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Slam poetry: Teens are hooked

Dodgeball participants say it’s a painfully fun time • SPORTS, D1

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Lourdes Segade New York Times News Service

The ups and downs of Puertollano, Spain, as a producer of solar power, could have implications for the U.S., where a similar solar push is under way.

A high-tech route to smarter kids?

After boom and bust, solar power finds a place in Spain

But joining another district ‘would be a last resort,’ schools chief says By Sheila G. Miller and Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

By Elisabeth Rosenthal New York Times News Service

PUERTOLLANO, Spain — Two years ago, this gritty mining city underwent a brief, 21st-century gold rush. Long famous for coal, Puertollano discovered another energy source it had overlooked: the relentless, scorching sun. With generous incentives from the Spanish government to jump-start a national solar energy industry, the city aggressively set out to replace its failing coal economy by attracting solar companies, with a campaign slogan: “The Sun Moves Us.” Soon, Puertollano, home to the Museum of the Mining Industry, became a hub of alternative energy, with two enormous solar power plants, factories making solar panels and silicon wafers, and clean energy research institutes. Half the solar power installed globally in 2008 was installed in Spain. Farmers sold land for solar plants. Boutiques opened. And people from all over the world, seeing business opportunities, moved to the city, which had suffered 20 percent unemployment and a population exodus. But as low-quality, poorly designed solar plants sprang up like weeds on Spain’s plateaus, Spanish officials came to realize that they would have to subsidize many of them indefinitely, and that the industry they had created might never produce efficient green energy on its own. See Solar / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE HEALTH CARE: Obama kicks off pivotal week on the offensive, Page A3

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Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Buff Elementary teacher Elizabeth Bare helps students Cesar Aguirre, 9, and Kaegan Prevett, 9, with a class project last week. The students were using their laptops to gather information from the Internet about the Iditarod race in Alaska. Bare uses a wireless mouse that operates her SMART board — a display connected to a computer and projector that shows the computer’s desktop on the board in the background.

It’s pricey and of unknown value in boosting achievement, but local districts say this: It gets kids interested and involved By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

MADRAS — When Elizabeth Bare’s third-grade students study mapping and Alaska’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, they reference the fraying paper map tacked up at the rear of the classroom. The Buff Elementary students also spend quite a bit of time studying directions and map coordinates with the help of a software program called Kidspiration. Their fingers tap persistently on laptops and their eyes rest on the classroom’s SMART board, which Bare operates with a wireless mouse and slate from the With her wireless mouse, rear of the room. Bare can control the This is a 21st-century SMART board from anyclassroom. where in the classroom. Teachers and administrators hope students will become as proficient in technology as they do in reading, writing and arithmetic. It’s not cheap, and there’s no proof that having the latest gadgets available will increase student achievement or help them pass state tests. In fact, districts are beginning to conduct their own research on whether the millions of dollars being spent on technology will help students learn. But anecdotal evidence from area districts indicates the addition of computers, iPods and other technology does what sometimes no standard lesson plan can: get kids engaged and interested. See Technology / A5

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Student-to-computer ratio in Bend-La Pine Schools Bend-La Pine Schools has spent millions over the past several years to increase the number of computers in classrooms and labs in its district schools. Below, a look at the student-to-computer ratio in each Bend-La Pine school. Instructional Technology Coordinator Amy Lundstrom would like to see one computer for every two to three students in the district. For now, some schools have more computers because of private fundraising.

SISTERS — Sisters School District officials are facing such serious budget shortfalls for the next few years that they have begun talking about fundamental changes to the district’s operations, including possibly merging with another school district or reducing its three schools to two. Administrators and board members say it’s unlikely such drastic changes will occur this year. But, “We have some difficult times financially coming,” Superintendent Elaine Drakulich said Monday. Drakulich estimates the district will have to fill a $667,000 gap for the 2010-11 school year. That shortfall will increase to about $1.2 million in 201112. The district has a roughly $12 million budget. As it stands, Drakulich believes the district could try to make cuts in existing programs or in teachers and other staffing. But Sisters residents routinely stress their interest in a district with strong academics, after-school activities and learning opportunities like outdoor school. That’s where Drakulich’s less-traditional costsaving measures come in. While it’s still early in the process, Drakulich said several options are under consideration. For one, she said, Sisters schools could become a part of another school district or regionalize some of its services, like special education or human resources, with other districts or the High Desert Education Service District. See Sisters / A4

School Student-to-computer ratio Elementary schools Amity Creek Magnet Bear Creek Buckingham Elk Meadow Ensworth High Lakes Highland Magnet Juniper La Pine Lava Ridge Pine Ridge Ponderosa R.E. Jewell Three Rivers Westside Village Magnet William E. Miller

3.7 students 4.1 4.3 5.3 2.2 The Associated Press file photo

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There’s no record of an orca in the wild ever killing a person, but cut one off from its family’s influence, and a fatality like last month’s becomes more likely, scientists say.

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By Kevin Spear

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High schools Bend La Pine Marshall Mountain View Summit

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Source: Bend-La Pine Schools Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

ORLANDO, Fla. — Neuroscientist Lori Marino and a team of researchers have explored the brain of a dead killer whale with an MRI and found an astounding potential for intelligence. Killer whales, or orcas, have the second-biggest brains among all ocean mammals, weighing as much as 15 pounds. It’s not clear whether they are as well-endowed with memory cells as humans, but scientists have found they are amazingly well-wired. Scientists are trying to better understand how killer whales are able to learn local dialects, teach one another specialized methods of hunting and pass on behaviors that can last generations — longer possibly than seen with any other species except humans. See Orcas / A4

Letters capture nation’s grief after Kennedy assassination By Katie Zezima New York Times News Service

Vol. 107, No. 68, 38 pages, 7 sections

Budget may force Sisters schools into merger, cuts

BOSTON — Days after President John F. Kennedy was killed, Dr. Ira Seiler sat at his desk and wrote a letter of condolence to his widow, Jacqueline Kennedy. “Today, on Thanksgiving,

I keenly sense his death for it was just three years ago today that I forced my breath into the lungs of his newly born son,” Seiler wrote. John F. Kennedy Jr., was born premature; Seiler, a pediatric resident, said he placed a tube in the baby’s tra-

chea and breathed air into his lungs. “I met your husband only once after this but the part I played in saving his son’s life gave me a feeling of deep closeness to your husband,” Seiler wrote. He added: “I only wish I had been able

to give my life in place of that of your husband. He had so much to offer.” Seiler was one of more than a million people who wrote to Jacqueline Kennedy in the months after her husband’s assassination in 1963. Many of the letters

were destroyed; thousands of others were stored in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston, where they were rarely seen, and at the National Archives; even many of the writers forgot what they said. See JFK / A4


A2 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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2010 Ford Escapes sit at a dealership in February in Littleton, Colo. When buying a new car, there are several factors consumers should consider beyond purchase price, says Mark Ragsdale, author of “Car Wreck: How You Got Rear-Ended, Run Over & Crushed by the U.S. Auto Industry.” The type of loan and the trade-in value are two important ones, he says.

Avoid the alluring pitfalls when buying that new car By Gregory Karp The Morning Call (Allentown, Pa.)

Car buyers often focus on haggling down a dealer’s offer toward invoice price. That’s OK, but often that’s not where the real money is, says a former car dealer in his new book. Instead of the purchase price, consumers should focus on other components of the deal, especially loans, trade-ins and their desire to buy more car than they can afford, said Mark Ragsdale, author of “Car Wreck: How You Got Rear-Ended, Run Over & Crushed by the U.S. Auto Industry.” “You’d be better off paying MSRP and paying attention to the big stuff,” Ragsdale said. “But dealer profitability gets the lion’s share of consumer focus and attention.” Here, Ragsdale said, are a few things to consider other

than price: • That upside-down feeling: Negative equity is when you owe more on your car than it’s worth. This is true of most who drive a financed new car off the lot. The vehicle can lose a quarter of its value as soon as the rear wheels hit the street. But even many people who have owned their cars for years are upside-down. It’s typical to own a car three or four years before your car is worth what you owe on it. This depreciation snowballs as consumers get car fever before they have equity in their vehicle. Dealers and auto lenders can accommodate these people by essentially rolling that negative equity into their next car loan — often keeping the payments reasonable by extending the loan. Customers trade in their cars every 39 months on average, but

finance them for an average of 64 months, Ragsdale said. That leaves many upside-down by an average of $4,700, Edmunds. com said. The lesson? Don’t buy a new vehicle until you pay off your current one. • Trade-in value: Many factors affect trade-in value, including a massive recall such as the one Toyota is experiencing. Among the best resources for finding the value of your car are online car-buying sites, Ragsdale said. Edmunds.com, KBB.com and your insurance agent can provide used-car prices, too, but they might not be as “real-time” as prices on cars for sale at this moment, he said. • Rule of 78s: This method of calculating loans is essentially a prepayment penalty because it front-loads the interest. You will be on the hook for most of the interest, even if you pay the

loan off early or trade in the car. The figure 78 comes from the sum of the digits one through 12 — the number of months in a year — and from a time when most loans were for 12 months. You want a simple-interest auto loan. • Simple math: When you see an advertised payment of less than $400, ask yourself how reasonable that is. Simple math tells you that a $25,000 car paid over 48 months costs $521 per month — before interest, taxes, fees and negative equity. The ideal way for many people to buy a car is to pay cash for a slightly used car and drive it for a decade. If you have caviar taste on a fish sticks budget, buy used or lease a vehicle. Leasing is more expensive than buying and holding, but it doesn’t put you thousands of dollars upside-down.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

12 21 23 29 34 42 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $8.2 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

Advances on checks to jobless touch off criticism By Robert Faturechi Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The payday loan industry has found a new and lucrative source of business: the unemployed. Payday lenders, which typically provide workers with cash advances on their paychecks, are offering the same service to those covered by unemployment insurance. No job? No problem. A typical unemployed Californian receiving $300 a week in benefits can walk into one of hundreds of storefront operations statewide and walk out with $255 well before that government check arrives — for a $45 fee. Annualized, that’s an interest rate of 459 percent. Critics of the practice, which has grown as the jobless rate has increased, say these pricey loans are sending the unemployed into a cycle of debt from which it will be tough to emerge. Many payday clients pay off their loans and immediately take out another, or borrow from a second lender to pay off the first, and sink ever deeper into debt. Typical customers take out such loans about 10 times a year, by some estimates. Lenders “market the product to give the illusion of assistance,” said Ginna Green, a spokeswoman for the advocacy group Center for Responsible Lending. “But instead of throwing them a life jacket they’re throwing them a cinder block.”

“We’re seeing a lot of demand from formerly banked businesses that are now looking to us to meet their needs.” — Mark Pinsky, chief executive of Opportunity Finance, a network of financial groups

With bank credit frozen, small U.S. businesses turn to microlenders By Ylan Q. Mui The Washington Post

Ryan Fochler’s life changed six years ago when he left his job in the computer industry to buy an Arlington County, Va.based dog-walking business with $50,000 in personal savings and a home-equity line of credit. The firm grew quickly, with revenue more than doubling each year. By 2008, Fochler was ready to expand the business into a full-fledged pet day-care service called Dog Paws ‘n Cat Claws. The only problem was money. Fochler wanted to convert an old drugstore into a 7,000-squarefoot paradise for pets, complete with retail products and dog training. But those plans collided with the most severe financial crisis in a generation, and credit froze up. At one point, Fochler said, his bank refused to release the money needed to complete the construction. “We just kind of hit it at completely the wrong time,” he said. But, he added, for entrepreneurs, “failing is not an option.” To help plug the gap, Fochler turned to the Latino Economic Development Corp.’s nascent microlending program, part of a growing network of financial institutions that specialize in small loans to mom-and-pop operations that are often below banks’ radar. The average size of the LEDC’s loans is $10,000 at a 10 percent interest rate, said Lend-

ing Director Rob Vickers. Many banks will not consider loans less than $200,000, he said. Microlending first became popular as a form of foreign investment in poor, emerging markets. Before joining the LEDC a few years ago, Vickers was a microlending specialist in Latin America for the World Bank, including financing projects in Nicaragua to help rural villagers connect to electrical grids. The trend has been slower to take off in the United States. But tightened underwriting standards have pushed many consumers out of the traditional banking system and sent them hunting for alternatives. In a survey of 16 microlenders by Opportunity Finance, a network of financial groups, 81 percent reported that applications for those small-dollar loans increased during the fourth quarter compared with the previous year. “We’re seeing a lot of demand from formerly banked businesses that are now looking to us to meet their needs,” said Mark Pinsky, chief executive of Opportunity Finance. In addition, the Internet has created a niche of microlending that allows businesses to appeal to everyday consumers for capital through peer-to-peer lending. Renaud Laplanche, chief executive of the Lending Club, said small businesses account for about 10 percent of loans made

on his peer-lending site, with the average amount about $18,000. Laplanche said that demand has increased among small businesses but that individuals have also grown more cautious about whom they lend money to. “It’s not like if you can’t get any loan from a bank, you can get it from Lending Club,” he said. “The individual lenders are also savvy investors.” But Fochler said that even the staff members at the LEDC were surprised that he could not qualify for a bank loan when he approached them two years ago. He reported record sales each year, with growth rates averaging 170 percent. The pet day care is profitable. Fochler employs 25 people and recently added dog training to his services. But he said that after the financial crisis, banks not only wanted to see profitability, but also matching assets. At the LEDC, Vickers said staff members consider not only standard criteria such as credit scores in approving loans but also the entrepreneur’s ability to pay. The LEDC requires all applications to go through credit counseling to be approved and scrutinizes companies’ balance sheets. And it helps borrowers separate personal expenses from business ones, typically a tangled web for small-business owners. “We are obsessed with making good loans,” Vickers said.

Deborah Tewey unwillingly joined a large and fast-growing club: victims of identity fraud. The Baltimore County elementary school teacher discovered this when checking her bank account online before heading out on a shopping trip this month. The $700 she had in the account had been cleaned out. At that point, Tewey began a two-week odyssey of alerting her card issuer, merchants and the police that a stranger had used her debit card. And what she found is that even though identity theft is now a well-known problem, some companies seem to take it more seriously than others. More than 11 million U.S. adults were victims of identity theft last year, a 12 percent rise from the year before, according to Javelin Strategy & Research. Identity thieves got away with $54 billion, or $6 billion more than the year before. Javelin blames the surge on the weak economy. “ID theft is being taken more seriously, but one problem is it’s not being taken seriously enough,” says James Van Dyke, Javelin’s president. “Some companies are much better than others, no question.” Some banks and online retailers, for instance, use sophisticated analyzers to match callers’ voice prints with those known to engage in the fraud, says Scott Mitic, chief executive of TrustedID. But other businesses still mail statements revealing customers’ Social Security numbers or toss documents with personal information in trash bins for anyone to steal, says Linda Foley, founder of the Identity Theft Resource Center.

Counting beans Companies weigh the cost of new safety measures against the cost of fraud and the loss of customer trust, Foley says. “Whichever is lower is the one they go with,” she says. “It’s a beancounter issue.” That’s because businesses end up bearing the brunt of fraud costs. The typical amount lost last year to ID fraud was $4,841 per victim, with consumers on average picking up $373, Javelin reported. That doesn’t mean consumers aren’t put out by fraud. Tewey, for instance, was the victim of one of the most common forms of ID fraud, and there are lessons in her tale. First, victims should call the card issuer if they suspect fraud. Tewey couldn’t because her credit union delayed its opening because of the recent snowstorms. She called Visa, which put a freeze on her card and told her about recent account activity. Tewey then contacted Netflix, where someone had tried to open an account with her card. Netflix said the application was rejected because the ZIP code given didn’t match the ZIP code for the billing address. Her next call was to HewlettPackard, where Tewey says the thief ordered a $620 laptop. The computer hadn’t been shipped, but Tewey says Hewlett-Packard told her the order couldn’t be stopped. The customized laptop was being assembled in China, and the company would have to wait until it arrived in this country before it could reimburse her, she says. Adding to her frustration, Tewey says, Hewlett-Packard didn’t ask for the card’s security code when the order was made, a step that’s supposed to thwart fraud. HewlettPackard said it asked for other verifying information. Tewey notified her credit union of the theft when it opened the next day, and upon its suggestion, filed a police report. Reporting the theft to the police should be the next step after notifying the card issuer. “That is the holy grail that says, ‘I am a victim,’” Foley says. Some consumers say they are victims of ID fraud, but the only way some companies trust those claims is if there is a police report, Foley says.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 A3

T S White House launches health push with Obama on offense By Amy Goldstein and Scott Wilson The Washington Post

Doug Mills / New York Times News Service

In a letter to health insurance executives and a speech Monday at Arcadia University in Glenside, Pa., President Barack Obama took aim at insurance rate increases. “How much higher do premiums have to rise,” he said, “before we do something about it?”

WASHINGTON — The White House is mounting a stinging, sustained broadside against health insurance rate increases as President Barack Obama and his aides enter what they hope will be the final stretch of a year-long political war over health-care reform. Obama and his health secretary staged a two-pronged attack Monday in a stern letter to health insurance chief executives and a speech in which the president castigated insurance companies 22 times. “How much higher do premiums have to rise,” he demanded, “before we do something about it?” The messages are part of a new strategy by Obama and those around him to ratchet up the pace

HEALTH CARE REFORM and populist appeal of their rhetoric against the health insurance industry. The barbed tone moves far beyond that of the 2008 presidential campaign, when Obama began to say that medical coverage should be accessible and affordable for more Americans. It remains unclear whether the strategy, coming this late in the debate, will mobilize support among the public and on Capitol Hill for the legislation that the White House and congressional Democrats favor. Obama has asked Congress to conduct final votes within 10 days, before lawmakers leave for a two-week break.

Senate panel to investigate long-term care deaths

By Adam Nossiter New York Times News Service

DAKAR, Senegal — Officials and human rights groups in Nigeria sharply increased the count of the dead after a weekend of vicious ethnic violence, saying Monday that as many as 500 people — many of them women and children — may have been killed near the central city of Jos, long a flashpoint for tensions between Christians and Muslims. The dead were Christians and members of an ethnic group that has been feuding with the Hausa Fulani, Muslim herders who witnesses and police officials identified as the attackers. Officials said the attack was a reprisal for violence in January, when dozens of Muslims were slaughtered in and around Jos, including more than 150 in a single village. Early Sunday, the attackers set upon the villagers with machetes, killing women and children in their homes and ensnaring the men who tried to flee in fishnets and animal traps, then massacring them, according to a Nigerian rights group whose investigators went to the area. Some homes were set on fire. The latest attacks were “a sort of vengeance from the Hausa Fulani,” said the Rev. Emmanuel Joel, of the Christian Association of Nigeria in Jos.

Jon Gambrell / The Associated Press

An unidentified woman covers her face from the smell of dead bodies Monday in Dogo Nahwa, Nigeria. Ethnic violence claimed as many as 500 lives over the weekend. After the January attacks, “the military watched over the city, and neglected the villages,” he said. The attackers, said Joel, “began to massacre as early as 4 a.m. They began to slaughter the people like animals.” The police said Monday that they had made 95 arrests, including a number of Hausa Fulani.

Iraqi parties both claim to be ahead in election

New York Times News Service

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Rescue workers and residents of a village in the Turkish province of Elazig search for possible survivors Monday in the debris of a destroyed house hours after a strong earthquake killed at least 57.

Not more quakes, just more people living in quake zones By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press

First the ground shook in Haiti, then Chile and now Turkey. The earthquakes keep coming hard and fast this year, causing people to wonder if something sinister is happening underfoot. It’s not. While it may seem as if there are more earthquakes occurring, there really aren’t. The problem is what’s happening above ground, not underground, experts say. More people are moving into megacities that happen to be built on fault lines, and they’re rapidly putting up substandard buildings that can’t withstand

earthquakes, scientists say. And around-the-clock news coverage and better seismic monitoring make it seem as if earthquakes are ever-present. A magnitude 7.0 quake last month killed more than 230,000 people in Haiti. Less than two weeks ago, a magnitude 8.8 quake — the fifth-strongest since 1900 — killed more than 900 people in Chile. And on Monday, a strong pre-dawn magnitude 6.0 quake struck rural eastern Turkey, killing at least 51 people. On average, there are 134 earthquakes a year that have a magnitude between a 6.0 and 6.9, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. This year is off

to a fast start with 40 so far — more than in most years for that time period. But that’s because the 8.8 quake in Chile generated a large number of strong aftershocks, and so many occurring this early in the year skews the picture, said Paul Earle, a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey. Also, it’s not the number of quakes, but their devastating impacts that gain attention with the death tolls largely due to construction standards and crowding, Earle said. “The standard mantra is earthquakes don’t kill people, buildings do,” he said.

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Military funeral protest to go before high court By Mark Sherman The Associated Press

The Supreme Court is entering an emotionally charged dispute between the grieving father of a Marine who died in Iraq and the anti-gay protesters who picket military funerals with inflammatory messages like “Thank God for dead soldiers.” The court agreed Monday to consider whether the protesters’ message, no matter how provocative or upsetting, is protected by the First Amendment or limited by the competing privacy and religious rights of the mourners. The justices will hear an appeal from a Marine’s father to reinstate a $5 million verdict against the protesters after they picketed outside his son’s funeral in Maryland four years ago. Members of a Kansas-based church have picketed military funerals to spread their belief

that U.S. deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq are punishment for the nation’s tolerance of homosexuality. The funeral protest dispute was one of three cases the court said it would hear in the fall. The others involve whether parents can sue drugmakers when their children suffer serious side effects from vaccine and NASA’s background checks on contract employees. The government says the decision in the NASA case could throw into question the background checks routinely done on all federal workers. The protest lawsuit stemmed from picketing by members of the fundamentalist Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kan., outside the funeral for Marine Lance Cpl. Matthew Snyder in Westminster, Md. Snyder died in March 2006 when his Humvee overturned.

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BAGHDAD — The Iraqi prime minister’s coalition and its main secular rival both claimed to be ahead in the vote count Monday, a day after historic parliamentary elections that the top U.S. commander said would let all but 50,000 American troops come home by the end of summer. Sunday’s election, which took place against a backdrop of violence in Baghdad, marked a turning point for the country’s nascent democracy. The winner will help determine whether Iraq can resolve its sectarian divisions and preserve the nation’s fragile security as U.S. troops leave. Initial results for some provinces, as well as for Baghdad — an area essential to determining any winner — were to be announced today. The election was only the country’s second for a full parliamentary term, and it attracted 62 percent of about 19 million eligible voters, according to the nation’s election commission. The last such

election, in December 2005, attracted roughly 76 percent of eligible voters. Officials attributed the lower turnout to a combination of voter intimidation, more stringent ID requirements at the polls and a drop in voter excitement. A spate of attacks on election day — some directly targeting voters and polling stations — killed 36 people. Gen. Ray Odierno, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, called the election a milestone and said that every sign suggests Iraq will be able to peacefully form a new government in the coming months.

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By Alex Berenson The Senate Finance Committee has opened an investigation into patient deaths and allegations of substandard treatment at long-term care hospitals, small specialty medical centers that treat chronically ill patients. The investigation focuses on the Select Medical Corp., a forprofit corporation that runs 89 long-term care hospitals, more than any other company. In a letter sent on Monday to Select’s chief executive, Robert Ortenzio, the committee’s top two senators demanded that Select provide records about staffing levels and quality at its hospitals. The committee has substantial power over long-term care hospitals because it oversees Medicare. The federal program spends almost $5 billion annually on the hospitals, providing about 60 percent of their total revenue. An article in The New York Times last month detailed poor treatment and patient deaths at long-term care hospitals, which treat 200,000 seriously ill patients a year nationwide, but rarely have full-time physicians on staff. In one incident at a Select hospital in Kansas, a dying patient’s heart alarm sounded for 77 minutes before nurses responded. Select has said that it conducted an appropriate clinical review in the case and terminated a clinician involved in the patient’s care. The article prompted the investigation, according to the letter, which was sent by Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., the committee’s chairman, and Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa, the panel’s senior Republican. The letter is not a subpoena; companies usually respond voluntarily to such requests for information. Select Medical said that it would cooperate fully with the inquiry. Through a spokeswoman, Carolyn Curnane, the company referred to the Times article as misleading and inaccurate and said it looked forward to providing the committee with accurate facts about the quality of care. Baucus and Grassley asked Select to disclose its policies for patient monitoring, emergency situations and staffing, including physician involvement at its hospitals and staff turnover. Former employees of Select have said that the company’s hospitals are understaffed and rely heavily on temporary nurses. The letter also requests that Select disclose information about its discharge policies. Former employees have also said that the company presses to keep patients for 25 days and then discharge them almost immediately, because patients are most profitable if they stay exactly 25 days under government reimbursement rules.

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A4 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Orcas Continued from A1 These researchers have yet to find evidence that an orca in the wild has ever killed a person. But they aren’t surprised that the world’s biggest, most powerful and possibly smartest predator, captured and kept for years in a tank, cut off from the influences of an extended family, could have a fatal encounter with a human. Human interaction with captive killer whales has come under scrutiny since Feb. 24, when a large male orca with a checkered past killed a trainer at SeaWorld Orlando by dragging her into a tank. “I’m not trying to secondguess what was in this particular whale’s mind,” said Marino, part of the Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Program at Emory University in Atlanta. “But, certainly, if we are talking about whether killer whales have the wherewithal and the cognitive capacity to intentionally strike out at someone, or to be angry, or to really know what they are doing, I would have to say the answer is yes.”

Much still a mystery Years of tediously difficult research has given scientists some understanding of killer whales — but also has made them aware of how little they know about the creatures. For starters, there’s puzzlement over exactly how to categorize them. They swim the world’s oceans — they are more widely distributed than any whale, dolphin or porpoise — in at least three distinct populations. There are

fish-eating orcas that stay in one area, flesh-eaters that wander more widely along coasts, and a third group that roams the deepblue waters. The three groups have starkly different diets, languages, hunting techniques and manners of behaving around other marine life, and they don’t seem to interact much with one another. “If they didn’t have the same paint jobs, you’d call them different species,” said Brad Hanson, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration biologist in Seattle. Yet the orcas’ DNA tells a different story. Instead of the world’s varied populations having genetics that spread outward like a tree with several main branches, theirs is but a single, nearly straight trunk, except for a mismatched pair of genes here and there. “It’s very, very strange,” said Hanson, who participated in research that led to the listing of resident whales in waters off the Northwestern U.S. as endangered. If genetic variety isn’t what makes these killer-whale groups so different, scientists suspect, their enormous brains might be the telltale factor. Bigger animals typically have bigger masses of brain cells. But scientists use brain-weight-tobody-weight ratios as a rough measure of intelligence. By that measure, human brains, by comparison, are seven times average. Orcas’ brains are 2½ times average — similar to those of chimpanzees. But scientist think that looking just at the brain-body ratio seriously underestimates the thinking power of larger marine mammals. In other words, orcas might be even much smarter

C OV ER S T OR I ES than the size of their big brain suggests. Hal Whitehead, a biology professor at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, awakened the world of cetacean research in 2001 when he co-authored a controversial paper that suggested no species other than humans are as “cultural” as orcas. “Culture is about learning from others,” Whitehead said. “A cultural species starts behaving differently than a species where everything is determined genetically.”

Talkative critters Equally remarkable to researchers is the orca’s ability to communicate with whistles and pulsed calls, and to “see” by making a clicking sound that works like sonar. Many cetaceans — whales, dolphins and porpoises included — have these abilities to some degree. But orcas learn local and complex languages that are retained for many generations. And their bio-sonar, or echolocation, abilities also amaze researchers. Professor Whitlow Au, of the University of Hawaii’s Marine Mammal Research Program, finished a study recently adding to evidence that orcas can use their bio-sonar not just to find fish in murky water and not just to single out salmon, but to identify their favorite meal: chinook salmon. “They can recognize chinook salmon from a long ways away,” said Au, who put the distance at roughly half a football field. “They are able to use their biosonar to detect and track and eventually catch them.” Sam Ridgway, a neurobiologist and research veterinarian

Solar Continued from A1 In September, the government abruptly changed course, cutting payments and capping solar construction. Puertollano’s brief boom went bust. Factories and stores shut, thousands of workers lost their jobs, foreign companies and banks abandoned contracts that had already been negotiated. “We lost the opportunity to be at the vanguard of renewables — we were not only generating electricity, but also a strong economy,” said Joaquin Carlos Hermoso Murillo, Puertollano’s mayor since 2004. “Why are they limiting solar power, when the sun is unlimited?” Puertollano’s wrenching fall points to the delicate policy calculations needed to stimulate nascent solar industries and create green jobs, and might serve as a cautionary tale for the United States, where a similar exercise is under way. For now, electricity generation from the sun’s rays needs to be subsidized because it requires the purchase of new equipment and investment in evolving technologies. But costs are rapidly dropping. And regulators are still learning how to structure stimulus payments so that they yield a stable green industry that supports itself, rather than just costly energy and an economic flash in the pan like Spain’s. “The industry as a whole learned a lot from what happened in Spain,” said Cassidy DeLine, who analyzes the Euro-

Sisters Continued from A1 Drakulich mentioned Black Butte School District as a possible merger partner, but it remains unclear which, if any, other districts could be part of the plan. Another proposal is to split the middle school, sending fifth- and sixth-graders to the elementary school and seventhand eighth-graders to the high school. The district could then potentially sell or rent out one of its three school buildings. Drakulich said the district could also save money by working with local public agencies or private businesses to provide some of the programs the district currently offers. Drakulich, for example, said perhaps the Sisters Park and Recreation District and the school district could work together to provide after-school activities and athletics. Though selling land is difficult now, the district could also put some of its property on the market. “I think it will be a very short discussion about consolidation,” Drakulich said. “That would be

Lourdes Segade / New York Times News Service

A technician makes adjustments to a solar panel last month at the Institute of Concentration Photovoltaic Systems, one of the research institutes in Puertollano, Spain. The most robust Spanish solar companies have survived the downturn and are re-emerging as global players.

The most robust Spanish solar companies survived the downturn, have restructured and are re-emerging as global players. For example, when the government changed course, Siliken Renewable Energy, originally a producer of solar panels, shut its factories for five months and cut its staff to 600 from 1,200. But after shifting its focus to external markets like Italy, France and the United States, and diversify-

ing into solar support services, the company turned a profit. Although Spain’s long-term goal had been to produce 400 megawatts of electricity from solar panels by 2010, it reached that milestone by the end of 2007. In 2008 the nation connected 2.5 gigawatts of solar power into its national grid, more than quintupling its previous capacity and making it second only to Germany, the world leader. But many of the hastily opened plants offered no hope of being cost-competitive with conventional power, having been poorly designed or located where there was inadequate sunshine, for example. Designs for solar power plants vary. The most common type

a last resort in many minds.” Much of the budget difficulty comes from falling district enrollment and state budget issues. The district will also lose money by ending its contract with two charter schools after this year: the Sisters Charter Academy of Fine Arts and the Sisters AllPrep Academy. In the 2010-11 school year, Drakulich estimates 11 fewer students will attend the district’s schools. Because Sisters is closing the two charter schools at the end of this school year, enrollment will likely fall another 119 students. Under the district’s current charter, it receives about 20 percent of all state funds for those students. The district will continue to receive state money for charter school students in 2010-11, even though the schools will be closed. But after that, charter school funds — about $200,000 annually — will be gone. “As we get two to three years out, the resources are not there,” Drakulich said. The district expects to see declining enrollment in its others schools as well. That, combined with a $50,000 decrease in the district’s local service plan, the loss of $315,000 in stimulus

funds and the need to put aside more than $500,000 for PERS funding, spells fiscal trouble for the district. Board member Glen Lasken said the major changes like merging two schools together will not happen by the next school year. The district staff is not yet certain how much each move could potentially save. “Certainly we’re not going to be closing any of our schools this year,” Lasken said. “That’s clearly not going to happen on this kind of short notice this year.” School Board Chairwoman Christine Jones said board members want to be cautious as they consider the list of drastic options. Last year, the district bridged a more than $1.5 million budget gap mainly through staff attrition. The district also took one step, if small, toward regional consolidation when it shifted payroll from Sisters to the High Desert ESD. That move saved the district about $60,000. The High Desert ESD is investigating what kind of savings area districts could see if they consolidated some services. That study should be ready at the end of the year, Jones said.

pean solar market for Emerging Energy Research, a firm based in Cambridge, Mass. She noted that other countries had since set subsidies lower and issued stricter standards for solar plants.

Solar rebirth

at San Diego’s National Marine Mammal Foundation, which works for the Navy, said the orca brain has a relatively smaller amount of cerebral cortex — the gray matter involved in memory, attention and thought — than the human brain does. But it has large-diameter myelinated axons, which carry nerve impulses. “It’s analogous to a computer that has maybe less memory but bigger wires,” said Ridgway, who puts a high value on being able to work with orcas in captivity. “The bigger the axon, the faster the nerve impulses travel.” Patrick Hof, vice chairman of the Department of Neuroscience at New York’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine, summed up the orca noodle as a “big brain, a really big brain” with enormous capacity. But whether that capacity creates the potential for intentionally killing a human is something for which there is “no scientific knowledge to prove,” he said. “It’s a wild animal to begin with, and it has predatory behaviors that are well-known,” Hof said. “It is possible that, in a situation of stress or captivity or stress related to captivity, some of the natural behavior might be expressed.” Marino, the Emory neuroscientist, wonders about the extent to which a captive orca could grow frustrated with being cut off from the cultural richness of living among an extended family — grandparents through calves — and the environmental richness of swimming the world’s oceans. “Living in a tank and having to splash people with your tail every day for 27 years would make anyone go nuts,” Marino said.

uses photovoltaic panels to generate electricity. Others, called thermal solar plants, use mirrors to focus the sun���s energy on a liquid that, when heated, drives a steam turbine. In its haste to create a solar industry, Spain made some miscalculations: solar plants can be set up so quickly and easily that the rush into the industry was much faster than anticipated. And the lavish subsidies inflated Spanish solar installation costs at a time when they were rapidly decreasing elsewhere — in part because of increasing competition from panel makers in China, but also because higher volumes produced economies of scale. Even with the reduced incentives and local economic downturn, the solar industry gave Puertollano something of a face-lift and, potentially, a new economic future. Research institutes there are developing cutting-edge technologies. Unemployment, though around 10 percent, has not returned to the 20 percent figure. The city is home to a number of solar businesses: a new 50-megawatt thermal-solar plant owned by the Spanish energy giant Iberdrola creating hundreds of jobs. Although coal mines still dot the landscape and a smokespewing petrochemical factory remains one of Puertollano’s largest employers, that new solar plant sits just next door, with more than 100,000 parabolic mirrors in neat rows on about 400 acres of former farmland. Clean and white as a hospital ward, it silently turns sunshine into Spanish electricity.

“I think we need to take a look and see what things we can do for next year that are significant but not radical,” Jones said. Board members said they want to avoid cutting programs or significantly increasing class size. Lasken said initiatives similar to last year’s could work. “I think we’ll be able to make cuts through attrition, but nothing too drastic,” Lasken said. The district will only know how much it can save through attrition sometime in spring. At a March 17 meeting, board members are going to begin working on more specific ideas that could fill next year’s budget gap, Lasken said. “The primary charge is to get a budget that is going to be balanced for next year and make whatever tweaks or adjustments to get through this upcoming (budget) cycle,” Lasken said. “Secondary, we’ll give some ideas for broader changes if we had to go down that road in years to come.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

JFK Continued from A1 For a new book, “Letters to Jackie: Condolences From a Grieving Nation,” released by HarperCollins, Ellen Fitzpatrick, a historian, culled through the archives. Now she has published about 250 letters, most for the first time, from people around the country who felt compelled to write to Jacqueline Kennedy. The letters, many of them eloquent expressions of grief — from a priest in an Eskimo village, schoolchildren in Texas, a middle-class family in California, a widow in Pittsburgh, a Louisiana woman with a fourthgrade education — provide a window into Americans struggling with poverty, fighting for civil rights and trying to comfort themselves and others in the face of the president’s death. “The lights of the prison have gone out now,” wrote Stephen J. Hanrahan, Prisoner 85255, from a federal penitentiary in Atlanta. “In this, the quiet time, I can’t help but feel, that my thoughts and the thoughts of my countrymen will ever reach out to that light on an Arlington hillside for sustenance. How far that little light throws his beam.” “There is great wisdom in the hearts of these average folks back in this moment in 1963,” said Fitzpatrick, an American political and intellectual historian and a professor at the University of New Hampshire.

Finding a book The idea for the book came as Fitzpatrick was conducting research at the Kennedy library on another project and remembered how, when she was a young girl, she saw the former first lady on television thanking Americans for sending letters of condolence. Fitzpatrick found the letters and started culling through them. Because of copyright law, she could not publish the letters — from taxicab drivers to the widow of Medgar Evers to Langston Hughes — without permission from the writers or their heirs. So she enlisted the help of genealogists and others to find them. Only one person asked that his letter remain private. Others were shocked to learn that theirs still existed. “I had forgotten what I had written,” said Tom Smith, who skipped school at age 14 to see the Kennedys in his hometown, Dallas. About six blocks after the motorcade passed, he said, Kennedy was shot. Days later, Smith bought a simple condolence card with his own money and mailed it to Jacqueline Kennedy. “I know the grief you bear,” he wrote. “I bear that same grief. I am a Dallasite.” He added, “I’m very disturbed because I saw him a mere 2 minutes before that

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fatal shot was fired.” Smith, now 61 and living in San Antonio, said he had not realized how many people wrote to Jacqueline Kennedy. “I felt so bad about it, and so much a part of it,” he said. “I thought I was the only one doing it.” Some correspondents did not realize letters they had written to family members about the assassination had been sent on to Jacqueline Kennedy.

‘Sense of loss’ Ann Owens, 72, of Seattle, was a Peace Corps volunteer in Ethiopia when she heard that the president had been killed. Schoolchildren and villagers mourned, and the school where Owens taught was closed for days. “I feel now as if a member of my family had died,” she wrote to her mother. “In a very real sense he was our idol; he is the reason for us being here — his idealism, his courage.” Owens’ mother included her daughter’s letter with her own condolence note to the former first lady, something Owens did not learn until she was contacted about the book. “It brought tears to my eyes to hear my mom’s words,” said Owens, whose mother died in 1990. Many of the letters show how profoundly many felt Jacqueline Kennedy’s loss. “Twenty-six years of escaping from Hitler — growing up in wartime China fleeing from communism — watching my father’s futile struggle against cancer — seeing my roommate killed in an automobile accident — all these I deemed adequate preparation for some of life’s bitter moments,” wrote Gabriele Gidion. “Yet NEVER, until last Friday, have I felt such a desperate sense of loss and loneliness.” Some historians view Kennedy as having been slow on civil rights. But many of the letters reveal how deeply he touched many black Americans. “We are a middle class Negro family and had of course felt after so long that President was like a beacon — a light in the darkness who would become a second emancipator,” wrote Cornelia M. Davis from Walnut Creek, Calif. Seiler, who was only 29 when he assisted in John Jr.’s birth, said he had received a thank you note from the president-elect. Seiler was invited to the Inauguration — an occasion so special his wife wore her wedding dress — and was seated next to Adlai Stevenson. Seiler was “devastated” upon hearing news of the president’s death, and wrote his letter in longhand. He never kept a copy. When it was read it back to him over the phone as the book was being prepared, “I got a little bit too emotional,” Seiler said. “I felt very strongly about him,” he said. “I really thought he was a great man.”

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C OV ER S T ORY

Technology Continued from A1 “Technology doesn’t teach,” said Sue Taylor, the Jefferson County School District instructional technology coach. “It’s just another tool in a teacher’s bag of tricks. But it might help reach kids who weren’t being impacted.”

Teaching tactics in Jefferson County There are all kinds of equipment and software being used in classrooms these days. In addition to more common pieces like iPods and laptops, many schools are purchasing SMART boards, a display connected to a computer and projector that projects the computer’s desktop onto the board. Teachers and students can control the computer with a pen, a finger or other implements, like a tennis ball on a stick. Boards can cost at least $2,000. Jefferson County School District started its influx of classroom technology in 2007 with a $250,000 federal grant. That grant, designed to enhance education through technology for students in third through fifth grades, was followed by two similar ones in 2009, the most recent for $275,000, and local business Central Oregon Seeds Inc. provided some matching funds to purchase more laptop carts. Some of the money has gone to professional development to help teachers learn to use the software and hardware; the federal grants require that 25 percent of the funds go to professional development. The rest has gone to new equipment and programs that officials hope will help improve student learning, with a focus in third through seventh grades. As part of the new focus on technology, several teachers in each building have been named technology mentors. “It’s been a real groundswell,” Taylor said. “If it had come from the top down it wouldn’t have been as successful. But people were wanting to get involved.” Now there are 80 SMART boards in schools around the district; there could be as many as 120 by the start of the 2010-11 school year. Nearly all K-8 classrooms have projection equipment, and more than a dozen laptop carts moving through classrooms in the district’s six schools. The latest grant will also pay for an after-school program for 20 seventh-graders who will learn higher-level technology skills. They will then become a student help desk that provides computer assistance to teachers and students around the school, and run a family night to teach parents some tech skills. With the resources the district has put into technology, it now wants to know whether any of it will make a difference. So officials are doing research on their own. “We’re looking critically at our practices, ‘How is what we’re doing impacting student achievement?’” Taylor said. Taylor is using state assessment data and creating other ongoing in-class assessments that will seek to show a connection between the technology and the increases students might make in the classroom. Some teachers have been conducting research projects in which they teach lessons with the technology and give preand post-tests to see whether the technology improves the lesson or student understanding. “It’s hard to isolate,” Taylor said. “There’s a lot of things we’re doing to try to improve student achievement.”

Not much research Jefferson County isn’t the only school district struggling to determine just what effect technology can have on student achievement. Many of the grants provided to fund classroom computers and other equipment comes with a requirement that teachers go through training and professional development; therefore, whether the gains in achievement are linked to the technology or the teacher’s increased abilities is hard to track. And there’s not much completed research on the subject. For example, the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology is part of the International Society for Technology in Education, which has offices in both Eugene and Washington, D.C. It offers research evidence showing technology can influence academic performance, but many of the studies are at least 10 years old. A researcher in Colorado studied teaching and student outcomes in about 180 classes, with teachers running a lesson plan with and without SMART

Technology comparison for Bend-La Pine Schools Bend-La Pine Schools Technology Director Steve Carlson hopes that in time every classroom will have a presentation station — which includes a projector, document camera and speakers, all of which can be connected to teachers’ laptops. Below, a look at the number of presentation stations in each school in the district.

School

Number of presentation stations

Elementary schools 5 stations

Amity Creek Magnet Bear Creek Buckingham Elk Meadow Ensworth High Lakes Highland Magnet Juniper La Pine Lava Ridge Pine Ridge Ponderosa R.E. Jewell Three Rivers Westside Village Magnet William E. Miller

22 26 20 11 27 12 22 12 27 22 21 23 19 8 21

Middle schools 22

Cascade High Desert La Pine Pilot Butte Sky View

27 18 25 19

High schools Bend La Pine Marshall Mountain View Summit

34 9 7 36 31 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Source: Bend-La Pine Schools Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

boards. The research generally indicated that students who learned with the boards had a higher achievement level, although in 23 percent of the cases teachers produced better results without the boards. With so little research to show whether money is being spent on the right tools, more studies are underway. This year, the state of Oregon awarded Bend-La Pine Schools a nearly $275,000 grant to help R.E. Jewell Elementary School fourth-graders improve their writing skills with an infusion of computers and other tech gadgets. The goal of the grant: provide evidence that technology can increase student learning in core subjects. To measure what effect, if any, the influx of technology has on students, teachers have collected writing samples. In the spring they’ll take another set of samples to see what progress students have made. The district will also use the state writing assessment and will have the fourth-graders take a technology literacy assessment the state has developed. Several weeks ago, the school received five carts, each with 16 laptops, for each fourth-grade classroom. The classrooms will also have SMART boards and other gadgets. Amy Lundstrom, Bend-La Pine Schools’ instructional technology coordinator, based that grant on information from the Stanford Study of Writing, which looked at college students’ writing and determined that nearly 40 percent of student writing took place outside of the classroom online, in social networking and other forums. According to the study, students write more now than in the past but in different ways, and are much less enthusiastic about class writing than personal writing. Using technology, Lundstrom believes, will increase Jewell student interest in developing writing skills. Fourth- and fifth-grade teacher Jaime Speed has certainly seen that phenomenon at Juniper Elementary, which became a technology magnet school five years ago. Speed said she can’t prove a definite correlation between her students’ use of technology and their scores on state assessments. But she has seen an improvement in student writing and research ability and a clear increase in interest. “It’s tricky to know because we’re constantly trying to improve, so is it the new reading program or is it the technology? It’s difficult to pinpoint,” Speed said. “One thing I do know is that it’s improved student interest in school and student interest in learning both reading and writing.” Many of the projects her students complete using laptops and other technology are placed online on Speed’s Web site for parents and friends to see. “They take such a great pride in their work that they are constantly reading and practicing and improving because they know it’s not just for me,” she said. “They know it’s a big deal,

and I see them taking a much more involved interest in what they’re learning.” She’s also seen jumps in reading and on early literacy skills tests after starting a program three years ago in which she recorded herself reading and commenting on books, then put the recordings on iPods that she sent home with students so they could practice reading at home.

Equipment isn’t cheap It’s innovations like Speed’s that Bend-La Pine Schools officials believe make the outlay of funding for technology worthwhile. According to Finance Director Brad Henry, the district has spent about $5.25 million since the 2006-07 school year on instructional technology. For the 2009-10 school year the district budgeted $500,000, not counting grants. The district operates annually on a roughly $120 million budget. Lundstrom said the first step for Bend-La Pine was simply getting every school operating on the same software and hardware. It’s taken a long time, but Lundstrom feels like the district is finally getting where it needs to be with the right tools in classrooms. “I think we’re a good halfway,” Lundstrom said. The district almost exclusively uses Apple computers, and Carlson said the plan is to provide a laptop to each district teacher and to place a presentation station, complete with projector, document camera and speakers, in each classroom in the district’s 27 schools. “The greatest financial expenditure we have made is to upgrade the school wiring, the Internet connections, the supporting electronic equipment,” Carlson wrote in an e-mail. One of the challenges of funding instructional technology is the constant need for upgrades; Lundstrom hopes that won’t prevent continued funds from coming into her department. Next year, eighth-graders around Oregon will take a test on their tech literacy; Lundstrom believes some students in the district are unprepared. “Some will do very very well, others will be completely lost,” she said. That’s because for many schools in the district, computer access is limited to state testing. “We can’t get them into the labs to teach them skills,” Lundstrom said. She’d like to see a ratio in the district of two or three students to each classroom computer. And she wants the use of technology to become an expectation of teachers, rather than a choice. “For many teachers, it’s still a choice whether they want to use technology or not,” Lundstrom said. “Teachers need to see the impact that technology learning tools can have on students.” They seem to be catching on; a survey Lundstrom presented to the school board in February showed 67 percent of teachers in the district considered themselves proficient or advanced

in using technology, more than double from a previous survey in 2009; the survey also indicated 94 percent of teachers said their laptops were important or necessary to do their jobs and 74 percent said their presentation stations were important or necessary to do their jobs. That’s how Buff Elementary’s Bare sees technology in her Madras classroom. Bare’s class uses laptops for at least an hour three or four days each week. The class uses the SMART board daily. “It’s just part of the daily routine,” Bare said. “They know the functions. They can do any type of basic research. … They’re pretty fluent in using this stuff.” Bare sees students retaining more information because they are both seeing the lesson and using their hands to reinforce it. “I have 100 percent of my students participating and they’re not afraid to make mistakes because we’re all doing something new,” she said. “I don’t know what I did before.” And Juniper Elementary’s Speed said she doesn’t know what her students would do without the knowledge they’re gaining. Her students write on blogs, e-mail one another and pen pals in Costa Rica, create documentaries and movies and podcasts. Currently students are using a software program called Garage Band to create raps about the Bill of Rights. Her students just completed a project they worked on with a school in New Jersey. “Our world is different,” Speed said. “We are actually preparing kids for jobs that don’t exist yet, while 50 years ago we were preparing them for jobs that existed. We need to teach our kids to think collaboratively, to think globally, to see the world beyond the classroom, or not just our kids but the U.S. will be left behind.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 A5

W  B Al-Qaida suspect isn’t Myanmar junta group’s spokesman is selling state assets ISLAMABAD — Pakistani officials reversed course Monday on a recently captured American suspected of being a member of al-Qaida, saying the man is not the terror network’s U.S.-born spokesman, as they initially believed. The man arrested in the southern city of Karachi was first identified as al-Qaida spokesman Adam Gadahn, the most wanted American in the terrorist network. But authorities later said it was a case of mistaken identity and that they have a different American in custody.

Biden visits Mideast to push peace talks JERUSALEM — Vice President Joe Biden began a fiveday visit to the Middle East on Monday, part of a concerted American effort to restart Israeli-Palestinian peace talks and keep Israel focused on imposing sanctions on Iran over its nuclear program rather than pursuing unilateral military action. Biden is due to meet Israeli, Palestinian and Jordanian leaders and give a speech at Tel Aviv University expressing American solidarity with Israel. George Mitchell, the Obama administration’s Middle East envoy, announced Monday in Jerusalem that Israel and the Palestinians had agreed to start indirect negotiations and that he would be back next week to continue structuring those talks.

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YANGON, Myanmar — Myanmar’s military government has quietly begun the largest sell-off of state assets in the country’s history, including more than 100 government buildings, port facilities and a large stake in the national airline, diplomats and businessmen here say. The sell-off, analysts say, appears to be part of a political transition as the government introduces elections for the first time in 20 years and a new constitution under which the military seems likely to perpetuate its rule, though more from behind the scenes. Diplomats and businessmen say that the sales may allow ruling generals to build up cash for election campaigns to the new parliament, where they will hold 25 percent of seats.

Gates, Karzai plan Kandahar offensive KABUL — Defense Secretary Robert Gates met here on Monday with President Hamid Karzai and Gen. Stanley McChrystal to review plans for a major U.S.-led offensive in the city of Kandahar, the spiritual heart and birthplace of the Taliban. McChrystal, the top NATO and U.S. commander in Afghanistan, declined to give a specific time, but told reporters at a briefing in Kabul that it would be several more months before U.S., coalition and Afghan forces were at full strength. — From wire reports

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A6 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

INTRODUCING THE BULLETIN’S BID-N-BUY ONLINE AUCTION EVENT BRINGING QUALITY PRODUCTS AT LOW-AUCTION PRICES TO CENTRAL OREGON Register to bid now! Bidding opens Sunday, March 14 at 9 a.m. and continues through March 23 at 8 p.m. A complete auction catalog will be in the Bulletin on March 14. Shop, bid and save on hundreds of items from local retailers. Over $250,000 in retail value.

Browse, Bid and Buy These And Other Great Auction Items Online at www.BulletinBidnBuy.com

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

Music Certificate

Hells Canyon Two-Night Package

16-Foot Esquif Ultra Light Canoe

TV Stand/ Console

French Face Lift Facial

Smokercraft Fishing Boat

RETAIL VALUE: $549 FROM: Geiser Grand Hotel

RETAIL VALUE: $1995 FROM: Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe

RETAIL VALUE: $499 FROM: Great American Furniture

RETAIL VALUE: $110 FROM: Clear Complexions

RETAIL VALUE: $5995 FROM: All Seasons RV & Marine

YOU CAN BID ON:

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Three Oil Changes

Forged Sterling Silver Snowflake Pendant

Two Mizuno CLK FLI-HI Hybrid woods

Pedicure and European Facial

Two Rounds of Golf With a Cart

Cort Acoustic/Electric Guitar

RETAIL VALUE: $120 FROM: Bryan’s Automotive

RETAIL VALUE: $350 FROM: John Paul Designs

RETAIL VALUE: $280 FROM: Awbrey Glen Golf Club

RETAIL VALUE: $135 FROM: Enhancement Center

RETAIL VALUE: From $190 FROM: Widgi Creek Golf Club

RETAIL VALUE: $700 FROM: Moore Music

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Dental Service Gift Certificate

Stick-Built 24’x30x Garage

One-Week Bobcat MT52 Rental

DNA Regenesis Therapy, Anti-Gravity.

Rega P-1 Turntable with Ortofon Cartridge

Gift Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $500 FROM: Distinctive Dentistry

RETAIL VALUE: $24,920 FROM: HiLine Homes

RETAIL VALUE: $582 FROM: Bobcat of Central Oregon

RETAIL VALUE: $120 FROM: Azurá Studio Salon and Spa

RETAIL VALUE: $400 FROM: Better Ideas

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Pro Golf

YOU CAN BID ON:

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Gift Certificate for Electical Service

Bronze Quail Statuary

Treatment Certificate

15’x25’x52” Swimming Pool

Ten Personal Training Sessions

RETAIL VALUE: $420 FROM: Quality Builders Electric

RETAIL VALUE: $120 FROM: The Garden Gallery

RETAIL VALUE: $1000 FROM: Aesthetics MD

RETAIL VALUE: $6500 FROM: Absolute Paradise

Carrier Furnace and Installation

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Moore Music

RETAIL VALUE: $2000 FROM: Tri County Climate Control

RETAIL VALUE: $600 FROM: Elite Fitness and Education

Central Oregon’s BIGGEST On-Line Auction Event Is Coming March 14th! FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 541-382-1811


B

B

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,332.21 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +5.86 +.25%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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CLOSE 10,552.52 DOW JONES CHANGE -13.68 -.13%

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Northrop Grumman withdraws, saying process isn’t fair McClatchy-Tribune News Service

A “phishing” scam targeting Bank of the Cascades customers is under way, and state officials are urging customers to never divulge their bank account numbers online or over the phone. The Oregon Attorney General’s Office said Monday it has lodged a surge of complaints from individuals who have received fraudulent phone calls from an entity claiming to be the Bank of the Cascades. State officials said the scammers are calling bank customers and telling them their bank accounts have been compromised and that they should verify their account numbers over the phone. State officials said a bank will never call and ask for an account number. Customers who have received such calls can report them to the Oregon Department of Justice Consumer Hotline, at 877-877-9392, or online at www.oregonattorney general.gov.

1,138.50 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -.20 -.02%

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.70 treasury CHANGE +.54%

t

$1,123.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$11.20

Tanker contract battle may be over By Les Blumenthal

Phone scam targets Bend bank customers

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WASHINGTON — Boeing now has the inside track on a $35 billion contract to start replacing the Air Force’s aging fleet of aerial refueling tanks after Northrop Grumman announced Monday that it wouldn’t bid. Northrop’s partner, the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Co., left open the possibility that it could bid on its own, though lawmakers and military analysts

said that might be difficult. EADS is the parent company of Airbus, Boeing’s fierce rival in the commercial airplane market. “This is now Boeing’s contract to lose,” said Loren Thompson, a defense analyst with the Lexington Institute, a national security research center based in northern Virginia. Defense Department officials didn’t indicate Monday whether they’d follow through with the bidding process even though there probably will be only one bid or negotiate a

sole-source contract with Boeing. Bids are due in May, and the Air Force was expected to award the contract this fall. In a statement, Deputy Secretary of Defense William Lynn said the Pentagon was disappointed that Northrop had decided not to bid and said that the competition was structured fairly so that both companies could compete effectively. Boeing supporters on Capitol Hill said Defense Secretary Robert Gates had told them the Air Force would move ahead with awarding the contract even if only one firm bid. See Tanker / B3

EXECUTIVE FILE

Keeping it local

Bob Thomas: No word from GM Bend General Motors dealer Bob Thomas said Monday that he was not among the dealers whose franchises the automaker offered to reinstate. GM announced Friday it would offer reinstatement to 661 of the more than 1,100 terminated dealers to request arbitration. GM had notified all those dealers as of Monday afternoon, The Detroit News reported. Thomas, who still services GM vehicles under a winddown agreement, is preparing for arbitration. Chrysler, which eliminated 789 dealers, made no reinstatement offer to its nearly 400 former dealers seeking arbitration.

New ReStore opens in La Pine

Total new orders to American factories for all manufactured goods: Seasonally adjusted 380

Nature’s General Store manager Calen Jessee says the Bend store follows the 150-mile rule for products it labels as local. “If it’s coming from within 150 miles, we can justifiably call it local, if you can get there on horseback in a day,” Jessee says.

