Red Cloud 3 0 Mtn. View Heating 3 0 Falling Waters 2 1 The Krew 2 1 Summit 1 2 Newman Brothers 1 2 Warm Springs Ridaz 1 2 Sidelines 1 2 Nugent Strangleholds 1 2 D&D Down & Dirty 0 3 Men’s Competitive C National Amerititle/Summit El 3 0 Brew Crew 3 0 Good Wood 3 0 East Cascade Sec. 2 1 Antioch 2 1 Cable Guys 1 2 Choke Up 1 2 Copia 0 3 Eastmont Eagles 0 3 Big Ballers 0 3 Coed Competitive Courtesy Flush 4 0 Mtn’s Edge 3 0 Meyer Media 3 1 Rockchucks 2 1 Seven 2 2 BAM 1 1 Phoenix 0 4 Southwest Swingers 0 4 DE/Ventures 0 2 Men’s Competitive A & B Knights 3 0 Advantage 3 0 All Options 2 1 Mtn’s Edge 1 2 Bend Research 0 3 10 Barrel Brewing Co 0 3 Men’s Competitive D The Bucks 3 0 Next of Kin 3 0 US Bank Dress Sox 3 0 Westside Church #1 2 1 Palmers Cafe 2 1 Northwestern Hm Loan 1 2 Selco Blues 1 2 Cascade Thunder 0 3 Westside Church #2 0 3 Calvary Chapel Bend 0 3 Men’s Competitive Clear One 3 1 Sidelines 3 1 Line-X 3 1 Bend Riverside Motel 2 2 Eagle Wealth Mgt. 2 2 Southside P.T. 1 3 Kozak 1 3 Bear Prints Sr. 1 3 Women’s Competitive Mikes Fence Center 3 0 Fire & Ice 2 1 Elevation Events 2 1 Bear Prints 2 1 Knife River 1 2 On Tap 1 2 Ron’s Auto Body 1 2 Ogre Knights 0 3

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D6 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Vertical Continued from D1 Kovach, 62, has always spent his winters snowboarding or skiing as much as possible. But since retiring 12 years ago from a long career as an elementary school and middle school health and physical education teacher for the Bend-La Pine School District, he has the freedom to ride daily from open to close. “It’s a passion for me,” says Kovach. “I just love being up here. I love being in the mountains. I love riding on the snow.” Before the Mt. Bachelor ski area’s website (www.mtbachelor.com) began recording the turns (lift rides) and vertical feet of pass holders, regular riders would personally keep track of their days on the mountain. Kovach recalls counting 193 days one season. Now, the Track Your Turns page on the website tracks and displays for each rider every lift ride, every day, tracking cumulative vertical feet logged and averages for each day and more. According to Bachelor records, Kovach has accumulated more vertical feet than any other pass holder at Mt. Bachelor for each of the past five years (including the 2009-10 season). In fact, the tech staff at Bachelor switched Kovach’s profile to simply “Butch” instead of the usual season-pass number. “I think the most impressive figure is that his nearest competitor is nowhere near him,” says Alex Kaufman, marketing director at Mt. Bachelor. “He is truly in a league of his own with amazing self-motivation. … I have never seen anyone

choose to do nonstop 10-minute laps from open until close as a manner of descent. His commitment is unwavering. Forty-six runs in one day is what I get in a month.” Kaufman refers to Kovach’s 46-run day, a personal best completed when Bachelor stayed open until 7 p.m. one Friday in April. Kovach loaded the first chair at 8:53 a.m. (Bachelor officially opens at 9 a.m.) and caught his last chair at 6:51 p.m. Kovach has had other epic days this season, where he logged 45 runs in seven hours. This season at Bachelor, Kovach’s closest contender for most vertical feet in a season is at 2,764,238 feet as of this past Sunday — a difference of nearly 3.5 million feet. “The vert I don’t really care about,” says Kovach. “The vert just comes with riding every day. That’s not the main emphasis. That’s why whenever there’s a lot of good powder, I’m out chasing powder, so my numbers (vertical feet) are going to drop. If I was worried about my numbers I wouldn’t do that.” A Bend resident for more than 30 years, Kovach has Mount Bachelor memorized. “I got to know the mountain really, really well over the years on skis,” he says, adding that, to him, the terrain at Bachelor never gets old. He knows each section, the number markers on the cat tracks, every trail name, each nook, tree grove and cliff wall. On a recent afternoon, he smoothly floats above the powder in a bowl below Cow’s Face off of The Summit chairlift. He points to an open, untouched slope of snow, referring to it

Andy Tullis/The Bulletin

Butch Kovach slashes a powder turn next to a Cirque Bowl pinnacle, snowboarding down through the bowl at Mount Bachelor Tuesday morning. by name and number. And he drops down, slicing S-turns in the fluff. This is where Kovach finds ultimate joy. In his mind,

this is exactly where he belongs. “Riding that pow,” Kovach says, smiling, “there are days when I’m just giggling to myself,

it’s so cool. You get those deep powder days and you’re just zipping along, you’re punching through rabbit holes and dropping glades where no one else has been. That’s what really motivates me to continue to ride day in and day out.” Kovach says he and his wife, Betty, have been happily married for 41 years, and that she is content and pleased with his passion for skiing and snowboarding. “He has always been like this,” says Betty Kovach, a former snowrider who no longer skis. “He’s always been really active — and more power to him. I’m happy for him that he got it (6 million vertical feet). It wasn’t a goal when it started and it just turned into one. … I’m proud of him.” “She doesn’t mind,” adds Butch. “She’s glad I’m out of the house. I’m too hyperactive for her. I got to burn the energy.” In the summertime, Kovach expends energy on his bikes (mountain and road), and he lifts weights nearly every day. “I’m a senior citizen,” says Kovach. “Seniors have to (condition) if they are going to ride a lot.” Kovach says he started skiing 43 years ago. He was born in Southern California, grew up in Michigan, and generally moved around a lot. He learned to ski at Mt. Holly ski area in Michigan. Kovach recalls days of skinning up mountains on edgeless crosscountry skis and zipping down. He first dabbled in snowboarding in the 1980s when his two sons were young, and became a snowboarding regular about seven years ago. Kovach remembers the day he

came to love snowboarding. “I went home that day and told my wife — I never, ever would have said this on skis: ‘I had the best damn day on two inches of breakable crust on the backside that I’ve ever had in my life and I rode it all day.’ … I realized then — it was 2000, somewhere around there — it (snowboarding) was way easier on my legs and I knew I wasn’t getting any younger, and so the board was really the best option for me.” Kovach has a casual, nonchalant attitude about his zest for snowboarding. “It’s just different strokes for different folks. We all have our things that we like to do,” he says. “Doing it day in and day out, seven hours a day — or whatever the hours are — and doing it five days a week, for me, that’s where it’s at. It’s what’s happening for the whole length of the season — not one run, not one day.” Though he does consider himself hyperactive, Kovach says he rides the lifts without angst if they break down or are running slow or are crowded with other mountain guests. He knows the weather rules the day. He goes with the flow and hopes for the same outcome each time he rides. “My No. 1 goal every day is to get off the mountain with all of my body parts intact,” says Kovach. “No. 2, I’m looking to ride the best snow and terrain I can find that day. And No. 3 is, I’m having fun. Those are the things that I’m after. And whatever vert I get, I get.” Katie Brauns can be reached at 5 4 1 -3 8 3 -0 3 9 3 or at kbrauns@ bendbulletin.com.

C S    B  Running • Loads of locals finish Eugene Marathon and Half Marathon: Redmond’s Jeanette Groesz won the women’s 6064 division of the Eugene Half Marathon. The race was staged on Sunday, May 2, in conjunction with the annual Eugene Marathon. Groesz’ winning time in the 13.1-mile race was 1 hour, 37 minutes, 36 seconds. Dave Webster, of Bend, was runner-up in the men’s 55-59 division of the half marathon with a time of 1:22:59. Cheryl Tronson, also of Bend, took third in the women’s 50-54 age category, clocking in at 1:33:14. Bend’s Mike Olson, Chris Manfredi, Andy Young, Cathal Ridge, Mickey McDonald and Tawnie McDonald and Redmond’s John Holland all finished in the top 10 in their respective age and gender divisions in the half marathon. In the full marathon (26.2 miles), top finishers from Central Oregon were Bend’s Chase Parnell, who took 12th in his 25-29 age group and placed 56th overall (2:03:41), and Jennefer Lloyd, who finished 15th in the women’s 40-44 division and 466th overall (2:31:17). More than 100 Central Oregon runners were in the field of 6,400 finishers in the two races. For complete results, visit www.eugenemarathon.com. • New running race scheduled for June: The inaugural Dry Canyon Run is scheduled for Saturday, June 19, in Redmond. Hosted by Redmond High School, the running race is a fundraiser for the school’s track and field program. The Dry Canyon Run will offer races of 5 and 10 kilometers, starting in American Legion Park across the street from Redmond High. The event begins at 9 a.m. Cost is $20 for the 5K, $25 for the 10K. To register, visit www.time2race. com. For more information, visit www.drycanyonrun.com. • Official charities named for half marathon: The official charities for the 2010 Smith Rock Sunrise Summer Classic Half Marathon have been named. The organizations include Oregon Adaptive Sports, the Redmond Parks Foundation, the Humane Society of Redmond, the Crook County High School boys tennis team, the Crook County Christian School STEPUP Program, and Girls on the Run of Deschutes County. The seventh annual Smith Rock event takes place on Saturday, July 10, in Terrebonne. The designated charities are recruiting runners to participate in the Summer Classic — which includes 5-kilometer, 10-kilometer and half-marathon races — to help raise funds for their organizations. The event will also include the Central Oregon Pumpkin Company Rock Race, a free fun run for children (preschool to fifth

grade). For more information, visit www.oregonadaptivesports.org or www.SmithRockRace.com. • Youngsters win 6-Mile Relay Race at COCC: A team of four eighth-grade students from Sisters took first place last Thursday in the annual 6-Mile Relay Race at Central Oregon Community College in Bend. In a field of 16 teams, the winning team of Brandon Pollard, Evan Rickards, Landon Poescott and Jake McAllister posted a time of 27 minutes, 36 seconds.

Boating • Free boat demonstrations on tap at local shop: Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe (formerly Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe) will hold its annual Post-PPP Demo Day this Sunday in Bend from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the lawn behind the shop, located at 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6. Tumalo Creek is expected to have 150 boats available for demonstrations. Kayak experts will be on hand to help answer questions, fit paddlers and offer advice. For more information, contact Geoff Frank at 541-317-9407 or at geoff@aldercreek.com.

Basketball • Local physically challenged athlete awarded grant: Walter Jones, of Redmond, was recently awarded a grant from the Challenged Athlete Foundation for a basketball wheelchair. The grant, in the amount of $1,799, will be used to purchase a customized chair allowing him to compete. Jones plans to practice and play games primarily in the Portland area and in Washington. According to Jones, 24, he is currently on the roster for the Oregon Disability Sports wheelchair basketball team. He is also an avid wheelchair road racer and competes in the wheelchair division at many local running events.

Yoga • 2005 International Yoga Asana champion to visit Bend: Esak Garcia, the 2005 International Yoga Asana champion, will lead a presentation and demonstration at Bikram Yoga in Bend from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday, May 23. He will discuss and demonstrate hatha yoga postures. The yoga studio will also host a weekend of free Bikram Yoga for community members on May 22 and 23. Bikram Yoga is located at 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 7. Cost is $20. For more information or to register, e-mail michael@bikramyogabend.com, or call 541389-8599, or visit www.bikramyogabend.com.

Rugby • Boys rugby team advances

to semifinals: The Bend Blues, a Central Oregon boys high school rugby team, opened the Rugby Oregon Saturday with a 64-5 drubbing of Columbia County at Delta Park in Portland. Kevin Baker scored 27 points on three tries and six conversion kicks to lead the Blues. Alex Esselstrom and Ethan Hawes added two tries apiece, and Marcos Vargas, Emory Babb and Kyle Jones completed the scoring for the Blues with one try apiece. The victory advanced Bend to a semifinal game against North Clackamas this Saturday, also at Delta Park. Bend’s record is 8-0 for the season.

Soccer • Oregon Rush 93 girls claim third state championship: The Oregon Rush 93 girls won their third State Cup Championship on

Saturday with a 2-1 overtime victory over Westside Metros in the finals of the Oregon Youth Soccer State Cup in Beaverton. Down 1-0 early, the Rush tied the game on a penalty kick by Allie Cummins that sent the match to overtime. With five minutes remaining in overtime, Maryn Beutler scored a goal with an assist from Gabby Vazquez. In addition to Beutler, Cummins and Vazquez, the Oregon Rush 93 girls team includes Tash Anderson, Rianna Alyward, Haley Estopare, Annie Hill, Zoe Kilmer, Torie Morris, Kristen Parr, Tatum Randall, Claire Ranstrom, Courtney Shearer, Madison Shore and Caitlin Tilby. The team has qualified to advance to the Far West Regional Championships, set for June 20-28 in Albuquerque, N.M. Also this past weekend, the Or-

egon Rush 91 boys and 91 girls lost their State Cup games. The Rush 91 girls lost 1-0 to Tualatin Hills United Soccer Club Neon. The 91 boys team lost to EastSide United FC Liverpool 2-1 in overtime.

Multisport • Annual duathlon serves up local winners: Joel Vergona, of Bend, won the Up the Crooked River Duathlon on Sunday. Vergona finished the 10-kilometer run, 40K bike ride and 10K run in 1 hour, 37 minutes, 12 seconds. Bend’s Fred Boos was runnerup with a time of 1:44:27. In third was Kevin Lair, also of Bend, who clocked in at 1:45:14. In the sprint duathlon (2-mile walk, 10-mile bike, 2-mile walk) the top finishers were Kim Addison (1:46:06), of Sisters, Marti Dale (1:59:39) and Chip Dale

(1:59:40), both of Camp Sherman. More than 50 participants took part in the Up the Crooked River Duathlon. For complete results, see Community Sports Scoreboard on Page D5. — Bulletin staff report

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

SPOTLIGHT St. Charles hosts events for stroke awareness St. Charles Health System will host events around Central Oregon for National Stroke Awareness Month. • Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m. St. Charles Redmond, 1253 N.W. Canal Blvd. — Stroke risk screenings, blood-pressure checks and presentations by Dr. Lynn Iwaniec, Dr. Laura Mavity and Dr. Gary Buchholz. • Wednesday, May 19, 12-2 p.m., Prineville Soroptomist Senior Center, 180 Belknap St. — Stroke risk screenings, blood-pressure checks and a presentation by Dr. Josephine Fitzsimons. • Wednesday, May 26, 12-1 p.m., Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road — Presentation by Dr. Richard Koller. • Thursday, May 27, 12-2 p.m., La Pine Senior Center, 16450 Victory Way — Stroke risk screenings, blood-pressure checks and a presentation by Dr. Fran McCabe. Contact: 541-706-3736.

Bend Senior Center earns accreditation The Bend Senior Center was recently awarded national accreditation by the National Institute of Senior Centers. To celebrate the award, the Bend Senior Center will host an open house from 1:30 to 3 p.m. May 13. The event will include a welcome proclamation, presentation of the award, tours and refreshments. It is free and open to the public. Contact: 541-388-1133 or visit www.bendseniorcenter.org.

If you go

Straight from the

dog’s mouth

Wh a t: Author Pete Nelson Details: • 6:30 p.m. Saturday at Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond (541-526-1491) • 5 p.m. Sunday at Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village, Building 25C (541-593-2525) Cost: Free

Volunteers sought for tick study The Oregon Lyme Disease Network is looking for donations and volunteers for the first major study to identify tick-borne illnesses in Central Oregon. Volunteers will be trained by entomologists and will sweep certain areas to collect ticks starting this month. Ticks will be collected, identified and tested for the presence of bacteria, which can cause Lyme disease or other tick-borne illnesses. Donations can be made through the Oregon Lyme Disease Network at www.oregonlyme.org. Contact: Theresa Denham, lyme@junipermeadow.com.

Author’s path of self-revelation with a doggy narrative By David Jasper • The Bulletin

S

tella is a prominent character in Pete Nelson’s new novel, “I Thought You Were Dead.” She’s imbued, Nelson tells The Bulletin, with his real-life grand-

mother’s charm: She is wise, droll and philosophical about getting long in the tooth and facing the inevitable. As readers, we know so much about her because she speaks often to Paul, the book’s protagonist. This would normally not be remarkable. After all, Paul, who is divorced and drinks too much, talks to lots of folks in the book. He speaks to his siblings, and his girlfriend, Tamsen, who is also seeing a married man. Then there’s his stroke-victim father, with whom he chats, after a manner, electronically. See Nelson / E3

Submitted photos

Author Pete Nelson will read from and sign his new novel “I Thought You Were Dead” on Saturday in Redmond and Sunday in Sunriver.

Saving Grace seeks clothing donations The Saving Grace Hospital Response program, aiding sexual assault victims, seeks donations of new sweat suits and underwear for use at St. Charles Bend and Redmond. Advocates from Saving Grace (formerly COBRA) provide support and care packages to sexual assault victims. Currently, women’s sweat suits in sizes small and medium, as well as women’s underwear sizes 5, 6 and 7, are needed. Donations can be taken to Saving Grace, 1425 N.W. Kingston Ave., Bend, between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays. Contact: 541-382-9227 or www.saving-grace.org.

Masterpiece mechanic: rebuilding classic autos with artists’ touch By Brian Melton McClatchy-Tribune News Service

FORT WORTH, Texas — Imagine strapping yourself into a fine work of art and roaring down the road. It’s hard to do with a Picasso, but easy if you’re Stephen Ramsey or one of his numerous international customers. For more than 30 years, he’s been restoring and rebuilding big iron from Detroit’s glory days. His cars have won multiple awards from virtually every bigtime car show in the country, including last year’s GoodGuys show at Texas Motor Speedway — a 1969 Chevy Camaro Pace Car that he had built for a customer took top honors from a field of more than 3,000 entrants as the Muscle Car Finalist

“I love the looks, the designs, the power and the sheer fun of driving a beautiful piece of art, because that’s what they are.” — Stephen Ramsey, winner of several big-time muscle car awards of the Year. His office walls are plastered with awards from show after show, as well as pictures and letters from ecstatic customers that encompass a lifetime of what some might call an obsession. He just calls it “being a car guy.” See Autos / E6

Simple instrument panel of a ’55 Chevy is being restored in Steve Ramsey’s classic car garage in a hangar at Hooks Field in Haslett, Texas, on April 13. Ron T. Ennis Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Volunteer of the Year winners announced The Network of Volunteer Administrators held its 21st annual Volunteer of the Year ceremony Thursday, issuing awards in three categories. Ana Baltazar, nominated by Department of Human Services, was named Youth Volunteer of the Year. Darcy Justice, nominated by Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center, was named Adult Volunteer of the Year. Roy Bunting, nominated by Retired Senior Volunteer Program, was Adult Volunteer of the Year, 55 and older. Contact: volunteerconnectnow.org or 541-385-8977. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Mix-and-match siblings echo their family’s rich heritage Dear Abby: “No Laughing Matter” (Feb. 22) wrote about her mother-in-law making snide comments because there is so little resemblance between her son and her grandchild. It’s a fact that not all offspring look like their parents. My husband and I have seven biological children who are now young adults. We marvel at the breadth and depth of our collective gene pool. I am a petite brown-eyed brunette, and my husband is tall and blond with hazel eyes. None of our kids look alike. One daughter inherited my brown eyes, but her hair is blond. Two kids have my dark hair, but one has blue eyes and the other has green eyes. One son is the spitting image of his dad, while another resembles my father as a child. Our “baby” girl is the tallest female and has a buxom figure she certainly did not inherit from me. Another thing: Out of all nine of us, our second child is the only family member who cannot curl her tongue. The study of genetics is an amazing thing, especially when we find out what we think we know isn’t necessarily so. — They’re All Ours In Virginia Dear All: Thank you for your in”gene”ious response. Other readers felt “No Laughing Matter” should ignore her mother-inlaw’s comments and handle the matter with humor. Read on: Dear Abby: When my daughter was about 13, my “dear” motherin-law said she didn’t look like her son, also implying that I had been unfaithful. I looked her directly in the eye and replied, “Of course she doesn’t look like your son. She resembles MY side of the family.” She never commented again. — Not Unfaithful In Florida Dear Abby: The next time “No Laughing Matter’s” motherin-law remarks how one child bears no resemblance to Dad, she should say, “You know, genetics are fascinating. I’ve often thought how much this beautiful child resembles you.”

