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Serving Central Oregon since1903 75 $

FRIDAY August 30, 201 3

ow o <ee our <i s in e Weekendguide ALL AGES• D1

GO! MAGAZINE

bendbulletin.com TODAY'S READERBOARD

The Bend Police Department's new speed signs not only Tiny drains —These'or-

YOWi

SPEED

tell drivers their speed, but record the data for the depart-

ganoids' grown from stem cells could provide insight into a variety of diseases.A3

ment to use in enforcement efforts.

Plus: Autism —Apossible

when they're likely to find speeders.

Bend dedicates new park on river By Scott Hammers

Now, officers can use that data to tell them where and

The Bulletin

lead on its cause.A3 By Branden Andersen• The Bulletin

4 days of school —Proponents say students do just as well, and teachers have more time to keep up.A4

Senior concierge — An errand service in Central

Oregon aims to takethe pressure off caregivers.D1 'Supef agefS' —These vital people in their 80s and beyond

could be the key to preventing memory loss.D2

And a Wed exclusiveA reporter remembers the 1963 case of Emmett Till, a black teen killed for whistling at a white woman.

Ryan Brennecke /The Bulletin

iving on the corner of Brookswood Boulevard and Southwest M ontrose Pass Street,64year-old Patrick Davis has had concerns about the busy road that runs past his home. Brookswood Boulevard has a speed limit of 35

L

mph, but Davis believes few people adhere to that restriction. "People speed like crazy back there," he said. "A bad wreck will eventually

partment deployed three speed-catching units on July 27 on the city's popular roads, including Newport Avenue, Third Street and Brookswood. Although the equipment has only been in use for a month, Bend Police spokesman Lt. Chris Carney said the department is

happen." In an effort to combat speeding areas around town, Bend Police De-

already starting to see useful information. "We're putting them out and seeing what driver habits are like around the city," he said. "Which streets are the worst? And, what time? It's all what we're looking at." SeeSpeed /A4

Percentageof recordeddrivers exceedingthe speedlimit The Bend Police Department's recently acquired speed signs not only tell drivers how fast they're going, but also record that data. Crime analyst Nancy Watson provided The Bulletin with data collected near 5 intersections in Bend that show what percentage of drivers exceed the

posted speed limit, and howmanycruise through in specific speed ranges throughout the day. EASTBOUND GREENWOOD AVENUE ATN.E.FIRST STREET Speedli mit:25 mph;Me asured July26-Aug. 7;Readings:87,733

Olne Ave.

ortan Ave.

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bendbulletin.com/extras

Fastest time of day: 1 a.m.;2.4% drove 45 MPHor faster 28 - 30 mph — 31- 3 3 mph — — 2 7 mph or less —

Green ood Ave.

34- 3 6 mph

At Thursday's dedication of Miller's Landing Park, Charley Miller said he'd once looked forward to livmg in one of the townhomes his family planned to build on the park site before the real estate downturn hit Bend. As the economy slowed, the Millers and partner Brooks Resources Corp. backed off their development plans for the 5-acre site on the Deschutes River that had been one of the earliest homes of Miller Lumber, the company founded by Charley Miller's grandfather in 1911. Then, Kristin Kovalik with The Trust for Public Land pitched an alternative idea, Miller said — a park — and was relentless in her push to convince the Millers to sell. SeePark/A4 H

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EDITOR'5CHOICE

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EASTBOUND REED MARKET ROAD ATDIVISION STREET Speedlimit:25mph;MeasuredJuly26-Aug.7;Readings:108,697 Fastest time of day: 3 a.m.;1.1% drove 48 mph or faster 28 - 30 mph — 31- 3 3 mph — — 2 7 mph or less —

By Melissa Maynard

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performance appraisals," he said. "To be successful, you have to insulate public employees from politics." SeeService /A4

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Fastest time of day: 3 a.m.;8% drove 48 mph or faster 31 - 33 mph — 34- 3 6 mph —

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SOUTHBOUND 15THSTREET AT RAMSAY ROAD Speed limit:30 mph;Measured Aug.1-9; Readings:63,217

— 3 0 mph or less —

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Iyicgay

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Stateune.org

WASHINGTON — State civil service rules originated a century ago to prevent incoming governors from replacing state workers with their political supporters. Now a handful of governors are working to change those rules, saying they make it difficult to hire and retain the right employeesand to fire anyone — even the worst underperformers. "I've got a $20 billion operation I've got to run, and you can't run it with your managers' and your executives' hands tied," North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory said in an interview with Stateline. McCrory, a Republican who worked for 28 years for Duke Energy, wants publicsector employment to be more like employment in the private sector. But some experts say significantly altering the current civil service system may bring back the widespread cronyism of the early 20th century. Rick Kearney, a professor of public administration at North Carolina State University's School of Public and International Affairs, worries the changes will make public employment a less attractive option for highly skilled workers. "The whole idea was to take politics out of the public bureaucracy and make it merit-based through job protections and objective

Colombla 5' .~ Park

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Miller's Landing Park

Bear CreekRd. 37- 3 9 mph

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detailed in'black budget' By Barton Gellman

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The Washington Post

~ Reed Market Rd.~

15TH AT FRIARTUCKROAD

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Speedli mit:40 mph;Me asured Aug.14-21;Readings:30,077 100%

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Fastest time of day: 2 a.m.;5.8% drove 58 mphor faster — 4 2 mph or less — 43 - 45 mph — 46- 4 8 mph — 0% 12

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NORTHBOUND BROOKSWOOD ATMONTROSE PASS STREET Speedlimit:35mph;MeasuredAug.15-21;Readings:15,001 100%

Fastest time of day: 1 a.m.;10.8% drove 52 mph or faster — 3 6 mph or less — 37 - 39 mph— 40 - 42 mph — H

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Montrose Ps t ~ 43- 4 5 mph

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Source: Nancy Watson, crime analyat, Bend Police Department

TODAY'S WEATHER Mostly sunny High 80, Low 52

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INDEX All Ages D1- 6 C lassified E 1 -1 0 Dear Abby D5 Obituaries 85 01-4 Busines s/Stocks 05-6 Comics/Puzzles E3-4 Horoscope D5 Sports Calendar I n GO! Crosswords E4 L o cal/State 81-6 TV/Movies D5, GO!

WASHINGTON — U.S. spy agencies have built an intelligence-gathering colossus since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but remain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security threats, according to the government's top-secret budget. The $52.6 billion "black budget" for fiscal 2013, obtained by The Washington Post from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, maps a bureaucratic and operational landscape that has never been subject to public scrutiny. Although the government has annually released its overall level of intelligence spending since 2007, it has not divulged how ituses those funds or how it performs against the goals set by the president and Congress. SeeSpying/A6

e p We userecycled newsprint AnIndependent

Vol. 110, No. 242, 6 sections

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1


A2 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 20'I3

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OUR ADDRESS Street

orece nize a marria esina saes By Annie Lowrey

of those questions Thursday. As of the 2013 tax year, WASHINGTON All same-sex spouses who are lelegally m a r r ie d s a m e-sex gally married will not be able couples will b e r e cognized to file federal tax returns as for federaltax purposes, re- if either were single. Instead, gardless of whether the state they must f il e t ogether as where they live r ecognizes "married filing jointly" or inthe marriage, the Treasury dividually as "married filing Department and th e I n ter- separately." nal Revenue Service said Gay and civil rights groups Thursday. praised the r u l i ng. "ComIt is the broadest federal mitted and loving gay and rule change to come out of lesbian married couples will the landmark Supreme Court now be treatedequally under decision in June that struck our nation's federal tax laws, down the 1996 Defense of regardless of what state they Marriage Act, and a sign of call home," said Chad Griffin, how quickly the government the president of the Human is moving to treat gay couples Rights C a mpaign. "These in the same way that it does families finally have access to straight couples. crucial tax benefits and proThe June decision found tections previously denied to that same-sex couples were them under the discriminatoentitled to f ederal benefits, ry Defense of Marriage Act." but left open the question of But the Treasury decision how Washington would adcould have ramifications for minister them. The Treasury many gay couples' tax liDepartment answered some abilities, said Roberton Wil-

1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR97702 P.o. Box6020 Bend, OR97708 CaorSd0AVL

smuoo Aw. DeciiurgsRe

Bin Laden CaSe —A Pakistani judicial official on Thursday overturned the conviction of a Pakistani doctor who helped theCIAwhile it was searching for Osama bin Laden, and ordered a retrial. The official, Sahibzada Muhammad Anis, who presided over an appellate

court hearing the case, ruled that the tribal judge whoconvicted the doctor, Shakil Afridi, exceeded his authority when he sentenced him to 33 years in prison in May 2012. Afridi's lawyer, Samiullah Afridi,

told reporters gathered outside Anis' office in Peshawar, that the court had agreed to a fresh trial under the auspices of the political agent of Khyber, the most senior government official in Shakil Afridi's home district.

liams of the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center in Washington. Couples with similar incomes often pay the "marriage penalty," with their tax liability as a couple being much higher than it would be if they were

New York Times News Service

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DeflCI't'talkS —A White House meeting with Senate Republicans to try to find a path forward on deficit reduction andavert a fiscal crisis in the fall ended Thursday with both sides saying the talks had proven fruitless and might not continue. The meeting between senior

White Houseaides and eight senators ended with no date set for the

single.

next meeting and blunt talk of failure. With the next fiscal showdown in Washington just weeks away, the failure of the talks will shift atten-

The Treasury ruling is one of many that are starting to emerge from all corners of the federal government as Washington changes regulations to conform with the Supreme Court decision. Separately, the Health and Human Services Department said Thursday that Medicare would extend certain key benefitsto same-sex spouses. But federalagencies are not moving in lock step. Instead, they are creating a patchwork of regulations affecting gay and lesbian couples — and may be raising questions about discrimination and fairness in the way that federal benefits are distributed.

tion toward congressional leaders whohaveyet to engage in detailed talks to avert a political and possibly an economic disaster.

GIIII COntrOI —Stymied by Congress, President Barack Obama used his executive powers Thursday to advancehis gun control agenda by closing a loophole in the background checksystem andbarring the reimportation of surplus U.S. military weapons. Months after failing to push significant gun legislation through the Senate, Obama announced the actions as part of what the White House said would

be a continuing push to keepfirearms out of the hands of dangerous people. Gun rights advocates have criticized him as overstepping by trying to use his authority to curb gun proliferation.

Talidan attaCk —The Taliban ambushedanAfghan police convoy onthe main highway between Heratand Kandahar onThursday

in Afghanistan, setting off a firefight that left 15 police officers dead and grew so intense that the police called in international air support, officials said. The battle was the latest in a string of violent episodes

in recent weeks onthe country's western edge.Afghan officials said that the police were escorting government officials when the ambush occurred. The police called for air support, and the International Se-

curity Assistance Force respondedwith airstrikes and medical evacuation for the wounded, local officials said.

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C.McCool...........541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black ..................... Editor-in-Chief John Costa.........................541-383-0337

PREPARING FOR THE POSSIBILITY OF ATTACKING SYRIA

Kenya dIIS CraSh —Thedriver of a bustraveling on a dark country road in Kenya lost control of the vehicle early Thursday, and it plunged into a valley, shearing the roof off as it rolled, and killing at least 4t

people, officials said. Police said morethan two dozenothers were injured. Police officer Samuel Kimaru said the bus veered off the road

around 2 a.m.and landed on its roof. Deadly road accidents are common in Kenya,where highways frequently lack safety features like

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Jay Brandt..........................541-383-0370 Circulation andOperations ............................................54f -385-5805 Finance Holly West ...........541-383-0321 Human Resources

guard rails, reflective paint or lights.

T(leIIOI WaNIIIgS —Bottles of Tylenol sold in the U.S.will soon bear red warnings alerting users to the potentially fatal risks of taking

too much of the popular pain reliever. Theunusual step, disclosed by the company that makesTylenol, comes amid agrowing number of

Traci Oonaca ......................

lawsuits and pressure from the federal government that could have widespread ramifications for a medicine taken by millions of people

TALK TO AN EDITOR Business Tim Doran..........541-383-0360 City DeskJoseph Oitzler.....541-383-0367 Community Life, Health Julie Johnson.....................541-383-0308 Editorials Richard Coe......541-383-0353 GO! Magazine Ben Salmon........................541-383-0377 Home, All Ages AlandraJohnson................541-617-7860 News Editor Jan Jordan....541-383-0315 Photos DeanGuernsey......541-383-0366 Sporls Bill Bigelow.............541-383-0359 State Projects Lily Raff McCaulou ............541-410-9207

every day. Thewarning will make it explicitly clear that the over-thecounter drug contains acetaminophen, a pain-relieving ingredient that is the nation's leading cause of sudden liver failure.

Chimp art —A painting by a 37-year-old Louisiana primate who applies color with his tongue instead of a brush has been deemed the

finest chimpanzeeart in the land. Brent, a retired laboratory animal, was the top vote-getter among 5 paintings in an online chimp art contest organized by the Humane Society of the United States, which

announced the results Thursday. Hewon $10,000 for the Chimp Ha-

TALK TO A REPORTER Bend Hillary Borrud ...........541-6f7-7829 Business Elon Glucklich ....................541-6f7-7820 Rachael Rees.....................541-61 7-7818 Calendar ............................54f-383-035f CrookCounty.....................541-383-0367 Deschutes County Shelby R. King ...................541-383-0376 EducationTyler Leeds.......541-633-2160 Famity/Att Ages Mac McLean......................541-617-7816 Fine Arts/Features David Jasper...................... Health Anne Aurand...................... 541-383-0304 Markian Hawryluk..............541-617-7814 Jefferson County...............541-383-0367 La Pine/Sunrtver...............541-383-0367 Music BenSalmo n............54f-383-0377 Projects Sheila G.Miller....541-617-7831 Public Lands Dylan J. Darling..................541-617-7812 Public Safety Scott Hammers..................541-383-0387

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CORRECTIONS The Bulletin's primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know ofan error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

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ven sanctuary in northwest Louisiana. One of the submitted paintings that didn't win was by Patti, a female at Chimps Inc. in Tumalo. — From wire reports

R>chard Drew/The Assoaated Press

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power talks with British delegate Michael Tatham Thursday in the U.N.

Security Council. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the inspection team in Syria is expected to complete its work

today and report to him Saturday. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama on Thursday prepared for the possibility of launching unilateral

Despite roadblocks in forming an international

coalition, Obamaappeared undeterred andadvisers said he would bewilling to retaliate against Syria on his own. "The president of the United States is elected with the duty to protect the national security interests in the United States of America," White House spokesman Josh Earnest said.

American military action against Syria within days

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Even before the vote in London, the U.S.was pre-

as Britain opted out in a stunning vote by Parliament. Facing skepticism at home, too, the administration

paring to act without formal authorization from the United Nations, where Russia has blocked efforts to

shared intelligence with lawmakers aimed atconvinc-

seek a resolution authorizing the use of force, or from

ing them the Syrian government used chemical weap-

Capitol Hill. But the U.S. had expected Britain, a major ally, to join in the effort.

ons against its people andmust be punished.

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legal pot New York Times News Service WASHINGTON The Obama administration said Thursday that it w ould not sue to undo laws legalizing marijuana in 20 l" Ore9O" states, although it • Little is will monitor opexpected erations in those to change, s tates to m a k e B3 sure they do not run afoul of several enforcement priorities. Washington and Colorado recently began allowing small amounts of marijuana to be u sed r e creationally, w h i l e 18 other states and the District of Columbia permit the use of marijuana for medical

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purposes. In a phone call Thursday, Attorney General Eric Holder explained the government's "trust but verify" approach to Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington and Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado, a Justice Department official said. After Colorado and Washington legalized recreational marijuana, some members of Congress sought to have the administration clarify whether state officials risked federal criminal p r osecution w h i le carrying out their duties under the state laws.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

MART TODAY

A3

TART • Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, namesin the news— the things you needto knowto start out your day

It's Friday, Aug. 30, the 242nd day of 2013. There are 123 days left in the year

BREAKTHROUGH HAPPENINGS Syria —U.N. weapons inspectors will complete their work, but won't issue a report until Saturday. A2

HISTORY Highlight:In 1983, Guion Bluford became the first black American astronaut to travel

in space as he blasted off aboard the Challenger. In1861, Union Gen. John Fremont instituted martial law in

Missouri and declared slaves there to be free. (However, Fremont's emancipation order

was countermanded by President Abraham Lincoln).

In 1862,Confederate forces won victories against the Union at the Second Battle

of Bull Run in Manassas, Va., and the Battle of Richmond in Kentucky. In1905, Ty Cobb made his

major-league debut as a

player for the Detroit Tigers, hitting a double in his first at-

bat in a gameagainst the New York Highlanders. (The Tigers won, 5-3.) In1941, during World War II,

German forces approaching Leningrad cut off the remaining rail line out of the city. In 1945, Gen. Douglas MacArthur arrived in Japan to set up Allied occupation

headquarters. In1963, the "Hot Line" communications link between

Washington and Moscow went into operation. In1967, the Senate confirmed the appointment of Thurgood Marshall as the first black

justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1986, Soviet authorities arrested Nicholas Daniloff, a

correspondent for U.S. News and World Report, as a spy a

The "cerebral organoids" grown from human stem cells could help POSSidle autiSm rOOt —Somecases of autism may be related to damage in akeyset of enzymes that are critical during brain

researchers understand diseases ranging from schizophrenia to autism.

growth and development, possibly helping narrow the search for

By Eryn Brown Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Scientists have figured out how to grow human stem cells into "cerebral organoids" — blobs of tissue that mimic the anatomy of the developing brain. The advance, reported online this week by the journal Nature, won't allow scientists to grow disembodied brains in laboratory vats, said study leader Juergen Knoblich, a stem cell researcher at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Science in Vienna. But it does offerresearchers an unprecedented view of human brain anatomy, he said. Having the ability to probe a 3-D model ofa 9-week-old embryo's brain c ould h elp scientists better understand conditions that h av e b een linked to problems in brain development, including autism and schizophrenia. In a f i r st, Knoblich's research team h a s a l r eady grown brain organoids using stem cells from a patient with microcephaly, a rare genetic disorder that s t u nts b r ain growth. "This allows us to study the disease in a human context" and not just in mice, Knoblich sa>d. The Austrian team's work follows a number of efforts to Use stem cells — either from e mbryos o r f r o m m a t u r e cells that have been repro-

grammed to a more flexible state — to grow three-dimensional brain tissues for researchers to study. Scientists had been able t o use such cells to m a k e neurons, gu t t i s sue, p i t uitary glands, livers and even rudimentary h u ma n e y e s, Knoblich said. But t h ey've never grown a p r o to-brain complex enough for its different regions to interact the way they would during early brain development. The key was to seed the cells in a gel-based scaffold to support them as they grew into neural tissue and to bathe them in nutrients with a spinning device called a bioreactor. Following this recipe, the organoids grew to 3 or 4 millimeters in diameter — a relatively large size, in embryonic biology terms. The o r ganoid s t r u cture became apparent about 20 to 30 days after the start of the procedure,said Madeline Lancaster, the postdoctoral researcher inKnoblich's lab who came up with the method. The process seemed to work most effectively when the tissues were allowed to s elf-assemble w i t hout t o o much guidance, she added. The hundreds of organoids the team made didn't look like 9-week-old embryo b r ains, exactly, but they shared many of their key characteristics. By evaluating gene expression in the tissues of 35 of the

organoids, the scientists confirmed that all incorporated cells that would become the dorsal cortex, where neurons are generated. Over two-thirds had a choroid plexus, w hich m a k es cerebral spinal fluid. A few developed retinal tissue or a hippocampus. The regions weren't spatially organizedas they would be in a developing embryo. But their presence in the organoid was enough to allow the team to study how neurons form in and migrate through the early brain. "I often compare this to a car — you have the engine, you have th e w h eels, but the engine is on th e r oof," K noblich s a i d. "The car would never drive, but you could take that car and analyze how an engine works." In t h e pa s t , s c i entists studying early human brain d evelopment had t o w o r k with mouse brains or human neurons in a dish, said Dr. Anthony Wy n s h aw-Boris, a medical geneticist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland who wasn't involved in K n oblich's work. That limited their ability to study diseases that don't behave the same way in mice as they do in people, or that i nvolved i n t eractions b e tween d i f ferentiated b r ain structures. Microcephaly is a case in point. Knoblich and his team

causes of the condition, researchers said. The enzymes known astopoisomerases work like scissors and glue whenbrain cells known as neurons are being copied or expressed, said Mark Zylka, anassociate professor in the Neuroscience Center at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. When studies linked mutations in the enzymes to some patients with autism last year, the researchers sought to

determine what exact effect they had onthe brain. The study found the enzymes are essential for the proper

functioning of someextremely long genes, including dozensof those that havegoneawry in patients with autism, Zylka said. The researchers inhibited the enzymes with a generic cancer medicine and found they effectively silenced about 50 genes linked to au-

tism, according to the study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. "Our study shows the magnitude of what can happen if topoi-

somerases are impaired," Zylka said. "We think there areprobably other drugs or chemicals in the environment that can have this same effect. We believe this is just the tip of the iceberg. We are

doing additional research to see if other compounds like this exist, and we have hints there are others." One in 50 U.S. children are diagnosed with autism or a related

disorder, according to the Centers for DiseaseControl and Prevention. The findings should help investigators in their hunt for causes of autism, Zylka said. While in the past scientists had no

idea what to look for, now they canquickly zero in on compounds that inhibit topoisomerases. — Bloomberg News decided to study the rare disorder because they knew that it stemmed from a problem with cell division in the embryonic dorsal cortex. T hey started with a sk in cell from a microcephaly patient and followed their usual method. But the resulting organoid was not the same as those made with skin cells from healthy patients. The microcephaly organoids had progenitor cells that divided strangely a n d gen e r ated neurons tooearly.The result

was fewer neuralprogenitor cells, which c ould ex plain the smaller brain sizes seen in people with the condition, Lancaster said. Yoshiki Sasai of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan, a leader in the field who was not involved in the study, called the work with the microcephaly cells an "important advancement" that showed why selforganizing cultures are preferable to traditional, two-dimensional cells in a dish.

week after American officials

arrested Gennadiy Zakharov, a Soviet employee of the United Nations, on espionage

charges in NewYork. (Both men were later released.) In1987, a redesigned space shuttle booster, created in the wake of the Challenger disaster, roared into life in its first full-scale test-firing near Brigham City, Utah. In1991, Azerbaijan declared

its independence, joining the stampede of republics seeking to secede from the Soviet

Union.

Austral ian cats and foxes maynot deserve bad rap By Gabriel Popkin

SCIENCE

ScienceNOW

In1993, "The Late Show with

David Letterman" premiered on CBS-TV.

In1997, Americans received word of the car crash in Paris that claimed the lives of

Princess Diana, Dodi Fayed and their driver, Henri Paul. (Because of the time differ-

ence, it was Aug. 31 where the crash occurred.) Ten years ago:A Russian submarine being towed to a

scrap yard sank in a gale in the Barents Sea, killing nine of the10-member crew. The

World Trade Organization agreed to let impoverished

nations import cheaper copies of patented medicines needed to fight killer dis-

eases. Five years ago:Hurricane Gustav slammed into Cuba

as a monstrous Category 4 storm, damaging 100,000

homes and causing billions of dollars in damage, but no reported fatalities.

One year ago:Mitt Romney launched his fall campaign for the White House with a

rousing, remarkably personal speech to the Republican Na-

tional Convention in Tampa, Fla., proclaiming that America

needs "jobs, lots of jobs." The Justice Department

announcedit had endedits investigation into CIA interro-

gations of terrorist detainees without bringing criminal charges.

BIRTHDAYS Cartoonist R. Crumb is 70.

Comedian Lewis Black is 65. Actor Michael Chiklis is 50. Actress Cameron Diaz is 41.

Tennis player Andy Roddick is 31. — From wire reports

BALTIMORE — Foxes and feral cats are wildly unpopular among Australian conservationists. The two animals are i nfamous for killing off t h e continent's native species, and they've been the targets of numerous g o vernment-backed eradication campaigns. But new research suggests that on Australian islands, these predators help control an even more destructive one: the black rat. As a result, eliminating cats and foxes could actually leave native mammals more vulnerable to predation, competition, and ultimately extinction. Australia is g r ound zero for the modern biodiversity crisis. The continent has suffered more than a quarterof all recent mammal extinctions, and many other native species survive only as small populations on one or more of the country's thousands of islands. While h a b itat d e s truction has caused some extinctions, cats, foxes and rats introduced around 1800 by British sailors have also played a major role, decimating native animals like bilbies and bandicoots — both small, ratlike marsupials found only in Australia. All of this has given large, non-native predators like cats and foxes a bad name. "We hate them," biologist Emily Hanna of the Australian National University in Canberra declared here last month at the International Congress for Conservation Biology. But to plan successful eradication campaigns, scientists must first u nderstand how introduced predators interact with native fauna and with each other.For instance, cats and foxes are infamous for hunting birds and other wildlife, but they can also control rats, which arethemselves fero-

cious killers of and competitors with native animals like the bandicoot. To date, few studies have looked at which type of predator is actually most likely to drive native animals extinct. To determine which island invaders were doing the most damage, Hanna and her research adviserMarcel Cardillo created and analyzed what she calls a "ridiculously large" database comprising 934 living and extinct populations of 107 mammal species on 323 Australian islands between the early 1800s and today. For each island, the researchers recorded th e p r esence or absence of various native mammals, and of rats, cats, foxes and wild dogs known as dingoes, which some scientists believe help control invasive predators. Th e r e searchers also included other factors that might affect extinction risk, such as the size of the island and distance from the mainland. (Ecologists have found that island populations close to continents are more easily replenished, while more distant populations more easily go extinct.) Hanna then analyzed these data to find which factors most often correlated with native mammal extinctions. The study yielded some surprising results: Native mammals were most likely to die off on islands that had rats, but not cats, foxes, or dingoes. Extinction rates on such islands ranged from 15 percent to 30 percent, but when cats, foxes, or dingoes were present, the rates plummeted to just over 10 percent — not much higher than on islands without any introduced predators, the scientists reported at the meeting and online this month in the journal Global Ecology and

Biogeography.

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A4 T H E BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

IN FOCUS: EDUCATION

4- a sc oo wee s ar s controvers By Donald Bradley

Fifth-grade teacher Jeanne Burgin assists student Dallie Morris with her iPad in Bates County, Mo. An extra day off for students means more time for teachers to get caught up with technoiogy, advocates of four-day school weeks

The Kansas City Star

B ATES C O U NTY , Mo . — Ever-increasing global competition in job markets and research fields has pumped up pressure on American schools to churn out smarter and better-prepared students. Some education experts a dvocate year-round schools. Others say we need longer school days. Some schools have even added Saturday classes. But a growing number of s chool districts across t h e country are trying a different strategy. In fact, they're going in a completely different direction. They're taking Mondays off. Students go longer Tuesday through Friday because they still must meet state minimums for classroom hours. And while they don't attend class on Mondays, teachers do. They come in for staff development, les-

and new technology, those demands are going to increase. Giving them this day is what teachers have been scream-

ing for for years," Dahman said. "Better-prepared teachers means better students, and that'swhere the rubber meets the road." No one knows for sure how many districts have gone to four-day schedules. The Education Commission of the States estimates the number at several hundred in 17 states — and go-

ingup.

Service Continued from A1 of any kind of people that are Some Republicans, who w o r k ing and producing, you are often at odds with public d o n't fire those people, you reemployee unions, also coun- w ard those people," she said. sel caution. Louisiana Gov. In N o r t h Carolina, McCrory BobbyJindalisamongthem. s i gned a law Aug. 21 that in"When you think about the c r eases the number of posipowers you'd like as gover- t i ons exempt from civil service nororinanyoftheseelected r e quirements from 1,000 to offices, you always have to 1 , 500. Even under traditional imagine: Would you want c i v i l service rules, governors yourpoliticaladversariesto a r e a llowed to fill a number have those same powers? o f h i g h-level positions with That's a good check on how p o l itical appointees. But as remuch power you can trust," c e ntly as two years ago, North Jindal said. Carolinahad only 400 exempt Jindal said he benefited p o sitions. greatly from the expertise The M cCrory administration of hi s s t ate's has come under c ivil ser v i ce fire in local meemployees dur- "When yOu dia for appointing

It's a big mistake, said Jennifer Davis, president of the National Center on Time k Learning, a Boston-based group that advocatesmore classroom time. "The idea of narrowing the e ducational structure is a b solutely the wrong direction," Davis said. "We are at a critical point of education in this country. We need to be raising standards. We're past the time

ing his first job

two 2 4-year-»d

in state govern-

former campaign aides to high-level p ositions i n t h e Depa~m«t

was to help financially strapped training. days in 2010. It was the first dis- small districts save money on The idea is either horrible trict in Missouri to do so after transportation, support staff or innovative, depending on the GeneralAssembly passed and utilities. Those savings whom you ask. Critics say it legislation a year earlier. turned out to be minimal, but adverselyaffects students'eduMost of these are small, rural that's not why Miami switched cation. Supporters say it makes districts, such as Miami R-l, this year. "This is about making teachteachers better. Students'? A about an hour south of Kansas senior girl shrugged and said City. Its one school building, ers better," S uperintendent she was looking forward to servingallgrades,is surroundFrank Dahman said earlier this sleeping in an extra day. ed by head-high corn this time month on opening day. Officials in these four-day of year. He is convinced that giving districts make no apologies T he Missouri la w c a m e teachers those Mondays revs and insist their students will with the requirement that any them up so they can do more hold their own against any district incurring substantial with the new four than the old elsewhere. drop-offs in performance must five. "Our ACT scores are the best go back to the traditional five "Ever since the beginning they've been in 10 years, and days. It's early, but no district of time, we've placed demands our teachers love it," said Chris has had to do that. on teachers and then not given F ine, superintendent of t h e When states first agreed to them time to do it. With new Lathrop school district in Clin- four-day schedules, the reason requirements for development

of graduating from high school

service employees that I had

Park

Addressing Thursday's gathering, Greg Cushman said he first learned of the campaign to acquire the Miller's Landing site in late 2010 and was immediately on board. Without the support of hundreds of donors, he said, the park never would have been built. "Bend is a great place to live, work and raise a family, and this is another example of what we can do when we work together," he said. Construction started in 2012 when Jack Robinson and Sons, Inc. began site excavation and grading, according to Pat Erwert, director of park services. In July, district crews completed the installation of the irrigation system and sod, and contractors began building restrooms, a shelter and entry plaza. "It had been an old vacant lot for years," Erwert said. "A lot of local donors stepped up to help purchase the land. Without them we might not have been able to complete this project." The land cost a total of $1.8 million, according to Taylor. The district received a $250,000 local government grant, the park district covered about $940,000 and the rest came from donations. Though the park is open to the public, work continues on the restrooms, picnic shelter and lighting. Construction is expected to be completed in the next few weeks.

say. Tammy Ljungblad Kansas City Star

son planning and technology ton County, which went to four

Continued from A1 Though the family was not eager, Miller said the park that's been built at M i l ler's Landing will enhance the livability of Bend for years to come. "I think ou r p arents and grandparents would be very proud of w h a t's h appened here," he said. Addressing an audience at the new park just across the Deschutes River from McKay Park on Thursday night, Miller described how his grandfather, Harry Miller, built his lumberyard on the site downstream from the city's two l umber mills, at first delivering wood to construction sites by horsedrawn cart. H a rr y M i l l er's sons'firstjobs were feeding the horses lodged at the lumberyard, he said, and Charley Miller's father, Bill Miller, was known to head to the stables beforeschool in order to ride his horse to class at Kenwood School. The family has had a deep interestin parks for generations, Miller said. "We love parks," Miller said "Parks are what make Bend so beautiful." Jan Taylor, community relations manager for the park district, said the family deserves the recognition of having both the park and its picnic shelter named in their honor. "They've been leaders in this community for almost as long as Bend has existed," she said.

Speed

Park district update Last November, Bend voters approved a $29 million bond to fund development and improvements to area parks. Director of Park

Services Pat Erwert said someprojects are already underway. COLORADO DAM SAFEPASSAGE Design and planning of a newpedestrian bridge oyer the Deschutes River and in-stream channel improvements to reduce hazards and increase recreational opportunities has begun, Erwert said. "There are still a lot of hoops to jump through in terms of

permitting," he said. "Wehope to break ground early next summer." PINE NURSERYPARK PHASEII New athletic facilities and parking areas will be added to the Pine Nursery Park in northeast Bend. "We'ye broken ground on the infrastructure for development of more soccer fields on the north side," Erwert said. "We have also started on a new parking lot that's located off Yeoman Road."

LAND FORSOUTHEAST BENDPARKS The park district in June closed on a 4-acre parcel of land located on the corner of SoUtheast15th Street and Reed Market

Road next to the BendSenior Center. This land will be used to expand the senior center. No projected completion date has been

scheduled. OTHER PROJECTS Other projects include the SimpsonAvenue Recreation and Event Center — anapproximately 25,000 square foot open-air space that will be Used for basketball, farmers markets and other sports activities. A completion date for the event center has not been

announced. Thedistrict will also continue development of the Deschutes River Trail system, including a spring 2014 installation of a footbridge to Gopher Gulch and further development of the

First Street Rapids Park, scheduled for completion in 2015.

"They're all

r eally c ivically to raise $700,000 in private donations to help the park disThe park district also recog- trict purchase the park site. An nized Greg Cushman, board interpretive center at the park member for the Trust for Public will be adorned with a plaque Land and local community ad- dedicating it to Greg Cushman vocate who led the campaign and his wife, Peggy Cushman.

minded people."

or map that reveals trends. "Take the information of

traffic officer, uses the information gathered by the signs. Continued from A1 people going over the speed Once Watson gathers and T he radar u n it, a w h i t e l imit a n d g r a p h t h a t f o r consolidates the information, square box with an orange them," Watson said. "That she gives it to the four traffic d igital r e adout a f f i xed t o way, they know what time of officers who cover Bend's 33 posts,stores how fast each day cars are going over the square miles. "There aren't a lot of us for car is going and what time speed limit." the driver passed the unit. To The advantage of this, she the area we cover," Beck said. "Knowing where to go and prevent speeders who want said, is the ability to use ofto see how fast they can drive ficers where they are needed when to go there makes us a past the signs, the manufac- most. Instead of sending traf- lot more efficient." turer designed the display to fic officersto drive around Beck said there are typicalturn off after drivers exceed a streets looking f o r s p eed- ly two traffic officers working certain speed. ing cars, they can pick areas at a time, responding to calls Carney b e lieves d r i vers where the speeders will likely and relying on experience to who see their speeds will be come to them. guess where the next speeder "I think it's a great idea," may be. inclined to slow down from "We know how many cars instinct. But another feature Davis said. "My wife and I encourages slower driving, he would like more patrol out are out there at this time, gosaid — a white strobe light be- here." ing this speed," he said. "It tween the flashing numbers. Davis said crosswalks dot just takes the randomness out "I never thought of this, but Brookswood Boulevard, con- of it." people think it's taking a pho- necting residential neighborThe project is still in early to," he said. "We got pretty hoods to area parks. Families, stages, Beck said, so he hasn't lucky with that." pets and wildlife commonly been able to use it as much Each week, Carney said, he cross the two-lane road. as he believes he will later. "If it will catch the people With more in-depth informagoes out to each of the three boxes and pulls the gathered speeding in this area, I really tion over longer spans of time data. The data is given to Bend wouldn't mind (if) an officer from more locations, officers Police crime analyst Nancy was around our streets," he will be able to have an accuWatson, who processes and sald. rate picture of the speeding converts the data into a graph John Beck, Bend P olice hot spots around the city.

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and getting a middle-class job. Those jobs are gone. "Our kids are going to have to compete with the world. I can't think that taking away a

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erno r s negotiated mutually a cceptable civil service changeswithstate

wor k ers.

administration muCh ppWeI. In T e nnessee, had gotten rid a key r e sult o f ' of that previous y months of difficult e xPertise a n d Loujeiana Goy negotiations with knowledge, we Ten n essee Bobby Jindai the wouldn't h ave State Employees b een able t o A ssociation w a s hit the ground the e l i m i nation running." of the practice of "bumping." In Arizona, Republican B u m ping a l lows e mployees Gov. Jan Brewer made shift- w h ose positions are being eliming the state's workforce i n a ted to force others with less system to an "at-will" model s e niority into lower positions, the centerpiece of her 2012 o r even out of the workforce legislative agenda. Florida, a l t ogether. Critics say the pracGeorgia and I ndiana al l ti c e o ften pushes employees have "at-will" systems, i n to positions that are a poor which give state officials the m a tch for their skills, forcing discretion to hire, reward t h e state to retrain them. and fire workers. As a result of the changes, "Our state employees s a laries and layoffs in Tenneswere just stuck," Brewer s e e now are based on perforsaid. "You could never re- m a nce evaluations rather than wardthem for performance, s eniority. so you take that natural Colo r ado is phasing out its instinct away from people b u m ping system by restricting becausethere'sno place for it to senior employees who are them to really move up." close to retirement. It also is ofNow new Arizona em- f e r ing help to workers who are ployees are required to ac- b u m ped from their jobs. State cept "uncovered" status, human resourceteams either foregoing traditional civil s e a rch for a suitable job for the service protections. Man- displaced worker somewhere agers have the flexibility to e l se in state government, or ofreward or discipline such f e r tuition help, severance pay, employees as they see fit. extended health benefits or Some current employees p l acement on a re-employment w ere automatically transi- l i s t . tioned to "uncovered" status.Others were offered a

day of school is going to help." The debate is a touchy one for state education officials. They may not like the idea of fourday schools, but the format has been approved by states. "We stay neutral, but it is the law," said Roger Dorson, Missouri'scoordinator of school financial and administrative services. It's too early to give the system a grade, he said. "Next year, we will know more."

5 percent one-time bonus

Am a n a . Di sh wa sher

in exchange for voluntarily giving up their "covered" status, and 5,276 of 13,761 eligible employees chose to do so. In total, at least 71 percent of Arizona's state workforce is now uncovered. Brewer said she isn't worried that future administrations will fire state employees who don't share their p olitical a ff i liations a n d

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A6 T H E BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Inside the $52.6 billion* 'black budget'

Total requested in 2013, in billions $14.7 Central Intelligence

Three of the agencies under the

r„" '.

Agency Program

National lntelligence Program would receive nearly 69 percent of the $52.6 billion top secret budget that was requested by the White House

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$1.1 Specialized Reconnaissance Programs $0.5 Foreign Counterintelligence Program

oo *This total does not include more than $510 million allocated for the CIA retirement and disability system.

I 4

$3.0 Justice Department III

$0.3 Homeland Security $0.2 Department of Energy

Funding the program's five major objectives Combating terrorism

Warning U.S. leaders about critical events

• •

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$3.8 billion

Prevent cyber intrusions and launchoffensive operations.

Preventthe Monitor and proliferation disrupt violent of weapons of extremists mass destruction. and suspected terrorist groups.

