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Controversial ex-Bend liquor officer jailed in Idaho District 54 By Nick Budnick and Cindy Powers The Bulletin

In a twist to the saga of a controversial Oregon Liquor Control Commission official who sparked complaints in Bend, the agency’s former

Central Oregon regional manager, Jason Evers, is sitting in a county jail in Idaho — the subject of an apparent federal investigation. Details of the allegations against him are unknown. However, Steve

Pharo, OLCC director, confirmed Thursday evening that Evers, who was accused of abusing his power by club owners in Central Oregon before being transferred, is facing a likely federal arraignment after being investigated

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by the U.S. Department of State. “The only thing that I can tell you at this point is they are in the process of investigating some issues concerning Jason,” Pharo said. See Evers / A5

2010 • The Bulletin

Central Oregon

The stars come out for The Tradition • Fred Couples, below, and Tom Watson are among the big names expected for this year’s Champions Tour event in Sunriver, Page 4

Golf Preview

A guide to the courses ofthe regi need to know to play golf on on, and everything you the High Desert this year

Places to play • Event calendar • The Tradition

House race already heating up Both candidates are unopposed in the primary, and incumbent Judy Stiegler is a top GOP target By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

C

Rescuing its golf course, Redmond eyes new ideas

SALEM — In what’s widely viewed as the hottest state legislative race in Central Oregon, neither firstterm incumbent Rep. Judy Stiegler, D-Bend, nor her challenger, Republican attorney Jason Conger, face opponents in the May 18 primary for House District 54. As a result, the race for the November election is already well under way. Earlier this month, Republicans sent out an e-mail questioning a claim in Stiegler’s ballot statement that she “led the fight” against a beer tax proposed in the state Legislature last year. Around the same time, a blog aligned with Oregon Democrats, Inside called Blue Oregon, made an is• Deschutes sue of Conger’s ties to conservaDA candidates tive Christians in Central Oregon trade sharp in a post called “The company he words, keeps.” Page C1 Both candidates shrug off the respective attacks against them as ill-informed, inaccurate and unfair. And both candidates say they personally intend to run positive campaigns, even if others who are interested in the district’s outcome do not. “It’s going to be a good, hard race.” said Stiegler, noting that she’d run for her seat twice before winning, and had been attacked before. “I’m used to that,” she said, adding that, “I’ve got a record. Frankly, I’ve got a lifelong record … of service to the community.” See Election / A5

ELECTION

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A golfer at Redmond’s Juniper Golf Course hits his tee shot on the 11th hole last week. Recently, the course has struggled financially, forcing the city to give it about $900,000 to pay debts. A new plan calls for the Redmond City Council to take a more active role in running the course.

City pledges $900K to cover debt payment, seeks management proposals, may take more active role By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — The city of Redmond may soon take a more active role in running its municipal Juniper Golf Course after pledging $900,000 to cover the course’s debt payments through next year. The city has given Juniper $450,000 and has

budgeted another $450,000 for next year’s debt payments. The city gave the money because it backed a $6 million bond in 2003 to fund course construction and so has to pay the debt if Juniper cannot. Juniper’s revenues were supposed to cover the bond payments, but income recently failed to keep up with that demand. The city began reviewing course operations

in recent months as it became clear Juniper would struggle to make its debt payments. First, the city hired the National Golf Foundation, a Florida-based golf consulting firm, to review the course and its operations. The report made several suggestions, including changing management, making the course easier to play and marketing the course more outside the area. Redmond formed a volunteer committee to review the report’s recommendations, and its plan will be presented to the City Council soon. The committee never considered selling Juniper, according to Councilor Jay Patrick. See Redmond / A5

The Associated Press file photo

Joann Weber of Midtown Realty changes the sign to “Sold” earlier this month at a home in Palo Alto, Calif. As of mid-February, nearly 1.8 million households had used a federal homebuyer tax credit, and the buying has continued through spring.

Homebuyer tax credit deadline is here, as is A containable oil spill – how’d it become a crisis? a national rush to cash in By Calvin Woodward The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Suddenly, everything changed. For days, as an oil spill spread in the Gulf of Mexico, BP assured the government the plume was manageable, not catastrophic.

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Federal authorities were content to let the company handle the mess while keeping an eye on the operation. But then government scientists realized the leak was five times larger than they had been led to believe, and days of lulling statistics and reassuring words gave way Thursday to an

all-hands-on-deck emergency response. Now questions are sure to be raised about a selfpolicing system that trusted a commercial operator to take care of its own mishap even as it grew into a menace imperiling Gulf Coast nature and livelihoods from Florida to Texas. See Spill / A2

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Real estate agents are working seven days a week, builders are staying open late and homebuyers are scrambling to get their offers in as they rush to take advantage of tax credits that expire at midnight. To qualify, buyers must have a signed contract in hand by the deadline and must complete the deal by June 30. The tax incentives — offered to both first-time buyers and some current homeowners — are fueling a strong spring selling season and helping home prices stabilize. Real estate agents hope the burst in activity, along with the lifting of general economic gloom, will propel the housing market for the rest of the year. See Homes / A5


A2 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Chimps mourn similar to humans, studies show By Amina Khan

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Gulf of Mexico Approximate oil locations from April 25, to April 29, 2010

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Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Some chimpanzees seem to grieve similarly to humans in the face of a fellow chimp’s death, two new studies have found, appearing to comfort the dying, experience trauma after death and have trouble letting go. The research, published Monday in the journal Current Biology, provides a window onto a less public aspect of primate life, the authors said. In one study, researchers at the University of Stirling and at Blair Drummond Safari Park in the United Kingdom watched how three chimpanzees, kept in heated indoor quarters during the winter, reacted as a fourth chimp, an elderly female named Pansy, sickened and died. Park officials had separated Pansy from the other chimpanzees for treatment when she became ill in November 2008. But when her breathing became erratic a few weeks later, the other three chimps were allowed to join her. In the 10 minutes before she died, the three animals — an elderly female named Blossom, Blossom’s adult son Chippy and Pansy’s adult daughter Rosie — frequently groomed and caressed Pansy. They crouched in close, and Chippy shook her arm, apparently testing for signs of life. When they got no reaction, “they appeared to arrive at a collective decision that something had changed, and she was no longer the same as she was beforehand,” said lead author James Anderson, who studies primate behavior at the University of Stirling. “It seems they are clearly able to distinguish the difference between being alive and unresponsive.” Soon, both Blossom and Chippy left Pansy’s side. Even though it was not her usual sleeping area, Rosie stayed by her mother’s corpse almost the entire night, sleeping fitfully. Sixteen hours after Pansy’s death, zookeepers removed the body, with the three chimps watching quietly. For several days afterward, the group was subdued, refusing to make a nest on the platform where Pansy had died. They also demanded more attention from the keepers. “I’m not going to say chimpanzees have a human understanding of death — chimps are chimps and humans are humans — but we were immediately struck during the video by the phenomena we observed,” Anderson said, “because we know chimpanzees are capable of a wide range of emotions very much akin to human emotions.” Anderson said he hoped this would prompt zookeepers to reevaluate the common practice of removing terminally ill animals from a group. In some ways, he said, it may be more humane to allow the group to remain together until a sick animal dies, to give the ailing animal comfort and allow the group a sense of closure. In the second study, chimpanzee mothers were observed in the forests of Bossou, Guinea, after a disease swept through a clan of 19 chimpanzees, killing five, including two infants. The mothers of those infants continued to carry the corpses around, even as the bodies swelled, then gradually dried out. Other studies had described this phenomenon, researchers said, but this was unique in the length of time it took for the mothers to abandon the bodies. One mother carried her baby for 19 days; another mother carried hers for 68 days. “We have two explanations here — one is that there is a very, very strong bond between chimpanzee mothers and chimpanzee infants,” said lead author Dora Biro, a biologist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Biro theorized that chimpanzee mothers had evolved to become extremely attached to their babies “because chimpanzee primates are born completely helpless, like humans.” “Another possibility is that they were aware of the death and this was just their way of dealing with it,” Biro added, pointing to humans’ inability to let go of objects that remind us of people we have lost.

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Chimps seem “clearly able to distinguish the difference between being alive and unresponsive,” says James Anderson, who studies primate behavior at the University of Stirling in the United Kingdom.

“I’m not going to say chimpanzees have a human understanding of death — chimps are chimps and humans are humans — but we were immediately struck during the video by the phenomena we observed.” — James Anderson, University of Stirling

To better understand the mothers’ awareness of death, Biro said, the researchers would have had to witness the infants’ actual moment of death. “It’s possible there would have been some response, like stress or fear or anger, but we weren’t there to see it.” Craig Stanford, co-director of the University of Southern California Jane Goodall Research Center, called the studies’ findings interesting, but said that although humans and chimpanzees share

similar emotions to some degree — fear, anger, empathy — it would be dangerous to extrapolate too much about chimps’ perception. He recalled a time he saw a few chimpanzees come across an antelope with its belly sliced open, its contents devoured. When the chimps came across the dead animal, Stanford said, “they used the empty ribcage … as a playhouse for a couple hours. So if they’re pushing a corpse around, it’s not something understood.”

FLA.

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L. PONTCHARTRAIN

Bay St. Louis

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Continued from A1 The pivot point had come Wednesday night, at a news conference at an oil research center in the tiny community of Robert, La. That’s when the nation learned the earlier estimates were way off, and an additional leak had been found. Only a few days after the Coast Guard assured the country there was “ample time” to protect the coast if oil came ashore, warnings from the government were newly alarming. “I am frightened for the country, for the environment,” David Kennedy, assistant chief of the National Ocean Service at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, told The Associated Press. “This is a very, very big thing, and the efforts that are going to be required to do anything about it, especially if it continues on, are just mind-boggling.” The political subtext of the crisis was clear and increasingly on people’s minds, whether from a federal office deploying oil-containment booms or from a Louisiana parish awaiting yet another sucker punch from the sea. Will this be President Obama’s Katrina? Should the federal and state governments have done more, and earlier? Did they learn the lessons of the devastating hurricane? Political calculations vied with the increasingly scary Gulf reality — hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil and its progression to landfall as soon as Thursday night. Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, who also is in a hot campaign for the Senate, flew over the slick and commended the federal actions to date but wondered if anyone, really, could be doing enough in this situation. “It appeared to me,” he said, “that this is probably much bigger than we can fathom.” The crisis began with a massive explosion aboard the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon on April 20, more than 40 miles off the Louisiana coast. Rear Adm. Mary Landry,

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chief of the Coast Guard in the region, said at the outset that most of the oil was burning off, leaving only a moderate rainbow sheen on the water and no sign of a major spill. Two days later, the Deepwater Horizon sank and crews spotted a 1-by-5-mile sheen with a dark center that appeared to be a crude oil mix. Obama got his first briefing on the accident. Landry said the following day that no oil appeared to be leaking from a well head at the ocean floor, nor was any leaking noted at the surface. At the White House, Obama spokesman Robert Gibbs said that sometimes accidents happen, and the loss of the Deepwater Horizon was no reason to back off on the president’s recent decision to support expanded offshore drilling. Throughout last week and into this one, the government was deferring to BP on what was being done at the site and on assessments of progress. The Coast Guard was not doing its own independent, firsthand assessment of the seabed rupture. Landry repeatedly asserted that BP was the responsible party and would shoulder the costs and organizational duties associated with the cleanup. On Monday, Landry offered assurances that the Gulf Coast should be safe. “This is ample time to protect sensitive areas and prepare for cleanup should the oil impact this area,” she said. On Wednesday night, she reported the findings of federal experts that up to 5,000 barrels a day were leaking from the well. BP had estimated only 1,000. By Thursday afternoon, the White House had assembled a team of top advisers to showcase the administration’s determination to head off the damage posed by the oil slick. And Gibbs acknowledged details of the president’s drilling proposal might be revisited, depending on the investigation into the rig explosion and spill. The equation had changed, like a hurricane setting a new course.

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Sophisticated and modern styling with rich textural story and organic flare, loungy outdoor living spaces. 3 bedroom, 3 bath, with office and basement living space. Adjacent to miles of trails for hiking and biking. $950,000. CALL TERRY SKJERSAA AT 541-383-1426. MLS#201002746

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REALTOR


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 A3

T S Goldman case goes to DOJ Criminal prosecution is possible By Zachary A. Goldfarb The Washington Post

The Securities and Exchange Commission has referred its investigation of Goldman Sachs to the Justice Department for possible criminal prosecution, less than two weeks after filing a civil securities fraud case against the firm, according to a source familiar with the matter. Any probe by the Justice De-

partment would be in a preliminary stage. No Goldman Sachs employees involved in the mortgage-related transactions that are the focus of the SEC case have been interviewed by Justice Department prosecutors or the FBI agents who often conduct probes on behalf of prosecutors, according to a source familiar with the matter. The sources spoke on condition of anonymity because they

were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly. The Justice Department usually investigates high-profile cases of securities fraud, but the threshold from criminal prosecution is significantly higher than that of civil cases. The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg News reported Thursday night that the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan had followed up on the request and opened a criminal probe. “Given the recent focus on the

firm, we’re not surprised by the report of an inquiry,” said Goldman spokesman Lucas Van Praag. “We would cooperate fully with any request for information.” It is very rare for the government to indict a firm, and the mere threat of criminal prosecution can destroy a company. Although the Supreme Court ultimately overturned the conviction, accounting firm Arthur Andersen collapsed after facing criminal charges in connection with the Enron corporate corruption in the early 2002.

Florida’s Crist says he will run as independent

New York Times News Service The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved the first treatment that uses a socalled cancer vaccine, a drug that trains the body’s own immune system to fight the disease. The drug, Provenge, developed by the Dendreon Corp., was approved to treat advanced prostate cancer. In clinical trials it extended the lives of patients about four months compared with a placebo. Getting the immune system to attack cancer has tantalized scientists for decades because it promises to have fewer side effects than the harsh chemotherapy now used. But until now, the approach has yielded little but disappointment. “The big story here is that this is the first proof of principle and proof that immunotherapy works in general in cancer, which I think is a huge observation,” said Dr. Philip Kantoff, chief of solid tumor oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and the lead investigator in Dendreon’s largest clinical trial for the drug. Provenge is not a preventive vaccine like those for measles, hepatitis or even the new ones for cervical cancer, which prevent a viral infection that causes the cancer. Rather, it is a so-called therapeutic vaccine, used after the cancer has already been diagnosed.

New York Times News Service

BEIJING — An unemployed man entered a kindergarten in Jiangsu province in eastern China on Thursday morning and stabbed 28 kindergarten students and three adults, critically wounding at least five children, local authorities and state news agencies reported. It was the second mass stabbing of students in two days, and the third in less than a month. Many of the wounded children were just 4 years old and shared the same classroom, according to the state-run Xinhua news agency. Police officers identified the assailant as Xu

Thai soldier killed in protest clash

The Associated Press

FDA OKs cancer ‘vaccine’

By Michael Wines

Yuyuan, a 47-year-old former insurance agent. According to Xinhua, he began attacking children with a knife about 8 inches long around 9 a.m. at the Zhongxin Kindergarten, a middle-class school in Taixing, about 570 miles southeast of Beijing. He also wounded two teachers and a security guard. Little other information was immediately available. Taixing propaganda officials did not respond to telephone calls. Thursday’s attack occurred a day after a 33-year-old man in the southern province of Guangdong stabbed 15 fourthand fifth-graders at a primary school in Leizhou.

W  B

By Brendan Farrington ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Former GOP darling Gov. Charlie Crist defected from the Republican Party on Thursday to run as an independent for U.S. Senate after months of being ripped by conservatives as too supportive of President Barack Obama. “I don’t have either party helping me. But I need you. I need you more than ever,” the governor said, surrounded by cheering supCharlie Crist porters carrying signs that included “Democrats for Crist.” Crist was the heavy favorite last year, and was even among the Republican names bandied about in the 2012 presidential race. But the primary campaign quickly became a lost cause as the tea party movement embraced another candidate, Marco Rubio, and held up the governor’s literal embrace of Obama last year as evidence that Crist was too liberal. Crist was mobbed by supporters after the speech. One man shouted, “I love you!” and Crist replied, “I love you more, brother.” He said he felt liberated. Asked why, he said, “Because I only belong to the people and that’s a wonderful place to be. That’s what it’s all about.”

Attacker stabs 28 children at a kindergarten in China

William Colgin / The (Biloxi-Gulfport, Miss.) Sun Herald

Two brown pelicans and a flock of seagulls rest Thursday on the shore of Ship Island as a boom line floats just offshore near Gulfport, Miss. Several hundred yards of boom line were set up on the north side of the island to try to contain an oncoming oil spill. Crews are placing the boom in different areas on coast waterways to help protect from the spill.

Gulf Coast oil spill spreads, could eclipse Exxon Valdez By Cain Burdeau and Holbrook Mohr The Associated Press

VENICE, La. — An oil spill that threatened to eclipse even the Exxon Valdez disaster spread out of control and drifted inexorably toward the Gulf Coast on Thursday as fishermen rushed to scoop up shrimp and crews spread floating barriers. The spill was both bigger and closer than imagined — five times larger than first estimated, with the leading edge just three miles from shore. Authorities said it could reach the Mississippi delta by Thursday night. “It is of grave concern,” said David Kennedy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “I am frightened. This is a very, very big thing. And the efforts that are going to be required to do anything about it, especially if it continues on, are just mind-boggling.” The oil slick could become the nation’s worst environmental disaster in decades, threatening hundreds of species of fish, birds and other wildlife in one of the world’s richest seafood grounds, teeming with shrimp,

‘Spill of national significance,’ government says WASHINGTON — The growing oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico was designated a spill of national significance and President Barack Obama has pledged all necessary federal help to deal with the massive slick that has crept to within 16 miles of the Louisiana coast. Three Cabinet officials will tour the site, the federal government said Thursday

as it stepped up its efforts to deal with the environmental disaster. “I have been receiving frequent briefings from my Cabinet and White House staff,” Obama said. “While BP is ultimately responsible for funding the cost of response and cleanup operations, my administration will continue to use every single available resource at our disposal including potentially the Department of Defense.” — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

BANGKOK — Thai security forces stopped anti-government protesters from rallying north of the capital in clashes that killed one soldier, raising tensions in a seven- week standoff that has paralyzed Bangkok’s commercial center. One soldier was shot dead and two were injured in the skirmish, police official Worapong Chiewprecha said in a televised briefing Wednesday night. Seventeen protesters were also wounded after authorities opened fire to prevent a convoy of about 5,000 people from traveling to a fresh-food market north of Bangkok, he said. The incident may add pressure on Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva to scatter demonstrators who have disrupted businesses and irked residents by occupying a district since April 3. The country’s worst political violence in 18 years has now resulted in the deaths of 27 people this month.

Afghans protest after U.S.-led death

during a night raid on her home, according to military and Afghan officials. The confrontation was another setback for the American-led military coalition in Afghanistan, which has declared an aim of reducing civilian deaths and winning support from skeptical Afghans as it prepares for a prolonged summer offensive meant to hobble the Taliban.

Taliban leader reported dead has resurfaced ISLAMABAD — Pakistani Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud was believed dead in a leadership duel last summer, only to stage a news conference a few days later. A U.S. drone strike in January was followed by intense speculation about his fate, then statements by Pakistani intelligence officials that he was “100 percent” dead. On Thursday, those intelligence officials circulated another message: Mehsud is alive. But Mehsud is not necessarily back. He may have survived the January attack, but he was wounded, and has been sidelined ever since, three senior intelligence officers said. — From wire reports

KABUL — Irate demonstrators burned tires and blocked traffic in eastern Afghanistan on Thursday after U.S.-led forces killed an armed relative of an Afghan lawmaker

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oysters and other marine life. Cade Thomas, a fishing guide in Venice, worried that his livelihood will be destroyed. He said he did not know whether to blame the Coast Guard, the government or the oil company. “They lied to us. They came out and said it was leaking 1,000 barrels when I think they knew it was more. And they weren’t proactive,” he said. “As soon as it blew up, they should have started wrapping it with booms.”

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A4 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Evers Continued from A1 “I’m still waiting for more information myself. … As far as we know he is going to be arraigned,” Pharo said. A corrections deputy at the Ada County Jail in Boise, Idaho, confirmed late Thursday that Evers was being held without bail at the facility.

Election Continued from A1 Conger, a former aide to Northern California congressman, is no stranger to politics. But he said he was aware that his first run for elected office would bring a new level of scrutiny and personal attacks. “It wouldn’t surprise me if they tried to characterize me as something other than what I am,” he said. “… As you know, in many cases political candidates and campaigns will go negative when they feel they’re vulnerable or headed for a loss.” The district, covering the city of Bend, was a Republican stronghold until Stiegler, in 2008, ousted incumbent Chuck Burley, a moderate Republican, in a presidential election year in which Democrats were galvanized to the polls by the chance to vote for Barack Obama. This year, political analysts are predicting that the pendulum will swing the other way, and Oregon’s Republicans are making Stiegler a top target. This may be their last, best chance to retake the district as a new round of redistricting in 2011 could make the district an even safer Democratic seat. The race matches two lawyers, but beyond that they share little in common. Stiegler worked as a criminal defense and juvenile lawyer and as an administrator for a program that helped neglected and abused children; she also served on the Bend-La Pine School Board and chaired state boards like the Oregon Government Ethics Commission and the state Board of Education. In her first term, Stiegler kept a fairly low profile except when she led the successful fight against a legislative push to consider eliminating OSU’s Cascades Campus in Bend. She also helped broker a bill that protected most of Skyline Forest — a key part of Bend’s skyline — from development. Conger, meanwhile, grew up poor and worked his way through Harvard Law School. He worked as an aide to California Congressman Frank Riggs, a Republican, and also developed a career in business law, becoming partner in a real estate firm

Homes Continued from A1 “It’s been a great thing for us,” said Andrew Dielmann, owner of Dielmann Sotheby’s International Realty in St. Louis. “I would love to be a first-time homebuyer right now.” In Houston, transit mechanic Stan Henderson, 51, is buying his first home, a three-bedroom, $104,995 house from builder KB Home that is still under construction. Affordable prices and low mortgage rates were part of the draw, he said, but the tax credit “was the straw that stirred the drink.” Congress included the temporary tax credit in the $787 billion stimulus package signed into law a month after President Barack Obama took office last year. The idea was to bring the housing market back to life. Lawmakers, after intense lobbying from the real estate industry, agreed last fall to extend it until April 30.

Spring surge Nearly 1.8 million households had used the credit as of midFebruary at a cost of $12.6 billion, according to the Internal Revenue Service. The government is offering buyers who haven’t owned a home for three years a tax credit of 10 percent of the purchase price, up to $8,000. Single buyers with incomes above $145,000 and couples who make more

U.S. marshals arrested Evers on Tuesday and brought him to the jail at 9:13 p.m., a jail official said. The official had no information about what charges Evers faces or how long he might stay at the Ada County Jail. “We don’t have any details behind what happened,” she said. “We basically just house them here until they come and pick him up.” It is unclear what charges, if any,

Evers faces. Asked why the Department of State might be involved, Oregon FBI spokeswoman Beth Anne Steele declined to speculate. “I don’t know. … The State Department has its own investigators and its own cases,” she said. “I have no clue.” According to the State Department’s website, the agency investigates a variety of crimes, including visa fraud and passport violations.

JASON CONGER

JUDY STIEGLER

Age: 42 Hometown: Bend Family: married, five children Employment: Lawyer, Miller Nash law firm Political, community experience: Former Congressional aide; youth volunteer; board member, Trinity Lutheran Church

Age: 56 Hometown: Bend Family: Married, two children, two

to boot. Having moved to Bend several years ago, he serves as a community volunteer and sits on the board of Trinity Lutheran Church in Bend. Asked the biggest difference between himself and Stiegler, he points to her record supporting tax increases including Measure 66 and 67, which raised corporate and personal income taxes on the wealthiest Oregonians. She also supported a hospital tax, as well as fee increases. “I wouldn’t have voted for any of them,” Conger said. Stiegler, for her part, said she supported the tax increases only reluctantly, and because they would protect kids by protecting scarce social services. She cited her votes supporting bills to help small businesses in the February special session, saying, “I did what I promised to do.” She said her record of volunteering and history in Bend far exceeds that of Conger, a relative newcomer. But Conger’s allies have attacked Stiegler’s claim of being a leader in the fight to oppose the beer tax proposed last year by Rep. Ben Cannon, D-Portland. The tax never moved past committee, and Stiegler says she played a vocal and “obstinate” role in opposing it behind the scenes, in the Democratic caucus and to the bill’s sponsor. Mark Nelson, a lobbyist who played a major role in the beer fight, says Stiegler’s role is news to him, and says that although he supports Republicans, he has gone out of his way to make sure Democrats who were clearly against the beer tax have re-

than $245,000 are not eligible. There is also a credit of 10 percent, up to a maximum of $6,500, for buyers who already own a home. To qualify, they have to have been homeowners for at least five years. The same income limits apply. The credit for first-time buyers is believed to be playing a bigger role in stimulating home sales this spring. Sales of new homes surged 27 percent last month from a record low a month earlier; it was the biggest monthly increase in 47 years. Sales of previously occupied homes, meanwhile, were up nearly 7 percent in March and are expected to keep climbing.

Has it helped? Skeptics say that these measures are an attempt to manipulate market forces and that they are leaving housing vulnerable to a dangerous double dip. And many economists say the main effect of the first-time buyer tax credit was to bring would-be homeowners into the market sooner. “Most of the benefits went to people who would have bought a home anyway,” said Patrick Newport, an economist at IHS Global Insight. He estimates that the tax credits will spark only 350,000 to 450,000 additional sales for 2009 and 2010 combined. Tasha Brown, 29, of suburban Atlanta, is hoping to seal a deal by today. She had no intention of buying as house until a friend

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 A5 Evers was temporarily reassigned to the OLCC’s Medford office in August, after multiple Central Oregon business owners complained to local officials that Evers allowed overzealous and unfair enforcement of liquor laws in the region. Pharo responded by asking the Oregon Department of Justice to investigate. A DOJ report issued in December said Evers and his staff overstepped their au-

thority or appeared excessively punitive in at least a dozen OLCC investigations. The OLCC announced in January that Evers had requested a transfer to its regional office in Nyssa. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@ bendbulletin.com. Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at cpowers@ bendbulletin.com.

grandchildren Employment: Lawyer, former director, Court-Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon Political, community experience: Former member, Bend La Pine School Board; former chairwoman, Oregon Government Ethics Commission; former chairwoman, Oregon state Board of Education ceived campaign support from his client, Anheuser-Busch. “She was never a committed ‘no’ vote, ever,” he said. “She thought some of the proposals were too high, but if it was a lower proposal she might support it. … If she was leading the fight within the Democratic caucus, I didn’t know about it.” Cannon, for his part, concedes that several Democrats were against the tax, thereby making it an impossible one to pass. However, he said, Stiegler was the first to voice her opposition to him. “She was a consistent and forceful opponent of increasing the tax,” he said. “She made her views known early and often to me and was a real thorn in my side during that debate.” Nick Smith, the Republican strategist who sent out the email, scoffs at Cannon’s version of events. And he says Republicans feel confident about their chances. “Jason’s going full steam, and we strongly believe that he is a winning candidate,” he said. Laurie Gould, Stiegler’s campaign manager, said she feels just as good, but knows it will be a tough campaign. “We’re off and running in terms of what’s going to happen in November. … It’s going to be another battle.” Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

convinced her earlier this year that buying could be as affordable as renting. Then she learned about the tax credit. “That was the thing that catapulted me,” said Brown, an executive assistant. She made an offer Monday on a foreclosed home, but the bank said it would take 10 days to approve the contract, which killed the deal. On Thursday, she was waiting to hear back from a seller on her offer of $141,000 for a home listed at $149,900. “I haven’t been sleeping for about two weeks,” she said. But even if she doesn’t get the credit, she won’t stop looking. “I might be able to get something a lot better,” she said. “It won’t be a mad dash.”

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

John Lohman, 71, hits his tee shot last week on the 11th hole at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Watching, from left, are Jack Gilbert, 80, Paul Shively, 91, and Jim Coe, 67. Redmond has pledged $900,000 to help Juniper, the city’s municipal course, pay its debt through next year. A committee assembled by the city to study the course’s financial problems recently suggested that Redmond put out a request for proposal to search for a management company to run Juniper.

Redmond Continued from A1 If the plan is approved, the city will send out a request for proposal to manage Juniper. The council hopes the RFP will force bidders to find a profitable way to run the course, Patrick said. If that happens, Redmond shouldn’t have to make future debt payments. “(We did it) just for the fact that competition always tends to bring out the sharpest pencil,” Patrick said and emphasized that the current management team will be allowed to bid. City Manager David Brandt said there is no schedule for completing the RFP, but the city is hopeful there will be several bids to run the course. Redmond will not know for certain if anyone is interested until the RFP is out. “We don’t even know who is interested,” Brandt said. “But there are some folks poking around.” The plan also brings the City Council closer to Juniper’s operations, cutting out the Redmond Public Building Corp., which is owned by the city, and the course’s board of directors. In place of those two groups, the city could create a new golf commission to report directly to the council. Though the new plan will involve the council more in course operations, Patrick said councilors will not run Juniper day-to-day. “But when (Juniper) starts to affect the city budget and taxpayers, then we’re concerned,” said Patrick, who chaired the committee. “We don’t want to run golf the course. We’re just taking a tighter reign on it.” Under the plan, the golf commission will include PBC members, councilors and city residents. Juniper management will report to the commission, which would give monthly updates to the council. The council feels as if it has been too far removed from course operations, according to Ron Bryant, PBC’s president. “I sat on committee that ended up making that recommendation,

Home Show Special!

and I don’t have a problem with it,” Bryant said. “(The council) wants to have closer contact with what’s going on.” In the end, the plan is designed to help the course fund its own operations and debt, Brandt said. The course’s current annual revenue is about $2.1 million, several hundred thousand dollars short of meeting all of Juniper’s obligations, according to Brandt. “The RFP is a way to see who can come up with a business plan,” Brandt said. In the meantime, golfers shouldn’t see too many changes at Juniper, according to General Manager Mark Crose. Course staff have already tried to adopt some of the original report’s recommendations. Juniper, for example, has joined with some area hotels to advertise package deals. As for making the course easier, much of that work would have to happen after the summer season is complete, Crose said. While making the course easier

to play could draw more golfers, Crose believes revenues will only improve once more out-of-town players visit. “To me, nothing is more important than driving tourism back to Central Oregon,” Crose said. Juniper is an 18-hole golf course located just south of the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. Until May 27, 18 holes of primetime golf costs $49. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,511.92 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +40.19 +1.63%

s

CLOSE 11,167.32 DOW JONES CHANGE +122.05 +1.11%

s

1,206.78 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +15.42 +1.29%

t

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.72 treasury CHANGE -1.33%

t

$1168.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$2.90

For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Jobless claims rise

Toyota offers a fix for SUV problems Toyota said Thursday it had resumed sales of the Lexus GX 460 after fixing a problem with the stability control system that could cause the luxury sport utility vehicle to roll over. The company said it had released a software upgrade for the vehicle to Lexus dealerships and had begun contacting GX 460 owners to schedule repairs. Toyota stopped selling the GX 460 on April 13 after Consumer Reports said the vehicle, which is new for the 2010 model year, failed to prevent its rear end from sliding sideways during sharp turns. Last week it announced a recall of the GX 460 and the Land Cruiser Prado, an SUV sold overseas. — Staff and wire reports

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Space Age Fuel, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . .$2.85 • Plumfierce, 614 S.W. Fifth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . .$2.90 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$2.96 • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.98 • Quick Way Market, 690 N.E. Butler Market Road . . . . $3 • Chevron, 1001 Railway, Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3 • Texaco, 178 S.W. Fourth St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.02 • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.02 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.05

DIESEL • Chevron, 2005 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.30 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.36 • Chevron, 1001 Railway, Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.36 The Bulletin

s

$18.549 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.442

United, Continental expected to announce merger

STOC K S R E P O R T

New claims for unemployment in Oregon rose last week over the previous week, while the total number of people receiving jobless benefits fell, according to the state Employment Department. For the week ending April 24, the state recorded 9,890 initial claims for unemployment, an increase of 2,946 over the week ending April 17, according to a news release. However, the number of new claims filed last week was down 2,469 over the number filed during the same week in 2009. The total number receiving unemployment benefits last week, 197,573, was a drop of 4,249 from the week before, the news release stated. But last week’s total increased 23,860 over the total receiving benefits during the same week in 2009. Job listings showed signs of improvement, the Employment Department reported. The number of openings increased more than 2,500 from the previous week, the news release stated. For information on job openings, visit www.emp.state. or.us/jobs.

B

Auto News

By Julie Johnsson Chicago Tribune

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Gorilla Glue employees, from left, Dave Kumpf, Nik Kostopoulos and Mark Kramer work on removing a conveyer belt Thursday afternoon at O’Keeffe’s Co., located in Sisters. Tara O’Keeffe sold her company to Cincinnati-based Gorilla Glue for an undisclosed amount.

Hand cream company leaving Sisters for Ohio By David Holley The Bulletin

T

he owner of a Sistersbased manufacturer of hand and foot creams, O’Keeffe’s Co., inked a deal this week to sell her company for an undisclosed amount to The Gorilla Glue Co., a wellk n o w n m a n u f ac turer of glue and tape products in Cincinnati. Calling Tara O’Keeffe the purchase price “a very comfortable number,” Tara O’Keeffe said she signed paperwork with Gorilla Glue representatives Monday. She said the final payment for her company — which she has operated since its inception 16 years ago — was transferred from Gorilla Glue on Wednesday. “They’re going to have the opportunity to grow this product,” O’Keeffe, 55, said about Gorilla Glue, adding that the Ohio company sells numerous other products. “I

Mathew Hanna, left, and Dave Rimel remove office furniture from O’Keeffe’s Co. in Sisters on Thursday afternoon. do believe they are the perfect match for where we want to go.” O’Keeffe’s moisturizing hand and foot creams began gaining widespread attention after multistate retailer Lowe’s, among other stores, began carrying the product,

and later began displaying it more prominently near checkouts. O’Keeffe herself gained recognition in 2009 when she was selected by the U.S. Small Business Administration as Oregon’s Small Business Person of the Year.

Finance reform Real estate brokers to highlight split using social media between parties to find more buyers By Brady Dennis

The Washington Post

By Greta Guest

WASHINSGTON — The Senate on Thursday began debating a far-reaching bill to overhaul financial regulations, bracing for a series of amendments in coming days that will highlight key divisions between Democrats and Republicans. The first proposed amendment, introduced by Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., would prohibit using any more taxpayer money to bail out troubled financial companies. This goal is so widely shared that members of both parties have been tripping over one another to assure the public that they are best at safeguarding taxpayers’ wallets. But like other goals in the legislation that are widely shared by both parties, disputes remain over how best to do it. After blocking the bill’s progress for three days in hopes of hammering out a bipartisan compromise behind closed doors, Republicans this week allowed the bill to move on to floor debate when negotiations between Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., and Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., again reached an impasse. See Reform / B5

Detroit Free Press

DETROIT — Joy Santiago stood in the living room of a one-bedroom condo she had listed for sale in Detroit, videotaping a 360-degree view to post on YouTube. Santiago, broker/owner of Dwellings Unlimited in Farmington Hills, Mich., didn’t stop there. She created a Web site for the home, featured it on two Facebook pages, posted a tweet or two on Twitter and listed it on a slew of real estate sites, including Realtor.com, Trulia and Zillow. Like Santiago, more agents are turning to social media to drive sales, featuring listings in their Facebook status updates. Others are marketing on 50 or more websites. They say Internet marketing — aside from being free — lets them tap into new audiences and sell more homes. “There’s never too many sites. There’s no overkill — the more exposure, the better,” Santiago said. Elyse Van Houzen, an agent for Re/Max Showcase Homes in Birmingham, Mich., said she’s sold several houses to old high school friends just from reconnecting with them on Facebook. See Internet / B5

But O’Keeffe’s notoriety wasn’t the only thing that led to her selling the company. O’Keeffe said Gorilla Glue was attracted to her company’s sizable profit margins and her unique formula for her products. See O’Keeffe / B5

CHICAGO — United and Continental Airlines are expected to announce Monday that they are combining operations to create the world’s largest airline, the culmination of more than a decade’s effort by Chicago-based United to strike a megamerger that would transform the U.S. airline industry. The transaction, which must still be approved by both airlines’ boards, would be structured as a merger of equals, with neither side paying a premium for the other’s stock, according to sources close to the talks. The new airline, to be called United and based in Chicago, sources said, would bring together two carriers whose hubs and routes complement each other, giving management a shot at running a more profitable business in an industry plagued by overcapacity. United’s board is expected to vote today on the deal, which was reached in a flurry of negotiations that lasted less than three weeks. Continental directors are meeting today to pore over the proposed transaction and are scheduled to vote Sunday. Representatives for Continental and United declined to comment on a possible merger. The airlines stood in nearly the same position two years ago, with an apparent deal in hand, sources said. But in a vote that shocked United’s executives, Continental directors called off the merger on the eve of its announcement, deciding their carrier would fare better independently. They were spooked by operations problems at United, its labor discord and unexpected poor quarterly financial reports, sources told the Chicago Tribune. Two years later, United has remade itself, earlier this week posting the best first-quarter results in a decade and besting its peers. And Continental has a new CEO, Jeff Smisek, 55, who decided his carrier couldn’t be left on the sidelines after news leaked earlier this month that United was deep into merger talks with US Airways. The proposed merger is the first major strategic initiative undertaken by Smisek, who took over as chief executive of the Houston-based carrier at the start of the year and is well-regarded within airline circles. See Merger / B5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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B2 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY “EDITING A REPORT WITH WORD”: Learn some of the basic functions of MS Word, plus edit and save a report. Familiarity with the Windows operating system and MS Office programs required. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or jenniferp@dpls.us. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. “INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS”: Learn the basics of small website building, uploading images, writing for the Web and blogging using WordPress; free; 1011 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541312-4704 or www.alpineinternet. com/locals. “BUILD A COMMUNITY SITE WITH WORDPRESS”: Learn to build a member or community website using WordPress; free; 11 a.m.noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541312-4704 or www.alpineinternet. com/locals. “THE FRESH WEB”: A short review of Web news intended to help Web authors and managers understand the ever changing Web environment; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals. CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: The 18th annual event features more than 300 exhibits, landscaping and gardening displays and more; $7 adults, free ages 16 and younger; noon-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-389-1058 or www. centraloregonshow.com. “CENTER STAGE REVIEW”: Learn to manage your site using “Center Stage,” Alpine’s Content Management System, with keyword analysis, suggestion and redirection tools; free; 12:15-1 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals.

SATURDAY ENSURING QUALITY CARE COURSE REGISTRATION DEADLINE: For prospective adult foster care providers, resident managers or shift caregivers to become licensed through Seniors & People with Disabilities. Preregistration required by May 1; $225 includes manual, $200 without manual; May 11 through 14 from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Seniors & People with Disabilities, 1135 Southwest Highland Ave., Redmond; 541-9710092. “BEGINNING INDESIGN: Learn how to create advertisements, fliers and color publications using Adobe InDesign. Preregistration required; $89, continuing education units available; Saturdays through May 8 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “EXPRESSION WEB”: Learn how to create websites with Microsoft Expression Web. Preregistration required; $69, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit. cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: The 18th annual event features more than 300 exhibits, landscaping and gardening displays and more; $7 adults, free ages 16 and younger; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-389-1058 or www. centraloregonshow.com.

SUNDAY CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: The 18th annual event features more than 300 exhibits, landscaping and gardening displays and more; $7 adults, free ages 16 and younger; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-389-1058 or www. centraloregonshow.com.

MONDAY NUTRITIONAL THERAPY TRAINING INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Learn about Central Oregon Community College’s nine-month nutritional therapy course that starts Sept. 19; free; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; RSVP to 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu/nutrition. “PAY PER CLICK”: Learn about online advertising that provides search engine rankings in return for payment. Preregistration required; $59; Mondays through May 10 from 6 to 9 p.m.; Central Oregon

Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-617-7822, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

Protesters flood financial district By Tomoeh Murakami Tse The Washington Post

TUESDAY “SEARCHING THE INTERNET”: Learn to select appropriate search tools and perform searches on the Internet. Prerequisites: “Getting Started on the Computer” or familiarity with Windows and “Introduction to the Internet” or other browser software. Registration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or lesliw@deschuteslibrary.org. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. “CRYSTALIZE YOUR MESSAGE WITH COLOR”: Part of a graphic design series hosted by Central Oregon Community College Community Learning. Preregistration required; $79, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through May 11 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY HOME ENERGY ANALYST TRAINING: Five-day core training for building professionals. Registration required by April 21; $749; May 5-7 and 12-14 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “ESTATE LONG-TERM CARE PLANNING”: Lisa Bertalan, local attorney, will discuss living trusts, estate planning, estate and capital gains taxes, and legal and financial options. Registration required; $39; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUSINESS FINANCE PROGRAMS PRESENTATION: Central Oregon Community College’s Business Development Center and the U.S. Small Business Administration will lead a program on business finance programs available from state and federal government agencies. The class will be held in room 306 of building 3; free; 1:30-3 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290. PLANNING FOR SENIOR CARE: Paul Hogan, author of “Stages of Senior Care” and CEO of Home Instead Senior Care, which offers nonmedical in-home senior care, will discuss care options available, financial planning, being a caregiver to an elderly parent, insurance options and the state of senior care in America; free; 4-6 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Village Resort Conference Center, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend; 541-330-6400. MICROSOFT CERTIFIED TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST COURSE: Prepares participants for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam 70-260. Preregistration required; $219; Wednesdays through May 26 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW”: Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty Bend hosts a live Internet show to discuss Central Oregon real estate market statistics. Visit the website and click on the show icons; free; 7 p.m.; www.ExitRealtyBend.com.

NEW YORK — The official target was big banks, but the message was aimed at Washington as much as Wall Street. Thousands of union workers, students and unemployed New Yorkers angry over high unemployment, reckless financial industry practices and billion-dollar bailouts gathered Thursday to march in the financial district in Lower Manhattan, one of a series of rallies organized by a coalition of labor and community groups. Although the anger was clearly directed at Wall Street, the protesters aimed much frustration at lobbyists and lawmakers in the nation’s capital, where the Senate had hours earlier begun debate on a regulatory overhaul bill. One by one, speakers, including teachers, those on government housing assistance and religious leaders, called for legislative action to spur banks to lend more to small businesses and pay more in taxes. One young mother of five, who said she could not find a job because of the economic downturn, called for a tax on speculative bets made on Wall Street. Richard Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO, the nation’s larg-

Frank Franklin II / The Associated Press

Protesters gather near city hall Thursday in New York. The protesters were calling for Wall Street accountability, the creation of good jobs, and an end to predatory lending practices. est organization of unions, said the No. 1 message was for Wall Street to “take some responsibility for what it did and call off the lobbyists in D.C.” The financial industry has ramped up its lobbying in the

face of the most comprehensive overhaul of the regulatory landscape in decades. Among the measures most fiercely opposed by large banks is a proposal that would force them to spin off their lucrative deriva-

tives-trading desks. “That would be like the first step to take,” Balthazar Becker, 29, a student at City University of New York, said of the measure as he marched down Broadway.

D I S PAT C H E S MicroSphere Computers, which bills itself as Bend’s oldest computer and networking provider, is moving to 1550 N.E. Williamson Blvd., in Bend, after operating downtown for more than 23 years. The new location is across Neff Road from St. Charles Bend and across Williamson from Central Oregon Pediatric Associates, next to Optima Foot and Ankle. The store, which opens at 9 a.m. Monday at its new location, will have its own parking lot, making it easier for customers picking up and dropping off computers. MicroSphere will retain the same phone number, 541-3881194, staff and e-mail: inquiry @microsphere.net. Julie Leutschaft has launched a human resources consulting company, The Human Touch, in Redmond. She provides human resources consulting services to smallto medium-sized companies throughout Central Oregon to ensure they’re providing the best HR services. The company is geared to the small-business owner who can’t afford a full-time HR staff but needs services that include outsourced recruitment, benefit

and compensation design, work force development, job descriptions, policies and procedures and employee handbooks. For more information, visit www.thehumantouchhr.com, or call 503-320-7516. Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe, of Bend, has changed its name to Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe. This summer, Tumalo Creek will be offering a wide range of beginning flatwater and whitewater kayak classes, summer camps for children, a music series/demo day the last Wednesday of every month, and a stand up paddleboarding race series every Wednesday in July and August. Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe has whitewater, sea and recreational kayaks, paddleboards and canoes. It also offers a range of tours and classes to improve kayaking skills. The shop is at 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, next to the Colorado Avenue Bridge on the Deschutes River. For information, call 541-317-

541-322-CARE

9407 or visit www.tumalocreek. com. The doors to the new Veterans Center in Bend officially opened for business Wednesday at 629 N.W. Franklin Ave. The center provides readjustment counseling to veterans who served in a war zone, at no cost, regardless of age or service era. The center will be open for business from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Staff can be made available upon request outside of normal work hours and/or on weekends. For more information, or to contact the Bend Veterans Center, call 541-647-5276. Bend ranked No. 4 on a list of top 10 cities for startups in a Bloomberg Business Week story published April 22 on business week.com. “This one-time logging town in Central Oregon has grown by about 50 percent in the past decade, drawing companies in computer technology, biotech and aviation,” the piece said. It included the following biograph-

ical information on Bend: population, 80,900; patents per 10,000 population, 4.3; creative professionals, 13.5 percent; bachelor’s degree or higher, 33.7 percent. A preface to the story noted that business location website ZoomProspector.com found that smaller cities have become the best places to start new companies. It went on to say that ZoomProspector weighed 11 factors, including the number of startups, quality of the work force, and resources like universities and venture capital to compile a list of the top places “to build the next Apple or Google.” The top three cities ahead of Bend, in order of ranking, were Boulder, Colo.; Boca Raton, Fla.; and Santa Monica, Calif.

541-388-4418

THURSDAY “TEAM BUILDING FOR GREATER PRODUCTIVITY” : Learn about collaborative team approaches in business. Registration required; $80; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “ONLINE MARKETING WITH FACEBOOK AND TWITTER”: Part of the Marketing Online series; $59; Thursdays through May 13 from 6 to 9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “ONLINE WRITING THAT SELLS”: Preregistration required; $69, continuing education units available; Thursdays through May 13 from 6 to 9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “CREATE YOUR PERSONAL RETIREMENT ANALYSIS”: Define retirement goals, income distribution and tax strategies. Taught by Chad Staskal. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

1 8 6 5 N E H i g h w a y 2 0 , B e n d • M o n – S a t 9 –7 | S u n 1 0 – 6 • 5 4 1 - 3 8 9 - 1 1 7 7 Expires Sunday, May 2 , 2010.


B USI N ESS

A N “I’ve been looking for one of these for 5 or 6 years.” — Bill Scheffler, Westport, Conn., car collector

Photos by Suzy Allman / The New York Times

This 1948 Chevy Fleetline Aerosedan featuring wood paneling, whitewall tires and chrome accents was recently purchased by Bill Scheffler in Westport, Conn., at auction. Citing an emotional connection, Scheffler purchased the classic car for a final price of $46,750.

’48 Chevy a modest car for a man of means ‘The car is rolling art,’ it’s new owner says, after winning bid By Jerry Garrett New York Times News Service

T

he glossy catalogs thunking into mailboxes in the weeks before a major collector-car auction have been known to reduce sober adults to drooling daydreamers. I know this from experience. Page after page of perfectly restored vintage cars, accompanied by vignettes describing each beauty’s provenance, have tested my restraint repeatedly, temptations held in check only by the values of the Aston Martins, Duesenbergs, Ferraris and Pierce-Arrows I desire most. Occasionally there are exceptions. One that caught my eye recently was a mere Chevrolet, tucked near the back of RM Auctions’ catalog for its winter sale in Phoenix. The presale estimate was $45,000-$65,000, and the car would be sold with no reserve. It was a 1948 Chevrolet Fleetline Aerosedan coupe — a woody, in surfer parlance, painted the color of a Bing cherry — that spent most of its life prowling California’s Pacific Coast Highway. But sandwiched

in the auction lineup between a 1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom and a 1953 Packard Caribbean convertible, would this beauty even be noticed? It was. When the Chevy crossed the block, bidding quickly escalated between a phone-in bidder and a gray-haired gentleman sitting with his wife in the center of the room. “I don’t think the paint is original,” an RM auction official had told me. “But it suits this car quite well. One of this car’s best features is its almost perfectly preserved, all-original interior.” Outside, the car wears three horizontal bands of gleaming chrome accents, wide whitewall tires and come-hither fender skirts. Under the long hood sits a 90-horsepower in-line-6.

Emotional connection The on-site bidder was Bill Scheffler, who had discovered the Chevy when the RM catalog arrived at his home in Westport, Conn. “I’ve been looking for one of these for 5 or 6 years,” he said. Scheffler, who owns a small

The Fleetline emblem adorns the 1948 Chevy Fleetline Aerosedan recently purchased by Bill Scheffler in Westport, Conn. “I got it at a fair price, maybe a little bit of a bargain,” Scheffler said. collection of post-World War II collectibles and serves as the chairman of the Fairfield County Concours d’Elegance, said he was born in 1948, so there was an emotional connection. Bidding stalled at Scheffler’s $37,500. Going once, going twice. The telephone bidder slid in a bid of $40,000. “Didn’t appreciate that,” Scheffler said. He waited, waited, waited — then bid $42,500. The phone bidder hung up. Sold. With a 10 percent buyer’s premium, the final price was $46,750, at the low end of the estimate. “I got it at a fair price, maybe a little bit of a bargain,” Scheffler said, as the Chevy was equipped with the rare dealer-installed Country Club wood trim package. Still, it was a Chevy. “These cars without the wood trim,” he said, “aren’t worth much more than, say, $20,000.” Scheffler said that while he had the means to purchase a more expensive car, this one offered what he was looking for: an emotional connection. “Why some cars are more valuable than others is always an interesting conjecture,” he said in an e-mail message. “In some cases, the reason is clear: exceptional rarity, exceptional provenance, exceptional stories

attached to the car.” At auctions, the spirit of competition also comes into play. “It’s as simple as two people wanting the same one object, price be damned,” he explained. “And in some cases, like this one, the car is both rare and unusual in one way or another. And then there’s the beauty in the eye of the beholder aspect.” “The car is rolling art,” Scheffler said, “and price is only one of several considerations that enter into the transaction. It is very cool, and that cool factor hijacks value considerations, at least for the right user.”

Driving the car Now that the Chevrolet has been a member of the Scheffler household for a few months, Scheffler was ready to offer driving impressions. “Utterly, if improbably, fantastic,” he said. “Drives very much like a modern car, gets buckets of favorable attention, often of the ‘My dad had one of these’ variety.” To sit in it is to take a trip back in time. “Not only does the car perform well mechanically, but both the (wind up, like an old wristwatch) clock (made in Connecticut) and the AM radio work flawlessly,” he continued. “How cool is that?”

Hearings set on bolstering federal auto oversight By Micheline Maynard New York Times News Service

DETROIT — Congress will hold its first hearings next week on proposed legislation that would strengthen the enforcement powers of federal auto regulators and require automakers to install a series of safety features on their vehicles. The legislation, called the Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 2010, includes many of the proposals discussed in hearings this winter that examined recalls of millions of cars by Toyota for problems with sudden unintended acceleration. It would also impose a fee on carmakers to pay for the costs

of certification. The proposed legislation would be the first time in a decade that Congress has taken a broad look at automotive safety. It last examined the topic after a series of recalls involving Firestone tires on the Ford Explorer. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., who heads the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, has begun circulating a draft of the proposal to committee members and has scheduled a subcommittee hearing on the measure for Thursday. The session had been scheduled to discuss the Toyota recalls, but a spokeswoman for the commit-

tee said the subject was changed to the proposed bill. She said the Toyota session would be held later. Toyota has recalled more than 9 million vehicles worldwide since November, mostly in two recalls: one for floor mats that could become entangled in accelerator pedals and the other for pedals that could stick. Waxman and Sen. John Rockefeller IV, D-W.Va., and chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, said last week that they would work together on proposed legislation to strengthen safety standards. David Strickland, head of the

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and a former aide to Rockefeller, said this year that he would be open to discussing the proposals. The agency could order many of the steps itself, but the lengthy rule-making process means the safety actions could take longer to put in place than a comprehensive bill passed by Congress. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., also introduced legislation this week that is meant to curb ties between the agency and the automobile companies, by prohibiting agency staff members from immediately joining carmakers once they leave government.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 B3


B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ACI Wwde ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMR AOL n ARCA bio ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivIden ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity AcuraPh Acxiom Adaptec AdeonaPh AdeptTch Adminstf AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaSol Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AllnceRes AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlnylamP AlphaOm n AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf Altria Alumina AlumChina AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntlGp rs AmLearn AmLorain n AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmRailcar AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrg s Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry n AnchBcWI AnglogldA ABInBev n Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenics Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApogeeE ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEnerg ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Aptargrp AquaAm ArQule ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArdeaBio ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AspenBio AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Aurizon g Authentidt

10.75 +.44 0.44 19.34 +.06 1.24 53.14 -.51 19.32 -.98 8.30 +.20 11.70 +.02 1.12 52.33 +2.70 36.23 +.37 1.76 39.52 -.11 0.20 17.15 -.26 34.18 +.41 1.12 28.89 +1.04 7.51 23.49 -.47 5.45 +.20 .90 -.01 0.27 33.32 +.30 1.68 26.14 +.23 20.54 -.75 3.99 +1.40 0.09 12.00 +.26 1.31 +.04 4.23 +.14 0.05 23.29 +.25 1.73 +.04 1.76 50.75 +.48 0.70 46.40 -.20 0.42 6.84 +.06 3.05 +.15 1.59 0.72 19.79 +.84 0.75 44.19 +.67 9.32 +.20 6.50 +.02 2.69 +.05 21.07 +.76 39.57 +.68 3.19 +.06 0.15 11.26 +.33 0.04 23.81 +.89 0.52 46.43 +.67 3.67 +.08 19.50 +.32 3.27 +.09 1.67 +.01 6.24 +1.34 0.52 22.67 +.17 34.96 -.51 2.01 +.09 0.36 27.47 +.34 0.25 6.28 -.65 0.24 45.88 +.35 4.01 +.08 3.61 +.02 9.72 +.17 0.08 4.97 +.05 7.21 +.02 3.60 30.56 +.57 7.10 +.34 14.00 +.10 30.45 -.17 1.17 +.07 0.04 31.24 +.74 87.05 +3.63 7.16 +.20 4.39 +.03 37.23 +.59 0.18 63.77 +.15 0.11 62.67 +1.28 1.96 78.03 -.03 5.61 +.18 0.40 12.31 +.22 0.88 63.68 +.12 5.34 -.05 0.20 31.50 -3.25 39.63 +6.45 1.11 -.03 2.09 +.03 42.02 -.22 0.86 8.24 -.10 0.56 46.49 +1.25 0.34 28.30 -.38 3.24 +.11 0.12 13.72 +.15 3.95 156.90 +.99 1.40 73.91 +1.89 54.85 +.45 17.93 +1.37 13.37 +.16 0.60 21.49 -.04 0.72 53.76 +.83 0.20 61.98 +1.03 75.63 +.87 5.35 +.12 3.16 48.21 -2.96 1.20 14.50 -.11 0.48 8.10 1.77 32.09 +.60 1.58 34.14 +.32 80.81 +.67 3.99 +.18 17.82 +.94 7.99 -.08 20.55 -.49 0.80 33.27 -.50 17.58 +.51 17.70 47.78 -2.16 6.95 -.37 1.44 9.00 +.09 .60 +.01 0.20 25.96 +.23 1.40 21.18 +.16 0.07 5.78 -.03 24.63 +.19 4.14 97.86 +2.30 2.19 +.19 141.73 +2.38 1.67 -.05 32.23 +.96 59.46 +1.57 1.54 26.36 -.11 36.35 +.70 1.22 51.13 +.74 11.74 +.82 1.35 29.10 +.30 5.70 27.97 +.34 6.45 +.45 0.40 16.98 -.13 1.68 33.84 +.32 0.08 10.84 +.14 0.72 47.60 +1.52 0.55 30.00 +.40 0.56 25.33 +.26 40.23 +.72 .94 +.33 3.18 +.03 18.36 +.44 7.10 +.17 4.15 +.03 0.12 17.39 -.77 30.67 +1.14 41.05 +.26 0.84 21.69 +.45 24.91 +.28 10.27 +.38 0.72 48.10 +1.63 0.32 31.36 +.57 0.24 44.07 +.49 58.59 +.41 7.89 0.06 46.73 +.37 21.52 +1.19 0.36 67.33 -2.87 5.10 +.05 0.80 30.85 +.60 19.53 +1.53 1.08 0.17 41.63 +.59 0.53 48.15 +1.07 53.70 +.86 23.04 +.36 2.69 17.18 +.22 1.71 +.03 46.04 +1.11 1.56 1.23 +.09 1.08 6.82 +.01 0.60 44.00 +.68 12.52 +.06 0.60 102.92 -3.66 0.40 23.13 +1.30 0.33 14.21 +.57 .33 +.00 57.73 -3.77 1.12 12.49 -.01 268.64 +7.04 1.45 +.17 0.60 30.87 +.34 0.28 14.26 +.21 10.58 +.04 0.60 43.72 +.77 0.58 18.41 -.05 6.75 +.26 .73 -.02 0.75 40.14 -.81 76.09 +.32 0.40 27.46 -.02 0.60 28.12 +.11 23.87 -.24 26.18 +.82 3.17 +.09 37.14 -.07 1.40 16.40 +.47 3.62 +.06 14.83 +.37 0.12 31.54 +2.06 0.11 11.71 +.39 3.80 +.10 12.58 +.14 31.80 +.66 1.55 +.08 4.50 -.08 0.24 22.98 -.14 13.27 +.19 15.91 +1.03 16.79 +2.82 9.37 +.16 0.30 63.27 +2.18 30.42 +.66 0.60 27.54 -.77 4.59 +.26 0.04 14.58 +.27 0.60 36.36 +2.67 0.18 22.10 +.02 0.52 16.60 -.04 2.30 44.34 +.66 35.35 +.83 41.39 +.29 56.71 +.23 36.26 +.48 14.39 +.13 5.74 +.15 1.34 29.79 +.03 36.67 -.16 3.93 -.13 5.48 -.05 .74 -.09

Nm AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv Autoliv pfC AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BWAY Baidu Inc BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BankFla BkGranite BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BiPNG Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante Biovail BlkRKelso Blckbaud BlackRock BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR Blockbst h BlckbsB h BlueCoat BluDolp BdwlkPpl Boeing BofI Hld Boise Inc Boise wt BonTon BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrinksHSec BrMySq BristowGp BritATob Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp h Brunswick BrshEMat BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BldBear BungeLt BurgerKing C&D Tch CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNOOC CNX Gas CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CdnSEn g CapellaEd CapOne CapProd CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapitolBcp Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardiacSci CardnlHlt s Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CascadeB h Caseys CashAm Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CedarSh CelSci

D 20.53 +.24 34.67 +.54 55.43 +1.88 2.00 74.19 +2.45 1.36 44.39 +.25 185.64 +5.38 35.99 +.75 21.40 +.39 3.57 106.65 +7.48 3.39 +.30 0.80 40.40 +.13 15.80 +.42 1.00 21.95 +.37 33.49 +.88 0.88 32.67 +.03 2.45 +.10 0.84 31.28 +.18 0.68 10.50 +.20 0.60 33.52 +.82 1.74 30.66 +.34 30.61 +1.28 1.66 75.60 -.09 1.66 63.85 +.43 24.88 +.48 38.73 +.35 1.01 +.02 40.03 +.40 3.36 52.56 -4.78 6.84 +.02 1.50 43.07 +2.16 0.06 13.21 +.39 1.75 +.09 19.92 -.10 709.87+88.49 0.60 51.42 +.18 0.68 40.39 +.61 0.40 53.82 -.95 2.45 -.03 46.03 +1.73 14.06 -.09 1.34 46.93 +1.14 0.59 13.16 +.32 0.76 18.60 +.60 0.82 12.33 +.34 0.20 11.50 +.61 0.88 22.16 +.49 0.04 18.30 +.52 10.58 +.11 4.07 +.13 1.06 +.06 1.88 -.25 1.80 53.14 +1.17 9.47 +.58 2.80 63.25 +.77 0.36 31.97 +.73 1.96 51.34 +.99 2.76 -.07 0.04 5.73 -.10 27.08 +.74 67.77 +1.11 9.73 -.75 0.16 22.33 +.85 69.76 -.54 19.58 -.81 0.68 87.55 +1.06 1.00 23.22 +1.19 0.32 20.80 +.37 0.40 42.87 +.70 10.40 +.44 1.16 48.22 +.33 .44 +.00 22.81 +.70 6.59 +.46 0.10 8.64 -.16 0.72 63.30 +4.74 1.48 76.60 -.10 47.09 +.98 0.20 29.77 -.21 9.00 +.16 0.92 31.38 +.56 22.19 -.21 0.24 27.32 +.07 78.09 +.92 0.30 30.97 +.12 0.56 47.68 +1.18 39.03 +.15 34.20 +.06 8.29 +.30 53.31 +1.19 23.36 +.56 0.56 19.34 +.67 .46 -.01 2.25 +.13 0.36 16.95 +.35 1.28 10.92 +.14 0.44 23.94 +.89 4.00 190.39 +5.95 2.28 20.36 +.31 1.82 11.16 +.08 1.20 14.55 +.34 0.60 18.91 +.57 .40 -.02 .36 -.02 33.87 +.62 .40 +.05 2.02 29.09 -.16 1.68 73.79 +1.42 17.97 +.82 7.30 +.15 .92 +.03 18.17 -.03 2.94 2.67 -.09 44.07 +4.12 0.04 8.74 +.68 2.00 83.39 +4.59 6.96 -.03 13.23 +.98 0.60 13.23 +.33 0.97 18.89 +.52 0.02 14.19 +.37 1.50 15.51 +.46 25.25 -.40 0.44 24.04 +1.05 19.40 +.89 8.34 +.21 0.56 19.28 +.38 0.40 26.76 -1.50 42.17 -.20 1.28 25.37 +1.03 38.96 +.63 3.07 64.59 +.29 0.32 35.76 +.35 4.38 +.04 0.56 23.86 +.32 4.09 +.05 6.64 +.10 22.00 +.96 0.52 26.28 +.88 0.56 16.21 +.42 0.34 11.24 +.38 10.03 +.27 0.31 20.25 +.44 0.28 19.37 +.90 15.25 +.09 0.05 22.69 +4.87 29.31 +1.78 15.17 +1.06 0.80 38.94 +.36 0.10 65.04 +.15 0.42 33.10 +.35 42.56 +.26 9.00 +.73 0.84 53.50 -3.78 0.25 21.42 +.73 1.52 0.16 23.42 +.15 17.58 +.34 0.80 15.07 +1.04 0.20 16.46 +.38 2.66 -.09 0.40 84.88 +1.00 1.00 61.15 +.59 0.04 33.81 +.71 40.77 -.01 0.24 12.41 +.06 4.60 331.50 +1.19 0.60 16.31 -.04 28.43 +.96 30.79 +.57 5.16 176.25 +.66 38.27 +.03 0.96 57.28 +1.40 0.26 18.36 +.04 0.34 11.35 +.17 0.35 37.26 +.15 18.85 +.62 0.40 27.45 +1.00 0.72 33.65 +1.61 0.12 35.75 -2.46 47.93 -2.58 7.65 +.50 6.88 -.70 0.63 9.29 +.12 16.67 +.04 0.04 10.05 +.50 6.44 -.27 13.71 +.55 4.45 +.26 1.80 50.00 +3.29 0.28 24.68 -.24 38.70 -5.77 1.10 35.72 +.34 1.08 62.16 +1.47 0.60 77.28 +1.78 0.99 60.35 +.79 18.31 +.55 .59 -.02 94.03 -3.55 0.20 44.87 +1.00 0.90 8.96 -.09 2.65 +.20 0.04 6.04 +.24 2.68 +.03 0.24 6.28 +.48 2.18 11.39 -.25 1.23 -.03 0.72 73.78 -2.25 1.63 +.07 0.70 35.65 -.64 8.52 +.09 9.88 +.71 .58 +.01 13.61 +.19 27.49 +.31 29.28 -4.13 0.64 38.87 -.53 25.39 +.68 0.40 43.16 +1.57 0.72 40.48 +.78 22.17 -.14 33.44 +1.14 .85 -.14 0.34 38.99 +.17 0.14 38.40 -1.60 1.68 70.75 +1.78 0.04 12.51 -1.24 28.86 +.21 15.17 +.28 0.36 8.29 +.41 .67 +.03

Nm Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf s CenovusE n Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Ceradyne CeragonN Cerner CerusCp Changyou CharlsColv ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaArch ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChiElMot n ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaInfra ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNG n ChNEPet n ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTel ChinaUni ChiValve n ChinaYuch ChinaCEd ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC Clarient h ClaudeR g ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH ClearChOut ClearwPpr Clearwire Clearw rt ClickSft CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs CogdSpen Cogent CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh CompSci Compuwre CmstkHme ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes Conexant Conmed ConocPhil Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgan Convio n Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Cosi Inc CostPlus Costco CousPrp Covance CovantaH Covenant CoventryH Covidien CredSuiss Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp n CytRx Cytec Cytokinet Cytomed Cytori DARABio h DCT Indl DDi Corp DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DBGoldDL

