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Effective, experimental? Artificial spinal disks

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Mixed reaction on school week in Redmond

MURDER-SUICIDE NEAR SUNRIVER

By Patrick Cliff

By Erin Golden

The Bulletin

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REDMOND — Karen Gray teaches an eighth-grade class in a modular classroom at Obsidian Middle School and can’t imagine more students in her room. But that could be her reality if the Redmond School District moves back to a five-day school week, or inserts teacher preparation time into the four-day schedule. Gray spoke during a Redmond School Board meeting Wednesday night and argued for keeping the four-day schedule in place. The board must now decide whether to build next year’s budget using a four-day or five-day schedule. The district adopted the four-day week as it faced a budget gap as a result of state school funding cuts. As part of the cuts, the district eliminated 59 teaching positions, and it now projects that the schools can operate with the reduced work force on a fiveday schedule. See Redmond / A4

Notes left at the scene of last week’s murder-suicide of a family of three near Sunriver indicate that Joachim Steffan was struggling with money problems and worried about being

‘He didn’t want to start over’ Investigators detail evidence that money, immigration problems led to 3 deaths; toxicology results still out deported before he strangled his wife and young son — and then hanged himself. After police found the bodies of Steffan, 40, his wife, Dagmar, 49, and son Pascal, 7, they recovered three letters, two of them written in German

and printed from a computer. A third letter, written in English, was on the headboard of the bed in which the mother and son were found. That note, written in what police believe is Joachim Steffan’s handwriting, blamed the economy and immigration problems for his actions. “He said he didn’t want to start over,” Deschutes County Chief Deputy District Attorney Darryl Nakahira said.

On Wednesday, nearly a week after Jehovah’s Witnesses passing by the house on Hermosa Road called 911 to report that a person was hanging from a rope outside the garage, investigators released new details about the deaths — and for the first time, called the incident a murder-suicide. Officials are still waiting on test results from the victim’s blood to see if they were drugged. See Deaths / A5

SUMMER ENTHUSIASTS REJOICE: WARM WEATHER’S TO STAY

Firing Madras principal seems to be only road to extra federal funds By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Now that Madras High School has been identified as one of Oregon’s poorest-performing schools, the district has an opportunity to go after millions of dollars to bolster educational efforts, but there’s a hitch — the high school principal, a man the superintendent called a passionate educator, has to go. Identifying Oregon’s poorestInside performing schools is part of a • On Capitol move by the federal government Hill, selling to change from punishing lowObama’s performing schools to offering blueprint for financial incentives to improve. overhauling Madras High School’s low reading and math scores put it in a catNo Child egory with the 18 lowest-achieving Left Behind, schools in the state. The Jefferson Page A2 County School District is eligible for as much as $6 million over three years to help academic performance. The district has to choose from one of four options laid out by the federal government. All the plans include replacing the high school principal. See Madras High / A4

“It’s a great ethical dilemma. ... How can we blame this on one person, just the high school principal, when it’s a K-12 issue? The performance of the high school is linked to all of our schools’ success.” — Rick Molitor, Jefferson County superintendent

TOP NEWS INSIDE Democrats inch toward a final vote House Democrats moved HEALTH toward the majority they need to pass health care legislation, CARE giving them confidence as they REFORM worked out details and girded for a historic showdown. Behind the scenes, Democratic leaders were still working to secure backing for the legislation from among roughly three dozen members of the party whose votes are considered to be in play, even as they awaited a final price tag on the bill from the Congressional Budget Office; they delayed the planned release of formal legislation at least until today. For full story, see Page A3.

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Paddle boarder Kyle Reed, 39, of Bend, glides downstream on the Deschutes River early Wednesday in Bend. Conditions for paddle boarding and other outdoor activities should continue to improve, with the National Weather Service forecasting clear skies and high temperatures, climbing to the mid-60s by Saturday and Sunday in Central Oregon. For a full weekly forecast, see Weather, Page C6.

The bald eagle: An amazing Spring break comeback story in Oregon’s backyard — in Kenya? Alternative getaways to needy areas are connecting with college students

By Aric Crabb McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KLAMATH BASIN — On a clear, cool morning, a bald eagle swoops in from its perch on a cliff overlooking Trinity Lake in Northern California. With grace and speed, the eagle flies low over the water and snatches a bass any fisherman would be happy to catch. Chased by three crows, the eagle settles atop a tree, high on the cliff overlooking the water below. The American bald eagle is an amazing comeback story; 40 years ago, the species was nearly extinct. Today, bald eagles have experienced a turnaround. Each winter near the California-Oregon border, the largest gathering of bald eagles in the continental United States takes place. The Klamath basin comes alive when hundreds of thousands of migrating waterfowl and hundreds of bald eagles settle in the area to hunt and feed. The eagles are a sight:

By Daniel de Vise The Washington Post

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

A bald eagle in California’s Klamath basin. Each winter near the California-Oregon border, the largest gathering of bald eagles in the continental United States takes place. Full-grown adults can weigh 14 pounds, with wingspans reaching 8 feet. In 1963, only 417 nesting eagle pairs were counted in the United States, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. By comparison, as many as 100,000 nesting eagles thrived

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in 1782, when the species was adopted as a national symbol. Hunting and loss of habitat were blamed for initial population declines, and the federal government reacted by creating the Bald Eagle Protection Act of 1940. See Eagles / A4

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WASHINGTON — Some of Jonathan Sitko’s classmates at Catholic University spent spring break on cruises or on the beach. He spent his in Maryville, Tenn., building houses for the poor. “Alternative spring breaks” are diverting a growing number of college students from a week of sloth and excess in Mexico or Florida to study post-election violence in Kenya, help public defenders in New Orleans or teach English in the Dominican Republic. “You can always just go on a beach and drink beer and whatnot,” said Sitko, 21, a junior from Bethlehem, Pa. “I wanted to experience a different sort of living than what I’m accustomed to.” Sitko had seldom traveled farther south than the Virginia suburbs. His trip to Tennessee with Habitat for Humanity last week as part of a 14-person Catholic University group exposed him to “a different kind of atmosphere,” he said: slower-paced, yet parallel in some ways to that of his childhood home. He spoke by cell phone at the end of a day spent installing siding. See Spring break / A6

“You can always just go on a beach and drink beer. ... I wanted to experience a different sort of living than what I’m accustomed to.” — Jonathan Sitko, 21, a junior at Catholic University in Washington, D.C., who built houses for the poor in Tennessee


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For most public schools, the perceived heavy hand of the federal government would become a lighter touch under the president’s plan to rewrite No Child Left Behind. But for others, the consequences of academic failure would stiffen. The proposal to update what is formally known as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act divides nearly 100,000 schools into three broad categories: those rewarded for high performance; those challenged and shaken up because they are struggling; and the huge number in the middle that are pushed to improve but given freedom to innovate. “For the vast majority of schools, we’re going to get rid of prescriptive interventions,” Education Secretary Arne Duncan told reporters Monday. Wednesday on Capitol Hill, Duncan laid out what the Obama administration is asking for: “We’re calling for over $1 billion to fund a complete education, because a whole child will be a successful adult. We want schools invested in the arts, history, sciences, languages, physical education, and all the learning experiences that contribute to a well-rounded education.” Under No Child Left Behind, public schools are rated every year on their progress toward a goal of 100 percent proficiency in reading and math by 2014 for students tested in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school. The two mandates would become options under Obama’s proposal. And the label of “failing to make adequate yearly progress” would vanish. In the 200809 school year, about onethird of schools fell short of what is known as “AYP.” Even if Congress revises the law, changing school accountability systems in 50 states and the district would take years. Separately, there is a state-led move to shift academic standards toward a new goal for all students to graduate ready for college and the work force. That would mean, in turn, new curriculum and new tests. — The Washington Post

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ficient in reading and math. Now the administration would like to In the blueprint for overhauling shift the focus to measuring each federal education policy that Pres- student’s academic growth, reident Barack Obama sent to Con- gardless of the performance level gress on Monday, his administra- at which he starts. tion seeks to confront some of the Many educators consider that major educational challenges that shift a promising one, but fewer have developed during the eight than half the states currently have years that President George W. the advanced student data trackBush’s No Child Left Behind law ing systems needed to measure has been a powerful student academic influence on the na- A N A L Y S I S growth. And experts tion’s public schools. say it could take sevThe administraeral years for all states tion’s proposal, if enacted into law, to develop those systems. would encourage states to raise “These are all big challenges,” academic standards after a period said Jack Jennings, a former of dumbing-down, end the identifi- Democratic congressional staff cation of tens of thousands of rea- member who is president of the sonably managed schools as fail- Center on Education Policy, a reing, refocus energies on turning search group. “But in my view the around the few thousand schools administration has put forward a that are in the worst shape and thoughtful proposal for dealing help states develop more effec- with several of the worst problems tive ways of evaluating the work created by No Child Left Behind.” of teachers and principals. And Some Republican analysts were those are just some of its goals. also impressed. But this ambitious agenda pres“It’s a serious blueprint, and one ents striking challenges of its that would be a huge improvement own, both political and in terms of over current law,” Michael Petrilli, implementation. a vice president at the Thomas Teachers’ unions and some Re- Fordham Institute who served in publican lawmakers immediately George W. Bush’s Education Designaled their dislike for pieces of partment, wrote in his blog. One the plan, complicating the admin- feature Petrilli liked was that the istration’s job as Congress consid- blueprint would “focus most of its ers reworking the No Child law. muscle and prescriptiveness on a And even if lawmakers were to handful of the worst schools.” adopt the plan in its broad outlines, The current law requires that experts said, years of work would test scores increase in every school be required to roll out the new fed- every year, to meet the requirement eral policies to states and in the that 100 percent of students reach nation’s 15,000 school districts. proficiency by 2014. According to a “This would require an immense new research report by Jennings’ reorganization of American edu- center, 31,737 of the 98,916 schools cation,” said Amy Wilkins, a vice missed the law’s testing goals last president at the Education Trust, year, vastly more than any level of an advocacy group that works to government can help to improve. close achievement gaps between The administration’s blueprint minority and white children. would refocus the most energy and resources on about 5,000 truly failing schools, and it outlines sevAcademic standards eral models for how districts could The administration’s blueprint, intervene in them. Most would infor example, calls on states to volve dismissing the principal and adopt new academic standards many teachers. that build toward having all stuTeachers’ unions criticized dents ready for college and career those models. by the time they leave high school. “It’s just not a solution to say, The National Governors Asso- ‘Let’s get rid of half the staff,’” said ciation introduced a draft of new Dennis Van Roekel, president of standards that fit that description the National Teachers Association. last week, and many states appear “If there’s a high-crime neighborlikely to adopt them. But even if the hood, you don’t fire the police offivast majority of states do so, that cers. This is a huge issue for us.” adoption process is likely to take a Grover Whitehurst, a senior year or so, and the new standards fellow at the Brookings Instituwill require a new effort to retrain tion, who headed the Education teachers, develop new textbooks Department’s research wing and write new tests. during the Bush administration, The administration’s testing noted that while the No Child law proposals themselves represent a ran to 600 pages, the blueprint is big new challenge. only 41, outlining general goals The standardized tests devel- but omitting myriad details. “As oped by the states under the No the administration reveals those Child law focus on measuring the details,” Whitehurst said, “more number of students in each grade political difficulties and implelevel in each school who are pro- mentation difficulties will arise.” New York Times News Service

Because the Texas market is so large, books assigned to the state’s 4.7 million students often rocket to the top of the national market, leading other school districts to buy the same materials. One publisher, however, has said that changes in technology, including the introduction of online components, make it easier and cheaper to tailor textbooks to specific states and requirements. Discussions in Texas ranged from whether Ronald Reagan should get more attention (yes), whether hip-hop should be included as part of lessons on American culture (no), and whether Confederate President Jefferson Davis’ inaugural address should be studied alongside Abraham Lincoln’s (yes). Of particular contention was the requirement that lessons on McCarthyism note that “the later release of the Venona Papers confirmed suspicions of communist infiltration in U.S. government.” The papers document communication between the Soviet Union and its spies; historians dispute the extent to which transcripts show Soviet involvement in American government.

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Array of hurdles awaits new education agenda

Historians have criticized proposed revisions to the Texas social studies curriculum, saying that many of the changes are historically inaccurate and that they would affect textbooks and classrooms far beyond the state’s borders. The changes, expected to be given final approval in May, will reach deeply into Texas history classrooms, defining what books must include and teachers must cover. The curriculum downplays Thomas Jefferson’s role among the founding fathers and questions the separation of church and state. “It’s not a partisan issue, it’s a good history issue,” said Fritz Fischer, chairman of the National Council for History Education, a group devoted to pre-college history teaching.

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Education Secretary Arne Duncan at a Virginia elementary school in January. Duncan was on Capitol Hill on Wednesday selling the administration’s 41-page blueprint to overhaul federal education policy. The 2002 No Child Left Behind law, a signature initiative of President George W. Bush’s, is overdue for reauthorization. Democratic and Republican lawmakers have launched hearings and bipartisan talks on a new education bill, but there is no certainty that Congress will act before fall elections.

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans raised questions Wednesday about whether President Barack Obama’s plan to turn around struggling schools would fly in rural America. Sens. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, pressed Education Secretary Arne Duncan on a proposal for interventions such as replacing at least half the teachers in a struggling school, or converting it to a charter school. The options, Enzi said, “seem to be urban-centered (and) may not work in many areas of Wyoming.” Duncan replied that the plan would allow rural schools to be transformed in ways that would work in sparsely populated regions. Sen. Patty Murray, DWash., said she had “serious concerns” about a proposal to shift emphasis toward competitive grants for teacher quality programs. She said formulas were the best way to ensure money is spread evenly, and she criticized the notion that there would winners and losers for important federal aid programs. Duncan replied: “Honestly, what we don’t want to do is fund the status quo.” But for the most part, Duncan drew a positive reception from key lawmakers as he began pitching the administration’s blueprint to rewrite the No Child Left Behind law. Sen. Lamar Alexander, RTenn., himself a former education secretary, held up the 41-page proposal to revise the 2002 law. “This is a helpful blueprint,” he said. “We asked you for it, and we’ll now take it from here. It’s a good beginning for a complex area.” Teachers unions disagree. The American Federation of Teachers, with 1.4 million members, and the National Education Association, with 3.2 million, have both criticized the plan. The Obama administration has begun trying to persuade union leaders, teachers and the public that its proposals are good for teachers and for public schools. In remarks prepared before Congress, Duncan argued that the proposed policies would elevate the teaching profession by encouraging better tests, by ending the demoralizing practice of mislabeling thousands of schools as failures and by offering teachers opportunities for career growth. “We believe there’s a lot in the proposal teachers will like,” he said.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 A3

T S Terrorism charges for 5 from U.S. in Pakistan

N 

 B Inmate numbers fall, first time in 38 years State prison populations, which have grown for nearly four decades, have begun to dip, according to a new report, largely because of recent efforts to keep parolees out of prison and reduce prison time for nonviolent offenders. State prisons held 1,403,091 as of Jan. 1, nearly 6 percent fewer than a year before. Prison populations have fallen in 27 states in that period, while they have risen in 23. “It’s too early to tell whether this is a tap of the brakes or a shift into reverse,” said Adam Gelb, with the Pew Center on the States, which produced the report. Still, Gelb said, the dip, the first since 1972, “took us a little bit by surprise.” In the same period, the population in federal prisons increased nearly 7 percent.

The Associated Press

ISLAMABAD — A Pakistani court charged five young Americans on Wednesday with planning terrorist attacks here and conspiring to wage war against nations allied with Pakistan, their defense lawyer said. The men — all Muslims from the Washington suburb of Alexandria, Va. — pleaded not guilty to a total of five charges, the most severe of which carries a maximum sentence of life in prison, defense lawyer Hasan Dastagir said. The men, all in their late teens or early 20s, were charged by an anti-terrorism court inside a prison in Sargodha, the city in Punjab province where they were arrested in December. They were reported missing by their families in November after one left behind a farewell video showing scenes of war and casualties and saying Muslims must be defended. Their lawyer has said they were heading to Afghanistan and had no plans to stage attacks inside Pakistan. The court also charged the men with planning attacks on Afghan and U.S. territory, Dastagir said. The charges did not specify what was meant by U.S. territory but could be a reference to American bases or diplomatic outposts in Afghanistan. The men also were charged with contributing cash to banned organizations to be used for terrorism and with directing each other to commit terrorist acts. Their trial will begin March 31. The U.S. has pressed an oftenreluctant Pakistan to crack down on militants in its territory, many of whom are believed involved in attacks on American and NATO forces across the border in Afghanistan. At the same time, several recent cases have highlighted incidences of foreigners signing up to join the insurgents on both sides of the border.

With 11 GOP votes, Senate sends jobs bill to president New York Times News Service In a bipartisan vote rare in today’s Washington, the Senate approved and sent to President Barack Obama on Wednesday a bill intended to spur employment by providing businesses with incentives to hire new workers. Obama thanked the 11 Republicans who backed the measure and said he would like to see that trend continue on emerging economic initiatives. In a sign of the significance Democrats place on the bill, the House leadership held a ceremony sending the legislation to the White House, where Obama is scheduled to sign it today.

The legislation’s goals The legislation, approved 68-29, would give employers an exemption from payroll taxes through the end of 2010 on workers they hire who have been unemployed for at least 60 days. It also extends the federal highway construction program, shifts $20 billion to road and bridge building and takes other steps to bolster public works projects. Democrats hope to follow up with legislation extending more than $30 billion in corporate tax breaks and aid to small business. The law provides an exemption from the 6.2 percent Social Security payroll tax for every worker who has been unemployed at least 60 days and is hired after Feb. 3 through the end of 2010. Employers will get an additional $1,000 income tax credit for new employees retained for at least a year. While lawmakers have said this will result in significant hiring, several economists said its impact on unemployment is modest.

New York Times News Service

President Barack Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi leave Wednesday’s annual St. Patrick’s Day congressional luncheon at the Capitol. Pelosi locked in two more votes Wednesday as the House inched toward the majority needed to pass health care legislation, giving congressional Democrats and the president added confidence as they worked out the last details of the bill and girded for a historic showdown as soon as this weekend.

Health bill 2 votes closer to law Democrats swayed as White House lobbying intensifies Bulletin wire reports WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s sweeping health care legislation won precious support from a longtime liberal holdout in the House on Wednesday and from Catholic nuns representing dozens of religious orders, gaining fresh traction in the run-up to a climactic weekend vote. “That’s a good sign,” said Obama, two weeks after taking personal command of a campaign to enact legislation in what has become a virtual vote of confidence on his stillyoung presidency. But Democrats delayed the planned release of formal legislation at least until today as they sought to make sure it would reduce federal deficits annually over the next decade. At the White House, Obama met with Richard Trumka, the head of the AFL-CIO. Officials said the labor leader raised concerns over the details of a planned excise tax on highcost insurance plans as well as other elements of the as-yetunreleased legislation. The long-anticipated measure is actually the second of two bills that Obama hopes lawmakers will send him in coming days, more than a year after he urged Congress to remake the nation’s health care system. The first cleared the Senate late last year but went no further because House Democrats demanded significant changes, the very types of revisions now being packaged into the second bill. Together, the measures are designed to extend coverage to more than 30 million who now lack it and ban the insurance industry from denying coverage on the basis of pre-existing medical conditions. Obama also has asked lawmakers to slow the growth of medical spending generally, a far more difficult goal to achieve. Taking a break from his face-to-face efforts to win

on a trip to northeastern Ohio for a presidential speech. Also, Rep. Dale Kildee of Michigan, who had been among a group seeking tighter restrictions on the financing of insurance covering support for the measure, Obama abortions, publicly declared his made a rare appearance on Fox support for the bill Wednesday. News Channel to declare that, Republicans are opposed to after a yearlong battle, Congress the legislation, arguing it still is finally poised to deliver the far- amounts to a government takereaching overhaul to his desk. over of health care. In recent days, “I’m confident it will pass. And they have also turned their critithe reason I’m confident cism on House Speaker that it’s going to pass Nancy Pelosi, who says is because it’s the right the House may approve thing to do,” the president the Senate-passed bill said in a sometimes testy without casting a sepainterview with reporter rate vote on it. Instead, Bret Baier, who repeatunder a rule that would edly prodded him about itself be subject to a vote, special deals contained it would be considered in the package that were Rep. Dennis passed automatically used to win over recal- Kucinich, if the second fix-it bill citrant lawmakers, as above, and passed. well as a much-criticized Rep. Dale This approach has parliamentary maneuver Kildee have been used numerous that the House may use. indicated they times in recent years by will change both political parties, but direction and Republicans added it to Lobbying efforts vote for the their list of grievances The interview inter- House bill. as they sought to send rupted a presidential Obama’s top domestic schedule packed with priority down to defeat. calls to Capitol Hill, where House leaders said Obama has focused on the 37 House Democrats who Revisions voted against health-care legislaWithout disclosing details, tion in November but may be open Democrats say the fix-it bill would to supporting the latest package. add funds to federal subsidies deRep. Dennis Kucinich’s an- signed to make health care more nouncement in the Capitol made affordable for the working poor him the first Democrat to declare and middle class, to benefit states he would vote in favor of the leg- that already meet standards the islation after voting against an bill sets for health care for the poor earlier version, and he stressed and to gradually close a gap in he was still dissatisfied with key Medicare prescription drug coverparts. “I know I have to make a age known as the doughnut hole. decision, not on the bill as I would The revisions are also expected like to see it but as it is,” said the to repeal a Nebraska-only inOhio lawmaker, who twice ran crease in federal Medicaid funds for president advocating national that cleared the Senate, a provihealth care. “If my vote is to be sion that became politically toxic counted, let it now count for pas- as news of it spread last year. sage of the bill, hopefully in the In a bid to reassure nervous direction of comprehensive health lawmakers in the House that they care reform.” would also approve the bill, SenObama lobbied Kucinich heav- ate Democrats circulated a letter ily for his vote, including aboard pledging their support. Air Force One earlier in the week Shortly after Kucinich’s an-

HEALTH CARE REFORM

Leader of Irish Catholics apologizes for abuse cover-up Los Angeles Times The head of the Catholic Church in Ireland apologized Wednesday for failing to tell police 35 years ago about an abusive priest who went on to molest more children before being imprisoned. Amid calls for his resignation, Cardinal Sean Brady expressed regret for his part in a 1975 case in which the church asked two boys to sign oaths of secrecy after they complained of being sexually abused. The offending priest was transferred from parish to parish. Brady told worshippers at a St. Patrick’s Day Mass in Northern Ireland that he was ashamed for not upholding

“the values that I profess and believe in.” But he gave no indication that he would step down. Brady’s apology came as the Vatican sought to contain a swelling crisis across Europe. Public

anger with the church has grown over allegations of child molestation and beatings in the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland and Germany, Pope Benedict XVI’s homeland.

Idaho first with law against health bill Idaho took the lead in a growing, nationwide fight against health care overhaul Wednesday when its governor became the first to sign a measure requiring the state attorney general to sue the federal government if residents are forced to buy health insurance. Similar legislation is pending in 37 other states. Constitutional law experts say the movement is mostly symbolic because federal laws supersede those of the states. — The Associated Press nouncement, a letter was released from 60 leaders of religious orders urging lawmakers to vote for the legislation. “Despite false claims to the contrary, the Senate bill will not provide taxpayer funding for elective abortions. It will uphold long-standing conscience protections and it will make historic new investments — $250 million — in support of pregnant women,” wrote the nuns, in a letter released by Network, A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby. The endorsement reflected a division within the church. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops opposes the Senate-passed legislation, contending it would, in fact, permit the use of federal funds for elective abortions.

GOP gaining in polls A year of partisan wrangling, tea parties and a new administration suffering the usual fading bloom have taken a toll on Democrats, according to two new polls. Not since the 1994 Republican revival have the major parties been as competitive in congressional races, according to a Gallup poll released Wednesday. A NBC/Wall Street Journal poll, meanwhile, found the nation evenly split on health care, Barack Obama’s presidency and which party would do better on the economy.

Toyota, feds inspect wrecked Prius in N.Y. Investigators from Toyota and the U.S. government examined a crashed 2005 Prius in a suburb of New York City on Wednesday to see if its wreckage could point to problems with the brakes or accelerator. The “black box” known as an event data recorder yielded information on engine speed and pedal position, a Toyota Motor Corp. spokesman said. Toyota has recalled more than 8 million cars since fall; the government is investigating complaints from at least 60 drivers who say their cars got fixed but still had problems. — From wire reports

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Madras High Continued from A1 District officials said the most likely option is the “transformational model.” That requires the district to come up with a plan to restructure the high school, which it will do by hiring an outside agency to evaluate it. The plan also includes extending time kids spend in class and teaching planning time. The other options are more drastic — including replacing at least 50 percent of the high school’s staff and closing the school to reopen it as a charter school. One school district in Rhode Island that chose the more drastic “ t u r n a r ou nd Gary Carlton, model” recently principal at made national Madras High news after the school board voted to fire the entire faculty and staff of the area’s only public high school. Jefferson County Superintendent Rick Molitor said blaming Gary Carlton, the Madras principal, for the school’s performance is misguided. “It’s a great ethical dilemma. … How can we blame this on one person, just the high school principal, when it’s a K-12 issue?” Molitor said. “The performance of the high school is linked to all of our schools’ success.” Carlton did not return several calls for comment.

Tenure at Madras High Carlton has been at the high school for six years and was named the 2009 Administrator of the Year by the Oregon Business Education Association. The award went to Carlton because he got the school current technology and encouraged professional training for his staff. Madras High School Vice Principal Simon White said $6 million could do a lot to help students, but the cost is high. “It’s the biggest hang-up that it does specify the principal has to go,” White said. “Gary is a great guy, a fantastic leader and I have the utmost respect for him. It makes the whole effort important, it’s not something you take lightly and just do.” Biology teacher Chris Scranton said the district will have to make a Faustian bargain. “There is always a scapegoat and someone has to take the fall,” he said. “That seems how the Department of Education works.” Scranton said sometimes students enter the school with a third-grade reading level. Replacing Carlton and hoping all the problems are fixed is “laughable,” Scranton said.

Where money could go Other than having to replace a “passionate and involved” educator, Molitor said, this is an opportunity for the school to help close the achievement gap. Madras High School consistently ranks low on the state’s annual report card. Since the 2001-02 school year, the school has been graded either low, satisfactory or in need of improvement on the state’s report card. On the 2008-09 report card, only 27 percent of students met or exceeded the state’s standards in mathematics. In the same school year, only 36 percent of students met the standards in writing. Molitor said the money could go toward before or after-school programs. It could go toward hiring more staff and offering advanced classes for kids. “We think this grant, on the positive side, this money could enhance the work we’re doing and enhance the programs we have in place to make them even more effective,” he said. Tryna Luton, with the Oregon Department of Education, said the grant money a school receives will range from $50,000 to $2 million a year for a three-year period. When the district hands in its formal application this spring, it will have an outlined model and include a budget it will need to implement the changes. The Jefferson County School District is working with an outside agency, Education Northwest, to help with the school improvement application. “Some districts are looking at this as an opportunity for changes and improvement, which is good,” she said. “One of our main goals, my team here is to collaborate with these schools and help support them in whatever they do implement. We will have workshops and webinars along the way to make sure we inform and work with them.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

“They’re a charismatic species. They have a long and storied history in this country, from being named the national symbol, to the DDT era, (when) they were almost wiped out, to a very successful recovery. The bald eagle attracts people.” — Fran McDermott, of San Leandro, Calif., who has watched eagles gather in the Klamath basin for the past 24 years

Eagles Continued from A1 The possession, selling and killing of the species were prohibited, yet the population continued to dwindle into the 1960s. The use of the pesticide DDT was a major factor. Chemical runoff contaminated the fish eaten by the eagles. The eagles’ eggshells were weakened to the point that the shells broke during incubation, or the young failed to hatch. The Environmental Protection Agency banned DDT in 1972, yet in 1978 the Fish and Wildlife Service listed the bald eagle as endangered in 43 states and threatened in five. That was the beginning of an American success story. The Fish and Wildlife Service created partnerships with organizations such as the San Francisco Zoo and the Institute for Wildlife Studies. A plan was launched to reintroduce the species to areas of California where the bird had disappeared. Over 22 years, 103 eagle chicks were hatched and released through a captive breeding program. Now, 200 pairs of nesting bald eagles reside in California, with about 9,789 pairs in the Lower 48 states. In 2007, the raptors were removed from the threatened and endangered species lists, though bald eagles in Arizona’s Sonoran desert — considered a distinct population — are listed as threatened. Fish and Wildlife officials list two main factors in the recovery of the bald eagle: the DDT ban and the protection of roosting, feeding and nesting sites under the Endangered Species Act. Wildlife officials will monitor the eagles’ numbers for up to 20 years to see if at any point the bird needs to be put back on the list. In the Klamath basin, the eagles start arriving in November and stay in large numbers until March, but the population peaks in January

Redmond Continued from A1 The district says it could return to a five-day week for about $400,000. That move is possible because the district saved about $4 million through the staff cuts, officials said. About 50 people attended the meeting, with roughly a dozen speaking. Some speakers backed the four-day week, while a handful urged a return to the five-day routine. Teachers, parents and business leaders spoke. Many urged the school board to not rush to a decision after just one year of a four-day week and to shy away from going to a fiveday week and increasing class sizes. District staff formally recommended that the district move back to a five-day week.

Possible drawbacks There are drawbacks to a fiveday week with the reduced work force. Classes could increase by as much as four students per room and the high school will lose most of its electives. The district, Gray said, adopted a four-day week in part, to keep class sizes down. “If it was unacceptable last year, it’s unacceptable this year,” Gray said. When the district first discussed possibly moving back to a five-day week, staff estimated the move would cost $545,000. But after recalculating how much more substitute time would be needed, staff reduced that number by about $140,000. The academic results have been mixed so far, and school officials cautioned that teachers are still adjusting to the fourday week. Not all schools have completed state testing, but most of the available scores have declined slightly from 2008-09 to 200910. Two reading results — third and fifth grade — increased by 3 percent and 6 percent, respectively. All but the third-grade math scores declined by between 3 and 5 percent, according to district data. Board member Jim Erickson, though, praised teachers for keeping the numbers fairly stable. “To see data like this, I am blown away by all the good things that continue to happen,”

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Two bald eagles hide in a tree at the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge near Tulelake, Calif. Once endangered in 43 states, the bald eagle now counts about 9,789 nesting pairs throughout the Lower 48 states.

The bald eagle The bird was named the national bird in 1782. Other facts: • Diet: Fish is a staple but bald eagles will feed on waterfowl, turtles, rabbits, snakes, mice and carrion. • Life span: Up to 30 years. Bald eagles mate for life. • Size: Bald eagles stand at least 3 feet tall, with wingspans between 6 and 8 feet. Females can weigh up to 14 pounds; males weigh seven to 10 pounds. Klamath • Flight: They can fly to an altitude of 10,000 feet, River Basin reach speeds up to 35 mph, and lift up to 4 pounds. • Habitat: Alaska and Canada south to Florida and Southern California. Concentrations of eagles occur in Florida, the Chesapeake Bay, the Mississippi River Valley, and the Pacific Northwest. Each winter near the California-Oregon border in the Klamath basin, the largest gathering of bald eagles in the continental United States takes place. • Status: Removed from the federal endangered and threatened wildlife list in 2007, but still listed as threatened in the Sonoran desert of Arizona and in recovery for the Lower 48 states. Sources: National Geographic, U.S. Fish and Game, baldeagleinfo.com

and February, when from 300 to 1,000 gather, said Dave Menke of the Fish and Wildlife Service. The eagles come from California, the West and as far as the Northwest Territories of Canada.

Erickson said. In describing the reasons for returning to a five-day week, Assistant Superintendent Heather Cordie described the pressure on families and the responsibility of the district to provide a stable place for children to study, eat and socialize. “We believe it’s in the best interest of students and the community (to return to a fiveday schedule),” Cordie said. “It doesn’t necessarily have to be one size fits all. We can look creatively at what that means.” Several teachers spoke in support of the shortened week. Cindy Murphy, a teacher at Obsidian, said she began the year opposed to the four-day week. But after spending the year adjusting curriculum and teaching, Murphy has become a fan of the shortened week. “I was the one, not the grumpiest, but I was certainly one who didn’t like this,” Murphy said. “It’s become very successful at our school.” Other speakers were unsure of what they wanted the district to do for next year. A mother of a second- and a third-grader at John Tuck Elementary School, Jennifer Smith, said she was torn between the two schedules. Presented with test scores and scheduling challenges, Smith said she was moving toward favoring the four-day week. But regardless of a four- or five-day week, Smith said the younger students must finish school earlier. Currently, elementary school days end at 4:15 p.m. “My only big concern is school, I believe, is ending too late,” Smith said. “They get home, they maybe have homework to do. They’re exhausted, and its time to go to bed.” But just as some students are adjusting to the four-day week — the district is considering moving back to a five-day week, said Traci Hartley, a parent of a fifth- and sixth-grader. The four-day week has worked in other districts and at some schools in Redmond, Hartley said, urging school leaders to give the schedule more time. “Can we explore what’s making their four-day work right?” Hartley said. “Quit bouncing the kids (around). That’s the bottom line for us.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

The number of tourists to the refuges and the Klamath basin swells during the Presidents Day weekend and the annual Winter Wings Festival, sponsored in February each year by the Klamath

Basin Audubon Society. For the past 24 years, Fran McDermott has been leading trips to the Klamath basin to watch the eagles. “They’re a charismatic species,” said McDermott, of San Leandro, Calif. “They have a long and storied history in this country, from being named the national symbol, to the DDT era, (when) they were almost wiped out, to a very successful recovery. The bald eagle attracts people.” During Presidents Day weekend last month, dozens of cars lined the dirt road leading to the Bear Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. Bird-watchers poured out of a school bus. More than 50 people stood in the early morning darkness bundled up from the cold, binoculars in hand. They came to watch the bald eagles leave their nighttime roosting homes among old-growth ponderosa pines and Douglas firs. As the sun crept over the horizon, making eagles’ silhouettes

visible in the sky. Bird-watchers shouted the location of more than 100 eagles leaving the Bear Valley refuge. They soared over the snow-capped hills and down to the flooded farm fields and refuge marshes in the basin. Fields used for growing hay and cattle grazing in the summer months are flooded in winter, attracting large groups of geese and other migrating birds. Bald eagles settle into the fields to feed. Across the road from the Lower Klamath refuge, more than 30 bald eagles sit in a newly flooded field with thousands of waterfowl. Their prey is not geese or ducks, but mice and other rodents. A dark-colored juvenile eagle grabs a mouse and sits on a dry plot of ground to pull apart its catch. A raven runs up and pulls on the eagle’s tail feathers, trying to distract it long enough to steal a bite to eat. Menke, of the Fish and Wildlife Service, said bald eagles are opportunistic feeders by nature, and rodents in flooded fields have been prevalent this year. When there is a waterfowl die off, eagles will dine on dead geese or ducks. Just over the Oregon border, McDermott’s group of 18 birdwatchers lines the side of Township Road, looking at a field full of bald eagles. “Pretty cool,” said Phil Henry, of Orinda, Calif. “You can see six or eight together of different ages.” That’s what McDermott enjoys about leading the groups. “They were saying they could stay here all day and just watch the field for hours and hours,” McDermott said. “The people were just listening to the geese, watching the bald eagles. It’s just magical.”

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Voter support is no guarantee of second term for al-Maliki By Hannah Allam and Laith Hammoudi

key to his survival. The campaign against him is so robust McClatchy-Tribune News Service that members of his own coaliBAGHDAD — Nearly half a tion haven’t ruled out dumping million people voted for Iraqi him as the prime minister nomiPrime Minister Nouri al-Ma- nee in order to lure partners that liki in Baghdad, making him would give them a dominant by far the leading candidate in voice in the next government, the province where the according to interviews most seats are at stake, with al-Maliki’s allies, according to partial reopponents and indesults from this month’s pendent observers. election. Even if he pulls off Those hundreds of a second term over thousands of supportthe objections of rival ers in the capital, along parties, his opponents with many thousands have said privately that more who voted for Iraqi Prime they’d block his efforts al-Maliki’s coalition Minister Nouri in parliament and open in outlying provinces, al-Maliki is in up potentially embarcould be in for a jolt in a close elecrassing corruption incoming months if his tion race with quiries, strategies that powerful enemies suc- secular rival could lead to a weaker ceed in derailing his Ayad Allawi. and more violent Iraq bid for a second term as just as U.S. forces preprime minister. pare for a full withEspecially now that he’s neck drawal by the end of next year. and neck with a secular rival, With about 80 percent of votes former interim Prime Minister counted, the race is too close Ayad Allawi, al-Maliki’s chanc- to call, but so far there’s only a es of retaining his premiership minuscule seat differential beare dubious. tween al-Maliki’s bloc and the His State of Law coalition has mixed-sect ticket led by Allawi, no outright majority, no man- a secular Shiite Muslim who date and precious little support appears to have picked up the from factions that would be the Sunni Muslim vote.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 A5

Discovery puts dog origins in Middle East Also, links between first domesticated animal, advances in human society are strengthened

From ancestral wolf to modern dog A genetic study of 85 breeds suggests that dogs are most closely related to Near Eastern wolves, and were probably first domesticated in the Middle East. A simplified family tree of the past 20,000 years is shown below. Ancient and spitz dogs

Toy dogs Scent hounds, spaniels and working dogs

Near and Middle Eastern wolves

By Nicholas Wade New York Times News Service

Researchers have concluded that dogs were probably first domesticated from wolves somewhere in the Middle East, in contrast to an earlier survey suggesting dogs originated in East Asia. This finding puts the first known domestication — that of dogs — in the same place as the domestication of plants and other animals, and strengthens the link between the first animal to enter human society and the subsequent invention of agriculture about 10,000 years ago. A Middle Eastern origin for the dog also fits in better with the archaeological evidence, and has enabled geneticists to reconstruct the entire history of the dog, from the first association between wolves and hunter gatherers some 20,000 years ago to the creation by Victorian dog fanciers of many of today’s breeds. A research team led by Bridgett vonHoldt and Robert Wayne of the University of California, Los Angeles, has analyzed a large collection of wolf and dog genomes from around the world. Scanning for similar runs of DNA, the researchers found that the Middle East was where wolf and dog genomes were most similar, although there was another area of overlap between East Asian wolves and dogs. Wolves were

The Associated Press file photo

The dingo was one of the breeds studied to determine where dogs were first domesticated from wolves.

Wolves Coyote

Common ancestor

Sight hounds and herding dogs Source: Nature

probably first domesticated in the Middle East, but after dogs had spread to East Asia there was a crossbreeding that injected more wolf genes into the dog genome, the researchers conclude in today’s issue of the journal Nature. The archaeological evidence supports this idea, since some of the earliest dog remains have been found in the Middle East, dating from 12,000 years ago. The only earlier doglike remains occur in Belgium, at a site 31,000 years old, and in western Russia from 15,000 years ago. Humans lived as roaming hunters and gatherers for most of their existence. Wayne believes that

Small terriers, retrievers and mastiff-like dogs New York Times News Service

wolves began following huntergatherer bands to feed on the wounded prey, carcasses or other refuse. At some stage a group of wolves, who happened to be smaller and less threatening than most, developed a dependency on human groups, and may in return have provided a warning system. Several thousand years later, in the first settled communities that began to appear in the Middle East 15,000 years ago, people began intervening in the breeding patterns of their camp followers, turning them into the first protodogs. One of the features they selected was small size, continuing the downsizing of the wolf

body plan. “I think a long history such as that would explain how a large carnivore, which can eat you, eventually became stably incorporated in human society,” Wayne said. Dog domestication and human settlement occurred at the same time, some 15,000 years ago, raising the possibility that dogs may have had a complex impact on the structure of human society. Dogs could have been the sentries that let hunter gatherers settle without fear of surprise attack. They may also have been the first major item of inherited wealth, preceding cattle, and so could have laid the foundations for the gradations of wealth and social hierarchy that differentiated settled groups from the egalitarianism of their hunter-gatherer predecessors. Notions of inheritance and ownership, said Carlos Driscoll, an expert on dog genetics with the National Cancer Institute, may have been prompted by the first dogs to permeate human society, laying an unexpected track from wolf to wealth.

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Missile strike kills militant with role in CIA blast By Jonathan S. Landay McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A view inside the garage on the Steffans’ property south of Sunriver on the evening of March 11, the day the bodies of three family members were discovered. On Wednesday, investigators for the first time called the incident a murder-suicide.

Deaths Continued from A1 Nakahira said police believed early on that the case didn’t involve any outside suspects but needed time to piece together what had happened before calling it anything other than homicide. He said the investigation was complicated by what police found at the crime scene, including letters that required them to find a translator. “We wanted to make sure it was what it seemed to be,” he said. “You can’t be too careful. They could go in and just make a guess based on what they saw, but that’s not how this Sheriff’s Office works. They need to take down leads and talk to associates.” A search warrant filed by detectives from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office on March 11, the day the bodies were found, shows that police recovered more than 80 pieces of evidence, ranging from blood samples from the driveway and the bathroom, to cell phones, a laptop computer and pancakes tossed in a kitchen trash can. The bodies of the mother and son were found in a bed, covered by a blanket. The family’s dog and two cats were also in the bedroom, their throats cut. Friends and neighbors of the Steffans, who had lived in the house south of Sunriver for about five years, said they were a close family that spent time outdoors for fun and ran a handful of businesses, including a construction company and a dry-cleaning and coin laundry in La Pine.

But in recent weeks, they said Joachim and Dagmar had been under stress related to money and their immigration status. Originally from Germany, the couple were reportedly having trouble renewing their visas and were about to be forced to leave the United States. The Steffans had begun to sell furniture and other belongings and had recently put their home on the market. Nakahira said investigators are still not sure exactly when the three died. They were last seen on the afternoon of March 10, and the bodies were found the following morning. A medical examiner looked at the bodies Friday and determined that the mother and son had been strangled and Joachim Steffan had died by a self-inflicted hanging. Blood samples were sent to a lab for testing, but those results won’t be available for several weeks. Nakahira said investigators have reason to believe the victims had been drugged but said he could not comment further on the issue. He said the case has been challenging to piece together — and tough on the police officers who responded to the grisly crime scene. The toxicology results are among the last pieces of the puzzle. “The Sheriff’s Office is very confident that this is what it is, and we agree with them, but we still want to see if anything was found in their blood,” he said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

WASHINGTON — An al-Qaida militant suspected of playing a key role in a suicide bombing at a CIA base in eastern Afghanistan died last week in Pakistan, apparently in a retaliatory missile strike by a CIA drone, a U.S. counterterrorism official said Wednesday. The death of Hussein al-Yemeni was the latest blow to al-Qaida’s leadership from stepped-up U.S. drone attacks inside Pakistan’s tribal area following the Dec. 30 suicide bombing. Four CIA officers, three agency security guards and a senior Jordanian intelligence officer died in the suicide bombing at a top-secret CIA facility in Khost. The bombing was carried out by a Jordanian double agent recruited to spy on al-Qaida and was a huge embarrassment to the CIA. The U.S. counterterrorism official, who requested anonymity to discuss the case, said al-Yemeni was killed on March 8 in Miram Shah, in North Waziristan, one of seven regions bordering Afghanistan that constitute Pakistan’s semi-autonomous Federally Administered Tribal Area. According to Pakistani news reports, at least six militants died March 8 in a missile strike in Miram Shah by a CIA-controlled drone aircraft. The CIA refuses to acknowledge it’s using drones. Al-Yemeni “was a conduit in Pakistan for funds, messages, and recruits, but his real specialty was bombs and suicide operations,” the U.S. counterterrorism official said. “He’s thought to have played a key role in the attack on December 30 at Khost.” Al-Yemeni, described as being in his late 20s or early 30s, had contacts with al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, the network’s affiliate based in Yemen, the Afghan and Pakistani Taliban and the Haqqani network, an Islamist insurgent organization based in Miram Shah. The strike that killed him was “a clean, precise action that shows that these killers cannot hide even in relatively built-up places,” the U.S. counterterrorism official continued, adding his death was “the latest victory in a systematic campaign that has pounded al-Qaida and its allies, depriving them of leaders, plotters, and fighters.”

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A6 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Spring break Continued from A1 “We met the future owner,” Sitko said. The owner and students worked together. Some college officials say alternative spring breaks originated at Vanderbilt University in 1987, as a student-led initiative to invest meaning into the week. The name might have started there, but the concept appears to be older. Georgetown University began sending groups of students on spring community-service missions to Appalachia in 1973. Hurricane Katrina, five years ago, breathed new life and fresh urgency into the programs; many colleges now send buses to Mississippi and Louisiana every March. The Center for Social Justice at Georgetown sent 194 students on 13 alternative spring break trips last week, “and that’s just my department,” said Ray Shiu, program director for student leadership and special programs. One group journeyed to New Orleans to help in the continuing effort to rebuild. Another headed to El Paso to explore the border community. A third went to Immokalee, Fla., to study migrant labor. Students contribute $100 or

U.S. rethinks Mideast talks after tense exchanges with Israel By David E. Sanger and Isabel Kershner New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The angry exchanges between the United States and the Israeli government have rekindled a White House debate over whether — and when — President Barack Obama should propose a U.S. plan to form the basis of negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians, senior administration officials said Wednesday. The move would be a risky one for Obama at a time that the coalition government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is fragile and the Palestinians are deeply divided. Until now Obama has deflected calls to put his own plan, with territorial maps, on the table. But in discussions in recent days, some senior officials have amplified their argument that the American approach needs to change. They said that Israel’s announcement that it would build 1,600 new houses in a disputed area of Israeli-annexed East Jerusalem further called into question the Netanyahu government’s commitment to seriously engaging in the peace talks. After Washington condemned the housing announcement, Netanyahu apologized for its timing, but has so far not responded to American demands to rescind the building plan. The series of tense, back-channel interchanges between the two governments, in the words of one administration official, demonstrated to White House officials that “the current status quo won’t work, and won’t get us anywhere.” If Obama decided to advance his own proposal, it would likely not be until his special envoy, former Sen. George Mitchell, had engaged in several months of “proximity talks,” the indirect, U.S.brokered peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians. There have been no Israeli-Palestinian negotiations in more than a year. The new round of indirect talks, which were supposed to begin this week, were delayed after the Israeli announcement. Netanyahu and Biden talked by phone Tuesday, but officials in both countries said little about the tone or details of their discussion. A senior administration official said the U.S. was “still awaiting an Israeli response to our request that they take steps to build confidence for the proximity talks.” He appeared to be referring to demands made by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton last Friday. In a tense conversation, she told Netanyahu that it would not be enough to rescind the announcement of the new housing project; she insisted that he freeze any prominent building projects in East Jerusalem and agree that the proximity talks convened by Mitchell must deal with substantive issues about boundaries, the status of Jerusalem, security and refugees. Israel has so far insisted that the talks focus only on procedural questions.

$200 toward travel and lodging. Costs are subsidized through tuition and activity fees. The program is so popular that, this year, 60 students were turned away. “We’ve had some students say this is the best part of their Georgetown experience,” Shiu said. “Hopefully, it’s a starting point for students to take what they’ve learned and incorporate it into their lives.” Although students in many alternative break programs pay a modest sum, Washington’s How-

C OV ER S T ORY ard University students pay nothing. They travel on funds raised in a 12-hour radiothon called A Helping Hand, and they pinch pennies. “Students take sleeping bags and pillows,” said Paula WhetselRibeau, a Howard volunteer and wife of the university president, and sleep in churches and gymnasiums. “There’s nothing glamorous about this trip. It’s really life-changing, though, what they see, what they learn.” The College of William and

Mary sent 160 students on alternative breaks last week, to 11 domestic and four international destinations: Cuje, Nicaragua, El Progreso, Honduras, Ho, Ghana, and Zacatecoluca, El Salvador. “This is really a great unifier,” said Mallory Johnson, 22, a senior from Burke, Va., who helped plan and run the trips. “We have kids that have never gone on break before. We have athletes. We have kids involved in Greek life.” In her sophomore year, Johnson removed mold from houses

and cleared trails in post-hurricane Biloxi, Miss. Last year, she led a group to Petersburg, Va., to tutor schoolchildren and volunteer in an HIV clinic. This year, one group is distributing medication in Ghana. “They say that college is the time of narcissism,” she said. But students who spend a few days helping the disadvantaged “see something that really transcends the individual.” American University’s expeditions this year had titles that show

the scale of the program’s ambitions: “Bangladesh: Rural Development & Women’s Economic Empowerment” and “Colombia: Grassroots Peace-Building Amidst Conflict.” Shoshanna Sumka, coordinator for global and community-based learning, said she is in touch with alumni who have made their spring break trips into careers with aid organizations. “We call it post-trip activism,” she said. “That’s really the way that things get changed.”


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,389.09 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +11.08 +.47%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Mexican restaurant to open downtown A new Mexican restaurant, Amalia’s, is set to open in the former Ciao Mambo spot in downtown Bend on March 26. Amalia’s will serve various traditional entrees and a few unique ones, such as lobster enchiladas, said owner James Orsillo, a retired engineer. Roberto Cardenas, the former chef of La Rosa Mexican restaurant in Bend, will head up the kitchen at Amalia’s, Orsillo said, adding that Cardenas is the mastermind behind the menu. Amalia’s also will distill its own tequila, Orsillo said. More than 100 types of margaritas will be served at the restaurant, which will be open from noon to 11 p.m. on weekdays and noon to close on weekends. It also will feature a late-night happy hour, and salsa classes on Fridays and Saturdays. The restaurant, at 915 N.W. Wall St., will employ about 20 people, said Orsillo, who is still accepting applications. The location, which Ciao Mambo occupied from June 2008 through January, housed Hans Restaurant for 27 years before it closed in 2007.

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CLOSE 10,733.67 DOW JONES CHANGE +47.69 +.45%

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1,166.21 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +6.75 +.58%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.64 treasury CHANGE -.27%

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$1,124.00 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$1.80

Bernanke argues for Fed to keep its regulatory powers Agency’s chief fights back against lawmaker’s proposal to reduce its role in oversight of banks By Jim Puzzanghera Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke told lawmakers Wednesday that regulatory failures by the central bank helped trigger the financial crisis, but that doesn’t mean they should strip the agency of much or all of its oversight of individual banks. The Fed has been under intense fire for not heading off the meltdown of the housing and financial markets, particularly in Congress where lawmakers are considering a sweeping

overhaul of financial regulations that would curtail the central bank’s role in bank supervision. Senate Banking Chairman Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., who has called the Fed’s regulation of banks an “abysmal failure,” proposed Monday taking away its oversight of all but about three dozen of the nation’s largest banks. Bernanke fought back Wednesday in his first public comments about Dodd’s proposal. The Fed is working to improve its oversight of the 6,000 small and large banks that it regulates, Bernanke

said. Stripping the Fed of a major part of that regulatory role, he said, would deprive it of important information about the state of the financial system and the economy that is necessary to set monetary policy. “We are quite concerned by proposals to make the Fed a regulator only of the biggest banks,” Bernanke told the House Financial Services Committee. “It makes us essentially the too-bigto-fail regulator. We don’t want that responsibility. We want to have a connection to Main Street as well as to Wall Street.” Bernanke said the Fed has made “substantial changes” to how it supervises banks to improve its ability to identify potential risks in the financial system and the broader economy.

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said his agency has made “substantial changes” in its bank oversight and can now better identify potential risks to the economy.

“I’m just one of many people who are facing these obstacles. The credit (problem) freezes me from any hope. It has the effect of just clamping down your options.” — Marie Payzant, former small-business owner who is now unemployed and hampered by her poor credit

Blockbuster may file for bankruptcy Blockbuster Inc. shares plunged further into pennystock territory Wednesday after the struggling home video rental company said in a regulatory filing that it will likely file for bankruptcy if it’s unable to address its debt load. Shares of Blockbuster fell 12 cents, or 29 percent, to 28 cents a share. The company’s market capitalization now totals about $34 million, or just a fraction of its fourth-quarter revenue of $1 billion. Since 2007, Blockbuster has racked up losses totaling more than $1 billion amid fiercer competition from other video rental services, such as Internet rental service Netflix and kiosk operator Redbox.

Wachovia cuts deal in laundering case

Producer prices The Producer Price Index for finished goods.

180

Credit F

By Lorraine Mirabella

MIAMI — Wachovia Bank, one of the nation’s largest financial institutions, agreed Wednesday to pay $160 million to the U.S. government for failing to block Mexican currency exchange houses from laundering billions of dollars — including drug-trafficking proceeds — through the bank. The agreement, struck with federal prosecutors in Miami, is the largest penalty ever paid by a U.S. financial institution for violating the Bank Secrecy Act. Wachovia will avoid prosecution if it implements a series of anti-money laundering policies over the next year. — Staff and wire reports

Seasonally adjusted (1982 = 100) 185

Jed Kirschbaum / The Baltimore Sun

Marie Payzant had to close her Baltimore boutique when she was unable to get a business loan or tap into her home equity. Payzant had sunk all her savings into the business, which she said went under — taking her credit with it — after she discovered one or possibly two employees stealing from her.

Change from previous month Feb. -0.6% Jan. +1.4% Dec. +0.4%

The Baltimore Sun

crisis More potential employers are checking applicants’ financial histories, leaving some with bad credit caught in a cycle of joblessness

acing unemployment in a dismal economy, Vernita Humphries, of Randallstown, Md., was elated when she landed a job last year. But just days before her start date, the chief financial officer phoned her to rescind the offer. Her bad credit, stemming in part from a divorce and the cost to care for her mother after a stroke, had come back to haunt her. “It was like a real bad feeling in the pit of my stomach,” said Humphries, who worked in payroll for 35 years. When the company indicated that her bankruptcy seven years ago prevented the hiring, she said she “was really taken for a loop.” Employers’ use of credit histories to screen applicants is turning into one more barrier for the nation’s unemployed — about 15 million people — many of whom end up with tarnished credit when they lose a job and

PERSONAL FINANCE

175

By Jessica Guynn Los Angeles Times

170 165 160 F MAMJ J A S O ND J F 2009 ’10 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics AP

SAN FRANCISCO — After reviewing objections, a San Jose federal judge has approved a $9.5 million settlement of a classaction lawsuit over social networking site Facebook’s program Beacon that published what users were buying. Facebook denied any wrongdoing but agreed to end the Beacon program last November.

As part of the settlement, Facebook will fund a “digital trust fund” that will issue more than $6 million in grants to organizations that study online privacy. Over the objections of privacy advocates, Facebook will have a seat on the fund’s three-member board. The board consists of Chris Jay Hoofnagle, who heads the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology; Tim Sparapani, Facebook’s public policy director; and writer Larry Magid.

$17.502 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.169

VULCAN POWER CO.

Bend-based geothermal company’s shareholders are at odds By Tim Doran The Bulletin

A rift has surfaced recently between shareholder groups of Bend-based Vulcan Power Co. over actions by two East Coast investment firms that included firing the company’s founder. The struggle, which also has been playing out in courts in Oregon and Colorado, pits a group of shareholders allied with the geothermal company’s founder, Steve Munson, against those who support institutional investors Denham Capital, a private equity firm based in Boston, and Merrill Lynch, which is now owned by Bank of America. The fight is taking place at a time when interest in geothermal and other forms of renewable energy has been soaring, fueled by looming state mandates to increase the use of renewable energy and investment by the federal government in technology to deliver it. Founded by Munson in 1991, privately held Vulcan holds geothermal leases on about 170,000 acres of federal and private land in five Western states. But to get drilling rigs and continue steam exploration, the company needed money, according to a lawsuit filed in Lane County Circuit Court by Munson and a handful of shareholders, who sought damages of at least $50 million in one claim and “many hundreds of millions of dollars” in other claims. A branch of Merrill Lynch and, separately, Denham Capital showed interest. Merrill Lynch Commodity Partners invested $35 million in Vulcan in 2007. See Vulcan / B3

Unemployed may not mean off the hook at tax time By David Holley

struggle to pay bills, credit cards and household expenses. Critics of the practice say it perpetuates a cycle of joblessness and hinders economic recovery. That has stirred a movement to clamp down on credit checks by employers. In 16 states, lawmakers are proposing legislation to limit use of credit checks to hire or fire, while legislation is pending in Congress that would ban employers from hiring and firing based on creditworthiness. Marie Payzant, a 52-year-old single mother and entrepreneur who’s run several small businesses in Baltimore over the years, said she has experience from both sides of the employment line. See Credit / B3

$9.5M settlement approved in Facebook privacy case

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“We’re pleased that Judge Seeborg has approved the settlement after carefully considering all opinions,” Facebook spokesman Barry Schnitt said. One privacy advocate said he’s exploring whether he can appeal the decision. “This sweetheart deal for Facebook is outrageous, and another indication they don’t really want to ensure privacy online,” said Jeffrey Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy.

The Bulletin

Some people receiving an unemployment check could be in for an unpleasant discovery April 15. They may owe taxes on the money. While anyone who receives unemployment benefits can choose whether to have state and federal taxes withdrawn from their weekly checks, which most people do, some don’t, possibly hoping for the largest check possible, said Craig Spivey, a spokesman for the Oregon Employment Department. “In all likelihood, they would owe taxes on that,” Spivey said. “That’s why, obviously, we recommend that it’s withheld.” Spivey said people are asked to make a decision about taxes when filing for unemployment benefits online or through the Employment Department’s hot line, the two ways people can apply. For both methods, the department recommends people have taxes withheld to avoid having to make a large payment during tax season, he said. See Taxes / B3

Find out more For information on unemployment benefits, visit www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/UI/ ui_benefit_faq.shtml.


