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911 director fired, even as handling of situation is criticized

VA soon will offer better care in Bend Local clinic will expand primary, specialty and mental health services as early as next year. The common refrain: fewer trips to Portland.

Professor emerging as Republican favorite to beat Wyden By Keith Chu

By Hillary Borrud

The Bulletin

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WASHINGTON — Longtime Lewis and Clark Law professor Jim Huffman is running for the U.S. Senate as a Republican, but there’s only one word to describe his political philosophy: libertarian. From his seat at the Portland law school, Huffman has spent the past 30 years vociferously opposing federal environmental reg ulations, state zoning laws and, most Jim Huffman recently, the health care overhaul bill that became law last month. While the 65-year-old professor has never held political office, his long record of advocating for limits on federal power made him well-known in conservative circles and quickly made him the favorite of the state GOP, despite a crowded field of Republicans seeking to challenge incumbent Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. See Senate / A5

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Inside • Meet Jim Huffman, Page A5

“I think we would have enough to cover all the veterans in the Bend area for primary care, mental health and the specialties, so they don’t have to come up to Portland.”

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WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs plans to more than double the size of its Bend clinic. That means that as soon as next year, far fewer veterans will have to make a trip to Portland for basic medical care. The department recently started a search for a new facility in Bend, where it plans to dramatically expand the medical services it will offer Central Oregon vets, VA spokesman Mike McAleer said Tuesday. “I think we would have enough to cover all the veterans in the Bend area for primary care, mental health and the specialties, so they don’t have to come up to Portland,” McAleer said. An expanded clinic would save many veterans more than six hours of round-trip driving to get to Portland’s VA hospital, said Anne Philiben, president of Central Oregon Veteran’s Outreach.

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“I think it’ll just be so great that so many really sick people, elderly and blind people don’t have to go to Portland for their health care,” Philiben said. “That’s massive, that’s huge, a big relief for the people in this area.” The exact range of services at the new clinic hasn’t been decided, McAleer said. “We’ll be looking at how to best serve the veterans around Bend,” McAleer said. “We’re going to of course expand mental health, the eye clinic with ophthalmology and optometry. We’ll also increase the amount of primary care.” See Veterans / A5

“We’ve needed this so badly. Some of these men who are younger than I find it difficult to get in a van and drive three, four hours to Vancouver and Portland. They shouldn’t be forced to do that. They served their time.” — Ole Anker, 81-year-old Marine Corps veteran from Bend

“I use the clinic in Bend because I’ve got a whole long list of disabilities. … If I have specialized care I have to go to either Portland or St. Charles sometimes. If it’s an emergency, you have to go to St. Charles.” — Michael Ward, 65year-old Air Force veteran from Bend

Marijuana tempts cash-starved states By David Harrison Stateline.org

Mary Lou Dickerson had seen enough. After wrenching cuts to Washington’s state drug and alcohol treatment programs, Dickerson, a Democratic representative, introduced a bill this year to sell marijuana in state liquor stores — and tax it. Dickerson is an unlikely cru-

• The Tea Party movement spawns a field of challengers • The Democratic lineup, including Wyden

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— Mike McAleer, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“Wait and see when it happens. When I see it, I’ll believe it. … I think it’ll be really great if they get it going here. It’ll be really nice.” — Andy Carroll, 59-year-old Army veteran from Bend

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Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Navy veteran Russ Haupt, 67, gets an eye exam by Dr. Richard Gardner at the Veterans Affairs specialty clinic in Bend on Tuesday. The VA plans to more than double the size of its current treatment in Bend, adding services specialists including eye doctors. Local veterans are pleased they won’t have to drive six hours round trip to Portland, except for major procedures. “If it’s something that they referred me to Portland then sometimes I go there,” says Haupt, of Bend. “… Even if it costs me something to go to a civilian doctor in town, sometimes it’s better than making a trek to Portland.”

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Deschutes County 911 officials voted to fire the dispatch center’s director Tuesday, but several used the occasion to raise concerns about the process leading to the vote. Officials said their decision was based on 911 Director Becky McDonald allegedly lying to them about her romantic relationship with a 911 dispatcher’s husband and Becky that she could McDonald no longer lead the district. Officials plan to discuss later this month whether the district needs to be restructured to avoid problems in the future. Some members of the district’s board said it was difficult to communicate and get all parties together to make a decision. And County Administrator Dave Kanner said it made him uncomfortable the 911 board pursued an investigation based on a complaint from the dispatcher, Theresa Joye, since she had made comments suggesting she wanted to get McDonald fired. Kanner only sits on the 911 board for issues related to its director. McDonald disagrees with her dismissal and plans to appeal it to the Deschutes County Commission, her attorney, Katherine Tank, said Tuesday morning. Only Kanner voted against terminating McDonald. The 911 district’s governing board placed McDonald on paid administrative leave in early December, after Theresa Joye filed a worker’s compensation claim against the district saying the 911 center had become a hostile workplace because of McDonald’s relationship with her husband, Kyle Joye. See 911 / A6

sader for marijuana legalization. A 63-year-old grandmother who doesn’t use it, she says money was the only reason for proposing her controversial bill. “According to the state’s own estimates, it would bring in an additional $300 million per biennium,” she says. “I dedicated (in the bill) a great deal of the proceeds from the tax on marijuana

to treatment.” This has been a bumper year for marijuana legislation, according to state policy observers. Crushing state budget deficits gave advocates in California, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, New York and elsewhere an opening to pitch marijuana as a new source of tax revenue. See Marijuana / A4

Pot laws Oregon was the first state to decriminalize marijuana; after 1973, possession of less than 1 ounce of pot was no longer a crime in the state. • See Page A4 for a history of marijuana laws throughout the nation.

Bombing video brings notice to a notorious fringe Web site By Noam Cohen and Brian Stelter New York Times News Service

Three months ago, WikiLeaks, a whistle-blower Web site that posts classified and sensitive documents, put out an urgent call for help on Twitter. “Have encrypted videos of U.S. bomb strikes on civilians. We need super computer time.” Somehow — it will not say how — WikiLeaks, which calls itself “an intelligence agency of the people,” found the necessary computer time to de-encrypt a graphic video, released Monday, of a U.S. Army assault in Iraq in 2007 that left 12 people dead, including two Reuters news agency employees. The video has been viewed more than 2 million times on YouTube, and has been replayed hundreds of times in television news reports. The video’s release is drawing attention to the once-fringe Web site, which aims to bring to light hidden information about governments and multinational corporations — putting secrets in plain sight and protecting the identity of those who help do so. See WikiLeaks / A4


A2 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Exploring Obama’s wildlife record: Some progress but a few disappointments A N A LY S I S By Paul Rogers San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News

During his first year in office, President Barack Obama won praise from environmental groups for a wide range of decisions, from toughening gas mileage rules to spending billions on renewable energy projects. But now there’s grumbling on his green flank. A growing number of environmentalists are clashing with the administration over its management of America’s struggling wildlife populations and what they call its reluctance to use the nation’s most powerful environmental law, the Endangered Species Act, to stand up to industry. Five conservation groups, led by the Sierra Club, are suing the federal government, stemming from a decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refusing to draw up critical habitat maps for the Florida panther. Florida’s state animal, the iconic panther, once widely roamed the South, but today numbers 100 or fewer. Protecting its habitat would limit development in parts of South Florida, an explosive political issue. The administration sparked controversy recently when it announced it would not add the American pika to the endangered species list. Found in California’s Sierra Nevada range and the Rocky Mountains, the pika is a rabbit-like mammal that has been considered symbolic of the impact of global warming because it can overheat and die at temperatures above 78 degrees. However, declaring it endangered could have led to new restrictions on coal mining, oil drilling and other fossil fuel uses. The Fish and Wildlife Service said that although it expects the West to warm, and although pika numbers are declining, there is enough alpine land for the pika to move to higher elevations and not go extinct. “We’re coming off eight years of the Bush administration where they actively worked to cripple endangered species programs,� said biologist Noah Greenwald, endangered species program director for the Center for Biological Diversity, a nonprofit group in Tucson. “We would have liked to have seen a strong effort by the Obama administration. But we just haven’t seen it.�

Many lawsuits

The Associated Press file photos

Meanwhile, the pika, a small mountain-dwelling mammal in the West that can’t tolerate heat above 78 degrees, would have been the first animal in the continental U.S. to receive federal protections primarily because of climate change, but the Obama administration refused to list it under the Endangered Species Act.

The Obama administration’s recent decisions on two iconic species in different parts of country — the Florida panther, left, and the American pika — have angered environmentalists. The panther — Florida’s state animal — once roamed the American South but now numbers below 100. aren’t troubled by the trend, and that fewer species should be listed because endangered-species rules curb important economic activity. “Frankly, the Obama administration is defending the record of the Fish and Wildlife Service under (George W. Bush),� said William Perry Pendley, president of the Mountain States Legal Foundation, a property rights group in Denver that once was run by James Watt, Reagan’s interior secretary. “But the bottom line is that Obama’s been up to enough mischief in other areas — global warming, a war on oil and gas development, that kind of thing — to certainly balance it out.�

&OEBOHFSFETQFDJFTVOEFSQSFTJEFOUT The Obama administration has listed fewer species under the federal Endangered Species Act than any administration in a president’s ďŹ rst year since Ronald Reagan. Average annual number of species listed during each president’s term: 

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Battleground species To be sure, environmentalists have been pleased by some wildlife decisions. Chief among them: Obama’s announcement early in his term that he would overturn a Bush rule that weakened the Endangered Species Act by no longer requiring federal agencies to consult with experts about potential effects on wildlife before allowing projects to go ahead. Yet the number of animal showdowns is increasing: • The gray wolf. In March of last year, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, a former rancher, announced he would uphold a Bush administration decision to strip endangered protections from the Northern Rockies gray wolf, citing increases in its numbers. Months later, Idaho and Montana opened a sport hunting season and since then, 230 of the estimated 1,350 wolves in the two states have been killed. A dozen environmental groups have sued. • The polar bear. The Obama administration upheld a Bush decision to list the polar bear as threatened, but also agreed to ban consideration of greenhouse gas emissions in reviews of federal projects affecting the bear. Obama officials said endangered species rules aren’t the right vehicle to address climate change.

In its first year, Obama’s administration added only two new species to the endangered list — the Idaho slick spot pepper grass and a white flower named Phyllostegia hispida, found only on the Hawaiian island of Molokai — the fewest in any president’s first year since Ronald Reagan in 1981. Valerie Fellows, a spokeswom- Varying views an for the Fish and Wildlife SerEnvironmental leaders have vice, said the agency plans to list varying views. Some think the 55 new species this year, includ- White House is deliberately trying ing 48 found only to limit controversy on Kauai. Much of and concentrate on the past year, she a few key priorities The list said, was spent such as health care About 250 species responding to lawand the economy. remain on the suits filed over the “Wildlife issues “candidatesâ€? list for past decade. have been conendangered status. “Up until very signed to the back Federal biologists recently, our entire burner. The meshave concluded they listing budget was sage is, don’t make are scientifically driven completely waves on them,â€? worthy of protection. by court-ordered said Jeff Ruch, ex• The U.S. Fish and action, lawsuits ecutive director of Wildlife Service, and litigation,â€? FelPublic Employees which administers the lows said. But now for Environmental Endangered Species that the agency is Responsibility, a Act, publishes digging out, it can nonprofit in Washinformation on do more proactive ington, D.C. threatened or work, she said. Others say they endangered species, Because the are pleased the ador candidates for Endangered Speministration has listing and delisting, cies Act, signed by chosen more scienonline at www.fws. President Richard tists and conservagov/endangered/ Nixon in 1973, can tionists to fill midwildlife.html. be used to limit delevel and top posts, velopment, logging, and that a few early mining and other bumps in the road projects, adding new species can are to be expected. “Just like this be controversial. When the Bush administration inherited a terrible administration designated the po- economic situation and two wars, lar bear as “threatenedâ€? in 2008, it also inherited an endangered roughly 10 lawsuits were filed species program that had been against the federal government, devastated by backlogs,â€? said atFellows said, some by groups ar- torney Bob Irvin, senior vice presguing it shouldn’t be protected and ident of Defenders of Wildlife. others by groups wanting more “This is a four-year marathon, not protections. a one-year sprint.â€? Some who have worked to A few weeks before he left oflimit environmental laws say they fice, President Bush told federal

officials that, in effect, they did not have to bother getting the advice of wildlife experts before taking actions that might harm plants or animals protected by the Endangered Species Act.

Early last month, Obama said that, in effect, they did. At a March 3 visit to the Interior Department marking its 160th anniversary, Obama said he had signed a memorandum directing the Interior

and Commerce Departments to review a regulation that the Bush administration issued Dec. 16. The regulation lifted longstanding requirements that agencies contemplating actions that might affect endangered species consult with scientists from the Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service and to take their guidance into account. Until the review is complete, Obama’s memorandum says, agencies must return to the former practice of seeking and acting on scientific advice. In brief remarks, the president said he had signed the memorandum to “help restore the scientific process to its rightful place� in the working of the Endangered Species Act. “We should be looking for ways to improve it, not weaken it,� Obama said of the act. The New York Times contributed to this report.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 A3

T S 25 deaths raise safety questions again By Lawrence Messina The Associated Press

MONTCOAL, W.Va. — Rescuers held out slim hope Tuesday that four missing coal miners might have survived when a mine repeatedly cited for improperly venting methane gas exploded, killing 25 people in the country’s deadliest underground disaster in a quarter-century.

CHURCH ABUSE

A day after the blast in southern West Virginia, desperate rescuers began boring into the mine in hopes of releasing poisonous gases so crews could go in search of the men. But Gov. Joe Manchin said it could be midday today before much progress is made. “I don’t want to give anybody any false hope, but by golly, if I’m on that side of the table, and

that’s my father or my brother or my uncle or my cousins, I’m going to have hope,” he said. Massey Energy Co., which owns the Upper Big Branch mine, was fined more than $382,000 in the past year for repeated serious violations involving its ventilation plan and equipment. The company’s chief executive said the mine was not unsafe, but federal regulators planned to review its many violations. In an area where coal is king,

people anxiously awaited word on the missing miners. One resident hung a “Praying 4 Our Miners” banner outside a home. The death toll was the highest in a U.S. mine since 1984, when 27 people died in a fire at Emery Mining Corp.’s mine in Orangeville, Utah. If the four missing bring the total to 29, it would be the most killed in a U.S. coal mine since a 1970 explosion killed 38 at Finley Coal Co. in Hyden, Ky.

RIO’S WORST RAINS IN HISTORY KILL AT LEAST 95

Indian priest won’t fight extradition to the states New York Times News Service NEW DELHI — A Roman Catholic priest in southern India charged with sexually assaulting a teenage girl in Minnesota in 2004 said Tuesday that he would return to face the charges, though he and his supervising bishop in India said they did not know about the criminal charges until reporters contacted them. But letters released Tuesday by a lawyer for the Holy See in the United States show the Rev. Joseph Palanivel Jeyapaul was told by his diocesan administrator in India of the accusations in 2005 and urged to cooperate with church and civil authorities. He continues to work in an administrative position in the church. The lawyer, Jeffrey Lena, said that the Vatican had recommended that the priest be defrocked but that canon law dictated that the decision rested with his superiors in India. They ordered him to undergo counseling and spend a year in prayer. Criminal charges were filed in Minnesota in December 2006 against Jeyapaul after a teenager accused him of forcing her to have oral sex in 2004, when she was 14. Jeyapaul said Tuesday he was unaware of any criminal case against him until he was contacted by reporters Monday and that he would be willing to return to the U.S. to prove his innocence. “I am ready to do it,” he said in a telephone interview. “I want to explain myself, that I am innocent.”

Challenges at the Vatican The sex abuse scandal engulfing the church is by far the most tenacious and complex crisis Pope Benedict XVI has faced. And it is a crucial test for a papacy that many Vatican observers say has a deep internal flaw: its management. Benedict is “a brilliant teacher and preacher, but not a strong administrator,” said George Weigel, an expert on the Vatican and a biographer of John Paul II, in an e-mail message. “To be candid,” Weigel added, “that’s what has seemed to many sympathetic observers of this pontificate that it has been missing thus far.” That Benedict’s papacy has gone from crisis to crisis points to its difficulties as an ancient institution still struggling with modernity. A decade after a sexual abuse crisis hit the United States, stirring up fierce anger and costing the church an estimated $2 billion in settlements, Vatican experts say the Vatican has not yet constructed an adequate infrastructure for processing abuse cases.

The Associated Press

A family is rescued after the heaviest rains in Rio de Janeiro’s history triggered landslides Tuesday that killed at least 95 people as rising water turned roads into rivers and paralyzed Brazil’s second-largest city. The ground gave way in steep hillside slums, cutting red-brown paths of destruction through shantytowns. Concrete and wooden homes were crushed and hurtled downhill, only to bury other structures. The future host city of the Olympics and football World Cup ground to a near halt as Mayor Eduar-

do Paes urged workers to stay home and closed all schools. Most businesses were shuttered. Eleven inches of rain fell in less than 24 hours, and more rain began falling early this morning. Officials said potential mudslides threatened at least 10,000 homes in the city of 6 million people. Neither the 2014 World Cup nor the 2016 Olympics will be held during Brazil’s rainy season. Brazil’s president played down the possibility that similar downpours could wash out the biggest sporting events the country will ever host.

Nuclear strategy splits many differences By Jonathan S. Landay and Margaret Talev McClatchy-Tribune News Service

With the new nuclear arms strategy he unveiled Tuesday, President Barack Obama aims to prod the world toward disarmament and stronger anti-terrorism efforts by rallying disparate interests — arms controllers, U.S. allies, nuclear and non-nuclear nations, and Republicans and other military hawks back home. Experts across the spectrum agreed that the Nuclear Posture Review represents a significant retreat by the U.S. from its traditional posture of reserving the right to use nuclear force against other nations, even as it maintains a robust arsenal to check Russia and retains Iran and North Korea as potential targets. Still, as is characteristic of many of Obama’s major policy initiatives, the new strategy isn’t as far-reaching as liberals had hoped or conservatives had feared. It contains initiatives sought by both sides, including Republican senators whose votes he needs to ratify the new armsreduction treaty that he’s to sign Thursday with Russia. “It’s not a radical document, not at all,” said Sharon Squassoni, the director of the Proliferation Prevention Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a center-right Washington research group. “It reduces the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy. And it doesn’t shy away from uncertainty.” While the review says the U.S. won’t test new nuclear weapons, it allows what some experts see as a back door for expanding war-

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Obama: Nuclear terror is top threat to U.S. Rewriting America’s nuclear strategy, the White House on Tuesday announced a fundamental shift that calls the spread of atomic weapons to rogue states or terrorists a worse threat than the nuclear Armageddon feared during the Cold War. “For the first time, preventing nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism is now at the top of America’s nuclear agenda,” Obama said, distancing his administration from the decades-long U.S. focus on arms competition with Russia. “The greatest threat to U.S. and global security is no longer a nuclear exchange between nations, but nuclear terrorism by violent extremists,” he said. Obama’s announcement set the stage for his trip to Prague on Thursday to sign a new arms reduction agreement with Russia. And it precedes a gathering in Washington on Monday of government leaders from more than 40 countries to discuss improving safeguards against terrorists acquiring nuclear bombs. — The Associated Press

head production capacity if circumstances change or if a future president wants to shift course. The strategy also calls for a major program to modernize the country’s aging nuclear weapons facilities, some of which date back to World War II, at a cost of about $5 billion over the next five years, acknowledging but not entirely satisfying a key Republican demand.

While it says that the U.S. would no longer threaten nuclear force against non-nuclear powers that launched biological or chemical attacks, they would have to be in compliance with their obligations under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Moreover, the administration reserved the right to change that policy in response to advances by U.S. foes in biological warfare technology.

Baja quake boosts risk of California temblors Bulletin wire reports The Baja California earthquake — the strongest to hit the region in more than a century — jostled fault lines, triggered 500 aftershocks in a day and will leave the area shaking for weeks, geologists said. Baja, a state in Mexico bordering Southern California, experienced at least five aftershocks of magnitude 5 or greater and can expect continued tremors for a month or more as the earth settles, said Paul Earle, a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey. While the risk of an even larger earthquake is elevated, it diminishes each day that passes. The magnitude 7.2 Baja earthquake occurred Sunday and was the third powerful temblor to roil the Americas this year, following one in Haiti and one in Chile. No consensus exists among scientists over whether a large earthquake increases or decreases the likelihood of a bigger future temblor, said Morgan Page, a geologist at the geologic survey in Pasadena, Calif. Small tremors boost the chances of triggering a larger quake, she said. Some scientists theorize that large earthquakes behave differently, relieving so much pressure they reduce the chances of another big one.

7.7 quake strikes Indonesian island A 7.7 earthquake shook Indonesia’s northwest island of Sumatra early this morning, prompting a brief tsunami warning and sending residents rushing for higher ground. There were scattered reports of injuries, but only minor damage was reported in most areas. At least five strong aftershocks measuring up to 5.2 were recorded. A 2004 tsunami triggered by a magnitude-9.2 earthquake in the same part of Indonesia killed 230,000 people in a dozen countries on the Indian Ocean basin. — The Associated Press

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Marijuana Continued from A1 At the same time, the Obama administration gave users and distributors some breathing room by signaling in October that it would scale back on prosecuting them as long as they comply with state law. Eighteen states discussed medical marijuana through legislation or citizen initiatives this year. Most visibly, California election officials announced March 24 that this year’s ballot would include a question to allow local governments to legalize and tax marijuana, casting a spotlight on the state that first legalized medical marijuana in 1996. The Washington state proposal died in committee, but Dickerson, who chairs the House Human Services Committee, expects to reintroduce it. While most state legislative efforts are likely to fail, a victory in California could encourage other states to follow suit just as they did when California approved medical marijuana. A 2009 poll found 56 percent of California voters support outright legalization. Estimates from California’s Board of Equalization peg the amount the state could raise from marijuana legalization at $1.4 billion. But those projections rest on shaky assumptions that the state could keep track of growers and that distributors would accurately disclose their sales, if at all. And since marijuana is still illegal under federal law, it’s unclear how the Obama administration would ultimately react to more permissive state marijuana laws. Officials have struggled for years with the legal questions posed by state and federal marijuana laws that appear to be in conflict. “The more people talk about marijuana laws, the more people come to the conclusion that they’ve completely failed, so we’re definitely optimistic here,” said Aaron Smith, California policy director for the Marijuana Policy Project. Meanwhile, opponents of legalization in California are gearing up for their own campaign, knowing that the rest of the country will be watching. “We have a lot of pressure on us,” says Aimee Hendle, statewide coordinator of Californians for Drug Free Youth. She sees marijuana advocates as opportunists exploiting the state’s financial distress. “They are seeing the vulnerability of the citizens of California with the state of our state,” she says.

Route to new revenue Arizona is also going this route for new tax revenue. Senators there have already approved levying the state sales tax on medical marijuana, even though voters won’t weigh in on medical marijuana until this November’s ballot. In Nevada, marijuana advocates are busy collecting signatures to place a legalization measure on the state’s 2012 ballot. Rather than leaving the question of legalization up to local governments, as California’s initiative does, Nevada’s proposal would legalize and tax marijuana statewide. Nevada voters have already approved medical marijuana. David Schwartz, campaign manager for Nevadans for Sensible Drug Laws, will be watching his counterparts in California. “If they win, it will be a stark event in the long battle to end marijuana prohibitions in this country,” he says. In South Dakota, Emmet Reistroffer is also among those following the news from California. Last year, he took time off from the University of South Dakota to gather signatures for a medical marijuana ballot initiative. It was a grass-roots effort, drawing 40 volunteers, almost no national attention and no funding from major marijuana policy groups. Reistroffer, a Sioux Falls 20-year-old, took a part-time job at a local bar to make ends meet. While he says he doesn’t necessarily support outright legalization, he wants to make marijuana accessible for patients like his mother, who suffers from lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. She has used marijuana in the past, he says. “While I was growing up I had friends in DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education),” he says. I’ve always looked at it very differently. I’ve always seen this injustice and felt obligated to do something about it.” Reistroffer plans to spend his summer trying to convince voters at county fairs. In 2006, voters turned down a medical marijuana measure on a close vote, the only state that has ever done so. If the measure passes this year, it will mark a significant shift in South Dakota’s attitude toward marijuana, he says.

A history of marijuana laws 1972: A commission led by former Pennsylvania governor Raymond Shafer recommends to President Richard Nixon that marijuana be decriminalized. 1973: Oregon decriminalizes possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana. 1975: Colorado decriminalizes possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana. • Ohio decriminalizes possession of 100 grams or less of marijuana. 1976: California decriminalizes possession of 28.5 grams or less of marijuana. • Maine decriminalizes possession of 1.25 ounces or less of marijuana. • Minnesota decriminalizes possession of 42.5 grams or less of marijuana. 1977: Mississippi decriminalizes possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana. • New York decriminalizes possession of 25 grams or less of marijuana. • North Carolina decriminalizes possession of half an ounce or less of marijuana. 1978: Nebraska decriminalizes possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana. 1981: Ronald Reagan becomes president. His administration would take a tough stand against drugs, discouraging states from softening their marijuana policies. 1996: California is the first state to legalize medical marijuana. 2003: Maryland establishes a defendant’s medical condition as an affirmative defense in marijuana prosecutions. 2005: The U.S. Supreme Court finds that the federal government could take steps prohibiting cultivation and distribution of marijuana despite state laws allowing medical marijuana in Gonzales v. Raich. The ruling reinforces the federal government’s supremacy over states in this area. 2009: The U.S. Department of Justice signals it will not aggressively prosecute suppliers or users of marijuana if they are complying with state medical marijuana laws.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA LEGALIZED IN 13 STATES 1996: California 1998: Oregon, Washington 1999: Alaska, Maine 2000: Hawaii 2001: Colorado, Nevada 2004: Montana, Vermont 2006: Rhode Island 2007: New Mexico 2008: Michigan • Washington, D.C., and New Jersey have passed laws legalizing medical marijuana. Sources: The National Conference of State Legislatures, the Marijuana Policy Project and the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws

How much revenue? But states shouldn’t count on a revenue bonanza from marijuana since distributors still risk federal prosecution by emerging from the shadows, according to Robert Mikos, a Vanderbilt University law professor. Ideally, the thousands of smallscale marijuana farm operations would consolidate into larger groups that would be easy for states to tax, but the federal ban makes that unlikely, he says. “If you get too big, you attract the attention of the federal government. If you’re a mom-andpop marijuana distributor in California right now, you have almost no concern about the federal ban,” Mikos says. Also, states would have to keep track of growers who have paid taxes. “That’s a goldmine of information for the federal government,” Mikos says. “If California requires marijuana distributors to keep records of all their sales, the federal government could sweep in, take that information and use it to prosecute these people.” In October, the Justice Department released a memo indicating it would back off from prosecuting medical marijuana users who are complying with state law, but the memo did not say the department would tolerate outright legalization in states, opening up more legal ambiguities. “The federal government will continue to try to combat recreational marijuana, so California is kind of getting ahead of itself,” Mikos says. But Hendle and other opponents of legalization will also keep up their fight. “Even if you say it’s only for people over the age of 21, that’s what they say about alcohol and look at all the underage drinking that we have,” she says. “We’re now going to make this a larger problem.”

Recession likely behind low birth rate By Mike Stobbe The Associated Press

ATLANTA — U.S. births fell in 2008, likely because of the recession, updated government figures confirm. The one exception to the trend was the birth rate among women in their 40s, who perhaps felt they didn’t have the luxury of waiting for better economic times.

The birth rate for women in their early 40s rose a surprising 4 percent over the previous year, reaching its highest mark since 1967. The rate for women in their late 40s also rose, slightly. But birth rates fell for teen mothers, as well as women in their 20s and 30s. Experts don’t know for certain why so many are delaying hav-

ing babies, though some suspect the economy is a big factor. However, “you get to the point where the biological clock starts ticking and people realize they have to do it,” said Trussell, who was not involved in the research. The new report on births was issued Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s based on a review of more than

99 percent of birth certificates for 2008 — the first full year of the recession. Overall, about 4.2 million babies were born that year, a 2 percent drop from 2007. It’s the first annual decline in births since the start of the decade. Experts say the most likely explanations are the recession and a decline in immigration to the United States.

MORE VIOLENCE IN IRAQ

50 dead as bombings stoke fears of warfare New York Times News Service Deadly blasts shook Baghdad for the second time in three days Tuesday, deepening fears of a new outbreak of insurgent and sectarian violence. At least seven bombings of residential areas of the Iraqi capital, both Shiite and Sunni, killed 50 people and wounded more than 140. The violence came against a backdrop of continuing political instability after March 7 parliamentary elections left no single group able to form a government, forcing a scramble to form coalitions.

WikiLeaks Continued from A1 Accordingly, the site has become a thorn in the side of authorities in the United States and abroad. With the Iraq attack video, the clearinghouse for sensitive documents is edging closer toward a form of investigative journalism and to advocacy. “That’s arguably what spy agencies do — high-tech investigative journalism,” Julian Assange, one of the site’s founders, said in an interview Tuesday. “It’s time that the media upgraded its capabilities along those lines.” Assange, an Australian activist and journalist, founded the site three years ago along with a group of like-minded activists and computer experts. Since then, WikiLeaks has published documents about toxic dumping in Africa, protocols from Guantanamo Bay, e-mails from Sarah Palin’s personal account and 9⁄11 pager messages. Today there is a core group of five full-time volunteers, according to Daniel Schmitt, a site spokesman, and the group can call on 800 to 1,000 people for expertise on topics like encryption, programming and writing up news releases.

Shaping the news The site is not shy about its intent to shape media coverage, and Assange said he considers himself both a journalist and an advocate; should he be forced to choose one, he would choose advocate. WikiLeaks didn’t merely post the 38-minute-long video, it used the label “Collateral Murder” and said it depicted “indiscriminate” and “unprovoked” slaying. (The Pentagon defended the killings and said no disciplinary action was taken at the time of the incident.) “From my human point of view, I couldn’t believe it would be so easy to wreak that kind of havoc on the city, when they

A similar political void after the 2005 parliamentary vote preceded Iraq’s bloody sectarian warfare of 2006 and 2007, from which the country has only begun to emerge. There are also new concerns that Iraq’s army and police may drift back into sectarianism. The explosions on Tuesday came after at least 30 people were killed and more than 240 were wounded during attacks Sunday on diplomatic buildings in Baghdad, including the Iranian Embassy. U.S. combat troops are scheduled to leave Iraq by Aug. 31.

can’t see what is really going on there,” Schmitt said in an interview from Germany on Monday. The Web site also posted a 17-minute edited version, which proved to be much more widely viewed on YouTube than the full version. Critics contend that the shorter video was misleading because it did not make clear that the attacks took place amid clashes in the neighborhood and that one of the men was carrying a rocket-propelled grenade. By releasing such a graphic video, one that a media organization had tried in vain to get through traditional channels, WikiLeaks has inserted itself into the national discussion about the role of journalism in the digital age. Where judges and plaintiffs could once stop or delay publication with a court order, WikiLeaks exists in a digital sphere where information becomes instantly available. “The most significant thing about the release of the Baghdad video is that several million more people are on the same page,” with knowledge of WikiLeaks, said Lisa Lynch, an assistant professor of journalism at Concordia University in Montreal, who recently published a paper about the site. “It is amazing that outside of the conventional channels of information something like this can happen.” Reuters had tried for 21⁄2 years through the Freedom of Information Act to obtain the Iraq video to no avail. WikiLeaks, as always, refuses to say how it obtained the video and credits only “our courageous source.” Assange said “research institutions” offered to help decrypt the Army video, but he declined to detail how they went about it. After decrypting the attack video, WikiLeaks in concert with an Icelandic television channel sent two people to Baghdad last weekend to gather information about the killings, at a cost of $50,000, the site said. David Schlesinger, Reuters

The Associated Press

A woman grieves at the scene of a blast in central Baghdad, where bombs ripped through apartment buildings and a market in mostly Shiite areas of the Iraqi capital on Tuesday, killing 50 people in postelection bloodshed that threatens to rekindle sectarian warfare that nearly destroyed the country three years ago.

editor in chief, said Tuesday the video was disturbing to watch “but also important to watch.” He said he hopes to meet with the Pentagon “to press the need to learn lessons from this tragedy.” WikiLeaks publishes its material on its own site, which is housed on a few dozen servers around the globe, including in Sweden, Belgium and the United States, jurisdictions the organization considers friendly to journalists and document leakers, Schmitt said.

Everywhere, yet nowhere By being everywhere yet in no exact place, WikiLeaks is, in effect, beyond the reach of any institution or government that hopes to silence it. Because it relies on donations, however, WikiLeaks says it has struggled to keep its servers online. It has found moral (but not financial) support from some news organizations, such as The Guardian newspaper in the United Kingdom, which said in January that “If you want to read the exposes of the future, it’s time to chip in.” On Tuesday, WikiLeaks claimed to have another encrypted video, allegedly showing a U.S. airstrike in Afghanistan that killed 97 civilians last year, and used the opportunity to ask for donations. WikiLeaks has grown increasingly controversial as it has published more material. (The U.S. Army called it a threat to its operations in a report last month.)

Many have tried to silence the site; in Britain, WikiLeaks has been used a number of times to evade injunctions on publication by courts who ruled that the material would violate the privacy of the people involved. These courts, too, reversed themselves when they discovered how ineffectual their rulings were. An early attempt to shut down the site involved a federal district court judge in California. In 2008, Judge Jeffrey White ordered the American version of the site shut down after it published confidential documents concerning a subsidiary of a Swiss bank. Two weeks later he reversed himself, in part recognizing that the order had little effect because the same material could be accessed on a number of other “mirror sites.” “We live in an age when people can do some good things and people can do some terrible things without accountability necessarily in a court of law,” White said.

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Senate Continued from A1 “It comes from … having written a number of things having been around public life for a very long time,” said Greg Leo, communications director for the Oregon Republican Party. That same record, though, includes endorsement of some issues that have proved politically divisive among moderates in the past, including privatizing Social Security and upholding Oregon’s Measure 37, a ballot initiative which effectively repealed many land use laws in 2004. The law was mostly reversed in 2007 by another ballot initiative, Measure 49. And he’s risked the wrath of some conservatives with a handsoff stance on abortion rights and gay marriage. But Huffman said his first priority is scaling back federal spending, cutting taxes and streamlining regulations on businesses, which he said is needed to boost the economy. “If we had an economy that wasn’t taxed in unpredictable ways and had a regulatory world in which these businesses could operate with some level of predictability without the threat of various new regulatory regimes off in the future, then we’d have a vibrant economy and Oregon state would have a much better revenue picture than it’s had,” Huffman said. Paring regulations is also Huffman’s solution to the high unemployment rates in Central and Eastern Oregon. He favors allowing more logging and resource extraction on federal lands. Wyden’s proposed forest bill, which would mandate higher timber harvest targets in exchange for stronger old-growth protections, doesn’t do enough for the timber industry, Huffman said. “I think it’s a step in the right direction, but I don’t think it goes anywhere near far enough,” he said. Although several logging companies and the American Forest Resources Council have endorsed the bill, Huffman said they can do better. “They should be grasping for more than that,” he said.

Veterans Continued from A1 The current Bend VA clinic, located just north of St. Charles Bend, is about 10,000 square feet. The new clinic will be between 20,000 and 24,000 square feet, McAleer said. The clinic won’t move into a new facility until sometime after the VA’s current lease expires in December 2010, and maybe not for a year after that, he said. Alan Allison is an Air Force veteran who is the volunteer driver of a Disabled American Veterans van that takes up to 10 vets to Portland five days a week. The van leaves Bend at

On health care reform, Huffman said he would support efforts to repeal the measure that became law last month, although he said amending the law may be more realistic. Huffman blamed Wyden for voting for the bill and abandoning reform ideas that Wyden had pushed for earlier in the debate. “He was in position to have real influence,” Huffman said. “He could have made some demands and gotten some of the things he had previously said was good ideas.” Huffman’s most controversial writing might be the signature he put on a 2005 petition. That document, circulated by the libertarian Cato Institute and conservative FreedomWorks, called for at least partial privatization of Social Security, in order to give seniors more control over their benefits. Asked about that decision, Huffman said he still supports at least some kind of privatization of the program. “I think Social Security is in desperate need of some kind of reform or it’s going to go bellyup and we’re going to have a disastrous situation on our hands,” Huffman said. “I think some elements of a privatized approach in which people have some control over how their money is being used makes sense. I would continue to support that option. I’m not saying any particular form of that, and probably not total privatization.” For conservatives, Huffman’s libertarian streak on social issues — he supports allowing gay marriage and abortion rights — might cause the most trouble. He said he wouldn’t change his views to conform to the Oregon Republican Party platform, which says the group “will support, financially or with in-kind contributions, only those candidates or nominees of the party who support measures to end so-called ‘partial birth abortions.’” “I’m really not happy with those kinds of pronouncements from the Republican Party or any other kind of entity,” Huffman said. “It’s really distorting of our politics.” Federal Election Commission records show that Huffman was a regular contributor to Republican

6 a.m. and begins the return trip at about 2 p.m., Allison said. While veterans aren’t crazy about six hours of driving, Allison said he rarely hears complaints. “A lot of those vets, hey, that’s the only medical care they’ve got,” Allison said. The new clinic won’t end the long drives completely, McAleer said. For more involved procedures, such as surgeries and cancer treatments, the Portland VA Medical Center will still be the only place for Oregon vets. Philiben said her group and others will have to find a better way to get veterans to the new clinic, given the gaps in Central Oregon’s public transportation.

U.S. Senate JIM HUFFMAN Seeking the Republican nomination

Age: 65 Hometown: Portland Family: Wife, Leslie. Three school-age children and two older children from a previous marriage. Employment: Professor at Lewis and Clark Law School since 1978. Political, community experience: Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment, Board of Directors, 1997-present; Cato Supreme Court Review, Editorial Board, 2002-present; Oregonians in Action Legal Center, Board Member, 1991-present. candidates and committees in the 1990s and 2000s, especially to Oregon’s former Sen. Gordon Smith, former President George W. Bush and the National Republican Senatorial Committee. It’s unclear how much money Huffman and other Republican candidates have raised to date. That will become public sometime after the Federal Election Commission reporting deadline for campaign contributions on April 15. Huffman leaned on his tenure as dean of Lewis and Clark Law School as something that allows him to understand the concerns of small business owners. Managing the school’s faculty and programs, “It was really like running a small business,” Huffman said. Asked about his responsibilities, current law school dean Bob Klonoff said the job entails proposing a budget, conducting community outreach, overseeing hiring of faculty and staff, fundraising, designing a curriculum and planning law school conferences and events, with active involvement from faculty

“We’re going to have to step up,” she said. Some local vets are skeptical the new clinic will happen at all. “When I see it, I’ll believe it,” said 59-year-old Andy Carroll, of Bend, a former medic in Vietnam who occasionally takes the van to Portland. “They always promise things and then three years down the road, you might get another whisper out of it. … Things are very slow in getting anything taken care of for the veterans.” Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com. Diane S.W. Lee contributed to this report.

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and staff. In the budget process, Klonoff, who emphasized that he wasn’t endorsing any candidate in the Senate race, said the dean proposes budgets, which are then subject to a faculty vote and review by the college’s board of trustees. Bill Funk was the only one of four Lewis and Clark Law School professors contacted by The Bulletin who would agree to speak on the record about Huffman’s tenure as dean. Half a dozen other professors didn’t return messages by late Tuesday afternoon. Funk, who has taught at Lewis and Clark since 1983, said Huffman was a successful leader at the school for the first decade on the job. “For most of that period of time everybody loved him and he was a great dean,” Funk said. “We have more clinics and centers and institutes now largely because of his leadership.” Near the end of Huffman’s run as dean, an initiative to overhaul some pay incentives for faculty led to a split among professors, Funk said. Rather than building consensus, Huffman seemed content to push through the changes he wanted, Funk said. “He got a little impatient and the faculty didn’t like that as much so they were less happy with him,” Funk said. Huffman didn’t disagree that his later agenda split the faculty. But he said it was because he felt changing professor pay was important enough to pass with a slight majority of faculty members supporting it. “It’s probably true there were at least a handful of faculty that felt I was not as interested in trying to reach consensus as I had been in the past,” Huffman said. “I felt these were important enough issues that I felt we needed to try to accomplish them.” The other candidates seeking the Republican nomination to the Senate seat held by Wyden are Walter Woodland, Keith Waldron, Tom Stutzman, Robin Parker, Loren Later and Shane Dinkel. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

FURNITURE OUTLET

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 A5

Immigration legislation seen as unlikely in 2010 Hearst News Service Despite his health care victory, President Barack Obama’s renewed pledge to overhaul immigration laws this year remains in serious doubt. Thousands of pro-immigration activists attending a recent rally heard Obama vow to forge a bipartisan consensus to overcome the gridlock and bickering that has doomed reform legislation in the past. But the reaction to that promise has been a cold dose of political realism in and out of Congress. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said she wants the Senate to address the issue first, but there is no Senate bill. With the legislative calendar

crowded, and with most lawmakers working with an eye on the November elections, the political will to tackle such a divisive issue is nowhere in evidence. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, RS.C., have drafted broad outlines of what they think a Senate bill should include. Following the raw feelings of the health care debate, even Graham, the one Republican working with Democrats on immigration, is threatening to retreat. Nearly a third of Senate Democrats and a majority of Republicans voted to block the bipartisan bill in 2007 that would have granted citizenship for the roughly 11 million unauthorized immigrants in this country.

Change afoot as Britain finally schedules election for May 6 The Associated Press LONDON — Britain is bracing for a May 6 general election that may alter the landscape of its politics — a race that offers at least three unpredictable outcomes and one of the most dramatic since Tony Blair defeated the Conservatives in 1997. Prime Minister Gordon Brown announced the longawaited election date Tuesday as the resurgent Conservatives prepared for battle against the bedraggled Labour incumbents with the nation drowning in debt after a golden age of economic prosperity. Youthful and charismatic Conservative leader David Cameron once seemed certain to grab power after 13 years of Labour rule — but tightening polls and quirks of the British election system leave the outcome uncertain. Whoever

wins, Britain could well become an altered state with higher taxes, fewer services, tougher business regulations and less willingness to join expensive U.S.-led military campaigns. The election comes at a bruising time for Britain’s main political parties — all three were stung in a scandal about expenses that exposed lawmakers who filed claims for everything from pornography to chandeliers at their country estates. Voters, meanwhile, lost jobs and homes as Britain struggled with the worst recession since World War II and the largest deficit among the Group of 7 nations.

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A6 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

911 Continued from A1 McDonald earns $98,137 a year, and has continued to receive a paycheck since she was placed on leave Dec. 3. At the same time, Interim Director Andy Jordan has earned more than $8,000 a month and the investigator hired to conduct a personnel investigation and produce a four-page report charged $5,554, county officials have said. The 911 board first learned of McDonald’s affair with Kyle Joye from Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton in early November, according to notes written by Bend Fire Chief Larry Huhn, the current chairman of the 911 board. The Bulletin obtained the notes through a public records request. Blanton heard about the relationship from Deputy Kyle Joye’s supervisor, according to Huhn’s notes. The sheriff wanted to place McDonald on paid administrative leave immediately and launch an investigation. Blanton could not be reached for comment on that point later Tuesday. Huhn and another fire chief on the 911 board who questioned McDonald about the situation said she lied to them by indicating the relationship was platonic, not sexual. McDonald has maintained the chiefs only asked whether she was having an inappropriate relationship, and she answered truthfully that it was not inappropriate because she and Kyle Joye were separated from their spouses.

Handling is criticized Kanner said he has been uncomfortable with the entire process, including the two options before the 911 board Tuesday: firing McDonald, or reinstating her as 911 director. He did not support either one, and would have preferred to demote McDonald or move her to a job in a different county department. Kanner said he was also uncomfortable the McDonald situation came to the attention of the 911 board by rumor and innuendo, and with Theresa Joye’s comments suggesting she “set out to get Becky fired and then used the (911 governing board) as a tool to achieve that.” At the same time, McDonald shared some responsibility for her situation, Kanner said, because an employee in her position should have exercised better judgment. “I always looked at you as a person who had a bright future in public administration,” Kanner said. “I think that someone who’s as bright and capable as you should have at some time paused and said, ‘This is the husband of a subordinate employee.’” Other members of the 911 board also critiqued how the district dealt with McDonald’s situation. “I’m not happy with the way we handled this process,” said Chief Mike Kennedy of the Sunriver Police Department. Members of the 911 board did not receive the record of the McDonald investigation until right before

Anger rises in Australia over Chinese coal freighter New York Times News Service Anger rose in Australia on Tuesday, including some blunt language from Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, over the off-course Chinese coal freighter that beached on the Great Barrier Reef last weekend and threatens to befoul its pristine corals with leaking fuel oil. Rudd on Tuesday flew over the stricken vessel, which had strayed at least 71⁄2 miles, outside the authorized shipping channel, and promised afterward a full investigation to identify and punish those responsible. He noted the vessel’s owners could be liable for a fine exceeding $5 million. “From where I sit, it is outrageous that any vessel could find itself 12 kilometers off course, it seems, in the Great Barrier Reef,” he told Australian news organizations after the flyover. The Chinese government and the ship’s owner, Cosco, a statecontrolled giant, have been silent in response to the grounding of the Shen Neng 1, which occurred in a section of the reef designated as a marine park and subject to extra environmental protection.

McDonald’s pre-termination hearing, Kennedy said. Chief Tim Moor of the Redmond Fire Department also said he “was not pleased with the process.” Communication was difficult, as the 911 board’s members tried to schedule a time they could all meet and get the leaders of seven different law enforcement agencies to come to a decision. Sisters-Camp Sherman Fire Chief Tay Robertson defended the process during Tuesday’s

C OV ER S T ORY meeting. “While I have been somewhat frustrated with the timelines and delays, I would rather have erred on the side of looking at this from every angle and working with Becky to try to find some solution prior to this pretty much black-and-white decision point,” Robertson said. Blanton disagreed with other board members’ criticisms of the process. County policy required the 911 board investigate Theresa Joye’s allegations, and “that’s

going to lead you to asking some very difficult, personal questions because that’s what’s based on the allegations,” Blanton said.

Long-term questions about 911 Jordan, the 911 interim director, said he is asking each member of the district’s board for suggestions on how to restructure or improve the district, and will report the results at a 911 board meeting later this month.

Huhn declined to discuss specific ideas to change the 911 district. Blanton said recently that one idea is to move the 911 dispatch center under a larger agency, possibly without a specific 911 director. Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney also said recently she heard one idea was to move the 911 center under the Sheriff’s Office. Jordan declined to provide details of board members’ suggestions, and said he did not want to

upset 911 employees by revealing ideas for changes the district might not ultimately pursue. Bend Police Chief Sandi Baxter said the board has not talked about specific ideas. “Nothing has been decided or even discussed yet, as far as Becky’s replacement or with the management of 911,” Baxter said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.


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Baggage fees Are carry-ons next? see Page B6.

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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Canada’s loonie surpasses U.S. dollar NEW YORK — Canada’s dollar was worth more than the U.S. greenback for the first time since July 2008 on the back of the rising price of crude oil and the prospect of higher interest rates. Canada’s dollar, dubbed the loonie for the aquatic bird on the C$1 coin, last traded through parity with the U.S. dollar on July 22, 2008, 11 days after crude, the country’s biggest export, reached a record $147.27 a barrel. Oil traded near a 17- month high Tuesday. “As we trade around it and move through it, the parity level becomes much less of a target and more of an accepted norm,” said Sacha Tihanyi, a currency strategist in Toronto at Bank of Nova Scotia, Canada’s third-largest bank. “Everything continues to be in line for Canadian dollar strength.” The currency traded at C$1.0001 at 2:20 p.m. in Toronto, compared with from C$1.0022 Monday. One Canadian dollar buys 99.99 U.S. cents.

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BMW motorcycle enthusiasts Court curbs to converge in Central Oregon FCC authority Event expected to bring as much as $3M to the region on Web traffic By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Some of the 6,000-plus BMW motorcycle enthusiasts planning to roll into Redmond this summer for their annual rally have already started registering for the event. The BMW Motorcycle Owners of America has signed up about 1,000 members so far for its International Rally, which will be held at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center from July 15-18. It will be followed about two weeks later by a motor home convention. The motorcycle gathering, dubbed Ride Rally Relax, is ex-

On the Web For more information about the BMW Motorcycle Owners of America International Rally, visit www.bmwmoa.org/rally10. For more information about the Family Motor Coach Association, visit www.fmca. com/

pected to pump $2 million to $3 million or more into the region. It will be the second time the BMW motorcycle owners converge on Redmond for their annual rally. The group held its 2001 rally at

the fairgrounds, and a return engagement speaks well of the city and the fairgrounds. Redmond will be only the third location to host an annual rally a second time in 38 years, said Ray Zimmerman, executive director of the Missouri-based organization. “The fairgrounds there (are) fantastic,” he said Monday. The other locations to hold multiple rallies are Oshkosh, Wis., and Missoula, Mont., he said. The motorcycle owners like to hold their events at fairgrounds, where they can find camping nearby. See BMW / B5

By Edward Wyatt New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — A federal appeals court ruled on Tuesday that regulators had limited power over Web traffic under current law. The decision will allow Internet service companies to block or slow specific sites and charge video sites to deliver their content faster to users. The court decision was a setback to efforts by the Federal Communications Commission to require companies to give Web users equal access to all content, even if some of that content is clogging the network.

The court ruling, which came after Comcast asserted that it had the right to slow its cable customers’ access to a file-sharing service called BitTorrent, could prompt efforts in Congress to change the law in order to give the FCC explicit authority to regulate Internet service. That could prove difficult politically, however, since some conservative Republicans oppose giving the agency more power on the grounds that Internet providers should be able to decide what services they offer and at what price. See Internet / B5

Commercial center takes shape

GM begins winding down Hummer SOUTHFIELD, Mich. — General Motors said Tuesday it will wind down its Hummer brand and offer rebates of as much as $6,000 to sell remaining sport-utility vehicles. Jim Bunnell, GM’s general director for dealer network support, told retailers in conference call that they will get letters within days about ending their franchises, Nick Richards, a company spokesman, said in an interview. Shedding Hummer was part of GM’s plan to pare its U.S. brands to four from eight after bankruptcy. GM has sold one of the four brands it explored selling. “Anyone who buys it needs cash to make it work,” said Jim Hall, principal of 2953 Analytics, a consulting firm in Birmingham, Mich. “That’s why GM has been turning buyers away left, right and center.” — From wire reports

Service sector grows The U.S. service sector grew in March at its fastest pace in more than two years, suggesting economic recovery is expanding.

an access road from Southwest Century Drive to the former Brightwood mill — the rust-colored building in the background — which is being converted into a new commercial center. Dave Hill, of Bend, is developing the project, which

already has a few tenants, including the West Bend Tennis Center, an indoor tennis facility open to the public, which occupies the taller building to the left. Other current tenants include Mail Boxes, Etc., which previously occupied the building on Southwest Century Drive that was demolished to make way for the bank branch and access road.

After months of silence, Crestview Cable plans cash registers ring again 5 percent rate increase for La Pine customers New data suggests that consumers are no longer restricting their budgets to necessities and have, in recent months, been buying clothes, jewelry, even cars.

New York Times News Service

55 50 45 40 35

’09

C

onstruction is under way along Southwest Century Drive in Bend in preparation for a new U.S. Bank branch as well as

By Stephanie Rosenbloom

55.4

Seasonally adjusted

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

2010

Non-manufacturing index monitors service industries such as construction, retail, banking and travel. A reading below 50 indicates contraction Source: Institute for Supply Management AP

American consumers are finally coming out of hiding. After months of pennypinching amid the recession, new figures — showing an improving job market, rising factory output and increased retail sales — suggest that consumers are no longer restricting their budgets to necessities like food and medicine. They are starting to buy clothes, jewelry and even cars again. The mood has gone from panicked to cautious and now, as Mark Zandi, chief economist for Moody’s Economy. com put it, some consumers are “almost a bit giddy.” After the financial crisis hit in late 2008, consumers retrenched

Richard Perry New York Times News Service

heavily. And in the months that followed, there were fears that newly frugal Americans would increase their savings so much there was no hope that consumer spending could be a

factor in a recovery. That was a troubling prospect because consumers have been the drivers of economic growth after past recessions. See Consumers / B2

By Andrew Moore The Bulletin

Crestview Cable will raise most of its cable television rates in La Pine come May 1, according to the company. The roughly 5 percent increase affects all service tiers except for the company’s basic cable service, which will remain at $15.99 per month. “This rate increase reflects the increase in programming costs for each programming tier,” said Tony Ashcroft, the manager for Crestview Cable. Ashcroft said the last increase for La Pine customers was December 2008. The company declined to state how many cus-

tomers it has in La Pine. The company’s four cable television service tiers above basic will increase by roughly $2 to $3 per month. Expanded Basic will increase from $34.98 to $36.93, Digital Choice will increase from $41.77 to $43.92, Digital Plus will rise from $48.76 to $51.41, and Digital Premier will increase from $52.10 to $54.75. Crestview is based in Prineville and serves customers there in addition to La Pine, Madras, Culver, Metolius and Crooked River Ranch. It also provides cable television service to Wallowa County. See Crestview / B5


C OV ER S T ORY

B2 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Taxpayer put country before his own $600 tax bonus By David Kocieniewski New York Times News Service

A flaw in the most recent version of TurboTax, the nation’s most popular tax-preparation software, may have caused thousands of retired federal employees to overstate their medical deductions and unwittingly underpay the Internal Revenue Service, according to federal officials. The program error affects federal retirees using versions of the 1099-R form who have health insurance premiums paid by their pension administrators. It can lead filers to inadvertently deduct the same expenses twice, leading to a miscalculation of the tax owed and an underpayment of hundreds of dollars on the typical return. Officials for Intuit, the Mountain View, Calif., company that produces the program, were alerted to the problem last week, after a retired federal worker from Virginia noticed that TurboTax had automatically doublecounted his medical insurance premiums as deductions. When questioned about the problem by a reporter last week, Intuit said it had begun working with the IRS to revise its computer-prompted instructions on TurboTax and prevent such errors in the future. TurboTax, owned by Intuit since 1993, dominates the tax preparation software business in this country and accounts for about 75 percent of the market. The program has nonetheless been troubled by occasional glitches and security breaches, notably in 2007, when so many last-minute filers overwhelmed the TurboTax servers that many returns failed to make it to the IRS by the filing deadline. Both IRS and Intuit officials were scrambling to gauge the scope of the problem involving the federal retirees, but said only a limited number of returns appeared to be involved. The IRS issued a statement Tuesday saying that, after consulting with Intuit, it believed the problem was confined to a small subset of filers — retired federal workers (filing a CSA1099-R form) and survivors of federal employees (using a CSF-1099-R). Julie Miller, an Intuit spokeswoman, said that the company suspected that the total number of filers affected by the mistake would not exceed “several thousand” because it only affected federal retirees who used TurboTax, itemized their deductions and had health care costs that exceeded 7.5 percent of their adjusted gross income. Intuit policy is to pay any interest or penalties assessed to filers who have underpaid their taxes because of the glitch. Miller said that under the TurboTax satisfaction guarantee, customers are also entitled to a refund for the purchase price of the software if they are unhappy with it for any reason. The man who reported the problem, Charlie Freret of Chantilly, Va., stumbled across the error while using a free version of TurboTax to e-file a tax return he had already prepared on paper. Freret, who retired as a lawyer in the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2004, said he had hoped that e-filing would allow him to get his refund faster. But the tax return calculated by TurboTax promised him a refund $600 larger than he was entitled to because it automatically added his medical insurance premiums to his deductions — after the computer-generated prompt had instructed him to enter his health care expenses manually. Freret said he figured that he probably could have taken the $600 bonus and never been caught because retiree medical benefits seem unlikely to flag an audit. But as a federal employee, he also worried that millions of other taxpayers might do the same, further depleting the nation’s already troubled treasury. “It seemed like the right thing to do,” said Freret, 63, adding that he has always tried to adhere to the code of conduct instilled at his alma mater, Washington and Lee University. “The honor code called for you to be a Southern gentleman: ‘Don’t lie, don’t cheat and don’t steal,’” he said.