DEAR ABBY — Marc In Cleveland Heights Dear Abby: My oldest brother and I look identical despite our 10-year age difference. Our middle brother, however, didn’t look like either one of us. Our family jokingly referred to him as “the milkman’s son” until he hit middle age. At that point in his life, he became the spitting image of our father. “No Laughing Matter” should not take her motherin-law seriously. — Kathy In Scottsdale, Ariz. Dear Abby: I bet if that mother-in-law looked through an old photo album she might notice that this grandchild has Grandpa’s nose and eyes, and maybe Great-Uncle Charley’s ears. My wife and I have five children. Three of them closely resemble us. The other two don’t look like they belong to us — until you look at my wife’s maternal cousins. Our daughter and one of her cousins could pass as twins. — Leroy In Poulsbo, Wash. Dear Abby: My mother was widowed at 35 with three young children. A few years later, “Pop” came into our lives and married “us.” He always treated us like we were his biological kids and we knew we were loved. Pop was a mailman in our small town and my brother used to tag along with him on his route. Many people would comment that they “knew” immediately that this was his son, “He looks just like you!” “No Laughing Matter” needs to move on. Life is too short to feel bad about thoughtless people and their silly comments. — Jack’s Daughter In Upstate New York

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Raiders’ L.A. years revisited in documentary By Chuck Barney Contra Costa Times

A long, ghastly nightmare. That’s how we Bay Area devotees of the Raiders regard the 13 years our nomadic football team wasted away in Los Angeles. Ah, but for hip-hop artist and filmmaker Ice Cube, those were the glory days — a period in which he not only formed a lasting bond with the Raiders, but also helped to make the silver and black culturally viable to a new generation and demographic. In the provocative ESPN documentary “Straight Outta L.A.,” Ice Cube chronicles the Raiders’ tumultuous Southern California tenure (198294) while examining how the team’s renegade swagger captured the imagination of the fledgling gangsta rap community. As director, he certainly does his homework, piecing

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together interviews with football greats like Howie Long and Marcus Allen alongside the contributions of rappers, journalists, cultural experts and even crusty Raiders owner Al Davis. It’s all interwoven with liberal doses of his own perspective. “My first impression of the Raiders was that they were violent and a little rough around the edges,” Ice Cube says in voiceover narration. “And I think that’s what I liked about them.” The film’s title is a play on “Straight Outta Compton,” the chart-topping album by N.W.A. that launched the gangsta rap revolution with explicit lyrics that reflected the rising anger of urban youth.

self indulgence on the part of its director. Overall, however, it’s a brisk, compelling, well-told tale that carries some nostalgic value for fans of both music and football (There’s nothing like clips of the 1983 Super Bowl triumph to ease the pain of recent Raider ineptitude). The highlight of the film is Ice Cube’s interplay with Davis who, with a near-skeletal frame, looks awfully terrifying these days — and not in a notorious, Darth Vader kind of way. Still, even at 81, Davis comes across as the combative rebel as he gruffly recalls his many legal brawls with the NFL and city officials. But it’s Ice Cube who gets in the last punch with a ludicrous closing statement that will have Bay Area Raiders fans rolling their eyes. “One thing I know for sure,” he says. “The silver and black might call another place home, but the Raiders will always belong to L.A.” Oh, please.

By Maria Elena Fernandez Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — NBC continues its march toward filling its many prime time holes with three new pickups Friday: a drama, “The Event,” a comedy, “Outsourced,” and a dramedy, “Love Bites.” They join “Undercovers” in the network’s lineup for fall. “The Event” is billed as an emotional, high-octane conspiracy thriller that stars Jason Ritter (“The Class”) as Sean Walker, an everyman who investigates the mysterious disappearance of his fiancee, played by Sarah Roemer of “Disturbia,” and unwittingly begins to expose the biggest cover-up in U.S.

history. Blair Underwood plays the newly elected U.S. president, and Laura Innes (“ER”), plays the leader of a mysterious group of detainees. Sean’s shadowy father-in-law is played by Scott Patterson (“Gilmore Girls”). Ian Anthony Dale (“Daybreak”) and Zeljko Ivanek (“Damages”) also star in the ensemble drama. “Outsourced” is a single-camera comedy centering on an allAmerican company that sells whoopee cushions, foam fingers and wallets made of bacon — and whose call center has suddenly been outsourced to India. Ben Rappaport plays the new company’s manager, who learns that he is being transferred there. Also in the cast: Rizwan Manji (“Privileged”), Sacha Dhawan (BBC’s

“Five Days II”), Rebecca Hazlewood (BBC’s “Doctors”), Parvesh Cheena (“Help Me Help You”), Anisha Nagarajan (Broadway’s “Bombay Dreams”), Diedrich Bader (“The Drew Carey Show”) and Jessica Gower (Network Ten’s “The Secret Life of Us”). Becki Newton (“Ugly Betty”)

and Jordana Spiro (“My Boys”) are teaming up in “Love Bites,” a romantic comedy created by Cindy Chupack (“Sex and the City”). The anthology series features three loosely connected stories of love, sex, marriage and dating. Each episode is told in vignettes.

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Ice Cube and his N.W.A. cohorts, looking to add that extra touch of menace, routinely donned Raiders apparel for photo shoots and music videos and the look caught on. Suddenly, kids who didn’t know a nickel defense from a 50-cent piece were rocking the Raiders gear and turning the “outlaw” franchise into a lucrative, worldwide brand. As rapper Snoop Dogg points out, “The hip-hop nation fueled the Raider nation.” But the tale has a dark side. Gangs started associating with Raiders colors and an element of thuggery became prevalent in the Los Angeles Coliseum, prompting families to flee in droves. The Raiders lost a lot of games, as well as the city’s love, and hightailed it back to Oakland. Lacking a full-blown commitment to excellence, “Straight Outta L.A.” doesn’t provide much in the way of fresh insight. And it could stand a little less

NBC orders 3 new series for next season

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 95053 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 68701 News 3275 CBS News 4527 World News 8121 Millionaire 2701 Two Men 9879 Two Men 3459 The Office 9879 The Office 3459 This Old H’se 237 Business 817 News 8343 News 9695 King 98817 King 89169 Europe 72879 Travels 96459 Old House 9633 Business 2035

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Jeopardy! 3879 Wheel 275 Jeopardy! 27782 Wheel 76546 Access H. 7985 Scrubs ‘14’ 3411 Ent 2459 The Insider 8985 Simpsons 6817 Simpsons 2343 Simpsons 6817 Simpsons 2343 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 3237 Live at 7 (N) 2053 Inside Ed. 5879 ’70s Show 69817 ’70s Show 78053 Garden 43879 Workshop 85343 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 54782

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Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ 5459 Lost Across the Sea ’ ‘14’ 6200459 The Biggest Loser Tony Romo gives a pep talk. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 52053 NCIS Borderland (N) ’ ‘14’ 83256 NCIS: Los Angeles (N) ’ ‘14’ 63492 Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ 16508 Lost Across the Sea ’ ‘14’ 7147140 American Idol ’ ‘PG’ Å 76904 Glee Laryngitis (N) ‘14’ Å 56140 News 76904 Smarter 45546 Smarter 10508 NOVA ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) 2985 The History Project ’ ‘G’ 2121 The Biggest Loser Tony Romo gives a pep talk. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 72140 90210 Javianna (N) ‘14’ Å 58275 Life Unexpected ‘PG’ Å 38411 Woodsmith 52527 Moment 64362 Art Work 91492 Painting 54546 NOVA ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) 63430 The History Project ’ ‘G’ 50966

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(10:02) V Fruition (N) ‘14’ Å 8782 Parenthood Solace (N) ‘PG’ 71188 The Good Wife (N) ‘PG’ Å 73879 (10:02) V Fruition (N) ’ ‘14’ 39459 News 72850 TMZ ‘PG’ 98898 Deal-Deal 72850 Deal No 98898 Frontline/World (N) ’ 2508 Parenthood Solace (N) ‘PG’ 91275 Married... 86940 Married... 23188 Mexico 14430 Baking 90850 Frontline/World (N) ’ 53053

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News 9049614 (11:35) Nightline News 4278169 Jay Leno News 8146701 Letterman Inside 81486527 (11:35) Nightline King of Hill 40091 Name Earl 99614 South Park 40091 South Park 99614 Independent Lens (N) ’ ‘PG’ 52508 News 8148169 Jay Leno Roseanne 29275 Roseanne 26362 Christina 49427 Avec Eric 73904 Independent Lens (N) ’ ‘PG’ 14411

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The First 48 ‘PG’ Å 488850 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 618904 Criminal Minds Cults. ‘PG’ 694324 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 614188 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 617275 CSI: Miami Dissolved ‘14’ 9942362 130 28 8 32 Cold Case Files ‘14’ Å 160782 (5:15) ››› “Out of Sight” (1998, Crime Drama) George Clooney, Jennifer Lopez, Ving Rhames. A U.S. marshal falls for an es- ›› “The Hunted” (2003, Action) Tommy Lee Jones, Benicio Del Toro. A retired com- ››› “Gangs of New York” (2002) Leonardo DiCaprio, Cameron Diaz. A man vows 102 40 39 caped con she must capture. 46776169 bat-trainer searches for a killer in Oregon. 665986 vengeance on the gangster who killed his father. Å 79342409 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4058546 Wild Kingdom ‘PG’ Å 9807017 Blue Planet: Seas of Life 3502625 Blue Planet: Seas of Life 7902481 The Blue Planet ‘G’ Å 2349418 Blue Planet: Seas of Life 5425324 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 9618169 The Millionaire Matchmaker 783661 Housewives/NYC 952966 Housewives/NYC 517817 Housewives/N.J. 593237 Housewives/N.J. 506701 9 by Design With Benefits 516188 Housewives/NYC 764898 137 44 Smarter 3756607 Smarter 9051099 Extreme Makeover: Home 1848430 Extreme Makeover: Home 1824850 ››› “Junior” (1994, Comedy) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Danny DeVito. ’ 5561459 Lethal 5542324 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents 9708350 Coca-Cola: The Real Story 570411 The Oprah Effect 777237 Mad Money 786985 Coca-Cola: The Real Story 766121 The Oprah Effect 776508 Fast Cash ‘G’ Business 661362 51 36 40 52 Planet of the Apps 261091 Larry King Live (N) Å 316148 Anderson Cooper 360 American Al Qaeda (N) Å 836508 Larry King Live 230140 Anderson Cooper 360 240527 Anderson Cooper 360 825492 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 155985 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 15411 Scrubs ’ 12324 Scrubs ’ 36904 Daily Show 92072 Colbert 32188 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 78492 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 97527 South Park 75492 South Park 12508 Sit Down 98430 South Park 74850 Daily Show 87237 Colbert 64459 135 53 135 47 Presents 89508 The Buzz 6661 Bend City Edition G Morning 3817 Outdoors 4169 Redmond City Council 45256 RSN 94898 RSN Movie Night 90492 G Morning 99343 Lacrosse 457633 11 Capital News Today 620614 Today in Washington 422343 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 997898 Deck 796237 Phineas 786850 Deck 700430 Wizards 838350 Hannah 706614 › “Inspector Gadget” (1999, Comedy) Å 836614 Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Hannah 235701 Wizards 882633 Deck 185625 87 43 14 39 Deck 438594 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 609256 Deadliest Catch (N) ’ ‘14’ 6721099 (10:01) Swamp Loggers ‘PG’ 699879 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 212904 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 163879 Cash Cab 808430 Cash Cab 805343 Cash Cab 896695 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 690508 MLB 2010: Fields of Play (N) 864256 Baseball Tonight Å 865184 SportsCenter (Live) Å 865904 Baseball 344817 NFL Live 869701 SportsCenter (Live) Å 215625 SportsCenter (Live) Å 643850 21 23 22 23 30 for 30 (N) 520140 2009 World Series of Poker 7486817 2009 World Series of Poker 1846072 30 for 30 (N) 1822492 Nation 5993459 NASCAR Now Å 9673430 NBA 3074256 Poker Stars Shootout 1956508 22 24 21 24 2009 World Series of Poker 1508332 Tennis Å 2524492 One 2992121 SSA 2911256 AWA Wrestling Å 2545985 Boxing: Kirilov vs. Perez 2548072 Tyson 7433492 Boxing 6350256 23 25 123 25 Boxing 2915072 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 70s Show 416508 70s Show 430188 Funniest Home Videos 234091 Funniest Home Videos 210411 America’s Funniest Home Videos: The Battle of the Best ’ ‘PG’ 220898 The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 489614 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 702817 Hannity 2029546 On the Record 5539188 The O’Reilly Factor 5515508 Hannity 5528072 On the Record 5538459 Glenn Beck 4359237 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor Å 8963256 Home 2457594 Cooking 5607017 Minute 1902409 Challenge 7007035 Cakes 9620904 Cakes 9609411 Chefs vs. City 1607099 Chopped (N) 8457576 Good Eats Unwrap 2767324 177 62 46 44 C’tessa 9691492 Mariners 66184 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles From Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore. 725508 Mariners 89782 NASCAR 92169 Final Scr 62091 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles (Live) 733527 (4:30) ›› “Night at the Museum” (2006, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Carla Gugino. 6402879 ›› “Beowulf” (2007) Voices of Ray Winstone, Anthony Hopkins. Premiere. 3546508 Justified Hatless (N) ‘MA’ 7794904 (11:02) Justified ‘MA’ 6022343 131 Buck 5034121 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 5069343 House 4445463 House 5051898 First 8140071 First 9495968 Home Rules (N) ‘G’ Å 4022343 House 8036701 House 8012121 First 8892633 Marriage 9346053 176 49 33 43 Income 7770797 Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ 3895275 Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å 3998546 The Real Robin Hood (N) ‘PG’ Å 3978782 The Universe ‘PG’ Å 3997817 Sex in the Ancient World 5499188 155 42 41 36 MysteryQuest ‘PG’ Å 1651527 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 673966 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 214237 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 223985 “Accused at 17” (2009) Cynthia Gibb, Nicole Gale Anderson. Å 226072 Will 594985 Will 748879 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘PG’ 708091 Rachel Maddow Show 11756275 Countdown 82231256 Rachel Maddow Show 82240904 Hardball Chris Matthews 82220140 Countdown 82230527 Rachel Maddow Show 59248169 56 59 128 51 Countdown 52917614 Disaster 417237 Disaster 407850 Cribs 421430 I Was 17 701188 I Was 17 427614 True Life ’ 218053 The City 584508 The Hills 670879 The Hills 963091 The City 949411 The Hills 589053 The City 766275 192 22 38 57 Disaster 781324 Sponge 806072 iCarly ‘G’ 803985 Big Time 894237 iCarly ‘G’ 174985 Sponge 883121 Malcolm 183633 Malcolm 162140 Chris 966053 Chris 403169 Lopez 772701 Lopez 758121 Nanny 978898 Nanny 582275 82 46 24 40 Sponge 154121 DEA ’ ‘14’ 334546 DEA Up the Ladder ’ ‘14’ 515324 DEA Deep Cover ’ ‘14’ 524072 DEA ’ ‘14’ 511508 Deadliest Warrior (N) ’ ‘14’ 514695 Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ 113140 132 31 34 46 DEA Deadly Chase ’ ‘14’ 443633 Star Trek: Next Gener. 2892898 Star Trek: Next Gener. 4814091 Star Trek: Next Generation 4890411 Star Trek: Next Generation 4810275 WWE NXT ’ Å 4813362 Star Trek: Next Gener. 1215508 133 35 133 45 Star Trek: Next Gener. 8192782 Behind 7073850 J. Meyer 7960350 Hagee 6815661 Hillsong 2110053 Praise the Lord Å 7313362 ACLJ 2165904 Dino ‘G’ 4697661 Full Flame Å Changing-World Harvest Crusade 3914091 205 60 130 Office 899817 King 889430 King 870782 Seinfeld 143140 Seinfeld 876966 Office 169188 Office 148695 Office 513985 Office 766689 Office 305053 Office 314701 Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 852546 16 27 11 28 Friends 163904 (9:15) ››› “The Last of the Mohicans” (1992, Adventure) Daniel Day-Lewis, Madeleine Stowe. Premiere. ››› “Geronimo” ››› “Northwest Passage” (1940) Spencer Tracy, Robert Young. A major and his ››› “Drums Along the Mohawk” (1939) Claudette Colbert. Colonial homesteaders 101 44 101 29 contend with war and Indian raids. Å 3083904 rangers search for a near-mythical passage. Å 27784966 Cooper’s frontier tale of Hawkeye, Chingachgook and Uncas. 42178614 9328256 Say Yes 152879 Say Yes 142492 Say Yes 166072 Best Food Ever ‘PG’ Å 500492 19 Kids and Counting ‘PG’ 519140 19 Kids 885695 19 Kids 331459 Quintuplet Surprise ’ ‘PG’ 532091 19 Kids and Counting ‘PG’ 115508 178 34 32 34 Say Yes 426966 To Be Announced 723362 Inside the NBA (Live) Å 530633 Bones Fire in the Ice ’ ‘14’ 106850 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers (Live) Å 719169 Amazing 4645661 Chowder 5047695 Johnny 5044508 Garfield 5068188 Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield 8245625 Chowder 3095922 Codename: Kid Ed, Edd 5077362 King-Hill 8049275 King-Hill 8025695 Family Guy ‘14’ Family 9359527 84 Unexplained 11756275 Creepiest Destinations 82231256 Most Terrifying Places 2 82240904 Most Terrifying Places 82220140 Mysteries of Smithsonian 82230527 Creepiest Destinations 59248169 179 51 45 42 Fun Food Factories 2 ‘G’ 52917614 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 9617430 Sanford 9102427 Cosby 9693850 Cosby 9612985 Ray 6489492 Ray 4035695 Ray 6957701 Ray 6933121 Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU 561296 Law & Order: SVU 236324 Law & Order: SVU 245072 Law & Order: SVU 232508 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 235695 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 850188 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 140053 Brandy & Ray J 578053 Beauty 260362 Beauty 993188 Tough Love Couples ‘PG’ 784527 Undateable Hour 1 ’ ‘14’ 797091 Undateable Hour 2 (N) ‘14’ 767850 Brandy & Ray J 397275 191 48 37 54 Brandy & Ray J 269633 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) › “Never Back Down” 2008 ’ ‘PG-13’ 9715508 (6:20) ›› “Nothing to Lose” 1997 ‘R’ Å 67922184 ›› “Quarantine” 2008 Jennifer Carpenter. 6816817 (9:35) ›› “Tears of the Sun” 2003 Bruce Willis. ’ ‘R’ Å 17125898 Never Bac ›› “Revenge of the Nerds” 1984 ‘R’ Å 7215099 ›› “Revenge of the Nerds III: The Next Generation” 1992 4209343 ›› “Revenge of the Nerds IV: Nerds in Love” 1994 Å 3014072 › “Freaked” 1993 Alex Winter. ‘PG-13’ Å 5363188 Winter X Games Classix 3510817 Daily 4099985 Surfing 4080237 Moto 3511546 Update 4079121 Winter X Games Classix 9373324 Daily 2434362 Ride Open Terjes 7506324 Moto 7515072 Firsthand Å Props 9315695 Monday After the Masters 168324 The Story of Golf (N) 486492 Fabulous World of Golf 616546 Golf 178701 PGA Tour 164508 The Story of Golf 605430 Fabulous World of Golf 615817 Lessons 963966 PGA Tour 577343 M*A*S*H 1663362 M*A*S*H 8595148 M*A*S*H 5240071 M*A*S*H 1545463 Touched by an Angel ‘G’ 3996188 Touched by an Angel ‘G’ 3972508 “Expecting a Miracle” (2009) Jason Priestley, Teri Polo. ‘PG’ Å 3975695 Golden 7350188 Golden 6147898 (4:30) ››› “The Abyss” 1989, Science Fiction Ed Harris. An oil-rig crew must search ›› “Fighting” 2009, Drama Channing Tatum, Terrence Howard. A young man be› “Land of the Lost” 2009 Will Ferrell. A time-space vortex sucks Shrek Forever Treme Janette cooks for four celebrity HBO 425 501 425 10 for a sunken nuclear sub. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 756985 comes a champion street brawler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 656324 three people into another reality. 8249121 96869324 chefs. ’ ‘MA’ Å 652508 “Good Guys Wear Black” 13978891 Arrested 3756607 Arrested 9051099 Food Party ‘14’ Dinner 7156463 Ideal (N) 8558017 Monty Python ›› “Galaxina” 1980 Dorothy Stratten. ‘R’ 4823850 Perra 67114091 Whitest 5990362 Rollins 7187091 IFC 105 105 (4:15) ››› “Marley & Me” 2008 Owen ›› “Terminator Salvation” 2009, Science Fiction Christian Bale. Humanity fights back ›› “Kiss of the Dragon” 2001 Jet Li. An intelligence officer Zane’s Sex Chron. (6:10) ›› “Inkheart” 2009, Adventure Brendan Fraser. A bookbinder accidentally MAX 400 508 7 Wilson. ‘PG’ Å 26739053 brings an evil storybook character to life. ’ ‘PG’ Å 80250017 against Skynet’s machine army. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 236459 becomes involved in a conspiracy. ‘R’ 8246492 37810188 Stone Age Atlantis ‘PG’ 7528546 Explorer ‘PG’ 9399362 Stone Age Atlantis ‘PG’ 9386898 Explorer ‘PG’ 9398633 Border Wars ‘PG’ 6489411 NGC 157 157 Avatar 3508072 Avatar 4009362 Iron Man 4006275 Iron Man 4097527 OddParents OddParents Avatar 3504256 Avatar 3516091 Mighty B 2418324 Mighty B 8512879 Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action 2420169 Rocko 9322985 NTOON 89 115 189 Outd’rs 9606324 Outdrs 2761186 Hunting 3902689 Hunting 3702481 Game Chasers Dream 7302445 Hunting 9602508 Nugent 9614343 Hunting 6481850 Hunting 4037053 Bone 6966459 Steve’s 6942879 Outd’rs 6493695 Manage. 2772256 OUTD 37 307 43 (7:50) ›› “What Women Want” 2000 Mel Gibson. iTV. A chauvinistic ad executive can Nurse Jackie ’ (4:30) › “Her Minor Thing” 2004 Estella ››› “Lars and the Real Girl” 2007 Ryan Gosling. iTV. A man forms an emotional United States of Nurse Jackie ’ United States of SHO 500 500 Warren. ‘PG-13’ 923633 bond with a plastic woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 9838121 suddenly read women’s minds. ’ ‘PG-13’ 89698633 ‘MA’ 310985 Tara ‘MA’ 329633 ‘MA’ 523362 Tara ‘MA’ 113169 Race in 60 (N) 7092985 NASCAR Hall of Fame Grand opening of the new NASCAR Hall of Fame. 4756614 Race in 60 7403508 NASCAR Hall of Fame 7406695 Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ 7319546 SPEED 35 303 125 (4:10) ›› “Pearl Harbor” 2001, War Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 42470237 (7:20) ›› “Hancock” 2008 Will Smith. Å 50390072 › “Pandorum” 2009, Science Fiction Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘R’ Å 3943594 (10:50) “The Sixth Sense” 24956324 STARZ 300 408 300 “The Sasquatch Gang” 2007 Jeremy Sumpter. Friends find pos- › “Deal” 2008 Burt Reynolds. A former card shark strikes a ›› “Meet the Browns” 2008 Tyler Perry, David Mann. A woman meets her late ›› “Rambo” 2008, Action Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz, Mat- ›› “The Lucky TMC 525 525 sible signs of Bigfoot. ’ ‘PG-13’ 913362 bargain with an up-and-coming player. 471701 father’s uproarious family for the first time. ’ ‘PG-13’ 157459 thew Marsden. ’ ‘R’ 2630275 Ones” 80629898 World Extreme Cage. 9605695 Hockey 3902689 NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks (Live) 7589898 Hockey 6481850 The Daily Line (Live) 6015459 Sports Soup The Daily Line 5432614 VS. 27 58 30 Women on Death Row 5 ‘14’ Å 9266546 Women Behind Bars ‘14’ 7492492 Golden 7097430 Golden 7083237 Golden 2150072 Golden 2897689 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 7424091 Secret Lives of Women 7304614 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY “EARLY WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS IN OREGON”: Carole Glauber talks about four female photographers; slide show included; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, 241 S.E. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351.