D 0.20 33.63 +.77 7.50 +.40 10.29 +.11 61.62 +1.99 .63 +.04 3.09 30.51 -.51 7.78 +.56 0.40 12.22 +.34 0.86 18.50 +.32 0.80 29.83 +1.42 23.93 -.03 6.30 +.36 0.78 14.39 +.05 0.03 17.78 +.12 1.56 14.48 +.20 36.25 +.59 35.32 +.12 0.01 14.83 +.18 2.53 -.51 14.32 +.17 2.90 34.10 +.34 8.98 +.26 64.85 +.72 23.03 -.11 10.24 -.30 87.50 -2.76 3.71 +.36 33.44 +1.95 2.31 -.01 34.28 +.09 5.81 +.31 23.97 -.86 35.79 +.14 23.46 +.46 28.09 +.63 4.44 +.04 0.30 23.61 -.11 2.88 82.29 +1.67 24.17 +.60 0.16 15.33 +.21 48.34 +.45 0.54 4.18 +.10 17.25 +.13 1.21 +.04 5.81 -.27 22.16 +.43 2.04 +.04 9.44 +.13 .62 +.04 6.39 +.10 1.66 -.19 1.54 67.80 +.88 13.16 +.31 1.81 49.29 -.56 9.37 +.37 8.80 +.26 2.64 80.87 -.12 2.06 -.01 6.16 +.14 4.53 +.43 1.10 44.92 -1.99 0.23 12.19 -.19 10.76 -.05 0.35 20.83 +1.41 6.81 -.29 1.86 +.36 139.13 +3.86 15.87 +.13 1.48 53.19 +.38 1.42 19.53 +.08 0.56 68.80 +.16 4.26 +.30 18.30 +.16 0.32 67.13 +.26 3.46 +.06 1.58 29.13 -.04 0.72 18.75 +.36 0.48 27.64 +.14 13.39 +.94 27.53 +.49 2.13 26.07 +.07 4.56 +.11 7.50 135.01 +2.95 1.32 +.10 47.78 +.05 0.40 58.13 +.64 2.74 +.03 1.33 +.03 8.68 +.47 18.63 +.02 62.21 +4.12 12.02 +.46 62.64 +7.53 7.70 -.09 .21 -.02 6.87 +.11 0.35 64.33 -5.88 2.00 64.75 +.68 16.34 +.35 0.60 43.11 +.76 11.98 -1.01 0.36 28.25 +.26 1.76 53.74 +.38 17.82 +.55 0.40 8.07 +.14 10.42 +.04 52.05 +1.07 0.37 7.84 +.26 38.21 +1.14 7.50 -.12 2.12 84.80 -.20 24.89 0.60 16.48 +1.73 0.04 23.28 +1.26 1.33 +.01 0.38 20.00 +1.19 0.38 18.92 +1.09 0.20 41.91 +.45 0.48 14.93 -.09 31.64 +.91 41.51 +1.26 0.67 66.80 +.72 1.36 15.16 +.31 1.56 76.67 +.92 13.08 +.09 15.33 +.23 .94 -.01 53.73 +.24 8.75 +.21 2.87 +.26 32.45 -.45 0.40 39.84 +1.79 0.80 24.67 +.16 19.08 +.45 54.70 +.73 3.30 +.14 23.33 -1.23 2.20 59.10 +.55 6.11 +.16 0.40 44.96 +.86 2.38 45.21 +.04 18.55 +.36 0.96 37.56 +.96 22.70 +.53 47.86 +1.50 3.45 -.09 13.07 +.25 1.19 +.07 10.24 1.08 50.58 +1.04 0.42 22.13 +.63 0.37 57.35 +.49 2.30 26.06 +1.11 35.59 +.48 15.98 -.93 0.56 36.63 +.10 0.20 19.94 -.13 1.57 41.55 -.19 21.08 +.12 10.58 +.31 1.26 +.03 5.27 +.17 0.84 59.35 +.50 0.13 8.20 +.20 58.43 -2.07 17.46 +.36 7.18 +.12 24.88 +1.53 0.72 48.24 +.68 1.85 46.95 +.43 76.00 +.01 10.23 +.06 .19 -.00 38.34 +.82 26.72 -.32 37.52 -.40 23.06 +.39 1.80 59.62 +1.68 0.70 75.79 +1.98 3.34 +.10 132.07 +.44 25.77 -.07 2.33 +.01 36.28 +1.03 13.58 +.08 2.20 12.98 +.13 1.16 +.07 0.05 50.14 +1.69 3.17 -.03 .88 +.16 5.69 +.26 .43 -.00 0.28 5.36 +.20 7.19 +.89 36.62 +1.11 4.67 +.07 1.21 28.10 +.21 0.15 14.24 +.62 0.60 43.20 +.09 31.55 +.75 2.12 48.07 -.22 51.59 +1.75 13.45 +.91 0.16 85.01 +1.50 1.00 46.10 +.32 9.61 +.26 63.96 +.42 .32 -.01 0.20 63.51 -3.19 16.00 -.39 15.80 +.31 3.38 -.69 149.10 +1.87 1.12 60.61 +1.03 .36 +.01 0.20 15.35 +.27 16.18 +.33 16.65 +.14 0.40 28.44 +.77 12.11 -.07 1.58 -.01 1.00 22.20 +.76 6.64 +.24 18.42 +.38 50.18+10.56 1.64 -.04 3.49 -.04 0.20 37.96 +1.19 3.84 +.24 0.70 71.33 +1.64 29.73 -.04

Nm

D

DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold Digirad DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity DirecTV A DirxTcBull DirxTcBear DirxEMBull DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DirFBull rs DirREBear DirREBull DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuneEn rs DyaxCp Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy

1.05 11.96 +.31 0.08 12.69 +.55 0.64 67.35 -.10 30.64 +.28 11.31 +.36 2.36 69.03 +1.82 0.50 82.74 -1.70 0.03 11.64 +.47 15.52 -.14 30.14 +1.27 1.08 33.28 +.20 2.23 +.13 1.92 60.21 +1.94 31.28 +.81 0.16 29.98 +.62 43.00 -.54 36.54 +.83 28.11 175.81 +5.10 6.89 -.19 23.09 134.02 +6.50 40.98 -2.25 11.42 -.83 0.46 108.51 +6.59 0.04 6.27 -.98 12.32 237.80+28.42 5.44 -.37 4.85 69.53 +4.08 12.46 -.50 8.22 65.76 +2.39 8.60 -.08 5.18 45.61 +.21 0.08 16.04 +.60 37.50 +1.25 32.19 +1.19 .51 -.02 2.00 22.23 +.50 0.35 37.22 +.93 8.84 +.99 0.13 28.34 +.52 62.52 +.64 11.45 29.13 +.12 44.80 +1.65 62.24 +1.41 1.83 41.30 -.12 15.78 +.43 76.40 +3.22 0.48 45.93 +.37 1.04 21.80 +.47 5.76 -.71 0.40 17.75 +.72 1.04 52.85 +.81 0.60 31.82 -.01 0.60 34.35 +.84 8.72 +.15 40.67 -.71 28.70 -.15 34.92 +1.00 65.62 +2.03 5.94 +.01 1.64 40.57 +1.11 0.32 22.48 +.62 0.96 16.53 -.11 0.68 13.99 +.79 1.40 77.20 -.12 .32 +.08 3.61 +.03 1.58 +.01 17.25 -.01 1.32 -.01

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0.25 17.08 +.53 1.74 -.10 24.24 +.25 13.96 -.28 19.63 +.08 29.50 +1.22 2.84 45.06 +.70 0.62 111.26 +1.84 0.88 43.79 -.67 18.97 +2.37 5.68 +.07 0.40 32.13 +1.43 0.64 9.23 +.32 0.04 19.86 -.05 1.76 68.60 +.49 6.94 -1.41 2.00 79.01 +1.90 0.64 35.42 +1.31 1.23 14.36 +.07 1.62 13.69 +.25 1.53 12.38 +.10 16.76 +.65 21.00 +.72 0.62 49.00 +1.54 1.26 33.72 +.33 0.20 7.20 +.40 105.50 +.99 0.04 12.09 +.09 6.83 +.10 15.32 +.47 19.80 +.17 .28 -.03 0.72 24.19 +.81 1.45 +.12 53.85 -.40 1.34 53.21 +.74 2.33 +.02 12.27 +.11 3.96 51.05 +.62 0.80 32.78 +.39 23.90 +1.70 3.58 -.20 1.69 +.10 3.80 +.07 23.00 -.05 4.26 +.06 0.52 48.71 -.26 61.83 +1.16 7.43 +.31 1.20 +.03 6.17 +.04 3.58 48.93 +.67 18.81 -.66 0.10 7.35 +.11 2.16 24.36 +.15 0.68 19.86 +.14 26.95 +.40 0.14 48.63 -1.30 6.37 +.24 3.32 80.55 +.60 2.27 35.70 +.22 2.60 46.46 +2.45 .69 +.06 5.73 +.46 10.81 +.31 9.39 -1.21 0.16 33.53 -1.73 101.35 +1.25 1.35 47.16 +3.24 0.28 11.62 +.09 0.32 31.52 +.50 4.13 109.76 +5.76 0.55 66.21 -.39 57.66 +2.84 0.20 21.12 -.38 .68 -.41 16.20 -.30 1.92 78.19 -2.67 .24 -.01 1.13 -.01 4.54 +.05 7.07 +.07 0.12 18.80 -.01 5.90 +.04 2.10 43.26 -.12 7.82 +.05 6.22 +.11 0.28 24.51 +1.01 0.38 40.68 +.91 102.89 +1.21 29.30 +.17 0.23 15.16 +.94 3.58 1.76 68.66 -.53 22.54 +.15 70.39 +.82 4.69 +.19 31.04 +.43 0.50 65.07 +.99 73.32 +5.88 0.48 9.69 +.52 2.00 50.69 -.06 4.07 -.05 41.30 +.28 0.80 74.93 -.05 0.08 22.07 -2.15 11.93 +.11 0.62 39.94 +.72 1.26 +.02 1.41 -.03 0.80 56.04 +1.49 0.44 92.58 +1.74 0.20 22.59 +1.22 2.64 78.80 +2.63 0.24 10.19 +.60 0.96 24.66 +.41 8.55 +.59 11.25 -.20 20.50 +.24 0.72 15.53 -.03 0.20 26.73 +.39 1.20 12.93 +.13 0.04 14.87 +.43 15.73 +.44 0.16 17.12 +.24 0.88 35.04 -1.62 2.18 -.08 0.04 6.87 +.30 0.80 14.53 +.46 8.38 +.52 3.66 +.25 1.79 -.20 0.04 15.73 +.17 0.56 14.15 +.08 150.87+22.74 .71 -.11 0.08 18.49 -.18 2.20 37.40 -.06 0.64 24.24 +.88 54.69 +.66 .66 -.02 8.08 +.17 2.07 +.10 0.70 26.27 +.31 1.16 118.91 +2.54 0.50 55.13 +1.93 16.96 -.10 0.32 47.22 +1.13 0.60 16.32 +.39 5.57 +.09 13.58 +.33 5.63 +.25 3.25 49.45 +.80 1.90 23.93 -.07 15.85 +.55 27.21 +.28 28.77 -.29 15.71 +.02 17.80 +.98

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D 5.15 +.13 0.76 54.00 +.34 40.63 +.50 31.34 +.67 1.97 21.70 -.06 0.88 118.34 +4.14 0.76 15.44 +.42 1.54 +.05 1.31 +.06 1.37 +.07 1.64 +.19 0.16 14.25 +.26 1.20 77.72 +1.23 .15 +.00 21.77 +.50 6.08 +.14 1.00 8.07 +.18 4.60 +.20 14.62 +.33 0.90 35.25 +1.15 32.33 +.83 2.81 -.02 0.28 24.56 +.64 0.12 11.05 +.10 11.00 +.44 9.30 +.56 1.12 34.10 +.45 0.20 6.26 +.40 3.34 +.08 8.09 -.32 28.34 +.26 6.73 +.72 5.82 +.30 0.44 5.35 +.08 1.68 18.28 +.09 0.14 13.85 +.33 1.28 26.56 +.75 24.99 +.27 7.28 0.16 17.50 +.10 0.40 25.63 +.42 0.20 52.00 +.96 1.50 38.74 +.49 24.55 +.46 .44 -.01 34.35 +1.01 48.58 +1.41 23.85 -.13 6.51 +.30 29.53 +.98 1.68 77.96 +.98 0.40 19.49 +.54 15.94 +.22 0.50 7.72 -.38 1.96 71.19 +.89 3.93 +.36 .45 +.01 41.05 +3.35 38.66 +.96 0.18 17.08 -.45 0.44 22.01 +.59 1.64 43.24 +.62 .69 +.01 18.09 +.69 53.99 +.99 21.59 +.12 1.38 +.09 20.83 -.09 7.63 +.07 0.16 16.77 +.38 5.96 +.21 15.65 +.20 3.03 +.02 29.48 +.05 40.40 -.28 0.52 18.50 +.84 1.94 37.50 +.22 0.40 6.70 +.29 15.16 -1.61 11.85 +.31 6.79 +.04 0.08 44.28 -.14 15.23 +.23 1.86 +.29 12.74 +.60 0.40 13.13 +.47 0.17 13.26 -.02 0.18 42.86 +.22 4.48 +.12 1.40 160.24 +3.23 1.08 75.96 +2.17 16.81 -.85 14.31 +.49 532.00 +2.81 29.75 +.82 0.80 35.75 +1.16 17.26 +3.79 2.16 111.38 +2.95 3.21 +.17 6.26 +.13 24.85 -.11 0.52 34.06 +1.08 3.94 -.05 8.31 +.18 1.90 +.08 0.07 5.65 +.29 0.83 19.13 +.07 23.17 -.30 0.08 11.69 +.04 77.53 -9.38 14.29 -.51 1.80 88.63 +4.37 14.56 +.60 33.90 +.39 1.95 -.04 1.19 20.68 +.48 0.64 47.94 +.42 32.96 +.97 0.05 1.01 -.01 51.02 +.18 0.54 27.02 +.24 1.86 32.89 +1.09 0.48 8.08 +.30 1.70 51.74 +.87 32.72 +.95 59.30 +1.33 20.00 +.62 0.36 31.60 -1.75 9.00 +.24 2.25 -.09 29.41 +.42 19.31 +.43 3.16 +.04 2.62 +.21 44.41 +1.59 22.28 +.53 .58 +.05 0.40 35.00 +.83 39.98-11.34 7.07 +.17 0.06 9.64 -.06 0.88 54.41 +4.62 0.82 32.64 -.99 0.30 14.31 +.70 0.20 29.64 +.72 1.81 27.24 +.53 1.00 39.32 +.54 4.65 27.05 +.30 1.24 23.63 +.01 7.10 +.06 6.21 +.35 2.72 45.78 +1.16 9.39 +.07 1.20 24.89 +.58 23.09 +.54 21.07 +.56 18.79 +1.72 0.08 16.75 +.29 6.17 +.03 1.03 -.02 5.98 -.08 1.68 46.94 +1.18 15.39 -.73 0.53 5.80 0.20 41.50 -1.12 .78 +.02 61.95 +.41 0.80 48.34 +1.03 4.27 -.14 0.20 5.83 +.22 1.28 47.22 +.34 14.75 +.53 0.40 64.32 +.65 41.44 +.40 0.32 52.88 -.40 16.25 +.43 29.39 +1.18 1.70 33.43 +.89 0.41 32.76 +.90 11.87 -.12 2.79 +.17 0.60 26.72 +1.04 11.35 -.20 17.76 -.26 0.95 35.56 +.37 35.33 +.43

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22.77 +.17 0.06 17.38 +.06 0.46 42.42 +1.00 1.50 -.09 66.26 +.60 10.12 +1.19 0.50 19.90 +.15 0.54 8.10 +.18 9.00 +.13 1.84 20.53 -.37 2.13 23.64 -.30 0.31 6.10 +.01 6.35 +.58 0.48 1.39 +.01 20.22 +5.00 31.91 +.36 0.66 23.96 +.21 2.72 73.20 +2.19 0.33 28.62 +.51 1.05 34.32 +.69 0.63 23.84 +.43 0.55 21.47 +.27 0.38 15.95 +.07 0.14 10.42 +.12 0.32 52.40 +.67 0.24 12.09 +.17 0.70 53.72 +.73 0.33 12.18 +.19 1.43 43.24 +.46 2.08 59.99 +.75 0.50 26.98 +.87 0.21 12.96 +.09 0.42 16.26 +.20 18.14 +.39 1.04 55.03 +.65 1.65 47.91 +.58 4.09 105.72 +.55 0.55 40.98 +.08 0.95 85.83 +1.81 2.22 121.23 +1.47 3.93 104.44 +.04 0.58 42.56 +.69 5.59 106.87 +.27 0.82 37.97 +.72 0.82 61.69 +.56 0.36 36.65 +.21 0.75 48.31 +1.13 1.20 58.50 +.83 3.68 91.08 +.38 3.82 90.17 +.15 1.48 83.44 +.02 1.44 55.10 +.84 0.72 42.96 +.77 0.39 51.20 +.82 1.22 94.57 +1.49 0.93 83.90 +1.28 8.02 89.11 +.61 91.87 +2.36 1.93 63.40 +2.79 0.56 64.35 +1.03 1.22 63.71 +.84 0.69 53.39 +.55 1.06 66.89 +.88 1.00 70.41 +1.58 3.74 104.38 -.01 0.42 78.51 +1.42 0.75 73.81 +1.53 2.84 38.66 +.14 1.12 71.63 +.92 1.86 54.66 +2.17 0.09 15.41 +.48 0.68 59.60 +1.32 0.48 35.04 -.05 0.54 65.13 +1.52 1.31 59.55 +.40 0.75 59.27 +1.05 0.79 65.40 +.64 0.32 48.36 +.12 0.24 56.91 -.09 1.00 37.41 +.68 0.84 70.80 +1.93 0.30 66.51 +1.44 6.50 +.80 1.00 57.97 +1.54 103.36 -7.34 1.57 -.16 29.45 +.11 18.60 +.27 4.55 +.06 0.60 34.62 +.56 1.24 52.28 +1.06 42.52 +4.88 19.72 -.58 21.44 +.07 9.90 +.32 3.66 +.10 18.33 +.52 13.68 +.45 1.15 -.13 1.82 -.05 9.75 +.03 25.64 -.02 0.56 61.01 +.65 0.28 37.26 +.71 18.55 +.37 0.57 9.75 +.39 6.02 -.04 1.38 +.01 25.46 +1.15 1.10 +.03 7.02 +.26 14.22 +.24 1.35 +.21 6.99 +.13 12.64 -.53 2.72 50.30 +.37 0.63 23.49 +.23 17.02 +.52 118.82 +2.37 0.41 17.68 +1.33 27.49 -.86 0.01 13.00 +.84 13.52 -.13 45.02 +1.92 5.88 +.18 0.34 24.92 +.52 2.60 130.46 +.36 5.37 +.10 1.00 51.31 +.97 0.24 21.49 +.76 0.50 28.00 +.82 25.10 +.58 68.81 +.02 9.50 +.23 0.48 15.70 +.03 3.56 -.16 26.20 +.11 36.17 +.39 368.38 +8.29 40.03 +1.07 0.41 23.66 +2.05 2.44 20.84 +.29 17.41 +.23 0.69 8.98 +.17 0.25 25.80 -2.20 .35 -.02 13.29 +.19 11.02 +.37 0.55 21.71 +.65 81.15 +5.18 3.18 -.06 16.40 -.04 10.81 +.47 48.30 +.98 6.26 +.54 30.06 -.32 13.51 +.36 0.20 44.00 +.54 1.68 24.28 +.16 0.28 16.22 +.18

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D 0.38 25.79 +.18 24.04 +.55 1.76 +.09 49.97 +1.59 10.74 +.08 15.97 +.65 3.55 -.01 17.74 +.39 0.04 14.56 +.82 0.33 33.51 +.32 2.18 -.02 10.50 +.66 0.30 26.30 +.95 5.68 -.09 0.14 17.12 +.99 2.56 +.13 0.28 18.68 +.48 2.16 65.01 +.39 0.52 34.52 +1.40 0.20 23.12 +.55 0.20 81.28 +.77 1.16 +.06 64.43 +2.92 0.70 61.48 +.56 29.36 +.35 9.15 -.16 49.47 +.95 0.25 18.88 +.67 0.20 23.20 -.75 14.72 +.46 0.28 9.00 +.25 0.60 34.69 +1.09 21.50 +.68 1.58 +.02 0.96 40.14 +1.05 41.41 +2.00 13.39 +.79 0.05 8.63 +.95 1.50 55.01 +2.43 0.48 33.65 +1.43 4.92 +.69 10.80 +.14 0.04 8.96 +.25 1.40 36.10 +.62 2.64 61.28 +.26 0.64 16.29 +.80 4.28 67.35 +.49 44.68 +.24 9.85 -.03 0.10 18.86 -.12 43.24 +1.86 0.24 5.79 +.38 15.57 +.46 0.20 21.72 +.48 0.08 14.00 3.81 +.16 56.56 +.14 4.50 +.14 15.06 +.13 16.72 -.21 1.16 29.91 +.16 3.87 +.11 0.38 22.50 -.59 8.82 +.17 11.02 -.30 8.99 +.14 1.60 95.43 +1.51 8.12 +.50 21.05 +.59 34.88 -1.37 21.18 -.02 6.29 -.10 3.60 +.11 14.01 +.07 1.59 +.05 78.83 +.70 4.88 +.02 1.59 +.22 42.44 +.98 38.00 +1.31 0.18 45.77 +1.17 26.05 +.90 0.04 28.01 +1.36 5.69 -.06 7.97 +.26 0.50 39.23 18.50 +.35 7.10 +.27 81.53 +1.56 0.16 32.32 +1.86 1.04 24.77 +.38 0.40 38.22 +.53 0.16 20.52 +1.17 0.60 46.32 +.51 25.90 +.73 1.53 -.05 1.54 +.03 0.40 7.51 +.37 38.80 -.22 10.05 -.02 1.59 +.04 0.29 4.91 +.07 27.64 +.54 27.25 +.46 15.81 +.51 45.24 +1.43 1.90 34.30 +.94 55.54 +1.83 37.61 +1.55 39.27 +1.54 1.89 +.01 0.60 35.90 -.46 1.96 35.04 +.28 4.00 +.18 0.60 27.55 +.40 47.70 -.10 25.18 -.08 0.04 31.52 +.62 0.92 30.89 +.46 2.52 26.93 +.42 5.59 +.18 7.00 +.13 0.20 8.43 +.56 16.18 +.24 9.18 +.54 1.43 4.22 +.09 8.62 -.12 2.52 86.37 +1.41 6.84 +.23 0.25 37.82 +.56 16.72 -.63 22.88 +2.86 4.00 78.57 +.74 12.41 +.78 0.36 27.40 +.37 1.44 97.17 +4.44 1.88 +.15 39.84 +.15 31.23 +.49 16.69 +.39

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MI Homes MIPS Tech MKS Inst MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MSG n MagelPt Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr ManTech Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls

2.80 89.44 +4.01 0.04 25.36 +.31 10.19 +.23 6.84 +.12 1.00 38.24 +1.00 8.99 -.01 0.63 22.52 +.10 15.94 +.67 9.55 +.48 0.96 7.24 -.03 0.58 6.58 -.08 10.94 +.69 16.46 +.66 15.87 +.62 5.24 +.06 23.48 +.28 35.46 +.05 0.24 45.61 +2.09 1.80 36.40 +.69 0.20 24.68 +.65 21.00 +.05 2.15 3.69 +.02 66.80 +2.24 4.44 -.07 3.92 +.20 45.63 -3.74 0.08 14.37 +.71 7.00 +.11 0.74 57.63 +.50 0.52 18.52 +.30 1.00 32.40 +.19 12.30 +.90 24.85 -.85 0.11 50.31 +.61 0.98 65.53 +.35 0.08 34.60 +.49 29.00 +.28 0.42 43.26 +.58 0.31 38.24 -.09 2.56 30.93 +.32 0.16 37.67 +1.78 0.80 24.79 +.72 0.04 9.37 +.34

Nm Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg MaxLine n Maxygen McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio MeridRs h Meritage Metabolix Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MettlerT Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft MicroStr Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MdwstBc h MillerHer Millicom Millipore MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed MineSaf Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MobileTel Mohawk MolecInsP Molex MolexA MolsCoorB MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCR Corp NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NatInstru h NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed NavigCons NaviosAc wt Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NtScout NetwkEng Neuralstem NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewMarket NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMed NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive

D 22.34 +.79 6.84 +.26 1.60 96.38 +2.95 21.82 +.22 0.30 16.84 +.39 2.00 23.79 +.36 0.24 41.16 -.28 12.87 +.16 0.60 255.38 +2.38 0.75 23.65 +.41 4.81 -.11 0.80 20.75 +.42 16.98 -.08 6.60 +.18 5.75 +.19 1.04 39.77 +.69 28.28 +.30 2.20 71.52 +1.18 0.94 34.12 +.90 0.48 66.48 +.23 13.06 -.33 39.53 -.39 0.90 53.58 +3.16 0.92 27.73 +.65 26.13 -.06 60.70 +.16 7.20 +.16 0.80 10.50 +.31 7.92 +.05 0.24 25.93 +.83 32.19 +1.39 11.39 +.10 57.33 +2.29 0.82 43.84 +.50 4.84 +.19 0.36 25.69 +.37 9.34 +.34 51.56 +.83 5.67 +.20 1.52 35.25 +.69 0.92 37.05 +.79 0.76 19.88 +.37 .29 -.01 24.82 +2.12 12.78 -.64 6.65 +.26 1.05 -.02 0.62 23.00 -.25 0.74 45.62 +1.71 7.79 +.25 119.83 +1.41 0.14 12.12 +.01 1.36 30.34 +.35 7.85 +.28 10.21 -.03 34.47 -.22 17.06 +.11 0.52 31.00 +.09 90.01 +1.33 3.44 +.01 2.46 56.13 +2.10 .70 +.04 .48 -.05 0.09 21.88 +.52 7.24 88.22 +2.60 106.24 +.07 1.25 -.01 0.20 38.54 -.03 10.71 +.07 0.96 29.70 -.27 10.13 +.08 11.71 -.12 5.35 +.11 55.90 -.26 63.65 +2.93 2.37 +.11 0.61 23.29 -.14 0.61 19.54 -.14 0.96 44.65 +1.78 3.20 +.02 24.91 +.56 1.06 62.25 -.89 17.89 +.54 0.36 16.97 -.02 0.42 25.22 -.39 0.20 31.31 +.98 1.10 15.90 +.07 8.74 +.21 0.20 51.51 -.44 7.16 +.24 2.34 +.05 0.07 5.72 +.14 1.00 60.69 -.26 21.77 +.06 1.75 23.85 +.22 5.72 +.10 40.35 +1.31 13.63 +.05 42.51 +3.46 3.28 +.07 7.00 +.10 23.79 +.23 0.44 12.61 +.04 1.20 33.11 +.55 21.72 +.28 0.14 25.18 +1.33 10.66 +.21 9.15 +.54 21.84 +.65 0.31 3.25 +.27 1.34 52.34 -.33 0.52 35.10 +.08 0.40 44.76 +.44 0.04 7.72 +.12 1.50 24.36 +.77 0.32 15.31 +.27 1.76 35.81 +.93 17.29 +1.59 13.25 +.09 1.40 +.15 0.24 7.05 +.02 1.66 18.83 -.59 49.50 +.54 14.41 +.36 16.56 -.15 11.81 +.29 34.90 +1.08 35.84 +.31 35.51 +.49 14.08 +.31 103.17 +3.78 3.16 +.01 15.00 -.09 3.17 +.27 2.97 +.16 25.71 +.28 17.45 +.02 2.96 -.04 .13 +.03 5.82 +.03 1.00 16.53 +.02 10.30 +.12 0.28 13.29 +.30 3.95 +.25 0.20 16.95 -.12 58.02 +.90 1.50 115.00 +5.76 0.40 55.80 +1.03 6.57 +.25 12.98 -.94 0.15 15.76 +.20 0.15 18.13 +.25 0.20 24.40 -.25 .50 +.02 .45 0.92 16.34 +.17 1.86 43.63 +.09 3.88 +.11 1.08 77.57 +1.13 16.10 0.20 41.06 -1.17 0.72 78.25 -.66 0.56 12.06 +.05 7.02 +.11 1.73 31.07 -.09 0.64 42.91 +.45 1.36 60.51 +1.34 4.82 +.17 1.03 27.57 +.24 16.36 +.02 1.12 55.65 +1.28 3.19 -.03 1.72 69.38 +.71 0.40 5.00 +.23 0.40 12.63 +.39 3.34 -.02 8.85 +.24 1.99 51.25 +.16 7.13 +.06 2.97 +.04 5.74 +.03 27.19 +.49 1.41 82.44 +3.41 1.60 36.87 -.25 0.50 31.88 +.50 41.91 +.55

D

NuanceCm 18.21 +.68 Nucor 1.44 45.66 +.65 NustarGP 1.74 30.15 +.10 NutriSyst 0.70 19.84 +.85 NvMSI&G2 0.75 8.47 +.09 Nvidia 16.65 +.49 OReillyA h 49.60 +3.26 OSI Phrm 58.77 +.52 OSI Sys 27.20 +.75 OcciPet 1.32 86.25 +1.35 Oceaneer 67.34 +1.09 OceanFrt h .75 -.01 Och-Ziff 0.72 17.60 +.12 Oclaro 2.81 +.23 OcwenFn 11.73 -.20 OdysseyHlt 21.29 +2.25 OfficeDpt 7.04 +.17 OfficeMax 18.20 +2.00 OilSvHT 1.81 127.83 -2.43 OilStates 48.79 -.31 Oilsands g .88 +.03 OldDomF h 37.01 +1.36 OldNBcp 0.28 13.92 +.45 OldRepub 0.69 15.29 +.12 Olin 0.80 21.56 -.08 OmegaHlt 1.28 20.70 +.64 OmniEnr 3.00 +.71 Omncre 0.09 28.66 +.21 Omnicom 0.80 43.13 +.96 OmniVisn 18.59 +.49 OnSmcnd 8.36 +.08 Oncothyr lf 3.92 +.17 1800Flowrs 3.10 +.08 ONEOK 1.76 49.20 +.34 OnyxPh 28.63 -1.59 OpnwvSy 2.35 -.37 optXprs 17.96 +.48 Oracle 0.20 25.97 +.11 OrbitalSci 19.04 +.39 Orbitz 6.89 +.02 Orexigen 6.67 +.20 OrientEH 14.06 +.18 OrientFn 0.16 16.17 +.80 OriginAg 9.12 +.12 Orthfx 34.86 +1.38 Orthovta 4.16 +.11 OshkoshCp 40.68 -1.74 OvShip 1.75 49.37 +1.43 OwensM s 0.71 32.39 +1.04 OwensCorn 34.59 +1.38 OwensIll 36.22 +.01 Oxigene 1.08 +.05 PDL Bio 1.00 6.53 +.01 PF Chng 0.17 45.36 +.11 PG&E Cp 1.82 43.53 +.06 PHH Corp 25.86 +.48 PLX Tch 5.55 +.08 PMC Sra 9.20 +.08 PMI Grp 5.67 +.34 PNC 0.40 66.06 +.59 PNM Res 0.50 13.58 +.24 POSCO 1.71 115.87 +.23 PPG 2.16 71.24 +1.32 PPL Corp 1.40 25.00 -.60 PSS Wrld 24.16 +.76 PVF Cap 2.15 -.16 Paccar 0.36 47.76 +1.32 PacerIntl 6.99 +.20 PacCapB 2.19 -1.92 PacEthan 1.10 -.04 PacRim .22 PacStBcp h .83 -.16 PacSunwr 5.32 +.06 PackAmer 0.60 25.25 +.47 Pactiv 25.97 +.07 PaetecHld 5.28 +.18 Palatin .31 -.01 PallCorp 0.64 39.75 +.21 Palm Inc 5.84 +1.21 PanASlv 0.05 26.58 +.42 PaneraBrd 79.58 -.39 Pantry 16.45 +1.12 ParPharm 27.49 +.56 ParagShip 0.20 4.78 -.05 ParamTch 19.32 +.20 ParaG&S 1.81 +.01 Parexel 25.16 +.69 ParkDrl 5.61 +.07 ParkerHan 1.04 71.23 +2.17 PartnerRe 2.00 78.69 -.39 PatriotCoal 20.61 -1.64 Patterson 0.40 32.63 +.38 PattUTI 0.20 15.47 +.39 Paychex 1.24 30.89 +.08 PeabdyE 0.28 48.12 -.14 Pegasys lf 0.12 31.76 +.40 Pengrth g 0.84 11.75 +.11 PnnNGm 31.40 +.52 PennVa 0.23 27.35 +.59 PennWst g 1.80 20.14 -.07 PennantPk 1.04 11.25 -.10 Penney 0.80 31.11 +.45 PenRE 0.60 16.29 +1.27 Penske 15.78 +.65 PensonWw 9.87 +.21 Pentair 0.76 37.14 +.72 PeopUtdF 0.62 15.57 -.04 PepBoy 0.12 13.00 +.71 PepcoHold 1.08 16.63 +.18 PepsiCo 1.92 65.20 +.45 PerfectWld 34.63 -.17 PerkElm 0.28 25.12 +.51 Perrigo 0.25 63.47 +4.43 PetChina 3.72 116.26 +.86 Petrohawk 21.58 -.46 PetrbrsA 1.34 38.09 +1.12 Petrobras 1.34 42.66 +.95 PtroqstE 6.04 +.08 PetsMart 0.40 33.93 +.92 Pfizer 0.72 16.86 +.33 PhmHTr 7.52 64.31 +.85 PharmPdt 0.60 27.57 +.38 Pharmacyc 7.27 +.11 PhaseFwd 16.88 +.02 PhilipMor 2.32 49.58 +.49 PhilipsEl 0.95 34.49 +.95 PhlVH 0.15 65.41 +1.84 PhnxCos 3.25 +.01 PhotrIn 5.67 -.04 PiedNG 1.12 27.89 +.03 Pier 1 8.79 +.18 PilgrmsP n 12.04 +.11 PimIncStr2 0.70 9.55 +.04 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.40 +.05 PinnclEnt 14.40 +.75 PinnaclFn 15.86 +.35 PinWst 2.10 37.60 +.35 PionDrill 7.58 +.16 PionFltRt 0.90 13.49 +.09 PioNtrl 0.08 63.92 +.78 PiperJaf 40.03 +1.98 PitnyBw 1.46 25.85 +.21 PlainsAA 3.74 58.81 +.67 PlainsEx 30.70 -1.06 Plantron 0.20 34.17 +.82 PlatGpMet 2.73 +.12 PlatUnd 0.32 36.45 -.28 PlugPwr h .64 -.04 PlumCrk 1.68 41.20 +.84 PokerTek h 1.30 +.17 Polaris 1.60 61.86 +1.24 Polo RL 0.40 93.85 +1.50 Polycom 32.82 +.77 PolyMet g 2.18 +.01 PolyOne 11.68 +.15 Polypore 18.23 +.15 Poniard h 1.24 +.03 Pool Corp 0.52 25.29 -.01 Popular 3.78 -.18 PortfRec 67.33 +.08 PortGE 1.02 19.90 +.02 PostPrp 0.80 26.56 +1.64 Potash 0.40 110.61 +1.60 Potlatch 2.04 39.43 +1.39 PwrInteg 0.20 39.38 -4.09 Power-One 5.76 +.21 PSCrudeDS 57.66 -3.08 PwshDB 24.25 +.19 PS Agri 24.70 +.22 PS USDBull 24.00 -.11 PwSClnEn 10.34 +.26 PSFinPf 1.36 17.02 +.01 PSVrdoTF 0.19 25.00 PwShPfd 1.04 13.83 +.07 PSIndia 0.13 22.92 +.27 PwShs QQQ 0.21 50.23 +.86 Powrwav 1.79 +.04 Pozen 12.08 +1.13 PranaBio 1.84 +.14 Praxair 1.80 84.31 -.03 PrecCastpt 0.12 133.83 +2.82 PrecDril 7.88 +.08 PrfdBkLA 2.01 -.27 PremGlbSv 10.00 +.76 PrmWBc h .91 -.12 Prestige 9.85 +.17 PriceTR 1.08 58.89 +2.38 priceline 273.00+11.22 PrideIntl 31.67 -.24 Primerica n 23.73 -.07 PrinctnR 3.33 +.01 PrinFncl 0.50 30.33 +1.08 PrivateB 0.04 14.55 +.08 ProShtQQQ 39.32 -.69 ProShtS&P 47.83 -.63 PrUShS&P 28.88 -.77 ProUltDow 0.53 50.50 +1.07 PrUlShDow 24.80 -.54 ProUltQQQ 70.88 +2.31 PrUShQQQ 15.35 -.53 ProUltSP 0.41 44.67 +1.07 ProUShL20 46.27 -.38 ProURgBk 62.41 +2.89 PrUSCh25 rs 40.61 -.31 ProUSEM rs 48.26 -1.73 ProUSRE rs 24.30 -2.22 ProUSOG rs 54.17 -.11 ProUSBM rs 33.07 -.68 ProUltRE rs 0.50 48.74 +3.79 ProUShtFn 17.36 -.80 ProUFin rs 0.30 73.96 +3.26 ProUltO&G 0.22 38.14 +.07 ProUBasM 0.15 37.65 +.70 ProShtR2K 36.73 -.79 ProUSR2K 17.23 -.74 ProUltR2K 0.04 39.42 +1.58 ProUSSP500 27.01 -1.06 ProUltSP500 0.23 189.97 +7.01 ProUltCrude 13.72 +.53 ProUShCrude 11.52 -.47 ProSUltSilv 64.12 +2.62 ProUltShYen 21.61 ProUShEuro 21.59 -.14 ProceraNt .60 -.01 ProctGam 1.93 62.20 -.97 ProgrssEn 2.48 39.59 +.36 ProgsvCp 0.16 20.39 +.25 ProLogis 0.60 13.64 +.49 ProspctCap 1.64 11.83 +.15 ProspBcsh 0.62 40.41 +.06 ProtLife 0.48 24.40 +.55

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0.72 8.19 +.12 0.44 13.64 +.12 0.70 65.23 +2.46 0.61 17.50 +.86 32.42 +.35 1.37 31.84 +.38 2.60 99.22 +4.10 13.31 +.45 3.23 +.18 0.64 6.03 -.06 0.68 6.56

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Reform Continued from B1 Lawmakers now face the prospect of two weeks or more of debate on the bill, which would create a new consumer regulator, establish oversight of the vast derivatives market and give the government authority to wind down large, troubled financial companies without leaving taxpayers on the hook. “The status quo is unacceptable,” Dodd, the chief architect of the bill, said on the Senate floor on Thursday. “We cannot leave the American people vulnerable to the present construct of our financial regulatory system.” The real fight over the details of the legislation will begin to unfold next week, as lawmakers on Tuesday begin voting on additional amendments. Dodd and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., have

O’Keeffe Continued from B1 Officials from Gorilla Glue could not be reached for comment. As a pharmacist, O’Keeffe started her company in her kitchen, where she worked to create a cream that would alleviate cracked, dry hands. Because she developed the formulas on her own, O’Keeffe said she’s been able to keep them secret. She never applied for a patent, which would create a public record of how she makes her product to ensure that others cannot copy her formula, because she believed there were low odds of someone else figuring out her process. If she had obtained a patent, O’Keeffe said it would have expired next year. Thus, the formula would be in the public realm, with little time remaining on the patent, she said. “It would have been quite a bit less valuable,” said O’Keeffe, who also will receive ongoing royalties. Most of O’Keeffe’s 20 employees will lose their jobs, as Gorilla Glue plans to move production of O’Keeffe’s Working Hands and Healthy Feet creams to Ohio, O’Keeffe said. One person will stay on with Gorilla

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 B5

vowed a fair and open amendment process. Still, Democratic leaders must walk a fine line as they try to pick up one GOP vote — and maybe more — to reach the 60 needed to overcome the threat of a filibuster. On one hand, they must allow consideration of a wide range of amendments, particularly from Republicans. On the other, leaving the door open to too many amendments could lead to potentially endless quibbling and fundamentally alter parts of the legislation. In addition, they must navigate the minefield of amendments in a charged political environment during an election season, gaining GOP support without losing Democrats along the way. Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., have yet to agree to the specific number of amendments that will be allowed or the order in which they will be heard. Democratic and Repub-

lican aides said Thursday that members had only begun to file amendments. If recent history is any indication, a flood of proposals lie ahead. Republicans on the Banking Committee submitted hundreds of amendments when the bill came up for consideration in March. At the time, Shelby decided against introducing any amendments in committee, choosing to continue talking with Dodd behind closed doors. Although the proposed changes to Dodd’s bill are certain to run the gamut of issues, several topics are likely to dominate the debate. Dodd’s bill would create a powerful, independent consumer financial protection bureau within the Federal Reserve to oversee mortgages, credit cards and other such loans. Republicans have long opposed the new consumer agency, insisting it would have too much power and could harm small businesses, stifle innova-

tion and raise consumer costs. Shelby and other Republicans, such as Bob Corker of Tennessee, said they plan to introduce amendments to scale back the power and scope of the consumer regulator. Meanwhile, Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., plans to push for a standalone consumer agency. Lawmakers also are certain to wrangle over the details of proposed rules to rein in the $600 trillion market in financial derivatives, including provisions that could force banks to spin off their derivatives desks and measures that would require nearly all deals to be traded openly on exchanges. Shelby has said the language currently in the Dodd bill, drafted largely by agriculture committee chairman Sen. Blanche Lincoln, D-Ark., “would have far-reaching and devastating effects” by raising costs for businesses that use derivatives to manage risk, such as the fluctuating price of oil, rather than simply speculating.

Glue, which plans to maintain the O’Keeffe’s brand on the product, she said. O’Keeffe said she is paying for an employment training and placement service to aid her former employees in their search for new jobs. She said each of her workers, many of whom had their final day Wednesday, also will receive a bonus. It may have been more than merely the distance from Gorilla Glue’s headquarters that kept the operation from staying in Sisters. Keeping the manufacturing in Central Oregon would have been possible for these buyers, or others who were interested in O’Keeffe’s products, she said, if not for the tax impact of the recently passed Measures 66 and 67. Measure 66 raised the personal income tax on joint filers with taxable income of at least $250,000 and single filers with taxable income of at least $125,000, while 67 raised corporate taxes. “The business climate in Oregon just does not provide an incentive for people to move businesses to Oregon,” she said. “Quite the opposite.” O’Keeffe said the passage of Measure 67 had a financial impact on her operations, which she said produced about $2 million a year in revenue. She said

the new taxes force employers to consider what they can cut in order to stay in business. Often the only things available are jobs, she said. “That kind of taxation ... will ultimately result in a continued loss of jobs,” O’Keeffe said. The two measures have already impacted Central Oregon’s economy in other ways, said Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon. He said one technology firm, which was considering locating in Central Oregon, decided to relocate out of state after the measures passed. Another company, the name of which Lee said he could not disclose, has plans to move out of the state in hopes of saving $10,000 a year on taxes, Lee said. Even if they aren’t leaving for tax reasons, there are instances of businesses leaving Central Oregon after being sold to a company in another state. “It’s especially hard for Sisters because this is a story that has been replayed here several times,” Lee said. “There’s a frustration about that.” Still, Lee said it’s important to keep in mind that the goal for many small-business owners is to do just what O’Keeffe did: sell. Sisters Mayor Lon Kellstrom

said people understand the opportunity presented to O’Keeffe, but it’s still disappointing for people to lose jobs. “It’s a good thing/bad thing kind of deal,” he said. With other companies having left before, Kellstrom said the city is anxious and looking for business owners to move there. He said additional taxes on businesses are proving to be a problem for economic development in Sisters, as well as every other city in Oregon. “There’s only so much we can do,” however, Kellstrom said. “We’ll just have to grit our teeth.” O’Keeffe said it was difficult, but necessary, to sell the company and the formula she invented. She said she informed employees last week after she realized the deal with Gorilla Glue was a possibility. “They understand why I need to do this at this time, personally, but also for the brand,” said O’Keeffe, who plans to keep working as a pharmacist and giving presentations to young people about owning a business. “It’s a little bit like sending your child off to college. You need to take this next step.”

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CREATIVE LIGHTING

Continued from B1 Combining Continental and United would create a global powerhouse, with a network reaching deep into Asia, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East. Continental entered talks with United on the condition that Smisek head the combined entity, sources said. United CEO Glenn Tilton, 62, has agreed to become nonexecutive chairman of the new airline and to serve on its board through a two-year transition period. The rest of the management team will be named later by Smisek. Although United is far larger than Continental, Smisek and other Continental executives hope their carrier’s culture of fostering good relations with customers and employees will prevail, sources said. That could prove a challenge, observers said. United’s reputation was badly battered during its three-year bankruptcy last

Internet Continued from B1 She loves the site. “It is free marketing. It is daily marketing,” Van Houzen said. “It is probably the best thing to happen to real estate agents.” Social media is changing the way Realtors market and sell homes. It’s faster than cold calling and costs nothing to promote the latest listing through a status update on Facebook or a tweet on Twitter. But sales from social-media contacts still represent a small portion of overall sales. Take Mark Zawaideh. The agent with Keller Williams Realty in Novi, Mich., said he markets listings on as many as 150 websites including large search engines Google and Yahoo, local classified-ads site Craigslist, and real estate search engines Trulia, Zillow and HomeFinder.

decade that also damaged the morale of employees, who took steep pay cuts and gave up pensions to ensure the carrier’s survival. But over the past two years, United has placed greater emphasis on pleasing customers. Its planes are cleaner, many are outfitted with new interiors, and it routinely posts the best on-time performance among its network airline peers. Continental sets the bar for service among large domestic carriers, receiving the highest marks from passengers in Zagat’s 2009 Airline Survey, by a wide margin. The Continental and United brands will likely remain in the market until the carrier receives a single operating certificate from the FAA, a process that took the recently merged Delta and Northwest Airlines two years to accomplish. Over that time, Smisek and his team plan to work hard at making sure there is a uniform level of service at the new United, a source said.

HomeFinder is on the Detroit Free Press’s website and includes real estate and classified. “I have one marketing manager and that’s all she does all day is post these homes on all these websites,” Zawaideh said. “And the results show. That’s how we sell 200 homes a year.” He’s sold nine houses in the past year and a half to friends through Facebook alone. Internet and social marketing have allowed Zawaideh to cut expenses on print advertising, which he’s dropped entirely. Now, about 35 percent of Realtors actively use social or professional networking websites and 14 percent plan to begin integrating online marketing in their business, according to a survey of members by the National Association of Realtors. The National Association of Realtors began offering a social-media course last summer.

TONY

DeBONE Deschutes County COMMISSIONER ★ ★ ★ ★ REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE ★ ★ ★ ★

541-382-0968

Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd. Redmond • 1332 SW Highland Ave.

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635 SE BUSINESS WAY • BEND, OR 97702

PAID FOR BY CITIZENS FOR TONY DEBONE

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

12 14 87 ... 45 ... ... 28 23 52 21 15 29 22 ... 11 63 ... 16 ... 16

42.02 -.22 +21.6 21.95 +.37 +1.7 18.30 +.52 +21.5 15.68 +.18 +27.6 73.79 +1.42 +36.3 .85 -.14 +25.0 39.31 +3.31 +43.0 57.40 +.27 +47.0 59.35 +.50 +.3 2.62 +.07 +9.2 31.04 +.43 -5.2 52.88 -.40 +2.7 16.03 +.18 +20.4 23.49 +.23 +15.1 8.96 +.25 +61.4 22.50 -.59 +9.6 5.69 -.06 +110.7 12.41 +.78 +77.8 22.52 +.10 -4.6 9.34 +.34 +5.8 31.00 +.09 +1.7

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

22 22 17 ... ... ... 42 20 ... 89 21 10 27 24 ... 26 ... 13 ... ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1169.00 $1168.40 $18.549

Pvs Day $1172.00 $1171.30 $18.107

Market recap 77.57 42.91 48.39 18.20 47.76 2.61 41.20 133.83 23.91 56.32 79.15 46.05 26.60 7.85 15.26 27.29 20.82 33.23 3.28 50.72

+1.13 +.45 +.20 +2.00 +1.32 -.02 +.84 +2.82 -1.52 +.30 -.17 +.65 +.38 -.10 +.26 +.72 +.40 +.78 +.07 +1.42

+17.4 +14.2 +7.4 +43.4 +31.7 -7.1 +9.1 +21.3 +12.3 +18.1 +28.4 +15.1 +15.4 +30.8 +13.8 +21.2 +7.7 +23.1 +56.2 +17.6

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp Synovus S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl

6911023 4.56 +.11 3270395 3.20 +.02 1764024 120.86 +1.48 1727871 18.30 +.52 1190772 16.56 +.37

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name RAIT Fin GrafTech Brunswick AsburyA OwensC wtB

Last 4.27 17.26 22.69 16.79 3.87

Chg %Chg +1.12 +3.79 +4.87 +2.82 +.65

+35.6 +28.1 +27.3 +20.2 +20.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name Harman EKodak CenPacF StewInfo DirREBear

Last

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name GoldStr g NovaGld g GrtBasG g NwGold g NA Pall g

41615 35530 34250 24759 20783

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

4.48 8.85 1.90 5.82 4.82

ETrade Palm Inc Popular PwShs QQQ Intel

2746736 1.74 -.10 1207440 5.84 +1.21 784816 3.78 -.18 759979 50.23 +.86 581661 23.49 +.23

+.12 +.24 +.08 +.03 +.17

Gainers ($2 or more) Chg %Chg

Name

RobertsRlt Chrmcft GenMoly Ballanty MtnPDia g

2.09 2.80 3.93 7.40 2.67

+.28 +15.5 +.29 +11.6 +.36 +10.1 +.59 +8.7 +.21 +8.5

ATS Med FNB Utd iRobot OmniEnr AdeptTch

Name ASpectRlty OrchidsPP NAsiaInv un PyramidOil MercBcp

2,333 765 104 3,202 308 10

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

-22.1 -16.9 -16.8 -15.5 -13.5

52-Week High Low Name

Last Chg

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

39.98 -11.34 6.94 -1.41 2.53 -.51 12.16 -2.23 6.27 -.98

Nasdaq

Last

Chg %Chg

3.99 +1.40 +54.1 2.08 +.54 +35.1 20.22 +5.00 +32.9 3.00 +.71 +31.0 6.24 +1.34 +27.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

24.80 -4.20 -14.5 15.31 -2.05 -11.8 8.88 -.87 -9.0 5.37 -.37 -6.4 3.25 -.15 -4.4

Name

Last

PacCapB DearbrnBc CascadeFn CamcoF KonaGrill

2.19 -1.92 -46.7 3.38 -.69 -17.0 2.00 -.39 -16.3 2.89 -.56 -16.2 4.20 -.81 -16.2

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 310 176 43 529 26 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

2,038 697 103 2,838 215 8

11,258.01 4,786.26 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

7,938.98 2,935.69 325.53 5,311.43 1,374.45 1,661.40 847.12 8,661.73 465.10

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,167.32 4,762.71 384.65 7,589.29 1,956.02 2,511.92 1,206.78 12,700.37 737.74

+122.05 +104.96 +.30 +89.57 +16.43 +40.19 +15.42 +173.52 +15.35

YTD %Chg %Chg +1.11 +2.25 +.08 +1.19 +.85 +1.63 +1.29 +1.39 +2.12

52-wk %Chg

+7.09 +16.17 -3.36 +5.63 +7.18 +10.70 +8.22 +9.97 +17.96

+36.72 +51.48 +15.10 +37.65 +38.08 +46.27 +38.26 +41.70 +51.31

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

348.46 2,561.69 3,840.62 5,617.84 6,144.91 20,778.92 32,861.00 21,695.70 3,282.27 10,924.79 1,728.42 2,959.01 4,816.10 5,896.86

+1.13 s +2.21 s +1.42 s +.56 s +1.00 s -.81 t -.28 t +.90 s +.05 s -2.57 t -.32 t +.92 s -.78 t +1.17 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9277 1.5333 .9939 .001920 .1464 1.3245 .1287 .010637 .081733 .0342 .000897 13.7916 .9232 .0318

Pvs Day .9255 1.5195 .9919 .001898 .1464 1.3187 .1287 .010604 .080541 .0340 .000894 13.6923 .9202 .0316

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.90 +0.13 +5.9 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.05 +0.22 +9.9 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.93 +0.05 +6.1 GrowthI 23.90 +0.30 +8.4 Ultra 20.79 +0.25 +6.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.16 +0.22 +9.4 AMutlA p 24.45 +0.24 +6.2 BalA p 17.12 +0.15 +6.2 BondA p 12.04 +0.03 +3.4 CapWA p 20.09 +0.10 +1.0 CapIBA p 48.10 +0.44 +1.3 CapWGA p 34.06 +0.47 +0.4 EupacA p 38.30 +0.59 -0.1 FdInvA p 34.68 +0.50 +6.3 GovtA p 14.11 +0.03 +1.9 GwthA p 29.04 +0.36 +6.3 HI TrA p 11.14 +0.01 +7.3 IncoA p 16.02 +0.15 +4.5 IntBdA p 13.27 +0.02 +1.8 ICAA p 27.26 +0.29 +5.6 NEcoA p 23.71 +0.37 +5.4 N PerA p 26.37 +0.37 +2.8 NwWrldA 49.02 +0.56 +3.9 SmCpA p 34.99 +0.45 +11.0 TxExA p 12.16 +2.3 WshA p 26.10 +0.27 +6.6 American Funds B: BalB p 17.05 +0.15 +5.9 CapIBB t 48.09 +0.44 +1.1 GrwthB t 28.11 +0.35 +6.0 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 28.70 +0.38 +1.6 IntlEqA 27.99 +0.37 +1.5 IntEqII I r 11.83 +0.16 +0.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.56 NA MidCap 28.73 +0.33 +12.4 MidCapVal 19.36 +0.21 +7.7 Baron Funds:

Growth 46.39 +0.57 +12.3 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.59 +0.03 +4.0 DivMu 14.48 +1.6 TxMgdIntl 15.08 +0.18 -1.3 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.60 +0.18 +5.4 GlAlA r 18.40 +0.13 +2.9 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.17 +0.12 +2.6 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.49 +0.13 +3.0 CGM Funds: Focus 30.84 +0.21 +3.7 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 47.59 +0.59 +7.0 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 27.32 +0.47 +13.9 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.15 +0.49 +14.1 AcornIntZ 36.26 +0.48 +5.8 ValRestr 46.09 +0.66 +7.8 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.46 +0.14 +3.3 USCorEq2 10.45 +0.17 +14.6 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.92 +0.35 +6.3 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 33.28 +0.35 +6.4 NYVen C 31.79 +0.34 +6.0 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.58 +0.03 +4.7 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.21 +0.20 +5.4 EmMktV 33.02 +0.43 +5.0 IntSmVa 16.15 +0.20 +7.0 USLgVa 19.68 +0.35 +15.6 US Micro 12.79 +0.29 +21.2 US SmVa 24.56 +0.54 +25.2 IntlSmCo 15.27 +0.18 +7.4 Fixd 10.33 +0.4 IntVa 17.27 +0.26 +1.4 Glb5FxInc 11.24 +0.01 +2.3 2YGlFxd 10.20 +0.6 Dodge&Cox:

Balanced 68.84 Income 13.17 IntlStk 32.95 Stock 105.33 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.19 NatlMunInc 9.76 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 18.24 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.62 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.26 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.99 FPACres 26.06 Fairholme 36.03 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.06 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.35 StrInA 12.41 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.53 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.16 FF2015 10.97 FF2020 13.29 FF2025 11.05 FF2030 13.21 FF2035 10.95 FF2040 7.66 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.48 AMgr50 14.57 Balanc 17.44 BlueChGr 41.76 Canada 52.94 CapAp 23.97 CpInc r 9.15 Contra 62.15 DisEq 22.66 DivIntl 27.98 DivGth 26.51 EmrMk 23.41

+0.94 +0.02 +0.50 +1.86

+8.2 +2.9 +3.5 +9.9

+0.22 +8.9 -0.01 +4.2 +0.22 +9.0 +0.08 +2.2 +0.08 +2.0 -0.01 +1.5 +0.08 +5.0 +0.59 +19.7 +0.09 +8.6 +0.20 +6.6 +0.01 +3.8 +0.20 +6.8 +0.11 +0.09 +0.13 +0.12 +0.15 +0.13 +0.10

+5.2 +5.3 +5.9 +6.4 +6.6 +6.7 +7.0

+0.20 +9.1 +0.12 +5.6 +0.18 +7.1 +0.65 +10.0 +0.75 +9.2 +0.31 +11.9 +0.04 +8.2 +0.71 +6.8 +0.30 +7.9 +0.40 -0.1 +0.42 +12.0 +0.29 +3.5

Eq Inc 43.27 EQII 17.96 Fidel 30.77 GNMA 11.54 GovtInc 10.50 GroCo 76.26 GroInc 17.59 HighInc r 8.82 Indepn 22.18 IntBd 10.36 IntmMu 10.23 IntlDisc 30.43 InvGrBd 11.52 InvGB 7.21 LgCapVal 12.28 LatAm 51.41 LevCoStk 26.71 LowP r 36.06 Magelln 69.64 MidCap 27.90 MuniInc 12.62 NwMkt r 15.55 OTC 50.77 100Index 8.52 Ovrsea 30.70 Puritn 17.22 StIntMu 10.65 STBF 8.39 SmllCpS r 18.21 StratInc 11.07 StrReRt r 8.89 TotalBd 10.74 USBI 11.20 Value 66.52 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 42.75 IntlInxInv 33.17 TotMktInv 34.72 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 42.75 TotMktAd r 34.73 First Eagle: GlblA 42.53 OverseasA 20.49

+0.63 +10.9 +0.25 +10.3 +0.41 +8.7 +0.01 +2.6 +0.01 +1.9 +1.38 +10.6 +0.22 +9.7 +0.01 +6.5 +0.39 +11.3 +0.01 +3.2 +1.9 +0.45 +0.3 +0.02 +3.2 +0.01 +3.5 +0.16 +9.2 +1.18 -0.8 +0.34 +16.5 +0.43 +12.9 +1.09 +8.3 +0.45 +19.1 +2.7 +0.03 +5.4 +1.03 +11.0 +0.10 +7.4 +0.50 -0.7 +0.16 +7.8 +0.9 +1.6 +0.26 +14.2 +0.02 +4.0 +0.06 +4.5 +0.02 +3.8 +0.02 +2.4 +1.18 +16.8 +0.55 +8.9 +0.46 -0.8 +0.47 +10.4 +0.55 +8.9 +0.48 +10.4 +0.35 +6.4 +0.11 +5.3

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.88 +2.4 FoundAl p 10.33 +0.09 +5.2 HYTFA p 10.09 +4.0 IncomA p 2.14 +0.01 +5.8 USGovA p 6.71 +0.01 +2.4 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +8.6 IncmeAd 2.13 +0.01 +5.9 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +0.01 +5.6 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.45 +0.17 +7.3 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.49 +0.07 -0.9 GlBd A p 13.62 +0.08 +8.5 GrwthA p 17.21 +0.24 +2.4 WorldA p 14.30 +0.20 +2.4 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.21 +0.23 +2.4 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.64 +0.07 +8.4 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.28 +0.44 +6.6 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.60 +0.12 +1.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.96 +0.19 +5.7 Quality 19.60 +0.12 +1.4 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 33.25 +0.56 +14.7 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.18 +0.01 +6.0 HYMuni 8.58 -0.01 +6.6 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.49 +0.02 +3.3 CapApInst 34.78 +0.50 +5.5 IntlInv t 54.27 +0.85 -0.2 Intl r 54.81 +0.85 -0.1 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.36 +0.42 +5.5 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 28.85 +0.37 +5.2 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.30 +0.41 +5.5

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 39.52 +0.53 +7.9 Div&Gr 18.79 +0.21 +7.1 Advisers 18.66 +0.20 +6.8 TotRetBd 10.99 +0.03 +3.9 HussmnStrGr 12.67 -0.07 -0.9 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.54 +0.30 +3.5 AssetStA p 23.12 +0.31 +3.8 AssetStrI r 23.29 +0.31 +3.8 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.28 +0.03 +2.5 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.27 +0.02 +2.5 HighYld 8.11 +0.01 +6.9 IntmTFBd 10.94 +1.3 ShtDurBd 10.92 +0.01 +1.1 USLCCrPls 19.65 +0.23 +8.1 Janus S Shrs: Forty 33.08 +0.48 +4.9 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.73 +0.41 +5.6 OvrseasT r 45.79 +0.77 +7.7 PrkMCVal T 21.80 +0.26 +10.1 Twenty T 64.71 +0.98 +5.1 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.62 +0.16 +7.9 LSBalanc 12.52 +0.12 +6.6 LSGrwth 12.27 +0.13 +7.2 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 23.08 +0.49 +16.4 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.45 +0.27 +8.0 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.72 +0.27 +7.9 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.05 -0.01 +3.1 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.20 +0.33 +12.9 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.00 +0.06 +7.1 StrInc C 14.58 +0.08 +6.9 LSBondR 13.95 +0.06 +7.0 StrIncA 14.50 +0.07 +7.1 Loomis Sayles Inv:

InvGrBdY 12.18 +0.05 +5.6 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.33 +0.16 +11.1 BdDebA p 7.63 +0.02 +5.8 ShDurIncA p 4.61 +0.01 +3.0 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.76 +0.11 +5.5 ValueA 22.20 +0.27 +7.2 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.30 +0.27 +7.3 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.81 +0.01 +4.8 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.33 +0.16 +2.6 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.97 +0.20 +3.8 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.32 +0.03 +5.9 TotRtBdI 10.32 +0.03 +6.0 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.14 +0.16 +0.9 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.16 +0.25 +5.4 GlbDiscZ 28.51 +0.26 +5.5 QuestZ 18.23 +0.14 +5.7 SharesZ 20.62 +0.18 +7.5 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 41.65 +0.36 +10.3 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 43.25 +0.37 +10.2 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.23 +0.20 +6.6 Intl I r 17.82 +0.29 +5.8 Oakmark r 41.22 +0.69 +11.3 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.60 +0.03 +7.5 GlbSMdCap 13.90 +0.21 +8.8 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.63 +0.44 +4.3 DvMktA p 30.18 +0.36 +4.9 GlobA p 56.61 +0.88 +6.8 IntBdA p 6.44 +0.03 +2.0 MnStFdA 30.27 +0.46 +7.6 RisingDivA 14.84 +0.19 +6.7 S&MdCpVl 29.67 +0.44 +11.6

StrInA p 4.13 +0.01 +6.9 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.48 +0.17 +6.4 S&MdCpVl 25.59 +0.38 +11.4 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.43 +0.16 +6.4 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.29 +5.7 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 29.87 +0.36 +5.1 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.11 +0.02 +3.8 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.98 +0.08 +5.2 ComodRR 8.02 +0.01 -0.7 HiYld 9.16 +0.01 +6.9 InvGrCp 11.28 +0.03 +5.2 LowDu 10.49 +0.02 +2.5 RealRet 11.43 +0.11 +4.9 RealRtnI 11.11 +0.07 +3.7 ShortT 9.89 +0.01 +1.0 TotRt 11.11 +0.02 +3.9 TR II 10.66 +0.03 +2.8 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.11 +0.07 +3.5 TotRtA 11.11 +0.02 +3.7 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.11 +0.02 +3.5 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.11 +0.02 +3.8 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.11 +0.02 +3.8 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 41.09 +0.33 +6.3 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.52 +0.49 +8.1 Price Funds: BlChip 35.57 +0.60 +8.5 CapApp 19.68 +0.17 +8.4 EmMktS 31.21 +0.38 +3.7 EqInc 23.35 +0.32 +11.7 EqIndex 32.53 +0.41 +8.7 Growth 29.78 +0.55 +8.3 HlthSci 28.54 +0.49 +9.1 HiYield 6.70 +0.02 +6.9

IntlBond 9.60 IntlStk 12.93 MidCap 54.59 MCapVal 23.15 N Asia 17.04 New Era 45.77 N Horiz 29.77 N Inc 9.44 R2010 14.82 R2015 11.40 R2020 15.68 R2025 11.45 R2030 16.38 R2040 16.45 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 31.85 SmCapVal 34.72 SpecIn 12.17 Value 22.94 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.05 VoyA p 22.13 RiverSource A: DEI 9.44 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.81 PremierI r 18.62 TotRetI r 12.25 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 36.09 S&P Sel 18.88 Scout Funds: Intl 29.63 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.77 AmShS p 39.77 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.10 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.08 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 47.89 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.14 IntValue I 25.69

+0.04 -1.9 +0.21 +2.6 +1.01 +15.0 +0.24 +11.7 +0.08 +5.6 +0.03 +4.9 +0.63 +16.4 +0.02 +3.1 +0.13 +6.2 +0.12 +6.8 +0.18 +7.4 +0.15 +7.9 +0.23 +8.3 +0.24 +8.6 +1.6 +0.67 +18.2 +0.77 +17.8 +0.05 +4.5 +0.38 +12.0 +0.17 +9.1 +0.36 +12.2 +0.08 +7.6 +0.17 +14.4 +0.30 +14.2 +0.15 +13.7 +0.47 +9.4 +0.25 +8.9 +0.45 +1.7 +0.41 +6.8 +0.41 +6.7 +0.03 +3.8 +0.23 -1.1 +0.56 +3.4 +0.30 +1.4 +0.31 +1.5

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.21 +0.27 +4.8 VALIC : StkIdx 24.25 +0.32 +8.8 Van Kamp Funds A: CapGro 12.32 +0.25 +9.7 CmstA p 14.96 +0.23 +8.7 EqIncA p 8.36 +0.09 +7.9 GrInA p 18.79 +0.23 +9.2 HYMuA p 9.33 +4.2 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.99 +2.8 CpOpAdl 74.70 +1.00 +7.7 EMAdmr r 35.24 +0.39 +3.5 Energy 115.83 +0.16 +3.3 500Adml 111.29 +1.43 +8.9 GNMA Ad 10.75 +0.02 +2.5 HlthCr 50.30 +0.63 +0.2 HiYldCp 5.62 +5.4 InfProAd 25.14 +0.13 +2.6 ITsryAdml 11.18 +0.01 +2.3 IntGrAdm 55.19 +0.89 +2.1 ITAdml 13.55 +1.8 ITGrAdm 9.88 +0.02 +4.8 LtdTrAd 11.05 +0.9 LTGrAdml 9.10 +0.04 +4.0 LT Adml 11.06 +2.2 MuHYAdm 10.45 +3.0 PrmCap r 65.12 +0.64 +5.6 STsyAdml 10.74 +0.01 +1.1 ShtTrAd 15.92 +0.5 STIGrAd 10.74 +0.01 +2.6 TtlBAdml 10.48 +0.01 +2.5 TStkAdm 30.16 +0.41 +10.3 WellslAdm 51.15 +0.28 +4.6 WelltnAdm 52.10 +0.44 +5.3 Windsor 44.07 +0.59 +9.6 WdsrIIAd 45.42 +0.55 +8.1 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.09 +0.24 +7.2 CapOpp 32.34 +0.44 +7.7 DivdGro 13.95 +0.11 +5.9 Energy 61.68 +0.08 +3.3 EqInc 19.52 +0.20 +7.7

Explr 66.15 GNMA 10.75 GlobEq 16.68 GroInc 25.49 HYCorp 5.62 HlthCre 119.18 InflaPro 12.80 IntlGr 17.34 IntlVal 30.52 ITIGrade 9.88 LifeCon 15.83 LifeGro 20.99 LifeMod 18.79 LTIGrade 9.10 Morg 16.72 MuInt 13.55 MuLtd 11.05 MuShrt 15.92 PrecMtls r 21.55 PrmcpCor 13.09 Prmcp r 62.75 SelValu r 18.03 STAR 18.51 STIGrade 10.74 StratEq 17.53 TgRe2010 21.64 TgtRe2025 12.10 TgtRe2015 12.00 TgRe2020 21.25 TgRe2030 20.72 TgtRe2035 12.52 TgtRe2040 20.51 TgtRe2045 12.95 USGro 17.40 Wellsly 21.11 Welltn 30.16 Wndsr 13.06 WndsII 25.58 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 111.28 Balanced 20.63 DevMkt 9.50 EMkt 26.78 Europe 25.00

+1.03 +15.4 +0.02 +2.5 +0.22 +6.4 +0.34 +9.0 +5.3 +1.48 +0.2 +0.07 +2.5 +0.28 +2.1 +0.39 -0.3 +0.02 +4.7 +0.10 +5.2 +0.24 +7.3 +0.17 +6.2 +0.04 +4.0 +0.22 +9.5 +1.8 +0.9 +0.4 +0.38 +5.5 +0.16 +8.1 +0.61 +5.6 +0.25 +13.0 +0.16 +5.5 +0.01 +2.6 +0.28 +14.7 +0.16 +5.5 +0.12 +6.9 +0.10 +6.1 +0.20 +6.5 +0.23 +7.3 +0.15 +7.7 +0.24 +7.7 +0.16 +7.7 +0.23 +5.7 +0.11 +4.6 +0.25 +5.2 +0.18 +9.7 +0.31 +8.0 +1.43 +0.18 +0.11 +0.29 +0.37

+8.8 +7.2 -0.3 +3.4 -3.6

Extend 38.20 +0.71 +16.9 Growth 29.54 +0.36 +8.4 ITBnd 10.92 +0.02 +3.3 MidCap 18.77 +0.29 +14.7 Pacific 10.29 +0.07 +6.3 REIT r 17.95 +0.79 +21.8 SmCap 32.69 +0.64 +18.9 SmlCpGth 19.76 +0.35 +17.4 SmlCpVl 15.72 +0.34 +20.4 STBnd 10.49 +1.5 TotBnd 10.48 +0.01 +2.5 TotlIntl 14.49 +0.17 +0.6 TotStk 30.16 +0.41 +10.3 Value 20.36 +0.28 +9.8 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 20.63 +0.18 +7.2 DevMkInst 9.43 +0.11 NS ExtIn 38.23 +0.71 +17.0 GrwthIst 29.54 +0.36 +8.4 InfProInst 10.24 +0.05 +2.6 InstIdx 110.55 +1.43 +8.9 InsPl 110.55 +1.42 +8.9 InsTStPlus 27.26 +0.37 +10.3 MidCpIst 18.83 +0.30 +14.8 SCInst 32.72 +0.64 +19.0 TBIst 10.48 +0.01 +2.5 TSInst 30.17 +0.41 +10.3 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 91.93 +1.18 +8.9 STBdIdx 10.49 +1.5 TotBdSgl 10.48 +0.01 +2.5 TotStkSgl 29.11 +0.39 +10.3 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.96 +0.15 +7.2 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.4 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.64 +0.04 +6.7


B6 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


L

C

Inside

OREGON Geocaching celebrates 10th anniversary, see Page C3. OBITUARY Civil-rights-era reporter dies, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

Governor denies Summers clemency DA candidates DESCHUTES

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Gov. Ted Kulongoski has denied a clemency request from one of the five young people convicted in the 2001 murder of a Redmond woman who was beaten and shot to death. Ashley Summers, 24, applied last year to get out of the 25year sentence she received for her involvement in the death of Barbara Thomas. Summers was 15 years old when she and four other teens plotted to murder Thomas and then attempted to flee to Can-

ada. While two boys, day, Kulongoski did one of them Thomas’ not provide any details son, beat Thomas with about his decision, but wine bottles and then noted that his clemshot her, Summers ency power should be and another girl stood used in only “the most watch. She pleaded extraordinary of cirguilty to conspiracy cumstances” and addto commit aggravated Ashley ed that a commutation murder, kidnapping, Summers, 16 was not warranted in first-degree robbery Summers’ case. and first-degree burDistrict Attorney glary and is currently Mike Dugan, whose serving time in the Oak Creek office filed a letter of opposiYouth Correctional Facility in tion to Summers’ request, said Albany. he was pleased with the govIn a short letter issued Mon- ernor’s decision, particularly

because Summers has only served about eight years of her sentence. “We’re very happy that the governor took a serious look at that, because protecting our community is important for us,” he said. “That young lady was part of a very horrible crime.” Summers will be moved to an adult prison when she turns 25 this year. Her father, James Summers, of Redmond, said he spoke to his daughter on the day she received the governor’s decision. See Summers / C5

Filling in the blank

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Timm Schimke, director of Deschutes County’s Department of Solid Waste, walks the 85-acre demolition landfill site located between Century Drive and Mt. Washington Drive in Bend Tuesday. Schimke says he hopes future developers will remove waste before building on the site.

