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nology center in Redmond and education centers in Prineville and Madras. It will also fund the renovation of several campus buildings to deal with the college’s 85 percent

Upcoming Central Oregon Community College construction projects

Bend campus

INDEX Abby

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Business

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Calendar

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Classified Comics

Local

Obituaries

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Oregon

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Outing

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Crossword E5, G2

Sports

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Editorial

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Stocks

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TV listings

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Weather

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Health

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 84, 38 pages, 7 sections

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Boyle Education Center

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Planning begins: Spring 2009 Construction starts: Winter 2011 Completion target: Winter 2012

COCC Culinary Institute E3

Education

Pinckney Pence Center Hall

Science

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Movies

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Planning begins: Spring 2009 Construction starts: Spring 2010 Completion target: Spring 2011

Renderings of building are not yet developed.

Planning begins: Fall 2009 Construction starts: Summer 2011 Completion target: Fall 2012

Other active COCC construction projects Project

Planning begins

Construction starts

Completion target

Madras Education Center

Fall 2009

Summer 2010

Fall 2011

Prineville Education Center

Fall 2009

Spring 2011

Spring 2012

Winter 2010

Summer 2011

Fall 2012

Redmond Tech Center

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Galveston Ave. Riverside

Revere Ave. Neff Rd. Fourth St. Franklin Ave. Bear Creek Rd.

Blvd.

Powers Rd.

American Ln.

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do Simpson Ave. olora C Bond St. Mt. Washington Dr. Columbia St. ry Dr. Centu Brookswood Blvd.

Wells Acres Rd.

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Wilson Ave.

Second St.

Chase Rd. Murphy Rd.

Reed Mkt. Rd.

Knott Rd.

Scandal deepens with pope mired in U.S. abuse case

Pioneer

Mazama Fitness Center

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Newport Ave.

t. Rd.

Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

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Bookstore

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With a $41.6 million bond in hand, Central Oregon Community College is preparing for a busy few years of construction. Below, a look at the facilities getting under way and when they're expected to be open for students.

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Ninth St.

See COCC / A4

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Summit Dr.

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classes are among the most overcrowded and in-demand courses on campus.

Empire Ave.

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determine what type of labs and rooms are vital to successful classes. Health and science

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First on the list to get under way is the health careers building, which administrators

Correction In a story headlined “3 charter schools face wider inquiry,” which appeared Wednesday, March 24, on Page A1, the date EdChoices/ AllPrep’s bill to Central Oregon Community College was due was wrong because of incorrect information supplied to The Bulletin. The bill for $8,000 in tuition, fees and textbooks was sent to the company in February and was due March 4. The Bulletin regrets the error.

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finalizing its program requirements for the health careers facility, talking with faculty to

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Archie Briggs Rd.

enrollment increase over the past three years. started planning a year ago. That building is slated to open in winter 2012. The college is

Cooley Rd.

Hamby Rd.

$12 million in state funding to build two new facilities on the Bend campus, a new tech-

Bend’s worst streets Limited street maintenance funding will be spent on keeping Bend’s healthiest streets in good condition. That means little work will be done on the city’s worst streets, highlighted on the map below.

Purcell Blvd.

The bond, which passed in November, will be combined with nearly

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hard at work getting ready to start those projects and ease crowding on the campus.

27th St.

existing facilities and construct new buildings with a $41.6 million bond, it’s been

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S

ince Central Oregon Community College got the go-ahead in November to expand

Jones Rd.

By Sheila G. Miller • The Bulletin

Continuing budget woes mean Bend’s worst streets won’t be getting much attention this year. In an effort to get the most for its maintenance dollars, the city will work to “keep good roads good” and move away from maintaining the “worst first,” said Bend’s street divisions manager, Hardy Hansen. If the city decided to tackle street maintenance based on the worst-first theory, Hansen said, it would take four decades to get to them all. “We are on a 40-year cycle, if we take the streets in order of how bad they are, and in 40 years they just fall apart,” Hansen said. “So if we went that route, the good ones — the streets that are good now — would fall apart.” Revenues for street maintenance — which come from sources including the general fund, garbage franchise fees and a portion of the state gas tax — have declined for this fiscal year to below 2005-06 levels. See City streets / A6

d. ey R . Ril O.B

The Sisters Charter Academy of Fine Arts may owe the Sisters School District thousands of dollars after closing two-thirds of the way through its school year. The closing ended what had been a difficult year for the academy. The School Board voted in January to not extend the school’s charter because of concerns about low attendance, finances and curriculum changes. That vote meant the school would close at year’s end. But, about a week ago, the school was evicted from its building near downtown Sisters after falling $8,100 behind on rent. School officials had hoped to keep the school open through the end of the year, but announced Tuesday that the academy had no money left. The arts academy, along with Sisters Early College Academy and Sisters AllPrep Web Academy, are now part of a wider investigation into EdChoices/AllPrep, a Clackamas-based company that runs schools in six Oregon school districts. Both the Oregon Department of Education and the Oregon Department of Justice are investigating the company for questionable finances. From June through September, the district paid the academy a total of $82,440 based on attendance estimates that were never met. That means the district overpaid at the start of the year. See Charter / A6

The Bulletin

14th St.

The Bulletin

By Cindy Powers

Was

By Patrick Cliff

Overcrowded COCC putting bond to work

To stretch repair dollars, that means just pothole patchups for roads, many residential, not already in fair shape

Mt.

Sisters district may be owed thousands from closed charter school

15th St.

• PV Powered: To be acquired by a Colorado company, but it will stay in Bend, B1 • Cascade Healthcare: Confused? Hospital system’s new name may help, C1

Road crew forced to let Bend’s bad streets get worse

Third St.

CHANGES FOR TWO CENTRAL OREGON BUSINESSES

Source: COCC. Renderings courtesy Yost Grube Hall Architecture, Pinnacle Architecture, The Estime Group

Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

By Laurie Goodstein New York Times News Service

Top Vatican officials — including the future Pope Benedict XVI — did not defrock a priest who molested as many as 200 deaf boys, even though several American bishops repeatedly warned that failure to act could embarrass the Benedict XVI church, according to files newly unearthed as part of a lawsuit. The internal correspondence from bishops in Wisconsin directly to Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the future pope, shows that while church officials tussled over whether the priest should be dismissed, their highest priority was protecting the church from scandal. The documents emerge as Benedict is facing similar accusations in Europe. See Vatican / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE NUCLEAR ARMS: Russia, U.S. report breakthrough on treaty, Page A3 SOCIAL SECURITY: Analysis shows payouts to exceed revenue this year, an early sign of insolvency, Page A6


A2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Cole banned laptops in the 2006-07 academic year. He found them an “attractive nuisance.” It was a bold decree: Georgetown had only recently begun requiring that first-year law students own laptops, after painstakingly upgrading the campus for wireless Internet access. The laptop computer, introduced in 1981, has become nearly obligatory on campus; some colleges require them. They are as essential to today’s student as a working stereo system was to their parents.

Madeline Twomey, 20, a junior at George Washington, has used a computer since age 6 and had her first laptop at 15. She senses a widening generation gap. “Most professors, even at their youngest, they’re in their 30s,” she said. “They don’t understand how much it’s become a part of our lives.” Professors say they do understand — all too well. Diane Sieber, an associate professor of humanities at the University of Colorado at Boulder, has debated her students on the collegiate conceit of multitasking, the notion that today’s youths can fully attend to a lecture while intermittently toggling over to e-mail, ESPN and Facebook. “It’s really serialized interruption,” Sieber said. “You start something, you stop it, you do something else, you stop it, which is something you’re doing if you’re switching back and forth between World of Warcraft and my class.” One recent semester, Siebert tracked the grades of 17 student laptop addicts. At the end of the term, their average grade was 71 percent, “almost the same as the average for the students who didn’t come at all.” Sieber believes those students, in turn, divert the attention of the students behind them, a parabolic effect she calls the “cone of distraction.” Jose Bowen, dean of the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Texas, is removing computers from lecture halls and urging his colleagues to “teach na-

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ked” — without machines. Bowen says class time should be used for engaging discussion, something that reliance on technology discourages.

Resistance Some early attempts to ban laptops met resistance. In 2006, a group of law students at the University of Memphis complained to the American Bar Association, in vain. These days, the restriction is so common that most students take it in stride. Perhaps no college has experienced the good and bad of laptops like Bentley University in Waltham, Mass. In 1985, Bentley was the first college in the nation to require students to own portable computers. By the late 1990s, professors complained of distracted students. In 2000, the college installed a custom-designed system that allowed professors to switch off Internet and e-mail access in their classrooms. Professors have flipped the switch “thousands of times,” said Phillip Knutel, an executive director who oversees technology at Bentley.

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American students are mired at a basic level of reading in fourth and eighth grades, their achievement in recent years largely stagnant, according to a federal report Wednesday that suggests a dwindling academic payoff from the landmark No Child Left Behind law. The report from the NaOn the tional AssessWeb ment of EducaThe 2009 tional Progress reading showed that report can four th-g rade be found at reading scores www. stalled after nations the law took report effect in 2002, card.gov. rose modestly in 2007, then stalled again in 2009. Eighth-grade scores showed a slight uptick since 2007 — 1 point on a scale of 500 — but no gain over the seven-year span when George W. Bush’s signature school reform program was in high gear. Only in Kentucky did reading scores rise significantly in both grades from 2007 to 2009. No Child Left Behind, which Bush signed in 2002, aimed to spur a revolution in reading. The government spent billions of dollars to improve instruction and required schools to monitor student progress every year toward an ambitious goal of eliminating achievement gaps. Yet an authoritative series of federal tests has found only isolated gains — notably including the District of Columbia’s longtroubled public schools — but no great leaps for the nation. “We’ve had a real focus on reading, and we’re stuck,” said Susan Pimentel, a member of the National Assessment Governing Board, which oversees the tests. The report, she said, “points to an issue, and we’ve got to as practitioners figure what’s going on. I think students aren’t reading enough. And I think they aren’t reading enough of the good stuff.” Last fall, the government reported sluggish gains in math in a companion series of federal tests. Taken together, the reading and math results are likely to be seized on by would-be reformers as evidence that a new approach should be taken. But what that should be remains an open question. “Today’s results once again show that the achievement of American students isn’t growing fast enough,” Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a statement. “The reading scores demonstrate that students aren’t making the progress necessary to compete in the global economy. We shouldn’t be satisfied with these results. By this and many other measures, our students aren’t on a path to graduate high school ready to succeed in college and the workplace.” President Obama wants to raise standards and give educators more freedom to innovate, without abolishing the premise of No Child Left Behind that students should be tested every year and schools held accountable for failure. Talks are under way in Congress on a rewrite of the law.

David Cole of Georgetown Law has banned laptops for most of his students. A laptop, he argues, “is like putting on every student’s desk … five different magazines, several television shows, some shopping opportunities and a phone.”

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WASHINGTON — On a windy morning in downtown Washington, a hundred Georgetown Law students gathered in a hall for David Cole’s lecture on democracy and coercion. The desks were cluttered with books, Thermoses and half-eaten muffins. Another item was noticeable in its absence: laptop computers. They were packed away under chairs, tucked into backpacks, powered down and forgotten. Cole has banned laptops from his classes, compelling students to take notes the way their parents did: on paper. A generation ago, academia embraced the laptop as the most welcome classroom innovation since the ballpoint pen. But during the past decade, it has evolved into a powerful distraction. Wireless Internet connections tempt students away from note-typing to e-mail, blogs, YouTube videos, sports scores, even online gaming — all the diversions of a home computer beamed into the classroom to compete with the professor for the student’s attention. “This is like putting on every student’s desk, when you walk into class, five different magazines, several television shows, some shopping opportunities and a phone, and saying, ‘Look, if your mind wanders, feel free to pick any of these up and go with it,’” Cole said. Professors have banned laptops from their classrooms at George Washington University, American University, the College of William and Mary and the University of Virginia, among many others nationwide. Recently a physics professor at the University of Oklahoma poured liquid nitrogen onto a laptop and then shattered it on the floor, a warning to the digitally distracted. A student — of course — managed to capture the staged theatrics on video and drew more than a million hits on YouTube.

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WASHINGTON — Senate lawmakers moved Wednesday to make school lunches healthier by cutting farm environmental programs, while leaving intact the crop subsidies that many experts say contribute to the high fat and starchy diets behind the obesity epidemic. The Senate Agriculture Committee approved a $4.5 billion increase for school nutrition over the next decade, with broad bipartisan support. To pay for the increase, the committee targeted for cuts a farm conservation program called the Environmental Quality Incentives Program that goes to farmers of all crops, many of them small, while leaving untouched the much larger crop subsidies that go to big growers of grain and cotton. A costly remake of the $17 billion school lunch program, which feeds 32 million children a day, is under way in Congress in tandem with first lady Michelle Obama’s highprofile campaign to end childhood obesity. Obesity has risen dramatically in children, and the cost of treating the conditions linked to overweight have reached nearly $150 billion a year, or 50 percent more than the cost of the health care law. There is widespread agreement that corn chips with cheese sauce, fried chicken nuggets and other staples of the school lunch menu have to go. In addition, Mars, Coca Cola and other food manufacturers have agreed with the American Academy of Pediatrics and other public health advocates to embrace national standards that could ban junk foods sold in vending machines. Environmental advocates contend there is more than enough money available for school nutrition if lawmakers would be willing to trim those payments. Many public health advocates fought a losing battle against the crop subsidies in the 2008 farm bill, arguing that they make corn and corn sweeteners that are the basis of many packaged foods artificially cheap in relation to fruits, vegetables and other more nutritious foods.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 A3

TS  By Robert Burns and Lynn Berry The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. and Russia reached a breakthrough agreement Wednesday for a historic treaty to reduce the nuclear arsenals of the former Cold War rivals, the most significant pact in a generation and an important milestone in the decades-long quest to lower the risk of global nuclear war. After long and trying negotiations, President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev are to sign the treaty in

Iran pressed from all sides to take U.N. uranium deal New York Times News Service MOSCOW — Russia disclosed on Wednesday that Russian and Chinese envoys had pressed Iran’s government to accept a U.N. plan on uranium enrichment during meetings in Tehran early this month but that Iran had refused, leaving “less and less room for diplomatic maneuvering.� “The clouds are piling up,� said a top Russian Foreign Ministry official, briefing reporters on condition of anonymity, following diplomatic protocol. He said Russia would consider supporting sanctions tailored to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons, though it “is certainly against any paralyzing sanctions that are aimed not at nonproliferation but at punishing Iran or, God forbid, regime change.� At the United Nations, Mark Lyall Grant, the British ambassador, confirmed that political directors from the six countries had consulted by telephone on Wednesday and that China had finally “agreed to engage substantively on the issue.� Li Baodong, the new Chinese ambassador, emphasized that China is committed to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. “We think it’s very important to maintain stability and peace in the Middle East,� he told reporters, but he left ambiguous exactly what China is committing to. The Russian official’s comments came after U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton chided Russia for announcing the start-up of a new nuclear power plant it had built at Bushehr, in Iran, which she said muddied the international effort to press Tehran on weapons development. The remarks suggested that China and Russia — the two holdouts among the six countries that could approve sanctions against Tehran — are themselves feeling the pressure as demands for sanctions mount. Locking in Russian support for sanctions was a central goal of the Washington’s “reset� with Moscow. But Russia has long resisted measures that would strain its ties with Tehran — a point underscored last week when, during a visit to Moscow by Clinton, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said that the Bushehr’s first reactor would begin operating this summer.

Saudis: 2 terror cells broken up Bloomberg News DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Saudi forces detained more than 100 terror suspects, including some who officials say were plotting attacks on energy installations and military sites in the eastern oil-producing hub of the country. Twelve people in two al-Qaida cells, all of them Saudis except for one Yemeni, were in the early stages of planning strikes, the official Saudi Press Agency announced Wednesday.

two weeks in Prague, once final technical details are worked out, officials in Washington and Moscow said. The accord is expected to cut the number of long-range nuclear weapons held by each side to about 1,500, and it raises hopes for further disarmament. The deal is seen as sealing an increased level of trust and cooperation between the U.S. and Russia, who possess the vast majority of the world’s nuclear arms and have labored under strained relations in recent years. Obama and Medvedev are ex-

pected to seal the deal when they talk by telephone this week, setting the stage for a White House campaign to win Senate ratification.

What’s next Senate ratification could take months. However, Robert Norris, a longtime analyst of U.S. and Russian nuclear arsenals, said ratification would not be easy. “Hard negotiations with the Russians will now be followed by hard negotiations with Republican senators to achieve ratifica-

tion,� he said. Though the State Department said the two countries were still working out unspecified final technical details, spokesman Mark Toner said there had been discussions with the Czech government about holding a signing ceremony in Prague — where Obama last April declared his vision of a nuclear-free world. In fact, Czech officials announced that Prague would host the signing. They did not give a date, but Russian and U.S. officials said it was expected to be April 8.

CURRENT STOCKPILES AND REDUCTION ESTIMATE What’s affected Operational • Strategic (long-range) • Proposed reduction

U.S.

Russia

2,126 1,500

Not affected by the treaty Reserve Awaiting dismantlement

2,500 4,200

WASHINGTON — Anything but jubilant, President Barack Obama awkwardly kept a promise Wednesday he made to ensure passage of historic health care legislation, pledging the administration would not allow federal funds to pay for elective abortions covered by private insurance. Unlike Tuesday, when a beaming Obama signed the health care law in a nationally televised ceremony interrupted repeatedly by applause, the White House refused to permit coverage of the event. It occurred in the Oval Office in the presence of a small group of anti-abortion Democratic lawmakers who had extracted the commitment over the weekend. The president supports abortion rights. Meanwhile, the Senate held a relentless series of votes stretching past midnight as Democrats drove toward final passage of a second health care bill. The measure was drafted to supplement the first by sweetening benefits for seniors with high prescription drug costs and for lower-to-middle income families who cannot afford the cost of insurance. By shortly after midnight, Republicans had offered 22 consecutive amendments, and over the course of nearly seven hours Democrats had rejected every one. It was unclear how much longer the night’s voting would last. Lacking the votes to stop the bill, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, vowed, “We’ll continue to fight until this bill is repealed and replaced with commonsense ideas that solve our problems without dismantling the health care system we have and without burying the American dream under a mountain of debt.�

Student loan provision The follow-up bill before the Senate included a second triumph for the administration on domestic policy. It generally strips banks and other private insurers of their ability to originate loans to students, in favor of direct government lending. The government’s savings would raise the maximum amount needy students could receive in Pell Grants, and pump about $2.6 billion over a decade into historically black and Hispanic colleges. The changes would mean the loss of billions of dollars for student lending giant Sallie Mae as well as large financial institutions such as Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America. Taken together, the day’s events amounted to mop-up actions by the White House and Senate Democrats, one day after Obama signed into law far-reaching changes in the nation’s health care system that had eluded presidents and lawmakers for a century.

Up next: overhauling financial regulation Buoyed by its passage, the Obama administration and Democrats in Congress said Wednesday that an overhaul of financial regulations was the next legislative priority. The legislation appeared to be gaining momentum, as two crucial Republicans on the Senate

Photo by The Associated Press

Threats surround health overhaul Bricks have been hurled through Democrats’ windows, a propane line was cut at the home of a congressman’s brother and lawmakers who voted for the health care bill have received phone threats. The FBI is investigating the vandalism and threats. At least 10 members of Congress have reported some sort of threat; no arrests have been made. — The Associated Press

Related • Local activists condemn harassment, Page C1 Banking Committee, Judd Gregg of New Hampshire and Bob Corker of Tennessee, said they expected the overhaul to pass this year

even though they had concerns about some provisions. A Democratic strategy appeared to be emerging: expressing confidence that the measure would pass and urging Republicans to help shape legislation that they could support, rather than trying to block it. “When we come back from recess, the No.1 issue for the U.S. Congress will be this bill in the United States Senate,� Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., the chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, said after meeting at the White House with President Barack Obama. The House voted along party lines in December to approve a regulatory overhaul similar to one proposed by the White House last summer. Described as the most sweeping change in financial rules since the Depression, the legislation would create a council to detect and avert serious risks to the financial system.

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Tennessee Tea Party protesters gather Wednesday at the attorney general’s office in Nashville to urge him to file a lawsuit against over the health care overhaul. Lawsuits by 14 other states seeking to scuttle the legislation signed Tuesday by President Barack Obama are given little chance of success by legal scholars in the face of the broad powers granted Congress by the Constitution. Led by Florida, the states charge that the law illegally places a fiscal burden on their cash-strapped budgets with an expansion of state-run Medicaid and illegally requires an individual mandate.

Bulletin wire reports

3,500* 4,670*

Other nations with nuclear warheads:

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Focus shifts to bank bill as Obama issues low-key edict on abortion HEALTH CARE REFORM

2,200+ 1,500

2nd day of blocked Senate hearings Sen. Mark Udall says GOP senators have been using “arcane rules� to block committee hearings since health care reform bill passed Sunday. Udall said a hearing in front of the Committee on Armed Services that brought admirals from as far away as Korea was postponed, for example. He said Sen. John McCain had tried to continue the proceedings, but was overruled. — From wire reports

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A4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

COCC Continued from A1 In 2008, the college had already begun preliminary planning for a health and science facility before failing to pass a similar $43.75 million bond. Vice President for Administration Matt McCoy said the college will still be able to use most of those plans. “It was preliminary programming and some design work before the bond campaign was successful,” McCoy said. “We didn’t want to delay so we couldn’t open for the fall (2012) term.” McCoy said the concept of a single health and sciences building was too large and overwhelming on the campus. Now, the college will start with the health careers facility and then get under way with a sciences building. The buildings will likely be close together, although the location of the sciences building is not yet certain. “It just felt like it needed to be two separate buildings in the same vicinity, and so it evolved into these two,” said Director of Campus Services Gene Zinkgraf. “Combined, they come in at a smaller square footage (than the original large building).” The sciences building is now being designed and is expected to open in fall 2012.

Other campuses Redmond’s technology education center is also in early planning stages. Right now, the college is figuring out what programs that building should contain. McCoy said preliminary possibilities include an aviation mechanic and maintenance program, labs for CAD and visual graphic arts, and possibly a sustainable resource management program. McCoy described that program as looking at sustainable practices and teaching technical skills for installing and maintaining solar, thermal, wind and biomass technologies. Farther afield, the college is also preparing to get its education centers off the ground. The Madras education center will be a 8,500-square-foot building on 15 donated acres from The Bean Foundation across from Jefferson County Middle School. The college had hoped to receive a grant that would allow the building’s size to double, but College Relations Director Ron Paradis said COCC found out recently it had not received the grant. He noted, however, that The Bean Foundation has set aside a total of 45 acres for the education center. “It would give us a greater opportunity to partner with and provide greater services to the Jefferson County communities,” McCoy said. The college hopes to have the building open and operational in fall 2011. In Prineville, COCC plans to collaborate with the Oregon State University Extension Service, Oregon Open Campus and the Crook County Fairgrounds. “There are a number of benefits that come to the community and the education providers by co-locating (the programs),” McCoy said. “It provides an economy of scale.” If the groups are able to work together, the groups will likely share a reception area and classrooms. And it will be a sort of one-stop shop for people in Crook County to access educational services. That facility is expected to open in spring 2012. While bond projects are still mostly in the planning phase, the new building for the college’s culinary program is nearly under way. The culinary building is being paid for primarily through fundraising; the college will not use any 2009 bond dollars to fund the building. On Feb. 24, the college sent to the city its site application for the culinary facility. Zinkgraf said COCC is still awaiting the approval of that application, then will finalize planning and construction documents and bid the project. The culinary building is slated to open a year from now in spring of 2011. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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C OV ER S T ORY

Near its end, CIA tape inquiry centers on false statements By Carrie Johnson and Julie Tate The Washington Post

An investigation into the destruction of CIA videotapes that depicted harsh interrogations of terrorism suspects appears to be nearing a close, ending a long inquiry in which authorities have encountered a series of roadblocks in building a case. Prosecutors are now examining

the sworn testimony of an agency official to assess whether false statements charges can be made, according to two sources. Assistant U.S. Attorney John Durham, who is leading the investigation, recently bestowed immunity from prosecution on a CIA lawyer who reviewed the tapes years before they were destroyed to determine whether they di-

verged from written records about the interrogations, the sources said. That could signal that the case is reaching its final stages. The agency lawyer, John McPherson, could appear before a grand jury later this month or in April, according to the sources, who spoke anonymously because the investigation continues. CIA lawyers have been

essential to understanding the episode because they offered advice to agency personnel about the handling of the tapes and whether they should have been included when agency records were turned over in other court cases. McPherson is not believed to be under criminal jeopardy but he had previously hesitated to testify, the sources said.

The decision to open a criminal inquiry into the interrogations — after two teams of Bush administration prosecutors decided against launching a probe — ignited fierce criticism, including a letter to President Barack Obama from seven former CIA directors from Democratic and Republican administrations asking him to reverse course last year.


C OV ER S T ORY

Vatican Continued from A1 Those accusations indicate he and direct subordinates often did not alert civilian authorities or discipline priests involved in sexual abuse when he served as an archbishop in Germany and as the Vatican’s chief doctrinal enforcer. The Wisconsin case involved an American priest, the Rev. Lawrence Murphy, who worked at a renowned school for deaf children

from 1950 to 1974. But it is only one of thousands of cases forwarded over decades by bishops to the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, an office led from 1981 to 2005 by Ratzinger. It is still the office that decides whether accused priests should be given full canonical trials and defrocked. In 1996, Ratzinger failed to respond to two letters about the case from Rembert Weakland, Milwaukee’s archbishop at the time. After eight months, the second in command at the doctrinal office,

Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, now the Vatican’s secretary of state, instructed the Wisconsin bishops to begin a secret canonical trial that could lead to Murphy’s dismissal. But Bertone halted the process after Murphy personally wrote to Ratzinger protesting that he should not be put on trial because he had already repented and was in poor health. “I simply want to live out the time that I have left in the dignity of my priesthood,” Murphy wrote near the end of his life to Ratzing-

er. “I ask your kind assistance in this matter.” The files contain no response from Ratzinger. The New York Times obtained the documents, which the church fought to keep secret, from Jeff Anderson and Mike Finnegan, the lawyers for five men who have brought four lawsuits against the Archdiocese of Milwaukee. The documents include letters between bishops and the Vatican, victims’ affidavits, the handwritten notes of an expert on sexual disorders who interviewed Mur-

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 A5 phy and minutes of a final meeting on the case at the Vatican. Murphy not only was never tried or disciplined by the church’s own justice system, but also got a pass from the police and prosecutors who ignored reports from his victims, according to the documents and interviews with victims. Three successive archbishops in Wisconsin were told that Murphy was sexually abusing children, the documents show, but never reported it to criminal or civil authorities. Murphy was quietly moved by

Milwaukee Archbishop William Cousins to northern Wisconsin in 1974, where he spent his last 24 years working freely with children in parishes, schools and, as one lawsuit charges, a juvenile detention center. He died in 1998, still a priest.

Vatican secrecy, and its fallout The fallout from the sexual abuse scandal in the church settled across Europe on Wednesday, as prosecutors said they were weighing criminal charges against a priest suspected of molesting children in Germany, and Benedict accepted the resignation of a bishop accused of mishandling allegations of abuse in Ireland. Bishop John Magee issued a statement of apology. In December 2008, an investigation by a church panel found that Magee had failed to respond to accusations of abuse and that policies to protect children were lacking, setting off calls for his resignation. Magee’s was the first resignation the pope accepted since issuing a long-awaited letter to Irish Catholics last weekend apologizing to victims of sexual abuse and expressing “shame and remorse.” Even as the pope himself in that letter has emphasized the need to cooperate with civil justice in abuse cases, the correspondence seems to indicate that the Vatican’s insistence on secrecy has often impeded such cooperation. At the same time, the officials’ reluctance to defrock a sex abuser shows that on a doctrinal level, the Vatican has tended to view the matter in terms of sin and repentance more than crime and punishment. The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, was shown the documents and asked to respond to questions about the case. He provided a statement saying that Murphy had certainly violated “particularly vulnerable” children and the law, and that it was a “tragic case.” But he pointed out that the Vatican was not forwarded the case until 1996, years after civil authorities had investigated the case and dropped it. Lombardi emphasized that neither the Code of Canon Law nor the Vatican norms issued in 1962, which instruct bishops to conduct canonical investigations and trials in secret, prohibited church officials from reporting child abuse to civil authorities. He did not address why that had never happened in this case. As to why Murphy was never defrocked, he said that “the Code of Canon Law does not envision automatic penalties.” He said that Murphy’s poor health and the lack of more recent accusations against him were factors in the decision.

Vatican inaction The Vatican’s inaction is not unusual. Only 20 percent of the 3,000 accused priests whose cases went to the church’s doctrinal office between 2001 and 2010 were given full church trials, and only some of those were defrocked, according to a recent interview in an Italian newspaper with Monsignor Charles Scicluna, the chief internal prosecutor at that office. An additional 10 percent were defrocked immediately. Ten percent left voluntarily. But a majority — 60 percent — faced other “administrative and disciplinary provisions,” Scicluna said, like being prohibited from celebrating Mass. To many, Murphy appeared to be a saint: a hearing man gifted at communicating in American Sign Language and an effective fundraiser for deaf causes. A priest of the Milwaukee Archdiocese, he started as a teacher at St. John’s School for the Deaf, in St. Francis, in 1950. He was promoted to run the school in 1960 even though students had disclosed to church officials in the 1950s that he was a predator. It was not until 1996 that Weakland tried to have Murphy defrocked. The reason, he wrote to Ratzinger, was to defuse the anger among the deaf and restore their trust in the church. With no response from Ratzinger, Weakland wrote a different Vatican office in March 1997 saying the matter was urgent because a lawyer was preparing to sue, the case could become public and “true scandal in the future seems very possible.” Recently some bishops have argued that the 1962 norms dictating secret disciplinary procedures have long fallen out of use. But it is clear from these documents that in 1997, they were still in force. Murphy died four months later at age 72 and was buried in his priestly vestments. Weakland wrote a last letter to Bertone explaining his regret that Murphy’s family had disobeyed the archbishop’s instructions that the funeral be small and private, and the coffin kept closed. “In spite of these difficulties,” Weakland wrote, “we are still hoping we can avoid undue publicity that would be negative toward the church.”


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Social Security will begin New human ancestor? Scientists slide to insolvency in 2010 ponder one small bone in Siberia By Mary Williams Walsh New York Times News Service

The bursting of the real estate bubble and the ensuing recession have hammered jobs, home prices and now Social Security. This year, the system will pay out more in benefits than it receives in payroll taxes, an important threshold it was not expected to cross until at least 2016, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Stephen Goss, chief actuary of the Social Security Administration, said that while the CBO projection would probably be borne out, the change would have no effect on benefits in 2010 and retirees would keep receiving their checks as usual. The problem, he said, is that payments have risen more than expected during the downturn, because jobs disappeared and people applied for benefits sooner than they had planned. At the same time, the program’s revenues have fallen sharply, because millions of jobs have disappeared, leaving fewer paychecks to tax.

Analysts have long tried to predict the year when Social Security would pay out more than it took in because they view it as a tipping point — the first step of a long, slow march to insolvency, unless Congress strengthens the program’s finances. The Social Security Administration is expected to issue in a few weeks its own numbers for the current year within the annual report from its board of trustees. The administration has six board members: three from the president’s Cabinet, two representatives of the public and the Social Security commissioner. Though Social Security uses slightly different methods, the official numbers are expected to roughly track the CBO projections, which were one page of a voluminous analysis of the federal budget proposed by President Barack Obama in January. Goss said Social Security’s annual report last year projected revenues would exceed payouts until at least 2016 because economists expected a quicker, stron-

ger recovery. Officials foresaw an average unemployment rate of 8.2 percent in 2009 and 8.8 percent this year, though unemployment is hovering at nearly 10 percent. Goss emphasized that even the $29 billion shortfall projected for this year was small, relative to the roughly $700 billion that would flow in and out of the system. The system, he added, has a balance of about $2.5 trillion that will take decades to deplete. Goss said that large cushion could start to grow again if the economy recovers fast. Indeed, the Congressional Budget Office’s projection shows the ravages of the recession easing in the next few years, with small surpluses reappearing briefly in 2014 and 2015. After that, demographic forces are expected to overtake the fund, as more and more baby boomers leave the work force, stop paying into the program and start collecting their benefits. At that point, outlays will exceed revenues every year, no matter how well the economy performs.

“The thing to remember is that if we look at all our streets, about a quarter of them are in very poor condition, which is scary.” — Hardy Hansen, Bend’s street divisions manager

City streets Continued from A1 The money, called the street operations fund, pays for street maintenance, plowing in winter, street sweeping and even the bill to keep the streetlights on, which itself has run about $400,000 annually, said City Finance Director Sonia Andrews. For the 2009-10 fiscal year, the total budget for the fund is $7.8 million, which includes a $1.45 million cushion for emergencies or unexpected projects. Despite a recent boost of $1.23 million in federal stimulus money and added revenues from a state transportation bill passed last year, Andrews and other city officials say they still cannot keep up with street maintenance because of rapid growth and the increasing cost of materials like asphalt. “That’s why Sisters and Madras went out for a local gas tax; their revenues weren’t going to be enough,” Andrews said. Bend is prohibited from seeking a gas tax for the next four years under a 2009 state law that, starting in 2011, will bring in an estimated $1.6 million annually for street maintenance, City Manager Eric King said. While that will help, the rapid growth that has brought with it more streets is a constant maintenance challenge, King said. Many of those streets are in residential areas, which will now rank low on the list for repairs, Hansen said. “Because they only carry a few hundred cars per day and the arterials and collectors carry thousands of cars per day, the focus with the few dollars we do have left is very little on residential,” Hansen said. He said that, in 1994, the city was able to repair about 16 percent of the streets annually and get to each street about every eight years. In 2008, the city repaired slightly more than 4 percent of the streets. And the passage of time and

Charter Continued from A1 It has since been withholding payments, effectively waiting for the academy’s enrollment to catch up. But the academy completed two-thirds of its school year and so owes a portion of its funding to the school district. In Oregon, charter schools are sponsored by school districts, which pass state funding through to the charters. In this case, the district paid the academy at the school year’s start after the academy projected it would have 50 students. But the academy never reached half that projection, topping out at about 20 students. Because of that overestimate, the district has not given the academy money since September. “We’re definitely upside-down with them,” school board Chairwoman Christine Jones said. But Principal Teresa Schneiderman said the academy is entirely out of money and she is unsure how it can repay whatever debt it owes the district. Still, the district will attempt to recoup some of the money, ac-

The condition of Bend streets TOTAL LANE MILES

All 824 MAIN STREETS Arterials 151 Collectors 94 SECONDARY STREETS Residential 579

VERY POOR LANE MILES

PERCENT VERY POOR

122

15%

34 23

22% 24%

64

11%

Bend’s annual street operations revenues The revenues, which pay for street maintenance and related expenses, come from Bend’s general fund, a state gas tax allocation, overlay grants and garbage franchise fees. $8 million $6 million

$6.45M

$7.3M

$6.9M

$7.16M

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

$6.34M

$4 million $2 million 0 Fiscal year

2005-06

Source: City of Bend

installation of more streets means more have fallen into disrepair. “Concisely, I guess the thing to remember is that if we look at all our streets, about a quarter of them are in very poor condition, which is scary,” Hansen said. The city has a 100-point rating system for its streets and any street that falls below 50 is considered very poor. The streets on that list will now receive only minimal repairs. “So the streets we can fix we’ll continue to chip seal and the ones that are marginal we’ll do overlays, and the ones that are really deficient, that are structurally deficient, we’ll do nothing more than pothole patch,” Hansen said. Once those streets can no longer be maintained by patching, they’ll move into a different category, making them eligible for reconstruction dollars, Andrews said. “Some of the streets, when the condition has become so bad it’s not just a resurface or an overlay,

cording to Jones. District staff is currently working to figure out how much the academy owes, Jones said. Sisters Early College Academy has also apparently hit financial difficulties recently. Last week, the Education Department sent a letter to several Oregon school districts stating that EdChoices/AllPrep had failed to pay their students’ tuition at community colleges, including Central Oregon Community College. Charter schools are given specific state funding to pay tuition when their students attend a community college. About 30 students attend the early college charter, and much of their tuition went unpaid until the school recently paid some of it, said Schneiderman, who is principal of all three Sisters charters. The school still has to pay back tuition for 14 students who attended various community colleges around the state, totalling around $10,000, according to Schneiderman. Staff at the EdChoices/AllPrep charter schools across the state, which all have separate bank accounts, have made paying the college tuition a priority, Schneiderman said.

2009-10

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

it is not part of the street maintenance budget anymore because it is like new construction,” Andrews said. Those projects are paid for by the city’s transportation construction fund, which gets revenues from water and sewer franchise fees as well as system development charges — fees charged to developers and builders to help pay for infrastructure. A projected $21 million shortfall in the city’s budget over the next six years has meant the street maintenance budget, despite increasing costs, has been relatively flat, Hansen said. “The money may be somewhat static but the costs go up,” Hansen said. “And I’m not doing my job if I pretend I can fix it, because I can’t. So we have to be realistic and realize I can only fix what I can fix.” Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at cpowers@bendbulletin.com.

“The colleges are going to be paid,” Schneiderman promised, though she did not know when that would happen. Sisters School District will not be responsible for the tuition even if EdChoices/AllPrep fails to pay its community college debt, according to Oregon Department of Education spokesman Morgan Allen. The schools’ financial instability is a major reason the school board cut ties with the three charters this year, according to board member Glen Lasken. Board members have worried about the schools collapsing financially that would leave Sisters schools holding the bill for money the district had paid until the state money arrived, according to Lasken. The board has made several unsuccessful attempts to get a full accounting of the school finances, Lasken said. “That’s why we pulled the plug as quickly as we did,” Lasken said. “We couldn’t get accurate information. Certainly, it scared us.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

By Nicholas Wade New York Times News Service

A previously unknown kind of human group vanished from the world so completely that it has left behind the merest wisp of evidence that it ever existed — a single bone from the little finger of a child, buried in a cave in the Altai mountains of southern Siberia. Researchers extracted DNA from the bone and reported Wednesday that it differed conspicuously from that of both modern humans and of Neanderthals, the archaic human species that inhabited Europe until the arrival of modern humans on the Continent some 44,000 years ago. The child who carried the DNA lineage was probably 5 to 7 years old; it is not yet known if it was a boy or a girl. The finger bone was excavated by Russian archaeologists in 2008 from a place known as the Denisova cave. The researchers, led by Johannes Krause and Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, are careful not to call the Denisova child a new human species, though it may prove to be so, because the evidence is preliminary. But they say the genetic material extracted from the bone, an element called mitochondrial DNA, belonged to a distinct human lineage that migrated out of Africa at a different time from the two known archaic human species. Homo erectus, found in East Asia, left Africa two million years ago, and the ancestor of Neanderthals emigrated some 500,000 years ago. The number of differences found in the child’s DNA indicate that its ancestors left Africa about 1 million years ago, the researchers say. Their report is published online in the journal Nature. Paabo, a pioneer in decoding ancient human DNA, said at a news conference that before asserting that the Denisova child was a new species, he needed to rule out the possibility that it belonged to a population formed by interbreeding between the new lineage and a known spe-

Nature via The Associated Press

A view from a rock above Denisova cave to the excavation field camp in the Altai Mountains of southern Siberia. In the latest use of DNA to investigate the story of humankind, scientists have decoded genetic material from an unidentified human ancestor that lived in Siberia and concluded it might be a new member of the human family tree. The DNA doesn’t match modern humans or Neanderthals, two species that lived in that area around the same time — 30,000 to 50,000 years ago. cies. He said he was analyzing the rest of the child’s DNA, from the main or nuclear genome, to test this possibility. “Back at the time this lineage came out of Africa, it had to have been a distinct group, perhaps a distinct species,” he said. “But whether or not this individual was a distinct species, we have to wait for the nuclear DNA.” The finger bone was found in a layer laid down on the cave floor between 48,000 and 30,000 years ago, according to radiocarbon dating. At that time, toward the end of the Pleistocene Ice Age, which ended 10,000 years ago, the climate was probably much colder. The artifacts found in the cave in the same layer as the finger bone include ornaments and a bracelet that are typical of modern human sites from the Upper Paleolithic age in Europe. These are puzzling artifacts to be found with a nonmodern human species. But bones can move up and down in archaeological sites, and it is hard to know if the finger bone is truly associated with these artifacts, Krause said, even though there is little sign of mix-

ing in the cave’s layers. The valley beneath the Denisova cave 30,000 years ago would have been mostly a steppe, or treeless grassland, according to pollen analysis, and it was roamed by ice-age species like the woolly mammoth and woolly rhino, Krause said. The region was inhabited by both Neanderthals and modern humans at that time. Counting the new human lineage, three human species may have lived together in proximity. “So the picture of the humans around in the late Pleistocene gets a lot more complex and a lot more interesting,” Paabo said.

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2010

MARKET REPORT

t

2,398.76 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -16.48 -.68%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

t

CLOSE 10,836.15 DOW JONES CHANGE -52.68 -.48%

t

1,167.72 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -6.45 -.55%

Bend art gallery Glass Symphony will close in April after a liquidation sale, its owners announced Wednesday. Owners Kate and Dan MacLeod said the difficult economic times forced them to close the gallery, located at 916 N.W. Wall St. It opened in September 2006, according to a news release. Glass Symphony will begin a liquidation sale April 1, the news release stated, and it will continue through April 30. The MacLeods said their art supply store will continue through May.

Durable goods orders rise in February WASHINGTON — Orders for long-lasting goods rose in February for a third month, while inventories and backlogs climbed by the most in more than a year, indicating the manufacturing rebound will keep propelling the recovery. The 0.5 percent increase in bookings for durable goods was in line with the median forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg News and followed a 3.9 percent gain the prior month, the Commerce Department said Wednesday in Washington. Excluding transportation equipment, orders advanced 0.9 percent, more than anticipated.

Watchdog: Program may extend crisis WASHINGTON — The Obama administration’s main foreclosure-prevention program risks helping few borrowers and may do more harm than good by “merely spreading out the foreclosure crisis” over several years, federal investigators said. “A year into the program, although more than a million trial modifications have been initiated, the number of permanent modifications thus far, 168,708, has been, even according to Treasury, ‘disappointing,’” according to a report by a government watchdog obtained by Bloomberg News. “The program will not be a long-term success if large amounts of borrowers simply re-default and end up facing foreclosure anyway.”

Ten-year CLOSE 3.82 treasury CHANGE +4.09%

t

$1,088.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$14.90

Solar company PV Powered to be bought for up to $90M the process is finalized, shareholders could receive up to $40 Bend-based PV Powered will million more in cash if certain soon have a new owner. financial targets are met, acFor up to $90 million, a Colo- cording to the agreement. rado-based power generation For the rest of 2010, Adcompany is set to purchase PV vanced Energy expects to Powered, a privately held solar earn $40 million to $50 million inverter manufacturer, accord- through PV Powered from the ing to a document filed with acquisition. the U.S. Securities and PV Powered’s sale Exchange Commission comes at a time of exon Wednesday. The ac- Inside pansion for the sevenquisition by Fort Colyear-old company. • PV Powered lins-based Advanced The current majortimeline, Energy Industries Inc. ity shareholder of PV Page B3 should be completed Powered, Evans Rewithin the next five newable Holding II, weeks, said Gregg Patwhich is managed by terson, chief executive officer Longview, Wash.-based conof PV Powered. struction company JH Kelly, PV Powered’s management recently invested $3 million team and its more than 90 em- in an overall expansion of PV ployees will keep their jobs in Powered’s 100,000-square-foot Bend, where the company will Brinson Boulevard facility, said remain located, Patterson said Erick Petersen, vice president Wednesday morning. of sales and marketing for PV “There is no employee or Powered. staffing impact,” Patterson Petersen said Advanced Ensaid. “We’re very excited.” ergy will continue that type Up front, PV Powered’s of investment, adding that the shareholders will receive about merger came about primarily $35 million in cash, along with because the two companies are $15 million in Advanced En- similar, both in terms of prodergy common stock, accord- uct line and development goals. ing to the SEC document. After See PV Powered / B3

By David Holley The Bulletin

New-home sales Sales of new single-family homes at a seasonally adjusted annual rate. In thousands

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

PV Powered CEO Gregg Patterson speaks at a news conference announcing the company’s acquisition, at its Bend headquarters on Wednesday.

What is Advanced Energy? Founded in 1981, Advanced Energy Industries Inc. focuses primarily on converting AC power to DC or RF power for various applications, principally in markets that manufacture thin-film for products such as windows, said Lawrence Firestone, chief financial officer. There are multiple layers of thin film on all windows, and Advanced Energy’s products convert the power used to operate the machines that creates the film,

Firestone said. Advanced Energy chose to expand its market in 2007, when it started building solar power inverters, which convert DC power obtained from the sun’s rays into AC power that can be sold on electricity grids. Now, solar accounts for 15 percent of Advanced Energy’s revenues. What: Advanced Energy Industries Inc. Where: Fort Collins, Colo. Revenue: $186.4 million in 2009 Web site: www.advanced-energy. com

PERSONAL FINANCE By Ron Lieber New York Times News Service

Last week, the Federal Reserve reaffirmed its intention to stop buying mortgage-backed securities, signaling the likelihood that the mortgage rates you can get today are as good as they’re going to be for a long while. Once the Fed stops buying, after all, rates are likely to go up. And current rates are quite good. At about 5 percent, in fact, they’re so good that they’ve helped change the age-old debate over whether homeowners should make extra mortgage payments to pay off their debt well before their loan periods are up. Back when rates ran at 7 or 8 percent, making extra payments offered what amounted to a guaranteed return on your money. When you’re ridding yourself of debt that costs you much less, however, it’s easier to imagine a future when you could more easily earn a higher return by investing those potential extra mortgage payments someplace else. Meanwhile, at a time when just about everyone knows someone who is unemployed or who owes more on a home loan than the house is worth, keeping extra cash someplace more liquid than a mortgage seems like a safer approach. So is the case against extra payments closed for good, given that so many people have locked in rock-bottom mortgage rates for the long haul? The answer depends on two things: how likely you are to leave the extra money in savings and how good it would feel to wipe your debt out years earlier than your mortgage requires.

The basics

308,000

First, let’s dispense with the standard boilerplate. Don’t even think about making extra mortgage payments unless you’ve paid off higher-interest debt. Credit card debt is the easiest win here. See Mortgage / B3

400

300

200 ’10

Source: Department of Commerce

AP

Illustration by Robert Neubecker / New York Times News Service

$16.626 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.386

BofA plans to forgive mortgage debt on a limited basis New York Times News Service

With such low rates, the answer isn’t as simple as it once was

WASHINGTON — Sales of new homes unexpectedly fell in February to a record low as blizzards, unemployment and foreclosures depressed the market. Purchases decreased 2.2 percent to an annual pace of 308,000, figures from the Commerce Department showed Wednesday. The median sales price climbed by the most in more than two years. — From staff and wire reports

t

By David Streitfeld and Louise Story

Is it a good idea to pay down the mortgage?

New-home sales drop to record low

2009

BONDS

Company will remain located in Bend; employees, staffing won’t be affected

Downtown gallery to close in April

500

s

Bank of America said on Wednesday that it would begin forgiving some mortgage debt in an effort to keep distressed borrowers from losing their homes. The program, limited in scope and available by invitation only, signals a significant shift in efforts to deal with the millions of homeowners who are facing foreclosure. It comes as banks are being urged by the White House, members of Congress and community groups to do more to stem the tide. Bank of America’s program may increase the pressure on other big banks to offer more help for distressed borrowers, while potentially angering other homeowners who have kept up their payments and are not getting such help. As the housing market shows signs of possibly entering another downturn, worries about foreclosure are growing. With the volume of sales dropping, prices are starting to slide again. When the gap increases between the size of a mortgage and the value that the home could fetch from a buyer, owners tend to give up. Cutting the size of the debt over a period of years, however, might encourage people to stick around. That could save homes from foreclosure and stabilize neighborhoods. “Banks are willing to take some losses now to avoid much greater losses later if the housing market continues to spiral, and that’s a sea change from where they were a year ago,” said Howard Glaser, a housing consultant in Washington and former government regulator. The threat of a stick may be helping banks to realize that principal writedowns are in their ultimate self-interest. The Bank of America program was announced simultaneously with the news that the lender had reached a settlement with the state of Massachusetts over claims of predatory lending. See BofA / B4

Epic Air to be sold at auction By Tim Doran The Bulletin

An auction scheduled for Friday will apparently determine who will own Bend-based kit airplane maker Epic Air, according to documents filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Wednesday marked the deadline to express an interest in buying Epic, and Bankruptcy Trustee Kenneth Eiler filed a notice that qualified bids were received. However, neither the number of bidders nor their identities was disclosed, and Eiler and two attorneys representing him did not return telephone calls or e-mailed requests seeking clarification. Attorneys representing Epic also could not be reached. Friday’s auction is scheduled to be held in the Portland offices of Ball Janik LLP, not in bankruptcy court, and only qualified bidders and “certain other parties specifically authorized to attend by prior order of the court” will be allowed to attend, according to notices filed with the court. A court hearing has been scheduled on Tuesday for final approval of the sale. See Epic / B3


B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power 11.67 -.23 ABB Ltd 0.44 21.38 -.41 ABM 0.54 20.82 -.09 ACE Ltd 1.24 52.88 +.09 ADC Tel 7.32 -.17 AES Corp 11.02 -.21 AFLAC 1.12 53.65 +.15 AGA Med n 14.77 -.61 AGCO 35.77 -.05 AK Steel 0.20 23.33 +.16 AMB Pr 1.12 28.78 +.31 AMR 9.04 +.09 AOL n 25.94 +.02 AP Pharma 1.14 +.03 ARYxTher .88 -.02 ASML Hld 0.26 34.83 -.57 AT&T Inc 1.68 26.26 -.29 ATP O&G 19.10 +.56 ATS Med 2.56 +.08 AU Optron 0.09 11.23 -.37 AVI Bio 1.34 +.01 AVX Cp 0.16 14.19 -.11 AXA 1.33 21.47 -.31 AXT Inc 3.21 -.12 Aarons 0.07 33.19 -.03 Aastrom rs 1.84 +.10 AbtLab 1.76 53.87 -.47 AberFitc 0.70 44.38 -.48 AbdAsPac 0.42 6.51 -.09 AboveNet s 52.49 -2.30 Abraxas 1.94 -.02 AcadiaPh 1.60 +.02 AcadiaRlt 0.72 17.86 -.08 Accenture 0.75 41.79 -.61 AccoBrds 7.61 +.25 Accuray 6.70 -.10 Acergy 0.23 18.48 -.47 AcmePkt 19.02 +.03 AcordaTh 35.43 -.20 AcornIntl 0.99 5.20 -.11 ActivsBliz 0.15 11.93 -.04 Actuant 0.04 19.77 -.52 Acxiom 17.70 -.29 Adaptec 3.24 -.04 AdeonaPh 1.15 -.01 AdobeSy 36.51 +1.29 Adtran 0.36 26.26 -.30 AdvAmer 0.25 6.04 -.06 AdvAuto 0.24 43.39 -.51 AdvATech 3.53 -.15 AdvBattery 3.94 -.08 AMD 9.23 -.22 AdvSemi 0.08 4.45 -.03 AdvOil&Gs 7.19 Adventrx .22 -.01 AecomTch 29.53 -.25 AegeanMP 0.04 27.26 -.23 Aegon 6.59 -.15 AerCap 10.83 -.14 Aeropostl s 28.49 -.97 AeroViron 24.24 -.16 AEterna g .85 +.02 Aetna 0.04 34.41 -.58 AffilMgrs 80.12 -.34 Affymax 21.48 +.20 Affymetrix 7.44 AgFeed 4.46 -.06 Agilent 33.90 -.21 Agnico g 0.18 55.32 -2.65 Agrium g 0.11 70.84 -.40 AirProd 1.96 74.81 -.73 AirTrnsp 2.22 +.05 Aircastle 0.40 9.74 -.20 Airgas 0.88 63.75 -.52 AirTran 5.07 -.04 Aixtron 0.20 33.94 -.82 AkamaiT 31.56 +.04 AlskAir 41.07 -.80 AlaskCom 0.86 8.47 -.12 Albemarle 0.56 42.51 -.69 AlbertoC n 0.34 26.46 -.49 AlcatelLuc 3.16 -.06 Alcoa 0.12 14.32 -.18 Alcon 3.95 162.06 -.94 AlexREE 1.40 67.40 +.41 Alexion 53.75 -.85 AlignTech 19.66 -.23 Alkerm 13.00 -.17 AllgEngy 0.60 23.76 -.02 AllegTch 0.72 54.19 +.09 AllegiantT 58.06 +.32 Allergan 0.20 64.10 -.29 AlliData 64.30 -.28 AlliHlthC 5.76 +.09 AlliancOne 5.22 -.02 AlliBInco 0.52 8.10 -.04 AlliBern 1.77 30.05 +.02 AlliantEgy 1.50 33.22 -.24 AlliantTch 82.70 -.08 AlliedCap 4.81 AldIrish 4.49 +.19 AlldNevG 15.50 -.55 AlldWldA 0.80 44.55 -.16 AllisChE 3.92 -.07 AllosThera 7.68 -.14 AllscriptM 20.16 -.34 Allstate 0.80 31.33 -.11 AlphaNRs 49.27 +1.01 AlpGlbDD 1.32 10.38 -.12 AlpGPPrp 0.40 6.52 -.07 AlpTotDiv 1.44 8.89 -.02 AltairN h .73 -.03 AlteraCp lf 0.20 24.52 -1.14 Altisrce n 23.96 -.50 AltraHldgs 13.19 -.13 Altria 1.40 20.47 -.05 Alumina 0.07 6.20 -.18 AlumChina 25.86 -.60 Alvarion 3.94 +.12 AmBev 4.14 91.82 -.98 Amazon 128.04 -1.22 AmbacF h .80 +.07 AmcorFn h .50 +.02 Amdocs 30.45 -.07 Amedisys 60.04 -.42 Ameren 1.54 25.50 -.38 Amerigrp 32.92 -.21 AMovilL 1.22 49.41 -.43 AmApparel 3.62 +.06 AmAxle 11.07 -.21 AmCampus 1.35 27.47 -.22 ACapAgy 5.70 28.12 +.01 AmCapLtd 0.19 4.78 +.05 AEagleOut 0.40 18.98 -.35 AEP 1.64 33.99 -.31 AEqInvLf 0.08 10.58 +.15 AmExp 0.72 41.01 -.23 AFnclGrp 0.55 28.43 +.01 AGreet 0.56 22.04 -.21 AIntGr pfA 5.31 10.25 +.25 AIntlGp rs 33.17 -.11 AIntGr62 1.93 20.18 -.10 AmerMed 18.88 -.29 AmO&G 6.45 +.09 AmOriBio 4.22 +.04 AmSupr 28.15 -.25 AmTower 44.47 -.10 AmWtrWks 0.84 21.70 +.09 Americdt 23.25 -.13 Amrign 11.25 +.22 Ameriprise 0.68 44.68 -.01 AmeriBrg s 0.32 28.72 -.49 AmCasino 0.42 18.13 +.07 Ametek 0.24 40.02 -.16 Amgen 59.07 -.99 Amicas 6.02 -.01 AmkorT lf 6.82 -.09 Amphenol 0.06 41.98 -.27 Amylin 23.04 -.02 Anadarko 0.36 70.36 -.41 Anadigc 4.76 +.26 AnalogDev 0.80 29.06 -1.37 AnchBcWI 1.16 -.05 Andrsons 0.36 32.97 +.42 Angiotch g 1.14 +.01 AnglogldA 0.17 36.80 -1.81 ABInBev n 50.66 -1.26 Anixter 46.50 -.87 AnnTaylr 20.47 -.30 Annaly 2.69 18.13 +.02 Anooraq g 1.45 +.02 Ansys 44.41 -.35 AntaresP 1.50 -.02 Anworth 1.12 6.86 -.01 Aon Corp 0.60 42.42 -.47 A123 Sys n 15.24 -.15 Apache 0.60 102.32 -.94 AptInv 0.40 18.50 +.23 ApolloG g .34 +.01 ApolloGrp 63.27 -.70 ApolloInv 1.12 12.53 -.15 Apple Inc 229.37 +1.01 ApldMatl 0.28 13.00 -.24 AMCC 8.37 -.12 AquaAm 0.58 17.34 -.12 Arbitron 0.40 26.22 +.26 ArborRT 3.16 +.27 ArcadiaRs .45 -.01 ArcelorMit 0.75 42.34 -.94 ArchCap 75.46 +.20 ArchCoal 0.36 23.90 -.32 ArchDan 0.60 28.50 -.82 ArcSight 27.57 -.11 ArenaPhm 3.33 -.03 ArenaRes 32.05 -.38 AresCap 1.40 14.37 -.05 AriadP 3.61 -.09 Ariba Inc 12.76 -.25 ArkBest 0.12 29.48 -.55 ArmHld 0.11 10.42 -.13 ArrayBio 2.61 +.08 Arris 12.51 +.27 ArrowEl 29.64 -1.13 ArrwhdR h 1.02 -.12 ArtTech 4.40 +.05 ArtioGInv n 0.24 23.49 -.07 ArubaNet 12.55 -.38 ArvMerit 13.78 -.08 AshfordHT 6.91 +.52 Ashland 0.30 53.43 +.24 AsiaInfo 26.07 -1.43 AspenIns 0.60 28.57 +.54 AsscdBanc 0.04 14.17 -.09 Assurant 0.60 33.48 +.31 AssuredG 0.18 22.34 +1.25 Astec 31.02 -.47 AstoriaF 0.52 14.46 +.07 AstraZen 2.30 44.52 -.63 Astrotech 3.48 +.30 athenahlth 37.58 -.42 Atheros 37.78 -1.36 Athersys 3.02 +.16 AtlasAir 50.16 -.55 AtlasEngy 33.13 -.08 AtlasPpln 13.41 -.05 Atmel 5.04 -.22 ATMOS 1.34 28.83 -.16 AtwoodOcn 33.97 -.60 Augusta g 2.70 +.04