Nature’s General Store tries to eliminate the middleman, bringing food straight from growers and outlets to customers By Tim Doran The Bulletin

T

he employees at Nature’s General Store in Bend made local a habit long before it began appearing on bumper stickers. For 27 years, Nature’s has sold natural and organic products in the Wagner Mall at Northeast Third Street and Revere Avenue. Founded by Debbie and Gordon Smith in 1983, the 5,200square-foot store sells organic or naturally grown fruits, vegetables, beef and other products, many of them grown, raised and made in Oregon, and as often as possible, Central Oregon. If Nature’s advertises the product on display as local, it has to meet the

$378.4B

What: Nature’s General Store Where: 1900 N.E. Third St., Suite 104, Bend (Inside the Wagner Mall at Northeast Third Street and Revere Avenue) Employees: 24, full and part time Phone: 541-382-6732 E-mail: natures@shopnatures.com Web site: http://shopnatures.com/

150-mile rule, said Calen Jessee, store manager. “If it’s coming from within 150 miles, we can justifiably call it local, if you can

By Miguel Helft New York Times News Service

370

360

350

340 2009

The basics

Using massive computing power, Google improves translation tool

Factory orders

’10

Source: U.S. Census Bureau AP

$17.252 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.110

Oil, gas prices creeping upward By Clifford Krauss New York Times News Service

HOUSTON — Crude oil and gasoline prices are inching up again. Optimism about the economy, new tensions in oil-producing Nigeria and reports that China intends to build up its strategic reserves lifted crude prices to around $82 on Monday, about a $10 increase in the last month. Prices at the pump are rising, too, with the average national price for a gallon of gasoline jumping 5 cents in the last week, to just above $2.75. “That’s a drag on the economy,” said Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at the Oil Price Information Service, who estimated that consumers were paying just over $1 billion a day at the pump, about $250 million more than this time a year ago. Kloza predicted that gasoline prices would top $3 a gallon between April and June as warm weather encouraged more driving, before dropping to as low as $2.50 after the summer driving season. “We’re in the fourth or fifth inning of the typical end-ofwinter, early spring rise in gasoline prices,” he added. The energy markets have been relatively stable since early October, with crude prices moving within a narrow range of $70 to $83. That followed years of erratic prices, with oil trading above $147 a barrel in July 2008 and falling below $33 only five months later. See Prices / B4

COLUMBIA RIVER BANK ACQUISITION

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

The Newberry Habitat for Humanity held a grand opening for a new ReStore in La Pine on Friday. The store will be open Thursday through Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The new ReStore, managed by Rolando Alonzo Jr., will sell items similar to those that can be found at the Bend ReStore, including used furniture, appliances, mirrors and other items. With the exception of Alonzo, the store will be staffed entirely by volunteers. Applications for new volunteers are being accepted. Money generated at the ReStore will help fund houses that Habitat for Humanity will build in the local community. Alonzo said plans call for building three new homes in the La Pine area during 2010. “We’ve had a tremendous response from the La Pine and Sunriver communities,” Alonzo said. — From staff reports

t

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — In a meeting at Google in 2004, the discussion turned to an e-mail message the company had received from a fan in South Korea. Sergey Brin, a Google founder, ran the message through an automatic translation service that the company had licensed. The result read: “The sliced raw fish shoes it wishes. Google green onion thing!” Brin said Google ought to be able to do better. Six years later, its free

TECH FOCUS Google Translate service handles 52 languages, more than any similar system, and people use it hundreds of millions of times a week to translate Web pages and other text. Google’s efforts to expand beyond searching the Web have met with mixed success. See Translation / B3

get there on horseback in a day.” It sells beef raised on ranches in Tumalo, Alfalfa and elsewhere in the region. The beef from Borlen Cattle Co., in Alfalfa, feeds on spent grain and hops from local breweries. Nature’s also works to keep prices low and products fresh by picking up its products from growers or outlets in the Willamette Valley, rather than having them age on trucks as they travel to distribution centers before heading to Central Oregon. “We pride ourselves in not listening to distributors, not listening to suppliers,” Jessee said. “That’s really where our niche is, looking forward.” See Nature’s / B3

Franz Och leads the machine translation team at Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., where the company keeps a replica of the Rosetta Stone. Peter DaSilva New York Times News Service

New owner says it plans to be involved in community By Andrew Moore The Bulletin

Similar corporate cultures, an attractive branch footprint and government assistance all made Columbia State Bank’s acquisition of Columbia River Bank in January “an attractive financial opportunity,” said Melanie J. Dressel, president and CEO of the bank’s parent company, TaMelanie Dres- coma, Wash.sel, president based Columbia Banking and CEO of System Inc. Columbia Columbia Banking River Bank, System Inc. based in The Dalles and with 21 branches in Washington and Oregon, including six in Central Oregon, was ordered closed in January by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. The state named the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. as receiver, which immediately sold the bank to Columbia State Bank. Columbia State Bank is known as Columbia Bank in Washington but uses the name Columbia State Bank in Oregon. It already had a presence in Oregon, primarily in Portland and on the coast, before it acquired Columbia River Bank. Dressel said the bank plans to be active in the community and “wants to be the community bank” in each of the communities it serves. See Columbia / B3


B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n AP Pharma ARYxTher ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXA Aarons AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AcadiaPh Accenture Accuray Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh AcornIntl ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom Adaptec AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon Aegon cap Aegon 6.5 AerCap Aeropostl s Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaSol AlancoTc h AlskAir AlaskCom AlbnyIn Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliHlthC AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AlliedCap AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs AlpTotDiv AlteraCp lf AltiGen h Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd ACmclLn rs AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntGr pfA AIntlGp rs AIntGr77 AIntGr62 AmLorain n AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks AmWstBc h Americdt Ameriprise AmeriBrg s AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmicusTh AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry n Andatee n Angiotch g AnglogldA ABInBev n Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigncs h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Aptargrp AquaAm ArborRT ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen Astrotech athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium

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Nm AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJ Svcs BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPW Acq BPW Acq wt BPZ Res BRE Baidu Inc BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BA SP10-11 BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD BiPNG Barclay BarVixShT Bard BareEscent BarnesNob BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden BellMicro Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlackD BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnhC&I BlkEnDiv BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst BlkSenHgh Blackstone BlockHR Blockbstr BlckbstrB BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BrdgptEd n BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker BrinksHSec BrMySq Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF BrdwindE n BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CKX Inc CME Grp CMS Eng CNinsure CRH CRM Hld CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotMic CabotO&G Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CdnSEn g CanoPet CapGold n CapOne CapProd CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CardiacSci CardnlHlt s CardiumTh CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carmike Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CastleBr CasualMal CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CedarSh CelSci Celadon Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf s CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt

D 19.31 -.05 3.57 84.38 +1.18 2.01 +.02 0.80 31.38 +.23 11.17 -.36 1.00 21.38 +.08 28.16 +.11 0.88 31.38 +.12 0.84 31.59 -.01 0.68 9.79 +.10 0.60 28.71 +.18 1.74 29.72 +.21 27.68 -.43 0.32 5.74 +.11 1.66 79.31 +.13 1.66 67.32 +.25 0.20 22.79 -.17 34.04 1.03 -.02 38.49 +.78 3.36 56.17 +.39 10.57 +.04 1.55 7.59 -.12 1.50 35.42 +1.27 534.33+13.58 0.60 50.34 -.55 0.68 34.01 +.44 0.40 54.41 -.49 2.40 +.11 39.03 -.02 1.24 46.54 +.20 0.39 14.44 +.22 0.76 18.02 -.20 0.87 14.28 +.04 12.60 +.21 0.88 19.56 +.10 0.04 16.74 +.04 8.84 +.19 2.88 +.07 10.57 1.80 42.88 -.39 6.40 -.42 2.80 57.86 +.05 0.36 29.62 -.08 1.96 48.70 +.30 1.42 +.18 40.68 -.02 26.31 64.45 -.23 2.03 25.59 +.07 11.34 -.13 0.16 20.73 -.01 23.55 -.46 0.68 83.66 -1.05 18.22 +.02 1.00 20.44 +.60 0.40 39.68 -.58 9.89 -.16 1.16 59.13 -.06 .41 +.00 18.83 -.08 4.25 +.04 0.10 8.81 0.72 68.76 -1.14 1.48 77.95 -.28 41.65 0.20 24.10 +.08 5.04 -.06 7.53 +.28 0.92 29.69 +.23 0.24 26.73 +.32 82.79 -.57 0.30 28.88 -.06 0.56 39.35 +.71 35.98 -.11 3.12 +.14 34.00 -.31 6.97 +.08 57.67 +.46 22.36 +.32 0.56 16.70 +.31 .53 +.01 1.80 +.06 8.35 -.11 0.36 15.30 0.48 75.22 -.14 1.42 28.67 +.13 1.28 9.89 42.41 -.14 4.00 218.12 -1.71 0.37 3.99 -.01 1.94 15.60 -.12 0.98 9.18 -.05 0.17 2.01 1.82 12.02 +.04 1.09 12.76 -.10 0.30 4.03 +.05 1.20 14.65 -.25 0.60 16.74 +.05 .38 -.01 .28 31.95 +1.39 2.00 29.72 +.19 1.68 67.24 -.69 5.35 +.07 2.03 +.03 2.05 +.22 37.75 +.10 0.04 7.51 +.17 2.00 72.58 +1.44 7.90 +.01 0.22 11.22 +.03 8.50 +.34 0.60 11.64 +.21 0.97 20.83 -.29 20.55 +.12 0.44 18.42 +.09 16.83 -.12 7.69 +.19 0.44 19.37 +1.10 42.20 -.07 1.28 25.31 +.03 0.32 31.46 +.31 4.23 -.03 0.56 21.44 -.26 5.11 -.13 5.88 +.07 5.83 +.40 19.20 -.16 0.52 24.45 +.02 0.56 14.36 +.20 0.34 10.33 -.13 0.31 17.31 -.05 0.28 14.46 +.46 1.20 55.47 -.04 14.31 +.55 0.05 13.34 +.36 13.24 -.08 0.80 33.01 -.04 0.10 66.12 +.30 0.16 34.02 +.23 46.49 +1.98 0.84 62.20 -1.07 0.25 18.32 +.42 0.16 22.81 -.03 14.12 +.07 0.80 13.77 +.48 0.20 14.71 +.06 2.70 +.12 0.40 102.98 -1.76 1.00 53.32 +.07 0.04 34.80 +.03 36.08 +.09 0.24 11.14 -.14 5.06 +.02 4.60 313.13 +4.15 0.60 15.62 -.07 0.22 25.96 +.13 0.87 24.51 +.55 .39 +.04 0.96 49.03 +.06 0.07 16.51 +.09 0.34 9.65 -.10 8.95 +.11 0.35 34.83 -.20 16.67 -.28 0.40 24.00 -.28 0.72 31.55 +.36 35.15 -.65 0.12 41.39 +.02 6.25 +.03 7.00 1.02 12.33 +.14 0.63 8.96 +.04 16.00 0.04 8.84 +.14 4.06 +.16 11.76 +.44 1.80 41.35 +.43 0.28 27.50 +.06 43.80 -.63 1.10 34.16 -.23 1.08 55.87 -.11 0.60 72.21 -.02 0.99 54.19 -.85 20.90 -.63 .51 +.01 .95 -.02 3.56 +.01 0.20 37.85 -.09 1.64 8.78 +.04 1.40 +.12 0.04 5.83 +.01 2.24 12.76 -.07 1.22 +.02 2.19 -.04 0.70 35.30 -.20 .63 -.02 25.93 -.04 30.28 -.15 0.64 36.35 +.32 23.23 -.07 12.00 +1.00 0.40 36.94 -.10 0.72 32.99 +.29 25.26 -.58 29.48 0.34 31.50 -.36 .28 +.00 3.78 +.11 38.89 -.19 1.68 58.91 -.32 0.04 10.06 -.07 24.37 +.05 12.23 -.73 0.36 6.93 +.15 .65 +.01 12.63 +.22 0.16 32.08 6.50 -.25 10.73 -.12 61.59 -.32 1.15 +.25 3.09 35.68 +.73 5.21 +.09 0.40 10.27 +.13 0.98 17.07 -.28 0.80 25.79 +.01 18.50 -.13 0.78 14.15 +.14

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D 1.56 13.84 -.13 34.44 +.35 0.01 14.02 -.05 1.24 +.01 15.03 +.20 2.90 33.57 +.19 9.15 -.01 70.85 +.13 18.11 +.55 11.40 -.15 83.72 -.90 38.78 -.26 6.50 -.15 33.76 +.01 25.84 +.13 2.94 +.06 3.29 -.04 0.30 25.59 -.72 2.72 74.64 +.34 22.51 +.16 0.16 14.72 +.17 41.01 -.14 0.43 4.04 +.02 5.43 +.08 30.45 +2.83 9.45 -.15 22.91 +.82 2.49 -.01 17.95 +.06 7.59 +.16 1.73 5.75 +.02 15.29 -.51 3.82 +.05 7.24 +.14 2.31 +.27 16.05 +.50 3.68 +.35 4.42 +.13 .61 +.04 5.34 -.17 0.51 68.40 +.73 6.89 +.53 3.02 -.28 11.85 -.34 0.55 13.27 +.11 1.77 48.26 +.86 10.72 -.18 8.61 -.33 2.61 +.36 8.59 -.09 1.30 -.10 16.84 +.65 4.19 -.12 0.29 12.36 -.17 0.35 16.37 +.85 .70 -.06 111.50 +.87 15.50 +.17 1.48 51.74 +.12 1.42 18.88 -.01 0.56 67.50 +.29 4.13 +.07 15.10 -.91 0.32 60.91 +.23 3.11 -.10 1.58 28.33 +.27 0.72 17.46 +.32 0.48 26.01 +.48 7.79 +.09 26.13 +.92 3.56 +.06 7.50 111.00 +1.77 .82 +.03 44.99 +.38 1.48 -.01 0.40 51.35 +.17 0.49 13.60 +.57 0.39 33.65 -.24 2.42 +.09 1.07 +.04 0.25 14.82 +.17 0.03 27.19 +.20 0.51 41.78 -.02 0.96 18.60 +.05 8.27 -.05 19.63 +.30 7.69 +.92 .36 +.14 7.69 +.27 0.35 60.17 -.48 2.00 61.88 +.38 16.39 -.33 0.30 37.55 -.14 0.36 26.17 +.31 0.51 68.10 -1.57 1.76 54.46 -.24 15.87 +.16 0.40 6.93 +.03 11.46 +.04 10.34 +.07 50.02 -.65 6.28 -1.67 0.37 6.55 +.13 29.66 -.17 7.01 -.34 2.12 83.95 -.26 23.64 -.51 0.60 12.49 +.16 1.06 -.08 1.25 -.10 0.38 17.56 +.13 0.38 16.81 +.13 0.20 36.29 -.45 0.20 11.77 -.05 0.94 40.50 -.15 0.48 16.25 -.13 27.51 +.24 37.23 +.16 21.92 +.19 0.47 67.91 -1.15 1.36 14.63 +.22 1.56 77.84 +.87 16.72 -.06 14.98 -.48 .84 -.01 53.15 +.19 8.30 +.03 33.05 -.79 30.09 -.23 10.71 -.19 0.40 34.15 +1.07 0.80 25.24 -.05 48.45 -1.59 42.02 +.93 4.18 +.10 6.35 +.88 2.00 50.73 +.32 1.73 +.01 5.92 -.07 0.40 53.71 -1.34 2.38 43.79 +.17 19.90 -.16 15.78 -.03 0.96 36.63 +.22 20.21 -.48 41.06 +.55 4.37 -.03 12.87 -.18 .95 -.03 0.06 39.25 +.74 1.08 47.50 -.29 0.42 18.67 -.06 2.30 23.66 +.13 35.51 +.12 17.56 -.03 0.56 34.78 +.01 0.20 18.35 +.25 1.57 38.83 +.19 21.06 -.13 9.30 +.19 .88 -.02 2.07 +.10 0.72 60.67 -.01 6.98 +.02 0.13 7.60 +.16 60.48 -.28 17.38 -.06 24.00 -.43 0.72 50.36 +.51 5.69 +.29 5.79 -.15 0.10 48.30 +.14 67.67 -1.13 0.32 13.21 -.85 7.72 +.23 9.73 -.37 9.68 +.10 10.65 -.16 38.47 -.93 27.37 +.13 .32 -.00 39.40 +.77 21.88 +.13 1.72 54.95 -.04 12.89 +.15 0.70 60.02 -.68 3.14 -.03 136.00 +.09 96.93 +.27 19.02 +.17 2.35 -.08 12.13 +.01 1.16 -.02 0.05 44.90 -.64 7.47 +.24 .50 -.04 0.28 5.27 +.12 4.15 -.07 0.78 9.17 -.04 1.21 27.44 +.21 0.15 12.96 +.09 0.60 40.61 +.23 2.12 44.84 -.20 45.13 +.08 12.00 +.10 0.16 76.60 -.35 1.00 41.99 +1.01 8.21 -.06 62.56 -1.59 0.20 65.93 -.86 16.41 +.69 16.18 +.18 130.67 +1.93 12.62 +.12 1.12 59.20 -.34 0.20 13.87 -.09 5.72 +.17 14.01 +.13 12.54 -.16 1.41 -.04 1.00 18.92 -.33 15.29 +.16 35.43 +.13 1.41 +.01 2.92 -.13 0.20 34.29 -.04 3.13 -.03 0.70 69.39 -.02 1.90 24.49 +.05 8.75 -.55

Nm

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27.60 -.48 13.36 +.24 1.05 13.29 +.04 0.08 11.48 +.08 0.64 69.69 -.26 2.36 65.71 -.07 0.18 40.61 +.43 0.50 88.50 +.57 0.03 8.80 +.07 14.86 +.27 25.62 +.43 1.08 30.75 +.50 1.92 54.98 +.70 29.29 +.25 0.16 22.14 34.64 -.50 34.78 -.17 23.07 148.38 +1.13 8.62 -.10 22.65 123.64 +.64 47.70 -.25 15.66 -.18 0.29 84.20 +.91 10.43 -.40 9.60 159.24 +5.52 7.65 -.05 4.75 51.78 +.28 15.26 -.02 6.85 56.08 +.07 10.40 +.04 4.78 39.84 -.17 0.08 14.12 -.05 31.68 +.13 27.95 +.24 .55 +.01 2.00 21.37 +.19 0.35 33.19 -.03 7.00 -.01 0.13 25.87 +.21 56.72 -.13 12.05 +.02 32.54 +.77 56.84 +.07 1.83 39.08 -.03 13.79 -.10 60.64 +.45 0.48 43.44 +.33 1.04 20.47 -.05 1.42 -.04 0.40 14.91 +.26 1.04 46.67 -.35 0.60 29.50 -.50 0.60 32.85 +.50 9.91 -.56 41.75 -.01 26.79 -.13 31.67 +.63 60.68 +.89 3.41 -.03 6.09 +.43 1.64 35.37 +.40 0.32 22.16 +.29 0.20 17.41 +.39 0.96 16.53 +.07 0.68 11.81 +.33 1.40 69.62 -.33 .18 +.01 26.01 -.49 2.70 +.05 3.88 +.06 0.16 15.95 -.39 11.12 +.01 1.54 +.08

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20.73 +1.91 1.67 +.01 24.84 +.21 18.42 +.55 24.50 +.70 2.84 47.83 +.32 0.62 97.37 -.01 12.24 +.05 0.88 47.10 -.23 3.02 31.95 +.72 16.16 +.11 5.91 +.18 0.40 25.10 +.66 0.10 6.21 +.17 0.56 8.68 +.04 0.04 18.29 -.38 1.76 61.75 5.95 -.05 2.00 72.60 -.54 0.64 32.17 -.26 1.39 15.64 +.04 0.38 7.04 +.03 1.62 13.17 -.03 1.53 11.91 -.07 1.56 13.74 -.14 16.92 -.03 20.12 +.45 0.62 42.70 -.40 1.26 33.56 -.22 0.20 5.76 +.09 96.78 -.15 0.04 11.38 -.05 1.44 26.93 +.02 7.14 -.19 13.15 -.10 17.28 +.16 0.55 22.71 -.07 1.13 -.01 54.31 +.13 15.91 +.02 1.34 47.98 -.51 1.10 4.33 +.62 2.03 +.22 13.66 -.18 0.80 34.18 -.07 51.88 +.17 1.36 -.04 3.60 -.11 23.52 -.08 4.30 +.06 30.10 +1.61 0.52 46.18 -.38 58.87 -.04 8.56 +.68 6.05 -.16 2.16 32.60 +.23 3.58 46.95 +.38 20.62 -.13 0.10 5.81 -.06 2.16 23.27 +.12 0.53 21.49 -.09 24.08 -.12 0.10 46.11 +.19 5.03 -.13 3.00 79.55 +.10 .66 +.08 2.24 33.49 +.15 2.75 +.02 2.60 39.98 +.41 2.84 +.05 3.94 -.02 9.81 +.13 0.16 33.04 -.30 102.62 -.12 0.88 18.93 -.07 1.35 37.62 +.35 0.23 10.63 +.08 4.13 90.54 +.16 6.46 +.02 0.55 62.34 +.68 47.05 +.01 0.20 20.38 +.32 0.60 31.94 -.06 1.92 83.26 +1.98 .32 +.01 1.28 -.01 6.43 -.01 0.12 19.21 +.04 6.81 -.15 2.10 45.33 -.17 5.86 -.14 17.53 -.06 0.28 23.13 -.10 0.38 36.48 -.10 98.29 -1.16 3.64 +.04 24.87 +.62 0.23 12.48 +.27 3.39 +.09 1.68 66.48 +.01 18.41 +1.82 20.99 +.17 60.88 -.34 26.49 -.15 0.50 59.55 -.26 60.62 -.90 0.48 7.78 2.00 47.75 +.10 2.90 +.08 36.39 -.40 0.08 24.10 -.35 10.38 -.03 0.62 35.56 +.09 1.01 0.80 45.45 -.25 0.44 86.67 -.28 2.64 72.21 +.76 0.96 25.88 -.10 4.61 +.11 2.00 22.78 -.37 8.91 -.06 20.13 -.59 0.60 14.41 -.07 0.20 23.40 -.08 1.20 11.81 +.39 0.04 12.61 -.12 13.30 +.22 0.16 13.29 -.20 0.88 32.02 +.07 2.09 +.01 0.12 6.15 +.08 0.40 18.07 -.22 0.80 13.56 +.05 6.45 +.24 2.74 +.04 0.04 13.29 -.13 0.56 13.91 +.07 0.80 15.40 +.70 108.64 +.02 0.01 21.35 +.09 26.05 +.25 0.13 13.12 +.10 0.08 18.32 -.15 2.20 39.51 -.10 0.64 21.03 -.14 49.91 +.18 .73 -.00 7.23 -.05 1.37 +.00 0.70 25.35 -.37 1.16 107.55 +.11 0.50 44.89 +.24 16.60 +.60 0.34 45.89 +.30 0.60 13.95 -.29 5.48 -.03

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D 12.93 -.07 1.84 22.59 +.12 13.22 +.26 30.01 -.09 28.12 -.20 17.38 +.10 17.24 +.19 4.33 -.03 0.76 46.43 +.01 38.99 +.26 26.07 +.17 0.88 108.32 -.97 0.76 13.69 +.48 1.19 -.03 1.04 -.04 1.34 -.04 0.60 80.62 -.09 1.00 7.49 +.18 13.46 -.02 0.90 28.23 -.10 29.65 +2.31 8.85 -.01 2.87 0.12 9.50 -.10 19.18 -.02 6.02 -.07 11.03 +.38 1.12 28.90 +.73 0.20 5.88 +.11 2.84 +.04 9.72 -.18 27.07 +.28 5.16 -.22 0.72 13.51 +.04 0.44 5.09 1.68 17.75 +.08 0.09 15.77 -.22 1.28 24.39 -.04 18.47 +.39 9.53 -.27 0.16 16.16 -.11 0.40 22.33 +.01 0.75 35.11 +.43 24.30 -.19 .38 24.55 -.01 22.49 -.41 4.51 -.07 25.50 -.17 1.68 73.65 -.08 0.40 16.27 -.08 14.08 +.07 0.50 7.64 +.27 1.96 72.15 -.54 3.68 -.31 4.65 -.03 .65 -.01 28.53 +.36 33.15 +.27 0.18 15.84 +.26 0.44 20.36 +.03 1.64 40.48 +.08 3.17 +.26 16.27 -.12 57.22 -.18 19.06 +.02 15.22 -.22 8.03 +.05 0.16 15.41 +.06 6.16 -.02 0.18 7.38 -.28 13.01 -.09 3.31 +.10 25.56 +.01 47.01 -.60 0.52 14.44 -.08 0.84 10.66 +.47 0.36 14.72 +.16 1.94 37.37 -.17 0.40 4.60 +.09 8.00 +.02 7.43 +.10 0.08 43.96 +.31 2.02 +.16 14.02 +.16 1.21 +.01 11.05 +.34 13.06 -.34 0.17 12.29 -.02 0.18 40.13 -.24 3.45 +.02 1.40 169.84 +2.66 1.08 68.74 -.95 19.16 -.31 13.68 -.02 562.48 -1.73 29.44 -.66 0.80 30.09 +.45 13.38 -.35 10.97 -.13 1.84 106.65 -.24 4.08 -.04 5.93 -.06 23.32 -.02 0.52 28.20 -.35 3.90 2.06 +.10 7.41 +.03 1.75 +.01 0.07 4.57 +.15 0.83 18.49 +.33 92.44 +4.70 14.48 +.15 31.96 +.16 1.91 +.13 1.19 19.37 +.07 0.50 44.19 +1.65 12.61 +.02 27.90 +.52 9.93 -.10 0.05 1.27 +.01 44.99 -.16 0.54 28.19 -.01 1.86 30.54 +.14 0.60 126.88 -.21 45.60 -.89 0.48 7.23 +.11 1.70 53.20 -.43 1.06 23.05 -.38 28.59 +.69 16.93 -.04 0.36 31.41 -.47 6.86 +.16 26.94 +.28 2.55 +.09 2.24 -.02 41.15 -.26 22.00 -.15 .64 -.05 0.40 26.63 -.19 42.94 -.09 6.81 -.01 0.06 9.81 -.09 0.88 46.24 -.11 1.22 +.06 0.82 30.82 -.16 0.20 26.93 +.07 1.00 37.50 +.03 4.50 26.72 +.25 1.24 20.77 -.26 5.33 -.22 2.72 43.40 +.24 7.80 -.04 1.20 22.06 +.37 24.16 -.40 17.55 -.65 18.44 -.29 0.08 15.81 +.09 0.04 17.38 -.01 6.18 5.63 -.02 1.68 46.20 -.20 24.67 -.30 .89 -.02 12.93 +1.07 0.53 6.48 -.01 0.20 39.60 -.64 .70 -.01 56.61 -.27 0.80 42.66 -.18 4.62 +.09 0.20 4.39 +.05 1.28 41.20 -.25 9.91 -.07 .95 -.02 0.40 61.25 -.29 39.90 -.14 0.32 51.73 -.30 12.84 +.05 25.05 -.37 24.70 +.16 0.63 7.27 +.04 1.70 30.46 +.46 0.60 27.67 -.40 17.52 +.11 0.95 31.96 +.16

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D 33.42 2.32 46.14 26.81 35.97 1.21 41.49 0.32 13.68 0.84 41.68 20.76 53.14 1.80 22.65 0.04 12.59 6.72 4.19 27.81 0.60 13.40 31.09 47.95 0.48 35.27 0.04 4.96 0.40 13.66 23.31 7.76 34.67 .23 3.61 1.22

-1.57 +.34 +.31 +.82 -.42 -.26 -.16 +.42 -.77 +.20 +.05 +.01 -.01 +.35 +.01 -.70 -.19 +.29 -.11 +.72 +.65 -.01 +.06 -.11

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23.98 +.28 0.06 15.23 -.43 0.46 40.75 -.21 1.24 +.06 54.79 +.29 0.54 6.97 -.05 1.50 12.49 -.03 9.98 -.14 0.30 5.99 +.01 5.35 32.77 +1.35 31.27 -.07 0.66 23.48 -.13 0.23 12.85 -.09 2.72 71.67 -.53 0.33 27.42 +.06 0.55 21.06 -.05 0.38 16.08 +.18 0.14 10.21 +.07 0.32 48.72 +.32 0.24 11.31 +.14 0.70 50.56 -.08 0.33 11.29 +.07 1.43 42.17 -.06 0.50 25.35 +.10 0.30 22.62 -.02 0.21 12.34 +.05 0.42 15.85 -.14 16.89 -.12 1.12 52.29 -.03 1.67 45.37 +.01 4.12 103.75 -.09 0.55 41.32 +.14 1.13 76.29 +.39 2.16 114.66 +.04 3.96 104.46 +.07 0.58 40.98 +.03 5.64 105.75 +.17 0.55 42.57 -.04 0.80 58.70 -.09 0.75 46.88 -.23 1.35 54.88 -.07 3.65 89.80 -.47 3.84 90.00 -.24 1.54 83.43 -.04 1.44 54.98 0.77 39.38 +.10 0.40 47.48 1.24 87.22 +.19 0.93 77.16 +.18 8.17 87.85 +.02 88.83 -.29 2.02 54.90 +.54 1.36 59.53 +.11 0.69 50.87 1.16 63.06 +.03 1.05 62.70 +.13 3.88 104.51 +.08 0.34 72.11 +.06 0.72 66.74 +.12 0.28 110.21 +.02 2.88 38.62 -.03 0.70 19.42 +.15 0.26 56.88 +.15 1.94 48.03 +.59 0.08 13.67 +.15 0.88 54.57 +.20 0.54 58.52 +.21 0.86 62.58 -.14 0.32 45.51 +.07 4.52 +.03 1.28 54.50 +.03 1.00 53.00 -.49 109.25 -1.67 1.36 58.50 +.70 24.25 -.14 15.13 +.45 0.48 32.30 +.13 1.22 +.02 1.24 46.66 -.61 38.67 -.15 14.84 +1.12 7.37 +.27 3.56 16.01 -.47 11.99 +.39 1.28 37.40 +1.22 8.15 -.04 7.92 -.24 7.78 +1.27 11.58 +.38 26.53 -.25 0.49 59.87 +.31 0.28 34.03 +.09 18.08 +.26 0.57 8.81 +.09 1.41 -.07 26.88 +.14 1.16 +.02 6.14 -.07 15.62 +.28 .64 +.07 5.90 +.12 8.39 -.25 2.72 46.12 +.20 0.63 20.77 -.02 0.80 31.27 +.27 110.22 +.78 26.08 +.30 0.01 9.94 +.08 1.09 +.05 23.30 +.02 5.67 +.16 0.34 21.54 -.23 2.20 126.41 -.84 4.24 -.49 1.00 44.27 -.22 0.24 17.28 +.18 0.10 25.25 -.10 21.76 -.15 64.09 +.21 8.51 +.06 0.48 15.42 +.05 15.39 +.01 28.11 -.28 33.98 +.07 39.70 -.24 0.41 21.08 -.28 18.22 +.46 13.04 -.02 0.69 9.35 +.14 8.20 +.65 0.25 25.84 +.01 .35 -.03 8.71 +.22 8.91 +.01 0.49 20.88 -.14 1.52 +.07 71.21 +.54 3.50 +.03 15.58 -.58 47.40 +1.79 22.82 -.05 5.07 -.04 29.54 +.10 11.34 -.08 0.20 42.59 -.22 1.77 29.99 +.11 26.95 +.06 0.28 16.95 +.23 0.38 23.59 -.11 22.90 +.30 2.39 -.02 42.01 +.57 10.40 -.10 2.21 +.12 18.14 -.40 0.04 13.70 +.03

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D 0.30 34.27 -.02 1.44 -.03 11.48 -.29 0.30 25.50 +.27 5.14 +.02 40.47 +.51 2.10 -.04 1.96 64.20 +.16 0.52 32.00 -.38 0.20 18.48 -.01 0.20 67.44 +.52 .84 +.05 48.38 +.46 0.70 56.24 +.39 29.60 +.50 45.85 +.81 0.25 17.48 +.23 0.20 21.67 +.27 13.75 +.18 0.28 7.50 0.60 30.13 -.16 0.08 15.36 +.74 20.50 +.86 3.39 +.21 5.58 +.87 35.55 +.10 11.50 +.99 0.72 37.20 +1.24 1.92 25.76 -.04 1.50 52.62 -.31 16.90 +.10 0.48 28.15 +.35 2.71 +.01 11.04 +.18 0.04 7.27 +.02 1.40 30.47 +.88 2.64 60.12 +.01 0.64 14.75 +.14 4.20 63.93 +.24 4.20 57.23 +.14 42.87 -.12 12.11 -.07 0.10 18.85 -.25 35.48 +.39 18.74 -.07 0.24 4.88 -.04 16.63 +.58 0.20 20.13 +.13 2.65 +.04 54.46 -.24 7.79 -.01 3.91 +.03 16.58 +.15 18.04 +.04 1.16 29.17 -.17 15.68 +.25 3.76 +.06 0.38 22.90 +.16 7.08 +.21 9.68 +.19 9.06 -.14 1.60 92.54 -.62 6.41 -.21 15.69 -.47 3.03 +.20 20.21 +.05 5.55 -.09 3.12 +.02 14.26 +.21 1.50 -.02 72.04 -.41 5.49 +.14 34.95 +.23 32.70 -.05 0.18 39.52 +.21 18.44 +.57 0.04 20.89 +.02 3.51 +.01 6.20 -.02 0.50 38.81 +.35 14.57 +.29 6.17 +.29 74.20 +.45 2.08 22.52 +.91 0.12 28.87 +.01 1.04 20.80 +.19 0.40 40.63 +.31 0.16 17.20 +.19 0.56 44.56 +.79 24.98 +.03 1.56 1.59 -.19 0.40 5.92 +.02 34.57 +.10 9.92 1.01 +.06 0.29 4.63 +.03 28.29 +.02 13.23 -.24 33.00 -.19 53.64 +.19 1.90 32.25 +.52 1.00 21.79 +.23 52.08 -.17 28.07 +.17 32.87 +.03 1.70 -.10 0.60 26.40 -.45 1.96 34.93 -.16 0.60 23.47 +.19 41.32 -.12 25.60 -.13 0.04 26.94 -.04 0.92 27.24 -.27 2.52 27.35 +.05 3.53 +.04 5.67 +.13 6.54 -.17 14.25 +.41 7.97 +.22 7.12 +.01 1.43 3.22 -.12 2.52 81.09 -.18 0.25 37.54 +.04 16.19 -.34 34.36 +1.24 4.00 75.84 +.34 8.60 +.06 0.36 23.95 -.10 1.24 86.42 -1.03 33.06 +.18 24.70 -.19

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDC Pr g MDRNA h MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagelPt Magma MagHRes MaguirePr MaidenBrd MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd

2.80 78.73 +.18 5.26 -.02 5.29 1.00 35.52 +.27 0.40 10.41 +.26 1.04 +.04 8.27 +.01 0.63 21.63 +.11 12.86 -.04 7.07 +.02 1.08 7.07 -.25 0.58 6.88 +.02 8.22 -.10 11.47 +.20 34.01 +.39 0.24 38.81 +.23 1.80 34.63 +.52 0.20 21.04 +.59 .54 +.03 42.91 -.43 2.84 45.12 -.32 2.03 -.02 2.46 +.07 3.15 +.05 2.16 +.30 20.50 +.24 14.17 +.80 0.08 12.41 -.30 10.20 +.01 0.74 55.33 -.40 0.52 19.41 +.08 0.96 30.80 +.19 15.12 -.19 0.11 45.95 -.48 0.98 64.87 +.32 0.08 33.05 -.01 25.74 -.10 0.42 44.99 -.15 0.45 46.73 -.23 0.31 37.79 -.11 2.56 31.13 +.53 0.16 27.90 +.03 0.80 23.72 -.07 0.04 7.48 +.08 5.59 -.06 1.60 82.53 +.39 20.27 -.13 0.30 14.66 +.27 2.00 29.07 -.04 0.24 48.78 -.54 12.96 -.19 0.60 245.61 +6.07

Nm Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedCath MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medidata n Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth MeridRs h Metalico Methode MetLife MetLfe pfB MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicroSemi Microsoft MicroStr Micrvisn MidAApt MiddleBk h MdwstBc h MillerHer Millicom Millipore Mind CTI MindrayM Mindspeed MineSaf Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MobileTel Mohawk MolecInPh Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG s NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT n NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr Nanosphere NasdOMX NashF NBkGreece NatlCoal h NatFnPrt NatFuGas NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed Natuzzi Nautilus NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetwkEng NBRESec Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource NichACv Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR nTelos NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor

D 0.75 22.59 +.09 3.33 -.15 0.80 18.91 -.11 5.19 +.05 1.04 37.76 -.24 25.21 -.22 2.20 65.12 +1.45 0.94 35.47 +.19 0.48 60.99 -1.09 18.44 -.11 40.70 +1.26 0.80 49.96 +.05 0.12 7.49 +.04 0.92 24.93 +.39 25.47 -.51 8.89 +.41 21.20 -.16 63.09 -.50 5.47 +.37 0.80 10.57 -.01 8.14 -.20 0.16 23.14 +.05 15.37 -.48 24.92 +1.31 12.27 +.14 54.37 -.09 0.82 44.81 -.69 4.77 +.39 20.56 +.17 0.36 24.84 -.33 8.02 -.08 45.44 +.79 5.43 +.32 1.52 37.35 -.14 0.92 33.37 +.12 2.20 +.02 .29 -.01 6.14 +.07 0.28 10.03 -.82 0.74 40.90 +1.98 1.63 24.50 +.10 6.55 +.17 0.14 10.27 +.02 1.36 27.09 -.17 7.93 +.06 9.59 +.13 16.84 +.03 0.52 28.63 +.04 86.54 -4.79 2.83 +.14 2.46 53.38 +.31 .46 -.01 .33 -.03 0.09 19.75 +.14 1.24 85.48 -.62 105.03 -.14 0.80 1.69 +.08 0.20 38.07 +.08 8.03 -.09 0.96 25.92 +.41 9.81 -.07 12.72 +.07 5.17 +.03 54.22 -.28 54.71 +.83 1.92 +.02 0.61 21.32 -.10 0.61 18.13 -.05 0.96 42.69 -.12 15.15 -.34 3.10 +.20 21.19 +.34 1.06 72.02 -.48 15.70 +.02 0.36 17.90 +.19 0.42 28.21 +.10 0.20 29.58 +.17 0.20 61.38 -.22 6.91 -.04 1.96 -.02 0.07 4.87 -.03 1.00 53.70 -.20 21.42 -.35 1.75 22.67 +.15 5.58 +.07 49.52 -.11 10.50 +1.00 13.29 +.24 26.95 -.28 0.60 15.52 -.01 32.77 +.80 38.59 -.88 3.02 -.22 22.90 +.08 0.44 11.65 -.05 1.20 28.53 -.02 22.42 -.09 0.14 23.90 -.23 9.39 -.51 3.95 +.57 20.07 +.04 0.72 34.58 +.32 0.31 4.35 +.09 .60 -.04 13.66 +.55 1.34 51.53 +.35 0.40 43.63 -.03 0.04 7.07 +.02 1.50 22.38 +.19 0.32 14.72 +.05 1.76 34.34 +.30 14.39 +.01 5.25 +.31 3.81 +.18 11.90 -.19 0.24 6.42 +.04 1.64 16.54 +.49 43.42 +1.08 14.89 -.05 19.16 +.27 0.01 13.42 -.10 57.94 +1.89 32.51 +.46 39.75 +.56 11.20 -.22 68.68 +1.03 4.21 +.01 2.05 -.07 0.24 3.27 +.05 2.34 +.04 17.74 +.19 2.50 -.07 .11 +.00 .88 +.15 4.67 -.11 1.36 37.37 -.48 77.00 1.00 15.80 +.20 11.77 0.28 12.46 +.03 2.99 +.50 0.20 14.64 +.13 52.66 -.18 0.40 51.06 -.49 5.32 -.03 0.15 14.28 -.07 0.15 16.71 -.02 0.20 23.38 +.06 .45 +.02 .44 -.02 0.92 15.44 +.06 1.08 9.63 +.04 1.86 42.72 -.11 3.26 +.13 1.08 68.82 +.50 17.03 +.12 0.29 21.91 +.14 0.20 44.09 -.16 0.72 72.98 -.25 0.56 14.17 +.04 7.39 +.14 1.73 29.86 +1.13 0.64 39.33 +.32 1.36 52.97 4.36 -.06 1.03 26.58 +.07 9.78 -.12 13.52 +.11 1.12 54.90 +.29 3.02 -.04 1.72 64.16 -.06 0.40 4.37 +.07 0.40 11.78 -.11 5.70 +.57 6.30 -.05 1.99 54.32 +.11 6.97 +.01 2.41 +.05 5.81 -.10 23.00 +.17 1.60 34.99 +.29 1.12 17.56 +.13 0.50 30.18 +2.00 42.30 +.37 16.13 +.26 1.44 44.84 +.28

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NutriSys h 0.70 16.07 -.25 NuvMuVal 0.47 9.85 NvMSI&G2 0.75 8.23 +.02 Nvidia 16.92 -.25 NxStageMd 9.91 -.21 OReillyA h 39.77 +.05 OSI Phrm 56.30 -.69 OcciPet 1.32 81.49 -.12 OccuLogix 4.10 +2.88 Oceaneer 63.18 +.54 OceanFrt .83 -.04 Oclaro 2.18 +.07 OcwenFn 10.53 -.05 OfficeDpt 7.71 +.30 OfficeMax 16.37 -.07 OilSvHT 1.78 126.47 -.33 OilStates 45.10 +.29 Oilsands g .79 +.01 OldDomF h 32.04 +.90 OldNBcp 0.28 11.80 -.13 OldRepub 0.69 11.42 +.01 Olin 0.80 18.63 +.04 OmegaHlt 1.28 19.58 +.24 Omncre 0.09 27.98 -.21 Omnicom 0.80 37.99 -.07 OmniVisn 15.93 -.10 Omnova 6.75 +.01 OnSmcnd 8.16 -.06 ONEOK 1.76 46.38 -.51 ONEOK Pt 4.40 61.13 +.13 OnlineRes 3.86 -.23 Onstream h .35 -.05 OnyxPh 30.29 OpenTxt 47.83 -.56 OpnwvSy 2.74 -.01 OptimerPh 13.47 +.01 optXprs 0.32 16.98 -.49 Oracle 0.20 24.70 -.25 OrbitalSci 18.23 -.22 Orbotch 9.55 +.34 OrientEH 11.59 -.01 OriginAg 11.27 +.94 OrionMar 17.49 OrsusXel .54 +.10 Orthovta 4.17 +.02 OshkoshCp 37.35 -.26 OvShip 1.75 44.70 +.94 Overstk 14.19 +.76 OwensCorn 24.77 +.12 OwensIll 30.73 -.30 Oxigene h 1.21 -.04 PDL Bio 1.00 7.09 +.05 PF Chng 44.73 +1.10 PG&E Cp 1.82 42.59 -.05 PHH Corp 22.81 +.63 Pimc1-5Tip 0.41 51.76 +.04 PLX Tch 5.43 -.25 PMC Sra 8.99 +.03 PMI Grp 3.06 +.02 PNC 0.40 55.53 -.04 PNM Res 0.50 13.04 +.05 POSCO 1.57 124.33 +2.99 PPG 2.16 63.55 +.26 PPL Corp 1.40 28.93 +.30 PSS Wrld 22.22 -.07 Paccar 0.36 38.99 -.22 PacerIntl 6.62 +.29 PacAsiaP n 3.88 -.12 PacCapB 1.22 +.05 PacEthan 1.94 -.11 PacSunwr 5.32 +.20 PackAmer 0.60 24.50 -.11 Pactiv 24.69 -.27 PaetecHld 4.37 -.06 Palatin .27 +.01 PallCorp 0.64 41.02 -.30 Palm Inc 5.55 -.16 PanASlv 0.05 22.58 -.22 PaneraBrd 78.53 +.49 ParPharm 25.13 +.03 ParagShip 0.20 4.93 +.20 ParamTch 18.18 +.16 ParaG&S 1.82 -.04 Parexel 21.70 +.08 ParkDrl 5.23 -.07 ParkerHan 1.00 63.02 +.09 PartnerRe 2.00 79.17 +.60 PatriotCoal 21.13 -.54 Patterson 30.66 -.11 PattUTI 0.20 15.28 +.05 Paychex 1.24 31.25 +.13 PeabdyE 0.28 48.18 -1.05 Pengrth g 0.84 11.06 +.07 PnnNGm 24.21 -.05 PennVa 0.23 24.89 PennWst g 1.80 21.06 +.01 PennantPk 1.04 10.36 +.06 Penney 0.80 30.61 +.46 PenRE 0.60 11.06 +.22 Penske 15.47 +.05 Pentair 0.76 34.04 -.30 PeopUtdF 0.61 15.64 +.04 PepcoHold 1.08 16.84 +.06 PepsiCo 1.80 64.15 -.22 Peregrne rs 3.33 +.13 PerfectWld 38.68 +.24 PerkElm 0.28 23.68 -.11 Prmian 0.81 17.50 +.25 Perrigo 0.25 50.14 -.59 PetMed 0.40 19.82 +.49 PetChina 4.01 118.90 +1.85 Petrohawk 20.94 -.44 PetrbrsA 1.17 40.08 -.32 Petrobras 1.16 44.76 -.19 PetroDev 22.62 -.23 PtroqstE 6.29 -.08 PetsMart 0.40 29.64 -.63 Pfizer 0.72 17.35 -.13 PhmHTr 7.59 65.66 -.22 PharmPdt 0.60 22.03 +.02 Pharmacyc 5.75 -.14 PhaseFwd 12.95 +.35 PhilipMor 2.32 50.79 -.46 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.59 -.22 PhlVH 0.15 46.24 +1.93 PhnxCos 2.84 +.03 PiedNG 1.12 26.70 -.04 Pier 1 7.19 +.02 PimCpOp 1.38 16.61 -.06 PimcoHiI 1.46 11.72 PinnclEnt 8.65 +.11 PinWst 2.10 37.86 -.13 PionDrill 7.44 -.01 PioNtrl 0.08 48.54 -.44 PitnyBw 1.46 22.93 -.02 PlainsAA 3.71 55.92 -.07 PlainsEx 33.15 -.65 Plantron 0.20 31.83 +.06 PlatGpMet 2.00 +.13 PlugPwr h .56 +.01 PlumCrk 1.68 37.09 +.30 Polaris 1.60 50.27 +.38 Polo RL 0.40 82.78 +.15 Polycom 28.27 +.24 PolyMet g 2.17 +.08 PolyOne 8.61 +.11 Polypore 17.35 +.35 Poniard h 1.60 -.17 Pool Corp 0.52 21.55 +.07 Popular 2.24 +.02 PortGE 1.02 19.00 -.07 PositiveID 1.59 -.01 PostPrp 0.80 19.97 +.13 Potash 0.40 117.91 +1.10 Potlatch 2.04 34.26 +.16 PwrInteg 0.20 38.90 +.38 Power-One 4.03 +.04 PSCrudeDS 61.60 -.09 PwshDB 23.91 -.03 PS Agri 24.90 -.08 PS Oil 27.78 +.03 PS BasMet 21.98 +.14 PS USDBull 23.62 -.01 PwSClnEn 9.79 -.02 PwShHiYD 0.34 7.98 +.03 PwSWtr 0.12 17.22 -.09 PSFinPf 1.38 17.19 +.06 PwShSMid 0.36 55.68 +.38 PSVrdoTF 0.26 24.99 PwShPfd 1.05 14.00 +.01 PShEMSov 1.64 25.97 +.09 PShGClnEn 0.02 14.76 -.06 PSIndia 0.13 22.14 -.08 PwShs QQQ 0.21 46.53 +.09 Powrwav 1.28 +.03 Praxair 1.80 79.23 +.24 PrecCastpt 0.12 117.80 -2.51 PrecDril 8.51 -.06 PremWBc .59 +.02 PrepaidLg 39.14 +.38 Prestige 8.74 +.19 PriceTR 1.08 53.36 -.62 PrSmrt 0.50 23.43 +1.64 priceline 240.18 +4.84 PrideIntl 29.72 +.33 PrinFncl 0.50 24.91 +.11 PrivateB 0.04 12.89 -.06 ProShtS&P 50.94 PrUShS&P 32.81 -.02 ProUltDow 0.55 45.11 -.12 PrUlShDow 28.06 +.05 ProUltQQQ 60.95 +.28 PrUShQQQ 18.06 -.05 ProUltSP 0.35 39.92 +.01 ProUShL20 48.54 +.41 PrUShCh25 8.27 -.05 ProUltSEM 10.67 ProUShtRE 6.65 -.14 ProUShOG 12.23 +.02 ProUShtFn 21.18 -.16 ProUShtBM 7.36 +.04 ProUltRE 0.13 7.43 +.15 ProUltO&G 0.23 34.62 -.06 ProUltFin 0.04 6.21 +.05 ProUBasM 0.18 34.71 -.14 ProUSR2K 21.49 -.10 ProUltR2K 0.06 32.22 +.13 ProUSSP500 32.74 -.03 ProUltSP500 0.17 159.78 -.02 ProUltCrude 12.79 +.01 ProSUShGld 9.60 +.15 ProUShCrude 12.70 -.02 ProSUSSilv 4.29 +.07 ProSUltSilv 56.66 -.78 ProUShEuro 20.44 -.09 ProceraNt .46 +.03 ProctGam 1.76 63.19 -.50 PrognicsPh 4.69 +.04 ProgrssEn 2.48 38.77 -.11 ProgrsSoft 31.17 +.11 ProgsvCp 0.16 17.17 -.15 ProLogis 0.60 13.11 +.17 ProsHldg 8.81 +.05 ProspctCap 1.64 12.38 +.28 ProspBcsh 0.62 41.81 -.45 Protalix 7.20 -.28 ProtLife 0.48 19.60 +.10 ProvET g 0.72 8.18 -.03 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1.37 30.71 -.14 2.60 87.58 +.16 9.57 -.32 11.42 +.19 0.53 7.00 +.04 0.64 6.25 +.02 0.64 6.37 -.02

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22.51 1.99 19.02 +.02 0.76 38.79 +.03 1.20 57.41 -.38 0.12 17.50 +.27 18.60 -.09 2.79 +.02 .76 0.40 55.93 -.26 17.90 -.03 0.52 43.91 -.21 6.91 +.41 2.70 +.20 15.26 -.34 3.10 +.14 0.32 4.70 +.04 2.14 +.18 15.13 -.02 4.98 +.16 0.16 12.67 +.03 0.82 20.67 -.20 4.42 +.13 7.62 +.04 27.02 -.18 19.16 -.03 0.01 10.70 +.17 0.25 21.88 +.15 22.76 -.29 2.90 +.18 0.17 75.93 -1.61 0.16 50.47 -.99 1.05 0.44 27.77 +.38 2.00 43.60 +.25 1.24 57.07 -.04 5.08 -.11 1.72 28.61 +.17 30.01 -.26 23.32 +.15 5.28 1.00 15.08 +.30 0.72 16.50 +1.28 1.85 36.78 +.39 1.78 21.41 +.34 25.47 -.04 1.11 82.68 -.31 0.04 6.98 +.14 0.16 17.07 +.04 26.48 +.38 0.48 50.26 +.20 0.40 47.31 +.08 1.00 56.94 -.03 5.25 -.25 23.22 +.01 1.13 +.01 .79 -.01 1.37 24.44 +.23 5.89 -.15 0.76 29.24 -.27 73.39 +3.89 59.18 -.32 11.72 +.40 1.00 7.00 -.18 16.99 -.16 1.51 98.30 +.17 14.04 -.18 1.37 +.05 3.60 53.12 -.72 7.67 -.11 16.82 +.10 23.28 -.06 1.80 224.50 -1.77 22.05 0.40 22.04 +.21 1.50 -.01 29.04 +.93 0.52 29.65 -.27 0.60 43.60 +.61 1.16 56.14 +.16 0.96 59.49 -.55 26.20 -.24 1.28 32.70 -.64 0.38 56.77 +.37 2.11 +.31 24.29 +.06 0.64 51.79 +.65 35.47 +.45 27.78 -.07 2.00 56.98 +.74 11.84 -.28 1.65 13.21 +.16 30.23 +.42 3.36 54.89 -.04 3.36 57.15 +.09 0.36 46.28 -.31 11.55 +.05 4.58 -.12 9.06 +.14 0.48 29.85 -.33 32.64 +.43 4.50 +.33 1.00 36.01 +.10 0.56 41.53 +.08 0.12 23.93 +.14 6.01 -.18 19.33 +.02 0.67 46.25 +.12 35.35 -.37 1.90 36.90 -.24 0.18 19.05 +.88 8.20 17.43 +.58 0.40 57.45 +2.05 12.29 +.29 2.49 105.59 -.17 109.88 -.93 1.61 140.26 +.27 2.29 114.27 +.02 1.73 48.43 +.07 0.15 16.81 +.24 0.36 24.20 +.06 0.49 38.77 +.28 1.98 51.50 +.56 4.98 39.35 +.19 0.52 24.16 +.02 0.03 45.84 0.46 25.07 -.10 0.48 39.61 +.27 0.28 42.59 -.20 0.46 56.02 -.32 1.00 62.37 -.53 13.32 +1.42 0.12 9.20 -.04 46.89 -.21 61.58 -.56 2.29 35.47 -.47 0.40 24.73 +.06 27.68 +.28 38.90 -.19 0.10 36.27 +.16 7.62 +.25 72.95 +.67 31.05 +.03 8.21 -.12 .48 +.01 33.41 +.09 7.45 -.05 17.25 -.24 1.63 38.15 +.01 2.63 28.83 +.33 4.80 -.07 0.35 9.83 +.37 0.44 13.89 -.06 1.08 39.54 +1.00 2.30 +.02 5.71 +.02 14.02 +.08 15.72 -.02 0.84 64.48 +.67 0.07 49.51 -1.50 0.30 29.20 -2.02 0.06 29.00 +.10 0.24 19.04 +.08 0.60 42.68 -1.32 3.68 +.13 14.45 -.14 0.50 40.78 +.24 0.30 40.94 +.12 9.60 -.10 22.40 -.52 1.78 -.02 19.89 -.03 0.48 20.88 -.03 1.19 101.87 +.92 0.40 10.40 +.18 11.81 +.03 8.65 +.15 0.50 26.94 -.09 1.56 51.00 +1.27 17.17 +.32 .41 +.01 1.44 22.22 +.29 2.75 +.13 8.10 -.10 0.16 8.47 -.08 6.67 -.14 39.74 +.99 34.75 -.54 6.77 +.26 1.44 65.26 +.10 1.20 17.77 0.34 66.48 -.27 8.46 -.07 21.41 -.06 1.12 35.97 +.68 8.39 -.12 6.96 12.49 +.35 0.64 52.80 -.15 12.03 +.33 2.69 +.14 47.03 +.58 3.45 +.13 3.08 -.17 0.28 6.11 +.04 18.00 -.41 15.45 -.10 0.08 6.78 +.05 2.40 79.79 +.36 0.40 26.91 +.95 41.95 +1.02 5.57 +.05 38.01 -8.49 6.53 +.07 .90 -.04 37.21 -.04 30.26 -.62 11.14 6.43 -.17 6.80 -.24

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U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Nature’s

Q: A:

You’ve been in business for 27 years. To what do you attribute the longevity? It’s really just being strong on fiscal responsibility and providing good customer service. This store is a niche market. We’ve been able to bring local (goods to our customers). We go to the (Willamette) Valley twice a week, to the Eugene-Springfield area, (for example), and we’re seen by our customers as a reliable source. We keep it fresh.

Continued from B1 One example is providing gluten-free products, which are becoming more popular with consumers with food allergies. Nature’s also stresses customer service, said Jessee, 29. Employees seek out customers’ questions. If they can’t answer them immediately based on their knowledge, employees have plenty of reference materials at hand. The store has available a computerized health reference, and a copy of “Prescription for Nutritional Healing, The A-Z Guide to Supplements,” sits on a book stand near one of the two aisles devoted to vitamins, health products, freeze-dried herbs, organic herbs and herbal tinctures, such as Good Mood Tonic, Nervous System Tonic or Healthy Veins Tonic. Gordon Smith died in 2007, but the store remains a family business. His former wife, now Debbie Sloan, owns the store, and Jessee, a Bend High School graduate who began working at Nature’s 12 years ago while attending Central Oregon Community College, married their daughter, Andee. Calen Jessee agreed to discuss Nature’s General Store with The Bulletin.

Q:

You mentioned your trips to the Valley reducing your carbon footprint. Can you explain that? There’s nothing from Springfield that comes (directly) to Bend. It goes to Portland or to a distribution center in Seattle. We take out the middleman. We’re able to bring it straight over the mountains. We’re way ahead of (the freshness date).

A:

Q: A:

How does making your own pick-ups factor into the revenue? With Nancy’s Yogurt, (one of the products from the Springfield Creamery), we can save $1 a quart, and we can pass that savings on to our customers.

Q: A:

Translation

Does that mean you have your own fleet of trucks? We have our own truck, and a part-time employee

Google’s strategic vision,” said Tim O’Reilly, founder and chief executive of the technology publisher O’Reilly Media. “It is not something that anyone else is taking very seriously. But Google understands something about data that nobody else understands, and it is willing to make the investments necessary to tackle these kinds of complex problems ahead of the market.” Creating a translation machine has long been seen as one of the toughest challenges in artificial intelligence. For decades, computer scientists tried using a rulesbased approach — teaching the computer the linguistic rules of two languages and giving it the necessary dictionaries. But in the mid-1990s, researchers began favoring a so-called statistical approach. They found that if they fed the computer thousands or millions of passages and

Continued from B1 Its digital books project has been hung up in court, and the introduction of its social network, Buzz, raised privacy fears. The pattern suggests that it can sometimes misstep when it tries to challenge business traditions and cultural conventions. But Google’s quick rise to the top echelons of the translation business is a reminder of what can happen when Google unleashes its brute-force computing power on complex problems. The network of data centers that it built for Web searches may now be, when lashed together, the world’s largest computer. Google is using that machine to push the limits on translation technology. “Machine translation is one of the best examples that shows

drives back and forth.

Q:

Nature’s also sells some fruits, vegetables, beef and other products grown, raised or made locally? That’s the labor-intensive part. You have to be fairly understanding that sometimes it’s going to take some work to get it ready (for display and sale). You just do it because you know customers want it. Even if we break even on it, we feel good about it. We’ve kept the dollars local.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 B3

ing mixes.) Kombucha Mama, (which makes fermented tea).

Columbia

Q: A:

Continued from B1 “I don’t foresee a lot of changes,” Dressel said of the bank’s acquisition. “I do think you’ll see us very active in business lending. We have money to lend and want to lend.” As of Dec. 31, 2009, the bank had roughly $3.2 billion in assets and a total risk-based capital ratio of 16.17 percent, according to the FDIC. According to FDIC market share data as of June 30, 2009, the bank was the 11th largest FDIC-insured deposit institution in Washington and 27th largest in Oregon. Dressel wouldn’t say whether the bank plans to close any of the newly acquired Central Oregon branches, saying the matter is still under review. The bank has 85 branches companywide, primarily in the Puget Sound region. Columbia Banking Systems is on a growth spurt. The week after it acquired Columbia River Bank, the company acquired American Marine Bank, on

Have you faced more competition since Whole Foods Market moved to town? They’re probably our top serious competitor. We share a lot of customers. We provide a lot of things that they can’t, (and vice versa). We call them a lot. They call us. We do the right thing when it comes to the customers. I think now it’s becoming more synergistic. … (Same thing with) Trader Joe’s. It’s helped us in the long run. They’re teaching people to eat naturally. It brought a new customer to us, the informed consumer.

A:

Q: A:

The help you give local producers sometimes goes beyond simply selling the product? We’ve really been a place where local producers (can find some help) to get their product to market. We help coach them through to get into other markets. We ask them where they’re at with the product. (If they want their company to get bigger.) You just have to help them so they don’t get off course. I really enjoy being that steward for other startups. I don’t do it for everybody. If it’s not natural or organic, it doesn’t exactly work for me.

Q:

With some people losing jobs or facing pay cuts because of the economic crisis, have you seen shoppers spend less? Has it had an effect here? We’re dealing with local customers, the ones that have shopped here 20 years. The way that we stretch our pricing, we’re competitive. It’s a fair price. We sell some high-dollar items, but at the same time, we have bread and oranges and eggs, (selling for about the same prices as other grocery stores).

A:

Q: A:

Can you name any of the local companies whose products you have in the store? The Cravings Place, (which makes allergen-free bak-

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

their human-generated translations, it could learn to make accurate guesses about how to translate new texts. It turns out that this technique, which requires huge amounts of data and lots of computing horsepower, is right up Google’s alley. “Our infrastructure is very well-suited to this,” Vic Gundotra, a vice president for engineering at Google, said. “We can take approaches that others can’t even dream of.” Automated translation systems are far from perfect, and even Google’s will not put human translators out of a job anytime soon. Experts say it is exceedingly difficult for a computer to break a sentence into parts, then translate and reassemble them. But Google’s service is good enough to convey the essence of a newspaper article, and it has become a quick source for translations for

millions of people. “If you need a rough-and-ready translation, it’s the place to go,” said Philip Resnik, a machine translation expert and associate professor of linguistics at the University of Maryland, College Park. Because Google’s ads are ubiquitous online, anything that makes it easier for people to use the Web benefits the company. And the system could lead to interesting new applications. Last week, the company said it would use speech recognition to generate captions for English-language YouTube videos, which could then be translated into 50 other languages. “This technology can make the language barrier go away,” said Franz Och, a principal scientist at Google who leads the company’s machine translation team. “It would allow anyone to communicate with anyone else.”

Tanker Continued from B1 However, Rep. Norm Dicks, D-Wash., who’s about to become the chairman of the powerful House of Representatives Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, said the bidding should be scrapped and the Air Force should negotiate a contract with Boeing. “I am confident they can now utilize their authority to proceed with the procurement of KC-767 tankers as quickly as possible, negotiating a contract that will allow the Air Force to begin replacing its tanker fleet rapidly,” Dicks said. Dicks also suggested that once the tanker is in production, he’d push to increase production levels from 15 a year to 20 to 25 a year in an effort to replace the current Cold War-era tankers as rapidly as possible. Northrop’s decision was the latest development in the nearly nine-year effort to replace the tankers. Northrop-EADS won an earlier competition, but government auditors overturned

Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

Treating all Foot Conditions

Bainbridge Island, Wash. But Dressel said the bank is not a “serial acquirer” and has long-term interests in Central Oregon. “We look for partners, and we knew we could build upon what Columbia River Bank had built,” Dressel said. Of the four Oregon banks regulators have closed since February 2009, Columbia River Bank was the largest. It had total assets of $1.1 billion and total deposits of $1 billion in the reporting period before its closure. Prineville-based Community First Bank was the first Central Oregon bank shut by regulators, in August. It had total assets of $210 million and total deposits of $178 million. It was acquired by Nampa, Idahobased Home Federal Bank. Shares of Columbia Banking Systems closed Monday at $21.04, down 27 cents, or 1.27 percent, in Nasdaq trading. Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or amoore@bendbulletin.com.

the award after Boeing protested. The initial contract is for 179 tankers, but the deal eventually could be worth $100 billion as the Air Force replaces about 600 tankers in what could be one of the largest Pentagon purchases ever. In announcing that it wouldn’t bid, Northrop said the competition “clearly favors” Boeing’s tanker and denied the larger NorthropEADS tanker any “competitive opportunity.” Wes Bush, Northrop’s chief executive, said in a statement that the company had a “fiduciary responsibility” to its shareholders. “Investing further resources to submit a bid would not be acting responsibly,” Bush said, adding that the company wouldn’t protest the latest request for bids. Boeing said in a statement that it remains “100 percent” focused on the competition and plans to submit a “fully responsive, transparent and competitive” proposal.