Officials hope to sell former landfill property By Hillary Borrud

Potential use for former landfill on Mt. Washington Drive County officials want to sell a former landfill on Bend's west side to developers, and county staff have met with other neighboring property owners to generate ideas for future development. Soon, the county will hold a public meeting for people to learn more about the rezoning process.

Simpson Ave.

Robinson Revocable Trust

Light industrial, with uses such as warehouses and a range of commercial activities allowed. Commercial

Dono van A ve.

Ch an dle r Ave .

Natural area Area of rock and sagebrush to be maintained.

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Would abut the existing commercial strip along Century Drive.

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Eric Baker / The Bulletin

Source: Deschutes County

Ballots for May 18 primary to be mailed today Bulletin staff report Ballots will be mailed today to registered voters in Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties for the May 18 primary election and arrive in residents’ mailboxes by early next week. Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship said there are several reasons some voters might not receive their ballots. If registered voters have moved in the past year and have not updated their address on their voter registration form, ballots will not be forwarded to their new address. Also, if there is a hold on the voter’s mail due

to a temporary vacation, the ballot will be returned to the Clerk’s Office and will not reach the voter. If ballots do not arrive by Wednesday, Blankenship recommended voters in Deschutes County contact the County Clerk’s Office at 541388-6546, or go to 1300 N.W. Wall St., Suite 202, Bend. Voters in Crook County should contact their County Clerk’s Office at 541-447-6553.

ELECTION

In Jefferson County, voters should call 541-475-4451 should they not receive their ballots in the mail. Occasionally, ballots that have been filled out and returned by voters will not be accepted due to changes in the signature. Signatures on the ballots are compared to those on the original voter registration forms to ensure the identity of the voter. If the two do not match, voters will be contacted and asked to re-sign and re-send their ballots. Blankenship said that another problem that occurs is that people forget to sign the ballot before

By Erin Golden

at the jail because prosecutors are too quick to charge people The two candidates for Des- with crimes. chutes County district attorney “The incumbent’s view is if sparred over political activism, you don’t want to be prosecuted, management decisions and the don’t commit a crime, and that handling of high-profile crimi- tells us he has no concept whatnal cases Thursday evening in soever of justice or its corollary, their first joint appearance of the prosecutorial discretion,” Flacampaign season. herty said. In a sometimes-heatDugan said the court ed public forum, District system and the jail are Attorney Mike Dugan busy because the area and his challenger, athas grown dramatically torney Patrick Flaherty, over the last several answered questions years and that his staff from some of the more makes the decision to than 70 people who charge or not charge a filled a meeting room at defendant after considthe Bend Public Library ering the facts in each — and pointed to probcase. lems they see with how “There’s no overtheir opponent works charging in the DA’s ofboth in and out of the fice,” he said. “We don’t courtroom. have the time for that. The May election We have serious proswill mark the first time ecutors, doing a serithere’s been a contest ous job: protecting our for the seat in more than Mike Dugan community.” 15 years. Dugan pointed to Both candidates chalthe growth of specialty lenged each other’s court programs, includability to lead a staff of ing family drug court deputy district attorand mental health court, neys and work with law as significant accomenforcement officers. plishments from his The rivals are former more than two decades co-workers; Flaherty in office. He said other was a prosecutor in Patrick programs, including an the Deschutes County Flaherty effort to get restitution District Attorney’s Ofpayments from people fice from 1992 to 2001, who write bad checks, including about five years as a have benefitted the commuchief deputy district attorney. nity without costing additional Dugan said Flaherty’s work as a money. supervisor raised concerns. But Flaherty said Dugan over“I think leadership is going states his role in the programs’ to be a big problem,” he said. development. “When Patrick was chief deputy “There’s no ‘I’ in the word DA in my office, he failed that teamwork,” he said. “Nearly test.” all these programs he menFlaherty fired back with a tioned were the result of collabchallenge to Dugan’s endorse- orative efforts by a number of ments from his current deputies organizations.” and touted his own endorseThe candidates shot comments ments from retired law enforce- back and forth over some highment officials and experience in profile cases handled by Duthe courtroom. gan’s office over the last several “I believe those folks ... know years, including the case of Dathe value of leadership. They vid Black, who was convicted of worked hand-in-hand with me manslaughter in 2004 in connecwhen I successfully prosecuted tion with a drag racing incident the most serious crimes, which in which two teenage girls died. is something the incumbent has Flaherty said Black’s prison never done in his 23 years in sentence was unfair, but said office.” he’d need to investigate the facts Flaherty said Dugan’s office of the case before the could say contributes to a backlog in the how he would have handled it. court system and overcrowding See Debate / C5

The Bulletin

ELECTION

Industrial

C

Would serve as a residential buffer to existing homes across the street at Broken Top.

Ownership boundaries

Deschutes County 4-R Equipment

Residential

Commercial

Bend Park & Rec. Dist.

Mt. Washington Dr.

Includes a mix of residential, commercial and light industrial uses. Some sections of mixed use would have more homes, while others could have convenience stores and manufacturing.

18th St.

Mixed use

Industrial

15th St.

Residential

Mixed use

Centur y Dr.

A new proposal from Deschutes County shows how a closed landfill and neighboring surface mine on Bend’s west side could develop in the future. Under the plan, about 25 acres of county and privately owned land, in an upscale area of Bend across from the gated community of Broken Top, would be set aside for homes, 68 acres would be designated for mixed use, 5 acres would be commercial and 15 acres would be industrial. County officials have said they want developers to purchase the land and build on it. The general zoning proposal unveiled this week gives residents an idea of what the property could look like in the future, and county staff plan to hold a community meeting soon to provide more information. See Landfill / C5

Metoliu sD r.

The Bulletin

trade barbs over leadership skills

it is mailed back. In this case, the voter must come into the County Clerk’s office to sign the ballot. In order for ballots to be counted, ballots must be received by 8 p.m. on May 18. Postmarks do not count. Blankenship recommended that voters living on the outskirts of Deschutes, Crook or Jefferson counties should return their ballots by May 12 to ensure that their votes are counted. Voters can either send their ballots back through the mail, or drop them off at drop sites stationed throughout the three counties.

Correction In an editorial titled “OLCC logic strikes again,” which appeared Wednesday, April 21, on Page C4, contained an error. Although the Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s new rules do allow bars and restaurants to advertise happy hours, they still are prohibited from mentioning the price of drinks in that advertising. PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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C2 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Man arrested after altercation at Bend convenience store

George Washington Prep athlete clings to life after car crash assumes the office of By Jeff Duewel The Daily Courier

A man who got into a verbal dispute at the Arco AM/PM in south Bend Thursday afternoon was arrested and jailed on multiple charges. Bend Police were called to the mini-market just before 1;30 a.m., on reports of an intoxicated driver. An officer arrived to find Steven Ross Beitelspacher, 43, driving erratically in the parking lot. Beitelspacher exited to Murphy Road, and the officer followed and attempted to pull him over. Beitelspacher continued to his home at 20247 Murphy Road. When the officer attempted to contact him, Beitelspacher was uncooperative, and went inside his home. Several hours later, Beitelspacher agreed to meet with officers, and was arrested and jailed on charges of eluding a police officer, menacing and reckless endangering.

Bend police capture three of four suspects in Friday robbery Three of the four people suspected of robbing a man at the Westward Ho Motel in Bend early Thursday have been arrested, according to Bend Police. The victim, a tenant at the motel, had met one of the suspects the previous day. At around 6:30 a.m. Friday, the four suspects came to the victim’s room, told him that a member of the group had a handgun, and robbed him. At around 2:15 p.m., the victim called 911 to report that he’d seen two of the suspects in the alley behind the Pilot Butte Drive-In. Police located the two suspects and a third suspect a short time later. Most of the victim’s property was recovered. Nathan J. Fletcher, 21, of Bend, Tawnni Marie Beard, 19, a transient, and Stranger Raymond Davis, 23, of Bend, were arrested and jailed on suspicion of second-degree robbery. The fourth suspect, Roger Martin, 29, is still at large.

GRANTS PASS — Larry Ragsdale earned the Skyline Conference’s offensive player of the year in football in 2007, and won a state hurdles title in spring of 2008 as a senior at Illinois Valley High School. He was so good at scoring touchdowns for the Cougars that Sports Illustrated featured him in “Faces in the Crowd.� Now everyone wonders if he’s going to wake up. The 20-year-old Ragsdale hasn’t regained consciousness since a March 10 crash on Highway 99W north of Monroe. His girlfriend Kelcie Yeoman, also an IVHS grad, was driving her own car behind Ragsdale’s 2002 Chevy Cavalier when it collided with a Jeep Cherokee driven by 31-year-old Shane Chambers of Corvallis.

Faithful girlfriend Yeoman has been at his side ever since, along with his mother Cathy and younger sister Paige, who are staying at Pastega House next to Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. Ragsdale’s father, John, has to hold down a job in Grants Pass but is in Corvallis every weekend, said McKenzie Yeoman, Kelcie’s younger sister. “It’s been so hard for everyone, especially Kelcie,� said McKenzie Yeoman, who also visits. “They’ve made so many plans together. “They said with head injuries you just don’t know. They can’t give you a prognosis of how he’s going to be in a few months, or in a year. They just can’t. It’s all kind of a mystery.�

McKenzie said Ragsdale has wiggled his toes a few times on command, but his eyes are not tracking. He moves around some. At IVHS, the former student is on everyone’s mind. “Larry is one of the most awesome kids to come through this school,� said Mark Higgins, IVHS athletic director, who gets text messages from Paige on Larry’s progress. “Very well liked, very involved.�

‘It’s just a tragedy’ “It’s just such a tragedy,� said IVHS office manager Janie Pope. “Such a great athlete, such a great student, never in trouble. He had such potential.� McKenzie Yeoman said Ragsdale has had multiple surgeries, including removing a flap of bone to relieve pressure from swelling in the brain, and to fix a broken arm. While he is not considered responsive, he has shown signs of life. “All the nurses say it seems like there’s more there. He moves his arms.� She said at some point Ragsdale will go to a rehabilitation facility or a nursing facility, depending on how he progresses. An account has been set up at U.S. Bank branches to help the Ragsdales’ costs, and “Everybody Loves Larry� blue rubber bracelets are for sale for $2 at IVHS and Lorna Byrne Middle School in Cave Junction. Chambers has been in the Benton County Jail since the accident, charged with drunken driving, assault, reckless driving and reckless endangerment. He was treated and released from the hospital the night of the accident.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — Vehicles were reported entered and diesel fuel stolen at 9:22 a.m. April 28, in the 1000 block of Northeast First Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:32 p.m. April 28, in the 20300 block of Penhollow Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:53 p.m. April 28, in the 1100 block of Northwest Lexington Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:33 p.m. April 28, in the 200 block of Northwest Florida Avenue. DUII — Blake Wellington, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:07 p.m. April 28, in the area of Northwest 10th Street and Northwest Newport Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:42 a.m. April 29, in the 1500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A purse was reported stolen at 6:28 p.m. April 28, in the 800 block of Southwest 11th Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:17 p.m. April 28, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:33 p.m. April 28, in the 1700 block of South U.S. Highway 97.

Theft — A television was reported stolen at 11:03 a.m. April 28, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:16 a.m. April 28, in the 700 block of Southwest 14th Street. Prineville Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:38 a.m. April 28, in the area of Northeast Bobbi Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered with a loss of $2400 at 10:03 a.m. April 28, in the area of Southeast Garner Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:14 p.m. April 28, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Robert William Forseth, 48, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:14 p.m. April 28, in the area of State Highway 126 and Junipine Lane in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:24 p.m. April 28, in the area of Kingsburg Road and Solar Drive in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:31 p.m. April 28, in the 100 block of West Main Avenue in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:42 a.m. April 28, in the 9300 block of Northeast Fifth Street in Terrebonne. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:54 a.m. April 28, in the 16000 block of Burgess Road in La Pine. DUII — Christopher Sean Jared, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:20 a.m. April 28, in the 700 block of Southwest Sixth Street in Redmond.

Oregon State Police

DUII — Richard Anthony Millhouse, 68, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:58 p.m. April 28, in the 10300 block of Northwest Kingwood Drive in Redmond. DUII — Steven Douglas Slye, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:29 a.m. April 29, in the area of Northwest Maple Avenue and U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 1:49 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 60889 Granite Drive. 3:17 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 2248 N.E. Fourth St. 3:26 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 19258 Apache Road. 14 — Medical aid calls. Wednesday 13 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the Web site at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the Web site at www.redmondhumane. org. The Bend shelter’s Web site is www.hsco.org.

and silver; found near 10th Street and Quince Avenue. Domestic short-haired cat–Siamese mix — Adult male, white tabby; found in the 2000 block of Northwest Ivy Place. Domestic short-haired cat — Adult female, brown and white tabby; found near Negus Loop. Domestic short-haired cat — Adult female, gray and white, microchipped; found near Negus Loop. Chihuahua–Terrier mix — Adult male, beige and red; found near 10th Street and Quince Avenue.

the president in 1789 The Associated Press Today is Friday, April 30, the 120th day of 2010. There are 245 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 30, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon announced the U.S. was sending troops into Cambodia, an action that sparked widespread protest. ON THIS DATE In 1789, George Washington took office in New York as the first president of the United States. In 1803, the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory from France for 60 million francs, the equivalent of about $15 million. In 1812, Louisiana became the 18th state of the Union. In 1859, the Charles Dickens novel “A Tale of Two Cities� was first published, in serial form. In 1939, the New York World’s Fair officially opened with a ceremony that included an address by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, as Russian troops approached his Berlin bunker, Adolf Hitler committed suicide along with his wife of one day, Eva Braun. In 1973, President Richard M. Nixon announced the resignations of top aides H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman, along with Attorney General Richard G. Kleindienst and White House counsel John Dean. TEN YEARS AGO Hundreds of thousands participated in a gay-rights rally in Washington.

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T O D AY I N HISTORY FIVE YEARS AGO Vietnam marked the 30th anniversary of the war’s end. James Toney outpointed John Ruiz to win the WBA heavyweight title in New York. ONE YEAR AGO Chrysler filed for bankruptcy protection; the federal government pledged up to $8 billion in additional aid and to back warranties. The Iraq war formally ended for British forces as they handed control of the oil-rich Basra area to U.S. commanders. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Cloris Leachman is 84. Singer Willie Nelson is 77. Actor Paul Gross is 51. Basketball Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas is 49. Rock musician Chris Henderson (3 Doors Down) is 39. Country singer Carolyn Dawn Johnson is 39. Rhythm-and-blues singer Akon is 37. Rhythm-and-blues singer Jeff Timmons (98 Degrees) is 37. Actor Johnny Galecki is 35. Singer-musician Cole Deggs (Cole Deggs and the Lonesome) is 34. Rapper Lloyd Banks is 28. Actress Kirsten Dunst is 28. Country singer Tyler Wilkinson (The Wilkinsons) is 26. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “In America, getting on in the world means getting out of the world we have known before.� — Ellery Sedgwick, American editor (1872-1960)

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 C3

O Happy birthday, geocaching Scavenger hunting celebrates 10 years

Supreme Court rules on political contributions

By Sarah Lemon

The Associated Press

Mail Tribune

PORTLAND — The Oregon Supreme Court has ruled the right to free speech does not protect political contributors who run afoul of campaign finance laws by disguising their contributions. Multimillionaire developer Tom Moyer was charged with violating a century-old

MEDFORD — A decade after the first geocache was stashed outside the Oregon community of Beavercreek, enthusiasts of this high-tech scavenger hunt have multiplied the game by more than a million. Geocaching’s 10th anniversary couldn’t be observed without adding to the 1,049,636 active caches recorded worldwide. Geocachers in southern Oregon have planted at least a half-dozen new ones near Ruch alone to tempt participants in their Saturday celebration at McKee Bridge, where the most prolific geocachers will be honored and everyone can relive the best “finds.” To start geocaching, one needs only a global-positioning system and access to the Internet. Log onto www.geocaching.com to search caches within several miles of a particular ZIP code or enter a set of coordinates for longitude and latitude. Print out or download the information onto a high-end GPS, Palm Pilot or iPhone and let the hunt begin. Geocachers generally hide caches on public land to avoid trespassing on private property, and they attempt to keep clear of “muggles,” or non-geocachers who may take note of the cache and later try to find or dispose of it. Some areas, such as national parks, have banned geocaching in order to keep the land pristine. While some view geocaching as a form of littering, there is an effort within geocaching circles to improve the pastime’s environmental image and diminish its impact on the natural landscape. However, geocachers aren’t above disguising a cache as trash, such as bottle caps that cover plas-

state law that requires contributions be made only in your own name after his granddaughter and an executive assistant donated about $5,000 to a Portland mayoral candidate. But the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the law is clear — contributions must be made in your own name, and not in the name of your family or employees.

Miner wants to go back to work The Associated Press

Jim Craven / The Medford Mail Tribune

Geocacher Darrell Potter of Grants Pass checks coordinates on his handheld GPS device for a new cache he was hiding near Ruch on Tuesday. Geocaching celebrates it 10th birthday in May.

Nearby geocaches Redmond: 1,333 Bend: 1,316 Sisters: 546 La Pine: 523 Madras: 342 www.geocaching.com tic tubes planted in a hole in the ground. “It’s a real prestige who has the most,” says 56-year-old Debbie Davenport, who organized the event. But anyone with a handheld global-positioning system unit can start racking up finds, often within just a short walk from their own front door. That’s how Davenport got started more than

two years ago with her first find near Central Point’s Dollar Tree store, pinpointed by the official geocaching website. Davenport has since used her GPS unit — a Christmas gift intended to help her navigate woodland trails — to find and place geocaches all over the region. “It was a good reason to get outdoors,” she says. “We love to geocache by horseback.” While rural areas host their fair share of geocaches, the pastime has penetrated urban landscapes. About 200 caches can be found within a 5-mile radius of downtown Medford, according to geocaching.com. Many are “nano-caches,” perhaps no more than an inch long and affixed with magnets to common city features, such as light poles and

street signs. “The ones in town are a lot harder to find,” Davenport says. “The ones out in the woods are usually a lot bigger.” Larger caches commonly contained in plastic containers or metal ammunition boxes usually contain trinkets, along with a logbook. Etiquette dictates that if finders take something out of the cache, they put something back in. As the Internet’s influence on geocaching has grown over the years, trackable “travel bugs” and “geocoins” have become the most desirable loot. Stamped with unique sequences of numbers, these items can be tracked across the world as geocachers move them from one stash to the next, recording those locations online.

MEDFORD — A man convicted of mining gold illegally on a national forest in southwestern Oregon is still hoping to strike it rich, but this time on U.S. Bureau of Land Management land. BLM told the Mail Tribune newspaper that they are in

the process of evaluating Clifford Tracy’s plan to mine Sucker Creek near Cave Junction.

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Portland-bound train hits van

Counties get F in air quality report

PORTLAND — An Amtrak train bound for Portland collided with a van in Klickitat County, Wash., killing the motorist. Amtrak spokeswoman Vernae Graham says the passengers and crew escaped injury in the Thursday morning collision 30 miles east of Wishram, Wash. The 85 passengers remained at the crash site well into the afternoon, awaiting buses that will take them to Portland. The Klickitat County Sheriff’s Office declined to release name of the motorist.

MEDFORD — An American Lung Association report on U.S. air quality gives Jackson and Klamath counties a failing grade. The association’s State of the Air report hands the southern Oregon counties an “F” for shortterm particulate pollution. Fine particulate matter is made up of tiny particles that can lodge deep in the lungs and exacerbate health problems such as asthma and lung disease. The report is based on statistics reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2006 to 2008. The counties got their bad grades by having 10 days in the three-year reporting period when particulate pollution reached a level considered unhealthy for sensitive groups.

Drought unaffected by April rains KLAMATH FALLS — Wet weather in April has done little to change the drought picture for farmers in the upper Klamath Basin. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation tells the Herald and News newspaper that the ground was so dry it soaked up the rains, so little got to Upper Klamath Lake, the main reservoir for the area’s federal irrigation project. The formal operations plan for the Klamath Reclamation Project is coming out in the first half of May, but the bureau says water is not likely to start flowing until sometime after May 15th — a month and a half later than usual.

Trial set in Roseburg park shooting ROSEBURG — The second man to face charges in the 2004 murder of Matthew Peach won’t stand trial until July 2011. The 20-year-old Peach was gunned at Roseburg’s Stewart Park in what prosecutors say was a case of mistaken identity. Jonathan Crawford has been charged with murder and attempted murder. — From wire reports

There is no better gift to give on

Mother’s Day Mother’s Day campaign supports COCOA Services for Seniors Honor, remember or say “Happy Mother’s Day” to that special woman in your life with a gift to the Council On Aging. Your donation of just $50 will help provide important independent living services to seniors in the tri-county area including Meals-OnWheels and other nutrition programs, in-home care services, senior center programs, the Help Line and much more. Visit COCOA’s website at www.councilonaging.org to take part in this year’s Mother’s Day Recognition Event. A special notice will be published in The Bulletin on Mother’s Day – Sun., May 9th and the name you submit via the donation form found online will be included here and on the Council On Aging website. Donation forms are also available by calling 541-548-8817. Deadline for inclusion in The Bulletin is Monday, May 3, 2010, but donations are always gratefully accepted. COCOA is a 501(c)3

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C4 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Ron Maurer for state school head

W

e’re deeply interested in the political process, but even we need a double dose of NoDoz to care much about the race for state superintendent of public instruction.

As we’ve said on numerous occasions, this shouldn’t be an elected position at all. The office should be filled by gubernatorial appointment. Try a little pop quiz: 1) Who’s the incumbent? The answer, for those who drew a complete blank, is Susan Castillo, a former state senator who’s completing her second term. 2) Who’s the challenger? The answer is Ron Maurer, a state representative from Grants Pass. 3) Finally, the truly tough question: Name one — just one — instance over the past eight years in which Castillo has used the bully pulpit provided by her office. Can’t name one, can you? The third question isn’t as arbitrary as it might seem. The only conceivable reason to elect a superintendent of public instruction is to provide a platform for advocacy that might irritate the person who’d otherwise appoint her. Take away the pulpit, and the superintendent of public instruction is largely an elected bureaucrat. Castillo does have priorities, of course. She supports early education programs, for instance, and greater spending on public schools. But she’d like to stick around for another four years, she told us, largely to see through some unfinished business — namely, the full implementation of tougher diploma requirements for high school students. Re-electing a capable educational bureaucrat isn’t necessarily a terrible thing — unless, of course, you consider the lost opportunity for educational leadership. And, boy, does Oregon need leadership. Look no further than the scoring of the state’s Race to the Top application, which was rated one of the country’s worst. Among the Beaver State’s biggest problems, the reviewers indicated, is its regula-

tory and labor environment, which is about as conducive to educational innovation as the moon’s atmosphere is to human life. Maurer doesn’t strike us as much of a tub-thumper, but he does argue that the state’s education superintendent should make greater use of the office’s bully pulpit than Castillo has. Just as importantly, his views on education are a lot closer than Castillo’s to the Obama administration’s reform agenda. Maurer, for instance, believes that teachers should be judged, at least in part, by how much their students learn. Oregon collects a great deal of data tracking the academic growth of each student, for which Castillo claims some credit. But when we asked her whether that data should be used in any way to assess teachers, she dodged the question: “I think that these are the conversations we’re having in Oregon.” And when we pushed on the issue: “I think that I am still trying to figure out whether that’s going to be a useful tool for us.” Her non-answers speak volumes. If you’d be excited by a federal initiative called “Race to the Status Quo,” be sure and vote for Castillo. Electing Maurer won’t shake the foundations of Oregon’s reactionary education establishment. The office is, after all, a largely bureaucratic position that comes with a modest pulpit, for which reason it should be filled by appointment. But Maurer, a legislator with a doctorate in education, is certainly qualified for the nuts-and-bolts aspects of the job. And to the extent he uses the pulpit, he’s far more likely than Castillo to support the innovative policies that Oregon so badly needs.

Dudley rises in polls T

oday, ballots will be mailed for the May 18 election. As is often the case with primaries, this one has been fairly low-key. Many of the partisan contests are notably lopsided, and Measures 68 and 69 haven’t enjoyed the vigorous public debate devoted so recently to Measures 66 and 67. As near as we can tell, in fact, they haven’t generated any debate. But plenty of people are talking about one possible November matchup for the governor’s office: Republican Chris Dudley and Democrat John Kitzhaber, both of whom we’ve endorsed in their respective primaries. If you believe in the predictive power of polls, this race could be very, very close. On Monday, Rasmussen Reports contacted 500 likely voters and asked them, among other things, whether they support Dudley or Kitzhaber. The result: a dead heat, with 41 percent of respondents supporting each.

Back in mid-February, Kitzhaber led, 42 percent to 36 percent. Dudley fared much better in this week’s poll than either of his two main contenders. John Lim trailed Kitzhaber by 16 points, and Allen Alley trailed by 15. Potential matchups between the three Republicans and Democrat Bill Bradbury followed the same pattern. Dudley was dead even, and Lim and Alley trailed. We were persuaded to endorse Dudley rather than Alley, in part, because he’s the Republican candidate with the best chance to win. This week’s poll bears that out. Dudley, in fact, is the only one of the three to gain ground on Kitzhaber since February. Republican voters who’d like to see a true race for governor this fall should keep that in mind when they open their ballots in the coming days.

My Nickel’s Worth Protecting public I read the excellent article about “Investment firms pampering officials” and shook my head. As a former chief investment officer (CIO) of a state fund and another large state affiliated fund, my reaction was one of dismay. Performance is critical, but how you get there is also important. Do you kick your opponent on the sports field just to achieve results? No, you abide and win by sought-out principles, codes of conduct and ethics. It is naive for anyone not to believe that, in some manner, influence is not affected by the kind of activities as described. The treasurer is responsible for overseeing the functions of the state Treasury, including staff. The CIO has the day to day responsibilities, among other things, of ensuring that the investment staff abide by rules of conduct that discourage extravagances in their counter party relationships. There should be an internal code of ethics for all investment staff to follow. To do otherwise should lead to reprimand or corrective action by the treasurer and or CIO. When it comes to excesses, $500 rooms and limousines, etc., it has gone too far. As I stated earlier, money can, and does, often buy influence. Furthermore, the state Treasury is a public institution and its activities are a public matter. Nothing is more important these days than transparency. We don’t need a “Wall Street” mentality at the state

level. We’ve already seen the results. Terry Brown Bend

Conger’s better Last month, Judy Steigler hosted a meeting at a local coffeehouse as a public forum for discussion to talk about issues of concern to her constituents. Since I have some issues with the lack of financial discipline that is being shown by our Legislature, I decided to attend. I sat and listened to the questions being asked and was surprised that while she was willing to have you ask a question, she was less than forthcoming with any substantive answers, saying that if someone wanted to discuss it in detail she would meet with them one on one. It seemed very disingenuous that she would invite people to a public forum and not discuss the concerns of the people who showed up. I have had the opportunity to watch Jason Conger meet with people who had a differing opinion than he did, and I was very impressed with the way he listened to the people in the room. He was able to find common ground and affirm their position without compromising his own. Having seen both the candidates for House District 54 in action, I will have to say I would rather have “coffee with Conger” than “java with Judy” any day. James Bird Bend

Budget problems For the past four years, our state’s budget has grown almost 30 percent. Before the passage of Measures 66 and 67, the budget for the coming 2012-2013 biennium was anticipated to increase 12 percent over the present biennium. After both passed, our state Legislature convened a special session and increased the next biennium’s budget even further. Projected spending for the 2012-2013 biennium is now 16 percent above current levels. And despite the passage of Measures 66 and 67, they anticipate this budget will produce another shortfall that will need to be offset by new tax hikes. There are a number of questions that we non-public employees, who fund these budgets, need to ask. Has your pay increased by 30 percent in the past four years? Will your pay be increasing by another 16 percent in the next two? Is growing the state budget faster than the income growth for those of us who fund these budgets sustainable? Is this fair to we the people of Bend? Our current Legislature clearly has a spending problem. It’s time to send new faces to the state Legislature who will work to curb spending. I believe Jason Conger should be one of those new faces. While no one person will single-handedly solve all the state’s budget problems, Jason’s background, knowledge and conservative fiscal philosophy will contribute to solutions — not exacerbate problems. Bill Brackett Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Theater productions will benefit intellectually disabled Y JANET ou might not get three great events for the price of one if you attend Bend’s Trilogy of Inspirational Theatre next month, but you will get three very different events and help three worthy agencies as you go. The full name of the trilogy may be a tongue tripper — Bend’s Trilogy of Inspirational Theatre, Embracing Diversity and Excellence — but it sums up in a very few words what the three are all about. Two benefit agencies that serve Central Oregon’s adults with intellectual disabilities, CORIL and Full Access, while the third is the work of and helps support Bend Experimental Art Theatre. The convergence of the three groups makes perfect sense, if you think about it. CORIL — Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living — provides direct support for adults with disabilities. Its staff teaches independent living skills, provides everything from job training to recreational opportunities,

and it operates a sheltered workshop. Full Access, whose case managers serve adults with developmental disabilities, often contracts with CORIL for services. BEAT, meanwhile, gives young people in the community the chance to learn about and take part in real theatrical productions. The three agencies began discussing combining their fundraising efforts earlier this year, says Kim Sellmann of Full Access. All three were planning May events that involved movies or live theater at about the same time, so the combination made sense. And just as the resulting event title speaks of diversity, the three events planned offer a broad range of experiences. First up is CORIL’s presentation of “Vincent” Saturday, May 8 at the Tower. The one-man play about artist Vincent Van Gogh was written by Leonard Nimoy. In it, actor Jim Jarrett plays Theo, Van Gogh’s brother, who, a few days af-

STEVENS

ter the artist’s death, discusses the physical and mental challenges that made his life difficult. Aside from rental of the Tower, “Vincent” is a gift to CORIL from Jarrett that will allow the agency to raise more from the production than it otherwise might. Though he lives in San Francisco, the actor’s family lives in Bend and he has visited several times. Just a week after the live theater production, Full Access presents its fourth annual Sprout Film Festival Friday, May 14, also at the Tower. Sprout is an international touring festival based in New

York, Sellmann says, focusing on short independent productions. The two-hour matinee and evening productions will involve different films, she says. Among her favorites this year is “My Classic Life as an Artist,” the story of Larry Bissonnette of Vermont. Bissonnette was institutionalized as a young child and only moved into the community with his sister’s help years later. Of the institution, he says in the film, “It’s better for growing vegetables than for growing people.” You can learn more about Bissonnette by Googling his name. Oregon, by the way, no longer institutionalizes any of its citizens with intellectual disabilities. Finally, from May 15 through 23 BEAT actors will present “The Boys Next Door,” by Tom Griffin, at the 2nd Street Theater on Lafayette Avenue in Bend. Like the other two productions, the comedy is a story of people whose challenges may seem overwhelming to outsiders,

in this case several young men living in a group home who are, at times, the despair of their social worker. Clients of both CORIL and Full Access have roles in the production. None of these events is hugely expensive, and, in fact, will give you an evening’s entertainment at the same price or less than an evening at the movies, even if you don’t buy popcorn. All benefit worthy causes. Most important, though, all have a message, presented in different forms and styles, that’s pretty simple: Those among us with disabilities may have to work harder for the things many of us take for granted, but they do so daily, and in so doing the enrich the lives of those around them. They’re worthy members of the community at large, and they should be treated accordingly.

Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 C5

O D

N   Norma Gail Hovey, of Bend Jan. 24, 1921 - April 4, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 Services: Memorial Services will be held at a later date.

Paul Lewis France, of Prineville Oct. 28, 1944 - April 25, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Graveside Services: 10:00 am, Wednesday, May 4, 2010, at Juniper Haven Cemetery. Charlie Hughbanks will officiate.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Jesse "Jet" E. Mitchell May 28, 1926 - April 25, 2010 Jesse "Jet" Mitchell, loving husband, father, brother and grandfather joined our lord and savior on April 25, 2010. There will be a graveside service at Greenwood Cemetery in Bend, OR, on April 30, 2010, at 11:00 am. Inurnment will follow at Greenwood Cemetery. Jesse was born on May 28, 1926, to Eddie Franklin and Ada Lee (Baxter) Mitchell in Wilburton, Oklahoma. The Mitchell family moved from Oklahoma to Prineville in September of 1941. Shortly afterwards, Jesse joined the United States Navy and served in the Pacific on the Aircraft Carrier USS WASP II. Jesse received numerous commendations for his service and valor. After the war Jesse returned to Central Oregon and married Virginia Stephens in 1948, Virginia preceded Jesse in death on April 9, 2003. Jesse is survived by a son Phillip Mitchell and his wife Diane of San Diego, California; two brothers, Marion Mitchell of Lebanon and James Mitchell of Prineville; one sister, Sue Mitchell of Prineville; two grandchildren, Tonya Bennett and Sean Mitchell. Jesse leaves behind two great-grandchildren, Carly and Jake Bennett, he also leaves numerous nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Partners In Care Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon, 97701. The family has placed their trust in Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home for the final arrangements. Please visit our website www.niswonger-reynolds.com

to sign the electronic guest register book for the family.

Virdie Dittmer Hackett July 2, 1923 - April 5, 2010 Virdie Matilda Hackett, 86, died in Bend, Oregon on Monday, April 5, 2010. Virdie was born in Puyallup, WA on July 2, 1923 to Pearl Pansy (Trumbull) and Guy Frances Dittmer. Virdie will be remembered for her keen memory for names and events, her Virdie Hackett ready sense of humor, her deep laugh, her love of fishing, hunting, her fresh crab feeds and her many tales of life in the Shevlin-Hixon logging camps. Virdie is survived by three sons and their families, Jack and Wanda Hackett of Bandon; Paul and Olivia Hackett of Crescent Lake; Ken and Debby Stalcup of LaCenter, Washington; four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and one great-greatgrandchild. She will be deeply missed. A private family memorial service has been held in celebration of her life. Donations in her memory can be made to the Des Chutes County Historical Society, 129 NW Idaho Ave., Bend, OR 97701.

George S. Williams March 11, 1924 - April 16, 2010 George Williams, 86, a resident of Bend, Oregon, for the last 20 years, died on April 16, 2010, at the Fox Hollow assisted living facility in Bend. George was born March 11, 1924, in Oakland, California, to Emma and Robert Williams and was one of six boys. He was a Navy veteran, George S. serving in Williams WWII from 1942 to 1946. George married Betty Jean Barry on September 13, 1947, and together they raised five children in Concord, California. A family memorial was held in Bend on April 17, and there will be a Celebration of Life on July 10, 2010, in California. George worked in sales and was a Teamster in Northern California. He loved to play tennis, fish, hunt, and motorhome across the country with wife, Betty. They also enjoyed traveling the world together, visiting many places in Europe and Asia. He is survived by his wife, Betty of 62 years; his youngest brother, Ron of Chiloquin, OR; three sons, Tim of Aberdeen, WA, Barry of Oakland CA, Ted of Great Bend, KA; two daughters, Dale Ketron of Volcano, CA, Jan Raymond of Orinda CA; nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by his parents and four brothers, Robert, John, Richard, and Melvin. The family has placed their trust in Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home for the final arrangements. Please visit our website www.niswonger-reynolds.com

to sign the electronic guest register book for the family.

Summers Continued from C1 He said Ashley had hoped her application, which included descriptions of her future plans, letters of reference and copies of certificates earned from drug and alcohol and behavioral treatment groups, would persuade the governor to release her from prison.

‘Disappointed’ “I’m disappointed,” he said. “Obviously, she’s disappointed also. She just was hoping that all the things she had done since she’d been in there would have a positive effect on the

Journalist who covered struggle for civil rights dies in Manhattan By Daniel Lovering New York Times News Service

Evelyn Cunningham, a civil-rights-era journalist and later an aide to Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. She was 94 and lived in Harlem most of her life. Cunningham died of natural causes, her niece, Gigi Freeman, said. At a time when few women worked at newspapers — never mind as reporters handling hard news — Cunningham covered many of the civil rights era’s biggest stories, including the battle over school desegregation in Birmingham, Ala., and the work of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Starting in 1940, she worked for more than 20 years as a reporter and editor for The Pittsburgh Courier, a black newsweekly with nationwide circulation. Much of that time she worked out of the paper’s New York office. In the newsroom, she was nicknamed “Big East,” partly because of her height, 5-foot11 in heels. She also became known as the “lynching editor,” a reference to her reporting on such killings in the segregated South. “She was a heck of a newspaper gal and played a prominent

Debate Continued from C1 Dugan said he wouldn’t change anything about the way he treated Black’s case. He said Black was offered the chance to plead to a lesser charge — like his co-defendant, who agreed and received a shorter sentence — but that Black opted for a trial. “I’m glad Mr. Flaherty points

Landfill Continued from C1 People began dumping material in the former pumice mine at Mt. Washington Drive and Simpson Avenue 35 years ago, first as an unregulated site and as a county demolition landfill from 1972 to 1996. The county and neighboring landowners will also begin work on a traffic study they need in order to apply for an “intent to rezone” from the city of Bend, said county Property & Facilities Department Director Susan Ross. In the application, the county will ask city planners to OK future zone changes in the proposal, but developers will have to apply for the changes when they have specific plans for projects. The county’s proposed development plan sets out sections of the 85-acre property and the surface mine next to it for homes and commercial and light industrial activities. In December 2008, a consultant for the county completed a detailed investigation of the site that found hazardous substances, including arsenic and lead, at the site, but the waste did not appear to be leaching

governor’s decision.” Dugan’s office has also sent a letter to the governor opposing the early release of Seth Koch, who was 16 years old when he pulled the trigger, firing the fatal shot. Koch pleaded guilty to two counts of aggravated murder and was sentenced to life in prison with no parole. A spokeswoman for the governor’s office said she has not received a clemency application from Koch, who is serving his sentence at the MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility in Woodburn. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

role with the newspaper,” said Bill Nunn Jr., 84, who worked with Cunningham at the Pittsburgh headquarters of The Courier and later became the paper’s managing editor. In 1998, The Courier received a George Polk Award for its civil rights coverage, and Cunningham was among five former Courier reporters who accepted it. Cunningham entered another realm of public life in the late 1960s, when she took a job as special assistant to Rockefeller, who had been impressed with her when she interviewed him as a candidate. Rockefeller named her to lead an office on women’s affairs, and she later served on many government panels dealing with women’s rights and community issues. She continued to advise him when he became President Gerald R. Ford’s vice president. Evelyn Elizabeth Long was born on Jan. 25, 1916, in Elizabeth City, N.C., the daughter of a taxi driver and a dressmaker. She moved with her parents to New York as a child, and earned a bachelor’s degree from Long Island University. She had no children. She had one brother, who died in 1973, and Cunningham raised his daughter, Gigi Freeman, her only immediate survivor.

out he has no details or knowledge (of the case) and then points out that he would do what we did, investigate as we did,” Dugan said. The district attorney is a nonpartisan office. Because there are only two candidates, the race will be decided in the primary election. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

into the ground, and there was no evidence of chemical contamination that would require immediate action. The report confirmed that concentrated deposits of sawdust and other wood products account for much of the waste at the demolition landfill, and this material has caused smoldering underground fires. That does not preclude development, however, said Timm Schimke, director of the county’s Department of Solid Waste. “There was really nothing to say it couldn’t be developed, unless it was too expensive,” Schimke said of the report. A developer could compact the ground to eliminate sinkholes, or drive pilings into the waste and build on top of them. Schimke said he would prefer for a developer to remove the waste or take some other measures to deal with the hot spots, because it would reduce the county’s liability. The county has proposed industrial and mixed-use development on areas where the most waste is located, Schimke said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

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W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, APRIL 30

SATURDAY

Today: Partly cloudy, breezy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

53

29

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

57/36

54/33

60/36

39/28

Marion Forks 49/26

Warm Springs 56/36



Willowdale

Mitchell

Madras

56/31

55/34

Camp Sherman 47/26 Redmond Prineville 53/29 Cascadia 52/30 52/30 Sisters 50/28 Bend Post 53/29

Oakridge Elk Lake 50/28

50/26

50/25

52/27

48/25

Crescent Crescent 45/24 Lake  44/19

Chemult 49/23

48/26

34/23

51/32

Seattle

City

58/45

Missoula Helena

Eugene 57/37

Bend

55/33

Redding

46/26



Partly sunny with cool temperatures.





Idaho Falls Elko

71/47

54/28

44/30

Boise

53/29

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

47/36



Reno

47/30



57/35

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

63/49

48/35



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Last

May 5

New

First

Full

May 13 May 20 May 27

Friday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 55/43/0.15 . . . . . . 55/41/c. . . . . . 56/43/pc Baker City . . . . . . 50/28/0.00 . . . . . . 50/32/c. . . . . . 56/33/pc Brookings . . . . . . 52/41/0.35 . . . . . 57/45/pc. . . . . . 59/47/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 47/30/0.00 . . . . . 50/26/pc. . . . . . 54/28/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 56/40/0.12 . . . . . 57/37/pc. . . . . . 61/40/pc Klamath Falls . . . 46/28/0.01 . . . . . 49/27/pc. . . . . . . 58/28/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 41/34/0.00 . . . . . 50/26/pc. . . . . . 56/29/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 47/28/0.00 . . . . . . 48/25/c. . . . . . . 55/26/s Medford . . . . . . . 53/37/0.13 . . . . . 57/36/pc. . . . . . 66/39/pc Newport . . . . . . . 55/46/0.04 . . . . . . 55/40/c. . . . . . 56/43/pc North Bend . . . . . . 54/43/NA . . . . . 55/42/pc. . . . . . 56/44/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 54/34/0.00 . . . . . . 58/37/c. . . . . . 61/39/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 54/41/0.00 . . . . . 62/39/pc. . . . . . 63/40/pc Portland . . . . . . . 57/43/0.12 . . . . . . 57/42/c. . . . . . 60/44/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 47/29/0.00 . . . . . . 52/30/c. . . . . . . 58/30/s Redmond. . . . . . . 51/31/0.00 . . . . . . 52/25/c. . . . . . . 57/28/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 53/42/0.23 . . . . . 57/39/sh. . . . . . 63/43/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 58/42/0.01 . . . . . . 57/40/c. . . . . . 61/41/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 49/32/0.00 . . . . . . 50/28/c. . . . . . . 54/32/s The Dalles . . . . . . 61/43/0.00 . . . . . 59/42/pc. . . . . . . 62/43/s

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46/29 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 in 1998 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.53” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 in 1972 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.67” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.59” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.48” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.97 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.38 in 1995 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:46 a.m. . . . . . .7:38 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:13 a.m. . . . . .10:30 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .12:09 p.m. . . . . . .2:53 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .4:17 a.m. . . . . . .3:56 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .4:10 p.m. . . . . . .4:41 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .4:27 a.m. . . . . . .4:23 p.m.

2

LOW

63 27

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

64 29

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary



52/27

50/23

Crater Lake

56/43

57/35

Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

Vancouver

Mostly cloudy.

62 33

BEND ALMANAC

57/42

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Expect partly to mostly cloudy skies today.

LOW

56 27

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:58 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:08 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:57 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:09 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:12 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:02 a.m.

TUESDAY

Partly cloudy, warmer.

NORTHWEST

51/26

Brothers

HIGH

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 63° Hermiston • 28° Baker City

MONDAY

Partly cloudy, breezy.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, winds subsiding, chilly.

Expect partly to mostly cloudy skies today, with a slight chance of rain and mountain snow.

Paulina

51/27

Sunriver

41/17

Skies will become mostly cloudy, and a few sprinkles will be possible. Central

55/35

SUNDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . 108-136 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 114-119 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 125-168 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . 4 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . .7-10 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . . 115-150 . . . no report . . . . . . . 211 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 56/43

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 51/32

S

S

S

S

Saskatoon 50/39

Seattle 58/45

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 64/39 Thunder Bay 67/45

Halifax 52/38 Portland Billings P ortland (in the 48 67/47 47/32 57/42 St. Paul contiguous states): Boston 69/48 To ronto Buffalo Boise 71/52 Green Bay Rapid City 72/53 74/60 55/33 74/54 Detroit 50/32 New York • 97° 79/63 76/64 Des Moines Wink, Texas Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 71/47 Chicago 44/26 80/60 80/63 75/57 • 14° San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 63/49 Omaha Monarch, Colo. City 81/64 Las 70/44 Denver Louisville 48/35 Vegas • 1.14” Kansas City 52/34 85/64 St. Louis 67/51 73/52 Charlotte Roseau, Minn. 80/62 83/61 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 54/32 68/52 82/50 84/69 79/67 Phoenix Atlanta 74/52 Honolulu 81/67 Birmingham 84/70 Dallas Tijuana 84/70 84/67 69/52 New Orleans 83/74 Orlando Houston 82/68 84/75 Chihuahua Miami 85/50 81/72 Monterrey La Paz 94/69 81/52 Mazatlan Anchorage 79/60 51/37 Juneau 49/39 Bismarck 60/33

FRONTS

Winnipeg 63/46

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .89/62/0.00 . 84/50/pc . . 81/50/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .63/35/0.00 . 80/58/pc . . . .76/59/t Albany. . . . . . . . .63/40/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . 82/60/pc Albuquerque. . . .75/56/0.00 . 54/32/pc . . 59/38/pc Anchorage . . . . .49/44/0.00 . . .51/37/c . . . 49/34/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .68/47/0.00 . . .81/67/s . . . .83/66/t Atlantic City . . . .69/44/0.01 . . .74/57/s . . . 87/63/s Austin . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . 87/68/pc . . 86/65/pc Baltimore . . . . . .70/36/0.00 . . .81/62/s . . 87/67/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .45/34/0.30 . . 47/32/rs . . . .55/32/r Birmingham . . . .77/48/0.00 . 84/70/pc . . . .86/70/t Bismarck . . . . . . .62/37/0.00 . . .60/33/r . . 53/34/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .52/33/0.00 . . .55/33/c . . . 58/35/c Boston. . . . . . . . .62/44/0.00 . 71/52/pc . . 74/62/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .70/43/0.00 . 69/56/pc . . 77/59/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . 74/60/pc . . . 77/61/c Burlington, VT. . .55/31/0.00 . . .68/45/c . . . .78/60/t Caribou, ME . . . .50/36/0.00 . .52/34/sh . . 61/43/pc Charleston, SC . .77/52/0.00 . . .82/67/s . . 86/67/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .73/38/0.00 . . .83/61/s . . 85/66/pc Chattanooga. . . .75/45/0.00 . 84/65/pc . . . .84/68/t Cheyenne . . . . . .48/29/0.10 . . 44/26/rs . . 48/28/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .75/57/c . . 73/54/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .73/36/0.00 . 80/63/pc . . . .77/64/t Cleveland . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . 79/60/pc . . . .75/56/t Colorado Springs 64/38/0.00 . . .50/29/c . . 50/30/pc Columbia, MO . .82/55/0.00 . . .79/56/t . . . .72/52/t Columbia, SC . . .78/41/0.00 . . .85/65/s . . 88/67/pc Columbus, GA. . .72/47/0.00 . 84/66/pc . . 88/67/pc Columbus, OH. . .70/36/0.00 . . .80/60/s . . . .77/63/t Concord, NH . . . .55/28/0.00 . 72/42/pc . . 83/52/pc Corpus Christi. . .85/65/0.00 . 89/74/pc . . 89/71/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .83/62/0.00 . . .84/67/t . . . .76/55/t Dayton . . . . . . . .71/40/0.00 . . .78/62/s . . . .76/63/t Denver. . . . . . . . .48/34/0.00 . 52/34/pc . . 51/37/pc Des Moines. . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .71/47/t . . 70/48/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .65/37/0.01 . 79/63/pc . . . .77/59/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .54/40/0.01 . . .56/45/t . . 65/41/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 65/45/pc . . 68/46/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .63/38/0.00 . 58/34/pc . . . 55/37/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .63/51/0.82 . . .62/44/r . . 55/38/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . .47/30/0.02 . 45/20/pc . . 51/25/pc

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .70/36/0.00 . 77/59/pc . . . .74/52/t Rapid City . . . . . .58/38/0.00 . . .50/32/r . . . 50/32/c Savannah . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . .82/66/s . . 85/68/pc Green Bay. . . . . .64/39/0.00 . . .74/54/c . . 74/48/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .48/35/0.00 . 57/35/pc . . 64/36/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .58/43/0.00 . . .58/45/c . . 56/44/sh Greensboro. . . . .72/42/0.00 . . .83/60/s . . 84/65/pc Richmond . . . . . .74/36/0.00 . . .83/61/s . . . 89/67/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .68/55/0.01 . 66/41/pc . . 62/40/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .70/42/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . 86/64/pc Rochester, NY . . .65/38/0.00 . . .74/60/c . . . 82/60/c Spokane . . . . . . .52/39/0.15 . . .55/38/c . . 56/35/pc Hartford, CT . . . .66/45/0.00 . 74/51/pc . . 87/60/pc Sacramento. . . . .67/36/0.00 . . .71/48/s . . . 78/50/s Springfield, MO. .81/56/0.00 . . .77/59/t . . . .73/52/t Helena. . . . . . . . .41/32/0.19 . . 44/30/rs . . .51/32/rs St. Louis. . . . . . . .83/57/0.00 . 80/62/pc . . . .75/59/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .83/60/0.00 . .84/71/sh . . 90/74/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .83/70/0.03 . . .84/70/s . . 83/70/pc Salt Lake City . . .47/31/0.36 . . .48/35/c . . .50/38/rs Tucson. . . . . . . . .75/62/0.01 . 66/41/pc . . . 70/47/s Houston . . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . . .84/75/t . . 86/71/pc San Antonio . . . .85/64/0.00 . . .90/68/s . . 89/65/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . 81/53/pc . . . .72/48/t Huntsville . . . . . .79/47/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . . .81/66/t San Diego . . . . . 63/56/trace . 66/55/pc . . . 68/57/s Washington, DC .72/44/0.00 . . .81/64/s . . 89/69/pc Indianapolis . . . .76/44/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . . .75/61/t San Francisco . . .60/48/0.00 . . .63/49/s . . . 68/51/s Wichita . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . 74/51/pc . . . .71/52/t Jackson, MS . . . .83/53/0.00 . . .82/70/t . . . .86/72/t San Jose . . . . . . .62/48/0.00 . . .66/47/s . . . 74/50/s Yakima . . . . . . . .62/37/0.00 . 64/40/pc . . . 64/39/s Madison, WI . . . .77/50/0.00 . . .73/51/t . . 72/50/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . . .50/22/c . . 54/30/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . 79/52/pc . . . 81/56/s Jacksonville. . . . .78/47/0.00 . 84/65/pc . . 89/70/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .49/44/0.22 . . .49/39/r . . . .48/37/r Kansas City. . . . .81/62/0.00 . . .73/52/t . . 70/51/pc Amsterdam. . . . .75/52/0.00 . 62/42/pc . . 62/41/sh Mecca . . . . . . . .106/84/0.00 101/80/pc . 100/79/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .65/34/0.01 . 77/61/pc . . . .75/55/t Athens. . . . . . . . .66/56/0.00 . . .73/53/s . . . 75/54/s Mexico City. . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .86/58/s . . . 87/58/s Las Vegas . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . . .67/51/s . . . 73/55/s Auckland. . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . 68/57/pc . . . 63/49/s Montreal. . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . 65/39/pc . . . 75/57/c Lexington . . . . . .72/40/0.00 . 83/63/pc . . . .75/65/t Baghdad . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 89/66/pc . . 87/68/pc Moscow . . . . . . .54/39/0.07 . . .61/45/c . . . 65/49/c Lincoln. . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .68/43/c . . 66/45/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .95/77/0.67 . .100/78/t . . .100/80/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/64/0.06 . . .76/59/t . . . .77/61/t Little Rock. . . . . .85/58/0.00 . . .79/67/t . . . .79/63/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .66/41/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . . 78/52/s Nassau . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . 87/73/pc . . 90/74/pc Los Angeles. . . . .63/53/0.00 . . .68/52/s . . . 71/54/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . . .71/62/c . . . .71/63/t New Delhi. . . . .107/82/0.00 102/73/pc . 103/74/pc Louisville . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . 85/64/pc . . . .75/64/t Berlin. . . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . .66/45/sh . . . 66/48/c Osaka . . . . . . . . .61/52/0.47 . .67/49/sh . . . 66/49/s Memphis. . . . . . .81/56/0.00 . . .82/70/t . . . .80/68/t Bogota . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . 72/51/pc . . 74/50/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .55/37/c . . .43/29/rs Miami . . . . . . . . .80/73/0.00 . .81/72/sh . . 87/75/pc Budapest. . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . 72/47/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . 66/40/pc . . . 74/57/c Milwaukee . . . . .69/47/0.00 . . .74/53/c . . 74/51/pc Buenos Aires. . . .72/45/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 80/55/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . 63/40/pc . . 63/42/pc Minneapolis . . . .73/56/0.00 . . .69/48/t . . 65/45/pc Cabo San Lucas .86/66/0.00 . . .80/57/s . . . 77/56/s Rio de Janeiro. . .75/70/0.00 . . .77/70/t . . 82/68/sh Nashville . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . 84/69/pc . . . .80/68/t Cairo . . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . .78/61/sh . . . .77/59/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . .73/51/s . . 71/50/pc New Orleans. . . .82/58/0.00 . . .83/74/t . . 86/74/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .37/30/0.77 . 51/32/pc . . 55/39/sh Santiago . . . . . . .81/37/0.00 . . .75/41/s . . . 71/37/s New York . . . . . .69/45/0.00 . 76/64/pc . . . 88/65/s Cancun . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . 90/73/pc . . 89/74/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . .78/66/sh . . . 82/64/s Newark, NJ . . . . .73/44/0.00 . 78/62/pc . . . 85/62/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.02 . .56/45/sh . . 54/43/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .51/41/0.73 . .46/42/sh . . 51/44/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .72/41/0.00 . . .80/59/s . . . 88/68/s Edinburgh . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . 51/37/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . 55/39/pc . . 65/46/pc Oklahoma City . .81/62/0.00 . 82/50/pc . . . .72/51/t Geneva . . . . . . . .81/48/0.00 . .67/48/sh . . 66/46/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .73/54/s . . . 76/55/s Omaha . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . .70/44/c . . 66/46/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . 78/57/pc . . 76/58/pc Singapore . . . . . .91/81/0.02 . . .92/78/t . . . .93/77/t Orlando. . . . . . . NA/54/0.00 . .82/68/sh . . 90/71/pc Hong Kong . . . . .79/66/4.94 . .82/71/sh . . . .84/72/t Stockholm. . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .60/45/c . . 49/36/sh Palm Springs. . . .75/57/0.00 . . .78/53/s . . . 83/58/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . .68/52/s . . . 69/50/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .72/51/s . . . 71/53/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .79/53/0.00 . . .78/58/t . . . .75/56/t Jerusalem . . . . . .73/42/0.00 . . .76/59/c . . . .73/58/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . 77/65/pc . . 83/69/pc Philadelphia . . . .71/44/0.00 . 80/63/pc . . . 89/66/s Johannesburg . . .70/50/0.00 . 73/51/pc . . 73/53/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . . .74/61/c . . . .73/62/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .76/61/0.00 . 74/52/pc . . . 79/55/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . . .75/65/c . . 76/66/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .65/51/s . . . 67/52/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .65/34/0.00 . . .82/58/s . . 80/61/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . 74/57/pc . . . 72/53/s Toronto . . . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . . .72/53/c . . . .76/57/t Portland, ME. . . .53/35/0.00 . . .67/47/s . . . 63/52/c London . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . 61/43/pc . . 60/42/pc Vancouver. . . . . .55/48/0.00 . .56/43/sh . . 55/41/sh Providence . . . . .64/42/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . 81/58/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 82/58/pc . . 79/56/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . .76/55/sh . . 73/54/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .75/38/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . 88/66/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .92/78/t . . . .93/79/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . 72/51/pc . . . 64/46/c

INTERNATIONAL


S

Golf Inside Tiger has rough start at PGA Tour event, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

L O C A L LY Paulina Lake opens for fishing Saturday Paulina Lake will be open for fishing this Saturday, according to Paulina Lake Lodge owner Karen Brown. Brown said Thursday that the lake, east of La Pine in the Newberry National Volcanic Monument, is about 90 percent ice free. The gate into the monument will be open by late this afternoon, Brown said. The only accessible boat ramp onto the lake this weekend, according to Brown, will be at Paulina Lake Lodge. For more information, call the lodge at 541-536-2240. —Bulletin staff report

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Outlaws win pair of meets Bulletin staff report SISTERS — Overcoming three other teams and the elements, both Sisters’ girls and boys teams posted wins in a home track meet Thursday afternoon. “I told my kids before the meet, ‘Don’t worry about the times today because of the weather,’ ” said Outlaws coach Bob Johnson. The Sisters boys walked away from the meet with 198 points, while La Pine finished second with 158 points, Elmira slotted in at third and Junction City took fourth place at the Sky-Em League event. The Outlaws’ Jared Nelson found a way around the wind, setting a new personal record in the pole vault. Nel-

P R E P T R AC K & F I E L D son cleared 14 feet and tied La Pine’s Jake Logan for first place. Sisters ruled the distance events, taking first and second place in the 800-, 1,500 and 3,000-meter events, thanks to winning performances from Drew Harrison, Mason Calmettes and Taylor Steele. La Pine doubled up in the 400 relay, snatching first and second place in the team event. Ty Slater won the discus for the Hawks and finished second in the shot put and javelin. Freshman Kole Kimmel took first in the 100, setting a new PR in the process.

On the girls side, Sisters’ Courteney Satko and Jodie Reoch made for an exciting finish in the 200, with Satko edging her Outlaw teammate at the finish. Sisters easily won with 222 points and Elmira followed in a distant second with 124 points, La Pine finished third with 96 and Junction City was fourth. Annie Mutchler, jumping into the wind, tallied another win for Sisters in the long jump with a mark of 15-11. Mutchler also posted a win in the high jump. La Pine’s Kassi Conditt was again a double winner — the senior has, this season, won every shot put and discus event she has entered, save for one second-place discus result — and Thursday proved no exception.

At right, Sisters’ Emi Conrads extends her lead over the competition during the girls 1,500-meter race Thursday during a track meet at Sisters High School. Conrads finished first in the event. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

GOLF Bend pair in semis at Tetherow event

PREP SOFTBALL

ADVENTURE SPORTS

A Bend duo has made it to the semifinals of the Tetherow Fourball Championship. Brandon Kearney, a pro at Bend Golf and Country Club, and amateur teammate Brad Mombert eliminated 2008 Oregon Open champion Corey Prugh, of Spokane, Wash., and Couer d’Alene, Idaho, teammate Reid Hatley, 5 and 3, to advance at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend on Thursday. Earlier Thursday Kearney and Mombert defeated Danny Moore, a pro from Willamette Valley Country Club, and Randy Fisher, of Eugene. The two Bend golfers will face pro Scott Williams and amateur Derek Berg, who are both from Bellevue, Wash., today at Tetherow. The winner of the match will advance to this afternoon’s final. The inaugural Tetherow Fourball Championship is a single-elimination two-man fourball tournament. Each team is made up of one pro and one amateur. The winning pro wins $7,500, and his amateur partner wins $750. For results, see Scoreboard, Page D2. — Bulletin staff report

COMING S AT U R DAY

Sisters ends Marist’s winning streak Bulletin staff report

Submitted photo

Competitors ski uphill during the King and Queen of the Cone last year at Mount Bachelor.

Uphill battle As skinners come to terms with Mt. Bachelor’s policy, uphill/downhill race is set for Sunday

K Central Oregon Golf Preview on tap The Bulletin’s annual guide to golf on the High Desert will be included with this Saturday’s edition. The guide offers golfers all the information needed for the upcoming golf season, including: • Details and descriptions of all golf courses in Central Oregon • Information on the JeldWen Tradition and other regionally significant golf tournaments • A comprehensive list of tournaments taking place in Central Oregon this season • Ways for juniors to get involved with golf Look for the 2010 Central Oregon Golf Preview in Saturday’s Bulletin.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 NHL ...........................................D3 NBA ...........................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Prep sports ................................D5 Adventure Sports...................... D6

evin Grove admits he is in an awkward position. The backcountry enthusiast from Bend is trying to promote his uphill/downhill ski race at Mt. Bachelor ski area, the very resort that has limited use to uphill skinners this season. “I think people have come to terms with it,” Grove says. “It’s a tough subject. I’m not a huge fan of talking about it too much.” The second annual King and Queen of the Cone is scheduled for Sunday at Mt. Bachelor. Competitors will use free-heeled gear such as alpine touring (AT), telemark or split boards to ascend and descend the race course, which

MARK MORICAL

includes Bachelor’s cinder cone and summit. For the uphill portion, most racers will use skins: fabric applied to the bottom of their skis for enhanced traction. For the first time ever, Mt. Bachelor this season limited access to uphill skinners, hikers and snowshoers, designating one route they could take to the mountain’s summit. This came after the resort had limited uphill access to only the cinder cone — an outcropping located on the northwest flank of Mount Bachelor near the West Village Lodge — resulting in an outcry from the backcountry community. See Uphill / D6

N B A P L AYO F F S

Suns finish off Blazers By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Jason Richardson scored 28 points, including five three-pointers, and the Phoenix Suns advanced to the second round of the playoffs with a 99-90 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers in Game 6 on Thursday night. The third-seeded Suns will face seventh-seeded San Antonio, which advanced by beating Dallas 97-87 on Thursday night. The opening game of the Western Conference semifinals is Monday night in Phoenix.

The Suns last went to the second round in 2007, when they got past the Los Angeles Lakers to open the playoffs before falling to the Spurs. In 2008, the Spurs got the best of Phoenix in the first round. Grant Hill of the Suns advanced past the first round for the first time in his career. The Suns went up 53-41 at halftime and led by as many as 16 points in the second half. The Blazers tied it at 76 midway through the fourth quarter, but could not pull ahead. See Blazers / D5

King and Queen of the Cone What: An uphill/ downhill skinning and skiing race Where: Mt. Bachelor ski area When: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. Who: Backcountry enthusiasts and competitors using alpine touring, telemark or split-board gear to ascend and descend the race course. Race Division climbs 4,000 feet, Recreational Division climbs 2,000 feet. Cost: $30 for Bachelor pass-holders and $55 otherwise at Pine Mountain Sports before Sunday; $40 for pass holders and $65 otherwise day of the race. Race is a benefit for The Environmental Center Contact: www.mtbachelor.com

EUGENE — Marist’s reign over the Sky-Em League is finally over. Sisters High ended the twotime defending Class 4A state softball champion’s 59-game winning streak on Thursday, topping the Spartans 3-1 on the road. The Outlaws scored three runs in the first inning and held on for the victory, avenging Marist’s 4-2 eight-inning win over Sisters on Monday. “No doubt about it, it’s the biggest win in Sisters softball history,” said Outlaw coach Tom Mauldin. “To end a team’s 59game winning streak is absolutely great.” Missie Calavan, Cassie Hernandez and Taylor Walker all had RBI singles in the first inning to shock the Spartans, who had not lost a league game since 2005. Dara Kosanke, who scored Sisters first run of the game, pitched a gem, striking out eight while giving up just five hits. “She was very, very tough,” Mauldin said about his ace in the circle. Despite committing four errors, the Outlaws also had their share of stellar defensive plays, according to Mauldin. Sisters right fielder Harley Rowe made a diving catch in the bottom of the sixth inning with runners on first and second, saving at least one run, said Mauldin. And in the bottom of the seventh inning, shortstop McKenzie Cooper nullified a Marist leadoff single by turning a double play. First baseman Amber Milliman then ended the game with a nice scoop in the dirt, giving the Outlaws their first-ever league victory over the Spartans. With the win, Sisters and Marist are now tied for first in the Sky-Em with matching 7-1 records.