Nm Aurizon g AutoNatn Autobytel AutoChi n Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJ Svcs BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPW Acq BPW Acq wt BPZ Res BRE BRF-Brasil Baidu Inc BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkAML pfL BkAm pfB BkCmcCA BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiP Sug BrcIndiaTR BiPNG Barclay BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeazerHm BeazH13 n BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioTime n Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkFloatR BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR Blockbstr BlckbstrB Blount BlueCoat BdwlkPpl BobEvn Boeing Boise Inc BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrdgptEd n BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF BrdwindE n BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrukerCp Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNX Gas CNinsure CRM Hld CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G Cache Inc Cadence CalDive CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CambLrn n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CdnSEn g CanoPet CapellaEd CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarnUK CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CelSci Celadon Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene

D 4.65 -.15 19.18 -.53 1.02 -.05 33.68 -8.75 29.43 -.28 53.40 -.10 1.36 44.34 -.57 173.57 -1.48 33.60 +.01 3.57 88.13 +.53 2.11 -.01 0.80 35.06 -.68 6.55 -.15 11.65 -.02 28.93 -.84 0.88 32.08 -.80 1.58 -.06 0.84 31.22 -.24 0.60 32.12 +.02 1.74 29.83 -.34 30.16 -.11 0.32 6.12 -.06 1.66 78.35 -1.93 1.66 66.32 -1.84 0.20 21.21 -.24 35.50 +.01 .96 +.03 38.84 -.20 3.36 57.23 -.72 10.95 +.04 1.48 +.02 7.22 +.01 1.50 36.68 +.05 0.26 49.87 -1.15 608.50+13.62 0.60 46.55 -.57 0.68 36.57 -.20 0.40 54.00 -.52 2.91 +.15 38.62 +.06 13.55 +.15 1.34 45.46 -.37 0.39 13.56 -.48 0.76 17.31 -.29 0.87 12.99 -.66 11.79 -.43 0.88 20.76 -.04 0.04 17.57 +.44 2.05 25.62 -.08 9.27 +.22 3.28 +.19 2.16 25.75 -.08 1.02 19.00 1.56 20.76 -.05 0.24 4.68 -.27 1.80 44.75 -.16 7.36 +.25 2.80 60.50 -.73 0.36 30.68 -.67 1.96 50.04 -.44 2.03 +.03 39.35 -.43 25.72 -.52 51.39 +2.86 65.02 -.69 10.13 -.17 0.16 21.32 -.37 22.06 +.55 0.68 84.53 -.49 1.00 23.29 -.63 0.32 19.50 +.34 0.40 37.24 -1.58 8.73 -.30 1.16 58.90 -.47 .42 -.01 4.85 +.05 1.88 26.76 +.32 0.10 9.40 -.20 0.72 64.29 +.07 1.48 79.01 -.70 44.12 -.37 0.20 25.26 -.01 6.52 -.06 0.92 29.69 -.31 21.20 -.78 0.24 25.66 -.04 81.44 -.89 0.30 27.85 -.41 0.56 41.18 -.33 37.24 -.67 3.28 -.05 30.79 -.38 6.81 -.08 58.85 -.99 23.00 +.05 0.56 17.23 +.22 .47 -.00 1.89 +.02 7.16 +.17 0.36 16.39 +.12 1.42 30.13 +.13 1.28 9.89 -.05 43.94 -.02 4.00 225.00 -2.00 0.37 4.19 -.01 0.81 15.37 +.26 2.28 19.86 -.01 1.82 11.19 +.03 1.20 14.52 +.13 0.60 17.46 -.16 .33 -.00 .25 -.00 10.50 -.25 32.45 -1.07 2.00 29.88 -.10 0.72 31.62 +.03 1.68 72.32 +.14 5.85 -.13 2.16 +.07 2.08 +.02 37.85 -.15 0.04 7.41 -.28 2.00 76.15 +.12 7.04 +.02 0.22 11.25 -.01 9.58 +.14 0.60 12.80 +.29 25.40 +.36 0.44 19.79 +.05 16.30 -.51 7.44 -.28 0.44 20.36 -.03 0.40 28.38 +.01 1.28 26.69 -.10 38.37 -.94 0.32 33.53 -.67 4.54 0.56 21.61 -.13 4.62 +.06 5.83 +.04 21.29 +.20 0.52 25.05 -.11 0.56 15.39 -.01 0.34 10.78 -.19 8.88 -.03 0.31 17.96 -.04 14.56 +.77 0.05 15.83 -.27 0.80 37.20 -.38 0.10 68.15 -.97 0.16 29.89 -1.14 0.84 64.38 -.96 0.25 20.40 -.19 0.16 23.72 -.08 14.18 -.32 0.80 14.25 +.26 0.20 14.24 -.02 2.87 +.08 0.40 92.41 +.71 1.00 56.12 -.31 0.04 36.39 -.55 39.23 +.24 0.24 11.25 -.03 0.90 26.33 -.33 4.60 318.90 +8.31 0.60 15.55 -.14 29.50 -.34 38.00 +.20 0.22 26.78 -.46 .34 -.01 0.96 51.10 -.65 0.34 10.53 +.11 8.72 -.05 0.35 35.51 -.41 17.42 -.58 0.40 23.77 +.28 0.72 31.23 +.26 0.12 38.17 -.07 5.60 -.25 6.73 +.01 7.32 +.04 0.60 8.04 0.63 9.13 +.03 17.00 -.06 17.86 -.05 15.10 0.04 9.01 -.19 5.17 +.20 11.51 +.16 3.90 -.01 1.80 42.72 -.38 0.28 26.98 -.66 41.94 -.17 1.10 35.24 -.28 3.48 75.20 -.77 1.08 58.75 -.07 0.60 70.62 -.87 0.99 53.37 -.52 22.02 -.43 .55 -.03 1.05 +.03 90.83 -.92 0.20 41.26 +.35 1.67 +.14 0.04 5.91 -.07 2.18 12.91 -.12 1.29 +.02 0.72 65.73 -1.59 0.70 35.79 -.47 7.64 +.06 .46 +.00 24.98 -.19 32.48 -.44 0.64 38.55 -.13 24.45 -.28 0.40 38.46 -.35 0.40 40.56 -.50 0.72 35.34 -1.12 23.77 -.42 30.55 -.53 0.34 31.17 -.39 1.68 62.06 -.35 0.04 11.85 +.29 24.71 -.83 13.36 -.40 .69 +.02 13.82 +.15 0.16 32.65 +.64 7.07 +.09 10.80 -.44 63.35 -1.06

Nm CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh CelsiusH Cemex Cemig pf s CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp Changyou n ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemspec n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBio ChinaBiot ChinaCbl wt ChinaEd n ChiGengM ChinaGreen ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMble ChNEPet n ChinaPStl ChiRecyE n ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTInfo ChinaUni ChinaCEd Chiquita Chordiant Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n Citigp pfV CitizRep h CitrixSys CityBank CityNC CityTlcm Clarient h ClayChinSC ClayBRIC CleanEngy Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n CoBizFncl Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica ComfrtS CmclMtls ComScop CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh Compugn CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs ComsysIT Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcMed n ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil Conolog Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgn h Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copel CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Corriente g Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrSuisInco CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold CrudeCrr n Cryolife Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh Cummins CurEuro CurAstla CurrCda CurJpn CybrSrce Cyclacel CypSemi CytRx Cytec Cytori DARABio h DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DJSP Ent DNP Selct DPL DR Horton Drdgold DST Sys DSW Inc DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath dELIAs Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DBGoldDL

D .65 +.01 3.09 33.98 -.22 6.39 +.62 3.59 +.57 0.40 10.46 -.54 0.98 16.80 0.80 24.77 -.40 24.26 +.02 0.78 14.19 -.11 1.56 14.55 -.32 35.57 -.68 0.01 13.58 -.10 1.75 +.18 15.27 -.10 2.90 35.12 -.22 9.00 -.29 71.46 -.73 18.11 -.32 88.99 -.03 2.95 -.03 30.19 -.90 39.43 +.21 6.63 -.27 20.30 -.68 34.93 +.08 27.60 -.06 3.95 -.05 7.96 -.09 3.04 -.05 0.30 23.11 -.16 2.72 73.93 -.84 23.61 -.17 0.16 14.09 -.12 44.11 -.90 0.54 4.06 +.01 26.89 +1.06 8.71 +.16 22.19 +1.02 2.40 11.26 +2.18 19.04 -.17 .02 -.01 5.38 -.17 3.25 +.20 14.37 +.34 .61 -.01 5.13 -.14 0.51 69.04 -.90 14.16 -.38 1.77 48.19 -.74 9.24 -.14 2.16 -.04 5.65 +.47 7.60 +.15 3.90 -.04 6.96 -.54 0.29 11.55 -.62 7.58 -.18 16.05 +.36 5.05 +.05 1.48 51.84 -.09 1.42 19.05 -.22 0.56 68.66 -.54 3.97 -.20 15.46 -.02 0.32 58.88 -.70 3.41 -.06 1.58 28.79 -.16 0.72 17.74 +.02 0.48 28.32 -.26 7.75 -.23 26.45 -.19 2.13 25.77 -.09 4.15 +.02 7.50 124.05 +.84 1.78 22.25 +.16 .93 +.05 48.53 +.53 1.29 0.40 54.21 -.23 0.49 16.03 +.29 2.64 -.01 0.03 27.05 -.37 0.51 41.80 -.47 21.55 -.07 7.74 -.13 .23 -.01 0.35 71.76 +2.04 2.00 64.85 -.26 16.10 -.02 0.04 6.31 -.14 0.30 38.65 +.30 13.85 -.30 0.36 27.20 -.15 1.76 54.62 -.68 14.90 -.86 10.26 -.11 51.92 -.60 0.96 14.96 -.10 0.37 7.09 -.05 33.13 +.09 7.12 -.07 11.84 +.24 2.12 84.34 -1.00 22.47 -.27 0.60 13.70 +.23 1.09 -.02 1.26 0.38 18.18 +.09 0.38 17.41 +.13 0.20 38.43 +.32 0.20 12.98 -.24 0.48 15.96 -.99 28.40 -1.16 0.88 23.60 +.01 38.00 -1.76 1.36 15.74 -.05 1.56 81.41 -.94 18.31 -.43 11.74 -.38 .97 -.05 5.17 +.15 54.88 -.55 8.58 -.12 31.76 -.55 17.50 -.06 31.59 -.03 0.40 35.29 -.49 0.80 26.10 -.18 49.77 +.01 7.15 +.05 43.99 -.49 3.74 -.16 2.00 52.53 +.02 1.41 +.05 6.15 +.07 0.40 45.70 +.83 2.38 43.84 -.33 23.38 -.04 16.22 -.15 0.96 36.29 +.06 22.23 +.13 39.21 -.60 4.04 -.13 12.86 -.08 .95 +.00 1.08 46.33 -.71 0.42 20.46 -.31 2.30 23.45 -.03 0.81 20.87 -.44 19.05 -.05 0.56 34.87 -.49 0.20 19.46 -.22 1.57 41.97 +.87 19.50 +.10 7.81 +.10 9.25 -.20 2.29 -.11 0.72 60.07 -.69 7.50 -.05 0.13 8.44 +.13 60.60 -.50 16.81 -.21 25.20 -.64 0.72 49.65 -1.45 5.29 -.07 0.32 3.59 +.02 1.85 49.81 -.98 0.32 3.02 70.42 -1.21 8.31 -.20 8.60 -.09 38.37 -.34 27.31 -.30 17.00 -.07 6.37 -.17 .34 +.03 39.26 +1.62 23.26 -.06 0.70 61.81 -.54 132.94 -1.73 2.01 91.02 -1.10 97.12 -.90 107.59 -2.08 18.39 -.39 2.38 -.13 11.78 -.15 1.25 -.01 0.05 46.76 +.76 4.78 -.22 .45 -.00 0.28 5.45 -.02 4.10 -.03 12.23 -.11 0.78 9.48 +.03 1.21 27.43 -.31 0.15 12.85 +.09 0.07 4.92 -.15 0.60 41.16 -.44 26.61 +.09 2.12 45.04 -.24 45.88 -.96 12.81 -.08 0.16 76.36 -1.15 1.00 44.91 +1.00 8.81 -.11 63.21 -.61 .35 +.05 0.20 66.16 -1.43 17.58 -.35 15.75 +.08 138.76 -1.58 11.43 +.33 1.12 60.49 -1.47 .39 -.04 0.20 14.54 +.16 6.51 +.07 1.79 -.22 14.99 -.23 0.40 24.87 -.07 13.81 +.38 1.52 -.07 1.00 19.77 -.51 15.51 -.12 37.65 -.17 1.49 +.03 3.73 -.05 0.20 34.26 -.27 3.44 +.03 0.70 73.70 -.37 25.80 -.98

Nm

D

DBGoldDS DeutTel DevelDiv DevD pfG DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DirxTcBull DirxTcBear DirxEMBull DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DirFBull rs Dir30TrBear DirREBear DirREBull DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DukeR pfM DunBrad DuneEn rs DyaxCp DynMatl Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy

14.24 +.47 1.05 13.02 -.35 0.08 12.35 2.00 24.18 +.04 0.64 65.12 +.14 10.56 -.26 2.36 66.04 -.81 0.18 42.49 +.20 0.50 84.52 -.63 0.03 9.70 +.25 14.19 -.13 26.59 -.40 1.08 31.47 -.58 1.92 55.53 +.16 29.12 -.70 0.16 24.00 -.39 22.86 -.23 33.79 -.21 28.11 156.94 -2.31 7.84 +.11 23.09 122.94 -4.88 47.24 +2.01 13.55 -.12 0.46 96.18 +.60 7.35 66.51 +3.47 0.04 8.58 -.17 12.32 187.15 +2.94 7.04 +.22 4.85 55.63 -1.95 14.02 +.18 8.22 59.29 -.95 10.68 +.18 5.18 38.13 -.55 0.08 15.40 33.46 +.11 29.62 +.24 .54 +.03 2.00 20.67 -.14 0.35 34.39 +.38 0.13 28.75 -.15 58.66 -.70 12.37 -.10 25.25 +.07 34.34 -.26 59.41 -.39 1.83 40.08 -.11 13.83 -.07 65.41 -.77 1.04 21.28 -.03 0.40 15.52 1.04 46.40 -.98 0.60 30.36 +.39 0.60 36.33 -.24 9.98 -.62 44.00 +1.59 26.45 -.44 32.49 +.41 0.42 4.23 +.14 62.12 +.84 3.80 +.05 5.83 -.07 1.64 38.77 +.46 0.32 22.35 +.02 0.96 16.32 -.14 0.68 12.58 +.09 1.74 22.38 -.08 1.40 73.70 -1.05 .23 -.00 3.52 -.23 0.16 15.72 +.13 1.37 -.08 11.81 -.46 1.40

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19.27 +.65 1.59 -.03 26.94 -.11 18.82 -.12 26.27 -.34 2.84 46.16 -.86 0.62 92.57 -1.57 0.88 41.51 -.22 44.54 -1.94 15.67 -.21 5.10 -.07 0.56 8.52 -.10 0.04 18.38 -.01 1.76 63.38 +.52 6.04 -.01 2.00 74.82 -1.50 0.64 33.37 -.26 1.39 15.70 +.03 1.29 16.10 +.01 1.62 13.13 -.02 1.53 11.95 -.03 1.56 13.33 -.06 16.95 -.13 21.13 -.14 0.62 43.29 -.13 1.26 34.09 -.39 0.20 6.07 -.02 100.01 -.55 1.40 +.08 0.04 10.84 -.09 7.48 -.19 12.04 -.62 18.53 +.01 0.55 24.09 -.57 1.09 +.01 1.34 49.13 -.41 1.10 3.21 +.04 13.67 -.13 0.80 30.10 -.87 0.08 21.34 -.63 1.36 3.16 -.18 23.71 -1.11 1.00 36.97 -.20 4.47 +.03 31.44 +.04 0.52 46.41 -.97 62.79 -.58 7.31 -.19 12.01 +.02 6.30 +.02 2.16 33.10 +.09 3.58 46.52 -.17 18.55 -.08 0.10 6.39 -.06 2.16 23.25 -.39 0.53 19.82 -.08 24.26 -.73 0.10 43.74 -.27 5.02 +.03 3.00 79.20 -.87 1.50 24.85 -.03 .55 -.01 2.24 33.70 +.12 2.60 43.15 -.03 4.51 -.13 10.33 +.01 0.16 35.85 -.01 100.09 -1.92 0.88 19.36 +.21 1.35 39.37 -.17 0.23 10.31 -.41 0.32 30.28 -4.22 4.13 91.75 -.02 0.55 63.69 -1.61 19.15 -.15 1.92 79.55 +.02 .21 +.02 1.02 9.74 +.04 1.19 -.02 5.98 -.08 0.12 18.60 -.13 6.08 -.09 2.10 43.56 -.75 6.62 -.13 5.56 -.07 0.28 22.80 -.11 0.38 37.83 -.59 100.83 -1.17 25.10 +.03 0.23 13.04 -.02 2.97 -.06 1.68 66.50 -.45 19.15 -.86 21.09 +.42 63.99 +.39 27.74 -.10 0.50 61.65 +.23 61.08 -.86 0.48 8.34 -.23 2.00 47.27 -.55 3.51 -.19 39.43 -.17 26.92 -.03 0.80 72.70 -.85 0.08 26.57 +.09 10.48 -.33 0.62 36.10 -.43 1.09 -.01 1.13 +.14 1.29 +.07 0.80 48.34 -.66 0.44 90.24 -1.39 2.64 73.82 +.26 0.96 26.17 -.05 6.25 +1.03 8.59 -.30 4.34 +.16 21.82 -.92 0.60 14.82 -.23 0.20 23.59 -.18 1.20 11.41 -.07 0.04 13.58 +.12 14.99 -.77 0.16 14.40 +.23 0.88 34.16 -.44 2.23 -.04 2.80 +.08 0.40 18.78 -.22 0.80 14.12 -.04 7.96 +.37 15.70 0.04 13.83 -.20 0.56 14.58 +.05 109.45 -2.57 0.08 17.42 -.20 2.20 40.27 -.17 0.64 20.99 -.26 50.71 -.29 .85 -.03 8.03 -.20 0.70 25.54 -.01 1.16 108.88 -1.05 0.50 46.77 +.92 16.96 -.04 0.34 47.59 +.14 0.60 14.87 -.23 6.19 -.06 13.90 3.25 49.01 -.19 13.61 +.20 31.56 -.51 26.98 -1.02 19.54 +.06 4.28 -.14 0.76 49.21 -.59

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D 37.79 -1.43 27.38 -.25 1.97 23.58 -.52 0.88 110.63 -2.06 0.76 14.32 -.11 1.28 -.02 .90 +.03 .90 1.27 +.07 0.16 11.35 +.08 0.60 79.79 -1.30 .20 -.03 1.00 7.41 -.09 2.40 -.35 14.49 +.38 0.90 30.66 +.17 31.18 -.80 2.90 -.08 0.12 10.36 -.04 6.87 +1.06 11.30 +.49 5.10 +.15 6.71 -.13 1.12 28.99 -.69 0.20 5.99 +.02 2.78 -.03 9.15 -.27 28.00 +.22 5.14 +.01 0.72 13.74 -.06 0.44 5.02 -.02 0.09 14.29 -.50 1.28 25.06 -.15 21.71 -.49 8.17 -.52 0.16 16.55 -.17 0.40 23.06 -.15 0.20 44.30 -.90 1.50 38.05 +.81 23.03 -.45 .31 -.01 27.05 +.96 48.78 -.44 20.21 -.58 4.63 -.09 27.93 -.69 1.68 75.74 -1.20 0.40 18.45 +.12 15.88 -.27 0.50 7.43 +.02 1.96 72.18 -1.39 3.37 -.18 3.92 -.05 .59 -.01 29.92 -.70 1.44 19.78 -.60 0.18 15.53 +.04 0.44 20.20 -.50 3.23 +1.41 1.64 42.38 -.70 3.05 +.04 17.24 +.70 55.33 -3.77 19.48 +.12 7.60 -.20 0.16 14.94 -.32 5.89 -.16 0.18 7.57 -.01 3.16 -.06 26.05 -.47 47.29 -.47 21.56 -.17 0.52 15.78 -.07 0.84 11.78 -.20 0.48 6.02 -.10 0.36 14.42 -.42 1.94 38.64 -.34 0.40 5.28 -.02 8.21 -.10 6.56 -.14 0.08 45.11 -1.27 1.32 -.03 11.10 +.02 0.40 12.34 -.17 0.17 12.12 -.37 0.18 37.36 -1.53 3.70 -.09 1.40 174.41 -.42 1.08 70.85 -.67 16.78 -.10 13.28 -.05 557.33 +8.33 28.70 -.34 0.80 31.08 -.36 12.88 -.14 1.84 108.88 -.46 3.02 +.16 5.68 -.07 26.42 -.06 0.52 30.69 -.85 3.94 -.07 7.15 -.15 1.69 -.05 0.07 4.90 -.10 0.83 18.45 -.39 0.08 12.00 -.26 95.13 -.34 14.34 +.35 33.43 -1.65 2.24 +.06 1.19 20.62 -.42 0.64 47.34 -1.07 11.96 +.46 11.34 -.26 0.05 1.18 +.06 52.72 -1.22 0.54 28.39 -.25 1.86 33.88 +.05 50.18 -1.72 0.86 27.35 -.04 0.48 7.91 +.22 1.70 50.35 -.97 29.81 -.54 17.62 -.29 0.36 30.21 -.50 8.31 -.17 27.72 -.29 19.14 -.08 2.53 +.14 2.16 -.06 43.14 -.23 21.86 +.16 0.40 27.80 -.68 46.88 -.36 6.43 -.06 0.06 9.30 -.31 0.88 46.59 -.94 1.25 +.02 0.82 31.83 -.09 0.30 12.60 0.20 28.14 +.28 6.38 +.06 1.00 38.06 -.17 4.65 27.32 +.33 1.24 22.30 -.14 5.00 -.01 2.72 46.31 +.06 6.44 +.27 8.76 -.29 1.20 24.13 +.11 25.23 -.38 19.25 -.34 18.11 -.10 3.38 +.05 0.08 16.09 -.35 5.63 -.16 5.33 -.29 1.68 47.21 +.35 13.50 +.01 0.53 6.09 -.15 0.20 38.09 -.70 .75 +.00 58.34 -.01 0.80 44.13 -.14 4.39 -.10 0.20 5.13 +.36 1.28 42.69 -.46 9.79 +.01 0.40 61.44 +.01 40.25 -.53 0.32 53.06 -.09 14.24 +.02 25.10 +.28 0.63 7.75 +.10 1.70 32.08 +.19 0.30 3.05 +.02 0.60 29.32 +1.06 18.67 -.16 0.95 32.32 -.27 34.05 +.78 2.32 46.52 +.02 26.72 -.28 35.53 -.73 1.21 44.48 +.29 6.35 +.72 0.32 14.89 +.11

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D 0.20 5.43 0.84 41.86 18.90 12.06 56.97 1.80 23.70 0.04 14.40 6.41 0.02 17.77 4.88 28.80 0.60 14.17 0.83 16.59 31.72 47.90 0.48 36.38 0.04 5.48 0.40 13.30 38.35 1.21

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23.70 -.17 0.06 13.53 -.89 24.49 +.79 0.46 40.16 -.56 0.20 8.33 -.16 57.31 -1.85 52.62 -.04 0.54 7.30 -.03 1.50 12.62 -.06 9.65 -.28 2.13 24.35 0.30 6.13 +.08 5.08 -.03 30.48 -.27 0.66 23.76 -.49 2.72 71.56 -1.16 0.33 27.47 -.45 1.05 35.05 -.70 0.55 21.19 -.29 0.38 16.15 -.10 0.14 10.28 -.17 0.32 49.03 -.37 0.24 11.26 +.02 0.70 52.02 -.77 0.33 11.41 -.20 1.43 42.67 -.73 2.08 59.08 -1.54 0.21 12.28 -.11 0.42 15.92 -.23 0.78 58.63 -.22 16.29 -.43 1.12 53.77 -.25 1.67 46.42 -.39 4.12 103.50 -.84 0.55 40.76 -.48 1.13 78.99 -.90 2.16 117.72 -.58 3.96 104.32 -.53 0.58 41.01 -.62 5.64 105.81 -.79 0.80 59.93 -.42 0.36 34.01 -.41 0.75 47.00 -.71 1.35 56.73 -.24 0.23 26.93 +.20 3.65 89.27 -1.66 0.19 27.68 -.12 3.84 89.45 -.90 1.54 83.21 -.13 1.44 55.00 -.92 0.72 40.43 -.22 0.39 48.72 -.34 1.22 89.48 -.50 0.93 79.34 -.70 8.17 88.45 -.05 92.32 -1.06 1.93 58.00 +.27 1.22 61.07 -.18 0.48 85.34 -.78 0.69 51.89 -.32 1.06 64.50 -.32 1.00 64.27 -.60 3.88 104.35 -.25 0.42 73.74 -1.03 0.75 68.27 -.78 2.88 39.21 -.09 1.12 68.90 -.35 1.35 72.05 -.65 0.70 20.27 -.23 0.26 58.58 -.36 1.94 50.70 +.16 0.61 59.31 +.14 0.88 57.08 +.12 0.54 60.15 -.79 0.86 64.03 -.11 0.24 54.03 -.21 1.00 37.59 -.59 0.30 43.34 -.41 0.93 64.88 -.88 4.87 -.12 1.00 52.69 -.61 113.56 -1.99 1.36 60.79 +.24 .81 -.01 26.41 +.36 15.23 -.30 5.58 +.51 0.48 32.56 -.57 1.65 +.08 2.54 -.05 1.24 46.90 -.64 39.30 -.72 16.56 -.05 22.07 -.06 8.11 -.01 3.49 -.09 17.62 -.22 14.11 -.04 2.74 37.20 +.40 8.08 -.23 7.90 -.01 11.48 +.07 27.16 -.43 .94 -.07 0.49 61.42 -.90 0.28 34.90 -1.25 17.92 -.15 1.40 +.06 0.57 9.84 +.13 0.68 26.97 -.44 1.24 26.33 -.91 1.15 -.04 6.24 -.01 6.24 -.19 9.25 +.67 2.72 45.89 -.38 0.63 22.43 -.24 0.80 31.84 -.14 110.49 +.64 27.97 -.16 0.01 11.32 -.07 .79 -.01 43.58 +.88 5.79 -.18 0.34 24.11 -.40 2.20 128.53 -.84 4.68 +.08 1.00 45.80 -.26 0.24 17.80 -.09 0.10 26.21 +.05 22.15 -.55 0.14 26.37 -.15 7.80 +.01 67.95 -.72 8.53 -.26 0.48 14.74 -.45 29.99 -.70 34.74 +.14 346.12 -2.85 17.09 +.11 40.74 +.30 0.41 20.57 -.21 17.94 +.06 0.69 9.03 -.10 0.25 27.02 -.26 .26 -.00 8.43 -.24 10.80 +.15 0.49 20.33 -.61 1.90 -.09 72.71 +1.11 3.41 -.07 16.27 -.33 9.59 +.14 45.12 -.75 4.85 +.16 27.72 -.36 11.19 -.14 0.20 44.94 +.36 15.34 +.40 1.77 29.98 +.01 1.80 26.70 -.25 0.28 16.53 -1.83

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Nm JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JavelinPh JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSda h JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KBR Inc KHDHumb KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA lf KaiserAlu KC Southn KapStone Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KirbyCp KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KongZhg KopinCp KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP n Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH LasrCard Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold Lihua Int n LillyEli LimeEngy LimelghtN Limited Lincare LincEl LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM Loews Logitech LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol lululemn g LumberLiq Luminex

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M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDC Pr g MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MKS Inst MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MSG n MagelnHl MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr MaidenH MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM

2.80 83.04 -.17 7.76 +.11 6.40 +.80 5.09 -.19 1.00 36.22 +1.05 0.40 10.91 -.02 1.02 -.07 8.55 -.03 0.63 21.79 -.16 14.69 -.12 8.08 +.76 1.08 7.28 -.02 0.58 6.89 +.03 9.50 +.57 12.45 -.05 18.92 -.14 0.80 50.27 -1.13 35.93 -.26 0.24 39.20 -.06 1.80 35.45 +.24 0.20 21.50 -.37 20.83 -.16 43.69 -.94 61.22 -.66 3.03 +.02 3.59 +.05 0.26 7.34 -.09 0.23 2.25 -.05 0.08 13.28 +.03 7.04 +.11 0.74 57.61 -1.58 0.52 19.51 -.06 0.96 31.38 -.36 15.04 +.05 0.11 43.50 -1.78 0.98 66.78 -.42 0.08 32.48 -.68 25.18 -1.26 0.42 44.96 -.28 0.45 45.25 -.98 0.31 37.17 -.09 0.16 29.67 -.08 0.80 24.47 -.15 0.04 8.03 +.03 23.09 -.17 5.48 +.01 1.60 87.90 -1.04

Nm MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Matrixx Mattel Mattson MaximIntg MaxLine n McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedCath MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio MeridRs h Metalico Methanx Methode MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MidAApt MiddleBk h MillerHer Millicom Millipore MincoG g MindrayM Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MultiFnElc MurphO Mylan MyriadG s NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NTTDoCo NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewMarket NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordson Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NthAsiaInv NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvEPOp

D 20.77 -.37 0.30 15.17 -.31 2.00 26.82 -.77 0.24 52.76 +1.88 12.88 -.05 0.60 244.68 -.91 5.20 +.07 0.75 22.94 -.28 4.39 +.02 0.80 19.50 -.24 18.70 4.81 -.02 1.04 39.37 -.34 26.09 -.15 2.20 66.80 -.55 0.94 35.87 -.17 0.48 64.01 -.92 15.34 -.20 40.39 -.48 0.90 51.87 -.46 0.92 25.43 -.27 26.77 +.11 11.16 -1.31 65.47 -.60 6.00 +.03 0.80 11.16 +.24 7.96 +.02 0.24 25.83 -.45 24.92 -.27 11.77 -.22 58.70 -.07 0.82 45.31 -.41 5.16 +.13 0.36 24.49 -.26 8.21 -.15 46.72 -.38 5.87 +.22 1.52 38.01 -.49 0.92 34.39 -.55 0.76 21.33 -.18 .29 -.00 5.85 -.27 0.62 24.08 -.66 0.28 10.08 -.31 0.74 41.92 -.25 7.07 -.13 0.14 10.55 -.34 1.36 28.56 -.51 8.80 -.03 10.43 -.11 33.15 +.15 16.19 -.33 0.52 29.65 -.23 2.43 -.04 2.66 -.05 2.46 54.12 -.26 .33 +.01 0.09 18.06 -.11 1.24 88.04 -1.00 105.39 -.07 1.13 -.12 0.20 38.34 -.29 9.48 -.22 11.79 -.36 5.15 -.10 4.17 -.13 54.75 -.32 53.86 -.33 0.61 21.11 -.35 0.96 42.80 -.20 15.18 +.04 3.25 +.06 22.68 -.39 1.06 73.11 +.15 16.92 -.30 0.36 16.95 -.14 0.42 30.33 +.01 0.20 29.37 -.16 5.58 +.44 0.20 60.28 +1.14 7.25 -.10 2.08 -.10 0.07 4.97 +.05 25.54 -.08 1.00 55.08 -.19 22.66 -.26 1.75 25.08 -.17 5.99 -.24 49.14 +.10 10.59 -.26 13.83 -.11 26.00 -.93 0.60 15.79 -.04 32.25 -1.11 41.25 -.40 3.02 +.14 4.55 +.34 21.17 -.41 0.54 15.27 -.41 0.44 11.93 -.17 1.20 29.09 -.24 19.58 +.19 0.14 24.05 -.16 8.81 -.13 20.99 +.05 0.31 4.00 -.14 1.34 52.00 -.39 2.89 47.28 -1.39 0.40 42.25 -.23 0.04 7.05 -.09 1.50 22.96 -.03 0.32 14.49 -.50 1.76 36.37 +.18 15.42 -.06 12.52 -.05 0.24 6.00 -.12 1.64 17.44 +.10 43.28 +.32 15.37 -.13 18.23 -.45 0.01 12.64 -.70 28.55 -1.77 33.17 +.43 37.36 -1.53 13.19 -.51 72.37 -.59 3.85 -.01 2.74 +.04 25.58 -.41 17.81 -.70 2.91 -.14 .13 +.02 4.30 -.22 1.36 37.57 -.22 85.77 -2.18 1.00 16.39 -.21 11.22 0.28 12.60 3.13 +.50 0.20 15.44 -.16 49.87 -.72 1.50 106.25 +2.35 0.40 49.72 -1.73 5.26 -.13 0.15 14.27 +.24 0.15 16.83 +.09 0.20 23.85 +.07 .43 -.03 .51 +.11 0.92 15.70 -.16 1.86 43.13 -.50 3.18 -.13 1.08 73.38 -1.11 16.91 -.15 0.29 21.03 -.27 0.20 40.15 -.20 0.72 72.05 +.33 0.56 15.07 -.19 7.28 -.11 1.73 30.19 -.06 0.76 68.62 -1.97 0.64 40.88 -.58 1.36 54.66 -.58 3.96 -.16 9.94 1.03 26.95 -.29 13.52 +.16 1.12 55.16 -.63 2.98 -.16 1.72 64.94 -.25 0.40 4.34 0.40 11.84 -.04 7.35 -.41 1.99 54.66 -.51 6.76 -.23 2.59 +.25 5.87 -.05 24.75 -.22 1.41 79.13 +.49 1.60 34.88 -.36 0.50 28.80 -.28 45.93 -.49 17.12 -.20 1.44 45.82 -.51 0.70 17.20 -.67 1.34 13.23 -.07

D

NvIMO 0.83 13.96 NvMSI&G2 0.75 8.24 -.06 NuvQualPf 0.58 7.22 NuvQPf2 0.65 7.85 +.01 Nvidia 17.29 -.60 OM Group 35.28 -.07 OReillyA h 42.04 -.96 OSI Phrm 58.83 +.06 OcciPet 1.32 82.95 -.37 Oceaneer 63.27 +.31 OceanFrt h .82 +.06 Och-Ziff 0.72 14.57 +.12 Oclaro 2.77 -.02 OcwenFn 11.00 -.05 OdysseyHlt 18.76 -.39 OfficeDpt 8.01 -.17 OfficeMax 16.61 -.64 OilSvHT 1.78 120.19 -.84 OilStates 47.92 +1.50 Oilsands g .77 -.01 OldNBcp 0.28 11.48 -.26 OldRepub 0.69 12.39 +.31 Olin 0.80 19.22 +.09 OmegaHlt 1.28 20.50 +.12 Omncre 0.09 28.97 -.31 Omnicom 0.80 39.75 -.07 OmniVisn 15.70 -.24 Omnova 7.40 +.04 OnSmcnd 7.98 -.26 Oncothyr h 3.42 -.07 1800Flowrs 2.51 -.18 ONEOK 1.76 46.14 -.28 Onstream h .36 +.02 OnyxPh 32.01 -.30 OpnwvSy 2.35 -.02 OplinkC 18.39 -.40 Opnext 2.31 -.15 Oracle 0.20 25.76 -.23 OraSure 5.84 -.04 OrbitalSci 19.17 -.35 Orexigen 6.30 -.04 OrientEH 13.60 +.12 OrientFn 0.16 13.81 +.90 OriginAg 10.22 -.04 OrionMar 18.12 -.12 OrmatTc 0.48 28.37 -.63 OrrstwnF n 0.88 26.40 -4.10 Orthovta 4.19 -.14 OshkoshCp 40.79 -.89 OvShip 1.75 42.42 -.50 OwensM 1.06 45.55 -.83 OwensCorn 24.10 -.40 OwensIll 35.00 +.11 PDL Bio 1.00 6.51 -.05 PF Chng 44.38 -.43 PG&E Cp 1.82 42.87 -.45 PHH Corp 23.70 -.11 PIMCO1-3Tr 0.35 50.23 -.10 PMC Sra 8.59 -.41 PMI Grp 4.49 +.85 PNC 0.40 59.87 +.06 PNM Res 0.50 12.86 -.09 POSCO 1.57 116.80 -1.32 PPG 2.16 65.43 -.62 PPL Corp 1.40 28.24 -.36 PSS Wrld 23.62 -.21 Paccar 0.36 43.06 -.18 PacerIntl 6.30 -.24 PacAsiaP n 3.80 -.10 PacCapB 1.85 +.07 PacEthan 2.00 -.04 PacSunwr 5.00 -.10 PackAmer 0.60 25.00 -.26 Pactiv 25.39 -.05 PaetecHld 4.57 -.12 Palatin .26 +.00 PallCorp 0.64 39.58 -.44 Palm Inc 4.01 -.03 PanASlv 0.05 22.47 -1.18 Panasonic 0.13 15.17 -.09 PaneraBrd 78.84 ParPharm 24.94 -.32 ParagShip 0.20 4.57 -.05 ParamTch 18.05 -.31 ParaG&S 1.43 -.03 Parexel 23.05 -.87 ParkDrl 4.95 -.09 ParkerHan 1.00 65.34 -1.23 Parkwy 0.30 17.85 +.01 PartnerRe 2.00 79.58 +.67 PatriotCoal 20.33 -.26 Patterson 0.40 30.79 -.28 PattUTI 0.20 13.82 +.10 Paychex 1.24 32.34 -.42 PeabdyE 0.28 47.23 -.53 Pengrth g 0.84 11.35 +.06 PnnNGm 25.81 +.01 PennVa 0.23 24.55 +.08 PennWst g 1.80 21.20 -.13 PennantPk 1.04 10.62 +.11 Penney 0.80 32.79 -.80 PenRE 0.60 12.40 +.04 Penske 15.64 -.40 Pentair 0.76 34.73 -.64 PeopUtdF 0.61 15.54 -.17 PepBoy 0.12 10.43 -.37 PepcoHold 1.08 16.90 -.21 PepsiCo 1.92 66.26 -.60 PerfectWld 39.66 -2.07 PerkElm 0.28 23.98 -.21 PermFix 2.37 -.06 Perrigo 0.25 57.80 +.60 PetMed 0.40 21.90 -.20 PetChina 4.01 114.79 -1.69 Petrohawk 20.50 +.48 PetrbrsA 1.17 40.28 -.15 Petrobras 1.16 44.89 -.19 PtroqstE 5.33 -.27 PetsMart 0.40 31.54 -.21 Pfizer 0.72 17.61 +.07 PFSweb 2.99 +.07 PhrmAth 1.62 -.02 PhmHTr 7.59 66.86 -.50 PharmPdt 0.60 22.38 -.27 Pharmacyc 6.18 -.49 Pharmasset 27.87 -1.22 PhaseFwd 13.14 -.32 PhilipMor 2.32 51.89 -.55 PhilipsEl 0.95 32.74 -.68 PhlVH 0.15 56.70 +.61 PhnxCos 2.66 +.15 PhotrIn 5.29 +.01 PiedNG 1.12 27.37 -.35 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.34 -.01 Pier 1 6.73 -.08 PilgrmsP n 11.10 +.17 PimIncStr2 0.70 9.50 -.01 PimcoHiI 1.46 11.88 +.08 PinnclEnt 9.61 -.04 PinWst 2.10 37.44 -.39 PionDrill 7.22 +.03 PioNtrl 0.08 53.90 +.11 PitnyBw 1.46 24.50 -.18 Pixelwrks 5.33 +.15 PlainsEx 30.22 -.32 PlatUnd 0.32 37.62 -.21 PlugPwr h .71 +.06 PlumCrk 1.68 39.04 -.07 Polaris 1.60 51.75 -.59 Polo RL 0.40 84.72 -.18 Polycom 30.40 +1.12 PolyMet g 2.29 -.03 PolyOne 10.37 -.01 Poniard h 1.30 -.26 Popular 2.74 -.04 PortGE 1.02 18.97 -.18 PortglTel 0.77 10.86 -.44 PostPrp 0.80 21.57 +.05 Potash 0.40 122.92 +.76 PwrInteg 0.20 41.74 -.49 Power-One 3.71 -.07 PSCrudeDS 64.56 +2.43 PwshDB 23.06 -.26 PS Agri 24.38 PS BasMet 21.17 -.38 PS USDBull 24.05 +.32 PwSClnEn 9.86 -.03 PwSWtr 0.12 17.41 -.23 PSFinPf 1.37 17.46 -.08 PSBldABd 0.38 24.80 -.26 PSVrdoTF 0.23 24.99 PwShPfd 1.04 14.05 -.03 PShEMSov 1.64 26.16 -.05 PwShs QQQ 0.21 48.02 -.23 Powrwav 1.24 Pozen 9.10 +.27 Praxair 1.80 82.28 -.39 PrecCastpt 0.12 122.26 -.38 PrecDril 7.38 -.16 PrmWBc h .49 -.03 Presstek 4.66 +.23 PriceTR 1.08 55.00 -.86 priceline 243.80 -.61 PrideIntl 29.24 -.35 PrinFncl 0.50 28.66 +.62 PrivateB 0.04 14.61 -.35 ProShtS&P 49.58 +.25 PrUShS&P 31.08 +.30 ProUltDow 0.53 47.58 -.39 PrUlShDow 26.51 +.23 ProUltQQQ 65.05 -.63 PrUShQQQ 16.87 +.15 ProUltSP 0.41 41.91 -.40 ProUShL20 48.95 +1.78 PrUShCh25 8.44 +.19 ProUltSEM 10.58 +.29 ProUShtRE 5.93 -.06 ProUShOG 12.51 +.16 ProUShtFn 19.30 -.07 ProUShtBM 7.01 +.03 ProUltSemi 0.19 34.91 -1.33 ProUltRE 0.10 8.27 +.06 ProUltO&G 0.22 33.64 -.40 ProUltFin 0.03 6.77 +.02 ProUBasM 0.15 36.16 -.17 ProUShEur 22.29 +.84 ProShtR2K 39.90 +.45 ProUltPQQQ 110.20 -1.59 ProUSR2K 20.36 +.45 ProUltR2K 0.04 33.84 -.78 ProSht20Tr 50.01 +.90 ProUSSP500 30.17 +.45 ProUltSP500 0.23 172.86 -2.52 ProUltCrude 12.20 -.47 ProSUltGold 43.27 -1.56 ProSUShGld 10.19 +.33 ProUShCrude 13.19 +.48 ProSUSSilv 4.52 +.22 ProSUltSilv 52.40 -2.69 ProUltShYen 20.80 +.75 ProUShEuro 21.41 +.56 ProceraNt .43 +.02 ProctGam 1.76 63.61 -.92 ProgrssEn 2.48 39.25 -.60 ProgrsSoft 32.77 -.22 ProgsvCp 0.16 18.49 -.02 ProLogis 0.60 14.12 +.09 ProspctCap 1.64 12.70 -.11 ProspBcsh 0.62 40.67 -.82 Protalix 7.04 +.08 ProtLife 0.48 20.43 -.11

Nm

D

ProvET g Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal n PulteGrp PMMI PPrIT

0.72 7.67 -.07 0.70 58.39 +.04 0.61 15.72 -.17 30.47 -.04 1.37 30.09 -.44 2.60 92.93 +.80 9.25 -.75 11.65 +.18 0.53 7.16 +.16 0.68 6.50 +.03

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN QLT Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h Quaterra g QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM RXi Phrm Rackspace Radcom RadianGrp RadientPh RadioShk Radware Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RetailOpp RetailVent RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RickCab RigelPh RINO Int n RioTinto RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RosettaSt n RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prM RBSct prN RBSct prR RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubyTues Ruddick Rural/Met RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SMTC g SORL SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntRE SP Mid S&P500ETF SpdrBiot SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrSemi SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SPLeSTMun SpdrLehMu SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro SVB FnGp SXC Hlth SABESP lf SafeBulk Safeway StJoe StJude StMaryLE Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SJuanB SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina rs Sanofi Sapient SaraLee Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schulmn Schwab SchMau SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeagateT Seahawk n SealAir Sealy s SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp 7DaysGp n ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderNac Siemens SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignatBk SignetJwlrs SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab SilicnMotn Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina

22.93 -.14 5.32 +.07 20.32 -.24 0.76 40.19 -.33 1.20 62.23 -.76 19.98 -.08 2.73 -.06 .68 1.56 +.09 0.40 57.45 +.17 18.02 -.19 0.52 43.37 +.13 7.86 +.12 14.54 +.07 13.90 +.39 4.30 0.32 5.29 -.07 2.16 +.07 15.22 +.04 5.13 -.08 0.82 21.00 -.29 4.10 -.08 7.67 -.22 30.09 -.61 5.73 -.23 19.18 -.48 3.46 +1.31 0.01 14.52 +2.63 .23 -.03 0.25 22.09 -.59 21.61 +.29 69.29 +1.34 22.82 -.08 0.65 11.58 -.13 0.17 72.02 -2.20 0.16 47.41 -.12 1.03 +.02 0.44 27.78 -.28 2.00 44.95 -.35 1.24 57.11 -.14 4.94 -.21 1.72 30.64 +.42 30.70 +.53 1.00 15.00 +.01 0.64 58.97 -1.65 0.72 18.07 +.20 1.85 38.78 +.01 25.40 -.32 1.11 87.39 +.12 0.04 7.85 +.12 0.16 18.48 +.26 0.48 51.47 +.49 0.40 48.41 -.84 1.00 56.88 +.19 5.00 -.02 23.70 -.38 1.05 -.04 .65 -.01 1.37 23.45 -.79 6.05 +.06 0.76 28.84 -.04 74.09 -1.31 63.41 +.58 1.00 7.10 +.08 18.03 -.31 1.51 99.63 -.97 10.20 9.50 +.09 12.03 -.59 1.58 -.07 3.60 53.73 -.37 13.25 -.72 8.26 -.33 24.10 +.87 1.80 230.43 -2.06 0.40 21.57 -.31 1.72 +.06 28.42 -.28 0.17 24.75 -1.76 0.52 30.86 -.72 0.60 47.41 -.29 1.16 55.82 -.96 0.96 62.54 -.31 26.43 -.06 1.28 33.74 -1.05 0.38 57.30 -.62 24.25 +.75 24.68 -.90 0.64 53.58 -.68 37.96 -.37 26.70 -.23 2.00 58.43 -.82 13.25 -.10 1.60 13.84 -.01 1.59 13.75 1.53 13.86 +.11 33.13 -.48 3.36 55.41 -.82 3.36 57.69 -1.00 0.36 45.75 -1.91 3.91 -.22 10.65 -.18 0.48 31.99 -.30 7.28 +.33 5.00 +.24 26.00 -.22 1.00 38.54 -.35 0.52 42.45 -.32 0.12 23.75 +.33 5.92 -.01 19.05 -.19 0.67 46.97 -1.00 35.69 -.61 1.90 37.59 -.40 0.18 21.67 -.18 16.91 -.08 0.40 54.78 -.12 11.90 +.24 2.43 -.16 8.63 +.63 2.51 108.40 -.47 106.30 -2.02 1.42 34.41 -.53 1.67 143.89 -1.33 2.21 116.84 -.57 61.38 -.67 0.13 16.90 -.04 0.25 26.01 +.12 0.46 40.29 +.31 0.36 48.24 -1.36 1.79 54.37 +.25 4.98 39.52 -.04 0.52 24.05 -.10 0.89 22.89 -.07 0.03 45.84 -.01 0.36 26.55 -.26 0.50 41.12 -.58 0.25 42.22 -.07 0.37 56.91 -.60 1.00 61.45 -.05 20.87 -.22 11.99 -.38 0.12 9.53 +.16 48.02 -.36 67.89 +1.33 2.29 35.08 -.52 0.60 7.25 -.10 0.40 24.26 -.19 31.00 -.28 40.44 +.25 0.10 34.84 +.10 9.16 +.20 76.16 -.94 33.52 -.01 8.80 +.15 .54 -.02 0.96 20.28 -.26 0.60 55.90 +2.96 35.18 +.35 7.56 -.22 16.68 -.81 1.63 37.28 -.87 0.35 9.69 -.17 0.44 13.88 -.14 2.37 -.04 5.38 +.06 14.81 -.20 0.84 62.21 -.82 0.07 51.34 -1.06 0.60 25.90 -.59 0.24 18.45 -.07 0.60 47.31 +.89 3.69 -.14 14.47 -.23 0.50 46.01 -.30 0.30 43.26 +.80 8.75 -.18 22.04 +.41 1.79 -.01 20.03 -.42 19.50 +.97 0.48 21.47 -.27 3.76 -.02 108.44 -.41 12.17 -.42 7.17 -.02 0.50 27.96 -.65 1.56 49.57 -.49 17.60 -.60 1.44 22.00 +.09 18.00 -.16 0.76 28.78 -.34 6.56 -.08 0.16 9.11 10.10 +.16 6.55 -.12 41.59 +1.02 35.89 +.20 1.44 65.85 -.61 1.20 18.22 +.02 0.34 67.30 +.30 8.02 -.06 24.07 +.33 1.12 38.62 -.33 2.41 95.69 -2.03 11.68 -.16 0.64 53.79 -.26 37.76 -.26 28.08 -.30 11.38 -.16 3.00 -.15 48.37 -.63 4.02 +.11 0.28 6.06 -.04 17.21 -.64 15.15 -.64 0.08 6.76 -.29 2.40 84.51 +.08 38.53 -.18

Nm

D

Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM h SironaDent Skechers SkillSoft SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithIntl SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M Sohu.cm SolarCap n Solarfun SolarWds n Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SpanBdc h Spartch SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StMotr StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT n StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse SteinMrt StemCells Stereotaxis Stericycle Steris SterlngBcp SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden StewEnt StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker SulphCo SunCmts SunHlthGp SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisPh SunLink Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperGen SupEnrgy SuperWell Supvalu SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng Switch&Dt Sybase SykesEnt Symantec Synaptics Syniverse Synopsys Synovus Syntroleum Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisB n TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData Techwell TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelItalia TelefEsp TelMexL Telestone TeleTech Tellabs TelmxIntl TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tennant Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium Terra Terremk TerreStr h Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm TxCapBsh Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textron Theravnce ThermoFis Thrmogn ThmBet ThomasPrp ThomCrk g Thor Inds Thoratec 3Com 3M Co 3Par TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany TW Cable TimeWrn rs Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc Tix Corp TollBros Trchmrk Toro Co TorDBk g TortEnInf Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi TowersWat Toyota TractSupp TradeStatn TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransGlb Transocn Travelers TricoMar TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Triumph TrueRelig TrstNY TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

0.16

0.78 0.48 1.40 1.20 1.30 2.40

1.08 0.27 0.20 1.75 0.76 0.60 0.02

1.00

0.52 0.53 0.73 0.41 1.00 0.20 0.59 0.31 1.26 0.20 1.32 0.36 0.20 0.40 0.20 0.33 0.04 1.14 0.30 0.16

0.44 0.36 0.06 0.07 0.12

0.60 2.52 1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04

0.35 0.04

0.04 1.00 0.09 0.20 0.80 0.28 0.47 0.60 0.46

0.23 1.53 0.68 0.13 1.66

1.27 1.40 1.17 0.76 0.63 4.20 0.67 0.02 0.25 0.44 0.50 0.86 0.56

0.40

0.64 0.30 0.48 0.08

0.28 2.10 1.00 0.80 1.60 0.85 0.36 0.02

0.60 0.72 2.44 2.16 3.20 0.28 0.28 0.30 0.56 0.80

1.32

0.32 0.16 0.25 1.00 0.79 0.64 0.80 0.16

Nm 4.94 -.17 6.40 -.17 .88 +.01 37.76 +.13 35.43 -.13 10.55 -.02 14.64 -.17 16.05 -.36 6.16 -.05 6.77 +.13 11.36 -.11 3.85 -.07 52.26 -.26 42.07 -.44 20.21 +.38 61.00 -.01 42.93 -.45 37.59 -.27 53.18 -1.01 20.29 -.01 6.64 -.12 21.65 -.21 16.23 +.67 9.25 +.37 12.01 -.50 10.89 -.30 31.30 -.15 2.75 -.01 38.70 -1.74 31.51 -.52 24.87 -.07 .81 +.06 33.03 -.32 30.98 -.84 25.38 -.19 13.00 -.03 39.42 -.51 .86 +.11 12.09 -.10 22.29 -.19 4.88 -.05 22.82 -.13 6.09 -.06 3.94 +.11 34.11 -.10 32.27 -.35 27.93 -.20 32.74 -.13 57.02 -.33 15.91 +.01 31.03 -.22 23.07 -.11 29.57 -.31 11.01 +.28 4.78 +.03 59.10 -.80 23.56 -.41 2.83 +.01 2.64 +.36 25.29 -.12 43.90 -.15 19.33 -.01 45.37 -.79 22.63 -.59 17.67 -.33 6.62 -.03 9.17 -.24 1.18 -.01 4.79 -.07 54.71 -1.67 33.58 -.47 9.01 +.11 5.50 -.03 .63 +.04 17.98 -.27 46.93 -.49 5.72 +.13 13.08 -.68 17.58 +.10 4.65 +.85 57.96 +.96 .34 +.00 24.27 -.12 9.81 -.18 31.68 +.13 30.45 -.44 .79 +.03 4.19 +1.22 30.19 +.05 3.89 +.01 18.50 +.03 16.42 +.04 5.51 -.07 10.73 +.28 13.91 -.08 27.26 +.39 3.44 +.21 20.80 +.31 14.76 +.08 16.59 -.32 9.37 +.16 7.27 7.45 -.12 31.23 -.18 17.87 -.42 47.22 -.98 23.36 -.26 16.97 -.08 25.07 -.08 18.58 +.34 22.81 +.03 3.60 +.01 2.18 -.03 29.09 -.34 16.19 -.35 16.20 -.09 18.71 +.15 15.65 -.24 13.55 -.03 6.60 +.09 27.49 -.61 43.23 -.30 28.64 -.56 17.95 -.37 10.33 +.06 10.38 -.12 11.27 +.10 20.63 +.01 16.69 -.23 44.19 -.64 4.01 -.06 53.37 -.52 4.88 -.02 6.63 +.03 17.65 -.35 41.17 +.03 44.50 -1.22 18.41 +.01 40.69 -.22 24.00 -.07 11.87 +.16 18.29 -.34 7.51 -.05 17.69 -.10 7.54 -.07 13.97 -.47 70.53 -1.52 15.46 -.22 17.97 +.11 16.82 -.36 7.57 -.08 18.93 -.25 21.53 -.11 10.02 -.02 29.79 -.42 43.39 -.87 5.97 -.33 26.86 -1.18 24.31 -.30 28.82 -.58 11.09 -.39 22.37 -.52 39.51 -.44 45.80 +.06 7.31 -.18 1.15 -.03 14.29 +.49 20.26 -.44 23.08 -.07 12.74 +.04 64.10 -.44 18.94 -.03 37.62 -.63 24.79 -.66 14.24 22.28 -.17 12.70 -.02 50.73 -.12 .72 -.05 38.15 -.56 3.10 +.05 13.52 -.10 31.78 -.79 32.99 -.19 7.65 +.01 81.61 -.74 10.09 -.26 10.64 -.20 47.85 -.70 47.33 -.43 50.10 +.94 31.25 -.04 28.35 -.26 8.73 -.01 16.71 +.42 16.59 +.42 1.27 +.12 20.61 +.18 52.90 -.47 49.74 -.81 74.10 -.82 32.93 +.61 56.49 -1.03 15.47 -.14 22.14 -.12 1.70 -.04 47.31 -.53 81.58 -.77 58.77 -1.13 6.95 +.04 52.44 -.22 3.39 +.17 4.91 +.19 82.01 -.67 54.06 +.16 2.67 -.08 1.73 -.05 28.59 -.48 22.60 +.08 20.45 7.16 -.19 69.32 +1.80 29.28 -.50 6.53 -.04 6.28 +.06 48.03 -.49 14.54 -.60 28.17 -.05 37.14 -.20 18.44 +.15

U-V-W-X-Y-Z

D

U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UQM Tech URS US Airwy US Cncrt h US Geoth US Gold USA Mobl USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Ultratech Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UAIndem h UBWV UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdThrp s UtdWestrn UtdhlthGp UnvAmr UnivDisp UnvHlth s Univ Insur UnumGrp Uranerz UraniumEn UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE VailRsrt Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceTc h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valmont Valspar ValVis A ValueClick VanKDyCr VKSrInc VanceInfo VandaPhm VangSTBd VangTotBd VangGrth VangSmCp VangTSM VangValu VangREIT VangDivAp VangTotW VangAllW VangEmg VangEur VangEurPc VangMat VantageDrl VarianMed VarianSemi VascoDta Vectren VeecoInst

m m m

m M m

G

Mw

M W& O WM W W O W W R W M W W W W W M W R W WR W W M W W W W W W WW W R W W W W W W W W W W H W H O WD W R W U W W W W W W W H W W W Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W mm D W m W D W W W W D W W W WW W W W W H W W W W M W W m W OM O m

M R Ww m G m

N mm m m m w w mG

0.10 0.72 0.80

1.00 0.06

0.20 0.67 0.67 1.08

1.20 0.40 1.88 0.20 0.20 1.70 0.03 0.20 0.56 0.33

2.40

0.52 0.52 0.20 0.88 0.76 0.60 0.64 1.03 0.30 2.10 3.09 0.61 0.65 1.11 1.36 1.96 0.98 0.66 0.86 0.55 1.91 0.81 0.92

1.36

7.47 19.60 15.29 17.79 26.27 4.03 49.28 7.41 .41 .98 2.72 12.95 5.88 16.28 17.10 2.39 21.97 44.86 12.76 .19 13.45 29.16 29.62 28.67 72.91 36.57 43.68 9.67 27.02 4.57 3.62 7.52 63.77 8.46 26.19 7.38 38.94 63.53 73.04 56.31 1.73 32.72 15.70 11.98 35.17 4.97 24.18 1.85 3.26 36.29 27.05 79.91 4.28 41.36 28.67 31.32 27.04 41.23 .89 20.69 26.80 15.39 82.15 28.91 3.47 10.08 13.05 5.01 20.70 12.10 79.93 79.22 55.64 63.33 59.74 50.67 49.80 48.83 44.01 43.62 41.16 46.99 33.96 71.21 1.55 54.75 31.10 8.75 23.71 43.50

+.01 +.07 -.30 +.06 -.13 +.20 -.12 +.02 +.04 -.02 -.04 +.10 +.52 -.07 +.15 +.01 -.24 +.18 -.14 -.01 -.19 -1.64 -.52 -.37 -.79 -.71 -.33 +.24 -.81 -.03 -.06 -.01 -.85 +.07 -.06 -.10 -.76 +.21 -.05 -.60 +.05 -.44 +.09 -.12 -.78 -.10 -.01 +.03 -.14 -.10 -.55 -1.08 +.01 +.21 -.01 -.25 -.32 -.61 +.39 +.43 -.20 -2.20 -.29 +.29 -.26 -.04 +.02 -.14 -.20 -.24 -.40 -.37 -.65 -.35 -.21 +.27 -.47 -.36 -.69 -.56 -.91 -.62 -.28 +.01 -.05 -.52 -.34 +.14


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Mortgage Continued from B1 Also, if you’re not saving enough to get the full match from your employer in a 401(k) or similar account, increase your savings there first. And don’t make extra mortgage payments if you don’t already have a decent emergency fund set aside.