$17.2

44 3

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Todd Lindeman /The WashingtonPost

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lous behavior" by personnel with access to highly classified material. • U.S. intelligence officials take an active interest in foes as well as friends. Pakistan is described in detail as an "intractable target," and counterintelligence operations "are strategically focused against (the) priority targets of China, Russia, Iran, Cuba and Israel." • In words, deeds and dollars, intelligence agencies remain fixed on terrorism as the gravest threat to national security, which is listed first among five "mission o b j ectives." Counterterrorism programs employ one infour members of the intelligence workforce and account for one-third of

l l

Warn of threats, such as economic instability, state failure, societal unrest and emergence of regional powers.

telligence during that period, an outlay that U.S. officials Continued from A1 say has succeeded in its main The 178-page budget sumobjective: preventing another mary for the National Intelcatastrophic terrorist attack in ligence Program details the the United States. successes,failures and objecThe result is an espionage tives of the 16 spy agencies empire with resources and that make up the U.S. intellireach beyond those of any adgence community, which has versary, sustained even now 107,035 employees. by spending that rivals or exThe summary describes cutceeds the levels reached at the ting-edge technologies, agent height of the Cold War. recruiting and ongoing operaThis year's total budget retions. The Washington Post is quest was 2.4 percent below withholding some information that of fiscal 2012. In constant after consultation with U.S. dollars, it was roughly twice officials who expressed conthe estimated size of the 2001 cerns about the risk to intelbudget and 25 percent above ligencesources and methods. that of 2006, five years into Sensitive details are so pervawhat was then known as the "global war on terror." sive in the documents that The Post is publishing only sum- all spending. Historical data on U.S. inmary tables and charts online. • The governments of Iran, telligence spending is largely China and Russia are difficult nonexistent. Through extrapoMajor revelations to penetrate, but North Korea's lation, experts have estimated "The United States has made may be the most opaque. that Cold War spending likely a considerable investment in There are five "critical" gaps peaked in the late 1980s at the Intelligence Community in U .S. i n t elligence about an amount that would be the since the terror attacks of 9/ll, Pyongyang's nuclear and mis- equivalent of $71 billion today. a time which includes wars sile programs, and analysts Spending in the most rein Iraq and Afghanistan, the know virtually nothing about cent cycle s u rpassed that Arab Spring, the proliferation the intentions of North Korean amount based on the $52.6 of weapons of mass destruc- leader Kim Jong Un. billion detailed in documents tion technology, and asymobtained by The Post, plus a metric threats in such areas Top priorities separate $23 billion devoted as cyber-warfare,"Director of The document describes a to intelligence programs that National Intelligence James constellation of spy agencies more directly support the U.S. Clapper said in response to in- that track millions of individu- military. quiries from The Post. al surveillance targets and carLee Hamilton, an Indiana "Our budgets are classified ry out operations that include Democrat who was a former as they could provide insight hundreds of l e thal s t rikes. chairman of the House Intelfor foreign intelligence servic- They are organized around ligence Committee and coes to discern our top national five priorities: combating ter- chairman of the commission p riorities, c apabilities a n d rorism, stopping the spread of that investigated the S ept. sources and methods that al- nuclear and other unconven11 attacks, said that access low us to obtain information to tional weapons, warning U.S. to budget figures has the pocounter threats," he said. leaders about critical events tential to enable an informed Among the notable revela- overseas, defending against public debate on intelligence tions in the budget summary: foreign espionage and conspending for the f irst time, • Spending by the CIA has ducting cyber operations. much as Snowden's disclosurged past that of every other In an introduction to the sures of N S A s u r veillance spy agency, with $14.7 billion summary, Clapper said the programs brought attention in requested funding for 2013. threats now facing the United to operations that had assemThe figurevastly exceeds out- States "virtually defy rank-or- bled data on nearly every U.S. side estimates and is nearly dering." He warned of "hard citizen. "Much of the work that the 50 percent above that of the choices" as the i ntelligence National S ecurity A g e ncy, community — sometimes re- intelligence community does which conducts eavesdrop- ferred to as the "IC" — seeks to has a profound impact on the ping operations and has long rein in spending after a decade life of ordinary A mericans, been consideredthe behemoth of often double-digit budget and they ought not to be exof the community. increases. cluded from the process,"he • The CIA and NSA have This year's budget proposal satd. "Nobody is a r guing t h at l aunched a g g ressive n e w envisions that spending will efforts to hack into foreign remain roughly level through we should be so transparent computer networks to steal in- 2017 and amounts to a case as to createdangers for the formation or sabotage enemy against substantial cuts. country," he said. But, he said, "Never before has the IC "there is a mindset in the nasystems, embracing what the budget refers to as "offensive been called upon to master tional s ecurity c o m munity cyber operations." such complexity and so many — leave it to us, we can handle • The NSA planned to in- issues in such a resource-con- it, the American people have vestigate at least 4,000 pos- strained environment," Clap- to trust us. They carry it to sible insider threats in 2013, per wrote. quite an extraordinary length cases in which the agency susThe summary provides a so that they have resisted over pected sensitive information detailed look at how the U.S. a period of decades transparmay have been compromised i ntelligence community h a s ency.... The burden of persuaby one of its own. The budget been reconfiguredby the massion as to keeping something documents show that the U.S. sive infusion of resources that secret should be on the intellii ntelligence community h a s followed the Sept. 11 attacks. gence community, the burden sought to strengthen its ability The United States has spent should not be on the American to detect what it calls "anoma- more than $500 billion on inpublic."

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Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

©

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

BRIEFING

en as s

RETRIEVING THEWRECKAGE e

a

Motorcyclist injured in crash

e tt

onm S

r

A motorcyclist struck

t

by a car Thursday night on the east side of Bend

a

e

suffered life-threatening injuries, according to Bend Police.

spending cutsrequired • Federal agency tory under sequestration. In March, the agency anasks for return of nounced it was seeking to more timber funds reclaim $18 million in tim-

r

Cpl. Adam Juhnke said the crash occurred near the intersection of

Northeast BearCreek

e

Road and Quail Run Place, a short distance east of 27th Street, at

By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., blasted the U.S. Forest Service Thursday for asking rural counties in Oregon to return an additional $400,000 of timber funds to the federal government. Last week, the Forest Service sent letters to individual states, saying that additional cuts to payments under the Secure Rural Schools program were necessary because of manda-

around 5:45 p.m. The rider was trans-

ported to St. Charles Bend for treatment, he sald.

Bear CreekRoadwas closed as of 8 p.m.,

(

Juhnke said, and was

expected to remain closed for another two to three hours as of-

ficers continued their e

investigation of the

crash. Police are notyet releasing the names of either the driver or the

www.bendbulletin.com/local

ber payments nationwide, including $3.6 million from Oregon counties. Including the cuts announced last week, Oregon's total SRS funds in fiscal year 2012 will be $4 million less than expected. In a letter Thursday to Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, Wyden voiced frustration at how the Forest Service, a branch of the Department of Agriculture, has "bungled" its efforts to recovermoney italready distributed. See Cuts/B2

t

e

motorcyclist.

ew acesa area sc oos

Missing manlast seen in LaPine A man last seen near Big River Drive in

La Pine was reported missing on Thursday, according to the Des-

chutes County Sheriff's Office. Thomas W. Colman,

'

li ,

>c

,.'&

57, has not beenseen since Wednesday.Colman is described as 5

rr

By Tyler Leeds

ge

The Bulletrn - ' •

-

.

As students return .

feet, 7 inches tall, 180

pounds, with brown hair and blueeyes. Heis

a

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Sheriff's Office at 541-693-6911. — From staff reports

teachers, Central Oregon teachers will also have new names to learn as 12 administrators take on new posts.

Apk

STATE NEWS

AnissaWiseman

Pendleton

Interim Principal at Bear Creek Elementary Wiseman was named interim principal for the 2013-14

Medford

school year after former

• Medford:The Coquille tribe is stepping up its efforts to build a

principal Matt Montoya was placed on paid administrative

.W

leave earlier

this summer. Wiseman

casino in Medford. • Pendleton:Manjailed

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®»,

"

has beenin

a».", r"-.~

for 19 years, including five years at

Stories on B3

served as student services e'

coordinator. She attended college at the University

Reported for Central

of Oregon and is fluent in Spanish. She received her master's degree from Pacific

and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb

University.

.us/information/ firemap.aspx.

,'"' j ,.'c"' ',

,

: adras~

'.eond ~

\

0 :: Mii.Es ::;;.V Burns

Mark Ylen i Albany Democrat-Herald

Water pours out of a Cessna172 as a Sikorsky helicopter lifts the plane out of Marion Lake in the Mount

Jefferson Wilderness areaWednesday afternoon. The pilot and three passengers survived a crash landing into the Linn County lake after their engine failed on Aug.18. To watch a video of the plane recovery, go to www.bendbulletin.com/planerecovery.

1. Government Flat

• Acres: 11,434 • Containment: 85%

Bend OLCC under investigation

• Containment: 45%

By Branden Andersen

• Cause: Lightning

The Bulletin

3. Sagehen Gulch • Acres: 290 • Containment: 80%

• Cause: Lightning 4. Olympus • Acres: 3,314 • Containment: 100%

• Cause: Lightning

Anissa Wiseman

beginning in1998.1n 2003, Wiseman transferred to Pine Ridge Elementary, where she

0,

=;;giLa. G'ra o~=' ;~~'j„-,: Ilde'~ .:

The Bend Police Department is investigating the Bend office of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission after a former employee filed a report saying the agency recorded staff meetings without employees' knowledge. Police are investigating the OLCC for interception of communications, a Class A misdemeanor, Lt. Chris Carney

said. The crime of intercepting communications takes place when a person purposely tries to, succeeds in, or gets another person to record a conversation without the party's knowledge or consent. According to OLCC spokeswoman Christie Scott, the event in question took place during a meeting on Feb. 6. Katie Siefkes, the regional director, gave employees an

Bend-La PineSchools career in1988 and most recently

served as the assistant director

of special programs

1

beginning in Pam 2pp7. She Palmer raised two daughters in Bend, both of whom graduated from

Mountain View HighSchool.

Bear Creek

I'

FIRE UPDATE

education

for attack, killing in Pendleton.

2. Vinegar • Acres: 1,220

denddnlletln.com /dack2school

to know their new

green Ford Fiesta.

• Cause: Lightning

BA CK TO SCHOOL

to school and get

associated with a lime

~~Ja.

~

opportunity to air concerns about the office without fear of retaliation. During the meeting, the now former employee said Human Resources Director Bonnie Barasch brought a recorder up from her lap and handed it to Siefkes because it had stopped working. The reportalleged employees were unaware they were being recorded. SeeOLCC/B5

SeanReinhart Co-director of special programs Reinhart is completing his 10th year with Bend-La Pine,

having served as aschool psychologist for nine years and assistant director of special

programs for the past year. Prior to

working for the school district, Reinhart

Jay Etnier

counseled

Assistant Principal at Summit High School Etnier began his education career in Edina, Minn., where he taught for two years at the middle school level. In 2002,

young adults

he moved to Beaverton and taught technical education at Jay Etnier Westview High School. In 2003, he became a metal shop instructor at Sam Barlow High School in Gresham, where he worked for

adecade.Heattendedcollege at St. Cloud State University

in Minnesota andreceived his master's degree from the University of Portland.

Pam Palmer Co-director of

special programs Palmer has 30years of education experience, having begun her career as ahigh school English teacher in the David Douglas School District in Portland. She began her

and mentored

,X

/,

Reinhart

at the Northstar Center in Bend. He attended college at

Evergreen State andreceived his master's degree from Lewis and Clark.

Wendy McCulloch Assistant Principal at High Desert Middle School

McCulloch hasbeenaspecial education teacher in Oregon for the past12 years, spending the last five as an instructional

coach and curriculum leader. In 2010,

she was a finalist for '%i the district's Teacher of the .

Year award,

. f,

representing W end y High Desert McCu l loch Middle School. She has two children who are enrolled in Bend-La Pine

Schools. Sheattended college at Western Washington University and earned her

master's degree from the University of Oregon. Continued on B2


B2

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

ew aces atarea sc oos

BACK TO SCHOOL bandbollatln.com

/back2school

Continued from Bl

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tvtcvg Mavkof faoofh.

Pick. vik an Oikon ltovcc, rrtals af ovv NWX oafvvcfasi Pav

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• •

I

Mark Keel

Jensine Lirette

Program Director at Edwin Brown Education Center Keel spent the

from Concordia University. Since

Assistant Principal at Ridgeview High School Lirette joins

Mark Keel

past decade in special education,

her administrative credentials

moving to Central Oregon, she has career, he has taught high school worked in both public and private social studies, special education

education. Jensine Lirette

the Redmond

working in Sisters, Crook County and Redmond. He earned his

School District after nine years in

education. As anundergraduate at Northern Arizona University, she served as anAmeriCorps

bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas and a

master's degree from Adams

educator. Later, she taught high

State University in Colorado. He is a father of three.

school science in Norfolk, Va., for four years. In 2013, Lirette earned

DedorahHunt

to the area14 years agofrom Wenatchee, Wash.During his and all middle school subjects. He has also coachedbaseball,

Marc Horner

basketball and football for the last

Assistant Principal at Elton Gregory Middle School

at Azusa Pacific University in California and Central Washington

Horner was p reviously the

17 years. Horner attended college University. He earned his master's Marc

Hor n er

WIN A

TRAEGERo

All entries must be

Lil' Tex Elite

received by 3 p.m Aug. 3t. Winner will be announced Sept. 7 at the NWX Farmers Market.

wood pellet grill

$799 VALUE 5 *epstakesop* t * l egalU 5 s de ts age 18 a d oider

Oregon.

Qe /p.

in Sweet Home.This year, shewill

fourth and sixth

spearhead the planning of the new

Hunt has lived in Madras for two decades and has worked for the Jefferson County School District for12 years. She taught first, second and third grades for her

grades. Shealso has experience as

K-8 school in WarmsSprings. She attended college atWestern

GlennaDeSouza

a literacy leader and talented and

Oregon University and earned her

Planning Principal for the new tr';8 schoolin Warm Springs

gifted coordinator.

State University.

first six years before becoming

DeSouza hasbeen ineducation for

years, she wastheelementary administrator at Foster Elementary

more than 20 years, having taught

W~A IP 1Za pp,tET1al ATP

dean of students at Redmond High School. He moved

first, second,

an instructional coach at Madras

LA aT

degree from the University of

Primary. Sheearned both her bachelor's and master's degrees from Eastern OregonUniversity.

Principalat Madras Primary

Visit any of our Saturday open houses during the month of August and fill out an entry form for your chance to win!

For the past seven

master's degree from Portland Qe$ouza

• •

Becky Stoughton

Redmond School District, serving bachelor's degree fromWestern as a primary and special education Washington University and teacher. In 2008, she became Redmond's instruction coach,

Director of

and administrators. She is actively B e cky Stoug h t on involved in the Oregon DATA

S toughton began her education

career in Sequim,

project, which helps districts

Wash., in1997. In1999, she came to Central Oregon to work for the

practices. She received her

Middle School. He attended

University of Oregon.

college at the University of Oregon and received his master's degree

Marshall Jackson

from Southern Oregon University.

use data to inform instructional

— RepOrter: 5dtt-633-2160,

Director of Sisters Middle School Jackson worked for Bend-La Pine

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

BEND POLICE DEPARTMENT Theft — A theft was reported at 2:32 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 100 block of Northwest Louisiana Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:07 a.m. Aug. 26, in the

Cuts Continued from B1 "I am astounded by the lack of agency clarity, the apparently arbitrary decision to disproportionately target Oregon's SRS funds, and the aggressive agency approach that has characterized this ordeal. I can only conclude that USDA and the Forest Service are continu-

900 block of Northwest Galveston Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:17 a.m. Aug. 27, in the 1100 block of Southeast Third Street. DUII — Colton Davis Dougherty, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:34 p.m. Aug. 27, in the area of Hawkview Road and Puffin Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:44 p.m. Aug. 27, in the 700 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8:18 p.m. Aug. 27, in the 1200 block of Northwest Hartford Avenue.

~ N oRTHWEsT

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Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:08 a.m. Aug. 28, in the 1800 block of Northeast Division Street. Theft — A theft was reported at11:53 a.m. Aug. 28, in the 2500 block of Northwest Shevlin Park Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:28 p.m. Aug. 28, in the 2800 block of Northeast Huettl Lane.

PRINEVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at1:10 p.m. Aug. 28, in the area of Northeast Court Street.

"I can only conclude that USDA and the Forest Service are continuing their campaign against cash-strapped rural counties."

Secure Rural Schools payments are authorized under three sections. Title I payments ing their campaign against are for schools and roads, and cash-strapped ruralcounties," Title III funds are dedicated Wyden wrote. for local fire prevention efforts. A Forest Service spokes- Title II funds are allocated for w oman said T h ursday t he special restoration p rojects, agency does notcomment on and the ForestService holds correspondencewith members on to those funds until specific of Congress. projects are approved. Last year, Oregon received The Forest Service is focusalmost $100 million in timber ing its efforts on recovering payments, including$36million as much as possible from Title from the BLM for the 18 coun- II funds, which would mean ties in Western Oregon con- some counties would not have taining Oregon and California to return any of the money they Railroad Co. lands. Deschutes have already received. County received $1.8 million, According t o t h e F o rest Crook County $1.7 million and Service's letter, it will take all Jefferson County $570,000. $4 million of repayments from Congress first enacted the Oregon's Title II funding, leavSecure Rural Schools program ing the state with only $3.4 in 2000 to compensate heavily million to spend on restoration forested counties whose local projects. economies were devastated In his letter, Wyden mainby federal limitations placed tained that Oregon was singled on logging on public land. The out because it had a relatively payments, designed to grow large amount of Title II funds. "Apparently, in deciding how smaller over time, were meant to help portions of local bud- to seek additional repayments, gets, including spending on the Forest Service arbitrarily schools and roads, normally increased the burden on some supported by the tax base until states specifically those the region could develop a non- with more Resource Advisory timber-based economy. Committee (RAC) funds," he

— Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

wrote. "This has resulted in Oregon bearing the lion's share of the additional costs. All of this is coming at a time when Oregon's counties are among those hardest hit by the decline in payments — in many places

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Drouillard Ave

OREGON STATE POLICE Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:26 p.m. Aug. 28, in the area of Dorrance Meadows Road and Rim Drive in La Pine.

/ a~

,,>Ik.

A LL A R O U N D

s

Bend R. Central O r ego n

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 2:04 p.m.— Unauthorized burning, 60249 Dean Swift Road. 6:13 p.m.— Authorized controlled burning, 1653 N.E. Lotus Drive. 6:26 p.m.— Authorized controlled burning, 1047 N.W. Milwaukee Ave. 17 — Medical aid calls.

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W O O D H IL L

-P A R

T C-

having to cut basic county services and eliminating sheriff's patrol, 911 services and roads work." By contrast, Alaska w as asked to return only $100,000 in the latest round of cuts. Wyden called for the Forest Serviceto provide a "clear accounting" of why the additional repayments are necessary, and

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21160 Claremont Ct.

suggested the agency apply

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them equally across SRS counties at a flat rate. — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

DIRECTIONS:From Hwy. 20 East, south on 27th St., right on SEClaremont Ct.

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special programs

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

B3

REGON

Deserter jailed in

AROUND THE STATE

.'-'<;.: 'C i " :~, ,

Bridge mitigatiOn deal —The governors of Oregon andWashington say they've reached anagreement with a Vancouver, Wash., company to mitigate the impacts of a proposed lnterstate 5 bridge

et-'Pt('~~ $g

across the Columbia River. John Kitzhaber of Oregon and Jay lnslee of Washington announced the agreement with Thompson Metal Fab

,'/ )

killing,

on Thursday but released nodetails. Thompson Metal Fab is one of

attack

the other two companies earlier this year. A project spokeswoman said she didn't have details of the agreement. A Thompson Metal Fab

three manufacturers upstream that would not be able to fit some of their products under the proposed bridge, which would be shorter

than the existing one. Thestates reached mitigation agreements with official did not immediately respond to aphone call.

'15«:, I-IX"t8

Medford firefighter dies at Galifornia wildfire —The

I'i

By Jeff Barnard

governor of Oregonhasordered state flags lowered to half-staff to honor a fire crew foremanwho collapsed and died, apparently of

The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — The slaying of a maid in a downtown Pendleton motel had stymied police for a year, until earlier this month, when surveillance

cameras along a jogging path

)

;RI(3<g~@

Siskiyou County Sheriff's Department says Oscar Montano-Garcia, of Medford, collapsed Sundayduring a lunch break while assigned

.~;"t

y~tsf l~>(

to the Nabob fire in the Rogue River Siskiyou National Forest. Emer-

yA.

gency personnel were unable to revive him. Sheriff's spokeswoman

captured video of a man hiding a length of steel pipe behind his back, sneak-

i ng up o n

natural cases, while working on a wildfire in Northern California. The

' Fkgler~~:g

Jayme Lynch says the contract firefighter's death was not related to the fire.

" fl'

91-year-old arrested in freeway closure — OregonState

a

woman who was brutally beaten. Two o f ficers C h a ng recognized t h e attacker as a local homeless man who went by the name of Danny Wu. DNA from the pipe used in the attack on the jogging path matched a sample from the motel slaying, said Pendleton Police Chief Stuart Roberts. But Wu's name, f ingerprints and t h e D N A samples did not match any nationwide databases, and while Wu's picture was circulated around the region, and there had been sightings for weeks, they had all turned up empty. Then on Wednesday night, workers at the local convention center spotted Wu eating leftovers in the kitchen, Roberts said. They called 911, and officers armed with assault rifles surrounded the vast building. A state trooper looking through a window spotted a leg hanging down from a ceiling in a stairwell. Confronted by officers and a policedog, the suspect came quietly, and under questioning, revealed he was a Marine Corps meteorologist, wanted for desertion after getting on a bus at Camp Pendleton, Calif., and never going back. He apparently enlisted right out of high school in Morganton, N.C., and ran out of money when he got to Pendleton, Ore. Lukah Pobzeb Chang, 23, was arraigned Thursday on charges of murder in the Aug. 14, 2012, stabbing of Amyjane B randhagen, 19, in a r o o m she was cleaning at the Travelodge in Pendleton, and attempted murder in the Aug. 9, 2013, beating of Karen Lange, 53, along the jogging path, authorities said. Bail was set at $10 million. A preliminary hearing was set for Sept. 4. Intermountain Public Defender was appointed to represent Chang but had no comment becausethe firm has not met with him yet, said attorney Kent Fisher. The attack on Lange and the revelation that it was linked to the Brandhagen slaying unnerved Pendleton, a High Desert town of 17,000 that is home to one of the nation's oldest rodeos, the Pendleton Roundup. The two women attended the same church, and the attacks were almost exactly a year apaH, Roberts said. "It's great to have him in custody because it gives a little peace in the community," Roberts said. Roberts said without the surveillance cameras, paid for with a $150,000 federal stimulus grant, they would still be looking for their man. "We have to use technology to augment our resources and services," said Roberts. "We have the same number of officers (23) that we had in 1968. We do have a very high volume of calls for a community of our size." Chang had been cited for

camping illegally along the jogging path, and jailed on criminal t r e spass c h arges after a repeat offense, so officers were familiar with him, and had his fingerprints from booking him into the county jail under the name Danny Wu, Roberts said. But in investigators have not uncovered any other criminal history. A s pokesman a t C a m p Pendleton, Lt. Ryan Finnegan, said Thursday that a person by Chang's name is listed as a deserter. Finnegan said he didn't immediately have other details about him.

Police say they used spike strips to stop an elderly Washington

driver who bumped apatrol car and raced off at speeds ashigh as

Bob Pennell / Medford Mail Tribune

Michelle Hammond, a 24-year-old Coquille Indian Tribe member who lives in Medford, supports the tribe's plan to build a casino in the area near the former Kim's Restaurant.

80 mph after troopers found the man traveling in a closed section of Interstate 84. Police were investigating a freeway gun battle that left

a motorist dead and atrooper wounded whenthey spotted the man

Coquille triberevampscampaign to build 26M Medfordcasino

driving in the closed area Thursday. Lt. Gregg Hastings says troopers told the man to turn around and exit. The driver turned around

The Associated Press

misdemeanor hit and run.

guard by negative reaction from Medford and Jackson County officials, said Judy Metcalf, the project manager. "We were just not p r epared," she said. The tribe has asked the f ederal government to p u t Medford property into trust status. It contains the bowling alley that would be turned into a casino. The tribe plans to leasea nearby golfcourse. The tribe's campaign focuses on jobs. According t o t h e t r i b e, annual wages at the casino would average $41,416, which would be 18 percent higher than the average wage reproposal. ported by the state EmployThe tribe has a casino in ment Department for Jackson North Bend and is proposing County. "It's really a surprise to another in Medford. The idea has drawn oppo- us that the city would be opsition from some in Medford posed to 233 new jobs," said and from th e Cow C reek Larry Campbell, a f o rmer Band of U m pqua Indians, speaker of the Oregon House which operates a casino on who stepped out of retirement Interstate 5 about 70 miles to work for the tribe. north of the city. Gov. John The tribe a lso d i sputes Kitzhaber has criticized it as the one- c asino-per-tribe violating his policy of one ca- argument. sinoper Oregon tribe. The nine tribal casinos in The tribe was caught off Oregon are called "Class III" MEDFORD — Taken aback bythe opposition, the Coquille Indian Tribe has revamped its campaign for a $26 million casino in Medford. The tribe has engaged a former speakerofthe Oregon House as a spokesman, hired local consultants who have experience with Medford decision-makers and created glossy brochures extolling the idea and addressing criticisms leveled at it. T he r e -energized c a mpaign includes letters from officials in North Bend and Coos Bay to counterparts in Medford praising the casino

but kept heading westbound in theeastbound lanes — right into an extensive highway backup. The driver then crossed a median into the open, westbound lanes, bumped a patrol car that tried to pull him

over and racedoff before finally stopping in TheDalles. Thespokesman says 91-year-old Marseill William Gunnyon of Toppenish was arrested for investigation of attempting to elude, reckless driving and

casinos because they have table games. The Coquille proposal is for one more modest, called "Class II" because of its video gambling machines. T he Coquilles c ite t h e Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs, saying it has a Class III casino as well as a Kah-Nee-Tah Resort, which features Class II games. The resort has 30 video games compared with more than 500 proposed atthe Medford facility. Susan Ferris, spokeswoman for the Cow Creek tribe, stood by the tribe's earlier fear of a casino war. "If all of a sudden one tribe has more than one casino, why wouldn't other t r ibes think they would be similarly entitled?" she said. "It defies

COuple dlamed fOrdaughter'S death — Authorities saytwo Albany parents denied their daughter medical treatment, and they have beenaccused of manslaughter in her death. Albany police say they are 39-year-old Travis Rossiter and 37-year-old Wenona Rossiter.

Police said Thursday in astatement that12-year-old Syble Rossiter died Feb. 5, and an investigation over several months determined that the parents "withheld necessary and adequate medical attention."

'Where's Waldo' dank rodder arrested —Authorities say the convicted bank robber known as the "Where's Waldo Bandit" for

his striped sweater, black-framed glassesandbowl-cut haircut has been arrested on a bank robbery and probation violation warrant. Ryan Homsley, 32,wasarrested Tuesday nightatan Alohaaban-

doned homeafter a neighbor called 911. Aloha is anunincorporated community near Portland. Washington County sheriff's spokesman

Sgt. Bob Raysays that Homsley appeared ill when hewas arrested and was taken to the hospital. Raysaid Homsley was released into the custody of U.S. Marshals and transferred to the Justice Center Jail in Portland, where he was booked into custody at 12:20 p.m.

Wednesday. — From wire reports

logic."

Weekly Arts Br Entertainment Inside hG i G A ZBiE

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M edford M a y o r Gar y Wheeler said the city is still waiting for a response regarding letters it sent to the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs expressing concern a bout the impacts to the local water system, storm drains, sewers, traffic, parks, fire, police and other emergency services.

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the distribution of marijuana to minors, and preventing SALEM — The top federal salesrevenue from going to prosecutor in Oregon said criminal enterprises, gangs Thursday that new U.S. Jus- and cartels. tice Department guidance on Federal authorities said marijuana won't require any they won't interfere with the changes in the state. state laws seeking to regulate U.S. Attorney A m anda legal marijuana as long as the Marshall said her staff redrug is kept away from kids, viewed marijuana prosecu- the black market and federal tions over the past two years property. and said all of the cases would Oregon allows marijuana have gone forward under the use with a doctor'srecomnew federal rules. mendation, and lawmakThe Justice Department ers voted this year to permit on Thursday outlined eight stores where medical maripriorityareas for its enforce- juana cardholders can buy ment of marijuana laws. The the drug. measuresinclude preventing Some advocates are also The Associated Press

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State trooperwounded, mOtOriStdieSin gLin battle The Associated Press P ORTLAND — A m a n pulled over for a traffic violation on Interstate 84 east of The Dalles shot and wounded an Oregon state trooper, who returned fir e T h ursday, an Oregon State Police spokesman said. The motorist drove another half mile and died. The 26-year-old trooper, w ho has w orked fo r t h e state police for five years, was treated at a hospital for a gunshot wound to his side, said Lt . G r egg H a stings, who described the trooper's wound as minor. It w a s n't im m e diately

clear whether the motorist was struck by the trooper's bullets or shot himself, Hastings said. An autopsy was

planned. Neither man was immediately identified after the afternoon gun battle. Three juveniles in the car with the motorist were unhurt and were taken to The Dalles for interviews, Hastings said. The trooper had gotten out of his patrol car after stopping the man for an unspecified traffic v i olation. The driver got out of his vehicle and shot at the trooper, who fired back, Hastings said.

The City of Bend and BendPark 8tRecreation District Mirror Pond Ad Hoc Committee is seeking citizen members to serve on this committee. This short-term committee's role is to address issues facing the future of Mirror Pond. II

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To apply, submit a letter of interest to: Jim Figurski, Landscape Architect, email: JimLebendparksandrec.org Or mail to: Bend Park 5 Recreation District, 799 SWColumbia St., Bend, OR97702 For more information, visit or call

www.MirrorPondBend.com (541) 706-6152


B4

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

The Bulletin

EDITORIALS

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involves dry details best left to planning experts, think again. It's really about how and where — and maybe how fast — Bend will grow. It's likely to reignite the slow growth-fast growth conflict that has bedeviled the city's politics for decades. One big change: The city wants to get lots of people involved, ensuring that a variety of viewpoints will be aired. That's a good idea, but it won't work if only the usual suspects speak up. It's time for wider involvement from people who might not think of themselves that way. Under Oregon law, the UGB is the limit beyond which the city can't develop. No houses or businesses or sewer lines allowed. The boundaries are periodically expanded if the city can prove the need to the state. The city started working on the current expansion effort in 2004 and took five years to submit a plan to the state that called for adding 8,500 acres. The state took only one year to reject it, and the city now faces an extended deadline of 2017 to submit a revision. Meanwhile, as the economy

slowly recovers from the Great Recession, development pressures are mounting. Too tight a limit on developable land can distort property values, creating artificial price hikes. Some believe in-fill development within existing boundaries is the answer for residential development. Others disagree. But there's little dispute that industrial land is in severely short supply. The new plan must address some big issues, including updating data included in the earlier draft and incorporating plans for the expansion of Oregon State University-Cascades Campus. And it must do it efficiently. To that end, planners are considering forming several citizen advisory groups to research and make recommendations. The City Council will likely be asked in mid-September to seek consultants for this outreach and planning process. Keeping those consultant costs under control is crucial, but so is citizen input and speedy resolution of the boundary question. Involvement from open-minded residents could help move the process beyond the familiar rigid divide.

Lifeline not likely asvoters ponder levy inCurry County urry County commissioners agreed earlier this month to ask voters again for money to finance public safety services in the county, including sheriff, district attorney, jail and juvenile. The county is running out of money, with no clear prospect for help apparent. The November ballot will include a three-year local option levy for sheriff, jail, juvenile and district attorney services. The current proposal would raise $1.35 per $1,000 of taxable property value in the county, down about 60 cents per $1,000 from the levy that was defeated in May. The decision for voters no doubt will be difficult. The county's current tax rate of 59 cents per $1,000 is the second lowest in the state, and by that measure the proposed increase is large. Meanwhile, at 10.6 percent, the county's unemployment rate is well above the 8 percent state average.The percentage of the county population that is retired, 28, is more than double the statewide average,according to the Oregon Employment Department. Those two numbers add up to a substantial portion of the popu-

C

lation that may be predisposed to vote against any tax increase. There are other problems as well. Several other money measures, including a bond proposal for a new county hospital and city measures in Gold Beach and Port Orford, raisethe odds against each oneof them. And voters may well be hanging on to the idea that once again the federalgovernment will step in with at least some assistance. Another levy failure wouldn't end life as the residents of Curry County know it, of course. The governor could step in, though all three county commissioners have opposed that, and they must sign off on the idea if it is to happen. State intervention almost certainly would raise taxes without a vote of the people, however. Some services residents rely on could disappear. If voters are inclined to hold out for a better deal or for more help from somewhere else, they're likely in for a disappointment. Now the County Commission, including the one member who voted against the measure because she disagreed with a November election, will have to persuade Curry County's residents of that unhappy reality.

M IVickel's Worth America is not color blind

wagon questioning aObamacare.n of people's yard debris, grass, hay, Alas, many working-class jobs no tree limbs and piles of gravel. Other longer offer health care benefits. items include: glass bottles, cans, As well, part-time workers, people plastic laundry jugs, paper trash, laid off by no fault of their own and tires, appliances, couches, a dresser the unemployed lack the advantage and a boat. The prize winner was of healthcare plans. These people a garbage bag full of kitchen trash often put themselves and their chiland a dead chicken dropped off by dren at risk by avoiding the cost of a row of community mailboxes. The a doctor visit and go without necesstench was so bad that I avoided sary medications. picking up my mail for days. Some Why are we the only developed nice person ended up disposing of country in the world that does not it, probably because they could not offer some sort of national health stand the smell either. plan? People, dispose of your garbage I have three questions for Costa: appropriately either at the dump, 1. Does he think Sweden, Canada the transfer station or get garbage or Britain would trade their national service. It's really not that expen- health programs for the expensive sive! You are littering our roads out mess we have? of pure disrespectfor others and 2. Do health insurance companies, laziness. which often deny legitimate claims, Our roads are public property, deserve their massive profits? and littering is against the law. If 3. Is health care in a wealthy counyou get caught, you will be turned try like ours a right or a privilege? in and fined. As a Bend resident for Obamacare has passed and been 30 years, I see this problem getting upheld by the Supreme Court. Let's worse. give it a chance. We all, as members of this comRick Burns munity, need to take responsibilBend ity and accountability for our trash and stop making it everyone else's Use turn signals problem. Jill Blume Bravo to Ross Flavel's view printBend ed Aug. 15 in regard to the use, or lack of, turn signals. May I suggest that it be reprinted Questions for Costa on the front page in bold letters? Editor John Costa writes about However, I fear that those who do his concerns about entering the not use turn signals do not read the "brave new world of A f f ordable paper and may not see the error of Health Care" from the point of view their ways. of someone with good health insurSandy Chester ance. He piles on the sagging bandBend or dumped on the side. This consists

I beg to differ with Jude Fulghum in her piece, "America is not color blind." I was born and r aised in t h e South, am very proud of my Southern heritage and have been fortunate enough to live in many different states. There are many states above the Mason-Dixon line where racism is prevalent today. Even in our black communities, a black person of lighter skin is not treated the same as a black person of dark skin, nor do they think of themselves as equal with darker-skinned people. All one has to do is listen to conversations. People tend to reveal themselves and who they truly are in thousands of little ways. Don't paint us all with the same brush. I can honestly say I have friends of many colors, and can honestly say the color of their skin is not the first thing to come to mind when I think of that person. It's their character, their honesty, their integrity, their kindness and the list goes on — but color is certainly far down the list. Brenda Morris Terrebonne

Take care of your own trash I am writing this letter out of great concernoverthe increasing amount of unruly, blatant garbage dumping on Alfalfa Market Road. Every morning when I am driving to work, I see a new pile of trash on the road

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U.S. Senate'S immigratiOn legiSlatiOn hurtS COuntry'S unemPIOyed By David Olen Cross regon U.S. Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden joining the Gang of Eight in the passage of Senate Bill 744, termed comprehensive immigration reform by some, amnesty by others, is unconscionable legislation considering the United States' seasonally adjusted July number of 12.1 million unemployed citizens; 7.4 percent of the country's civilian labor force. According to the "Feb. 1, 2011, Pew Hispanic Center, Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010," there are 8 mill ion unauthorized workers in t h e U.S. With so many unemployed American citizens looking for jobs and 8 million unauthorized workers currently holding the jobs many citizens will do, the U.S. Senate's legislation at best seems oblivious to the plight of the unemployed in this country. Two of the negative consequences

During the summer congressional recess, when Merkley and Wyden of SB 744 are reveled in a June 2013 returnto Oregon, the senators should Congressional Budget Office report take a look at the number of unemthat indicates the legislation will ployed in the state and unemploycause unemployment to increase ment numbers of the individual counthrough 2020 and average wages to ties they choose to visit across the decline through 2025. state. An evaluation of the seasonally adThe Oregon Department of Emjusted unemployment numbers from ployment reported 158,645 citizens a Bureau of L abor Statistics/U.S. were unemployed in July; the state Department of Labor news release ranked 10th, tied with Arizona for from Aug. 19 titled "Regional and the percentageofunemployed. State Employment and UnemployLocally, Deschutes County's 7,240 ment — July" reveals unemployment unemployed in July equated to 10 perrates in the states represented by the cent of the county's work force; 4.6 Gang of Eight plus their two Orego- percent of the state's unemployed. nian senatorial sidekicks: Oregon, Including Deschutes, 28 of 36 Or8 percent;Arizona, 8 percent; Colo- egon counties (77.8 percent of the rado, 7.1 percent; Florida, 7.1 percent; state's counties) in July had a higher Illinois, 9.2 percent; New Jersey, 8.6 u nemployment rate than th e n a percent; New York, 7.5 percent; and tionalaverage of 7.4 percent: Baker, South Carolina, 8.1 percent. Six 9.4 percent; Columbia, 8.2 percent; of the preceding eight states had a Coos, 10.2 percent; Crook, 12.6 perhigher percentage of unemployed cent; Curry, 10.6 percent; Douglas, 11 than the national average. percent;Grant, 12.2 percent;Harney,

IN MY VIEW

12.9 percent; Jackson, 9.8 percent; Jefferson, 10.8 percent; Josephine, 11.3 percent; Klamath, 10.9 percent; Lake, 11.9 percent; Lane, 8 percent; Lincoln, 8.4 percent; Linn, 10 percent; Malheur, 8.7percent; Marion, 8.6 percent; Morrow, 8.8 percent; Polk, 7.9 percent; Sherman, 7.6 percent; Tillamook, 7.6 percent; Umatilla, 8.4 percent; Union, 8.3 percent; Wallowa, 10percent; Wasco, 7.5 percent; and Yamhill, 7.7 percent. Thirteen of the preceding counties had doubledigit unemployment. Back to the Pew Hispanic Center report: According to the Pew report, there are an estimated 110,000 unauthorized workers in Oregon. If SB 744 is passed by both sides of Congress and signed into law by the president, the addition of 110,000 unauthorized workers into the state's civilian labor force, if the CBO report is right, will likely increase unemployment in Oregon. This would be a setback for a state

strugglingto recover from a severe recession. The U.S. House of Representatives will hopefully take a more incremental approach to any type of immigration reform and first pass stand-alone legislation requiring a federally mandated national employment verification system like E-verify, which the federal government currently uses on all its new hires. During the congressionalrecess, Oregon's 158,645 unemployed U.S. citizens should contact Merkley and Wyden, along with C ongressman Greg Walden, and tell them Oregonians should never have to compete for scarcejobs now or in the future with illegal alien workers; and furthermore, the U.S. Congress passing a standalone federally mandated E-Verify system is best way to get those unemployed in the state and across the country back to full-time employment. — David Oien Cross livesin Salem.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

BS

WEST NEWS

Rim Fire slowsfor secondday in a row

BITUARIES

By Mike Rosenberg San Jose Mercury News

DEATH NOTICES De Etta "Dee" Yvonne Mason, of Bend

C.L. "Butch" Downs, of La Pine

Sept. 8, 1917 - Aug. 25, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private family gathering will be held later.