WEDNESDAY “LAST CHILD IN THE WOODS”: Richard Louv talks about how American children and families are losing touch with nature, and the costs of this alienation; $10; 6:30 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-383-7257. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan talks about his books “100 Hikes in Southern Oregon” and “The Ship in the Hill”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. CASEY NEILL & THE NORWAY RATS: The Portland-based folk rockers perform; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. POETRY SLAM: A live poetry reading open to competitors and spectators; $3; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/bendpoetryslam.

presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. WORD CAFE: Featuring “Poet Healers II: Gifts for the Journey,” health care students reading poems inspired by patients and families; free; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Robert L. Barber Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www. clear1017.fm. THE PARENTAL ADVISORY TOUR: Loud, sweaty rock ‘n’ roll from Nashville Pussy, Green Jelly, The Fabulous Miss Wendy, Psychostick and High Desert Hooligans; $17 plus service charges in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-4101049 or www.myspace.com/ actiondeniroproductions or www. bendticket.com.

FRIDAY THURSDAY STUDENTS SPEAK — A WATERSHED SUMMIT: Local students share their watershed projects in art, science, videography and hands-on restoration; with keynote speaker Richard Louv; free, but a ticket is required; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6103, ext. 33 or kolleen@ thefreshwatertrust.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Island of the Blue Dolphins” by Scott O’Dell; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.dpls. us/calendar. CENTRAL OREGON LAW ENFORCEMENT MEMORIAL CEREMONY: The Redmond Police Department honors men and women who have sacrificed their lives while serving the citizens of Oregon; 5:30 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-5191. CHAIR-IT-ABLE AUCTION: Bid on hand-painted chairs designed by Crook County High School students; with live music and drama performances; proceeds benefit the Oasis Food Kitchen; free; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County High School, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4166900, ext. 3120 or heidi.barney@ crookcounty.k12.or.us. TIGHT LINES AUCTION & BBQ DINNER: The Deschutes River Conservancy hosts an evening of food, fishing lore, an auction, drinks and more; registration requested; $35; 6 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-382-4077, ext. 10 or www.deschutesriver. org. WOMEN’S BREW REVIEW: Enjoy appetizers paired with beers; tickets available through the website; proceeds benefit the Women’s Resource Center of Central Oregon; $25; 6-8 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541385-8606, info@deschutesbrewery. com or www.wrcco.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Mary Sojourner reads from her books “She Bets Her Life” and “Going Through Ghosts”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766. ALASDAIR FRASER AND NATALIE HAAS: The duo perform Scottish fiddle and cello music; $20 or $25; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department

SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL: International touring festival showcases a series of films about people with developmental disabilities; proceeds benefit Full Access; $6 matinee, $10 evening, $25 includes preshow reception and silent auction; 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-749-2158 or www. towertheatre.org. CULVER CENTENNIAL DINNER: A dinner with Culver historical presentations; reservations requested; $15; 6 p.m.; City Hall, 200 First Ave.; 541-546-6494. “HAITI, THE EARTHQUAKE AND THE AFTERMATH”: A talk and slide show, with photographer David Uttley; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan presents a slide show, “New Hikes in Southern Oregon”; free; 7 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121032 or www.dpls.us/calendar. SISTERS AMERICANA PROJECT CD RELEASE: Celebrate the release of the latest compilation from the Sisters High School Americana Project; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; The Barn at Pine Meadow Ranch, The Barn, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-549-4979 or info@sistersfolkfestival.org. “SHERLOCK HOLMES”: A screening of the 2009 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www. jcld.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. PEPPINO D’AGOSTINO: Italianborn acoustic guitarist and singer performs; $12; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.bendticket.com. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8:30-11 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@oldshoepress.com. CRUST REMASTERED: Celebrate the DVD release, with performances by My New Vice and Sumbitch; free; 9 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-388-8178.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SATURDAY ICEBREAKER POKER RUN: South Central Oregon Outreach and Toy Run hosts a benefit featuring a ride open to all street-legal vehicles, food and live music by the Badland Boogie Band; $10 per hand, $6 for Lions Club breakfast; 8 to 10 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. poker run start time; Vic’s Bar & Grill, 16980 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-5362644 or www.scootr.org. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR STAR PARTY: The 11th annual party includes professional and amateur astronomers who will share telescopes with novice stargazers to see the night sky; daytime activities include talks by local astronomers, informative displays and exhibits, and kayak tours on the Prineville Reservoir; food and refreshments available; free; 9 a.m., star gazing begins at 9:30 p.m.; Prineville Reservoir State Park, 19020 S.E. Parkland Drive; 541-923-7551. 34TH ANNUAL POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Participants will race through multiple sports from Mt. Bachelor to Bend; the Les Schwab Amphitheater, which marks the end of the race, will host a festival with food, music and sponsor booths; free; 9:15 a.m. start time on Mt. Bachelor; 10 a.m. booths open; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. DOG PARK CELEBRATION: Celebrate Prineville’s first dog park with adoptable pets, a low-cost microchip and rabies clinic, dog CPR, dog-sledding demonstrations, a pet blessing, vendors and more; free admission; 10 a.m.; Crooked River Dog Park, 1037 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-1209. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan presents a slide show, “New Hikes in Southern Oregon”; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents a gala opening of the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $45; 6:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beatonline. org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Pete Nelson talks about his book “I Thought You Were Dead”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. POETRY EVENING: The Peregrine Poets share their works; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. STRAIGHT NO CHASER: The 10-voice male a cappella group performs pop music; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-3836402. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com.

CROWN POINT: The alternative poprock band performs; free; 9 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-3000. PROFESSOR GALL CD RELEASE: The Portland-based roots band performs, with Grant Sabin; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

SUNDAY “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941 or www. cosymphony.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Pete Nelson talks about his book “I Thought You Were Dead”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541593-2525. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs under the direction of Julie Hanney; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www.freewebs. com/bendgospel. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso as a pub theater production; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-306-3723 or www.bendticket. com. A TASTE OF UGANDA: Eat a traditional Ugandan dinner, with entertainment, a silent auction and more; proceeds benefit the Sisters of the Heart Micro Loan Foundation in Kapchorwa, Uganda; $10 suggested donation; 6 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-5951818. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. THAT 1 GUY: The funk act performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

MONDAY THE FACEMELTER TOUR: Featuring performances by Dying Fetus, Arsis, Misery Index, Annotations of an Autopsy and Conducting from the Grave; $15; 7 p.m.; Bend Event Center, 2221 N.E. Third St., lower floor; 541-550-8186 or www. myspace.com/dlproductionsllc. CHARLIE HUNTER TRIO: The jazz act performs, with Adam Carlson Trio; $17 plus service charges in advance, $20 at the door; 7:15 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com.

M T For Tuesday, May 11

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) 12:15, 2:30, 4:50, 8 CITY ISLAND (PG-13) 12:05, 2:40, 5:20, 7:50 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) Noon, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 DEATH AT A FUNERAL (R) 12:20, 2:55, 5:05, 8:10 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5:10, 8:05 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:50 a.m., 3:05, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 12:45, 6:50 THE BACK-UP PLAN (PG-13) 11:20

a.m., 2:15, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 3:50, 9:45 CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 10:55 a.m., 1:50, 4:50, 7:50, 10:25 CLASH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG-13) 9:40 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 9:55 FURRY VENGEANCE (PG) 10:50 a.m., 1:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:35 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 4:10 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:15 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 12:35, 1, 2, 2:30, 3:30, 4, 5, 5:30, 6:30, 7, 8, 8:30, 9:30, 10, 10:55 IRON MAN 2 (DLP — PG-13) 10:35 a.m., 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30 KICK-ASS (R) 1:10, 7:10, 10:10 THE LOSERS (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8:20, 10:45 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:20, 2:10,

4:20, 5:10, 7:20, 8:10, 9:50, 10:40 OCEANS (G) 10:40 a.m., 12:50, 3:40, 6:40, 9:25 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: DLP technology uses an optical semiconductor to manipulate light digitally. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 6 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 8:30

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

FURRY VENGEANCE (PG) 4:45, 6:45, 8:45 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 5, 7:15, 9:30 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) 5, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

CHLOE (R) 7 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 7 GREENBERG (R) 6:45 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7

Nelson Continued from E1 But Stella is a different species of speaker. She’s a dog — specifically, a German shepherd-yellow lab mix modeled after Nelson’s deceased pet of the same mixed breed. In short, Stella, whom one reviewer called the smartest character in the book, is a composite of Nelson’s real-life grandmother and his pet dog, who died a while back at age 16. Paul’s family probably has the strongest impact on his development in the book, “but Stella is definitely part of that family,” Nelson explains. “Paul has a very low sense of self-esteem, but he knows he comes from good stock.” Nelson, 57, doesn’t want people to focus only on the fact that the fictional Stella converses with Paul, but he knows it makes for interesting conversation. On his book tour, which brings him to Central Oregon for two appearances this weekend (see “If you go” on Page E1), he’s chosen to read from sections where Stella speaks. “I would like to stress that there’s a lot more to it than that,” adds Nelson. Nevertheless, “it is the part that people respond to. It’s kinda the core of the book.” Nelson picked up the real-life Stella as he was leaving Iowa, where he received his Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing from the University of Iowa. He got her from the owner of a bar where he was a bartender. “The owner of the bar owned this farm, and Stella was one of these farm dogs, you know, living in the weeds. She was the friendliest. She was the first one to come out and sort of shyly wag her tail and say hello. “So when I left town, I picked her up and threw her on the front seat of my car as a companion,” he says. “She moped all the way to Montana. She just had her head on her paws. I kept lifting her up trying to tell her how pretty things were.” He and Stella headed to Portland, where he lived for a year before moving to the Northeast to concentrate more on his budding magazine-writing career. “I realized if I was going to have meetings, I had to move East. I also had a pickup truck that got seven miles a gallon. People would say, ‘You want to go up to Mount Hood?’ and I’d think, ‘Well that’s a $100 trip. I could try.’” The author of several books in addition to a successful magazine writer, Nelson lived for many years in Northampton, Mass., and moved recently with his family to Westchester, N.Y., 40 miles outside Manhattan, where his wife works as a literary agent. His website contains this partial description of “I Thought You Were Dead”: “Set in pre-Y2K America, the world is changing for Paul Gustavson, who does not like change, not even a little. Dotcoms come and go. The Internet appears to be here to stay. The stock market soars and crashes. Everybody’s getting cell-phones, but nobody answers their phone. On a personal note, Paul’s life is in the toilet.” As the book’s acknowledgments page suggests, the book took a while for Nelson to complete. He wrote it in two years, “but it took about another 12 years to edit, because — well, for one thing, I had to keep doing

stuff to pay the rent while I was working on it … magazine stuff and a bunch of other books.” The first draft was 1,200 pages. “I was just writing without any sense of editing. I said ‘I’m going to write it first, every scene and every little tangent where I want to go, and cut it back later.’” Nelson plans to mine the excised material for another novel, with a new protagonist, he says, and set in the present rather than 1998. Like Paul of “I Thought You Were Dead,” Nelson decided to give up drinking a while back. “It is autobiographical to the extent that I wrote it after I quit drinking. It wasn’t that big a struggle for me; I know for some people, it’s very difficult,” Nelson says. “I remember when I quit drinking, thinking my grandparents were all teetotalers, and realizing that life can be lived that way. … It’s just not necessary to live the way I was living, going to bars all the time.” There is a bar in Northampton, though, that remains special to him. “We posed some photographs (there), back before I even thought of doing this. We brought my dog into this bar, and there’s this picture of me and her; I was having a beer and she was having a martini. And the owner of the bar had it framed. “I was driving through Northampton with my publicist, and I said, ‘Stop a second, let me show you this picture in this bar.’ It’s one of those bars with just clutter, stuff everywhere. And I couldn’t find the picture of me and the dog having a drink. We’re walking down the stairs from the pool room, and I look on the wall next to the stairs, and there’s a totally different picture of Stella in the bar, that I have no recollection of. I was trying to show him this one picture and instead there’s another picture I didn’t even know was there.” Stella was a bit of a celebrity in Northampton, he says. The newspaper there even ran an obituary of Stella headlined “Death takes a Familiar Wag.” “People I’d never met would just say hello to her by name when we were walking down the street,” he says. “I had a teacher once who said never write about something unless you care passionately for it. And it’s pretty obvious in this book that dogs are among the things I care passionately for.” Of course, Stella’s voice is more like his grandmother’s than his dog’s. He grew up with his grandmother living a few doors down. “She wasn’t as salty, but she was very funny, and very kind,” Nelson says. “She’d sort of put me on her knee and teach me lessons when I was younger.” Nelson considers Stella the voice of Paul’s conscience, and so far, readers not only don’t mind the literary device of a talking dog — they seem to love her, says Nelson. At signings, “people ask me to sign it to their dogs. Yeah, about half — about half the books I’ve signed have been to the dog. And that’s cool,” Nelson says. “I was joking that the cover of the book is beef-flavored. I’m trying to get people to buy two, one for themselves and one for their dog.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, May 11, 2010: This year, you might need more downtime. Much comes at you from out of left field. The unexpected aspect of what happens can tire you more than you think, even if it is good news. You might move this year or, if you stay in the same home, change your environment. You are changing, and your home reflects that change. If you are single, don’t move in with each other too quickly. You are better off waiting. If you are attached, the two of you could quarrel more than usual. Is this about control? Neither of you will win. Why not enjoy your differences? ARIES reads you cold. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You might be pushing a little too hard to accomplish what you must. Your fiery temperament, if well-harnessed, allows greater happiness and success. Don’t deny a loved one’s need to talk. There is more there than you think. Listen. Tonight: Slow down. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You might not want to share everything you know. In fact, it will serve you well to say little and learn more. Your instincts are important, but only if they come from a centered place. Emotions could get tied in otherwise. Tonight: Nap and then decide. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Use the daytime for any matter that you are vested

in. Be careful how hard you push a friend or deal with someone in a meeting. You finally get to clear the air. Use your instincts properly. Tonight: Take some much-needed personal time. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You will be asked once more to take the lead in a matter that is close to your heart. Be careful about spending money in order to make an impression on someone. Ultimately, for many reasons, this could be a mistake. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Detach if you feel that you are in an inordinately touchy situation. You might gain more understanding. Realize what is going on with someone you care about deeply. Could you be misreading a partner? Tonight: Count on being a force to be reckoned with. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Understand where a partner is coming from. You might have pushed this person far too hard, to the extent that his or her feelings have changed. Open up to a discussion that surrounds this issue. Tonight: Togetherness remains a theme. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Defer to those with high energy levels or someone you trust to represent your interests. You could be more focused on a personal matter or pushing forward in another area of your life. A male friend could play a significant role. Tonight: Clear out a problem. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Your focus defines the

end results of a project. A must appearance could make all the difference. You will take action if you don’t get the desired results. Understand that this action could cause more problems. Tonight: Have an important discussion. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Tap into your imagination and think about a new direction. Make a call or two to someone who might have a very different perspective from yours. An effort toward a partner pays off. Tonight: Let your hair down. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Pressure builds on the home front and/or in your personal life. A partner or key associate takes extra time. One-on-one relating could start in a volatile manner. Communication needs to surround practical matters. Tonight: Order in. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Keep conversations moving. You could get caught up in a power play. An argument that has been brewing simply might not be worth the effort. Isn’t it normal to have different opinions? Let your imagination set the tone. Tonight: Visit with a friend. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You might be so into your head that you are accident-prone. Know when to pull back and rethink a situation. You could hit a problem if you act without thought. What you believe is a good risk might not be. Tonight: Your treat.

© 2009 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

Autos Continued from E1 “I love the looks, the designs, the power and the sheer fun of driving a beautiful piece of art, because that’s what they are,” he says with a grin that lights up his still-youthful face (he’s nearly 70). “I can’t help it, I just love ’em all.”