The Phoenix Suns’ Jarron Collins and the Portland Trail Blazers’ Marcus Camby (21) battle for a rebound during the first half of Game 6 of an NBA firstround playoff basketball series Thursday in Portland. Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press


D2 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Spanish Open, second round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Quail Hollow Championship, second round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic, first round, Golf.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Atlanta Hawks at Milwaukee Bucks, ESPN. 6:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Los Angeles Lakers at Oklahoma City Thunder, ESPN. 7 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Denver Nuggets at Utah Jazz, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Montreal Canadiens at Pittsburgh Penguins, VS. network.

AUTO RACING 4:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Richmond 250, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 7 p.m. — College, Washington State at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet. 7:30 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

SATURDAY SOCCER 4:30 p.m. — Barclays Premier league, Birmingham City vs. Burnley, ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — MLS, Columbus Crew at Seattle Sounders FC, FSNW.

GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Spanish Open, third round, Golf. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Quail Hollow Championship, third round, Golf. 11 a.m. — LPGA Tour, The Mojo Six, day one, CBS (taped). Noon — PGA Tour, Quail Hollow Championship, third round, CBS. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic, second round, Golf.

HOCKEY 9:30 a.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Philadelphia Flyers at Boston Bruins, NBC. 5 p.m. — NHL conference semifinals, Vancouver Canucks at Chicago Blackhawks, VS. network.

AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. — IndyCar, Izod Road Runner Turbo 300, ABC. 4 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Heath Calhoun 400, Fox. 6 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA AAA Insurance Midwest Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2.

HORSE RACING 11 a.m. — Kentucky Derby Undercard, ESPN. 1 p.m. — Kentucky Derby, NBC.

CYCLING 11 a.m. — Liege Bastogne Liege, VS. network (taped).

BASEBALL Noon — College, Kansas at Oklahoma State, FSNW. Noon — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, Fox.

SOFTBALL 4:30 p.m. — College, Tennessee at Alabama, ESPN. 9:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Washington, FSNW (joined in progress, same-day tape).

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first-round, Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers, TNT.

SUNDAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Spanish Open, final round, Golf. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Quail Hollow Championship, third round, Golf. 11 a.m. — LPGA Tour, The Mojo Six, day two, CBS (taped). Noon — PGA Tour, Quail Hollow Championship, final round, CBS. 4 p.m. — Champions Tour, Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic, final round, Golf.

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Milwaukee Bucks at Atlanta Hawks, ABC (if necessary). 12:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC (if necessary).

SOCCER 10 a.m. — Spanish Primera Division, Real Madrid vs. Osasuna, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Chicago White Sox at New York Yankees, TBS. 10 a.m. — College, LSU at Florida, ESPN. 1 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

ON DECK

Matt Bettencourt Cameron Tringale Willis Ring Jeff Klauk Richard S. Johnson Cameron Beckman Adam Scott Notah Begay III J.B. Holmes Jason Dufner Omar Uresti Kevin Johnson Jeff Peck Parker McLachlin

IN THE BLEACHERS

Today Girls golf: Summit vs. Redmond at Juniper Golf Course, 1:30 p.m. Baseball: Redmond at North Salem, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Hermiston, 4:30 p.m.; Kennedy at Culver (DH), 2:15 p.m. Softball: North Salem at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Hermiston, 4:30 p.m.; Kennedy at Culver (DH), 2:15 p.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at McNary, 3:30 p.m.; Summit at Medford Tournament, 9 a.m. Girls tennis: McNary at Redmond, 3:30 p.m. Track: Summit at Oregon Relays in Eugene, 10 a.m. Boys lacrosse: Mountain View at Harney County, 5 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 5 p.m.

LPGA Tour

Saturday Baseball: Madras at Bend (DH), 11 a.m.; Crook County at Mountain View (DH), 10 a.m.; Summit at Hermiston (DH), 11 a.m. Softball: Madras at Bend (DH), 10 a.m.; Crook County at Mountain View (DH), 10 a.m.; Summit at Hermiston (DH), 11 a.m. Track: Mountain View at Centennial Invite, 3:30 p.m.; Summit at Oregon Relays in Eugene, 10 a.m.; Sisters at Dick Baker Invitational in Gladstone, 11 a.m.; La Pine and Gilchrist at Sterling Bank Invitational in Klamath Union, 10 a.m. Boys tennis: Summit at Medford Tournament, 9 a.m. Girls tennis: Madras and Mountain View at Sisters tournament at Black Butte Ranch, 10 a.m. Sunday Boys lacrosse: Sisters at Hermiston, 1 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— PLAYOFF GLANCE CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Pittsburgh vs. Montreal Today, April 30: Montreal at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Sunday, May 2: Montreal at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. Tuesday, May 4: Pittsburgh at Montreal, 4 p.m. Thursday, May 6: Pittsburgh at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, May 8: Montreal at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. x-Monday, May 10: Pittsburgh at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 12: Montreal at Pittsburgh, TBD Boston vs. Philadelphia Saturday, May 1: Philadelphia at Boston, 9:30 a.m. Monday, May 3: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 5: Boston at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Friday, May 7: Boston at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. x-Monday, May 10: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 12: Boston at Philadelphia, TBD x-Friday, May 14: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago vs. Vancouver Saturday, May 1: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Monday, May 3: Vancouver at Chicago, 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 5: Chicago at Vancouver, 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 7: Chicago at Vancouver, 6:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 9: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 11: Chicago at Vancouver, 6:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 13: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. San Jose 1, Detroit 0 Thursday, April 29: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Sunday, May 2: Detroit at San Jose 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 4: San Jose at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, May 6: San Jose at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 8: Detroit at San Jose, 7 p.m. x-Monday, May 10: San Jose at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 12: Detroit at San Jose, TBD

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Saturday’s Games New York at D.C. United, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at New England, 4:30 p.m. Kansas City at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Seattle FC, 7:30 p.m.

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— PORSCHE GRAND PRIX Thursday Stuttgart, Germany Singles Second Round Samantha Stosur (7), Australia, def. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, 3-6, 6-0, 6-2. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, 6-4, 6-4. Anna Lapushchenkova, Russia, def. Victoria Azarenka (6), Belarus, 6-3, 6-3. Jelena Jankovic (4), Serbia, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-2, 6-2. Justine Henin, Belgium, def. Yanina Wickmayer (8), Belgium, 6-3, 7-5. Dinara Safina, Russia, def. Agnes Szavay, Hungary, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 6-0. GRAND PRIX SAR Thursday Fez, Morocco Singles Quarterfinals Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, def. Angelique Kerber (5), Germany, 7-5, 6-2. Iveta Benesova (7), Czech Republic, def. Laura Pous Tio, Spain, 2-6, 6-1, 6-0. Alize Cornet, France, def. Anne Keothavong, Britain, 7-5, 6-2. Simona Halep, Romania, def. Patty Schnyder (2), Switzerland, 6-2, 7-6 (3).

39-39—78 37-41—78 40-38—78 39-39—78 39-39—78 38-40—78 39-39—78 39-39—78 40-39—79 40-40—80 40-41—81 38-43—81 43-44—87 49-39—88

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— ROME MASTERS Thursday Rome Singles Third Round Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 6-4, 6-4. Fernando Verdasco (6), Spain, def. Guillermo GarciaLopez, Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (7), France, def. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 6-3, 6-4. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Ivan Ljubicic (11), Croatia, walkover. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Filippo Volandri, Italy, 6-2, 3-6, 7-6 (4). David Ferrer (13), Spain, def. Andy Murray (4), Britain, 6-3, 6-4. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland, def. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, 6-3, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (3), Spain, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 6-3, 6-2.

GOLF PGA Tour QUAIL HOLLOW CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday At Quail Hollow Club Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,469; Par 72 (36-36) First Round Bo Van Pelt 33-32—65 Kenny Perry 33-33—66 Camilo Villegas 33-34—67 Billy Mayfair 34-34—68 Paul Goydos 35-33—68 Geoff Ogilvy 36-32—68 J.J. Henry 34-34—68 Andres Romero 33-35—68 Brad Faxon 34-34—68 Ricky Barnes 34-35—69 Cameron Percy 33-36—69 Brian Stuard 32-37—69 Heath Slocum 34-35—69 Garth Mulroy 34-35—69 Alex Cejka 33-37—70 Nick Watney 35-35—70 Angel Cabrera 33-37—70 Davis Love III 34-36—70 Rod Pampling 35-35—70 Greg Chalmers 35-35—70 Scott McCarron 36-34—70 Bubba Watson 32-38—70 Harrison Frazar 36-34—70 Brendon de Jonge 35-35—70 Rocco Mediate 31-39—70 Phil Mickelson 35-35—70 Troy Matteson 36-34—70 Brandt Snedeker 34-36—70 David Duval 34-37—71 Tim Herron 36-35—71 Bill Haas 36-35—71 Hunter Mahan 38-33—71 Robert Allenby 38-33—71 Jeff Overton 32-39—71 Lucas Glover 34-37—71 Zach Johnson 35-36—71 Will MacKenzie 35-36—71 Mark Calcavecchia 36-35—71 Ben Curtis 34-37—71 David Toms 33-38—71 Vaughn Taylor 35-36—71 Jarrod Lyle 36-35—71 Tom Gillis 38-33—71 Anthony Kim 32-40—72 Stewart Cink 34-38—72 Martin Laird 34-38—72 Kevin Na 37-35���72 Rory McIlroy 34-38—72 Kevin Stadler 37-35—72 Tim Wilkinson 33-39—72 Chad Campbell 34-38—72

D.A. Points John Merrick James Nitties Sean O’Hair Padraig Harrington Rory Sabbatini Kevin Sutherland Jonathan Byrd Carlos Franco Alex Prugh Ross Fisher Charley Hoffman Kris Blanks Henrik Bjornstad Chris Tidland Steve Marino Jason Day Brett Quigley Lee Westwood D.J. Trahan Brian Gay Johnson Wagner Ryan Moore Chez Reavie Mark Wilson Jimmy Walker James Driscoll Rickie Fowler Bill Lunde Chris Stroud Aaron Baddeley Mathew Goggin Joe Ogilvie Dustin Johnson Nick O’Hern Blake Adams Webb Simpson Charles Warren Woody Austin Tiger Woods John Senden Boo Weekley Ryuji Imada Jeff Maggert Tim Petrovic Roger Tambellini Josh Teater Garrett Willis George McNeill Charles Howell III J.P. Hayes Greg Owen Kevin Streelman Trevor Immelman Carl Pettersson Jeff Quinney Chad Collins Matt Jones Nicholas Thompson Roland Thatcher Jason Bohn Derek Lamely Stuart Appleby Michael Allen Scott Piercy Rich Barcelo Spencer Levin Aron Price Jim Furyk Matt Kuchar Steve Wheatcroft Cortland Lowe Bryce Molder Steve Lowery Fred Couples Daniel Chopra Vance Veazey Michael Connell Pat Perez Ted Purdy Brian Davis Craig Bowden David Lutterus Troy Merritt Jerod Turner Martin Flores Chris Riley Nathan Green Vijay Singh Fredrik Jacobson

36-36—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 34-38—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 36-36—72 38-34—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 37-35—72 35-37—72 37-36—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 34-39—73 34-39—73 36-37—73 38-35—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 37-36—73 33-40—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 38-35—73 35-38—73 34-39—73 36-37—73 35-39—74 36-38—74 38-36—74 35-39—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 35-39—74 37-37—74 36-38—74 35-39—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 40-34—74 34-40—74 35-39—74 36-38—74 39-35—74 36-38—74 35-39—74 37-37—74 35-39—74 36-38—74 35-40—75 35-40—75 36-39—75 37-38—75 37-38—75 40-35—75 36-39—75 37-38—75 39-36—75 37-38—75 37-38—75 35-40—75 38-37—75 37-38—75 38-38—76 39-37—76 36-40—76 37-39—76 40-36—76 37-39—76 39-37—76 36-40—76 38-38—76 38-38—76 36-40—76 37-39—76 35-41—76 37-39—76 37-40—77 37-40—77 40-37—77 38-39—77

TRES MARIAS CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday At Tres Marias Golf Club Morelia, Mexico Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,539; Par 73 (36-37) First Round a-denotes amateur Leading scores Ai Miyazato 32-31—63 Azahara Munoz 31-34—65 Michelle Wie 33-33—66 Lorena Ochoa 33-33—66 Mariajo Uribe 33-34—67 Karen Stupples 36-31—67 Irene Cho 33-35—68 Amanda Blumenherst 34-34—68 Brittany Lincicome 30-38—68 Sarah Jane Smith 33-35—68 Wendy Doolan 33-36—69 Jeong Jang 34-35—69 Katherine Hull 32-37—69 In-Kyung Kim 32-37—69 M.J. Hur 33-36—69 Na Yeon Choi 33-36—69 Alejandra Martin Del Campo 34-36—70 Lisa Meldrum 36-34—70 Diana D’Alessio 34-36—70 Michele Redman 34-36—70 Anna Nordqvist 34-36—70 Sherri Steinhauer 35-35—70 Jimin Kang 35-35—70 Song-Hee Kim 35-35—70 Tania Elosegui 34-36—70 Shanshan Feng 33-37—70 Na On Min 36-35—71 Sarah Kemp 37-34—71 Grace Park 36-35—71 Angela Park 36-35—71 Kristy McPherson 34-37—71 Stacy Lewis 35-36—71 Karine Icher 35-36—71 Nicole Castrale 34-37—71 Jee Young Lee 35-36—71 Paige Mackenzie 32-39—71 Allison Hanna 35-36—71 Anna Rawson 34-37—71 Sun Young Yoo 37-35—72 Hee-Won Han 37-35—72 Helen Alfredsson 35-37—72 Candie Kung 36-36—72 Mindy Kim 39-33—72 Mina Harigae 36-36—72 Gwladys Nocera 34-38—72 Marianne Skarpnord 36-36—72 Julieta Granada 34-39—73 Christina Kim 34-39—73 Sandra Gal 35-38—73 Natalie Gulbis 35-38—73 Laura Diaz 35-38—73 Wendy Ward 38-35—73 Suzann Pettersen 37-36—73 Maria Hjorth 37-36—73 Amy Hung 36-37—73 Maria Hernandez 37-37—74 Heather Bowie Young 36-38—74 Allison Fouch 37-37—74 Katie Kempter 36-38—74 Reilley Rankin 35-39—74 Louise Stahle 35-39—74 Silvia Cavalleri 34-40—74 Jimin Jeong 36-38—74 Michelle Ellis 39-35—74 Haeji Kang 36-38—74 Jill McGill 35-39—74 Mika Miyazato 34-40—74 Anna Grzebien 41-33—74 Jane Park 38-36—74 Moira Dunn 38-36—74 Alena Sharp 34-40—74 Erica Blasberg 36-39—75 Samantha Richdale 38-37—75 Leah Wigger 39-36—75 Amy Yang 37-38—75 Ji Young Oh 37-38—75 Lorie Kane 36-39—75 Katie Futcher 38-37—75 Jean Reynolds 36-39—75

Local TETHEROW FOUR-BALL CHAMPIONSHIP Fourball Match Play at Tetherow Golf Club (Pros listed with club affiliation, amateurs with hometown) Round 3 (April 29) — Brian Nosler (Vanco Driving Range)/Bill Winter (Portland) def. Casey McCoy (Hood River GC)/Michael Kloenne (Portland), 3 and 2. Chris Polski (Emerald Valley GC)/Nic Polski (Eugene) def. Sean Fredrickson (Tualatin CC)/Spencer Klapp (Portland). Brandon Kearney (Bend CC)/Brad Mombert (Bend) def. Corey Prugh (Manito G&CC)/Reid Hatley (Coeur d’Alene, Idaho), 5 and 3. Scott Williams (Glendale GC)/Derek Berg (Bellevue, Wash.) def. Brian Thornton (Meridian Valley)/ Mike Haack (Kent, Wash.), 1 up. Round 2 (April 29) — Brian Nosler (Vanco Driving Range)/Bill Winter (Portland) def. Matt Bunn (Hayden Lake CC)/Doug Potter (Coeur d’Alene, Idaho). Casey McCoy (Hood River GC)/Michael Kloenne (Portland) def. Chris Daggitt (Centennial GC)/Rick Dimick (Medford). Chris Polski (Emerald Valley GC)/Nic Polski (Eugene) def. Todd O’Neal (Orchard Hills)/Tim O’Neal (Vancouver, Wash.). Sean Fredrickson (Tualatin CC)/Spencer Klapp (Portland) def. Tim Fraley (Awbrey Glen GC)/James Chrisman (Bend). Corey Prugh (Manito G&CC)/Reid Hatley (Coeur d’Alene, Idaho) def. Bob Rannow (Sandpines GL)/Tim Tucker (Bandon). Brandon Kearney (Bend CC)/

Brad Mombert (Bend) def. Danny Moore (Willamette Valley CC)/Randy Fisher (Eugene). Scott Williams (Glendale GC)/Derek Berg (Bellevue, Wash.) def. Vincent Johnson (Portland)/Jeremiah Oliver (Troutdale). Brian Thornton (Meridian Valley)/Mike Haack (Kent, Wash.) def. Chris van der Velde (Tetherow)/Pat Cooney (Portland). Round 1 (April 28) — Matt Bunn (Hayden Lake CC)/Doug Potter (Coeur d’Alene, Idaho) def. Ryan Benzel (Battle Creek GC)/Kent Brown (Colville, Wash.), 20 holes. Brian Nosler (Vanco Driving Range)/Bill Winter (Portland) def. Kyle Johnson (Sunriver Resort)/Ryan Smith (Sunriver), 4 and 3. Chris Daggitt (Centennial GC)/Rick Dimick (Medford) def. Dan Ostrin (Widgi Creek)/Jay Poletiek (Portland), 1 up. Casey McCoy (Hood River GC)/ Michael Kloenne (Portland) def. Ryan Clemens (Pumpkin Ridge)/Kelly Garland (Portland), 1 up. Chris Polski (Emerald Valley GC)/Nic Polski (Eugene) def. Pat Huffer (Crooked River Ranch)/Mark Wilson (Roseburg), 3 and 2. Sean Fredrickson (Tualatin CC)/Spencer Klapp (Portland) def. Gary Dowen (PGA Life- Retired)/Mark Reed (West Linn), 4 and 3. Tim Fraley (Awbrey Glen GC)/James Chrisman (Bend) def. Laine Wortman (Reames G&CC)/ Erik Pedersen (Klamath Falls), 1 up. Corey Prugh (Manito G&CC)/Reid Hatley (Coeur d’Alene, Idaho) def. Cruz Bocanegra (Kah-Nee-Ta Resort)/Emerson Miller (Kah-NeeTa), 6 and 5. Bob Rannow (Sandpines GL)/Tim Tucker (Bandon) def. Mark Gardner (Creek at Qualchan)/Bob Witte (Spokane, Wash.), 2 up. Brandon Kearney (Bend CC)/Brad Mombert (Bend) def. Tam Bronkey (Eagle Crest Resort)/Jeff Mashos (Salem), 3 and 2. Scott Williams (Glendale GC)/Derek Berg (Bellevue, Wash.) def. Clayton Moe (Tetherow GC)/Taylor Garbutt (Bend), 5 and 4. Brian Thornton (Meridian Valley)/Mike Haack (Kent, Wash.) def. Jeff Coston (Semiahmoo Resort)/Derek Barron (Tacoma, Wash.), 1 up. Vincent Johnson (Portland)/Jeremiah Oliver (Troutdale) def. Daniel Wendt (The Club at Brasada Canyons)/Jim Brown (Bend), 3 and 2. Chris van der Velde (Tetherow)/Pat Cooney (Portland) def. Bobby Grover/Adam Huycke, 4 and 3. Todd O’Neal (Orchard Hills)/Tim O’Neal (Vancouver, Wash.), bye. Danny Moore (Willamette Valley CC)/Randy Fisher (Eugene), bye.

BASEBALL College All Times PDT PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 11 4 .733 35-5 Stanford 10 5 .667 21-13 UCLA 7 5 .583 29-7 California 8 7 .533 23-14 Arizona 8 7 .533 28-11 Oregon 8 7 .533 28-13 Washington 5 7 .416 21-19 Washington State 5 7 .416 21-15 Oregon State 4 8 .333 21-14 Southern California 3 12 .200 17-23 Today’s Games Oregon State at California, 2:30 p.m. Arizona State at UCLA, 6 p.m. Stanford at Washington, 6 p.m. Arizona at USC, 7 p.m. Washington State at Oregon, 7 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Placed LHP John Parrish on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Victor Marte from Omaha (PCL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Claimed 2B Kevin Frandsen off waivers from the Boston Red Sox and have optioned him to their Salt Lake City (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Assigned RHP Merkin Valdez outright to Las Vegas (PCL). National League PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Optioned LHP Antonio Bastardo to Lehigh Valley (IL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Promoted RHP Drew Storen to Syracuse (IL). FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Signed DT Trey Bryant and DE Rajon Henley. BUFFALO BILLS—Signed WR Naaman Roosevelt, RB Joique Bell, DE Will Croner, DB John Destin, G Jorge Guerra and DB Stephan Virgil. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed WR Bryan Anderson, S Sergio Brown, DE Dane Fletcher, CB Terrence Johnson, DL Kyle Love, RB Pat Paschall, S Ross Ventrone and OL John Wise. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Signed QB Kevin Kolb to a one-year contract extension. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Announced the retirement of OL Walter Jones. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed WR Joey Galloway, WR Bobby Wade, TE Logan Paulsen and RB Keiland Williams. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES—Exercised their one-year option on the contract of coach Lindy Ruff. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Signed D Cody Goloubef. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Assigned D Karl Alzner and D John Carlson to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE OKLAHOMA—Announced men’s assistant basketball coach Mark Cline is leaving to take a similar position at Marshall.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 8,122 82 85 29 The Dalles 2,732 41 18 10 John Day 3,681 70 12 14 McNary 5,304 98 32 22 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 119,179 711 6,406 1,911 The Dalles 73,279 395 1,860 962 John Day 63,249 537 2,116 1,245 McNary 41,299 496 1,926 1,048

1 p.m. — College, Washington State at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet. 5 p.m. — MLB, New York Mets at Philadelphia Phillies, ESPN.

HOCKEY 11 a.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Montreal Canadiens at Pittsburgh Penguins, NBC. 5 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinal, Detroit Red Wings at San Jose Sharks, VS. network.

BULL RIDING 1 p.m. — PBR Des Moines Invitational, VS. network (taped).

BEACH VOLLEYBALL 2:30 p.m. — AVP Nivea Tour, men’s final, ESPN2.

AUTO RACING 4 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA AAA Insurance Midwest Nationals, final eliminations, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

SOFTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Washington, FSNW (same-day tape).

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 2:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at California, KICE-AM 940, KRCOAM 690.

SATURDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — College, Oregon State at California, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — College, Oregon State at California, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Woods well off Van Pelt’s pace at Quail Hollow GOLF ROUNDUP

The Associated Press CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Tiger Woods delivered a few memorable shots of his own Thursday at Quail Hollow on a pleasant day that produced birdies and eagles and plenty of excitement. It’s just not what he had in mind. He hit a tee shot into the water on the par-3 17th that produced little reaction except to hold out his hand for another ball. He hit his next tee shot into the water and had to scramble for bogey. And he wound up with a 2-over 74 that left him nine shots behind Bo Van Pelt and ended his streak of 21 straight rounds at par or better. “I hit a bunch of balls left, I hit a bunch of balls right, hit a few down the middle,” Woods said. “And that was about it.” For everyone else — Masters champion Phil Mickelson included with his 70 — there was so much more. Mickelson had a severe stomach ailment that forced him to withdraw from the pro-am Wednesday, and he started feeling it when he climbed the steep hill to the 15th green. He two-putted for birdie to reach 4 under for his round, only to three-putt from the fringe on the 17th and made another bogey from

Nell Redmond / The Associated Press

Bo Van Pelt reacts as he watches his putt on the third hole during the Quail Hollow Championship in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday. the trees on the 18th. “I may have run out of energy there toward the end, but I hit some good shots and was able to shoot a decent round,” Mickelson said. Van Pelt is using an old putter that he had refurbished, and he already got strong results in Hilton Head two weeks ago with a tie for

third, his best finish of the year. The opening round of the Quail Hollow Championship was even better, as Van Pelt made birdie on all the par 5s and made it through the tough closing stretch with all pars. Kenny Perry shot a 66 and didn’t let the finish ruin his day. After a flawless shot into 8 feet for eagle on the par-5 seventh, he hit his drive 35 yards short of the green on the par-4 eighth and had an open angle at the pin. But he didn’t commit to the delicate wedge, and the ball rolled back to his feet. That turned potential birdie — and the outright lead — into a bogey. “One little blunder,” Perry said. “But it was a fun round of golf. It’s been a long time since I’ve played like that.” Camilo Villegas played bogeyfree for a 67, while the group at 68 featured a collection of players that included former U.S. Open champion Geoff Ogilvy, Monday qualifier Billy Mayfair and Brad Faxon, who has made only two cuts this year while spending time working for NBC Sports. “When you start trending like I did with a 74th-place finish last

week, you could see this coming,” Faxon said, laughing. Woods hasn’t played enough to detect any trends, although this would count as a step backward with his golf. He was coming off a tie for fourth in the Masters, his first competition in five months, in which he broke par all four rounds for the first time at Augusta National. It was his highest opening round at a regular PGA Tour event since he shot 75 at The Players Championship three years ago. Tres Marias Championship MORELIA, Mexico — Ai Miyazato is trying to spoil Lorena Ochoa’s going-away party. Miyazato, the Japanese star who won the first two events of the LPGA Tour season, shot a 10-under 63, the best round of her career in relation to par, to take the first-round lead in the Tres Marias Championship. Spanish rookie Azahara Munoz opened with a 65, and the topranked Ochoa, who will retire after the tournament, matched Michelle Wie with a 66. Argentine in front in Spain SEVILLE, Spain — Argentina’s Ricardo Gonzalez shot a 7-under 65 to take a one-stroke lead over England’s Paul Waring in the Spanish Open.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 D3

N B A P L AYO F F S

N H L P L AY O F F S

Spurs finish off Mavs

Sharks take series opener against Wings

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Football • Seattle’s tackle retires: Four-time All-Pro Seattle Seahawks lineman Walter Jones has retired after a 13-year career during which he became a cornerstone of the team and one of the players against whom other left tackles were measured. The 36-year-old Jones made the announcement in a team news release Thursday. It had been expected for months. Jones hasn’t played since Thanksgiving Day 2008 and has had two knee surgeries in that span. The team is immediately retiring Jones’ number 71 jersey. Former Seahawks coach Mike Holmgren has called Jones the best offensive player he ever coached, and Holmgren has coached Brett Favre, Joe Montana, Steve Young and Jerry Rice. • Roethlisberger’s police buddies investigated: Ben Roethlisberger has been suspended for six games, but two Pennsylvania police officers who worked as personal assistants to the Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback are still being investigated, with their jobs at stake. At issue is their role the night Roethlisberger was accused of sexual assault in Georgia. • Pro Bowl back misses Titans’ opening minicamp: The Titans wrapped up their second on-field session Thursday, and Chris Johnson wasn’t there. The two-time Pro Bowl running back who is staying away from the voluntary team practices as part of his campaign for a very big pay hike since becoming only the sixth player in NFL history to run for at least 2,000 yards.

Cycling • Armstrong finishes third in second stage in New Mexico: Lance Armstrong finished in third place in the windy second stage of the Tour of the Gila in New Mexico on Thursday, helping teammate Levi Leipheimer preserve his overall lead. Luis Amaran beat out Leipheimer in the final sprint to win the 80-mile loop that started and ended in Fort Bayard. Seventime Tour de France champion Armstrong finished in a group of about 20 riders. Wind gusts of up to 60 miles per hour hampered riders protecting teammates.

College • UO: No wrongdoing in $2.3M Bellotti payment: The Oregon attorney general’s office says a lawyer was deficient for failing to put the contract for departing Oregon athletic director Mike Bellotti in writing but there was no criminal wrongdoing. The state Department of Justice also said its review found that settling the contract for $2.3 million was not unreasonable. Bellotti announced in March that he was stepping down as athletic director to become an ESPN analyst, leading to questions about his compensation package. University of Oregon president Richard Lariviere agreed with the decision by Bellotti, who coached the Ducks for 14 seasons and took them to 12 bowl games before taking the AD job last year. But Lariviere announced last week that the university’s general counsel, Melinda Grier, will not have her contract renewed when it expires next year.

Basketball • NCAA approves 68-team men’s basketball tourney: The road to the Final Four will have a new look next season. On Thursday, the NCAA’s board of directors approved expansion from 65 to 68 teams and endorsed a proposal to add three more opening-round games to the schedule. The board also approved new rules governing concussions, and may sanction schools that do not comply. It’s only the second time in a quarter-century the NCAA has increased the number of teams competing for the men’s national championship. The format must still be approved by the men’s basketball committee later this summer, which the NCAA is hoping is done by July. • Tyreke Evans wins NBA Rookie of the Year award: Sacramento point guard Tyreke Evans beat out Golden State’s Stephen Curry and Milwaukee’s Brandon Jennings to win the NBA Rookie of the Year award. Evans received the honor Thursday after becoming the fourth rookie ever to average at least 20 points, five rebounds and five assists per game. He joined an illustrious club that

includes Oscar Robertson, Michael Jordan and LeBron James. • LeBron has strained elbow but expected to play: LeBron James is not expected to miss any of Cleveland’s playoff games because of his strained right elbow and bone bruise. The Cavaliers say James was re-examined Wednesday night by team doctors, who took more X-rays and an MRI. The tests revealed the strain and a bruised bone near the elbow. • Nene has sprained knee, not torn ACL: Medical tests have revealed that Nuggets center Nene only hyperextended his left knee and didn’t tear his ACL as feared when he went down in the first half of Denver’s Game 5 win over the Utah Jazz.

Tennis • Nadal, Djokovic advance at Rome Masters: Rafael Nadal improved his record at the Rome Masters to 24-1 with a methodical 6-3, 6-2 win Thursday against 39th-ranked Victor Hanescu. Second-ranked Novak Djokovic defeated Thomaz Bellucci 6-4, 6-4, and will meet Fernando Verdasco in the quarterfinals. Verdasco edged Guillermo Garcia-Lopez 6-4, 7-6 (2) to improve his record to 13-2 on clay this year. • Henin, Stosur, Safina win in Stuttgart: Justine Henin outlasted Belgian teammate Yanina Wickmayer 6-3, 7-5 Thursday to advance to the quarterfinals of the Porsche Grand Prix. Dinara Safina, playing her first match since retiring at the Australian Open with a lower-back injury, beat Agnes Szavay 7-6 (5), 36, 6-0 to make the last eight. In other matches, Samantha Stosur rallied past Alexandra Dulgheru 3-6, 6-0, 6-2, and Jelena Jankovic eased past Tsvetana Pironkova 6-2, 6-2.

Baseball • Immigrant rights activists protest Diamondbacks: Immigrant rights activists chanting “Boycott Arizona” and “Reform, Not Racism” demonstrated Thursday outside Chicago’s Wrigley Field as the Cubs opened a four-game series against the Arizona Diamondbacks. Protesters are upset over Arizona’s new immigration law that makes it a state crime to be in the U.S. illegally and lets police question anyone they suspect of being an illegal immigrant. Activists nationwide have called for a boycott of Arizona tourism and businesses, including its athletic teams. • Lee finally debuting for Mariners: Cliff Lee has been through a season’s worth of events for his new Seattle Mariners. And he hasn’t even pitched in a game that counts yet. Finally, the 2008 American League Cy Young Award winner gets his Mariners debut tonight at Safeco Field. Lee says he is fully recovered from a strained abdomen that has had him delayed since March 15. • Report: Black players drop to 9 percent in majors: A new report shows Major League Baseball equaled its best grades for racial and gender diversity hiring, even as the percentage of black players dropped again last year. MLB received an A for race and a B for gender hiring in the annual study Wednesday by the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports. Baseball received the same grades in last year’s report. Among major leaguers, though, the number of black players dropped from 10.2 percent to 9 percent last season. The sport had made a small stride since reaching a low of 8.2 percent in 2007, but the latest data indicates a steady rise among black players might be years away.

Sports • San Diego’s Chicken top mascot: Plucked from among all sports mascots, San Diego’s Chicken still rules the roost. The Chicken ranks first in Forbes magazine’s survey of 10 most-liked sports mascots. Ted Giannoulas, the man inside the costume, no longer is affiliated with the Padres, but has a 78.7 awareness in the rankings. Trailing the Chicken are the Phillie Phanatic; Mr. Met; the Racing Sausages of the Milwaukee Brewers; The Gorilla of the Phoenix Suns; Benny the Bull of Chicago; Wally the Green Monster, who represents the Red Sox; Billy the Marlin; Rocky of the Denver Nuggets; and The Coyote of the San Antonio Spurs. — From wire reports

By Paul J. Weber The Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO — Manu Ginobili stepped off the podium and bumped into Dirk Nowitzki. They shook hands. Nowitzki gave his longtime foe a congratulatory slap on the back and Ginobili disappeared down the hallway. He was off to celebrate a playoff series win. Just like old times for the Spurs. “We’re thrilled that we beat them,” Ginobili said. “We’re really proud of it.” Nowitzki then sat down for a playoff ritual of his own — dissecting yet another first-round failure by the Mavericks. Ginobili scored 26 points and San Antonio survived blowing a 22-point lead to finish off the Mavericks 97-87 in Game 6 on Thursday night, getting payback after Dallas eliminated the Spurs a year ago in the opening round. The Spurs will play Phoenix in the West semifinals that start Monday. The Mavs, meanwhile, slump away into another too-early summer. Dallas lost in the first round for the third time in four years. The Mavs head into an interesting offseason for a team that’s

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

San Antonio Spurs’ Manu Ginobili, right, drives to the basket past Dallas Mavericks defender Dirk Nowitzki during the first quarter of Game 6 of a firstround playoff series Thursday in San Antonio. won 50 games for 10 straight seasons, but has only one trip to the NBA finals to show for it. “Going into the playoffs as a No. 2 seed, it is all we could have wanted,” Nowitzki said. “We just happened to see a tough No. 7 seed that got rolling at the right time.”

Said Mavs guard Jason Terry, “As of right now this season is a failure.” Nowitzki nearly carried the Mavs to an unbelievable comeback, getting 25 of his 33 points in a remarkable second half. But George Hill, the hero for the Spurs in Game 4, scored 10 of his 21 points in the fourth quarter to keep the series from going back to Dallas. The Spurs continue their roll after coming off their worst regular season in the Tim Duncan era, which perhaps makes this series all the more impressive. It will technically go down as an upset. San Antonio is only the fifth No. 7 seed to win a firstround series, and the first since the opening round became a best-of-seven in 2003. It hadn’t been done since New York beat Miami in 1998. Nowitzki, who had four fouls in the first half, shrugged off the foul trouble and put Dallas ahead 57-56 with a three-pointer midway through the third quarter. But Ginobili immediately fired back with a three-pointer, and Dallas never led again. “I think we took a lot of their energy, a lot of their effort getting back into it after being so far down,” said Duncan, who had 17 points and 10 rebounds.

N B A P L AYO F F S C O R E B O A R D SCHEDULE NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Cleveland 4, Chicago 1 Saturday, April 17: Cleveland 96, Chicago 83 Monday, April 19: Cleveland 112, Chicago 102 Thursday, April 22: Chicago 108, Cleveland 106 Sunday, April 25: Cleveland 121, Chicago 98 Tuesday, April 27: Cleveland 96, Chicago 94 Orlando 4, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 18: Orlando 98, Charlotte 89 Wednesday, April 21: Orlando 92, Charlotte 77 Saturday, April 24: Orlando 90, Charlotte 86 Monday, April 26: Orlando 99, Charlotte 90 Milwaukee 3, Atlanta 2 Saturday, April 17: Atlanta 102, Milwaukee 92 Tuesday, April 20: Atlanta 96, Milwaukee 86 Saturday, April 24: Milwaukee 107, Atlanta 89 Monday, April 26: Milwaukee 111, Atlanta 104 Today, April 28:Milwaukee 91, Atlanta 87 Today, April 30: Atlanta at Milwaukee, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, May 2: Milwaukee at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Boston 4, Miami 1 Saturday, April 17: Boston 85, Miami 76 Tuesday, April 20: Boston 106, Miami 77 Friday, April 23: Boston 100, Miami 98 Sunday, April 25: Miami 101, Boston 92 Tuesday, April 27: Boston 96, Miami 86 WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers 3, Oklahoma City 2 Sunday, April 18: L.A. Lakers 87, Oklahoma City 79 Tuesday, April 20: L.A. Lakers 95, Oklahoma City 92 Thursday, April 22: Oklahoma City 101, L.A. Lakers 96 Saturday, April 24: Oklahoma City 110, L.A. Lakers 89 Tuesday, April 27: L.A. Lakers 111, Oklahoma City 87 Today, April 30: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City 6:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 2: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. San Antonio 4, Dallas 2 Sunday, April 18: Dallas 100, San Antonio 94 Wednesday, April 21: San Antonio 102, Dallas 88 Friday, April 23: San Antonio 94, Dallas 90 Sunday, April 25: San Antonio 92, Dallas 89 Tuesday, April 27: Dallas 103, San Antonio 81 Thursday, April 29: San Antonio 97, Dallas 87 Phoenix 4, Portland 2 Sunday, April 18: Portland 105, Phoenix 100 Tuesday, April 20: Phoenix 119, Portland 90 Thursday, April 22: Phoenix 108, Portland 89 Saturday, April 24: Portland 96, Phoenix 87 Monday, April 26: Phoenix 107, Portland 88 Today, April 29: Phoenix 99, Portland 90 Utah 3, Denver 2 Saturday, April 17: Denver 126, Utah 113 Monday, April 19: Utah 114, Denver 111 Friday, April 23: Utah 105, Denver 93 Sunday, April 25: Utah 117, Denver 106 Today, April 28: Denver 116, Utah 102 Friday, April 30: Denver at Utah, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, May 2: Utah at Denver, 12:30 or 5 p.m.

Team Rebounds: 12. Team Turnovers: 10 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Aldridge 5). Turnovers: 10 (Bayless 3, Camby 2, Miller 2, Roy 2, Fernandez). Steals: 7 (Aldridge 2, Cunningham 2, Bayless, Camby, Miller). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 3:04 second. Phoenix 24 29 21 25 — 99 Portland 17 24 24 25 — 90 A—20,313 (19,980). T—2:38. ——— SPURS 97, MAVERICKS 87 FG FT Reb DALLAS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Marion 25:10 3-8 0-0 1-4 0 3 6 Nowitzki 38:21 13-21 5-6 1-5 4 5 33 Haywood 21:03 1-2 0-0 1-7 0 3 2 Kidd 43:13 1-6 0-0 1-8 6 5 3 Butler 39:27 9-18 6-6 1-3 1 2 25 Terry 20:14 1-7 0-0 0-0 2 1 2 Najera 4:22 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 1 0 Barea 6:18 0-3 0-0 1-2 0 0 0 Dampier 20:56 0-1 0-0 2-5 1 3 0 Beaubois 20:57 7-13 1-3 2-5 1 4 16 Totals 240:01 35-80 12-15 11-40 15 27 87 Percentages: FG .438, FT .800. 3-Point Goals: 5-20, .250 (Nowitzki 2-4, Beaubois 1-3, Kidd 1-4, Butler 1-5, Barea 0-1, Najera 0-1, Terry 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (22 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Butler 2, Barea, Haywood).

Turnovers: 11 (Beaubois 2, Kidd 2, Terry 2, Barea, Butler, Dampier, Marion, Nowitzki). Steals: 4 (Kidd 2, Haywood, Terry). Technical Fouls: Butler, 4:33 second. FG FT Reb SAN ANTONIO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Jefferson 31:02 2-5 3-4 1-4 2 1 7 Duncan 42:52 8-17 1-7 4-10 5 1 17 McDyess 25:13 4-6 0-0 2-6 0 5 8 Ginobili 38:26 7-19 10-12 0-2 5 2 26 Hill 42:10 7-12 5-6 3-6 2 1 21 Parker 35:18 5-12 0-2 1-7 8 2 10 Blair 5:08 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 4 Bonner 11:53 2-4 0-0 1-7 1 4 4 Bogans 7:26 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Mahinmi 0:17 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Temple 0:17 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 240:02 37-78 19-31 12-43 23 17 97 Percentages: FG .474, FT .613. 3-Point Goals: 4-12, .333 (Hill 2-4, Ginobili 2-6, Bonner 0-1, Parker 0-1). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 8 (4 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Duncan 3, McDyess). Turnovers: 8 (Duncan 3, Jefferson 2, Bonner, Ginobili, Hill). Steals: 7 (Duncan 3, Parker 2, Ginobili, Hill). Technical Fouls: None. Dallas 8 26 29 24 — 87 San Antonio 22 25 23 27 — 97 A—18,581 (18,797). T—2:34.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Joe Pavelski got the San Jose Sharks off to a fast start in the game — and for a change, a playoff series. Pavelski scored the first of three goals in a 1:19 span in the first period and added a second power-play goal early in the third to lead San Jose to a 4-3 victory over the Detroit Red Wings on Thursday night in Game 1 of the second-round series. Dany Heatley and Devin Setoguchi added first-period goals of their own to help the Sharks end a string of four straight home losses in series openers. “We just got the early jump — a couple quick goals bang bang,” Setoguchi said. “It’s a little bit of a buzz-killer for them. We wanted to jump early. We were ready to go.” The Sharks were the more rested team having had four days off since knocking off Colorado in six games. The Red Wings opened the series less than 48 hours after winning Game 7 in the first round at Phoenix but showed no signs of fatigue. Game 2 will be Sunday night in San Jose. “It was a good game and it’s going to be a good series,” Red Wings coach Mike Babcock said. “We didn’t play poorly, they just shot it to the net and we made a couple of mistakes.” After breaking out to a 3-0 lead, the Sharks entered the third period ahead by only one goal. But with Johan Franzen and Valtteri Filppula in the penalty box to open the third, Pavelski made it 42 when he beat Jimmy Howard with a shot from the side of the net 50 seconds into the period. Evgeni Nabokov stopped a late flurry in front of the net to preserve the lead in the closing seconds. Detroit finished zero for five on the power play.

C R E AT E D W I T H T H E H I G H D E S E R T H O M E O W N E R I N M I N D .

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CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE EASTERN CONFERENCE Cleveland vs. Boston Saturday, May 1: Boston at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Monday, May 3: Boston at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Friday, May 7: Cleveland at Boston, 4 p.m. Sunday, May 9: Cleveland at Boston, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 11: Boston at Cleveland, TBD x-Thursday, May 13: Cleveland at Boston, TBD x-Sunday, May 16: Boston at Cleveland, 12:30 p.m.

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WESTERN CONFERENCE Phoenix vs. San Antonio Monday, May 3: San Antonio at Phoenix,4:30 or 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 5: San Antonio at Phoenix 3 or 6 p.m. Friday, May 7: Phoenix at San Antonio, 5:30 or 6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 9: Phoenix at San Antonio, 4 or 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 11: San Antonio at Phoenix,TBD x-Thursday, May 13: Phoenix at San Antonio, TBD x-Sunday, May 16: San Antonio at Phoenix,TBD

SUMMARIES Thursday’s Games ——— SUNS 99, TRAIL BLAZERS 90 FG FT Reb PHOENIX Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Hill 30:30 1-4 1-3 2-12 4 1 3 Stoudemire 32:00 9-15 4-6 1-3 3 3 22 Collins 13:36 1-2 0-0 1-4 0 3 2 Nash 29:52 2-7 5-5 0-2 6 0 10 Richardson 32:33 10-16 3-3 0-7 2 4 28 Frye 24:48 1-5 0-0 0-4 0 3 3 Dudley 28:14 3-7 3-5 0-2 3 3 12 Amundson 16:09 2-5 0-2 2-4 0 4 4 Barbosa 13:18 2-6 1-2 1-1 0 1 5 Dragic 18:08 4-7 0-0 0-0 3 0 10 Clark 0:52 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Totals 240:00 35-74 17-26 7-40 21 22 99 Percentages: FG .473, FT .654. 3-Point Goals: 12-23, .522 (Richardson 5-8, Dudley 3-6, Dragic 2-2, Nash 1-1, Frye 1-4, Barbosa 0-2). Team Rebounds: 15. Team Turnovers: 17 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Dudley 2, Hill 2, Stoudemire 2, Amundson, Richardson). Turnovers: 14 (Nash 7, Stoudemire 5, Collins, Frye). Steals: 7 (Frye 2, Hill 2, Richardson 2, Dudley). Technical Fouls: None. FG FT Reb PORTLAND Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Batum 13:59 1-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 3 Aldridge 44:38 5-17 6-8 1-9 2 4 16 Camby 21:26 2-4 0-0 0-4 2 3 4 Miller 18:26 2-10 0-0 1-1 3 0 4 Roy 37:09 4-16 5-5 1-5 4 3 14 Bayless 29:10 4-12 3-4 0-4 7 3 12 Webster 32:36 6-10 4-5 3-4 2 4 19 Cunningham 8:57 1-2 0-0 3-5 0 2 2 Howard 15:50 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 2 0 Fernandez 17:49 5-6 1-2 0-2 1 0 16 Totals 240:00 30-79 19-24 9-35 22 21 90 Percentages: FG .380, FT .792. 3-Point Goals: 11-23, .478 (Fernandez 5-6, Webster 3-4, Batum 1-1, Bayless 1-3, Roy 1-8, Aldridge 0-1).

The Associated Press

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D4 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M AJ O R L E A GUE B A SE BA L L ANGER MANAGEMENT

STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 17 5 .773 — New York 14 7 .667 2½ Boston 11 11 .500 6 Toronto 11 12 .478 6½ Baltimore 4 18 .182 13 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 14 8 .636 — Detroit 13 10 .565 1½ Cleveland 9 12 .429 4½ Chicago 9 13 .409 5 Kansas City 8 14 .364 6 West Division W L Pct GB Los Angeles 12 11 .522 — Oakland 12 11 .522 — Seattle 11 11 .500 ½ Texas 10 12 .455 1½ ——— Thursday’s Games Detroit 3, Minnesota 0 Chicago White Sox 7, Texas 5 N.Y. Yankees 4, Baltimore 0 Toronto 6, Oakland 3 Tampa Bay 11, Kansas City 1 Today’s Games Boston (Lackey 2-1) at Baltimore (D.Hernandez 0-3), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 0-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 3-0), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Pineiro 2-2) at Detroit (Porcello 1-2), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Slowey 2-2) at Cleveland (Carmona 3-0), 4:05 p.m. Oakland (Cahill 0-0) at Toronto (Morrow 1-2), 4:07 p.m. Kansas City (Bannister 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Niemann 1-0), 4:10 p.m. Texas (C.Lewis 3-0) at Seattle (C.Lee 0-0), 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 13 9 .591 — Philadelphia 12 9 .571 ½ Washington 12 10 .545 1 Florida 11 11 .500 2 Atlanta 8 14 .364 5 Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 15 7 .682 — Cincinnati 11 11 .500 4 Pittsburgh 10 12 .455 5 Chicago 10 13 .435 5½ Milwaukee 9 13 .409 6 Houston 8 13 .381 6½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 14 8 .636 — San Francisco 12 9 .571 1½ Arizona 11 11 .500 3 Colorado 11 11 .500 3 Los Angeles 8 14 .364 6 ——— Thursday’s Games St. Louis 10, Atlanta 4 Arizona 13, Chicago Cubs 5 Cincinnati 4, Houston 2 San Diego 9, Milwaukee 0 Pittsburgh 2, L.A. Dodgers 0 Today’s Games Arizona (R.Lopez 1-0) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 2-0), 11:20 a.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Olsen 1-1) at Florida (Nolasco 2-0), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Myers 1-1) at Atlanta (Hanson 1-2), 4:35 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 0-1) at St. Louis (Penny 3-0), 5:15 p.m. Milwaukee (Bush 1-1) at San Diego (Richard 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 0-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 1-1), 7:10 p.m. Colorado (Cook 1-2) at San Francisco (Zito 3-0), 7:15 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP White Sox 7, Rangers 5 ARLINGTON, Texas — Paul Konerko hit two home runs after Chicago took advantage of a wild pitch, two errors and two walks to go ahead of Texas and avoid a three-game sweep. Konerko leads the majors with 10 homers after hitting a solo drive in the eighth and a two-run shot in the ninth. He also drove in another run with a sacrifice fly. Chicago Pierre lf Beckham 2b An.Jones rf Konerko 1b Teahen 3b Rios cf Kotsay dh Pierzynski c Al.Ramirez ss Totals

AB 5 4 3 3 4 5 2 4 3 33

R 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 7

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 2 4 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 8 5 7

SO 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .200 .221 .259 .292 .268 .266 .111 .172 .222

Texas J.Arias 2b M.Young 3b Hamilton lf Guerrero dh Dav.Murphy rf Smoak 1b M.Ramirez c A.Blanco ss b-Garko ph Borbon cf a-Gentry ph-cf Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 2 2 37

R 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 9 4 0

SO 0 1 0 1 2 0 3 1 0 0 1 9

Avg. .321 .247 .278 .350 .167 .158 .000 .214 .133 .194 .200

Chicago 000 100 312 — 7 8 1 Texas 002 100 002 — 5 9 2 a-struck out for Borbon in the 8th. b-singled for

Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 4 (Fox, Pennington, Powell, R.Sweeney); Toronto 4 (V.Wells, Lind, Bautista 2). Runners moved up—Barton, R.Sweeney, F.Lewis, V.Wells. GIDP—Kouzmanoff, Fox, A.Hill. DP—Oakland 1 (Kouzmanoff, A.Rosales, Barton); Toronto 2 (Bautista, A.Hill, Overbay), (Ale.Gonzalez, A.Hill, Overbay). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dchschrr L, 2-1 3 1-3 5 4 4 2 3 55 2.89 Blevins 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 2 28 3.38 Breslow 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 2 28 4.70 Ziegler 2-3 0 0 0 2 0 19 2.53 A.Bailey 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Romero W, 2-1 6 4 3 3 4 6 104 2.25 Camp H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 2.63 S.Downs H, 6 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.59 Gregg S, 6-6 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 0.82 Inherited runners-scored—Blevins 2-2, Ziegler 1-0. IBB—off Ziegler (Overbay). HBP—by Camp (R.Davis). WP—R.Romero. T—2:37. A—10,721 (49,539).

NL ROUNDUP Diamondbacks 13, Cubs 5

Lenny Ignelzi / The Associated Press

San Diego Padres’ Scott Hairston argues a called third strike with home plate umpire Angel Hernandez in the first inning of a game against Milwaukee Brewers on Thursday, in San Diego. The call came with two runners on base. A.Blanco in the 9th. E—Teahen (4), M.Ramirez (1), Smoak (1). LOB—Chicago 8, Texas 5. 2B—Beckham (4), J.Arias (3), Hamilton (8), Smoak (2). 3B—Borbon (2). HR—Konerko (9), off Nippert; Konerko (10), off D.Mathis; Smoak (1), off Floyd. RBIs—Konerko 4 (18), Pierzynski (4), Hamilton (11), Smoak 2 (3), Garko (1). SB—Rios 2 (8), Al.Ramirez (1). CS—Beckham (1). S—Al.Ramirez. SF—Konerko. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 4 (Pierre, Teahen, An.Jones, Al.Ramirez); Texas 3 (Guerrero, Hamilton, J.Arias). Runners moved up—An.Jones, Pierzynski. GIDP— Dav.Murphy. DP—Chicago 1 (Al.Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Floyd W, 1-2 7 5 3 1 0 5 99 6.49 Thornton H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 1.59 Jenks 1 3 2 2 0 3 26 5.00 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Feldman 6 2 3 1 4 4 101 4.50 O’Day L, 0-1 2-3 1 1 0 1 0 14 0.00 Nippert BS, 1-1 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 24 3.86 D.Mathis 1 3 2 2 1 0 19 4.15 Feldman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—O’Day 2-1, Nippert 3-2. WP—Jenks, Nippert. T—2:53. A—17,778 (49,170).

Tigers 3, Twins 0 DETROIT — Dontrelle Willis pitched four-hit ball over six-plus innings in perhaps his best performance with Detroit. Willis (1-1) struck out six — his highest total since 2007 when he was with the Florida Marlins — and walked two. Joel Zumaya struck out two in two perfect innings and Jose Valverde pitched a hitless ninth for his seventh save in eight chances. Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Cuddyer 1b Thome dh Kubel rf Delm.Young lf B.Harris ss L.Hughes 3b Butera c a-Mauer ph-c Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 2 3 3 3 2 1 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 3

SO 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 1 9

Avg. .221 .281 .303 .256 .206 .233 .195 .286 .125 .342

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch lf Kelly lf Inge 3b Laird c S.Sizemore 2b Everett ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 2 1 4 3 3 3 30

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

H BI BB 2 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 2

SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 5

Avg. .330 .309 .310 .330 .278 .238 .253 .163 .259 .200

Minnesota 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Detroit 100 010 01x — 3 7 0 a-struck out for Butera in the 8th. E—Butera (1). LOB—Minnesota 4, Detroit 6. 2B—Ordonez (6), S.Sizemore (4). RBIs—A.Jackson (7), Damon (10), Kelly (3). SB—A.Jackson (4), Ordonez (1). CS—L.Hughes (1). SF—Damon. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 1 (Thome); Detroit 2 (Inge 2). GIDP—Cuddyer, Delm.Young. DP—Detroit 3 (Laird, Laird, Everett), (S.Sizemore, Everett, Mi.Cabrera), (S.Sizemore, Everett, Mi.Cabrera). Minnesota IP H R ER BB Pavano L, 3-2 8 7 3 2 2 Detroit IP H R ER BB Willis W, 1-1 6 4 0 0 2 Zumaya H, 4 2 0 0 0 0 Valverde S, 7-8 1 0 0 0 1 Willis pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Zumaya Pavano (Mi.Cabrera). T—2:18. A—25,595 (41,255).

SO 5 SO 6 2 1

NP 102 NP 101 24 14

ERA 3.73 ERA 3.75 1.23 0.82

1-0. IBB—off

timore to finish a three-city road trip with a 5-4 record.

Rays 11, Royals 1 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Matt Garza gave up one run over six sharp innings, Jason Bartlett and Reid Brignac drove in three runs apiece. At 17-5, the Rays are off to the best start in the majors after 22 games since 2003 when San Francisco and the New York Yankees opened 18-4 and the Royals were 17-5. Tampa Bay has won 14 of 16, outscoring opponents 117-44 during the stretch. Kansas City DeJesus dh Podsednik lf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen rf Callaspo 2b Kendall c B.Pena c Gordon 3b Y.Betancourt ss Maier cf Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 2 2 3 4 2 32

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 6 1 3 11

Avg. .297 .359 .318 .303 .302 .289 .000 .194 .310 .219

Tampa Bay AB Bartlett ss 4 Crawford lf 5 1-Kapler pr-lf 1 Zobrist rf 4 Longoria 3b 5 C.Pena 1b 4 B.Upton cf 4 a-S.Rodriguez ph-cf1 Burrell dh 5 Jaso c 2 Brignac 2b 5 Totals 40

R 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 2 1 11

H 1 4 0 1 2 1 1 0 2 1 2 15

Avg. .281 .341 .222 .250 .329 .253 .275 .200 .246 .455 .286

BI 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 3 11

BB 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 6

SO 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 7

Kansas City 000 100 000 — 1 6 2 Tampa Bay 054 100 10x — 11 15 0 a-struck out for B.Upton in the 7th. 1-ran for Crawford in the 7th. E—Gordon (4), V.Marte (1). LOB—Kansas City 7, Tampa Bay 12. 2B—Podsednik (2), B.Butler (6), Crawford 2 (9), Longoria (8), Burrell (5). 3B—Bartlett (2), Crawford (2). HR—Callaspo (4), off Garza. RBIs—Callaspo (13), Bartlett 3 (16), Crawford (13), Zobrist (10), C.Pena (22), Burrell (13), Jaso (10), Brignac 3 (10). SB—Callaspo (2), Longoria (3), B.Upton (5). Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 5 (Y.Betancourt, J.Guillen 2, B.Butler, Podsednik); Tampa Bay 7 (Zobrist, Longoria 2, Brignac, B.Upton 2, Kapler). Runners moved up—Kendall, Longoria, B.Upton, Burrell. GIDP—DeJesus, Zobrist. DP—Kansas City 1 (Callaspo, Y.Betancourt, B.Butler); Tampa Bay 1 (Bartlett, Brignac, C.Pena). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar L, 2-1 2 2-3 11 9 9 2 1 73 6.11 V.Marte 2 1-3 2 1 1 2 0 46 3.86 Farnsworth 2 2 1 1 1 4 43 4.82 Soria 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.86 Tejeda 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 11.57 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza W, 4-1 6 5 1 1 2 9 97 2.06 Benoit 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 0.00 Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.45 Balfour 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 2.38 Inherited runners-scored—V.Marte 2-0, Tejeda 1-0. HBP—by V.Marte (Zobrist). Balk—Tejeda. T—3:13. A—12,766 (36,973).

Yankees 4, Orioles 0 BALTIMORE — A.J. Burnett pitched eight innings of three-hit ball, Robinson Cano homered twice, and New York beat Brian Matusz and Baltimore. Marcus Thames had three hits and an RBI for the Yankees, who took two of three from Bal-

New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Thames dh Granderson cf Cervelli c Gardner lf Totals

AB 5 5 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 36

R H 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 3 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 4 11

Baltimore Ad.Jones cf Markakis rf Wieters c M.Tejada 3b Scott dh Wigginton 2b R.Hughes 1b Reimold lf C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

Avg. .311 .264 .139 .250 .407 .588 .230 .409 .306

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 2

SO 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 5

Avg. .204 .274 .286 .268 .200 .323 .313 .193 .279

New York 100 101 010 — 4 11 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 LOB—New York 7, Baltimore 5. 2B—Teixeira (4), Cano (5), Thames (3), Gardner (2). HR—Cano (7), off Matusz; Cano (8), off A.Castillo. RBIs—A.Rodriguez (13), Cano 2 (17), Thames (2). SF—A.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—New York 4 (Cano, Gardner 2, Swisher); Baltimore 2 (Markakis, M.Tejada). Runners moved up—Jeter. DP—Baltimore 1 (A.Castillo, R.Hughes). New York IP H R ER BB Burnett W, 3-0 8 3 0 0 1 M.Rivera 1 0 0 0 1 Baltimore IP H R ER BB Matusz L, 2-1 6 9 3 3 0 Albers 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 A.Castillo 1 2 1 1 1 Berken 2-3 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Berken A.J.Burnett. T—2:51. A—26,439 (48,290).

SO NP ERA 4 116 2.43 1 13 0.00 SO NP ERA 2 96 4.40 1 22 7.36 0 12 2.08 0 8 1.32 1-0. WP—

Blue Jays 6, Athletics 3 TORONTO — John Buck became the first catcher to hit three home runs in six years, Travis Snider added a solo shot and Toronto beat Oakland. Buck led off the third inning with a drive off right-hander Justin Duchscherer into the left field bullpen. Oakland Pennington ss Barton 1b R.Sweeney rf Kouzmanoff 3b A.Rosales 2b Fox dh Powell c Patterson lf R.Davis cf a-E.Chavez ph Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 4 1 1 31

R 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

Toronto AB R F.Lewis lf 5 0 A.Hill 2b 1 0 Lind dh 4 0 V.Wells cf 4 0 Overbay 1b 2 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 Bautista 3b 4 1 J.Buck c 4 3 Snider rf 4 1 Totals 31 6

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 5 3 4 10

Avg. .250 .301 .298 .244 .327 .182 .143 .250 .220 .215

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 5 0 2 1 0 8 6 6

Avg. .225 .152 .291 .318 .165 .277 .224 .194 .147

SO 1 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 7

Oakland 102 000 000 — 3 5 0 Toronto 002 301 00x — 6 8 1 a-struck out for R.Davis in the 9th. E—Bautista (3). LOB—Oakland 6, Toronto 7. 2B— Barton (7), R.Sweeney (6), Fox (2), Lind (6), Snider (3). HR—J.Buck (2), off Duchscherer; Snider (3), off Duchscherer; J.Buck (3), off Blevins; J.Buck (4), off Breslow. RBIs—Kouzmanoff (12), Fox 2 (8), J.Buck 5 (11), Snider (5). SB—R.Davis (9).

CHICAGO — Ian Kennedy pitched eight strong innings for his first victory in 2½ years and Adam LaRoche drove in five runs with two homers and a double as Arizona defeated Chicago. Kelly Johnson and Chris Snyder also connected for Arizona, which leads the majors with 33 homers. Johnson, who has an NL-high nine homers and has gone deep six times in the last seven games, also had three singles. Arizona K.Johnson 2b S.Drew ss J.Upton rf G.Parra rf M.Reynolds 3b Ojeda 3b Ad.LaRoche 1b b-Ryal ph-1b C.Young cf Gillespie lf Snyder c I.Kennedy p d-T.Abreu ph Stange p Totals

AB 5 5 3 0 3 1 4 1 5 5 5 3 1 0 41

R 1 1 2 0 1 0 3 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 13

H 4 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 14

BI 3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 3 1 0 0 13

BB 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 11

Avg. .320 .291 .214 .239 .227 .000 .299 .286 .281 .263 .278 .222 .323 ---

Chicago Theriot ss Fukudome rf D.Lee 1b Ar.Ramirez 3b Byrd cf Berg p c-Nady ph Marshall p A.Soriano lf Fontenot 2b Soto c Lilly p a-Tracy ph Gray p J.Russell p Colvin cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 4 3 3 0 1 0 0 1 32

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 5

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 1

SO 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .340 .328 .193 .159 .333 --.194 --.275 .309 .340 .000 .133 ----.317

Arizona 000 510 700 — 13 14 1 Chicago 001 000 040 — 5 6 1 a-popped out for Lilly in the 5th. b-grounded out for Ad.LaRoche in the 8th. c-lined out for Berg in the 8th. d-struck out for I.Kennedy in the 9th. E—Ryal (1), Ar.Ramirez (2). LOB—Arizona 5, Chicago 3. 2B—Ad.LaRoche (7), Gillespie (3). HR—Ad.LaRoche 2 (4), off Lilly 2; Snyder (3), off Lilly; K.Johnson (9), off J.Russell; Fukudome (4), off I.Kennedy. RBIs—K.Johnson 3 (18), Ad.LaRoche 5 (17), Gillespie (1), Snyder 3 (12), I.Kennedy (1), Theriot (12), Fukudome 4 (15). S—Lilly. SF—I.Kennedy. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 1 (Fukudome). DP—Arizona 1 (K.Johnson). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy W, 1-1 8 6 5 4 1 6 110 4.45 Stange 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lilly L, 1-1 5 7 6 6 2 6 98 4.91 Gray 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 2 23 7.11 J.Russell 2-3 5 5 1 0 1 32 3.86 Berg 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.60 Marshall 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 3.00 Inherited runners-scored—J.Russell 2-2. HBP—by I.Kennedy (Fontenot). WP—I.Kennedy. PB—Soto. T—2:40. A—36,850 (41,210).

J.Chavez p c-M.Diaz ph Moylan p Saito p Totals

0 1 0 0 32

0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 8

0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 2

0 --0 .196 0 --0 --4

St. Louis Schumaker 2b Ludwick rf Holliday lf T.Miller p Rasmus cf Freese 3b Y.Molina c-1b Mather 1b-lf Wainwright p b-Jay ph D.Reyes p Hawksworth p LaRue c Greene ss Totals

AB 5 5 4 0 2 3 3 4 2 1 0 1 0 4 34

R 0 1 2 0 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 10

H 0 1 1 0 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 10

BB 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 6

Avg. .207 .294 .274 --.344 .328 .257 .150 .143 .000 --.000 .000 .250

Atlanta 000 102 100 — 4 8 1 St. Louis 300 141 10x — 10 10 0 a-flied out for Medlen in the 5th. b-struck out for Wainwright in the 6th. c-grounded out for J.Chavez in the 7th. d-grounded out for Y.Escobar in the 8th. E—Infante (2). LOB—Atlanta 4, St. Louis 5. 2B—Infante (3), Holliday (5), Freese (3), Y.Molina (3). HR—Heyward (5), off D.Reyes; Freese (1), off Jurrjens; Greene (1), off J.Chavez. RBIs—Hinske 2 (8), Infante (3), Heyward (17), Freese 6 (14), Y.Molina 2 (15), Mather (1), Greene (1). S—Medlen. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 2 (Y.Escobar, Heyward); St. Louis 4 (Wainwright, Mather, Hawksworth 2). Runners moved up—McCann 2, Mather. GIDP—Prado, Infante, Mather. DP—Atlanta 1 (Y.Escobar, Hinske); St. Louis 2 (Wainwright, Greene, Mather), (Freese, Schumaker, Mather). Atlanta IP H R ER Jurrjens L, 0-3 1 2 3 3 Medlen 3 2 1 1 J.Chavez 2 5 5 5 Moylan 1 1 1 1 Saito 1 0 0 0 St. Louis IP H R ER Wnwrght W, 4-1 6 6 3 3 D.Reyes 1-3 1 1 1 Hawksworth 1 2-3 1 0 0 T.Miller 1 0 0 0 IBB—off J.Chavez (Rasmus). (Holliday). T—2:33. A—39,561 (43,975).

BB SO NP ERA 0 0 14 6.38 1 2 44 3.07 1 2 49 4.76 2 1 28 2.70 0 1 12 3.00 BB SO NP ERA 2 4 78 2.13 0 0 8 1.42 0 0 17 0.00 0 0 11 1.93 HBP—by Jurrjens

Reds 4, Astros 2 HOUSTON — Bronson Arroyo pitched 62⁄3 strong innings for his first win of the season, Joey Votto hit a two-run homer and Cincinnati held on for a victory over Houston. Arroyo (1-2) allowed six hits and two runs with seven strikeouts to bounce back from his last start, when he allowed eight runs in three-plus innings. Cincinnati Dickerson cf Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b Bruce rf O.Cabrera ss L.Nix lf Hanigan c Arroyo p Herrera p Lincoln p c-Gomes ph Cordero p Totals

AB 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 0 0 1 0 34

Houston AB Bourn cf 4 K.Matsui 2b 2 b-Keppinger ph-2b 1 Ca.Lee lf 4 Berkman 1b 2 P.Feliz 3b 4 Pence rf 4 Towles c 4 Manzella ss 3 d-Blum ph 1 Oswalt p 2 a-Sullivan ph 1 Byrdak p 0 Lyon p 0 Lindstrom p 0 Totals 32

R H 0 0 2 2 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10 R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 9

Avg. .227 .197 .224 .278 .258 .237 .241 .250 .452 .083 ----.214 ---

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 3

SO 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .329 .147 .295 .177 .242 .260 .228 .205 .236 .325 .143 .100 -------

ST. LOUIS — Rookie David Freese homered, doubled and drove in six runs as St. Louis sent Atlanta to its ninth straight loss. Adam Wainwright (4-1) worked six solid innings as the Cardinals completed a four-game sweep.