B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMR AOL n AP Pharma ARYxTher ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXA Aarons Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AboveNet s Abraxas AbraxisBio +12.15 AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom Adaptec AdeonaPh Adminstf AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AeroViron Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaSol AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AlliedCap AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs AlphaPro Alphatec AlpGlbDD AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlteraCp lf Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd ADairy AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntGr pfA AIntlGp rs AIntGr77 AIntGr62 AmItPasta AmLorain n AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Ameriprise AmeriBrg s Ametek Amgen Amicas AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Angiotch g AnglogldA ABInBev n AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Antigncs h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEner h ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap ArgoGpInt AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG Astec AstoriaF AstraZen Astrotech athenahlth Atheros Athersys AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData

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4.13 -.01 15.27 +.10 2.02 +.01 6.61 +.06 11.53 +.17 12.81 -.07 4.20 +.01 14.65 +.22 16.87 -.07 .28 -.12 .22 -.09 10.74 -.14 31.92 -.34 2.00 29.88 +.19 1.68 69.38 +.66 6.02 +.32 .60 +.08 2.08 -.08 2.00 +.11 36.89 -.31 0.04 7.82 +.29 2.00 77.14 +1.45 6.95 -.14 17.30 +.29 0.22 11.29 +.02 8.86 +.16 0.60 12.17 +.25 14.78 -.24 23.39 +.39 0.44 19.26 +.55 16.94 -.37 0.44 19.66 +.09 0.40 27.47 -.10 42.09 -.03 1.28 25.98 -.01 0.32 33.61 +.09 4.45 +.16 0.56 22.29 +.21 4.13 -.09 5.61 +.04 20.47 +.34 0.52 25.28 +.30 0.56 15.10 +.24 0.34 10.84 +.13 0.31 17.88 +.14 0.28 15.07 +.18 1.20 56.46 +.90 14.61 -.02 0.05 16.12 -.01 13.99 +.01 0.80 35.58 -.16 0.10 64.89 +.62 0.16 33.46 +.55 3.10 -.01 0.84 61.68 +1.67 0.25 20.17 +.61 1.89 -.03 0.16 23.51 +.27 14.93 +.51 0.80 15.27 +.47 0.20 14.50 -.28 2.86 -.02 0.40 94.50 -1.12 1.00 55.68 +.40 0.04 34.83 -.13 37.87 +1.58 0.24 11.56 +.09 5.62 -.22 4.60 316.00 +1.67 0.60 15.75 +.01 29.14 +.25 0.96 51.23 -.31 0.07 16.08 -.19 0.12 9.37 +.24 0.34 9.84 +.09 9.09 +.13 0.35 35.21 +.28 17.32 +.37 0.40 23.88 +.12 0.72 31.53 -.02 0.12 41.62 +.46 6.50 +.18 7.41 +.24 1.02 12.22 +.08 0.60 8.07 +.05 0.63 9.15 +.12 16.58 +.24 0.04 9.45 +.04 4.92 +.42 11.61 +.02 1.80 42.26 +.39 0.28 28.62 +.57 44.33 +.31 1.10 35.13 +.13 1.08 58.37 +.28 0.60 73.95 +1.04 22.24 -.14 .53 1.03 +.01 45.68 -.17 0.20 40.25 -.14 1.64 8.78 -.07 0.04 5.78 -.09 2.18 13.02 1.25 -.01 0.72 65.71 +1.50 2.00 +.21 0.70 35.49 +.17 7.34 +.23 .45 -.02 25.40 -.36 0.68 8.92 +.01 31.98 +.60 0.64 38.19 +.26 24.21 +.84 0.40 37.60 +.48 0.72 35.20 +.22 25.09 +.22 31.06 +.37 0.34 29.93 +.13 42.27 +.80 .72 +.03 1.68 60.22 +.77 0.04 11.54 +.48 25.64 +.81 12.15 +.03 12.00 -.20 0.36 7.57 +.22 .69 0.16 33.23 +.28 6.94 -.02 10.89 +.04 64.71 +1.89 1.03 -.03 5.20 +.10 0.40 10.80 +.34 0.98 17.24 +.11 0.80 25.99 +.16 19.66 +.47

Nm CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentGard lf CenGrdA lf CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaArch ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChinaEd n ChiElMot n ChiFnOnl ChinaFire ChiGerui n ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinIntE n ChinaLife ChMarFd n ChinaMda ChinaMed ChinaMble ChinaNG n ChNEPet n ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaSky ChinaSun ChinaUni ChiValve n ChinaYuch ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChoiceHtls Chordiant Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitizRep h CitrixSys CityBank CityNC Clarcor Clarient h ClayChinSC ClayBRIC ClayGSol CleanEngy ClearChOut Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n CoBizFncl Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CCFemsa CocaCl Coeur rs CogdSpen Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica ComfrtS CmcBMO CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh Compugn CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs ComsysIT Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns ConocPhil Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgn h Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Corriente g Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Crane Credicp CrSuisInco CredSuiss Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold CrudeCrr n Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp n CytRx Cytec Cytori DARABio h DCT Indl DJSP Ent DNP Selct DPL DR Horton Drdgold DST Sys DSW Inc DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed

D 0.78 14.46 +.03 1.56 15.41 +.30 37.35 +.56 30.35 +.62 0.01 14.16 +.03 11.19 +.29 10.20 +.29 1.87 +.23 15.39 +.55 2.90 35.07 +.22 9.41 +.23 70.67 -.13 18.49 -.59 87.40 +1.79 2.91 +.06 38.18 -.05 6.72 +.04 34.36 -.15 26.86 +.11 3.66 -.10 1.70 15.20 -.05 0.30 25.05 -.37 2.72 74.67 +.69 24.92 +.25 0.16 14.54 +.08 43.45 +.37 0.43 4.03 +.03 25.47 -.01 1.15 +.03 7.35 -.35 20.60 -1.26 2.50 -.03 7.95 +.53 1.62 +.02 5.49 -.16 5.22 -.54 8.22 +.25 14.64 +.36 7.74 +.33 14.69 -.35 3.91 -.03 .60 +.02 5.57 +.13 9.51 -.43 0.51 71.84 +1.33 6.56 -.08 12.83 +.67 0.55 14.53 +.03 1.77 48.48 -.30 10.58 -.20 9.15 +.20 2.31 +.04 7.23 +.03 14.49 -2.66 4.04 -.02 0.29 12.28 +.22 13.34 -1.11 0.35 15.88 +.62 .72 -.01 115.02 +.31 15.83 +.86 0.74 33.89 -.51 5.00 +.02 1.48 50.74 +.69 1.42 19.35 +.13 0.56 67.77 -.13 15.79 -.17 0.32 61.29 -.89 3.21 -.02 1.58 29.11 +.36 0.72 17.28 -.09 0.48 27.51 +.40 7.98 +.23 26.26 +.11 4.05 7.50 121.35 +1.03 .81 -.01 47.43 -1.52 1.03 -.22 0.40 54.86 +.96 0.39 34.63 +.49 2.70 +.05 0.03 27.32 +.24 0.51 42.80 +.13 8.43 +.03 21.02 -.03 11.90 +.10 8.14 -.02 .35 +.03 0.35 65.43 -.84 2.00 64.64 +.69 16.59 -.16 0.04 6.46 +.11 0.30 38.23 +.41 13.99 -.09 0.36 27.23 -.10 0.51 64.05 -.03 1.76 53.84 +.14 16.51 -.26 0.40 7.24 +.08 10.32 -.03 51.62 +.36 0.96 15.29 -.11 0.37 7.23 +.28 33.14 +1.61 6.98 2.12 84.63 +.01 21.72 -.22 0.60 13.62 +.02 1.15 -.02 1.22 -.03 0.38 17.58 +.09 0.38 16.81 +.13 0.20 38.24 +.49 0.20 12.30 -.07 0.94 41.36 +.60 0.48 17.08 -.13 29.54 +.18 37.83 -.43 23.12 +.34 0.47 68.59 +.61 1.56 81.76 -.17 17.62 +.04 13.91 +.12 1.02 +.02 5.16 +.05 54.38 +.72 8.71 +.14 33.86 +.60 17.52 -.03 0.40 35.83 -.07 0.80 25.76 +.16 20.89 -.22 51.34 +1.17 43.23 +.46 3.82 +.02 6.23 -1.08 2.00 52.98 +.81 6.43 -.04 0.40 48.58 -.11 2.38 44.51 +.03 23.21 +.79 16.24 +.07 0.96 36.38 -.01 22.57 -.63 41.90 +.98 4.20 -.11 12.82 +.06 .97 -.01 1.08 47.28 -.07 0.42 19.87 +.27 0.37 58.16 -.21 2.30 23.89 -.08 18.49 +.23 0.56 34.29 +.22 0.20 18.88 +.40 1.57 41.04 +.55 20.67 -.33 8.43 +.03 9.75 +.23 2.29 +.10 0.72 61.33 +.42 7.36 +.24 0.13 8.10 +.25 61.62 -.13 17.11 -.02 25.03 -.12 0.72 51.24 +.88 0.80 47.09 +.45 0.80 34.67 +.42 1.50 85.02 -.17 0.32 3.52 +.02 0.10 52.10 +1.04 71.66 +.73 8.22 +.83 9.17 +.07 11.32 -.12 39.10 -.70 27.60 +.15 18.34 +.29 36.62 -.59 22.81 +.10 1.72 56.20 +.41 0.70 60.17 -.53 3.24 +.06 137.11 -.36 18.79 -.01 2.41 -.08 36.25 +.92 12.35 +.05 0.90 13.25 +.05 1.23 +.01 0.05 45.07 +.03 4.82 -.31 .48 -.01 0.28 5.48 +.03 12.14 +.35 0.78 9.42 +.03 1.21 27.49 -.14 0.15 12.89 -.14 0.07 4.99 -.02 0.60 41.52 +.40 25.54 -.79 2.12 45.82 +.21 47.20 11.93 -.02 0.16 77.41 -.57 1.00 43.49 +.89 9.00 +.15 63.39 +.72 .34 0.20 67.00 -.03 18.64 +.19 15.90 +.24 1.47 +.16 135.74 +5.00 11.13 -.63 1.12 59.59 +.67 .36 -.00 0.20 14.52 +.22 6.20 +.02 14.59 +.29 12.94 -.04 1.36 -.04 1.00 19.89 +.32 16.03 +.32 36.40 -.08 1.65 +.09 3.29 +.18 0.20 34.67 +.04 3.31 -.06

Nm

D

DeutschBk DB Cap pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitlGlb n Dillards DimeCBc DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DirxTcBull DirxTcBear DirxEMBull DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DirFBull rs DirREBear DirREBull DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolanMda DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DotHill lf DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuneEn rs DyaxCp Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy

0.70 75.32 +.72 1.90 24.88 +.16 8.21 +.21 27.41 -.44 1.05 13.53 +.03 0.08 12.82 +.41 0.64 67.17 -.62 2.36 66.97 -.31 0.50 87.37 -.95 0.03 9.40 +.16 14.67 -.09 26.63 +.08 1.92 55.96 +.02 30.28 -.16 25.37 -.25 0.16 23.59 +.17 0.56 13.74 +.38 37.28 +1.64 22.31 +.26 34.35 -.33 23.07 159.25 +1.78 8.01 -.10 22.65 132.36 +3.71 43.97 -1.48 13.71 -.47 0.29 95.61 +3.07 8.66 -.39 9.60 189.67 +6.93 7.04 -.14 4.75 55.99 +.99 14.12 -.27 6.85 60.52 +1.11 9.86 -.32 4.78 41.92 +1.34 0.08 15.24 -.06 32.57 +.13 .52 2.00 21.31 -.24 0.35 33.75 0.13 27.54 +.68 9.98 -.06 58.77 +1.71 12.12 -.02 25.82 +.70 32.49 -.46 56.49 -.23 1.83 40.56 +.67 14.19 +.11 69.34 +2.33 0.48 45.13 +.17 1.04 20.63 +.07 1.55 +.03 0.40 16.07 +.35 1.04 46.93 +.57 0.60 30.43 -.01 0.60 36.68 +.21 10.84 +.64 41.57 -.29 26.46 -.49 32.66 +.31 0.42 4.03 +.02 63.20 +.11 3.69 -.04 5.92 -.03 1.64 36.49 +.55 0.32 23.27 +.43 0.20 17.54 +.35 0.96 16.62 +.01 0.68 12.48 +.24 1.40 73.59 +.91 .28 +.05 4.13 +.10 1.49 -.01 11.87 +.37 1.51 +.01

E-F-G-H E-House 19.70 -.05 ETrade 1.67 -.02 eBay 26.98 +.19 EMC Cp 18.70 -.08 EMCOR 26.03 -.16 ENI 2.84 47.73 -.38 EOG Res 0.62 95.81 -.67 EQT Corp 0.88 43.62 -.08 EV Engy 3.02 31.94 -.75 ev3 Inc 15.85 +.05 EagleBulk 5.37 -.10 EagleMat 0.40 26.47 +.98 ErthLink 0.56 8.73 +.10 EstWstBcp 0.04 17.80 +.07 EastChm 1.76 63.12 +.90 EKodak 6.00 +.05 EasyLkSInt 2.15 +.05 Eaton 2.00 74.90 +.33 EatnVan 0.64 32.97 +.45 EV FltRt 1.02 16.29 +.07 EV LtdDur 1.39 15.65 -.07 EV SrFlt 1.03 15.93 +.08 EV TxAG 1.23 14.31 +.10 EV TxDiver 1.62 13.15 -.03 EVTxMGlo 1.53 12.05 +.04 EVTxGBW 1.56 14.18 +.03 Ebix Inc s 17.26 Eclipsys 20.99 +.04 Ecolab 0.62 43.60 -.11 EdisonInt 1.26 34.71 +.34 EducRlty 0.20 6.01 +.19 ElPasoCp 0.04 11.20 +.01 Elan 7.46 EldorGld g 13.60 +.02 ElectArts 18.14 +.22 EBrasAero 0.55 23.86 +.11 Emcore 1.09 +.02 Emdeon n 16.30 -.34 EmersonEl 1.34 48.89 +.20 EmersnR h 1.10 3.48 +.24 Emulex 14.28 +.05 EnCana g s 0.80 32.35 -.76 EncoreEn 2.15 19.75 -.12 EndvrInt 1.38 -.07 EndvSilv g 3.27 -.03 EndoPhrm 24.14 +.11 EndurSpec 1.00 37.92 -.38 Ener1 4.26 -.11 EnerNOC 30.25 -.05 Energen 0.52 48.00 +.13 Energizer 60.48 +.18 EngyConv 8.24 +.28 EngyTsfr 3.58 47.58 +.19 EgyXXI rs 19.70 -.28 EnergySol 0.10 5.97 +.04 Enerpls g 2.16 23.63 +.06 Enersis 0.53 20.63 EnerSys 24.95 +.06 ENSCO 0.10 46.60 +.68 Entegris 5.16 +.08 Entergy 3.00 80.58 +.32 EnteroMed .56 -.01 EntPrPt 2.24 34.39 +.18 Enterra gh 2.76 -.06 EnterPT 2.60 42.69 -.30 EntropCom 4.87 +.08 EnzonPhar 10.04 +.02 Equifax 0.16 35.15 +.50 Equinix 104.46 +2.45 EqtyOne 0.88 19.13 +.27 EqtyRsd 1.35 39.91 +.54 EricsnTel 0.23 10.85 -.45 EssexPT 4.13 93.42 +1.05 EsteeLdr 0.55 63.93 +.49 Esterline 48.75 +.36 EthanAl 0.20 20.91 -.27 Euronet 18.94 -.01 EverestRe 1.92 82.38 +.62 EvergrnEn .20 -.09 EvgIncAdv 1.02 9.57 +.04 EvrgrSlr 1.26 +.02 EvgUtilHi 0.90 12.21 +.13 ExactSci h 4.43 +.04 ExcelM 6.21 +.03 ExcoRes 0.12 19.25 -.17 Exelixis 6.29 -.02 Exelon 2.10 45.35 +.01 ExeterR g 8.61 +.10 ExideTc 5.78 -.11 Expedia 0.28 22.90 +.14 ExpdIntl 0.38 37.58 +.09 ExpScripts 99.01 -.66 ExprsJet 3.60 -.07 ExterranH 26.15 +.15 ExtraSpce 0.23 13.13 +.03 ExtrmNet 3.03 +.07 ExxonMbl 1.68 67.36 +.79 EZchip 18.85 +.76 Ezcorp 20.69 +.20 F5 Netwks 64.60 +2.09 FEI Co 22.64 +.17 FLIR Sys 26.70 -.10 FMC Corp 0.50 60.53 +.27 FMC Tech 63.60 +.24 FNBCp PA 0.48 8.10 +.03 FPL Grp 2.00 48.02 +.17 FSI Intl 3.65 +.43 FTI Cnslt 39.74 +.59 FacetBio 26.99 +.01 FactsetR 0.80 76.17 +2.28 FairIsaac 0.08 26.04 +.43 FairchldS 10.59 +.15 FamilyDlr 0.62 36.09 +.68 FannieMae 1.12 +.07 FMae pfS 1.15 +.11 Fastenal 0.80 47.44 +1.09 FedExCp 0.44 89.80 +1.17 FedAgric 0.20 8.97 -.83 FedRlty 2.64 73.67 +.58 FedInvst 0.96 26.32 +.47 FelCor 5.00 +.18 Ferro 8.40 +.11 FibriaCelu 22.53 +1.13 FidlNFin 0.60 14.75 +.51 FidNatInfo 0.20 23.83 +.31 FifthStFin 1.20 11.74 +.04 FifthThird 0.04 13.70 +.25 FinEngin n 16.69 -.56 Finisar rs 14.13 -.17 FinLine 0.16 13.88 +.10 FstAmCp 0.88 35.57 +.02 FstBcpPR 2.17 -.12 FstBusey 0.16 4.41 +.06 FstCwlth 0.12 6.70 +.19 FFnclOH 0.40 18.60 +.12 FstHorizon 0.80 13.93 +.50 FstInRT 7.49 +.16 FstMarblhd 2.82 -.06 FMidBc 0.04 14.04 +.34 FstNiagara 0.56 14.53 +.09 FstPotom 0.80 14.89 -.26 FstSolar 114.53 -.72 FT RNG 0.08 18.48 -.02 FirstEngy 2.20 39.99 +.14 FstMerit 0.64 20.97 +.18 Fiserv 51.26 +.60 FlagstrB h .82 +.03 FlrtyPfdOp 0.69 9.63 +.68 Flextrn 7.74 +.07 FlowrsFds 0.70 25.19 -.07 Flowserve 1.16 106.50 +.19 Fluor 0.50 46.20 +.35 FocusMda 16.40 -.37 FEMSA 0.34 46.50 +.52

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D 0.60 14.67 -.03 1.16 -.02 6.37 +.03 14.10 +.61 3.25 50.05 +1.19 1.84 22.89 +.04 14.00 +.28 31.67 +.30 28.65 -.86 19.09 +.05 18.83 +.95 16.94 +.46 4.62 +.17 0.76 49.75 +.59 38.89 -.02 27.50 -.34 1.97 24.59 0.50 29.15 +.15 0.88 111.47 +2.53 0.76 13.79 +.16 1.34 +.08 1.16 +.06 0.60 81.23 -.96 20.51 -.16 5.09 +.04 1.00 7.58 +.13 2.89 -1.35 14.45 +.43 0.90 31.31 +.12 32.97 -.82 3.01 -.04 0.12 10.10 +.07 11.90 -7.10 6.98 -.01 11.75 -.05 6.04 -.02 1.12 29.46 -.01 0.20 6.07 +.03 2.81 -.03 9.84 +.06 28.09 +.56 5.18 -.01 3.44 +.01 0.44 5.04 +.02 1.68 17.85 +.11 0.09 15.00 -.52 1.28 25.64 +.15 19.86 +.45 9.00 -.13 0.16 16.78 +.36 0.40 23.15 -.15 0.20 45.75 +.06 1.50 37.27 +1.97 23.58 .33 -.01 25.55 +.05 21.25 -.38 4.68 +.13 26.26 +.05 1.68 74.98 +1.27 0.40 18.04 -.03 15.84 +.74 0.50 7.87 1.96 73.17 -.10 3.44 +.03 4.05 +.03 .62 -.02 1.44 20.55 +.10 0.40 11.11 -.05 0.18 15.45 +.54 0.44 20.71 +.21 1.64 41.26 +.30 2.79 +.01 16.40 -.16 57.04 -.29 19.79 +.19 7.90 +.11 17.80 +.81 7.98 -.03 0.16 15.78 -.08 6.15 -.08 0.18 7.52 +.02 3.24 -.04 26.49 +.19 47.18 -.29 0.52 15.60 +.32 1.94 37.80 +.01 0.40 5.08 +.15 6.78 +.01 1.95 22.75 +.07 0.08 46.06 +1.06 13.51 +.28 1.32 -.05 13.09 -.31 0.17 12.44 +.10 0.18 39.80 -.26 3.65 -.02 1.40 176.64 +.45 1.08 71.49 -.54 19.11 +.58 13.53 -.02 565.56 +.36 1.60 24.22 +.22 29.28 +.03 13.52 +.22 11.23 +.16 1.84 108.35 +.60 2.79 5.97 +.18 24.67 +.21 0.52 30.05 +.97 3.99 +.01 7.35 +.05 1.77 0.07 4.60 +.01 0.83 19.00 +.14 0.08 12.95 +.31 97.61 +3.68 13.93 +.37 25.50 +.10 1.39 +.16 1.80 86.73 +4.31 25.00 -.15 13.35 +.05 32.69 +1.17 2.20 +.14 1.51 36.62 +.05 5.63 +.13 1.19 20.83 +.30 0.50 46.68 +.07 12.14 +.39 29.21 +.50 12.19 +.19 0.05 1.17 +.04 51.69 +.05 0.54 28.89 +.13 1.86 33.80 +.79 49.13 +1.24 6.43 -.57 0.48 7.53 -.15 1.70 52.97 +1.28 29.64 +.49 0.36 32.52 +.81 7.44 +.01 27.35 +.34 2.51 -.04 1.00 43.06 +.06 2.20 -.16 42.58 +.38 22.59 -.67 0.40 28.18 -.17 43.59 +.68 6.44 -.05 0.06 9.62 -.15 0.88 46.55 +.61 1.22 +.02 0.82 31.59 -.02 0.20 28.58 +1.32 6.43 1.00 38.14 +.29 4.50 27.15 +.28 1.24 22.60 +.01 5.17 +.13 2.72 46.21 +.23 8.00 -.17 1.20 23.92 +.20 24.60 -.27 18.71 +.04 18.81 +.16 0.08 16.42 -.14 5.87 -.13 .91 -.12 5.86 +.10 1.68 47.57 +.25 .90 +.04 2.48 +1.44 14.38 +.13 0.53 6.27 -.21 0.20 41.07 +.19 .74 +.01 57.36 +.23 0.80 43.50 -.08 4.61 +.11 0.20 4.40 -.02 1.28 43.15 -.37 9.94 -.32

Nm Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel HiTchPhm HghldsCrdt HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HimaxTch HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HubGroup HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon Hyperdyn

D 0.40 62.65 +1.00 39.48 +.21 0.32 52.23 -.12 13.43 +.04 24.00 +1.16 0.63 7.55 -.01 1.70 31.85 +.18 0.41 27.40 0.30 3.01 +.01 0.60 28.73 +.22 19.07 -.11 0.95 32.52 -.03 30.81 -.80 2.32 47.69 +.38 26.08 -.17 35.79 -.21 1.21 42.91 -.12 0.84 41.57 +.18 20.43 +.80 11.98 +.08 55.99 +.12 1.80 24.49 +.07 0.04 13.64 +.29 6.37 +.07 0.02 15.72 +1.57 4.57 +.02 29.86 +.90 0.60 14.05 +.25 31.24 -.47 48.23 +.53 0.48 36.02 -.52 0.04 5.76 +.23 0.40 13.44 +.05 21.73 -.52 1.14 +.07

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ICOP Dig h IESI-BFC gn ING GRE ING GlbDv ING ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPC iPass iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShBRIC iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBShtT iShUSPfd iShDJTel iShDJTch iShREst iShDJRBk iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOE iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Icagen h Icon PLC IconixBr IDEX iGo Inc h ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte Infinera infoGRP Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE Innophos InovioBio Insmed InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface InterMune InterNAP IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntlSpdw IntTower g InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invernss Invesco InvTech InvRlEst IowaTel IridiumCm IronMtn IrvinSens IsilonSys Isis ItauUnibH Iteris Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng

24.09 +.20 0.06 14.67 -.12 0.46 42.55 +1.06 .34 -.01 0.50 18.05 +.35 0.54 7.37 +.26 1.50 12.61 +.11 10.25 +.22 2.13 24.18 +.17 0.30 6.14 -.01 5.21 +.04 34.00 +1.01 0.48 1.19 -.01 0.66 24.16 +.27 2.72 73.57 -.40 0.33 28.19 +.14 0.63 25.29 +.01 0.55 21.78 +.11 0.38 16.35 +.15 0.14 10.39 +.04 0.32 49.43 +.85 0.24 11.35 +.10 0.70 52.12 +.57 0.33 11.66 +.11 1.43 43.22 +.38 2.08 60.15 +1.08 0.21 12.54 +.25 0.42 16.26 +.11 0.54 46.42 +.67 0.40 46.56 +.37 17.08 +.03 1.12 53.58 +.29 1.67 46.46 +.29 4.12 104.80 +.22 0.55 41.62 +.66 1.13 79.34 +.14 2.16 117.48 +.66 3.96 104.92 +.08 0.58 42.05 +.45 5.64 106.79 +.39 0.80 60.01 +.30 0.36 35.29 +.34 0.75 48.12 -.10 1.35 56.53 +.38 3.65 91.47 +.39 3.84 90.60 +.11 1.54 83.45 +.02 1.44 56.27 +.30 0.77 40.74 +.41 0.40 48.82 +.28 1.24 89.94 +.75 0.93 79.65 +.58 8.17 88.40 +.00 90.71 -.33 2.02 58.55 +.87 1.36 61.30 +.42 0.69 51.94 +.30 1.16 64.67 +.41 1.05 64.48 +.51 3.88 104.65 -.03 0.34 73.88 +.32 0.72 68.47 +.40 0.28 110.20 +.03 2.88 39.38 +.20 0.70 20.07 +.28 0.26 58.27 +.25 1.94 50.79 +.61 0.42 24.90 +.41 0.88 56.90 +.61 0.54 60.20 +.46 0.86 64.14 +.39 0.32 46.54 +.44 4.45 +.21 1.00 53.63 +.44 114.79 +.27 .67 -.08 25.31 +.63 15.37 +.12 0.48 32.80 +.23 1.52 -.07 1.24 46.28 +.48 39.85 -.30 15.46 -.10 21.53 +.36 7.52 +.13 3.67 +.06 17.50 +.55 13.38 +.39 8.13 -.11 7.91 -.03 27.61 +.37 0.49 61.14 +1.02 0.28 35.19 -.51 18.76 +.61 0.57 9.31 +.14 0.68 26.85 +.10 1.25 -.03 1.20 +.04 6.06 -.24 6.18 +.06 8.09 +.61 2.72 46.85 -.48 0.63 22.24 +.23 109.45 +.74 27.87 +.34 0.01 11.05 +.08 38.77 +1.04 6.01 0.34 24.64 +1.55 2.20 127.76 -.91 4.71 +.21 1.00 45.40 +.03 0.24 17.04 +.13 0.10 27.02 +1.64 22.74 +.48 0.14 26.70 +.33 6.13 -.17 67.71 +2.07 8.54 +.11 0.48 15.70 +.36 31.52 -.80 34.53 -.11 356.18 +.67 40.38 -.04 0.41 21.41 +.72 17.96 +.36 0.69 8.96 -.11 1.62 17.18 +.06 7.88 -.04 0.25 26.39 +.29 .31 -.06 8.29 -.13 9.80 0.49 21.11 -.32 1.77 -.09 70.75 +1.00 3.63 -.08 16.49 +.27 45.05 -.61 4.73 -.02 27.89 -.41 11.46 +.09 0.20 43.79 +.55 1.77 30.58 +.11 0.28 17.90 +.18 0.38 24.76 +.21 24.30 +1.18 2.26 +.01 44.43 +.46

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D

0.04 0.33 0.30

1.96 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70 0.25 0.20 0.28 0.60 0.96 1.92 1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 1.94 4.20 0.10 0.24 0.20 0.08

1.16 0.38

1.60 0.31

0.18 0.04 0.50

0.12 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40 0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 0.04 0.92 2.52

1.43 2.52 0.25 4.00 0.36 1.24

11.72 -.18 2.26 -.06 17.47 +.63 14.35 +.35 34.23 -.09 12.49 +1.19 26.98 +.99 5.45 +.03 40.45 +.09 2.54 -.01 64.65 +.12 32.20 +.49 18.96 +.23 70.39 +1.57 .55 -.02 57.04 -.79 30.69 +.29 47.02 +1.49 17.65 +.09 21.40 -.29 7.78 -.01 29.42 +.41 20.36 -.07 36.29 +.79 36.10 -.23 12.29 +.31 25.18 +.09 52.96 +.13 30.25 +.35 2.74 +.04 11.26 +.25 7.90 +.20 15.03 31.70 +.17 60.93 +.40 15.90 +.33 25.68 +.15 64.97 -.03 49.76 -.13 12.44 -.06 18.08 -.08 21.44 +.25 4.81 -.19 16.12 +.10 20.78 -.36 12.86 -.08 3.04 +.14 54.99 -.04 9.60 +1.81 3.83 +.04 17.14 +.45 17.99 +.07 29.70 +.01 4.05 +.19 22.44 +.15 7.16 -.02 9.65 +.76 9.36 +.10 94.01 +1.06 17.47 -.39 6.69 +.04 17.08 +.55 2.94 +.12 20.40 -.25 6.34 +.52 2.97 -.03 14.07 -.36 1.46 -.04 75.71 +.71 5.33 -.02 33.89 +.15 35.69 +2.06 41.13 +.40 19.84 -.22 21.75 +.61 3.51 +.08 6.55 +.05 37.15 -.44 16.00 -.17 6.74 +.21 75.81 +1.81 30.37 +.87 21.53 +.15 41.57 +1.13 16.64 -.10 44.56 -.53 25.59 +.25 1.68 +.08 1.40 +.12 7.05 +.05 35.98 +.37 1.06 -.06 4.78 +.03 28.93 +.72 28.45 +.55 14.54 +.39 34.85 +.60 51.81 -.28 33.42 +.71 53.34 -.08 29.65 -.13 35.37 +.47 1.86 -.05 28.49 -.03 8.24 -.76 36.22 +.04 24.68 -.03 42.98 +.23 29.73 +1.25 28.80 +.31 27.37 +.28 3.50 +.06 5.95 -.21 7.07 +.38 13.76 +.04 8.04 +.07 7.14 +.18 3.53 -.04 84.86 +.24 6.30 -.29 37.60 -.02 17.05 +.11 33.76 -.21 76.95 +.01 8.68 +.23 25.16 +.11 89.70 +1.79 35.25 -.28 25.76 +.62

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAP Phm MB Fncl MBIA MDC MDC Pr g MDRNA h MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MKS Inst MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MSG n MagelnHl MagelPt MagicSft Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr MaidenH Majesco h MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MartMM MarvellT Masco MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel

2.80 82.79 +1.34 16.55 -.07 0.04 22.27 +.57 5.94 +.19 1.00 35.56 -.10 0.40 10.94 -.05 1.04 -.02 8.40 -.06 0.63 22.24 +.27 14.58 +.48 7.44 +.21 1.08 7.27 +.08 0.58 6.85 -.01 8.45 -.04 12.26 -.04 19.18 -.11 35.37 +.45 0.24 41.07 +.12 1.80 35.67 +.51 0.20 21.58 -.06 20.03 +.52 43.80 +.32 2.30 +.14 0.50 3.11 +.41 2.62 58.95 -.11 3.06 +.04 2.59 0.26 7.11 -.30 .92 -.12 12.91 +.03 0.08 13.20 +.16 7.49 -.10 0.74 58.36 +.26 0.52 20.51 +.13 0.96 32.33 +.62 11.03 +.01 16.17 +.57 0.11 46.27 +.15 0.98 66.29 -.24 0.08 33.86 +.31 26.73 +.02 0.42 45.31 -.16 0.45 46.66 -.25 0.31 38.44 +.79 0.16 28.72 -.08 0.80 24.60 +.11 0.04 8.34 +.34 1.60 89.20 +6.39 20.45 +.04 0.30 15.53 +.22 0.24 53.15 +2.93 12.84 -.01 0.60 248.65 -.69 0.75 23.21 +.07

Nm MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio MeridRs h MeritMed Meritage Mesab Metalico Methode MetLife MetLfe pfB MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MiddleBk h Middleby MdwstBc h MillerHer Millicom Millipore MincoG g Mind CTI MindrayM Mindspeed Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel Mohawk MolecInP h Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Momenta MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS China MSEMDDbt MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Movado Move Inc MuellerWat MultimGm MurphO Mylan MyriadG s NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NFJDvInt NGAS Res NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NBGre pfA NatlCoal h NatFnPrt NatFuGas NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoStem NetServic NetLogic NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NwIreland NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource NichACv NikeB 99 Cents NoahEduc NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NwtPipe lf NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSys h NuvFloat NuvFltOp NuMulCGv NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvQPf2 NvTxAdFlt Nvidia

D 0.80 19.58 +.12 5.05 +.16 1.04 38.89 +.26 25.60 -.07 2.20 66.38 +.31 0.94 35.78 +.45 0.48 62.96 +1.67 16.43 +.29 41.75 +.50 0.80 51.41 +.30 0.92 25.87 +.34 26.08 -.76 64.60 +.59 6.10 +.15 0.80 11.24 +.09 9.83 +1.57 0.24 26.17 +.13 26.29 +.46 12.65 +.04 56.39 +.97 0.82 44.95 -.17 4.74 -.11 0.36 23.80 -.05 8.41 +.13 47.33 +1.00 5.85 +.10 1.52 38.08 +.14 0.92 33.61 +.30 0.76 20.08 -3.67 .29 14.99 +.40 22.26 +.15 1.15 23.05 -.45 6.35 +.06 0.28 10.08 +.19 0.74 43.03 +.34 1.63 24.49 -.01 6.91 +.06 0.14 10.84 +.16 1.36 28.61 +.26 7.46 -.13 10.40 +.19 16.79 +.14 0.52 29.63 +.26 2.61 -.03 2.46 54.85 +.41 .37 +.02 56.69 +1.70 .33 +.01 0.09 20.07 +.19 1.24 89.84 +1.53 105.52 +.18 1.26 +.02 1.00 1.80 +.10 0.20 38.00 -.13 8.49 +.14 12.42 -.11 5.32 4.29 +.02 58.08 +.05 54.42 +.36 1.44 -.23 0.61 21.17 +.01 0.61 17.99 +.05 0.96 43.46 +.12 14.22 -.40 21.56 +.71 1.06 72.26 +.18 17.29 +.38 0.36 17.44 +.01 0.42 28.74 +.01 0.20 30.28 -.03 4.26 28.37 +.39 1.05 15.20 5.09 +.10 0.20 61.91 -1.13 7.27 -.11 11.11 -.31 2.16 -.03 0.07 4.88 +.12 4.31 -.04 1.00 55.62 +.94 22.10 +.01 1.75 25.07 -.42 49.29 -.01 9.96 +.49 14.11 -.05 0.60 16.21 +.12 1.63 +.13 33.43 +.49 41.24 +.77 2.92 -.14 22.47 -.03 0.44 12.02 +.09 1.20 29.59 +.75 21.68 -.38 0.14 24.07 +.54 8.80 +.14 8.88 -.12 20.51 +.26 0.31 4.31 -.14 2.25 22.32 -.03 .63 -.05 13.90 +.18 1.34 51.73 -.29 0.40 44.66 +.56 0.04 7.25 +.04 1.50 23.42 +.06 0.32 15.06 +.29 1.76 36.24 +.23 12.11 +.01 0.24 6.43 -.06 41.26 +.60 15.22 -.15 1.78 +.01 0.01 13.29 -.08 58.61 +.90 33.04 -.15 40.71 +.81 12.48 +.32 70.92 +.29 4.42 +.25 2.58 +.12 25.69 +.46 18.39 +.06 3.05 +.10 .13 +.00 4.56 -.03 7.34 +.30 87.90 +2.89 4.41 +.12 1.00 17.08 +.24 11.42 +.03 0.28 12.81 +.07 2.87 +.07 0.20 15.77 +.26 54.22 -.03 0.40 51.23 -.11 5.73 +.12 0.15 14.01 -.02 0.15 16.65 +.08 0.20 23.83 +.37 .49 +.01 .42 -.01 0.92 15.83 +.15 1.08 9.65 +.10 1.08 70.88 +.50 16.73 -.07 5.19 +.12 0.20 43.72 +.27 0.72 76.16 +2.09 0.56 15.42 +.28 7.60 -.06 1.73 30.31 -.04 0.64 39.91 +.19 1.36 55.28 +.15 4.21 -.09 1.03 27.16 -.09 13.29 +.34 1.12 55.80 +.99 3.15 +.02 1.72 64.90 +.27 0.40 4.38 +.13 0.40 11.80 -.01 20.12 -3.90 5.10 +.23 7.54 +.04 1.99 54.82 -.04 6.87 -.08 2.31 5.77 -.01 23.77 +.41 1.60 35.58 +.05 0.50 29.28 +.46 44.76 -.93 17.05 +.05 1.44 45.11 -.96 0.70 17.07 +.32 0.61 12.03 +.05 0.74 11.96 +.04 1.51 15.16 -.06 0.47 9.83 -.02 0.75 8.20 +.05 0.65 7.84 +.06 0.18 2.17 +.03 18.10 +.35

D

O2Micro 6.85 +.10 OReillyA h 41.89 +.78 OSI Phrm 58.24 +.26 ObagiMed 11.91 +.08 OcciPet 1.32 83.21 +.84 Oceaneer 65.43 +.76 OceanFrt h .75 +.01 Oclaro 2.42 -.11 Oculus 2.28 -.02 OcwenFn 11.36 +.39 OdysseyHlt 18.20 +.20 OdysMar 1.49 -.05 OfficeDpt 8.17 +.03 OfficeMax 16.96 +.07 OilSvHT 1.78 128.52 +.75 OilStates 46.97 +.37 Oilsands g .81 +.01 OldDomF h 34.00 -.47 OldNBcp 0.28 12.05 +.32 OldRepub 0.69 12.29 +.26 OldSecBc 0.04 6.70 -.02 Olin 0.80 19.09 +.19 OmegaHlt 1.28 20.64 +.06 Omncre 0.09 29.14 +.06 Omnicom 0.80 39.78 +.54 OmniVisn 15.96 +.20 Omnova 7.33 +.31 OnSmcnd 8.06 -.01 ONEOK 1.76 46.76 +.12 OnlineRes 4.06 +.01 Onstream h .32 -.01 OnyxPh 32.00 -.46 OpntTch 0.36 15.50 +.50 Opnext 2.59 -.10 Optimal grs 2.34 +.74 optXprs 0.32 16.87 -.37 Oracle 0.20 25.47 +.26 OrbitalSci 18.99 +.24 OrchardEn 1.99 -.01 Orexigen 6.24 -.29 OrientEH 12.76 +.16 OrientFn 0.16 12.60 +.35 OriginAg 11.02 +.04 Orthovta 4.24 +.19 OshkoshCp 40.31 +.69 OvShip 1.75 44.15 -.26 OwensM 1.06 45.49 +.05 OwensCorn 24.72 +.01 OwensIll 34.99 +.86 PDL Bio 1.00 6.63 +.04 PF Chng 43.50 +.15 PG&E Cp 1.82 43.22 PHH Corp 22.84 -.24 PLX Tch 5.96 -.04 PMC Sra 9.21 +.16 PMI Grp 3.20 +.02 PNC 0.40 59.96 +1.34 PNM Res 0.50 13.22 -.08 POSCO 1.57 123.80 +2.36 PPG 2.16 65.90 +1.26 PPL Corp 1.40 29.18 +.25 PSS Wrld 23.63 +.73 PacWstBc 0.04 22.19 -.13 Paccar 0.36 42.42 +.67 PacerIntl 6.53 -.06 PacAsiaP n 3.86 +.03 PacCapB 1.92 +.26 PacEthan 1.89 -.08 PacSunwr 5.35 +.16 PackAmer 0.60 25.46 +.42 Pactiv 25.24 +.09 PaetecHld 4.24 +.06 Palatin .25 -.01 PallCorp 0.64 38.66 +.45 Palm Inc 5.37 -.02 PanASlv 0.05 24.14 +.38 Panasonic 0.13 14.94 +.22 ParPharm 25.35 -.13 ParagShip 0.20 4.74 +.01 ParamTch 17.93 -.03 ParaG&S 1.55 -.01 Parexel 23.77 -.11 ParkDrl 5.26 -.02 ParkerHan 1.00 65.37 +.93 PrtnrCm 3.89 22.11 -.62 PartnerRe 2.00 78.90 +.52 PatriotCoal 20.67 +.37 Patterson 0.40 30.98 +.41 PattUTI 0.20 14.55 -.31 Paychex 1.24 32.43 +.14 PeabdyE 0.28 49.73 +.92 Pearson 0.55 15.39 +.07 Pebblebk n 21.44 -.03 Pengrth g 0.84 11.19 -.02 PnnNGm 24.96 +.16 PennVa 0.23 26.69 +.44 PennWst g 1.80 21.61 +.16 PennantPk 1.04 10.74 +.11 Penney 0.80 30.89 +.17 PenRE 0.60 12.00 +.08 Penske 15.80 +.17 PensonWw 10.23 -.11 Pentair 0.76 35.32 +.11 PeopUtdF 0.61 15.61 +.05 PepBoy 0.12 10.18 +.33 PepcoHold 1.08 17.28 -.05 PepsiCo 1.92 66.57 +.50 PerfectWld 40.93 +.78 PerkElm 0.28 24.00 +.37 Perrigo 0.25 50.06 -1.46 PetMed 0.40 22.14 -1.16 PetChina 4.01 118.22 +.82 Petrohawk 21.87 +.42 PetrbrsA 1.17 42.07 -.11 Petrobras 1.16 46.85 -.16 PtroqstE 5.91 +.02 PetsMart 0.40 31.51 +.06 Pfizer 0.72 17.21 -.05 PhmHTr 7.59 66.43 +.06 PharmPdt 0.60 22.34 +.08 Pharmacyc 5.90 -.20 Pharmasset 28.20 +1.76 PhaseFwd 12.60 +.06 PhilipMor 2.32 51.83 +.59 PhilipsEl 0.95 33.48 +.41 PhlVH 0.15 54.18 +.40 PhnxCos 2.78 +.09 PhotrIn 5.03 +.13 PiedNG 1.12 27.67 +.04 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.05 +.46 Pier 1 7.08 -.24 PikeElec 9.22 +.07 PimcoHiI 1.46 11.75 +.10 PinnclEnt 9.23 +.52 PinnaclFn 16.72 +.53 PinnGas h .33 -.00 PinWst 2.10 37.91 +.19 PionDrill 7.81 +.12 PioNtrl 0.08 53.29 -.46 PitnyBw 1.46 24.48 +.39 Pixelwrks 5.03 +.08 PlainsEx 31.72 -.02 PlatUnd 0.32 37.44 +.68 Plexus 37.72 +.32 PlugPwr h .61 +.01 PlumCrk 1.68 38.57 +.93 Polaris 1.60 53.57 +.18 Polo RL 0.40 81.99 +.62 Polycom 33.14 +2.70 PolyMet g 2.47 +.04 PolyOne 8.77 -.02 Polypore 17.22 +.69 Poniard h 1.56 Popular 2.52 -.04 PortGE 1.02 19.68 +.31 PositiveID 1.55 +.07 PostPrp 0.80 21.19 +.52 Potash 0.40 125.69 -1.29 Potlatch 2.04 35.93 +.96 PwrInteg 0.20 41.45 +.66 Power-One 3.68 -.26 PSCrudeDS 60.39 -1.51 PwshDB 23.76 +.21 PS Agri 24.72 +.21 PS BasMet 22.12 +.36 PS USDBull 23.39 +.01 PwSClnEn 10.04 +.06 PwSWtr 0.12 17.26 +.05 PSPrivEq 0.30 10.07 +.12 PSFinPf 1.37 17.50 +.01 PSVrdoTF 0.23 24.99 -.01 PwShPfd 1.04 14.07 +.04 PShEMSov 1.64 26.27 +.07 PShGlbWtr 0.23 17.99 +.02 PSIndia 0.13 22.39 +.19 PwShs QQQ 0.21 47.67 +.13 Powrwav 1.27 -.04 Praxair 1.80 82.04 +1.45 PrecCastpt 0.12 119.65 -.50 PrecDril 8.10 -.02 PremWBc .64 +.08 PriceTR 1.08 55.25 +1.40 priceline 242.92 +1.11 PrideIntl 30.26 -.07 PrinFncl 0.50 27.76 +.93 PrivateB 0.04 14.97 +.28 ProShtDow 50.22 -.23 ProShtS&P 49.68 -.30 PrUShS&P 31.22 -.40 ProUltDow 0.55 46.74 +.41 PrUlShDow 27.08 -.21 ProUltQQQ 63.90 +.23 PrUShQQQ 17.18 -.09 ProUltSP 0.35 41.91 +.49 ProUShL20 46.79 -.38 PrUShCh25 8.10 -.27 ProUltSEM 10.11 -.21 ProUShtRE 5.91 -.15 ProUShOG 11.79 -.22 ProUShtFn 19.43 -.45 ProUShtBM 7.00 -.09 ProUltSemi 0.20 35.06 +1.06 ProUltRE 0.13 8.33 +.23 ProUltO&G 0.23 35.77 +.64 ProUltFin 0.04 6.75 +.15 ProUBasM 0.18 36.43 +.55 ProShtR2K 39.91 -.26 ProUSR2K 20.37 -.26 ProUltR2K 0.06 33.89 +.39 ProSht20Tr 48.86 -.26 ProUSSP500 30.40 -.54 ProUltSP500 0.17 171.85 +2.90 ProUltCrude 13.01 +.30 ProUShCrude 12.42 -.29 ProSUSSilv 4.12 -.03 ProSUltSilv 57.79 +.20 ProUShEuro 20.10 +.11 ProceraNt .42 -.01 ProctGam 1.76 64.01 +.48 ProgrssEn 2.48 39.82 +.38 ProgsvCp 0.16 17.89 +.52 ProLogis 0.60 14.52 +.31 ProspctCap 1.64 12.39 -.08 ProspBcsh 0.62 40.30 -.07 Protalix 7.04 +.09 ProtLife 0.48 20.70 +.19 ProvET g 0.72 8.09 +.03 Prudentl 0.70 57.59 +.50 Prud UK 0.61 16.37 +.06 PsychSol 29.52 +.03 PSEG 1.37 30.96 -.17

Nm

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22.95 +.14 5.49 -.79 5.11 +.15 1.93 +.07 20.56 +.17 0.76 38.90 -.11 1.20 60.00 +.70 0.12 16.03 -.20 19.76 +.31 2.71 -.09 .65 -.05 1.46 -.08 0.40 57.49 +.54 18.45 +.30 0.52 44.18 +.27 7.53 +.32 15.74 +.18 13.09 -.39 4.22 -.04 0.32 5.00 +.14 2.09 -.06 1.52 14.20 -.02 15.31 +.06 5.20 +.17 0.16 12.75 +.34 0.82 21.09 +.04 4.25 -.09 4.25 -.15 28.07 6.94 +.40 19.64 +1.04 0.01 11.72 +.26 0.25 22.01 -.04 19.95 +.41 67.03 -.25 22.58 +.13 0.65 10.93 -.05 0.17 75.88 -.23 0.16 50.88 +.27 1.02 +.01 0.44 27.98 +.22 2.00 46.02 +.76 1.24 56.84 +.03 5.33 -.03 1.72 30.21 +.29 30.72 +.11 25.62 +.28 1.00 14.91 +.09 0.72 17.28 +.08 1.85 39.37 +.70 1.78 22.31 +.18 24.58 -.18 1.11 86.86 +1.20 0.04 7.70 +.19 0.16 17.31 +.08 0.48 50.69 +.09 0.40 48.46 +.11 1.00 55.70 -.22 4.99 23.16 +.06 1.05 -.01 .71 -.04 1.37 24.65 +.14 5.73 +.07 3.32 +.10 0.76 28.84 74.49 -.66 61.80 +.80 1.00 6.56 -.16 17.01 1.51 100.26 +.10 8.99 -.17 1.22 -.03 3.60 53.13 -.16 14.42 +.19 8.24 16.89 -.05 23.48 -1.38 1.80 229.49 +2.79 22.24 +.04 0.40 22.06 +.81 1.56 -.01 27.90 -.05 0.52 31.40 +.57 0.60 46.50 +4.13 1.16 55.23 -.10 0.96 60.69 +.17 25.91 +.34 1.28 35.36 +.61 0.38 58.34 +.43 24.29 +.27 0.64 53.96 -.25 37.68 +.13 27.85 +.16 2.00 58.86 +.20 13.29 +.09 1.44 16.55 -.02 1.53 13.81 +.12 1.81 14.94 +.34 31.62 +.51 3.36 57.63 +.84 3.36 59.90 +.89 0.36 47.32 +.27 4.29 -.04 22.17 +2.07 10.67 +.13 0.48 32.18 +.42 35.37 +1.27 26.48 -.05 1.00 38.49 +.80 0.56 42.69 +.34 0.12 24.26 -.23 5.95 +.01 19.27 -.05 0.67 47.39 +.98 36.34 -.04 1.90 37.63 +.23 0.18 20.68 +.38 8.74 +.09 17.49 +.13 0.40 57.60 +.52 12.55 +.20 2.24 -.17 8.50 +.03 2.49 107.52 +.45 109.59 -.81 1.68 35.61 -.04 1.61 144.80 +1.02 2.29 117.10 +.69 1.73 49.51 +.34 0.15 16.93 -.03 0.36 26.02 +.45 0.49 40.08 +.54 1.98 54.68 +.73 0.88 44.36 +.20 4.98 39.42 -.01 0.52 24.17 +.01 0.65 57.02 +.24 0.03 45.84 0.46 26.51 +.43 0.48 40.79 +.11 0.28 43.69 +.17 0.46 57.74 +.34 1.00 62.97 +.89 11.97 -.25 0.12 9.34 +.05 19.84 +1.15 47.45 +.68 65.27 +2.23 0.40 25.33 +.30 29.77 +1.39 39.93 -.44 0.10 37.33 +.31 8.49 +.01 76.74 +.05 30.68 +.04 8.70 +.16 .54 +.00 0.83 21.32 -.41 33.29 -.58 7.76 -.05 17.94 +.41 1.63 38.88 -.56 0.35 9.80 +.36 0.44 14.01 -.01 2.30 -.03 5.23 -.05 15.03 -.07 17.98 +.23 0.50 9.62 +.52 0.84 66.60 +1.08 0.07 51.26 +.60 0.60 26.20 +.20 0.24 18.49 +.02 0.60 46.27 -.37 4.19 +.14 14.85 +.06 .72 -.04 0.50 42.64 +.66 0.30 41.47 -.28 9.08 +.09 22.21 -.12 19.32 +.19 0.48 21.71 +.23 3.70 -.04 1.17 +.01 104.77 -.45 0.40 10.02 -.07 7.91 +.08 8.33 +.24 0.50 28.05 +.39 1.56 50.31 -.02 18.05 +.12 .39 +.03 1.44 22.30 +.13 18.15 +.25 5.69 -.39 0.16 8.91 +.10 10.52 +.05 6.50 -.07 40.57 -.28 35.27 +.44 6.92 -.02 1.44 65.76 +.69 1.20 18.75 +.26 0.34 66.51 -.80 8.11 +.13 1.12 38.04 -.98 2.41 99.23 +3.01 8.74 +.26 12.02 -.27 0.64 54.90 +.36 38.48 +.04 29.19 -.30 11.62 +.11 2.94 +.10 47.65 +.57 3.90 -.05 3.08 -.07 0.28 6.17 +.11 18.11 +.17 16.31 +.44 0.08 6.95 +.12 2.40 85.65 +1.47

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D 3.00 72.56 +1.21 41.03 -.08 5.65 6.67 -.07 .89 -.01 37.08 -.26 33.93 +.12 10.69 +.03 0.16 14.53 -.07 5.89 -.23 16.09 +.42 5.95 +.36 6.74 +.14 12.07 -.93 3.96 -.04 0.48 45.13 +.79 18.45 -.08 1.40 60.23 +.43 1.20 43.53 +.22 1.30 38.30 -.32 53.36 +.70 6.65 -.04 21.24 -.22 0.25 37.97 +.49 14.72 -.13 20.79 +3.31 3.94 -.11 12.02 +.12 11.11 +.03 9.97 +.09 1.08 31.75 +.51 2.58 -.02 0.27 37.80 +.23 0.20 30.79 -.11 26.91 +.44 .76 -.06 1.75 33.45 +.24 0.76 32.47 +.32 0.60 25.57 +.09 0.02 13.03 -.15 0.20 10.50 +.03 42.96 +.38 .95 -.04 0.10 5.57 -.19 1.00 22.45 +.01 5.19 -.23 21.30 -.01 6.56 +.10 3.61 +.16 9.70 -.29 0.80 46.17 -1.22 0.58 33.96 +.19 0.57 32.15 +.01 0.73 27.94 +.12 0.45 32.57 +.16 1.03 59.06 +.64 0.25 15.92 +.19 0.65 30.83 +.05 0.31 22.97 +.07 1.27 30.40 +.10 4.82 -.16 1.32 58.44 +.68 0.36 23.72 +.09 0.20 2.81 +.06 1.60 -.39 25.56 +.27 0.20 42.50 +.03 0.33 18.95 -.28 0.04 46.27 +1.18 1.14 23.29 +.09 0.30 17.98 -.23 0.16 7.39 +.02 9.45 +.38 1.22 +.01 5.33 +.09 55.49 +.22 0.44 32.86 -.13 0.36 8.64 +.33 0.06 5.28 +.18 17.55 +1.50 .64 -.13 0.07 18.58 +.16 0.12 5.72 +.02 55.68 +.61 13.78 -.20 18.37 +.26 3.70 +.07 0.60 56.27 +.84 20.21 +.13 .40 -.00 2.52 23.64 +.79 0.40 31.78 +.89 .79 -.02 0.60 30.68 +.41 21.90 +.66 19.76 +.95 5.65 +.13 10.47 +.17 15.09 +.76 0.04 28.09 +.71 17.41 +1.23 21.44 +.21 16.33 +.71 0.35 17.47 +.14 0.04 8.78 -.07 7.42 +.07 7.70 +.08 33.50 +.37 47.10 +.30 23.78 +.15 17.12 -.16 27.50 -.20 18.31 +.12 22.66 +.04 0.04 3.75 +.17 1.00 29.06 +.43 0.09 17.27 +.08 7.10 +.44 0.20 16.04 +.06 18.78 -.02 0.80 16.17 +.18 0.28 13.24 +.01 5.84 -.02 0.47 29.80 -.19 0.60 43.10 -.13 23.42 +.41 27.61 +.04 9.46 +.27 18.45 +.31 0.46 10.42 +.13 9.83 -.13 11.73 +.10 20.64 -.54 27.02 +.17 0.23 18.11 -.23 1.53 43.86 -.15 2.07 26.47 -.16 18.62 -.47 0.68 53.18 -.26 5.07 -.01 6.70 -.08 0.13 18.77 +.27 1.66 41.93 +.84 1.91 24.62 -.07 45.39 +1.34 0.10 5.12 +.19 12.45 +.15 41.49 +.53 1.27 24.35 1.80 19.60 -.90 1.40 11.50 +.04 18.77 +.29 7.58 -.05 1.17 19.14 -.05 0.76 7.72 -.03 4.20 73.99 +.46 0.67 15.41 +.61 0.45 34.64 +.08 17.24 -1.01 17.28 0.02 7.70 0.25 19.03 +.19 3.20 -1.42 0.49 29.27 -.12 0.44 21.53 +1.80 0.50 9.99 +.03 29.97 -.64 0.86 44.88 +.09 5.66 -.06 22.97 +.14 28.98 -.05 10.92 +.30 23.46 +.44 0.40 45.99 -.13 1.12 +.04 14.22 +.30 20.56 +.21 20.77 13.07 -.23 0.64 59.94 -.40 0.30 39.91 +1.85 0.48 24.91 +.23 13.84 +.20 0.08 22.53 +.13 49.97 +.46 .64 +.02 13.68 +.07 0.28 31.09 -.09 33.11 -.06 7.63 -.07 2.10 82.18 +.52 10.43 +.42 10.67 +.08 1.00 49.94 +.54 0.80 47.39 -.60 20.78 +.12 1.60 49.02 +.50 0.85 31.20 +.14 0.36 28.52 +.61 14.60 +.23 15.85 -.29 1.22 +.07 20.28 -.16 0.60 53.73 +1.14 8.91 -.45 0.72 48.71 +.36 2.44 73.72 -.24 3.20 58.87 +.27 0.28 15.30 +.17 0.28 22.10 +.27 1.67 +.07 3.95 +.05 79.30 -.13 0.56 58.98 -1.30 6.95 -.07 1.60 36.78 +.27 0.80 52.40 -.24 3.07 -.18 16.12 -.38 85.47 -.89 1.32 52.99 +.14 2.75 -.54 1.61 -.04 27.83 +.71 23.08 +.19 0.32 19.32 +.22 7.14 +.24 29.55 +.02 0.92 24.87 +.45 0.60 15.40 -.73 6.75 -.03

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7.45 19.49 15.89 17.84 25.83 4.34 48.82 7.59 .35 2.88 1.37 5.53 16.20 16.98 2.22 22.49 48.15 .18 13.48 28.97 31.52 31.01 29.86 73.21 39.83 45.74 4.85 3.67 29.15 7.87 62.88 8.25 26.21 6.08 7.77 40.23 60.94 72.19 56.79 1.64 32.75 14.92 34.63 5.31 25.95 9.04 24.43 1.81 .74 36.04 26.44 80.39 4.38 29.13 87.06 88.93 30.72 26.95 40.40 .93 20.66 25.98 15.45 29.55 3.63 10.27 4.91 20.83 11.93 80.24 79.62 55.60 53.35 63.36 59.71 50.54 49.86 48.84 44.58 41.97 54.57 48.57 34.80 1.55 51.82 53.32

+.26 -.69 +.15 +.04 +.19 +.02 +.07 -.18 -.02 -.01 -.13 +.17 +.55 +.38 +.02 -.37 -.15 -.00 +.29 +.28 -.10 -.05 +.02 -.24 -.08 -.35 +.06 +.04 +.07 +.15 +.40 +.09 -.12 -.13 +.44 -1.55 -.21 -.19 -.06 -.30 -.02 +.48 -.84 -.40 -.38 +.26 +.01 +.01 -.38 -.08 +.51 +.06 +.09 -.87 -.04 -.15 -.07 +.54 -.03 +.10 -.04 +.20 +.35 +.14 +.01 -1.11 -.21 +.03 +.02 +.30 +.31 +.37 +.38 +.34 +.73 +.24 +.31 +.42 +.32 +.22 +.20 -.02 +.06 +.53


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Vulcan

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY

FRIDAY

CITY FORECAST BREAKFAST: Bend City Manager Eric King and Mayor Kathie Eckman will discuss Bend’s 2009 accomplishments and plans for the future; $30 for members if registered by March 17, $50 at the door and for nonmembers; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org/city. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BREAKFAST: Hosted by the Boys and Girls Club of Central Oregon; free; 8 a.m.; Terrebonne Boys and Girls Club Teen Center, 1198 B Ave.; 541-923-2679. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Preregistration required; $15; noon-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. “ROTH IRA — RETIREMENT CAN BE LESS TAXING”: Learn about new tax law changes and the differences between traditional and Roth IRAs. Reservations requested; free; noon-1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser C.J. Ferrari’s office, 1247 N.E. Medical Center Drive, Suite 2, Bend; 541-382-0853 or www.edwardjones .com. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking and support group for unemployed people to get out of the house and discuss various topics; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; bendetg@gmail.com. LEED EXAM PREP COURSE INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Meeting to learn about the green building strategies and LEED exam prep course that will take place Wednesdays from March 31 to April 28; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu/LEED. “CREATING AN INCOME IN RETIREMENT”: Free; 6-7 p.m.; Northwest Quadrant Wealth Management, 869 N.W. Wall St., Suite 204, Bend; RSVP to 541-388-9888. TOASTMASTERS CLUB COMMUNICATORS PLUS: Learn how to improve public speaking and communication skills; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive, Bend; 541-480-1871.