LEFT: Here is a detailed view of the iconic grill of Steve Ramsey’s 1967 Pontiac GTO. Photos by Ron T. Ennis / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Tri-five fan Love them all he may, but Ramsey confesses to being especially partial to “Tri-Fives,” the series of iconic 1955-56-57 Chevrolets that many aficionados regard as the golden age of postwar American motoring. (Although the Bel Air Sport Sedan and the two-door Nomad station wagon are the most recognized of the lineup, the less-familiar, economy model 150s and 210s are also coveted by collectors.) And a few years back, when GM paid homage to Tri-Fives with a massive display of flawless examples at its headquarters, they asked another of Ramsey’s customers if he’d lend them his stunning coral and black 1955 Bel Air Sport Coupe, updated with custom leather interior, 502 cubic-inch ramjet V8 and state-ofthe-art suspension and transmission. In a testament to the car’s superb rebuild, GM awarded it “Best Modern Restoration.” “I’ve often thought,” he reflects, “that if GM built these same cars with today’s modern mechanicals and safety features, they wouldn’t be in the shape they’re in now.” GM’s loss is Ramsey’s gain. He’s happy to rebuild a classic to original factory specs, or to customize it with today’s high-efficiency engines, transmissions and suspensions. And in the world of car guys, that’s a fairly provocative philosophy. “There are two basic approaches to classics,” he says. “Some people want their classy chassis rebuilt and updated with modern amenities and mechanicals. Others want their cars restored to exactly the same condition as when they rolled off the line. Both sides get pretty passionate about their preferences,” he adds with a chuckle. “My passion is all about delivering what the customer wants. If the car is already near original, I’ll usually recommend that we keep it that way and make it better. But if

The interior of Steve Ramsey’s personal ’67 Pontiac GTO has been brought back to its original state. it’s already been modified, then let’s update it and have some fun. That’s the key word.” That sense of fun is palpable at Ramsey’s shop, a neat-as-a-pin, 12,000-square-foot space spread out between two aircraft hangars at Hicks Airport, north of Fort Worth. A traffic light blinks red-yellow-green, casting its light on a vintage gas pump, a giant tin Texaco sign and a squat, ’50s-era Coke machine. Music by Elvis and the Beach Boys fills the air. Tigger and Beauty, two rescue cats, continually prowl the grounds and nap with Sadie, Ramsey’s beloved Heinz 57 dog. “They’re our on-site security patrol,” jokes Ramsey, who set up an office for them, complete with food, water and litter boxes.

A classy, classic lineup The animals are cute and speak to Ramsey’s softer side. But the real attractions are the cars, obsessively fussed over by five specially trained mechanics. Just sitting there quietly, the black 1963 Corvette Sting Ray with the broad red stripe running front to back looks dangerous. Crank the high-performance 383-cubic-inch engine, and the shop fills with a menacing rumble. “That’s a rare one,” says Ramsey, “because it’s still got the Bill Mitchell-designed

split window. Lots of owners back then had it removed for better visibility. Chevy got the message and did away with it a year later, but this one is original and all the better for it.” Then there’s the sky-blue 1968 Camaro Z28 Rally Sport Coupe with twin white stripes fore and aft and 302 engine, restored to blinding glory and blistering performance. “It’s one of only 7,199 made,” Ramsey says. “It’s only got 290 horsepower, but that Muncie transmission will get it going pretty quickly. If you really want to move, though,” he says as he opens the hood on a nice but unassuming jade-painted 1965 Dodge Coronet, “this one’s for you.” He gestures casually to the beastly 426-cubic-inch Ramcharger V8 equipped with dual-quad carburetors and says, “It’s got 620 horsepower. Passes everything but a gas station.” He’s also working on a special project in his “secret room.” As he cracks the door to a narrow room away from the main hangar, his face lights up like a little kid showing off his private fort. And sitting there like Sinbad’s treasure is a 1955 Chevy Nomad that he is rebuilding with a Corvette LT-1 engine and C-5 suspension. Basically, it’s a modern Corvette disguised as a 55-year-old station wagon. Even Ramsey’s forklift isn’t im-

Steve Ramsey, right, looks in on refurbishing work going on in his classic car garage in a hangar at Hooks Field in Haslett, Texas, on April 13. mune: spinners sparkle on the little yellow Clark workhorse’s wheels as he uses it to set a pallet of Camaro spare parts into a customer’s truck. “It used to have flame decals on it, but they wore off with all the abuse it gets,” he shrugs.

Long-term legacy Ramsey traces his obsession to fond remembrances of scampering around the family garage as a boy, fetching wrenches for his grandfather and father as they souped up Model A’s and Model T’s. The attraction persisted, even as he attended the University of California-Berkeley and hung out at Haight Ashbury during the tumultuous 1960s. “My dad said packing me off to California was a bad idea, and he was probably right,” says Ramsey. But the long-haired hippie was also a practicing capitalist who marshaled his funds into a decade’s worth of successful real estate investments in Fort Worth’s hos-

pital district. He also noticed that when he took his own collectible cars into various shops for restoration work, progress was generally slow, poor quality and much more expensive than the original quotes that he’d been given. Sensing an opportunity to feed his soul as well as his bank account, Ramsey’s Rods was born. Ramsey credits wife Denise (“a fellow car guy”) with being the catalyst to getting the business off the ground, setting up the corporate structure and inspiring what he calls “our very simple business philosophy — we put our work and our customers on the same high level. Cars don’t gather dust in our shop. We always have a queue of projects, and when yours is at the top of the list, it gets done quickly and correctly. I want people to say that we did what we said, on time and spent wisely and fairly. It’s a philosophy that’s served us well for more than three decades, and I’m proud of that.”

Today, Ramsey is mindful that while his days of picking up transmissions single-handedly are over, he’s still adept at getting his hands dirty with electrical and detail work. But his specialty has always been the overall planning and design of rebuilding and restoring cars, and that’s what still energizes him every morning. “Even if I wind up in a wheelchair someday, I can still point and tell our crew what I want done,” he says. “I’ve always taken solace in working with cars and taking what’s there and making it better and putting my personal imprint on it. And the knowledge I’ve gained over all these years tells me what needs to be done and dictates how I want it done, and I’m pretty picky about that. I have a real zest for life and a hugely positive attitude. With that, I can do anything I want. And this,” he says, waving at his shop and the rolling art that he brings to life, “is what I want to do.”


v

AH

HO ME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTR A L ORE GON Spring is here It’s time to get the garden in order and give your cupcakes a festive look, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 11, 2010

HOME

FOOD

Quinoa Quiz:

The Bulletin file photo

Quinoa is a healthy whole “grain” that comes from a South American plant related to beets.

By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

Televisions are bigger and better than ever. They’re thinner and lighter too, and that opens up new options about where to put them for the best viewing experience. They’re easily hung on the wall now or placed in a cabinet, creating a home theater in a family or media room. Positioning a large flat-screen TV above the fireplace in the main living space has been a popular choice. But a bigger television is better only when you can see it clearly and comfortably and can find an aesthetically pleasing spot for it at home. We asked three experts to address the challenges of interior decorating with big flat-screen televisions.

By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

If you’re not keen on quinoa yet, just wait. It won’t be long before you’ll encounter it on a restaurant menu or notice it in your favorite grocery store. The National Restaurant Association’s Chef Survey of What’s Hot in 2010 named quinoa (KEEN-wah) the No. 1 trend for the year in the sides/ starches category. Chances are, if you enjoy whole grains such as barley, oatmeal, bulgur and rice, you’ll like quinoa. Quinoa is an ancient and versatile pseudo-grain originating in the Andes mountains of South America. It’s getting a lot of attention because it’s one of those foods that is close to perfect, supplying almost everything needed to sustain life: It’s high in protein, calcium, iron, B vitamins and minerals; it’s gluten-free, with a low glycemic index; and it has all of the essential amino acids.

Part of the home Visionary residential architect Sarah Susanka, author of the “Not So Big House” books (www .notsobighouse.com) shared her thoughts about where to put a TV so it fits well into our homes and lives. The questions Susanka asks clients about how TV watching happens in their homes and how they’d like it to happen may help you clarify where your TV should go (see sidebar below). “The TV is too often just something that we put in the middle of our main space, so for an awful lot of people, when it’s there it gets turned on. So, by default, we’re all watching TV without even thinking about whether that’s how we want to spend our time,” Susanka said in a phone interview from her home office in Raleigh, N.C. See TV / F4

But don’t call it a grain Even though it looks, acts and tastes like a grain, quinoa is actually a member of the goosefoot family of plants (Chenopodiaceae), which includes beets, chard and spinach. The “grain” is the seed of the plant. It’s not only good for you, it tastes good, too, with a mild, nutty flavor and a pleasant, chewy texture, like that of couscous and brown rice rolled into one. See Quinoa / F2

Ask yourself: How do you watch TV? Photo by Caren Alpert for “The New Whole Grains Cookbook,” Chronicle Books, 2007

Peruvian Quinoa Shrimp Chicharrones with Green Aji Sauce makes good use of quinoa’s unique texture. Recipe on Page F2.

GARDEN

Nursery know-how How to shop — and what to avoid For The Bulletin

Other than his or her own garden, I suspect that at this time of year a gardener’s favorite place is a plant nursery. Walking into the nursery is easy; making a decision and walking out with plant material is much harder.

A place for your television at home Use these guidelines to find the best spot for a flat-screen TV

• Just what meal can’t this nutty No. 1 pseudo-grain improve upon?

By Liz Douville

F

You may know you want the perennial “Moonbeam” coreopsis. Do you want the short, full plant or the tall, thin one? Then you spy others loaded with open flowers; surely those are the ones to choose. But wait, there’s more. Next to the blooming pots are some with many stems

and lots of buds. There have been times I felt so confused I have put off the decision-making for another day. I usually find myself in that sort of quandary on the first few trips to a nursery. We have waited so long we want instant gratification. But there are ways to make the nursery trip easier. Try these guidelines. See Nursery / F5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Never buy a plant without a plant tag. The more information you have, the more confident you’ll be that the right plant is being planted in the right place.

Architect and author Sarah Susanka says knowing how your television is used is the best way to determine where to place it. Make two lists about your TV viewing habits: 1. Where are the TVs located? When are they used? Are they on when no one is around? How does the placement affect other activities in the house? 2. What activities are interrupted by the presence of the TV? How often is TV watching affected by other activities occurring in the same space? Are there disagreements related to TV watching and TV placement, and what are the solutions? If the goal is to watch together and not have it on all the time, the solution may be a TV in a cabinet so it’s out of sight when it’s not on. If the goal is to not have the TV in the main living space or to watch less TV, consider placing it in a separate or “away room.” Source: “More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home,” by Sarah Susanka, The Taunton Press, 2010

T O DAY ’ S RECIPES

• TURMERIC CAULIFLOWER, F2 • PERUVIAN QUINOA SHRIMP CHICHARRONES WITH GREEN AJI SAUCE, F2

• MEXICAN QUINOA WITH PEPITAS AND CILANTRO, F2 • SAFFRON QUINOA CON POLLO, F2 • PERUVIAN QUINOA AND ORANGE SALAD, F2

• HOMEMADE GRANOLA, F3 • SHREDDED BEEF SANDWICHES WITH BROCCOLI SLAW, F3 • CREAM OF TOMATO-DILL SOUP WITH SHRIMP, F6

Inside • How far away should you sit from your TV? These and other tips on Page F4


F2 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F Turmeric: A spice for a healthy life

Next week: Mushrooms Make the most of their earthy flavor with a duxelles.

COVER STORY

Quinoa Continued from F1 “There has been a big surge in the last couple of years of interest in quinoa. It’s been getting good press in places like Men’s Health magazine and Oprah’s O magazine, and people are discovering that it’s quick, easy to cook — you really can’t mess it up — and it’s tasty,” said Robin Asbell, author of “The New Whole Grains Cookbook,” from Chronicle Books, in a phone interview from her home office in Minneapolis. Her recipes for Peruvian Quinoa Shrimp, Mexican Quinoa with Pepitas (pumpkin seeds) and Cilantro, and Saffron Quinoa con Pollo are featured on this page. Asbell has been teaching and writing about whole foods and grains for 20 years, along with developing recipes and working as a culinary adviser for the Whole Grains Council (www.wholegrainscouncil.org). She said she’s glad to see the new interest in quinoa and hopes people will try it. Asbell knows that healthy foods aren’t often associated with great flavor, so the media attention surrounding quinoa, giving it some glamour, is welcome. “Healthy foods kind of have an image problem, so the more ‘glam’ they can get, celebrity status or some kind of association with something hip, the better. But I know that people are trying quinoa and actually liking it,” Asbell said.

By Judy Hevrdejs Chicago Tribune

Turmeric, a tawny orangegold spice that is an integral part of curry powder and ballpark mustard, has been garnering some nice press lately — and not just among foodies. It’s also known for its health benefits, from aiding digestion to easing inflammation. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) does more than turn foods yellow. When used without being heated (in pickled vegetables, for example), turmeric will impart a floral, almost grasslike taste. We like to add turmeric to a bottled garlic-pepper blend to sprinkle on grilled meats and fish, or use the blend to sprinkle on pan-fried cubed of white and sweet potatoes with lots of chopped onion.

TURMERIC CAULIFLOWER Cut 1 small head of cauliflower into florets; set aside. Heat 1 tablespoon canola oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add ½ teaspoon turmeric; cook until fragrant. Add cauliflower and toss to coat. Add ¼ teaspoon ground red pepper, 1½ teaspoons salt and 1 cup chicken stock. Cover, lower heat and cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Uncover and cook, turning until liquid evaporates and vegetables begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Stir in ¼ cup finely chopped cilantro. Makes 4 servings.

Cooking quinoa Cooking quinoa couldn’t be easier. Rinse and drain the quinoa. In its natural state, quinoa has a bitter coating, but manufacturers

“Healthy foods kind of have an image problem, so the more ‘glam’ they can get, celebrity status or some kind of association with something hip, the better. But I know that people are trying quinoa and actually liking it.” — Robin Asbell, author of “The New Whole Grains Cookbook”

Health food in a cup 1 cup (185 grams) of cooked quinoa contains: • 222 calories • 4 grams of fat • 39 grams of carbohydrates • 8 grams of protein Source: www.nutritiondata.com

wash that off. Still, most recipes call for a quick rinse. For every cup of quinoa, add 2 cups of water or broth in a 1.5quart saucepan and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover the pan, and simmer the quinoa for about 10 to 15 minutes, until the water is absorbed. Asbell said to make sure it’s fully cooked. “You definitely don’t want quinoa to be underdone. That’s something that turns people off about whole grains. You want it to be fully cooked and digestible. Quinoa is going to stay nice and together after cooking. It doesn’t fall apart the way white rice can.” After the water or broth has been absorbed and small holes have formed on the surface of the cooking quinoa (as with cooked rice), Asbell suggests you let the pan stand, covered, for another five minutes, to finish steaming. Plain quinoa may be served as a side dish or as a bed for stirfries, or it may be incorporated

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into more involved recipes such as the Mexican-inspired dish with pepitas and cilantro from Asbell’s cookbook. “Those are South American flavors, so the pumpkin seeds and the cilantro and the quinoa really work well together, the same way that Parmesan, red wine and pasta go together. They’re from the same region of the world. I think they were meant for each other,” Asbell said.

Finding quinoa It takes a little sleuthing to find quinoa in Central Oregon. It might be in the rice section of a grocery store, but it’s most likely to be found in the natural foods or bulk section. Although there are more than 120 varieties of quinoa, according to the Whole Grains Council, the most common ones that are cultivated commercially are ivory, red and black quinoa. Red and ivory varieties were available at some

local food stores, ranging in price from $2.49 per pound to $4.00 per pound. It’s worth tracking down this ancient food that was almost lost. Quinoa came close to disappearing in the 1500s when Spanish explorer Francisco Pizarro destroyed quinoa fields in order to undermine Incan culture, which used quinoa in most of its ceremonies, according to the Whole Grains Council. “Sacred to the Incas, quinoa was referred to by them as ‘chisaya mama,’ or the mother of all grains,” the Whole Grains Council reports. “I’ve been working with whole grains for such a long time, I’m so glad to see this uptick in interest about quinoa,” Asbell said. “After all, it’s not just about trying to live a little longer; it really is genuinely tasty stuff.” Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

PERUVIAN QUINOA SHRIMP CHICHARRONES WITH GREEN AJI SAUCE Serves 4. SAUCE: 1 lg jalapeño chile, seeded 2 cloves garlic 1 bunch cilantro, cleaned and stemmed (2 cups leaves) 2 TBS lime juice ¼ tsp salt ¼ tsp extra-virgin olive oil

SHRIMP: ½ C red quinoa, rinsed 16 jumbo shrimp or prawns, tails on, deveined ½ tsp dried oregano ½ tsp ground cumin ¼ tsp cayenne ½ C unbleached white flour 2 lg eggs, lightly beaten

Make the sauce first. In a food processor or blender, finely mince the jalapeño, garlic and cilantro. Add the lime juice and salt, and purée. Drizzle in the olive oil to make a smoother sauce. Reserve. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. After rinsing the quinoa, add it to the boiling water and cook for 10 minutes, then drain. Spread the quinoa out on a baking sheet lined with paper towels to dry. It should be quite dry to the touch; pat it with towels if necessary. Pat the shrimp dry, if damp, and put it in a medium bowl. Mix the oregano, cumin and cayenne, and sprinkle over the shrimp; toss to coat. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Prepare 2 pie pans, one with the flour, one with the beaten eggs. Dip the shrimp in the flour, then the egg, then the quinoa. Place 2 heavy baking pans in the hot oven for 5 minutes. Take each out, spray liberally with oil, then quickly place the shrimp on the hot pans, keeping them from touching. Spray the coated shrimp with oil, and bake for 5 minutes. Flip the shrimp with tongs, then bake for 5 minutes more. Cut one through the thickest part to make sure they are cooked through. The baking time will vary with the size of the shrimp. Serve the shrimp hot with the aji sauce. — From “The New Whole Grains Cookbook” by Robin Asbell

SAFFRON QUINOA CON POLLO Serves 4-6. Chicken with rice, Spanish style, is called arroz con pollo. Quinoa makes a delicious change, and the shorter cooking time means dinner is ready sooner. — Robin Asbell, “The New Whole Grains Cookbook” ½ lemon 6 whole artichokes 2 TBS extra-virgin olive oil 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into 2-inch chunks 1 tsp salt, divided 1 tsp freshly cracked black pepper, divided 1 lg onion, diced (about 2

cups) 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 TBS tomato paste 1 med red bell pepper, seeded and chopped ½ C frozen peas or edamame, thawed ½ tsp saffron threads 1 C quinoa, rinsed 1¾ C chicken stock

Fill a large bowl halfway with cool water, and squeeze in a tablespoon or so of lemon juice. Pull off the leaves of each artichoke and discard. Pare out the hairy choke, trim around the artichoke bottom and peel the stem, leaving only edible flesh. Cut each in half vertically, submerge in the lemon water and reserve. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large, heavy Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat and drop in the chicken chunks, then season with a bit of the salt and pepper. Let cook, undisturbed, for 2 minutes before stirring to get a good sear. Turn the chicken, and cook until both sides are browned. Drain the artichoke bottoms, pat dry and add to the pot. Add the onion, garlic, tomato paste, bell pepper, peas, saffron, remaining salt and pepper, and quinoa, and stir to coat. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes, to soften the vegetables. Add the stock and bring to a boil, covered. Put the pot in the hot oven and bake for 45 minutes, then check to see if the quinoa is done. If the quinoa is tender but there is still liquid in the pot, uncover and bake for another 5 minutes. — From “The New Whole Grains Cookbook,” by Robin Asbell

MEXICAN QUINOA WITH PEPITAS AND CILANTRO Serves 4. 1½ C water 1 C quinoa ½ C raw pumpkin seeds (pepitas) 1 C cilantro leaves, washed and dried 2 cloves garlic ½ jalapeño chile ½ tsp salt 1 tsp ground cumin 2 TBS olive oil 1 tsp lime juice 1 sm red bell pepper, chopped 2 scallions, chopped In a 2-quart pot with a tight-fitting lid, bring the water to a boil. In a medium bowl, rinse the quinoa with warm water, pour off most of the water, then drain in a fine-mesh strainer. When the water boils, add the quinoa and bring it back to a boil. Reduce the heat to the lowest setting, cover and simmer for 15 minutes. The water should all be absorbed, and small holes should have formed on the surface of the grain. Let stand, covered, for 5 minutes, to finish steaming. In a large sauté pan over high heat, dry-toast the pumpkin seeds. Shaking the pan, move the seeds over the heat until they begin to pop. Remove from the heat, and put them into a food processor or blender. Add the cilantro, garlic, jalapeño, salt and cumin and process, scraping the sides down frequently, until all the ingredients are well minced. Gradually add the olive oil and lime juice, processing until smooth. If serving immediately, stir the cilantro mixture, bell pepper and scallions into the quinoa while still warm. Otherwise, chill the quinoa and add the remaining ingredients when it is cool. — From “The New Whole Grains Cookbook” by Robin Asbell

PERUVIAN QUINOA AND ORANGE SALAD Makes 4 to 6 servings. This simple salad from Elizabeth Luard, author of a book on Latin American cooking, can be served as an accompaniment in which the nutty sweetness of the quinoa is balanced by the acidity of the citrus. Serve with thick slices of corn bread or whole wheat tortillas, hot from the griddle. 1 lb quinoa Water 1 sm cucumber or chayote, chopped 6 scallions, white and tender green parts, chopped 1 sm handful of flat-leaf parsley, chopped 1 sm handful of fresh mint, chopped 1 to 2 oranges, segments divided and zest finely grated 2 green or red jalapeño chiles, seeded and chopped 6 TBS extra virgin olive oil 2 TBS freshly squeezed lemon or Seville orange juice Sea salt Rinse the quinoa under cold running water until the water runs clear. In a large pan, cover the grains with double their own volume of water. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to a simmer with the lid on loosely. Cook for about 20 minutes or until the grains are translucent and the water has all been absorbed. Combine the warm quinoa with the cucumber or chayote, scallions, parsley, mint, oranges and orange zest, jalapeños, olive oil, lemon juice and salt to taste. Taste and adjust seasonings by adding salt or an extra squeeze of lemon, as desired. Serve warm or cold. — www.wholegrainscouncil.org


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 F3

F Power to the foodies

Pot roast lives again

What a strange trip it’s been as notions of food have changed over 4 decades

Lucky you. That long-simmered pot roast from Sunday was not obliterated by the family; there are still some succulent leftovers in the fridge. Turn them into a second, filling meal with these easy sandwiches. And if you like the look of these and have no pot roast? Those convenient precooked, microwavable pot roasts are available near the meat case in the supermarket. Just heat, shred and use in this recipe. Tips: Don’t like broccoli? Use a regular slaw mixture. Add some heat with a teaspoon or so of prepared horseradish in the slaw. Beverage selection: A cold lager or glass of ice tea fills the bill.