Cincinnati 000 010 210 — 4 10 0 Houston 000 000 200 — 2 7 0 a-grounded out for Oswalt in the 7th. b-grounded out for K.Matsui in the 7th. c-struck out for Lincoln in the 9th. d-grounded into a double play for Manzella in the 9th. LOB—Cincinnati 9, Houston 6. 2B—Bruce (4), Bourn (5), Manzella (2). 3B—L.Nix (1). HR—Votto (4), off Oswalt; Bruce (4), off Byrdak; Pence (2), off Arroyo. RBIs—Votto 2 (12), Bruce (9), Bourn (3), Pence (6). SB—Stubbs 2 (7), B.Phillips (2). Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 5 (Bruce, Dickerson, Arroyo, Rolen 2); Houston 4 (P.Feliz 2, Berkman, Keppinger). Runners moved up—Sullivan. GIDP—Votto, Rolen, Hanigan, P.Feliz, Blum. DP—Cincinnati 2 (O.Cabrera, B.Phillips, Votto), (O.Cabrera, B.Phillips, Votto); Houston 3 (Manzella, Berkman), (Manzella, K.Matsui, Berkman), (Keppinger, Manzella, Berkman).

Atlanta Me.Cabrera lf Y.Escobar ss d-Glaus ph-1b Prado 2b McCann c Hinske 1b-3b Infante 3b-ss Heyward rf McLouth cf Jurrjens p Medlen p a-Conrad ph

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB Arroyo W, 1-2 6 2-3 6 2 2 3 Herrera H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 Lincoln H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 Cordero S, 8-9 1 1 0 0 0 Houston IP H R ER BB Oswalt L, 2-3 7 8 3 3 4 Byrdak 2-3 1 1 1 0 Lyon 1-3 0 0 0 0 Lindstrom 1 1 0 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—Herrera Oswalt (Hanigan). T—2:56. A—21,493 (40,976).

Cardinals 10, Braves 4

AB 3 3 1 3 4 4 4 4 4 0 0 1

R 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

Avg. .189 .215 .200 .360 .250 .308 .267 .239 .148 .000 .000 .222

SO NP ERA 7 101 6.37 0 4 1.23 0 10 3.27 0 7 2.92 SO NP ERA 7 119 2.73 1 8 4.00 0 6 5.79 1 25 2.70 1-0. IBB—off

Padres 9, Brewers 0 SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Padres tied a team record with seven straight singles during a five-run fifth inning — including pitcher Wade LeBlanc’s career-high third hit of the night. The NL West-leading Padres won their seventh straight home game and for the 11th time in 13 games overall. San Diego’s 13 hits were all singles. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Braun lf Fielder 1b Hart rf Counsell 3b A.Escobar ss Kottaras c D.Davis p Suppan p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 0 1

San Diego AB R H Hairston Jr. ss 5 0 2 Eckstein 2b 4 0 1 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 0 0 Headley 3b 4 1 1 Hairston cf 4 2 1 Blanks lf 3 2 1 Salazar rf 4 2 2 Torrealba c 3 2 2 LeBlanc p 3 0 3 Stauffer p 1 0 0 Totals 36 9 13

BI 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2

SO 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 8

Avg. .258 .273 .356 .253 .271 .314 .260 .261 .000 .200

SO 0 0 0 2 2 2 1 1 0 1 9

Avg. .231 .273 .299 .333 .225 .191 .136 .286 .667 .000

Milwaukee 000 000 000 — 0 9 2 San Diego 000 450 00x — 9 13 1 E—Counsell 2 (2), Hairston Jr. (1). LOB—Milwaukee 8, San Diego 6. 2B—Gomez (5), Braun (6), Counsell (6), Kottaras (2). RBIs—Hairston Jr. 2 (5), Eckstein (6), Blanks (10), Salazar (1), Torrealba 3 (7). Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 6 (Fielder, Weeks 2, Counsell, Gomez 2); San Diego 5 (Hairston, Hairston Jr. 2, Ad.Gonzalez 2). GIDP—Gomez, Eckstein, Ad.Gonzalez. DP—Milwaukee 2 (Weeks, A.Escobar, Fielder), (A.Escobar, Weeks, Fielder); San Diego 1 (Eckstein, Hairston Jr., Ad.Gonzalez). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Davis L, 0-3 4 8 6 5 2 5 106 8.87 Suppan 4 5 3 3 0 4 65 8.16 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc W, 2-0 6 1-3 8 0 0 0 6 107 0.52 Stauffer 2 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 31 0.00 D.Davis pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—Suppan 2-2, Stauffer 1-0. HBP—by D.Davis (Eckstein). WP—LeBlanc. T—2:52. A—16,696 (42,691).

Pirates 2, Dodgers 0 LOS ANGELES — Ryan Doumit got two RBIs on a play that Matt Kemp misplayed into a triple and Pittsburgh sent Los Angeles to its fifth loss in a row. Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw (1-1) walked his first two batters of the game, and both scored when Doumit’s sinking liner got past Kemp in center with two outs as he tried to backhand it on the short hop. Pittsburgh Milledge lf An.LaRoche 3b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf Doumit c Clement 1b Crosby 2b Burres p Taschner p b-Delw.Young ph Meek p Cedeno ss Totals

AB 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 4 32

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 2 4 10

Avg. .232 .358 .290 .213 .300 .194 .269 .000 --.189 --.211

Los Angeles Martin c G.Anderson lf Kemp cf Ethier rf Blake 3b Loney 1b J.Carroll ss c-Belliard ph DeWitt 2b Kershaw p Troncoso p a-Re.Johnson ph Kuo p Broxton p Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 0 1 0 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4

Avg. .284 .122 .290 .333 .292 .287 .212 .289 .264 .000 .000 .282 -----

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Pittsburgh 200 000 000 — 2 5 1 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 a-grounded out for Troncoso in the 7th. b-struck out for Taschner in the 9th. c-struck out for J.Carroll in the 9th. E—G.Jones (3). LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Los Angeles 7. 2B—DeWitt (2). 3B—Doumit (1). RBIs—Doumit 2 (11). SB—Doumit (1). Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 3 (Clement, Burres, An.LaRoche); Los Angeles 6 (Martin, J.Carroll 4, G.Anderson). Runners moved up—Loney. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Burres W, 1-1 5 1-3 4 0 0 4 3 93 6.00 Taschner H, 1 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 27 3.95 Meek S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.60 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw L, 1-1 6 1-3 3 2 2 4 7 117 3.07 Troncoso 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 10 3.46 Kuo 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 10.80 Broxton 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Taschner 2-0, Troncoso 1-0. IBB—off Kershaw (Crosby). T—2:51. A—40,185 (56,000).

Streaking Mets aren’t also-rans in NL East race By Howie Rumberg The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Ike Davis bounded into the New York Mets’ clubhouse on April 19, his big grin and wide eyes — and big bat — a needed boost for a team that just returned from a demoralizing road trip. The top prospect raced through a condensed pregame routine, then got two hits in his winning major league debut. The Mets haven’t slowed down since then. In Davis’ first 10 days in the big leagues the Mets matched the franchise’s best homestand, going 9-1 for the first time since 1988. They surged from the bottom of the NL East to the top — a turnaround as startling as it was necessary for the snake-bit club. Next up, a real test. A weekend trip to Philadelphia to face the two-time NL champion Phil-

lies and Roy Halladay. “The thing about our team right now is we appear youthful. With Ike Davis and Jose Reyes running around, and (Jeff) Francouer, (Angel) Pagan, even the new catchers. We just appear that way at this point,” Mets manager Jerry Manuel said Wednesday after sweeping the Dodgers. “We still look like we have a lot of life. I think that’s a key for us in going forward is hopefully we can keep that type of spirit as we continue to play.” Looking at the schedule the day before the season started, Francouer hoped for a .500 record in April. After taking two of three from the Chicago Cubs, and sweeping the Atlanta Braves and Dodgers for seven straight wins, the goals are a bit loftier. “I think this whole homestand gives us confidence moving for-

ward,” third baseman David Wright said. “Everybody should be excited about the direction this team’s headed and not relax when we go on the road.” Only 3½ weeks ago, the Mets appeared headed for also-ran status before the first pitch of 2010 even was thrown. Carlos Beltran was out until at least May, Daniel Murphy was hurt and Reyes was still several days away from returning from a hyperactive thyroid. Coming off an injury wrecked 70-92 season, everyone from the trainers to beleaguered lefty Oliver Perez was booed on opening day. New York dropped two series at home then two more on the road — the first time the Mets lost their first four series since 1997. There was talk about several players’ dissatisfaction with Manuel’s moves and the

team was being vilified in the New York tabloids. There was talk, too, that Manuel’s job was in jeopardy. All a distant memory now. “The way we came in and battled, showed resiliency,” outfielder Jason Bay said. “I don’t know if guys expected it but I know a lot of guys wanted it.” Davis arrived with the enthusiasm of a 23-year-old rookie but with the maturity of a kid who grew up around baseball — his dad is former big league reliever Ron Davis — and inspired an insipid offense. In his first 10 games, he is hitting .355 with six RBIs and has scored five runs. “If I’ve helped them that’s what I hopefully was brought up here to do, just help,” Davis said. “I definitely wasn’t the answer. Our pitching has been unbelievable.”

The rookie is right. Led by Johan Santana, Mike Pelfrey and reliever Pedro Feliciano, the staff has been stellar. Over the homestand, the Mets had a 2.09 ERA in 86 innings with three shutouts. The bullpen has a 2.51 ERA this season. Pelfrey, who is scheduled to face Halladay on Saturday, is 40 with one save and a 0.69 ERA. He has a 24-inning scoreless streak going. “It’s comfortable on offense to know that we don’t have to score that many runs,” Francoeur said. After Manuel shook up the lineup a week ago by moving the speedy Reyes to third and dropping Wright to the No. 5 spot to give Bay protection, the offense began to click, too. Bay is hitting .400 (eight for 20) since the switch and connected for his first homer of the

season in the first game of a doubleheader sweep of the Dodgers on Tuesday, Wright broke out of a seven-for-42 slump (.167) with four RBIs in the nightcap. Francoeur who snapped a zero-for-24 skid last Thursday, had a hit and two RBIs in the finale against the Dodgers. The offense has scored 17 runs in the past two games after scoring 31 runs in the first eight games of the homestand. “Right now every time we take the field we feel like we’re going to score runs, we’re going to hit. We feel like our pitching is going to shut them down and when you do that it’s a good feeling,” said Francoeur, a mid-2009 acquisition. “I know as a team we haven’t been able to feel that in a long time. I know since I’ve been here since July we haven’t had this much confidence and this much fun so it’s really cool.”


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 D5

PREP ROUNDUP

Crook County boys golf wins tourney NECK AND NECK

Bulletin staff report With three competitors in the top five and four below 90, Crook County drove past the competition at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend on Thursday, winning the Mountain View Invitational boys golf tournament with a team score of 330. Jared George led the Cowboys with a 9-over-par 81, which tied him for runner-up honors. Crook County golfers Caleb Henry and Dillon Russell landed in a threeway tie for third with a score of 82. Aaron Simundson of Sisters took medalist honors with his score of 79. Simundson, who shot 1-over on the back nine, led the Outlaws (346) to a third-place team finish. Second place went to Bend High, which was led by Robbie Wilkins and his 82. Four of the Lava Bears’ five golfers managed to shoot under 90 as Bend went on to post a team score of 340, its lowest mark of the season. Mountain View’s Paul Coduti tied for second with an 81 while helping the host Cougars to a fourth-place finish. Jasper Gerhardt, who posted a score of 90, was the star of the fifth-place Madras squad, while Travis Knight paced sixth-place La Pine with a team-best score of 94. In other prep sports on Thursday: SOFTBALL Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRINEVILLE — The Cowgirls stayed within striking distance of the Cougars through the third inning, but Mountain View broke open the game in the fourth inning, scoring three runs followed by four in the sixth. Morgan Robles led the Cougs’ game-changing spurt with an RBI double in the fourth and a three-run double in the sixth. Kylie Durre of Mountain View knocked a solo homer in the third inning and ended the game with three RBIs. Pitcher Shelbee Wells went the distance for the Cougars and held the Cowgirls to five hits. For Crook County, McKenna Ontko and Emily Gannon were both two for three at the plate. Crook

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Sisters teammates Courteney Satko, left, and Jodie Reoch fight to gain ground on each other while competing in the 100-meter dash during a high school meet Thursday afternoon in Sisters. Satko finished second, and Reoch finished fourth. For more on the meet, see story, Page D1. County fell to 4-9 in the Intermountain Conference and to 5-13 overall, while the Cougs jumped to 6-7 in league and 9-9 overall. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MADRAS — Jamie Moe twohit the Lava Bears to improve the White Buffaloes’ Intermountain Conference record to 6-7. Inez Jones led the Madras offense with a double and three RBIs while Mallory Smith added a double of her own and two RBIs. Kaydee Tarin took the loss for Bend, which is now 1-12 in league play. Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 LA PINE — Elmira’s sluggers tallied 18 hits and scattered runs throughout every inning. The Falcons broke the game open in the third with a four-run inning

that vaulted the visiting team to a 6-1 lead. La Pine’s Becca Toepfer logged the Hawks’ only double in the home loss. La Pine is now 1-5 in Sky-Em League play. BASEBALL Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes came out on top during a back-and-forth Intermountain Conference matchup against the Lava Bears, who matched the Buffs with 11 hits. Pitcher Austin Say went more than five innings on the mound and led the Madras offense with RBI doubles in the third and sixth innings in addition to a two-run homer in the first. For Bend, Travis Wiest belted a two-run double in the first inning, a double in the fourth and an RBI double in the sixth. Grant Newton added one double

for Bend. With the win, Madras jumped to 9-4 in league and 13-6 overall. The Bears fell to 11-3 in the IMC and 11-7 overall. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PRINEVILLE — The Cowboys picked up their first Intermountain Conference win of the season, ending the game in five innings because of the 10run mercy rule. Dayton Stafford paced the Crook County offense with two home runs and five runs batted in. Parker Woolridge earned the win on the mound, striking out eight while allowing just three hits. The Cowboys are now 1-12 in league play while Mountain View falls to 3-10. Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 LA PINE — A bases-loaded walk in the eighth inning forced

home what proved to be the winning run for the visiting Falcons in the Sky-Em League contest. After being shut down for four innings by La Pine starting pitcher Ricky Dinger, Elmira rallied for seven runs in the fifth inning for a 7-2 lead. The Hawks (2-5 SkyEm, 5-12 overall) answered with Jon Ebner’s two-run triple in the home half of the fifth, then went ahead 9-7 with a five-run sixth that featured a two-run double by Ebner. Austin Manley and Austin Steinbach each also had two hits for La Pine. Marist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 EUGENE — The Spartans held the Outlaws to just one hit, a double by Shane Groth, and Sisters fell to 3-4 in Sky-Em League play. Marist jumped out early, scoring three runs in its first at bat. Dan Weigand threw just one inning and took the loss for the Outlaws. Sisters is now 13-5 on the season. GIRLS TENNIS Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Redmond’s Monica Johnson outlasted Bryn Oliveira 6-4, 2-6, 7-5 in what Redmond coach Nathan Saito called the contest’s best match. The Panthers went on to take the top three singles matches en route to the win. Bend’s Lexi Kadlecik and Andrea Lohmann broke Redmond’s streak with a win at No. 2 doubles, but the Panthers took the remaining doubles matches as well. BOYS TENNIS The Dalles-Wahtonka . . . . . . . . . .4 Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 (The Dalles-Wahtonka wins 8-7 on sets) THE DALLES — The Cougars won three of the four doubles matches and Nolan King posted a victory at No. 2 singles, but the Eagle Indians nipped Mountain View in the tiebreaker based on number of sets won, 8-7. Crook County, Sisters rained out PRINEVILLE — The Cowboys’ Trevor Brown defeated the Outlaws’ Ben Fullhart 6-2, 6-1 in No. 1 singles in what was the only match that was completed before the nonleague event was postponed because of rain.

PREP SCOREBOARD SOFTBALL Thursday’s Results ———

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE Mountain View 011 304 0 — 9 10 1 Crook County 010 000 0 — 1 5 3 Wells and Bigby; Gannon, Reece (6) and Ontko. W—Wells. L—Gannon. 2B—Mountain View: Robles 2. HR—Mountain View: Durre. ——— Bend 021 001 — 4 2 4 Madras 014 045 — 14 14 5 Tarin and Bowe; Moe and J. Smith. W — Moe. L— Tarin. 2B — Madras: Abendschein, M. Smith, I. Jones.

Class 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE Sisters 300 000 0 — 3 6 4 Marist 010 000 0 — 1 5 2 Kosanke and T. Walker; White and Boyd. W — Kosanke. L— White. ——— SKY-EM LEAGUE Elmira 114 111 2 — 11 18 1 La Pine 010 001 0 — 2 5 4 Boytz and Thoms; Owen and Jackson. W—Boytz. L—Owen. 2B—Elmira: Thoms, Vanderpool, Boytz, Lay; La Pine: Toepfer.

BASEBALL Thursday’s Results ———

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE Mountain View 000 02 — 2 3 1 Crook County 005 8X — 13 8 4 Deadmond, Zettle (4) and Hester, Ayers; Woolridge and Cleveland W — Parker. L— Deadmond. 2B — Crook County: C. Stafford. HR —Crook County: D. Stafford. ——— Bend 210 103 0 — 7 11 0

Blazers Continued from D1 Martell Webster had 19 points for Portland, which failed to advance out of the first round for the second straight year. The Blazers narrowed it to 7471 with 10:44 left on Rudy Fernandez’s three-pointer. Jared Dudley fouled Webster on a three-point attempt, and Webster made two free throws to close within 74-73. After Leandro Barbosa’s bank shot, Jerryd Bayless hit a long jumper that pulled Portland within one. Amare Stoudemire fouled LaMarcus Aldridge, who made one of two free throws to tie it at 76. Stoudemire’s layup prevented Portland from taking the lead, and Goran Dragic added a rebound to put the Suns in front 8076. Phoenix extended it on two consecutive layups and a threepointer from Richardson to make it 87-78 with 4:36 left. Steve Nash sealed it with a 3pointer that gave the Suns a 9282 lead.

Madras 202 412 X — 10 11 0 Hirko and Norgaard; Say, Gill (6) and R. Smith. W—Say. L— Hirko. 2B—Bend: Wiest 3, Newton; Madras: Say 2. HR—Madras: Say.

Class 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE (8 innings) Elmira 000 070 21 — 10 7 2 La Pine 200 025 00 — 9 9 2 Boggs, Daniels (6), Boggs (7) amd Keegal; Dinger, Pickering (5), Steinbach (7), Morton (8) and Morton, Ebner (8). W—Boggs. L—Steinbach. 2B—La Pine: Morton, Ebner. 3B—La Pine: Ebner. ——— Sisters 001 000 0 — 1 1 2 Marist 310 220 x — 8 8 2 Weigand, Morgan (2), Carlson (6) and Warner; Kirkpatrick, Balerson (7) and Swingley. W — Kirkpatrick. L— Weigand. 2B — Sisters: Groth; Marist: Swingley. HR — Marist: Paskan, Weilbrenner.

GIRLS TENNIS Thursday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE REDMOND 6, BEND 2 At Bend Single — Monica Johnson, R, def. Bryn Oliveira, B, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5; Genna Miller, R, def. Allie Calande, B, 6-1, 6-3; Many Dollarhide, R, def. Katheryn Fowlds, B, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4); Kaylee Tornay, B, def. Candace Siangco, R, 6-4, 2-6, 7-6 (11-9). Doubles — Karli Christensen/Kayla Woychak, R, def. Chloe Knievel/Hannah Palcic, B, 6-3, 6-1; Andrea Lohmann/Lexi Kadlecik, B, def. Emmalee Cron/Megan McGinty, R, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3; Abby Cranston/Leslie Teater, R, def. Allison Daley/Claire Nichols 67 (4-7) 6-1, 6-1; Janessa Haugen/Hannah Ronhaar, R, def. Lindsey Petersen/Mariah Taunton, B, 6-1, 7-5. ——

BOYS TENNIS Thursday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE CROOK COUNTY VS. SISTERS (Incomplete because of rain)

Stoudemire finished with 22 points for the Suns. Brandon Roy had 14 points for the Blazers in his first start of the series. Portland’s three-time AllStar had arthroscopic surgery for a torn meniscus in his right knee two days before the series against the Suns opened. He was originally ruled out of the first round, but unexpectedly came back for Game 4, which the Blazers won 96-87 at the Rose Garden. Roy had 10 points in that game, then got just five in Portland’s 107-88 Game 5 loss in Phoenix, but he was coming off the bench which he said made him uncomfortable. The Suns, who found success in the series when they established a fast pace, went up 17-6 early with Richardson hitting three three-pointers. But Stoudemire collected two quick fouls and retreated to the bench. Richardson wound up with 14 points after the first quarter, but it was tempered by Nash’s five turnovers. Portland narrowed it to 28-26

At Crook County High School Singles — Trevor Brown, CC, def. Ben Fullhart, S, 6-2, 6-1; Marc Dawen, CC, leads Luke Gnos, S, 6-2, 6-5; Jared Schneider, S, leads Jared Anderson, CC, 3-1. Doubles — Sean Tosello/Colby Gilmore, S, leads Brady Slater/Zac Thompson, CC, 2-6, 6-4, 1-0; Josue Lopez/Gabe Alvarez, CC, leads Sam Quinn/Marcus Cooper, S, 7-5, 5-4.

Triple jump — 1, Brett Breding, E, 43-9; 2, Logan Loftis, E, 42-0; 3, Tim Hernandez, S, 39-00. Long jump — 1, Brett Breding, E, 20-0; 2, Forrest Hayson, E, 19-6; 3, Logan Loftis, E, 19-1. ———

BOYS TRACK

SKY-EM LEAGUE MEET At Sisters Team scores — Sisters 198, La Pine 158, Elmira 152, Junction City 32. 400-meter relay — 1, La Pine A, 45.81; 2, La Pine B, 47.23; 3, Elmira, 48.18. 1,500 — 1, Mason Calmettes, S, 4:51.63; 2, Grayson Gould, S, 4:59.31; 3, Zander Albertson, S, 5:02.67. 3,000 — 1, Taylor Steele, S, 9:43.31; 2, Mason Calmettes, S, 10:56.98; 3, Erik Lund, S, 11:35.21. 100 — 1, Kole Kimmel, LP, 11.63; 2, Jared Nelson, S, 11.65; 3, Garrett Lewellen, E, 11.94. 400 — 1, Anders Westlund, E, 55.04; 2, Jeremiah Stahn, S, 55.08; 3, Luis Labastida, E, 55.43. 110 hurdles — 1, Chad Cummings, S, 16.98; 2, Garrett Lewellen, E, 17.38; 3, Colton George, LP, 17.61. 800 — 1, Drew Harrison, S, 2:05.26; 2, Parker Bennett, S, 2:06.64; 3, Donovin Mobley, JC, 2:16.96. 200 — 1, Brett Breding, E, 23.39; 2, David Cowan, S, 23.78; 3, Kole Kimmel, LP, 24.60. 300 hurdles — 1, Jeff Wilder, S, 42.16; 2, Jordan Rudinsky, S, 44.97; 3, Garrett Lewellen, E, 46.70. 1,600 relay — 1, Sisters, 3:42.68; 2, La Pine, 3:43.23; 3, Elmira, 3:52.56. High jump — 1 (tie), Nick Read, LP, 5-10; Brandon Nash, JC, 5-10; 3, Maxwell Beebe, E, 5-8. Discus — 1, Ty Slater, LP, 155-0; 2, John Green, S, 116-10; 3, Travis Harrison, LP, 115-3. Pole vault — 1 (tie), Jake Logan, LP, 14-00; Jared Nelson, S, 14-00; 3, Deion Mock, LP, 13-6. Shot — 1, John Green, S, 40-5; 2, Ty Slater, LP, 39-5; 3, Travis Harrison, LP, 37-5. Javelin — 1, Brett Breding, E, 183-7; 2, Ty Slater, LP, 179-0; 3, Maxwell Beebe, E, 143-0.

Thursday’s Results ——— SKY-EM LEAGUE TRACK AND FIELD MEET At Sisters Top three individuals Team scores — Sisters 222, Elmira 124, La Pine 96, Junction City 62. 400-meter relay — 1, Sisters (Annie Mutchler, Courteney Satko, Cindy Steele, Jodie Reoch) 51.76; Elmira, 53.63; La Pine, 57.68. 800 — 1, Laura Jackson, LP, 2:27.7; 2, K.D. Solomon, JC, 2:41.58; 3, Andrea Blake, JC, 2:41.89. 1,500 — 1, Emi Conrads, S, 5:29.08; 2, Vicki O’Halloran, LP, 5:46.13; 3, Katie Stewart, S, 5:52.3. 100 — 1, Ashliegh McIntyre, E, 12.39; 2, Courteney Satko, S, 12.47; 3, Annie Mutchler, S, 12.6. 200 — 1, Courteney Satko, S, 26.86; 2, Jodie Reoch, S, 27.25; 3, Ashliegh McIntyre, E, 27.66. 400 — 1, Karah Herr, S, 1:04.24; 2, Hannah Bolton, JC, 1:04.93; 3, K.D. Solomon, JC, 1:05.64. 100 hurdles — 1, Brooke Swesey, E, 16.86; 2, Meesha Baldree, E, 17.02; 3, Chelsea Reifschneider, S, 17.77. 300 hurdles — 1, Chelsea Reifschneider, S, 49.41; 2, Brooke Swesey, E, 51.02; 3, Karah Herr, S, 51.63. 1,600-meter relay — 1, Sisters (Hannah Harrer, Courteney Satko, Emi Conrads, Jodie Reoch) 4:25.62; Elmira, 4:35.11; La Pine, 4:40.46. High jump — 1, Annie Mutchler, S, 4-8; 2, Alicia Haken, S, 4-6; 3, Amber Turner, JC, 4-6. Discus — 1, Kassi Conditt, LP, 112-4; 2, Jessika McCullough, E, 98-3; 3, Ashley Hall, JC, 85-2. Pole vault — 1, Sara Small, S, 10-6; 2, Paris Piva, E, 8-0; 3, Alicia Haken, S, 7-6. Shot — 1, Kassi Conditt, LP, 41-2 3/4; 2, Jessika McCullough, E, 31-2 1/2; 3, Alexis Tilman, LP, 27-1 3/4. Javelin — 1, Megan McReynolds, LP, 90-7; 2, Carly Roderick, LP, 80-6; 3, Jessika McCullough, E, 78-7. Triple jump — 1, Ashliegh McIntyre, E, 35-4 1/2; 2, Alicia Haken, S, 30-11 3/4; 3, Stephani Gent, JC, 30-9. Long jump — 1, Annie Mutchler, S, 15-11; 2, Sara Small, S,

on Fernandez’s three-pointer. The Suns stretched it out to 4132, but Roy finally came alive, hitting a running shot from the top of the key with 4:51 to go in the half. It was Roy’s first basket of the half. Hill’s fast-break layup and free throw made it 53-40. Richardson finished the first half with 19 points. He made all four of his three-point attempts. Channing Frye’s 3-pointer put Phoenix up 64-50 midway through the third quarter. But Webster hit consecutive three-pointers that narrowed it to

69-65. But Dudley answered with a three-pointer for the Suns. The Suns are 6-1 in their last six potential series-clinching games. Portland has never won a series that it has trailed 3-2. NOTES: C Greg Oden was at Portland’s shootaround earlier Thursday. The 7-foot former No. 1 draft pick broke his left kneecap and required season-ending surgery early in December. Oden addressed reporters during Thursday’s shootaround, saying he was not yet doing any courtrelated workouts.

Thursday’s Results ———

Class 4A

GIRLS TRACK

14-4 3/4; 3, Stephani Gent, JC, 14-0.

BOYS GOLF Thursday’s Results ——— MOUNTAIN VIEW INVITE Awbrey Glen Golf Club, Bend, Par 72 Team scores — Crook County 330, Bend 340, Sisters 346, Mountain View 367, Madras 386, La Pine 420 Medalist — Aaron Simundson, Sisters, 42-37—79. Crook County (330) — Jared George 40-41—81, Caleb Henry 42-40—82, Dillon Russell 43-39—82, Kurt Russell 4342—85, Mitch Scofield 43-50—93. Bend (340) — Robbie Wilkins 40-42—82, Martin Marquez 41-42—83, Carter McGowan 42-44—86, Jaired Rodmaker 4445—89, Ryan Crownover 49-46—95. Sisters (346) — Aaron Simundson 42-37—79, Cody Farr 4242—84, Johnathan Standen 49-41—90, Jeff Fought 50-43—93, Zach Cummings 57-47—104. Mountain View (367) — Paul Coduti 39-42—81, Ryan Vieira 45-48—93, Jacoby Donaca 48-48—96, Cameron Mackenzie 5443—97, James Harper 53-45—98. Madras (386) — Jasper Gerhardt 44-46—90, Nick Johnson 47-45—92, Rabe Clements 46-52—98, Sloan Bush 53-53—106, Drew Pennington 59-60—119. La Pine (420) — Travis Knight 43-51—94, Drew Smith 53-51—104, Niko Cummings 53-58—111, Jacob Watkins 5556—111.

BOYS LACROSSE Thursday’s Results ——— HIGH DESERT LEAGUE Sisters 13, Harney County 8

KENTUCKY DERBY

Filly will try to show girls rule By Beth Harris The Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The girls already grabbed horse racing’s biggest headlines. Now another one is out to steal the sport’s biggest race from the boys. Devil May Care will try to become the fourth filly to win the Kentucky Derby on Saturday and extend the dominance begun last year by Rachel Alexandra, who won the Preakness, and Zenyatta, who won the Breeders’ Cup Classic. Those two finished 1-2 for Horse of the Year honors and they’re back competing this year. Devil May Care is listed at 10-1 odds in her bid to join the last filly winner, Winning Colors in 1988. Just as important, her trainer, Todd Pletcher, knows plenty about beating the boys with a girl. He did it with Rags to Riches in the 2007 Belmont Stakes, his only victory in a Triple Crown race. But Pletcher is zero for 24 in the Derby, where his horses have finished last five times and next-to-last twice. “When you get an exceptional animal, you’ve got to give them a chance to do exceptional things,” owner John Greathouse said. Devil May Care will run two years after filly Eight Belles finished a gallant second, then broke down past the finish line of the 1¼-mile race and had to be euthanized on the track. “It’s a big challenge for all of them — filly, colts and geldings,” Pletcher said. “She’s been preparing her whole life to run long and I think that’s what she wants to do.” He has no qualms about sending a filly into the 20horse fray. Muscular colt Lookin At Lucky is the 3-1 favorite, followed by Sidney’s Candy at 5-1. Joining Devil May Care as the third favorite are Florida Derby winner Ice Box and Gotham Stakes champion Awesome Act.

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A D V EN T U R E S P O RT S

D6 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Continued from D1 “Initially, there was a large uproar and people were very upset, but Mt. Bachelor came back with revised policies to open up more terrain,” Grove says. “The community does feel they’re working with us.” Mt. Bachelor, whose last day of operation this year will be May 16, revised its uphill policy for the final month of this season. Following what Grove describes as a productive meeting with a number of skinning enthusiasts, the resort decided to allow additional uphill access daily from its 2 p.m. closing time until dusk. The route to the summit was also moved from the east side of the mountain near the Rainbow chairlift to the west ridge above Pine Marten Lodge, where snow grooming and avalanche control is less of a hazard in the spring. Uphill access remains unchanged on the cinder cone. “From my end, it seems to be a good working relationship now,” Grove says. “(Bachelor officials) take our input, and that was a big part of the new change — have it (uphill access) open in the afternoon (in the spring) when the snow is soft and nice for uphill skinning. A large percentage of the uphill community wants to skin the mountain during afterhours times, when nobody else is up there. And the evening sunsets are pretty stirring.” Safety concerns prompted Mt. Bachelor to implement a policy to govern uphill access, according to Bachelor marketing director Alex Kaufman. Uphill travelers could be at risk in areas of avalanche control and grooming, where heavy equipment is used, Kaufman notes. “We’re hoping to come to a place with an uphill policy that is something both sides can work with, where we can maintain safety and people can still enjoy their uphill exploits,” Kaufman says. “This event (King and Queen of the Cone) can be an extension of that.” While Grove likes the new spring policy, he and other backcountry enthusiasts would like to see an opportunity for hikers and skinners to have uphill access before the resort opens in the morning — from 6 to 9 a.m.,

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Start / Finish West Village Day Lodge Greg Cross / The Bulletin

About the course Both the Race and Recreational divisions start at the bottom of the Leeway Run. Competitors climb past the cinder cone, then ski to the bottom of the Outback chairlift before climbing to the top of the Outback lift, where the two divisions split. The Recreational Division skis down Leeway, skins up the cone, then skis down the cone to the finish. Race Division competitors continue to climb up the West Ridge to the summit, then ski down the Cirque Bowl, before skiing down the same route as the Rec Division to the finish.

for example. “Before they work, people like to go up there and skin the mountain,” Grove says. But Kaufman says that the morning period before the resort opens is when avalanche danger is high and when snowcat groomers are busy. “Right now, that seems to be the area where there will continue to be disagreement,” Kaufman says of early-morning uphill access during the season. “We may never see eye to eye, but we’re in communication with folks who represent that group.” After Bachelor closes in a couple of weeks, skinners will be free to hike and ski the mountain whenever and wherever they want, until the resort opens again next season. But uphill users should expect limited access next season and beyond. “The policy itself won’t change, but the route or routes may be realigned, moved or added,” Kaufman says. “That’s what we’ll continue to adjust.”

AT and telemark skis have free heels, allowing skiers to skin up the mountain after attaching skins to their skis. Skiers then remove the skins to ski down the hill. AT ski bindings allow skiers to lock their heels down for skiing, while telemark skis are always free-heeled. Split boards give snowboarders the ability to tour in the backcountry. The board splits in two, allowing snowboarders to apply skins for climbing. Then the boards can be put back together for the ride down the mountain. Part of the issue at Bachelor — and at resorts across the country — is the increased popularity of skinning due in part to the rapid evolution of lightweight gear. “There are definitely safety hazards on the mountain, and as numbers of uphill users grow and grow, you can imagine more potential safety issues,” Grove concedes. And as the number of uphill users grows, so grow races like the King and Queen of the Cone.

Popular in Europe for more than a decade, uphill/downhill alpine ski races have become more common in the United States in recent years. Several are staged in Colorado and, according to Grove, 30 or more similar races are now scheduled nationwide. Grove, who says he has skied in backcountry across the West, has competed in three such races: two at Alpental, in the Washington Cascades, and one in Jackson, Wyo. “They’re all over the country and they’re growing in number and sizes,” Grove says. “It’s a sport in the early stages in the U.S. In Europe, you’ll see races with huge numbers of competitors and spectators. It’s just taking off in the U.S.” Grove says that one of the fastest-growing groups of snowriders is multidimensional skiers: those who ride lifts at a resort one day, and then ski backcountry the next. “That’s a huge percentage of what this race (King and Queen of the Cone) attracts as well,” he says. The King and Queen of the Cone is staged in two competition divisions. The Race Division route climbs 4,000 feet, and the Recreational Division route climbs 2,000 feet. The courses include a series of ascents and descents near the cone, the Outback chairlift and the Leeway Run. Race Division competitors will climb to Bachelor’s 9,065foot summit and ski the Cirque Bowl. While the competition may attract some accomplished endurance athletes and skiers, Grove explains that the race is mostly about the camaraderie of backcountry riders. “It’s just a great event for meeting new backcountry partners, and for getting together with folks you see every once in a great while out in the mountains,” Grove says. “It’s a time for the backcountry community to come together and hang out and have a good time.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

N   B

 Motorcycle rally at Crooked River Ranch

Auto-racing season in Madras under way

CROOKED RIVER RANCH — The Steel Stampede Vintage Motorcycle Rally is scheduled for Crooked River Ranch this Saturday and Sunday. The rally will include the American Historic Racing Motorcycle Association’s Northwest Trials Series and Lumberjack Series. Competitors, ranging in age from 30 to 80 and older, will race motorcycles from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s. Former two-time national champion Dick Mann, age 75, is expected to compete, along with Northwest pros Randy Skiver and Dallas Nyblod. The trials utilize hills, valleys, boulders, tree roots, and a variety of objects to challenge riders. Speed is not a determining factor, and the goal for riders is to complete the course without their feet touching the ground. The Trials Series will start Saturday at 10 a.m. The Northwest Regional Series and the Lumberjack MX Series will be staged Sunday, starting at 9:15 a.m. General admission is $10 per person. For more information, call 541-923-2679. The event, which benefits the Crooked River Ranch community, is presented by the Crooked River Ranch Club and Maintenance Association.

MADRAS — The Madras Speedway opens its season this Saturday with races for PHRA Dwarf Cars, Sprints, Supers, Sportsmen, Minis and Juniors. The main gate opens at 4:30 p.m., and racing starts at 6:30 p.m. Cost for adult spectators is $10. Admissions for kids ages 6 to 11 is $5 and for seniors is $6. Races are staged at Madras Speedway most Saturdays through September. For more information, call 541-389-7518 or visit www.madrasspeedway.com. The Madras Dragstrip season began April 17, and more races are scheduled for this weekend. Saturday is the Battle of Detroit, and Sunday is the High Desert Auto Supply Points Racing Series. Gates open at 8:30 a.m. and racing starts at 10 a.m. both days. The next races at the dragstrip are May 15-16. Cost to race is $30. Admission for adult spectators is $7 and for seniors is $5. Children age 12 and under are admitted free. Anybody is welcome to race their everyday car at the Madras Dragstrip. For more information, visit www.madrasdragstrip.com or call 541-815-2107. — Bulletin staff reports

ADVENTURE SPORTS SCOREBOARD BMX HIGH DESERT BMX, BEND April 26 Results 11 Girls — 1, McKenna Brown. 2, Hannah Beaty. 3, Olivia Armstrong. 17-20 Cruiser — 1, Dustin Robertson. 2, Ryan Armstrong. 3, Jordan Brown. 36-40 Cruiser — 1, Shawn Wright. 2, Jim Campbell. 3, Lowell Snider. 6 Novice — 1, Suddy Helzer. 2, Hudson Pifferini-Carter. 3, Rowan Heisinger. 8 Intermediate — 1, Austin Brown. 2, Diesel Vecqueray. 3, Garrett Reid. 9 Novice — 1, Griffin McKean. 2, William Minshew. 3, Amber Cox. 11 Novice — 1, Austin Davenport. 2, Troy Sawyer. 3,

Russel Niedzwiecki. 12 Intermediate — 1, Shawn Slavey. 2, River Stredwick. 3, Cameron Griggs. 13 Novice — 1, Jaden Sequeira. 2, Christopher Crescenzi. 3, Jaydra Kinsey. 13 Expert — 1, Taylor Stephens. 2, Tyler Ducharme. 3, Zakkary Campbell.

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Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

ALPINE SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING NORTH AMERICAN POND SKIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS: May 16, 11 a.m., at Mt. Bachelor’s West Village Lodge; $30 for pond skim or dash for cash, or $40 for both (dash for cash will be an obstacle course, including swimming through the pond); costumes required; call 541-382-1709 to register and pay.

BIKING HIGH DESERT BMX: Regular races are Mondays and Wednesdays, with registration and open practice from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., races begin at 6:30 p.m.; 541-815-6208 or www.highdesertbmx.org. ROLLER RUMBLE — GOLD SPRINTS RACE SERIES: Sunday nights through May 9 at Silver Moon Brewing in Bend; registration at 6:30 p.m., races 7-10 p.m.; $5 racers; $3 spectators; 541-610-7460; info@velosprints. com; www.velosprints.com. CASCADE CHAINBREAKER MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE: May 9; open to all skill levels; at Cascade Timberlands’ property west of Bend off Shevlin Park Road; online registration open through May 3; $10-$28; www.webcyclery.com. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@ deschutesbrewery.com. BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: A fundraising event; taking submissions from local filmmakers and photographers; must have cycling and local components; film festival on May 22 at Tower Theatre; part of a weekend of biking activities to benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance and Bend Endurance Academy; www.BendBicycleFilmFestival. com; Paul at 541-420-5777; bendbicycleff@yahoo.com.

instructor Damian Fagan, an avid birdwatcher and naturalist, for one classroom session, May 5, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and four field sessions on Thursdays in May, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; cost is $79; 541383-7270 or noncredit.cocc.edu

MULTISPORT POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Saturday, May 15; Teams, pairs, and individual participants race from Mount Bachelor to Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend; participants alpine ski, cross-country ski, bike, run, canoe/ kayak and sprint to the finish; the Les Schwab Amphitheater area will host a day-long festival of various foods, music and sponsor booths; register online at www.mbsef.org.

MISCELLANEOUS WILD CANYON GAMES: June 4-6 at Washington Family Ranch in Antelope; Central Oregon adventure race with seven-member teams; geocaching, triathlon, challenge events; entry fee is $200; registration required by May 1; 541-3908379; nancyjohack@yahoo.com; www.wildcanyongames.org.

NORDIC SKIING GROUP NORDIC SKIS: Ski at local sno-parks; meet with Central Oregon Nordic Club on Sundays, 9 a.m. at DiLusso’s Coffee on Franklin Avenue in downtown Bend; all levels of skiers are welcome; if learning, get a free lesson through the Ski Buddy program; http://conc. freehosting.net; 541-382-8023. CROSS-COUNTRY SKI SHUTTLES: Cog Wild offers weekly Thursday evening shuttles to various local sno-parks for cross-country skiing or snowshoeing; cost is $10 per person; shuttle leaves from Cog Wild in Bend at 5:30 p.m., and departs sno-park at 8:45 p.m.; gear not included; RSVP required; 541-385-7002; www.cogwild.com.

CLIMBING

RUNNING

PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT AT INCLIMB ROCK GYM: Saturdays from 6 to 9 p.m., children will receive climbing instruction and play games; $15 for one child, $8 for each additional child. Pre-registration required; 555 Arizona Ave., Suite 50 in Bend; 541-388-6764 or info@inclimb.com.

COCC 6-MILE RELAY: Thursday, May 6, 5:30 p.m. at Central Oregon Community College track in Bend; teams of two, three or four; register on event day; $5; free for COCC and OSU-Cascades students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. JUNGLE RUN/WALK: A 2- or 4-mile race at Central Oregon Community College track; Thursday, May 20, 5:30 p.m.; course includes singletrack trails, mud bogs, steep hills and log crossings; day of event registration from 4:30-5:15 p.m. $5; free for COCC

HIKING HIKING IN THE SPRING: Hike Central Oregon while learning about the local geology, ecosystems, birds, trees, wildlife and wildflowers; join

and OSU-Cascades students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. STORM THE STAIRS: A 2-mile run/walk (300 stairs) or 3-mile ultimate challenge run (450 stairs); at Central Oregon Community College in Bend; Thursday, May 27, 5:30 p.m. at COCC track; entry forms are available in the Mazama building in the club sports office or register from 4:30-5:15 p.m. on the day of the event; $3-$6; free for COCC and OSU-Cascade students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. REGISTRATION FOR SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: Half Marathon scheduled for Saturday, July 10; 5K and 10K also offered; starts and finishes at Smith Rock State Park in Terrebonne; online registration at www.smithrockrace.com; also register at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Group accommodates 7- to 11-minute-mile pace; Mondays at 5:30 p.m.; locations vary, Bend; 541-317-3568; jenny@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com.

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SNOWSHOEING HALF-DAY AND EVENING SNOWSHOE TOURS: Daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. from Bend and Sunriver; special evening events also available; led by professional naturalist guides; halfday tours $49 adults, $44 children under 12; includes transportation, equipment, instruction; 541389-8359 or 800-962-2862; www.wanderlusttours.com. SNOWSHOE OUTINGS: Bend Park and Recreation District will host outings on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and/or Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; fee varies by program; includes transportation from town; 541-3897275; ericd@bendparksandrec. org; www.bendparksandrec.org.

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SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, see Page E3

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Author to discuss caring for seniors Paul Hogan, the CEO of Home Instead Senior Care and author of ”Stages of Senior Care,” will host a free book signing that will start with a discussion on senior care. The event will take place Wednesday from 4 to 6 p.m. at Mount Bachelor Village Resort, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend. According to local Home Instead owner Todd Sensenbach, the book is a comprehensive guide for senior care. “It talks to the family that is trying to come up with a plan for senior care for their mom or dad.” It includes how to start the planning process and how to bridge gaps of communication. The book also goes into the different options, from aging in place to assistant living to hospice care, offering pros and cons of each option. Contact: 541-330-6400.

Learn about low-cost kids’ health insurance Families interested in learning more about obtaining lowcost or free health insurance for children can attend the Healthy Kids Connect enrollment event and health fair May 8 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. Healthy Kids Connect offers major medical insurance coverage for children age 0-18 in Oregon. Families may want to attend if they have insurance, but insuring a child is very expensive; if the child’s insurance doesn’t cover vision, dental or mental health; if the child does not have insurance. For a single parent with one child, the income cap is just below $44,000 a year; for a family of four the income limit is just more than $66,000. Parents should bring proof of income, social security cards and citizenship documentation. Contact: www.myhb.org. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN Details, Page E3

Coyotes! Families can enjoy hearing coyote tales from Jim Anderson and listen to live music and poetry during this event at the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory tonight.

May Faire Festival The Waldorf School of Bend will host a festival including a Maypole dance, crafts, pony rides and more on Saturday.

Pet Parade and May Day Celebration Families and children are welcome to join in this pet parade through downtown Sisters on Saturday. The event will lead to Village Green Park, which will feature activities for kids.

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FAMILY INSIDE

E

HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE

Give your family

Aby LAST GIFT organizing your affairs By Alandra Johnson

with the idea for her book after a friend died and she helped his partner take care of the estate. Her friend had organized things perfectly — from a list of bank accounts to instructions on his cremation — which made everything easier. “I just sat there and went, ‘This is a fabulous thing he did.’” Her book is a step-by-step outline to help people collect and record information. She says some people find the idea of preparing for the end overwhelming, while others say, “if I fill that out, I’m going to die.” Every once in a while someone tells her he wants to leave his estate a mess because it’s what his kids deserve. But

for the most part, people understand the merit of preparing. Local attorney Lisa Bertalan sees what can happen to families that don’t plan. People become medically incapacitated and relatives are unsure of what to do. Families can fight and end up in court. Information gets lost. She says preparing and planning for the end is important. “The worst comes out in people when they are in that emotional, grieving situation,” said Bertalan. “The more you can spell things out, the better.” And letting people know about your wishes can help solve potential issues. See Affairs / E6

Advance medical directive

Power of attorney

Will

What it is: This is a document that records an individual’s wishes regarding medical treatments (does this person wish to be placed on life support, for example). It also allows the individual to name a person who can serve as her health care representative to make health care decisions when she cannot. The directive takes effect only if the person is incapacitated (whether because of a coma or dementia or another medical issue). Details: Individuals can set up an advance medical directive without a lawyer. The document, which can be obtained at most hospitals or medical offices, requires the signature of two witnesses. What happens without it: Decisions may be made that a person does not want; relatives may disagree about the choices available. To make decisions, someone may need to be appointed by the court, which can cost $1,000 or more.

What it is: This is a legal document that names an individual to act on the person’s behalf in legal and business matters. It allows an individual to pay bills, collect mail, sign a tax return, make banking transactions and perform other duties on someone’s behalf. The power ceases after the individual dies. Details: A lawyer is required to set up this arrangement. Estimated cost is around a couple hundred dollars. Caution: In Oregon, this takes effect immediately. Many cases of financial elder abuse spring from power of attorney (the most common involving an adult child stealing money). What happens without it: If a person becomes incapacitated, no one can pay his bills, access his accounts or perform other basic duties for him. In this case, relatives often must go to court to have a conservator appointed, which can cost $1,000 or more, and the proceedings are public.

What it is: This details what should happen to a person’s belongings after she has died. It involves only probate property that is solely owned by the individual who died (so a jointly-owned house would not be included). It can also include information about who should serve as a guardian for the person’s underage children if the parents die. (Some people opt to create a trust instead). Details: This requires a lawyer and costs about $500$600 (which often includes other documents, including power of attorney). What happens without one: Assets will be distributed based on Oregon law. The assets go to the spouse or, if there is no spouse, to the children (unless the spouse is a second or third marriage, in which case the assets are split between spouse and children).

The Bulletin

Many people leave a mess for their relatives to clean up when they die or become incapacitated. According to author Maggie Watson, getting yourself organized and prepared for the inevitability of the end is “the last gift we can give to loved ones.” And it’s a gift they will always remember. Watson wrote a book, “A Graceful Farewell: Putting Your Affairs in Order,” to help people organize the information their loved ones will need when they die or become incapacitated. Watson, a professional organizer, came up

ISSUES IN AGING

Source: Bend attorney Lisa Bertalan Photos from Thinkstock

How do you communicate Blocks a great choice with your antisocial teen? for the little architect K I D C U LT U R E

Chicago Tribune

Your teen daughter, seemingly overnight, lost all interest in hanging out with you and her siblings. Should you force the issue?

Parent advice In our family, our teenage children are expected to have dinner at home most nights, to attend church with us on Sunday and to be present at most family celebrations. In addition, we encourage our children to attend their siblings’ sporting and school events as a way of supporting one another. Teens crave closeness with their families but are experimenting with separating themselves from their parents. It is up to the parents to insist that their teen remain involved in the life of the family. —Mary Rayis Yes, at least once a week, but make

it something that she and her siblings would like to do, even if it is just going out for ice cream or a bite to eat. Once you free them, it will be hard to get them back. —Eva Rios

Expert advice “Our teens must separate from us, must reject us, and then later take back what they think is important for them to integrate into their new young adult lives,” says Janice Hillman, adolescent medicine specialist and co-author of “The Teen Owner’s Manual” (Quirk Books). “Let them gain independence, let them build the confidence to make choices, and of course, let them make mistakes.” And hope like heck they decide you’re important enough to integrate back into their new lives. See Teens / E6

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids.

Hard Maple Block Sets Beka, Inc., $77 Ages 2 and older Fun: A Movement: A Thinking: A Personality: A Social interaction: A Submitted photo

These wooden blocks are available in different sets: Traditional Sets with basic shapes, Little Builder Sets with notched and narrow blocks, and a Special Shapes Collection, which contains irregular shapes. See Toys / E6


T EL EV IS ION

E2 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Abortion decision Will ‘Dancing’ suffer without Gosselin? is a private matter By Scott Collins

the fall, when ’70s teen idol Donny Osmond won the competition and the show seemed devoid of drama.

ed on April 20, she cried again — then went on Jimmy Kimmel’s talk show and offered more of her characteristic defiance and bravado. “Are things going to be a little more boring now that the mother of eight is gone?” Alyssa Lee asked on the Los Angeles Times’ Showtracker blog. “Where can we direct our energy and vitriol now?” For ABC, that’s no idle question. The network is currently ranked fourth among young adults, with “DWTS” the brightest spot in an otherwise challenging season. The show has averaged 22.4 million total viewers, up 27 percent overall compared with last fall’s cycle. “They cast it well. I’ll give them credit for that,” Darnell said of the dance show. “But their biggest cast member has gone. The reason they were doing any number at all was Kate Gosselin, and she left.”

The Kate factor

Fading ‘Idol’ buzz

Gosselin, the 35-year-old mother of eight who rose to tabloid fame as her marriage sputtered on TLC’s “Jon & Kate Plus 8,” changed all that. As long as she was around, “DWTS” viewers enjoyed a nonstop feast of melodrama and bad behavior. Gosselin chafed under the tutelage of her partner, Tony Dovolani, who during one tense rehearsal tore off his microphone and announced, “I quit.” Gosselin responded with tears: “I don’t get it.” The duo patched things up, but when they got to the ballroom the results were almost uniformly panned. Judge Bruno Tonioli ripped their version of the jive as “a nightmare.” When Gosselin was finally eliminat-

DWTS may already be suffering a bit of Gosselin withdrawal. The show slipped 3 percent for Monday’s performance, the first Kate-free edition, to 20.2 million viewers, compared with the week earlier. Meanwhile, it’s been “Idol’s”

Los Angeles Times

Dear Abby: My fiancee, “Cheryl,” and I are in our early 30s and recently made an extremely difficult decision. We decided to terminate her pregnancy at six weeks. Cheryl’s sister “Nicki” — my future sister-in-law — is opposed to abortion and now no longer wants to talk to me or have anything to do with me. I have tried reaching out to Nicki to explain the reasons for our decision, but it has fallen on deaf ears. Should I continue asking her for forgiveness, or have I done enough already? This is causing Cheryl a great deal of pain, and I don’t believe that it’s fair for Nicki to punish me for a personal family decision. Please let me know your thoughts. — Cheryl’s Fiance in Phoenix Dear Fiance: So how did Nicki get inserted in the middle of something that was none of her business in the first place? Surely, she didn’t have a vote. Nicki is entitled to her feelings, but she has no right to punish you for a decision that was arrived at by both you and her sister. And the person to make that crystal clear to Nicki is Cheryl, not you, so stop apologizing. The decision to terminate a pregnancy is an extremely sensitive one and never one that is taken lightly. Every decision has consequences, and I am sure that you and your fiancee accepted that when you made yours. Dear Abby: Many senior citizens, including me, never get a phone call, visit or e-mail from our children or grandchildren. They say they’re too busy with school, sports, etc. I say baloney! Is this present generation so narcissistic that all they can think of is themselves? Your answer will go to many, many seniors who would like some communication once in a while. — Waiting by the phone, Friendswood, Texas Dear Waiting: There are far

DEAR ABBY more constructive and rewarding things to do with your time than wait fuming by your phone because you feel you’re not receiving enough attention. One of them would be to reach out and contact your children and grandchildren yourself. There is more pressure on families today than at any time I can remember. Many teens are so overscheduled and pressured to succeed they don’t get enough sleep. So please try to judge them less harshly. Dear Abby: My husband is a computer programmer. When he calls me from work I can hear him typing on his keyboard. I find this as rude as people texting while they’re in the company of others. My husband thinks it is just fine and becomes angry if I mention it. What do you think? — Annoyed in Imperial Beach, Calif. Dear Annoyed: I think that when your husband is working, he should devote his full attention to the job he’s being paid to do. And as accomplished as your husband may think he is at multitasking, it is unfair to his boss to chat you up on company time. He should be making his personal calls during his breaks — away from his computer. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

LOS ANGELES — Critics can say what they like about Kate Gosselin, but she’s probably the best weapon yet devised against Simon Cowell. Gosselin, the tabloid ubermom-turned-reality TV ultravillain, finally got ushered off ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” last week. That’s unwelcome news for the network, because during her short tenure she probably did more than anyone else to push the 10th season to the series’ best ratings ever, allowing it to threaten Fox’s “American Idol” as America’s most-watched show. For three weeks this month, the Monday performance show of “DWTS” drew more viewers than “Idol” — the first time any Fox rival has managed to do that in five years. As might be imagined, the very idea of ABC’s dance competition toppling “Idol,” for years the colossus of network TV, is enough to make Fox executives bristle. “Idol,” they point out, may be down 5 percent in total viewers (to an average of 25.4 million for the Tuesday shows), but it still draws a much younger audience than the ABC show (a median age of 43 versus 55, according to the Nielsen Co.) and handily beats “DWTS” among viewers ages 18 to 49, the chief yardstick for network TV ad rates. “This is like asking me to compare AARP magazine with Tiger Beat,” Mike Darnell, Fox’s reality guru and the network’s point person overseeing “Idol,” said of the race with “DWTS.” “We don’t take any of this seriously.” Maybe so, but many fans and analysts are taking note. “DWTS” was looking hoary in

The Associated Press file photo

Kate Gosselin and her partner Tony Dovolani perform on “Dancing with the Stars,” which airs Mondays on ABC.

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turn to show signs of age. “The buzz for ‘Idol’ is starting to fade, and the raw numbers are wobbling,” said Jeffrey McCall, a media professor at DePauw University. Some of the problem may be traced to turmoil at the judges’ table, McCall added: “The loss of Paula Abdul has likely hurt the show more than most observers would have thought.” Also potential factors: The oftcriticized addition of Ellen DeGeneres as a judge and the pending loss of lead judge Cowell, who’s leaving to start his own “The X Factor” on Fox in 2011. But other analysts point out that although it may not be nearly as impressive as it was a few years ago, “Idol” still pulls the kind of numbers other networks would kill to get. “‘Idol’ is still a hit, although a declining one, and appeals to a largely different audience than ‘Dancing,’ “ said Steve Sternberg, an independent analyst who writes the Sternberg Report blog about TV programming and ratings. Fox executives agree, insisting that Gosselin hasn’t done any long-term damage to “Idol.” Any ninth-year show is going to show ratings erosion, Darnell said. “This is still by far the biggest show on TV,” he said. “Monumentally so.”

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KATU News 1295 World News 818 News 54905 NBC News 11176 News 8363 News 3194 Judge Judy 4189 Inside Ed. 9740 Funniest Home Videos 1634 Jim 2127 Malcolm 4450 Electric 8721 Fetch! Ruff 672 News 3059 NBC News 5382 Reba ‘PG’ 89740 Reba ‘PG’ 15653 Daisy 96030 Thai 22943 Rudy Maxa 9653 Europe 8276

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 16617 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 95158 News 7127 CBS News 8479 World News 6653 Millionaire 7905 Two Men 1363 Two Men 5943 The Office 1363 The Office 5943 Travelscope 585 Business 837 News 2295 News 3547 King 12566 King 44978 Europe 29856 Travels 10108 Travelscope 5189 Business 9769

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! 1059 Wheel 295 Jeopardy! 74769 Wheel 83905 Access H. 8127 Scrubs ‘14’ 7363 Ent 7653 The Insider 3189 Simpsons 2363 Simpsons 1127 Simpsons 2363 Simpsons 1127 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 9301 Live at 7 (N) 3295 Inside Ed. 2059 ’70s Show 76276 ’70s Show 25030 Garden 83566 Old House 44932 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 56382

8:00

8:30

Wife Swap (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 8295 Who Do You Think You Are? 98924 Ghost Whisperer (N) ’ ‘PG’ 63634 Wife Swap (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 48238 House Broken ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å 49092 News 45276 Washington 4905 NOW, PBS 6740 Who Do You Think You Are? 81030 Smallville Sacrifice (N) ‘PG’ 63276 Hometime 92214 Garden 71721 Washington 5837 NOW, PBS 7672

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Wife Swap Adams/Hess ‘PG’ 8059 20/20 Mother’s Little Helper (N) 8818 Dateline NBC The murder of Michelle O’Keefe. (N) ’ Å 91011 Medium Sal (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 83498 Miami Medical (N) ‘14’ Å 86585 Wife Swap Adams/Hess ‘PG’ 14382 20/20 Mother’s Little Helper 24769 News 27479 TMZ ‘PG’ 36127 WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 48363 Bill Moyers Journal (N) ’ Å 2905 Morristown 61740 Dateline NBC The murder of Michelle O’Keefe. (N) ’ Å 68189 America’s Next Top Model 76740 Married... 52769 Married... 38189 Sewing 62059 Dewberry 69547 Simp. Ming 69059 Italy 45479 Bill Moyers Journal (N) ’ Å 25924 Morristown 23653

11:00

11:30

News 9435382 (11:35) Nightline News 8407739 Jay Leno News 4062653 Letterman Inside 47880030 (11:35) Nightline King of Hill 32214 Name Earl 13363 South Park 32214 South Park 13363 Austin City Limits ‘PG’ Å 69285 News 4057721 Jay Leno Roseanne 50214 Roseanne 31363 Daisy 34276 Thai 48653 Austin City Limits ‘PG’ Å 38160

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CSI: Miami Innocent ’ ‘14’ 966189 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 172653 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 181301 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 178837 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 171924 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 6338943 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami The Oath ’ ‘14’ 640479 “Ferris Bueller’s Day ›› “Shallow Hal” (2001, Romance-Comedy) Gwyneth Paltrow, Jack Black, Jason Alexander. A superficial ››› “First Blood” (1982, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. A Vietnam vet is ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. 102 40 39 Off” 755382 man now sees only the inner beauty of a very fat woman. Å 216818 hounded by a brutal small-town sheriff. Å 523363 Ex-Green Beret goes on Vietnam mission. Å 802382 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4149856 Rogue Nature Lions ’ ‘14’ 1510160 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ‘PG’ 1536108 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ‘PG’ 1549672 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ‘PG’ 1559059 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ‘PG’ 5802092 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 7761721 Ladies First 534450 ››› “Little Miss Sunshine” (2006) Greg Kinnear. Å 927063 ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest” (2006) Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. Premiere. Å 454382 “Pirates of the Caribbean” 445634 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home 4375566 Extreme Makeover: Home 3480160 Smarter 6060295 Smarter 6072030 Gator 911 (N) ’ Coast 4370011 ››› “Urban Cowboy” (1980) John Travolta, Debra Winger. ’ 7003059 190 32 42 53 Trading Spouses 6050818 Run for the Roses 264214 Mad Money 240634 The Celebrity Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å 243721 90 Days! 520382 Paid 125011 51 36 40 52 The Celebrity Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å 319363 Larry King Live (N) Å 508189 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å 314837 Larry King Live Å 718479 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 711566 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 303721 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 626924 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 62498 Scrubs ’ 52011 Scrubs ’ 43363 Daily Show 23011 Colbert 49547 Presents 49059 Presents 28566 Gabriel Iglesias: Hot-Fluffy 50740 Anjelah Johnson: That’s How 60127 Comedy 34214 Comedy 88108 135 53 135 47 Married... 10547 The Buzz 2585 Bend City Edition High School Basketball ‘G’ 67634 High School Basketball ‘G’ 951721 RSN Extreme 19837 PM Edition 83924 HS Basketball 11 Capital News Today 100301 Today in Washington 995740 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington 220214 Deck 276924 Montana 273837 Phineas 264189 Phineas 7068498 Good-Charlie Wizards 553585 Wizards 532092 Phineas 350585 Phineas 420818 Wizards 706740 Montana 782160 Phineas 355030 Deck 516214 87 43 14 39 Deck 557301 Cash Cab 385030 Cash Cab 376382 Dirty Jobs ’ ‘14’ Å 187585 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 163905 Dirty Jobs ’ ‘PG’ Å 183769 Construction Intervention (N) 186856 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 769363 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch Special: 2 648011 NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Oklahoma City Thunder (Live) Å 221740 SportsCenter (Live) Å 545585 SportsCenter Å 548672 SportsCenter Å 130837 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball: Hawks at Bucks 217547 NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Utah Jazz (Live) Å 2372030 Baseball Tonight Å 7362450 NBA 7156382 NASCAR Racing 9063568 22 24 21 24 (4:30) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Richmond 250 (Live) 2366479 30 for 30 ‘PG’ Å 5526672 Bull Riding 5502092 American Gladiators ‘PG’ 5522856 Horse 3249092 Horse 3258740 Horse 8666295 Horse 3825301 23 25 123 25 ESPN Films 3269856 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS SportsCenter Å 2322491 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 70s Show 905943 70s Show 996295 Funniest Home Videos 798740 Funniest Home Videos 774160 Funniest Home Videos 794924 Funniest Home Videos 797011 The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 967943 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 275214 Hannity (N) 2023740 On the Record 1719498 The O’Reilly Factor 1795818 Hannity 1708382 On the Record 1718769 Glenn Beck 2351363 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 3167914 Home 4469160 Cooking 4499301 Minute 4480653 Challenge Ice Age Cakes 1529818 Chopped 1538566 Diners 5362585 Diners 4153059 Private Chefs 1528189 Good Eats Rachael 9452301 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Unscripted 60030 Mariners 67943 Mariners 58295 MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) 211856 Mariners 27011 MLB Baseball: Rangers at Mariners 921721 20 45 28* 26 Beavers 25479 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ››› “X-Men” (2000, Action) Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart. 1792721 ››› “X2: X-Men United” (2003, Fantasy) Patrick Stewart. A right-wing militarist pursues the mutants. 6412634 Justified Blind Spot ‘MA’ 9936160 131 Get Sold 6256214 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 4270130 House 2474295 House 6233363 Sell It Yourself (N) ‘G’ 6355455 House 8119740 Buck 9020437 House 5377566 House 5386214 Battle on the Block ‘G’ 4986547 176 49 33 43 Divine 2494059 Gangland Kill ’Em All ‘14’ 8066856 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 4523547 Gangland ‘14’ Å 4532295 Gangland Hell House ‘14’ 4552059 MonsterQuest ‘PG’ Å 4522818 UFO Hunters ‘PG’ Å 9810672 155 42 41 36 Gangland ‘14’ Å 8118634 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 160943 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 701214 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 787634 “Hush Little Baby” (2007) Victoria Pratt, Ari Cohen. ‘14’ Å 780721 Will 565112 Will 226108 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘14’ 248160 Rachel Maddow Show 41951740 Who Do You 76396672 Addicted to Power 76372092 Lockup: Raw 76392856 Addicted to Power 76395943 Lockup: Raw 75755566 56 59 128 51 Countdown 57770382 The Hills 994837 True Life ’ Å 796382 S. Park 250905 S. Park 262740 The Challenge 792566 ›› “Jeepers Creepers” (2001) Gina Philips, Justin Long. ’ 515437 192 22 38 57 (4:00) › “What a Girl Wants” (2003) ’ 497856 Sponge 393059 iCarly ‘G’ 383672 Big Time 374924 iCarly ‘G’ 647382 iCarly ‘G’ 370108 Big Time 656030 Troop 642837 Chris 453030 Chris 974108 George 243740 Lopez 229160 Nanny 432547 Nanny 711504 82 46 24 40 Sponge 634818 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 805585 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 3891214 CSI: Crime Scene 7117498 Ways to Die (9:41) Entourage ’ ‘MA’ 45855856 (10:17) Entourage (10:53) Entourage (11:29) Entourage 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 990092 Stargate SG-1 ‘PG’ Å 3013943 Eureka ’ ‘14’ Å 9886030 Stargate Universe Human 9862450 Stargate Universe Lost (N) 9882214 Merlin (N) Å 9885301 Stargate Universe Lost ’ 8837011 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ‘PG’ 6521504 Behind 7398030 Lindsey 7750585 Osteen 7757498 Price 7731450 Praise the Lord Å 2045943 First to Know Prince 8813059 Clement 4812769 Changing-World Christian Celeb First to Know 205 60 130 Friends 353566 Friends 350479 Office 374059 Seinfeld 621479 Seinfeld 363943 ›› “The Longest Yard” (2005, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Chris Rock. Å 573740 ›› “The Longest Yard” (2005) Adam Sandler. 561905 16 27 11 28 King 634943 ›› “The House Across the Bay” (1940, Drama) George Raft, (8:15) ››› “Nocturne” (1946, Mystery) George Raft, Lynn Bari, (9:45) ›› “Johnny Angel” (1945, Crime Drama) George Raft, (11:15) › “Incubus” (1966, Horror) William ›› “Background to Danger” (1943, Suspense) George Raft, 101 44 101 29 Brenda Marshall. 7075924 Joan Bennett. Premiere. 90727108 Virginia Huston. 3444943 Claire Trevor, Signe Hasso. Å 2148276 Shatner. Premiere. 1865905 Say Yes 649856 Say Yes 646769 Say Yes 620721 Four Weddings ‘PG’ Å 332491 Say Yes 902837 Say Yes 914672 Say Yes 363924 Say Yes 802498 Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ 782932 Say Yes 375769 Say Yes 974214 178 34 32 34 Say Yes 906653 Law & Order Bottomless ‘14’ 898295 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 132473 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 837081 ›› “We Are Marshall” (2006, Drama) Matthew McConaughey, Matthew Fox. Å 919108 Legend 923301 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ 916030 Amazing 2467905 Chowder 6229160 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield 6240653 Total Drama Batman 6246837 Ben 10 2463189 Generator Rex Star 8122214 Star 3620491 King-Hill 5373740 King-Hill 5359160 Venture 8134059 Amer. 1087721 84 Caribbean Beach Resorts 41951740 Man v. Food ‘G’ Food 37063837 Man v. Food ‘G’ Food 57776566 Ghost Adventures ‘14’ 76392856 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 76395943 Most Haunted (N) ‘14’ 75755566 179 51 45 42 Florida-Beaches 57770382 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 7777382 Sanford 4482011 Cosby 7786030 Cosby 7772837 Ray 5375059 Ray 4126905 ››› “The Fugitive” (1993) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones. 4696214 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Internal Affairs ’ ‘14’ 526585 NCIS Minimum Security ‘PG’ 707363 NCIS Good Wives Club ‘PG’ 716011 NCIS Heart Break ‘PG’ Å 703547 NCIS Hometown Hero ‘PG’ 4566769 (11:05) NCIS ’ ‘PG’ Å 5512059 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 611092 Sober House With Dr. Drew 784130 Chilli 724011 Basketball Wives ››› “Boyz N the Hood” (1991) Larry Fishburne, Ice Cube. ’ 242092 Brandy & Ray J 261127 Awards 528924 Boyz N the Hood 191 48 37 54 Tough Love Couples ‘PG’ 723382 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

“So I Married-Murderer” 98867769 ››› “Bad Boys” 1995, Action Martin Lawrence. ’ ‘R’ Å 1725059 ›› “Hancock” 2008 Will Smith. ‘PG-13’ Å 9385189 (9:40) ››› “Enemy of the State” 1998, Suspense Will Smith. ’ ‘R’ Å 99884905 Legacy 3711672 (5:21) ›› “Can-Can” 1960, Musical Frank Sinatra. ‘NR’ Å 92496160 Legacy 9124276 Legacy 2808585 (8:21) ›› “Can-Can” 1960, Musical Frank Sinatra. ‘NR’ Å 92494295 Legacy 4224011 Legacy 5475634 (11:21) Can-Can Misfits 1725740 Tampa 3263769 Daily 3253382 Bubba 3244634 Tracking Eero Cinema 3240818 Misfits 1721924 Tampa 1740059 Daily 2724214 Bubba 4045585 Cinema 7424092 Cinema 7433740 Built to Shred Surfari 3750189 PGA Golf 321189 PGA Tour Golf Quail Hollow Championship, Second Round From Charlotte, N.C. 270301 Golf 637905 PGA Tour Golf 182030 PGA Tour Golf 795479 7th Heaven Tit for Tat ‘G’ 8116276 Golden 9142672 Golden 9133924 Golden 8117905 Golden 9139108 Touched by an Angel ‘G’ 4530837 “Always and Forever” (2009) Dean McDermott, Rena Sofer. Å 4533924 Golden 3085653 Golden 8379092 “Burma VJ: Report- ›› “Four Christmases” 2008, Romance-Comedy Vince Vaughn, 24/7 Mayweather 24/7 Mayweather 24/7 Mayweather 24/7 Mayweather Ricky Gervais The Life & Times of Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist HBO 425 501 425 10 ing” 877856 563194 729450 563914 513699 893634 Ross Douthat. ’ ‘MA’ Å 132295 Robert Duvall. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 799566 Tim (N) 349498 Ross Douthat. ’ ‘MA’ Å 540030 Breaker! 7511009 (5:35) ›› “Southern Comfort” 1981 Keith Carradine. ‘R’ Å 70786653 Ideal 1849924 Food Party ‘14’ Arrested 6072030 ›› “Cursed” 2005 Christina Ricci. ‘PG-13’ 4597653 Food Party ‘14’ The Business Rollins 3325301 IFC 105 105 (4:20) ››› “State of Play” 2009, Crime Drama Russell Crowe, ›› “The Distinguished Gentleman” 1992, Comedy Eddie Murphy, Lane Smith. Con ›› “Journey to the Center of the Earth” 2008, Adventure Bren- ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” 2009, Action Hugh Jackman. Wolverine becomes MAX 400 508 7 Ben Affleck. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 21809011 man goes to Washington as a senator. ’ ‘R’ Å 153214 dan Fraser. ’ ‘PG’ Å 427301 involved with the Weapon X program. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 799517 Dog Whisperer ‘G’ 1713905 Dog Whisperer (N) ‘G’ 4042498 Two Kenyan Guys (N) ‘PG’ 8027289 Dog Whisperer ‘G’ 6027009 Dog Whisperer ‘G’ 6122653 Two Kenyan Guys ‘PG’ 3972130 Inside the Taliban ‘14’ 1166030 NGC 157 157 Wolverine-XMn Wolverine-XMn Fantastic Four Fantastic Four Speed 1729566 Speed 3257108 Fanboy 1738214 Fanboy 1717721 Avatar 2708276 Avatar 4029547 Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action 2703721 Rocko 3767479 NTOON 89 115 189 Offshore 7766276 Monster 4474092 Pattern 4471905 Fish TV 4495585 Strike 7779740 Water 4491769 Advent. 7755160 Ron and Raven Monster 5344189 Water 4128363 Outdoor 5421924 Fmlr Wtr 5430672 Fishing 5349634 Step Out 9434905 OUTD 37 307 43 (4:15) ›› “The Killing Room” 2009 Nick ››› “Save the Last Dance” 2001, Romance Julia Stiles. iTV. A white teen falls for a The Tudors Catherine begins an affair. ’ Nurse Jackie ’ United States of Green Collar Comedy Slam (iTV) ‘MA’ Boxing Derek Edwards vs. Marcus JohnSHO 500 500 Cannon. iTV. ’ ‘R’ 77810653 black student who also loves dance. ’ ‘PG-13’ 722672 ‘MA’ Å 723301 ‘MA’ 214176 Tara ‘MA’ 505092 713924 son (iTV) 579924 Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ 7384837 Drive 7757498 The Grid 7731450 NASCAR Hall of Fame (N) 4064739 Trackside At... (N) 4358617 NASCAR Racing 5499672 NASCAR Racing 6702419 SPEED 35 303 125 (4:40) ›› “American Pie 2” 2001 ‘R’ Å 96604818 (6:25) ›› “Reign of Fire” 2002 ‘PG-13’ Å 64177740 (8:10) ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ Å 17008585 Party 5382498 Gravity 5368818 ›› “American Pie 2” ‘R’ 1979498 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:40) ›› “Little Chenier” 2006, Drama Johnathon Schaech, (6:20) “Three Days of Rain” 2002 Don Meredith. Cleveland resi- “Miss Conception” 2008, Romance-Comedy Heather Graham, Mia Kirshner. A woman “Bottoms Up” 2006, Comedy Paris Hilton. A bartender falls for ›› “The Eye” 2008 TMC 525 525 Fred Koehler. ’ ‘R’ 87902301 dents grapple with life’s problems. ‘R’ 53694108 searches for a man to father her child. ’ ‘R’ 620856 the girlfriend of a rising star. ’ ‘R’ Å 678653 ’ 1527011 NHL Hockey: Canadiens at Penguins 3383059 Hockey 4495585 NHL Hockey Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA (Live) 3367011 NBA D-League Basketball 6245059 Sports 9434905 VS. 27 58 30 Wedngs 7390498 Wedngs 7745653 Celebrity Wedding Gowns 8896382 Girl Meets Gown ‘PG’ 2358437 Sunset 7389382 Sunset 7375189 Golden 5483011 Golden 8808127 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 3708978 Amazing Wedding Cakes 2036295 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P        

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance. Compiled by St. Petersburg Times film critic Steve Persall.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine.