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS TOWN HALL BREAKFAST: Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon, will discuss “What Does Bend Need to Do to Get Its Own Facebook?”; $25 for members if registered by March 18, $35 at the door and for nonmembers; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by Hayden Homes; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; AmeriTitle, 735 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-5191 or www .visitredmondoregon.com. “ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNET SEARCHING”: Learn to use search engine features and critically evaluate Web sites and information. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or kathy@dpls.us. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. ALPINE INTERNET WORKSHOPS: Free; 10-11 a.m. Introduction to WordPress, 11 a.m.-noon New Google Apps Marketplace, noon-1 p.m. Build Your Intranet with Google Sites, 1-1:15 p.m. The Fresh Web, 1:15-2 p.m. Center Stage Review; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704, support@alpineinternet.com or www .alpineinternet.com/locals. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; M.A. Lynch Elementary School, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-504-1389 or www .yourmoneyback.org. “GET BACK ON TRACK — DEVELOP YOUR FINANCIAL RECOVERY PLAN”: Evaluate your current situation, goals, saving and spending needs and more; free; noon; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; RSVP to 541-330-4329.

NEWS OF RECORD Greg Welch Construction Inc., 2442 N.W. Lolo, $212,785

PERMITS

City of Redmond

City of Bend

Chet Antonsen, 21297 S.E. Bellflower, $213,848 Brookswood Bend LLC, 61143 S.W. Montrose Pass, $253,464 Wight Development LLC, 3220 N.E. Zoe, $202,487 Mel McDougal Family Foundation, 20768 N.E. Horizon Ridge, $235,714

D.R. Horton Inc. Portland, 2770 S.W. 49th St., $194,166 Crook County

Darryl Storey Construction Inc., 1345 N.W. Locust, Prineville, $139,068 Deschutes County

AT&T, 63140 Don Jr Lane, Bend, $120,000

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 B3

On March 3, the committee issued its own statements, declaring a lack of confidence in the company’s current management. Vulcan’s acting CEO, Bob Warburton, is an operating partner at Denham Capital, according to Denham’s Web site, and four board members hold positions with Denham or Merrill Lynch, according to company news releases and Web sites. A fifth, listed as the independent director, is credited in Vulcan’s news release with the closing of Vulcan’s $108 million investment in January. Vulcan received a $108 million investment from an affiliate of Denham, according to a Feb. 2 announcement from Vulcan. Members of the shareholder rights committee planned to protest at the meeting in Denver, but according to a Vulcan spokeswoman, the meeting took place with no disruption. Denham Capital expressed support for Vulcan’s current management, according to a statement issued on March 4, and its “ability to operate and grow the company.” Denham also pointed out a Lane County judge’s dismissal of many of the claims made by Munson, Fraser and several other shareholders in the Lane County Circuit Court lawsuit. In a Dec. 21 ruling, Judge Karsten Rasmussen threw out six claims and ordered Munson and the shareholders to pay Vulcan’s attorney fees. However, Munson, Fraser and the other shareholders have filed an appeal in the Oregon Court of Appeals.

Continued from B1 Denham Capital, meanwhile, made two investments totaling more than $253 million, one in 2008 and the second in February. But the two institutional investors gained control of the company and, in November 2008 fired Munson, who lives in Eugene, according to the lawsuit. On March 4, Vulcan held its annual shareholders meeting in Denver, where shareholders elected several new board members, and on Tuesday, the company announced their election and named all nine directors in a news release. Board Chairman Scott Mackin, who is a partner at Denham Capital, touted the energy-sector experience of the new members and the key roles they would play as Vulcan begins development. In late February, the company began drilling production wells in Nevada for its first geothermal power plant. But Bill Fraser, a board member who lost his seat on March 4, said several board members have ties to Denham Capital, and together, Denham and Merrill Lynch also own half of Vulcan’s common shares. “Denham now has complete, absolute control of the board,” he said. Fraser, of Florida, also is chairman of the Vulcan Shareholder Rights Protection Committee, which supports Munson and represents 150 investors who hold stock and proxies representing 14 million common shares, according to its new releases and Web site.

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Taxes

from an unemployment check withheld should put the amount withheld on line 61 of the 1040 along with withholdings listed on any W2 forms. For people receiving unemployment insurance, withholding amounts are listed on 1099 forms beneficiaries receive from the Employment Department. Withholdings are listed on Oregon tax form 40, line 42. All people receiving unemployment benefits during 2009 received a boost from both Oregon and the federal government. Neither federal nor Oregon taxes are due on the first $2,400 of benefits

Continued from B1 With many Oregonians spending record lengths of time on unemployment insurance — the only source of income for some people — a substantial tax payment has the potential of becoming a burden on the unemployed. “It’s obviously not a fun thing when you’ve already been stretched,” Spivey said. Last week, there were 210,670 Oregonians receiving unemployment benefits, according to the state. For people who might itemize their deductions or might claim multiple tax credits, there’s the potential that they could still be due a refund, even without having the taxes withheld, Spivey said. Richard Panick, a spokesman for the Internal Revenue Service, said people who do have taxes

Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

CREATIVE LIGHTING

Credit Continued from B1 Payzant owned the A Bit of Zen boutique in Hampden, where she sold apparel from around the world until closing last March. She said she discovered one or possibly two former employees stealing from her, though she never was able to bring a case against them. She’s not sure whether running a credit check would have stopped her from hiring those employees. But she blames losses in the business, in which she had invested all her savings, for ruining her own credit. Since then, she said, the lending climate and her debt have made it impossible to tap into the equity on her condo to pay off business debt. Banks will no longer give her loans to start a new venture, though she’s run many in the past. And now, Payzant has found herself unable to get a job; she’s been turned down for positions in stores and restaurants. To make car and condo payments, she has resorted to selling her furniture and other possessions online. She put her truck and condo up for sale and doesn’t know where she will move. “I feel like a metaphor as so many of us are for what’s happening,” she said. “I’m just one of many people who are facing these obstacles. The credit (problem) freezes me from any hope. It has the effect of just clamping down your options.” Sixty percent of employers surveyed by the Society for Human Resource Management

anyone receives. If people received more than $2,400, that money is taxed at the same rate as any other income. While it’s too late for 2009 tax purposes, a person can change his or her withholding, but changes must be made in writing. Form 1040WH must be filled out and mailed to the Oregon Employment Department, P.O. Box 14135, Salem, OR 97309-5068, or faxed to 866-345-1878, according to the Employment Department. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

said they conduct credit background checks for job candidates, with most employers running checks only on selected applicants, rather than all. About half the employers in the January survey said they typically review six or seven years of history. The top reasons given by respondents for turning down candidates: outstanding judgments, accounts in debt collection and bankruptcies. With people unemployed for longer periods than in past economic downturns, “unprecedented numbers of people are seeing their credit suffer because of job loss,” said Melissa Broome, a senior policy advocate with the Job Opportunities Task Force. “People these days are doing everything they can to scrape by and figure out what bills they’re going to pay,” Broome said. “Just because you have bad credit doesn’t mean you will be a bad worker or an untrustworthy person.” But employers and business groups have come out against efforts to limit credit checks, saying they need to know the financial backgrounds of people working not only in banks and other financial institutions but in stores, restaurants, hospitals and customers’ homes. Opponents have testified in legislative hearings that such limits would deprive companies of a valuable screening tool. And some argued that employees and applicants are already protected under the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, which requires an employee’s consent before credit can be checked.

HIGH TRAFFIC COMMERICAL BUILDING

204 SE MILLER AVENUE $279,900 1047 sq. ft. CL zoned on .12 acre lot. 385 sq. ft. heated warehouse. 6 parking spots. Tom Strange, Broker 541-410-2062 or 541-317-0123 office

FURNITURE OUTLET “WE MAKE IT EASY!” 541-385-0373 • 1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend

541-382-0968

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .72 ... ... .32 .22 .63f .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

14 13 ... ... 39 ... ... 27 24 ... 18 14 26 29 ... 11 ... ... 16 ... 16

41.02 +.70 +18.7 21.45 -.05 -.6 17.27 +.24 +14.7 13.24 -.03 +7.7 69.38 +.66 +28.2 .60 +.03 -11.8 36.29 +1.94 +32.0 52.34 +.50 +34.1 61.33 +.42 +3.7 2.30 -.08 -4.2 26.70 -.10 -18.4 52.23 -.12 +1.4 14.50 +.49 +8.9 22.24 +.23 +9.0 7.90 +.20 +42.3 22.44 +.15 +9.3 3.51 +.08 +30.0 8.68 +.23 +24.4 22.24 +.27 -5.8 8.41 +.13 -4.8 29.63 +.26 -2.8

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44f .80f ... ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

24 21 16 100 87 ... 26 18 14 ... 17 11 49 55 ... 32 66 36 ... ...

70.88 +.50 +7.3 39.91 +.19 +6.2 46.80 +.37 +3.9 16.96 +.07 +33.6 42.42 +.67 +17.0 2.84 ... +1.1 38.57 +.93 +2.1 119.65 -.50 +8.4 25.33 +.30 +19.0 51.26 +.60 +7.5 65.76 +.69 +6.7 46.17 -1.22 +15.4 25.56 +.27 +10.8 7.14 +.24 +19.0 13.48 +.29 +.5 26.21 +.09 +16.4 20.35 +.20 +5.2 30.55 +.27 +13.2 2.65 +.04 +26.2 45.32 +.68 +5.1

Precious metals Metal

Price (troy oz.)

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

$1,127.00 $1,124.00 $17.502

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp GenElec S&P500ETF FordM BkofAm

6394623 1581378 1577528 1360843 1321791

Last Chg 4.05 18.04 117.10 14.10 17.27

... -.03 +.69 +.61 +.24

Gainers ($2 or more) Name PPL pfBcld BankAtl A MS oil2010 Grmrcy pfA RockTen

Last

109.88 +31.48 2.68 +.56 31.76 +4.82 13.39 +1.23 46.50 +4.13

FedAgric BkA BM RE FdAgricA W Holding JPM FTLgC

Last

+40.2 +26.4 +17.9 +10.1 +9.7

Most Active ($1 or more) Name VirnetX GoldStr g NthgtM g VantageDrl DenisnM g

$1,127.00 $1,122.20 $17.333

33178 29298 25672 25452 24079

Name VirnetX Alcoa pf FstWV EmersnR h StreamG un

Name

6.29 3.65 3.15 1.55 1.65

Intel PwShs QQQ Microsoft ETrade Dell Inc

+.70 -.02 +.02 -.02 +.09

Last

Vol (00) 770320 629419 499646 343708 327468

Last Chg 22.24 47.67 29.63 1.67 14.59

+.23 +.13 +.26 -.02 +.29

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

6.29 +.70 +12.5 73.00 +5.86 +8.7 14.93 +1.18 +8.6 3.48 +.24 +7.4 7.65 +.45 +6.3

Name

Last

Optimal grs AbraxisBio KongZhg MediCo Somantc

Chg %Chg

2.34 +.74 52.00 +12.15 9.60 +1.81 9.83 +1.57 20.79 +3.31

+46.3 +30.5 +23.2 +19.0 +18.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Univ Insur BioTime wt IncOpR HQ SustM OrienPap n

5.31 4.83 5.80 6.43 9.11

-.84 -13.7 -.72 -13.0 -.70 -10.8 -.57 -8.1 -.70 -7.1

Fuqi Intl FrontFn rs Telular TricoMar NwtPipe lf

Last

2,176 904 108 3,188 601 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

-8.5 -7.7 -7.6 -7.3 -6.4

Diary Pvs Day

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

8.97 -.83 2.52 -.21 8.79 -.72 12.90 -1.02 30.04 -2.07

Nasdaq

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Indexes

11.90 2.89 3.20 2.75 20.12

Chg %Chg -7.10 -1.35 -1.42 -.54 -3.90

-37.4 -31.8 -30.7 -16.3 -16.2

Diary 269 227 37 533 32 1

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,600 1,085 145 2,830 293 12

10,729.89 4,375.79 408.57 7,471.31 1,925.54 2,378.84 1,160.28 12,144.55 679.58

7,172.05 2,420.82 304.10 4,690.16 1,277.60 1,402.48 749.93 7,583.84 384.26

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,733.67 4,378.41 384.01 7,474.13 1,907.11 2,389.09 1,166.21 12,210.45 683.98

+47.69 +4.29 +1.24 +47.43 +7.03 +11.08 +6.75 +71.23 +4.40

YTD %Chg %Chg +.45 +.10 +.32 +.64 +.37 +.47 +.58 +.59 +.65

52-wk %Chg

+2.93 +6.80 -3.52 +4.02 +4.50 +5.29 +4.58 +5.73 +9.37

+43.37 +66.32 +17.59 +50.22 +43.64 +60.21 +46.81 +51.67 +63.78

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

343.06 2,665.62 3,957.89 5,644.63 6,024.28 21,384.49 32,798.30 22,902.58 3,200.96 10,846.98 1,682.86 2,919.30 4,866.90 6,004.28

+1.12 s +1.29 s +.48 s +.43 s +.89 s +1.72 s +.23 s +1.25 s -.21 t +1.17 s +2.11 s +.79 s +1.20 s +.36 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9234 1.5329 .9910 .001903 .1465 1.3753 .1288 .011087 .080128 .0343 .000886 .1415 .9497 .0315

Pvs Day .9173 1.5230 .9856 .001906 .1464 1.3756 .1289 .011076 .079796 .0341 .000882 .1411 .9475 .0314

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.63 +0.05 +4.1 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.42 +0.09 +6.1 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.76 +0.03 +3.0 GrowthI 23.02 +0.09 +4.4 Ultra 20.34 +0.05 +4.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.51 +0.11 +5.5 AMutlA p 23.94 +0.12 +3.4 BalA p 16.81 +0.06 +4.3 BondA p 12.01 +2.6 CapWA p 20.51 +0.08 +2.2 CapIBA p 48.59 +0.30 +1.5 CapWGA p 34.33 +0.29 +0.7 EupacA p 38.67 +0.38 +0.9 FdInvA p 34.00 +0.22 +4.3 GovtA p 14.14 +1.7 GwthA p 28.41 +0.16 +4.0 HI TrA p 10.89 +0.02 +4.0 IncoA p 15.94 +0.07 +2.9 IntBdA p 13.28 +1.6 ICAA p 26.67 +0.15 +3.3 NEcoA p 23.33 +0.13 +3.7 N PerA p 26.28 +0.18 +2.5 NwWrldA 48.48 +0.46 +2.7 SmCpA p 33.69 +0.33 +6.9 TxExA p 12.17 +1.9 WshA p 25.55 +0.14 +3.7 American Funds B: BalB p 16.76 +0.06 +4.1 CapIBB t 48.53 +0.30 +1.3 GrwthB t 27.52 +0.16 +3.8 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 28.73 +0.23 +1.7 IntlEqA 28.04 +0.24 +1.7 IntEqII I r 11.88 +0.11 +0.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.30 +0.13 -1.7 MidCap 27.31 +0.14 +6.8 MidCapVal 18.59 +0.16 +3.4 Baron Funds:

Growth 44.31 +0.19 +7.3 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.54 +0.02 +3.2 DivMu 14.56 -0.01 +1.8 TxMgdIntl 15.48 +0.11 +1.3 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.31 +0.10 +3.1 GlAlA r 18.23 +0.05 +1.9 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.03 +0.05 +1.7 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.31 +0.05 +1.9 CGM Funds: Focus 30.98 +0.27 +4.1 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 46.07 +0.27 +3.6 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.81 +0.16 +7.6 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.58 +0.16 +7.7 AcornIntZ 35.63 +0.30 +4.0 ValRestr 45.04 +0.30 +5.3 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.45 +0.06 +3.2 USCorEq2 9.88 +0.07 +8.3 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.15 +0.21 +3.8 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.48 +0.21 +3.8 NYVen C 31.07 +0.21 +3.6 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.48 +0.01 +2.9 Dimensional Fds: EmMktV 32.27 +0.38 +2.6 IntSmVa 15.84 +0.08 +5.0 USLgCo 34.39 +0.20 +5.1 USLgVa 18.55 +0.13 +9.0 US Micro 11.63 +0.07 +10.2 US SmVa 22.11 +0.20 +12.7 IntlSmCo 14.97 +0.09 +5.3 Fixd 10.33 +0.4 IntVa 17.44 +0.12 +2.4 Glb5FxInc 11.20 -0.01 +1.9 2YGlFxd 10.20 +0.6 Dodge&Cox:

Balanced 67.31 Income 13.25 IntlStk 33.05 Stock 101.99 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.60 NatlMunInc 9.66 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 17.65 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.55 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.20 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.06 FPACres 25.86 Fairholme 33.52 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.90 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.81 StrInA 12.32 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.98 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.90 FF2015 10.75 FF2020 12.99 FF2025 10.77 FF2030 12.86 FF2035 10.65 FF2040 7.44 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.99 AMgr50 14.36 Balanc 17.03 BlueChGr 39.94 Canada 51.99 CapAp 23.14 CpInc r 8.86 Contra 60.27 DisEq 21.92 DivIntl 28.20 DivGth 25.17 EmrMk 23.11

+0.23 +0.02 +0.34 +0.40

+5.1 +2.2 +3.8 +6.1

+0.11 +5.4 +2.5 +0.12 +5.5 +0.04 +1.6 +0.03 +1.5 +0.01 +1.3 +0.11 +4.2 +0.24 +11.4 +0.02 +5.2 +0.07 +3.5 +0.03 +2.6 +0.07 +3.6 +0.05 +0.04 +0.06 +0.05 +0.06 +0.05 +0.03

+3.1 +3.2 +3.5 +3.7 +3.8 +3.8 +3.9

+0.08 +0.06 +0.07 +0.09 +0.25 +0.08 +0.04 +0.23 +0.12 +0.17 +0.17 +0.27

+4.8 +3.7 +4.1 +5.2 +7.2 +8.0 +4.1 +3.6 +4.3 +0.7 +6.3 +2.2

Eq Inc 41.51 EQII 17.27 Fidel 29.55 GNMA 11.55 GovtInc 10.52 GroCo 73.09 GroInc 17.00 HighInc r 8.63 Indepn 21.25 IntBd 10.34 IntmMu 10.25 IntlDisc 30.65 InvGrBd 11.49 InvGB 7.18 LgCapVal 11.87 LatAm 51.90 LevCoStk 24.81 LowP r 34.62 Magelln 67.26 MidCap 26.05 MuniInc 12.58 NwMkt r 15.50 OTC 48.15 100Index 8.25 Ovrsea 30.79 Puritn 16.73 StIntMu 10.70 STBF 8.38 SmllCpS r 17.31 StratInc 10.98 StrReRt r 8.69 TotalBd 10.68 USBI 11.21 Value 62.27 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.42 IntlInxInv 33.86 TotMktInv 33.46 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.42 TotMktAd r 33.46 First Eagle: GlblA 41.70 OverseasA 20.23

+0.31 +0.13 +0.15 +0.01

+6.1 +5.8 +4.3 +2.3 +1.8 +0.17 +6.0 +0.09 +5.9 +0.02 +3.5 +0.06 +6.7 +0.01 +2.6 +1.7 +0.21 +1.0 +0.01 +2.5 +0.01 +2.7 +0.08 +5.6 -0.04 +0.1 +0.19 +8.2 +0.20 +8.4 +0.61 +4.6 +0.22 +11.2 +1.8 +0.06 +4.4 +0.25 +5.3 +0.03 +4.0 +0.16 -0.5 +0.06 +4.2 -0.01 +1.0 +1.3 +0.10 +8.6 +0.01 +2.6 +0.05 +2.1 +0.01 +2.8 +0.01 +2.1 +0.52 +9.4

+0.24 +5.0 +0.22 +1.2 +0.20 +6.0 +0.24 +5.0 +0.20 +6.0 +0.29 +4.3 +0.14 +4.0

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.83 +0.01 FoundAl p 10.12 +0.06 HYTFA p 10.02 IncomA p 2.09 USGovA p 6.72 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.08 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.11 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.04 +0.09 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.56 +0.05 GlBd A p 13.28 +0.06 GrwthA p 16.98 +0.14 WorldA p 14.11 +0.11 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 16.98 +0.14 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.30 +0.06 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.54 +0.23 GMO Trust: ShDurColl r 14.70 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.64 +0.05 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.54 +0.14 Quality 19.65 +0.05 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.05 +0.01 HYMuni 8.43 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.46 +0.01 CapApInst 33.75 +0.07 IntlInv t 54.90 +0.31 Intl r 55.42 +0.31 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.91 +0.20 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 28.47 +0.17 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 31.85 +0.20

+1.6 +3.1 +2.6 +2.8 +2.2 +5.6 +2.8 +2.6 +5.1 +0.2 +5.5 +1.0 +1.0 +1.1 +5.4 +4.6 NE +1.1 +2.3 +1.1 +3.2 +4.1 +2.6 +2.4 +0.9 +1.0 +4.0 +3.8 +4.1

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.51 +0.24 Div&Gr 18.36 +0.12 Advisers 18.23 +0.08 TotRetBd 10.87 +0.01 HussmnStrGr 12.80 -0.02 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.67 +0.13 AssetStA p 22.21 +0.14 AssetStrI r 22.37 +0.14 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.25 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.24 HighYld 7.90 +0.01 IntmTFBd 10.99 ShtDurBd 10.91 USLCCrPls 19.10 +0.12 Janus S Shrs: Forty 32.78 +0.14 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.07 +0.07 OvrseasT r 46.41 +0.48 PrkMCVal T 21.04 +0.14 Twenty T 64.07 +0.28 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.29 +0.07 LSBalanc 12.28 +0.06 LSGrwth 11.95 +0.06 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.42 +0.16 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.74 +0.24 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.01 +0.24 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.98 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.71 +0.17 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.88 +0.05 StrInc C 14.42 +0.05 LSBondR 13.83 +0.05 StrIncA 14.36 +0.06 Loomis Sayles Inv:

+5.1 +4.6 +4.3 +2.8 +0.2 -0.5 -0.3 -0.3 +1.9 +2.0 +3.4 +1.5 +0.9 +5.1 +4.0 +3.1 +9.2 +6.3 +4.0 +4.8 +4.1 +4.4 +8.1 +4.1 +4.0 +2.1 +6.7 +5.1 +4.9 +5.1 +5.1

InvGrBdA p 12.08 +0.04 InvGrBdY 12.08 +0.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.88 +0.08 BdDebA p 7.50 +0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.56 +0.05 ValueA 21.68 +0.13 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.78 +0.12 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.74 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.27 +0.02 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.68 +0.29 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.19 +0.01 TotRtBdI 10.19 +0.02 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.28 +0.05 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.80 +0.10 GlbDiscZ 28.13 +0.10 QuestZ 17.90 +0.10 SharesZ 20.20 +0.10 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.17 +0.28 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 41.72 +0.29 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.77 +0.11 Intl I r 17.55 +0.10 Oakmark r 38.80 +0.24 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.34 +0.02 GlbSMdCap 13.34 +0.08 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.17 +0.19 DvMktA p 29.45 +0.31 GlobA p 55.93 +0.23 IntBdA p 6.49 +0.01 MnStFdA 29.38 +0.19 RisingDivA 14.41 +0.09 S&MdCpVl 28.31 +0.21

+4.3 +4.3 +6.5 +3.3 +3.7 +4.4 +4.4 +2.9 +1.8 +2.3 +4.0 +4.0 +2.0 +4.0 +4.1 +3.8 +5.3 +6.4 +6.3 +4.8 +4.2 +4.8 +3.8 +4.5 +3.1 +2.4 +5.5 +2.2 +4.4 +3.4 +6.5

StrInA p 4.05 +0.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.08 +0.08 S&MdCpVl 24.44 +0.19 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.04 +0.08 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.16 +0.01 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.05 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.87 +0.05 ComodRR 8.18 +0.09 HiYld 9.02 +0.01 InvGrCp 11.23 +0.03 LowDu 10.43 RealRet 11.11 +0.07 RealRtnI 10.96 +0.03 ShortT 9.87 TotRt 11.05 +0.01 TR II 10.64 +0.01 TRIII 9.79 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 10.96 +0.03 TotRtA 11.05 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.05 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.05 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.05 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.05 +0.14 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.51 +0.26 Price Funds: BlChip 34.04 +0.16 CapApp 19.08 +0.09 EmMktS 30.76 +0.25 EqInc 22.28 +0.19 EqIndex 31.53 +0.19 Growth 28.49 +0.13 HlthSci 28.40 +0.07 HiYield 6.55 +0.01 IntlBond 9.85

+4.0 +3.2 +6.4 +3.2 +2.9 +2.9 +3.3 -1.2 +4.3 +4.0 +1.7 +1.6 +1.9 +0.7 +3.0 +2.4 +3.1 +1.9 +2.9 +2.7 +2.9 +2.9 +3.6 +5.0 +3.9 +5.1 +2.2 +6.1 +5.0 +3.6 +8.5 +3.6 +0.3

IntlStk 13.06 MidCap 51.38 MCapVal 22.03 N Asia 16.47 New Era 45.44 N Horiz 28.17 N Inc 9.43 R2010 14.50 R2015 11.12 R2020 15.24 R2025 11.09 R2030 15.83 R2040 15.87 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 29.60 SmCapVal 31.96 SpecIn 12.06 Value 21.71 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.62 VoyA p 21.11 RiverSource A: DEI 9.25 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.17 PremierI r 17.42 TotRetI r 11.61 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.78 S&P Sel 18.22 Scout Funds: Intl 29.94 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.83 AmShS p 38.84 Sequoia 118.68 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 50.41 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.99 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.23 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 47.74 Thornburg Fds:

+0.07 +3.7 +0.34 +8.2 +0.18 +6.3 +0.16 +2.0 +0.25 +4.1 +0.29 +10.1 +0.02 +2.6 +0.06 +3.9 +0.06 +4.2 +0.08 +4.4 +0.06 +4.5 +0.10 +4.7 +0.10 +4.8 +1.2 +0.23 +9.9 +0.21 +8.4 +0.02 +3.0 +0.18 +6.0 +0.07 +5.5 +0.09 +7.0 +0.05 +5.1 +0.06 +7.6 +0.09 +6.8 +0.06 +7.7 +0.20 +5.5 +0.11 +5.1 +0.16 +2.7 +0.25 +4.2 +0.25 +4.2 +0.57 +8.0 +0.31 +2.5 +2.1 +0.14 -0.4 +0.70 +3.1

IntValA p 25.23 +0.18 IntValue I 25.81 +0.18 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.94 +0.09 VALIC : StkIdx 23.40 +0.13 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 14.50 +0.11 EqIncA p 8.18 +0.04 GrInA p 18.33 +0.10 HYMuA p 9.27 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.96 CpOpAdl 73.05 +0.28 Energy 115.22 +0.97 500Adml 107.85 +0.62 GNMA Ad 10.82 HlthCr 52.37 +0.03 HiYldCp 5.55 +0.01 InfProAd 24.96 +0.06 ITsryAdml 11.28 +0.01 IntGrAdm 55.31 +0.27 ITAdml 13.61 ITGrAdm 9.87 +0.01 LtdTrAd 11.11 LTGrAdml 9.06 +0.04 LT Adml 11.05 MuHYAdm 10.42 PrmCap r 63.95 +0.18 STsyAdml 10.79 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.71 TtlBAdml 10.49 +0.01 TStkAdm 29.06 +0.17 WellslAdm 50.89 +0.19 WelltnAdm 51.62 +0.23 Windsor 42.69 +0.30 WdsrIIAd 44.23 +0.24 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.50 +0.11 CapOpp 31.62 +0.12 DivdGro 13.52 +0.08 Energy 61.36 +0.52 EqInc 19.04 +0.12

+1.7 +1.7 +3.5 +5.0 +5.4 +5.5 +6.5 +2.8 +2.0 +5.3 +2.1 +5.0 +2.3 +3.2 +3.1 +1.3 +2.4 +2.4 +1.8 +3.6 +1.1 +2.8 +1.6 +2.1 +3.7 +0.9 +0.5 +1.9 +2.1 +5.9 +3.1 +3.6 +6.2 +5.2 +4.5 +5.3 +2.7 +2.1 +4.3

Explr 62.44 GNMA 10.82 GlobEq 16.32 GroInc 24.50 HYCorp 5.55 HlthCre 124.09 InflaPro 12.71 IntlGr 17.38 IntlVal 31.06 ITIGrade 9.87 LifeCon 15.65 LifeGro 20.45 LifeMod 18.40 LTIGrade 9.06 Morg 16.06 MuInt 13.61 MuLtd 11.11 MuShrt 15.95 PrecMtls r 21.15 PrmcpCor 12.65 Prmcp r 61.63 SelValu r 17.14 STAR 18.20 STIGrade 10.71 StratEq 16.46 TgtRetInc 10.89 TgRe2010 21.26 TgtRe2025 11.82 TgtRe2015 11.76 TgRe2020 20.79 TgRe2030 20.19 TgtRe2035 12.18 TgtRe2040 19.95 TgtRe2045 12.59 USGro 16.93 Wellsly 21.00 Welltn 29.88 Wndsr 12.65 WndsII 24.92 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 107.83 Balanced 20.20 DevMkt 9.70 EMkt 26.43

+0.44 +9.0 +2.3 +0.12 +4.1 +0.13 +4.8 +0.01 +3.1 +0.09 +3.2 +0.04 +1.3 +0.08 +2.3 +0.19 +1.5 +0.01 +3.6 +0.05 +3.5 +0.10 +4.6 +0.08 +4.0 +0.04 +2.8 +0.06 +5.2 +1.8 +1.1 +0.5 +0.24 +3.5 +0.03 +4.5 +0.17 +3.7 +0.14 +7.5 +0.07 +3.8 +1.9 +0.11 +7.7 +0.03 +2.8 +0.08 +3.6 +0.06 +4.4 +0.05 +4.0 +0.09 +4.2 +0.10 +4.6 +0.07 +4.8 +0.11 +4.7 +0.07 +4.7 +0.09 +2.9 +0.08 +3.1 +0.13 +3.6 +0.09 +6.2 +0.14 +5.2 +0.63 +0.08 +0.06 +0.30

+5.0 +4.4 +1.8 +2.0

Europe 25.82 +0.13 -0.5 Extend 35.81 +0.25 +9.6 Growth 28.61 +0.14 +4.7 ITBnd 10.94 +0.01 +2.9 MidCap 17.83 +0.14 +9.0 Pacific 10.27 +0.07 +6.1 REIT r 16.54 +0.22 +11.5 SmCap 30.35 +0.23 +10.4 SmlCpGth 18.52 +0.12 +10.0 SmlCpVl 14.46 +0.12 +10.7 STBnd 10.51 +1.3 TotBnd 10.49 +0.01 +2.1 TotlIntl 14.67 +0.10 +1.8 TotStk 29.05 +0.17 +5.8 Value 19.70 +0.12 +5.7 Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst 9.62 +0.05 NS ExtIn 35.83 +0.24 +9.6 GrwthIst 28.62 +0.14 +4.8 InfProInst 10.17 +0.03 +1.3 InstIdx 107.13 +0.62 +5.1 InsPl 107.14 +0.62 +5.1 InsTStPlus 26.27 +0.16 +5.9 MidCpIst 17.87 +0.13 +9.0 SCInst 30.37 +0.22 +10.4 TBIst 10.49 +0.01 +2.2 TSInst 29.07 +0.17 +5.9 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 89.09 +0.52 +5.0 STBdIdx 10.51 +1.4 TotBdSgl 10.49 +0.01 +2.1 TotStkSgl 28.05 +0.16 +5.8 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.55 +0.07 +4.1 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.82 +0.4 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.45 +0.02 +4.1


B4 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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L

C Inside OREGON Crews dismantle rare covered railroad bridge, see Page C3. Klamath drought declaration opens way for assistance, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 2010

DOWNTOWN BEND

‘Confusion’ over parking rule changes delays vote By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A series of proposed changes to the city code were abandoned at the last minute Wednesday night by the Bend City Council, after it was told approval would inadvertently undercut parking enforcement efforts downtown. Councilors were due to vote the second and final time to approve a slate of amendments to the city code dealing with vehicles, traffic and parking, all of which had received preliminary approval at the March 3 council meeting. At that meeting, councilors opted to eliminate two proposed changes dealing with downtown parking prior to the vote. One change, if approved, would have created higher fines for repeat parking violators, while the second would have required those parking downtown to move their vehicle at least 1,000 feet when moving from one free two-hour parking spot to another — the current code sets the limit at 500 feet. However, city attorney Mary Winters told councilors Wednesday that their previous vote to strip the 1,000-foot rule from the code would have also eliminated the existing 500-foot rule. If approved, motorists would have been free to move from one space to another downtown indefinitely, provided they stayed no more than two hours in any one space. Councilors declined to vote to approve the code changes and now plan to return to discussions of downtown parking issues at an April 21 work session. Mayor Kathie Eckman described the mix-up as “the council’s error.” “There was just a lot of confusion about the motions that were made at that last meeting,” she said. Eckman said the mistake was only a minor setback and that there should be no harm in waiting to approve the code amendments until the council decides what to do about downtown parking. The council has considered a variety of possible changes to downtown parking policies in recent months, and several councilors have expressed an interest in tackling all of them in a single ordinance. Jeff Datwyler, the city’s downtown manager, has said that some owners and employees of downtown businesses have been taking up spaces intended for customers, racking up tickets and repeatedly moving from one parking space to another to avoid detection by parking enforcement. See Parking / C6

Downtown Bend parking citations While most vehicles cited for parking violations in downtown Bend received only one citation in a year’s time, several vehicles — many of which are owned by downtown employees and business owners, the city says — racked up multiple citations in the period between Feb. 21, 2009, and Feb. 21, 2010.

Redmond school workers’ contract OK’d By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — The Redmond School Board unanimously approved Wednesday both a grievance settlement and new labor contract with the district’s classified employees, a group that includes custodians, bus drivers and secretaries. The Oregon School Employees Association filed the grievance last month, arguing that the district was incorrectly calculating what a day of leave meant under the four-day week, which was adopted this

year in an attempt to make up a severe budget shortfall. Was it equal to eight hours or to the number of hours an employee now worked a day during the four-day school week? Until the board’s Wednesday meeting, the grievance had blocked progress on approval of the contract. Under the settlement, the union agreed to give up its grievance on sick leave. But employees will receive a few more hours of personal leave and be reimbursed for the hours equivalent to a full work day. In some cases,

which could be nine or more hours. The district estimates the settlement will cost between $8,000 and $15,000. The district had said if it lost the grievance fight, the cost would have climbed to about $100,000. “We came up with a very reasonable solution,” said John Witty, the district’s lawyer. Classified employees agreed to defer a raise for this year, but a 1 percent salary increase will take effect on June 30, the year’s final day. Salary will again be up for negotiation for

the 2011-12 year. Under the new contract, some employees will gain expanded health insurance benefits. Employees who work 30 hours or more will see an increase in the district’s contribution to their health insurance premium. For the current year, the district will pay up to $1,038 a month, up from $900. In 2010-11, the contribution limit increases to $1,095 a month. Employees who work 18 hours to 29 hours a week will continue to receive $900 a month contribution. Those who

work less than 18 are not eligible for insurance. Before voting, board member Jim Erickson praised the settlement’s balance between increasing some insurance payments and keeping salaries flat for the current year. “Though there were no great salary increases, I think there are a significant number of people who will benefit from (the insurance),” Erickson said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

State gathers information ahead of UGB appeal hearing

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Tour participants, including Bend city officials and Oregon Land Conservation and Development commissioners, stand along Clausen Road near Cooley Road on Wednesday. Bend Area Transit buses transported them on a tour of the city’s urban growth boundary proposal.

Bend UGB topic of tour for state officials By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

T

he message from the Oregon Department of Justice lawyer to a crowd standing outside Bend City Hall on Wednesday afternoon was clear: Do not talk to the people in green hats. Oregon Land Conservation and Development commissioners, wearing baseball caps that suited the St. Patrick’s Day holiday, took a bus tour of the city in preparation for two days of hearings on a proposal to expand Bend’s urban growth boundary. Bend staffers have appealed

to those commissioners an Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development decision that the city did not make its case for expansion under Oregon’s land use planning rules. Those rules require cities with a population greater than 25,000 to plan for a 20-year need for housing, employment lands, infrastructure and public utilities, and show the need for additional land before urban growth boundaries can be expanded. Wednesday’s tour will be considered evidence in the appeal hearings, said Assistant Attorney General Steve

Shipsey, general counsel to DLCD. So conversation with the commissioners about the proposed UGB expansion was a no-no. It was a bit like the wizard telling Dorothy to ignore the man behind the curtain. “Because of the way this is structured, as a public meeting with limited interaction with the commission, it’s challenging to have a good dialogue,” Bend City Manager Eric King said, riding on a Bend Area Transit bus along the city’s east side. State land use planners at DLCD have criticized Bend’s

expansion proposal, saying local officials did not consider increasing housing density and the availability of employment lands within the existing urban growth boundary. But King and city planners say Bend is not a metro area like Eugene or Portland and their proposal to add about 8,500 acres in various locations around the city is designed to preserve the city’s face. King said the city organized the tour to “give a little reality to a very intense process that can get lost in statutes and procedures.” See Tour / C6

If you go The Land Conservation and Development Commission will hold its hearing concerning Bend’s appeal of a state decision on its urban growth boundary in the Bend Police Department, Municipal Court Room, at 555 N.E. 15th St. The hearing begins 8:30 a.m. today, though other agenda items are likely to be heard before the Bend growth plan. The hearing of Bend’s appeal is likely to continue Friday.

7,000 6,420 vehicles cited

Black Butte Ranch security tax levy to appear on ballot

6,000 5,000 4,000

24-hour patrols can’t be maintained without additional revenue

3,000 By Diane S.W. Lee

2,050

The Bulletin

2,000 1,000 0

170 20 1

2 to 4

5 to 9

7

10 15 to and 14 more

Citations per vehicle Source: City of Bend Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

Black Butte Ranch residents will be asked to pay more for security services in a levy on the May ballot. Residents of the community northwest of Sisters will vote on a levy that could add 15 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value to their tax bills to pay for an increase in 24-hour patrol officer salaries.

Many Black Butte Ranch residents live only part of the year at the ranch and pay extra for the security patrols. The Deschutes County Commission on Wednesday approved a proposed local fiveyear levy of 55 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. If approved, homeowners will pay $75 more per year in property taxes for a home assessed at $500,000.

Residents currently pay a permanent levy and local option levy. The permanent tax rate for residents is $1.05 per $1,000 in assessed property value. The current levy costs residents an additional 40 cents per $1,000 in assessed property value. It was approved November 2005, and will expire November 2011. Homeowners now pay $725 per year in property taxes for

a home assessed at $500,000. If the proposed 3 percent local tax levy increase is approved by voters in May, homeowners at the ranch will have to pay $800 per year on the same house starting in November this year. In the first year of 2010-11, the proposed rate is estimated to generate the district approximately $282,100, and approximately $319,100 in the last year of 2014-15. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office also patrols at Black

Butte Ranch. There are currently six patrol officers on the ranch’s force and one administrator on staff at the ranch. The money will help fund patrol officer salaries, which is estimated to increase between 8 and 9 percent in the first year of the levy, according to Bill Carson, a union contract negotiator for Black Butte Ranch Special Services District. The district’s five-year contract with the patrol officers’ union expires in June. See Security / C6


C2 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

New principal selected for Bear Creek in Bend

students, staff and parents. Montoya will start work July 1.

Bend-La Pine Schools has hired Matthew Montoya to take over as principal at Bend’s Bear Creek Elementary School. Currently the principal at Pima Butte Elementary School in Maricopa, Ariz., Montoya has worked as a teacher and administrator for more than eight years. Superintendent Ron Wilkinson said the district had a strong pool of candidates, and Montoya was the best match for the school’s

Man pleads guilty in wife’s death A Terrebonne man has pleaded guilty to manslaughter and criminal mistreatment in the death of his paralyzed wife, who officials say he failed to bathe or take to the bathroom for up to two months. Paul Eugene Meyer, 58, was arrested in May after Sandra Meyer was found in the couple’s

home alive but suffering from bed sores and malnutrition. She was taken to the hospital and died several days later. Meyer entered the guilty plea on Wednesday in Deschutes County Circuit Court after a series of negotiations between his attorney, Aaron Brenneman, and prosecutors from the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office. The agreement recommends that Meyer be sentenced to 15 years in prison. His sentencing is scheduled for March 31.

N  R POLICE LOG

Northeast Second Street.

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:16 p.m. March 16, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:45 p.m. March 16, in the area of Southwest High Desert Drive.

Prineville Police Department

Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:29 p.m. March 16, in the 3100 block of Southwest Quartz Place. Theft — A purse was reported stolen at 1:30 p.m. March 16, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:28 p.m. March 16, in the 500 block of Southwest 12th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:40 a.m. March 16, in the 800 block of Southwest Deschutes Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:34 a.m. March 16, in the 1700 block of

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — James Thomas Mcallister, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:25 p.m. March 16, in the 800 block of Southwest Rimrock Way in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:29 p.m. March 16, in the 5100 block of Southwest Lynx Avenue in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:42 p.m. March 16, in the 7500 block of Southwest Falcon Crest Drive in Redmond. Theft — A license plate was reported stolen at 12:59 p.m.

March 16, in the 19000 block of Shoshone Road in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:43 a.m. March 16, in the 21200 block of Young Avenue in Redmond. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:18 p.m. March 15, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 116.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 3:49 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 64640 Old Bend-Redmond Highway. 4:37 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 60072 Cinder Butte Road. 9:36 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 60282 Cree Circle. 13 — Medical aid calls. Tuesday 12:40 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 65380 Tweed Road. 2:33 p.m. — Building fire, 1291 N.E. Fifth St.

First ‘Frankenstein’ film released in 1910 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, March 18, the 77th day of 2010. There are 288 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On March 18, 1910, the first filmed adaptation of Mary Shelley’s novel “Frankenstein,� produced by Thomas Edison’s New York movie studio, was released, with Charles Ogle as the Monster. ON THIS DATE In 1766, Britain repealed the Stamp Act of 1765. In 1837, the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, Grover Cleveland, was born in Caldwell, N.J. In 1922, Mohandas K. Gandhi was sentenced in India to six years’ imprisonment for civil disobedience. (He was released after serving two years.) In 1937, some 300 people, mostly children, were killed in a gas explosion at a school in New London, Texas. In 1940, Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini met at the Brenner Pass, where the Italian dictator agreed to join Germany’s war against France and Britain. In 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Hawaii statehood bill. (Hawaii became a state on Aug. 21, 1959.) In 1962, France and Algerian rebels signed a cease-fire agreement, which took effect the next day.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1965, the first spacewalk took place as Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov went outside his Voskhod 2 capsule, secured by a tether. In 1974, most of the Arab oilproducing nations ended their embargo against the United States. TEN YEARS AGO Taiwan ended more than ahalf century of Nationalist Party rule, electing an opposition leader (Chen Shui-bian) whose party favored Taiwan’s formal independence from the rest of China. FIVE YEARS AGO Doctors in Florida, acting on orders of a state judge, removed Terri Schiavo’s feeding tube. (Despite the efforts of congressional Republicans to intervene and repeated court appeals by Schiavo’s parents, the braindamaged woman died on March 31, 2005, at age 41.) Former Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland was sentenced to a year in prison and four months under house arrest for selling his office in a corruption scandal (he served 10 months behind bars). ONE YEAR AGO Under intense pressure from the Obama administration and Congress, the head of bailedout insurance giant AIG, Ed-

ward Liddy, told Congress that some of the firm’s executives had begun returning all or part of bonuses totaling $165 million. Tony-winning Actress Natasha Richardson, 45, died at a New York hospital two days after suffering a head injury while skiing in Canada. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Composer John Kander (“Chicago�) is 83. Nobel peace laureate and former South African president F.W. de Klerk is 74. Country singer Charley Pride is 72. Actor Kevin Dobson is 67. Actor Brad Dourif is 60. Jazz musician Bill Frisell is 59. Singer Irene Cara is 51. Movie writer-director Luc Besson is 51. Actor Thomas Ian Griffith is 48. Singer-songwriter James McMurtry is 48. Singeractress Vanessa L. Williams is 47. Olympic gold medal speedskater Bonnie Blair is 46. Country musician Scott Saunders (Sons of the Desert) is 46. Rock musician Jerry Cantrell (Alice in Chains) is 44. Rock singer-musician Miki Berenyi is 43. Rapper-actresstalk show host Queen Latifah is 40. Actor-comedian Dane Cook is 38. Rock musician Stuart Zender is 36. Singer Devin Lima (LFO) is 33. Rock singer Adam Levine (Maroon 5) is 31. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “I take a simple view of living. It is keep your eyes open and get on with it.� — Laurence Olivier, British actor (1907-89)

Files logging Scout abuse are a focus in civil trial By William Yardley New York Times News Service

PORTLAND — Files kept secret for decades that detail hundreds of claims of child sexual abuse by troop leaders of the Boy Scouts of America are at the center of a civil court case that began here Wednesday. Lawyers for a victim say the files show a centralized national effort to conceal abuse while lawyers for the Boy Scouts say the files demonstrate proactive efforts to stop it. The group has acknowledged that abuse occurred. The lawsuit, brought by a man who was abused by a Scout leader in Oregon in the early 1980s, seeks $4 million in damages for the victim, who was about 12 at the time. Timur Dykes, a former Scout leader and convicted pedophile, has admitted to abusing the man, Kerry Lewis, 37, when he was a boy. Scout leaders have been found guilty of sexual-abuse crimes in various cases across the country for more than two decades. On Wednesday, lawyers for Lewis said in court that they would make a broader case, bolstered by the recent re-

lease of about 1,000 individual files kept by the Boy Scouts of America from 1965 to 1984. The lawyers said they would argue that the national group was aware of abusive leaders across the country, including Dykes, and frequently took no action to prevent more abuse. “The Boy Scouts of America actually set back the child abuse prevention movement in this country, held it back, because of their secrecy,� Kelly Clark, a lawyer for Lewis, said in opening arguments here. Parts of the files have emerged in other lawsuits, and officials with the Boy Scouts, based in Irving, Texas, have previously acknowledged concealing some abuse. But in court on Wednesday, Chuck Smith, a lawyer for the Boy Scouts, said the files — sometimes called “the red-flag file� or the “confidential files� — showed that the group had been ahead of national trends in tracking abuse, and he said the files had been kept confidential only to protect victims. “We do not produce them willingly or voluntarily for a very good reason until by a court order,� Smith said in opening arguments. Clark and Paul Mones, the

other lead lawyer for Lewis, have led several high-profile child abuse cases, including against the Boy Scouts, the Roman Catholic Church and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Clark said the files, which were not made public on Wednesday, showed that national and regional Scout leaders had allowed troop leaders and volunteers to work with Scouts for years after complaints arose that they had abused children, sometimes even after they had been convicted of sexual abuse. He said evidence would show claims of abuse as early as the 1920s. In a statement, Deron Smith, the group’s national spokesman, said the Boy Scouts of America had aggressively addressed the issue of abuse. “Unfortunately, child abuse is a societal problem, and there is no fail-safe method for screening out abusers,� the statement said. “However, the BSA has some of the oldest and most respected youth protection measures of any youth-serving organization.� The jury trial, in Multnomah County Circuit Court, is expected to last more than a week.

Wenatchee World names new managing editor The Associated Press WENATCHEE, Wash. — The editor of The Daily News in Longview, Wash., has been named managing editor of The Wenatchee World. Cal FitzSimmons replaces Gary Jasinek, who announced his departure in December. Publisher Rufus Woods praised FitzSimmons’ skills in commu-

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 C3

O Klamath drought declaration opens way for assistance By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

Winston Ross / The Register-Guard

Crews with Hamilton Construction work to free a gable of the Chambers Railroad Bridge in Cottage Grove on Tuesday.

Crews dismantle rare covered railroad bridge By Winston Ross The Register-Guard

COTTAGE GROVE — The gable was stuck, “no trespassing” signs and all. Much as the Hamilton Construction crane tugging at it tugged, the gateway to the only covered railroad bridge this side of the Mississippi refused to budge. The gable couldn’t just be ripped off or bulldozed down, because the city of Cottage Grove is planning to rebuild the old structure once it’s carefully dismantled, piece by piece. Plus, anything too dramatic could send the whole bridge tumbling into the Row River, which would send giant beams tumbling to the next bridge downstream, a mere 200 feet away.

Precise work This job required surgical care, Hamilton superintendent Bob Fletcher said. “It’s a salvage job,” Fletcher said. “Not a demolition.” The crew was prepared for hang-ups such as this, having already chain sawed key points at the east-facing gable just enough to free it, while still keeping it intact. Jason Stone, operating a man lift, and Don Fradd, wielding the chain saw, coasted up to the stuck spot and sawed it loose. Then, as the gable swung gently south, Fradd reached out and guided it free from a protruding beam, until it was dangling over the river. “It’s quite a show they’re putting on,” said Lee Kohen, a Cottage Grove resident who has walked over to watch each of the two days this week that Hamilton has been

removing pieces of the bridge. On Monday, the crew took the siding and then the roof off, in five parts, flying it above the structure. “What’s really amazing,” Kohen said, “is how they’re able to take this down without demolishing it.”

Precarious lean It’s also remarkable that the bridge is still standing. The 94year-old structure had been leaning precariously to one side, lifted clear off of its pier at the north end. Were it not for the six steel cables anchored to a platform that Hamilton built and slid beneath it, the bridge could have fallen into the water at any moment, city engineers say. That’s why the City Council last month declared an emergency to help jump through the state and federal agency hoops necessary to remove the bridge during a June-October window when in-water work is permitted. The city already had the cash to do the job, from a $1.3 million grant from the National Historic Covered Bridge Preservation Program. The plan was to take the bridge down this summer and rebuild it the next. But nature made the task a bit more urgent, as engineers discovered that a Jan. 12 windstorm had knocked the bridge farther out of plumb than it was the last time it had been measured. “The project is a puzzle,” said Stewart McCornack, a consulting engineer with the Eugene firm OBEC, which is overseeing the project for the city. “It’s like taking apart a hand-built car.”

GRANTS PASS — Gov. Ted Kulongoski issued a state drought declaration for Klamath and surrounding counties on Wednesday, and asked the Obama administration to follow suit with a federal disaster declaration so farmers can get loans and other assistance. Meanwhile, federal authorities are expected to announce today whether irrigation water will have to be cut off to farmers like it was in 2001 to help protected fish survive a drought. A lack of rain and snow over the winter makes it likely farmers will not get what they need to stay in business. NOAA Fisheries Service issued a new plan, known as a biological opinion, dictating how much water has to go down the Klamath River to sustain threatened coho salmon. It takes the place of a federal court order dictating flows the past four years. The plan finds that operating the irrigation project without restraint will send coho to extinction, and lays out minimum flows for salmon in wet as well as dry years. Minimum levels also have to be maintained in Upper Klamath Lake, the irrigation project’s main reservoir, to sustain two endangered species of sucker. The governor’s drought declaration allows farmers to uncap emergency drought wells to sustain their fields. “The water situation presents a real threat of economic loss to those who live and work in the Klamath Basin — and the state is going to do everything in its power to help,” Kulongoski said in a statement. Kulongoski sent a letter to U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack saying rain has been 81 percent of normal, reservoirs were 51 percent of normal and snowpack 71 percent of normal in the region. “A result of such conditions has led the Bureau of Reclamation to estimate that irrigation water will be in short supply this season and may not be available until late in the irrigation sea-

“ The water situation presents a real threat of economic loss to those who live and work in the Klamath Basin — and the state is going to do everything in its power to help.” — Gov. Ted Kulongoski, in a statement son, which will be too late to be of significant value to agriculture in the county,” the governor wrote. A federal disaster declaration would open access to aid, mostly low-interest loans. Kulongoski has acknowledged that state and federal assistance will not keep farmers from suffering losses. Greg Addington, director of the Klamath Water Users Association, said all wells within the irrigation project provide enough water to keep 20 percent to 25 percent of the land producing crops, which range from potatoes to pasture. This year will be the first test for many of them, drilled since the 2001 irrigation shut-off. Addington said he has been keeping in touch with the Klamath Tribes to avoid the bitterness that erupted during the 2001 irrigation shut-off, when federal agents were called in to guard headgates forced open to allow water to flow to the irrigation project. The Klamath Basin Reclamation Agreement, signed last month to end years of fighting over water in the Klamath Basin, has yet to be put in force or funded by Congress. “It is going to be hard,” Addington said. “It’s hard to have your whole life tied up in the ability to get surface water and you can’t get it. “You can’t help but look for how come. Some of it is related to climate and precipitation. Some of it is related to biological opinions, and that is just the way it is.”

O  B Man says civil rights Massage therapist accused of sex abuse violated in gun seizure OREGON CITY — An Oregon City massage therapist has been arrested on an accusation he sexually abused a patient. Oregon City police said Wednesday a woman in her 40s reported the abuse last week, and detectives later recorded a phone call between her and massage therapist Rick McDaniel. Police say the 50-year-old McDaniel admitted the illegal contact during the recorded conversation and blamed his behavior on a sexual addiction. McDaniel has been lodged at the Clackamas County Jail on charges of second-degree and third-degree sex abuse. The woman told police she had been seeing McDaniel for treatment of a back problem and was not abused at earlier sessions.

MEDFORD — An Oregon Department of Transportation planner who had his guns seized after being placed on administrative leave wants Medford officials to address what he describes as a civil rights violation. David Pyles bought two handguns and an AK-47 rifle shortly after he was placed on leave, and police across Southern Oregon feared he might retaliate against ODOT. Pyles surrendered to a SWAT team early March 8 and was taken to Rogue Valley Medical Center for a mental health evaluation. Police seized five firearms, but later returned them. In an e-mail to Medford Mayor Gary Wheeler and City Council, Pyles asks what they will do to ensure a “similar militaristic police action” doesn’t happen to others. The mayor told the Mail Tribune newspaper he has complete confidence in the police department.

Woman indicted after Street lights stay on baby’s body found in Myrtle Creek ENTERPRISE — The Wallowa County district attorney’s office says a woman has been indicted after two fishermen found her stillborn baby near a roadside in northeastern Oregon. The fisherman found the baby March 8 along Oregon 82, the road that leads into Minam State Park. The Oregonian reports that the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office in Clackamas determined that the girl had been stillborn. A Wallowa County grand jury indicted 22-year-old Olivia Lorraine Soares on Tuesday on charges of felony second-degree abuse of a corpse and misdemeanor concealing the birth of an infant.

MYRTLE CREEK — The Myrtle Creek City Council rejected a proposal to turn off almost half the city’s 293 street lights. Such a move would have cut about $20,000 from the annual lighting budget. The council instead opted to impose a $3 monthly utility fee to help offset the cost of operating the lights. Most of the more than 50 residents who crowded into council chambers wanted the lights to stay on, saying well-lit streets are safer. — From wire reports

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C4 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

State’s exporters need consistent trade policies

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regon exporters are hoping President Obama can help them tear down trade barriers. But it’s not going to help that Obama has been good at putting them up.