Nov. 9, 1932-Aug. 18, 2013 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A riverside service will be held sometime in Oct. at Brown's Mt. Crossing.

Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Vincent "Vince" Lavios, Jr., of Bend Mar. 23, 1932 - Aug. 22, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private Celebration of Life Gathering for family and close friends will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Judith "Jude" Louise Anders-Gilbert, of Redmond Feb. 27, 1951 - Aug. 26, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private Celebration of Life gathering will be held at her home at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

OLCC

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They maybesubmitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits©bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

A fter b attling t h e R i m Fire in and around Yosemite National Park for nearly two weeks, firefighters were buoyed to see the blaze slow for the second day in a rowbut they have not yet declared victory. The fire spread at about 300 acres an hour Thursday, though planned burnouts in Yosemite pushed numbers higher inthe afternoon after the number of acresbarely budged overnight. By sundown, the inferno reached nearly 200,000 acres to become the fifth-largest blaze in 81 years of California recordedfire history,surpassing the 2007 Witch Fire in San Diego County, which destroyed 1,650 structures and killed two people. But the growth was still far below the explosive rate seen last week, when the fire was spreading at 3,000 acres an hour during its apex. Fire containment grew to 32 percent, up from 30 percent,and the

Deadlines:Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and by 4:30 p.m. Friday for Sunday publication. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by1 p.m. Friday for Sunday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Mail:Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

*.

g

'

Derek RosenI sonora Union Democrat

evacuation advisories were lifted Thursday for nearby Tuolumne City and two small communities: S o u lsbyville and Willow Springs. Cal Fire says the cooling temperatures, rising humidity and constant work from 4,900 firefighters to dig dirt lines to

contain the fire all combined to help slow the flames. Still, temperatures were expected to rise again Friday, with the humidity forecast to drop, said Cal Fire spokesman Daniel Berlant. That would make it easier for the flames to spread and could

ployee's ability to do the job, and he was denied full employment on April 24. Scott said the employee left, saying he was going directly to the Bend Police Department to file the report. Carney said a night officer received the report on April 29. The officer, who was not named, did not think much of the report, according to Carney.

Carney saiddetectives were given the report after The Continued from B1 Oregonian contacted the de"One sidesaid the recorder partment for comment on the came from her lap out of sight case. and theother said the recordM ajor cr imes w i l l t a k e er was on the table the whole p recedent over th e O L CC time," Scott said. case, Carney said, but he preScott said the OLCC met dicts the investigation could with a labor union on Feb. 19 be handed to the Deschutes to discuss the incident and the County District A t t orney's issue of recording staff during office as soon as two weeks meetings. from now. "Because o f con c erns "Graveyard (shifts) make it It's not the first problem for Bend's regional OLCC office. brought up, we agreed to an- hard for those guys to follow nounce verbally any time we up on reports," he said. "It's a In 2 0 09 , t h e n -regional intend to record a meeting," short time period, and we get manager Jason Evers was the she said. a lot of calls." subjectof great ire from area Scott said the employee The report remained dor- bars that claimed he was unwho filed the report was in mant until Th e O regonian fairly targeting them. Eventuthe midst of a one-year proba- received tw o a n o n ymous ally, the Oregon Department tionary service to test the em- tips over the past two weeks. of Justicelaunched an inves-

DEATHS

Bruce Murrayco-founded ThePlanetary Society

ELSEWHERE

The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Former Jet Propulsion Laboratory director Bruce Murray, who battled Washington and NASA over money, projects and policy, has died. He was 81. Murray died at his home in Oceanside, Calif., early Thursday, said Charlene Anderson, a longtime friend and former colleague at t h e P l anetary Society. In 1980, Murray co-founded The Planetary Society with the late astronomer Carl Sagan and astronautics engineer Louis Friedman as part of the quest to save JPL and the planetary exploration program. "Bruce was an extremely strong personality, but brilliant. I worked with a lot of smart people in my time at the Planetary Society, but Bruce's mind was the mind I admired most for the way he could slice through a problem," Anderson said. "He was forceful and

dynamic." Murray took over JPL in 1976 when the Viking program was putting landers on Mars, Voyager was touring the solar system and the Apollo

program was winding down. According to JPL, Murray disagreed with NASA's focus on the search for life during

Jet Propulsion Laboratoryvia The AP

Former Jet Propulsion Laboratory Director Bruce Murray died early Thursday of Alzheimer's disease. Murray "was a pioneer and undisputed leader in unmanned spaceexploration," saidDave Stevenson, a Caltech

professor of planetary science. the Viking missions to Mars. He said it was premature because the craft's biological instruments would not provide adequate results. As it turned out, that was right and probably helped him get the job at JPL when William Pickering retired. Before taking the job at JPL, Murray took a sabbatical from the California Institute of Technology, which manages JPL, to read up on management and

March 28, 1928 —August 22,2013 Myrtle was called to be with the Lord tu the age of 85. Her greatest gift was the love she had for all. Born in Saddletree, N.C. as a member of the Lumbee tribe, she was a proud American Indian known as "Princess Bright Star". A talented doll maker/restorer, seamstress, and musician, she was known as themnat lady" at the Foundry Church

which she attended for over 20years. Sheis survived by her husband Roy Highland, children Bill Hosier (Debbie), Joni Shoemaker (Doug), Peggy Sweet (Mark), Sam Hosier III (Cassandra), stepson Roger Highland (Jackie), 8 siblings, 13 grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren plus a very large number of extended family members, all whom loved her dearly. She was preceded in death by her parents, a brother, her first husband Sam Hosier Jr., and a step-son. Memorial services will be held on Saturday August 31st at 2p.m. at the Foundry Church, 205 NW Irving Ave. Bend, Oregon. Myrtle will be greatly missed by everybody who knew her. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you make a donation in her name to the local hospice Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, Oregon 97701

partnersbend.org

came back convinced that to survive, the laboratory would have to embrace change, said colleague John Casani, who is now retired, but was the project manager on the Voyager, Galileo and Cassini missions, and later chief engineer at JPL. Murray ran into a lot of internal opposition because of that thinking, Casani said. "Bruce Murray was a pioneer and undisputed leader in unmanned space exploration," said Dave Stevenson, a Caltech professor of planetary science. In fact, Stevenson said, Murray was named Caltech's first planetary science professor in 1963. As NASA focused on the space shuttle program and low-Earth-orbit c a pabilities, it cut back on the planetary

director in 1982, returning to the department he started at Caltech. JPL said Murray was able to salvage the Galileo mission to Jupiter, but lost the American half of the two-satellite International Solar Polar Mission, which wa s u l timately launched with J P L i n s truments as the European Space shuttleDiscovery. A proposed mission to Halley's comet was also dropped. Murray was able to obtain the American portion of the joint U.S.-Netherlands-United Kingdom infrared astronomy satellite to JPL, and Caltech gained the project's science data center. Shortly after he got to JPL, Murray set up a n a dvisory council for w omen because there werehardly any female engineers. Murray is survived by his wife, Suzanne, and five children: Steve in Nevada, Peter in Oregon, Christine in Maryland, Allison in California and Jonathan in Tennessee.

program. Murray was able to start a solar energy research project for the Department of Energy, a study that was abruptly ended in 1981. Murray stepped down as

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Deaths of note from around the world: Anthony Pawson, 60: Canadian cell biologist whose insights about how cells communicate with one another resolved one ofscience's oldest mysteriesand helped develop a class of drugs that target cancer,diabetes and other diseases. Died Aug. 7 in Toronto. — From wire reports

tigation into Bend-area OLCC enforcement, a report found the OLCC had been "overzealous" in its enforcement, and Evers was transferred to the OLCC's Nyssa office. Less than a year later, Evers was jailed for identity theft and providing false information on a passport. Eventually, Evers was revealed to be a Bulgarian national named Doitchin Krastev who h ad s tolen the identity of a 3 year-old Ohio boy who was kidnapped and murdered in 1982. Krastev was deported to Bulgaria last year. — Sheila G. Millercontributed to this report. — Reporter: 541-383-0348, bandersen@bendbulletin.com

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Myrtle Lee (Hosier) Highland

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A DC-10 drops retardant as firefighters combat the Rim Fire near Yosemite on Monday afternoon. The massive wildfire slowed for the second day in a row Thursday.

FEATURED OBITUARY

By Sue Manning

~

e xhaust firefighters in t h e field, he said. Dick Fleishman, a spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service, which i s l eading the response with Cal Fire, said all it would take for the fire to explode again is to reach the base of a hill, where it can race upward or into a canyon that would act like a chimney. " That p otential i s s till out there," Fleishman said. "There's a lot of work that still needs to be done." The estimate for full containment of the blaze was p ushed back from t w o t o three weeks. The Rim Fire is named for the Rim of the World vista point off Highway 120 west of Yosemite, close to where the blaze first sparked. It now has cost $47 million to fight. The Yosemite Conservancy announced it was launching a fundraising campaign to help restore trails and lost habitat in the tens of thousands of acres in the park that have been burnedsince the fire began on Aug. 17.

A mind-blowing deal!

In Memory of BerniceB Black N0V. 8, 1920 — AuguSt 24, 2013 BerniceBrough Black wasborn Nov. 8, 1920 in Tremonton, UT to Owen L Brough and Ivy DoraToone Brough. She was the fourth of sevenchildren,fourboysand three girls. She and herbrothers and sisters wereraised on the family dairy farm. Even though she grew upon a dairy, she proudly remarked that shenever learned to milk a cow as she hadbrothers and sisters who ' knewhowtodothat. Bernicegraduated from Utah State University in 1944 with a Bachelor of Science degreein Education majoring in PE and minoring in Physiology andMusic. Music was in her life from the time she was very youngand she would continue to sing attd perform in church and in the communities she lived in, therest ofher life. While going to school at Utah State, she met her future husband, Harold Black. They were married Oct. 15, 1944, while Harold was stationed on Bermuda Island, United Kingdom during WWIL They had two daughters, Suzann Greenwood of Bend, Cyndy Armour (husband, Phil) of Prineville. Bernice also had one grandson, Brandon Follose (wife, Miranda) and one great-granddaughter, Samantha of Bend.Bernice always said it's the quality not the quantity that counts.

sernice was a member of the Church ofJesusChrist of Latter-day Saints. She served her whole life in positions ofservice to her church. Bernice and Harold weremarried again, this time, for time and all eternity itt the Logan Utah Temple in 1945 when they got back to the states from Bermuda. She and Harold serveda mission for their church in Houston Texas, after their respective retirements. Bernice was a schoolteacher, librarian, clerk typist and secretary as she followed Harold while he served in the military and as he pursued his education. While living in Pocatello, Idaho attd then Bend,Oregon, Bernice was able to do what she loved best — teach. Bernicetaught at Juniper Elementary in Bend for 16years before her retirement in 1983. Bernice loved to travel, play golf, garden, hike and entertain. Her love of travel took her and Harold to the countries of the Far East, Middle East, Europe, Hawaii, Mexico and many more. Bernice and Harold belonged to Juniper Golf Club of Redmond. They both played golf into their 80's. Bernice is survived by her husband, Harold, her two daughters, Suzatttt and Cyndy, son-in-law, Phil, grandson, Brandort, his wife Miranda and their daughter, Samantha. She is also survived by her older sister, Augusta, one older brother, Owen Ir., and one younger brother, Bob and numerous nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held Saturday, August 31, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. at theLDS church at60800 Tekampe Rd.,Bend, OR. The family wishes to thank Hospice Housein Bend for the love, care and compassionthey showed Bernice while In their care. In lieu of flowers, consider donating in her name to Partners In Care/Hospice Houseof Bend.


B6 T H E BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

W EAT H E R Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central, LP ©2013.

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Today:2 Mostly sunny

Tonight: Mostly clear.

80 WEST Partly to mostly cloudy with rain far northwest.

As t o ria 68/55

UmatiUa

Hood

Seasideo 66/54 • Cannon each

TS/SJ

72/55

Higsboro POrtland 77/60

• C 79/57 z g/57 McMinnville

76/55

Lincoln City 66/55

Biggs

,

smse

Sandy

76/57

• Hermiston 85/57

Dages sz,sg ~d krlington 81/59 86/sg • oWasco

~

80/54

83/57

Wallowa • PendletOn ze/44 • Enterprisq 85/53 • Meacham 80/47

Ruggs

Maupin

Government

Wigowdale

80/56

Eugene•

Florence•

Valeo

92/63

Ham lmon

Coos Bay

Crescento • CreSCent Lake

72/54 •

Roseburg

70/52

• Fort Rock sgos

78/38

71/44

o Bandon

Chemult

79/37

83/58

I

•R RI

82/42

85/50

Frenchglen •

89/53

Rome

82/50

Chiloquin

M dferd

+

• 36'

• sg/58•

• Rrooldngs

Ashiand

Fields•

• Lakeview

FalIS s»oe

3/53 ~

67/55

~

Klamath Falls .. 83/54/000 ....82/46/s ... 87/44/s Lakeview...... 82/36/0.00 ....82/48/s..... 87/48/s La Pine.........80/81/NA....79/40/pc.....84/42/pc Medford.......89/62/0.00....89/58/pc......92/59/s Newport.......66/61/0.37.....64/53/c.....65/53/pc North Bend......77/61/NA....71/55/pc.....65/55/pc Ontario........96/60/0.00.....90/62/s......92/61/s Pendleton......89/58/0.00.....85/53/s......88/55/s Portland .......80/65/0.38....77/60/pc......86/62/s Prineville.......82/56/0.00....80/48/pc.....85/52/pc Redmond.......84/56/0.00.....81/50/s......86/52/s Roseburg.......84/65/0.04....83/58/pc.....87/59lpc Salem ....... 80/65/019 ...80/57/pc ... 87/58/s Sisters.........81/56/0.00....78/45/pc.....83/47/pc The DaRes......84/69/0.01 .....81/59/s......89/61/s

Ontario McDermitt

90/57

Lakeview

89/51

82/4 8

, a "7 0/54 ,"" 6 xxxi t "

(intthe48 (' contiguous states):

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82/63 •

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Death Valley, Calif.

WI

92/64

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69/57

Two Harbors, M'inn.

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5 ++ . • + +~ ~ J ~ + ~t ~ ~ n oronto 82/61 Green'8'ay 89/66o N 85/64 L " ,+) ( • . i i, etroit~ ~ g Buffalo 83/68 x 87/yt •

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Cheyenne

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93/62 ~

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Sait Lake

« 75/ 5

Halifax

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77/54

96/70".

Lakeview, Ore. • 2.36 w

+

Thunder Bay Ciiiiiii » » »

Bismarck

180S 96/59

77/60

• 36'

Winnipeg

79/55

f 7OS

8'H'ngs

ortland~

0

lll

S eattlb xx '75/60

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(calgary 5 k too

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100/7J cMcag - '. Cotumbus

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77/62

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78/67

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2/ +xe v e 8 e e x Albuquerque Oklahoma City +++ e e • 9000 98/7S•

LosAngel • 77/70

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BS/69 ittle RoclM~Nashvtll'e ~ ~ 95 / 73. 96/74 9~

,, Phoenix

• Dallas 104/7

TiJuana 4 84/66

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ap khthuahua

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Birming rli ' 8 8/73

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9 2/72

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Houston

x

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rlando

50s

Anchorage

a Paz 8 87/76

61750

Juneau 63/51

~A LAS KA

27 / 4

B S/67 • Miami 91/78

40s

t t+ + + + - - -

M o nterrey 99/72• - Mazatlan ' • • .88/79~q+

CONDITIONS FRONTS Cold

• 1 I V I TI A V

WATER REPORT

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as Redmond/Madras.......High Prineviae.........................High a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Mod. = Moderate; Exi. = Extreme

Reservoir Acre feet C a p acity Crane Prairie...... . . . . . . 29,931...... 55,000 Wickiup...... . . . . . . . . . . 56,644..... 200,000 Crescent Lake..... . . . . . . 61,633.... . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir 1 2 601 47 0 0 0 The higher the UV Index number, the greater Prineville...... . . . . . . . . . 97,222..... 153,777 the need for eye and skin protection. Index is R iver flow St at i o n Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie ...... . 216 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup .... . . . . . . 1,210 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake ...... . 140 L OW MEDIUM H l tz Little DeschutesNear La Pine ...... . . . . . . . 214 0 2 4 6 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend .... . . . . . . . . . 354 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls ..... . . . . 1,758 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res..... . . . . . NA Crooked RiverBelow Prinevige Res..... . . . . 218 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow OchocoRes. .... . . . . . 3.07 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne ..... . . . . . . 214 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 MEDIUM or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 7

IPOLLEN COUNT LOW0

TRAVELERS' FORECAST NATIONAL

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Yesterday's weather through 4 p.m. inBend High/Low.............. 84/53 24 hours endmg 4 p.m.*. . 0.00" Recordhigh........95m1998 Monthtodate.......... 0.39" Recordlow......... 28in1969 Average monthtodate... 0.45" Average high.............. 78 Year to date............ 3.58" Average low .............. 44 Average year to date..... 6.73" Barometricpressureat 4 p.m30.02 Record 24 hours ...0.42 in1953 *Melted liquid equivalent

Legend Wweather, Pcp precipitation,s sun,pcpartial clouds,c clouds,h haze,shshowers, r rain,t thunderstorms,sf snowflurries,snsnow, i-ice, rs-rain-snowmix,w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle,tr-trace

INATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS

Y esterday s extremes

TEM P ERATURE PRECIPITATION

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury....6:59 a.m...... 8:03 p.m. Venus......9:55 a.m...... 9:05 p.m. Mars.......3:16 a.m...... 6:13 p.m. Jupiter......1 48 a.m...... 5 03 p.m. Satum.....l1;30 a.m.....10:02 p.m. Uranus.....8:49 p.m...... 9:28 a.m.

FIRE INDEX

Astoria ........67/62/0.80....68/55/sh.....71/55/pc Baker City......93/47/0.00.....85/46/s.....87/50/pc Brookings......64/61/0.07.....67/55/c.....61/54/pc Burns..........89/44/0.00.....84/46/s......88/48/s

• 96'

90/51

Paisley

PLANET WATCH

F r i day S a turdayBend, westof Hwy 97....High Sisters.............................High H i / Lo/W H i /Lo/WBend,eastofHwy.97.....High La Pine..............................High

City Precipitationvaluesare24-hour totals through4 p.m.

Yesterday's state extremes

Jordan Valley

83/42

Grants~

67/54

78 51

Eugene........82/62/0.08....80/55/pc......86/55/s

ll

83/50

l.ake ss/52

HIGH LOW

81 52

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

sg/63

Juntura

84/46

Chr i stmas Valley

Slve i r

Port Orford

• eg/54

HIGH LOW

85 54

OREGON CITIES

Nyssa

Partly cloudy

HIGH LOW

Pi •

Partly cloudy

85 55

Sunsettoday...... 7 44 p.m N ew First F ull Sunrise tomorrow .. 6:28 a.m Sunset tomorrow... 7:42 p.m Moonrise today....1:03 a.m Moonsettoday ....4:10 p.m Sept.5 Sept.12 Sept.19 Sept.26

EAST Mostly sunny and warm.

Is

HIGH LOW

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE Sunrisetoday...... 627 a.m Moon phases

pleasant.

80/47

83/si

Grande

Q

83/54

CENTRAL Partly cloudy and

1,

80/55 Union

ondon

80/57•

76/ 4 2

i La Grande•

Camp 64/5i

Salem

86/58

River Th

I s

Mostly sunny

BEND ALMANAC

IFORECAST: STATE

Tigamook•

Sunny.

3

LOW

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: +++ + 4 4 4 .* * * * * • ++++' 4 d 4 d ' * * * * * + ++ x 4 x * +

W ar m Stationary Showers T-storms Rain

Br • I ~

A V I

2013

K 1~

F l urries Snow

%T I • I H

Ice

J V

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX......97/70/0.00..99/74/pc100/74/pc Grand lapids....87/64/0.00...87/69/t...85/68/t RapidCity.......95/69/0.00..96/70/pc .. 87/63/s Savannah.......94/72/0.00... 90/74/t...89/75/t Akron..........84/70/000 ..86/68/pc...85/68/t GreenBay.......86/66/000...85/64/t. 80/65/pc Reno...........92/56/000...91/60/s .. 92/62/s Seattle..........75/66/033 ..75/60/sh.. 80/60/s Albany..........79/64/000 ..83/66/pc...83/67/t Greensboro......87/73/0 00 ..86/67/pc. 86/68/pc Richmond.......87/73/000..85/67/pc. 89/71/pc SiouxFalls.......91/69/000...90/65/s...90/65/t Albuquerque.....85/70/000 ..90/70/pc. 92/70/pc Harnsburg.......82/70/0.00 ..84/66/pc. 85/68/pc Rochester, NY....84/64/0.00 ..86/68/pc...83/65/t Spokane........84/61/0.00... 80/54/s .. 86/53/s Anchorage......56/51/016...61/50/c...59/50/r Hartford,CT.....78/66/000..82765/pc.82/68/pc Sacramento......91/62/0.00...97/64/s .. 94/61/s Springfield, MO ..94/70/0.00..95/72/pc.. 94/72/s Atlanta.........92/72/0.00... 88/73/t...87/70/t Helena..........91/54/0.00 ..88/55/pc .. 85/53ls St. Louis.........97/75/0.00..97/75/pc. 97774/pc Tampa..........93/76/0.00... 91/76/t...89/77/t Atlantic City.....79/68/000 ..79/69/pc.82/71/pc Honolulu........88/72/0 04... 89/76/s.. 89/76/s Salt Lake City....97/71/000 ..96/72/pc. 94771/pc Tucson..........87/73/012... 93/75/t. 95/76/pc Austin.........101/70/000102/76/pc100/75/pc Houston ........98/76/000..95775/pc.96/75/pc SanAntonio....100/767000..99/75/pc. 99776/pc Tulsa...........98/78/000 100/76/pc101/75/pc Baltimore .......86/72/0.00 ..85/68/pc. 88/71/pc Huntsville.......94/67/0.00...94/71/l...93/71It SanDiego.......87/69/000..82/73/pc. 78/68/pc Washington, DC..87/73/000 ..86/71/pc. 88/73/pc Bigings.........89/62/0.00 ..96/59/pc.. 85/51/s Indianapolis.....90/72/0.00... 92/72/t...90/73/t SanFrancisco....74/61/000...74/59/s .. 72/58/s Wichita.........99/72/000..99/77/pc101/74/pc Birmingham .. 91/70/000... 92/72/t. 93/72/pc Jackson, MS.... 93/66/002. 95/72/pc. 96/73/pc SanJose..... 81/63/000 .. 82/61/s 79/60/s Yakima.........86/61/004 82/55/s .. 86/59/s Bismarck........90/67/082..92/64/pc...87/57/t Jacksonvile......92/70/000...92/73/t...91/73/t SantaFe........88/60/000 ..85/60/pc.87/60/pc Yuma...........94/78/013... 96/79/t 1JI/Btlpc Boise...........97/72/000...88/56/s .. 88/57/s Juneau..........67/43/0.00... 63/51/r...58/51/r INTERNATIONAL Boston..........67/62/000 ..78/67/pc. 81/68/pc Kansas City......97/72/0.00 ..98/73/pc. 98/74/pc Bndgeport,CT....78/69/0.00..78/67/pc. 79/68/pc Lansing.........87/62/0.00 ..87/69/pc...85/67/t Amsterdam......73/54/000 ..72/63/sh 63/53/sh Mecca.........109/88/000 107/84/s. 107/84/s Buffalo.........86/64/000 ..83/68/pc...83/67/t Las Vegas.......98/81/000... 92/81/t...93/78/t Athens..........90/80/0.00... 93/72/s .. 83/69/s MexicoCity .....72/57/1 95... 72/54/t .. 70/57/t Burlington, VT....82/66/000... 84/65/t...84/69/t Lexington.......88/70/0 00 ..91/71/pc...89/73/t Auckland........52/46/000 ..55/50/pc.57/46/pc Montreal........75/61/000 ..79/63/pc .. 77/68/s Caribou,ME.....67/54/000..77/56/pc...75/55/t Lincoln..........9$68/000..98769/pc. 96/71/pc Baghdad.......109/82/0.00..112/91/s.116/92/s Moscow........68/54/0.00...70/54/s. 65/54/sh Charleston,SC ...95/74/0.00..88/72/pc. 88/75lpc Little Rock.......97/73/0.00..96774/pc.97/74/pc Bangkok........97/82/000 ..92/78/sh. 92/79/sh Nairobi.........70/54/000 ..75/58/pc. 74/54/sh Charlotte........93/73/000..85/69/pc...85/69/t LosAngeles......83/66/0 00..77/70/pc. 75/65/pcBeiyng..........84/68/000... 85/68/s. 90/65/pc Nassau.........88/81/000... 85/78/t. 85/80/pc Chattanooga.....93/72/0 00...93/72/t...90/71/t Louisville........94/75/000..94/75/pc...92/75/t Beirut..........88/7970 00... 88/75/s.. 87/73/s New Delhi.......93/73/0 00 .. 1 0/84/c 100/85/pc Cheyenne.......89/61/0.00..93/62/pc.89/55/pc Madison,Wl.....86/61/0.00...91/68/t. 85/66/pc Berlin...........75/507000...79/56/c.74/49lsh Osaka..........86/82/000 ..89777/sh...87777lr Chicago...... 88/66/0 00...91/74/t. 82/72/pc Memphis....... 94/73/0 00 96/75/pc 96/75/pc Bogota .........75/48/000...62/45lt...63/46/t Oslo............64/50/000 ..69754/sh. 67/42/sh Cincinnati.......86/66/0.00..92/73/pc...88/71/t Miami . . . . 91/77/0 00 91/78/t .89/80/t Budapest........75/597000..78/55/pc. 79760/pc Ottawa.........81/63/000..77/57/sh .. 75/59/s Cleveland.......82/73/0 00..83/70/pc...83/71/t Milwaukee......84/67/0 00...86/68/t. 80/68/pc BuenosAires.....77/57/000...71/50/s.. 73/55/c Paris............75/55/000...73/63/c.72/49/sh ColoradoSpnngs.91/61/000..89/63/pc. 87/60/pc Minneapolis.....95/75/0.03..89/66/pc. 89/68/pc CaboSanLucas ..86/757000.90/75/pc. 93779 / pc Rio de Janeiro....77/55/000... 75/59/s.. 7I61 Is Columbia,MO...97/69/000 ..98/73/pc.. 97/74/s Nashvige........95/74/0 00 ..95/73/pc...93/73/t Cairo...........99/75/000..102/72/s .. 98/70/s Rome...........82/66/000...81/70/c.. 85/70/s Columbia,SC....96/73/000 ..89/72/pc...88/72/t New Orleans.....89/71/0 00..92/75/pc. 92/77/pc Calgaiy.........82/54/0.00... 79/50/s.. 75/50/s Santiago........61/46/0.00... 63/52/c.61/54/pc Columbus, GA....95/73/0.00... 92/73/t...89/72/t NewYork.......80/71/0.00..81769/pc. 83/70/pc Cancun.........88/73/0.00... 87/78/t...88/79/t Sao Paulo.......73/52/0.00... 76/54/s .. 78/57/c Columbus, OH....86/71/000 ..90/70/pc. 87/71/sh Newark,NJ......79/71/000 ..82769/pc.85/70/pc Dublin..........70/57/000...63/44/c. 61/48/pc Sapporo ........63/61/000..71/62/sh. 73/61/sh Concord,NH.....66/62/0.00..81/60/pc...83/62/t Norfolk, VA......81/73/0.02..85767/pc. 88/71/pc Edinburgh.......64/54/000... 59/45/c .. 57/49/c Seoul...........79/73/000 77/66/sh. .. 82/68/sh Corpus Christi....97/76/000 ..91/77/pc. 89/78/pc Oklahoma City...98/71/0.00 ..98/75/pc. 100/76/s Geneva.........72/55/0.00 ..77/55/pc.73/53/pc Shanghai........99/81/0.00 ..88/72/sh. 82/73/pc DallasFtWorth..l02/76/000 104/78/pc103/78/pc Omaha.........98/74/0 00... 98/69/t. 95/72/pc Harare..........75/55/000 ..79/54/pc. 85/57/pc Singapore.......88/79/000 ..88/79/sh. 90/79/sh Dayton .........85/68/0.00..90/71/pc.87/70/sh Orlando.........92/73/0.00...92/74/t...91/75/t HongKong......93/81/000..86/78/sh. 86/77/sh Stockholm.......66/50/000..66/50/sh.67/49/sh Denver....... 95/65/000 ..96/66/pc.94/63/pc PalmSprings.... 98/85/0.00... 99/80/t101/79/pc Istanbul.........88/73/000..84/68/pc.77770/pc Sydney..........75/63/000...81/56/s.74/58/pc DesMoines......96/73/0.00..100/71/t. 94/71/pc Peoria..........88/71/0.00... 96/73/t. 92/71/pc lerusalem.......87/68/0.00...90/70/s .. 89/68/s Taipei...........84/77/0.00...86/74/c. 76/72/sh Detroit..........88/68/000..87/71/pc...86/69/t Philadelphia.....83/71/000..85/67/pc.85/71/pc Johannesburg....73/52/000...71/32/s .. 52/28/s Tel Aviv.........90/77/000...95/72/s .. 93/71/s Duluth..........76/67/041 ...77/61/t...76/62/t Phoenix.........99/81/000...97/84/t. 99/84/pc Uma...........64/57/000..71/61/pc .. 72/61/s Tokyo...........90/81/000..91/7ipc. 91/77/sh El Paso..........79/66/062...91/72/s .. 93/74/s Pittsburgh.......85/69/000 ..85/67/pc...84/67/t Lisbon..........88/63/000.. 91/67/s 91/66/s Toronto.........82/68/000 82/61/sh .. 79/63/s Fairhanks........56/49/000 ..56/38/sh. 55/38/pc Portland,ME.....68/64/0.00..77/62/pc. 79/64/pc London.........75/59/000...72/62/c.68/47/pc Vancouver.......70/64/000..70/54/sh..70/55/s Fargo...........91/72/008..88/66/pc...87/60/t Providence ......70/64/0 00..78764/pc. 81/67/pc Madrid .........82/61/0.00... 85/60/s .. 89/62/s Vienna..........73/61/0.00... 78/62/s.79/59/pc Flagstaff ........75/52/0.68...71/59/t...72/55/t Raleigh.........87/75/0.00..86768/pc.89/70/pc Manila..........88/79/000..88/79/pc. 91/78/pc Warsaw.........73/52/000..74/56/pc. 73/58/sh

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IN THE BACI4: BUSINESS Ee MARIKT NE%S > Scoreboard, C2 Te n nis, C3 Sports in brief, C3 Golf, C3 MLB, C3

NFL, C4

© www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

TRIATHLON

Last chance to do MACDash If you are thinking

about signing up for this year's MAC Dash triathlon in Madras, do not delay. Registration for the popular sprint triathlon — participants swim 500 yards at the Madras Aquatic Center, bike12 miles and run

3 miles — closes on Sunday. Cost for individuals is

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Frost settles in asDucks' offensive coordinator • The reins ofOregon'sup-tempooffense havebeen handed over tothe former Nebraskaquarterback By Anne M. Peterson

Nextup at Oregon • When:

Saturday,

free Mini MAC Dash for children 10 years old

• Radio:

For more information,

EUGENE — It's true: Sometimes Scott Frost wants to just dash onto the field and run the play himself. Frost, the former Nebraska quarterback who led the Huskers to a share of the 1997 national championship, is settling into his role as offensive coordinator for No. 3 Oregon. Except for the fact that at times he needs to resist the urge to join in. "I don't think it ever leaves any of us who used to play," the 38-year-old Frost said. "Some of the guys who aren't around football every d ay after playing are a little bit luckier

Nicholls State

$55 per person or $45 per person for participants doing the raceas a team. There is also a and younger.

The Associated Press

1 p.m. • TV: Fox Sports1 KBND-AM 1110

go to www.roguemultisport.com. — Bulletin staff report

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

I think because they don't have to watch someone else doing it all the time. I'm mostly over it now, but there's still times I get out and throw with the quarterbacks. I miss the competition." Frost joined the Ducks' staff in 2009 as wide receivers coach under then-head coach Chip Kelly, architect ofOregon's speedy spread-option offense. Earlier this year Frost was promoted to offensive coordinator to replace Mark Helfrich, who was named head coach when Kelly left the Ducks for the NFL's Philadel-

phia Eagles. SeeDucks /C4

II

jlf Ted S. Warren l The Associated Press file

Scott Frost, right, was Oregon's wide receivers coach under former coach Chip Kelly; he has been promoted to offensive coordinator under new coach Mark Helfrich.

LOCAL GOLF

Patriot

No. 6 S. Carolina wins in opener

Gof Day

COLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina All-

American Jadeveon Clowney looked less than dominant against North Carolina, not that it mattered to him or the sixth-ranked Game-

• Bend's MadisonOdiornefinishes in atie for fourth at an elite junior tourney in Sunriver

cocks. Clowney shook off a

By Zack Hall

stomach virus earlier in the week — and some

SUNRIVER — Confidence can be elusive. But Bend's Madison Odiorne got a heap of it after finishing in the top five of the girls division Thursday at the Sunriver Junior Open. And so did the winners of the American • Results Junior Golf from the A s s o ciation AJGA tournament Sunriver — Jennifer Yu, Junior of Huntington Open,C2 Be a ch, Calif., and Henry Lee, of Coquitlam, British Columbia — both of whom earned their first-ever A JGA wins. Odiorne got to 2 under par forthe day early to creep close to the leaders before settling for a 1-over-par 72 for the final round on a breezy afternoon on Sunriver's Meadows course. That put her at7 over forthe 54-hole tournament and in a tie for fourth place, five shots behind Yu. Not bad for her first AJGA appearance. "I'm very happy with the way I played," Odiorne said. "I came in thinking no expectations and to just play my own game. I thought top 10 was realistic, now I think I should have thought top five or better, knowing how I

sluggish play during the game — to help South Carolina's defense hold North Carolina to its lowest point total under

coach Larry Fedora in a 27-10 victory to open

the season Thursday night. "Here I am back in

front again, ready for all these questions about conditioning," Clowney

said. "Let's go." Mike Davis ran 75

yards for a touchdown while Connor Shaw

and Dylan Thompson each threw long scoring passesto puttheGamecocks in front. Clowney

and company made it all stand up. "Hats off to my de-

fense," Clowney said. "As long as weget the win, that's all that matters to me."

Steve Spurrier was disappointed at his team's conditioning

on defense, including Clowney. "Did you watch what

I was watching?" he said when asked about Clowney. "No, I don't have to say it. You write what you see. We'll try

and work on our conditioning for the entire team." The Tar Heels'fast-

paced offense wore him down and forced him to the sideline for

several pit stops, yet he and the defense mostly hemmed in North

Carolina. Shawand Thompson put South Carolina up 17-0 in the

opening quarter. Shaw found Shaq Roland for

a 65-yard touchdown on the game's third play.

~i l p,

The Bulletin

By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Patriot Golf Day seems

to only get bigger. As part of a national fundraising campaign that begins today and runs through Monday

(Labor Day), golfers are

played." Any finish near the top is a reason tocelebrate atsuch an A JGA event, which attracted some of the West's top golfers, ages 12 to 18. In his third AJGA start ever, Lee posted a final-round 3 under par to come from well back in the field and win at 5 under for the tournament. Dressed inmatching red shirt and shorts, and wearing sunglasses,Lee waited beside the 18th green for the final

boys group to finish. SeeSunriver /C4

returns to area

Ryan Brennectre l The Bulletin

Bend's Madison Odiorne chips onto the17th green during the American Junior Golf Association Sunriver Junior Open at Sunriver Resort's Meadows course on Thursday. Odiorne shot a 1-over-par 72 in the third and final round to finish in a tie for fourth place in the elite junior tournament.

being asked to donate a minimum of $1 to benefit the Folds of Honor Foundation, which provides postsecondary educational scholarships to families of American soldiers disabled or killed in the line of duty. This year, 12 Central Oregon golf facilities — representing 18 of the region's 30 golf courses — are planning to participate in Patriot Golf Day. And another facility, Bend Golf and Country Club, in October will co-host the Patriot Challenge, a tournament that also benefits Folds of Honor. Local participation in the fundraiser has steadily grown from seven area golf courses in 2007, the event's inaugural year. Now, with a clear majorityof the area's courses involved, Bend's Brian Whitcomb, cannot help but smile. "It's just heartwarming to see that people still care and still will slow down their lives long enough to recognizethe problems of other people and the needs that are out there, and that they will contribute through the game of golf," says Whitcomb, who owns Lost Tracks Golf Club and helped launch the fundraiser on a national level when he was the president of the PGA of America in 2007-08. See Patriot/C4

Thompson threw a 29yard TD to Kane White-

hurst later in the quarter. The gamewas

NFL COMMENTARY

delayed with 8:20 left

when lightning closed in on the stadium.

Also on Thursday: Utah 30, Utah State 26:SALT LAKE CITY — Travis Wilson threw

for 302 yards andtwo touchdowns to help Utah edge Utah State.

Wilson played error-free while completing 17 of

28 passes and rushed for a key first down on Utah's final drive. Anthony Denham set

career highs with six receptions for 113yards for the Utes. — The Associated Press

Concussionsett ementwith retirees a'win-win' for everyone By Jlm Lltke The Associated Press

he court-appointed m ediator who brokered a proposed $765 million deal between the NFL and 4,500 former playerscharacterized it as a "win-win." So did the league and the players' lead attorney. But not everyone with skin in the game was convinced. At least one

T

player suggested it was hush money well spent. "I'm used to the NFL taking a hardline approach as they have throughout

Inside • A closer look at the NFL's$765 million settlement,C4

they are ready to settle something, it shows they knew they had some sort

of negligence."

The nature of compromise is such that neither side gets everything they the years with strikes and everything want. And the benefits proposed for else," said former Pro Bowl lineman former playersare both considerable Lomas Brown, a plaintiff in the con- and desperately needed. cussion-related lawsuits. "I'm curious It won't restore lives already lost or how they came up with the figure and ruined, nor heal broken minds and I've got a lot of questions, but I am hap- spirits — the toll the game extracted py that it's done." from some has been terrible and Yet Brown couldn't help adding, irreversible. "Any time the NF L a cknowledges See NFL/C4

The settlement won't restore lives already lost or ruined, nor heal broken minds and spirits — the toll the game extracted from some has been terrible and irreversible. But it would provide help right away to

generations of past players still suffering the effects of concussion-related injuries.


C2

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

SPORTS ON THE AIR

COREBOARD

TODAY GOLF

Time

TV/Radio

European Tour,Wales Open

6:30 a.m. Web.com Tour, Hotel Fitness Championship 9:30 a.m.

Golf Golf

PGA Tour, DeutscheBankChampionship

noon

LPGA Tour, Safeway Classic

3:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Golf Golf Golf

Champions Tour, ShawCharity Classic TENNIS

U.S. Open,second andthird rounds U.S. Open,second andthird rounds

8 a.m. 10 a.m.

U.S. Open, second and third rounds

4 p.m.

Tennis ESPN2 ESPN2

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Advocare 500, practice noon Fox Sports 1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Advocare 500, qualifying4 p.m. Fox Sports 1 NASCAR, Nationwide, Great Clips-Grit Chips 300, practice 6 p.m. Fox Sports 2 SOCCER

Men's college, Georgetown atCal Women's college, Baylor at Washington

2 p.m. 4 p.m.

Pac-12

MLS, Portland at Salt Lake City

7 p.m.

NBCS N

Pac - 12

BASEBALL MLB, St.Louis at Pittsburgh MLB, Seattle at Houston

4 p.m.

5 p.m.

MLB Root

FOOTBALL

College, Morgan State at Army College, TexasTechatSMU

4 p.m. 5 p.m.