$7,500 (35 percent of $20,000) less in taxes than you would have without the deduction. So ultimately, you’re not really paying $20,000 in interest at all; your net cost is $12,500 after you subtract the $7,500 tax savings. And that makes your effective, after-tax interest rate on your loan just 3.25 percent, which is simply 35 percent (your tax rate) less than the original 5 percent.

Your real interest rate

Better returns?

Now, take a look at the interest rate on your mortgage. That 5 percent? It’s not your real rate if you get some of the interest back each year in the form of a tax deduction. Let’s say you have a household income of $175,000 and are paying 35 percent of that in total to the state and federal tax collectors. If you pay $20,000 in mortgage interest each year on a loan that charges 5 percent, the deduction effectively brings your taxable income down to $155,000. As a result, you’re paying

So any money you set aside in lieu of making extra mortgage payments would need to earn more than 3.25 percent annually. That seems like a reasonable possibility in the future. In fact, you could have done that well during the supposedly lost decade we just finished. Vanguard Wellington, for instance, a popular low-cost mutual fund that holds about 65 percent stocks and 35 percent bonds and other short-term securities, earned an average annual return of 6.15 percent in the 10 years ended Dec. 31, 2009.

Storing the savings

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 B3

to flee to an Asian beach for a few weeks of playtime. If the money is not locked up in retirement or college savings, however, you may be tempted to spend it.

Wouldn’t taxes eat into the returns from the money you’d save instead of making extra mortgage payments? Not if you place it into an account shielded from taxes. A Roth individual retirement account would fit the bill here, as would a 529 college savings account or health savings account. Bruce Primeau, whose note to his financial planning clients at Wide Financial Group in Minneapolis on this topic inspired me to re-examine it, adds that this isn’t simply about keeping more assets under his watch so he can earn a better living. “I’m not telling them that the money has to come to me,” he said. “A 401(k) match beats the return on paying a mortgage off automatically. There’s real estate and buying employer stock through a purchase plan at a 15 percent discount and all kinds of things.” Then you need to preserve those savings. When extra money goes toward a mortgage, it’s hard to get at it when the urge strikes

The liquidity problem Capital gains taxes might eventually come due with some of these investments, and the rate could well rise above the current 15 percent long-term rate before too long. Still, having some of your savings in a taxable account makes sense for several reasons. If you hit a stretch of longterm unemployment after having plowed most of your extra cash into paying down your mortgage, your bank probably won’t pat you on the back for being a good saver and give the money back to you. Nor is it likely to let you borrow it through a home equity loan if you have no income with which to repay it. Elaine Scoggins, who had the mortgage department chief reporting to her at a bank before she became a financial planner, suggests imagining a situation

Reason and emotion So the reasoned case for making no extra payments is very strong. But there’s one counterpoint that almost always carries the day, even when there’s only a mild risk with the financial strategy of putting extra money elsewhere. And it’s this: I need to be able to sleep at night. Even Primeau concedes here. “Emotionally, you’re right, and financially, I’m right, and emotionally, you win,” he said. “If emotionally, people want to pay down

Epic

PV Powered timeline 2003 Founded by Bill Taylor in January; original location in the Old Mill District; 12 employees by end of 2003

where you need to move quickly but can’t sell your home or extract equity to use as a down payment in your new town. Given that possibility, why create more home equity through extra mortgage payments than you have to? “The whole housing debacle has reminded us all, including me, that real estate is not liquid,” said Scoggins, who is the client experience director for Merriman, a planning firm in Seattle. “And it takes cash to support it.”

2004 Begins selling solar inverters for residential market

PV Powered

2006 At the end of the year, a new management team takes over; 14 to 18 employees

2007 Announces first 30 kilowatt commercial inverter

Advanced Energy. Most of $40 million to $50 million Advanced Energy expects to earn from buying PV Powered is projected to come from commercial market sales — about $30 million to $35 million — with the remainder coming from the residential market. Advanced Energy has had a tough go during the past couple of years. The semiconductor market — on which about 41 percent of the company’s 2009 revenues were based — began to take a slide during 2008, Firestone said. Advanced Energy was in the red for the whole of 2009, he said. But the company expects to the first quarter of 2010 to be profitable, Firestone said. He said the addition of PV Powered was an offensive move, an effort to give Advanced Energy a more complete portfolio because the inverter market would be a “strong growth engine for the company.” Both PV Powered and Ad-

Continued from B1 Advanced Energy, which was founded in 1981, is an energy generator like PV Powered, but its focus is in converting AC power to DC or RF power to be used in automated systems, such as production lines, said Lawrence Firestone, the chief financial officer of Advanced Energy. In 2007, however, Advanced Energy began building its own line of solar inverters, which convert energy saved from sunlight (DC power) to energy that can be sold on the grid (AC power). For 2009, energy generation from solar power — PV Powered’s focus — made up about 16 percent of Advanced Energy’s total revenues. Advanced Energy, a publicly held company with more than 1,300 employees in six countries, earned $186.4 million during 2009. PV Powered earned $21 million during 2009, according to

2008 Announces 1,000 watt, 2,000 watt and 3,000 watt residential inverters; presidential candidate Barack Obama visits

2009 Relocates to Brinson Boulevard facility with about 40 employees; large investment by Evans Renewable Holding II, making it majority shareholder

vanced Energy officials said the merger fits well with the companies’ current production. PV Powered’s recent expansion improved its production capacity to 500 megawatts a year, twice as much as Advanced Energy’s 250 megawatt capacity. PV Powered currently builds commercial solar inverters that max out at 260 kilowatts. Advanced Energy’s smallest inverter starts at 250 kilowatts, Firestone said. That doesn’t mean that Advanced Energy plans to stunt further development by PV Powered, Firestone said. There are still plans for PV Powered to release a 500 kilowatt inverter at the end of 2010. “We bought this company as a growth company,” Firestone said. “We want them to achieve all the plans they have on the table. Their strength is going to be continued growth.” PV Powered will operate on a stand-alone basis until Dec. 31, with a new board of directors,

2010 Sold to Advanced Energy Industries Inc. for up to $90 million

which includes Mark Fleischauer, the vice president of JH Kelly. In 2011, old shareholders, like Evans Renewable Holding, represented by Fleischauer, will no longer be involved. Patterson, the PV Powered CEO, said there are no plans to restructure his company. Firestone, of Advanced Energy, said any kind of examination of the way the businesses work together won’t take place until 2011. With the merger, Patterson said he expects increased growth and sales of PV Powered, which has doubled its employee count during the last nine months. He said he expects there will be more than 100 employees working for the company by the end of 2010. “I think you’ll just see accelerating growth,” Patterson said. “It is truly a match made in heaven.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from B1 Officially known as Aircraft Investor Resources, Epic moved into a new $4.5 million plant on the east side of the Bend Municipal Airport in 2004 with promises to create 400 jobs. About $1.3 million of the money came from state and local economic development funds. It became the second airplane maker at the Bend airport. The other, known later as Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing Corp., filed bankruptcy in September 2007. Cessna bought Columbia in 2007, but shut down the plant last year. Aircraft Investor Resources and its related companies filed for bankruptcy in September in the wake of a breach of contract lawsuit filed against it. While the bankruptcy case was pending, Harlow Aerostructures LLC, of Wichita, Kan., offered to buy Epic, and the offer sparked the auction process. If no other bidders had stepped forward before Wednesday’s deadline, the purchase would have gone ahead, according to court records. Harlow makes components,

their debt, then that’s what I help them to do.” Many people who are years into their mortgages — and perhaps paying less in interest and getting less of a tax break as a result — tend to develop stronger feelings about making extra payments. Those feelings are often even more acute as retirement approaches and homeowners become determined to quit work with no debt to their names. Those who do retire their debt rarely regret it or wring their hands over the big gains they might have scored by investing the money elsewhere. Tim Maurer, a financial planner and coauthor of “The Financial Crossroads,” describes the feeling that washes over people who have paid their last mortgage bill as “beholden to no one.” So he doesn’t feel as if it’s his business to separate people from their emotions if they feel strongly about working toward a debt-free existence. “The whole point of planning is to make life better,” he said. “It’s not to have more dollars at the end of the day.”

such as bulkheads and other parts, for the aircraft industry, according to Wichita city documents, and offered to buy Epic for $2 million, which represents about 10 percent of Epic’s total value, according to bankruptcy filings. In exchange, it would have received all of Epic’s assets, including plane designs, machinery, furniture and other equipment in the plant on Nelson Road, where it helped customers build the planes. Partially completed airplanes remaining in the factory would not have been included in the sale. Under the agreement, Harlow would have had no obligation to honor the lease for the Nelson Road plant, where Epic employed about 160 people in 2008, and the trustee gave an approaching April 8 deadline by which he must decide whether to reject or continue the leases as a reason for the auction. Several of Epic’s creditors objected to the sale to Harlow, and in court records filed earlier this month identified at least three separate parties interested in buying the company. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360, or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .72 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

14 13 ... ... 40 ... ... 27 23 ... 19 15 25 29 ... 11 ... ... 16 ... 16

YTD Last Chg %Chg 41.07 21.03 17.57 14.12 72.32 .60 34.92 52.77 60.07 2.49 27.74 53.06 13.99 22.43 7.90 21.25 3.67 8.42 21.79 8.21 29.65

-.80 -.28 +.44 +.33 +.14 -.01 -.64 -.57 -.69 +.14 -.10 -.09 -.38 -.24 +.21 -.14 -.05 +.06 -.16 -.15 -.23

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

+18.8 -2.6 +16.7 +14.9 +33.6 -11.8 +27.0 +35.2 +1.5 +3.8 -15.2 +3.0 +5.1 +10.0 +42.3 +3.5 +35.9 +20.6 -7.7 -7.0 -2.7

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1085.00 $1088.60 $16.626

Pvs Day $1105.00 $1103.50 $17.012

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44f .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

21 21 16 98 88 ... 27 18 13 ... 18 11 49 55 ... 32 66 36 ... ...

73.38 -1.11 +11.1 40.88 -.58 +8.8 46.85 -.36 +4.0 16.61 -.64 +30.9 43.06 -.18 +18.7 2.87 ... +2.1 39.04 -.07 +3.4 122.26 -.38 +10.8 24.26 -.19 +14.0 51.34 -1.06 +7.6 65.85 -.61 +6.8 46.74 -.22 +16.8 25.29 -.12 +9.7 7.16 -.19 +19.3 13.45 -.19 +.3 26.19 -.06 +16.3 20.41 +.23 +5.5 30.86 -.22 +14.3 2.60 +.03 +23.8 45.00 -.32 +4.3

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF SprintNex GenElec

4430395 4.15 +.02 2668797 17.57 +.44 1698437 116.84 -.57 1369759 3.94 +.11 1234010 18.45 +.12

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name PMI Grp StratHotels RadianGrp FelCor Newcastle

Last

Chg %Chg

4.49 +.85 +23.4 4.65 +.85 +22.4 14.52 +2.63 +22.1 6.25 +1.03 +19.7 3.13 +.50 +19.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

MS S&P12-11 12.11 -1.93 -13.7 EscoTech 30.28 -4.22 -12.2 Jaguar g 9.82 -1.18 -10.7 Jabil 16.53 -1.83 -10.0 CaptlTr pf 2.96 -.29 -8.9

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Rentech GoldStr g LibertyAcq NthgtM g NovaGld g

34964 33146 31900 27133 23955

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Name

1.05 3.70 9.87 2.98 7.35

PwShs QQQ Intel Microsoft ApldMatl Yahoo

-.04 -.09 -.02 -.16 -.41

Gainers ($2 or more) Last

SunLink ChinaNet Arrhythm ChiGengM VirnetX

4.19 +1.22 +41.1 4.45 +.41 +10.1 8.06 +.66 +8.9 3.25 +.20 +6.6 5.43 +.33 +6.5

Chg %Chg

Diary

Last 9.25 12.50 5.20 2.01 2.26

Last

Gentium ChinaBio Funtalk n StarScient AdeptTch

1,055 2,014 119 3,188 271 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 48.02 22.43 29.65 13.00 16.09

-.23 -.24 -.23 -.24 +.06

Chg %Chg

3.23 +1.41 +77.5 11.26 +2.18 +24.0 6.87 +1.06 +18.2 2.64 +.36 +15.8 4.01 +.54 +15.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

-.75 -.90 -.31 -.12 -.13

-7.5 -6.7 -5.6 -5.6 -5.4

FrontFn rs MedCath BBC pf II BioSphre WaterstnF

Last

205 290 34 529 21 1

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

605928 533918 334313 331208 319588

Name

Losers ($2 or more) PudaCoal n SwGA Fn AdcareHlt VistaGold WellsGard

Vol (00)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Name

52-Week High Low Name

Chg %Chg

2.40 -.35 -12.7 11.16 -1.31 -10.5 7.20 -.80 -9.9 2.67 -.27 -9.2 3.39 -.33 -8.9

Diary 784 1,881 142 2,807 143 9

10,893.89 4,439.24 408.57 7,497.88 1,925.54 2,416.51 1,174.72 12,292.92 690.85

7,278.78 2,517.16 320.44 4,832.15 1,321.21 1,482.15 772.31 7,801.35 405.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,836.15 4,362.06 377.43 7,408.16 1,875.44 2,398.76 1,167.72 12,217.45 683.68

-52.68 -48.33 -3.54 -70.60 -20.66 -16.48 -6.45 -69.99 -6.62

YTD %Chg %Chg -.48 -1.10 -.93 -.94 -1.09 -.68 -.55 -.57 -.96

52-wk %Chg

+3.91 +6.40 -5.17 +3.11 +2.77 +5.71 +4.72 +5.79 +9.32

+39.82 +64.69 +13.30 +44.49 +36.42 +56.89 +43.48 +48.00 +60.29

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

341.74 2,649.70 3,949.81 5,677.88 6,039.00 21,008.62 33,160.97 22,798.70 3,232.72 10,815.03 1,681.01 2,886.36 4,903.20 5,994.88

+.07 s +.01 s -.07 t +.07 s +.36 s +.10 s -.60 t +.14 s +.13 s +.38 s -.05 t -.66 t +.31 s +.06 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9090 1.4893 .9757 .001875 .1464 1.3338 .1289 .010858 .079726 .0337 .000879 .1376 .9326 .0314

Pvs Day .9173 1.5032 .9825 .001877 .1465 1.3488 .1288 .011059 .079796 .0338 .000878 .1390 .9455 .0314

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.59 -0.12 +3.8 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.47 -0.08 +6.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.74 -0.04 +3.2 GrowthI 23.06 -0.19 +4.6 Ultra 20.37 -0.12 +4.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.47 -0.16 +5.2 AMutlA p 23.75 -0.17 +3.2 BalA p 16.79 -0.10 +4.1 BondA p 11.94 -0.06 +2.1 CapWA p 20.01 -0.15 +0.6 CapIBA p 47.67 -0.40 +0.4 CapWGA p 33.60 -0.36 -1.0 EupacA p 37.88 -0.43 -1.2 FdInvA p 33.85 -0.22 +3.8 GovtA p 14.04 -0.09 +1.1 GwthA p 28.30 -0.19 +3.5 HI TrA p 10.91 +0.01 +4.3 IncoA p 15.71 -0.10 +2.5 IntBdA p 13.21 -0.05 +1.1 ICAA p 26.59 -0.23 +3.0 NEcoA p 23.13 -0.19 +2.8 N PerA p 25.99 -0.22 +1.4 NwWrldA 48.02 -0.30 +1.7 SmCpA p 33.36 -0.26 +5.8 TxExA p 12.13 -0.03 +1.7 WshA p 25.41 -0.21 +3.7 American Funds B: BalB p 16.73 -0.10 +3.9 CapIBB t 47.69 -0.41 +0.2 GrwthB t 27.41 -0.18 +3.4 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 28.22 -0.34 -0.1 IntlEqA 27.53 -0.34 -0.1 IntEqII I r 11.64 -0.15 -1.2 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.84 -0.29 -4.0 MidCap 27.33 -0.18 +6.9 MidCapVal 18.51 -0.16 +2.9 Baron Funds:

Growth 44.20 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.46 DivMu 14.50 TxMgdIntl 15.15 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.29 GlAlA r 18.06 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.87 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.14 CGM Funds: Focus 31.02 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 45.63 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.62 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.39 AcornIntZ 34.99 ValRestr 44.49 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.23 USCorEq2 9.88 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.02 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.36 NYVen C 30.94 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.45 Dimensional Fds: EmMktV 31.76 IntSmVa 15.55 USLgCo 34.44 USLgVa 18.61 US Micro 11.64 US SmVa 22.13 IntlSmCo 14.70 Fixd 10.32 IntVa 16.99 Glb5FxInc 11.16 2YGlFxd 10.19 Dodge&Cox:

-0.48 +7.0 -0.07 +2.6 -0.04 +1.4 -0.26 -0.9 -0.12 +3.0 -0.15 +1.0 -0.13 +0.8 -0.15 +1.0 -0.11 +4.3 -0.27 +2.6 -0.28 +6.8 -0.28 +6.9 -0.46 +2.1 -0.23 +4.0 -0.15 +1.0 -0.06 +8.3 -0.26 +3.4 -0.26 +3.4 -0.25 +3.2 -0.03 +2.7 -0.31 +1.0 -0.21 +3.0 -0.19 +5.2 -0.01 +9.4 -0.13 +10.3 -0.16 +12.8 -0.19 +3.4 -0.01 +0.3 -0.29 -0.3 -0.04 +1.6 -0.01 +0.5

Balanced 67.33 Income 13.23 IntlStk 32.39 Stock 102.07 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.56 NatlMunInc 9.67 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 17.61 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.47 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.12 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.04 FPACres 25.71 Fairholme 33.75 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.91 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.72 StrInA 12.25 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.89 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.84 FF2015 10.70 FF2020 12.93 FF2025 10.73 FF2030 12.81 FF2035 10.61 FF2040 7.42 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.97 AMgr50 14.27 Balanc 16.98 BlueChGr 40.04 Canada 50.86 CapAp 23.25 CpInc r 8.86 Contra 59.95 DisEq 22.00 DivIntl 27.64 DivGth 25.10 EmrMk 22.70

-0.35 -0.04 -0.43 -0.62

+5.2 +2.1 +1.7 +6.2

-0.10 +5.1 +0.01 +2.7 -0.09 +5.3 -0.09 +0.9 -0.09 +0.7 -0.02 +1.1 -0.11 +3.6 -0.03 +12.2 -0.04 +5.4 -0.12 +3.0 -0.05 +2.1 -0.12 +3.1 -0.07 -0.06 -0.07 -0.06 -0.08 -0.07 -0.04

+2.6 +2.7 +3.0 +3.3 +3.4 +3.4 +3.6

-0.08 -0.07 -0.10 -0.19 -0.69 -0.04 -0.01 -0.43 -0.14 -0.32 -0.16 -0.10

+4.7 +3.0 +3.8 +5.5 +4.9 +8.5 +4.2 +3.0 +4.7 -1.3 +6.0 +0.4

Eq Inc 41.47 EQII 17.25 Fidel 29.53 GNMA 11.51 GovtInc 10.46 GroCo 73.13 GroInc 16.96 HighInc r 8.64 Indepn 21.33 IntBd 10.28 IntmMu 10.22 IntlDisc 30.08 InvGrBd 11.43 InvGB 7.14 LgCapVal 11.89 LatAm 50.66 LevCoStk 24.70 LowP r 34.57 Magelln 66.92 MidCap 25.95 MuniInc 12.55 NwMkt r 15.47 OTC 48.40 100Index 8.29 Ovrsea 30.13 Puritn 16.74 StIntMu 10.67 STBF 8.36 SmllCpS r 17.24 StratInc 10.93 StrReRt r 8.61 TotalBd 10.63 USBI 11.15 Value 61.92 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.48 IntlInxInv 33.14 TotMktInv 33.49 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.48 TotMktAd r 33.50 First Eagle: GlblA 41.20 OverseasA 19.96

-0.22 -0.09 -0.16 -0.04 -0.04 -0.49 -0.09

+6.0 +5.6 +4.2 +2.0 +1.2 +6.0 +5.6 +3.7 -0.03 +7.1 -0.05 +2.1 -0.02 +1.5 -0.35 -0.9 -0.05 +2.0 -0.03 +2.2 -0.04 +5.7 -0.70 -2.3 -0.14 +7.8 -0.23 +8.2 -0.55 +4.0 -0.17 +10.8 -0.03 +1.7 -0.02 +4.3 -0.23 +5.9 -0.04 +4.5 -0.41 -2.6 -0.07 +4.2 -0.02 +0.8 -0.01 +1.1 -0.04 +8.2 -0.04 +2.2 -0.03 +1.2 -0.04 +2.4 -0.05 +1.6 -0.38 +8.7 -0.22 +5.2 -0.44 -0.9 -0.20 +6.1 -0.23 +5.2 -0.19 +6.1 -0.33 +3.1 -0.16 +2.6

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.81 -0.02 FoundAl p 10.08 -0.05 HYTFA p 10.01 -0.01 IncomA p 2.09 -0.01 USGovA p 6.71 -0.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.08 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.11 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.00 -0.09 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.43 -0.06 GlBd A p 13.23 +0.01 GrwthA p 16.84 -0.15 WorldA p 13.99 -0.09 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 16.84 -0.16 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.25 +0.01 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.52 -0.25 GMO Trust: ShDurColl r 14.72 +0.01 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.64 -0.17 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.35 -0.09 Quality 19.65 -0.16 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.07 +0.01 HYMuni 8.44 -0.01 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.42 -0.05 CapApInst 33.77 -0.13 IntlInv t 53.60 -0.91 Intl r 54.11 -0.92 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.96 -0.15 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 28.51 -0.14 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 31.90 -0.15

+1.4 +2.6 +2.6 +2.8 +2.1 +5.1 +2.8 +2.6 +4.9 -1.8 +5.1 +0.2 +0.1 +0.2 +5.0 +4.5 NE +1.1 +0.7 +1.1 +3.6 +4.3 +2.3 +2.4 -1.5 -1.4 +4.2 +4.0 +4.2

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.54 -0.20 Div&Gr 18.30 -0.16 Advisers 18.22 -0.10 TotRetBd 10.84 -0.04 HussmnStrGr 12.75 -0.05 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.63 -0.06 AssetStA p 22.17 -0.06 AssetStrI r 22.33 -0.06 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.21 -0.04 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.21 -0.04 HighYld 7.93 IntmTFBd 10.95 -0.02 ShtDurBd 10.88 -0.02 USLCCrPls 19.12 -0.10 Janus S Shrs: Forty 32.70 -0.13 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.03 -0.20 OvrseasT r 46.11 -0.11 PrkMCVal T 20.87 -0.12 Twenty T 63.96 -0.29 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.21 -0.09 LSBalanc 12.22 -0.07 LSGrwth 11.89 -0.08 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.36 -0.18 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.64 -0.05 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 18.91 -0.05 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.99 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.53 -0.22 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.73 -0.09 StrInc C 14.29 -0.08 LSBondR 13.68 -0.09 StrIncA 14.22 -0.08 Loomis Sayles Inv:

+5.2 +4.3 +4.3 +2.5 -0.2 -0.7 -0.5 -0.4 +1.6 +1.7 +3.8 +1.2 +0.6 +5.2 +3.7 +2.9 +8.5 +5.4 +3.8 +4.1 +3.6 +3.8 +7.8 +3.5 +3.4 +2.2 +6.0 +4.5 +4.3 +4.4 +4.5

InvGrBdA p 11.97 -0.09 InvGrBdY 11.98 -0.09 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.89 -0.03 BdDebA p 7.50 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.52 -0.08 ValueA 21.63 -0.16 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.74 -0.15 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.75 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.15 -0.06 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.52 -0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.14 -0.05 TotRtBdI 10.14 -0.04 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 12.96 -0.20 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.80 -0.06 GlbDiscZ 28.14 -0.05 QuestZ 17.86 -0.05 SharesZ 20.15 -0.10 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 39.87 -0.44 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 41.41 -0.46 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.60 -0.20 Intl I r 17.34 -0.13 Oakmark r 39.07 -0.23 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.35 GlbSMdCap 13.29 -0.11 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.04 -0.23 DvMktA p 29.08 -0.20 GlobA p 55.38 -0.58 IntBdA p 6.37 -0.07 MnStFdA 29.48 -0.14 RisingDivA 14.41 -0.10 S&MdCpVl 28.26 -0.10

+3.3 +3.5 +6.6 +3.4 +3.4 +4.1 +4.2 +3.1 +0.4 +1.5 +3.5 +3.6 -0.5 +4.0 +4.1 +3.6 +5.0 +5.6 +5.5 +4.2 +3.0 +5.5 +4.0 +4.1 +2.8 +1.1 +4.5 +0.4 +4.8 +3.6 +6.3

StrInA p 4.03 -0.02 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.10 -0.09 S&MdCpVl 24.39 -0.09 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.06 -0.08 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.15 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.01 -0.04 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.63 -0.09 ComodRR 7.70 -0.11 HiYld 9.03 InvGrCp 11.14 -0.07 LowDu 10.42 -0.01 RealRet 10.90 -0.13 RealRtnI 10.83 -0.08 ShortT 9.86 -0.01 TotRt 11.01 -0.04 TR II 10.58 -0.05 TRIII 9.75 -0.04 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 10.83 -0.08 TotRtA 11.01 -0.04 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.01 -0.04 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.01 -0.04 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.01 -0.04 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 39.48 -0.35 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.54 -0.27 Price Funds: BlChip 33.92 -0.22 CapApp 19.13 -0.06 EmMktS 30.40 -0.22 EqInc 22.30 -0.11 EqIndex 31.57 -0.17 Growth 28.43 -0.16 HlthSci 28.67 -0.28 HiYield 6.57 +0.01 IntlBond 9.62 -0.13

+3.6 +3.4 +6.1 +3.4 +2.9 +2.6 +2.1 -4.7 +4.6 +3.3 +1.7 -0.3 +0.8 +0.6 +2.7 +1.8 +2.8 +0.7 +2.6 +2.4 +2.6 +2.6 +2.1 +5.1 +3.5 +5.3 +1.0 +6.2 +5.1 +3.3 +9.6 +4.1 -2.0

IntlStk 12.85 MidCap 51.17 MCapVal 21.97 N Asia 16.37 New Era 43.80 N Horiz 28.11 N Inc 9.37 R2010 14.44 R2015 11.07 R2020 15.17 R2025 11.04 R2030 15.75 R2040 15.80 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 29.60 SmCapVal 31.92 SpecIn 12.01 Value 21.68 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.62 VoyA p 21.17 RiverSource A: DEI 9.22 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.10 PremierI r 17.37 TotRetI r 11.58 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.82 S&P Sel 18.24 Scout Funds: Intl 29.47 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.64 AmShS p 38.65 Sequoia 118.63 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 50.36 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.96 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.84 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 46.97 Thornburg Fds:

-0.16 +2.0 -0.43 +7.7 -0.13 +6.0 +1.4 -0.47 +0.4 -0.28 +9.9 -0.04 +2.0 -0.08 +3.5 -0.06 +3.7 -0.09 +3.9 -0.07 +4.1 -0.10 +4.2 -0.10 +4.3 -0.01 +1.1 -0.27 +9.9 -0.27 +8.3 -0.05 +2.6 -0.09 +5.9 -0.06 +5.5 -0.07 +7.3 -0.06 +5.1 -0.12 +6.9 -0.21 +6.5 -0.10 +7.5 -0.19 +5.6 -0.10 +5.2 -0.40 +1.1 -0.32 +3.7 -0.32 +3.7 -1.07 +7.9 -0.42 +2.4 -0.04 +1.8 -0.20 -2.4 +0.10 +1.4

IntValA p 24.89 -0.18 IntValue I 25.47 -0.18 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.91 -0.05 VALIC : StkIdx 23.43 -0.13 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 14.58 -0.06 EqIncA p 8.17 -0.05 GrInA p 18.34 -0.10 HYMuA p 9.25 -0.01 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.92 -0.03 CpOpAdl 72.96 -0.70 Energy 110.30 -1.07 500Adml 108.01 -0.59 GNMA Ad 10.79 -0.04 HlthCr 51.93 -0.61 HiYldCp 5.55 InfProAd 24.64 -0.19 ITsryAdml 11.16 -0.09 IntGrAdm 54.47 -0.70 ITAdml 13.54 -0.04 ITGrAdm 9.80 -0.06 LtdTrAd 11.08 -0.02 LTGrAdml 8.91 -0.11 LT Adml 11.02 -0.02 MuHYAdm 10.39 -0.02 PrmCap r 63.91 -0.44 STsyAdml 10.76 -0.02 ShtTrAd 15.94 -0.01 STIGrAd 10.69 -0.01 TtlBAdml 10.43 -0.05 TStkAdm x 28.97 -0.29 WellslAdm 50.66 -0.35 WelltnAdm 51.43 -0.39 Windsor 42.67 -0.21 WdsrIIAd 44.38 -0.19 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.39 -0.20 CapOpp 31.59 -0.30 DivdGro 13.53 -0.13 Energy 58.74 -0.57 EqInc 19.08 -0.14

+0.3 +0.4 +3.3 +5.1 +6.0 +5.4 +6.6 +2.7 +1.7 +5.1 -1.6 +5.2 +2.1 +3.4 +3.3 +1.3 +0.8 +1.4 +3.0 +0.9 +1.2 +1.4 +1.9 +3.6 +0.7 +0.5 +1.8 +1.6 +6.0 +2.7 +3.2 +6.1 +5.6 +4.0 +5.2 +2.7 -1.6 +4.5

Explr 62.38 GNMA 10.79 GlobEq 16.19 GroInc 24.67 HYCorp 5.55 HlthCre 123.05 InflaPro 12.54 IntlGr 17.12 IntlVal 30.44 ITIGrade 9.80 LifeCon 15.58 LifeGro 20.36 LifeMod 18.31 LTIGrade 8.91 Morg 16.05 MuInt 13.54 MuLtd 11.08 MuShrt 15.94 PrecMtls r 20.57 PrmcpCor 12.68 Prmcp r 61.59 SelValu r 17.12 STAR 18.13 STIGrade 10.69 StratEq 16.46 TgtRetInc 10.82 TgRe2010 21.14 TgtRe2025 11.77 TgtRe2015 11.71 TgRe2020 20.70 TgRe2030 20.11 TgtRe2035 12.13 TgtRe2040 19.88 TgtRe2045 12.55 USGro 16.92 Wellsly 20.91 Welltn 29.77 Wndsr 12.64 WndsII 25.00 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 107.98 Balanced 20.17 DevMkt 9.48 EMkt 25.99

-0.58 -0.04 -0.15 -0.12 -1.44 -0.10 -0.22 -0.42 -0.06 -0.09 -0.16 -0.14 -0.11 -0.12 -0.04 -0.02 -0.01 -0.49 -0.10 -0.42 -0.13 -0.12 -0.01 -0.13 -0.07 -0.15 -0.08 -0.08 -0.15 -0.15 -0.09 -0.14 -0.09 -0.10 -0.14 -0.22 -0.07 -0.11

+8.9 +2.1 +3.3 +5.5 +3.2 +3.4 -0.1 +0.8 -0.6 +3.0 +3.0 +4.1 +3.5 +1.2 +5.1 +1.4 +0.9 +0.4 +0.7 +4.7 +3.6 +7.3 +3.4 +1.7 +7.7 +2.2 +3.0 +4.0 +3.5 +3.7 +4.1 +4.4 +4.4 +4.4 +2.8 +2.7 +3.2 +6.1 +5.6

-0.60 -0.11 -0.15 -0.23

+5.2 +4.2 -0.5 +0.3

Europe 25.07 -0.42 -3.4 Extend 35.76 -0.27 +9.5 Growth x 28.54 -0.25 +4.7 ITBnd 10.82 -0.09 +1.9 MidCap 17.80 -0.10 +8.8 Pacific 10.18 -0.13 +5.2 REIT rx 16.42 -0.02 +11.4 SmCap 30.31 -0.27 +10.3 SmlCpGth 18.47 -0.19 +9.7 SmlCpVl 14.47 -0.10 +10.8 STBnd 10.46 -0.03 +0.9 TotBnd 10.43 -0.05 +1.6 TotlIntl 14.36 -0.20 -0.3 TotStk x 28.97 -0.28 +5.9 Value x 19.65 -0.18 +6.0 Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst 9.41 -0.15 NS ExtIn 35.78 -0.27 +9.5 GrwthIst x 28.54 -0.27 +4.8 InfProInst 10.04 -0.07 InstIdx 107.28 -0.60 +5.2 InsPl 107.29 -0.59 +5.2 InsTStPlus 26.29 -0.15 +6.0 MidCpIst 17.84 -0.11 +8.8 SCInst 30.34 -0.27 +10.3 TBIst 10.43 -0.05 +1.6 TSInst x 28.98 -0.28 +6.0 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 89.22 -0.49 +5.2 STBdIdx 10.46 -0.03 +0.9 TotBdSgl 10.43 -0.05 +1.6 TotStkSgl x 27.96 -0.28 +5.9 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.49 -0.09 +3.6 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.82 +0.5 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.43 -0.05 +4.0


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Kimberly Bowker at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

BofA

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY LEAD-BASED PAINT RENOVATION AND REPAIR CERTIFICATION: Certification that allows contractors to perform renovation, repair and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint on homes built before 1978. Required for an EPA rule that goes into effect April 22. Preregistration required; $189 for COBA members and $229 for nonmembers, includes lunch; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Builders Association, 61396 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 203, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www.coba.org. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS CLASS: Learn basic computer skills. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. ADBITE LUNCH: Hosted by the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon. Rachel Trice, certified festivals and events executive for Punch Event Marketing, will discuss fundraising strategies. RSVP by noon March 23; $10 for AdFed members, $30 for nonmembers and $20 for nonprofits; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-385-1992 or www.adfedco.org. WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS BUSINESS RESOURCE LUNCHEON: David Rosell of Rosell Financial Group will present “Financially Sound in 2010: Strategies to Live the Life You Have Always Imagined.” RSVP by March 22; $20 for WCR members and $25 for nonmembers, includes lunch; 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-480-6808, joy@bendproperty.com or www.centraloregonwcr.org. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking and support group for unemployed people to get out of the house and discuss various topics; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; bendetg@gmail.com. “GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SOCIAL SECURITY AND MEDICARE”: Learn about potential opportunities to help increase retirement benefits through Social Security and Medicare. Sponsored by Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and Clear One Health Plans. Registration requested; free; 4 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-617-6033 or erik.tobiason@smithbarney.com. GREEN DRINKS: Networking event for green businesses and individuals; free; 5-7 p.m.; Moonfire and Sun Garden Center, 61944 27th St., Bend; 541385-6908 or www.envirocenter.org. “DEFENSIVE INVESTING 101”: Learn how to plan for retirement, health care costs, Social Security, and how to create a budget and a portfolio to defend against bad markets; free; 6-7 p.m.; Northwest Quadrant Wealth Management, 869 N.W. Wall St., Suite 204, Bend; RSVP to 541-388-9888. “FINDING YOUR DREAM HOME”: Presented by Kris Danks of Arbor Mortgage Group; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 2625 S.W. 17th Place, Redmond; RSVP to 541-3821795. “OWNING A FRANCHISE”: Terry Rost will discuss how to choose a franchise

and arrange financing. Registration required; $19; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. TOASTMASTERS CLUB COMMUNICATORS PLUS: Learn how to improve public speaking and communication skills; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive, Bend; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY LEAD-BASED PAINT RENOVATION AND REPAIR CERTIFICATION: Certification that allows contractors to perform renovation, repair and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint on homes built before 1978. Required for an EPA rule that goes into effect April 22. Preregistration required; $189 for COBA members and $229 for nonmembers, includes lunch; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Builders Association, 61396 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 203, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www.coba.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by Smith Rock BMX; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. ALPINE INTERNET WORKSHOPS: Free; 10-11 a.m. Introduction to WordPress, 11 a.m.-noon Introduction to Google Analytics, noon-1 p.m. Advanced Google Analytics, 1-1:15 p.m. The Fresh Web, 1:15-2 p.m. Center Stage Review; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704, support@alpineinternet.com or www.alpineinternet.com/locals. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-5041389 or www.yourmoneyback.org. “GET BACK ON TRACK — DEVELOP YOUR FINANCIAL RECOVERY PLAN”: Evaluate your current situation, goals, saving and spending needs and more; free; noon; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; RSVP to 541-330-4329.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. PREVENTING FORECLOSURE WORKSHOPS: Learn about foreclosure prevention programs. Workshops offered in English and Spanish.

Presented by state agencies and NeighborImpact; free; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 866-814-9710 or www.foreclosurehelp.oregon.gov. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-504-1389 or www.yourmoneyback.org.

MONDAY FILE MANAGEMENT CLASS: Learn how to create, organize and delete files or folders. Keyboarding and Introduction to Computers are required prerequisite classes. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians who are eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-5041389 or www.yourmoneyback.org. “RÉSUMÉS AND APPLICATIONS”: Learn to prepare applications, résumés and cover letters. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 24 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts “The Jail Expansion Bond and Tax Cuts Ahead” with Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@bendbroadband.com or www.talkofthetownco.com.

TUESDAY

BNI NETWORKING EVENT: Network with business professionals looking to build business by referral. RSVP by March 26; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-526-0639 or sreynolds@ leamsc.com. FILM OREGON ALLIANCE QUARTERLY BUSINESS AND NETWORKING MEETING: Features updates and speakers from the local media production scene, a preview of projects and professional development opportunities; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-7715440, stan@filmoregon.org or www.filmoregon.org.

WEDNESDAY “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS”: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “SPANISH COMPUTER CLASS — CREATE A RESUME IN WORD”: Familiarity with Windows operating system and MS Office programs required. Taught in Spanish. Preregistration required; free; 3:30-5 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1066. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Preregistration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SIMPLE WILLS CLINIC: Presented by Hurley Re Attorneys at Law. Reservations requested; free; 6-7 p.m.; Hurley Re, 747 S.W. Mill View Way, Bend; 541-317-5505 or jmlove@ hurley-re.com.

NEWS OF RECORD

Continued from B1 The program is designed for borrowers who received sub-prime or other high-risk loans from Countrywide Financial, the biggest and one of the most aggressive lenders during the housing boom. Bank of America bought Countrywide in 2008. Bank of America officials said the program would work this way: A borrower might owe, say, $250,000 on a house whose value has fallen to $200,000. Fifty thousand dollars of that balance would be moved into a special interestfree account. As long as the owner continued to make payments on the $200,000, every year $10,000 in the special account would be forgiven until either the balance was zero or the housing market had recovered and the borrower once again had positive equity. “The time has come to test this sort of program,” Jack Schakett, a Bank of America executive, said in a media briefing. “Modifications are better than foreclosure.” Bank of America said its new program would initially help about 45,000 Countrywide borrowers — a fraction of the 1.2 million Bank of America homeowners who are in default. The total amount of principal reduced, it estimated, would be $3 billion.

PERMITS City of Bend

Floyd C. Antonsen, 3218 N.E. Spring Creek, $165,410 Alterra Investments LLC, 1740 N.W. Harriman, $164,254 Greg Welch Construction Inc., 2555 N.W. Crossing, $337,630 James Weeks MD, 2564 N.E. Courtney, $750,000 Don D. Willis, 840 S.W. Hill, $109,337 City of Redmond

Oregon Joy LLC, 203 S.W. 33rd Drive, $113,562 D.R. Horton Inc. Portland, 2855 S.W. 49th St., $236,633 Crook County

Kurt and Donna Kendrick, 3493 S.E. Dallas, Prineville, $240,890 Deschutes County

Roy H. Burroughs, 15051 Wildwing Road, Sisters, $171,239.24 Jeffrey E. Bender, 1154 Highland View Loop, Redmond, $311,790.42

Find It All Online

bendbulletin.com

Featured Business of the Week:

Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

“When Taste Matters”

CREATIVE LIGHTING

2755 NW Crossing Drive 541-312-9349 NorthWest Crossing • Bend

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OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WORKING WITH EXCEL SPREADSHEETS: Learn to understand Excel and spreadsheets. Familiarity with Windows operating system and MS Excel required. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. “GROWING FARMS”: Teaches beginning specialty crop and livestock farmers about how to manage biological and financial risks of farming. Preregistration required; $200 or $350 per couple from the same farm; Tuesdays through May 4 from 5-9 p.m., and one farm tour on April 24; OSU Extension Service, 3893 S.W. Airport Way , Redmond; 541-548-6088, ext., 7957, dana. martin@oregonstate.edu or http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/ growing-farms-workshop-series.

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By Appointment

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NEXT ISSUE MAY 4 TH !

H I G H

D E S E R T

Healthy Living in Central Oregon A S L I C K S T O C K M A G A Z I N E C R E AT E D T O H E L P P R O M O T E , E N C O U R A G E , A N D M A I N TA I N A N A C T I V E , H E A LT H Y L I F E S T Y L E .

Central Oregon Business Owners: If you need to reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services, HIGH DESERT PULSE is for you! Distributed quarterly in more than 35,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this new glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811.

A D V E R T I S I N G D E A D L I N E — M A R C H 2 0 T H • C A L L T O D AY


L

C

Inside

OREGON Abuse expert testifies at Boy Scouts sex abuse trial, see Page C6. OBITUARIES Actor Robert Culp remembered for “I Spy,” see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2010

Hospital company Area activists condemn harassment changing its name By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

Cascade Healthcare Community, the parent company of hospitals in Bend, Redmond and Prineville, next week will change its name to St. Charles Health System. The name change is being undertaken to alleviate confusion over the identity of the hospital system. It will take effect on April 1 when the organization’s hospitals will switch their letterhead, Web site, e-mail addresses and anything else with the CHC moniker. “People were not familiar with the Cascade Healthcare Community name,” said Jim Diegel, CEO of the organization. “They were really confused about what Cascade Healthcare Community was.” None of the individual hospitals within the system, St. Charles Bend, St. Charles Redmond or Pioneer Memorial Hospital, will change their names. CHC did a community survey last August in which they asked people whether they recognized the various names associated with the organization. According to that survey, just 14 percent said they were familiar with the organization Cascade Health-

care Community. More than 90 percent of survey respondents, when asked to name a hospital in the Bend area, said St. Charles Bend. Diegel said that once executives and the board of directors saw those statistics, changing the name became a “no-brainer.” “We could spend years and millions of dollars trying to establish a brand for CHC, but when it’s clear that the brand is so strong for St. Charles, (we decided) let’s just change the name.” As of April 1, the new Web site will be stcharleshealthcare.org and e-mail addresses will end with that tag. The old Web site address and e-mails will continue to work for some time. The change does not affect the organization’s status as a nonprofit hospital nor does it have an impact on any other operations, Diegel said. Nor was the change caused by the recent split with the Catholic diocese over some of the hospital’s practices, said Diegel. “The timing is awkward but it’s completely unrelated.”

Local conservative activists condemned recent acts of vandalism targeting members of Congress on Wednesday, and said their members are focusing on upcoming elections. In the run-up to and the days following Sunday’s vote by the House of Representatives to approve a health care reform bill, members supporting the legislation have reported threatening phone calls and other forms

someone had cut the of harassment. gas line to the grill on A brick was thrown his porch. One day earthrough a window at lier, Tea Party activists a district office of Rep. had posted the address Louise Slaughter, DHEALTH online, apparently beN.Y., on Friday, and on CARE lieving it to be the home Monday, a glass door and a window were REFORM of Rep. Periello, and encouraged opponents of broken at the Tuscon health reform to visit to office of Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz. Tuesday evening, make their objections known. John Carrigg of the Bend Tea the brother of Rep. Tom Periello, D-Va., found a threatening letter Party said the incidents are trouaddressed to the congressman in bling, and that fortunately, only his mailbox, and discovered that a small number of people seem

to have an interest in vandalism and intimidation. “A lot of people got pretty angry last week before the vote and were angry after the vote,” he said. “If this were some kind of insane national protest, I think you’d see things happening across the country, but its still just a few incidents.” Bend Tea Party board member John Philo called the targeting of lawmakers “abhorrent,” and “sad.” See Activists / C5

Winds can mean danger when burning outdoors

Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

DEADLINE NEARS FOR STUDS

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend resident Paul Wheeler, 32, and his dad, Rick Wheeler, 56, of Medford, empty yard debris from their pickup truck on Wednesday. The younger Wheeler recruited his dad to visit him in Bend to help haul yard debris to Knott Landfill for recycling.

Don’t leave fires unattended By Diane S.W. Lee • The Bulletin Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Brandon Sottosanti, 30, of Bend, changes out studded tires for summer tires Wednesday at the Les Schwab Tire Center on Franklin Avenue in Bend. Oregon drivers have until the end of Wednesday to remove studded tires. Drivers caught driving on studded tires after the deadline can be cited with a Class C traffic violation, which carries a minimum fine of $190.

DEQ meeting to address pollutants in water supply By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Some pollutants wash into streams, carried by storm water that flows over agricultural fields and city streets. Some are flushed through the sewer system to the wastewater treatment plant and beyond. Others are created from combustion processes and settle out from the air. And all of the 118 pollutants on the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s list of persistent pollutants are toxic, and could be harmful to people or waterways in the state. While some are chemicals that people don’t often think of as pollutants — like synthetic hormones or food additives — the state is drafting a report on different options to help prevent them from contaminating streams and rivers. “They’re beginning to be detected in places where we would not expect to see them,” said Cheryl Grabham, project coordinator

Details The DEQ will hold a public meeting on persistent pollutants from 4 to 6 p.m. on April 6 at the agency’s office, 475 N.E. Bellevue Dr., Suite 110, in Bend. To view the draft report, and for more information, visit www. deq.state.or.us/wq/SB737/. To submit comments on the report, e-mail p3@deq. state.or.us, or write to Cheryl Grabham, DEQ Water Quality Division, 811 S.W. Sixth Ave., Portland, OR 97204. with DEQ. “They’re just emerging into the public consciousness. It’s something we might need to be paying more attention to.” DEQ is holding a meeting in Bend in early April to discuss persistent pollutants and its draft report, and to take public comments. See Pollutants / C5

T

he warm weather is bringing more people outdoors to enjoy the sun, but it may also bring problems to those trying to get rid of their yard debris. Over the weekend, Bend’s fire crews responded to five fires that had escaped during agricultural burning — a result of gusting

winds and drier weather conditions. This time of the year, people are cleaning their yards and farmers are burning their fields, Fire Inspector Larry Medina said. This can lead to escaped fires. “Over the weekend it started, we’ve had a number of escape burns — fires taken by the wind and burning stuff that you didn’t want to burn,” Medina said. The Bend Fire Department helped extinguish flames from field burning several times on Saturday. Wind

Inside • Tips and alternatives for outdoor burning, Page C5 speed and change in direction is a major cause in the increased number of escaping fires, Medina said. “Typically we have really calm mornings when most people will start their burn,” he said. “Depending on weather conditions, you’ll

see the winds pick up. Most of it is predictable. You just don’t know when and where. ... They tend to find people right in the middle of the burning, and (the fires) get away.” A permit is required for commercial and agricultural burning. Two agricultural sites were issued minor violation notices for lacking a permit at sites on Waugh Road on Saturday and Hamehook Road on Tuesday. See Burning / C5

“We have the FireFree Recycle Days, so really, we find that the easiest. You take (debris) to the landfill for free.” — Fire Inspector Larry Medina

Employment Source temporary workers Ray Guardado, 43, center, and Isaac Gansberg, 24, right, both of Bend, work to clean yard debris off the grounds of Central Oregon Community College in Bend on Wednesday afternoon. Andy Tullis The Bulletin


C2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

ODOT hosts meeting on safety issues Central Oregonians will get a chance to talk about their transportation safety concerns at a meeting beginning at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday in Bend. The Oregon Department of Transportation is updating its safety action plan to address safety challenges and opportunities in the state. ODOT spokeswoman Sally Ridenour said the meeting will be a good overview of issues in Deschutes County. The meeting will be held at Tumalo Feed Company, 64619 U.S. Highway 20. Contact Walt McAllister at 503-986-4187 or Ridenour at 503986-3359 for details.

Most area businesses pass OLCC check Ten of 13 Central Oregon businesses refused to sell alcohol to minors in a recent compliance check performed by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. On March 6, underage volun-

teers working for the OLCC visited the businesses and attempted to purchase alcohol using their own identification. Three businesses — The Smokehouse, Tom & Charley’s, and Leather’s Fuel, all in Prineville — failed the compliance check. Businesses that fail the check are subject to OLCC penalties including fines or license suspension.

United Way chapter seeking volunteers The United Way of Deschutes County is signing up volunteers for its annual Days of Caring, scheduled for May 22 and 23. Individual volunteers or volunteer teams from area businesses are matched with a local nonprofit agency for a day of community service. Projects scheduled for this year include repairing and painting bicycles, landscaping, painting, building a swing set for a child care facility and more. Companies or individuals in-

terested in volunteering should contact Terianne at the Untied Way office, at 541-389-6507 or doc@deschutesunitedway.org.

Lost Crooked River Ranch man rescued A man whose vehicle became stuck in the snow in rural Crook County was rescued Tuesday. Darwin Siebert, of Crooked River Ranch, called the Crook County Sheriff’s Office shortly after 5 p.m. Monday to report that he had become stuck while taking a shortcut, and believed he was 25 to 30 miles southsouthwest of Ashwood. An initial search by Crook County Search and Rescue found no sign of Siebert. Tuesday morning, the search was turned over to Jefferson County Search and Rescue, and Siebert was spotted by an Oregon State Police airplane. Search and rescue personnel reached Siebert, and a U.S. Forest Service employee transported him to Terrebonne to be picked up by his wife.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:51 p.m. March 23, in the 2000 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 11:45 a.m. March 23, in the 800 block of Northeast Nickernut Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:21 a.m. March 23, in the 2000 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:01 a.m. March 23, in the 500 block of Southwest Sixth Street.

The Oregonian

By Meghan Walsh The (Coos Bay) World

COOS BAY — Oregon Resources Corp. wants to mine on Coos County forest lands, but commissioners are at odds over whether the county should pay for its own drilling samples beforehand. Commissioner Bob Main advocates hiring a consulting service, PBS Engineering and Environmental, to do preliminary drilling for about $80,000. But commissioners Kevin Stufflebean and Nikki Whitty rejected that idea, fearing it would be a waste of money. “We need to see if we can’t come to an agreement outside of spending $80,000,� Whitty said. The county remains in negotiations with Oregon Resources for an exploration agreement, which would let the company do its own test drilling on county land. Main, despite being outvoted last week, still argues the county should find out what it has before entering into any agreements. “It wouldn’t be prudent to lease

the ground if we don’t know what we are leasing out, especially when this is known to be a goldbearing region,� Main said. Oregon Resources wants permission to explore and possibly mine chromite on 6,000 acres of county-owned forest in the Beaver Hill area between Charleston and Bandon. Main contends the property may hold precious metals along with the chromite. In a recent email, he described the Oregon Resources proposal as “a possible rip-off of county minerals,� which might be worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Oregon Resources doesn’t deny the presence of gold. But the company says it’s in such small quantities it wouldn’t be worth extracting. The mining company says it is interested in minerals such as chromite, garnet and zircon. Any gold would stay in the soil, to be redeposited in the ground after the targeted minerals are extracted, the company says. Furthermore, the land-use

lease would include royalties for any mined minerals, including gold. If hired, PBS would drill approximately 60 holes and 1,400 feet in concentrated areas. The main objective would be to find out what types and percentages of minerals the soil contains. Oregon Resources has already sampled 9,000 feet of core near Beaver Hill, delving 60 to 100 feet into the ground, Drew said. He doesn’t think PBS’s assessment will be thorough enough to provide an accurate portrayal of the area’s mineral content. “As taxpayers you’re throwing your money away,� Dan Smith, Oregon Resources chief operating officer, told the commissioners last week. If the county and Oregon Resources reach an agreement, the Portland-based firm has said it will share its core drilling samples with the county. Main said Oregon Resources has offered to pay the county a 3 percent royalty for minerals mined on county land.

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:09 a.m. March 23, in the area of state Highway 126. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:41 p.m. March 23, in the area of Northeast Blackbear Street.

Oregon State Police

DUII — Kevin Bradley Tate, 36, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10 p.m. March 23, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 150.

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 4:27 p.m. March 23, in the 51600 block of Huntington Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:42 p.m. March 23, in the area of Bear Creek and Ward roads in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:03 p.m. March 23, in the 60000 block of Cinder Butte Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:13 a.m. March 23, in the 15900 block of Burgess Road in La Pine. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 4:44 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 22188 Erickson Rd. 25 — Medical aid calls. Tuesday 2:07 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 63440 Hamehook Rd. 6:10 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 65800 E. U.S. Highway 20. 7:22 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 60200 Cree Circle. 18 — Medical aid calls.

Mount Hood featured on coin By Lynne Terry

Mining proposal divides Coos County commissioners

reported stolen at 4:52 a.m. March 23, in the 64300 block of Old Bend Redmond Highway in Bend.

Prineville Police Department

PORTLAND — An artist for the U.S. Mint was handed the difficult task last year of capturing the panoramic drama of Mount Hood on a quarter. Phebe Hemphill studied drawings, sculpted molds, poured clay, fine-tuned the bas relief and then repeated the process until she had a design that was crisp, lush and picture-perfect. The image was unveiled by the Mint on Wednesday as part of the new America the Beautiful Quarters series honoring national parks and national sights in the 50 states, five territories and the District of Columbia. The coin can be viewed online at at americathebeautiful quarters.gov. “Mount Hood is going to be on quarters that 300 million Americans will see,� said Ed-

mund Moy, director of the Mint. The image of Mount Hood with Lost Lake and a forest in the foreground is as iconic as the mountain itself, Moy said. “You look at it, and you know it’s Mount Hood,� he said. “She was able to make the lake look like water, and the mountain looks rugged. That’s difficult to do.� Hemphill, who also designed the Grand Canyon National Park coin, said the Mount Hood image was the more difficult. “You have this long landscape, and you’re trying to capture this great mountain in the distance,� she said. “It’s a challenge, but I think I pulled it off fairly well.� This is the second round of commemorative state quarters. The first, 50 State Quarters, ran from 1999 through 2008 and included Crater Lake National

Park on Oregon’s coin. Gov. Ted Kulongoski’s office suggested both Mount Hood and Timberline Lodge for the America the Beautiful series. The Mint commissioned four potential designs for the Mount Hood coin, and the governor’s office, U.S. Forest Service and other federal officials gave their feedback on the designs. The 56 coins will be issued over the next 12 years, based on when the sites were established. The first quarter — commemorating Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas — will be released in April. The coin for Mount Hood National Forest will be released in November.

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Today is Thursday, March 25, the 84th day of 2010. There are 281 days left in the year. T O D AY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On March 25, 1965, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led 25,000 marchers to the state capitol in Montgomery, Ala., to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks. ON THIS DATE In 1634, English colonists sent by Lord Baltimore arrived in present-day Maryland. In 1865, during the Civil War, Confederate forces attacked Fort Stedman in Virginia but were forced to withdraw by counterattacking Union troops. In 1894, Jacob S. Coxey began leading an “army� of unemployed from Massillon, Ohio, to Washington D.C., to demand help from the federal government. In 1911, 146 people, mostly female immigrants, were killed when fire broke out at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company in New York. In 1918, French composer Claude Debussy died in Paris. In 1947, a coal mine explosion in Centralia, Ill., claimed 111 lives. In 1957, the Treaty of Rome established the European Economic Community. In 1960, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, in New York, ruled that the D.H. Lawrence novel “Lady Chatterley’s Lover� was not obscene and could be sent through the mails. Ray Charles recorded “Georgia on My Mind� as part of his “The Genius Hits the Road� album in New York.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1975, King Faisal of Saudi Arabia was shot to death by a nephew with a history of mental illness. (The nephew was beheaded in June 1975.) In 1990, 87 people, most of them Honduran and Dominican immigrants, were killed when fire raced through an illegal social club in New York City. TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton briefly visited Pakistan, where he met with the new military ruler, Gen. Pervez Musharraf. A weary Pope John Paul II traveled the ancient streets of Nazareth, Jesus’ boyhood town, and celebrated Mass in the soaring Basilica of the Annunciation. FIVE YEARS AGO Losing still more legal appeals, Terri Schiavo’s father, Bob Schindler, said his severely brain-damaged daughter was “down to her last hours� as she entered her second week without the feeding tube that had sustained her life for 15 years. An ailing, silent Pope John Paul II appeared to the faithful via video for Good Friday services at the Vatican. ONE YEAR AGO Pirates seized the Panamaregistered, Greek-owned Nipayia with 18 Filipino crew members and a Russian captain off the Somali coastline. (The ship and crew were released in May 2009.) John Hope Franklin, a towering scholar of AfricanAmerican studies, died in Dur-

ham, N.C. at age 94. Dan Seals, half of the pop duo England Dan and John Ford Coley, later a top country singer (“You Still Move Me�), died in Nashville at age 61. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Modeling agency founder Eileen Ford is 88. Movie reviewer Gene Shalit is 84. Former astronaut James Lovell is 82. Feminist activist and author Gloria Steinem is 76. Singer Anita Bryant is 70. Singer Aretha Franklin is 68. Actor Paul Michael Glaser is 67. Singer Elton John is 63. Actress Bonnie Bedelia is 62. Actress-comedian Mary Gross is 57. Actor James McDaniel is 52. Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) is 52. Rock musician Steve Norman (Spandau Ballet) is 50. Actress Brenda Strong is 50. Actor Fred Goss is 49. Actor-writer-director John Stockwell is 49. Actress Marcia Cross is 48. Author Kate DiCamillo (“Because of Winn-Dixie�) is 46. Actress Lisa Gay Hamilton is 46. Actress Sarah Jessica Parker is 45. Former MLB All-Star pitcher Tom Glavine is 44. Olympic bronze medal figure skater Debi Thomas is 43. Singer Melanie Blatt (All Saints) is 35. Actor Lee Pace is 31. Actor Sean Faris is 28. Auto racer Danica Patrick is 28. Singer Katharine McPhee (“American Idol�) is 26. Singer Jason Castro (“American Idol�) is 23. Actress-singer Aly (aka Alyson) Michalka is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for something you are not.� — Andre Gide, French author and critic (1869-1951)

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 C3

O I B Ex-director ordered to repay charity $2M ASTORIA — A Clatsop County judge has ordered the former director of the Wintercross Foundation to repay the charity more than $2 million. Oregon Attorney General John Kroger said Wednesday the foundation sustained heavy losses and was virtually insolvent because director Ann Ellis invested irresponsibly. The judge’s order bars Ellis from ever again serving as the director of a charity. Real estate investor Barry Beutel established the foundation in 1990 to promote South American art, but it was not funded until after his 1998 death. Ellis had been Beutel’s longtime employee.