A legal way to print money: Change the fonts you use By Dinesh Ramde The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — Here’s a way you might save $20 this year: Change the font in the documents you print. Because different fonts require different amounts of ink to print, you could be buying new printer cartridges less often if you wrote in, say, Century Gothic rather than Arial. Schools and businesses could save thousands of dollars with font changes. Data on the subject from Printer.com, a Dutch company that evaluates printer attributes, persuaded the University of WisconsinGreen Bay to make a switch. Diane Blohowiak, coordinator of information-technology user support, has asked faculty and staff to use Century Gothic for all printed documents. The school also plans to change its e-mail system so it uses Century Gothic. “The feedback we’ve gotten so far has been positive,” she said. “Century Gothic is very readable.” The school of 6,500 students spends about $100,000 per year on ink and toner cartridges. Although students and staff can change the default font to something more ink-intensive, Blohowiak said the university expects to save $5,000 to $10,000 per year with the font switch. When Printer.com tested popular fonts for their inkfriendly ways, Century Gothic and Times New Roman topped the list. Calibri, Verdana, Arial and Sans Serif were next, followed by Trebuchet, Tahoma and Franklin Gothic Medium. Century Gothic uses about 30 percent less ink than Arial. The amount of ink a font drains is mainly driven by the thickness of its lines. A font with “narrow” or “light” in its name is usually better than its “bold” or “black” counterpart, said Thom Brown, an ink researcher at Hewlett-Packard

Ink-friendly fonts can save money

New York Times News Service

Fonts that use less ink 1. CENTURY GOTHIC (11 pt)

2. TIMES NEW ROMAN (12 pt)

3. CALIBRI (12 pt)

4. VERDANA (11 pt)

5. ARIAL (12 pt)

Co., the world’s top maker of printers. Also, serif fonts — those with short horizontal lines at the top and bottom of characters — tend to use thinner lines and thus less ink than a “sans serif” counterpart. But while using less ink at home can help you buy roughly one fewer printer cartridge each year, it’s not necessarily better for the environment. That’s because some fonts that use less ink, including Century Gothic, are also wider. A document that’s one page in Arial could extend to a second page if printed in Century Gothic. Blohowiak said her research suggests that ink comprises the main cost of a printout, but the environmental costs of paper are probably higher. “Maybe the individual characters use less ink, but if you’re using more paper, that’s not so green, is it?” said Allan Haley, director of “words and letters” at Monotype Imaging Inc. in Woburn, Mass., which developed Century Gothic. Also, Century Gothic was designed for limited blocks of text such as titles and headlines, not for full documents, said Haley, who describes fonts as his “children.” Despite Printer.com’s research and UW-Green Bay’s

for a more stable global financial system,” he said. The two nations can help create economic growth that is “less dependent on the willingness of Americans to live beyond our means,” he said. Fast-growing emerging-market countries like India, Brazil and China make up an increasing share of the world’s economy and are expected to account for more than a third of global gross domestic product this year. Mukherjee said Tuesday that discussions with Geithner had focused on “global development with a special emphasis on U.S. and Indian economies” and that both sides had discussed monetary and fiscal policies, banking regulations and managing capital flow, and infrastructure finance. Later on Tuesday, Geithner told the Indian television channel NDTV that he was “confident that China will decide it is in their interest to resume the move to a more flexible exchange rate that they began some years ago and suspended in the midst of the crisis.” Still, he stressed that it was China’s “choice” to do so. The U.S. Treasury Department said over the weekend that it would delay a report to Congress that could have charged China with currency manipulation. India’s finance secretary, Ashok Chawla, told reporters Tuesday that the Chinese currency debate was a “bilateral issue between the U.S. and China.” India has “no role to play in that,” he said.

By Heather Timmons

Changing your printer’s typeface can add up to savings over time, because different fonts require different amounts of ink to print.

Source: Printer.com

U.S., India pledge cooperation on economic issues

AP

experience, Haley said he still recommends Times New Roman or Arial for their readability. The standard advice for trimming printing expenses still applies: Print in “draft mode,” if you can. Use both sides of a page and do a print preview to make sure you’re not printing pages with useless text such as a copyright line. Using an ink-saving font is just one more technique to consider. And the greenest way to save on ink is not to print at all. That’s the philosophy Microsoft Corp. said it uses in deciding which fonts to include in its Outlook and Word applications. The more pleasing a font looks on the screen, the less tempted someone will be to print, said Simon Daniels, a program manager for Microsoft’s typography group. That’s why the company changed its defaults in Office 2007 from Arial and Times New Roman to Calibri and Cambria, he said. “We’re trying to move the threshold of when people hit the print button,” he said.

NEW DELHI — China’s currency and role in global trade may be on economic policymakers’ minds in the United States and India, but it certainly was not on their lips here on Tuesday. The U.S. Treasury secretary, Timothy Geithner, started his first official trip to India on Tuesday morning with a visit to a village to see a “mobile bank,” which serves customers far from bank branches. Next, he met with his economic counterparts in India, including the finance minister, Pranab Mukherjee. China was never mentioned in a joint press conference afterward in New Delhi, and Indian officials said later that they had no plans to intervene in China’s currency policies. Instead, Geithner and Mukherjee, who met to cement an economic partnership first announced during Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s state visit to Washington last November, pledged increased cooperation on macroeconomic issues and finance. They did not cite specifics but said they would meet again in Washington. The two countries may “come from different positions,” Geithner said, but they have common problems, including the need to finance infrastructure projects and future innovation and to extend financial services to people outside the banking system. Cooperation between the nations is “critically important to the success of global efforts to create conditions

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Consumers Continued from B1 After all, their spending accounts for more than two-thirds of all economic activity in the United States. But just a year later, consumers have eased off a bit on their savings, which frees up cash for them to spend. And in part because of the high rate of mortgage defaults, the overall consumer debt burden has been dropping. Those trends suggest to some economists that consumers may now be in a position to help drive the recovery.

are simply much stronger than companies had expected,” said Robert Barbera, chief economist of ITG, an investment advisory firm. The improvement extends even to some of the most costly household items. Last week, almost every automaker, including Ford, Toyota and General Motors, reported robust sales increases in March.

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The Commerce Department said its broadest measure of retail sales, a figure known as personal consumption expenditures, increased 0.3 percent in February compared with or $34.7 billion, the Beyond expectations January, fifth consecutive monthly gain. The improved outlook has And the personal savings rate been showing up at store cash — which jumped above 5 perregisters for several months, cent during the recession — has and the trend returned to its seems to be achistorical level of celerating. Major “There’s a true about 3 percent. retailing chains desire to buy that I Perhaps the posted bettermost meaningthan-expected haven’t seen in two ful sign of recovearnings in their or three years. The ery is that emmost recent reployers added porting periods consumer’s gotten 162,000 jobs last and are likely a little bit braver.” month. With to deliver more unemployment good news on — John Morris, a hovering at 9.7 Thursday, when retailing analyst with percent, the job they report their BMO Capital Markets market is still March sales weak by historiresults. cal standards, Total industry sales are pre- but the rate is no longer rising. dicted to increase up to 10 perJohn Morris, a retailing anacent compared with the period lyst with BMO Capital Markets, a year ago, which would make said that at the nation’s malls, March the seventh consecutive strong fashion trends like jegmonth of growth, according gings (jeans so tight they reto the International Council of semble leggings) are helping Shopping Centers, an industry drive sales. He expects Apple’s group. (A significant part of that new iPad will do the same. increase is because of a calendar “There’s a true desire to buy shift involving Easter.) that I haven’t seen in two or SpendingPulse, an informa- three years,” Morris said. “The tion service of MasterCard Ad- consumer’s gotten a little bit visors, is scheduled to release braver.” figures today showing that Michael McNamara, vice closely watched retailing cat- president for research and analegories — furniture and home ysis for SpendingPulse, pointed furnishings, clothing, electron- out that the chain-store results ics and luxury goods — had sound robust largely because healthy year-over-year sales this year’s sales were being growth last month. compared with the depths of the And after months of cutting recession. So the big gains reinventory to bring it in line with ally represent a return to normal weakened demand, the nation’s patterns of spending. retailers are ordering more “It’s more about how little merchandise. people were buying a year ago “What I’m hearing across a than how much people are buywide swath of retail is that sales ing today,” he said.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 B3

A W Tech firms race to be perk-iest Silicon Valley’s culture of comfort starting to return By Jessica Guynn Los Angeles Times

SAN FRANCISCO — The 700 people lucky enough to work for online social-games maker Zynga Game Network Inc. feast on exotic gourmet grub prepared by professional chefs. They soothe stress with a visit to the company masseuse or reflexologist. And they take a break to get their hair cut. All for free. If singled out for a quarterly award, an employee can win a weekend spin in a $200,000 Lamborghini or a carload of vested stock. No perk is too small. Administrative assistants are even dispatched to engineers’ homes to wait for the cable guy so engineers can stay laser-focused on developing the next hit game. During the downturn, some Silicon Valley firms cut back on the free food and other goodies. That’s starting to change. With the tech-heavy Nasdaq stock index up 90 percent over the last year, investors are bankrolling new companies looking to invent the next big thing in social networking, mobile phones and other new technologies. And that’s led companies to try to outperk the competition once again. “The competitive nature of Silicon Valley forces you to get creative,” said Farbood Nivi, founder of San Francisco’s online learning startup Grockit. Other common perks include upgraded health plans, flexible hours, gym memberships and tuition reimbursement. There’s the vast cornucopia of free snacks

Robert Durell / Los Angeles Times

Amitt Mahajan, 25, a lead developer on Zynga’s popular game FarmVille, picks up his free lunch at the company’s headquarters in San Francisco on March 8. (vegan cookies and coconut water) and services (dry cleaning and leather repair). Grockit picks up the tab for employee health insurance and contributes $100 a month to each worker’s health savings account. During a workday, employees can gather at a long table at Grockit’s headquarters — a hip Mission District loft — and enjoy free or-

ganic meals. The perks being offered often reflect the character of the business. Airbnb Inc., for example, offers free travel. The San Francisco firm that helps people rent out rooms to travelers dispatches its employees to visit hosts around the world. As a result, they can spend up to 5 percent of their jobs

traveling. Sometimes, a perk is simply fun. Social publishing company Scribd encourages roughhousing. Every evening, the freewheeling San Francisco headquarters turns into a go-cart track with employees either “scracing,” zooming around the office in a figure eight, or playing “go-cart tag,” earning points for bumping another player from behind. The layout of the office, with its six pairs of eight-sided concrete columns running down the middle, also proved ideal for a zip line. “Pretty soon we are getting a ball pit for the end of the zip line, and I’m still thinking about where we can put a hot tub,” said Chief Executive Trip Adler. At Asana, an Internet software developer, it’s all about creating a workplace nirvana where employees can focus on their work and on the big picture, said Justin Rosenstein, who started the outfit with Facebook Inc. co-founder Dustin Moskovitz. The San Francisco start-up doles out $10,000 to recruits to spend as they like on computers and electronics equipment. They also get catered meals and twiceweekly yoga lessons. “Employees should pretty much get whatever will help them be more productive, since their energy and time are invaluable, and small expenditures can go a big way in making people happier and more effective,” Rosenstein said. Paul Saffo, a Stanford University professor who studies the future of technology, said such perks — like Wall Street bonuses — may sound extravagant but are not. “Despite the downturn and the number of people on the street looking for jobs, filling or replacing a knowledge-worker job at a Silicon Valley company is a com-

plex, expensive process,” he said. “Companies have a very powerful incentive to do everything they can to make an employee happy.” Motivational experts like “Drive” author Daniel Pink applaud Silicon Valley for its counterculture mind-set. Unlike elsewhere in corporate America, where top executives vie for corner offices and country club memberships, perks here do not come with rank. But they do come with a sense of freedom and purpose, something employees crave more than free food and massages, Pink said. He points to the motivational success of Google Inc.’s encouraging engineers to spend 20% of their time on side projects of their choosing, some of which became major initiatives. “The rallying cry at many companies is ‘Let’s raise earnings per share 2 cents a quarter.’ That’s not going to get someone to jump out of bed in the morning and race to do something extraordinary,” Pink said. Zynga may have some of the more generous perks, said Amitt Mahajan, a lead developer on the company’s popular game FarmVille who won a $5,000 quarterly award and took his girlfriend to Spain. His colleague Ginger Larsen, an associate on another popular Zynga game, Mafia Wars, is hooked on the company-paid once-a-week acupuncture treatments, which appeared to cure stomachaches that had bothered her all her life. Even with all the perks, Zynga’s Chief People Officer Colleen McCreary says, the company is trying to work to prevent a potential fallout: a culture of entitlement. “We do have a workforce for whom this is their first job out of school,” McCreary said. “I worry if they ever wanted to go work somewhere else. What a shock to the system that would be.”

Job-search resources as close as the Web By Chuck Myers McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Although the economy has shown signs of recovery, the job market remains tight. But job opportunities are out there; you just need to know where to find them. A good place to start is on the Internet. A wide range of job Web sites list positions in the United States and overseas, with some offering more specialized job information. In addition, many sites also provide special tools and features to assist a job seeker’s efforts. If you’re in the market for work, here are a few places on the Web that might help with the search: • American Association for the Advancement of Science http://aaas.sciencecareers. org/jobseekerx/ Select “Browse Jobs” under “My Search” to explore jobs in different science fields by country or state. • EmploymentGuide.com www.employmentguide. com/browsejobsnew.html Browse job openings in a specific market or by location. • FlipDog.com www.flipdog.com Find jobs in a local area, or by most popular cities, states and categories. • Jobs.com http://www.jobs.com Check out jobs by a variety of locations, both domestic and international. • USAJOBS http://jobsearch.usajobs. opm.gov Site devoted to employment opportunities with the federal government.

How to negotiate pay after a period of unemployment By Marcia Heroux Pounds Sun Sentinel

FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida — Close to a job offer? If you’ve been unemployed for several months or longer, you are likely at a disadvantage in negotiating salary. Still, knowing the rules of the game can help you navigate a competitive compensation package. “Whether out of work or not, don’t talk about the compensation until you’ve been offered the position,” says Joan Ciferri, president of David Wood Personnel in West Palm Beach, Fla. And, she says, “don’t behave like you’re more interested in the package than the job.” Ciferri recommends getting the interviewer to tip his or her hand first on the salary budget. “Find out what range they have for the position. If they ask you what compensation you’re looking for, turn it back on them: “What range do you have budgeted for the position?’” “Once you have that information, you can negotiate,” Ciferri says. Generally, unemployed job candidates in the recession have been offered less or equal to what they were making in a previous job. Look at salary information on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Web site, http://www.bls.gov, to gauge salary for different occupations. But consider the entire compensation package, not only the salary. “Make a business decision, instead of an emotional decision,” she says. One strategy is to offer your services for 90 percent of the midpoint in the pay range, says Barry Brown, president of Effective Resources, a consulting firm that annually surveys employers in Florida about pay rates. Most employers have not updated their pay ranges for two years.

“Ask an employer when the last time the pay range was updated,” Brown says. If you are more experienced, you may want to ask for at least 95 percent of the midpoint, he says. Joe LoBello, managing director of staffing firm Stephen James Associates in Boca Raton, Fla., says what matters is the market value for the job. If an employer has identified a group of qualified candidates who were all making $75,000 a year in a similar position, “that’s the new market value.” LoBello says he’s seeing a significant jump in hiring activity, which also makes a difference in what a firm offers. If a candidate has other offers, “that gets employers excited. ‘They must be pretty good,’” he says. But he’s not suggesting candidates play games. Negotiating compensation is all about timing, LoBello says. If someone is recently laid off and has a good severance package, even an unemployed worker may decline an offer that is substantially below his or her former salary. But job hunters who have been out of work for eight months or more should think twice about rejecting an offer — even if it seems significantly less than they once made. There’s also a case for being somewhere “in the middle” in salary in changing economic times, Ciferri says. “Businesses are not making what they used to make and have had to cut staff. ... You don’t want to go so far off the scale that you’re the first one to go.” Still, Brown counsels employers not to take too much advantage when hiring workers in these economic times. “They will be the first people to leave when things turn around,” he says.

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B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGA Med n AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n AP Pharma ARCA bio ARYxTher ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp Aarons Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AboveNet s Abraxas AcadiaRlt Accenture Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivPw h ActivsBliz Acuity AcuraPh Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish AlldNevG AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs AlphaPro AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf Altisrce n Altria AlumChina AmBev Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AmCareSrc AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AIntlGp rs AmItPasta AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrg s Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry n AnchBcWI AnglogldA Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigncs h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEner h ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArborRT ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArdeaBio ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdR h ArtTech ArthroCre ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Audvox Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm

10.20 -.15 0.44 22.31 +.25 1.24 52.73 +.17 7.62 +.13 11.81 +.21 1.12 55.96 +.44 15.81 +.46 37.38 +.13 1.76 39.58 +.33 0.20 25.00 +.80 34.63 -.09 1.12 28.64 +.89 9.11 -.11 8.79 -.06 26.39 +.25 .99 -.01 5.10 +.25 .97 +.05 0.27 35.85 -.13 1.68 26.31 18.91 -.30 2.65 -.01 0.09 11.66 -.31 1.17 -.03 0.16 14.40 -.30 0.07 33.96 +.19 1.72 +.05 1.76 52.84 -.09 0.70 47.83 -.28 0.42 6.58 +.02 9.93 -.22 49.19 -.38 2.03 -.11 0.72 18.49 +.15 0.75 41.52 -.44 2.95 +.05 20.13 +.42 36.57 +.42 .76 -.04 0.15 12.07 +.04 0.52 46.76 -.23 6.27 +.62 18.89 +.41 1.55 +.06 35.70 -.29 0.36 27.27 +.09 0.25 6.42 +.11 0.24 42.56 -.11 3.86 -.04 9.35 -.18 0.08 4.75 -.01 7.18 -.10 .24 +.01 29.23 -.06 0.04 28.66 -.87 7.05 +.05 13.00 -.06 29.40 -.19 .89 -.06 0.04 35.11 -.06 83.68 +1.21 7.64 4.42 -.07 34.56 -.26 0.18 58.23 -.14 0.11 69.46 -1.45 1.96 74.63 +.46 4.00 -.06 0.40 10.57 +.68 0.88 63.67 -.25 5.14 +.08 0.20 38.56 +.21 32.83 +.38 40.98 -.12 0.86 8.09 +.12 0.56 43.62 +.46 0.34 26.64 +.13 3.15 -.05 0.12 15.03 +.30 3.95 159.95 -.68 1.40 71.84 +2.07 3.95 +.15 54.52 +.02 2.93 +.16 18.44 -2.00 13.16 -.10 0.60 23.22 +.15 0.72 55.64 -.59 54.20 -1.01 0.20 64.48 -.69 65.97 +.98 5.41 +.06 1.20 14.41 +.06 0.52 8.12 +.05 1.77 32.55 -.20 1.50 34.16 +.23 3.67 +.31 16.97 +.05 8.34 +.39 5.55 +.42 19.74 +.65 0.80 32.62 -.01 54.39 +1.30 2.40 +.11 0.40 6.69 +.03 1.44 9.19 +.06 .75 -.01 0.20 25.17 +.09 24.26 +2.09 1.40 20.98 +.06 26.60 +.16 4.14 94.00 +.51 135.56 +4.07 .56 +.00 30.60 +.08 57.43 -.69 1.54 26.65 +.17 34.31 +.20 1.22 51.72 +.19 10.58 +.14 1.35 29.44 +1.39 5.70 26.26 +.14 0.19 5.57 +.06 1.97 +.14 0.40 18.70 -.28 1.64 34.30 -.01 0.08 10.87 +.08 0.72 43.12 +.45 0.55 29.31 +.31 5.31 10.43 +.15 35.91 +.85 39.08 +.01 18.85 -.09 6.97 -.15 4.14 -.06 29.32 +.50 42.81 -.51 0.84 22.14 -.01 24.62 -.08 10.02 -.17 0.68 45.99 -.25 0.32 29.03 +.11 0.24 42.24 +.23 60.29 -.13 7.30 +.09 0.06 42.97 22.83 -.06 0.36 73.95 -.79 4.99 -.01 2.69 +.04 0.80 29.29 -.16 17.50 +.37 .87 +.05 0.17 40.36 +.04 47.66 -.32 22.03 +.18 2.69 17.33 +.10 1.66 +.01 44.28 +.07 1.64 +.04 .73 +.02 1.12 6.83 -.01 0.60 43.01 +.08 13.54 +.18 0.60 106.54 +.33 0.40 20.17 +.74 .34 +.00 63.76 +1.20 1.12 13.22 +.24 239.54 +1.05 1.26 +.23 0.28 13.48 -.04 8.95 +.09 0.58 18.03 +.07 6.34 +.20 0.40 27.57 -.45 3.92 +.22 0.75 46.95 +.70 74.54 -.32 0.36 25.10 +.61 0.60 28.23 -.23 27.78 -.75 21.35 -.41 3.22 37.80 +1.09 1.40 15.07 -.13 3.46 -.12 13.50 +.24 0.12 29.85 -.20 0.11 11.32 +.13 39.39 +.35 2.80 +.06 12.37 +.05 30.13 -.67 1.11 +.02 4.40 -.02 32.17 +1.51 0.24 24.97 -.68 13.76 -.12 14.52 -.06 7.85 +.41 0.30 58.53 +1.44 26.72 -.05 0.60 28.69 +.05 0.04 14.57 +.57 0.60 35.47 -.16 0.18 22.74 -.11 0.52 14.91 +.09 2.30 44.63 -.24 38.25 +.46 40.08 -.19 51.81 -.80 33.03 -.46 14.05 -.01 5.20 -.03 1.34 29.64 +.25 35.98 +.08 8.11 +.07 2.78 +.01 4.99 +.04 18.65 +.61 30.91 +.73 52.31 +.14 1.36 44.29 -.10 173.97 +.44 33.62 -.31 20.68 +.42 3.57 92.42 +3.44 2.58 +.10

Nm AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJ Svcs BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPW Acq BPZ Res BRE BWAY B&B Air Baidu Inc BakrHu BallCp Ballanty BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BankMutl BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BA SP10-11 BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD BiPNG Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath BellMicro Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst BlkSenHgh Blackstone BlockHR Blockbstr BlckbstrB BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BreitBurn BrdgptEd n BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker BrinksHSec BrMySq BristowGp BritATob Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF BrdwindE n BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp h Brunswick BrshEMat BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BldrFstSrc BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNX Gas CRM Hld CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive Cal-Maine CalaCvHi CalaStrTR CalAmp Calgon CalifPizza CalifWtr CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CalumetSp CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CdnSEn g CanoPet Canon CapGold n CapOne CapProd CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carmike Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf s

D 0.80 37.13 +.58 13.42 +.78 1.00 21.07 -.03 31.20 -.75 0.88 33.74 -.16 1.99 +.02 0.84 31.64 +.30 0.68 10.54 +.15 0.60 33.53 +.61 1.74 30.39 +.13 29.90 -.16 1.66 82.32 -.54 1.66 70.86 -.04 0.20 22.59 +.05 37.14 -.07 1.06 +.06 38.53 -.08 3.36 59.36 +.85 7.98 105.08 +1.08 12.10 -.51 7.27 -.09 1.50 37.89 +.76 20.19 -.18 0.80 11.46 +.66 619.41+18.11 0.60 49.92 +.24 0.40 54.12 -.30 6.11 +.24 2.63 -.06 40.51 -1.82 13.90 -.10 1.34 47.00 +.26 0.59 14.03 -.14 0.76 18.92 -.17 0.82 13.58 -.34 0.20 12.47 -.16 0.88 21.84 +.44 0.28 6.90 +.31 0.04 18.49 +.36 10.08 +.18 4.08 +.14 11.13 +.15 1.80 46.68 +.95 9.58 +.13 2.80 61.25 -.18 0.36 31.70 +.20 1.96 50.44 +.13 2.01 +.09 0.04 4.76 +.52 40.85 -.17 27.84 -.01 69.17 -.42 2.03 25.81 +.00 10.22 -.40 0.16 22.25 -.08 65.56 -.58 19.57 -.65 0.68 84.53 +.33 1.00 22.56 -.06 0.40 39.42 -.23 8.53 -.11 1.16 58.20 -.06 .44 19.97 -.06 4.87 -.01 0.10 9.54 +.23 0.72 62.30 -.20 1.48 78.43 -.08 44.62 -.48 7.02 +.01 7.15 +.11 0.92 29.88 -.21 0.24 26.20 +.08 80.91 -.25 0.30 31.80 -.03 0.56 44.11 +.74 37.43 +.15 3.47 -.02 31.90 7.36 +.12 57.50 -.03 24.69 -.02 0.56 17.39 +.39 .45 +.03 1.86 9.44 +.60 0.36 16.90 +.16 1.42 31.85 +.66 1.28 10.75 +.34 42.86 +.10 4.00 198.55 -7.45 0.37 4.30 +.05 1.82 11.29 -.22 1.09 13.55 +.12 0.30 4.27 +.09 1.20 14.64 +.16 0.60 18.01 -.13 .25 -.02 .19 -.01 31.53 +.10 2.00 29.94 -.11 1.68 72.36 +.32 6.81 +.16 .80 +.04 2.40 -.08 2.78 +.07 38.05 -.32 0.04 8.26 +.61 2.00 79.41 +1.62 7.14 -.07 0.22 11.13 +.01 10.93 +.58 0.60 12.95 +.37 0.97 19.29 -.04 15.30 -.15 23.82 +.02 0.44 20.58 +.29 18.33 +.37 7.98 +.24 0.56 19.87 +.01 42.79 +.05 1.28 26.38 -.39 38.49 -.11 3.07 69.71 -.68 0.32 34.40 -.23 4.18 -.13 0.56 21.27 -.01 4.46 -.04 5.97 +.07 22.07 +.48 0.52 25.81 +.07 0.56 15.95 +.23 0.31 17.91 +.12 0.28 16.27 -.13 1.20 59.94 -.22 14.71 -.08 0.05 16.45 +.17 26.49 +.34 14.00 +.15 0.80 38.86 +.58 0.10 70.40 -.35 0.42 33.39 +.23 3.41 +.02 0.84 60.18 -.82 0.25 21.24 +.04 0.16 23.40 -.45 16.53 +.05 0.80 15.23 +.24 0.20 14.59 -.05 3.14 +.11 0.40 92.43 +.48 1.00 55.28 -.38 0.04 37.09 +.09 38.98 +.23 0.24 11.08 -.02 5.88 -.12 0.90 27.56 +.36 4.60 316.90 -.22 0.60 15.98 +.14 27.61 -.06 33.15 +.24 38.07 +.07 .51 +.09 0.96 52.46 -.15 0.34 9.63 -.22 9.20 +.06 0.35 35.85 -.16 18.11 +.05 0.40 25.28 +.23 0.72 31.89 -.11 0.12 38.99 +.14 9.71 +.68 6.76 -.27 7.65 +.01 0.80 35.05 +.51 1.02 12.64 +.07 0.63 9.26 -.04 3.36 +.20 17.70 +.26 17.09 -.11 1.19 39.27 +.37 0.04 9.16 -.08 6.75 +.71 12.41 +.17 1.82 21.84 +.55 1.80 44.93 +1.57 0.28 27.04 -.03 45.65 +.15 1.10 35.33 -.09 1.08 61.38 -.59 0.60 79.06 -.55 0.99 56.70 -1.24 24.41 +.26 .60 +.01 1.24 47.51 +.12 3.75 +.07 0.20 43.26 +.11 1.64 8.65 -.04 1.68 +.03 0.04 5.90 +.05 2.18 11.80 +.01 1.31 0.72 66.06 +.53 0.70 36.10 -.23 8.28 +.36 .46 +.01 26.38 +.02 32.29 +.20 0.64 38.67 +.12 25.46 -.25 15.46 +.86 0.40 39.33 -.06 0.72 38.45 +.49 24.68 +.31 32.10 +.28 0.34 31.87 -.22 42.28 +.24 1.68 65.29 +.30 0.04 12.65 +.67 25.76 +.24 12.37 +.17 .65 -.02 0.16 33.15 -.08 7.29 +.09 10.89 -.01 63.40 +1.37 .54 +.02 6.14 +.11 0.40 10.91 +.11 0.98 17.10 -.06

Nm CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CentGard lf CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaDir ChinaEd n ChiElMot n ChiGengM ChinaGreen ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinIntE n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChMarFd n ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNG n ChNEPet n ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE n ChinaSecur ChinaTInfo ChinaUni ChinaCEd ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChoiceHtls ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitizRep h CitrixSys CityBank CityNC CityTlcm Clarient h ClayGSol CleanEngy Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n CoBizFncl Coach CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs Cogent CognizTech CohStQIR CohStRE Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil Conolog Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgn h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copel CoreLab CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Cray Inc CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurrCda CybrSrce Cyclacel CyprsBio CypSemi CypSharp n CytRx Cytec Cytomed Cytori DARABio h DCT Indl DDi Corp DNP Selct DPL DR Horton Drdgold DSW Inc DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckOut Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB Cap pf DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DeutTel DevelDiv DevD pfI DevonE Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt

D 0.80 28.48 -.10 24.59 -.06 0.78 14.74 +.10 0.03 18.49 +.01 1.56 15.01 +.04 35.97 +.04 0.01 14.34 -.02 10.02 +.04 1.98 +.24 16.35 +.82 2.90 35.96 -.24 9.72 +.41 67.29 -.10 18.34 -.43 86.05 -.28 3.07 -.18 40.11 -.13 4.99 -.19 36.23 +.43 27.60 -.02 4.66 +.62 0.30 24.52 -.06 2.72 77.88 +.22 24.84 +.24 0.16 14.66 +.17 0.54 3.92 +.02 24.24 -.12 9.03 +.49 22.95 -.32 2.42 -.03 1.67 -.02 5.44 -.06 6.20 +.77 2.89 +.24 14.10 +.08 .59 +.03 7.00 +1.68 11.23 +.13 0.51 74.50 -.29 16.89 -.23 6.50 +.21 12.44 +.06 1.81 49.25 +.06 9.71 -.19 9.08 +.29 1.46 85.80 -.65 2.25 +.08 10.46 +.05 7.74 +.03 6.83 +.36 0.29 11.26 +.07 7.19 +.07 .80 +.02 122.17 +2.87 16.20 +.02 0.74 35.90 +1.12 0.24 9.04 +.04 1.48 51.31 -.38 1.42 19.60 +.01 0.56 67.56 -.17 4.10 -.04 16.13 +.70 0.32 62.36 +.54 3.37 -.09 1.58 29.37 +.10 0.72 18.92 +.37 0.48 28.14 9.37 +.22 26.22 +.05 2.13 25.72 -.06 4.29 +.03 7.50 127.25 +1.25 1.28 +.08 47.25 -.07 1.12 -.03 0.40 55.70 +1.46 0.49 17.33 +.35 2.85 +.14 8.54 -.04 22.66 -.81 7.09 -.11 .18 -.00 0.35 74.02 -.83 2.00 63.71 -.26 16.77 -.38 0.04 6.41 +.07 0.30 40.73 +.19 0.36 28.18 -.08 1.76 54.29 -.57 15.70 -.24 10.52 +.04 52.25 +.27 0.37 7.42 +.19 0.80 12.84 +.36 34.65 +.78 7.33 +.13 12.10 +.13 2.12 84.93 -.69 23.43 -.02 0.60 13.83 +.57 1.04 -.03 1.20 -.02 0.38 18.76 -.06 0.38 17.94 0.20 40.57 +1.63 0.94 41.67 +.48 0.48 16.15 +.47 30.90 +1.23 38.34 +.21 20.78 0.47 70.10 +.32 1.56 80.01 -.21 17.44 +.83 11.92 -.04 1.04 +.06 53.89 -.15 8.49 -.02 35.40 0.40 35.75 +.66 0.80 25.02 -.20 53.19 -.36 42.65 -.40 3.80 +.20 2.20 53.30 +.02 1.45 +.02 6.43 +.10 0.40 45.94 +.67 2.38 45.36 +.32 17.00 +.33 0.96 37.90 +.93 21.05 -.10 44.85 -.53 3.88 +.07 12.70 +.13 .85 +.01 0.06 38.39 -.77 1.08 47.91 -.46 0.42 19.31 -.33 2.30 25.51 +.37 0.81 21.29 +.08 0.48 136.01 +.91 18.05 +.32 0.56 34.37 -.43 0.20 20.45 -.21 1.57 41.88 +.39 19.67 -.15 9.37 +.02 2.41 +.15 0.72 61.74 +.92 8.06 -.03 0.13 8.47 +.12 62.22 -.23 17.27 +.11 25.42 +.77 0.72 50.70 -.01 0.80 48.45 +.49 6.17 1.85 51.38 -.39 0.32 3.00 -.05 77.07 -.56 8.90 -.01 9.20 +.03 11.70 +.34 37.58 -1.05 27.50 -.38 .43 -.05 39.71 -.60 23.49 +.09 1.72 57.04 +.69 0.70 65.12 -.51 3.20 -.03 133.73 -.75 99.43 +.14 18.66 +.30 2.45 -.02 5.08 -.01 11.80 2.20 13.47 -.03 1.12 -.01 0.05 49.52 +.12 .54 +.04 4.91 +.29 .44 -.01 0.28 5.38 +.08 6.13 +.11 0.78 9.19 -.07 1.21 27.91 +.27 0.15 12.52 -.07 0.07 5.22 +.16 26.17 +.47 2.12 46.48 +.73 47.70 -.27 12.46 0.16 80.57 -.33 1.00 45.26 -.25 9.02 -.05 63.97 -.01 .26 +.00 0.20 65.12 +.32 17.40 -.11 16.39 +.20 143.11 +1.20 1.12 60.68 +.04 0.20 14.83 -.02 8.40 -.07 15.57 +.37 0.40 26.42 +.20 14.66 +.24 1.63 +.12 18.00 +.12 39.40 +1.21 1.61 +.01 3.95 +.15 0.20 34.86 +.27 3.56 +.14 0.70 78.31 -.96 1.90 24.88 -.02 2.01 25.58 +.04 28.12 +.11 13.08 -.04 1.05 13.50 -.07 0.08 13.02 +.37 1.88 22.62 +.01 0.64 66.49 -.72 2.36 68.79 +.18 0.50 91.94 -.28 0.03 10.50 +.11 15.52 +.10 27.14 +.25 1.08 32.41 +.32 1.92 56.27 +.57

Nm

D

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31.43 +.33 0.16 25.64 -.02 34.74 +.05 28.11 162.11 +.47 7.56 -.01 23.09 146.86 +1.36 38.61 -.30 12.24 -.46 0.46 105.67 +3.46 0.04 7.60 -.57 12.32 208.00+13.38 6.46 -.11 4.85 60.11 +.95 13.23 -.09 8.22 62.94 +.48 9.36 -.01 5.18 42.99 +.13 0.08 15.38 -.20 34.62 +.51 29.93 +.35 .51 -.02 2.00 22.01 +.75 0.35 35.47 +.25 0.13 29.08 -.29 10.49 -.36 59.09 -.87 11.80 -.18 27.01 +1.21 34.12 +.59 59.49 1.83 41.70 -.11 13.94 -.06 67.65 +1.87 0.48 46.43 -.06 1.04 21.87 -.04 4.90 +.52 1.48 -.03 0.40 16.40 +.53 1.04 47.65 +.10 0.60 31.16 +.17 0.60 35.45 -.02 9.37 +.10 38.45 +.07 27.80 +.37 33.50 +.87 0.42 4.36 -.06 3.81 -.05 6.39 +.24 1.64 38.81 +.39 0.32 22.90 +.04 0.96 16.55 +.13 0.68 13.22 +.40 1.40 74.46 -.23 .22 -.01 3.52 +.02 9.55 +.05 11.81 +.16 1.30 +.03

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Nm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MergeHlth MeridBio MeridRs h Meritage Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MiddleBk h MdwstBc h MillerHer Millicom Millipore MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel Modine ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB MoneyGrm Monotype Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Movado MuellerWat MultimGm MurphO MyersInd Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NFJDvInt NGAS Res NII Hldg NIVS IntT NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr Nanophs h NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatlCoal h NatInstru h NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh Ness Tech Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetwkEng NBRESec Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR nTelos NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvMuVal NuvQualPf NuvQPf2 Nvidia OGE Engy OReillyA h OSI Phrm OcciPet OccuLogix Oceaneer OceanFrt h Och-Ziff

D 27.65 +.36 2.20 67.81 -.22 0.94 35.51 -.10 0.48 66.62 +.01 16.75 +.79 40.77 +.22 0.90 52.29 -.02 0.92 26.30 -.09 30.47 -.66 20.51 -.06 64.04 +.53 0.80 11.04 +.13 8.70 +.82 0.24 25.94 +.08 26.52 +.83 10.90 -.05 59.09 +.05 0.82 45.44 -.30 5.35 +.22 0.36 23.95 -.24 8.12 -.09 49.97 +.59 5.79 +.18 1.52 37.25 -.14 2.39 +.16 0.76 19.87 -.06 .27 -.02 20.62 -.67 6.32 +.07 1.27 +.08 0.62 25.79 +.04 0.74 44.84 -.11 7.32 +.04 3.21 +.10 0.14 11.03 +.09 1.36 28.69 +.02 8.19 -.14 10.23 -.37 33.42 -.22 17.01 -.30 0.52 29.32 +.05 3.54 -.04 2.46 51.99 +.52 .31 .24 -.01 0.09 18.79 +.15 1.24 89.61 -.91 105.90 +.13 0.20 36.17 -.26 8.23 +.42 9.56 10.73 +.21 5.29 +.08 3.96 +.04 57.49 -.19 12.16 +.17 8.54 -.05 54.27 -.52 0.61 21.35 -.09 0.96 42.89 -.28 3.75 -.06 10.00 -.01 1.06 69.80 -.64 16.55 +.04 0.36 16.64 -.10 0.42 29.44 -.09 0.20 29.36 +.07 6.80 +.04 0.20 57.54 -.45 7.28 +.12 13.12 +.27 0.07 4.99 -.03 4.32 +.04 1.00 59.73 +.26 0.26 10.64 -.01 22.83 -.42 1.75 23.44 -.67 5.37 -.03 49.81 +.05 11.80 +.26 15.10 +.58 0.60 16.02 +.07 1.67 +.06 42.72 -.70 3.65 -.19 21.64 -.01 0.44 12.58 +.09 1.20 31.04 +.28 20.68 +.04 0.14 24.93 -.35 10.31 +.39 1.86 +.13 9.09 +.23 21.69 +.08 0.31 3.85 -.28 .43 +.05 0.52 35.26 +.33 0.40 43.22 +.61 0.04 7.88 +.57 1.50 23.73 +.48 0.32 14.75 +.10 1.76 35.94 +.53 2.16 25.12 -.12 12.08 -.16 0.24 6.82 +.03 47.75 -.16 15.10 -.48 6.70 +.24 17.04 +.19 13.03 -.12 31.35 +.25 34.83 +.06 36.50 +.57 13.65 -.05 83.37 +3.38 3.63 -.04 2.19 +.12 0.24 3.57 +.05 2.55 16.37 -.22 3.20 +.15 .11 4.73 -.06 89.84 +1.50 4.71 -.04 1.00 16.95 +.08 11.25 -.04 0.28 12.70 +.04 3.45 +.11 0.20 16.01 +.15 55.78 +.29 0.40 53.27 -.54 5.77 +.49 0.15 14.70 -.09 0.15 17.34 -.07 0.20 26.27 -.16 .45 +.00 .43 +.00 0.92 16.45 +.16 1.86 42.16 -.31 1.08 73.91 -.20 16.33 -.07 0.29 20.99 +.15 0.20 42.80 -.29 0.72 75.90 -1.09 0.56 15.56 -.09 7.37 +.02 1.73 31.45 +.11 0.64 43.37 +.61 1.36 57.59 +.03 10.39 +.10 4.49 -.05 1.36 27.98 +.98 1.03 28.20 +.16 10.04 +.12 17.59 +.21 1.12 57.45 +.28 3.08 +.03 1.72 65.73 -.69 0.40 4.45 +.08 0.40 11.86 +.09 7.60 +.03 1.99 52.69 -.84 6.98 +.30 2.35 -.03 5.91 -.11 25.31 -.22 1.60 36.49 +.31 1.12 17.95 -.40 0.50 29.05 -.43 44.86 +.12 16.87 -.29 1.44 47.64 +.11 0.70 17.84 -.03 0.47 9.81 -.05 0.58 7.49 +.12 0.65 7.97 +.05 17.05 -.43 1.45 40.07 +.22 41.91 -.16 59.96 +.03 1.32 88.49 +.08 2.32 -.18 66.43 +.31 .79 +.01 0.72 16.96 +.34

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0.76 36.28 -.19 PeopUtdF 0.61 15.81 +.20 PepcoHold 1.08 17.67 +.16 PepsiCo 1.92 66.39 +.41 PerfectWld 36.30 -.37 PerkElm 0.28 24.01 -.19 PermFix 2.27 -.01 Perrigo 0.25 60.69 -.32 PetChina 3.72 121.25 -.27 Petrohawk 21.90 -.25 PetrbrsA 1.07 41.23 +.19 Petrobras 1.07 46.35 +.44 PtroqstE 5.67 +.07 PetsMart 0.40 32.36 -.17 Pfizer 0.72 16.96 +.06 PFSweb 3.00 +.03 PhrmAth 1.72 +.03 PharmPdt 0.60 23.84 +.24 PhaseFwd 13.42 -.08 PhilipMor 2.32 52.65 -.20 PhilipsEl 0.95 32.80 -.11 PhlVH 0.15 60.08 +.05 PhnxCos 2.89 +.36 PhotrIn 5.25 +.01 PiedNG 1.12 28.07 +.46 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.80 +.05 Pier 1 7.43 +.08 PilgrmsP n 10.99 +.10 PimIncSt rt PimIncStr2 0.70 9.65 +.02 PimIncS2 rt PimcoHiI 1.46 12.55 +.07 PimcoStrat 0.78 10.00 -.26 PinnclEnt 10.78 +.51 PinnaclFn 17.07 +1.07 PinWst 2.10 39.07 +.65 PionDrill 7.21 -.12 PioNtrl 0.08 60.96 -.44 PiperJaf 42.03 +1.01 PitnyBw 1.46 24.79 +.01 PlainsAA 3.71 58.19 -.57 PlainsEx 31.92 +.11 Plantron 0.20 32.23 +.30 PlatGpMet 2.08 -.05 PlatUnd 0.32 36.87 -.07 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Nm 16.95 +.15 7.28 -.02 87.71 +1.57 28.52 -.04 39.22 +.01 5.57 -.02 5.63 -.31 .87 +.01 38.19 -.60 37.45 +.18 11.10 -.01 14.33 +.07 15.90 -.08 8.19 -.06 9.96 +.03 4.13 +.15 45.11 +.68 21.35 +.27 4.76 +.13 60.70 +.31 37.88 -.38 54.48 +.41 7.95 +.22 23.39 +.91 39.63 -.28 17.62 +.05 8.46 +.35 12.05 +.08 11.51 +.13 31.65 -.12 2.72 +.07 37.42 -1.15 33.66 +1.18 .79 -.02 33.88 +.39 34.49 +.22 26.57 +.14 13.45 +.29 31.30 +.62 41.93 -.81 .85 +.05 23.21 -.03 7.02 -.37 4.51 -.04 23.05 -.52 6.20 +.09 3.88 -.03 10.28 +.21 34.99 +.06 32.20 -.02 28.02 -.09 33.52 +.05 59.58 16.41 +.17 31.68 +.01 23.35 +.02 30.50 +.25 4.73 -.08 59.72 +.49 24.01 -.04 2.94 -.04 2.95 +.12 24.60 -.01 48.65 +.63 46.61 +.26 23.95 -.02 4.79 -.25 18.66 +.23 6.54 +.01 1.16 5.13 -.03 55.14 +.06 33.96 -.33 5.98 +.27 .65 +.01 19.47 -.09 49.57 +1.14 6.51 -.01 52.06 -.88 14.22 +.08 19.30 +.32 5.00 +.31 57.78 -.07 12.88 +.64 20.08 +.19 .31 +.01 10.21 +.16 35.11 -.01 1.06 -.02 31.44 -.19 18.81 -.27 5.46 +.21 12.08 +.39 14.00 -.18 28.71 +.97 23.21 +.49 14.93 -.03 16.82 -.08 10.57 +.29 7.85 +.01 34.32 +.43 18.31 -.08 46.90 -.51 16.73 -.10 13.49 -.05 5.48 +.02 28.94 -.12 10.67 -.18 19.54 -.18 22.91 -.10 3.62 +.21 1.24 +.19 2.16 -.05 29.98 +.25 18.14 +.65 7.83 +.40 16.92 +.69 19.96 +.45 16.35 +.11 13.35 +.02 7.64 +.13 28.11 -.02 44.70 +.35 30.80 +.14 9.14 +.14 18.63 +.06 10.83 +.10 10.42 +.06 13.21 -.50 19.76 -.04 25.90 -.12 17.82 -.25 44.43 +.33 4.43 +.13 54.09 +.33 5.46 -.07 5.62 +.03 18.99 -.36 42.03 +.91 43.63 +.54 5.64 +.03 18.60 -.03 46.63 +.58 25.02 +.54 12.15 -.89 19.09 +.44 7.51 -.01 18.55 +.65 7.97 +.12 22.18 +.08 71.27 -.98 15.98 +.12 15.09 +.79 17.25 -.17 .87 +.02 7.97 +.14 19.55 +.01 27.90 -1.52 21.60 -.05 26.75 -.06 10.09 -.01 30.96 -.13 45.43 +.15 5.83 -.10 .54 +.03 24.79 -.56 29.27 -.03 11.46 -.01 24.75 +.30 46.00 +.13 14.11 +.43 1.19 -.03 13.80 +.19 20.71 -.12 23.85 +.24 13.44 -.01 63.77 +.01 19.55 +.30 25.05 -.34 14.14 -.05 21.57 +.24 13.84 -.35 51.70 -.17 .71 +.02 40.11 -.43 14.42 -.04 31.36 +.32 34.33 +.25 7.74 -.01 84.35 +.16 10.47 +.12 10.98 -.08 49.40 +.15 .30 -.01 49.20 +.08 33.42 +.18 1.17 +.01 52.47 -1.06 31.99 +.09 30.75 -.13 9.53 +.09 17.03 -.12 17.54 +.68 20.42 -.38 54.71 +.07 8.72 74.12 +.45 59.59 -.30 16.09 +.06 1.63 -.03 80.84 -.42 7.30 +.18 52.96 -.06 54.85 +.25 6.36 +.06 27.95 -.14 88.34 -.78 52.59 -.74 1.32 -.83 2.46 -.01 1.81 -.03 28.99 +.06 25.20 -.16 21.43 +.28 7.37 +.08 67.53 -1.32 15.42 -.47 29.98 +.50 25.12 +.26 6.95 -.20 49.76 -.79

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8.06 +.41 19.47 +.12 16.88 +.10 18.79 +.56 26.81 +.03 50.23 -.34 7.08 -.05 .40 .95 -.07 2.96 +.06 6.30 -.10 17.58 -.42 15.91 -.01 2.90 23.19 +.56 8.37 +.46 48.10 -.36 .15 +.00 13.50 +.29 31.36 +.42 32.50 +.47 30.83 -.17 29.93 -.09 6.97 -1.07 73.64 -.17 37.43 +.80 44.75 +.28 27.95 +.77 5.18 +.27 3.89 +.02 7.66 -.04 64.22 +.04 9.74 +.14 27.08 +.61 27.76 -.17 6.21 +.16 7.35 -.31 42.02 -.05 69.71 +.75 74.67 -.18 58.16 +1.85 33.41 +.27 36.69 +.06 25.60 +.26 1.98 3.51 +.02 39.15 +.24 27.85 -.05 82.51 +.49 5.10 +.10 29.11 +.11 32.99 +.08 28.46 +.15 44.29 +.24 1.01 +.06 20.74 +.11 27.12 -.19 16.17 +.51 83.13 -3.22 29.80 -.07 10.15 -.04 13.08 -.05 5.23 -.02 22.88 -.02 11.35 -.40 79.50 +.03 78.53 +.06 56.41 +.05 67.10 +.28 65.14 +.38 62.25 +.54 60.77 +.17 51.48 +.13 51.29 +1.15 49.39 -.05 45.45 -.03 43.68 +.09 48.85 -.30 35.12 +.04 1.57 +.01 55.81 -.19 33.50 -.19 15.77 25.60 +.26 47.50 +1.03 14.45 +.27 48.86 +.71 20.86 +.05 11.76 +.10 26.92 +.11 28.16


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Internet

net neutrality banner,” he said. As a practical matter, the court ruling will not have any immediate impact on Internet users because Comcast and other large Internet providers are not currently restricting specific types of Web content and have no plans to do so. Comcast, the nation’s largest cable provider, had a muted reaction to its victory. The company said it was gratified by the court’s decision but added that it had changed the management policies that led it to restrict access to BitTorrent, a service used to exchange a range of large data files, from pirated movies to complex software programs. “Comcast remains committed to the FCC’s existing open Internet principles, and we will continue to work constructively with this FCC as it determines how best to increase broadband adoption and preserve an open and vibrant Internet,” Comcast said in a statement. The company is currently seeking federal approval for its proposed acquisition of a majority stake in NBC Universal, the parent of the NBC broadcast network and a cadre of popular cable channels. Some members of Congress and consumer groups have opposed the merger, saying that it would enable Comcast to favor its own cable channels and discriminate against those owned by competitors — something the company has said it does not intend to do.

Continued from B1 More broadly, the ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit could raise obstacles to the Obama administration’s effort to increase Americans’ access to high-speed Internet networks. For example, the national broadband plan released by the administration last month proposed to shift billions of dollars from a fund to provide phone service in rural areas to one that helps pay for Internet access in those areas. Legal observers said the court decision suggested that the FCC did not have the authority to make that switch. The FCC will now have to reconsider its strategy for mandating “net neutrality,” the principle that all Internet content should be treated equally by network providers. One option would be to reclassify broadband service as a sort of basic utility subject to strict regulation, like telephone service. Telephone companies and broadband providers have already indicated that they would vigorously oppose such a move.

A victory for some The appeals court’s 3-0 decision, which was written by one of the court’s more liberal members, Judge David Tatel, focused on the narrow issue of whether the FCC had authority to regulate Comcast’s network management practices. But it was a clear victory for those who favor limiting the FCC’s regulation of the Internet, said Phil Kerpen, a vice president at Americans for Prosperity, a group that advocates limited government. “The FCC has no legal basis for imposing its dystopian regulatory vision under the

An open Internet

Crestview Continued from B1 Crestview customers in the company’s other Central Oregon markets are not subject to the increases as their rates were increased last October, Ashcroft said. The timing discrepancy for the

an open Internet.” While the court decision invalidated its current approach to that goal, the agency said, “the court in no way disagreed with the importance of providing a free and open Internet, nor did it close the door to other methods for achieving this important end.” The concept of equal access for all Internet content is one that people who favor some degree of FCC regulation say is necessary not only to protect consumers but also to foster innovation and investment in technology. “You can’t have innovation if all the big companies get the fast lane,” said Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge, which advocates for consumer rights on digital issues. “Look at Google, eBay, Yahoo — none of those companies would have survived if 15 years ago we had a fast lane and a slow lane on the Internet.” The court’s ruling could potentially affect content providers like Google, which owns YouTube, a popular video-sharing service. Content providers fear that Internet service companies will ask them to pay a fee to ensure delivery of material like high-definition video that takes up a lot of network capacity. Google declined to comment directly on the ruling but pointed to the Open Internet Coalition, of which it is a member. The coalition’s executive director, Markham Erickson, said the decision “creates a dangerous situation, one where the health and openness of the Internet is being held hostage by the behavior of the major telco and cable providers.”

Julius Genachowski, chairman of the FCC, had said previously that if the agency lost the Comcast case, he would seek to find other legal authority to implement consumer protections over Internet service. In a statement, the FCC said it remained “firmly committed to promoting

Sam Feder, an attorney who formerly served as general coun-

rate hikes is due to the difference in channels offered to the service areas, he said. Cable television rates have risen steadily in the past 15 years. A study released January 2009 by the Federal Communications Commission said cable rates rose 122 percent from 1995 to 2008. However, Multichannel News,

a cable television industry blog, said the report did not take into account inflation costs or the increase in the quality of programming. BendBroadband announced in early March it would raise its cable television rates as of April 1 by 3 percent on average. The company said the increase was necessary to cover higerh pro-

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 B5

sel for the FCC, said that the court’s decision “is the worst of all worlds for the FCC.” He said the opinion was written narrowly enough that it was unlikely to be successfully appealed, while also raising enough possibilities of other ways that the FCC could accomplish the same goals that it was unlikely to inspire congressional action to give the agency specific regulatory authority over the Internet. Under the Bush administration, the FCC largely deregulated Internet service. But in 2008, the final year of the administration, the agency decided to impose the net neutrality order on Comcast. Under President Barack Obama, the FCC has broadened that initiative, seeking to craft rules governing the entire industry. Tuesday’s ruling was the latest in a string of court decisions that rebuffed efforts by the FCC to expand its regulatory authority, noted Eli M. Noam, a professor of finance and economics at the Columbia University graduate business school and the director of the Columbia Institute for Tele-Information. “The FCC is going to have to be more careful in how it proceeds,” he said, suggesting that the agency would have to structure policy decisions that were more broadly acceptable to the major telecommunications industry players in order to give them some legitimacy. Andrew M. Odlyzko, a professor at the University of Minnesota who formerly served as director of the school’s Digital Technology Center, said that while some Internet service providers might jump at the opportunity to establish toll roads for their broadband service, the biggest companies, including Comcast and Verizon, have said they do not intend to do so.

Diminished authority

gramming and operating costs. Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or amoore@ bendbulletin.com.

Food, Home & Garden In AT HOME Every Tuesday

BMW

Zimmerman estimates the BMW Motorcycle Owners of America International Rally will Continued from B1 generate between $500,000 and Most convention centers $750,000 in economic benefit a are located in urban areas day. And just as it did in 2001, this and surrounded by concrete. Zimmerman estimates summer’s rally will serve as a about half of the 6,000 to 7,000 warm-up event. From Aug. 11-14, the Family Moparticipants will be camping, and he said the fairgrounds, tor Coach Association will hold which opened in 1999, offer its annual convention at the fairgrounds, for the plenty of campfourth time since ing space, air2001. c o n d i t i o n e d “The Deschutes The 2007 conbuildings to County fairgrounds vention attracted escape the heat and more mod- (are) really one of the more than 2,600 motor homes, acern restrooms, nicest fairgrounds cording to newsshowers and paper archives. other features we’ve been to.” It generated than many othroughly $20.7 miler fairgrounds. — Ray Zimmerman, lion in economic “The Des- executive director of chutes County BMW Motorcycle Owners impact, said Dan D e s p o to pu lo s , f a i r g r o u n d s of America director of the (are) really one fairgrounds and of the nicest fairgrounds we’ve been to,” he expo center, and that number reflects only direct spending, not said. The rally, which attracted money spent, for example, by venabout 6,600 participants in dors who buy items to outfit their 2001, will feature motorcycle displays. “It’s amazing how much money displays, vendors, entertainment and other activities, ac- they spend in this area,” he said. And the region’s tourism seccording to the group’s Web site. Members can take part tor, which has suffered with the in rider-training classes. Off- rest of the economy, can use it, road riding and training also said Alana Audette, president and CEO of the Central Oregon Visiwill be available. The event is for members tors Association. Hitting the region at peak tourand guests only, but the rally will be noticeable to residents ism season, the motorcycle rally as Redmond begins filling up and motor coach convention will do more than just fill hotel rooms with motorcycles. “Each day it grows little by and restaurants. They increase little,” Zimmerman said, with demand, allowing those businessall 6,000-plus participants ex- es to charge a little more and earn pected in town by Saturday, peak revenue. “It’s definitely the shot in the July 17. “Every hotel parking lot in arm for tourism we’ve been looktown will be full of motorcy- ing for,” Audette said. cles. Every restaurant will be full of motorcycles.” Tim Doran can be reached After the 2001 rally, then- at 541-383-0360, or at tdoran@ Redmond Police Chief Lane bendbulletin.com. Roberts reported no problems, not even a traffic citation. Local businesses saw an increase in sales, however, according to The Bulletin archives. Laundromats and dry cleaners and the liquor store reported more business.