Oregon exporters racked up nearly $15 billion in foreign sales last year or about 9 percent of Oregon’s gross domestic product, according to The Oregonian. With some help, exporters could do much more. The state’s seafood dealers, for instance, want the European Union to scrap a duty of 20 percent on imported cooked and peeled shrimp. The Oregonian detailed many other issues for exporters on Tuesday — “border delays, inconsistent regulations, trade-promotion glitches and travel-visa problems.” There’s even a serious shortage of shipping containers to put exported goods in. There are many ways Obama could help. Last week, he launched the National Export Initiative, designed to put the full resources of the federal government behind American businesses that export goods and services. One of the biggest things he could do, though, is consistently support open trade. Obama knows that. “When we give other countries the privilege of that free and fair access, we can expect it in return,” he said last week. “That’s the spirit in which we’ll move forward.”

Oregon exporters racked up nearly $ 1 5 billion in foreign sales last year or about 9 percent of Oregon’s gross domestic product, according to The Oregonian. With some help, exporters could do much more. He took a step backward last year. He announced tariffs on Chinese tires in September. They start out at 35 percent, then decrease annually. U.S. tire manufacturers didn’t ask for that. Unions called for it and Obama listened. Tire distributors, such as Les Schwab, fought against the tariff, concerned that it would raise prices to consumers. Sure enough, tire prices did rise. And the U.S. reputation for dealing fairly on trade fell. Oregon exporters can’t very well hope other countries will drop their protectionism and buy American if we’re putting up our own trade barriers.

Guarantee cleanup of solar cell farms R

esidents of northern Lake County are caught in what’s likely to become an increasingly common problem. As the national demand for green power rises, pressure will mount to site generating facilities in rural areas. Like much of the rest of southeastern Oregon, Lake County is prime siting ground for solar power panels. Energy companies, aided by tax credits and other financial assistance, are taking notice. Some of their neighbors are not happy. Folks don’t choose to live in places like Christmas Valley because they love the urban life. Rather, they move to remote sites to get away from it all, sometimes including such things as pavement and land-line telephones. The neat rows of solar panels that have been cropping up in their neighborhoods simply do not fit with that lifestyle. They may be better than the large wind turbines that grow along the Columbia River, but that’s about it in some folks’ minds. We cannot always pick our neighbors, and with the demand for solar power growing, more solar neighbors are certain to move in. In reality, what those panels produce — electricity — may well be the most profitable crop that can be found for a region that is

high and dry and where the expansion of irrigation pumping is prohibited because of a falling water table. Meanwhile, the Lake County Commission should do what it can to ease tensions between the north county’s residents and those who hope to farm the sun there. The residents worry that if solar generation sites are abandoned, a mess will remain, and that’s a legitimate concern. Though county planners say they fear solar companies will not locate in the county if they must insure against abandonment, that fear may well be overblown. County commissioners have yet to have a final say on the matter, though they’re likely to discuss it next week. Ken Kestner, commission chairman, says he’s continuing to explore ways to assure cleanup if it’s needed. He worries, though, about putting a requirement on a single industry. Other industries, he notes, face no such requirement. No matter what the commission decides, some neighbors will remain unhappy, we suspect. Yet solar power generation is clean and quiet, and while it may not look like a cow or an alfalfa field, it’s likely to be a relatively small intrusion of the modern world on the rural Western lifestyle.

My Nickel’s Worth Cost of unions Labor unions once were the organization to make fairness in the workplace. Seniority. The unions now control who a contractor can employ or a grocery store. What happened to the constitution, freedom to work, freedom to hire? When you look to hire someone, you check their ability, personality to be a team worker. The unions dictate who to hire. I was in a union for 40 years in a factory where there were people unable to do the work. As a result, I paid their salary with my work. It prevented my promotion. Teachers unions. New people will not teach. The union dictates you cannot fire bad teachers. Result, poor education of our children, who will not be able to hold jobs. The cost of unions’ rules will be paid by high taxes. Who pays them? You and me. John McBride Terrebonne

ments on their loans until they were repaid. Further they agreed that if they didn’t make those payments, they would forfeit their ownership. Banks are simply following through with the signed agreements. Nowhere was it stated that banks had to forgive the debt, renegotiate the contracts or otherwise allow the homeowners to keep homes that were not owned by them. I can sympathize with someone being unemployed, I was unemployed for nine months. I can appreciate the pain and anguish of losing the place you live. But there is no justification for trashing the home in retaliation against the bank. Banks give people hundreds of thousands of dollars supported by a signature and a promise of repayment. If the new attitude is that every time homeowners get into trouble (whether of their own making or not), that they are entitled to a handout from the bank or the government, the system will collapse from lack of accountability. Jake Elliott Bend

Take responsibility

Never-ending taxes

Recent media coverage has highlighted the inexcusable trend of people trashing their homes prior to banks taking possession as a result of foreclosure. This behavior demonstrates a huge lack of responsibility and accountability, which are the very things that caused the housing crisis in the first place. When homeowners purchased property, they signed contracts stating they would make monthly pay-

As a taxpayer and property owner, I am always willing to support our community and state in efforts to make this a better place to live. But, in reviewing our latest property tax statement I find we are still paying for our past bonds: the jail bond, the fairground bond, the library bond, the forestry patrol bond, and the four school bonds of 1992, 1998, 2002 and 2007. In addition we now will have the

new COCC bond on top of the new tax Measures 66 and 67. When is enough enough? Gene Cotter Bend

Vasa is great We’ve said it before and we say it again: Bishop Robert Vasa is the best thing that ever happened to the Diocese of Baker. He is a great moral and spiritual leader! Hermit Sisters Mary Diana and Mary Magdalen Springfield

Fix sidewalks The city of Bend is to be commended for its upgrade and safety of neighborhood sidewalks, street corners and at intersections. Now I am wondering if there’s enough money in the city coffers to begin more improvement on stretches of sidewalks that have crumbled or cracked and are hazardous to walking. An example: On Wilson Avenue from Third Street to the tracks, past Centennial (east from Third) and from Wilson Avenue north on Third to the railroad overpass. Could somebody in street maintenance from Bend take a walk in these areas and see what I mean? Besides the obvious repair needed, there are stretches of no sidewalks at all. Hopefully, this is not common throughout the city, but not where I live. David Glawe Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

St. Charles Bend, Catholic Church split over tubal ligations By Todd Taylor Bulletin guest columnist

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inety-two years ago a group of nuns from Tipton, Ind., boarded a train and headed west to start a hospital on the banks of the Deschutes River in the then-tiny town of Bend, Ore. The Sisters of St. Joseph ran the St. Charles Hospital for several decades before giving the incredible gift of the hospital and its assets to the community in the 1970s. At that time St. Charles Bend became a community nonprofit hospital, but the sisters continued to have operational oversight and influence until Sister Catherine Hellmann retired and moved back to Indiana in 2001. The hospital’s ties to the Catholic Church have remained strong through the years. On Feb. 15, Bishop Robert Vasa of the Diocese of Baker announced the sad

news that the diocese had decided to end the formal sponsorship relationship between the church and St. Charles Bend. This decision has been in the making for several years as Bishop Vasa and hospital leaders have respectfully disagreed on the interpretation of some of the ethical and religious directives that guide Catholic health care organizations. In particular, the two sides have been unable to agree on the practice of tubal ligations, a form of permanent female reproductive sterilization that is often conducted in the hospital setting after a woman has a C-section. Bishop Vasa asked St. Charles Bend in 2007 for an audit of the hospital’s compliance with the ethical and religious directives. The hospital has been transparent about its practices and openly provided the bishop with the information he requested, including the

IN MY VIEW number of tubal ligations performed at St. Charles Bend annually — which is approximately 240. We have had many thoughtful conversations at the Cascade Healthcare Community Board of Director’s meetings about if it would be possible for St. Charles Bend to stop offering tubal ligations — a practice that has been in place at the hospital for several decades — in order to come into compliance with the ethical and religious directives according to Vasa’s interpretation. In the end, we couldn’t escape our conviction that the hospital has a sacred trust with its patients to provide necessary health care services to the Central Oregon community. It is our sincere feeling that the decision to have a tubal ligation

lies with the patient, her physician and within her own spiritual beliefs. The decision by Bishop Vasa is difficult for us as it symbolizes a break with our history. But, we feel it is important for the community to understand we have no plans to stray from the values that have always guided our decisions when it comes to patient care. The hospital does not conduct elective abortions and intends to continue following its policies around this issue. In addition, we have a robust end-of-life care program that evaluates a patient’s medical needs and provides comfort care measures including pain medications when necessary. Ultimately, we respect the sanctity of human life and will continue to do so. The hospital has a bioethics committee that reviews sensitive patient cases and helps us make decisions that are in

the best interest of patient care. In addition, the CHC board plans to develop its own set of ethical standards based largely on the ethical and religious directives we have followed for nearly a century. Ultimately, we expect little to change at St. Charles Bend. Our name will remain the same and the cross will remain on top of the building. The Sisters of St. Joseph founded St. Charles Bend with a mission to serve all patients in need. Although Bishop Vasa has ended our formal relationship with the Catholic Church, the board is resolute in its dedication to protecting patients. That mission continues to guide hospital leaders and caregivers today and will continue into the future. Todd Taylor is chairman of the Cascade Healthcare Community Board of Directors.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 C5

O Love C. Bragg

D N   Charles Edward Raney, of Bend Nov. 17, 1931 - Mar. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel Bend, 541-382-5592, www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Saturday, March 20, 2010, New Hope Church, 22080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend, OR 97702. Contributions may be made to:

The Giving Plate (Food Relief/Outreach Ministry), 60445 S. Hwy. 97, Bend, OR 97702.

Dagmar Annerose Steffan, of Bend July 10, 1960 - March 11, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine. 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: 11:00 am, Saturday, March 20, 2010, at Baird Memorial Chapel, 16468 Finley Butte Rd., La Pine, OR.

Kurt Paul Fowers, of Crescent Mar. 8, 1947 - Mar. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Graveside Service will be held on Tuesday, March 23, 2010 at 1:00 p.m. at the Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.

Joseph Longbrake, of Klamath Falls May 12, 1920 - March 11, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine. 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Private family services.

Joachim Erich, of Bend Jan. 3, 1970 - March 11, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine. 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: 11:00 am, Saturday, March 20, 2010, at Baird Memorial Chapel, 16468 Finley Butte Rd., La Pine, OR.

Pascal Steffan, of Bend June 18 2002 - March 11, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine. 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: 11:00 am, Saturday, March 20, 2010, at Baird Memorial Chapel, 16468 Finley Butte Rd., La Pine, OR.

Walter Eugene Jones, of Bend Jan. 26, 1926 - Mar. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592 Services: LDS Chapel, 60800 Tekampe Rd., Bend, Saturday, March 20, 2010. Viewing: 10 a.m. and Service: 11 a.m.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Jessie Marie Churchill Darrin Feb. 1, 1909 - Mar. 16, 2010 Jessie Marie Churchill was born to Dayton Elmyron Churchill and Pearl Lurene Spellman Churchill, on Feb. 1, 1909, in Curtis, Nebraska. Jessie had one sister, Etta Fern Churchill Swanson, preceding her in death in 1997, and one brother, William (Bill) Jessie Darrin Harold Churchill, who passed in 2001. Jesse married John Herman Harder on April 24, 1926, in McCook, NE. Jessie had one child, a daughter, Ida Arlene Harder Harmon and two grandsons, John Michael Harmon and Ronald Jesse Harmon, and three greatgrandchildren along with two great-great grandchildren. John Harder and Jessie moved to Bonners Ferry, Idaho during the Dust Bowl days and then moved to Portland, OR. Jessie lost John, her husband of 37 years in 1963. Jessie worked as a Teamster Warehouseman at Meier & Frank in the warehouse in NW Portland. She remarried Claude Darrin and they moved to La Pine in 1973, after retiring in 1971. After buying Arizona property, Claude and Jessie became Snowbirds for several years. In the summer, while in the northwest, they became ardent salmon fishermen. Jessie became known for her great fishing success and was known as the "Fishing Lady".

After Claude passed away of complications from Alzheimers disease, Jessie became a walker for the annual Bend Memory Walk. She started at age 90 and walked nine years to age 99. For her 10th and final walk at age 100, her great friends at La Pine's Prairie House wheeled her in a wheelchair. Jessie loved to travel and made many trips with her husband, Claude Darrin, to Alaska, Arizona, Mexico, Las Vegas, and the Western States. She attended several family reunions in Wray, CO, including the one in 2009, celebrating the 100 years of family settlement in the area and Jessie was in her 100th year. She traveled with her daughter, Arlene Harmon, to several Madam Alexander Doll conventions in Nashville, TN, the Queen Mary in Los Angeles, CA, Portland, OR, and San Jose, CA. There will be a graveside memorial on Friday, Mar. 19, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at Skyline Memorial Gardens in Portland OR. On Monday, Mar. 22, 2010, there will be a memorial at 2:00 p.m. in the Prairie House in La Pine, OR. Her family and friends, who were fortunate in having her for so many years, will miss Jessie. The family requests that in lieu of flowers that you may donate money or sponsor a person to walk in the Memory Walk of the Alzheimer's Association of Central Oregon. Services were entrusted to Deschutes Memorial Garden, 541-382-5592.

June 2, 1975 - March 12, 2010 Love C. Bragg passed away March 12, 2010 from a pre-existing medical condition. She resided in Bend. Love was born in Columbia, Missouri on June 2, 1975 to her father, Lynn Robert Colvard, and her mother, Glenda Sue Steelman-Garoutte. Her grandmother, Barbara May Hunt, and her grandfathers, Willard Bernell Steelman and Robert Colvard, preceded her in death. Love is survived by her mother and father; stepfather, John Garoutte; her children, Mariah Summer Yegge, Elle Sue and Elijah James Halvorsen; her brothers, Darrell Elsworth Miller, Michael Colvard, Ethan Colvard, Joshua Garoutte, Jeremiah Garoutte; sisters, Laura Lea Harder and Bobbie Jo Tyler. Her grandmother, Clara Lee Steelman, lives on as well. She was a great aunt and is also survived by numerous cousins, nephews, nieces, aunts, uncles, great aunts and great uncles. Love’s life may have ended too soon at the young age of 34, but her memories and the love we share for her will live on forever. She was a spontaneous child and an adventurous adult. She learned to live every day, as she said, “as if it was her last”, when she knew it could end at any given moment. We love and miss her greatly and will remember all the wonderful things she brought into our lives. We all have a reason for being on this earth, and her family who has struggle through many hardships, now believe hers may have been to bring us closer, when we may have lost one another forever. The loss of her beautiful life will not be in vain. Love is now protected in the arms of Our Heavenly Father, as is her memory within our Hearts. There will be a memorial service/wake to celebrate her life in June 2010.

Olivia Tyner-Karl June 5, 1975 - March 15, 2010 Olivia Tyner-Karl passed peacefully during her sleep on March 15, 2010. She was 34. She leaves behind her parents, Sherry L. West of Bend, OR, and Dr. John E. Tyner of Elma, WA; grandparents, Olivia Frank and Tyner-Karl Joanne McLucas of Elma, WA; a son, Hunter Raymond Karl, 15, and daughter, Allissa Grace Karl, 11, both of whom she loved deeply, both of Bend; and siblings, Jason McLucas, Stephanie West, and Sarah West. Olivia was a 1993 graduate of Ashland High School where she was involved as a manager of the volleyball team. She also loved riding horses and travel, as a young adult. As a young child, she loved ballet and dance and playing the piano. As an adult, laughing, cooking and reading novels, was her passion. She will be dearly missed and loved by her family and friends. Thank you Olivia for your light and love. Services will be held for Olivia at 2 p.m. Friday, March 19, 2010 at Hollinshead Park, Bend. Friends welcome. Autumn Funerals of Bend is in charge of arrangements, 541-318-0842.

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Backgammon champion Tim Holland

WORLD’S SHORTEST MAN DIES

By Dennis Hevesi New York Times News Service

Tim Holland, who was widely considered the world’s greatest backgammon player during that ancient board game’s modern heyday, in the 1960s and ’70s, died on March 10 at his home in West Palm Beach, Fla. He was 79. The cause was emphysema, his daughter, Vanessa Holland, said. In winning tournament after tournament and three world championships, Holland brought a cool self-confidence to the rapid-fire clacking of the checker-like pieces (the “men”) around the 24 narrow triangles of the backgammon board. “He did not speak; he did not smile; his eyes rarely left the table,” Jon Bradshaw wrote of Holland in his 1975 book, “Fast Company” (Harper’s). “There was a palpable arrogance in his play. He rolled the dice and moved the men about the board with the poise of a man who knows that victory is only a matter of time.” Holland won the World Backgammon Association championship in 1967, 1968 and 1971. (No championship tournaments were held in 1969 or 1970.) Besides retaining the title, he pocketed more than $30,000 in prize money for each of those championships. By the early 1970s he was averaging $60,000 a year in tournament money, and that did not include significant earnings from bets he had placed on himself or his percentage from the winnings of the highest bidders at tournaments where the best players were “auctioned off.” “Holland is generally believed to be the best backgammon player in the world,” The New York Times said in a 1974 article describing the renaissance of a game played in the days of the pharaohs. In the five years since 1969, it said, the number of Americans playing backgammon jumped from 200,000 to two million. In that revival, Holland saw another path to profit — teaching. He wrote three books: “Beginning Backgammon” (1973); “Better Backgammon” (1974), for intermediate players; and “Backgammon for People Who Hate to Lose” (1977), about the psychological aspects of the game.

The Associated Press file photo

The world’s shortest man, He Pingping, and world’s tallest man, Sultan Kosen, of Turkey, 27, stand together Jan. 14 during an event organized by the Guinness World Records in Istanbul. According to a spokesperson for Guinness World Records in London, He Pingping, 21, died after developing chest problems while filming a television program in Italy. The Chinese-born man, who became a record-holder in March 2008, died Saturday.

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541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Velma Frances Hampel January 19, 1923 - March 11, 2010 Velma Frances Hampel passed away peacefully on March 11, 2010 at St. Charles Hospital surrounded by her loving family. Frances had been a strong and dignified woman all her life and died with the same grace that she had shown throughout her 87 years. Frances was born January 19, 1923, in Mountain Home, Idaho, of Velma Skelton and Robert Jackson. She grew up in Rocky Bar, Idaho, where her parents managed a small hotel. Frances enjoyed the outdoors especially mountain flowers and loved spending summers at her grandfather’s cattle ranch in Pine, Idaho. She graduated from Gem State Academy in Caldwell, Idaho. After graduating, she met Robert Stiegler working in a bakery in The Dalles and they married on November 4, 1943 in Ely, Nevada. Bob was a master baker requiring frequent moves for his job. Their children were born in various towns around the West. Becky Stiegler was born on July 10,1944 and was followed by Trish on June 26, 1946, David on January 22, 1948, and Judy on July 4, 1953. As the family grew, Frances took a job as a nurses’ aide to help support them. Her love for helping people flourished and she decided to go into nursing graduating in 1958 in Reno as an LPN in the first LPN class in the state of Nevada. Bob had died of lung cancer in 1957 and Frances was left to raise 4 children on her own. She met her second husband Ed Hampel while working in Reno and they were married in 1959 and a fifth child was born to Frances. Janet Hampel was born October 9, 1960. The family moved to Grants Pass, Oregon, as the older kids left home and went to college. Ed died in 1983 in Paradise, California, where they had moved some years later. Frances moved to Bend in 1988 where two of her children, Judy and Janet, had settled and were raising their children. She retired from nursing when she moved and continued to help people, volunteering for a variety of organizations and programs over the years, including: working in the cafeteria at the old St. Francis School; Meals on Wheels; COBRA (now Saving Grace); for the First Presbyterian Church in various capacities and Grandma’s House. For the past dozen years, she volunteered with the Victim’s Assistance Program of the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, working three to four days a week. Her last day at work was the Friday before she passed. In her later years she also enjoyed working in her garden box growing vegetables and flowers, and traveling with her family to visit her kids and grandkids. Her travels took her as far away as Mexico, Washington D.C., and various Civil War sites in the Eastern U.S.; always enjoying meeting people and carrying their stories with her. Frances always had a sense of adventure and loved to travel the country by train as she didn’t like to fly. Frances is survived her older sister, Barbara Walters of Manson, Washington, her 5 children Becky (Paul) Smith of Clarksville, Tennessee, Pat (Bill) Kelley of Grand Junction, Colorado, David (Pamela Hewitt) Stiegler of Greeley, Colorado, Judy Stiegler (Mike Dugan), of Bend, and Janet Read (Randy Gonyer) of Bend, a step-son, Jay Hampel of Morongo Valley, California, 9 grandchildren and 9 great-grand children. A celebration of Frances’ life was held on March 13 and according to her wishes her ashes will be spread over the hills in her beloved Idaho. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions be made to the Deschutes County Victims Assistance Program, C/O District Attorney’s Office, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, OR 97701, or a charity of your choice in Frances’ name.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MARCH 18

FRIDAY

Today: Abundant sunshine.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL 

53

20

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

49/28

46/30

55/28



46/30

Marion Forks

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman 48/17 Redmond Prineville 53/20 Cascadia 53/21 52/21 Sisters 52/19  Bend Post 53/20

50/17

53/36

Portland

Burns 50/18

60/30

77/46



Elko Reno

61/31

Mostly sunny skies today. San Francisco 70/51 Mostly clear skies tonight.



52/25

58/32

54/24

51/19

56/20

42/22

Boise

53/20

Idaho Falls

Christmas Valley

Crater Lake

Bend

67/35

Redding

Silver Lake

49/14

47/28

Helena

Grants Pass

52/18

Chemult

Missoula 

Eugene

Eastern

48/17



47/27



 Salt Lake City 54/38



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases First

Full

Last

Mar. 23 Mar. 29 April 6

New

April 14

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

66 32

Astoria . . . . . . . . 53/39/0.07 . . . . . . 57/33/s. . . . . . . 65/41/s Baker City . . . . . . 53/28/0.00 . . . . . . 53/21/s. . . . . . . 49/25/s Brookings . . . . . . 62/37/0.00 . . . . . . 67/47/s. . . . . . . 67/44/s Burns. . . . . . . . . . 56/26/0.00 . . . . . . 51/20/s. . . . . . . 49/22/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 55/35/0.00 . . . . . . 60/30/s. . . . . . . 65/34/s Klamath Falls . . . 56/23/0.00 . . . . . . 60/24/s. . . . . . . 58/25/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 43/30/0.00 . . . . . . 58/26/s. . . . . . . 58/24/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 50/19/0.00 . . . . . . 50/16/s. . . . . . . 58/23/s Medford . . . . . . . 61/44/0.00 . . . . . . 67/33/s. . . . . . . 70/34/s Newport . . . . . . . 54/39/0.03 . . . . . . 58/39/s. . . . . . . 66/43/s North Bend . . . . . . 55/37/NA . . . . . . 59/40/s. . . . . . . 62/39/s Ontario . . . . . . . . 61/42/0.00 . . . . . . 58/30/s. . . . . . . 55/30/s Pendleton . . . . . . 55/38/0.00 . . . . . . 54/24/s. . . . . . . 61/29/s Portland . . . . . . . 56/43/0.02 . . . . . . 61/36/s. . . . . . . 63/37/s Prineville . . . . . . . 49/20/0.00 . . . . . . 53/21/s. . . . . . . 55/22/s Redmond. . . . . . . 52/18/0.00 . . . . . . 55/20/s. . . . . . . 58/22/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 57/37/0.00 . . . . . . 65/36/s. . . . . . . 67/36/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 56/39/0.01 . . . . . . 60/32/s. . . . . . . 63/35/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 53/22/0.00 . . . . . . 52/19/s. . . . . . . 55/25/s The Dalles . . . . . . 60/36/0.00 . . . . . . 59/30/s. . . . . . . 62/32/s

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48/23 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 in 1947 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.07” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 in 1971 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.51” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.16” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.40” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.32 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.28 in 1993 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:27 a.m. . . . . . .7:42 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:51 a.m. . . . . . .8:38 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .1:49 p.m. . . . . . .5:14 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:45 a.m. . . . . . .5:56 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .7:14 p.m. . . . . . .7:37 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:11 a.m. . . . . . .7:00 p.m.

4

LOW

54 25

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers.

LOW

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City



61/36

Hampton

Fort Rock

44/10

Calgary

55/36

51/17



Crescent 49/15

Vancouver

Paulina

50/16

La Pine

50/16

Crescent Lake

High pressure to the northwest will provide plenty of sunshine and quiet conditions.

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:12 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:15 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:10 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:17 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:59 a.m. Moonset today . . . 10:45 p.m.

Partly cloudy, warm.

67 30

BEND ALMANAC

Seattle

Mostly sunny skies today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Central

Brothers

LOW

NORTHWEST Yesterday’s regional extremes • 62° Brookings • 18° Redmond

MONDAY

Mostly sunny, unseasonably mild.

59 24

39/19

51/18

Sunriver

41/8

HIGH

56/22

55/25

Oakridge Elk Lake

Mostly sunny skies today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

55/26

56/27

49/17

50/19

LOW

SUNDAY

Sunny, slightly warmer.

Tonight: Clear and chilly.

HIGH

STATE

SATURDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 58-76 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-70 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 80-114 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 90-100 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 105-110 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 1.0 . . . . . . 28-41 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 101-125 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 20-58

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . . . 45 . . . . 121-160 . . . . . . . . 77 . . . . . . . 145 . . . . . . 28-73 . . . . . . 86-96 . . . . . . . . 44

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 53/36

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Calgary 39/19

Seattle 55/36

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Portland 61/36

• 1° Angel Fire, N.M.

San Francisco 70/51

Boise 58/32

Salt Lake City 54/38

• 0.37” Macon, Ga.

Los Angeles 71/54

Honolulu 80/65

Las Vegas 78/52 Phoenix 84/57

Tijuana 79/53

S Saskatoon 28/14

La Paz 82/54 Juneau 39/29

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 42/30

Winnipeg 33/20 Thunder Bay 43/25

Oklahoma City 67/42 Albuquerque 70/41

Mazatlan 85/62

Little Rock 67/45

Dallas 69/47 Houston 71/49

Chihuahua 78/45

Anchorage 37/27

S

Halifax 44/26 Portland Billings To ronto 50/40 47/24 58/37 Green Bay St. Paul Boston 58/37 62/35 63/42 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 53/39 New York 45/25 67/40 66/48 Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 65/41 68/45 Cheyenne Des Moines 67/46 55/23 W ashington, D. C. Omaha 65/42 63/36 68/47 Denver Louisville 67/29 Kansas City 66/43 St. Louis 65/40 64/42 Bismarck 49/27

• 91° Santa Ana, Calif.

S

Nashville 64/40

Charlotte 68/41

Atlanta 64/45 Birmingham 63/42 New Orleans 67/47

Orlando 70/48 Miami 73/54

Monterrey 75/53

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .73/36/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . 74/40/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .62/29/0.00 . . .62/39/s . . 64/43/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .62/27/0.00 . . .63/40/s . . 65/36/pc Albuquerque. . . .66/37/0.00 . . .70/41/s . . 61/31/sh Anchorage . . . . .38/14/0.00 . . 37/27/rs . . .38/28/rs Atlanta . . . . . . . .58/46/0.00 . 64/45/pc . . . 70/46/s Atlantic City . . . .67/29/0.03 . . .56/37/s . . . 56/42/s Austin . . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .70/39/s . . 74/52/pc Baltimore . . . . . .67/35/0.00 . . .68/43/s . . . 72/44/s Billings. . . . . . . . .73/42/0.00 . . 47/24/rs . . 35/17/sn Birmingham . . . .52/45/0.00 . .63/42/sh . . . 72/45/s Bismarck . . . . . . .46/21/0.00 . 49/27/pc . . .31/16/sf Boise . . . . . . . . . .61/42/0.00 . . .58/32/s . . . 54/31/s Boston. . . . . . . . .65/35/0.00 . 63/42/pc . . . 57/43/s Bridgeport, CT. . .62/32/0.00 . . .60/47/s . . . 60/41/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .53/29/0.00 . . .53/39/s . . 54/39/pc Burlington, VT. . .61/27/0.00 . 53/36/pc . . 57/37/pc Caribou, ME . . . .54/23/0.00 . 46/26/pc . . 46/31/pc Charleston, SC . .55/42/0.03 . .61/47/sh . . . 68/48/s Charlotte. . . . . . .59/37/0.00 . 68/41/pc . . . 71/43/s Chattanooga. . . .51/46/0.00 . 66/40/pc . . . 71/43/s Cheyenne . . . . . .62/32/0.00 . 55/23/pc . . 26/10/sn Chicago. . . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . . .67/46/s . . . 60/39/c Cincinnati . . . . . .65/40/0.00 . . .65/40/s . . . 66/44/s Cleveland . . . . . .60/29/0.00 . . .61/45/s . . . 65/49/c Colorado Springs 69/34/0.00 . . .66/29/s . . . 30/9/sn Columbia, MO . .49/39/0.00 . . .62/41/s . . 67/44/pc Columbia, SC . . .56/44/0.03 . 66/40/pc . . . 74/42/s Columbus, GA. . .60/45/0.00 . . .65/44/c . . 72/45/pc Columbus, OH. . .63/33/0.00 . . .65/41/s . . . 65/43/s Concord, NH . . . .64/23/0.00 . 59/31/pc . . 57/32/pc Corpus Christi. . .74/47/0.00 . . .73/55/s . . 74/60/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .65/42/0.00 . . .69/47/s . . . 72/48/s Dayton . . . . . . . .62/32/0.00 . . .64/41/s . . . 65/43/s Denver. . . . . . . . .69/36/0.00 . . .67/29/s . . 30/14/sn Des Moines. . . . .59/39/0.05 . . .65/42/s . . 52/33/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .65/33/0.00 . 67/40/pc . . . 59/43/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .57/33/0.00 . 52/31/pc . . 38/22/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .70/40/0.00 . . .75/46/s . . 74/43/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . 27/-11/0.00 . . . .30/4/s . . . . 33/8/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .46/26/0.00 . 49/25/pc . . . 31/17/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .59/19/0.00 . . .60/25/s . . 50/25/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .65/31/0.00 . 63/39/pc . . 59/41/pc Green Bay. . . . . .62/28/0.00 . 62/35/pc . . 50/31/pc Greensboro. . . . .63/36/0.00 . . .67/39/s . . . 71/42/s Harrisburg. . . . . .65/32/0.00 . . .67/40/s . . 68/41/pc Hartford, CT . . . .67/30/0.00 . . .66/37/s . . . 67/38/s Helena. . . . . . . . .58/32/0.00 . . 42/22/rs . . 36/18/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .81/65/0.00 . 80/65/pc . . 78/66/pc Houston . . . . . . .71/49/0.00 . . .71/49/s . . 74/56/pc Huntsville . . . . . .54/47/0.00 . 64/40/pc . . . 70/47/s Indianapolis . . . .63/38/0.00 . . .63/44/s . . . 63/44/s Jackson, MS . . . .57/48/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . . 73/47/s Madison, WI . . . .65/27/0.00 . 63/37/pc . . 55/34/sh Jacksonville. . . . .57/44/0.04 . . .65/44/c . . . 70/45/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .39/36/0.15 . . 39/29/rs . . .39/30/rs Kansas City. . . . .57/37/0.00 . . .65/40/s . . 65/35/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .63/28/0.00 . 63/39/pc . . 59/42/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .77/51/0.00 . . .78/52/s . . . 72/51/s Lexington . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . . .62/43/s . . . 66/44/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . . .64/37/s . . .46/28/rs Little Rock. . . . . .60/41/0.00 . 67/45/pc . . . 72/50/s Los Angeles. . . . .83/59/0.00 . . .71/54/s . . . 70/53/s Louisville . . . . . . .61/49/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . . 67/46/s Memphis. . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . 68/45/pc . . . 73/53/s Miami . . . . . . . . .68/60/0.10 . 73/54/pc . . . 73/58/s Milwaukee . . . . .59/31/0.00 . 62/40/pc . . . 54/36/c Minneapolis . . . .58/34/0.00 . 58/37/pc . . 42/29/sh Nashville . . . . . . .53/46/0.00 . 64/40/pc . . . 68/45/s New Orleans. . . .65/51/0.17 . 67/47/pc . . . 71/54/s New York . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . . .66/48/s . . . 66/48/s Newark, NJ . . . . .68/39/0.00 . . .68/47/s . . 67/47/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .62/33/0.00 . . .66/42/s . . . 70/43/s Oklahoma City . .53/33/0.00 . . .67/42/s . . 68/37/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .63/36/s . . 44/27/sh Orlando. . . . . . . .70/53/0.00 . 70/48/pc . . . 75/49/s Palm Springs. . . .88/56/0.00 . . .85/58/s . . . 86/54/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .61/38/0.00 . . .65/42/s . . 65/42/pc Philadelphia . . . .66/37/0.00 . . .68/45/s . . . 68/45/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .85/56/0.00 . . .84/57/s . . . 79/53/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . . .63/38/s . . . 62/40/s Portland, ME. . . .64/32/0.00 . 50/40/pc . . 50/41/pc Providence . . . . .61/31/0.00 . . .65/40/s . . . 66/43/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .64/35/0.00 . 70/40/pc . . . 72/42/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .70/27/0.00 . . 45/25/rs . . 33/16/sn Savannah . . . . . .68/51/0.00 . . .64/44/c . . . 71/45/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . 61/31/pc . . . 62/29/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .52/41/0.01 . . .55/36/s . . . 58/39/s Richmond . . . . . .69/34/0.00 . . .70/41/s . . . 72/42/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .50/33/0.00 . 52/33/pc . . .37/21/rs Rochester, NY . . .62/29/0.00 . . .60/38/s . . 60/38/pc Spokane . . . . . . .51/36/0.00 . . .50/28/s . . . 51/27/s Sacramento. . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .76/49/s . . . 75/47/s Springfield, MO. .45/37/0.01 . . .61/40/s . . 67/44/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .61/44/0.00 . . .64/42/s . . 67/45/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .67/53/0.00 . 69/50/pc . . . 72/53/s Salt Lake City . . .62/38/0.00 . .54/38/sh . . 46/33/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .83/58/0.00 . . .84/51/s . . . 78/45/s San Antonio . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .72/49/s . . 74/55/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .50/35/0.00 . . .65/45/s . . 71/39/pc San Diego . . . . . .82/56/0.00 . . .70/55/s . . . 68/53/s Washington, DC .68/41/0.00 . . .68/47/s . . . 69/44/s San Francisco . . .71/53/0.00 . . .70/51/s . . . 71/49/s Wichita . . . . . . . .50/28/0.00 . . .65/44/s . . . 64/35/c San Jose . . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 75/48/s Yakima . . . . . . . .58/27/0.00 . . .57/28/s . . . 60/33/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .64/30/0.00 . 64/32/pc . . .49/24/rs Yuma. . . . . . . . . .87/57/0.00 . . .88/56/s . . . 85/53/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .57/34/0.00 . 62/43/pc . . 61/42/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .60/41/0.00 . 60/40/pc . . . 62/41/s Auckland. . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .72/58/s . . 74/59/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .75/60/0.00 . 75/57/pc . . . 70/49/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . 95/78/pc . . . 96/78/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . . .42/18/s . . 67/41/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .62/43/sh . . . 65/44/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .48/30/0.00 . 55/38/pc . . 56/41/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . . .69/53/t . . . .70/52/t Budapest. . . . . . .46/27/0.00 . 51/34/pc . . . 55/39/c Buenos Aires. . . .90/64/0.00 . . .80/65/t . . . .81/65/t Cabo San Lucas .88/61/0.00 . . .84/58/s . . . 82/58/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . . .67/52/s . . . 66/51/s Calgary . . . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . 39/19/pc . . . 38/18/s Cancun . . . . . . . .73/64/3.05 . . .74/60/s . . . 77/61/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . .59/46/sh . . . 53/30/s Edinburgh . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . .56/44/sh . . 48/29/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .64/28/0.00 . . .63/39/s . . . 64/43/c Harare . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.55 . . .82/62/t . . . .80/61/t Hong Kong . . . . .72/64/0.00 . . .76/64/s . . . 77/64/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . 41/29/pc . . . 51/30/s Jerusalem . . . . . .65/44/0.00 . . .59/38/s . . . 64/41/s Johannesburg . . .79/59/0.19 . . .79/59/t . . . .78/59/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . 82/71/pc . . . 81/71/c Lisbon . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .68/54/sh . . 71/56/sh London . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . . .59/45/c . . . 60/37/s Madrid . . . . . . . .66/36/0.00 . . .65/41/c . . 68/53/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . .90/76/sh . . 91/76/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . .102/79/0.00 . .101/73/s . . 94/70/pc Mexico City. . . . .73/50/0.00 . .75/56/sh . . . 79/50/s Montreal. . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . . .45/32/c . . . 45/33/c Moscow . . . . . . . .21/3/0.00 . . .17/2/pc . . .26/15/sf Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/61/0.07 . . .79/60/t . . . .77/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .73/62/sh . . . 75/63/s New Delhi. . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . .95/67/s . . . 97/66/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .54/41/0.00 . .60/46/sh . . . 56/38/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .36/19/0.00 . .48/33/sh . . 47/33/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .61/32/0.00 . . .49/33/c . . . 48/34/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .63/36/0.00 . 64/42/pc . . . 64/43/s Rio de Janeiro. . .79/73/0.00 . . .84/72/t . . . .88/74/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . . .65/42/s . . . 64/44/c Santiago . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . . 94/59/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . 86/69/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .30/27/0.07 . 32/23/pc . . . 35/27/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .37/27/0.00 . . .37/22/s . . . 43/28/c Shanghai. . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . 66/47/pc . . . 75/53/s Singapore . . . . . .93/79/0.11 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .39/18/0.00 . .44/31/sh . . 48/33/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .83/65/s . . . 84/65/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . . .78/65/s . . . 80/66/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . .64/49/s . . . 66/51/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .54/46/0.00 . 56/38/pc . . . 58/37/s Toronto . . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . . .58/37/c . . . 55/36/c Vancouver. . . . . .50/45/0.02 . . .53/36/s . . . 57/39/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . 56/36/pc . . 55/37/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .39/25/0.00 . . 42/28/sf . . . 56/38/c

Developers sue Eugene over trespassers The Associated Press EUGENE — Developers have filed a $4.5 million lawsuit against Eugene, claiming the city encourages people to trespass on their land. Martin and Leslie Beverly also contend a city threat of condemnation prevents them from devel-

Security Continued from C1 By law, patrol officers at the ranch cannot strike, but instead must be compensated in comparison with other departments of similar size and communities of similar population, Carson said. “It takes six police officers here for patrol, and a sergeant and a chief, who also do a lot of

Tour Continued from C1 Bend resident Paul Shonka took the tour as an “objector” to the city’s expansion proposal. Shonka, 50, who has lived on Bend’s southwest side for 10 years, said he attended all of the city’s public meetings on the UGB expansion and would like his property included in the proposal. Shonka said he and his neighbors, who live east of South U.S. Highway 97, will be left in a “no man’s land” if the expansion goes through. Areas surrounding Shonka are included in the proposed expansion so they will

Parking Continued from C1 In early February, Chuck Arnold, the executive director of the Downtown Bend Business Association approached the council with a proposal to eliminate the free two-hour parking in the Mirror Pond parking lots, an idea that was quickly abandoned after downtown business owners

oping or selling their 26 acres at Amazon Creek. The Beverlys, who failed to win city approval to develop a housing subdivision, say maps, signs and kiosks direct people to public trails near their property, and those who cross their land represent a public tak-

ing of their property without compensation. City Attorney Glenn Klein declined comment on the suit filed last week in Lane County Circuit Court. But parks director Johnny Medlin says the city does not encourage people to trespass.

the patrol work,” Carson said. “It takes that many people to provide the 24/7, when you figure some people are off on vacation, some people are on sick leave, whatever it might be.” If the levy doesn’t pass, then the current level of patrol service at the ranch won’t be maintained 24/7, Carson said. If that happens, at least one job will be eliminated or patrol hours will be cut to address the budget shortfall, Carson said. The total

budget for operating expenses at the ranch is estimated at $820,000, he said. “You’ve got a set of fairly expensive homes that need protection more than what the sheriff is going to give and at best case, 24/7 service, and the only way we could do that is with this tax levy,” Carson said.

benefit from more uniform planning as well as city services, while he and his neighbors will not, he said. The two BAT buses provided for the tour stopped at four locations around the city’s periphery where Bend’s Long Range Planning Manager Brian Shetterly gave an overview of surrounding parcels. Shetterly pointed out areas that would, and would not, be included in the expansion and explained how the zoning of those lands affected the city’s selection of some lands over others. On the final leg of the tour, Shonka said he had a better understanding of those choices and

could see why planners chose to focus on including acreage on the city’s northeast side. “I can see their point of view a lot more now, just getting out and seeing it,” Shonka said. He added that he’ll try to attend the appeal hearings today and Friday. The city will present its case, as will the DLCD and nearly a dozen objectors to the city’s expansion plan. “It’ll be interesting to see how they work all of this out,” Shonka said. “Because it seems like they are miles apart in some ways.”

protested. A proposal to adopt escalating fines for habitual offenders — the proposal considered March 3 — would have kept the current $22 fine for a motorist’s first four tickets, but added a $44 fine for tickets five through nine, a $66 fine for tickets 10 through 14, and an $88 fine for every ticket beyond 15. Business owners and downtown employees have advised

the council to consider offering them discounted parking in the public parking garage on Lava Road. A monthly parking pass in the garage is $50, which some have said is too steep for part-time employees working for or near minimum wage.

Diane S.W. Lee can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dlee@bendbulletin.com.

No monthly dues until June 1, 2010 and No initiation fees until June 30, 2011 In addition you will receive a $25 to $50 monthly credit to your member account for up to 18 months beginning June 1, 2010. (Preview Members Only)

Other memberships are available for as low as $145 per month with initiation fees beginning at $1,200.

Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at cpowers@bendbulletin.com.

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Contact Keith Kessaris in the Membership Department for more details. 541-385-6011 or keith@awbreyglen.com 2500 NW Awbrey Glen Drive | Bend | www.awbreyglen.com | 541-385-6011


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NBA Inside Blazers dismiss VP of basketball operations Tom Penn, see Briefs, Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 2010

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Defending champ Oregon State bows out of CBI with loss CORVALLIS — John Holland had 26 points and five rebounds as Boston rolled to a 96-78 win against Oregon State in the first round of the College Basketball Invitational at Gill Coliseum. Carlos Strong added 22 points and Tyler Morris 18 points for the Terriers (2013), who celebrated their first postseason victory since 1959 and their first 20-win season since 2004-05. Jared Cunningham had 21 points for Oregon State (1418), the 2009 CBI champion. “It was a disappointing effort,” said OSU coach Craig Robinson. “Our effort was not what it should have been and that is on me as a coach. I am optimistic about the future, I am excited about the future, and I think things can be really good here.” Boston advances to play Morehead State in a quarterfinal next week. Morehead State won 74-60 at Colorado State on Wednesday. Boston used a 17-2 first-half run to take a 37-19 lead. The Terriers led by as many as 21 in the first half and 46-27 at halftime. They went up by as many as 28 in the second half. Boston shot 38 of 67 (56.7 percent) from the floor, including 12 of 32 from three-point range. The Terriers have 13 games this season with 10 or more three-pointers, including five of the last six contests. Holland, a two-time America East Conference first-team selection, shot 11 of 16 and was four of nine on threepointers. Oregon State shot 24 of 56 (42.9 percent), including nine of 25 in the first half. “We just tried to be aggressive from the start,” Cunningham said. “Tried to knock some shots down, which happened, and we just tried to get a roll on it, but it just didn’t come together enough for us to win the game.” The Terriers’ 96 points were a season-high for Boston and the second-most allowed by Oregon State this season. — The Associated Press

SKIING Bend’s Ford wins season’s final NorAm Cup race WATERVILLE VALLEY, N.H. — 2010 U.S. Olympic Team member Tommy Ford, of Bend, on Tuesday won the final NorAm Cup giant slalom ski race of the season. Warner Nickerson, of Gilford, N.H., finished second, and Canada’s Jan Hudec was third. Nickerson led the pack after the first run by nearly a half-second. Ford made up nearly a full second on Nickerson in his second run to take the win. Ford’s final two-run time was 2 minutes, 22.5 seconds. Nickerson finished in 2:22.64. “First run, I skied all right, but I made some mistakes at the bottom,” Ford, 20, was quoted saying on www. usskiteam.com. “Second run I skied well and skied fast, I kept it going all the way down.” The season’s overall NorAm Cup giant slalom title was awarded to Sweden’s Jon Olsson. Nolan Kasper, of Warren, Vt., tied Norway’s Petter Brenna for second overall. —From wire reports

PREP SOFTBALL

Panthers shut out Storm for 6-0 victory Bulletin staff report REDMOND — Justine Callen recorded eight strikeouts as Redmond High shut out Summit 6-0 in nonleague softball action Wednesday. Callen held the Storm to three hits while Ashlie Ostrander and Alyssa Nitschelm each went two for three at the plate to lead the Panthers (2-0 overall) to victory. “We struggled the first four innings,” said Redmond coach C.J. Johnson. “But I though we made some good team adjustments.”

The Panthers scored three runs in the bottom of the fifth inning to break a 0-0 tie, and added three more in the sixth to go ahead 6-0. Mariah Defoe went the distance for the Storm (0-1), striking out two while giving up eight hits. Sarah Oller led the Summit offense with a double. Redmond is back on the field Friday when the Panthers play at Crook County. The Storm are off until Monday. when they host the Summit Invitational on Monday and Tuesday.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

The year of the big one at Wallowa

HUNTING & FISHING

Eastern Oregon lake might see American kokanee record broken this summer

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regon’s state fish might be the Chinook salmon, but east of the Cascades, it might as well be a silver-sided landlocked sockeye we call kokanee. Devotees of the diminutive salmon are a serious lot, single-minded in purpose, bent on bending their rods every chance they get to put a limit of kokes in the cooler. Their quarry is a finicky creature known for wild feeding frenzies followed by days of apparent lockjaw. Kokanee are plankton feeders that follow their food up and down in the water column. At times they find their feed close to the surface and other times they plunge to depths of 100 feet or more. Sometimes jigging tempts them to dinner. Later in the year, trolling puts landlocked sockeye slabs in the box. In most waters, kokanee are measured in inches rather than pounds. They run 15 to 16 inches and tip the scales at about a pound. A big kokanee might run to 19 or 20 inches and weigh two pounds by the time it turns its energy to spawning in September. If you have ever plumbed the depths of Paulina, East, Lake Billy Chinook, Detroit Lake, Wickiup, Odell or Crescent Lake for kokes, you might have a hard time imagining a 7-pounder, the kind of fish that set the new state record last July at Wallowa Lake. It’s even harder to imagine the world-record fish, a 9-pound, 6-ounce kokanee landed on June 18, 1988, at Okanagan Lake in British Columbia. That state record is in jeopardy. According to the buzz, Wallowa Lake just booted out another trophy kokanee, a fish that weighed in at more than 7½ pounds after it had been bled out. See Kokanee / D4

GARY LEWIS

Photos by Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Mount Jefferson towers above Lake Billy Chinook, where the fishing season began on March 1.

N o b u ll s ? Angler numbers and success are down, but bull trout population is still thriving By Mark Morical The Bulletin

CULVER — The bull trout are there — but the anglers are not. During a fishing outing Monday on Lake Billy Chinook, I saw nearly as many bald eagles as I saw boats. Fish biologists have predicted a good year for bull trout fishing on the lake, but angler numbers have been down, as has angler success, since the season opened on March 1.

“We’re seeing 50-boat days as opposed to 100-boat days we saw four or five years ago,” Brett Hodgson, a Bend-based fisheries biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, said this week. “I think (the bad economy) is certainly a factor. The economy has had an impact on being able to afford a boat.” But even those who have launched their boats onto Lake Billy Chinook

This bull trout was landed with a Rapala lure on the Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook. this month in search of the aggressive-feeding bull trout have fared poorly, according to ODFW creel surveys. See Bulls / D4

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COLLEGE BASKETBALL: NCAA TOURNAMENT

No. 16 beat a No. 1? It hasn’t happened yet in men’s tourney By Dan Gelston The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Prep Sports ...............................D2 Basketball ..................................D3 Hockey .......................................D3 Hunting & fishing ..................... D4

Summit’s catcher Sarah Berge (10) attempts to make the tag as Redmond’s Alyssa Nitschelm (1) looks for the call from the umpire after sliding into home during the fifth inning Wednesday in Redmond.

Al Behrman / AP file photo

Arkansas-Pine Bluff and guard Allen Smith will be one of four No. 1 seeds trying to knock off No. 16 seeds in the NCAA tournament.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — The NCAA tournament is famous for the little guys shocking the marquee powerhouses and turning into the darlings of March. Upsets happen. In every region, every year. With one lopsided exception: No. 1 vs. No. 16. When brackets are e-mailed to the office staff after the 65team field is set, typing the “W” in that 1-16 matchup is about as automatic an annual occurrence as ringing in the New Year on Dec. 31. With good reason: The Washington Generals have better odds at victory over the Harlem Globetrotters than a No. 16 seed does over a No. 1.

100-0. That’s the career record for No. 1 seeds against 16th seeds since the field expanded to 64 teams in 1985. Yet those unlucky 16s, sometimes schools you never heard of from small college towns across America, always think big even if they should pack light. This year’s likely one-anddoners: Lehigh, East Tennessee State, Vermont and Arkansas-Pine Bluff. Those four have a combined 17 tournament appearances. Top seeds Kansas, Kentucky, Syracuse and Duke have a total of 14 — as in NCAA national championships. All but the Wildcats have won a title in the past 10 years. See NCAA / D3

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D2 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European

Tour, Hassan II Trophy, first round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Transitions

Championship, first round, Golf. BASKETBALL 9:10 a.m. — Men’s college,

NCAA Tournament, first round, Florida vs. BYU , CBS. 11:30 a.m. — Men’s college,

NCAA Tournament, first round, Murray State vs. Vanderbilt, CBS. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA

Tournament, first round, Washington vs. Marquette, CBS. 4 p.m. — NBA, Orlando Magic

at Miami Heat, TNT. 6:30 p.m. — Men’s college,

NCAA Tournament, first round, Montana vs. New Mexico, CBS. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, New Orleans

Hornets at Denver Nuggets, TNT. BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB Preseason,

Colorado Rockies at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

FRIDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European

Tour, Hassan II Trophy, second round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Transitions

Championship, second round, Golf. BASKETBALL 9:10 a.m. — Men’s college,

NCAA Tournament, first round, Minnesota vs. Xavier, CBS. 11:30 a.m. — Men’s college,

NCAA Tournament, first round, Siena vs. Purdue, CBS. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA

Tournament, first round, Florida State vs. Gonzaga, CBS. 6:30 p.m. — Men’s college,

NCAA Tournament, first round, Louisville vs. California, CBS. 7 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail

Blazers vs. Washington Wizards, Comcast SportsNet TENNIS Noon — BNP Paribas Open,

men’s quarterfinals, FSNW (same-day tape). 7:30 p.m. — BNP Paribas

Open, women’s semifinals, FSNW. BOXING 7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights,

Deandre vs. Sechew Powell, light middleweights, ESPN2.

Today Baseball: Bend at Aloha, 4 p.m. Softball: Sisters at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: Summit at Redmond, 3:30 p.m.; Bend at Madras, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: North Salem at Redmond, 3:30 p.m. Track: Oregon City at Summit, 3 p.m.; Sisters, Madras at Icebreaker hosted by Crook County, 3:30 p.m.; La Pine at Pleasant Hill, 4 p.m. Friday Baseball: Mountain View at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Thurston at Summit, 4 p.m.; Hood River Valley at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Grant Union, TBA; La Pine at Grant Union Tournament, 1 p.m. Softball: Redmond at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Hood River Valley, 4:30 p.m. Track: Redmond at Bend, 3 p.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at North Salem, 3:30 p.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at Summit, 3:30 p.m.; Crook County at Mountain View, 4 p.m. Saturday Baseball: Madras at Henley (DH), 1:30 p.m.; Sisters at Grant Union, TBA; La Pine at Grant Union Tournament, 10 a.m. Softball: Madras at Henley, 1:30 p.m. Girls tennis: Crook County at Klamath Union, 1 p.m.

PREP SPORTS Golf Wednesday’s Results GIRLS ——— Sisters Invitational At Crooked River Ranch Team scores — Redmond 388, Bend 403, Madras 464, Sisters incomplete. Medalist — Kayla Good, Bend, 42-44—86. Redmond (388) — Rachel Westendorf 51-44—95; Chelsea Driggers 48-48—96; Rheannan Toney 51-51— 102; Alex Toney 54-53—107. Bend (403) — Kayla Good 42-44-86; Heidi Froelich 51-42—93; Alex Jordan 60-52—112; Lili Bornie 6158—119; Danae Walker 55-57—112. Madras (464) — Rachel Simmon, 101; Savannah Patterson, 111; Moriah Pugh, 121; Lauren Simmons, 131. Sisters (Inc.) — Stephanie Cole 50-51—101; Trish Erickson 69-60—129. BOYS ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE At Crooked River Ranch Team scores — Crook County 324, Sisters 351, Bend 356, Madras 360, Mountain View 368, Sweet Home 389. Medalist — Paul Coduti, Mountain View, 4136—77. Crook County (324) — Jared George 40-39—79; Kurt Russell 40-39—79; Caelb Henry 42-40—82; Dillon Russell 48-36—84; Ben McLane 44-48—92. Sisters (351) — Aaron Simondson 40-39—79; Jonathan Standen 43-39—82; Geoff Houk 46-49—95; Zach Cummings 50-45—95; Kevin Marquardt 4948—97. Bend (356) — Jarid Rodmaker 40-43—83; Robbie Wilkins 41-43—84; Ryan Crownover 43-51—94; Tanner Cherry 49-46—95; Martin Marques 54-46—100. Madras (360) — Jasper Gerhardt, 86; Nick Johnson, 87; Rabe Clements, 90; Sloan Bush, 97; Adrian Phillips, 101. Mountain View (368) — Paul Conduti 4136—77; James Harper 44-45—89; Cameron Mackenzie 49-47—96; C. Schumacher 55-51—106; Nick Adamo 66-81—147. Monday’s Results BOYS ——— MARSHFIELD INVITATIONAL At Bandon Dunes Team scores — Summit 374, Churchill 410, Canby 411, Roseburg 450, Willamette 478, Crater 483, Marshfield 542 Medalist — Aaren Ziegler, Canby, 75 Summit (374) — Marlee Barton 40-46— 86; Mad Mansberger 46-46—92; Rebecca Kerry 57-40—97; Stacey Patterson 49-50—99.

Baseball Wednesday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE Mountain View 410 013 0 — 9 11 5 Sisters 201 150 1 — 10 9 1 Robinett, Yankovich (3), Deadmond (5) and Hester; Weigland, Waters (6) and Warner. W — Waters. L— Deadmond. 2B —MV: Jo Carroll 2, Mierjeski, C. Hollister, John Carroll; Sisters: Hodges, Hudson, Rocco. HR — MV: Yankovich; Sisters: Groth.

Softball Wednesday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE Summit 000 000 0 — 0 3 4 Redmond 000 033 x — 6 8 1 M. Defoe and B. Defoe, Berge (3); Callan and Friend. W — Callan. L— M. Defoe. 2B —Summit: Oller

Tennis Wednesday’s Results BOYS ——— NONCONFERENCE SISTERS 5, MADRAS 3 At Madras Singles — Ben Fullhart, S, def. Joe Garcia, M, 6-1, 6-4; Sean Tosello, S, def. Ryan Hutchins, M, 6-2, 8-9, 62; Jared Schneider, S, def. John Hernandez, M, 6-0, 6-1; Cesar Zamora, M, def. Andy Thomas, S, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. Doubles — Colby Gilmore/Luke Gnos, S, def. Kesh Phillips/Ryan Fine, M, 6-2, 6-4; Jake Lasken/Sam Quinn, S, 6-4, 6-3; Caleb Freshour/Alexsis Penaloza, M, 6-4, 63; Carlos Mendez/Jordan Gemelas, M, def. Trevor BulmaJutte/Seth Urquhart, M, 6-0, 5-7, 6-4; Hunter Young/Eliceo Garcia, M, Spencer Greene/Cody Lane, S, 6-1, 6-1. GIRLS ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAN CONFERENCE SUMMIT 5, BEND 3 At Summit High Singles — Bryn Oliveira(B) def Hannah Shepard(S)

5-7,7-6,10-3; Jessie Drakulich(S) def Allie Calande(B) 60,6-1; Kaylee Tornay(B) def McKenzie Sundborg(S) 7-5,60; Lauren Berthold(S) def Rebecca Dooms(B) 7-6,6-1. Doubles — Natalia Harrington/Austin Hill(S) def Chloe Knievel/Hannah Palcic(B) 6-4,6-2; Andrea Lohmann/Katie Fowlds(B) def Amy Gieber/Megan Souther(S) 7-6,6-4; Lisa Caine/Hailey Dodson(S) def Claire Nichols/ Allison Daley(B) 6-4,6-4; Sophie Loy/Mikaela Forrest(S) def Mariah Taunton/Lindsey Peterson(B) 6-2,7-5.