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .72 ... ... .32 .22 .63f .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

13 13 ... ... 38 ... ... 24 23 ... 18 14 25 27 ... 100 ... ... 15 ... 16

36.10 -1.05 +4.5 21.38 +.08 -1.0 16.74 +.04 +11.2 13.71 -.51 +11.6 67.24 -.69 +24.2 .61 +.04 -10.3 32.62 +.99 +18.7 47.12 +.15 +20.7 60.67 -.01 +2.5 2.39 -.03 -.4 26.49 -.15 -19.1 51.73 -.30 +.4 14.13 +.07 +6.2 20.77 -.02 +1.8 7.27 +.02 +31.0 22.90 +.16 +11.5 3.51 +.01 +30.0 8.60 +.06 +23.2 21.63 +.11 -8.3 8.02 -.08 -9.2 28.63 +.04 -6.1

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal

Price (troy oz.)

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

$1,124.00 $1,123.60 $17.252

YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.41 -0.02 +2.6 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.02 -0.02 +3.7 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.64 +0.01 +1.2 GrowthI 22.58 -0.01 +2.5 Ultra 20.01 +0.02 +2.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.07 -0.01 +2.8 AMutlA p 23.38 -0.01 +0.9 BalA p 16.53 +2.5 BondA p 11.97 +2.2 CapWA p 20.29 +0.03 +1.1 CapIBA p 47.74 +0.08 -0.3 CapWGA p 33.47 +0.05 -1.8 EupacA p 37.71 +0.08 -1.6 FdInvA p 33.26 +0.01 +2.0 GovtA p 14.11 -0.02 +1.4 GwthA p 27.84 +1.9 HI TrA p 10.81 +0.03 +2.9 IncoA p 15.66 +0.02 +1.1 IntBdA p 13.26 -0.01 +1.4 ICAA p 26.09 +1.0 NEcoA p 22.77 +1.2 N PerA p 25.71 +0.03 +0.3 NwWrldA 47.43 +0.15 +0.5 SmCpA p 32.77 +0.04 +3.9 TxExA p 12.17 +1.8 WshA p 24.99 -0.01 +1.4 American Funds B: BalB p 16.48 -0.01 +2.3 CapIBB t 47.69 +0.08 -0.5 GrwthB t 26.97 -0.01 +1.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 27.98 +0.10 -0.9 IntlEqA 27.31 +0.10 -0.9 IntEqII I r 11.61 +0.05 -1.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.89 +0.02 -3.7 MidCap 26.66 +4.3 MidCapVal 18.23 +0.03 +1.4 Baron Funds:

Growth 43.47 +0.07 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.46 DivMu 14.56 +0.01 TxMgdIntl 15.12 +0.03 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.00 +0.01 GlAlA r 17.98 +0.01 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.80 +0.01 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.06 +0.01 CGM Funds: Focus 30.10 -0.08 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 45.22 +0.11 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.10 +0.03 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 25.85 +0.04 AcornIntZ 34.73 ValRestr 43.99 -0.05 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.17 +0.02 USCorEq2 9.63 +0.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.59 -0.07 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.92 -0.07 NYVen C 30.53 -0.07 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.42 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMktV 31.64 +0.14 IntSmVa 15.28 +0.01 USLgVa 18.06 +0.04 US Micro 11.40 +0.03 US SmVa 21.50 +0.05 IntlSmCo 14.51 +0.01 Fixd 10.34 IntVa 16.96 +0.01 Glb5FxInc 11.23 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.20 +0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 65.89 +0.01

Pvs Day $1,134.00 $1,134.80 $17.362

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44f .80f ... ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

23 20 16 96 80 ... 25 18 13 ... 17 11 45 56 ... 31 62 34 ... ...

68.82 +.50 +4.2 39.33 +.32 +4.7 46.73 +.22 +3.8 16.37 -.07 +29.0 38.99 -.22 +7.5 2.73 -.16 -2.8 37.09 +.30 -1.8 117.80 -2.51 +6.8 24.73 +.06 +16.2 49.51 -1.50 +3.8 65.26 +.10 +5.9 46.56 +.72 +16.3 23.32 -.05 +1.1 7.28 +.13 +21.3 12.86 +.06 -4.1 24.99 -.21 +11.0 19.32 -.07 -.1 28.89 -.26 +7.0 2.54 -.01 +20.7 43.59 +.21 +1.0

Prime rate Time period Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF FordM SprintNex

4363536 3.56 +.06 1255153 16.74 +.04 1072922 114.27 +.02 761312 12.93 -.07 744163 3.40 +.12

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Newcastle FstPfd pfA MaguirePr Borders ArborRT

Last

Chg %Chg

2.99 +.50 +20.1 12.75 +2.09 +19.6 2.16 +.30 +16.1 2.05 +.22 +12.0 2.84 +.30 +11.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name UnivTrav n Intl Coal MLDJREst10 ChinaMM Methode

Last

Chg %Chg

9.68 -1.17 -10.8 4.24 -.49 -10.4 6.45 -.71 -9.9 3.02 -.28 -8.5 10.03 -.82 -7.6

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

ChiArmM GenMoly EmersnR h LibertyAcq GoldStr g

45819 38974 24401 23814 23661

NewConcEn EmersnR h EngySvc un SagaComm ChMarFd n

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

9.45 3.68 4.33 9.92 3.45

Cisco DryShips PwShs QQQ Microsoft Intel

1148550 605678 516576 391209 354571

26.13 6.09 46.53 28.63 20.77

-.15 -.31 +.62 ... +.02

5.30 +1.50 +39.5 4.33 +.62 +16.7 3.90 +.50 +14.7 18.15 +2.12 +13.2 6.89 +.53 +8.3

Name

Last

Name

Last

PSB Hldg Travelzoo RosettaG Nanosphere Conns

1,785 1,291 115 3,191 464 3

Chg %Chg

6.28 -1.67 -21.0 74.32 -7.93 -9.6 3.68 -.31 -7.8 3.30 -.24 -6.8 3.02 -.22 -6.8

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

4.50 +.83 +22.6 15.03 +2.62 +21.1 2.11 +.31 +17.2 3.95 +.57 +16.9 6.35 +.88 +16.1

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

WestwdO n FstBkshs Analyst rs Covenant A-Power

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

+.92 +.43 +.09 +.04 -.02

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Cohen&Co HaderaPap GenMoly Ever-Glory NIVS IntT n

52-Week High Low Name

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Indexes

Chg %Chg

8.69 -2.70 -23.7 9.75 -1.20 -11.0 2.59 -.21 -7.5 4.85 -.39 -7.4 11.82 -.93 -7.3

Diary 276 221 46 543 38 ...

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,446 1,242 130 2,818 251 7

10,729.89 4,265.61 408.57 7,471.31 1,919.00 2,327.03 1,150.45 11,941.95 666.02

6,469.95 2,134.21 288.66 4,181.75 1,234.81 1,265.52 666.79 6,772.29 342.59

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,552.52 4,214.14 377.54 7,292.53 1,916.90 2,332.21 1,138.50 11,912.57 667.11

-13.68 +18.30 -.66 +1.22 -2.10 +5.86 -.20 +6.01 +1.09

YTD %Chg %Chg -.13 +.44 -.17 +.02 -.11 +.25 -.02 +.05 +.16

52-wk %Chg

+1.19 +2.79 -5.14 +1.50 +5.04 +2.78 +2.10 +3.15 +6.67

+61.18 +96.29 +29.88 +72.55 +53.79 +83.84 +68.29 +73.69 +94.35

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

338.17 2,600.83 3,903.54 5,606.72 5,875.91 21,196.87 32,520.27 22,398.21 3,222.82 10,585.92 1,660.04 2,834.57 4,819.60 5,955.99

-.15 t -.39 t -.18 t +.12 s -.02 t +1.97 s +.26 s +.54 s +.25 s +2.09 s +1.56 s +1.59 s +.97 s +.10 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9095 1.5072 .9731 .001966 .1465 1.3633 .1289 .011072 .078945 .0336 .000883 .1407 .9316 .0314

Pvs Day .9079 1.5157 .9713 .001965 .1464 1.3624 .1288 .011065 .078989 .0336 .000877 .1404 .9309 .0313

Selected mutual funds +5.2 +2.4 +1.7 -1.0 +1.1 +0.5 +0.4 +0.6 +1.2 +1.7 +4.7 +4.7 +1.4 +2.8 +0.3 +5.4 +2.0 +2.0 +1.8 +2.2 +0.6 +1.3 +5.9 +8.0 +9.5 +2.0 +0.4 -0.5 +1.8 +0.6 +2.9

Income 13.13 IntlStk 32.00 Stock 99.41 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.18 NatlMunInc 9.66 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 17.23 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.39 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.05 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.04 FPACres 25.54 Fairholme 32.59 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.78 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.49 StrInA 12.22 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.65 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.70 FF2015 10.58 FF2020 12.75 FF2025 10.56 FF2030 12.60 FF2035 10.43 FF2040 7.28 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.67 AMgr50 14.13 Balanc 16.71 BlueChGr 38.91 Canada 50.62 CapAp 22.39 CpInc r 8.77 Contra 59.20 DisEq 21.38 DivIntl 27.58 DivGth 24.59 EmrMk 22.56 Eq Inc 40.32

+0.01 +1.3 +0.06 +0.5 +3.4 +0.01 +2.6 +0.01 +2.4 +0.01 +2.7 +0.2 +0.1 -0.01 +1.1 +0.01 +2.9 +0.13 +8.3 +2.6 +0.01 +1.6 +0.02 +1.6 +1.7 +1.5 +1.5 +1.6 +1.6 +0.01 +1.7 +0.01 +1.7 +1.7 +0.01 +2.0 +0.01 +2.0 +2.1 -0.01 +2.5 +0.06 +4.4 -0.08 +4.5 +0.03 +2.9 +0.01 +1.7 +0.02 +1.8 +0.05 -1.5 -0.01 +3.9 +0.13 -0.2 +0.02 +3.0

EQII 16.78 Fidel 28.86 -0.04 GNMA 11.52 -0.01 GovtInc 10.50 -0.01 GroCo 70.99 -0.01 GroInc 16.57 HighInc r 8.57 +0.02 Indepn 20.68 -0.01 IntBd 10.31 IntmMu 10.25 IntlDisc 29.90 +0.05 InvGrBd 11.44 -0.01 InvGB 7.14 -0.01 LgCapVal 11.58 +0.01 LatAm 50.92 -0.29 LevCoStk 24.06 -0.03 LowP r 33.71 +0.02 Magelln 65.46 +0.02 MidCap 25.20 +0.04 MuniInc 12.57 +0.01 NwMkt r 15.29 +0.05 OTC 46.64 +0.05 100Index 8.06 Ovrsea 30.16 -0.03 Puritn 16.44 StIntMu 10.70 STBF 8.38 SmllCpS r 16.69 -0.02 StratInc 10.90 +0.02 StrReRt r 8.58 +0.01 TotalBd 10.62 USBI 11.17 -0.01 Value 60.29 +0.11 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 40.41 IntlInxInv 33.06 +0.05 TotMktInv 32.63 +0.01 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 40.41 TotMktAd r 32.63 +0.01 First Eagle: GlblA 40.94 +0.20 OverseasA 19.90 +0.13 Frank/Temp Frnk A:

+2.8 +1.8 +2.0 +1.5 +2.9 +3.2 +2.6 +3.8 +2.2 +1.6 -1.5 +2.0 +2.1 +3.0 -1.8 +5.0 +5.5 +1.8 +7.6 +1.6 +2.8 +2.0 +1.6 -2.5 +2.4 +1.0 +1.2 +4.7 +1.7 +0.8 +2.1 +1.6 +5.9 +2.5 -1.2 +3.4 +2.5 +3.4 +2.4 +2.3

FedTFA p 11.80 FoundAl p 9.96 +0.03 HYTFA p 10.01 IncomA p 2.07 +0.01 USGovA p 6.70 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.06 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.09 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.71 +0.01 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.42 +0.02 GlBd A p 13.21 +0.03 GrwthA p 16.63 +0.04 WorldA p 13.81 +0.04 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 16.63 +0.04 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.24 +0.04 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 37.69 +0.05 GMO Trust: ShDurColl r 14.67 +0.01 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.36 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.26 +0.05 Quality 19.36 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.02 +0.03 HYMuni 8.39 +0.01 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.38 CapApInst 33.17 +0.04 IntlInv t 53.66 +0.08 Intl r 54.16 +0.08 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.26 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 27.90 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 31.20 Hartford HLS IA :

+1.4 +1.4 +2.4 +1.8 +1.9 +4.6 +1.8 +1.6 +3.4 -2.0 +4.6 -1.1 -1.1 -1.0 +4.6 +2.3 NE -0.4 -0.4 +2.5 +3.4 +2.0 +0.6 -1.3 -1.3 +1.9 +1.8 +1.9

CapApp 37.57 Div&Gr 17.93 -0.02 Advisers 17.89 -0.01 TotRetBd 10.81 +0.01 HussmnStrGr 12.84 +0.05 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.51 +0.09 AssetStA p 22.04 +0.10 AssetStrI r 22.20 +0.10 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.22 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.21 -0.01 HighYld 7.85 +0.03 IntmTFBd 10.99 ShtDurBd 10.91 USLCCrPls 18.62 +0.03 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 25.04 Contrarn T 13.68 +0.03 Grw&IncT 29.05 -0.01 Janus T 26.60 -0.02 Orion T 10.44 -0.03 OvrseasT r 44.61 PrkMCVal T 20.61 +0.02 ResearchT 25.21 +0.04 Twenty T 62.75 +0.18 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.03 +0.01 LSBalanc 12.08 +0.02 LSGrwth 11.72 +0.01 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 20.91 -0.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.29 +0.10 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 18.56 +0.10 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.96 Longleaf Partners: Partners 24.88 -0.06 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.65 +0.01 StrInc C 14.19 +0.01 LSBondR 13.60 +0.01

+2.6 +2.2 +2.4 +2.2 +0.5 -1.2 -1.1 -1.0 +1.7 +1.7 +2.7 +1.5 +0.9 +2.4 +2.0 +3.7 +2.1 +1.3 +4.5 +5.0 +4.1 +3.2 +1.9 +2.4 +2.4 +2.4 +5.5 +1.6 +1.5 +1.8 +3.3 +3.4 +3.2 +3.3

StrIncA 14.12 +0.01 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p 11.90 +0.01 InvGrBdY 11.91 +0.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.58 BdDebA p 7.44 +0.02 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.36 ValueA 21.22 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.32 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.71 +0.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.12 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.37 +0.20 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.13 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.13 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.00 +0.02 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.47 +0.04 GlbDiscZ 27.80 +0.05 QuestZ 17.66 +0.03 SharesZ 19.86 +0.01 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 39.25 -0.05 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 40.77 -0.05 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.35 -0.03 Intl I r 17.10 +0.06 Oakmark r 37.81 -0.02 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.25 +0.01 GlbSMdCap 13.02 +0.05 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 40.26 +0.02 DvMktA p 28.81 +0.14 GlobA p 54.34 +0.10 IntBdA p 6.41 +0.01 MnStFdA 28.66 +0.01

+3.4 +2.7 +2.8 +3.5 +2.3 +2.2 +2.2 +2.2 +2.3

+0.7 +3.2 +3.3 -0.2 +2.8 +2.8 +2.4 +3.5 +3.9 +3.9 +3.2 +1.5 +2.1 +2.5 +2.0 +0.8 +0.2 +2.5 +0.9 +1.9

RisingDivA 14.13 S&MdCpVl 27.68 +0.03 StrInA p 4.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.83 S&MdCpVl 23.90 +0.03 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.79 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.13 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.99 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.72 +0.01 ComodRR 8.16 HiYld 8.98 +0.03 InvGrCp 11.12 LowDu 10.41 +0.01 RealRet 10.92 -0.03 RealRtnI 10.87 ShortT 9.86 TotRt 10.99 TR II 10.59 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 10.87 TotRtA 10.99 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.99 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.99 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.99 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 39.52 -0.07 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 36.69 -0.07 Price Funds: BlChip 33.27 CapApp 18.77 -0.01 EmMktS 30.16 +0.16 EqInc 21.61 EqIndex 30.76 Growth 27.83 -0.02 HlthSci 27.82 -0.10 HiYield 6.50 +0.02

+1.4 +4.1 +2.8 +1.2 +4.0 +1.2 +2.3 +2.3 +2.0 -1.4 +3.7 +2.8 +1.5 -0.3 +1.0 +0.6 +2.3 +1.8 +1.0 +2.3 +2.1 +2.3 +2.3 +2.2 +2.7 +1.5 +3.4 +0.2 +3.0 +2.4 +1.2 +6.3 +2.7

IntlBond 9.76 IntlStk 12.72 MidCap 50.06 MCapVal 21.44 N Asia 16.35 New Era 44.68 N Horiz 27.29 N Inc 9.37 R2010 14.25 R2015 10.90 R2020 14.92 R2025 10.85 R2030 15.46 R2040 15.50 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 28.69 SmCapVal 31.23 SpecIn 11.95 Value 21.16 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.37 VoyA p 20.64 RiverSource A: DEI 9.04 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.96 PremierI r 17.09 TotRetI r 11.39 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 33.93 S&P Sel 17.78 Scout Funds: Intl 29.28 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.16 AmShS p 38.17 Sequoia 116.85 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.95 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.83 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 46.60 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.78

-0.6 +0.03 +1.0 -0.04 +5.4 +3.5 +0.20 +1.3 -0.08 +2.4 +0.02 +6.7 +1.8 +0.01 +2.2 +2.2 +0.01 +2.2 +0.01 +2.3 +0.01 +2.2 +0.01 +2.3 +1.1 +0.06 +6.5 +0.09 +5.9 +0.01 +1.9 +3.3 +0.01 +3.3 +0.02 +4.6 +2.7 +0.02 +5.4 +0.02 +4.8 +0.03 +5.4 +2.9 +2.5 +0.09 +0.5 -0.08 +2.4 -0.08 +2.4 -0.15 +6.3 +1.7 +0.05 -2.4 +0.32 +0.6 +0.08 -0.1

IntValue I 25.35 +0.08 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.74 +0.09 VALIC : StkIdx 22.83 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 14.23 +0.02 EqIncA p 8.05 GrInA p 17.94 +0.01 HYMuA p 9.27 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.96 CpOpAdl 71.61 +0.06 Energy 113.50 -0.14 500Adml 105.23 GNMA Ad 10.77 -0.01 HlthCr 51.77 -0.21 HiYldCp 5.51 +0.01 InfProAd 24.74 -0.01 ITsryAdml 11.25 -0.02 IntGrAdm 54.17 +0.10 ITAdml 13.62 ITGrAdm 9.81 LtdTrAd 11.11 LTGrAdml 8.89 -0.01 LT Adml 11.05 MuHYAdm 10.41 PrmCap r 62.69 -0.07 STsyAdml 10.80 ShtTrAd 15.96 STIGrAd 10.70 TtlBAdml 10.45 -0.01 TStkAdm 28.34 +0.01 WellslAdm 50.20 -0.02 WelltnAdm 50.67 -0.04 Windsor 41.64 WdsrIIAd 43.25 -0.06 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.01 -0.02 CapOpp 31.00 +0.03 DivdGro 13.26 -0.03 Energy 60.45 -0.07 EqInc 18.58 -0.01 Explr 60.75 +0.10

-0.1 +2.5 +2.4 +3.0 +3.3 +3.8 +2.7 +1.9 +3.2 +0.6 +2.5 +1.8 +2.1 +2.2 +0.4 +2.0 +0.2 +1.8 +2.9 +1.1 +0.7 +1.4 +1.9 +1.7 +1.0 +0.5 +1.7 +1.7 +3.2 +1.7 +1.7 +3.6 +2.9 +2.2 +3.2 +0.7 +0.6 +1.8 +6.0

GNMA 10.77 GlobEq 15.96 GroInc 23.95 HYCorp 5.51 HlthCre 122.66 InflaPro 12.59 IntlGr 17.03 IntlVal 30.29 ITIGrade 9.81 LifeCon 15.43 LifeGro 20.01 LifeMod 18.07 LTIGrade 8.89 Morg 15.67 MuInt 13.62 MuLtd 11.11 MuShrt 15.96 PrecMtls r 20.54 PrmcpCor 12.41 Prmcp r 60.41 SelValu r 16.66 STAR 17.88 STIGrade 10.70 StratEq 16.01 TgtRetInc 10.76 TgRe2010 20.93 TgtRe2025 11.58 TgtRe2015 11.56 TgRe2020 20.41 TgRe2030 19.76 TgtRe2035 11.90 TgtRe2040 19.50 TgtRe2045 12.31 USGro 16.58 Wellsly 20.72 Welltn 29.33 Wndsr 12.34 WndsII 24.36 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 105.21 Balanced 19.85 DevMkt 9.47 EMkt 25.90 Europe 25.17

-0.01 +0.04 -0.01 +0.01 -0.51 -0.01 +0.03 +0.05 -0.01 +0.01 -0.01 -0.01 +0.02

-0.06 -0.07 +0.01

+0.02 -0.01 -0.01

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+2.5 -0.01 +2.6 +0.01 -0.6 +0.14 -0.03 -3.0

Extend 34.80 +0.07 Growth 27.95 ITBnd 10.88 MidCap 17.30 +0.01 Pacific 10.06 +0.06 REIT r 15.59 +0.18 SmCap 29.49 +0.07 SmlCpGth 18.02 +0.03 SmlCpVl 14.04 +0.04 STBnd 10.51 TotBnd 10.45 -0.01 TotlIntl 14.34 +0.04 TotStk 28.33 +0.01 Value 19.19 +0.01 Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst 9.39 +0.01 ExtIn 34.82 +0.07 InfProInst 10.08 InstIdx 104.52 InsPl 104.53 InsTStPlus 25.61 +0.01 MidCpIst 17.35 +0.01 SCInst 29.52 +0.07 TBIst 10.45 -0.01 TSInst 28.35 +0.02 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 86.92 -0.01 STBdIdx 10.51 TotBdSgl 10.45 -0.01 TotStkSgl 27.35 +0.01 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.27 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.82 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.38 +0.01

+6.5 +2.3 +2.3 +5.7 +3.9 +5.1 +7.3 +7.1 +7.5 +1.3 +1.6 -0.5 +3.2 +3.0 NS +6.5 +0.4 +2.5 +2.5 +3.2 +5.8 +7.3 +1.7 +3.2 +2.5 +1.3 +1.7 +3.2 +2.1 +0.4 +3.3


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Kimberly Bowker at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY “EMPLOYEE HANDBOOKS — FRIEND OR FOE?�: Features presenter Katherine Tank, employment law attorney for Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt. Register by March 2; $50; registration 7:30 a.m., presentation 8 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-388-6024 or Denise.A.Pollock@state.or.us. FILE MANAGEMENT CLASS: Learn how to create, organize and delete files or folders. Keyboarding and Introduction to Computers are required prerequisite classes. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org. LEED EXAM PREP COURSE INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Meeting to learn about the green building strategies and LEED exam prep course that will take place Wednesdays from March 31 to April 28; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu/LEED. “PUBLISHER 2007�: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through March 16 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY “RALLY YOUR BRAND WITH THE FIVE�: Part of the Bend Chamber of Commerce’s Business Success Program. Features presenter Chris Piper, president of Breakout Strategic Merchandising; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. MICROSOFT WORD PARTS 1, 2 AND 3: Learn basic Word skills. Keyboarding, Introduction to Computers and File Management are required prerequisite classes. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon., and class continues March 11 and 15 from 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “SALES 101 — THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CUSTOMER MOTIVATION�: This Opportunity Knocks Best Practices Seminar features presenters David Knuff, assistant professor of marketing at Oregon State University-Cascades Campus; and Kevin Gorman, owner of WebCyclery. Preregistration required; $30 for OK members and $45 for nonmembers; 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-318-4650, info@opp-knocks.org or www.opportunityknocksevents. eventbrite.com. REDMOND STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS: Reservations required; $15; 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Chloe at North Redmond Station, 1857 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-5191 or karen@ visitredmondoregon.com. “ROTH IRAS — RETIREMENT CAN BE LESS TAXING�: Learn about the differences between traditional and

Roth IRAs and new tax law changes for conversion; free; noon-1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser Mark Schang’s office, 1180 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541617-8861 or www.edwardjones.com. “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS�: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “SPANISH COMPUTER CLASS — USING MS OFFICE PROGRAMS�: Introduces users to MS Office 2000 programs. Taught in Spanish. Preregistration required; free; 3:305 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1066 or sarahv@dpls.us. CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW: Jim Mazziotti, principal broker and owner of Exit Realty Bend, will discuss “How to Purchase a Home With Zero Down�; free; 7 p.m.; mazz@propertiesinbend .com or www.exitrealtybend.com.

THURSDAY WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction requirements. Successful completion results in an ODOT credential for flaggers. Preregistration required; $69; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “PRESIDENTS DAY — TRAINING AND ROBERT’S RULES OF ORDER�: Hosted by the Central Oregon regional council of the Community Association Institute. Presenters include Chris Tingey, attorney with Vial Fotheringham; Gary Bell, CAI Professional Community Association manager and Doug Bristol, resort manager at WorldMark by Wyndham; $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers, includes lunch; 11:30 a.m. networking, noon lunch; Awbrey Glen Restaurant, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 503-531-9668 or knguyen@caioregon.org. “ROTH IRA — RETIREMENT CAN BE LESS TAXING�: Learn about new tax law changes and the differences between traditional and Roth IRAs. Reservations requested; free; noon1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser C.J. Ferrari’s office, 1247 N.E. Medical Center Drive, Suite 2, Bend; 541-3820853 or www.edwardjones.com. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking and support group for unemployed people to get out of the house and discuss various topics; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; bendetg@gmail.com. “GO GREEN, SAVE GREEN — TODAY’S TAX CREDITS�: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www.buildinggreencouncil.org. “WILLS, TRUSTS AND ESTATE — THE BASICS�: Learn how to minimize taxes after death and the differences between a will and a trust; free; 6-7 p.m.; Northwest Quadrant Wealth

Management, 869 N.W. Wall St., Suite 204, Bend; RSVP to 541-388-9888. TOASTMASTERS CLUB COMMUNICATORS PLUS: Learn how to improve public speaking and communication skills; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive, Bend; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY “BE MORE COMPETITIVE THROUGH TECHNOLOGY�: Learn how to use computers more efficiently, access data from anywhere and utilize software for live meetings. Preregistration required; $29; 8-10:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pioneer Building, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by Pacific Power; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Chloe at North Redmond Station, 1857 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. “NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING�: Learn how to select and write grant applications for nonprofit organizations. Taught by professional nonprofit fundraiser Laura Pinckney. Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MANAGING YOUR YAHOO! E-MAIL ACCOUNT: Learn to create mailing lists, manage folders and attach files. Familiarity with Windows and Internet Explorer required. Preregistration required; free; 9 a.m.-10:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; M.A. Lynch Elementary School, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541504-1389 or www.yourmoneyback.org. “GET BACK ON TRACK — DEVELOP YOUR FINANCIAL RECOVERY PLAN�: Evaluate your current situation, goals, saving and spending needs and more; free; noon; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; RSVP to 541-330-4329. EFFECTIVE JOB INTERVIEWING SKILLS WORKSHOP: Features presenter Gary Schmidt, Toastmasters International president; free; noon-1:30 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; www.toastmasters.org. ADFED 2010 DRAKE AWARDS: The Advertising Federation of Central Oregon’s annual Drake Awards and party. A 21-and-over event; $60; 6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-385-1992 or www.adfedco.org.

SATURDAY “CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT OF THE CERVICAL SPINE�: Physicians and physical therapists will learn about cervical conditions and their diagnosis. Preregistration required;

B  B  $69; 8:30 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. EXPLORING THE DESCHUTES PUBLIC LIBRARY CATALOG: Learn to locate materials at the library, place a hold and access your account. Familiarity with Windows operating system and Internet Explorer required. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-5041389 or www.yourmoneyback.org. DAVE RAMSEY’S TOTAL MONEY MAKEOVER SIMULCAST LIVE: Learn how to get out of debt, save money and invest confidently; $10; noon-5 p.m., doors open 11 a.m.; First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-3020, financialfreedom@ westsidechurg.org or www.dave ramsey.com/live/simulcast/.

MONDAY CHILD CARE OVERVIEW CLASS: Learn how to become a registered family child-care provider. Registration required by March 12; free; 9 a.m.-noon; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541548-2380, deniseh@neighborimpact .org or www.neighborimpact.org. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-504-1389 or www.yourmoneyback.org. “RÉSUMÉS AND APPLICATIONSâ€?: Learn to prepare applications, rĂŠsumĂŠs and cover letters. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 2-4 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org.

TUESDAY March 16 “CREATING A RÉSUMÉ WITH WORDâ€?: Familiarity with Windows operating system and MS Office programs required. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121055 or jenniferp@dpls.us. MICROSOFT EXCEL PARTS 1, 2 AND 3: Learn how to enter data, format, adjust columns and rows, problem-solve, apply colors and borders, and create formulas, charts and worksheets. Keyboarding and Microsoft Word experience required. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon, and class continues March 17 and 18 from 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

National City Mortgage to Fannie Mae, Porcupine, Lot 10, $336,233.31 National City Mortgage to Fannie Mae, Porcupine, Lot 11, $335,965.40 Flagstar Bank FSB to The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Dana Butler, Lot 4, Block A, $177,365.77 Jacqueline Saul to Thomas J. and Bonnie G. Bennett, South Heights Add., Lot 4, Block 5, $163,862 John and Linda Dietrich to Thomas M. and Gwendolyn M. Owen, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top Phases 7-8, Lot 134, $295,000 James P. White to Martin J. and Therese M. Johnston, T 14, R 13, Section 14, $215,000 Recontrust Co. NA to Jerry and Jason Powell, Edgecliff, Lot 12, Block 2, $150,500 Federal National Mortgage Association to Nicole Jordan, Second Add. to Whispering Pines Estates, Lot 1, Block 24, $205,000 Nancy K. Cary, trustee to Wachovia Mortgage FSB, Conestoga Hills, Lot 15, Block 1, $581,298 Shane Davison, Stacee D. Miller to Charles A. and Susan W. Agostinelli, Foxborough Phase 3, Lot 187, $157,100 Western Capital Partners LLC to Brett J. Parker, Veranda Glen, Lot 2, $256,000 Lori L. Block to Karen A. Cook, Canal View Phase 3, Lot 31, $180,000 Scott C. and Catherine A. Malk to Scott W. Henrikson, Broken Top Phase 2G, Lot 264, $610,000 Mark S. and Amy J. Stamper to Justin J. Chappell, Monticello Estates Phase 1, Lot 3, $156,700 PNC Mortgage to Fannie Mae, NorthWest Crossing Phase 1, Lot 21, $323,909.52 Affordable Homes of Oregon Inc. to Todd E. and Leann R. Piper, Boulder Ridge Phase 2, Lot 29, $258,750

Richard L. and Robyn R. Sharp to Richard B. and Penelope C. Troop, Pine Canyon Phase 5, Lot 65, $470,000 Recontrust Co. NA, trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Coulter, Lot 10, $267,439.61 Regional Trustee Services Corp., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Ridge at Eagle Crest 43, Lot 1, $429,419.25 Cory’s Custom Homes Inc. to Elizabeth Highet, River Village 3, Lot 23, Block 19, $795,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., River Canyon Estates, Lot 112, $215,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., River Canyon Estates No. 3, Lot 223, $220,000 Charles M.B. and Marianna Wiper to Todd J. and Katherine M. Peterson, Jeffrey R. Currie and Alexandra W.B. Wallace-Currie, Overlook Park, Lot 8, Block 9, $600,000 First Horizon Home Loans to Brent and Sarah Bracelin, Broken Top Phase 3C, Lot 347, $585,000 David M. Bender to Fre 475 LLC, Broken Top Phase 3H, Lot 340, $490,000 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee to Kent D. Voronaeff, Copper Canyon Phase 1, Lot 34, $215,000 Michelle M. Bertolino, trustee to SD Deacon Corp., River Forest Acres, Lot 3, $200,000 Michelle M. Bertolino, trustee to Strategic Sacramento LLC, River Forest Acres, Lots 30 and 32, $800,000 RKTTB LLC to Victoria A. Ivy, Meredith, Lot 4, $195,000 Carla A. Noble to Felix P. Eckenstein, Fairway Island, Lot 5, Block 4, $455,000 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee to Brynda J. Petrie, Broken Top Phase 2E, Lot 174, $434,700 David B. and Kelly S. Holliday to James

J. and Virginia L. Elliott, Heights of Bend Phase 6, Lot 75, $225,500 Gary A. and Kathryn D. Gasper to Albert L. and Colleen R. Baily, Cessna Add., Lot 4, $154,500 Krista L. White, trustee to Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance Inc., Rimrock West Estates Replat, Lot 1, Block 2, $205,000 Rocky Mountain Land LLC to Dennis L. Pahlisch, Deschutes River Ranch, Lot 21, $265,772.35 Eric Pennick to Thayne A. and Kyrie K. Guymon, Bear Creek Estates Planned Unit Development, Lot 2, $206,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Gorilla Capital of Deschutes County 2 LLC, Stonebrook Phase 3, Lot 6, $200,100 Hayden Homes LLC to George M. Callinan, Aspen Rim No. 2, Lot 180, $295,000 Gary Cornett to Gary, Jeffrey R. and Jennifer M. Cornett, River Bend Estates, Lot 117, $425,000 Randal M. and Erica A. Gordon to Daniel J. and Mary Sweeney, Lazy River South First Add., Lots 34-35, Block 6, $155,000 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to First Horizon Home Loans, Awbrey Butte Homesites Phase 23, Lot 44, Block 18, $960,500 Brooks Resources Corp. to Douglas L. and Susan D. Parker, North Rim on Awbrey Butte Phase 5, Lot 106, $340,000 Chase Home Finance LLC to The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Whispering Pines Estates Fourth Add., Lot 5, Block 1, $174,971.23 West Coast Bank to Joanna Jacobs, Blakley Heights, Tract 11, $155,000 David A. and Catherine L. Krieves, trustees to Mark A. and Kristin H. Gonzalez, Vista Del Sol, Lot 4, Block 3, $450,000 Joel R. and Martha J. Bennette to Richard R. and Marlene F. Glasgow, Cascade View Estates

Phase 9, Lot 128, $344,500 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, River Village 1, Lot 17, Block 1, $198,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Bank of America NA, Estates at Pronghorn Phase 2, Lot 160, $207,000 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to SunTrust Mortgage Inc., T 17, R 12, Section 3, $467,218.01 Dana S. Burton, per rep to Timothy D. Gorbold, First Add. to Bend Park, Lots 22-23, Block 112, $178,000 Michael W. and Carol M. Flinn to Justin D. and Jennifer N. Fisher, Elkhorn Ridge Phase 5, Lot 46, $249,000 Curtis W. and Julianne F. Hagner to Lyman P. and Deborah L. Rutkai, Oak Tree Phase 3, Lots 2-3, $235,000 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to U.S. Bank NA, trustee, Westbrook Village Phase 1, Lot 18, $343,595.66 Lawyers Title Insurance Corp., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, T 18, R 12, Section 4, $180,154.76 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to U.S. Bank NA, trustee, Sisters Park Place, Lot 23, $175,252.09 Jayme K. and Thereasa R. David to Nicholas T. Merrill, Jacquelyn D. Dwyer, trustees, Ridge at Eagle Crest 3, Lot 6, $155,000 James R. and Lorraine A. Craig to Larry N. and Patricia Webber, NorthWest Crossing Phases 2-3, Lot 101, $280,000 Regional Trustee Services Corp., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Partition Plat 200720, Parcel 2, $322,763.75 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Patrick J. Trowbridge, T 18, R 11, Section 25, $204,000 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to First Horizon Home Loans, Crescent Creek No. 2, Lot 54, $226,262.98

AIG sells unit in effort to pay down its debt American International Group announced Monday the sale of one of its major global insurance units to MetLife for $15.5 billion, the latest step in the insurance giant’s quest to pay down its massive debt to U.S. taxpayers. Under the complex agreement, MetLife will pay $6.8 billion in cash and the remainder in a mix of common and preferred stock to buy American Life Insurance Co., or Alico, which operates in more than 50 countries. The cash immediately will go toward paying down loans from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and AIG plans to sell the equity stakes over time to further reduce its debt.

Toyota defends its electronics WASHINGTON — Toyota, dogged by millions of recalls and claims that it still has not fixed its safety problems, took its strongest step yet Monday to silence critics who blame faulty electronics for runaway cars and trucks. Toyota assembled a group of experts to refute studies by an Illinois professor who revved Toyota engines simply by shortcircuiting the wiring. Toyota’s experts say the experiments were done under conditions that would never happen on the road.

Prices Continued from B1 Global crude oil inventories have been slowly declining. But domestic inventories have been climbing and remain well above the five-year average for this time of year. Gasoline supplies also remain ample, but prices at the pump have been rising along with oil prices. The average gallon of regular gas rose nearly a penny to $2.75 on Monday, up from just over $2.70 a week ago and $2.66 a month ago, according to a report compiled by AAA, the motorists’ group. Gasoline prices typically go up in the spring as refiners retool and switch to more expensive summer blends of gasoline. Demand and prices were particularly low this winter because of cold and stormy weather, and experts say they believe many drivers will be keen to take to the highway as spring blooms. Still, high unemployment is keeping many commuters off the road, and putting a cap on discretionary driving. In early morning trading on Monday, oil prices surged above $82 a barrel, but retreated later to settle at $81.87 a barrel, the highest closing

The automaker maintained its assertion that simpler mechanical flaws, not electronics, were to blame. “There isn’t a ghost issue out there,� Kristen Tabar, an electronics general manager with Toyota’s technical center, told a news conference at the company’s North American headquarters in Torrance, Calif.

EU may create IMF-style lender BERLIN — European leaders are in talks to establish a lender of last resort and limits on credit-default swaps to bolster the euro area and prevent a repeat of the Greek financial crisis. Plans for what may become the European Monetary Fund and a German-French push to curb the use of derivatives to bet against sovereign debt are to be ready by June, officials in Berlin and Brussels said Monday. In Greece, tax and trash collectors walked out as a week of strikes to protest austerity measures began. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and her European counterparts are shifting from rhetoric to regulation as they seek to defend the euro and rally behind coordinated measures. Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou said his country’s fiscal crisis could spread unless “unprincipled speculators� and “ill- regulated� financial markets are reined in. — From wire reports

price since Jan. 11. “It remains to be seen whether we can hold $80, since we’ve failed to hold it five times in the past five months,� said Addison A. Armstrong, senior director for market research at Tradition Energy, an energy broker in Stamford, Conn. “Given the low level of demand, gasoline inventories certainly aren’t tightening.� Several international factors, however, are pushing oil prices higher. A Nigerian rebel group recently called off a three-month cease-fire, and attacks on oil production operations have resumed. In recent weeks, oil production in Nigeria has fallen by 85,000 barrels a day, more than 4 percent of normal output. Meanwhile, China is building storage plants to amass emergency reserves while prices remain relatively low, raising expectations that China may import as much as 15 percent more oil this year. There is little expectation that OPEC, the producers’ cartel, will alter supplies at its meeting later this month. The oil minister for Ecuador, Germanico A. Pinto, who is the current president of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, has said there is no need for members to cut shipments.

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C Inside

OREGON Faith-healing couple sentenced in son’s death, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Bruce Graham, architect of nation’s tallest building, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

Arguments heard ahead of 4th death penalty trial By Erin Golden The Bulletin

A Redmond man sentenced to death three times in a case that has gone to the U.S. Supreme Court was back in Deschutes County Circuit Court on Monday, as a judge heard arguments in advance of his upcoming fourth death penalty trial. After more than two decades on death row, Randy Lee Guzek, 40, Randy Lee is scheduled Guzek to again stand before a Deschutes County jury in May. That jury will decide whether he should be sentenced to death, spend his life in prison without parole, or get a life sentence with a chance of parole in 10 years. Guzek was sentenced to death, but the Oregon Supreme Court overturned the sentence the same year. On Monday, Lane County Circuit Court Judge Jack Billings, who is presiding over the case, listened to the first of what is scheduled to be three days of arguments on a variety of motions filed in the case over the last several months. Guzek was 18 years old when he was convicted in the murders of Rod and Lois Houser, of Terrebonne, in 1988. Guzek, who had dated the Housers’ niece, came to the couple’s home in the earlymorning hours of June 29, 1987, along with two other men. They pounded on the door until Rod Houser, 51, answered, and one of the men shot him at least 20 times, according to evidence presented at Guzek’s trial. See Guzek / C6

School officials going to China for teacher exchange deal

Attention, photographers!

ELECTION

These photos were among hundreds readers posted on www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. We publish reader photos every other Tuesday, the week after our photographers offer advice.

We asked for readers’ photos, and today we’re publishing some of the best

Well sh t!

Installment 13:

Architecture

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

Uploaded by user steve

“Healy Bridge” Uploaded by user david

“FLW Marin Civic Center”

SALEM — State Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, says she will file today to run for the seat vacated by the death of state Treasurer Ben Westlund on Sunday. Telfer, 60, who spoke with Westlund a week before his death, said her decision is Chris Telfer spurred by dozens of phone calls from friends and fellow lawmakers urging her to run. Because the filing deadline falls today, the certified public accountant said she decided to go for it. “If I had a month, I might be sitting around thinking a little more,” she said. “But there’s no time.” The death of Westlund, a longtime Tumalo lawmaker, came after months battling a recurrence of the lung cancer he’d beaten once in 2003. See Telfer / C5

Memorial services set for Westlund

Submitted by user Carolyn

“Jail window, Pioche, NV”

“Ghost town” Uploaded by user Amber

Uploaded by user Kyle Rood

“Church”

“Going up” Uploaded by user Derek Oldham

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

As the district grapples with a more than $5 million budget gap for the 2010-11 school year, three Bend-La Pine Schools officials will travel to China this month to finalize a long-term teacher exchange agreement. Superintendent Ron Wilkinson, Chief Academic Officer Vicki Van Buren and Summit High School Principal Lynn Baker will fly to China on March 19 and remain there throughout the district’s spring break, March 22-26. While there, they will meet with education officials to formalize a 10-year agreement that will exchange local teachers with those in Yangzhou, a city 185 miles northwest of Shanghai, with approximately 4.6 million people. Wilkinson said sending the three-person delegation indicates to the government that the district is taking the teacher exchange seriously. “We are trying to form an ongoing teacher exchange, and it will be the final formal negotiations with Yangzhou’s vice-mayor to set up the program for the long term,” he said. “And we’ve got to do this face-to-face or it’s considered disrespectful.” Spokeswoman Julianne Repman said the round-trip airline tickets are $1,654 each, and that $4,962 is the only anticipated cost to the district. “We may be buying dinner for the hosts, one dinner,” Repman said. “The three people going are paying for their own meals and are not taking a per diem.” See China / C5

Telfer will file to run for state treasurer

Gov. Ted Kulongoski has ordered flags at all public institutions in Oregon to fly at half-staff beginning at sunrise today through sunset on Sunday in honor of state Treasurer Ben Westlund. Westlund died of cancer on Sunday. Memorial services for Westlund are planned later this week in Bend and Salem, according to information from Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home. In Bend, the service will be at 2 p.m. Friday at The Riverhouse Convention Center, on Mt. Washington Drive, west of the intersection of U.S. Highway 97. The Salem service will take place at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Capital House Chambers, at 900 Court St. N.E. Contributions in memoriam may be made to the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon, P.O. Box 430, Redmond, OR 97756.

Ex-deputy DA to challenge Dugan in May By Erin Golden The Bulletin

The Bulletin assumes that submitted photos are the original work of the entrants and that no excessive postprocessing has altered the content of the images.

Readers’ photos

Each installment of Well shot! features photos submitted by readers for the previous week’s theme.

Jan. 5 Jan. 26 Feb. 9 Feb. 23 Today March 23 April 6 April 20 Landscapes Flowers Morning light On stage Architecture Close-ups Pets Family events

A former Deschutes County deputy district attorney has announced that he will challenge District Attorney Mike Dugan in the May election — making it the first contested race for the position in more than 15 years. Patrick Flaherty, an attorney with the Patrick Bend law firm Flaherty of Wright, Van Handel & Flaherty, said Monday he’s running for the job because he believes it’s time to have someone new running the DA’s Office. He said he’d been considering the move for a while but was pushed to file for office when he saw Dugan campaigning for Measures 66 and 67 in the leadup to the January election. See Flaherty / C5


C2 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The Barbie doll debuts in 1959 The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, March 9, the 68th day of 2010. There are 297 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On March 9, 1862, during the Civil War, the ironclads USS Monitor and CSS Virginia (formerly USS Merrimac) clashed for five hours to a draw at Hampton Roads, Va. ON THIS DATE In 1796, the future emperor of the French, Napoleon Bonaparte, married Josephine de Beauharnais. (The couple later divorced.) In 1910, American composer Samuel Barber, best remembered for his Adagio for Strings, was born in West Chester, Pa. In 1916, Mexican raiders led by Pancho Villa attacked Columbus, N.M., killing 18 Americans. In 1932, Eamon de Valera was appointed head of government of the Irish Free State. In 1945, during World War II, U.S. B-29 bombers launched incendiary bomb attacks against Japan, resulting in an estimated 100,000 deaths.

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y In 1954, CBS newsman Edward R. Murrow critically reviewed Wisconsin Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy’s anti-Communism campaign on “See It Now.� In 1959, Mattel’s Barbie doll, created by Ruth Handler, made its public debut at the American International Toy Fair in New York. In 1964, the Supreme Court, in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, ruled that public officials who charged they’d been libeled by news reports could not recover damages unless they proved actual malice on the part of the news organization. In 1977, about a dozen armed Hanafi Muslims invaded three buildings in Washington, D.C., killing one person and taking more than 130 hostages. (The siege ended two days later.) In 1990, Dr. Antonia Novello was sworn in as surgeon general, becoming the first woman and the first Hispanic to hold the job. TEN YEARS AGO John McCain suspended his

presidential campaign, conceding the Republican nomination to George W. Bush. Bill Bradley ended his presidential bid, conceding the Democratic nomination to Vice President Al Gore. FIVE YEARS AGO Michael Jackson’s young accuser took the witness stand, saying he once considered the pop star being tried for allegedly molesting him “the coolest guy in the world.� (Jackson was later acquitted.) Dan Rather signed off for the last time as principal anchorman of “The CBS Evening News.� ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama lifted George W. Bush-era limits on using federal dollars for embryonic stem cell research. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former Sen. James L. Buckley (Conservative-N.Y.) is 87. Singer-actress Keely Smith is 78. Singer Lloyd Price is 77. Actress Joyce Van Patten is 76. Actor-comedian Marty Ingels

is 74. Country singer Mickey Gilley is 74. Actress Trish Van Devere is 69. Singer Mark Lindsay (Paul Revere and the Raiders) is 68. Former ABC anchorman Charles Gibson is 67. Rock musician Robin Trower is 65. Singer Jeffrey Osborne is 62. Country musician Jimmie Fadden (The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band) is 62. Actress Jaime Lyn Bauer is 61. Magazine editor Michael Kinsley is 59. TV newscaster Faith Daniels is 53. Actor-director Lonny Price is 51. Actress Linda Fiorentino is 50. Country musician Rusty Hendrix (Confederate Railroad) is 50. Actress Juliette Binoche is 46. Rock musician Robert Sledge (Ben Folds Five) is 42. Rapper C-Murder is 39. Actor Emmanuel Lewis is 39. Actress Jean Louisa Kelly is 38. Actor Kerr Smith is 38. Rapper Chingy is 30. Actor Matthew Gray Gubler is 30. Actress Brittany Snow is 24. Rapper Bow Wow is 23. Actor Luis Armand Garcia is 18. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Delay is the deadliest form of denial.� — C. Northcote Parkinson, British author (1909-93)

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a stereo and CDs stolen at 8:50 a.m. March 5, in the 300 block of Southeast Reed Market Road. Theft — A computer, iPod and backpack were reported stolen at 9:58 a.m. March 5, in the 1000 block of Southeast Fourth Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10 a.m. March 5, in the 600 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a purse stolen at 10:21 a.m. March 5, in the 1000 block of Southeast Fourth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and GPS and firearm stolen at 12:16 p.m. March 5, in the 300 block of Southeast Reed Market Road. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 1:14 p.m. March 5, in the 20200 block of Reed Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:48 p.m. March 5, in the area of Northwest First Street and Northwest Portland Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:49 p.m. March 5, in the 100 block of Southwest Century Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:09 p.m. March 5, in the 2000 block of Northeast Neil Way. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:24 p.m. March 5, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:23 p.m. March 5, in the 700 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8:33 p.m. March 5, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:39 p.m. March 5, in the area of Northwest Oregon Avenue and Northwest Wall Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:38 p.m. March 5, in the 600 block of Southeast Glencoe Place. DUII — Paul Matthew Dillman, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:49 a.m. March 6, in the 100 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:08 a.m. March 6, in the area of Northwest Broadway Street and Northwest Tumalo Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:10 a.m. March 6, in the 20600 block of Redwing Lane. DUII — Alicia Raye Boston, 36, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:53 a.m. March 6, in the area of Northwest Fifth Street and Northwest Portland Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:46 a.m. March 6, in the 2400 block of Northwest Lolo Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:38 a.m. March 6, in the 400 block of Northwest Delaware Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:38 a.m. March 6, in the 63000 block of Corporate Place. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:46 a.m. March 6, in the 100 block of

Northeast Franklin Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:41 p.m. March 6, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8:13 p.m. March 6, in the 100 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Boyd Fleming Brown, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:17 p.m. March 6, in the 61500 block of Brookswood Boulevard. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 2:03 a.m. March 7, in the 1000 block of Northwest Lexington Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:27 a.m. March 7, in the 1300 block of Southeast Reed Market Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a backpack stolen at 2:51 p.m. March 7, in the 100 block of Northwest Gilchrist Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to five vehicles was reported at 3:56 p.m. March 7, in the 900 block of Southeast Third Street. Burglary — A bicycle was reported stolen at 5:42 a.m. March 8, in the 100 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Danny Ray Jonathan Parsley, 40, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:36 p.m. March 5, in the 1700 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Ginger Lee Brehm, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:46 p.m. March 5, in the 1700 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 6:37 p.m. March 5, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 6:05 p.m. March 5, in the 1300 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 5:06 p.m. March 5, in the 700 block of Northwest Fifth Street. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 3:53 p.m. March 5, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. DUII — Donald Michael Denno, 60, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:25 a.m. March 5, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:48 p.m. March 6, in the area of Southeast Cascade Avenue and Southeast Railroad Boulevard. Theft — A license plate was reported stolen at 4:07 p.m. March 6, in the 1200 block of Northwest 20th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:14 a.m. March 6, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Robbery — A robbery was reported at 2:59 a.m. March 6, in the 3600 block of Southwest 21st Place. Burglary — Ladders were reported stolen at 8:31 a.m. March 7, in the 1400 block of Northeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:46 a.m. March 7, in the 400 block of West Antler Avenue.

of Northeast Wolverine Loop. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Robin V. Elbek, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:51 p.m. March 5, in the area of Cimarron Drive and Rodeo Court in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:30 p.m. March 5, in the 70000 block of Camp Polk Road in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:26 a.m. March 5, in the 60100 block of Navajo Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:56 a.m. March 5, in the 17200 block of Gadwall Drive in Bend. DUII — Peter Donald Lang, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:54 p.m. March 6, in the area of Butler Market and Eagle roads in Bend. DUII — Christopher Joel Abbott, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:27 p.m. March 6, in the 60400 block of Lakeview Drive in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:38 p.m. March 6, in the 62900 block of Clyde Lane in Bend. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:34 a.m. March 6, in the 17200 block of Baker Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:36 a.m. March 6, in the 51600 block of Coach Road in La Pine. DUII — Candis Michelle Owens, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:46 a.m. March 6, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Odem Medo Road in Redmond. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 3:35 p.m. March 7, in the 1000 block of Rail Way in Sisters. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:17 p.m. March 7, in the 66900 block of Fryrear Road in Cloverdale. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — Slashed tires were reported Feb. 23, in the 6200 block of Northwest Columbia Drive in Metolius. Theft — A theft was reported at 10 a.m. Feb. 23, in the 1500 block of Northwest Clackamas Drive in Metolius. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:50 a.m. Feb. 25, in the area of Forest Service Road 14 near milepost two. Theft — Firewood was reported stolen at 7 a.m. Feb. 26, in the 200 block of Second Street in Culver. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12 p.m. Feb. 27, in the 900 block of Northwest First Street in Madras. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:42 p.m. March 1, in the 15900 block of Southwest Culver Highway in Culver. Burglary — Musical instruments were reported stolen March 1, in the 8800 block of Southwest Panorama Road in Crooked River Ranch.

Oregon State Police

DUII — Alisa Kay Shuffield, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3 a.m. March 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 26 near milepost 26. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:30 p.m. March 6, in the area of State Highway 126 near milepost six. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:05 a.m. March 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 14. DUII — Brock Raymond Clark, 34, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:30 p.m. March 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 130. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:43 a.m. March 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 72. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:20 p.m. March 6, in the area of State Highway 126 near milepost 110. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:50 p.m. March 7, in the area of Century Drive and Forest Service Road 400. DUII — Robert Montgomery Hooker III, 54, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:30 p.m. March 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 115.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 9:59 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, in the 1700 block of Southwest Forest Ridge Avenue. 20 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 3:39 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 63905 North U.S. Highway 97. 17 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 12:45 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 20706 High Standard Drive 21 — Medical aid calls.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Ex-Warm Springs detective sentenced

Dispose of documents, prescription drugs

A former detective with the Warm Springs Police Department was sentenced to three months in prison Monday, for stealing money from the department, according to a U.S. Department of Justice news release. Gregory A. Stinson, 40, of Madras, must pay back $4,989 to the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and serve three years of supervised release after prison. Stinson worked for the tribes’ Police Department for 13 years and stole money in April 2007 that was seized as evidence in a criminal case, according to the news release. Stinson supervised the Police Department’s evidence room at the time of the theft and took the money for his personal use, according to the Department of Justice.

People can dispose of unwanted prescription medications and over-the-counter drugs, destroy unneeded personal documents and learn identity-theft prevention tips at an event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on March 20. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Data Delete are holding the free event, according to a Sheriff’s Office news release. A county sheriff’s deputy will be at the event to collect unwanted prescription and overthe-counter drugs. The drug disposal program is aimed at keeping medications out of the environment and away from drug abusers, children and animals. The event will take place in the Sheriff’s Office parking lot at 63333 W. U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. The Sheriff’s Office is asking event participants to bring nonperishable food to donate to NeighborImpact. A NeighborImpact representative will collect food items and answer questions about the organization. The event is for residents to dispose of unwanted medications and shred documents. It is not for business or company disposal, according to the news release.

Democrat meeting scheduled in Jefferson The Jefferson County Democrat Central Committee is scheduled to meet at 6:30 p.m. March 17, according to a news release from the committee. The meeting will be at the Rodriguez Library Annex, at 134 S.E. E St., in Madras. All Democrats are welcome at the meeting. For more information, call Stephen Hillis at 541-475-6448.

W   B  Crews search for hiker near Bonneville Dam STEVENSON, Wash. — Two helicopters from the Coast Guard and Washington National Guard helped in Monday’s search for a 24-year-old Portland woman missing near Bonneville Dam in Washington’s Skamania County. Undersheriff Dave Cox says no fresh clues were found Monday. He says search efforts will resume this morning. Kathrine Huether texted a friend Thursday afternoon that she was at a trailhead and going for a hike. The search began Friday, after she was reported overdue. Cox says searchers found their first clue Sunday when a searcher found a credit card receipt with Huether’s name on it about four miles north of Bonneville Dam in the Table Mountain area. Cox says there’s nothing to indicate Huether might be a vic-

tim of a crime; she’s just lost. Monday’s searchers included nine dog teams and five additional ground search teams involving about 50 people.

Rail line reopens after derailment WILSON CREEK, Wash. — A rail line that closed in eastern Washington after a 24-car derailment has reopened. Burlington Northern Santa Fe spokesman Gus Melonas says the line reopened at 5 p.m. Sunday. No one was hurt when the 110-car train traveling from Florence, Minn., to Seattle derailed Saturday morning near Wilson Creek, about 18 miles north of Moses Lake. However, it blocked the single track, used by about 20 freight and Amtrak trains daily. The train was carrying corn, which was taken to a nearby grain elevator. — From wire reports

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The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the Web site at www .humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the Web site at www.redmondhumane .org. The Bend shelter’s Web site is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Pit bull — Adult male, brindle, red and silver collar; found near U.S. Highway 97. Pomeranian — Adult male, gray and white, blue and gold collar; found in the 300 block of Southeast Jackson Street. Saint Bernard mix — Adult male, tan and white, blue and red collar; found near Highland Avenue.

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Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:52 a.m. March 5, in the area of Northwest Madras Highway. Theft —Thefts were reported at 1 p.m. March 5, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Ochoco Plaza. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:37 p.m. March 7, in the area

March 16th, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. The Riverhouse Convention Center FREE, open to the public with advance reservations For Reservations: 541-382-4682 or campfire@bendcable.com


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 C3

O Faith healers sentenced to 16 months for son’s death By Abby Haight The Associated Press

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

A sea lion swims in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam on Monday in North Bonneville, Wash. After trying other methods to keep sea lions from eating endangered salmon, wildlife officials began last year issuing death sentences to the most chronic offenders.

Sea lions being euthanized for eating too many salmon By Abby Haight The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Wildlife officials have tried everything to keep sea lions from eating endangered salmon, dropping bombs that explode under water and firing rubber bullets and bean bags from shotguns and boats. Now they are resorting to issuing death sentences to the most chronic offenders. A California sea lion last week became the first salmon predator to be euthanized this year under a program that has been denounced by those who say there are far greater dangers to salmon — including the series of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia. This is the second year of the program, which is administered by wildlife officials in Oregon and Washington and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Last year, 11 sea lions were euthanized. Another four were transferred to zoos or aquariums. The sea lions represent a massive headache each year as chinook salmon begin arriving at the Bonneville Dam east of Portland, congregating in large numbers as they return from the ocean. Sea lions have become keenly aware that the dam is a great spot to feast on salmon, easy pickings as they wait to go up the dam’s fish ladders. “They learn. They come up here and know it’s a good place to eat, and sooner or later the salmon are going to arrive,” said Robert Stansell, a fisheries biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Repeat offenders Officials are tracking 63 additional sea lions listed as repeat offenders. They are identified by scars or by numbers that were branded on them by researchers. “To get on that list, we have to have observed them as distinct individuals,” said Jessica Sall, spokeswoman for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “They are not responding to hazing, and they’re eating chinook salmon.” Sea lions have gobbled salmon

“They are not responding to hazing, and they’re eating chinook salmon.” — Jessica Sall, spokeswoman for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife forever. But their numbers have soared in recent years, as has the number of those cruising upriver to dine on salmon at Bonneville Dam. Frustrations peaked, especially among fishermen who have watched sea lions snatch salmon right out of their gill nets. The Bonneville crowd of hefty mammals — they can reach more than 600 pounds and 8 feet in length — have become the enemy of commercial and sport fisherman, who are allowed to catch and keep hatchery-raised fish, and a concern for conservationists trying to restore migratory runs, since sea lions don’t distinguish between hatchery and wild fish. At least three of the upper Columbia River spring salmon runs that pass through the dam are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, most significantly the spring chinook salmon run. The sea lions’ growing numbers forced state, federal and tribal agencies to intensify efforts to protect the region’s multibilliondollar salmon recovery program. The sea lions are protected by a 1972 federal law, but an amendment leaves open the possibility that some can be captured or killed if the states request it. Oregon and Washington did in 2006 with the support of Indian tribes and sport and commercial fishing groups. Two years ago, the National Marine Fisheries Service authorized Oregon and Washington officials to first attempt to catch the sea lions that arrive at the base of Bonneville Dam and hold them 48 hours to see whether an

aquarium, zoo or similar facility will take them. Otherwise, they could be euthanized, along with those that avoid trapping. Only California sea lions can be destroyed. Stellar sea lions cannot be killed because they are protected under the Endangered Species Act. Supporters say the program works. The numbers of sea lions at the dam have dropped, although the 4,489 salmon they ate last year was the highest since tracking began in 2002. Critics, led by the Humane Society of the United States, say that a far greater danger to salmon are hydroelectric dams on the Columbia, which are an obstacle to salmon both as they head out to sea and when they return from the ocean to spawn. The Humane Society also says fishermen catch three times as many salmon as sea lions eat.