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .72 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

14 13 ... ... 40 ... ... 28 24 50 20 15 26 29 ... 11 ... ... 16 ... 16

YTD Last Chg %Chg 40.98 21.07 18.49 14.12 72.36 .57 34.23 54.76 61.74 2.50 28.66 53.86 14.67 22.40 8.47 21.94 3.89 10.01 22.37 8.12 29.32

-.12 -.03 +.36 +.47 +.32 +.02 -.70 +.39 +.92 +.03 +.39 -.01 -.22 -.19 +.31 -.09 +.05 -.17 +.05 -.09 +.05

Name

+18.6 -2.4 +22.8 +14.9 +33.7 -16.2 +24.5 +40.3 +4.3 +4.2 -12.4 +4.6 +10.2 +9.8 +52.6 +6.9 +44.1 +43.4 -5.2 -8.0 -3.8

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1136.00 $1135.10 $17.917

Pvs Day $1133.00 $1132.90 $18.104

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44f .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

21 22 16 98 91 ... 27 19 14 ... 19 11 47 57 ... 33 65 38 ... ...

73.91 -.20 +11.9 43.37 +.61 +15.4 47.69 +.21 +5.9 16.72 +.26 +31.8 44.69 -.07 +23.2 3.06 -.14 +8.9 39.96 +.52 +5.8 126.25 -1.01 +14.4 25.50 -.08 +19.8 54.66 -.56 +14.6 69.87 +.88 +13.3 48.84 +.09 +22.0 24.60 -.01 +6.7 7.37 +.08 +22.8 13.50 +.29 +.7 27.08 +.61 +20.3 20.27 -.01 +4.8 32.28 +.77 +19.6 2.66 +.01 +26.4 46.32 +.20 +7.4

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF Pfizer FordM

2670672 1566390 1016365 770414 743176

Last Chg 4.29 18.49 119.04 16.96 12.70

+.03 +.36 +.28 +.06 -.07

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

FelCor PhnxCos MaguirePr DoralFncl CallonP h

7.42 +1.07 +16.9 2.89 +.36 +14.2 3.67 +.42 +12.9 4.90 +.52 +11.9 6.75 +.71 +11.8

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name MasseyEn BkA BM RE DirREBear NBkGreece TeekayTnk

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

48.45 -6.24 -11.4 2.05 -.20 -8.9 7.60 -.57 -7.0 3.85 -.28 -6.8 12.15 -.89 -6.8

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g KodiakO g TriValley CheniereEn ExeterR gs

62826 52957 48770 40255 22656

Name

4.04 3.75 1.32 4.66 7.28

PwShs QQQ ETrade Intel Microsoft MicronT

+.08 +.02 -.83 +.62 +.62

Engex CheniereEn PudaCoal n ExeterR gs ChiGengM

Last

Vol (00)

6.75 +1.85 +37.8 4.66 +.62 +15.3 11.31 +1.40 +14.1 7.28 +.62 +9.3 2.89 +.24 +9.1

Last Chg 48.75 1.71 22.40 29.32 10.23

+.14 +.02 -.19 +.05 -.37

Name

Last

ChinaInfo AtlCstFd FidelSo PacCapB ViragLog

7.00 +1.68 +31.6 3.98 +.66 +19.7 6.99 +.99 +16.5 2.15 +.27 +14.4 9.43 +1.19 +14.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

SunLink ProlorBio AdcareH wt Chrmcft AdcareHlt

3.08 4.11 2.80 2.40 5.50

-.32 -.30 -.20 -.15 -.30

-9.4 -6.8 -6.7 -5.9 -5.2

Unilife n BeasleyB AlignTech SptChalA CmwlthBsh

288 198 43 529 39 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

502538 487112 464948 462767 419330

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Last

Diary 1,754 1,313 114 3,181 476 4

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

6.97 -1.07 -13.3 3.83 -.52 -12.0 18.44 -2.00 -9.8 3.06 -.30 -9.0 2.88 -.24 -7.7

Diary 1,501 1,151 141 2,793 229 13

10,988.06 4,439.24 408.57 7,600.93 1,971.20 2,432.25 1,187.73 12,435.37 697.65

7,750.85 2,757.79 324.39 5,107.95 1,336.87 1,559.46 814.53 8,292.40 431.69

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,969.99 4,431.42 387.69 7,604.44 1,960.87 2,436.81 1,189.44 12,464.59 701.48

-3.56 +16.01 +2.77 +3.51 -8.70 +7.28 +2.00 +29.22 +3.83

YTD %Chg %Chg -.03 +.36 +.72 +.05 -.44 +.30 +.17 +.23 +.55

52-wk %Chg

+5.20 +8.09 -2.59 +5.84 +7.45 +7.39 +6.67 +7.93 +12.17

+40.83 +58.44 +17.04 +48.50 +42.33 +56.04 +45.85 +50.18 +62.49

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

355.61 2,696.66 4,053.94 5,780.35 6,252.21 21,537.00 33,801.21 23,346.66 3,308.91 11,282.32 1,726.09 2,975.51 4,974.10 6,046.85

+1.19 s +.60 s +.49 s +.62 s +.27 s +1.40 s +.45 s +.60 s +1.00 s -.50 t +.06 s +.24 s +.98 s +.09 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9276 1.5277 .9999 .001923 .1464 1.3396 .1287 .010654 .081653 .0340 .000890 .1388 .9352 .0315

Pvs Day .9210 1.5298 .9969 .001915 .1464 1.3486 .1287 .010611 .081443 .0342 .000890 .1393 .9413 .0313

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.84 -0.01 +5.5 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.82 +0.03 +8.5 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.84 +0.01 +4.7 GrowthI 23.40 +0.03 +6.2 Ultra 20.69 +0.02 +6.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.81 +0.02 +7.3 AMutlA p 24.06 +4.5 BalA p 16.92 +0.02 +4.9 BondA p 11.91 +0.01 +2.0 CapWA p 20.04 -0.06 +0.8 CapIBA p 48.36 -0.03 +1.9 CapWGA p 34.39 -0.09 +1.4 EupacA p 39.22 -0.11 +2.3 FdInvA p 34.57 +0.03 +6.0 GovtA p 13.96 +0.02 +0.6 GwthA p 28.91 +5.8 HI TrA p 10.97 +0.01 +5.2 IncoA p 15.93 +3.9 IntBdA p 13.17 +0.01 +0.9 ICAA p 27.03 +4.7 NEcoA p 23.68 -0.03 +5.3 N PerA p 26.61 -0.05 +3.8 NwWrldA 49.72 +0.01 +5.3 SmCpA p 34.54 +0.16 +9.5 TxExA p 12.06 -0.01 +1.2 WshA p 25.81 +0.02 +5.4 American Funds B: BalB p 16.86 +0.02 +4.7 CapIBB t 48.38 -0.02 +1.7 GrwthB t 28.00 +0.01 +5.6 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.26 -0.07 +3.6 IntlEqA 28.55 -0.07 +3.6 IntEqII I r 12.08 -0.03 +2.5 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.40 -0.09 -1.3 MidCap 27.88 +0.03 +9.1 MidCapVal 18.88 +5.0 Baron Funds:

Growth 45.10 +0.14 +9.2 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.42 +0.03 +2.5 DivMu 14.40 -0.01 +0.8 TxMgdIntl 15.67 +0.03 +2.6 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.63 +0.02 +5.1 GlAlA r 18.40 +0.01 +2.9 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.18 +0.01 +2.6 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.49 +0.02 +3.0 CGM Funds: Focus 31.79 +0.12 +6.9 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 46.90 +0.10 +5.5 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 26.42 +0.10 +10.2 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.21 +0.10 +10.3 AcornIntZ 36.29 +0.15 +5.9 ValRestr 46.23 +0.23 +8.1 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.65 +0.01 +5.2 USCorEq2 10.13 +0.03 +11.1 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.77 +0.01 +5.8 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 33.12 +0.01 +5.8 NYVen C 31.66 +0.01 +5.6 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.46 +0.02 +3.0 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.52 +0.07 +7.1 EmMktV 33.63 +0.14 +7.0 IntSmVa 16.26 +0.07 +7.8 USLgCo 35.09 +0.06 +7.2 USLgVa 19.14 +0.03 +12.5 US Micro 11.94 +0.06 +13.1 US Small 18.74 +0.09 +13.8 US SmVa 22.89 +0.15 +16.7 IntlSmCo 15.32 +0.07 +7.7 Fixd 10.32 +0.3 IntVa 17.74 -0.01 +4.1 Glb5FxInc 11.14 +1.4

2YGlFxd 10.19 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 68.00 Income 13.04 IntlStk 33.57 Stock 103.97 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.09 NatlMunInc 9.65 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 18.14 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.66 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.31 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.95 FPACres 26.14 Fairholme 34.69 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.00 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.12 StrInA 12.30 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.29 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.03 FF2015 10.86 FF2020 13.16 FF2025 10.94 FF2030 13.08 FF2035 10.85 FF2040 7.59 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.27 AMgr50 14.49 Balanc 17.23 BlueChGr 40.77 Canada 52.63 CapAp 23.63 CpInc r 8.98 Contra 61.32 DisEq 22.40 DivIntl 28.69

+0.01 +0.5 +6.8 +0.01 +1.8 -0.03 +5.4 -0.04 +8.5 +0.07 +8.3 -0.01 +2.7 +0.07 +8.4 +2.6 +0.01 +2.5 +0.01 +1.1 +5.3 +0.26 +15.3 +0.01 +7.3 +0.03 +5.3 +2.6 +0.02 +5.4 +0.03 +0.02 +0.03 +0.03 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02

+4.2 +4.2 +4.9 +5.3 +5.6 +5.8 +6.0

+0.03 +7.3 +0.03 +4.6 +0.03 +5.3 +0.07 +7.4 -0.01 +8.6 +0.07 +10.3 +0.01 +5.8 +0.09 +5.4 +0.04 +6.6 +0.01 +2.5

DivGth 25.93 EmrMk 23.89 Eq Inc 42.56 EQII 17.68 Fidel 30.12 GNMA 11.44 GovtInc 10.41 GroCo 74.71 GroInc 17.31 HighInc r 8.70 Indepn 21.82 IntBd 10.26 IntmMu 10.16 IntlDisc 31.17 InvGrBd 11.39 InvGB 7.12 LgCapVal 12.16 LatAm 53.14 LevCoStk 25.59 LowP r 35.52 Magelln 69.02 MidCap 27.03 MuniInc 12.50 NwMkt r 15.52 OTC 49.05 100Index 8.41 Ovrsea 31.23 Puritn 16.96 StIntMu 10.62 STBF 8.36 SmllCpS r 17.70 StratInc 10.97 StrReRt r 8.76 TotalBd 10.61 USBI 11.09 Value 64.34 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 42.26 IntlInxInv 34.23 TotMktInv 34.17 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 42.27 TotMktAd r 34.17 First Eagle:

+0.08 +9.5 +0.08 +5.7 +0.13 +8.7 +0.06 +8.3 +0.09 +6.3 +0.02 +1.5 +0.02 +0.8 +0.14 +8.3 +0.04 +7.8 +0.02 +4.7 +0.11 +9.5 +0.02 +2.0 -0.01 +1.0 +0.07 +2.7 +0.02 +1.8 +0.01 +2.0 +0.05 +8.1 +0.10 +2.5 +0.15 +11.6 +0.12 +11.2 +0.06 +7.3 +0.16 +15.4 -0.01 +1.4 +0.01 +4.8 +0.12 +7.3 +0.01 +6.1 +1.0 +0.03 +5.6 +0.4 +0.01 +1.1 +0.03 +11.0 +2.8 +0.03 +2.9 +0.01 +2.3 +0.02 +1.2 +0.46 +13.0 +0.07 +7.2 +0.07 +2.3 +0.08 +8.2 +0.07 +7.2 +0.08 +8.2

GlblA 42.27 -0.01 +5.7 OverseasA 20.58 -0.02 +5.8 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.75 +1.3 FoundAl p 10.26 +0.03 +4.5 HYTFA p 9.98 +2.5 IncomA p 2.11 +4.3 USGovA p 6.64 +0.01 +1.3 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +7.6 IncmeAd 2.10 +0.01 +4.4 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.13 +0.01 +4.1 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.28 +0.03 +6.4 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.65 +0.02 +1.5 GlBd A p 13.53 +0.01 +7.5 GrwthA p 17.24 +0.02 +2.6 WorldA p 14.29 +2.3 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.24 +0.02 +2.6 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.56 +0.02 +7.4 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.22 +0.04 +6.4 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.67 -0.02 +1.7 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.12 +0.04 +7.0 Quality 19.67 -0.03 +1.7 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 32.59 +0.21 +12.5 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.10 +0.01 +4.3 HYMuni 8.45 +4.6 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.36 +0.01 +2.2 CapApInst 34.38 +0.10 +4.3 IntlInv t 55.78 +0.06 +2.6 Intl r 56.32 +0.06 +2.6 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.40 +0.05 +5.6 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 28.90 +0.05 +5.4

Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.34 +0.05 +5.7 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 39.27 +0.07 +7.2 Div&Gr 18.69 +6.5 Advisers 18.45 +0.05 +5.6 TotRetBd 10.82 +0.02 +2.3 HussmnStrGr 12.68 -0.02 -0.8 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.38 +0.03 +2.8 AssetStA p 22.94 +0.02 +3.0 AssetStrI r 23.11 +0.03 +3.0 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.16 +0.01 +1.4 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.16 +0.01 +1.5 HighYld 7.95 +4.8 IntmTFBd 10.84 -0.01 +0.4 ShtDurBd 10.87 +0.7 USLCCrPls 19.53 +0.04 +7.4 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.49 +0.01 +4.7 OvrseasT r 47.18 +0.12 +11.0 PrkMCVal T 21.30 +0.01 +7.6 Twenty T 64.56 +0.33 +4.8 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.53 +0.03 +7.1 LSBalanc 12.38 +0.03 +5.4 LSGrwth 12.15 +0.03 +6.1 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 22.07 +0.09 +11.4 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.59 +0.05 +8.8 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.87 +0.05 +8.7 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.97 +2.3 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.52 +0.10 +10.1 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.83 +0.02 +5.2 StrInc C 14.39 +0.02 +5.1 LSBondR 13.78 +0.02 +5.2 StrIncA 14.32 +0.02 +5.3 Loomis Sayles Inv:

InvGrBdA p 11.98 +0.02 InvGrBdY 11.99 +0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.17 +0.05 BdDebA p 7.53 ShDurIncA p 4.58 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.62 +0.01 ValueA 21.95 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.04 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.74 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.46 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 20.27 +0.04 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.12 +0.02 TotRtBdI 10.12 +0.02 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.41 -0.04 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.28 +0.11 GlbDiscZ 28.62 +0.11 QuestZ 18.12 +0.07 SharesZ 20.44 +0.03 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.61 +0.06 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.17 +0.06 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.03 -0.02 Intl I r 18.09 +0.05 Oakmark r 40.10 +0.06 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.47 +0.02 GlbSMdCap 13.69 +0.05 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.85 +0.02 DvMktA p 30.42 +0.15 GlobA p 56.96 -0.15 IntBdA p 6.45 MnStFdA 30.12 +0.06 RisingDivA 14.69 +0.01

+3.8 +4.0 +9.5 +4.0 +2.1 +4.4 +6.0 +6.0 +3.5 +4.2 +5.4 +3.5 +3.6 +3.0 +5.8 +5.9 +5.1 +6.5 +7.5 +7.4 +5.8 +7.4 +8.3 +5.7 +7.2 +4.8 +5.8 +7.5 +1.9 +7.1 +5.6

S&MdCpVl 29.08 +0.07 StrInA p 4.06 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.35 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 25.09 +0.06 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.30 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.17 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.10 +0.15 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.00 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.69 +0.03 ComodRR 7.99 HiYld 9.07 +0.01 InvGrCp 11.14 +0.03 LowDu 10.44 +0.01 RealRet 10.93 +0.07 RealRtnI 10.84 +0.04 ShortT 9.87 +0.01 TotRt 11.00 +0.01 TR II 10.54 +0.02 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.44 +0.01 RealRtA p 10.84 +0.04 TotRtA 11.00 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.00 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.00 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.00 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.23 +0.05 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.12 +0.02 Price Funds: BlChip 34.74 +0.11 CapApp 19.42 +0.04 EmMktS 31.91 +0.02 EqInc 22.79 +0.09 EqIndex 32.04 +0.05 Growth 29.14 +0.07

+9.4 NA +5.4 +9.2 +5.3 +3.5 +5.9 +2.6 +2.7 -1.1 +5.3 +3.5 +2.0 +0.1 +1.0 +0.8 +2.7 +1.5 +1.8 +0.9 +2.5 +2.3 +2.6 +2.6 +4.0 +6.9 +6.0 +6.9 +6.0 +9.0 +7.1 +5.9

HlthSci 28.84 HiYield 6.61 IntlBond 9.65 IntlStk 13.32 MidCap 52.92 MCapVal 22.57 N Asia 17.16 New Era 46.15 N Horiz 28.70 N Inc 9.34 R2010 14.66 R2015 11.27 R2020 15.48 R2025 11.29 R2030 16.14 R2040 16.21 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 30.46 SmCapVal 32.77 SpecIn 12.04 Value 22.31 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.92 VoyA p 21.81 RiverSource A: DEI 9.40 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.35 PremierI r 17.92 TotRetI r 11.85 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.50 S&P Sel 18.59 Scout Funds: Intl 30.38 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.61 AmShS p 39.61 Sequoia 119.99 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 51.09 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.88 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.49

+0.02 +10.2 +0.01 +5.0 -0.03 -1.6 +0.01 +5.7 +0.29 +11.4 +0.13 +8.9 -0.06 +6.3 +0.21 +5.8 +0.05 +12.2 +0.01 +1.8 +0.02 +5.1 +0.02 +5.6 +0.03 +6.0 +0.02 +6.4 +0.04 +6.7 +0.05 +7.0 +1.0 +0.11 +13.1 +0.18 +11.2 +0.01 +3.1 +0.11 +8.9 +0.02 +8.0 +0.06 +10.5 +0.02 +7.1 +0.02 +9.5 +0.03 +9.9 +0.04 +10.0 +0.06 +7.6 +0.03 +7.2 -0.07 +4.3 +0.02 +6.3 +0.02 +6.3 -0.07 +9.2 +0.02 +3.9 +0.01 +1.6 +0.04 +1.0

Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 48.40 +0.06 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.67 +0.03 IntValue I 26.22 +0.02 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.36 VALIC : StkIdx 23.88 +0.04 Van Kamp Funds A: CapGro 11.95 +0.05 CmstA p 14.85 EqIncA p 8.29 GrInA p 18.75 +0.02 HYMuA p 9.23 -0.01 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.86 CpOpAdl 74.00 -0.07 Energy 116.13 +0.22 500Adml 109.59 +0.18 GNMA Ad 10.65 +0.01 HlthCr 51.79 -0.09 HiYldCp 5.56 InfProAd 24.54 +0.09 ITsryAdml 11.05 +0.02 IntGrAdm 56.54 +0.06 ITAdml 13.44 ITGrAdm 9.74 +0.02 LtdTrAd 11.02 LTGrAdml 8.83 +0.02 LT Adml 10.96 -0.01 MuHYAdm 10.35 -0.01 PrmCap r 64.42 -0.15 STsyAdml 10.69 +0.01 ShtTrAd 15.90 -0.01 STIGrAd 10.68 +0.01 TtlBAdml 10.37 +0.01 TStkAdm 29.57 +0.06 WellslAdm 50.43 +0.09 WelltnAdm 51.76 +0.04 Windsor 43.72 +0.12 WdsrIIAd 45.25 +0.02 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.62 +0.04 CapOpp 32.03 -0.04

+4.5 +3.5 +3.6 +5.5 +7.1 +6.4 +7.9 +6.9 +9.0 +2.7 +1.3 +6.6 +3.6 +7.2 +1.4 +3.1 +3.7 +0.1 +0.9 +4.6 +0.8 +2.9 +0.4 +0.5 +1.0 +1.7 +4.5 +0.5 +0.3 +1.8 +1.2 +8.2 +3.2 +4.6 +8.8 +7.7 +5.1 +6.6

Energy 61.84 EqInc 19.25 Explr 63.92 GNMA 10.65 GlobEq 16.76 GroInc 25.16 HYCorp 5.56 HlthCre 122.71 InflaPro 12.49 IntlGr 17.77 IntlVal 31.63 ITIGrade 9.74 LifeCon 15.63 LifeGro 20.73 LifeMod 18.55 LTIGrade 8.83 Morg 16.37 MuInt 13.44 MuLtd 11.02 MuShrt 15.90 PrecMtls r 22.30 PrmcpCor 12.83 Prmcp r 62.08 SelValu r 17.62 STAR 18.36 STIGrade 10.68 StratEq 16.90 TgRe2010 21.37 TgtRe2025 11.97 TgtRe2015 11.86 TgRe2020 21.02 TgRe2030 20.51 TgtRe2035 12.39 TgtRe2045 12.82 USGro 17.24 Wellsly 20.81 Welltn 29.97 Wndsr 12.96 WndsII 25.49 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 109.59 Balanced 20.28 DevMkt 9.81 EMkt 27.43

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+7.2 +5.4 +2.9 +5.9

Europe 25.98 -0.03 +0.2 Extend 36.70 +0.17 +12.3 Growth 29.04 +0.03 +6.5 ITBnd 10.76 +0.02 +1.5 MidCap 18.29 +0.06 +11.8 Pacific 10.48 +0.04 +8.3 REIT r 17.04 +0.35 +15.6 SmCap 31.15 +0.18 +13.3 SmlCpGth 18.94 +0.08 +12.5 SmlCpVl 14.90 +0.11 +14.1 STBnd 10.44 +0.01 +0.9 TotBnd 10.37 +0.01 +1.2 TotlIntl 14.92 +0.01 +3.5 TotStk 29.57 +0.07 +8.1 Value 20.07 +0.05 +8.3 Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst 9.73 +0.01 NS ExtIn 36.72 +0.17 +12.4 InfProInst 9.99 +0.03 +0.1 InstIdx 108.86 +0.19 +7.2 InsPl 108.86 +0.18 +7.2 InsTStPlus 26.72 +0.06 +8.1 MidCpIst 18.34 +0.06 +11.8 SCInst 31.18 +0.18 +13.4 TBIst 10.37 +0.01 +1.2 TSInst 29.58 +0.07 +8.2 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 90.53 +0.16 +7.2 STBdIdx 10.44 +0.01 +0.9 TotBdSgl 10.37 +0.01 +1.2 TotStkSgl 28.54 +0.06 +8.1 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.76 +0.04 +5.7 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.3 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.43 +0.01 +4.2


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY “ROTH IRAS — RETIREMENT CAN BE LESS TAXING”: Learn about the differences between traditional and Roth IRAs and new tax law changes for conversion; free; noon-1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser Mark Schang’s office, 1180 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541617-8861 or www.edwardjones.com. “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS”: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. DEMOCRATIC GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE FORUM: Candidates Bill Bradbury and John Kitzhaber will discuss how to support businesses, employment and economic growth. Live stream of the Portland event; $10 to stream; 4:30-5:45 p.m.; www.sao.org/event/dgp. CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW: Jim Mazziotti, principal broker of Exit Realty Bend, will present “Central Oregon’s Top 10 Best Home Buys.”; free; 7 p.m.; mazz@propertiesinbend.com or www.exitrealtybend.com.

THURSDAY 2010 CENTRAL OREGON CAMPAIGN SCHOOL: Features political experts and local government leaders who will discuss topics such as election and campaign finance law, fundraising, contacting voters and working with media. Preregistration required by April 6; $25, includes breakfast and lunch; 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-585-2066 or bill@coar.com. “TAKE CHARGE — PROTECT YOUR MONEY”: Seminar about fraud prevention. Presented by Department of Consumer and Business Services and AARP Oregon. Reservations requested; free; 9 a.m.- noon and 6:30-8 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 877-926-8300 or http:// takechargebend.eventbrite.com. POWERPOINT CLASS: Learn how to construct a basic PowerPoint presentation. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9-11:30 a.m., and class continues April 12 from 9-11:30 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “BEYOND THE COURTROOM — THE ROLE OF LOCAL JUDGES AND WHY YOUR VOTE MATTERS”: Meet judicial candidates and panel discussion about the role local judges play in the legal system. Registration required by April 5; free; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; robyn@cityclubofcentraloregon.com or www.karnopp.com. “DROUGHT TOLERANT LANDSCAPING”: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:306:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-3891058 or www.buildinggreencouncil.org. “PESTICIDE APPLICATOR — HERBICIDES ORNAMENTAL TURF”: Prepare for the Oregon commercial pesticide certification exam, or for recertification credit for Oregon applicators and consultants. Preregistration required; $99, continuing education units available; Thursdays through April 22 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY “GETTING STARTED WITH GMAIL”: Must have familiarity with Windows operating system and Internet Explorer. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or jenniferp@dpls.us. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; M.A. Lynch Elementary School, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-504-1389 or www. yourmoneyback.org.

SATURDAY EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-504-1389 or www. yourmoneyback.org.

MONDAY “LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS”: Business owners learn how to develop a working plan. Preregistration required; $49; course combines four

coaching sessions starting April 12 and classes on April 21 and May 5 and 19 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “BEGINNING EXCEL 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-noon and class continues April 14 from 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “ENERGY EDUCATION IS FOR EVERYONE”: Presented by Diane Hanson of NeighborImpact; free; 9 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-504-1389 or www. yourmoneyback.org. “RÉSUMÉS AND APPLICATIONS”: Learn to prepare applications, résumés and cover letters. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 24 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org.

TUESDAY KEYBOARDING CLASS: Class for beginners or those wanting to improve. Features an introduction to Ultra Key typing software. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9-11 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. E-MAIL CLASS: Learn how to sign up for a free e-mail service. Basic computer experience required. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 2-4:30 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org. “ESSENTIALS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT”: Human resource professionals will learn practices to help lead an organization to success. Preregistration required; $89, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through June 1 from 6-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY April 14 DISCOVERING YOUR CORE BRAND ENERGY: Steve Curley, of Kinetic Branding, will lead a presentation on how companies can make an emotional connection with consumers. He also will discuss the Core Brand Energy principles and how to integrate them into a business. Registration is requested; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS CLASS: Learn basic computer skills. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “ROTH IRAS — RETIREMENT CAN BE LESS TAXING”: Learn about the differences between traditional and Roth IRAs and new tax law changes for conversion; free; noon-1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser Mark Schang’s office, 1180 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541617-8861 or www.edwardjones.com. “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS”: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “CREDIT MANAGEMENT AND CREDIT REPORTS”: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn how to use a credit card responsibly. Preregistration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@ neighborimpact.org. “INTRODUCTION TO PAYROLL ACCOUNTING”: Learn the basics of payroll accounting including laws, calculations, deductions and reporting in Excel and QuickBooks. Preregistration required; $129, continuing education units available; Wednesdays through June 2 from 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY April 15 “NABCEP SOLAR PV ENTRYLEVEL EXAM PREP”: Prepare to take the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners entry-level certification exam. For licensed electricians. Registration required by April 5; $349, continuing education units included; 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and class continues April 16 from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and April 17 from 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu/building.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Kimberly Bowker at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

Charging for carry-on bags: Is it inevitable? By Christine Negroni

Although unpopular with many passengers, checked bag fees have accounted for $2 billion in additional revenue for airlines.

New York Times News Service

The airlines first imposed a fee on the second checked bag in 2005. Then, they started charging for the first bag. Now, Spirit Airlines says it will charge as much as $45 each way for carryon bags that are too big to fit under the seat. True, Spirit is a small airline and none of the bigger carriers indicated on Tuesday, after Spirit’s announcement, whether they would follow suit. But it is already clear that the fees air travelers pay to check luggage on most flights have had a bigger impact on airlines’ bottom lines than, perhaps, even the airlines had expected. A fee for a carry-on bag only underlines the new financial reality at airlines: Everyone, and everything, on a

Ruth Fremson New York Times News Service

plane must pay its own way. The total in bag fees collected by the airlines has skyrocketed since the fees were first imposed. According to Department of Transportation statistics, the fees rose from $464 million in 2007 to nearly $2 billion in just the first nine months of last year.

At the same time, passengers are now checking fewer and lighter bags to avoid the extra fees for heavy suitcases. As a result, the airlines have not been losing as many bags and baggage handlers appear to be suffering fewer injuries. In addition, the airlines now

have more space available for cargo, which sells at a higher rate than a checked bag. “Freight makes a significant contribution to the bottom line of passenger airlines,” said Ulrich Ogiermann, chairman of the International Air Cargo Association. The revenue potential “if passengers check fewer suitcases to avoid baggage fees cannot be ignored,” he added. In the United States, the most visible consequence of baggage fees has been the increase in more and heavier items in the passenger cabin, the very behavior that prompted Spirit’s new fee for carry-on policy. A survey by the Association of Flight Attendants found “excess amounts of oversized carry-on items” were causing flight attendants to be injured.

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed March 30

Robert B. and Pamela J. Axmaker, P.O. Box 1352, Bend Susan K. Takemoto, 21381 Kristin Court, Bend Brett E. Roos. 20882 N.E. Nova Loop Unit 1, Bend Deborah L.E. Kalista, P.O. Box 8267, Bend James P. and Terri L. McGinnis, 20407 Pine Vista Drive, Bend Richard L. Wright, P.O. Box 699, Redmond Stephen M. Jr. and Joy A. Doyle, 21251 Hurita Place, Bend Mark E. and Linda M. Bessey, 65246 76th St., Bend Filed March 31

Clayton L. Landen, 2809 S.W. Umatilla Ave., Redmond Robert D. and Kristin T. Lambson, 2969 N.W. Merlot Lane, Bend Kelley D. Kersch, 209 N.W. Outlook Vista Drive, Bend

Eric M. Bozovich, 209 N.W. Outlook Vista Drive, Bend Leslie J. Kuper, 67070 Paradise Alley, Bend Brit M. Johnson, P.O. Box 1975, Sisters Daniel J. and Sharon L. Dillard, P.O. Box 2132, Bend Sharon Jinks, 61543 Baptist Way, Bend Donald L. Wood, 395 N.E. Elm St., Prineville Charles B. Wilcox, 2660 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Suite 610-PMB 334, Bend Filed April 1

Kirby A. and Tammy R. Hollowell, 60045 Crater Road, Bend Brian S. Shenk, 20630 Colt Lane, Bend Julie A. Spindler, 19680 Alexandrite St., Bend Michael B. and Constance L. Evans, 63400 Goldspur Way, Bend Filed April 2

Rita J. Sabin, 260 W. First St., Prineville

Theodore R. and Karen L. Sommers, P.O. Box 1228, La Pine Patrick H. Meskel, 3625 S.W. Reindeer, Redmond Peter P. Brazel, 86 S.W. Century Drive, PMB #177, Bend Marcus E. and Lisa N. Crocker, 3225 N.W. Prairie Place, Bend James Rivera, 2568 N.E. Third St., Redmond Trampus C. Peterson, 10473 S.W. Cornett Loop, Powell Butte Laura L. Milne, 1855 N.E. Altura Drive, Bend Filed April 3

Michael J. Sullivan, 61414 Davis Lake Loop, Bend Filed April 4

Heather Ann Marlatt, P.O. Box 9352, Bend Filed April 5

Gregory A. and Darla K. Engstrom, 1266 N.E. Wilshire Drive, Prineville Tana M. Jordan, P.O. Box 451, Prineville Judy G. McFadden, 2546 N.E. Brandon Court, Bend

Calvin L. McDowell, 2510 N.E. Ravenwood Drive, Bend Melissa M. McNally, 19909 Elm Lane, Bend Michael J. O’Connor, 2339 N.E. Tucson, Bend Jeneane L. Warner, 61445 S.E. 27th St., Space 16, Bend Patricia H. Leveille, 156 N.E. Willow Ave., Prineville Roger R. Wilson, 84205 Christmas Valley Highway, Silver Lake Filed April 6

Jeffery D. and Patricia G. Evans, P.O. Box 1093, Bend Maggie J. and Rex A. Heising, 2202 S.W. 30th Court, Redmond Chapter 13 Filed March 30

Karin Brouillette, 930 N.W. Spruce Ave., Redmond Gregory and Kim Schmidt, P.O. Box 2258, Terrebonne Filed March 31

Brian A. and Davenie J. Tulledge, 6627 S.W. Buckskin Lane, Terrebonne


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

Treating rape victims faster

IT’S BIKE SAFETY TRAINING TIME

Officials try to increase number of certified examiners in area By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Colby Devore, 9, a student in Karen Brockway’s fourth-grade class at M.A. Lynch Elementary School in Redmond, gets some help fitting a bicycle helmet Monday. Commute Options Safe Routes coordinator Sami Fournier told students helmets have a short life span. “After one crash, it’s trash,” she said. To read the full story, see Local Schools, Page C3.

Geese hazing put on hold this month for nesting

When victims of sexual assault turn up at the hospital for treatment, they are referred to a nurse who is trained to collect evidence and to document signs of abuse. But in Central Oregon, where there are only a handful of certified sexual assault nurse examiners — often called SANE nurses, for short — victims often have to wait. Sometimes it’s a matter of minutes. But on occasion, victims have waited for six or eight hours or longer, without showering or changing clothes so they won’t lose precious evidence. Hospital and law enforcement officials say the shortage of SANE nurses has been a problem for years, but has become a bigger issue as the local population and number of patients seeking exams have increased. Now, they

are working to add more nurses to the rotation and move closer to round-theclock coverage — and prevent victims from opting out of the exam because they don’t want to wait. “We’ve had victims of sexual assault who came to us for services after they attempted to go to the hospital for the exam and be turned away, asked to come back several hours later, and then decided not to go back,” said Trish Meyer, the assistant director of Saving Grace, a group that provides support to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. “Imagine what it would be like to experience this profound act of violence, and then you go to the hospital for medical services and you are turned away,” SANE nurses must complete a 40hour training course, which is typically held outside of Central Oregon, said Darin Durham, the manager of the

emergency department at St. Charles Bend. Training for pediatric exams is usually held in only one location in the U.S. Nurses learn how to document and preserve evidence in exams that can last between three and five hours. “They learn everything about the mechanisms of the assault, the types of injuries they’re going to see,” Durham said. “A great deal of it is how to complete all the paperwork that is required, because most of these cases are going to end up in court.” St. Charles Bend currently has five emergency room nurses who have received SANE certification, and St. Charles Redmond has two SANE nurses. Last year, SANE nurses performed 70 examinations. Durham said over the last few years, the number of exams has gone up by about 10 each year. See SANE / C5

Finding the right path

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Local Canada geese will get a brief break from the Bend Park & Recreation District’s efforts to harass them into leaving parks along the Deschutes River. With the goose-nesting season coming up, volunteers have backed off chasing or “hazing” the geese, according to district Natural Resources Manager Paul Stell. “It would be counterproductive,” he said. “If you chase them off of where they want to nest, they’re going to nest some place you don’t know about.” Stell said it’s critical for the district to know where geese are nesting in order to conduct the next phase of its effort to reduce the local population. Once geese begin laying eggs, volunteers will be sent out to locate nests and coat eggs with vegetable oil, a process that kills the goose embryo inside the shell. Hazing is scheduled to resume in mid- to late May, around the time un-oiled eggs should begin hatching. Mid-May to mid-June will be a key time for the district’s efforts, according to David Feld, national program director for GeesePeace, an organization that has signed on to assist the park district. If geese are going to be persuaded to leave the area, it’s likely to happen in the period between hatching and molting (when geese shed their feathers and become unable to fly). Mating pairs that do not produce offspring — due to oiled eggs or other reasons — can sometimes be persuaded to leave during this window of time, Feld said. An offshoot of the Humane Society of the United States, GeesePeace has assisted with goosecontrol efforts in dozens of communities around the country. Since launching its stepped-up campaign to drive geese out of the parks in January, the district has seen some success. Stell said some geese appear to have relocated within Central Oregon, moving to farms and ranches outside of town. Feld said with a committed and organized effort, local geese can be coaxed to go much further. In a recent experiment in southern Michigan, a group of 200 to 300 mating pairs were outfitted with transmitters so they could be tracked by satellite. Many of the birds ended up flying more than 700 miles away to Canada prior to molting, Feld said. See Geese / C5

“If you chase them off of where they want to nest, they’re going to nest some place you don’t know about.” — Paul Stell, Bend Park & Recreation District

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Scott Schauer, of Bend, 48, rides his new Niner bike across a wood feature while checking Marvin’s Trail for debris for the Central Oregon Trail Alliance at the Phil’s Trail complex west of Bend on Tuesday. Today’s weather should be perfect for outdoor activities, with a predicted high temperature of 61 degrees under partly cloudy skies. For the full forecast, see Weather, Page C6.

REDMOND

City may fix Mt. Washington bridge, Council considers but Riverhouse lawsuit to continue reroute face-lift By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

Bend officials tonight are expected to approve a deal with a private developer to fix drainage problems at the Mt. Washington Drive bridge and make access to offices for the city’s only convention center compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. The decision updates a 2004 development agreement between the city and River’s Edge Investments, LLC., developer of the Riverhouse Resort and Conference Center. Under the new deal, the city will pay about $39,000 for ADA upgrades to the resort’s office building made necessary when the current bridge across Mt. Washington Drive was constructed in 2005. River’s Edge, in turn, will pay the city about $54,000 for infrastructure connecting the Riverhouse Hotel to the convention center and will also pay about $15,000 to fix drain-

age issues caused when the bridge went in. But the deal will not resolve a 2007 lawsuit over the same development agreement that is now on its way to the Oregon Court of Appeals. The city filed a document in late March saying it will appeal a Deschutes County Circuit Court ruling that it must pay River’s Edge $142,000 for charges a judge determined were wrongly assessed by the city in late 2005 in connection with the construction of the convention center. The decision upheld arguments made by lawyer Robert Bonaparte, who represents River’s Edge, that the city made a limited agreement to waive systems development charges — or fees charged to developers and builders to help pay for infrastructure — under the 2004 convention center development deal. Bend city officials did not return calls for comment on the

appeal Tuesday. The 2004 agreement states the city would not assess SDCs against River’s Edge for a period of seven years or until the development met a certain density level, whichever occurred first. But in late 2005, the city presented River’s Edge with a bill for $142,190 for system development charges, which the developer paid. Now Judge Michael A. Adler also has ordered the city to give that money back and pay $42,000 in interest accrued at 9 percent since 2005. That interest will continue to accrue at 9 percent annually if the city loses at the appeals court level. The plan to build a convention center at the Riverhouse dates back nearly 30 years. That’s when city officials approved a master plan allowing River’s Edge to build a facility there. See Riverhouse / C5

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — The slapdash quality of landscaping along the Redmond reroute irritates Redmond City Councilor Ed Boero, and he wants to do something about it. Boero worries that drivers get a poor impression of Redmond as they pass the city along U.S. Highway 97. Stretches of property have no landscaping, while one property’s fence is made of shipping palates. To fix that, Boero wants the city to develop a landscaping plan for the corridor. But with the city facing a tight budget this year, some councilors don’t think Redmond has the money for aesthetic fixes. Almost two years ago, the reroute opened to take U.S. Highway 97 traffic out of downtown Redmond. Since then, much of the land along

either side of the highway has been untouched. A new BMX park that recently opened near St. Charles Redmond is a major exception, and volunteers have spent hours cleaning the land near the park. During a meeting Tuesday morning, Boero urged city staff to develop a plan for the stretch of Highway 97 because of that inactivity. “The fact is, we’ve got this whole section that really is a gateway to our city and we’re not going to get people to stop in our city if that’s what they see,” Boero said. “If the gateway looks like garbage, we’re not going to attract people.” Beautifying the gateway, though, has several roadblocks. Various people own property along the stretch, and the city would have to work with each before new landscaping could be installed. See Reroute / C6


C2 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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under the influence of intoxicants at 1:49 a.m. April 4, in the 1600 block of Northwest Awbrey Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:21 a.m. April 4, in the 700 block of Southwest Columbia Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:34 a.m. April 4, in the 2700 block of Northeast Boyd Acres Road. Burglary — Tools were reported stolen at 11:55 a.m. April 4, in the 3000 block of Northeast Rock Chuck Drive. Theft — Furniture was reported stolen at 12:36 p.m. April 4, in the 21000 block of Desert Woods Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:33 p.m. April 4, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A wallet and cell phone were reported stolen at 5:12 p.m. April 4, in the 800 block of Northeast Sixth Street. DUII — Stacy Michael Caito, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:45 a.m. April 5, in the 1100 block of Northwest Harriman Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 6:26 a.m. April 5, in the 500 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:50 a.m. April 5, in the 1200 block of Northwest Ogden Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:57 a.m. April 5, in the 1400 block of Northwest Juniper Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:27 a.m. April 5, in the 100 block of Southeast Airpark Drive. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:16 a.m. April 5, in the 600 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and tire chains stolen at 11:26 a.m. April 5, in the 20800 block of Desert Woods Drive. Burglary — A computer was reported stolen at 11:50 a.m. April 5, in the 2100 block of Northeast Studio Road. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 12:11 p.m. April 5, in the 800 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 12:53 p.m. April 5, in the 1300 block of Northwest Lexington Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and arrests made at 1:50 p.m. April 5, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Punctured tires were reported at 4:14 p.m. April 5, in the 1300 block of Northeast Fifth Street. Theft — A GPS was reported stolen from a vehicle at 5:28 p.m. April 5, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. Theft — A phone was reported stolen at 5:37 p.m. April 5, in the 63200 block of Jamison Street. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 6:22 p.m. April 5, in the 63200 block of Jamison Street. DUII — Salvador Sanchez Suarez, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:16 a.m. April 6, in the area of Southeast Second Street and Southeast Miller Avenue.

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A bench was reported stolen at 10:12 a.m. April 1, in the 2100 block of Northeast Fourth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:21 p.m. April 1, in the 500 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 8:30 a.m. April 2, in the 1000 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:02 a.m. April 2, in the 1100 block of Northwest Redfield Circle. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:22 a.m. April 2, in the 100 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 3:20 p.m. April 2, in the 2600 block of Northwest College Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:19 p.m. April 2, in the 2200 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:08 p.m. April 2, in the 2500 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a purse and coat stolen at 8:48 p.m. April 2, in the 2500 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. DUII — Tawnya Jean Knight, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:08 a.m. April 3, in the 1000 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. DUII — Edith Jorge Sanchez, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:35 a.m. April 3, in the 20000 block of Brookswood Boulevard. DUII — Shawn David Thomas, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:16 a.m. April 3, in the 3000 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:37 a.m. April 3, in the 400 block of Southeast Mustang Place. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 7:54 a.m. April 3, in the 800 block of Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:33 a.m. April 3, in the 60800 block of Yellow Leaf Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 3:40 p.m. April 3, in the 400 block of Northwest Franklin Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 4:26 p.m. April 3, in the 1100 block of Southeast U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:55 p.m. April 3, in the 1800 block of Southwest Turnberry Place. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and an arrest made at 11:33 p.m. April 3, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. DUII — Ryan Allan Jordan, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:16 a.m. April 4, in the area of Northeast 15th Street and Northeast Forbes Road. DUII — Nathaniel Lee Winkler, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving

Redmond Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and an arrest made at 7:16 p.m. April 5, in the 2600 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. DUII — Gene Alonzo Carter, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at

7:05 p.m. April 5, in the 3700 block of Southwest Ben Hogan Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:24 p.m. April 5, in the 1200 block of Southwest 28th Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 2:45 p.m. April 5, in the 3000 block of Southwest Juniper Avenue. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 8:11 a.m. April 5, in the 1300 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:29 a.m. April 2, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:40 a.m. April 2, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:47 a.m. April 2, in the area of Southeast Second Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:30 a.m. April 2, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported with a loss of $1,000 at 3:50 p.m. April 2, in the area of Northwest Second Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:22 p.m. April 2, in the area of Northeast Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:57 a.m. April 3, in the area of Northeast Yellowpine Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:37 p.m. April 3, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:43 a.m. April 5, in the area of Northeast Court Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:40 p.m. April 5, in the area of Northwest Studebaker Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:46 p.m. April 5, in the area of Madras Highway. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:38 p.m. April 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 148 in Sunriver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:44 p.m. April 5, in the 1600 block of West Hill Avenue in Sisters. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:38 p.m. April 5, in the 63800 block of Miday Way in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:47 p.m. April 5, in the 2900 block of Northwest Way in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:15 p.m. April 5, in the 19500 block of Pinehurst Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 11:39 a.m. April 5, in the 61000 block of Southwest 27th Street in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:29 a.m. April 5, in the 16200 block of Dyke Road in La Pine.

Today is Wednesday, April 7, the 97th day of 2010. There are 268 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 7, 1862, Union forces led by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee. ON THIS DATE In 1860, Will Keith Kellogg, founder of cereal maker Kellogg Co., was born in Battle Creek, Mich. In 1927, the image and voice of Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover were transmitted live from Washington to New York in the first successful long-distance demonstration of television. In 1939, Italy invaded Albania, which was annexed less than a week later. In 1949, the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “South Pacific� opened on Broadway. In 1969, the Supreme Court, in Stanley v. Georgia, unanimously struck down laws prohibiting private possession of obscene material. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter announced he was deferring development of the neutron

T O D AY IN HISTORY bomb, a high-radiation weapon. In 1983, space shuttle astronauts Story Musgrave and Don Peterson took the first U.S. spacewalk in almost a decade as they worked in the open cargo bay of Challenger for nearly four hours. TEN YEARS AGO Attorney General Janet Reno met in Washington with the father of Elian Gonzalez; Reno later told reporters that officials would arrange for Juan Miguel Gonzalez to reclaim his son, but she gave Elian’s Miami relatives one more chance to drop their resistance and join in a peaceful transfer. FIVE YEARS AGO The blockbuster painkiller Bextra was taken off the market, and the FDA said all similar prescription drugs should strongly warn about possible risk of heart attacks and strokes. Historic bus service began between the two parts of Kashmir, one controlled by India, the other by Pakistan.

The City Club of Central Oregon and Karnopp Petersen, LLC will host a panel discussion on the role of local judges in the legal system on Thursday afternoon. The free event, which will be held from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Oxford Hotel in downtown Bend, will include a presentation from Oregon Court of Appeals Chief Judge David Brewer. There will also be time for audience members to meet the candidates running for the Deschutes County Circuit Court seat currently held by Judge Edward Perkins.

Protesters arrested over irrigation pipe Two protesters were arrested Monday afternoon after laying down in front of, and then climbing on, heavy machinery to pro-

Young sea lion dies at Oregon Coast Aquarium

test the digging of an irrigation pipe in McKenzie Canyon. Tim Stroud, 49, and Susan Brown, 48, both of Sunriver, were arrested on suspicion of disorderly conduct, third-degree criminal mischief and second-degree criminal trespass. Both were taken to the Deschutes County jail, but released later Monday. Sheriff’s deputies were first called to the scene Monday morning after six protesters were in the canal, drinking beer and climbing on the Three Sisters Irrigation District machinery, said Capt. Tim Edwards with the Sheriff’s Office. The irrigation district decided to work elsewhere that morning, Edwards said. In the afternoon, however, three protesters lay down in the canal in front of a big excavator, Edwards said. When it stopped, they climbed on the vehicle’s tracks, he said. However, Stroud said Tuesday he and others had not been

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The Associated Press NEWPORT — Oregon Coast Aquarium officials in Newport say one of two young California sea lions recently acquired by the aquarium has drowned. Aquarium spokeswoman Cindy Hanson says the sea lion named Bailey and the other young newcomer named Maya apparently worked loose a filtration drain cover in a temporary pool where the two were being quarantined. It appears suction from the drain kept 10-month-old Bailey from being able to surface to breathe. The animal’s remains have been sent to Oregon State University’s veterinary college to confirm the cause of death. Hanson says the accident happened Sunday night or early Monday.

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drinking beer, and were not climbing on the machinery. He said he believes the irrigation district does not have the easements to construct a pipe through the property in the canyon.

Land donation for Bend parks district Brooks Resources has given the Bend Park & Recreation District 28.1 acres of land on the north side of Awbrey Butte. The property includes a strip of land linking Mount Washington Drive and the Deschutes River Trail, and a horseshoeshaped section between the trail and the Deschutes River. Bruce Ronning, the district’s Director of Planning and Development, said maintenance costs for the new property will be minimal, though the district will include it in a scheduled fire fuels management project planned on adjacent lands later this year.

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Supreme Court ends prohibition of private obscene material in 1969 The Associated Press

City Club to host judicial forum

ONE YEAR AGO Vermont became the fourth state (after Connecticut, Massachusetts and Iowa) to legalize gay marriage. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Sitar player Ravi Shankar is 90. Actor James Garner is 82. Actor Wayne Rogers is 77. Media commentator Hodding Carter III is 75. California Attorney General Jerry Brown is 72. Movie director Francis Ford Coppola is 71. TV personality David Frost is 71. Singer John Oates is 61. Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels is 61. Singer Janis Ian is 59. Country musician John Dittrich is 59. Actor Jackie Chan is 56. Football Hall-of-Famer Tony Dorsett is 56. Actor Russell Crowe is 46. Christian/jazz singer Mark Kibble (Take 6) is 46. Actor Bill Bellamy is 45. Rock musician Dave “Yorkie� Palmer (Space) is 45. Former football player-turnedanalyst Tiki Barber is 35. Actress Heather Burns is 35. Actor Kevin Alejandro (TV: “Southland�) is 34. Actor Conner Rayburn is 11. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Lying is done with words and also with silence.� — Adrienne Rich, American poet

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 C3

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A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

Redmond students exercise the cycling option By Diane S.W. Lee The Bulletin

REDMOND — About 26 kids donned bicycle helmets and crowded around 66-year-old Richard Fleming on Monday. “Go ahead and pick a bike,” Fleming told them. The kids scrambled to claim one of about 30 new, youth-sized mountain bikes laying on the ground. It was the start of a lesson in bicycle and pedestrian safety for fourth-graders at M.A. Lynch Elementary School in Redmond. The students wrote their names on masking tape to label the bicycles. They were theirs to keep — at least for three days. Commute Options for Central Oregon, a nonprofit that promotes transportation alternatives, visits about 13 elementary and middle schools in Deschutes and Jefferson County throughout the year. The Safe Routes to School program encourages students to walk and bicycle to school, teaches them proper helmet and bicycle checks, and how to ride safely in traffic. “I think it’s really great for kids to get specific bike safety instructions,” said Fleming, a Commute Options volunteer. “For a lot of these kids, it’s their very first safety instructions they’ve had, even though many of them are riding out on the roads already. Our whole objective is to keep kids safe.” Sami Fournier, 43, a Safe Routes coordinator, instructed students about the ABCs of bicycle safety, preparing them to ride safely. “So before every ride, we do a check of the air, brakes, cranks, chains and quick releases — quick releases hold the wheels on,” Fournier said. “So we want to check the bikes to make sure they are road-worthy.” Students also watched a fiveminute, student-produced video teaching them to wear helmets, use hand signals and follow traffic rules while riding bicycles. Fournier said students also learn

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

LEFT: M.A. Lynch Elementary School students from Karen Brockway’s fourth-grade class receive instruction from Commute Options on Monday in Redmond.

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about pedestrian safety, walking in large groups and avoiding strangers on the streets. Although most students already know how to ride bicycles, Fleming said students are taught how to safely maneuver through traffic, roundabouts and intersections. They start practicing on the playground, and later ride bicycles on the streets with supervision. “We consider a bicycle a vehicle, just like a car or truck on the road,” Fleming said. Fourth-grader Koby Herron, 10, said he enjoys riding his bicycle up and down his street. Herron

said he plans to be a responsible rider. “I just think people should be more safe with their bikes, and really think about it when they’re riding their bikes,” he said. Classmate Carly Christiansen, 10, said she has been riding a bicycle since the age of 5, but learned something new on Monday. “I learned to check your bike before you ride it, and not to put it on the chain side when you lay it down,” she said. Most students ride bicycles at home, but they may not be familiar with bicycle safety, said fourth-

grade teacher Karen Brockway. On Monday, Brockway, 48, helped students fix their helmets. She said students learn to stay alert for other cars on the road, helping to keep them safe while riding. “One of the kids made a comment that they had never really thought about how they have the same responsibilities as a car when they are on their bikes,” Brockway said. “Just that awareness — it’s huge.” Diane S.W. Lee can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dlee@bendbulletin.com.

SCHOOL NEWS Redmond charter has open enrollment Enrollment for students interested in attending Redmond Proficiency Academy during the 2010-11 school year will begin this week. Registration starts today and closes at 4 p.m. on April 15. The academy, which is a public charter school that is part of the Redmond School District, offers standards-based learning. An open house will take place from 6 to 8 p.m., April 13, and staff and students will be on hand for tours and questions. The school is open to students from Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties. For more information, go to www.rpacademy. org or call 541-526-0882.

Bend High DECA plans fashion show Bend High’s DECA chapter will host a fashion show and silent auction on Saturday. The money raised will benefit DECA students who will attend the International Career Development Conference in Louisville, Ky. DECA is a student marketing group. Tickets cost $5 for students and $10 for adults, with VIP tickets for $15, securing seats in the front row. The event will take place in Bend High’s mini gym, and the auction will start at 7 p.m. Saturday, with the fashion show to follow at 8 p.m.

Nursing scholarship to be presented The Bend chapter of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution will present its 2010 nursing scholarship at 1:15 p.m., May 18 at the North Redmond Station at 1857 N.W. Sixth St., in Redmond. The scholarship goes to a second- or third-year Central Oregon Community College nursing student. This year, the Bend chapter partnered with State Farm Insurance to double the scholarship to $1,500. For more information, contact Maggy Wilcox at 541-318-7235 or wilcox5@bendbroadband.com. — Bulletin staff reports

ABOVE: Koby Herron, left, and Cheyenne Helle, both 10, ride bicycles around the playground Monday at M.A. Lynch Elementary School in Redmond as part of Commute Options’ Safe Routes to School program.

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VOLUNTEER BUDGET COMMITTEE MEMBERS If interested, please contact the Redmond Main Fire Station at 541-504-5000 by April 12, 2010 for further information.


C4 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Dugan for DA

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eschutes County District Attorney Mike Dugan will confront something unusual on next month’s ballot: an opponent.