Teacher pleads not guilty to sex crimes PENDLETON — A teacher and coach at Pilot Rock High School pleaded not guilty this week to multiple sex crimes. Police arrested Kevin Nice last week on a warrant following a 35-count indictment from a Umatilla County grand jury. The state has accused the 37year-old of having sexual contact with four girls he knew from his work at Pilot Rock High. Police arrested Nice in Union County and then brought him to the Umatilla County Jail in Pendleton, where he has remained on a $1 million bond. A pretrial hearing has been scheduled for April 22.

Deal near on historic S. Oregon building JACKSONVILLE — Jackson County commissioners could decide as early as today to OK the sale of the U.S. Hotel in Jacksonville. The Mail Tribune newspaper reports that several potential buyers have expressed interest in the historic building, but the county is required to put it up for auction. An undisclosed minimum bid would be required, though the 1880 building is valued at roughly $2 million. After expenses involved in the sale are paid off, the Southern Oregon Historical Society would get $1 million and the county would get the rest. The finally troubled historical society has maintained the building for years.

Saks Fifth Avenue closing Portland store PORTLAND — Saks Fifth Avenue is closing its store in downtown Portland. In its official WARN notice to the state Tuesday, the luxury retailer said the closure at the end of July would be permanent. Saks is laying off 100 workers — 88 sales and support staff and 12 managers. — From wire reports

Ashland ski growth Federal judge upholds has little impact on initiative drive reforms weasel, study says By Tim Fought

The Associated Press

(Medford) Mail Tribune MEDFORD — Projects designed to reduce wildfire hazards in the Ashland watershed likely would disturb more habitat for a rare bushy-tailed weasel than the proposed expansion of the Mount Ashland ski area, according to a newly released environmental study prepared by the U.S. Forest Service. Ski area expansion likely would remove suitable habitat within the home range of one male Pacific fisher and one female fisher, the study determined. Thinning trees within the Ashland watershed to reduce the risk of a catastrophic wildfire potentially could influence the home range of two to three female fishers and one to two male fishers. Supporters of the expansion said the new study verifies the conclusions of the 2004 environmental review that approved the expansion. “We’re still reviewing the document,” said Kim Clark, general manager of the Mount Ashland ski area. “We like what we see so far, and we’re looking forward to moving on.”

Cumulative impacts Expansion opponents said it showed the need to protect fisher habitat and scale back the expansion. Eric Navickas of Ashland, who sued to block the expansion, said the study indicates cumulative impacts on the fisher population should require the Forest Service to modify its wildfire hazard reduction plans and the agency and ski area to scale back the expansion. “I fully expect (the Forest Service) will see legal challenges again,” Navickas said. Navickas also sued the Forest Service over its wildfire reduction plan, known as Ashland Forest Resiliency. The 94-page environmental study draws no new conclusions about the expansion.

Rather, it complies with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals order to address shortcomings in the final environmental impact statement issued in 2004, said Steve Johnson, project leader. In September 2007, the court found that the Forest Service failed to adequately study how the expansion might affect fisher habitat. The court also directed the Forest Service to designate land zones known as riparian reserves and restricted watershed terrain within the area where new ski trails would be built. The 2004 environmental review gave approval for building 16 new ski trails, two chairlifts and about 200 additional parking spaces at the ski area. Three conservation groups sued the Forest Service in federal district court and then appealed the district court decision at the 9th Circuit.

Small population Forest Service biologists estimate there are 48 to 91 fishers in a roughly circular area that extends from just north of the city of Ashland to about six miles south of the California state line, bounded on the east by Interstate 5. The local fishers are at the extreme northern end of a population of 1,000 to 2,000 animals that extends well into Northern California. Biologists estimated each male has a range of 15,000 acres to 36,000 acres. Females have a range of about 6,000 acres. The ski area occupies about 287 acres. The proposed ski runs would require the removal of about 68 acres of trees. Fishers are wary of humans and human activity, and tend to inhabit heavily treed landscapes. Biologists determined the new ski trails would not prevent fishers from moving north and south across the Siskiyou Mountains.

2nd Reed College student dies The Associated Press PORTLAND — Two Reed College students have died in two weeks. Portland police were called to an apartment east of campus Monday night where they found the body of 22-year-old Samuel Tepper, a senior physics major from New York. The Oregonian reports it will take the Multnomah County

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medical examiner’s office several weeks to determine the cause of death, pending the result of toxicology tests. Ten days earlier, 20-year-old Jessica Ettenger of Los Angeles was found dead in her campus dorm room. The medical examiner’s office also is away toxicology test results to help determine the cause of her death.

PORTLAND — A federal judge has upheld a 2007 law tightening regulations on initiative drives in Oregon. The law was aimed at enforcing the state’s ban on paying petition passers by the signature — a practice that critics said encouraged fraud such as forged signatures. Conservative opponents said the law was really aimed at keeping them from putting measures to statewide votes, and it violates their constitutional rights. But in a ruling Tuesday, Judge Michael Hogan said the regulations aren’t overly burdensome and serve the state’s interest in mak-

ing sure that petition drives are conducted legally. Among the requirements: Paid petition circulators must register, undergo state training and use petition sheets readily identified by color. Their employers must keep contract and payroll records. People convicted of fraud, forgery or ID theft in the past five years can’t be paid to gather petitions. Backers of the law said such regulation would make it easier for state officials to determine whether petition drives were complying with a 2002 constitutional amendment that outlawed paying signature gatherers on a piecework basis. Opponents of the law lost one

Marchers protest Portland shooting The Associated Press PORTLAND — Several dozen demonstrators marched Tuesday night through southeast Portland to protest the fatal police shooting of a transient man near Hoyt Arboretum. The Oregonian newspaper reports the march was peaceful, with demonstrators staying mostly on sidewalks. Marchers dispersed at the Police Bureau’s traffic division after they were met by officers in riot helmets. Police said they arrested a 26-yearold man on assault and other charges after he hurt a motorcycle officer with his bicycle. Marchers were dressed in black, and some wore masks. They were followed by officers on motorcycles, in cars

and on foot. Police said 58-year-old Jackie Collins had a hobby knife and was coming at the officer, who hit Collins with four shots. Police said Collins had cut his own neck numerous times before encountering the officer on Monday afternoon.

round in state court, and conservatives Russ Walker and Glenn Pelikan filed suit in federal court, alleging the law violated their free speech rights, among others. But Hogan disagreed with all their objections, saying at one point that a rule would help state officials investigate petitions “which have proven more likely to contain fraudulent signatures, namely those of paid circulators.” As a legislator in 2007, Secretary of State Kate Brown backed the law and called Hogan’s decision a “win for all Oregonians.” Ross Day, attorney for Walker and Pelikan, said Hogan’s decision was headed for appellate courts no matter which way he ruled. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

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C4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Crook Court made its own trouble

T

he Crook County Court has arrived at a mess of its own making. The court voted to guarantee the performance of a pri-

vate developer to create a subdivision. It can’t be surprised that other developers are lining up asking for the same treatment. Except now, the court isn’t as eager to help out anybody else. This all started with Breese Ranch LLC. It had divided up a ranch into 10 lots. Before developers can begin selling lots, county code requires them to complete the infrastructure — roads and wells — or post a bond. Breese didn’t have the ability to complete the infrastructure or post a bond. The county discovered a way it could help out Breese. County Counsel Dave Gordon found a section of county code that enables the county to be the bonding agency for a private development. The county would likely be protected from any financial harm because if Breese failed, the county could sell lots to pay for the infrastructure to be built. The county court’s vote was 21 and contentious. Commissioner Lynn Lundquist was the lone vote against the deal. It’s just one of the reasons we endorsed him in his race for re-election. Lundquist recognized that while it’s nice to be able to help out the economy, the county has to be careful about what sort of precedent would be set. Give the deal to Breese

(Crook County Commissioner Lynn) Lundquist recognized that while it’s nice to be able to help out the economy, the county has to be careful about what sort of precedent would be set. and other developers would expect the same treatment. Other developers might be able to make a legal argument that they are entitled to get it. And the court wouldn’t look fair if it didn’t do it for all qualified developers. Those were plenty of reasons not to do the deal, but here’s one more: Why should the county be getting in the bonding market? County Judge Mike McCabe and Commissioner Ken Fahlgren led Crook County into this mess by voting for the Breese deal. They should show leadership by getting the county out of the bonding market.

How the stimulus bill erodes efficiency

T

he Government Accountability Office delves periodically into the workings of Congress’ $787 billion stimulus package. The agency released its most recent findings this week, and they focus on that monument to government inefficiency, the prevailing wage. Created by the Davis-Bacon Act, it’s a superminimum wage paid to those who work on federally funded projects. The stimulus bill imposes prevailing-wage requirements for the first time upon 40 programs spread across 12 federal agencies. While some of these programs are new, most — 33 — existed prior to the stimulus. The wage mandate won’t be a big deal for those programs that fund relatively little construction work. But for some, including the Department of Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program, the impact will be significant. The weatherization program subsidizes efficiency upgrades in lowincome housing. The program has existed since 1976, but has remained blissfully free of the prevailing wage choke hold until now. Weatherization officials in Iowa told the GAO that the wage requirement will boost costs by 9 percent per home. The effect will be even larger on contractors weatherizing buildings exceeding four stories, who must pay higher “commercial” prevailing wages. Officials with the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s

Lead Hazard Reduction Program tell a similar story. One local official warned the GAO that the prevailing wage could boost costs by 10 to 13 percent per home. But that isn’t all. Federal officials with both the lead removal and weatherization programs predicted that various administrative requirements attached to the prevailing wage “would be particularly burdensome for small companies.” As a result, HUD is preparing to boost the amount of money grant recipients may spend on administrative costs by 50 percent. The prevailing wage’s supporters like to focus on the very real benefit to people cashing artificially inflated paychecks. What they hope everyone else overlooks, meanwhile, is the fact that funding is finite — no matter what Congress’ behavior might suggest. The stimulus bill, for instance, steered $5 billion into the weatherization assistance program. What happens when you increase the salaries of people doing weatherization work and devote more money to wage-related red tape? You decrease the number of people you can employ and the number of houses you can weatherize. Ironically, the weatherization program is supposed to enhance efficiency. If Congress and the president were as determined to use the public’s money as efficiently as the world’s energy, this country would be in much better shape than it is.

My Nickel’s Worth Life of a public servant is not so easy Ed Barbeau has filed to run for Deschutes County commissioner. In January, The Bulletin printed Ed’s letter condemning the “high paid” Deschutes County administrator and blaming public employees as the number one reason taxes keep getting raised. He praised corporations for creating wealth, condemning public employees for not doing that. First, corporations create jobs; the wealth they create goes back to the stockholders or their CEOs. The “wealth” is the profit we pay for when we buy their products. Ed creates his own wealth in his company, not your wealth. Second, if elected, Ed will make $6,410.56 a month, plus health and PERS benefits. I am wondering if Ed will consider himself overpaid. Will Ed accept the blame for high taxes? Will he accept this salary or forego it so as not to be a hypocrite? I do hope Ed wins. He needs a life lesson in what it is like to be a public servant. He needs to know how it feels to have the public complain about every decision he makes and hate the fact that he is being paid at all. We need people like Ed to work in public office. If he doesn’t pull a Sarah Palin and quit because he cannot take the heat, then he will have learned something the rest of us public servants have — that working for government is not as easy as it seems. Ed needs to walk in someone else’s shoes. Go, Ed. Nancy Buffinton-Kelm Sisters

Teaching’s tough

Wilderness size

For those who think that teachers have the best job in the world, I say, go back to college, get your advanced degree and credential, and start your new dream job. But before you do, I recommend you walk in the shoes of a teacher first. Salary: If you do the math with the contract hours and annual salary, the hourly rate looks like generous compensation. But think about it — teachers spend those contract hours with students. Everything else that teachers are required to do must be done in the evenings, on weekends, and over the summer (on top of a second job for many). Do the math again with the actual number of hours teachers work, and the hourly rate no longer seems so generous. Accountability: Make a list of all the factors that go into a successful education from the birth of a child forward to age 18. Of all those items, teachers have control over the curriculum and the classroom environment. The students spend most of their days and years outside of school, yet the public holds teachers accountable for everything. Barbara Doherty (March 9) is not alone when she muses about the perks of being a public school teacher. To her and others, I highly recommend you make arrangements to spend a week in a classroom with 30 to 40 students, taking bathroom breaks only when the teacher does. Then you might be able to answer Barbara’s question, what am I missing here? Wendy Hill Bend

A recent opinion piece expressed concerns about U.S. Forest Service (USFS) approaches to OHV management. The author made several good points, including the economic significance of OHV use and that well-designed trail systems can be compatible with multiple use management. While not a fan myself, I appreciate that others view OHV use as an important component of their public land experience. That said, some of the information presented was misleading. For example, the author claims that wilderness areas occupy approximately 66 percent of national forest land, which would support his claim that USFS policies are essentially “locking” OHV users out of public lands. Data from the 2009 National Forest System Land Areas Report indicate that federally designated wilderness accounts for 19 percent of all national forest land nationwide, 14 percent of national forest land in Oregon and 11 percent in the Deschutes National Forest. Data from 2004 are similar. It is quite clear that designated wilderness is a minority land unit within the national forest system. The total land area available to OHV users may be small in comparison to the land area where they are restricted, but designated wilderness isn’t the issue. The author also indicates that OHV users have no desire to go off-trail if quality trail experiences are available. That may represent the views of some OHV users, but it certainly can’t be said of all users, and the impacts of off-trail use are exactly why the USFS attempts to limit OHV use in the first place. Matt Shinderman Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Legislature creates PERS perk in special session By Daniel Re Bulletin guest columnist

I

n one of their first acts during the 2010 Special Session, 71 members of the Oregon Legislature voted to override Gov. Kulongoski’s veto of Senate Bill 897. Now that it has become law, SB 897 provides that PERS members can request verification of the data that their retirement benefits will be calculated on, such as years of service, account balance and final average salary. The law then requires that the verification data must be used to compute the member’s PERS retirement benefit, even if the data is wrong. There are three exceptions to this mandatory use of incorrect data. It will not be used if: (1) the error reduces the PERS member’s retirement benefit; (2) adjustments will be made for changes to the data that occur after the verification

date; or, (3) if the member knew the information was wrong and did not notify PERS within 60 days of receiving the verification data. The only exception to the mandatory rule that makes sense is exception two, as it takes into consideration actual changes in the data that occur after the date of the verification. Exception one defies any logical explanation. Why must incorrect data be used if it increases the retirement benefit but cannot be used if it reduces the benefit? Exception three provides no real safeguard against the use of incorrect data because PERS members have no obligation to read the verified data that is given to them. If they do not read the data, they cannot know that it is wrong. And there is no reason for them to read it because it can never hurt them; it can only increase their benefits.

IN MY VIEW Here is an example of what could happen under SB 897. The figures are based on the PERS benefit estimator. PERS member Smith has an account balance of $100,000, 31 years of service, 30 hours of unused vacation time and a last annual salary of $60,000. With that data, PERS member Smith would be entitled to an estimated PERS retirement benefit of $4,176 per month. However, if PERS member Smith received but did not read a verification statement that incorrectly added another 0 to the account balance, unused vacation time and last annual salary, PERS member Smith would be entitled to an estimated retirement benefit of $42,500 per month. Under SB 897, the people of Oregon must pay PERS member Smith 10 times

the earned PERS retirement. If the error had instead removed a 0 from PERS member Smith’s account balance, unused sick leave and final average salary, the estimated retirement benefit would be $415 per month. But in that case, the incorrect data must be disregarded and PERS member Smith receives the actual earned benefit of $4,176 per month. It is difficult to understand how the Oregon Legislative Assembly would pass SB 897 over the governor’s veto. Rep. Whisnant voted against overriding the veto. Sen. Telfer and Rep. Stiegler, however, voted for the override. On March 4, I emailed them asking why they did so, but as of March 15, neither has responded. One senator who voted for the veto override was quoted as saying, “It’s time to stop letting bureaucrats dump liability for mistakes onto the backs of the citizens. If bureaucrats screw up, retirees lose.”

That simply is not true regarding a bureaucratic screwup of how much a PERS member’s estimated retirement benefit is going to be. If the retiree receives what he or she is actually entitled to, nothing has been lost. It is SB 897 that dumps liability to pay unearned retirement benefits on the backs of the citizens. Another representative said, “This bill says that when an agency makes an estimate it ought to get it right.” The reality is that SB 897 does nothing to help an agency “get it right.” In fact, it is likely to encourage mistakes to be made. SB 897 allows anyone with legitimate or illegitimate access to the PERS computer system, from PERS employees to computer hackers, to establish a PERS member’s retirement benefit. That’s wrong and it needs to change. Daniel Re lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 C5

O D

N   Lynn Vivian Spring, of Bend August 7, 1936 - March 20, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: 2:00 - 4:00 pm, Saturday, April 24, 2010, at St. Francis Parish Center, 2450 NE 27th St., Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Michael Wade Laberee, of Crescent, OR Dec. 7, 1972 - March 22, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: At this time, there will be no service.

Rae Mollie Fest, of Bend July 14, 1907 - March 20, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: 2:30 pm, Saturday, March 27, 2010, at Bend Villa Court Retirement Community, 1801 NE Lotus Dr., Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Organization of your choice.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Peltonen created UCLA genetics department Los Angeles Times Dr. Leena Peltonen, an unusually prolific genetics researcher whose team discovered mutated genes responsible for 15 inherited diseases and who established the department of human genetics at UCLA, died of cancer March 11 at her home in Finland. She was 57. Her “contribution to understanding the genetics of human disease has been a lifelong commitment and is simply outstanding,” said Allan Bradley, director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in England, where Peltonen ended her career. According to the Academy of Finland, which awarded her the honorary title of Academician of Science in October 2009, “Her team diagnosed genetic mutations associated with dyslipidemias (abnormal cholesterol levels), lactose intolerance, MS disease, schizophrenia, obesity and heart diseases. ... Their efforts have paved the way to new diagnostic tests and to screening for disease carriers.”

‘I Spy’ star Robert Culp By Bob Thomas The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Robert Culp, the actor who teamed with Bill Cosby in the racially groundbreaking TV series “I Spy” and was Bob in the critically acclaimed sex comedy “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” died Wednesday after collapsing outside his Hollywood home, his manager said. Culp was 79. Manager Hillard Elkins said the actor was on a walk when he fell. He was taken to a hospital and pronounced dead just before noon. The actor’s son was told he died of a heart attack, Elkins said, though police were unsure if the fall was medically Robert Culp related. Los Angeles police Lt. Robert Binder said no foul play was suspected. Binder said a jogger found Culp, who apparently fell and struck his head. “I Spy” greatly advanced the careers of Culp and Cosby and forged a lifelong friendship. Cosby said Wednesday that Culp was like an older brother to him. “The firstborn in every family is always dreaming of the older brother or sister he or she doesn’t have, to protect, to be the buffer, provide the wisdom, shoulder the blows and make things right,” he said. “Bob was the answer to my dreams. “No matter how many mistakes I made on ‘I Spy,’ he was always there to teach and protect me,” Cosby said. Candace Culp, the actor’s exwife, said she was devastated. “He was a wonderful, creative man who contributed so much to his business, as an actor, as a writer, as a director,” she said. Robert Culp lately had been working on writing screenplays, Elkins said.

TV milestone “I Spy,” which aired from 1965 to 1968, was a television milestone in more ways than one. Its combination of humor and adventure broke new ground, and it was the first integrated television show to feature a black actor in a starring role. Culp played Kelly Robinson, a spy whose cover was that of an ace tennis player. (In real life, Culp actually was a top-notch tennis player who showed his skills in numerous celebrity tournaments.). Cosby was fellow spy Alexander Scott, whose cover was that of Culp’s trainer. The pair traveled the world in the service of the U.S. government. Culp followed “I Spy” with his most prestigious film role, in “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice.” The work

Pollutants Continued from C1 The report stems from 2007 legislation that required the DEQ to come up with a list of these persistent pollutants, as well as a report on where they come from and what could be done to reduce them. “They’re pollutants that come from all kinds of sources,” Grabham said. The list includes pharmaceuticals that get washed down drains, pesticides that wash off not only farms, but backyards, and flame retardants and other chemicals used on furniture

Activists Continued from C1 “Most people here are pretty level-headed within the Tea Party group; we don’t have a rebel component as far as I can tell,” he said. “It’s mostly just people like me who are concerned with the activities in Washington, D.C.” Carrigg said groups like his can sometimes attract zealots hoping to find a friendly audience. In November, a pair of 9/11 conspiracy theorists turned up at an open meeting of the Bend Tea Party, Carrigg said, and one

Burning Continued from C1 People need to follow burning requirements, Medina said. “If you are burning, you have to be attending your fire,” he said. “So attending would be, you are physically present and you’re not inside eating lunch with your eyes on it. So you want to be physically out there.” As an alternative to burning, Medina recommends that people take advantage of 2010 Project Wildfire FireFree Recycle Days in May. “We have the FireFree Recycle Days, so really, we find that the easiest,” Medina said. “You take it to the landfill for free and that can be turned into a compost and a number of other things that just doesn’t get buried in a landfill.” Burning debris leaves behind ashes, which need to be taken to a landfill, Medina said. Recycling debris eliminates that extra step, he said. “The reminder would be that when the conditions change — the wind — you need to take appropriate action which would be to extinguish the fire, especially if those winds are going to be prolonged,” Medina said. Diane S.W. Lee can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dlee@bendbulletin.com.

Tips for outdoor burning

The Associated Press file photo

This undated photo originally released by NBC shows Robert Culp, left, and Bill Cosby starring as a team of American agents in the 1960s television series, “I Spy.” Culp, 79, died Wednesday of first-time director Paul Mazursky, who also co-wrote the screenplay, lampooned the lifestyles of the sexual revolution of the 1960s. Bob and Carol (Culp and Natalie Wood) introduced wife-swapping to their best friends, Ted and Alice (Elliott Gould and Dyan Cannon). Culp also had starring roles in such films as “The Castaway Cowboy,” “Golden Girl,” “Turk 182!” and “Big Bad Mama II.” His teaming with Cosby, however, was likely his best remembered role. Cosby won Emmys for actor in a leading role all three years that “I Spy” aired, and Culp, who was nominated for the same award each year, said he was never jealous. “I was the proudest man around,” he said in a 1977 interview. Both he and Cosby were involved in civil rights causes, and when Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 the pair traveled to Memphis, Tenn., to join the striking garbage workers King had been organizing. Culp and Cosby also costarred

in the 1972 movie “Hickey and Boggs,” which Culp also directed. This time they were hard-luck private detectives who encountered multiple deaths. Audiences who had enjoyed the lightheartedness of “I Spy” were disappointed, and the movie flopped at the box office. “His proudest moments were when he was writing and directing ‘I Spy’ and ‘Hickey and Boggs,’” Cosby said. “Bob was meticulous and committed.” After years of talking up the idea, they finally re-teamed in 1994 for a two-hour CBS movie, “I Spy Returns.”

and electronics that can make their way into the environment. The list also includes industrial chemicals, pesticides, polychlorinated bisphenyls, or PCBs, as well as pollutants that result from wildfires and wood stoves. The 2007 legislation also requires the state’s 52 largest municipalities — including Bend, Redmond and Sunriver — to test for the 118 chemicals to determine which ones are above levels the state sets. That testing, which has to be done twice, could start this summer and costs $7,000 per round. Once the municipalities know which pollutants are above the

limit in wastewater, they have to develop a plan for reducing the chemicals, which has to be completed by July. DEQ’s draft report outlines some steps that could be taken to cut down on the chemicals, including researching and promoting alternative products that don’t have toxic materials, setting up programs to certify that products are free of the toxics and developing new pollution prevention technologies. The state also could set regulations for new storm water controls, restricting different types of open burns, or requiring disclosures on pesticides, among other actions.

Persistent pollutants aren’t at the top on the list of water concerns in Central Oregon, where the focus is on things like water temperature and sediments, said Ryan Houston, executive director of the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council. “It’s not something that’s come up a lot,” Houston said. ”But the trick with things like this is, we don’t know if it hasn’t come up a lot because we haven’t thought about it yet, or it hasn’t come up a lot because it’s not a problem.”

man on the group’s mailing list has attempted to redirect the group’s purpose toward the abolishment of the Federal Reserve. A group of neo-Nazis showed up at a southern Oregon Tea Party rally last summer, he said, but was persuaded to leave by event organizers. Carrigg said the group is in the process of organizing an April 15 rally and mobilizing its members to vote in the November election. “We don’t need a brick for that, we just need to mail in that envelope and hope it’s not thrown in the garbage down at the county,” he said. U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and

Jeff Merkley, both Democrats who supported the health care legislation in the Senate, and Rep. Greg Walden, a Republican who voted against the bill on Sunday, all maintain field offices in Bend. Merkley’s Deputy Communications Director Courtney Warner Crowell said there have been no threats at any of the senator’s field offices. “We have gotten, clearly in the last few months, communication from people who disagree about the health care bill or other issues, but for the most part, all of the communication has been done in a civil manner,” she said.

Warner Crowell said the tenor of the debate over health care seems to have become more respectful in recent months. Recent Merkley town halls held in Clatsop, Tilamook and Lincoln counties were lightly attended as compared to town halls late last summer, she said, and phone calls to the senator’s offices opposing health care reform have fallen off from their peak in December. Wyden’s office did not return a call for comment.

Other roles In his first movie role Culp played one of John Kennedy’s crew in “PT 109.” His first starring TV series, “Trackdown” (1957-1959) was a Western based partly on files of the Texas Rangers. In the 1980s, he starred as an FBI agent in the fantasy “The Greatest American Hero.”

He remained active in movies and TV. Among his notable later performances was as a U.S. president in 1993’s “The Pelican Brief.” More recently, he had a recurring role as Patricia Heaton’s father in the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond” and appeared in such shows as “Robot Chicken,” “Chicago Hope” and an episode of “Cosby.” Robert Martin Culp, born in 1930 in Oakland, Calif., led a peripatetic existence as a college student, attending College of the Pacific in Stockton, Calif., Washington University in St. Louis and San Francisco State College before landing at the University of Washington drama school. Then at age 21, a semester removed from his degree, he moved to New York, where he began landing roles in off-Broadway plays. Culp was married five times, to Nancy Ashe, Elayne Wilner, France Nuyen, Sheila Sullivan and Candace Culp. He had four children with Ashe and one with Candace Culp.

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

• Call the Burning Information Line at 541-3226335 before burning outdoor debris, open commercial and agricultural sites. • Check weather conditions during day of burn. Do not burn if wind picks up. • Open burning is not allowed within the city of Bend. Outdoor burning is allowed outside the city and within Deschutes County. • Commercial and agricultural burning requires a $15 permit fee. • The following are permitted: Approved bonfires, barbecues, recreational fires and commercially manufactured fire appliances like gas fireplaces. • The following are prohibited: Burning of plastic, garbage, wire insulation, auto bodies and mobile homes, rubber, petroleum based products, food waste, animal waste and industrial waste. • People are required to have a recent copy of burning regulations on the burning site. A copy may be picked up at any fire department or downloaded online at www. ci.bend.or.us/depts/fire/ index.html. Call Bend Fire Department at 541-3226309 for details. • Stay with the fire until it is completely extinguished. • Keep debris piles away from grass, trees, power lines, fences and buildings. • Call 911 immediately if fire gets out of control.

Alternatives to burning • People can recycle yard debris free of charge during the 2010 Project Wildfire FireFree Recycle Days: May 1-9 at Knott Landfill Recycling & Transfer Station in Bend, 61050 S.E. 27th St. May 1-2 and 8-9 at Westside Recycle Depot in Bend, Simpson Avenue between Century and Mt. Washington. May 1-2 at Sunriver Compost Site in Sunriver. May 15-16 at Northwest Transfer Station in Sisters, 68200 Fryrear Road. May 15-16 at Southwest Transfer Station in La Pine, 54580 U.S. Highway 97. May 15-16 at Negus Transfer Station in Redmond, 2400 N.E. Maple Way. April 17-18 and 24-25 at Box Canyon Transfer Station in Madras, 1760 S.E. McTaggert Road. • Yard debris can also be recycled during curbside pickup from local disposal companies for a fee. Source: Bend Fire Department


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MARCH 25 Today: Mostly cloudy, cooler, showers, breezy.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

54/36

52/34

57/35

41/31



Warm Springs

Marion Forks

54/35

46/25

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

53/30

53/33

Camp Sherman 44/25 Redmond Prineville 50/28 Cascadia 49/29 49/29 Sisters  47/27 Bend Post 50/28

Oakridge Elk Lake 47/27

38/16

Showers, with snow above 4,000 feet today. Rain and snow tonight. Central

52/34

Sunriver 46/25

47/24

Burns 47/26

45/24

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

43/23

Vancouver

56/30

54/41

Bend

58/33

Boise

50/28

Grants Pass

52/35

57/38

 Redding

Idaho Falls Elko

57/40

51/29

45/27

Reno

Clouds and showers today. A chance of rain and snow tonight.

49/25



Crater Lake

Missoula Helena

48/27

Silver Lake

43/22



Eugene

Christmas Valley

Chemult

58/34



53/45

49/26

41/18

35/24

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

Mar. 29 Apr. 6

Apr. 14

Apr. 21

52/31

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

59/49

55/38



City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 63/40/0.00 . . . . . 54/44/sh. . . . . . 54/44/sh Baker City . . . . . . 53/21/0.00 . . . . . .49/31/rs. . . . . . 48/28/pc Brookings . . . . . . 48/44/0.00 . . . . . 53/44/sh. . . . . . 55/47/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 59/22/0.00 . . . . . .44/28/rs. . . . . . 46/26/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 69/38/0.00 . . . . . 54/41/sh. . . . . . 54/41/sh Klamath Falls . . . 63/30/0.00 . . . . . .45/27/rs. . . . . . 46/24/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 59/25/0.00 . . . . . .48/28/rs. . . . . . 48/26/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 64/25/0.00 . . . . . 45/24/sn. . . . . . . 47/25/c Medford . . . . . . . 74/39/0.00 . . . . . 55/36/sh. . . . . . 57/35/pc Newport . . . . . . . 57/39/0.00 . . . . . 55/45/sh. . . . . . 55/45/sh North Bend . . . . . . 55/43/NA . . . . . 53/45/sh. . . . . . 54/42/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 63/24/0.00 . . . . . 54/36/sh. . . . . . 54/34/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 68/33/0.00 . . . . . 58/33/sh. . . . . . 56/36/sh Portland . . . . . . . 68/41/0.02 . . . . . 55/44/sh. . . . . . 56/44/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 66/31/0.00 . . . . . 49/29/sh. . . . . . . 52/30/c Redmond. . . . . . . 66/25/0.00 . . . . . 51/23/sh. . . . . . . 50/27/c Roseburg. . . . . . . 71/39/0.00 . . . . . 56/41/sh. . . . . . 55/40/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 69/39/0.00 . . . . . 55/43/sh. . . . . . 57/44/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 62/29/0.00 . . . . . .47/27/rs. . . . . . . 50/30/c The Dalles . . . . . . 69/35/0.00 . . . . . 57/33/sh. . . . . . 54/37/pc

Mostly cloudy, showers, breezy.

LOW

HIGH

58 36

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66/30 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 in 1960 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.08” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 in 1942 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.72” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.17” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.61” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.76 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.50 in 1993 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:23 a.m. . . . . . .8:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:42 a.m. . . . . . .8:56 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .1:28 p.m. . . . . . .4:49 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:21 a.m. . . . . . .5:37 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:44 p.m. . . . . . .7:08 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:44 a.m. . . . . . .6:35 p.m.

1

LOW

58 30

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Calgary Seattle

LOW

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

57/45

45/25

Fort Rock

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:59 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:24 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:57 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:25 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:21 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:22 a.m.

MONDAY Mostly cloudy, showers, breezy.

64 35

A storm system will move off to the east, but showers will linger over much of the region.

55/44

Clouds and showers today. A chance of rain and snow tonight. Eastern

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 74° Medford • 21° Baker City

SUNDAY Mostly sunny, significantly warmer.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

48/25

Brothers

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers, LOW breezy.

50 25

Portland

48/26

SATURDAY

NORTHWEST

Paulina

La Pine

HIGH

28

STATE 

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, isolated mixed showers, breezy.

LOW

50

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

FRIDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 52-76 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-61 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 69-104 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 89-106 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 102-107 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 37-40 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 101-125 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 20-55

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 7 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 48-55 . . . . 111-148 . . . . . . . . 75 . . . . . . . 120 . . . . . . 27-69 . . . . . 87-102 . . . . . . 47-50

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 57/45

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Calgary 58/34

Seattle 53/45

S

• -2°

San Francisco Yellowstone N. P., Wyo. 59/49 Las • 1.64” Vegas Creston, Iowa 73/51 Los Angeles 62/52

St. Paul 42/26

Denver 49/27 Albuquerque 60/34 Phoenix 80/55

Honolulu 83/69

Green Bay 37/20

Kansas City 50/33

St. Louis 54/34 Nashville Oklahoma City 65/43 58/36 Little Rock 62/41 Dallas 63/43

Tijuana 71/51

Houston 71/48

Chihuahua 78/44

Anchorage 37/25

La Paz 84/55 Juneau 40/30

Mazatlan 83/58

S

New Orleans 72/53

S

S S

Quebec 34/19 To ronto 44/34

Detroit Buffalo 49/25 52/25 Des Moines 51/32 Chicago Columbus 58/33 45/32 Omaha 50/32

Cheyenne 45/30

Salt Lake City 55/38

S

Thunder Bay 33/12

Rapid City 59/30

McAllen, Texas

S

Bismarck 37/29

Boise 52/35

• 88°

S

Saskatoon 37/26 Winnipeg 31/17

Billings 61/37

Portland 55/44

S

Louisville 60/44 Atlanta 68/49

Halifax 54/33 Portland 48/33 Boston 58/38 New York 61/43 Philadelphia 65/48 Washington, D. C. 67/49

Charlotte 72/53

Birmingham 71/49 Orlando 82/66 Miami 80/70

Monterrey 75/48

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .73/56/0.00 . 65/37/pc . . . 73/54/s Akron . . . . . . . . .58/31/0.00 . . .54/26/r . . . 43/24/s Albany. . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . . .54/31/r . . . 36/18/s Albuquerque. . . .49/32/0.04 . . .60/34/s . . 64/37/pc Anchorage . . . . .37/28/0.00 . . .37/25/c . . 38/28/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .65/44/0.00 . . .68/49/t . . 60/41/pc Atlantic City . . . .64/47/0.00 . 58/47/pc . . . .52/35/r Austin . . . . . . . . .67/58/0.06 . . .73/39/s . . . 74/44/s Baltimore . . . . . .65/44/0.00 . 65/49/pc . . . .50/26/r Billings. . . . . . . . .56/28/0.00 . 61/37/pc . . 55/34/pc Birmingham . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .71/49/t . . . 65/45/c Bismarck . . . . . . .54/25/0.00 . . .37/29/c . . . 51/31/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .60/36/0.00 . .52/35/sh . . 52/33/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .52/39/0.02 . . .58/38/c . . 40/22/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .61/42/0.00 . . .55/42/c . . 48/27/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .44/32/0.00 . . .49/25/r . . 34/21/pc Burlington, VT. . .48/32/0.00 . . .51/17/r . . . 25/13/s Caribou, ME . . . .34/28/0.26 . 42/13/pc . . . 20/0/pc Charleston, SC . .74/45/0.00 . 71/58/pc . . 74/51/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .75/36/0.00 . 72/53/pc . . . .69/41/r Chattanooga. . . .75/38/0.00 . . .65/49/t . . 58/44/sh Cheyenne . . . . . .35/20/0.00 . 45/30/pc . . . 51/28/c Chicago. . . . . . . .53/35/0.00 . . .45/32/r . . . 44/33/s Cincinnati . . . . . .67/36/0.00 . . .59/35/r . . 49/32/pc Cleveland . . . . . .57/30/0.00 . . .49/27/r . . . 41/27/s Colorado Springs 36/27/0.01 . . .44/28/s . . 53/29/pc Columbia, MO . .69/48/0.00 . . .50/32/r . . 55/39/pc Columbia, SC . . .77/38/0.00 . 77/55/pc . . 73/46/pc Columbus, GA. . .69/41/0.00 . . .72/52/t . . 66/45/pc Columbus, OH. . .61/32/0.00 . .58/33/sh . . 45/29/pc Concord, NH . . . .44/36/0.03 . . .59/32/c . . 39/18/pc Corpus Christi. . .76/65/0.06 . . .77/49/s . . . 73/57/s Dallas Ft Worth. .74/60/0.00 . 63/43/pc . . . 71/52/s Dayton . . . . . . . .63/34/0.00 . .56/32/sh . . 46/30/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .37/25/0.01 . . .49/27/s . . . 56/30/c Des Moines. . . . .51/46/0.15 . 51/32/pc . . . 54/36/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .61/33/0.00 . .52/25/sh . . . 43/26/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .51/23/0.00 . . .34/12/s . . 43/34/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .66/47/0.00 . . .70/42/s . . . 78/49/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .28/11/0.00 . . . .28/1/c . . . . 27/5/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .52/23/0.00 . 34/22/pc . . 49/33/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .51/17/0.00 . . .54/30/s . . 45/27/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .60/30/0.00 . .49/21/sh . . . 41/23/s Green Bay. . . . . .57/29/0.00 . . .37/20/s . . . 41/29/s Greensboro. . . . .73/39/0.00 . 71/54/pc . . 67/37/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .64/47/0.00 . . .62/42/r . . 48/27/sh Hartford, CT . . . .58/41/0.00 . . .63/38/c . . 41/19/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .54/24/0.00 . 58/33/pc . . 52/30/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .83/72/0.00 . . .83/69/s . . . 82/68/s Houston . . . . . . .65/55/0.01 . 71/48/pc . . . 72/52/s Huntsville . . . . . .73/42/0.00 . . .67/46/t . . . 59/43/c Indianapolis . . . .65/41/0.00 . . .55/35/r . . . 49/33/s Jackson, MS . . . .73/45/0.00 . . .71/42/t . . . 66/47/s Madison, WI . . . .57/31/0.00 . 47/22/pc . . . 46/29/s Jacksonville. . . . .75/44/0.00 . 77/63/pc . . 76/52/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .42/39/0.18 . . .40/30/c . . . 41/31/c Kansas City. . . . .54/48/0.33 . 50/33/pc . . . 61/44/s Lansing . . . . . . . .57/27/0.00 . .49/21/sh . . . 41/22/s Las Vegas . . . . . .68/49/0.00 . . .73/51/s . . . 69/49/s Lexington . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . . .60/40/t . . 52/36/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . 51/32/pc . . 60/41/pc Little Rock. . . . . .75/46/0.00 . .62/41/sh . . . 67/52/s Los Angeles. . . . .69/54/0.00 . 62/52/pc . . . 67/51/s Louisville . . . . . . .70/42/0.00 . . .60/44/t . . 58/41/pc Memphis. . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . . .68/43/t . . . 57/43/s Miami . . . . . . . . .79/60/0.00 . 80/70/pc . . . .86/66/t Milwaukee . . . . .57/32/0.00 . 42/27/pc . . . 39/31/s Minneapolis . . . .55/31/0.00 . 42/26/pc . . 52/37/pc Nashville . . . . . . .73/41/0.00 . . .65/43/t . . . 54/39/c New Orleans. . . .71/50/0.00 . . .72/53/t . . . 67/54/s New York . . . . . .60/43/0.00 . . .61/43/c . . . .47/30/r Newark, NJ . . . . .64/44/0.00 . . .62/45/c . . 50/28/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .69/46/0.00 . 71/56/pc . . . .62/37/r Oklahoma City . .64/54/0.00 . .58/36/sh . . . 69/44/s Omaha . . . . . . . .53/41/0.00 . 50/32/pc . . . 60/42/s Orlando. . . . . . . .77/49/0.00 . 82/66/pc . . . .78/58/t Palm Springs. . . .81/51/0.00 . . .80/55/s . . . 80/52/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .60/44/0.00 . . .48/31/r . . 51/33/pc Philadelphia . . . .64/47/0.00 . . .65/48/c . . . .52/33/r Phoenix. . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .80/55/s . . . 75/54/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .60/35/0.00 . . .60/34/r . . 45/27/pc Portland, ME. . . .41/34/0.34 . . .48/33/c . . 34/27/pc Providence . . . . .55/42/0.00 . . .62/42/c . . 46/21/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .74/39/0.00 . 73/56/pc . . . .68/39/r

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .53/18/0.00 . 59/30/pc . . . 59/31/c Savannah . . . . . .71/43/0.00 . 76/58/pc . . 78/52/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .73/35/0.00 . . .52/31/c . . 57/32/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .68/42/0.00 . .53/45/sh . . 52/43/sh Richmond . . . . . .70/44/0.00 . 72/55/pc . . . .58/32/r Sioux Falls. . . . . .54/29/0.00 . . .45/28/s . . 52/37/pc Rochester, NY . . .54/32/0.01 . . .51/26/r . . . 34/21/s Spokane . . . . . . .58/32/0.00 . .50/34/sh . . 50/30/sh Sacramento. . . . .70/45/0.00 . .64/46/sh . . . 67/46/s Springfield, MO. .70/47/0.00 . . .53/37/r . . 58/40/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .73/45/0.00 . . .54/34/r . . . 55/38/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .77/51/0.00 . 78/67/pc . . . .77/54/t Salt Lake City . . .53/29/0.00 . 55/38/pc . . 49/34/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .70/44/0.02 . . .77/47/s . . . 79/46/s San Antonio . . . .68/61/0.16 . . .77/46/s . . . 76/51/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .65/55/0.01 . .56/38/sh . . . 67/44/s San Diego . . . . . .69/55/0.00 . 64/52/pc . . . 66/51/s Washington, DC .68/48/0.00 . 67/49/pc . . . .50/32/r San Francisco . . .62/48/0.00 . .59/49/sh . . . 62/48/s Wichita . . . . . . . .54/45/0.01 . 57/35/pc . . 60/40/pc San Jose . . . . . . .70/49/0.00 . .64/45/sh . . . 65/45/s Yakima . . . . . . . .64/29/0.00 . . .58/28/c . . 57/33/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .47/26/0.00 . . .52/28/s . . 58/32/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . . 80/53/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .64/46/0.00 . .64/46/sh . . 55/36/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .62/51/0.00 . . .64/50/c . . 65/44/pc Auckland. . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .71/57/s . . . 73/58/s Baghdad . . . . . . .71/59/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . 77/52/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .97/82/0.00 . 97/81/pc . . 90/75/sh Beijing. . . . . . . . .52/34/0.00 . 38/21/pc . . . 49/28/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . 71/56/pc . . . .67/54/t Berlin. . . . . . . . . .61/32/0.00 . 66/42/pc . . . 66/44/c Bogota . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . 74/48/pc . . 73/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . .66/32/0.00 . . .61/41/c . . 66/44/pc Buenos Aires. . . .77/55/0.00 . . .77/58/s . . . 80/61/s Cabo San Lucas .84/61/0.00 . . .85/56/s . . . 86/58/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . 73/54/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .28/25/0.00 . 58/34/pc . . 55/35/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . 88/68/pc . . . 85/69/c Dublin . . . . . . . . .54/43/0.10 . .53/40/sh . . 52/38/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .55/33/c . . 49/35/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .64/37/0.00 . .64/46/sh . . . .59/41/r Harare . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .82/63/t . . . .82/64/t Hong Kong . . . . .82/64/0.00 . .73/65/sh . . 71/60/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .52/48/0.00 . . .63/46/c . . 61/40/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .73/47/0.00 . .67/43/sh . . . .66/48/t Johannesburg . . .68/55/0.00 . . .77/59/t . . 79/58/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . 82/72/pc . . 80/71/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .58/47/sh . . 56/46/sh London . . . . . . . .63/46/0.06 . .58/45/sh . . . 51/36/c Madrid . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .64/43/c . . 57/36/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . 93/78/pc . . 90/76/sh

Mecca . . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . . 90/70/s Mexico City. . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .83/53/s . . . 82/50/s Montreal. . . . . . .50/32/0.21 . . 36/24/sf . . . 28/6/pc Moscow . . . . . . .36/27/0.01 . . .26/8/pc . . 30/14/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .76/59/t . . . .80/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . 81/67/pc . . . .79/67/t New Delhi. . . . .102/71/0.00 . .102/72/s . . 101/72/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .48/46/1.65 . . .46/37/r . . . 48/31/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . .50/36/sh . . 50/38/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .52/28/0.33 . . 39/23/sf . . . 27/7/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .63/46/sh . . 54/35/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .91/77/0.00 . . .86/73/t . . . .85/73/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .68/50/c . . 73/55/pc Santiago . . . . . . .88/52/0.00 . . .88/56/s . . . 88/57/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .82/67/t . . . .81/67/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .42/27/0.01 . .32/27/sn . . 29/22/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .55/34/0.00 . . 38/27/rs . . . 39/27/c Shanghai. . . . . . .46/41/0.50 . . .52/33/s . . . 54/34/s Singapore . . . . . .91/79/2.42 . . .91/78/t . . . .90/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .39/28/0.00 . . .42/31/c . . 52/38/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . .83/64/s . . . 86/65/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . .72/64/sh . . 70/61/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . 72/55/pc . . . .69/55/t Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . . .59/51/r . . . 57/40/s Toronto . . . . . . . .59/28/0.11 . .44/34/sh . . . 36/16/s Vancouver. . . . . .52/41/0.00 . . .57/45/r . . 54/43/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .63/37/0.00 . . .62/41/c . . 65/44/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . . .61/31/s . . 63/35/pc

A magazine for your mind, body, and self.

Brent Wojahn / The Oregonian

Paul Xochihua, left, representing Cascade Pacific Council, a Boy Scout organization in Portland, and Charles Smith, attorney for the national Boy Scouts, attend a hearing in Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland last week. An Oregon man’s lawsuit alleges the Boy Scouts of America knew it had child molesters among its troop leaders but didn’t tell parents or authorities and sometimes let confessed pedophiles continue in scouting activities.

Trial: Abuse expert says Scouts put boys at risk By Ab b y Haight The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The Boy Scouts of America showed reckless indifference to protecting young Scouts when it kept confidential two decades’ worth of files on suspected molesters among its troop leaders, a psychologist testified Wednesday as part of a $14 million lawsuit against the organization. Despite creating a remarkably in-depth file about sexual abusers, the Boy Scouts failed to warn parents or tell authorities about suspected or confessed pedophiles, said Gary Schoener, a national expert and consultant on sexual misconduct in the clergy, health care and other segments of society. Some boys may have become victims because of the silence, he told the Multnomah County Circuit Court jury. “The Boy Scouts had the information, had the knowledge, had

the ability to make a difference,” Schoener said. “And they didn’t.” The lawsuit was brought by a 37-year-old Klamath Falls man who was abused by an assistant Scoutmaster, Timur Dykes, in the early 1980s. Dykes was convicted three times between 1983 and 1994 of sexually abusing boys, most of them Scouts. He acknowledged abusing the plaintiff in a video deposition played for jurors last week. The Boy Scouts began keeping secret files on suspected molesters among its adult volunteers decades ago. Dubbed the “perversion files” by the organization, the more than 1,100 reports from 1965-84 were released into evidence in the suit last week. The files noted that confessed abusers who completed probation with the Scouts often were allowed to return to Scout activities. The files didn’t explain what the Scouts’ probation entailed,

Schoener said. Schoener, who studied hundreds of the formerly confidential files, said the detailed documents showed patterns, including how molesters would groom potential victims, how most pedophiles had many victims and how most re-offended. He said it was the most complete picture of sexual abusers and victims in the country at the time. “Some are as thorough as a police report,” Schoener said. “Clearly, they realized they had a problem. They created a system to deal with it.” The defense ran out of time Wednesday and will continue its cross-examination of Schoener early next month. Charles Smith, attorney for the national Boy Scouts, earlier told jurors the documents protected children by helping national scouting leaders weed out sex offenders.

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Golf Inside Tiger to give press conference at Masters, see Sports in Brief, Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2010

GOLF

PREP BASEBALL

Oregon men’s team is ranked No. 1

Bend falls to 6A’s Canby

EUGENE — The men’s golf team at the University of Oregon — which includes Bend’s Andrew Vijarro — is now the No. 1-ranked team in the country. For the first time in the UO golf program’s history, the Ducks are rated No. 1 among 285 NCAA Division I teams by Golfstat.com, according to the golf Web site’s latest rankings released Wednesday. The rankings are based on head-to-head standings. Oregon so far this season has compiled a 12-1 mark against teams ranked in the top 25, and the Ducks lead the nation in adjusted scoring average at 71.49 strokes per round. Vijarro, a UO sophomore and former Bend High School standout, has been a crucial member of Oregon’s run to the top of the rankings. He has four top-10 finishes this season and ranks No. 66 in the Golfstat Cup standings, which rank the top Division I golfers. The Ducks’ ranking comes on the heels of their win Tuesday at the Oregon Duck Invitational in Junction City, Oregon’s second tournament win of the 2009-10 season. —Bulletin staff report

Bulletin staff report Bend High expected a challenge from Canby — and the Lava Bears got one. Canby’s Cougars, who finished third last season in the Class 6A Pacific Conference, handily defeated the 5A Lava Bears on Wednesday afternoon, winning 9-1 in the nonleague baseball contest on the Bend High diamond. “We wanted to play a tough nonleague schedule in order to challenge the team,” said Dan Weber, the Bend head coach. “There’s no sense of panic over this.” Weber noted that the Cougars’ pitching staff registered several strikeouts, holding back an already struggling Bend offense. Conversely, Lava Bear pitchers Travis Wiest and Grant

Inside • More coverage of Wednesday’s prep events, Page D2 Newton battled with control and allowed a number of Canby players on base. Tallying only two errors, Bend’s defense was solid, Weber said. Offensively for Bend, Kenny Norgaard belted a triple. Collecting Bend’s other three hits were Lucas Degaetano with two hits and Steven Barrett adding one hit. Wednesday’s loss dropped the Lava Bears to 1-3 overall. Bend will travel to face Grant in nonconference play tomorrow.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend High pitcher Travis Wiest throws a ball in the first inning to a batter in a nonleague game against Canby at Bend High Wednesday afternoon. Bend lost the game, 9-1.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL C O M M E N TA RY

The NCAA’s new stars, old stars and fading stars By John Marshall The Associated Press

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BASEBALL M’s Bradley: I am baseball’s Kanye PEORIA, Ariz. — Many around baseball have a place for Milton Bradley: in a corner where angry meets trouble. Bradley has no use for what anyone thinks. He claims his own place in the game. “If I was a musician, I’d be Kanye West. If I was in the NBA, I’d be Ron Artest,” the 31-year-old former Expo, Indian, Dodger, Athletic, Padre, Ranger and Cub said this week. “In baseball, they’ve got Milton Bradley. I’m that guy. You need people like me, so you can point your finger and go, ‘There goes the bad guy.’” Here’s “the bad guy,” the 2008 All-Star with Texas, taking batting practice on a side field, smiling and shagging fly balls falling out of a desert sun while wearing his eighth different uniform in 11 major-league seasons. Here’s “the bad guy,” the one Cubs general manager Jim Hendry said should “look in the mirror” and stop blaming everyone else for his tumultuous season in Chicago. Here’s that “bad guy,” ejected twice in three Mariners spring games last week. But Bradley is smiling a lot this month. Part of it is because he says his legs are as healthy as they’ve been since he hit .321 for Cleveland in 2003, tying a career high. The physical part may have changed, but Bradley says the fiery, controversial persona won’t. “I had a teammate last year who said if I ever change, he’d kick my (rear),” Bradley said. “So I’m not changing. Everybody is not going to love you, no matter how you treat other people, no matter what you say.” — The Associated Press

Bulletin file photo

This 2008 photo shows steelhead fry shortly before they were released into Whychus Creek near Sisters. Biologists are hoping some of these fish will make it to the ocean and eventually return to Whychus Creek as large, adult steelhead.

Historic runs set to return? Reintroduction of salmon, steelhead to Upper Deschutes Basin could allow for fishing seasons, but it might take decades By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Central Oregon anglers hoping to soon fish for salmon and steelhead in the Metolius, Crooked and Middle Deschutes rivers should not hold their breath. A massive project to restore historic runs of salmon and steelhead in the Upper Deschutes Basin could be a crowning environmental achievement. But whether it work remains to be seen. HUNTING will And whether it will result in a & FISHING fishery for salmon and steelhead is a question, according to biologists, that might not be answered for some 20 years. Biologists are currently gathering thousands of chinook smolts and kokanee on Lake Billy Chinook at the $100 million underwater structure designed to collect fish and safely transport

Bulletin file photo

This steelhead was caught last year on the Lower Deschutes. If the reintroduction effort is successful, Deschutes steelhead and chinook salmon could return to their original home waters above Pelton Dam as far upstream as Big Falls. They could also return to the Metolius and Crooked rivers.

y now, a nation full of college basketball fans knows all about Northern Iowa’s Ali Farokhmanesh. The son of an Iranian Olympic volleyball player hit two icy three-pointers to shoot the Panthers into the NCAA tournament’s round of 16 for the first time at the expense of UNLV and Kansas. The next Stephen Curry? He could be if Northern Iowa gets past Michigan State. Halfway through this March of madness, Farokhmanesh has distinguished himself as one of the attention-grabbers of this year’s NCAA tournament. What about the rest of the field? Well, there are plenty of other story lines: players making names for themselves and their teams, stars living up to their billing on the marquee, others who have wilted under the spotlight. Here’s a look at who’s hot, who’s not and who has put themselves on the spot in each region:

West Rising star: Shelvin Mack, Butler, So., 6-3, 215 — Teammate Gordon Hayward gets more attention, but Butler’s reserved shooter — no tattoos, no trash talking — matched a careerhigh with 25 points and had seven three-pointers against UTEP. He may need to do it again against No. 1 seed Syracuse. Not as advertised: Jamar Samuels, Kansas State, So., 6-7, 215 — K-State’s super sub

Seattle’s Milton Bradley.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Prep Sports ...............................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 Hunting & Fishing .................... D4

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GARY LEWIS

Sweet 16, on the air Games on CBS; times Pacific: TODAY • No. 2 West Virginia vs. No. 11 Washington, 4:27 p.m. (Coverage begins at 4 p.m.) • No. 1 Kentucky vs. No. 12 Cornell, 6:57 p.m. FRIDAY • No. 10 St. Mary’s vs. No. 3 Baylor, 4:27 p.m. (Coverage begins at 4 p.m.) • No. 4 Purdue vs. No. 1 Duke, 6:57 p.m.

has been superbly average so far. Capable of scoring in bunches — tied his career high of 21 in the first half against Oklahoma State late in the season — Samuels has three points on one-of-nine shooting in two NCAA games. See NCAA / D3

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them around the Pelton Round Butte dam complex. The fish are released back into the river below the dam so they can make their way to the Pacific Ocean via the Columbia River. See Runs / D4

Inaugural 4-H sportsmen’s pentathlon is a big success avid White had tried for seven years to land his first steelhead. Now, on the banks of the Deschutes River, with Doug Hart and Todd Williver, he waded in and powered a cast toward the opposite bank. When the fly line touched down, he threw an upstream mend as he had done countless times before. Marking another line, he cast again and watched the indicator bob through the seam. He took two steps out and boomed a third cast. Halfway through the drift, he saw the indicator

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

Kansas State guard Jacob Pullen is known for his range from three-point distance.

dip. When he lifted the rod, a fish flashed, hooked solid in the corner of the mouth. When the supercharged vision of chrome and rainbow was subdued, White and Williver sat at the water’s edge. Both 4-H program coordinators, White and Williver had been talking about a fundraiser to boost the effectiveness of 4-H programs in Deschutes County. “How about a sportsmen’s pentathlon to pit sportsmen teams against each other in a variety of events?” See Pentathlon/ D4

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1250 East 3rd

La PINE

SISTERS

52596 N. Hwy 97 600 W. Hood Ave.

BEND COOLEY RD. 63590 Hunnell Rd.