Michigan State-Bowling Green winner vs. Kentucky-Liberty winner, TBA Tuesday, March 23 At Williams Arena Minneapolis Nebraska-Northern Iowa winner vs. UCLA-N.C. State winner, TBA At Lloyd Noble Center Norman, Okla. Georgia Tech-Arkansas-Little Rock winner vs. OklahomaSouth Dakota State winner, TBA At Joyce Center Notre Dame, Ind. Wisconsin-Vermont winner vs. Notre Dame-Cleveland State winner, TBA

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASKETBALL College MEN NCAA TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— EAST REGIONAL First Round Today New Orleans Kentucky (32-2) vs. ETSU (20-14), 4:15 p.m. Texas (24-9) vs. Wake Forest (19-10), 30 minutes following San Jose, Calif. Marquette (22-11) vs. Washington (24-9), 4:20 p.m. New Mexico (29-4) vs. Montana (22-9), 30 minutes following Friday, March 19 Buffalo, N.Y. West Virginia (27-6) vs. Morgan State (27-9), 9:15 a.m. Clemson (21-10) vs. Missouri (22-10), 30 minutes following Jacksonville, Fla. Temple (29-5) vs. Cornell (27-4), 9:30 a.m. Wisconsin (23-8) vs. Wofford (26-8), 30 minutes following SOUTH REGIONAL First Round Today Providence, R.I. Villanova (24-7) vs. Robert Morris (23-11), 9:30 a.m. Richmond (26-8) vs. Saint Mary’s, Calif. (26-5), 30 minutes following New Orleans Notre Dame (23-11) vs. Old Dominion (26-8), 9:25 a.m. Baylor (25-7) vs. Sam Houston State (25-7), 30 minutes following Friday, March 19 Jacksonville, Fla. Duke (29-5) vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff-Winthrop winner, 4:25 p.m. California (23-10) vs. Louisville (20-12), 30 minutes following Spokane, Wash. Purdue (27-5) vs. Siena (27-6), 11:30 a.m. Texas A&M (23-9) vs. Utah State (27-7), 30 minutes following MIDWEST REGIONAL First Round Today Providence, R.I. Georgetown (23-10) vs. Ohio (21-14), 4:25 p.m. Tennessee (25-8) vs. San Diego State (25-8), 30 minutes following Oklahoma City UNLV (25-8) vs. Northern Iowa (28-4), 4:10 p.m. Kansas (32-2) vs. Lehigh (22-10), 30 minutes following Friday, March 19 Milwaukee Oklahoma State (22-10) vs. Georgia Tech (22-12), 4:15 p.m. Ohio State (27-7) vs. UC Santa Barbara (20-9), 30 minutes following Spokane, Wash. Michigan State (24-8) vs. New Mexico State (22-11), 4:20 p.m. Maryland (23-8) vs. Houston (19-15), 30 minutes following WEST REGIONAL First Round Today Oklahoma City BYU (29-5) vs. Florida (21-12), 9:20 a.m. Kansas State (26-7) vs. North Texas (24-8), 30 minutes following San Jose, Calif. Vanderbilt (24-8) vs. Murray State (30-4), 11:30 a.m. Butler (28-4) vs. UTEP (26-6), 30 minutes following Friday, March 19 Buffalo, N.Y. Gonzaga (26-6) vs. Florida State (22-9), 4:10 p.m. Syracuse (28-4) vs. Vermont (25-9), 30 minutes following Milwaukee Xavier (24-8) vs. Minnesota (21-13), 9:25 a.m. Pittsburgh (24-8) vs. Oakland, Mich. (26-8), 30 minutes following NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— First Round Wednesday’s Games Kent State 75, Tulsa 74 Dayton 63, Illinois State 42 Cincinnati 76, Weber State 62 Virginia Tech 81, Quinnipiac 61 Rhode Island 76, Northwestern 64 Mississippi 84, Troy 65 Nevada 74, Wichita State 70 Illinois 76, Stony Brook 66 Memphis 73, St. John’s 71 Second Round Saturday, March 20 North Carolina (17-16) at Mississippi State (24-11), 9 a.m. N.C. State (20-15) at UAB (24-8), TBA Monday, March 22 Connecticut (18-15) at Virginia Tech (24-8), 4 p.m. March 18-22 Illinois (20-14) vs. Kent State (24-9), TBA Dayton (21-12) vs. Cincinnati (19-15), TBA Jacksonville (20-12) at Texas Tech (18-15), TBA Memphis (24-9) at Mississippi (22-10), TBA Nevada (21-12) vs. Rhode Island (24-9), TBA COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL All Times PDT ——— First Round Wednesday’s Games Princeton 65, Duquesne 51 IUPUI 74, Hofstra 60 Wisconsin-Green Bay 70, Akron 66 College of Charleston 82, Eastern Kentucky 79 Morehead State 74, Colorado State 60 Boston U. 96, Oregon State 78 ——— Quarterfinals Monday, March 22

BASEBALL MLB

Saint Louis (21-11) vs. Wis.-Green Bay (22-12), TBA Virginia Commonwealth (23-9) vs. College of Charleston (22-11), TBA Boston U. (20-13) vs. Morehead State (24-10), TBA IUPUI (25-10) vs. Princeton (21-8), TBA Wednesday’s Summary ——— BOSTON U. 96, OREGON ST. 78 BOSTON U. (20-13) O’Brien 4-8 2-2 11, Holland 11-16 0-0 26, Pelage 2-2 1-2 5, Strong 9-18 2-3 22, Morris 7-10 0-1 18, Schulze 0-0 0-0 0, Lowe 4-11 3-6 12, Sirutis 1-2 0-1 2, Agboola 0-0 0-0 0, Sullivan 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-67 8-15 96. OREGON ST. (14-18) Brandt 0-0 4-5 4, S.Tarver 3-10 0-0 7, Schaftenaar 4-6 4-6 12, Cunningham 7-11 5-7 21, Haynes 5-11 2-2 15, McShane 0-0 0-0 0, Richard 0-0 0-0 0, J.Tarver 0-1 0-2 0, Burton 0-2 2-2 2, Johnson 0-2 2-2 2, Deane 0-1 0-0 0, Wallace 5-12 3-3 15. Totals 24-56 22-29 78. Halftime—Boston U. 46-27. 3-Point Goals—Boston U. 12-32 (Morris 4-4, Holland 4-9, Strong 2-8, O’Brien 1-3, Lowe 1-7, Sirutis 0-1), Oregon St. 8-23 (Haynes 3-8, Cunningham 2-3, Wallace 2-7, S.Tarver 1-2, Schaftenaar 0-1, Johnson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston U. 33 (Pelage 10), Oregon St. 37 (Burton 7). Assists— Boston U. 22 (Lowe 9), Oregon St. 15 (J.Tarver 4). Total Fouls—Boston U. 22, Oregon St. 14. A—2,913. COLLEGE INSIDER.COM All Times PDT First Round Wednesday’s Games Appalachian State 93, Harvard 71 Missouri State 87, Middle Tennessee State 79 Northern Colorado 81, Portland 73 Pacific 63, Loyola Marymount 52 Today’s Game Southern Mississippi (20-13) at Louisiana Tech (23-10), 8 p.m. Women NCAA TOURNAMENT All Times PDT ——— DAYTON REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 20 At Donald L. Tucker Center Tallahassee, Fla. St. John’s (24-6) vs. Princeton (26-2), 9:21 a.m. Florida State (26-5) vs. Louisiana Tech (23-8), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 21 At Petersen Events Center Pittsburgh Ohio State (30-4) vs. St. Francis, Pa. (17-14), 9:06 a.m. Mississippi State (19-12) vs. Middle Tennessee (25-5), 30 minutes following At Ted Constant Convocation Center Norfolk, Va. Connecticut (33-0) vs. Southern U. (23-8), 9:16 a.m. Temple (24-8) vs. James Madison (26-6), 30 minutes following At James H. Hilton Coliseum Ames, Iowa Virginia (21-9) vs. Wisconsin-Green Bay (27-4), 4:21 p.m. Iowa State (23-7) vs. Lehigh (29-3), 30 minutes following Second Round Monday, March 22 At Donald L. Tucker Center Tallahassee, Fla. St. John’s-Princeton winner vs. Florida State-Louisiana Tech winner, TBA Tuesday, March 23 At Ted Constant Convocation Center Norfolk, Va. Connecticut-Southern U. winner vs. Temple-James Madison winner, TBA At Petersen Events Center Pittsburgh Ohio State-St. Francis, Pa. winner vs. Mississippi StateMiddle Tennessee winner, TBA At James H. Hilton Coliseum Ames, Iowa Virginia-Wisconsin-Green Bay winner vs. Iowa State-Lehigh winner, TBA MEMPHIS REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 20 At Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham, N.C. LSU (20-9) vs. Hartford (27-4), 9:06a.m. Duke (27-5) vs. Hampton (20-11), 30 minutes following At Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee (30-2) vs. Austin Peay (15-17), 9:16 p.m.

Dayton (24-7) vs. TCU (22-8), 30 minutes following At Haas Pavilion Berkeley, Calif. Georgetown (25-6) vs. Marist (26-7), 8:21 p.m. Baylor (23-9) vs. Fresno State (27-6), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 21 At Frank Erwin Center Austin, Texas Texas (22-10) vs. San Diego State (21-10), 4:11 p.m. West Virginia (28-5) vs. Lamar (26-7), 30 minutes following Second Round Monday, March 22 At Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee-Austin Peay winner vs. Dayton-TCU winner, TBA At Haas Pavilion Berkeley, Calif. Georgetown-Marist winner vs. Baylor-Fresno State winner, TBA At Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham, N.C. LSU-Hartford winner vs. Duke-Hampton winner, TBA Tuesday, March 23 At Frank Erwin Center Austin, Texas Texas-San Diego State winner vs. West Virginia-Lamar winner, TBA SACRAMENTO REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 20 At Bank of America Arena Seattle Texas A&M (25-7) vs. Portland State (18-14), 5:06 p.m. Gonzaga (27-4) vs. North Carolina (19-11), 30 minutes following At Wells Fargo Arena Tempe, Ariz. Oklahoma State (23-10) vs. Chattanooga (24-8), 5:11 p.m. Georgia (23-8) vs. Tulane (26-6), 30 minutes following At Maples Pavilion Stanford, Calif. Iowa (19-13) vs. Rutgers (19-14), 5:16 p.m. Stanford (31-1) vs. UC Riverside (17-15), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 21 At Cintas Center Cincinnati Vanderbilt (22-10) vs. DePaul (21-11), 9:11 a.m. Xavier (27-3) vs. ETSU (23-8), 30 minutes following Second Round Monday, March 22 At Wells Fargo Arena Tempe, Ariz. Oklahoma State-Chattanooga winner vs. Georgia-Tulane winner, TBA At Maples Pavilion Stanford, Calif. Iowa-Rutgers winner vs. Stanford-UC Riverside winner, TBA At Bank of America Arena Seattle Texas A&M-Portland State winner vs. Gonzaga-North Carolina winner, TBA Tuesday, March 23 At Cintas Center Cincinnati Vanderbilt-DePaul winner vs. Xavier-ETSU winner, TBA KANSAS CITY REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 20 At Freedom Hall Louisville, Ky. Michigan State (22-9) vs. Bowling Green (27-6), 9:11 a.m. Kentucky (25-7) vs. Liberty (27-5), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 21 At Joyce Center Notre Dame, Ind. Wisconsin (21-10) vs. Vermont (26-6), 9:21 a.m. Notre Dame (27-5) vs. Cleveland State (19-13), 30 minutes following At Williams Arena Minneapolis Nebraska (30-1) vs. Northern Iowa (17-15), 4:06 p.m. UCLA (24-8) vs. N.C. State (20-13), 30 minutes following At Lloyd Noble Center Norman, Okla. Georgia Tech (23-9) vs. Arkansas-Little Rock (26-6), 4:16 p.m. Oklahoma (23-10) vs. South Dakota State (22-10), 30 minutes following Second Round Monday, March 22 At Freedom Hall Louisville, Ky.

Major League Baseball Preseason All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 2 Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Yankees 2 N.Y. Mets 4, Boston 2 Atlanta 4, Florida 2 Toronto 4, Baltimore 1 Detroit 6, Pittsburgh 3 Houston 11, Washington 2 Chicago White Sox 5, L.A. Dodgers 1 San Francisco 6, Oakland 1 Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 2 Arizona 7, L.A. Angels 6 San Diego 16, Kansas City 14 Colorado 6, Cleveland 3 Texas 8, Seattle 1 Cleveland 8, Cincinnati 2 Today’s Games Houston vs Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh vs Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Baltimore vs Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Atlanta vs St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Arizona vs Oakland at Phoenix, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Colorado vs Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 6:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Detroit (ss) vs N.Y. Yankees (ss) at Tampa, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Boston vs Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Toronto vs Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. St. Louis (ss) vs Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Minnesota vs N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 a.m. Chicago Cubs vs Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Cleveland (ss) vs San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Kansas City vs Arizona at Tucson, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs Milwaukee at Phoenix, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Cleveland (ss) vs Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Oakland vs Colorado at Tucson, Ariz., 1:10 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (ss) vs Washington at Viera, Fla., 4:05 p.m. Baltimore vs Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 7:05 p.m. Seattle vs Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 7:05 p.m.

TENNIS BNP PARIBAS OPEN Wednesday Indian Wells, Calif. Singles Men Fourth Round Juan Monaco (21), Argentina, def. Guillermo GarciaLopez, Spain, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1. Rafael Nadal (3), Spain, def. John Isner (15), United States, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. Ivan Ljubicic (20), Croatia, def. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, 7-5, 6-3. Robin Soderling (6), Sweden, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (9), France, 6-3, 6-4. Tomas Berdych (19), Czech Republic, def. Viktor Troicki (29), Serbia, 6-1, 6-3. Tommy Robredo (18), Spain, def. Marcos Baghdatis (27), Cyprus, 7-5, 0-6, 6-4. Andy Roddick (7), United States, def. Jurgen Melzer (22), Austria, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, 6-2, 1-0 retired. Women Quarterfinals Agnieszka Radwanska (5), Poland, def. Elena Dementieva (4), Russia, 6-4, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (2), Denmark, def. Zheng Jie (18), China, 6-4, 4-6, 6-1.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF New Jersey 69 42 24 3 87 188 Pittsburgh 70 41 24 5 87 219 Philadelphia 69 36 28 5 77 206 N.Y. Rangers 70 31 30 9 71 182 N.Y. Islanders 70 29 32 9 67 185 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Buffalo 68 36 22 10 82 186 Ottawa 70 37 28 5 79 187 Montreal 71 36 29 6 78 194 Boston 69 31 26 12 74 174 Toronto 70 24 34 12 60 187 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF y-Washington 70 47 14 9 103 277 Atlanta 69 29 29 11 69 204 Tampa Bay 69 28 29 12 68 183 Florida 68 28 30 10 66 177 Carolina 69 28 33 8 64 191 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Chicago 69 44 19 6 94 227 Nashville 70 39 26 5 83 197 Detroit 69 34 23 12 80 187 St. Louis 69 32 28 9 73 189 Columbus 70 28 31 11 67 183 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF

GA 166 202 189 191 216 GA 174 201 195 177 235 GA 198 224 211 200 216 GA 174 201 186 193 226 GA

Vancouver Colorado Calgary Minnesota Edmonton

70 70 70 69 70

43 24 3 89 230 181 40 24 6 86 211 185 35 26 9 79 177 174 34 29 6 74 192 199 21 42 7 49 176 245 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 69 43 16 10 96 226 180 Phoenix 70 43 22 5 91 189 170 Los Angeles 68 40 23 5 85 206 182 Dallas 69 30 26 13 73 199 220 Anaheim 69 32 29 8 72 193 211 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. y-clinched division Wednesday’s Games New Jersey 5, Pittsburgh 2 Calgary 3, Colorado 2 Anaheim 4, Chicago 2 Today’s Games Pittsburgh at Boston, 4 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Washington at Carolina, 4 p.m. Ottawa at Atlanta, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Toronto, 4:30 p.m. Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at Nashville, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. NHL Scoring Leaders Through Tuesday’s Games GP G Alex Ovechkin, Was 61 44 Henrik Sedin, Van 70 28 Sidney Crosby, Pit 68 45 Nicklas Backstrom, Was 70 29

A PTS 52 96 66 94 42 87 56 85

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Seattle LHP Cliff Lee for the first five games of the regular season for throwing a pitch over the head of Arizona’s Chris Snyder in an exhibition game. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned LHP Dustin Richardson to Pawtucket (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Optioned OF Stefan Gartrell, RHP Jeff Marquez and INF Dayan Viciedo to Charlotte (IL). Released OF Jason Botts and RHP Daniel Cabrera. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Claimed INF Anderson Hernandez off waiver from the New York Mets. Designated INF Brian Bixler for assignment. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Optioned RHP Aaron Crow to Northwest Arkansas (Texas). TEXAS RANGERS—Optioned RHP Omar Beltre, LHP Zach Phillips and RHP Omar Poveda to its minor league camp. Assigned C Emerson Frostad, LHP Kasey Kiker, INF Marcus Lemon and LHP Clay Rapada to its minor league camp. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Agreed to terms with RHP Kris Benson on a minor league contract. FLORIDA MARLINS—Optioned RHP Jay Buente and RHP Brett Sinkbeil to New Orleans (PCL) and RHP Kris Harvey to Jacksonville (SL). Reassigned LHP Dan Jennings, RHP Matt Peterson, RHP Chris Schroder, C Chris Hatcher, 3B Matt Dominguez, SS Ozzie Martinez to their minor league camp. Released RHP Derrick Turnbow. HOUSTON ASTROS—Reassigned C Lou Santangelo and RHP Chia-Jen Lo to their minor league camp. Optioned LHP Fernando Abad, RHP Evan Englebrook, RHP Matt Nevarez, LHP Polin Trinidad, RHP Jose Valdez, RHP Henry Villar, OF Yordany Ramirez, OF Brian Bogusevic and INF Wladimir Sutil to their minor league camp. Released OF Alex Romero unconditionally. Announced INF Jose Vallejo cleared waivers and was sent to Round Rock (Texas). LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Reassigned LHP Juan Perez, OF Prentice Redman and INF Russell Mitchell to their minor league camp. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Assigned RHP Simon Castro, RHP Wynn Pelzer, INF James Darnell and INF Lance Zawadzki to POrtland (PCL). Optioned OF Chad Huffman to Portland. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Released OF Elijah Dukes unconditionally. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BOARD OF GOVERNORS—Approved the acquisition of a controlling interest in the Charlotte Bobcats by Michael Jordan. PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS—Fired vice president of basketball operations Tom Penn. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with QB Derek Anderson on a two-year contract. BUFFALO BILLS—Signed DE Dwan Edwards to a four-year contract. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Agreed to terms with DE Tyler Brayton on a three-year contract. CHICAGO BEARS—Released DB Nathan Vasher. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Re-signed LB Marcus Benard, LB Blake Costanzo and RB Chris Jennings. Named Jim Ross as senior vice president-business development. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed G Richie Incognito to a one-year contract. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Agreed to terms with DT Jimmy Kennedy. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Released G Shawn Andrews. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Agreed to terms with DL Ian Scott on a one-year contract. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed CB Karl Paymah to a one-year contract. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Signed LB Matt McCoy to a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Agreed to terms with S Sean Jones on a two-year contract. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed QB Rex Grossman. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Signed D Jake Newton to a three-year contract. Re-Assigned LW Kyle Calder to Toronto (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Activated D Paul Martin from injured reserve. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Recalled F Michael Grabner from Manitoba (AHL). COLLEGE CALIFORNIA—Suspended F Omondi Amoke from the men’s basketball team indefinitely for violating team rules. SETON HALL—Fired men’s basketball coach Bobby Gonzalez.

FIGURE SKATING 8 p.m. — “Thin Ice” competi-

tion, ABC.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. — NBA, New Orleans

Hornets at Denver Nuggets, KICE-AM 940.

FRIDAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Oregon

State vs. Main, KICE-AM 940. BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail

Blazers vs. Washington Wizards, KBND-AM 1110.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

PREP ROUNDUP

Redmond girls golf wins opening tourney Bulletin staff report CROOKED RIVER RANCH — Redmond High took top honors at Crooked River Ranch on Wednesday in what served as the girls golf season opener for the Redmond, Sisters, Bend and Madras teams. The Lava Bears’ Kayla Good took medalist honors, carding a 42-44-86 to boost Bend (403) to a second-place finish. Teammate Heidi Froelich logged a 93 — the second best score of the day — after shooting a 42 on the back nine holes. Redmond, led by Rachel Westendorf, edged out Bend with a 388 team score. Westendorf shot a team-low 95. Chelsea Driggers followed close behind Westendorf with a 96. Madras placed third with 464 strokes. Sisters was scored as

“incomplete” with just two golfers competing in the invite. In other Wednesday prep action: BASEBALL Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 SISTERS — Brandon Morgan hit a game-winning RBI single in the bottom of the seventh inning to give the Outlaws their first win of the season. Sisters (1-1 overall) pounded out nine hits in its victory over the Cougars (0-1). Chris Waters picked up the win in relief for the Outlaws. Morgan led Sisters at the plate, going three for five with two RBIs. Jo Carroll paced the Mountain View offense by going three for four with a pair of doubles. The Outlaws travel to the Grant Union Tournament on Friday, while Mountain View is at Redmond the same day.

BOYS GOLF Crook County edges host Sisters CROOKED RIVER RANCH — Crook County boasted three golfers who shot under 85 to lead the Cowboys to victory at the seasonopening Sisters invitational. Jared George (79), Caleb Henry (82) and Dillon Russell (84) helped Crook County (324) stay clear of Sisters (351). Aaron Simundson led the Outlaws with a 79. Mountain View’s Paul Coduti claimed the low score of the day after shooting a 77 on the par-72 course. Bend came in third, Madras finished fourth and Mountain View took fifth place, ahead of Sweet Home. GIRLS TENNIS Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Storm won three of the four doubles matches to hold off

the Lava Bears at Summit High School. The Storm’s No. 1 doubles team of Natalia Harrington and Austin Hills topped Bend’s Chloe Knievel and Hannah Palcic 6-4, 6-2 to set the tone in doubles play. Summit is back on the court Friday with a home match against Redmond, while Bend is at The Dalles-Wahtonka on Wednesday. BOYS TENNIS Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MADRAS — Ben Fullhart of Sisters topped Joe Garcia of Madras 6-1, 6-4 in the No. 1 singles match as the Outlaws went on to take three of the four singles competitions. Cesar Zamora notched Madras’ only singles win in a three-set battle against Andy Thomas, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. Colby Gilmore and Luke Gnos continued Sisters’ winning ways with a victory

in the No. 1 doubles match, and teammates Jake Lasken and Sam Quinn followed up by taking the No. 2 doubles match. Both teams resume action after spring break with Madras hosting The DallesWahtonka on March 30 while Sisters will travel to meet Cascade on the same day. On Monday: GIRLS GOLF Summit takes season-opening tourney BANDON — Paced by Marlee Barton’s 86, Summit won the seven-team Marshfield Invitational at Bandon Dunes on Monday. The Storm shot 374 as a team, besting runner-up Churchill (410) by more than 30 strokes. Madi Mansberger added a 92, Rebecca Kerry posted a 97 and Stacey Patterson recorded a 99 on the par-72 Bandon Trails course.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 D3

S  B

Basketball • Blazers ditch VP: The Portland Trail Blazers have dismissed Tom Penn as vice president of basketball operations. The team issued a statement that said Penn was dismissed Tuesday for “philosophical differences.” No details were offered. Penn, who was regarded as a salary cap specialist, joined the Blazers as an assistant general manager in 2007. He was a candidate for the general manager’s job with the Minnesota Timberwolves last May. He removed himself from consideration when the Blazers promoted him. • Seton Hall fires coach: Fed up by his antics on and off the court, Seton Hall fired basketball coach Bobby Gonzalez on Wednesday after a 19-win season. The dismissal came roughly 12 hours after the coach known as “Gonzo” endured an 87-69 loss in the opening round of the NIT, a game in which Seton Hall forward Herb Pope was ejected for punching a Texas Tech player and Gonzalez picked up his seventh technical foul of the season. • Obama picks Jayhawks: The First Fan appears to be a big fan of basketball programs from Kansas. President Barack Obama predicted Kansas and Kansas State to join Kentucky and Villanova in the men’s basketball Final Four this season, with the Jayhawks defeating Kentucky for the title. Obama filled out a bracket for ESPN for the second straight year Wednesday. • Jordan approved as NBA owner: The NBA’s Board of Governors on Wednesday unanimously approved Michael Jordan’s $275 million bid to buy the Charlotte Bobcats from Bob Johnson. Jordan will immediately take over the team after functioning as a minority investor with the final say on basketball decisions since 2006. “Purchasing the Bobcats is the culmination of my post-playing career goal of becoming the majority owner of an NBA franchise,” Jordan said in a statement. “I am especially pleased to have the opportunity to build a winning team in my home state of North Carolina. • Pilots fall: Northern Colorado knocked off Portland 81-73 in an opening round CollegeInsider.com Postseason Tournament game Wednesday night in Greeley, Colo. Senior point guard T.J. Campbell led the Pilots (2111) with 19 points and 10 assists in his final game in a Portland uniform.

Baseball • Lee suspended for start of season: Seattle Mariners pitcher Cliff Lee has been suspended for the first five games of the regular season for throwing a pitch over the head of Arizona’s Chris Snyder in an exhibition game this week. Major League Baseball vice president Bob Watson issued the suspension and a fine on Wednesday. If the players’ association appeals, the penalty would be delayed until after a hearing and a decision. • Texas manager tested positive for cocaine: Texas Rangers manager Ron Washington admitted he made a “huge mistake” when he used cocaine and failed a Major League Baseball drug test last season. In his first public acknowledgment, Washington apologized Wednesday for his behavior, eight months after he told Rangers president Nolan Ryan, who turned down the manager’s offer to resign. “I made a huge mistake and it almost caused me to lose everything I have worked for all of my life,” Washington said at a news conference Wednesday. “I am not here to make excuses. There are none.” • Nats release Dukes: Outfielder Elijah Dukes has been released by the Washington Nationals, a sudden move with about two weeks left in spring training. The 25-year-old Dukes had been expected to be Washington’s starting right fielder. He hit .242 with 31 homers and 123 RBIs in three seasons with Tampa Bay and Washington. He was limited to 188 games with the Nationals the past two seasons because of injuries.

Football • NFL to examine two possessions in playoffs OT: NFL owners will vote next week whether to allow each team a possession in overtime in the playoffs if the team winning the OT coin toss kicks a field goal on the first series. Previously, the game would end whenever either side scores, as happened in the NFC championship game in January, with New Orleans beating Minnesota on Garrett Hartley’s kick. But NFL

competition committee chairman Rich McKay says a trend has developed showing too strong an advantage for teams winning the coin toss to start overtime. If the team that falls behind by three points on the first series also kicks a field goal, then the game would continue under current sudden death rules. The proposal is only for the postseason. • Ex-OSU QB to Cardinals: The Arizona Cardinals have come to terms on a two-year contract with free agent quarterback Derek Anderson. The one-time Pro Bowl quarterback comes to Arizona as the Cardinals look for someone to compete with Matt Leinart, the only quarterback the team has under contract after Kurt Warner’s retirement. Anderson was released by Cleveland on March 9, ending an uneven five-year stint with the team. The former Scappoose High and Oregon State star made the Pro Bowl in 2007 when he threw 29 touchdown passes and led the club to a 10-6 record. At the start of last season, Anderson lost his starting job to Brady Quinn, got it back, lost it again, returned to the starting lineup when Quinn got hurt, and won Cleveland’s last two games. • Tebow debuts new throwing motion: Tim Tebow, the 2007 Heisman Trophy winner, was the star attraction at Florida’s pro day Wednesday, receiving rave reviews from NFL scouts, coaches and general managers after he unveiled his new, compact throwing motion. The bulky left-hander threw dozens of passes to former teammates Riley Cooper, Aaron Hernandez and David Nelson during a 30-minute workout.

Auto racing • NASCAR spoiler change nears: NASCAR will switch from a wing to a spoiler at next weekend’s race at Martinsville Speedway. NASCAR vice president of competition Robin Pemberton confirmed Wednesday that the transition from the rear wing to the spoiler will begin at Martinsville. The setup was tested Tuesday at Talladega Superspeedway, and there’s a two-day test scheduled for next week at Charlotte Motor Speedway. • Drivers say F1’s new rules reduce overtaking: Fernando Alonso’s victory at the Bahrain Grand Prix exposed potential problems with Formula One’s rule changes, with some drivers saying they could lead to duller racing this season. F1 introduced a ban on refueling in order to reduce costs and encourage more passing and create more exciting racing, but Alonso’s win seems to have reinforced the belief that it might have the opposite effect as the sport goes into a highly anticipated championship fight. “Overtaking was basically impossible unless somebody made a mistake,” Schumacher said after his first race back in F1 after a three-year retirement.

Tennis • Agassi drug inquiries dropped: Tennis officials have closed the book on Andre Agassi’s drug revelations. International Tennis Federation president Francesco Ricci Bitti told The Associated Press on Wednesday that despite appeals from the World Anti-Doping Agency, the statute of limitations in the case expired long ago and no retroactive punishment was possible. In Agassi’s recently published autobiography, “Open,” he wrote that he took crystal meth in 1997 and lied to the ATP to avoid a suspension after failing a doping test. • Nadal avoids upset at Indian Wells: Rafael Nadal advanced to the quarterfinals on a day of upsets with a 7-5, 3-6, 6-3 fourth-round victory over American John Isner at the BNP Paribas Open on Wednesday in Indian Wells, Calif., while No. 2 Novak Djokovic and No. 4 Elena Dementieva were ousted. No. 7 Andy Roddick defeated 22ndseeded Jurgen Melzer 7-6 (5), 6-4.

College • Iowa wrestling loaded for title run: Iowa’s strength is in its numbers as it enters the NCAA wrestling championships in Omaha, Neb. The two-time defending champion Hawkeyes don’t have a No. 1 seed at any weight entering the three-day tournament that starts Thursday at the Qwest Center in Omaha. But they are represented in all 10 weight classes, and they’re favored to win the program’s 23rd title. Iowa State, Central Michigan and Oklahoma join Iowa as teams with full lineups in the championships. — From wire reports

NBA ROUNDUP

LeBron nearly gets triple-double, scores 32, Cavs top Pacers The Associated Press CLEVELAND — LeBron James had 32 points, nine rebounds and nine assists, and the Cleveland Cavaliers clinched their second straight outright Central Division championship and third in team history, beating Indiana 99-94 on Wednesday night. Cleveland (54-15) is the first team this season to clinch its division. After Cleveland’s 18-point lead was cut to one, James had six points, two blocks, two steals and an assist in the final 4 minutes, including a dunk behind his head after catching an alley-oop pass from Anderson Varejao. Also on Wednesday: Mavericks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 DALLAS — Caron Butler scored 27 points, Dirk Nowitzki had 26, and J.J. Barea scored 10 straight when things tightened up in the fourth quarter for Dallas. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Stephen Jackson scored 18 of his 20 points in the second half and Charlotte rallied to beat Oklahoma City to give Michael Jordan a victory in his first game as Bobcats majority owner. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 HOUSTON — Aaron Brooks set a Houston record by hitting seven three-pointers without a miss and scored 31 points, and the Rockets snapped Memphis’ seven-game road winning streak. Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Spurs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 ORLANDO, Fla. — Vince Carter had 24 points and eight assists, and Orlando smothered San Antonio star Tim Duncan, who had just two points. Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 BOSTON — Paul Pierce scored 29 points, Kevin Garnett had 22 and Boston cruised to its third straight lopsided victory at home. Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 TORONTO — Chris Bosh hit a 16-foot jumper with 2.1 seconds left and Toronto beat Atlanta to end a fivegame losing streak. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 PHILADELPHIA — Andre Iguodala scored 20 points, Jrue Holiday added 19 points, seven rebounds and seven assists to help Philadelphia snap a five-game losing streak. Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 LOS ANGELES — Chris Kaman had 20 points and seven rebounds and Los Angeles snapped an eightgame losing streak, recovering after squandering a big second-half lead to beat Milwaukee. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 SALT LAKE CITY — Carlos Boozer had 19 points and 11 rebounds and Utah kept pace in the Western Conference with a victory over struggling Minnesota. Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 OAKLAND, Calif. — Monta Ellis had 28 points and tied his career high with 13 assists, Anthony Tolliver had a career-high 30 points and Golden State overcame a 21-point deficit to beat New Orleans. David West had 36 points and 15 rebounds for the Hornets.

NCAA Continued from D1 Yet, the rallying cry from these small schools is the same every season: Why Not Us? Why not indeed? Because if there was ever a bracket where the 1-16 matchup might merit a little more study, perhaps it’s this one: Syracuse vs. Vermont. After all, this upset has happened before, only five tournaments ago. In 2005, it was a 3-14 matchup. Win on Friday, and the Catamounts would not only add to their lore as Orange squeezers, they’d pull off one of the monumental upsets in sports history. “When I saw that name pop up, it fired me up a little bit,” said Andy Rautins, a fifth-year senior with the Orange who grew up in Syracuse. “I think everybody around Syracuse took that loss to heart. It’s definitely going to be a payback game.” If the game is even tight at halftime — or especially in the waning minutes — that would be enough of a stunner. The No. 1s usually destroy and demoralize the 16s by halftime — and make CBS want to cut away to a more competitive game. No No. 1 wants to become the answer to a trivia question. “Yeah, it enters your mind. You don’t want to be the first school to lose to a 16 seed,” Kentucky guard John Wall said on Wednesday. “They could come out and hit a lot of shots and they might get the lead and feel confident. We’ve just got to go out and play basketball like we’ve been doing this whole season, and don’t overlook no team.” Last year, top-seeded UConn beat Chattanooga 103-47 in the third-largest margin of victory ever in the NCAA tournament. But two other No. 1s — Louis-

NBA SCOREBOARD STANDINGS By The Associated Press All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 43 24 .642 Toronto 33 33 .500 New York 24 44 .353 Philadelphia 24 44 .353 New Jersey 7 61 .103 Southeast Division W L Pct x-Orlando 48 21 .696 Atlanta 43 24 .642 Charlotte 35 32 .522 Miami 35 33 .515 Washington 21 45 .318 Central Division W L Pct y-Cleveland 54 15 .783 Milwaukee 36 30 .545 Chicago 31 36 .463 Detroit 23 45 .338 Indiana 22 46 .324 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct Dallas 46 22 .676 San Antonio 40 26 .606 Houston 35 31 .530 Memphis 36 33 .522 New Orleans 33 36 .478 Northwest Division W L Pct Denver 46 22 .676 Utah 44 24 .647 Oklahoma City 41 25 .621 Portland 41 28 .594 Minnesota 14 55 .203 Pacific Division W L Pct x-L.A. Lakers 50 18 .735 Phoenix 42 26 .618 L.A. Clippers 26 43 .377 Sacramento 23 45 .338 Golden State 19 48 .284 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ——— Wednesday’s Games Charlotte 100, Oklahoma City 92 Cleveland 99, Indiana 94 Toronto 106, Atlanta 105 Philadelphia 108, New Jersey 97 Boston 109, New York 97 Orlando 110, San Antonio 84 Dallas 113, Chicago 106 Houston 107, Memphis 94 Utah 122, Minnesota 100 Golden State 131, New Orleans 121 L.A. Clippers 101, Milwaukee 93 Today’s Games Orlando at Miami, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Denver, 6:30 p.m.

GB — 9½ 19½ 19½ 36½ GB — 4 12 12½ 25½ GB — 16½ 22 30½ 31½ GB — 5 10 10½ 13½ GB — 2 4 5½ 32½ GB — 8 24½ 27 30½

SUMMARIES Wednesday’s Games ——— CHICAGO (106) Johnson 5-9 0-0 11, Gibson 4-9 4-6 12, Miller 5-10 2-2 12, Pargo 4-10 0-0 9, Hinrich 4-8 1-2 9, Warrick 5-8 3-6 13, Murray 6-17 0-0 12, Richard 3-3 0-0 6, Law 7-8 7-7 22. Totals 43-82 17-23 106. DALLAS (113) Marion 6-12 0-2 12, Nowitzki 10-16 6-8 26, Haywood 1-3 2-4 4, Kidd 0-5 0-0 0, Butler 6-11 14-16 27, Dampier 4-6 1-1 9, Terry 4-10 0-0 9, Stevenson 0-1 0-0 0, Barea 6-9 0-0 15, Beaubois 4-5 2-2 11. Totals 41-78 25-33 113. Chicago 20 24 28 34 — 106 Dallas 32 32 24 25 — 113 3-Point Goals—Chicago 3-15 (Johnson 1-2, Pargo 1-2, Law 1-2, Miller 0-1, Hinrich 0-2, Murray 0-6), Dallas 6-18 (Barea 3-4, Butler 1-2, Beaubois 1-2, Terry 1-4, Marion 0-1, Stevenson 0-1, Kidd 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 45 (Richard 9), Dallas 45 (Nowitzki, Marion 7). Assists—Chicago 20 (Miller, Pargo 4), Dallas 22 (Nowitzki, Barea 5). Total Fouls—Chicago 23, Dallas 16. Technicals—Hinrich, Chicago defensive three second, Dallas defensive three second. A—20,406 (19,200). ——— MEMPHIS (94) Gay 6-17 2-4 14, Randolph 12-21 6-11 30, Thabeet 4-7 0-2 8, Conley 5-11 1-2 11, Mayo 1-6 2-2 4, Brewer 0-3 0-0 0, Haddadi 1-2 1-1 3, Williams 4-12 2-2 11, Arthur 4-6 1-2 9, Young 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 39-91 15-26 94. HOUSTON (107) Ariza 2-7 3-4 7, Scola 9-21 2-4 20, Hayes 2-4 0-0 4, Brooks 11-14 2-2 31, Martin 6-12 6-7 18, Battier 2-6 0-0 6, Hill 3-3 3-4 9, Budinger 1-2 0-0 2, Lowry 1-1 3-4 5, Andersen 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 39-73 19-25 107. Memphis 29 26 18 21 — 94 Houston 22 31 29 25 — 107 3-Point Goals—Memphis 1-7 (Williams 1-3, Conley 0-1, Young 0-1, Randolph 0-1, Gay 0-1), Houston 10-19 (Brooks 7-7, Battier 2-5, Andersen 1-2, Ariza 0-2, Martin 0-3). Fouled Out—Con-

ville and Pittsburgh — won their games by 10 points. And remember, the 16 over 1 upset has happened once in the women’s tournament: Topseeded Stanford lost to Harvard in 1998. Eastern Tennessee State was also a No. 16 last season when it threatened Pittsburgh. Coach Murry Bartow said the near-miss helped his team gain confidence and makes them believe they can finish the job this season. “I think the mental part of it is big, that, ‘Hey, we can win this game if we do these things well,’” he said. “I think our guys really believe that. Obviously, we’re smart enough to know we’ll have to play our best game of the year.” Sometimes the underdog sneaks in some body blows and jabs that stumble the heavyweights. An overwhelming underdog in its first NCAA tournament appearance in 2006, Albany led No. 1 Connecticut 50-38 about 8 1⁄2 minutes into the second half. The 21 1⁄2 -point favorite Huskies were flustered in Philadelphia until, well, they remembered how top seeds are supposed to dominate and used a 20-4 run to snuff the Great Danes’ upset bid. There have been other “can you believe this?” moments in the first two days of the tournament. • 1989. East Regional. No. 1 Georgetown, 50, No. 16 Princeton 49: Ivy League champion Princeton was considered so little of a threat that ESPN broadcaster Dick Vitale said before the game he would hitchhike to Providence, R.I., where the game was played, if the Tigers won. “I’m going to be their ballboy on their next game, and then I’m going to change into a Princeton cheerleading uniform and I’m going to lead all the cheers. Let’s go Tigers! Let’s go Tigers! ... Never happen,” Vitale said.

ley. Rebounds—Memphis 53 (Randolph 15), Houston 50 (Hill 9). Assists—Memphis 14 (Gay 4), Houston 22 (Brooks, Battier, Lowry 4). Total Fouls—Memphis 24, Houston 22. Flagrant Fouls—Randolph. A—16,142 (18,043). ——— SAN ANTONIO (84) Jefferson 9-12 2-2 20, Duncan 1-10 3-4 5, McDyess 1-4 0-0 2, Hill 1-5 0-0 2, Ginobili 8-13 1-2 18, Bonner 2-6 0-0 6, Bogans 0-2 2-2 2, Blair 3-5 1-2 7, Mason 1-4 0-0 3, Hairston 3-8 0-0 7, Temple 1-4 0-0 2, Mahinmi 4-7 2-2 10. Totals 34-80 11-14 84. ORLANDO (110) Barnes 4-7 0-0 8, Lewis 7-10 2-2 20, Howard 3-4 3-8 9, Nelson 3-9 3-3 10, Carter 7-11 7-8 24, Williams 1-4 0-0 3, Gortat 3-5 1-2 7, Bass 3-5 2-2 8, Pietrus 1-3 0-0 3, Redick 2-7 6-6 10, Johnson 2-3 2-2 6, Anderson 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 37-71 26-33 110. San Antonio 24 18 16 26 — 84 Orlando 29 23 28 30 — 110 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 5-14 (Bonner 2-5, Hairston 1-2, Mason 1-2, Ginobili 1-3, Jefferson 0-1, Bogans 0-1), Orlando 10-23 (Lewis 4-6, Carter 3-4, Williams 1-2, Nelson 1-3, Pietrus 1-3, Barnes 0-1, Anderson 0-1, Redick 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 41 (McDyess 7), Orlando 49 (Gortat 10). Assists—San Antonio 17 (Hill 4), Orlando 24 (Carter 8). Total Fouls—San Antonio 25, Orlando 15. A—17,461 (17,461). ——— ATLANTA (105) Williams 1-10 0-0 2, Jos.Smith 5-15 4-8 14, Horford 7-11 4-4 18, M.Evans 6-9 0-1 16, Bibby 6-11 1-1 17, Crawford 14-25 2-3 33, J. Smith 01 0-0 0, Pachulia 0-0 0-0 0, Teague 2-3 1-1 5, West 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-85 12-18 105. TORONTO (106) Turkoglu 5-12 5-6 16, Bosh 6-19 2-2 14, Bargnani 8-14 4-6 22, DeRozan 7-12 5-7 19, Calderon 3-8 2-4 9, A.Johnson 3-5 1-3 7, Jack 3-10 1-1 7, Weems 4-7 0-0 8, R.Evans 2-3 0-1 4. Totals 41-90 20-30 106. Atlanta 25 31 30 19 — 105 Toronto 30 29 16 31 — 106 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 11-18 (Bibby 45, M.Evans 4-5, Crawford 3-8), Toronto 4-12 (Bargnani 2-4, Turkoglu 1-3, Calderon 1-4, Jack 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 51 (Horford 14), Toronto 58 (Bargnani 11). Assists—Atlanta 22 (Jos.Smith 7), Toronto 23 (Calderon 6). Total Fouls—Atlanta 23, Toronto 20. Technicals—Bibby, Jos.Smith, Toronto defensive three second. A—18,441 (19,800). ——— NEW YORK (97) Gallinari 2-9 3-4 9, Walker 4-8 0-1 8, Lee 1021 9-9 29, Douglas 5-13 0-0 11, McGrady 4-12 3-4 12, Harrington 6-14 1-2 16, Rodriguez 0-1 00 0, Duhon 0-1 0-0 0, Giddens 2-5 0-0 4, Bender 3-3 1-1 8. Totals 36-87 17-21 97. BOSTON (109) Pierce 11-17 4-5 29, Garnett 9-11 4-4 22, Perkins 3-5 3-3 9, R.Allen 3-6 1-1 9, Rondo 2-3 1-2 5, Daniels 5-8 0-0 10, Davis 0-5 0-0 0, Wallace 3-7 1-1 7, Finley 1-9 0-0 2, Robinson 3-6 00 8, Williams 2-4 4-4 8, T.Allen 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 42-83 18-20 109. New York 19 30 22 26 — 97 Boston 32 36 24 17 — 109 3-Point Goals—New York 8-26 (Harrington 37, Gallinari 2-3, Bender 1-1, McGrady 1-5, Douglas 1-6, Walker 0-1, Rodriguez 0-1, Duhon 0-1, Giddens 0-1), Boston 7-20 (Pierce 3-6, Robinson 2-4, R.Allen 2-5, Wallace 0-1, Finley 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 48 (Lee 9), Boston 50 (Perkins 12). Assists—New York 21 (Lee 7), Boston 28 (Rondo 12). Total Fouls—New York 19, Boston 19. Technicals—New York defensive three second 2, Boston defensive three second 2. A—18,624 (18,624). ——— INDIANA (94) D.Jones 5-8 0-0 10, Murphy 6-14 3-4 19, Hibbert 8-12 4-4 20, Watson 4-9 0-0 9, Rush 510 1-2 13, S.Jones 1-3 0-0 2, Dunleavy 2-7 2-2 7, Price 6-15 0-1 14, McRoberts 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 10-13 94. CLEVELAND (99) James 11-24 8-10 32, Jamison 7-12 1-2 17, Hickson 6-10 1-2 13, M.Williams 3-5 1-1 7, Parker 1-7 0-0 2, Varejao 6-9 1-1 13, West 4-10 1-2 9, Powe 1-3 1-2 3, J.Williams 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 40-83 14-20 99. Indiana 25 23 17 29 — 94 Cleveland 30 20 31 18 — 99 3-Point Goals—Indiana 10-24 (Murphy 47, Rush 2-3, Price 2-7, Dunleavy 1-3, Watson 1-4), Cleveland 5-16 (Jamison 2-4, James 2-4, J.Williams 1-1, M.Williams 0-1, West 0-2, Parker 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Indiana 45 (Murphy 15), Cleveland 48 (Jamison, James 9). Assists—Indiana 28 (Price, D.Jones 6), Cleveland 23 (James 9). Total Fouls—Indiana 18, Cleveland 11. Technicals—Indiana defensive three second 2. A—20,562 (20,562). ——— OKLAHOMA CITY (92) Green 7-14 2-2 17, Durant 9-26 8-8 26, Krstic 3-6 0-0 6, Westbrook 6-16 3-4 15, Sefolosha 14 0-0 2, Collison 6-8 3-4 15, Weaver 0-1 0-0 0, Maynor 2-3 0-0 5, Ibaka 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 37-82 16-18 92. CHARLOTTE (100) Graham 7-9 4-6 19, Diaw 6-12 0-0 13, Ratliff

Almost did. The Tigers led Alonzo Mourning and Big East power Georgetown for most of the second half and were only three minutes away from the shocker. Mourning put the Hoyas ahead 50-49 lead with 23 seconds left and blocked a pair of shots late — including a controversial non-foul call — to hold on for the win. “I knew how they played and I didn’t want to play against that system,” former coach John Thompson said on Wednesday. Thompson, back in Providence to support his son, the coach of the third-seeded Hoyas, is always reminded of one of the most famous close calls in tournament history. “I always tell them their claim to fame was that they almost beat us,” he said. • 1990. Southeast Regional. No. 1 Michigan State 75, No. 16 Murray State 71, OT: The Ohio Valley champion Racers pushed the Spartans in regulation and became the only No. 16 seed to lose in overtime. “It was one of those situations where you think you’re going to go out there and have an easy game because you hadn’t heard of the school,” former MSU star and current assistant coach Dwayne Stephens said by phone Wednesday. “The game got tight and the longer we let them stick around, we got tighter. Luckily, Steve (Smith) made some baskets to get us out of the jam.” Murray State’s Greg Coble sank a three-pointer as time expired to send the game into OT. Murray State had future NBA player Popeye Jones — the kind of prospect most of the automatic losers don’t have on their roster. Jones had 37 points and 11 rebounds, one reason why they led 68-67 late in the game. The Spartans were understandably nervous about being on the wrong end of history.

3-9 2-2 8, Felton 7-10 2-4 17, Jackson 7-15 4-7 20, Chandler 2-5 3-3 7, Augustin 1-4 0-0 2, Henderson 0-2 1-2 1, T.Thomas 4-11 3-6 11, Brown 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 37-77 21-32 100. Oklahoma City 26 25 19 22 — 92 Charlotte 15 28 30 27 — 100 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 2-13 (Green 1-1, Maynor 1-2, Sefolosha 0-1, Westbrook 0-2, Durant 0-7), Charlotte 5-7 (Jackson 2-2, Graham 1-1, Felton 1-1, Diaw 1-3). Fouled Out—Green. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 48 (Durant 10), Charlotte 50 (T.Thomas 9). Assists—Oklahoma City 22 (Westbrook 10), Charlotte 18 (Felton 7). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 26, Charlotte 17. Technicals—T.Thomas, Charlotte defensive three second. A—16,179 (19,077). ——— NEW JERSEY (97) T.Williams 4-16 5-6 13, Boone 3-6 0-0 6, Lopez 2-9 8-8 12, Dooling 6-11 0-0 15, Lee 1-8 0-0 2, Humphries 3-7 4-4 10, Hayes 4-8 2-2 12, Douglas-Roberts 9-15 4-4 23, Quinn 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 34-83 23-24 97. PHILADELPHIA (108) Iguodala 7-14 6-7 20, Brand 6-12 0-1 12, Dalembert 5-10 0-2 10, Holiday 8-11 2-3 19, Green 5-9 0-0 11, Smith 2-3 2-4 6, L.Williams 4-6 2-3 11, Kapono 3-6 0-0 7, Carney 2-3 7-8 11, Meeks 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 42-75 20-30 108. New Jersey 22 27 19 29 — 97 Philadelphia 32 28 21 27 — 108 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 6-16 (Dooling 3-6, Hayes 2-5, Douglas-Roberts 1-2, Lee 0-3), Philadelphia 4-10 (L.Williams 1-1, Kapono 1-2, Holiday 1-2, Green 1-3, Meeks 0-1, Iguodala 01). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 42 (Boone 8), Philadelphia 51 (Dalembert 9). Assists—New Jersey 15 (T.Williams, Dooling 3), Philadelphia 26 (Iguodala 8). Total Fouls—New Jersey 23, Philadelphia 18. A—11,618 (20,318). ——— MILWAUKEE (93) Salmons 6-12 7-8 20, Mbah a Moute 2-6 22 6, Bogut 8-15 2-4 18, Jennings 9-16 0-0 21, Bell 1-6 0-0 3, Ridnour 3-10 0-0 7, Ilyasova 3-6 0-0 6, Stackhouse 2-7 0-0 5, Thomas 0-1 0-0 0, Ivey 2-3 0-0 5, Brezec 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-83 11-14 93. L.A. CLIPPERS (101) Butler 4-6 1-2 11, Gooden 5-8 6-6 16, Kaman 8-13 4-4 20, Davis 6-11 2-5 14, Gordon 3-9 6-7 14, Jordan 1-2 0-0 2, Outlaw 3-6 4-4 11, Blake 2-6 1-2 6, Smith 2-3 3-4 7. Totals 34-64 2734 101. Milwaukee 27 16 31 19 — 93 L.A. Clippers 27 25 20 29 — 101 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 8-23 (Jennings 37, Ivey 1-2, Bell 1-2, Salmons 1-2, Ridnour 1-4, Stackhouse 1-5, Ilyasova 0-1), L.A. Clippers 6-12 (Butler 2-2, Gordon 2-4, Blake 1-2, Outlaw 1-3, Davis 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Milwaukee 40 (Bogut 11), L.A. Clippers 46 (Gooden 11). Assists—Milwaukee 19 (Jennings 5), L.A. Clippers 25 (Blake 8). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 26, L.A. Clippers 12. A—15,241 (19,060). ——— MINNESOTA (100) Gomes 3-6 4-4 11, Jefferson 7-13 3-4 17, Milicic 4-8 1-2 9, Flynn 3-9 2-2 8, Brewer 6-16 3-5 17, Love 1-4 0-0 3, Wilkins 1-3 2-3 4, Ellington 4-6 2-2 13, Hollins 1-4 4-4 6, Sessions 2-6 4-4 8, Pecherov 1-1 0-0 2, Tucker 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 34-78 25-30 100. UTAH (122) Kirilenko 4-6 1-1 9, Boozer 8-11 3-3 19, Okur 7-16 0-0 14, Williams 4-10 0-0 9, Matthews 3-9 4-4 10, Miles 4-8 0-0 8, Millsap 8-14 5-5 21, Price 2-2 2-2 6, Korver 7-9 3-3 20, Fesenko 0-2 1-2 1, Jeffers 1-2 0-0 2, Gaines 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 49-91 19-20 122. Minnesota 26 17 30 27 — 100 Utah 26 26 35 35 — 122 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 7-15 (Ellington 34, Brewer 2-5, Love 1-1, Gomes 1-2, Wilkins 0-1, Flynn 0-2), Utah 5-20 (Korver 3-4, Gaines 1-2, Williams 1-4, Kirilenko 0-1, Matthews 0-2, Miles 0-2, Okur 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Minnesota 43 (Jefferson 8), Utah 49 (Boozer, Millsap 11). Assists—Minnesota 23 (Gomes 6), Utah 30 (Williams 11). Total Fouls—Minnesota 18, Utah 25. Technicals—Minnesota defensive three second. A—19,851 (19,911). ——— NEW ORLEANS (121) J.Wright 5-7 0-2 10, West 14-26 8-8 36, Okafor 3-7 0-0 6, Collison 7-14 4-5 20, Peterson 6-12 1-5 17, Songaila 2-5 9-9 13, Thornton 5-12 3-3 14, Posey 2-3 1-2 5. Totals 44-86 26-34 121. GOLDEN STATE (131) Morrow 1-2 2-2 5, Maggette 5-10 4-5 14, Tolliver 11-19 4-4 30, Ellis 10-23 6-6 28, Watson 2-8 3-4 7, Hunter 7-9 3-3 17, Williams 8-11 2-2 22, George 3-5 0-0 8. Totals 47-87 24-26 131. New Orleans 34 35 27 25 — 121 Golden State 30 26 32 43 — 131 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 7-21 (Peterson 4-9, Collison 2-5, Thornton 1-6, Posey 0-1), Golden State 13-27 (Williams 4-6, Tolliver 4-8, George 2-3, Ellis 2-5, Morrow 1-2, Watson 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 50 (West 15), Golden State 42 (Hunter 8). Assists— New Orleans 28 (Collison 14), Golden State 32 (Ellis 13). Total Fouls—New Orleans 19, Golden State 25. Technicals—Golden State defensive three second. A—17,155 (19,596).

NHL ROUNDUP

Bourque, Flames beat Avalanche By The Associated Press DENVER — The NHL playoffs don’t start until midApril, but the desperate Calgary Flames decided to move up their postseason a month. It paid dividends against the Colorado Avalanche. Rene Bourque scored two goals, Vesa Toskala made 32 saves and the Flames beat Colorado 3-2 on Wednesday night to keep pace in the Western Conference playoff race. Eric Nystrom also scored for the Flames, who are in ninth place with 79 points, one point behind idle Detroit for the final postseason spot with 12 games left. “We talked about the playoffs starting tonight,” Toskala said. “Every game is huge from here on in.” Also on Wednesday: Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 NEWARK, N.J. — Patrik Elias scored a breakaway goal and set up another for New Jersey, who beat sloppy Pittsburgh and completed a six-game season sweep of their Atlantic Division rivals. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Saku Koivu scored the go-ahead goal with 5:36 left in the third period, Todd Marchant had a short-handed goal and Bobby Ryan notched his 30th and 31st goals, leading Anaheim to a victory over Chicago.


H U N T I N G & F ISH I N G

D4 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lake Simtustus

Kokanee Pelton 26 Dam

Continued from D1 It is probable that this fish will be confirmed the next Oregon state record kokanee. If so, it will share the United States kokanee record with a fish caught on Montana’s Hauser Lake in 2003. Consider that last year’s staterecord fish was close to its peak weight in July. Now think about this latest fish, landed in February, with a long growing season ahead. This latest record-beater would have put on a lot more weight if it hadn’t made the fatal mistake of grabbing a jig on a cold February afternoon. If there was one big fish, there are others still putting on pounds. And we could see a new U.S. record by the end of summer, perhaps a new world record from Wallowa Lake. If you haven’t opened the 2010 Oregon Fishing Regulations, you may not be aware of a new rule that is likely to empower kokanee trollers and still-fishermen around the state. For 2010,

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Bulls

uled for Aug. 21 at Odell Lake. For more information, check out www.kokaneepower.org. Chances are the competition will sharpen your skills. And, in the after-action analysis, when your fellow anglers are sufficiently lubricated with barbecue and beverage, you’re likely to pick up a few tips that could

help you score the next state record. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Lures, seen here on the fishing line, can be used to cast for bull trout on Lake Billy Chinook.

FLY-TYING CORNER

FISHING REPORT

Steelhead catch rates increasing on Hood River

bull trout longer than 24 inches per day. If they keep one they can continue fishing, but only for a different species. The trout bag limit is five. All bull trout not kept in the daily catch limit must be immediately released unharmed. Kokanee are included as part of the trout bag limit. A Warm Springs tribal angling permit ($10 per day) is required to fish on the Metolius arm. Bull trout are typically characterized by their aggressive feeding on kokanee and by their coloring: olive green to bronze backs, with pale yellow, orange or salmon-colored spots. Federally listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1998, bull trout are continuing to thrive in Lake Billy Chinook. As the kokanee population goes, so goes the bull trout, according to Hodgson. The two populations surged in the late 1990s and peaked in 2006, but they had been in decline since then — until last year. “In 2009 we saw a significant rebound in kokanee numbers and bull trout,” Hodgson said. “The two populations seem to be tracking quite closely together.” Garrison and I finished the day with 10 fish between us — not a bad outing considering the slow start to the season. I have a feeling that the fishing will pick up at Lake Billy Chinook. And that the anglers there will soon outnumber the eagles.

the best time to fish for 12- to 18-inch rainbow and brown trout in Haystack Reservoir. Trolling is the most effective method, however, bank anglers are often successful near the dam and fishing platform.