Ever since 1990, when he defeated Leonard Parker, Dugan has reclaimed his position by crushing “write in” on the May ballot. With opposition like that, even the Detroit Lions could win a few games. Challenger Patrick Flaherty worked under Dugan for more than eight years, rising to chief deputy DA before leaving in 2001. For most of the past decade, Flaherty has done criminal-defense work. Flaherty is, indeed, qualified to be district attorney. But the question voters should ask next month is whether installing him in Dugan’s chair will improve the district attorney’s office. We don’t think so. Which isn’t to say Dugan’s a shooin. He is particularly vulnerable on two fronts. The first is his office’s role in the David Black disaster. We won’t rehash the details here, but Black has suffered an injustice to which Dugan’s office contributed. But this episode should be weighed against Dugan’s tenure as Deschutes County’s top prosecutor, which spans nearly 24 years. He has been, with very few exceptions, a very good DA. There’s a reason Dugan’s rarely been challenged for re-election. Dugan’s second vulnerability is his avid campaigning in favor of Measures 66 and 67. The two tax hikes are, indeed, bad public policy. But Dugan’s advocacy says nothing about his competence as a DA. In any case, the person with whom voters have a beef is Dugan’s wife, Rep. Judy Stiegler. She voted for the tax hikes last year. But when they were referred to the ballot, she disappeared. As strong opponents of the tax measures, we understand the impulse to lash out at Dugan. But doing so

would be counterproductive. Besides tossing aside one of the state’s most experienced district attorneys, it would create turmoil among the office’s 18 deputy district attorneys. These are the people who handle the county’s criminal cases, and they do so very well. Lobbing a ballot-box hand grenade in their direction would be a good idea only if it improved the function of the DA’s office, and voters have no reason to believe that it would. If you set aside David Black’s treatment and Dugan’s tax-hike campaigning, Flaherty’s case for election virtually disappears. He says he’d like to give individual prosecutors greater authority to settle cases on their own. He also believes Dugan’s office is inefficient, arguing that two prosecutors frequently appear in the courtroom when only one would suffice. He also believes Dugan too often uses Ballot Measure 11 as a plea-bargain club, though he doesn’t know if this phenomenon is more pronounced in Deschutes County than elsewhere. This is a weak foundation upon which to build an oust-the-incumbent campaign. Flaherty argues that Dugan is a living testament to the value of term limits. It’s “not the DA’s office anymore,” he told us this week. “It’s the office of Mike Dugan.” We’d understand this argument better if district attorneys, like legislators, made policy. But they don’t. In effect, they’re elected legal administrators, and in that sense experience helps far more than it hurts. But let’s concede the point and assume that the DA’s office has become the Office of Mike Dugan. What really matters is whether the Office of Mike Dugan is serving the people of Deschutes County well enough to justify another four years. The answer is yes.

Back reform candidates

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edmond Superintendent Vickie Fleming isn’t defensive about the fate of Oregon’s Race to the Top application, which she helped prepare. While Tennessee and Delaware waltzed away with hundreds of millions of dollars, Oregon emerged from the competition’s first round with the innovation equivalent of a scarlet letter. Said Fleming this week: “I think we got exactly what we deserved and that we have to get serious about the reforms they’re proposing or we’re not going to be competitive in any way, shape or form. We’ve got to have some hard conversations politically and on the ground.” Federal evaluators identified a number of shortcomings, including a weak system for evaluating teachers and a rigid certification process that keeps many potentially good teachers out of the classroom. Nobody thinks fixing these problems will be easy. But with the May primary just around the corner, now’s a good time to have some of the “hard conversations” Fleming mentioned.

As even the governor now recognizes, Oregon is speeding toward a budgetary cliff. The economy isn’t producing enough tax receipts to satisfy the ever-increasing appetite of state government, and Oregonians are tired of tax and fee hikes. These are ideal conditions to push educational reforms that improve productivity. Policymakers might not be able to turn the funding spigot any further, but they can invite the best and brightest into the classroom even if they haven’t undergone traditional teacher training. They can adopt policies that improve the accuracy of teacher evaluations. They can reward the best teachers appropriately while motivating weak teachers to improve or leave. Oregonians who want their state to adopt such common-sense reforms should choose their legislative and gubernatorial candidates accordingly. If the struggle to push Oregon’s educational establishment into the modern age is a “hard conversation,” to borrow Fleming’s metaphor, then it’s one in which Oregonians themselves have the last word. It’s called a vote.

My Nickel’s Worth Massages are good I want to start with commending Deschutes County for having the foresight to take care of its employees. As far as the county paying out $136,000 last year for massages, 2.9 percent of this going to me as an LMT, let’s see a figure that compares pharmaceutical payments with all the alternative treatment options combined. I can guarantee that the amount paid out for drugs would far outweigh the cost of massage, acupuncture, etc. You may say that this is not a fair comparison. People need those drugs to be “healthy.” Well, there is a chance that with the proper preventive care those drugs would not even be needed. More importantly, people should be given the choice on how to care for themselves. If people want to seek out alternative options, they should not be judged, nor should those that seek a more “western” style of medicine. The word we should focus on here is choice. We all want less expensive health care, right? Well, the county so happens to have seen the big picture and is ahead of its time with the benefits it can offer to employees and feel it is saving money for that reason. Commissioner Tammy Baney is even quoted in the article saying, “(The massage benefit) has not proven to be a big strain on the budget.” So what’s the problem here, folks? Stacey Wimberley Bend

Pointless drug war In response to Diana Hopson (“Legal-

ize drugs”), legalizing drugs might very well cause similar troubles as the current practice of “war on drugs.” Portugal decriminalized drugs in 2001. Recently the CATO Institute did a report on how things have gone in Portugal since the change (www.cato.org/pub_display. php?pub_id=10080). It is a report well worth reading. According to Webster’s, decriminalize is defined as “to eliminate or reduce the penalties for.” In the same dictionary, legalize is defined as “to make legal or lawful.” When Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was asked (during an interview regarding the murders. Hopson referred to) if decriminalization was an option, she replied “no.” Hopson stated, “Unless our own government has a stake in this war on drugs,” obviously this is the situation, otherwise decriminalization would, at least, be considered an option. The “war on drugs” is profitable, as is the “war on terror.” I am not happy to say such a thing; it actually terrifies me. I recently listened to an interview on an OPB station that was discussing why America seems to be on the brink of revolution. Perhaps one of the reasons is the refusal of the government to at least consider decriminalization of drugs as an option to the apparently never-ending war on drugs and the multitude of deaths that “war” has caused. Tina Towler Madras

Live with less I guffawed while reading “Calls can leave Bend Fire tapped” on March 28. What about tapped taxpayers? This January, Oregonians increased

personal income taxes and created a de facto sales tax. Since 2007, our federal government has increased national debt with corresponding taxes by billions to bail out a failed government financial system. Government then added billions more to bail out failed automobile companies. Next, government added additional billions to pay for a failed government mortgage industry. In March, government blasted Americans with more taxes to pay for government health care. Don’t forget recently passed new taxes for Deschutes County sheriff services and COCC. It’s time government understands, there is no money left! Government will always create reasons to demand more money, but at what cost? Every time additional money is requested for more government programs, we must ask two questions: First, can we afford it? Second, what will it do to our rights and individual freedoms? I can’t afford, nor do I want or need, more government. It’s time government makes do with what it has. If that means less service, then so be it. I’m willing to accept the risk. Less service should come from nonessential government programs only. Prudent, frugal Americans are continually cutting back and living with less. It’s time government does the same. Thomas Jefferson believed if we can prevent government from wasting the labors of the people, under the pretense of taking care of them, they will be prosperous and content. Gladys Biglor Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Demographics, economic competitiveness will serve U.S. well

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ccording to recent polls, 60 percent of Americans think the country is heading in the wrong direction. The same percentage believe that the U.S. is in long-term decline. The political system is dysfunctional. A fiscal crisis looks unavoidable. There are plenty of reasons to be gloomy. But if you want to read about them, stop right here. This column is a great luscious orgy of optimism. Because the fact is, despite all the problems, America’s future is exceedingly bright. Over the next 40 years, demographers estimate that the U.S. population will surge by an additional 100 million people, to 400 million overall. The population will be enterprising and relatively young. In 2050, only a quarter will be over 60, compared with 31 percent in China and 41 percent in Japan. In his book “The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050,” uber-geographer Joel Kotkin sketches out how this growth will change the national landscape. Extrapolating from current trends, he describes an archipelago of vibrant suburban town centers, villages and urban cores.

The initial wave of suburbanization was sprawling and featureless. Tom Wolfe once observed that you only knew you were in a new town when you began to see a new set of 7-Elevens. But humans need meaningful places, so developers have been filling in with neo-downtowns — suburban gathering spots where people can dine, work, go to the movies and enjoy public space. Over the next 40 years, Kotkin argues, urban downtowns will continue their modest (and perpetually overhyped) revival, but the real action will be out in the compact, self-sufficient suburban villages. Many of these places will be in the Sun Belt — the drive to move there remains strong — but Kotkin also points to surging low-cost hubs on the Plains, like Fargo, Dubuque, Iowa City, Sioux Falls and Boise. The demographic growth is driven partly by fertility. The American fertility rate is 50 percent higher than Russia, Germany or Japan, and much higher than China. Americans born between 1968 and 1979 are more family-oriented than the boomers before them, and are having larger families.

DAVID BROOKS In addition, the U.S. remains a magnet for immigrants. Global attitudes about immigration are diverging, and the U.S. is among the best at assimilating them (while China is exceptionally poor). As a result, half the world’s skilled immigrants come to the U.S. As Kotkin notes, between 1990 and 2005, immigrants started a quarter of the new venturebacked public companies. The United States measures at the top or close to the top of nearly every global measure of economic competitiveness. A comprehensive 2008 Rand Corp. study found that the U.S. leads the world in scientific and technological development. The U.S. accounts for a third of the world’s research-and-development spending. Partly as a result, the average American worker is nearly 10 times

more productive than the average Chinese worker, a gap that will close but not go away in our lifetimes. This produces a lot of dynamism. As Stephen J. Rose points out in his book “Rebound: Why America Will Emerge Stronger From the Financial Crisis,” the number of Americans earning between $35,000 and $70,000 declined by 12 percent between 1980 and 2008. But that’s largely because the number earning more than $105,000 increased by 14 percent. Over the past 10 years, 60 percent of American adults made more than $100,000 in at least one or two of those years, and 40 percent had incomes that high for at least three. As the world gets richer, demand will rise for the sorts of products Americans are great at providing — emotional experiences. Educated Americans grow up in a culture of moral materialism; they have their sensibilities honed by complicated shows like “The Sopranos,” “The Wire” and “Mad Men,” and they go on to create companies like Apple, with identities coated in moral and psychological meaning, which affluent consumers crave.

As the rising generation leads an economic revival, it will also participate in a communal one. We are living in a global age of social entrepreneurship. In 1964, there were 15,000 foundations in the U.S. By 2001, there were 61,000. In 2007, total private giving passed $300 billion. Participation in organizations like City Year, Teach for America, and College Summit surges every year. Suburbanization helps. For every 10 percent reduction in population density, the odds that people will join a local club rise 15 percent. The culture of service is entrenched and widespread. In sum, the U.S. is on the verge of a demographic, economic and social revival, built on its historic strengths. The U.S. has always been good at disruptive change. It has always excelled at decentralized community-building. It has always had that moral materialism that creates meaning-rich products. Surely a country with this much going for it is not going to wait around passively and let a rotten political culture drag it down. David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 C5

O D

N   Albert Ernest LaCroix, of Redmond Nov. 3, 1922 - March 29, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond. 541-504-9485. Services: None.

Charles W. Yancy, of Bend Aug. 30, 1935 - Mar. 16, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Bend, 541-318-0842 Services: His request, no services will be held.

Eva Jo Lunsford, of Bend June 16, 1927 - Mar. 30, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Bend, 541-318-0842 Services: A celebration of Jo's life will be Friday, April 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. at the Bend First United Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond St. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care or to the Humane Society of Central Oregon.

Frank C. Villastrigo Sr., of Prineville Jan. 29, 1929 - April 2, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home - Prineville, 541-416-9733. Services: Visitation will be held 2:00 5:00 P.M. at Whispering Pines Funeral Home Chapel, 185 NE 4th St., Prineville on Thursday, April 8, 2010. A funeral mass will be held at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, 150 East 1st St., Prineville, OR on April 9, 2010 at 11:00 A.M.

Melvin Burdette Tisthammer, of Redmond Nov. 12, 1914 - Mar. 27, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Graveside service will be held Friday, April 30, 2010 at 1:00 pm at Lawncrest Cemetery in Redding, California.

Michael Dale Bushong, of Bend Dec. 14, 1942 - Mar. 15, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Bend, 541-318-0842 Services: Celebration of Life will be held at a later date.

Robert Sidney Gill, of Redmond July 16, 1924 - April 4, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 541-504-9485 Services: 2pm Tues. 4/13/10 Redmond Senior Center, 325 NW Dogwood Ave., Redmond.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLIN ES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Albert Ernest LaCroix

William "Bill" D. Naftel

Nov. 3, 1922 - March 29, 2010

January 2, 1934 - March 31, 2010

Albert passed away March 29, 2010, at the age of 87. He was born in Vassalboro, Maine, in 1922. He was from a family of 21; he also served in World War II where he was stationed in Saipan and the Marshall Islands. Albert was married to Evangeline Duguay for 63 years. He also has two daughters, Cynthia Lee Bowser and Roberta Alvina Ontjes; five grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren. There was a gathering at the hospital while he passed away. Albert had lived in Redmond for 28 years.

William "Bill" D. Naftel of Redmond, died at his home on Wednesday, March 31, 2010, at the age of 76. Bill was born January 2, 1934 in Stockton, California, to parents, Arthur C. and Marjorie E. (Bauguess) Naftel. He was united in marriage to William ‘Bill’ D. Margaret Naftel Ann Spell in 1954, in Jackson, California. Bill spent 35 years serving in the California National Guard and retired in 1989. He has lived in Redmond since 2003, having moved from La Pine where he lived for 11 years. Among his hobbies were golf, fishing, bowling, gardening, and he enjoyed teaching TaiChi . He was also a member of the Bend Elks Lodge. Bill leaves behind wife, Margaret; daughter, Barbara Naftel-Anderton and husband, Fred of Paso Robles, CA; sons, Bill Jr. of Redmond, and Tim and wife, Sabrina of Longmont, CO; brother, Arthur and wife, Jan of Coulterville, CA; and sister Mabel Keller of Houston, TX. There are seven grandchildren, Christy, Steven, Kimberly, Katie, Daniel, Hannah and Brendon. There are also five greatgrandchildren, Eric, Michele, Shelby, Zachary and Blake. The family will have a celebration of life for Bill in June of 2010. Those who wish, may send memorials in his name to the Arthritis Foundation. Arrangements are entrusted to Redmond Memorial Chapel 541-548-3219. You may visit the website at www.redmondmemorial.com to leave condolences to the family.

Charles F. Davis Sept. 4, 1929 - April 1, 2010 Charles F. Davis, 80, passed away peacefully at home in Bend on April 1, 2010. Born in Downington, Pennsylvania, he was the son of the late E. Russell and Mabel K. Davis. He married Bette Stringer on May 16, 1953. He was a devoted husband to Bette until her passing in 1994. Charlie lived in the Philadelphia Charles Davis area for 72 years. He moved to Bend in 2001. Charlie proudly served his country during the Korean conflict. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1948 to 1952. He served on the U.S.S. Philip DDE-498. Charlie will be remembered for his tenacity, sense of humor, work ethic and devotion to friends and family. He retired from the Black Clawson Co., due to poor health. Charlie had a passion for family, friends, camping, football, basketball, and baseball. He was a loyal fan of Penn State University and Oregon State University. Charlie Davis is survived by his two daughters and their spouses, Teresa and Joseph Kilgarif of Exton, PA, and Patricia and William Stoneroad of Bend, OR. He leaves his beloved grandchildren, Patrick Kilgarif and his spouse, Katie Kilgarif, Brian Kilgarif, Holli Stoneroad and Charlie Stoneroad. He is also survived by his brother and his spouse, William and Judy Davis of Reading, PA. A private memorial celebration of Charlie’s life was held on Easter Sunday in Bend, OR. His final resting place will be at St. Cecilia Cemetery in Coatesville, PA. The family would like to give thanks to Dr. Patricia Nibler and her staff at Fall Creek Internal Medicine for the beautiful care and friendship extended to Charlie and family for the last nine years. We would also like to thank Pastor Bill Franklin. He has been spiritual counselor and friend to Charlie for many years. A heartfelt appreciation is extended to all of Charlie’s friends at Stone Lodge and High Desert Haven. Charlie Davis lit up with joy when in the presence of children. To honor his love and concern for children, memorial contributions may be sent in his name to CASA of Central Oregon, 1130 NW Harriman St., Suite 122, Bend, OR 97702. Autumn Funerals, Bend is entrusted with arrangements. 541-318-0842.

Reginald Bryant, radio and TV host McClatchy-Tribune News Service PHILADELPHIA — Reginald Bryant, 68, a Philadelphia radio and TV host, a labor union spokesman and a founder of the National Association of Black Journalists, died of cancer at a Philadelphia convalescent center on Monday. Since 2006, he had been host of “In Pursuit of Truth, a weekday talk show on Philadelphia radio station WURD-AM.

Geese Continued from C1 “They didn’t go next door, they just left town,” Feld said. “Geese have a built-in desire to go north.” An aggressive hazing campaign in the time leading up to molting and a crackdown on feeding geese can help push the birds to leave, Felt said. In some communities, GeesePeace has sent volunteers into schools to teach children about the goose-control campaign, and the hazards feeding poses for waterfowl. Geese and ducks fed a diet rich in bread or other human foods can develop “angel wing,” Feld said, twisted wings that render the birds flightless. Geese that choose to migrate don’t necessarily leave the area for good. Like salmon, Canada geese have a strong desire to return to their birthplace to mate. While juvenile geese under 3 years old may choose a new breeding ground after migrating, the adult pairs currently living in Bend parks year-round are likely to return in the winter even if persuaded to fly north for the summer. Feld said after three to four years of egg oiling and goose hazing, Bend should see fewer geese — at least in the summer, when park usage is at its peak. Stell said between 600 and 800 geese populate Drake Park in the summer. The park district has not set a target goose population, he said, but will be measuring the program’s success by the mess the birds leave behind in the park. The district spent $22,000 repairing goose-related damage to parks in 2009 — a little more than double what the district expects to spend on eradication efforts this year. “If it doesn’t work, we could always try lethal methods afterward, but we’re going to do our best to make it work,” Stell said. “Hopefully we’ll solve the problem good enough we won’t have to do that, that’s what we’re hoping.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Actor Corin Redgrave, brother of Vanessa and Lynn Redgrave By Bruce Weber New York Times News Service

Corin Redgrave, a versatile actor and ardent left-wing political activist who, as the son of Michael Redgrave and the brother of Vanessa and Lynn Redgrave, was the prince of the royal family of English theater, died on Tuesday in London. He was 70. His death was announced by

Riverhouse Continued from C1 But River’s Edge did not make any official moves toward construction until 2001 when it filed an application to build with the ctiy. Neighbors of the then much smaller hotel fought the expansion, which required a change in zoning laws to go forward. City councilors seemed poised to change the zoning and let the project move ahead in 2002 but ultimately voted to restrict development along the river. After a series of well-attended public hearings, a city hearings officer denied the River’s Edge application to expand the resort in late 2003. River’s Edge responded by filing suit against the city in December 2003, claiming it had illegally denied the construction of the convention center and related improvements. Nearly a year of negotiations took place. The city allowed variances so the convention center could sit closer to the river than allowed by the thencode and stand taller as well. In December 2004, the city

SANE Continued from C1 At the same time, the number of SANE-certified nurses hasn’t increased. Last year, there were eight nurses in Bend, but three left to take other jobs. “The economy has had an impact on this,” Durham said. “We’ve lost three SANE nurses in the last year because they’ve moved out of the area and all of a sudden, the coverage has dropped.” This summer, however, St. Charles Bend will send two more nurses for SANE training. In addition, Meyer said a recently reconvened sexual assault response team made up of nurses, county health and law enforcement officials and others has made the issue a top priority. She said the group is considering other options, including adding Deschutes County Health Department nurses into

his wife, Kika Markham, The Associated Press reported. No cause was given. He had survived a heart attack in 2005. Redgrave was a less celebrated performer than his father, who was known for his Shakespearean eloquence, matinee idol good looks and turbulent personal life; or his sisters, who became internationally recognized figures, as glamorous as

they were accomplished. But he was a forceful, impassioned actor who became a veteran of the British stage, both in comedies and tragedies, and was especially at home in enduring works by Shakespeare, Chekhov, Noel Coward and Harold Pinter. Redgrave devoted as much energy to political causes as he did to acting. He had close ties with far left organizations.

and River’s Edge signed the development agreement at issue in the lawsuit soon to be before the court of appeals. The development agreement allowed River’s Edge to build the 30,000-square foot convention center, a restaurant, 102 hotel rooms, 80 condominium units and a swimming pool and spa. While River’s Edge has successfully maintained the city partially waived its right to impose SDCs in the 2004 agreement, court documents show the city has argued the language of that agreement was ambiguous. Eugene lawyer Jens Schmidt, who represents the city, has filed documents saying the development agreement allowed the city to collect SDCs whenever River’s Edge filed a building permit related to the expansion. Schmidt did not return a call for comment Tuesday. But a section of the 2004 development agreement between the city and River’s Edge states that “When building-permit applications are filed for all or any portion of the Proposed Development, the applicant shall pay and the city shall collect the System Development Charges

(SDC) in effect at the time of each application.” In an August 2008 filing, Schmidt wrote that River’s Edge had confused SDC’s with developer “exactions,” imposed to address the impact development has on existing infrastructure. Schmidt argued that SDCs are imposed to pay for future and additional infrastructure made necessary by overall development. Adler’s one-page ruling, signed in February, did not address the merits of each side’s arguments but ruled the city could not impose development fees until its agreement with River’s Edge expires in 2011 or until the development reaches a specific level of density. Bonaparte said Tuesday that the city had drafted its appeal and that he is in the process of preparing a response on behalf of River’s Edge. “Let’s just say we have a continuing disagreement and it’s really just a matter of being at a different level now,” Bonaparte said.

the on-call rotation. Durham said the hospital is always looking for SANE nurses when it makes regular hires. He said he’s not sure how long it will take to get full coverage, but is working to make it happen as quickly as possible. “I wish we had the ability to turn the switch and say, ‘We have 24-hour coverage,’” he said. “We’ll be much happier when we have an abundance of them.” Law enforcement officers said they’re also hoping for an increase in SANE nurses, particularly because the evidence they gather is so valuable in prosecuting assault cases. “It’s often difficult for us in these cases where you have a victim and a suspect — and that’s it,” said Lt. Erik Utter of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. “You don’t have a witness to the crime and the evidence you do have is contained within the victim. In order to help us establish and prove the

case, it’s crucial when we have that opportunity to secure that evidence.” When victims have to wait for a nurse, a police officer often stays with them at the hospital. Redmond Police Chief Ron Roberts said that can create a strain on resources, but he’s even more troubled by the thought of victims waiting for hours after a violent incident. “We recognize the hospitals have a vested interested in these situations as well, and know they are struggling like we are to make sure these medical needs get addressed,” he said. “It’s not because they don’t want to provide. It’s about a resource issue, and it’s just disheartening at times to have to deal with such significant delays in supporting and addressing these victims’ issues.”

Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at cpowers@bendbulletin.com.

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Father Evangelist Kelly September 15, 1921 - March 26, 2010 Fr. Evangelist Kelly, a Capuchin Franciscan Friar who served many years in Santa Barbara Count y, died March 26, 2010, at San Lorenzo Friary in Santa Ynez. Born John Francis Kelly in Clara, Count Offaly, Ireland, September 15, 1921, the son of William and Elizabeth Deegan, he received the name Evangelist when he joined the Capuchin Franciscan Order on October 3, 1940. After his ordination on June 16, 1949, Fr. Evangelist came to the United States, as a teacher at St. Francis High School in La Cañada, California. In 1962, after serving in various places, Fr. Evangelist was appointed Pastor of Old Mission Santa Ines in Solvang. There he continued the work of restoration, promoting tours of the Mission, expanding the parish organizations and working on a strong spiritual program for the parishioners. He was popular with both Catholics and non Catholics. His compassion and pastoral good sense were always appreciated. In 1968 he became head of the Capuchin friars in the west, then served in various parishes in California and Oregon. In 1999, Fr. Evangelist returned to the Santa Ynez Valley, stationed at San Lorenzo Prayer and Retreat Center, serving as spiritual director, bible study leader, and visiting priest in many of the local parishes. He was known as the ‘voice of San Lorenzo,’ cheerfully answering the phones at the retreat center, as well as carrying on a voluminous correspondence. Fr. Evangelist was known as a quiet man of firm convictions, a man of deep compassion, prayer and wisdom. He will be missed by all the Capuchin friars and the many people who got to know him over the years. Visitation for Fr. Evangelist was held on Tuesday, March 30 at Mission Santa Ines, followed by the rosary. The funeral mass was held on Wednesday, March 31 at the Mission, followed by interment at San Lorenzo Friary. In lieu of f lowers, please consider making a donation to the Capuchin Franciscan Foundation for Retired Friars, 1345 Cortez Avenue, Burlingame, CA 94010 in memory of Fr. Evangelist. •Loper Funeral Chapel, Directors

A Memorial Mass will be offered for Father Evangelist Kelly at the new St. Francis Church on 27th Street in Bend on Thursday, April 8th at 7:00 pm


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, APRIL 7

THURSDAY

Today: Partly cloudy, relatively mild.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

61

35

STATE Western



 Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman 55/32 Redmond Prineville 61/35 Cascadia 61/36 60/36 Sisters 58/34 Bend Post 61/35

Oakridge Elk Lake 49/23

52/43

Sunriver 57/32

Sunny to partly cloudy skies today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Eastern

55/33

Hampton 56/32

Fort Rock

63/42



Idaho Falls Elko



56/34

46/27



52/29



Reno



60/29

58/39

 73/47

53/30

Boise

61/35

67/41

Redding

Silver Lake

55/29

Helena

Bend

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Chemult



Eugene

60/33

52/25

50/32

60/45

Burns

56/31

Missoula

Portland

59/32

58/31



57/45

Sunny to partly cloudy skies today. Partly cloudy skies tonight.

Crater Lake 47/26

67/39

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

66/49

47/31



LOW

First

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

City

Full

Last

April 14 April 21 April 28 May 5

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

TEMPERATURE

5

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

SKI REPORT

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48/30 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 in 1952 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.28” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 in 1929 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.15” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.34” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.96” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.26 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.29 in 1978 *Melted liquid equivalent

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Astoria . . . . . . . . 53/45/0.08 . . . . . 56/43/pc. . . . . . 50/39/sh Baker City . . . . . . 44/22/0.02 . . . . . 55/35/pc. . . . . . 49/27/sh Brookings . . . . . . 50/43/0.12 . . . . . . 58/46/s. . . . . . 57/42/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 47/27/0.00 . . . . . 55/32/pc. . . . . . . 47/21/c Eugene . . . . . . . . 52/40/0.20 . . . . . 63/42/pc. . . . . . 51/34/sh Klamath Falls . . . 44/30/0.00 . . . . . . 60/30/s. . . . . . 49/23/pc Lakeview. . . . . .not available . . . . . 55/29/pc. . . . . . 48/26/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 44/25/0.00 . . . . . 56/31/pc. . . . . . . 44/19/c Medford . . . . . . . 54/39/0.00 . . . . . . 67/42/s. . . . . . . 55/31/c Newport . . . . . . . 55/45/0.10 . . . . . 59/43/pc. . . . . . 52/39/sh North Bend . . . . . . 54/41/NA . . . . . 58/44/pc. . . . . . 53/37/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 53/28/0.00 . . . . . 60/39/pc. . . . . . . 59/32/c Pendleton . . . . . . 52/38/0.00 . . . . . 66/42/pc. . . . . . 55/32/sh Portland . . . . . . . 55/42/0.05 . . . . . 60/45/pc. . . . . . 52/37/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 46/24/0.00 . . . . . 61/36/pc. . . . . . . 50/26/r Redmond. . . . . . . 50/22/0.00 . . . . . 62/33/pc. . . . . . . 48/20/r Roseburg. . . . . . . 54/38/0.02 . . . . . 64/43/pc. . . . . . 51/31/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 54/41/0.13 . . . . . 62/43/pc. . . . . . 52/35/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 47/25/0.02 . . . . . 58/34/pc. . . . . . . 46/22/r The Dalles . . . . . . 52/41/0.01 . . . . . 60/41/pc. . . . . . 52/34/sh

LOW

52 25

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers. HIGH

54 24

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases New

HIGH

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:06 a.m. . . . . . .9:28 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:26 a.m. . . . . . .9:31 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .12:55 p.m. . . . . . .4:04 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:37 a.m. . . . . . .5:01 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .5:48 p.m. . . . . . .6:15 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:54 a.m. . . . . . .5:47 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Seattle

Paulina

La Pine 55/30

Vancouver

Central

Brothers

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:36 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:40 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:34 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:41 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:26 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:10 p.m.

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers.

50 20

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

57/31

59/33

HIGH

NORTHWEST Yesterday’s regional extremes • 58° Hermiston • 22° Baker City

SATURDAY Partly cloudy, cool.

47 20

64/37

62/40

HIGH

Mostly cloudy, morning mixed showers, LOW windy.

Showers will be possible over western Washington, with dry conditions elsewhere.

Partly cloudy skies today. Increasing clouds tonight.

63/41

63/42

57/32

58/34

61/39

60/37

64/39

48/32

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

Tonight: Increasing clouds, becoming breezy overnight.

FRIDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 73-79 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 50-96 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 88-133 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . 124-155 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . 138-143 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 63 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 125-152 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 34-96 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . 2 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

. . . . . . 57-61 . . . . 140-184 . . . . . 89-110 . . . . . . . 181 . . . . . . 23-82 . . . no report . . . . . . . . 64

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 52/43

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

Calgary 57/31

Saskatoon 57/34

S Winnipeg 59/33

Rapid City 49/30

Atlantic, Iowa

Las Vegas 68/50

Salt Lake City 47/31

Denver 46/30 Albuquerque 58/33

Los Angeles 77/55 Phoenix 79/57

Honolulu 82/72

Kansas City 56/38 Oklahoma City 65/39

Chihuahua 85/44

La Paz 85/56 Juneau 40/29

Mazatlan 84/57

S

Little Rock 74/46

S

S S

Quebec 63/47

To ronto 67/52

Green Bay 51/35

St. Louis 68/44

Dallas 73/43

Tijuana 71/50

Anchorage 38/18

S

Des Moines 54/35 Chicago 62/40 Omaha 53/34

Cheyenne 41/26

• 3.17”

S

Thunder Bay 49/26

St. Paul 54/34

Boise 58/39

San Francisco 66/49

S

Bismarck 58/31

Billings 54/34

Portland 60/45

Laredo, Texas Bryce Canyon, Utah

S

Seattle 57/45

• 96° • 6°

S

Halifax 69/49

Boston 84/60 70/55 New York 84/63 Philadelphia 87/62 Washington, D. C. 84/64

Buffalo

Detroit 73/51 Columbus 78/56 Louisville 76/52

Portland 65/48

Charlotte 86/59

Nashville 78/55

Birmingham 81/64 New Orleans 78/62

Houston 79/53

Atlanta 84/62

Orlando 84/63 Miami 83/71

Monterrey 88/66

FRONTS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .68/40/s . . . 69/42/s Akron . . . . . . . . .83/59/0.06 . 75/56/pc . . . .52/33/t Albany. . . . . . . . .57/43/0.16 . . .79/57/t . . . .77/46/t Albuquerque. . . .60/43/0.00 . . .58/33/s . . . 66/39/s Anchorage . . . . .36/31/0.03 . 38/18/pc . . 35/24/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .86/58/0.00 . . .84/62/s . . . .70/43/t Atlantic City . . . .88/53/0.03 . . .77/60/s . . 72/47/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .75/46/t . . . 70/39/s Baltimore . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . . .87/63/s . . . .82/50/t Billings. . . . . . . . .43/34/0.02 . 54/34/pc . . 69/36/pc Birmingham . . . .88/59/0.00 . . .81/64/s . . . .64/38/t Bismarck . . . . . . .61/30/0.00 . 58/31/pc . . . 61/31/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .52/32/0.00 . 58/39/pc . . 60/32/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .67/51/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . . 75/50/s Bridgeport, CT. . .66/46/0.00 . . .75/57/s . . 70/46/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .61/48/0.43 . . .70/55/t . . 58/36/sh Burlington, VT. . .59/48/0.12 . . .68/54/t . . 70/44/sh Caribou, ME . . . .61/43/0.02 . .53/40/sh . . . 53/36/c Charleston, SC . .85/61/0.00 . . .74/63/s . . 73/56/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . . .86/59/s . . . .76/51/t Chattanooga. . . .87/56/0.00 . . .83/60/s . . . .66/42/t Cheyenne . . . . . .42/33/0.00 . 41/26/pc . . . 53/31/s Chicago. . . . . . . .76/46/0.37 . . .62/40/t . . 48/36/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .82/57/0.01 . 76/53/pc . . . 54/37/c Cleveland . . . . . .85/64/0.00 . 72/55/pc . . 51/34/sh Colorado Springs 58/38/0.00 . .43/28/sh . . . 59/32/s Columbia, MO . .81/64/0.00 . 63/39/pc . . 59/38/pc Columbia, SC . . .91/61/0.00 . . .88/59/s . . . .79/50/t Columbus, GA. . .88/53/0.00 . . .86/60/s . . . .73/45/t Columbus, OH. . .83/61/0.00 . . .78/56/c . . 55/36/sh Concord, NH . . . .61/38/0.06 . . .77/51/t . . 75/44/pc Corpus Christi. . .83/70/0.00 . 81/54/pc . . . 75/49/s Dallas Ft Worth. .81/65/0.00 . 73/43/pc . . . 72/44/s Dayton . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .73/50/c . . 53/35/sh Denver. . . . . . . . .49/36/0.06 . 46/30/pc . . . 62/35/s Des Moines. . . . .84/53/0.72 . .54/35/sh . . 59/35/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .81/55/0.07 . . .73/51/t . . 53/36/sh Duluth . . . . . . . . .57/40/0.00 . 47/31/pc . . 46/28/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .77/58/0.00 . . .67/40/s . . . 74/46/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .42/28/0.00 . . 37/20/rs . . 36/12/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . . .53/29/s . . 58/35/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .44/20/0.06 . . .50/24/s . . . 60/24/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .60/50/2.20 . . .65/41/t . . 49/33/pc Rapid City . . . . . .42/35/0.32 . 49/30/pc . . . 60/33/s Green Bay. . . . . .50/46/0.25 . .51/35/sh . . 51/30/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .57/35/0.00 . . .67/39/s . . . 68/37/s Greensboro. . . . .89/62/0.00 . . .89/63/s . . 79/51/pc Richmond . . . . . .92/64/0.12 . . .90/63/s . . 83/53/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .89/56/0.00 . . .86/59/s . . . .78/47/t Rochester, NY . . .61/49/0.47 . . .75/59/t . . 65/37/sh Hartford, CT . . . .73/46/0.01 . . .86/55/s . . . 81/49/s Sacramento. . . . .64/36/0.00 . . .73/46/s . . . 71/46/s Helena. . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . 53/30/pc . . 59/29/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .86/69/0.00 . . .68/44/t . . 59/42/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .82/70/0.01 . 82/72/pc . . 83/71/pc Salt Lake City . . .46/31/0.03 . . .47/31/s . . 60/38/pc Houston . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .79/53/t . . . 71/50/s San Antonio . . . .81/67/0.00 . . .76/48/t . . . 73/44/s Huntsville . . . . . .87/57/0.00 . . .81/60/s . . . .63/40/t San Diego . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . . .75/55/s . . . 73/54/s Indianapolis . . . .83/63/0.00 . . .72/45/t . . 53/36/sh San Francisco . . .61/44/0.00 . . .66/49/s . . . 64/50/s Jackson, MS . . . .84/64/0.00 . 82/57/pc . . . .68/44/t San Jose . . . . . . .62/41/0.00 . . .71/46/s . . . 68/47/s Madison, WI . . . .56/46/0.61 . .52/33/sh . . 52/29/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .54/41/0.00 . 54/24/pc . . . 65/35/s Jacksonville. . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . 82/56/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .41/32/0.50 . .40/29/sh . . . .43/28/r Kansas City. . . . .80/61/0.18 . .56/38/sh . . 61/40/pc Amsterdam. . . . .61/41/0.00 . 63/46/pc . . 60/45/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .65/48/1.38 . . .67/42/t . . 50/33/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .68/58/0.00 . 66/47/pc . . 66/49/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . .68/50/s . . . 75/54/s Auckland. . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .67/52/sh . . 64/51/sh Lexington . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .79/53/s . . . .58/38/t Baghdad . . . . . . .89/61/0.00 . 90/68/pc . . . 83/57/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .64/48/0.01 . .53/34/sh . . . 61/36/s Bangkok . . . . . . .99/84/0.00 . 98/81/pc . 101/82/pc Little Rock. . . . . .83/64/0.00 . . .74/45/t . . 65/41/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . 64/45/pc . . 69/50/pc Los Angeles. . . . .65/50/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . . 75/54/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . . .73/57/s . . 70/56/pc Louisville . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . 76/52/pc . . 60/40/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . .55/32/0.00 . . .63/42/s . . 64/44/pc Memphis. . . . . . .81/65/0.00 . . .73/52/t . . 64/43/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .66/52/sh . . 68/52/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . . .83/71/s . . 81/71/pc Budapest. . . . . . .54/41/0.03 . 58/36/pc . . 60/38/pc Milwaukee . . . . .49/43/1.22 . .50/36/sh . . 47/35/pc Buenos Aires. . . .70/48/0.00 . . .73/51/s . . . 72/50/s Minneapolis . . . .52/45/0.12 . 54/34/pc . . 57/32/pc Cabo San Lucas .88/63/0.00 . . .87/60/s . . . 90/61/s Nashville . . . . . . .88/62/0.00 . . .78/55/s . . 62/39/sh Cairo . . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .79/56/s . . . 76/54/s New Orleans. . . .80/63/0.00 . . .78/62/s . . . .72/50/t Calgary . . . . . . . .50/25/0.00 . . .57/31/s . . . 63/25/c New York . . . . . .78/61/0.00 . . .84/63/s . . 78/49/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . 85/74/pc . . . .83/74/t Newark, NJ . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . 78/49/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .52/43/0.15 . 47/29/pc . . 49/30/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .90/66/0.00 . . .89/65/s . . 82/57/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . 45/27/pc . . . 46/31/c Oklahoma City . .82/64/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 67/41/s Geneva . . . . . . . .61/32/0.00 . .65/47/sh . . 62/44/sh Omaha . . . . . . . .72/50/0.93 . .53/34/sh . . 61/36/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .77/62/t . . . .78/63/t Orlando. . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .84/63/s . . 86/65/pc Hong Kong . . . . .81/73/0.00 . . .79/68/c . . 74/66/sh Palm Springs. . . .79/46/0.00 . . .83/55/s . . . 87/55/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .57/41/sh . . 56/43/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . .64/40/sh . . 57/38/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . .72/48/s . . . 69/44/s Philadelphia . . . .86/57/0.02 . . .87/62/s . . 80/48/pc Johannesburg . . .70/59/0.65 . . .73/59/t . . . .75/60/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 87/58/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .79/68/0.00 . 80/68/pc . . 79/69/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .85/59/0.16 . . .79/56/s . . 58/35/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .71/52/s . . . 72/53/s Portland, ME. . . .61/45/0.01 . .65/48/sh . . . 63/44/s London . . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . . .59/42/c . . 57/39/pc Providence . . . . .69/48/0.00 . . .84/59/s . . . 74/49/s Madrid . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . .68/47/sh . . . 74/54/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .90/62/0.00 . . .90/61/s . . 82/53/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .95/80/s . . . 95/79/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .89/61/0.00 . . .80/62/s . . 79/55/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .51/41/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . 50/37/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .50/43/0.39 . 53/33/pc . . 58/34/pc Spokane . . . . . . .45/33/0.05 . 52/39/pc . . . .46/29/r Springfield, MO. .77/61/0.00 . 63/37/pc . . 60/39/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .83/66/s . . 82/65/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .72/50/0.01 . . .77/49/s . . . 85/51/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .79/67/0.00 . . .70/40/s . . . 65/40/s Washington, DC .90/62/0.00 . . .84/64/s . . . .82/51/t Wichita . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . 59/35/pc . . . 65/39/s Yakima . . . . . . . .56/31/0.00 . 61/38/pc . . . 55/27/c Yuma. . . . . . . . . .78/49/0.00 . . .81/53/s . . . 86/56/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .104/79/0.00 104/78/pc . 101/77/pc Mexico City. . . . .82/52/0.00 . 81/55/pc . . . .77/56/t Montreal. . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .66/50/sh . . 65/47/sh Moscow . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . 52/29/pc . . 48/26/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .77/56/t . . . .79/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .79/67/s . . 78/65/pc New Delhi. . . . . .99/71/0.00 . .101/71/s . . 103/72/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . .56/38/sh . . . 60/41/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .37/27/0.00 . . .46/30/c . . .42/29/rs Ottawa . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .64/49/sh . . 62/44/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .66/36/0.00 . . .63/46/c . . 60/41/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .77/70/0.00 . .80/66/sh . . 83/67/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . 65/45/pc Santiago . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . 89/58/pc . . 86/57/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . .75/61/sh . . 76/62/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .45/30/0.22 . 31/22/pc . . . 38/26/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .50/31/s . . . 58/36/s Shanghai. . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . . .63/45/s . . 65/48/pc Singapore . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .91/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .50/30/0.00 . 45/27/pc . . . 49/30/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . . .75/65/t . . 78/64/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .73/63/sh . . 71/64/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . . .72/55/s . . . 70/54/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .61/47/sh . . . 57/40/s Toronto . . . . . . . .55/48/0.25 . . .67/52/t . . 62/45/sh Vancouver. . . . . .54/41/0.30 . . .52/43/r . . . .48/40/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . . .64/42/s . . . 63/41/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .48/43/0.02 . 51/33/pc . . . 57/35/s

MEETING THE CHALLENGE

For the Hearing You Deserve. CALL THIS WEEK for an appointment to try an actual Smart Technology Hearing aid to hear much better and clearer

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Greg Evans, 52, paddles into a wave while kayaking at First Street Rapids on Tuesday afternoon. Evans said he was taking advantage of the recent increase in water flow to sharpen his kayaking skills.

SoundRecover exclusive to PHONAK, the best, new, cutting-edge technology in Hearing Aids

Ex-Boy Scouts exec testifies on reported abuse The Associated Press PORTLAND — A Boy Scouts leader testifying in a sex abuse lawsuit said Tuesday he reported the abuse confession of another group leader, only to find the man still with the organization more than a decade later.

In testimony Tuesday at the Portland trial, Larry O’Connor said he was surprised to see the man he reported in 1970, wearing the full uniform at a national Scouts jamboree in 1981. “I went up to him and asked, ‘What are you doing here?’”

O’Connor said. “And he just walked away from me.” O’Connor, 67, said he volunteered to testify after reading about the $29 million lawsuit filed by a Portland man abused as a boy by an assistant Scoutmaster in the early 1980s.

Serving Central Oregon for over 50 Years said. “We may not be able to afford it.” In a step toward answering Boero’s concerns, city staff will prepare a request for proposal by the end of the month, according to Public Works Director Chris Doty. The RFP will include a broad outline of what the city wants, including low- and highcost options. Specific designs will not be part of the RFP. Once the RFP goes out, the city may hire a consultant to run the study. Once a study is completed, the city would have a better understanding of the potential challenges it faces, Doty said. “I think what we need to do is get on the same page and figure out what’s there,” Doty said.

Jim Leagjeld Hearing Instrument Specialist

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Continued from C1 And a canal runs along the highway’s western edge, which means staff may have to negotiate with the Central Oregon Irrigation District. The Oregon Department of Transportation also owns some of the property along the road. Several councilors called for patience. Councilor Shirlee Evans compared the reroute to the Bend Parkway and said property owners have gradually improved how land bordering that road looks. “As I watched the parkway go through Bend, it took many years for private parcels to redevelop,” Evans said. “We need to be really thoughtful. Sometimes when you have a scar, it takes a

while to heal.” Other councilors were concerned about how much money the project could cost the city. Councilor Camden King said all of the city’s departments are facing budget pressures, so Highway 97’s appearance may not be the most critical issue. “I agree that it’s important. I agree the aesthetics of that corridor are ultimately going to be very important for our community,” King said. “Proceed with caution.” Boero agreed that cost could prevent the city from doing anything about the corridor in the immediate future. But, he said, the city needs to study the issue so it understands what can or cannot be done. “I think first step is a plan, so we can figure out if we can figure out how to afford it,” Boero

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Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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D

Sports Inside Jazz edge Thunder, 140-139 in overtime, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

PREP SPORTS Culver wrestling coach receives Oregon honor J.D. Alley, longtime wrestling coach at Culver High School, has been selected as the 2010 National Wrestling Coaches Association head high school wrestling coach of the year for the state of Oregon. Alley, who this year coached Culver to its fourth consecutive Class 2A/1A state championship, is now under consideration for honors in NWCA Region 8 (Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and Alaska). Regional winners are eligible for national awards. Nominations for the state award are solicited from high school coaches around the state. Coaches are then polled and asked to rank the individuals nominated for the award. — Bulletin staff report

2010 PREP BOYS GOLF PREVIEW

Central Oregon teams have high hopes for new season By James Williams

coach Ron Buerger. Rodby was medalist at the 2009 CVC Experience, talent and drive are championships and appears to be in three common elements of team suc- • Capsules fine form this season after posting the on every cess. And the Redmond High boys golf lowest score of the day at the six-team area team, CVC season opener on April 1. Moore team — the reigning Central Valley Conference champion — has all three and Lambert finished close behind, Page D4 of those qualities in spades. placing third and fourth, respectively. The Panthers return three of the five Buerger observes that his No. 4 golfgolfers who last season boosted Redmond to a er is no slouch either, noting that senior Colton second-place finish at the Class 6A state tour- Henshaw “was prime time last year.” Henshaw nament. Back this year, and packing state tour- will provide depth for a Panther squad that exnament experience, are seniors Landon Moore pects to need all of its firepower to outshoot and Andy Rodby and junior Jared Lambert. league contenders West Salem and Sprague. “They’re good players,” states Redmond See Golf / D4

The Bulletin

Inside

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

The Redmond High School boys varsity golf team — from left, Landon Moore, Andy Rodby, Jared Lambert, Colton Henshaw and Mason Rodby — will try to defend its Central Valley Conference title.

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

UConn rallies for second straight title, perfect season

GOLF Woods’ return comes during ESPN telecast AUGUSTA, Ga. — Tiger Woods has an ideal tee time for his return to golf at the Masters — at least as far as TV is concerned. After weeks of speculation about his playing partners for the opening two rounds at Augusta National, the starting times released on Tuesday had more to do with “when” than “who.” Woods is to tee off at 10:42 a.m. PDT Thursday in the penultimate group for the second straight year. Barring any delays, his group likely will be on about the eighth hole when ESPN’s live coverage begins at 1 p.m. PDT. It will be the first time Woods has competed since a shocking sex scandal began to unfold the day after Thanksgiving. Joining him for two days will be Matt Kuchar, a popular figure in these parts from his all-American days at Georgia Tech; and K.J. Choi of South Korea, which is sure to appeal to Augusta National’s broadcast partners in Asia. Woods is to start at 7:35 a.m. PDT on Friday, limiting coverage of him to live streaming on the Masters’ Web site. ESPN executive vice president John Wildhack said every “meaningful shot” by Woods will be shown by the network at some point, whether live or as part of highlights. “This is the Masters tournament, and that is THE story line, and we’re here to cover the Masters tournament,” Wildhack said. “Obviously Tiger and the fact this is his return to golf is the story line in terms of individual players, but not the only one.” — The Associated Press

By Doug Feinberg The Associated

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

GD Construction owner Gary Hecht checks the level of the new shed for driving range balls and a vending machine at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine Tuesday.

Quail Run puts on a new face

SAN ANTONIO — Every basket built their streak, every romp enriched their legacy. From the first shot of the season, it seemed inevitable that Maya Moore, Tina Charles and the Connecticut Huskies would win the NCAA championship. And so they did Tuesday night, rallying from a horrible first half to beat Stanford 53-47 for their 78th straight victory and stamp themselves as one of the most dominant teams ever — in their sport or any other, men or women. Held to only five points through the first 12 minutes and trailing 20-12 at the break, coach Geno Auriemma’s team bounced back and played like champs. “We knew a run was coming,” said Maya Moore, the tournament’s outstanding player. “We settled down and hit some big shots.” Did they ever. UConn surged to start the second half, bolting to an 11-point lead. Moore scored 23 points and grabbed 11 rebounds to help Auriemma win his seventh national championship, moving within one title of Pat Summitt and Tennessee. He’s never lost in the title game. See UConn / D5

La Pine golf course is undergoing a series of improvements By Zack Hall The Bulletin

TEE TO GREEN

LA PINE — An infrequent visitor to Quail Run Golf Course might not notice any difference. But Quail Run, which is under not-quitenew management, has been making subtle changes to the 18-hole golf course. Todd Sickles was elevated from the course’s head professional to its general manager earlier this year after Bill Martin,

who ran the day-to-day operations, sold his 50 percent share of Quail Run to his longtime business partner, Les Howatt, of Gresham. And Sickles and Howatt are trying to improve the public golf course, Sickles says. So far the modifications have been mostly minor — a bag rack here, a new merchandise display cabinet there. See Quail Run / D5

NFL

Sue Ogrocki / The Associated Press

Connecticut’s Maya Moore (23) and Tina Charles (31) react in the second half of the women’s NCAA championship game against Stanford Tuesday in San Antonio. PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Dementia claims find California home By Alan Schwarz New York Times News Service

Tiger Woods points to a spectator during a practice round at the Masters.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Colleges ....................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 Baseball .................................... D4 Tee to Green.............................. D6

VAN NUYS, Calif. — The five paper-clipped sheets slipped into a wire basket at the Van Nuys State Office Building, looking no different from the other workers’ compensation claims filed by welders and cashiers. But this packet was different — it will almost certainly become a test case in considering National Football League teams’ liability for the dementia experienced by retired players. The claim was filed by Eleanor Perfetto on behalf of her husband, Ralph Wenzel, contending that his dementia at age 67 is related to his career as an NFL lineman from 1966 to 1973. California’s workers’ compensation system provides a unique, and relatively unknown, haven for retired professional athletes among the states, allowing hundreds of long-retired veterans each year to file claims

CUSTOM

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ULTRA 200 APEX ULTSW SEPANG

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15x7 Starting At

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Josh Haner / The New York Times

Eleanor Perfetto helps her husband, Ralph Wenzel, 67, a former linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers and San Diego Chargers, in an assisted-living facility in Annapolis, Md., in January. for injuries sustained decades before. Players need not have played for California teams or be residents of the state; they had to participate in just one

game in the state to be eligible to receive lifetime medical care for their injuries from the teams and their insurance carriers. See Dementia / D5

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541-382-3551 541-385-4702 541-548-4011 541-447-5686 541-475-3834 541-536-3009 541-549-1560 541-318-0281


D2 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Baseball: North Salem at Redmond (DH), 1 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at North Salem (DH), 1 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 4:30 p.m. Track: Crook County at Bruin Coed Relay, Bend, 3:30 p.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Mountain View, 3:30 p.m. Girls golf: Mountain View at Summit, at Broken Top, 2 p.m. Boys tennis: Crook County at Mountain View, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at Sprague, 11 a.m.; Redmond at West Salem, 3:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 4 p.m.

Noon — The Masters, Par 3 Contest, ESPN.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Utah Jazz at Houston Rockets, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, San Antonio Spurs at Phoenix Suns, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Los Angeles Clippers, Comcast SportsNet.

THURSDAY GOLF 1 p.m. — The Masters, first round, ESPN.

BASEBALL 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics, FSNW.

HOCKEY 2 p.m. — NCAA tournament, semifinal, RIT vs. Wisconsin, ESPN2. 5:30 p.m. — NCAA tournament, semifinal, Boston College vs. Miami (Ohio), ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Cleveland Cavaliers at Chicago Bulls, TNT. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Lakers at Denver Nuggets, TNT.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Los Angeles Clippers, KBNDAM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

UO president: severance for Bellotti was a buyout B y Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — University of Oregon president Richard Lariviere characterized the $2.3 million golden parachute for outgoing athletic director Mike Bellotti as a buyout — but he stopped short of saying that the former football coach was fired. Bellotti coached the Ducks for 14 seasons and took them to 12 bowl games before sliding into the AD’s job last year. He abruptly announced on March 19 that he was stepping down as athletic director after nine months on the job to become an ESPN analyst. Since then questions have been raised about both Bellotti’s departure and the generous compensation package from the public university. At a news conference in Eugene on Tuesday, Lariviere called the move a “mutually agreed-upon resignation.” Asked if Bellotti was fired, Lariviere said: “I told Mike we were going to have a change at athletic director. I was struggling with when and how I was going to effect that, and when the ESPN deal came up, that seemed the right moment. I felt that I had to explain to Mike what the options were before he made a decision regarding ESPN.” Bellotti first broached the possibility of working in television with Lariviere several months ago. He appeared somewhat awkwardly with Lariviere at Tuesday’s news conference, insisting he resigned. “In a perfect world I would have done both (serving as AD and working for ESPN),” Bellotti said. “But that was not possible.” The university did not have a written contract with Bellotti, so terms of the “separation agreement” were determined by Lariviere. Bellotti’s deal was orally struck with former athletic director Pat Kilkenny. There are differing opinions as to its length. Lariviere called the lack of documentation “a very odd situation.” “This institution did not follow acceptable business practices in the past,” Lariviere said. “This will not be repeated under my administration.” Lariviere said that no public funds would be used for the buyout, which would come from donor funds earmarked for the athletic department. He said: “$2.3 million is a lot of money, but I feel it was a fair settlement based on the commitments to Mike before I got here.” The Oregon Department of Justice said it would conduct a review of Bellotti’s deal because of concerns raised by the media. The State Board of Higher Education also is looking at it. Bellotti went 116-55 as coach of the Ducks. In 2001, Oregon won 11 games, including a 38-16 victory over Colorado in the Fiesta Bowl to finish ranked No. 2. Offensive coordinator Chip Kelly took over as coach when Bellotti became AD after the 2008 season. Bellotti’s move comes as there is upheaval in the athletic department. Several football players — including quarterback Jeremiah Masoli and top running back LaMichael James — have had well-publicized legal problems. Masoli, a potential Heisman Trophy candidate, pleaded guilty to misdemeanor burglary and was suspended for the entire upcoming season, while James pleaded guilty to misdemeanor harassment in an altercation with his former girlfriend and was suspended for the home opener on Sept. 4. Additionally, Bellotti fired longtime head basketball coach Ernie Kent after two disappointing seasons. The university is currently searching for a successor. Oregon has named Lorraine Davis, the university’s former vice president for student affairs, as interim athletic director while the university searches for Bellotti’s replacement. Bellotti’s first broadcast in his new position will be the Auburn spring football game on ESPNU.

8. Florida 9. Louisville 10. Arkansas 11. South Carolina 12. Texas Christian 13. Coastal Carolina 14. Miami 15. Mississippi 16. Clemson 17. Oregon State 18. UC Irvine 19. Oklahoma 20. Vanderbilt 21. Western Kentucky 22. Stanford 23. Texas A&M 24. Alabama

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Baseball: Mountain View at Bend, 4;30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Pendleton at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at West Salem, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Pendleton at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: Summit at Bend, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Bend at Mountain View, 4 p.m. Boys golf: Madras, La Pine, Sisters at Crook County (Meadow Lakes), 11 a.m. Track: Sisters at Elmira, 4 p.m.; La Pine at Marist, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Mountain View at Redmond, 5 p.m.; Bend at Harney, 5 p.m.