541-382-3551 541-385-4702 541-548-4011 541-447-5686 541-475-3834 541-536-3009 541-549-1560 541-318-0281


D2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION ON DECK

TODAY

Today Baseball: Churchill at Mountain View, 1 p.m.; Bend at Grant, 1 p.m.; Summit at Bob National Invitational, Ariz., TBA; Molalla at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m.; La Pine at Grant Union Tournament, 11 a.m.; Culver at John Day Tournament, TBA.

GOLF 4:30 a.m. — PGA Europe, Andalucia Open, first round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, first round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Kia Classic, first round, Golf.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB preseason, New York Mets at St. Louis Cardinals, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA tournament, regional semifinals, (Washington vs. West Virginia, at 4:27 p.m.), CBS. 5 p.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls, TNT. 6:30 p.m. — Men’s college NCAA tournament, regional semifinal, (Kentucky vs. Cornell at 6:57 p.m.), CBS. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers, TNT.

FRIDAY GOLF 7:30 a.m. — PGA Europe, Andalucia Open, second round, Golf. 9:30 a.m. — Champions Tour, Cap Cana Championship, first round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, second round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Kia Classic, second round, Golf.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB preseason, Detroit Tigers at Atlanta Braves, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA tournament, regional semifinals, (St. Mary’s vs. Baylor joined at 4:27 p.m.), CBS. 5 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA Division II tournament, final, ESPN2.

Saturday Softball: Madras, La Pine at Sisters Tournament, TBA. Baseball: La Pine, Culver at Grant Union Tournament, 10 a.m.

PREP SPORTS Baseball Wednesday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE Bend 000 010 0 — 1 4 2 Canby 310 020 3 — 9 9 1 Wiest, Newton (6) and Barrett. Hein, Nelson (7) and Bucklein. W— Hein. L— Wiest. 2B—Bend: Norgaard. ——— Canby 017 111 5 — 16 15 3 Mountain View 100 300 0 — 4 6 5 Smith, Grant (7) and Becklein and Hoffman. Robinett, J. Hollister (3), Hester (7), C. Hollister (7) and Hester and Miller (7). W— Smith. L— Robinett. 2B—Canby: Thompson, Hodgkinson, Smith, Hein, Dillon; MV: Vandermeer. HR — Canby: Grant. BOB NATIONAL INVITATIONAL In Anthem, Ariz. Summit 012 1 — 4 6 2 Boulder Creek (Ariz.) 306 6 — 15 15 1 Hamann (3), Reddick and Mingus. Wagner (3), Hunsaker and NA. W — Wagner. L — Hamann. 2B— BC: Chaides (2), Trujillo. HR — BC: Trujillo and Felton.

Softball

7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Steve Cunningham vs. Matt Godfrey, IBF cruiserweight title, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers, KRCO-AM 690, KBND-AM 1110.

FRIDAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Long Beach State at Oregon State, KRCO-AM 690, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

PREP ROUNDUP

Wednesday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE Sisters 000 000 x — 0 6 6 Tigard 101 017 x — 10 10 0 Kosanke, Wavrin (6) and Walker. Bailey and Caelin. W — Bailey. L — Kosanke. ——— NONCONFERENCE Sisters 001 110 010 02 — 7 10 6 Canby 110 200 010 03 — 8 9 4 Kosanke and Walker. Nosinger, Gould (3), Oman (9) and Caelin. W — Nosinger. L — Kosanke. 2B—Sisters: Calavan; Canby: Depner.

BASKETBALL College MEN NCAA TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— EAST REGIONAL At The Carrier Dome Syracuse, N.Y. Regional Semifinals Today, March 25 West Virginia (29-6) vs. Washington (26-9), 4:27 p.m. Kentucky (34-2) vs. Cornell (29-4), 30 minutes following Regional Championship Saturday, March 27 Semifinal winners SOUTH REGIONAL At Reliant Stadium Houston Regional Semifinals Friday, March 26 Saint Mary’s, Calif. (28-5) vs. Baylor (27-7), 4:27 p.m. Duke (31-5) vs. Purdue (29-5), 30 minutes following Regional Championship Sunday, March 28 Semifinal winners

Sisters softball falls in 11 innings to Class 6A school Bulletin staff report CANBY — Class 6A Tigard pounced on the Sisters softball team in game one of the Outlaws’ doubleheader at the Canby Tournament, shutting out Sisters 10-0 in nonconference play. Yet the Outlaws fought back against 6A Canby in game two, finally losing 8-7 after 11 hard-fought innings. In both games, Sisters struggled with defensive errors, allowing the 6A squads more opportunities to score. Offensively for the Outlaws, Marisa Calavan belted a double in game two. Dara Kosanke of Sisters tallied 15 total strikeouts in the games. The Outlaws fell to 3-2 overall. Sisters will host Madras and La Pine at the Sisters Tournament on Friday. In other prep sports events on Wednesday: BASEBALL Canby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In the battle of the Cougars, Class 6A Canby added Mountain View to its list of Central Oregon casualties during Wednesday’s nonconference game in Bend. Canby beat Bend on Wednesday as well. Canby got an early lead, scoring seven runs in the third, and tallying several doubles and one home run. For Mountain View, Grayson Vandermeer belted a double. The loss drops Mountain View to 0-3. The Cougs will host Churchill today. Boulder Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ANTHEM, Ariz. — Summit had a tough time stopping the bats of the host of the Bob National Invitational outside of Phoenix. After giving up three runs in the first inning, the Storm (1-3 overall) got back into the game with a run in the second and two in the third, tying the game. But the Jaguars responded by posting six runs in both the third and fourth innings to win by the 10-run rule. Summit, which has won once and lost twice in the tournament, now heads into bracket play, which begins today.

72 46 19 7 99 74 42 27 5 89 73 37 23 13 87 73 34 30 9 77 73 29 32 12 70 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts Vancouver 74 45 25 4 94 Colorado 73 41 25 7 89 Calgary 73 37 27 9 83 Minnesota 73 35 32 6 76 Edmonton 73 24 42 7 55 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts San Jose 73 44 19 10 98 Phoenix 74 46 23 5 97 Los Angeles 72 42 24 6 90 Dallas 73 32 27 14 78 Anaheim 73 34 31 8 76 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point loss. y-clinched division Wednesday’s Games Washington 4, Pittsburgh 3, SO Buffalo 3, Montreal 2, SO Colorado 4, Los Angeles 3, SO N.Y. Rangers 5, N.Y. Islanders 0 Detroit 4, St. Louis 2 Vancouver 4, Anaheim 1 Today’s Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Calgary at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Washington at Carolina, 4 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 4 p.m. Florida at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Los Angeles at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Nashville, 5 p.m. Dallas at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

Friday Baseball: Churchill at Redmond (DH), 1 p.m.; Summit at Bob National Invitational in Ariz. vs. Legacy, Colo., noon; Klamath Union at Madras, noon; La Pine, Culver at Grant Union Tournament, 1 p.m. Softball: Madras, La Pine at Sisters Tournament, TBA.

6:30 p.m. — Men’s college NCAA tournament, regional semifinal, (Purdue vs. Duke joined at 6:57 p.m.), CBS.

BOXING

Chicago Nashville Detroit St. Louis Columbus

IN THE BLEACHERS

MIDWEST REGIONAL At Edward Jones Dome St. Louis Regional Semifinals Friday, March 26 Ohio State (29-7) vs. Tennessee (27-8), 4:07 p.m. Northern Iowa (30-4) vs. Michigan State (26-8), 30 minutes following Regional Championship Sunday, March 28 Semifinal winners WEST REGIONAL At Energy Solution Arena Salt Lake City Regional Semifinals Today, March 25 Syracuse (30-4) vs. Butler (30-4), 4:07 p.m. Kansas State (28-7) vs. Xavier (26-8), 30 minutes following Regional Championship Saturday, March 27 Semifinal winners FINAL FOUR At Lucas Oil Stadium Indianapolis National Semifinals Saturday, April 3 East champion vs. South champion Midwest champion vs. West champion National Championship Monday, April 5 Semifinal winners NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— Quarterfinals Tuesday, March 23 Mississippi 90, Texas Tech 87, 2OT North Carolina 60, UAB 55 Wednesday, March 24 Rhode Island 79, Virginia Tech 72 Dayton 77, Illinois 71 Semifinals Tuesday, March 30 At Madison Square Garden New York Mississippi (24-10) vs. Dayton (23-12), 4 p.m. North Carolina (19-16) vs. Rhode Island (26-9), 6:30 p.m. COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL All Times PDT ——— Semifinals Wednesday, March 24 Virginia Commonwealth 88, Boston U. 75 Saint Louis 69, Princeton 59 Championship Series

236 207 200 198 190

179 206 195 203 235

GF 242 220 187 199 187

GA 191 197 182 215 250

GF GA 236 193 201 181 214 192 211 231 205 224 for overtime

TENNIS (Best-of-3) Monday, March 29 Saint Louis (23-11) at Virginia Commonwealth (25-9), 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 31 Virginia Commonwealth at Saint Louis, 5 p.m. Friday, April 2 Virginia Commonwealth at Saint Louis, 5 p.m., if necessary COLLEGE INSIDER.COM All Times PDT ——— Semifinals Wednesday, March 24 Missouri State 67, Creighton 61 Today, March 25 Pacific (22-11) at Appalachian State (24-10), 4 p.m. WOMEN NCAA WOMEN’S TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— DAYTON REGIONAL Second Round Monday, March 22 At Donald L. Tucker Center Tallahassee, Fla. Florida State 66, St. John’s 65, OT Tuesday, March 23 At Ted Constant Convocation Center Norfolk, Va. Connecticut 90, Temple 36 At Petersen Events Center Pittsburgh Mississippi State 87, Ohio State 67 At James H. Hilton Coliseum Ames, Iowa Iowa State 60, Wisconsin-Green Bay 56 Regional Semifinals Sunday, March 28 At University of Dayton Arena Dayton, Ohio Connecticut (35-0) vs. Iowa State (25-7), 9 a.m. or 11:30 a.m. Florida State (28-5) vs. Mississippi State (21-12), 9 a.m. or 11:30 a.m. Regional Championship Tuesday, March 30 At University of Dayton Arena Dayton, Ohio Semifinal winners, TBA MEMPHIS REGIONAL Second Round Monday, March 22 At Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee 92, Dayton 64 At Haas Pavilion Berkeley, Calif. Baylor 49, Georgetown 33 At Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham, N.C. Duke 60, LSU 52 Tuesday, March 23 At Frank Erwin Center Austin, Texas San Diego State 64, West Virginia 55 Regional Semifinals Saturday, March 27 At FedExForum Memphis, Tenn. Tennessee (32-2) vs. Baylor (25-9), 9 a.m. or 11:30 a.m. San Diego State (23-10) vs. Duke (29-5), 9 a.m. or 11:30 a.m. Regional Championship Monday, March 29 At FedExForum Memphis, Tenn. Semifinal winners, TBA SACRAMENTO REGIONAL Second Round Monday, March 22 At Wells Fargo Arena Tempe, Ariz. Georgia 74, Oklahoma State 71, OT At Maples Pavilion Stanford, Calif. Stanford 96, Iowa 67 At Bank of America Arena Seattle Gonzaga 72, Texas A&M 71 Tuesday, March 23 At Cintas Center Cincinnati Xavier 63, Vanderbilt 62 Regional Semifinals Saturday, March 27 At ARCO Arena Sacramento, Calif. Georgia (25-8) vs. Stanford (33-1), 6 or 8:30 p.m. Gonzaga (29-4) vs. Xavier (29-3), 6 or 8:30 p.m. Regional Championship Monday, March 29 At ARCO Arena Sacramento, Calif. Semifinal winners, TBA KANSAS CITY REGIONAL Second Round Monday, March 22 At Freedom Hall Louisville, Ky. Kentucky 70, Michigan State 52 Tuesday, March 23

At Williams Arena Minneapolis Nebraska 83, UCLA 70 At Lloyd Noble Center Norman, Okla. Oklahoma 60, Arkansas-Little Rock 44 At Joyce Center Notre Dame, Ind. Notre Dame 84, Vermont 66 Regional Semifinals Sunday, March 28 At Sprint Center Kansas City, Mo. Nebraska (32-1) vs. Kentucky (27-7), 4:30 or 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma (25-10) vs. Notre Dame (29-5), 4:30 or 6:30 p.m. Regional Championship Tuesday, March 30 At Sprint Center Kansas City, Mo. Semifinal winners, TBA FINAL FOUR At Alamodome San Antonio National Semifinals Sunday, April 4 Dayton champion vs. Memphis champion Sacramento champion vs. Kansas City champion National Championship Tuesday, April 6 Semifinal winners

BASEB A L L MLB Major League Baseball Preseason All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games St. Louis 4, Baltimore 2 Minnesota 4, Florida 1 Atlanta 8, Philadelphia 0 Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 3 Boston 6, Pittsburgh 4 N.Y. Mets 5, Houston 2 Chicago White Sox 10, Arizona 3 Chicago Cubs 12, Texas 1 L.A. Angels 8, Kansas City (ss) 6 Cincinnati 10, San Francisco (ss) 3 N.Y. Yankees 3, Washington 1 San Francisco (ss) 7, Kansas City (ss) 0 San Diego 2, Seattle 1 Los Angeles Dodgers 3, Oakland 3, tie Today’s Games N.Y. Mets vs St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 9:05 a.m. Florida vs Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Minnesota vs Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Toronto vs Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Atlanta vs Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees vs Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Houston vs Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Chicago Cubs vs Arizona at Tucson, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Texas vs L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs Colorado at Tucson, Ariz., 1:10 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs Washington at Viera, Fla., 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 7:05 p.m.

College Wednesday’s Result Oregon State 11, Southern Utah 1

GA 212 172 201 197 227 GA 182 212 203 181 242 GA 206 234 210 227 229 GA

FEDEXCUP LEADERS Through March 21 Rank. Name Pts 1. Steve Stricker 911 2. Camilo Villegas 829 3. Ernie Els 820 4. Dustin Johnson 807 5. Bill Haas 676 6. Matt Kuchar 669 7. Jim Furyk 656 8. Ben Crane 648 9. Ian Poulter 622 10. Geoff Ogilvy 614 11. Hunter Mahan 608 12. Ryan Palmer 604 13. Robert Allenby 598 14. Paul Casey 595 15. J.B. Holmes 593 16. Luke Donald 580 17. K.J. Choi 500 18. Bubba Watson 467 19. Tim Clark 464 20. Rickie Fowler 458 21. Retief Goosen 451 22. Nick Watney 451 23. Brandt Snedeker 433 24. Anthony Kim 430 25. Charles Howell III 430 26. Y.E. Yang 403 27. Justin Rose 391 28. Marc Leishman 369

354 348 347 329 312 309 278 274 267 265 262 261 257 255 251 251 250 248 245 242 241 235

$724,940 $731,674 $612,854 $729,585 $529,956 $500,627 $477,659 $577,420 $535,057 $566,421 $430,705 $457,508 $364,808 $366,158 $659,456 $406,479 $574,897 $468,602 $396,467 $419,053 $502,573 $600,422

STATISTICS Through March 21 Scoring Average 1, Camilo Villegas, 68.46. 2, Ernie Els, 69.02. 3 (tie), Steve Stricker and K.J. Choi, 69.22. 5, Robert Allenby, 69.42. 6, Charles Howell III, 69.56. 7, J.B. Holmes, 69.63. 8, Justin Rose, 69.66. 9, Anthony Kim, 69.67. 10, Bubba Watson, 69.71. Driving Distance 1, Dustin Johnson, 300.4. 2, Bubba Watson, 299.9. 3, Camilo Villegas, 299.6. 4, Angel Cabrera, 299.1. 5, Phil Mickelson, 297.1. 6, Graham DeLaet, 296.6. 7, Andres Romero, 295.6. 8, J.B. Holmes, 295.3. 9, Marc Leishman, 293.7. 10, Jason Day, 292.9. Greens in Regulation Pct. 1, Kevin Stadler, 76.30%. 2, Billy Mayfair, 74.75%. 3, Cameron Tringale, 74.60%. 4, Martin Laird, 73.56%. 5 (tie), Joe Durant, Henrik Bjornstad and Troy Matteson, 73.46%. 8, Stephen Ames, 73.28%. 9 (tie), Heath Slocum and D.J. Trahan, 73.19%. PGA TOUR Official Money Leaders 1, Steve Stricker (6), $1,974,300. 2, Ernie Els (6), $1,951,106. 3, Camilo Villegas (4), $1,861,500. 4, Dustin Johnson (8), $1,772,950. 5, Ian Poulter (4), $1,505,025. 6, Paul Casey (4), $1,470,700. 7, Matt Kuchar (8), $1,406,013. 8, Geoff Ogilvy (5), $1,314,606. 9, Hunter Mahan (6), $1,244,793. 10, Jim Furyk (5), $1,222,987.

LPGA Tour MONEY LEADERS Through March 21 Trn 1. Ai Miyazato 2 2. Suzann Pettersen 2 3. Cristie Kerr 2 4. Yani Tseng 2 5. Song-Hee Kim 2 6. Karrie Webb 2 7. Jiyai Shin 2 8. In-Kyung Kim 2 9. Momoko Ueda 2 10. Hee Young Park 2 11. Maria Hjorth 2 12. Na Yeon Choi 2 13. Angela Stanford 2 14. Amy Yang 2 15. Vicky Hurst 2 16. Seon Hwa Lee 2 17. Jee Young Lee 2 18. Michelle Wie 2 19. Sun Young Yoo 2 20. Juli Inkster 2

Money $390,000 $191,047 $187,468 $156,495 $102,756 $79,582 $79,141 $60,881 $55,705 $49,939 $49,540 $46,229 $43,359 $41,080 $40,178 $39,421 $33,611 $32,090 $30,350 $30,097

Champions Tour STATISTICS Through March 21 Charles Schwab Cup 1, Fred Couples, 691 Points. 2, Bernhard Langer, 400. 3, Tom Watson, 390. 4, Tom Lehman, 291. 5, Ronnie Black, 211. 6, John Cook, 208. 7, Tommy Armour III, 182. 8, Joey Sindelar, 168. 9, Mike Goodes, 161. 10, Chien Soon Lu, 153. Scoring Average 1, Fred Couples, 65.44. 2, Tom Watson, 66.00. 3, Tom Lehman, 67.00. 4, Michael Allen, 67.17. 5, Chien Soon Lu, 67.33. 6, Bernhard Langer, 68.17. 7, Tommy Armour III, 68.44. 8, Ronnie Black, 68.56. 9, Loren Roberts, 68.58. 10, Mike Goodes, 68.67. Driving Distance 1, Fred Couples, 298.7. 2, Michael Allen, 295.8. 3, Tom Purtzer, 288.6. 4, Tom Lehman, 288.3. 5, Keith Fergus, 287.9. 6, Dan Forsman, 285.5. 7, Gary Hallberg, 285.3. 8, Brad Bryant, 284.6. 9, Nick Price, 282.3. 10, Chien Soon Lu, 281.8. MONEY LEADERS Through March 21 Trn 1. Fred Couples 3 2. Bernhard Langer 4 3. Tom Watson 2 4. Tom Lehman 3 5. John Cook 4 6. Ronnie Black 3 7. Mike Goodes 4 8. Loren Roberts 4 9. Tommy Armour III 3 10. Joey Sindelar 3 11. Michael Allen 2 12. Chien Soon Lu 2 13. Nick Price 4 14. Dan Forsman 4 15. Hale Irwin 4 16. Scott Hoch 1 17. Gene Jones 3 18. Keith Fergus 4 19. Corey Pavin 3 20. Mike Reid 4

Money $691,000 $421,958 $389,800 $291,500 $242,820 $223,252 $210,183 $207,850 $188,400 $173,197 $162,600 $153,000 $148,350 $137,197 $133,708 $115,200 $109,245 $107,920 $103,260 $103,220

DEALS Transactions

GOLF PGA Tour

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Pittsburgh 74 42 25 7 91 228 New Jersey 72 43 25 4 90 195 Philadelphia 73 37 31 5 79 212 N.Y. Rangers 73 32 32 9 73 191 N.Y. Islanders 73 29 34 10 68 189 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Buffalo 72 40 22 10 90 203 Ottawa 74 39 30 5 83 198 Montreal 74 36 30 8 80 198 Boston 72 33 27 12 78 180 Toronto 73 26 35 12 64 193 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF y-Washington 73 49 14 10 108 287 Atlanta 73 32 30 11 75 218 Florida 72 30 31 11 71 190 Tampa Bay 73 29 32 12 70 191 Carolina 73 30 34 9 69 203 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF

SONY ERICSSON OPEN Wednesday Key Biscayne, Fla. Singles Men First Round Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Arnaud Clement, France, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Daniel Koellerer, Austria, def. Christophe Rochus, Belgium, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Jan Hajek, Czech Republic, 6-3, 5-7, 7-5. Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, def. Marc Gicquel, France, 4-3, retired. Igor Andreev, Russia, def. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-4, 6-4. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, 7-6 (2), 1-6, 6-2. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-4. Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Mario Ancic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-4. Michael Llodra, France, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-2, 6-2. Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Simon Greul, Germany, 6-3, 6-2. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Richard Gasquet, France, 7-6 (2), 1-6, 6-4. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 6-3, 7-6 (3). David Nalbandian, Argentina, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-3, 6-2. Taylor Dent, United States, def. Rainer Schuettler, Germany, 6-1, 6-4. Michael Russell, United States, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 7-6 (5), 6-4. James Blake, United States, def. Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, 6-7 (6), 6-4, 6-4. Women First Round Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Anastasia Pivovarova, Russia, 6-1, 7-6 (3). Alize Cornet, France, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-3, 0-6, 6-2. Sara Errani, Italy, def. Tatjana Malek, Germany, 6-1, 6-0. Kimiko Date Krumm, Japan, def. Anna Chakvetadze, Russia, 7-5, 3-6, 6-4. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, def. Katarina Srebotnik, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-7 (3), 6-1. Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Anne Keothavong, Britain, 6-4, 6-2. Melinda Czink, Hungary, def. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 3-6, 6-1, 7-6 (6). Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Sybille Bammer, Austria, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 6-3, 7-5. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-4, 6-2. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-2, 6-4. Justine Henin, Belgium, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-2, 6-2. Virginie Razzano, France, def. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 6-3, 5-0, retired. Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, def. Kristina Barrois, Germany, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3. Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-4, 6-4. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-4, 6-2. Roberta Vinci, Italy, def. Regina Kulikova, Russia, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Elena Baltacha, Britain, def. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-4. Melanie Oudin, United States, def. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-4.

29. Rory Sabbatini 30. Derek Lamely 31. Alex Prugh 32. Padraig Harrington 33. Brian Gay 34. Stephen Ames 35. D.J. Trahan 36. David Duval 37. Sean O’Hair 38. Stewart Cink 39. Phil Mickelson 40. Vijay Singh 41. Tom Gillis 42. Charlie Wi 43. Cameron Beckman 44. Mike Weir 45. Steve Marino 46. Chad Collins 47. Brendon de Jonge 48. John Rollins 49. Michael Sim 50. Sergio Garcia

Money $1,974,300 $1,861,500 $1,951,106 $1,772,950 $1,221,850 $1,406,013 $1,222,987 $1,195,203 $1,505,025 $1,314,606 $1,244,793 $1,162,202 $1,144,307 $1,470,700 $1,182,383 $1,200,671 $844,630 $795,192 $803,426 $889,471 $1,003,833 $795,694 $685,189 $788,557 $727,276 $780,360 $686,995 $669,648

BASEBALL American League MINNESOTA TWINS—Agreed to terms with LHP Ron Mahay on a minor league contract. TEXAS RANGERS—Traded RHP Edwar Ramirez to Oakland for INF Gregorio Petit. Announced INF Hernan Iribarren has cleared waivers and been assigned outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS—Signed F Mike Harris for the remainder of the season. Recalled G Jermaine Taylor from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). NBA Development League RIO GRANDE VALLEY VIPERS—Signed G Travis Holmes and F Louis Graham. Waived G Craig Winder. HOCKEY National Hockey League DALLAS STARS—Signed C Mathieu Tousignant and C Tomas Vincour to three-year contracts. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed F Ryan Thang to a two-year contract. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS—Recalled G Johan Backlund from the Adirondack (AHL). COLLEGE AUBURN—Named Tony Barbee men’s basketball coach. NORTHERN IOWA—Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Ben Jacobson on a 10-year contract. SOUTH CAROLINA—Announced QB Aramis Hillary is transferring.

Shootout goals lift Avalanche to 4-3 win over Kings The Associated Press DENVER — The new guy rescued the game and quite possibly the season, too. Peter Mueller had one of the two shootout goals and the scuffling Colorado Avalanche beat the Los Angeles Kings 43 on Wednesday night to end a three-game winless streak. The Avalanche moved into a tie with Nashville in points with 89 — two more than eighthplace Detroit and six ahead of ninth-place Calgary in the race for the eight conference playoff spots.

NHL ROUNDUP “Huge getting the two points,” Mueller said. “We couldn’t settle for anything less.” All Mueller has done since coming over from Phoenix in a deadline deal is find a way to pitch in. This, though, was one of his biggest contribution yet. The Avalanche have been in a free fall in the Western Conference standings since the Olympic break. They needed something, anything, to go their way. But Colorado squandered

a two-goal lead, allowing the Kings to tie it with 1:21 remaining when Alexander Frolov sent a shot over Craig Anderson’s shoulder. In the shootout, Mueller got things rolling by sneaking a shot through the pads of Erik Ersberg, who came on in relief of starting goalie Jonathan Quick after Quick allowed three goals in the opening period. Chris Stewart followed by beating Ersberg with a shot to

the glove side. Anderson made it stand up, stopping Anze Kopitar and then receiving a little help when Ryan Smyth’s wrist shot clanged off the goal post to end the game. Also on Wednesday: Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WASHINGTON — Mike Knuble scored the decisive goal in the fourth round of the shootout, and also connected in regulation in Washington’s victory over the Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh.

Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DETROIT — Valtteri Filppula scored with 6:49 left and added an empty-net goal, and Jimmy Howard made 30 saves to help Detroit moved four points ahead of Calgary for the eighth and final Western Conference playoff spot. Sabres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Jason Pominville and Thomas Vanek scored in the shootout after Buffalo overcame a two-goal deficit in the final 2 minutes of

regulation. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Islanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 NEW YORK — Marian Gaborik had two goals and an assist, and Henrik Lundqvist made 27 saves for his third shutout of the season for New York. Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Daniel Sedin had a goal and two assists, twin brother Henrik added three assists, and Andrew Raycroft made 30 saves in Vancouver’s victory over Anaheim.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 D3

NBA ROUNDUP

Lakers beat Spurs, extend win streak to 7 The Associated Press SAN ANTONIO — Kobe Bryant kept his shooting hand raised high, smiling while backpedaling to halfcourt after burying the San Antonio Spurs. A seventh straight win for the Los Angeles Lakers looked that easy. Bryant scored 24 points and hit a pair of backbreaking three-pointers in the fourth quarter, helping the Lakers preserve their second-longest winning streak of the season with a 92-83 victory on Wednesday night. “It was a playoff-type of atmosphere,” Bryant said. “We were down in the first half. We had to battle back. It was a good win for us to start this road trip.” He means a five-game road trip, the longest left for the Lakers before the playoffs. With just 11 games remaining, the West-leading Lakers have a six-game cushion over Dallas. The Spurs, meanwhile, are seventh in the West, a halfgame ahead of Portland. San Antonio might have blown a chance to get more breathing room. Manu Ginobili scored 24 points and George Hill had 21, but the Spurs got little help from anyone else. San Antonio had no other scorers in double figures, and got a dreadful two-of-11 night from Tim Duncan, who finished with six points and 12 rebounds. In other games on Wednesday: Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 NEW ORLEANS — LeBron James scored an efficient 38 points on 15 of 22 shooting to go with nine assists, and Cleveland won its eighth straight game, over New Orleans. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 MILWAUKEE — Rookie Jrue Holiday had 15 points and seven assists, leading Philadelphia to a victory over the Bucks that snapped Milwaukee’s longest home winning streak in six years at eight games. Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant scored 25 points, James Harden added a spark with 23 points off the bench while returning from an injury and Oklahoma City ended a string of futility against Houston with a victory. Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Brook Lopez had 26 points and 13 rebounds, and New Jersey moved a step closer to avoiding a dubious date with NBA history by beating Sacramento to snap an eight-game losing streak and a franchise-record 14-game skid at home. Celtics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 BOSTON — Paul Pierce scored 27 points, Kevin Garnett had 20 and Boston clinched a playoff berth with a win over Denver. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Stephen Jackson shook off a sore hand and busted out of his shooting slump with 37 points, leading Charlotte past Minnesota to send the reeling Timberwolves to their 14th straight loss. Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 ATLANTA — Josh Smith swooped in to slam through Joe Johnson’s missed shot just ahead of the buzzer and Atlanta finally beat Orlando, clinching a third straight trip to the playoffs with a victory. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Raptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 TORONTO — Deron Williams had 18 points, 16 assists and eight rebounds, leading Utah to a victory over Toronto. Pacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger scored 31 points to help Indiana beat Washington and extend Washington’s losing streak to a franchise record-tying 13 games. Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 OAKLAND, Calif. — Stephen Curry had 30 points and 11 assists, Reggie Williams scored 23 points, and Golden State damaged Memphis’ playoff hopes with a victory.

NBA SCOREBOARD STANDINGS All Times PDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct x-Boston 46 25 .648 Toronto 35 35 .500 New York 26 45 .366 Philadelphia 25 47 .347 New Jersey 8 63 .113 Southeast Division W L Pct x-Orlando 50 22 .694 x-Atlanta 46 25 .648 Charlotte 37 34 .521 Miami 37 34 .521 Washington 21 49 .300 Central Division W L Pct y-Cleveland 57 15 .792 Milwaukee 39 31 .557 Chicago 33 37 .471 Indiana 26 46 .361 Detroit 23 48 .324 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct Dallas 47 24 .662 San Antonio 42 28 .600 Memphis 38 34 .528 Houston 36 34 .514 New Orleans 34 39 .466 Northwest Division W L Pct Denver 47 25 .653 Utah 47 25 .653 Oklahoma City 43 27 .614 Portland 42 29 .592 Minnesota 14 58 .194 Pacific Division W L Pct x-L.A. Lakers 53 18 .746 Phoenix 45 26 .634 L.A. Clippers 26 45 .366 Sacramento 24 48 .333 Golden State 20 51 .282 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ——— Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 86, Orlando 84 Boston 113, Denver 99 Charlotte 108, Minnesota 95 Indiana 99, Washington 82 Utah 113, Toronto 87 New Jersey 93, Sacramento 79 Philadelphia 101, Milwaukee 86 Cleveland 105, New Orleans 92 Oklahoma City 122, Houston 104 L.A. Lakers 92, San Antonio 83 Golden State 128, Memphis 110 Today’s Games Miami at Chicago, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Washington at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Utah at Indiana, 4 p.m. Denver at Toronto, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Orlando, 4 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Detroit at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Miami at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Cleveland at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. New York at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

GB — 10½ 20 21½ 38 GB — 3½ 12½ 12½ 28 GB — 17 23 31 33½ GB — 4½ 9½ 10½ 14 GB — — 3 4½ 33 GB — 8 27 29½ 33

SUMMARIES Wednesday’s Games ——— PHILADELPHIA (101) Kapono 4-6 1-1 10, Brand 1-7 1-2 3, Dalembert 6-7 0-0 12, Holiday 7-10 0-0 15, Iguodala 4-10 5-6 14, Speights 3-6 1-2 7, Carney 2-7 2-2 6, Meeks 2-7 2-2 7, Smith 5-7 1-2 11, Green 711 0-0 16. Totals 41-78 13-17 101. MILWAUKEE (86) Delfino 3-10 2-2 10, Mbah a Moute 2-3 1-2 5, Bogut 4-8 0-0 8, Jennings 4-9 3-5 12, Salmons 2-12 0-0 4, Ridnour 4-10 3-4 11, Stackhouse 3-9 8-8 15, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0, Ilyasova 3-8 0-0 6, Ivey 2-4 0-0 4, Bell 3-4 0-0 7, Brezec 2-2 0-2 4. Totals 32-79 17-23 86. Philadelphia 28 30 23 20 — 101 Milwaukee 23 22 18 23 — 86 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 6-19 (Green 24, Holiday 1-1, Kapono 1-3, Meeks 1-3, Iguodala 1-5, Carney 0-3), Milwaukee 5-28 (Delfino 2-7, Bell 1-2, Jennings 1-4, Stackhouse 1-6, Ridnour 0-1, Ilyasova 0-2, Ivey 0-2, Salmons 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 50 (Dalembert 10), Milwaukee 44 (Ilyasova 11). Assists—Philadelphia 24 (Holiday 7), Milwaukee 16 (Ridnour 4). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 21, Milwaukee 20. Technicals—Milwaukee defensive three second. A—12,675 (18,717). ——— HOUSTON (104) Ariza 8-14 1-2 20, Scola 11-25 3-3 25, Hayes 4-5 1-2 9, Brooks 3-12 2-3 11, Martin 3-6 2-2 8, Armstrong 1-3 0-2 2, Lowry 4-11 4-4 15, Harris 3-9 1-2 7, Budinger 0-3 0-0 0, Taylor 1-5 5-6 7. Totals 38-93 19-26 104. OKLAHOMA CITY (122) Durant 8-16 8-8 25, Green 8-11 0-0 19, Krstic 6-9 1-2 13, Westbrook 2-7 0-0 4, Sefolosha 5-6 0-0 11, Collison 2-4 2-2 6, Harden 6-10 8-8 23, Maynor 5-8 0-0 10, Ibaka 3-5 0-0 6, Thomas 1-2 1-2 3, Weaver 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 47-80 20-22 122. Houston 25 32 25 22 — 104 Oklahoma City 39 35 27 21 — 122 3-Point Goals—Houston 9-19 (Ariza 3-4, Lowry 3-6, Brooks 3-7, Taylor 0-1, Armstrong 01), Oklahoma City 8-16 (Harden 3-4, Green 3-4, Sefolosha 1-2, Durant 1-4, Westbrook 0-1, Krstic 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 49 (Harris 8), Oklahoma City 48 (Collison 9). Assists—Houston 20 (Brooks 7), Oklahoma City 30 (Maynor 9). Total Fouls—Houston 19, Oklahoma City 20. Technicals—Brooks. A—18,203 (18,203). ———

CLEVELAND (105) James 15-22 7-8 38, Jamison 5-10 0-0 11, Hickson 9-11 2-5 20, M.Williams 3-10 1-1 8, Parker 2-7 0-0 5, Varejao 2-2 0-0 4, De.West 7-11 0-0 15, Ilgauskas 0-2 1-2 1, J.Williams 0-1 0-0 0, Gibson 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 44-77 11-16 105. NEW ORLEANS (92) Peterson 4-8 0-0 9, Da.West 5-16 6-8 16, Okafor 3-7 0-0 6, Paul 2-8 0-0 5, Thornton 8-17 3-3 20, Songaila 5-9 1-2 11, Collison 7-13 2-2 17, Posey 2-5 0-0 6, Wright 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-84 12-15 92. Cleveland 26 26 35 18 — 105 New Orleans 21 27 23 21 — 92 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 6-20 (Gibson 1-1, De.West 1-2, Jamison 1-2, M.Williams 1-4, James 1-5, Parker 1-6), New Orleans 6-21 (Posey 2-4, Collison 1-2, Peterson 1-4, Paul 1-4, Thornton 1-6, Da.West 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Cleveland 48 (Jamison 11), New Orleans 40 (Okafor 10). Assists—Cleveland 26 (James 9), New Orleans 29 (Collison, Paul 7). Total Fouls—Cleveland 16, New Orleans 17. Technicals—New Orleans defensive three second. A—18,008 (17,188). ——— SACRAMENTO (79) Greene 4-9 5-7 14, Landry 4-13 3-4 11, Hawes 5-13 2-2 12, Udrih 8-13 0-0 19, Garcia 4-11 1-1 10, Casspi 1-8 0-0 2, Thompson 2-6 4-6 8, May 1-1 0-0 2, Udoka 0-2 1-2 1, Nocioni 0-5 0-0 0, McGuire 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-81 16-22 79. NEW JERSEY (93) Hayes 2-7 0-0 5, Yi 2-7 1-1 5, Lopez 11-21 4-6 26, Harris 6-13 10-11 24, Lee 6-12 0-0 12, Humphries 0-4 2-2 2, Douglas-Roberts 3-9 3-4 10, Dooling 2-5 3-4 9, Hassell 0-1 0-0 0, Boone 0-3 0-0 0, Quinn 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-82 2328 93. Sacramento 23 18 18 20 — 79 New Jersey 24 21 23 25 — 93 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 5-15 (Udrih 3-3, Garcia 1-2, Greene 1-3, Hawes 0-1, Casspi 0-1, Udoka 0-1, Landry 0-1, Nocioni 0-3), New Jersey 6-14 (Dooling 2-3, Harris 2-5, DouglasRoberts 1-2, Hayes 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Sacramento 59 (Thompson 11), New Jersey 54 (Lopez 13). Assists—Sacramento 16 (Hawes 6), New Jersey 23 (Harris 9). Total Fouls—Sacramento 20, New Jersey 20. Technicals—Sacramento defensive three second. A—10,068 (18,974). ——— DENVER (99) Anthony 9-23 13-16 32, Nene 3-7 1-5 7, Petro 1-2 0-0 2, Billups 3-9 5-5 12, Afflalo 5-8 1-2 13, Andersen 0-1 1-2 1, Smith 8-14 4-7 21, M.Allen 1-1 0-0 2, Carter 1-1 0-0 2, Graham 2-3 0-0 5, Lawson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 34-70 25-37 99. BOSTON (113) Pierce 10-16 7-7 27, Garnett 8-20 4-5 20, Perkins 3-7 1-1 7, Rondo 4-9 3-6 11, R.Allen 613 3-3 16, Wallace 1-4 0-0 2, Daniels 0-1 0-0 0, Davis 1-2 0-0 2, Robinson 3-7 0-0 8, Finley 3-4 0-0 7, T.Allen 5-6 3-4 13, Williams 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-90 21-26 113. Denver 27 24 29 19 — 99 Boston 30 31 26 26 — 113 3-Point Goals—Denver 6-13 (Afflalo 2-4, Graham 1-1, Billups 1-2, Smith 1-3, Anthony 1-3), Boston 4-18 (Robinson 2-5, Finley 1-2, R.Allen 1-5, Daniels 0-1, Wallace 0-2, Pierce 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 47 (Billups, Andersen 7), Boston 52 (Rondo 11). Assists—Denver 21 (Billups 6), Boston 30 (Rondo 15). Total Fouls—Denver 23, Boston 34. Technicals—Smith, Boston defensive three second. A—18,624 (18,624). ——— ORLANDO (84) Barnes 4-8 2-2 12, Lewis 2-9 2-2 6, Howard 4-11 11-16 19, Nelson 6-13 6-6 20, Carter 7-16 1-2 16, J.Williams 0-3 0-0 0, Gortat 0-0 0-0 0, Redick 1-7 2-2 5, Pietrus 2-3 0-1 4, Bass 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 27-72 24-31 84. ATLANTA (86) M.Williams 2-9 0-0 4, Jos.Smith 4-10 7-9 15, Horford 6-11 0-0 12, Bibby 5-9 0-0 14, J.Johnson 5-17 7-7 17, Crawford 4-14 2-2 11, Evans 4-5 00 10, Pachulia 1-1 1-2 3, Teague 0-0 0-0 0, West 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-76 17-20 86. Orlando 22 20 20 22 — 84 Atlanta 16 30 22 18 — 86 3-Point Goals—Orlando 6-21 (Barnes 2-4, Nelson 2-6, Redick 1-2, Carter 1-3, J.Williams 0-2, Lewis 0-4), Atlanta 7-13 (Bibby 4-5, Evans 2-3, Crawford 1-3, M.Williams 0-1, J.Johnson 01). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 55 (Howard 24), Atlanta 45 (Horford 11). Assists— Orlando 20 (Nelson 8), Atlanta 21 (J.Johnson 8). Total Fouls—Orlando 17, Atlanta 24. A—16,887 (18,729). ——— UTAH (113) Miles 5-11 0-0 12, Boozer 8-14 2-3 18, Okur 5-13 5-6 16, Williams 7-15 4-5 18, Matthews 510 3-4 16, Korver 5-7 0-0 12, Millsap 5-8 3-3 13, Price 1-3 0-0 2, Jeffers 0-3 0-0 0, Fesenko 0-0 1-2 1, Koufos 2-3 0-2 4, Gaines 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 43-87 19-27 113. TORONTO (87) Turkoglu 1-3 2-2 4, Bosh 7-18 6-10 20, Bargnani 5-9 1-2 12, Calderon 4-11 0-0 10, DeRozan 3-7 0-0 6, Wright 6-15 2-3 15, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Jack 3-9 0-0 7, Weems 2-6 2-4 6, Evans 2-2 34 7, Banks 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 33-82 16-25 87. Utah 33 28 26 26 — 113 Toronto 17 26 24 20 — 87 3-Point Goals—Utah 8-20 (Matthews 3-6, Korver 2-3, Miles 2-3, Okur 1-5, Williams 0-3), Toronto 5-21 (Calderon 2-7, Bargnani 1-1, Jack 1-4, Wright 1-7, Banks 0-2). Fouled Out—Boozer. Rebounds—Utah 61 (Boozer 11), Toronto 49 (Evans 9). Assists—Utah 31 (Williams 16), Toronto 14 (Calderon, Bosh 3). Total Fouls—Utah 25, Toronto 20. A—16,178 (19,800). ——— WASHINGTON (82) Thornton 3-8 0-0 6, Blatche 8-17 3-4 21, McGee 0-5 0-0 0, Livingston 2-5 0-0 4, Miller 2-10 0-0 5, Singleton 8-13 3-5 19, Boykins 1-8 0-0 2, Ross 1-4 0-0 2, Young 6-11 0-2 12, Foye 3-9 2-2 9, Gee 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 35-96 8-13 82. INDIANA (99) Granger 12-20 3-3 31, Murphy 4-11 3-4 12,

S  B

McRoberts 7-15 0-1 14, Watson 3-5 3-5 10, Rush 4-14 3-3 11, Dunleavy 1-2 0-0 2, S.Jones 0-1 1-4 1, D.Jones 2-4 2-4 6, Price 4-11 4-5 12. Totals 37-83 19-29 99. Washington 25 17 16 24 — 82 Indiana 29 20 25 25 — 99 3-Point Goals—Washington 4-12 (Blatche 2-2, Miller 1-2, Foye 1-5, Ross 0-1, Young 0-1, Boykins 0-1), Indiana 6-28 (Granger 4-5, Watson 1-2, Murphy 1-5, Dunleavy 0-1, McRoberts 0-4, Price 0-5, Rush 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 63 (Singleton 21), Indiana 59 (Murphy 19). Assists—Washington 11 (Boykins 3), Indiana 19 (Watson 7). Total Fouls—Washington 21, Indiana 18. Technicals—Washington Coach Saunders. A—12,504 (18,165). ——— MINNESOTA (95) Gomes 5-10 1-2 12, Jefferson 9-16 3-6 21, Milicic 4-8 2-3 10, Flynn 2-7 4-5 8, Brewer 410 0-0 8, Love 2-6 1-1 5, Ellington 2-8 0-0 6, Wilkins 2-4 4-4 8, Sessions 6-11 2-2 14, Hollins 0-1 0-0 0, Pavlovic 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 37-82 17-23 95. CHARLOTTE (108) Wallace 9-16 4-7 23, Diaw 3-8 0-0 7, Ratliff 2-5 1-2 5, Felton 8-10 0-0 16, Jackson 15-24 3-4 37, Chandler 2-4 0-0 4, Thomas 3-6 2-2 8, Augustin 1-4 1-1 4, Hughes 2-6 0-0 4, Henderson 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-84 11-16 108. Minnesota 33 12 31 19 — 95 Charlotte 30 25 30 23 — 108 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 4-13 (Ellington 2-4, Pavlovic 1-1, Gomes 1-3, Love 0-1, Wilkins 0-1, Brewer 0-3), Charlotte 7-15 (Jackson 4-6, Wallace 1-1, Augustin 1-3, Diaw 1-3, Felton 0-1, Hughes 0-1). Fouled Out—Diaw. Rebounds— Minnesota 43 (Love 9), Charlotte 52 (Chandler 9). Assists—Minnesota 20 (Sessions 5), Charlotte 24 (Felton 8). Total Fouls—Minnesota 19, Charlotte 21. Technicals—Minnesota defensive three second. A—14,457 (19,077). ——— L.A. LAKERS (92) Artest 5-11 5-9 16, Odom 8-18 2-2 19, Gasol 4-11 2-4 10, Fisher 1-5 0-0 3, Bryant 11-16 0-0 24, Farmar 4-8 0-0 11, Brown 3-5 0-0 8, Mbenga 0-1 1-2 1, Vujacic 0-0 0-0 0, Powell 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 10-17 92. SAN ANTONIO (83) Jefferson 3-9 0-1 6, Duncan 2-11 2-2 6, McDyess 1-3 0-0 2, Hill 8-14 3-4 21, Ginobili 8-18 4-5 24, Bonner 3-9 0-0 8, Bogans 0-1 00 0, Mason 3-9 3-3 9, Blair 2-5 1-2 5, Hairston 0-0 0-0 0, Mahinmi 0-0 0-0 0, Temple 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 30-80 15-19 83. L.A. Lakers 22 19 30 21 — 92 San Antonio 25 23 18 17 — 83 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 10-20 (Farmar 34, Bryant 2-2, Brown 2-2, Fisher 1-3, Odom 1-4, Artest 1-5), San Antonio 8-27 (Ginobili 4-9, Hill 2-3, Bonner 2-7, Bogans 0-1, Jefferson 0-2, Mason 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 54 (Odom 13), San Antonio 50 (Duncan 12). Assists—L.A. Lakers 15 (Bryant 6), San Antonio 16 (Duncan 6). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 21, San Antonio 20. A—18,581 (18,797). ——— MEMPHIS (110) Gay 9-12 6-8 25, Z.Randolph 5-13 6-7 16, Thabeet 1-1 2-4 4, Conley 9-20 2-2 21, Mayo 9-18 2-3 21, Young 5-14 4-5 14, M.Williams 0-4 0-0 0, Arthur 2-5 1-2 5, Carroll 1-3 2-2 4. Totals 41-90 25-33 110. GOLDEN STATE (128) Maggette 5-8 2-4 12, Tolliver 6-11 0-0 12, C.Hunter 3-7 4-5 10, Curry 12-19 2-2 30, Ellis 7-16 7-8 21, George 4-7 0-0 11, R.Williams 814 5-6 23, Watson 3-6 2-2 9, Morrow 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 48-88 22-27 128. Memphis 23 33 30 24 — 110 Golden State 34 44 25 25 — 128 3-Point Goals—Memphis 3-13 (Gay 1-2, Conley 1-3, Mayo 1-4, Young 0-1, M.Williams 0-3), Golden State 10-24 (Curry 4-6, George 36, R.Williams 2-4, Watson 1-2, Ellis 0-3, Tolliver 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Memphis 51 (Gay 10), Golden State 51 (C.Hunter 10). Assists—Memphis 19 (Conley 9), Golden State 30 (Curry 11). Total Fouls—Memphis 23, Golden State 22. Technicals—Maggette, Golden State defensive three second. A—17,123 (19,596).

LEADERS Through Wednesday’s Games SCORING G FG FT PTS James, CLE 70 707 548 2086 Durant, OKC 70 675 626 2077 Anthony, DEN 59 599 462 1709 Bryant, LAL 66 662 403 1816 Wade, MIA 67 624 462 1776 Ellis, GOL 60 597 279 1542 Nowitzki, DAL 70 625 454 1738 Bosh, TOR 63 542 421 1513 Granger, IND 52 403 294 1233 Stoudemire, PHX 71 602 422 1627 Roy, POR 56 433 307 1242 Johnson, ATL 69 581 205 1478 Jackson, CHA 71 536 302 1484 Randolph, MEM 71 580 305 1477

Howard, ORL Lee, NYK Randolph, MEM Camby, POR Boozer, UTA Bosh, TOR Wallace, CHA Duncan, SAN Bogut, MIL

REBOUNDS G OFF DEF 72 253 703 70 195 637 71 293 543 64 217 527 69 158 610 63 185 508 66 136 558 67 202 489 64 194 460

ASSISTS G Nash, PHX 70 Paul, NOR 40 Williams, UTA 66 Rondo, BOS 70 Kidd, DAL 69 James, CLE 70 Davis, LAC 69 Westbrook, OKC 70

AVG 29.8 29.7 29.0 27.5 26.5 25.7 24.8 24.0 23.7 22.9 22.2 21.4 20.9 20.8

TOT AVG 956 13.3 832 11.9 836 11.8 744 11.6 768 11.1 693 11.0 694 10.5 691 10.3 654 10.2

AST 780 434 685 678 637 598 549 555

AVG 11.1 10.9 10.4 9.7 9.2 8.5 8.0 7.9

Golf • Tiger to hold first press conference at Masters: Tiger Woods will speak before he plays in the Masters. Woods is scheduled to hold his first press conference in nearly five months at 11 p.m. PDT on Monday, April 5, according to a tentative interview schedule that Augusta National released Wednesday. It will be his first press conference in nearly five months, and his first time facing a room full of reporters since he crashed his SUV into a tree on Nov. 27, setting off shocking revelations of rampant infidelity. He did appear in a televised statement last month, but did not take questions.

Hockey • NHL players union to vote on head shot ban: All that stands between the NHL and a rule banning blindside hits to the head is final approval from the players’ association. The union’s representatives on the competition committee signed off on the new rule Wednesday. The executive board will soon vote on the proposed edict to eliminate dangerous hits against unsuspecting skaters. If the ban passes, the NHL will be allowed to issue supplemental discipline to violators as early as Thursday.

Figure skating • Pang-Tong win world pairs title: Pang Qing and Tong Jian have a world title to go with their Olympic silver medal. Runners-up at the Vancouver Olympics last month, Pang and Tong easily won their second title Wednesday at the World Figure Skating Championships in Turin, Italy. Earlier Wednesday, Olympic bronze medalist Daisuke Takahashi took the lead in the men’s competition. U.S. champion Jeremy Abbott is sixth

Baseball • Gooden charged with driving on drugs: Former Major League Baseball star Dwight Gooden has been charged with driving under the influence of drugs and leaving the scene of an accident in New Jersey. The former pitcher for the New York Mets and New York Yankees had a child in his vehicle at the time of the two-vehicle crash around 9 a.m. Tuesday, Franklin Lakes police Capt. Joseph Seltenrich said. • Beavs win: Adalberto Santos hit his third home run of the season and Ryan Gorton threw five scoreless innings as the 17th-ranked Oregon State baseball team defeated Southern Utah, 111, Wednesday night at Goss Stadium in Corvallis. With the win, Oregon State improved to 15-3 on the year and the Beavers have won nine straight dating back to March 6.

Cycling • Australians, American take golds at worlds: Austra-

NCAA Continued from D1 Up to the hype: Jacob Pullen, Kansas State, Jr., 6-0, 200 — The scruffy-necked shooter has made NCAA opponents “Fear the Beard” so far. Known for his near-halfcourt range, Pullen has displayed the depths of his overall game by scoring 34 points and playing inside BYU’s Jimmer Fredette’s jersey in what might be the best performance of the tournament.

Midwest Rising star: Ali Farokhmanesh, Northern Iowa, Sr., 6-0, 190 — Big-shot Ali has carried the Panthers into the round of 16 for the first time ever. He knocked off UNLV in the first round with a three-pointer with 4.9 seconds left, then toppled Kansas with an are-you-kidding-me dagger early in the shot clock with his team leading by one with about 40 second to play. Oh, and he iced that game with two late free throws, too. Not as advertised: Evan Turner, Ohio State, Jr., 6-7, 210 — Hard to pick on a guy who had 24 points and came an assist and a rebound away from a triple-double his last game, but Turner has been inconsistent. He had just nine points on twoof-13 shooting in the first round against UC Santa Barbara, then

had nine turnovers to nearly pull an unwelcome quadruple-double against Georgia Tech. Up to the hype: Wayne Chism, Tennessee, Sr., 6-9, 246 — Consistency has been big fella’s biggest contribution so far in the tournament, as it was during the regular season. He’s averaged an unexciting 10.0 points in two NCAA tournament games, but has drawn double teams in the middle while crashing the boards and anchoring the Vols’ stingy defense.

South Rising star: Omar Samhan, St. Mary’s, Sr., 6-11, 265 — The once-pudgy teen has become a force for the Gaels in their first run to the regional semifinals in more than 50 years. The affable big guy has attracted attention in the paint to free up St. Mary’s gunners while still averaging 30.5 points and shooting 75 percent. Not as advertised: Jon Scheyer, Duke, Sr., 6-5, 190 — The Blue Devils’ best shooter has misfired in the NCAA tournament. He opened the tournament with a ho-hum 13-point game against Arkansas-Pine Bluff and followed with a one-for-11 performance against Cal. Duke can’t have another sub-par shooting game from him, especially with Purdue up next. Up to the hype: LaceDarius Dunn, Baylor, Jr., 6-4, 205 — The

king of the stepback three has shot the Bears into the regional semifinals for the first time in their history. Dunn has averaged 19.5 points while filling up the rest of the stat sheet.

East Rising star: Ryan Wittman, Cornell, Sr., 6-7, 215 — The son of former NBAer Randy Wittman has a lightning-quick shot release. Give him half an inch, it’s going up and usually in. Wittman has seven three-pointers in two NCAA tournament games, helping the Big Red become the first Ivy League team since 1979 to reach the round of 16.

Not as advertised: Patrick Patterson, Kentucky, Jr., 6-9, 235 — Get to this point in the season and criticizing sounds like nitpicking, but the Wildcats could use a little more consistency from their elder statesman. Patterson was solid against Wake Forest, but had just four points in the opener against East Tennessee State. Up to the hype: John Wall, Kentucky, Fr., 6-4, 195 — The athletic freshman has led the top-seeded Wildcats to a pair of easy wins, including a doubledouble in the opening round against East Tennessee State. So what if he turns it over a little too much? This guy’s fun to watch.

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lia won the first gold medals of the track cycling world championships in Ballerup, Denmark, Wednesday with Anna Meares winning the women’s 500-meter time trial and Cameron Meyer defending his title in the men’s points race. U.S. rider Sarah Hammer won the women’s individual pursuit and Germany outpaced defending champion France in the men’s team sprint.

Basketball • Onuaku out for Syracuse: Syracuse center Arinze Onuaku will not play Thursday against Butler in the West Regional semifinal. Orange coach Jim Boeheim says the 6-foot-9 center is doing better but will not be available for the Butler game. Onuaku has an injured right quadriceps. • Nuggets’ Karl might miss rest of regular season: The Denver Nuggets might not have coach George Karl back on the sideline until the playoffs begin next month. Karl is undergoing treatment for throat and neck cancer and, according to a blog by his girlfriend, he was hospitalized this week with blood clots in his lungs and a leg. Adrian Dantley has served as acting head coach for eight games since Karl announced just after the All-Star break that he had been diagnosed with cancer. Dantley is 5-3 in those games. The Nuggets (47-24) are tied with Dallas in second place in the Western Conference standings and are clinging to a one-game lead over the Utah Jazz in the Northwest Division.

Football • Lions ‘definitely interested’ in Pacman: Adam “Pacman” Jones is getting looks from NFL teams again. Detroit Lions coach Jim Schwartz said Wednesday at the NFL meetings that the Lions are gathering more information about Jones’ level of commitment and how he could fit in Detroit’s system. The Lions were among a few teams that worked out Jones last week in New Orleans. Jones, now 26, was an elite cornerback and kick returner in his first two seasons with the Tennessee Titans. But he was suspended for the 2007 season by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell for his repeated off-field incidents, including six arrests since he was drafted in 2005. • NFL passes player safety rules: NFL players should be safer during games thanks to several rules changes passed at the league meetings. They also might be playing longer in regular-season overtimes. The NFL passed rules Wednesday to further protect defenseless players, including ball carriers who lose their helmet during a play. Seven of eight overall rules proposals were adopted, then several owners said they also expect the modified overtime for the playoffs that passed the previous day to be revisited in May to include the regular season. — From wire reports

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FISHING DESCHUTES STEELHEADERS: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Central Oregon Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; contact eflowerchild@yahoo.com. TIGHT LINES AUCTION AND DINNER: May 13, 6 p.m., at Aspen Hall in Bend’s Shevlin Park; $35 (includes dinner, drinks, and auction); join the Deschutes River Conservancy for the evening and bid on fishing trips throughout the West and other items; to register, call 541-382-4077 (ext. 10) or visit www.deschutesriver.org.