By Lee Svitak Dean (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

Earth Day’s recent 40th anniversary got me thinking about all the wacky notions advocated by the long-haired, tie-dyed, wire-rimmed youthful hipsters of the early ’70s. (Yes, I was among them.) You know, those wild anarchists who read the “Whole Earth Catalog” and may as well have been called “nattering nabobs of negativism,” to recycle a phrase from then Vice President Spiro Agnew. They not only thought that plenty was wrong with the world, but also believed fervently that they could make it right by encouraging a few small changes in our lives, such as eating brown rice. We tend to think of Earth Day as a celebration of the three Rs (reduce-reuse-recycle). But many of the rallying cries of those ’70s activists were food related, from how we grew it to how we picked it, sold it and cooked it. At the time, no one realized it was the beginning of a food revolution, since much of the action took place out of the public eye — in kitchens and co-ops, at farms and farmers markets. There were no leaders and certainly no celebrities in those early days, just regular folks scooping up bulk foods and bringing their own reusable containers to stores in a modest effort to change the world. It truly was a “people’s” revolution that occurred so quietly and completely that outrageous actions became mainstream in what seems to have been the blink of an eye. Compare it with the self-proclaimed “Food Revolution” of today, with slick made-for-television productions by celebrity British chef Jamie Oliver and his predictable on-camera tears and hugs. Makes you wonder who will do the real work of creating change once the cameras are off. So what were those too-crazyto-consider brazen ideas offered forth as Earth Day rolled around for the first time in 1970? • Eat less meat. “But we need meat,” said the critics. • Eat more vegetables. “We don’t like vegetables, especially anything green,” they whined. • Avoid food waste. “We paid for it, and we can do whatever we want with it,” they snorted. • Grow our own food. “That’s what our grandparents did,” the critics scoffed. • Buy in bulk. “We don’t need to. We shop often,” they argued. • Be gentle with the Earth. “Oh, please,” they murmured as they rolled their eyes. “It’s a big place.” • Keep water pure. “Have you seen how much water there is on the planet?” they laughed. • Avoid pesticides. “We want our produce to be perfect,” the critics insisted. • Buy organic food. “Isn’t all food organic?” they smirked. • Eat whole grains. “Like eating sandpaper,” they said, shaking their heads. • Pay fair wages to growers and harvesters. “Not our responsibility,” they shrugged. • Conserve energy. “We’ve got enough to keep us going for centuries,” they said. • Reuse bags and containers for food storage. “Next thing you know, they’ll be telling us not to smoke,” they sputtered.

(Minneapolis) Star Tribune file photo

In this 1982 file photo, Pam Ampferer repackages bulk spices for resale. Many of the rallying cries of “hippy” activists were food related, from how we grew it to how we picked it, sold it and cooked it. At the time, no one realized it was the beginning of a food revolution, since much of the action took place out of the public eye, in kitchens and co-ops, at farms and farmers markets.

HOMEMADE GRANOLA Makes 10 cups. Don’t like prunes? You can substitute Craisins, dried apples or other dried fruit. From “The Pillsbury Cookbook.” 4 C quick-cooking rolled oats 1 C sunflower nuts (the inside of sunflower seeds) 1 C coconut ½ C slivered almonds ½ C unsalted raw pumpkin seeds (pepitas) ½ C wheat germ

¼ C oil ¼ C honey 1 ⁄3 C water 1 C finely chopped dried apricots 1 C finely chopped prunes 1 C raisins

Heat oven to 250 degrees. Lightly grease 2 (9-by-13-inch) baking pans. In large bowl, combine oats, sunflower nuts, coconut, almonds, pumpkin seeds and wheat germ. In small bowl, combine oil and honey. Add oil-honey mixture to dry ingredients, stirring until well mixed. Sprinkle water over mixture, a tablespoon at a time, while tossing and stirring. Divide mixture into prepared pans. Bake for 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes until mixture starts to turn light brown. Stir in apricots, prunes and raisins. Return to oven for an additional 15 minutes or until desired dryness; fruit should be slightly soft, not dried out. Cool and store in tightly covered container. Nutrition information per ½ cup: calories: 278; fat: 13 g; sodium: 17 mg; carbohydrates: 36 g; saturated fat: 3 g; calcium: 36 g; protein: 8 g; cholesterol: 0 mg; dietary fiber: 5 g. • Stay away from processed foods and make your own. “Why would we cook when a company can do it for us?” • Avoid Styrofoam cups and other non-biodegradable singleuse items. “Good grief,” they chortled. “Why?” • Share extra food with those in need. “They’ll probably sue us.” • Buy fresh, local foods. “We like our strawberries in January and asparagus in December, thank you very much.” For all those who persisted in the effort for good, healthful food (we didn’t worry too much if it tasted good back then), despite naysayers and roadblocks, a big thanks is due. Eat well.

Philosophy in a bowl If there were a single recipe that reflected the early 1970s, it was granola, a baked mixture of rolled oats, nuts and honey, with a little dried fruit. Today, it’s a familiar dried snack, but then it was a cultural statement: You were not only hip if you were eating or making granola, but also eating healthfully. Well, as nutritional myths go, it wasn’t quite the healthy powerhouse that the bell-bottomed crowd banked on (nuts, honey, coconut and dried fruit have significant fat, sugar and calories). But it was homemade, and it offered whole grains, and in the grand food scheme, that’s what mattered at the time. The cereal, first made with

graham flour and called granula, was created in 1894 at a New York health spa. A few years later, John Kellogg (yes, of Kellogg fame) made his own version and called it granola to avoid legal issues. Fruit, nuts and more were added in the 1960s, and the breakfast staple soon caught the attention of major cereal producers. By 1972, it was on the grocery shelves. You can, of course, still make it yourself.

Birth of a food activist In 1971, I was 18, a freshman at the University of MinnesotaDuluth, and a diner in the dorm cafeteria, where I became curious about what happened to all the leftover food. Curiosity turned to action when I discovered that any extra food at the end of the day that was not repurposed into something else was discarded. All of it. Dinner rolls, vegetables, meat, potatoes and dessert all ended up in the trash. I was appalled by the waste, which unfortunately was not unusual in the food business then. Meanwhile, in a room near the cafeteria, the sports teams were fed those same dorm meals. As I saw them plow through their heavy-duty dinners, I wondered if the leftover food (the odds and ends that hadn’t yet been served) could be offered to others in the manner it was for the players, a “people’s buffet,” to use the parlance of the day, to feed students outside the dorm. Such is the naivete of teens —

Lumpy cheese in the macaroni? By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q:

Why doesn’t my cheese melt completely when I make macaroni and cheese? It has small lumps in the sauce. Cheese-based sauces can tend to separate or curdle a bit. Some cheeses have more trouble with this than others.

A:

Cheddar has more trouble with curdling than gruyere, for instance. So using more than one kind of cheese in the sauce will help. To get the smoothest sauce possible, you need to give the cheese something to melt into, such as a bechamel, a simple white sauce of flour, butter and

milk for a macaroni and cheese. After you make the sauce, remove it from the heat and stir in the grated cheese by small amounts. Let the first batch melt before you add more. E-mail food questions to Kathleen Purvis at kpurvis@charlotteobserver.com.

and the birth of a food activist. I went to the director of university food services and made my case. “Not possible,” I remember him telling me. “The Good Samaritan law doesn’t apply to food. We would put ourselves at risk of being sued if we gave away food for free.” Thirteen years later, in 1984, the Greater Minneapolis Food Bank (later called Second Harvest Heartland) was formed to feed those in need and to reduce food waste by redistributing unused edibles from restaurants, groceries, bakeries and farmers. That’s how most revolutions take place: An idea percolates from many ordinary people — and then takes off.

By Carol Mighton Haddix Chicago Tribune

Chicago Tribune

Turn that long-simmered pot roast into a second, filling meal with these easy shredded beef sandwiches with broccoli slaw.

SHREDDED BEEF SANDWICHES WITH BROCCOLI SLAW Makes 4 servings. 2 C broccoli slaw mix 3 TBS mayonnaise 1 tsp cider vinegar ¼ tsp each: celery seed, salt

Freshly ground pepper 2 C shredded cooked beef pot roast 4 kaiser or onion rolls 4 leaves Boston lettuce Dijon mustard, optional

Place broccoli slaw mix into a medium bowl; stir in mayonnaise, vinegar, celery seed, salt and pepper to taste. Mound beef on bottom buns; top with slaw. Place lettuce leaf on each. Spread top bun with mustard, if desired. Place top buns on sandwiches.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In


F4 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: At Home With ... … TR and Jen McCrystal

Making a home, making a living under one roof

Painting a vinyl surface: It can be done

COVER STORY

By Kim Palmer (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

MINNEAPOLIS — In the old days, when shopkeepers lived above their stores and blacksmiths lived behind their shops, homes and workplaces were often connected. Then came the car, suburban migration and commuter culture. Home was home, work was work, and never the twain did meet — unless the boss was coming for dinner. But in today’s economic climate, that old model is making new sense. With jobs vanishing and budgets shrinking, self-employment is on the rise, and home is a cost-effective place to launch a start-up. About 5.7 million Americans worked primarily at home in 2008, up from 4.2 million in 2000, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. To attract today’s home-based entrepreneurs, some developers are creating new takes on old housing options: storefronts on the street with apartments behind, or buildings designed to accommodate clients in hallways and business signage outside. Live/work housing is popular in New York and California, although the concept has been a slower sell elsewhere. “It’s taking a while to catch on,” said Katie Visina, property manager for Uptown Lake Apartments in Minneapolis, which includes some live/work units. “No one understands why there are two doors, one to the street and one to the apartment.” “People seem to struggle with it (the concept) — some don’t get it,” agreed Tony Smith, project manager for SOHO (Small Office, Home Office), a former nut factory converted to condos here. The project was designed to include two floors of live/work units, but

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Work-life balance To avoid a deterioration of this balance, here is some advice from Cindy Krischer Goodman, a columnist with the Miami Herald: • Set work hours. Anne Alexandra Kessler raised six kids while working from home as a legal assistant. Her advice for those whose schedules aren’t dictated by an employer: Set office hours. They don’t have to be 9 to 5, they just have to work well for you. Kessler would work intensely from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. and take the afternoons off to spend with her kids. Then, she would return to her office in the late evenings. • Close the door. Closing my office door makes me feel isolated. Yet it appears to be the reason I’m more productive than I should be. One of the biggest adjustments is getting family and neighbors to distinguish between my physical presence and availability. • Allow set breaks. My friend, Linda DeMartino, works from home as a communications consultant and schedules a lunch break into her day. “The exact time may fluctuate, but the allotment remains the same,” DeMartino says. It’s a disciplined approach to letting yourself leave your home office without losing the integrity of the workday. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service so far, only two units are being used that way, he said. Living and working in the same place can be challenging, according to those who do it, but for many, the positives outweigh the negatives. “Starting a new business in a time of recession is risky,” said Ashley Powell, who launched A/star, a model and music agency. “But if you’re smart about it, it’s actually the best time. We needed a way to combine everything and save money, but make sure the business is taken seriously.”

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By Al Heavens The Philadelphia Inquirer

Q:

A:

Courtesy Kirsti Wolfe

More and more, televisions are being incorporated into the design of a home, giving an unobtrusive location for the screen, such as for this kitchen TV at left.

TV Continued from F1 Susanka said her design philosophy about television used to be to try to get it out of sight. “It used to be to hide the TV when they were just these black eyeballs staring at you, but with the flat-screen, it’s less objectionable, so I find I’m less worried about hiding it,” Susanka said. Susanka likes the screen-saver technology that’s available to turn blank TV screens into artwork; she recommends checking out www.screendreamsdvd.com. “Nowadays, TVs look so much like a frame that they could just be movable art most of the time, and I like that idea a lot,” she said.

Getting the right size Susanka has noticed that people are buying flat-screen televisions that are too big for their rooms. “My joke is, if you want a bigger screen, move your chair closer,” she said with a laugh. “People assume you’ve got to get a bigger and bigger TV screen, but in reality, when you do that you have to be farther away from it to see it appropriately, and, for many people, their rooms are not big enough to do that,” she said. Best Buy home entertainment sales associate Andrew Purslow, who works in the Bend store, said there’s an easy way to calculate the size and placement of a big flat-screen television for optimal viewing. “For every 5 inches of screen, you want to be a foot back, so if you have a 40-inch TV, the couch should be 8 feet back.” Best Buy offers a home consultation by the Geek Squad experts to discuss where a big-screen TV might fit best. The $99.99 charge is refunded if the homeowner spends more than $499 at the store. It’s also important to install a flat-screen television at the right height. “Not too high. The bottom of the TV should be at head level or almost straight across from where you’re sitting on your couch, and lifted a bit. You don’t want to be looking up,” Purslow said. Purslow said Best Buy often installs flat-screen TVs over fireplaces on a 30-degree tilting mount so TV watchers can avoid neck strain. Test the heat level before choosing this location. Turn the fireplace on for an hour and see if the mantle feels hot. If it doesn’t hurt you, it won’t hurt the television components, Purslow said. The angle of viewing is also important. Recent studies show most plasma TVs offer a nearly 180-degree viewing angle with little degradation of image, meaning viewers could still see the screen even when looking from the side of the TV. But LCD screen images start to degrade if viewed

Placing your flat-screen TV Paying attention to these details when setting up your entertainment room can make television viewing more comfortable.

Proper distance Use this formula: For every 5 inches of screen, allow a foot of distance. For instance, it’s recommended that your seating area is 8 feet away from a 40-inch television.

8 feet for a 40-inch TV

Correct height The bottom of the TV screen should be at eye level.

Watch your angles Recent studies show plasma screens offer a nearly 180-degree viewing angle with little degradation of image. LCD screens, however, can degrade in image quality if viewed from an angle greater than 10 degrees.

Undistorted viewing angle of plasma TV: 180°

Q:

Undistorted viewing angle of LCD TV: 10° Greg Cross / The Bulletin

from more than 10 degrees off center, according to a study from DisplayMate, a video diagnostics company. Place the TV and seating with this in mind.

Plan the right room Bend interior designer Kirsti Wolfe said she avoids the fireplace location for TVs. “I think those are two separate focal points, and it also strains your neck to look up that high, even if you’re sitting far back,” Wolfe said. “People are not putting flatscreen TVs in the living room so much anymore because they want that to be for family or company time, so there’s another room to retreat to for movie or TV watching,” she said. Susanka calls that separate room an “away room.” “It can be the place that you go to be away from the television, if your TV is in the main family room space, or you have the television in the ‘away room’ so that you don’t have the TV going in the family room all the time,”

Susanka said. Wolfe said there’s a lot of planning involved with a new build or remodel in order to get the TV locations just right. She works with architects from the very beginning of a project to plan which rooms will have televisions and where they’ll be placed. “There’s nothing worse than that feeling of sitting in the front row of a movie theater. For a TV in a bedroom, I like to design it to be on a retractable arm so when you’re in bed, you can swing it out so it’s a better angle for viewing,” Wolfe said. Another option is hiding the TV in a piece of furniture at the end of the bed; the touch of a remote control makes it appear. “It’s a retractable unit — very expensive, but they do work great,” Wolfe said. Since flat-screen televisions are here to stay, explore the options that will determine the best places for you to enjoy them in your home and your life. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

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My mother, who believes that if you say it is so, it must be so, has a vinyl roof on her bay window she wants to repaint. My Internet search found that it can be done, and that a high-quality, 100 percent latex paint should be used, but she needs to hear it from the master. The “master” defers to the Rohm & Haas Paint Quality Institute, which has never steered him wrong. The PQI says, “Yes, you can,” with the proper surface preparation and, as you say, a high-quality, 100 percent latex paint. You can follow the link www.paintquality.com/paint -professionals/newsletter/pdfs /0408newsletter.pdf, but, to summarize, this is what the institute recommends to contractors, for whom this article originally was designed: “Unlike wood, these substrates — aluminum and vinyl — are significantly more rigid and dimensionally stable and, hence, there are generally less compelling reasons to paint these sidings.” But they do fade, chalk, and grow mildew and algae. As a result, aluminum and vinyl siding provide a great opportunity for painting. Some things to keep in mind: • In most cases, simply power washing to remove dirt, chalk and mildew is sufficient to prep the surface for painting. For mildew removal, washing with a mild bleach solution is recommended. • Painting transforms an otherwise dull exterior to a fresh, colorful finish. This is important not only from the standpoint of “curb appeal,” but it can afford great creative satisfaction. • Top-quality 100 percent acrylic paints deliver good adhesion and durability on aluminum and vinyl siding

Fridays In

We are looking to renovate our cedar deck. We want to add a new area to accommodate a new door and add a roof. The deck looks terrible despite a good deal of maintenance. I have received quotes on composite decking, pressure-treated wood, stamped concrete and pavers. Each contractor claims his materials are better than the others. We just don’t know what direction to turn. What material offers the best longterm durability and low maintenance? Any help is greatly appreciated. If I suggested any one of these materials over the rest, my e-mail would crash with contrarian opinions. Composite decking is supposed to be low maintenance. My neighbor used it for a porch floor that still looks good four years later. Others complain about it. I had a pressure-treated deck. It was heavy maintenance because it was on the shady side of the house. Yet my kitchen stairs are pressuretreated wood in the shade, and they look terrific. I have a concrete-paver patio that requires much less maintenance than a deck but needs periodic weeding between the pavers. Maybe my readers (consumers only) could weigh in?

A:

Questions? E-mail Alan J. Heavens at aheavens@ phillynews.com or write him at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia, PA 19101.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 F5

G

Next week Betty Faller’s greenhouse garden is taking off.

COVER STORY Look at the shape of the plant. The more stems a plant has, the better. Many stems indicate that the plant is more mature than one with few stems, and it will provide you with increased growth.

Continued from F1

barely see or feel any soil, you probably won’t have good luck bringing the plant into a healthy state. Shrubs are not as forgiving as annuals or perennials. If you do find yourself with some root-bound plants, using a fork, gently tease the roots downward to open up the root system. Some gardeners use a gentle back-and-forth twisting motion to release some of the roots; others will carefully slash into the outer roots. If you do nothing and plant a root-bound plant, I guarantee that at the end of the growing season, if you dug up the plant, the root system would be exactly the same as when planted. Then you’ll have the answer to why the top growth did so poorly.

Buds over blooms

Slugs? Here?

If we focus on growth instead of flowers, we’ll get more for our money. In other words, choose buds over blooms. Ah yes, that also goes for the long-awaited tomato plant with the alreadyformed tomato. The plants that so far have spent their life in a cozy container are now called upon to put their roots into a different soil texture, adjust to different meal times and still perform at the top of the class. Just think how hard it is for us to make minor adjustments to our own lives.

Get in the habit of checking for slugs. I know, your reaction is that we don’t have slugs. With the plants that are shipped in from out of the area, though, we do get some hitchhikers, so check the bottom of the pot and the soil surface before you purchase.

They’re not as pretty, but it’s good to choose budding plants over blooming ones.