PREP SPORTS Girls Tennis Tuesday’s Results ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE BEND 6, THE DALLES-WAHTONKA 2 At Bend High Singles — Jeff Windsor, B, def. Alex Bruttin, TDW, 6-2, 6-0; Sergio Lopez, TDW, def. Aidan Contreras, B, 6-3, 6-2; Trace Byrd, TDW, def. Joel Johnson, B, 6-2, 6-4; Cole Anderson, B, def. Danny Perez-Crouse, TDW, 6-1, 6-1. Doubles — Kyle Pickard/Steven Marques, B, def. Bailey/Chavarria, TDW, 6-4, 6-3; Matt Sterling/Jake Brown, B, def. A. Vasquez/Z. Mazeski, TDW, 6-3, 7-5; Jon Simning/Preston Tuttle, B, def. D. Nunez/J. Anderson, TDW, 6-3, 6-2; Kristian Raymond/Trent Janes, B, def. J. Fowlkes/T. Vanloock, TDW, 6-0, 6-4. CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE HERMISTON 5, CROOK COUNTY 3 At Hermiston Singles — Erin Crofcheck, CC, def. Lili Gomez, H, 6-4, 6-0; Kelsi Kemper, CC, def. Shela Ritzer, H, 7-5, 62; Crystal Cain, H, def. Ali Apperson, CC, 6-7, 6-4, 6-2; Marissa Pope, CC, def. Furily Stocker, H, 7-6, 7-5. Doubles — Mary Hawman/Madison Garcia, H, def. Catherine Brown/Braiden Johnston, CC, 6-2, 6-2; Mary Adams/Sarah Hawman, H, def. Lisa Pham/Anna Lichtenberg, CC, 7-5, 6-2; Gardenia Jwuie/Bailey Burns, H, def. Natasha Wiersch/Jenni Leskinen, CC, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2; Marianne Jimenez/Yvette Herteia, H, def. Katie Slawter/ Harli Bowers, 6-4, 6-2. CROOK COUNTY 6, PENDLETON 2 At Pendleton Singles — Erin Crofcheck, CC, def. Jillian Short, P, 6-1, 6-4; Emily Henderson, P, def. Kelsi Kemper, CC, 6-4, 6-4; Romy Nijenhuis, P, def. Marissa Pope, CC, 6-2, 6-4; Ali Apperson, CC, def. Tara Homar, 7-5, 6-0. Doubles — Catherine Brown/Braiden Johnston, CC, def. Tayler Jerame/Liz Winter, 6-2, 6-0; Lisa Pham/Anna Lichtenberg, CC, def. Bailey Bixler/Kadysha Reyes, 6-3, 6-1; Natasha Wiersch/Jenni Leskinen, CC, def. Alex Reyes/Miranda Muller, 7-5, 6-0; Katie Slawter/Harli Bowers, CC, def. Lexi McGraw/Taylor Cooper, CC, 6-4, 6-2. BEND 6, THE DALLES-WAHTONKA 2 At The Dalles-Wahtonka Singles — Sydney Hege, DW, def. Bryn Oliveira, B, 63, 5-7, 6-1; Aubrey Hansen, DW, def. Alexandria Calande, B, 6-2, 6-4; Alexa Kadlecik, B, def. Laura Mondregon, DW, 6-2, 6-3; Kaylee Tornay, B, def. Ciara Buchanan, DW, 6-0, 6-2. Doubles — Chloe Knievel/Hannah Palcic, B, def. Emily Boyden/Hailey Sorensen, DW, 6-0, 6-3; Andrea Lohmann/Katheryn Fowlds, B, def. Taylor Luebke/Maza Brady, DW, 6-4, 6-3; Allison Daley/Claire Nichols, B, def. Stephanie Jenkins/Jessica Sorensen, DW, 6-0, 6-3; Lindsey Petersen/Mariah Taunton, B, def. Rachel Fiegenbagen/Katie Mazeski, DW, 7-5, 6-7, 6-2.

Boys Tennis Tuesday’s Results ——— CLASS 5A

8 9 10 12 13 14 15 11 16 21 24 17 20 18 19 23 25

Tuesday’s Result Oregon State 9, Portland 2

TENNIS WTA

Friday Girls golf: Summit, Madras at Redmond Invite at Eagle Crest, 1:30 p.m.; Bend at Pendleton Country Club, 1 p.m. Baseball: Redmond at McNary, 4:30 p.m.; Marist at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Delphian (DH), 2:15 p.m. Softball: McNary at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Marist at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Delphian (DH), 2:15 p.m. Boys tennis: West Salem at Redmond, 3:30 p.m. Girls tennis: Summit, Mountain View, Redmond, Crook County at Bend Invite, TBA Boys golf: Sisters at Shadow Hills, noon. Boys lacrosse: Sisters at Harney, 5 p.m. Saturday Baseball: Bend at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Crook County (DH), 11 a.m.; Madras at Pendleton (DH), 1 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home (DH), noon; Burns at La Pine (DH), noon. Softball: Bend at Mountain View, DH, 11 a.m.; Summit at Crook County (DH), 11 a.m.; Madras at Pendleton (DH), 1 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters (DH), noon; Grant Union at Culver (DH), noon. Girls tennis: Summit, Mountain View, Redmond, Crook County at Bend Invite, TBA. Boys tennis: Bend, Mountain View, Sisters at Madras Tournament, TBA; Crook County at Treasure Valley Tournament, Ontario, TBA. Track: Summit at Sandy, 9 a.m.; Madras, Culver at Burns, noon. Gilchrist Dual in the Woods, noon. Boys lacrosse: Sprague at Mountain View, 1:30 p.m.

20-7 24-3 22-6 22-6 20-6 23-5 20-7 21-8 20-8 18-6 17-8 22-6 24-6 22-7 13-9 18-8 19-8

INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE First Game HERMISTON 6, CROOK COUNTY 2 At Hermiston Singles — Trevor Brown, CC, def. Joey Burns, H, 7-5, 6-2; Dain Lloyd, H, def. Marc Dawen, CC, 6-1, 7-5; Matt Booher, H, def. Jared Anderson, CC, 6-0, 6-0; Austin Boedeheimer, H, def. Gabe Alvarez, CC, 6-0, 6-0. Doubles — Zac Thompson/Brady Slater, CC, def. Riley Smith/Ben Millard, H, 6-4, 0-6, 6-4; Ryan Parsons/Connor McMichael, H, def. Josue Lopez/Dakota Umbarger, CC, 6-1, 6-0; (names unavailable), H, win by forfeit; (names unavailable), H, win by forfeit. ——— Second Game PENDLETON 7, CROOK COUNTY 1 At Pendleton Singles — Trevor Brown, CC, def. Shannon Hartley, 6-2, 6-3; Bryan Carter, P, def. Marc Dawen, CC, 6-1, 6-3; Karew Haug, P, def. Jared Anderson, CC, 6-0, 6-3; Curran Holdman, P, def. Gabe Alvarez, CC, 6-3, 6-2. Doubles — Tyler Simpson/Carson Clem, P, def. Zac Thompson/Brady Slater, CC, 6-1, 7-5; Marshall Bixler/ Travis Bannister, P, def. Josue Lopez/Dakota Umbarger, CC, 6-1, 6-0; Joe Ettinger/Sam Reeves, P, win by forfeit; Micah Wood/Peter Anrerton, P, win by forfeit.

Softball Tuesday’s Result ——— CLASS 2A SPECIAL DISTRICT 3 Santiam 002 22 — 6 5 4 Culver 277 1x — 17 14 2 Grimes and Goodrich; Hood and Daugherty, Donnelly (3). W—Hood. L—Grimes. 2B—Santiam: Rosco; Culver: Wofford 2, Daugherty. 3B—Culver: O’Gorman.

Baseball Tuesday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE La Pine 000 100 — 1 2 4 Crook County 012 224 — 11 10 1 Wiley, Morton (5) and Pickering; C. Stafford, Larimer (2) and Cleveland. W—C. Stafford. L—Wiley. 2B—LP: Manley; CC—D. Stafford (2), C. Stafford. CLASS 2A SPECIAL DISTRICT 2 Santiam 010 002 1 — 4 6 6 Culver 100 020 0 — 3 4 1 White and Sexton; R. Gibson, Gonzalez (4) and Barany . W—White. L—Gonzalez. 2B—Santiam: Davis.

Boys Lacrosse Summit 9, Bend 5

BASKETBALL College WOMEN NCAA TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— FINAL FOUR At Alamodome San Antonio National Semifinals Sunday, April 4 Stanford 73, Oklahoma 66 Connecticut 70, Baylor 50 National Championship Tuesday, April 6 Connecticut 53, Stanford 47 Men USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the final USA Today-ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, final record, points based on 25 points for a first-

place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Duke (31) 35-5 775 3 2. Butler 33-5 739 8 3. West Virginia 31-7 696 5 4. Michigan State 28-9 654 12 5. Kentucky 35-3 650 2 6. Kansas 33-3 604 1 7. Kansas State 29-8 573 7 8. Syracuse 30-5 554 4 9. Tennessee 28-9 494 14 10. Baylor 28-8 487 21 11. Ohio State 29-8 483 6 12. Purdue 29-6 448 11 13. Northern Iowa 30-5 344 24 14. Xavier 26-9 271 — 15. Villanova 25-8 267 9 16. New Mexico 30-5 229 10 17. Cornell 29-5 225 — 18. Maryland 24-9 201 20 19. Saint Mary’s 28-6 198 — 20. Pittsburgh 25-9 182 16 21. Washington 26-10 163 — 22. BYU 30-6 161 16 23. Gonzaga 27-7 141 18 24. Wisconsin 24-9 140 19 25. Texas A&M 24-10 136 23 Others receiving votes: Georgetown 92, Temple 83, Georgia Tech 29, Vanderbilt 21, California 14, Murray State 12, Missouri 5, Dayton 3, Old Dominion 1.

BASEB A L L College POLLS Collegiate Baseball Poll TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through April 4, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pv 1. Arizona St. 25-1 496 1 2. UCLA 23-1 494 2 3. Georgia Tech 25-3 491 5 4. Louisiana St. 23-4 490 4 5. Virginia 23-6 488 3 6. Texas 21-7 487 7 7. Louisville 24-3 484 8 8. South Carolina 22-6 481 14 9. Miami, Fla. 20-7 479 17 10. Oregon St. 18-6 475 10 11. Florida St. 21-6 473 6 12. Oklahoma 22-6 471 9 13. Florida 20-7 469 12 14. Coastal Carolina 23-5 468 15 15. Clemson 20-8 465 13 16. Arkansas 22-6 463 19 17. Mississippi 21-8 460 11 18. Texas Christian 20-6 459 16 19. U.C. Irvine 17-8 456 26 20. New Mexico St. 22-10 453 — 21. Kansas St. 21-5 449 20 22. S.E. Louisiana 24-5 446 22 23. Vanderbilt 24-6 443 23 24. Western Kentucky 22-7 439 21 25. Rice 17-12 438 — 26. Ca. St. Fullerton 15-11 436 — 27. N.C. Charlotte 19-6 433 — 28. N.C. State 18-10 430 — 29. VMI 23-5 428 29 30. California 16-10 426 — Baseball America Top 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through April 4 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pv 1. Arizona State 25-1 2 2. Georgia Tech 25-3 3 3. UCLA 23-1 6 4. Virginia 23-6 1 5. Louisiana State 23-4 5 6. Texas 21-7 7 7. Florida State 21-6 4

WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— ANDALUCIA TENNIS EXPERIENCE Tuesday Marbella, Spain Singles First Round Alberta Brianti, Italy, def. Julie Coin, France, 6-2, 6-0. Simona Halep, Romania, def. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-1. Carla Suarez Navarro (8), Spain, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 6-4, 6-0. Sara Errani, Italy, def. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-2. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (5), Spain, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-4, 6-3. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Maria Kirilenko (6), Russia, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, 6-3, 6-0. Anabel Medina Garrigues (7), Spain, def. Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 6-1, 6-4. THE MPS GROUP CHAMPIONSHIPS Tuesday Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Singles First Round Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-2, 6-7 (4), 7-5. Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Sesil Karatantcheva, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2. Angelique Kerber, Germany, def. Vania King, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Peng Shuai, China, def. Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, 6-4, 6-2. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, def. Alona Bondarenko (2), Ukraine, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, 6-0, 6-4. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, def. Mariana Duque Marino, Colombia, 6-1, 7-6 (2). Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-3, 3-6, 7-5. Melanie Oudin (8), United States, def. Rossana de los Rios, Paraguay, 7-5, 6-2. Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Sophie Ferguson, Australia, 6-2, 6-3.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— GRAND PRIX HASSAN II Tuesday Casablanca, Morocco Singles First Round Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Mehdi Ziadi, Morocco, 6-1, 6-1. Florent Serra (8), France, def. Santiago Ventura, Spain, 6-4, 6-3. Jan Hajek, Czech Republic, def. Simon Greul (6), Germany, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Reda El Amrani, Morocco, def. Teimuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-6 (4). Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, def. Daniel Koellerer, Austria, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Stephane Robert, France, def. Stefan Koubek, Austria, 6-3, 5-7, 7-5. Arnaud Clement, France, def. Ivan Navarro, Spain, 6-3, 6-3. Richard Gasquet, France, def. Olivier Rochus (7), Belgium, 6-1, 6-1. Martin Klizan, Slovakia, def. Oleg Dolgopolov Jr., Ukraine, 4-6, 6-1, 7-5. U.S. MEN’S CLAY COURT CHAMPIONSHIPS Tuesday Houston Singles First Round Eduardo Schwank (7), Argentina, def. Marcos Daniel, Brazil, 6-3, 6-2. Nicolas Massu, Chile, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-4, 6-2. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, def. Rajeev Ram, United States, 6-2, 3-0, retired. Horacio Zeballos (6), Argentina, def. Taylor Dent, United States, 6-3, retired. Ryan Sweeting, United States, def. Evgeny Korolev (5), Kazakhstan, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Donald Young, United States, 7-5, 6-3. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Michael Yani, United States, 6-1, 7-5. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Nick Lindahl, Australia, 6-3, 7-5. Somdev Devvarman, India, def. Conor Niland, Ireland, 6-4, 6-2.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE

All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-New Jersey 79 46 26 7 99 211 186 x-Pittsburgh 79 45 27 7 97 244 228 Philadelphia 80 40 34 6 86 231 220 N.Y. Rangers 79 36 33 10 82 212 212 N.Y. Islanders 79 34 35 10 78 213 244 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Buffalo 79 44 25 10 98 228 200 x-Ottawa 80 44 31 5 93 220 229 Montreal 80 39 32 9 87 212 214 Boston 79 36 30 13 85 195 194 Toronto 80 29 37 14 72 209 259 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Washington 80 53 15 12 118 310 227 Atlanta 80 34 33 13 81 231 251 Carolina 80 34 36 10 78 223 250 Florida 79 31 36 12 74 201 235 Tampa Bay 79 31 36 12 74 206 253 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Chicago 79 50 22 7 107 258 199 x-Nashville 80 46 28 6 98 221 219 x-Detroit 79 41 24 14 96 221 211 St. Louis 79 39 31 9 87 213 212 Columbus 80 32 34 14 78 213 254 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Vancouver 80 48 27 5 101 263 215 Colorado 79 43 29 7 93 237 221 Calgary 80 40 31 9 89 200 201 Minnesota 80 37 36 7 81 214 241 Edmonton 79 25 46 8 58 203 270 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-San Jose 80 49 20 11 109 257 211 x-Phoenix 79 48 25 6 102 215 195 x-Los Angeles 79 45 27 7 97 234 211 Anaheim 79 38 31 10 86 226 240 Dallas 80 35 31 14 84 230 249 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Tuesday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Montreal 3, SO Colorado 4, Vancouver 3, SO Los Angeles 5, Anaheim 4, SO Buffalo 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Philadelphia 2, Toronto 0 New Jersey 3, Atlanta 0 Ottawa 5, Florida 2 Washington 6, Pittsburgh 3 Carolina 8, Tampa Bay 5 Chicago 5, Dallas 2 San Jose 2, Calgary 1 Today’s Games Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Columbus at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Nashville at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Saturday, April 10 New York at Chivas USA, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at New England, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Columbus at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL—Promoted Patrick Courtney to senior vice president of public relations. American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Sent 3B Alex Gordon to Wilmington (Carolina) for a rehabilitation assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MIAMI HEAT—Signed F Shavlik Randolph. FOOTBALL National Football League CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed PK Todd Carter. DALLAS COWBOYS—Signed DE Marcus Spears and LB Steve Octavien. DETROIT LIONS—Signed CB Dante Wesley to a twoyear contract. NEW YORK JETS—Signed PK Clint Stiser. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed DL Chris Cooper. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Waived RB Xavier Omon. Terminated the contract of TE John Owens. HOCKEY National Hockey League OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed F David Dziurzynski to a three-year contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Recalled F Blair Jones and D Matt Lashoff from Norfolk (AHL). Signed LW Johan Harju to a one-year contract. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Recalled F Matt Pettinger from Manitoba. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Recalled D Karl Alzner and F Jay Beagle from Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE BOSTON COLLEGE—Named Steve Donahue men’s basketball coach. DELAWARE—Named Mark Urick associate director of annual giving for intercollegiate athletics. DEPAUL—Named Oliver Purnell men’s basketball coach. LSU—Announced the resignation of swimming and diving coach Adam Schmitt. MASSACHUSETTS—Named Sharon Dawley women’s basketball coach. VIRGINIA—Announced junior men’s basketball G Jeff Jones is transferring.

Duval makes it back to Augusta By Paul Newberry The Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. — David Duval ambled away from the 13th tee, strolled over the Nelson Bridge and found a nice, comfortable spot to plop down in the middle of the fairway. He sat there for a couple of minutes, next to his ball, staring across Rae’s Creek toward the woods on the other side, soaking up the brilliant colors of the azaleas and dogwoods. The perfect place to reflect, to think back on all he once was at Augusta National and still hopes to be. Hardly. Duval isn’t much for reminiscing or any of that mushy stuff. “It was brutal out there. They were playing soooo slow,” he grumbled Tuesday after a practice round that dragged on for nearly five hours. “I was just trying to keep from going to sleep.” For Duval, so much has changed since the last time he contended at the Masters, nearly a decade ago. From the expanded waistline to the errant shots to the wandering concentration, he barely resembles the guy who once ruled as golf’s No. 1 player. This is the first time he’s qualified for the Masters since 2006, when he shot a 10 on the second hole and missed the cut for the fourth year in a row. He’s here thanks to a runner-up finish at last year’s U.S. Open. Then again, so much remains the same. Duval still walks the course with an aura reserved for the greats, not someone who last won a tournament at the 2001 British Open, not someone who looks perpetually frumpy with his shirttail hanging out, not someone

GOLF: 2010 MASTERS who comes here sandwiched between Anthony Wall and Danny Willett at No. 110 in the world rankings. Maybe it’s the aloof demeanor, obscured by those wraparound glasses. Maybe it’s the standoffish body language, the sense that he’s not really paying a lick of attention to the folks shouting, “Go get ’em, David” and other encouraging words. There was always a mystery about Duval, and the fact that a once-brilliant game got away from him in the blink of an eye only adds to the intrigue. At nearly every hole, some patron posing as a fairway psychologist offered up a possible explanation for his baffling decline, everything from depression to vertigo. For the record, Duval feels just fine — about his fame, too. “I’m comfortable, entirely comfortable, with what I’m doing right now,” he said. “I feel like I’m swinging the golf club how I want to. I feel like I’m striking the golf ball how I want to. To me, it’s a matter of performing and doing that more regularly than I may be at the moment.” If nothing else, Duval seems to have rekindled a sense of feistiness with the media that melted away as his scores went up and up. He now feels as though he’s put up enough good results — the 2009 U.S. Open and this year’s AT&T at Pebble Beach — to stop all those annoying questions about his slump. Never mind that he’s missed the cut in four of his seven PGA Tour events this year.

“Some of this, I don’t understand,” he said. “I’m trying to talk about and answer questions I’ve been answering for a couple of years now, and I don’t know why I need to answer them any more than I have. I have talked about it.” Duval might have hit rock bottom at that 2006 Masters. He opened with an 84, then started the second round with a double bogey at No. 1 and a quintuple-bogey 10 at the second, when he drove into a hazard on the left and took two more penalty strokes before he finally escaped. But that day, as bad as it was, also signified that Duval’s shotmaking skills had not totally abandoned him. He bounced back to make five birdies over the final 12 holes, including a 32 on the back nine. Not nearly good enough to make the cut, of course, but a start. Duval never doubted that he’d make it back to the Masters someday. Whether he can ever be the sort of player he once was at Augusta National remains to be seen. Over a four-year stretch beginning in 1998, Duval had a pair of runner-up finishes, plus a third and a sixth. He still believes those are four green jackets that got away. “I’d like to see him at his best again,” said Jim Furyk, who joined Duval for the practice round along with Justin Leonard. “I played a lot of golf with him back when he was the best player in the world, and he was really, really good. I guess the rest of that is: Does he really want to get back to that level again? It’s difficult to do. But I really liked what I saw today in his game.”


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 D3

NBA ROUNDUP

S  B

NBA SCOREBOARD EASTERN CONFERENCE

Baseball • Beavers get midweek win over Portland: Ryan Gorton allowed just one run in a careerlong seven innings as the 17thranked Oregon State baseball team defeated Portland, 9-2, in a midweek contest Tuesday night at Goss Stadium in Corvallis. Gorton surrendered his only run of the game in the first, and it was charged as an unearned run, keeping his ERA at 0.00 in a total of 13 2⁄3 innings this season. Gorton struck out four while walking three and allowing five hits to improve to 3-0 this season. The Pilots used eight pitchers and Oregon State sufficiently supported Gorton with a total of 12 hits, six of which went for extra bases. • Players mull grievance: Baseball players are threatening to file a collusion grievance charging owners with conspiring against free agents last winter. New players’ association head Michael Weiner told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the union has concerns. Owners deny any wrongdoing. The Major League Baseball Players Association still hasn’t decided whether to go ahead with a grievance against owners alleging misconduct after the 2008 season. The sides reached a standstill agreement last year giving the union additional time to decide whether to proceed.

Basketball • DePaul hires Clemson’s Purnell: Vowing to make DePaul “Chicago’s team” again, Clemson’s Oliver Purnell simply couldn’t resist the urge to restore a storied program and became the Blue Demons’ coach on Tuesday. He leaves behind a stunned school back in South Carolina — the Tigers clearly didn’t see this coming — while taking on the huge task at DePaul, which has one regularseason Big East win the past two years. The 56-year-old Purnell was 138-88 in seven seasons at Clemson and is 394-279 in 22 years with stops at Radford, Old Dominion and Dayton. • Title game gets good ratings: The NCAA championship game matched its highest preliminary television rating since 1999. Duke’s 61-59 win over Butler on Monday night on CBS earned a 16.0 overnight rating and 25 share. That’s up 34 percent from the 11.9/19 for North Carolina’s blowout against Michigan State last year. It tied the 16.0/23 for North Carolina-Illinois in 2005 as the best since a 16.0/25 in 1999 for Connecticut-Duke. The entire tournament averaged a 6.6 overnight rating, up 5 percent from last season. Ratings represent the percentage of all households with televisions tuned into a program. Shares represent the percentage of all homes with TVs in use at the time. Overnight ratings measure the nation’s largest markets. • Cornell’s Donahue moves to Boston College: Steve Donahue has been hired as Boston College’s basketball coach after leading Cornell to three straight Ivy League titles and the round of 16 in this NCAA tournament. The move was announced by Boston College on Tuesday. Donahue led the Big Red to a 29-5 record this season — the most wins in Ivy history. They beat favored Temple and Wisconsin in the NCAA tournament to be the first Ivy team to reach the round of 16 in more than 30 years. Donahue replaces Al Skinner, who was fired after 13 years and was the winningest coach in BC history. • Ill Dantley misses Nuggets practice: The Denver Nuggets, already dealing with the absence of ailing coach George Karl, were faced with another issue when acting head coach Adrian Dantley was forced to miss Tuesday’s practice because of a kidney stone. A group of assistants oversaw the 90-minute workout, the team’s last practice before a pivotal back-to-back set that begins Wednesday in Oklahoma City and concludes on Thursday, when the Nuggets host the Los Angeles Lakers. The Nuggets, who have five regular season games remaining, began Tuesday tied with Utah atop the Northwest Division and in a four-way tie for the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference playoffs. • Syracuse’s Boeheim picks up award: Syracuse basketball coach Jim Boeheim has been selected the Naismith college coach of the year. The Atlanta Tipoff Club made the announcement Tuesday. Boeheim won out over finalists Steve Alford of New Mexico, John Calipari of Kentucky and Frank Martin of Kansas State. Boeheim, who guided the Orange from unranked in the

Atlantic Division

preseason to No. 1, becomes the fourth Big East coach to win the award. He joins Ben Howland (2002) and Jamie Dixon (2009) of Pittsburgh and Jay Wright of Villanova (2006). Syracuse went 30-5, making it to the round of 16 in the NCAA tournament before losing to national runner-up Butler.

Golf • Floyd done at Masters: Raymond Floyd has called it a career at Augusta National, saying he won’t be playing the Masters anymore after 45 appearances. The 67-year-old Floyd said Tuesday he decided not to play this year’s event because he didn’t want to embarrass himself trying to compete on the 7,435-yard course. He still plans to play the Par-3 tournament today, joking that he can reach most of those greens off the tee. Floyd is the latest in a line of past champions who have decided to stop playing the Masters in recent years, including Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Gary Player. Floyd had played in every Masters since 1965 and won the event in ’76. But he had missed the cut the last 10 years.

Cycling • Valverde takes stage: Alejandro Valverde kept the overall lead in the Tour of Basque Country after winning Tuesday’s second stage in Spain. Valverde edged Oscar Freire in the sprint finish a day after earning a victory when Freire was demoted for blocking his fellow Spaniard as they raced across the line. Valverde of Caisse D’Epargne took the 135-mile stage in 5 hours, 53 minutes, 40 seconds, with Freire finishing in the same time. Valverde leads Freire of Rabobank with an overall time of 9:51:38. • Armstrong 24th in France: Welcome back to France, Lance Armstrong: This way to doping control, s’il vous plait. The seventime Tour de France champion competed in mainland France for the first time this year on Tuesday and was called in for a random doping test after the first stage of the four-day Circuit de la Sarthe. The 38-year-old Texan rode for Team RadioShack and placed 24th, trailing in the main pack just a split second behind winner Luis Leon Sanchez of Spain. Armstrong also said he won’t compete as planned in the Amstel Gold race in the Netherlands on April 18, wanting to spend time with his family and feeling confident that he can prepare for the Tour de France in the U.S. RadioShack spokesman Philippe Maertens said Armstrong will race in next month’s Tour of California. — From wire reports

L 29 39 49 51 66

y-Orlando x-Atlanta x-Miami Charlotte Washington

W 54 49 43 41 24

L 23 28 34 36 53

z-Cleveland x-Milwaukee Chicago Indiana Detroit

W 61 43 37 29 24

L 17 34 40 48 53

Pct .623 .494 .364 .338 .143

GB — 10 20 22 37

L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str L-1 L-2 W-2 L-4 L-1

Home 24-15 24-14 17-22 12-27 7-32

Away 24-14 14-25 11-27 14-24 4-34

Conf 31-16 27-20 19-28 14-34 7-40

Away 23-16 17-21 21-18 11-27 10-28

Conf 34-13 28-19 28-19 25-24 16-31

Away 26-13 16-23 15-23 8-31 8-30

Conf 38-10 28-19 24-23 20-27 16-32

Southeast Division

Football • McNabb starts ‘new chapter’ as Redskins QB: The quarterback holding the burgundy No. 5 Washington Redskins jersey was Donovan McNabb. From everything that was said, it might have been simpler to just go ahead and call him John Elway II. The six-time Pro Bowl star was formally introduced Tuesday at Redskins Park. All things being equal, he would rather be preparing for a 12th season with the Philadelphia Eagles, but an Easter Sunday trade between NFC East rivals has opened what he called “a new chapter in the book of Donovan.” “I’ve always believed in finishing where you started,” McNabb said. “I think there’s a lot to be said with that. Not a lot of quarterbacks in this league are able to do that these days. Sometimes change is better. Sometimes you’re forced into change. I would have loved to (stay in Philadelphia), but it didn’t happen.” Instead, he is with the Redskins and new coach Mike Shanahan, and both went to great lengths to say that trading two draft picks for a 33-year-old quarterback with a few nicks is a solid investment. They did so by repeatedly invoking Elway, who was 34 when Shanahan became coach of the Broncos in 1995. • Rogers must pay $6.1M to Lions: A judge says former Detroit Lions receiver Charles Rogers must repay $6.1 million to the team. Rogers was suspended for substance abuse in 2005 and was released by the Lions the next year. The team has been trying to recoup two-thirds of his $9.1 million signing bonus. U.S. District Judge Julian Abele Cook said Monday the money must be repaid. An NFL arbitrator made the same conclusion in 2008. Rogers was the second pick in the 2003 NFL draft. In January, the former Michigan State star was sentenced to 93 days in jail for violating a court order to stay sober.

y-Boston Toronto New York Philadelphia New Jersey

W 48 38 28 26 11

Pct .701 .636 .558 .532 .312

GB — 5 11 13 30

L10 7-3 6-4 8-2 6-4 3-7

Str W-1 L-1 W-8 W-1 W-2

Home 31-7 32-7 22-16 30-9 14-25

Central Division Pct .782 .558 .481 .377 .312

GB — 17½ 23½ 31½ 36½

L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 7-3 1-9

Str W-1 W-2 L-1 W-1 W-1

Home 35-4 27-11 22-17 21-17 16-23

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Danny Chan La / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant, left, walks off the court after missing a last-second shot in overtime as Utah Jazz forward Carlos Boozer, right, celebrates their 140-139 win after Tuesday’s game in Salt Lake City.

Late jumper lifts Jazz over Thunder The Associated Press SALT LAKE CITY — Deron Williams set his career high for points, then was able to celebrate when the Jazz were finally able to stop Kevin Durant. Williams’ jumper with 1.1 seconds left in overtime gave Utah a one-point lead and C.J. Miles clinched it with a disputed block on Durant’s shot at the buzzer in a 140-139 win over the Oklahoma City Thunder on Tuesday night. The Jazz pulled into second place in the Western Conference standings and ended the Thunder’s four-game winning streak, which has Oklahoma City also contending with Utah and Denver for the Northwest Division title. “It was a huge win for us because they were right on our heels,” said Williams, who finished with 42 points and 10 assists. Carlos Boozer had 28 points and 15 rebounds for the Jazz, who hadn’t scored 140 in almost 20 years. Durant finished with 45 points as the Thunder and Jazz combined for the highest-scoring game in the NBA this season, according to STATS LLC. “Great game. Classic,” Boozer said. “Both teams scrambled for balls on the floor, hustled on defense, fought for rebounds. I mean, it was like a playoff game and I’m proud of us coming with that W.” Durant thought he was fouled on a three-pointer just before the buzzer that would have won it for the Thunder. He and several teammates stayed on the court pleading for a call that never came before the officials were escorted to the tunnel by security. Miles appeared to get a piece of the ball — and the Thunder thought he got some of Durant, too. “The referee didn’t call a foul. You have to go with him. He had a better look than I had,” Oklahoma City coach Scott Brooks said. “Sometimes you get those. Sometimes you don’t. We had a good opportunity to win the game. We didn’t get a stop. That’s the bottom line.” Also on Tuesday: Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 CLEVELAND — Flattened by an in-

advertent elbow, Toronto All-Star forward Chris Bosh broke a bone in his face as the Raptors’ playoff hopes took a blow with a loss to Cleveland. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 CHICAGO — John Salmons scored 26 points against his former team and Milwaukee secured a playoff spot by beating Chicago. Wizards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 WASHINGTON — Don Nelson came up way short in his first attempt at breaking Lenny Wilkens’ record for NBA coaching victories as Golden State fell behind by double digits before the game was 3 minutes old and lost to Washington. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Gerald Wallace scored 28 points, Boris Diaw nearly had a triple-double, and Charlotte ensured its first non-losing season in its six-year history. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 NEW YORK — Danilo Gallinari scored a career-high 31 points, including the go-ahead basket with 36 seconds left, Earl Barron had 17 points and a career-best 18 rebounds, and New York handed Boston its fourth loss in five games. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 PHILADELPHIA — Charlie Villanueva scored 25 points, Rodney Stuckey added 24 and short-handed Detroit snapped an 11-game losing streak with a victory over Philadelphia. Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Kevin Martin scored 29 points, and Aaron Brooks added 17 points and seven assists to lead Houston over Memphis. Spurs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Richard Jefferson scored 18 points, Manu Ginobili had 16 and surging San Antonio beat Sacramento for its fourth straight victory.

NHL ROUNDUP

Avs make playoffs with victory over Canucks The Associated Press VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Rookie Matt Duchene used a strong deke to the forehand to score the only goal of a shootout and put Colorado in the playoffs with a win over Vancouver. Craig Anderson stopped 28 shots through overtime and all three in the shootout as the Avalanche secured a postseason spot. Darcy Tucker, T.J. Galiardi and Paul Stastny scored for Colorado, which had lost a season high four straight. In other games on Tuesday: Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PITTSBURGH — Alex Ovechkin scored twice to tie Sidney Crosby for the NHL lead with 48 goals and Presidents’ Trophy-winning Washington swept the season series from Pittsburgh. Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 ATLANTA — Martin Brodeur got his 600th career win with his second straight shutout. Sabres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Ryan Miller made 30 saves, including a brilliant blocker stop on Marian Gaborik, in helping Buffalo clinch the Northeast Division title. Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 TAMPA, Fla. — Rod Brind’Amour, Drayson Bowman and Eric Staal

scored two goals apiece and Carolina beat Tampa Bay. Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Frans Nielsen scored the tying goal with 2:01 left in regulation and added a goal in the shootout. Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 TORONTO — Brian Boucher made 23 saves for Philadelphia. Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 SUNRISE, Fla. — Mike Fisher scored twice to help Ottawa to its seventh win in eight games. Sharks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CALGARY, Alberta — Evgeni Nabokov made 38 saves to give San Jose its third straight division title with a win over Calgary. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Michal Handzus tied it with 1:09 left in regulation to cap the Kings’ rally from a three-goal deficit. Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DALLAS — Marian Hossa scored 36 seconds after the opening faceoff, Colin Fraser had the first of his two goals in the final minute of the first period, and Chicago stretched its winning streak to four games.

x-Dallas x-San Antonio Houston Memphis New Orleans

W 50 48 39 39 35

L 27 29 38 38 43

Pct .649 .623 .506 .506 .449

GB — 2 11 11 15½

L10 5-5 7-3 4-6 4-6 2-8

Str L-2 W-4 W-1 L-2 L-3

Home 26-13 28-11 21-17 23-17 23-15

Away 24-14 20-18 18-21 16-21 12-28

Conf 28-19 29-18 26-22 21-27 24-25

Away 19-19 18-21 23-16 22-17 5-34

Conf 29-19 31-16 26-21 30-17 8-40

Away 22-16 21-18 8-32 7-33 6-32

Conf 33-14 31-16 13-34 15-33 12-35

Northwest Division W x-Utah 51 x-Denver 50 x-Oklahoma City 48 x-Portland 47 Minnesota 15

L 27 27 29 30 62

W y-L.A. Lakers 55 x-Phoenix 50 L.A. Clippers 27 Sacramento 24 Golden State 23 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

L 22 27 50 54 54

Pct .654 .649 .623 .610 .195

GB — ½ 2½ 3½ 35½

L10 7-3 5-5 6-4 8-2 1-9

Str W-1 W-2 L-1 W-1 L-2

Home 32-8 32-6 25-13 25-13 10-28

Pacific Division Pct .714 .649 .351 .308 .299

GB — 5 28 31½ 32

L10 6-4 9-1 2-8 1-9 4-6

Str L-1 L-1 L-5 L-8 L-1

Home 33-6 29-9 19-18 17-21 17-22

——— Tuesday’s Games Charlotte 109, Atlanta 100 Cleveland 113, Toronto 101 New York 104, Boston 101 Houston 113, Memphis 103 San Antonio 95, Sacramento 86

Washington 112, Golden State 94 Detroit 124, Philadelphia 103 Milwaukee 79, Chicago 74 Utah 140, Oklahoma City 139, OT Today’s Games

New York at Indiana, 4 p.m. Washington at Orlando, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 4:30 p.m. New Jersey at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Charlotte at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Memphis at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m.

Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Utah at Houston, 5 p.m. Golden State at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Portland at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games

Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Denver, 7:30 p.m.

L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 7 p.m. ——— All Times PDT

SUMMARIES Tuesday’s Games ——— HOUSTON (113) Ariza 4-11 3-4 12, Scola 7-12 3-3 17, Hayes 1-2 1-2 3, Brooks 6-14 2-2 17, Martin 7-16 1212 29, Hill 5-7 2-2 12, Jeffries 4-9 4-6 12, Lowry 1-5 2-2 4, Budinger 2-9 0-0 5, Taylor 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 38-87 29-33 113. MEMPHIS (103) Gay 10-18 0-0 20, Randolph 8-18 6-8 22, Thabeet 2-2 0-0 4, Conley 6-13 2-2 15, Mayo 2-7 0-0 4, Williams 4-6 0-0 8, Arthur 4-7 0-0 8, Young 6-13 4-6 16, Carroll 2-6 0-0 4, Haddadi 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 45-92 12-16 103. Houston 32 27 29 25 — 113 Memphis 32 23 19 29 — 103 3-Point Goals—Houston 8-27 (Martin 3-6, Brooks 3-8, Budinger 1-4, Ariza 1-6, Lowry 0-3), Memphis 1-5 (Conley 1-2, Gay 0-1, Young 02). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 55 (Jeffries 10), Memphis 49 (Arthur 12). Assists— Houston 19 (Brooks 7), Memphis 15 (Williams 4). Total Fouls—Houston 18, Memphis 22. Technicals—Lowry. A—11,673 (18,119). ——— MILWAUKEE (79) Delfino 3-8 1-2 8, Mbah a Moute 0-2 0-0 0, Thomas 2-8 0-0 4, Jennings 1-8 1-2 4, Salmons 8-19 7-8 26, Ilyasova 7-14 2-2 17, Ridnour 4-9 4-4 13, Gadzuric 1-1 0-2 2, Stackhouse 2-8 1-2 5. Totals 28-77 16-22 79. CHICAGO (74) Deng 6-17 3-4 16, Gibson 4-7 0-2 8, Noah 4-7 0-0 8, Rose 5-12 2-2 12, Hinrich 4-16 0-0 9, Miller 4-9 2-2 10, Murray 3-4 0-0 6, Johnson 1-1 0-1 2, Pargo 1-1 0-0 3, Warrick 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-74 7-11 74. Milwaukee 14 28 18 19 — 79 Chicago 27 9 15 23 — 74 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 7-29 (Salmons 3-6, Delfino 1-4, Ridnour 1-5, Jennings 1-5, Ilyasova 1-5, Stackhouse 0-4), Chicago 3-11 (Pargo 1-1, Deng 1-2, Hinrich 1-6, Miller 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Milwaukee 52 (Thomas 14), Chicago 49 (Noah 11). Assists—Milwaukee 18 (Jennings 8), Chicago 21 (Rose 11). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 16, Chicago 19. A—20,268 (20,917). ——— BOSTON (101) Garnett 7-12 0-0 14, Pierce 4-10 5-6 13, Perkins 6-8 2-2 14, Rondo 3-7 0-1 6, R.Allen 6-9 2-2 17, Davis 4-6 4-5 12, Robinson 2-4 0-1 5, Wallace 3-7 0-2 7, T.Allen 2-5 1-3 5, Finley 3-5 0-0 8. Totals 40-73 14-22 101. NEW YORK (104) Gallinari 10-15 10-11 31, Lee 6-16 1-2 13, Barron 8-13 1-1 17, Duhon 2-5 1-2 5, Walker 2-10 5-6 10, Douglas 4-14 1-2 10, Giddens 2-5 0-0 4, Rodriguez 5-10 1-1 14. Totals 39-88 20-25 104. Boston 21 31 26 23 — 101 New York 27 26 33 18 — 104 3-Point Goals—Boston 7-18 (R.Allen 3-6, Finley 2-3, Robinson 1-2, Wallace 1-2, Rondo 0-2, Pierce 0-3), New York 6-25 (Rodriguez 3-7, Gallinari 1-4, Douglas 1-5, Walker 1-7, Duhon 01, Giddens 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Boston 45 (Perkins 8), New York 50 (Barron 18). Assists—Boston 26 (Rondo 6), New York 23 (Duhon 8). Total Fouls—Boston 22, New York 20. Technicals—Boston defensive three second 2, New York Coach D’Antoni, Walker, New York defensive three second. A—19,763 (19,763). ——— ATLANTA (100) Williams 1-4 4-4 6, Jos.Smith 9-15 0-0 18, Horford 7-14 2-2 16, Evans 8-15 0-0 20, Teague 3-10 2-2 9, West 1-2 0-0 2, Crawford 6-15 3-3 18, Pachulia 1-2 0-0 2, J. Smith 3-6 1-2 7, Morris 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 40-84 12-13 100. CHARLOTTE (109) Wallace 10-18 8-8 28, Diaw 5-12 7-8 17, Ratliff 0-2 0-0 0, Jackson 5-12 3-4 15, Felton 6-10 0-1 14, Chandler 3-4 6-7 12, Hughes 1-4 0-0 2, Augustin 4-4 0-0 11, Thomas 2-5 4-4 8, Graham 1-1 0-0 2, Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-72 28-32 109. Atlanta 14 22 36 28 — 100 Charlotte 34 25 25 25 — 109 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 8-19 (Evans 4-7, Crawford 3-9, Teague 1-3), Charlotte 7-12 (Augustin 3-3, Felton 2-2, Jackson 2-4, Diaw 0-1, Hughes 0-1, Wallace 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 43 (Horford 12), Charlotte 41 (Diaw 9). Assists—Atlanta 24 (Crawford, Teague 6), Charlotte 25 (Diaw 9). Total Fouls—Atlanta 24, Charlotte 18. Technicals—Charlotte defensive three second. A—18,610 (19,077). ——— GOLDEN STATE (94) Williams 7-15 3-4 18, Tolliver 3-13 3-3 10, Hunter 1-3 0-0 2, Curry 10-21 4-4 27, Maggette 6-14 8-8 20, Morrow 6-15 3-4 17, George 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 33-84 21-23 94. WASHINGTON (112) Miller 3-4 0-0 8, Blatche 8-16 5-5 21, Oberto 0-1 0-0 0, Livingston 9-11 3-3 21, Young 10-18 4-6 29, McGee 11-18 3-4 25, Martin 3-10 0-0 7, Jackson 0-3 0-0 0, Singleton 0-4 1-2 1. Totals 44-85 16-20 112. Golden State 23 20 34 17 — 94 Washington 40 28 26 18 — 112 3-Point Goals—Golden State 7-20 (Curry 3-6, Morrow 2-4, Williams 1-2, Tolliver 1-4, Hunter 0-1, George 0-3), Washington 8-18 (Young 5-11, Miller 2-3, Martin 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Golden State 37 (Morrow 7), Washington 61 (McGee 15). Assists— Golden State 16 (Tolliver, Curry 4), Washington 22 (Livingston, Miller 8). Total Fouls—Golden

State 19, Washington 18. Technicals—Miller, Washington defensive three second. A—14,721 (20,173). ——— DETROIT (124) Prince 5-8 2-2 14, Jerebko 5-7 1-2 11, Wallace 8-10 2-2 18, Bynum 3-6 4-6 10, Stuckey 9-17 6-9 24, Gordon 6-10 0-0 13, Villanueva 8-11 5-6 25, Daye 3-6 2-2 9, Summers 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 47-75 22-29 124. PHILADELPHIA (103) Kapono 4-9 0-0 9, Brand 3-4 0-0 6, Dalembert 2-4 0-0 4, Holiday 5-10 0-0 11, Iguodala 2-6 8-8 12, Smith 2-5 0-0 4, Speights 7-13 7-8 21, Williams 4-9 3-4 12, Meeks 8-11 1-3 19, Green 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 39-74 19-23 103. Detroit 34 27 30 33 — 124 Philadelphia 30 31 19 23 — 103 3-Point Goals—Detroit 8-17 (Villanueva 4-6, Prince 2-3, Daye 1-2, Gordon 1-4, Bynum 0-1, Stuckey 0-1), Philadelphia 6-20 (Meeks 2-4, Green 1-1, Holiday 1-4, Williams 1-4, Kapono 1-6, Smith 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 41 (Daye 9), Philadelphia 33 (Speights 6). Assists—Detroit 27 (Bynum 6), Philadelphia 28 (Holiday 9). Total Fouls—Detroit 18, Philadelphia 19. A—13,832 (20,318). ——— TORONTO (101) Bosh 1-1 0-0 2, Wright 3-9 1-1 9, Bargnani 514 1-1 11, Calderon 2-8 0-0 5, Weems 5-10 0-0 10, Evans 1-2 1-4 3, Turkoglu 3-10 2-2 10, Johnson 7-8 2-2 16, Jack 7-12 7-8 23, Nesterovic 1-4 0-0 2, DeRozan 4-4 2-2 10, Belinelli 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-83 16-20 101. CLEVELAND (113) James 5-13 9-10 19, Jamison 10-18 0-0 20, Hickson 5-9 0-1 10, M.Williams 6-9 1-2 14, Parker 7-12 1-1 18, Ilgauskas 3-7 0-0 6, J.Williams 5-8 0-0 13, Varejao 5-7 0-0 10, Moon 1-1 0-0 3, Powe 0-0 0-0 0, Green 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 47-84 11-14 113. Toronto 26 27 26 22 — 101 Cleveland 35 20 35 23 — 113 3-Point Goals—Toronto 7-20 (Jack 2-4, Wright 2-4, Turkoglu 2-6, Calderon 1-1, Belinelli 0-1, Bargnani 0-4), Cleveland 8-20 (J.Williams 3-5, Parker 3-6, Moon 1-1, M.Williams 1-3, James 0-2, Jamison 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 41 (Johnson 10), Cleveland 47 (Parker 8). Assists—Toronto 25 (Jack 6), Cleveland 38 (James 13). Total Fouls—Toronto 12, Cleveland 13. Technicals—Toronto defensive three second. A—20,562 (20,562). ——— SAN ANTONIO (95) Jefferson 7-14 3-4 18, Duncan 5-12 0-0 10, McDyess 6-8 0-0 12, Temple 5-8 4-4 15, Ginobili 5-13 3-3 16, Parker 3-8 2-2 8, Blair 6-6 1-2 13, Mason 0-2 0-0 0, Bonner 0-5 0-0 0, Bogans 0-2 1-1 1, Hairston 0-1 2-2 2, Mahinmi 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-79 16-18 95. SACRAMENTO (86) Nocioni 0-2 0-0 0, Landry 9-17 2-5 20, Thompson 3-8 0-0 7, Udrih 2-7 7-9 11, Evans 10-24 1-2 22, May 5-6 0-0 10, Garcia 2-6 0-0 4, Casspi 0-2 0-0 0, Greene 5-10 0-0 12, Brockman 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-82 10-16 86. San Antonio 18 29 24 24 — 95 Sacramento 18 29 20 19 — 86 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 5-18 (Ginobili 36, Jefferson 1-2, Temple 1-2, Parker 0-1, Mason 0-1, Bogans 0-2, Bonner 0-4), Sacramento 4-11 (Greene 2-5, Thompson 1-1, Evans 1-2, Casspi 0-1, Udrih 0-1, Nocioni 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 51 (McDyess 11), Sacramento 45 (Evans 9). Assists—San Antonio 22 (Ginobili 6), Sacramento 16 (Evans 6). Total Fouls—San Antonio 14, Sacramento 18. Technicals—Duncan, Sacramento defensive three second 2. A—11,732 (17,317). ——— OKLAHOMA CITY (139) Green 9-18 0-2 20, Durant 13-29 12-12 45, Krstic 4-5 0-0 8, Westbrook 7-15 12-13 27, Sefolosha 0-5 0-0 0, Collison 2-3 2-2 7, Harden 4-7 5-6 15, Ibaka 4-5 5-6 13, Maynor 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 45-90 36-41 139. UTAH (140) Miles 5-12 4-6 16, Boozer 12-20 4-7 28, Okur 6-12 5-5 20, Williams 14-23 10-11 42, Matthews 4-11 4-4 14, Price 1-2 2-2 5, Millsap 7-11 1-2 15, Korver 0-2 0-0 0, Jeffers 0-1 0-0 0, Koufos 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 49-94 30-37 140. Oklahoma City 29 36 29 35 10 — 139 Utah 32 31 34 32 11 — 140 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 13-30 (Durant 7-13, Green 2-5, Harden 2-5, Collison 1-1, Westbrook 1-2, Sefolosha 0-4), Utah 12-21 (Williams 4-7, Okur 3-5, Matthews 2-3, Miles 2-5, Price 11). Fouled Out—Millsap. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 54 (Green, Durant 7), Utah 48 (Boozer 15). Assists—Oklahoma City 27 (Westbrook 9), Utah 29 (Williams 10). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 27, Utah 31. Technicals—Boozer. A—19,911 (19,911).

LEADERS Through Monday’s games SCORING G FG FT PTS James, CLE 75 763 584 2239 Durant, OKC 76 729 690 2258 Anthony, DEN 64 644 479 1819 Bryant, LAL 72 708 438 1950 Wade, MIA 73 682 507 1942 Ellis, GOL 61 603 280 1556 Nowitzki, DAL 76 671 497 1882 Bosh, TOR 69 599 470 1676 Granger, IND 57 449 328 1371

AVG 29.9 29.7 28.4 27.1 26.6 25.5 24.8 24.3 24.1


D4 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

PREP ROUNDUP

Culver softball scores 17 runs in league win Bulletin staff report CULVER — Santiam proved no match for the hot Culver bats as the home team trounced the Wolverines 17-6 in girls softball action Tuesday afternoon. The Bulldogs (4-0 Special District 3) remain undefeated in league play and have racked up a total of 27 hits over the course of their last two games. “I guess the wind was with us today,” said Culver coach Kevin Urbach. “We’ve been hitting the ball well.” The Bulldogs put up the game’s first runs, scoring two in the first inning. They followed with seven runs in both the second and third innings to take a 16-2 lead. Culver also benefited from strong pitching. Evangeline Hood went the distance against the Wolverines with seven strikeouts in the five-inning contest. Kymber Wofford cracked two doubles and two singles, and Amanda Treadway notched four singles in the home win. Sarah O’Gorman added a triple for the winners. In other Tuesday prep action: BOYS TENNIS Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Dalles-Wahtonka. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Jeff Windsor set the pace for Bend and bested Alex Bruttin 6-2, 6-0 to take No. 1 singles for the host team. The duo of Kyle Pickard and Steven Marquess won at No. 1 doubles and paved the way for the rest of the Lava Bears (4-0 Intermountain Conference) doubles teams, who won every match in straight sets.

Golf Continued from D1 “We have a tradition of being successful,” says Buerger, “and we want to keep that ride going as long as possible.” In the Class 5A ranks, Summit is another team that appears to have the right ingredients for a winning season. The Storm managed a runner-up finish at last season’s Intermountain Conference district championships, finishing second to a powerful The Dalles-Wahtonka team. And like Redmond, Summit boasts three returning state qualifiers, one of whom — senior Jesse Heinly — finished second at last season’s state tournament and this week was medalist at the eight-team IMC Preview tournament. Summit’s other two returning state golfers, senior Jordan Scheimer and sophomore Dylan Cramer, combine with Heinly to form a squad with legitimate state-title aspirations. Cramer carded the second-lowest score at Monday’s IMC Preview, following Heinly’s tournament-best 78 with a 79. Such talent has prompted many area coaches to pick the Storm as the team to beat in the IMC this season. “We always have the same goal every year — to win state,” says Mark Tichenor, now in his fifth year as Summit’s head coach. “Most teams have one or two decent guys, but what separates the good teams from the great teams are the guys in the No. 3 and No. 4 positions,” Tichenor explains, adding that he feels fortunate to have senior Anders Hansen and junior Josh Mitchell battling for Summit’s No. 4 position. Crook County, already off to a strong start after winning its first tournament of the season, also figures to be in the IMC mix this year. After the Cowboys finished fourth in the league in 2009, coach Zach Lampert expects Caleb Henry and Jared George to lead Crook County to a successful season this spring. “Summit returns basically everybody and is the favorite,” Lampert says. But the second-year coach adds that, with a little improvement, Crook County should be able to compete with other league favorites The Dalles-Wahtonka, Hermiston and Pendleton. Mountain View coach Lucas Taroli agrees that Summit is in a league of its own. But he says he believes that second place in the IMC — and the league’s No. 2 state team berth — is up for grabs. “We hope to be more competitive,” says Taroli, whose team finished sixth at last year’s IMC tournament. Senior Paul Coduti is back for the Cougars and made his mark early this season by winning the Sisters Invitational at Crooked River Ranch. First-year Madras coach Spud Miller expects that the White Buffaloes will be better this year than last. Senior Nick Johnson and junior Jasper Gerhardt lead a young but motivated squad. Improvement must be contagious

Scoreboard • Prep results, Page D2

Hermiston. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ——— Pendleton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Cowboys tallied two losses in Intermountain Conference matchups at Hermiston and Pendleton. Against Hermiston, No. 1 Crook County doubles team Zac Thompson and Brady Slater battled the wind to pull off a hard-fought victory. The Cowboys’ Trevor Brown also registered wins in No. 1 singles matchups against both Hermiston and Pendleton. Crook County did not field No. 3 and No. 4 doubles teams in either match. The losses dropped the Cowboys to 0-2 in league and 1-3 overall. GIRLS TENNIS Hermiston. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ——— Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Pendleton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Crook County swept the doubles matches against Pendleton to secure the team victory in the second of two road matches. Earlier at Hermiston, the Cowgirls won three of four singles matches but were swept in the doubles competition. Erin Crofcheck won both of her matches at No. 1 singles for Crook County (2-2 overall, 1-1 IMC). Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Dalles-Wahtonka. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 THE DALLES — The Lava Bears

sunk the Eagle Indians in their Intermountain Conference opener, bumping Bend’s record to 2-1 overall. Bend swept the doubles matches, including a hard-fought match won by No. 4 doubles team Lindsey Petersen and Mariah Taunton after three sets. Alexa Kadlecik and Kaylee Tornay picked up wins in No. 3 and No. 4 singles matches, while Bend’s Bryn Oliveira was narrowly defeated in No. 1 singles in a tiebreaker match. BASEBALL Santiam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CULVER — Culver gave up a tworun lead when Santiam went on a late-game hitting streak to score two runs in the sixth inning and one in the seventh to win by one run in Special District 2 play. Leading the Culver offense were Devin Ozment with a sacrifice fly and Nick Barany with an RBI single, both in the fifth inning. Culver is now 1-3 in league and 2-6 overall. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRINEVILLE — Crook County took a landslide win against La Pine, winning by 10 runs in six innings of nonconference play. Cully Stafford and Dayton Stafford led the Cowboys’ offense. Cully Stafford hit a two-RBI double in the fifth, while Dayton Stafford registered a one-run double in the second and a two-run double in the fourth. For the Hawks, Austin Manley smacked a double. Crook County improved to 4-4 overall, while La Pine dropped to 3-5 overall.