HUNTING ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION BANQUET: Saturday, April 17, 5 p.m., at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds; RMEF protects and enhances elk and other wildlife habitat; tickets must be purchased in advance; registration is required by April 1; 541383-8518 or www.rmef.org. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE

OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Stafford Inn, 1773 N.E. Third St., Prineville. Contact: 447-5029.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap and skeet Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: Two 5-stand courses with towers; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; open Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Friday, Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.; Tuesdays and Fridays in March are $10 for 50 targets for new shooters; www.birdandclay. com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Trap, skeet, and sporting clays fields; rifle/pistol ranges; open to the community; training programs and competition; families welcome; www.rrandgc.com. COWBOY ACTION SHOOTING: Pistols, rifles, shotguns; hosted by Horse Ridge Pistoleros at Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

Continued from D1 When the salmon and steelhead return from the ocean, they will be trucked back around the dam and released into Lake Billy Chinook, where they can then make their way to the Metolius, Crooked and Middle Deschutes rivers. Mike Gauvin, Pelton mitigation coordinator for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, says steelhead and salmon adults could start returning from the ocean to Pelton Dam in 2011. He adds, however, that the fish will probably not return in large numbers for another four to five years. Gauvin says the goal is to have 500 chinook and steelhead return each year. “We need to get closer to 750 to 1,000 a year to have a fishing season,� Gauvin says. “The longterm goal is to establish a harvestable, self-sustaining fishery. We’ll need numbers above the 500 mark before we can establish a fishery.� But just how long is long term? “I don’t want to venture too much of a guess (for when there could be a fishing season),� Gauvin cautions. “But 15 to 20 years is a good hypothetical guess. More hypothetical than anything.� From 2007 to 2009, ODFW biologists placed more than 2 million tiny steelhead and chinook salmon fry into rivers and creeks of the Upper Deschutes and Crooked River basins. Those

fry are now the smolts — young salmon and steelhead ready for their first trip to the ocean — that are arriving at the dam complex. Gauvin says that once adult fish begin returning in large numbers, in perhaps 2012 or 2013, the ODFW will use them as a broodstock, from which biologists will take eggs to produce more fish with DNA fit to complete the life cycle. “Those (broodstock) fish will have proven they’re able to survive above the dam, migrate to the ocean and come back,� Gauvin explains. A returning fish will have an intact (not clipped) adipose fin, indicating that it is not to be harvested if caught by an angler. Also, a returning fish will be clipped on its upper jaw to indicate that it is a reintroduced salmon or steelhead. “We’re trying to give the fish a fighting chance to survive in the Deschutes River,� Gauvin says. Since December of last year, biologists have collected about 1,800 chinook smolts at the Pelton facility, trucked them around the dam and released them into the Lower Deschutes. They have done the same with about 400 kokanee — which technically become sockeye salmon when they migrate to the ocean. The chinook smolts are small, just about 100 to 300 millimeters in length. “That’s the right size for a smolt,� Gauvin says. “We’re excited to see the growth rate of these fish mimic what we see on the Deschutes.� Once the reintroduced steel-

Hood River

Mt. Hood

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CENTRAL ZONE

CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Population estimates from 2009 show an increase in redband populations and a decrease in whitefish populations; fishing is good. Dry fly action is increasing; however, nymphs are still providing the most success. Flows on the Crooked River are currently 77cfs.

Government Camp Wh ite R iver

DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Northern Boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): Anglers can take advantage of these early spring days by targeting trout with dry flies. Look for blue-winged olive and caddis hatches during mid-day. Stonefly nymphs will also start getting more active. FALL RIVER: Fall River above the falls remains open to fly angling only. Probably the best fly fishing in the region right now with good hatches of bluewing olive, midges and tan caddis. HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: Spring is often

OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: Local anglers should consider lunchtime outings, as hatches are strong in the noon hour. Artificial flies and lures only; two trout per day and 8-inch minimum length. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Opportunities for 12- to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather.

FLY-TYING CORNER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Island Point Sunset, tied by Capt. Manuel Torrez.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

In the canyon, it is hard to remember the things that mattered so much yesterday — the goals for tomorrow. Here, the river is timeless, basalt walls and the grass that lines the bank, the wind, the water. In cold water, steelhead pull back into softer water. In these conditions, pinks, reds and oranges seem to move more fish than other colors. A swinging fly should have soft, flowing hackle that pulsates with the current. And a trailing hook is more likely to pin short-striking steel-

head. Here’s a pattern created by Manuel Torrez, a fly that should work as well for September’s Coho salmon as it does for cold-water steelhead. Tie the Island Point Sunset with pink thread on a 25mm Waddington shank. Connect the No. 1 Gamakatsu Octopus hook with 30-pound Spider Wire. Build the body with fuschia Lite Brite dubbing. For the rear hackle, use fuschia Spey hackle. Tying forward, wrap black Spey fly hackle and top with fuschia Spey. Finish with light pink Lite Brite dubbing and light pink Spey fly hackle.

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Warm Springs W arm Indian Reservation Spri ngs River

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26 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

head and chinook do return from the ocean, according to Gauvin, they could travel as far upstream as Big Falls on the Middle Deschutes, the headwaters of the Metolius, and Ochoco and Bowman dams on the Crooked River. (The Deschutes, Crooked and Metolius rivers connect to form the three arms of Lake Billy Chinook.) “The anglers need to know

that this is a long-term process, but the benefits of it are going to be great,� Gauvin says. “The managers have really had to do it right and responsibly. It’s going to take awhile. Everyone is really encouraged, but all of us know it’s a long-term project.� Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

Rheuben and Dustin Kersavage took home the purple ribbons and the top prizes. The mutt, a half Griffin, half Australian shepherd didn’t come to the banquet and awards ceremony, but he was there in spirit. Kersavage said that the only event that he did poorly in was fly-fishing. “I caught one and Rheuben caught all the rest,� Kersavage said. In the GPS section, their team came in second. They were lucky in the draw that placed them last in line for the chukar hunt with plenty of birds on the ground. They guessed correctly that the birds would group together and go to high ground. Their hunt was over in 15 minutes. “It was a lot of fun and we can’t wait to do it again.�

HOOD RIVER: Flows are good on the Hood River with good numbers of winter steelhead being caught by anglers. Spring weather has been warming the Hood and increasing catch rates as the water warms. The peak of the winter steelhead run on the Hood will be the end of March and beginning of April.

METOLIUS RIVER: Fishing has been up and down but is generally good. There have been strong hatches of blue-wing olive and October caddis, with a few March Browns as well. The mainstem Metolius upstream from Allingham Bridge is currently closed to angling.

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Maupin

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the best time to fish for 12- to 18inch rainbow and brown trout in Haystack Reservoir. Trolling is the most effective method, however, bank anglers are often successful near the dam and fishing platform.

LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: The Metolius Arm is open. Angler effort has been light. Several legal-sized bull trout (greater than 24 inches) have been caught, but most bull trout being reported are in the 16- to 20-inch range.

Wasco

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Fall River continues to have good hatches for fly fishing

CRESCENT LAKE: Boat launching access to the lake is available at the Crescent Lake Lodge. There is currently good opportunity for lake trout and brown trout.

The Dalles

35

FISH REPORT

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

Biggs

Columbia River

Cascade Locks

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Metolius R.

D4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Photo courtesy Ron Radabaugh

Scott Higdon shows off the big rainbow he caught at Alder Creek Lake near Sisters while competing in the Sportsmen’s Pentathlon last week.

Pentathlon Continued from D1 When the idea was floated by Sykes Mitchell, the plan began to take shape. South Valley Bank & Trust stepped in as the title sponsor and Keith and Connie Cyrus at Alder Creek Ranch offered the use of their property. A handful of other sponsors signed on. At 7 a.m. this past Saturday, the two-man teams began to assemble at Alder Creek Ranch. The teams would compete in 3-D archery, sporting clays, fly-fishing, chukar hunting and orienteering. The golf tournament would be held the next day. Teams would take their combined scores from their three best events for a chance to earn the title of overall champions. Teams were allowed two hours to fish the lake. Volunteers from the Fly Fisher’s Place in Sisters were on hand to offer assistance if assistance was needed. On the archery course, volunteers from Top Pin Archery coached newcomers to better scores. A few of the competitors had never shot a shotgun before. Spencer Tabor from Central Oregon Sporting Clays made sure they went away with a new skill to add to their repertoire. When competitors showed up to hunt chukar, they were assisted by Living Sky Outfitters. Blake Miller, of Redmond, the owner of Outdoor Quest, designed and oversaw the orienteering/GPS course. “I thought the GPS event was going to be daunting,� Miller

said. “One guy crossed the finish line in 16 minutes. He just collapsed.� That guy was Scott Higdon, of Bend. “I’m an avid fly fisherman,� he said. “Out of the five events we did, that was the only one that I thought I was really good at before the pentathlon.� Javan Shull invited Higdon to join him on a team and in the month before the pentathlon, Higdon tried archery for the first time. “I absolutely loved it,� he said. His next lesson was on the shotgun. “I just had a blast. I feel like it’s going to be a new hobby for me. “Bowhunting, shooting clays. It was the most fun I’ve had in a long time. The coolest thing was it taught me more stuff I can do out there.� Shull caught his first fish on a fly rod that day. “I set Javan up on a chironomid and indicator,� Higdon said. “His float kept going down and he was always late on the strike, so I set up with a chironomid, too, and cast out and five minutes later got a grab. I caught the first fish in about 10 minutes and then caught eight after that.� Sykes Mitchell, of Living Sky Outfitters, was impressed by the competitors that came out to support the mission of 4-H in Deschutes County. “There were a lot of guys who thought they were going to win an event and didn’t,� Mitchell said. “But I was impressed by the gracious winners and losers. “We’re looking forward to adding some disciplines in the next one we do. It may become some-

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thing more than just five events. Some guys don’t own bows. Some guys don’t own shotguns. But you are scored on your best three events. We expect to see a women’s division next year and some father/son and father/ daughter teams.� “Two Guys and a Mutt� were named Overall Champions. Tom

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS

O

Great TV blooms “Nurse Jackie” among Top 10 of this season’s favorites, Page E2

OUTING

Inside

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• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2010

Beckett Hills / For The Bulletin

This view of the lake is from an access point just steps away from some of the cabins at Clear Lake Resort.

Moments of clarity Appropriately named Clear Lake is ideal for a day trip or for camping 126 20

Clear Lake Resort

126 20

Black Butte Ranch

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Tamolitch Falls (Blue Pool)

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Sisters

Trailbridge Reservoir McKenzie River DETAIL AREA

Belknap Springs 242

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Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

Raise funds, have fun at masquerade ball Dance the night away for a good cause at the masquerade benefit ball, from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday at Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters. The evening will feature presentations by photographer David Uttley, returned from four weeks in Haiti, and videographers Eli and Kelly Pyke, recently returned from Uganda. Dancing and dessert will follow. Proceeds will benefit children in Uganda, via Sisters Community Church, as well as survivors

SPOTLIGHT of the earthquake in Haiti. Formal dress is required for the event and guests are encouraged to bring their own masks. Masks will be available for a fee at the door, however, for those who can’t find their own. Tickets are $35 per person or $60 per couple in advance, or $50 per person and $90 per couple at the door. Aspen Lakes and Sisters Community Church are both selling tickets.

I

I was introduced to a place with that kind of beauti-

Suttle Lake

Sahalie Falls

By Eleanor Pierce • The Bulletin ’ve never been to the Caribbean, but I’ve always loved photos of the crystalline water found there. The kind so clear that with the right light, it appears to glow, and you can see a hundred feet down to inspect the landscape below. Earlier this month, ful clarity — minus the bathing suits. And it’s only about an hour from Bend. Clear Lake Resort is 55 miles from Bend, just off state Highway 126; near enough for a day trip, but far enough to make a weekend of it by camping or renting a cabin. The resort is open year-round, though in certain months it can be difficult to access, especially in years with normal snowfall. The lake is open only to non-motorized boats, making it a perfect place to explore the tranquil scenery on a canoe or rowboat. My party arrived late on a Friday night, and the place looked nearly deserted. Fortunately, we’d planned ahead for our late arrival, calling the Linn County Parks & Recreation Department to get instructions. We were told to park near the boathouse, where the camp hosts live, and honk. After a short wait, the host appeared and cheerfully supplied us with our key and tokens to use for hot showers at the bathhouse, located just up the hill from our cabin. See Clear Lake / E6

Contact: 541-549-1201 or www .sistersmasquerade.com.

Learn about beauty tips for chemo patients The American Cancer Society will host a Look Good … Feel Better volunteer training class at 11 a.m. Monday at St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road. The three-hour course is open to licensed b3eauty professionals, who will learn to give tips on beauty, skin care and disguising hair loss to women undergoing cancer treatment. Contact: 541-434-3114 or charlie.johnson@cancer.org.

If you go What: Clear Lake Resort Getting there: From Sisters, head west on U.S. Highway 20 and veer left at the junction with state Highway 126. Follow the signs to Clear Lake. The resort is about 40 miles from Sisters, and Sahalie Falls is located a few miles farther on state Highway 126. Cost: Campsites cost $18 per night, cabins range from $64 to $117 per night. Reservations are needed early as campsites and cabins are already nearly full for mid-May through Labor Day weekend. Rowboats can be rented for $30 per day or $15 per hour. There are no motorized boats allowed on the lake, and there is a boat launch fee of $5 per day. Contact: 541-967-3917 or www.co.linn.or.us/parks/ parks/clearlake.html

Hint of summer on area trails By David Jasper The Bulletin

TRAIL UPDATE

Due to the recent warm weather, area trails are starting to transition into summer conditions about three weeks earlier than usual, says Chris Sabo, trails specialist for the Deschutes National Forest. West of U.S. Highway 97, the snow depth ranges from patchy to 8 inches at 4,500 feet, and 60 to 106 inches above 6,000 feet. Less than 50 percent of those depths can be expected east of the highway, he says. Over the past week, area sno-parks

have received anywhere from zero to 5 inches of new snow, Sabo writes in his weekly report. Much of that snow has melted off at lower elevations where snoparks, such as Virginia Meissner, mostly lack adequate depth for safe use. The forecast for the next several days includes a mix of weather conditions, from mild, clear springlike days to rain to a few inches of snow at the higher elevations. The Phil’s Trail area is in good condition to Marvin’s Garden and on to the Deschutes River Trails, Sabo says. See Trails / E3


T EL EV IS IO N

E2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Mom struggles to love daughter she dislikes

Great TV is blooming this spring By Chuck Barney

Edie Falco stars in the dark comedy “Nurse Jackie’’ as a flawed emergency room nurse. Catch the second episode of Season 2 at 10 p.m. Monday on Showtime.

Contra Costa Times

Dear Abby: I can’t stand my 10-year-old daughter. I was an 18-year-old single mother when she was born. I find her ugly and annoying. Everyone tells me how “sweet” and “pretty” she is, but I can’t see it. I dread when she comes home from school. I am not physically abusive to her — I would never do that. But I can be verbally abusive, and I know I need to stop. She just makes me so mad. I am now married with two more kids (boys), and I adore them. What’s wrong with me? How can I fix this? I’m afraid it’s too late. I have no spiritual adviser to talk to, and I can’t afford to speak to a professional counselor. — Anonymous in Washington State Dear Anonymous: The circumstances of your daughter’s birth were very different from those of your sons. When you look at her, you may be reminded of a chapter in your life you would prefer to forget. How sad for both of you. The way you treat her, particularly in relation to her half-brothers, will affect the way she perceives herself for the rest of her life. People whose parents treat them as unlovable often regard themselves as not “measuring up,” and it can cause self-esteem problems that last a lifetime. Ordinarily, I would encourage you to seek low-cost therapy through your county department of mental health for the sake of both you and your daughter. If that isn’t possible, then I advise you to hold your tongue, control your temper and compel yourself to show your daughter approval and affection every day until it becomes a habit or she’s old enough to leave — whichever comes first. Dear Abby: My workplace has instituted “casual dress Friday,” where everyone is supposed to make a donation to a charity selected by a different employee each fortnight. While this is nice in theory, I often find that I don’t

DEAR ABBY wish to donate to the chosen charity because I don’t agree with its ethics or its methods. I give regularly to charities of my choice, which I have researched beforehand, but have never been one to donate automatically to every passing collection. How do I bow out gracefully when the collection tin comes around? I have tried to explain to my co-workers why I don’t support a particular charity and simply say I have chosen not to participate. I am met with blank stares and demands that I explain myself, and lectures about why I must “support the team.” I don’t feel my colleagues have any right to tell me what I should do with my money, but they obviously disagree and I am finding the situation very uncomfortable. Any suggestions? — Feeling Awkward in Australia Dear Feeling Awkward: The policy you describe seems more like “friendly” extortion than real charitable giving. (Is there some kind of contest going on between teams to see who can raise the most money?) While I’m all for casual Fridays, the policy of pressuring people to give strikes me as one that should be modified or done away with completely. That’s why I think you should discuss your feelings with your supervisor or the head of the department and go on record that you prefer to give your money to causes you have researched and with which you identify. If that doesn’t help, you may be working for the wrong company. Sorry, mate. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

1. “Breaking Bad” 10 p.m. Sundays, AMC Poor, tortured Walt White (two-time Emmy-winning Bryan Cranston). How much more existential angst can he endure? As Season 3 starts, his wife (Anna Gunn) has left him and she’s about to discover that he’s a drug dealer. Yes, “Breaking Bad” can bring the pain, but it does so in an artful, enthralling and even humorous style that makes it difficult to turn away. 2. “Lost” 9 p.m. Tuesdays, ABC There are times when I wonder if this island mystery is almost as ridiculous as it is audacious. The trippy time lines? The “sideways” flashes? The Indiana Joneslike temple of doom? Kooky Claire? It all gets to be a little much. Still, the show holds a strange, mostly unexplainable power over me, just as Locke holds some of the clueless castaways in his mighty, viselike grip. And with only a few episodes to go, I’m not about to bail out now.

Showtime via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

3. “Friday Night Lights” Returns 8 p.m. April 30, NBC As coach Taylor (Kyle Chandler) assumes his post at East Dillon High, the new setting and characters take some getting used to, but this cult favorite quickly finds its groove with stirring stories that explore race relations and the bonds between friends and family. “FNL” continues to provide more lump-in-the-throat moments than any other show. 4. “Modern Family” 9 p.m. Wednesdays, ABC Prime time’s funniest new show has made it safe to watch family sitcoms once again. And just when you think it’s heading into gooey territory, “Modern Family” snaps off a biting remark and/or clever insight. 5. “Glee” Returns 9 p.m. April 13, Fox Yes, it’s weird and wacky and often eye-rollingly over-the-top, but that’s exactly what we love about this classic high school underdog story. With “American Idol” proving to be a bummer so far this season, we desperately need a show that gets us off the

couch to bust a move and channel our inner Broadway diva. 6. “Justified” 10 p.m. Tuesdays, FX Prime time needs another crime show like a hole in the head. But there’s definitely room for this wry and offbeat series based on a character by created by the great Elmore Leonard. Timothy Olyphant, who so often played second fiddle to Ian McShane in “Deadwood,” now has a chance to shine as a lawman who speaks softly, but carries a deadly sidearm. 7. “Damages” 10 p.m. Mondays, FX After jumping off the bandwagon in Season 2, I am again a Patty Hewes (Glenn Close) loyalist. This season’s investmentfraud case has a timely relevance, and the twisty plots and creepy cliffhangers often send chills down my spine. Yes, “Damages” still can frustrate us with its false clues and fake outs, but it more than makes up for its deficiencies with compelling performances, including stellar guest turns by Martin Short and Lily Tomlin.

9. “Nurse Jackie” 10 p.m. Mondays, Showtime Here we have the cure for the common medical show. Edie Falco is mesmerizing as the brutally flawed Jackie Peyton — a caustic caregiver with a drug habit and a workplace affair. Season 2 of this dark comedy is packed with consequences for Jackie, which only makes it more intriguing to watch one of television’s best actresses work her way in and out of trouble. 10. “Cougar Town” 9:30 p.m. Wednesdays, ABC Behold a show that’s smarter than its name implies — a sitcom pegged to the endearing Courteney Cox as a divorced real estate agent looking for love. At its worst, “Cougar Town” can be uneven and push the bounds of good taste. But at its best, it provides one laugh-out-loud moment after another and has a lot of interesting things to say about interpersonal relationships.

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“The 10 Best TV Shows Right Now!” The headline on the March 12 issue of Entertainment Weekly leapt out at me. I was struck by the live-in-themoment immediacy of it. The 10 best shows now. Not last week. Not a few months down the road. Not the best shows over the course of a year, or a season even. The problem: Whenever someone publishes some kind of numerical list, they’re opening themselves up for debate. Yes, we enjoy “The Good Wife,” but not quite as much as EW, which has it ranked No. 1. Here’s my own Top 10 list, which might also spark a debate or two:

8. “The Good Wife” 10 p.m. Tuesdays, CBS I’ve been a fan of Julianna Margulies since her “ER” days, but my appreciation for her dramatic skills has risen to new heights while watching her nimble performance as the spouse of a disgraced politician (Chris Noth). Now, hubby is out of the slammer — on house arrest — and the awkward tension is palpable. Plus, there’s a law firm co-worker (Josh Charles) who has the hots for her.

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THURSDAY PRIME TIME 3/25/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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KATU News 3583 World News 564 KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 86090 Jeopardy! 4449 Wheel 941 FlashForward Blowback ‘14’ 1699 News 56816 NBC News 99019 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 17699 Jeopardy! 69380 Wheel 68516 Community 72800 Parks 64835 College Basketball: NCAA Tournament 894201 College Basketball NCAA Tournament -- Cornell vs. Kentucky (Live) Å 230534 Judge Judy 3835 Inside Ed. 5800 World News 8941 Millionaire 9293 Ent 3699 The Insider 5477 FlashForward Blowback ‘14’ 27309 Funniest Home Videos 4038 Two Men 4767 Two Men 5019 Simpsons 5767 Simpsons 4903 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 45729 Jim 5903 Malcolm 7854 Simpsons 4767 Simpsons 5019 The Office 5767 The Office 4903 PDX TV Prime News (N) 45729 Electric 7309 Fetch! Ruff 390 Wolf: Travels 903 Business 583 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 9477 Art Beat 6293 Oregon Field News 2019 NBC News 7670 News 4583 News 5835 Live at 7 (N) 5583 Inside Ed. 1019 Community 1903 Parks 1598 Reba ‘PG’ 72903 Reba ‘PG’ 24854 King 21767 King 12019 ’70s Show 92767 ’70s Show 41813 The Vampire Diaries (N) ‘14’ 65187 Christina 89293 Burt Wolf 91336 Europe 41859 Travels 29309 Garden 76729 Workshop 18293 Woodsmith 85477 Moment 97212 Travels 9729 Europe 4380 Burt Wolf 1293 Business 2545 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 56835 Art Beat 1941 Oregon Field

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Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ 7747090 (10:01) Private Practice (N) ‘14’ 4922 The Office 59090 30 Rock 89816 The Marriage Ref (N) ’ ‘PG’ 55598 Incredible Dog Challenge 69361 Makeover 10583 Access H. 96903 Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ 3027380 (10:01) Private Practice ‘14’ 59372 Fringe Jacksonville ‘14’ Å 58293 News 36670 TMZ ‘PG’ 12090 › “Date Movie” (2006) Alyson Hannigan, Adam Campbell. ’ 48816 ›› “Bonhoeffer: Agent of Grace” (2000) ’ 5309 Parks 54903 The Office 59496 30 Rock 29729 The Marriage Ref (N) ’ ‘PG’ 64816 Supernatural (N) ‘14’ Å 78651 Married... 54670 Married... 30090 Art Work 57670 Painting 78748 Mexico 38632 Julia 47380 ›› “Bonhoeffer: Agent of Grace” (2000) ’ 18187 Parks 16816

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News 6167835 (11:35) Nightline News 1686038 Jay Leno News 9959090 Letterman Inside 90116748 (11:35) Nightline King of Hill 25477 Name Earl 13816 South Park 25477 South Park 13816 Nova ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) 59800 News 9951458 Jay Leno Roseanne 52125 Roseanne 33274 Christina 36187 Burt Wolf 40564 Nova ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) 61941

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å 588800 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 872106 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 881854 The First 48 Alias; Duel ‘14’ 861090 Manhunters Manhunters Manhunters Manhunters 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 333632 (3:00) “Star Trek: ›› “Volcano” (1997, Action) Tommy Lee Jones, Anne Heche, Gaby Hoffmann. Earthquakes and lava rav- › “Red Planet” (2000, Science Fiction) Val Kilmer, Carrie-Anne Moss, Tom Sizemore. Marooned astronauts ››› “Superman Returns” (2006) Brandon Routh. The Man of 102 40 39 Nemesis” 455835 age Los Angeles. Å 925019 struggle to survive on Mars. 666854 Steel faces an old enemy. Å 528038 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4750380 Untamed and Uncut ‘PG’ 7263212 A Lion Called Christian ’ 7249632 The Tiger Next Door (N) ‘G’ 7269496 Fatal Attractions (N) ‘PG’ 7262583 A Lion Called Christian ’ 2607699 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 1846361 Real Housewives of NYC 243651 Real Housewives of NYC 149496 Real Housewives of NYC 780767 Real Housewives of NYC 766187 Real Housewives of NYC 779651 Real Housewives of NYC 789038 Real Housewives of NYC 928090 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home 1581552 Extreme Makeover: Home 8074767 Smarter 2892125 Smarter 2871632 Cribs ’ 3753309 Cribs ’ 6331859 Cribs ’ 7230106 Cribs ’ 7249854 Cribs ’ 3758854 Broken 80187545 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents 2882748 Inside American Airlines: A Week in the Life 965496 Mad Money 966125 Marijuana Inc.: Pot Industry 946361 Porn: Business of Pleasure 956748 Ripped 239583 Naked 524583 51 36 40 52 Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s 418903 Larry King Live (N) ‘PG’ 200090 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å 304598 Larry King Live ‘PG’ 427670 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ 404729 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ 409962 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 319187 Married... 71699 Scrubs ’ 61212 Scrubs ’ 52564 Daily Show 25922 Colbert 58748 George Lopez 63767 Futurama 15632 Futurama 52748 Ugly 21380 South Park 34800 Daily Show 27477 Colbert 74629 135 53 135 47 Married... 12458 The Buzz 8903 Bend City Edition PM Edition 2039 Cooking 4361 City Club of Central Oregon 35729 RSN 6922 RSN 71632 RSN Movie Night 30632 PM Edition 83477 Health 46019 11 Capital News Today 893564 Today in Washington 688903 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 160748 Sonny 985125 Phineas 982038 Deck 966090 Wizards 253038 Montana 962274 “Starstruck” (2010, Drama) Sterling Knight. ‘G’ 723534 Phineas 153699 Phineas 406293 Montana 415941 Wizards 371895 Deck 216767 87 43 14 39 Sonny 233274 Bermuda Triangle Exposed 863458 Monsters in Alaska 876922 Alaska: Most Extreme ‘PG’ 886309 Bermuda Triangle Exposed 485854 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 336729 Cash Cab 956980 Cash Cab 106403 Cash Cab 401895 Squid Invasion ‘PG’ Å 887038 SportsNation (N) Å 158926 2009 World Series of Poker 249854 SportsCenter (Live) Å 225274 SportsCenter (Live) Å 245038 SportsCenter (Live) Å 248125 SportsCenter (Live) Å 743800 21 23 22 23 Baseball Tonight Å 700380 Mike Tyson’s Greatest Hits 4634380 MLS Soccer Philadelphia Union at Seattle Sounders FC From Qwest Field in Seattle. 2188699 Live 3744651 NASCAR 4836629 GameDay Scoreboard 8064380 SportsNation Å 1117632 22 24 21 24 Tyson 2894583 Tennis Å 9960361 Who’s Number 1? Å 9961090 American Gladiators ‘PG’ 9981854 College Football Played 9/29/79. 9797545 23 25 123 25 Boxing 9851651 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 “The Cutting Edge: Fire & Ice” (2010) Francia Raisa. ‘14’ Å 499922 ››› “The Parent Trap” (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Dennis Quaid, Natasha Richardson. Å 862361 The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 643816 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 975767 Hannity (N) 9537651 On the Record 9053458 The O’Reilly Factor 9062106 Hannity 9075670 On the Record 9052729 Glenn Beck 8129903 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 1948545 Home 7025309 Cooking 7015922 Minute 7006274 Challenge A steak cook-off. 7265670 Iron Chef America 7241090 Iron Chef America 7261854 Cakes 7291816 Cakes 7200564 Good Eats Unwrap 6966800 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Unscripted 43816 Mariners 67496 Beavers 30854 Unscripted 56380 Boxing (Live) ‘PG’ 49187 Mariners 36212 Final 12632 M1 Fighting Championship 88354 20 45 28* 26 Game 365 10090 Baseball 46903 That ’70s Show ’70s 9357729 › “Big Daddy” (1999) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams. 9076309 ›› “Night at the Museum” (2006, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Carla Gugino. 8851922 ›› “Night at the Museum” (2006, Comedy) 8849187 131 Buck 9382516 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 8046922 House 1747922 House 6932895 First 1756670 My First Sale (N) Selling New York Nails 8058767 House 9330090 House Hunters House 5667458 First 3263835 176 49 33 43 Income 1734458 Star Wars Tech ‘PG’ Å 7164941 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 6162729 Modern Marvels (N) ‘PG’ 6171477 Food Tech Pizza (N) ‘PG’ 6184941 Pawn 6983651 Pawn 6909699 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 2726941 155 42 41 36 Lost Worlds ‘PG’ Å 1544293 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 860496 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 494477 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 403125 Project Runway ‘PG’ Å 483361 Project Runway (N) ‘PG’ 493748 Models 767835 Runway 982903 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘PG’ 971941 Maddow Show 67257699 Countdown-Olbermann 90392854 Maddow Show 90378274 Hardball Å 90398038 Countdown-Olbermann 90391125 Maddow Show 79818090 56 59 128 51 Countdown-Olbermann 93602019 Life, Liz 606125 True Life Digital habits. ’ 855564 Spring Break Challenges ’ 489545 Spring Break Challenges 38432090 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Å 485729 America’s Best Dance Crew 488816 Taking 752903 Dance 917699 192 22 38 57 Life, Liz 954274 Malcolm 356583 Malcolm 335090 Chris 146293 Chris 676019 George 952941 Lopez 938361 Nanny 158038 Nanny 748835 82 46 24 40 Sponge. 1643274 Sponge. 7924458 iCarly ‘G’ 906485 Big Time 201877 iCarly ‘G’ 347835 Sponge 506629 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 581458 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 786816 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 795564 ››› “First Blood” (1982) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. ’ 798651 MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘MA’ 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 690545 › “In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale” (2007) Jason Statham. Å 7240877 ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest” (2006) Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. Å 8183922 Caprica 5469748 133 35 133 45 10.5 6956729 Behind 8560361 David J. 4294496 Winning 4291309 This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å 6834125 Christian Celeb Live-Holy Land Jeffrey 2410835 Changing-World ›› “Time Changer” 4559816 205 60 130 Friends 457449 Friends 102372 Office 102552 Seinfeld 330670 Seinfeld 702516 ››› “Mean Girls” (2004) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. 412748 Payne 592583 Payne 578903 Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 809908 16 27 11 28 King 327106 (9:15) ››› “I Never Sang for My Father” (1970) Melvyn Douglas. An estranged father ››› “The Happy Ending” (1969) Jean ›››› “Interiors” (1978, Drama) Diane Keaton, Geraldine Page. The pain of divorce is ›››› “Ordinary People” (1980) Donald Sutherland, Timothy Hutton. Guilt over his 101 44 101 29 seen through a daughter’s eyes. Å 7223816 older brother’s death haunts a teenager. Å 28501545 and son attempt to open communications. 83674800 Simmons. Premiere. 9294767 Say Yes 322632 Say Yes 346212 LA Ink Gone Too Far ‘PG’ 704212 Police Women of Maricopa 780632 Police Women of Maricopa 700496 LA Ink (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 703583 Police Women of Maricopa 206800 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear ’ ‘PG’ 618941 NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers (Live) Å 996212 Inside the NBA (Live) Å 701125 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 300670 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls From the United Center in Chicago. (Live) 982019 Chowder 1730632 Chowder 3982570 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 2437485 Stoked 1750496 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Ben 10 1736816 Ben 10 1748651 Total Drama 6TEEN 8054941 King-Hill 9343564 King-Hill 9352212 Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Best of Hawaii ‘G’ Å 67257699 Europe 93603748 Passport to Eu Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 90378274 Ghost Adventures ‘14’ 90398038 Ghost Adventures ‘14’ 90391125 Ghost Adventures ‘14’ 79818090 179 51 45 42 Hawaii’s Best 93602019 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 1852922 Sanford 7008632 Home Improve. Home Improve. Ray 8489670 Ray 4744729 Ray 7297090 Ray 7213038 Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Cover Story ‘PG’ Å 202458 NCIS Heartland ‘PG’ Å 423854 NCIS Mind Games ’ ‘PG’ 409274 NCIS Silver War ‘PG’ Å 429038 NCIS Switch ’ ‘14’ Å 422125 Burn Notice ‘PG’ Å 104390 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 337583 ››› “Grease” (1978, Musical) John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John. ’ Å 715309 Beauty 412729 Sober House With Dr. Drew 944903 Sober House With Dr. Drew 947090 Sober House With Dr. Drew 544187 191 48 37 54 Tool Academy ’ ‘14’ 416545 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

Rock 44322125 ›› “Toy Soldiers” 1991, Action Sean Astin. ’ ‘R’ Å 6732380 House 9350816 ›› “Booty Call” 1997 Jamie Foxx. ‘R’ Å 2827748 (9:20) ››› “Traitor” 2008 Don Cheadle. ’ 21231090 (11:15) “The Rock” 1996 79126729 ››› “Hot Shots!” 1991 Charlie Sheen. Å 9035496 ››› “Hot Shots! Part Deux” 1993 ‘PG-13’ 5375380 ››› “White Men Can’t Jump” 1992 Wesley Snipes. ‘R’ Å 6168903 ›› “Terror Train” 1980, Horror Ben Johnson. ‘R’ Å 5782361 Vans Triple Crown 5859187 Daily 9479075 Vans Triple Crown 2219552 Built to Shred Vans Triple Crown 5438816 Daily 3586699 Update 3114670 Stupidface Å Check 1, 2 Å Misfit 3558816 Thrillbill 7774903 LPGA 845980 PGA Tour Golf Arnold Palmer Invitational, Final Round From Bay Hill Club & Lodge in Orlando, Fla. Å 963564 Golf 337458 LPGA Tour Golf Kia Classic, First Round From Carlsbad, Calif. 882583 Ultimate Matches 478564 7th Heaven ‘G’ Å 1542835 7th Heaven ‘G’ Å 7162583 7th Heaven ‘G’ Å 6193699 7th Heaven PK ‘G’ Å 6179019 “Sacrifices of the Heart” (2007, Drama) Melissa Gilbert. ‘PG’ Å 6172106 Golden 5785458 Golden 5338598 (4:00) “Afghan Star” (5:45) ›› “Riding in Cars With Boys” 2001, Comedy-Drama Drew Barrymore, Steve Zahn. A teenage ›› “Monsters vs. Aliens” 2009, Adventure Voices of Reese Clash of Titans REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ Real Sex 22 ’ ‘MA’ Å 825458 HBO 425 501 425 10 ’ 7563632 36620309 mother becomes a divorcee and aspiring writer. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 59991380 Witherspoon, Hugh Laurie. ’ ‘PG’ Å 1096813 ‘PG’ Å 240583 (5:05) ›› “Boondock Saints” 1999 Willem Dafoe. ‘R’ Å 28671309 › “Bullet” 1997 Mickey Rourke. ‘R’ Å 7062859 (8:45) ›› “Brotherhood of Death” 1976 15919106 Arrested Dev. Arrested 7249854 Wilfred 3758854 Jon Dore Show IFC 105 105 (5:15) ›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” 2008 Keanu Reeves. The arrival of an extra- ›› “The Uninvited” 2009, Horror Elizabeth Banks, Emily Brown- ››› “Taken” 2008 Liam Neeson. A former spy uses his old › “Babylon A.D.” 2008 Vin Diesel. A mercenary guards a “Day Earth Stood MAX 400 508 7 terrestrial visitor triggers global upheaval. ‘PG-13’ 80113800 ing, Arielle Kebbel. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 266477 skills to save his kidnapped daughter. ’ 110564 woman who is mankind’s last hope. 9216854 Still” 17595477 Ultimate Factories (N) ‘G’ 5851545 Fight Science ‘PG’ 3111583 Naked Science ‘PG’ 5454854 Ultimate Factories ‘G’ 5430274 Fight Science ‘PG’ 5450038 Naked Science ‘PG’ 5453125 Lockdown Tent City ‘14’ 2809629 NGC 157 157 Big Time Rush OddParents Avatar 5876854 Speed 5855361 Phantom 3553361 Phantom 3198632 Three 4168835 Three 4177583 Secret 3565106 Mikey 7781293 ›› “Barnyard: The Original Party Animals” (2006) Premiere. ’ 4188699 NTOON 89 115 189 Hunt 1841816 Outdoor 7023941 Magnum 7020854 Whitetails Bow Madness Adven 7000090 Outdrs 1767800 Steve’s 1859835 Trophy 8385800 Hunt 4746187 Wild Outdoors Outdoor 7215496 Trophy Hunt Elk Chronicles OUTD 37 307 43 Nurse Jackie ’ (5:05) ›› “The Longshots” 2008, Docudrama Ice Cube, Keke Palmer. iTV. A girl ›› “Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys” 2008, Drama Kathy Bates. iTV. Greed and ›› “Soul Men” 2008, Comedy Samuel L. Jackson, Bernie Mac, Sharon Leal. iTV. United States of SHO 500 500 becomes a Pop Warner quarterback. ’ ‘PG’ 26796106 scandal test the mettle of two family matriarchs. ‘PG-13’ 504516 Estranged singers reunite for a tribute concert. ’ ‘R’ 419651 ‘MA’ 787564 Tara ’ 9036212 Fast Track to Fame 8589496 Bullrun 1833699 Bullrun (N) 4664361 Pass Tm 8566545 Hub 8578380 Fast Track to Fame 4660545 NASCAR 2410835 Formula One Racing 1697800 SPEED 35 303 125 Reign 28676477 Studio 17988477 › “The Ugly Truth” 2009 Katherine Heigl. ‘R’ 5508309 (7:40) ›› “Hancock” 2008, Action Will Smith. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 55618941 (9:21) ›› “Step Brothers” 2008 Will Ferrell. 29601449 Spartacus: Blood and Sand 4300651 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:10) ›› “The Forbidden Kingdom” 2008 (5:55) ››› “Capricorn One” 1978, Suspense Elliott Gould. Astronauts threaten to ›› “Flashbacks of a Fool” 2008, Drama Daniel Craig, Eve, Harry Eden. A fading star › “Awake” 2007, Suspense Hayden Christensen, Jessica Alba, ››› “Lonely Hearts” TMC 525 525 Jackie Chan. 91348854 reveal a faked NASA space mission. ’ ‘PG’ 48885903 reminisces on his youth. ’ ‘R’ Å 337699 Terrence Howard. ’ ‘R’ 378106 379835 ››› “Field of Dreams” (1989, Fantasy) Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan. 8687361 UFC 7206748 Sports Soup Sports 8460545 Sports 6044632 ››› “Field of Dreams” (1989, Fantasy) Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan. 8606496 VS. 27 58 30 20/20 on WE Driven to Kill 8574564 20/20 on WE Å 1828767 20/20 on WE (N) Å 4666729 20/20 on WE Å 4675477 20/20 on WE Driven to Kill 4688941 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4585800 Secret Lives of Women 6825477 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY SNAKES ALIVE!: Meet and learn about live snakes, including a Burmese python; $7 plus museum admission, $5 High Desert Museum members; noon and 2 p.m., members half-hour earlier; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: Discuss the film “Field of Dreams” and the book “Shoeless Joe” by W.P. Kinsella; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls .us/calendar. TEN FOOT TALL AND 80 PROOF: The Bozeman, Mont.-based roots group performs; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

FRIDAY GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088. SNAKES ALIVE!: Meet and learn about live snakes, including a Burmese python; $7 plus museum admission, $5 High Desert Museum members; noon and 2 p.m., members half-hour earlier; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BMX CHAMPIONSHIPS: Top BMX racers compete in the ABA BMX Great Northwest Nationals; free; 6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; www.ababmx.com. “IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE?”: Local performers present Tim Kelly’s comedy about a mayor who tries to marry his daughter to the richest man in town; part of “100 Years of Culver”; free; 7 p.m.; Culver High School, 710 Fifth St.; 541-546-6494. CASH LEVY: The comedian performs and records a TV special; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. COOL NUTZ: The Portland-based hiphop artist performs; free; 9 p.m.; Bendistillery Martini Bar, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-3886868 or www .myspace.com/ bendistillery. DISCO ORGANICA: The Eugene-based funk band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

SATURDAY GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: A sale of miscellaneous items; proceeds benefit the Redmond High School lacrosse team; free; 7 a.m.-3 p.m.; Redmond High School Hartman Campus, 2105 W. Antler Ave.; 541-389-3157. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, HAMLET”: Starring Simon Keenlyside, Natalie Dessay, Jennifer Larmore, Toby Spence and James Morris in a presentation of Ambroise Thomas’s adaptation; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $22, $20 seniors, $15 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. 13TH ANNUAL FIBER MARKET DAY: Featuring fiber vendors, demonstrations and animal sales; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-548-1024 or www .highdesertwoolgrowers.com. GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088.

SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY OPEN HOUSE: Featuring activities and nature talks; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. TRAIL COURSE PRACTICE: Try your horse on obstacles and get ready for trail-riding season; $15 suggested donation; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Deschutes County Sheriff’s Posse Clubhouse, 65432 Deschutes Pleasant Ridge Road, Bend; 541-610-2484. BMX CHAMPIONSHIPS: Top BMX racers compete in the ABA BMX Great Northwest Nationals; free; 11:30 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; www.ababmx.com. SNAKES ALIVE!: Meet and learn about live snakes, including a Burmese python; $7 plus museum admission, $5 High Desert Museum members; noon and 2 p.m., members half-hour earlier; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. ALFALFA DRUM CIRCLE: Drum circle followed by a bonfire and community sweat; free; 6-8 p.m.; Steve and Teri’s home, 25175 Lava Lane, Bend; 541-420-2204. BACHELOR AUCTION: Bid on bachelors, with date packages; proceeds benefit Angel Notion; $10 suggested donation; 6-9 p.m.; Summers Flooring & Design, 63700 N.W. Clausen Drive, Bend; 541-3906491 or www.asweetevent.info/ Events.html. “IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE?”: Local performers present Tim Kelly’s comedy about a mayor who tries to marry his daughter to the richest man in town; part of “100 Years of Culver”; free; 7 p.m.; Culver High School, 710 Fifth St.; 541-546-6494. CASH LEVY: The comedian performs and records a TV special; $10; 7 and 9:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. MASQUERADE BENEFIT BALL: Featuring presentations by photographer David Uttley and videographers Eli and Kelly Pyke, dancing and dessert; dress is formal; proceeds benefit Haitian earthquake survivors and Ugandan child sponsorship; $35 or $60 per couple in advance, $50 or $90 per couple at the door; 7-10 p.m.; Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-549-1201 or www .sistersmasquerade.com. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn; donations requested from the inn’s wish list, available on the Web site; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516, derek@actorsrealm .com or www.bethleheminn.org. HOUSEWARMING KARAOKE AND DANCE PARTY: Featuring a DJ, karaoke, dancing and more; free, donation of diapers for Bend’s Community Center requested; 8 p.m.-midnight; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. THE DIMES, NORMAN AND TORTUNE: The Portland-based bands play folk-pop, funk and experimental music; $7; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-323-0964 or www .bendticket.com. “ODD FROST”: CD release and performance of a spoken-word and piano album by Guy J. Jackson and David Finch; $15 with CD, $5 show only; 8:30 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803.

SUNDAY BMX CHAMPIONSHIPS: Top BMX racers compete in the ABA BMX Great Northwest Nationals; free; 9:30 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; www.ababmx.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SNAKES ALIVE!: Meet and learn about live snakes, including a Burmese python; $7 plus museum admission, $5 High Desert Museum members; noon and 2 p.m., members half-hour earlier; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. MATT HOPPER: The Boise, Idahobased folk-rock artist performs, with opener Eric Tollefson; $5; 7 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-389-2884. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 500 meters on single-speed bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; a portion of proceeds benefits Bend’s Community BikeShed; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7 p.m., sign-ups at 6:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541610-7460 or www .myspace. com/silvermoon brewing.

MONDAY TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts “The Jail Expansion Bond and Tax Cuts Ahead” with Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton; RSVP required; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@ bendbroadband.com or www .talkofthetownco.com.

TUESDAY OREGON BADLANDS WILDERNESS CELEBRATION: Celebrate the creation of the Badlands Wilderness Study Area, with live music, refreshments and more; free; 3-6 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. “MAKING MIRACLES HAPPEN”: Learn how Bend’s Community BikeShed repairs old bikes and provides a transportation option for area homeless; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his novel “Secrets of the Bull”; free; 7 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766. KOGANE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT EXCHANGE CONCERT: The Tokyo-based band from Kogane High School performs, with the Mountain View High School band, under the direction of Robert W. Smith; donations accepted; 7-9 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6360. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; ages 21 and older; $7 plus service charges in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516, volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com or www.bendticket.com.

WEDNESDAY “ON THE ROAD IN ALASKA AND CANADA”: Carolyn Hammond presents a slide show and talk about her experiences with a group of RV travelers on the Cassiar Highway and the Alaska Highway; free; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 800-824-2714 or ctrinfo@uoregon.edu. ALEXIS EBERT: The Oregonian singersongwriter performs; concert will be filmed; $10; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. NERSHI-LAW DUO: Rootsy jams from a founding member of The String Cheese Incident, with Elephant Revival; ages 21 and older; $13 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 9

p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com.

THURSDAY April 1 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett; bring a lunch; free; noon1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. WALLOWA LLAMA SLIDE SHOW: Meet Nigel the llama and see a slide show about packing with llamas in Eastern Oregon; free; 6 p.m.; REI, 380 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541742-2961 or wallama@pinetel.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond reads from her book “Seeing Stars”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766 or www.btcbooks.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Joann Green Byrd talks about her book “Calamity: The Heppner Flood of 1903”; free; 6:30 p.m.; A.R. Bowman Memorial Museum, 246 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-3715. “WEST SIDE STORY”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the Tony award-winning musical about love blossoming in the face of a rivalry between two New York gangs; $15, $10 ages 8-18; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber reads from his novel “Secrets of the Bull”; free; 7 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. “COUPLE DATING”: Preview performance of the play by Cricket Daniel; directed by Susan Benson; adults only; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626.

FRIDAY April 2 EASTER EGG HUNT: Bring a basket, hunt for eggs and win prizes; hunt areas will be separated by age group; ages 10 and younger; free; 2 p.m.; Cougar Springs Assisted Living Center, 1942 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond; 541-316-4400. TREE OF HOPE CEREMONY: KIDS Center kicks off the annual Blue Ribbon Campaign, which is held to acknowledge National Child Abuse Prevention month; event includes live music, speakers and refreshments; free; 4-5 p.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-383-5958 or www.kidscenter.org. TOUR DU CHOCOLAT: Taste chocolates prepared by local chefs; proceeds benefit The Tower Theatre Foundation; $5, includes five tastes and a beverage; 6-9 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Joann Green Byrd talks about her book “Calamity: The Heppner Flood of 1903”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “COUPLE DATING”: Opening night of the play by Cricket Daniel; directed by Susan Benson; with champagne and dessert reception; adults only; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m., 7 p.m. reception; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. “NAIL SCARRED HANDS”: The La Pine Community Arts Choir performs a concert to benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; donations of nonperishable food or money accepted; 7 p.m.; La Pine Christian Center, 52565 Day Road; 541-536-2021. “WEST SIDE STORY”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the Tony award-winning musical about love blossoming in the face of a rivalry between two New York gangs; $15, $10 ages 8-18; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beatonline.org.

M T For Thursday, March 25

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CRAZY HEART (R) 12:25, 3, 5:40, 8:15 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:40, 5:35, 8:20 IT’S COMPLICATED (R) Noon, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50 THE LAST STATION (R) 12:15, 2:50, 5:30, 8:10 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:20, 8:05 THE WHITE RIBBON (R) 12:10, 5, 8

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 11:20 a.m., 1:30, 1:55, 4:05, 4:35, 6:40, 9:15 ALICE IN WONDERLAND 3-D (PG)

11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15 AVATAR 3-D (PG-13) 12:10, 3:35, 7, 10:25 THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:45, 2:15, 4:25, 5:15, 7:10, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30 BROOKLYN’S FINEST (R) 10:20 THE CRAZIES (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7:55 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 GREEN ZONE (R) 11:25 a.m., noon, 2:05, 4:10, 4:45, 6:50, 7:25, 9:30, 10:05 PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF (PG) 12:20, 3:45, 6:30, 9:25 OUR FAMILY WEDDING (PG-13) 12:05, 2:30, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 REMEMBER ME (PG-13) 12:15, 3:55, 6:35, 9:20 REPO MEN (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8, 10:35

SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 12:25, 3:40, 6:45, 9:55 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 7:15, 10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 9 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 6 TOOTH FAIRY (PG) 3:30

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

10:30 a.m., 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:15 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1, 3:30, 6, 8:45 GREEN ZONE (R) 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:30, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 4, 6:30 THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45 CRAZY HEART (R) 4:15 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 4, 6:30 GREEN ZONE (R) 6:45

PINE THEATER

N   N  Palin near deal for reality show reported Tuesday. Earlier this month, Burnett, After trying, apparently un- best known for executive-producsuccessfully, to sell a travelogue ing CBS’ “Survivor” and NBC’s TV series about Alaska that … “Celebrity Apprentice,” shopped zzzzzzzzzzzz … the show around in L.A., with PalOh sorry, where was I? in, to the broadcast networks for Oh yes: After trying a reported price of about unsuccessfully to sell to $1 million an episode. the broadcast networks The broadcast neta travelogue series works appear to have about Alaska that would passed because the feature none other than show is not called “The Sarah Palin, realityPalins,” and it is not TV king Mark Burnett about Palin, her unwed appears to be in negodaughter Bristol and tiations with Discovery Sarah Palin baby Tripp, her pot-shotCommunications about taking nearly son-inplacing the Palin “reallaw Levi, her hot-lookity series” there. ing husband Todd, and Discovery is expected to an- her baby with Down syndrome nounce soon that it’s getting into whom we all fell in love with bed with the former Alaska gov- during the 2008 presidential ernor for this limited-one series. race, Trig. Evidently, Palin will serve as “If it was ‘The Osbournes,’ sort of modern-day Sacagawea. and they were going to follow She’ll guide viewers around (Palin’s) family, then it would be Alaska to meet the “characters, interesting,” one broadcast exec tradition and attractions in the said, sadly, as if mourning what 49th state,” trade paper Variety might have been.

By Lisa de Moraes

The Washington Post

Kate Gosselin offers fancy footwork By Lisa de Moraes The Washington Post

Kate Gosselin’s still got it! Performing to a bigger broadcast audience, the TLC realityshow luminary proved that she has the makings of a true Hollywood star when she catapulted ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” to its biggest opening audience ever. More than 24 million people watched the two-hour springseason debut Monday night, according The Nielsen Company. America’s Most Put-Upon Mother, whose talents clearly have been squandered in the small-potatoes landscape of TLC’s “Jon & Kate Plus 8,” waltzed to the Billy Joel tune “She’s Always a Woman to Me” with professional dancer Tony Dovolani. The latest Gosselin triumph outperformed last spring’s “Dancing” debut, which had been the show’s highest-rated debut ever, clocking around 11 million fans. Mysteriously, Gosselin’s waltz received the third-lowest score from the show’s professional judges.

Trails Continued from E1 The Deschutes River Trails, from Entrada Lodge to Benham Falls, are reportedly snow-free and mostly in good condition. Trails from Benham Falls West, upstream to Sunriver, have some soft to muddy sections with possible icy patches. Sabo urges the public to avoid soft, muddy trails, which are prone to damage from early spring use. Likewise, access roads; Sabo urges folks “to

ABC via The Associated Press

TV personality Kate Gosselin and her dancing partner Tony Dovolani performed on the celebrity dance competition series “Dancing With the Stars” on Monday.

avoid driving on native surface and gravel roads that are soft and muddy and prone to serious damage from rutting. Road maintenance budgets are tight and many of these forest access roads do not receive annual maintenance and may become impassable from damage caused by early season use.” For more information on the Deschutes National Forest, contact 541-383-5300. Da v id Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG)

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

Closed on Thursdays. Available for private rentals.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


E4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, March 25, 2010: This year, events often catch you off guard. Know that even if you are surprised, you are capable of handling whatever comes up. You are in the last year of a 12-year cycle. Often people let go of what doesn’t work in their lives. Stellar happenings might help isolate these areas. If you are single, romance can be passionate and exciting. Enjoy, but take your time making long-term commitments. If you are attached, share your challenges and desires more often with your significant other. The friendship between you is key. LEO displays passion. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Though you might be hesitant, tap into your unusual creativity and dynamic energy. What you believe is workable might not be, despite all efforts. Your resourcefulness could make or break a situation. Tonight: On top of your game. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Stay centered and direct in your dealings. You could be on top of your game, despite some personal uproar and a need to reexamine an issue. Focus on work. A move or change could be slated. You wonder about the possibilities ahead. Tonight: Relax at home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Your style and way of handling others emerges. State your case with the full knowledge

of what you want. Investigate new possibilities with an open mind. Listen to feedback from others in a meeting. Pressure builds within a partnership. Tonight: Hang out with a friend. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Be sensitive with your financial dealings. You might feel awkward and need a change. You could be overwhelmed by what is happening within a partnership. You are settling and might need to revamp a project more to another’s liking. Tonight: Treat yourself on the way home. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Your energy could make you assertive to a point where others see you as pushy. Don’t be so efficient that you forget the role of charm, OK? Realize what is going on behind the scenes. Perhaps the less said the better. Tonight: As you like. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Feel comfortable taking a backseat. With all the strong personalities and opinions, this attitude works. Your creativity bubbles up in a conversation. Choose the right moment for your feedback, and you’ll get the reaction you desire. Tonight: Get some extra sleep. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You could be overwhelmed by a friend’s determination. Might it not be easier to let this person have his or her way? Difficulties occur when there are power plays. Let others express themselves, their ideas and their direction. Tonight: Only what you want. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Demands push you into action. The question remains: When

is enough enough? You will want to analyze more of your directions and choices. If you’re a boss, you could be a lot harder on your employees than you realize. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You keep pushing to see the big picture. Whether you can achieve that goal remains to be seen. Financial pressure pushes you to find an expert. Stop trying to solve the problem on your own. Tonight: Let your imagination choose. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Dealing with a demanding associate could test your patience and effectiveness. Back off and approach the situation again with a new attitude. More often than not, you’ll discover that what has worked for you in the past no longer does. Go within before taking any action. Tonight: Togetherness is the theme. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You have your hands full as another person expresses his or her opinions in no uncertain terms. You might want or need to step back some, especially if you are feeling hurt or put upon. Refuse to take a situation personally. Tonight: Listening to a suggestion doesn’t mean that you must take it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Others drive a hard bargain. Many people you deal with right now want a lot from you. Stop. Think about yourself. What can you handle and what is too much? If you can eliminate stress from your life, by all means do. Tonight: Get some errands done. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS

FRIDAY

TODAY

ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Social hour; 4:15 p.m.; 541-388-4503. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m. to noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo. com/group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@ bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. DESCHUTES COUNTY BALLROOM DANCE CLUB: 8 to 10 p.m.; 175 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-322-0220 or www. deschutescountyballroom.com. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4 to 5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. PINOCHLE: The Vintage of Bend; 541-388-4286. RAWBENDALIVE! POTLUCK: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.; The Cascades Living Water Store, Bend; 541-550-7520. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. THE CENTRAL OREGON WRITERS GUILD: 6:30 to 9 p.m.; COCC Redmond; 541-923-0896 or www. centraloregonwritersguild.com. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP MEETING: 7 p.m.; Morning Star Christian Church, Bend; 541-389-5400. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-3392. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. OUTRIGGER CANOE CLUB: 5:30 p.m.; Deschutes River, Bend; amy@BendOutrigger.org. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30 to 5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15 to 3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

SATURDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY:

9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. RICE COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-447-0732. SASSY LADIES GROUP: Hospitality coffee; 10 a.m. to noon; call Darlene at 541-382-0267.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1 to 4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 2 p.m., Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-279-7962.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6 to 9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541385-9198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7 to 9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 to 9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE: 6 to 8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366.

REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 3 to 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library; 541-350-3345. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15 to 3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; WOMEN’S INTEREST BOOK GROUP: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-318-7242. 541-312-1507. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122.

LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. PRINEVILLE EAGLES BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge, Prineville; 541-447-7659. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon; Housing Works, Community Room, Redmond; 541-323-7413. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1 to 3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133.

TUESDAY

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon to 1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNIT UP: 5:30 to 8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups. yahoo.com/group/bendknitup. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 to 8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT AMATEUR RADIO GROUP (HIDARG): 11:30 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-388-4476. HIGH DESERT CORVETTE CLUB:

ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AGILITY DOG CLUB: 541385-6872 or 541-385-5215. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon to 1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45 to 6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799.

Photos by Beckett Hills / For The Bulletin

ABOVE: Sahalie Falls is just minutes south of Clear Lake on state Highway 126. AT LEFT: The shadow of a canoe with two paddlers can be seen from above, with reflections of trees and clouds on the surface of the water.

Clear Lake Continued from E1 We had rented a rustic cabin and weren’t quite sure what to expect. We knew we wouldn’t have indoor plumbing, but we were happy to discover that the hosts had started the heater earlier in the day, making for a cozy arrival. Inside the cabin, there was also a built-in, two-burner propane stove. There were electric lights, but generator hours are restricted in the off months, so we made do with flashlights and candles while we settled in. We knew to bring bedding, but once we started setting up, we wished we’d brought extra padding to put on top of the rubber sheets affixed to the mattresses, which prominent signs warned us not to remove. Our small cabin was divided into three rooms with curtains for doors. It could accommodate six in two double beds and a fold-down futon in the main room, which was also furnished with a Formica table, four chairs and a few buckets to retrieve water from the spigots scattered around the grounds. The resort is pet friendly (leashes required), so we also had two dogs in tow.

Out on the water Chattering birds woke us the following morning, and we were pleased to discover we could see a luminous, green strip of lake through the trees from the front porch of our cabin. As soon as everyone had eaten breakfast, we dressed in layers, loaded up our canoe with supplies and dogs, strapped on personal flotation devices and headed out onto the lake. It was a sunny spring day, but still chilly. We gave stern directions to our furry canoe compan-

It’s the cold of the water that makes the lake so beautiful. ... Clear Lake hovers just above freezing yearround, discouraging the growth of organisms that could cloud the waters or break down ancient trees submerged below. ions to stay still, lest we end up playing tippy-canoe in the frigid lake. It’s the cold of the water, in fact, that makes the lake so beautiful. As I read in a packet I later picked up at the lodge, Clear Lake hovers just above freezing year-round, discouraging the growth of organisms that could cloud the waters or break down ancient trees submerged below. Out on the water, we could see dead trees reaching up toward us from below, ghostly as shipwrecks. The literature also said the preserved trees were submerged more than 3,000 years ago. In places where the sand at the bottom of the lake was light, we could watch our shadow on the floor of the lake, and see the ripples billowing in rings when we dunked our paddles into the water. We hung close to shore, trying to get good photos of the birds, including uncommon ducks called Barrow’s goldeneyes. The male goldeneyes had purple-black heads with contrasting white markings. Their drab mates were a little less interesting to look at, except when they suddenly flipped up their backsides

to dive underwater for a snack. We also saw geese, small brown and yellow pine siskins flitting in the bushes on the banks, and red crossbills, birds that use their splayed beaks to pick seeds out of pine cones. The lake is oblong, about a mile from tip to tip, perhaps a half mile across at its widest point. A bottleneck separates a smaller northern part of the lake from the larger southern portion, and the resort’s Crockett Lodge, day use area and boat launch are located near the bottleneck.