College, Florida Atlantic at Miami College, Western Michigan at Michigan State College, North Dakota State at Kansas State High school, Lebanon at Mountain View

5 p.m. 5 p.m.

College, Northern Arizona at Arizona

7 p.m.

CBS S N ESPN ESPN U Big T e n

5:30 p.m. FoxSports 1 7 p.m.

COTV Pac-12

SATURDAY SOCCER

Time

TV / Radio

English Premier League, Manchester City vs. Hull

4:45 a.m.

NB C SN

6:55 a.m.

NB C SN

English Premier League, Cardiff City vs. Everton

English Premier League, Crystal Palace vs. Sunderland 9:30 a.m. NBC MLS, D.C. at New York 5 p.m. NBCS N NWSL, final, Portland at Western New York 5 p.m. Fox Sports 2 7:30 p.m. Root MLS, Seattle at Columbus (taped) GOLF

European Tour,Wales Open 5:30 a.m. Web.com Tour, Hotel Fitness Championship 1 0 a.m. PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship noon LPGA Tour,Safeway Classic 3:30 p.m. Champions Tour, ShawCharity Classic 5:30 p.m.

Golf Golf Golf Golf

Golf

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR, Nationwide, Great Clips-Grit Chips 300, practice

7:30 a.m. Fox Sports 2

NASCAR,Sprint Cup, Advocare 500, practice noon Fox Sports 2 NASCAR, Nationwide, Great Clips-Grit Chips 300, qualifying

1 p.m. Fox Sports 2

NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Advocare 500, practice 3 p.m. Fox Sports 2 IndyCar, Grand Prixof Baltimore, qualifying 3 p.m. NBCS N NASCAR, Nationwide, Great Clips-Grit Chips 300 4 :30 p.m. ES P N2 TENNIS

U.S. Open, third round

8 a.m.

U.S. Open, third round

4 p.m.

CBS Tennis

FOOTBALL College, Buffalo at Ohio State College, William & Mary at West Virginia

9 a.m. ESPN 2 9 a.m. Fox Sports 1

College, UMass atWisconsin

9a.m.

College, Villanova at Boston College

9 a.m. 9 a.m. 10 a.m.

Big Ten

E SPN News College, Purdue at Cincinnati ESPN U College, Rice at Texas A&M ESPN College, Colgate at Air Force noon Root College, Mississippi State vs. Oklahoma State12:30 a.m. ABC College, Syracuse atPennState 12:30 p.m. E S PN2 College, Temple atNotre Dame 12:30 p.m. NBC College, BYU at Virginia 12:30 p.m. E SPNU College, Central Michigan at Michigan College, Nicholls State at Oregon

12:30 p.m. B i g Ten

t p.m. Fox Sports1 1 t to-AM College, Alabamavs. Virginia Tech 2:30 p.m ESPN College, Eastern Washington at Oregon State 3 p.m. Pac-t2 College, Washington State at Auburn

College, Kentucky vs. Western Kentucky College, Miami (Ohio) at Marshall College, Georgia at Clemson College, Wyoming at Nebraska College, LSU vs. Texas Christian College, Boise State at Washington College, Nevada at UCLA College, Northwestern at Cal BASEBALL MLB, Baltimore at New York Yankees MLB, St. Louis at Pittsburgh MLB, Seattle at Houston

4 p.m. 4 p.m. 4 p.m.

5 p.m. 5 p.m. 6 p.m.

940-AM ESPNU ESPN News CBSSN ABC

Big Ten

ESPN 7 p.m. Fox Sports t 7 p.m. Pac-12 7:30 p.m ESPN2

10 a.m. t p.m.

4 p.m.

MLB MLB Root

FIELD HOCKEY

College, Connecticut at Stanford

tt a.m.

Pac-12

t p.m.

NBCSN

HORSERACING

Woodward Stakes, ForegoHandicap MIXED MARTIALARTS

UFC 164, preliminary bouts

5 p.m. Fox Sports 1

Listings are themostaccurateavailable. The 73ulletinis not responsible for late changesmade by TVor radio stations.

74-74-71 219 77-74-68—219 75-75-69—219 Today 70-73-77—220 Football: Pendetonat Bend,7 p.mcRedmond at 72-76-72—220 SweetHome,7 p.m.; Summit at NorthEugene,7 74-70-77—221 p.m.; Lebanon at Mountain View,7 p.m., Bakerat 73-78-70—221 Ridgeview,7pm4CrookCounty atHenley, 7p.m.; 74-72-75 221 Madras atStayton, 7p.m4McLoughlin atSisters,7 72-73-76—221 p.m.; Culver atNorth Douglas, 7p.m. 71-74-76 —221 C hase C a rl s on, T ac om a, W as h. 71-75-75 —221 Saturday M ichael But er, S am m am ish, W as h. 7 3-78-71 —222 Volleyball: Culverat Warrenton tournament, TBA ColtonYates,Scottsdale,Ariz. 73-75-74 —222 Girls soccer:Sandyat Summit, noon SamWu,San Diego 75-76-71—222 WilliamMoffy,Pasadena,Calif. 70-77-75—222 ConnerKumpula, Albany 74-70-78 —222 GraysenHuff, Eagle,Idaho 76-69-78 —223 SeanYi, Auburn,Wash. 74-75-74 223 Professional 77-71-75—223 AdamBarker, GigHarbor, Wash. U.s. Open JoshuaWu,Medford 74-78-72—224 Thursday 72-74-78—224 AndrewBrown,Calgary, Alberta At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis 74-74-76—224 HunterWescott, Beaverton Canter 74-71-79—224 JohnnyHyun,lrvine,Calif. New York 70-82-72—224 T ony Ko, La ng l e y, B. C . Purse: $34.3 million (GrandSlam) JoeHighsmith,Lakewood,Wash. 74-72-78 224 Surface: Hard-Outdoor 76-76-72—224 Matt Codd,RedDeer,Alberta Singles 75-73-76—224 DavidTottori, LasVegas Men BryanHong,Newport Coast, Calif. 75-75-75 225 SecondRound 77-76-72—225 Bailey,Walnut Creek, Calif. DmitryTursunov(32), Russia,def. GuilaumeRu- Zack JJ Qualkenbush, LaQuinta, Calif. 74-78-73—225 fin, France,7-6(4), 1-1,retired. wenXiong,West Vancouver, B.C. 73-74-78—225 JankoTipsarevic(18), Serbia,def. DudiSela,Is- O 77-73-75—225 BrandonSmith,Las Vegas rael, 6-4,6-4, 6-1. ColbyDean,Eagle,ldaho 78-72-75—225 RichardGasquet (8), France,def. StephaneRobert, Michae lZhang,SanDiego 74-76-76—226 France,6-3, 7-5,7-5. Garner,ParadiseValley, Ariz. 72-74-80 226 RogerFederer(7),Switzerland,def. CarlosBerlocq, Andrew JakeReiff,LakeOswego 74-75-77—226 Argentina,6-3,6-2, 6-1. MaxDavis,Medford 73-77-76—226 DavidFerrer(4),Spain,def. RobertoBautista Agut, Joe HarvieOrti , ng, Wash. 73-73-80—226 Spain,6-3,6-7(5), 6-1,6-2. Jeff Camey, SanMateo, Caif. 74-76-76—226 Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Andreas JoshuaMatz, AgouraHils, Calif. 75-76-75 —226 Haider-Maurer, Austria, 6-4, 6-4,7-5. RyanMendoza,DoveCanyon,Calif.75-76-75—226 Jack Sock,UnitedStates, def. MaximoGonzalez, CodyRiecks,Aubum,Calif. 79-76-72—227 Argentina, 7-6 (3), 1-6,7-5, 6-2. AndyLiu,Bellevue,Wash. 76-78-74 —228 DanielEvans,Britain, def. Bemard Tomic, Australia, DerrickVigarreal, Hartland,Wis. 71-75-82 —228 1-6, 6-3,7-6(4), 6-3. S Comerford,RanchoSantaFe,Cal if 74-82-73—229 Ivan DodigCroati , a,def NikolayDavydenko, Rus- JordanBassWatford, U.K. 77-72-80 —229 sia, 6-1, 6-4,6-4. Aubrey Mackenzie,Poulsbo,Wash. 75-74-81 —230 Tommy Robredo(19), Spain,def. FrankDancevic, JakeRyan,Portland 77-76-77—230 Canada, 6-4,6-4, 6-1. JohnHong,Newport Beach, Calif. 73-83-74—230 AdrianMannarino, France,def SamQuerrey (26), G. Hughes, MissionViejo, Calif. 79-72-80 —231 UnitedStates,7-6(4), 7-6(5), 6-7(5), 6-4. EddieAbellar,Vancouver, Wash. 74-79-78—231 PhilippKohlschreiber(22), Germany, def. Edouard OwenFenner,Snohomish, Wash. 79-72-80 231 Roger-Vasselin,France,6-3, 6-2,5-7, 6-2. 74-76-82—232 Yeo,HappyValey Milos Raonic(10), Canada,def. PabloAndular, Austrn 79-80-74—233 ConnorSims,Kent, Wash. Spain,6-1, 6-2,6-4. Brett Kromy,GrandRapids, Minn. 77-76-81 234 FelicianoLopez(23), Spain,def Bradley Klahn, Jeremy 78-76-80—234 Wu,Medford UnitedStates,6-4,7-6(4), 4-6, 7-5. 76-79-79—234 LeMay,Waterloo, Ontario RafaelNadal(2), Spain, def. RogerioDutraSilva, Matt 81-77-77—235 HanselSuharli, Fullerton,Calif. Brazil, 6-2,6-1,6-0. 75-82-78—235 yanDecastilhos, Bend John Isner(13), UnitedStates, def GaelMonfils, R 84-76-75—235 Jon Fry,Calgary, Alberta France, 7-5, 6-2,4-6,7-6(4). 78-80-77—235 Bret tManke,Lakewood,Wash. Women JosephBaldeckIII, Clarkston,Wash 78-79-78 235 SecondRound 77-81-78—236 Bloomer, Boise,Idaho JelenaJankovic(9), Serbia, def.Alisa Kleybanova J.T. Andrew Fernandes, Cerritos, Calif. 76-85-75—236 Russia,6-3, 6-2. Jack Atwat e r, San F r an ci s co 86-79-71—236 Kaia Kanepi (25), Estonia,def AnnaSchmiedlova, ConradCroshaw,Redmond,Wash. 81-76-80—237 Slovakia,6-4, 6-1. Kevin Li,Burnaby,B.C. 79-81-77—237 Yaroslava Shvedova,Kazakhstan, def. Patricia RowanFoxley,Arlington, Wash. 81-79-78—238 Mayr-Achleitner,Austria, 6-2, 6-3. JonathanPurceg,SanJose, Calif. 81-84-74 239 SabineLisicki (16), Germ any, def. PaulaOrmae- BrockAnderson,LakeOswego 79-81-80—240 chea,Argentina,6-2, 6-3. WalterSherry,Portland 82-75-84—241 Flavia Pennetta,Italy, def. SaraErrani (4), Italy, AustinKwon,Pebble Beach, Calif. 79-81-81—241 6-3, 6-1. Zeshanchuan Chen, Richmond,B.c 74-79-89—242 KurumiNara,Japan,def. SoranaCirstea (I9), Ro- SamFisher,Redmond,Wash. 80-75-87—242 mania,7-5,6-1. Millan Batra,Eagle,Idaho 78-81-85—244 Ekaterina Makarova(24), Russia, def. Bethanie DevinWhipple,Brea,Calif. 80-80-87—247 Mattek-Sands,UnitedStates,6-4,6-4. GiebienNa,Mercer Island, Wash. 85-80-83—248 RobertaVinci(10), Italy, def.LucieSafarova, Czech RyanKelley,West Linn 82-82-86—250 Republic,4-6,6-1, 6-2. CalebAn,Bothell, Wash. 83 84 84 251 Angelique Kerber (8), Germany,def. Eugenie B. Skenderian,CotoDeCaza,Calif. 80-92-79—251 Bouchard,Canada,6-4,2-6, 6-3. Trevor Lohman,Bellevue,Wash. 86-83-96—265 ChristinaMcHale,UnitedStates, def. ElinaSvito- Alec Charles,GigHarbor, Wash. 72-71 — JWD lina, Ukraine,6-4,3-6, 7-5. MitchellGatzke,Portland 90-DQ SvetlanaKuznetsova(27), Russia, def. PengShuai, Spencer Weiss, Sammamish, Wash 73-DQ

ON DECK

Zi HaoChen,SanLeandro, Calif. AlexWrenn,LakeOswego J. MichielEyre,Salem JamesKim,Langley,B.C. DanielDimaculangan,lrvine,Calif. JensVerhey,Reno,Nev BrianMoon,Mukilteo, Wash. Louis Kim,Brea,Calif SamuelFoust,Edina,Minn. SpencerDobbs,Brooklin, Ontario

TENNIS

China,6-1,4-6,6-4. Karin Knapp,Italy, def ElenaVesnina(22), Russia, 6-1,6-4. Alize Cornet(26), France,def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, 6 2,6-2. SerenaWiliams(1), United States, def. GalinaVoskoboeva,Kazakhstan, 6-3,6-0. SimonaHalep(21), Rom ania, def. DonnaVekic, Croatia,6-2, 6-1. Ana Ivanovic(13),Serbia,def.AlexandraDulgheru, Romania6-2, , 6-1. PetraKvitova(7), CzechRepublic, def. BojanaJovanovskiSerbi , a,6-2,6-4. AlisonRiske,UnitedStates, def.MonaBarthel (28), Germany, 6-4,6-2. Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def.Michelle Larcher de Brito,Portugal,6-3, 6-1. Julia Glushko,Israel, def.SachiaVickery, United States,7-5,6-3 Victoria Azarenka(2), Belarus, def. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada,6-3,6-1. Camila Giorgi, Italy, def. HsiehSu-wei, Taiwan, 6-4, 7-6(8). CarolineWozniacki(6), Denmark, def. Chanelle Scheepers, SouthAfrica, 6-1,6-2. DanielaHantuchova,Slovakia, def.Victoria Duva, UnitedStates,6-2,6-3.

U.S. OpenShowCourt Schedules Today At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Canter New York All Times PDT

Play begins onall courts at 8 a.m. Arthur AsheStadium LauraRobson(30), Britain,vs. LiNa(5), China Not before10a.m.:NovakDjokovic (1), Serbia,vs. BenjaminBecker, Germany JamieHampton (23), UnitedStates, vs. SloaneStephens(15), UnitedStates Night Session (4p.m.) LleytonHewitt, Australia, vs. Juan Martin del Potro (6), Argentina SerenaWiliams (1), UnitedStates,vs YaroslavaShvedova,Kazakhstan Louis ArmstrongStadium Agnie szkaRadwanska(3),Poland,vs.AnastasiaPavlyuchenkova(32),Russia Denis KudlaUni , tedStates, vs.TomasBerdych (5), CzechRepublic Andy Murray(3), Britain, vs. LeonardoMayer, Argentina Not before 2:30p.mzBobandMikeBryan(1), United States,vs.Eric Butorac,UnitedStates, andFrederik Nielsen,Denmark Grandstand TommyHaas(12), Germany,vs. Yen-hsun Lu,Taiwan EkaterinaMakarova(24), Russia,vs. SabineLrsickr (16), Germ any DonaldYoung,United States, vs.FlorianMayer, Germany Zheng Jie, China,vs. CarlaSuarezNavarro (18), Spain Court 11 MelanieOudinand Alison Riske, United States, vs. LaurenDavis andGraceMin, UnitedStates Alex BogomoloJr., v Russia,vs.Tim Smyczek, United States Kaia Kanepi(25), Estonia,vs. AngeliqueKerber(8), Germany StanislasWawrinka (9), Switzerland,vs. IvoKarovic, Croatia

GOLF Local AMERICAN JUNIORGOLFASSOCIATION

Girls Division Girls Yardage: 6,183; P ar: 71 JenniferYu,HuntingtonBeach, Calif. 69-73-73—215 71-71-74 —216 MarianneLi, Bellevue,Wash. Alix Kong,WestVancouver, Canada 72-76-70—218 73-75-72 —220 MadisoOndiorne,Bend MadisonKerley,Scottsdale,Ariz. 72-76-72—220 6 8-76-77 —221 Hannah Swanson,Forest Grove —222 Alivia Brown,GigHarbor, Wash. 72-71-79 MadelineChou,SantaAna, Calif. 74-71-78—223 79-73-72 224 SarahRhee,Lynnwood,Wash. S. Barker,HighlandsRanch, Colo. 72-77-76—225 78-77-72—227 JanetZhang,Richmond,B.C. MichelleKimSurrey, B.C. 75-78-75—228 Be laSetio, SanMarino, Calif. 74-77-77—228 A. Fitzgibbons,Sammamish, Wash. 79-75-75—229 BreannFox,Chino, Calif. 75-76-78—229 MichelleXie,Palo Alto, Calif. 76-75-78 229 Abigail CantwellScottsdal , e,Ariz. 75-77-77—229 EllenTakada,Irvine, Calif. 75-76-79—230 Olivia Benzin,Tacoma,Wash 78 80-73 231 HayleyMortensen,Tualatrn 78-75-82—235 GloriaUsuChoi, Langley,B.c. 76-81-81—238 AnnieSongeunLee, Surrey,B.C. 78-79-82—239 KathyLim,Langley, B.C. 79-86-76—241 D. Addicks,Gagatin Gateway, Mont. 85-76-83—244 CatherineWarner, Kennewick, Wash. 85-81-80—246 HaleyTygret,Gardena,Calif. 84-79-85 248 MeganChao,Fulerton, Caif. 81-86-82—249 Yuri Machida,Redmond,Wash. 84-80-86—250 HannaYi,FederalWay,Wash. 82-83-85—250 Caitlin Maralack,Snoqualmie,Wash 83-86-84—253 81-85-89—255 Hannah Cruz, LongBeach, Calif. A. Trask,CommerceCity, Colo. 84-85-87—256 88-82-86—256 LauraBurke,Princeton,N.J. 88-86-86—260 EleanorBlum,PaloAlto, Calif. 95-92-92—279 Rio Smith,Camas,Wash.

LPGA Tou SafewayClassic

Thursday At Columbia EdgewaterCountry Club Portland Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,475; Par72 (36-36) First Round a-denotasamateur Pornanong Phatlum 32-32—64 Lexi Thomp son 33-32 — 65 SandraGal 34-32—66 CrrstreKerr 33-33—66 LizetteSalas 34-32—66 HeatherBowieYoung 34-33—67 Austin Ernst 33-34—67 Juli Inkster 34-33—67 Eun-Hee Ji 33-34—67 lhee Lee 34-33W7 StacyLewis 33-34—67 Mo Martin 33-34—67 SydneeMichaels 35-32—67 Ai Miyazato 34-33—67 Se RiPak 34-33—67 GerinaPiler 36-31—67 34-33—67 SarahJaneSmith 33-34—67 YaniTseng 32-35—67 MichelleWie 34-34MB Chie Arimura 32-36—68 Karlin Beck 33-35—68 Dori Carter 33-35—68 SandraChangkija 34-34—68 PazEcheverria 32-36—68 NatalieGulbis 35-33—68 SarahKemp 34-34MB BrittanyLang 34-34—68 Pernilla Lindberg a-KristinaMerkle 33-35—68 JanePark 33-35MB SuzannPetersen 33-35—68 Jiyai Shin 35-33—68

Sunriver Junior Open Final round AmyYang Thursday SunYoungYoo At Sunriver Resort, Meadows NicoleCastrale 54-hole Stroke Play JodiEwartShadoff Boys Division Mina Harigae Yardage: 6,940;Par: 71 JenniferJohnson HenryLee,Coquitlam, B.C. 7 4 -66-68 —208 I.K. Kim Jae Hoon lanKim,Surrey, B.c. 66-71-73 —210 Min SeoKwak Rile yElmes,Lakeoswego 69-67-74 210 CarolineMasson PeterKyoWon Koo,Chandler,Ariz. 70-72-71—213 Lisa Mccloskey GregoryGildea,Lakewood,Wash. 74-71-68 —213 AnnaNordqvist OscarBaek,LaHabra, Calif . 7 0 -76-67 213— HeeYoungPark DylanWu,Medford 69-74-71 —214 StacyPram manasudh CarterIrwin, DoveCanyon, Calif. 73-70-72—215 MorganPressel BenWa nichek,Eugene 70-70-75—215 SophiaSheridan KevinGeniza,Corvallis 71-69-75—215 ThidapaSuwannapura PerryCohen,LaJoga,Calif . 7 1 -72-73—216MomokoUeda ZacharySmith, Pleasanton,Calif. 74-75-68—217 KarrieWebb Lawrence Tu,Irvine, Calif . 68- 7 2-77 217 ChellaChoi 74-72-71 —217 Na YeonChoi Cole Madey, West Linn EdwinYi, Beaumont, Calif . 72- 72-73217 — CydneyClanton 78-70-69 217 CJ Sitton,WestLinn Ky eComett, Mrll Creek,Wash. 72-79-67 —218 Austin Stadeli,Scottsdale,Ariz. 70-75-73 —218 Brian Humphreys,Washougal,Wash.68-76-74— 218 RJ Manke,I.akewood,Wash. 74-77-67 —218 RomanAragon, MissionViejo, Calif. 71-74-73—218 Jack Ireland,MissionViejo, Calif. 70-76-72—218 TannerComes, Spokane,Wash. 77-70-72 —219 MichaelKirby,Henderson,Nev. 72-70-77 —219

BreannaElliott

Lisa Ferrero KatieFutcher AllisonHanna Maria Hjorth AmyHung TiffanyJoh LorieKane CandieKung

CindyLaCrosse JennieLee Mi HyangLee BeckyMorgan BelenMozo JiYoungOh BrookePancake JaneRah DewiClaireSchreefel Giulia Sergas Jessrca Shepley JenniferSong Kris Tamulis Julia Boland FrancesBondad Katie M.Burnett Silvia Cavalleri LauraDiaz KathleenEkey Veronica Feibert Hee-WonHan Mi JungHur VickyHurst Jeong Jang Sara-Maude Juneau DanielleKang

JeeYoungLee MeenaLee PaigeMackenzie Kristy McPherson Mika Miyazato PaolaMoreno BeatrizRecari AlenaSharp Stephanie Sherlock AngelaStanford WendyWard MarinaAlex Danah Bordner IreneCho LauraDavies MoiraDunn JulietaGranada MarcyHart NicoleJeray P.K.Kongkrapha n RebeccaLee-Bentham AmeliaLewis AzaharaMunoz ReilleyRankin

JenniferRosales JennyShin KarenStupples LindseyWright CarlotaCiganda JacquiConcolino Numa Gulyanamitta SophieGustafson Pat Hurst Felicity Johnson MoriyaJutanugarn MitsukiKatahira a-SooBinKim Sue Kim RyannO'Toole MariajoUribe AlisonWalshe ChristelBoeljon KatherineHull-Kirk Song-Hee Kim Maude-Aimee Leblanc SeonHwaLee Amanda Bumenherst Meaghan Francella ChristinaKim Kelly Jacque s HannaKang Lauren Doughtie Danielalacobelli TayloreKarle EstherChoe Jin YoungPak

FOOTBALL

BoiseStateat Washington, 7p.m. Northwestern atCalifomia, 7:30 p.m.

Betting line College (Hometeamsin Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Today MICHIGAN ST 25 28 W.MICHIGAN MIAMI(FLA) 32.5 3 2 . 5 Fl a. Atlantic TexasTech 4 5 SMU Saturday W ISCONSIN 42.5 44 5 Uma ss MICHIGAN 28.5 3 15 C. Michigan OHIOST 3 4 . 5 35 Buffalo Nc STATE 1 2 14 La Tech MARYLAND 17 22 Flor i da Int'I IOWA 5 3 N. Ill i nois NOTRE DAME 25 30 Temple Byu 4 1 VIRG INIA a-Alabama I 9 20.5 Vi r ginia Tech TROY 6.5 4 Uab C INCINNATI 13 10.5 Purd u e n Kentucky 3. 5 5 WKen tucky MARSHALL 1 5 19 5 Mia mi-Ohio h-Oklahoma St 13.5 1 2.5 M ississippi St OKLAHOMA 24 22 UL- Monroe S. MISSISSIPPI 10 8 Texa s St TEXAS 43 4 2 . 5New Mexico St TEXASA8 M 28.5 27 Rice FLORIDA 2 1 24 To edo ARKANSAS 12.5 11 UL- Lafayette AUBURN 1 3 15.5 W ashington St N.TEXAS 1 6 15 Idaho e-Penn St 5 . 5 8 Syrac use NEBRASKA 24.5 30 Wyom ing NEW MEXICO 5.5 3 TX -S.onAnt io

Georgia ar-Lsu

Monday

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN'SNATIONAL BASKETBALLASSOCIATION All Times PDT

EasternConference W 20 14 14

x-Chicago

Atlanta Washington Indiana NewYork Connecticut

L 8 12 15

Pct GB .714

.538 5 ,483 6'/2 12 15 .444 P/~ 11 17 393 9 7 2 1 .250 13

Western Conference

x-Minnesota x-l.os Angeles Phoenix Seattle SanAntonio Tulsa x-clinchedplayoff spot

W L 21 7 20 8 14 13 15 14 10 18 9 19

Pct GB .750 714 1 ,519 6'/z .517 6'/z .357 11 .321 12

Thursday's Game Seattle78,Connecticut 65 Today's Games IndianaatNewYork, 4:30 p.m. SanAntonioatTulsa, 5p.m.

MLS MAJORLEAGUE SOCCER All Times POT

Eastern Conference W L T P t sGF GA Montreal 12 7 5 4 1 41 35 NewYork 1 1 9 6 3 9 38 34 S porting KansasCity 11 9 6 3 9 36 26 Philadelphia 10 8 8 38 37 37 NewEngland 1 0 9 6 36 34 24 Houston 1 0 8 6 3 6 29 28 Chicago 1 0 10 4 3 4 30 34 Columbus 8 12 5 2 9 29 34 TorontoFC 4 12 9 2 1 22 34 D.C. 3 17 5 1 4 15 41 Western Conference W L T P t sGF GA RealSaltl.ake 1 3 8 6 45 48 33 Los Angele s 1 2 9 4 40 40 32 Portland 9 4 1 2 3 9 37 26 Colorado 1 0 7 9 3 9 33 27 Fc Dallas 9 7 1 0 3 7 36 38 Seattle 1 1 8 4 3 7 31 26 Vancouver 1 0 9 6 3 6 36 33 SanJose 9 10 7 3 4 28 37 ChivasIJSA 5 14 6 21 24 45 NOTE: Three points for victory, onepoint for tie.

Minnesota 24, Tennessee23 Cleveland18,Chicago16 KansasCity 30, GreenBay8 Houston24,Dallas6 St. Louis24,Baltimore21 Arizona32,Denver24 Seattle22,Oakland6

SanFrancisco41, SanDiego6 End of Preseason

College All Times PDT

(Schadulesubject to change) Thursday'sGames

EAST Delaware 51,Jacksonville 35 Fordham 51,RhodeIsland26 Towson 33,Uconn18 SOUTH E. Kentucky 38,Robert Morris 6 MiddleTennessee45,W.Carolina 24 Mississippi39,Vanderbilt 35 Pikevile 13,MoreheadSt. 10 S. Utah22, SouthAlabama21 SE Louisiana 45,SEMissouri 7 SouthCarolina27, NorthCarolina10 Tennessee Tech63, Cumberland(Tenn.) 7 Tu ane 34, JacksonSt.7 UCF38,Akron7 UT-Martin31,Chatanooga21 Wake Forest31, Presbyterian7 MIDWEST Ball St. 51,lllinois St.28 BowlingGreen34 Tulsa7 GrandView21, Drake16 Indiana73, IndianaSt.35 Kent St.17,Liberty10 Minnesota 51, UNLV23 NorthDakota69,Valparaiso10 Northwestern St 23, Missouri St.17 W. II inois42, Hampton 9 Youngstown St. 28,Dayton10 SOUTHWE ST Cent.Arkansas58, IncarnateWord 7 FAR WEST Montana St. 42, Monmouth(NJ) 24 Montana St.-Northern14, DickinsonSt.0 PortlandSt.57, E.Oregon17 San Jose St 24, SacramentoSt. 0 USC30, Hawaii13 Utah 30,UtahSt. 26 Today's Games EAST MorganSt.atArmy,4 p m SOUTH SamfordatGeorgiaSt., 4 p.m. FAUat Miami,5 p.m. MIDWEST W. MichiganatMichiganSt., 5p.m. N. DakotaSt.atKansasSt., 5:30p.m. SOUTHWES T TexasTechatSMU,5p.m. SouthernU,at Houston 530p m. FAR WEST N. ArizonaatArizona, 7p.m.

Today'sGames NewEnglandat TorontoFC,4p.m. Portland at RealSalt Lake7p.m Saturday's Games Seattle FC at Columbus, 4.30p.m. Montrealat Philadelphia,4:30p.m. D.C. UnitedatNew York,5p.m. Colorado atSporting KansasCity 530 pm SanJoseatLosAngeles, 7:30p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL

Major LeagueBaseball MLB — SuspendedPhiladelphia minor league RHPGustavoArmas (Venezeula Summer League) 50 gamesfor testingpositive forametabolite of Nandrolone;DetroitminorleagueSSMoisesBelo (Venezeula SummerLeague) 50 games after testing positive for a metabolite of Boldenone and ChicagoWhite Sox minor league CNicholas Parent(Bnstol-Appalachian) 50 gamesafter testing positive for metabolites of Stanozolo. American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — ReleasedRHPBrett

Myers.

Pac-12 Standings All Times PST North

Conf.

Overall

Conf. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 Thursday's Games Utah 30,UtahState26 USC30, Hawaii13

Overall

USC Utah Arizona ArizonaState UCLA Colorado

BoiseSt

SOCCER

Detroit 35,Buffalo13 N.Y.Jets27, Philadelphia20 Miami24,NewOrleans 21 Washington30, TampaBay12 Jacksonvi le 20, Atlanta16 NewEngland28,N.Y.Giants 20 Carolina25,Pittsburgh10

South

CL EMSON Tcu

Florida St 1 2 . 5 11 PIT TSBURGH a-Atlanta;n-Nashvige,Tenn.; h-Houston; e-East; Rutherford,N.JJar-Arlington, Texas; d-Denver Note: 0-Clemson openedasthefavorite; CO-Coloradoopenedasthefavorite.

Thursday'sGames Cincinnati27,Indianapolis10

0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

4.5 3 21

Nevada 6 CALI FORNIA Sunday L OUISVILLE 16.5 2 0.5 OhioU d-Colorado St 1 (CO) 2.5 Col orado

NFL

California Oregon Oregon State Stanford Washington Washington State

1 . 5 (C) 1 . 5

5 WASHING TON 3 UCLA 1 5.5 Northwestern 8.5

NATIONALFOOTBALLLEAGUE Preseason

31-37 — 68 33-35—68 36-33—69

33-36—69 35-34 69 35-34—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 36-33—69 33 36 69 33-36—69 34-35—69 33-36W9 33-36—69 34-35—69 33-36—69 36-34—70 38-32—70 36-34—70 34-36 70 37-33—70 36-34—70 37-33—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 35-35—70

37-33 70 36-34 — 70 36-34 — 70 35-35 — 70 35-35 — 70 35-35 — 70 35-35 — 70 36-34 — 70 36-34 — 70 37-33 70 34-36 — 70 34-36 — 70 35-35 — 70 36-35 — 71 36-35 — 71 35-36 — 71 34-37 — 71 36-35 — 71 35-36 36-35—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 37-34—71 35-36—71 38-33—71 33-38—71 35-36—71 34-37 71 35-36 — 71 35-36 — 71 37-34 — 71 35-36 — 71 36-35 — 71 36-35 — 71 34-37 — 71 37-34 — 71 37-34 37-35—72 35-37 — 72 35-37 — 72 35-37 72 37-35—72 37-35 — 72 35-37 — 72 36-36 — 72 34-38 — 72 35-37 — 72 36-36 — 72 37-35 — 72 39-33 72 36-36—72 37-35—72 34-38—72 36-36 — 72 37-36 — 73 36-37 — 73 35-38 — 73 38-35 — 73 38-35 73 37-36 — 73 39-34 — 73 38-35 — 73 39-34 — 73 36-37 — 73 36-37 — 73 37-36 — 73 35-38 — 73 37-37 74 39-35—74 38-36—74 37-37—74 35-39—74 35-40—75 37-38—75 37-38 — 75 38-38—76 36 40 76 35-42 — 77 40-37 — 77 37-42 — 79 42-38MO WD

0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Today'sGame NorthernArizonaatArizona, 7p.m. Saturday's Games NichollsStateat0regon,1 p.m. Eastern WashingtonatOregonState, 3p.m WashrngtonState atAubum,4p.m. Nevadaat UCLA,7 p.m.

1-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

LOS ANGELESANGELS Placed 38 ChrisNelson onthe15-dayDL RecaledINFLuisJimenezfrom Salt Lake(PCL). National League ST. LOUISCARDINALS — Recalled LHPSam FreemanfromMemphis(PCL). OptionedRHPMichael Wachato Springfield (Texas)andRHPMichael Blazek to Memphis. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDENSTATE WARRIORS — Named JoHan Wangathletic trainer, DrewYoderassistant athletic trainer,KekeLyles director of athletic performance/ assistantcoachand Michael Roncaratistrength and conditioningcoach. PHOENIX SUNS — Signed C Alex Len. Traded FCaronButler to Milwaukeefor GIsh Smith andC ViacheslavKravstov SACRAMENTOKINGS— Named Shareef AbdurRahimgeneral manager of the RenoBighorns of the NBADevelopm ent League. FOOTBALL National Football League KANSAS CITYCHIEFS—Named Tyler Eppvice presidentof businessdevelopment. HOCKEY NationalHockeyLeague BOSTON BRUINS—Signedgeneral manager Peter Chiareli to afour-year contract extensionthrough the 2017-18season.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movem ent of adult chinook,jack chinook,steelheadandwild steelheadat selected ColumbiaRiverdamslast updatedonWednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd B onneville 21,720 2,497 2,328 7 5 2 T he Dalles 4,159 1,067 1,233 4 3 4 John Day 3,780 8 4 1 589 196 McNary 1 ,338 3 7 8 516 213 Upstream year-to-date movement ofadult chinook, jack chinook,steelheadand wild steelheadat selected ColumbiaRiverdamslast updatedonWednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 295,405 77,552 177,060 81,811 The Dalles 204,358 62,981 72,077 38,451 John Day 158108 54,366 41,103 20,579 McNary 144,857 40,379 36,423 18,015


FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

SPORTS IN BRIEF

GOLF ROUNDUP

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

BASKETBALL Suns tradeButler to BuCkS —The Phoenix Suns have traded small forward

Standings

Caron Butler to the Milwaukee

AMERICANLEAGUE East Division W L 79 56 75 57 71 61 70 63 60 74

Bucks for point guard Ish Smith and center Viacheslav Kravstov. Themovesends Butler to his hometown team.

The11-year NBA veteran is from nearby Racine. TheSuns acquired Butler and point guard Eric Bledsoe from the Clippers on July10 in a threeteam trade that sent the Suns'

All Times PDT

Boston TampaBay Baltimore NewYork Toronto

Central Division

Detroit Cleveland Kansas City Minnesota Chicago

past two seasons, Butler has averaged 15.5 pointsin stops that included Miami, the Los

Angeles Lakers, Washington, Dallas and the Clippers.

Hawks coacharrested — Atlanta Hawks coach Mike

Budenholzer hasapologized for his arrest on a driving under the influence of alcohol

charge. According to a report from the Georgia State Patrol, Budenholzer was pulled over at10:30p.m.Wednesday in Atlanta for not having working taillights. Trooper J. Nelms said Budenholzer had blood-

shot and watery eyes "and a strong odor of an alcoholic beverage coming from his breath." Budenholzer refused a breath test but agreed to a field sobriety test, according to the

report.

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle Houston

increase field —The Boston Marathon will accept an extra 9,000 runners for next

year's race, making room for the more than 5,000 people

stopped on the course this year when two bombs went off and for many of those wanting to run as a tribute to the victims. Registration for the 118th edition of the world's oldest

and most prestigious annual marathon will open Sept. 9, the Boston Athletic Association said. The expanded field of 36,000 for the April 21, 2014,

race would be thesecond largestin the event's history, behind only the 38,708 who registered for the100th anni-

versary race in1996. Drganizers have said they are forced to cap the field size because they have limited space at the start

inHopkintonandonsome of the course's Colonial-era streets.

.568 2'/r .538 6'/r

.526 8

,448 I Bi/r

Pct GB .582 .534 6'/z ,519 8'/r 432 20 .424 21

W 78 75 60 60 44

Pct GB .586 .564 3 .455 17'/z .451 18 .331 34

L 55 58 72 73 89

Thursday'sGames Detroit 7,Oakland6 Kansas City3, Minnesota1 L.A. Angels2,TampaBay0 Baltimore3,Boston2 Atlanta 3,Cleveland1 Seattle 3,Houston2 Today'sGames Baltimore(Mig.Gonzalez 8-6) at N.Y.Yankees(Sabathia11-11),4.05p.m. Kansas City(E.Santana8-7)atToronto(Buehrle 10-7), 4:07 p.m. Cleveland(McAllister 7-7)at Detroit (Porcello10-7), 4:08 p.m. Chicago WhiteSox(H.Santiago4-7)atBoston (Dempster 6-9),4:10p.m. Minnesota(Hendriks 0-2) at Texas(Darvish 12-5), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Angels(Weaver 8-7) at Mrlwaukee(W.Peralta 813), 5:10p.m. Seattle(Walker0-0) at Houston(Peacock 3-4), 5:10 p.m. TampaBay(Price 8-5) at Oakland(J.Parker 10-6), 7;05 p.m.

NATIONALLEAGUE East Division W L Atlanta BI 52 Washington 68 65 Philadelphia 61 73 NewYork 60 72 Miami 49 83

Central Division

RUNNING Boston Marathonto

Pct GB .585

W L 78 56 71 62 69 64 57 75 56 76

West Division

JaredDudleyandMilwaukee's J.J. Redick to Los Angeles. A starter for the Clippers the

St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati Milwaukee Chicago

Los Angeles Arizona Colorado SanDiego SanFrancisco

W L 78 55 77 56 75 59 59 74 56 77 West Division W L 78 55 68 64 63 72 60 73 59 74

Pct GB .609 .511 13 .455 20'/r .455 20'/z .371 31'/r

Pct GB .586 .579 I .560 3'/r ,444 19 .421 22

— Michael Morkov of Denmark won the sixth stage of the Spanish Vuelta after spoiling

.467 16 .451 18 .444 19

Thursday'sGames

N.Y.Mets11, Philadelphia3 Washington9,Miami 0 Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh0 Atlanta 3,Cleveland1

American League

Mariners 3, Astros 2

Tony Martin's long solo escape in the final miles, and race favorite Vincenzo Nibali maintained the overall lead ahead of Bend's Chris Horner on Thursday. Martin, the world time trial

champion, brokeaway nearthe start of the108-mile ride Guijuelo to Caceres and held off the peloton until the final sprint. The 28-year-old Morkov, riding for SaxoBank-Tinkoff, pushed in front of the pack to claim the victory with a time of 3 hours, 54 minutes,15 seconds. There

were no changes atthetop of the overall classification. Nibali

kept the red leader's jersey for today's seventh stage, asec-

Franklin gaveSeattle an early lead with a solo shot, and theMariners ended a six-gameskid. ah r hbi

Houston

ab r hbi

BMiller ss 4 0 1 0 Grssmnlf 4 0 1 0 Frnkln2b 4 1 1 1 Hoesrf 4110 Seager3b 3 0 0 0 Atuve2b 4 0 1 0 Ibanezdh 4 1 1 0 Jcastro c 3 0 1 1 Smoak1b 4 0 0 0 MDmn3b 3 0 0 0 FGtrrzrf 4 1 3 2 MGnzlzpr 0 0 0 0 MSndrsIf 3 0 0 0 Carterdh 3 0 0 0 Ackleycf 4 0 0 0 Wallac1b 4 1 1 1 Quinterc 2 0 0 0 BBamscf 3 0 0 0 Villarss 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals 3 125 2 Seattle 100 200 000 — 3 Houston 000 110 000 — 2

By Eddie Pells The Associated Press

ovan redeemedhimself — and then some — with his play in

her high ranking and the high

last month's Gold Cup,scoring five goals as theAmericans won the title. TheAmericans resume qualifying at Costa Rica on Sept. 6.

expectations that have come with that. "My problem isn't that I lost. I've lost a million times in my life," Errani said. "My problem is trying to find the desire to

128 miles from Almendralejo to Mairena delAlijarafe. The Giro d'Italia champion kept his three-second advantageover Horner.