Nursery

Live and let die

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Liz Douville checks out a plant with discolored leaves at Eastside Gardens in Bend. Plants with discolored leaves, such as this Christmas rose at left, could be suffering from something as simple as a change in watering schedule. Ask before you buy or disregard.

Look for the label Never buy a plant without a label. If one isn’t in the container, ask a nursery staffer for one. You may need the tall variety of a certain plant but find out through obser vation over the season you ended up with the short variety. The more information on the label, the more confident you’ll be that the right plant is being planted in the right place. Regard the information about the plant’s behavior, such as growing height, maturity to production, etc., as a tendency rather than a certainty, especially in our climate.

Health checkup Check plants for unusual spots, discolored leaves or signs of insects. Learn to recognize

better. Many stems indicate that the plant is more mature than one with few stems, and it will provide you with increased growth. If the plant is intended to keep its foliage low to the ground instead of holding it on tall stems, choose the fuller growth over height or flowers.

By John Ewoldt About the time you’re celebrating that most of your perennials survived the winter, you discover that your lawn mower wasn’t as lucky. If you’re in the market for a new push mower and haven’t shopped for a decade or so, the landscape has changed. Gas-powered mowers pollute much less than they did 10 years ago, said Rob Little, marketing manager for Toro walk mowers, but more buyers are choosing electric or battery-powered mowers. While about 83 percent of all mowers sold this year will be gaspowered, Little said, 17 percent will be electric — up from 8 percent in 2000. This year Toro introduced a battery-powered mower, the eCycler (Model 20360). “With the spike in gas prices, more people are looking to get rid of oil and gas machines,” he said. “In 2012, the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) will have new emissions regulations that could increase the cost of gas mowers.”

Pros, cons of electric If you’re considering a batterypowered mower, the advantages include a quieter engine, better cutting than a reel mower (but not as good as a gas-powered mow-

Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

Root check the difference between a plant with powdery mildew and a plant with a whitish spotting from fertilizer residue. If you doubt the plant’s health, ask the nursery attendant. A few discolored leaves doesn’t mean you have a bad plant. It could have been caused by a change in watering schedule, wind or change of weather. The little round shapes you see on the soil surface aren’t nasty bug larvae, but rather time-re-

lease fertilizer pellets. But check the underside of leaves; if they seem to be speckled with barely visible black or white shapes, the plant probably has aphids. Rather than simply putting the plant back, take it to a nursery worker so he or she is aware of the problem, which is treatable.

What kind of shape? Look at the shape of the plant. The more stems a plant has, the

The grass is getting ‘greener’ with lawn mowers these days Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

picious that the plant is totally root-bound, which means the plant’s roots have tightly twined around the inside of the pot. In severe cases, when you can

As we ready ourselves for intense planting days, remember the do’s and don’ts of spring bulb care. The foliage of springblooming bulbs should be left to die back naturally. The slowly dying foliage is what provides the bulbs with nutrients for next year’s bloom. There is an underlying wisdom in that process. It gives us an excuse to go and buy another plant to help camouflage the dying foliage. Right?

Buying tips Get a guarantee: H ate not being able to test a mower before purchasing? Buy one with a sixmonth money-back guarantee, such as Neuton battery-powered models, or buy from retailers with unconditional return policies, such as Sam’s Club. Read up on ratings: Check out the May issue of Consumer Reports for mower reviews and manufacturer reliability. Consider newer features: Options include electric start, self-propulsion that automatically adjusts to your walking speed, and a port to wash out green gunk with a hose. er), fewer parts to replace and low maintenance. Battery-powered models cost about $100 more than a gas-powered push mower but about the same as many self-propelled gas models. Owners will save a lot in maintenance costs, but they need to figure in the cost of a battery replacement ($60 to $150) after four to six years. Most batteries charge overnight and the charge lasts about an hour. If mowing time takes longer, some people cut half the lawn, recharge the battery overnight and finish the job the next day.

Toro’s new e-Cycler ($419) was top-rated by Consumer Reports in its May issue and is getting fivestar customer reviews at Amazon.com. It’s giving the popular Neuton model some competition in the cordless category. (Neuton lowered the price of its 19-inch cordless model from $479 to $399, possibly in response to Toro’s new model.) Online nits about the eCycler have concerned its weight (77 pounds) for a mower that’s not self-propelled, its hard-to-remove battery and its small grass catcher.

Finally, turn the pot over and check the bottom for extruding roots. Occasionally, you will find that a plant’s roots have grown out of the bottom. Generally, these roots will have to be removed before you can even get the plant out. If I see that the roots are fine in texture and still have signs of white healthy roots, I feel confident that the roots inside the pot are healthy. If the extruding roots are dull, thick and dry looking, I am sus-

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Gas means performance Gas-powered mowers offer better cutting and easier bagging, Consumer Reports said, but require more work to maintain. To minimize problems, use gas that is less than 30 days old. Little recommends using non-oxygenated gas (ethanol-free). An additive such as Seafoam can extend the life of the gas for up to 60 days, said Derrick Wood at Cedar Small Engine in Minneapolis. He also recommends Echo universal blend oil for two-stroke engines. It works well for people with several machines that have different oil mix ratios of 50:1, 40:1 or 32:1. A small bottle costs less than $2.

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F6 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Spring up and head outdoors It’s time to get the garden in order — but there’s plenty to do inside, too Martha Stewart Living The Bulletin file photo

Swapping out marjoram for fresh dill in the recipe below worked just as well for a nicely balanced, rich and creamy soup.

Fresh dill balances flavor in this soup By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Linda Ratarsky, of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for the recipe for tomato dill soup with shrimp that she so enjoyed at Puleo’s Grill in Knoxville. Unfortunately, I had no luck getting the specific recipe she wanted. However, an Internet search turned up a soup that sounded pretty close to what Ratarsky described. This recipe comes from Oprah .com and was adapted from a recipe in Art Smith’s “Kitchen Life” cookbook. I made the simple substitution of fresh dill for the marjoram that was in the original recipe since that was the flavor combination that Ratarsky said she liked so much in the restaurant soup. The finished soup had nicely balanced flavor and a rich creamy consistency. It was as pretty to look at as it was tasty. RECIPE REQUEST: Jackie Cassel, of Baltimore, Md., is seeking a recipe she has misplaced for a very simple corn pudding that appeared in a Dundalk, Md., community magazine about 10 years ago.

If you are looking for a hardto-find recipe or can answer a request, write Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. Names must accompany recipes for them to be published. Letters may be edited for clarity.

CREAM OF TOMATO-DILL SOUP WITH SHRIMP Makes 4-6 servings. ¾ lb medium (25 to 31 count) unshelled shrimp 2 C reduced-sodium chicken broth 5 TBS unsalted butter, divided use 1 medium rib celery, finely chopped ½ C shallots, chopped 1 clove garlic, minced 1 ⁄3 C all-purpose flour 1 can (28 oz) diced tomatoes in juice 2 C half-and-half 2 tsp fresh dill, chopped Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Peel and devein the shrimp, reserving the shells. Combine the shells and broth in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Strain the soup, reserving the broth. You should have 2 cups; add water if needed. Meanwhile, melt 4 tablespoons butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until it begins to soften, about 2 minutes. Add shallots and garlic and cook, stirring often, until the shallots soften, about 2 minutes. Add flour and stir well. Add tomatoes with their juices. Stir in reserved broth, half and half and dill and stir well. Bring to a boil, stirring often. Reduce heat to medium low. Simmer, uncovered, until the soup is lightly thickened, about 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Just before serving, melt the remaining tablespoon of butter in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the shrimp and cook, stirring often, just until they turn opaque. Season with salt and pepper. Stir the shrimp into the hot soup and serve.

Why not try out a few of Martha’s tips for indoor and outdoor creativity at home.

Order in the shed Create custom cabinetry in your garden shed with vintage wine crates from flea markets or online auctions. Stack them horizontally and vertically, using some as bases to vary heights. Once you’ve established a layout, connect crates with wood screws and collars near the corners. Use cup hooks to hang smaller items, such as trowels, funnels and scissors. If your storage needs grows, you can easily reconfigure the system.

Raspberry lemonade Enlist raspberries — those on the verge of being overripe are perfect — to sweeten lemonade and turn it a pleasing shade of pink. Pounding the lemon slices releases oil from the rinds, rounding out the flavor. To make enough to serve eight, combine 10 sliced lemons, 2 cups raspberries and 11⁄2 cups sugar in a large pot. Pound the mixture firmly with the end of a straight rolling pin (or a large wooden spoon) for about 10 minutes to extract as much juice as possible. Stir in 6 cups water. Pour through a sieve into a large bowl. Press the solids until all juice is extracted, then discard them. Serve over ice. Makes 9 cups. For a cocktail version, stir in 21⁄4 cups of tequila blanco. Serve over ice, and garnish with mint.

Herbal remedy Sachets of aromatic herbs, such as the classic bouquet garni of thyme, parsley and bay leaves, add flavor to simmering soups, stews, stocks and braises. To make it easier to remove the herb packet from your preparation, tie a length of butcher’s twine to the sachet, and then tie the loose end to one of the pot’s handles. (Be sure the twine stays clear of the burner.) When the time comes, the bouquet garni will be easy to retrieve and remove.

Keep gardening gloves handy Gardening gloves have a way of disappearing. Once dirty, they seem to blend into berry patches and stone walls, only to be found the next day, dew-soaked and useless until they dry. To keep gloves handy, sew magnets onto

their cuffs and attach them to a metal bucket — a handy tote for gardening supplies. It’s easy to do: Cut two 11⁄4-inch-long pieces of 3⁄4-inch-wide grosgrain ribbon. Sew one piece of ribbon to inside of cuff, leaving one side open a 1⁄2 inch. Slip a rare-earth disk magnet into the pocket; stitch to close. Repeat with second glove.

Ivy basket Create a verdant planter for your front porch using a trio of hanging wire baskets, sheet moss and two containers of ivy. Hang the baskets, and line each with sheet moss. Remove ivy from one pot, and divide in two. Pot one half in the top tier and one in the middle tier. Plant the remaining container of ivy in the bottom tier. Water when the top inch of soil becomes dry. If you prefer flowers, wait until later in the season and fill baskets with petunias or scaevola instead, and keep them in a sunny spot.

Weed sans chemicals To keep weeds from growing between the pavers of a pathway, pour boiling water on them. Keep the kettle close to the ground to avoid splashing yourself or any nearby plants you want to keep.

Napkin rings go green Bamboo is as handsome as it is versatile. So it seems only natural that the material should join us at the table in the form of sturdy napkin rings. Start with a 2-inch-diameter bamboo pole (available at garden centers and some hardware stores for a few dollars apiece). Using painters’ tape, mark off a 2-inch section of the pole, making sure a joint (one of the raised lines along the bamboo) lies in the middle of the section. Repeat process, taping off one 2-inch section for each napkin ring. Place the pole in a miter box, and secure with pegs. With a miter saw, cut out each section, cutting on side of tape nearest joint. Remove the crisscrossing fibers inside the joints using a drill fitted with a 11⁄2-inch paddle bit.

Photos by Martha Stewart Living

Make muffin-tin liners in a pinch

Shake away pests

These crisp parchment wrappers give muffins and cupcakes a festive air — and they keep the baked goods from sticking to the pan, too. Cut 5-inch square pieces of parchment. Spray a muffin tin with vegetable oil cooking spray to hold parchment in place. Place one piece of parchment into one cup of the tin, pressing along folds to crease. Repeat with other cups and parchment pieces. Scoop batter into cups and bake.

Put a kitchen shaker to work in your garden; it’s a great tool for dispersing horticultural-grade diatomaceous earth. This nontoxic pesticide, which has sharp edges that kill slugs and bugs without chemicals, can be difficult to spread. But a shaker lets you dust an even ring on soil around plants.

Questions for Martha Stewart can be e-mailed to mslletters@marthastewart .com. Questions of general interest will be answered in the Ask Martha column; for more information on the topics covered in this column, visit www.marthastewart.com. Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.

A trio of hanging wire baskets can be combined to create a planter for your front porch.

Muffin-tin liners, which are made of parchment paper, ensure that cupcakes and muffins don’t stick to the pan.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 G1

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Cat breeding season has begun! Please have your cats spayed and neutered before our shelters become overcrowded with unwanted litters. Adult female or male cats, $40. Bring in the litter under 3 months and we’ll alter them for free! Call Bend Spay & Neuter Project for more info. 541-617-1010.

Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. Wanted: Cars, Trucks, Motorcylecs, Boats, Jet Skis, ATV’s RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

1 7 7 7

Chesapeake Retriever Pups, AKC, shots, hips, great hunt/ fam dogs, parents on site, $500-$575. 541-259-4739

Cockalier Spaniel Puppies! Last batch sold in 9 hours. $350 Call for pictures! ADORABLE. 541-475-3410 Cockatiels, babies and adult pairs, w/ cages, $20 and up. 541-548-0501 Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org FREE: 10 Mo. Black Lab mix loves kids & other animals sweet dog. 541-633-0268. FREE 2 PET RABBITS 6 lbs., mix breed. No equipment.Call 541-322-5253 FREE Border Collies/Kelpies, 8 mos., females, call for more info., 541-462-3134. FREE CATS, shy grey males, brothers, need stable home, healthy. 541-598-7260.

Heeler

S . W .

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

ITEMS NEEDED for huge yard sale to benefit abandoned & abused cats! Nonprofit Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team seeks all kinds of items for a yard sale in June. Covered storage is available so we can accept your items NOW. Time to clean out your garage/closets! Donations are tax-deductible! Call re: where to drop off & we can pick up too! Also seeking deposit cans & bottles - it all helps! info@craftcats.org, or call 728-4178 or 389-8420. www.craftcats.org Kittens & cats ready to adopt! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, 1-5 Sat/Sun, call re: other days. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. 65480 78th St., Bend, 389-8420. Info & photos at www.craftcats.org. Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at $55.00. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 541-923-0882

Macaw, Beautiful female, 2yr old Severe. Playful, loving and talkative. Incl: 2 cages & toys. $850. 541-549-8036 Maltese 8 mo old, house broke, great loving pet. $300. Call 541-420-0947 or 610-2286

The Bulletin Border Collie Gollden Retriever cross puppies $50 each black w/ white toes! 6 weeks old ready to go! 307-534- 5350 Bunnies: Adorable cute baby bunnies all black $10 each. Call 541-923-7501

Purebred Golden Retriever Puppies!! lands 2 AKC, Sweet and Sassy! Only a few females left. Ready to go May 1st. $600. oregonhomes@hotmail.com 541-419-3999 Golden Retriever Puppies, AKC, wormed & shots, great disposition, parents OFA cert., refs. avail., 541-420-1334.

Newfoundleft born

3/20/10, now 7 weeks old, reserve your puppy today, 1 female $600, 1 Landseer male $500 ., Ready to go now. Both Dam & Sire onsite, also selling Dam, Medusa $400 born 1/6/08 Amy 541-788-5374 or Josh 541-788-5349.

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

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210

257

265

270

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Furniture & Appliances

Musical Instruments

Building Materials

Lost and Found

Hay, Grain and Feed

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Hay Is Expensive! Protect your investment Let KFJ Builders, Inc. build your hay shed, barn or loafing shed. 541-617-1133. CCB 173684.

ROTTWEILER WANTED Young Female, Excellent Home! Lost our Rottie. 541-536-2588 donnaandmax1@msn.com

Siberian Huskey/Wolf Puppies, exc. quality, $250-$400. Can bring to Prineville 5/1 & 5/15. 541-755-5335

Springer Spaniel Puppies, 4 weeks, liver & white, absolutely beautiful, reserve yours now, ready 5/25, $300, 541-633-9755.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Timberwolf, Husky, Rottweiler Mix to good home only, 1st shots, ready now $200 ea. OBO. 541-647-1232

Toy Poodle Mix A darling little male puppy, waiting to fill A Mother's day wish. $200. 541 504-9958 Welsh Corgi, 7+ mo. old, all shots, chipped, spayed female, likes children, $800, 541-504-1908.

Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE, fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bed -Beautiful Custom King Size Barn Wood Bed, $1000. Call 541-548-5657. Fridge 9.8 Cu. ft. Magic Chef white, great shape $125. 541-382-3487. Frigidaire Range/Oven, ceramic top, ivory, exc. cond. $650 OBO. 541-419-8673. Furniture

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953. Grand Piano, Ivers & Pond, very nice, $9995, 541-815-3318. Piano, 1911 Jewitt Upright, good cond., $500 OBO, 541-815-9218.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

212

Antiques & Collectibles 6 Vintage Cardboard goose decoys, $45/all. Call 541-390-5986. Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishing, marbles, wood furniture, beer cans. 541-389-1578 Coca Cola cooler, 1950’s exc. condition $160 or trade for gun. 541-382-8973. Vintage galvanized watering can, $89. Call for more info., 541-390-5986.

215

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

240

Crafts and Hobbies Crafters Wanted Open Jury May 15th, 9:30 am, Highland Baptist Church, Redmond, Tina 541-447-1640 or www.snowflakeboutique.org

245

Golf Equipment Golf Cart, elec. w/split windshield, full curtains, exc. cond., must see! 388-2387

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

Piano, Farrand Upright, with bench, fair to good cond. $400 . 541-389-0650. Pianos - Piano Teacher Selling her Studio Pianos, Beautiful Grand Piano, French Provincial Legs, almost new, very nice, $10,050, will deliver; Piano, used, nice, $695, 541-383-3888.

260

Misc. Items 6 Cemetery Lots, Deschutes Memorial Gardens, $650/ea. 541-312-2595 Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191.

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

541-598-4643.

MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

KRIEGHOFF

Model 32 O/U Shot Gun w/full set of BRILEY CHOKES $2500. 541-815-8317 Pics Avail.

Qualify For Your Concealed Handgun Permit. Sat. May 15th, Redmond Comfort Suites. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information. Remington Model 31TC 12 Ga. Trap Gun, $450. 541-548-3408. Ruger, P97-45 acp, stainless, semi-auto, Make Offer; S&W 9mm, stainless ,semi-auto, Make Offer; Remington, M10, 12g. Pump, 90%+$350 OBO. 541-647-8931

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

266

Heating and Stoves

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 Pool Table, custom made, exc. cond., moving, must sell, first $300 incl. accessories. 541-788-4229. The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

264

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Lawn Mower, Riding, 42” Craftsman, hydrostatic trans., $500, 541-280-7024. Small Unique Greenhouse $499 call for details. Ask for Brian 541-508-6920. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Found: 2 pistols, call to identify. In Police custody. 541-317-0988. FOUND: Dog, 4/25, in DRW on Riverwoods Dr., 25-30 lbs., 1 blue eye. 541-647-2181 FOUND: Dog, on Reed Mkt. near Chevron/Parkway, to identify, 541-788-6577. CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes Market Rd. 541-408-2973.

$2,500. 541-385-4790.

FOUND: Money, at Old Mill Theater, identify, email ea_current@yahoo.com. LOST: Tri-Tronics transmitter for dog collars, Sawyers Uplands Park on Sunday, 5/9. Reward. 541-382-8559

Orchard Grass Hay small bales covered $150 a ton, Feeder Hay small bales $90 a ton. Tumalo 541-322-0101. Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $135 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $75 per ton. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Quality Orchard Grass Hay, Tumalo, small bales, clean no rain $150 per ton. Kennor Farms 541-383-0494

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581 Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

341

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Horses and Equipment

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Mares (3) Reg. ea. 10 yrs, 1 Paint & 1 Pinto not broke, 1 Palomino, some training make offer 541-546-2453.

Peruvian Paso Gelding and Mare. Reg. 14 yrs. Amazing gaited ride. Perfect trail horses for any age. $3,500 ea. Peruvian tack avail as well. 541-610-5799

Farm Market

300 308

QUALITY REGISTERED PERFORMANCE HORSES all ages. 541-325-3376.

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Cacti, already planted in gallon pots, $6/ea+. Crooked River Ranch, 541-548-0501.