Boys golf outlook A look at the boys golf teams from Central Oregon competing this spring:

CLASS 6A REDMOND PANTHERS Coach: Ron Buerger (sixth season) 2009 record: First at CVC district tournament and second at 6A state tournament Returning state qualifiers: Landon Moore, sr.; Andy Rodby, sr.; Jared Lambert, jr. District tournament: May 10-11 at Trysting Tree

CLASS 5A BEND LAVA BEARS Coach: Rusty Clemons (10th season) 2009 record: Eighth at Intermountain Conference district tournament Returning state qualifiers: none District tournament: May 10-11 at The Dalles Country Club MOUNTAIN VIEW COUGARS Coach: Lucas Taroli (fourth season) 2009 record: Sixth at IMC district tournament Returning state qualifiers: none District tournament: May 10-11 at The Dalles Country Club SUMMIT STORM Coach: Mark Tichenor (fifth season) 2009 record: Second at IMC district tournament, third at Class 5A state tournament Returning state qualifiers: Jesse Heinly, sr.; Jordan Scheimer, sr.; Dylan Cramer, soph. District tournament: May 10-11 at The Dalles Country Club CROOK COUNTY COWBOYS Coach: Zach Lampert (second season) 2009 record: Fourth at IMC district tournament Returning state qualifiers: none District tournament: May 10-11 at The Dalles Country Club MADRAS WHITE BUFFALOES Coach: Spud Miller (first season) 2009 record: Seventh at IMC district tournament Returning state qualifiers: none District tournament: May 10-11 at The Dalles Country Club

CLASS 4A SISTERS OUTLAWS Coach: Jeff Barton (18th season) 2009 record: Second at Sky-Em district tournament, seventh at Class 4A state tournament Returning state qualifiers: Aaron Simundson, sr.; Cody Farr-Baenziger, sr.; Jonathan Standen, sr.; Jeff Fought, jr. District tournament: May 10-11 at Middlefield, Cottage Grove LA PINE HAWKS Coach: Kent Wieber (11th season) 2009 record: Fifth at Sky-Em district tournament Returning state qualifiers: none District tournament: May 10-11 at Middlefield, Cottage Grove in Central Oregon, as Bend coach Rusty Clemons reports that his team thus far has shot much better scores than it did last year. The Lava Bears are led by senior Jake Koski and junior Robbie Wilkins, a transfer from La Pine. Clemons picks sophomores Tanner Cherry and Carter McGowan to round out Bend’s top five. Look for Sisters to make another giant splash in Class 4A following its second-place finish at last year’s SkyEm League district tournament. The Outlaws went on to take seventh at state and this year return four golfers from that state run: seniors Aaron Simundson, Cody Farr-Baenziger and Jonathan Standen as well as junior

Jeff Fought. On the second day of state tournament play last season, Simundson shot a career-best, 4-over-par 76 at the Quail Valley Golf Course in Banks. Already this season, Simundson has led the Outlaws to a secondplace finish at their own invitational tournament. La Pine coach Kent Wieber predicts Sisters will be a tough team to topple in the Sky-Em League, as will Marist. But he hopes top Hawks golfers Travis Knight and Nico Cummings will score state tournament berths. James Williams can be reached at jwilliams@bendbulletin.com

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 1 0 1.000 — Boston 1 1 .500 ½ New York 1 1 .500 ½ Baltimore 0 1 .000 1 Toronto 0 1 .000 1 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 1 0 1.000 — Detroit 1 0 1.000 — Minnesota 1 1 .500 ½ Cleveland 0 1 .000 1 Kansas City 0 1 .000 1 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 1 0 1.000 — Los Angeles 1 1 .500 ½ Oakland 1 1 .500 ½ Seattle 1 1 .500 ½ ——— Tuesday’s Games Tampa Bay 4, Baltimore 3 N.Y. Yankees 6, Boston 4 Minnesota 5, L.A. Angels 3 Oakland 2, Seattle 1, 10 innings Today’s Games Baltimore (Guthrie 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Garza 0-0), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 0-0) at Boston (Lackey 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Tallet 0-0) at Texas (Harden 0-0), 5:05 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at Kansas City (Hochevar 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Santana 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Rowland-Smith 0-0) at Oakland (Duchscherer 0-0), 7:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 1 0 1.000 — New York 1 0 1.000 — Philadelphia 1 0 1.000 — Florida 0 1 .000 1 Washington 0 1 .000 1 Central Division W L Pct GB Pittsburgh 1 0 1.000 — St. Louis 1 0 1.000 — Milwaukee 1 1 .500 ½ Chicago 0 1 .000 1 Cincinnati 0 1 .000 1 Houston 0 2 .000 1½ West Division W L Pct GB San Francisco 2 0 1.000 — Arizona 1 1 .500 1 Colorado 1 1 .500 1 San Diego 1 1 .500 1 Los Angeles 0 1 .000 1½ ——— Tuesday’s Games San Francisco 3, Houston 0 Milwaukee 7, Colorado 5 San Diego 6, Arizona 3 Today’s Games Colorado (Cook 0-0) at Milwaukee (D.Davis 0-0), 10:10 a.m. San Francisco (Cain 0-0) at Houston (Myers 0-0), 11:05 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 00), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 0-0) at Washington (Marquis 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 0-0) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Maine 0-0), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wainwright 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 0-0), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Correia 0-0) at Arizona (Kennedy 0-0), 6:40 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Athletics 2, Mariners 1 (10) OAKLAND, Calif. — Mark Ellis hit a game-ending RBI single with two outs in the 10th inning, lifting Oakland past Seattle. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Bradley dh Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b Byrnes lf Moore c J.Wilson ss Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 34

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 2 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 10

Avg. .286 .143 .429 .000 .125 .250 .000 .000 .000

Oakland R.Davis cf Barton 1b R.Sweeney rf Kouzmanoff 3b 1-Patterson pr K.Suzuki c E.Chavez dh Ellis 2b T.Buck lf Pennington ss Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 0 5 5 5 4 1 38

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 3 1 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4

SO 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 7

Avg. .222 .000 .111 .250 --.250 .111 .429 .143 .500

Seattle 000 100 000 0 — 1 5 1 Oakland 000 100 000 1 — 2 9 0 Two outs when winning run scored. 1-ran for Kouzmanoff in the 10th. E: Jo.Lopez (1). LOB: Seattle 5, Oakland 12. 2B: F.Gutierrez (1), T.Buck (1). HR: K.Suzuki (1), off Snell. RBIs: K.Suzuki (1), Ellis (1). Runners left in scoring position: Seattle 1 (Byrnes); Oakland 5 (K.Suzuki, R.Davis 2, Barton 2). Runners moved up: Kotchman. GIDP: K.Suzuki. DP: Seattle 1 (Figgins, J.Wilson, Kotchman). Seattle IP H R Snell 6 3 1 Kelley 1 0 0 M.Lowe 1 1 0 Texeira L, 0-1 1 2-3 5 1 Oakland IP H R Braden 7 4 1 Ziegler 2-3 0 0 Breslow 1-3 0 0 A.Bailey 1 1 0 E.Ramirez W, 1-0 1 0 0 T: 2:47. A: 10,090 (35,067).

ER 1 0 0 1 ER 1 0 0 0 0

BB SO 2 4 1 0 0 1 1 2 BB SO 1 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

NP 100 18 13 39 NP 91 8 1 14 12

ERA 1.50 0.00 0.00 5.40 ERA 1.29 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Yankees 6, Red Sox 4 BOSTON — Hideki Okajima walked Nick Johnson to score the tiebreaking run after a costly error by shortstop Marco Scutaro loaded the bases. New York Jeter ss N.Johnson dh Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Posada c Swisher rf Winn rf Thames lf a-Gardner ph-lf Granderson cf Totals

AB 5 2 5 5 3 4 4 0 1 2 4 35

R 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 6

H 1 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 1 9

BI 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 5

SO 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 7

Avg. .300 .000 .000 .200 .500 .500 .429 --.000 .500 .250

Boston Ellsbury lf Pedroia 2b Martinez c Youkilis 1b D.Ortiz dh Beltre 3b J.Drew rf Cameron cf Scutaro ss Totals

AB 5 5 3 3 4 4 4 3 4 35

R 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 2 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 1 9

BI 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 0 2 1 1 2 1 0 8

Avg. .200 .333 .375 .571 .000 .429 .125 .333 .429

New York 010 030 011 — 6 9 3 Boston 102 010 000 — 4 9 1 a-grounded out for Thames in the 6th. E: Jeter (1), Posada (1), D.Marte (1), Scutaro (1). LOB: New York 10, Boston 7. 2B: A.Rodriguez (2), Posada (1), Swisher 2 (2), Ellsbury (1), Martinez (2), Scutaro (1). HR: Cano (1), off Atchison; Martinez (1), off A.J.Burnett. RBIs: N.Johnson (1), Teixeira (1), A.Rodriguez (1), Cano 2 (3),

Swisher (1), Martinez 3 (3), Youkilis (3). SB: Ellsbury (1), Beltre (1). SF: Cano, Youkilis. Runners left in scoring position: New York 6 (Jeter 3, Posada, Teixeira 2); Boston 5 (Scutaro 2, D.Ortiz, J.Drew, Pedroia). Runners moved up: Gardner. GIDP: Posada, Scutaro. DP: New York 1 (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira); Boston 1 (Scutaro, Pedroia, Youkilis). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP A.J.Burnett 5 7 4 3 1 5 94 Aceves W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 0 0 23 D.Robertson 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 D.Marte H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 Chamberlain H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 9 M.Rivera S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP Lester 5 5 4 4 3 4 94 Delcarmen 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 Bard 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 Okajima L, 1-1 2-3 2 1 0 1 0 32 Atchison 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 2 23 D.Robertson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T: 3:48. A: 38,000 (37,402).

ERA 5.40 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.50 0.00 ERA 7.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 6.75

Rays 4, Orioles 3 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Carl Crawford drove in two runs with a basesloaded double in the ninth inning to give Tampa Bay a season-opening victory over Baltimore. Baltimore Roberts 2b Ad.Jones cf Markakis rf M.Tejada 3b Scott dh Wieters c Pie lf Atkins 1b C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 5 5 3 5 3 4 4 4 4 37

R 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

H 0 3 1 0 1 2 1 1 2 11

BI 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 7

Avg. .000 .600 .333 .000 .333 .500 .250 .250 .500

Tampa Bay Bartlett ss Crawford lf Zobrist rf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Burrell dh S.Rodriguez 2b Navarro c a-Shoppach ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 36

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 4

H 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 13

BI 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO Avg. 1 .500 0 .250 0 .500 2 .250 1 .250 1 .250 2 .250 2 .250 0 .667 0 1.000 9

Baltimore 001 101 000 — 3 11 0 Tampa Bay 000 011 002 — 4 13 0 One out when winning run scored. a-doubled for Navarro in the 9th. LOB: Baltimore 10, Tampa Bay 9. 2B: Ad.Jones (1), Markakis (1), Pie (1), Atkins (1), Zobrist (1), Burrell (1), Shoppach (1). HR: Ad.Jones (1), off J.Shields; Scott (1), off J.Shields; Wieters (1), off J.Shields; Longoria (1), off Millwood. RBIs: Ad.Jones (1), Scott (1), Wieters (1), Bartlett (1), Crawford 2 (2), Longoria (1). SB: C.Izturis (1). Runners left in scoring position: Baltimore 7 (M.Tejada 3, Roberts 3, Scott); Tampa Bay 3 (Longoria, Zobrist, S.Rodriguez). Runners moved up: Markakis. GIDP: M.Tejada, Burrell. DP: Baltimore 1 (C.Izturis, Roberts, Atkins); Tampa Bay 1 (Longoria, S.Rodriguez, C.Pena). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO Millwood 5 9 2 2 1 5 Albers H, 1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 Ohman H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Ji.Johnson H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Gonzalez L, 0-1 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO J.Shields 6 9 3 3 2 6 Choate 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Cormier 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano W, 1-0 1 2 0 0 1 0 J.Shields pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Millwood pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T: 3:02. A: 36,973 (36,973).

NP ERA 100 3.60 16 0.00 8 0.00 13 0.00 15 54.00 NP ERA 107 4.50 9 0.00 8 0.00 26 0.00

Twins 5, Angels 3 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Joe Mauer, Justin Morneau and J.J. Hardy each homered off Joe Saunders, leading Minnesota over Los Angeles. Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Kubel dh Delm.Young lf Hardy ss Punto 3b Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 4 2 3 4 3 32

R 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 5

H 1 0 1 2 3 0 1 1 0 9

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 5

BB 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 5

SO 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 6

Avg. .111 .125 .250 .500 .571 .000 .429 .250 .000

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf H.Matsui dh K.Morales 1b J.Rivera lf H.Kendrick 2b B.Wood 3b J.Mathis c a-M.Izturis ph Totals

AB 3 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 1 33

R 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 1 3 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 8

BI 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 6

Avg. .333 .143 .500 .286 .250 .125 .375 .125 .286 .000

Minnesota 301 100 000 — 5 9 0 Los Angeles 001 020 000 — 3 8 1 a-fouled out for J.Mathis in the 9th. E: E.Aybar (1). LOB: Minnesota 6, Los Angeles 7. 2B: Cuddyer (1), Tor.Hunter (1). HR: Mauer (1), off Saunders; Morneau (1), off Saunders; Hardy (1), off Saunders; Tor. Hunter (1), off Blackburn. RBIs: Mauer 2 (2), Morneau (1), Delm.Young (3), Hardy (1), Tor.Hunter 3 (3). SF: Delm. Young. Runners left in scoring position: Minnesota 3 (Hardy, Kubel, O.Hudson); Los Angeles 4 (H.Matsui 2, J.Mathis, J.Rivera). Runners moved up: K.Morales. GIDP: Cuddyer, Hardy 2, Tor.Hunter. DP: Minnesota 2 (Blackburn, O.Hudson, Morneau), (Punto, O.Hudson); Los Angeles 3 (H.Kendrick, E.Aybar, K.Morales), (E.Aybar, K.Morales), (Stokes, E.Aybar, K.Morales). Minnesota IP H R Blackbrn W, 1-0 6 2-3 8 3 Duensing H, 1 1-3 0 0 Guerrier H, 1 1 0 0 Rauch S, 1-1 1 0 0 Los Angeles IP H R Saunders L, 0-1 5 8 5 Palmer 2 1 0 Stokes 2 0 0 T: 2:41. A: 43,510 (45,285).

ER 3 0 0 0 ER 5 0 0

BB SO 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 BB SO 2 4 2 0 1 2

NP 103 3 11 16 NP 91 24 25

ERA 4.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 ERA 9.00 0.00 0.00

NL ROUNDUP Giants 3, Astros 0 HOUSTON — Barry Zito pitched three-hit ball over six innings and four relievers finished up the shutout for the Giants. San Francisco Rowand cf Renteria ss Sandoval 3b A.Huff 1b Ishikawa 1b DeRosa lf B.Molina c Uribe 2b Torres rf Zito p Joaquin p Runzler p Romo p b-Bowker ph Br.Wilson p Totals

AB 5 3 3 4 0 3 3 4 3 2 0 0 0 1 0 31

R 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 8

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .000 .500 .286 .375 --.333 .286 .429 .000 .500 ------.400 ---

Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Pence rf Ca.Lee lf

AB 4 2 4 4

R 0 0 0 0

H 0 2 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0

BB 0 2 0 0

SO 2 0 1 1

Avg. .125 .667 .000 .250

P.Feliz 1b C.Johnson 3b Quintero c Manzella ss W.Rodriguez p Fulchino p a-Blum ph Lyon p Lindstrom p Totals

4 4 4 2 2 0 1 0 0 31

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

.125 .000 .250 .167 .500 --.200 -----

San Francisco 000 003 000 — 3 8 0 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 a-popped out for Fulchino in the 7th. b-singled for Romo in the 9th. E: W.Rodriguez (1). LOB: San Francisco 7, Houston 7. 2B: Keppinger 2 (2). RBIs: A.Huff (1), B.Molina (2), Uribe (2). S: Zito. SF: B.Molina. Runners left in scoring position: San Francisco 3 (B.Molina, Rowand, Zito); Houston 4 (Ca.Lee 2, Pence, Blum). GIDP: Rowand, Sandoval, Uribe. DP: Houston 3 (Manzella, Keppinger, P.Feliz), (C.Johnson, Keppinger, P.Feliz), (C.Johnson, Keppinger, P.Feliz). San Francisco IP H R Zito W, 1-0 6 3 0 Joaquin H, 1 2-3 1 0 Runzler H, 1 2-3 0 0 Romo H, 1 2-3 0 0 Br.Wilson S, 2-2 1 0 0 Houston IP H R W.Rodriguez L, 0-16 7 3 Fulchino 1 0 0 Lyon 1 0 0 Lindstrom 1 1 0 T: 2:38. A: 24,237 (40,976).

ER 0 0 0 0 0 ER 3 0 0 0

BB SO 1 5 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 BB SO 4 4 0 1 0 0 0 1

NP 90 16 8 4 13 NP 96 10 11 11

ERA 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 ERA 4.50 0.00 0.00 0.00

Brewers 7, Rockies 5 MILWAUKEE — Randy Wolf’s debut for the Brewers was a success, Casey McGehee and Rickie Weeks homered and Milwaukee beat Colorado. Colorado C.Gonzalez lf Fowler cf e-Giambi ph Helton 1b Tulowitzki ss Hawpe rf Iannetta c Stewart 3b Barmes 2b G.Smith p Corpas p a-Spilborghs ph Daley p Belisle p d-S.Smith ph Totals

AB 5 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 0 1 0 0 1 37

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 2 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 11

BI 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 1 0 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11

Avg. .600 .167 .000 .556 .125 .143 .000 .571 .250 .000 --.500 ----.000

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Zaun c Hart rf A.Escobar ss Wolf p Stetter p b-Counsell ph Hawkins p c-Edmonds ph Hoffman p Totals

AB 2 4 4 2 3 4 3 4 2 0 1 0 1 0 30

R 2 0 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

H 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 2 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .400 .444 .375 .571 .571 .000 .000 .125 .000 --.000 --.200 ---

Colorado 110 010 101 — 5 11 1 Milwaukee 300 110 02x — 7 7 0 a-struck out for Corpas in the 7th. b-flied out for Stetter in the 7th. c-struck out for Hawkins in the 8th. d-grounded out for Belisle in the 9th. e-struck out for Fowler in the 9th. E: Barmes (1). LOB: Colorado 6, Milwaukee 5. 2B: C.Gonzalez (1), Stewart (1), Barmes (1), Fielder (1). 3B: Stewart (1). HR: Stewart (2), off Wolf; McGehee (1), off G.Smith; Weeks (1), off G.Smith. RBIs: C.Gonzalez 2 (2), Helton (1), Stewart (3), S.Smith (1), Weeks (1), Fielder (1), McGehee 3 (3), A.Escobar (1). SB: Weeks (1), Hart (1). S: G.Smith. Runners left in scoring position: Colorado 2 (Helton, Giambi); Milwaukee 3 (Zaun, Gomez, Edmonds). Runners moved up: C.Gonzalez, Fowler, S.Smith, Gomez, McGehee. GIDP: Zaun 2. DP: Colorado 2 (Tulowitzki, Barmes, Helton), (Barmes, Tulowitzki, Helton). Colorado IP H R G.Smith L, 0-1 5 4 5 Corpas 1 0 0 Daley 1 0 0 Belisle 1 3 2 Milwaukee IP H R Wolf W, 1-0 6 2-3 9 4 Stetter H, 1 1-3 0 0 Hawkins H, 1 1 0 0 Hoffman S, 1-1 1 2 1 T: 3:07. A: 37,344 (41,900).

ER 5 0 0 2 ER 4 0 0 1

BB SO 2 5 1 0 2 0 1 1 BB SO 0 8 0 0 0 2 0 1

NP ERA 89 9.00 14 0.00 17 0.00 31 16.20 NP ERA 97 5.40 4 0.00 12 0.00 15 9.00

Padres 6, Diamondbacks 3 PHOENIX — Chris Young allowed one hit through six innings, Everth Cabrera drove in four runs with a triple and a double, and San Diego beat Arizona. San Diego Gwynn cf Hairston Jr. 2b Ad.Gonzalez 1b Blanks lf Adams p d-Stairs ph Bell p Headley 3b Venable rf Hundley c E.Cabrera ss C.Young p Gregerson p Ramos p Hairston lf Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 0 1 0 5 4 3 4 2 0 0 0 37

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 10

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 4

SO 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 2 0 0 0 10

Avg. .125 .000 .444 .125 --.000 --.444 .143 .167 .429 .000 -------

Arizona C.Jackson lf S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b Montero c C.Young cf K.Johnson 2b E.Jackson p a-Ojeda ph L.Rosales p Norberto p Boyer p b-T.Abreu ph Vasquez p c-Ryal ph Qualls p Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

H 1 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO Avg. 0 .250 0 .222 1 .500 2 .000 2 .200 0 .571 0 .125 1 .000 1 .000 0 --0 --0 --0 --0 1.000 0 --1 .000 0 --8

San Diego 020 102 001 — 6 10 1 Arizona 000 000 300 — 3 7 0 a-walked for E.Jackson in the 5th. b-singled for Boyer in the 7th. c-struck out for Vasquez in the 8th. d-grounded out for Adams in the 9th. E: Headley (2). LOB: San Diego 8, Arizona 9. 2B: E.Cabrera (1), C.Young (1). 3B: E.Cabrera (1). HR: Venable (1), off E.Jackson; Ad.Gonzalez (2), off Qualls. RBIs: Ad.Gonzalez (2), Venable (1), E.Cabrera 4 (4), S.Drew (3), J.Upton (1), C.Young (1). SB: Gwynn (1), Headley (1), E.Cabrera (1). Runners left in scoring position: San Diego 4 (C.Young, Blanks, Gwynn 2); Arizona 3 (Montero, Ad.LaRoche, Ryal). Runners moved up: Ad.Gonzalez, S.Drew. GIDP: S.Drew. DP: San Diego 1 (E.Cabrera, Hairston Jr., Ad.Gonzalez). San Diego IP H R C.Young W, 1-0 6 1 0 Gregerson 1-3 3 3 Ramos H, 1 1-3 0 0 Adams H, 1 1 1-3 2 0 Bell S, 1-1 1 1 0 Arizona IP H R E.Jackson L, 0-1 5 5 3 L.Rosales 2-3 2 2 Norberto 1-3 0 0 Boyer 1 1 0 Vasquez 1 1 0 Qualls 1 1 1 T: 3:20. A: 19,177 (48,633).

ER 0 3 0 0 0 ER 3 2 0 0 0 1

BB SO 3 5 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 BB SO 1 5 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0

NP ERA 86 0.00 22 81.00 2 0.00 27 0.00 14 0.00 NP ERA 94 5.40 32 27.00 5 0.00 13 0.00 23 0.00 12 9.00


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 D5

Dementia Continued from D1 About 700 former NFL players are pursuing cases in California, according to state records, with most of them in line to receive routine lump-sum settlements of about $100,000 to $200,000. This virtual assembly line has until now focused on orthopedic injuries, with torn shoulders and ravaged knees obvious casualties of the players’ former workplace. But Perfetto’s contention that Wenzel’s dementia relates to his football employment represents a significant shift, several lawyers involved in the California system said. They estimated the case’s potential value at more than $1 million if it reaches its conclusion, probably in two or three years. Given the dozens and perhaps hundreds of players who could file similar claims, experts in the California system said NFL teams and their insurers could be facing liability of $100 million or more. They identified a wide spectrum of possible effects: These costs could merely represent a financial nuisance for a league that recorded $8.5 billion in revenue last year, or, if insurance costs rise drastically because of such claims, the NFL could be forced to alter its rules to reduce head trauma. Officials already are considering decreased contact in practice and forbidding linemen from using the threepoint stance. The more routine orthopedic claims filed by retired players have helped persuade a newly formed version of the Arena Football League to stay out of the state, according to the league’s commissioner, Jerry Kurz. Perfetto’s lawyer, Ronald G. Feenberg of Los Angeles, likened football head trauma to asbestos exposure: a workplace danger whose effects can take 20 to 40 years to manifest. “Medical science has recently put those puzzle pieces together — that hitting your head over and over on the football field causes certain conditions,” Feenberg said. “All of these hits could have injured Ralph Wenzel’s spine. But they didn’t. They injured his brain.” Dennis Curran, the NFL’s senior vice president for labor litigation and policy, said in a statement Monday that the league was already assisting players with dementia by reimbursing medical expenses and offering financial assistance to players who could not afford doctors’ visits. “Any workers’ compensation claim will be evaluated and addressed on its merits and the relevant provisions of state law and the collective bargaining agreement,” Curran said. After watching her otherwise healthy husband begin to lose his mental faculties in his mid-50s and be placed in an assisted-living facility at 64, Perfetto has become one of the most outspoken voices in football’s dementia debate. She testified at a United States House Judiciary Committee hearing on brain injuries in October and served as a resource for other spouses of former players with dementia; in December 2008 she tried to attend a meeting between NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and retired players but was turned away. “Having a judge deem this is work-related would move this forward and keep it very visible,” said Perfetto, a senior director at Pfizer who holds a doctorate in public health from the University of North Carolina. “I think when they look at all the information it will just be undeniable.”

The Golden State Retired NFL players have flocked to California in recent years as word has spread about its workers’ compensation system. The state is believed to attract more football-related claims than all other states combined because of two quirks that suit it perfectly. While most states require workers’ compensation claims to be filed within one to five years of the injury, California’s statute of limitations does not begin until the employer formally advises the injured worker of his or her right to workers’ compensation. NFL teams have almost never brought up workers’ compensation — hoping to avoid even more claims, several lawyers said — so long-retired players can file for injuries sustained decades ago. Dozens of veterans from as far back as the 1960s and 1970s, including the star San Diego Chargers wide receiver Lance Alworth, who retired in 1972 and turns 70 in August, have California cases pending. California’s other crucial wrinkle requires a professional athlete to have played only one game of his or her career within state borders to file a full claim for cumulative injuries. The law derives from California’s desire to protect outside workers who temporarily pass through the state, like truckers or flight attendants. Leroy Thompson is an example of how the concept operates to athletes’ advantage. A reserve running back for four non-California NFL teams from 1991 to 1996, Thompson qualified for California workers’ compensation because four of his 80 regular-season games were played there. In January he accepted a $120,000 lump sum to settle

his claim, whose original 2008 filing asserted cumulative injuries to his “head, neck, back, spine, shoulder, hips, elbows, wrists, hands, legs, knees, ankles, feet” and other body parts. The NFL unsuccessfully lobbied the California legislature in 1997 to exclude professional athletes from workers’ compensation benefits. The Cincinnati Bengals have for several years included language in their contracts requiring players to file claims only in Ohio — where cumulative trauma is not compensable — and are currently asserting the validity of those provisions in federal court, fending off more than 30 claims. Other teams have resigned themselves to the significant — and rising — cost of conducting business in California. Teams’ insurance policies have varied widely over the years, but most provide for a $250,000 deductible per claim, according to several lawyers familiar with the system; that translates to about $175 million in total potential liability just for the 700 players currently pursuing claims, or about $5.5 million per team. Most of that is for players who would be ineligible to file in any other state but California. “The last three years we’ve seen a tremendous spike in claims, and in particular the last two,” said Todd Davis, who has overseen workers’ compensation for the St. Louis Rams for the past 15 years. He said that the Rams’ workers’ insurance policy covering just California costs about $1 million annually. “It doesn’t make a lot of sense when Player X plays 55 games or 100 games in his career, spends one day in California and files a California claim,” Davis said. “And he may or may not have even been injured in that game — he stretched, he ran one route, was untouched, a pass didn’t come his direction, and he didn’t get bumped off the line of scrimmage, and there was no contact. He can claim injurious exposure in California. It’s a flawed system, in my opinion.”

Establishing links Almost every football player’s workers’ compensation claim in California mentions headaches or memory problems among some dozen other maladies, according to public records and interviews with player and defense lawyers. But Perfetto’s claim on Wenzel’s behalf is almost certainly the first to connect a player’s early-onset dementia with his former workplace of professional football. Researchers at the University of North Carolina have recently linked pro football careers and concussions with heightened rates of depression, mental decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Groups at Boston University and West Virginia University have found chronic traumatic encephalopathy — a disease caused only by head trauma that typically results in progressive cognitive decline — in the brain tissue of many deceased players. A survey commissioned by the NFL that came to light in September indicated that retired players ages 30 to 49 had been found to have memoryrelated diseases 19 times more often than the general population; for players 50 and older the rate was five times. Although the NFL has questioned the validity of that and other studies, the league has since softened its stance on the issue. Yet even if early-onset dementia is now considered to have been an occupational risk for players of past eras, that connection does not inexorably prove that any individual case was caused by football. California’s workers’ compensation procedures will examine that issue through Wenzel’s filing. “Absolutely this was work-related for Ralph,” Perfetto said. “There’s scientific evidence that these players who had head trauma every day in games and practice, and there are long-term neurological ramifications.” Davis, the Rams’ lawyer, said: “It’s reasonable to assume a case like this coming at some point. The result will be determined on the individual merits.” Other sports like professional hockey would not face the workers’ compensation liability for dementia that the NFL does, several lawyers in the field said, because scientific evidence linking players to cognitive disease is not nearly as compelling. Medical records are usually vital to establishing cause, but it is not clear whether Wenzel’s records from his two teams — the Pittsburgh Steelers and San Diego Chargers — even exist. Wenzel himself is unable to communicate. Perfetto will testify to her husband’s having told her many years ago about sustaining “more concussions than he could count,” and about an incident in Pittsburgh in which he was knocked unconscious, began repeatedly running to the wrong huddle, and ultimately had to be helped off the field. Feenberg, her lawyer, said he would seek former teammates to corroborate her testimony. He will also cite the heightened rates of dementia among NFL football players of Wenzel’s era, and find medical experts to claim an overwhelming likelihood that pro football played at least some role in his condition — which is all California requires to entitle a worker to full medical benefits.

Quail Run Continued from D1 Improvements such as a new Web site, www.golfquailrun.com, and cosmetic refinements were undertaken in an effort to be more welcoming for Central Oregonians, Sickles says. “It’s a great golf course,” says Sickles. “It’s one of the best in the area. “All these little changes are just trying to get (Quail Run) up to snuff.” Outdoor bag racks on each side of the facility’s clubhouse, a small building to house the driving range’s ball dispenser and vending machine, and new wooden display cases in the pro shop have all been added. Quail Run has also filled in the bunkers with more sand and fitted the cart paths with fresh gravel. The most aesthetically obvious improvement will be on the course’s par-3 14th hole. That hole’s pond, which was left drained two years ago because it leaked an estimated 1,000 gallons of water each day, will be relined and refilled. That work is scheduled to begin this week. “Fourteen is a beautiful hole,” Sickles says. “We’re just trying to do everything to make (Quail Run) nicer.” For golfers, Quail Run’s Web site might be the most significant new addition. Until this year, the only way to

UConn Continued from D1 “This one was by far the hardest and most difficult,” Auriemma said. “Not because of what we went through, but we played a great team and they had a great game plan. It took everything we had to beat that team.” The Huskies (39-0) are the first team ever to have consecutive unbeaten seasons, but that doesn’t cover it. They’ve been unstoppable over the past two years, winning every game until Tuesday night by double figures, and passing their own NCAA women’s Division I record of 70 straight wins set from 2001-03 in early March. The championship victory put them within 10 of the vaunted 88game winning streak set by the UCLA men in the early 1970s.

members and bring in a lot more golfers.” The layout of Quail Run is highly regarded by many golfers in Central Oregon. And the relatively affordable greens fees at the course have largely stayed the same since last year. But despite Quail Run’s quality, Sickles observes, the course sometimes struggles to attract Bend golfers despite being just a 25-mile trip south on U.S. Highway 97. Despite its proximity to Bend, Quail Run is not all that easy to find. It is not visible from the highway, and only recently has the signage improved enough to point uninitiated golfers in the right direction. The recent changes are just meant to make playing Quail Run a bit easier by breaking down some barriers. “This is such a great golf course, and people should be accessing it more,” Sickles says. “Where I just need to spend more time is not only in connecting with all my golfers who have come here over the years, but in connecting with Bend people and let them access the golf course, which has not been done enough. We’ll do that through our marketing and getting them on my e-mail list, where they can get specials.”

make a tee time at Quail Run was to make a phone call to the course. While booking the old-fashioned way is still an option, of course, it no longer is the only way. The Web site offers an option to book a tee time online, a staple at nearly every golf course in Central Oregon, and has much more information about the course than Quail Run’s rudimentary old site. Through the upgraded Web site, golfers can now sign up for Quail Run’s e-club, which sends email blasts offering course information and rate specials. And Quail Run now offers tee times through www.golfnow.com, a Web site at which golfers can book times at several area tracks. “We’re modernizing this facility to get up with the times,” Sickles says. “We just feel like we need to do a lot more e-marketing and e-blasts and getting on board with our Web site and online reservations.” Jeff Scott, a 63-year-old retiree, has been an annual member at Quail Run since 2003 along with his wife, Penny. He has witnessed the course’s growth in 2006 from a well-kept nine-hole course to an 18-hole gem. And so far, he likes what he sees with the latest tweaks. “That sort of stuff gets us into the bigger leagues,” says Scott, who lives just south of Sunriver. “Just some nice, positive changes to the pro shop and the golf course amenities will really wind up making it better for all the

Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Charles added nine points, 11 rebounds, and six blocks. The senior and Auriemma shared an embrace after the final buzzer. The lowest-scoring game in NCAA championship game history was played in front of a crowd of 22,936 that included Vice President Joe Biden, who hugged the UConn players after the game, as well as former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. While Biden showed impartiality in his cheering, Rice was rooting on Stanford — the school at which she served as provost for six years. She visited with the team at a morning shootaround, offering words of encouragement. Rice had hoped to see the Cardinal win their third championship and first since 1992. Stanford (36-2) played a nearly flawless defensive first half, holding UConn to 12 points — the

lowest ever in a championship game and the lowest in school history. But then Moore and the Huskies took over. “I’ve never been prouder of a group of young people,” Auriemma said. “How they fought back today. It was easy for them to pack it in. People wondered ‘what are you going to do the first time we’re in a close game?’ We reacted how champions react.” UConn opened the second half by scoring 17 of the first 19 points to take its first lead since early in the game. Moore had 11 points during the spurt, scoring from all over the court. Her three-pointer from the top of the key made it 23-22, giving UConn its first lead since it was 5-0. That ended a 19-minute stretch in which UConn was behind — the longest that UConn had trailed this season.


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D6 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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T O G R EEN GOLF SCOREBOARD

LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

G W PGA TOUR THE MASTERS Site: Augusta, Ga. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Augusta National Golf Club (7,435 yards, par 72). Purse: TBA ($7.5 million in 2009). Winner’s share: TBA ($1.35 million in 2009). Television: ESPN (Thursday-Friday, 1-4:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday, 12:30-4 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.). Last year: Angel Cabrera became the first Argentine winner in tournament history, beating Kenny Perry with a two-putt par on the second hole of a playoff. Last week: Anthony Kim won the Houston Open for his third career PGA Tour title, finishing off Vaughn Taylor with a par on the first hole of a playoff. Notes: Tiger Woods is playing for the first time since revelations that he had repeatedly cheated on his wife. Woods won his fourth Masters title in 2005, beating Chris DiMarco on the first hole of a playoff. Woods set the tournament record of 18-under 270 in 1997, and also won in 2001 and 2002. ... Phil Mickelson, the 2004 and 2006 champion, is winless in seven starts this season. ... Fred Couples, the 1992 winner, has won his last three Champions Tour starts. He tied for 55th last week in Houston. ... The Verizon Heritage is next week at Hilton Head Island, S.C., followed by the Zurich Classic of New Orleans.

PGA EUROPE MADEIRA ISLANDS OPEN Site: Porto Santo, Madeira Islands.

Club Results DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, April 1 Net Blind Draw 1, Val Paterson/Skip Ditmore, 138. 2, Bob Victorin/Al Dupont, 147. 3, John Drake/Wes Graves, 149. KP — Dean Hunt. Long Drive — Al Dupont. EAGLE CREST Men’s Club, March 31 Alternate Shot at Challenge Course 1, Phil Chappron/Tom Joyce, 61. 2, Allan Falco/Ken Wellman, 62. 3 (tie), Bob Mowlds/Don Greenman, 63; Frank Nickel/Michael Reynolds, 63. 5 (tie), Mac Heitzhausen/Cliff Shrock, 65; Jeffrey Lucas/Bill McCullogh, 65. 8, Peter O’Reilly/Don Wyatt, 66. 9, Jerry Rogers/Chuck Scrogin, 67. 10, Jim Hawkes/Sam Puri, 68. JUNIPER Men’s Club, April 1 Three Low Net 1, Roger Aikin/Dave King/Kip Gerke/Byren Dahlen, 192. 2 (tie), Gene Peles/Ken Carl/Scott Hakala/Bob Babcock, 197; Ron Grace/ Chuck Swenson/Jim Goad/Bill Nelson, 197. KPs — Elton Gregory, No. 3; Roger Aikin, No. 8; John McDaniel, No. 13; Bob Kennedy, No. 16. Maverix Golf Tour, April 1 18-Hole Stroke Play Flight A — Gross: 1 (tie), Barry Greig, 68; Patrick Woerner, 68. 3, Scott Cravens, 72. Net: 1, Scott Brasher, 68. 2, Mark Crose, 70. Flight B — Gross: 1, Ron Wirtjes, 76. 2, Norm Orio, 81. Net: 1, Daniel Hostetler, 70. 2, Gib Stephens, 74. 3 (tie), Brent Snyder, 75; Bill Burley, 75; Allen Heinly, 75; Steve Heckart, 75.

Hole-In-One Report March 29 BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Doug Schmidt, Bend No. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron April 3 JUNIPER Kory Callantine, Bend No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-iron

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— LEAGUES April 7 — The Juniper Ladies Golf Club will host its opening breakfast for the 2010 golf season. The breakfast will begin at 7:45 a.m. and be followed by a nine-hole round of best ball. The Juniper Ladies Golf Club is open to nonmembers of Juniper, and hosts tournaments each Wednesday during the golf season. Each member must have a USGA handicap. Cost to join for new members is $55, $50 for returning members and $30 for social members. For more information, visit www.juniperladies.com. April 17 — The Central Oregon chapter of the Executive Women’s Golf Association is hosting its 2010 kickoff event at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Meeting is open to anybody interested in the EWGA, and will unveil the 2010 event schedule, and include speakers, fashion show and a raffle. Begins with a 9:30 a.m. check in and a free breakfast buffet. Optional round of golf or a lesson after the meeting for $20. RSVP by April 10. For more information or to register, call Vicky Thomas at 541-389-1513 or e-mail at ewgaco@ gmail.com.

May 7 — Opening day for the Meadow Lakes Ladies Golf Club. Registration and refreshments begin at 7:30 a.m.; welcome meeting at 8:30 a.m. Informal round of golf begins at 9 a.m. Cost to join the club is $35. For more information or to register, call Linda Richards at 503-577-5983. Tuesdays — The Ladies League at Lost Tracks Golf Club plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women golfers are welcome. For more information, call the pro shop at 541-385-1818. Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend plays weekly in flighted tournaments. Members of the men’s club and other interested River’s Edge Golf Club men with an established USGA handicap are invited to participate. Interested golfers should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — The Women’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course Club play weekly in tournaments that tee off at 9:30 a.m. Members are welcome and should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — Juniper Ladies Golf Club plays weekly between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information, visit www.juniperladies.com. Thursdays — Ladies League at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information, call Linda Richards at 503-577-5983. ——— CLINICS April 17 — Swing into Spring beginning golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Club in Prineville. Clinic offers a review of golf fundamentals. Cost is free and everyone is welcome. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. April 26-28 — Women-only lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes on-course instruction, and a maximum student/ teacher ratio is 8-to-1. Cost is $53 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $72 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. May 15 — Golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Club in Prineville. Clinic begins at 9 a.m. and offers a review of golf fundamentals. Cost is free and everyone is welcome. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. June 19 — Golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Club in Prineville. Clinic begins at 9 a.m. and offers a review of golf fundamentals. Cost is free and everyone is welcome. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. ——— TOURNAMENTS April 8 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Crooked River Ranch. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www. maverixgolftour.com. April 9 — Fundraiser golf tournament for Crook County High School’s senior class at Prineville Golf Club. For more information or to register, call Prineville GC at 541-447-7266. April 15 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Pronghorn Club’s Nicklaus Course in Bend. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. April 17 — Third Annual Golf on the Links Fundraiser at Eagle Crest Resort’s Challenge Course. Four-person scramble tees off with 8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. shotgun starts. Cost is $70 per player and includes golf, golf cart, unlimited range balls, snacks, and prizes. Proceeds to benefit the boys and girls golf teams at Bend, Mountain View, Redmond and Summit high schools. For more information contact Rusty Clemons at 541-383-6308, Lowell Norby at 541322-5403 or 541-480-2854, Ron Buerger at 541-504-3887, Jerry Hackenbruck at 541-647-4802, or Jim Coon at 541-408-0566. April 17-18 — The Iceberg Open at Crooked River Ranch is a two-person scramble on Saturday and two-person best ball on Sunday. Gross and net divisions along with closest-to-the-pin and long-drive contests. 9 a.m. shotgun both days. Practice round Friday for $30. Entry deadline is April 10. Entry fee is $125 per player and includes greens fees, lunch, cart, range balls and raffle prizes. For more information, call the Crooked River Ranch pro shop at 541923-6343. April 17-18 — Three-person all-in-one scramble at Prineville Golf Club. For more information or to register, call Prineville GC at 541-447-7266.

April 22 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. April 23-25 — The Central Oregon Shootout is a two-person team event held at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters, Black Butte Ranch and Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. The tournament will feature scramble, best ball and Chapman formats. Cost is $550 per team and includes greens fees, carts, range balls, tee gift, continental breakfast, and lunch. Deadline to register is April 14 or the first 150 teams. For more information or to request an entry form, call 541549-4653, 541-595-1294 or 541-923-4653. April 26 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. April 29 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-3897676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. May 1-2 — Best-ball tournament at Prineville Golf Club. For more information or to register, call Prineville GC at 541-4477266. May 4-6 — Central Oregon Senior Spring Tour Pro-Am is for teams and individuals through the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. Golfers must be 50 years old or more. This three-day event is held at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond, Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course in Redmond, and Crooked River Ranch. Golfers will compete in a net Stableford, gross and net stroke play and one gross and two net formats. Deadline to register is April 6. Contact: Amy Kerle, 800-574-0503 or www.pnwpga.com. May 6 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Broken Top Club in Bend. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. May 8-9 — 39th annual Tee Pee Chapman at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. 36-hole couples Chapman begins each day with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $200 per couple. For more information or to register, visit www.kahneeta.com or call 800-554-4786. May 10 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Crooked River Ranch. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. May 13 — Maverix Golf Tour event at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. May 15 — Pride Baseball Benefit Tournament at Prineville Golf Club. For more information or to register, call Prineville GC at 541-447-7266. May 15 — Men’s League Invite at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville is a three-person scramble tournament. Event tees off with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. May 15 — The Jim Noteboom Memorial Golf Tournament is a four-person team scramble, hosted by Chief Delvis Heath, at KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino golf course to benefit The Museum at Warm Springs. For more information or to register, e-mail Jim Manion at j_manion@wspower.com or call 541-553-1046. May 15-16 — 26th edition of the Juniper Chapman at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Open to any two male golfers with a maximum 28 handicap per contestant, and maximum handicap differential of eight strokes between partners. Two-day, 36-hole tournament with gross and net divisions includes a practice round. Cost is $240 per team. To register, call the Juniper pro shop at 541-548-3121 or download entry form at www.junipergolfcourse.com. May 19 — The Central Oregon Builders Association is hosting a golf tournament at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend. Four-person shamble tees off with an 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $400 per team before April 16, $500 after, and includes lunch. Field is limited

Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Porto Santo Golf (7,047 yards, par 72).

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Purse: $947,355. Winner’s share: $157,885. Television: None. Last year: Argentina’s Estanislao Goya won his first European tour title, holding off Scotland’s Callum Macaulay by a stroke. Last event: South Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen earned his second straight trip to the Masters, winning the Andalucia Open on March 28 for his first European tour title. Notes: The Seve Ballesteros-designed course is on a small island off Madeira, a Portuguese archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean about 400 miles west of Morocco. The 13th and 14th holes feature 500foot seaside cliffs. ... Ireland’s Des Smyth won in 2001 at 48 years, 34 days to become the oldest winner in European tour history.

LPGA TOUR Next event: The Mojo 6, April 15-16, Cinnamon Hill Golf Course at Rose Hall City, Montego Bay, Jamaica. Last week: Taiwan’s Yani Tseng won the Kraft Nabisco Championship for her second major title, beating Suzann Pettersen by a stroke.

CHAMPIONS Next event: Outback Steakhouse ProAm, April 16-18, TPC Tampa Bay, Lutz, Fla. ——— All Times PDT

Tetherow sets dates for junior orientations Tetherow Golf Club will host four orientations for junior golfers planning to play free golf at the southwest Bend golf course this summer. The two-hour orientations will be held April 17 and 24, and May 8 and 15, beginning each day at 2 p.m. and cost $39. Tetherow is offering free golf after 3 p.m. every day this summer for golfers between 12 and 17 years old. But to be eligible to play Tetherow, young golfers must attend one orientation course. For more information or to register, call Bob Duncan, Tetherow’s director of instruction, at 541-749-8253, or e-mail him at golfsavvy@msn.com.

The Bulletin seeks tournament info The Bulletin’s sports department is seeking 2010 golf tournament information to be published May 1 in our annual Tee to Green spring golf preview. The submission deadline is Friday, April 23. The tournament

calendar is for golf events to be held in Central Oregon during 2010. To submit a golf calender item, send details to Zack Hall

by e-mail at zhall@bendbulletin.com or by fax at 541-3850831. For more information, call 541-617-7868. — Bulletin staff report

to the first 120 golfers. Proceeds to benefit the COBA Government Affairs Program. For more information or to register, call Andy High at 541-389-1058, or e-mail him at andyh@coba.org. May 20 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Club in Redmond. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. May 22-23 — The 4th OGA Women’s Team Championship at Broken Top Club in Bend is an Oregon Golf Association 36-hole gross stroke play event. OGA member clubs nominate four amateur golfers to represent the club. Team scores are calculated using the best three individual scores on the team each day. For more information, visit www.oga.org or call the OGA at 866-981-4653.

PROFESSIONAL PGA Tour THE MASTERS Tee Times All Times PDT Thursday-Friday First-Second Rounds At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. a-amateur 4:50 a.m.-7:57 a.m. — Nathan Green, Heath Slocum, Louis Oosthuizen 5:01 a.m.-8:08 a.m. — Craig Stadler, John Merrick, Jerry Kelly 5:12 a.m.-8:19 a.m. — Ian Woosnam, Brian Gay, Marc Leishman 5:23 a.m.-8:30 a.m. — Bernhard Langer, Scott Verplank, a-Brad Benjamin 5:34 a.m.-8:41 a.m. — John Senden, David Toms, Graeme McDowell 5:45 a.m.-8:52 a.m. — Mark O’Meara, Rory Sabbatini, a-Nathan Smith 5:56 a.m.-9:14 a.m. — Martin Kaymer, Geoff Ogilvy, Luke Donald 6:07 a.m.-9:25 a.m. — Tom Watson, Tim Clark, Steve Marino 6:18 a.m.-9:36 a.m. — Bill Haas, Todd Hamilton, Anders Hansen 6:29 a.m.-9:47 a.m. — Dustin Johnson, Oliver Wilson, Alvaro Quiros 6:40 a.m.-9:58 a.m. — Mike Weir, Lee Westwood, a-Matteo Manassero 7:02 a.m.-10:09 a.m. — Chad Campbell, Francesco Molinari, Paul Casey 7:13 a.m.-10:20 a.m. — Ernie Els, Anthony Kim, Ryo Ishikawa

7:24 a.m.-10:31 a.m. — Angel Cabrera, Jim Furyk, a-Byeong-Hun An 7:35 a.m.-10:42 a.m. — Phil Mickelson, Robert Allenby, Y.E. Yang 7:46 a.m.-10:53 a.m. — Retief Goosen, Hunter Mahan, Robert Karlsson 7:57 a.m.-4:50 a.m. — Ben Crane, Simon Dyson, Michael Campbell 8:08 a.m.-5:01 a.m. — Larry Mize, Ryan Palmer, Chris Wood 8:19 a.m.-5:12 a.m. — Sandy Lyle, Justin Leonard, Kevin Na 8:30 a.m.-5:23 a.m. — Ben Crenshaw, Steve Flesch, a-Ben Martin 8:41 a.m.-5:34 a.m. — Ryan Moore, Ross Fisher, Nick Watney 8:52 a.m.-5:45 a.m. — Trevor Immelman, Soren Hansen, John Rollins 9:14 a.m.-5:56 a.m. — Vijay Singh, Jason Dufner, Sean O’Hair 9:25 a.m.-6:07 a.m. — Thongchai Jaidee, Ben Curtis, Soren Kjeldsen 9:36 a.m.-6:18 a.m. — Camilo Villegas, Kenny Perry, Rory McIlroy 9:47 a.m.-6:29 a.m. — Zach Johsnon, Henrik Stenson, a-Changwon Han 9:58 a.m.-6:40 a.m. — Fred Couples, Sergio Garcia, Shingo Katayama 10:09 a.m.-7:02 a.m. — Miguel Angel Jimenez, Edoardo Molinari, Lucas Glover 10:20 a.m.-7:13 a.m. — Charl Schwartzel, Stewart Cink, Padraig Harrington 10:31 a.m.-7:24 a.m. — Yuta Ikeda, Ian Poulter, Steve Stricker 10:42 a.m.-7:35 a.m. — Tiger Woods, Matt Kuchar, K.J. Choi 10:53 a.m.-7:46 a.m. — Adam Scott, David Duval, Ricky Barnes. WORLD GOLF RANKING Through April 4 Country USA USA USA Eng USA Eng Eng SAf Ger Irl NIr Col Aus USA Swe

Rank. Name 1. Tiger Woods 2. Steve Stricker 3. Phil Mickelson 4. Lee Westwood 5. Jim Furyk 6. Paul Casey 7. Ian Poulter 8. Ernie Els 9. Martin Kaymer 10. Padraig Harrington 11. Rory McIlroy 12. Camilo Villegas 13. Geoff Ogilvy 14. Anthony Kim 15. Henrik Stenson

Rating 11.28 7.88 6.98 6.77 6.21 6.19 5.97 5.96 5.32 4.87 4.68 4.51 4.43 4.38 4.33


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HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS Inside

SAVVY SHOPPER

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

SHOPPING IN BRIEF Oregon State Parks permits are on sale The new 12-month Oregon State Parks day-use parking permit is on sale for $25 through April 30. The price goes up to $30 in May. The two-year permit is always $50. New this year, the yellow hanging tag is transferable to any vehicle. It will save you a day-use fee (usually $5) at recreation spots including Detroit Lake and Fall Creek state recreation areas, and Smith Rock and The Cove Palisades state parks. The permit is available at several locations in Central Oregon, including REI and Visit Bend or by calling at 800-551-6949. Disabled U.S. military veterans, active military on leave and Oregon foster parents or parents of former foster children may qualify for a free permit. For information, call the number above or visit www.oregon .gov/OPRD/PARKS/fee_waivers .shtml.

Spring in your step By Eleanor Pierce • The Bulletin

S

ure, many of us are still crunching down the road with studs

on our car tires, but it is spring. Local shoe stores have largely put away their

Find, sell kid gear at consignment sale Second Stitches, a consignment sale that will include children’s and teens’ clothing, shoes, toys, books, nursery furniture, baby gear and maternity wear, is coming to Bend for several days later this month. Jenne Redfern, of the Gresham-area town Corbett, started Second Stitches with her husband, Torey. With six children, the couple knows how expensive it can be to keep kids clothed. “I like designer clothes, but I can’t afford them unless I buy them used,” she said. The three-day sale will be held at the East Bend Plaza, 924 S.E. Wilson Ave., Suite B, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. April 23-24 and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 25. Consignors pay $10 to participate. After registering online, consignors inventory their items, print tags and hang clothes. Consignors keep 70 percent of the price of items sold, 80 percent if they volunteer. Registered items can be dropped off between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. April 21 or between 9 a.m. and noon April 22. Consignors are invited to shop during a presale April 22, with discounts and admission based on the number of shifts the consignor volunteers to work at the sale. Contact: 503-936-4084 or www.secondstitchesresale.com. — Eleanor Pierce, The Bulletin

knobby-soled winter boots in favor of a lighter, brighter selection that, to many, symbolizes hope. We checked out a few locally owned shoe boutiques to get you a preview of the styles spring has in store, along with a few

Bright colors and flowers, like on these Born women’s Cornflower in pink, are in for spring. $95

tips on how to wear the latest shoes, from metallic gladiators to flower-embellished sandals with delicate straps. See Shoes / E6 Combine two spring trends with metallic gladiator sandals like these Sofft’s Fiore sandals in pewter. Cost: $99

Teva men’s Omnium sandals, seen in brown leather, are a good choice for men who like sandals, but don’t want to show their toes. Cost: $90

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin; shoes courtesy Acadia Footwear in Bend

Top entertainment sellers For the week of April 1

Los Angeles Times fiction best-seller “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett

Los Angeles Times nonfiction best-seller “The Big Short,” by Michael Lewis

Top Billboard album

Find your living room’s Mr. Right By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz Chicago Tribune

Buying a new sofa — one of the largest and most-used pieces of furniture in your home, the scene of much reading, TV-watching, snoozing and everything else-ing — is not a task to take on lightly. You want comfort, style, dura-

bility, fabric that will withstand a spill and color that’ll hide pet hair. And you don’t want to pay too much. But what’s too much? Prices can vary wildly depending on the store and the manufacturer. Some of those differences are cosmetic, but most of what separates the high-end from the low-

end is under the hood. Pricier sofas generally have goosedown cushions for ultimate softness and are made with the most durable materials, including kiln-dried hardwood to prevent warping, doweled joints for stability, and eight-way hand-tied springs to prevent sagging. See Sofa / E6

Room and Board’s Wells sofa is available in at least 240 fabrics. This sofa retails at around $3,000.