SOCCER Donovanbackfor Gup qualifyiug —With Landon Donovan back in the fold, the

U.S. resumesWorld Cup qualifying next week with its deep-

estteam yet.Donovanwas among 23 players selected Thursday by coachJurgen Klinsmann for upcoming qualifiers against Costa Ricaand Mexico.Klinsmann snubbed

the Americans' career scoring leader for the last round

of qualifiers, saying Donovan needed to work his way back onto the team following his offseason sabbatical. But Don-

— From wire reports

0 0 0 0 0 1

0 3 1

3 2 0 1 0 0

4 3 1

Orioles 3, RedSox2 BOSTON — Chris Tillman pitched

seven strong innings to earn his 15th victory of the season and Baltimore avoided a three-game

sweep. Baltimore Boston ah r hbi ab r hbi M cLothlf 3 1 0 0 Ellsurycf 4 0 2 0 M achd3b 3 0 2 2 Victornrf 4 I 2 I A.Jonescf 4 1 2 0 Pedroia2b 4 0 0 0 C.Davis1b 5 0 1 1 D.Ortizdh 4 0 0 0 W ietersc 4 0 0 0 Nava1b 4 1 3 0 Hardyss 3 0 0 0JGomslf 4 0 0 0 M arkksrf 4 0 0 0 Sltlmchc 4 0 0 0 V alencidh 3 0 2 0 Drewss 3 0 1 1 Betemtph-dh I 0 0 0 Mdlrks3b 3 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 4 I 0 0 T otals 3 4 3 7 3 Totals 3 42 8 2 B altimore 002 0 1 0 0 00 — 3 Boston 0 10 001 000 — 2 DP — Baltimore 1. LOB —Baltimore 10, Boston5.

Lucas1b-3b 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn3b 3 2 3 0 S tantonrf 3 0 0 0 Harperlf 3 3 2 2 R ugginlf 4 0 1 0 Werthrf 4 2 3 3 Polanc3b 3 0 0 0 Dsmndss 4 2 2 3 SDyson p 0 0 0 0 AdLRclb 3 0 0 0 C ishekp 0 0 0 0 Roarkp 0 0 0 0 LJimnz3b 3 0 2 ILoatonc 3 0 0 0 Pierreph 1 0 0 0 WRamsc 4 0 0 0 Bourloscf 3 0 0 0 DeJessph 1 0 0 0 Hchvrrss 4 0 2 0 Rendon2b 3 0 1 1 Fuldli 30 0 0 Mrsnckcf 4 0 1 0 GGnzlzp 2 0 0 0 T otals 3 0 2 6 2 Totals 2 90 3 0 M athisc 2 0 0 0 Tracy1b 1 0 0 0 L os Angeles 0 1 0 0 0 1 000 — 2 Koehlerp 2 0 0 0 T ampa Bay 0 0 0 0 0 0 000 — 0 Morrsn1b 1 0 0 0 E—L.Jimenez(1). DP—LosAngeles1, TampaBay Totals 3 1 0 4 0 Totals 3 19 129 2. LOB —LosAngeles 5, TampaBay8. 2B—Conger Miami 0 00 000 000 — 0 (12), L.Jimene z(4), De.Jennings(25), Y.Escobar(22) Washington 0 0 0 2 0 4 3 0x — 9 L os Angeles IP H R ER BB SO DP Miami 3. LOB Miami 7, Washington VargasW,8-5 7 2 0 0 3 7 3. HR — Harper (19) Werth (21), Desmond(20). D.De La RosaH,13 1 0 0 0 1 0 S—G.Gonzalez. Frieri S,28-32 1 1 0 0 1 0 Miami IP H R E R BB SD TampaBay KoehlerL,3-9 5 7 6 6 4 I OdorizziL,O-I 5 4 1 1 2 3 SDyson 2 5 3 3 0 0 Al. Torres 2 2 1 1 1 1 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 1 J.Wright 1130 0 0 1 1 Washington WWright 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 G .Gonz alezW,8-6 7 3 0 0 3 8 HBP —byVargas(Zobrist). Roark 2 1 0 0 0 0 T—3:02. A—15,741(34,078). Koehlerpitchedto5 baters inthe6th. T—2:25.A—27,374 (41,418).

Royals 3, Twins1

MINNEAPOLIS — BruceChen bounced back with a solid start and Kansas City completed a sweep for its fifth straight win.

Kansas City Minnesota ab r hbi ab r hbi AGordnlf 4 0 1 1 Dozier2b 4 1 2 1 Bonif ac3b 4 0 0 0 Flormnss 4 0 0 0 Hosmer1b 4 0 1 0 Morneadh 4 0 0 0 Butlerdh 3 1 0 0 Wlnghli 2 0 0 0 28 — Machado (45), C.Davis(38), Valencia2 (9),Nava B M axwllrf 3 1 1 0 Doumitc 4 0 1 0 2(23) HR Victorino(12). SB Ellsbury(50). Kottarsc 3 0 0 0 Pouffe3b 3 0 1 0 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO S.Perezph-c 1 0 1 0 Colaell1b 3 0 0 0 TillmanW,15-4 7 6 2 2 0 8 AEscorss 4 0 1 1 WRmrzrf 1 0 1 0 Tom.HunterH,17 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 Getz2b 2 1 1 1 CHrmnph-rf 2 0 0 0 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 MatuszH,17 JDysoncf 3 0 0 0 Thomscf 3 0 0 0 Ji.Johnson S,41-50 1 1 0 0 0 I T otals 3 1 3 6 3 Totals 3 0I 5 I Boston K ansas City 0 3 0 0 0 0 000 — 3 LesterL,12-8 6 5 3 3 3 4 M innesota 000 0 0 1 000 — 1 Thornton 1 2 0 0 0 0 DP KansasCity1, Minnesota2. LOB Kansas I 2-3 0 0 0 3 2 Workman —Dozrer 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Crty 4, Minnesota4. 2B—Ploufte (18). HR Breslow (14). SB —AEscobar (16), Getz(13), J.Dyson(27) WP — Tilman. PB—Saltalamacchia. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SD T—3'20 A—33,300(37,499) B.chenW,6-2 5 2-3 5 1 1 1 3 KHerreraH,16 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 W.SmithH,2 I 0 0 0 0 2 Tigers 7, Athletics 6 G.HollandS,36-38 1 0 0 0 1 2 Minnesota DETROIT — Torii Hunter hit a DedunoL,B-B 3 4 3 3 1 4 three-run homer with two outs Pressly 3 1 0 0 I 0 Thielbar 2 0 0 0 0 2 in the ninth inning, lifting Detroit Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 3 over Oakland and boosting the HBP —byDeduno (Maxwell). T—2:39 A—28012(39,021). Tigers after Max Scherzer was

an awkward slide while trying to stretch a single into a double in the fifth. He was listed as day to day with discomfort. Detroit ab r hbi ab r hbi Crispcf 5 1 1 0 AJcksncf 4 1 1 0 Dnldsn3b 5 1 1 0 Dirkslf-rf-If 5 0 0 0 Lowriedh 5 1 3 2 Micarr3b 3 0 2 0 Mossrf 4 1 1 2 Tuiassplf-3b 1 0 0 0 C allasp2b 4 1 1 0 Avilaph 1 0 0 0 S.Smithlf 4 1 1 0 Fielder1b 4 3 3 1 Barton1b 3 0 1 1 VMrtnzdh 5 0 3 1 Sogard ss 2 0 1 1 Iglesias pr 0 1 0 0 Vogtc 4 0 2 0 D.Kellyrf-3b 3 1 1 0 TrHntrph-rf 2 1 1 3 B.Pena c 3 0 2 1 Infante2b 4 0 1 0 RSantgss 4 0 I I Totals 3 6 6 126 Totals 3 9 7 157 Oakland 2 00 220 000 — 0 Detroit 0 00 102 004 — 7 Twooutswhenwinningrunscored. E— D.Kelly (1). LOB—Oakland 7, Detroit 9.

National League

Brewers 4, Pirates 0 PITTSBURGH — Yovani Gallardo pitched seven sharp innings to beat Pittsburgh once again and

Aramis Ramirez homeredagainst

NatiDIIals 9, Marlins 0

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.— Jason WASHINGTON — JaysonWerth Vargas allowed two hits over seven and lan Desmond each hit a three-

innings, helping LosAngeles win for the fifth time in six games.

run homer, leading GioGonzalez and Washington over Miami.

Los Angeles TampaBay ah r hbi ab r hbi Shuckrf 4 1 2 0 DJnngscf 3 0 1 0

Miami

Trumo1b 0 0 0 0 Zobrist2b 2 0 1 0

NEW YORK — Carlos Torres did his best Matt Harvey imitation, carrying a two-hit shutout into the

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his former team as Milwaukee downed the Pirates.

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Angels 2, Rays 0

Mets11, Phillies 3

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pitched sevenscoreless innings and Atlanta completed a sweep of Cleveland. Cleveland Atlanta ab r hbi

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Teary Errani gone, while Williamsmoveson NEW YORK — Only a few s pots separate them in t h e seedings. Still, the considerable gulf between No. I Serena Williams and No. 4 Sara Errani was hard to ignore in their back-to-back matches Thursday at the U.S. Open. Williams, seeking her 17th Grand Slam title and second straight at Flushing Meadows, brushed off an ungainly slide onto her backside en route to a typically easy second-round victory, 6-3, 6-0 over Galina V oskoboeva in half-full A r thur Ashe Stadium. Barely worth talking about by Williams' standards: "I'll have to think about it and see what I can do better, but it was OK," she said. Only an hour before on the same court, a much different scene: Errani imploded in a 63, 6-1 loss to her Italian teammate, 83rd-ranked Flavia Pennetta. Then, with tears welling in her eyes, Errani conceded that she's struggling to handle

ond consecutive flat ride favoring sprinters that will stretch

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Oakland

Today'sGames Philadelphia (Halladay3-4) at Chicago Cubs(Samardziia8-11),11:20a.m. N.Y.Mets(Gee9-9) at Washrngton (Zimmermann157), 4:05p.m. St. Louis (SMiler12-8) at Pittsburgh(Liriano14-6), 4:05 p.m. Miami (Fernandez10-5) at Atlanta(Teheran 10-7), 4:30 p.m. L.A. Angels(Weaver8-7) at Milwaukee(W.Peralta 813),5:10p.m. Cincinnati(Arroyo13-9) at Colorado(Manship 0-4), 5:40 p.m. San Francisco(Lincecum7-13) at Arizona(Delgado 4-4), 6:40p.m. San Diego(Stults 8 11)at LA Dodgers (Ryu12-5), 7:10 p.m.

Seattle

E Hoes (4). DP Seattle1, Houston2. LOB Aybarss 4 0 0 0 Longori3b 4 0 0 0 Seattle 5,Houston5. 28—FGutierrez(5), Altuve(22), T routlf 2 0 0 0 WMyrsrf 1 0 0 0 J.castro (34). HR —Franklin (12), FGutierrez (7), Hamltndh 3 0 0 0SRdrgzfb 3 0 0 0 Wallace (12). Calhon1b-rf 4 0 1 1 Joyceph 1 0 0 0 Seattle IP H R E R BB SO Congerc 3 1 1 0 YEscorss 4 0 1 0 E.RamrrezW,5-1 52-3 5 2 2 2 7 GGreen2b 4 0 0 0 KJhnsndh 4 0 0 0

denied his 20th win and Miguel Pct GB Cabrera limped off with an injury. .586 .515 9'/~ Cabrera hurt his abdomen making

HOUSTON — Franklin Gutierrez hit a two-run homer after Nick

CYCLING Horner remainssecond

C3

five-time c h ampion R o ger Federer, the seventh seed, dispatched Carlos Berloq 6-3, 6-2, fight and be on the court ready 6-1 in I hour, 35 minutes. "It's one of those matches to fight. For a few weeks, I haven't felt like I wanted to I expect myself to win if posbe on the court. That's the s ible in s t r aight s ets a n d problem." gain confidence in the proThat concession was the cess," Federer said. "All those most u n expected d evelop- things happened, so, yeah, I'm ment on Day 4 of th e U.S. pleased about it." Open, where the tournament American Christina McHale got back on track after a rainy won a three-setter over Elina Wednesday that p o stponed Svitolina, while another U.S. eight women's matches and player, 81st-ranked A l l ison shuffled the lineups. Riske, had an easier time in Among the r esults f r om a 6-4, 6-2 victory over Mona Thursday's full slate: Barthel. "You never know at these — No. 2 Rafael Nadal improved to 17-0 on hard courts things," Riske said after makthis season with a 6-2, 6-1, 6-0 ing the third round of her secvictory over qualifier Rogerio ond straight Grand Slam tourDutra Silva. nament. "Anything can hap— No. 4 seed David Ferrer pen. That's kind of the beauty overcame an error-fi lled sec- of tennis in general. Ranking ond-set tiebreaker to top Ro- is kind of just a number." berto Bautista Agut 6-3, 6-7 B ut Victoria D u val, t h e 296th-ranked, 17- y ear-old (5), 6-1, 6-2. — Second-seeded Victoria American who e arned her Azarenka defeated Aleksan- first victory in a Grand Slam dra Wozniak of Canada 6-3, tournament Tuesday, couldn't 6-1. keep the magic going. She fell — Sixth-seeded C a r o line 6-2, 6-3, to 30-year-old Daniela Wozniacki b e a t Ch a n elle Hantuchova. "Ithinktoday I couldn'tquite Scheepers 6-1, 6-2 to open the night session. get myself going," Duval said. Williams got through her "But I've had a great experiwin unscathed, and when she ence this whole tournament." was done in Ashe Stadium, The top U.S. man, No. 13

TENNIS: U.S. OPEN

John Isner, held off Gael Monfils of France 7-5, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (4) in the night's last match at Armstrong Stadium, where the Frenchman got more than his share of support. "He's a very f u n -loving guy and he gets cheered on wherever he goes, not just in France," Isner said, not appearing the least bit u pset about being cheered against in his home country. Isner is t h e l ast s eeded American in the men's draw after No. 26 Sam Querrey lost in four sets to Adrian Mannarino. Another U.S. man, 20year-old Jack Sock, moved to the third round with a 7-6 (3), 1-6, 7-5, 6-2 win over Maximo Gonzalez of Argentina. On the women's side, Williams was pushed only briefly against Voskoboeva, ranked 77th from Kazakhstan. Serving at game point trailing 5-3, Voskoboeva drew Williams to the net, and as Williams reached for the ball, her feet slid out from under her and she fell hard onto her backside, her r acket slamming to the ground. Before she fell, however, she reached the shot to win the point. Two points later, she closed out the set. The second set took all of 27 minutes.

Thai golfer leads at Portland LPGAevent The Associated Press P ORTLAND — T h a i land's Pornanong Phatlum shot an 8 -under 64 o n Thursday to t a k e a one-stroke lead over Lexi Thompson after the first round o f t h e S a f eway Classic. The 23-year-old Phatlum, winless in five seasons on the LPGA Tour, had 10 birdies and tw o b o geys in her afternoon round at rain-softened C o l u mbia E dgewater. The start o f play was delayed an hour, and players were allowed to lift, clean and place their golf balls because of the wet conditions. "Putting was so good," said Phatlum, the winner of the unofficial LPGA Brazil Cup in 2012. "I changed putter for this week and

feeling very good. And I made many birdies today, like 10 birdies today.... I just try my best and I'm feeling very good with the course. I like the course, very nice." The 18-year-old Thompson eagled the par-5 seventh hole — her 16th hole of the day — and had five birdies in her bogey-free morning round. She won the 2011 Navistar LPGA Classic for her lone tour title. " I would say j ust m y iron shots into the green," Thompson said about her strongest play Thursday. "I hit a lot of good ones and I played the par 5s 4 under, so I took advantage of those. Overall, I've just been working on the consistency of my game and working on tightening my shots up." Christie Kerr, the winner in 2008 the last time the event was played at Columbia Edgewater, was at 66 along with L izette Salas and Germany's Sandra Gal. S econd-ranked S t acy Lewis, returning to play after withdrawing from the Canadian Women's Open last week because of illness, opened with a 67. She won the Women's British Open on Aug. 4 at St. Andrews and had consecutive early season victories in Singapore and Phoenix. "I felt great," said Lewis, w ho withdrew after t h e first round in Canada. "I felt like a different person out there from last week. Just being focused and I knew what my game plan was. I felt great out there." Hall of Famers Juli Inkster and Se Ri Pak also were in the large group at 67 that included Michelle Wie, Yani Tseng and Ai Miyazato. The 53-year-old Inkster won the last of her 31 tour titles in 2006. " Just i ro n p l a y w a s g ood," Wi e s a i d . "Just put in a lot of close shots. Didn't really take advantage of par 5s, w hich I kind of want to tomorrow. It was a good day. It was consistent." N atalie Gulbis ha d a hole-in-one on the second hole and finished with a 68. Sheused a 6-iron onthe 166-yard hole, with the ball bouncing once and falling in. She has seven aces in competition and 14 overall. Suzann Pettersen, the 2011 winner, also shot 68. Defending cha m pion Mika Miyazato opened with a 71. Also on Thursday:

Norwegian leads: NEWPORT, Wales — Espen Kofstad of Norway closed h is r o un d w i t h t hr e e s traight birdies an d a n eagle, shooting a 7-under 64 that gave him a tw ostroke lead after the first day of the Wales Open. Kofstad, ranked No. 305, went out in the first group of the day and concluded his round at Celtic Manor by making a bunker shot. England's Chris Wood and Australia's Richard Green shot 66s on the Twenty Ten course that hosted the 2010 Ryder Cup.


C4

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Sunriver

NFL settles concussion suit for 8765M

par-4 18th hole tied at 2 over with reigning Sunriver Junior Open champion Marianne Li, of Bellevue, Wash. But Li's approach shot hooked left into the greenside hazard and Yu sank her par putt to win. It was anything but a calm moment for Yu, who is committed to

Continued from C1 The 15-year-old, who is originally from South Korea, was congratulated by many of the 20 or so spectators after Riley Elmes, of Lake Oswego, lipped out his par putt that would have sent the two to a playoff. "To do it f eels amazing," said Lee of his win. "(My confidence) is right there on top. Better than ever. I struggled throughout the season, but to finish the season like this is truly remarkable." Yu, a soon-to-be senior in high school, headed into the

The NFLagreed to pay$765 million to settle a lawsuit brought by more than 4,500 retirees, some of whom claim to

have advanceddementia or other health problems, as well as the families of players who havedied from what they claimed were the long-terms effects of head trauma.

The settlement, announcedThursday, will be seen asa victory for the league, which hasnearly $10 billion in annual revenue and faced the possibility of billions of dollars in liabil-

ity payments and adiscovery phase that could have proved damaging if the casehad movedforward. The leaguehaschanged its rules to make the gamesafer and modified its medical protocols for concussions as mounting scientific evidence in recent years linked headtrauma suffered on the field to long-term cognitive damage. Among the terms of the agreement is that the settlement is not to be

regarded as anadmission of guilt by the league. "The settlement seems low considering the number of claimants and the severity of their conditions, but it also

play college golf not far from home atLong Beach State. " On that last hole I w a s shaking," said Yu , 17. "It's really important. It helps my confidence and I have learned how to be on top." Bend's Ryan DeCastlihos shot a final-round 78 to finish at 22 over par and in a tie for

82nd place in a boys field of 105. As for Odiorne, she had made the turn at 2 under for the day — moving her to 4 over for the tournament and just three shots off the lead — before three bogeys on the back side dropped her back to 7 over. Odiorne said that until this week she had been disappointed in her play this summer. So for the Summit H igh School junior, who had made a swing change with Bend instructor Jim Wilkinson before the tournament, her top-5 finish in her first AJGA tourna-

ment was a welcome one. "I don't want to say that I didn't think I was as good as them, but I was thinking top 10 would be pretty good for my goals," Odiorne said. "But I feel like I played really solid and still left some shots out there. If I w o uld have kept those shots today, I probably could have been right there. "I feel like I c o uld have played better this whole summer," she added, "but now I feel like in my last tournament I closed summer with a good ending in my mind." — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbufletin.com.

shows the uphill climb in proving the leaguewas responsible for the players' injuries," said Michael LeRoy, who teaches labor law at the University of lllinois, Urbana-Champaign. "The

Patriot

league is keenly sensitive to its public image. It changesthe conversation and really lets the air out of the publicity bal-

loon." Lawyers for the plaintiffs were eager to reach asettlement because many of their clients have debilitating neurological problems that need attention. Without a deal, a legal remedy

might have takenyears, with no guarantee that the courts would rule in favor of the players. A court-appointed mediator helped the two sides reach the

settlement; it now must beapproved by Judge Anita B. Brody of U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.

The money would beusedformedicalexams,concussionrelated compensation and aprogram of medical research for retired players and their families. The money, which may not be distributed for many months, will be available to all retired

players with neurological problems, not just the plaintiffs. — New YorkTimesNews Service

NFL

than a decade. The deal also ends the Continued from C1 specter o f C o m m issioner But it would provide help Roger G oodell a n d hi s right away to generations of league — just ahead of this past players still suffering s eason's kickoff, n o l e s s the effects of concussion-re- — callously battling in court lated injuries. It would also the very players who made replace the uncertain out- pro football wildly popular come and cost of litigation and profitable. And it finally with a step-by-step process puts realmoney where the overseen by i n d ependent NFL's mouth has been for doctors to assess the extent years. "Commissioner G o odell of those injuries and then cover the medical bills. and every owner gave the leThere's no way to mini- gal team the same direction: mize how important that is Do the right thing for the to those near the breaking game and forthe men who p oint or b eyond, and t he played it," league vice presifamilies struggling to look dent JeffPash said. "This is an important step after them. "I am able to live my life that builds on the significant the same way I was, but now changes we've made in re— chances are I am 44 now, cent years to make the game I won't make it to 50 or 60 safer, and we will continue — I have money now toput our work to better the longback for my children to go to term health and well-being college and for a little some- of NFL players." thing to be there financially," Save the second half of said former NFL r u n ning t hat quote, and look at i t back Kevin Turner, who suf- again at the end of this seafers from Lou Gehrig's dis- son, and for a few seasons ease and was also a party to after that. the lawsuit. Because the $765 million, "It will give them the peace even if the league paid it of mind to h ave the best now in a lump sum, reprequality of life they can have," sents less than 10 percent of Turner added, referring to the $9 billion-plus the NFL other former players."No c urrently collects i n r e v longer have to make deci- enues. Assuming the league sions regarding their health grows only modestly year based on what they can af- after year, by the time the ford, but based on what is the settlement fund i s c l osed best treatment for them." sometime around 2025, the And as m e diator L ayn payout will be less than I Phillips, a retired judge ap- percent. pointed by the U.S. District Until the settlement was Court in Philadelphia, noted proposed, it was impossible in a statement released af- to have a candid discussion ter the proposed deal was of how safe playing in the announced, "The alterna- NFL can be. The league's tive was for the two sides to insurers and lawyers made spend the next 10 years and sure of that, at least as long millions of dollars on litiga- as the lawsuit was hanging tion, which would have been over their heads. On top of great for lawyers, expert that, the collective bargainwitnesses, trial consultants ing agreement between the and others. But it would not NFL and its players effecdo much forretired players tively heads off similar lawand their families who are in suits in the future. need." By capping the league's Yet it was Phillips' next liability fo r t h e d a m ages sentence that may ultimately that concussions caused in decide how good a deal this the past, it frees the NFL to turns out to be: "This resolu- become a real partner in tion allows the sides to join player-safety issues unhintogether, do something con- dered by any conflicts of structive, and build a better interest. That was exactly game for the future." what Phillips had in mind Like the players, the NFL when the mediator called it a will reap some important "win-win." "The settlement means benefits. For one thing, the league can deny any wrong- that the parties reached an doing and likely won't have agreement to put litigation to answer a variety of poten- behind them, get help to retially damaging questions; tired players who need it, for example, how a rheuma- and work proactively to suptologist ended up in charge port research and make the of its euphemistically named game safer. These," Phillips "Mild Traumatic Brain Inwrote, "are goals everyone jury Committee" for more can share."

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Continued from C1 "Not all of us served in the military, but here is a way in ancillary form to contribute toward the well-being of our country and those who served us so b r avely," W h itcomb adds. The origin of Patriot Golf Day was spearheaded by PGA pro Dan Rooney of Stillwater, Okla. Rooney, an F-16 pilot in the Oklahoma Air N ational Guard, has logged two tours of duty in Iraq. And with the help of the PGA of America, the fundraiserhas blossomed to raise $17.1 million nationwide through Patriot Golf Day events, according to the Folds of Honor. Brasada Canyons Golf Club in Powell Butte, which is open to the public on Monday for the event, and Black Butte Ranch's Big Meadow and Glaze Meado w have joined the mix o f participating Central Oregon courses this year for the first time. Each of the courses taking part in Patriot Golf Day tailors the fundraiser to maximize donations. Some examples include: • Aspen Lakes in Sisters, which will ask for the customary $1-per-round donation, in October will co-host the third annual Patriot Challenge, a b enefit tournament for t h e Folds of Honor. • Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend is holding a raffle for golf equipment or free golf; tickets cost $10 each, three for $20, or

Ducks

PatriotGolfDayWeekend What:A nationwide golf-related fundraiser for the Folds of Honor

(a reference to the folding of the American flag) Foundation, an Oklahoma-based charity that provides postsecondary educational scholarships to families of U.S. soldiers who have been disabled or killed in the line of duty. When:Today through Monday

Participating cluds:Awbrey Glen, Lost Tracks, Tetherow and Widgi Creek, all in Bend; BlackButte Ranch (both courses); Crooked River Ranch; Juniper and Eagle Crest Resort (all three

courses), all in Redmond;Aspen Lakes inSisters; Brasada Canyons Golf Club in Powell Butte; MeadowLakes in Prineville;

and Crosswater, Meadows and Woodlands, all at Sunriver Resort. For more information:www.patriotgolfday.com,

www.playgolfamerica.com, www.foldsofhonor.org. CAN'T PLAY THIS WEEKEND? The Patriot Challenge at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters, Bend

Golf and Country Club andWidgi CreekGolf Club in Bendwill take place Dct. 4-6. Two-person best-ball tournament includes18

holes of golf at eachcourse. Cost is $565 per teamand includes golf, cart, range balls, contests, lunch eachday andtee prizes. Proceeds benefit the Folds of Honor Foundation and Patriot Golf Day. For more information or to register, visit www.aspenlakes.

com or contact Aspen Lakesgolf director Rob Malone at 541549-4653orrob©aspenlakes.com; BendG8CC head proErik Nielsen at 541-382-2878 or erikn@bendgolfclub.com; or Widgi

Creek general manager BradHudspeth at 541-382-4449 or brad©widgi.com.

the spring. He's a bright guy, a sharp guy, and he did a great job taking control of that role," Helfrichsaid."He is somebody I trust wholeheartedly.... That is something that I want to be able to do: Whether it is an of-

fensive guy, a defensive guy or a special teams situation, I want to be able at any time to look a guy in the eye." Frost grew up in Wood River, Neb. His father, Larry, was a halfback for the Huskers and went on tobecome the coach at Wood River High School, while his mother, Carol, was a national track champion in the discus and was on the U.S. Olympic team. She now serves a s receivers coach for h e r husband. Scott Frost played two seasons atStanford before transferring to N ebraska, where he was 24-2 as a starter under coach Tom Osborne. His senior season in 1997 was capped by a 42-17 victory over Tennessee and quarterback Peyton Manning in the Orange BowL As for the national championship:

ing $100 per player. Brasada will then donate $10 of that green fee. • Crooked River Ranch will ask for donations through Oct. 6, and those who donate are automatically entered into a drawing for a prize pack from Bushnell. In addition, active and retired military receive a discount with another paid

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In the end, the success of the fundraiser comes down to the golfers who choose to donate, he adds. "The golf courses sort of get the credit, but it's the players that donate the money through one form or another," Whitcomb says. "It's a great way for the game of golf, as well as

ing, one receiving). The first

O n Saturday, when t h e Ducks open the season at home against Nicholls State, Frost will be watching from upstairs in the booth, something new to him at Oregon. P lay-calling duties w il l b e collaborative, as it was under Kelly. "It's a different experience up there. You're able to separate yourself from the emotion of it and see the whole field," Frost said. "It's more like playing chess with live action figures than being on the sideline and coaching emotion and making sure everyone's head is on right. It's a different kind of coaching."

freshman selected to the Pac12's all-conference first team in 23years,Mariota passed for 2,677 yards while completing a school-record 68.5 percent of his passes. He had 3,429 yards of total offense. Although the Ducks' trademark i s t h ei r w a r p -speed ground game, there has been talk that Mariota may pass more now that he has a year of starting experience. "I've heard those rumors, too. I think those are the talking heads, the people outside of the program who are prognosticating," Frost said, unwilling to give away any new wrinkles in Oregon's offense. "We're going to do whatever gives us the best chance to win. That said, Marcus Mariota is a very tal-

the people who play the game, to give to what I think is one of the most worthy causes." — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com.

ented passer. He's going to give us a great chance to win when he throws the ball."

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DEADLINES

We will be closedMonday,Labor Day,Sept. 2, 2013 RETAIL K CLASSIFIED DISPLAYADVERTISING

CLASSIFIED LINER DEADLINES Tuesday 9/3..............................Noon Friday 8/30

Classifieds • 541-385-5809

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adult. • E agle Crest Resort i n Redmond on Saturday is offering a 50 percent discount on its green feesat allthree courses to all veterans and active military, and the first golfer who aces the Challenge Course's 18th hole wins a 2013 Chevrolet Camero. • Employees at Lost Tracks in south Bend go door to door around the surrounding neighborhood seeking donations. • M eadow L a kes G o l f

DAY DEADLINE Monday9/2....................................W ednesday,8/28 4 p.m. At Home9/3..................................W ednesday,8/28 4 p.m . Tuesday 9/3........................................Thursday, 8/29 Noon W ednesday 9/4........................................Fri day,8/30 Noon

,'$20 GREENFEESFOR ,' oÃfaIItfnk,.

• Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend will be asking for donations from golfers this weekend and also will co-host the Patriot Challenge. "Everybody has d i f ferent forms of fundraising, and it's heartwarming," W hi t comb

Jeep

I

I

their green fees waived ($40 cart and caddie fee will apply).

SUMMER CLEARANCEEVENT

PRESENT THIS AD

Celehratinri ZO Years I

In addition, the resort offers a pizza party to whichever of its three golf shops raises the most money for the Patriot Golf Day fundraiser. • Tetherow Golf Course in Bend is reducing its green fee to $99 through Monday and will match any donation of $5. In addition, military veterans with proof of service will have

='0:

CELEBRATION of Go1f For Everyone.

more (the balls retail for $3).

says. 10 for $70. • Brasada Canyons is opening its private-resort course to the public on Monday, charg-

The 13-0 Huskers finished as the No. I team in the coaches' poll, while undefeated Michigan was No. 1 in the AP poll. He went on to play for six y ears in the NFL, with t he Jets, Browns, Packers and Buccaneers. Frost's first coaching job was as a graduate assistant for the Huskers in 2002. He was linebackers coach at Northern Iowa in2008 before being named co-defensive coordinator there the next year. He was hired by Kelly in 2009. The Ducks have gone 467 since then. Frost is now in charge of quarterbacks, a natural fit, and he has one of the best in the country in sophomore Marcus Mariota, who some have labeled an early Heisman Trophy contender. "The funny thing i s t h at every time I've gotten a job coaching a different position, things that I didn't even realize that I knew come back to me," he said. "Situations come up and it makes you remember a situation that happened when you were playing or a coaching point that somebody gave you along the way." Mariotasettheteam'ssingleseason record with 38 touchdowns (32 passing, five rush-

Continued from C1 Helfrich said there was never a doubt that Frost would be the perfectfit. "Frosty did a great job in

Course in Prineville is discounting its green fees on Labor Day to $20 for veterans and seniors, and to $25 for any other golfer. • Sunriver Resort golfers will receive a free logo golf ball from the resort'sMeadows, Crosswater o r Wo o d lands coursesfor donations of $3 or

SMOLIC H

m ot o r s

541.389.1 1 77 1865 NE Highway 20 I Bend www.smolichmotors.com Expires e/31/13

The Bulletin


C5 © To look upindividual stocks, goto bendbulletin.coin/bueinss. Alsoseearecapin Sunday's Businesssection.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

NASDAO 14,840.95

3,620.30

Toda+ Foday, August 30, 2013

Lighter wallets? The Commerce Department's latest monthly tally of Americans' income is due out today. Income growth slowed to 0.3 percent in June, weaker than May's 0.4 percent gain. Economists anticipate income growth

+

+

S&P 500

1,640

Close: 1,638.17 1 0 DA Y S

1,700

15,600

1,650

15,200.

0.3

M

A

2,462 1,292 2,714 1,336 1958 1792 1 085 7 0 8 26 61 32 19

F

M

A

J

DDW DDW Trans. DDW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

J

Alaska Air Group Source Factset Avista Corp Bank of America Barrett Business Boeing Co

ALK 32.69 ~ AVA 22 78 ~ BAC 7. 8 3 ~ BBSI 24 6 4 ~ BA 6 903 ~ CascadeBancorp CACB 4.65 ~ Eye on consumers Columbia Bukg CDLB 16.18 ~ Rising home prices and steady job Columbia Sporlswear COLM 47.72 ~ gains are giving Americans reasons CostcoWholesale COST 93.51 to be more confident about the Craft Brew Alliance BREW 5.62 — 0 economy. FLIR Systems FLIR 18.58 The University of Michigan ConHewlett Packard HPQ 11.35 sumer Sentiment Survey index rose Home Federal BucpID HOME 9.90 Intel Corp INTC 19.23 to 85.1 in July, the highest in six KEY 78 1 ~ years. The August reading, due out Keycorp Kroger Co KR 2 1. 73 ~ today, is expected to be down 4yLattice Semi LSCC 3.46 slightly. Consumers' confidence is LA Pacific L PX 12.19 ~ watched closely because their M DU 19 . 59 ~ spending accounts for about 70 per- MDU Resources MentorGraphics M EN T 13,21 — o cent of the U.S. economy. 4yMicrosoft Corp MSFT 26.26 Nike Inc 8 NKE 4 4.83 ~ NordstromIuc JWN 50.94 ~ Nwst NatGas NWN 41,01 o — OfficeMax Iuc DMX 4 . 75 ~ PaccarIuc PCAR 38.76 ~ 4y Planar Systms PLNR 1.12 Plum Creek PCL 40.51 ~ Prec Castparts PCP 157 51 ~ Safeway Iuc S WY 15.00 $$Schuitzer Steel SCHN 23.07 Sherwin Wms SHW 138.36 Staucorp Fucl SFG 30.45 — 0 StarbucksCp SBUX 44.27 Triquiut Semi TQNT 430 ~ UmpquaHoldings UMPQ 11.17 $$ US Baucorp U SB 30.96 ~ WashingtonFedl WAFD 15.56 ~ 2 4yWells Fargo &Co WFC 31.25 Business index Weyerhaeuser W Y 2 4.35 ~

Economists project that a key business gauge improved slightly last month. The Institute for Supply Management'sChicago business barometer index will be released today. Forecasts call for the August reading to be 53.0, up from 52.3 in July. A reading above 50 means theeconomy is expanding in the region.

Chicago business barometer seasonally adjusted 60

58.7

est. 52.4

50

51.6

52 3 53.0

4g.o

A

M

J

J

A

SILVER

+

.