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘The Losers’ TODAY CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: The 18th annual event features more than 300 exhibits, landscaping and gardening displays and more; $7 adults, free ages 16 and younger; noon-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-389-1058 or www.centraloregonshow.com. WALK THE ART BEAT YOUTH SHOW: A spring showcase of local youth art and music at participating businesses; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. (Story, Go! Magazine) “MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS�: The Bend High School drama department presents a musical about the American family, based on the 1942 film starring Judy Garland; cast includes students and faculty members; $5-$15; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. COSA SONG OF THE YEAR SHOW: The Central Oregon Songwriters Association presents its 12th annual awards show, with live performances and a silent auction; $10, free ages 12 and younger with a paid adult; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre. org. (Story, Go! Magazine) COYOTES!: Featuring coyote tales from Jim Anderson, live music, poetry and refreshments; $20 in advance, $25 at the door; 7-9 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394.

SATURDAY May 1 COMMUNITY GARDEN PLANTING: Plant trees and food plants in the garden adjoining the church; bring a shovel, rake and gloves; a portion of the food grown will benefit a food bank; 8 a.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 562-221-6519. VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes, sausage, ham, eggs and coffee; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. SOLAIRE SALMON RUN: The 18th annual 5K and 10K run/walk, and kids 1K fun run; registration required; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $24 for 5K or 10K for adults, $14 ages 13 and younger; $5 fun run; prices increase by $5 after April 23; 9 a.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-480-8555 or www.solairesalmonrun.com. CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center; see Today’s listing for details. MOTHER’S DAY JEWELRY SALE: Buy jewelry and support the Feed the Hungry program at the center; donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069, liz@ bendscommunitycenter.org or www.bendscommunitycenter.org. MAY FAIRE FESTIVAL: Event includes a Maypole dance, crafts, pony rides, a climbing wall, music and food; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Waldorf School of Bend, 63175 O.B. Riley Road; 541-3308841 or www.bendwaldorf.com. PET PARADE AND MAY DAY CELEBRATION: Parade a pet down Hood Avenue, then proceed to Village Green Park for children’s activities, pet adoptions and more; free; 11 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5490251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com. BIKESHED CELEBRATION: Featuring food, drinks, music, bike safety checks and clinics; free; noon-2 p.m.; Bend’s Community BikeShed, 350 S.W. Industrial Way; 541-312-2069. “MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS�: 2 and

The Associated Press

The PG-rated film “Hoot� will be shown at the Bend Public Library Wednesday.

Story times, library youth events for April 30 to May 6 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday and Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • MUSICAL ADVENTURES: With the Cascade Community School of Music; ages 3-6; 10:30 a.m. Monday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Saturday. • WACKY WEDNESDAY: Go fly a kite theme; ages 6-11; 2:30 to 3:15 p.m. Wednesday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLER STORY TIME: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • TEEN GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.,

Redmond; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesday. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • TODDLIN’ TALES; Ages 18 months to 3 years; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • TEEN TERRITORY GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • FANCY NANCY POETRY PARTY: Ages 3 and older; 11 a.m. Friday. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 10 a.m. Wednesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541385-8080 or www.mtbachelor.com. CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center; see Today’s listing for details. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-4 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-7395. “MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS�: 2 p.m. at Bend High School; see Today’s listing for details.

SUNDAY May 2 KING AND QUEEN OF THE CONE: A race

up and down Mount Bachelor and Leeway Cone; participants can use alpine touring or telemark skis or a splitboard snowboard; helmets are mandatory; costumes encouraged; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $30-$55 in advance, $40-$65 at the event; 9:30 a.m. race begins, 7-8 a.m. registration; Mt. Bachelor ski area,

May 3 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Princess Bride� by William Goldman; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www.dpls.us/calendar.

TUESDAY May 4 FREE CLOTHES: FreeStoreRedmond donates clothes to those in need; free; 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-508-6262. SIERRA LEONE’S REFUGEE ALL-STARS: A screening of the documentary about musicians who escaped civil war in Sierra Leone; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. (Story, Go! Magazine)

WEDNESDAY May 5 RESOURCE FAIR AND CINCO DE MAYO CELEBRATION: A bilingual communityresource fair with information on health care, housing, education, employment and more; with music and folkloric dancing; free; 5-8 p.m.; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541-588-6298. “HOOT�: A screening of the 2006 PG-rated film based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls.us/calendar. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@oldshoepress.com.

May 6 IMPROV-A-THON: Teams of four to seven students compete before a small judging panel to see who will advance; $2; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900, ext. 3132.

Johnson is rock solid as the ‘Tooth Fairy’ The Washington Post

‘Tooth Fairy’ PG, 101 minutes

mons from the Department of the Dissemination of Disbelief, where a sort of executive fairy godmother (Julie Andrews) orders him to do time as one of her army of tooth fairies. One of the film’s charms is the way it carries childhood mythology to its logical, if absurd, extreme. Contains hockey violence and crude humor. DVD Extras: Interactive feature; karaoke.

Rating: PG for some rude humor, mild language and brief smoking What it’s about: Developers feel the wrath of the forest dwellers they try to displace. The kid attractor factor: Scheming woodland creatures on a rampage Good lessons/bad lessons: “Building a community� often means destroying somebody else’s. Violence: Slapstick involving car crashes and critter-bites Language: Mild, muttered profanity Sex: “I need to remove a leech from my no-no zone.� Drugs: Cigars, mushroom tea Parents’ advisory: Appropriate for kids of all ages, maybe a bit long for five-and-unders, though

Sending the kids to grandma camp Los Angeles Times

F  DVD   W

The Artist Formerly Known as The Rock shines as Derek Thompson, a once-promising pro hockey player now relegated to the minors who is sentenced to perform a bizarre kind of community service after almost destroying a little girl’s belief in the Tooth Fairy. The genial wrestler-turned-actor, who has recently become the go-to guy for kids’ comedies, almost single-handedly carries this movie on his broad back. After spoiling the secret to the daughter of his girlfriend (Ashley Judd), he finds himself with a sum-

‘Furry Vengeance’

By Whitney Friedlander

MONDAY

THURSDAY 7 p.m. at Bend High School; see Today’s listing for details.

Rating: PG-13 for sequences of intense action and violence, a scene of sensuality and language What it’s about: A specialforces team is betrayed and sets out to avenge itself on the villain who did the deed. The kid attractor factor: A comic-book action picture that keeps its death and destruction mostly off camera Good lessons/bad lessons: Violence doesn’t have consequences so long as you’ve got a ready quip for every shot fired and bomb detonated. Violence: Quite a bit, with little blood Language: Some profanity Sex: A hot-and-heavy scene that involves shirts being ripped off Drugs: A drug war subtext Parents’ advisory: An adoles-

cent’s movie all the way around. If they’re old enough to enjoy combat comic books (13-and-up), this won’t be anything new.

The Associated Press

Dwayne Johnson, Stephen Merchant and Julie Andrews “Tooth Fairy.�

Kids had taken over the kitchen to cook dinner for themselves. There were nine children total, four rooms in the house, just one bathroom — and no video games. For many adults, this would be a test of wits. But for Joan Brackin, 64, it’s just another day at grandma camp. Some parents may send their kids to sleep-away summer camps, but Brackin’s three daughters bring their children to grandma’s for seven structured days of learning, playing and bonding. Think of it as the usual visit with grandparents but with a schedule of activities and outings not only to keep the children occupied, but also to help the generations connect. “When my husband passed away, I was concerned how to keep his memory alive,� says Brackin, a special education teacher in Grant City, Mo., who considers herself a bit of an Auntie Mame eccentric. “I just want to keep a little check on my grandchildren. I was trying to come up with a way so that they could come together as cousins and give me something positive to hold on to.� Brackin’s teacher instincts help: Her camp is centered on a theme. Last year it was gems and minerals. This year she thinks it will be land and volcanoes. Brackin shows videos and teaches lessons about the topic. Each night of camp, different cousins host a tea party or themed dinner based on a menu they create. Brackin gives them

Tips for your own ‘grand camp’ For grandparents hosting children on spring break or planning a camp for summer, a few tips from Joan Brackin and Georgia Witkin, senior editor of Grandparents.com and a professor of psychiatry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York: • Open the camp to the older kids. Brackin welcomes all of her grandkids who are out of diapers. Once they reach 13, they become her “counselors in trainingâ€? and help care for the younger ones. • Keep projects geared to subjects that interest you as well. • Keep activities short; always plan more activities than you think time will allow. • If you’re doing something new, tell the kids about it ahead of time, Witkin says. “You tend to get a little more excitement and a little more control.â€? a crisp $100 bill to use at the grocery store, so that they can learn the value of money On the last day of camp, the kids perform a play they have written about what they have learned. Despite the structure, the week definitely includes some grandma-style spoiling. “If they want ice cream for breakfast, they can have it,â€? Brackin says.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly


E4 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, April 30, 2010: This year, a partnership enhances your life and becomes far more important than in the past. You might feel out of sync sometimes when interacting on such a close level. Realize how much approval means to you. Learn to stand without it, and you will become freer. If you are single, you will desire a close relationship. As a result, you could hook up too quickly. Don’t settle, under any circumstances. Remember, it takes a year to get to know someone. If you are attached, the two of you defer to each other depending on the occasion. This year, you will want your significant other to make more decisions. SAGITTARIUS can encompass all your time and attention. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You have plans for the weekend that might prevent you from being present in the here and now. You feel uncomfortable with a discussion, a financial matter and others in general. Why not take off early? Tonight: Proving life is an adventure. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A key associate, friend or loved one demands to be the one making the decisions. You could be uncomfortable with the decisions this person makes, but you don’t have a better solution. You come from a vibrant, centered place when dealing with others. Tonight: Go along with another’s plans.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH A lot of opinions come forward if you listen and challenge. You could be overwhelmed by everything that is racing through your mind. Know when to share your ideas, which might not be now. Timing is everything! Be assertive. Tonight: Answer calls and e-mail first. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH All work and no play is not a good recipe right now. Friends tend to keep pushing you to join them. Meetings seem out of sync with the real issues. Use care with a financial commitment; you could go overboard with spending. Tonight: Clear out errands first, then decide. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Your fiery side emerges when dealing with a child or loved one. Your high energy gets others thinking. You are very serious with a co-worker or associate. You take action quickly and surprise others. Tonight: Going to extremes. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Keep an eye on the basics. You might be more comfortable at home. Your creativity helps you get a project and your week accomplished. Others need your stability and perspective. Use care with frustration. If you suppress it, anger can develop and you could blow up. Tonight: Happy at home. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Keep conversations moving and don’t lock on any one point. Later, you can rethink these conversations. A friend could encourage you to do something you want to do. You are high energy. A partner seems to understand you

well. He or she feels connected with your feelings. Tonight: TGIF. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You can gain financially if you don’t overthink things too much. Others mean well, but you might feel a little out of sync with them. A professional effort pays off in many ways. Remain centered. Tonight: Your treat. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Beam in exactly what you want. With your magnetism skyrocketing, a “maybe” easily could turn into a “yes.” Reach out for someone at a distance who you trust. This person certainly has a strong opinion. Tonight: Whatever makes you happy. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Take your time coming to a decision. If you are uncomfortable with what you are hearing, just listen. You will have plenty of time to think later. A partner takes a very strong stand. He or she knows you well. Listen to this person. Tonight: Just for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH All arrows point to a key meeting. As a sign, you excel with people, especially in group settings. Though you might get a strong reaction from another person, express your thoughts in a meeting. Tonight: Where people are. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH A must appearance is inevitable. You might have a very different idea about what is acceptable to the majority. Communication lets you know when others feel uncomfortable. Do listen. Tonight: Count on going to bed late. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Affairs Continued from E1 “Always, communication is key with your family. Most problems arise when family members are blind-sided,” said Bertalan.

Medical directive (This is also sometimes called an advance medical directive or an advance directive.) While many people think about creating a will, fewer think about the need for a medical directive. Yet, according to Bertalan, it should be the other way around. It applies to everyone over the age of 18 and is free to create. The documents are available at most hospitals and medical offices, she said. This document appoints a representative who can make health care decisions when you cannot. It also states a person’s wishes regarding certain issues, typically including things like life support and tube feeding. Typical cases involving a medical directive might involve someone who has had a stroke and is in a coma at the hospital, or someone with severe Alzheimer’s disease who needs to be placed in a care facility. But it could also be a young man who is unconscious after a car accident. “It really can affect anyone,” said Bertalan. Without a directive, no one has the authority to make important medical decisions, and a guardian must be appointed by the court. Sometimes relatives disagree about what should be done, making the situation that much more difficult and emotional. And because people are living longer with more debilitating diseases, this is becoming more and more important. Bertalan says people should think carefully about the person they choose; some people wouldn’t want to play that role because it is too hard or too emotional. She says it’s important for people to talk to the person ahead of time and also give copies of the directive to their doctor and to close family and friends.

diately. This is incredibly helpful and important, for instance, when an older person becomes incapacitated due to Alzheimer’s. It would allow the person he or she named (often an adult child) to collect mail, pay bills, switch a phone number, roll over a CD, sell or rent a home, sign a tax return, and on and on. Without someone in place, the family has to go to court and appoint a conservator (which is more expensive than setting one up ahead of time and also is open to the public). But with this important document can also come trouble, because it gives the designated person a great deal of power. “A lot of elder abuse stems from powers of attorney,” said Bertalan. She says people should name someone who is trustworthy, financially solvent and honest. She says often this job is given to the adult child who lives closest or is the oldest.

Wills and trusts

of a trust, however, is that there are more guidelines and they are more regulated by law.

Other things In addition to these legal considerations, Watson encourages people to think about funeral preparations and their final wishes. In many ways, she thinks that can be the most challenging aspect, making decisions about what they want. Watson suggests people also consider what they want to do with their things, particularly because often relatives aren’t interested in receiving items. Do they have a favorite charity to which items could be donated? Or can they put the furniture up for auction? But beyond the will or trust, relatives may need numerous other documents to help sort things. Important documents can include: Titles for cars, doctor contact information, attorney contact information, deed to the house, bank account information, any CDs or IRAs, value assessments of any pieces of property, documents about repairs or maintenance to the house, marriage certificates, information about hiding places and also details about any loans they may have given to other people (say, giving a cousin a loan). Once all of this information is collected in one place, an individual needs to find a safe place for it, either a safe, a safety deposit box or a lawyer’s office. Either way, once it is in place, individuals need to make sure that loved ones know the location so when the time comes, they are prepared. Watson has encountered many funny stories involving hiding places. Some older relatives wanted to keep their most valuable items — cash or a will, say — hidden away, and don’t tell anyone about their stash before they die. Watson knows of a daughter who found thousands of dollars pinned to curtains; a shopkeeper who kept all of his money in the ceiling of his store; and some adult children who searched their father’s home for months for information about his trust. They finally found it in the dog house. While these are funny stories, too much disorder can be difficult for grieving relatives to handle.

Power of attorney is a document that names someone to act as your agent for legal and business matters, effective imme-

Based on a person’s assets and needs, either a will or trust may be appropriate. Wills cover only property that is solely owned by the person who died. Bertalan says sometimes people become focused on the will, not realizing it is not as critical as setting up power of attorney and the advance medical directive. “Honestly these two documents are a lot more important than a will,” said Bertalan. Wills are essential, however, for people who have minor children, so parents can name a guardian should they die. They are also important if individuals don’t want their assets divided up according to Oregon law, which provides for the spouse to receive the assets and, if no spouse, then assets go to children. In the case of a second marriage, the assets are split between the spouse and the children. Bertalan has seen this become ugly. She says second marriages, with both sets of kids wondering who is in charge, are the hardest situations and the source of the most fights. Bertalan said a trust puts all the assets together and a trustee is put in charge. This person can pay bills and sell property. But often a power of attorney is still needed to deal with retirement and Social Security benefits or to sign a tax return. The benefit

Toys

How to travel with a toddler

Power of attorney

Continued from B1 All sets can be used together. Building encourages critical thinking, imaginative play and fine motor skills.

Submitted photo

Rocky Cone Frog and Duck Mix and Match Stacking Toy Holgate, $16 Ages 1 and older Fun: A Movement: A Thinking: A Personality: B Social interaction: B This three-piece wooden block set features frog parts depicted on one side of the blocks and duck parts on the other (head, body and legs). They can be stacked upon each other to mix and match the parts. The bright graphics provide an introduction to matching and colors while stimulating available vision. Pieces are easy for small hands to grasp; our toddler testers with special needs were easily able to hold on to the pieces. Moving the pieces encourages use of fine motor skills, tactile exploration, hand/eye coordination and focusing abilities. Tip: Ideal for a preschool classroom or Montessori-based learning. Recommendations from Marianne M. Szymanski, publisher of www.toytips. com, Toy Tips Magazine and co-author of “Toy Tips: A Parent’s Essential Guide to Smart Toy Choices.”

By Kristin Finan Houston Chronicle

Traveling with a 16-month-old requires planning. These tips worked for our five-day trip to Buenos Aires: • Take only what you can carry: My general rule for traveling alone with my daughter is to take only what I can carry. Typically, that includes a purse, backpack, diaper bag, one suitcase and one umbrella-style stroller. Anything more than that and I’ll have to rely on others for help. While you’ll be surprised by the kindness of strangers when you travel with a baby, you can’t always depend on that to get around. • Don’t knock chains: I used to go out of my way to avoid chain hotels, but since I’ve started traveling with my daughter, I’ve embraced them. Sometimes just knowing that you’ll have access

Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

to a crib, an English-speaking staff and a 24-hour front desk makes it worth missing out on the trendy boutique hotel down the street. • Backpack it up: Rather than trying to lug around several bags for a day of sightseeing, combine all the items you need from your purse and diaper bag in a backpack. By the end of the day, your legs will thank you for it, and you’ll have extra space for any purchases you make along the way. • Work in daily downtime: No matter how packed our days were, I made a point to work in nap time and time at the pool every afternoon. Keeping a nap schedule similar to what we had at home and working in at least one activity that Kona loved seemed to help the rest of the day go smoothly.

Available: Free, reliable and endless baby-sitting By Jessica Yadegaran Contra Costa Times

With three children younger than 6, date night could’ve easily run the Dillmans of San Ramon, Calif., almost $100 — and that’s just for the high school baby sitter. Never mind that many high school kids have never changed a diaper; they’re also rarely available in a midday pinch, when doctor’s appointments coincide with baby naps. The family’s child-care options expanded a year ago when Danae Dillman and others in the Iron Horse Mothers Club started a baby-sitting co-op, a community-focused trend in child care exchange. While some co-ops have bylaws and hundreds of members, others keep it simple. Many co-ops consist of a few overwhelmed parents who join forces because they believe watching someone’s child is the neighborly thing to do. Since more young couples live far away from grandmas and aunties, many co-ops grew out of a need for reliable, free child care in an increasingly tight economy. Need to hit the gym or get your hair cut? Request a sit using hours that are accumulated when you watch someone else’s child. Dillman is the president of her co-op, which consists of 12 parents in the Windemere area of San Ramon, Calif. She and her board members meet monthly to make sure the children’s medical records are up to date and to visit homes of new recruits for safety and childproofing. They also run new members’ names through the Megan’s Law Web site to check for sexual offenders. An annual fee of $12 covers administrative costs, including a quarterly barbecue.

Doug Duran / Contra Costa Times

Melanie Beardslee baby-sits Julia Nolen, 2, left, and Grant Nolen, 4, in San Ramon, Calif. Beardslee is a member of the Windermere Babysitting Cooperative, and by taking care of Julia she accrues points that she can use the next time she needs a sitter. From there, members log into the co-op’s Yahoo group and post “sit requests” with logistics — “I will bring my two boys over for an hour after lunch.” Average sits are requested 48 hours in advance, and they usually get filled, Dillman says. It works in emergencies, too. One woman relied on the co-op to watch her first child when she went into labor. Another used it to attend a funeral. At first, Melanie Beardslee was skeptical about leaving her two children with “strangers.” So, Beardslee, a full-time speech therapist, spent a little time getting to know the Windemere co-op members, which is something experts like Washingtonbased Gary Myers, author of “Smart Mom’s Baby-sitting Coop Handbook” (Tukwila; 2000) suggest. “It’s easier to start and build a co-op than find one,” says My-

ers, who wrote his handbook based on his wife’s experience in Tacoma’s University Place Co-op. “You don’t want strangers in your co-op, so all you need is two friends and you’re up and running.” After a few visits, Beardslee, 41, realized she and her neighbors were all in the same situation. “We have the same values,” she says. “We have the same needs for our kids.” The co-op allowed Beardslee to join a tennis league. More importantly, it has made her community stronger and given her unexpected breaks, she says. “When you go to someone else’s house for a sit, you can’t wash dishes or do your laundry,” she says. “So you can put your feet up and not feel guilty about it. And, other people’s kids are usually way better behaved when they are with you.”

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Teens Continued from E1 In the meantime, Hillman says to “pick your battles.” If your teen wants to stay in her room while the family plays Scrabble one evening, you’re probably wise to let it slide. If she wants to skip her grandma’s 70th birthday party, it’s time to step in. Some pointers to ease that exchange: Use “I” statements: “’It is important to me that you come. I would like you to come,’” Hillman says. Don’t guilt them. “We do want to teach them about responsibility, but we want to teach responsibility without guilt,” Hillman says. “Many parents will guilt teens into going. Many parents will let their child stay home, but then guilt them afterward. “Tell them that you would like them to go and why it is important to you. If they say no, accept the no graciously.” Don’t bribe them. “We have just so many favor points before

our kids start figuring out what we are conniving them into,” she says. “If your bribes or positive rewards are starting to grow bigger and bigger, you know you have gone too far.” Be a chatty chauffeur. Offer to be your teen’s driver as often as possible. “The car is a safe place because you can talk casually but not have direct eye contact,” Hillman says. “You can try easy conversation starters: ‘What are your plans this weekend?’ ‘Can we go shopping Saturday morning?’” Play host. “The Teen Owner’s Manual” urges you to stock your fridge and welcome the teen troops. “Make your house the central hub for your teen’s friends. ... You’ll be better able to get a sense of the teenager’s life.” Stop talking. Also from Hillman’s book: “If you are overhearing conversations, kindly refrain from comments, suggestions or criticisms. If you continue to listen, you will acquire much more insight into your teen’s life, and you will be better prepared to help when help is asked for.”

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Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each 541-325-3376. FREE Cats (2), in/outdoor, 1 female, 1 male, both 1 yr., good w/other pets & kids, call 541-410-9339. 202 Free to good home. Spayed 3yr Want to Buy or Rent cattle/mix female dog, very friendly, loves to play ball. Furniture wanted, luxury pkg. 541-977-3599 to outfit 2 bdrm. cabinBrasada Ranch, 541-382-7577 German Shepherd AKC, female, 1.5 yrs., great markings, Wanted: Cars, Trucks, Motorgentle yet protective, $300, cylecs, Boats, Jet Skis, ATV’s 541-504-8386,541-410-3602 RUNNING or NOT! German Shepherd Puppies, 541-280-6786. AKC, rare all black, beautiful, Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for born 3/11/10, healthy, very old vintage costume, scrap, special, 5 females, $700 ea., silver & gold Jewelry. Top ready 4/22, 541-932-2704, dollar paid, Estate incl. Honno calls on Sat. please. est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 German Shepherds, AKC, solid white, $500 or possible We Want Your Junk Car!! trade, 541-927-3213. We'll buy any scrap metal, German Shorthair Pointers, 2 batteries or catalytic conmales, Ready now, $200 ea. verters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 541-550-6283 German Shorthair Pointer, 205 AKC reg., 7 mo. male, started on yard work & bird work, Items for Free will demonstrate, great dog! $600. 541-942-2015 Refrigerators. 1 Hotpoint and 1 Amana, Both work, Call for Golden Retriever Puppies, AKC, details, FREE. 541-593-7483 wormed & shots, great disposition, parents OFA cert., 208 refs. avail., 541-420-1334.

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Tzu/Maltese Cross pups and older dogs, males and females avail. 541-874-2901 charley2901@gmail.com Siberian Huskey/Wold Puppies, exc. quality, $250-$400. Can bring to Prineville 5/1 & 5/15. 541-755-5335 Shih

Golden Retriever Puppies!! AKC, Sweet and Sassy! Only a few females left. Ready to go May 1st. $600. oregonhomes@hotmail.com 541-419-3999

Stainless Steel Smith & Wesson, 9mm, $500. 541-306-7241

COCA COLA COOLER No dings, exc. shape, $1295 or best offer. 541-517-3622.

COORS “Passage to Gold” collectors stein, in box, $10. 541-388-1533. Springer Spaniel Puppies, 4 weeks, liver & white, absolutely beautiful, reserve yours now, ready 5/25, $300, 541-633-9755.

Sun Conure. Beautiful! 2yrs old. Incl: large cage, manzanita tree stand, pet carrier & toys. $499. 541-549-8036 Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE, fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420 Yorkie Pups, vet checked, 8 wks. 2 males, $500/ea. (541)-932-4714, 620-2632

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Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Pets and Supplies

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

S . W .

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers

COORS “Seasons of the Heart” stein, no box, $8.00 541-388-1533.

Weatherby Vanguard 300 Weatherby Mag, synthetic stock, new, $400, 541-475-2872 WIN 71- 348 cal, Marlin 375 -375 cal, CIM 1873 38-40 cal, Henry 45 cal, REM 14-30 cal, WIN 1894 38-55 cal, SPR 1903 30-06 cal, Inland M-1 US car. H & H Firearms 541-382-9352

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Computers Dealer Dicker Day! Meet the dealers and make your best deal! Sat. May 1, 10-5 in Cent-Wise Building, downtown Redmond. Lladro Porcelian Collection, for more information call 541-389-3458.

100’s Of Various New & Used Computer Items incl. computers, hard drives, keyboards, printers & much more! Fri. & Sat. April 30th & May 1st, 10-3, no early sales or inquires. MicroSphere Computers, 855 NW Wall St., Bend

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the 215 name of the business or the Coins & Stamps term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one WANTED TO BUY computer. US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 257 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Musical Instruments coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

N o n-c o m m e r cial a d v e r ti s e r s c a n place an ad for our

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

$2,500. 541-385-4790.

Ad must include price of item

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Victorian Platform Rocker, 100% restored, exc. cond., sacrifice $195. 541-923-1615

242 $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s Exercise Equipment Heeler Pups, $150 ea. dead or alive. 541-280-7355. 541-280-1537 Appliances, new & recondi- Large Gold’s Gym Workout http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com Stay-Ball, $15. tioned, guaranteed. OverKittens & cats ready to adopt! 541-388-1533. stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Cat Rescue, Adoption & FosMaytag, 541-385-5418 Staionary Bike, Health Ways, ter Team, 1-5 Sat/Sun, call $25, FoldAway Elliptical re: other days. Altered, shots, Desk, Ivory, 4 drawers, Airdale/Terrier Mix, Rescued, 6 Strider, $45, 541-549-1778. 48”x30”x18”, $30, call ID chip, more. 65480 78th mo. old, male, $50, call 541-389-1574. St, Bend, 389-8420, info & 541-576-2188.. 246 photos at www.craftcats.org. Guns & Hunting Furniture Labradoodles, Australian and Fishing Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com 1904 Remington 12 gauge Lhapsa Apso mix, 7 weeks, 1st pump, m10, 28" barr. 80-90% shots, 2 females left, $200 $350 OBO. 541-647-8931 Visit our HUGE home decor AKC Beagle Pups. Born each. 541-536-2592. consignment store. 1948 - 1949 WIN model 94, 3/30. Ready 5/13. Taking “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” New items arrive daily! .25-35, 80%+, $1275. S&W, dep now! 4 Choc Tri's, 2 Black The Humane Society of Red930 SE Textron & 1060 SE stainless, .44mag/comp., Tri's. Males/Females. Prices: mond now offers low cost 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 made in custom shop, gun + Choc, F-$400 M- $350 Black spays and neuters, Cat spay www.redeuxbend.com all acces., $1300. Taurus F- $350 M $300. Dusty starting at $45.00, Cat neustainless, .44mag, 4 inch bar541-475-1535. Leave msg. ter starting at $25.00, Dog rell, brake, with ammo, $600. spay and neuter starting at GENERATE SOME excitement in Basset Hound Pus, 4 weeks, 10 MM Glock 20, new, cusyour neigborhood. Plan a ga$60.00. For more informaparents on-site, 8 females, 2 tom trigger safety, 4 clips, rage sale and don't forget to tion or to schedule an apmales, $400, 541-350-4000. 100 rounds ammo, $750. advertise in classified! pointment, please call Berreta 12ga., O/U, Golden 385-5809. 541-923-0882 Snipe, $850. Monogrillo/ Mattresses good Macaw, Beautiful female, 2yr Italian, 12ga., SxS, $1175. quality used mattresses, old Severe. Playful, loving Bengal Kittens Mix, beautiful, NO. 1 MK III Enfield, 303 discounted king sets, and talkative. Incl: 2 cages & great markings, serious inBritish, $675. Bolt Action fair prices, sets & singles. toys. $850. 541-549-8036 quiries only, ready on MothStevens 22, $165. Bolt Acers Day for their new homes, tion REM 22, $165. Lots of 541-598-4643. $225/ea. 541-923-7501 Ammo avail. 541-728-1036 Bichon/ShihTzu pups. 7 weeks MODEL HOME CASH!! old, 1 male, 2 females $800. Mini Aussie Pup, male toy red FURNISHINGS For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Call 541-749-0462. tri, 9 weeks, 1st shots, $220 Sofas, bedroom, dining, Supplies. 541-408-6900. cash. 541-678-7599 sectionals, fabrics, leather, NAA mini 22, $185; Custom home office, youth, Border Collie/Heeler Remington 700 30-06, $500; accessories and more. puppies, $50. Call 454 revolver, make offer; MUST SELL! 541-306-9764 Ready to go Winchester 67A 22, $100; (541) 977-2864 Winchester 70-300, $400. www.extrafurniture.com Boston Terrier/Pug mix, 2.5 Taurus PT22, 175; S&W 357 mo, male, dark brindle, $175, $470. 541-330-5485 Pool Table, regulation, red felt, 951-634-0260 (Prineville). Mini Dachshund (Doxie) exc. cond., $500, incl. acces- P.A. HP22 LR, Semi-Auto, AKC Puppies. 20 Champions BOXER, AKC dewclaw, tail dock, sories, 541-788-4229. Stainless, w/extra mags, in past six generations. Shots very playful, ready to go $170 OBO, 541-647-8931. Sears Kenmore Hepa 200 Air and wormed. Ready now home $499 1-541-556-8224 Purifier, $50. Call for info., RIFLES, shotguns, handguns $450 males, $500 females. 541-388-1533 Cat breeding season has begun! (541)678-7529 for sale, several of each. Please have your cats spayed 541-771-5648. Table, Maple, seats 4-12 and neutered before our people, round to oval, $35 Savage 30.06 Model 111, w/ shelters become overfirm, call 541-389-1574. Simmons Scope, synthetic crowded with unwanted litstock new, $375, ters. Adult female or male The Bulletin 541-475-2872 cats, $40. Bring in the litter recommends extra caution under 3 months and we’ll SKEET CLINIC, everyone welwhen purchasing products alter them for free! Call Bend Mini Schnauzer puppies, AKC, come, conducted by Olympic or services from out of the Spay & Neuter Project for One female $500. One male trainer Larry Sifer. Wed., 5/5 area. Sending cash, checks, more info. 541-617-1010. $450. 9 weeks old, salt and at Bend Trap Club. Contact or credit information may pepper. Ready for new Dave Jewell, 541-322-0181. Chihuahua 2 years old. Potty be subjected to F R A U D . homes. 541-416-0941 or trained. AKC registered, all For more information about 541-771-8563 Smith & Wesson 9mm semi shots, teeth cleaned, spayed. an advertiser, you may call dewey@cbbmail.com auto. w/ (2) 10 round clips, Merle with one blue eye. the Oregon State Attorney $350 OBO. 541-647-8931 POODLES, AKC Toy Weighs less than 3 lbs. General’s Office Consumer or mini. Joyful tail waggers! $500. 541-279-0241 Protection hotline at Smith & Wesson Model 59, Affordable. 541-475-3889. 1-877-877-9392. 14-shot, 2 clips, holster, Companion cats free to seniors! $325. 541-306-7241 PUREBRED CHIHUAHUAS Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. PUPPIES FOR SALE. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org Spring Chinook Are 541-977-4817. Here! Now booking trips Dachshund Weiner pups $150, with Captain Greg. $100 per 3 female, 6 weeks old Schnoodle Pups, home raised, Wanted washers and dryers, person. 5 Person special for 541-923-9675, ready for very smart, 7 weeks old, working or not, cash paid, $450. 541-379-0362. shots and a good home. $200 each. 541-306-1807. 541- 280-6786.

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953. Grand Piano, Ivers & Pond, very nice, $9995, 541-815-3318.

KRISTEN BLAKE black wool coat, size 6. Like new exc. cond., $35. 541-350-1555. NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Ralph Lauren red plaid PJs, sz large, new w/o original store tags, $25. 541-350-1555. The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 7 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised equals $25 or Less • One ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months Call 385-5809 fax 385-5802 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Pianos - Piano Teacher Selling her Studio Pianos, Beautiful Grand Piano, French Provincial Legs, almost new, very nice, $10,050, will deliver; Piano, used, nice, $695, 541-383-3888.

Starck Piano with bench, black, fair/good cond., $400 OBO. 541-447-5414

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Misc. Items 6 Cemetery Lots, Deschutes Memorial Gardens, $650/ea. 541-312-2595 Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** Crypt, Inside double companion, # 46604B in Deschutes Memorial Park, best offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis

Found: Beautiful and affectionate adult neutered Siamese Mix Cat, on 4/16 near Hunnell Rd. area. Call 389-8420

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

Vest, stars & striped with sequins, extra large, exc. cond., $100, call 541-388-1533. Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Building Materials

Trex Decking, used, $1.00/ft., Winchester grey, 1700 ft. avail. 541-480-6900.

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords, 1-$150, 2-$270. Bend Del. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

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BarkTurfSoil.com

Medical Equipment

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Hospital Bed, pwr., exc. cond., hand control, $475 OBO, 503-719-3334. Pronto M51 Wheel Chair, exc. cond., $500 Call for more info., 541-550-8702. Recliner, pwr., La-Z-Boy, blue, never used, w/warranty, paid $999, sacrifice $375 OBO, 503-719-3334. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Tools Welder, MillerMatic, 130 wire feed, cart, tank & guages, works on 110V, call Tom for details, asking $650, 541-410-2662..

Riding Lawn Mower, Sears Craftsman, 42” cut, hyrdostatic, $500, 541-382-4115.. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Weed Wacker, Sears Craftsman 4 cycle, used 4 time, sacrifice $95. 541-923-1615

LOST: Male, Lynx Point Tabby, blue eyes 20 lbs. on Sun. 4/25 18th & Empire area, REWARD. 541-390-7159. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

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Auction Sales

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Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

No Minimums - No Reserves COLT STARTING PUBLIC AUCTION We build solid foundations that 10AM - WEDNESDAY - MAY 5 stay with the horse forever. Preview 8-10, Visit us at Wednesday, May 5 www.steelduststable.com PULEO'S RISTORANTE or call Paul 541-419-3405 546 NW 7TH, Redmond Gas Ranges; Char Broiler; Fry- Mares (3) Reg. ea. 10 yrs, 1 Paint & 1 Pinto not broke, 1 ers; Convection Oven; Food Palomino, some training Warmers; Refer Prep make offer 541-546-2453. Counters; Refers; Freezers; Slicer; Food Processor; QUALITY REGISTERED Sandwich Press; SS Tables PERFORMANCE HORSES and Sinks; (19)Dining Tables; all ages. 541-325-3376. (42)Chairs; Dishware; Utensils; Pots; Pans; Decor; Much More! 10% Buyers Premium Terms: Cash, Cashiers Check, READY FOR A CHANGE? MC/Visa Cards Don't just sit there, Persons Under 12 Not Admitted let the Classified ILLUSTRATED BROCHURE Help Wanted column find a James G. Murphy Inc. new challenging job for 425-486-1246 you. www.murphyauction.com www.bendbulletin.com

Farm Market

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

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Livestock & Equipment Babydoll Southdown Sheep. Small starter flock available. Please call 541-385-4989. BEEF CALVES 300-800 lbs., pasture ready. VAC., delivery available. 541-480-1719. Fancy Purebred Breeding Age Angus Heifers, proven bloodlines, good dispositions, raised in trouble free herd, $800 ea., delivery avail., 541-480-8096.

9N FORD tractor loader, PTO, Box Gannon, $3875. 541-536-3889 or 420-6215. Feeder Steers, pasture ready, 541-382-8393 please leave a message. John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

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Irrigation Equipment 7’ WHEEL LINES, 5” pipe, approx 1/4 mile self levelors, good cond. $7000 each. 541-546-2492.

OVER 470 TOTAL HEAD OFFERED!!!! NW Breeders Female Sale SUNDAY 5/2, 12 noon Central Oregon Livestock Auction Yard, Madras. Angus, Red Angus, Sim-Angus & Limousin including The Pope Ranches mature cow herd dispersion, selling 191 Angus spring pairs. Every sound, good-uddered female 4 yrs & older, sells. (916) 362-2697 www.jdaonline.com

Hay, Grain and Feed

Sim Angus Heifers, 500-600 lbs., vaccinated & wormed, 541-546-8747/541-460-0841

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Excellent hay for horses. $120/ton & $150/ton 541-549-3831

Yearling Angus Bulls, ready to work, raised in trouble free herd, good dispositions, growth, proven bloodlines, $1200 ea., delivery avail., 541-480-8096.

Hay Is Expensive! Protect your investment Let KFJ Builders, Inc. build your hay shed, barn or loafing shed. 541-617-1133. CCB 173684.

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HEY!

HAY!

Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard Grass $115 a ton. Madras 541-390-2678.

347 Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

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Farmers Column

Orchard Grass Hay A farmer that does it right & is small bales covered $150 on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant a ton, Feeder Hay small bales $90 a ton. Tumalo 541-322-0101. Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $135 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $75 per ton. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain,

Lost and Found

small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581

Found: 2 pistols, call to identify. In Police custody. 541-317-0988.

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

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ADORABLE BABY BUNNIES, $5 each. 541-923-7501

new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


F2 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

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Schools and Training Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 25 daily newspapers, five states. 25-word classified $500 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Construction – hardwood floors installer (part to full time). Drug free workplace seeking to expand w/ a reliable, technical, hard-working, conscientious, good listener, & an intuitive thinking individual. Involves lifting up to 100 lbs. Excellent driving record req. Willing to train. Mail resume to Prestige Hardwood Flooring, Inc., PO Box 7564, Bend, OR 97708. No phone calls, please.

Dispatcher, 35 hrs/week, $11 hr, Wed-Sun, view job description at www.consolidatedtowing.com, must apply in person 1000 SE 9th St. Mon.-Fri., 9-5. Contact: Lori at 541-389-8080.

La Pine Interim City Manager: Salary $5000/mo. Need exp. city manager, part time (20 hrs) for 6-9 mo. or until a full time city manager can be hired. To apply visit www.ci.la-pine.or.us.

Painters- Lead person & regular painter. Must be experienced. All types of work. To apply call Bill, 541-771-9564, or Mike 541-280-4234.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

Phlebotomy Classes Begin May 3rd. Test for National Certification upon successful completion of our course 541-343-3100 www.OregonMedicalTraining.com

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825 Advertise in 25 Daily newspapers! $500/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Washington. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Art Picture Yourself Here! Busy frame shop looking for an artistic, friendly, and hardworking part-time salesperson. Art background, outstanding customer service skills and a flexible schedule are required. Submit resume to The Great Frame-Up, 61535 S. Hwy 97, Suite 4, Bend, OR 97702. tgfubend@msn.com

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Automotive Technician Central Oregon Ford dealer looking for technician, must have ASE Certification or Ford Certification. Full time flat rate position. Call 541-475-7204.

Certified Nurse Assistant LaPine Partners In Care is currently accepting resumes for a Certified Nurse Assistant living in the LaPine area or willing to work in LaPine area part-time with the ability to flex up to full-time as needed. Home Health and Hospice experience preferred. Qualified candidates area asked to submit their resume to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701 Attn: HR or fax to 541-706-8070.

Certified Pharmacy Tech Pharmacy Express in Bend is looking for a full time Tech to join our team. Great customer service is a must! Needs to be licensed in Oregon and nationally certified. For more information or to apply contact the Human Resources Dept. C&K Express, LLC at 541-412-3579. EEO. Church Choral Director: First Presbyterian seeks director of Traditional Music Ministries to lead Chancel Choir and music ensembles. Experience in church music, track record of excellence in choral conducting, motivating and recruiting volunteer singers and instrumental groups. Resume to Administrator, 230 NE Ninth, Bend, 97701. blevet@bendfp.org 541-382-4401.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Customer Support/Office Assistant Needed. This is a temporary, part-time position for about 8-10 weeks. Duties include back up telephone support, data entry, filing, copy projects, and other misc. duties as requested. Computer skills needed are Word, Outlook, Excel, and Power Point. The right candidate will have at least three years customer service/office support experience, ability to pass pre-employment drug test and criminal background, and the ability to have a flexible work schedule (Monday-Friday). Pay rate is $12/hour. To schedule and interview, please call 541.382.6946.

Fuel Reduction Chain Saw Operators needed for work in Central Montana, experience & equip. required. Call 406-250-0925. Gardener-Naturalist Help in botanic garden, Sunriver Nature Center. 10 hr./wk. Seasonal. 541-593-4442

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

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Estate Sales

DON'T FORGET to take your VACATION RENTAL HOME signs down after your gaSALE! On May 2nd from rage sale and be careful not 10-2pm. All must go!! 61185 to place signs on utility SW Lodgepole Dr. Bend poles! www.bendbulletin.com 282

Sales Northwest Bend Estate Sale. Furniture, refrigerator, household items. Saturday, May 1st, 8:00 to 12:00. 2518 SW 43rd Ct, Redmond. (541) 390-4192.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Garage Sale: Fri.,-Sun., 9-?, 65360 Gerking Market Rd Tumalo, furniture, household, and more. Everything must go, two for one! Huge Multi-Family Sale in Starwood, Sat. & Sun. 8-2, 20874 Soltice Dr., quality furniture, kitchen, clothes, kids, home decor, no junk.

Large Indoor/Outdoor Moving Sale, Sat. & Sun., 10am-1pm. 1433 NW Lexington Ave. off NW 14th St. MULTI-FAMILY SALE Fri. and Sat., 8-3. exercise equipment, computer hardware, furniture, toys & more.! 64025 N. Hwy 97 Quality Sale, Sat. only!! 8-3. Rain or shine, antiques, original art and more. Shevlin to 19032 NW Shasta Dr.

Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802

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288 2 Party Sale, antique furniture, Western art by Michael Atkinson, guns, household items, LP records, books, much, much more. Sat. & Sun., 8am-3pm. 213 & 224 SE Soft Tail Dr.

MAY DAY! MAY DAY! Please help! I’m drowning in “stuff”. BIG SALE! Sat., May 1st, 9-4. 3139 SW Timber (SW 31st St. between Timber & Umatilla)

SALE

Plus estate items from Mick Cleary

1859 NE VERONICA FRI. April 30, 2010 SAT. May 1, 2010 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 a.m. Friday. (Take Wells Acres Rd. from either 27th St. or Butler Market Rd., follow to Sheridan, turn north to Red Rock, go west (Left) and follow to Veronica) 1987 Toyota MRII with 83,000 miles; 1977 Chevy Blazer with 139,000 miles; 2009 Samsung LCD TV 40"; Large Glass Display cabinet; Sofa; Loveseat; Queen Bed; Dale Earnhardt NASCAR items; Patio Table and four chairs; Brinkman barbecue; Antique library table; Microwave cart; Canon Printer; Rolling Tool chest; Pressure washer; "Kegged" refrigerator; CDs; few books; RV water filters; nail and staple guns; Sockets and misc. tools; Hammers, pliers, drill bits, screwdrivers, and small electrical hand tools; Security camera; Golf club set; Floor jack; Compressor; dishes and glassware; nice men's clothing and boots; kitchen appliances and pots and pans; glass and brass tables; lots and lots of other items. Sale conducted by;

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Sales Southwest Bend MOVING SALE Sat. only from 9 to 4. A variety of “stuff”, bed sets, household misc., DVDs 61008 Snowbrush Drive Yard Sale. Baby/kid stuff, tools, sewing, fabric, clothes, bike, paint sprayer and more. 60105 Cheyenne Rd (DRW) Fri & Sat 8am to 6pm Sun 10am to 5pm. 541-815-0003

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ESTATE

For more information go to: www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days 541-382-5950 eves Community Sale, Fri. Noon-5, Sat. 9-3, 2755 NE Boyd Acres Rd. Items Galore, load of stuff, corner of Boyd Acres, Butler Market. Garage Sale, Sat. Only 9am-?, 975 NE Hidden Valley Dr. Bikes, furniture, luggage, stereo, kitchen items & DVD’s.

BSH Grad party fundraiser. Sat. May 1st, 9 am at the Bend Factory Stores, nice donated items, priced to sell!!! Multi Family Garage Sale, lots of kids items, household, something for everyone. Fri. & Sat., 9-3. 20389 Rae Rd.

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Sales Redmond Area Fundraiser Yard Sale: All Quality Items, Antiques to Zappers, 16568 Steelhead Rd., CRR, Sat. 8:30-6 & Sun. 8:30-?

Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat., 8am-4pm. Clothing, misc. items, some antiques & collectibles, art & art supplies. 627 NW 19th Pl.

Multi-Family Garage Sale: Sat., 8-3, 2014 NW 11th St, tanning hood, tent, wet suits, wake board, yard equip, misc. Multi-family sale: Sat. 8-2, 2138 SW Pumice Ave., old furniture, TV, mirror, bike, toys, tents, clothes, lots of other great stuff, cheap, cash only. NEIGHBORHOOD SALE May 1st & May 2nd, 8-3 Stonehedge On The Rim, off SW 23rd between Kalama and Obsidian. Baby items, furniture, household goods and decor, clothing, antiques, tools, and much more.

SAT. 5/1 10 AM - 2PM, 6523 Canal Blvd., near the intersection of 61st & Canal Blvd., Furniture, Stainless Steel Smoker, Misc. Housewares, and Books.

GARAGE SALE- Multi-familySaturday ONLY. Furniture, toys, clothes, baby, electronics, and more!! Evergreen Academy-Redmond 1012 SW Evergreen Ave, 8am-3pm Large Multi-Family Moving Sale, In Alley Behind Garage, Sat. 9-3, 861 NW 17th St., in Canyon Rim Village off 19th.

Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. computer skills and customer service req., Quickbooks a plus. Apt., util. + salary incl. Fax resume to 541-330-6288.

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Mark Kosse

Machinist Minimum 5 years lathe and milling experience. Operate CNC equipment, including set-up, adjustment and tool change. Read and edit machine programs. Competitive pay and benefits. Please send resume to Box 16150477, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Independent Contractor Sales

WE

Product ManagerFull Time position for growing Fishing Wader Manufacturer. Must have prior experience with Far East Imports as well as Far East travel. This position requires excellent organizational, follow up, communication and computer skills. College degree required.Serious prior experience will be considered. Outdoor or fishing industry background a plus. Send resume to: Product Mgr. PO Box 1410 La Pine OR 97739

Line Cooks - Experienced, both lunch & dinner, apply at Pine Tavern, between 9-11 a.m. and 2-4 p.m., 967 NW Brooks, Bend.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. RN: On-Call Every Other Weekend Partners In Care is currently accepting resumes for an RN to work On-call every other weekend starting Saturdays at 7:00 AM through Mondays at 7:00 AM. Qualified candidates are asked to submit their resume to: 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701 Attn: HR or fax to 541-706-8070.

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809

FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in: 292

News Flash! New Huge outside flea market, Wikiup Junction, LaPine, $15/day, 10x15, hwy. frontage. Opening weekend May 7th. 541-410-9473.

H Sunriver

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 SALES AGENT Real estate new home sales agent needed for largest builder in Oregon. Only apply if you have a proven track record. High pressure environment. Email your resume to resume01@pdxdhi.com. Seasonal Naturalist Help visitors, teach kids/adults. Sunriver Nature Center, 30 hrs./wk. 541-593-4442

Student Naturalist Intern Summer Intern, part time, students age 16-19, assist all aspects of Sunriver Nature Center.541-59 3-4442

Sunriver Reservationist: Highly motivated, friendly professional w/ excellent people skills. Must be a self-starter, able to work weekends. Competitive pay w/ cash bonuses. Fax to 541.593.6864 or email ashleighw@sr-sunset.com Taxi Drivers Wanted! Must be 25 or older, clean driving record, no felonies. Apply in person at 1515 NE 3rd, Bend, OR 97701.

Independent Contractor

& Call Today & Sales Other Areas

READERS:

SEO ANALYST & WEB DEVELOPER POSITIONS AVAIL! For more info, visit www.smartz.com/careers

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

Multi Family Yard Sale, Saturday May 1st 8AM-4PM @ 62279 Powell Butte Hwy (5 mins from Costco). Antiques; Wringer Washer, Stoves, Piano, Harley Golf Carts, Baby items, Furniture, Fat Cat Motorcycles and more!

CAUTION

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Training Provided; I am selling my 1/2 of a license to provide services for Central OR people w/learning disabilities. Req. exp. working w/children 541- 504-2536 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 F3

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Independent Positions

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Motorcycles And Accessories

Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Homes for Sale

Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Houses for Rent NW Bend On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Finance & Business

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Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

A-1 Room in nice clean, SW Redmond home, $350 incl. utils. 548-4084 for more info.

1015 Roanoke Ave., $610 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, near college, no smoking/pets. 420-9848.

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Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

OCEANFRONT HOMES Rent now for Summer. Waldport. Sleeps 10-16. www.rodbyroost.com 541-923-0908

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Rooms for Rent NW Bend room with shared kitchen, bath etc. $350 incls. utils. 541-385-5800 ext. 436, cell 541-390-7718. STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 deep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. 1059 NE Hidden Valley Dr., 2 bdrm., 1.75 bath townhouse, garage, W/D hook-ups, W/S paid, $699/mo. + $650 dep. No Pets. 541-610-4070 1/2 Month Free! 55+ Hospital District, 2/2, A/C, from $750-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

541-385-5809 573

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq.ft., near hospital, fenced back yard, large deck, gas heat, A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, $750+dep., 541-280-3570

Business Opportunities Duplex, 1 bdrm, 1 bath, single A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $500/25-word classified ad in 25 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Great Westside Location! 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath in 4-Plex close to COCC, Century Dr. 1506 NW Juniper. $575/mo. 541-350-9421

638

car garage, fenced yard, $550 per mo., Water & Sewer paid, Please Rob, 541-410-4255

HOSPITAL AREA Clean, quiet , 2 master bdrms, 2.5 bath townhouse. All kitchen appliances, w/d hook up, garage w/ opener, gas heat, a/c, w/s/g pd. $645/mo + deposit. 541-382-2033

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

STONE CREEK APARTMENTS 2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments 3 bdrm, 2 bath townhomes with garages. W/D included, gas fireplaces. 339 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend $595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D in unit. front balcony, storage, no pets. 1558 SW NANCY, 541-382-6028.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, storage units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com A Large 1 bdrm. cottage-like apt in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Ask Us About Our

April Special! Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval.

Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS!

Move in Special! Quiet Town home 2/1.5 W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2022 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

• 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. • Screening fee waived Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from $395. Lots of amenities. Pet friendly, w/s/g paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1. $725/mo. 541-420-0208

Duplex, $300 off 1st mo., 2 bdrm., 1 bath, appl., W/D hookup, fenced yard, w/storage shed, $599, pets neg. 2812 SW 24th. 541-504-9264

Tumalo, 5 minutes to Bend, nice clean 4 bdrm., 2.5 bath, 2 fireplaces, dbl. carport, big yard, no smoking, $875, $1000 dep., avail. now, 541-408-5920,541-548-4689

Cute & clean mall 3 bdrm. 1 bath on 2 acres, Plainview area, garage, 3 sided barn storage shed avail. early May $850. 541-948-7499.

Westside, Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath house, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $900/mo. (1416 NW 5th St.) 541-389-5408

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

WESTSIDE, Near Downtown 1+ bdrm. W/D, quiet St., large fenced yard, detached garage, pet OK w/ dep. $675/mo., Avail 6/1 541-382-4530

The Bulletin The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

mo. 3 bdrm, 2 bath + Apt./Multiplex SE Bend $1100 office/4th bdrm, large fenced

Dulpex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, sparkling clean, all appl., garage, W/D hookup, fenced yard, W/S paid, no smoking, pets neg. $695. 541-389-2240.

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

2700 Sq.Ft. triple wide on 1 acre, Sun Forest Estates in LaPine, 3/3, exc. shape lots of room $800, 1st & last +$250 dep. 503-630-3220.

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

631

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WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Awbrey Butte Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199

2 BDRM., 2 BATH DUPLEX, living/dining room, newly carpeted & painted, $650/mo. +1st & last, W/S/G paid. For more info, 541-390-1253.

Real Estate Contracts

Loans and Mortgages

65155 97th St., 2/1 duplex on 2.5 acres, $850; 1/1, 1 garage, mtn. views, $650 incls. util. No smoking/pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414

Tumalo Studio: 2 rooms, own bath & kitchen, separate entrance, util., wi-fi, & satellite TV incl., $475, avail. 5/15, 541-389-6720.

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528

648

Houses for Rent General

Roommate Wanted

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

yard, RV parking, cul-de-sac. Pets considered. Call Gregg at 541-480-8337. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, wood stove, micro, fenced yard, near hospital, $895+ dep., pets? avail. now, 541-389-0573,541-480-0095

A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq.ft., gas fireplace, great room, newer carpet, oversized dbl. garage, $995, 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 Near Bend High School, 4 bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 sq. ft., large carport, no smoking, $995/mo. + deps. 541-389-3657

NOTICE:

3 Bdrm, 2.5bath, A/C, 1800 sq.ft., $1125 mo. 3011 NE Charleston Court 541-306-5161 When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343

Debris Removal

Appliance removal, reinstalled, gas lines, handyman services. CBC#49072. Since 1969. Special: $89 Local! 541-318-6041 or 408-3535.

Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Thomas Carey Construction 35 yrs. exp. in Central Oregon Custom homes, all phases or remodeling, small jobs, window replacement. 541-480-8378 • CCB#190270

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Excavating

DMH & Co. Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, GradDomestic Services ing, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. We Clean Houses & OfAlex 419-3239 CCB#170585 fices: Over 10 years of experience, good references, best Handyman service for the least cost, 541-390-8073. I DO THAT! Home Is Where The Dirt Is Remodeling, Handyman, 13 Yrs. Housekeeping Garage Organization, Exp., References. Rates To Professional & Honest Work. Fit Your Needs. Call Angela CCB#151573Dennis 317-9768 Today! 541-390-5033

Decks

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Excavating

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Roof-Foundation

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 AVM CONSTRUCTION • Carpentry • Home Repair • Expert Painting • Stain • Decks • Pergolas • Foreclosure Restoration 541-610-6667 CCB #169270 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

747

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Office/Retail Space for Rent

Northeast Bend Homes

Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $995/mo. + deps. Pets okay. 20561 Dorchester East. 541-410-8273,541-389-6944

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. newer carpet & paint, woodstove, garage fenced yard on .92 acre lot $795 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. 3 Bdrm., 2 bath mfd. 1440 sq.ft, family room w/wood stove, all new carpet, pad & paint, big lot, db l. garage, $ 895. 541-480-3393,610-7803 DRW 2+2+2, Above Dillon Falls, Cozy Cabin, Quiet Neighborhood, 1 yr. lease, $850+$1100 cleaning dep. 541-549-1611, 541-350-6216 Walking Distance to Old Mill, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage w/opener, fenced yard, sprinkler sys. pet OK $1150 $700 dep. 815-5141.

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495 Cute, clean 2/1, single garage, W/D hookups, nice yard, great in town location, $725 rent + $700 dep., 156 SW 8th St., 541-548-0932.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver Cozy, Quiet 2/1, fridge., W/D, fenced yard, $625/mo. + last & $450 dep. Pets? Avail. 5/10. 54789 Wolf St. 805-479-7550 Immaculate 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, quiet area, furnished, W/D, dbl. garage, 2 story, hot tub, no smoking/pets, N. Sunriver, $850/mo. 541-821-3878

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $675/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432

1 BDRM., 1 BATH HOUSE, walk Newer Mfd. between Sunriver/LaPine 2/2 bath o-sized in closet, W/D incl., nice, carport, heat pump, pet? new kitchen & living room, 541-5362729, 503-538-3688 view of river, large dbl. ga$590 mo. +$300 dep. rage, W/S/G paid, close to parks & river trails, 676 $750/mo. + $750 dep. NO pets/smoking. 67 B McKay. Mobile/Mfd. Space 541-419-0722 Mobile Home Lot for rent Near Shevlin Park, 1 level in Beautiful Prineville! open floorplan, great kitchen No deposit. Will pay to move 3/2, gas fireplace, A/C, your home! Call Bobbie W/D, dbl. garage, fenced at 541-447-4464. yard $1400. 541-678-5064.

Real Estate For Sale

700

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

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705

Real Estate Services PRIVATE LENDER WANTED! We own our home outright, looking for private lender to lend us $30,000 for remodel. Call 541-279-8826. * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Sunriver/La Pine Homes 3 Bdrm. 2 bath single story on 1/2 acre, built in 2003, also 1/2 acre lot with well, same area, S. of Sunriver, please call 509-585-9050.

762

Homes with Acreage Sunriver Area, framed 2 bdrm., 1 bath, “U” driveway w/ extra parking, large detached garage/shop, groomed 1.47 acres, $224,900. Call Bob, 541-593-2203.

771

Lots 713

Real Estate Wanted Struggling with payments? I will buy your house or take over payments. Rapid debt relief. 541-504-8883 or 541-385-5977

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

1 Acre Corner Lot Sun Forest Estates, buildable, standard septic approved $49,000 or trade, owner financing? 503-630-3220..

Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly Maintenance

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

773

Acreages

745

Homes for Sale 1 Acre 2700 Sq.ft. triple wide, exc. shape, 3/3 family, living bonus & 2 diving rooms, 2 small decks, metal roof, new well & septic block foundation $129,000 possible trade & owner financing 503-630-3220

***

CHECK YOUR AD

CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $140,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

382-3883

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. Polaris Predator 90 2006, new paddles &

wheels, low hours, $1400; Suzuki 250 2007, garage stored, extra set of new wheels & sand paddles, SOLD both exc. cond., all 541-771-1972 or 541-410-3658.

385-5809

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Honda Scooter 2005, Reflex 250 cc, 2K mi. , silver, 2 helmets, travel trunk, exc. cond. $3000. 541-389-9338.