FASHION Q&A

Wash the sport out of your favorite sport bra By Jean Patteson The Orlando Sentinel

Q:

I have an embarrassing problem. My sport bras have a mildew smell that just won’t come out, no matter how much I wash them. Any suggestions? Or do I have to throw them out and buy new ones? Usually, it’s a buildup of mildew and/or bacteria that causes that musty odor — which only gets stronger in warm, damp conditions, such as during a sweaty workout. Before tossing your bras, try Win Detergent, promoted as a “high-performance sports detergent.” It is formulated to eliminate odors embedded in the fibers of workout clothes that most laundry detergents can’t budge. It’s also safe for use on all fabrics and colors, in all water temperatures, for washing machines or hand-washing, and is biodegradable. For a retailer near you or to order online, visit http://windetergent.com. See Q&A / E3

A:

“My World 2.0,” Justin Bieber

Top alternative album “Volume Two,” She & Him

Top Amazon.com DVD “Avatar” (two-disc Blu-ray/DVD combo) Sources: Wire reports Chicago Tribune


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Naked 9-year-old makes his sister’s life difficult Dear Abby: My brother is 9 and still walks around naked. I have asked “Josh” repeatedly to put on some clothes, but he blows me off and flaunts himself around the house. My mother is no help. When I ask her to talk to him, she laughs and says, “Boys will be boys.” Abby, I’m 13 and it is starting to freak me out. Am I being paranoid, or am I right to want him to put on a pair of boxers or something? — Older Sister in McAllen, Texas Dear Older Sister: Your mother is right about one thing: Boys WILL be boys. Your brother is acting like an immature child who’s enjoying teasing his sister. On the other hand, she’s wrong to laugh off your discomfort. One reason children have parents is so someone can teach them respect for the feelings of others. At 9, Josh is too big to ignore, and at 13, you are no longer a little girl. If he wants to be naked in his bedroom, fine and dandy. But when he’s in the rooms shared by everyone, he should cover up. And if he doesn’t, there should be consequences. Dear Abby: My ex-motherin-law died unexpectedly three weeks ago. We were very close, and I handled most of the arrangements. She left no will, so my ex-husband and I did our best to provide what we thought she would have wanted. We chose to have Mom cremated, but decided to have a short open viewing at the funeral home for her grandchildren’s benefit. We wanted them to realize Grandma was no longer in her body. This morning I was shocked to receive a phone call from the funeral parlor saying they have received a letter from one of Mom’s co-workers, expressing that she felt the viewing was disrespectful and in bad taste. Abby, we chose to display her body on a table with blankets. We didn’t think spending hundreds of dollars for a coffin for the four-hour viewing was justified, nor did we think

DEAR ABBY Mom would have wanted us to do that. Was it inappropriate? — Slapped in the Face In Montana Dear Slapped In the Face: There was nothing disrespectful or inappropriate about the way your ex-mother-in-law’s body was displayed. And you were wise not to spend a lot of money on a casket that was to be used only for a viewing. I applaud your courage to do things differently. Please let that presumptuous woman’s criticism roll off your backs. Dear Abby: I work for a nonprofit organization, and once a month we convene early in the morning for a staff meeting. To make up for the fact that we are meeting earlier than usual, departments take turns providing breakfast. This has turned into a contest to see who can bring the most elaborate breakfast. Frankly, it’s all I can do to get breakfast on the table for my own family without the added pressure of having to provide something for my “work family.” The one-upmanship and back-stabbing is bad enough without having to become Martha Stewart in the process. — Eggs-asperated In New York Dear Eggs-asperated: I can see how something like that could get out of hand. Someone must break the cycle — so why not you? When your department’s turn rolls around, either order something you can pick up the night before or the morning of the meeting, or bring in fruit, granola and yogurt so your colleagues can have a healthy breakfast. And don’t apologize for it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Rattle those pots, pans: ‘Masters’ is back By Gail Pennington

Season 2 contestants

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

All “Top Chef Masters” needs is brackets to be the food world’s equivalent of the NCAA Tournament. Can molecular gastronomy proponent Wylie Dufresne, returning after an embarrassing Episode 2 meltdown last season, regain his honor? Will he have to face off again against Graham Elliot Bowles, who went down to defeat beside him last year? Are Mark Peel and Rick Moonen, who narrowly missed making it to the Champions’ Round the first time, ready to rumble this season? And what about newcomers to the competition? Will Susan Feniger, one of the Food Network’s original stars as co-host of “Two Hot Tamales,” bring the heat? Can a Midwesterner, Debbie Gold, of Kansas City, hold her own in competitive cooking’s fast lane? Whatever happens, fans of the “Top Chef” franchise will be salivating. If we watch the original “Top Chef” to see new talents revealed, we watch “Masters” to see how the greats live up to their acclaim — and to get a peek behind the curtain at some of the country’s most famous chefs in unguarded moments. Ah, those unguarded moments. Last season solidified the reputation of chef Hubert Keller (Sleek and Burger Bar at Lumiere Place) as a charmer who smiled through all tribulations, including being called on to cook in a dorm room. But it also revealed a harsh side of Michael Chiarello, who dropped his “Easy Entertaining” persona to snap at those attempting to help him. Yes, reputations are on

Here are the contestants on Season 2 of “Top Chef Masters,” airing tonight on Bravo:

RETURNING FOR A SECOND TRY: • Graham Elliot Bowles, Graham Elliot Restaurant, Chicago • Wylie Dufresne, wd~50, New York • Ludo Lefebvre, Ludo Bites, Los Angeles • Rick Moonen, RM Seafood at Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas • Mark Peel, Campanile, Los Angeles • Jonathan Waxman, Barbuto, New York

NEW TO THE SHOW:

The Associated Press file photo

“Top Chef” judge Gail Simmons will join the “Top Chef Masters” judging panel.

‘Top Chef Masters’ When: 11 tonight Where: Bravo

the line, but so is money for favorite charities. And the publicity also can be worth a pretty penny. Art Smith, who competed in Season 1, was already famous via his friend and former client Oprah Winfrey, but since the TV challenge he’s been recognized by the likes of Lady Gaga. In a change this season that cuts down on the length of the preliminaries, six chefs will compete in each round, with two moving on. Kelli Choi returns as host, with Gail Simmons of “Top Chef” joining the judging panel alongside restaurant critic Gael Greene, culinary expert James Oseland and food critic Jay Rayner.

• Jody Adams, Rialto Restaurant, Cambridge, Mass. • Govind Armstrong, 8 Oz Burger Bar, Los Angeles • Jimmy Bradley, the Red Cat, New York • David Burke, David Burke Townhouse, New York • Susan Feniger, Street, Los Angeles • Debbie Gold, the American Restaurant, Kansas City • Carmen Gonzalez, chef consultant, New York • Maria Hines, Tilth, Seattle • Susur Lee, Madeline’s, Toronto • Tony Mantuano, Spiaggia, Chicago • Monica Pope, t’afla, Houston • Thierry Rautureau, Rover’s, Seattle • Marcus Samuelsson, the Red Rooster, New York • Ana Sortun, Oleana, Cambridge, Mass. • Rick Tramonto, TRU, Chicago • Jerry Traunfeld, Poppy, Seattle

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News 2262 World News 939 News 60823 NBC News 96736 News 5378 News 4991 Judge Judy 3552 Inside Ed. 9465 Funniest Home Videos 2991 Accrd/Jim 3484 Malcolm 3823 Electric 2216 Fetch! Ruff 465 News 6674 NBC News 2587 Reba ‘PG’ 61910 Reba ‘PG’ 96194 Gourmet 78200 Pepin 51264 Travelscope 6610 Europe 7649

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 89945 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 98378 News 1804 CBS News 5484 World News 6378 Millionaire 3858 Two Men 2656 Two Men 7216 Simpsons 2656 Simpsons 7216 Equitrekking 378 Business 858 News 9200 News 8692 King 93007 King 80587 Europe 49467 Travel 91649 Trek 7262 Business 1842

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7:30

Jeopardy! 2026 Wheel 216 Jeopardy! 53587 Wheel 43723 Access H. 8842 Scrubs ‘14’ 1668 Ent 6216 The Insider 9842 Simpsons 3620 Simpsons 3200 The Office 3620 The Office 3200 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 7804 Live at 7 (N) 3910 Inside Ed. 6736 ’70s Show 54674 ’70s Show 41811 Garden 65736 Old House 80533 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 53552

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Family 4674 The Middle 7151 Family 1991 Cougar 2497571 Minute to Win It (N) ’ ‘PG’ 64533 Law & Order: SVU 84397 Chris 4262 Accidentally 3397 Criminal Minds The Fight ‘14’ 80668 Family 9736 The Middle 1571 Family 76991 Cougar 6788113 Human Target Victoria (N) ‘14’ 48674 American Idol ’ ‘PG’ Å 55910 News 48674 The Unit ’ ‘14’ Å 55910 The Buddha Richard Gere narrates the life of the Buddha. (N) ’ ‘G’ 7668 Minute to Win It (N) ’ ‘PG’ 88200 Law & Order: SVU 75736 America’s Next Top Model 48587 Fly Girls 19533 Society 75465 Your Home 74484 Katie 53991 Knit 26823 Landscape 82755 The Buddha Richard Gere narrates the life of the Buddha. (N) ’ ‘G’ 46216

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(10:01) Ugly Betty (N) ’ ‘PG’ 9649 News 9160026 (11:35) Nightline Law & Order: Special Victims 87484 News 7133133 Jay Leno CSI: NY (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 83755 News 4797397 Letterman (10:01) Ugly Betty (N) ’ ‘PG’ 85277 Inside 47688674 (11:35) Nightline News 24649 TMZ ‘PG’ 33397 King of Hill 15804 Name Earl 36571 The Unit ’ ‘14’ Å 65397 South Park 15804 South Park 36571 Mustang 68910 Independent Lens Reincarnation of master. ‘PG’ 75571 Law & Order: Special Victims 78823 News 4782465 Jay Leno Married... 42649 Married... 51397 Roseanne 21378 Roseanne 47281 Cook’s 59939 Lidia Italy 31587 Gourmet 38668 Pepin 54571 Mustang 17303 Independent Lens Reincarnation of master. ‘PG’ 84281

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å 901755 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 199823 Dog 677026 Dog 656533 Dog 474026 Dog 906200 Dog 266194 Billy 275842 Billy 479571 Billy 9086262 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 667649 (3:45) ›››› “The Untouchables” (1987) (6:15) ›› “Phone Booth” (2002, Suspense) Colin Farrell, Kiefer Sutherland. A sniper ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York ››› “Superman Returns” (2006) Brandon 102 40 39 Kevin Costner. Å 84441754 traps an arrogant publicist in a phone booth. 23126858 Mafia. Å 387668 Routh. Å 302533 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4867200 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 1245804 Animal Nightmares 1254552 River Monsters ‘PG’ Å 1347216 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ‘PG’ 1340303 River Monsters ‘PG’ Å 5537736 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 7496465 Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Å 551620 Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Å 459823 Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Å 187674 Shear Genius ’ ‘14’ Å 230674 Shear Genius ’ ‘14’ Å 183858 Shear Genius (N) ‘14’ Å 186945 Top Chef Masters (N) ‘14’ 261755 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Teas Family ’ ‘PG’ Å 3123823 Smarter 6795939 Smarter 6870674 Ron White: Fix Stupid 3217216 Drew Hastings 3210303 Ron White: Fix Stupid 6835303 190 32 42 53 Trading Spouses 6778262 American Greed (N) 286228 American Greed 274194 Mad Money 283842 American Greed 270378 American Greed 273465 Paid 530262 Profit In 135991 51 36 40 52 American Greed 735620 Larry King Live (N) Å 534007 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å 420945 Larry King Live Å 735649 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 738736 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 426129 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 645552 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 69668 Scrubs ’ 59281 Scrubs ’ 40533 Daily Show 39939 Colbert 42945 Chappelle 11587 Chappelle 27194 Futurama 13397 Futurama 51823 South Park 28007 Ugly 37755 Daily Show 18842 Colbert 94026 135 53 135 47 Stuck 781533 The Buzz 8620 Trading 4533 PM Edition 7674 Bend City Edition Bend City Council 75823 RSN 74587 RSN Movie Night 33587 PM Edition 73804 Deschutes 50026 11 Capital News Today 101533 Today in Washington 912910 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 574945 Deck 293194 Phineas 290007 Deck 387587 Wizards 561007 Montana 203571 “Halloweentown High” (2004) ’ ‘G’ Å 3774179 Good-Charlie Phineas 723910 Montana 812858 Wizards 363552 Deck 519804 87 43 14 39 Deck 574571 MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å 286303 MythBusters (N) ‘PG’ Å 100939 Is It Possible? (N) ’ ‘PG’ 103026 MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å 702571 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 759674 Cash Cab 305397 Cash Cab 395910 Cash Cab 386262 MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å 104755 NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Phoenix Suns (Live) 259026 SportsCenter (Live) Å 565842 SportsCenter (Live) Å 246945 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Utah Jazz at Houston Rockets From the Toyota Center in Houston. 238533 Baseball Tonight Å 3219674 SportsCenter (Live) Å 3122194 Baseball 7649755 NASCAR 4003397 NBA 7872378 MLB Baseball: Yankees at Red Sox 2620736 22 24 21 24 (4:00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox Å 1044465 (6:42) Golf 72983823 (7:33) 1990 Masters Film 53246026 (8:25) Golf 81087129 1992 Masters (10:07) 1993 Masters Film 51871674 (10:58) 1994 Masters Film 54370945 23 25 123 25 Masters 9704216 Masters 5428804 Golf 71494571 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 70s Show 330213 70s Show 920755 70s Show 373303 70s Show 926939 ›› “Van Helsing” (2004) Hugh Jackman. Premiere. A monster-hunter battles creatures in Transylvania. 103668 The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 960533 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 372674 Hannity (N) 2758484 On the Record 1437842 The O’Reilly Factor 1413262 Hannity 1433026 On the Record 1436113 Glenn Beck 2086007 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 6719638 Home 4194804 Cooking 4297945 Minute 4115397 Challenge 1247262 Ultimate Recipe Showdown 1256910 Flay 5160129 Flay 4944303 Dinner: Impossible (N) 1246533 Good Eats Unwrap 9250945 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Beavers 67200 Unscripted 64113 Mariners 55465 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics (Live) 238026 Mariners 33939 Varsity 15587 MLB Baseball 965668 20 45 28* 26 Beavers 24007 (4:30) ›› “I, Robot” (2004) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. 5847668 ››› “Walk the Line” (2005) Joaquin Phoenix. The story of music legends Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash. 2728668 ››› “Walk the Line” (2005, Biography) 9207705 131 Get Sold 6054858 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 2878754 House 2109939 House 6968007 Property 2281587 Property 2197194 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 9002723 House 5095910 House 5184858 Ren. 8929129 Nails 1709991 176 49 33 43 Divine 2285303 Ax Men ‘PG’ Å 8784200 Gangland Crazy Killers ‘14’ 4241991 Gangland Miami. ‘14’ Å 4267939 Gangland (N) ‘14’ Å 4343303 Ax Men ‘PG’ Å 4240262 MonsterQuest ‘PG’ Å 9618216 155 42 41 36 Ax Men ‘PG’ Å 8843378 Grey’s Anatomy Rise Up ‘14’ 187113 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 728484 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 704804 ››› “The Savages” (2007) Laura Linney, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Premiere. Å 145484 Will 252026 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘14’ 272620 Maddow Show 41686484 Countdown-Olbermann 76194216 Maddow Show 76007736 Hardball Å 76010200 Countdown-Olbermann 76193587 Maddow Show 75473910 56 59 128 51 Countdown-Olbermann 57405026 Disaster 130295 Cribs 928397 Cribs 371945 True Life ’ 806823 16 and Pregnant Leah ’ ‘14’ 420991 The Challenge 712823 Challenge 111200 Challenge 307216 192 22 38 57 World’s Strictest Parents ’ 370216 Sponge 303939 iCarly ‘G’ 393552 iCarly ‘G’ 384804 iCarly ‘G’ 664552 iCarly ‘G’ 486216 Malcolm 673200 Malcolm 669007 Lopez 470200 Lopez 631754 Chris 279668 Chris 351216 Chris 555945 Chris 718282 82 46 24 40 Sponge 757216 The Unit True Believers ‘PG’ 815465 The Unit ’ ‘PG’ Å 139151 UFC Unleashed ‘PG’ Å 101129 UFC Unleashed (N) ’ ‘14’ 739115 The Ultimate Fighter (N) ‘14’ 589692 Jail ‘14’ 472129 Ult. Fight 672007 132 31 34 46 DEA ’ ‘14’ 917262 Ghost Hunters ‘PG’ Å 3811587 Ghost Hunters ‘PG’ Å 9684674 Ghost Hunters ‘PG’ Å 9597194 Ghost Hunters (N) ’ Å 9680858 Destination Truth (N) Å 6990129 (11:01) Ghost Hunters ’ 8562755 133 35 133 45 Ghost Hunters International 9173228 Behind 7196674 Jeffrey 7558129 Bible 7475842 Van Impe Pres Praise the Lord Å 2843587 Easter 5296587 Jesse Duplantis History 4530113 Changing-World “The Heart of Texas” 2769571 205 60 130 Friends 389484 Friends 386397 Office 377649 Seinfeld 640007 Seinfeld 366533 Browns 659755 Browns 638262 Browns 716084 Browns 533378 Payne 819200 Payne 895620 Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 340755 16 27 11 28 King 653571 ››› “The Black Swan” (1942, Adventure) Tyrone Power, Mau- ››› “The Spanish Main” (1945, Adventure) Paul Henreid, Mau- (8:15) ››› “Captain Blood” (1935, Adventure) Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Basil Rathbone. An enslaved ››› “The Pirate” (1948, Musical) Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, 101 44 101 29 reen O’Hara, Laird Cregar. 7700668 reen O’Hara, Walter Slezak. Å 90445552 British doctor turns Caribbean pirate. Å 36521200 Walter Slezak. Å 2635668 Say Yes 656649 Say Yes 743129 Addicted Kevin ‘14’ Å 339179 TV Murders: Fiore-Pressly 640477 Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ 434543 Addicted Heroin addict. ‘14’ 284020 Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ 709945 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear: Spouse 458718 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ 904303 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 634561 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 834769 ›› “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) Lucas Black. 684246 CSI: NY Open and Shut ‘14’ 707587 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ 933200 Chowder 2192649 Chowder 6954804 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 6975397 Stoked 2105113 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Dude 2181533 Destroy 2100668 Ed, Edd 8920858 Ed, Edd 6272115 King-Hill 5008484 King-Hill 5084804 Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Cruising Do’s and Don’ts 41686484 Ghost Adventures ‘14’ 76194216 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 76007736 Man-Breakfast Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Food 79414858 Extreme Pools ‘G’ Å 75473910 179 51 45 42 Great Cruises ‘G’ Å 57405026 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 7402026 Sanford 4117755 Ray 7584674 Ray 7490281 Ray 5166303 Ray 4851649 First Love, Second Chance 1259007 Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Smoked ’ ‘PG’ Å 625303 NCIS Knockout ‘PG’ Å 724533 NCIS Hide and Seek ’ ‘14’ 733281 NCIS Broken Bird ‘14’ Å 826945 In Plain Sight (N) ‘PG’ Å 723804 “The Dukes of Hazzard” 239736 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 630620 Greatest Songs of the ’90s 581610 Greatest Songs of the ’90s 272736 Greatest Songs of the ’90s 281484 Greatest Songs of the ’90s 261620 Greatest Songs of the ’90s 271007 Beauty 538804 Ray J 832552 191 48 37 54 (4:30) Celebrity Fit Club ‘PG’ 592262 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) ››› “Signs” ’ 98669129 (6:10) ››› “Back to the Future Part II” 1989 Michael J. Fox. 14630649 ›› “Mars Attacks!” 1996 Jack Nicholson. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 9014649 (9:50) ›› “Porky’s” 1981 Dan Monahan. ‘R’ 81019668 Signs 5805281 ››› “Night and the City” 1992 Robert De Niro. ‘R’ Å 4953571 ››› “The Fly” 1986, Science Fiction Jeff Goldblum. ‘R’ Å 4475397 ››› “Rising Sun” 1993, Drama Sean Connery. ‘R’ Å 76272620 “Man-Red Shoe” 33013620 Bubba 1450484 Exp 3981113 Daily 3988026 Cinema 3979378 Firsthand Props 3968262 Bubba 1456668 Exp 1531303 Daily 2522858 Winter Dew Underground 4026045 Tracking Eero On Surfari Bubba 3478533 19th Hole (Live) 658991 Live From the Masters 105484 Live From the Masters 280129 19th Hole 264736 Top 10 273484 Live From the Masters 693910 Martha 8855113 Martha 9943303 7th Heaven Fathers ’ ‘PG’ 8782842 7th Heaven ’ ‘PG’ Å 4249533 7th Heaven ’ ‘PG’ Å 4258281 “The Wishing Well” (2010) Jordan Ladd, Jason London. ‘PG’ Å 4268668 Golden 1683277 Golden 8004736 (4:00) › “Fool’s Gold” 2008 Matthew Mc- (6:15) ›››› “The Dark Knight” 2008, Action Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart. The Joker creates havoc in Gotham How to Make It in How to Make It in The Pacific Part Four Sledge trains for Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 Conaughey. ‘PG-13’ 112129 America 836842 America 368026 combat. ‘MA’ Å 567200 City. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 21402198 248303 ›› “Lords of Dogtown” 2005 Emile Hirsch. ‘PG-13’ Å 6239991 ››› “Wassup Rockers” 2006 ‘R’ Å 8885649 (8:45) ›› “Wide Sargasso Sea” 1993 Karina Lombard. ‘R’ 59094638 Wrong 7883484 Dinner 7726858 Jon Dore Show IFC 105 105 (4:15) ››› “The Fifth Element” 1997 Bruce Willis. A New York (6:20) ››› “National Lampoon’s Animal House” 1978, Comedy (8:15) ›› “Trespass” 1992, Action Bill Paxton, Ice-T, William Sadler. Firemen and ›› “Orphan” 2009, Horror Vera Farmiga, Peter Sarsgaard. An adopted child’s angelic MAX 400 508 7 cabby tries to save Earth in 2259. 81428858 John Belushi. ‘R’ Å 30598026 crime lord’s gang have shootout over gold. ’ ‘R’ Å 20312649 face hides a demonic heart. ’ ‘R’ Å 6490939 E-Mail Order Bride ‘14’ 1448649 L.A. Gang Wars ‘14’ 4760842 Breakout The Escapist ‘14’ 3374823 E-Mail Order Bride ‘14’ 3174133 L.A. Gang Wars ‘14’ 4720277 Breakout The Escapist ‘14’ 1570754 Explorer ‘PG’ 1964674 NGC 157 157 Avatar 1530674 Avatar 3061303 OddParents OddParents OddParents OddParents Avatar 1536858 Avatar 1442465 Fanboy 2426620 Fanboy 4747991 Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action 2438465 Rocko 3485823 NTOON 89 115 189 Shooting 7484620 Sighting 4109736 Defense 4106649 Guard 4293129 Rifle 7404484 Impossible Shots Cowboys Shoot 7409939 Shooting 5062533 Sighting 4853007 Rifle 5156668 Guard 5238216 S.W.A.T. Maga Impossible Shots OUTD 37 307 43 Fight Camp 360: ›› “Rambo” 2008, Action Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz, MatPenn & Teller: Penn & Teller: (4:30) ›› “But I’m a Cheerleader” 1999 › “Lucky Numbers” 2000, Comedy John Travolta, Lisa Kudrow. iTV. A TV-weather- Nurse Jackie ’ United States of SHO 500 500 Boxing 891804 Bulls...! 531910 Tara ‘MA’ 643194 Bulls...! 412976 Natasha Lyonne. ‘R’ 404552 man and his girlfriend rig the state lottery. ’ ‘R’ 749842 ‘MA’ 737587 thew Marsden. iTV. ’ ‘R’ 232303 The Racing Chef NASCAR 7558129 Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ 8609858 Pass Tm 7003910 Pass Tm 7462378 Pass Tm 7192858 Hub 7008465 The Racing Chef NASCAR 8604303 Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ 8150674 Pass Tm 5195804 Pass Tm 2959804 SPEED 35 303 125 (4:50) ›› “America’s Sweethearts” 2001 53640277 (6:40) ›››› “WALL-E” 2008 Voices of Ben Burtt. ’ ‘G’ Å 63649552 (8:22) ›› “Year One” 2009 Jack Black. ’ 14209246 Spartacus: Blood and Sand 8452084 “Nothing Like” 1697842 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) › “Spinning Into Butter” 2007 (6:15) “The Deal” 2008, Comedy William H. Macy, Meg Ryan, LL Cool J. A movie is ›› “Stepfather II” 1989, Horror Terry O’Quinn, Meg Foster, › “The Air I Breathe” 2007, Drama Forest Whitaker, Brendan (11:05) ›› “Dahmer” 2002 Jeremy TMC 525 525 Sarah Jessica Parker. 6483007 on hold until its star can be rescued. ’ ‘R’ 30633113 Caroline Williams. ‘R’ 977939 Fraser. ’ ‘R’ Å 2677113 Renner. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ 81672571 NHL Hockey: Maple Leafs at Rangers 3174303 Hockey 4293129 Sports 7404484 Sports 4119113 Poker 7480804 Sports 7409939 Sports 5062533 Sports 4853007 Sports 5156668 Sports 5238216 The Daily Line 5544026 VS. 27 58 30 Locator 7018842 Locator 7470397 Locator 7460910 Locator 7451262 Locator 7005378 Locator 7553674 Locator 7014026 Locator 7093533 Locator 5118755 Locator 8526571 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 6803642 John Edward 2761939 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Ron Reuter presents “Canada: It’s NOT part of the U.S.”; the lecture explores Canada and Canadians; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100, info@ osucascades.edu or www.osucascades.edu/ lunchtime-lectures. “GHOSTS OF MISSISSIPPI”: A screening of the film about the shooting of Medgar Evers; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.dpls .us/calendar. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $25 per team of four; 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-0864 or www.kurerafund.org. HOUSE OF FLOYD: Pink Floyd tribute band performs, with lasers, lights and video; $26 in advance, $29 day of show; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700, info@houseoffloyd.com or www.towertheatre.org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. BAKI: The California-based acoustic musician performs, with Mindscape; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. SUPERSUCKERS: The rock ‘n’ roll group performs, with Tuck and Roll; $15 plus service charges in advance, $18 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.dpls.us/calendar. HANDS AROUND THE COURTHOUSE: Show your commitment to efforts to prevent and eliminate child abuse and sexual assault; free; noon; Jefferson County Circuit Court, 75 S.E. C St., Suite C, Madras; 541-475-1880. “THE DESCHUTES LAND TRUST AND YOU”: Learn about the land trust, what it does and how it will continue its work during the slowed economy; free; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 800-824-2714 or ctrinfo@uoregon.edu. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626.

FRIDAY MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “Traveling Light,” features a parade and art stroll throughout Sisters, and a performing arts evening at Bronco Billy’s Ranch Grill and Saloon; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; chili feed is $10 with chili, $5 without chili; 4 p.m. parade, 4:30 p.m. art stroll, 6:30 p.m. performing arts; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

“PRECIOUS”: A screening of the Rrated 2009 film; representatives from local assault and child abuse service agencies will be on hand before and after the film for questions and discussion; part of Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Awareness Month; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. SEAN HAYES: The indie-folk musician performs; $16 in advance; 7:30 p.m.; Mandala Yoga Community, tbd loft, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-678-5183. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8-11 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846. TONY SMILEY: The one-man rock band performs; free; 10 p.m.; Bendistillery Martini Bar, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or www.myspace.com/bendistillery.

SATURDAY TRASHFORMATIONS: Pakit Liquidators hosts a 36-hour artmaking event centered on making new creations from reused and recycled materials; raw materials provided; participants should bring tools and fasteners; registration required; proceeds benefit Bend’s Community Center; free for spectators, $20 adults or $10 children to compete; 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. April 11; Pakit Liquidators, 903 S.E. Armour Drive, Bend; 541-280-9301 or sacredbuffalo@gmail.com. EVERY DAY IS TAG DAY: A microchip and rabies clinic to support the Every Day is Tag Day campaign; $20 for microchip implants; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 S.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3537. VACCINATION CLINIC: Bring dogs and cats for vaccinations; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $20 per vaccine, $25 microchip; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Oregon Feed & Irrigation, 2215 N. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond.. BENEFIT DINNER FOR DAWNA DITMOREAZICH: Featuring music, a silent auction, raffle and dinner; proceeds benefit DitmoreAzich, who was injured in an automobile crash; $8, $5 children and $25 for families; 5-9 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 262 S.W. Second St., Madras; 503-642-7506. A NIGHT IN WONDERLAND: A silent auction and fashion show to benefit the Bend High School DECA team; registration requested; $10, $5 students; 6 p.m. auction, 7 p.m. fashion show; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-322-5005 or kristen.torkelson@bend.k12.or.us. ART FOR A CAUSE: Local artists showcase their work; with desserts and champagne; a portion of proceeds benefits MountainStar Family Relief Nursery; free; 6-9 p.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Company, 1054 N.W. Milwaukee Ave., Bend; 541322-6820 or www.mountainstar family.org. MY OWN TWO HANDS: An art auction and party; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; $55; 6 p.m.; Ponderosa Forge and Iron

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Works, 207 W. Sisters Park Drive, Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@sisters folkfestival.org or www.sistersfolk festival.org. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Silas Maynard and music by Hands 4; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave.; 541-330-8943. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY DONOR CONCERT: The Vinca Quartet performs; free for members, or $50 for symphony season membership; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941 or www.cosymphony.com or www.vincaquartet.com. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. BEER RELEASE PARTY: Featuring a performance by Leif James; proceeds benefit Bend Spay & Neuter Project; $5-$10; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www .myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing. DOUG BENSON: The stand-up comedian performs; $23 in advance, $28 day of show; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. KABLE ROC: The Portland-based MC performs; free; 10 p.m.; Bendistillery Martini Bar, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or www.myspace.com/bendistillery.

SUNDAY RIDERS FOR THE CURE: With a rail jam, live music, booths, a barbecue, costume competition and more; proceeds benefit Sara’s Project; $35 entry fee or $150 or more in donations; 8-10 a.m. registration, 10:30 a.m. event; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-382-2442 or bkinney@ mtbachelor.com. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. A NOVEL IDEA OPENING: Jason Graham and the Central Oregon Gospel Choir kick off the 2010 A Novel Idea ... Read Together program; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY DONOR CONCERT: The Vinca Quartet performs; free for members, or $50 for symphony season membership; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941 or www.cosymphony.com or www.vincaquartet.com. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. CELTIC MUSIC SESSION: Celtic musicians play traditional Irish music; session players welcome; free; 3-6 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-647-4789. U2CHARIST: Listen to live U2 songs and their messages of justice and caring; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-382-4401 or www.bendfp.org.

ICON CITY MEETING: Listen to live music and inspiring stories, and learn about ways to volunteer, creating awareness of social and economic issues in Central Oregon; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 661-717-0433 or www.volunteerconnectnow.com. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 500 meters on single-speed bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; a portion of proceeds benefits Bend’s Community BikeShed; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7 p.m., sign-up at 6:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-6107460 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

MONDAY “BACKWARDS IN HIGH HEELS”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the play by Jim Henry about a couple that dance their way through war, peace, fame and fortune; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677.

TUESDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515 or www.dpls.us/calendar. OPEN MIC WITH TALL ADAM: Two sessions, open to all varieties of performers; free; 5-6:30 p.m. all ages, 8 p.m. to close ages 21 and older; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond reads from and discusses her novel “Seeing Stars”; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. FREEDOM SUMMER — “AIN’T GOIN LET NOBODY TURN ME ROUND”: Marion Davidson recalls her year in Mississippi in 1964 and her hostess, Carrie Clayton; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.dpls.us/calendar.

WEDNESDAY April 14 HORSE-DRAWN AUCTION AND SWAP MEET: Continuous auctions of items including horse and farm gear, antiques, horses and mules, and more; free; noon-6 p.m.; Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-549-2064 or www.smallfarmers journal.com. “REDUCING WATER USE BY HARVESTING AND REUSING RAINWATER”: Learn about what rain harvesting is, why it’s important and the types of systems that are available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7093 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, HAMLET”: Starring Simon Keenlyside, Natalie Dessay, Jennifer Larmore, Toby Spence and James Morris in an encore presentation of Ambroise Thomas’s adaptation; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. FRONTIER RUCKUS: The Michiganbased folk-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascades theatrical.org.

M T For Wednesday, April 7

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG13) Noon, 2:45, 5:25, 7:55 CHLOE (R) 12:20, 3, 5:45, 8:20 CRAZY HEART (R) 12:25, 2:55, 5:35, 8:10 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8 GREENBERG (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:30, 8:15 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:20, 8:05

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 10:50 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 9:55 AVATAR (PG-13) 12:05,

3:35, 6:55, 10:20 THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 5, 7:55, 10:40 CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 10:55 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 4:20, 5:20, 6:50, 8, 9:30, 10:35 CLASH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 11 a.m., 1:20, 3:55, 6:35, 9:15 GREEN ZONE (R) 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 HOT TUB TIME MACHINE (R) 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 5:15, 8:05, 10:40 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 10:45 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:15, 2:15, 4:05, 5:05, 6:40, 7:40, 9:10, 10:10 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40 THE LAST SONG (PG) 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:35, 2:25, 4:10, 5:10, 7, 7:50, 9:35, 10:25 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) Noon, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50 TYLER PERRY’S WHY DID I GET

MARRIED TOO (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:45, 10:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: THE SQUEAKQUEL (PG) 3:30 THE BOOK OF ELI (R) 8:50 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

13) 3:45, 6:15, 9:15 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 4:30, 6:30, 8:45 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 5, 7:15, 9:30 THE LAST SONG (PG) 4, 6:30, 9

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 6:45 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 6:30 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 6:30 THE LAST STATION (R) 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 4, 7

N   N  Blagojevich fired from ‘Celebrity Apprentice’

Judge settles key issues in Hopper divorce case

CHICAGO — Former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich was ejected from NBC’s “Celebrity Apprentice” on Sunday, after yet another display of cluelessness, evasion and arrogance. Blagojevich’s worst enemies on the show weren’t his Rod teammates. He Blagojevich was done in by his inability to use technology, his addiction to political doublespeak and his inability to admit mistakes. If his appearance on this show was meant to buff up his image in the public eye, it’s hard to see how showing America his most slippery qualities did him any good. Tasked with creating an interactive display promoting the new Wizarding World of Harry Potter at the Orlando Universal theme park, RockSolid team leader Blagojevich turned over most of the responsibility to Bret Michaels. The team complained of having no clear direction of what the former governor wanted, but he took it all in stride and even slept on the plane back from Florida. Blagojevich favored Chicago-style improv rather than prepared remarks during the presentation of the Harry Potter display to a group of fans and Universal executives. Or, as teammate Curtis Stone put it, in terms that Blagojevich himself would understand, “The plan for the presentation was, we haven’t got a (bleepin’) plan.”

LOS ANGELES — Dennis Hopper’s estranged wife Victoria Hopper and young daughter can live on his property while the couple resolve their bitter divorce case and the actor fights prostate cancer, a judge ruled Monday. Superior Court Judge Amy Pellman also ordered the actor to pay $12,000 a month in spousal and child support. Hopper, 73, did not attend the hearing but was described by his attorney as “desperately ill.” Pellman sternly told both sides they needed to come together during what appeared to be Hopper’s final days. The judge noted the couple’s 7-year-old daughter is about to undergo the traumatic loss of her father and the rhetoric should be toned down. The rulings came after two months of bickering in court filings, including allegations of abuse by both sides, and jockeying for financial position. The couple has been married for nearly 14 years. Hopper, star of films such as “Easy Rider” and “Speed,” filed for divorce in January. Hopper’s attorney, Joseph Mannis, said after the hearing that he was happy with the outcome. He said his side did not intend to further contest the spousal or child support orders but was preparing for a fight over the couple’s prenuptial agreement. The agreement calls for Victoria Hopper to lose her stake in her husband’s estate if they are divorced or not living together when he dies. — From wire reports

Q&A Continued from E1 You could also try such home remedies as soaking your sport bras in water to which baking soda or white vinegar has been added — or adding either of those products to the machine during the wash cycle. It is possible the problem is in your washing machine, where mildew may be growing and contaminating your sport bras. If you notice other garments or linens also have that musty smell, the aptly named Smelly Washer detergent should solve the problem. Order at http://smellywasher .com. Also, try to launder all workout gear as soon as possible after a workout. And once it is washed, dry it immediately and thoroughly. Finally, when you do need new sport bras, look for brands with antimicrobial treatments, which inhibit the growth of bacteria.

How to clean brushes

Q: A:

How should I clean my makeup brushes, and how often? Brush cleaning should be done every couple of weeks. (I know. I don’t either. But I should!) Start by assembling your brushes, a clean towel and gentle liquid soap. A favorite of many makeup artists is

Thinkstock

Does your sport bra stink from enduring many sweaty workouts? Try adding white vinegar or baking soda to your wash. And if that doesn’t do the trick, consider ordering a sports detergent. Dr. Bronner’s Magic Pure Castile Liquid Soap, available at health food stores and Target. Squeeze the soap in a zigzag motion across the sink. Swirl each brush around and pump it up and down in a fresh section of soap, then lay it on the counter to absorb the soap. After a few minutes, rinse each brush under warm water, swirling and pumping until all the pigment and bubbles disappear. Finally, mold the wet brushes into their original shape and lay them on the towel to dry.


E4 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, April 7, 2010: This year, you often live in a world where the impossible becomes a reality. Your focus, energy and drive help you reach your goals. Many of you are likely to take up a new hobby or pastime. If you are single, someone you draw in to your life might be difficult to get rid of! Proceed with care and get to know a new sweetie well. If you are attached, you can push your significant other only so hard. Give him or her space to come to you. AQUARIUS makes a great pal. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Call on your people skills for a meeting. Others could be very hard on you, especially an associate. In some form, what goes on is deja vu. Snickering and backstabbing come up from out of nowhere. Tonight: Take a deep breath and go to the gym. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Others depend on you much more than you realize. When you discover that you are out of sync or overwhelmed, others are scarcely surprised. Understand that everyone has his or her limitations — you, too. Learn to say “no” more often. Tonight: Work as late as need be. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Use your imagination and try to understand where others are coming from. A child or loved one

could try your patience. Be careful with those close to you. You easily could take out your frustration from other matters on them. Tonight: Wherever you are, have music on. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Deal with people independently, and you will experience far more success. Don’t sell yourself short. A sense of insecurity or feeling uncomfortable in your own skin could be telling you to back off. Tonight: Don’t go overboard. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You come off more abrupt than you realize. If you note that someone is getting contentious, even out of the blue, know that your attitude, presentation and/or words are getting under this person’s skin. Understand that you could be overwhelming someone. Tonight: Sort through invitations. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Keep reaching out for more information. Incorporate new technology and ideas. You could feel tight or closed down. Focus on what is going on. Are you swallowing anger or frustration? Tonight: Perhaps the time has come to clear out bad feelings. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH If you relax some and toss negativity in the garbage can, you’ll discover your ingenuity and other such assets. A friend could push you, causing a very strong reaction. Stop internalizing so much, and let another person know how you feel. Tonight: Let go of today. Find fun. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

HHH Be honest with yourself: Did you even want to come to work today? If you can call it an early day or take work home, do. You will accomplish a lot more, and far more quickly at that. An older friend could be demanding. Tonight: Stay close to home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Attempt to see the other side of questions and issues. When you grasp where someone else is coming from, you could be startled. Don’t put off a trip or workshop. You need a break from the here and now. Tonight: Visit over dinner with friends. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Be sensitive to spending, whether the funds are coming out of your pocket or another person’s pocket. In the long run, a boss will be pleased to see this conservative approach. A partner flares, and there is little you can do. Tonight: Look at your budget. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You wake up full of energy. Others easily could trigger you out of the blue. Keep your mind on a project or what might be going on at the moment. Don’t allow others to distract you. Tonight: Kick up your heels. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HH You might want to follow your instincts and take the day off. On the other hand, you can take out recent frustrations through working on a project. You might get a lot done. Don’t allow a trivial incident to trigger you. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Shoes

Put your best feet forward

Continued from E1 A wide range of shoe shopping can be found in Central Oregon. While we spoke with locally owned shops that tend to carry higher-end brands, many of these styles can be found at lower price points by shopping at stores like Payless Shoe Source, Ross Dress For Less or T.J. Maxx. Careful shopping can be especially rewarding if you end up having enough left over to buy a second pair.

TEVA MARY JANES COST: $75

SOFFT GIOVANNI IN FAUX SNAKESKIN COST: $105

SOFFT FIORE IN METALLIC COST: $99

BORN TALCA IN RED COST: $90

of arch,” she said.

Acadia Footwear, in Bend’s Old Mill District, is stocked with a variety of spring footwear:

SANDRO MOSCOLONI ARIZONA COST: $130

Women’s shoes • FAUX REPTILE SKINS Hillary Richards, owner of Acadia Footwear in Bend, said faux snake and crocodile are in this season. Generally a dressier look, the reptilian material adds texture and interest to shoes. While sometimes colored, she said they are mostly showing up in muted tones. “It makes a really nice neutral, it just goes with anything and everything,” she said. • PATENT LEATHER Another dressy option is patent leather, which is made by applying a lacquer to finished leather shoes. The super-shiny shoes needn’t be saved for the most special occasions; a high-gloss shoe can also be used to dress up a crisp pair of jeans with a fitted jacket or chic sweater. Lower-cost, faux patent-leather can be substituted to get a punch of gloss without the price of genuine leather. • METALLIC Margaux Kellenberg-Hought, who owns North Soles Footwear in Bend, identified metallic colors as a spring trend. But it’s important to be judicious in your use of metallic, lest you end up looking like an overtinseled Christmas tree. However, don’t be afraid to play with color. Try pairing warm tones with gold or bronze shoes and cool tones with silver or pewter. According to Richards, “Even sporty, casual shoes like Tevas have gotten into metals,” with metallic texture on Mary Jane slip-ons. • COLOR Bright colors are in this spring, as well. A fuchsia, yellow or teal shoe can add pop to an outfit, but

Sofa Continued from E1 At high-end stores, you’re also paying for the design quality, the knowledge of the sales staff and the ability to customize just about anything. Ultimately, said Peter Howlett, director of operations at highend furniture maker George Smith, where sofas run between $10,000 and $20,000, you’re paying for longevity. “It’s going to last four generations because of the materials we use and the way it’s crafted,” said Howlett. That’s not a knock on cheaper sofas, Howlett said: “All of them have a relevance in their market.”

TEVA OMNIUM SANDALS COST: $90

SOFFT PALADEA IN PATENT LEATHER COST: $105

BORN CORNFLOWER COST: $95

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Richards warned against getting “matchy.” “If you get a turquoise shoe, don’t wear it with turquoise. Do all black, brown, or white, and bring color into your wardrobe with the shoe,” she said. Nicole Jackson, who owns Mary Jane’s in Bend, agreed. “It gets a little overwhelming.” Again, think of color families. Jackson identified teal as a trend. Try adding teal shoes to an outfit that features jewel tones like amethyst, sapphire and ruby. Another pairing tip: Richards said several of her customers

have asked what to wear with the navy clothing they’ve been finding in stores. Some think their only choice is brown shoes. She said not only can metallic shoes work with navy, but red shoes can work like a neutral with navy, especially a rich, brick-red. • WEDGES “Wedges and platforms are still really strong,” Richards said. “You get the height, but you still get comfort.” Kellenberg-Hought also identified wedges, noting their versa-

• GLADIATORS, FLATS AND BOOTIES The Grecian style of sandal, with straps up to the ankle or higher, is still popular. Additionally, KellenbergHought said booties — short, often slouchy boots — are big. Some

booties are open-toed for spring. “I call it a boho-chic look,” she said. Richards said flats are still “huge,” both dressy and sporty. She also said flip-flops remain popular, but warned that buying versions without support can do damage to your feet. “They should have some sort

Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@bendbulletin.com.

ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

CENTRAL OREGON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

Some ideas to sit on Here’s what goes into sofas at either end of the price spectrum.

Low end

High end

IKEA KARLSTAD SOFA (PICTURED BELOW)

GEORGE SMITH SIGNATURE SOFA

Price: $499 Construction: DIY — you put it together. Particleboard, plywood, fiberboard frame; joints secured with corner blocks, staples, screws Cushions: High-resilience polyurethane foam with polyester wadding Customization: Slipcovers available in 11 colors, removable and machine washable Waiting time: None

Price: $10,685 Construction: Hand-built by craftsmen. Kiln-dried beech and birch wood frame; joints secured with dowels Cushions: 80 percent feather, 20 percent down Customization: Everything is customizable, including size, fabric and decorative touches such as welts and buttoning. Waiting time: 10 to 12 weeks from the receipt of fabric

HOME EIGHTEENTH

&

ANNUAL

GARDEN S H O W PRESENTED BY:

5 keys to smart sofa shopping No matter your budget, a sofa is a big investment. Here are five tips for shopping wisely, courtesy of furniture maker Mitchell Gold. 1. Measure. There’s nothing worse than buying a dream sofa you can’t get into your home. Go shopping armed with precise measurements of your stairwell, elevator, doors, hallways, garden gates and any other space your new sofa might have to squeeze through. 2. While in the store, sink into the sofa the way you would at home. So lie down and put your feet up if that’s how you plan to use it, and test its comfort. Make sure the armrests are well-padded: you don’t want to feel wood poking through. 3. The sturdiest sofa frame will be made of kiln-dried hardwood like maple, poplar, beech or oak, or engineered hardwood. Avoid air-dried wood or soft woods, like pine. Joints secured with corner blocking, dowels and screws will last longer than just glue and staples, and it’s best to have a ticking between the foam cushion and fabric cover. Check stitches to make sure they’re even and not bunched. 4. Consider the cushions. The softest, most luxurious cushions are filled with goose down, but they take a lot of regular fluffing to keep their shape. Less expensive cushions made of high-resil-

tility. She said she sells them to patrons young and old. A younger woman might wear them with leggings, boy shorts or a short skirt, while an older woman can wear them with a pair of linen gaucho pants. Cork-heeled wedges are one popular type of wedge, though the espadrille, with its woven appearance, can also be found this season.

• MEN’S SHOES “Men buy a couple pair of shoes a year,” Kellenberg-Hought said, so they need to be versatile. “Men are casual here in Central Oregon,” which makes it easier to take a simple leather shoe from work to weekends and evenings. Richards said soft, lighter colored leathers are popular for spring in men’s shoes. Kellenberg-Hought said Simple brand casual men’s shoes, which boast Earth-friendly materials, are popular. For a slightly more dressy look, she said leather Pikolinos, a Spanish shoemaker with a more “European” look, is also popular among men. Another spring trend is called a fisherman sandal. The closed-toe sandal is “the sandal for men who don’t wear sandals. A lot of guys don’t feel comfortable showing their toes,” Richards said. Both Richards and KellenbergHought were adamant about one thing: The sock issue. Both urged men to avoid not just the infamous “black socks with shorts” fashion travesty, but unless you’re in athletic gear, be wary of any sock with sandals or shorts. “I think if you’re in question, do not wear them,” KellenbergHought said. If toes are showing? Never. Worried about smelly feet? Try a shoe powder, a no-show sock (lower than an ankle sock), or buy a shoe with an allleather lining. “It’s the synthetic stuff that’s going to make your feet sweat and stink,” she said, but it’s not a problem with high-quality shoes. Plus, she said high-end shoes like Pikolinos “feel like a slipper on the foot.”

APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2, 2010

Courtesy Chicago Tribune

Pick a fabric, any fabric Just because you can get a sofa in just about any fabric doesn’t mean you should. Interior designer and style blogger Nick Olsen offers some advice on choosing fabrics. • Microsuede or ultrasuede are red or blue sofa,” Olsen said. unbeatable for stain resistance. “It could be the giant Smurf in the Another resilient option is cotton room.” On the flip side, he said, velvet. Don’t forget to try Belgian don’t do a beige sofa with beige linen or cotton canvas in summer. pillows. Beware gorgeous fabrics like silk • Dark colors and patterns are best velvet: one water stain, and it’s at hiding stains and imperfections, there forever. but beware muddy colors, which • Trends are moving away from can look dreary. loopy boucle fabrics and nubby • If ordering online, always request wool blends. Classic, crisp and to have a fabric swatch sent to you. tailored is in. What looks beige online could look • Unless you’re very daring, yellow or tan in your living room. get a sofa in a neutral color and • Get a tight-fitting slipcover add color with throw pillows or instead of reupholstering so that blankets. “Resist the urge to buy a you can change colors.

iency foam compress during use and then spring back to shape. A happy medium: An inner foam core wrapped with a down cover. 5. Notice design details. Check out the sofa’s arms: A roll arm is

more traditional, while a square or straight arm looks more modern. If you want the freedom to put the sofa in the middle of the room rather than against a wall, make sure the back is presentable.

Reach more than 70,000 Central Oregon readers in the official Home & Garden Show guide. Official Show Guide Publishes: in The Bulletin Saturday, April 24 Advertising Deadline: Thursday, April 8

For show information visit: www.centraloregonshow.com

To Advertise, call your Bulletin Sales Representative at 541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 F1

C

The Bulletin

LASSIFIEDS

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

contact us:

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371 FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

Subscribe or manage your subscription

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

210

246

264

General Merchandise

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Snow Removal Equipment

200

MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

202

Want to Buy or Rent Student wants CAR OR TRUCK running or NOT! Call anytime. Daniel 541-280-6786. $$$ WANT TO BUY $$$ Old Men’s WATCHES, Old MOTORCYCLE HELMETS, & Old SUNGLASSES 541-706-0891

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Pillow-top twin mattress. $200. Pop-up trundle day bed with twin mattresses, metal frame, $60. Bottom frame needs minor repair. Cash only. 385-0542 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Absolutely Irresistible, Terrier Chihuahua mix male 14 wks, potty & leash trained, very intelligent, was $150, Free to approved home, 541-550-0444.

Aussie/Rottie Puppies, rescued, 7 wks., 4 males, 2 females, $100. 541-576-3701 503-310-2514. BOXER, AKC dewclaw, tail dock, very playful, ready to go home $499 1-541-556-8224 FREE Geese, 5 Chinese white, beautiful, friendly to good home only. 541-536-6167.

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com/

Lab Puppies

AKC,

excellent pedigree, 2 males, 1 female 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Lab Puppies, yellows, AKC, good blood lines, $300 males, $350 females, 541-447-1323. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com

215

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

240

Crafts and Hobbies

unused, assembled for crib to king size quilts.541-419-1151

245

Golf Equipment Cleveland 900 Series Wedges 56 degree & 60 degree $45 each OBO. 541-389-9345. Golf Clubs, Just in time for golf season, women’s, Taylor Made Hybrids, $275, bag, $45, 541-279-0006. Mizuno MP-32 w/rifle Project X 6.0 Shaft 3-P wedges. $395. 541-389-9345.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Ping I/10 Irons, 4-W+ Tour 56 degrees & 60 degrees. $425. 541-389-9345.

Minature Schnauzer, born 1/16, 1st shot, AKC reg. salt/ pepper or black/silver, $350. 541-536-6262,541-610-8836

Ping I/3 Irons, 3-LOB $375, call for more information. 541-389-9345.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing Papillon-poodle mix pups. Will be under 10 lbs., low shed. Sweet and healthy $275. 541-350-1684. Pomeranian Male Puppy. Tiny, cute, loveable and fun. $350 541-316-0638 POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyfull tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889.

Sheltie Puppies, APRI -1 female black & white, $350, 2 Sable and White, 1 Brown & White, 1 Black & White Male $250, each to loving homes, 541-977-3982. Tzu/Maltese Cross pups and older dogs, males and females avail. 541-874-2901 charley2901@gmail.com

Shih

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Grizzly 50 BMG 12x36x80 mm Electronic scope, 3000 yd. bullet crop compensator, custom leaded ammo 160 to 750 grain, hard case & info on replacement ammo. $2,750. 541-420-7773.

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643.

Octa$850, .223 $450.

253

TV, Stereo and Video TV, Magnavox Color, 27”, with built in VCR & DVD, $150 OBO, call 541-382-0879.

255

Computers

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

260

Misc. Items

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

HK 91 .308, pre-ban, beautiful condition, $3000 OBO. 541-420-0577.

Remington 788 .308 Winchester w/ sling, case, ammo & Bushnell 3x9 scope $400 or trade. 541-647-8931 Ruana Knives - Buying Ruana knives and bowies, Jerry 360-866-5215 Sig 5.56 Assault Rifle w/ holographic sight+3x9 scope w/ laser, 4 grip, 5-30 round mags, hard case, fired less than 200 rounds, $1600. 541-410-0922 Taurus Judge 410/45 stainless with a 6 1/2 inch barrel. Like new! $550. 541-610-5638

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

261

Medical Equipment Pronto M51 Wheel Chair, exc. cond., $695. Call for more info., 541-550-8702. Wheelchair carrier for a regular hospital chair only, unfolds & tilts $150. 322-0983

421

Schools and Training

266

Hay, Grain and Feed

325 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Excellent hay for horses. $120/ton & $150/ton 541-549-3831

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon De- 2nd Cutting Grass Hay, small bales, in barn, exc. quality, partment of Environmental load any time, $150/ton. Quality (DEQ) and the fedLonepine, 541-480-8673 or eral Environmental Protec541-548-5747 tion Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission stan- Alfalfa hay, 2 string, very nice & dards. A certified woodstove green, clean, no rain, in barn, can be identified by its certi1st & 3rd cuttings, bale or fication label, which is perton, $115/ton & up, manently attached to the 541-408-5463, 541-475-6260 stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising Cheaper Than Feed Store! Premium Orchard Grass Hay, for the sale of uncertified small, square, no rain, weedwoodstoves. less, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll 267 store the rest until needed. Fuel and Wood By ton, 1st cut/$135, 2nd cut/$145. Near Alfalfa Store. 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail WHEN BUYING kerrydnewell@hotmail.com To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords, 1-$150, 2-$270. Bend Del. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Excellent grass hay, no rain, barn stored, $130/ton. FREE grapple loading, 1st & 2nd cutting avail. Delivery available.541-382-5626,480-3059

HEY!

HAY!

Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard Grass $115 a ton. Madras 541-390-2678. Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $150 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $3 per bale. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581 Top Quality Grass Alfalfa Mix Hay, 2 string bales, no rain, barn stored, $115 per ton, Burns, delivery avail., please call 541-589-1070.

Cemetery Plot, in Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Aspen Garden section, $695, call 208-442-0909 or call Deschutes Memorial Gardens. Crypt, Inside double companion, # 46604B in Deschutes Memorial Park, best offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

Heating and Stoves

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Firewood For this year and next year $150 a cord, please call 541-610-6713. Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found FOUND: Craftsman 3/4” wrench, found on Ferguson Dr., to ID, 541-382-8880. FOUND: Garage door opener on Boyd Acres Road, Bend, call to identify. 541-389-4837.

333

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies Special breed hens! 4 weeks old: Light Brahmas, New Hampshire Reds, Cuckoo Maran, Turkens and Black Australorps. $8 each. Crooked River Ranch, 541-408-4884.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377. Free Older white Mare, to good home, refs. req, great w/kids, needs love, 541-410-0685. Horse Trailer, 18’, $2750, also Saddle, western, 15”, $600, call 541-447-1699.

345

Livestock & Equipment Healthy Beef Steers del. for small fee 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

LOST: Gold charm bracelet with charms in Bend, REWARD. 541-678-2232. Lost: Golf Shoe, men’s Footjoy, white, w/cleats, between Shopko and IHOP, Bend, 4/1, 541-923-3926. Longhorn Cows & Trophy Steers, Registered Texas Longhorns. www.kbarklonghornranch.com, $300. Joel, 541-848-7357.

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Wheelchair with pedals, light blue, very good condition $100 OBO. 541-647-2621

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

262

358

Commercial / Office Equipment &Fixtures

Winchester 32 WS Model 94, 60% $400 & 1989 O/U 45 Desks, Office, some with cab. muzzle loader $200, credenza’s, all in one inkjet Mark III Remington Arms printers, bookcases, eraser Flair Pistol Collector $400 boards, computer work desk, firm. 541-420-7773 in Redmond, 541-420-0427

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-610-2799

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

HVAC/Service Technician HVAC company looking for experienced Service Technician, must be refrigerant certified. Fax resume & qualifications to: 541-382-8314. Machinist Minimum 5 years lathe and milling experience. Operate CNC equipment, including set-up, adjustment and tool change. Read and edit machine programs. Competitive pay and benefits. Please send resume to Box 16150477, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Management

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362

Redmond Non-Profit wants thrift store manager, manager will run a staff of employees and volunteers, set Receptionist work schedules, develop Big Country RV pricing, oversee inventory, seeking experienced Recepdisplay goods and have ditionist, Full time with benrect P&L responsibility. Reefits. Fax resumes only to: tail and merchandising exp. 541-330-2496. is req. Starting salary, $22,000/year. No benefits. Availability May 1st, 2010. Remember.... Add your web address to Respond email with cover your ad and readers on letter and one page resume The Bulletin's web site will to: noprofit7777@aol.com. be able to click through automatically to your site. Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. Need Seasonal help? computer skills and cusNeed Part-time help? tomer service req., QuickNeed Full-time help? books a plus. Apt., util. + Advertise your open positions. salary incl. Fax resume to The Bulletin Classifieds 541-330-6288.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Medical Billing Specialist Resort/Inn Crook County Fire & Rescue in Front End person for ReserPrineville Oregon is seeking a vations/Check in etc., some highly qualified medical billnight calls, computer skills ing specialist. This is a part not necessary, furnished apt. time position with full time w/utilities included time off potential. Salary DOE, appli& salary negotiable. Let’s cation period closes April 15, hear about you. Send re2010 at 5 pm. Some of the sume to: Job, PO Box 1176, essential functions of the poCrescent Lake, OR 97733. sition are performs receptionist duties and provides RV Sales clerical support for the disBig Country RV is trict . One year experience in seeking exp. RV Salesperson. a position of similar responIndustry exp. req. Competisibility and complexity. Expetive pay and benefits. Fax rience with medical insurresume to: 541-330-2496. ance terminology preferred, experience and or training in RV Tech computer medical billing apBig Country RV in plications, training in ICD-9 Redmond is seeking exp. codes. Must have experience RV Tech, Full Time w/benand understanding of HIPAA. efits. Apply at 3111 N. Canal Contact jdean@ccf-r.com for Redmond . information packet.