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

HOOD RIVER: Flows are good on the Hood River with good numbers of winter steelhead being caught by anglers. Spring weather has been warming the Hood and increasing catch rates as the water warms. The peak of the winter steelhead run on the Hood will be the end of March and beginning of April.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

CENTRAL ZONE

Copper Pupa, courtesy The Fly Fisher’s Place.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

Trout fishermen are thinking big in April and May — big bugs, big water and big trout. The salmonfly hatch gets all the press, but tiny nymphs can provide a lot of action, especially when paired with a large, heavy stonefly nymph. The Copper Pupa represents an emerging caddis fly. The bead and wire help get it down, which makes this a good choice in big water. Fish this pattern as part of a twofly rig with another nymph beneath a strike indicator. In faster water, set the indicator at twice the depth of the fish.

Cast upstream and mend the line for a long, drag-free drift. Set the hook if the indicator does anything fishy. Tie the Copper Pupa on a No. 14-16 nymph hook. Slide a small brass or tungsten bead up to the eye of the hook. For the tails, use orange biots. Start the body with fine copper wire at the tail and wrap forward, securing a piece of orange vernille on top. At the thorax, tie in two pieces of green Flashabou. Build the thorax of peacock herl then pull down the wingcase. Add two pieces of mallard flank for wings. Epoxy the wingcase to finish.

CRESCENT LAKE: Boat launching access to the lake is available at the Crescent Lake Lodge. There is currently good opportunity for lake trout and brown trout. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Population estimates from 2009 show an increase in redband populations and a decrease in whitefish populations; fishing is good. Dry-fly action is increasing; however, nymphs are still providing the most success. Flows on the Crooked River are currently 77cfs.

LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: The Metolius arm is open. Angler effort has been light. Several legal-sized bull trout (greater than 24 inches) have been caught, but most bull trout being reported are in the 16- to 20-inch range. METOLIUS RIVER: Fishing has been up and down but is generally good. There have been strong hatches of blue-wing olive and October caddis, with a few March Browns as well. The mainstem Metolius upstream from Allingham Bridge is currently closed to angling.

DESCHUTES RIVER (mouth to the northern boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): Look for blue-winged olive and caddis hatches during mid-day. Stonefly nymphs will also start getting more active in March and fish will certainly start keying in on them. FALL RIVER: Fall River above the falls remains open to fly angling only. Probably the best fly fishing in the region right now with good hatches of bluewing olive, midges and tan caddis.

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Continued from D1 Hodgson and other biologists were expecting a big year for bull trout based on last year’s creel surveys, the numbers of bull trout caught and released, and fall spawning surveys in the Metolius River, which feeds Lake Billy Chinook. “The fish are out there,” Hodgson says. “Why they’re not being caught in big numbers is open to speculation. It might have to do with water temperature or conditions, or depth.” On Monday, we set out on Lake Billy Chinook hoping to buck the trend and land some bull trout. John Garrison, of Garrison’s Guide Service in Sunriver, launched his 24-foot pontoon from Cove Palisades State Park as the bright morning sun peered over the canyon wall to the east. We shouted our “hellos” to the cove mascot, a once-domesticated goat that now roams the steep, rocky cliffs on the east shore of Lake Billy Chinook. In the distance, snow-covered Mount Jefferson jutted above the rimrock. A bald eagle was perched atop a juniper tree close to shore as a few horses and cows foraged for food along the north bank of the Metolius arm of the lake on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Chukar sounded their distinctive calls high up on the sagebrush- and rock-covered hillside. A couple other fishing boats cozied up to the reservation side of the Metolius arm. The plan was to cast Rapala lures close to shore, hoping to tempt hungry bull trout, which will feed on almost anything, including crayfish near the bank. “The reason I like to cast is it’s more fun, and more exciting when you get to see (the bull trout) chase the lure,” Garrison said. “You don’t get that trolling. I don’t usually catch them close to shore casting until April. But this year it’s ready.” As water temperatures warm in March and April, the fish become more active, according to Hodgson. The water temperature on Garrison’s Fishfinder read 48 degrees, just about right. “About 46 to 52 (degrees) is good,” Garrison said. We began casting — over and over again — usually coming close to the rock-lined bank. We reeled in quickly, aiming to get the bull trout to chase the sinking lure and latch on. Garrison moved the boat frequently to let us cover as much water near shore as possible. After nearly two hours of casting, we had yet to land a fish. Finally, I saw two fish follow my lure toward the boat, and I yelled. But so did Garrison — and he had a fish on. He reeled in a 14-inch bull trout, and then another one just five minutes later. We moved to the south bank of the Metolius arm, and I soon had another bull at the boat. Its pinkdotted, dark-green back gleamed in the sun. We changed tactics after Garrison detected a large school of kokanee on his Fishfinder. He anchored the boat and baited our lines with herring. “We’ve got a lot of kokanee right below us, and if there’s kokanee, the bulls are underneath feeding on them,” Garrison noted. Kokanee were splashing out of the water all around the boat, but the bull trout did not seem to go for the herring. We switched back to casting lures, and I spotted another bald eagle as the kokanee continued breaking the water’s surface. Garrison hauled in a 19-inch bull, and we admired it before releasing it back into the lake. The guide brought in fish after fish as I sulked. With yet another fish on, he yelled, “Oh, baby!” I continued sulking but then felt a strong pull on my line. “I got one too!” It was a double hookup: two nice 16-inch bulls. On Lake Billy Chinook, anglers are allowed to keep one

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

This nickel-bright kokanee fell for a pink Apex. Terry Bennett boated the fish on an early-morning June jaunt at Crescent Lake.

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anglers can employ two rods if they buy a special Two-Rod Angling License. Kokanee anglers, take note, you can troll with four baits and double or quadruple your offerings and your chances. Once you locate fish, set the downrigger to run the first bait at the bottom limit of the school. Clip a drop line at 20 feet above the downrigger ball. Set the next rod to run 10 feet above the downrigger and run a drop line 20 feet up. Now you have baits running deep and shallow, prospecting for feeders throughout the water column. On the other side of the boat your buddy is doing the same thing — eight baits in the water for two anglers. You’re going to want to fish Wallowa Lake this year. You won’t be alone. If you need to fine-tune your fishing before you go, there are three kokanee derbies slated for this summer on local waters. May 15 marks the first, on Lake Billy Chinook. On July 17, there will be a derby at Green Peter Reservoir. A derby is sched-

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

‘FlashForward’ is back After three-month hiatus, ABC series returns tonight, Page E2

OUTING

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 2010

Most trails snow-free Bulletin staff report It’s spring break, and with the recent mild temperatures, spring seems imminent. Some lowerelevation trails are snow-free far before they normally would be, says Chris Sabo, trails specialist for Deschutes National Forest. Spring break can mean heavy crowds on upper- and lower-elevation trails, says Sabo. He warns that the nearer you are to the existing snow line, the more likely you will encounter icy, wet, muddy or soft conditions. “Trail sections with these conditions are fragile and subject to tread damage and erosion when users hike, bike or horse ride on them,” he says. Trail users are asked to stay off of trails showing those conditions. “Trashing soft/muddy trails means rough trail conditions during the main season and lots of extra work for volunteers to repair them,” Sabo says. Deschutes River Trail, from Entrada Lodge to Slough Picnic Area, is reportedly snow-free and mostly in good condition, Sabo says. River access roads along Forest Road 41 to Benham Falls West are snowfree, drivable and in fair condition, but drivers can expect potholes and rutted sections. Phil’s Trail is reportedly in good condition to Marvin’s Gardens and then on to the Deschutes River Trail. Trails west of Phil’s get into soft and muddy conditions with the increase in elevation and a likelihood of patchy to solid snow, Sabo says. Metolius River Trail is snowfree and has mostly firm tread, but expect some soft to possibly muddy sections. Peterson Ridge Trail is reportedly in good condition and is even seeing dusty conditions. Be aware of construction/heavy equipment traffic along the irrigation canal as crews are laying pipe. Deschutes County Road Department has begun spring road plowing on Highway 46 south of Deschutes Bridge. Sabo says that plowed roads will remain closed during plowing operations, activity mainly affecting snowmobilers who may want to venture south of Deschutes Bridge toward Crescent Ranger District. However, snow levels on those trails is marginal at best in some areas.

TRAIL UPDATE

Photos by Ben Salmon / The Bulletin

Tumalo Creek flows through Shevlin Park in west Bend. The park offers an excellent opportunity for inexperienced cyclists to check out easy trails.

How I roll Taking in the extra sunshine on the easy paths in Shevlin Park By Ben Salmon • The Bulletin

F

olks, our long, regional nightmare is finally over. Don’t get me wrong, I

enjoy the winter for a while. I like to ski. I have a couple of sweaters I pull out of a box around Halloween. But by mid-March, I am ready

SPOTLIGHT

to move on to sunnier times. And like clockwork, daylight

Retreat offers time for silence, discussion

saving time comes along and rescues me.

Myriad spur paths sprout from the side of Shevlin Park’s Tumalo Creek Loop trail, and many dead-end or turn into terrain too challenging for beginning cyclists. At left is the beginning of a tempting, narrow route through the brush. At right, further exploration turns up a log blocking the way.

Shevlin Park trails

Aspen Hall event center

Parking

Mountain bike trail Loop trail Tumalo Creek trail Footbridge

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Parking

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Covered bridge

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BEND Skyliners Rd.

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Fremont Meadow group site

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Like you (I hope), I sprung forward Saturday night, setting my clock ahead and losing an hour of sleep. It’s a small price to pay, I say, for more sunshine at the end of a work day. More sunshine at the end of a work day is good for the soul. If your job is like mine, you sit in a cubicle next to a window, and that window has shown a drab scene for the past few months. But thanks to the Earth’s rotation, office windows across the area will taunt us with a bright and vibrant Central Oregon summer soon. The daylight saving time shift last weekend means we now have plenty of post-5 p.m. time to get out and play. On Monday, as temperatures reached into the 60s, I took advantage of that extra time by heading to Shevlin Park for a short ride on my long-neglected bicycle. Let’s clear up one thing right now: A hard-core cyclist could’ve gone and did what I did two weeks ago and been home before the sunset. But I am not a hard-core cyclist. I am not even a cyclist. I am a guy who has a bike in his garage. My bike has been buried behind a pingpong table and a bucket of gardening supplies for a while now. See Outing / E6

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

What: Tumalo Creek Loop at Shevlin Park Getting there: Drive west on Newport Avenue (which turns into Shevlin Park Road) for about three miles past the roundabout at 14th Street. Turn left into the park’s main parking lot. Difficulty: Easy Cost: Free Contact: 541-389-7275 or www.bendparksandrec.org

Contemplative Outreach of Central Oregon, a local network committed to centering prayer, will host a Taste of Silence retreat from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. The free event will take place in Heritage Hall at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., in Bend. The retreat is for those who seek calm. There will be periods of silence and reflection as well as time for discussion. The retreat will also offer information about centering prayer. Contact: 541-382-0086 or www.contemplativeoutreach.org.

Bulletin seeks Easter egg hunts, events The Bulletin is compiling a list of Easter egg hunts and related activities that are open to the public. Please e-mail details about your event, including date, time, a description and contact names and phone numbers to communitylife@bendbulletin .com. The deadline to submit information is March 29, and publication is planned in GO! Magazine on April 2. Contact: 541-383-0351. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Loved ones’ final wishes honor unique individuals Dear Abby: I’m writing to encourage “Wants to Do Right by Mama” (Jan. 25) to honor her mother’s final wishes regarding her burial attire and the position of her body. Several years ago, I sat down with my parents and we talked about their wishes for when they die. We discussed everything from the distribution of their assets to the type of funerals they want. I learned that my father would like a large tombstone, which is something I never knew, so I asked him to draw up exactly what he had in mind. Mom and Dad have already written their obituaries for the newspaper. Mom listed all the songs to be played at her service and the flowers she wants. We visited funeral homes, and discussed coffins and services, etc. Since then, they have changed their minds several times and have now decided they prefer cremation. Everything is written down and I sent copies to my brother, who lives out of town. Both of us want to respect our parents’ wishes. It wasn’t as difficult as we thought it would be, and when the time comes and everyone is emotionally spent, the arrangements will already be in place. — Jim in Chesterfield, Mo. Dear Jim: I congratulate you for having that important discussion with your parents. A number of readers commented on that letter. Their remarks made me smile, so I’ll share. Read on: Dear Abby: My father wanted to be buried without any clothes on and without his dentures. His reasoning was he came into the world naked and toothless, and he wanted to go out the same way. To my brother’s dismay, Daddy got his wish. He was, however, covered discreetly by a lovely blue sheet. — Missing Daddy Dear Abby: My children know for a fact that if I’m ever unable to care for myself, they’ll have to pluck out my chin hairs. Whether I’m in a nursing home or in a coffin, if there are any coarse

D E A R ABBY hairs sprouting from my chin, I’ll come back and haunt them. — Martha in Green Bay Dear Abby: When we buried my mother, Dad realized his burial plot next to hers would be so close to the road that visitors might drive over it or park on his grave. So he requested that when he was interred, a nail be placed in his fist so he could reach up and pop their tires. When he passed away last August, we gave him the largest nail we could find. — Daddy’s Daughter Dear Abby: Our mother saved her favorite square dancing outfit for when the angels called her, and we honored her wishes when she passed away a few months ago at the age of 89. She was completely decked out in her dress, right down to the “full” slip, shoes and six-shooter earrings. We miss her terribly, but can’t help smiling when we think of her in her dress. — Did Right By Mama, Othello, Wash. Dear Abby: My great-grandma also requested that she be buried in her pajamas, but said she also wanted a fork placed in her hands. We could understand the pajamas — given the “long sleep” — but the fork had us stumped. She explained that when dishes were cleared after family dinners when she was growing up and dessert was on its way, her father would say, “Hold onto your fork, the best is yet to come!” We did as my great-grandmother asked, and it helped those of us who were grieving to remember that she’s now enjoying her “just desserts.” — Holding Tight To My Fork, Sioux Falls, S.D. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘FlashForward’ looks ahead, not behind By Rick Bentley McClatchy-Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES — ABC launched “FlashForward” in September to generally good reviews and ratings. Then, after 10 episodes, it was pulled and has been off the air for more than three months. The series returns to the ABC schedule with a two-hour special tonight. If you’ve forgotten (or never watched) “FlashForward,” it deals with an incident that caused everyone on the planet to black out for 137 seconds. They awoke with a glimpse of what their future would be on April 29. This next batch of shows will delve into the mystery behind the blackout and there will be another flash forward. Before “FlashForward,” Joseph Fiennes worked in the very structured worlds of movies and theater. Whether it was the period film “Shakespeare in Love” or the quirky modern day “Running With Scissors,” the British actor knew the beginning, middle and end of the character. In most television series there’s only the present. But “FlashForward” offers a different challenge for actors because all of the characters have been given what they believe are glimpses into their futures. The actors must decide whether to use the glimpses to play their characters or just treat each episode as it blindly unfolds. That acting dilemma has been a challenge to Fiennes in playing Mark Benford, the FBI agent who’s leading

ABC via The Associated Press

Courtney Vance, and Joseph Fiennes co-star in the ABC series “FlashForward.” The drama returns tonight as a two-hour special after being off the air for a few months.

‘FlashForward’ returns When: 8 tonight Wh e re : ABC

the investigation into the show’s time-glimpsing mystery. “This is the first job where I haven’t been fully cognizant of the role. That has been taken away so you rely on the writers and hope they piece it together. You hope that what I have done is justified several episodes down

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the line even though I might not know what the outcome will be,” Fiennes said during an interview on the set of the show. “Sometimes it can be frustrating and sometimes you just have to let go.” Fiennes has had adjust his acting style to fit the uniquely designed show. He’s learned to be more willing to improvise, accept contradictions in his character and adjust to last-second changes. “FlashForward” operates on the principle that to a certain degree everyone is predestined.

Fiennes believes that everyone is predisposed genetically to a certain path and it’s just anomalies along the way that make people different. Fiennes knows enough about future episodes to say many of the mysteries from the first flash forward will be addressed. “Hopefully it will satisfy everyone. But, at the same time, there will be something else afoot,” Fiennes said.

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Å 83918296 Montgomery. 8655532 Say Yes 206147 Say Yes 297499 LA Ink ’ ‘PG’ Å 671437 Police Women of Maricopa 657857 Police Women of Maricopa 660321 LA Ink Gone Too Far ‘PG’ 670708 Police Women of Maricopa 246925 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear ’ ‘PG’ 585166 NBA Basketball New Orleans Hornets at Denver Nuggets (Live) Å 838741 Inside the NBA (Live) Å 668963 Law & Order Cherished ‘14’ 661050 Law & Order Obsession ‘14’ 277895 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat 857876 Chowder 1901128 Chowder 7889186 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 6286771 Stoked 1914692 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Chowder 1990012 Advent. 7958876 Total Drama 6TEEN 8225437 King-Hill 9507760 King-Hill 9523708 Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 67411895 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 90556050 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 90532470 Ghost Adventures ‘14’ 90552234 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 90555321 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 79089586 179 51 45 42 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ 93866215 All in the Family Sanford 1023418 Sanford 7279128 Home Improve. Home Improve. Ray 8650166 Raymond Ray 7468586 Ray 7477234 Ray 8622383 Ray 6206470 65 47 29 35 Bewitch 1003654 Bewitch 7292079 All in the Family NCIS ’ ‘PG’ Å 186963 NCIS Internal Affairs ’ ‘14’ 390079 House The Right Stuff ‘14’ 376499 House 97 Seconds ’ ‘14’ 389963 House Guardian Angels ‘14’ 382050 Burn Notice ‘PG’ Å 981505 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 280128 ››› “Drumline” (2002, Comedy-Drama) Nick Cannon, Zoe Saldana. ’ 659296 Beauty 372654 Sober House With Dr. Drew 828418 Sober House With Dr. Drew 821505 Sober House With Dr. Drew 420050 191 48 37 54 Tool Academy ’ ‘14’ 376470 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

Lakeview Terrace ››› “Mask” 1985, Biography Eric Stoltz, Cher. ‘PG-13’ Å 6903876 House 9514012 ››› “Black Hawk Down” 2001, War Josh Hartnett, Ewan McGregor. ’ ‘R’ Å 8015128 ››› “Fargo” 1996 Frances McDormand. ‘R’ 8912654 ››› “My Cousin Vinny” 1992, Comedy Joe Pesci. ‘R’ Å 71215895 (7:15) ›› “Vital Signs” 1990, Drama Adrian Pasdar. ‘R’ Å 71523895 ›› “The Van” 1996, Comedy-Drama Colm Meaney. ‘R’ Å 6321470 “Marriage-Stockbroker” 2592234 Rip Curl Pro Search 5013383 Daily 7871091 Vans Triple Crown 6116168 Built to Shred Rip Curl Pro Search 5692012 Daily 3740895 Update 3385166 Stupidface Å Check 1, 2 Å Misfit 3712012 Thrillbill 7945499 Golf 402673 PGA Tour Golf Transitions Championship, First Round ’ Å 814741 Golf 297383 PGA Tour Golf Transitions Championship, First Round Å 566692 7th Heaven ‘G’ Å 1706031 7th Heaven ’ ‘G’ Å 7333079 7th Heaven ’ ‘G’ Å 6357895 7th Heaven ’ ‘G’ Å 6333215 ›› “A Simple Twist of Fate” (1994, Drama) Steve Martin, Gabriel Byrne. Å 2282296 Golden 3730514 Making: Treme (N) Taxicab Confessions: New York, New ››› “Marley & Me” 2008 Owen Wilson, Eric Dane. A couple’s new puppy grows up to ›› “Get Smart” 2008, Comedy Steve Carell, Anne Hathaway. Agent Maxwell Smart ››› “Afghan Star” 2009 Afghan contestants risk their lives to HBO 425 501 425 10 become an incorrigible handful. ’ ‘PG’ Å 265944 battles the KAOS crime syndicate. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 710079 appear on a TV show. ‘NR’ 487079 ‘PG’ 261128 York Part 3 ‘MA’ Å 709963 ››› “Before Sunrise” 1995 Ethan Hawke. 3698012 From-Basement Dinner 72625215 “Loudquietloud: A Film About the Pixies” ‘NR’ 4803418 ››› “The Cooler” 2003 William H. Macy. 7264234 (10:45) › “The Million Dollar Hotel” 2000 ‘R’ 64480673 IFC 105 105 (4:15) › “The Wash” 2001, Comedy Dr. ››› “Sex and the City” 2008, Romance-Comedy Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Chris Noth. Time ›› “Observe and Report” 2009 Seth Rogen. A flasher tests the › “Miss March” 2009 Zach Cregger. A young man sees his Life on Top ‘MA’ Å MAX 400 508 7 Dre. ’ ‘R’ Å 50810708 brings many changes for Carrie and her gal pals. ’ ‘R’ Å 274838 mettle of a mall security officer. 365449 high-school sweetheart in Playboy. ‘R’ 322963 880302 Ultimate Factories ‘G’ 5015741 Ultimate Factories ‘G’ 3382079 Ultimate Factories ‘G’ 5618050 Ultimate Factories ‘G’ 5694470 Ultimate Factories ‘G’ 5614234 Ultimate Factories ‘G’ 5617321 Lockdown ’ ‘14’ 3910995 NGC 157 157 Avatar 5041166 Speed 4421370 Invader 7671893 Penguin 9671073 Big Time Rush OddParents Avatar 5030050 Speed 5026857 Phantom 3724857 Phantom 3369128 Three 4322031 Three 4348079 Secret 3729302 Mikey 7952789 NTOON 89 115 189 Hunt 1005012 Outdoor 7294437 Magnum 7284050 Whitetails Bow Madness Adven 7271586 Outdrs 1001296 Steve’s 1013031 Trophy 8629296 Hunt 4900383 Outd. 7460944 Outdoor 7479692 Trophy Hunt Elk Chronicles OUTD 37 307 43 “Dead Man Walking” (4:30) › “Mother’s Boys” 1994 Jamie Lee (6:15) › “The Bikini Shop” 1986, Comedy Michael David Wright. iTV. MBA and beach › “My Best Friend’s Girl” 2008, Romance-Comedy Dane Cook. iTV. A cad falls in love Stripped: Greg Friedler’s Naked Las Vegas Photographer SHO 500 500 Greg Friedler compiles his fifth book. ‘MA’ 786147 Curtis. ‘R’ 4273215 bum inherit aunt’s bikini shop. ’ ‘R’ Å 87628012 with the ex-girlfriend of his best pal. ’ ‘R’ 387505 ‘R’ 5192654 Fast Track to Fame 8743692 Bullrun 1097895 Bullrun (N) 4835857 Pass Tm 8720741 Hub 8749876 Fast Track to Fame 4824741 Bullrun 4834128 Bullrun 6094505 SPEED 35 303 125 (5:10) ›› “The International” 2009 Clive Owen. ’ ‘R’ Å 3199708 (7:10) › “Obsessed” 2009 Idris Elba. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 75408857 (9:05) › “Never Back Down” 2008 Djimon Hounsou. ’ ‘PG-13’ 87753302 Spartacus: Blood and Sand 5916296 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:00) ›› “Assassination Tango” 2002 ››› “To Die For” 1995, Comedy-Drama Nicole Kidman, Matt Dillon. A woman will ›› “Zoolander” 2001 Ben Stiller. A disgraced male model is › “Witless Protection” 2008, Comedy Larry the Cable Guy, Ivana (11:15) ››› “The Believer” 2001 Ryan TMC 525 525 Robert Duvall. ’ ‘R’ 750418 stop at nothing to achieve television stardom. ’ ‘R’ 278499 brainwashed to become an assassin. 510147 Milicevic, Yaphet Kotto. ’ ‘PG-13’ 9815876 Gosling. ’ ‘R’ Å 63770876 Sports 1005012 Sports 7294437 Sports 7284050 Sports 7275302 Sports 1025876 Sports 7271586 Sports 1001296 Sports 1013031 Sports 8629296 Sports 4900383 UFC 7460944 Sports 7479692 Sports 8624741 Sports 6215128 VS. 27 58 30 20/20 on WE Vanished 3 8738760 20/20 on WE Driven to Kill 1082963 20/20 on WE (N) Å 4820925 20/20 on WE Å 4839673 20/20 on WE Vanished 3 4859437 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4829296 Locator 3575166 Locator 6629708 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Trees!”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesert museum.org. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Trees!”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: A screening of the film “Field of Dreams,” followed by a discussion March 25; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039. “BEYOND BARS — RE-ENVISIONING THE PRISON SYSTEM”: Walidah Imarisha talks about the role of prisons in our country and discusses alternative justice systems; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. BRANDI CARLILE: The fast-rising, rootsy singer-songwriter performs, with Eoin Harrington; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. randompresents.com. GREAT AMERICAN TAXI: The Americana musicians perform, with Smokestack and The Foothill Fury; $10; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. KNOBODY: Hip-hop performance, with Germane, The Tones, Cloaked Characters and more; ages 21 and older; $5; 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.myspace. com/actiondeniroproductions. TOWNSHEND THIRD THURSDAY: Featuring an all-ages poetry slam of original compositions lasting three minutes or less; hosted by Mosley Wotta; $3; 8 p.m., sign-up begins 7 p.m.; Townshend’s Bend Teahouse, 835 N.W. Bond St.; 541-312-2001.

FRIDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Trees!”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Trees!”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CENTRAL OREGON ROD & CUSTOM SHOW: Featuring hot rods, custom cars and bikes; $11, $6 ages 6-15, free ages 5 and younger; $2 off adult admission with two cans of nonperishable food; 5-9 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-317-9351 or www. centraloregoncarshow.com. CANDLELIGHT DINNER DANCE: Featuring dinner, live music and dancing; proceeds benefit the Bend Senior Center; tickets must be purchased in advance; $10; 6-9 p.m.;

Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Alan Contreras talks about his books “Handbook of Oregon Birds: A Field Companion to Birds of Oregon” and “Afield”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. BEND FOR HAITI: Featuring performances by David JacobsStrain, Rootdown, Reed Thomas Lawrence and Eric Tollefson; proceeds benefit relief efforts for earthquake survivors in Haiti; $35, $50 for VIP seating and admission to an afterparty; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3170700 or www.bendforhaiti.com. “THE ITALIAN”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2007 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. COME ALIVE TOUR: Mark Schultz and Point of Grace perform a concert of faith; free; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-633-6804.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON ROD & CUSTOM SHOW: Featuring hot rods, custom cars and bikes; $11, $6 ages 6-15, free ages 5 and younger; $2 off adult admission with two cans of nonperishable food; 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-317-9351 or www. centraloregoncarshow.com. DOCUMENT SHREDDING AND DRUG DISPOSAL: The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Data Delete of Oregon partner to safely destroy personal documents and provide identity theft prevention tips; outdated or unwanted prescription medications will be accepted for disposal; donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, 63333 W. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-388-6655 or www.deschutes.org. USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-593-6885. “THE RETURN OF THE CONDORS”: David Moen talks about California condors and a condor reintroduction program; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Les Joslin talks about his book “Year of the Forest: Rangering the Intermountain West Forests”; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesert museum.org. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Trees!”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. DULCIMER DEMONSTRATION: Richard Neises plays an Appalachian dulcimer; free; 1-2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1051. “MAD CITY CHICKENS”: A screening of the film about raising urban chickens, with a discussion of how to keep urban chickens, a silent auction and more; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact’s food bank; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 5:30

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-244-2536 or 541chicken@gmail.com. GOSPEL CONCERT: The sixth annual Redmond Community Gospel Concert, featuring local gospel groups, choirs and soloists; free; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-447-5650. JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 21: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Rebecca Kilgore, with PDXV; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-9775637, joe@justjoesmusic.com or www.justjoesmusic.com/jazzatjoes/ events.htm. IRISH ROVERS: The Celtic band performs Irish music; $35 or $40; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; ages 21 and older; $7 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY BOUT: The coed roller derby league presents a bout with guest skaters from Oregon and Washington; $10, free ages 10 and younger; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; nicholecp@ hotmail.com or www.renegadesor. com. NETTLE HONEY: The Seattle-based bluegrass act performs, with Mai from Moon Mountain Ramblers; ticket prices to be announced; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

WEDNESDAY KIDS DAY AT THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Learn all about reptiles; with live reptiles, reptile feedings and crafts; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1072 or www.dpls.us/calendar. LISTENING AT THE LIBRARY: Listen to a short story; for adults; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7085 or www.dpls.us/calendar. HERSTORY OPEN MIC: A celebration of women’s history month; proceeds benefit the Human Dignity Coalition; $5; 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT: Cello fusion group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. DEBBIE FRIEDMAN: The composer and singer performs contemporary Jewish music; proceeds benefit the Jewish Community of Central Oregon; $29, $21 students and children; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-382-3138 or www. towertheatre.org. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; ages 21 and older; $7 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com.

SUNDAY CENTRAL OREGON ROD & CUSTOM SHOW: Featuring hot rods, custom cars and bikes; $11, $6 ages 6-15, free ages 5 and younger; $2 off adult admission with two cans of nonperishable food; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-317-9351 or www. centraloregoncarshow.com. USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission; 1-5 p.m., bag sale from 3-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-593-6885. JAZZ FEST: Featuring performances by Andy Warr, Tom Freedman and more; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-382-4401 or www.bendfp.org. JOHN CRUZ: The Hawaiian singersongwriter performs; ages 21 and older only; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing or www.bendticket.com.

MONDAY NIGHTSOUNDS AT THE PAC: Featuring a performance by singersongwriter Marianne Thomas; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677.

TUESDAY FREE ICE CREAM CONE: Ben & Jerry’s hosts a free cone day; donations benefit Healthy Beginnings; free; noon-8 p.m.; Ben & Jerry’s, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3836357 or http://benjerry.com/bend. WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: ”Stompin’ Stu Thomsen” tells the story of Stuart Thomsen, a dominant BMX racer; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; ages 21 and older only; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174.

THURSDAY March 25 SNAKES ALIVE!: Meet and learn about live snakes, including a Burmese python; $7 plus museum admission, $5 High Desert Museum members; noon and 2 p.m., members 1/2 hour earlier; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: Discuss the film “Field of Dreams” and the book “Shoeless Joe” by W.P. Kinsella; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls. us/calendar. TEN FOOT TALL AND 80 PROOF: The Bozeman, Mont.-based roots group performs; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

FRIDAY March 26 GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088. SNAKES ALIVE!: Meet and learn about live snakes, including a Burmese python; $7 plus museum admission, $5 High Desert Museum members; noon and 2 p.m., members 1/2 hour earlier; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE?”: Local performers present Tim Kelly’s comedy about a mayor who tries to marry his daughter to the richest man in town; part of “100 Years of Culver”; free; 7 p.m.; Culver High School, 710 Fifth St.; 541-546-6494. CASH LEVY: The comedian performs and records a TV special; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 5:15 CRAZY HEART (R) 12:25, 3, 5:40, 8:20 IT’S COMPLICATED (R) Noon, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50 THE LAST STATION (R) 12:15, 2:50, 5:30, 8 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:25, 8:10 A SINGLE MAN (R) 2:40, 8:05 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 12:10, 2:55, 5:35, 8:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG)

11:55 a.m., 1:25, 2:25, 4:05, 5:15, 6:40, 7:50, 9:15, 10:35 ALICE IN WONDERLAND 3-D (PG) 11:25 a.m., 1:55, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 AVATAR 3-D (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:35, 7, 10:30 BROOKLYN’S FINEST (R) Noon, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40 COP OUT (R) 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:55, 10:30 THE CRAZIES (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 DEAR JOHN (PG-13) 3:55, 10:05 GREEN ZONE (R) 11:35 a.m., 1:35, 2:20, 4:15, 5, 6:50, 7:40, 9:30, 10:15 OUR FAMILY WEDDING (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 5:10, 7:30, 9:45 PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 REMEMBER ME (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:10, 9:50 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 12:10, 6:35 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R)

11:20 a.m., 2, 5:20, 8, 10:25 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 1:20, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 12:05, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 6 IT’S COMPLICATED (R) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG)

The Associated Press file photo

Michael Jackson performs in Kansas City, Mo., in 1988. Jackson’s estate has landed the late King of Pop the biggest recording deal in history: a $200 million guaranteed contract with Sony Music Entertainment for 10 projects over seven years.

Sony bets MJ fans won’t stop ‘til they get enough By Ryan Nakash im a and L ind a Deu tsch The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The record-breaking deal in which Michael Jackson’s estate will get up to $250 million in the next seven years probably isn’t a huge gamble for the company that will pay the money out, Sony Music Entertainment. Before he died in June at age 50, Jackson, a prolific songwriter, left dozens of unreleased recordings that are sure to be in high demand. Those include studio sessions from some of his best albums and recently recorded songs made with the likes of Black Eyed Peas frontman will.i.am. Under a deal officially announced Tuesday, Sony has guaranteed Jackson’s estate $200 million for 10 projects over the next seven years. One of them, a movie and album called “This Is It,” was already completed. If certain conditions are met, the payment could rise to $250 million. Since Jackson’s death, estate co-administrator John McClain, a childhood friend and Jackson producer, has combed through boxes of tapes and recordings Jackson left behind. McClain and the other co-administrator, John Branca, who cut the Sony deal, each stand to make 5 percent on every new dollar of revenue brought into the estate.

These are it

M T For Thursday, March 18

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

4, 6:45, 9:15 GREEN ZONE (R) 4, 6:30, 9 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 5:30, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 6:30 CRAZY HEART (R) 6:45 GREEN ZONE (R) 6:45 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 6:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville 541-416-1014

Closed on Thursdays. Available for private rentals.

McClain found about 60 songs in various forms that have never been released, according to people familiar with the songs, who spoke on condition of anonymity because what will be done with the material remains in flux. Even if only half of them are commercially viable, that would be enough for two or three albums. And some songs could also be packaged with already-heard material. That likely wouldn’t detract from a new album’s value. It might even add to it, because fans have been flocking to known commodities in music. For example, 14 remastered albums from The Beatles catalog sold 13 million copies worldwide in the four months after they were released last September. Bob Seger’s “Greatest Hits,” an album that came out in 1994, was the best-selling catalog album of the last decade, with 9 million albums sold to date. Jackson’s own two-disc set that accompanied the concert rehearsal footage in “This Is It” has

sold 5 million copies, and it had only one new song. That was the title song, which Jackson wrote with Paul Anka around the time the “Thriller” album was becoming a smash hit. With the album selling for $10 to $14, the revenue generated from sales is already well beyond the tens of millions of dollars needed to cover the per-project guarantees Sony is promising. “He always said his children would never have anything to worry about because he had volumes of songs to release,” said Raymone Bain, who began representing Jackson during his child molestation trial in 2005, in an interview Tuesday. Bain, who is also suing the estate for fees, said Jackson told her he had “thousands of recordings” that he wanted to aim at a youthful audience, and spent nights during the trial writing new tunes as therapy. “He wanted to prove to a new demographic group that he was still a major player in the industry,” she said. “That’s why he added Akon and Fergie and will.i.am to the 25th anniversary recording of ‘Thriller.’”

What they crave Releases from well-established artists have other advantages. An older fan base is more accustomed to buying whole albums than are younger fans familiar with free song-swapping online. A long sales history also makes it easier to evaluate what catalogs are worth. Speculation on exactly what unreleased songs exist (and how good they are) has been rampant since the King of Pop’s death. Many who collaborated with Jackson in his later years have discussed their work with him, including will.i.am and Akon, who is a Senegalese R&B singer. Several unreleased Jackson songs have leaked, though many of them are in dubious forms. A 24-second clip of the song “A Place With No Name” was on TMZ.com shortly after Jackson’s death. A track Jackson recorded with Lenny Kravitz, “Another Day,” also got out last year, though Kravitz said it wasn’t a proper, finished version of the song. Whatever the unreleased material comprises, the Sony deal suggested that repurposing Jackson material across several formats — from DVDs to video games — will be of particular importance.


E4 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQ U ELINE BI GA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, March 18, 2010: This year, you break precedence and open up to new types of change. You are also likely to land on your feet more often. You are beginning a new life cycle and opening doors. You could be amazed by what life offers you if you are willing. If you are single, you feel much more connected than in the past. You could meet someone very special to your life’s history. If you are attached, the two of you connect on a deeper level. Communication will flourish for those born today. TAURUS anchors you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Know your limits and understand that you can help others feel inspired, too. If many people feel the way you do, there is a greater likelihood that what you want could happen. Pressure builds, and you handle a matter directly. Tonight: Gather your bills. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Your ability to handle pressure and stay ahead of situations emerges. A boss might think he or she has a good idea, but you disagree. Be careful how you approach this matter, for all parties’ sake. Tonight: Think “weekend.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Use the morning, when clearly you are on top of your game. Think positively about what must occur if you are going to try another approach. Sometimes it is wiser

to sit back and just think. New ideas come up naturally. Tonight: Take some needed downtime. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You could be overwhelmed by everything that is happening. You might not want to assume control. On the other hand, you might consider trying another approach or doing something in a totally different manner. Tonight: Get into weekend mode. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Keep your mind open before taking action. You might want to review a situation with more intensity. Be careful with how you handle your temper. Focus and decide on the most effective manner of self-expression. Let creativity flourish. Tonight: Be yourself. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Take an overview this afternoon, and your perspective could change radically. Investigate what is going on with a child or someone at a distance. Be aware of what is going on behind the scenes — even with you! Tonight: Get another perspective. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Let others do what they want — run with the ball. There is nothing you can do to change directions. Investigate the alternatives presented to you. Understand what is motivating someone. Discussions could be nothing less than disruptive. Tonight: Togetherness works. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Defer to someone else. You might want to understand what is happening with this person.

Listen more, and you’ll gain a sense of grounding. A boss could be most pushy and demanding. Be diplomatic under pressure. Tonight: Say “yes” to a loved one. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Your smile melts boundaries with ease. You are sensitive to difficult circumstances. Your creativity peaks, and others love to hear your suggestions if you approach them appropriately. Still, some details and work do need to be cleared out. Tonight: Could be late. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Anchor in and know what you want. You are on top of your game. Stay more in touch with your needs and with others’. Your instincts play a role with a financial situation. Avoid a wild risk if possible. Be sure you know what to expect. Tonight: Start your weekend early. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH If you have a suggestion or a sixth sense about what you need to happen, follow it. You are on top of your game. Understanding what others want might encourage you to back off and do your own thing. Be more forthright with a child or family member. Tonight: Make it relaxing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Use your sensibilities, especially in a serious conversation. You’ll do much better in a situation than you thought possible. Listen to someone who has a lot to say. Be willing to express yourself openly if you want a meeting of the minds. Tonight: Yapping up a storm. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF CENTRAL OREGON: 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Realtors Association, Bend; 541-325-6071 or meleajaye1956@yahoo.com. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND COIN CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Stone Lodge Retirement Center, Bend; 541-693-3438. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION COUPLES GROUP: $25; 6-7:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-633-5704. DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS: 5:30 p.m. potluck social, 6:30 p.m. meeting; Bend VFW Hall; 541-389-0775. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. GOOD SAM CLUB: 541-382-7729. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 2-3:30 p.m.; Fourth Street Medical Building, Redmond; 541-382-5882 to register. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-3392. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT II — SANITATION DISTRICT: Board meeting; open to the public; 11 a.m.; District Plant Office, Sunriver; 541-923-3124. OUTRIGGER CANOE CLUB: 5:30 p.m.; Deschutes River, Bend; amy@ BendOutrigger.org. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30-5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010.

WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Social hour; 4:15 p.m.; 541-388-4503. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@ bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. DESCHUTES COUNTY BALLROOM DANCE CLUB: 8-10 p.m.; 175 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3220220 or www.deschutes countyballroom.com. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HOMELESS LEADERSHIP COALITION: 8:30 a.m.; Bend Public Library; www.cohomeless.org or 541-504-1389, ext. 306. NATIONAL ACTIVE AND RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL OREGON CHAPTER: 10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-2228. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. RAWBENDALIVE! POTLUCK: 6:307:30 p.m.; The Cascades Living Water Store, Bend; 541-550-7520. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229

or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. CENTRAL OREGON SUBMARINE VETERANS: 2 p.m.; VFW Hall, Redmond. OPEN DANCE: 7-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. RICE COMPAÑEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-447-0732. SONS OF NORWAY: Social; 6 p.m. children’s club, 6:30 dinner; Fjeldheim Lodge Hall, Bend; 541-382-4333.

SUNDAY BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. ECKHART TOLLE MEDITATION GROUP: 7:30-9 p.m.; Namaspa, Bend; 541-678-1801 or tolle-bend@ bendbroadband.com. HUMAN DIGNITY ADVOCATES: 7 to 7:30 p.m., Pioneer Park, Prineville; 541-350-5133. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 2 p.m., Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-279-7962.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-385-9198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-322-0983. LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE: 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366.

LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 3-6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library; 541-350-3345. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AGILITY DOG CLUB: 541385-6872 or 541-385-5215. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON GOAT PRODUCERS: 7 p.m.; Redmond Public Library; 541-322-6992 or 541-420-3294. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CLASSIC BOOK CLUB OF BEND: 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room; 541-3121046 or kevinb@dpls.us . CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Pine; 541-536-9235. OUTRIGGER CANOE CLUB: 5:30 p.m.; Deschutes River, Bend; amy@BendOutrigger.org. PAINT: Open mic with painting; 7-9 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, Bend; 541-389-2884. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. PRINEVILLE EAGLES BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge, Prineville; 541-447-7659. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon; Housing Works, Community Room, Redmond; 541-323-7413. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. VIETNAM VETERANS OF AMERICA: 6 p.m.; VFW Post 1643, Bend; 541-706-0645.

WEDNESDAY ASSOCIATION OF NAVAL AVIATION: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-318-3833. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon to 1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNIT UP: 5:30 -8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http:// groups.yahoo.com/group/bendknitup. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. CASCADE BRIDGE CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend

Senior Center, Bend; 541-788-7077. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY GAY/STRAIGHT ALLIANCE NETWORK SUPPORT GROUP: 6-8 p.m.; office@humandignitycoalition. org or 541-385-3320. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT AMATEUR RADIO GROUP (HIDARG): 11:30 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-388-4476. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon to 1 p.m.; Izzy’s restaurant, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org./ KNITTING MEET-UP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND MOMS GROUP: 10 a.m.; Redmond Community Church; 541-923-8227. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. SERVICE FOR PEACE: 6:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-4401.

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Ben Salmon / The Bulletin

There are lots of places in Shevlin Park to sit, take a break and take in the sights and sounds of Tumalo Creek’s calming waters.

Outing Continued from E1 When I rolled it backward out of its spot, I swear it recoiled like I was a stranger offering candy. When I put on my helmet, it said, “Nice to meet you.” We’ve met before, but I was too embarrassed to remind it of that. With both stuffed into the back of my car, I headed to Shevlin Park, where I planned a leisurely ride along the Tumalo Creek Loop, a 2.5ish-mile trail that leaves the park’s parking lot and runs, generally, along flat, wooded terrain between Tumalo Creek and the park’s paved road. It’s an easy ride, no doubt about it. If you’re a serious cyclist who enjoys rock- and root-hopping through tight singletrack, you should probably try another trail. But if you’re a novice who just wants to work off some of the workday stress and soak in some sun without having to work too hard, this is the path for you. It was the path for me. It was

also my first time on the Tumalo Creek Loop, which meant I often found myself on a spur trail that dead-ended, or ran into the creek or the road, or turned into something more technical than I wanted to try. But that was OK. At the creek, I’d stop and marvel that there’s a whole town just over the ridge on the other side of the water. At other dead-ends, I’d just back up and try another way. It was a bit like being a mouse in a maze. Which is better than the rat race, right? The trail meanders through ponderosa pines and into a larch grove, and the one time I started to wonder if I had traveled the wrong way for too long, a friendly sign popped up and pointed me back to the easy trail, just across a scenic covered bridge. Even in the late afternoon on a Monday, the trail was relatively uncrowded; I passed some dogwalkers, a couple taking in the creek view from a bench, and two women traipsing and talking. One wore an Beavers shirt, the other a Ducks hat. A warm spring afternoon on

this trail can cure even the most deep-seated ills, I thought to myself. Before I knew it, I arrived at Fremont Meadow, near the south end of Shevlin Park. It took me right around 30 minutes, including several stops to take photos and find my way back to my trail. Just beyond that point, Tumalo Creek Loop hooks up with Deschutes National Forest trails that lead to Tumalo Falls. Riders more adventurous than me could take that trip, or you could stop in the meadow, grab a brochure and hit the park’s interpretive trail, a one-mile loop with 21 stops on a self-guided tour of Shevlin Park’s natural history. Or you could do what I did: Turn around and take the fun, easy way home, making big, sweeping turns down the paved road, like a skier doing the giant slalom, and letting the whipping, man-made wind take my troubles away. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

SPONSORED IN PART BY:


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IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Nutrition The calorie can’t be smelled, counted or seen in foods, but eat too many and you’ll be in trouble, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 2010

INSIDE

FITNESS

effective or experimental? MEDICINE

In motion Female marathon runners have to be wary of pollution in big cities, study says, Page F2

Uplifting workout Combine yoga, martial arts and a dash of positive psychology and you have IntenSati, Page F2

Some artificial disk replacements have earned FDA approval, but insurance companies are still hesitant to foot the bill By Markian Hawryluk

THE PAIN IS GONE

NUTRITION

The Bulletin

Culver resident Robert Miller was unable to move his neck or raise his arm after an injury last July. He was given an artificial disk replacement, one of the first in Central Oregon. The alternative, neck fusion surgery, would have limited his range of movement and caused damage to other disks. “I’ve got a 9-year-old and an 11-year-old that I want to spend time with,” Miller said.

Good for you Is spinach better than iceberg lettuce in your salad? Page F3

Toxins in foods Don’t panic, and take a quiz on what is and is not in your favorite snack, Page F3

MEDICINE Celebrity medicine A new feature. This week: Obama has to watch his cholesterol, and so should you, Page F5

FIGHTING IT OUT Injuries from a car accident have left Jennifer Gates, of Sisters, struggling to work through neck pain while reading to her 5-year-old daughter, Kathryn. Gates’ insurance company says artificial disk replacement is still experimental and won’t approve the procedure. “There’s a possibility of not having more surgeries by doing the artificial disk,” she said.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

3-D sickness Watching a film like “Avatar” in 3-D can cause vision fatigue, Page F5

MONEY nians attitudes Survey on Oregoalth he c nonprofit, bli pu t n, a health policy abou behavior st Health Foundatio the Northwe s for healthful support incentive tion for children. In a recent survey, rity of Oregonians found that the majo money to promote fitness and nutri ayer and spending taxp

health survey Results of public premiums

h insurance Support lower healt se healthy behaviors for people who choo s that it for small businesseloyees cred tax a ort Supp ance to all emp provide health insur s fund state Support increasing l programs for farm-to-schoo state funds asing incre ort Supp in schools for physical education cco Support limiting tobastate advertising in the

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ast July, Robert Miller thought he had just pulled a muscle. The 43-year-old railroad employee and weight-lifting enthusiast from Culver figured he’d take it easy at the gym for a while and everything would return to normal. But during the next six months, his biceps got weaker and weaker. Then on New Year’s Eve, he awoke to find he couldn’t move his neck or raise his arm. An MRI confirmed he had an acute herniation of a disk in his neck. The jelly-like substance inside the disk, which provides cushioning between vertebra, had squirted out and was pressing against his spinal cord. In most cases, doctors Inside would address Miller’s • What does condition by removing an artificial the disk and then fusdisk look ing the vertebra above like and and below the disk with how is the a series of metal screws and rods. But the fix procedure would also limit the modone? tion in Miller’s neck and Find out on increase the pressure on Page F5 adjacent vertebra. “I’ve got a 9-year-old and an 11-year-old that I want to spend time with,” Miller said. “They’re at that age where you do a lot of stuff outdoors.” Because he was relatively young and had an otherwise healthy spine, Dr. Anthony Hadden, a neurosurgeon with Northwest Brain & Spine in Bend, opted for a different solution. Last month Miller became one of the first patients in Central Oregon to receive an artificial disk in his spine. Artificial disks have been in use in Europe for 20 years, but in the U.S. the devices have had to plod their way through a slower regulatory system. Now that several artificial disks have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, however, doctors face an altogether different challenge. Many U.S. insurance companies are unwilling to pay for artificial disk replacement until they see longer term data proving the devices are effective and safe. See Artificial disk / F5

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The year 2010 is already shaping up to be a tough one for Central Oregon’s hospitals, with fewer patients coming through the doors in the first two months. That decline has executives worried. In a message to staff this month, Jim Diegel, CEO of Cascade Healthcare MO Community — parent company of hospitals in Bend, Redmond and Prineville — called the decreasing number of patients a “disconcerting trend.” “The lobbies are quieter, rooms are sitting empty and our staffing levels are down,” he wrote. “We’re doing fewer surgeries, imaging exams and we’re even delivering fewer babies.” The overall number of patients is down 1.5 percent from 2009 at CHC. At Mountain View Hospital in Madras, volumes are down significantly across several

departments as well. Since October, inpatient admissions have declined 19 percent compared with the same time period a year earlier. Births have taken a big hit: The hospital delivered 32 percent fewer babies in January than it did in January 2009. Fewer patients means fewer dollars coming into the hospital. Most hospitals, inN E Y cluding Mountain View and those that make up CHC, rely almost solely on patient revenue to fund operations. In 2008, more than $400 million of CHC’s total revenue of $427 million came from its patient services. Central Oregon is not alone. Across the state, fewer patients are coming through hospital doors, said Andy Van Pelt, a spokesman for the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. Overall, volumes are down 1 percent from 2009, he said. See Hospitals / F6

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F2 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week

CLASSES

Photos by Jim Gehrz / Minneapolis Star Tribune

Dawn Hudson concentrates during a mind-body class called IntenSati, taught by Lisa Van Ahn, at the Calhoun Beach Club in Minneapolis. Sati focuses on themes of mindfulness and positive energy while incorporating movements from yoga and martial arts.

High-energy cardio workout utilizes positive psychology By Dee DePass Minneapolis Star Tribune

Instructor Lisa Van Ahn leaps in the air while teaching IntenSati in Minneapolis. Student Dawn Hudson is framed in the middle. hands above our heads, to the forehead, chest and up again. That morphed into thrusting hands way up in the air, then down by our feet, up in the air, down by our feet. Cool Indian music blended with the simple rise and squat exercise as we chanted, “So as above. So is below.” Wait a minute. I was breathing harder and cracked a sweat. “I am becoming …” said Van Ahn while bolting us into a Vstep march with arms extended upward. “All I want to be!” we said while jogging and clawing for the sun. “I feel my joy!” was belted to jumping jacks. “I feel my power” (deep plie and rapid air punches). “It feels so good” (pump arms toward ceiling, wall, floor and wall again). “I am on fire!” (fast dips while thrusting arms toward ceiling, then floor). The class had a really nice structure. The moves were simple at first and progressed with simple phrases that helped you remember which movement came next. The music’s tempo was just right, slow enough so the moves could be learned without struggle. And the names of our movements proved really cool: “greatness,” “fearless” and “grace.” They involved jester-like bows, forward lunges and elegant arabesques. The first part of the class got our heart rates up and the sec-

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INTRODUCTION TO INTENSATI

MINNEAPOLIS — If anyone had asked me if there was such a thing as aerobics for yogis, I’d send them packing with a lecture about dippy oxymorons. But that was before last month, when I tried Lisa Van Ahn’s IntenSati class at the Calhoun Beach Club in Minneapolis. The New York hit is spreading across the states; there are two instructors teaching it in Minnesota. So when my buddy Lynn Nelson invited me, I pounced. Nelson’s been going since September and swore it was fun. Then she warned me that there would be lots of yelling. Yelling? Sure enough, Van Ahn belted out positive affirmations that we echoed throughout the class, which proved to be part aerobics, part yoga, part martial arts, balance work and crunchy-granola feel-good talk. According to IntenSati creator Patricia Moreno, Sati is designed to be a high-energy cardio workout threaded with themes for mindfulness, positive psychology and the law of attraction. Moreno invented this mind/ body/cardio blend after struggling to control her weight. Now she’s teaching other instructors nationwide. At full intensity, participants burn 600 to 800 calories per class. Want to know how? Check out www.satilife.com. In class, Van Ahn warmed us up while chanting, “This week, who are you becoming?” … “I take responsibility for my thoughts. I take responsibility for my actions,” and “Every day, in a very true way, I co-create my reality.” My first reaction? This class is nuts! But then, I got it. Each movement had a name or phrase. There really was a pose called “responsibility.” Who knew? Van Ahn wasn’t nuts. She was using the rhythm of the words to cue a sequence of movements. It proved brilliant and effective. And because we moved at a decent, but not frantic, pace, the 60-year-old grandmother in the back of the room was able to keep up with the 20-year-old in front. We started by moving prayer

LTH H E A B O OK . N E DAT RE TUR s e L s WIL the Clas page.

ond part worked our lower bodies and tested our balance with one-legged poses that melted into lunges and kicks that worked our quads. “I never heard of this type of class, but I like it,” said Stephanie Yue Hang, a new mother who had just moved to Minnesota from Beijing with her family in January. “This is a little bit more like yoga but you burn a lot of fat, which is really good.” Maryann Evander has been taking Sati since September and she still isn’t sure how to describe it. Evander wasn’t looking for Sati and frankly never heard of it until she stumbled upon it last fall when it replaced her usual cardio class at Calhoun Beach Club. “I was like, ‘Hey! Who moved my cheese?’” she said. “It took me the longest time to get into (Sati) but I kept coming, and one day it was like someone switched on a light. I got it. The cardio sneaks up on you because it doesn’t seem that hard at first. But then you sweat. I like the yoga and balance work, and I like the affirmations, but I was slow to warm to that. Calling out things in class is not really me. So I lip-synched for a while, until it was working for me.”

ART OF ASSISTING WORKSHOP: L e a r n to a s sis t a vin y a s a y o g a cla s s; $ 4 0 ; 1 - 4 p .m. S u n d a y; N a m a s p a, 1 1 3 5 N.W. G alv e s t o n A v e ., B e n d ; 5 4 1 - 5 5 0 - 8 5 5 0 o r w w w.n a m a s p a.c o m. COPA THIRD THURSDAY SEMINAR: C e n t r a l Or e g o n P e d i a t r i c A s s o ciate s p r e s e n t s a “ S p e e c h a n d L a n g u a g e D e v elo p m e n t ” s e min a r; f e a t u r i n g s p e a k e r S u s a n Ru z z o ; 7 - 8:15 tonight; free; Bouncing Off the Wall, 1134 S.E. Centennial Court, Bend; 541-389-6313. FOUNDATIONS OF FLOW: Learn the basics of Baptiste power vinyasa yoga; suited for beginner yoga students; $25; 1-4 p.m. Saturday; Namaspa, 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-5508550 or www.namaspa.com. INFORMATIONAL MEDICARE UPDATE: Presented by Daniel McNally; free; 2:30 p.m. today; Aspen Ridge Retirement Community, 1010 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-8500. MEMORY EXERCISE CLASS: Presented by Joni Goodnight; free; 2-4 p.m. Tuesday; Aspen Ridge Retirement Community, 1010 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-8500. MUSIC IS MEDICINE: Learn how sound and music can be used to promote health and healing; $20 per class; 5-6 tonight, four-week series; Healing Heart Natural Health Center, 20 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-330-0334. ROAD TO RECOVERY TRAINING: Training for volunteer drivers who transport cancer patients to treatment services; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541434-3114 or charlie.johnson@ cancer.org to register. SPRING EQUINOX PRACTICE: Perform 108 modified sun salutations and meditate; $20 suggested donation benefits Bethlehem Inn; 9:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday; Namaspa, 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-5508550 or www.namaspa.com. TREATMENT OPTIONS PROGRAM: Learn the benefits and limitations of available dialysis treatment options; free; 9:30 a.m. last Thursdays of each month; Fresenius Medical Care, 2275 N.E. Doctors Drive, #1, Bend; 877-867-7543 to register.

IN MOTION Pollution in big cities may pose greater risk for female runners Training for a marathon in a big city? Don’t be surprised if you can’t match your best time. According to a new study from the American College of Sports Medicine, poor air quality may hinder times for female marathon runners. Researchers led by Virginia Tech civil and environmental engineer Lindsey Marr compared annual race times for the top three male and female finishers for seven marathons over 8 to 28 years, then cross-referenced those results with air pollution and temperature on race day. After accounting for warmer temperatures, they found that higher levels of particles in the air were associated with slower times for women, but not for men.

Some of the nation’s most prestigious marathons are held in big cities, such as Boston and New York, but attract runners from across the country. Marr said the pollution levels were still acceptable under national standards for air quality and that people who weren’t running a marathon probably wouldn’t have been affected. “Previous research has shown that during a race, marathon runners inhale and exhale about the same volume of air as a sedentary person would over the course of two full days,” she said. “Therefore, runners are exposed to much greater amounts of pollutants than under typical breathing conditions.” — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

New York Times News Service file photo

New York City Marathon runners react to cheers from spectators on a rooftop in Brooklyn in 2006. A new study suggests pollution in the air can affect women’s race times in marathons.