Foreclosures For Sale BANK OWNED HOMES 100’S TO CHOOSE FROM Oregon Group Realty, LLC. 541-389-2674

12 FT. Valco, 7.5 Merc., Calkins trailer, trolling motor, licensed thru 2011, cover, exc. cond. $2,500. 548-5642.

16.5 FT. 1980 Seaswirl, walk through windshield, open bow, EZ Load trailer, 2003 Suzuki outboard, 115 hp., 55 mph or troll 1.5 mph all day on 2 gal. of gas $3900. 541-420-2206

16’ FISHER 2005 modified V with center console, sled, 25 HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holders, mini downriggers, depth finder, live well, trailer with spare, fold-away tongue. $7000 OBO. 541-383-8153. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774 19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

Find It in

Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

FSBO: $10,000 Down and Take over Payments on a real Log Cabin, 1+1+loft & Garage, on 1.5 acre wooded landscaped lot,541-617-5787

870

Boats & Accessories

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Honda Shadow 1100 Spirit 2005, red, windshield, glass bags, sissy bar & rack, 16K mi., $4500. 541-815-8025

The Bulletin Classified ***

Yamaha YFZ 450 2006, Special Edition, only ridden in the sand, paddle steer tires, pipe, air cleaner, jetted, ridden very little, $5000, 541-410-1332.

14’ Lund, 25 Merc, Calkins trailer, elec. trolling motor, fish finder, down rigger, 2 anchors & other equip., great for fly fishing, $2000. 541-388-6922

Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Please check your ad on the Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! first day it runs to make sure Starting at $100 per mo+space it is correct. Sometimes in- Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker structions over the phone are misunderstood and an error Beautiful Smith Rock can occur in your ad. If this 55+ MHP 2 bdrm., 1 bath, all happens to your ad, please appl., very cute mobile, RV contact us the first day your space $9000 terms w/down ad appears and we will be payment. 541-647-2992. happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Week- Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new days 12:00 noon for next roof, heat pump, A/C, new day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Suncarpet, $10,000. day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. 541-390-3382 If we can assist you, please call us:

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

(This special package is not available on our website)

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD Four Leaf Clover Lawn Service wants to get your lawn off to a great start with our thatch & aeration process at 25% off. Experienced, knowledgable care. FREE Estimates, 541-504-8410 or 541-279-0746

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD BIG

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Painting, Wall Covering

Exterior/Interior, Carpentry & Drywall Repairs CCB#180420

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Remodeling, Carpentry D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Mahler Homes, LLC Additions, Kitchens, Bathrooms, General Remodeling. Design Services Available. CCB#158459. 541-350-3090 All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765. Don 385-4949

Tile, Ceramic

Randy, 541-306-7492

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

865

ATVs

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in 541-944-9753 SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

YAMAHA XT 225 1993, licensed, 5K miles, very nice, $1500. 541-504-0927.

Aspen Lakes, 1.25 Acres, Lot #115, Golden Stone Dr., private homesite, great view, gated community $350,000 OWC. 541-549-7268.

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, Quality Work, Clean up & haul, repair & improve, fences, odd jobs, and more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267 American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Spring Clean Up

850

Snowmobiles

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

749

Southeast Bend Homes

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

800

MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Mfd. Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, appls., decks, 10x20 wood shop $12,950. 530-852-7704

Handyman

CCB#180420

Drywall

3 bdrm 2 bath, 1100 sq. ft. recently upgraded w/ granite counters, tile and laminate flooring. Hot tub with privacy deck. Dbl. garage plus 3 storage/shop bldgs. On approx. 1/3 acre w/ irrigation, near Tumalo School. $199,500. 541-419-6408

The Bulletin is now offering a Southwest Bend Homes LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a Single Story, 3/2.5, over $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, home to rent, call a Bulletin 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookClassified Rep. to get the ups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 new rates and get your ad www.owners.com/jpm5553 started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Appliance Sales/Repair

Northwest Bend Homes

654

656

Boats & RV’s

746 Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

Houses for Rent SE Bend

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise 658 any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, Houses for Rent color, religion, sex, handicap, Redmond familial status or national origin, or intention to make 2 Bedroom, 1 bath on 1326 any such preferences, limitaSW Obsidian Avenue, tions or discrimination. We $550 mo. +635 deposit. will not knowingly accept any 541-447-1616 advertising for real estate or 541-728-6421 which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, big fenced informed that all dwellings yard, new appl., dog okay, advertised are available on $795+security dep., 1617 an equal opportunity basis. SW 33rd, 541-948-2121, The Bulletin Classified tmenergyrates@gmail.com

• Providence •

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

*JAKE’S Yardscaping* Big or Small We Do It All! High Quality, Low Rates 18+Years Exp., Call Jake at 541-419-2985

FREE NO OBLIGATION ESTIMATES for any painting needs. Branch Manager, Jordan Klinski, 541-350-9539 CCB#142082

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Wweekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

The Bulletin Classifieds

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-4977-4826•CCB#166678


F4 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 870

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Boats & Accessories

Travel Trailers

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Dutchman 26’ 2005, 6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Fleetwood Pioneer 2004, 30’, 14’ slide, bath, fridge., range, micro., stereo, A/C, 19’ awning, exc. cond., camped in twice, selling at low retail book value at $9999 OBO. 541-536-5774 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

THE PLASTIC SURGERY CENTER, P.A., a foreign corporation, Plaintiff, v. ANGELENA BRADLEY, an individual, Defendant.

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Case No. 10CV0143MA PUBLISHED SUMMONS

Watercraft

TO: ANGELENA BRADLEY

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Kayack, 18’ 2 seater, needs little work, $70, call 541-389-1574.

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Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Fifth Wheels Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833. Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

Jamboree II 19’ 1977, all appl. & holding tanks works, needs cosmetic and interior work over, good tires, low mi., $1500 OBO. 541-475-3777 Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade, needs some TLC, everything works, shower & bathtub,Oldie but

Goody $4,000 541-610-6713

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled action within 30 days from the date of first publication of this summons. If you fail to so appear and defend, plaintiff will apply tot he above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in the complaint, to wit: action against defendant under ORS 108.040 for expenses of the family in the sum of $97,675.12, together with interest thereon at the rate of 18% per annum from January 23, 2007 until paid, plus costs and disbursements. The summons is published by order of the Honorable A. Michael Adler, Judge of the above-entitled court signed March 31, 2010 and entered April 2, 2010, directing publication of this summons once each week for four consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in Deschutes County, Oregon. Date of first publication: April 9, 2010 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must appear in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “answer.” (or “reply”) must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. Elliott, Anderson, Riqualme & Wilson, LLP Timothy G. Elliott, OSB No. 952553 Attorney for Plaintiff 250 NW Franklin Ave., Ste. 201 Bend, OR 97701 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of MAHLON G. ROHRBACH, Deceased,

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Winnebago Itasca HoriTrailer. 541-410-9423 or zon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, 541-536-6116. loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Case No. 10PB0042ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, Wayne Mark Rohrbach, has been appointed personal representative for the estate of Mahlon G. Rohrbach. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Ryan P. Correa. Dated and first published: April 23, 2010. Wayne Mark Rohrbach Personal Representative HURLEY RE, P.C. Attorneys at Law 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend OR 97702 Phone: 541-317-5505 / Fax: 541-317-5507 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Non-Testamentary Trust Estate of LEONORA M. TAYLOR, Deceased.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

No. 10PB0035MS NOTICE TO INTERESTED PARTIES AND CREDITORS

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

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Travel Trailers CK Pioneer Trailer 180 2006, very clean, located in Bend. $9,850. Call 503-481-1730

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to ORS 128.264 that the undersigned is successor trustee to the LEONORA M. TAYLOR REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST dated April 28, 1990. The grantor (settlor) of the Trust was LEONORA M. TAYLOR who died January 18, 2008. All persons having claims against grantor (settlor) of the LEONORA M. TAYLOR REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST are required to present them with vouchers attached, to: DENISE O'CONNELL, Successor trustee LEONORA M. TAYLOR REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST c/o EDWARD P. FITCH

one or more local Post Offices, will be offered for sale at public auction.

PO BOX 457 REDMOND OR 97756 All claims against the LEONORA M. TAYLOR REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST dated April 28, 1990 must be presented to the Successor Trustee at the above address within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, or such claims may be barred. Date first published: April 16, 2010.

Livestock not sold at public sale may be sold at private sale or condemned and destroyed, or otherwise disposed of as provided by Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations, §262.10(f). Signed at the FremontWinema National Forests Headquarters, 1301 South G Street, Lakeview, Oregon: On this 26th day of April, 2010.

LEONORA M. TAYLOR REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST Denise T. O'Connell, Successor trustee LEGAL NOTICE NATIONAL FOREST TIMBER FOR SALE DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

By: /s/ J. Richard Newton J. Richard Newton Acting Forest Supervisor Fremont-Winema National Forest

The Thumb Poles Sale is located within Section 10, T.20S., R.8E., Surveyed, WM, Deschutes County, Oregon. The Forest Service will receive sealed bids in public at Deschutes National Forest Supervisor's Office, 1001 SW Emkay Drive, Bend, OR 97702 at 11:00 AM local time on 06/01/2010 for an estimated volume of 24 CCF of Lodgepole Pine and Other Coniferous species poles marked or otherwise designated for cutting. The Forest Service reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Interested parties may obtain a prospectus from the office listed below. A prospectus, bid form, and complete information concerning the timber, the conditions of sale, and submission of bids is available to the public from the Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District, 1230 NE Third St., Suite A-262, Bend, OR 97701, Phone (541)383-4770; or the Forest Supervisor's Office, 1001 SW Emkay Drive, Bend, OR 97702, Phone (541)383-5586. The USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENT TO IMPOUND UNAUTHORIZED LIVESTOCK (Ref: FSM 5330) Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Regulation of the Secretary of Agriculture, Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations §262.10, all unauthorized livestock found upon National Forest System lands or other lands under Forest Service control within the following area: All lands under the Administrative control of the Fremont-Winema National Forests, May be impounded by the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service on or after May 15, 2010, if the same be not previously removed permanently from the above described lands. Any unbranded livestock, or any livestock bearing brands of previously unauthorized livestock which are found to be making continued or subsequent unauthorized use within twelve (12) months after publication of this notice may be impounded without further notice. After the impoundment, owners of unauthorized livestock may regain possession thereof only by first showing proof of ownership and reimbursing the United States in full for the expense incurred in impounding, feeding, and care of such livestock, or if impoundment costs exceed fair market value, by a payment equal to the fair market value of the impounded livestock. All impounded animals not redeemed within five (5) days after notice of sale of impounded livestock has been published in a local newspaper, posted in the County Court House and in

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON AUCTION AD Wall Street Storage, LLC at 1315 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701 will be accepting sealed bids on 5/21/10 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the following units: Ronald Schlager, Unit D-1 Crystal Harrison, Unit H-14 Stephanie Triplett, Unit K-2 William Workman, Unit W-8 LEGAL NOTICE Request for Proposals The City of Bend requests proposals from qualified companies to test, repair and maintain backflow assemblies for which the City of Bend is responsible. The City currently maintains approximately 8,500 residential assemblies and is currently adding approximately 10 backflow assemblies a month due to new construction. Sealed proposals must be received by June 1, 2010, 3:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, Bend, Oregon, 97701, Attn.: Gwen Chapman, Purchasing Manager. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. The outside of the package containing the proposal shall identify the project: "Backflow Testing and Maintenance 2010 (WA10GA)". A mandatory pre-submittal meeting will be held at City Hall Council Chambers at 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon on May 18, 2010, 10:00 AM. Proposals will only be accepted from attendees of this meeting. Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder's Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE. The City of Bend reserves the right to: 1) reject any or all proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) select consultant on the basis of the proposals or to conduct interviews with the highest qualified proposers after scoring, 4) seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 5) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the City. Dated: April 30, 2010 Gwen Chapman Purchasing Manager 541-385-6677

LEGAL NOTICE The undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the estate of EUGENE HOMER MILLER, Deceased, by the Deschutes County Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, probate number 10PB0040ST. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same with proper vouchers within four (4) months after the date of first publication to the undersigned or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned or the attorney. Date first published: April 30, 2010. Jeanne P. Miller Personal Representative c/o Ronald L. Bryant Attorney at Law Bryant Emerson & Fitch, LLP PO Box 457 Redmond OR 97756 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031404379 T.S. No.: 10-08688-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, AMIE D. SCHULZ, DEVAN K. SCHULZ as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-65076 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 249930 LOT FIVE (5), HINKLE PARK, RECORDED OCTOBER 14, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 885, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 16623 ASCHA COURT, LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $953.84 Monthly Late Charge $47.69 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 245,801.98 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.19400 % per annum from December 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on August 10, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and

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LEGAL NOTICE Public Notice of Opportunity to Object USDA - Forest Service Deschutes National Forest Sisters Ranger District Whychus Creek Wild and Scenic River Plan: An Amendment to the Deschutes National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 219.32 the Deschutes National Forest, Sisters Ranger District, is giving notice of the opportunity to object to a Forest Plan Amendment (decision notice) to incorporate a comprehensive management plan for Whychus Creek Wild and Scenic River into the Deschutes National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP). The project is located in the Whychus watershed in T17S R8E, T16S R8E and R9E, T15S R9E, T15S R10E W.M. The forest plan amendment provides an area-specific programmatic plan to manage the Whychus Wild and Scenic River. The development of a comprehensive management plan meets the requirements of Section 3(d)(1) of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The Plan would provide guidelines for managing pubic use and enjoyment of Whychus Creek and protecting and enhancing the aspects of the river found to be unique on a regional or national scale; the "Outstandingly Remarkable Values." No site-specific ground disturbing activities are authorized by this programmatic management plan. The comprehensive plan is based on Alternative 2, with some modifications in response to public comments, of the Whychus Wild and Scenic River Management Plan Environmental Assessment. The Plan would establish a final Wild and Scenic River boundary and incorporate additional standards and guidelines into the Deschutes National Forest LRMP; the plan provides a non-significant amendment to the Deschutes National Forest LRMP. The decision notice and the comprehensive river management plan can be accessed on the Forest Service Website at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/projects/units/sisters/whychus/index.shtml Objections must be submitted to the reviewing officer, Regional Forester, 333 SW First Avenue, Portland, OR 97204 or PO Box 3623, Portland, OR 97208-3623, phone (503) 808-2468, fax (503) 808-2339. The Regional Office is open from 8:00 am until 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. Electronic objections must be submitted to: appeals-pacificnorthwest-regional-office@fs.fed.us and be in the body of the email, or in Microsoft Word, Rich Text Format (rtf), or Portable Document Format (pdf). Any person may object to a proposed amendment or revision prepared under 36 CFR 219. An objection must be filed within 30 days of the publication date of this legal notice, in The Bulletin, the newspaper of record Objections must be filed with the reviewing officer and contain: (1) The name, mailing address, and telephone number of the person filing the objection; (2) A specific statement of the basis for each objection; and (3) A description of the objector's participation in the planning process for the proposed amendment, including a copy of any relevant documents submitted during the planning process. For electronically mailed objections, the sender should normally receive an automated electronic acknowledgement from the agency as confirmation of receipt. If the sender does not receive an automated acknowledgement of the receipt of the objection, it is the sender's responsibility to ensure timely receipt by other means. Within ten days after the close of the objection period, the responsible official will publish a legal notice of all objections in the local newspaper of record. Objectors may request meetings with the reviewing officer and the responsible official to discuss the objection, to narrow the issues, agree on facts, and explore opportunities for resolution. The reviewing officer must allow other interested persons to participate in such meetings. An interested person must file a request to participate in an objection within ten days after publication of the notice of objection as described above. The reviewing officer must respond, in writing, to an objection within a reasonable period of time and may respond to all objections in one response. The final decision notice approving the forest plan amendment must be consistent with the reviewing officer's response to objections and will not be subject to any additional administrative review procedures. Additional information on the proposed management plan and forest plan amendment can be obtained from Michael Keown, District Environmental Coordinator, PO Box 249, Sisters, OR, 97759, (541) 549-7735; e-mail: mkeown@fs.fed.us. For information on the objection process please contact Susan Skakel, Forest Environmental Coordinator, (541) 383-5563: e-mail: sskakel@fs.fed.us.

the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 16, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lorena Enriquez, Authorized Signor ASAP# 3535828 04/23/2010, 04/30/2010, 05/07/2010, 05/14/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359510065 T.S. No.: OR-236211-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BETH LARSEN as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 3/26/2007, recorded 3/30/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-18706 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 120985 LOT 5, BLOCK 7, KINGS FOREST FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61237 KING SOLOMON LANE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $296,090.25; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that

become payable. Monthly Payment $1,589.89 Monthly Late Charge $59.10 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $296,090.25 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.12% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-351472-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STEPHANIE D. ZIRKLE, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE ESTATE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN A NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Beneficiary, dated 5/24/2006, recorded 6/14/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. - fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2006-41146, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 243677 LOT 22, OAKVIEW, PHASE VI, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2847 NE RAINIER DR. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 11/1/2008, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,831.35 Monthly Late Charge $141.57 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $321,600.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8.2500 per annum from 10/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/16/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities iscovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 8/16/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one- year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 7/17/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 4/12/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92^02 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3530337 04/23/2010, 04/30/2010, 05/07/2010, 05/14/2010


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 30, 2010 F5

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right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3409381 04/23/2010, 04/30/2010, 05/07/2010, 05/14/2010

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030770416 T.S. No.: 10-08674-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARILYN S. BLACK, RICHARD J. BLACK as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on October 6, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-68322 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 196182 LOT SEVENTY-ONE (71), PINE CANYON. PHASE FIVE, RECORDED NOVEMBER 20. 1998. IN CABINET E, PAGE 129, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 3267 NW MASSEY DRIVE, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,327.50 Monthly Late Charge $116.38 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 532,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25000 % per annum

from December 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on August 10, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee-Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF DEFAULT / NOTICE OF SALE To: Grantors THE S&H GROUP, INC., a Washington corporation as to an undivided one-half interest and BRAD A. EVERT and SHANNON EVERT, as tenants by the entirety as to one-half interest, pursuant to ORS 86.735, Beneficiary DENNIS P. JONES, of that certain Trust Deed, dated October 13, 2003, and recorded October 15, 2003, at 2003-71507 Official Records of Deschutes County, has elected declare the entire amount owing under the terms of the obligation secured by said Trust Deed and to sell the trust property to satisfy the obligation. The Trustee was AmeriTitle, an Oregon corporation. Successor Trustee is Greg Hendrix, attorney. The description of the real property is: The South Half of the Northwest Quarter (S 1/2 NW 1/4) of Section Five (5), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian; EXCEPT the East Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (E 1/2 SE 1/4 NW 1/4) of said section; ALSO EXCEPT: Beginning at the Southwest corner of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4); thence North along the West boundary line of said Northwest Quarter (NW '/4) a distance of 660 feet, more or less, to a point which is located South 660 feet from the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4); thence East along a line parallel to the North line of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4) a distance of 534 feet to a fence; thence Southerly to a point on the South boundary line which is located 455 feet East from the Southwest corner of said Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4); thence West 455 feet at the point of beginning. ALSO EXCEPT: Beginning at the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4); thence South along the West boundary line of said Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW '/4 NW '/a); a distance of 660 feet to a point; thence East along a line parallel to the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4) a distance of 534 feet to a fence; thence Northerly to a point on the North boundary line of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4) which is located 514 feet East from the Northwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4); thence West 514 feet to the point of beginning. ALSO EXCEPT: Beginning at an 1/2" iron pipe on the South line of and North 89°53'57" West, 680.30 feet from the Southeast corner of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) of Section Five (5), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; running thence North 2°26'51" East, 1262.46 feet to an 1/2" iron pipe on the South line of the Northwest Spruce Avenue; thence North 89'42'16" West, on the South line of said Northwest Spruce Avenue, 756.95 feet; thence due South 1263.98 feet to the South line of said Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4); thence South 89'53'57" East, 703.03 feet to the point of beginning. ALSO EXCEPT that portion lying within NW Spruce Avenue. The Trust Deed is in default for failure to pay the balance of $192,285 plus $29.02 interest per day from February 15, 2010. Unless the default is cured pursuant to ORS 86.753, wherein five days prior to the date of sale the default may be cured by payment of the sums secured by the Trust Deed in the entire amount due at the time of cure under the terms of the obligation, other than such portion as would not then be due had no default occurred, plus any other default of the trust deed obligation that is capable of being cured may be cured by tendering the performance required, attorney fees, publication costs, recording fees and the cost of the foreclosure title policy ($700). Date of Sale: Thursday, August 19, 2010. Time of Sale: 10:00 am Place of Sale: Front Steps of Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, OR 97701 NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date of the first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 20, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are: Greg Hendrix, OSB 83234 Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP, 716 NW Harriman St., Bend, OR 97701. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any other rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar lawyer referral service is 1.800.452.7636. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is Legal Aid Services of Oregon 800.678.6944. Greg Hendrix, OSB 83234 Successor Trustee.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8873 T.S. No.: 1273812-09.

fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 16, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lorena Enriquez, Authorized Signor ASAP# 3535761 04/23/2010, 04/30/2010, 05/07/2010, 05/14/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T09-5815l-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON B. HOWARD, AND JOHANNA K. HOWARD,, as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 08-25-2005, recorded 08-26-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES

County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-56932 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit; APN: 241518 RIVER RIM P.U.D PHASE 2 LOT ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FOUR (184) CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19417 GOLDEN MEADOW LOOP BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 04/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $3,019.22 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit:

The sum of $411,469.84 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from 03-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 05-21-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed

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reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: January 07, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3529212 04/16/2010, 04/23/2010, 04/30/2010

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Bend Metro Park and Recreation District, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget and the revised Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 will be held at the District Office Community Room at 799 SW Columbia Street, Bend, OR. The meeting will take place on the 10th day of May 2010 at 5:30 pm. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 30th at the District Office, 799 SW Columbia Street, Bend, OR, between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the City of La Pine, Deschutes, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011, will be held at So. Deschutes County Building Meeting Room, 51340 Highway 97, La Pine, Oregon. The meeting will take place on the May 17, 2010 at 6:00 PM. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after May 14, 2010 at La Pine City Hall, 51340 Highway 97, La Pine, OR between the hours of 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0377 T.S. No.: 1273621-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6746 T.S. No.: 1270250-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Richard C. Herget and Connie M. Herget Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated January 26, 2009, recorded January 30, 2009, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2009-04328 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 16, block L, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 59870 Cheyenne Rd. Bend OR 97702.. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,425.64 Monthly Late Charge $57.03. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $217,762.04 together with interest thereon at 5.000% per annum from August 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 31, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 7, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Chancellor L. Colter, An Unmarried Person and Lisa Della-rose, An Unmarried Person, as Grantor to Fidelity Service Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Action Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated June 30, 2005, recorded July 01, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-42191 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 9 of Sterling Pointe, Phase 1, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2707 NW 22nd Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,496.04 Monthly Late Charge $58.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $189,826.52 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from August 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-307090 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21

R-307684 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5950 T.S. No.: 1273658-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6569 T.S. No.: 1274147-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jane T. Menefee, as Grantor to Regional Trustee Services Corp., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Gn Mortgage, LLC., as Beneficiary, dated August 26, 2004, recorded September 13, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-54773 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 62, Awbrey Village, Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3042 NW Craftsman Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,875.90 Monthly Late Charge $57.62. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $442,499.99 together with interest thereon at 3.125% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Danielle M. Lee, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Hyperion Capital Group, LLC, A Limited Liability Company, as Beneficiary, dated June 22, 2006, recorded June 28, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-44444 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 280 in Foxborough Phase 6, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61372 SE Woodbury Lane Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay when due liens and charges Superior hereto; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,526.73 Monthly Late Charge $65.85. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $207,254.35 together with interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is XXX, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jack R. Lane and Marilyn K. Lane, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated January 22, 2007, recorded January 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-04947 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6, block 1, Whispering Pines, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16861 Whittier Dr. Bend OR 97707-2663. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $886.59 Monthly Late Charge $37.97. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,714.58 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from August 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 10, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 11, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-307689 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21

R-307686 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21

R-307694 04/30/10, 05/07, 05/14, 05/21


F6 Friday, April 30, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Autos & Transportation

933

933

940

975

975

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975

Pickups

Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

900

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford F-350 XLT 2004, 4X4, 6L Turbo Diesel, long bed, auto, A/C, CD, tow pkg., new tires, X-cab, canopy, extras, 46K mi., $23,000, 541-390-2002.

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Chevy 1/2 Ton 2004 4X4, EX Cab, Z71, Local Trade! Vin #178579 Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718 T Hangar for rent at Bend Airport, bi-fold doors. Call for more info., 541-382-8998.

Only $16,888 HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Smolich Auto Mall

366

916

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Smolich Auto Mall

Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

Chevy Silverado 1500 1994 4WD, 123K, X-Cab, Gemtop canopy $5500,541-593-6303

925

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Smolich Auto Mall HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

Toyota Sienna Mini Van 2006

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Dodge Dakota EX Cab 2005 Only $10,888

GMC SLT 1997 X-cab, 2x2, canopy, tow pkg, & bedliner, $1995 OBO. 541-480-1373.

Low Miles! Great Shape! VIN #443417

Only $15,975

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

932

Antique and Classic Autos

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

935

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Crew Cab, Well Equipped, and Very Affordable. Vin #080432

GMC DENALI 2004 exc cond V-8 automatic, 4 wheel drive, leather, Bose, 74,000 miles, $16,950. 541-382-2997.

Only $9,878

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Wagon

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $5000. 541-617-1888.

V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600. Ford F150 Super Crew 2006, 4 dr., 4WD, green/tan, 5.4 V-8, Lariat, leather, loaded! ONLY 24K miles! Exc. Cond. $26,999. 541- 480-3265 DLR. Ford F250 1996; Ford F350 Crew Cab 1997; Ford F250 2003; Ford Pickup Bed Only 1997. Deschutes Valley Water District is taking bids by May 10th. Call Rick, 541-410-4452.

Ford F-250 Super Cab 2006

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

4X4, Low Miles, New Tires. VIN #B86130

Only $18,888

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

CD, ABS, Power Seats & More! Vin #245565

2.5I Limited, Leather, Dual Moonroof. Vin #367188

1 Owner, Local Trade! VIN #086434

Only $5,997

Only $21,878

Only $10,888

NISSAN

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1178 • DLR

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498 Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $8995 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

ABS All Wheel Drive, automatic, air conditioning, snow tires and rims, ps, pl, pw, 159,000 miles, AM/FM, roof rack, runs great! Retiree. Blue book price $5,700. will sell for $3,700. 541-306-6883.

366

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $14,800, 541-388-3108.

Hyundai Genesis 2009, 4.6L, V-8 sedan. 5500 mi. Technology pkg. NAV. Sterling Blue. Warranty. Compare at $33,950. 541-480-3265 DLR.

Only $12,888

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

VW Bug 1969, yellow, sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

The Bulletin

Best Color! Just Traded In! Vin #033060

HYUNDAI

Toyota Avalon 2001, 102K, all options incl. ESC, silver, $9880. 541-593-4042

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

VW Jetta VR6 2003

smolichmotors.com

Subaru Outback 2002, Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 1 owner, exc. cond., non smoker, handles great in any weather, 112,000 miles, oil changed every 3000 mi., auto, AWD, 4 wheel anti-lock brakes, all pwr., A/C, rear defroster, heated front seats, $7200, call 541-504-0712, anxious to sell!

VW Jetta GL 1996, 5 spd., manual, 130K, original owner, maint. records, sunroof, 4 studded tires on rims incl., $2300. 541-480-7521

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VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

VW Jetta Sedan 2001, A/C, 5-spd, 124K, very clean, 1 family owner, silver, $3195, Please call 541-312-4260 or 503-539-5804.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Lincoln Towncar 1992, top of the line model, immaculate condition, $2995, please call 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521.

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Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

1 AT Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, $6210. Call 541-350-7017.

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $17,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

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42 Month Lease Model AJA-01 SALE PRICE $16,949 MSRP $18,190. Cap Reduction $1,699. Customer Cash Down $1,878.32. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 54% $9,822.60. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 512154 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

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Chevy Trailblazer 2005 Leather, Moonroof, Tow & More! Vin #223182

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

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KIA Spectra SX 2006, 4 dr., 49K mi., $6500. (530)310-2934, La Pine.

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Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

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Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $14,999, Call 541-390-7780 .

Ford F150 2001 real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Very Nice Condition! Local Trade, 41K Miles! VIN #037496

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

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Ford Bronco 1981 with heavy duty Western snow plow, V8, 4 WD, everything runs & works well, Bronco needs a little interior TLC, asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

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Need Suv’s, Trucks & Cars, $3000-$40,000. call Todd 541-633-0940.

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Ford Thunderbird Convertible 2003, 5 spd. auto. trans, leather, exc. cond., 74K, $14,999. 541-848-8570

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

GMC Extra Cab 1995 Call Today!

Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Ford Mustang GT Premium Coupe 2010, 2K mi. Candy Red/Saddle , auto, 6 options, $28,900. 541-728-0843

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Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, $13,900 OBO, 541-420-3277

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709.

Ford F250 XLT Lariat 1989, 111K, 460, 7.5 litre, 4x4, long bed, good cond. in & out, power windows & locks, auto., A/C, CD, tow pkg., new tires & water pump, both window motors new, new brakes, runs & drives great, well maint. $3,300 OBO. 541-350-9938. Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

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Model AFB-01 SALE PRICE $21,888 MSRP $22,490. Cap Reduction $1,999. Customer Cash Down $2,248.13. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 54% $12,144.60. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 744554

366

Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,000, w/o winch $23,000, 541-325-2684

Ford Focus ZTS 2004, 5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354 Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884 Saturn Vue 2003, AWD, 90K, burnt orange, 4 door, A/C, auto., cruise $8,400. 541-848-7600 or 848-7599.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 original miles, Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

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Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through May 3, 2010.


EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN APRIL 30, 2010

R E S TAU R A N T S : A review of Slick’s Que Co. in Sisters, PAGE 10 MOVIES: ’City Island’ and three others open, PAGE 25


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

inside

REPORTERS Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Eleanor Pierce, 541-617-7828 epierce@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

PRESENTATION EDITOR Anders Ramberg, 541-383-0373 aramberg@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a Web site, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Cover photo illustration by Althea Borck / The Bulletin Submitted photo

FINE ARTS • 12

OUT OF TOWN • 21

• Nancie Zivetz-Gertler is inspired by her mother • Redmond hosts youth art show • Glass Symphony closing • Art & Wine Auction supports children’s foundation • Summit High student earns art award • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

• OMSI film fest in Portland • A guide to out of town events

MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: Head for the Hills heads to Bend • Powerman 5000 at the Domino Room • Kleverkill plays CD-release show • Central Oregon Songwriters Association awards show at the Tower • Jade’s Jazz Lounge opens in La Pine • Blues Amuse and Brews supports magnet school

AREA 97 CLUBS • 7 • Guide to area clubs

ADVERTISING

MUSIC RELEASES • 8

541-382-1811

• Take a look at recent releases

RESTAURANTS • 10 • A review of Slick’s Que Co.

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • Make your plans for later on

TALKS, CLASSES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES • 20 • Learn something new

GAMING • 24 • Review of “MLB 10: The Show” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25 • “City Island,” “A Nightmare on Elm Street,” “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” and “Furry Vengeance” open in Central Oregon • “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus,” “It’s Complicated,” “Disgrace,” “Transylmania,” “District 13: Ultimatum” and “Five Minutes of Heaven” are out Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

PAGE 3

PLENTY OF ENERGY Head for the Hills bluegrass band returns to Bend to celebrate new CD

By Alandra Johnson • The Bulletin

P

erforming live is one of the things members of the Colorado-based bluegrass band Head for the Hills feel they do best.

“A huge strength of ours is live performance,” said bassist and vocalist Matt Loewen. Local audiences will get a chance to experience the energy Head for the Hills brings in person at the Domino Room on Saturday (see “If you go”). Continued Page 5

H ead for the Hills is, from left, Joe Lessard, Adam Kinghorn, Matt Loewen and Mike Chappell. Courtesy Tobin Voggesser

If you go What: Head for the Hills When: 9 p.m. Saturday, doors open 8 p.m. Where: Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $10 Contact: www.random presents.com


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

music Powerman 5000 leads heavy bill at Domino Fans of sludgy, propulsive hard rock have somewhere to be Monday night. That’s when Powerman 5000 rolls back into town to headline a heavy show at the Domino Room. Powerman has been chugging along now for almost 20 years under the direction of Spider One, also known as Rob Zombie’s brother. The New England-based band’s sound is a hard-charging mix of metal, industrial, robotic beats and fistpumping choruses, not too far removed from his older brother’s better-known band. Opening the show are two local bands that Powerman fans should pay attention to because they stake out territory similar to the headliner. There’s Warm Gadget, the Bend-based quartet that features the thunderous foundation of Jared Forqueran and Eric Metzger, nervy guitar and electronics work by Colten Williams, and the always caustic vocals of Tim Vester. And then there’s Stillfear, who draw more from old-school

metal but, like Spider One, don’t shy away from memorable melodies. Powerman 5000, with Warm Gadget and Stillfear; 8 p.m. Monday, doors open 7 p.m.; $15 plus service charges in advance, $18 at the door. Advance tickets available at Ranch Records (541389-6116); Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .bendticket.com.

Kleverkill celebrates release of new CD I don’t know a lot about Kleverkill, in part because I have had a hard time getting in touch with the band. But I’ll tell you what I do know: • The Bend-based quartet includes Kurtis Israel, Joe Romero, Casey Jones and Shane Jones as members. • Kleverkill is ready to release their new, self-titled CD, and they’ll do so with a show Saturday at Mountain’s Edge. • That CD is likely to be an ear-splitting good time, if you’re into modern metal. At their MySpace, the band lists Godsmack, Slipknot, Metallica and Seether atop their “Influences”

%

5 ! % -7 tail 50off re

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Lakes Submitted photo

section, but farther down the list, you’ll find diverse artists like Bob Marley, Jay-Z, Kansas, Michael Jackson and Tool. But, yeah, it’s mostly heavy stuff. • The songs at that MySpace — www.myspace.com/kleverkill — are equal parts spooky and savage, where boggy, brooding passages coexist with blasts of sheer metal that feel straight out of a hot furnace. • When you search “Kleverkill” on The Bulletin’s website, you learn that there was a team with that name that competed in the Bend Park & Recreation District softball league last year. That’s awesome! Did the band field a team? Is it a coincidence? The mystery continues … Kleverkill, with Ditch Digger; 9 p.m. Saturday; $3; Mountain’s Edge, 61303 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.myspace .com/kleverkill.

Songwriters group holds awards show Each year for more than a decade, the Central Oregon Songwriters Association has gathered to honor its own at its annual Song of the Year show. Think of it like the Grammy awards, only with talented local songwriters in place of Miley Swift and the Black Eyed Gagas, or whatever. Earlier this year, songwriters from across the region entered their tunes into the association’s contest, which has a variety of categories besides Song of the Year, including pop, folk, country, Americana and so on. Tonight, the group’s members (and others) will come together at the Tower Theatre to find out who won and to listen to members perform their songs. At the end of the night, the crowd will also choose someone to win the Audience Choice award.

Sale includes all items from our Retail store as well as select closeouts from the warehouse. Large selection left including fountains, solar lights, bird baths, rainchains, furniture, ceramic & fiberglass pottery and home décor.

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Moving to a new home?

Jade’s Jazz Lounge to open in La Pine Central Oregon jazz fans rejoice! Sheila O’Malley is back at it. Last summer, O’Malley — who is a jazz DJ on local and digital radio — staged the first Jade’s Jazz Festival in La Pine. (The dates for this year’s Jade’s Jazz fest have been set: Aug. 6-8.) This weekend, O’Malley will celebrate the grand opening of her new venue, Jade’s Jazz Lounge, in La Pine’s Aspen Alley across from Cinco de Mayo. Continued Page 6

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

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COSA moved its annual gala from McMenamins Old St. Francis School to the Tower last year to accommodate the growing number of folks who show up to celebrate not only songwriting, but also Central Oregon’s endless parade of songwriters. For more information, visit the group’s new website at www .oregonsongwriters.org. Central Oregon Songwriters Association Song of the Year show; 7 tonight; $10, children 12 and younger admitted free with purchase of adult ticket; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .oregonsongwriters.org.

AT HOME 541.419.2512

W W W. TA M M I E T O T H E R E S C U E . C O M

Every Tuesday


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

PAGE 5

m u s i c

Last Band Standing 38 (mostly) local bands are battling for the title of Last Band Standing each week at Boondocks Bar & Grill in Bend. April 29’s winner was selected after GO! went to press. Next week’s battle is Thursday at 8 p.m., and tickets cost $3 in advance at Bend’s Indoor Garden Station (541-385-5222) or $5 at the door. Visit www.clear1017.fm for more info. April 22 winner: Kleverkill. April 29 contestants: Absofreakinlutely, Boxcar String Band, Electric Moccasin Party, High Desert Hooligans, Rough String Band. May 6 contestants: Elliot, Jones Road, KouseFly, Shades Of Society, Tuck And Roll. — Ben Salmon

From Page 3 But translating the live show into an album was tricky. “It’s hard to capture some of that energy in the studio,” said Loewen. When it came time for the band to make a second album — the eponymous “Head for the Hills” — they wanted to do a better job capturing the excitement, intensity and interaction that comes with their live shows. So they opted to take a unique approach. The band members trucked up their equipment to a studio in the mountains outside of Boulder, Colo. They used a system with higher fidelity to give the album a bit more warmth of sound, according to Loewen. And the band committed to trying to record live as much of the album as possible. They avoided doing over-dubs. All the lead vocals and solos on the album were recorded live during the recording, versus recorded separately. While Loewen said this resulted in some compromises and required a bit more focus, ultimately the band members are happy with the sound and energy the method produced. The album also marked the first time the band worked with producer Drew Emmitt of Boulder jam band Leftover Salmon. “He’s an incredible musician and a really great singer,” said Loewen.

The band also found Emmitt was skilled at helping them get the live feeling they all wanted to achieve on the album. Loewen said Emmitt had the ability to “hone in on that energy and sound.” Head for the Hills formed after the four members met and started playing together in the fall of 2003, when they were students at Colorado State University. The band is neither a strictly traditional bluegrass band nor a jam band, per se. But it integrates those styles and more into their sound. Loewen said they aren’t interested in strictly pursuing any specific genre because their tastes and influences are all over the map. For instance, the band’s violinist and vocalist Joe Lessard also plays in a hip-hop group. “We all bring a really varied set of influences to the table,” said Loewen.

He said there is a certain amount of “playing to your audience,” depending on if they are playing at a traditional sitdown event or at a venue that would call for more improv. “We really try to showcase a little bit of the variety at every show.” Loewen believes people can get a snapshot of the variety the band plays by listening to the first two or three songs off of the album. The Saturday show marks the band’s fourth trip to Bend. “We’re kind of building a little thing in Bend,” said Loewen. The band plans to play mostly songs from the new album, as well as a few songs from its first record, “Robbers Roost” and maybe a few covers. Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

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PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

music From Page 4 O’Malley said she is going to try to host live music every weekend and some weekdays, all focused on jazz. Tonight, Ed Criss will kick things off at 6 p.m., and Saturday’s lineup features Robin and Jason Jackson at 7 p.m., followed by the Jazz Bros at 8 p.m. There will be no cover this weekend, though O’Malley will charge a cover in the future to help pay the bands. The lounge will also feature a DJ and dancing, and it’s a non-alcohol venue. Jade’s Jazz Lounge grand opening, with Ed Criss (7 tonight), Robin and Jason Jack-

son (7 p.m. Saturday) and Jazz Bros (8 p.m. Saturday); free; Jade’s Jaz z Lounge, 5 1 4 7 0 U.S. Highw a y 9 7 #5, La Pine; 5 4 1 8 7 6 -1 0 0 9 , jade@jadesjaz z .net or www.jadesjaz z .net.

Upcoming Concerts May 7 — Tony Smiley (rock), Bendistillery Martini Bar, Bend, 541-388-6868 or www. myspace.com/bendistillery. May 8 — Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons (rock), The Annex, Bend, www. randompresents.com.

Gear up for 6th Blues Amuse and Brews Good music, good food and a good cause. Good times, right? That’s what Blues Amuse and Brews is all about. Now in its sixth year, the event benefits Westside Village Magnet School in Bend. This year, the music is particularly sweet. Headlining will be Lakes, a band from California that plays sweet, sun-kissed pop music with hooks that soar. Hear them at www.myspace. com/lakes. Also on the bill: local power trio The Autonomics, the Westside Village Roots Band, and man-about-the-music-scene

May 13 — The Parental Advisory Tour (rock), Domino Room, Bend, www.myspace. com/actiondeniroproductions. May 14 — Peppino D’Agostino (acoustic guitar), Old Stone Church, Bend, www.bendticket.com.

Warm Gadget B en S almon / The Bulletin file photo

Mark Ransom. There will be food (by the Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room) and cocktails (by Plum) available for purchase, plus a silent auction. Proceeds benefit Friends of Westside Village Magnet School. There’s lots of info at www

.bluesamuseandbrews.com. Blues Amuse and Brews benefit with Lakes and more; 5 -1 1 p.m. Saturday ; $ 3 5 at the door; Boy s & Girls Club, 500 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www.blues amuseandbrews.com. — Ben Salmon

May 17 — Charlie Hunter Trio (guitar hero), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. May 17 — The Facemelter Tour (metal), Bend Event Center, Bend, 541-5508186 or www.myspace. com/dlproductionsllc. May 18 — Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars (African/ roots-reggae), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. May 25 — Tech N9ne (hip-hop), Midtown Ballroom, Bend, www.randompresents.com. May 25 — Horse Feathers (indie-folk), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. pdxchangeprogram.com. May 28 — Trainwreck (satire-rock), Mountain’s Edge, Bend, 541-388-8178. May 28 — Goo Goo Dolls (rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, 541-322-9383 or www.bendconcerts.com. May 30 — Band of Horses and She & Him (indie rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, 541-322-9383 or www.bendconcerts.com. June 3 — The Helio Sequence (indie-rock), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. pdxchangeprogram.com. June 5 — The Chicharones (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, 541-388-6868 or www. myspace.com/bendistillery. June 20 — Merle Haggard (country), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, 541-322-9383 or www. bendconcerts.com. June 29 — Steve Earle (altcountry), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.randompresents.com. June 30 — GBH (punk), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. July 8 — Pinback (indie-pop), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. July 16 — Steve Miller Band (rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, 541-322-9383 or www. bendconcerts.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

920 N.W. Bond St., #105, 541-385-0828 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-318-0200

DJ Barisone, 10 pm dj

Black Horse Saloon 20565 Brinson Blvd., 541-382-4270

The Blacksmith 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

SUNDAY

MONDAY

MUSIC TYPE: b c

Blues Country

dj f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

h j

Hip-hop Jazz

DJ Mud, 10 pm dj

Crossings Lounge 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm Emerald City, 9 pm r/p

The Decoy 1051 N.W. Bond St., 541-318-4833

Domino Room 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

Giuseppe’s 932 N.W. Bond St., 541-389-8899

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm Emerald City, 9 pm r/p Valorie Jones and David Finch, 7 pm j Head for the Hills, 9 pm, $10 a (P. 3)

Blues jam, 8 pm, sign-ups 7:30 pm

b

Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Pub 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., 541-815-8439

M&J Tavern 102 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-389-1410

Eric Tollefson & The World’s Greatest Lovers, 7 pm r/p

McMenamins Old St. Francis 700 N.W Bond St., 541-382-5174

62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

Parrilla Grill 635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600

Tentareign, Apparatus, 9 pm Hot Tea Cold, 9 pm r/p

r/p

Greg Botsford, 7 pm r/p

Kleverkill CD release, 9 pm, $3 m (P. 4) Hot Tea Cold, 9 pm r/p

Antique Scream, 8 pm r/p

25 S.W. Century Drive, 541-389-2558 2754 N.W. Crossing Dr., 541-385-1777

Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

Heleos, 9 pm, $2 r/p Sassparilla, 9 pm, $6 b

Babes, Bikinis, Brews, w/ Black Mercies, 9 pm

Strictly Organic Coffee Co. 6 S.W. Bond St., 541-383-1570

The Summit Saloon & Stage 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

Volcano Vineyards 126 N.W. Minnesota Ave., 541-617-1102

Karaoke with Big John, 8:30 pm

Ladies night, 10 pm dj

‘80s night, 10 pm dj

Casey Parnell, 7 pm r/p

portello winecafe

Reed Market Road and Paiute Way, 541-312-2800

Northside Jazz Coll., 2 pm; Jazz w/ Robert & Lisa, 5:30 pm j

Lads of Leisure, 7 pm w

Players Bar & Grill

Reed Pub

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

KC Flynn, 9 pm r/p Sagebrush Rock, 8 pm r/p Heleos, 9 pm r/p

JC’s

Northside Pub

THURSDAY

Powerman 5000, 8 pm, $15-18 m (P. 4)

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

61303 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend, 541-388-8178

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

Bittercreek, 7:30 pm a

Grover’s Pub

Mountain’s Edge Bar

r/p

Last Band Standing, 8 pm, $3-5

70 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-388-6999 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

p

Metal Punk

So Many Dynamos, 7 pm r/p

Boondocks Bar & Grill Bo Restobar

m

WEDNESDAY

Deco Moon Jazz, 8:30 pm j Mr. Wu, Vinnie The Squid, 10 pm dj AM Interstate, 9 pm r/p DJ Mud, 10 pm dj

28 Bendistillery Martini Bar

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

PAGE 7

DJ Knuckles, 9 pm dj Tim Coffey, 6 pm j

Roller Rumble Race Series, 7 pm John Allen and Dillon Schneider, 3-5 pm j

Open mic with Tall Adam, 8 pm

Underscore Orkestra, 8 pm, $5 r/p Open mic with Dan Chavers, 6-8 pm

DJ Knuckles, 9 pm dj

REDMOND Avery’s Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Billy Wilson, 6 pm r/p Hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm, $40

Hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm, $20

Hold’em tournament, 1 pm, $10

Tourney for World Series Hold ‘em tournament, of Poker seat, 4 pm, $60 6 pm, $5

SISTERS The JZ Band, 8 pm, $5 r/p

Three Creeks Brewing Co. 721 Desperado Court, 541-549-1963

SUNRIVER Owl’s Nest 1 Center Drive, 541-593-3730

The Reptutations, 9 pm r/p

The Reptutations, 9 pm r/p

Ed Criss, 7 pm j (P. 4)

Robin & Jason Jackson, 7 pm; Jazz Bros, 8 pm j (P. 4) Karaoke by Bo, 8:30 pm

LA PINE Jade’s Jazz Lounge 51470 U.S. Highway 97 #5, 541-876-1009

Wickiup Station Sports Pub 52600 U.S. Highway 97, 541-536-7577

Karaoke by Bo, 8:30 pm

Ron Laws and friends, 7 pm, $5 r/p


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

music releases

David Byrne/ Fatboy Slim HERE LIES LOVE Nonesuch Records It’s important to know that this whirlwind song cycle, starring the diverse likes of Steve Earle, Nellie McKay and Santigold, started life as a musical theater piece. That’s how David Byrne conceived of this schmaltzy disco splash dedicated to enigmatic Philippine first lady Imelda Marcos’ wild life and love of shoes, the woman who raised her, her despot husband, and ’70s night-

life. Knowing such gives you an indication why its melodies and arrangements are so hammy. Byrne and co-composer Fatboy Slim left the evil politics of martial law implied and took Lady Marcos’ sappy words, fashioned them into garish show-tune lyrics and got 20-plus vocalists to tell her tale. There are sprightly grooves and curious tales of courtship (“Eleven Days,” sung by Cyndi Lauper) and Manhattan society (“Dancing Together,” with Sharon Jones) that allow its vocalists dramatic breadth even when the music is fluffy. There are wrenching and darkly comic songs featuring Natalie Merchant (as Marcos’ cast-aside caretaker) and the B-52s’ Kate Pierson. With Byrne’s patented tropical lilt and Fatboy’s beats added to the music’s snazzy patina, the whole affair comes across as equal parts Latin telenovela and “Evita.” — A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Dr. Dog SHAME, SHAME ANTI- Records Dr. Dog, the Philadelphia indierock band that released its first album in 2001, is already feeling its age. “Where’d All the Time Go?” asks one song title (and opening line), and it’s a recurring notion throughout “Shame Shame,” the band’s new album. “I do believe that there’s no more tricks up my sleeve/ The good old days are past,” Scott McMicken sings in “Stranger,” the album’s first song. Perhaps Dr. Dog is identifying a little too closely with its now grizzled main sources, the three B’s of 1960s rock: the Beatles, the Beach Boys and the Band. From them, it variously draws chord changes, exuberant vocal harmonies, rootsy Americana and familiar instrumental sounds. Or perhaps Dr. Dog is taking stock as it moves from the home recordings of its previous albums to a professional studio and an outside producer, Rob Schnapf (who has worked with Beck and Elliott Smith). But in the new songs, melancholy thoughts about time, decline and limitations are neatly refuted by music that’s full of life. The years of home recording have given Dr. Dog the assurance to leave things unpolished. The structures are elaborate, with vocal chorales and counter-

point blossoming while instrumental timbres transmute from acoustic realism to a psychedelic shimmer and back. Yet Dr. Dog gives its songs a casual, homely surface; it has perfected the imperfections that make indie-rock approachable. Dr. Dog treats its ’60s touchstones anything but slavishly. McMicken seems more like Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy than like any of the ’60s bands. As the music tumbles into place and then lurches into motion, songs like “Unbearable Why” and “I Only Wear Blue” move from confessions of uncertainty and failure to choruses that rebound into affirmations. “We’re all in it together now/ ’Cause we all fall apart,” the band and friends sing in “Jackie Wants a Black Eye.” That could be Dr. Dog’s mission statement. — Jon Pareles, The New York Times

Jakob Dylan WOMEN AND COUNTRY Columbia Records The son of a legend, Jakob Dylan would seemingly have all the cred one could need. But after five albums with the modern rock outfit the Wallflowers, each with a declining chart impact, and one rather quiet solo acoustic effort with 2008’s “Seeing Things,” a creative and career revitalization is in order. Teaming with alt-country scorchers Neko Case and Kelly Hogan certainly can’t hurt the effort. Add a former collaborator and veteran producer in T Bone Burnett, and the resulting “Women and Country” is as rootsy and elegant as all the aforementioned resumes would foretell. It’s a comfortable fit for

the hushed-voiced artist. “Truth for a Truth” accentuates Dylan’s sense of melody with steel guitar shading, a Wild West strut and seductive barking harmonies, while the three vocalists are up to something far more haunting on “Down on Our Own Shield.” Yet one can’t shake the feeling that the real star here is Burnett. Pairing Dylan with a number of musicians who helped shape the Burnett-produced Robert PlantAlison Krauss collaboration “Raising Sand,” the 11 tracks of “Women and Country” are similarly dressed with low-key Americana atmospherics. The results, however, are mixed. “They’ve Trapped Us Boys” has a saloon feel and out-of-nowhere backing vocals, yet “Lend a Hand,” despite a horn section that could be backing Cab Cal-

Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings I LEARNED THE HARD WAY Daptone Records The retro-soul queen Sharon Jones comes by her authority naturally, but that doesn’t mean she hasn’t worked for it. As the voice of Daptone Records, Brooklyn’s own funk factory, she has devoted countless hours and an even greater share of kinetic energy to an evangelical task: the practice of a gritty, time-warped strain of R&B. “I Learned the Hard Way” is her fourth album with the DapKings, and to say that it does nothing differently from its predecessors is essentially, among Daptone believers, high praise. The title doubles as a testimonial by Jones and her band. As is generally the case with a Daptone release, the album’s producer is Bosco Mann, the label founder

Jónsi GO XL Recordings As Jónsi’s “Go” finds its start in the track “Go Do,” it’s easy to be surprised at the bounce, the joy of the Sigur Rós frontman’s solo work. Iceland’s Sigur Rós is responsible for some of the most stunning atmospheric music of the past decade. But Sigur Rós was never bouncy like “Go Do” or dancey like “Around Us.” What’s most rewarding about “Go” is its bold statement

loway, is more forced than lively, and all the textures in the country rule book can’t rescue “Yonder Come the Blues” from lullaby status. Worse, Case and Hogan are relegated largely to backing duty, as if to provide a sense of mystery that wasn’t there from the start. — Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times

Here and there June 22 — McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; 866-866-4502 or www.ticketmaster.com.

and Dap-Kings bassist, who also goes by his real name, Gabriel Roth. Recorded on an eight-track tape machine, the music gives off a musk of enlightened toil. Jones learned the hard way, it would seem, because she and the band do everything the hard way. They did, however, have a breakthrough hit in 2007 with “100 Days, 100 Nights,” an album of tight exuberance and

proud conviction. (It arrived on the heels of the first American release by Amy Winehouse, largely recorded in the Daptone studio with many of the same musicians.) The new album sustains more of a plaintive air, with songs about eroded trust, exasperated patience and wounded indignation. Jones conveys emotions as blunt facts, through the sheer physical force of her singing, and it’s easier to believe her fury than her vulnerability. — Nate Chinen, The New York Times

that, yes, Jónsi needed to step out from the gorgeous, multilayered chamber pop group to create a record that was every bit as complex — but filled with fun instead of pretension. It’s no slam against Sigur Rós. This record complements the band’s work nicely, though, as the liner notes admit, these songs don’t fit into the context of that group. That said, “Go” is a sonic indulgence that is a close, upbeatand-jaunty cousin to Sigur Rós’ music — perfect for those days

when “Ágaeis Byrjun” is just too dark. — Ricardo Baca, The Denver Post


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

PAGE 9

music releases Peter Wolf

Slash

MIDNIGHT SOUVENIRS Verve Records With “Overnight Lows,” Peter Wolf offers up a perfectly realized homage to Philly soul. It’s a lush bedroom ballad with the strings, the falsetto, the background vocals — and a comical recitation by Wolf that recalls his days as a jive-talking DJ and the front man for the J. Geils Band. Like “Overnight Lows,” much of “Midnight Souvenirs” has a late-night feel, though it’s rarely as lighthearted. The album, his first in eight years, continues the often intimate, soul-baring style the 64-year-old Wolf has developed over his solo career, and one that remains richly rewarding. If many of the songs sound downbeat on the surface — from “Tragedy” (with Shelby Lynne) to “The Green Fields of Summer” (with Neko Case) and especially the closer, “It’s Too Late for Me” (with Merle Hag-

SLASH EMI Records On Slash’s first solo album the most faithful approximation of the classic Guns N’ Roses sound doesn’t come in the track featuring Ozzy Osbourne or the one with Avenged Sevenfold frontman M. Shadows. Nor is it in “Watch This,” which includes input from another ex-GNR member, Duff McKagan. Rather, it’s “Beautiful Dangerous” that comes closest to old hits like “Welcome to the Jungle” and “You Could Be Mine.” The guest vocalist on that cut? Fergie of the Black Eyed Peas. Slash’s recruitment of such a heavy-metal outlier illustrates

Sam Amidon I SEE THE SIGN Bedroom Community Sam Amidon’s singing doesn’t beat a straight path to you. It’s got some feeling, but it also seems weedy on purpose, second-guessed and underplayed. You might be unsure where he’s coming from. He’s a young folk singer — whatever that means these days, right? In this case, here’s exactly what it means: Amidon was born in 1981 and raised in Vermont by parents who are groupsinging leaders and storytellers. Rare for someone his age, he knows where a lot of old folk songs come from, what they can accomplish and how they might be revised. But he must also know how earnest they can seem, so the raw core of his voice remains hidden among the tangle of musical languages on his new record, “I See the Sign.” This is an album whose repertory tells one story and its arrangements

gard) — the album ultimately does not. That’s because of the way classic R&B, country, and rock-and-roll still fire Wolf’s passion, and inform his music. “I don’t know where I’m going, but I know I’m going to see it through,” he declares on “There’s Still Time.” And, amid the heavy sense of mortality, he’s still setting goals, in this case courtesy of Allen Toussaint: “Everything I Do (Gonna Be Funky).” — Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer

another. It includes a children’s singing game (“Way Go Lily”), a Georgia Sea Island song (“You Better Mind”) and the traditional Appalachian “Rain and Snow,” the rendering of whose title suggests that Amidon favors the version recorded by the banjoist Obray Ramsey in 1963 over one called “Cold Rain and Snow” and recorded by the Grateful Dead in 1967. And, also, um, “Relief,” by the R&B singer R. Kelly. Playing guitar or banjo as he sings, he transforms all of them, changing their colors and loading them with trapdoors. He slows them down and rewrites their harmonies, making curious, arty, quiet pop in his own mood — ornery, sensitive, distant. “I See the Sign” is a seriously intelligent record, but never cute or overbearing; its Icelandic producer, Valgeir Sigurdsson, has left it dry and full of space, so that you hear the seams. The songs pass through clouds of animated, rigorous arrangements of strings, woodwind and brass, written by the composer Nico Muhly; Beth Orton, strong-voiced and rawtoned, sings backing harmony; the drummer Shahzad Ismaily plays drums thoughtfully and sparingly, improvising just a little bit. It’s theoretical and handsome music, and it makes good sense of its curious point of view. — Ben Ratliff, The New York Times

Matt Pond PA THE DARK LEAVES Altitude Records Throughout a fruitful songwriting career, Philly expat Matt Pond has often expressed his melancholy in the form of quivering, universal beauty. Now based in Brooklyn, N.Y., and fronting the latest version of his titular band on this eighth album, he’s no less fixated on changing seasons and other wonders of the natural world. (See “Winter Fawn” and “Brooklyn Fawn.”) Just as rewarding as Pond’s scratchy voice and thematically

his determination to find a replacement for Axl Rose, whose paranoid whinny so perfectly complemented the guitarist’s arsenal of trashy glam-blues riffs. You can look at the 14 allstar collaborations on “Slash” as evidence of his impressive Rolodex, or you can view them

Here and there June 13 — Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; 800-992-8499 or www.ticketswest.com.

consistent lyrics is the girlgroup fullness of the instrumentation. Steel guitar, finger snaps, strings, keyboards, and more coalesce in a honeyed syrup. An electric guitar even climbs its way to a skyscraping, rock-star flourish on “Running Wild.” That tune and the Springsteen-ish “Remains”

demonstrate a scrappier, more lighthearted Pond. He sounds hopeful, almost. —Doug Wallen, The Philadelphi Inquirer

and New Orleans street singer Gertrude Morgan. Now, King Britt claims he’s going to focus on more experimental work and that “The In-

tricate Beauty” will be his last “conventional dance album.” If so, he’s left us with a good one. Unified by the metronomic thump of house music, the album takes a seamless, hourlong journey. The first four tracks feature female vocalists, including the sultry Astrid Suryanto on the seductive “Now.” From there, the album moves through African chants, disco-funk anthems and chilled-out electronics. “Intricate Beauty” peaks early, but it lives up to its title. — Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

King Britt THE INTRICATE BEAUTY Nervous Records It’s no surprise that “The Intricate Beauty,” although all originals, plays like an expert DJ set: It’s the work of Philadelphia’s King Britt, who has been spinning, mixing and producing under various guises since the early ’90s. He’s DJ’ed with Digable Planets, masterminded the Sylk 130 collective, produced and/or remixed countless singles, and done albums paying tribute to ’70s funk, ’80s new wave and old-school rap,

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

as a series of creative tryouts — musical speed dating in search of a new Mr. (or Ms.) Right. Team-ups with Ian Astbury (“Ghost”), Chris Cornell (“Promise”) and Wolfmother’s Andrew Stockdale (“By the Sword”) produce familiar sparks but die out quickly. And a ballad with Adam Levine of Maroon 5, “Gotten,” aims for “November Rain” but ends up pretty soggy. Slash seems more energized in “Doctor Alibi,” a brainless fist-pumper with Motorhead maestro Lemmy Kilmeister, and “We’re All Gonna Die,” in which Iggy Pop up offers some of the cheerful nihilism that originally inspired Rose. — Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times

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PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

restaurants

R yan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Roy Slicker, owner of Slick’s Que Co. in Sisters, checks the meat in the barbecue pit in front of his restaurant.

Barbecue heaven Slick’s Que Co. in Sisters slow-cooks its meats, pit-style By Joh n Gottberg Anderson For T h e Bulletin

W

ant to know all about barbecue? Ask Roy Slicker. He’s the high-energy owner of Slick’s Que Co. in Sisters and one of the top authorities on barbecue this side of Kansas City. Slicker, who serves on the board of directors of the National Barbecue Association, opened his barbecue joint last year on May 20, after five years of

running a small catering business called The Left Handed Chef. He achieved professional success so rapidly that after just nine months, in mid-February of this year, he was delivering one of the opening speeches to the association’s national convention in Memphis. A year earlier, when Slicker visited the 2009 convention in Austin, Texas, “I did not want to open a restaurant,” he said. “I was happy with my catering company. I had no plans for a restaurant, no name, no location, no suppliers, only a lot of resistance to the whole damn idea.” But encouraged by barbecue-business veterans, whom he calls “the masters,” he returned from Texas to his Sisters home ready to launch a new business. “I attended a lot of seminars and heard some amazing stories,” he said. “I got lots of advice from everyone I met.” Continued next page

Slick’s Que Co. Location: 240 E. Cascade Ave. (U.S. Highway 20), Sisters Hours: 11 a.m. “until we’re out” Wednesday to Sunday (usually about 6 p.m. Wednesday, around 7:30 p.m. other days). To open Mondays beginning May 31. Price range: $7.50 to $21 Credit cards: MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Yes Vegetarian menu: Cole slaw, potato salad Alcoholic beverages: Wine and beer Outdoor seating: Yes

Reservations: No Contact: 541-719-0580 or www.slicksque.com

Scorecard OVERALL: AFood: A-. Tender, delicious barbecue meats are slow-cooked in a pit smoker. Service: A-. Although diners order at the counter, owner Roy Slicker’s enthusiasm is infectious. Atmosphere: B+. Casual and friendly, with photos on the walls and a mannequin in the corner. Value: B+. Sandwich prices begin at $7.50; meats are moderately priced.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

PAGE 11

restaurants From previous page Slicker signed a lease on his Sisters restaurant — a former convenience store next to a gas station on the town’s main street — on April 17. He converted it to a barbecue joint in a single month and opened the doors before Memorial Day weekend in 2009.

Next week: Cork Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

Pit essentials Slick’s Que Co. is unlike other barbecue restaurants in Central Oregon, according to Slicker, because everything is prepared on a pit barbecue. “In a pit-style restaurant,” he said, “food that comes out of the smoker today is served today. When you run out, you close. If we have leftovers, we donate it to local charities.” There are three essential elements to good barbecue, Slicker said. First is the quality of meat. “We buy only choice pork butts, Angus beef brisket and turkey breast,” Slicker insisted. “And our sausage is the best in the country, Meyer’s Elgin Sausage from Texas.” Next is the style of cooking: very slowly at a low temperature. “I cook between 200 and 210 degrees,” Slicker said. “I’ll leave it in the pit for 16 to 18 hours.” Finally, there’s the choice of fuel, producing heat and flavor. “I’m using apple wood that I handselect in Yakima,” Slicker said. “I look for moisture in the wood and sweetness in the bark.” He combines the apple with buttery pecan wood shipped from Louisiana.

Tender ribs Slick’s ribs are served after 4 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays only. There are two cuts offered: baby back ribs, which come from the top of a hog’s rib cage, or St. Louis-style spare ribs, taken from the belly side of the rib cage. The difference is important to Slicker. “If I have a cloud cover and I’m going to be making a lot of ribs, I’ll do baby backs … because the humidity is higher and I don’t have to worry about them drying out. But if it’s cold and dry, I’ll pick the St. Louis ribs.” Spare ribs, he explained, are fattier and retain moisture. I timed one of my visits to Slick’s for a weekend ribs feast and was treated to the St. Louisstyle dish. The ribs were tender and delicious. But the meat was not smothered in sauce, nor did it fall off the bone. Slicker wouldn’t have wanted it to do so. “In the barbecue connoisseur world, meat is not supposed to fall off the bone,” he said. “In competitions, you are disqualified if it does so. That means its been reheated or overcooked.”

Sauces, marinades and dry rubs, said Slicker, are matters of personal preference. While he makes his own barbecue sauce — he is marketing it independently with the slogan, “It’s like a rodeo in your mouth” — he believes in leaving it to the individual diner to add as much or as little as he or she wants.

Sampler plates The rest of the menu is available whenever Slick’s is open for business. My family and I tried a bit of everything on two sampler plates, each of which offers a combination of four meats and three side dishes. All of us loved the pulled pork, the beef brisket and the spicy sausage. We were split on the smoked turkey; two people found it overly dry, but I thought it was very good. I wasn’t as fond of the burnt ends, and we agreed they lacked the tenderness of the other meats; the ends were cut from smoked brisket and bathed in barbecue sauce. Among the side dishes, the baked beans were simply mouthwatering with their sweet touch of molasses. The smoky potato salad was better than the cole slaw, which was little more than peppery cabbage with vinegar and sugar. The potatoes gratin were, frankly, forgettable. But the bread pudding was superb, heated and served with pecan praline ice cream.

Family friendly Slick’s is a casual, family-friendly restaurant. Patrons order in a cafeteria-style line and have meals delivered on paper plates to their seats at shellacked picnic tables. They can order fountain drinks, beer or wine from a separate bar. While they wait for their food, they can study dozens of photographs that line the walls, many of them of Roy Slicker himself talking with the “masters” of barbecue-style cooking. And then there’s Charlie. He’s a mannequin that Slicker found on Craigslist and bought for $50. “He was naked when I picked him up,” Slicker said. “He had a mustache. That was it.” That was less than a year ago. Since that time, Charlie has trav-

eled more than 26,000 miles around North America with his foster father, visiting barbecue joints, competitions and meetings. He now sits more-or-less permanently in a corner of the restaurant. Patrons like to have their photos taken with Charlie, Slicker said. And just a year ago, they didn’t know who he was.

Mother’s Day Serving Brunch & Dinner

John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com

SMALL BITES Spice Box, a small Indian cafe, has announced that it will open Saturday in the former location of Hurricane’s dessert deli in Century Village on Bend’s west side. Mrinal Patel, whose parents came from the west Indian state of Gujarat, will serve dishes based on her mother’s family recipes, including the lentil stew known as dhal. The menu will feature vegetarian, vegan and meat dishes. Open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. with prices in the $6 to $8 range. 133 S.W. Century Drive, Suite 204; 541-419-2542. El Super Burrito opened its third Central Oregon restaurant earlier this month on Bend’s east side. Located in the former A&W Drive-In, the budget eatery serves its popular burrito specialties, as well as tacos and other traditional Mexican food. It also has a drivethrough window and is licensed to serve margaritas and other adult beverages. Other stores are in downtown Bend and in Redmond. Open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 2100 East U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-388-5667.

Featuring our special chocolate soufflé. (Dinner 3-9)

Enjoy our Marimba band in the lounge all afternoon with specials all day. Reservations - always accepted!

Reservations: 541-317-0727 Brunch 9am - 3pm or Dinner 3pm - 9pm

Visit us at www.thephoenix.biz Off East Hwy 20 just after 27th St.