Snow Removal Equipment FOUND: Large collection of

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

275

Auction Sales

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, 2 DAY AUCTION: Sat & Sun advertising for used woodMay 15 & 16 at 10 a.m., Tostoves has been limited to tal liquidation of SilverLite models which have been Trailer Co. 1291 S. A Street certified by the Oregon Dein Springfield. Trailers, Pickpartment of Environmental ups, Forklifts, Welders, AluQuality (DEQ) and the fedminum, Shop Equipment, eral Environmental ProtecTools & More. 1,500 Sale tion Agency (EPA) as having Lots! For details visit met smoke emission stanI-5auctions.com or call dards. A certified woodstove 541-643-0552. can be identified by its certification label, which is per280 manently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not Estate Sales knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified DON'T FORGET to take your woodstoves. signs down after your garage sale and be careful not 267 to place signs on utility poles! Fuel and Wood www.bendbulletin.com

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a gaFREE: Male Lab Huskey mix, 6 rage sale and don't forget to yrs., neutered, sweet & proadvertise in classified! tective. 541-610-4214. 385-5809. German Shorthair Pointer Headboard, oak, 3 piece, Pups, all liver colored, 5 AKC Black Lab and ? puppies. 7 middle mirror, sides w/ cupwks, taking dep., 1st shots, Miniature Dachshund weeks old with shots and boards & drawers, $250, $500 ea. 541-420-5914. (Doxie) purebred puppies. worming. $50 541-382-7567 541-598-7986. Males $300 & Females $350. Golden Lab female, Australian Black Lab Puppies. AKC Call anytime (541) 678-7529 Mattresses (2), extra long, Shepherd female, Rhodesian Registered, 1 female and foam, twin size, fits adjustRedback female, all spayed & POODLES, AKC Toy 7 males. Dewclaws removed, able beds, $150 ea. rescued $50 ea. or mini. Joyful tail waggers! de-wormed, first shots. 541-383-3772. (541)576-3701, 576-2188. Affordable. 541-475-3889. Puppies ready to go home by 20th, $250 each. Mattresses good Pug Puppies, AKC/pet, fawns, 541-480-4625,541-385-5724 quality used mattresses, all shots, worming, healthy, discounted king sets, happy beauties, $500/ea. TURN THE PAGE fair prices, sets & singles. 541-536-9495.

For More Ads

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $3500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4 As low as

345

Livestock & Equipment

A1 Beef Steers Ready for Pasture 541-382-8393 The New Kubota RTV500 complease leave a message. pact utility vehicle has all the comfort, technology and re- Cow Calf/Pairs (9), young, finements of a larger utility please call 541-548-1184 for vehicle – but fits in the bed more info of a full-size, long bed pickup. Financing on ap347 proved credit.

0% APR Financing

Midstate Power Products

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Redmond

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

325

Farmers Column

541-548-6744

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc, hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831

358 A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516


G2 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities Food Service Attendants

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Chip Truck Driver Experience and clean driving record required, out of area work call 541-647-7516 Church Choral Director: First Presbyterian seeks director of Traditional Music Ministries to lead Chancel Choir and music ensembles. Experience in church music, track record of excellence in choral conducting, motivating and recruiting volunteer singers and instrumental groups. Resume to Administrator, 230 NE Ninth, Bend, 97701. blevet@bendfp.org 541-382-4401.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

541-617-7825

The Ranch is accepting applications for food service attendants to work in our Lake Side Bistro next to the Lodge swimming pool. Responsibilities include pizza and grilled burger preparation, serving and bussing tables. The service will be of high quality and fast and courteous. These self starters must be able to work weekends. A valid Deschutes Count Food Handler permit is required. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE Garbage Truck Driver - Cascade Disposal, Full Time Mon.-Fri. $14.00. Must have CDL and 2 years CDL driving exp. Very labor intensive position. Apply online at www.wasteconnections.com questions call Lance at 360-448-6958.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Glazier have clean DOE. info.

-- Residential: Must 5 years experience & driving record, pay Call 541-382-2500 for

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Sunriver

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Hotel Front Desk & Night Audit – Part to Full time positions available. The perfect candidate will be outgoing, have good knowledge of the area, poses excellent customer service skills, be honest, motivated, energetic and responsible. Full time positions offer benefits after 90 days to include medical, dental, vision, vacation, paid holidays and more. Please turn in a completed application and resume to the Fairfield Inn & Suites at 1626 NW Wall Street Bend . No phone calls please.

Job Fair-Suttle Lake May 14th & 15th 9am - 4pm The Lodge at Suttle Lake is hiring for the following seasonal positions •Housekeeping •Frontdesk •Maintenance •Experienced Line Cooks •Banquet Cooks •Dishwashers •Bussers •Back Wait •Servers •Host/ Hostesses •Bartenders •Banquet Servers Please apply on these specific dates at the Main Lodge

Medical - LPN/RN Charge Nurse part time position avail., swing shift. Contact Kim Carpenter, Ochoco Care Center, Prineville, 541-447-7667.

Medical

Phlebotomy Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301

Medical Wallowa Memorial Hospital, Located in Enterprise, OR, currently has two full-time positions available for a Laboratory MT/MLT. Outstanding benefits package. If interested please contact Linda Childers, Human Resource Director at (541) 426-5313, or visit our website at www.wchcd.org. E OE

Pacific Truck Center is looking for a Journey Level Diesel Tech. Must have own tools. Able to work in a fast pace environment. Able to work on all makes of heavy duty diesel trucks and chassis repairs. excellent pay and benefits. Send resume to PO Box 730, Redmond Oregon 97756 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

RN/Medical

632

Finance & Business

Rentals

507

604

Real Estate Contracts

Storage Rentals

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $90/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

500 600 528

616

Loans and Mortgages

Want To Rent

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Want to Rent acreage to park Travel Trailer east of Bend preferable with horse area. Will rent/lease with possible option to buy 541-610-4100.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Partners In Care is accepting resumes for a part-time (24+ hours/week) RN to work in its in-patient unit; 573 Hospice House. Regular weekly hours include two Business Opportunities 12-hour night shifts (7pm 7am) and a weekend rotation. Preference given to candidates with in-patient hospice or general hospice experience. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit their resume via mail XOCAI: Expanding business opportunity coming to the to: Partners In Care / Attn: Bend area offering great HR, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, health and wealth potential. OR 97701 or by fax to: Event: Eagle Crest Resort, 541-389-0813 Summit Room, May 14 & 15 @ 6:30 p.m. Call 360-450-5985 for more information. All enthusiasts for a better future welcome!

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges LAS VEGAS, next to South Point/Las Vegas Blvd., 2 bdrm. condo, 5/30-6/6, $800, call for more info., 541-447-1616.

OCEANFRONT HOMES Rent now for Summer. Waldport. Sleeps 10-16. www.rodbyroost.com 541-923-0908

630

Rooms for Rent Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. www.healthychocolate.cfdgrp.com 541-382-1885

632

Medical -Registered Nurse: Harney County Home Health & Hospice. Work w/home bound patients who need skilled nursing care & hospice patients who need symptom management. Relaxed, knowledgable & helpful team environment. We pride ourselves in being nurse & patient friendly. To apply e-mail: cherylk1@centurytel.net

Medical/Software

Teachers Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) is recruiting for two Classroom Instructors for high school alternative education classes. One in Redmond and one in Bend. Positions will be a 10month position working approx. August 25 – June 24. Bachelor’s degree in related field or the equivalent combination of education and experience in related field may be substituted, plus Oregon Teaching Certificate required. Annual salary $34,092 to $37,260 plus excellent benefits. Application and full job description available on the COIC website www.coic.org ( http://www.coic.org/ ), at local COIC offices or at Administration – 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, OR 97756. In order to be considered for this position, a completed application must be received by 5:00 p.m., Friday May 14, 2010, in the Redmond Administration office. Faxed applications will be accepted (541) 923-3416. COIC is an EOE.

Partners In Care is accepting resumes for the newly created position of Organization Systems Coordinator. This is a full-time position (generally Mon. - Fri./ 8am - 5pm). Responsibilities include providing support and administration of clinical software application (SunCoast) in order to resolve application incidents and/or to fulfill requests from internal clients, and participation in new module/application testing and implementation for the Technician Frontier Motors a Chrysler/ organization. Minimum Jeep /Dodge 5 Star Dealer in qualifications include: CliniLaGrande OR, is offering a cal caregiver knowledge and Great Opportunity for an exexperience in hospice/home perienced Technician. Ideal health settings (ie. RN, SoApplicant will have Chrysler cial Worker), and a demontechnical exp., ASE cert. w/3 strated knowledge in clinical yrs. min. exp. Transmission software applications (EMR) exp. a plus Fax resume to with ability to manage the 541-962-9607 or Email development and sustaining marc@frontier-motors.com of such software applications. Compensation dependent on qualifications/expeThe Bulletin rience. Qualified candidates Recommends extra caution are encouraged to submit when purchasing products their resume via mail to: or services from out of the Partners In Care / Attn: HR, area. Sending cash, checks, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR or credit information may 97701 or by fax to: be subjected to F R A U D. 541-389-0813. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Apt./Multiplex General Medical RCM Position RN with knowledge of MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, 541-447-7667. dns@ochococare.com

634

Apt./Multiplex General Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Desert Garden Apts., 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. 62+/Disabled

$100 Move In Special

Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 209 NW Portland: Quiet 2 bdrn., DW, W/S/G paid, oak cabs., carport, laundry facilities, extra large living room, $670 $500 dep., 383-2430. Awbrey Butte Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 W/D hookups, near St. bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, Charles. $550/mo. Call $550; woodstove, W/S/G 541-385-6928. paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 SHEVLIN APARTMENTS 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., Near COCC! Newer 2/1, grangas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car ite, parking/storage area, garage, no pets. $795+dep. laundry on site. $600/mo. Viking Property Management 541-815-0688. 541-416-0191

1059 NE Hidden Valley Dr., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, garage, W/D hook-ups, W/S paid, $675/mo. 541-610-4070 1/2 Month Free! 55+ Hospital District, 2/2, A/C, from $750-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Duplex 2/1, fully updated W/D hookup, W/S paid, patio, fully fenced, garage w/opener $650 +dep. No smoking/pets 503-507-9182.

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Dulpex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, sparkling clean, all appl., garage, W/D hookup, fenced yard, W/S paid, no smoking, pets neg. $695. 541-389-2240. Near Old Mill, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, wood stove, garage, fenced yard, 603 SE Wilson, $650/$600 dep., please call 541-480-3832. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

STONE CREEK APARTMENTS 2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments 3 bdrm, 2 bath townhomes with garages. W/D included, gas fireplaces. 339 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1. $725/mo. 541-420-0208

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

OWNER PAYS W/S/G, near hospital, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, open floor plan, private deck, $630/mo. Call Katie Kelly at Kelly Realty, 541-408-3220.

1807 SW 21st, spacious 2/2 gorgeous fenced duplex, w/garage, mint cond. W/S/G, paid pet OK reduced to $695. 541- 549-2228.

642

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

642

648

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent General

1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, storage units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com Ask Us About Our

May Special! Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval.

Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

MAY

SPECIALS!

Studios & 1 bdrm

$395 to $415 • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. •Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Large 2 bdrm., 1 bath, upstairs unit, W/S/G+gas paid, onsite laundry, no smoking/ pets, $495/mo. 358 NW 17th St., Gael, 541-350-2095. Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

541-322-7253

Move-in Incentive 1/2 off 1st month rent! SW Redmond duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, garage, fenced back yard, all kitchen appl., W/D hookup, $650 + dep. 541-480-7806.

personals Need Attorney to represent me in a wrongful termination case for equal share of settlement.Possible discrimination. John, 541-977-2434.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 G3 652

658

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

3 bdrm., W/D, dishwasher, 2 Cute, clean 2/1, single garage, car garage, fenced back yard, W/D hookups, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, W/S/G great in town location, $695 & gas heating paid, rent + $670 dep., 156 SW $1150/mo. 541-382-4868 8th St., 541-548-0932. CLEAN, large older 2 bedroom, Deluxe Newer 3/2.5, 2245 $700 mo. + last + dep. No sq. ft., huge fenced yard. pets. See at 1977 NW 2ND, $995/mo. lease to own. or Bend and call # off sign for $1095 lease only, 1615 SW appointment to see. Sarasota Ct. 541-350-2206. HORSE PROPERTY, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 acres, storage, small shop, private well, CRR near entrance, lease, option possible, $875, 541-771-7750

541-385-5809

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. Tumalo: 5 Min. from Bend, nice 3/2 house, 2150 sq.ft., dbl. garage, $1100/mo., 1st/last/$500 dep. No pets or smoking. (541)317-8794 Westside, Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath house, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, 650 dog okay, $900/mo. (1416 Houses for Rent NW 5th St.) 541-389-5408 NE Bend WESTSIDE, Near Downtown 1 bdrm., W/D, quiet St., Near Bend High School, 4 large fenced yard, detached bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 garage, pet OK w/ dep. $650 sq. ft., large carport, no Avail. 6/1. 541-382-4530 smoking, $995/mo. + deps. 541-389-3657 Newer, spacious 3 Bdrm/2 Bath, oversized garage, fenced yard, cool great room, quiet neighborhood! $950/ mo. Call Kurt 541 350-5552

$350 MOVE-IN SPECIALS EXTENDED ONE MORE MONTH for Apts. & Multi-plexes at: COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 ���NOT THE TAJ MAHAL but livable. 1 bdrm, 1 bath with large shared yard and extra storage. Near Pioneer Park. Pet OK. Only $395 mo. • COZY 1 bdrm, 1 bath Apt. upper unit. Where north meets south in town. Just $425 mo. includes W/S/G. • CLOSE TO PIONEER PARK Private 2 bdrm, 1 bath upstairs apts. with on-site laundry and off-street parking. Cute balconies. $495 includes W/S/G. •REDMOND APT. - 2 bdrm, 1 bath lower unit, end of quiet dead-end st., A/C and Private patio. $495 includes W/S/G. •SPACIOUS APTS. 2 bdrm, 1 bath near Old Mill District. $525 mo. includes CABLE + W/S/G - ONLY 1 left! • 1/2 MO. FREE RENT + Special - Nice Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Near hospital. On-site laundry & off-street parking. $540 W/S/G incl. •FURNISHED Mt. Bachelor Condos - 1 bdrm/1 bath: 1 with Murphy bed; 1 w/ W/D. $595, $645 mo. includes W/S/G/wireless.(1 @ $550 - only part. furnished) •NEAR DOWNTOWN - Spacious cottage duplex, 3 bdrm/ 1 bath. W/D hookups. View Pilot Butte fireworks from living room. Pets? $595 includes W/S/G. •LARGE SE TOWNHOME - 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath with W/D hookups. Totally private back deck. Covered parking. Extra storage. New paint & carpet! Just $595 mo. incl. W/S/G. •PEACEFUL SERENITY Nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath mfd home on Huge Lot in DRW. Must see. $625 mo. •NEAR TOWN & RIVER 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhome w/W/D hookups and extra storage. Small pet considered with deposit. $695 incl. W/S/G. • MODERN NE DUPLEX - 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, garage, vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace. Small pet ? $695 Incl. W/S • SITS AT BASE OF PILOT BUTTE - 2 bdrm, 1.75 bath. Unique floorplan. Skylight. Carport. Fenced backyard. W/D included. $695 mo.. •SPACIOUS CONDO w/ TWO MASTERS +Half bath + Washer/Dryer + Dbl. Garage + Space & storage galore + Corner fireplace. Pool +Tennis courts. Cedar Creek Apts. Only $750 mo. (excluded from Move In Special) • WONDERFUL SW PRIVATE HOME: 3 bdrm/2 bath, dbl. garage. Partial fenced backyard, new hardwood floors and carpet. Wood stove. MUST SEE. $875 mo. • 2 STORY 3 bdrm/2 bath house in SE - Double garage. Fenced back yard, storage house, dog house, 1 pet cons. W/D included, 1382 sq. ft. $925 mo. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website (REDMOND PROPERTIES, TOO!) www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

PRIVATE LENDER WANTED! We own our home outright, looking for private lender to lend us $30,000 for remodel. Call 541-279-8826. * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

713

Real Estate Wanted Struggling with payments? I will buy your house or take over payments. Rapid debt relief. 541-504-8883 or 541-385-5977

Domestic Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

We Clean Houses & Offices: Over 10 years of experience, good references, best service for the least cost, 541-390-8073.

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411 Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 13 Yrs. Housekeeping Exp., References. Rates To Fit Your Needs. Call Angela Today! 541-390-5033

Decks

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Thomas Carey Construction 35 yrs. exp. in Central Oregon Custom homes, all phases or remodeling, small jobs, window replacement. 541-480-8378 • CCB#190270

Debris Removal

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585 Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Handyman Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fridge, range & large storage shed incl., $5900 or $1000 down, $175/mo.+ space rent. 541-383-5130.

Cozy, Quiet 2/1, fridge., W/D, fenced yard, $625/mo. + last & $450 dep. Pets? Avail. 5/10. 54789 Wolf St. 805-479-7550

660

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

693

Houses for Rent Redmond

Office/Retail Space for Rent

$200 off 1st mo. 3/2, fenced back yard, new appl., dog OK, $785+sec. dep., 1617 SW 33rd, 541-948-2121, tmenergyrates@gmail.com

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

AVM CONSTRUCTION • Carpentry • Home Repair • Expert Painting • Stain • Decks • Pergolas • Foreclosure Restoration 541-610-6667 CCB #169270

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Weed free bark & flower beds

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

762

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization Award Winning Design

Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

Fertilizer included with monthly program

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Excavating

21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Yamaha YFZ 450 2006, Special Edition, only ridden in the sand, paddle steer tires, pipe, air cleaner, jetted, ridden very little, $5000, 541-410-1332.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

875

Watercraft

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and 870 motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Boats & Accessories Class 870. 541-385-5809 10’ Fiberglass Boat, w/ 7 HP motor & trailer, $500, please call 541-233-3357. 12 Ft. Sea King Boat and Trailer, $400 call for more info. 541-389-4411.

880

Motorhomes

14.5’ 1962 completely restored Hydroswift fiberglass boat, $1600. 541-536-6059

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

14’ Lund, 25 Merc, Calkins trailer, elec. trolling motor, fish finder, down rigger, 2 anchors & other equip., great for fly fishing, $2000. 541-388-6922

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Beaver Patriot 2000, 37’, 44K mi., w/options. $119,000. 541-382-9755,541-215-0077 Fleetwood Expedition 38’ N Model 2005, 7.5 kw gen. W/D, pwr awning, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, micro & convection, dual A/C, heat pump, AC/DC pwr. inverter, backup camera, etc. $98,000. 541-382-1721

(This special package is not available on our website)

541-389-4974

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

CCB#180420

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

771

springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Randy, 541-306-7492

tom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Lots

Ask us about

Weekly Maintenance

Roof-Foundation

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Own A Park 1.47 Acres+/- 2 12 FT. Valco, 7.5 Merc., Bdrm 1 Bath Home. Finished Calkins trailer, trolling motor, Detached Garage/shop, licensed thru 2011, cover, Circle Drive w/RV Parking, exc. cond. $2,500. 548-5642. PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver Harley Davidson 1200 XLC Area. $224,900 Call Bob 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & 12’ Sears Fiberglass boat, ores Mosher 541-593-2203. Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, & trailer incl., $500. Call for $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506. more info., 541-419-1891.

Fire Fuels Reduction

Drywall

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Motorcycles And Accessories Baja SC150 Scooter 2008, 225 mi., like new, silver/red, $1095 LaPine, 503-539-9646.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Homes with Acreage

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

Spring Clean Up

J. L. SCOTT

860

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

ATVs

fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

Southeast Bend Homes HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Cus3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo,

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, Quality Work, Clean up & haul, repair & improve, fences, odd jobs, and more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Landscaping, Yard Care

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

747

749

Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

Southwest Bend Homes Single Story, 3/2.5, over $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 www.owners.com/jpm5553

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

865 Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100

3 bdrm 2 bath, 1100 sq. ft. recently upgraded w/ granite counters, tile and laminate flooring. Hot tub with privacy deck. Dbl. garage plus 3 storage/shop bldgs. On approx. 1/3 acre w/ irrigation, near Tumalo School. $199,500. 541-419-6408

mi. , silver, 2 helmets, travel trunk, exc. cond. $3000. 541-389-9338.

Yamaha XT225 2002, l2,600 mi. st. legal never dropped, runs great $2,100. 410-4492.

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Mfd. Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, appls., decks, 10x20 wood shop $12,950. 530-852-7704 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Snowmobiles

Homes for Sale

746

Honda Scooter 2005, Reflex 250 cc, 2K

800 850

Northwest Bend Homes

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Boats & RV’s

745

748

Handyman

Move-In Ready! Homes start at $10,000, on land, $30,000, delivered & set-up start at $26,500 within 50 mi., Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

Westside - 4 Units+ 2-2 bdrms., 2-1 bdrms.+ huge RV garage, good cash flow, $349,000. 1623 Knoll, Bend. 650-298-0093

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Excavating

Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $34,900, 541-480-4059.