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Put Life Back in Your Life Living Well with Chronic Conditions Workshops Begin March 24 If you have conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain and anxiety, the Living Well with Chronic Conditions program can help you take charge of your life. The six-week workshop and the book “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions” costs only $10. Benefits for attending the workshop include: • Regain control of your life and do the things that matter • Feel better, have more energy and get relief from your symptoms of pain and fatigue • Meet new people, share what you know, learn new ways to improve your life

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Workshop series offered: Classes meet each Wednesday, March 24 - April 28 2:00 pm - 4:30 pm Unitarian Fellowship 157 NW Franklin in Bend Living Well is brought to you in partnership by: Deschutes County Health Services HealthMatters Central Oregon Oregon Department of Human Services PacificSource Health Plans Northwest Health Foundation Cascade Healthcare Community Jefferson County Health Department Clear One Health Plans Mountain View Hospital Mosaic Medical Crook County Health Department


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 F3

N G OOD FOR YOU The best leafy choice for your salad? Depends on the vitamins Yes, you know that salad is good for you. All lettuce is low in fat and calories, making it a staple of any dieter’s daily regimen. But some types of lettuce have more vitamins than others. The general rule of thumb is that the darker the color, the more vitamins. Consider this: One cup of iceberg lettuce and one cup of spinach contain 10 calories or less. The spinach, however, has 56 percent of your daily recommended intake of vitamin A and 14 percent of vitamin C. The iceberg lettuce contains just 7 percent of the recommended intake of vitamin A and 3 percent of vitamin C. Another good choice? Romaine lettuce, which also contains high amounts of both vitamins A and C. Watch out: Lettuce is good for

you. Drenching it with fattening salad dressings is not. How to eat: Salads are the obvious way to eat lettuce. But if you can’t stomach those each night, try adding spinach to other dishes such as quiches, pasta or soups. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

Thinkstock

Spinach is chock full of vitamins A and C.

A poison apple? Perhaps not ... By Sam McManis

4.

We depart from our usual calm and reasoned nutrition quiz for this alarmist, tabloid bleating: Your food can poison you! OK, stop hyperventilating and take our quiz.

According to the Web site HealthAliciousNess.com, “small amounts of cyanide may even be good for you by helping” which condition? a) kidney disease b) gout c) high blood pressure

1.

5.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Which toxin do apple seeds contain? a) arsenic b) cyanide c) hemlock

2.

True or false: Chewing three or four seeds from a single apple is enough to be sickened.

3.

Which of the following foods does not contain small levels of cyanide? a) cherries b) lima beans c) broccoli

Potatoes and tomatoes contain traces of glycoalkaloids, a poison that can affect which part of the body? a) stomach b) brain c) joints

ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: false (according to the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, a person would have to eat a “huge” number of seeds to suffer serious health consequences); 3: c; 4: c; 5: a Sources: National Institutes of Health; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; www. healthaliciousness.com; U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

Apples contain some toxins in the seeds, but eating a few will cause you no harm. Thinkstock

Next week Explore how to help someone in your home improve their diet.

The mysterious calorie Few understand them, yet many are counting By Julie Deardorff Chicago Tribune

Registered dietitian Jill Weisenberger once had a client who kept a puzzling food journal. The calorie counts were all out of whack. The woman’s tuna sandwich had 33 calories. An apple: 144. Turns out the woman was mistaking a food-calorie book’s index for a calorie chart. It’s not too far-fetched, seeing as few common health words are as baffling to us as “calorie.” Calories are invisible, yet we try to count them and cut them. Food supplies them, but they’re not nutrients. “They’re abstract,” said Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition at New York University, who says calories are “a mess” to explain. “Ordinary mortals cannot count, see, taste, smell or feel a calorie.” As a result, we’re bizarrely wedded to a concept we know very little about. Calories are the first thing people look for on the Nutrition Facts panel of food and beverages, according to a survey by the International Food Information Council and Foundation. But just 15 percent of Americans can accurately estimate the number of calories they should be consuming. And less than onethird of us correctly say that “calories in general are most likely to cause weight gain.” “I frequently discourage calorie counting because it can be tedious and ruin the joy of eating,” said Weisenberger, a food and nutrition consultant based in Virginia. “But I still want my patients to understand the concept so they can compare different food choices.” And if they don’t understand? Focus instead on food choices and portions. “But weight loss won’t happen without calorie reduction,” she said. Most of us simply want to know how many calories we need. But to truly grasp how calories can help you reach and maintain a healthy weight, it helps to know the basics.

Q&A

Q: A:

Are some calories more fattening than others? Not any more than the dollar in your right pocket will buy you more than the dollar in your left pocket. Some foods are more jampacked with calories than others. You can eat a cup of pasta for about 220 calories, or you can eat about 4 cups of broccoli or you can munch

on about one-quarter cup of nuts. They’re all about the same calories, but the 4 cups of broccoli will tame your hunger more.

For most people, a calorie is hard to define. Smaller food portions are often the best way to cut back on calorie intake while still staying healthy. Kraft’s Nabisco unit led the way in small food portions with its 100-calorie snack packets.

Q: A:

How many calories do I need? The best way is to look at your weight. If you’re gaining weight (and don’t want to), you’re eating too many calories. You can also get an estimate at mypyramid.gov.

Q: A:

How can I cut calories without starving or hating what I eat? If you like vegetables, there’s no reason to be hungry. They’re relatively low in calories and pretty filling because of their fiber and water content. Eat a couple of cups of them at dinner. It’s a lot easier to decrease your potatoes and steak when you’ve got broccoli or zucchini or both to fill you up. Also try cooking at home. If take-out is your norm, commit to cooking just once or twice each week. And allow indulgences. There’s no reason to give up your favorite foods. Eat smaller portions or eat them less often.

By the numbers 2,000 to 3,000 — The range of calories per day that maintains body weight in most people. Bigger or more active people need more. Smaller, more sedentary people need fewer. 3,500 — Number of calories in 1 pound of body fat.

A calorie is ... A unit of energy. First described in the 1800s, a calorie is technically the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celsius. But in the health and nutrition world, a calorie is the potential energy in food and the amount of energy the body uses, according to the American Dietetic Association’s Complete Food and Nutrition Guide. “We need this reference value in the same way we’d need to know how many pieces of wood to build a certain size house,” said San Diego registered dietitian Janice Baker, a certified diabetes educator. “Everyone’s body needs different amounts of energy based on height, weight, activity level, age and other factors. A calorie is not good or bad. It just is.”

Naum Kazhdan New York Times News Service

food, the nutrients are released, absorbed into the bloodstream and converted to glucose, or blood sugar. This powers the body, allowing us to shiver, blink, remember, breathe or run marathons. The food energy we don’t need right away is stored as body fat, regardless of the nutrient it comes from. That means excess carbs are no more fattening than additional calories from any source, including fats and proteins.

Calories can help us lose weight if ... We burn more calories than we take in. “It doesn’t matter when you eat them; your body uses the calories from ice cream in the same way, whether you eat at 10 p.m. or 10 a.m. But if you deliberately eat lightly during the day to have a good dinner, then hunger often gets out of control and you overeat,” said Susan Roberts, director of the Energy Metabolism Laboratory at Tufts University’s Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging. “Pacing calories is an important

where fitness gets personal

component of successful dieting.” Registered dietitian Weisenberger tells her clients that calories are money. “You have a certain amount in your budget, and if you spend too much, you go into debt. If you take more than your calorie allowance, you get fat.” If you want extra money for something special, you might try to earn more or save. “Think of calories the same way: If you want some extra for a special dessert or other treat, earn them by doing extra exercise, or save them from another time,” said Weisenberger. “A 500-calorie slice of cheesecake will take an hour or more of really hard exercise. Or you could skip that second piece of buttered toast at breakfast, cut your juice in half and trade in your large sandwich for a smaller one. Or you could combine dietary and exercise changes.”

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Dr. Stephen Knapp Welcomes the arrival of Karyn Anderson, FNP and welcomes back Rebecca Short-Brewer P.A-C from maternity leave. Rebecca is a certified physician assistant and has practiced with Dr. Knapp, M.D. since 2004. Karyn Anderson has been a RN since 1978 and a Nurse Practitioner for twelve years.

Calories come from ... Three nutrients: carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Water, vitamins and minerals are all calorie-free. When we digest

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Karyn Anderson FNP

Rebecca Short-Brewer P.A-C

Now Accepting New Patients!

541-382-4721 • 726 NW Wall St., Bend


F4 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

K S A A

HEALTH PROFESSIONAL c/o The Bulletin • 1526 NW Hill St., Bend OR 97701

SKIN CARE

SPINE / CHIROPRACTIC Q UESTION: I experienced a whiplash injury in an automobile accident about 8 months ago and continue to experience some pain and problems from the injury. My auto insurer sent me to their medical examiner who apparently thinks if I had been injured, I should have been better in 6 weeks, and now my auto insurance is refusing to pay for treatments. How can that be?

QUESTION: I have been using several different types of sunscreen. I would like to know what the best product is to protect my skin. ANSWER: The most important thing to consider when purchasing a sunscreen is to choose a product that is broad-spectrum. This means it covers both UVB and UVA rays. UVB rays from the sun causes the skin to burn. UVA rays penetrate very deep into the skin and causes Carrie Baxter, aging. Both UVB and UVA exposure increases the MSPAS, PA-C risk of developing melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Many sunscreens will claim to cover both UVB and UVA rays. This can be very misleading. The label on the sunscreen bottle can claim to be broad-spectrum even if the product covers a very small percent of UVA. Most sunscreens do a great job of protecting the skin from UVB rays. In order to insure that the product you are using provides good coverage of UVA rays, you must read the ingredients. It should contain one of the five following ingredients; zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, avobenzone, helioplex or mexoryl. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are considered the most broad-spectrum. Many sunscreens will contain several ingredients. Choose a product that is SPF 30 or above and remember to re-apply every two hours if you are outdoors.

ANSWER:

Multiple studies over the last few years have shown that most chronic pain from auto injuries is a result of injury to the ligaments of the spine. These injuries most often occur to the facet capsular ligaments, but studies have also shown injury to the anterior and posterior longitudinal ligament and the alar ligament. It’s a common misconception that whiplash injuries are self-limiting. Even though clinical experience and the medical literature make it clear that a significant group of whiplash patients have chronic pain, the conventional wisdom is that the patient should be completely recovered in a few months. This idea is based on the myth that ligament injuries heal in about six weeks. A recent review in the American Journal of Medicine provides a better understanding. In this article, researchers looked at 24 high-quality studies that examined the natural course of recovery from ankle sprain. They found the following: There was a rapid decrease in pain levels in the patients during the first two weeks. There was a wide range of pain levels at one year. Some patients reported problems three years after the injury. In one study, up to 15% of patients complained of problems at three years. This study is important, because it demonstrates that ligament injuries can result in chronic issues for the patient. If 15% of patients with ankle sprains report symptoms three years later, it shouldn’t be surprising that some patients with whiplash injury could also have long-term symptoms after their injury. If you have further questions, please contact our office. Brad Pfeiffer, DC

FA M I LY M E D I C I N E Q UESTION : Several people in my family have been

diagnosed with gastric ulcers. I have occasional abdominal pain over my stomach. How do I go about finding out if I have an ulcer? ANSWER: Gastric ulcer or Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD) is a common problem and can be diagnosed with several different tests. The most accurate study is an esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD. This is perfomed Kevin Reuter, under light anesthesia and a camera is passed into the M.D. stomach and first part of the small intestine to visualize the lining of the alimentary tract. Biopsies can be taken and bleeding controlled if an ulcer is visualized. The bacteria Helicobacter pylori can cause ulcers and treatment with a cocktail of medications including antibiotics can then be commenced if the bacteria is detected. Other ways to check for the bacteria are with a blood test, stool test, or a urea breath test. Risk factors for developing ulcers include smoking, alcohol abuse, illicit drug use, and use of NSAIDs such as ibuprofen or aleve. Complications such as stomach perforation or gastric outlet obstruction can occur if ulcers are left untreated. In general, if you have had an ulcer, you should be on medication to help suppress gastric acid and your doctor can help you decide which medication to choose.

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Brad Pfeiffer, DC • 541-383-4585

PHYSICAL THERAPY

COSMETIC DENTISTRY

QUESTION: “I have been diagnosed with a chronic myofascial pain in my hips and thighs. How is this treated and can it be cured?” ANSWER: Simply stated, myofascial pain is a form of chronic pain in the muscles and tissues known as the fascia. Unlike a typical muscle strain or injury, myofascial pain lingers long after physiological “healing” of the tissues has taken place. There can as many approaches to curing or managing this type of pain, as there are practitioners. Many myofascial pain syndromes are exacerbated by a nervous system Allison Suran, that becomes “hypersensitive”. This begins a downward spiral of inacP.T., GCFP tivity which leads to increased pain, which leads to less activity, which leads to increased hypersensitivity, and so on. What nerves need to decrease their hypersensitive state is movement. But for folks who have chronic painful conditions, finding the right amount and level of movement or exercise can be challenging. A physical therapist can guide and support you in finding the right level and intensity of movement and exercise that gradually desensitizes the nerves in your muscles. By evaluating postural alignment and imbalances that may be contributing factors to pain, a physical therapist can provide in-depth education and retraining of movement patterns to support necessary changes and promote healing. Simultaneously, a physical therapist can use a variety of techniques to treat and manage the painful symptoms in the muscles and tissues while an individualize exercise program is being developed and progressed. See the entire article at http://healingbridge.com/newsletters-articles.htm. Allison Suran has been specializing in the treatment of chronic pain conditions for over 20 years. For more information and recent articles she has written about chronic pain, go to her website at www.healingbridge.com

ALLISON SURAN, PT, FOUNDER WWW.HEALINGBRIDGE.COM

404 NE PENN AVE, BEND, OR 541-318-7041

PLASTIC SURGERY QUESTION: I’m a healthy woman in my mid 40’s who has had three children by natural means and has breast feed all of them. I exercise regularly but am unhappy with my loose skin over the stomach area and my breast as well. What can I do to revitalize these areas? Adam Angeles, M.D.

A NSWER : This is a common complaint among patients that have had children. Although liposuction is a good technique for removing localized areas of fat over the torso, hips and thighs, it does not tighten the skin overlying those areas of fat removal. Conversely, a tummy tuck (or abdominoplasty) not only removes the fat from the abdomen and flanks, but tightens the skin and underlying muscles for a more cosmetically appealing figure. The skin around your breast may also be lax and is best treated by a breast lift with or without augmentation to give you a more youthful appearing breast. These procedures can usually be performed in an outpatient surgical setting such as the Bend Plastic Surgery, Outpatient Surgical Center. Contact us for more information.

ADAM ANGELES, M.D. MEDICAL DIRECTOR, BEND PLASTIC SURGERY www.bendprs.com 541-749-2282

NAT U R AL WEIG HT LOSS QUESTION: I am trying to lose weight, hardly eating anything, and exercising like crazy. Why can’t I lose weight? A NSWER : Weight management can be a tricky business, with problems due to many reasons. First would be to ensure that there is not any chronic disease or medical reasons such as thyroid, adrenal or sex hormone balance; or insulin resistance. Next Kerie Raymond, would be a liver detox or cleanse. We tend to store N.D. our toxins in fat tissue and it is difficult to lose the fat until we lose the toxins. Then there are a few myths we need to bust. Metabolism is set and can be reset by a variety of mechanisms. If we “fast” by not eating, our metabolism slows deliberately to compensate for the lack of fuel. To lose weight we need to eat, especially a breakfast high in protein, low in sugars. Coffee is our enemy here also by stimulating insulin and cortisol. “The Weight Loss Cure” book re-popularized Dr Simeon’s HCG protocol which we utilize here in our clinic along with other medically supervised weight management programs. We can provide all hormone testing, programs and tools to get you started looking and feeling better.

QUESTION: I was in a car accident in 1990 and back then they wanted to surgically break my jaw and do braces to fix it. I am now having lots of problems and was wondering if there are any solutions other than surgery?

ANSWER: I am sorry that you are having problems right now. Chronic pain can have a seriously negative impact on the quality of daily life. I Kelley Mingus, have treated several people who have been in car D.M.D. accidents, both recent car accidents and distant accidents. The good news for you is that we have had some amazing advancements in both technology and treatment options since 1990. It is difficult for me to give a definitive answer, but I can tell you that it is very rare that the kind of surgery your talking would be required to improve your situation. Major jaw surgery should only be considered as a last resort. I have been able to dramatically improve the condition of every chronic pain patient I have treated and have never had to resort to surgery. Your bite is made up of a system that includes your jaw bones, your TMJ joint, your teeth, and the muscles. If any part of the systems loses its harmony then the whole system is compromised and results in chronic pain. The key to treatment is to put that system back into harmony in the most conservative way possible. So to answer your question, yes there are many treatment solutions that do not require surgery. I hope this helps. You can visit my web site to learn more about TMJ treatment solutions at www.bendcosmeticdentist.com.

WELLNESS QUESTION: Is there a difference between Home Health and Home Care? ANSWER: There are key differences between these two in-home services. Home Health is prescribed by a physician and includes the skills of a registered nurse and physical, occupational, and speech therapies. Medicare pays for Home Health skilled nursing care and/or therapy. To Winona Phelps, qualify, a physician must prescribe the services, R.N. which have to be provided by a Medicarecertified home health agency. Home Care does not require a physician’s order. It is available for assistance with daily activities, such as laundry, cooking, bathing, transportation to appointments, and light housekeeping. Many agencies provide these services, and it is important to know that you can choose your home health agency. Home care can be a good solution for short-term needs. For longterm needs of a more complex nature, you may want to consider moving into a retirement community that offers a continuum of professional care. If you think you could benefit from care in the home, Touchmark Home Services offers an assessment at no charge.

Winona Phelps, R.N.

DISTINCTIVE DENTISTRY AT BROKEN TOP 1475 SW Chandler Ave., Suite 201, Bend www.bendcosmeticdentist.com • 541-382-6565

EYE CARE

PERMANENT MAKEUP : I spend too much time putting on Qmy makeup. Can permanent makeup simplify

QUESTION: My mother was told that she has macular degeneration and that glasses were of limited help. Is there anything available to help her see clearer? ANSWER: Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina causing gradual loss of central acuity. Those who have been diagnosed with macular degeneration need a complete, dilated eye exam to determine the level of severity and type of macular degeneration present. Progression of some forms of macular Winter Lewis, degeneration may be slowed with therapeutic O.D., F.A.A.O. intervention by a retinal specialist. Those who have experienced significant central acuity loss may benefit from magnification devices or specialty glasses. It is important to realize that magnification devices do not restore original vision but work to enhance the visual acuity that remains intact. The use of magnifiers will allow for images to be enlarged and projected onto the retina such that peripheral viewing system can “understand” the image better. This takes time and practice to become comfortable with. Support and training is most effective with an Occupational Therapist and Low Vision specialist. Locally, St. Charles Outpatient Rehabilitation program has trained Occupational Therapists who can assist those with central acuity loss. Low Vision Specialists are available locally as well. Ask your eye care provider for more information.

WINTER LEWIS, O.D., F.A.A.O. INFOCUS EYE CARE 24509 NE Mary Rose Pl, Ste 110 • Bend 541-318-8388 www.infocus-eyecare.com

C O L O N & R E C TA L C A R E QUESTION: Who is at risk for colon cancer? ANSWER: More than 90 percent of patients are over 40, at which point the risk of contracting the disease doubles every ten years. QUESTION: How does it start? ANSWER: It is generally agreed that nearly all colon and rectal cancer begins in benign polyps. These premalignant growths occur on the bowel wall and may eventually increase in size and become cancer.

Mark Maddox, M.D., FACS QUESTION: What are the symptoms?

ANSWER: Rectal bleeding and changes in bowel habits (such as constipation or diarrhea) are the 2 most common symptoms. Abdominal pain and weight loss are usually late symptoms indicating possible extensive disease. QUESTION: Can colon cancer be prevented? ANSWER: Colon cancer is preventable. The most important step toward preventing colon cancer is to get a screening test. Any abnormal screening test should be followed by a colonoscopy which provides a detailed examination of the bowel. Polyps can be identified and can often be removed during colonoscopy. And though not definitely proven, there is some evidence that diet may play a significant role in preventing colorectal cancer. As far as we know, a high fiber, low fat diet is the only dietary measure that might help prevent colorectal cancer. If you would like to schedule an appointment or have questions regarding colon and rectal care, please call (541) 322-5753 or visit our website: www.advancedspecialtycare.com.

MARK MADDOX, M.D., FACS • ADVANCED SPECIALTY CARE 916 SW 17th St. • Suite 202 • Redmond • 541-923-4257 www.centerforintegratedmed.com

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Send, fax or e-mail your question to: Ask a Health Professional c/o Kristin Morris, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • Fax: 541-385-5802 • kmorris@bendbulletin.com

My question is:


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 F5

M Artificial disk Continued from F1

Compared with fusion Hadden said artificial disks can offer significant advantages over fusion surgery in the right patients. They allow for the spine to move more naturally and have fewer complications, he said. Fusion surgeries, on the other hand, have a notoriously high rate of follow-up surgeries. Part of the problem is that a fused joint cannot flex and winds up putting more stress on the disks above and below it. Normally, a disk will degenerate at a rate of 0.3 to 0.5 percent per year. But Hadden said after fusion, adjacent disks degenerate at 2.5 percent per year, or five times as fast. It means many fusion patients wind up needing another surgery to repair the adjacent disks three or four years down the road. And each fusion reduces the individual’s ability to bend at that joint. “You’re stealing motion from them,” Hadden said. Hadden said in some cases he can increase the mobility in fusions by using flexible rods that will bend with the spine. But many believe that artificial disks will eventually replace fusion surgeries altogether. Years ago, surgeons fused knee or hip joints as well. But with the advent of good artificial joints, knee and hip fusion has now become unthinkable. Analysts at Life Science Intelligence, which tracks the medical-device industry, estimate the U.S. market for artificial disk replacement will grow from $55 million in 2007 to $440 million in 2012. The number of patients with spine problems is expected to skyrocket in the coming decades, as the population ages and experiences the consequences of carrying too much weight for too long. But for now, artificial disks are not for everyone with back pain. Good candidates, Hadden said, are generally younger patients — between the ages of 20 and 50 — whose bones are strong enough to handle the implant. Patients must also have at least 50 percent of their disk height still intact. That allows enough room for proper placement of the device. In patients who have more degeneration of the disk, the body has likely already tried to fix the problem, he said, creating arthritis to slow down the movement in that joint. “If you put the artificial disk in and you regain motion, you’re going to have pain in those joints,” Hadden said. “And then you’ve done them a disservice.” Spine specialists generally recommend starting with rest and physical therapy, which will alleviate the problem or lessen the pain for some patients. If that fails, they may turn to steroid injections that can relieve the pain and allow the body to repair itself. If the patient still gets no relief, then surgery becomes an option.

Insurance battles Hadden said he must often call medical directors of insurance companies to convince them to approve a fusion or artificial disk surgery. Mick AnDyck, a 43-year-old Home Depot employee from Bend, had dealt with the pain of a bulging disk for more than six years. He went through multiple sets of physical therapy appointments, none of which helped. It took three months for him and Hadden to get approval for an artificial disk. At one point, Hadden told him he could probably get approval for a fusion the next day, but that the artificial disk might be worth the wait. “There are seven or eight people I know who have had back fusions and have had multiple fusions. That scared me,” AnDyck said. “I went online to read the stories, and I didn’t read one good story.” Both Miller and AnDyck had successful surgeries and both were up and walking the same day. Hadden said that’s standard procedure after artificial disk surgery because it helps to compress the spine to fully seat the disk in the bones. Both have returned to work within a month of their surgery. Hadden said fusion patients can get back to limited work within 6 to 9 weeks, but often can’t resume full work for three months post-surgery. Other patients in the region

Artificial disk replacement An artificial spinal disk relieves back pain caused by degenerative disk diseases and preserves mobility after surgery.

Back and neck pain Vertebra Caused by pinched nerves, due to a diseased disk

Diseased disk

Artificial disk replacement Surgery performed through small incision in the abdomen or the neck:

1.

Vertebral bodies are spread apart to relieve pressure on pinched nerve. Diseased disk is removed

2. Metal implants Vertebra

inserted into place, tapped into position

3. Sliding core

inserted between endplates

Artificial disk Endplates: Cobalt chromium alloy, coated with titanium

when new technology was freely adopted before it was adequately vetted. That’s been a problem with several orthopedic devices, including artificial hips that later had to be replaced. “We’ve seen too many treatments launched because they seemed like they were a good idea, and early indicators were favorable,” Prowf said. “This artificial disk may be one of those, or it may turn out to be much better than existing treatments.” With new studies on artificial disks emerging regularly and great interest in the devices from physicians and patients, Regence has reviewed its policy at least annually since 2003. And it allows several layers of appeals for patients who believe there are good reasons why they should get investigational devices. “We hope there will be new studies that will shed light on things, one way or another,” Prowf said. “Spine disease, it maims many people, leading to disability and lost work time. Treatments are really complicated and difficult. I wish we had a silver bullet for this problem.”

4.

High cholesterol levels need to be fixed, even when you’re president President Barack Obama had a physical last month, and according to his physician, he has somewhat high cholesterol. Obama’s total cholesterol rose from 173 mg/dL in July 2008 to 209 mg/dL. Most of that rise came from an increase in LDL, or bad cholesterol, from 96 mg/dL to 138 mg/dL. The president’s good cholesterol fell slightly from 68 mg/dL to 62 mg/dL. His doctor recommended lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise, to get the cholesterol back down. According to the American Heart Association, individuals should strive to keep total cholesterol levels under 200 mg/dL.

Total cholesterol over 240 mg/dL is considered high risk. But more importantly, LDL levels should be lower than 130. High cholesterol levels are associated with a higher risk of heart problems, although plenty of people with high cholesterol will never develop heart disease, and many people with low cholesterol levels will die of heart attacks. Doctors will also use other factors, including family history, lifestyle and more tests, to determine how aggressively to treat high cholesterol. Patients with multiple risk factors might be put on cholesterollowering medications, called statins. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Growing support

Surgeons who want to implant the disks, however, disagree with the insurance companies Spine is returned to Sliding core: that still view artificial disks as normal posture Polyethylene experimental. “I think there’s strong eviSource: Charité, Germany dence that it is a very effective © McClatchy-Tribune News Service tool for certain patients. And I would certainly recommend it based on what we know about it today,” Belza said. “This is a new future. This is where we definitely should be going,” Belza has performed six disk replacements in Central Oregon as part of a now-completed clinical trial but has yet to get insurers to pay for a disk replacement for patients not involved in research. Gates has been pursuing her appeals with the help of attorney Warren West of Bend. West said they are considering suing the insurance plan if she doesn’t get approved for an artificial disk. “They’ve indicated they still consider that to be experimental, but there are BlueCross BlueShield insurance carriers in other states that approve it,” West said. “So at this point, we are considering filing a lawsuit.” Last year, the Chicago Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroresearch compiled a list of insurance companies that cover artificial disk replacement surgery for neck disks. The list Submitted photo included more than 30 national An artificial lumbar disk in the spine of Mick AnDyck, 43, of and regional carriers, including Bend. AnDyck suffered back problems for six years, going through nine BlueCross plans and two of several sessions of physical therapy, with no relief before having Oregon’s larger carriers, ODS the disk replaced in January. Health Plans and PacificSource. A Regence spokesperson explained that BlueCross plans in have flown to Europe and paid search in Bend, has recommenddifferent areas of the country for artificial disk surgery out of ed Gates get a disk replacement are licensees of the BlueCross their own pocket. But not everyrather than fusion surgery, but BlueShield Association but that one can afford such costs. her insurance company, Regence each operates as a separate BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon, company and makes individual doesn’t cover the procedure. decisions on what procedures or Long-term benefits “We were told they’ll pay for technology to cover. BlueCross Surgeons argue that the youngthe fusion but not the artificial plans can also rely on guidance er the patient, the more sense artidisk,” Gates said. from the association’s Technoloficial disks make over fusion surBoth procedures would cost gy Evaluation Center, which has gery. The longer a patient has to about the same, between $30,000 yet to back disk replacement. live with a fused joint, the greater to $40,000. The Oregon Health Plan the chance that the adjacent disks does not cover the device and will rupture as well, necessitating will not approve disk Proceed with caution Medicare more fusions down the road. replacement for patients older It’s why 35-year-old Jennifer Regence still considers artifithan 60. Bend-based Clear One Gates of Sisters continues to fight cial disks to be “investigational” Health Plan still considers the with her insurance company to and is waiting for studies trackprocedure investigational. approve an artificial disk replaceing the longer term outcomes of Hadden feels there is sufficient ment. She has been dealing with disk replacement to be completevidence to support the use of arneck pain since a car accident in ed. According to Dr. tificial disks over November 2008. When physical Ralph Prowf, the fusion as long as therapy and chiropractic visits company’s senior “I think there’s the patient meets didn’t help, she went for an MRI medical director, all the selection that revealed a herniated disk. the FDA approved strong evidence criteria. There’s “I could do the fusion but that the artificial disks that it is a very always the possicould mean there would be anon the market today bility that 10 years other surgery,” she said. “There’s with only two years effective tool for after implantation a possibility of not having more of follow-up data. certain patients.” the device could surgeries by doing the artificial Company officials fail and doctors disk.” want to make sure — Dr. Mark Belza, would have to Gates has lived in almost conthat if they approve The Center: Orthopedic replace it, either stant pain since the accident, the devices, pa- & Neurosurgical Care with another disk dealing with daily headaches. An tients won’t need to & Research or with a fusion. accountant by trade, she can not have additional surBut Hadden said sit at a desk or work on a computgeries several years he’s put disks in er for any length of time without down the road if the both AnDyck and experiencing pain in her neck, devices start to fail. Miller with the expectation the shoulders and arms. She rarely “This is a controversial area devices will last their entire lives. sleeps through the night. because patients who have spine “These guys are hard workers “You try to avoid things that problems hurt, and they’re in and they have a lot of working might set it off, but you can’t go pain and they want and need betyears left. I don’t want to limit through life not doing anything,” ter treatment,” Prowf said. “But I them at all,” he said. “If it were she said. “It’s something you try don’t really want one of our memmy back, that’s what I’d want.” to live with, but it really interferes bers to be the one who’s experiwith everything.” mented on.” M a r k ia n Hawryluk can be She often used to go fishing Prowf said health insurers are reached at 541-617-7814 or with the family but can no longer trying to avoid past mistakes mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com. hold a fishing pole. She cannot push her children on the swings. Dr. Mark Belza, a neurosurWeekly Arts & Entertainment geon with The Center: OrthopeEvery Friday In dic & Neurosurgical Care & ReVertebra

CELEBRITY MEDICINE

The Associated Press file photo

SEEING TRIPLE AT THE 3-D MOVIE?

Films can cause dizziness, nausea By Evan S. Benn St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Thousands of people are packing movie theaters across the country to see the new “Alice in Wonderland” in 3-D, and dozens of them will likely leave with headaches. That’s not a criticism of the film, but a fact: Doctors say those with less-than-perfect eyesight can suffer nausea, blurred vision and dizziness from 3-D movies. “The 3-D technology taps into our depth perception,” said Dr. Lawrence Tychsen, ophthalmologist in chief at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. “To fully appreciate depth in a 3-D movie, you need equally clear vision in both eyes. Even a small misalignment could contribute to those symptoms of discomfort.” Tychsen said relatively minor conditions such as nearsightedness, farsightedness or a lazy eye — if not treated with glasses or contacts — could trigger headaches and other side effects from 3-D visuals. He estimated that up to 20 percent of the population — kids and adults — could be affected. “Many people are unaware that anything’s wrong until they experience a 3-D movie and have these symptoms,” Tychsen said. The problem comes from socalled vision fatigue, caused when 3-D technology forces

the eyes to make constant adjustments to focus on images that are simultaneously near and far away. Humans see in three dimensions, but the exaggerated imagery of 3-D movies can cause a strain in some, according to Jeffrey Anshel, a California optometrist who has researched vision fatigue in computer users. Reports of vision fatigue popped up in recent months after the release of the 3-D blockbuster “Avatar,” which has shattered box office records. The popularity of these movies and the money they pull in keep them in favor with theater owners and studio executives. Whether your eyesight is 20/20 or less than perfect, watching a 3-D movie isn’t going to cause any vision damage, according to experts like Anshel and Tychsen. “Getting a headache at a movie isn’t harmful, but it is symptomatic of subnormal vision,” Tychsen said. “If it happens, that might be a good sign it’s time to visit an eye doctor.”

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F6 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M Hospitals Continued from F1 “The trend we’ve been seeing in utilization has been going down as the economy is going down,” Van Pelt continued. In addition, CHC executives said they are being stretched because those patients who are coming in are less able to pay. The number of patients without insurance jumped from 6.7 percent in 2009 to 7.9 percent in the first part of 2010. For hospital charges billed to patients without insurance, the hospital collects, on average, 10 cents on every dollar, said CHC Chief Financial Offier Karen Shepard. The decline in people with insurance is a significant problem because of the way hospitals are paid. Not everyone pays the same for the same procedure. For patients with governmentsponsored insurance, such as Medicaid or Medicare, the hospital is paid less than for people with commercial insurance. The hospital relies on commercial insurance patients to make up the difference between their costs and the low reimbursement from other types of insurance. “Commercial is really where the profit margins are,” said Shepard. The decline in commercial insurance patients combined with the decline in patients overall is a “double whammy,” said Diegel. “We have a volume problem and a net revenue per unit of service component (problem). It’s a deeper amplification on the financial impact.”

Financial impact So far, the decline in volumes has hit the bottom line hard at CHC. In a letter to staff, Diegel said revenues were “already behind budget by several million dollars” in 2010. In an interview, he said the hospital is operating in the red. Last year, the hospital operated in the black, according to Shepard. The hospital has responded to the budget crunch by eliminating a small number of positions and, to a much greater extent, reducing the hours worked by nursing staff. Since the beginning of the year, the hospital has laid off five people. The majority of those positions were lost when the Heart Institute of the Cascades, a nonprofit foundation affiliated with CHC and Heart Center Cardiology, was absorbed into CHC earlier this year; radiology and pharmacy also lost one position each. Many more nurses have been sent home for periods of time. The practice, known as “call-offs”, is common in hospitals; as the number of patients ebbs and flows, staffing is adjusted accordingly. When nurses are sent home, they

Doctors, patients clash on priorities By Roni Caryn Rabin New York Times News Service

High blood pressure is often a top priority for doctors. But pain and depression may be more pressing to their patients. A new study that surveyed health care providers and their patients with both diabetes and high blood pressure found that most of the time they agreed on at least one or two of the three most important health problems affecting the patient. But in almost one-third of the cases, the provider’s top three concerns did not include the top priority of the patient, the survey found, especially if that item was pain or depression, said Dr. Donna Zulman, a Veterans Affairs researcher who was lead author of the study. The paper was published online Feb. 2 in The Journal of General Internal Medicine. The findings may reflect a lack of awareness about how important it is for diabetics to control their blood pressure, Zulman said, adding that the message to patients is that they must communicate clearly.

Volume of patients at Cascade Healthcare Community The number of patients at CHC, parent company of hospitals in Bend, Redmond and Prineville, has gone down dramatically in the first two months of 2010. Many areas of the hospitals have seen drops. Total discharges

Down 1.5%

Outpatient surgery

Down 5%

Inpatient surgery

Births

Emergency room visits

Down 2.8%

Down 5%

Down 20%

Source: Cascade Healthcare Community

can go without pay or use vacation time. But call-offs are being used much more often this winter than in the past, said Alison Hamway, the labor relations representative for the Oregon Nurses Association, which represents nurses within CHC. “Some people are losing one-third of their paycheck.” According to notes from a nurses association meeting last week, nurses were called off for more than half a day so many times in January that it totaled 5,300 hours, compared with an average of 2,000 hours each

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

month before the recent decline in patient volumes. In the intensive care unit, nurses were called off so often they filed a formal grievance with the hospital. The grievance was resolved by moving three recently hired nurses to other positions, according to notes from the nurses association meeting. “The hospital was very cooperative and very much worked to resolve the issue,” said Hamway. Non-union staff members, who took a 5 percent pay cut in January 2009 that was reversed in November, will be given a 2 percent raise in 2010 if they are “consis-

tently meeting expectations,” according to a letter to staff from Katy Vitcovich, CHC’s senior vice president for human resources. Diegel said executive salaries are still being evaluated. An earlier article in The Bulletin reported that the organization’s board of directors was considering giving Diegel a raise. “There are no decisions on that yet,” Diegel said.

Morale problems With many staff members taking a hit in pay, staff morale is low, executives acknowledged. “If I were to tell you that morale was not affected, I’d be blowing smoke,” said Diegel. “There is a lot of anxiety.” Shepard said the state of the economy, particularly the high unemployment rates, puts stress on the person who is working to make up for income losses. “There’s no cushion any longer.” Hamway said nurses were frustrated by the call-offs and the cuts in pay. “Those dollar amounts have a huge impact on people’s pay and morale.” Diegel said the problems at the organization were a sign of the larger, troubled times. “These are such disruptive times that it’s really hard to manage in a consistent way,” he said. “You just try to do the very best you can going forward.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

V ITAL STATS Survey on Oregonians attitudes Attitudes about public health about public health In a recent survey, the Northwest Health Foundation, a health policy nonprofit, found that the majority of Oregonians support incentives for healthful behavior and spending taxpayer money to promote fitness and nutrition for children.

Results of public health survey Support lower health insurance premiums for people who choose healthy behaviors

83%

Support a tax credit for small businesses that provide health insurance to all employees

93%

Support increasing state funds for farm-to-school programs

84%

Support increasing state funds for physical education in schools

84%

Support limiting tobacco advertising in the state

71%

Support adding flouride to the drinking water

63% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%

Source: Northwest Health Foundation Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Kari Szukalski of Focus Physical Therapy Inc. has completed the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy level II lower quadrant class. The course focused on biomechanical evaluation and manual treatment of the lower quadrant to alleviate movement dysfunction and pain.

Kari Szukalski


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 G1

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Airedale free sweet neut. male to approved home. Family moved. 541-318-5046.

201

New Today Jeep Grand Cherokee 2004, Special Edition, 4.7, 91K, leather, sun roof , tow pkg., new tires, $11,800. 541-548-7818.

202

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Arctic Wolf, Alaskan Malamute, Alaskan Husky mom, dad Timberwolf & Siberian Husky. 8 wk old pups. $400/ea. OBO. 209-675-3630 Barn/shop cats free to suitable homes. Altered, shots. Wll deliver! 389-8420, leave msg.

Rock saws, sanders, polishers, rocks, jewelry, stones, cutters, polishing equip. 541-350-7004. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call

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205

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208

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Adoptions - Rescues: Do you have an Aviary Bird that no one wants to take care of anymore? Or you’re working too many hours? Or they are just too demanding? I will adopt your small or large FREE birds for my private hobby aviary, feather pickers, loud & noisy, or just plain mean, all are welcome. I guarantee they will have a good home. 541-410-9473. Adorable Bichon and poodle mix boy. Very cute markings. Ready to love $250. 541504-9958

Chihuahuas, 2 tiny, cute females, shots, 7 weeks, $240 cash. 541-678-7599. Chihuahua/Sheltie pups (3), 10 weeks, look like mini Collies, $150, 541-536-5538 Companion cats free to seniors! Fixed, shots, ID chip, more. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org English Bulldog Pup, 1 male, brindle with white $1200 541-290-0026 ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC registered, champion lines. microchipped, ready to go, $2000. 541 416-0375

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Lab Puppies (Black) - $200 girls & boys, 1st shots, well socialized, parents have pointing traits, 541-389-0978 Lab Puppies, yellows, AKC, good blood lines, $300 males, $350 females, 541-447-1323. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Labrador retriever, yellow male, 6 mths old, AKC, all shots, $250, 541-647-4811.

Pomeranian Pups, (3), CKC reg., 2 reds, 1 black, $250 ea., call 541-923-3999. POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyfull tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889.

Low cost vaccine and microchip clinic. Eastside Bend Pet Express, Sat. Match 20th, 10am-1pm. Call the Bend Spay & Neuter Project for more info. 541-617-1010 Minature Schnauzer born 1/16/2010 1st shot akc reg. salt/pepper black/silvers $600. 541-536-6262 Miniature Pincher/Poodle Mix Pups, look like poodles, 2 females, 1 black, 1 black & brown, $160 ea., born 1/2/10, 541-593-7455. Mini Dachshund, 7 weeks. 1 piebald male, 1 black and tan female, $350. 541-610-7341

TOY SHIH TZU PUP 8 wk. male black & white. won't last!!! Lots of character! Waiting for forever home. Roger 541-598-4713

Pekinese pups ready 3/1, 3 males $190 ea., 1 female 1.5 yr. $125. 1-951-634-0260

210

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www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Great condition leather furniture set. Aspen Brand – Prescott (#89) dark brown in color, café sofa, café loveseat and single recliner all power/electric motored – five recliners in all. Pet free / non smoking home. 2-yr. old set, parts remain under warranty. Call for photos or to view. $2,800. Call 541-420-0794

PATIO table outdoor table, no umbrella, 28Hx40W, $40. 541-388-1533.

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TV, Stereo and Video

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

1952 Winchester Model 12, 12 ga. Trap, SOLD; Winchester Model 97, 12 ga. pump, $475 OBO, Call 541-389-7385.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Bid Now!

ATTN. BIRD HUNTERS Gateway Canyon Preserve is offering special March pricing on Pheasant and Chukar hunting while supplies last located just 11 miles North of Madras. Steve & Faith 541-475-2065 email: micmcm@madras.net

Bid Now!

Sofa & Loveseat set, great cond., $600/both; Drexel Heritage Coffee Table & 2 end tables, $600/set; Thomasville Queen Anne 7 piece dining set, $800; China cabinet, $500; 2 Leather chairs, $300, 541-389-5519

Student wants CAR OR TRUCK running or NOT! Call anytime. Daniel 541-280-6786.

You Can Bid On: Hand-Knotted Rug from India Retail Value $2000 From Area Rug Connection

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

You Can Bid On: Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set with Pedestal, Energy Star Retail Value $2299 From Lance & Sandy’s Maytag

Furniture

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

248

Health and Beauty Items

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

You Can Bid On: Aspen Wardrobe Armoire Base with Top Retail Value $1600 From Great American Home Furnishing

Bed, Juniper post & slab, queen size, $1600, this is a must for your bdrm, 541-923-3700

Dining Room table and six upholstered chairs (two arm chairs). Wonderful new condition, warm brown, slightly distressed solid wood. Made in Hickory, NC. $375 541-306-4582

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

You Can Bid On: Huntington House Sofa and Chair Combo Retail Value $2850 From Dovetails Furniture

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Dick Idol Elk chair, exc. cond., burnished red pattern. $375. Call 541-383-2062

9 7 7 0 2

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Smile Makeover Retail Value $7600 From Steve Schwam, DDS

You Can Bid On: Pair of Polk RTSFX 250 Watt In-Wall Speakers Retail Value $2000 From Quality Builders Digital Living

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Browning Theftguard gun / fire safe 58" x 30" x 23", 510lbs $650. 503-789-7412

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Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

O r e g o n

www.gatewaycanyonpreserve.com

541-385-5809

Furniture & Appliances

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

B e n d

300 Lever action Savage, with scope, $400, good cond., please call 541-420-4183.

Shih

2 Feral Cats make great rodent Mini Dachshund Pups, girls $275 ea., 2 boys $250 control! Contact the Bend ea. Prineville. 360-607-0604. Spay & Neuter Project for more info. All cats are al- More from Madras & Munchtered and vaccinated. Availkins, too! Cat Rescue, Adopable on a donation basis. tion & Foster Team rescued Help us give them a second 16 Munchkins from a Bend Log Bed, Twin, beautiful wood, chance. 541-617-1010 $200, please call backyard breeder last week, 541-923-3700. & another dozen cats & kitFREE Kitty, beautiful blue eyes, tens from the Madras MATCHING PIECES: full size pampered, female, needs hoarder on Thurs. Some can home ASAP. 541-550-6143. headboard, night stand and be adopted soon, while othmirror, $50. 541-526-1068. ers have health issues that FREE PET RABBIT - Senior will require some time to mixed breed doe. Call Mattresses good treat. We have baby kittens (541)-322-5253 quality used mattresses, in foster homes, ready in a discounted king sets, FREE to good home Pit Bull’s, 2 couple of weeks. See fair prices, sets & singles. sisters from same litter, www.craftcats.org for the full 541-598-4643. great with kids, housebroke, Munchkin story & to see our 1 black with white & 1 blue available cats, for an adopwith white, 5 years old. tion application & directions. MODEL HOME 541-480-8293 Open for visits/adoptions FURNISHINGS Sat. & Sun., 1-5, other days Sofas, bedroom, dining, French Bulldog Pups, pureby appt. 389-8420, 65480 sectionals, fabrics, leather, bred, reg., dame and sire on 78th St, Bend/Tumalo area. home office, youth, site, born Valentines weekaccessories and more. end, ready to go to new Norwich Terrier Pups, AKC, MUST SELL! home April 10th, call to make rare, 2 males, 9 weeks, (541) 977-2864 appnt. to visit. 541-771-0981 $1500 each, 360-378-1364 www.extrafurniture.com ask for Rob. or sharonm@rockisland.com Golden Retriever Pups exc. quality, parents OFA, good hips, $650. 541-318-3396.

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A v e . ,

*SHIHTZU*AKC*

Labs, AKC, excellent pedigree, 5 males, 2 females 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Table, Wooden 6 ft. w/6 chairs & two leaves, good cond. $300 OBO. 541-350-1765. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: (6) 40 Minute Body by Laser Weight Loss Sessions Retail Value $2800 From Body by Laser

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GUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade call for more information. 541-728-1036.

Hot Tubs and Spas

Hi-Point 9mm semi-auto, 8 round mag. w/ ammo, lock & case, lifetime warranty. $250 OBO. 541-647-8931

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now!

H&K USP 45 with H&K Universal Tactical Light. 2 mags. $775 541-948-5018 New Mossberg-Maverick 88 12g 5+1 28inch barr. lock, manual and box include. $275 OBO. 541-647-8931 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

You Can Bid On: Mallorca Hot Tub By Hot Spot Retail Value $7795 From Hot Springs Spas

You Can Bid On: Energy RC-70 Tower Speakers Retail Value $2200 From Better Ideas Audio and Video

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments

The Bulletin Classifieds Oregon’s Largest 3 Day GUN & KNIFE SHOW March 19, 20 & 21 Portland Expo Center NEW SHOW HOURS Fri. 12-6, Sat.9-5, Sun.10-4 I-5 exit #306B - Adm. $9 1-800-659-3400 CollectorsWest.com

WANTED:

Winchester Model 94 S.R.C. carvine, 25-35, will consider 30-30. 541-576-2352

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Guitar, Yamaha 12-string, with case, good condition $200 541-350-1711 Keyboard, Casio, $250 OBO, seen by appointment only, 541-536-9869

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Sporting Goods - Misc. Fully guided Spring Turkey Hunts w/ Webfoot Outfitters, Call for a free brochure, 541-661-6313. goosehunts@gmail.com

You Can Bid On: 82" x 82" x 36" Spa, Fits 7 Retail Value $5995 From Bend Spa & Hearth, LLC

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. You Can Bid On: 60" Amish Handcrafted 60" Round Table & 4 Chairs Retail Value $3200 From Dovetails Furniture

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Washer/Dryer, GE, White, 4 yrs. old, exc. condition, $250, 541-548-5516, 541-548-6195

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Antiques & Collectibles Pump Organ, Antique, 1883 Western Cottage, call 541-312-9592.

AUTOMOTIVE Bob Thomas Car Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-2911 . . . . . . . . . . www.bobthomas.com Thomas Sales and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-389-3031 . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tsands.com

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Coins & Stamps

EMPLOYMENT

WANTED TO BUY You Can Bid On: Amish Hand-Crafted Sideboard with Small Hutch Retail Value $2400 From Dovetails Furniture

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 549-1658

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing 12 Ga. Winchester Shotgun, model 12, 2 barrels, full choke & modified choke,good cond, $375, 541-420-4183.

Barrett Business Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-6946 . . . . . .www.barrettbusiness.com Flex Force Staffing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-749-7931 . . . . . . . . . . . .www.flex-force.com

MEDIA The Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-1811 . . . . . . . . . www.bendbulletin.com

For as low as $2.00 per day, your business, phone number, and Web address can be listed. Call 541-382-1811 to add your business and reach more than 80% of the market 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


G2 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 257

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Musical Instruments

Misc. Items

Misc. Items

Misc. Items

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Bid Now!

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191.

Bid Now!

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

You Can Bid On: New Lowrey Organ Purchase with 6 Classes Retail Value $1600 From M o o r e M u s i c SCHUMAN UPRIGHT PIANO, original, very old. $150. 541-410-7930.

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Memberships Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Crypt, Inside double companion, # 46604B in Deschutes Memorial Park, best offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Ad must include price of item

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Cristal Brand 7 Light Pendant Retail Value $3806 From Quality Builders Lighting and Design

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 You Can Bid On: Annual 7 Day Single Membership Retail Value $2400 From Widgi Creek Golf Club

You Can Bid On: 6 Light Pendant Retail Value $4232 From Quality Builders Lighting and Design

You Can Bid On: 24 Light Crystal Chandelier - Installed Retail Value $4800 From Quality Builders Lighting and Design

You Can Bid On: Eclipse Motorized Retractable Awning Retail Value $5000 From Classic Coverings & Design

FIND IT! The Bulletin reserves the right BUY IT! to publish all ads from The SELL IT! Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website. The Bulletin Classifieds

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Annual 7 Day Family Membership Retail Value $3300 From Widgi Creek Golf Club

You Can Bid On: $2500 Gift Certificate for Hunter Douglas Window Fashions Retail Value $2500 From Classic Covering & Design

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: 15’x25’x52’ Swimming Pool Retail Value $6500 From Absolute Paradise

You Can Bid On: Stick-Built 24’x30’ Garage Retail Value: $24,920. from HiLine Homes

Bid Now!

Used kitchen cabinets & bathroom vanities, $2000 OBO or trade. 541-279-8826

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

266

Heating and Stoves

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 549-1592

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

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Estate Sales DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

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The Bulletin

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

290

Sales Redmond Area

tiques, furniture, vacuum & much more! At Tumalo Feed Co., turn West on Bailey Rd., go 3 mi., left on Tyler Rd. Fri. & Sat., 9am-4pm. Signs up! Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

Woodworks is Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-5, downsizing, HUGE invenhousehold, tools, kids items, tory Reduction, sale movies, snowboards, China starts Friday noon-5 & Hutch, more! 2501 NE 5th Sat. 8-noon, doors, winSt. off Maple behind WalMart dows, lots of hardware, moldings, woodworking tools & equip, office supplies & equip Indoor Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat., 9-5 smalll assortment & much more, 20514 Murof tools, some furniture, ray Road, off Boyd Acres glassware & kitchenware & Road in front of Fuqua Homes. lots of misc. Doors will not open before 9 am. 1865 NE 6th St, Redmond.

www.bendbulletin.com

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Sales Southwest Bend Fantastic Garage Sale Fri & Sat. 10-3, Brookside Loop, kid’s items, RV & auto access., household, shooting supplies

Moving

Sale, 56108 Stellar Dr., Fri. & Sat., 9am-2pm. 97 S. to Sunriver Exit, to Spring River Rd., left on Stellar, 2 miles. Furniture, tools, home decor, snow blower, and much more. 286

ESTATE/MOVING SALE Beautiful Teak dining set, Hickory ent. center, 2 twin pillowtop beds, freezer, fridge, two pontoon boats, fishing & sporting goods, Smoky Mt. Smoker, tools, kitchen, china & glassware, teapot collection, quality Christmas items, jewelry, much more! Fri. & -Sat. 9-4 Numbers at 8 a.m. Friday 2651 NW CANYON (north of Maple) Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-504-1827 350-6822 for pics & info go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

Sales Northeast Bend MOVING SALE: SAT. - 8-4, 62968 Bilyeau Way, furniture, camping equip., yard equip., clothing, electronics, tools.

Lawn/Garden sprayer, trailer mounted,w/boom, new 15 gal. Fimco, $190, 541-923-1363. Log bridge, decorative, 8’ long, 2’ wide, great for dry creek bed or small creek, $350, 541-923-3700.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Moving & Garage Sale, Sat/ Sun. 10-3, 1365 NW 35th St. residential/commercial electrical tooling & equip., shelving, snowmobiles, trailers, irrigation equip., shop tools & misc.

Moving Sale- 2022 SW Salmon, Redmond (Behind Albertsons), Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3. Something for everyone. Antiques, lions paw oak table, Crock stoneware, plus more.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords for as low as $150. Bend Del. Cash, Check, Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

MacDon 1991 Swather 14’ Cummins Diesel 920 header conditioner, exc. cond. heat, A/C, radio, everything works $16,500. 541-419-2713.

You Can Bid On: Outdoor Fire Pit Retail Value $3500 From Cement Elegance SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 548-3949.

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Found: Large set of car keys & others on the corner of Savannah & Derek Dr. 389-5845 Found light jacket, mens, on 27th St. in Bend, 3-13. Please call 541-419-2156 to ID. Found Yellow Lab male, 3/13, SE Bend, near Benham Rd., 541-848-8832.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Lost Brown Tabby Cat, with pretty green eyes, off Boyd Acres/Fred Meyers Rds, very shy, reward, 541-312-0054 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

THE OL'E TACK ROOM is back . Along with Home Grown Furnishings. OPENING March 17th at 10:00am. Located on the corner of 7th & Cook in Tumalo. Phone: 541-312-0082. Come see us & our NEW Additions ~ The Coffeee is on!

1st Quality Grass Hay, barn stored, no rain , 2 string , 425 tons at $140/ton & tons $120/ton 541-549-3831 Patterson Ranch Sisters 2nd Cutting Grass Hay, small bales, in barn, exc. quality, load any time, $150/ton. Lonepine, 541-480-8673 or 541-548-5747 Alfalfa hay, 2 string, very nice & green, clean, no rain, in barn, 1st & 3rd cuttings, bale or ton, $115/ton & up, 541-408-5463, 541-475-6260

Barn Stored Orchard Grass, and grass mix,70 lb. bales, $150/ ton, 3x3 Alfalfa feeder & premium, $100/ton & $125/ ton, Delivery avail. 548-2668. Cheaper Than Feed Store! Premium Orchard Grass Hay, small, square, no rain, weedless, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll store the rest until needed. By ton, 1st cut/$165, 2nd cut/$175. Near Alfalfa Store. 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail kerrydnewell@hotmail.com

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

358

Farmers Column

Horses and Equipment

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

BALE FEEDERS (2), 8’, $350/both, 541-382-1230, 541-480-9071.

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Excellent grass hay, no rain, barn stored, $160/ton. FREE grapple loading, 2nd cutting avail. Delivery available. 541-382-5626,541-480-3059

Lost and Found

Quality Hay,small bales in barn, Alfalfa 1st, 2nd, & 3rd, Orchard Grass 2nd, Feeder hay delivery avail. $85/ton & up. 541-771-9270,541-475-3379 Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Barn Stored Bluegrass Straw, clean & green, 3X3 mid-size bales, $22/bale, volume discounts available, Madras, call 541-480-8648.

FOUND: Dog, mini Schnauzer, neutered male, off Ferguson in SW Bend. 541-617-6071

You Can Bid On: Carrier Furnace and Installation Retail Value $2000 From Tri County Climate Control

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

325

John Deere Rider LX 277 AWS, 48” low hours, new $5200 now $2500. 280-7024.

HAY!

Orchard Grass Hay, shed stored, guaranteed quality, 25 bales/ton, $145/ton, 3 plus ton, $140/ton, 541-382-3023. Tumalo Area.

Hay, Grain and Feed

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

290

Sales Redmond Area

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Wine Barrel, authentic, used, European, great shape, $250. 541-279-8826

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Lets Make A Deal! An- Plateau

NOTICE TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

You Can Bid On: Cristal Brand Light Pendant Retail Value $1690 From Quality Builders Lighting & Design

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

300

Nokka grapple loader/trailer. Heavy duty loader and trailer ideal for a variety of lifting and hauling jobs. $15,000 (541) 554-5759

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You Can Bid On: Milgard Window Package with installation Retail Value $3500 From High Desert Glass

BarkTurfSoil.com

345

Livestock & Equipment

HEY!

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Building Materials

Misc. Items

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Wheelchair Carrier, Tilt & Load plugs into 1 & 1/4 in. hitch $200. 541-322-0983.

Bid Now! TIMBER WANTED Warm Springs Forest Products Call Dean Rowley 503-260-5172

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Hay, Grain and Feed Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard Grass $115 a ton. Madras 541-390-2678.

Seasoned Doug Fir, Juniper or Lodgepole $170 a cord split and delivered. Call 541-977-2040.

Bid Now!

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Medical Equipment Invacare Patient Lift, Hydraulic, new seating sling with capacity for over 400 lbs. $250. Can email pics upon request. 541-504-0975.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now!

261

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Farm Market

Find It in

Paint Mares, 3-14 year olds, broke to ride, from $750, 541-815-0966.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

345

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.

Alpaca Apparel. We’re Livestock & Equipment Unique located just outside of SisBred Nubian Dairy Goats (2) Herd bred does, will sell single also discount for purchasing both, please call evenings 541-548-1857 for more info. Capital Hens, 7 laying Silver Wyandotte Hens, 1 year old, $70. Call 541-318-5751

Corriente Long Horn Cross Roping Steers 1 year old $300 each 541-420-4379 please leave a message. Longhorn Bulls and Cows. Young solid color bulls available. Registered Texas Longhorns.www.kbarklonghornranch.com $300. Joel, 541-848-7357

ters off Hwy 20. Call 541-385-4989 or visit us at www.alpacasofidyllwild.com Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of March 15, 2010

Business Opportunity ALL CASH vending! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 1-888-776-3071.

Employment SLT NEEDS class A team drivers with Hazmat. $2,000 bonus. Split $.68 for all miles. Regional contractor positions available. 1-800-835-9471.

Miscellaneous NEW NORWOOD sawmills. LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mill boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 300N 1-800-661-7746 ext 300N.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

421

Alcohol & Drug Counselor: Adult/Juvenile. Seeking full time, state Certified, salary DOE, send resume to: Pfeifer & Associates, 23 NW Greenwood Ave. Bend, OR 97701 or fax to 541-383-4935.