Haven for hikers In addition to the amenities for boaters, there is a well-maintained trail all around the lake for hikers that links in to the McKenzie River National Recreation Trail. I took a short walk along the Clear Lake Trail before we headed home Sunday, and according to the materials I picked up at the lodge, if I had continued on the trail I could have checked out the headwaters of the McKenzie River, the lava flow that abuts the lake to the east, and a log picnic shelter that was built in 1937 by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps, On the way home, we took a 10 minute detour and stopped at Sahalie Falls. The falls are down a short path from the parking area, and provide great views, a little spray and a perfect ending to a weekend with nature. Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@bendbulletin.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Jacket night; 6:30 p.m.; The Phoenix, Bend; 541-923-1369. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon to 1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org./ KNITTING MEET-UP: 5:30 to 8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05 to 1:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732.

WEDNESDAY

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday 541.306.3750

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IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Medicine Ingredients in cosmetics can be cause for concern, so read the fine print, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2010

INSIDE

a

MEDICINE

strong

Oregon rates in Central Immunizationlds with all recommended immunizations ar-o Percentage of 2-ye Crook Deschutes County County

Jefferson County

Statewide

100%

81

78

80%

73

60% 54 51

73 71

75 72

69 51

55

51

74 76

74

79

74

68

54

40% 20% 0

04

2005

2006

2007

2008 l al pediatric clinics

.

shift

Vital stats A rising percentage of young Oregonians have had immunizations, Page F3

Answering questions

Once a no-no for kids, strength training is now considered a great idea — with supervision

Does my child’s cold need antibiotics? Can vaccinations cause autism? Find out, Page F3

FITNESS

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

Exercise tips The bent row helps strengthen the back muscles, Page F4

Let’s go for a ... For pleasure and health, it’s a walk in the park (or on the sidewalk), Page F5

NUTRITION Vitamins Got fortified milk? If you do, you also have a good source of Vitamin D, Page F6

Snacking power Non-meal foods eaten by children may be the biggest contributor to obesity, Page F6

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Under the coaching guidance of Dave Zimmerman, Ryan Davis, 11, a sixth-grader at Seven Peaks School, goes through a strength workout at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend.

Ryan Davis meets with his personal trainer at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center one or two times a week. In the center’s weight room, he does squats on a balance ball, chest presses and core strengthening exercises. He sweats and he strains as he goes from machine to machine. Ryan enjoys weight training, he said, and feels that it is making him stronger, particularly in his legs. It’s also helping to relieve heel pain that was exacerF I T N E S S bated through a football injury last fall. Ryan is like many other Bendites who regularly hit the gym to lift weights and build muscle. The difference? Ryan is 11. Doing strength training with kids used to get a bad rap. A generation ago, medical experts counseled that strength training for children was, at best, ineffective and could be dangerous, perhaps stunting children’s growth. Times have changed. These days, “no reputable medical organization does not endorse strength training,” said Avery Faigenbaum, professor in the department of health and exercise science at The College of New Jersey and the lead author of a recent set of guidelines on youth strength training for the National Strength and Conditioning Association. See Strength / F4

The do’s and don’ts of strength training for kids

4

DO ...

•Supervise children the entire time they are near weight-lifting equipment • Start slowly and be sure not to load up equipment with heavy weights • Make the routine fun and social for kids • Help show children proper form

8

DON’T ...

• Let kids lift weights on their own • Push them to lift heavier weight than they are capable of • Let kids carry around heavy weights that they might drop on themselves

Pistachio time PAID ADVERTISEMENT

How much do you know about the small and savory nut? Page F6

Correction In a story titled “Effective or Experimental?” which ran on Page F1 on March 18, the name of Dr. Ralph Prows, senior medical director of Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon was misspelled. The Bulletin regrets the error.

HEALTH DATEBOOK For a listing of health-related community events, see Page F2

Compassionate Care

DIETING INTERVENTION

Here are a few tips to help guide families to healthy eating By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

Sure, opposites attract. But when one person in a household is trying to eat a healthy diet and another is throwing nutritional caution to the wind, it can be a source of frustration. And efforts to try to force dietary changes, however well-intentioned, will only result in a figurative — and maybe even literal — food fight. NUTR “Really no matter how hard we want to or how hard we try, we can’t control other people’s behavior, only our own” said Bethany Thayer, a registered dietitian in Detroit and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. “So if somebody else doesn’t want to change their behavior, there isn’t really anything you can do, other than role model what you hope to see in others.” Frankie Mauti, a registered dietitian at St. Charles Bend, often counsels patients on dietary changes after one of them has received a medical diagnosis requiring them to make a change.

She’s noticed that in older couples it’s the wife who is more willing to make changes to the family diet. But in younger couples, it’s often the opposite. She agrees that nagging, threats or other coercion simply isn’t going to work. “Any sort of external pressure or nagging or monitoring of food from the other person usually just causes animosity or rebellion,” she said. “That’s with kids or parents.” But both agree that a spouse, ITION roommate or partner can be a tremendous help when somebody wants to improve his or her diet. They suggested the following approaches: • Express yourself. Making dietary changes can be trying. “Make sure your loved one knows you’re willing and able to offer support,” Thayer said. Maybe they need you to take over meal planning or perhaps they’d benefit if you didn’t snack in front of the TV. Let your partner tell you what you can do to help. See Dieting / F6

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F2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H D

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SUPPORT GROUPS AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-548-0440 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-388-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEAT CANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-4202759 or 541-389-6432. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DOWN SYNDROME PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-317-0537. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond

Submitted photo

Participants in a No Boundaries program gather outside Fleet Feet Sports last year. For more information, see the Classes listings. 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-318-9093. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133. HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-350-1915 or HLACO@ykwc.net. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MLS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras,

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541-322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-3885634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOT LINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

3114 or charlie.johnson@cancer.org. MEET THE EXPERT: DEFEAT Cancer presents a talk about “What happened to my brain?” “Sexuality, intimacy and body image,” “Life issues” and “Healthy steps for cancer”; RSVP requested; free; 6 p.m. Tuesday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-7743 or rndeleone@ cascadehealthcare.org. NO BOUNDARIES PROGRAMS: Train to run or walk a 5K race for the first time; $75; 8:30 a.m. Saturdays, April 3 through May 29; Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-389-1601 or www.fleetfeetbend.com/5k. VOLUNTEER TRAINING: Train to participate in the Redmond-Sisters Hospice and Transitions programs; registration required; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. April 6 and 7, 2:30-6 p.m. April 8; Hospice of Redmond-Sisters, 732 S.W. 23rd St., Redmond; 541-5487483, patm@bendbroadband.com or www.redmondhospice.org. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902.

CLASSES BLOOD DRIVE: Appointments required; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday; Redmond-Sisters Hospice, 732 S.W. 23rd St., Redmond; 541-548-7483. GIRLS ON THE RUN: Girls in third through eighth grades train to run in the Heaven Can Wait 5K while learning to celebrate themselves; $150 or less on sliding scale; 3:45-5 p.m. Mondays and 2:15-3:30 p.m. Wednesdays, March 29 through June 7 at High Lakes Elementary School, 2500 N.W. High Lakes Loop, Bend; or 3:45-5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, March 30 through June 3 at Pine Ridge Elementary School, 19840 Hollygrape St., Bend; 541-788-2499, heidi@deschutescountygotr.org or www.deschutescountygotr.org. LOOK GOOD … FEEL BETTER VOLUNTEER TRAINING: Learn to teach beauty and skin-care techniques to women undergoing cancer treatment; for licensed beauty professionals; free; 11 a.m. Monday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-434-

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

sacroilliac pain

herniated disc

s c i a tic a neuropathy arthritis

back pain TRIGGER POINT

failed back surgery

radiculopathy

degenerative disc disease D A I LY H E A D A C H E

neck pain

muscle spasm

• BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Center for Health & Learning; 541-706-6390 or www.cascadehealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LIFTED SPIRITS: 541-388-1133. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MONTHLY CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com.

• MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND HEALING YOGA: Sante Wellness Studio, 541-390-0927 or http://redmondhealingyoga.vpweb .com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STEPPING SENIORS/STEPPING SENIORS TOO: Bend Senior Center; 541-728-0908. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net . • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA FITNESS: Latin rhythms dance-based fitness classes; 541-610-4598.

where fitness gets personal

www.neosforlife.com

Community Education Series

Kidney Disease Update Featuring advances in treatment options; palliative care; and patient and family support

Presenters the medical professionals from Fresenius Dialysis Center of Bend/ Redmond

RSVP | Contact Seating is limited Call Jean at 541-382-5882 to RSVP

Date Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Cost - Free Time 12:00–1:00 pm Lunch provided with reservation

r e fl ex sympathetic dystrophy

spine arthritis So many ways to say pain. Here’s a new way to say PA I N R E L I E F

Bend Spine & Pain Theodore Ford, MD Board Certified Anesthesiologist · Board Certified Pain Specialist · Non-surgical Pain Management

2041 NE Williamson Court, Suite B • Bend www.BendSpineandPain.com • (541) 647-1646

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions Serving Central Oregon 24 Hours Everyday

Experts in Chronic and Terminal Care A nonprofit, mission driven organization for over 30 years.

www.partnersbend.org 541.382.5882 | 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 F3

M Ask yourself, what’s in your lipstick? Some ingredients in cosmetics can cause irritation, so here’s what to watch out for By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — We turn to cosmetics to look our very best, but sometimes all that lathering, slathering, powdering and painting can do more harm than good. Certain ingredients in personal care products can cause redness, itching, swelling, acne and other reactions in people who are sensitive to them. Preservatives, fragrances and dyes are common culprits. Some people are allergic to specific ingredients, but more commonly the problem is irritation, which can happen to anyone. Either way, it’s wise to keep an eye on the ingredients you’re smearing on your skin. “The bottom line is that if you get a rash, you just have to stop using that product, and when you go to the store to buy another lotion, compare the ingredients and make sure they’re not exactly the same,” said Dr. Ella Toombs, a Washington-based dermatologist and former office director for cosmetics and colors at the Food and Drug Administration. “Or go to a dermatologist to see what component might have been causative.” Ingredient lists often look like gobbledygook to consumers, so it takes research and experimentation to identify the offending substance. Christopher Drummond, who developed bad acne during the eight years he worked as a print and catalog model, said it was through trial and error he determined his makeup’s mineral oil was to blame. “Mineral oil does work well to bind the ingredients together, and it feels good, but it’s very pore clogging,” Drummond said. “It’s like putting plastic wrap over your face.” Hoping natural products would be better, Drummond turned to dye- and preservative-free mineral makeup, but found it made his skin itch — which he traced to bismuth oxychloride.

Avoid these Drummond, who last year launched his own organic-based cosmetics line under his name, said navigating the ingredient

“The bottom line is that if you get a rash, you just have to stop using that product, and when you go to the store to buy another lotion, compare the ingredients and make sure they’re not exactly the same.” — Dr. Ella Toombs, dermatologist minefield can be overwhelming, so to simplify, he has made a list of five substances he avoids at all costs. His hit list includes artificial colorants, artificial fragrance, petroleum (such as mineral oil), parabens (a widely used preservative) and phthalates (often found in fragrance to help hold scent). Unfortunately, reading the product label doesn’t always tell you everything that’s inside. While the FDA requires companies to list all intentional ingredients, it doesn’t require them to list byproducts, such as formaldehyde, or the ingredients in fragrance, considered trade secrets. Fragrances can contain dozens of ingredients, many of them irritants, but all that’s listed on the label is the word “fragrance.” Consumers also should be wary of products marketed as “natural,” “organic,” “dermatologist-tested,” or “hypoallergenic,” as the FDA doesn’t have standards for those claims and doesn’t require companies to substantiate them. Even “fragrance-free” doesn’t always mean what it seems: the product may contain fragrance ingredients to mask an unpleasant odor.

Few federal rules While the FDA prohibits the marketing of adulterated or misbranded cosmetics, the agency doesn’t test or approve cosmetics before they go on the market (with the exception of color additives). It’s up to the cosmetics com-

WHAT PARENTS WANT TO KNOW

Pediatrician provides answers about care By Diane Cowen Houston Chronicle

Dr. Jennifer Trachtenberg sees plenty of new parents in her pediatrics practice in New York. They’re usually overwhelmed, unsure of what to do when their child is sick, or just paralyzed by too much information. Determined to provide the basics, she’s written “The Smart Parent’s Guide to Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, Accidents” (Free Press; $16) to help parents navigate the health care system and be an advocate for their children. “New parents don’t have hindsight,” Trachtenberg said. “They want to have all the information, and that’s when they become overwhelmed. They get so terrified they don’t do anything and, sometimes, not making a decision is making a decision.” Trachtenberg’s book is like a printed version of taking a big, deep breath. Here are six things Trachtenberg mentions: DOCTOR VISITS: The 15-20 minutes you get during a visit to the doctor is precious oneon-one time. Arrive with a list of questions so you don’t forget anything and ask them at the beginning of the visit rather than at the end when the doctor may be rushing out to see the next patient. Don’t leave until you understand everything the doctor has told you. COLDS ARE COMMON: Don’t rush to ask for antibiotics every time your child coughs or sneezes. Antibiotics won’t do a thing

for a cold virus, and overuse of this drug can diminish their effect when you really do need them. BPAs: By now, most parents know not to use bottles or containers made with Bisphenol A. Not sure what does and doesn’t have BPAs? Trachtenberg offers this mnemonic device: “5, 4, 1, 2, all the rest are bad for you.” (Look on the bottom of your bottle or container for a triangle with a number in it. Stick with those bearing the numbers 5, 4, 1 or 2.) VACCINATIONS AND AUTISM: Trachtenberg, the mother of a son with autism, urges all parents to follow through on traditional childhood vaccinations. The notion that vaccinations cause or contribute to autism is driven by fear, not science, she says. THE RIGHT ER: Know in advance which hospitals or urgent care centers are equipped to treat children. Trachtenberg cited a National Institutes of Health study that showed 94 percent of ERs don’t have necessary equipment — we’re talking basics such as oxygen masks, intubation tubes, smaller needles and blood pressure cuffs — to treat children. How do you find out? Call them and ask. IN THE HOSPITAL: If your child needs to be hospitalized, be fully engaged in the process. Have a notebook on hand and keep track of everything that happens to your child. Know what each day’s health goals are and who’s in charge of your child’s care.

Ingredients to watch for in cosmetics Dr. Ella Toombs, a Washingtonbased dermatologist, offered a list of some ingredients that can be problematic. Quaternium-15 (a formaldehydereleasing preservative) Fragrance Hair dyes • p-phenylenediamine; toluene-2; 5-diamine; p-aminophenol • Lanolin (a lubricant) • Cocamidopropyl betaine (found in some bath preparations) Eye makeup • Parabens (methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben); nickel; cobalt; chromate Facial makeup: • D&C red, 19, 31, 36 Eye cream, lipstick: • D&C yellow 11 Nail polish: • Tosylamide formaldehyde resin (sometimes causes eyelid rashes when people scratch their face)

panies themselves to make sure their products and the ingredients in them are safe. To that end, the Cosmetic Ingredient Review, an independent panel of experts funded by the industry trade group Personal Care Products Council, reviews some 250 ingredients each year to determine their safety. If the panel finds an ingredient causes irritant or allergic reactions, it recommends a limit on the concentration that’s considered safe and disseminates the information to manufacturers, said CIR director Alan Andersen.

Known irritants Common ingredients that are known irritants include sodium lauryl sulfate, used to produce the lather in soaps and shampoos, and quaternium-15, a preservative that releases formaldehyde and can cause allergic reactions, Andersen said. The CIR has set concentration limits on both. A chemical found in most hair dyes called paraphenylenediamine (or p-phenylenediamine, or PPD), is another common allergen. It can be particularly dangerous when used in dark henna

Immunization rates in Central Oregon Immunization rates in Central Oregon Percentage of 2-year-olds with all recommended immunizations Deschutes Crook Jefferson Statewide County County County 100% 80% 60%

73 54

51

75 69 51

73 71

72

55

51

81

78

74

74 76

79

74

68

54

40% 20% 0 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Note: The jump in rates in 2007 can be attributed in large part to better data reporting by some local pediatric clinics.

LEARN MORE

Source: Oregon Immunization Program

www.cosmeticsinfo.org • Search ingredients at this site sponsored by the trade group Personal Care Products Council. www.cosmeticsdatabase.com • The nonprofit Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep database evaluates the safety of thousands of products and ingredients.

tattoos, as extended exposure to the skin can cause scarring, Andersen said. Some health advocates worry that, in addition to causing irritant or allergic reactions, certain ingredients may be harmful long term. The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, a coalition of nonprofits including the Breast Cancer Fund and the Environmental Working Group, has fingered parabens, which mimic estrogen and have been found in breast cancer tumors, and phthalates, which are linked to male reproductive problems, as particularly worrisome. The FDA says the levels of lead, parabens and phthalates found in cosmetics are so low they wouldn’t pose a risk, but activists worry about the cumulative effect of using multiple products. “We’re concerned about the repeated chronic exposure to these chemicals,” said Stacy Malkan, co-founder of the campaign and author of “Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry.” Malkan’s best advice to consumers: “Simplify. Choose products with fewer ingredients, and choose fewer products overall.”

Nursing a baby may lower risk of obesity By Shari Roan Los Angeles Times

Newborn mice who receive their mother’s milk experience a biological process that boosts their metabolism, possibly lowering the risk of obesity and diabetes in adulthood, according to a new study. Breast-feeding confers several protective benefits in human babies. Some research suggests, for example, that breast-fed babies have a lower risk of obesity and diabetes later in life. The new study sheds light on a littleknown process that takes place just after birth in mice. Researchers in Spain found that suckling the mother’s milk prompts the newborn’s liver to produce a molecule that then turns on heat-generating brown fat. That process helps the baby’s body adapt to a lower environmental temperature than it experienced inside the mother’s womb. The protein that is released in response to suckling, called FGF21, also appears to be important in regulating metabolism. In the study, researchers injected the protein into fasting newborn mice and found that the treatment prompted heat generation within brown fat and boosted body temperature. These brown fat cells burned more energy and glucose. Recent studies in humans have found that greater activity

VITAL STATS

Thinkstock

Breast-feeding may help boost metabolism in newborns, a new study shows. in brown fat appears to protect against obesity. “There are many evidences that alterations of dietary, genetic, environmental, or other origin in the metabolic performance during the fetal and early neonatal life can make an individual prone to develop diabetes and obesity in adulthood,” the lead author of the study, Francesc Villarroya, of the University of Barcelona, said in a news release. “It will be important to know whether any disturbance in this naturally occurring event (the burst of FGF21) may have negative consequences in adulthood.” Researchers still don’t know yet if this process observed in mice is similar in human newborns. The study is published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Robyn Rosenfield has been named the pharmacy technician of the month by Professional Compounding Centers of America. Rosenfield works at Redmond Pharmacy & Compounding Center. Chris Cooper of Therapeutic Associates at the Athletic Chris Cooper Jody Vance Club of Bend has completed level two fitness professional training at the Titleist Performance Institute. The training certified Cooper as a level two golf fitness instructor. He specializes in treating and training golfers. Jody Vance has joined the staff of Rebound Physical Therapy in Redmond. Vance is a licensed acupuncturist specializing in orthopedic acupuncture and sports-related injuries and trauma.

When it comes to sleep, few of us get enough By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz Chicago Tribune

Sleep deprivation, it turns out, is colorblind. The National Sleep Foundation, a Washington-based nonprofit that promotes sleep health, released its annual “Sleep in America” poll this month. The poll of 1,000 Americans ages 25 to 60, who were asked to identify as white, black, Hispanic or Asian, was meant to examine how cultural differences push the physiological boundaries. NSF Board Chairman Thomas Balkin cited one overarching similarity among the ethnic groups: A fifth to a quarter of the respondents across the board said they missed work or family functions, or went without sex, because they were too sleepy. “This reflects the power and influence of the larger U.S. culture,” said Balkin, chief of the department of behavioral biology at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. “Regardless of ethnic backgrounds, we’re not getting enough sleep.”

Survey says ... Some of the poll’s findings: Kept awake by financial, employment, personal relationship or health concerns Blacks: 33% Hispanics: 38% Whites: 28% Asians: 25% Rarely or never have a good night’s sleep Blacks: 15% Hispanics: 14% Whites: 20% Asians: 9% Use sleep medication at least a few nights a week Blacks: 9% Hispanics: 8% Whites: 13% Asians: 5%

www.OasisSpaofBend.com


F4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week Google now provides bike routes.

Strength-training exercises to try

EXERCISE TIPS

Avery Cloninger, 11, with trainer Ruth Ann Clarke, demonstrates a few good strength training exercises for kids. The demonstrations were done at WRP Training Studio in Bend. Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

PROPER TECHNIQUE:

Bent row

1

RING-TO-RING AGILITY

SQUATS

PUSH-UPS

Cloninger boosts his agility and strengthens his legs hopping from ring to ring.

Cloninger strengthens his back, legs and shoulders with squats. He holds a medicine ball but anything heavy, even a can of soup, will work.

Push-ups work the upper body and core. Cloninger demonstrates how to do it, keeping the body straight.

Strength

issues. “What we’re seeing and what I’ve been seeing is there isn’t a lot of physical activity” in schools or at home. Even for children who are active, strength training can have benefits, proponents say. Engaging in weight-bearing physical activity — which encompasses strength training as well as a variety of activities in which the body must support its own weight — strengthens bones. “It’s particularly important for young girls,” said Faigenbaum, “because of their later risk for osteoporosis.”

Continued from F1 Strength training, also called resistance training or weight training, is basically lifting weights. Sometimes the weight is quite literal, a dumbbell or weighted machine; other times the weight can be a person’s body weight or something that is being pulled. Most people do strength training to build muscle. Though children have long engaged in some forms of resistance training — think push-ups or a game of tug of war — it had until recently been relegated to a small corner of kids’ fitness. Aerobic exercise was thought to be the most important form of exercise for kids. But with the recognition that strength training can be beneficial and that not all children like aerobic activity, the exercise is becoming more popular. Local personal trainers as well as gyms nationally report an increase in the number of kids they see, often coming in to use weights. With more kids participating, the question has arisen about whether using weights is an effective mode of exercise for children. The answer, said Faigenbaum, is an unequivocal yes. “There have been volumes of data over the last few years, and it’s just compelling,” he said. “Not only is strength training safe but it offers observable health and fitness value.”

Benefits for kids Children can realize many of the same benefits of strength training that adults do: stronger muscles, less fat and more resilient bones. A recent study from researchers in Australia, published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, found that kids who were overweight significantly reduced their body fat percentage after an eight-week training program. Resistance training is “proven to help regulate and change body composition,” said Monica McClain-Smith, fitness coordinator at Juniper in Bend. Body composition, she said, is one of the primary measures of fitness. Strength training can be especially helpful for children who are overweight or obese. In their paper, the Australian researchers pointed out that many of these children do not enjoy aerobic exercise, and weight training may be a way to promote physical activity in this group. Indeed, in Bend, Elizabeth Goodheart, a personal trainer at Rebound Sports Performance, said most of her young clients come in to help deal with weight

Supervision and other precautions Though there are measurable benefits, those who work with children stress the need for some precautions. Children cannot be treated as mini-adults. The biggest change is the way many of the workouts are conducted. “With youths, the motivation is so much different,” said Goodheart. “They don’t necessarily want to lose weight and have a healthier lifestyle. It’s more about the fun factor.” Trainers said in workouts they stress the social aspect of exercise to try to keep kids engaged. For Ruth Ann Clarke, a personal trainer at WRP Training Studio in Bend who used to run a strength training program at Skyview Middle School, that meant turning training into a game. There, she said she would do “little contests to see who could do the most sit-ups and push-ups. They loved that.” She said it was important to keep the workouts fun and lively, interspersing games in with the more tedious exercises such as lifting weights. “Their attention spans aren’t quite as big as adults.” As with adults, children need to be taught the proper form for individual exercises. Kids may have a little bit harder time doing exercises correctly, said Shannah Werner, a personal trainer at Peak Training, because they don’t have the same coordination and awareness of their body’s movements that adults do. “You just really have to watch their form a little more.” The need for constant supervision is another big difference in training for kids. Even older children need to have an adult close by when they engage in strength training. The boys in particular, said Clarke, “had a tendency to overdo it. They would see their dad or someone else do these big squats or overhead presses” and want to emulate it. “You had to keep your eye on them all the time because the minute you turn around, they will go and try

2

Morri Stewart, a trainer at the Athletic Club of Bend and Energize Fitness, demonstrates the correct way to perform some of the classic strengthening exercises. Doing these with the proper form helps prevent injury and provide the maximum benefit. This exercise can be done individually or you can try all nine, which are running every other week in The Bulletin from Feb. 11 to June 3. The bent row strengthens the muscles across the back.

Keep burning calories throughout the day By Vicky Hallett The Washington Post

TRICEPS DIPS Cloninger uses a bench for tri-cep dips, which work the upper body. Clarke said to make sure elbows do not drop below the shoulders during this move.

to grab that big weight.” Kids are most often getting hurt in the weight room by picking up a weight that is too heavy and dropping the weights on their fingers or toes, said Faigenbaum. Accidents, not overuse problems such as pulled muscles, are the most common injuries, he said. The potential for injury, Faigenbaum said, is why the recent guidelines he helped put together emphasize that youth strength training programs must be supervised. “I do not support strength training at home without supervision,” he said. “You need to take sensible precautions.”

SIT-UPS

Lifelong habits As with other types of activity, developing good habits that kids can carry into adulthood is key. With childhood obesity rates at unprecedented levels, any exercise that a child enjoys is good exercise, many say. “What we’re really trying to do is spark a lifelong interest in physical activity,” said Faigenbaum. He said studies show that kids who weight train are more likely to do other forms of physical activity. McClain-Smith said that in recognition of the benefits of strength training for kids, Juniper started Teen Time, a time when adolescents ages 12 to 15 are allowed in the gym and a trainer is stationed to help them. (Teens ages 16 and older are always allowed in the gym.) The younger teens have to take an orientation where trainers emphasize the proper use of equipment and how to train for your strength, said McClainSmith. “We teach them about the components of fitness, so they understand it’s not just about muscle strength.” Werner said her aim when she did training for kids was to make sure they wanted to come back. “You make it more play than you

Cloninger works his abs, keeping his feet directly under his knees during each sit-up, using an agility ball for core stability.

do formal strength training,” she said. “If you make it fun, they are much more likely to enjoy it.” Faigenbaum said that developing a love for exercise should be the primary goal of any program. “When you put it in that perspective, you become less interested in loading up the barbell and more interested in creating a fun, positive experience for kids.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or at bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

The formula everyone always hears about weight loss is “calories in, calories out” — burn more calories than the number you consume, and you’ll slim down. That’s why you’ll see folks carefully scrutinizing the digital displays of their elliptical machines to determine exactly how much they’ve accomplished over the past hour. But for a better figure, you should be thinking about another figure: How many calories are you burning after you hit the showers? Tanya Colucci, the wellness director at Mint Fitness in Washington, has a way to keep torching through calories even the next day. “Get your muscular system to do as much as possible in a short period of time,” says Colucci, who also is president of the Infinity Wellness Foundation, which is dedicated to fighting childhood obesity. The method, called Metabolic Density Training (MDT), takes two forms. You can pick a couple of exercises — say, deadlifts and stability ball push-ups — and perform each for a minute, constantly switching back and forth with minimal rest for as long as you can manage. Or, you can string together a series of total-body exercises that require explosive power in addition to strength. (For example, a single-arm dumbbell split snatch: Start in a squat holding the weight down in one hand, then jump into a lunge while lifting the weight above your head.) With those, you

The Gazette

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Well, hello hips. Nice to meet you. You think you know these vital parts of your body fairly well. You take them to yoga class, you take them for walks, you talk pretty to them. But one Zumba class later and you realize something’s been missing. A good wiggle here. A shake and a bump there. Zumba what? Zumba is an aerobic fitness

class with bumping beats and mostly Latin dance steps. Not only will you get a workout, but if you’re dying to dance and there’s no dance club around, this is the next best thing. “Zumba is, for me, a feel-it-tothe-core best Latin dance party,” said Dorie Wexler, owner of Springs Salsa and Dance Fitness Studios and amazingly fluid hips. There are several reasons Zumba appeals to people, Wexler said. It could be the festive music

with beats that make your body naturally want to move. It could be the freedom to not have to do the exact pattern on the Reebok step. You can make it up as you go if your feet aren’t doing exactly the same thing as the teacher’s. “I love to dance. And if I can find an aerobic way to exercise through dance, I do it,” said student Jerianne Heimendinger, before taking her third class Friday. Oh, and the key to moving those hips? Bend the knees.

go for a certain number of reps rather than time, and once you get through the grueling routine, you do it again and again. This structure may sound similar to circuit training, but the difference with MDT is the intensity. Instead of using moderate weights and getting an aerobic effect, you’re relying on heavy weights to achieve an anaerobic one. That means you can’t keep it up for nearly as long — 20 to 30 minutes at most — and you’re burning more calories both during the workout and beyond. Every bout of strenuous physical activity creates some sort of afterburn effect. The technical term is excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, or EPOC. “The more intense the exercise is, the longer it takes the body to come down to a resting state,” she explains. Nothing is more intense than MDT, which is why it’s certainly not for everyone. Colucci introduces only her most advanced clients to the technique. “If you hate sprinting all-out, it’s that feeling the majority of the workout,” she says. Given what you can accomplish in such a short period of time, though, Colucci’s found that it’s ideal for people with busy schedules looking to “kick it up a notch” — including her. You can take a look at a sample workout on her Web site (tanyacolucci. wordpress.com/2009/11/12) or find similar routines at Crossfit. com. However you do it, just be sure to end with a cooldown. It’s the calories you want to keep burning for days, not your muscles.

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Well, hello hips. Ready to Zumba? By Jen Mulson

How to do it: Stand with feet hip width apart in a slight squat. Arch your lower back slightly and bring chest forward as if placing it on a tabletop. Holding free weights, dangle arms in front of the body (1). Bring arms up in rowing motion, concentrating on bringing shoulder blades together in the back (2). Think about leading with the elbows and keeping the wrists in line. Go slow to avoid using momentum to assist with the exercise. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 F5

F The ancient art of walking — outdoors By Sam McManis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — In 1951, Ray Bradbury published a short story, “The Pedestrian,” set in a totalitarian world circa 2050, in which no one walks the streets for pleasure or purpose. No one except the story’s titular hero, Mr. Leonard Mead. He strolls the sidewalks in early evening, looking into windows with only “the faintest glimmers of firefly light” — the flicker of primetime television. To be ambulatory in such a milieu draws suspicion and, eventually, the police. “What are you out doing?” the police ask Mead. “Walking.” “Walking where? For what?” “Walking for air. Walking to see.” The man ends up in the “Psychiatric Center for Research on Regressive Tendencies.” This is the stuff of fanciful fiction, Bradbury’s dystopian musings. It could never really happen, right? And yet ... In July, Long Branch, N.J., police answered a call about a suspicious-looking person walking in a suburban neighborhood in a light rain. The man had stopped on the sidewalk to look at a house for sale. The officer, Kristie Buble, asked the aging pedestrian, his curly salt-and-pepper hair partly covered by a hood, his purpose in the neighborhood. “Walking,” the man said. She asked his name. “Bob Dylan.” She asked for identification. He had none. The officer put Dylan, 68, in the back of the squad car and took him back to a nearby hotel parking lot, where the legendary musician’s tour buses were parked, so he could present valid ID. Once Dylan’s character was vouched for, police Sgt. Michael Ahart asked him what in the world he was doing roaming city streets hours before his scheduled concert in a nearby town. “I just felt like going for a walk,” Dylan said.

Confined So maybe we don’t live in a world yet where it’s illegal to walk for pleasure, to wander and wonder without a specific destination or an aerobically correct stride. But it seems that walking — so elemental, so primal — now is seen by some as uncommon, if not unnatural. We rush to work or to the store in cars, and if we notice stray pedestrians as we whiz by, we presume they are walking because their doctor prescribed exercise and they can’t afford a treadmill, or their car broke down and they’re forced to hoof it, or they live just down the street. We also confine nature walking to hikes on well-maintained

trails in bucolic places. As Geoff Nicholson writes in “The Lost Art of Walking” (Riverhead, $24.95, 288 pages), a 2009 book of essays, “Most people who want to walk in nature want to walk in a very specific version of it. ... They want to walk in managed nature, which is probably just as well, since nothing else is currently available to us.” At the risk of going all Thoreau, permit me to share a dismaying recent sight: a line of treadmill walkers at my health club in Davis, looking like so many automatons staring at TV sets mounted on walls, while just outside, nature offered a gorgeous spring day with miles of trails and farmland to walk. Treadmill users, especially women who do not walk in groups, will counter that they feel safer walking indoors. If true, it’s a fact of modern urban life to be mourned. “Just as it demeans life to live alongside a great river you can no longer swim in or drink from, to be crowded into safer areas and hours takes much of the gloss off walking — one sport you shouldn’t have to reserve a time and a court for,” writer Edward Hoagland mused. Walking in midtown Sacramento can be a sensory joy: the aroma of ethnic restaurants, the personal touches on front porches of well-maintained Victorian homes, the cute little boutique you failed to see while driving on J Street. Yes, there’s a flip side: the stench of alleys, dilapidated, empty storefronts, sketchy sidewalk characters. But urban walking advocates such as Anne Geraghty of Walk Sacramento call midtown a jewel awaiting pedestrians and a model for less-walking-friendly suburbs to emulate via “retrofitting.” She sees walking as a social lubricant, a way to connect people who spend too much time hermetically sealed in cars with windows rolled up, air conditioning blowing and radio blasting. “I had a friend once who had been my Realtor years before,” Geraghty recalls. “I had been meaning to visit for years. Every time I’d drive by her house, I’d think of it but keep going. One day, I happened to be walking by her house and I decided, ‘You know, I’m going to go visit her now.’ It was such a treat. And she died (shortly thereafter). I was glad I did that.”

Walking gear The great thing about walking is that you don’t need much to do it, not necessarily even shoes, if you’re game to go barefoot. But here are accessories for the activity, with some frugal and expensive examples.

SHOES Cheap:Any pair of comfortable, well-fitting sneakers Pricey:New Balance 844 Women’s Walking Shoes and New Balance 927 Men’s Walking Shoes ($109.95)

PEDOMETERS/GPS Cheap:Sportline Step and Calorie Monitor ($14.99 at Big 5) Pricey:Garmin Forerunner 205 GPS ($155 at REI)

STICKS Randy Pench / Sacramento Bee

Walking, like along this trail in Sacramento, Calif., gives a chance to look and listen to the things around you while giving your body gentle exercise. communing with nature and, yes, fitness. He says walking helps him “achieve a state of mind that is truly effortless awareness.” To be an effortless walker, though, takes some effort. “If you’re walking to take consciousness to the level of reaching the senses, to fully be present in terms of hearing, seeing, smelling, it does take some practice,” he says. “Our mind likes to dwell on things that aren’t real, such as what am I going to do next week, or dwell on the past. You need to

be wholly present when you’re walking if you want to draw in all the experience.” Many religious rituals include contemplative walking. Taoists practice Baguazhang, walking in circles for enlightenment. Islam has its pilgrimage to Mecca. A Buddhist temple in Oregon holds a yearly “Meditation Marathon” walking relay for 26.2 hours. (Community members take turns circumambulating a labyrinth for 15 minutes.) Christian labyrinths are popular in France. The moralist philosopher Jean

Jacques Rousseau wrote one of his singular works, “Reveries of the Solitary Walker,” a meditation on God, politics and the nature of happiness, on rambles he called “charming periods of contemplation.” But even the godless can find inspiration in a good walk. No less a personage than Friedrich (“God is dead”) Nietzsche famously declared, “All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.” Provided, of course, he wasn’t stopped for questioning by a Swiss constable.

Cheap: A sturdy, yet lightweight, tree branch slightly more than waist high Pricey: Gymstick Health Nordic Walking Poles ($89.95 at Target)

CLOTHES Cheap: A breathable cotton Tshirt from the dresser drawer Pricey: Patagonia Capilene 3 Long-Sleeve Crew T-shirt ($45 at REI)

HYDRATION Cheap: Any water bottle purchased at a convenience store Pricey: CamelBak Rogue Hydration Pack, 70 ounces ($58, REI)

Mindfulness But it’s about more than social connections; it can be a journey of discovery. Mike Garofalo grew up walking the streets of East Los Angeles by necessity — his only means of transportation. But walking grew into a lifelong passion. Now, in retirement near Red Bluff, Garofalo walks daily for meditation,

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F6 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N Dieting

VITAMINS TAKE YOUR VITAMINS: A regular look at the sources and benefits of vitamins and minerals.

Vitamin D Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that has shown great promise in improving health. It is needed for normal absorption of calcium and phosphorus, critical for strong bones and teeth. When exposed to sunlight, the skin creates a compound that the liver and kidneys convert into vitamin D. Yet many people don’t get enough vitamin D from sunlight, either because of the regular use of sunscreens or because they don’t spend enough time outdoors. In most parts of the world, you’d need only 15 minutes of sunlight a day on unprotected faces and arms to manufacture enough vitamin D. People who live north of the line drawn between San Francisco and Philadelphia need to spend more time in sunlight, particularly in winter months. Many people remain deficient, despite fortification of dairy and grains with vitamin D. There are few good sources of vitamin D in unfortified foods. In extreme cases, lack of vitamin D can weaken bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Over time, low vitamin D levels — which affects one in four people worldwide — can lead to loss of bone mass and osteoporosis later in life. Studies suggest vitamin D may have a significant impact on health. Researchers believe that multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and even cold and flu prevalence might be in some way linked to low vitamin D levels. A recent study found that people who take vitamin D supplements between 400 and 800 international units per day had a 7 percent lower rate of death from any cause. The current recommended daily allowance of vitamin D is set at 200 IU from birth to age 50, and 400 IU for older adults. But many clinicians believe a dose of 1,000 IU is optimal for adults and 400 IU for children. The upper safe limit has been set at 2,000 IU. Vitamin D toxicity can occur with higher levels of intake. Daily recommended amount: Children (0-18): 200 IU Adults (ages 19-50): 200 IU Adults (older than 50): 400 IU Good sources: Salmon (cooked, 3 oz.): 320 IU Sardines (canned in oil, 3 oz.): 240 IU Milk (fortified, 1 cup): 100 IU

Thinkstock

Orange juice (fortified, 1 cup): 100 IU Egg yolk (cooked, 1 large): 25 IU Sources: National Institutes of Health, University of Florida, Harvard University, Linus Pauling Institute.

— Markian Hawryulk, The Bulletin

WHAT’S WHAT WITH PISTACHIOS?

Continued from F1 • Set some parameters. Mauti recommends having a frank discussion about what your partner is willing to do. Perhaps it’s as simple as getting the tempting foods out of the house or agreeing to eliminate one sort of dietary vice. “So getting to some sort of an agreement,” Mauti said. “I’m not willing to do this, but let’s not have soda in the house, or we’ll no longer keep candy dishes around. It’s having that discussion within a family. Where are there lines that can be drawn to support someone trying to make changes.” • Guard the gate. In most households, there’s a single person who usually buys the food and does the cooking. The decisions that gatekeeper makes, therefore, have ramifications for the entire household. “I can tell you, when my mother-in-law goes on a diet, my father-in-law loses weight,” Thayer said. By not bringing unhealthy foods into the house, the gatekeeper can easily upgrade the diets of the entire family. “It’s another step for you to have to get in the car and go someplace and purchase it,” she said. • Have a family meal. You’d be surprised how much better your diet will be simply by making this one simple choice. Studies show that families who sit down to eat together tend to have healthier meals than when everybody fends for themselves. “That’s something that can be done easily, especially if you have kids in the house,”

Los Angeles Times

Thinkstock

They’re small but full of benefits McClatchy-Tribune News Service

As antioxidant-saturated nuts go, pistachios don’t usually enjoy the acclaim of walnuts or almonds. But they get their day in this week’s quiz.

1.

An ounce of pistachios contains 13 grams of fat. How much of that is the so-called good fat that lowers LDL cholesterol? a) 6 grams b) 11 grams c) 13 grams

2.

A small study by researchers at the University of Texas’ M.D. Anderson Cancer Center showed which vitamin present in pistachios can help to reduce lung cancer? a) Vitamin B12 b) Vitamin B6 c) Vitamin E

3.

An ounce of pistachios provides 20 percent of the daily value of vitamin B6. What ma-

Mauti said. “You’re not even talking about the types of food, you’re not nagging. You’re saying, ‘This is something that’s important.’” • Hide your snack foods. “If for some reason you feel like you have to have some sort of snack food or something in the house, it really seems to help if you hide it,” Thayer said. Put it in the back of the cupboard behind the cereal boxes or bury it deep in the freezer. “It seems very silly, people say, ‘I know it’s there,’” she said. “But really, we’re very visual. And if you don’t see it, you might not think to grab for it.” • Find alternative activities. “Often our hobbies and traditions or rituals are all around food,” Mauti said. That could mean passing up movie night with popcorn and soda for a night of dancing, or going for a bike ride instead of out for pizza

and beer. “It’s not saying I want to restrict your food intake, but more of what can we include that’s healthy, that we can both do and not being about food,” she said. • Make healthy choices easy. Leave bowls of pre-washed fruit, such as grapes or cherries, on the kitchen counter. Cut celery and carrot sticks to make healthy snacking easy. Make a batch of unsalted, unbuttered popcorn. Offer to cook a healthy dinner from scratch. • Make small changes. “What is see in general is people are the most successful when they start to have this inner motivation to make a change and they start to slowly make changes,” Mauti said. “It’s not really rigid.” Individuals who take a small step, say replacing sugary soda with water, and lose a little bit of weight are encouraged by the

“Long term, they’re thinking I want to be healthier and at the end of the year, I want to weigh less.” — Frankie Mauti, registered dietitian at St. Charles Bend results and motivated to do more. Maybe the next step is eating more fruits and vegetables. “So there is this onward progress and it’s flexible and big picture,” she said. “Long term, they’re thinking I want to be healthier and at the end of the year, I want to weigh less.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

Children’s snacking packs a punch, study finds By Melissa Healy

By Sam McManis

Illustration by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

jor benefit does B6 have for the body? a) Helps make amino acids that build body cells b) Protects the body from harmful effects of toxins c) Helps maintain the health of skin and mucus linings

4.

A small study by Penn State researchers shows that pistachio consumption can reduce body inflammation, a major factor for which condition? a) Kidney failure b) Cardiovascular disease c) Shingles

5.

In spring 2009, how many pounds of pistachios were recalled for suspected salmonella poisoning? a) 100,000 b) 1 million c) 5 million

LOS ANGELES — When American kids reflect upon their childhoods decades from now, snacks may figure more prominently in their memories — and around their waists — than meals shared around a table. From 1977 to 2006, American children have added 168 snack calories per day to their diets, a study finds. They’re munching cookies after school, granola bars on the way to piano lessons, chips after an hour of soccer practice and peanut butter and crackers while waiting for dinner. For some, those extra 1,176 calories a week could amount to as much as 13½ pounds of body fat a year. Those non-meal noshes now account for more than a quarter of their average daily caloric intake, said Barry Popkin of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, author of the study published Tuesday in the journal Health Affairs. The research establishes just how much the omnipresence of snacks — and the $68 billion-a-year industry that sells them — has contributed significantly to an epidemic of excess weight among U.S. children. But even as public health officials remove sodas and fatand salt-laden snacks from school vending machines, parents hoping to roll back the tide of snacking face some daunting challenges, including a food industry dedicated to satisfying the nation’s voracious between-meal appetite with snack wraps, burger bites and miniature candy bars marketed as midafternoon pick-me-ups. Dr. Judy Palfrey, president of the American Academy of

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

ANSWERS: 1: b (7 grams monunsaturated, 4 grams polyunsaturated); 2: c; 3: a; 4: b; 5: b Sources: www.usda.gov; www.thegreennut.org; www.calorielab.com.

Every Friday

Pediatrics, said the study’s findings pointed to one of many factors that had pushed the nation’s rate of child obesity to 16.4 percent in 2007 — an increase of roughly 10 percent since 2003 alone. “We see milk intake and meal intake are going down; the consumption of fatty and salty foods is going up. Everybody is very busy, on the go all the time, not having three meals at home,” Palfrey said. American families need to “think about healthier replacements” for between-meals food, she says, and they need to hear those messages from their children’s physicians. “Remember the days when we used to get quartered oranges? Bring those back!” Palfrey added. In 1977, just under 75 percent of kids between 2 and 18 consumed at least one snack between meals, according to the new study, which tallied the responses of 31,337 children and adolescents to four federally funded food surveys. In 2006, the proportion of kids who snack reached 98 percent.

That surge in snacking has pushed kids’ overall intake of daily calories to an average of 2,099 a day — up by 100 calories a day since 1977, the survey reports. By 2006, 27.3 percent of the total calories — just under 600 calories a day — came in the form of snacks, the North Carolina research team found. Meanwhile, calories consumed at mealtimes have begun to slide slightly since the last food survey was conducted in 1994. The result: U.S. children are consuming more fatty, sugary and salty foods and less of the dairy, protein and produce that predominate at mealtime. Sweet snacks such as cookies, cereal bars and cakes continue to supply the largest share of snacking calories, but the number of calories consumed in salty snacks such as popcorn, crack-

ers and chips more than doubled from 1977 to 2006, the study found. Study co-author Carmen Piernas, a researcher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said very active kids could burn snack calories through growth and physical activity, but children who are inactive, whose growth has slowed or whose diet is otherwise high in fat, will pack more of those calories not as muscle but as fat. The snacking habit starts early, she added: Children ages 2 to 6 had the highest rate of snacking of all the groups surveyed.

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BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. CHAIRS, WICKER, 2 large, & sidetable, $100;Tires, 4, $200, LT275/70R18, 541-923-6487

H & K USP .45 2 mags & box $650; HP Universal Tactical Feral Cats make great rodent Papillon-poodle mix pups. Will The Bulletin light $125 541-948-5018 control! Contact the Bend Crypt, Inside double com208 be under 10 lbs., low shed. recommends extra caution Spay & Neuter Project for panion, # 46604B in DesLike New Remington 870 Pets and Supplies Sweet and healthy $275. 541 when purchasing products more info. All cats are alchutes Memorial Park, best Express Magnum with 350-1684 or services from out of the tered and vaccinated. Availoffer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis ventilated rib, shoots 3 in. or area. Sending cash, checks, able on a donation basis. The Bulletin recommends 2 & 3/4 inch shells $235. FIND IT! or credit information may Help us give them a second extra caution when 541-447-1039. DO YOU HAVE be subjected to F R A U D . BUY IT! chance. 541-617-1010 purchasing products or SOMETHING TO SELL For more information about SELL IT! TC Contender 45 Colt, with acservices from out of the FOR $500 OR LESS? Free Cat, Black, indoor/outdoor, an advertiser, you may call The Bulletin Classifieds cessories, $500, call area. Sending cash, checks, 5-6 yrs., spayed female, lovthe Oregon State Attorney 541-548-8478 or credit information may Non-commercial ing, playful, 541-610-9872. General’s Office Consumer Pomeranian Pups, (3), CKC be subjected to fraud. For advertisers can Wanted: Party of Hunters Protection hotline at reg., 2 reds, 1 black, $250 more information about an French Bulldog Pups, pureplace an ad for our to lease 9200 acres near 1-877-877-9392. ea., call 541-923-3999. advertiser, you may call the bred, reg., dame and sire on Long Creek, OR. Deer and/or Oregon State Attorney site, born Valentines week"Quick Cash Special" POODLES, AKC Toy Elk. 541-676-5235, leave General’s Office Consumer end, ready to go to new 1 week 3 lines or mini. Joyfull tail waggers! message. Protection hotline at home April 10th, call to make $10 bucks Affordable. 541-475-3889. 1-877-877-9392. appnt. to visit. 541-771-0981 or W A N T E D : Winchester Wanted washers and dryers, ask for Rob. 2 weeks $16 bucks! Pug/Cocker Spaniel Hybrid Model 94 Saddle carbine, working or not, cash paid, Pup, male, 4 mo., 9 lbs., very 25-35, will consider 30-30. 541- 280-6786. Ad must cute & playful, needs last 541-576-2352 include price of item shot, chocolate, brown & 212 Adoptions - Rescues: Do you 255 black, crate trained, needs Antiques & have an Aviary Bird that no www.bendbulletin.com fun, caring home, comes Computers one wants to take care of or w/crate, bed toys, etc., $350, Collectibles anymore? Or you’re working Call Classifieds at 541-815-4236. THE BULLETIN requires comtoo many hours? Or they are Golden Retriever AKC female 385-5809 puter advertisers with mulPugs, AKC, show/pet, 2 fawn Furniture pups for sale $600 each. just too demanding? I will tiple ad schedules or those call for information females, dbl. coated, large adopt your small or large selling multiple systems/ LG ENV Touch with charger 541-460-2411 bone, beauties, shots, ready FREE birds for my private software, to disclose the and manual. Asking $100. Easter, details & viewing, hobby aviary, feather pickers, name of the business or the 541-280-0463. $800-$1200, 541-536-9495. loud & noisy, or just plain Golden Retriever Pups exc. term "dealer" in their ads. quality, parents OFA, good mean, all are welcome. I Minolta 5.0, Dimage Z5 Digital Private party advertisers are Visit our HUGE home decor hips, $650. 541-318-3396. Shihtzu male $450 12 weeks guarantee they will have a Camera w/acces. in original defined as those who sell one consignment store. and Chihuahua male good home. 541-410-9473. Heeler Pups, $150 ea. box. $140. 541-388-0868 computer. New items arrive daily! $350. 541-728-4367. 541-280-1537 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com/ The Bulletin reserves the right 257 Shih Tzu/Maltese Cross pups 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 to publish all ads from The and older dogs, males and www.redeuxbend.com Musical Instruments Bulletin newspaper onto The females avail. 541-874-2901 Bulletin Internet website. charley2901@gmail.com 215 Just in time for Easter, fluffy Coins & Stamps 210 AKC BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG bunnies for your kid’s basket, puppies Socialized, healthy, variety colors $10 each. Furniture & Appliances WANTED TO BUY happy, good markings, great 541-923-7501. TIMBER WANTED 1910 Steinway Model A US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & personalities. $1500 e-mail #1 Appliances • Dryers Warm Springs Parlor Grand Piano burled Currency collect, accum. Pre • Washers trinityfarms@bendtel.net for KITTENS! Cat Rescue, AdopForest Products mahogany, fully restored in & tion & Foster Team has baby 1964 silver coins, bars, infomation and application. Call Dean Rowley out, $46,000 incl. profeskittens available starting this rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold 503-260-5172 sional West Coast delivery. Check out the week! In foster homes, so coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & 541-408-7953. classifieds online contact 317-3931 for info. dental gold. Diamonds, Wall Pocket Baskets, (2) Vin$75 adoption fee covers Rolex & vintage watches. No Keyboard, Casio, $125 OBO, tage Native American, very www.bendbulletin.com spay/neuter, vaccinations & collection to large or small. unusual $88. 541-390-5986. seen by appointment only, Start at $99 Updated daily booster, deworm, ID chip, Bedrock Rare Coins 549-1658 541-536-9869 FREE DELIVERY! Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi carry box, food, free vet visit Lifetime Warranty audio & studio equip. McIn241 & more. Older kittens & cats 260 Also, Wanted Washers, tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, avail. at CRAFT, $25 fee, Bicycles and Dryers, Working or Not Misc. Items Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, 389-8420, www.craftcats.org Call 541-280-6786 Accessories NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 Bedrock Gold & Silver Lab Puppies. Chocolate, Yellow, Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! BUYING DIAMONDS & Wine Barrel, authentic, used, Black, 6 weeks on 3/25. Sun Recumbent E-Z1, funcA-1 Washers & Dryers Alaskan Husky puppies $400. R O L E X ’ S For Cash European, great shape, $250. $100 Cash only, 1st shots intional use, used 20 hrs., $125 each. Full Warranty. To suitable homes only. Call 541-279-8826 cluded. 541-546-9445. 549-1592 $500, 541-548-8478. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s 541-971-6492 dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Lab Puppies, yellows, AKC, good blood lines, $300 Australian Shepherd, males, $350 females, Appliances, new & recondiASCA (Small Standard) tritioned, guaranteed. Over541-447-1323. colored female -- 11 mos. stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s old, unaltered, UTDs, RaMaytag, 541-385-5418 LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & bies, registered and loblacks, champion filled lines, Couch, Hideabed, queen cally bred. Great with kids, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st new cond. dark cinnamon, loves the dog parks, knows shots, wormed, parents on 78” long $400. 322-0983. basic commands, no site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. AUTOMOTIVE herding instincts! Makes a www.kinnamanranch.com Fridge, Top freezer Kengreat in town dog! Asking more works great, white Labradoodles, Australian price: $300. Home site inBob Thomas Car Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-2911 . . . . . . . . . . www.bobthomas.com $250. 541-322-0983. Imports 541-504-2662 spection required. Will dewww.alpen-ridge.com liver! gowest272004@yaGENERATE SOME excitement in hoo.com or 541-385-9288. Thomas Sales and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-389-3031 . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tsands.com your neigborhood. Plan a gaLabs, AKC, rage sale and don't forget to excellent pedigree, 5 males, advertise in classified! Barn/shop cats free to suitable 2 females 541-536-5385 385-5809. homes. Altered, shots. Will www.welcomelabs.com deliver! 389-8420, leave msg. EMPLOYMENT Lady Gouldian finch pair. ExBostonTerrier AKC puppy otic coloring. With nice cage ready to go home $650 $150. 541 504-9958. Barrett Business Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-6946 . . . . . .www.barrettbusiness.com please call 541-317-3938. Grandpa moved into care Minature Schnauzer born 1/16, facility houseful of furniture BOXER, AKC, puppy, ready to 1st shot, AKC reg. salt/pepand belongings, call for go home dew clew and tail Flex Force Staffing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-749-7931 . . . . . . . . . . . .www.flex-force.com per, black/silvers, $500. prices. 541-382-8399 dock, $499 541-556-8224 541-536-6262,541-610-8836 MATCHING PIECES: full size Miniature Yorkie Puppies, headboard, night stand and $800 each, please call mirror, $50. 541-526-1068. MEDIA 541-693-3293, Chihuahuas, 2 tiny, cute feMattresses good males, shots, 7 weeks, $240 Mini-Australian Shepherd male The Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-1811 . . . . . . . . . www.bendbulletin.com quality used mattresses, cash. 541-678-7599. puppy, beautiful Blue Merle discounted king sets, with blue eyes with full white Chihuahua/Sheltie pups (3), 10 fair prices, sets & singles. collar, born 01/02/2010, weeks, look like mini Collies, For as low as $2.00 per day, your business, phone number, and Web 541-598-4643. $350. 541-433-2112. $150, 541-536-5538 Companion cats free to seniors! Fixed, shots, ID chip, more. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org

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Mini Dachshund Pups, 2 girls $275 ea., 2 boys $250 ea. Prineville. 360-607-0604.

Microwave, GE white, w/carousel, exc. cond. $5. & blender for $5. 541-322-9412.

address can be listed. Call 541-382-1811 to add your business and reach more than 80% of the market 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

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Medical Equipment Wheelchair carrier for a regular hospital chair only, unfolds & tilts $200. 322-0983

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords for as low as $150. Bend Del. Cash, Check, Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Firewood

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

$300 REWARD, black/tan, female Chihuahua THERAPY-DOG. Recent pups No ID. Not used to strangers PLEASE CALL. 541-647-7467, 541- 678-0626 or 541-382-0439

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Lodgepole dry split and delivered $150 a cord. 541-610-6713. Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

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SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 548-3949.

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265 Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Lawn/Garden sprayer, trailer mounted,w/boom, new 15 gal. Fimco, $190, 541-923-1363.

Lost and Found

Building Materials

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The Bulletin Found Baby backpack at trail head, Call to identify. Call Rod at 541-419-9938 Found Cell Phone: 3/20 at 7th & Greenwood, call to identify, 541-771-1553. Found Digital Camera: Fell off Vehicle,Ward Rd, Bend, 3/15, call to ID, 541-548-6636 Found on NE Upas in Redmond Sunday afternoon, 3/21. Set of keys: Toyota. Call to Identify. 541-923-5493

BarkTurfSoil.com

FOUND post box key near Old Mill, please call to identify, 541-318-5732.

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

FOUND Woman's Bike in West Bend. Call to identify 541-318-1271

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178 Stolen: Red Honda CBR 600, w/white rims, from garage in SW Bend, if you have info call 541-350-5448, Reward. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of March 22, 2010

Business Opportunity ALL CASH vending! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 1-888-776-3071.

Employment SLT NEEDS class A team drivers with Hazmat. $2,000 bonus. Split $.68 for all miles. Regional contractor positions available. 1-800-835-9471.

Miscellaneous NEW NORWOOD sawmills. LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mill boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 300N 1-800-661-7746 ext 300N. If you used type 2 diabetes drug, Avandia and suffered a stroke or heart attack? You may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727.