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker

Northeast Bend Homes

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

738

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. newer carpet & paint, woodOffice/Warehouse space stove, garage fenced yard on 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. .92 acre lot $795 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. 2 Bdrm., near Old Mill, 1000 sq. ft., newer carpet, vaulted ceilNeed help fixing stuff ing, wood stove, big deck, around the house? fenced yard, single garage, Call A Service Professional $795,541-480-3393, 610-7803 and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., Shop With Storage Yard, wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 in DRW on canal $695, sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. 541-480-339 610-7803. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343

658

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

16.5 FT. 1980 Seaswirl, walk through windshield, open bow, EZ Load trailer, 2003 Suzuki outboard, 115 hp., 55 mph or troll 1.5 mph all day on 2 gal. of gas $3900. 541-420-2206

Chiloquin: 700 Acres reduced to $600,000 Millican: 270 Acres great horse property only $575,000 160 Acres: Outside of Hines hunting & more reduced to $449,000. Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521. CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $140,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

Multiplexes for Sale

Commercial for Rent/Lease

ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, $850, Jim, 541-388-3209. Walking Distance to Old Mill, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage w/opener, fenced yard, sprinkler sys. pet OK $1150 $700 dep. 815-5141.

870

Boats & Accessories

659

687

656

705

Real Estate Services

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

The Bulletin Classifieds

3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $675/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432

Houses for Rent SW Bend

700

773

Acreages

Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new roof, heat pump, A/C, new carpet, $10,000. 541-390-3382

Houses for Rent La Pine

652

Houses for Rent $1100 mo. 3 bdrm, 2 bath + office/4th bdrm, large fenced NW Bend yard, RV parking, cul-de-sac. Pets considered. Call Gregg 1 BDRM., 1 BATH HOUSE, walk at 541-480-8337. in closet, W/D incl., nice, new kitchen & living room, view of river, large dbl. gaA newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 rage, W/S/G paid, close to sq.ft., gas fireplace, great parks & river trails, room, newer carpet, over$750/mo. + $750 dep. NO sized dbl. garage, $995, 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 pets/smoking. 67 B McKay. 541-419-0722

Upscale Home 55+ Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, triple garage, gardener paid, $1400 +security dep of $1400. 541-526-5774.

Real Estate For Sale

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD Four Leaf Clover Lawn Service wants to get your lawn off to a great start with our thatch & aeration process at 25% off. Experienced, knowledgable care. FREE Estimates, 541-504-8410 or 541-279-0746

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Wweekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Masonry

D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099 COOKS CREATIVE MASONRY Stone projects of all types 23 yrs experience. Wayne, 541-815-1420. L#119139 www.cookscreativemasonry.com

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Painting, Wall Covering

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

BIG

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. *JAKE’S Yardscaping* Big or Small We Do It All! High Quality, Low Rates 18+Years Exp., Call Jake at 541-419-2985 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Find It in Exterior/Interior,

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


G4 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744. Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade, needs some TLC, everything works, shower & bathtub,Oldie but

Goody $4,000 541-610-6713

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

Dutchman 26’ 2005, 6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437. Keystone Cougar 2003 33 ft. 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 8, 2 bdrms., elec./gas stove, large rear storage, outside util. shower, full kitchen & micro $12,500. Incl. skirting, very clean, located near Bend. 541-383-0494

Terry Manor 29’ 1989, extra’s, non smoker, $2500 OBO. Call for details. 541-508-6920.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

Autos & Transportation

900

933

Pickups

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718 T Hangar for rent at Bend Airport, bi-fold doors. Call for more info., 541-382-8998.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Dodge Sport 1/2-Ton 1999, 4X4, quad cab, Casset/CD Player, running boards, tinted windows A/C, cruise, all bells & whistles, etc., 98,837 mi., $6900, please call 541-420-2206.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck - Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, Cat engine, 10 yd mixer 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 w/minor damage. 168k, Water truck, Kenworth 1963, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990. 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931. Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Drastic Price Reduction!

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

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8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking or pets $17,500 pics available (541)410-3658.

Porsche Carrera 1999, black metallic, 43K careful mi., beautiful, upgrades, Tiptronic $20,000. 610-5799.

SUBARUS!!! CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

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Legal Notices

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RICHARD DIAZ AND JUDITH M. ROCKWELL DIAZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 5/4/2006, recorded 5/10/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-32270, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SEVENTEEN (17), BLOCK THREE (3), FOREST VIEW FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 52591 SUNRISE BOULEVARD LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 16, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,272.74 each $5,090.96 (01-01-10 through 04-16-10) Late Charges: $198.92 Beneficiary Advances: $697.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $5,986.88 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $176,800.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 19, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/16/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3534370 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $14,999, Call 541-390-7780 .

Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by O.C. Henkle Building, LLC, as grantor, to AmeriTitle as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank, as beneficiary, dated March 25, 2005, recorded April 28, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2005-25971, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: Lots Eleven (11) and Twelve (12) in the Re-subdivision of Block Four (4) of Bend, recorded March 3, 1910, in Cabinet A, Page 3, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Real property commonly known as 821 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. Note that Columbia State Bank is the successor in interest to Columbia River Bank, ("Beneficiary") The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Loan No. : 81661 Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of March 15, 2009. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance Interest Total

5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354 Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114 Ford Mustang GT Premium Coupe 2010, 2K mi. Candy Red/Saddle , auto, 6 options, $28,900. 541-728-0843

$2,500,000.00 $398,020.83 $2,898,020.83*

*Total does not include interest at the rate of $1,250.00 per diem from January 15, 2010, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 2010, at the hour of 2:00 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows:

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

The Bulletin Classifieds

Lance 820 Lite 2004,

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

Ford Focus ZTS 2004,

BUY IT! SELL IT!

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

Antique and Classic Autos

Canopies and Campers FIND IT!

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $22,500 541-610-9900.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl.,

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Mercedes E320 2003, 35K!!! panoramic roof, $18,250. Located in Bend. Call 971-404-6203.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-93935

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Find It in Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Automobiles

Chevy 1/2 Ton Camper Special 1966, runs great, all original, $2500. 541-536-6059.

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Aircraft, Parts and Service

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

(Private Party ads only)

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

VW Super Beetle 1974,

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

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Automobiles

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

Utility Trailers Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

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Vans

VW Cabriolet 1981,

925 Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

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Antique and Classic Autos

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4800. 541-617-1888. Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MGB GT 1971, Valued at $4000, MGD Roadster 1973, Valued at $6000, MGA Roadster, Valued at $18,000, Great Collectors Cars, Make offer, 541-815-1573

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Dated:25, February, 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, new tires, all service records since new, great value, $16,999 OBO, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

Jaguar XJ6 1985, orig. 67,000 miles, British tan/tan leather interior, body & interior a 9, driven only in summer months, $4,000, call days 541-385-6861 private party.

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement.

If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of a rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is APRIL 7, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice below. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so.

VW Bug 2004, convertible KIA Spectra SX 2006, w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 4 dr., 49K mi., $6500. 51K miles, immaculate cond. (530)310-2934, La Pine. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

Saturn Vue 2003, AWD, 90K, burnt orange, 4 door, A/C, auto., cruise $5,500. 541-848-7600 or 848-7599.

I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale.

If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale.

NAVIGATOR 2004 4x4 loaded 1 owner, 34k miles, like new, mineral gray, Lt parchment leather buckets. $21,500 OBO. 541-389-7108.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss.

NOTICE TO TENANTS: Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $14,400, 541-388-3108. Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,000, w/o winch $23,000, 541-325-2684

Erich M. Paetsch Trustee

/s/Erich M. Paetsch Attorney for said Trustee

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Erich M. Paetsch P.O. Box 470 Salem, OR 97308-0470

Ford Thunderbird Convertible 2003, 5 spd. auto. trans, leather, exc. cond., 74K, $14,999. 541-848-8570

Lexus ES350 2008, immaculate, low mi., $30,000 firm. 541-389-0833

Lincoln Towncar 1992, top of the line model, immaculate condition, $2995, please call 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521.

If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. You may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org, or contact the Legal Aid Services of Oregon, Central Oregon Regional Office, 1029 NW 14th Street, Suite 100, Bend, OR 97701 or call (541) 385-6944 or (800) 678-6944. DATED: 25 day of February, 2010.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Trustee's name: Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee's signature: /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee telephone number: (503) 399 1070.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 11, 2010 G5

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May 11, 2010.

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF HOWARD C. THOMPSON; LEE DORAL THOMPSON; OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES; and Occupants of the Premises, Defendants. Case No. 09CV1371AB SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: Unknown Heirs of Howard C. Thompson and Occupants of the Premises: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is April 27, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief

prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property:

publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff.

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT

THE WEST HALF (W1/2) OF LOT 10, BLOCK 2, SUN COUNTRY ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON

If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636.

RICHARD C. MITCHELL,

Commonly known as: 16901 Indigo Lane, Bend, OR 97707. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first

This summons is pursuant to ORCP 7.

issued

ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By: Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 3535 Factoria Blvd. SE, Suite 200 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

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NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DOUGLAS L. BUYSMAN AND LUCINDIE W. BUYSMAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 12/18/2007, recorded 12/26/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-65725, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE SOUTHERLY THIRTY (30) FEET OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY SIXTY (60) FEET OF LOT NINE (9) THE SOUTHWESTERLY SIXTY (60) FEET OF LOT TEN (10) TOGETHER WITH THE ADJOINING PORTION OF MILLICAN DRIVE NOW VACATED, ALL IN BLOCK TEN (10) BEND PARK CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 171 NORTHEAST 10TH STREET BEND, OR 97701 Amount due as of April 16, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,380.12 each $ 5,520.48 (01-01-10 through 04-16-10) Late Charges: $237.08 Beneficiary Advances: $151.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $5,908.56 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $185,707.05, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 19, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/16/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee BY CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3534357 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0655 T.S. No.: 1268267-09.

PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Aud Mitchell 3561 NW Conrad Drive Bend, Oregon 97701 TEL: (541) 318-9988

Estate of

Deceased.

ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:

Case No. 10PB0048MA NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-93950

Aud Mitchell Personal Representative

KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP Thomas J. Sayeg, OSB #873805 tjs@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS TO BE PRE-QUALIFIED TO SUBMIT A CONSTRUCTION BID FOR THE COCC HEALTH CAREERS BUILDING HALL PROJECT Respondent Qualifications due by 4:00PM local time on June 3rd, 2010. The College is requesting a "Pre-Qualification Package" from prime contractors to be pre-qualified to submit bids for the Health Careers Building Project. The College has determined that prospective bidders on the Health Careers building must be pre-qualified prior to sub-

mitting a bid. It is mandatory that contractors who intend to submit a bid provide a Pre-Qualification Package that includes a fully completed Pre-Qualification Application and all requested materials. The College will evaluate the Pre-Qualification Package and approve qualified contractors to be on the final qualified Bidders List. No bid will be accepted from a contractor that has failed to comply with these requirements. Contractors are encouraged to submit Pre-Qualification Packages as soon as possible, so that they may be notified of omissions of information to be remedied or of their pre-qualification status well in advance of the bid advertisement for this project. Project Description and Schedule The COCC Health Careers Building Project includes the construction of a new 46,000sq. ft. three story building on the Awbrey Butter campus in Bend. The new structure includes a general classroom, office and several health laboratory spaces. The College is seeking an Earth Advantage Gold Certification for this building. The ITB for construction is currently scheduled to go out in August of 2010. To request a copy of the Prequalification Application, contact Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator, by email at jmosier@cocc.edu, or by telephone at

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541-383-7779. The submittal due date is June 3, 2010 at 4 PM. The documents must be returned to Julie Mosier in Metolius 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 by the day and time specified. Publication and Dates: Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon and Portland Daily Journal of Commerce, Portland, Oregon. First Advertisement 5/3/2010; Second Advertisement 5/11/2010; Third Advertisement 5/19/2010 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS GREG A. CARDER has been appointed Administrator of the Estate of Orval B. Carder, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under Case Number 10PB0032ST. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP at 716 NW Harriman Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, ATTN.: Lisa N. Bertalan, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the following named attorney for the Administrator. Date of first publication: April 27, 2010. LISA N. BERTALAN HENDRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP 716 NW HARRIMAN BEND, OR 97701 LEGAL NOTICE Request for Proposals

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-94269 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MARIA R. THOMAS, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGE IT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 12/19/2006, recorded 12/26/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-83669, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2007-A5, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-E under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated March 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1 AND THE NORTHEAST HALF (NE1/2) OF LOT 2, BLOCK 4, BOULEVARD ADDITION TO BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 605 NORTHWEST NEWPORT AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 23, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 4 payments at $4,438.13 each $17,752.52 (01-01-10 through 04-23-10) Late Charges: $1,608.72 Beneficiary Advances: $109.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $19,470.24 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $715,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 26, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/23/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 -Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

The Redmond Area Park and Recreation District is requesting proposals (RFP) from qualified professional service organizations capable of providing complete Consulting Services for the preparation and completion a comprehensive Feasibility Study and Development Plan for Biomass and Solar Thermal Energy for a community center. Proposals must be received at the RAPRD District office, 465 SW Rimrock Dr, Redmond, OR 97756 by 5:00 P.M. on June 2, 2010. Questions should be directed to: Katie Hammer, Executive Director Katieh.raprd@uci.net or 541-548-7275 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359046564 T.S. No.: OR-234952-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, OSCAR A MARTINEZ, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to FIRST LAND TRUSTEE CORPORATION, as trustee, in favor of FIRST BANC MORTGAGE, INC. A CORPORATION, as Benefi-

ciary, dated 3/30/2004, recorded 4/2/2004, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2004-18066 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 209096 LOT 29, FAIRHAVEN, PHASE V, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2121 NW CEDAR AVENUE REDMOND, OREGON 7756-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $128,378.70; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $957.23 Monthly Late Charge $36.10 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $128,378.70 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/11/2010 **Sale will postpone to 07/12/2010** at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the

beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/22/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature ByCindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3387665 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S.No.:T10-60575-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRIAN JOSEPH as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-10Â2005, recorded 03-31-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-19229 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: AI'.N: 105841 LO T THREE (3) AND THE EAST FIFTEEN (15) FEET OF LOT TWO (2) IN BLOCK TWO (2) OF BEAR CREEK ROAD ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1115 NE BURNSIDE AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real properly to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BE-

ASAP# 3542848 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by Todd E. Wilde and Heather M. Wilde, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 01, 2007, recorded August 10, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-44004 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A portion of lots seventeen (17) and eighteen (18), block three (3) of Clear Sky Estates, recorded April 7, 1977, in cabinet B, page 225, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 18, Block 3, the true point of beginning of this description; thence West 130 feet to the East right of way of Sun Lane; thence North 0 deg, 4' 10" West 46.17 feet; thence along a curve to the right having a central angle of 41 deg, 24' 35" a radius of 30 feet, an arc distance of 21.68 feet; thence South 88 deg, 35' 17" East 122.54 feet; thence South 0 deg, 4' 10" East 63.00 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 728 SE Sun Ln. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,699.33 Monthly Late Charge $69.75. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $195,506.99 together with interest thereon at 7.500% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 02, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 3, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Russell C. Chamberlain and Dori L. Chamberlain, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Land Home Financial Services, as Beneficiary, dated October 01, 2002, recorded October 07, 2002, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2002-54959 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots 15, 16, 17 and 18, block 33, Hillman Deschutes County, Oregon. Together with that portion of vacated central avenue which inured thereto. Commonly known as: 8512 4th Street Terrebonne OR 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $769.18 Monthly Late Charge $38.46. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $92,498.09 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 31, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 7, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Darren K. Weeks and Robin Weeks, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated May 30, 2006, recorded June 06, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-39226 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3 in block 35 of Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Inc., Unit 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 17039 Hermosa Road Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,277.96 Monthly Late Charge $54.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $155,903.60 together with interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from May 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 11, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 07, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 12, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-305478 04/20/10, 04/27, 05/04, 05/11

R-307068 04/27/10, 05/04/10, 05/11/10

R-309017 05/04, 05/11, 05/18, 05/25

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxx9044 T.S. No.: 1273526-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8858 T.S. No.: 1240257-09.


G6 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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COME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,123.56 Monthly Late Charge $56.17 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared ail obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $175,577.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 11 -01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 08-12-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors m interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obli-

gations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by die trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated; March 31, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN

TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE CO CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3522299 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-60927-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARY CATHERINE KOZUSKO as Grantor to AMERITITLE. as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 09-14-2005, recorded 09-22-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-64024 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: AP.N: 247690 LOT FIFTY-FOUR (54), CASCADE VISTA P.U.D., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20085 MOUNT FAITH PLACE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by-said trust

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0158 T.S. No.: 1268250-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason D. Neel and Connie L. Neel Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated December 06, 2006, recorded December 13, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-81507 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot ninety-seven (97), Diamond Bar Ranch, Phase 3, recorded February 14, 2006, in cabinet G, page 1042, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2600 NE 9th St. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,504.38 Monthly Late Charge $75.22. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $249,000.00 together with interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 11, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 05, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 12, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-307703 05/04, 05/11, 05/18, 05/25

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-92355

deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 01/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $760.90 Monthly Late Charge $38.04 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $169,874.89 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375% per annum from 12-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 08-27-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT EN-

TRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest m the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors m interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" in-

cludes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: April 15, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC., P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DE LA TORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3539125 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 502338453 Title Order No: 100227929-OR-GNO T.S. No.: OR07000022-10-1 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TIMMOTHY AND CINDY LEROUE, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of 1ST RATE MORTGAGE, INC., A OREGON CORPORATION as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, recorded on November 14, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-45708 of Official

Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 203933 LOT THREE (3), BRIERWOOD, CITY OF REDMOND, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 13, 2001, IN CABINET E, PAGE 700, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2234 SW REINDEER AVE, REDMOND, OR 97756-7004 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $2,285.61 Monthly Late Charge $114.28 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $284,824.80 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000 % per annum from October 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of

Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the

feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 19, 2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon L. Tran, Authorized Signor C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE, CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, (949) 252 8300 THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3546848 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx4338 T.S. No.: 1274929-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8025 T.S. No.: 1275199-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tessa White, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 09, 2007, recorded July 10, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-38230 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots fifteen and sixteen, Block Eleven, Boulevard Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1119 NW Milwaukee Ave. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,473.62 Monthly Late Charge $73.68. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $223,855.25 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is XXX, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Brad L. Maesner and Tiffany Maesner, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin Financial Corp., An Op. Sub. of Mlb&t Co., Fsb, as Beneficiary, dated March 26, 2007, recorded March 29, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-18387 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot forty-two (42), Chestnut Park, Phase I, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20238 Morgan Loop Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,452.86 Monthly Late Charge $62.15. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $270,186.28 together with interest thereon at 5.000% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 19, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-310210 05/11/10, 05/18, 05/25, 06/01

R-310213 05/11, 05/18, 05/25, 06/01

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0490 T.S. No.: 1273013-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7760 T.S. No.: 1272865-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RONALD GUTHRIE AND DONNA GUTHRIE, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 1/31/2008, recorded 2/4/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-05296, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: A tract of land located in the Southwest Quarter Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) Section Twenty-six (26), Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Section 26, also the true point of beginning; thence North 00º17'25" West along the West line of said Section 357.17 feet; thence North 8901413511 East, parallel with the South line of Section 26, 304.90 feet; thence South 00º17'25" East parallel with said West line 357.17 feet to the South line of said Section 26; thence South 89º14'35" West along said South line of Section 26, 304.90 feet to the true point of beginning. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1723 NORTHEAST ONEIL WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 7, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 6 payments at $ 2,351.99 each $ 14,111.94 (11-01-09 through 04-07-10) Late Charges: $ 588.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 112.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 14,811.94 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $369,525.18, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 10, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/7/2010 By REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1St Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by John R. Riley, As Sole Owner, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Lehman Brothers Bank, Fsb, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 01, 2006, recorded December 04, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-79372 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot three (3) in block six (6) of South Heights, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3580 SW Antelope Avenue Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,679.94 Monthly Late Charge $70.67. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $233,929.31 together with interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 5, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by James C. Nore, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For American Brokers Conduit, as Beneficiary, dated July 19, 2005, recorded July 27, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-48249 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot six (6), block seven (7), Tillicum Village Second Addition Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61225 Nisika Court Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,750.13 Monthly Late Charge $87.51. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $220,175.52 together with interest thereon at 5.250% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 29, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3524146 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010

R-306804 04/27/10, 05/04, 05/11, 05/18

R-306787 04/27, 05/04, 05/11, 05/18


Bulletin Daily Paper 05/11/10