Collecting data The Columbia River InterTribal Fish Commission this year has begun tracking the sea lions’ movements with acoustic transmitters and cameras placed along the river. Instead of just reacting to the sea lions, the data might help authorities plan a more successful campaign, a fisheries scientist says. “All of the counts that you hear, all of the impact on salmon, is based on what they can see from the dam,” said Doug Hatch, of the inter-tribal commission. “That doesn’t account for the whole 150 river miles below the dam.” The frustration comes as experts predict the largest spring chinook run since 1938. Thanks to good ocean conditions for young salmon, an expected 470,000 fish will head up the Columbia River, compared to 169,300 in 2009. The primary weapon against the sea lions still remains hazing, but even that has limitations. “The problem is, as soon as the boats go around the corner, they’re right back,” Stansell said. “Some of the animals that have been there a long time don’t even move when they get hit in the back with a rubber bullet. They just keep eating their fish.”

O  B Deputy slightly hurt in traffic accident BEAVERTON — A Washington County sheriff’s deputy received minor injuries in a traffic accident Monday morning in Beaverton. Sheriff’s spokesman Sgt. David Thompson says Deputy Dan Muehlek was responding to an alarm at a business overnight when his patrol car was struck by a minivan. He tells The Oregonian that Muehlek received bumps and bruises and was released after being treated at a hospital. Thompson says the driver of the minivan was not injured and was not cited.

AG hires domestic violence prosecutor SALEM — Oregon Attorney General John Kroger has hired a domestic violence prosecutor. Kroger says in a news release Monday that Erin Greenawald will fill a new position at the state’s Department of Justice. She has worked since 1999 as a domestic violence prosecutor, first in Marion County and then in Yamhill County.

Kroger says there is an overwhelming need to combat domestic violence in the state. He says there were at least 22 domestic violence homicides in Oregon last year and nine so far in 2010.

Phony officer stopped car, Aurora police say AURORA — Aurora police are looking for a man who posed as a police officer and pulled over a car. Officers say the impersonator was driving a dark-colored car and used a flashing blue light to signal the driver to stop Saturday night. Officer Scott Reilly says the phony officer asked to see the man’s drivers license, registration and insurance information, but returned the documents and left after the driver questioned his credentials. The Oregonian says the impostor was not wearing any patches or badge, and his car had no markings or license plate. Aurora police say they don’t know his motive for stopping the car. Reilly says officers have no reason to suspect he’s the same man who posed as a police employee and abducted two women

in Portland on Thursday. Both women escaped.

Woodburn police: man cut at wedding party WOODBURN — Woodburn police say a man is in critical condition after an altercation at a wedding party. Police were called to a residence early Sunday on a report of an armed man. They found no one had been shot, but that 26-year-old Jose Orozco had been cut in the lower torso. He was airlifted to a Portland hospital. Officers from six agencies surrounded the home after learning 10 people were still inside. Woodburn police say they were able to persuade some to come outside, but others remained. A tactical unit then entered the home and removed five people. Police say several people arrived at the residence during a wedding party and at least two allegedly forced their way in. Two men were arrested for investigation of burglary, but not for injuring Orozco. Officers continue to investigate the incident. — From wire reports

OREGON CITY — The judge who sentenced an Oregon couple to prison Monday for the death of their son says members of their church must quit relying on faith healing when their children’s lives are at stake. “The fact is, too many children have died unnecessarily — a graveyard full,” Judge Steven Maurer said. “This has to stop.” Maurer spoke in a quiet, unemotional voice as he led up to his conclusion: Jeffrey and Marci Beagley each should serve 16 months in prison. Members of the Followers of Christ church who packed the courtroom sobbed. The Beagleys were earlier convicted of criminally negligent homicide in the June 2008 death of their 16-year-old son, Neil, of complications from a congenital urinary tract blockage. The condition normally is easily treated. Members of their church avoid most medical care and instead rely on rituals such as anointing sick people with oil and laying hands on them. In ordering prison terms, Maurer reflected changes made in Oregon law a decade ago stipulating that freedom of religious practices is not an excuse to shun medical treatment for a dangerously ill child. The changes were a result of the deaths of children in Followers of Christ families. The church’s small cemetery near the end of the Oregon Trail includes row after row of headstones marking the graves of children.

Doug Beghtel / The Oregonian

Jeffrey and Marci Beagley are taken into custody and led out of the courtroom Monday in the Clackamas County Courthouse in Oregon City after they were sentenced to 16 months in prison for criminally negligent homicide in the death of their 16-year-old son. Maurer said the community is tolerant of the church, and he emphasized the sentences were not an indictment of it. “We must keep in mind that this crime was one in which a child died,” Maurer said. “This was a situation where the community was counting on his parents to understand the boundaries of their faith.” The Beagleys’ attorneys said they would appeal. “This case is not a referendum on religion,” defense attorney Wayne Mackeson said. “To me, it’s a battle in a larger war — seeing that justice is done.” Neil Beagley was described as a bright, confident boy who loved his church and fixing cars. He became ill as the blockage trapped toxic waste in his body.

www.OasisSpaofBend.com Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

His parents testified they thought he had a cold or the flu. Medical experts say the boy’s kidneys were destroyed and his organs shut down. Just months earlier, the Beagleys’ granddaughter, 15-month-old Ava Worthington, died from pneumonia and a blood infection that also could have been treated. Her parents, Raylene and Carl Brent Worthington, were acquitted of manslaughter. Carl Brent Worthington served two months in jail for criminal mistreatment. They were in the courtroom Monday. Before the sentencing, Marci Beagley dabbed at her eyes as she huddled with Raylene Worthington and several other women. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org


C4 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Westlund was an Oregon original

B

en Westlund was one of Oregon’s most engaging public figures, a man whose stamp on Central Oregon will long outlive him. Westlund died Sunday morning after a long

fight against lung cancer. If there is a monument to Westlund, it is surely OSU-Cascades Campus in Bend. Though it took the efforts of dozens, if not hundreds, of people to bring the capstone campus here, it survived its first few years thanks in large part to Westlund and his tireless work in the state Legislature. Every student at OSU-Cascades owes him a debt. Westlund’s career in politics was unusual. He was a political peripatetic, a Republican-turned-independentturned-Democrat who served in the House, the Senate, ran for the governor’s office and, in 2008, was elected state treasurer. In this last capacity, he served admirably, even while battling the recurrence of cancer that ultimately claimed his life. Westlund’s temporary successor will be appointed by Gov. Ted Kulongoski in the coming days, and voters will elect a permanent replacement in November. We hope the governor chooses someone who will agree in advance not to run this fall so that Oregonians may choose Westlund’s successor from candidates who enter the race on equal terms. Meanwhile, although his political shifts made for good news stories, we’ll remember Ben Westlund most for who he was. It’s hard to imagine a more gregarious individual, a trait that was as natural to him as the color of his eyes. Westlund never met a stranger he didn’t like. He had a hail-fellow-wellmet air about him, and he was almost never at a loss for words, no matter how complex the subject. Just ask anyone who discussed health care reform with him in recent years. That gregariousness and a strong

Although his political shifts made for good news stories, we’ll remember Ben Westlund most for who he was. It’s hard to imagine a more gregarious individual, a trait that was as natural to him as the color of his eyes. Westlund never met a stranger he didn’t like. sense of humor made him the perfect keynote speaker at a small high school graduation in 2001, where, he clearly understood, the usual platitudes simply would not do. Instead, Westlund sat down among the handful of graduates and read them a book by Dr. Seuss, “Oh, The Places You’ll Go.” It was funny, it was fitting and it was memorable in the most pleasant of ways. And it was vintage Westlund. If there’s such a thing as a political personality, Westlund had it in spades. There was that gregariousness. There was also an ability to associate names and seldom-seen faces that’s the hallmark of others in his field. And there was one of the most important features of many really good politicians, a thick skin that allowed him to take criticism and still smile at his critics. He will be missed.

Be honest with voters about Bend tax choice

L

ast Wednesday, the city of Bend stared right in the face of public skepticism about new taxes. The city did a poll of Bend voters to measure support for different options for funding public safety. Most surveyed voters said they were unwilling to pay more taxes to avoid cuts. That’s not what city staff wanted to hear. Bend faces a financial cliff. Even by cutting its work force by 18 percent, it anticipates a shortfall of $21 million in the general fund over the next six years. Without a change, it’s going to be hard to keep up levels for police and fire protection. Majorities of surveyed voters were not inclined to support any option to increase taxes. They didn’t like a proposal to increase taxes by 41 cents per thousand of assessed property value and annex the city fire department to the rural fire district. Voters didn’t like a similar five-year local option levy for police and fire. Trying another approach, the city had pollsters

ask voters about a general obligation bond for sewer, water and street improvements. Opposition was strong for that, too. There was majority support, though, for a tax neutral proposal to take the 27 cents per thousand of assessed value that voters are paying now for downtown urban renewal and reauthorize it in two years — when it expires — for public safety. Councilor Jeff Eager made an important point about the voter response to that option. If it had been more clear to voters they were facing the choice between continuing the tax and a tax cut, the polled voters would have been less likely to support it. Councilors and city staff wouldn’t be much good at their jobs if they didn’t know how to make what they’re selling palatable to the public. But when the city does decide what it wants to do about funding for public safety, it should be nothing less than honest with voters about the choice they face.

My Nickel’s Worth Union demands A recent issue of The Bulletin stated teachers have filed a grievance protesting sick leave policy. This is a shining example of state workers and their unions making ridiculous demands on the taxpayer. The recent passage of tax measures that failed in all Eastern Oregon counties, but passed with the support of counties with the most state employees, is another sign of out-of-control public employees and their unions. They already have an excessively liberal retirement system. After 30 years of employment, many are entitled to retirement at full pay. By comparison, a member of the armed forces who serves 30 years is only entitled to 75 percent of his base pay. Other pay benefits he/she has during service time are not included in retirement pay. It is past time for government to tighten its belt, reform PERS, eliminate many liberal programs and stop threatening to throw our kids under the bus every time a tax increase measure arises. Jack Warden Redmond

ODOT bullies Bullies win. Despite concerns voiced by the numerous emergency response groups, Jefferson County community, Crooked River Ranch association officials and concerned CRR residents, ODOT announced the closure of the Wimp Way access to Highway 97 effective Feb. 2. They mention the fact that the newly installed gates could be opened in an emergency. But how much valuable time could be lost at someone’s expense? It will be just a short matter of time before a seri-

ous accident or fatality occur due to the increased traffic flow placed on the intersection of Lower Bridge and Highway 97, as people try to squeeze out onto Highway 97 in order to travel north, dodging oncoming traffic from the north as well as traffic turning onto Lower Bridge from the south. The officials who have made these decisions should play this game of Russian roulette a few times in order to feel the excitement! I would guess that it may take a major lawsuit following a traffic accident or fatality to reopen this issue, and hopefully hold the person accountable for this ill fated move. Imagine the increased congestion when the new development proceeds at the Old Lower Bridge mine site. I hope ODOT is proud of itself, as it has won this round. I just hope it is not at the cost of human life. This is not a personal attack on anyone or group of individuals, but rather a statement regarding the system’s lack of ability to look at the total picture! Dennis Barker Crooked River Ranch

Bad analogy On Feb. 11, The Bulletin stated that allowing a child the opportunity to walk to a school as part of the magnet school lottery process is like giving somebody a better shot at winning the Oregon Lottery. This is far from a just analysis. Let’s look at the facts associated with the magnet school lottery. The facts are that three older schools that used to serve their neighborhood children were turned into magnet schools. The children in magnet school neighborhoods were then, most often, either put on a bus or taken by their parents to elementary schools miles away. This raised questions that Bend-

La Pine Schools made a value-based decision on. Here are some of the questions that were evaluated. Should we really punish a child just because they live by a magnet school zone? Should we make a child that could walk to school take a bus while similar children in a different neighborhood can walk to school with their friends? Do the citizens of Bend want our children sitting in buses and cars or having more time to learn and play? Is promoting a healthy neighborhood something this town supports? Is it really the position of The Bulletin that none of these issues should be taken into account? Is the state Lottery really a good analogy for something that affects our children? Mike Marshall Bend

Teacher perks If I am reincarnated, I want to come back as a teacher, for two reasons. The first is that it is a noble and important profession. It probably has the biggest influence on the success or failure of our young people, next to parenting. The second reason is that there is a lot of time off. According to what I read, our teachers work only 1,520 hours a year. Using a 40 hour workweek, that is only 38 weeks a year. In addition they can take 80 hours of paid sick time, which accumulates, and 24 hours in paid personal time. Sounds great doesn’t it? We taxpayers foot the bill, but the biggest impact is on the students. Our students have a minimal length school year anyway, and then might have substitute teachers up to 104 hours during that already shortened year. What am I missing here? Barbara Doherty Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Would-be Christmas bomber tests our civil liberties B y Dick Phay Bulletin guest columnist

I

n 1776, Thomas Jefferson listed in his writing of the Declaration of Independence the following grievances against Britain, and specifically King George III: Grievance 12: “He (King George III) has affected to render the military independent of and superior to the civil power.” Grievance 18: “For depriving us in many cases of the benefits of trial by jury.” Grievance 19: “For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended offenses.” One of the major grievances our Founding Fathers had against the British, grievances that eventually led to the American Revolution, was the practice

of arresting American colonists, transporting them to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to be tried in an Admiralty Court, a military rather than a civil court, denying them a trial by jury. As a result of the British abuse of the right to a fair, jury trial, the U.S. Constitution contains a number of items safeguarding fair, jury trials in this country: Article 1, Section 9, Clause 2: “The privilege of habeas corpus shall not be suspended unless in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety may require it.” Article 3, Section 2, Clause 3: “The trial of all crimes shall be by jury and such trials shall be held in the state where the said crime shall have been committed.” Amendment 6: “In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall enjoy the

IN MY VIEW right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed.” Amendment 14: “Nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protections of the laws.” During the Civil War (1864) Lamdin P. Milligan, a northern Confederate sympathizer, was arrested by Union troops in Huntington, Ind., then tried and convicted of treason by a military court and sentenced to be hanged. In 1866, following the end of the war, the Supreme Court heard arguments in the Milligan case. The court was con-

fronted with a basic concept of American liberty, whether or not a military court had the legal, constitutional right and power to try a civilian during war time. The court decided that, since martial law had not been declared in Indiana and the civil courts were open and operating in that state, a military tribunal did not have the legal authority to try a civilian even in times of war or rebellion. Milligan had been denied his habeas corpus rights as well as his right to a trial by an impartial jury. Trial by jury is so essential to our concept of a free and democratic society that it is not only mentioned in the Declaration of Independence, but is guaranteed in the original Constitution as well as in the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment. Any American who

sincerely believes in the Constitution should not be hasty in succumbing to the hysteria presently demanding that the Christmas airline bomber be tried by a military court, an act that would be illegal and unconstitutional. In essence, we would be turning our personal right to a fair trial over to the military, the second step on a very slippery slope, the first step being the existence of a standing army, which, at present, is highly privatized and profit oriented. Those who cherish their liberties, their individual rights, guaranteed by the Constitution, should seriously consider the possible future loss of those rights if we as a nation turn the responsibility of our civilian courts over to military tribunals. Dick Phay lives in Prineville.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 C5

O D

N   Ben Westlund, of Bend Sept. 3, 1949 - March 7, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home www.niswonger-reynolds.com

541-382-2471 Services: Friday, March 12, 2010, 2:00 pm, at Riverhouse Conference Center, 2850 Rippling River Ct., Bend. 2nd service on Saturday, March 13, 2010, 2:00 pm, at the Capital House Chambers, 900 Court St. NE, Salem, OR Contributions may be made to:

Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon, 835 E. Hwy 126, Redmond, OR 97756

Douglas James, of Redmond June 12, 1916 - Feb. 7, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel. 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com Services: March 14, 2010, at 3:00pm, at Zion Lutheran Church on Black Butte in Redmond.

Karen Jean White, of Redmond March 7, 1947 - March 7, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, Bend, Oregon, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Service will be announced in the obituary to follow.

Marie Myrtle Cornwall, of Redmond April 30, 1937 - March 5, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459. Services: Memorial Services will be held on Friday, March 12, 2010 at 1:00 p.m. at the Redmond Chapel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Bishop Mitch Wilcox will officiate.

Sue James, of Redmond August 18, 1921 - Feb. 12, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel. 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com Services: March 14, 2010, 3:00pm, at Zion Lutheran Church on Black Butte in Redmond.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Evelyn (Evie) Courlette Allen

Lois P. Bloom

August 9, 1912 - March 3, 2010

Lois P. Bloom, born December 18, 1933, died Sunday, January 17, 2010, just after celebrating her 76th birthday. Lois was preceded in death by her husband, Leroy V. Bloom; both parents, Alex and Henrietta Breitgham; a brother and sister as infants; and two older brothers, Leroy Breitgham Lois P. Bloom in World War II and Harold Breitgham. She is survived by three sisters: Carolyn Doucette of Yakima, Washington; Dorothy Connell of Portland, OR; and Sharon Schonewell of Yakima, WA; and one brother, Virgil Breitgham, also of Yakima, WA; her two children, Lowell Bloom of Yakima, WA, and Laurie (Sunny) Hisel of Bend, OR; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Lois was born and raised in Yakima, WA, where she graduated from Davis High School in 1951. After moving to Portland, OR, she met Leroy Bloom and married him on December 22, 1963. She devoted her life to others, working at home to provide the best for her husband and children. She enjoyed gardening, bowling, card and other games. Mom, you loved us so much and will be remembered for how you taught us to think of the little things, how to get the bacon just right, how to decorate a home, bake a cake, hug real big. Your family and friends will miss your smile, your jokes, and how you could reach out to those who needed to be accepted for who they were at the moment. A private memorial will be held at a later date.

Evelyn (Evie) Courlette Allen, 97, passed from this life on the evening of Wednesday, Evelyn (Evie) Courlette Allen, at Gibson Creek Retirement Residence in Salem, Oregon surrounded by loving members of her family. Evelyn was born in Fargo, North Evelyn Allen Dakota on August 9, 1912, and was the youngest of six children born to Henry and Ingeborg Hanson. Evelyn moved with her family to Bend, Oregon when she was eleven years old, when the population there was only 500, and she saw many changes as Bend grew in size. Her parents passed away within a year of each other when she was only in her mid-teens. She married the love of her life, Doran Allen, when she was 20, and they had six children. Evelyn dedicated her early years to providing a warm and loving home for her husband and children. Doran died suddenly in 1969, when Evelyn was 57. Several years later, Evelyn met a wonderful man, Leonard Langliers, who shared her life until his death in 1996, the same year both of her beloved sons passed away. With Leonard, Evelyn began a second life filled with fun that included joining many social clubs and activities, bowling, dancing, traveling, and learning to drive at the age of 61. She loved life, and lived with joy and enthusiasm. In 2002, Evelyn moved to Salem to be closer to her surviving family living in the Valley. She had a life-long deep faith, and was a member of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in Bend. Evelyn dearly loved her grandchildren and great-grandchildren, having a special relationship with each one, and was in turn deeply loved by them. All who knew her, even if briefly, sensed her loving, caring, and accepting nature. In recent years, she counted among her many friends the kind staff and residents at Gibson Creek, where she spent the final 6 ½ years of her life. She was greatly loved, and her presence in this world will be missed by many people. Evelyn was preceded in death by her husband, Doran L. Allen; her five brothers, Oscar, Harold, Stan, Walt, and Alph Hanson and all of their wives; and her two sons, Ron (survived by daughter in-law Carolyn), and Dick Allen. She is survived by her four daughters, Jeanne Molina and husband, Lino of Vancouver, WA; Courlette Swensen and husband, Dick, and Sandra Tarter and husband, Hank, both families of Keizer, OR; Ann Memory of Portland, OR; and 14 grandchildren, and 12 great grandchildren. There will be a celebration of Evelyn's life at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 20, 2010 at Keizer Funeral Chapel. Interment will be at Pilot Butte Cemetery in Bend. Memorials may be made to the Willamette Valley Hospice, 1015 3rd Street NW, Salem, OR 97304 or donate online at www.wvh.org.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

H HEALTH

Dec. 18, 1933 - Jan. 17, 2010

Flaherty Continued from C1 Flaherty said he’s concerned about the office getting too political. “I think we need a district attorney who’s got the knowledge, skill and experience to lead from inside the courtroom, prosecuting cases, and outside the courtroom, working with law enforcement,” he said. “I’m willing and able to get the job done with the resources available.” Flaherty, 53, grew up in the Portland area and received his undergraduate and law degrees at the University of Oregon. He worked as a judicial clerk in Clackamas County and as a prosecutor in Lincoln County before moving to Bend to work at the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office in 1992. In 1995, Flaherty was promoted to chief deputy district attorney and remained in that position until he left the office in 2001 to join his wife in a private law firm.

Architect behind nation’s tallest building By Blair Kamin Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Bruce Graham, the hard-driving architect of the Willis Tower, once the world’s tallest building, and the John Hancock Center, the Xbraced giant that became a symbol of C h i c a g o ’s Bruce i ndu s t r i a l Graham might, died Saturday at his home in Hobe Sound, Fla. He was 84 years old. The cause of death was complications from Alzheimer’s disease, said his son George. At the peak of his influence, from the 1960s through the 1980s, Graham was the top man at Chicago’s biggest architectural firm, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Besides the Willis (originally Sears) Tower and the Hancock Center, which bracket Chicago’s skyline like enormous black parentheses, Graham played a major role in designing such landmark structures as the Inland Steel Building and the 1986 expansion of McCormick Place. Reviewing Sears Tower in 1974, the late Chicago Tribune architecture critic Paul Gapp called the skyscraper “a building whose exterior profiles are a bold, vital and exciting departure from orthodox mediocrity.”

Flaherty said he takes issue with the way Dugan has handled some cases during his 23 years in office. As an example, he pointed to the case of David Black, who was convicted of manslaughter in 2004 in connection with a drag racing incident in which two teenage girls died. “Cases like David Black show the district attorney believes his duty is to merely convict people, not seek justice,” Flaherty said. “It’s time for a district attorney that understands what prosecutorial discretion means.” The district attorney is a nonpartisan office, and the filing deadline for the office is today at 5 p.m. If one candidate wins a majority of votes in the May primary election, he or she will win the seat. If there are multiple candidates on the May ballot, the top two vote-getters will move on to the November election.

China Continued from C1 Repman said traditionally the Chinese government pays for all travel within the country, as well as meals and lodging. “In some situations they may pay up front and in other situations they may pay us back,” she said. Wilkinson said he and Baker will also bring their wives on the trip, although they will pay their own way. Government officials will pay for the delegation’s four-night stay in Yangzhou, and Repman said it’s likely the government will also pay for the group’s additional expenses in Beijing and Shanghai, where Wilkinson said the group will also spend time. The delegation will meet with the mayor and the vice-mayor of Yangzhou, which Repman said is equivalent to meeting with the state governor and deputy governor. According to Sisters High School Mandarin teacher Dave Perkins, face-to-face communication is very important in Chinese culture. “The Chinese are very big on relationships, they want to see you and touch hands with you and not just sign a paper with someone who is 10,000 miles away,” he said. “It definitely means a lot and shows a lot of earnestness if people got on an airplane and flew over.” The trip comes as district officials are working to close a more than $5 million budget gap for the 2010-11 school year. District officials have said they’ll

Telfer Continued from C1 Had it occurred three days later, leadership of the major political parties would have selected nominees for the May 18 primary. Instead, several candidates, including Democrats and Republicans, are expected to file for the primary election by today’s 5 p.m. deadline. Already, retiring Sen. Rick Metsger, DWelches, has filed on the Democratic side. Until the seat is filled in the November general election, an interim treasurer, selected by Gov. Ted Kulongoski, will hold the position. Telfer’s entry is notable because she successfully ran for Westlund’s old Senate seat when he left it to run for treasurer rather than for re-election. And like Westlund, a Democrat who was a former Republican, she has changed parties. The longtime Democrat changed her registration to Republican in 2007, while serving on the Bend City Council. Asked her greatest similarity to Westlund, she said, “I think the thing we have in common is we are friendly people, we listen to all different perspectives.” However, she said she would try to be more active than Westlund on issues such as helping Oregon businesses and cutting the state’s level of bonded

ask teachers and staff to make concessions and likely reduce funding to textbooks, technology and other budget items. Repman said the travel costs will come from the administrative travel fund. The fund includes about $600 for each fulltime administrator and provides funding for staff development, training and conferences, Repman said. While Wilkinson said he is looking to cut costs around the district, he believes the relationship with Yangzhou is important to helping the district be globally competitive. “I think our focus, in terms of offering a world-class education, this is an important piece,” Wilkinson said. “We’ve said through the entire budget process that we don’t want to lose focus on what’s important. … This will have a long-term impact.” Summit High School began offering Mandarin language and culture classes in fall 2008, when Andrew Wang arrived at the high school. For the 2009-10 school year, MaryKatie Wang joined the Summit faculty to take over Andrew Wang’s position. And in February, High Desert Middle School teacher Katie Ford traveled to Yangzhou to teach conversational English. “What I’ve been hearing from Katie is that there is tremendous value” in teaching internationally, Wilkinson said. “We’re taking one more step in understanding international education.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

indebtedness. “I just think I’ve got a skill set that’s needed for that position,” she said. “I think as a CPA I have something to offer.” She said that running for higher office just over a year after she took the job would be a natural progression and would allow her to help more people. “I’m still going to serve my constituents and Oregonians,” she said. “I just think you hear a call and you answer the call, and if the state’s in need of something and I have something to offer, I’m going to jump in and offer it.” The treasurer’s post has not been held by a Republican since 1993. However, many political analysts are predicting Republicans to fare well in the 2010 election cycle. Kulongoski is expected to announce today his choice to serve as interim treasurer, which would give that person a leg up in the race to serve out Westlund’s term. On Monday night, two names batted about in Democratic circles included Sen. Richard Devlin, D-Tualatin, and former state Rep. Greg MacPherson, D-Lake Oswego. A past ally of Kulongoski, MacPherson lost to John Kroger in the 2008 Democratic primary for state attorney general. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MARCH 9 Today: Mostly clear start, clouds increasing, showers late.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

45/32

41/30

48/28

34/21

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

44/33

37/23

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman  37/23 Redmond Prineville 41/26 Cascadia 41/25 40/27 Sisters  39/25 Bend Post 38/25

29/12

44/33

36/21

38/20

45/37

Burns

Hampton 36/21

Fort Rock

Eugene 45/34

44/25





Idaho Falls Elko

55/35

40/22

40/23

37/25

Reno

Partly to mostly cloudy skies.



Crater Lake

42/26

44/30

44/33

Christmas Valley 35/19

Helena Boise

41/26

Redding

Silver Lake

34/18

Missoula

Bend

Grants Pass

40/22

Chemult



Portland

36/24

Crescent

32/14

Calgary

47/37

39/21

La Pine 37/19

Vancouver

20/15

43/30

San Francisco



56/49

Salt Lake City 48/31



S

S

S

S

Vancouver 44/33

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Calgary 33/15

S

Saskatoon 32/21

Seattle 47/37

• 7°

San Francisco 56/49

Stanley, Idaho

• 1.63” Waco, Texas

Las Vegas 52/40

Phoenix 60/44

Detroit 53/38

Houston 76/59

Chihuahua 72/43

Juneau 39/26

Mazatlan 78/59

S

S

To ronto 49/30

Green Bay 46/37

Des Moines 47/42 Chicago 45/41 Omaha 46/39 St. Louis 57/49 Kansas City 55/44

Dallas 75/53

La Paz 73/52

S

S S

Quebec 34/15

Albuquerque Oklahoma City Little Rock 68/44 56/32 67/53

Tijuana 62/44

Anchorage 29/12

S

Thunder Bay 48/24

Rapid City 39/27

Los Angeles 61/47 Honolulu 81/69

Winnipeg 35/27

Cheyenne Salt Lake 38/24 City 48/31 Denver 46/28

Laredo, Texas

S

St. Paul 43/35

Boise 44/30

• 83°

S

Bismarck 36/28

Billings 49/26

Portland 45/37

Buffalo

46/26

Columbus 58/44 Louisville 60/47

Halifax 35/28 Portland 43/25 Boston 49/32 New York 52/37 Philadelphia 58/41 Washington, D. C. 58/41

Charlotte 68/47

Nashville 66/52 Birmingham 61/50 New Orleans 68/61

Atlanta 64/46 Orlando 74/56 Miami 77/65

Monterrey 83/61

FRONTS

ROCK SLIDE CLOSES COLORADO INTERSTATE

Joe Amon / The Denver Post

Colorado Department of Transportation crew members watch the mountain for more falling rocks Monday as others drill holes to set explosives in boulders on Interstate 70 near Glenwood Springs, Colo., after an overnight slide deposited large rocks and hit a bridge, closing a 17-mile stretch of the road. I-70 is the major route connecting Denver to the West Coast and carries 25,000 drivers daily.

Guzek Continued from C1 Guzek chased Lois Houser, 49, up a flight of stairs, shooting her twice as she ran and then a third time as she tried to hide in a closet. The men then attempted to make the deaths look like a ritual murder by stabbing Lois Houser and putting the knife and an open Bible in her husband’s hands. In 1991 and 1997, two new juries both found that he should receive the death penalty, but both decisions were reversed because of issues about evidence presented or blocked from the trials. The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in 2005 overturned an Oregon Supreme Court ruling that evidence about Guzek not being present at the Housers’ home at the time of the murders should have been allowed in the third sentencing trial. Recent motions filed in the case range from challenges to Oregon’s death penalty to a request to have the trial held outside Deschutes County to an attempt to get one of the defense

First

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Full

Last

Mar. 15 Mar. 23 Mar. 29 Apr. 6

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

54 27

48 27

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 50/43/0.20 . . . . . . 47/36/r. . . . . . 50/39/sh Baker City . . . . . . 39/28/0.23 . . . . . 40/25/pc. . . . . . 39/22/rs Brookings . . . . . . 50/39/0.31 . . . . . 46/40/sh. . . . . . 50/41/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . . 42/31/NA . . . . . 36/24/sn. . . . . . 36/20/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 51/40/0.14 . . . . . . 45/34/r. . . . . . 48/34/sh Klamath Falls . . .40/29/trace . . . . . 37/22/pc. . . . . . . 38/25/c Lakeview. . . . . . . . 39/30/NA . . . . . 34/25/sn. . . . . . . 36/23/c La Pine . . . . . . . . 39/27/0.00 . . . . . 36/20/sn. . . . . . . 38/20/c Medford . . . . . . . 47/40/0.10 . . . . . . 45/32/r. . . . . . 46/33/sh Newport . . . . . . . 50/41/0.29 . . . . . . 48/38/r. . . . . . 49/39/sh North Bend . . . . . 48/43/0.50 . . . . . . 46/40/r. . . . . . 50/37/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 46/30/0.10 . . . . . 47/30/pc. . . . . . 47/28/sh Pendleton . . . . . .50/38/trace . . . . . 46/33/pc. . . . . . 47/29/sh Portland . . . . . . . 51/40/0.07 . . . . . . 45/37/r. . . . . . 48/38/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 40/28/0.00 . . . . . 41/25/sn. . . . . . 42/26/pc Redmond. . . . . . .45/26/trace . . . . . 39/26/pc. . . . . . 38/24/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 49/39/0.22 . . . . . . 45/35/r. . . . . . 47/37/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 51/36/0.18 . . . . . . 45/36/r. . . . . . 49/36/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 41/28/0.00 . . . . . 39/25/sn. . . . . . 40/24/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 54/44/0.00 . . . . . 49/35/pc. . . . . . 47/32/pc

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2 2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.04” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 in 1934 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.04” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 in 1951 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.24” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.13” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.13” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.97 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.31 in 1970 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:30 a.m. . . . . . .5:43 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:04 a.m. . . . . . .7:15 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .1:21 p.m. . . . . . .4:50 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:16 a.m. . . . . . .5:20 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:54 p.m. . . . . . .7:13 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:45 a.m. . . . . . .6:33 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

LOW

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 51-75 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 . . . . . . 30-59 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 76-107 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 89-102 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 1.0 . . . . . 95-100 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 28-37 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 111 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 20-52

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . 10.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 43-45 . . . . 122-160 . . . . . . . . 75 . . . . . . . 148 . . . . . . 29-68 . . . . . . 77-90 . . . . . . 46-47

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

Moon phases New

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

LOW

Partly cloudy.

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS S

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:28 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:04 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:26 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:05 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:20 a.m. Moonset today . . . 12:16 p.m.

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of PM showers.

52 29

Rain will spread into the coastal region today. Rain and snow showers over the Rockies.

Seattle

Mostly cloudy with a chance of afternoon showers. Eastern

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 55° Hermiston • 26° Redmond

FRIDAY Partly cloudy, warmer.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Paulina

Brothers

Sunriver

Chance of AM showers, partial afternoon LOW clearing.

NORTHWEST

Central

39/22

THURSDAY

42 23

33/15

36/20

Crescent Lake

HIGH

44/26

43/31

Oakridge Elk Lake

Mostly cloudy with rain developing today.

43/32

41/26

LOW

26

Western



Tonight: Mostly cloudy, isolated snow showers, chilly.

41

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

WEDNESDAY

attorneys removed because prosecutors believe he suffers from a sleep disorder. Guzek wore a Deschutes County Jail jumpsuit, handcuffs and a stun belt as he sat quietly in court on Monday. Three prison guards and two sheriff’s deputies watched over him during the court proceedings. Billings threw out the motion about the attorney and then spent most of Monday listening to an expert witness called by the defense to testify about the behavior of death penalty jurors and the likelihood of those jurors to sentence a defendant to death in the “penalty phase” of a trial — the type of trial scheduled for Guzek. Dr. Wanda Foglia, a professor at Rowan University in New Jersey, said her research has found that many jurors on capital cases decide whether a defendant should get the death penalty before the trial reaches the sentencing phase. She said she has not researched cases like Guzek’s, where a defendant has been convicted and sentenced to death several times, but said she believes jurors might be more inclined to opt for the death pen-

alty than life in prison because of the history of the case. “(Jurors are) going to see the judge as the authority in the room, and they’re going to assume, ‘OK, the judge is telling us he must be guilty,’” Foglia said. “They’re going to hear evidence of guilt and think, ‘OK, he must be deserving of the death penalty.’” Billings said he might consider Foglia’s testimony as he makes decisions about jury questionnaires and other matters. Guzek’s accomplices in the murders, James Michael Wilson and Donald Ross Cathey, pleaded guilty to aggravated murder and agreed to testify against Guzek to avoid the death penalty. Both men are serving life sentences in state prison. If Guzek is sentenced to death for a fourth time and the punishment is carried out, he would be the first person executed in Oregon since 1997. Hearings on the matter are scheduled to resume in court this morning. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .73/55/0.31 . . .73/42/s . . 65/42/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .48/24/0.00 . . .52/37/s . . 57/40/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .51/35/0.00 . . .47/25/s . . 50/29/pc Albuquerque. . . .51/36/0.09 . 56/32/pc . . 52/30/pc Anchorage . . . . .30/11/0.00 . .29/12/sn . . . 22/12/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .73/38/0.00 . .64/46/sh . . 59/51/sh Atlantic City . . . .62/32/0.00 . . .52/37/s . . . 48/40/c Austin . . . . . . . . .68/58/0.03 . . .76/51/s . . . 72/41/s Baltimore . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . . .57/39/s . . . 56/45/c Billings. . . . . . . . .60/39/0.00 . 49/26/pc . . .43/25/rs Birmingham . . . .73/35/0.00 . .61/50/sh . . . .63/54/t Bismarck . . . . . . .36/33/0.00 . . . 36/28/i . . 36/29/sn Boise . . . . . . . . . .52/39/0.06 . .44/30/sh . . .44/27/rs Boston. . . . . . . . .59/42/0.00 . . .49/32/s . . . 48/35/s Bridgeport, CT. . .61/32/0.00 . . .50/32/s . . 49/35/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .38/30/0.00 . . .46/26/s . . . 48/34/c Burlington, VT. . .52/32/0.00 . . .42/22/s . . . 46/27/s Caribou, ME . . . .40/30/0.00 . 33/16/pc . . . 35/14/s Charleston, SC . .72/39/0.00 . 65/51/pc . . 65/54/sh Charlotte. . . . . . .70/28/0.00 . 68/47/pc . . 66/50/sh Chattanooga. . . .73/34/0.00 . .65/47/sh . . 64/48/sh Cheyenne . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . 38/24/pc . . 33/19/sn Chicago. . . . . . . .44/35/0.00 . . .45/41/c . . 52/43/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .63/32/0.01 . .60/45/sh . . 60/46/sh Cleveland . . . . . .51/29/0.00 . 48/37/pc . . 56/41/sh Colorado Springs 49/33/0.00 . 49/25/pc . . .39/24/rs Columbia, MO . .65/31/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . . .65/46/t Columbia, SC . . .71/29/0.00 . 71/48/pc . . 68/52/sh Columbus, GA. . .73/32/0.00 . .63/48/sh . . . .61/55/t Columbus, OH. . .55/34/0.00 . 58/44/pc . . 60/46/sh Concord, NH . . . .56/27/0.00 . . .45/19/s . . . 47/23/s Corpus Christi. . .70/66/0.04 . 76/61/pc . . . 80/56/s Dallas Ft Worth. .61/52/0.31 . . .75/53/s . . 72/44/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .56/32/0.00 . . .56/44/c . . 58/45/sh Denver. . . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . 46/28/pc . . .40/26/rs Des Moines. . . . .45/34/0.00 . . .47/42/r . . 48/40/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .55/26/0.00 . 53/38/pc . . 51/42/sh Duluth . . . . . . . . .37/28/0.00 . . .38/33/c . . 39/33/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . .59/45/0.01 . 62/40/pc . . . 59/39/s Fairbanks. . . . . . 23/-24/0.00 . . 22/-4/sn . . .13/-14/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .36/34/0.00 . . . 38/31/i . . . .38/31/i Flagstaff . . . . . . .37/23/0.03 . .32/16/sn . . 33/19/sn

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .48/24/0.00 . . .55/38/c . . . .52/36/r Green Bay. . . . . .51/28/0.00 . 46/37/pc . . 47/39/sh Greensboro. . . . .67/37/0.00 . 69/47/pc . . 67/49/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .60/31/0.00 . . .56/36/s . . 52/42/sh Hartford, CT . . . .60/34/0.00 . . .52/27/s . . 55/32/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .54/25/0.00 . . 42/26/rs . . 39/23/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .78/66/0.07 . 81/69/pc . . 82/68/pc Houston . . . . . . .66/56/0.29 . . .76/59/t . . 75/49/pc Huntsville . . . . . .74/34/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . . .62/53/t Indianapolis . . . .60/34/0.00 . .55/44/sh . . . 57/45/c Jackson, MS . . . .72/40/0.00 . . .64/57/t . . . .73/51/t Madison, WI . . . .40/23/0.00 . . .46/38/c . . 49/41/sh Jacksonville. . . . .73/35/0.00 . 71/51/pc . . 72/59/sh Juneau. . . . . . . . .34/25/0.01 . . 39/26/rs . . .34/31/rs Kansas City. . . . .65/38/0.00 . .55/44/sh . . . 60/43/c Lansing . . . . . . . .50/22/0.00 . 53/38/pc . . . .52/36/r Las Vegas . . . . . .58/45/0.00 . .52/40/sh . . 57/41/sh Lexington . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . .59/44/sh . . 62/46/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . .52/35/0.00 . .47/38/sh . . . 44/34/c Little Rock. . . . . .74/42/0.00 . . .67/53/t . . . .71/49/t Los Angeles. . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .61/47/s . . . 63/46/s Louisville . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . .60/47/sh . . . 63/47/c Memphis. . . . . . .74/41/0.00 . . .60/55/t . . . .71/51/t Miami . . . . . . . . .76/55/0.00 . .77/65/sh . . 79/72/pc Milwaukee . . . . .50/26/0.00 . . .42/38/c . . 43/39/sh Minneapolis . . . .37/35/0.00 . .43/35/sh . . 45/37/sh Nashville . . . . . . .73/44/0.00 . .66/52/sh . . . .70/49/t New Orleans. . . .66/50/0.02 . . .68/61/t . . . .71/57/t New York . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . . .52/37/s . . 53/37/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .64/37/0.00 . . .53/36/s . . 54/36/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .57/32/0.00 . . .58/42/s . . . 65/47/c Oklahoma City . .55/48/0.50 . 68/44/pc . . 60/39/sh Omaha . . . . . . . .49/36/0.00 . .46/39/sh . . . 42/35/c Orlando. . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . 74/56/pc . . 78/62/sh Palm Springs. . . .70/46/0.00 . . .67/41/s . . . 72/47/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .43/36/0.00 . .53/44/sh . . 58/47/sh Philadelphia . . . .60/36/0.00 . . .58/41/s . . . 55/41/c Phoenix. . . . . . . .58/46/0.11 . .60/44/sh . . . 63/47/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .51/23/0.00 . . .53/37/s . . 54/42/sh Portland, ME. . . .56/29/0.00 . . .43/25/s . . . 44/34/s Providence . . . . .63/36/0.00 . . .52/31/s . . . 53/34/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .66/30/0.00 . . .69/47/s . . . 69/49/c

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . .39/27/sh . . 34/24/sn Savannah . . . . . .74/38/0.00 . 69/51/pc . . . .69/55/r Reno . . . . . . . . . .52/32/0.00 . 43/30/pc . . 44/26/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .41/38/0.14 . . .47/37/r . . 49/40/sh Richmond . . . . . .64/33/0.00 . . .64/43/s . . . 66/48/c Sioux Falls. . . . . .36/33/0.00 . . .37/33/r . . .37/32/rs Rochester, NY . . .49/32/0.00 . . .45/26/s . . 48/34/pc Spokane . . . . . . .43/37/0.03 . . 38/27/rs . . .41/26/rs Sacramento. . . . .59/47/0.00 . 56/43/pc . . 59/40/pc Springfield, MO. .69/35/0.00 . . .64/45/t . . . .68/43/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .59/38/0.00 . .57/49/sh . . . .68/49/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . .70/56/sh . . 74/65/sh Salt Lake City . . .53/33/0.00 . .48/31/sh . . .44/29/rs Tucson. . . . . . . . .52/10/0.00 . .60/38/sh . . . 59/39/s San Antonio . . . .70/61/0.17 . . .79/54/s . . . 77/45/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .56/48/0.54 . 68/43/pc . . . .66/41/t San Diego . . . . . .61/56/0.00 . . .59/46/s . . . 61/49/s Washington, DC .62/37/0.00 . . .58/41/s . . . 57/45/c San Francisco . . .54/51/0.02 . . .56/49/s . . . 58/46/s Wichita . . . . . . . .54/48/0.90 . .59/38/sh . . 59/37/sh San Jose . . . . . . .57/46/0.03 . . .59/43/s . . . 60/42/s Yakima . . . . . . . 53/35/trace . 46/32/pc . . 47/26/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .44/33/0.31 . 48/23/pc . . 43/24/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.01 . . .68/43/s . . . 70/48/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .41/27/0.00 . 39/25/pc . . . 40/27/s Athens. . . . . . . . .50/44/0.10 . .57/45/sh . . 63/52/sh Auckland. . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .75/60/sh . . 75/61/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .78/57/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . 90/64/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . 96/79/pc . . 88/74/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .28/23/0.07 . 30/16/pc . . . 40/22/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . 88/67/pc . . . 80/64/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .34/23/0.00 . . .34/20/c . . . 39/22/s Bogota . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .68/53/t . . . .72/54/t Budapest. . . . . . .37/19/0.00 . . .35/22/c . . .36/25/sf Buenos Aires. . . .81/64/0.00 . . .83/67/t . . . .82/67/t Cabo San Lucas .77/61/0.00 . . .75/56/s . . . 77/57/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .99/63/0.00 . . .95/66/s . . . 95/68/s Calgary . . . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . .33/15/sn . . . 36/19/s Cancun . . . . . . . 81/NA/0.00 . 84/66/pc . . 89/68/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .43/19/0.00 . . .46/29/s . . 47/31/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . 46/26/pc . . . 47/28/s Geneva . . . . . . . .37/25/0.00 . . .34/17/s . . . 35/24/c Harare . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . 83/62/pc . . 85/64/pc Hong Kong . . . . .64/54/0.14 . .63/57/sh . . . 65/56/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .48/37/0.30 . .60/41/sh . . . 48/34/c Jerusalem . . . . . .85/46/0.00 . . .91/64/s . . . 88/62/s Johannesburg . . .73/52/0.00 . 83/62/pc . . 85/63/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . 83/71/pc . . 84/71/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . . .56/49/s . . . 58/47/s London . . . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . . .47/30/s . . 44/29/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .41/30/0.14 . . .45/26/s . . . 46/26/s Manila. . . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . 90/74/pc . . 88/74/sh

Mecca . . . . . . . . .99/73/0.00 . . .98/75/s . . 100/76/s Mexico City. . . . .72/54/0.00 . . .78/48/s . . . 82/51/s Montreal. . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . 38/17/pc . . . 38/18/s Moscow . . . . . . . .23/5/0.00 . . .25/12/c . . .23/11/sf Nairobi . . . . . . . .70/63/0.55 . . .81/64/t . . . .83/64/t Nassau . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . . .76/66/c . . 77/66/pc New Delhi. . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .83/58/s . . . 85/61/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . . .48/43/r . . 44/37/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .34/5/0.00 . 35/14/pc . . 35/12/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . 37/18/pc . . . 38/18/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .43/27/0.00 . . .40/21/s . . 37/23/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .88/75/0.00 . . .84/75/t . . . .86/75/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . .45/36/sh . . 50/41/sh Santiago . . . . . . .84/52/0.00 . . .88/57/s . . . 89/57/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .87/74/t . . 88/74/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .25/25/0.00 . . .24/17/s . . 30/25/sn Seoul . . . . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . . 35/26/sf . . .34/26/sf Shanghai. . . . . . .45/39/0.05 . . 37/28/sf . . . 38/23/s Singapore . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . 91/77/pc . . 90/77/pc Stockholm. . . . . .39/23/0.00 . . .29/11/c . . 32/15/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 77/64/pc . . 73/62/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .60/56/sh . . . 62/53/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .93/55/0.00 . . .89/69/s . . . 85/67/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . . .50/45/r . . 51/42/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .57/32/0.00 . 49/30/pc . . . 51/31/c Vancouver. . . . . .45/37/0.24 . .44/33/sh . . 46/36/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .32/18/0.00 . . 33/24/sf . . .32/24/sf Warsaw. . . . . . . .30/16/0.00 . 33/18/pc . . . 36/18/s


S

Women’s basketball Inside Connecticut sets an NCAA record by winning its 71st consecutive game, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

PREP BASKETBALL Lineup set for state basketball tournament teams Following is a breakdown of the quarterfinal games for Central Oregon’s four high school basketball teams playing this week in Oregon School Activities Association state championship tournaments: CLASS 5A GIRLS At McArthur Court, Eugene • Bend High Lava Bears (17-9) vs. Crater Comets (196), Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. CLASS 4A GIRLS At Gill Coliseum, Corvallis • La Pine Hawks (19-9) vs. Cascade Cougars (22-2), Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. CLASS 5A BOYS At McArthur Court, Eugene • Mountain View Cougars (24-1) vs. Glencoe Crimson Tide (16-9), Thursday, 6:30 p.m. • Summit Storm (14-13) vs. Crescent Valley Raiders (179), Thursday, 8:15 p.m. For more state tournament information, including brackets, admission and spectator parking, go to the OSAA Web site at osaa.org. — Bulletin staff report

D

Championship road racing for the rest of us D HEATHER

on’t get me wrong. I love watching the fast guys go fast. The elite road national championships present an exceptional opportunity to be wowed by some of the nation’s top-tier men and women as well as up-and-coming young riders as they go at it for U.S. cycling supremacy. But for most riders, even the really good weekend-warrior types, participating in a championship race at that level is a bit out of our league. We have jobs, we have families, and our wattage numbers aren’t popping off the charts. And

CLARK

maybe, we’re just old(er). Which is why hosting the 2011 and 2012 USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships is such a catch for local riders — particularly for those competitive cyclists who race at a step or two,

or three, below the nation’s pro/elite level. Although a verbal commitment had been announced months ago, USA Cycling late last month finally inked an official two-year deal with Bend to host the masters road national championships in 2011 and 2012. The weeklong event is scheduled for Aug. 30-Sept. 4 in its first year in Bend and for Aug. 27-Sept. 2 in the second year. The agreement between USA Cycling, the sport’s national governing body, and Visit Bend, the city’s tourism arm, will bring to Central Oregon an event that is

expected to attract more than 800 competitors and 2,500 spectators to the area both years in the week leading up to Labor Day weekend. This year, the championships are scheduled to take place in Louisville, Ky. According to USA Cycling, it was Bend’s warm reception and smooth handling of the Junior, U23 and Elite Road Nationals and the Cyclocross National Championships, both held here in 2009, that earned our community yet another round of championship racing. See Racing / D2

Royce Nelson of Smolich Snipers hurls a ball for a hit during dodgeball action last week at Morning Star Christian School in Bend. There are five teams taking part in the Spring 2010 Coed Dodgeball League. Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

COLLEGE BASKETBALL OSU’s Seth Tarver among Pac-10 award recipients WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — California guard Jerome Randle has been picked as the Pac-10 player of the year. Randle averaged 18.7 points and 4.5 assists per game. He helped the Golden Bears win their first conference title in 50 years. In other awards handed out by the league on Monday, Arizona forward Derrick Williams was picked as the league’s top freshman, Arizona State’s Herb Sendek was selected as the coach of the year, Oregon State’s Seth Tarver was named defensive player of the year, and Southern California’s Nikola Vucevic won most improved player. The awards are voted on by the league’s coaches. — The Associated Press

Ready, aim — dodgeball New league allows players to take the court and let go

INSIDE NBA

By Katie Brauns The Bulletin

Cavaliers......97 Spurs ...........95

Mavericks ..125 T’wolves .... 112

Knicks ..........99 Hawks ..........98

Grizzlies ..... 107 Nets ...........101

Hornets ......135 Warriors..... 131

Short-handed Cavs get past Spurs Without its star players, Cleveland takes a 97-95 win over San Antonio, see Page D3 Smolich Snipers team member Holly Myers reacts after losing her grasp on a catch attempt during dodgeball action last week in Bend.

Let’s face it. Dodgeball is brutal. Though many of us can recall visions of fifth-grade gym class, where the slam jam resulted in only a few casualties, adult dodgeball looks a lot different. When 150 to 200 pounds of muscle launches a heavy 8.5inch-diameter rubber ball through the air COMMUNITY and that ball connects with a body part, it’s SPORTS going to hurt a little. “It’s painful,” says Joseph Shinn, 36, of Bend, during the first night of the Spring 2010 Coed Dodgeball League at the Morning Star Christian School in southeast Bend. “I got hit in the face and shot in the back by somebody,” says Shinn, who plays for the Smolich Snipers, a team

AUTO RACING

Wreck paints NASCAR into corner Cleveland’s Mo Williams brings the ball up against San Antonio’s George Hill during Monday’s game in Cleveland.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 Community Sports ................... D4

By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The boys sure backed NASCAR into a corner on this one. Determined to give drivers more leeway this season when it came to policing each other on the track, NASCAR opened the year with a relaxed “boys, have at it” attitude. It was interpreted to mean NASCAR would look the other way at a nudge here, a spin there, and all the retaliatory bumping and banging that goes on over a very long season. No one could have predicted, though, that NASCAR’s first true test would come a mere four races into the season following a frightening accident at Atlanta.

NASCAR on Monday found itself smack in the center of a dilemma over what to do with Carl Edwards, whose intentional wrecking of Brad Keselowski late in Sunday’s race ignited a heated debate about just what’s permitted under this new policy. Emotions are high in almost every corner, and no decision NASCAR makes will satisfy everyone. What first must be figured out, though, is what is everyone is so upset about? Is it that Edwards returned to the track down 153 laps, intent on retaliating against Keselowski, and after trying for at least one full lap, finally succeeded with a deliberate nudge? See NASCAR / D3

Want to join? What: 2010 Spring Coed Dodgeball League When: Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. through April 26; league from 7-10 p.m.; drop-in from 6-7 p.m. Where: Morning Star Christian School in southeast Bend Cost: $300 per team; $2 for drop-in Web site: www.ABABend.com

made up of employees of Smolich Motors of Bend. “It was a good time.” “All I gotta say is, ‘Ouch!’ ” exclaims Smolich teammate Michael Ivens, 34, of Bend. “I skinned my knee and took one in the jimmy. It’s definitely not a smoker’s sport,” he adds, admitting that he smokes. “Guys are intense about everything,” says Kaila Brothers, 25, of Bend, who plays for the Subaru of Bend team. “You can take the easiest sport and they make it a conquest. They’re crazy.” Dodgeball is typically played with six players on each team (eight in the Central Oregon league, two of whom have to be female). See Dodgeball / D3

At Talladega, Ala., on April 26, 2009, Carl Edwards (99) was sent airborne after colliding with Brad Keselowski, bottom, on the final lap of the Aaron’s 499 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Talladega Superspeedway. Glenn Smith / AP file


D2 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

BASKETBALL

Wednesday Girls basketball: Class 5A state tournament, Bend High vs. Crater at McArthur Court in Eugene, 6:30 p.m.; Class 4A state tournament, La Pine vs. Cascade at Gill Coliseum in Corvallis, 6:30 p.m.

9 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, first round, DePaul vs. South Florida, ESPN2. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, first round, St. John’s vs. Connecticut, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — Women’s college, Big East Tournament, final, Connecticut vs. West Virginia, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Sun Belt Tournament, final, North Texas vs. Troy, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Horizon League Tournament, final, Wright State vs. Butler, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Summit League Tournament, final, IUPUI vs. Oakland, Mich., ESPN2. 7 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Sacramento Kings, Comcast SportsNet.

SOCCER 11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, Arsenal vs. FC Porte, FSNW.

HOCKEY 2 p.m. — NHL, Dallas Stars at Washington Capitals, VS network. 4 p.m. — NHL, New York Islanders at Philadelphia Flyers, VS network.

WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, teams TBD, ESPN. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, teams TBD, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, teams TBD, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Northeast Conference Tournament, final, teams TBD, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, teams TBD, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Big Sky Tournament, final, teams TBD, ESPN2. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Pac-10 Tournament, first round, teams TBD, FSNW. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

S   B Basketball • UConn wins NCAA record 71st straight game: Tina Charles, Maya Moore and the latest Connecticut Huskies dynasty now has its own place in the record books. Charles scored 16 points and Moore added 11 to help top-ranked Connecticut win an NCAA record 71st straight game — a 59-44 victory over No. 6 Notre Dame on Monday night in the semifinals of the Big East tournament. UConn surpassed its own mark set from Nov. 9, 2001, to March 11, 2003. Unlike that amazing run, which ended in a loss in the Big East conference tournament semifinals to Villanova, this Huskies team has thoroughly dominated its opponents in every game, winning all of them by double digits. Connecticut (320) will face West Virginia tonight with a chance to win its 16th Big East Conference Tournament Championship. • Saint Mary’s upsets Gonzaga in WCC title game: Mickey McConnell scored 26 points, Ben Allen added 20 and Saint Mary’s upset No. 18 Gonzaga with an 81-62 victory Monday night in the West Coast Conference tournament title game. Omar Samhan had nine points and seven rebounds for the Gaels (26-5), who earned the sixth NCAA tournament berth in the small Bay Area school’s history with a remarkable shooting performance against the top-seeded Zags (26-6), the 10-time regular-season WCC champions. Saint Mary’s won the WCC tournament for just the second time since it began in 1987, beating Gonzaga for the first time in 10 tourney meetings.

Baseball • Selig: Too soon to determine if HGH test valid: Baseball commissioner Bud Selig says it’s too soon to determine whether a blood test for human growth hormone can be used for minor leaguers. Speaking Monday night before receiving a lifetime achievement award at the annual dinner of the Jackie Robinson Foundation, Selig said Dr. Gary Green, the sport’s outside expert, and other medical staff were examining the data. Selig said the scientific experts haven’t been able to give him a timeframe for their conclusions. • Canadian doctor says HGH was for him: A sports doctor at the center of drug investigations in Canada and the United States said Monday he treated Alex Rodriguez after the Yankees slugger had hip surgery last year and prescribed anti-inflammatories but not human growth hormone. Dr. Anthony Galea also told The Associated Press an assistant who was stopped at the U.S.-Canadian border in Buffalo, N.Y., last year was carrying only a minuscule amount of HGH — which Galea said was for his own use. The doctor reiterated that he has never given the drug to an athlete.

Football • Trial opens in Vikes’ challenge of NFL drug policy: The attorney for two Minnesota Vikings challenging the NFL’s anti-doping policy opened their closely watched trial Monday by accusing the league of failing to follow state law when it tested them for drugs two years ago and then decided to suspend them. The attorney, Peter Ginsberg, also said the NFL is at least a partial employer of defensive linemen Kevin Williams and Pat Williams. Just who employs the two players when it comes to drug testing is considered a key issue in their lawsuit against the NFL.

Cycling • Henderson wins 1st stage of Paris-Nice: Greg Henderson of New Zealand won a sprint Monday to take the first stage of the Paris-Nice race in Contres, France, and Lars Boom of the Netherlands maintained the overall lead. Henderson beat Slovenian rider Grega Bole and Jeremy Galland of France to complete the 125-mile flat stage in 4 hours, 22 minutes, 17 seconds.

Golf • Ping waives settlement on square grooves: The 20year-old Ping wedges with square-shaped grooves will no longer be allowed on the PGA Tour starting March 29 under an agreement reached Monday with Ping executives. John Solheim, the chairman and CEO of Ping, said the Phoenix-based company is waiving its right that had kept the PGA Tour from banning Ping Eye2 wedges made before April 1, 1990, that have deeper, wide grooves no longer allowed under new USGA regulations. — From wire reports

Seattle vs Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs Oakland at Phoenix, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Kansas City vs Colorado at Tucson, Ariz., 12:10 p.m. Baltimore vs Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 4:05 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

College POLLS Collegiate Baseball TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through March 7, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pv 1. Louisiana St. 11-0 493 1 2. Arizona St. 11-0 491 2 3. Florida St. 10-0 489 6 4. Virginia 9-2 488 3 5. Georgia Tech 10-1 486 5 6. Texas 8-3 484 4 7. Coastal Carolina 10-1 481 8 8. Louisville 11-0 478 13 9. Florida 7-2 477 7 10. UCLA 9-0 475 14 11. Texas Christian 8-2 473 9 12. Oregon St. 7-3 472 10 13. Clemson 9-1 469 12 14. North Carolina 10-1 468 15 15. Miami, Fla. 7-3 466 11 16. Oklahoma 11-1 464 17 17. Ohio St. 8-2 462 16 18. Mississippi 9-2 460 18 19. Arkansas 8-2 458 19 20. East Carolina 7-3 455 21 21. Wichita St. 7-1 452 24 22. New Mexico 8-4 449 20 23. South Carolina 6-4 448 22 24. Kentucky 9-1 445 25 25. Washington St. 9-1 440 28 26. S.E. Louisiana 11-1 438 29 27. Vanderbilt 10-1 436 30 28. N.C. State 10-1 433 — 29. Stanford 7-4 432 27 30. Alabama 8-1 429 —

Thursday Boys basketball: Class 5A state tournament, Mountain View vs. Glencoe at McArthur Court in Eugene, 6:30 p.m.; Summit vs. Crescent Valley at McArthur Court in Eugene, 8:15 p.m.