G2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Hay, Grain and Feed

Horses and Equipment

Cheaper Than Feed Store! Premium Orchard Grass Hay, small, square, no rain, weedless, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll store the rest until needed. By ton, 1st cut/$135, 2nd cut/$145. Near Alfalfa Store. 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail kerrydnewell@hotmail.com

Paint Mares, 3-14 year olds, broke to ride, from $750, 541-815-0966. Western Saddles (3): 14” Pot Longhorn, lots of silver, $450; 15” Hereford, $400; 12” Kids, $90, 541-480-6900.

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Caregivers VISITING ANGELS is looking for compassionate and reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. 1 year experience required. Must pass background check and drug test. Apply at Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend.

RE/MAX Agents wanted! New or Experienced! Call 541-350-3419

WANTED Top Producing Sales Executive Central Oregon company seeking a top 10% or better sales professional desiring income in range of $50,000-$100,000 Seeking ambitious, enthusiastic, optimistic self starters to work with like minded individuals. Ideal candidate: min. 5 yrs. sales exp. (HVAC preferred), proven track record, team player mindset, possess strong communication skills & genuine customer service attitude. Full benefit pkg. &. Fax resume: 541-923-7628 sales@coheating.com

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Special Low 0% APR Financing John Deere Rider LX 277 all wheel steering, 48” cut , low hours, new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23 HP Was $13,975

Sale Price $11,975 Financing on approved credit.

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond 325

Hay, Grain and Feed

MacDon 1991 Swather 14’ Cummins Diesel 920 header conditioner, exc. cond. heat, A/C, radio, everything works $16,500. 541-419-2713.

1st Quality Grass Hay, barn stored, no rain , 2 string, $120, $140 & $150 a ton. 541-549-3831 Patterson Ranch Sisters 2ND CUTTING GRASS HAY for sale, no rain & barn stored, small bales $140 a ton. 541-382-0205. 2nd Cutting Grass Hay, small bales, in barn, exc. quality, load any time, $150/ton. Lonepine, 541-480-8673 or 541-548-5747 Alfalfa hay, 2 string, very nice & green, clean, no rain, in barn, 1st & 3rd cuttings, bale or ton, $115/ton & up, 541-408-5463, 541-475-6260 Barn Stored Bluegrass Straw, clean & green, 3X3 mid-size bales, $22/bale, volume discounts available, Madras, call 541-480-8648. Barn Stored Orchard Grass, and grass mix,70 lb. bales, $150/ ton, 3x3 Alfalfa feeder & premium, $100/ton & $125/ ton, Delivery avail. 548-2668.

Nokka grapple loader/trailer. Heavy duty loader and trailer ideal for a variety of lifting and hauling jobs. $15,000 (541) 554-5759

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Excellent grass hay, no rain, barn stored, $160/ton. FREE grapple loading, 2nd cutting avail. Delivery available. 541-382-5626,541-480-3059

HEY!

HAY!

Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard Grass $115 a ton. Madras 541-390-2678.

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Livestock & Equipment Bred Nubian Doe,, please call evenings 541-548-1857 for more information.

Corriente Long Horn Cross Roping Steers 1 year old $300 each 541-420-4379 please leave a message.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Longhorn Bulls and Cows. Young solid color bulls available. Registered Texas Longhorns.www.kbarklonghornranch.com $300. Joel, 541-848-7357

Top Quality Grass Alfalfa Mix Hay, 2 string bales, no rain, barn stored, $115 per ton, Burns, delivery avail., please call 541-589-1070.

Reg. Hampshire Ram, 2 yrs., $300 OBO, Reg. Hampshire Ram Lamb, 3 mos., $200, Club lambs, Suffolk/Hamp, 541-815-6539.

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

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Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Horses and Equipment

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200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

Llamas/Exotic Animals

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Farmers Column

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying serDriftwood Foals Coming vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher by daughters of Whitelightcontrol. 541-419-4516 ning Ike, by Driftwood Ike by Custom Farming: Driftwood. Daughter of Waywawd Ike by Driftwood Ike Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler by Driftwood. Daughter of systems, irripod irrigation Blantonwood, by Drifting systems, call 541-383-0969. Sage by Driftwood. All mares are bred to our 18.75% Drift- Unique Alpaca Apparel. We’re wood Stallion Lucky Speedlocated just outside of Siswood. 541-410-6359 or ters off Hwy 20. Call 541-383-1919 541-385-4989 or visit us at www.flyingaranch.biz www.alpacasofidyllwild.com

Employment

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Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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Domestic & In-Home Positions Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-385-0177

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Employment Opportunities Alcohol & Drug Counselor: Adult/Juvenile. Seeking full time, state Certified, salary DOE, send resume to: Pfeifer & Associates, 23 NW Greenwood Ave. Bend, OR 97701 or fax to 541-383-4935.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

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Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Sales Southwest Bend

Sales Redmond Area

ESTATE SALE REDMONDFriday & Saturday 9AM-4PM. Furniture, Lots of household items, antiques, guns, twin Tempur-pedic adj. massage bed, Precious Moments collection, organ, all items must go. East of Wal-Mart & by-pass off Maple in Ni-La-Sha Village. 1905 NE 6th St. questions call 610-2270

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

GIANT Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat. 7-4, 20040 Badger Rd. Furniture, electronics, sporting goods, tools & more!

Indoor Moving Sale, Fri. & Sat. 9-2, 1655 NW 74th St., antiques, art, nautical, photo, garden, tools & more

Coming Fri. & Sat. April 2nd & 3rd. 8-3, 6315 North Hwy. 97, Terrebonne furniture, household decor & more! DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Estate Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-3, Antique bdrm. furniture, Princess House crystal & much more, 19455 Apache Rd. Deschutes River Woods Bob Randis Estate Sale, Second Installment of the Estate, tons of more boxes unpacked, 8762 SW Shad Road, Crooked River Ranch, Friday & Saturday, March 26th & 27th. NOTE DIFFERENT HOURS 9-4 each day. Hwy. 97 to Lower Bridge Rd. to CRR, north of 43rd. L. on Chinook, L. on Mustang, R. on Shad, 11 miles from Hwy. 1.5 miles past Fire Hall, follow signs! Huge amount of antiques and collectibles, gazebo, vintage farm machinery, old stagecoach, vintage grinders, lots of vintage yard art such as old hand plows, wheels tools washtubs etc. , 100’s of tools of all kinds, router, planer, table saws, vintage forge billows, single person pontoon boat, almost new pellet stove, vintage cabinet, antlers, furniture, patio swing, 1940’s patio table & chairs, boxes of old bottles & jars, lots of old clocks and clock parts, tons of old toys, old train sets-Lionel etc., vintage VAROOM PEDAL CAR X-15 Old Singer hand crank sewing machine, vintage wrought iron bed, old gumball machine, Black Americana items, lawyers book case, spinning wheels, old quilts, kitchenware, doll house & furniture, 100’s of items of vintage & collectible pottery & glassware, linens & much much more. A COLLECTORS PARADISE. NO EARLY SALES PLEASE!

S & S Estate Sales cell 541-419-4961 or 541-549-1839 Eves.

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

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Sales Northeast Bend Estate Sale: Fri. & Sat., 9-4, tools, treadmill, 3 TV’s & stands, recliner, tables, rolltop desk, linnens, clothes, dishes, bed, & freezer, 62045 Cody Rd. Moving Sale, Fri. & Sat. 8-4, 1271 NE Dawson Dr., Unit A, kitchen items, furniture, decor & more!

Rummage Sale, All Must Go! Thursday thru Sunday 9-5, 629 NE Seward, antiques, appliances, and much more!! Yard Sale, Kid’s Items, Ladies, household and Misc. 1052 NE Rambling Ln. #2 Friday 3/26 & Saturday 3/27 8am-3pm 541-848-1518.

Sales Northwest Bend GARAGE SALE: Fri. Sat. and Sun., 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 65360 Gerking Market Road Houshold, furniture, books, etc. Massive amount of household goods, 9:00am to 2:00pm Sat March 27. 233 NW Outlook Vista St. 541-480-7230

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

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Sales Redmond Area Block Sale: Fri.- Sun. 8-4, SW 24th St. between Reindeer & Salmon, incl. moving & estate sales. Garage Sale: Thur.-Sat., 9-6, 7075 NW Westwood Ln., Terrebonne, Army tent, truck canopy and lots more.

SOME OLD, SOME NEW, Antique, too! Come to the 1500 block of NW Spruce Place. Friday only, 8 a.m. .

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Sales Other Areas

CLERK/Gas attendant/Subway RISE, Services Inc. is looking for energetic individuals who Must be 18+ yrs. Full-time wish to provide life and soand Part-time. Apply at: cial skills training to children Riverwoods Country Store, in the greater Bend/Red19745 Baker Rd., Bend. mond area. The DSP position involves taking clients CRUISE THROUGH Classion 1:1 outings to facilitate fied when you're in the community integration, and market for a new or used work through client-specific car. goals. This is a part time position, with possibilities for full time in the summer. Minimum qualifications include having a valid license Driver to operate a motor vehicle, CDL req. w/ dbl. endorsement, ability to pass a criminal must have 1 yr. exp. driving. background check, and a Parked in Madras, evening willingness to complete paid position. Call 541-475-4221. trainings. $9.00/hour EOE Apply online at: Food service www.riseservicesinc.org BROKEN TOP CLUB now Or contact RISE at: hiring seasonal cooks. Apply (503) 371-3001 in person, no phone calls. 62000 Broken Top Drive, RV Sales Bend, OR 97702. Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Salesperson. Industry exp. req. Comp pay General and benefits. Fax resume to DO YOU NEED A 541-330-2496. GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before CAUTION READERS: noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! Ads published in "Employment 385-5809. Opportunities" include employee and independent poVIEW the Classifieds at: sitions. Ads for positions that www.bendbulletin.com require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. Use extra caution when computer skills and cusapplying for jobs online and tomer service req., Quicknever provide personal books a plus. Apt., util. + information to any source salary incl. Fax resume to you may not have researched 541-330-6288. and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online emMedical RCM Position ployment ad from RN with knowledge of out-of-state. MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, We suggest you call the State 541-447-7667. of Oregon Consumer Hotline dns@ochococare.com at 1-503-378-4320 Medical RESPIRATORY THERAPY DEPT. MANAGER - full time for Curry Health District in Gold Beach, OR. Req. exp. in both in-patient & out-patient settings. Oversees day-to-day department operations & clinical activities. Must have previous exp. managing an RT dept; OR RRT or CRT req.. Apply at: www.curryhealthnetwork.org or fax application to: 541-247-3159. Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362 Real Estate Coordinator

Estate Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-4. Household, garden, shop, tiller, mower, Treadle, & Necchi sewing machines, 563 NW Gerke, Prineville. ESTATE SALE Home packed! Furniture of all kinds, beds, dressers, dining, living room, lamps, pictures, décor; over 100 figural teapots & others, cut crystal, china, collectibles of all kinds; vintage linens, quality kitchen & household items; quality ladies clothing; lots of jewelry - costume & fine; amazing holiday collection 100s pcs: Radko, Fitz & Floyd, Dept. 56, Old World Christmas & more; garage packed full, tools; 100s of yard items- benches, ironware, bird feeders & houses, patio furniture. Much, Much More! Fri. & -Sat. 9-4 Numbers at 8 a.m. Friday In Sisters, take N. Locust, becomes Camp Polk Rd., turn on Old Wagon Road to 69707 Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 • 504-1827 pics go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS NEEDED-- we are looking for FFT2's, FFT1's, and ENGB's to work on engine crews. If interested please call 1-877-867-3868

486

Independent Positions CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FINANCING

NEEDED

First Position Loans 2 Newer Bend Homes I Own Free & Clear 2 Points & 9% 3 Year Term Be The Bank Joel 949-584-8902

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

541-617-7825 541-383-0386 SUBWAY MANAGER position. Salaried position with excellent benefits package. Call 541-389-0503 or fax resume to 541-389-9042.

Riverwoods Country Store 19745 Baker Rd., Bend.

Pronghorn seeking part time to full time Real Estate Coordinator to support sales team. Oregon real estate license required. Please email resumes to: kclark@pronghornclub.com

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

507

Real Estate Contracts

Trucking JOHN DAVIS TRUCKING in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: Maintenance Mechanics and CDL Class A Drivers. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For application, please call 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or website www.jdt3d.net

Part-Time Business News Assistant The Bulletin is looking for a resourceful, self-motivated person to work in the newsroom, assisting the business reporting staff. Duties will include data entry, proofreading for Bulletin & Associated Press style and other clerical work. This person should like working in a fast-paced environment and be able to meet tight deadlines. Excellent writing, understanding of grammar, good organization, flexibility and basic computer skills are essential. Attention to detail is necessary. Must enjoy working with the public and understand the importance of accuracy and thoroughness in all duties. College degree or previous related experience preferred. Submit a resume and letter of interest by Friday, March 26th, to Marielle Gallagher at mgallagher@bendbulletin.com, or drop off or mail to The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave., P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

WE

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 636

642

656

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

600

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Studio, 1 bdrm, furnished, fenced backyard, all util. except phone +laundry facilities $500 mo+$250. dep. Pet? 541-508-6118.

Houses for Rent SW Bend

605

65155 97th St., newer 1/1 duplex on 2.5 acres w/ kitchen, 1 garage, mtn. views, $650 incls. util. No pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414

Rentals

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Roommate Wanted Rooms in Nice House, next to park/school, $300/1 room, both for $450, 541-408-7019

630

Rooms for Rent NE Bend, area of 8th & Greenwood, master bdrm. w/ bath, $425. 541-317-1879 Quiet furnished room in Awbrey Heights, no smoking etc.$350+dep 541-388-2710 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES: Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent 1302 NW Knoxville, Westside 2 bdrm. condo, W/S/G paid, woodstove, W/D hookups, deck storage, $575 + $550 dep. Cat okay, 541-389-9595. Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Next to Pilot Butte Park 1989 Zachary Ct. #4 1962 NE Sams Loop #4 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage with opener. $675 mo., $337.50 1st mo., incl. w/s/yard care, no pets. Call Jim or Dolores, 541-389-3761 • 541-408-0260

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with garage. $675 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special

Move In Special, Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Westside Condos, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2/1.5 $545, Clean Units, Great Location, Move In Special, Hud OK, 2007 Timber Ave. The Rental Shop. 541-389-2260 www.rentmebend.com 2553 SW 20th St.- 2/1 duplex, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600 + dep, incl. yard maint., No pets/smoking. 541-382-1015 3/2, Newer 1 Story Duplex, w/big yard, vaults, garage w/opener, all appl., central gas heat, no smoking, pets neg., $725, 541-280-3152. A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Ask Us About Our MARCH IN SPECIAL! 2 bdrm, 1 bath starting at $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, non-smoking units, stg. units, carport, dog run. Approved pets okay. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Ask Us About Our

March in Special! Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval. Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet AVAIL. NOW (2) nice duplexes, quiet neighborhood 2 bdrm., complex, covered parking, 2 bath, 1 car garage, fenced W/D hookups, near St. backyard, fully landscaped, Charles. $550/mo. Call more info call 541-545-1825. 541-385-6928.

#1 Good Deal, 3 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $675+dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615. 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq.ft., near hospital, fenced back yard, large deck, gas heat, A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, $750+dep., 541-280-3570 55+ Hospital District, 2/2, 1 level, attached garage, A/C, gas heat, from $825-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiamgmt.com

Duplex, beautiful 1100 sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, cul-de-dac, newer, clean, vaulted, spacious, W/S paid, $650/mo. 541-815-1643 NEWER 3/2.5 duplex, fenced yard, gas fireplace, nice unit, garage 1108 NE Kayak Loop $750 mo., Vernon Property Management. 541-322-0183. PILOT BUTTE TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, fireplace. Only $710 per month w/ one year lease. Call 541-815-2495 Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS! • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. • Screening fee waived Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from $395. Lots of amenities. Pet friendly, w/s/g paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Move In Special $99 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RE.NTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com Newer Duplex, 2/2 wood floors, granite counters, back deck, garage W/D hookup, quiet st., 2023 NW Elm, $600. 541-815-0688.

NOW RENTING! Fully subsidized 1 and 2 bdrm Units Equal Opportunity Provider Equal Housing Opportunity

Ridgemont Apartments

2210 SW 19th St. Redmond, OR (541) 548-7282

Private secluded studio attached to large shop, W/D, fridge, W/S/G incl, NW Redmond, 3 mi. to High School, $550, pets ok, 541-548-5948

648

Houses for Rent General Rent to own - or not: 1+1 Log cabin, loft & balcony, in the pines, wrap around deck, 1.5 acres, landscaping, garage, $900, 541-617-5787

$850 - Newer, 3/2 full bath, 1300 sq. ft., dbl. garage, on dbl. cul-de-sac, fireplace, avail. 4/1, 19833 Sprig Ct., 541-848-1482, 541-385-9391

On the way to the Mt. Bachelor, near downtown Bend 3/2.5, 2000 sq.ft. open floor plan, dbl. garage 19424 SW Brookside Way. $1200. 408-0086

Real Estate For Sale

700

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Great NW Location! 3 bdrm., 2 bath, garage & driveway short walk to downtown, river & Old Mill, pet? $1000 Avail. 4/1. 503-729-3424 .

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

Fabulous 3/2.5 on corner lot, great neighborhood, near high school,community pool/ park, $1200, 925-978-5304 suzanneverhaeg@hotmail.com Newly Renovated in SW 1100 sq. ft, 2/1, hardwood floors large yard, pet? $600 +dep. Near High School, Refs. req. 541-350-3321.

Real Estate Services

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $179,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $995/mo. + deps. Pets okay. 20561 Dorchester East. 541-410-8273,541-389-6944

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

762

Homes with Acreage

675

RV Parking KEYSTONE

RV

PARK

Downtown, near shopping, 305 E Burnside, 18-40’ spaces, W/S/G/cable, Overnighters OK. 541-382-2335 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

676

Mobile/Mfd. Space Mobile Home lot for rent in Beautiful Prineville! No deposit. Will pay to move your home! Call Bobbie at 541-447-4464.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1680 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Office/Warehouse Space, nice 350 sq. ft. office w/ bath, 1250 sq. ft. warehouse, 14’ overhead door, 63065 Sherman Rd., Bend. 1 block from Empire & Hwy 97. $650/mo. 541-815-9248.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, 900 sq.ft., w/ attached single garage, incl. 693 W/D, newly remodeled bath, Office/Retail Space W/S incl., $725, 1st & last + dep., pet neg., 541-350-2248 for Rent 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Mobile Home with stove & W/D, An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from W/S/G paid, $250 per month, including $565/mo.+$250 sec. dep. utilities. 541-317-8717 Pets okay. 541-382-8244

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. newer carpet & paint, woodstove, garage fenced yard on .92 acre lot $795 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803.

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD

FAMILY GETAWAY! Lots of space, 9+ acres, will accommodate up to 12 ppl. Close to Sisters, private location. Only $485,000! Bachelor Realty, 389-5516

Please check your ad on the 763 first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes inRecreational Homes structions over the phone are and Property misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please $70,000: 2 Bdrm. recreational cabin, Crescent/Gilcontact us the first day your christ area, older mobile, ad appears and we will be very nice & cozy, elec. & happy to fix it as soon as we wood stove, septic & storage can. Deadlines are: Weekwater system that works days 12:00 noon for next exc., 2.5 acres, close to day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunhunting & fishing, 2 bunk day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. houses, & other outbuildings, If we can assist you, please 541-689-9486. call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** FSBO: $249,000 Furnished 2/2 dbl wide/shop & farm equip. 40 acre lot fenced/gated. Pond, good well. 2 mi. E. of Mitchell, OR. Seller Finance Sharon 541-408-0337 Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Carpet & Vinyl

Quality & affordable, auto body & paint work. Rocky Fair, 541-389-2593 after 4 p.m.

A & R Paintworks

Carpet & Vinyl Installation & Repairs, Carpet binding & area rugs, 30 yrs. exp. in OR, CCB#21841, 541-330-6632, or 541-350-8444.

Barns

Debris Removal

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Cabinetry All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765.. Don 385-4949

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585 Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Hauling Services

Home Improvement Collins Custom Woodworks: Provides honest, reliable service, specializing in carpentry, decks, remodels & furniture, CCB#173168, 541-815-2742.

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Weekly Maintenance

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 13 Yrs. Housekeeping Exp., Refs. Rates To Fit Your Needs. Call Angela Today! 390-5033 or 948-5413.

Kathys House Cleaning, experi enced, refs, reasonable rates. Call 541-389-8315.

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years! FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

10’ Cargo Toy Hauler 2008 w/back door ramp, white, like new cond., Keeps your 4-wheeler dry and clean. $1,750. 541-350-3866.

850

Snowmobiles

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvass enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Yamaha 2007 V-Star 650 Custom. 500+ miles. Always garaged. $3,500. (541)536-7402.

865

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

24' Splash: Like new, gently used by two adults, step in tub/shower, double bed, micro, oven, 4 burner, accessories, awning. $8500 OBO. 541-420-6234.

Fleetwood Terry 2001, 34p slide-out, awning, self contained, less than 100 "on-the-road" miles. NICE! $13,000 OBO. 541-475-3869

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

875 Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. Suzuki 250 2007, garage stored, extra set of new wheels & sand paddles, Polaris $2400; also Predator 90 2006, new paddles & wheels, low hours, $1400; both exc. cond., call 541-771-1972 or 541-410-3658.

C, with slide, sleeps 6, low miles, perfect condition, $45,900, call 541-923-8333.

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Watercraft ATVs

Jamboree Sport 25G 2008, Class

880

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ BHS w/ custom value pkg., 20’ awning, gas grill, tow pkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227

Jayco Quest 2003 Tent Trailer, sleeps 8, furnace, fridge, awning, $3700. Please call 541-604-0586 for more information.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $18,500. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

882

Fifth Wheels Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

(This special package is not available on our website)

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • S p ri n k l e r a c t i v a t i o n & r e p a ir • T h atc h & A erate • S pr ing C l ean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s. Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Remodeling, Carpentry

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-279-8826

Painting, Wall Covering

CLEAN-UP

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates.

Thatch, aerate, weekly maintenance, weeding, fertilizing, sprinkler activation.

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

BIG

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

SPRING

Free Estimates Commercial and Residential

Contact Hal, Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Misc. Items

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Hauling Everything from pine needles to horse manure. Best prices in town. Little Whiskey Farm CCB #68496 • 541-408-2262

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Excavating

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19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

771 PUBLISHER'S 870 NOTICE Expedition 38’ 2005 Lots Boats & Accessories All real estate advertising in Ideal for Snowbirds this newspaper is subject to WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in Very livable, 23K miles, the Fair Housing Act which SE Bend. Super Cascade 16’ FISHER 2005 modified V Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, with center console, sled, 25 makes it illegal to advertise Mountain Views, area of nice incl. W/D, Warranty, HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole hold"any preference, limitation or homes & BLM is nearby too! $99,500, please call ers, mini downriggers, depth discrimination based on race, Only $199,950. Randy 541-815-9573. finder, live well, trailer with color, religion, sex, handicap, Schoning, Broker, John L. spare, fold-away tongue. familial status, marital status Scott, 541-480-3393. $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153. or national origin, or an intention to make any such 775 17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on preference, limitation or dismotor. Only $3700! Call 541Manufactured/ crimination." Familial status 390-1609 or 541-390-1527. includes children under the Mobile Homes age of 18 living with parents 18.5’ Reinell 2003, 4.3L/V6, FLEETWOOD BOUNDER 38L or legal custodians, pregnant Affordable Housing of Oregon 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, war100 hrs., always garaged, women, and people securing *Mobile Home Communities* ranty. Price reduced! NOW beautiful boat, many extras custody of children under 18. Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! $98,000. 541-389-7596 to incl. stereo, depth finder, This newspaper will not Starting at $100 per mo+space two tops, travel cover & knowingly accept any adver- Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker matching bow canvas, tising for real estate which is $13,500 OBO. 541-504-7066 in violation of the law. Our Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, readers are hereby informed Pines Mobile Home Park, new Ford Pinnacle 33’ that all dwellings advertised roof, heat pump, A/C, new 19’ 2002 Custom in this newspaper are avail1981, good condition, carpet, $10,000. Weld, with 162 hrs. on able on an equal opportunity runs great, $5200, call 541-390-3382 inboard Kodiak, Extreme basis. To complain of dis541-390-1833. Jet, with split bucket, crimination call HUD toll-free WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 Hummingbird 967C color at 1-800-877-0246. The toll bath, new carpet, fireplace, Holiday Rambler Neptune gps - 3d sonar & maps, & free telephone number for large backyard, range, W/D, 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, more. $17,500, please call the hearing impaired is fridge, incl., $1000 down, 14K, loaded, garaged, no 541-977-7948. 1-800-927-9275. $175/mo., 541-383-5130. smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Automotive Service

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Redmond Homes

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Houses for Rent SE Bend

Single Story, 3/2.5, over $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 www.owners.com/jpm5553

Houses for Rent Sunriver COZY 2+2, garage, w/ decks & lots of windows, hot tub, wood stove & gas heat, furnished/unfurnished. Near Lodge $1050. 541-617-5787

Boats & RV’s

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, 5724 SW Shad Rd., CRR. $700/mo.+dep. Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, 13879 SW Cinder Dr., CRR. $850/mo.+dep. 541-350-1660,541-504-8545

A

Mountain View Park 1997 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in gated community $179,000. Terry Storlie, Broker John L. Scott Realty. 541-788-7884

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* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. Houses for Rent The Real Estate Services classiRedmond fication is the perfect place to A newer Redmond 4 bdrm., 2 reach prospective B U Y E R S SELLERS of real esbath, 1600 sq. ft., family AND room, mostly fenced, nice tate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809 yard, RV parking, $850. 541-480-3393,541-389-3354

smoking, pet neg., $550 mo.,, plus dep. Refs. req. 541-388-0337,541-389-1728

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Motorhomes

Southeast Bend Homes

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Downtown, 1 bdrm, 1 bath, fenced yard, no

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Boats & Accessories

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Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, W/D incl., $875 mo. w/lease. 14 Timber, please call 541-345-7794,541-654-1127 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., home to rent, call a Bulletin $695/mo. 1st, last. No inClassified Rep. to get the side pets. Mtn. views. new rates and get your ad 503-829-7252, 679-4495 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Cute 2 bdrm, 1 bath house, 650 on corner lot, in quiet neighborhood, great locaHouses for Rent tion, large fenced yard, new NE Bend carpet and paint, central furnace, near schools, 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath, quiet location, housebroken pets okay, W/D hookup, dishwasher, available now, $600 + $600 W/S paid, plenty of storage, dep., please call fenced yard $675/mo. cats 541-280-7910 OK. 541-419-4520. 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, W/D hookups, dbl. garage, very spacious, new, W/S incl., no smoking, avail. now, $750/mo., call Rob, 541-410-4255 3 bdrm., 2 bath, large dbl. garage, large fenced yard, RV or toy parking, near schools, 541-385-1515

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Northeast Bend Homes

Owner, 541-771-2880. hranstad@bendbroadband.com

RODRIGO CHAVEZ LAWN MAINTENANCE Full Service Maintenance 10 Years Experience, 7 Days A Week, 541-408-2688 Gregg’s Gardening & Lawn Maintenance. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

Doug Laude Paint Contracting, Inc., In your neighborhood for 20 Years, interior/exterior, Repaints/new construction, Quality products/ Low VOC paint. Free estimates, CCB#79337,

541-480-8589 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate Steve 977-4826 •CCB#166678 CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com


G4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Canopies and Campers

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 32' 5th wheel, 3/slides many add-on extras. exc. cond. Reduced to $37,500. 541-689-1351.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, mirco., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Antique and Classic Autos

Antique and Classic Autos

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

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Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Host 10.5DS Camper 2005, Tahoe, always stored indoors, loaded, clean, Reduced to $20,900, 541-330-0206.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig., $2500, please call 541-389-8971 for more info.

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Sandpiper Toyhauler 39’ 2004, w/garage, like new, A/C, gen., many extras, $29,500 OBO. 541-536-1361.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

VW Cabriolet 1981,

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Lance Camper 11' 1993, fully self contained, $9,000 OR incl 1993 Ford F250 w/59,850 mi., $14,000. 541-923-2593. email for photos, redbird33bt@yahoo.com

Smolich Auto Mall

Utility Trailers

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Freeway 11’ Overhead Camper, self contained, A/C, reconditioned, $1900 OBO. 541-383-0449

Autos & Transportation

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036 Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Chevy HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8650. 1-907-355-5153.

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Wagon

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

VW Super Beetle 1974,

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Find It in

Reach thousands of readers!

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Ford F-150 2005

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

4X4, FX4 Off Road, new tires, Great Deal! VIN #A60699

Only $18,888

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Pickups Ford Tudor 2 Door Sedan, All Steel, 327 Chevy, T-350 Trans., A/C, Tilt, Cruise, Disc. Brakes. Many Time Show Winner and Great Driver. Displayed at Professional Auto Body, South, 61210 S. Hwy. 97, Bend. $34,900. 541-306-5161, 209-993-6518

Dodge 9000 1972, good

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

rubber, needs trans. seal, $600 firm, 541-382-4313. Dodge Ram 3/4-Ton 2006, 4WD, like new, 16K miles, 5.7 Hemi, goosneck hitch, $23,900, 541-416-0941.

Drastic Price Reduction!

Hood for 1951 Ford Pickup, $100, please call 541-389-0232. Tires, 245/70R16 & 5-hole wheels, take-off, new cond., fits newer Dakota, Durango & 1500 Dodge, $350, 541-382-1853.

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford F1 1951, older restoration. Flathead six 3 spd. stick. Everything is orig. & works. $10,000 OBO. 541-419-1966.

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

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Legal Notices

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additional information from the records of the Court, the Personal Representative, or the lawyers for the Personal Representative, Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP.

LEGAL NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 87 Notice is hereby given that the following vehicle will be sold, for cash to the highest bidder, on 4/1/10. The sale will be held at 10:00 am by Bend Euro Moto at 1064 SE Paiute Way, #1 Bend OR. 2006 Suzuki M/C Plate: M621096 VIN: JS1GW71A562110272 Amount due on lien: $2914.13 Reputed owner(s): Andrew T. Respivo & Mid Oregon FCU

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the matter of the Estate of Keith Redwine, Deceased.

Dated and first published on March 11, 2010.

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Case No 10PB0003ST NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative care of Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP, 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101, Bend Oregon, 97702 within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain

Georgianne Bancroft, Personal Representative 2799 NE Lapoint Ct. Bend, OR 97701 541-389-3387 Attorney for Personal Representative: Patrick J. Widmer, OSB#934966 339 SW Century Dr., Suite 101 Bend, OR 97702 541-318-3330

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91409 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ANESA Z MOYER AND JASON A MOYER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY., as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OR OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC. , DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 12/22/2005, recorded 12/29/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-89536, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR11, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR11 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated April 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FIFTEEN (15), PHASE TWO (2), WESTBROOK MEADOWS P.U.D. PHASE 1 AND 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61261 SOUTHWEST BROOKSIDE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 2 payments at $ 2,126.87 each $ 4,253.74 3 payments at $ 2,174.34 each $ 6,523.02 (11-01-09 through 03-01-10) Late Charges: $ 435.40 Beneficiary Advances: 33.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 11,245.16 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $327,834.35, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 10/01/09 to 1/1/2010, 6.375% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 2, 2010, at the hour of 11:00AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3469395 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010, 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4785 T.S. No.: 1264331-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE FOREGOING INSTRUMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE NOTICE, PURSUANT TO ORS 86.740, THAT THE GRANTOR OF THE TRUST DEED DESCRIBED BELOW HAS DEFAULTED ON ITS OBLIGATIONS TO BENEFICIARY, AND THAT THE BENEFICIARY AND SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST DEED HAVE ELECTED TO SELL THE PROPERTY SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain Trust Deed, Security Agreement, and Assignment of Leases and Rents dated October 4, 2007, and recorded on October 4, 2007, as instrument number 2007-53577, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein ARROWOOD TETHEROW, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Grantor and WEST COAST TITLE COMPANY is the Trustee, and WESTON INVESTMENT CO. LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Tract AE, TETHEROW PHASE 1, filed September 24, 2007, Plat Cabinet H-470, Deschutes County, Oregon. The tax parcel number is: 260623. The undersigned hereby certifies that she has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DENISE J. LUKINS, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Denise J. Lukins, Esq., Successor Trustee, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th Street, Suite 130, Vancouver, WA 98685. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Grantor's failure to pay to Beneficiary, when and in the full amounts due, payments as set forth on the Agreement for Letter of Credit dated and effective September 28, 2007, secured by said Deed of Trust. Grantor has failed to pay Beneficiary payments totaling $3,087,345.00 as of December 17, 2009. The full $3,087,345.00 is now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. Other Default/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure: Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments/ Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real Property are paid current; Permitting liens and encumbrances to attach to the Property, including a deed of trust by Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt, P.C.; a deed of trust by First American Title Insurance Company; and a judgment by Hotel Financial Strategies/ Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all liens and encumbrances against the Real Property have been satisfied and released from the public record. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Tuesday, May 18, 2010, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED December 29, 2009 By: Denise J Lukins, OSB 95339, Successor Trustee, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th St Ste 130, Vancouver WA 98685, Telephone: (360) 576-5322, Facsimile: (360) 576-5342, Email: dlukins@salmoncreeklawoffices.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8480 T.S. No.: 1262273-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1461 T.S. No.: 1234806-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lane Edward Thomas and Linda Kay Thomas, As Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tariq Shureih, as Grantor to First American Title Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Ins, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For SecuRegistration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Mortgageit, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated Januritynational Mortgage Company, A Utah Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated November 22, 2006, ary 31, 2007, recorded February 05, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/ recorded November 30, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-07451 coverat page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-78806 covering the following ing the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot one (1), block three (3), of Valley Ridge Acres, First Addition, Lot ten (10), block forty (40), Oregon water wonderland unit 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. recorded march 18, 1970, in cabinet a, page 365, Deschutes county, Oregon. Commonly known as: Commonly known as: 56820 Gina Lane Bend OR 97707. 17490 Gull Drive Bend Or 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obli- Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligagations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of tions secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent inpay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsestallments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by benquent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced eficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,081.98 by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment Monthly Late Charge $89.92. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obliga$1,945.56 Monthly Late Charge $90.31. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared tions secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the to-wit; The sum of $286,026.38 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from Octofollowing, to-wit; The sum of $258,800.00 together with interest thereon at 8.375% per annum ber 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corpoundersigned trustee will on June 17, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as estabration the undersigned trustee will on June 11, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as lished by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to DesCounty Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at chutes county courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the extrust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired afecution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and ter the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure urther given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the benamount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no deeficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then fault occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligaany other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required tion or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes pluIn construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular ral, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perincludes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any sons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 03, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your February 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to reaffect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the quire you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to eithe date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be ther a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evirental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term dence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before sale is May 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this the date of the sale is May 12, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may conadvance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you tact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Ormay contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for egon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corhttp://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org poration 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western ReconveyCal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA ance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-294484

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott B. Reeves and Leslie A. Reeves Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 05, 2006, recorded October 13, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/ microfilm/reception No. 2006-68698 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3 in subdivision of lots 5 & 6 in block 2 of Lazy River West, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 17412 Darin Ln. Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,507.48 Monthly Late Charge $64.48. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $209,168.65 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from May 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 23, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 24, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-293667 03/04, 03/11, 03/18, 03/25

R-294541 03/04/10, 03/11, 03/18, 03/25

Publication Dates: 03/11/10, 03/18, 03/25, 04/01


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 25, 2010 G5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 933

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LEGAL NOTICE Loan No: xxxxxx1640 T.S. No.: 1248312-09 AMENDED TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE AMENDED TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6335 T.S. No.: 1217881-09.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-92358 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KEVIN T. WILSON AND JOY E. WILSON, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR LOANCITY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 6/7/2006, recorded 6/13/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-40737, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 21, PHEASANT RUN, PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61149 SOUTHWEST LODGEPOLE DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 12, 2010 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2009 4 payments at $2,312.39 each $9,249.56 (12-01-09 through 03-12-10) Late Charges: $346.86 Beneficiary Advances: $237.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,833.42 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, he beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $338,748.33, PLUS interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from 11/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/12/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by ESTELLE FIELD AND KEVIN L. FIELD, WIFE Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tessa M. White and Kevin J. White As Tenants By AND HUSBAND as grantor(s) to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECThe Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN FINANRegistration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Loancity, A California Corporation, as BenefiCIAL CORP., AN OP SUB. OF MLB&T CO., FSB as beneficiary, recorded March 16, 2007 as ciary, dated April 27, 2006, recorded May 02, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in no.2007-15808 in book XX, page XX, in the official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, covbook/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. ering the following-described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: 2006-30396 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, LOT 228 OF RIVER CANYON ESTATES NO.3, to-wit: CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Lot eleven (11), in block twenty-seven (27),bonne home addition, Commonly known as: recorded April 1, 1925, in cabinet a, page 249, 60967 SNOWBERRY PL. BEND OR 97702 Deschutes county, Oregon. There is a default by the grantor(s) or other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which Commonly known as: is secured by said trust deed, or by their successor in interest; The default is: Failure to pay the 1599 NW Fresno Ave., Bend OR 97701. monthly payment due August 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by benefi- Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligaciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly Payment $2,263.88 tions secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Monthly Late Charge $110.00 By reason of said default, the beneficiary or the beneficiary's sucOregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to cessor in interest has declared all obligations secured by said trust deed immediately due and pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installpayable, said sums being the following: $335,189.03 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.750% ments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by benefiper annum, from July 01, 2008 until paid, plus monthly late charges of $110.00 each, beginning ciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,601.92 ugust 01, 2008 until paid; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees Monthly Late Charge $62.45. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligaincurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary or the tions secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, beneficiary's successor in interest for protection of the above-described real property and its to-wit; The sum of $211,998.29 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from Deinterest in it. The beneficiary and trustee or their successors in interest, have elected and do cember 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclohereby elect to cause the property to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash to sure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and the expenses of the sale, including the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation compensations of the trustee or successor trustee and the reasonable attorneys fees incurred. The the undersigned trustee will on July 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as estabNotice of Default and original Notice of Sale given pursuant thereto stated that the property lished by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Deschutes would be sold on April 08, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at AT THE BOND STREET ENTRANCE TO DESCHUTES f Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described COUNTY COURTHOUSE 1164 NW BOND, in the City of BEND County of DESCHUTES State of real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of Oregon; however, subsequent to the recording of said Notice of Default the original sale the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest proceedings were stayed by order of the Court or by proceedings under the National Bankruptcy acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secAct or for other lawful reasons. The beneficiary did not participate in obtaining such stay. Said ured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is stay was terminated on February 10, 2010 WHEREOF, notice hereby is given that the undersigned further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right trustee will on April 12, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm Standard of Time, as established by section to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at AT THE BOND STREET ENTRANCE TO DESCHUTES COUNTY beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not COURTHOUSE 1164 NW BOND, City of BEND County of DESCHUTES State of Oregon, sell at public then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of Dated: February 19, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and by curing any the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive Dated: March 11, 2010 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION 525 EAST MAIN STREET after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 (619) 590-9200 SIGNATURE/BY: 03/18/10 R-302038 entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you Publication Dates: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2010. have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days Just bought a new boat? TURN THE PAGE before the date of the sale is June 6, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing Find exactly what Sell your old one in the address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a For More Ads you are looking for in the classifieds! Ask about our longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. ASAP# 3486176 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010, 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010 Super Seller rates! CLASSIFIEDS You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current The Bulletin 541-385-5809 obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in 1000 1000 1000 writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this 1000 1000 1000 Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact inLegal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices formation for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and LEGAL NOTICE meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact LEGAL NOTICE information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Peter C. Mann SECTION 00 11 13 and Kathryn A. Mann, as grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon, as STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS trustee, in favor of National City Bank, as beneficiary, dated 09/15/06, recorded 09/25/06, in the 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-64747, covering the following described Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 1.01FROM: real property situated in said county and state, to wit: PARCEL 3 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird 2000-68, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. More Accurately described as: Parcel 3 of Partition Plat A.Housing Works, and Oregon Housing Authority (hereinafter referred to as "Owner" or "Housing R-296713 03/18/10, 03/25, 04/01, 04/08 NO. 2000-68, recorded December 11,2000, in Cabinet 2, Page 138, Deschutes County, Oregon. Works"), 405 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 17295 Emerald Valley Road Sisters, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed 1000 1000 1000 B. Separate sealed BIDS for the construction of 6 units of two story wood framed rental housing inand a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the cluding utilities, landscaping and site amenities will be received by Keith Wooden, Project Mandefault for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices ager, at the office of the Owner until 2:00 pm on Thursday, April 15th, 2010. Then at said office monthly payments of $4,885.42 beginning 06/01/09; plus late charges of $244.27 each month will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids received after 2:00 pm on that date will not be rebeginning 06/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $1,495.86; toLEGAL NOTICE ceived or considered. Bids will be available for public inspection after opening. TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of Loan No: xxxxxx9240 T.S. No.: 1265580-09. said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above deC. Provide all required bid documents in a sealed envelope as described in the instructions to bidscribed real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ders. Plainly mark the outside of the sealed envelope with the project name, bid date and time, Reference is made to that certain deed made by Casey Carnahan, as Grantor to Deschutes Title, as By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by bidder's name, bidder's Oregon State CCB license number, and bidder's certificate of responsibilthe trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $700,000.00 Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For ity number. Homecomings Financial, Llc (f/k/a Homecomings Financial Network, Inc.), as Beneficiary, dated with interest thereon at the rate of 8.375 percent per annum beginning 05/01/09; plus late January 11, 2007, recorded January 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in charges of $244.27 each month beginning 06/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of D. No bid will be received or considered unless the bidder is registered with the Construction S0.00; plus advances of $1,495.86; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. Contractor's Board pursuant to ORS Chapter 701. 2007-04847 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for to-wit: the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penE. All bidders must complete and submit the First Tier Subcontractor Disclosure Form per Oregon Lot 6 in unit 1 of bend cascade view estates, tract two, alties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee Revised Statutes (ORS) 279C.370 by 4pm on the day set for opening of bids. The First Tier SubDeschutes county, Oregon. will on June 24,2010 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time estabcontractor Disclosure Form, if submitted separately, shall be submitted in a sealed envelope Commonly known as: lished by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County plainly marked on the outside with the project name, bid date and time, "First Tier Subcontractor Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at 24865 Alpine Lane Bend Or 97701. Disclosure Form", bidder's name and CCB license number. The Owner must reject a bid as non-re- Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligapublic auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described sponsive if a bidder fails to submit the subcontractor disclosure form by the deadline. The Disclotions secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of eal property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor sure of first-tier subcontractors shall include the name of each subcontractor, the category of of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to work that each subcontractor will perform and dollar value of each subcontract. The disclosure pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent inacquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured must be in the form included in the project manual. After the bids are opened, the subcontractor and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further stallments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by bendisclosures shall be available for public inspection. eficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $895.88 given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must Monthly Late Charge $44.79. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligabe timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the F. A bid must include a statement on whether or not the bidder is a "resident bidder" as defined in trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call tions secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, ORS 279A.120. to-wit; The sum of $274,703.33 together with interest thereon at 4.000% per annum from Octofor address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons ber 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure G. The Owner may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public contracting procedures costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information and requirements including but not limited to ORS 279A, ORS 279C, and the Housing Work's Prodeed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the curement Policy. The Owner may reject for good cause all bids upon a finding of the Owner that it trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in undersigned trustee will on July 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as estabis in the public interest to do so. The Owner may award a contract, and if so, it will award the lished by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Deschutes ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder whose bid meets its requirements. county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the public auction to the highest beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not H. ORS 279C.840 (Oregon "prevailing wage") and 40 U.S.C. 276a (the Davis Bacon Act) apply to this idder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is Project, and the bidder shall include in its bid a statement that the bidder will comply with them. to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, The Project is considered residential construction under OAR 839-025-0004(24). Therefore the which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, provisions of OAR 839-025-0037, which instruct public agencies to use federal Davis-Bacon wage satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, rates for residential construction, apply to this Project. The federal Davis-Bacon prevailing rate of reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided wage can be found at www.wdol.gov, for Residential Construction Projects for Crook, Deschutes y said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and and Jefferson counties in Oregon. The effective date for determining the applicable minimum the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the wage rates shall be the date of the award of the Contract. In the event that the federal discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with Davis-Bacon wage rate is less than the Oregon minimum wage, the Oregon minimum wage shall the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to apply. Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender I.Contractor is responsible for paying required licenses, fees and taxes that may be required. includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the J. The Contractor shall secure and pay for the building, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a permits and other governmental fees, licenses, and inspections necessary for proper execution of their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 19, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on and completion of the Contract. you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who or after the date of sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled K. Refer to other bidding requirements described in Section 00 21 13 "Instructions To Bidders," to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you Section 00 21 20 "Special Instructions To Bidders," and Section 00 41 00 "Bid Forms." to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a L. Submit your offer on the Bid Form provided. purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before M. All bid questions pertaining to the project should be addressed to: Peter Baer at Pinnacle before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the date of the sale is May 25,2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are Architecture, Inc. 547 SW 13th St STE 1 Bend, OR 97702 PH: 541-388-9897 ext. 12 FAX: the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer 541-388-5167 E-mail: peter-baer@pinnaclearchitecture.com notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 06, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current N. The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined and obtained at the following location: you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in 1.Ford Graphics: 1151 SE Centennial Ct. NO.3, Bend, OR 97702. PH: (541) 749-2151. information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this www.fordgraphics.com and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, 2. Prime bidders may obtain one paper set only from Ford Graphics office upon deposit check in the Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800)452-8260) and ask for lawyer to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you amount of $50.00 per set. Deposits will be refunded upon return of Documents, including any believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask referral service. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be Addenda, in good and reusable condition and within 10 days of bid opening. Prime Bidders and eligible for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this Plan Centers are required to contact the Architect for inclusion on the plan holders/bidders list. notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for the Internet at http://www.osbar.ora/public/ris/lowcostletJalhelp/legalaid.hrml. The trustee's 3. Bidders and Suppliers may obtain additional sets by paying cost of reproduction, which is not free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this refundable. Personal sets may be obtained at Ford Graphics. included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid www.USA-Fofedosure.com. Northwest/Trustee Services, Inc. Dated: February 12, 2010 Northwest O. All contracts shall contain a provision requiring compliance with Executive Order 11246, entitled, Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main "Equal Employment Opportunity," as amended by Executive Order 11375 and as supplemented in Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No.7236.22224/Mann, Department of Labor regulations (41 CFR Part 60). Signature/By: Tammy Laird Peter C. and Kathryn A. END OF BID SOLICITATION

R-297502 03/18, 03/25, 04/01, 04/08

ASAP# 3451583 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010, 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010


G6 Thursday, March 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

935

975

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

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Smolich Auto Mall BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Nissan Murano 2007 AWD, Navigation, Leather, Loaded! Vin #612299

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NISSAN

Chevy Corsica 1996, 196K, well maint., runs great, all records $1650 541-317-9006

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

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Nissan Versa SL H/B 2007 Auto., ABS, CD, Alloys. Vin #447569

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366

366

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

SUBARU FORESTER S 2002, Loaded 2.5, auto, White, alloy wheels, 73K Runs exc. $7,950 OBO. 541-317-9478

Chevy Impala 2001,

Smolich Auto Mall

Excellent shape, runs good, 104,000 miles, A/C, cassette player, power windows & locks, $4200 541-548-4051.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700

Subaru Baja 2006 Very hard to find in this condition! Vin #106180

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original miles, Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032 Ford Taurus SE 2006, 6-cyl., 67K mi., very clean, non-smoker owned, $8250, call 541-548-4284.

HYUNDAI

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SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Toyota Sequioa 2004 4X4, limited, like new, great cond. VIN #224237

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Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 44K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., extra set snow tires, $13,200, 541-419-4018.

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

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The Bulletin smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9 940

Vans

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Toyota Avalon 2000

Lincoln Towncar 1992, top of the line model, immaculate condition, $2995, please call 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521.

Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, 107K mi., $6210. Call 541-350-7017.

The beneficiary has elected to sell the real property described above to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. Pursuant to ORS 86.735(3), a Notice of Default and Election to Sell was recorded on February 12, 2010 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Document No. 2010-06760. There are presently one or more defaults by the grantor owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions in the Trust Deed which authorize sale in the event of default under such provisions. The defaults for which foreclosure is made are grantor's failure to pay the installments due under a promissory note, Note No. 56925, between grantor as debtor and beneficiary as creditor, from and after February, 2009. By reason of such defaults, the beneficiary has declared and hereby does declare all sums owing on the obligations secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable. Such sums are as follows: Principal: $60,089.25 Interest to 02/09/10:$11,589.81 Late charges through 02/09/10:$3,044.44 Appraisal Fee $350.00 Foreclosure guarantee$775.00 Per diem interest from and after 02/09/10: $29.63 Attorneys' fees, costs and other sums necessary to protect beneficiary's interests as provided by law and contract. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned successor trustee will on July 1, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described real property which grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by the grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest grantor, or grantor's successor in interest, acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and the expenses of the sale, including the compensation due to the successor trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of the attorneys for the successor trustee. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have the foreclosure proceeding terminated and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, and by curing any other default described herein if such default is capable of cure by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed and the obligation secured by the Trust Deed, plus payment of all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Trust Deed and the obligation it secures and all fees of the successor trustee and of attorneys as provided by ORS 86.753.

All references herein to "grantor," "trustee" and "beneficiary" shall be deemed to include their successors in interest, if any. Date: February 16, 2010. /s/ Bennett H. Goldstein _____________________________________ Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee STATE OF OREGON) )ss. County of Multnomah)

/s/ Bennett H. Goldstein Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee Direct inquires to: Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee 1132 SW 19th Ave., No. 106 Portland, Oregon 97205 Email: bhgoldatty@aol.com Telephone: (503) 294-0940 Telecopy: (503) 294-7918

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Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm sys- Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch owner, service records, 168K start, power everything, 197K much hwy. $1000 below KBB miles, will run for 500K miles @$9,950. 541-410-7586. easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

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The undersigned successor trustee, Bennett H. Goldstein, hereby certifies that (i) no assignments of the Trust Deed by the trustee or the beneficiary and no appointments of successor trustee have been made, except as recorded in the official records of the county or counties in which the above-referenced real property is situated, and including specifically the appointment of Bennett H. Goldstein, attorney, as successor trustee, and (ii) no action has been commenced or is pending to recover the debt or any part of it now remaining which is secured by the Trust Deed.

366

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REFERENCE IS MADE to that certain Deed of Trust (the "Trust Deed") Trust recorded in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon on January 15, 2003 as Document No. 2003-03162, by and among Cyndi Willerton as Grantor, Amerititle as the Trustee and Columbia River Bank, an Oregon corporation, as the Beneficiary. The Trust Deed covers the real property legally described as:

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The undersigned hereby certifies that he is the successor trustee named above and that the foregoing is a duplicate original of the Trustee's Notice of Sale.

Lincoln Continental Mark IV 1979, 302, body straight, black, in good running cond., tires are good, $800 OBO. 541-536-3490

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Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

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Other than as shown of record, neither the beneficiary nor the successor trustee has any actual notice of (i) any person having or claiming to have any lien upon or interest in the real property described herein subsequent to the interest of the trustee, the grantor, or any successor in interest to either of them, or (ii) any lessee or person, other than grantor, in possession of or occupying the real property.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Christopher Brinegar, a married man, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Ownit Mortgage Solutions, Inc., as beneficiary, dated 03/27/06, recorded 04/03/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-22889 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the Home Equity Asset Trust 2006-7 Home Equity Pass Through Certificates, Series 2006-7 by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Four (4), Block Four (4), Hunter's Circle, Deschutes County, Oregon. More accurately described as: Lot Four (4), Block Four (4), Hunter's Circle, recorded June 30, 1977, in Cabinet B, Page 243, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 20631 Colt Lane Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,700.13 beginning 06/01/09; plus late charges of $70.44 each month beginning 06/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $128.41; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $198,409.85 with interest thereon at the rate of 8 percent per annum beginning 05/01/09; plus late charges of $70.44 each month beginning 06/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $ 128.41; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 3, 2010 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 4,2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800)452-8260) and ask for lawyer referral service. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Dated: JANUARY 25, 2010 NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC. CHRIS ASHCRAFT Assistant Vice President, Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No.7236.22236/Brinegar, Christopher THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3425056 03/04/2010, 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010, 03/25/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-91918 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GONZALO O. NAJAR AND RAMONA NAJAR, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MERITAGE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 4/14/2005, recorded 4/27/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-25642, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Meritage Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1, FORREST COMMONS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1364 NORTHWEST 19TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 9, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 1 payments at $1,066.31 each $1,066.31 4 payments at $856.55 each $3,426.20 (11-01-09 through 03-09-10) Late Charges: $181.77 Beneficiary Advances: $35.50 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,709.78 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens r encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $167,813.10, PLUS interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from 10/01/09 to 12/1/2009, 7.625% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 12, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/9/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee BY: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1ST AVENUE, SUITE 500, SEATTLE, WA 98104 PHONE: (206) 340-2550 SALE INFORMATION: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3479895 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010, 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE FOREGOING INSTRUMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE NOTICE, PURSUANT TO ORS 86.740, THAT THE GRANTOR OF THE TRUST DEED DESCRIBED BELOW HAS DEFAULTED ON ITS OBLIGATIONS TO BENEFICIARY, AND THAT THE BENEFICIARY AND SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST DEED HAVE ELECTED TO SELL THE PROPERTY SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND ELECTION TO SELL TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain deed of trust, assignment of rents and leases, security agreement and fixture filing dated August 9, 2007, and recorded on August 10, 2007, as instrument number 2007-44189, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein REDMOND REGENCY PARK LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, an Oregon limited partnership, is the Grantor and AMERITITLE is the Trustee, and HOMESTREET BANK, a Washington state chartered savings bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: A parcel of land being a portion of Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 2001-55, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of County Clerk for Deschutes County, Oregon, and located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 20, Township 15 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. For a full legal description, see Exhibit A attached hereto. Also commonly described as: 2250 SW 21st St, Redmond, OR 97756. The tax parcel number(s) are: 205140. The undersigned hereby certifies that he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of JEFFREY C. GARDNER, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Jeffrey C. Gardner, Successor Trustee, c/o Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Grantor's failure to pay to Beneficiary, the full aggregate amount of monthly payments on account of accruing interest due for the period commencing May 2009 and continuing through and including December 2009, a net amount that as of December 22, 2009 totals $105,808.54, and which past-due amount continues to increase from and after December 22, 2009 at the rate of $683.58 per diem, together with Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses (including Beneficiary's unpaid attorneys' fees and costs as allowed under the Trust Deed) as of December 22, 2009 of $12,372.99, resulting in an aggregate arrearage amount as of December 22, 2009 that totals $118,181.53. The total amount of accrued and unpaid interest Grantor owes Beneficiary through December 22, 2009 is $149,426.35; Lender is holding in suspense a total of $43,617.81 representing Grantor's partial and incomplete tender of the total past-due amounts it owes to Beneficiary, resulting in a net past-due interest amount of $105,808.54 as of December 22, 2009. The full arrearage amount, $118,181.53 is immediately due and payable to Beneficiary together with additional accruing interest from and after December 23, 2009, plus Beneficiary's additional costs and expenses (together with Beneficiary's additional attorneys' fees and costs and expenses arising on account of this foreclosure process). 2. Grantor's failure to cure defaults (cross-defaults) under certain loans made by Beneficiary to Angus Acres Limited Partnership. Due to the cross-default provisions of the loan documents including, but not limited to, the Trust Deed, Grantor's uncured defaults related to the Angus Acres Limited Partnership loans constitute an event of default under the Trust Deed. 3. On account of Grantor's continuing and uncured defaults, on November 2, 2009, Beneficiary accelerated all amounts due under the loan secured by the Trust Deed and made demand on Grantor for immediate and unconditional payment to Beneficiary of all amounts due under the loan. Despite Beneficiary's demand, Grantor has failed to pay to Beneficiary the full amount of the indebtedness due under the loan secured by the Trust Deed. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of December 22, 2009: $2,986,980.45; Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of December 22, 2009: $149,426.35; Payments held in suspense for application to accrued interest owed by Grantor to Beneficiary as of December 22, 2009: ($43,617.81); Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, including attorneys fees and costs, to December 22, 2009: $12,372.99; TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $3,105,161.98. Accordingly, the sum owed by Grantor to Beneficiary on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $3,105,161.98, as of December 22, 2009, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Wednesday, May 12, 2010, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is April 12, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. DATED December 22, 2009 By: Jeffrey C. Gardner, OSB 98054, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219, Telephone: (503) 228-2525, Facsimile: (503) 295-1058, Email: jgardner@balljanik.com. Exhibit A Legal Description A parcel of land being a portion of Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 2001-55, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of County Clerk for Deschutes County, Oregon, and located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 20, Township 15 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon, and also being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner for Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 2001-55, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of the County Clerk for Deschutes County, Oregon; thence South 00°03'39" East, 260.35 feet along the Easterly boundary of said Parcel 1; thence South 88°23'20" West, 104.43 feet along the Easterly boundary of said Parcel 1; thence South 01°56'00" East, 100.27 feet along the Easterly boundary of said Parcel 1 to the Southeast corner of said Parcel 1; thence South 89°33'51" West, 178.91 feet along the Southerly boundary of said Parcel 1 to the Southwest corner of said Parcel 1; thence North 00°05'40" West, 215.89 feet along the Easterly right of way line for S.W. 21st Street; thence following the arc of a 170.00 foot radius curve to the right, a distance of 63.96 feet (the long chord of which bears North 10°41'01" East, 63.58 feet) along the Easterly right of way line for S.W. 21st Street; thence following the arc of a 230.00 foot radius curve to the left, a distance of 86.65 feet (the long chord of which bears North 10°40'06" East, 86.14 feet) along the Easterly right of way line for S.W. 21st Street to the Northerly boundary of said Parcel 1; thence North 89°34'57" East, 252.27 feet along the Northerly boundary of said Parcel 1 to the point of beginning.


Bulletin Daily Paper 03/25/10