Schools and Training

Apprentice Plumber

Customer Service Working as part of our Service Support department, Yellowknife Wireless is looking for innovative, highly motivated Customer Service Technicians. Interested parties please respond to our job offer form at: http://www.ykwc.com/jobs/

Employment

400 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Must be in apprenticeship program. Please call 541-312-2771.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

454

Looking for Employment Caregiver, female, RN, background in Dementia & eldercare, will travel & transport, competitive rates, 541-548-3660.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Exp. housekeeper seeking every-other week position, reasonable rates. 541-389-8315.

CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for caregivers, full or part-time, in Bend/Redmond. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Doreen or Evangelina for more information. Se habla espanol. 541-923-4041 from 9 am.-6pm, Mon.-Fri.

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-385-0177 Light housework, yard work, part time, $9 hr. on the East side of Bend. 541-389-0034.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

personals Thanks to Residents & Horse Riders around Tumalo Reservoir to help us find our lost horse Tony. Special thanks to Tyler & Katie for finding it for us. -- Randy & Teek.

Caregivers VISITING ANGELS is looking for compassionate and reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. 1 year experience required. Must pass background check and drug test. Apply at Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Front Desk /CSR Prineville Disposal Front Desk Receptionist/CSR Specialist. Tired of the commute? Small family owned local business has a fast paced full-time position available. Hours are 7:00am-4:00pm Mon.-Fri. Pay DOE and full benefits. Application available at www.prinevilledisposal.comsubmit with resume to our office in person. No phone calls please. Front Desk & Nigh Audit Marriott Hotels of Bend now hiring part to full time night audit and front desk. Flexible hours a must. Weekends and holidays required. Apply in person with resume at 1626 NW Wall St. No phone calls.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

General

476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362

Sales & Marketing Professional for medical practice. Looking for proven local networking skills, up to $40K. prior sales & work in medical field req., incl. cover letter outlining qualifications & accomplishments. 16073460 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Janitorial The Bulletin has an opening for a janitorial position. Hours are 11:00pm to 7:30am, Sun. - Thurs. Must be able to lift 50 lbs. Experience is preferred. Please send resume to: Box 16093163, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. RV Sales Mgr.

Big Country RV is

Laboratory Assistant Interpath Laboratory is looking for a full-time lab assistant. Experienced phlebotomy skills, customer service and computer skills preferred. Mon. - Fri., variable day shifts and locations in Bend & Redmond. Schedule flexibility required. Competitive pay + benefits. Email resume to jobs@interpathlab.com or fax to (541)278-8316

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. computer skills and customer service req., Quickbooks a plus. Apt., util. + salary incl. Fax resume to 541-330-6288.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Medical Billing/Collection Professional Incl. receptionist & office duties; part-time; must have exp. in medical field; holds current certification in coding & billing; incl. cover letter outlining qualifications/accomplishments. 16073734 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Medical RCM Position RN with knowledge of MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, 541-447-7667. dns@ochococare.com

seeking exp. RV Sales Manager. Industry exp. req. Comp pay and benefits. Fax resume to 541-330-2496. RV Sales Mgr.

Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Salesperson. Industry exp. req. Comp pay and benefits. Fax resume to 541-330-2496. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

RV Tech

Big Country RV is seeking Exp. RV Tech. FT with benefits. Apply at 63500 N. HWY 97 Bend.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

GALVESTON GARDENS Now accepting resumes. Apply between 1 and 5, Mon.-Fri. 1515 NW Galveston, Bend.

Sales & Marketing Professional for medical practice. Looking for proven local networking skills, up to $40K. prior sales & work in medical field req., incl. cover letter outlining qualifications & accomplishments.Bx 16073460, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Tele Fundraising for Non-profit Organization: Students, seniors, homemakers & others, great suplimental income. Part time permanent AM/PM shifts. Mon.-Fri. $8.40-$12.00 hr. to start DOE. 541-382-8672

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

Interior RV Detailer Big Country RV seeking interior RV detailer. Maid experience a plus. Full time w/benefits.Apply at 63500 N. HWY 97 Bend.

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU?

General

Circulation Processing and Retention Specialist The Bulletin has an immediate opening in the Circulation Department for a Retention/Processing Specialist. Responsibilities include: Days end processing of The Bulletin, The Redmond Spokesman, The Central Oregon Marketplace, Postage Statement and other processing related elements, as well as making outbound calls to customers to ensure customer satisfaction of newspaper delivery, to secure payments and customer retention. This position will also provide backup support to the Customer Service Group. Support includes, but is not limited to, providing customer service to The Bulletin subscribers over the phone and entering transactions into the PBS system, running reports, figure entry, and 10-key totalling. We are looking for someone with a positive and upbeat attitude, and strong service/team orientation; must have accurate typing, computer entry experience and the ability to multi-task. Most work is done via telephone, so strong communication skills are a must. Work shift: Sunday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday: 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hourly pay plus commission and full benefits package. Please send resume to PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Attn: Circulation Office Manager or send via e-mail: ahusted@bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED W IN N IN G TE A M O F S A L E S / P R O M O TIO N P R O F E S S IO N A L S A R E M A K IN G A N A V E R A G E O F $400 - $800 PER WEEK D O IN G S P E C IA L E V E N T, TR A D E S H O W , R E TA IL & G R O C E R Y S TO R E P R O M O TIO N S W H IL E R E P R E S E N TIN G THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

WE

The Bulletin 486

528

Independent Positions Loans and Mortgages CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-385-5809

541-617-7825

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!

OFFER:

FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

Home Improvement Collins Custom Woodworks: Provides honest, reliable service, specializing in carpentry, decks, remodels & furniture, CCB#173168, 541-815-2742.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Handyman

The Bulletin Classifieds

I DO THAT!

Debris Removal

Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Spring Clean Up

541-322-7253

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Weekly Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Drywall

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

Excavating

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Building/Contracting

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours

Excavating

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

573

Business Opportunities

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Sales

Cabinetry

Barns

507

Real Estate Contracts

The Bulletin Classifieds

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765.. Don 385-4949

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

NEEDED

Advertise your open positions.

Adult Care

Quality & affordable, auto body & paint work. Rocky Fair, 541-389-2593 after 4 p.m.

500

First Position Loans 2 Newer Bend Homes I Own Free & Clear 2 Points & 9% 3 Year Term Be The Bank Joel 949-584-8902

FINANCING

LOOK IN OUR

Compassionate Caregiver, CNA seeks work, open to all care needs, Mark, 541-678-4693.

A & R Paintworks

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Loans and Mortgages

DEALS ABOUND!

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

Automotive Service

528

Finance & Business

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

382-3883

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

SPRING

CLEAN-UP

Thatch, aerate, weekly maintenance, weeding, fertilizing, sprinkler activation. Free Estimates Contact Hal, Owner, 541-771-2880. hranstad@bendbroadband.com

BIG

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s. Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Landscape Design Hauling of most everything, Installation & Maintenance. you load or we load short or Offering up to 3 Free long distance, ins. 26 ft. Visits. Specializing in enclosed truck 541-279-8826 Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Commercial and Residential “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Gregg’s Gardening & Lawn Maintenance. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate Steve 977-4826 •CCB#166678 CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


G4 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 642

650

658

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS! RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted Rooms in Nice House, next to park/school, $300/1 room, both for $450, 541-408-7019 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

630

Rooms for Rent NE Bend, area of 8th & Greenwood, master bdrm. w/ bath, $425. 541-317-1879 Quiet furnished room in Awbrey Heights, no smoking etc.$350+dep 541-388-2710 Secluded Guest House, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, semi-furnished, all appl., W/D, no pets/smoking, $750/mo. All util. paid. 541-390-0296 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES: Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. NE Bend, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 decks, sunny, skylight, W/D hookup, fenced, private, W/S/G paid, cats ok, very nice, $650 mo, 541-350-0958

636

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Newer Tri-Plex, 2 bdrm., 2 bath. 1300 sq. ft., garage w/ opener, W/S/G paid, W/D + all kitchen appl. incl., next to park, near shopping, $650/mo.+sec. dep. 541-604-5534

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Fully subsidized 1 and 2 bdrm Units

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appnt.

Equal Opportunity Provider Equal Housing Opportunity

55+ Hospital District, 2/2, 1 level, attached garage, A/C, gas heat, from $825-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiamgmt.com

Duplex, beautiful 1100 sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, cul-de-dac, newer, clean, vaulted, spacious, W/S paid, $650/mo. 541-815-1643

Furnished studio condo, all utils paid, no pets, swimming pool & hot tub, close to town & river, references, $550, 1st, last, dep, 541-382-3672 Move In Special, Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Westside Condos, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Upstairs Studio Apt. for rent, 10 minutes E. of Costco, A/C, no W/D, elec., water & garbage incl. in rent, $425/mo., 541-385-5400.

Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

2553 SW 20th St.- 2/1 duplex, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600 + dep, incl. yard maint., No pets/smoking. 541-382-1015 3/2, Newer 1 Story Duplex, w/big yard, vaults, garage w/opener, all appl., central gas heat, no smoking, pets neg., $725, 541-280-3152. A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave., $610 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, near college, no smoking/pets. 420-9848. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Ridgemont Apartments

2210 SW 19th St. Redmond, OR (541) 548-7282

Ask Us About Our MARCH IN SPECIAL! 2 bdrm, 1 bath starting at $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, non-smoking units, stg. units, carport, dog run. Approved pets okay. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Ask Us About Our

March in Special! Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval. Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com AVAIL. NOW (2) nice duplexes, quiet neighborhood 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1 car garage, fenced backyard, fully landscaped, more info call 541-545-1825.

here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend $950, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, fenced yard, all gas, some appl., no smoking, pets okay, 1648 NW Elgin, 541-633-0572, 541-323-6965 A Rent-To-Own -- or Not: Westside 2 bdrm, 1 bath cottage with loft & upper deck, large fenced yard, gas heat, alley parking, across from Columbia Park & river access, $900, 541-617-5787. Great NW Location! 3 bdrm., 2 bath, garage & driveway short walk to downtown, river & Old Mill, pet? $1000 Avail. 4/1. 503-729-3424 .

Private secluded studio attached to large shop, W/D, fridge, W/S/G incl, NW Redmond, 3 mi. to High School, $550, pets ok, 541-548-5948

LOVELY WESTSIDE 2 bdrm, 1 bath home, Riverside neighborhood, pets accepted with dep. & ref. $790/mo. + dep. Heather, 541-815-7476.

648

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

Houses for Rent General A 1+1 Log cabin w/loft & balcony in the pines, wrap around deck, 1.5 acres, front & back landscaping, garage, $900/mo., 541-617-5787.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $1100/mo. + deps. Pets okay. 20561 Dorchester East. 541-410-8273,541-389-6944

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2/1.5 $545, Clean Units, Great Location, Move In Special, Hud OK, 2007 Timber Ave. The Rental Shop. 541-389-2260 www.rentmebend.com

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

NOW RENTING!

642

PILOT BUTTE TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, fireplace. Only $710 per month w/ one year lease. Call 541-815-2495

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. PriClassified Rep. to get the vate Balcony and lower Patio, new rates and get your ad storage W/S/G paid $650 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

$99 1st Month!

Move In Special $99 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RE.NTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

65155 97th St., newer 1/1 duplex on 2.5 acres w/ kitchen, 1 garage, mtn. views, $750 incls. util. No pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414

Apt./Multiplex General

2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with garage. $675 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719

Foxborough, cute 3/2 fenced yard 1200 sq.ft. W/D $850+dep. 541-389-2260 The Rental Shop www.rentmebend.com

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

632

634

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

2969 LOTNO refurbished 2 bdrm, 1 bath duplex, garage. Beautiful private yard. Yard care, w/s paid. $725. 2358 OCKER immaculate freshly repainted 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath townhome, single garage, gas heat, w/d. $695. 2061 YORK CIRCLE 2 bdrm, 2 bath immaculate townhome, semi-private yard, close to park. $620. 20782 ALPINE RIDGE BARTON CROSSING 545 sq.ft. beautiful 1 bdrm, 1 bath, washer/dryer. $545. 1700 WELLS ACRES Burning Tree Village condos. Storage, athletic court & laundry facilities. #4: 1 bdrm, new tile counters. $495. #23: 1 bdrm, new maple cabinets & counters. Air-conditioning. $510. #8: 1 bdrm, tile counters. $500. CENTRAL OREGON Leasing & Management 1250 NE 3rd B200, 385-6830 www.centraloregonrentals.com

Rent/Lease Option, 650 sq.ft. 1 bdrm., 2 bath Near Park, River, downtown & COCC, indoor pool $750 incl. util. Sharon 541-408-0337

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

• 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. • Screening fee waived Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from $395. Lots of amenities. Pet friendly, w/s/g paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Downtown, 1 bdrm, 1 bath, fenced yard, no All real estate advertised

NOTICE:

656 Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, W/D incl., $875 mo. w/lease. 14 Timber, please call 541-345-7794,541-654-1127 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Fabulous 3/2.5 on corner lot, great neighborhood, near high school,community pool/ park, $1200, 925-978-5304 suzanneverhaeg@hotmail.com

Great

Location, freshly

painted, 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, single garage, fenced yard, pets okay, $625/mo. + dep. 541-788-9027

Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, 5724 SW Shad Rd., CRR. $700/mo.+dep. Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, 13879 SW Cinder Dr., CRR. $850/mo.+dep. 541-350-1660,541-504-8545

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver 1/2 Off 1st mo., OWWII, .5 acre, 55948 Snowgoose Rd., short walk to river, community boat ramp, $795,pets neg, no smoking, 541-420-0208 A

$850 - Newer, 3/2 full bath, 1300 sq. ft., dbl. garage, on dbl. cul-de-sac, fireplace, avail. 4/1, 19833 Sprig Ct., 541-848-1482, 541-385-9391

On the way to the Mt. Bachelor, near downtown Bend 3/2.5, 2000 sq.ft. open floor plan, dbl. garage 19424 SW Brookside Way. $1200. 408-0086

Houses for Rent Redmond

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

A newer Redmond 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 1600 sq. ft., family room, mostly fenced, nice yard, RV parking, $850. 541-480-3393,541-389-3354

2 Bdrm., 1 bath, single car garage, storage, W/D hookup, fenced yard, exc. location, additional parking, $750 mo+dep. 541-382-8399.

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Cute 2 bdrm, 1 bath cottage on corner lot, well established neighborhood, fully fenced yard, 1.5 car detached garage, new carpet/ paint, W/D, fridge provided, walk to schools, shopping/ downtown, well behaved pet(s) okay, $650, 1st & $800 dep., call 541-280-4825.

658

Show Your Stuff. Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

1. Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your ad package.

2. Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

700 705 Private Money for Real Estate Loans no credit, bad credit OK. Alan, Redwood Financial Services EHO 541-419-3000 (ML-3100)

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

675

RV Parking RV

PARK

Downtown, near shopping, 305 E Burnside, 18-40’ spaces, W/S/G/cable, Overnighters OK. 541-382-2335

Mobile/Mfd. Space Mobile Home lot for rent in Beautiful Prineville! No deposit. Will pay to move your home! Call Bobbie at 541-447-4464.

687

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

744

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Open Houses

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

FSBO: Open house, Sat.-Sun., 654 SW 25th, Redmond, 1370 Sq.ft., 3 bdrm., 2 bath, new carpet, tile, windows, $119,000, 541-979-1920

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1680 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Office/Warehouse Space, nice 350 sq. ft. office w/ bath, 1250 sq. ft. warehouse, 14’ overhead door, 63065 Sherman Rd., Bend. 1 block from Empire & Hwy 97. $650/mo. 541-815-9248.

745

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 771

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

773

Acreages 2.26 ACRES, NE Bend, exclusive neighborhood. $285,000. Reduced to $260,000 541-306-7357 See www.bigbrick.com/3590

748

740

676

750

Redmond Homes

Real Estate Services

COZY 2+2, garage, w/ decks & lots of windows, hot tub, wood stove & gas heat, furnished/unfurnished. Near Lodge $1050. 541-617-5787

KEYSTONE

745

Homes for Sale FSBO: $249,000 Furnished 2/2 dbl wide/shop & farm equip. 40 acre lot fenced/gated. Pond, good well. 2 mi. E. of Mitchell, OR. Seller Finance Sharon 541-408-0337

MOVE IN SPECIAL ½ OFF 1st mo. rent: immaculate 3/2.5 2-story home on quiet cul-de-sac, master downstairs, freshly repainted and laminate floors installed, large fenced yard, dbl. garage, gas fireplace. No smoking. $1050 with lease + security dep. 541-548-9965.

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. newer carpet & paint, wood- The Bulletin is now offering a stove, garage fenced yard on LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE .92 acre lot $795 Rental rate! If you have a (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Mobile Home new rates and get your ad w/ stove & W/D, W/S/G started ASAP! 541-385-5809 paid, $565/mo.+$250 sec. dep. Pets okay. 693 541-382-8244

2200 sq. ft. 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath, fenced backyard. Available now. $1150, first, security, and screening. Pets neg. 541-306-7968.

3 bdrm., 2 bath, large dbl. garage, large fenced yard, RV or toy parking, near schools, 541-385-1515

smoking, pet neg., $550 mo.,, plus dep. Refs. req. 541-388-0337,541-389-1728

Real Estate For Sale

Northeast Bend Homes

541-322-7253

Mountain View Park 1997 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in gated community $179,000. Terry Storlie, Broker John L. Scott Realty. 541-788-7884

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker

(Private Party ads only) 749

Southeast Bend Homes

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $179,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new roof, heat pump, A/C, new carpet, $10,000. 541-390-3382

WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, new carpet, fireplace, large backyard, range, W/D, fridge, incl., $1000 down, $175/mo., 541-383-5130.

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

H I G H

D E S E R T

Healthy Living in Central Oregon A SLICK STOCK M A G A Z I N E C R E AT E D TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND M A I N TA I N A N A C T I V E , H E A LT H Y LIFESTYLE.

C e n tr a l O r e g o n B u s i n e s s O w n e rs: Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/ Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811.

3. Create your account with any major credit card. All ads appear in both print and online.

S0305 5X6 kk

Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

R E S E R V E Y O U R A D S PA C E T O D AY C A L L 5 4 1 - 3 8 2 - 1 8 1 1


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 G5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

800 805

Misc. Items 10’ Cargo Toy Hauler 2008 w/back door ramp, white, like new cond., Keeps your 4-wheeler dry and clean. $1,750. 541-350-3866.

850

Snowmobiles

865

870

870

880

881

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Suzuki 250 2007, garage stored, extra set of new wheels & sand paddles, Polaris $2400; also Predator 90 2006, new paddles & wheels, low hours, $1400; both exc. cond., call 541-771-1972 or 541-410-3658.

Boats & Accessories 16’ FISHER 2005 modified V with center console, sled, 25 HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holders, mini downriggers, depth finder, live well, trailer with spare, fold-away tongue. $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish Yamaha YFZ 450 2005 exc. holding tank, canvass enshape, new rebuilt eng., closed, less than 20 hours on stock wheels & brand new boat, must sell due to health sand wheels & tires, lots of $34,900. 541-389-1574. extras $4500 or trade for 4x4 truck 503-437-5763.

870

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

Bid Now!

16’ Glass Trihull boat, open bow, 70 HP Johnston electric start, & 5 HP kicker. (3) New tires on trailer, $1500. 541-536-2848.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Reach thousands of readers!

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Yamaha 2007 V-Star 650 Custom. 500+ miles. Always garaged. $3,500. (541)536-7402.

865

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

18.5’ Reinell 2003, 4.3L/V6, 100 hrs., always garaged, beautiful boat, many extras to incl. stereo, depth finder, two tops, travel cover & matching bow canvas, $13,500 OBO. 541-504-7066 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to FIND IT! advertise in classified! BUY IT! 385-5809. SELL IT!

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

inboard Kodiak, Extreme Jet, with split bucket, Hummingbird 967C color gps - 3d sonar & maps, & more. $17,500, please call 541-977-7948. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

runs great, $5200, call 541-390-1833. Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744. You Can Bid On: Smokercraft Fishing Boat Retail Value $5995 From All Seasons RV & Marine

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Outboard Motor, Honda 2009, 8 HP, used once, new trolling plate, $1850. 541-410-0579

Fleetwood Terry 2001, 34p slide-out, awning, self contained, less than 100 "on-the-road" miles. NICE! $13,000 OBO. 541-475-3869

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

C, with slide, sleeps 6, low miles, perfect condition, $45,900, call 541-923-8333.

880

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ BHS w/ custom value pkg., 20’ awning, gas grill, tow pkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227

Motorhomes

Jayco Quest 2003 Tent Trailer, sleeps 2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

881

882

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Jamboree Sport 25G 2008, Class

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Everest 2006 32' 5th wheel, 3/slides many add-on extras. exc. cond. Reduced to $37,500. 541-689-1351.

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

882

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Fifth Wheels

875

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

19’ 2002 Custom Weld, with 162 hrs. on

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin Classifieds

ATVs

Polaris 90 Sportsman 2004, 4-wheeler with Mossy Oak finish. Great condition. Perfect for beginning riders. $1,650. Call 541-923-0924 before 9:00 p.m.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

Bid Now!

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on motor. Only $3700! Call 541390-1609 or 541-390-1527.

You Can Bid On: 16-Foot Esquif Ultra Light Canoe Retail Value $1995 From Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe

24' Splash: Like new, gently used by two adults, step in tub/shower, double bed, micro, oven, 4 burner, accessories, awning. $8500 OBO. 541-420-6234.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965

541-385-5809

FLEETWOOD BOUNDER 38L 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, warranty. Price reduced! NOW $98,000. 541-389-7596

The Bulletin

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

8, furnace, fridge, awning, $3700. Please call 541-604-0586 for more information. Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740 Rockwood 32’ 1993, diesel with Allison 6 spd., beautiful interior, $19,995. 541-617-1249

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $18,500. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Freeway 11’ Overhead Camper, self contained, A/C, reconditioned, $1900 OBO. 541-383-0449

Host 10.5DS Camper 2005, Tahoe, always stored indoors, loaded, clean, Reduced to $20,900, 541-330-0206.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

885

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, mirco., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

541-322-7253

Lance Camper 11' 1993, fully self contained, $9,000 OR incl 1993 Ford F250 w/59,850 mi., $14,000. 541-923-2593. email for photos, redbird33bt@yahoo.com

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

The Bulletin Classifieds

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


G6 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

932

935

935

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

BUICK LESABRE 2005

Nissan 350Z Convertible 2009, 5400 miles, roadster tour model, silver with black leather interior, $27,500, 541-923-7689.

Smolich Auto Mall

KBDN, hangar space available in shared heated hangar, up to medium twin-turbine size. 541-419--9510 e@fractionalexchange.com

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

925

Utility Trailers 2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Custom white cloth upholstery, 94K, lots of nice things you’ll like. Dependable. Only $6495. 541-815-3639

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

VW Super Beetle 1974, Jeep New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

933

Pickups

Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig. needs radiator/muffler $5000 trade for motorcycle 541 389-8971

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $18,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2004, Special Edition, 4.7, 91K, leather, sun roof , tow pkg., new tires, $11,800. 541-548-7818.

Smolich Auto Mall Chevy 1500 1992, 4x4, X-cab, V8, 5 litre, w/6 in. lift, alloy wheels, good condition $3,299. 541-536-5774. Dodge Ram 3/4-Ton 2006, 4WD, like new, 16K miles, 5.7 Hemi, goosneck hitch, $23,900, 541-416-0941.

Smolich Auto Mall

Toyota Sequioa 2004 4X4, limited, like new, great cond. VIN #224237

Only $18,888

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

940

Vans

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005 Laredo, 4X4, local trade, Great Deal! VIN #578365

Only $13,888

Dodge Caravan 1999 Super low miles, great family room. Vin #606407

Ford F-150 2005 4X4, FX4 Off Road, new tires, Great Deal! VIN #A60699

Only $18,888

541-389-1177 • DLR#366 NISSAN

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Smolich Auto Mall

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $17,495 Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036 Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

O nly $13,888

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Ford Ranger XLT 1999, V6 4 litre, auto., 4x4, pwr. steering, dual air bags, off road pkg. pwr windows, tilt, cruise, CD, matching canopy, & mounted snow tires, low mi. $7,450. 541-388-6751

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $2500, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Dodge Van 1991, 134K, great for second car to work, $500. 541-389-1626

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1178 • DLR

Long Cargo Van, low, low Miles. Like New! Vin #A803753

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$25,500, w/o winch $24,500, 541-325-2684

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

975

Automobiles Acura MDX 2006, 48K, new 60K mi. Toyo tires, garaged, $22,500, 541-318-5331.

Smolich Auto Mall

Nissan Murano 2007 Leather, navigation, 4X4. Vin #612299

Only $24,995

NISSAN 366

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $75,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

BMW 330CI Convertible 2004, 22K mi., auto, leather, loaded, sport pkg., immaculate, $19,500, 541-504-0145.

Smolich Auto Mall

Subaru Baja 2006 Very hard to find in this condition! Vin #106180

Only $18,888

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 330-5818.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

HYUNDAI 366

366

Smolich Auto Mall

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

366

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

LEGAL NOTICE Bend 2030 Project Manager for Mirror Pond Siltation Project Request for Proposals Bend 2030, as fiscal agent of the Mirror Pond Management Board and the Mirror Pond Steering Committee, requests proposals for Project Manager for the Mirror Pond Siltation Project. The Project Manager will oversee the process of an alternatives analysis to address siltation in Mirror Pond, including but not limited to fund-raising, community outreach, group facilitation, organization and project oversight. Details are included in Exhibit A to the RFP. Sealed proposals must be submitted by April 20, 2010, 4:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, PO Box 431 Bend, Oregon, 97709, Attn: Stephanie Hicks, Bend 2030 Representative. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. A mandatory pre-proposal meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, April 6 at 10:00 a.m. in City Council Chambers, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon.

Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder's Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE. Bend 2030 reserves the right: 1) to reject any or all proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) to reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) to select consultant on the basis of the proposals or to conduct interviews with the highest qualified proposers after scoring, 4) to seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 5) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the Mirror Pond Management Board and Mirror Pond Steering Committee. Dated: March 15, 2010 Stephanie Hicks Bend 2030 Representative 541-390-7590 LEGAL NOTICE Gray Prairie Fuels Project preliminary Decision Memo USDA - Forest Service Ochoco National Forest Crook County, OR 30-day Comment Period

The Forest Service, Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District, has made a preliminary assessVerylowmiles. ment that this proposal falls This weeks Best Buy! within a category of actions Vin #030512 listed in the Forest Service Only $15,888 NEPA Handbook (FSH) that are excluded from documentation in an Environmental Assessment (EA) or HYUNDAI Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and there smolichmotors.com are no extraordinary circum541-749-4025 • DLR 366 stances that would preclude use of the category (FSH 1909.15, Chapter 30, Section 31.2(6), Timber stand KIA Amanty and/or wildlife habitat im2004 provement activities that do Fully loaded, local car, not include the use of herbilow miles, Pearl White. cides or do not require more Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, Vin #023187 than 1 mile of low standard 5-spd,runs great, minor body road construction. The proOnly $9450 & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ posal is to reduce the risk of PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114 high severity fire and improve forest stand conditions by thinning with fire. HYUNDAI The project is located in Township 15 South, Ranges smolichmotors.com 20 and 21 East, south of Big 541-749-4025 • DLR 366 Summit Prairie near Prineville, Oregon. A draft memoToyota Prius Hybrid 2005, randum detailing the prosilver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 posal is available for review owner, service records, 168K at the Lookout Mountain much hwy. $1000 below KBB Ranger District, Prineville, @$9,950. 541-410-7586. Lincoln Continental Mark IV Oregon. Additional informa1979, 302, body straight, tion regarding this action can black, in good running be obtained from: Bryan cond., tires are good, $800 Scholz, Project Leader, LookOBO. 541-536-3490 out Mountain Ranger District, (541-416-6500 or VW Bug 1969, yellow, bscholz@fs.fed.us). sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. ReThis comment period is incently tuned, ready to go tended to provide those in$3000. 541-410-2604. terested in or affected by this proposal an opportunity to Mazda Protégé 5 2003, make their concerns known hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, prior to a decision being multi disc CD, 107K mi., made by the Responsible Of$6210. Call 541-350-7017. ficial. This comment period is being provided pursuant to Mercedes 300SD 1981, the September 16, 2005, ornever pay for gas again, will der issued by the U. S. Disrun on used vegetable oil, VW Bug 2004, convertible trict Court for the Eastern w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, sunroof, working alarm sysDistrict of California in Case 51K miles, immaculate cond. tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch No. CIV F-03-6386JKS. $10,950. 541-410-0818. start, power everything, 197K Those who provide timely miles, will run for 500K miles and substantive comments easily, no reasonable offer will be eligible to appeal the refused, $2900 OBO, call decision pursuant to 36 CFR 541-848-9072. part 215 regulations. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

loaded, 3rd row seat, extra set of tires, great cond., all maintenance records, $7500. 541-771-1451.

GMC Yukon 2007, 4x4, SLT, 5.3L V8 FlexFuel, 63K, 100K extended warranty, loaded, $25,500, 541-549-4834

Only $8888

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Ford E-250 2007

Chevy Trailblazer Extended XLT 2002,

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Toyota Avalon 2000

Smolich Auto Mall

NISSAN

1000

Legal Notices

"Project Manager for Mirror Pond Siltation Project".

VIN #317150

Only $7999

1000

Legal Notices

The outside of the package containing the proposal shall identify the project:

Only $11,995

Low miles, like new! Vin #270226

Only $20,888

Chevy Tahoe LS 1999, loaded, low miles, perfect, 1-owner, $6500. 541-350-0527. Chevy Trailblazer 2005, in good condition, with extras, Asking $17,000 or assume loan. Call 541-749-8339.

Smolich Auto Mall

Low miles, nicest car you’ll see for

Hyundai Accent GLS 2008

Ford F1 1951, older restoration. Flathead six w/ 3 speed stick. Everything is original & works. 541-419-1966.

MUST SELL! 1969 Chevelle SS clone 1963 SS Nova Convertible. $8,500 each. Call for more info., 541-788-7884.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Avalon 2003

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

Fully loaded, local trade in, low miles! VIN #192744

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep Liberty 2008

541-389-1178 • DLR

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 2004, loaded, nav., heated leather seats, tow pkg., sun roof, $11,500 OBO. 541-280-2327

smolichmotors.com

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., extra set snow tires, $13,200, 541-419-4018.

smolichmotors.com

935

Ford Tudor 2 Door Sedan, All Steel, 327 Chevy, T-350 Trans., A/C, Tilt, Cruise, Disc. Brakes. Many Time Show Winner and Great Driver. Displayed at Professional Auto Body, South, 61210 S. Hwy. 97, Bend. $34,900. 541-306-5161, 209-993-6518

SUBARUS!!!

541-749-4025 • DLR

Only $15,688

Sport Utility Vehicles

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

366

FORD F350 2000 4x4 7.5 diesel Crewcab Super Duty 1 ton long bed, tow pkg, 5th wheel hitch, auto., air, Winter pkg, great cond., 179,740 road mi. $12,750. 907-355-5153. Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 44K miles,

NISSAN

Toyota Tundra 2006, Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Fully loaded, local trade, all maint. just done. Vin # 098923

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

air cleaner to the pan $1500 OBO. 541-788-7884

Dodge Grand Caravan 2008 Has stow and Go! 105 point safety check! VIN #677575

541-389-1178 • DLR

Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709.

Ford Mustang Cobras-2003 & 2004, extremely low mi., 7700 mi. on Mystichrome 2004 - $29,500 OBO; 1700 mi. on Red tint anniversary edition 2003 - $24,500; Both pampered, factory super charged “Terminators”, never abused, always garaged, 541-390-0032. Ford Taurus SE 2006, 6-cyl., 67K mi., very clean, non-smoker owned, $8250, call 541-548-4284.

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005 Loaded, 4X4! Vin #655004

Motor, 1968 396 Chevy, everything from

Tires, (4) Bridgestone All Season, 26570R17, 50% tread, $80 for all. 541-388-9828.

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

smolichmotors.com

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Hitch for 5th wheel, Valley PowerPro, 16,000 lb., $300 or trade, 541-517-3622.

Chevy Impala 2001, Excellent shape, runs good, 104,000 miles, A/C, cassette player, power windows & locks, $4200 541-548-4051.

Only $4995

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

931

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8650. 1-907-355-5153.

Cadillac Deville 2000, new body style, V-8, 25 mpg., auto trans, 120K, silver/grey, heated leather seats, fully loaded, w/front & side air bags, great cond. in and out, new tires, brakes & rotors, water pump, maintained extremely well, $5400 OBO, 541-350-9938.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl.,

1000

Legal Notices

Toyota Camry LE 2008

Smolich Auto Mall

How to Comment and Timeframe BMW M3 Convertible 2002, VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, SMG gear box, 28k mi., mint 53K, all service records, 2 Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, oral, and electronic cond, caramel leather, built sets of mounted tires, 1 comments concerning this for the young at heart, snow, Yakima bike rack Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. action will be accepted for 30 $26,500. 541-480-1884 $13,500. 541-913-6693. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new calendar days following pubtires, soft & hard top, lication of this notice in the $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Bend Bulletin. The publication date in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for this proposal. Buick LeSabre 1998 Those wishing to comment VW Jetta Wagon 2003, 2.0 90K loaded, 30 mpg hwy., should not rely upon dates or engine, A/C, PS, 75K, incl. 4 you’ll like it! $3250, timeframe information prostudded tires w/rims, asking 541-508-8522. Mercedes E320 2004, vided by any other source. $6750, Mike, 541-408-8330. 4-matic, 4 door sedan, The regulations prohibit exloaded, exc. cond. $10,900. tending the length of the 541-536-5774. TURN THE PAGE Find It in comment period. For More Ads The Bulletin Classifieds! Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low Written comments must be 541-385-5809 The Bulletin mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. submitted to: Bill Queen,

District Ranger, Lookout Mountain Ranger District, 3160 NE 3rd Street, Prineville, Oregon, 97754. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are: 7:30 am 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments must be provided at the Responsible Official's office during normal business hours via telephone (541-416-6500) or in person. Electronic comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), or Word (.doc) to comments-pacificnorthwestochoco@fs.fed.us. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to a comment, a verification of identity will be required for appeal eligibility. If using an electronic message, a scanned signature is one way to provide verification. Electronic comments must be submitted as part of the actual e-mail message, or as an attachment in Microsoft Word, rich text format, or portable document format only. E-mails submitted to e-mail addresses other than the one listed above, in other formats than those listed, or containing viruses will be rejected. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. It is the responsibility of persons providing comments by electronic means to ensure that their comments have been received. Individuals and organizations wishing to be eligible to appeal must meet the information requirements of 36 CFR 215.6. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the matter of the Estate of Keith Redwine, Deceased. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Case No 10PB0003ST NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative care of Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP, 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101, Bend Oregon, 97702 within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, the Personal Representative, or the lawyers for the Personal Representative, Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP. Dated and first published on March 11, 2010. Georgianne Bancroft, Personal Representative 2799 NE Lapoint Ct. Bend, OR 97701 541-389-3387 Attorney for Personal Representative: Patrick J. Widmer, OSB#934966 339 SW Century Dr., Suite 101 Bend, OR 97702 541-318-3330 LEGAL NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 87 Notice is hereby given that the following vehicle will be sold, for cash to the highest bidder, on 4/1/10. The sale will be held at 10:00 am by Bend Euro Moto at 1064 SE Paiute Way, #1 Bend OR. 2006 Suzuki M/C Plate: M621096 VIN: JS1GW71A562110272 Amount due on lien: $2914.13 Reputed owner(s): Andrew T. Respivo & Mid Oregon FCU LEGAL NOTICE

Skanska - Invitation to Bid Three Rivers School Remodel and Expansion 3/23/2010 @ 1:00pm For questions contact Mark Jones at 503-641-2500 or mark.jones@skanska.com Bids can be faxed to 503-643-0646 Three Rivers School Remodel and Expansion The scope of work includes All Trades. The Project consists of the addition of a single story gymnasium building, remodel and expansion of the administration area, a two story "middle school" addition, mechanical system upgrades, site work reconstruction and associated landscape and irrigation improvements. All questions are due in by 3/16/2010. This work may require approved prequalification prior to accepting a bid. Prequalification instructions and status can be found at dfs.skanskausa.com. Documents are available at the following locations: For Review: Skanska, 2555 SW 153rd Drive, Beaverton, OR 97006; (503) 641-2500 Central Oregon Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 389-0123 Online at http://dfs.skanskausa.com/

For Purchase: Ford Graphics, 1151 SE Centennial Court #3, Bend, OR 97702 (541) 749-2151 Ford Graphics, 1431 NW 17th, Portland, OR, 97209 (503) 227-3424 Central Oregon Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 389-0123 * Any addenda issued related to this bid will be available at the locations above upon issue. Please note that bid documents that may be posted at other locations will not receive notification of any addenda. All bids are to be in strict accordance with the Contract Documents and all other related bid documents. We are also requesting all bidders actively solicit local, minority, woman owned, ESB contractors, suppliers and their organizations. All bidders must comply with the following requirements: BOLI Prevailing Wage Law, January 1, 2010 Edition. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-58738-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, AMY L. SAATHOFF, RYAN K. DOUGLASS NOT AS TENANTS IN COMMON, BUT WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 09-12-2006, recorded 09-15-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-63007 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 246557 LOT FOURTEEN (14), DESCHUTES RIVER CROSSING, NORTH, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61134 KEPLER STREET BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 10/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,437.50 Monthly Late Charge $71.87 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $276,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 09-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 06-17-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: February 04, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272 -4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3450108 02/25/2010, 03/04/2010, 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, March 18, 2010 G7

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-59075-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHAD ELLIOTT AND LOIS ELLIOTT, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMER1TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-13-2008, recorded 05-19-2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-21554 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: AFN: 115423 LOT THIRTEEN (13) BLOCK TT, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1952, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19089 PUMICE BUTTE RD. BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME

DUE ON 07,01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $2,159.85 Monthly Late Charge $71.86 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, io-wit: The sum of $299,909.43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5,875% per annum from 06-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 06-17-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W, BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time

of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91028 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRIAN MC CLUNG AND KIMBERLY MC CLUNG, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC. DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 7/12/2006, recorded 7/18/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-49152, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SIX IN BLOCK FIVE OF SUMMERFIELD PHASE III, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2234 SOUTHWEST 31ST STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 17, 2010 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2009 2 payments at $758.94 each $1,517.88 8 payments at $864.23 each $3,456.92 (09-01-09 through 02-17-10) Late Charges: $287.46 Beneficiary Advances: $1,620.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $6,882.26 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $203,391.83, PLUS interest thereon at 3% per annum from 08/01/09 to 11/1/2009, 3% per annum from 11/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 18, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/17/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3456013 02/25/2010, 03/04/2010, 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9240 T.S. No.: 1265580-09.

contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: February 04, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O.Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST SEC ASAP# 3450215 02/25/2010, 03/04/2010, 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-58765-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRIAN F. CARNEY, AN UNMARRIED MAN as Grantor to DAVID FENNELL, ATTORNEY, as trustee, in favor of UNION FEDERAL BANK OF INDIANAPOLIS, as Beneficiary, dated 06-26-2003, recorded 06-30-2003, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2003-44167 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 116044 LOT 5, BLOCK 31, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., UNIT 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH 1/1224 INTEREST AS TENANTS IN COMMON IN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS: PARCEL 1: LOT 1, BLOCK 2, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, AS FILED OCTOBER 11, 1961; PARCEL 2; RECREATION AREA, OFFICIAL PLAT OF BLOCK 9, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, AS FILED OCTOBER 18, 1962; PARCEL 3: RECREATION AREA AND BOAT DOCKING FACILITIES, CORRECTED PLAT OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OR-

EGON, AS FILED MAY 16, 1963. Commonly known as: 16983 JACINTO ROAD BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 09/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE, Monthly Payment $932.65 Monthly Late Charge $37.30 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $113,543.34 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 08-01-2009 until paid; plus ail accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE FOREGOING INSTRUMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE NOTICE, PURSUANT TO ORS 86.740, THAT THE GRANTOR OF THE TRUST DEED DESCRIBED BELOW HAS DEFAULTED ON ITS OBLIGATIONS TO BENEFICIARY, AND THAT THE BENEFICIARY AND SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST DEED HAVE ELECTED TO SELL THE PROPERTY SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain Trust Deed, Security Agreement, and Assignment of Leases and Rents dated October 4, 2007, and recorded on October 4, 2007, as instrument number 2007-53577, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein ARROWOOD TETHEROW, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Grantor and WEST COAST TITLE COMPANY is the Trustee, and WESTON INVESTMENT CO. LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Tract AE, TETHEROW PHASE 1, filed September 24, 2007, Plat Cabinet H-470, Deschutes County, Oregon. The tax parcel number is: 260623. The undersigned hereby certifies that she has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DENISE J. LUKINS, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Denise J. Lukins, Esq., Successor Trustee, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th Street, Suite 130, Vancouver, WA 98685. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Grantor's failure to pay to Beneficiary, when and in the full amounts due, payments as set forth on the Agreement for Letter of Credit dated and effective September 28, 2007, secured by said Deed of Trust. Grantor has failed to pay Beneficiary payments totaling $3,087,345.00 as of December 17, 2009. The full $3,087,345.00 is now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. Other Default/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure: Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments/ Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real Property are paid current; Permitting liens and encumbrances to attach to the Property, including a deed of trust by Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt, P.C.; a deed of trust by First American Title Insurance Company; and a judgment by Hotel Financial Strategies/ Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all liens and encumbrances against the Real Property have been satisfied and released from the public record. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Tuesday, May 18, 2010, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED December 29, 2009 By: Denise J Lukins, OSB 95339, Successor Trustee, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th St Ste 130, Vancouver WA 98685, Telephone: (360) 576-5322, Facsimile: (360) 576-5342, Email: dlukins@salmoncreeklawoffices.com

trustee will on 06-17-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the

masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: February 04, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DEIATORRE, ASST SEC ASAP# 3450176 02/25/2010, 03/04/2010, 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010

Public Notice NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Administrative School District No. 1, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011, will be held at the Education Center, 520 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon. The meeting will take place on the 13th day of April, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 13, 2010, at 520 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91409 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ANESA Z MOYER AND JASON A MOYER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY., as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OR OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC. , DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 12/22/2005, recorded 12/29/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-89536, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR11, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR11 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated April 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FIFTEEN (15), PHASE TWO (2), WESTBROOK MEADOWS P.U.D. PHASE 1 AND 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61261 SOUTHWEST BROOKSIDE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 2 payments at $ 2,126.87 each $ 4,253.74 3 payments at $ 2,174.34 each $ 6,523.02 (11-01-09 through 03-01-10) Late Charges: $ 435.40 Beneficiary Advances: 33.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 11,245.16 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $327,834.35, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 10/01/09 to 1/1/2010, 6.375% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 2, 2010, at the hour of 11:00AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3469395 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010, 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain deed made by Casey Carnahan, as Grantor to Deschutes Title, as Loan No: xxxxxx8480 T.S. No.: 1262273-09. Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Homecomings Financial, Llc (f/k/a Homecomings Financial Network, Inc.), as Beneficiary, dated Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tariq Shureih, as Grantor to First American Title January 11, 2007, recorded January 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in Ins, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Secubook/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. ritynational Mortgage Company, A Utah Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated November 22, 2006, 2007-04847 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, recorded November 30, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx to-wit: at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-78806 covering the following Lot 6 in unit 1 of bend cascade view estates, tract two, described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Deschutes county, Oregon. Lot ten (10), block forty (40), Oregon water wonderland unit 2, Commonly known as: recorded march 18, 1970, in cabinet a, page 365, Deschutes county, Oregon. 24865 Alpine Lane Bend Or 97701. Commonly known as: Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obliga17490 Gull Drive Bend Or 97707. tions secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligaOregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to tions secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent inOregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to stallments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by benpay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subseeficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $895.88 quent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced Monthly Late Charge $44.79. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligaby beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment tions secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, $1,945.56 Monthly Late Charge $90.31. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared to-wit; The sum of $274,703.33 together with interest thereon at 4.000% per annum from Octoall obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the ber 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure following, to-wit; The sum of $258,800.00 together with interest thereon at 8.375% per annum costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions undersigned trustee will on July 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as estabof the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corpolished by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Deschutes ration the undersigned trustee will on June 11, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Despublic auction to the highest chutes county courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell idder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired afsatisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a ter the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and urther given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the bensuch portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with eficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 19, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who February 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evibefore the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of dence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 06, 2010, the name other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant the date of the sale is May 12, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA Signature/By: Tammy Laird 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-294484

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lane Edward Thomas and Linda Kay Thomas, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Mortgageit, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated January 31, 2007, recorded February 05, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/ volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-07451 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot one (1), block three (3), of Valley Ridge Acres, First Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 56820 Gina Lane Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,081.98 Monthly Late Charge $89.92. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $286,026.38 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 17, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 03, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-297502 03/18, 03/25, 04/01, 04/08

R-293667 03/04, 03/11, 03/18, 03/25

Publication Dates: 03/11/10, 03/18, 03/25, 04/01

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4785 T.S. No.: 1264331-09.


G8 Thursday, March 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE SALE

LEGAL NOTICE Loan No: xxxxxx1640 T.S. No.: 1248312-09 AMENDED TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE AMENDED TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE

REFERENCE IS MADE to that certain Deed of Trust (the "Trust Deed") Trust recorded in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon on January 15, 2003 as Document No. 2003-03162, by and among Cyndi Willerton as Grantor, Amerititle as the Trustee and Columbia River Bank, an Oregon corporation, as the Beneficiary. The Trust Deed covers the real property legally described as:

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1461 T.S. No.: 1234806-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott B. Reeves and Leslie A. Reeves Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 05, 2006, recorded October 13, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/ microfilm/reception No. 2006-68698 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3 in subdivision of lots 5 & 6 in block 2 of Lazy River West, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 17412 Darin Ln. Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,507.48 Monthly Late Charge $64.48. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $209,168.65 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from May 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 23, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 24, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by ESTELLE FIELD AND KEVIN L. FIELD, WIFE AND HUSBAND as grantor(s) to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN FINANCIAL CORP., AN OP SUB. OF MLB&T CO., FSB as beneficiary, recorded March 16, 2007 as The undersigned successor trustee, Bennett H. Goldstein, hereby certifies that (i) no assignments of no.2007-15808 in book XX, page XX, in the official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, covthe Trust Deed by the trustee or the beneficiary and no appointments of successor trustee have ering the following-described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: been made, except as recorded in the official records of the county or counties in which the LOT 228 OF RIVER CANYON ESTATES NO.3, above-referenced real property is situated, and including specifically the appointment of Bennett CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. H. Goldstein, attorney, as successor trustee, and (ii) no action has been commenced or is pending Commonly known as: to recover the debt or any part of it now remaining which is secured by the Trust Deed. 60967 SNOWBERRY PL. BEND OR 97702 There is a default by the grantor(s) or other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which The beneficiary has elected to sell the real property described above to satisfy the obligations seis secured by said trust deed, or by their successor in interest; The default is: Failure to pay the cured by the Trust Deed. Pursuant to ORS 86.735(3), a Notice of Default and Election to Sell was monthly payment due August 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installrecorded on February 12, 2010 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Document No. ments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by benefi2010-06760. ciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly Payment $2,263.88 Monthly Late Charge $110.00 By reason of said default, the beneficiary or the beneficiary's sucThere are presently one or more defaults by the grantor owing an obligation, the performance of cessor in interest has declared all obligations secured by said trust deed immediately due and which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions in the Trust Deed which authorize payable, said sums being the following: $335,189.03 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.750% sale in the event of default under such provisions. The defaults for which foreclosure is made are per annum, from July 01, 2008 until paid, plus monthly late charges of $110.00 each, beginning grantor's failure to pay the installments due under a promissory note, Note No. 56925, between ugust 01, 2008 until paid; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees grantor as debtor and beneficiary as creditor, from and after February, 2009. incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary or the beneficiary's successor in interest for protection of the above-described real property and its By reason of such defaults, the beneficiary has declared and hereby does declare all sums owing on interest in it. The beneficiary and trustee or their successors in interest, have elected and do the obligations secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable. Such sums are as folhereby elect to cause the property to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash to lows: satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and the expenses of the sale, including the Principal: $60,089.25 compensations of the trustee or successor trustee and the reasonable attorneys fees incurred. The Interest to 02/09/10:$11,589.81 Notice of Default and original Notice of Sale given pursuant thereto stated that the property Late charges through 02/09/10:$3,044.44 would be sold on April 08, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Appraisal Fee $350.00 Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at AT THE BOND STREET ENTRANCE TO DESCHUTES Foreclosure guarantee$775.00 COUNTY COURTHOUSE 1164 NW BOND, in the City of BEND County of DESCHUTES State of Per diem interest from and after 02/09/10: $29.63 Oregon; however, subsequent to the recording of said Notice of Default the original sale Attorneys' fees, costs and other sums necessary to protect proceedings were stayed by order of the Court or by proceedings under the National Bankruptcy beneficiary's interests as provided by law and contract. Act or for other lawful reasons. The beneficiary did not participate in obtaining such stay. Said stay was terminated on February 10, 2010 WHEREOF, notice hereby is given that the undersigned WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned successor trustee will on July 1, 2010, at trustee will on April 12, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm Standard of Time, as established by section the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at AT THE BOND STREET ENTRANCE TO DESCHUTES COUNTY the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, COURTHOUSE 1164 NW BOND, City of BEND County of DESCHUTES State of Oregon, sell at public County of Deschutes, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the the above-described real property which grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, the execution by the grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest grantor, or grantor's together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the successor in interest, acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations seexecution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs cured by the Trust Deed and the expenses of the sale, including the compensation due to the and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that successor trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of the attorneys for the successor any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the trustee. foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and by curing any to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have the foreclosure proceeding termiother default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under nated and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due, the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, and by Dated: March 11, 2010 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION 525 EAST MAIN STREET curing any other default described herein if such default is capable of cure by tendering the P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 (619) 590-9200 SIGNATURE/BY: 03/18/10 R-302038 performance required under the Trust Deed and the obligation secured by the Trust Deed, plus payment of all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Trust Deed and the obligation Publication Dates: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2010. it secures and all fees of the successor trustee and of attorneys as provided by ORS 86.753. Other than as shown of record, neither the beneficiary nor the successor trustee has any actual notice of (i) any person having or claiming to have any lien upon or interest in the real property described herein subsequent to the interest of the trustee, the grantor, or any successor in interest to either of them, or (ii) any lessee or person, other than grantor, in possession of or occupying the real property. All references herein to "grantor," "trustee" and "beneficiary" shall be deemed to include their successors in interest, if any. Date: February 16, 2010. /s/ Bennett H. Goldstein _____________________________________ Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee STATE OF OREGON) )ss. County of Multnomah) The undersigned hereby certifies that he is the successor trustee named above and that the foregoing is a duplicate original of the Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Bennett H. Goldstein Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee Direct inquires to: Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee 1132 SW 19th Ave., No. 106 Portland, Oregon 97205 Email: bhgoldatty@aol.com Telephone: (503) 294-0940 Telecopy: (503) 294-7918 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

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Legal Notices

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,601.92 Monthly Late Charge $62.45. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $211,998.29 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State f Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 19, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 6, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Christopher Brinegar, a married man, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Ownit Mortgage Solutions, Inc., as beneficiary, dated 03/27/06, recorded 04/03/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-22889 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the Home Equity Asset Trust 2006-7 Home Equity Pass Through Certificates, Series 2006-7 by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Four (4), Block Four (4), Hunter's Circle, Deschutes County, Oregon. More accurately described as: Lot Four (4), Block Four (4), Hunter's Circle, recorded June 30, 1977, in Cabinet B, Page 243, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 20631 Colt Lane Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,700.13 beginning 06/01/09; plus late charges of $70.44 each month beginning 06/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $128.41; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $198,409.85 with interest thereon at the rate of 8 percent per annum beginning 05/01/09; plus late charges of $70.44 each month beginning 06/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $ 128.41; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 3, 2010 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 4,2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800)452-8260) and ask for lawyer referral service. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Dated: JANUARY 25, 2010 NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC. CHRIS ASHCRAFT Assistant Vice President, Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No.7236.22236/Brinegar, Christopher THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

R-296713 03/18/10, 03/25, 04/01, 04/08

ASAP# 3425056 03/04/2010, 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010, 03/25/2010

R-294541 03/04/10, 03/11, 03/18, 03/25

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6335 T.S. No.: 1217881-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tessa M. White and Kevin J. White As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Loancity, A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 27, 2006, recorded May 02, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-30396 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot eleven (11), in block twenty-seven (27),bonne home addition, recorded April 1, 1925, in cabinet a, page 249, Deschutes county, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1599 NW Fresno Ave., Bend OR 97701.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE FOREGOING INSTRUMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE NOTICE, PURSUANT TO ORS 86.740, THAT THE GRANTOR OF THE TRUST DEED DESCRIBED BELOW HAS DEFAULTED ON ITS OBLIGATIONS TO BENEFICIARY, AND THAT THE BENEFICIARY AND SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST DEED HAVE ELECTED TO SELL THE PROPERTY SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND ELECTION TO SELL TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain deed of trust, assignment of rents and leases, security agreement and fixture filing dated August 9, 2007, and recorded on August 10, 2007, as instrument number 2007-44189, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein REDMOND REGENCY PARK LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, an Oregon limited partnership, is the Grantor and AMERITITLE is the Trustee, and HOMESTREET BANK, a Washington state chartered savings bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: A parcel of land being a portion of Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 2001-55, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of County Clerk for Deschutes County, Oregon, and located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 20, Township 15 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. For a full legal description, see Exhibit A attached hereto. Also commonly described as: 2250 SW 21st St, Redmond, OR 97756. The tax parcel number(s) are: 205140. The undersigned hereby certifies that he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of JEFFREY C. GARDNER, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Jeffrey C. Gardner, Successor Trustee, c/o Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Grantor's failure to pay to Beneficiary, the full aggregate amount of monthly payments on account of accruing interest due for the period commencing May 2009 and continuing through and including December 2009, a net amount that as of December 22, 2009 totals $105,808.54, and which past-due amount continues to increase from and after December 22, 2009 at the rate of $683.58 per diem, together with Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses (including Beneficiary's unpaid attorneys' fees and costs as allowed under the Trust Deed) as of December 22, 2009 of $12,372.99, resulting in an aggregate arrearage amount as of December 22, 2009 that totals $118,181.53. The total amount of accrued and unpaid interest Grantor owes Beneficiary through December 22, 2009 is $149,426.35; Lender is holding in suspense a total of $43,617.81 representing Grantor's partial and incomplete tender of the total past-due amounts it owes to Beneficiary, resulting in a net past-due interest amount of $105,808.54 as of December 22, 2009. The full arrearage amount, $118,181.53 is immediately due and payable to Beneficiary together with additional accruing interest from and after December 23, 2009, plus Beneficiary's additional costs and expenses (together with Beneficiary's additional attorneys' fees and costs and expenses arising on account of this foreclosure process). 2. Grantor's failure to cure defaults (cross-defaults) under certain loans made by Beneficiary to Angus Acres Limited Partnership. Due to the cross-default provisions of the loan documents including, but not limited to, the Trust Deed, Grantor's uncured defaults related to the Angus Acres Limited Partnership loans constitute an event of default under the Trust Deed. 3. On account of Grantor's continuing and uncured defaults, on November 2, 2009, Beneficiary accelerated all amounts due under the loan secured by the Trust Deed and made demand on Grantor for immediate and unconditional payment to Beneficiary of all amounts due under the loan. Despite Beneficiary's demand, Grantor has failed to pay to Beneficiary the full amount of the indebtedness due under the loan secured by the Trust Deed. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of December 22, 2009: $2,986,980.45; Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of December 22, 2009: $149,426.35; Payments held in suspense for application to accrued interest owed by Grantor to Beneficiary as of December 22, 2009: ($43,617.81); Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, including attorneys fees and costs, to December 22, 2009: $12,372.99; TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $3,105,161.98. Accordingly, the sum owed by Grantor to Beneficiary on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $3,105,161.98, as of December 22, 2009, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Wednesday, May 12, 2010, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is April 12, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. DATED December 22, 2009 By: Jeffrey C. Gardner, OSB 98054, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219, Telephone: (503) 228-2525, Facsimile: (503) 295-1058, Email: jgardner@balljanik.com. Exhibit A Legal Description A parcel of land being a portion of Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 2001-55, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of County Clerk for Deschutes County, Oregon, and located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 20, Township 15 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon, and also being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner for Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 2001-55, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of the County Clerk for Deschutes County, Oregon; thence South 00°03'39" East, 260.35 feet along the Easterly boundary of said Parcel 1; thence South 88°23'20" West, 104.43 feet along the Easterly boundary of said Parcel 1; thence South 01°56'00" East, 100.27 feet along the Easterly boundary of said Parcel 1 to the Southeast corner of said Parcel 1; thence South 89°33'51" West, 178.91 feet along the Southerly boundary of said Parcel 1 to the Southwest corner of said Parcel 1; thence North 00°05'40" West, 215.89 feet along the Easterly right of way line for S.W. 21st Street; thence following the arc of a 170.00 foot radius curve to the right, a distance of 63.96 feet (the long chord of which bears North 10°41'01" East, 63.58 feet) along the Easterly right of way line for S.W. 21st Street; thence following the arc of a 230.00 foot radius curve to the left, a distance of 86.65 feet (the long chord of which bears North 10°40'06" East, 86.14 feet) along the Easterly right of way line for S.W. 21st Street to the Northerly boundary of said Parcel 1; thence North 89°34'57" East, 252.27 feet along the Northerly boundary of said Parcel 1 to the point of beginning.


Bulletin Daily Paper 03/18/10