BASKETBALL College MEN Monday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENT Colonial Athletic Association Championship Old Dominion 60, William & Mary 53 Frontier Conference Tournament Championship Westminster, Utah 76, Montana Western 68 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Championship Siena 72, Fairfield 65, OT Southern Conference Championship Wofford 56, Appalachian St. 51 Summit League Semifinals IUPUI 69, Oral Roberts 65 Oakland, Mich. 71, IPFW 58 Sun Belt Conference Semifinals North Texas 63, Denver 56 Troy 54, W. Kentucky 48 West Coast Conference Championship Saint Mary’s, Calif. 81, Gonzaga 62 POLLS AP Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 7, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Kansas (63) 29-2 1,623 2 2. Kentucky (2) 29-2 1,553 3 3. Syracuse 28-3 1,500 1 4. Duke 26-5 1,348 4 5. Ohio St. 24-7 1,344 6 6. Purdue 26-4 1,252 7 7. West Virginia 24-6 1,231 10 8. New Mexico 28-3 1,188 8 9. Kansas St. 24-6 1,063 5 10. Villanova 24-6 1,016 9 11. Michigan St. 24-7 1,015 11 12. Butler 27-4 796 12 13. Wisconsin 23-7 710 15 14. BYU 28-4 690 14 15. Tennessee 23-7 650 16 16. Pittsburgh 24-7 644 17 17. Temple 26-5 552 20 18. Gonzaga 26-5 534 18 19. Maryland 23-7 499 22 20. Vanderbilt 23-7 480 13 21. Baylor 24-6 474 21 22. Georgetown 20-9 277 19 23. Texas A&M 22-8 271 23 24. Xavier 23-7 136 25 25. UTEP 24-5 134 24 Others receiving votes: N. Iowa 48, Richmond 41, Utah St. 12, Virginia Tech 12, Texas 10, Marquette 6, Notre Dame 6, Cornell 3, Louisville 3, California 2, Oklahoma St. 1, Siena 1. USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 7, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Kansas (30) 29-2 774 2 2. Kentucky 29-2 740 3 3. Syracuse (1) 29-2 709 1 4. Duke 26-5 661 4 5. Purdue 26-4 625 6 6. West Virginia 24-6 610 8 7. Ohio State 24-7 604 7 8. New Mexico 28-3 526 10 9. Kansas State 24-6 501 5 10. Villanova 24-6 476 9 11. Michigan State 24-7 463 12 12. Butler 27-4 461 11 13. Tennessee 23-7 387 13 14. Gonzaga 26-5 347 14 15. Brigham Young 28-4 324 15 16. Pittsburgh 24-7 295 18 17. Temple 26-5 282 16 18. Wisconsin 23-7 273 17 19. Maryland 23-7 210 23 20. Baylor 24-6 167 22 21. Texas-El Paso 24-5 153 21 22. Georgetown 20-9 125 20 23. Vanderbilt 23-7 117 19 24. Texas A&M 22-8 103 24 25. Northern Iowa 28-4 54 NR Others receiving votes: Utah State 24; Xavier 24; Cornell 10; Texas 7; Saint Mary’s 6; Richmond 5; California 4; Oklahoma State 2; UNLV 2; Virginia Tech 2; Memphis 1; Old Dominion 1. PAC-10 TOURNAMENT In Los Angeles

——— First round Wednesday Oregon vs. Washington State, 8 p.m. Quarterfinals Thursday Arizona vs. UCLA, noon Cal vs. Oregon/Washington State winner, 2:30 p.m. Oregon State vs. Washington, 6 p.m. Arizona State vs. Stanford, 8:30 p.m. Semifinals Friday First semifinal, 6 p.m. Second semifinal, 8:30 p.m. Final Saturday Semifinal winners, 3 p.m. WOMEN Monday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENT Atlantic 10 Conference Championship Xavier 57, Temple 55, OT Big East Conference Semifinals Connecticut 59, Notre Dame 44 West Virginia 56, Rutgers 49 Horizon League First Round Wis.-Milwaukee 71, Valparaiso 57 Wright St. 61, Youngstown St. 43 Southern Conference Championship Chattanooga 72, Samford 67 Summit League Semifinals Oral Roberts 77, UMKC 71 S. Dakota St. 67, W. Illinois 39 Sun Belt Conference Semifinals Ark.-Little Rock 73, New Orleans 43 Middle Tennessee 76, W. Kentucky 63 West Coast Conference Championship Gonzaga 76, Pepperdine 48 SOUTHWEST UAB 52, Tulsa 45 SOUTH Charleston Southern 66, Winthrop 62, OT Coastal Carolina 47, Presbyterian 46 East Carolina 102, Southern Miss. 64 Liberty 73, High Point 48 UCF 59, Marshall 57, OT POLLS AP Women’s Top 25 The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 7, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Connecticut (40) 31-0 1,000 1 2. Stanford 28-1 959 2 3. Nebraska 29-0 920 3 4. Tennessee 30-2 880 4 5. Xavier 26-3 821 5 6. Notre Dame 26-4 770 6 7. Duke 27-5 764 9 8. Ohio St. 30-4 734 10 9. West Virginia 27-4 669 7 10. Florida St. 25-5 616 8 11. Texas A&M 22-7 588 15 12. Oklahoma 21-9 553 11 13. Georgetown 25-6 457 12

Racing Continued from D1 “In hosting the 2009 USA Cycling National Championships Bend showcased an entire community who passionately embraces the sport of cycling and its various disciplines as a lifestyle,” said Steve Johnson, CEO of USA Cycling, last month in a press release confirming the masters deal with Bend. “That type of support is critical to growing the sport across the country and is a large reason why Bend was awarded the Masters Road National Championships for 2011 and 2012.” The masters road nationals are open to men and women ages 30 and older (and by older, we’re talking divisions for riders older than 80). Like the Junior, U23 and Elite version, participants at masters nationals have the option to contest three separate championships — time trial, criterium and road racing — all in age-graded divisions. Two-rider tandem racing divisions will also be offered in road racing and time trial. Bend cyclist Brenna Lopez-Otero told me Monday that she was planning to buy a plane ticket to Kentucky to compete in her first-ever masters championship this coming August. But now that masters road nationals are heading to her hometown next year, the 39-yearold mother of 1- and 3-year-old boys said she is having second thoughts. “Maybe I ought to just wait,” said Lopez-Otero, who works as a nurse anesthetist. A bike racer since 1995, Lopez-Otero competed at the elite level in California and participated in the elite road and criterium national championships before relocating to Bend with her husband two years ago to raise their family. She first discovered Central Oregon while racing in the Cascade Cycling

14. Iowa St. 23-6 431 13 15. Texas 21-9 415 18 16. Baylor 22-8 382 14 17. St. John’s 24-5 373 16 18. Gonzaga 26-4 346 17 19. Kentucky 25-7 324 19 20. Oklahoma St. 20-9 203 20 21. Hartford 27-3 187 23 22. LSU 20-9 113 21 23. UCLA 22-7 107 — 24. Georgia 23-8 86 22 25. Michigan St. 22-9 44 25 Others receiving votes: Fresno St. 42, Georgia Tech 35, Virginia 33, Wis.-Green Bay 31, Iowa 19, Ark.-Little Rock 18, Middle Tennessee 17, TCU 17, Vanderbilt 13, Princeton 11, North Carolina 4, Syracuse 4, Bowling Green 3, Illinois St. 3, Temple 3, BYU 2, DePaul 1, Rutgers 1, Wisconsin 1.

BASEBALL MLB SPRING TRAINING SCHEDULE Subject to change Times PST ——— Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees (ss) 6, Pittsburgh (ss) 0 Toronto 4, Houston 1 Minnesota 5, Baltimore 0 Florida (ss) 11, Washington 2 N.Y. Mets 11, Florida (ss) 2 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 7, Philadelphia 5 Atlanta 12, Detroit 4 Boston 7, St. Louis 6 Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh (ss) 3, 10 innings L.A. Angels 13, Texas 9 Seattle (ss) 5, Chicago White Sox 4 Cleveland 3, Arizona 2 San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 2, 10 innings Colorado 5, San Diego 4 Chicago Cubs 10, Oakland 3 Milwaukee 6, Seattle (ss) 2 Cincinnati 14, Kansas City 5 Today’s Games Pittsburgh vs N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 10:05 a.m. St. Louis vs Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Boston vs Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay vs Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Detroit vs Washington at Viera, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Houston vs N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 a.m. Texas vs Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Colorado vs L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Arizona vs Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. San Diego vs L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Cleveland vs Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 4:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Tampa Bay vs Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets vs Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Philadelphia vs Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Washington vs St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees vs Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Florida vs Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. San Diego (ss) vs Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs San Diego (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Arizona vs L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. San Francisco vs Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 12:05 p.m.

Classic several years ago. “I knew this town was hot for cycling,” Lopez-Otero said. “But I didn’t know it would be hosting national (championship) events.” She noted that those national championships have motivated her to continue racing and training at a high level — she finished seventh in the women’s 35-39 age division at cyclocross nationals here back in December. Still, as a working mom, she admits that racing against full-time and younger pros is no longer realistic. “In years past when I was racing at the elite level, I used to pooh-pooh the masters racing, even though I was 35 at the time,” Lopez-Otero recalled. “Now, when I look around the (elite) field, I wonder how many of these women have a career and two kids.” Masters nationals represent an opportunity at glory for the older set, which is not necessarily to say the slower set. Anyone who rode or raced alongside Bend’s Steve Larsen knows that just because a rider has turned 30 or 35 or 40 does not mean he or she has slowed down much. (Larsen, a world-class cyclist and triathlete, was still dominating his competition when he died of a heart attack last spring at the age of 39.) What’s special about masters nationals is the rare chance they offer for racers to compete against amateur riders of similar age from across the country — all the while aiming for a shot at a starsand-stripes jersey and a national title. Lopez-Otero, who said she does not expect to be bike racing beyond her 40s, is taking a now-or-never approach to masters nationals when they come to Central Oregon in 2011 and 2012. “If you’re going to have any glory,” she said, “that’s where it’s going to be.” Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com.

Baseball America Top 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through March 7 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pv 1. Virginia 9-2 1 2. Louisiana State 11-0 2 3. Texas 8-3 3 4. Georgia Tech 10-1 4 5. Florida State 10-0 6 6. Florida 7-2 5 7. Texas Christian 8-2 7 8. Coastal Carolina 10-1 8 9. Rice 7-5 9 10. Louisville 11-0 10 11. Arizona State 11-0 12 12. Clemson 9-1 13 13. East Carolina 7-3 14 14. Arkansas 8-2 17 15. UCLA 9-0 19 16. UC Irvine 6-5 11 17. North Carolina 10-1 20 18. Mississippi 9-2 21 19. South Carolina 6-4 15 20. Miami 7-3 16 21. Oregon State 7-3 22 22. Kentucky 9-1 23 23. Stanford 7-4 24 24. Vanderbilt 10-1 NR 25. Oklahoma 11-1 NR

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Pittsburgh 66 40 22 4 84 New Jersey 64 38 23 3 79 Philadelphia 64 34 26 4 72 N.Y. Rangers 66 29 28 9 67 N.Y. Islanders 65 26 31 8 60 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Buffalo 64 35 20 9 79 Ottawa 66 36 25 5 77 Montreal 67 32 29 6 70 Boston 64 29 24 11 69 Toronto 65 20 33 12 52 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Washington 66 44 13 9 97 Atlanta 64 28 26 10 66 Tampa Bay 64 27 26 11 65 Florida 64 26 28 10 62 Carolina 65 27 31 7 61 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Chicago 65 43 17 5 91 Nashville 65 35 25 5 75 Detroit 65 31 22 12 74 St. Louis 65 30 26 9 69 Columbus 66 25 30 11 61 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts Vancouver 65 40 23 2 82 Colorado 65 37 22 6 80 Calgary 65 32 24 9 73 Minnesota 64 31 28 5 67 Edmonton 65 21 38 6 48 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts

GF 211 169 195 170 169

GA 189 154 173 179 206

GF 174 181 178 157 168

GA 161 189 185 164 220

GF 260 194 172 168 182

GA 186 209 196 186 200

GF 217 182 175 177 170

GA 161 187 178 182 215

GF 211 192 166 178 162

GA 166 170 165 185 221

GF GA

San Jose 65 42 14 9 93 212 160 Phoenix 66 39 22 5 83 176 164 Los Angeles 65 39 22 4 82 200 175 Dallas 65 29 24 12 70 184 206 Anaheim 65 30 27 8 68 183 201 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Games Dallas 4, Washington 3, SO Los Angeles 6, Columbus 0 Today’s Games Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Nashville at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Calgary at Detroit, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Florida at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Dallas at Buffalo, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Vancouver at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Named Sandy Alderson to serve as a consultant, focusing on the implementation of reform to the sport’s operations in the Dominican Republic. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Agreed to terms with RHP Daniel Bard, RHP Michael Bowden, RHP Clay Buchholz, LHP Felix Doubront, RHP Ramon A. Ramirez, LHP Dustin Richardson, C Dusty Brown, C Mark Wagner, 1B Aaron Bates, 2B Tug Hulett and SS Jed Lowrie, OF Jacoby Ellsbury and OF Josh Reddick on one-year contracts. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with LHP Brett Anderson, RHP Andrew Bailey, LHP Jerry Blevins, LHP Dallas Braden, LHP Craig Breslow, RHP Trevor Cahill, RHP Bobby Cassevah, RHP Fautino De Los Santos, RHP Pedro Figueroa, LHP Gio Gonzalez, LHP Brad Kilby, RHP Vin Mazzaro, RHP John Meloan, RHP Clayton Mortensen, LHP Josh Outman, RHP Henry Rodriguez, RHP Justin Souza, RHP Brad Ziegler, 1B Daric Barton, OF Travis Buck, 1B Chris Carter, 3B Jake Fox, 2B Eric Patterson, SS Cliff Pennington, C Landon Powell, 3B Adam Rosales, C Kurt Suzuki, OF Ryan Sweeney and 2B Steve Tolleson on one-year contracts. National League NEW YORK METS—Signed RHP Kyle Snyder to a minor-league contract. American Association EL PASO DIABLOS—Sold the contract of RHP Rick Rivas to Los Angeles (NL). FORT WORTH CATS—Signed RHP Grant Varnell. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY JACKALS—Signed INF Abraham O. Nunez. SUSSEX SKYHAWKS—Traded OF Maikel Jova to Chico (Golden) for cash. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES—Recalled C Hasheem Thabeet from Dakota (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Re-signed C Joe Zelenka. BUFFALO BILLS—Agreed to terms with OT Cornell Green on a three-year contract. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Released FB Brad Hoover. DETROIT LIONS—Re-signed TE Will Heller to a three-year contract. Signed WR Brian Clark to a one-year contract. Released DE Dewayne White. Acquired CB Chris Houston from Atlanta for 2010 fifth- and sixth-round draft picks. HOUSTON TEXANS—Re-signed WR Kevin Walter and P Matt Turk. MIAMI DOLPHINS-Agreed to terms with QB Chad Pennington on a one-year contract. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Released WR Javon Walker and DE Greg Ellis. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Agreed to terms with WR Jason Avant on a five-year contract. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Signed WR Arnaz Battle and S Will Allen. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Claimed RB Marcus Mason off waivers from Washington. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Traded QB Seneca Wallace to Cleveland for a 2011 undisclosed draft pick. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Signed DT Fred Robbins. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Acquired WR Reggie Brown from Philadelphia for a 2011 sixth-round draft pick. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed C Casey Rabach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Recalled D Alexander Sulzer from Milwaukee (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed D Brian Lee to a twoyear contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS—Signed G Kevin Hartman. KANSAS CITY WIZARDS—Traded G Kevin Hartman to FC Dallas for a 2012 second-round draft pick. COLLEGE ALBANY, N.Y.—Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Trina Patterson. BOISE STATE—Suspended senior football S Jason Robinson indefinitely for violating team rules. HAWAII—Fired men’s basketball coach Bob Nash. MASSACHUSETTS—Fired women’s basketball coach Marnie Dacko. SEATTLE—Announced F Charles Garcia is entering the NBA draft effective the end of the season.

NHL ROUNDUP

Goalie leads Stars to win over Capitals The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Marty Turco and the rest of the Dallas Stars could have been forgiven for figuring this was a lost cause. They trailed by two goals after two periods against Alex Ovechkin and the NHLleading Washington Capitals, a team seemingly en route to a 14th consecutive home victory and fourth straight win overall. Plus, the Stars have been fading: Entering Monday, they were 0-3 and had been outscored 17-5 since the end of the Olympic break. So much for all that. With Turco in the net on this night, anything was possible. He made a career-high 49 saves, and Dallas scored three times in six shots early in the third period, leading to a 4-3 shootout victory over Washington, despite two goals from Ovechkin. “It’s not going to be every night that your goalie’s going to wear a mask and steal a game for you,” Dallas coach Marc Crawford said. “We needed a great goaltending performance tonight, and Marty was absolutely terrific. We love the fact that he fought and fought and fought and

fought — and got a payoff.” Turco’s save total doesn’t even include the shootout, which Dallas took 2-1. He blocked four of five attempts by Washington, including by Ovechkin and Alexander Semin, who seemed to fake himself out and fell down head-first into Turco. “I think he was trying too hard,” Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau said. Brad Richards had a goal and an assist in regulation, plus one of Dallas’ two scores in the shootout. The other came from Loui Eriksson. Also on Monday: Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 LOS ANGELES — Michal Handzus and Alexander Frolov scored power-play goals 41 seconds apart during a four-goal first period, Fredrik Modin also scored with the man advantage against the team that traded him last week, and Los Angeles routed Columbus. Frolov also tied a career high with three assists, and the Kings also got goals from Wayne Simmonds, Drew Doughty and Brad Richardson to match their highest-scoring output of the season.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 D3

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

Dodgeball

Cavs push past Spurs

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Continued from D1 The objective for both teams is to eliminate all players from the opposing team. Picture a basketball court. Six balls are lined up at the center of the court and the two teams line up facing each other along the baselines at the opposite ends of the floor. When the first game starts, players from both teams run to the center of the court and grab balls and start chucking them at their opponents. Players who get hit by a ball thrown by an opposing player are out and must then step to the sidelines. If a player catches the ball, the opponent who threw the ball is out. Players who are out may resume play if a teammate catches the ball. No outs for hits in the head or below the knees. Several games are played within a 45-minute time frame (the time allotted for each match in the Central Oregon league). The team that has won the most games wins the match. Five teams currently make up the 2010 Winter Dodgeball League, hosted by All-Stars Basketball Academy, a local youth basketball training organization offered at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon and other locations around the area. Organizers Jared Webb and Danny Makepeace say the league has room to grow, and they welcome more teams to sign up. “It will catch on,� says Webb, who moved to Bend from Seattle a few months ago. “We used to play in downtown Seattle in the parks on

The Associated Press CLEVELAND — LeBron James was in street clothes. Shaquille O’Neal was nowhere to be found, and Antawn Jamison was in the locker room icing his sore knee. If they had lost, the Cleveland Cavaliers had plenty of excuses. They didn’t have to use one. Mo Williams made two free throws with 9 seconds left and Delonte West made the kind of plays down the stretch reserved for James as the Cavs won for the first time in three seasons without their superstar, beating the San Antonio Spurs 97-95 on Monday night. Cleveland had been 0-9 since 2007-08 without James. “We had a great opportunity. Not many teams can come here and win,� said Spurs guard Manu Ginobili, who scored a season-high 38. “LeBron wasn’t playing, Jamison didn’t play the second half and Shaq wasn’t there. We blew a big one.� Williams finished with 17 points for the Cavs, who were playing their second straight game without the injured James. The NBA’s reigning MVP is nursing a tender right ankle as well as other bumps and bruises and Cleveland coach Mike Brown is taking advantage of a lull in Cleveland’s schedule to get him rest. West had 16 points and made a key steal in the final minute as Cleveland became the first team to reach 50 wins this season. Also on Monday: Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . .112 MINNEAPOLIS — Shawn Marion had a season-high 29 points and 14 rebounds and Dallas stretched the league’s longest active winning streak to 12 straight games with a victory over Minnesota. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 NEW YORK — New York beat Atlanta for the third time this season when video replay showed Al Horford’s basket came after the buzzer. Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 NEW ORLEANS — Darren Collison had 16 points and a career-high 20 assists, and New Orleans snapped a four-game losing streak. Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Mike Conley and Rudy Gay had 21 points each, and Marc Gasol added 19 points and 13 rebounds and Memphis withstood a second-half rally to defeat New Jersey, snapping an eight-game home losing streak.

Briefs Continued from D4

Oregon Select Baseball takes title MEDFORD — Redmond’s Oregon Select Baseball team posted a 4-0 record and outscored its opponents 51-4 en route to winning the championship at the Grand Slam Medford Tourney. Central Oregon was represented by Bend’s Brock Powell, Devin Haney and Dominic Trono, Redmond’s Jeremy Erisman and Cam Peters, Prineville’s Troy Benton and Kahl Malott of Powell Butte.

Tae kwon do students do well at tourney PORTLAND — Five tae kwon do students from Bend’s Acrovision Sports Center won titles at the West Coast Tae Kwon Do Championships, held Saturday at the Oregon Convention Center. More than 30 schools from around the Northwest competed. Reece King, 6, a blue belt, was second in forms; Dylan

Atlantic Division Boston Toronto Philadelphia New York New Jersey

W 40 32 23 22 7

L 21 29 39 41 56

Orlando Atlanta Miami Charlotte Washington

W 44 40 32 30 21

L 20 23 31 31 39

Cleveland Milwaukee Chicago Detroit Indiana

W 50 33 31 22 20

L 15 29 31 41 43

Pct .656 .525 .371 .349 .111

GB — 8 17½ 19 34

L10 7-3 4-6 3-7 3-7 2-8

Str W-4 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1

Home 18-11 22-10 10-19 14-21 3-28

Away 22-10 10-19 13-20 8-20 4-28

Conf 27-13 23-18 11-23 16-27 6-34

Away 19-14 15-16 15-17 8-23 9-20

Conf 30-11 21-14 19-17 17-19 15-24

Away 22-11 13-20 12-19 7-24 7-27

Conf 29-9 24-15 19-18 14-22 15-22

Southeast Division Pct .688 .635 .508 .492 .350

GB — 3½ 11½ 12½ 21

L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-6

Str W-5 L-2 W-3 W-2 L-3

Home 25-6 25-7 17-14 22-8 12-19

Central Division Pct .769 .532 .500 .349 .317

GB — 15½ 17½ 27 29

L10 7-3 9-1 5-5 3-7 2-8

Str W-1 W-3 L-4 W-1 L-4

Home 28-4 20-9 19-12 15-17 13-16

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division Dallas San Antonio Memphis New Orleans Houston

W 44 36 33 32 31

L 21 25 31 32 31

Denver Utah Oklahoma City Portland Minnesota

W 42 40 38 37 14

L 21 22 24 28 50

L.A. Lakers Phoenix L.A. Clippers Sacramento Golden State

W 46 40 25 21 17

L 18 25 38 42 46

Pct .677 .590 .516 .500 .500

GB — 6 10½ 11½ 11½

L10 10-0 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-6

Str W-12 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1

Home 22-9 22-10 19-14 21-11 17-14

Away 22-12 14-15 14-17 11-21 14-17

Conf 24-16 22-17 18-22 21-17 23-18

Away 14-16 15-14 19-13 17-15 5-27

Conf 25-14 25-16 20-18 23-15 7-32

Away 17-13 16-17 7-24 6-27 4-28

Conf 26-11 25-15 12-28 13-26 9-28

Northwest Division Pct .667 .645 .613 .569 .219

GB — 1½ 3½ 6 28½

L10 7-3 7-3 7-3 6-4 1-9

Str W-3 W-2 W-2 L-1 L-6

Home 28-5 25-8 19-11 20-13 9-23

Pacific Division Pct .719 .615 .397 .333 .270

GB — 6½ 20½ 24½ 28½

L10 Str 5-5 L-3 8-2 W-1 4-6 L-3 3-7 L-2 2-8 L-5 ——— Monday’s Games

Cleveland 97, San Antonio 95 Memphis 107, New Jersey 101 New Orleans 135, Golden State 131

Home 29-5 24-8 18-14 15-15 13-18

tennis courts, and there were leagues all over the place. And I got here and there was nothing.� Webb and Makepeace, also of Bend, run All-Stars Basketball Academy. They decided to offer other sports for adults to raise money for the basketball academy, and part of the proceeds from the adult leagues go to partners Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon. The organizers say they plan to host another dodgeball session in the summer. “How could you NOT want to come out on a weekday and play dodgeball?� Webb asks. “Everybody has played dodgeball at one point in their life, and everybody can associate dodgeball with when they were a kid. It’s such a great opportunity to relive childhood memories.� The 45-minute dodgeball sessions take a toll on the players. “Forty-five minutes felt like two hours,� says Redmond’s Jesse Grover, 30, of the Smolich team as sweat drips off his face. Some of the players liken dodgeball to therapy. “It helps with aggression and stress. It’s good stress relief,� says Greg Thiessen, 40, of Bend, shortly after his Smolich Snipers team steps off the court following a 10-9 win against the Old Dodgers. In the background, a new match is starting between teams called Subaru of Bend and the Blacked-out Bank Robbers. Webb shouts “Dodgeball!� and throws down his arms. Bass-heavy music fills the well-lit school gym, and the game is on.

Blacked-out Bank Robbers, a team of employees from Bend’s Powder House ski shop, is dressed in various denim attire for a 1950s street-gang effect. And Subaru of Bend team members are all wearing white and black T-shirts with the letters SOB printed on them. The teams ease into play and at first all the throwing seems random. But after several games, the team members are attacking together. They wait for the right moment, then all fling balls at the same time. “It’s a lot of work,â€? says SOB’s Bob Tippet, 50, of Bend, moments after getting slammed in the face with a ball. “It’s physical: running, jumping — and making sure the ball doesn’t hit you in the face like it did me. I was out by myself and three balls came at one time; it’s hard to watch all three of them. It kind of upset me for a second, but it’s all in good fun.â€? After the game is over, players come off the court a bit battered and bruised, some limping. But every one of them is smiling. After all, it is just dodgeball. “It’s one of those old school-ground sports you played when you were 8, 9, 10 years old,â€? says Ray Chapa, 54, of Bend, who plays for the Subaru team. “And at that time you had no worries at all. ‌ And your future was bright and rosy. It kind of brings that feeling back when you are out here. You just forget everything. “All you do is take your opponent’s head off.â€? Katie Brauns can be reached at 541383-0393 or at kbrauns@bendbulletin. com.

New York 99, Atlanta 98 Dallas 125, Minnesota 112 Today’s Games

Miami at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Houston at Washington, 4 p.m. Utah at Chicago, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Portland, 7 p.m.

Philadelphia at Indiana, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 4 p.m. Boston at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

C S   C 

Wednesday’s Games Charlotte at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Utah at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Denver at Minnesota, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Toronto at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Memphis at Boston, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Miami, 4:30 p.m. New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. New York at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. All Times PST

SUMMARIES Monday’s Games ——— DALLAS (125) Butler 9-19 2-2 23, Marion 14-25 1-2 29, Nowitzki 8-15 8-10 24, Kidd 4-8 2-2 12, Beaubois 4-12 3-4 11, Najera 3-5 2-2 9, Barea 4-8 0-0 9, Stevenson 1-2 2-2 4, Carroll 1-2 2-2 4. Totals 48-96 22-26 125. MINNESOTA (112) Gomes 5-12 2-2 12, Jefferson 15-21 6-7 36, Hollins 5-8 3-5 13, Flynn 4-12 3-3 13, Brewer 3-10 4-5 11, Love 1-7 4-4 6, Pavlovic 3-10 0-3 7, Milicic 1-3 1-2 3, Sessions 5-5 1-2 11, Wilkins 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-88 24-33 112. Dallas 34 37 26 28 — 125 Minnesota 27 34 23 28 — 112 3-Point Goals—Dallas 7-21 (Butler 3-6, Kidd 2-5, Barea 1-2, Najera 1-3, Stevenson 01, Carroll 0-1, Beaubois 0-3), Minnesota 4-22 (Flynn 2-6, Pavlovic 1-6, Brewer 1-7, Gomes 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Dallas 44 (Marion 14), Minnesota 63 (Jefferson 13). Assists—Dallas 30 (Kidd 10), Minnesota 26 (Flynn 8). Total Fouls—Dallas 24, Minnesota 20. Technicals—Nowitzki, Stevenson, Minnesota defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Hollins. Ejected— Hollins. A—14,007 (19,356). ——— GOLDEN STATE (131) Morrow 11-13 0-1 28, Maggette 7-10 4-4 18, Hunter 5-8 0-0 10, Curry 5-13 0-0 12, Watson 4-9 4-4 12, George 7-11 0-0 18, Williams 10-16 7-8 28, Tolliver 1-5 3-4 5. Totals 50-85 18-21 131. NEW ORLEANS (135) Stojakovic 6-14 3-4 16, West 11-16 6-7 28, Okafor 10-12 2-3 22, Collison 7-12 0-2 16, Peterson 4-8 0-0 12, Songaila 3-6 1-1 7, Thornton 11-19 4-5 28, J.Wright 1-2 0-0 2, Posey 1-3 1-2 4. Totals 54-92 17-24 135. Golden State 25 37 33 36 — 131 New Orleans 36 31 33 35 — 135 3-Point Goals—Golden State 13-25 (Morrow 6-6, George 4-7, Curry 2-4, Williams 1-3, Tolliver 0-2, Watson 0-3), New Orleans 10-22 (Peterson 4-7, Collison 2-3, Thornton 2-6, Posey 1-3, Stojakovic 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Golden State 29 (Tolliver 5), New Orleans 54 (West 13). Assists—Golden State 26 (Watson 7), New Orleans 38 (Collison 20). Total Fouls—Golden State 23, New Orleans 18. A—13,889 (17,188). ——— NEW JERSEY (101) Hassell 0-1 0-0 0, Boone 3-5 0-2 6, Lopez 3-10 4-5 10, Harris 9-18 8-10 28, Lee 13-20 2-3 30, Humphries 1-7 0-0 2, Douglas-Roberts 1-2 0-0 2, Hayes 2-7 1-2 6, Dooling 1-4 0-0 3, T.Williams 6-11 1-2 14. Totals 39-85 16-24 101. MEMPHIS (107) Gay 7-18 7-9 21, Arthur 3-4 1-2 7, Gasol 813 3-5 19, Conley 9-18 1-2 21, Mayo 2-8 4-4 8, Haddadi 1-1 1-2 3, Young 3-11 4-4 10, Carroll

5-8 0-0 10, M.Williams 3-6 0-0 8. Totals 41-87 21-28 107. New Jersey 27 24 26 24 — 101 Memphis 32 35 14 26 — 107 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 7-23 (Harris 26, Lee 2-6, T.Williams 1-2, Dooling 1-3, Hayes 1-6), Memphis 4-12 (M.Williams 2-3, Conley 2-5, Gay 0-1, Young 0-1, Mayo 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 50 (Boone 9), Memphis 57 (Gasol 13). Assists—New Jersey 23 (T.Williams, Lopez 6), Memphis 16 (Mayo 6). Total Fouls—New Jersey 20, Memphis 18. Technicals—Gasol, Memphis defensive three second 2. A—10,317 (18,119). ——— ATLANTA (98) Williams 3-6 2-2 8, Jos.Smith 11-22 3-7 25, Horford 6-14 6-6 18, Bibby 0-4 1-1 1, Johnson 8-17 5-6 22, Crawford 5-16 4-5 16, Evans 3-6 00 6, Pachulia 0-1 0-0 0, Teague 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-87 21-27 98. NEW YORK (99) Gallinari 9-14 5-6 27, Chandler 2-8 0-0 5, Lee 9-15 1-1 19, Rodriguez 4-10 1-2 9, Walker 3-5 0-0 8, Harrington 5-10 2-2 14, Douglas 4-8 2-2 11, House 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 39-77 11-13 99. Atlanta 27 19 24 28 — 98 New York 27 17 32 23 — 99 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 3-17 (Crawford 2-8, Johnson 1-4, Williams 0-1, Evans 0-2, Bibby 0-2), New York 10-15 (Gallinari 4-5, Harrington 2-3, Walker 2-3, Douglas 1-1, Chandler 1-2, Rodriguez 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 51 (Horford 12), New York 45 (Lee 13). Assists—Atlanta 15 (Jos.Smith 6), New York 20 (Rodriguez, House 4). Total Fouls—Atlanta 17, New York 23. Technicals— New York defensive three second 2. A—19,763 (19,763). ——— SAN ANTONIO (95) Ginobili 12-23 7-7 38, Duncan 6-12 1-2 13, McDyess 2-8 0-0 4, Hill 8-13 5-8 23, Bogans 0-2 0-0 0, Bonner 4-7 0-0 9, Jefferson 1-3 1-2 3, Mason 1-10 0-1 2, Blair 0-3 0-0 0, Hairston 1-2 0-0 2, Mahinmi 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 35-84 15-22 95. CLEVELAND (97) J.Williams 6-11 0-1 13, Jamison 6-12 2-4 17, Hickson 5-12 2-2 12, M.Williams 7-16 2-2 17, A.Parker 3-3 2-2 8, West 5-13 6-6 16, Varejao 3-5 5-7 11, Moon 0-1 0-0 0, Gibson 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 36-76 19-24 97. San Antonio 26 26 24 19 — 95 Cleveland 28 21 23 25 — 97 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 10-29 (Ginobili 7-11, Hill 2-3, Bonner 1-3, Bogans 0-2, Jefferson 0-2, Mason 0-8), Cleveland 6-14 (Jamison 3-4, J.Williams 1-2, Gibson 1-2, M.Williams 1-5, Hickson 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 51 (Jefferson 9), Cleveland 50 (Varejao 9). Assists—San Antonio 21 (Ginobili, Duncan 5), Cleveland 21 (M.Williams 8). Total Fouls—San Antonio 19, Cleveland 17. Technicals—Cleveland defensive three second. A—20,562 (20,562).

Ely, 7, a white belt, was second in forms; Rayne Ely, 9, a yellow belt, was third in forms; Joni Ransom, 9, a brown belt, was first in forms; and Jadon Bachtold, 11, a black belt, was first in forms. All five Central Oregon entries took first place in sparring in their respective categories.

Local skiers gain top honors in Sweden Kristina Strandberg, Sarah Max, Taylor Leach and Evelyn Dong, all XC Oregon crosscountry skiers, won a handful of top honors in several events during last week’s Swedish Vasaloppet cross-country skiing event in the Salen-Mora region of Sweden. Strandberg took second out of 8,000 women in the 30kilometer TjejVasan classic event. Her time was 1 hour, 32 minutes and 40 seconds. Max placed ninth in the Skate Vasa 45K freestyle. In the 90K classic race, Strandberg was sixth, Max finished 42nd and Leach placed 107th. In the American Birkebeiner ski marathon, Dong finished sixth, Max was 12th and Leach 68th. — Bulletin staff report

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL FRIDAY NIGHT WORKOUTS: For Little League players; this Friday and March 19; ages 10 and under 6-7:30 p.m.; ages 11 and older 7:30-9 p.m.; $10 per session, three for $25; at Bend Fieldhouse, located at Vince Genna Stadium, 401 S.E. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-312-9259; www.bendelks.com; jr@bendelks.com. BEND MASTERS SOFTBALL LEAGUE REGISTRATION: For ages 60 and over; deadline is March 31; season runs May 20-Aug. 26; $20; Rob Cohen at 541-3825659; rob0405@bendbroadband.com. BEND ELK’S BASEBALL TRAINING CAMP: Ages 7-10, skill development will include hitting, throwing, fielding, base running; bring baseball mitt, bat and a water bottle each day; March 17, 18 and 19, 8:30–11:30 a.m. at the Bend Field House; $60-$81; www.bendparksandrec.org. JUNIOR COUGAR BASEBALL GOLF FUNDRAISER: A friendly golf tournament fundraiser in four-person scramble format is open to the public at The Club at Brasada Ranch on April 3. Tournament includes 18 holes with cart and range balls, contests, barbecue, silent auction and tournament prizes. Cost: $87.50 per player, $350 per team. Info. and registration: Brandon Sunitsch at sunitsch@bendcable.com.

BASKETBALL THREE-ON-THREE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT: Five-game guarantee on March 20 and 21 hosted by Cannonball athletics and open to all divisions and age groups. Event will include trophies, dunk contest and live band. Entry deadline is Monday. Location: West Bend Tennis Center, 1355 S.W. Commerce Ave. Cost varies. Info. and registration: murraycannon@live.com or 541-480-0093.

MISCELLANEOUS WEST POWELL BUTTE EQUESTRIAN: Western and English riding taught to all levels ages 7 and older. Horses and tack provided. At Powell Butte estates. From 10 a.m. to noon March 20, 21, 27

NASCAR Continued from D1 Is it that the high-speed contact sent Keselowski airborne in a spectacular flip that could have caused serious harm to Keselowski or any number of fans in the grandstands? Or, maybe, the issue is that NASCAR wasn’t properly prepared to deal with the ramifications of allowing drivers free rein on the race track. All three are valid arguments. First up is Edwards, who is on a long list of drivers who have been on the losing end of Keselowski’s aggressive charge into NASCAR’s top level. Edwards’ most obvious run-in with Keselowski was on the final lap of last April’s race at Talladega, where Keselowski’s nudge sent Edwards flying into the fence in a wreck that some may argue was more frightening than Atlanta. But the two race against each other weekly in two series, and Edwards’ hinted at a far deeper history with the unapologetic Keselowski. So when early contact between the two knocked Edwards out Sunday, at a track where he’s won four times in two series, he

and 28. Cost: $50 per session. Info: Yvonne Tillman at 541-548-7275, yvotill@ bendbroadband.com, www.raprd.org. LIFEGUARD CLASS: For ages 15 and older; certification for lifeguarding, CPR, first aid and AED; Saturdays and Sundays, March 20-21 and 27-28, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center; $150; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION: Ages 16 and older can become a certified swim instructor through a Red Cross course. March 22-26 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond. Cost: $175. Contact: Yvonne Tillman at 541-548-7275, yvotill@ bendbroadband.com, www.raprd.org. BMX RACES: Opening day, registration and practice for High Desert BMX races March 20 from noon to 2 p.m. After opening day, race registration and practice 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, races at 6:30 p.m. All ages welcome. Helmet, long-sleeved shirt and pants required. Can race any working bike without pegs, reflectors or chainguards. One day free membership and available gear. At Big Sky Park, 21690 Neff Rd. Contact: 541-815-6208, www.highdesertbmx. org or renegade_sjane@hotmail.com CPR & FIRST AID CLASS: Ages 14 and older; receive certification in CPR and first aid; Sunday, March 21, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center; $45$58; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. BASIC FIRST AID: For ages 8-12, children will learn how to handle an emergency situation without panicking; Saturday, March 20, 1-3 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center; $20; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. INCLIMB ROCK ‘N’ TIME: Indoor rock climbing for grades 6-12; Friday, March 19, 1-4:15 p.m. at Inclimb Rock Gym, Bend; transportation provided from Redmond; $20; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. COED DODGEBALL LEAGUE: Through April 26; eight matches plus playoffs; at Morning Star Christian School, 19741 Baker Road in Bend, from 6-10 p.m.; $300 per team; registration still open; $2 drop-in; jared@ababend.com; 541-420-3081. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR COURSE: American Red Cross WSI Course provides

was ready for revenge. Edwards, who was immediately parked for his actions, had little to say after a postrace meeting with NASCAR. But he minced no words in a Facebook posting late Sunday night. “My options,� he wrote, “Considering that Brad wrecks me with no regard for anyones safety or hard work, should I: A-Keep letting him wreck me? B-Confront him after the race? C-Wait til bristol and collect other cars? or D-Take care of it now? “I want to be clear that I was surprised at his flight and very relieved when he walked away. Every person has to decide what code they want to live by and hopefully this explains mine.� Opinions were split, though, perhaps fueled by the severity of Keselowski’s crash. There was no similar outrage when Hamlin fulfilled his promise of payback on Keselowski in last year’s Nationwide Series finale at Homestead. And it sure seemed that the cheers far outweighed the jeers when Juan Pablo Montoya and Tony Stewart played retaliatory bumper-cars a day later. But because Keselowski went airborne, bounced hood-first off the retaining wall, and had to

training to become a swim instructor; at the Athletic Club of Bend; April 3, 4, 10 and 11, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day; open to the public; must be age 16 or older; $135; Rob at 541-322-5856. LIFEGUARD CLASS: Provides certification in CPR/PR, standard first aid and life guarding; April 17, 18, 24 and 25, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day; open to the public; must be age 15 and older and have swimming skills; $175; Rob at 541-322-5856.

MULTISPORT SNOWATHLON MULTISPORT RACE: Combined snowshoe, downhill and nordic multisport race to benefit Oregon Adaptive Sports; $25 individual; $50 per team; Saturday at Hoodoo Mountain Resort, Sisters; registration at 9 a.m., race starts at 11 a.m.; 541-848-9390; oasbend@gmail. com; www.oregonadaptivesports.org.

RUNNING GIRLS ON THE RUN REGISTRATION: For girls ages 8-11; sign-ups are limited to 15 girls per location; offered at Pine Ridge and High Lakes Elementary; starts March 29 and 30; $150; financial assistance is available; heidi@deschutescountygotr.org; 541-7882499; www.deschutescountygotr.org.

SKIING CASCADE CREST NORDIC RACE: Hosted by MBSEF, Saturday at Mount Bachelor; 541-388-0002, mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. WESTERN REGION J3 JR. OLYMPICS: March 17-21 at Mount Bachelor; disciplines include alpine super-G, giant slalom and slalom; 541388-0002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. MBSEF FREERIDE SPRING BREAK CAMP: Freeriding for skiers and snowboarders; March 22-26, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; 541-3880002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINE SPRING BREAK CAMP: March 22-26, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; 541-3880002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org.

TENNIS LITTLE STARS TENNIS: For ages 3-5 years; helps build hand/eye coordination; MondayThursday, March 15-18, 2-2:30 p.m. at Redmond Activity Center; $15; parents must attend; 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

climb from a cockpit so crumpled it looked more like an accordion than a car, there’s been a cry for NASCAR to issue serious sanctions against Edwards. Fans want him suspended, and many analysts have agreed. Even Keselowski seemed to taunt NASCAR into cracking down on Edwards. “It’ll be interesting to see how NASCAR reacts to it,� he said after the wreck. “They have the ball. If they’re going to allow people to intentionally wreck each other at tracks this fast, we will hurt someone either in the cars or the grandstands. It’s not cool to intentionally wreck someone at 195 mph.� It’s left NASCAR to sift through the evidence. On one hand, this is no different than a traffic infraction: run a red light and nothing happens, you maybe get a ticket. Run a red light and kill someone, now you’re looking at vehicular homicide. So now NASCAR plays judge, jury and executioner, and its decision will reverberate through the rest of the season. A severe punishment against Edwards is akin to a death sentence on the “have at it� attitude. If the first driver who actually “had at it� is hit with a stiff pen-

alty, then other drivers won’t ever dare test the limits. A significant fine, points deduction or probation will likely back Edwards into a conservative mode that could alter the way he races the rest of the year. And no action at all, well, that could promote repeat behavior from Edwards or others. Whatever NASCAR decides won’t satisfy everyone, but there are some guarantees going forward. Keselowski, for one, got the message loud and clear that some rival drivers have been trying to deliver for a while now, and he’s likely going to think twice before bulldozing his way through a pack of traffic. Edwards probably wishes he’d done things a little differently and will likely give deeper thought to how he exacts his revenge. And NASCAR? Well, NASCAR knows for sure it needs a quick handbook on how to deal with these issues. Nobody wants to see the Wild West re-enacted on the track every weekend, but “boys, have at it� was a well-intentioned idea that doesn’t deserve to be scrapped because one incident took everyone — including Edwards — by surprise.


D4 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD

I B

BOWLING

Orienteering event set BSC takes second at for Mount Bachelor state championships The Columbia River Orienteering Club will host a ski orienteering challenge, starting between 10 a.m. and noon this Sunday at the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center. Participants can take on courses of 3, 7 or 10 kilometers. Snowshoes will be allowed, and classic and skate skis will be available for rent. Registration is slated between 9 a.m. and noon. Cost is $6 for individuals and $10 for groups for CROC members, $8 for individuals and $12 for groups otherwise. Nordic center trail fees are extra. For more information, go to www.croc.org.

Summit hosts Hike for Haiti this Saturday The public is invited to join or sponsor students of Bend’s Summit High School in hiking up and down Pilot Butte from noon to 2 p.m. on Saturday to raise money for the American Red Cross Haiti Relief and Development Fund. Donations will be accepted. Registration is not necessary. For more information, call 541-322-3300.

Lava City hosts derby bout this Saturday The Lava City Roller Dolls Cinder Kittens are back in roller derby action this Saturday night with a home bout against the Southern Oregon Roller Girls. The bout will take place at Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane in northeast Bend, where the doors will open at 5 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, or $12 at the door. The Roller Dolls are coming off two bouts at the Slaughter County Vixens Invitational Wild West Showdown, a 19-team event held Feb. 26-28 in Bremerton, Wash. There, Lava City lost two close decisions, falling 156119 to Pikes Peak (Colorado) and 138-137 to Arizona Roller Derby. For more information about the Lava City Roller Dolls and their upcoming events, go to www.lavacityrollerdolls.com.

CORVALLIS — Strong individual performances in both the girls and boys divisions carried Bend Swim Club to second place at the Oregon Swimming 11-14 Short Course State Championships. The meet was held Feb. 25-28 at Osborn Aquatic Center and included nearly 40 teams. Bend Swim Club piled up 486.5 points to finish behind only the Tualatin Hills Thunderbolts (898.5) in the team standings. Lake Oswego Swim Club was third, with 413.5 points. BSC’s Baxter Halligan and Ben Brockman tied for meet high-point honors in the 11-yearold boys division, and Bend’s Brandon Deckard was highpoint winner in the 14-year-old boys division. On the girls side for BSC, Mackenzie Halligan placed first in two events and set three Bend Swim Club records. Complete BSC results from the meet are listed in today’s Community Sports Scoreboard.

Bend swimmers shine at 10-under meet SPRINGFIELD — Emily Brockman led the charge for Bend Swim Club at the Oregon Swimming 10-Under Championships, held Feb. 20-21 at Willamalane Park Swim Center. Swimming in the 9-year-old girls division, Brockman placed first in four events and second in two others. Among 16 BSC swimmers in the meet, Tia Lindsay (8-under girls) and Hannah Peterson (10-year-old girls) also were event winners. Complete BSC results from the meet are listed in today’s Community Sports Scoreboard.

Golf tournament to benefit youth baseball The 13U Junior Cougar Baseball program plans to host a golf tournament to raise funds for its 2010 season. The event is scheduled for Saturday, April 3, at The Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. The tournament format will be four-player scramble. Entry fee is $87.50 for individuals, or $350

for teams. Fees include 18 holes of golf with cart and range balls. To sign up or for more information, contact Brandon Sunitsch, tournament coordinator, at sunitsch4@bendcable.com.

Youth baseball camp offered Saturday The Summit High School baseball program will conduct its annual youth baseball camp this Saturday at Summit High. The camp, designed for boys in 10U and 12U baseball programs, will run from 1-4 p.m. The Summit coaching staff and varsity players will conduct the camp. Instruction during the first half of the camp will focus on baseball fundamentals, including throwing, catching, hitting, infield play, outfield play and pitching. Starting at 2:30 p.m., camp participants will play in a competitive game coached by Summit players. Cost for the camp is $30 per player. Registration will be available on the day of the camp at Summit High. For more information, call C.J. Colt, Summit varsity baseball coach, at 541-322-3279.

Roughriders roll to nonleague rugby win PORTLAND — The Bend Rugby Club Roughriders improved their season record to 9-6 on Saturday with a convincing 43-7 nonleague road victory over the Oregon Sports Union Division 3 team. Bend trailed 7-0 before scoring 43 unanswered points in a rally that included two tries apiece by Mike Hunter and Clint Vogelsang and one each by Ron Hernandez and Tyler Dolman. Hunter made good on five of six conversions and added a penalty kick to complete the scoring. The Roughriders’ Max Nicholson was named the game’s most valuable player. The Roughriders take a 4-6 Pacific Northwest Rugby Football Union Division 2 record into a league match at home this Saturday against the Axemen of Bellevue, Wash. The match is set for 2 p.m. at Bend’s High Desert Middle School. See Briefs / D3

LAVA LANES League Standings and High Scores Feb. 26-March 4 Tea Timers — Boom Boom & Bam Bam, Chris Gray 257/621. Afternoon Delight — Clay Pigeons, Josh Dagenais 247/707, Joy Reeves 228/613. Latecomers — No Threat, Becky Zimmerman 194/532. Progressive — Freight Lanes Intl., Don Justice 289/652. Free Breathers — Spares and Strikes, Doug Gray 268/762, Ellen Tucker 214/579. T.G.I.F. — Happy Guys & A Gal, Rich Wolf 279/705, Joy Reeves 223/627. Casino Fun — Team 10, Dieryel Wade 240/661, Edith Roebuck 192/537. Win, Lose or Draw — Let’s Rum Bowl, Lyle Lorentz 196/542, Jamie Sernett 174/475. His and Hers — Flippin 68’s, Robert Boller 236/692, Diana Hayes 213/602. Jack and Jill — Boo Yah! Zin Watford 248/688, Pennie Olson 184/508. Guys and Gals — Smokey and the Bandits, Ryan Johnson 280/636. Michelle Wallace 201/591. Early Risers — Bowlie Rollers, Diana Turner 204/541. Rejects — Blue Ribbons, David Pete 238/571, Gail Kirk 203/539. Lava Lanes Classic — Pin Heads, Travis Holmes 266/728, Bev Sunderlin 221/607. Wednesday Inc. — Auntie Em’s Deli, Randy Mooney 300/665, Rommel Sundita 258/761.

SWIMMING BEND SWIM CLUB Oregon Swimming 11-14 Short Course State Championships At Corvallis, Feb. 25-28 (BSC Results) GIRLS 11 Year Old 50 Backstroke — 6, Mary Stewart, 32.70. 12 Year Old 200 Individual Medley — 1, Mackenzie Halligan, 2:13.57 (BSC record). 100 Butterfly — 1, Mackenzie Halligan, 1:01.19 (BSC record). 500 Freestyle — 2, Mackenzie Halligan, 5:21.79; 8, Merritt Allen, 5:49.37. 200 Freestyle — 3, Mackenzie Halligan, 2:02.17. 50 Freestyle — 3, Mackenzie Halligan, 28.28 (BSC record). 1,000 Freestyle — 7, Mackenzie Halligan, 11:03.12. 13 Year Old 200 Backstroke — 4, Elizabeth Cobb, 2:12.38. 1,650 Freestyle — 2, Phoebe Weedman, 18:33.73. 200 Individual Medley — 6, Elizabeth Cobb, 2:18.61. 100 Backstroke — 8, Elizabeth Cobb, 1:02.76. 400 Individual Medley — 5, Elizabeth Cobb, 4:53.41; 6, Sarah Jane Souther, 4:53.61. 200 Butterfly — 5, Sarah Jane Souther, 2:18.97. 500 Freestyle — 5, Phoebe Weedman, 5:22.55. 1,000 Freestyle — 4, Phoebe Weedman, 11:00.23. 14 Year Old 100 Breaststroke — 8, Ciara Hogue, 1:15.14. BOYS 11 Year Old 50 Backstroke — 1, Ben Brockman, 31.79. 50 Freestyle — 1, Ben Brockman, 26.87. 100 Butterfly — 1, Ben Brockman, 1:04.43; 7, Austin Snyder-Jewsbury, 1:14.69. 100 Backstroke — 1, Baxter Halligan, 1:06.14; 2, Ben Brockman, 1:06.87. 50 Butterfly — 1, Ben Brockman, 28.47. 100 Freestyle — 1, Ben Brockman, 58.37; 4, Paul Rogers, 1:01.00. 200 Individual Medley — 1, Baxter Halligan, 2:23.50; 7, Paul Rogers, 2:31.60. 500 Freestyle — 1, Baxter Halligan, 5:41.76. 200 Freestyle — 1, Baxter Halligan, 2:06.55; 3, Paul Rogers, 2:11.42. 100 Individual Medley — 1, Baxter Halligan, 1:08.05; 3, Paul Rogers, 1:11.72. 100 Breaststroke — 1, Baxter Halligan, 1:15.59; 4, Paul Rogers, 1:18.57. 50 Breaststroke — 2, Paul Rogers, 34.66. 12 Year Old 50 Backstroke — 8, John Hartmeier, 30.14. 200 Individual Medley — 5, John Hartmeier, 2:25.20. 100 Backstroke — 6, John Hartmeier, 1:03.91. 500 Freestyle — 6, Jeremy Moon, 5:42.35. 200 Freestyle — 7, Jeremy Moon, 2:09.72. 13 Year Old 50 Freestyle — 5, Joseph Murphy, 24.33. 100 Butterfly — 3, Joseph Murphy, 57.65. 100 Backstroke — 6, Joseph Murphy, 1:01.61. 200 Freestyle — 4, Joseph Murphy, 1:54.36. 200 Butterfly — 2, Joseph Murphy, 2:08.52. 100 Freestyle — 4, Joseph Murphy, 53.04. 14 Year Old 200 Individual Medley — 1, Brandon Deckard, 1:58.25 (BSC record); 7, Aidan Soles, 2:07.76. 100 Butterfly — 1, Brandon Deckard, 52.93 (BSC record). 1,650 Freestyle — 4, Matt Carpenter, 16:48.73. 200 Backstroke — 4, Matt Carpenter, 2:01.24. 500 Freestyle — 3, Matt Carpenter, 4:56.30; 8, Aidan Soles, 5:04.36. 200 Breaststroke — 2, Aidan Soles, 2:19.33. 100 Backstroke — 1, Brandon Deckard, 52.69 (BSC record); 6, Matt Carpenter, 56.07. 200 Butterfly — 1, Brandon Deckard, 1:57.20 (BSC record); 6, Matt Carpenter, 2:06.05. 1,000 Freestyle — 3, Matt Carpenter, 10:08.00. 200

Backstroke — 7, Connor Brenda, 2:06.46. 400 Individual Medley — 1, Brandon Deckard, 4:12.06 (BSC record). 100 Breaststroke — 5, Aidan Soles, 1:05.57; 7, John Murphy, 1:07.04. OREGON SWIMMING 10-UNDER CHAMPIONSHIPS At Springfield, Feb. 20-21 (BSC Results) GIRLS 8-Under 25 Backstroke — 2, Emma Brady, 19.18; 8, Ella Frank, 22.17. 25 Butterfly — 2, Maria Wold, 17.50. 50 Backstroke — 3, Emma Brady, 40.89; 4, Tia Lindsey, 41.25; 15, Ella Frank, 47.57. 100 Individual Medley — 2, Tia Lindsey, 1:25.74; 4, Maria Wold, 1:29.60; 5, Emma Brady, 1:33.24. 50 Freestyle — 2, Tia Lindsey, 33.77; 5, Emma Brady, 35.50; 14, Ella Frank, 38.23. 100 Freestyle — 3, Tia Lindsey, 1:14.81; 6, Emma Brady, 1:18.45; 9, Maria Wold, 1:23.87. 50 Butterfly — 6, Emma Brady, 42.39; 8, Maria Wold, 42.85. 25 Freestyle — 1, Tia Lindsey, 14.62; 10, Ella Frank, 17.03. 50 Breaststroke — 6, Maria Wold, 48.83. 25 Breaststroke — 6, Maria Wold, 21.99. 9 Year Old 50 Breaststroke — 1, Emily Brockman, 39.51. 100 Individual Medley — 1, Emily Brockman, 1:17.66. 200 Individual Medley — 1, Emily Brockman, 2:47.41. 100 Backstroke — 2, Emily Brockman, 1:19.36. 50 Butterfly — 2, Emily Brockman, 36.16. 100 Breaststroke — 1, Emily Brockman, 1:25.24. 10 Year Old 200 Individual Medley — 4, Hannah Peterson, 2:41.47. 50 Breaststroke — 5, Teresa Cobb, 38.77; 12, Piper Flannery, 42.31. 50 Backstroke — 4, Hannah Peterson, 34.60; 10, Teresa Cobb, 36.82. 100 Individual Medley — 5, Hannah Peterson, 1:16.15; 9, Teresa Cobb, 1:18.67. 100 Backstroke — 2, Hannah Peterson, 1:13.73; 9, Teresa Cobb, 1:17.58. 50 Butterfly — 1, Hannah Peterson, 32.14; 9, Teresa Cobb, 35.49. 100 Breaststroke — 3, Teresa Cobb, 1:25.76. BOYS 9 Year Old 100 Breaststroke — 8, Christopher Davami, 1:40.52. 50 Breaststroke — 16, Griffin McKean, 47.63. 10 Year Old 50 Breaststroke — 4, Noah Vial, 40.11. 100 Backstroke — 6, Noah Vial, 1:21.54. 100 Breaststroke — 4, Noah Vial, 1:29.81. 100 Freestyle — 9, Noah Vial, 1:09.93. 200 Individual Medley — 10, Noah Vial, 2:54.41. 50 Backstroke — 11, Noah Vial, 38.27. 100 Butterfly — 9, Jonathan Davami, 1:28.36. 50 Butterfly — 11, Jonathan Davami, 38.70.

VOLLEYBALL REDMOND VOLLEYBALL ASSOCIATION Women W L Gravity 33 2 Lady Slammers 33 3 Hit List 23 13 S.W.A.T. 20 16 Just Lucky 20 16 The Volley Girls 18 18 VB Fuller Girls 12 23 Ball Luvrz 7 28 G.N.O. 6 28 Dinkin & Divin 5 30 Tuesday Coed W L Plum Fierce 37 5 Trybz 35 7 Benz Electric 33 9 Team Pink 26 18 Super Awesomes 20 22 All Stars 18 23 Kaos 16 25 Storm Water Services 14 30 Dysfunctionals 10 30 Philgood Crew 1 41 Thursday Coed W L Net Results 51 12 Trybz 50 12 Peak Performance 50 14 Number One 44 20 Solid Rock 25 38 Take Two Aspirin 23 40 Hang Time 16 47 The Ducks 12 51 Bouncin’ Beans 11 52

T 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 T 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 T 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1

ALPINE SKIING MINI-WORLD CUP SLALOM February 28 Mount Bachelor BOYS J-6 (7-8 years old): 1, Jace Marshall, 65.06 seconds. 2. Jack Smith, 65.45. 3. Reed Kellar, 69.22. 4. Canon Settlemier, 69.23. 5. Tyler Lovejoy, 70.42. 6. Chance Settlemier, 71.40. 7. Luc

Barnes, 72.35. 8. Spencer Burgess, 73.12. 9. Carter Archuleta, 73.78. 10. Aidan Donohue, 75.06. 11. Maximus Nye, 76.55. 12. Jack Schaffer, 76.90. 13. Jack Cauble, 79.11. J-5 (9-10 years old): 1. Harrison “Laz” Glickman, 58.83. 2. Wolfgang Meckem, 64.34. 3. Ragnar K. Schmidt, 66.23. 4. Minam Cravens, 66.71. 5. Giovanni Ricci, 70.05. 6. Dawson Conway, 70.59. 7. Hayden Hall, 71.03. 8. Magnus Schmidt, 71.16. 9. Reece Marshall, 71.61. 10. Tyler Ericksson, 72.01. 11. Charlie Law, 73.25. 12. Wyatt J. Topping, 75.19. 13. Joseph Ringo, 75.40. 14. Mallory Purdy, 77.21. 15. Cole Fuller, 81.37. 16. Hunter Spence, 82.14. 17. Chase Spence, 83.43. 18. Will Stuermer, 84.28. J-4 (11-12 years old): 1. Thomas Wimberly, 53.46. 2. Ryan Griffiths, 57.85. 3. Nick Rasmussen, 57.91. 4. Connor Coggin, 59.19. 5. Alex Yount, 59.31. 6. Mitchell Law, 62.03. 7. Charlie Stuermer, 62.66. 8. Ryan Stanley, 68.54. 9. Andrew Bristow, 70.11. 10. Sean Wilson, 73.95. 11. Blake Bell, 79.65. 12. Peter Johnston, 83.38. 13. Ian Lafky, 103.39. J-3 (13-14 years old): 1. Eli Crane, 60.38. GIRLS J-6 (7-8 years old): 1. Alice Bouchard, 63.40. 2. Keely Buchanan, 71.57. 3. Maria Wold, 71.62. 4. Ava Sophia Lilley, 71.79. 5. Tiger Gingold, 71.82. 6. Madi Sebulsky, 71.92. 7. Annelise Norkitis, 72.00. 8. Zayna Farah, 73.69. 9. Carly WaltherPorino, 77.49. 10. Darcy Hays, 78.65. 11. Megan Kaiser, 78.66. 12. Jenelle Neumann, 81.58. 13. Coco Bouchard, 85.83. 14. Julia Watson, 89.16. J-5 (9-10 years old): 1. Lili Bouchard, 55.20. 2. Erin Smith, 59.37. 3. Maggi McElrath, 59.57. 4. Addison Beasley, 61.30. 5. Zoe Rischitelli, 62.65. 6. Sophia Sahm, 62.71. 7. Alexandra Kaiser, 62.98. 8. McElle Kelley, 63.73. 9. Paget Rathbun, 65.22. 10. Lauren Wattenburg, 65.34. 11. Kelsey Olson, 66.07. 12. Sarah Rose Buchannan, 67.54. 13. Dagny Donohue, 68.90. 14. Maelynn Fletcher, 69.94. 15. Ashlyn Bronson, 72.68. 16. Parker Campbell, 75.48. 17. Olivia Colton, 76.33. 18. Peyton William, 76.64. 19. Sara Dingman, 79.23. 20. Vivienne Cornutt, 82.53. J-4 (11-12 years old): 1. Madison Archuleta, 52.80. 2. Winter Vinecki, 58.15. 3. Carlisle Topping, 63.32. 4. JoJo Bond, 64.75. 5. Natalie Merrill, 67.44. 6. Samantha Tullis, 67.49. 7. Taye Nakamura-Koyama, 67.51. 8. Cammi Benson, 67.86. 9. McCall Phillips, 70.30. 10. Shelby Cutter, 71.34. 11. Maya Paulson, 76.74.