A

HIGH LOW CLOSE 14916.01 14792.11 14840.95 6365.82 6295.74 6322.14 480.38 476.88 477.83 9354.71 9286.24 9315.82 3635.84 3587.07 3620.30 1646.41 1630.88 1638.17 1206.10 1194.28 1201.33 17516.28 17347.34 17438.59 1029.05 1015.59 1026.94

M

CHG. %CHG. WK Mo OTR YTD +16.44 +0.11% T T +13.25% +16.36 +0.26% T T +19.13% -3.04 -0.63% T T +5.46% +6.75 + 0.07% T T +10.33% +26.95 +0.75% T +19.90% +3.21 +0.20% T T +14.86% $-17.73% +5.26 +0.44% T +55.74 +0.32% T T +16.30% +10.44 +1.03% T +20.91%

68.00 57.73 +.90 +1.6 w 29 26 26.44 15 - 0.6 V 15.03 14.17 +05 + 04 w 73 49 64.28 +.79 +1.2 w 109 49 104.93 +1. 66 $.1.6 w 7.18 6.23 +.31 +5.2 w 25.59 23.69 +.13 +0.6 w 66.69 56.36 +.15 +0.3 120.20 111.39 +93 + 08 w 1206 11.48 -.52 -4.3 33.82 31.77 +.26 $.0.8 w 27.78 22.52 09 -04 4 14.81 13.38 10 -0.7 w 25.98 22.06 23 -1.0 1 263 1179 + 10 +0 9 w 39.98 36.7 8 +. 3 8 +1 .0 w 5.71 4 . 8 9 + . 0 2 +0.4 ~ 22.55 15.3 4 +. 4 3 +2 .9 4 30.21 2 7. 1 3 -.30 -1.1 w 23,60 22 .58 + . 4 2 +1,9 k 36.43 33 .55 +. 5 3 +1.6 w 66.85 63.4 8 +.3 2 +0 .5 V 63.34 5 5. 9 8 -.25 -0.4 w 50,8 0 41. 4 0 -.14 -0.3 W 13.17 10. 9 4 +. 0 4 + 0.4 a 60.0 0 54. 0 0 +. 0 4 +0.1 V 2.36 1.90 + .08 +4 .4 54.62 44.55 +.39 $-0.9 V 2 70 00 213.57 +1.18 $.0.6 w 28 . 4 2 26.03 +.23 +0.9 w 32.99 25.42 -.25 -1.0 194.56 172.05 +2.68 +1.6 V 56.07 53 .54 + . 46 +0.9 w 74.27 71 .18 + . 22 +0.3 V 8 30 7 79 + 07 + 09 x 17 .48 16 . 66 +. 1 6 +1.0 w 37.97 36. 1 1 ... ... w 2.78 2 1. 2 6 -.08 -0.4 w 44.79 41 .25 . .. ... w 33.24 27. 7 2 +. 0 6 +0.2 4

i

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A weak profit outlook for the third quarter weighed on i n creased 29 percent and overall U.S. sales strength shares of Signet Jewelers. Shares fell 4 percent ened. However, Wall Street expected $906.7 Thursday. million in revenue. The company says itforesees Signet earned $67.4 million, or 84 cents third-quarter earnings of 37 cents to 43 per share. That's down from $70.7 million, cents per share. Analysts were expecting or 85 cents per share, a year earlier. Taking 48 cents per share. out costs related to its acquisition of Ultra Signet also reported results that fell Stores, earnings were 90 cents per share. short of second-quarter revenue expectaSignet's results arrived after rival Zale tions. For the period ended Aug. 3, revenue topped analyst expectations, and Tiffany & Co. rose 3 percent to $880.2 million, as online sales posted a 16 percent profit jump. 52-wEEK RANGE $45 ~ ~ ~ ~ 76

10-Y R * :9%

FundFocus

Price - earnings ratio (trailing 12 months):15

Market value: $5.4 billion

Total returns through Aug. 29 *Annualized

AP

source Factset

5 -YR*: 24%

Ann. d i vidend:$0.60 Div. yie ld: 0. 9%

Source: FactSet

SelectedMutualFunds

EURO

+

ppg3

1.3244

StoryStocks

VZ

Close:$47.82 X1.26 or 2.7% The largest U.S. wireless carrier in the country may be buying Vodafone's stake in their joint venture for $100 billion. $52 ~ 50 48

Campbell Soup CPB Close:$43.33 V-1.38 or -3.1% The food company posted a loss for its fourth quarter, stung by a charge related to the potential sale of a European business. $48 46 44

J

J 52-week range

$48.51 ~

J J 52-week range

A $54.31

$34.28 ~

A $48.83

Vol.:36.2m (3.3x avg.) PE: 88.6 Vol.:3.1m (2.6x avg.) P E: 18 . 4 Mkt. Cap:$136.84 b Yi e l d: 4.3% Mkt. Cap:$13.57 b Yiel d : 2. 7%

Guess

w

-1.30

Stocks finished higher on Thursday, as investors focused on encouraging economic reports even as a U.S. standoff with Syria loomed large. The government raised its estimate for U.S. economic growth in the April-through-June quarter to 2.5 percent from 1.7 percent. A separate report showed that the number of Americans who sought unemployment benefits last week fell to the lowest level in five years. Verizon Communications was the biggest gainer among the blue chips after Britain's Vodafone confirmed it was in talks with Verizon to sell its 45 percent stake in their joint venture, Verizon Wireless. Verizon

Signet outlook disappoints::.", „;".",

1-Y R :47%

$108.80 +

30

$24.09

GES

Close:$30.82 %3.51 or 12.9%

The clot hing company's secondquarter profit and revenue beat market expectations and it raised its full-year profit forecast. $35

Signet SIG Close:$67.00V-2.83 or -4.1% The company failed to follow the path of other jewelry retailers this quarter and fell short of Wall Street expectations. $80 75

30

70

J

J 52-week range

65-

J J A 52-week range $22.48~ $34.36 $44.88 ~ $76.15 Vol.:7.4m (9.1x avg.) P E: 16 . 4 Vol.:2.6m (5.4x avg.) P E: 14 . 9 Mkt. Cap:$2.62 b Yiel d : 2 .6% Mkt. Cap:$5.84 b Yiel d : 0. 9 %

Corinthian Colleges

A

C OC O Fresh Market

Close:$2.35 V-0.26 or -10.0% Shares of the for-profit educator sank after revenue slipped in its fourth quarter, hurt by a drop in new enrollments. $3.0

TFM Close:$48.01 V-6.27 or -11.6% The grocer was downgraded by UBS, which expects earnings-pershare growth to be delayed for another six months.

$60 55

2.5

50

J

J 52-week range

$1.85~

Urban Outfitters

J J 52-week range

A

$2.37

Vol.:2.2m (2.8x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$202.53 m

A

$36.51 ~

$62.48

P E: 8 . 7 Vol.:3.7m (8.1x avg.) Yield : ... Mkt. Cap:$2.32 b

P E: 34 .3 Yield:...

URBN

Close:$42.49 %0.54 or 1.3% The retailer has regularly announced major stock buyback programs and says it will buy back as many as 10 million shares. $44 42 40

Stemline Thera. STML Close:$35.20 %1.32 or 3.9% Jefferies Group initiated coverage of the biopharmaceutical company, citing upcoming pivotal trials of its lead dl'ug. $40 30 20

J

J 52-week range

$34.38~

Total return YTD: 26% M

.

Dividend Footnotes:a - Extra dividends were paid, i75itare not included. ii - Annual rate plus stock c - Liquidating dividend. 8 - Amount declared or paid in last12 months. f - Current annual rate, wriicii was mcreased bymost recent divuend announcement. i - Sum ot dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. 1 -Sumof dividends Caidthis year. Most recent divuend was omitted or deferred k - Declared cr paid thi$ year, acumulative issue with dividends marrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - imtiai dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. 7 - Declared or paid in precedmg 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, apprcicmate cash value cn ex-distriiiution date.PE Footnotes:q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no PiE ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds ea dd - Loss in last12 months

Signet Jewelers(SIG) Thursday's close:$67 40

.

52-WK RANGE oCLOSE YTD 1YR VOL TICKER LO HI C LOSE CHG %CHG WK MO OTR %CHG %RTN (Thous)P/E DIV

NAME M

Chan g e: 16.44 (0.1%)

NorthwestStocks

0.1 0.0

Close: 14,840.95

.

1 4 000

M

est.

flat

I

14,400 "

0.4

0.3

-6.10

1 0 DAY S

14,800"

NYSE NASD

1.0

GOLD ~ $1412.90 ~

i•

14,760

16,000"

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

1.3

.

14 960 .

1,750

percent change, seasonally adjusted 1.5%

10 YR T NOTE 2.76%

Dow jones industrials

Change: 3.21 (0.2%)

1,600 '

StocksRecap

Personal income

3 21

1,638.17

1 680

slowed again in July, rising only 1,600 0.1 percent. A slowdown in 1 550: income growthcould dash hopes that strong consumer spending will help boost a lackluster economy in the second half of this year.

0.5

S&P 500

26 g5

Vol.:1.8m (1.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$6.24 b

J J A 52-week range $44.86 $16.33 ~ $33.18 P E: 23 .7 Vol.:442.8k (2.2x avg.) P E: . . . Yield: ... Mkt. Cap:$441.37 m Yield :... A

AP

SOURCE: Sungard

InterestRates

NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG WK MO OTR AGO 3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.76 percent on Thursday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.

. 02 .03 . 0 5 .06 .11 .12

-0.01 w w -0.01 -

w

w w

.10 .1 4

-0.01

.17

V

~

V

2 -year T-note . 40 .40 ... L 5-year T-note 1 .6 1 1 .58 + 0.03 w 10-year T-riote 2.76 2.77 -0.01 W

i A L

L .27 i .68 X 1.65

- 0.03 w

w

a 2.7 7

30-year T-bond 3.71 3.74

BONDS

NET 1YR YEST PVS CHG WK MO OTR AGO

Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.52 3.57 -0.05 w BondBuyerMuni Idx 5.29 5.29 ... W L Barclays USAggregate 2.50 2.46 +0.04 W L PRIME FED Barcl ays US High Yield 6.40 6.40 ... w L RATE FUNDS Moodys AAACorp Idx 4.58 4.51 $0.07 w L YEST 3.25 .13 Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.70 1.70 . . . w L 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Barclays US Corp 3 .42 3.37 +0.05 w L 1 YR AGO3.25 .13

>

2 4. 7

L 4 .22 L 1.81 L 6 .74 L 3.41 L .95 L 2 95 .

AP

PERCENT RETURN Yr RANK The fund is in the midst of a FAMILY FUND N AV CHG YTD 1Y R 3 Y R 5YR 1 3 5 leadership change. Its longtime Marketsummary American Funds BalA m 22.27 + . 04+10.1 +13.6 +13.4 +7.5 A A A manager, Bob Fetch, stepped Most Active CaplncBuA m 55.00 +.17 + 6.1 + 8 .7 +10.0 +4.9 8 A C aside as lead manager earlier this CpWldGrlA m 40.57 +.09 +10.7 +18.1 +11.7 +4.6 C C C NAME VOL (Ogs) LAST CHG year and plans to retire by year's EurPacGrA m 43.35 +.19 + 5.2 +14.8 +7.9 +3.4 D D A S&P500ETF 914940 164.17 + . 26 end. FrilnvA m 46.5 0 + .13+14.7 +20.1 +15.9 +6.3 C D C BkofAm 733988 14.17 + . 05 iShEMkts MktVGold

Facebook Vodafone FordM

BariPVix rs Microsoft VerizoriCm

603002 599456 570473 483912 468920 453101 442142 296243

3 7.73 $ . 2 9 28.54 + . 24

41.28 +.73 31.80 +2.39 16.50 + . 48 16.86 + . 38 33.55 +.53 47.82 +1.26

LAST 23.36 Percptr 10.75 eGain 13.00 AcastiPh g 2.84 ParkCity 7.40 GW Phmn 11.95 PrUShtMex 29.00 Guess 30.82 McEwenM 2.88 AnchBcWA 17.40

CHG %CHG +5.73 +2.15 +2.18 $-.38 $..95 +1.39 +3.37 +3.51 $ ..31 +1.75

+ 3 2 .5 + 2 5 .0 + 2 0.1 + 1 5 .4 + 1 4 .7 + 1 3.2 + 1 3.1 + 1 2 .9 + 1 2 .1 + 1 1 .2

Losers NAME LAST CSVlnvBrnt 26.15 JetPay 3.10 C oeur wt 2.4 6 CVD Eqp 1 2 . 48 x G Tech n 5 .26

CHG %CHG -7.29 -21.8 —.65 -17.3 —.44 -15.2 -2.17 -14.8 -.74 -12.3

Foreign Markets LAST CHG %CHG + 25.89 + . 6 5 3,986.35 London 6,483.05 + 52.99 + . 82 Frankfurt 8,194.55 + 36.65 + . 4 5 Hong Kong 21,704.78 $ 180.13 $ . 8 4 Mexico -85.58 -.22 39,162.49 Milan 16,905.15 + 162.06 + . 97 Tokyo $ -12%25 + . 91 13,459.71 Stockholm 1,224.31 + 6.16 + . 5 1 Sydney + 5.10 + . 1 0 5,083.10 Zurich 7,763.55 -12.46 —.16 NAME Paris

VALUE

BL EN D

LD F VX GR OWTH

cC o $3

$o

Dodge 8 Cox

$L

The price of oil dipped after surging earlier in the week over GrthAmA m 40 .11 +.16+ 16.8 +23.0 +16.7 +6.5 A C C worries about a IricAmerA m 19.23 +.02 + 8.3 +11.8 +12.2 +7.4 8 8 A potential U.S. atIrivCoAmA m 34.88 +.14 +16.6 +19.3 +15.8 +6.6 C D C tack against SyrNewPerspA m 34.61 +.08 + 10.7 +18.0 +13.6 +6.7 C 8 A ia. Silver led a WAMutlnvA m36.06 +.05 +16.7 +18.9 +17.5 +7.3 D 8 B decline in met-1.3 + 0.5 + 4.2 +6.7 A 8 8 Income 13.48 +.02 als. Crops were IntlStk 3 7.86 +.06 +9.3 +22.7 +9.7 +3.4 A 8 A Stock 1 46.27 +.33 +21.0 +27.8 +19.5 +6.9 A A B mixed.

Fidelity

Gainers NAME Methode

Lord Abbett FdmtlEqtyA m

Commodities

Contra 89.07 +.35 +15.9 +17.3 +17.1 +7.9 C C 8 GrowCo 112. 49 +.90+ 20.7 +19.7 +20.8+10.2 8 A A LowPriStk d 47 .31 +.18+19.8 +25.7 +19.3+10.7 C 8 A Fidelity Spartan 500l d xAdvtg 58 .25 +.12+ 16.5 +18.7 +17.9 +7.4 C 8 8 FrankTemp-FraukliuIncome Cm 2.32 ... +6.2 +10.2 +10.0 +6.8 A A A «C $3 IncomeA m 2.3 0 . .. +6 . 6 + 1 0.9 +10.7 +7.4 A A A FrankTemp-TempletouGIBoridAdv 12 . 64 +.02 -2.8 + 3 .5 + 4 .9 +8.9 A A A «C 4o Oppeuheimer RisDivA m 19. 57 +.03+13.1 +15.4 +15.3 +5.5 E D D RisDivB m 17 . 70 +.03 + 12.4 +14.4 +14.3 +4.5 E E E Morningstar OwnershipZone™ RisDivC m 17 . 61 +.02 + 12.5 +14.6 +14.4 +4.7 E E E e Fund target represents weighted O SmMidValA m39.60 +.19 + 22.2 +31.0 +15.1 +4.5 A E E average of stock holdings SmMidValB m33.24 +.15 + 21.4 +29.9 +14.1 +3.6 A E E • Represents 75% of furid's stock holdings PIMCO TotRetA m 1 0 . 67 .. . -3.7 -1.4 +3.3 +6.5 C C B CATEGORY Large Blend T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 30.43 + . 03+16.1 +21.1 +16.7 +7.2 C C 8 MORNINGSTAR GrowStk 44.2 2 + .28+ 17.0 +18.3 +19.4 +8.8 8 A A RATING™ * ** * f r HealthSci 54.7 7 + .53+ 32.9 +36.1 +32.8+17.3 8 A A Newlncome 9. 3 4 +.01-3.5 - 2.1 +2.7 +5.3 D D C ASSETS $2,946 million Vanguard 500Adml 151.54 +.32 +16.5 +18.7 +17.9 +7.4 C 8 8 EXP RATIO 1.09% 500lnv 151.51 +.32 +16.4 +18.6 +17.8 +7.3 C 8 8 MANAGER Deepak Khanra CapDp 42.52 +.24 $-26.5 +34.2 +19.8 +8.9 A A A SINCE 2007-12-31 Eqlnc 27.78 +.04 +16.6 +19.1 +19.1 +9.0 D A A RETURNS3-MD +1.1 StratgcEq 26.13 +.17 +21.8 +27.9 +22.1 +8.5 8 A 8 YTD +20.8 TgtRe2020 25.50 +.06 +7.0 +10.5 +10.9 +5.9 8 A A 1- YR +25.1 Tgtet2025 14.71 +.04 +8.2 +12.0 +11.8 +5.9 8 8 8 3-YR ANNL +16.2 TotBdAdml 10.59 +.02 -2.8 -2.1 +2.7 $-4.9 D D D 5-YR-ANNL +7.8 Totlntl 15.19 +.02 +3.0 +13.4 +6.8 +1.6 D E C TotStlAdm 41.51 +.13 +17.5 +20.5 +18.5 +7.9 8 A A TOP 5HOLDINGS PCT TotStldx 41.49 +.13 +17.4 +20.3 +18.4 +7.8 8 A A JPMorgan Chase & Co 3.07 USGro 24.79 +.15 +16.6 +19.5 +19.0 +7.4 8 A 8 Actavis Inc 2.75 Welltn 36.89 +.06 +10.4 +13.7 $-12.7 $7.7 A A A Citigroup Inc 2.74 Fund Footnotes. b - ree covering market costs 1$paid from fund assets. d - Deferred sales charge, or redemption Verizon Communications Inc 2.43 fee. f - front load (saies charges). m - Multiple feesarecharged, usually a marketing feeand either asales or Express Scripts 2.32 redemption fee. Source: Morn1ngsta7.

CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD Crude Dil (bbl) 108.80 110.10 -1.18 + 18.5 Ethanol (gal) 2.46 2.50 -0.36 + 12.2 Heating Dil (gal) 3.18 3.21 - 0.73 + 4 . 6 Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.62 3.57 + 1.01 + 8 . 0 Unleaded Gas(gal) 3.07 3.09 - 0.91 + 9 . 1 FUELS

METALS

Gold (oz) Silver (oz) Platinum (oz) Copper (Ib) Palladium (oz)

Exchange The dollar rose versus the Japanese yen, euro and other major currencies, getting a lift from positive news on U.S. economic growth and unemployment aid applications.

h5N4 QG

%CH. %YTD -0.40 -15.6 -1.23 -20.2 -1.15 -1.1 -1.74 -10.9 - 1.25 + 4 .9

CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD -4.9 Cattle (Ib) 1.24 1.23 +0.20 Coffee (Ib) 1.13 1.15 -1.27 -21.3 Corri (bu) 4.97 5.04 -1.39 -28.8 Cotton (Ib) 0.93 0.93 +24.2 Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 316.10 308.70 +2.40 -15.5 Orange Juice (Ib) 1.38 1.37 +0.95 +18.9 AGRICULTURE

Soybeans (bu) Wheat(bu)

Foreign

CLOSE PVS. 1412.90 1419.00 24.09 24.39 1522.40 1540.10 3.24 3.31 736.75 746.05

14.30 6.41

14.33 6.47

- 0.21 -0.81

+ 0.8 -17.6

1YR. MAJORS CLOSE CHG. %CHG. AGO USD per British Pound 1.5500 —.0025 —.16% 1.5836 Canadian Dollar 1.0530 +.0047 +.45% .9886 USD per Euro 1.3244 —.0093 —.70% 1.2528 Japanese Yen 9 8.26 + . 5 5 + . 56 % 78 . 7 0 Mexican Peso 13.3 477 + .0586 +.44% 13.3124 EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLEEAST Israeli Shekel 3.6259 —.0345 —.95% 4.0316 Norwegian Krone 6. 0 902 + .0402 +.66% 5.8256 South African Rand 10.3520 +.0615 +.59% 8.4019 Swedish Krona 6.58 2 9 + . 0707 +1.07% 6.6635 Swiss Franc .9308 +.0091 +.98% .9587 ASIA/PACIFIC Australian Dollar 1.1195 + .0013 +.12% .9 6 51 Chinese Yuan 6.1205 -.0000 -.00% 6.3529 Hong Kong Dollar 7.7549 -.0006 -.01% 7.7556 Indian Rupee 66.600 -2.225 -3.34% 55.695 Singapore Dollar 1.2752 -.0021 -.16% 1.2530 South Korean Won 1112.15 -1.52 -.14% 1135.01 -.03 -.10% 2 9 .94 Taiwan Dollar 29.95


© www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

CentralOregon fuel prices Price per gallon for regular unleaded gas and diesel, as posted Thursday at AAA Fuel Price Finder

(aaa.opisnet.comj. GASOLINE • Space Age,20635 Grandview Drive,

Bend............ $3.52 • Fred Meyer,944 S.W. Ninth St.,

Redmond ....... $3.57 • Rnn's Oil,62980 U.S. Highway 97,

easex e aions

I'0 — saw no improvement under the government's latest reviWASHINGTON — The U.S. sion. That suggests the econeconomy grew much faster omy entered the third quarter in the second quarter than with little added momentum. previously believed, mainly Gross domesticproduct because of an improved trade rose at a 2.5 percent annual picture and higher demand for rate in the April-to- June periAmerican-made goods and od instead of an initial reading services. of 1.7 percent, the Commerce Yet the spending pattern of Department said Thursday. That's much faster than 1.1 American consumers —the linchpin of the U.S. growth percent in the first quarter

By Jeffry Bartash

Marhetwatch

spending slow wage growth

and a scant 0.1 percent growth rate in the final three months of 2012. It also topped economists' revised expectations. In recent trading, U.S. stocks rose in the wake of the upward revision to GDP and another report showing a decline in weekly jobless claims. Still, few analysts expect U.S. growth to accelerate much in the second half of the year in light of reduced government

remains troubling," said Jim Baird, chief investment officer and a sluggish global economy. at Plante Moran Financial The U.S. is forecast to grow Advisors. 2.4 percent in the third quarter GDP is the broadest meaand 2.8 percent in the fourth sure of an economy's health, quarter, according to the latest reflecting the value of all the poll of economists. goods and services a nation "The positive news is that produces. Economists surthe economy is still advancing, veyed byMarketWatch had although the fact that growth expected GDP to be revised up has not surpassed 3 percent to 2.3 percent, largely because since the first quarter of 2012 of a smaller U.S. trade deficit. a still-high unemployment rate

Bend............ $3.61 • Chevron,1745 N.E.

Third St., Bend... $3.64 • Safeway,80 N.E.Cedar

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St. Madras .......$3.72 • Texaco,539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond.....$3.74 • Chevron,2100 N.E. U.S. Highway 20,

J.

Nasdaq shoulders blame for

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Bend............ $3.76 • Texaco,178 Fourth St.,

Madras..........$3.74 • Chevron,398 N.W. Third St., Prineville........ $3.80

!

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trade halt

• Chevron,1001 Railway, Sisters .. $3.80

DIESEL • Gnrdy's TruckStop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine.......... $3.68 • Chevron,398 N.W. Third St.,

Prineville........ $3.70 • Chevron,1210 U.S. Highway 97,

Madras......... $3.78 • Safeway,80 N.E. Cedar St. Madras .......$3.84 • Texaco,539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond.... $3.99 The Bulletin

Roh Kerr i The Bulletin

BRIEFING

Boneyard to open new drewery Boneyard Beerplans to open a newbrewery in a leasedspace in northeast Bendand hopes to bemaking beer there by January.

Tony Lawrence, coowner of Boneyard Beer, said the new brewery off

Empire Avenue isthree times the size of the current one and will allow

the company to brew about twice as much

beer next year as it expects to makethis year. Lawrence said plans for a canning line have beenhaltedsothecompany can focus ondraft production. "It's about keeping things simple," he said. "Dur current vision is

going to allow us to do a better job and stay

focused on what wecurrently do." But by 2015, he hopes to be able to of-

fer customers someof Boneyard's brews in

An excavator and a drilling rig prepare land Wednesday in NorthWest Crossing for the development's next expansion, called the Discovery Park area.

xpan in or t

e s t r ossin

By Rachael Rees

ready for building roads and The Bulletin laying out home lots. ork i s und e r w ay The plan is to develop 172 to prepare land for single-family housing lots the next big expan- in the Discovery Park area, sion of NorthWest Crossing, pending approval by the city. referred toas the Discovery Three additional lots, includPark area, with a proposed ing a nearly 5-acre parcel, 175 housing lots, a 34-acre are planned for multifamily park and a 3-acre pond. housing. "We'll determine what we'll Heavy equipment has started to remove loose dirt do with those lots at the time in a former pumice mine on the land is developed, dependthe property, said David Ford, ing on market conditions," he general manager for Northsaid. "It gives us some flexibilWest Crossingdeveloper ity to respond to the market." West Bend Property Co. Ford said 15 acres of the He said about 565,000 cubic 34-acre park will be imyards will be removed and proved, with a manicured replaced, and about 200,000 landscape and paved trails, yards of additional fill will be and the rest will be left natubrought in to bring the land to ral. The improved section of the required elevation. He ex- the park is scheduled to be pects the work, which began completed in the fall of 2014. "The goal is we would have Aug. 19, to take between six and seven months. our first phase of lots availWhen complete, he said, able in the Discovery Park the 98-acre area west of Mt. area by spring or summer Washington Drive will be 2014, with homes available

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for sale spring of 2015," Ford sald. In the existing NorthWest Crossing area, he said, builders are finishing up the last residential area, composed of 60 lots, on the east side of Mt. Washington Drive. Ford

expects construction to be done by next month. He said a couple of parcels of commercially zoned land near W estside Church are also undeveloped. — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

The Associated Press NEW YORK — A threehour trading outage on the Nasdaq last week was partly the result of issues within the company's control, the Nasdaq OMX Group said Thursday. In a statement, the company detailed some of its early findings from an internal review. The Nasdaq blamed "a confluenceofunprecedented events" that overwhelmed the exchange'ssystem for handling price information. It said the catalyst was a torrent of messages from a trading platform run by the New York Stock Exchange, Arca. "NASDAQ OMX is deeply disappointed in the events of August 22," the statement said, "and our performance is unacceptable to our members, issuers and the investing

public." Sara Rich, a spokeswoman for NYSE Euronext, declined to comment. The outage cracked the midday calm of a quiet summer day on Wall Street, sending brokers and traders scrambling to figure out what went wrong. Suspicion immediately fell on high-speed trading. But on Thursday, the Nasdaq absolved high-speed trading of any blame. The trouble started in the morning, according to Nasdaq's version of events, when Arca tried to connect and disconnect more than 20 times with the Nasdaq's information processing system. Arca then senta stream ofprice quotes for inaccurate stock symbols. The flood of data amounted to more than double the amount Nasdaq's processing system was tested to handle and 26 times the average flow. As a result, the company's processing system failed, which revealed a flaw in the system's software.

either 750-milliliter or 1-liter bottles. While plans for the

current tasting room and breweryarestill unknown, he said, Boneyard

Fast-food workers protest across the United States

lovers will haveaccessto the brewery's beer. "We'll always havea

By Candice Choi

tap room available to the

and Sam Hananel

public," he said. — Bulletin staff report

DISPATCHES • Dent Instruments,of Bend,hasannounced that its PowerScout 3 Plus Power Meter has been certified by independent testing labs to have met or exceeded guidelines of BACnet Testing Laboratory, a leading industry standards agency. PowerScout 3 Plus provides precise energy measurements and can beused in new construction or building recommissioning. • Invisible FenceCentral Oregon has received certification in Perfect Start Plus Training, Invisible Fence's program for training petsto use the electronic fence.

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Fast-food protests are underway in cities including New York, Chicago and Detroit, with organizers expecting the biggest national walkouts yet in a demand for higher wages. Similar protests organized by unions and community groups in cities over the past several months have brought considerable media

attention to a staple of the fastfood industry — the so-called "Mc Jobs" that are known for their low pay. In New York, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn joined about 300 to 400 protesters in a march. The lack of awareness among some illustrates the challenge workers face. Participating workers, who are asking for $15 an hour, still represent a tiny fraction of the industry.

The federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour, which works out to about $15,000 a year for fulltime employees. The movement comes amid calls from the White House, some members of Congress and economists to hike the federal minimum wage. But most proposals seek a far more modest increase than the one workers are asking for, with President Barack Obama wanting to boost it to $9 an hour.

Danny Alvarez protests with about 200 supporters of the fast-food workers strike at a Burger King in Austin, Texas, on Thursday. Jay Janner Austin Amencan Statesman

BEST OF THE BIZ CALENDAR TUESDAY • What's Brewingin Your Community? Representatives from Crux Fermentation Project, Deschutes Brewery, GoodLife Brewing, Worthy Brewing and 10 Barrel discuss the economic impactof the brewing industry, issues

thecompaniesfaceand what the future holds, registration requested; $30 for members, $40 for non-members; 5 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881 or www. bendchamberrorg. • Be a TaxPreparer: Preparation for the Oregon

Board of TaxPractitioners preparer exam;CEUs included; registration required; $429; Sept. 3, 5:30-9:30 p.m., Tuesday evenings through Nov. 19, alternating Saturdays, 8:30 a.mn3 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way,Bend;

541-383-7270. • La Pine Chamder Toastmasters:Humorous speech contest; 8-9 a.m.; Gordy's Truck Stop,17045 Whitney Road, LaPine; 541-771-9177. • Highnooners Toastmasters:Humorous speech contest; noon1 p.m.; Classroom D,

New HopeEvangelical Church, 20080 S.W. Pinebrook Blvd., Bend; 541-382-6804. • The10 KeyStrategies to Build anExpert Empire in AnyBusiness: Jim Mazziotti, principal managing broker of Exit Realty Bend will discuss strategies to takeany

business to newheights; free; 7 p.m.; webinar; http://goo.gl/RtnJe. WEDNESDAY • Prime Time Toastmasters:Humorous Speech Contest; 12:051 p.m.; HomeFederal Bank, 555 N.W.Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6929.

THURSDAY • The Value of Performance,Buying or Building anEnergy Efficient Home: Free; 6-7 p.m.; TheEnvironmental Center, 16 N.W.Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908. For the complete calendar, pickup Sunday's Bulletin or visit bendbulletin.comlbizcal


IN THE BACI4: ADVICE 4 ENTERTAINMENT > 50-Plus, D2-3 Parents a Kids, D4 Pets, D4 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

O www.bendbulletin.com/allages

BRIEFING FAMILY LIFE

Senior

concierge service a rowing emand

Andy Tulls/The Bulletin file photo

Rachel Thomas, gives her fourth grade twins, Connor and Sophia, a hug goodbye on their first dayof school at High Lakes Elementary School in Bend last year.

By Mac McLean The Bulletin

Raising a teenager when you're in your mid-50s is

Share photos of first day of school

tough. But when you add caring for aparent who recently suffered a stroke into the mix — a situation one of Wendy McInnis-Hall's clients recently encountered — the stress can get over-

Do you haveyour camera (or smartphone) ready to go for the first day of school?

If you snap a cute backto-school picture of your child, yourself or your friends, consider

whelming. Things like paying bills, running errands and picking up medication can fall through the cracks. Mclnnis-Hall hopes her new business, Life Tree Personal Services, LLC, can help reheve some of the burden faced by baby boomers in this dual caregiver role and by seniors who want to continue living at home. "People may not realize some of the things they need help with," said McInnis-Hall, who started her senior concierge business two months ago. Before opening this business, she spent 12 years working with people who have developmental disabilities in Crook County and in Bend. Even though she's relatively new at the game, McInnis-Hall already has a list of about eight clients who she helps on a monthly basis or as needed. She helps these clients by running errands, picking up their medication, taking

sharing it with The Bulletin. We will be collect-

ing and sharing photos from the first day of school. To submit a photo on the first day of school, either visit www.bend bulletin.com/first

dayphotos or post on social media (such as Twitter, Instagram or Tumblr) with the hashtag ¹firstdayof

school.

Competitiveness starts at age 4 New research from the University of Warwick and the University of Salzburg found that children don't understand competitive behavior until age 4. Before that children did not understand that people could have conflicting motivations.

The researchers asked children ages 3to5toengageina gameinvolvingbeads.

care of their grocery shopping and performing other tasks.

See Concierge /D2

Children could take the beads from a neutral

location or from each other's pot. Many chil-

dren did not take from each other, evenwhen beads were taken from them. The changein behavior occurred for most children around age 4. That is when most tendedto behave more competitively.

KID CULTURE

Gamesteach kids to think on their feet

AARP predicts caregiver shortage The AARP Public Policy Institute predicts the country will go through

a devastating caregiver shortage whenbaby boomers enter their 80s and may start needing help performing their basic activities of daily life. According to the policy's report, the

country's caregiver support ratio is expected to fall from its currentlevel of 7.2 potential caregivers for

every one potential care recipient to 4.2 care-

givers for every care recipient in 2030 and

2.9 caregivers for every care recipient in 2050.

The report defines a potential caregiver as any person between the ages of 45 and 64 and a potential care recipient as any one who is 80 or older. According to the report, Oregon is expected to see a similar decline as the state's caregiver ratio is expected to fall from its current level, 6.9 caregivers for every care recipient, to 3.9 caregivers for every

(% 1

lllustration by Greg Cross/The Bulletin

• Consistency can be key to putting the nightly struggle to rest By Alandra Johnson• The Bulletin

need another drink of water.

to stall bedtime. It is one of many behaviors

One more hug.

young children adopt that can make bed-

I need to tell you something.

time incredibly frustrating for parents.

Submitted photo

How many days until my birthday? Mommy, I love you. I need to go potty.

Bend mom Michelle Calvillo can relate. She calls her daughter Ruby's bedtime "truly one of the most difficult parts of each day." Ruby, 5, seems to have boundless energy.

"Many children engage in what we call

Bedtime starts around 9 p.m. with three

a curtain call," said sleep expert Dr. Judith

books, a snack, water, toothbrushing and

Owens with Children's National Medical

a snuggle, plus a back rub. That's where

Center in the Washington, D.C., area. The

Michelle would like it to end. Instead, she

children— who are supposed to be sleep-

says, Ruby ends up asking for more and

ing — pop outofbed again and again, each

more. She says: I'm not tired. I need more

time with a new request, a new "need." Ow-

water. My legs hurt. I'm not sleepy. I'm

care recipient in 2030

ens says the children know exactly what

scared. I miss you.

and 2.8 caregivers for every care recipient in

they are doing, using any means necessary

2050. — From staff reports

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids. Toy recommendations are based on independent research conducted by The Toy Research Institute.

See Bedtime/D3

Electronic Labyrinth By Ravensburger

$49.99 Ages 8 and older Toy Tips: B+ Fun: B+ Movement: B Thinking: A Personality: B+ Social interaction: A This interactive board game featuresan electronic book that helps playerslook formagic gems in a maze. The object of the game is for the players to free the wizard and his friends by breaking the spell cast by the evil witch that banished him into the labyrinth. Game-play encourages listening, concentration and thinking skills. The theme of the game adds mystery and challenge and is appropriateforclassroom play. See Toys/D4


D2

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Email information for the Activities Calendar at least 10 days before publication to communitylife@bendbulletin.com, or click on "Submit an Event" at www.bendbulletin.com. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

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Concierge Continued from 01 She also spends time with seniorsso their loved ones can get a break, comes up with ways to make sure people take their medication properly, and ensures their bills get paid on time. McInnis-Hall's bus i n ess and other senior concierge service businesses have been sprouting up across the country lately and are just one of a few ways people are working to meet a huge demand for services that will be created as the country's 77 million baby boomers get older. "It's a huge market for our industry," s a i d K a t h a rine Giovanni, founder of the International Concierge and Lifestyle Management Association, a North Carolina-based association that r e p resents more than200 concierge businesses around the globe. Giovanni said t h e s h eer number of boomers — those born between 1946 and 1964 — makes them a great population for her industry to serve as they age. Boomers want to continue leading particularly active lives that have a lot of tasks to manage, they want to stay in their homes as long as possible, and they had some of their children relatively late in life, she said.

TODAY BEND KNIT-UP:$2; 10 a.m.-noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St.; 541-728-0050. THE GOLDENAGECLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4p.m.;GoldenAge Club,40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. BINGO:6 p.m.; American Legion Post No. 44, 704 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-548-5688.

SATURDAY VFW DINNER:Chicken fried steakdinner;$9;5 p.m .;VFW Hall,1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 54 I-390-6837.

SUNDAY BINGO:12:30 p.m.; American LegionPostNo.44,704 S.W .Eighth St., Redmond; 541-548-5688.

learning English. He got

Photos by Kristyna Wentz-Graff I Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Allan Plato, of Muskego, Wis., has been knitting up a storm since he began loom knitting three years ago. He mainly knits caps, which he mostly gives away, although his wife has sold some and donated the proceeds to charity.

loom, looping yarn over pegs and then scooping the loops over the peg. Kim saw him watching her at w ork. One day, she presented him with a loom. A llan got r i ght t o w o r k . Ever since, his days follow this rhythm — up by 8:40 a.m. at his Muskego home, with its "Elephant Crossing" sign amid a bed of snapdragons out front. His wife has collected elephant figures ever since Allan gave her a pair on their honeymoon 56 years ago. Now they nearly take over the houseand some of them wear caps made by Allan. Allan says he is not an early riser, but he is at work by 9. The television goes on to an easy listening music station, and the knitting begins. He had heart surgery six years ago — bypass and a valve replacement — and he has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.. "If I walk 100 yards or so, I gotta rest. I get winded early," he said. H e gets h i s y a r n f r o m Walmart — "they got the best buy on it," he said. His favorite brand is called Red Heart. People bring him yarn, too.

CALENDAR

caps — for themselves and hunting buddies. J oan carries a bag of caps in the trunk of her car. You never know. She goes to the local Y every day, and her friends often find a need for a cap. They don't bother to ask if she has one. They know she does. "I have friends on social security," Joan said. "They don't have a lot of money. At Christmastime, they come and get caps for gifts. They don'thave much, but they want to do something." Last year, Allan heard about two classes of kids

Milwaufzee Journal Sentinel

MILWAUKEE — It's midAugust, blazing hot and sunny, and Allan Plato sits and knits. Some people would c a ll Allan burly. He puts it another way. "I'm Big Fat Al," he said by way of introduction. Ask him how he is and he says what he usually says: "I'm nice." The kids who get the caps h e knits certainly think h e is. So do the cancer patients. Their heads, bald from chemo treatments, get cold. Those caps come in handy. Hundreds of caps have gone to wiggly newborns in hospitals. Some of Allan Plato's hats have gone to soldiers in Afghanistan, too — sent there by a veterans organization. " There's caps of mine i n Florida. There's some in Colorado." Plato is 80 years old and has been knitting for the past three years — almost continuously, if you ask his wife, Joan. He saw his daughter-in-law, Kim Plato, knitting on a round

nst Itl

ACTIVITIES

A signed card of thanks was sent by children who received colorful hats knitted by Plato.

they don't get no tassels." Newborn caps have gone to Columbia-St. Mary's, Elmbrook Memorial Hospital and St. Mary's Hospital in Duluth, Minn. — passed along through acquaintances. Every Christmas, the "cap a nd mitten t r ee" a t t h e i r church, Hales Corners Lutheran, gets 100 caps. His deer-hunter sons asked for and received blaze orange

TUESDAY

a call for more than 50 c aps for them. It wa s a challenge to get them done before the holidays, but he got it done. There were the homeless kids that a local Home Depot invited for a holiday event. His daughter-in-law, who worked at Home Depot, asked him if he could make some caps. He did, for two years, dozens of caps. Those kids were surprised. They didn't expect to be able to keep the caps. "I don't care where they go," Allan said of his caps. But he does keep the handd rawn cards f ro m k i d s thanking him. There are stacksof them. "Dear Secret Santa," one

MOTHERS OFPRESCHOOLERS: Meeting; child care provided; 9a.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. BEND KNIT-UP: 6-8 p.m.;Gossamer The Knitting Place, 550 S.W. Industrial Way; 541-728-0050.

WEDNESDAY KIWANISCLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave.; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. BINGO:6 p.m.; American Legion Post No. 44, 704 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-548-5688.

THURSDAY

begins. "I liked the present that you gave us, and my mom told me I'm lucky to have that hat to keep me warm."

COMMUNITY HEALINGNIGHT: Canned food drive; 5-7 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-389-1159.

Plato, 80, was inspired to knit by his daughter. He has given his hats to cancer patients and newborns. They bring it in boxes and big plastic bags — new or left over. They know Allan Plato will loop his way through it. Does he do this every day? "No," he said. "Just about every day he does some," Joan said. "Very few days that you don't do knitting." He doesn't fight that idea. He keeps knitting.

3capsaday Generally,he makes three caps a day, and gets a start on a fourth. If you add it all up, and carry the one, that makes

— well, Allan doesn't really care how many caps he's made these past three years. "Probably a c ouple thousand," he said. "I don't know." And he doesn't really care who gets them, he says. "You want one? Take a couple." The caps for the newborns — and there are a lot of those caps — are tassel-free (which is a shame because, as Joan says,"He really does a nicejob on the tassels.") This is because Al worries. "I'm afraid they might come off. I'm afraid the babies might swallow a piece of yarn. So

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Findinghelp According to a recent report by the Congressional Budget Office, the number of people whoare 65 or older is expected to increase until seniors make up 20 percent of the U.S. population by 2050.