Advertising Account Executive Media sales professional needed to help our Central Oregon customers grow their businesses through a widely distributed and well read publication. This full time position requires a demonstrable background in consultative sales, extremely strong time management skills, and an aggressive approach to prospecting and closing sales. A minimum of 2 years outside advertising sales or similar experience is required to be considered.

Needed, full time, to oversee the operation & fiscal activities of growing youth development non profit. 5+ year exp. & a degree preferred. Send request for position description & resume to: jen.petrie@heartoforegon.org by 5pm, April 26th, 2010. Caregivers VISITING ANGELS is looking for compassionate and reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. 1 year experience required. Must pass background check and drug test. Apply at Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

The position offers a commission-based compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive salesperson with unlimited earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Box 16151536, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

541-383-0386 Sous Chef

Sales

Loan Officer (Financial Services Representative Float Position) Business Manager

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Mid Oregon Credit Union is looking for a dynamic, energetic salesperson possessing a strong desire to help our members better themselves financially. This position is based primarily in our Bend branch, but the successful candidate will travel between branches located in the tri-county area to fill in as needed for other Loan Officers. Duties include opening new accounts, processing, approving and disbursing loan applications, doing outbound calling to pursue additional credit union business, and educating members about the features and benefits of the credit union's products and services. Minimum 1-2 years new accounts and/or consumer lending experience. See our website at www.midoregon.com for more information. Please send resume, application, and cover letter to: Mid Oregon FCU, Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Box 6749, Bend, OR 97708. Mid Oregon Credit Union is a drug-free workplace

The Ranch is accepting applications for a year round full time Sous Chef. Need dedicated individual who possesses good supervisory and leadership skills that has an extensive knowledge of food preparation. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Independent Contractor READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

FOUND: Hitch receiver 3/31 on 27th and Forum by E. Safeway, identify 617-1716.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Employment

300 400

Trex Decking, $2/lineal foot, limited to stock on hand; Raised Garden Materials, 2x12 rough cedar, $1.35/lineal ft., 2x10 rough sawn cedar, $1.05/lineal ft., Backstrom Builders,541-382-6861

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191.

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809

.Remington 700 7 mm rifle sling, case & Leupold 3x9 scope w/lens covers $600 OBO or trade. 541-647-8931.

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

6 Cemetery Lots, Deschutes Memorial Gardens, $875/ea. 541-312-2595 Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Farm Market

265

FIREWOOD...

Hi-point 380 acp semi-auto black, compact w/mag, lock, case and ammo. Lifetime Warranty $265 OBO. Hi-Point 9 mm semi auto black, case & ammo. SOLD. Ruger P94 40 cal. semi auto, stainless w/4 mags, case & ammo make offer. 541-647-8931.

Shih Tzu purebred puppies. One male, one female. Both Norma Mag Custom 358 $400 & 20 gauge break down. $75. tri-color. 1st and 2nd shots. 541-420-7773. 15 weeks old. $400 each. 541-447-0141. QUALIFY FOR YOUR CONCEALED HANDGUN PERMIT 210 Sunday, April 11, Redmond Comfort Suites. Carry conFurniture & Appliances cealed in 33 states. Oregon #1 Appliances • Dryers and Utah permit classes, $50 • Washers for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information.

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Winchester Model 92 gon barrel rifle .357 Mini 14 stainless $475, Russian SKS 541-610-3732.

Ad must include price of item

Mossberg semi auto 250c 22 rifle SHV-L-LR, case & ammo $100 or trade. 541-647-8931

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Building Materials

GUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade call for more information. 541-728-1036.

H&K USP 45, 2 mags., $595; H&K Univ Tac Light, $100. Both $650. 541-948-5018

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

Winchester Mag 300, no scope, needs stock work $250 & 45 Muzzle load pistol kit $75. 541-420-7773.

Printer w/4 new toners. $200 Call 541-548-0345

Pups, $150 ea. QUILTING FRAME, BERNINA $1500 OBO,

541-280-1537

Winchester 94 WCF 30 (take down 80%) $750. 541-420-7773.

Troy-Bilt 21 inch, 6 hp. snowthrower, model 42027. Two speed drive. $499. 541-322-0537

HP 1215 Color Laser

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. Washer/Dryer Set, white, Whirlpool, large tub, new cond., $285. 541-389-6510

Heeler

To place your ad visit call 541-385-5809 Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. or visit www.bendbulletin.com

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Food Service - Bruno’s Grocery & U-bake is hiring for Cashier & Pizza Maker. Apply in person at 1709 NE 6th St., Bend. No phone calls. Food Service KFC Management If you have proven management experience, we can train you for a career that has no layoffs, competitive salaries & paid vacations. Starting salaries from $24,000-$34,000. We have immediate openings for management in Bend, Redmond, & Klamath Falls. Fax resume Attn. Robert Loer to 541-773-8687 or mail to Lariot Corp., Attn. Sally, 390 E McAndrews, Medford, OR, 97501. General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist: Looking for Independent Hairstylist preferably with nails licence as well. New shop, great location. Molly, 541-410-4125. HOUSE CLEANER - wanted for home cleaning service. Drivers license, no smoking, bondable, no weekends, no holidays. 541-815-0015.

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Sunriver

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


F2 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 642

652

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Edited by Will Shortz

1st Month Free 6 month lease!

Houses for Rent NW Bend

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, storage units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Ask Us About Our

April Special! Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval.

Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS! • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. • Screening fee waived Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from $395. Lots of amenities. Pet friendly, w/s/g paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

541-385-5809 476

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476

634

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS NEEDED-- we are looking for FFT2's, FFT1's, and ENGB's to work on engine crews. If interested please call 1-877-867-3868

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

WIRELESS SALES Activate, AT&T’s largest wireless dealer in the NW just opened a brand new store in your area. We are looking for qualified, energetic, career minded people to add to our sales team in Redmond. You must have strong presentation skills and a dynamic personality in order to maximize our generous commission structure. If you fit this description, we would like to talk with you. Benefits and many ongoing business incentives available for those who qualify. Fax your resume to 877-880-3800 or email resumes@activatecellular.co m. EOE.

Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

WE

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Loans and Mortgages

284

Estate Sales

Sales Southwest Bend

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Moving Sale, Fri. & Sat., 9-5pm. 18914 Shoshone Rd. off Baker. 27” TV, keyboard, mower, household, rocker.

286

Sales Northeast Bend H ESTATE SALE! H Thurs. -Sun. 9am-5pm Corner of Bear Creek and Craven, 1823 SE Bear Creek Rd., Bend. TV, Lefton figurines, kitchen items, tools, bed frames, fridge, freezer, antique picture frames, etc,

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Fri. & Sat., 7:30-5, Name brand, teens, women’s & mens clothes, books, games, Christmas decorations galore, many household & yard items. 2403 NE Ravenwood Dr. between 8th & 12th St., Sat. after 3 p.m, $1/bag sale. Garage Sale, Remodeling materials, tools, furniture, etc. 1270 NE 27th St. Sat., April 10th, 8am-4pm.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FINANCING

First Position Loans 2 Newer Bend Homes I Own Free & Clear 2 Points & 9% 3 Year Term Be The Bank Joel 949-584-8902

541-322-7253

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

6

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

290

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Sales Redmond Area

Business Opportunities

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

282

Sales Northwest Bend “Grandpa Moved” Sale, you name it, its here! Sat. 4/10, 9am-3pm. 3174 NW Fairway Heights Dr.

Garage/Yard Sale, Fri. & Sat., 8am-2pm. Push mowers, Avon bottles, housewares, hardware. 710 NW 21st Ct. HUGE GARAGE SALE Sat. Only, in heated arena in Tumalo to Benefit Chimps, Inc, Sat. 4/10, 8:30-5, 65525 Gerking Market Rd, Tumalo. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

3/2 house in Redmond, no pets, $275/mo. +util. Call Jim, 541-280-4185.

616

Want To Rent Retired couple looking to lease nice home in Sisters or Bend. Moving to area from out of state 818-517-0948 - Bob

630

Rooms for Rent NE Bend, Own Bed & Bath, incl. util., pasture avail., great seasonal rental, no pet /smoking, background check req., $375. 541-388-9254.

Room in nice spacious 3 bdrm., 2 bath home, huge fenced yard, pets? fully furnished, all utils paid, near shopping & bus stop, $500,541-280-0016 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

1302 NW Knoxville, Westside 2 bdrm. condo, W/S/G paid, woodstove, W/D hookups, deck storage, $575 + $550 dep. Cat okay, 541-389-9595. Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Next to Pilot Butte Park 1989 Zachary Ct. #4 1962 NE Sams Loop #4 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage with opener. $675 mo., $337.50 1st mo., incl. w/s/yard care, no pets. Call Jim or Dolores, 541-389-3761 • 541-408-0260

632

Apt./Multiplex General Desert Garden Apts., 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. 62+/Disabled The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with garage. $675 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Duplex, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, W/D hookups, dbl. garage, very spacious, new, W/S incl., no smoking, avail. now, $700 mo. Rob, 541-410-4255 Duplex, beautiful 1100 sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, cul-de-dac, newer, clean, vaulted, spacious, W/S paid, $635/mo. 541-815-1643 First Month’s Rent Free 130 NE 6th St. 1/2bdrm 1 bath, w/s/g pd., laundry room, no smoking, close to school. $495-525 rent+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414 HOSPITAL AREA Clean, quiet townhouse, 2 master bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appliances, w/d hook up, garage w/ opener, gas heat, a/c, w/s/g pd. $645/mo + deposit. 541-382-2033

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Move in Special! Quiet Town home 2/1.5 W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2022 NE Neil. 541-815-6260 Newer Duplex 2/2 close to hospital & Costco garage w/opener. yard maint., W/D, W/S no smokimg. pet? $725 +$725 dep. 541-420-0208. Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz 65155 97th St., newer 1/1 duplex on 2.5 acres w/ kitchen, 1 garage, mtn. views, $650 incls. util. No pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414 A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 First Month Rent Free 406 NW Bond St. Charming townhouse, 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, with garage, 896 sq. ft., W/S/G pd., pets neg. $795+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 Move In Special, Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199

638 1/2 Off First Month’s Rent 838 SE Stratford Ct. 2 bdrm./ 2 bath, single garage, all appl. incl., 1000 sq, W/S pd. Pets neg. $675+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq.ft., near hospital, fenced back yard, large deck, gas heat, A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, $750+dep., 541-280-3570 55+ Hospital District, 2/2, 1 level, attached garage, A/C, gas heat, from $825-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. A

20350 SE Fairway, 2/1.5, large duplex unit, fenced back yard, garage, W/D hook-up, W/S paid, $695+ $650 dep. 541-280-7188 Duplex - 2 bdrm, 1 bath, garage, W/D hookup, gas heat. $600/month, W/S included, $600 dep., No pets. Call 541-408-1151 for info. First Month’s Rent Free 20507 Brentwood Ave. #1 3 bedroom/ 2.5 bath, patio, W/D, fridge, W/S pd. & landscaping paid. $829+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414

640

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Good Deal! 2 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $625+dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

$595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D in unit. front balcony, storage, no pets. 1558 SW NANCY, 541-382-6028.

Boats & RV’s

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Real Estate Services

Snowmobiles

Houses for Rent SE Bend

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Sun Meadow, 1400 sq. ft., 3/2.5, W/D, appl., dbl. garage, yard maint. incl., pet ?, $995/mo, 61173 Daysprings Dr, call 541-388-4533.

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. newer carpet & paint, woodstove, garage fenced yard on .92 acre lot $795 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803.

740

860

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

Motorcycles And Accessories

MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

2 Bdrm., 1 bath, 900 sq.ft., w/ attached single garage, incl. W/D, newly remodeled bath, W/S incl., $725/mo. + dep., pet neg., 541-350-2248 New Listing! Mt. Bachelor Village., priced for quick sale at 3 Bdrm., 1 bath 1144 sq.ft., $150,000. Turnkey Comgas fireplace, garage, $795 pletely Furnished, sleeps 6, mo., 1st/ last, $700 cleaning 1/1 nice deck w/grill FSBO dep. 60847 Emigrant Circle for showing 541-550-0710. 541-389-8059,541-480-9041 $850 - Newer, 3/2 full bath, 1300 sq. ft., dbl. garage, on dbl. cul-de-sac, fireplace, avail. 4/1, 19833 Sprig Ct., 541-848-1482, 541-385-9391

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

$950 Mo. Newer immaculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. 503-363-9264,503-569-3518

Cute updated 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq. ft., nice appliances, elect. heat + woodstove, fenced backyard, trees, lots of parking, dbl garage on about 3/4 acre in DRW, $950 month. 541-550-7364. First Months Rent Free 61677 SW Cedarwood 2bdrm/ 2 bath mfd. home, w/d, pets neg. $675+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414

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Houses for Rent Redmond 2 Bedroom, 1 bath on 1326 SW Obsidian Avenue, $550 mo. +635 deposit. 541-447-1616 or 541-728-6421 3 Bdrm. Duplex, garage, fenced yard, $650/mo. No Application Fee, Pets considered, references required. Call 541-923-0412.

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

745

Homes for Sale

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

3102 sq. ft. 3 bdrm, 4 bath, 1.62 ac, CR Ranch golf course property, shop, garage. Reduced $90k now $459,900 Virginia Runge, Broker 541-419-5307 CB Dick Dodson Realty. 541-475-6137 ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** FSBO: $249,000 Furnished 2/2 dbl wide/shop & farm equip. 40 acre lot fenced/gated. Pond, good well. 2 mi. E. of Mitchell, OR. Seller Finance Sharon 541-408-0337 Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

865

ATVs

Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 Polaris Phoenix 747 bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new W/D incl., $875 mo. w/lease. A newer Redmond 4 bdrm., 2 Southwest Bend Homes rear end, new tires, runs bath, 1600 sq. ft., family 14 Timber, please call excellent $1800 OBO, room, mostly fenced, nice FSBO: $198,000 Golden 541-345-7794,541-654-1127 541-932-4919. yard, RV parking, $850. Mantle Subdivision 1234 The Bulletin is now offering a 541-480-3393,541-389-3354 sq.ft., 3/2, 1/3rd acre treed LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE lot, decking, fully fenced Rental rate! If you have a Newly Renovated in SW Suzuki 250 2007, garage backyard. 541-312-2711. 1100 sq. ft, 2/1, hardwood home to rent, call a Bulletin stored, extra set of new floors large yard, pet? $600 Single Story, 3/2.5, over Classified Rep. to get the wheels & sand paddles, +dep. Near High School, new rates and get your ad $2400; also Polaris $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, Refs. req. 541-350-3321. started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Predator 90 2006, new 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 paddles & wheels, low Nice 2/2 double garage, 650 hours, $1400; both exc. www.owners.com/jpm5553 $700/mo.+dep. Clean 3/2 cond., call 541-771-1972 or Houses for Rent dbl. garage, $850/mo.+dep. 541-410-3658. 748 NE Bend C R R No smoking pet neg. 541-350-1660,541-504-8545 Northeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. ga870 Mountain View Park 1997 rage, w/RV parking, close to 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in Boats & Accessories schools, off Cooley Rd., pet Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of gated community $169,900. on approval, $800 per mo., Terry Storlie, Broker John L. 16’ FISHER 2005 modified V 541-678-0229. Area Real Estate for Sale with center console, sled, 25 Scott Realty. 541-788-7884 A quiet 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, 1751 HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holdsq. ft., family room with pelers, mini downriggers, depth 659 749 let stove, fenced yard, storfinder, live well, trailer with Houses for Rent Southeast Bend Homes age shed, RV parking, $995. spare, fold-away tongue. 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153. Sunriver 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., Near Bend High School, 4 17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on living room w/ wood stove, bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 1/2 Off 1st mo., OWWII, .5 motor. Only $3700! Call 541family room w/ pellet stove, acre, 55948 Snowgoose Rd., sq. ft., large carport, no 390-1609 or 541-390-1527. dbl. garage, on a big, fenced short walk to river, commusmoking, $995/mo. + deps. .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy 18.5’ Reinell 2003, 4.3L/V6, nity boat ramp, $795,pets neg, 541-389-3657 Schoning, Broker, Owner, no smoking, 541-420-0208 100 hrs., always garaged, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. beautiful boat, many extras 661 to incl. stereo, depth finder, 750 two tops, travel cover & Houses for Rent Redmond Homes matching bow canvas, Prineville $13,500 OBO. 541-504-7066

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

LARGE DBL. wide mfd. & small cabin, on 40 acres of horse property, 15 mi. E. of Prineville, $900 - $1100mo. 907-315-0389 , 907-373-5524 Prineville: 2 bdrm,1 bath, appl, dbl. lot, close to schools, quiet neighborhood, pet okay w/dep., $550, incl. W/G, avail now, 602-510-3064.

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Mobile/Mfd. Space Mobile Home lot for rent in Beautiful Prineville! No deposit. Will pay to move your home! Call Bobbie at 541-447-4464.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 3000, 1500, & 2500 Sq.ft. Units, light industrial, 1 block W of Hwy 97, 2 blocks N. of Greenwood. Lets make a deal! Call Tom 541-408-6823

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Small studio, $395/mo. 1st/ last + $200 security dep. 362 NW Riverside, Close to Drake park, downtown & Old Mill District. 541-382-7972.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

#1 Good Deal, 3 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $675+dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Houses for Rent General

636

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928.

648

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1/2 OFF 1ST MONTH! PILOT BUTTE TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, fireplace. Only $710/mo. w/ one year lease. 541-815-2495

families’ useful stuff. Quality new & used. Saturday only, April 10, 8-4. 61524 Twin Lakes Loop off 15th.

GARAGE SALE April 9th & 10th (Fri & Sat) starts at 8 am clothes, W/D, lots of misc. 2467 SW 33rd St., Redmond

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Roommate Wanted

NEEDED

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Sales Southeast Bend

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Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

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Rentals

Move In Special $99 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com Newer Duplex, 2/2 wood floors, granite counters, back deck, garage W/D hookup, quiet st., 2023 NW Elm, $600. 541-815-0688. Studio, 1 bdrm, furnished, fenced backyard, all util. except phone +laundry facilities $500 mo+$250. dep. Pet? 541-508-6118.

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

Real Estate For Sale

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Avail. 5/1, West Hills, energy efficient, 3 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/D,new gas furnace, $800, 1st, last, dep., no pets or smoking drive by 1278 NW Vicksburg, then call 541-382-9470.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

19’ 2002 Custom Weld, with 162 hrs. on inboard Kodiak, Extreme Jet, with split bucket, Hummingbird 967C color gps - 3d sonar & maps, & more. $17,500, please call 541-977-7948.

762

Homes with Acreage GETAWAY on 9+ acres, will accommodate up to 12 ppl. Close to Sisters in private location. Only $485,000! Bachelor Realty, 389-5516 Sunriver Area, framed 2 bdrm., 1 bath, “U” driveway w/ extra parking, large detached garage/shop, groomed 1.47 acres, $224,900. Call Bob, 541-593-2203.

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

771

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $35,000, 541-480-4059.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvass enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker

The Bulletin is now offering a Beautiful Smith Rock 55+ 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. M H P 2 bdrm., 1 bath, all apRental rate! If you have a cond., stored indoors for pliances and partially furhome to rent, call a Bulletin life $11,900 OBO. nished very cute mobile, RV Classified Rep. to get the 541-379-3530 space $12,000 541-526-5870 new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeRock Arbor Villa, completely board boat, ballast, tower, 350 693 updated, new floors, appliV8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. ances, decks, 10x20 wood Office/Retail Space shop $12,950. 530-852-7704 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, for Rent perfect pass, loaded, Must Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, sell $29,000. 541-280-4965 Pines Mobile Home Park, new An Office with bath, various roof, heat pump, A/C, new 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, sizes and locations from pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom carpet, $10,000. $250 per month, including trailer. $22,950. 480-6510 541-390-3382 utilities. 541-317-8717


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 870

880

882

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides,

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. OBO. 509-552-6013. 541-788-0338

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

880

881

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573.

FLEETWOOD BOUNDER 38L 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, warranty. Price reduced! NOW $98,000. 541-389-7596

The Bulletin Classifieds

Everest 2006 32' 5th wheel, 3/slides many add-on extras. exc. cond. Reduced to $37,500. 541-689-1351.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Fleetwood Terry 2001, 34p slide-out, aw- Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, ning, self contained, less than 100 "on-the-road" miles. NICE! $13,000 OBO. 541-475-3869 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 7, 2010 F3

Autos & Transportation

932

933

940

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig., $2500, please call 541-389-8971 for more info.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

916

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck - Karman Ghia 1970 conCat engine, 10 yd mixer vertible, white top, Blue $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 body, 90% restored. $10,000 Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 541-389-2636, 306-9907. 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs Mercedes 380SL 1983, great, $4000. 541-977-8988 Convertible, blue color, new 925 tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 Utility Trailers

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

VW Super Beetle 1974,

541-385-5809

933

Pickups Chevy 1/2-Ton 4X4 1992, V8, auto, A/C, PW, PDL, etc., runs & drives fantastic, $2950, 702-557-7034, Bend.

runs great, $5200, call 541-390-1833. Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Studded Wintercat Radial 16” snow groove, 225/70R16 $150. 541-312-8226 or 760-715-9123 ask for Mike.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744. Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

885

Canopies and Campers 12’ Camper, overcab bed, lights/heat/water, plus extras. $295. 541-548-2731

Tires (4) 235R45/17 Continental Pro Contact $400 541-383-8092,541-749-8060 Tires, (4) 245/70R16 & 5-hole wheels, take-off, new cond., fits newer Dakota, Durango & 1500 Dodge, $350, 541-382-1853. Tires, (4) on rims P23578R15 for Dodge Dakota or similar vehicle, 541-419-4018 Tires, Set of (4) 265-70-17, exc. cond. $200 call for more info. 541-280-7024. Wheels & tires, (4) Audi 2006/A4 235R45/17 16 spoke exc. cond., $350 541-383-8092,541-749-8060

932

Antique and Classic Autos

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036 Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583 Chevy Trailblazer 2005, in good condition, with extras, Assume loan. Call 541-749-8339.

Appliance Sales/Repair

Cabinetry

Drywall

Handyman

All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765.. Don 385-4949

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Automotive Service

Carpet & Vinyl

Excavating

A & R Paintworks Quality & affordable, auto body & paint work. Rocky Fair, 541-389-2593 after 4 p.m.

Carpet & Vinyl Installation & Repairs, Carpet binding & area rugs, 30 yrs. exp. in OR, CCB#21841, 541-330-6632, or 541-350-8444.

Chevy Scottsdale 1984, 4x4, 6 in. lift, less than 3K mi. on 35 in. tires & new eng. no dents, new Leer canopy, red/gray $4500 or trade for ATV. 541-416-0654.

Chevy Silverado 1500 1994, 4WD,

X-Cab, 123K, $5500, call 541-593-6303. Dodge Ram 1500 1998, 4X4, Club cab, 148,500 miles, too many options to list, $6500, 541-617-5291.

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600.

GMC Yukon 2007, 4x4, SLT, 5.3L V8 FlexFuel, 63K, loaded, Extended warranty, $23,900, 541-549-4834

Barns

Concrete Construction

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Cascade Concrete where square, plumb & level is not an extra, commercial, residential, 34+yrs. in Bend. No job too big or small, ccb16071 call for FREE estimates. 541-382-1834.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Domestic Services Desert Rose Cleaning Now taking new clients in the Powell Butte, Redmond & Prineville areas. 20 Years Exp., Honest & Reliable. Call Gina, (541)788-0986 Home Is Where The Dirt Is 13 Yrs. Housekeeping Exp., Refs. Rates To Fit Your Needs. Call Angela Today! 390-5033 or 948-5413.

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

C-2 Utility Contractors Avail. for all of your Excavation Needs: Backhoe, Trench, Plow, Rock Saw, and Boring. 541-388-2933.

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

Hauling Everything from pine needles to horse manure. Best prices in town. Little Whiskey Farm CCB #68496 • 541-408-2262

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration Weekly Maintenance Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years! FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

382-3883

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565

KIA Spectra SX 2006 blue, 4 door 49K mi.$6500. 530-310-2934 LaPine.

Audi Quattro 20V 1990, Manual Transmission, Pearl White, 4-Door, 218K, New Timing Belt and Water Pump, Good Tires, Selling this for $1800 O.B.O call Larry at 541-610-9614 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Lincoln Continental Mark IV 1979, 302, body straight, black, in good running cond., tires are good, $800 OBO. 541-536-3490

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Camry LE 2005 4 cyl FWD, 4 dr auto w/ 109k mls. Silver ext. w/ grey cloth int. 6 disc in dash CD changer, factory power moonroof, A/C, cruise, keyless entry, ps, pw, pm, pl, ABS braking, factory floormats w/ trunk mat, PIAA Fog Lights, tire chains, professionally tinted windows, 2” receiver hitch used for bike/ski racks, all services done at Toyota of Bend. 2nd owner, NON SMOKER & PET FREE. $8900 OBO Call 541-749-8409

Lincoln Towncar 1992, top of the line BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

model, immaculate condition, $2995, please call 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521.

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Toyota Corolla LE 2003, tinted windows, PW, PDL, stereo system, snow tires/rims & premium rims/tires. 100K. $7295 OBO 541-222-9858

541-322-7253 Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, $6210. Call 541-350-7017. Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530 Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $17,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102. Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $18,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 original miles, Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl.,

Lexus GX470 2004, all factory options, great cond., 56K, $21,500, 541-419-6967.

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

VW Bug 1969, yellow, sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

Mercedes E320 2003, 32K!!! panoramic roof, $19,950. Located in Bend. Call 971-404-6203.

Mercedes E320 2004, 4-matic, 4 door sedan, loaded, exc. cond. $10,900. 541-536-5774.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,500, w/o winch $23,500, 541-325-2684

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

(This special package is not available on our website)

Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

SPRING

CLEAN-UP

Thatch, aerate, weekly maintenance, weeding, fertilizing, sprinkler activation.

Same Day Response

Free Estimates Contact Hal, Owner, 541-771-2880. hranstad@bendbroadband.com

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

RODRIGO CHAVEZ LAWN MAINTENANCE Full Service Maintenance 10 Years Experience, 7 Days A Week, 541-408-2688 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 BIG

Fertilizer included with monthly program

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Commercial and Residential “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Hauling Services

975

Automobiles

Chevy Corsica 1996, 196K, well maint., all records $1000 OBO. 541-317-9006

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

Appliance removal, reinstalled, gas lines, handyman services. CBC#49072. Since 1969. Senior Discount. 541-318-6041 or 408-3535.

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

The Bulletin

Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709.

Host 10.5DS Camper 2005, Tahoe, always stored indoors, loaded, clean, Reduced to $20,900, 541-330-0206.

SUBARUS!!!

Toyota Tundra 2006,

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

931 Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

VW Cabriolet 1981,

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and Fleetwood Prowler Regal double doors, 12 volt, roof 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., vent, stone guard, silver with Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ solar, 7 speaker surround chrome corners, exc. cond., BHS w/ custom value pkg., sound, mirco., awning, lots of $8150. 541-639-1031. 20’ awning, gas grill, tow storage space, 1 yr. expkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227 tended warranty, very good Find It in cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251 The Bulletin Classifieds!

Terry Dakota 30’ 2003, Ultra Lite, upgraded, 13’ slide, 18’ awning, rubber roof queen island bed, 2 swivel rockers $12,000 541-923-1524

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

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Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

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Remodeling, Carpentry D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

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F4 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE Housing Works will hold its Regular Board Meeting on Wednesday, April 14, 2010 at 3:00 p.m. in the Board Room of Housing Works, located at 405 SW 6th Street, Redmond, OR 97756, and with electronic communication with Board members.

Legal Notice Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property)

Principal subjects anticipated to be considered include update on housing programs, development opportunities, and further progress on other public/private development proposals and projects. A draft agenda for the meeting will be posted under Legal Notices on the Housing Works web site www.housing-works.org.

KOKANEE HOLDINGS, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company; MARCIA VAN HORN and TIM VAN HORN Defendants.

If you have any questions or need special accommodations, please contact Stephanie Westendorf at (541) 923-1018. For special assistance due to motion, vision, speech and hearing disabilities, the toll free number of Qwest's services for customers with disabilities is 1-800-223-3131. Cyndy Cook, Executive Director Housing Works (abn Central Oregon Regional Housing Authority)

HIGH DESERT BANK, Case No.09CV1097MA Plaintiff, v.

Notice is hereby given that I will on April 29, 2010, at 11:10 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property to wit,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that William D. Meierotto has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the Personal Representative c/o Robert W. Palmer, Lindsay, Hart, Neil & Weigler LLP, 1300 S.W. Fifth Avenue, Suite 3400, Portland, Oregon 97201, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the lawyers for the Personal Representative. Dated and first published on March 24, 2010. Robert W. Palmer, Attorney for Personal Representative Attorney for Personal Representative Robert W. Palmer OSB #742480 Lindsay, Hart, Neil & Weigler LLP 1300 SW Fifth Ave., Suite 3400 Portland, Oregon 97201-5696 (503) 226-7677 Fax: (503) 226-7697 rpalmer@lindsayhart.com Personal Representative William D. Meierotto 104 Apperson St. Oregon City, Oregon 97045 (503) 805-6218 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING

Unit No. RL220, as described in that certain Supplemental Declaration of Unit Ownership of THE INN OF THE SEVENTH MOUNTAIN, PHASE II-B, recorded on March 3, 1972, in Book 182, Page 880, Deed records of Deschutes County, Oregon, appertaining to a tract of land situated in Section Twenty-Two (22), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Eleven (11), East of the Willamette Meridian, in said Deschutes County, Oregon, as described in said Declaration, which Declaration is incorporated herein by reference and made a part hereof, as if fully set forth herein, together with a percentage of the common elements in the Association of Unit Owners of the Inn of the Seventh Mountain.

Lot Twenty-four, AIRPORT BUSINESS CENTER PHASE 2, Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution Foreclosure Deschutes County, Oregon. issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ for the County of Deschutes, of Execution issued out of dated March 10, 2010, to me the Circuit Court of the State directed in the aboveof Oregon for the County of entitled action wherein THE Deschutes, dated March 4, ASSOCIATION OF UNIT 2010, to me directed in the OWNERS OF THE INN OF above-entitled action THE SEVENTH MOUNTAIN wherein HIGH DESERT BANK recovered General recovered Limited Judgment Foreclosure Default Against Defendants Kokanee Judgment on February 8, Holdings, LLC and Tim Van 2010, against LISA Horn on February 11, 2010, VANDEHEY aka LISA against KOKANEE HOLDINGS, VANDEHEY aka LISA LLC and TIM VAN HORN as VINCENTY as defendant. defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE:

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Matter of the Estate of LEROY W. MEIEROTTO, Deceased. No. 10PB0031MA NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

County Records.

BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE:

(a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property;

(a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring prop(e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and erty owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Rebecca Brown, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: M arch 24, 2010; March 31, 2010; April 7, 2010, date of Last Publication:April 14, 2010 Attorney: Jim Petersen, OSB #00002 Slothower & Petersen, PC 205 NW Franklin Avenue Bend, OR 97701 (541) 318-2997

LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Rebecca Brown, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: March 31, 2010; April 7, 2010; April 14, 2010 Date of Last Publication: April 21, 2010 Attorney: Thomas K. Wolf, OSB #794558 4550 SW Kruse Way, Suite 125 Lake Oswego, OR 97035 (503) 697-8455

Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. Deschutes County Sheriff's currency and/or cashier's Office will be accepted. checks made payable to DesPayment must be made in chutes County Sheriff's Offull immediately upon the fice will be accepted. Payclose of the sale. ment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) THE ASSOCIATION OF UNIT OWNERS OF THE INN OF THE SEVENTH MOUNTAIN, an Oregon non-profit corporation, Plaintiff

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

v. LISA MARIE VANDEHEY, aka LISA VANDEHEY, aka LISA VINCENTY Defendant Case No.09CV1174MA

A public meeting of the Bud- Notice is hereby given that I will on May 6, 2010, at 11:00 get Committee of the Bend a.m. at the front, west, enMetropolitan Planning Orgatrance to the Deschutes nization (BMPO), Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 County, State of Oregon, to NW Bond Street, Bend, Ordiscuss the budget for the egon, sell, at public oral aucfiscal year July 1, 2010 to tion to the highest bidder, for June 30, 2011 will be held in cash, the following real propthe DeArmond Room, Deserty known as 18575 SW chutes Services Center, 1300 Century Drive, Building No. 5, NW Wall Street, Bend. Unit No. 512, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit, The meeting will take place on the 15th day of April, 2010 at 3:00 pm. The pur- A leasehold as created by that certain instrument dated pose of this meeting is to February 13, 1970, recorded hear the budget message and February 25, 1970, in Book to receive comment from the 168, Page 874, Deed public on the budget. Records, Deschutes County, Oregon, between CondoA copy of the budget documinium Land Co., an Oregon ment may be inspected or corporation, Lessor, and obtained on or after April Condominium Northwest, 13th at the City of Bend AdInc., an Oregon corporation, ministration Office in City Lessee, and amended by the Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, following instruments, reBend, between the hours of corded August 20, 1971, in 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM or via Book 178, Page 302; Decemthe web at ber 16, 1971, in Book 180, www.bendmpo.org/upwp.ht Page 991; June 13, 1972, in ml. Book 185, Page 574; July 28, 1972, in Book 186, Page 902; This is a public meeting March 16, 1973, in Book 193, where deliberations of the Page 449, Deed Records; Budget Committee will take June 18, 1985, in Book 97, place. Any person may apPage 1824, Deschutes pear at the meeting and disCounty Records and April 27, cuss the proposed programs 1999, in Volume 1999, Page with the Budget Committee. 20611, Deschutes County Records; the Lessee's interest was assigned to The Association of Unit Owners of The Inn of The Seventh Mountain, an Oregon non-profit corporation, in instrument recorded November 19, 1998, in Book 522, Page 1720, Deschutes County Records; the Lessor's interest in said lease was assigned by an unrecorded assignment to Lewis B. Huff and Doris J. Huff; the Lessor's interest of Lewis B. Huff was assigned to Pioneer Trust Bank, NA, Doris J. Huff, Pamela S. Pruitt, Linda D. Huff and Jennifer Huff Beal, as their interests appear of record, by numerous assignments recorded in Volume 257, Page 1197; Volume 257, Page 1199; Volume 257, page 1201; Volume 393, Page 586; Volume 439, Page 285; Volume 2000, Page 49355; Volume 2002, Page 11301 and Volume 2007, Page 43567; all in Deschutes

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Loan No: 0031173297 T.S. No.: 10-08093-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ROBERT QUINONEZ as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on June 14, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-40948 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 118038 PARCEL 1: LOT 7 IN BLOCK 3, OF RIM ROCK VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PARCEL 2: THAT PORTION OF LOT 6 IN BLOCK 3, OF RIM ROCK VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: STARTING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 6, BLOCK 3, RIM ROCK VILLAGE; THENCE NORTH 14º25'17" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 22 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY TO A POINT 22 FEET EAST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING ON THE SOUTHERLY PROPERTY LINE OF SAID LOT 6; THENCE WESTERLY ON SAID PROPERTY LINE TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 63286 CHEROKEE LANE, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,633.43 Monthly Late Charge $81.67 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $575,162.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.91000 % per annum from July 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned

trustee will on June 28, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 10, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY JUAN ENRIQUEZ ASAP# 3481590 03/17/2010, 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Loan No: 0031316375 T.S. No.: 10-07845-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TAMMY R. LAKE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on August 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-55736 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 125613 LOT TWENTY-SIX (26), BLOCK TWENTY-NINE (29), OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 17354 KINGFISHER DRIVE, BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,080.56 Monthly Late Charge $54.03 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 359,410.14 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.75100 % per annum from September 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 11, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section

187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 NW. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 10, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY JUAN ENRIQUEZ ASAP# 3482476 03/17/2010, 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Loan No: 0020900361 T.S. No.: 10-08063-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ISCELA U. LOPEZ as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, recorded on February 23, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-12517 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 17-12-28-CA-00300 THE NORTH 50 FEET OF LOT 4 AND THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF LOT 5, BLOCK 4 AND THE NORTH 50 FEET OF LOT 4 AND THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF LOT 5, BLOCK 6 OF ELLIS SUBDIVISION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION OF VACATED SEVENTH STREET ABUTTING THEREON. Commonly known as: 2287 NE 8TH STREET, BEND, OR 97701-8889 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $5,620.20 Monthly Late Charge $264.89 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $632,746.39 together with interest thereon at the rate of 9.25000 % per annum from September 1, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, no-

tice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 25,2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 10, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY JUAN ENRIQUEZ ASAP# 3481561 03/17/2010, 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010

LEGAL NOTICE RFP 1322-10 Architectural Services Central Oregon Community College -Request for Proposals- Madras Campus. COCC requests sealed proposals to be received no later than 2:00 p.m., current local time, Wednesday, May 5, 2010. Requests for a complete RFP Package shall be directed to Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator, Central Oregon Community College, via 541-383-7779 or by email at jmosier@cocc.edu. Specific questions shall be directed to the attention of Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator. Sealed proposals shall be received at: Central Oregon Community College, Metolius Hall, room 212C, Bend, Oregon 97701. There will be a mandatory pre-proposal meeting. The meeting will be held at the Madras Campus Project location (see Attachment C in Bid Documents for map) at 9:00am, Thursday April 15, 2010. The College intends to enter into an Architectural Services Agreement with the successful proposer to provide all services required for the construction of its new Madras Campus Building; a new approximately 8,500 square foot building, including all associated infrastructure. The Madras Campus Building will be built on undeveloped land. Architectural Services will include full programming services,

schematic design phase services; design development services; construction document phase services, bidding, construction administration and project close-out; plus all contingent services required, i.e. drawing and specifications changes and any cost/claim negotiations associated therewith, shop drawing/date review and approvals, plus all preparation of alternate, separate or sequential bids in connection with bidding, negotiations or construction prior to the completion of the construction phase. The College may waive any or all informalities and irregularities, may reject any Proposal not in compliance with all prescribed public procurement procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause, any Proposal upon a finding of the College that it is in the public interest to do so. The College is not responsible for any costs of any proposers incurred while submitting proposal; all proposers who respond to solicitations do so solely at their own expense. Central Oregon Community College, a Community College District created within the context of Oregon Revised Statutes, is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minority and Women-Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in this solicitation. The RFP Coordinator is the

sole point of contact for this procurement. All communication between the Offeror and the College regarding this solicitation shall be in writing, submitted by email, to the RFP Coordinator at the email listed above. Proposers are to rely on written statements issued exclusively by the RFP Coordinator. Any other communication will be considered unofficial and non-binding. Communications directed to other then the RFP Coordinator will have no legal bearing on this RFP or the resulting contract(s). Central Oregon Community College, a Community College District created within the context of Oregon Revised Statutes, is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minority and Women-Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in this solicitation.

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT II SANITARY DISTRICT NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit II Sanitary District, Deschutes County State of Oregon to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 will be held in the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit II Sanitary District's office, located at 55841 Swan Road. The meeting will take place on April 14, 2010 at 1:00 P.M. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained by appointment on or after April 14th at OWW District Office at 55841 Swan Drive, Bend, OR, between the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 1:00 P.M. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting.

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LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE (After Release From Stay) Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Gabriel Donnelly, as grantor, to Western Title Company, as trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as beneficiary, dated November 24, 2006, recorded December 6, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, Page 79787, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank, covering the described real property in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 13, Tollgate Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly Known as: 69359 Silver Spur, Sisters, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,657.77 from August 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: $318,292.54, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from July 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. The Notice of Default and original Notice of Sale given pursuant thereto stated that the property would be sold on April 8, 2010, at 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard of time establishe d by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon; however, subsequent to the recording of said Notice of Default the original sale proceedings were stayed by order of the court or by proceedings under the National Bankruptcy Act or for other lawful reason. The beneficiary did not participate in obtaining such stay. Said stay was terminated on March 16, 2010. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on May 24, 2010, at 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, (which is the new date, time and place set for sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder foreclose the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstate by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then to be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 03-22-2010_ KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 Telephone:(360) 260-2253 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa S&S 09-103515 ASAP# 3505643 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010, 04/21/2010

Published 4-7-2010


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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031048879 T.S. No.: 10-08185-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, FIDELINA LIMA as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on April 20, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-27259 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 182105 LOT 4 OF OBSIDIAN ESTATES, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2843 SW QUARTZ AVE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $921.00 Monthly Late Charge $38.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 131,156.69 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.00000 % per annum from September 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 7, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 10, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY LISA BRADFORD ASAP# 3483398 03/17/2010, 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T09-56509-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON MERRITT, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to LAND AMERICA ONE STOP, as trustee, in favor of CITICORP TRUST BANK, FSB, as Beneficiary, dated 09-12-2006, recorded 11-15-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-75755 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 161733 THAT PORTION OF THE EAST HALF (E 1/2) OF BLOCK THREE (3), OF MEETS SUBDIVISION, IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NE 1/4 SW 1/4) OF SECTION TWENTY (20), TOWNSHIP FIFTEEN (15) SOUTH, RANGE THIRTEEN (13) EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF BLOCK 3 OF METTS SUBDIVISION; THENCE SOUTH 89º35'42" WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERN RIGHT OF WAY OF TIMBER STREET, A DISTANCE OF 136.58 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00º35'57" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 219.05 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 00º35'57" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 79.69 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89º36'54" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 136.67 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF S, W, 30TH STREET; THENCE NORTH 00º34'58" WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 79.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89º36'36" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 136.65 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 2544 SW 30TH ST

REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/18/2008 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,758.74 Monthly Late Charge $87.93 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $215,033.28 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8.95% per annum from 12-01-2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 07-21-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: March 08, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DE LA TORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3481888 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-59677-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON D. NEEL AND CONNIE L. NEEL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 06-12-2006, recorded 06-16-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-41684 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245242 LOT FIFTY (50), DIAMOND BAR RANCH, PHASE 2, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2435 NE 9TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 11/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $761.98 Monthly Late Charge $38.09 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $133,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 10-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums ad-

vanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 07-19-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W, BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee, Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: March 04, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3481908 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359529987 T.S. No.: OR-234997-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GLEN T. COSTA AND JENNIFER COSTA as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of NATIONAL CITY BANK OF INDIANA, as Beneficiary, dated 7/19/2006, recorded 7/25/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-50994 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 112708 LOT THIRTEEN (13), BLOCK SEVEN (7), SUNDANCE EAST, PHASE II, RECORDED OCTOBER 6, 1972 IN CABINET A, PAGE 593, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 60135 STIRLING DR. BEND, OREGON 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $656,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $4,576.37 Monthly Late Charge $194.75 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $656,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 3/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/15/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said

trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/3/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3438229 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010, 04/21/2010, 04/28/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-59675-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON D. NEEL AND CONNIE L. NELL. AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 06-12-2006, recorded 06-16-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/ volume No. at page No. fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-41686 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245231 LOT THIRTY-NINE (39), DIAMOND BAR RANCH, PHASE 2 City Of Redmond DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 710 NE QUINCE AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 11/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $865.10 Monthly Late Charge $43.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to-wit:: The sum of $151,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.78% per annum from 10-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 07-19-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110. Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURT-

HOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors m interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of m the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: March 04, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE.ASST SEC ASAP# 3481895 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010 LEGAL NOTICE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION KC Hydro LLC Project No. 13617-000 NOTICE OF COMPETING PRELIMINARY PERMIT APPLICATION ACCEPTED FOR FILING AND SOLICITING COMMENTS (March 4, 2010) On November 6, 2009, KC Hydro LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of a hydropower development at North Unit Diversion Dam on the Deschutes River in Deschutes County, Oregon. The sole purpose of a preliminary permit, if issued, is to grant the permit holder priority to file a license application during the permit term. A preliminary permit does not authorize the permit holder to perform any land disturbing activities or otherwise enter upon lands or waters owned by others without the owners' express permission. The proposed project would utilize the existing North Canal Diversion Dam, which is used by three irrigation districts, and would consist of the following new facilities: (1) an approximately 50-foot-long, 8to 10-foot-diameter penstock to accommodate flows up to 800 cubic feet per second downstream of the dam; (2) a powerhouse containing a Francis turbine with an installed capacity of 1.8 megawatts; (3) an approximately 500-foot-long, 21-kilovolt transmission line; and (4) appurtenant facilities. The proposed project would have an average annual generation of 7.2 gigawatt-hours.

Applicant Contact: Kelly Sackheim, KC Hydro LLC, 5096 Cocoa Palm Way, Fair Oaks, CA 95628, phone: (916) 962-2271, email: oregon@kchydro.com

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FERC Contact: Gina Krump, phone: (202) 502-6704, email: gina.krump@ferc.gov. Competing Applications: This application competes with Project No. 13560-000 filed August 27, 2009, and Project No. 13639-000 filed December 9, 2009. Deadline for filing comments and motions to intervene: 60 days from the issuance of this notice. Comments and motions to intervene may be filed electronically via the Internet. See 18 C.F.R. 385.2001(a)(1)(iii) and the instructions on the Commission's website (http://www.ferc.gov/docs-f iling/ferconline.asp ) under the "eFiling" link. For a simpler method of submitting text only comments, click on "Quick Comment." For assistance, please contact FERC Online Support at FERCOnlineSupport@ferc.gov; call toll-free at (866) 208-3676; or, for TTY, contact (202) 502-8659. Although the Commission strongly encourages electronic filing, documents may also be paper-filed. To paper-file, mail an original and eight copies to: Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20426. More information about this project, including a copy of the application, can be viewed or printed on the "eLibrary" link of Commission's website at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp. Enter the docket number (P-13617) in the docket number field to access the document. For assistance, contact FERC Online Support. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Budget Committee Meeting A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Crooked River Ranch Rural Fire Protection District VI-503, Jefferson County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 01, 2010 through June 30, 2011. The meeting will be held at the Crooked River Ranch Fire Station, 6971 SW Shad Rd, Terrebonne, OR, on the 22nd day of April at 7:00 p.m. The purpose is to receive the budget message and receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 22, 2010, at the Crooked River Ranch Fire Station, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed budget with the Budget Committee.

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Andrew Harris, a married man. Amy Meadow, a married woman, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 2, 2006. recorded October 13, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006. at Page 68658. Beneficial interest now held by .JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirteen (13), Hollygrape Subdivision, Deschutes County. Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 19705 S.W. Harvard Place, Bend. OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected lo sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,508.61, from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on die obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $296,775.40, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1% per annum from October 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 1, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend. County of Deschutes, Slate of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than live days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) mid by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter. the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, (he performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while properly is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this properly at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the dale of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive alter the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the dale first sell for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 1. 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with (his matter, you may contact the Oregon Stale liar and ask for (he lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. The Fair Debt Collection Practice AcT requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to Collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed 10 be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 2/25/2010 BY: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-103869 I, The undersigned certify that the foregoing instrument is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale ASAP# 3464999 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010, 04/21/2010, 04/28/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FFF-90503 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, WILLIAM N. COX, as grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE CO., as Trustee, in favor of FINANCIAL FREEDOM SENIOR FREEDOM FUNDING CORPORATION, A SUBSIDIARY OF INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 11/21/2006, recorded 11/28/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-77991, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SEVEN IN BLOCK TWO OF BLUE SKY ADDITION TO THE CITY OF REDMOND, RECORDED OCTOBER 19, 1976, IN CABINET B, PAGE 190, IN DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1199 NORTHWEST 7TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 19, 2010 Total Amount Due $ 172,928.66 Accrued Late Charges $ 0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 0.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 172,928.66 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: FAILURE TO PAY THE PRINCIPAL BALANCE WHICH BECAME DUE ON 6/18/2009, DUE TO THE CONDITIONS ON THE NOTE REFERENCED AS PARAGRAPH 7 (B)(1), TOGETHER WITH ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST, CHARGES, FEES AND COSTS AS SET FORTH. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 21, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/19/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kevin Raichl and Natalie Raichl. Husband and Wife, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 25, 2006, recorded November 1. 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County. Oregon, as Instrument No. 2006-72931, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Four (4), Westbrook Village Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 21241 Starlight Drive. Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $755.19, from November 1, 2008, and monthly payments in the sum of $908.97, from December 1, 2008, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation dial the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $247,134.18, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.36% per annum from October 1, 2008, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that die undersigned trustee will on July 1, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the lime of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct properly inspections while properly is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this properly, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the dale of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to cither a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 1. 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we slate the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 02-25-2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND. LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-101794

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-92353

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TS No. 10-103856 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Dennis Dean Grant and Stefanie Carol Gram, as grantor to First American, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 6, 2005, recorded October 13, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 69757, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 32 of SISTERS PARK PLACE, City of Sisters, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 220 East Park Place, Sisters, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,473.45, from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $179,317.86, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per annum from October 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or lees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 28, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under die obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 29, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally, liable for the debt. Dated: 2-24-2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-103856 ASAP# 3464154 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010, 04/21/2010, 04/28/2010 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property)

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEANETTE JANIA, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 7/21/2007, recorded 8/7/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-43379, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT NINE (9), BLOCK TWO (2), PINE CREST RANCHETTES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 17120 COUGAR LANE LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 12, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 2 payments at $ 1,346.70 each $ 2,693.40 3 payments at $ 1,319.16 each $ 3,957.48 (11-01-09 through 03-12-10) Late Charges: $ 200.56 Beneficiary Advances: $ 22.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 6,873.44 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $165,967.74, PLUS interest thereon at 7.25% per annum from to 1/1/2010, 7.25% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word ‘grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/12/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3486136 03/24/2010, 03/31/2010, 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by William M. Jones and Sharon N. Jones, as grantors, to First American Title as trustee, in favor of West Coast Bank, as beneficiary, dated June 4, 2007, recorded June 8, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2007-32535, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: Parcel 2 of Partition Plat 1992-55, located in the Southwest quarter of Section 34, Township 21 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, filed November 12, 1992. Real property commonly known as 16160 Burgess Road, LaPine, OR 9773. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums:

COLUMBIA RIVER BANK, an Oregon banking corporation,

Loan No. 48013302: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of December 1, 2009.

Plaintiff, v. AWBREY COURT DEVELOPMENT CO., LLC, an Oregon LLC; BANKEN FINANCIAL, INC., an Oregon corporation; BADGER FOREST, LLC, an Oregon LLC; KENTON N. POWELL; an individual; DAVID R. MADRIGAL, an individual; and KATHY MADRIGAL, an individual, Defendants. Notice is hereby given that I will on April 29, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the real property described in the attached "Exhibit A". EXHIBIT "A" PARCEL I: THAT PORTION OF TRACT 15 OF WARD'S TRACTS COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 15-A OF WARD'S TRACTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; THENCE NORTH 17°20' EAST, 143.20 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 74°19' EAST, 377.30 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17°20' WEST, 134.83 FEET; THENCE NORTH 88°58' WEST, 98.42 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70°58' WEST, 283.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. (A PORTION OF WHICH IS NOW DESCRIBED AS BADGER FOREST PHASE 1) PARCEL II: THAT PORTION OF TRACT 15 OF WARD'S TRACTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 15 OF WARD'S TRACTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; THENCE NORTH 17°20' EAST, 143.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING NORTH 17°20' EAST, 150.30 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 74°19' EAST, 377.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17°20' WEST, 150.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH 74°19' WEST, 377.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. (A PORTION OF WHICH IS NOW DESCRIBED AS BADGER FOREST PHASE 1). EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION DEDICATED FOR PUBLIC ROADWAY PURPOSES. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM: LOTS 37 AND 39 OF BADGER FOREST, PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Associated addresses: 61260 Parrell Road, Bend, Oregon 97702; 20253 Hufflepuff Court, Bend, Oregon 97702; 20245 Hufflepuff Court, Bend, Oregon 97702; 20261 Hufflepuff Court, Bend, Oregon 97702; 20269 Hufflepuff Court, Bend, Oregon 97702 and 20265 Hufflepuff Court, Bend, Oregon 97702

By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance Interest Total

$172,855.84 $8,027.73 $180,883.57*

*Total does not include interest at the rate of $30.78 per diem from November 11, 2009, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on Friday, May 7, 2010, at the hour of 2:00 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch P.O. Box 470 Salem, OR 97308-0470 Dated: 6, January, 2010.

PARCEL III: /s/Erich M. Paetsch TRACTS 20 AND 21 OF WARD'S TRACTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON EXCEPT THE SOUTH 99 FEET OF SAID TRACT 21.

Erich M. Paetsch Trustee

Tract 20 also known as 61244 Parrell Road, Bend, Oregon 97702 State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. PARCEL IV: TRACT 19 OF WARD'S TRACTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO DESCHUTES COUNTY BY DEED RECORDED DECEMBER 13, 1960 IN VOLUME 126, PAGE 449, DEED RECORDS. ALSO EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO JAMES J. WILSON AND HELEN A. WILSON, BY WARRANTY DEED RECORDED AUGUST 2, 1968 IN BOOK 160, PAGE 53, DEED RECORDS.

I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch Attorney for said Trustee NOTICE TO TENANTS:

Also known as 61231 Travis Road, Bend, Oregon 97702 NOTE: This legal description was created prior to January 1, 2008. Tax Parcel Number: 120124, 261643, 261642, 261641, 261639, 261637, 261636, 261635, 261634, 120100, 120110 and 120128 Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated February 19, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein COLUMBIA RIVER BANK recovered General Judgment on January 9, 2010, against BADGER FOREST, LLC as defendant. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Rebecca Brown, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: March 17, 2010; March 24, 2010; March 31, 2010 Date of Last Publication: April 7, 2010 Attorney: Bennett H. Goldstein, OSB #80239 1132 SW 19th Avenue #106 Portland, OR 97205 (503) 294-0940 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of a rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is APRIL 7, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice below. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. You may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org, or contact the Legal Aid Services of Oregon, Central Oregon Regional Office, 1029 NW 14th Street, Suite 100, Bend, OR 97701 or call (541) 385-6944 or (800) 678-6944. DATED: 6 day of January, 2010. Trustee's name: Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee's signature: /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee telephone number: (503) 399 1070.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4413 T.S. No.: 1265403-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Bradley Jay Caputo, A Single Man., as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Community Lending Incorporated, as Beneficiary, dated October 03, 2005, recorded October 12, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-69554 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 20 of Arborwood, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1938 N.E. Curtis Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $836.65 Monthly Late Charge $41.83. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $163,914.80 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 30, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 18, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 31, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-296472 03/17/10, 03/24, 03/31, 04/07

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TS No. 10-103815 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Susan G. Campbell, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 26, 2005, recorded July 29, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 49582, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Portions of Lots Fourteen (14), Fifteen (15), and Sixteen (16), Block One (1) of RIVER'S EDGE VILLAGE, PHASE I, in the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4) of Section Twenty-nine (29), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, City of Bend, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a point on the Easterly right of way of Golf Course Drive South, said point being the Southwest corner of Lot 15; thence along said Easterly right-of-way North 07º43'30'' East 20.68 feet to the point of beginning; thence continuing North 07º43'30" East 41.32 feet; thence along the arc of a 92.86 foot radius curve to the right 6.10 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way South 45º26'01" East 195.28 feet to the Westerly edge of Fairway number 5; thence along said Fairway South 25º56'40" West 43.73 feet; thence leaving said Fairway North 44º22'02" West 181.01 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2824 N.W. Golf Course, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,462.21, from September 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,491.98, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $252,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.4% per annum from August 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 22, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 23, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 2-18-2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-103815 ASAP# 3457937 04/07/2010, 04/14/2010, 04/21/2010, 04/28/2010


Bulletin Daily Paper 04/07/10