GYMNASTICS ROSE CITY CHALLENGE In Beaverton Friday through Sunday Results for Cascade All-Star Gymnastics Katelyn Ohlrich (Level-10 senior): 9.25, 9.4, 9.075, 9.15, 36.875 (first in every event) Level-9 seniors Courtney Miller: 8.95 9.025, 9, 8.925, 35.9 (fourth place allaround) Shelby Kine: 0, 8.05, 0, 7.65, 0, 15.7 (15th place allaround) Annica Balentine (Level-8 junior): 8.65, 9.325, 9.15, 9.45, 36.575 (second place all-around, first place floor) Brandi Jacobson (Level-8 senior): 9, 9.15, 8.975, 9.3, 36.425 (second place all-around) Level-7 child, 8-10 years Lacy Eddleston: 9.3, 9.525, 9.3, 9.325, 37.45 (first all-around, first on vault, bars, beam) Macy Odiorne: 9.3, 9.45, 9.25, 9.35, 37.35 (second place all-around) Camri Reinhart: 8.4, 8.5, 8.05, 8.775, 33.725 (eighth place all-around) Stacia Apple (Level-7 child, 11 years): 9, 9, 7.3, 8.875, 34.175 (ninth place all-around) Level-7 junior, 13 years Kyriel Butler: 9.15, 9.175, 8.15, 8.75, 35.225 (seventh place all-around) Melissa Lorenz: 9.125, 8.575, 8, 8.7, 34.4 (11th place allaround) Level-7 fourth-place team Level-6 child, 7-9 years Faith Rightmire: 9.35, 8.35, 8.425, 9.05, 35.175 (fourth place all-around) Sahalie Levine: 8.25, 6.8, 9.05, 8.3, 32.45 (10th place allaround) Trew Farnworth (Level-6 child, 10 years): 9.05, 8.35, 8.75, 8.55, 34.7 (sixth place all-around) Shyla Monen (Level-6 junior, 12 years): 8.9, 7.6, 8.9, 7.65, 33.05 (eighth place all-around) Level-5 child, 10 years MacKenzie Champion: 9.2, 9.125, 9.35, 9.35, 37.025 (first place all-around) Morgan Champion: 9.25, 8.6, 9.1, 9, 35.95 (third place allaround, first on vault) Bailey Miller: 8.1, 7, 8.45, 7.6, 31.15 (14th place all-around) Level-5 junior, ages 12 and older Madison Glaviano: 8.9, 8.575, 9.45, 8.75, 35.675 (third place all-around, first place on beam) McKenna Stevens: 8.8, 8.2, 8.9, 8.55, 34.45 (eighth place all-around) Level-5 fourth-place team


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Tea for men? More men are showing interest in the aromatic liquid, Page E6

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

SPOTLIGHT Family, pizzeria to host medical fundraiser

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Summit High School senior Naomi Wright performs a poem during the Art Fusion event at PoetHouse Art on Friday night. She is part of a new class offered for teens about slam poetry and the art of hip-hop.

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Rhymes get real during local teen poetry class By Alandra Johnson • The Bulletin

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n Friday, Summit High School senior Naomi Wright stood in front of a packed audience at PoetHouse Art and shared a poem about her daddy

issues, as she put it. The piece chronicled the three years she’s spent with no contact from her father, breaking it down into number of soccer games missed and cookies eaten. When she finished, the crowd of mostly adults cheered loudly as Naomi grinned. She had just shared something utterly personal in a very public forum. “It’s a really good way to vent and get that off your chest,” said Naomi. Just a few weeks ago, Naomi had no idea she would fall in love with spoken word poetry. But now she is hooked. She is one of 10 students in a brand new class dedicated to slam poetry and the art of hip-hop. The class is one of a handful of art classes offered through the local nonprofit CADA | CASA (which is Spanish and English for Community Academics Sports Arts). Tymon Emch organized the class and Jason Graham, known as Mosley Wotta, teaches. See Poetry / E6

If you go Kit Foreman, 17, performs a song Friday about being stuck in Reno. She says the slam poetry class has helped her write better lyrics and become more confident.

What: Open house, student performance When: 7 p.m. March 17 Where: PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave. (upstairs), Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.cadacasa.com

What: All-ages poetry slam When: March 18, sign-ups for performers at 6 p.m., performance begins at 6:30 p.m. Where: Townshend’s Bend Teahouse, 835 N.W. Bond St. Cost: $3 Contact: 541-312-2001

At Pappy’s Pizzeria on Wednesday in Bend, you can help raise money for a local boy who’s receiving a kidney from his mom. Brady Hardin, a 16-year-old Mountain View High School student, was diagnosed with chronic renal failure at birth, said his mom, Kim VanAntwerp. For 16 years, the family cared for Brady’s kidneys so they’d last as long as possible. Currently, his left kidney doesn’t work and his right one is working at about 12 percent of normal, VanAntwerp said. So Brady needs a transplant, and his mother is a match. They’re heading to Portland next week for the surgery. Brady’s grandmother, Linda Kereen, is putting together fundraising opportunities to help with the family’s medical bills. On Wednesday, Pappy’s Pizzeria will donate half of the proceeds of any food order made by someone who presents a flier about Brady. Fliers have been placed around Bend or are available by contacting Kereen at 541-389-7166 or gkereen@hotmail.com. Then at 6 p.m., several baskets and boxes filled with merchandise and gift certificates from local businesses will be raffled off, Kereen said. Certificates range from restaurants to hairstylists to car washes. A quilt crafted by Carol Houser will also be raffled. To buy a raffle ticket, call or e-mail Kereen. Raffle tickets are $1 each or $5 for six tickets. You don’t have to be present to win. Contact: Melissa at 541-6781840, help4bradyh@gmail.com or www.cotaforbradyh.com.

Film about peace, music to benefit KPOV The film “Playing for Change: Peace Through Music” will be shown twice Thursday at the Domino Room in Bend. Proceeds will benefit Bend’s community radio station, KPOV. The 84-minute documentary takes viewers around the world as musicians merge their music into an inspirational tapestry by performing songs such as “Stand By Me,” “One Love” and “War/No More Trouble.” The idea in the film is to gather musicians, singers and audiences to bring peace to the world through music. “Playing for Change” was the Audience Award winner at the 2008 Woodstock Film Festival and an official selection at 2008’s Tribeca Film Festival and Jerusalem Film Festival. The film was produced over several years with a mobile recording studio and cameras. More info is at www.playingforchange.com. In Bend, the film will screen at 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. Thursday, with doors opening 30 minutes before each showing. Tickets at the door are $6, and $5 for KPOV members. Children are welcome. Concessions, including beer and wine, will be sold. The Domino Room is at 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave. in Bend. Contact: 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org.

State calendar seeks children’s illustrations Middle school students can now enter illustrations to be included in the 2011 Oregon Department of Human Services problem gambling awareness calendar. Of the designs submitted by Oregon students, 12 will be selected. Students are encouraged to express their feelings and perceptions about problem gambling through their art. Suggested art themes can be found at www.problemgambling prevention.org/art-search.htm. All entries must be received by March 19. Winners will receive gift certificates. Send entries to: Greta Coe, Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E. E86, Salem, OR 97301. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Was it Dogen’s final act on ‘Lost’?

Man has wife’s OK to look, but not touch, other women Dear Abby: Regarding your answer to “Yoo-Hoo, I’m Over Here!” (Jan. 10), who was bothered by her husband’s constant leering at women, you’ve got to be kidding. Men have been looking at young women since the beginning of time. My husband and his friends hold “office hours” every morning at our neighborhood coffeehouse. I’ve told him as long as he “touches” only with his eyes, there won’t be a problem. My husband and his pals are not “creepy old men.” They are leaders in our community — doing what they can to make the world a better place, while enjoying the scenery. There must be something terribly wrong with “Yoo-Hoo’s” marriage if she’s contemplating divorce because of this. — Keeping It Real in Tampa Dear Keeping It Real: I told “Yoo-Hoo” that from her description, her husband’s behavior seemed obsessive, that it showed a lack of sensitivity to her feelings and I recommended marriage counseling. Responses from my readers were varied. Read on: Dear Abby: In marriage we promise to love and cherish our wives. That is not what “YooHoo’s” husband is doing. It is disrespectful to her, his supposed one and only, and to the women he is ogling. When a man stares at another woman, it is not just looking. He is fantasizing about her. And sometimes it doesn’t stop there. — Tom in Half Moon Bay, Calif. Dear Abby: I have been happily married for 18 years, we have four children, and I can attest that all men do NOT do that. My husband isn’t blind to a beautiful woman, but he is respectful of my feelings and has enough selfrespect to not openly drool over any women in my presence. Unfortunately, we do know “Yoo-Hoo’s” husband’s type. We have seen “men” like him gawking open-mouthed at the teenALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

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DEAR ABBY age girls wearing tight jeans at school. We have also made careful note of who they are and who their children are. If an invitation comes for one of our girls to visit their kids at their house, the answer is always NO. “Yoo-Hoo’s” husband has a problem. The sooner she realizes it, the better. — Watchful Mom in Butler, Pa. Dear Abby: The way she describes her husband’s behavior with women sounds like he may have a sexual addiction. If so, he is powerless over his behavior and will do anything to justify his addiction. It’s a waste of time asking him to change unless he goes into recovery for it. Other signs of this addiction are affairs, frequenting bars, using Internet chat rooms and looking at porn. — Knows From Experience Dear Abby: I wonder how that man would feel if he caught someone his age leering at HIS daughter? Maybe then he would think twice about what he is doing. — Divorced in Kansas City Dear Abby: Women look, too. I look! I think it’s healthy to be aware of the people around you. But that doesn’t mean we have to be obvious about it — certainly not so obvious that we are inconsiderate of the people we are with. That said, the other side of the coin is: Did he act like this when they were dating? Did she know what she was getting when she married him? As they say, a leopard doesn’t change its spots. — Irene in San Antonio Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Los Angeles Times

The Associated Press file photo

Martha Stewart hopes to surprise people in their homes in “Help Me, Martha.”

Stewart pitches new show: ‘Help Me, Martha’ The Associated Press NEW YORK — Ever wonder how Martha Stewart might tackle your decorating disaster or party planning nightmare? Some folks will soon get the chance to find out. Stewart announced Thursday that she and producer Mark Burnett are teaming up for a new television series, “Help Me, Martha.” It’s being made by Stewart’s company, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. In the reality series, someone petitions Stewart to help a friend who’s having trouble planning a wedding or a special meal or is facing some other lifestyle issue. The doorbell rings and — surprise! — Stewart and her team are there to take over. Burnett says it’s been fun to see “the joy on people’s faces that Martha Stewart is in their home.” Stewart’s company has yet to sell the series to a television network.

Let’s get it out of the way quickly. The answer to the question we all want to ask is: “I can’t. I’m sorry about that. This is ‘Lost.’ I would tell you, but I can’t.” Is Dogen really dead? Of course, we did not get to the bottom of that mystery during a phone interview with Hiroyuki Sanada, the actor who plays him, or an e-mail exchange with executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse. “Lost” fans saw Temple Master Dogen drown at the hands of the infected Sayid (Naveen Andrews) in last Tuesday’s episode, but whether viewers will see Dogen again, well, that’s a question for the birds at this point. What Sanada did share is what was going through his mind during his awesome action sequence in the temple with Sayid. “Lost” fans couldn’t get enough of it, according to the Internet chatter after the episode aired. “I heard the voices of Sayid’s fans screaming, ‘Don’t do that to my Sayid!’” Sanada said. “I heard that in my head when I was fighting with him.” With plenty of experience under his belt as an on-screen warrior, Sanada (“The Last Samurai,” “Twilight Samurai” and “Rush Hour 3”) said neither he nor Andrews was injured in the filming of the big temple scene. In case anyone was worried. “The choreographer is a good friend of mine and we had a great relationship,” Sanada said. “We had one or two hours of rehearsals one or two days before shooting and then just, ‘Go! Go! Go!’ It was so smooth. We shot a lot more, but it was edited very well.” When “Lost” producers cast the role of Dogen last year, the Japanese actor was

‘Lost’ When: 9 p.m. Tuesdays Where: ABC

their first choice. “We were big fans of his work from the movies ‘Twilight Samurai’ and ‘The Last Samurai,’” Cuse and Lindelof wrote in an e-mail. “We needed someone as the Temple Master who conveyed real strength and presence but also had an underlying vulnerability.” Dogen, as he explained in the show, made a pact with Jacob in Osaka, Japan, after he got drunk and got into a car accident that critically injured his son. Jacob offered to heal the boy if Dogen agreed to go to the island to work for him and never see his son again. “He has dignity, and also weakness, and a lot of love,” Sanada said. “That’s why I love that character.” With no script to read when producers first called him, Sanada agreed to meet with Lindelof and Cuse to learn more about the character. They explained that Dogen was the guardian of the temple and was said to be the only person capable of keeping the Man in Black/Smocke out. “But I needed to know, why does a Japanese man come to the island? Is it about Japanese culture? Is it political? Is it religious? It’s a very delicate thing for us,” Sanada said. “They answered very clearly and were very understanding about my cultural concerns and were very respectful. So I felt I could believe them without a script and I decided then.” What came next was a monthlong marathon of watching

the first five seasons of “Lost.” The actor, who incidentally had worked with Matthew Fox on “Speed Racer,” took in five or six episodes a day until he caught up. Of course, Sanada and the producers wouldn’t address whether Dogen’s drowning is final, whether that pool of water heals him, or if we will, at least, see him in more sideways flashes. Dogen appeared in Jack’s (Fox) parallel story line in last week’s episode. “From the beginning, I heard that he would be a sacrifice to the island,” Sanada said. “A good death is what they said. But I didn’t know I would be in the sideways flashes. That was a big surprise for me. That’s all I can say about that.” In case it turns out that magic water can’t resurrect Dogen and Sanada is gone from the show, fans can find him in James Ivory’s “The City of Your Final Destination,” a movie that will have a limited theatrical release next month. Based on the Peter Cameron novel of the same title, the cast includes Anthony Hopkins and Laura Linney. Sanada said working in Argentina on the film was “like a dream.” “I was so nervous, but Anthony Hopkins, he’s like a gent, and he made me relax,” Sanada said. “It’s good timing and good contrast between the movie and ‘Lost,’ so I hope that the audience enjoys the contrast.” where fitness gets personal

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 3/9/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News 3977 World News 712 News 90828 NBC News 23921 News 9793 News 5606 Judge Judy 4267 Inside Ed. 3880 Funniest Home Videos 6660 Jim 8625 Malcolm 4538 Electric 3731 Fetch! Ruff 538 News 4489 NBC News 3002 Reba ‘PG’ 92575 Reba ‘PG’ 28248 Christina 16915 Burt Wolf 35538 Travels 5151 Europe 1064

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 15170 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 11083 News 5847 CBS News 6199 World News 3903 Millionaire 4373 Two Men 4151 Two Men 8731 Simpsons 4151 Simpsons 8731 This Old H’se 151 Business 731 News 1165 News 1267 King 58489 King 32441 Europe 25151 OpenRoad 49731 Old House 8977 Business 2557

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! 6441 Wheel 489 Jeopardy! 70064 Wheel 29828 Access H. 9557 Scrubs ‘14’ 5083 Ent 7731 The Insider 3147 Simpsons 8489 Simpsons 4915 The Office 8489 The Office 4915 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 5809 Live at 7 (N) 4625 Inside Ed. 1921 ’70s Show 29489 ’70s Show 38625 Garden 96151 Workshop 45915 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 83557

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Lost Sundown ’ ‘14’ Å 7101 Lost Dr. Linus (N) ‘PG’ Å 7267 The Biggest Loser The contestants work at a food bank. (N) ’ ‘PG’ 10985 NCIS Double Identity (N) ‘PG’ 32147 NCIS: Los Angeles (N) ’ ‘14’ 89793 Lost Sundown ’ ‘14’ Å 47731 Lost Dr. Linus (N) ‘PG’ Å 34267 American Idol ’ ‘PG’ Å 65151 Glee Sectionals ’ ‘14’ Å 85915 PDX TV Prime News (N) 65151 Smarter 33064 Smarter 70170 Civil War Pledge Event: The Universe of Battle ’ ‘PG’ Å 8373 The Biggest Loser The contestants work at a food bank. (N) ’ ‘PG’ 98441 90210 Rats and Heroes ‘14’ 74129 Melrose Place Oriole (N) ‘14’ 89335 Woodsmith 12199 Moment 91606 Art Work 68354 Painting 89422 Civil War Pledge Event: The Universe of Battle ’ ‘PG’ Å 63793

10:00

10:30

11:00

the forgotten (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 2034 News 6621083 Parenthood (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 17170 News 1140286 The Good Wife Fleas (N) ‘PG’ 82880 News 9420538 the forgotten (N) ‘PG’ Å 37354 Inside 90670996 News 47354 TMZ ‘PG’ 56002 King of Hill 45809 Deal No 47354 Deal No 56002 South Park 45809 Michael Bolton at the Royal Albert Hall ’ ‘G’ 88842 Parenthood (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 84248 News 9415606 Married... 74002 Married... 50422 Roseanne 63809 Mexico 58064 Julia 67712 Christina 70199 Michael Bolton at the Royal Albert Hall ’ ‘G’ 51118

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Name/Earl 40538 South Park 40538 Roy O. 52927 Jay Leno Roseanne 25996 Burt Wolf 32286 Roy O. 37064

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å 737170 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 932538 Criminal Minds In Heat ‘14’ 941286 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 921422 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 931809 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 6989977 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 419002 ››› “The Pelican Brief” (1993, Suspense) Julia Roberts, Denzel Washington, Sam Shepard. An inquisitive law student becomes ››› “Space Cowboys” (2000, Adventure) Clint Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, Donald Sutherland. NASA reunites four aging ››› “Blazing Saddles” (1974, Comedy) 102 40 39 the target of assassins. 404847 flyboys for an urgent mission. Å 113083 Cleavon Little. Å 892267 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4221828 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘G’ 7727460 Wild Recon (N) ‘PG’ Å 7703880 Madman of the Sea ’ ‘14’ 7723644 Madman of the Sea (N) ‘14’ 7726731 Madman of the Sea ’ ‘14’ 2161847 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 1317809 The Millionaire Matchmaker 394335 The Millionaire Matchmaker 209828 The Millionaire Matchmaker 840199 The Millionaire Matchmaker 859847 The Millionaire Matchmaker 839083 The Millionaire Matchmaker 832170 The Millionaire Matchmaker 345070 137 44 Smarter 5033002 Smarter 5024354 ›› “Blue Collar Comedy Tour: The Movie” (2003) ’ 1684354 Ron White: Fix Stupid 8534199 Brian Regan: Hyperbole 8537286 Ron White: Fix Stupid 1680538 190 32 42 53 The Singing Bee ’ 2346996 SI Swimsuit Issue 810083 Biography on CNBC Sears 549369 Mad Money 749147 SI Swimsuit Issue 149903 Biography on CNBC Sears 999480 Fast Cash ‘G’ Paid 978606 51 36 40 52 Cruise Inc.: Big Money 587083 Larry King Live (N) ‘PG’ 360422 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å 183460 Larry King Live ‘PG’ 570712 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ 580199 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ 189644 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 488267 Married... 68793 Comedy 65606 Comedy 89286 Daily Show 52644 Colbert 78170 Daniel Tosh: Serious 90489 South Park 59644 South Park 98118 South Park 58002 South Park 34422 Daily Show 61489 Colbert 89511 135 53 135 47 Married... 32880 The Buzz 9335 Bend City Edition G Morning 5489 Outdoors 9441 Redmond City Council 79688 RSN 91064 RSN Movie Night 76002 G Morning 50539 Health 66441 11 Capital News Today 960286 Today in Washington 755625 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 220170 Phineas 193539 Phineas 848462 Deck 848642 Wizards 397422 Montana 448606 ›› “The Wild” (2006), Eddie Izzard 169996 Phineas 206731 Phineas 566625 Montana 575373 Wizards 199977 Deck 385847 87 43 14 39 Phineas 317286 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ 956118 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ 936354 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ 939441 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ 545286 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 412199 Cash Cab 131712 Cash Cab 138625 Cash Cab 129977 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ 930170 College Basketball: Horizon League Tournament 391267 SportsCenter (Live) Å 392996 NFL Live 684489 Fastbreak 109373 SportsCenter (Live) Å 315847 SportsCenter (Live) Å 983422 21 23 22 23 Women’s College Basketball 864538 College Basketball 8511248 Final 2354915 Baseball 2333422 SportsNation Å 8525441 NASCAR 7792996 Baseball 7701644 College Basketball Å 9743083 22 24 21 24 College Basketball 2357002 College Basketball 1989 Loyola Marymount at Oregon State 9431809 Seats 9309248 Seats 9311083 American Gladiators ‘PG’ 9445002 College Basketball 9251793 23 25 123 25 Boxing 9322199 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 8 Rules 772118 8, Rules 756170 Funniest Home Videos 558625 Funniest Home Videos 567373 Funniest Home Videos 554809 Funniest Home Videos 557996 The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 729286 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ‘PG’ Å 278149 Hannity (N) 9008199 On the Record 9517606 The O’Reilly Factor 9526354 Hannity 9546118 On the Record 9516977 Glenn Beck 8683151 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 1402793 Home 7589557 Cooking 7579170 Minute 7560422 Challenge 7736118 Cakes 1329644 Cakes 1308151 Unwrap 8947644 Best 4228731 Chopped Chopped Liver (N) 7735489 Good Eats Beets. Unwrap 6500248 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Mariners 34248 Huskies 83002 UEFA Champions League Soccer Fiorentina vs. Bayern Munich 759847 Huskies 49354 Unscripted 36793 Final 15373 20 45 28* 26 High School Basketball 43170 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ››› “Double Jeopardy” (1999, Suspense) Tommy Lee Jones. 9530557 ››› “The Devil Wears Prada” (2006, Comedy) Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway, Adrian Grenier. 3414441 ››› “In Her Shoes” 3405793 131 Buck 8037624 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 8500170 House 1201170 House 5687903 First 1227118 My First Place House 5159489 Buck 8512915 House 9801538 House 9810286 Property 5121606 My First Place 176 49 33 43 Income 1298606 How the Earth Was Made 7635489 How the Earth Was Made 6626977 How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Å 6639441 Life After People (N) ‘PG’ 6625248 Life After People ‘PG’ 2297489 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Journey to 10,000 BC 1095977 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 913538 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 561199 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 570847 “Still Small Voices” (2007, Suspense) Catherine Bell. ‘14’ Å 540606 Will 841847 Will 827719 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘PG’ 920985 Maddow Show 67711847 Countdown-Olbermann 90856002 Maddow Show 90832422 Hardball Å 90852286 Countdown-Olbermann 90855373 Maddow Show 79389538 56 59 128 51 Countdown-Olbermann 93166267 Life, Liz 773847 Going 763460 Made (N) 754712 True Life I’m Ex Amish ’ 556267 S. Park 970480 South Pk 920165 16 and Pregnant Valerie ‘14’ 545151 16 and Pregnant (N) ’ ‘14’ 555538 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Å 727828 192 22 38 57 Life, Liz 875016 Sponge 139354 iCarly ‘G’ 136267 Big Time 150847 iCarly ‘G’ 490977 Sponge 149731 Malcolm 409625 Malcolm 411460 Chris 213915 Chris 752489 Lopez 576593 Lopez 271101 Nanny 218460 Nanny 815557 82 46 24 40 Sponge 403441 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 674118 UFC Unleashed ‘14’ Å 855996 UFC Unleashed ‘14’ Å 864644 UFC Unleashed ‘14’ Å 844880 Blue Mountain Players 922267 Ways Die 135644 Ways Die 718151 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 750977 Stargate SG-1 Fallout ‘PG’ 4069828 Star Trek: Next Gener. 4694199 Star Trek: Next Generation 4603847 Star Trek: Next Generation 4683083 WWE NXT ’ ‘PG’ Å 4686170 “Stargate: Continuum” 7103731 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ’ ‘PG’ 1881151 Behind 8031809 J. Meyer 4758644 Hagee 4755557 Hillsong 4746809 Praise the Lord Å 6398373 ACLJ 3845977 Dino ‘G’ 1369064 Heritage 2974083 Changing-World Spring Praise-A-Thon Å 4991460 205 60 130 Friends 139489 Friends 129002 Office 110354 Seinfeld 476422 Seinfeld 116538 Office 485170 Office 471977 Office 853557 Office 369793 Office 645625 Office 654373 Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 176170 16 27 11 28 King 496286 ››› “The Hidden Fortress” (1958, Comedy) Toshirô Mifune, Misa Uehara, Minoru Chiaki. Three soldiers ››› “Ikiru” (1952, Drama) Takashi Shimura, Miki Odagiri, Kyoko Seki. A lonely man searches for fulfillment ›››› “Throne of Blood” (1957, Drama) Toshirô Mifune, Isuzu Yamada. A samurai 101 44 101 29 in his final days. Å 2630002 murders his lord at the behest of his wife. 4190996 transport a deposed princess to safety. 7222064 Say Yes 482064 Say Yes 406644 Ultimate Cake Off ‘PG’ Å 840064 Dwarf Adoption Story ‘PG’ 859712 19 Kids 125267 19 Kids 664731 Miss Turkey Trot 849335 Dwarf Adoption Story ‘PG’ 448880 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear ’ ‘PG’ 778373 Law & Order Paradigm ‘14’ 667828 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 848606 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 857354 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 877118 Southland (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å 847977 CSI: NY Bad Beat ‘14’ Å 446422 17 26 15 27 Law & Order C.O.D. ’ ‘14’ 776915 Chowder 1294880 Chowder 8132278 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 1182593 Stoked 1214644 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Ed, Edd 1290064 Ed, Edd 1219199 Titans 5122335 Titans 8525489 King-Hill 9807712 King-Hill 9816460 Family Guy ‘PG’ Family 3730557 84 Pizza Wars 67711847 Barbecue Wars ‘G’ Å 90856002 Man v. Food 90832422 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Hamburger Paradise ‘G’ 93166267 Sanford 1316170 Sanford 7562880 Griffith 1332118 Griffith 1311625 Home 8950118 Home Improve. Home 7768538 Home 7777286 Boston Legal ’ ‘14’ Å 7637170 65 47 29 35 Bewitch 1303606 Bewitch 7585731 All/Fam. 7582644 All in the Family Law & Order: SVU 281977 Law & Order: SVU 570373 ›› “National Treasure: Book of Secrets” (2007) Nicolas Cage. Premiere. Å 605354 White Collar (N) ‘PG’ Å 6176199 (11:01) Psych ‘PG’ Å 174712 15 30 23 30 Law 144267 Fantasia 225731 Fantasia 222644 Fantasia 213996 Celebrity Fit Club ‘PG’ Å 349921 RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ 549129 RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ 949985 ››› “What’s Love Got to Do With It” (1993) Angela Bassett. ’ 588793 191 48 37 54 Fantasia 506118 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) “Bachelor Party” 34734335 (6:05) ›› “The Karate Kid Part II” 1986 Ralph Macchio. ‘PG’ 20203267 ›››› “WALL-E” 2008 Voices of Ben Burtt. 6733422 “Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion” 39008489 (11:15) “Vantage Point” 12600625 ››› “Brubaker” 1980, Drama Robert Redford, Yaphet Kotto. ‘R’ Å 9057847 ››› “Night and the City” 1992 Robert De Niro. ‘R’ Å 6413880 ››› “Barton Fink” 1991, Drama John Turturro. ‘R’ Å 9579880 Incident 3861118 Prog. 5334828 Snow 5974660 Daily 8124183 Gypsea 4429575 Firsthand Update 8029539 Prog. 5323712 Snow 5342847 Daily 3040847 Ride Open Terjes 4615793 M80 4624441 Moto 3012064 On Surfari Top 10 405809 John Daly 124422 John Daly 121335 John Daly 145915 Haney 418373 Haney 141199 Golf 494793 PGA Tour 413828 John Daly 208083 John Daly 747557 Haney 271921 Haney 471129 Lessons 210828 PGA Tour 800625 7th Heaven Apologize ‘G’ 1006083 7th Heaven Virgin ‘G’ Å 7626731 7th Heaven Regrets ’ ‘G’ 6657847 7th Heaven Chances ‘G’ 6633267 ›› “A Cooler Climate” (1999) Sally Field, Judy Davis. ‘14’ Å 6636354 Golden 5249606 Golden 4083606 Magic & Bird (5:45) ›› “The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor” 2008, Adventure Brendan ›› “Inkheart” 2009, Adventure Brendan Fraser. A bookbinder accidentally brings an How to Make It in Big Love End of Days Bill tries to protect How to Train Road to Dallas: HBO 425 501 425 10 5227199 10836921 Pacquiao 863809 evil storybook character to life. ’ ‘PG’ Å 815083 America 454335 his candidacy. ‘MA’ 985880 Fraser, Jet Li, Maria Bello. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 1581151 ›› “Cabin Fever” 2002 Jordan Ladd. ‘R’ 3912644 The IT Crowd ‘14’ The IT Crowd ‘14’ ››› “Layer Cake” 2004 Daniel Craig. Premiere. ‘R’ Å 64691170 ›› “Cabin Fever” 2002 Jordan Ladd. ‘R’ 5602118 (11:05) “Layer Cake” 2004 97284996 IFC 105 105 (4:45) › “What Happens in Vegas” 2008, Romance-Comedy ››› “Death Becomes Her” 1992, Fantasy Meryl Streep, Bruce (8:15) ›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” 2008 Keanu Reeves. The arrival of an extra- ›› “Street Kings” 2008, Crime Drama Keanu Reeves, Forest Whitaker. A Los Angeles MAX 400 508 7 Cameron Diaz. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 32122083 Willis. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 4143267 terrestrial visitor triggers global upheaval. ‘PG-13’ 32042921 cop walks an ethically ambiguous path. ’ ‘R’ Å 9766809 Explorer ‘14’ 5315793 Explorer Inside LSD ‘14’ 3675731 Explorer ‘14’ 5918002 Explorer ‘14’ 5994422 Explorer Inside LSD ‘14’ 5914286 Explorer ‘14’ 5917373 Lockdown ‘14’ 1554737 NGC 157 157 Avatar 5341118 Big Time Rush Invader 8924985 Mighty B 5474815 OddParents OddParents Avatar 5330002 Iron Man 5326809 Phantom 3024809 Phantom 3652880 Three 4622083 Three 4631731 Secret 3029354 Mikey 7245441 NTOON 89 115 189 Outd’rs 1305064 Outdrs 7594489 Hunting 7584002 Hunting 7575354 Game Chasers Dream 7571538 Hunting 1301248 Nugent 1313083 Hunting 8929248 Hunting 4200335 Bone 7760996 Steve’s 7779644 Outd’rs 8924793 Manage. 6508880 OUTD 37 307 43 Secret Diary of a ›››› “Dead Man Walking” 1995 Susan Tracey Ullman’s (4:45) “The Amateurs” 2005 Jeff Bridges. Small-town citizens “Why We Laugh: Black Comedians on Black Comedy” 2009 ››› “Transsiberian” 2008, Suspense Woody Harrelson, Emily Mortimer. iTV. A SHO 500 500 Call Girl 636977 State 650557 make an amateur porn film. ‘R’ 39443880 Narrated by Angela Bassett. ‘NR’ Å 250731 couple’s train journey takes a deadly turn. ’ ‘R’ 563422 Sarandon. ‘R’ 7073002 Race in 60 (N) 8043644 Monster Jam (N) 1397847 Dangerous Drives 4135809 Pass Tm 8020793 Hub 8049828 Race in 60 4124793 Monster Jam 4127880 Dangerous Drives 6394557 SPEED 35 303 125 The International ››› “Cadillac Records” 2008 Adrien Brody. ’ ‘R’ Å 67649199 (7:25) ›› “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” 2008 84076170 ›› “Step Brothers” 2008 Will Ferrell. ’ ‘R’ 8587118 (10:40) ›› “The International” 2009 ‘R’ Å 8538847 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:10) ›› “The Kite Runner” 2007, Drama Khalid Abdalla, › “Awake” 2007, Suspense Hayden Christensen, Jessica Alba, ››› “To Die For” 1995, Comedy-Drama Nicole Kidman, Matt Dillon. A woman will “The Mysteries of Pittsburgh” 2008, Adventure Sienna Miller, (11:40) › “Gigantic” TMC 525 525 Homayoun Ershadi. ’ ‘PG-13’ 26612977 Terrence Howard. ’ ‘R’ 795335 stop at nothing to achieve television stardom. ’ ‘R’ 480731 91070199 Mena Suvari. ’ ‘R’ Å 2316606 NHL Hockey: Islanders at Flyers 8166828 Hockey 7575354 Sports 1325828 Sports Soup Countdown to UFC 7710170 WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å 7707606 Sports 7760996 Sports Soup WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å 2145809 VS. 27 58 30 Little Miss Perfect 8038712 Little Miss Perfect 1382915 Little Miss Perfect (N) 4120977 Little Miss Perfect 4139625 Little Miss Perfect 4159489 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4129248 Secret Lives of Women 6389625 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY MCTEACHER’S NIGHT: Teachers and school staff prepare meals; a portion of proceeds will benefit La Pine High School’s Future Business Leaders of America club; free admission; 5-7:30 p.m.; McDonald’s, 16505 Reed Road, La Pine; 541-355-8400 or steve.parnell@ bend.k12.or.us. “THE PALEOLANDS”: Ellen Morris Bishop talks about ancient seas and volcanoes in the John Day Basin, climate change and more; $2 suggested donation; 6:30 p.m. social, 7 p.m. program; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. OPEN MIC WITH TALL ADAM: Open to all varieties of performers; free; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. THE MISSIONARY POSITION: The Seattle-based rock ’n’ roll band performs; $2; 10 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www.myspace .com/themissionaryposition.

WEDNESDAY SOFTBALL FUNDRAISER DINNER: A catered dinner of hamburgers, corn dogs, fries and more, with a silent auction and door prizes; proceeds benefit the Mountain View High School softball team; $10, $25 for families of three; 5-8 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-647-4885 or brianh86@msn.com. “A LANDSCAPE OF ULTIMATE SIMPLICITY”: Learn about going green and getting the most for your money from your landscape design; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7093 or www.dpls.us/calendar. DO-IT-YOURSELF FREEZER JAM: Make jam the simple way and take a jar home; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.dpls.us/calendar. CRAIG CAROTHERS: The Nashvillebased singer-songwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. POETRY SLAM: A live poetry reading open to competitors and spectators; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/bendpoetryslam. IGOR & RED ELVISES: The campy Russian rock ’n’ roll group performs; ages 21 and older; $12; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com.

THURSDAY SUMMIT HIGH SCHOOL SILENT AUCTION: A silent auction of items donated by businesses and community members; proceeds benefit the high school’s 2010 graduation party; free; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 360-607-9961 or shsgradparty@bendbroadband.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Welsh Girl” by Peter Ho Davies; bring a lunch; free; noon1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121064 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “AN AFTERNOON TEA — THE HISTORY OF APRONS, MEMORIES FROM THE PAST”: Bobbe Schafer talks about the American folk art of aprons; free; 2:30-4 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Community, 1010 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-8500. “PLAYING FOR CHANGE — PEACE THROUGH MUSIC”: A screening of the documentary that features an international tapestry of musicians; proceeds benefit KPOV; $6, $5 KPOV members; 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.playingforchange.com.

“GO-GO BEACH”: The La Pine High School drama department presents a musical about young surfers in California who have to decide what to do with their lives as they approach adulthood; $5; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541355-8400 or jeff.parker@bend.k12 .or.us. FREMONT LECTURE: Loren Irving talks about Capt. John Fremont’s 1843 expedition through Central Oregon; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. PEACE OF MIND ORCHESTRA: The New Orleans-based funk band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

FRIDAY GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: A sale of household items, including dishes, books, toys, jewelry and more; proceeds benefit the Feed The Hungry Program at Bend’s Community Center; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. SPRING GARAGE SALE: A sale of new and gently used items; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave.; 541-923-0882. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “Evolution of Complexity: Inside Darwin’s Black Box” with Joe Thornton; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4442. “DIVERSITY”: Featuring performances by Ubiquitous Dance Company, sNm’s Bhangra Dancers, Hokule’a Polynesian Dancers and Jazz Dance Collective; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-410-8451 or benddeanceproject@gmail.com. “GO-GO BEACH”: The La Pine High School drama department presents a musical about young surfers in California who have to decide what to do with their lives as they approach adulthood; $5; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-3558400 or jeff.parker@bend.k12.or.us. “BEING JOHN MALKOVICH”: A screening of the R-rated 1999 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs under the direction of Andy Warr; $10, $8 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. MONICA’S FRIENDS PRESENT: Featuring performances by Sarah Mattox, Trish Sewell, James Knox, Melissa Bagwell, Jason Stein, Rick Johnson, Jacob Looper, the Central Oregon Mastersingers and more; proceeds benefit Monica and Dee Torrey; Monica is battling cancer; $15; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. GALLAGHER: Wacky comedian performs a sledge-o-matic show; ages 21 and older; $10, $15 or $20; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Kah-NeeTa High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. ONE HORSE SHY CD-RELEASE SHOW: The Ashland-based roots musicians perform; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom,

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace .com/silvermoonbrewing. PATO BANTON & THE NOW GENERATION: The Los Angelesbased reggae musician performs; $15 plus service charges in advance, $18 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com. DANGER DEATH RAY: The Portlandbased pop-punk group performs, with Tuck and Roll; $2; 10 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www .myspace.com/dangerdeathrayus.

SATURDAY BREAKFAST AT THE V: A breakfast of eggs, hash browns, bacon and English muffins; $6.50, $5.50 seniors; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: A sale of household items, including dishes, books, toys, jewelry and more; proceeds benefit the Feed The Hungry Program at Bend’s Community Center; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. SPRING GARAGE SALE: A sale of new and gently used items; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave.; 541-923-0882. COMMON CANVAS COMMUNITY ARTS DAY: Celebrate and create art for the April 9 My Own Two Hands Community Arts parade; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sisters Middle School, 15200 McKenzie Highway; 541549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival .org or www .sistersfolkfestival .org. GRIN AND BEAR IT RUN: 5K, 10K and 1-mile runs to benefit Healthy Beginnings; races begin and end at the amphitheater; costs vary, see Web site for details; free for spectators; 10 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-383-6357 or www.myhb.org. PRESCHOOL & CHILD CARE FAIR: Explore preschool and child care options in Deschutes County; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-389-5475, office@cirlcleoffriendsbend.com or www.cofamilynews.com. SUMMIT HIGH SCHOOL HIKE FOR HAITI: Hike up and down the butte; proceeds benefit the American Red Cross; donations accepted; noon-2 p.m.; Pilot Butte State Park, Northeast Pilot Butte Summit Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300. “GO-GO BEACH”: The La Pine High School drama department presents a musical about young surfers in California who have to decide what to do with their lives as they approach adulthood; $5; 5 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-355-8400 or jeff.parker@bend.k12.or.us. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jeff Mapes speaks about his book “Pedaling Revolution”; reservations requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-5932525. CENTRAL OREGON’S GOT TALENT: A talent show contest with celebrity judges; proceeds benefit special recreation programs with Bend Park & Recreation District; $10, $7 ages 12 and younger; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Cinder Kittens play the Southern Oregon Roller Girls; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center, 20795 High Desert Lane, Bend; www.lavacityrollerdolls.com.

LOCAL FLAVOR: Performances by the Moon Mountain Ramblers, Mark Ransom and Friends, appetizers and beer, with a silent auction of items from local businesses; proceeds benefit Waldorf School of Bend; $20, $30 for two; 6 p.m.-midnight; Sons of Norway Hall, 549 N.W. Harmon Blvd., Bend; 541-330-8841. “DIVERSITY”: Featuring performances by Ubiquitous Dance Company, sNm’s Bhangra Dancers, Hokule’a Polynesian Dancers and Jazz Dance Collective; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-410-8451 or benddeanceproject@gmail.com. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by the Tunedawgs; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave.; 541-330-8943. THE HOLLOWBODYS: The Medfordbased punk band performs, with Capture the Flag; $2; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www .myspace.com/thehollowbodys.

SUNDAY SKI ORIENTEERING: The Columbia River Orienteering Club leads a day of ski orienteering with courses for beginning, intermediate and advanced skiers; snowshoes allowed; $8, $12 for groups, $6 individuals and $10 groups for club members; trail fees apply; 9 a.m.-noon registration, starts begin from 10 a.m.-noon; Mt. Bachelor ski area, Nordic Center, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-977-8684 or www.croc.org. JIM JAM: Bring instruments and voices and play with other music lovers; in remembrance of Jim Witty; free; 1-4 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. DEAN PRESCOTT BENEFIT: Featuring performances by Dan Chavers, Emerald City, Allan Byer, Doug Zinn Band and Steve Neth; with a silent auction and more; proceeds will go toward medical expenses incurred by Prescott’s stroke; $10, free ages 18 and younger; 2 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; thesubstitutes@ bendbroadband.com. REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: Tango-, klezmer- and Gypsyinfluenced quintet 3 Leg Torso performs; $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org. SECOND SUNDAY: David Biespiel, author of “Shattering Air,” “Wild Civility” and “The Book of Men and Women” reads from his work; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.dpls.us/calendar. CELTIC MUSIC SESSION: Celtic musicians play traditional Irish music; session players welcome; free; 3-6 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-647-4789. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Proteus Chamber Players; free; 4 p.m., doors open 3:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-317-3941, symphony@ bendbroadband.com or www.cosymphony.com. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs under the direction of Julie Eberhard; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www.freewebs .com/bendgospel.

MONDAY MR. SHS “EVER AFTER” PAGEANT: A male beauty pageant for seniors at Sisters High School; proceeds benefit the neonatal intensive care unit at St. Charles Bend; $5; 6:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-633-8639.

M T For Tuesday, March 9

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 5:20 CRAZY HEART (R) 12:20, 2:55, 5:35, 8:10 DEAR JOHN (PG-13) 12:25, 3, 5:40, 8:15 IT’S COMPLICATED (R) Noon, 2:35, 5:15, 7:50 THE LAST STATION (R) 12:10, 2:45, 5:25, 8 A SINGLE MAN (R) 2:40, 8:05 A TOWN CALLED PANIC (no MPAA rating) 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 10:55 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 4:05, 5:15, 6:40, 7:50, 9:15, 10:25 ALICE IN WONDERLAND 3-D (PG) 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 AVATAR (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:40, 7:05, 10:30 THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 12:10, 6:30 THE BOOK OF ELI (R) 3:45, 9:25 BROOKLYN’S FINEST (R) 12:05, 3:55, 6:55, 10:05 COP OUT (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 5:05, 7:55, 10:35 THE CRAZIES (R) 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 5, 7:25, 10 DEAR JOHN (PG-13) 11 a.m., 1:35, 4:15, 6:50, 9:30 PERCY JACKSON AND THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 12:15, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 1:20, 4:25, 7:40, 10:40

TOOTH FAIRY (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:40, 4:10, 6:35, 9:20 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:30, 10:15 WHEN IN ROME (PG-13) Noon, 2:25, 5:20, 8, 10:10 THE WOLFMAN (R) 11:30 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 7:10, 9:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

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N   N  Lil Wayne begins yearlong jail term

D’Angelo accused of soliciting prostitute

NEW YORK — After saying goodbye on concert stages and online video streams, Lil Wayne had nothing to add as he was sentenced Monday to a year in jail for having a loaded gun on his tour bus. The Grammy Aw a r d - w i n - Lil Wayne ning rapper delivered only a brief bow to fans and supporters as he was led out of a courtroom in handcuffs to start serving his sentence. With that, Lil Wayne headed off to face his punishment in a case that had shadowed him as he became one of music’s most prolific and profitable figures in recent years. Arrested in July 2007, he pleaded guilty in October to attempted criminal possession of a weapon. He admitted he had the loaded .40-caliber semiautomatic gun on his bus. His lawyer, Stacey Richman, said the rapper was resolute as he was taken away. “He knew what he had to do, and he’s doing it,” she said. Lil Wayne, born Dwayne Carter, will serve his sentence in the Rikers Island jail complex. The 27-year-old rap star could be released in about eight months with good behavior.

NEW YORK — Authorities say D’Angelo was caught in New York City trying to pay $40 for sex with an undercover cop posing as a prostitute. Police said Monday that the 36-year-old R&B singer was arrested D’Angelo early Saturday while behind the wheel of his Range Rover. D’Angelo’s real name is Michael Archer. He says in a statement that he pleaded not guilty and plans to fight the charge. The statement says the singer hopes the public will “allow the American justice system to resolve the matter before jumping to any conclusions.”

Beyoncé named an official Brooklynite NEW YORK — The president of Brooklyn has declared Beyoncé an official Brooklynite. Borough President Marty Markowitz said Beyoncé is a Brooklynite by marriage and by moxie. Beyoncé’s hus- Beyoncé band, Jay-Z, is from Brooklyn. The superstar visited the New York City borough Friday for the opening of the Beyoncé Cosmetology Center at a residential substance abuse treatment center. The Phoenix House offers programs for residents in carpentry, building maintenance, computer technology and culinary arts. Beyoncé said she thought it also should have more programs geared toward women. She said her mother’s Houston salon helped so many people feel good about themselves and better their lives. Beyoncé first spent time at Phoenix House when preparing for the role of Etta James in the 2008 film, “Cadillac Records.”

Alleged stalker of Dr. Pinsky is arrested LOS ANGELES — A man was being held in a Pasadena, Calif., jail Thursday on suspicion of stalking reality show star Dr. Drew Pinsky. Charles William Pearson, 33, was deta i ned Dr. Drew Wednesday by Pinsky L.A. County sheriff’s deputies, who spotted him at a computer terminal in the school library at Pierce College in Woodland Hills, said Deputy Ronald Nohles. Pearson was arrested by Pasadena police at about 5:30 p.m. on suspicion of stalking the television and radio personality, according to public records. Pearson posted violent threats to Pinsky and his family over the Internet for the last several weeks before Pinsky contacted police March 1, said Janet Pope Givens, a spokeswoman for the Pasadena Police Department. At some point during that time, Pearson showed up at the radio station where Pinsky works and made accusations about the doctor, she said. Pinsky stars on “Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew” and hosts the nationally syndicated radio show “Loveline.” On Thursday, he sent this message on Twitter: “’Be generous with kindly words’- Goethe / Something I am trying to cultivate in light of recent events.” Pearson’s bail was set at $150,000, according to L.A. County Sheriff’s Department records. — From wire reports

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 6:30 COP OUT (R) 6:45 CRAZY HEART (R) 6:45 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 6:15

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VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 4, 7

Every Saturday In


E4 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, March 9, 2010: You discover that if you have the support of others, your abilities are enhanced. This year, you can manifest many more of your desires. Your birthday heralds a new life cycle. Remain positive, and manifesting could become second nature to you. If you are single, you will have to work to maintain that status with so many suitors. If you are attached, your sweetie benefits from your positive, happy attitude. CAPRICORN helps make what you want happen. This person is a friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH What you are sure of this morning could be up for grabs by the afternoon. Your instincts could be telling you that another course would be better. Don’t fight city hall until you know exactly which path suits you. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Listen to another’s opinion, but understand that this might not be the gospel truth, only what he or she is thinking. A meeting proves to be most enlightening and provides direction. Check in with an expert or two before you say that this is it. Tonight: Take in new vistas. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Others could be forward, in your opinion, but what you think might not be

all that important. Be willing to break through and find another path that suits you. Investigate options with care. Tonight: A long-overdue conversation. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Dive into work. You will want to network later and handle an issue. Your ability to change gears is a testimony to your strengths. You are able to do this with ease. Work with a loved one who presents a different point of view. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Be aware of what is happening with a child or loved one. This person might feel a little down. Your conversation could be difficult. Discussions remain animated, especially at work. Accomplishment is your middle name. Tonight: Quit pushing so hard. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Your creativity marks your decisions, forcing your hand with a child or loved one. You simply know when something is off. Honor a change, remaining more upbeat than many. Others happily allow you to take the lead. Tonight: Kick up your heels. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Don’t question what is happening so intensely. Sometimes you are the source of your negativity. Pleasure surrounds a domestic matter. Make your best effort to get past a problem. Tonight: Settle in early. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Avoid going to extremes. You could be a lot more vulnerable

than you realize. Communication keeps others in touch with what needs to happen. Just pick up the phone if you need to have something happen. Tonight: Visit with friends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You could be overwhelmed by what is going on around you. You might feel as if you have pushed way beyond your limits. Others simply won’t work with you. Honor what is happening with a family member. Tonight: Your treat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might feel as if the pressure is way too heavy and overwhelming. You might wonder exactly what to do with a family member who can be charming yet demanding. Communication flourishes in the afternoon. Tonight: As you like. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Knowing when to back off could be significant if ultimately you want to work through a problem. Observe what isn’t being said rather than intercede in a situation. In the long run, the more facts you have the better. Tonight: Do your thing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Zero in on what you want. Your finances could be restricting you. Honor that which you cannot change. Not everything is as you think it is. Your words have an impact, especially in a meeting. You might wonder why this doesn’t occur more often. Tonight: You are the center of the action. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Poetry Continued from E1 Naomi was one of two students from the new class to perform at the Art Fusion event after Friday’s Gallery Walk. All of the students are slated to perform at a special open house March 17, and many will also showcase their efforts at the allages poetry slam at Townshend’s Bend Teahouse on March 18 (see “If you go” on Page E1).

The class Emch came up with the idea for this class as a way for young voices to be heard. He contacted Graham, who is a well-known and respected spoken word artist, visual artist and musician, about teaching. Emch says the students have produced a lot of good writing about some interesting subjects, from parent issues, stress about college, politics and war, to the cliches of Bend. He thinks the experience has helped students gain a little bit of introspection and helped them “analyze themselves and analyze society around them.” The class includes information about the history of these art forms as well as practical tips and techniques. Graham talks about the importance of character and one’s ability to take on a persona on stage. He explains that’s why he uses his stage name Mosley Wotta. He calls it a protective coating — that way “Jason Graham doesn’t get affected.” Graham has also worked with students about how to use a microphone, being aware of their breath, learning to see cliches and discovering that really simple things can by dynamic. He doesn’t expect students to wind up perfectly polished. In fact, Graham says some of his fa-

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Naomi Wright, center, and her instructor, Jason Graham, right, react to the crowd’s cheers after Naomi read her poem at a PoetHouse Art event Friday. vorite moments are the awkward ones because those are the truth. Emch and Graham also teach the class at J Bar J Boys Ranch, a residential program for adjudicated youth. Graham says the students at J Bar J are not as loquacious or academic, but they have “raw guts and bones” and talk about heavy subjects. That class involves less critique and more encouragement. “The last thing we want them to do is clam up,” said Graham.

The PoetHouse class culminates next week with an open house and performance. The event will showcase work from all of the classes offered by CADA | CASA — including graffiti, silk screening, puppet and 3D design, and more. It will also include a presentation about the next round of classes slated to start later this spring. Classes all cost $60 for the six-week session, but scholarships are available. Graham and Emch both have

long-term vision for these classes and hope to see them continue indefinitely.

Students Naomi first heard about the class when Graham stopped by her Advanced Placement English class this year. She didn’t think of herself as a poet, but liked the sound of the class and decided to give it a go. She loved meeting all of the students and has found the

medium inspiring. “The whole world of slam poetry was new to me.” She watched every episode of the Def Poetry Jam on HBO. And she competed in the all-ages slam at Townshend’s Bend Teahouse last month (she earned third place). Naomi says she likes the beat and rhythm that comes with this style of poetry. It also tends to have vivid imagery and metaphors and deals with real-life issues. She compares it to an object in

the Harry Potter world called a “pensieve,” which characters use to examine memories. Slam poetry allows her to take issues out of her head and share them. Naomi also credits the class with keeping up her enthusiasm. As a senior in her second semester, Namoi says she had started to feel burned out on school. But this art form has “revamped my passion for everything.” Sitting in a history lesson about courts, Naomi starts thinking about how “Ladies and gentlemen of the jury” would make an excellent start to a new poem. Summit senior Caitlin Young didn’t perform at Friday’s event, but she was there to support her classmates. She didn’t feel quite ready to take the stage, but feels she’s getting closer. “My confidence level is not quite there yet.” As a member of the speech and debate team and the school newspaper, Caitlin is always looking at facts. This gives her an outlet to express her own perspective and feelings. She wants to stay involved with slam poetry and hiphop “as a way to enhance my life.” On Friday, class member Kit Foreman, who attends Marshall and Bend high schools, performed a song she had written. It was about a day in December when she got stuck in Reno and wanted to go east. She joined the class to improve her lyric writing ability. Kit says the class did that and helped give her a boost of confidence — enough that she felt comfortable playing her acoustic guitar and singing in front of a large crowd. Her melodic song quieted the crowd and by the end, everyone was clapping and even singing along. A ton of cheers greeted the close of her song — and a few shouts of “That was awesome!” Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Men savoring the – non-foamy – brew technology (eventually retiring as assistant vice president at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia), he had to create a newventure business plan. Classmate Richard Miller, an avid tea drinker, suggested a tea business. James and another student, Duane Higginbotham, “looked at him like he was crazy.” But because it was only an academic exercise, they thought, why not? When research showed tea was a growth industry, the trio decided to invest in Tea Country as an online vendor in 2001 before opening the East Oak Lane shop in 2004. A few years later, James noticed that not only were more men buying tea at his shop — where shelves are stocked with black canisters that feature 100 varieties (Golden Assam, Monk’s Blend, Organic Wuyi Oolong) — but they were asking questions on the finer points of tea leaves.

By Lini S. Kadaba The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — The 10 men bantered about their wives’ cooking, boxing greats, and suits that fit too snugly. This, however, was no sports bar meet-up or barbershop chat. Two hours earlier, Howard James, a co-proprietor of Tea Country in Philadelphia, had called the group to order by taking requests for a beverage steeped in centuries of elegant tradition. “Can I have yerba maté?” asked regular Weller Thomas, 54, a travel magazine publisher who lives nearby. James, 61, wearing a maroon apron stamped with his shop’s name, looked pleased. “It has four times the antioxidants than green tea,” he told the men, the first of many tea tidbits he would pass along this afternoon. “It keeps you alert without the jitters.” So began the third meeting of the budding Gentlemen’s Tea Club — one more indication of guys’ growing interest in the aromatic liquid. No one keeps track of how many macho types find the leaves of the Camellia sinensis to be just their cup of tea, but it is known that tea itself is big business. In the United States, the wholesale market has nearly quadrupled from $1.84 billion in 1990 to $7.13 billion in 2008, according to the New York-based Tea Association of the U.S.A. Also, Americans consume more than 55 billion servings of tea — 2.5 billion gallons.

Earl Grey for Earl But if the idea of men sharing stories sipping blueberry rooibos rather than Budweiser sounds like a “Saturday Night Live” skit, consider the anecdotal evidence to the contrary. Tea drinking is no longer confined to lace-covered parlors. In

Tea for 2 or 3 Elizabeth Robertson / The Philadelphia Inquirer

From left, Gentlemen’s Tea Club members Joseph Moore, Tea Country owner Howard James (standing), James Vance and Evan Draber attend a meeting at Tea Country in Philadelphia. recent years, tea cafes and tea bars with chic, hip vibes (and no pink) have joined the party — more than 2,400 tearooms exist around the country — and have offered a welcoming hub for men. One New Mexico venue even provides tea and cigar tasting for the manly. Last year, Thistledown Shop in New Hampshire, which has long made teapot covers in flowery motifs, added a man cozy, called a hob (cozy being too feminine-sounding), “to appeal to the growing number of male tea drinkers,” as its Web site notes. Hobs come in olive greens and grays with a buckle — no silk ribbons here. Meanwhile, TeaGuySpeaks blogs about “Tea and Boobs,”

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“Tea During Wartime,” and a company called Manteas.com. “It’s not an Earl Grey, English breakfast tea scene anymore,” said tea blender and author Bruce Richardson, owner of Elmwood Inn Fine Teas in Perryville, Ky. Men, of course, have historically enjoyed the brew, including George Washington, but the rise of Victorian-era tea culture in the 19th century was a dealbreaker for many fellas. Now, America’s renewed interest in tea, particularly among men, has “gone into fifth gear,” Richardson said, taking off like a Maserati. When he began tea talks two decades ago, he attracted mainly women. Now, men make up at least 20 percent of the audience. “A gentlemen’s tea club is right

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on for this time in our tea world,” said Pearl Dexter, editor and publisher of Tea A Magazine, who has noticed more male tea imbibers in her travels. Even though the club makes sense, James himself seems an unlikely enthusiast of tea. “People are amazed I’m around,” he said. He grew up in the rough James W. Johnson Homes in North Philadelphia, where gangs ran rampant. “I’ve been stabbed and stomped, all that kind of crazy stuff.” But he also was a Boy Scout, and mentors kept him at his studies, he said. His interest in tea began as a requirement. As a master’s of business administration student at Eastern University while working full time in information

“Some of them would sit down and chat,” said James, who replaced his addiction to two large cups of Starbucks a day with three cups of tea. Before long, he was introducing customers to one another. Why not create a club? “This is really a relaxation spot,” he said, noting that membership comes with no obligations beyond a $40 annual fee that includes the gatherings on the third Saturday of the month (and plenty of tea). New members also get a free porcelain teapot. Several of the men live in East Oak Lane, as James does, and joined the club because they knew the trim (he has taught karate) shopkeeper with the shaved head through Omega Psi Phi fraternity. “He was someone I respected,” said Emerson Willis, 59, a sales rep who admits he wasn’t much of a tea drinker at first. But tastings turned to full cups, green

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tea among his favorites. “I’ve grown to like it. Howard brought a whole new world to us.” Thomas, who serves as the club’s vice president, agreed. “I was just fascinated,” he said. “I’m always learning something. At a bar, you have so many different distractions. Here, you don’t.” As the day’s guest speaker, Donald Schuler, Sr., talked about “taking charge of your body” and the pluses of fruits and vegetables, the men poured the rich brown liquid from mustard-colored or white pots into patterned Chinese-style cups (no handles) and black mugs with a splash of color. English teacups held with a raised pinky would be “too soft for the men,” James said with a chuckle. Health was the topic of the day, prompting discussion of recipes for smoothies and how best to prepare greens. It’s the health benefits, and foodie allure, of tea that often attract the testosterone set. “It’s a very easy way to alter your lifestyle,” said Joe Simrany, the tea association president. The jury is still out, but studies have shown an association between the antioxidant-rich tea leaf and improved cardiovascular function; reduced incidence of cancer, particularly colon; and increased bone density. As recently as January, tea was touted as a way for men to trim a belly after researchers found that men who drink more than two cups of tea a day have trimmer waistlines than men who drink coffee or nothing at all. (Alas, women didn’t see the same advantage.) “You’re not going to see specialty tea advertised on the Super Bowl,” said Frank Viola, 60, of Rydal, an adjunct who taught James at Eastern. But, he said, “men have a lot of issues. They want to take time to decompress. It doesn’t have to be alcohol or physical sports contact.” For this group of men, at least, a hot cup of tea will do.