Three different types of businessesand groups arespringing up to help seniors stay at home and give their caregivers some relief: • SENIOR CONCIERGE perfo rm tasks such as going to the doctor, minor home repairs SERVICES and watering plants. An offshoot of the traditional concierge industry, senior ,HOMF QQRE $ERggE$ concierge services helPPeoPle These businesses sendforwith tasks — such asrunning profit or state-supported errands, groceries and paying home-care worker t

FURTHER MARKDOWNS!

bills — that their clients

may be too busy or unable to perform by themselves. • VIRTUAL VILLAGES Virtual villages arecommunitybased membership organizations for seniors who live at homeand independently volunteer to help each other

organization cater to seniors as well as people who are younger than them. "There's definitely been an increase (in the number of these businesses)," said Pat B rengman, president of t h e National C o ncierge A s sociation, a Minneapolis-based organization that represents almost 500corporate,residential and leisure concierge businesses in the country. Brengman said that while she's heard a lot of talk about senior concierge services, it's " These people are g o - still too soon to tell exactly ing to need our services be- how many such services exist cause theirchildren are now becausethe business model is strapped for time and now so new. have their own careers and She sees these services as families to manage," Giovanni being the next logical step for said. She says most of the per- the concierge services indussonalconcierge services in her try that has made its way from

help them take care of tasks

such as running errands and preparing meals, andto help them perform certain activities of daily life, such as

using the bathroom or taking medications. luxury hotels and resorts to conventioncenters,corporate office buildings, and most recently into people's homes, hospitals and o t her h ealth care facilities. "There's definitely a need for them," she said. Offering the same advice she gives to people who are shopping for a traditional concierge service, Brengman said it's important to consider the person's references and how long they have been working in the field. But she also said this last quality can be a little difficult to assess because most senior concierge services are just getting started right now and it may be hard to find one that's had a lot of time in the game. — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

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DMAN f ine furnit u r e D OW N T O W

N BEND

1020 NW Wall St Bend, OR ph 541-617-9799 SPecial SaleHours: Mon-Sat 20-6 Sun 12-5

Pictured items are subiect to prior sale andlor may not be available for purchase.


5 0-PLU S

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

D3

u see ssu era ers'secre s o ea By Lindsey Tanner

he nimbly packaged hamand-cheese sandwiches, set out bags of chips and cans of soda,and cheerfully greeted a steady stream of customers. "Good morning,good to see you," he said, standing at the pantry's bright red door. He gave everyone theirchoice of chips — a small gesture but important, he said, because it givesthem some sense of control over their hard-luck lives.

The Associated Press

They're CHICAGO called "super agers" — men and women who are in their 80s and 90s, but with brains and memories that seem far

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younger. Researchers are looking at this rare group in the hope that they may find ways to help protect others from memory loss. And they've had some

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tantalizing findings: Imaging tests have found unusually low amounts of age-related plaques along with more brain mass related to attention and memory in these elite seniors. "We're living long but we're n ot necessarily l i ving w e l l in our older years, and so we hope that t h e S u perAging study can find factors that are modifiable and that we'll be able to use those to help people live long and live well," said study leader Emily Rogalski, a neuroscientist at Northwestern University's cognitive neurology and Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago.

The volunteers The study is still seeking volunteers, but chances are you don't qualify: Fewer than 10 percent of would-be participants have met study criteria. "We've screened over 400 people at this point and only about 35 ofthem have been eligible for this study, so it really represents a rare portion of the population," Rogalski sard. They include an octogenarian attorney, a 96-year-old retired neuroscientist, a 92-yearold Holocaust survivor and an 81-year-old pack-a-day smoker who drinks a nightly martini. To qualify, would-be participants have to undergo a bat-

Bedtime

Edith Stern, 92, walks through the cafeteria at her retirement home in Chicago. Stern is a super ager participating in a Northwestern University study of people in their 80s and 90s with astounding memories. "I am young — inside. And I think that's the difference," said Stern. Photos by M. Spencer Green/The Associated Press

Don Tenbrunsel, 85, a soup kitchen volunteer, laughs with other volunteers as he makes lunches at St. Josaphat's Church in Chicago. "I think I'm just lucky, not only with respect to my memory, but I'm able to get around very well; I walk a lot and I have a pretty good attitude toward life itself," said Tenbrunsel. tery of mental tests. Once enrolled, they undergo periodic imaging scans and other medical tests. They also must be willing to donate their brains after death.

is bigger than even in many 50- and 60-year-olds. The super agers aren't just different on the inside; they have more energy than most people their age and share a positive, inquisitive outlook. Different inside and out Rogalski said the researchThe memory tests include ers are looking into whether lists of about 15 words. "Super those traits contribute to brain agers can remember atleast health. nine of them 30 minutes later, Other research has linked a which i s r e ally i m pressive positive attitude with overall because often older adults in health. And some studies have their80s can only remember suggested that people who are "cognitively active and socialjust a couple," Rogalski said. Special MRI s c ans have ly engaged" have a reduced yielded o t he r r e m a rkable chance of developing Alzheimer'sdisease, but which comes clues, Rogalski said. T h ey show that in super agers, the first — a healthy brain or a brain'scortex, or outer layer, great attitude — isn't known, responsible for many mental said HeatherSnyder,director functions including m emoof medical and scientific opry, is thicker than in typical erations for the Alzheimer's 80- and 9 0-year-olds. And Association. deep within the brain, a small All about attitude? region called the anterior cingulate, important for attention, Snyder said the SuperAging

Why the struggles

E lizabeth Pantley i s a u Continued from 01 thor of one of the best-sellSometimes this can go on ing books on children's sleep, for hours and will devolve into "The No-Cry Sleep Solution." tears and anger. Michelle says She says there are many reaRuby sometimes isn't asleep sons why children, especially until close to 11 p.m. Recently, preschoolers,may struggle at they starteda reward system bedtime. Some children are that seems to be working (it in- not tired at the time parents volves reading her "The Sleep want them to go to bed. She Fairy" book and rewards if also cautions that naps too late she stays in bed). But it isn't in the day can leave children perfect. alert at bedtime. On the other Michelle worries that Ruby hand, an overly tired child can isn't getting enough rest and also spell trouble. Often, Pantalso feels the strain of h er ley says, children will catch a daughter staying up so late. "second wind" and then need "When it gets late, I don't get more help winding down at any down time." the end of the day. Many parents face these Owens agrees, saying bedbedtime battles with their chil- time problems can be tied to a dren. "Almost all children go "mismatch between the time through this," said Dr. David parents are putting a child to Dedrick, medical director of bed and (the child's) natural the St. Charles Sleep Center. sleep onset." She says parents "I deal with this kind of issue can test for this by putting the almost every day. It's a very child to bed later — if he or she common problem." He says by falls asleep easily, that's a sign the time most families make bedtime was too early. their way to his office, they Pantley says preschool- and h ave been dealing with i s elementary-age children are sues for years, have read three also often curious — they hear books about sleep, talked with the noise in the living room their child's pediatrician and and want to check it out. Or are "horribly frustrated." they can become fearful of While some children are something. naturally better sleepers than Owens also believes that others, Dedrick an d o t h er many problems may s t em sleep experts believe there are from parents being overly steps parents can take to help lenient. make bedtime better. Experts D edrick p oints ou t t h a t offer varied and sometimes children sleeping apart from conflicting recommendations parents in a separate room to parents, from gentle to strict "is probably very foreign to methods. But the key to all of our nature," as previously in the suggestions — regardless human development we used of the specifics — was consis- to sleep much closer to our tency on the part of parents. family group. But since many

families sleep in separate bedrooms, parents need to make adjustments. Ultimately, he says, "children will sleep better if they learn to comfort themselves. A little separation is not a bad thing."

In cases like this, he recommends installing a gate so the child can see out, but cannot leave. "For a lot of them, r easoning w it h t h e m j u s t won't work. Reasoning with a 3-year-old won't work," said Dedrick. Be firm Dedrick says parents need Dedrick believes parents to be very consistent, from need to draw boundaries and "night to night and from parenforce them. He suggests ent to parent." That means parents facing bedtime battles mom can'tgive a quick peck with their children need to on the cheek while Dad gives "grow a spine." Of the parents a long snuggle. who visit him, Dedrick says One frequent problem he about 80percent are not being sees is when parents become firm enough, while the other "a human cuddling toy" that 20 percent have children with the child requires to fall asleep. real physiological issues such When that happens, children as sleep apnea or neurological rely on the parent's presence seizure disorders. The over- to fall asleep. This becomes whelming majority of families problematic if the child wakes who come to him have what in the night. he calls "limit-setting sleep Gentler approaches disorder." When children leave their Owens believes preschoolrooms, parents need to send ers and early-elementary-age them right back to bed. children respond well to reDedrick knows issues vary wards, such as sticker charts from child to child, something as well as verbal praise. Parhe experienced personally. ents can establish a reward His son was very easy, while system for children who stay h is daughter had a m u c h in bed. She also points out that harder time. She needed lots parents can expect children to of extra attention at night. He stay in bed, but cannot force says they were just very firm them to go to sleep. with her and ended up placing Pantley suggests parents ala physical barrier in her room lot more time for bedtime and so she could not leave. While then try to view that time in a the children may have tremen- new light, "as a wonderful opdous temper tantrums, with portunity for a nightly ritual the "noise level going through of quiet connection and bonding." While that concept may the roof," Dedrick says parents who are being firm are not seem far-fetched to those in the causing their children trauma. throes of nightly battles, Pant"What you are establishing ley believes the idea is possible is good parenting skills and for all families. She offers a boundary setting." few ideas to help families.

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First, start the bedtime routine earlier. While a w h ole hour dedicated to b e dtime may seem like a lot, Pantley says many families who are butting heads at bedtime end up spending at least an hour or more. When parents assign little time to bedtime, they may feel stressed and try to rush things. Pantley says children can sense that tension and end up dawdling or acting out. O ther t i p s s he off e r s include: • No TV before bed. All of the sleep experts we talked to for this story mentioned this. Screentime is a stimulant and can lead to all sorts of sleeping issues. • Write down the bedtime routine. Pantley recommends creating a poster with images of everything in the routine. Be consistent and thoughtful about your routine and its order. Pantley suggests parents end with reading in bed, as that activity can make children drowsy. • Or end with a story-telling session after books. Children often love to hear stories about themselves:"Jane went on a boat ride." • Either lie with t he child until he or she falls asleep and commit to doing this every night, or try to offer a reward

system for staying in bed. Ly-

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ery single night (until age 5 to 10, when she says they will relinquish it naturally), it can work to smooth out bedtimes and ease children into sleep. But parents have to be consistent and committed. On the other hand, rewards can also be effective. Pantley suggests

giving the child one (or more) "get out of bed free" tickets to use each night. If the child gets out of bed for a sip of water or a hug, they have to give away one of the tickets. When all the tickets are gone, the child has to stayin bed. Or she suggests offering a simple prize. — Reporter: 541-617-7860, ajohnson@bendbulietin.com

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"I enjoy doing it. I probably

get more out of it than I give," Tenbrunsel said. Ken Zwiener, of Deerfield, Ill., is another super ager. He had "more than an inkling" he might qualify for the study, study is an important effort ways, too. and his kids encouraged him "When you get old,people to enroll. that may help provide some "They said, 'Dad, your brain answers. are mainly interested in themEdith Stern is among the selves. They talk about the is the best thing about you,'" super agers. The petite woman doctor, what hurts," she said. the 81-year-old retired busilooks far younger than her 92 "You are not so important that nessman recalled. He's a golfer and Broadway years, and is a vibrant pres- you just concentrate on yourence at her Chicago retirement self. You have to think about musical "nut" who created a home, where she acts as a sort other people." 300-plus-page computer dataof room m other, volunteerStudy participant Don Ten- base of shows. Zwiener uses ing in the gift shop, helping brunsel has a similar mindset. an iPad, recently went hot-air residents settle in and making The 85-year-old retired busi- b allooning and is t r y ing to sure their needs are met. nessman doesn't think of him- learn Spanish. Stern lost most of her family self as a super ager. "Neither He also pours himself a vodin the Holocaust and takes her do my children," he said. ka martini every night and is a work seriously. B ut Tenbrunsel says h i s pack-a-day cigarette smoker, " What I c o u ldn't d o f o r memory has been sharp "from but says he doesn't think his m y parents, I try t o d o f o r the time I was born. My moth- habits have made much difthe residents in the home," er used to say, 'Donald, come ference.His healthy brain, he she said, her voice still thick sing with me — not because I says, may be due to heredity with the accent of her native had a good voice, but because and genes, but Zwiener said he Czechoslovakia. I always knew the words," he hopes the study comes up with Stern acknowledges she's said. "I think I'm just lucky, more "scientific insights". "My dad lived into his middifferent from most people at not only with respect to my the home, even many younger memory, but I'm able to get dle 90s and was pretty sharp residents. around very well; I walk a lot right up until the day he died," "I am young — inside. And and I have a pretty good atti- Zwiener said. I think that's the difference," tude toward life itself." Z wiener's motivation f o r she said. Tenbrunsel volunteers sev- joining the study was simple: "I grasp fast," she adds. "If eral hours a week at a food The best man at his wedding people say something, they pantry run b y t h e Chicago died of A lzheimer's disease don't have to tell me twice. I church where he is a parish- before age 50. don't forget it." "To lose a mind ... is just a ioner. One recent morning in S he's different i n o t h e r the sun-filled rectory kitchen, terrible way to go," he said.

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TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PARENTS 4 ICIDS FAMILY CALENDAR CENTRALOREGONSATURDAY MARKET:Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Downtown Bend Public Library, Parking Lot, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING SATURDAYFARMERSMARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www.nwxevents.com. GRAPE STOMP ANDGRAPE STOMP ROMP:Featuring a general stomp, kids stomp, stomp competition, romp (walk or stroll through the vineyard), music and more; proceeds of the romp and competition benefit Terrebonne Community School and Tom McCall School; $8 in advance, $10 at the door, free for children with adult, $5 for romp and tasting; 11 a.m. romp, gates open at10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. stomp; Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver; 541-5465464 or www.maragaswinery.com. DIXIELANDPARTY BANDAND FRIENDS:Musicians from the Northwest and California perform in an organized jam session; refreshments available; free, donations accepted;noon-10 p.m .; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. "THEJUNGLEBOOK—THE MUSICAL": The play is presented by the Sunriver Stars Community Theater; proceeds benefit scholarships for children to Fun After School Time Camp; $5 general admission, $15 dinner theater; 6 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-593-4150 or www.sunriverstars.org. TWILIGHT CINEMA:Anoutdoor screening of "Life of Pi" (2012); bring low-profile chair or blanket, your own picnic, snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-585-3333 or www.sunriversharc.com.

TODAY DIXIELANDPARTYBANDAND FRIENDS:Musicians from the Northwestand California perform in an organized jamsession; refreshments available; free, donations accepted;110 p.m.; La PineMoose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. SISTERS FARMERSMARKET:3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park,W estCascade Avenue and Ash Street; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. MUNCH & MOVIES:An outdoor screening of "Life of Pi" (2012); with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1662 or www. northwestcrossing.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Gregory Nokes will present from his book, "Breaking Chains: Slavery on Trial in the Oregon Territory," with a slide show; $5; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. HoodAve., Sisters; 541-540-0866. "THE JUNGLE BOOK— THE MUSICAL":Theplay is presented by the Sunriver Stars Community Theater; proceeds benefit scholarships for children to FunAfter School Time Camp; $5general admission, $15 dinner theater; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250Overlook Road;541593-4150 or www.sunriverstars.org.

SATURDAY SUNRIVERMARATHON FOR A CAUSE: A half-marathon,10K and 5K run/walks starting in front of the lodge; proceeds benefitSusanG.Komen for the Cure; freefor spectators, $40$105; 8:45 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-2342 or www.sunrivermarathon.com. MADRASSATURDAYMARKET: Free admission; 9a.m.-2 p.m.;Sahalee Park, Seventh and B streets; 541-489-4239. OREGON TRAILGUN SHOW: Featuring guns for show and sale; $8, free for children12 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W.Airport Way, Redmond; 541-347-2120. PRINEVILLEFARMERS MARKET: Free; 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E.Third St.; 541-4476217 or prinevillefarmersmarket@ gmail.com.

SUNDAY SUNRIVER MARATHON FORA CAUSE:A half- and full-marathon run/walks starting in front of the lodge; proceeds benefit Susan G. Komen for the Cure; free for spectators; 7:45 a.m.;

STORY TIMES and library youthevents • Forthe week of Aug. 30toSept. 5. Story times are free unless otherwise noted. I :

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175 S.W.MeadowLakesDrive, Prineville; 541-447-7978 • PRESCHOOL STORYTIME: Ages3and older; 630 p m. Tuesday and11 a m.Thursday. • WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday andWednesday. I I

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62080 DeanSwift Road; 541-330-3760 • Story times resume the week of Sept. 9. 59800S.U.S.Highway97,Bend;www.highdesertmuseum.org;541-382-4754 • Unless noted, eventsincluded with admission ($15 adults, $12ages 65and older,$9ages 5-12free ages 4and younger) • WILD WEDNESD AYS:Ages7-12; treasure hunt;12:30 p.m. to close Wednesday. • BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Ages 3-4; explore museum's animal habitat, share stories and songs;10to11 a m. Thursday; $15per child nonmembers, $10 per child members. • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; storytelling about animals and people of the High Desert; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. I

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241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351 • BABIES AND TODDLERS STORY TIME:10:10a.m.Tuesday. • PRESCHOOLAND OLDER STORY TIME:Ages3-5; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SPANISHSTORYTIME:All ages;1 p.m. Wednesday. I

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BEND FARMERSMARKET:Free admission; 3-7 p.m.;Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket©gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC ONTHE GREEN:Asummer concert series featuring the Hokulea Dancers; food, crafts, retail and more; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, S.W.15th St. and S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-923-5191 or http:I/ visitredmondoregon.com.

BASIC COMPANIONSHIP:Basic commands and skills; $120; sixweek class; 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays or Wednesdays; preregister; Dancin' Woofs; Kristin Kerner at 541-3123766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. BEGINNEROBEDIENCE: Basic skills, recall and leash manners; $110125; 6 p.m. Mondays or Tuesdays; preregister; call for directions; Meredith Gage, 541-318-8459 or www.pawsitiveexperience.com. INTERMEDIATE/CANINEGOOD CITIZEN:fun and challenging class for dogs and owners with canine good citizen test option; $85; 12:201:30 p.m. Sept. 28, register by Sept. 27, Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or www.diannshappytails.com. INTERMEDIATE OBEDIENCE:Of f-leash work and recall with distractions; $110; 6 p.m. Wednesdays;preregister; call for directions; Meredith Gage at 541-3188459or www.pawsitiveexperience.com. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Six-week, drop-in classes; $99.95; 4 and 5 p.m.Mondays,4 and 5 p.m.Fridays, and12 p.m. Saturdays; Petco,3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen,541-382-0510. OBEDIENCE FORAGILITY: Six weeks; $120; 5 p.m. Mondays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www. desertsageagility.com. PUPPY101:Socialization, basic skills and playtime for puppies 8- to 13-weeks old; $85; fourweek class; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; preregister; Dancin'Woofs; Kristin Kerner at 541-312-3766 or www. dancinwoofs.com. PUPPY BASICMANNERSCLASS: Social skills for puppies up to 6 months old; $110; seven-week class, cost includes materials; 6-7 p.m. Mondays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www. friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PUPPY LIFESKILLS:$120 for six weeks;5 p.m.Tuesdays; Desert SageAgility,24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Jan at 541-420-3284 or www. desertsageagility.com. PUPPY KINDERGARTENCLASSES: Training, behavior and socialization classes for puppies 10- to 16-weeks

I(eeping tall dog off counter requiresdifferent perspective operative words here ar e " every single t i me." Y ou My Lab stands almost can do this only if you are • as high as I donowat1 with the dog all day long. So year old, and when we leave you must manage the situathe house, he thinks our tion by either gating off the kitchen counter is a buffet ta- kitchen so the dog has no ble. He even eats the fruit we access to it when you are not leave out in the fruit basket home or just locking up anyand breaks open any bags of thing edible in a high cupbread or cookies. When we board, out of his reach and get home and see the devas- sight and smell. tation, we always show the If the dog does not have mess to him and scold him, the opportunity to counter but as soon as we are done, surf like this, eventually he he starts looking up there will forget it was ever an opfor food again. How can we tion. Scolding the dog after train him to leave the coun- the fact when you get home ter alone? is useless. There is no way . This i s m o r e o f a he has the cognitive ability • m anagement s i t u a - to figure out that you pointtion than a training situa- ing at an empty bread basket tion. In a training situation, and yelling at him means he you would spend a w eek should not eat bread out of it or so with the dog all day when you put more back into long, and every single time it. This is the perfect situahe goes for any food on the tion where you have to look counter, you would then cor- at things from the animal's rect him. Thus, he would point of view to figure out learn to leave it alone. The what is going on.

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110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070 • Story times resume the week of Sept. 9. ~

WEDNESDAY

CROOKEDRIVER RANCHTERREBONNECHAMBEROF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL:Food and networking opportunities hosted by Laurie's Gentle Pet Grooming and Crooked River Ranch Pet Sitting; free; 5:30 p.m. Sept. 17; 8392 North U.S. Highway 97, Terrebonne; Hope at 541-923-2679. DOG TRAININGSEMINAR: Author Suzanne Clothier; $300; 9 a.m. Sept. 21-22; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 54 I-350-2869. CHIR04CRITTERS:Discussion about chiropractic medicine and your four-legged companion with Dr. Amanda Kremer;11 a.m.-1 p.m. Sept. 7; Bend Pet Express Eastside, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive, Bend; 541-385-5298. GREYHOUND ADOPTIONS NW:Meet, learn aboutand adopt these retired racing dogs; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Saturday; Central Oregon Saturday Market; Bend-La Pine School Administration parking lot, Bend; 541-420-7819. MICROCHIPCLINIC: Open for pets with owners 55 and older; hosted by Aspen Court and Cascade East Veterinary Clinic; $25; 2-3:30 p.m. Sept. 14; 470 N.E. Oak St., Madras; Kim at 541-325-3253, 541-475-6425 or ksprengel@alcco.com. MT. BACHELORKENNELCLUB FALL AGILITY TRIALS:Over 120 dogs race through a timed obstacle course; free; 1:30-5 p.m. Sept. 27 and 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Sept. 28-29; Crook County Fairgrounds, Prineville; 541388-4979 or www.mbkc.org. MUTT STRUTANDMORE: 1.3 mile fun walk, dog contests and vendors hosted by the Humane Society of Central Oregon; $25, individual, $150, any number of teams, free, 12 and younger; register at hsco.org, HSCO shelter and other locations; 10 a.m. Sept.14; Riverbend Park, 799 S.E. Columbia St.,Bend; 541-330-7096.

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827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054 • Story times resume the week of Sept. 9.

REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmond farmersmarket1©hotmail.com.

16425 First St.; 541-312-1090 • Story times resume the week of Sept. 9. I

TUESDAY

CLASSES

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DIXIELANDPARTYBANDAND FRIENDS:Musiciansfrom the Northwestand California performin an organized jamsession; refreshments available; free, donations accepted; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.;LaPineM ooseLodge, 52510 Drafter Road;541-548-0679. "THE JUNGLEBOOK— THE MUSICAL":The play is presented by the Sunriver Stars Community Theater; proceeds benefit scholarships for children to Fun After School Time Camp; $5 general admission, $15 dinner theater; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-593-4150 or www.sunriverstars.org. TWILIGHT CINEMA:Anoutdoor screening of "Oz the Great and Powerful" (2013); bring low-profile chair or blanket, your own picnic, no glass or pets, snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-585-3333 or www.sunriversharc.com.

EVENTS

Newsday

19530Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188 • STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Thursday. 'll

Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or www. sunrivermarathon.com. OREGON TRAILGUN SHOW: Featuring guns for show and sale; $8, free for children12 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-347-2120.

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2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242 • ONCE UPON ASTORYTIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. I

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old; $80; 6:30 p.m. Thursdays; preregister; call for directions; Meredith Gage, 541-318-8459 or www.pawsitiveexperience.com. TREIBBALLCLASS: Urban herding sport involving eight exercise balls, a goal and165-foot field; $120 for six weeks; Saturdays, call for times; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Jan at 541-420-3284 or www.desertsageagility.com.

TRAINING, BOARDING ANNE GESER: In-home individual training with positive reinforcement; 541-923-5665. CASCADEANIMAL CONNECTION: Solutions for challenging dog behavior, Tellington TTouch, private lessons; Kathy Cascade at541-5168978 or kathy©sanedogtraining. com. DANCIN' WOOFS: Behavioral counseling; 63027 Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Kristin Kerner at 541-312-3766 or www. dancinwoofs.com. DIANN'S HAPPY TAILS: Private training, day care, boarding/board and train; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails©msn.com or www.diannshappytails.com. DOGS LTD & TRAINING: Leash aggression, training basics, day school; 59860 Cheyenne Road, Bend; Linda West at 541-318-6396 or www.dogsltdtraining.com. FRIENDSFOR LIFEDOG TRAINING: Private basic obedience training and training for aggression/serious behavior problems; 2121 S.W. DeerhoundAve., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www. friendsforlifedogtraining.com. LIN'SSCHOOL FOR DOGS: Behavior training and AKCringready coaching; 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www. linsschoolfordogs.com. PAWSITIVE EXPERIENCE: Private training and consulting; Meredith Gage, 541-318-8459 or www. pawsitiveexperience.com. ZIPIDY DODOG:Daycare, boarding, groomingand dog walking;675 N.E. Hemlock Ave., Suite 112, Redmond; www.zipidydodog.com, 541-526-1822 or zipidydodog@ bendbroadband.com.

for classroom use and as a homework helper for schoolage children.Gameplay can e nhance v o cabulary v e r nacular and motivate players to learn new words from others. — Recommendationsfrom Marianne M. Szymanski, publisher of www.toytips.com, Toy Tips Magazine and co-author of"Toy Tips: A Parent's Essential Guide to Smart Toy Choices."

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ADVICE 4 E N T ERTAINMENT

MTV's 'Teen Mpm 3 Famjljarj breeds maspchjsm TvTODAv TV SPOTLIGHT

celebrity economy during the past few years. By Jon Caramanica In 2009 MTV i n t roduced New York Times News Service "16 and Pregnant," a sort of On the cover of the current cuddly horror docuseries. EpiUS Weekly — along with One sodes featured stories about Direction; Prince William and pregnant teenagers, their difCatherine, Duchess of Cam- ficult c i r cumstances, their bridge; and Gi a A l l emand, mostly deadbeat boyfriends the "Bachelor" contestant who and their adorable babies. It recently committed suicide became a hit and eventually — is a smiling young couple, led to a spinoff, "Teen Mom," Mackenzie Douthit and Josh which followed a handful of McKee, capturedon theirwedthe young women as t h ey ding day. tried to balance motherhood T hey didn't land o n t h e and, really, anything else. cover via their talent, peerage Douthit is one of the stars or tragedy, but rather because of "Teen Mom 3," the show's of an unanticipated shift in the third series, which walks a

fine line between cautionarytale documentary and t a bloidization of an emotionally, logistically an d f i n a ncially challenging situation. The stars of "Teen Mom 3" — Douthit, Briana DeJesus, Katie Yeager and Alex Sekella — are all alumnae of "16 and Pregnant," the feeder docudrama, and their stories are distressingly familiar by now. The men are, in every case, ciphers, and also very much

boys — young, pretty, husks of proto-masculinity crippled with dismal eye contact and a fundamental inability to speak full sentences when being in-

terrogated by their girlfriends, or their girlfriends' parents. Whatever joy may have once been a p art o f t h ese shows is largely gone, leaving them essentially exercises in masochism, especially because they've been running long enough for viewers to know what comes afterward. Amber Portwood, a g r aduate of the first "Teen Mom," has dealt with legal and drug issues and is in jail. Farrah Abraham, also from the first s eries, recently t u r ned t o

ing without a safety net; there's a wide gap between being given a huge stage and having the tools to use it wisely. Worse, theypresumably rely on the money the series provides them for participating.

(A couple of years ago Portwood told a judge she earned $140,000 for a six-month contract with the show.) There's no mention of this on the show, though, which doesn't bother dwelling on the toxic overlap between documenting and enabling. That's a problem no photo on the cover of US Weekly can obscure, or fix.

pornography. Such stumbles reveal how these young women are work-

PARENTS'GUIDE TO MOVIES This guide, compiled by Orlando Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, is published here every Friday. It should be used with the MPAA rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included, along with R-rated films that may have entertainment or educational valuefor older children with parental guidance.

'ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US' Rating:PG for mild language. Whatit's about: The lads of One Direction go on tour, bond and reminisce about how they were brought together to form a band. The kid attractor factor: It's10,on stage and backstage.

Goodlessons/dad lessons: You're never too young to learn not to take yourself seriously. Violence:None. Language:Mildly profane Brit-slang. Sex:A lot of shirtless scenes, an

onstage pantsing. Drugs:None at all. Parents' advisory:Teen and tweenage girl friendly in the extreme, with nothing that would offend any grandmothers in the audience. Suitable for all ages.

'GETAWAY' Rating:PG-13 for intense action, violence and mayhem throughout, some rude gestures, and language. What it's about: A disgraced race car driver is blackmailed into performing a series of stunts, chases and getaways by a

manipulative criminal mastermind. The kid attractor factor:Selena Gomez, riding along with Ethan Hawke in a Shelby Mustang Super Snake and complaining the whole time. Good lessons/bad lessons:If your car is stolen, don't try to get it back on your own. Violence:Quite a bit, lots of car crashes and shooting, but not much blood. Language:A little profanity here and there. Sex:None.

Courtesy Sony Pictures

One Direction — Liam Payne, from left, Louis Tomlinson, Zayn Malik, Harry Styles and Niall Horan — are the focus of a new concert documentary. See the full review in today's GO! Magazine. Drugs:Martinis are downed, olives to take the car keys away from older are devoured. teens after this one, but still suitable Parents' advisory:You may have f o r 1 0 and older.

MOVIE TIMESTODAY • There may be an additional fee for 3-0 andIMAXmovies. • Movie times are subject to change after presstime. 1

Dear Abby: I have a 20-plus-year high school friend who is fighting ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease.) I have developed a close relationship with him and his parents. His mom has shared some of his comments with me, but h e h a sn't shared those thoughts with me himself. The comments are, "I want to die," or, "I want to go home to God." I t h ink l i stening and being a supportive friend is what I can do for him, but I'm at a loss as to what to say to his mother. I don't know what advice to give her so she can be supportive in her conversations with her dying son. — Deep Sorrow in Ohio Dear Deep Sorrow: I agree that listening and b e ing s upportive is what you can do best for your friend. When the son raisesthe subject again with his mother, she should tell him that she loves him and will see that his wishes are carried out, even though losing him will be losing a part of herself. When you see the mother again, ask if he has an advance directive for medical decisions in place. In it, a person can specify that only palliative care is preferred.

HAPPY BIRTHDAYFORFRIDAY, AUG. 30, 2013:Thisyearyou will see a big difference in what occurs between you and others. You will make anewfriend who will be more receptive toyou. Ifyou are single, meeting someone through this person's circle of Stars showthe kind friends could prove of day you'll have to be significant to ** * * * D ynamic your life history. If ** * * P ositive y o u are attached, ** * A verage thetwo of you will ** So-so realize a long-term * Difficult dream thatyou both have wanted. CANCER is aloyal friend. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ** * * S tay focused. Keep the lines of communication open, but choose to discuss only what's necessary. Your mood, as well as others', will be changing rapidly in the near future. Once one individual opens up, others will follow suit. Tonight: Go with the flow.

TAURUS (April 20-May20)

YOURHOROSCOPE By Jacqueline Bigar

CANCER (June21-July22) ** * * * Y ou might want to relax and let go, but a surprise visit from a superior or friend will set the pace of your day. In fact, you might not realize how essential you are to others right now. People feel as if they need you. Be gracious. Tonight: Celebrate the weekend well.

LEO (July23-Aug. 22) ** * Understand thatyou can't control issues or people. Youcan control only yourself and your responses. Others can choose to do whatever they want. By withdrawing and allowing others to make their own choices, in time, there will be a better rapport. Tonight: Follow suggestions.

VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept. 22) ** * * W ith as many people as there are seeking you out, it will be almost unbelievable that you are choosing to work on a project instead of socializing. Mixing the two is fine if you complete what you must. Someone aroundyou could bequite serious. Tonight: The world is your oyster.

** * * T h ough you might be out of sorts at first, know that whatyou're looking for is readily accessible. Open up talks with a loved one. You might be surprised by what you hear, given that you might not be around your family as much LIBRA (Sept. 23-Dct. 22) ** * * O t hers turn to you for advice. as you might like. Tonight: Hang out with You might not be in a position to help a friends. particular person, butyou can point him or GEMINI (May 21-June20) her to a different source for feedback. This ** * Curb a need to be possessive, and person will feel empowered. You might simply trust what is going on. Be willing have helped him or her by honoring your to express your thoughts and find out limitations. Tonight: Leader of the gang. where a friend is coming from. You might SCORPIO (Dct. 23-Nov.21) discover thatyou are spending too much ** * * * Y ou have the gift of seeing money. Still, use your judgment. Tonight: more in interactions and discussions than It is OK if someone else wants to treat.

8 p.m. on H f3, "Betty White's Dff Their Rockers" —Someof the best pranks from the show's first season arerevisited in this episode. Theyincludea man pretending to be blind andthrowing birdseed onpeople while they eat, a pair of nuns raising funds for "breast awarenessweek," and a waiter wearing rubber gloveswho claims to havebeendealing with a toilet issue. 8 p.m. on l3, "Undercover Boss" —Lynne Zappone, chief talent officer of PopeyesLouisiana Kitchen, takes on avariety of lower-level jobs at thefast-food chicken chain's franchised restaurants.

Mom eestattoosaresa in ace Dear Abby: My husband and I have two beautiful, hardworking daughters we brought up as loving, respectful parents. Recently, "Kellie," 25, got tattoos covering her right arm, leg and ankle as well as her shoulders. They are visible unless she wears long sleeves DEAR and long pants. ABBY This has r u ined our relationship because it shows how little she thinks of us as parents, and how disrespectful of our feelings she is to put the tattoos where everyone can see them. She knows we don't like tattoos because we have mentioned it to her and voiced our disappointment. I can't sleep at night or look at my daughter knowing how little she cares about our feelings. I feel it's a slap in the face that she doesn't honor, respect or love us. What do you think? — Beside Myself in Fort Worth Dear Beside Yourself: I think it is time you toned down the high drama. What's done is done. If you do not appreciate the person your daughter is BENEATH her skin, you will lose her. And THAT would be a tragedy!

5:49p.m. on CDM, Movie: "Idiocracy" —Most science fiction envisions a future wherewe've all gotten smarter. But thewaythings are going, a dumbed-down future is more likely. That's the premise of this spot-on 2006 satire from Mike Judge ("Office Space," "King of the Hill"). A soldier and ahooker (Luke Wilson, MayaRudolph), both of average intelligence, are cryogenically frozen andawaken centuries later to discover they're the smartest people alive. Scary? Yes, but hilarious.

A g r ou p t h a t o f f er s g u i d ance in drafting these important documents is C o mpassion and Choices. The toll-free number is 800-247-7421. Dear Abby:Our across-the-street neighbors feel they need to mow their lawn three (excessive) times a week. This includes using a weedeater and two mowers — a push mower and a large riding mower. Quite often, the husband chooses to mow after 8 p.m. He doesn't work and could do it during the morning hours if he wants it cooler. The noise is loud and extremely disruptive, and lasts about an hour because he goes over and over the same area. We work and would like to enjoy the few hours we have in the evening and relax. Any ideas? — Tired of the Noise Dear Tlred of the Noise:If you're on speaking terms with this neighbor, you should ask him if he would please manicure his lawn at a different time because the noise is disruptive. If he is unwilling to cooperate, check with the city to find out if there areany noise ordinances in place. If there are, you can report the noise as a nuisance. — Write to Dear Abby at dearabby.com or P0. Box69440,Los Angeles, CA 90069

others see. You understand that each action creates a response. Realize that you can't pull this person away from his or her choices of the past. Tonight: Put on some great music to escape from the here and now.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.22-Dec.21) ** * * O t hers will make an effort to influence an important matter involving your finances. Honor what is going on, as it only can benefit you. If you keep feeling doubtful, know that it comes from within yourself and not from the other parties involved. Tonight: Dinner with a loved one.

CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan. 19) ** * * L isten to news that is forthcoming, and be aware that everyone has a different perspective. An important offer or request might be woven into a conversation. Understand that what you see evolving could offer a positive outcome.Tonight:Bearound thoseyou most enjoy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Fed.18) ** * * Honor who you are throughout the day. Sometimes you might be so quick to give a knee-jerk reaction that others could be put off. Express your authenticity more often, and resist getting tied up in an intense, fast pace when possible. Tonight: Spend some time with friends.

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Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 &IMAX, 680 S.W.Powerhouse Drive, 541-382-6347 • 2 GUNS (R)2:20, 6:55, 9:30 • BLUE JASMINE (PG-13) 1:10, 3:45, 6:45, 9:15 • DESPICABLE ME2 (PG)12:20, 2:55, 6,9: IO • ELYSIUM(R) 12:10, 3:15 • ELYSIUM IMAX(R) 7, 9:40 • GETAWAY (PG-13) 12:45, 3:35, 7:20, 9:45 • THE HEAT (R) 12: I5, 6:20 • JOBS(PG-13) 8:40 • LEE DANIELS'THEBUTLER(PG-13) 12:05, 3:10, 6:IO, 9:05 • MONSTERSUNIVERSITY (G)Noon,2:40 • THEMORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY DFBONES (PG-13) 6:40, 9:35 •THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY DFBONES IMAX (PG-13) 1, 4 • ONE DIRECTION: THIS ISUS(PG) 5:20, 10:10 • ONEDIRECTION:THIS IS US 3-D (PG)2,4:25,7:30,9:55 • PERCYJACKSON: SEA OFM ONSTERS (PG)Noon,2:30, 6 • PLANES (PG)12:25, 2:45, 6:30, 9 • STARTREK INTO DARKNESS 3-D/WORLD WAR Z3-D DOUBLE FEATURE(PG-13) 1:15, 6:15 • WE'RE THE MILLERS(R) 12:55, 3:55, 7:40, 10:15 • THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) 3, 9:20 • THE WORLD'SEND(R) I2:35, 3:25, 7:10, IO:05 • YOU'RENEXT(R) 1:05, 4:10, 7:55, 10:20 • Accessibility devices are available forsome movies. ' I r r I Regal Pilot Butte 6, 2717N.E.U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-6347 • FRUITVALE STATION(R) 3, 8:45 • THELONE RANGER (PG-13)11:30a.m.,2:30,5:30,8:30 • PACIFIC RIM(PG-13) 11:45a.m., 2:45, 5:45, 8:25 • RED 2(PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9 • STAR TREK INTODARKNESS(PG-13) Noon, 6 • THE WAY WAYBACK(PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9 • WORLDWARZ (PG- I3) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 8:50 I

9p.m. onDISC,"Gold Rush" — It's a jungle down there.The summer spinoff of the hit series about a colorful group of gold miners sent them to SouthAmerica in search of the precious metal. The adventure wraps uptonight with the season finale. 9 p.m. on TRAV,"Ghost Adventures" —In this new episode, Nick, Zak and Aaron visit an abandoned hospital in California, The few people who have been inside lately have reported seeing lights turn offand on bythem selvesand hearing the phones ring in what was once the emergency room — despite the fact they haven't been connected for years. During their lockdown, the guys notice some suspicious cold spots. ©zap2n

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Redmond Cinemas,1535 S.W.OdemMedo Road, 54 I-548-8777 • ELYSIUM(R) 11a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 • LEE DANIELS'THEBUTLER(PG-13) 12:15, 3,5:45, 8:30 • PLANES (PG)11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 • WE'RE THE MILLERS (R)11:30a.m.,2,4:30,7,9:30

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• •

PISCES (Fed. 19-March20) ** * * You might want to see a personal matter in a different light, and you will ... once you stop reacting. Others could offer different perspectives that might prove helpful. Many more doors will open as a result, and you will be happier. Tonight: Be creative when coming up with plans.