East fuse West

RECENT REVIEWS Lola’s (B): Excellent soups, salads and sandwiches highlight the lunch hours at this casual cafe on the breezeway between Brooks and Wall streets in downtown Bend. A recently added breakfast menu needs work. Breakfast at 8 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, lunch at 11 a.m. every day; open until mid-afternoon Sunday to Wednesday, until twilight Thursday to Saturday. 852 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-508-4533. 5 Fusion & Sushi Bar (B): Inconsistency marks the dining experience at this Asian restaurant, which couples a fusion menu with a sushi bar in downtown Bend. Order the wonderful oolong teaglazed sea bass but avoid the numerous fried dishes. Open 4 p.m. to close every day. Lunch will be served beginning in May. 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3232328, www.bend5spice.com.

Enjoy a delicious assortment of Brunch and Dinner entrees on this Mother’s Day, May 9th. Each mom will receive a single rose upon arrival.

Open for Lunch Starting May 3rd Mother’s Day Special Served All Day


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

f in e a r ts

art therapy Inspired by her mother, Bend artist pursues a new career in painting By Eleanor Pierce T h e B ulletin

I

n 2005, Nancie Zivetz-Gertler’s mother, Anita Zivetz, was diagnosed with lung cancer. In the nine months between the diagnosis and her mother’s death, Zivetz-Gertler spent a lot of time with her mother at her home in California. Although she’d never been much into drawing, she began sketching objects in her mother’s house and showing her the drawings. “She had these little bird figurines that I knew she loved, so I sketched them,” Zivetz-Gertler said. Her mother, sometimes in a fog of pain,

would brighten when she saw the sketches. In her younger days, Zivetz herself had enjoyed art, painting and creating sculptures. After her mother died, Zivetz-Gertler and her siblings went through her mother’s home. “I just gathered up all her art supplies. My brother and sister were taking all the practical things, and I took sketch pads and some watercolors. I filled those journals, then I just kept going from there.” When friends began asking for prints of the resulting paintings, Zivetz-Gertler realized she needed to sign them. Though she’d given up her

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Nancie ZivetzGertler, in her home studio, will have a show at Thump Coffee through May.

maiden name when she married, and had gone by Nancie Gertler for decades, she reclaimed her maiden name in her art, signing “Nancie Zivetz-Gertler.” A show of Zivetz-Gertler’s work will be on display at Thump Coffee in May, just in time for Mother’s Day (see “If you go”). The images in the paintings come from dreams and meditation. She often paints women with swirling ribbons of color for hair, sometimes the ribbons are cut from other unfinished paintings. The moon also figures prominently in her work. “The moon for me is a symbol of the sacred feminine,” she said. “I feel like, in terms of my mom passing on, the challenge of being an artist to me, it’s like I’m meant to take it somewhere she couldn’t.” Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

PAGE 13

fine arts Youth art show coming to Redmond

Submitted photo

“Metamorphosis” by Nancie Zivetz-Gertler

Glass Symphony closing today

If you go What: “Winged Women and Moonmaids,” paintings by Nancie Zivetz-Gertler at Thump Coffee When: Saturday through May 31; 6 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. MondaysFridays, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturdays, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sundays Where: 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend Cost: Free to browse Contact: 541-388-0226

derful because of who was going to see it.” She’s back at work now and said that her work does inspire her painting in a way. “I think that my work as a therapist is all about healing and holding space for people as they do the work they need to do to heal,” she said. “My artwork is more self-expression, but they influence each other.” Her work as a therapist “grows my compassion and my understanding. My humility,” she said. “I don’t know exactly how it influences the work that I do, but it does.”

AL OREG TR

H

O

LLE

T

ON

CEN

Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@ bendbulletin.com.

SC

From previous page Her mother was a stay-at-home mom and was too focused on family to pursue her art, ZivetzGertler explained. Her role was caretaker. “My daughter was born into a world that looks different than the one I was born into — thank God,” she said. The pieces Zivetz-Gertler sells will not be originals but archivalquality giclee prints of her original watercolor, pen and collage works on paper. “I’m not ready to part with the originals,” she said. When she first started painting, she didn’t have a dedicated space to work in. “Close friends of mine saw what I was doing before I had this studio,” she said recently from the room that has since been added on to her Bend home. Several asked for copies of the paintings for their own homes, so she found someone to take photographs of the pieces so that she could make reproductions of the originals. It was the photographer she hired who suggested she try showing the work. “It honestly hadn’t occurred to me,” she said. She had her first Gallery Walk show at the now-closed downtown Bend shoe store King of Sole. Zivetz-Gertler, 56, is a psychotherapist with a private practice. When she went on medical leave while undergoing treatment for breast cancer, her painting habit intensified. “I painted every day,” she said of the leave of absence. “It was incredibly healing for me. It just kind of opened up all this energy for artwork.” When a friend suggested she look into getting the work into a show that’s part of a rotating gallery in the cancer treatment center at St. Charles Bend, she jumped at the opportunity. “So I did, which felt really won-

O L O F BA

A spring showcase of youth-produced art and music will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. today in downtown Redmond. Visual, written and performance art by Redmond School District students will be featured at the free event, held in about a dozen businesses on Sixth Street, including Paulina Springs Books, Goody’s and Blue Dot Studio. Look for signs outside of downtown retailers for the Walk the Art Beat Youth Show. Contact: 541-923-5191.

CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL of BALLET

Directors: Zygmunt Sawiel Sarah Chase Sawiel

Home of the “Nutcracker Ballet”

541-389-9306

1155 SW Division Bend 97702 www.centraloregonschoolofballet.com

The downtown Bend glass art gallery, Glass Symphony, will close its doors for good at 6 p.m. today. The liquidation sale at the store (916 N.W. Wall St.) will continue until the end of business today, and “no reasonable offer will be refused,” according to a press release.

Kate MacLeod, co-owner of Glass Symphony, will continue to make her glass skis and snowboards as well as doing architectural glasswork for residential and commercial customers. Contact: 541-388-0331.

a nonprofit that supports other organizations that serve children and families, partly by providing rent-free spaces to the groups. Contact: 541-388-3101 or www .deschuteschildrensfoundation .org.

Art & Wine Auction only a week away

Summit senior nabs national art award

Tickets are on sale now for the 18th annual Art & Wine Auction, which will kick off at 5:30 p.m. May 7 at The Riverhouse Convention Center (2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend). The evening will feature wine tasting, a three-course dinner and live music by Todd Haaby and Sola Via. The auction will feature art and wine as well as prizes such as vacation giveaways. Tickets are $99. The event is a fundraiser for the Deschutes Children’s Foundation,

Carter Pierce, a senior at Bend’s Summit High School, won the American Visions medal in the mixed media category of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards for his piece “Watering Hole.” The awards are part of an 87year-old national competition that identifies and develops creative teens. Pierce and his art teacher, Meaghan Houska, will travel to Carnegie Hall in New York to receive the award in June. — Eleanor Pierce

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

fine arts ART EXHIBITS ALTERA REAL ESTATE: Featuring “Breaking Myths,” works by Shannon Carroll and Meaghan Houska; through today; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-633-7590. AMBIANCE ART GALLERY AT EVERGREEN STUDIOS: Featuring original works by local artists and craftsmen; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. AZURA STUDIO: Featuring glass design by Thaddeus Petterson and works by SageBrushers Art Society; through May; 856 N.W. Bond St., Unit 3, Bend; 541-385-1846. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Keeping it Cool,” works in all media types; through Aug. 2; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. BICA GALLERY: The Bend Independent Contemporary Art Gallery features “Oils, Acrylics and Metals,” works by Donald Yatomi, Randy Smithey, Holly Rodes-Smithey and Valerie Winterholler; through today; wine events offered every Saturday from 3-5 p.m.; 2748 N.W. Crossing Drive, Suite 130, Bend; 541788-4623 or www.bicagallery.com. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. CORK CELLARS WINE BAR & BOTTLE SHOP: Featuring giclée prints of the Italian Langa wine region by Hilloah Rohr; through Aug. 1, reception from 4-7 tonight; 101 Elm St.,

Suite A, Sisters; 541-549-2675. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. EASTLAKE FRAMING: Featuring photography by Buddy Mays; through today; 1335 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-389-3770. THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring “Subjective,” portraits by Becca Bernstein and Gwenn Seemel; through today; new exhibit, featuring the COCC 2010 Student Art Invitational Exhibit, opens Tuesday; reception from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday; Pinckney Center for the Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 411 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498751 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT GALLERY & CUSTOM FRAMING OF BEND: Featuring “A View From the Top,” works by Grace Bishko; exhibit opens Thursday; through May 30, reception from 5-8 p.m. Thursday; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964. HIGH DESERT GALLERY & CUSTOM FRAMING OF SISTERS: Featuring landscape paintings by Sue Favinger Smith; through today; new exhibit featuring works by Sue Smith opens Saturday; 281 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertgallery.com. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “Stones from the Sky,” aerial photographic prints of landscapes from Michael Collier; through

Submitted photo

A photo of Mount St. Helens, part of the “Stones from the Sky” exhibit by Michael Collier, on display through June 27 at the High Desert Museum. June 27; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. JOHN PAUL DESIGNS: Featuring sculpture by Ben Hull; through May; 1006 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-318-5645. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Merging Arts: 2-D meets 3-D” and Karen Bandy’s customdesigned jewelry and abstract acrylic paintings; through today; new exhibit, “Timeless Messages: Jewelry and Paintings,” opens Tuesday; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307,

Old Mill District, Bend; 541-3884404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Bold Strokes,” works by Ken Roth, Eric Jacobsen and Troy Collins; through today; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. POETHOUSE ART: Featuring resident artists; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring art by Redmond High School students; through today; new exhibit, featuring fabric art by Cindy Summerfield and Kathie Olson, opens Saturday; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring “Beneath the Surface II,” works

by the members of Alt; through May 7; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring “Prime Time Friday Artists” by members of the art society; through May; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring works by Nancy Kakuska-Haas; through Saturday; new exhibit, featuring pastels by the Dusty Dames, opens Saturday; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “Cambodia Revisited … From Pulitzer to Present,” photography by Pulitzer winner Jay Mather; through May; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY: Featuring “Celebrate Spring,” works by the High Desert Art League; through today; 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-318-8803. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring photographs by Richard Frederick and mosaic sculpture by Donna Lutzky; through today; new exhibit, “Inspirations in Paint and Clay,” featuring works by Pam Jersey Bird and Nancy Dasen, opens Saturday; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring acrylic paintings by Ellen Dittebrandt, watercolor and oil paintings by Mike Smith and photography by Larry N. Olson; through today; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TAKARA HOME AND GARDEN: Featuring photography by Sandra Steele Kunz; through today; 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1144. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December ; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www. wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring “Winged Women and Moonmaids,” prints from mixed media by Nancie Zivetz-Gertler; through May, exhibit opens Saturday; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring pastels by Marty Stewart and oil paintings by Vicki Shuck; through today; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Ray Benson Sno-park Portland Salem Area of detail Bend Eugene

Santiam Pass 20

O R E G O N

126

To Sisters, Bend

Santiam Sno-park Hogg Rock

To Salem, Eugene

Hoodoo Ski Area

20

126

Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail

Phil’s Trail

Ray Benson Sno-park

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

A

s winter gives up its grip on Central Or-

egon, the high-elevation David Jasper / The Bulletin

Mark Van Hilten moved to Bend four years ago from Portland. He rides Phil’s Trail daily. “Work a little bit, ride a little bit,” he said.

Ray

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DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST 46

better known in some circles roundabout art installation at Galveston Avenue and 14th Street in Bend. — Bulletin staff

into spring.

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near the Santiam Pass

What: Ray Benson Sno-park Getting there: From Sisters, take U.S. Highway 20 west to Santiam Pass, take the turnoff for Hoodoo Ski Area on the left side of the highway, and follow the signs for the sno-park Difficulty: Moderate Cost: Sno-park permit required through April 30 Contact: Willamette National Forest, 541-225-6300

— Bulletin staff

Helicopter pad

the dust kicks up.

of “Phoenix Rising,” perhaps

Sno-park

rience snowy trails well

Trailhead

mountain bike trails are in fine

Benson

If you go

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

If you go What: Phil’s Trail Getting there: Head west on Skyliners Road about 2.5 miles and follow bike signs to paved road. Proceed half a mile down this road to trailhead parking area. Difficulty: Easy to moderate, with plenty more challenging terrain for those seeking it Cost: No trail fee required Contact: 541-383-5300

ENJOY PLAYING EZ MUSIC YOU LOVE! Call today for your 4 week class for

ONLY $19 95!

ls from

New Spring Arriva

For Adults 50 and over. Includes music & Lowrey Organ rental delivered to your home!

Moore Music & Sons,llc Since 1971

541-383-TUNE (8863) 1531 NE Third St., Bend www.mooremusicandsonsllc.com

5 NW Minnesota Ave. | Bend At the Firehall Mon-Sat 10-6 | 541-647-2355


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL THE 30,BULLETIN 2010 • FR

this w CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW

‘THE MET

SATU

TODAY THROUGH SUNDAY

COYOTES!

TODAY

What: Featuring coyote tales from Jim Anderson, live music, poetry and refreshments. A coyote is pictured in Redmond. When: 7-9 p.m. Where: Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road Cost: $20 in advance, $25 at the door Contact: 541-593-4394

TODAY CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: The 18th annual event features more than 300 exhibits, landscaping and gardening displays and more; $7 adults, free ages 16 and younger; noon-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-389-1058 or www.centraloregonshow.com. WALK THE ART BEAT YOUTH SHOW: A spring showcase of local youth art and music at participating businesses; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. (Story, Page 13) BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY SPRING SEMINAR: Gary Zimmerman, president of the Fiske Genealogical Foundation of Seattle, will present “History and Genealogical Records of the British Isles”; $55 or $50 for members; 4:30 p.m. registration and hors d’oeuvres, 5:30 p.m. lecture; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541317-8978 or 541-317-9553. BLACK & WHITE FAT CAT GALA DINNER: A live and silent auction, with dinner and drinks; reservations requested; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $60, tables available; 6 p.m., dinner begins at 7 p.m.; Chloe at North Redmond Station, 1857 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-0882. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Doris Pullis talks about her book “How It Looks Going Back”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Eileen Garvin talks about her book “How to be a Sister: A Love Story with a Twist of Autism”; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. “MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS”: The Bend

High School drama department presents a musical about the American family, based on the 1942 film starring Judy Garland; cast includes students and faculty members; $5-$15; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. COSA SONG OF THE YEAR SHOW: The Central Oregon Songwriters Association presents its 12th annual awards show, with live performances and a silent auction; $10, free ages 12 and younger with a paid adult; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 4) COYOTES!: Featuring coyote tales from Jim Anderson, live music, poetry and refreshments; $20 in advance, $25 at the door; 7-9 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. SASSPARILLA: The Portlandbased blues-punk band performs; $6; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. DJ BARISONE: The Portlandbased DJ performs; free; 10 p.m.; Bendistillery Martini Bar, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or www.myspace.com/bendistillery.

SATURDAY May 1 COMMUNITY GARDEN PLANTING: Plant trees and food plants in the garden adjoining the church; bring a shovel, rake and gloves; a portion of the food grown will benefit a food bank; 8 a.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 562-221-6519. VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes, sausage, ham, eggs

What: The 18th annual event features more than 300 exhibits, landscaping and gardening displays and more. Patrons browse the booths at last year’s show. When: Noon-6 p.m. today, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 7. and coffee; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY SPRING SEMINAR: 8:30 a.m. registration and breakfast, 9 a.m. lecture at North Redmond Station Conference Center, 1857 N.W. Sixth St.; see Today’s listing for details. GRADUATION GARAGE SALE: A sale of furniture, appliances, clothing, books and more; proceeds benefit the 2010 graduation party for Bend High School; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Bend Factory Stores, 61334 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-2805502 or pamela@secondtrunks.com. SOLAIRE SALMON RUN: The 18th annual 5K and 10K run/walk, and kids 1K fun run; registration required; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $24 for 5K or 10K for adults, $14 ages 13 and younger; $5 fun run; prices increase by $5 after April 23; 9 a.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-480-8555 or www.solairesalmonrun.com. STEEL STAMPEDE: Crooked River RanchTerrebonne Chamber of Commerce presents a vintage motorcycle rally for riders and spectators; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch community; $10; 7:30 a.m. registration, 9:15 a.m. start; field across from Trading Post, Southwest Chinook Drive and Commercial Loop Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-2679. WESTERN ARTS ROUNDUP: A celebration of Western art, cowboy music, poetry, vendors and more; proceeds

Where: Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond Cost: $7 adults, free ages 16 and younger Contact: 541-389-1058 or www.centraloregonshow.com

benefit the Central Oregon Wild Horse Coalition; free; 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-8165. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: ARMIDA”: Starring Renee Fleming, Lawrence Brownlee, Bruce Ford, Jose Manuel Zapata, Barry Banks and Kobie van Rensburg in a presentation of Rossini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $22, $20 seniors, $15 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center; see Today’s listing for details. MOTHER’S DAY JEWELRY SALE: Buy jewelry and support the Feed the Hungry program at the center; donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069, liz@bendscommunitycenter.org or www.bendscommunitycenter.org. MAY FAIRE FESTIVAL: Event includes a Maypole dance, crafts, pony rides, a climbing wall, music and food; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Waldorf School of Bend, 63175 O.B. Riley Road; 541-3308841 or www.bendwaldorf.com. PET PARADE AND MAY DAY CELEBRATION: Parade a pet down Hood Avenue, then proceed to Village Green Park for children’s activities, pet adoptions and more; free; 11 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5490251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com. BIKESHED CELEBRATION: Featuring food, drinks, music, bike safety checks and clinics; free; noon-2 p.m.; Bend’s Community BikeShed, 350 S.W. Industrial Way; 541-312-2069. “MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS”: 2 and

What: Starring Renee Fl pictured, in the title role Lawrence Brownlee, Bru Jose Manuel Zapata, Ba Banks and Kobie van Re in a presentation of Ross masterpiece; opera perfo transmitted live in high d When: 10 a.m.

7 p.m. at Bend High School; see Today’s listing for details. BET AGAINST HUNGER: Watch the Kentucky Derby and play casino games; event also includes a fancifulhat contest, a silent auction and hors d’oeuvres; reservations requested; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $50; 2-5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-548-2380, ext. 148, sandyk@neighborimpact. org or www.neighborimpact.org. “MARKING OUR TERRITORY — SEGREGATION IN THE JIM CROW SOUTH”: Reiko Hiller explores how people exert power over each other by limiting access; part of A Novel Idea … Read Together; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.dpls.us/calendar. BLUES AMUSE & BREWS: With live music, food and a silent auction; proceeds benefit Friends of Westside Village Magnet School; $35; 5-11 p.m.; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; www.bluesamuseandbrews. com. (Story, Page 6) RACE FOR THE ROSES: Featuring live and silent auctions, dinner, a showing of the Kentucky Derby, drinks and dancing; $55; 5 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-4701. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Doris Pullis talks about her book “How It Looks Going Back”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. LADS OF LEISURE: The Celtic musicians perform; free; 7-9 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. BABES, BIKINIS, BREWS, BAND: A summer fashion show, featuring a performance by new-wave band the Black Mercies; free; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood


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week

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Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TROPOLITAN OPERA: ARMIDA’

KING AND QUEEN OF THE CONE

URDAY

SUNDAY

‘THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN MISSISSIPPI’

MONDAY & TUESDAY

leming, , uce Ford, rry nsburg sini’s ormance definition.

Where: Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend Cost: $22, $20 seniors, $15 children Contact: 541-382-6347 Courtesy Ken Howard Metropolitan Opera

Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. HEAD FOR THE HILLS: The Fort Collins, Colo.-based bluegrass band performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. (Story, Page 3)

SUNDAY May 2 STEEL STAMPEDE: 7:30 a.m. registration, 9:15 a.m. start at Crooked River Ranch; see Saturday’s listing for details. KING AND QUEEN OF THE CONE: A race up and down Mount Bachelor and Leeway Cone; participants can use alpine touring or telemark skis or a splitboard snowboard; helmets are mandatory; costumes encouraged; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $30-$55 in advance, $40-$65 at the event; 9:30 a.m. race begins, 7-8 a.m. registration; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080 or www.mtbachelor.com. CENTRAL OREGON HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center; see Today’s listing for details. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-4 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-7395. “MARKING OUR TERRITORY — SEGREGATION IN THE JIM CROW SOUTH”: Reiko Hiller explores how people exert power over each other by limiting access; part of A Novel Idea … Read Together; free; 1:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS”: 2 p.m. at Bend High School; see

What: A race up and down Mount Bachelor and Leeway Cone; participants can use alpine touring or telemark skis or a splitboard snowboard; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center. Colin Mahood leads a stream of racers ascending Mount Bachelor during last year’s race. When: 9:30 a.m. race begins, 7-8 a.m.

Today’s listing for details. BUNCO PARTY: Featuring games, prizes and refreshments; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7903. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 500 meters on singlespeed bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; a portion of proceeds benefits Bend’s Community BikeShed; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7 p.m., sign up at 6:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-610-7460 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

MONDAY May 3 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Princess Bride” by William Goldman; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN MISSISSIPPI”: Melissa Stuckey discusses the important people and history-making events that occurred during this time; part of A Novel Idea … Read Together; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177040 or www.dpls.us/calendar. SPRING SPEAKER’S FORUM: Dr. John Corso discusses his best-seller “Stupid Reasons People Die”; proceeds benefit the Assistance League of Bend; $20; 7 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-389-2075. THE SPEAKEASY: Guy J. Jackson hosts an open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; May’s theme is “Who I Am”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677.

What: Melissa Stuckey, pictured, discusses the important people and history-making events that occurred during this time; part of A Novel Idea … Read Together. When and where: Times and locations vary: see individual listings for details Cost: Free Contact: 541-617-7040 or www.dpls.us/calendar

registration Where: Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend Cost: $30-$55 in advance, $40-$65 at the event Contact: 541-385-8080 or www.mtbachelor.com

POWERMAN 5000: The metal band performs, with Warm Gadget and Still Fear; $15 plus service charges in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. bendticket.com. (Story, Page 4)

TUESDAY May 4 FREE CLOTHES: FreeStoreRedmond donates clothes to those in need; free; 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-508-6262. “THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN MISSISSIPPI”: Melissa Stuckey discusses the important people and history-making events that occurred during this time; part of A Novel Idea … Read Together; free; noon; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541312-1070 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “DAVID VS. MONSANTO” AND “MY FATHER’S GARDEN”: A screening of the documentaries about a small farmer battling a large corporation, and the misuse of technology on the American farm; free; 6:30-8:35 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts a discussion of higher education in Central Oregon; reservations required; free; 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3885814, talk@bendbroadband.com or www.talkofthetownco.com. SIERRA LEONE’S REFUGEE ALL-STARS: A screening of the documentary about musicians who escaped civil war in Sierra Leone; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 28)

OPEN MIC WITH TALL ADAM: Open to all varieties of performers; free; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

WEDNESDAY May 5 “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Natalie Dollar presents “Bringing Civility Back”; the lecture examines the demise of civil conversation and the ways to promote true dialogue; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3223100, info@osucascades.edu or www. osucascades.edu/lunchtime-lectures. “STANDING ON MY SISTERS’ SHOULDERS”: A screening of the documentary about the civil rights movement in Mississippi in the 1950s and 1960s; part of A Novel Idea … Read Together; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. RESOURCE FAIR AND CINCO DE MAYO CELEBRATION: A bilingual communityresource fair with information on health care, housing, education, employment and more; with music and folkloric dancing; free; 5-8 p.m.; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541-588-6298. “HOOT”: A screening of the 2006 PGrated film based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls.us/calendar. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $25 per team of four; 6:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541306-0864 or www.kurerafund.org.

STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@oldshoepress.com.

THURSDAY May 6 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “South of Broad: A Novel” by Pat Conroy; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “STANDING ON MY SISTERS’ SHOULDERS”: A screening of the documentary about the civil rights movement in Mississippi in the 1950s and 1960s; part of A Novel Idea … Read Together; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177040 or www.dpls.us/calendar. IMPROV-A-THON: Teams of four to seven students compete before a small judging panel to see who will advance; $2; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900, ext. 3132. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www.clear1017.fm. (Story, Page 5) THE UNDERSCORE ORKESTRA: The Portland-based jazz band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.


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planning ahead Right Around the Corner MAY 7-8 — ART ON THE RIVER: Featuring art exhibits, sales and more; free; 5-8 p.m. May 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 8; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541548-4244 or mhlkeldy@yahoo.com. MAY 7-8 — IMPROV-A-THON: Teams of four to seven students compete before a small judging panel to see who will advance; $2; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900, ext. 3132. MAY 7 — ART & WINE AUCTION: Featuring wine tasting, a gourmet dinner, live music and an auction; proceeds benefit Deschutes Children’s Foundation; $99; 5:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-388-3101 or www. deschuteschildrensfoundation.org. MAY 7 — LITTLE RASCALS DINNER AND AUCTION: A catered dinner, with live entertainment and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit the Redmond Learning Center; $50, $90 per couple; 5:30 p.m. social hour, 6:30 p.m. dinner and auction; Eagle Crest Resort, Conference Center, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-923-4854. MAY 7 — KATHRYN STOCKETT: The author of “The Help” speaks about her work; part of the A Novel Idea … Read Together program; free, but a ticket is required; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1031. MAY 7 — VIP RECEPTION: Meet and talk with Jim Jarrett, the actor starring in “Vincent”; $75, includes ticket for “Vincent”; 7:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541388-8103 or www.coril.org. MAY 7 — FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5 to 9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. MAY 8 — HIGH DESERT CRUISE-IN: The High Desert Mopars host a car show featuring cars of all types, a raffle, awards and more; free for spectators, $10 to register a car; 8 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. show and shine; Albertsons, 1655 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond; 541-548-4895. MAY 8 — RAKU POTTERY SALE: The Raku Artists of Central Oregon host a sale of handcrafted pottery; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-593-9652. MAY 8 — CHICKEN COOP TOUR: Tour approximately 25 chicken coops in Central Oregon; tour booklets will provide a map to the coops; proceeds benefit Together for Children, Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center and Bend’s Community Center’s Feed the Hungry program; $8 or five items of

nonperishable food; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; 541-420-2588, lizbend5@yahoo. com or www.bendchickens.com. MAY 8 — PLANTS FOR FOOD: Buy plants, attend workshops, shop and more; proceeds benefit Bend’s Community Center; donations accepted; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069, liz@ bendscommunitycenter.org or www. bendscommunitycenter.org. MAY 8 — KATHRYN STOCKETT: The author of “The Help” speaks about her work; part of the A Novel Idea … Read Together program; free, but a ticket is required; 1 p.m., doors open 12:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-312-1031. MAY 8 — MOTHER’S DAY EVE MURDER MYSTERY DINNER: Buckboard Productions presents interactive murder mystery dinner theater; reservations recommended; $55; 5 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700. MAY 8 — PAUSE 4 PAWS DINNER AND AUCTION: Dinner and auction benefit medical care, food and housing for animals in Crook County; $75; 5:30-9 p.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 541-447-7178, shelterstaff@ humanesocietyochocos.com or www.humanesocietyochocos.com. MAY 8 — “BELLY”: Screening of the documentary film about belly dancers; includes food and live belly dance performances; tickets must be purchased in advance; proceeds benefit the High Desert Belly Dance Guild; $18, $30 for a pair, plus service charges; 7 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, Center for Health & Learning, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; www.brownpapertickets. com/event/101141. MAY 8 — JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 22: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Michelle Van Handel, with David Evans, David Goldblatt, Phil Baker and Todd Strait; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-977-5637, joe@justjoesmusic. com or www.justjoesmusic. com/jazzatjoes/events.htm. MAY 8 — “VINCENT”: Jim Jarrett stars in Leonard Nimoy’s play about Vincent van Gogh, told through the eyes of the artist and his brother, Theo; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living; $25 general, $35 reserved; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. MAY 8 — JERRY JOSEPH & THE JACKMORMONS: The Portlandbased rock musicians perform; ages 21 and older; $12; 9:30 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com. MAY 9 — MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH: A brunch celebrating all mothers, with live music; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Council On Aging

Courtesy Liz Lotochinski

Chickens mill about outside the Lotochinski coop, which is built inside a barn. The coop is part of the Chicken Coop Tour on May 8. Meals on Wheels Program and Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers; $8, $5 ages 16 and younger; 9-11:30 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-548-8817. MAY 9 — SECOND SUNDAY: Charles Finn and Mary Sojourner read from their work; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541312-1034 or www.dpls.us/calendar. MAY 9 — CELTIC MUSIC SESSION: Celtic musicians play traditional Irish music; session players welcome; free; 3-6 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-647-4789. MAY 9 — DIVISI AND ON THE ROCKS: The University of Oregon

a cappella groups perform, with students from Summit High School; proceeds benefit Friends of Music; $25, $15 students and children; 3 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. MAY 12 — “LAST CHILD IN THE WOODS”: Richard Louv talks about how American children and families are losing touch with nature, and the costs of this alienation; $10; 6:30 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-383-7575. MAY 12 — CASEY NEILL AND THE NORWAY RATS: The Portland-based Celtic rockers perform; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School,

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. MAY 13 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Island of the Blue Dolphins” by Scott O’Dell; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121055 or www.dpls.us/calendar. MAY 13 — CHAIR-IT-ABLE AUCTION: Bid on hand-painted chairs designed by Crook County High School students; with live music and drama performances; proceeds benefit the Oasis Food Kitchen; free; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County High School, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900, ext. 3120 or heidi. barney@crookcounty.k12.or.us.


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PAGE 19

planning ahead MAY 13 — TIGHT LINES AUCTION & BBQ DINNER: The Deschutes River Conservancy hosts an evening of food, fishing lore, an auction, drinks and more; registration requested; $35; 6 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-382-4077, ext. 10 or www.deschutesriver.org. MAY 13 — WOMEN’S BREW REVIEW: Enjoy appetizers paired with beers; tickets available through the Web site; proceeds benefit the Women’s Resource Center of Central Oregon; $25; 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery & Public House, 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3829242, info@deschutesbrewery. com or www.wrcco.org. MAY 13 — ALASDAIR FRASER AND NATALIE HAAS: The duo perform Scottish fiddle and cello music; $20 or $25; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. MAY 13 — “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. MAY 13 — LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999. MAY 13 — THE PARENTAL ADVISORY TOUR: Loud, sweaty rock ’n’ roll from Nashville Pussy, Green Jelly, The Fabulous Miss Wendy, Psychostick and High Desert Hooligans; $17 plus service charges in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-410-1049 or www.myspace. com/actiondeniroproductions or www.bendticket.com.

Farther Down the Road MAY 14-18 — “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. MAY 14 — SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL: International touring festival showcases a series of films about people with developmental disabilities; proceeds benefit Full Access; $6 matinee, $10 evening, $25 includes preshow reception and silent auction; 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-7492158 or www.towertheatre.org. MAY 14 — CULVER CENTENNIAL DINNER: A dinner with Culver historical presentations; reservations requested; $15; 6 p.m.; City Hall, 200 First Ave.; 541-546-6494. MAY 15-20 — “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $75 May 15; $15, $10

ages 18 and younger May 16-20; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.bendticket.com. MAY 15-17 — CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m. May 15 and May 17, 2 p.m. May 16; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941 or www.cosymphony.com. MAY 15 — 34TH ANNUAL POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Participants will race through multiple sports from Mt. Bachelor to Bend; the Les Schwab Amphitheater, which marks the end of the race, will host a festival with food, music and sponsor booths; free; 9:15 a.m. start time on Mt. Bachelor; 10 a.m. booths open; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. MAY 16 — “LAMPPOST REUNION”:

TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso as a pub theater production; $12.50 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.bendticket.com. MAY 18-20 — “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. MAY 20 — READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: A screening of the film “The Four Feathers,” followed by a discussion May 27; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls.us/calendar. MAY 20 — LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999.

a C3 events house concert (outdoors, on the back patio, weather permitting), at the home of Cameron and Tiffany Clark. Gourmet, Buffet Dinner, Wine Samplings

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

The Vocal, A Cappella, Gymnastics of “Sonos”

1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Free Chair Massage, Pedicures and Manicures About Sonos... “Prepare to be stunned,” advised the U.K. newspaper The Guardian.

Treat Mom to a Mother’s Day Brunch overlooking the beautiful Deschutes River Join us May 9th • 9:00am to 2:00pm Indulge in Bend’s largest Mother’s Day Buffet offering:

$9900

• Ice Carving Display with Poached Shrimp • Smoked Salmon Display • Carving Station with Honey Glazed Ham, Roast Prime Rib of Beef, Roast Leg of Lamb • Chicken Picatta • Seafood Newberg • Cajun Pan Seared Salmon • Made to Order Omelets • Poached Eggs with Crab and Asparagus Hollandaise • Ham and Cheddar Scrambled Eggs • Waffle and Cheese Blintz Station • Assorted Fruit and Six Assorted Salads • Bacon, Sausage, Delmonico Potatoes • Grilled Vegetables • An Array of Desserts on the Chef ’s Sweet Table

Lodging Special

Good Sat. or Sun.

based on availab

ility • River view room fo • Full, hot Breakfast r two Bu • Bottle of champagn ffet e • Long ste • $1000 Coupon to Anm rose jou Spa & Salon

“Unaccompanied magnificence,” lauded the Campus Circle. On its debut album, SonoSings, the group combines a rich, classically choral sensibility with an ultra–modern repertoire and sonic toolkit. The result is a spellbinding fusion of ancient and contemporary sounds, as songs by the likes of Radiohead, Sara Bareilles, Fleet Foxes, Bon Iver, Rufus Wainwrigh, Björk, Imogen Heap and other cuttingedge creators are transformed into mesmerizing vehicles for voices only.

Adults: $27.95 Seniors (60+): $23.95 Kids (5-12): $15.95

For reservations: 541-389-8810 - Restaurant 541-389-3111 - Hotel

3075 N. Business 97 • Bend, OR 97701

www.riverhouse.com Based on availability, some restrictions apply, subject to change.

325 NW Delaware Ave Bend

Sunday, May 9th, 6:00pm $35 per person • reservations, directions, Jessica, 541-480-1764; jessica@c3events.com


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talks, classes, museums & libraries Education CONTAINER GARDEN WORKSHOP: Learn tips for using color and height, vegetable, herb and flower choices, and more; $25; 10-11:30 a.m. Saturday ; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222 or www.chsgardencenter.com. KARMA — HOW YOUR THINKING CREATES YOUR BODY AND EXPERIENCES: Erik Jung teaches the Buddhist fundamental principles of karma and perception, and how thinking creates your experience of reality; donations accepted; 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday and noon-4:30 p.m. Sunday ; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 702-210-9642 or maryorton33@earthlink.net. FIREFREE FORUM: Prepare and beautify your home for fire season; learn about fire-resistant plants and landscaping; free; 5:30 p.m. Tuesday ; City Hall, 520 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0251 or karly@sisterscountry.com. DAZZLING DINER PARTY ON A BUDGET: Create a four-course meal using fresh ingredients and learn plating techniques; $49; 6-9 p.m. Thursday ; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HEALTHY AND ECONOMICAL COOKING: Learn to stock your kitchen with ingredients to create meals for any budget or health concern; $79; 6-9 p.m. Thursday ; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu to register. INTENSIVE CRITIQUE WORKSHOP: Mike Lankford leads a small-group critique; manuscripts must be submitted by Saturday in order to be reviewed; $15, $10 Central Oregon Writers Guild members, and $7 to attend without having work reviewed; 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. May 8; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop; 541-408-6306 or www. CentralOregonWritersGuild.com. COMPASSIONATE COUPLES WORKSHOPS: Learn to move past blame, express yourself honestly and listen deeply; $150 per couple; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 15; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-633-5704 or http://counselorbendoregon.com. AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM: 541-317-0610. AEROSPACE CADET EDUCATION: 541-598-7479. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMMUNITY CLASSES: www.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION: www.katyelliottmft.com or 541-633-5704. COMPUTER CLASSES: 541-3837270 or www.cocc.edu; Deschutes Public Library System, www. dpls.us or 541-312-1020.

KINDERMUSIK: www. kidsmovewithmusic.com or 541-325-6995. KINDERMUSIK: www.developmusic. com or 541-389-6690. LATINO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION: 541-382-4366 or www.latca.org. METAPHYSICAL STUDY GROUP: 541-549-4004. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY: http:// teamoregon.orst.edu. NEIL KELLY CO. REMODELING SEMINARS: 541-382-7580. PARTNERS IN CARE PRESENTATIONS: loriew@partnersbend. org or 541-382-5882. PEACE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: Compassionate communication, Enneagram, yoga and more; www.pcoco. org or 541-325-3174. SPIRITUAL AWARENESS COMMUNITY OF THE CASCADES: www.spiritualawarenesscommunity. com or 541-388-3179. THE STOREFRONT PROJECT: Creative writing workshops for middle- and high-school students; 541-3304381 or www.thenatureofwords.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER CLASSES: www.wrcco. org or 541-385-0750. WRITERS GUILD: 541-923-0896.

Parks & Recreation BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT: www.bendparksandrec. org or 541-389-7275. BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. CAMP TUMALO: www.camptumalo. com or 541-389-5151. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: www. raprd.org or 541-548-7275. SISTERS ORGANIZATION FOR ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION: www.sistersrecreation. com or 541-549-2091.

Outdoor Recreation HIKING IN THE SPRING: Hike Central Oregon and learn about geology, ecosystems, wildlife and more; $79; 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. May 6, 13, 20 and 27; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. NORTH AMERICAN MIGRATION COUNT: Teams of birdwatchers are assigned areas to count bird species; free; May 8; locations vary; 541-388-1770 or www.ecaudubon.org. MOUNTAINEERING TECHNIQUES: Practice and discuss basic to advanced skills and gear, camping, rappelling and more; reservations required; $25; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. May 8; register for southeast Bend location; 541-385-0445 or info@ traditionalmountaineering.org. PROTECTED CLIMBING AND DESCENDING STEEP SLOPES: Practice climbing and descending

technical step snow slopes, ice axe belay and more; reservations required; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. May 9; register for exact location near Mt. Bachelor ski area parking lot, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-0445 or info@ traditionalmountaineering.org. DESCHUTES LAND TRUST: www.deschuteslandtrust. org or 541-330-0017. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER: www. envirocenter.org or 541-322-4856. OREGON PALEO LANDS INSTITUTE OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS: www. paleolands.org or 541-763-4480. OUTDOORS SKILLS WORKSHOPS: 800-720-6339, ext. 76018. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: pmo-sun.uoregon.edu. REI: www.rei.com/stores/96 or 541-385-0594. SILVER STRIDERS: strideon@ silverstriders.com or 541-383-8077. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: www. sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4442. TRADITIONAL MOUNTAINEERING MAP, COMPASS AND GPS SKILLS: Offering outdoor and indoor classes; 541-385-0445. WANDERLUST TOURS: www.wanderlusttours. com or 541-389-8359.

Arts & Crafts INTRODUCTION TO PINE-NEEDLE BASKETRY: Gillian Burton presents techniques for starting, adding, shaping and finishing baskets; $65, $60 SageBrusher Art Society members, plus $20 materials fee; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday and May 11; SageBrushers Art Society Gallery, 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-923-7192 to register. ABRACADABRA ARTS & CRAFTS: www.abracadabracrafts.com. ART IN THE MOUNTAINS: www.artinthemountains. com or 541-923-2648. ART STATION: Art camps, classes and workshops; www.artscentraloregon. org or 541-617-1317. ATELIER 6000: Classes and workshops in printmaking, book arts and more; www.atelier6000. com or 541-330-8759. CREATIVITY RESOURCE FOUNDATION: 541-549-2091. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY ART ACADEMY: 541-549-7200. KEN ROTH STUDIO: Painting workshops; www.kenrothstudio. com or 541-317-1727. KINKER ART STUDIO: 541-306-6341. PAINT ITALY, BEND OR SEATTLE WITH CINDY BRIGGS: 541-420-9463, www.cindybriggs.com or www. MakeEveryDayAPainting.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: www.sagebrushersart. net or 541-306-6341.

Performing Arts SIZZLING SALSA: Learn basic steps for salsa, rumba and mambo; ages 16 and older; $15 per couple; 7-8 tonight; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St.; 541548-7275 or www.raprd.org. ACADEMIE DE BALLET CLASSIQUE: 541-382-4055. ACTOR’S REALM: 541-4107894 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. ADULT MODERN DANCE: Taught by Fish Hawk Wing Modern Dance troupe; 541-788-0725. AN DAIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE: 541-678-1379. BARBERSHOP HARMONY: www. showcasechorus.org or 541447-4756 or 541-526-5006. BEND EXPERIMENTAL ART THEATRE: www.beatonline.org or 541-419-5558. CASCADE COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC: www.ccschoolofmusic. org or 541-382-6866. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE COMPANY: www.centraloregondance.com or 541-419-8998 or 541-388-9884. CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL OF BALLET: www. centraloregonschoolofballet. com or 541-389-9306. CHILDREN’S MUSIC THEATRE GROUP: www.cmtg.org or 541-385-6718. THE CLOG HOUSE: 541-548-2062. CUBAN STYLE DRUMMING CLASSES: 541-550-8381. GOTTA DANCE STUDIO: 541-322-0807. GYPSY FIRE BELLYDANCE: 541-420-5416. HAND DRUMMING: 541-350-9572. INDONESIAN ORCHESTRA: 541-385-0394. JAZZ DANCE COLLECTIVE: www.jazzdancecollective. org or 541-408-7522. LINE DANCE CLASSES: 562-508-1337 or danceforhealth@ymail.com. MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLASSES: 541-385-8074. REDMOND SCHOOL OF DANCE: 541-548-6957 or www. redmondschoolofdance.com. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 541-549-7311. SQUARE DANCING: 541-548-5743. TANGO DANCE: 541-330-4071. WEST AFRICAN DRUM: 541-760-3204.

Museums A.R. BOWMAN MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Exhibits about Crook County, the City of Prineville Railroad and the local timber industry; free; 246 N. Main St., Prineville; www.bowmanmuseum. org or 541-447-3715. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Explores the history, culture and heritage of Deschutes County; $5 adults, $2 ages 13-17, children ages 12 and younger free with adult; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave.,

Bend; www.deschuteshistory. org or 541-389-1813. FORT ROCK MUSEUM: A collection of original buildings from the early 1900s homestead era; $1; Fort Rock; www.fortrockmuseum. com or 541-576-2251. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring the “Year of the Forest: Human Connections,” “Sin in the Sagebrush” and “Stones from the Sky ” exhibits; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; admission is good for one day; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.highdesertmuseum. org or 541-382-4754. THE MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Cultural, traditional and artistic heritage of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; $7 adults, $6 seniors, $3.50 ages 5-12, $4.50 students; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; www.museumatwarmsprings. org or 541-553-3331. REDMOND MUSEUM: Museum will open May 15 to celebrate Redmond’s centennial; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-504-3038. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: Featuring live birds of prey, hands-on exhibits, nature trail, telescopes, night sky viewing and more; $3 adults, $2 ages 12 and younger; 57245 River Road, Sunriver; www.sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4394. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: Featuring lectures, star gazing, instructional sky navigation demonstrations; $5 suggested donation Friday and Saturday; Sunday-Thursday large groups only; 541-382-8331.

Libraries BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY: Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa (behind Jake’s Diner), 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7040. CROOK COUNTY LIBRARY: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY: 1260 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend; 541-382-9947. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: 1642 51st St., La Pine; 541-312-1091. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY: 241 S.E. 7th St., Madras; 541-475-3351. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050. ROBERT L. BARBER LIBRARY: 2600 N.W. College Way (Central Oregon Community College), Bend; 541-383-7560. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080.


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out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

This composite image of the colorful Helix Nebula is featured in the new IMAX film “Hubble.” Part of the OMSI Film Festival, the blockbuster film will screen daily, May 4-June 27, in Portland.

Concerts

© 2010 Warner Bros. Courtesy of NASA, ESA, C.R. O’Dell (Vanderbilt University), M. Meixner and P. McCullough (STScI)

IMAX

exploration

From Hubble to Mecca, OMSI Film Festival lifts off

By Jenny Harada The Bulletin

T

his spring, you can experience exotic locations without the jet lag or worrying about volcanic ash leaving you stranded. From the comfort of the OMNIMAX Dome Theater, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) will explore places like Mount Everest, Egypt, the Amazon, India and even outer space during the 2010 OMSI Film Festival. Featuring 21 educational and documentary IMAX films, the festival will run May 4-June 27 in Portland. Built in 1992, the OMNIMAX Dome Theater features a five-story domed screen and a 330-seat, 30-degree seating platform. Images are projected with a fish-eye lens, surrounding the audience and covering most of the viewer’s peripheral vision, according to a press release. The large image produces the sensation of being in the movie. The festival highlights include the new IMAX blockbuster “Hubble” and the inter-

national hit “Journey to Mecca” as well as “Adrenaline Rush,” “Journey into Amazing Caves,” “Amazon,” “Deep Sea” and “Roving Mars.” To see a full schedule, visit www .omsi.edu. OMSI is offering several passes for the film festival. For $80, the Director’s Pass grants the pass holder and a guest admission to all 21 films, any time during the festival. The Producer’s Pass ($40) admits the pass holder and guest to any four films of their choice. The Producer’s Pass is also available for individuals for $22. All pass holders receive one free popcorn for each show. Passes are only available for purchase at the OMSI ticket desk. For individual films, tickets are $8.50 for adults and $6.50 for youth and seniors. Shows starting after 6 p.m. are $6 for adults and $5 for youth and seniors. For more information, contact 503-7974640 or visit www.omsi.edu. Jenny Harada can be reached at 541383-0350 or jharada@bendbulletin.com.

April 30 — Aqualung, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TW* April 30 — John Pizzarelli, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org. May 1 — Thrice, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* May 2 — Pat Methany, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. May 2 — The Used, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 4-5 — Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles, Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. May 5 — King Sunny Adé & His African Beats, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 6 — Groundation/Orgone, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. May 6 — Italian Saxophone Quartet, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. May 6 — Lupe Fiasco, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 6 — Needtobreathe, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* May 6, 9 — “‘S Wonderful”: Featuring lyrics by Ira Gershwin; presented by The Emerald City Jazz Kings: The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541434-7000 or www.theshedd.org. May 7 — Carole King & James Taylor, Rose Garden, Portland; 877-7897673 or www.rosequarter.com. May 7 — Coheed & Cambria, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 7 — Groundation/Orgone, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* May 7 — Intervision, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 7 — Ricky Nelson Remembered — The Nelson Brothers, Seven Feathers Casino Resort, Canyonville; 800-585-3737 or www.sevenfeathers.com. May 7 — Shpongle, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* May 8 — Nickelback, Memorial Coliseum, Portland; 877-7897673 or www.rosequarter.com. May 9 — George Thorogood & The Destroyers, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 10 — Mastodon, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* May 11 — Owen Pallett (formerly known as Final Fantasy), Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 11 — Thirty Seconds to Mars, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 12 — Martin Sexton, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. May 13 — Jóhann Jóhannsson, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 14 — Martin Sexton, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM*

May 14 — That 1 Guy, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TW* May 15 — Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541434-7000 or www.theshedd.org. May 15 — Kaki King, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* May 15 — That 1 Guy, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. May 16 — Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 16 — Kaki King, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. May 17 — Eagles, Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. May 17-18 — Straight No Chaser, Aladdin Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT (May 17); TM* May 18 — As I Lay Dying, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* May 20 — Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 21 — Sons of the San Joaquin, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. May 22 — 30 db, Berbati’s Pan, Portland; 503-226-2122 or www.berbati.com. May 22 — Nas/Damian “Jr Gong” Marley, The Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* May 22 — Portland Cello Project, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 22 — Sons of the San Joaquin, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.org. May 23 — Barenaked Ladies, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* May 24 — Tech N9ne, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 25 — Cobra Starship/3Oh!3, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 26 — Marcia Ball, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 26-27 — John Butler Trio, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* May 28 — Minus the Bear, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* May 28 — Why?, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM*

Lectures & Comedy May 3 — “Science and Public Policy: A Time for Action”: Lecture by Jane Lubchenco; part of the 2010 World Affairs Council International Speakers Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 503-2747488 or www.worldoregon.org. May 7 — An Evening with David Sedaris: Lecture by NPR humorist and best-selling author; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* May 9 — Rob Schneider, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM*

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out of town From previous page May 11 — Isabel Allende: Lecture by renowned novelist, teacher, journalist and celebrated human rights advocate; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* May 14 — Ralphie May, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* May 15 — “Creating a Sustainable K-12 School Garden”: Lecture by Dawn Hummel; part of the “Garden University” series; The Oregon Garden, Silverton; 503-874-8100 or www.oregongarden.org. May 18 — “Civil War Era”: Lecture by James McPherson; part of the Mark O. Hatfield Distinguished Historians Forum; presented by the Oregon Historical Society; First Congregational United Church of Christ, Portland; 800494-8497 or www.ohs.org. May 29 — Henry Rollins: Frequent Flyer Tour, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* May 30 — Henry Rollins: Frequent Flyer Tour, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW*

Symphony & Opera May 7, 9, 13, 15 — “The Barber of Seville”: One of the most beloved comic operas by Gioachino Rossini; presented by the Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* May 8 — “Three’s Company”: Featuring music by Beethoven, Schubert and Copland; presented by the Oregon Mozart Players; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org. May 8-10 — “Dvorak’s Cello Concerto”: Featuring cellist Quirine

*Tickets • TM — Ticketmaster, 866866-4502, www.ticketmaster.com • TW — TicketsWest, 800992-8499, www.ticketswest.com Viersen; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org May 15-17 — Beethoven Festival: Featuring five Beethoven piano concertos played by Arnaldo Cohen; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org May 20 — “Mahler Titan”: Featuring music by Mahler, Delius and Wagner; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Silva Concert Hall, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org. May 22-24 — “Mahler’s Titan”: Featuring violinist Elina Vahala; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org.

Theater & Dance Through April 30 — “Who Stole My Dead Husband?”: An interactive musical dinner-theater; Portland Spirit, Portland; 503-224-3900 or www.portlandspirit.com. Through May 2 — “The Chosen”: Award-winning adaptation from

the award-winning novel is the coming-of-age story of two boys growing up in two very different Jewish communities in the 1940s; presented by the Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Through May 2 — Cirque du Soleil: Featuring critically acclaimed touring show “KOOZA” that combines two circus traditions — acrobatic performance and the art of clowning; Portland; www. cirquedusoleil.com/kooza. Through May 2 — “Duets”: Featuring choreography by Christopher Stowell, Twyla Tharp, George Balanchine and Trey McIntyre; presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Through May 2 — “1-2-3 Imagine! with Elmo & Friends”: Presented by Sesame Street Live; Memorial Coliseum, Portland; 877-7897673 or www.rosequarter.com. Through May 16 — “Othello”: Play by Shakespeare, inspired by film noir and set during World War II; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Morrison Stage, Portland; 503-241-1278 or www.artistsrep.org. Through May 16 — “Small Steps”: The world premiere sequel to “Holes”; based on the book by Louis Sachar; presented by the Oregon Children’s Theatre; Winningstad Theatre, Portland; TM* Through May 23 — “Girl Crazy”: A musical salute to the greatest female singing groups in American popular music; Seven Feathers Casino Resort, Canyonville; 800-548-8461 or www.sevenfeathers.com.

Through May 30 — “Gracie and the Atom”: World premiere of new musical by popular singer-songwriter McKinley (member of Dirty Martini); presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; 503241-1278 or www.artistsrep.org. Through May 30 — “Mike’s Incredible Indian Adventure”: Written and performed by Mike Schlitt; an epic tale of clashing cultures and gastric distress; presented by the Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Through June 18 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: The following plays are in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre: “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” (through July 4), “Hamlet” (through Oct. 30), “She Loves Me” (through Oct. 30) and “Pride and Prejudice” (through Oct. 31). “Well” (through June 18) and “Ruined” (through Oct. 31) are playing at the New Theatre; Ashland; 800-2198161 or www.osfashland.org. April 30 — “Diva Nation”: New musical revue by the creators of “Hormonal Imbalance”; Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. May 5 — Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet: Makes its Northwest debut with a program scheduled to include “Orbo Novo” by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui; part of the White Bird Dance Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* May 14 — Hip-Hop Cabaret: Presented by Phenomenon Hip Hop; Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. May 14 — “Eurydice”: An inventive telling of the story of Orpheus and Eurydice by playwright Sarah Ruhl; Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; 541-465-1506 or www.lordleebrick.com. May 15-June 6 — “Sideways Stories from Wayside School”: Based on the novels by Louis Sachar; presented by the Oregon Children’s Theatre, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* May 25-30 — “Cirque Dreams Illumination”: Created and directed by Neil Goldberg; combines the European cirque-style of performance artistry with American circus arts and Broadway theatrics; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* May 25-June 27 — “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”: Lyrics and music by William Finn; Tony Award-winning musical about six kids facing off in a spelling bee; presented by the Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org.

Exhibits Through April 30 — Oregon Jewish Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “The Shape of Time: Accumulations of Place and Memory” (through April 30) and “Letters to Sala: A Young Woman’s Life in Nazi Labor Camps” (through June 6); Portland; 503-226-3600 or www.ojm.org. Through May — “Oddwater”: Exhibit combines strange marine life with

colorful blown art glass; Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; 541867-3474 or www.aquarium.org. Through May 1 — “The Living River”: Juried art exhibit; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-345-2799 or www.mckenzieriver.org. Through May 1 — Shannon Richardson, Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; 503-581-3229 or www.zeekgallery.com. Through May 1 — Tom Fawkes and Judith Poxson Fawkes, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; 503-2262754 or www.laurarusso.com. Through May 2 — Bush Barn Art Center: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Deanna White” (through May 2) and “Something Special: Vintage Embellishments and Accessories” (through May 9); Salem; 503-5812228 or www.salemart.org. Through May 2 — “Gathering of the Guilds”: Featuring works by the Creative Metal Arts Guild, Guild of Portland Woodworkers, Northwest Fine Woodworkers Guild, Oregon Glass Guild, Portland Bead Society and the Portland Handweavers Guild; Oregon Convention Center, Portland; 503-222-0533 or www.ceramicshowcase.com. Through May 2 — Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Amazonia” (through May 2), “Buste D’Homme” (through June) and “Marie Antoinette’s Head and Others” (through Sept. 5); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541346-3027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. Through May 2 — Spring Unveiling: Annual fine art festival; Cannon Beach; www.cannonbeach.net/springunveiling. Through May 13 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “DISQUIETED” (through May 13), “Cy Twombly” (through May 16), “More Than a Pretty Face: 150 Years of the Portrait Print” (through July 4), “Private Passions: Collecting Miniature Works of Asian Art” (through July 11) and “Surrounded by Beauty: Selections from the Elizabeth Cole Butler Bequest (through July 11); Portland; 503-226-2811 or www.portlandartmuseum.org. Through May 16 — Hallie Ford Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Heidi Preuss Grew: Romhild Ubersetzung” and “Senior Art Majors”; Willamette University, Salem; 503-370-6855 or www. willamette.edu/museum_of_art. Through May 27 — “The Great Recession”: Featuring works by Michael Mandiberg; Pacific Northwest College of Art; Portland; 503-226-4391 or www.pnca.edu. Through May 31 — “70: Seven Decades of Collecting at Maryhill Museum of Art”: Exhibit features 70 objects that highlight the museum’s legacy of collecting; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; 509-773-3733 or www.maryhillmuseum.org. Through May 31 — “Space: A Journey to Our Future”: Exhibit explores aeronautics and space


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out of town exploration; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; 800-955-6674 or www.omsi.edu. Through June 7 — “Kangaroo Crossing Traveling Exhibit”: Explores life as a child in Australia; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; 503223-6500 or www.portlandcm.org. Through June 13 — “PaleoLab — Oregon’s Past Revealed: Whales of Deep Time”: Exhibit explores the evolution of whales; featuring a working paleontology lab; Museum of Natural and Cultural History, University of Oregon, Eugene; 541346-3024 or www.uoregon.edu/~mnh Through June 26 — Museum of Contemporary Craft: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Gestures of Resistance” (through June 26) and “Land Art: David Shaner” (through Aug. 7); Portland; 503-223-2654 or www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org. Through June 27 — “Media Alchemy of Nam June Paik”: Featuring a selection of work by the internationally acclaimed late pioneering video artist; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene; 541-346-3027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. Through July 5 — “Pack Your Wagon: Critters, Costumes & Curiosity”: Featuring interactive elements and a full scale display where visitors practice the decision-making skills Oregon Trail pioneers needed to plan their long journey to the west; National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City; 541523-1849 or oregontrail.blm.gov. Through July 11 — “At Home in Portland: 1909-1914”: Exhibit explores the variety of architecture styles used during the early 20th century; Pittock Mansion, Portland; 503-8233623 or www.pittockmansion.org. May 1 — Art Evening and Auction: Featuring 225 works from Oregon’s artists; proceeds benefit the Cascade AIDS project; The Bison Building, Portland; 503-2239255 or www.capartauction.org. May 1-2 — Carriage Me Back: Featuring reenactments of the 1930s; Linn County Historical Museum; Brownsville; 541-466-3390. May 4-29 — “Art in Place: Sculptures by 8 Oregon Artists,” Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; 503-5813229 or www.zeekgallery.com. May 4-June 27 — 2010 OMSI Film Festival: Featuring 21 IMAX films including “Hubble” and “Journey to Mecca”; OMNIMAX Dome Theater, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; 503-797-4640 or www.omsi.edu. May 6-8 — Science of Wine: Activities examine the art, craft and science of making, aging and tasting wine; ScienceWorks, Ashland; 541-482-6767 or www. scienceworksmuseum.org. May 6-29 —Michihiro Kosuge

and Margaret Shirley, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; 503-2262754 or www.laurarusso.com. May 8-9 — Spring Bonsai Exhibition at the Garden: Presented by the Bonsai Society of Portland; Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; 503-2231321 or www.japanesegarden.com. May 15 — Founders’ Day & 70th Anniversary Celebration, Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; 509-773-3733 or www. maryhillmuseum.org. May 15-Oct. 3 — “Outdoor Sculpture Garden”: Featuring large-scale works in a variety of media; all created by contemporary Pacific Northwest sculptors; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; 509-773-3733 or www.maryhillmuseum.org. May 16-Sept. 5 — “One Step Big Shot: Portraits by Andy Warhol and Gus Van Sant”: Featuring original Polaroid pictures by Warhol and Van Sant; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene; 541-3463027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. May 29-31 — Wagon Encampment: Featuring costumed volunteers and living history specialists; National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City; 541-5231843 or oregontrail.blm.gov.

Miscellany May 5 — “The Video Art of Nam June Paik”: Film part of the “Schnitzer Cinema” series; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene; 541-3463027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. May 5-9 — Cinema Pacific: Showcasing films and new media from Pacific-bordering countries; presented by the University of Oregon; Eugene; 800-824-2714 or www.cinema.uoregon.edu. May 8 — Fern Ridge Wings & Wine Festival: Featuring guided bird walks, speakers, wine tastings, crafts and kids’ activities; Veneta; 541-935-8443 or www.wingsandwinefestival.com. May 9 — Mother’s Day Brunch: Presented by the Eagle Cap Excursion Train; Elgin; 800-323-7330. May 15 — Bouquet of Hope: Featuring Aaron Meyer and the Oregon Ballet Theatre; proceeds benefit Rose Haven, a community and intervention center for women and children; Venue Pearl, Portland; 503-2262377 or www.bouquetofhope.com. May 15 — Sasquatch Brew Fest, Hilton Eugene & Conference Center, Eugene; www.northwestlegendsfoundation. org/sasquatch_brewfest.html May 28-31 — Fossil Campout: Featuring bike rodeo, bike show, live music and a tattoo contest; presented by ABATE of Oregon; Bear Hollow Campground, Fossil; 503-791-2862 or www.fossilcampout.com. May 30 — Stars on Ice, Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com.

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PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

gaming A high-tech ball game ‘MLB 10’ puts on a g reat show, but expect to look bad

DOWNLOADS The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top 10 downloadable games for April: 1. “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 Stimulus Pack” (PS3, X360) 2. “Cave Story” (Wii) 3. “The Misadventures of P.B. Winterbottom” (X360) 4. “Mass Effect 2: Kasumi’s Stolen Memory” (X360)

By Seth Schiesel New York Times News Service

5. “Toy Soldiers” (X360)

W

hen it comes to sports video games, is there such a thing as too much realism? I have spent more than 20 hours struggling to achieve mere competence in “MLB 10: The Show,” the latest installment in Sony’s successful baseball series, and am coming to suspect that the answer is yes. That’s 20 hours of whiffing at changeups, watching fly balls sail over my head, tossing what appear to be pumpkins over the plate, making disastrous bullpen moves and watching opposing runners steal bases as if they were churning out laps. It is wholly inconceivable that the 2010 Yankees could come in dead last in the American League East this season, yet over the last week or so I have managed to manage my favorite team straight into the cellar. All of this has been bad for my ego, but none of this makes “MLB 10” a bad game. Even as I was losing game after game to the likes of the Pirates and the Royals, it was obvious that “MLB 10” is perhaps the most finely calibrated, lusciously animated, fanatically detailed team sports game yet made. Every time I made a ridiculously boneheaded play — throwing the ball to the wrong base, getting picked off while leading off second, striking out after being ahead in the count 3 and 0 — the result felt like a proper organic response to my own mistakes rather than an arbitrary punishment by

TOP 10

6. “Perfect Dark” (X360) 7. “Mega Man 10” (X360, PS3, Wii) 8. “Xbox Live Arcade Game Room” (X360) 9. “Scrap Metal” (X360) 10. “Dragon Age: Origins Awakening” (X360) Sony Computer Entertainment via New York Times News Service

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“MLB 10: The Show” tries to capture the pace and feel of a major league game. the software. In other words, the game never tempted me to blame it for my own failures. And yet there is a major problem here, the same one that afflicts most team sports games these days: “MLB 10” is so focused on realism, on rendering every speck of infield dirt and every last nuance of biomechanics and physics, that accessibility to the everyday person has been almost completely forgotten if not deemed irrelevant. The world of sports video games has become so selfreferential and so obsessed with catering to a hard-core audience that everyone else has been left behind. “MLB 10” takes so much for granted in terms of what the player understands not only about baseball but also about baseball video games that anyone who is not altogether steeped in both (and who isn’t getting paid to play) is bound to come away frustrated. A serious baseball fan with only minor experience with video

EW RE V I

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of April 24: • “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 — Stimulus Package” (PS3) • “Lead and Gold: Gangs of the Wild West” (PS3) • “Dante’s Inferno: Trials of St. Lucia” (X360, PS3) • “Kick-Ass” (PS3)

‘MLB10: THE SHOW’ No rating provided. PlayStation 3 Sony Computer Entertainment ESRB rating: E for Everyone games will have to spend dozens of hours in the virtual batting cage before being able to make consistently solid contact at the major league level in “MLB 10.” And even serious gamers who do not play a lot of team sports games (like me) will feel as if they have been transported to an alternate universe where everything they know must be relearned. Of course, baseball is extremely difficult, complicated and unforgiving in real life. It also seems to be the case that people who play a lot of sports video games are in some ways a breed apart from other gamers: If you play a lot of “MLB 10” or, say, a lot of “Madden” football, that may be all that

• “Speed” (Wii) • “Tecmo Bowl Throwback” (X360, PS3) • “Serious Sam HD: The Second Encounter” (X360) • “Horrible Histories: Ruthless Romans” (Wii, PC) • “Free Running” (Wii) • “2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa” (PSP, X360, Wii, PS3)

you play. And so these team sports games are made more and more realistic as a way of allowing those hard-core players to establish a pecking order among themselves. But that all makes these games incredibly off-putting and intimidating for everyone else, a phenomenon that is all the more striking because the rest of the video game business has found its growth and resurgence in public acceptance by catering to newcomers and casual players. Not even video games based on individual sports are as relentlessly technical as top team sports games like “MLB 10.” Can anyone imagine a golf game where you have to spend a few weeks practicing before you can break 100 finding a ready audience? That all said, “MLB 10” simply oozes the pace and feel of real baseball. The processing power of the PlayStation 3 has been harnessed in the service of a presentation that looks and sounds almost exactly like a real baseball television broadcast.

• “NIER” (PS3, X360) • “Super Street Fighter IV” (X360, PS3) • “Dead to Rights: Retribution” (X360, PS3) • “Record of Agarest War” (PS3, X360) • “Sherlock Holmes vs. Jack the Ripper” (X360) • “DodoGo!” (DS) — Gamespot.com

Gaming gear PEREGRINE GLOVE Rating: 4 out of 10 Details: $149.95, www.the peragrine.com On paper, the Peregrine Glove may seem like a good idea. The thought of removing the keyboard for repetitive tasks such as selecting the marquee tool in Photoshop or an attack command in an RTS game has appeal, but the Peregrine isn’t the answer. The USB-powered glove has 30 programmable buttons, which work with virtually any application. Unfortunately, the steep learning curve will turn off most the first time they slip on the glove. It has a decent build quality, but the top connecter for the USB cord falls off at the slightest tug. Unless you’re desperate to ditch the keyboard for a sci-fi chic input solution, however problematic, the classic QWERTY layout is still your best bet. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

While cool in concept, the Peregrine Glove has a steep learning curve. MCT


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

PAGE 25

movies

The Associated Press

Emily Mortimer and Andy Garcia star in “City Island.”

Silly, but with heart ‘City Island’ puts good acting, plot into clever mix of humor and drama

V

ince is a man with a dream. Marlon Brando is his god. He would like to become an actor. This is not likely. He’s well into his 40s, a prison guard living with his family on City Island, a bucolic outcrop of the Bronx known mostly to its residents. Telling his wife he’s going to a poker game, he at-

tends acting classes in Manhattan. In one class, Vince creates a spot-on imitation, not of Marlon Brando, but of bad Brando imitators. Vince, played by Andy Garcia with brawny blue-collar dialogue, is married to Joyce (Julianna Margulies), who’s convinced the poker games mean

a mistress. His children hide secret lives. His daughter, Vivian (Dominik Garcia-Lorido), has dropped out of college and is working as a stripper in hopes of saving money to reapply. His son, Vinnie (Ezra Miller), is hooked not just on any old Internet porn, but on sites featuring fat women who eat on camera. The younger son in so many movie families is somehow weird. Two life-changing experiences happen to Vince. At work, he gets a new prisoner whose name

he has reason to recognize. He pulls the kid’s file to confirm it: Tony (Steven Strait) is the son he fathered in a long-ago affair. Meanwhile, in acting class, his teacher (Alan Arkin) assigns the students to pair up and share their biggest secret in order to prepare for a monologue. He draws Molly (Emily Mortimer), who slowly draws this secret from him. They meet often in the city — not to have an affair but because they become friends and confidants. Continued next page

ROGER EBERT

“City Island” 103 minutes PG-13, for sexual content, smoking and language


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 2010

movies

Just insert scary noise here ‘Nightmare’ remake isn’t worth a look

F

orget about the plot, the actors and the director. What you require to make a new “Nightmare on Elm Street” are these three off-the-shelf sound effects: 1. A sudden, loud clanging noise mixed with a musical chord. 2. Snicker-snack sounds, which Freddy Krueger’s steel finger claws make every time they are seen. 3. A voice deepener, to drop Freddy’s speaking voice to an ominous level. On top of that, you need your sudden cuts, your lighting from below, your thump-thumpthumps and of course a dog that barks at something unseen in the night, so t