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HOMES, GARDENS AND FOOD IN CENTRAL OREGON

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Terra cotta in no time Six easy techniques from Martha Stewart to get pots through the terra cotta transformation in just weeks, Page F6

AT HOME

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

HOME

A splash of style By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

Your kitchen’s backsplash has a simple job: to protect the walls from spills and splatters. But it can also add a big splash of style to your decor. When interior designer and Cascade Design Center owner Ronda Fitton works on a kitchen project, she focuses special attention on this small but important area. “I look for impact; something to catch the eye. Anything that’s on a vertical surface, as opposed to a horizontal surface, you’re going to see more quickly when you walk into a room,” she said.

Not much sugar, plenty of spice FOOD

Savory baking uses familiar techniques, but new flavors By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

I

f you only bake desserts and breakfast sweets, you’re missing out. There’s a whole world of savory baking waiting for you that has nothing to do with sugar. It’s all about herbs and spices, mushrooms, cheeses, vegetables, nuts and meats. “Savory baking is for people who like to cook, but would like to bake without the sweet component, so it’s more of a combination of baking and cooking,” said Mary Cech (pronounced “check”), author of “Savory Baking.” Cech is an award-winning pastry chef and culinary instructor from Park City, Utah. After years of teaching cooking classes all over the United States, often to home cooks with a sweet tooth, Cech shifted gears and started to explore the savory side of her profession. Cech’s experimentation resulted in her cookbook, which includes 75 savory recipes with a variety of ethnic flavors that are designed to expand the repertoire of anyone who likes to bake. It’s all the same techniques, but with a flavor switch. See Baking / F2

Backsplash choices Ceramic and glass tile remain the No. 1 choices for backsplashes, according to Fitton. Jorden Swart agrees. He’s the owner of Brilliant Environmental Building Products in Bend, which specializes in environmentally friendly and recycled materials. “Tile dominates because of its versatility,” Swart said. But there are other options worth exploring, from recycled plastic and resin products to stainless steel and custom-designed acrylic paintings by local artists. Stainless steel tiles and stainless steel panels are available, but not as popular in Central Oregon as they are in more urban areas. “People here are outdoorsy, so they like the natural, casual look. Not to say they don’t like a little bling of a little glass tile now and then,” Fitton said.

Beyond tile Backsplashes used to be 6-inch borders of tile, wood or other material that started at the countertop, with painted walls above. Not anymore. See Backsplash / F4

IN BRIEF OSU Extension seeks master food preservers The Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson county offices of the Oregon State University Extension Service are recruiting volunteers to participate in 48 hours of indepth food safety and preservation training on Wednesdays, March 31 through May 26 (except April 14). Applications are due by March 16. Volunteers will receive a resource notebook with reliable methods for preserving food at home and hands-on practice in the kitchen. They also agree to spend at least 48 hours helping county residents handle and preserve food safely. Volunteer activities will include conducting workshops, testing pressure canner gauges and staffing exhibit booths at county fairs. The cost of the program is $50. The training sessions will be at the OSU/Deschutes County Extension office in Redmond. Contact: http://extension .oregonstate.edu/deschutes/ food-preservation, 541-548-6088 or glenda.hyde@oregonstate.edu. — From staff reports

Photos by Noel Barnhurst, courtesy “Savory Baking” by Mary Cech, Chronicle Books, 2009

Spicy Tomato Crumble can be served as a side dish, or as a pasta topper. “It’s a little crunchy on top, it’s spicy like a puttanesca, and it’s just yummy,” says Mary Cech, an award-winning pastry chef and author of “Savory Baking.”

GARDEN

Catalogs offer germinating devices and more By Liz Douville

This “cow pot” manure container promises to decompose after being planted in the ground. See more planting techniques on Page F5.

For The Bulletin

Wake up, procrastinators. As we get another day closer to planting season, more gardeners will feel the disappointment of not receiving some of the seeds they ordered. I started ordering seeds in January, and immediately received notice that one item was sold out and several others were back-ordered, to be shipped in late March. I have heard similar stories from friends. Why do I order seeds? Firstly, because I want to make sure I am planting open-pollinated seeds for my vegetable selections. That is information that may or may not be printed on the

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

seed packets from the rack displays. Open-pollinated varieties are consistent in characteristics; each generation is almost identical to its parent. The seeds will be true to type and

can be saved. Open-pollinated seeds also have not been altered by genetically modified organisms, commonly called GMOs. I like knowing the background of the companies I order from. Their letter of introduction, usually found on the inside cover of the catalog, makes me feel more connected to the complete cycle of gardening. See Germinating / F5

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S • PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM, ROSEMARY AND SHALLOT CREAM CLAFOUTI, F2 • SPICY TOMATO CRUMBLE, F2 • CHILE-CHEESE GRATIN SANDWICHES, F2 • ‘CREATIVE’ LOADED MACARONI & CHEESE, F3 • ‘HOMESTYLE’ BAKED MACARONI & CHEESE, F3 • ‘LUXURY’ FOUR-CHEESE & BACON CAVATAPPI, F3 • ‘MAC WITH MEAT’ SPICY MAC & SAUSAGE, F3 • COCONUT POUND CAKE, F6 • SHANGHAI CABBAGE WITH HOISIN SAUCE, F6


F2 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Romesco sauce Packing a flavor punch.

COVER STORY

Baking Continued from F1 If you love to bake cookies, for example, you’ll find 11 recipes for savory shortbreads, biscotti, madeleines and others that are meant for the start of a meal, not the end. They make sensational appetizers when matched up with cheeses, dips and drinks. Cech said in a phone interview that she finds savory baking a fun and creative way to cook. “It’s not easy to come up with a cookie recipe without sugar. With sweet baking, you lean on sugar for flavor, and without the sugar, you have to be creative and come up with substitutes like cheeses and herbs, dried mushrooms and spices,” she said. For people who love to cook, but shy away from baking, Cech said a good recipe to try is her Spicy Tomato Crumble (recipe at far right). “A crumble topping is one of the easiest things to make for a nonbaker. You just mix the ingredients together. What I really like about this is it can be served in a casserole as a side dish, or I love to do a pasta, like fettuccine, and then serve the crumble on top. It’s a little crunchy on top, it’s spicy like a puttanesca, and it’s just yummy,” Cech said. The good news about savory baking is that Central Oregon’s high altitude won’t deflate your efforts. Cech is aware of the problem. In Park City, she’s at about 7,000 feet. Bend’s elevation is 3,600 feet. “For high-altitude baking, what you’re dealing with is the lack of structure in baked goods that comes from the air pressure being less. One of the culprits is sugar, which is a tenderizer and ‘weakener’ of that whole structure. In these savory items, there is little or no sugar, so you should be in good shape at your altitude. I haven’t had any problems with it,” she said. If you love to bake, you’ll be intrigued with Cech’s more complicated recipes. She recommends her Chili-Cheese Gratin Sandwiches (far right) for people who enjoy making quick breads. “The bread is great alone or served with chili, or you can transcend it and make it into openfaced sandwiches with a slice of really nice tomato on top and then that cheese herb butter broiled on top. Oh my gosh, it’s so good — garlicky and kind of like a Welsh rarebit type of thing,” she said. Another dish that Cech said is not to be missed is her clafouti made with portobello mushrooms in a shallot cream sauce (at right). A clafouti is traditionally a dessert made with cherries baked in a sweet batter, but Cech’s savory

SPICY TOMATO CRUMBLE Makes 4 to 6 servings. This delicious puttanesca-style dish with a crunchy topping is great with grilled fish. For an interesting change, scoop a large spoonful on top of fresh-cooked pasta. — Mary Cech TOPPING 1 ⁄3 C dry bread crumbs ¼ C rolled oats 1 TBS all-purpose flour ¼ C finely grated Parmesan cheese 1 tsp dried oregano ½ tsp dried sage ¼ tsp salt 2 TBS unsalted butter, cold and cut into cubes

FILLING 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 TBS capers, rinsed, drained and roughly chopped 2 TBS finely diced pepperoncini 2 tsp clover honey 1 tsp dried basil ½ C dry red wine One 28-oz can whole Italian tomatoes with juice, roughly chopped ½ C kalamata olives, roughly chopped

To prepare the topping, combine the bread crumbs, rolled oats, flour, Parmesan cheese, oregano, sage and salt in a medium bowl. Add the butter and work it into the flour mixture with your fingertips until the mixture is crumbly. Set aside. To prepare the filling, put the garlic, capers, pepperoncini, honey, basil, red wine, tomatoes and olives in a medium saucepan over high heat. Stir and bring to a rapid boil. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for 25 minutes to reduce the filling slightly. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Pour the filling into a 6-cup (1½-quart) casserole dish, and sprinkle with the topping. Place the casserole dish on a baking sheet and center in the oven. Bake until the topping is golden brown and the filling is bubbling, about 15 minutes. Serve hot from the oven. — “Savory Baking” by Mary Cech, Chronicle Books, 2009

CHILE-CHEESE GRATIN SANDWICHES Makes 8 servings. Thick slices of warm, moist cheese bread with a kick of jalapeño are topped with ripe tomato slices and a cheese topping, then broiled until bubbly and golden brown. Make the bread and topping ahead, and toast sandwiches in an instant. You’ll be sure to make these fork-and-knife, open-faced sandwiches often for lunch or brunch. — Mary Cech

Photos by Noel Barnhurst, courtesy “Savory Baking” by Mary Cech, Chronicle Books, 2009

Mushroom Clafouti is a savory take on a classic French dessert. twist turns it into an earthy side dish. “I’ve done this recipe so many times for guests and for myself and my husband. It’s sooooo good, and I serve it in little ramekins like you’d serve a creme brulee. It’s great as a side dish with beef,” she said. Cech writes in her book that baking sweets will always be “a big part of my culinary pleasures,” but the fun of baking is no longer reserved for dessert. “I’ve had very good success with teaching students savory baking who say, “Wow, now I like to bake more,” Cech said. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

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PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM, ROSEMARY AND SHALLOT CREAM CLAFOUTI Makes 4 servings. A clafouti is a rustic dessert popular in Provence, France. It is usually made with black cherries blanketed with a thin, white sweet batter, baked and served hot. My earthy and aromatic savory rendition is decadent, rich and flavorful. It is delicious served with roasted meats or poultry. Mix and match mushrooms for fun. — Mary Cech CLAFOUTI BATTER ¼ C dried portobello mushrooms (or dried chanterelles or porcini)

¾ C boiling water ½ C all-purpose flour ¼ tsp salt 2 eggs

FILLING 4 TBS extra-virgin olive oil 2 TBS minced shallots 1¼ C heavy (whipping) cream 8 oz fresh portobello mushrooms, stemmed, thickly sliced and cut into 1-inch chunks

2 tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary (or use thyme if you don’t care for rosemary) ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper

To prepare the batter, put the dried mushrooms in a small bowl and pour the boiling water over the top. Gently stir and then cover with plastic film. Let the mushrooms hydrate for 15 minutes. Drain, reserving ½ cup of the liquid. Chop the mushrooms into 1-inch pieces. Put the flour in a medium bowl. Pour the reserved mushroom liquid over the flour and whisk until smooth. Add the salt, eggs and hydrated mushroom pieces. Continue mixing to a smooth batter. Meanwhile, prepare the filling. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Lightly butter four shallow, 6-ounce (¾-cup) ceramic dishes and arrange them on a baking sheet. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and sauté until lightly browned on one side. Turn them over and brown the other side. Add the shallots and rosemary, and continue to sauté until the shallots are translucent, about 1 minute. Stir in the heavy cream, salt and pepper. Bring to a rapid boil and cook until the cream is reduced by half, 1 to 2 minutes. Divide the mushroom cream among the prepared ceramic baking dishes. Pour the batter evenly over the mushroom cream and place the baking sheet in the oven. Bake until the crust looks puffed and the mushrooms are bubbling, about 15 minutes. Serve immediately from the oven. — “Savory Baking” by Mary Cech

CHILE-CHEESE BREAD 2 C all-purpose flour 2 tsp granulated sugar 1 TBS baking powder 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 tsp salt 4 oz (1 C) sharp cheddar cheese, shredded 1 C whole milk 1 ⁄3 C vegetable oil 1 egg One 4-oz can peeled mild green chilies, drained 3 TBS finely chopped jalapeño chili, veined and seeded ½ C finely chopped red bell pepper

CHEDDAR TOPPING 4 oz (1 stick) unsalted butter at room temperature 4 oz (1 C) sharp cheddar cheese, shredded 1 oz (¼ C) Romano cheese, shredded ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp garlic powder Pinch of salt 8 tomato slices, cut ¼-inch thick

To prepare the bread, preheat the oven to 375 degrees and butter or spray an 8x3-inch loaf pan. Stir the flour, sugar, baking powder, pepper and salt together in a medium bowl. Add the cheese, and gently toss until the cheese is evenly distributed throughout the mixture. Whisk the milk, oil, egg, green chilies, chopped jalapeño and red bell pepper together in another bowl. Pour the milk mixture over the flour mixture and briefly blend with a spatula. The batter will look moist. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and place it in the oven. Bake until the top is golden brown and springs back when gently touched in the center, about 45 minutes. Put the loaf on a cooling rack for 10 minutes and then remove the bread from the pan to completely cool. Meanwhile, prepare the topping. Put the butter, cheddar and Romano cheeses, Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder and a little salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whip attachment. Whip for 2 minutes on medium speed. Alternatively, the topping can be pulsed in a food processor for about 1 minute. Set the oven to broil. Cut the loaf into 8 slices and lay the slices on a baking sheet. Place a tomato slice on each piece of bread. Spoon about 2 heaping tablespoons of the cheese topping over each tomato slice. Put the baking sheet in the oven about 4 inches away from the flame, and broil until the cheese is bubbly and golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Serve immediately. Note: Wrap cooled bread in plastic film and store at room temperature for up to 1 week, or freeze for up to 1 month. Remove the loaf from the freezer and thaw at room temperature for a couple of hours. Warm in a 300-degree oven for 15 minutes before serving. The cheddar topping can be made ahead and stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. — “Savory Baking” by Mary Cech

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 F3

F Four favorite mac’n’cheeses, from classic to creative ‘MAC WITH MEAT’ WINNER: SPICY MAC & SAUSAGE

By Greg Morago Houston Chronicle

Trying to form consensus on the best macaroni and cheese is like getting Congress to agree on anything. There is precious little agreement where a dish of pasta baked in a cheese sauce is concerned. Why? Because we’re all convinced we make the best. Or our taste buds are attuned to familiar flavors — our mom’s mac; that prized recipe from our favorite magazine or cooking show; the heart-attack-on-a-plate from a beloved restaurant. Our mac ’n’ cheese allegiances are steeped in oven-baked tradition and formed by bonds far stronger than the elastic pull of molten cheese. Like recipes for homey favorites such as pot roast, lasagna, chili and apple pie, macaroni and cheese is a treasure; not something to be trifled with (or truffled with — more on that later). We knew that going into our macaroni and cheese throwdown, a friendly competition among Houston Chronicle readers for the best recipe. We knew we’d get plenty of submissions (more than 100), but we weren’t prepared for the variety of interpretations of what was considered classic macaroni and cheese. Some recipes called for unusual cheeses (ricotta, mascarpone, cottage cheese, Cheez Whiz and canned nacho cheese sauce) and exotic (gorgonzola and Roquefort) and even disarming (“rat” cheese). Some recipes felt a need to soup up their sauce with canned chicken, celery or mushroom soups. There were odd add-ins: chopped pecans and chopped pimento, mayonnaise, frozen spinach, a can of diced tomatoes, hot dogs and cubed tofu. There were shots at elegance with additions of vermouth, white wine and truffle oil (we can tell you now that truffle oil, much too overworked by chefs, does nothing to improve macaroni and cheese). And there was the alarming ingredient of a dash of “tobacco,” although we’re sure it was supposed to be “Tabasco.” We sorted the recipes into four categories: traditional or “homestyle”; recipes with meat (bacon, pancetta, ham, etc.); luxury versions (an abundance of rich and artisanal cheeses); and creative recipes (those that combined ethnic flavors or unusual add-ins). While there were many to admire among the groupings, some recipes immediately stood out for their ingredients, and for the sureness and clarity of their instructions. We baked so many dishes

CREATIVE FLAVORS WINNER: LOADED MACARONI & CHEESE 10 slices of bacon 16 oz elbow macaroni 1 stick of butter 1 C of whole milk 16 oz evaporated milk Dash of salt Dash of pepper 4 C of shredded cheddar 1 beaten egg 1 ⁄4 C of diced green onions 1 ⁄2 C of sour cream 1 ⁄4 C of ranch dressing Sprinkle of paprika Heat oven to 400 degrees. Fry bacon until crisp; crumble. Set aside. On low heat, melt butter. Add all milks, salt and pepper. Once it starts to bubble, add 3 3⁄4 cups of cheese. Once all ingredients have melted, remove from heat. Mix egg into the sauce. Add green onions, bacon, sour cream and ranch dressing. Set aside. Cook macaroni as directed on package; drain. Add to cheese sauce. Spread macaroni and cheese in a rectangular baking dish; sprinkle top with remaining cheese and paprika. Cover with foil and place in the oven until cheese on top is melted. Remove foil and turn off the oven; return the pan to the (off, but still hot) oven for 5 more minutes to brown the cheese on top a little. — Recipe by Isiah Thomas, of The Woodlands, Texas

of macaroni and cheese, we were convinced our co-workers, who we looked to for feedback, would accuse us of shortening their lives with all the cheese and butter. But the interesting thing about macaroni and cheese is that even middling versions have the ability to hit the spot and satisfy. Good versions immediately stood out.

What was learned Before we get to the good, though, a few observations about deficiencies in some of the recipes: • Almost across the board, there was a tendency to under-salt. We found a bit more salt woke up cheese sauces that relied on American, Colby and Velveeta. • Recipes that called for more than a couple of eggs were concerning. One recipe called for eight eggs and produced a mac ’n’ cheese that was more like a quiche. It also tasted overwhelmingly eggy — not the first flavor you want from this dish. • Dryness can easily sink a mac ’n’ cheese recipe. Many recipes clearly needed more liquid. If you’re concerned your cheese sauce is too loose or that there’s too much of it, that’s probably not the case. Pasta can drink up the sauce, and the oven can dry it out. If anything, err on the side of more liquid or more sauce.

What was liked Now for the good news. Here’s what we liked about each of the best recipes: • Mac with meat: James Gerstner’s recipe for Spicy Mac & Sausage shone for its abundance of flavors. It wasn’t just the smoked

The Associated Press file photo

With reader input, the Houston Chronicle found four favorite macaroni and cheese recipes, sorting them into four categories: traditional or “homestyle” recipes; recipes with meat; luxury versions; and creative recipes (with unusual add-in ingredients). sausage, but the kick of Louisiana hot sauce and the undertow of pepper jack cheese. Even the bread crumbs were kicked up a notch with the addition of chili powder. This was a lusty winner. • Luxury mac: Martin Tomek’s recipe is not for everyday eating. In fact, it is so rich, you would have to consider it a special-occasion dish. The cheese sauce is fit for a king, using Gruyere, fontina, sharp cheddar and Emmentaler (a cow’s milk Swiss cheese). But Tomek doesn’t stop there: There’s bacon larded through his cavatappi noodles as well as bacon drippings and parmesan cheese in his panko bread topping, which we found make a superior topping. • Creative mac: We have to admit that we were skeptical about Isiah Thomas’ Loaded Macaroni & Cheese that called for ranch dressing. But we were believers after tasting this mac that combined the flavors of a loaded baked potato with bacon, sour cream and

HOMESTYLE WINNER: BAKED MACARONI & CHEESE 8 TBS unsalted butter 2 C fresh bread crumbs 1 lb elbow macaroni 1 clove garlic, minced 1 tsp dry mustard, dissolved in 1 tsp water 1 ⁄4 tsp cayenne pepper 6 TBS all-purpose flour 31⁄2 C whole milk

13⁄4 C low-sodium chicken broth 1 tsp nutmeg 1 lb Colby cheese, shredded (4 C) 8 oz extra-sharp cheddar cheese, shredded (2 C) Salt Black pepper, to taste

With oven rack in the middle, heat the oven to 400 degrees. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter and toss with bread crumbs; set aside. Bring 4 quarts water to a boil in a large pot. Stir in 1 tablespoon salt and macaroni; cook until almost tender but still firm to the bite. Drain and set aside. Wipe the pot dry, add the remaining six tablespoons butter and melt over medium heat. Stir in garlic, mustard and cayenne. Cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in flour and cook until golden, about 1 minute. Slowly whisk in milk and broth. Add nutmeg. Bring to a simmer. Cook, whisking often, until the mixture is slightly thickened, about 6 minutes. Remove from heat, whisk in cheeses until completely melted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir macaroni until well combined. Pour into a 9x13 baking dish. Sprinkle evenly with bread crumbs. Bake until golden brown and bubbling around the edges, 25 to 30 minutes. To make bread crumbs: Use good-quality white bread. Tear pieces of bread into quarters, and pulse in food processor 8 or 9 times for coarse crumbs. One slice yields about 1 cup. — Recipe by Hilary Purcell, of Houston

LUXURY VERSION WINNER: TOMEK’S FOUR-CHEESE & BACON CAVATAPPI 5 slices bacon, cut into 1 ⁄4 -inch pieces 1 lb cavatappi (corkscrew) pasta Béchamel Sauce 1 TBS bacon drippings 1 ⁄3 C onion, chopped fine 3 TBS white wine or dry Vermouth 1 stick butter 1 ⁄4 C flour 11⁄2 C whole milk 1 C heavy cream 1 ⁄4 tsp ground nutmeg 1 tsp kosher salt 3 ⁄4 tsp black pepper

1 C Gruyere cheese, grated 1 C fontina cheese, grated 1 C Emmentaler cheese, grated 1 C New York sharp cheddar cheese, grated 1 TBS green onions, sliced TOPPING 11⁄4 C panko bread crumbs 1 ⁄4 C Parmesan cheese, grated 3 TBS chopped parsley 1 ⁄2 tsp paprika 3 ⁄4 tsp kosher salt 3 ⁄4 tsp black pepper 2 TBS bacon drippings 2 TBS butter, melted

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cook bacon, drain pieces and save drippings. Cook pasta according to directions on package. Place a tablespoon of bacon drippings in a 4-quart saucepan on medium; add onions. Sauté until soft. Add wine and reduce by 80 percent. Add butter and flour to make a roux; cook 6-7 minutes. Add milk and cream; bring to a slight simmer, stirring frequently. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper. Reduce the heat to low and add cheeses; fold until all are melted. Add sliced green onion. In a large mixing bowl, combine cheese sauce, macaroni and bacon. Pour the mixture into a greased 9x13 baking dish. Put the bread crumbs in a mixing bowl, and add Parmesan cheese, parsley, paprika, salt and pepper. Mix until well blended. Mix the melted butter and bacon drippings together, and pour over top of dry mix; stir until mixture is well coated. Sprinkle the topping evenly over the top of the pasta mixture. Bake 30 minutes. — Recipe by Martin Tomek, of Humble, Texas

shredded cheese. Two other things Thomas’ recipe had going for it: the use of evaporated milk (in addition to whole milk) that made for a lusciously smooth sauce, and the use of ranch dressing, sour cream, bacon and green onion, which loaded the dish with flavor. • In the end, however, one recipe stood out for its overall excellence. Hilary Purcell’s version of classic homestyle mac hit all the right notes: superior flavor, excellent moisture from a spoton cheese sauce; perfect, gooey mouth feel; handsome appearance. The standout attributes of Purcell’s recipe were the use of dried mustard, fresh garlic, cayenne pepper and freshly grated nutmeg. She also incorporated chicken broth in addition to whole milk in her cheese sauce. It’s the macaroni and cheese that you envision when you think of the best virtues of the dish. Not only that, it would please kids as well as fussy foodies.

16 oz shell pasta 6 TBS butter, divided use 1 ⁄4 C flour 3 C whole milk 1 tsp salt 1 tsp dry mustard 1 tsp white pepper 3 TBS Louisiana hot sauce 1 C pepper jack cheese, shredded 1 C sharp cheddar cheese, shredded 1 C Gruyere cheese, shredded 1 lb precooked smoked sausage (sliced lengthwise and then in 1⁄4 inch pieces) 1 ⁄2 C of bread crumbs 3 TBS chili powder Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cook pasta according to directions on package. In large pan, melt three tablespoons butter; add 1⁄4 cup of flour and whisk. Over low heat and stirring constantly, gradually add 3 cups of milk, salt, mustard, white pepper and hot sauce. After several minutes, sauce will start to thicken. Remove from heat and stir in all cheeses. In a large bowl, combine cooked drained pasta, cheese sauce and sausage. Pour into a greased 9x13 casserole dish. In smaller pan, melt 3 tablespoons butter. Add bread crumbs and chili powder; mix well. Spread bread crumb mixture evenly over top of prepared casserole. Bake uncovered for 30 minutes. — Recipe by James Gerstner, of Houston

Traveling Asia via its cuisine “The Flavors of Asia” by Mai Pham (DK Publishing, 272 pgs., $35)

Chicago Tribune • What it is: Seven Asian countries — China, India, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam — star in this large, handsome cookbook assembled by California restaurateur Mai Pham on behalf of the Culinary Institute of America. • Praise and quibbles: This work is the second cookbook spawned by a “World of Flavors” conference sponsored by the institute in 2007. You’ll find 125 recipes from 40 top chefs and food figures from around the world. Essays offer the essentials about each cuisine and important food staples. Recipes are clear and well-written, but you have to know the basics of Asian cooking — how to toast spices, for example — to use this book most effectively. • Why you’ll like it: Given its somewhat globe-girdling scope, this book cannot be considered the authoritative source for any one cuisine; rather, it offers a foretaste of what each culture and each cuisine is about. Pham does a good job pulling the book together into a coherent whole. It’s fun to compare and contrast the various cooking traditions.


F4 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week The energy-efficient home of David Maul.

Don’t try this at home Sometimes home improvement should be left to the experts By Amy Hoak MarketWatch

CHICAGO — Eager to save money, homeowners are more willing to get their hands dirty with home-improvement projects these days. But the DIY route isn’t always the safest or cheapest. “Especially with money being so tight, it’s totally understandable that people want to take on projects themselves that in other periods they would have hired someone to do,” said Meri-K Appy, president of the Home Safety Council, a Washington nonprofit dedicated to preventing home-related injuries. But how do you determine if a project entails more than you can realistically handle? If you’re unsure about your ability to finish a project correctly, get an expert opinion before proceeding. Sometimes, you may end up spending more money to repair a bungled DIY job than if you had hired someone to do it from the start. Here are a few occasions when you may want to consider turning to a pro:

Safety is an issue Tinkering with a home’s electric system can be risky business, said Matt Knox, chief executive of DiggersList.com, a construction classifieds Web site. Not only could the do-it-yourselfer risk electrocution, but doing a job incorrectly could create a safety hazard within the home’s structure. Some other jobs that involve safety risks: • Extending a gas line. “Do not mess around with gas. ... If you’re DIY, you probably don’t know how to check for gas leaks,” Knox said. A mistake there could lead to an explosion or carbonmonoxide poisoning. • Projects that involve heights. Carefully assess projects that require you to be up high, whether it’s roofing or pruning trees, Appy said. “Do the cost/benefit analysis up front and ask yourself, ‘How well trained am I to do this, do I have the proper tools, what is my physical well-being?’” she said.

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• Projects that require power tools. Obviously, big power tools, such as a circular saw, can lead to serious injury or even death if used improperly.

Water is involved Leaks and water damage can lead to more costly and complicated repairs. If left unfixed, they can lead to mold — which affects air quality and, if found during an inspection, can be a deal breaker on a home sale. Water-related projects don’t have to strictly involve your home’s pipes. Putting in a skylight might seem like a do-ityourself job you can handle. Do it incorrectly, however, and you could end up with a leaky roof, water damage and mold. “If you’re lucky and it leaks, you will see the leak,” said Knox. If you’re not lucky, leaking can start inside the ceiling and drip behind the walls, causing damage to drywall and wooden beams.

Costs are high Sometimes the costs of materials and the expense associated with making a mistake are enough to make hiring an expert a good idea. A kitchen cabinet can cost a couple hundred dollars, and if you order incorrectly, there might be a restocking fee and special orders may be nonreturnable, said Mike Albrecht, division director for Home Depot’s installation business. Being off on measurements for granite countertops also can be a costly flub.

Project is too big If you’re planning on replacing all the windows in your home or remodeling your kitchen, think twice about how much of the project you want to take on yourself, Albrecht said. Often, you can leave the heavy lifting to the experts, and work on the finishing touches, such as painting and tiling backsplashes, he said. In a bathroom, for example, you might be comfortable changing lighting fixtures and medicine cabinets, painting and retiling, Knox said. “If you mess up, there’s no injury or damage,” he said. “If it can do damage you can’t see, have someone else do that part.” While putting in hardwood or laminate flooring can be a good do-it-yourself project, its complexity will largely be determined by its scale.

COVER STORY

Photos by Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Backsplash options

Backsplash tips and finishing touches

• Ceramic or glass tile • Recycled glass tile (varieties pictured) • Recycled resins and plastics • Corian • Stainless steel • Tin • Wood • Marble (warning: stains easily)

• If you like your existing counter, but not the backsplash, it’s easy to update only the backsplash. • Under-cabinet lighting adds atmosphere and highlights the backsplash. • Use silicone to seal the gap where backsplash meets countertop to liquid-proof the connection. • Like carpet samples, you may borrow tile samples from design stores to live with at home for a bit.

Resources • Annie Ferder, artist (www.annieferder.com) • Jorden Swart, owner, Brilliant Environmental Building Products (327 N.W. Greenwood Avenue, Suite 100, 541-317-0202, www.livegreenbebrilliant.com) • Ronda Fitton, interior designer and owner, Cascade Design Center (1805 N.E. Highway 20, 541-385-0808, www.cascadedesigncenter.com)

Backsplash Continued from F1 “For every 10 backsplashes that we install now, nine of them are full height, going all the way up to the bottom of the cabinets,” Fitton said. Hundreds of different glass and ceramic tiles are available in a wide variety of shapes, sizes and colors. Browse in design and home stores and online to explore the possibilities. Brilliant Environmental Building Products has been open for two years in Bend, offering recycled glass tiles from Oceanside Glasstile and Portland-based Stardust Glass, among others. Brilliant also carries Lumicor and 3form recycled resin panels that make interesting backsplashes with solid translucent colors, patterns or embedded natural elements such as twigs and bamboo. Recycled tiles are typically more expensive than conventional ones, starting at about $20 per square foot versus $10, said Swart. A typical kitchen has about 30 square feet of backsplash area, Fitton said, and the price can range from $10 to $50 per square foot or more, depending on how many expensive decorative tiles are used. Matching a backsplash to the kitchen decor and house colors can be tricky. “Some people want it to be more subtle; others want it to stand out,” Swart said. Fitton said she aims for the backsplash to contrast with the cabinets so it doesn’t blend in. But if a client prefers a similar color palette for both cabinets and backsplash, Fitton suggests colored canisters on the counter to add some visual interest.

Kitchen masterpiece The backsplash area behind the stove offers more space to get creative. For people who want to make a bold artistic statement, and who have some money to spend,

Jorden Swart, of Brilliant Environmental Building Products in Bend, displays recycled backsplash materials. Recycled tiles are typically more expensive than conventional ones, Swart said. “Tile dominates because of its versatility.” Dean Guernsey The Bulletin

there’s the option of commissioning a custom, fine-art painting. Bend artist Annie Ferder has created several local kitchen paintings, which take months to complete and cost in the range of $5,000 to $10,000. Ferder said her clients tend to

be interested in Old World-style art, so she paints Dutch mastersinspired fruit and vegetable still lifes. Ferder paints on MDF particleboard in her studio, then the painting is installed on-site. “It’s really challenging because the painting has to match

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the tile, the granite, the woodwork and the colors in the room. In a new home, I meet with the builder, the electrician and the cabinetmaker because the painting has to fit in there properly,” she said. A work of fine art near a hot, steamy stove didn’t make sense until Ferder explained why acrylic paint is perfect for a kitchen. “It dries so hard you can use soap and water to wash it down. Because I live in this town, I’m an ‘artist on call.’ If there’s a problem, I’ll come with my paint and fix it, like a doctor on call,” Ferder said. She also said she can seal the painting. Some of Ferder’s clients protect their paintings with non-glare glass or Plexiglas. Tile or paint, ceramic or recycled resin — if you can decide what you like best, you’ll have a backsplash that not only does its job of helping keep your kitchen clean, but will make you proud of its stylish looks.

Courtesy Annie Ferder

Bend artist Annie Ferder painted this custom acrylic painting as a backsplash behind a customer’s stove. With acrylic paint, “it dries so hard you can use soap and water to wash it down,” she says.

Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

Baskets: My favorite solution for storing things By Martha Phifer The Orlando Sentinel

It seems as if no matter the size of our homes, we always need (or want) more closet or storage space. But in the absence of that extra room, you can always use baskets, like I do. It’s the mission of the Blessing Basket Project (blessingbasket .org) “to reduce poverty in devel-

oping countries by paying prosperity wages for artisan products.” Those products include woven baskets, bowls, fans and hats, among other things, from Bangladesh (made of date palm leaf and sea grass); Ghana (made of elephant grass); Madagascar (made of Mahampy, aka sedge); and Uganda (made of banana leaf and sisal). It takes weavers

between one and two days to weave these works of art, which are unique and affordable. All of a sudden I came to the realization that I have one in almost every room. A basket, that is. I have a fruit basket on the kitchen counter. Another two baskets store my spices and condiments in the pantry. Instead of trash cans in the bathrooms, I prefer small

baskets. Tiny ones filled with potpourri double as decor and air freshener on my bathroom counter. My bath products in the linen closet also are in baskets. And proof of how far I’ve gone with these as a storage solution is that I even shopped for a manly basket to put a few of my husband’s personal products in. He resisted at first but ended up falling for it!


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 F5

G Celebrity horticulturist Jamie Durie glams up gardening By Connie Nelson

Next week: Spring lawn care What you should do now.

COVER STORY

Germinating

These spinach sprouts were planted using the seed “disk” technique, which makes planting tiny seeds easier.

Continued from F1 I also feel adamant about supporting seed suppliers who have joined the Safe Seed Pledge, which in part reads: “We pledge that we do not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered or modified seeds or plants.” For a list of seed companies that have signed the Safe Seed Pledge, visit hortmag.com/ article/safeseedpledge.

(Minneapolis) Star Tribune

Q: A:

So how do you design, post-Vegas? We’re all spatially aware. We know what it takes to feel comfortable in our living rooms. I’m just translating that to the garden. You have to create a space that’s so comfortable, so private, that people feel like they could go out and walk around naked in their garden.

Q: A:

By Norman Winter McClatchy-Tribune News Service

It seems today everyone is searching for those plants that perform from the minute they are planted until killing frost takes them out. If you find yourself in that group, then you’ll welcome Purple Knight and Brazilian Red Hot, both varieties of Alternanthera. You’ll also relish in the fact that these are only two of several new varieties reaching your local garden center in the last few years. Botanically speaking, they are both Alternanthera dentata. If you are not familiar with that name, then consider them to be like Joseph’s Coats on steroids. The name Brazilian Red Hot indeed gives the clue they are native to South America and Mexico. These plants will be riveting in your garden because of their eye-catching foliage. In the case of Purple Knight, the leaves are such a deep dark purple they would almost pass for black. With this color, you’ll be able to

combine just about any other color of flower or foliage and have them literally dazzle. One striking partnership I had the opportunity to photograph had them growing behind a drift of Torch Red Ember gaillardia. The fiery red and yellow stood out against the sea of dark black purple. The Brazilian Red Hot garnered awards in almost every trial in the country. The leaves are smaller than Purple Knight, but the iridescent shades of red hot pink and magenta make this plant look like it is on fire. In the trials I worked with, the August sun and heat only made it ever more sizzling. I’ve seen great combinations with yellow lantanas, and a gaudy but dashing partnership with Blue Wave petunias. Almost any color will work with this plant other than orange. Also look for a selection called Summer Flame with the same intense colors. I compared these to Joseph’s Coats, and some sell them under that name. Expect them to easily reach 24 to 36 inches,

which will make them great as a backdrop for your other flowers. Space your plants about 18 to 24 inches apart, and they will quickly fill in. They will fit in any style of garden from grandma’s cottage to the look of the islands. Like the small Joseph’s Coats you may be most familiar with, they do need fertile, welldrained soil. They can take anything summer can dish out, but they do not want to sit in wet, soggy soil. They can still perform with a little midafternoon shade, but they reach their true potential in the full sun. These are very low-maintenance plants. Feed your plants with light applications of a slow-release fertilizer, about three times during the summer and early fall. Though they are drought tolerant, supplemental water during prolonged dry periods will keep them looking their best. If at any time you don’t like their size or shape, feel free to cut back. New growth will quickly begin.

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Q: A:

A planting bag made from breathable garden cloth, left, could help protect roots from critters.

Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

TOOLS

How did you get into gardening? I grew up in the Australian outback. My dad was a miner, and my mom was a passionate gardener. She had the ability to grow roses in the desert soil. It wasn’t until after I dabbled in show business in Las Vegas that I began to take what I learned about lights, sets and staging, and apply it to the garden.

Another item that piqued my interest was the grow bags made from unbreakable, lightweight patented fabric, not plastic. Gar-

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

ment paging through my stash of catalogs, I realized there are tools, supplies and kitchen garden goodies to fulfill your every need. It is worse than a toy catalog at Christmas. On second thought, I guess they are our toy catalogs, and we want one of everything.

TREES & SHRUBS

Q: A:

Breathable bags

deners Supply lists theirs as a feltlike fabric that breathes. They have developed sizes for different crops from lettuce to potatoes. Territorial Seed has a similar product called Smart Pots in sizes that are smaller. The containers are reusable. With the trouble I have from my underground critters, I am tempted to use the larger size for some potatoes. After all my hours of enjoy-

SEEDS

So you’re making plants exotic? We’re all pretty much experts on what grows on our street, but to take the blinkers off and see what’s growing in the rest of the world, that’s exciting. Plants really give a sense of place, and a sense of escape.

Available through Johnny’s Seed are Herb Disks, 4-inch, preseeded rounds intended to be placed in a 6-inch-round pot. Given a window sill with sufficient light, you could grow them indoors, or the pots could be placed outdoors on a patio table. I decided if I could make seed tapes, I could make “herb disks.”

So I will give it a try experimenting with a biodegradable paper towel and just an ordinary paper towel — to be blunt, the cheap kind. I also want to try using coffee filters, brown and white. According to the catalog, depending on the herb, the seed count could vary. A parsley disk contains 45 seeds, the thyme disk 75 seeds and the chive disk 100 seeds. I have heard good reports on the Topsy Turvy method of planting tomatoes, which uses a special planter to hang the plants upsidedown. I may add that to the list of new methods. I have grown cherry tomatoes in hanging baskets but never upside-down.

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Q: A:

So how do you make geraniums sexy to young people? That’s one of the reasons I wanted to do “The Outdoor Room.” It combines gardening with travel, and then I eat all these exotic foods. Our show appeals to travelers, foodies and to young people. I’m trying to harvest a whole new audience for gardening shows.

Herb Disks

GIFT ITEMS

Doesn’t sound like an easy task. No, it’s hard because 25 years ago, it was a real grandma’s sport. So, how does this guy from Aus make geraniums sexy to young people? That’s what you’ve got to do. If you can get your young people interested, they’ll become real ambassadors for gardening — and for the planet.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Liz Douville glues spinach seeds to a piece of paper towel, creating a seed “disk” that can be planted in a pot.

BIRDBATHS

You’ve been credited with making gardening sexy. Have you? Well, I’ve given it a bloody good bash.

Catalogs provide me with more than detailed variety and culture information. I page through, becoming familiar with new tools and supplies. Each year, those sections become more extensive. Propagation heat mats, soil-heating cables, automatic vent and window openers for greenhouses and cold frames, copper plant tags and a variety of potting supplies are available with just the click of the mouse and a credit card. The satisfaction for me is to learn about some of the newest products available and then find them locally. My friends and anyone else who will listen know I am not a fan of peat pots for starting seeds. I never have good luck with them decomposing in the soil, let alone the roots breaking through the pots into the soil. I am sure it is just me and my conservative nature with regard to irrigating. That said, I am intrigued with the cow pots that were introduced to the market last year. If you are a fan of TV’s “Dirty Jobs,” you may have seen them featured in a segment. Two Connecticut dairy farmers created these 100 percent biodegradable starting/transplant pots made from fully composted cow manure. When planted, the pots rapidly disintegrate, adding nutrients to the soil. Redmond Greenhouse will be one of the local suppliers. I have made many feet of seed tapes over the years, especially to make growing carrots an easier process. A little Elmer’s Glue, stripes of biodegradable paper the length you want for a row, plus a chilly, windy day, and you have the perfect combination for an indoor session of producing seed tapes. Place the seeds according to the spacing on the packet, adhering to the paper with a tiny dab of glue, and you won’t have to perform seedling triage on your root crops. Seed tapes have long since been dropped from the pages of the catalogs. They were expensive and, as in our household, I think many gardeners figured out how to make them at home. This year, I spotted something new that would have more appeal to the way many garden these days in containers or with limited space.

POTTERY

Q: A: Q: A:

New techniques

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

Jamie Durie’s a globe-trotting, jet-setting celebrity horticulturist. Maybe the only one. The former stripper has been a regular on “Oprah,” designed for Charlize Theron, trained on climate change with Al Gore and hosted a forum on sustainability with the Dalai Lama. He also went “Dancing With the Stars” (he made it through seven of 10 eliminations) and hosted the venerable PBS show, “The Victory Garden” (the 32nd season). He’s written five books (all garden-related), created his own line of outdoor furnishings and garden tools, and founded a landscape company, Patio, which is designing gardens in 11 countries. This year, he launched yet another venture: a new HGTV show, “The Outdoor Room With Jamie Durie.” Durie, 40, an Aussie with a killer smile, took a break from scuba diving in Barbados (no kidding) to talk about what he learned in Las Vegas, why he’s into native plants and his hopes for his travelogue/glam garden show.

PLANTERS


F6 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A pound cake that’s rich yet frosting-free By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Hope Dailey, of Sykesville, Md., wrote in on behalf of a friend about a recipe for coconut pound cake. She said her friend’s mother-in-law made this cake with lots of eggs, butter and frozen coconut, and she thinks it may have been a Southern recipe. Dotty Rather, of Knoxville, Tenn., sent in a recipe for coconut cream cheese pound cake, which she said came from an older issue of Southern Living. The cake is rich, dense and delicious. It is rife with coconut flavor and needs no frosting or glaze. RECIPE REQUESTS • Judy Schwalben, of Santa Rosa, Calif., is looking for the recipe for a dessert she made “eons ago” that she thinks was called Danish apple dessert. It was made with applesauce, condensed milk, lemon rind, separated eggs and bread crumbs. • Nancy Hawkins, of Oliver Springs, Tenn., is looking for a recipe for a chocolate cake called “Aussie dump cake.” She said the cake was actually just dumped out of the pan and was a mixture of gooey melted chocolate and cake.

RECIPE FINDER

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or e-mail recipefinder@baltsun.com.

COCONUT POUND CAKE Makes 10 servings. ½ C butter, softened ½ C shortening 1 (8-oz) package cream cheese, softened 3 C sugar 6 eggs 3 C all-purpose flour ¼ tsp baking soda ¼ tsp salt 1 (6-oz) package frozen coconut, thawed 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp coconut flavoring Cream butter, shortening and cream cheese together in a bowl. Gradually add sugar, beating well at medium speed. Add eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition, then add vanilla extract and coconut flavoring. In another bowl, sift flour, soda and salt together. Add dry ingredients to creamed mixture, stirring until blended. Stir in coconut. Pour batter into a greased, floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake in a preheated 325-degree oven for 1½ hours or until toothpick tests clean. Cool in pan for 10 to 15 minutes. Turn out of pan and cool on a wire rack. Nutrition information per serving: 730 calories, 36 g fat, 19 g saturated fat, 96 grams carbohydrates, 10 g protein, 2 g fiber, 176 mg cholesterol, 251 mg sodium.

Ask a cook: frozen melons By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q:

Can I freeze fresh watermelon and cantaloupe for use later in fruit salad without it getting mushy? Unfortunately, there’s not much you can do about the mushy-melon problem. Without getting too technical, there is liquid in the cells of all fruits and vegetables. When the liquid freezes, it forms ice crystals, which break the cell walls and allow what’s in the cells to come out. Some fruits contain more than 90 percent water. When that fruit is thawed, it’s going to slump and lose its shape. For some uses, soft fruit isn’t terrible. If you freeze strawberries to purée in a blender for a smoothie or peaches to bake into a pie, it doesn’t matter that the fruit is soft. But fruit you want to put in a fruit salad would be unpleasantly soft and mushy if you freeze it first. So the best choice for melon is to eat your fill in the summer or save it for smoothies in the winter.

A:

E-mail questions about cooking to Kathleen Purvis at kpurvis@charlotteobserver.com.

Terra cotta without the wait Martha Stewart Living

Tips and tricks

Like many objects of value, terra-cotta pots take on character as they age. The clay darkens, assuming a whitish cast from fertilizers and the minerals in water. When kept in the shade and watered frequently, the pots gradually acquire a verdant sheen of algae or moss. But you don’t have to wait for that look. These six easy techniques help pots undergo a transformation within weeks. Start now, and you’ll enjoy their vintage charm this summer and for many seasons to come.

Although each technique will yield unique results, a few common truths apply to the various methods. • Ingredients: It’s fine to use dairy products that aren’t fresh or have expired. Low-fat products will work, but higher-fat versions tend to be thicker and therefore less likely to drip off. • Application: To achieve an authentic appearance, vary the thickness of the materials and the direction of application. Look to true aged pots for inspiration. • Storage sites: Shaded locations are ideal for most pots while they To induce algae growth, “age.” Do not stack the pots. Spray them occasionally with water, or place soak a pot in water while letting it sit in the sun. them where rain can reach them. Pots coated with food products may smell strongly for a few days after the ingredients have been applied; keep them away from living areas. • Waiting: The longer a pot sits, the more pronounced the effect will be. It’s up to you to decide when you think it’s ready. Most pots will continue to “age” even as they are being used. Be creative. Try combining methods for different effects.

Fertilizer Accelerate the appearance of white deposits by filling the pot with a highly concentrated fertilizer solution for a few weeks. Pots aged this way are safe for plants because the salts won’t wash from the pot to the soil. • Tools and materials: wine cork, candle and water-soluble fertilizer. • Directions: Plug pot’s drainage hole with a wine cork. (A standard cork will fit a 10-inch pot perfectly. For smaller pots, whittle the cork; for larger ones, slice additional corks to fit, and wedge in place.) Light candle. Let wax drip over cork on outside of pot to seal. Let cool. Fill pot with water. (Hard water accelerates the aging process.) Add five times more fertilizer than package directions recommend. The longer the pots sit, the more dramatic the effect. Remove water, wax and cork.

Yogurt One of the most natural-looking patinas can be achieved by simply slathering plain yogurt on a new pot. Yogurt applied to dry pots yields more dramatic results. For a subtler look, first soak pots in water for 15 minutes. • Tools and materials: plain yogurt and a 2-inch foam brush. • Directions: Stir yogurt. Use brush to coat surface of pot with yogurt, covering it completely. Set aside in a shaded place until pot achieves the desired look,

Photos by Raymond Hom / Martha Stewart Living

Whether applying lime, yogurt or buttermilk and moss, there’s more than one way to achieve the warm and appealing patina of aged terra cotta. at least one month.

Buttermilk and moss Combining buttermilk and moss to encourage moss growth is a common tactic. The moss serves to hold the runny buttermilk in place and vary the texture, as well as to promote growth. • Tools and materials: moss (or sheet moss), buttermilk and 2-inch foam brush. • Directions: If you’ve gathered your own moss, remove as much soil as possible. Tear moss into small pieces, removing materials such as bark and pine needles. Pour buttermilk into a bowl, add moss and combine. Use brush to paint the mix-

Cuckoo for cabbage By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick

just as fond of other small Chinese bok The Washington Post choys, but I’ve only I’m a cabbage recently been able lover, so any time to find them outside I see a new variety of Asian markets. of cabbage at the marAlso look for baby bok ket it’s bound to make its choy’s cousins: petite way to my dinner table. choy sum (the heart I’m particularly fond of of full-size large the Chinese cabbages, bok choy) and petite especially the baby or Bok choy, a Shanghai cabbage (a petite versions. Chinese variety bok choy that’s even Baby bok choy is smaller than baby bok a favorite. I love the choy). They’re all bok tender leaves and the slightly choys, which is a little confusbitter taste of the stalks. I’m ing, but they’re all good.

SHANGHAI CABBAGE WITH HOISIN SAUCE Serves 6. This recipe uses the petite Shanghai variety of bok choy. The cabbages can be sliced and used in stir-fries, cut into julienne and added to salads, or cooked whole. Here, the cabbages are steamed and served with a hoisin-infused sauce thickened with cornstarch. The steamed cabbages turn a beautiful bright green, and the sauce lends a wonderful Asian flavor. Serve with grilled steaks, broiled salmon or chicken. 1 lb (16 to 18) petite Shanghai cabbages, rinsed 1 TBS olive oil 4 or 5 scallions, white and light-green parts, cut crosswise into thin slices (1⁄4 C) 1-inch piece peeled ginger root, finely chopped or minced (1 TBS) 2 TBS bourbon, whiskey or dry sherry

1 C low-sodium or homemade chicken broth 2 tsp toasted sesame oil, or more to taste 1 ⁄2 tsp sugar, or more to taste 2 TBS hoisin sauce 1 TBS cornstarch 2 TBS cold water 1 to 2 TBS toasted sesame seeds, for garnish (optional; see note below)

Position a steamer over several inches of water in a saucepan or wok and heat over medium-high heat. When the water comes to a boil, add the cabbages, cover and steam for 3 to 4 minutes, until they are brightly colored and just tender. You will probably need to do that in batches so the cabbages are not crowded in the steamer. As the cabbages are done, transfer them to a large platter, arranging them in a single layer. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the scallions and ginger; cook for 1 to 2 minutes, stirring, until the scallions start to soften. Add the bourbon, whiskey or sherry and cook for 30 seconds. Add the broth, toasted sesame oil, sugar and hoisin sauce. Stir to combine, and bring to a boil. Whisk together the cornstarch and water in a small bowl until well incorporated, then add the mixture to the skillet. Once it returns to a boil, cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until it has thickened. Remove from the heat. Taste, and adjust the seasoning as desired. Pour the sauce over the steamed cabbages. Garnish with sesame seeds to taste, if using. Serve hot or at room temperature. Note: Toast the sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring or shaking them frequently, just until fragrant and lightly browned.

ture over pot. Set aside in a shaded place until pot achieves the desired look. If necessary, use a metal-bristle brush to remove any heavy clumps of moss.

Clay soil It’s easy to make a pot appear as if it had been unearthed in an archaeological dig. Just apply soil found in your backyard. Moist soils with high clay content are ideal, since they adhere to terra cotta best. • Tools and materials: clay soil and flexible wire brush. • Directions: Rub soil over surface of pot, moistening the soil with a little water if it doesn’t stick. Place pot in a shaded area for at

THE CHOICE IS YOURS, IT’S TIME TO

least one month while soil bonds. Brush pot to create a varied, textured surface.

Sand pot in random directions, wiping dust frequently, until you have achieved the desired look.

Lime

Water and sunlight

This method provides instant gratification. The lime solution quickly tones down the harsh orange of many new pots. • Tools and materials: hydrated lime (available at hardware stores), natural-bristle paintbrush, spray bottle and 150-grit sandpaper. • Directions: Dissolve 1 cup hydrated lime in 2 cups water, stirring until no clumps remain. (This amount will age several small pots or two large ones. You can make varying quantities of the solution, but always use 1 part lime to 2 parts water.) Using random strokes, brush pot with lime solution, applying thickly in some areas, and thinly in others to simulate the subtle streaks of old pots. Fill spray bottle with water, set it on the “stream” setting, and coat pot in various spots while lime is still wet. This thins the coating for a more natural look. Let dry.

Sometimes, the simplest methods bring the most satisfying results. Soak a pot in a tub of water until algae grows on its surface. Algae grows best in the sun, so be sure that vessels sit in bright locations and that water is replenished as it evaporates. Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 West 26th Street, 9th floor, New York, NY 10001. Questions may also be sent by e-mail to: mslletters@ marthastewart.com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually. For more information on the topics covered in the Ask Martha column, visit www.marthastewart.com.

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___________ Enter my vote for the pet(s) indicated and accept my fee to fund NIE ___________ Enter my vote(s) for the pet(s) indicated. Vote to support newspapers in your schools! All proceeds go to Newspapers in Education. Vote as many times as you like, but only 50 votes per form. Mail form to - The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708-6020. All votes for the Pet Pals Contest must be received by March 15. The final twelve pets will be published on March 17, 2010. Rules: First 2 votes are free, additional votes must be purchased. More voting forms are available at The Bulletin reception desk at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend between 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM or in The Bulletin or vote online at www.bendbulletin.com/petpals Make checks payable to NIE. Vote as many times as you like, but the maximum number of votes per newsprint form is 50. The Bulletin employees and their immediate families are not eligible to win. Ties will be decided by random drawing.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

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General Merchandise

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Tools

Lost and Found

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French Bulldogs with a 1/4 Dash of Pug! Mom/Dad onsite. 3 Females, 2 Males. Come meet your new best friend. 1st. shots/wormed avail now. 541- 420- 1091 leave msg

Rockwell Delta D-24 scroll saw, free-standing industrial floor model, $450. 541-280-6175.

FOUND: Black metal cane on 3/7 on Newport Avenue, Bend. 541-410-1093.

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FOUND: Mini Schnauzer, male, on SE Hwy. 97 near Jack In The Box, 503-953-5454.

201

New Today Honda CV750C 1981 25K, 50 mpg., excellent condition $1,295. 541-548-3439.

202

Want to Buy or Rent ROCKHOUNDS Must See! 18”, 10”, 8” Rock saws, 15” flat lap polisher, sanders and rocks. 541-350-7004. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Adorable Bichon and poodle mix boy. Very cute markings. Ready to love $250. 541504-9958

German Shepherd Puppies, Ready now! 541-550-9994 www.megaquest.us Golden Retriever, female, 9 mo. old, spayed, shots, not papered, $275. 541-306-0035 Golden Retriever Pups exc. quality, parents OFA, good hips, $650. 541-318-3396.

HAVANESE Purebred Pup, Shots, 12 wks, Non Allergy, $500, 541-915-5245.

Heeler

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com/ HUMANE SOCIETY OF REDMOND GARAGE SALE Fridays and Saturdays, March 5, 6, 12 and 13th from 9:00 - 5:00. For more information call 541-923-0882. Italian Greyhound, Registered, 14 weeks old, all shots. Beautiful blue-gray with white stockings & very sweet. $500 OBO to approved household. 541-654-2162 Lab Puppies, yellows, AKC, good blood lines, $300 males, $350 females, 541-447-1323. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com

Electronic underground fence,

INNEX SD2100, 2 dog collars, 1200’ 18 ga. wire, barely used, $285, 541-526-5004. Feral Cats make great rodent control! Contact the Bend Spay & Neuter Project for more info. All cats are altered and vaccinated. Available on a donation basis. Help us give them a second chance. 541-617-1010 Free 9 Mo. Pit to good home. Beautiful, a love, very playful. 541- 633-6188 Lauryn, Mike Free PET Rats, young, 2 females, w/cage setup. For info: surfaddress@msn.com

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 COMPUTER DESK, cherry, & matching bookcase, Lane leather office chair, 2 leather couches, matching chair & ottoman, end tables & coffee table, orient. ceramic fish bowl. Buffalo head mount & more. No junk! 541-588-6082. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com Sofa & Loveseat set, great cond., $600/both; Drexel Heritage Coffee Table & 2 end tables, $600/set; Thomasville Queen Anne 7 piece dining set, $800; China cabinet, $500; 2 Leather chairs, $300, 541-389-5519

Labs, AKC, excellent pedigree, 6 males, 3 females 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686.

Companion cats free to seniors! Fixed, shots, ID chip, more. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Student wants CAR OR TRUCK running or NOT! Call anytime. Daniel 541-280-6786.

Baby Parrot, Sun Conure, fully weaned & ready to be spoiled. Pincher/Poodle $450, 541-548-7653 or Miniature Mix Pups, look like poodles, richandjulia97760@yahoo.com 2 females, 1 black, 1 black & Barn/shop cats free to suitable brown, $160 ea., born locations. Altered, shots. Will 1/2/10, 541-593-7455. deliver! 389-8420, leave msg. Mini Dachshund Pups, 2 Bernese Mt Dog Puppies $1000 girls $275 ea., 2 boys $250 Health Guarantee, Pets only, ea. Prineville. 360-607-0604. Parents on Site. Ready soon. 541-401-3033 or 401-4334. Mini Schnoodle, Beautiful black pups $300-$400. Family Border Collie male, neutered, raised, 1st shots, tails & obedience trained, rescued, dews, pup kit. 541-410-7701 all papers, $50. 503-310-2514,541-576-3701 Norwich Terrier Pups, AKC, rare, 2 males, 9 weeks, Boston Terrier Puppies, 2 fe$1500 each, 360-378-1364 males, born 2/15, tails/dew or sharonm@rockisland.com claws removed, $400/ea. Days, 541-475-2651 or eves, PARROT - rare female Eclectus, 541-475-6058. and 3 cages, $1250. 541-588-6082. Brittany Spaniel, neutered male, 16 mo, knows sit, stay, Pekinese pups ready 3/1, 3 whaoa, heel & kennel, males $280 ea., 1 female 1.5 housebroke, points & honors yr. $150. 1-951-634-0260 points, $850, 541-526-5004. POODLES, AKC Toy Cats/kittens ready to adopt! joyful, loving! Parti’s & more Cat Rescue, Adoption & FosREASONABLE 541-475-3889. ter Team, 65480 78th St, Bend, 389-8420. Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt. Low *SHIHTZU*AKC* adoption fees. Altered, shots, . Don't wait these TOY ID chip, free vet exam, carry SHIH TZU PUPPIES won't box, etc. www.craftcats.org. last!!! Lots of character! Waiting for their forever homes. 1 Male / 1 Female. Available Now. Prices vary. Call Roger 541-598-4713

Chihuahua/Sheltie Mix puppies (4), black tri and sables, very cute, $175, 541-536-5538

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

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Antiques & Collectibles Furniture

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Yorkie Pups, ready for loving homes, parents on-site, 1st shot, $550, 541-536-3108

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Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Pre-owned jetted Phoenix Spa w/ wood skirting, newer pump & motor, comfy lounger, seats 4, w/ cover, buyer removes, $800. 541-526-0356, Eagle Crest.

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Musical Instruments

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 549-1658

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. ATTN. BIRD HUNTERS Gateway Canyon Preserve is offering special March pricing on Pheasant and Chukar hunting while supplies last located just 11 miles North of Madras. Steve & Faith 541-475-2065 email: micmcm@madras.net www.gatewaycanyonpreserve.com

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Glock 22 RTF handgun (.40) 3 hi-cap mags Like-new $475 OBO (541) 977-3173

Wall Oven, built in Whirlpool 24” black self cleaning, used 2 wks. under warranty $450. Barbara 541-382-1096.

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SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include,

Firewood, Jack Pine/ Lodgepole mix, $145/cord, split & delivered to LaPine/ Sunriver area, $160/cord to Bend area. 541-536-7917

Lodgepole or Fir & Pine Mix, split and delivery included $175 a cord. 541-923-6987. Leave message.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Log Truck loads of dry LodgeCrypt, Inside double compole firewood, $1200 for panion, # 46604B in DesBend Delivery. 541-419-3725 chutes Memorial Park, best or 541-536-3561 for more offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis information. GLOBE COMMERCIAL SLICER, Seasoned Doug Fir, Juniper or $300. Lodgepole $170 a cord split 541-389-8624 and delivered. Call The Bulletin reserves the right 541-977-2040. to publish all ads from The SEASONED JUNIPER Bulletin newspaper onto The $150/cord rounds, Bulletin Internet website. $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

TIMBER WANTED Warm Springs Forest Products 541-260-5172. Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

261

Medical Equipment Hover-Round Power Chair w/ leg extenders, exc. cond., $1100 OBO. 541-617-9867

Invacare Patient Lift, Hydraulic, new seating sling with capacity for over 400 lbs. $250. Can email pics upon request. 541-504-0975. Mark 4 wheel scooter new batteries, $470 OBO. 541-420-4825.

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O r e g o n

Farm Market

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Lost:$250 reward,Oakley snow308 board goggles, clear frame, purple/blue lens, black band, Farm Equipment at Mt. Bachelor, 2/21, near and Machinery W. Village Lodge, high sentimental value, 310-780-4280 John Deere Tandem Disc with 3 or findkimmie@hotmail.com point hitch, $475, LOST: Black male short hair 541-447-1039. dog, Near SW 35th & Metolius Meadow Ct. "Max". Reward! 541-749-0393

Heating and Stoves

Misc. Items

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH

WANTED TO BUY

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. Fairbanks Upright Player Piano, Circa 1919, incl. approx. 35 piano rolls+bench, needs work, you haul, $250. 541-383-8834 All Year Dependable Keyboard, Casio, $250 OBO, Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgeseen by appointment only, pole cords for as low as 541-536-9869 $150. Bend Del. Cash, Check, Molinar Violin Exc. cond., $225. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484 Musical Omnichord, exc. cond., $150. 541-389-8624. CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for 260 a new or used car.

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Coins & Stamps

Building Materials

257

Pump Organ, Antique, 1883 Western Cottage, call 541-312-9592.

Colt Combat Commander 45 ACP, blued, like new. $850. OBO. 541-410-4069 Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

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Hot Tubs and Spas

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 549-1592

7 Reels $5-$25 each, 100 fishing lures $1-$2 each. 541-410-4596. Siberain Husky pups, AKC reg. Champion Lines. 8 wks. They're very affectionate & playful. $695. 541-330-8627 stones-huskies@live.com

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. . Gary DeKorte. Sun. Mar. 14th, 5:30-9:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 Motor, 9.9 Johnson Outboard, good condition $200. 541-410-4596. Rifle, Winchester Model 70 X T R Sportster Mag.338, Leupold Vari-XIII, 2.5x8, sling, bipod, $600. 541-815-8105. Wanted: Collectible fishing items, rods, reels & lures. 541-678-5753,503-351-2746

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

MacDon 1991 Swather 14’ Cummins Diesel 920 header conditioner, exc. cond. heat, A/C, radio, everything works $16,500. 541-419-2713.

STEEL FLATBED, 16’x 8’, for farm truck, $285. 541-447-1039.

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Irrigation Equipment Lost: Blue belly pack w/ .45 cal Colt Defender on lower Fall River trail 3/4 mi. below falls at intersection w/ powerline access rd. Reward. Call 541-593-2039.

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Livestock & Equipment

Premium Alfalfa Orchard Grass Hay, no rain, barn stored, 3 tie bales, 4-ton block avail., $135 per ton., please call 541-576-2402.

Corriente Long Horn Cross Roping Steers 1 year old $300 each 541-420-4379 please leave a message.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All FIND IT! BUY IT! Cert. Noxious Weed Free, SELL IT! barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163. The Bulletin Classifieds Quality Hay,small bales in barn, Alfalfa 1st, 2nd, & 3rd, Orchard Grass 2nd, Feeder hay delivery avail. $85/ton & up. 541-771-9270,541-475-3379 Ten Barr Ranch Offers: Quality Orchard Grass Hay, $165/ton, barn stored, small bales, Bend. Please call 541-389-1165, leave msg.

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

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Horses and Equipment

Small Nubian Dairy Goat Herd bred does, dry yearlings & one mature Buck, will sell single also discount for multiple purchase call evenings 541-548-1857.

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Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989. Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

325 Lost Cat: Calico Female, 8 yrs. old, declawed, “Cali”, near Shad Rd. in CRR on 3/3, please call 541-548-1237. LOST: Little gray cat on 2/27, Tumalo Rd. & Valeview, missed by children, reward on return no questions asked, 541-977-5409, 647-2630 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178 Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Estate Sales DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay, barn stored, no rain , 2 string , 425 tons at $140/ton & tons $120/ton 541-549-3831 Patterson Ranch Sisters Barn Stored Bluegrass Straw, clean & green, 3X3 mid-size bales, $22/bale, volume discounts available, Madras, call 541-480-8648. Cheaper Than Feed Store! Premium Orchard Grass Hay, small, square, no rain, weedless, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll store the rest until needed. By ton, 1st cut/$165, 2nd cut/$175. Near Alfalfa Store. 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail kerrydnewell@hotmail.com

Excellent grass hay, no rain, barn stored, FREE grapple loading, 2nd cutting avail. $160/ton. Delivery avail. 541-382-5626,541-480-3089 Excellent Quality Grass Hay, 1st cutting $100/ton, 2nd & 3rd cuttings, $120/ton, Madras area, call 541-420-2203. Grass Hay, barn stored 1.5 Ton for $150 or $8 a bale. 541-480-9071, 382-1230 Orchard Grass Hay, shed stored, guaranteed quality, 25 bales/ton, $145/ton, 3 plus ton, $140/ton, 541-382-3023. Tumalo Area.

Culvert, 42 ft. of unused culvert, $300 Barbara 541-382-1096.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.

Tennessee Walker gelding, bay, 19 yrs, 15.3H, very gentle, $1500. 541-815-1523.

Pasture For Rent, Powell Bute, 33 acres of water, please call 541-548-7922 after 5 p.m. for more information. Unique Alpaca Apparel. We’re located just outside of Sisters on Hwy 20. Call 541-385-4989 or visit us at www.alpacasofidyllwild.com Well Pump, Sears Irrigation 50 psi, 220 volt, 69 gpm, new still in box $150. 280-4675 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

AUTOMOTIVE Bob Thomas Car Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-2911 . . . . . . . . . . www.bobthomas.com Thomas Sales and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-389-3031 . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tsands.com

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Irrigation Hand Lines & parts, 70+ pieces of 3”x40’ with risers & heads, $65/ each, open/close valves, 1 & 2 way, w/risers, $65 ea., misc. other parts, all in great cond., 541-420-5184.

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Sales Redmond Area

EMPLOYMENT

BarkTurfSoil.com

LADIES AFTERNOON OUT!! Come and join us for an afInstant Landscaping Co. ternoon of fun, shopping and PROMPT DELIVERY great company. We have rep541-389-9663 resentatives available for many different home-based businesses. Come and shop SUPER TOP SOIL till you drop or just find a www.hersheysoilandbark.com consultant for your favorite Screened, soil & compost products. There will be door mixed, no rocks/clods. High prize drawings from all exhumus level, exc. for flower hibitors! Come win some beds, lawns, gardens, great prizes! straight screened top soil. Date: Sat., March 13th Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you Time: 1:00 - 5:00 haul. 548-3949. Come anytime TIME TO GET Location: Redmond Masonic THE GARDEN READY! Center, 627 SW 7th Street, Free horse manure - can load Redmond OR with a tractor. 541-548-1353. Contact: Shellie, 541-410-9762

Barrett Business Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-6946 . . . . . .www.barrettbusiness.com Flex Force Staffing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-749-7931 . . . . . . . . . . . .www.flex-force.com

MEDIA The Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-1811 . . . . . . . . . www.bendbulletin.com

For as low as $2.00 per day, your business, phone number, and Web address can be listed. Call 541-382-1811 to add your business and reach more than 80% of the market 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


G2 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAILABLE: Retired RN in Bend area, flexible daytime hrs, household assistance, affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Independent Positions

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

NO MOVE IN FEE

2553 SW 20th St.- 2/1 duplex, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600 + dep, incl. yard maint., No pets/smoking. 541-382-1015 3/2, Newer 1 Story Duplex, w/big yard, vaults, garage w/opener, all appl., central gas heat, no smoking, pets neg., $725, 541-280-3152.

Dental - Orthodontic Asst. Awesome Bend office seeking team player to join our family! Requires: 3 Yrs. exp in C.D.A., X-ray Cert., digital X-ray & computer. goortho@bendbroadband.com

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! DRIVER Tow Truck Operator Must have clean driving record. Part time, including weekends. Apply or send resume to: American Towing, 61532 American Lp. #3, Bend, OR 97702 Food Service

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-385-0177

476

Employment Opportunities Airport Manager

Refueling ability. Inquiries: Airport Commission, PO BOX 1284, Prineville, OR 97754.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Breedlove Guitar Co.

Seeking 2 highly entrepreneurial & versatile guitarists with the following skills; web design, digital photography & lighting, ability to boost online & retail merchandise sales, perform customer service & start up new café. PhotoShop, PageMaker, InDesign & food service exp. req. Resume, cover letter & photo to: 2843 NW Lolo Dr., Bend, OR 97701, Mon.-Fri. between 11 am. & 2 pm. Catering Supervisor

The Ranch has immediate openings for experienced food serve personnel to work at our Big Meadow Golf Course restaurant.. Must be gregarious, professionally motivated with good communication skills and willing to work weekends. These seasonal positions require valid food handlers and/ or OLCC cards. •Line Cooks •Servers •Bussers •Bartenders •Dishwashers These exciting job opportunities offer some benefits including golf privileges. Go on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com for application. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Highly professional law office seeks part-time receptionist. Dependable transportation required. Flexible hours. $9-$11 per hour DOE Application can be downloaded at www.romanolawpc.com. Email application, cover letter, and resume to info@romanolawpc.com or fax to (541) 330-0223. No phone calls please. Janitorial Part time, night and weekends in Bend. Call 541-389-6528 Mon-Fri., 9am-5pm. Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. computer skills and customer service req., Quickbooks a plus. Apt., util. + salary incl. Fax resume to 541-330-6288. Medical Billing/Collection Professional Incl. receptionist & office duties; part-time; must have exp. in medical field; holds current certification in coding & billing; incl. cover letter outlining qualifications/accomplishments. 16073734 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

General

Circulation Processing and Retention Specialist

The Bulletin has an immediate opening in the Circulation Department for a Retention/Processing Specialist. Responsibilities include: Days end processing of The Bulletin, The Redmond Spokesman, The Central Oregon Marketplace, Postage Statement and other processing related elements, as well as making outbound calls to customers to ensure customer satisfaction of newspaper delivery, to secure payments and customer retention. This position will also provide backup support to the Customer Service Group. Support includes, but is not limited to, providing customer service to The Bulletin subscribers over the phone and entering transactions into the PBS system, running reports, figure entry, and 10-key totalling. We are looking for someone with a positive and upbeat attitude, and strong service/team orientation; must have accurate typing, computer entry experience and the ability to multi-task. Most work is done via telephone, so strong communication skills are a must. Work shift: Sunday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday: 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hourly pay plus commission and full benefits package.

RV Sales Mgr.

Medical MA/LPN Fall Creek Internal Medicine is seeking dynamic skilled individual for full time 4 day a week position experience required, successful candidate will have basic triage skills, working knowledge of medications, enjoy multi tasking practice OSHA compliance and participate in team culture, competitive salary, health & dental benefits, 401K package, fax resume to: 541-389-2662 attn: Nita Medical

Phlebotomy

Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301 Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362

RE/MAX Agents wanted! New or Experienced! Call 541-350-3419 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Big Country RV is

seeking exp. RV Sales Manager. Industry exp.req'd. Comp pay and benefits. Send resume to: accounting@bigcrv.com or fax 541-330-2496.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Sales & Marketing Professional for medical practice. Looking for proven local networking skills, up to $40K. prior sales & work in medical field req., incl. cover letter outlining qualifications & accomplishments.Bx 16073460, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Sales & Marketing Professional for medical practice. Looking for proven local networking skills, up to $40K. prior sales & work in medical field req., incl. cover letter outlining qualifications & accomplishments. 16073460 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Sous Chef

The Ranch is accepting applications for a seasonal Sous Chef. Need dedicated individual who possesses good supervisory and leadership skills that has an extensive knowledge of food preparation. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

600

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Finance & Business

500

Roommate Wanted Beautifully furnished home near BMC East, bdrm. & bath avail. $475/mo. incls. utils. & cable, no smoking/pets, 541-389-9680. Rural Redmond with private bath & entrance, util. incl. + cable TV and internet, storage space, pets? Avail. soon. $300/mo. + $300 dep. 541-504-0726, 541-633-5856

630

Rooms for Rent Quiet furnished room in Awbrey Heights, no smoking etc.$350+dep 541-388-2710 Room in spacious 3 bdrm. home, Wells Acres area, utils incl., $500, 541-280-0016. Secluded Guest House, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, semi-furnished, all appl., W/D, no pets/smoking, $750/mo. All util. paid. 541-390-0296 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES: Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

1059 NE Hidden Valley Dr., 2 bdrm., 1.75 bath townhouse, garage, W/D hook-ups, W/S paid, $699/mo. + $650 dep. No Pets. 541-610-4070 for rent in Eagle Crest & Terrebonne. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Rent/Lease Option, 650 sq.ft. 1 bdrm., 2 bath Near Park, River, downtown & COCC, indoor pool $750 incl. util. Sharon 541-408-0337

632

Apt./Multiplex General

The Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center is seeking a BE/BC Family Practice or Internal Medicine Physician to serve as the group practice manager at the Bend Community Based Outpatient Clinic. The Bend Clinic offers primary care, mental health, eye care, and some specialty services to over 5,000 veterans in the region. The Clinic was recognized as the Most Outstanding VA Primary Care Clinic in the nation in 2008, and is part of the Portland VA Medical Center’s practice of over 50 primary care providers serving veterans in Oregon and Southwest Washington. For job specific questions related to this position, contact John Shea, Operations Manager at the clinic, at 541-647-5201, or email him at john.shea3@va.gov.

WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

Applications from minorities and women are encouraged. Applicants must be US citizens and hold a current, active and unrestricted physician license in a State, Territory or Commonwealth of the U.S. or the District of Columbia. The VA offers a competitive salary and benefits package consistent with community practice standards. A recruitment bonus may be available to highly qualified candidates. This position will require a background check and a pre-employment physical and may require a pre-employment drug test.

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours

Please send application (found at: http://www.va.gov/vaforms/medical/pdf/vha-10-2850-fill.pdf ) to: Charles Ritter, P3PC, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239. Please annotate “Bend GPM” on application. For additional application information, contact Charles Ritter at 503-381-4399.

FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

WE

OFFER:

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Close to COCC, spacious 2 bdrms., 950 sq. ft., starting at $550/mo. W/S/G paid, 2 on-site laundries, covered parking, 541-382-3108 Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appnt.

On The River, 2 bdrm., 1 bath duplex, W/D, W/S/G paid, carport parking, 214 NW Riverfront. $700/mo. + $700 dep. 541-419-0722

$550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

638 A Cute, Clean 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath duplex, on quiet street near Country Club, nearly new carpet, dishwasher, fireplace, W/D hookup, large private backyard w/ storage, 20360 Fairway Dr., $665/mo. Small pet neg. Call for specials, Days, 541-306-1378. Evenings, 541-382-2716

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

634

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $100 Move In Special

Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928.

2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, Du-

plex, W/D incl., 1 car garage. Pet(s) OK. Near Hospital, shopping. $725 per mo, $725 Security. W/S/G paid. Call Bev. 541-408-0388

2

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Old Mill Studio, separate entrance, new carpet & paint, all utilities paid $500 mo. plus $500 deposit. Small pet negotiable. 541-382-1941.

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS

Bend VA Outpatient Clinic

1015 Roanoke Ave., $610 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, near college, no smoking/pets. 420-9848.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Sales

OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Long term townhomes/homes

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU?

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

Condominiums & Condos, 2 bdrm., 1 Townhomes For Rent Westside bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath,

Real Estate Contracts

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

1/2 Off 1st Month! $580-$590 Carports and W/D hookups Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

605

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

528

MEDICAL

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Loans and Mortgages

The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

The Ranch is accepting applications for a seasonal Catering supervisor. Job requires exceptional customer service skills. Must enjoy working with people, be a good organizer and supervisor. This self-starter must be able to work any day of the week. Oversee the fast paced operations of special events. Banquet and catering experience preferred. This is an exiting job planning and carrying out banquets for groups of 50 to 150 guests. Should have a basic knowledge of computers and word processing. Responsible to train and supervise waitstaff. Must have current OLCC server permit and Deschutes County food handler card. Benefits include golf privileges and 30% discount on food and merchandise. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com BBR is a drug free work place. EOE.

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

507

Please send resume to PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Attn: Circulation Office Manager or send via e-mail: ahusted@bendbulletin.com

Rentals

READERS:

541-617-7825

Restaurant Supervisor

The Ranch is accepting applications for a seasonal supervisor at our Big Meadow Golf Course Restaurant. Applicant should have 1 year restaurant management experience with a highly successful track record. Ability to use computers and excellent customer service skills a must. This self-starter must be able to work any day of the week. Oversee daily operations of the Dining Room and fill hostess and server positions when needed. Responsible to train and supervise waitstaff. Must have current OLCC server permit and Deschutes County food handler card. Benefits include golf privileges and 30% discount on food and merchandise. Apply con-line at www.blackbutteranch.com BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

CAUTION

Bdrm. in quiet single story 8-plex, COMPLETELY REMODELED! W/S/G/Cable paid, $595, 541-389-2249 or 541-504-0502.

55+ Hospital District, 2/2, 1 level, attached garage, A/C, gas heat, from $825-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiamgmt.com FREE MONTHS RENT Beautiful 2/2.5 , util., garage, gas fireplace, no smoking orpets. $650 1st+last+sec. (541)382-5570, 420-0579.

HOSPITAL AREA Clean, quiet townhouse, 2 master bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appliances, w/d hook up, garage w/ opener, gas heat, a/c, w/s/g pd. $645/mo + deposit. 541-382-2033

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms w/d hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

642 2/1.5 $545, Clean Units, Great Location, Move In Special, Hud OK, 2007 Timber Ave. The Rental Shop. 541-389-2260 www.rentmebend.com

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, dishwasher, garage, W/S/G paid, $595/mo. + $500 dep. HUD OK, Avail. Now, Please call 503-329-6672. Ask Us About Our MARCH IN SPECIAL! 2 bdrm, 1 bath starting at $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, non-smoking units, stg. units, carport, dog run. Approved pets okay. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Ask Us About Our

March in Special!

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval. Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

AVAIL. NOW (2) nice duplexes, quiet neighborhood 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1 car garage, fenced backyard, fully landscaped, more info call 541-545-1825.

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS! • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. • Screening fee waived Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from $395. Lots of amenities. Pet friendly, w/s/g paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Clean 2 bdrm., garage, wood stove, W/D hookups, W/S/G incl., appl., patio, $595, 3410 SW Glacier, See CraigsList, call 541-923-6649.

Clean, nice, 2 bdrm., 1 bath duplex. garage, W/D hookup. Great in town location. $575+$550 dep. 737 SW Glacier Ave. 541-815-1709. Foxborough, cute 3/2 fenced yard 1200 sq.ft. W/D $895+dep. 541-389-2260 The Rental Shop www.rentmebend.com

Great in town location, new 2/1 in Dawson Station above The Healing Hub, 219 NW 6th St. W/D hookup,W/S/G pd. $650+$625dep 815-1709

$350 LATE WINTER MOVE-IN SPECIALS - Apts. & Multi-plexes at: COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •SPACIOUS APTS. 2 bdrm, 1 bath near Old Mill District. $525 mo. includes CABLE + WST •CUTE SE DUPLEX 2 bdrm, 1 bath w/W/D hoookups. Carports w/ storage. $525 includes W/ S. ½ off 1st Full month! (Also 1 w/ lrg. fenced yard @ $570) •NICE UPSTAIRS APT. NEAR HOSPITAL. 2 bdrm/1 bath, on-site laundry and off-street parking. $550 WST incl. •FURNISHED Mt. Bachelor Condos - 1 bdrm/1 bath, $595, $645 mo. includes WST & Wireless. •NEAR DOWNTOWN - Spacious. W/D hookups. Pet Considered. 3 bdrm/ 1 bath. Just $595 includes WST. • LARGE TOWNHOME - 3 bdrm, 1½ bath w/W/D hookups. Totally private back deck. Covered parking and extra storage. Just $595 mo. incl. WST. •CHARMING COTTAGE style home on nice lot with raised garden. 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Detached garage. Hardwood floors, W/D included. pets considered. $675 MO. •GREAT NW LOCATION - Adorable Older 2 bdrm, 1 bath house with garage and usable basement. W/D Hookup just added. $695 mo. •PEACEFUL SERENITY Nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath mfd home on Huge Lot in DRW. Must see. $725 mo. •NEWER TOWNHOMES 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath with garage, & W/D included. Gas heat. Not far from Old Mill Dist. $725/ mo. includes garbage. ½ Mo. FREE Rent! (2 bdrm/2.5 bath avail. @$650) •DOWN BY THE RIVERSIDE 3 bdrm, 1½ bath townhome with W/D hookups and extra storage. $750 mo. incl. WST. •CUTE NE TOWNHOME! 3 bdrm, 1½ bath w/sgl. garage & W/D incl. $750 mo. incl. W/S. ½ Mo. FREE Rent! ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website (REDMOND PROPERTIES, TOO!) www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 642

654

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Move In Special $99 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RE.NTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com Private secluded studio attached to large shop, W/D, fridge, W/S/G incl, NW Redmond, 3 mi. to High School, $550, pets ok, 541-548-5948

648

Houses for Rent General 2+ Bdrm., 2 Bath, approx. 1800 sq. ft., appl. incl., elec. heat w/ wood stove, single garage, 2 small shops, quiet neighborhood, all on 1 acre near Culver, $650/mo. + deps. 541-546-2382 Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, W/D incl., $900 mo. w/lease. 14 Timber, please call 541-345-7794,541-654-1127

Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $1100/mo. + deps. Pets okay. 20561 Dorchester East. 541-410-8273,541-389-6944

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. newer carpet & paint, woodstove, garage fenced yard on .92 acre lot $795 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Mobile Home w/ stove & W/D, W/S/G paid, $565/mo.+$250 sec. dep. Pets okay. 541-382-8244 Mtn. & Park views, clean 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, 2000 sq.ft. open floor plan, dbl. garage 19424 SW Brookside Way. $1200 mo., 541-408-0086

658

The Bulletin is now offering a Houses for Rent LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Redmond Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the 3 Bdrm. Duplex, garage, fenced yard, $650. No Applinew rates and get your ad cation Fee, Pets considered, started ASAP! 541-385-5809 references required. Call 541-923-0412. 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Real Estate For Sale

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 G3

Boats & RV’s

700 800 705

850

Real Estate Services

Snowmobiles

Private Money for Real Estate Loans no credit, bad credit OK. Alan, Redwood Financial Services EHO 541-419-3000 (ML-3100)

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

$950, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, fenced yard, all gas, some appl., no smoking, pets okay, 1648 NW Elgin, 541-633-0572, 541-323-6965

Mobile Home lot for rent in Beautiful Prineville! No deposit. Will pay to move your home! Call Bobbie at 541-447-4464.

LOVELY WESTSIDE 2 bdrm, 1 bath home, Riverside neighborhood, pets accepted with dep. & ref. $790/mo. + dep. Heather, 541-815-7476.

Commercial for Rent/Lease

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. Westside, Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath house, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $900/mo. (1416 NW 5th St.) 541-389-5408 Westside Cutie! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, gas, W/D, fenced yard, no smoking or pets $825/ mo.+ dep. Close to Newport Mkt. & COCC. 541-388-7541.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 20418 Trap Ct., A Nice 3 bdrm., 1 bath single level house on large lot, incl. kitchen appl., W/D hookup, forced air heat & A/C, close to Old Mill District in quiet tucked away neighborhood, no pets or smoking avail. now $725mo., $825 security dep. $40 application fee. 541-408-4999

687

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Office/Warehouse space for rent: 3584 sq.ft., 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + $400 dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Office/Warehouse Space, nice 350 sq. ft. office w/ bath, 1250 sq. ft. warehouse, 14’ overhead door, 63065 Sherman Rd., Bend. 1 block from Empire & Hwy 97. $650/mo. 541-815-9248.

882

Fifth Wheels

Fleetwood Bounder 38L 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, warranty, price reduced, now $108,000. 541-389-7596

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvass enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

860 HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, new carpet, fireplace, large backyard, range, W/D, fridge, incl., $1000 down, $175/mo., 541-383-5130.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740 Rockwood 32’ 1993, diesel with Allison 6 spd., beautiful interior, $19,995. 541-617-1249

loaded used 1 time, sacrifice at $11,000. Call for details 541-504-4284.

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Older T/Hangar, Bend Airport, holds Bonanza/C-182 type aircraft, 1 piece door, 40 year lease, reduced $54,900. Bill, 541-480-7930.

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low Fleetwood Prowler Regal hours on engine - $10,500. 31’ 2004, 2 slids, gen., so1986 Autocar cement truck lar, 7 speaker surround sound, Cat engine, 10 yd mixer mirco., awning, lots of stor$10,000. Call 541-771-4980 age space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs $20,000, MUST SEE! great, $4000. 541-977-8988 541-410-5251

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

SBC 3X2 Offy, intake, Rochester carbs, rebuilt, new linkage, ready to run. $1200. OBO. 541-410-4069

932

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

PRISTINE COND. Everest 2006 32' 3/slides many add-on extras. Reduced to $37,900. 541-689-1351. Prowler 18’ 1992, tandem axle, ready to go, gas/elec. fridge, hot water tank, gas stove, furnace, queen bed, full bath,. incl. 5th wheel hitch & Coleman 1500 gen. all for $1,500. 541-312-5159.

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

935

Antique and Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

360 Sprint Car

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036 Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Chevy

Wagon

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Chevy Trailblazer Extended XLT 2002, loaded, 3rd row seat, extra set of tires, great cond., all maintenance records, $7500. 541-771-1451.

885

Canopies and Campers

882 Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

GMC 2005, 1/2 ton, Crew cab short box, low mi., 1 owner, extras, charcoal, very sharp, mint cond., all records, always maintained $18,900 541-350-0775

Hitch for 5th wheel, Valley PowerPro, 16,000 lb., $300 or trade, 541-517-3622.

Motorhomes Fifth Wheels

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $2500, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Motor, 1968 396 Chevy, everything from

Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ BHS w/ custom value pkg., 20’ awning, gas grill, tow pkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

air cleaner to the pan $2000 OBO. 541-788-7884

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600.

931

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $18,500. 541-771-8920

933

Pickups

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

875

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides,

Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $500 OBO, 541-548-3711.

Watercraft

1988 Johnson 70 hp outboard with Power Trim (no controls) low hrs., runs great $700 firm. 541-480-0849.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

KBDN, hangar space available in shared heated hangar, up to medium twin-turbine size. 541-419--9510 e@fractionalexchange.com

Aljo Lite 2007, 23 ft., fully

16’ FISHER 2005 modified V Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in with center console, sled, 25 motorized personal waterSE Bend. Super Cascade HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holdcrafts. For "boats" please see Mountain Views, area of nice ers, mini downriggers, depth Class 870. homes & BLM is nearby too! finder, live well, trailer with 541-385-5809 Only $199,950. Randy spare, fold-away tongue. Schoning, Broker, John L. $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153. Scott, 541-480-3393. 17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on motor. Only $3700! Call 541773 880 390-1609 or 541-390-1527. 2.26 ACRES, NE Bend, exclusive neighborhood. $285,000. Reduced to $260,000 541-306-7357 See www.bigbrick.com/3590

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

C, with slide, sleeps 6, low miles, perfect condition, $45,900, call 541-923-8333.

881

870

18.5’ Reinell 2003, 4.3L/V6, 100 hrs., always garaged, beautiful boat, many extras to incl. stereo, depth finder, two tops, travel cover & matching bow canvas, $13,500 OBO. 541-504-7066

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig. needs radiator/muffler $5000 trade for motorcycle 541 389-8971

Travel Trailers

Boats & Accessories

Acreages

900

Jamboree Sport 25G 2008, Class

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

Lots Yamaha YFZ 450 2005 exc. shape, new rebuilt eng., stock wheels & brand new sand wheels & tires, lots of extras $4500 or trade for 4x4 truck 503-437-5763.

runs great, $5200, call 541-390-1833.

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Autos & Transportation

Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

771 Aspen Lakes, 1.25 Acres, Lot #115, Golden Stone Dr., private homesite, great view, gated community $350,000 OWC. 541-549-7268.

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE 775 Rental rate! If you have a Manufactured/ home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the Mobile Homes new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new 693 roof, heat pump, A/C, new carpet, $10,000. Office/Retail Space 541-390-3382 for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

880

Motorhomes

Motorcycles And Accessories

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 Harley Davidson 1200 XL-C bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., 745 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & $695/mo. 1st, last. No inHines Pipes, lots of chrome, Homes for Sale side pets. Mtn. views. 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, single car gamust see, $8000, 541-408-7020 503-829-7252, 679-4495 rage, storage, W/D hookup, *** fenced yard, exc. location, Cute 2 bdrm, 1 bath cotCHECK YOUR AD additional parking, $750 tage on corner lot, well Please check your ad on the mo+dep. 541-382-8399. established neighborhood, first day it runs to make sure fully fenced yard, 1.5 car deit is correct. Sometimes in3 bdrm., 2 bath, large dbl. gatached garage, new carpet/ structions over the phone are rage, large fenced yard, RV paint, W/D, fridge provided, misunderstood and an error or toy parking, near schools, Harley Davidson Heritage walk to schools, shopping/ can occur in your ad. If this 541-385-1515 Softail 1988, 1452 original downtown, well behaved happens to your ad, please mi., garaged over last 10 pet(s) okay, $650, 1st & $800 A 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1276 sq.ft., contact us the first day your yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022 dep., call 541-280-4825. fireplace, big deck, dbl. gaad appears and we will be rage with openers, all on 2.5 Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. happy to fix it as soon as we acre lot, $1095, can. Deadlines are: Weekgarage, 5724 SW Shad Rd., 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 days 12:00 noon for next CRR. $700/mo.+dep. day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for SunHarley Davidson Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. NOTICE: day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. Screamin’ Eagle Elecgarage, 13879 SW Cinder If we can assist you, please All real estate advertised tric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, Dr., CRR. $850/mo.+dep. call us: here in is subject to the Fed541-350-1660,541-504-8545 candy teal, have pink slip, eral Fair Housing Act, which 385-5809 have title, $25,000 or Best makes it illegal to advertise 659 The Bulletin Classified offer takes. 541-480-8080. any preference, limitation or * * * Houses for Rent discrimination based on race, Foreclosures For Sale Honda CV750C 1981 25K, Sunriver color, religion, sex, handicap, All Central OR Avail. Buy on the 50 mpg., excellent condition familial status or national Court steps w/cashier’s check. $1,295. 541-548-3439. origin, or intention to make Sunriver, 3/2, dbl. garage, waOregon Group Realty, LLC. ter paid, .5 acre, short walk any such preferences, limita541-389-2674 865 to river, community boat ramp, tions or discrimination. We $795+$795 dep., no smok- FSBO: $249,000 Furnished 2/2 will not knowingly accept any ATVs ing, pet neg. 541-420-0208. advertising for real estate dbl wide/shop & farm equip. which is in violation of this 40 acre lot fenced/gated. 671 law. All persons are hereby Pond, good well. 2 mi. E. of informed that all dwellings Mitchell, OR. Seller Finance Mobile/Mfd. advertised are available on Polaris 90 Sportsman 2004, Sharon 541-408-0337 for Rent an equal opportunity basis. 4-wheeler with Mossy Oak Looking to sell The Bulletin Classified finish. Great condition. Per3 Bdrm., 2 bath, Century Dr. your home? fect for beginning riders. Mobile Home Park, 30x50 Check out $1,650. Call 541-923-0924 Looking for your next dbl. wide, fenced back yard, Classification 713 before 9:00 p.m. employee? cat and/or small dog al"Real Estate Wanted" Place a Bulletin help lowed, $695, W/S/G incl., wanted ad today and 748 credit check & refs. req. reach over 60,000 541-420-2407. Northeast Bend Homes readers each week. Polaris Phoenix Your classified ad will Mountain View Park 1997 Find It in 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new also appear on 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in rear end, new tires, runs bendbulletin.com which The Bulletin Classifieds! gated community $179,000. excellent $1800 OBO, currently receives over 541-385-5809 Terry Storlie, Broker John L. 541-932-4919. 1.5 million page views Scott Realty. 541-788-7884 every month at 675 no extra cost. 749 RV Parking Bulletin Classifieds Southeast Bend Homes Get Results! KEYSTONE RV PARK Call 385-5809 or place Yamaha 350 1994 4x4, exc. your ad on-line at Downtown, near shopping, 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., cond., racks front & rear living room w/ wood stove, bendbulletin.com 305 E Burnside, 18-40’ $1900. Also ATV Big Tex family room w/ pellet stove, spaces, W/S/G/cable, Over5x14 trailer 2006 with drop dbl. garage, on a big, fenced nighters OK. 541-382-2335 ramp $1100 or will sell as 652 .50 acre lot, $189,900. Randy package. 541-382-4115. Schoning, Broker, Owner, 676 Houses for Rent John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. Mobile/Mfd. Space

NW Bend

870

Boats & Accessories

Freeway 11’ Overhead Camper, self contained, A/C, reconditioned, $1900 OBO. 541-383-0449

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

GMC Yukon 2007, 4x4, SLT, 5.3L V8 FlexFuel, 63K, 100K extended warranty, loaded, $25,500, 541-549-4834

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 330-5818.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

Host 10.5DS Camper 2005, Tahoe, always stored indoors, loaded, clean, Reduced to $20,900, 541-330-0206.

Leer, canopy fiberglass, fits shortbed step side, silver $150. 541-382-7984.

Ford Tudor 2 Door Sedan, All Steel, 327 Chevy, T-350 Trans., A/C, Tilt, Cruise, Disc. Brakes. Many Time Show Winner and Great Driver. Displayed at Professional Auto Body, South, 61210 S. Hwy. 97, Bend. $34,900. 541-306-5161, 209-993-6518

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $18,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Automotive Service

Debris Removal

Handyman

A & R Paintworks

JUNK BE GONE

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Quality & affordable, auto body & paint work. Rocky Fair, 541-389-2593 after 4 p.m.

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Barns

DMH & Co.

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Building/Contracting

Drywall

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Excavating

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585 Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 Bend’s Reliable Handyman

30% Winter Discount

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction

Repair & improve, cleanup & haul, odd jobs & more! 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Landscape Maintenance

Home Improvement

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Collins Custom Woodworks: Provides honest, reliable service, specializing in carpentry, decks, remodels & furniture, CCB#173168, 541-815-2742.

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Gregg’s Gardening & Lawn Maintenance. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only. BIG RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s. Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

541-385-5809 Chad L. Elliott Construction

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

Remodeling, Carpentry

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate Steve 977-4826 •CCB#166678 CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171

Moving and Hauling

Tree Services

U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-279-8826

Three Phase Contracting tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 2004, loaded, nav., heated leather seats, tow pkg., sun roof, $13,500 OBO. 541-280-2327

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Tile, Ceramic

Masonry 541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates.

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$25,500, w/o winch $24,500, 541-325-2684

MUST SELL! 1969 Chevelle SS clone 1963 SS Nova Convertible $9,500 each. Call for more info., 541-788-7884.

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

933

Pickups Chevy 1500 1996, X-cab, 100K, 4x4, 5.7, tow pkg. nice truck, $7900. 541-388-8434.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $75,000 OBO. 541-480-1884


G4 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 935

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Toyota

Sequoia 2008, Platinum Edition 19,630 mi., white pearl, exc. cond., $43,350. 541-610-5070. 940

Vans Dodge Van 1991, 134K, great for second car to work, $500. 541-389-1626

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Honda Prelude 2001, 119K, black, runs great, $6800. 541-728-7651.

LEGAL NOTICE DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON ROAD DEPARTMENT

Jeep Grand Cherokee 1995 V8 105K, auto, good cond., w/ minor scratches. $7000. 541-815-8347.

INVITATION TO BID

Lincoln Continental Mark IV 1979, 302, body straight, black, in good running cond., tires are good, $800 OBO. 541-536-3490 Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

975

Automobiles 2004 HYUNDAI ACCENT, good cond., 68,000 miles on new motor, tires like new. White. $5,500. 541-389-8624.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, 107K mi., $6500.541-350-7017.

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

BMW 330CI Convertible 2004, 22K mi., auto, leather, loaded, sport pkg., immaculate, $19,500, 541-504-0145.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Saturn Series 2002, 4 cyl. Sedan 4 door SL1 excellent cond. 72K mi. new tires $3200 OBO. 541-504-2541.

SUBARUS!!! BMW M3 Convertible 2002, SMG gear box, 28k mi., mint cond, caramel leather, built for the young at heart, $26,500. 541-480-1884

Buick LeSabre 1998 90K loaded, 30 mpg hwy., you’ll like it! $3250, 541-508-8522.

BUICK LESABRE 2005

Custom white cloth upholstery, 94K, lots of nice things you’ll like. Dependable. Only $6495. 541-815-3639

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Celica 1992, 138K, 4 speed good tires very reliable & very economical 36 mpg, $1,999. 541-647-2697

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

(Private Party ads only) Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

VW Bug 1969, yellow, CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chevy Impala 2001, Excellent shape, runs good, 104,000 miles, A/C, cassette player, power windows & locks, $4200 541-548-4051.

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

FORD FOCUS SE 2007 sedan, auto., like new, 13,500 mi., $10,000, 541-318-0567 VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Ford Mustang Cobras-2003 & 2004, extremely low mi., 7700 mi. on Mystichrome 2004 - $29,500 OBO; 1700 mi. on Red tint anniversary edition 2003 - $24,500; Both pampered, factory super charged “Terminators”, never abused, always garaged, 541-390-0032. Honda Civic Coupe LX 2007, 27K, tilt, cruis, A/C, ABS, CD, great gas mi. 4 cyl. $13,500. 541-312-5159.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 48K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., extra set snow tires, $13,200, 541-419-4018.

VW Jetta Wagon 2003, 2.0 engine, A/C, PS, 73K, incl. 4 studded tires w/rims, asking $6750, Mike, 541-408-8330.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

FOR SUPPLYING AND HAULING OF CRUSHED, PRE-COATED ROCK FOR CHIP SEAL Sealed bids will be received at the Deschutes County Road Department, 61150 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, until but not after, 2:00 p.m. on March 24, 2010 at which time and place all bids for the above-entitled public works project will be publicly opened and read aloud. The contract calls for supplying and hauling 13,400 Tons of 3/8" to #8 and/or 1/4" to #10 asphalt coated crushed rock to specified stockpiles sites in the Redmond, Bend, Tumalo, and LaPine areas of Deschutes County. Specifications and other bid documents may be inspected and obtained at the Deschutes County Road Department, 61150 S.E. 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702. Inquiries pertaining to these specifications shall be directed to Roger Olson, Operations Manager, telephone (541) 322-7120. Bids shall be made on the forms furnished by the County, incorporating all contract documents, addressed and mailed or delivered to Tom Blust, Department Director, 61150 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702 in a sealed envelope plainly marked "BID FOR CRUSHED, PRE-COATED ROCK FOR CHIP SEAL" and the name and address of the bidder. Each bid must contain a statement as to whether the bidder is a resident bidder, as defined in ORS 279A.120. Vendors shall use recyclable products to the maximum extent economically feasible in the performance of the contract work set forth in this document. Deschutes County may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding of Deschutes County it is in the public interest to do so. The protest period for this procurement is seven (7) calendar days. TOM BLUST Department Director PUBLISHED: THE BEND BULLETIN: March 9, 2010 and March 16, 2010 Legal Notice NOTICE OF INTENT TO AWARD SOLE SOURCE CONTRACT For CAD-to-CAD Interface and Interoperability Project The Board of County Commissioners for Deschutes County, Oregon, will consider whether to award Executive Information Services, Inc. (EIS) the contract for the above-referenced project. The goods and services to be acquired are: EIS CAD M2 adapter, server equipment, EIS CAD mapping, EIS CAD interface development, licensing and installation. The Board of County Commissioners will decide whether the requirements to award the contract to EIS, Inc. based on sole source procurement are met. This notice is based upon Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 137-047-0275 Affected or aggrieved persons may protest the County's intent to award the contract as sole source procurement to the Board of County Commissioners of Deschutes County, Oregon at 1300 NW Wall St. Suite 200, Bend, OR 97701 within seven (7) days after the first publication date of this Notice of Intent to Award Sole Source Contract. The seven (7) day protest period will expire at 5:00 PM on Tuesday, March 9, 2010.

this RFP should be submitted via email to: Leo Birbilas, Sr. Consultant, RCC Consultants, Inc. LBirbilas@RCC.com. The District may reject any proposal not in compliance with prescribed procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause any and all proposals upon a finding of the County that it is in the public interest to do so. This solicitation is governed by the Oregon Attorney General's Model Public Contract Rules. The protest period for the solicitation is five (5) days after the date of notice of intent to award the contract. Deschutes County 911 Service District Rick Silbaugh, Public Safety System Manager LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0593320302 T.S. No.: OR-234839-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GARY L. OLDHAM and LORA L. OLDHAM as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 5/31/2006, recorded 5/31/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-37791 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 149431 LOT FOUR HUNDRED THIRTY (430), TOLLGATE EIGHTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 14852 DOUBLETREE SISTERS, OREGON 97759-9532 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $399,200.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,393.68 Monthly Late Charge $97.72 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $399,200.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from 5/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/7/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest

which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/17/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3383142 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-59352-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KEAN L. DILLON, CINDY D. DILLON as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 08-17-2006, recorded 08-28-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 200658719 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 126968 LOT 49, BLOCK 3, LAZY RIVER SOUTH, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 16767 DONNER PLACE LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 11/01 2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $2,531.25 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $450,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 08-30-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all

trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 06-28-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors m interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: February 15, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3461984 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031390222 T.S. No.: 10-07735-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, HANNAH K. NAGEL as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on October 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-67323 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 195895 PARCEL 3, PARTITION PLAT NO. 2000-33, BEING A REPLAT OF PARCEL 1, PARTITION PLAT NO. 1998-02, CITY OF SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 576 S SPRUCE ST., SISTERS, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O. R. S. 86.705 et seq. and O. R. S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-89845

which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,580.80 Monthly Late Charge $102.56 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $732,046.60 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000 % per annum from June 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 7, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the

trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 2, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Chris Bradford ASAP# 3472356 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010 Find exactly what you are looking for in the C LA SSIFIED S

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0471544049 T.S. No.: OR-234676-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RONALD A. LEIS AND SHAWN M. LEIS, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) , as Beneficiary, dated 11/30/2006, recorded 12/6/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-79949 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 134698 LOTS 11 AND 12 IN BLOCK 13 OF DAVIDSON ADDITION TO SISTERS, DESCHUTES, COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 215 SOUTH SPRUCE STREET SISTERS, Oregon 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $392,752.70; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91510 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LESLIE A. WALKER AND KENDRA M. WALKER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to ORANGE COAST TITLE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC., as beneficiary, dated 3/15/2006, recorded 3/20/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-18735, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SEVENTEEN, STONEHEDGE ON THE RIM, PHASE III, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1316 SOUTHWEST RIMROCK WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 24, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 4 payments at. $ 1,929.13 each $ 7,716.52 (11-01-09 through 02-24-10) Late Charges: $ 351.12 Beneficiary Advances: $ 134.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,201.64 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $175,175.94, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 28, 2010, at the hour of 11:00AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/24/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3464091 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3475 T.S. No.: 1251463-09.

A voluntary (not mandatory) pre-proposal conference to discuss the context of this RFP and answer proposer questions will be held at 9:00 AM PST Wednesday March 17, 2010. The pre-bid meeting will be conducted electronically via web meeting. All organizations receiving a copy of the RFP will be notified of the specifics of the web meeting.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOHN B. TAYLOR AND KAREN A. TAYLOR, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 9/18/2006, recorded 9/29/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-66007, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC Bank USA, National Association AS TRUSTEE FOR LUMINENT 2007-1 Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT THREE (3), BLOCK THREE (3), RIMROCK WEST, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 611 NORTHWEST SILVER BUCKLE ROAD BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2009 1 payments at $ 2,072.96 each $ 2,072.96 2 payments at $ 2,191.15 each $ 4,382.30 2 payments at $ 2,202.92 each $ 4,405.84 (10-01-09 through 02-02-10) Late Charges: $ 332.93 Beneficiary Advances: $ 22.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 11,216.03 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $462,990.02, PLUS interest thereon at 4.375% per annum from 09/01/09 to 11/1/2009, 4.375% per annum from 11/01/09 to 01/01/10, 4.375% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 7, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION By ANNA EGDORF, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by James W. Horn, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated June 06, 2007, recorded June 08, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-32550 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4 in block 5 of Second Addition to Chapparral Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 5598 SW 58th Pl. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,671.68 Monthly Late Charge $73.67. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $544,000.00 together with interest thereon at 3.250% per annum from May 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 29, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Note: Questions concerning

ASAP# 3438015 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010

R-293141 02/23, 03/02, 03/09, 03/16

Any protest must be in writing and must include: a detailed statement of the legal and factual grounds for the protest; a description of the resulting harm to the Affected Person; and the relief requested. If no timely protest is filed, this Notice of Intent to Award Contract becomes an Award of Contract without further action by the Board. Legal Notice The Deschutes County 9-1-1 Service District Multi-agency Law Enforcement Records Management System and Field Based Reporting System REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS NOTICE TO PROPOSERS Specifications and Proposals for providing the subject items or services are available electronically by contacting Mr. Leo Birbilas, Sr. Consultant, RCC Consultants, Lbirbilas@RCC.com and will be received until 5:00 PM, local time, Friday, April 9, 2010, at 63333 Highway 20, Bend, OR 97701. Proposals received after the above-referenced time set for opening will be rejected and returned unopened.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 G5

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installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,995.31 Monthly Late Charge $128.37 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $392,752.70 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/14/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3378200 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010

prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/14/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3378173 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010

together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/30/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Gina Avila Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3395460 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010

at the rate of 8.125% per annum from 7/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/12/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/22/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3387776 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601719465 T.S. No.: OR-234628-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CRAIG J. HUBBARD AND JENNIFER C. HUBBARD, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 9/12/2006, recorded 9/15/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-62892 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 122212 LOT 3, BLOCK 3, PLAT OF NORTH RIM, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2309 NORTHWEST 12TH STREET REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $212,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,705.72 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $212,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7429505803 T.S. No.: OR-235454-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRENT HARRISON as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 7/22/2006, recorded 7/28/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-51949 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 186976 LOT 44 IN BLOCK 4 OF PROVIDENCE PHASE 8, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 939 NORTHEAST LOCKSLEY DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $251,991.01; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,841.62 Monthly Late Charge $78.74 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $251,991.01 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.5% per annum from 5/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/21/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed,

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0597017904 T.S. No.: OR-211765-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CRAIG J. BAKER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 9/22/2006, recorded 9/26/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-65131 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245893 LOT FOUR OF CANAL ROW, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20867 DANIEL DUKE WAY BEND, OREGON 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $212,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,435.42 Monthly Late Charge $71.77 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $212,000.00 together with interest thereon

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3175 T.S. No.: 1235897-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7470830662 T.S. No.: OR-235036-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DEREK B. HAMBLIN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Beneficiary, dated 11/3/2006, recorded 11/13/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-74839 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 205875 LOT 60 OF SUNSET VIEW ESTATES, PHASE III-B, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20318 RAINBOW LAKE TRAIL BEND, OREGON 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $835,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $5,651.21 Monthly Late Charge $221.79 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $835,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/11/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx8862 T.S. No.: 1260696-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Mario Riquelme, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 05, 2006, recorded October 16, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-68922 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 7 of River Park Estates, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3530 NW Mesa Verde Ct. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,940.74 Monthly Late Charge $175.49. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $990,986.36 together with interest thereon at 4.250% per annum from April 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 22, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 23, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rick C. Upham, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Aspen Mortgage Group, as Beneficiary, dated January 27, 2005, recorded February 02, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-06596 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 39, block 30, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Inc., Unit 5, Deschutes County Oregon. Commonly known as: 56430 Celestial Drive Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $922.09 Monthly Late Charge $46.10. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $151,988.95 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from June 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 25, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 5, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-294279 03/09/10, 03/16, 03/23, 03/30

R- 291832 02/16/10, 02/23, 03/02, 03/09

prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/21/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3385570 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0713908212 T.S. No.: OR-235369-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MITZI M. KAWAKAMI as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MIT LENDING, A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/6/2005, recorded 6/17/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-38090 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206097 LOT 48, MAJESTIC RIDGE, PHASES 1 AND 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 4022 SW MAJESTIC AVENUE REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $226,201.01; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,465.31 Monthly Late Charge $49.48 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately

due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $226,201.01 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/20/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/29/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Gina Avila Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3393672 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441388873 T.S. No.: OR-234953-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHARLES W. REPONEN and KELLY L. REPONEN, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER MERITAGE MORTGAGE, as Beneficiary, dated 4/5/2006, recorded 4/7/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-23880 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 244278 LOT SEVENTY-SIX OF HAYDEN RANCH ESTATES, PHASES 2 AND 3, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1261 NORTHEAST 5TH STREET REDMOND, OREGON 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $236,011.09; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 1/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,791.93 Monthly Late Charge $77.46 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $236,011.09 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.374% per annum from 12/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/7/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor

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LEGAL NOTICE Request for Proposal for Contracted Baker County Marketing Director Background Baker County and the incorporated cities in Baker County have entered into intergovernmental agreements for the collection of Transient Lodging Taxes (TLT) from overnight visitors to our County. These TLT fees are then utilized for the operation of a visitor center, tourism marketing and economic development. The tourism marketing function is overseen by a 5 member committee appointed by the Baker County Board of Commissioners (Commission). This committee recommends marketing policy, implementation and development of the Baker County Marketing Plan and budgetary considerations to the Commission. Baker County is requesting proposals for the position of contracted Marketing Director. All individuals or vendors who have experience and expertise in tourism marketing and the ability to provide dynamic leadership toward the marketing of Baker County tourism are encouraged to apply. Position Description Baker County intends to enter into a long term relationship with a contractor to enhance the Baker County Marketing Plan. It is the desire of the County to have continuity in County marketing and to utilize limited resources with maximum efficiency. The need for a marketing professional to guide our marketing strategy is imperative. This position will be the catalyst for a broad community discussion surrounding visitor services, marketing strategy and long term tourism focus. Presently, Baker County has a marketing budget of nearly $350,000. Of that budget, $120,000 are allocated to the operation of the Baker County Visitor Center and a grant program for events. The remaining $230,000 has been earmarked for tourism marketing, a marketing director and opportunistic marketing. The opportunistic marketing line is a type of contingency fund for unforeseen opportunities which could be expended if needed. Presently we pay $60,000/year for an independent contractor to fulfill the marketing director position. Baker County has a marketing strategy and is looking for creative proposals which utilize the above resources and maximize return on our marketing dollars. Baker County looks to the Marketing Director position to analyze the marketing plan, provide insight and specific strategies to maximize returns. After buy-in from stakeholders and the Commission, the marketing director will be responsible for implementation of the adopted plan. All creative and dynamic proposals will be considered. We are interested in the applicants viewpoint on our present marketing plans and strategies and how they can be sustained or improved in the future. Scope of Work a. Serve as an independent contractor. b. Monitor and implement budget as approved by the Baker County Board of Commissioners. c. Work with Transient Lodging Tax Committee and other partners to develop current marketing plan and then implement the plan. d. Help develop measurement standards for monitoring the effectiveness of tourism marketing in Baker County. e. Act as the public spokesperson for tourism and marketing in Baker County. f. Advocate positively for Baker County as a destination for tourists, businesses and relocation. Proposals should Include: 1. Familiarity with Baker County tourism industry and general attractions. 2. Analysis of Baker County marketing plans 3. Analysis of Base Camp Baker brand 4. Ability to create, install and implement fulfillment pieces, web site content and print/media ads. 5. Plans and abilities to engage community partners (lodging establishments, government entities, chambers of commerce, event managers, tourism destination entities, regional tourism organizations, key local attractions and businesses, etc.) 6. Ability to communicate and partner with a wide variety of diverse interests. 7. Ability to monitor spending based on adopted budget. 8. Ability to articulate marketing activities to the TLT Committee and other stakeholders. Additional Information: 1. Detailed cost proposal for Marketing Director position. 2. References 3. Examples of previous work product. Scoring and Ranking of Applicants Baker County will score potential applicants on the following criteria: • Marketing Experience20 points • Communication Skills20 points • Demonstrated ability to interact with diverse groups effectively20 points • Analysis of strengths and weaknesses of current Baker County Marketing Plan30 points • Fiscal Management10 points The applicants with the highest scores will be required to attend a personal interview. An interview panel will recommend the hiring of a contract Marketing Director to the Baker County Board of Commissioners. Copies of the 2009-10 Baker County Marketing Plan and 2009-10 Marketing Budget are available at the Baker County Commissioner's office located at 1995 Third St., Baker City, OR 9781 Baker County Board of Commissioners 1995 Third Street, Suite 101 Baker City, OR 97814 For further information, please contact Heidi Martin, Executive Assistant at 541-523-8200 Responses must be received in the Commissioner's office no later than 5:00 p.m. on March 26, 2010. The position will be filled by July 1, 2010


G6 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/18/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3383915 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010

being the following, to-wit: The sum of $212,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8.125% per annum from 7/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/12/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/22/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3387776 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010

eficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee under Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of January 1, 2006 Morgan Stanley Home Equity Loan Trust 2006-1 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 7, BLOCK 17, DAVISON ADDITION TO SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: LOT 7 DAVISON ADDITION NOW KNOWN AS 358 SOUTH CEDAR STREET SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: TOTAL AMOUNT DUE AS OF 2/2/2010 $ 157,966.46 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: ALL DUE AND PAYABLE BALANCE OF 157,966.46 AS OF 02/02/2010 PLUS interest thereon at 10.375% per annum, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 17, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwith-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0597017904 T.S. No.: OR-211765-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CRAIG J. BAKER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 9/22/2006, recorded 9/26/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-65131 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245893 LOT FOUR OF CANAL ROW, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20867 DANIEL DUKE WAY BEND, OREGON 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $212,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,435.42 Monthly Late Charge $71.77 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-90743 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ROSEMARIE BERGER AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE CO, as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 10/5/2006, recorded 10/11/2006, under instrument No. 2006-68091, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The ben-

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standing the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/12/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By MELISSA HJORTEN, ASST. VICE PRESIDENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3450803 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 502167856 Title Order No: 4365859 T.S. No.: OR05000010-10-1. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ROBERT LINK AND CARI LINK, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to LANDAMERICA LAWYERS TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, recorded on July 10, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-29317 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 209060 LOT 21, RIVER CANYON ESTATES, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19612 SW HOLLYGRAPE ST., BEND, OR 97702-2688 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $2,370.26 Monthly Late Charge $118.52 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $372,588.01 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000 % per annum from March 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on June 24, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc-

cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 10, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE, CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, (949) 252 8300 THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3453502 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441121357 T.S. No.: OR-177972-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARIA EMMA TECK as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO., as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 2/10/2006, recorded 2/16/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-11083 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 240338 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWENTY (120), OBSIDIAN ESTATES NO. 3 RECORDED JULY 7, 2003 IN CABINET F, PAGE 577, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2935 SW PERIDOT AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $172,857.17; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,133.49 Monthly Late Charge $47.71 By this reason of said default the

beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $172,857.17 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from 3/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 4/30/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/18/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3384300 02/16/2010, 02/23/2010, 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 8254747838 T.S. No.: OR-202490-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRAD D. SHAVER AND MARILYN F. KOSEL as Grantor to HOME CONNECTS, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 2/7/2007, recorded 3/12/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-14540 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 165042 PARCEL 1: In Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Ten (10), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Section Twenty-five (25): Commencing at the Southwest corner of said Section 25; thence North 89º56'06" East, 1340.66 feet; thence North 00º09'46" West, 1320.32 feet to the point of beginning; thence continuing North 00º09'46" West, 435.66 feet; thence North 89º59'06" East, 400 feet; thence South 00º09'46" East, 435.66 feet; thence South 89º56'06" West, 400 feet to she point of beginning. PARCEL 2: The Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4) of Section Twenty-five (25), Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Ten (10). East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM In Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Ten (10), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Section Twenty-five (25): Commencing at the Southwest corner of said Section 25; thence North 89º56'06" East, 1340.66 feet; thence North 00°09'46" West, 1,320.32 feet to the point of beginning; thence continuing North 00°09'46" West, 435.66 feet; thence North 89º59'06'' East, 400 feet; thence South 00º09'46" East, 435.66 feet; thence South 89º56'06" West, 400 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 69700 PINE RIDGE DRIVE SISTERS, Oregon 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $200,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/20/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $739.73 Monthly Late Charge $20.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $200,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.5% per annum from 1/20/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/17/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/4/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3399124 03/02/2010, 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-09-330426-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Larry G. Walker and Marian L. Walker, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated June 23, 2005, recorded June 30, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-41368 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty (20), Stonehenge on the Rim, Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2152 SW Newberry Court Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,448.05 Monthly Late Charge $57.73. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $175,950.12 together with interest thereon at 7.875% per annum from August 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 25, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by John M. Simpson and Jolene M. Simpson, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, dated November 07, 2005, recorded November 14, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-77859 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-seven (27), block HH, Deschutes River Woods, recorded march 22, 1962, in plat book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19483 Baker Road Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,735.62 Monthly Late Charge $68.83. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $202,974.80 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from January 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 22, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 23, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL C HOUSE AND SARA D HOUSE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/23/2006, recorded 1/27/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2006Â06434, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 247807 LOT 63, VILLAGE POINTE, PHASES 2 & 3 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2990 SW DESCHUTES AVE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,112.44 Monthly Late Charge $55.62 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $168,493.30 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5000 per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 4/26/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com 1 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the Trustee of the Deed of Trust written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the Trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is 3/27/2010 the name of the Trustee and the Trustee's mailing address is set forth on this Notice of Sale below. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your Landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included below with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included below with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 12/18/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Seth Ott, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

R-291819 02/16/10, 02/23, 03/02, 03/09

R-294444 03/09/10, 03/16, 03/23, 03/30

ASAP# 3385696 03/09/2010, 03/16/2010, 03/23/2010, 03/30/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0272 T.S. No.: 1260483-09.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1913 T.S. No.: 1236599-09.


Bulletin Daily Paper 03/09/10