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ON PAGES 3&4.COMICS & PUZZLES ~ The Bulletin

Create or find Classifieds at www.bendbulletin.com THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

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Pets & Supplies

Furn i ture & Appliances Furniture & Appliances

Adopt a rescued kitten Donate deposit bottles/ German Wirehaired AKC, POODLE Toy pups 8 Bakers Rack,commeror cat! Dozens avail- cans to local all vol- pointers, parents OSA teens. Also, POMAPOOS cial, great shape, $65. able. Fixed, shots, ID unteer, non-profit res- certified hips & elbows, Call 541-475-3889 541- 4 80-3893 ITEMS FORSALE 264-Snow RemovalEquipment chip, tested, m ore! cue, to help w/feral great hunting ancestry, Beautiful king size matQueensland Heelers c at s p ay / ne u t er ready to g o ! $ 8 0 0. Nonprofit s a nctuary 201 - NewToday 265 - Building Materials tress & b o xsprings, Standard & Mini, $150 open Sat/Sun 1-5, costs. Cans for Cats 541-247-2928, eves. 202- Want to buy or rent 266- Heating and Stoves & up. 541-280-1537 $150. 541-390-8720 other days by appt. trailer at Ray's Foods High Quality King 203- Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 267- Fuel and Wood 6 5480 7 8 th , B e n d . on Century Dr. Or do- Greyhounds - Rescued www.rightwayranch.wor Bunk Beds, dark pine, Bedroom Set with 204- Santa's Gift Basket ex-racers for adoption at 268- Trees, Plants & Flowers dpress.com Photos, m a p at nate Mon-Fri at Smith C.O. Saturday Market, Storage - 1 yr old, in c omplete, $100 . 205- Free ltems 269- Gardening Supplies & Equipment www.craftcats.org. Sign, 1515 NE 2nd; or PERFECT condition! 541-593-1455 Rodent issues? Free 208- Pets and Supplies 270 - Lost and Found 541-389-8420, or like at CRAFT in Tumalo this Sat 8/31, across from Beautiful medium oak downtown Bend Library! adult barn/shop cats, anytime. 3 8 9 -8420 210- Furniture & Appliances us on Facebook. hardwood bedframe GARAGESALES fixed, shots, s o me Call The Bulletin At www.craftcats.org 211 - Children's Items with storage drawers, 541-385-5809 Important note! Cats 8 275 Auction Sales friendly, some n o t. 212 - Antiques & Collectibles king pillow-top matother pets are being Will deliver. 389-8420 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 280 - Estate Sales tress, 2 night stands, 215- Coins & Stamps DO YOU HAVE p oisoned i n loc a l At: www.bendbulletin.com 281 Fundraiser Sales 2 lamps, 1 5-drawer 240- Crafts and Hobbies SOMETHING TO SHIH-TZU PUPS neighborhoods. Visit dresser, 1 dresser + 282- Sales Northwest Bend SELL 241 - Bicycles and Accessories Male, $350. Desk: large, oak vewww.facebook.com/ mirror, ALL for only 284- Sales Southwest Bend FOR $500 OR 2 Females, $500/ea Craftcats for info. neer, A-1 condition. 242 - Exercise Equipment LESS? $3000. 541-410-1010 tesslovespets©gmail.com $100. 541-504-2694 286- Sales Northeast Bend 243 - Ski Equipment Chesapeake AKC pups, Non-commercial KITTENS! Fostered for 541-416-3630 $300-$600 health guar. 244 - Snowboards 288- Sales Southeast Bend advertisers may local nonprofit rescue parents on site, 1st TURN THE PAGE 290- Sales RedmondArea 245 - Golf Equipment place an ad with group. Fixed, friendly, Weimaraner Pups, exlnt shots. Good hips/lines. 246-Guns,Hunting and Fishing 292- Sales Other Areas For More Ads oui shots, ID chip, tested, temperament, great fam541-259-4739. 247- Sporting Goods - Misc. "QUICK CASH more! Variety of col- ily & companion dogs. The Bulletin FARM MARKET 248- Health and Beauty Items SPECIAL" ors. Se e T o m TomParents ranch-raised; lilce 308- Farm Equipment and Machinery Say"goodbuy" hunt. Females 249- Art, Jewelry and Furs 1 week 3 lines 12 Motel Mgr, a c rosswater 8males 316 - Irrigation Equipment MOVING-BEAUTIFUL $300. Pls Iv 2 k 2tl ! 251 - Hot TubsandSpas from S onic, B e nd.$350; to that unused ~ Dining table 42"x58" FURNITURE FOR 325Hay, Grain and Feed message, 541-562-5970. Ad must include Sat/Sun 1-5 PM or by 253- TV, Stereo andVideo SALE. 970-401-4062 (42"x94" with three item by placing it in 333Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies price of single item appt. 5 41-815-7278. 255 - Computers 12" leaf extensions), Yorkie pups AKC, big 341 - Horses and Equipment of $500 or less, or www.craftcats.org The Bulletin Classifieds 256- Photography eyes, potty training, health 4 straight back and 2 multiple items 345Li ve s t o ck and E qui pment guar. 2 boys, $550; 2 257- Musical Instruments captains chairs. whose total does Labradoodles, F1, 9 wks 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals Asking 258 - Travel/Tickets 5 41-385-580 9 old, 1st shots, worming, girls, $650. 541-777-7743 not exceed $500. 350 Horseshoeing/Farriers $165 obo 259- Memberships r eady n o w . $35 0 . 210 541-419-5060 358- Farmer's Column 260- Misc. Items 541-870-6495 Call Classifieds at Furniture & Appliances 375- Meat and Animal Processing 541-385-5809 261 - MedicalEquipment MOVING! 383 - Produce andFood www.bendbulletin.com Labrador Puppies, $300 Futon mattress, very 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & $350. 8 wks, 1st MUST good cond, $60 obo. A1 Washers&Dryers 263- Tools shots. 541-416-1175 SELL! 541-480-3893 $150 ea. Full warEnglish Bulldog pups, Custom made 203 vlii//////r ."i'r ; ranty. Free Del. Also GENERATE SO ME sectional & ottoman Chihuahua puppies, tea- AKC reg, 1st s hots. Mixed: Maltese/Chihua- wanted, used W/D's Holiday Bazaar EXCITEMENT in your -orig. $5,000, cup, shots & dewormed, $2000. 541-325-3376 hua, 2 males born 2009. 541-280-7355 0 & Craft Shows Also 1 female AKC Yorkneighborhood! Plan a now $850. $250. 541-420-4403 Exotic 8 Oriental Shortshire Terrier, born 2007. garage sale and don't The Bulletin recomhair cats-$150-450 All are small dogs. No Central Oregon Dog portable kennel, Antique iron twin bed forget to advertise in Call Steve at mends extra caution Saturday Market 36"x24"x27" $45 obo. www.phatkat.bravesA.M. calls, please! f rame w h ite, $ 6 5 . classified! 503-585-5000. when purc h a sTHIS Labor Day ites.com 279-3018 541-350-5106 541-420-2220 541-480-3893 541-385-5809. ing products or serweekendonly, open vices from out of the Sat. AND Sun., 10-4, Sending cash, downtown Bend, across area. checks, or credit infrom library. Also, Grey202 ormation may b e hound adopfions on Saf./ fsubjected to fraud. Want to Buy or Rent 541-420-9015 For more i nformation about an adverWanted: $Cash paid for Check out the tiser, you may call vintage costume jewclassifieds online the O r egon State elry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.l buy by the www.bendbullefln.com Attorney General's Estate, Honest Artist Office Co n s umer Updated daily 286 286 288 Elizabeth,541-633-7006 Protection hotline at Estate Sales • Sa l e s Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Sales Other Areas 1-877-877-9392. 205 Want two Nubian or S a le , 6 6 8 4 5 Great Stuff Garage Sale! Big End o f S u mmerMoving Sale: LoveseatM OVING SALE S a t . Items for Free The Bulletin E Cstate Saanen goats at Serving Cent al 0 egon SinCe r903 Salei Something for recliner, buffet, 3-pc 9-4, S un . 9 - n oonentral St. , B e n d. Aug. 31, 9am-2pm, reasonable price. 2326 NW Torsway St. Aug. 30th thru Sept. everyone! Fri. & Sat., twin bed set, lamps, 2 hand tools, p ower 3 Family Sale! EveryDesk 60"x30" + L-shaped 541-388-3535 8-3 2 0535 S underbookcases, boys, mens tools, books, clothing, thing under the sun! 2nd. 8am - 5pm. Be- Art, photography, camreturn 48"x21", g ood 8 w omens clothing, fishing gear, m isc. Massive selection of tween Bend and Sis- era stuff, camera bags, land Way. Just too many Where can you find a cond, free! 541-610-9918 old cameras (film), antoys and misc. 1 day ters. Misc. d i shes, 21700 Old Red Road. hunting & camping gear, Sat. 8/31, 8am-4pm, collectibles? f urniture, line n s , tique typewriter, office helping hand? rafts, tools, gen208 ** FREE ** stuff, shop stuff, hardShaniko Lane off Boyd PRE-Estate Sale - sell- rubber household goods. erators 8 air compresFrom contractors to ware, YARN, household Acres Rd. ing off bigger items to get sors, furniture, 150-gal Pets & Supplies Garage Sale Kit Sell them in Just bought a new boat? & kitchen stuff, BOOKS, yard care, it's all here ready for estate sale! Place an ad in The fish tank & stand, ** ** Sell your old one in the CD's & more! MOVING SALE Freezer, refrigerator, 2 A dog sitter in NE Bend, The Bulletin Classifieds classifieds! Bulletin for your gabicycles, electronics, in The Bulletin's Ask about our Sat. only, 9am-4pm, small fridges, mattress warm and loving home rage sale and reflatscreen TV, DVD playSuper Seller rates! "Call A Service 2907 NE Jackdaw Dr. Moving must sell: Furn., ceive a Garage Sale sets, sleeper sofa, with no cages, $25 day. 541-385-5809 ers, lots of new things, 541-385-5809 in Bend. glass-top dining table 8 4 jewelry collection, asst'd lots misc. some horse Kit FREE! Professional" Directory Linda at 541-647-7308 tack. Fri. thru Mon. chairs, end & coffee clothes (some new), anLook What I Found! MOVING! SAT ONLY tables, leather reclining tiques, collectibles, appli9 -4. 65050 Hwy 2 0 You'll find a little bit of KIT I NCLUDES: 10-4 Tool Bench-Gun sofa, chairs, TV sets, lots west. 5 4 1 -388-2706 • 4 Garage Sale Signs ances. 2001 Chrysler everything in Safe-Furniture-Stuff! of miscellaneous! See craigslist ad. • $2.00 Off Coupon To mini van; immac 1994 The Bulletin's daily Fri-Sat-Sun, 8am-4pm, Neff to Parkridge, rt to Use Toward Your Aerostar (Eddie Bauer garage and yard sale 1636 NE Daphne Ct 1569 SE Ramsey Rd. Next Ad Ed.), golf cart, & much section. From clothes Sat. Aug. 31, 8:30-3pm • 10 Tips For "Garage A Street of Neighbormore! Fri-Sat-Sun-Mon, to collectibles, from Sale Success!" Sat. 8/31, 8-4:30. Crib, USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! 9-6; 6 miles east of Sishood Yard Sales, in housewares to hardswing set, home deters, Hwy126 & GooRiver's Edge - west off ware, classified is cor, womens & baby Door-to-door selling with drich, follow signs. always the first stop for of Mt. Washington Dr., P!CK UP YOUR clothing, e lectronics, fast results! It's the easiest following signs. cost-conscious GARAGE SALE KIT at kitchen items, more! Gates openat8:30 a.m. Generations Sale consumers. And if way in the world to sell. 5 1777 SW Chandler 3337 NE Mendenhall. Antiques, baby, crafts, you're planning your Ave., Bend, OR 97702 woodworking, luggage, 284 own garage or yard The Bulletin Classified sporting goods, guns. 288 sale, look to the clas- Sales Southwest Bend The Bulletin 541-385-5809 Fri/Sat 9-4, 2480 SW Sales Southeast Bend sifieds to bring in the Hwy 97 Madras. buyers. You won't find Furniture-loaded Garage Hers Shop Sale! 290 a better place Sale! Dressers 8 elec- Garage Sale - Golf clubs, His &Craft Harley Davidson helsupplies, We will be closedMonday,Labor Day,Sept. 2, 2033 for bargains! tronics, Sat-Sun, variety of misc, someSales Redmond Area mets, Craftsman bike tools & furniture. Call Classifieds: 8/31-9/1, 8am-4pm, thing for everyone. Frijack, fly rods/reels, 541-385-5809 or RETAIL 8 CLASSIFIED DISPLAYADVERTISING 19560 Apache Rd, DRW Sat, 8/30-31, 7am-3pm, Sat., 8/31, 8am-3pm, Alley Garage Sale, bevintage furniture email 3361 NE Stonebrook Lp. 20644 Pine Vista Drive. hind 1406 SW 12th 14140 SW Stallion, DAY DEADLINE clasefied@bendbulletin.com Sat. Only! 8 am-3pm. St., at Newberry. Sat. Crooked River Ranch, I've Got It; Come Get It! People Look for Information Collectables, t o o l s, Unusual assortment8/31, 9am-5pm. Monday9/2....................................W ednesday,8/28 4 p.m. 282 Saturday only, 10-5. About Products and clothing, & a lot more. sunrise to sunset Fri-Sat541-923-7304 Sales Northwest Bend At Home9/3...................................W ednesday,8/28 4 p.m . 1 9775 S i l ve r Ct . , Sun, 8/30-9/1, 1935 NE Services Every Daythrough Aug. 30 & 31, 1517 NW Redwood, 8-5. Tools, The Bulletin Class/Neds cross street Amethyst. Lotus Dr. 541-965-0663 Tuesday 9/3.........................................Thursday, 8/29 Noon AWBREY BUTTE SALE generator, riding lawn HUGE Multi-Family Yard 1641 NW Promontory m ower an d pu s h Sale Hwy 20 btwn Bend W ednesday 9/4.........................................Fri day,8/30 Noon Sat. 8 Sun., 9-4. No Sat. 8/31, 8am-2pm. earlybirds please! Many * COLLECTORS LIQUIDATION * mowers, R o t otiller,8 Sisters. Hsehold, furn., Half price at noonbikes, golf balls, 30 barn, tack, yard, much knickknacks, picture 40 years worth! Antiques including cash Low prices all day! more. Sat-Sun-Mon, 9-5 fishing poles, edger 66895 frames, clothing, gym 8 registers, Arts 8 Crafts furniture & lamps, West St. and Weedeaters. BIG Yard/Garage Sale! more! 141 SW 15th, ¹32 Roseville & Bauer pottery, old store & adOffice equipment, kids' vertising items, Military & Railroad, paintHuge Neighborhood Estate Sale! Final days, toys, horse tack, barn 286 Garage Sale, Fri-Sat., ings & artwork, vintage paper & signs, To- Fri-Sat 9-5. Must sellstuff, tools, books, misc. Tuesday 9/3..............................Noon Friday 8/30 bacco items, old toys, lots more! Plus reasonable offers wel- 8/30-8/31 9-4 Take State house items, clothing. Sales Northeast Bend regular household items. Friday and Satur- come! 7075 NW West- Rec Rd. off Hwy 97 S to Fri-Sat-Sun, 10-4, 65360 Classifieds • 541-385-5809 3-car garage FULL of wood Lane, Terrebonne. Foster Rd., follow signs. Gerking Market Rd. day, 9-4, numbers Friday, 8 a.m. various items! Some 126 NE Franklin Garage Sale! Household antiques, snow tires on GIANT YARD SALE! HUGE Yard Sale! items, horse equip, gar- 6-hole rims, like new bed behind Les Newmans Store Fri & Sat., 8-3, 543 NW Thurs-Fri-Sat, den equip. 19155 Tu- mattresses - too much 17th St. Furniture, hosAugust 29-30-31, Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 malo Reservoir Rd. in too list. 63080 Stenkamp pital beds, dishes, plants, 2222 Crescent Cut-off Rd www.atticestatesandappraisals.com Tumalo, Sat & Sun, 9-4. LOADS of stuff! in Crescent, Oregon. Rd, Sat-Sun. 8-5. •

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DEADLINES

CLASSIFIED LINER DEADLINES

The Bulletin


E2 FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

To PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

260

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Misc. Items

fg,/F~>Jirr Jl,jj Jl)IJjjJ~ jg Can be found on these pages:

H & H FIREARMS

Monday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 : 0 0 pm Fri. Tuesday • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Noon Mon.

Wednesday •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5 Noon Tuess a

246

Thursday • • •••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • N oon Wed. Fr i d ay . . . . . . • • • • • . • • • • • • • • . • Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate.. . . . . . . . . . 1 1 :00 am Fri. Saturday • • • • 3:00 pm Fri. Sunday. • • • • • 5:00 pm Fri.

Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign. Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction Comforter: red 8 gold 421 - Schools andTraining with soft yellow side 454- Looking for Employment $45. 541-419-6408 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions File cabinet, tan metal 476 - Employment Opportunities 4-drawers, 26 t/s'Dx15" 486 - Independent Positions

L H Rem 700 B DL 7mm Mag Leupold VX II 3X9. $1,000; Wx52"H $89. LH Rem 700 BDL 541-923-8271 22-250 Leupold VX I II 6 .5x20. C o m p Free: 80 + Glass snack S tock $1,800. A l l sets. Great for speExc. Cond. cial occasion. 541-923-5568 541-388-0868

FINANCEAND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 -Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - StocksandBonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - BusinessOpportunities

Heating & Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER

QOrj0rj

Since September 29, 1991, advertising for Remington 700 used woodstoves has SPS, left hand 243 been limited to modca.with 6 -2 4 AO els which have been scope, $ 700 . c ertified by th e O r 325 421 541-536-7924. egon Department of Hay, Grain & Feed Schools 8 Training Environmental Qual541-385-5809. ity (DEQ) and the fedPlace a photoin your private party ad S&W 44 Mag, Mdl 629, Beautiful, green Oregon Medical TrainPRIVATE PARTY RATES 4" barrel, like new, with GET FREE OF CREDIT eral En v ironmental mixed hay, barn-stored, ing PCS - Phlebotomy for only $15.00 perweek. Starting at 3 lines Protection Ag e n cy holster. 541-279-8654 $230/ ton. classes begin Sept. 3, CARD DEBT NOW! (EPA) as having met "UNDER '500in total merchandise Patterson Ranch 2013. Registration now OVER '500in total merchandise Cut payments by up Wanted: Collector P ":~ to half. Stop creditors smoke emission stan- Sisters, 541-549-3831 seeks high quality 7 days .................................................. $10.00 4 days.................................................. $18.50 cer t ified medicaltrainin .com from calling. dards. A fishing items. Exc. orchard grass hay, 14 days................................................ $16.00 w oodstove may b e 7 days.................................................. $24.00 541-343-3100 866-775-9621. Call 541-678-5753, or Ibs bales , identified by its certifi- 7 0 *Must state prices in sd 14 days .................................................$33.50 (PNDC) 503-351-2746 $215/ton, 8 mi. east of 470 cation label, which is 28 days .................................................$61.50 Garage Sale Special Winchester 20ga Model Hot Tub, 6 person with permanently attached Bend. 541-306-1118 Domestic & (call for commercial line ad rates) or 206-954-8479. 4 lines for 4 days.................................. lounge, all access., to the stove. The Bul1500 XTR, bent rib, 2 In-Home Positions chokes, like new, $400. w orks g reat, n e w letin will no t k n owh eater, y o u ha u l . ingly accept advertis541-968-6245 Looking for your Gardener, male/female, 2 $500. 541-593-1455 i ng for the sale of A Payment Drop Box is available at CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: next employee? days/wk, 5 h r s/day, 247 Men's shirts, brand new, uncertified Place a Bulletin $20/hr 541-382-1640 Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Sporting Goods woodstoves. size XXX tall, Cabella's 8 help wanted ad BELOW M A R K E D W ITH AN ( *) House M a nager/Shift - Misc. other good brands, 10 O today and Caregiver, with EQC. $15 ea. 541-279-9995 REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well reach over • Fu e l 8 Wood Position req. 3-4 24hr Winn Pro2 Upright ten 60,000 readers Pool Table, $600. as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin s hifts in a r o w f o r nis stringing machine each week. You haul. adult foster care home $275. 541-923-8271 reserves the right to reject any ad at beodbulletimcom Your classified ad 541-504-9119 WHEN BUYING in Bend. Must be over will also any time. is located at: 253 FIREWOOD... 21 and have 3 yrs. * REDUCE YOUR appear on exp with group set1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. TV, Stereo & Video CABLE BILL! Get an To avoid fraud, bendbulletin.com ting. Pass a criminal All-Digital Sa t e llite The Bulletin Bend, Oregon 97702 which currently background c h eck. D irecTV - O v e r 1 4 0 system installed for recommends payreceives over Must be mature, good channels only $29.99 FREE and programment for Firewood 1.5 million page problem solver, a month. Call Now! ming s t a rting at only upon delivery PLEASE NOTE:Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is views every cooking 8 a bility to Triple savings! $ 24.99/mo. FRE E needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or and inspection. month at no prioritize work. Email $636.00 in Savings, HD/DVR upgrade for • A cord is 128 cu. ft. reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher qualifications to bend Free upgrade to Geextra cost. new callers, SO CALL 4' x 4' x 8' shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days cottagecare@yahoo. nie & 2013 NFL SunNOW (877)366-4508. • Receipts should Bulletin will publish in the Central OregonMarketplace each Tuesday. com day ticket free!! Start (PNDC) Classifieds include name, saving today! Table round pedestal Get Results! phone, price and Live-in, full time care for 1-800-259-5140. kind of wood Call 541-385-5809 elderly woman in LaPine w/4 upholstered chairs, IFurniture & Appliances Furniture & Appliances • Crafts & Hobbies • Ski Equipment • (PNDC) purchased. or place your ad area. Help with mobility, $195, 541-420-2220 • Firewood ads on-line at grooming, meal preparaDISH T V Reta i ler. NEED TO CANCEL Stamp Collector The Bulletin Offers MUST include bendbulletin com tion, transportation, medStarting at The Bulletin YOUR AD? 4 S E ASONS Cash buyer for new or Free Private Party Ads species & cost per i cations, s om e li g ht recommends extra ' (for 12 The Bulletin used postage stamps. I LA BOR DAY I $19.99/month lines - 3 days cord to better serve housekeeping, housemos.) & High Speed •• 3Private l caution when purThe Bulletin Classifieds has an Albums, singles or Party Only hold errands and comLIQUIDATION our customers. chasing products or, I nternet starting a t • Total of items adver"After Hours"Line To Subscribe call shoe boxes. panionship. Wages neSALE!! $14.95/month (where tised must equal $200 services from out of I Call 541-383-2371 541-279-0336 541-385-5800 or go to otiable and will include The Bulletin available.) SAVE! Ask or Less l Sunday Sept. 1st l the area. Sending I 24 hrs. to cancel rer ve centraloregon isce rw3 www.bendbulletin.com free rent. R e ferences SAME DAY In- FOR DETAILS or to cash, checks, or Look at: I 9 30-2:30. up to I About your ad! required. For interview stallation! CALL Now! l credit i n f o rmation Bendhomes.com call 916-216-0162. 75% off. demo PLACE AN AD, ** All Year Dependable 1-800-308-1563. may be subjected to Queen 6 pc. for Complete Listings of Call 541-385-5809 skis from K2, Poultry, Rabbits, Firewood: Seasoned (PNDC) l FRAUD. For more Area Real Estate for Sale Bedroom Set 476 Fax 541-385-5802 Lodgepole, Split, Del. Rossi and information about an I 8 Supplies $2400...503-812-2391 SAVE on Cable TV-InEmployment Bend: 1 for $175 or 2 advertiser, you may I Stampin' Up s t amps, Atomic. SnowWantedpaying cash ternet-Digital Phone- for Hi-fi audio 8 stu- for $335. Cash, Check 3 older Araucana Hens, Opportunities Or e gonI supplies, some new. Round solid oak pedes- call t h e board boots Satellite. You've Got Credit Card OK. FREE! Attor ney ' 541-410-7778 equip. Mclntosh, or tal table & 5 chairs, $395 State I starting at $20. I A C hoice! O ptions dio 541-420-3484. 541-330-5660 obo. 541-280-7999 or l General's O f f i ce from ALL major ser- J BL, Marantz, D y CAUTION: Lots of helmets Consumer P r otec- • naco, Heathkit, San- Electric l o g 541-610-4613 sp l itter, vice providers. Call us sui, Ads published in 341 and goggles 60% t ion ho t l in e at I Carver, NAD, etc. need adjusting. $69. to learn more! CALL "Employment O p I o f f . All rental I Today. 888-757-5943. Call 541-261-1808 Horses & Equipmentg portunities" in clude Sleeper sofa, m i cro- l 1-877-877-9392. 541-317-2890. suede, $195. bikes on sale (PNDC) 261 Premium dry seasoned Four horses all reg. all employee and inde541-312-4341. Bicycle cart, older, hard too!!! 57195 firewood, 3 co r d s, have profess. training pendent p o sitions. Medical Equipment 255 p lastic, $ 4 5 obo . fo r p o s itions Beaver Dr. in $440. 541-420-4418 all up to date on vac., Ads 541-480-3893 Computers that require a fee or Sunriver. Medical Alert for SeTrims, etc. must sell 211 Seasoned Juniper fire- S ee c r aigslist a d . upfront i nvestment 541-593 2255~ Mountain bike 26", 21 T HE B U LLETIN r e - niors - 24/7 monitor- w ood d e livered i n 541-388-2706. must be stated. With Children's Items ing. FREE Equipment. C entral Ore . $ 1 7 5 speed, $200. quires computer adany independentjob 541-382-3275 FREE Shipping. Na- cord. 541-419-9859 vertisers with multiple opportunity, please Power 3-wheel chair, 345 PORTABLE CRIB, Ser v i ce. P aceSaver Tita n ad schedules or those tionwide i nvestigate tho r 242 We're selling half a $10 Livestock & Equipment $ 29.95/Month C A L L 268 selling multiple sys$375. 389-8391. oughly. Use e xtra 541-420-2220 house full of very nice Medical Guardian ToExercise Equipment tems/ software, to disc aution when a p furniture! Teak sideNigerian Goats 85 5 - 345-7286.Trees, Plants & Flowers close the name of the day plying for jobs onboard, $400; with hutch, for sale. (PNDC) 212 Treadmill, Precor 905E, business or the term line and never pro2 2 l arge b l u e o a k Golf Equipment • 541-388-2706. $800. Large maple exood for running, $350. "dealer" in their ads. Antiques 8 262 grasses, you dig, $6.75 vide personal inforecutive corner desk, irgometer exercise bike, Callaway Razr Hawk tour Private party advertiseach. 541-408-0846 mation to any source $1000. Brass bed, $400. Collectibles Commercial/Office $125. 541-382-1630 you may not have 3 Tiffany lamps, $125 ea. driver, 9.5', stiff shaft, ers are defined as Equipment & Fixtures Produce & Food 269 those who sell one researched and Oak computer desk 8 5' cross-cut saw, recently $80. 541-389-9905 Get your computer. chair, $350. Small an- filed, w/handles, sharp. ardening Supplies THOMAS ORCHARDS deemed to be repuCommercial s t ainless CHECK YOUR AD table. Use extreme tique painted desk, $100. $100. 541-815-7330. & Equipment Kimberly,Oregon business 257 s teel 30x30 x 30 Large beautiful area rug, c aution when r e 541-934-2870 cooler, pre v iously $700. 541-593-8921 or Musical Instruments s ponding to A N Y M itchell 3 0 0 19 6 0 s, used b y b e v erage BarkTurfSoil.com Uick 541-410-2911 ~ online employment fishing reel made in A lso • Freestone canning 1934 Kurtzmann Parlor distributor. ad from out-of-state. France $30. smaller cooler availGrand Piano, ideal for peaches: Ange/us We suggest you call • • I I 541-408-5926 PROMPT D E LIVERY s e rious s t udent. able. 541-749-0724. Elbertas, ZeeLady the State of Oregon on the first day it runs the 541-389-9663 deliver on 5 Sept. • Nectarines Consumer H o tline to make sure it is cor- Can With an ad in 263 at 1-503-378-4320 • Bartlett Pears Meet singles right now! The Bulletin reserves rect. "Spellcheck" and $3750. 541-965-0663 Tools Briggs 8 Stratton push For Equal Opporturight to publish all Read Picked The Bulletin's human errors do oc- Masakichi Suzuki violin, No paid o p erators, the ~ mower, rec. serviced. from The Bulletin nity Laws c ontact cur. If this happens to full size, Mdl 106, 1979, 17" floor mod. drill press $60 firm . 541-504-0707 • Freestone canning just real people like ads onto The "Call A Service Oregon Bureau of your ad, please con- $250. 541-968-6245 peaches:Ange/us you. Browse greet- newspaper 3/4 hp, 5/8 and ¹2 mt. Bulletin Internet webLabor & I n d ustry, tact us ASAP so that Elbertas, ZeeLady ings, exchange mes- site. c huck. $ 350, e x c . Civil Rights Division, corrections and any For newspaper • Nectarines sages and c onnect Professional" cond. 541-330-5516 971-673- 0764. delivery, call the live. Try it free. Call adjustments can be • Bartlett Pears The Bulletin made to your ad. Airco 300amp S uper Circulation Dept. at • Plums now: 8 7 7 -955-5505. ser ve central oregons nce r903 Directory The Bulletin Hornet DC arc welder/ 541-385-5800 541-385-5809 BRING CONTAINERS (PNDC) The Bulletin Classified gen ¹1350-1121; $300. To place an ad, call for U-PICK!!! 541-385-5809 541-389-2636 541-385-5809 Open 7 days week, 8 Ping graphite golf clubs, Piano, Baldwin up- Pedestal-mountedbench or email a.m. to 6 p.m. ONLY! FIND IT! classifiedObendbulletin.com R-Flex, $ 350 w i t h right, with b e nch, Look for updates on exc. cond. $ 6 00. grinder, 8", s/4 hp, w/acgtIV ty I bag. 541-382-3275 Facebook. We are at cys $200 541 330 5516 The Bulletin 541-410-4087 SELL IT! rervrngcentral oregon since 1903 the Bend Farmers MarP oulan Pro 2 0 " b a r ket on Wed., 3-7 p.m. The Bulletin Classifieds Call54I-385 5809topromotefaur service' Advertisefar 28daysstarting at I4) llirssperrrritartateisnorrvslatrtee ourwelrritet chainsaw, $100 obo. Guns, Hunting TIME FOR SCHOOL! SUPER TOP SOIL 541-546-1313. Yamaha violin model w|Nw.hershe sorlandbark.com & Fishing V-5 4x4 with case and RV Generator, 3600 LP Screened, soil & com- Accounting bow, exc. cond., post mi x ed , no Bend local pays CASH!! +2, 119 hrs, all acPayroll Specialist Building/Contracting Handyman Landscaping/Yard Care $275. 541-410-2040 rocks/clods. High huLES NIIW48 for all firearms & cess. for RV. $800. mus level, exc. for ammo. 541-526-0617 541-593-1455 NOTICE: Oregon state I DO THAT! NOTICE: Oregon LandNeed help fixing stuff? flower beds, lawns, law r equires anyone Home/Rental repairs scape Contractors Law Call A Service Professional Steel forms, p recast gardens, CASH!! straight Responsible for processing payroll, garnishwho con t racts forSmall jobs to remodels (ORS 671) requires all For Guns, Ammo & find the help you need. concrete, parking lot s creened to p s o i l . ments and child support orders, answering construction work to businesses that a dquestions and r e solving payroll i ssues, Honest, guaranteed Reloading Supplies. www.bendbulletin.com wheel stops, 2 @ $45 Bark. Clean fill. Debe licensed with the vertise t o pe r form work. CCB¹151573 541-408-6900. liver/you haul. generating W-2s, setting up and changing each; Chicago pneuConstruction Contrac- Dennis 541-317-9768 Landscape Construcdirect deposits, and other duties as assigned. Yamaha 6'1" Grand Pi- m atic 1 " imp a c t 541-548-3949. tors Board (CCB). An tion which includes: Compound Bows: Alpine ano, immaculateebony wrench, anvil, 2 tire Sil v erado,finish, beautiful t one, sockets, 8" active license ERIC REEVE HANDY p lanting, decks , split-limb Requires a high school diploma or equivalent very little use means the contractor fences, arbors, loaded w /accessories, $11,000. 541-788-3548 and prior payroll experience. Must be able to SERVICES. Home & $175; 10' roller panels • Lo s t & Found is bonded & insured. water-features, and in- 60-70 lb., super quiet, work independently; possess strong written Commercial Repairs, Verify the contractor's stallation, repair of ir- like new, $350. Older Yamaha Clarinet Mod. for f eeding c u t-off and verbal c o mmunication skills; g o od Carpentry-Painting, saws, rollers 8" long; Found dog, med. sized 20, $250. Selmer Signet CCB li c ense at rigation systems to be Darton wheel-bow, 60-70 decision making, mathematical, analytical and Pressure-washing, Cornet, $250. Both exlnt spacing 5'/s", 9 I $20 female, gray body, black problems solving skills. Les Schwab has a www.hirealicensedlicensed w i t h the Ib, $80. 541-771-2424 Honey Do's. On-time ea. 541-416-9686 face w/brown points Sun. reputation of excellent customer service and cond. 541-968-6245 contractor.com Landscape Contracpromise. Senior night after storm Alfalfa over 400 stores in the Northwest. or call 503-378-4621. Board. This 4-digit Compound Bows: Parker 265 Discount. Work guar- tors 260 area. 541-389-9844 Hunter Maq, single cam, The Bulletin recom- anteed. n umber is to be i n541-389-3361 Building Materials Misc. Items mends checking with cluded in all adver- 60-70 lb., $225. Golden Lost: Grill 8 l i c ense We offer a c o mpetitive salary, excellent or 541-771-4463 Eagle Raptor single cam, the CCB prior to contisements which indiplate (779 ECP), Neff benefits, retirement, and cash bonus. Visit us Bonded & Insured split limb, 60-70 Ib, $225. 2 burial plots, sect C ¹945 MADRAS Habitat tracting with anyone. cate the business has & Purcell. Tues, 8/13 at: www.LesSchwab.com. Resumes will be CCB¹181595 RESTORE Some other t r ades a bond,insurance and Both like new; some ac- 8946 Redmond Memorial, 2:20 pm., following accepted through September 5, 2013. also req u ire addiworkers c o mpensa- cessories. 541-771-2424 $500 each. 509-630-8348 Building Supply Resale at accident. Please reQuality at tional licenses and Landscaping/Yard Care tion for their employgal. fuel tank, with turn to R on's Auto Please send resume and salary requirements LOW PRICES certifications. ees. For your protecDON'TMISS THIS 500 meter, $250; or trade for Body, SE Armour Rd., to: ZYLSHuman. ResourcesI lesschwab.com. 84 SW K St. tion call 503-378-5909 Nelson 16-30 gal. propane hot Bend, Oregon. Emails must state "Payroll Specialist" in the 541-475-9722 Concrete Construction or use our website: Landscaping & subject line. No phone calls please. water htr. 541-923-4071 541-633-7509. Open to the public. www.lcb.state.or.us to DO YOU HAVE EOE Maintenance check license status JJ & B Construction, Advertise V A CATION SOMETHING TO Prineville Habitat Serving Central BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS before contracting with quality concrete work. SPECIALS to 3 milSELL ReStore Oregon Since 2003 Search the area's most the business. Persons Over 30 Years Exp. Residental/Commercial lion P acific N o rth- Building Supply Resale comprehensive FOR $500 OR listing of doing land s cape Timber Produ ctsCompany Sidewalks; RV pads; westerners! 29 daily 1427 NW Murphy Ct. LESS? I II i N K N 0 0 U 5 maintenance do not classified advertising... Driveways; Color & newspapers, six Sprinkler Repair Non-commercial 541-447-6934 real estate to automotive, r equire an L C B Stamp wor k a v a il. Back Flow Testing states. 25-word clasadvertisers may Open to the public. cense. merchandise to sporting Electricians & Millwrights Also Hardwood floorsified $540 for a 3-day place an ad goods. Bulletin Classifieds Timber Products Company, a leader in diversified ing a t aff o rdable Maintenance a d. Cal l 266 (916) with our ALLEN REINSCH appear every day in the wood product sales, manufacturing and transporta2 88-6019 o r vis i t prices. 541-279-3183 sThatch & Aerate "QUICK CASH Heating & Stoves Yard maintenance 8 tion, has maintenance openings for Journeyman print or on line. CCB¹190612 • Summer Clean up www.pnna.com for the SPECIAL" clean-up, thatching, Level Electricians8 Millwrights who: have wood •Weekly Mowing Call 541-385-5809 Pacific Nor t hwest 1 week3lines 12 2009 L e nnox p e l let plugging 8 much more! products or manufacturing setting experience; are www.bendbulletin.com I D e bris Removal & Edging Daily Con n ection. OI' Call 541-536-1294 s tove, M o de l PS 4 0 able to work shift work and weekends; have a •Bi-Monthly 8 Monthly (PNDC) k 2s ~2 w/new control board & strong commitment to safety excellence; and work The Bulletin Maintenance JUNK BE GONE Ad must igniter + 48"x48" hearth unng cenfrai oreqon ance f903 well in a team environment. Must pass drug screen. Remodeling/Carpentry Briefcase: Italian leather include price of I Haul Away FREE •Bark, Rock, Etc. pad, light brown, $1600 maroon, like new. $89 • Lot clearing/brush cut f $500 all. 541-815-2406 Lost: Me d i terraneanELECTRICIAN openings in Grants Pass, White For Salvage. Also SILVER LINING obo. 541-330-9070 or less, or multiple d resser drawer, S City, and Medford: Current Oregon general or Cleanups 8 Cleanouts CONSTRUCTION Landsca in ~ tI MISS IHIS Hwy 97, around Big R manufacturing plant electrical license required; 2-3 items whose total Buying Diamonds DII Mel, 541-389-8107 Residential const., •Landscape does notexceed i n R e dmond. C a l l years experience including PLC. /Gold for Cash remodels, maint. Construction 541-420-9372. Domestic Services •Water Feature $500. Saxon's Fine Jewelers 500 Gallon used 8 repair. CCB ¹199645 MILLWRIGHT openings in Grants Pass and Yreka: 541-389-6655 Cody Aschenbrenner Installation/Maint. propane t a n k, Minimum of two years iourneyman level experience. Call Classifieds at A ssisting Seniors a t •Pavers 541-263-1268 541-385-5809 BUYING $900. Home. Light house- •Renovations Timber Products offers a competitive wage and www.bendbulletin.com Lionel/American Flyer keeping & other ser- •Irrigations Installation REMEMBER: If you 541-382-0217. trains, accessories. Need to get an have lost an animal, benefit package including health, dental, vision, life v ices. Licensed 8 541-408-2191. don't forget to check insurance, and 401K. Relocation package proBonded. BBB CertiSenior Discounts ad in ASAP? GUN SHOW to successful candidate. DII'I MISSTHIS The Humane Society vided Please fied. 503-756-3544 BUYING & SE L LING Bonded 8 Insured Aug. 31-Sept. 1, 2013 submit resume and cover letter: Bend 541-815-4458 You can place it Deschutes Fairgrounds All gold jewelry, silver Email: SorhumanresOtimber roducts.com 541-382-3537 I Decks LCB¹8759 and gold coins, bars, Monitor Empire Buy! Sell! Trade! (Subiect: Position/Location) online at: Redmond SAT. 9-5 • SUN. 10-3 rounds, wedding sets, Fax: 541-618-3804 propane stove, 541-923-0882 Oregon Decks & Fencing $8 Admission, class rings, sterling silMail:ATTN: Human Resources www.bendbulletln.com Find exactly what PI Expert installation,all types 12 & under free! ver, coin collect, vin- p ipe incl., e x c . TIMBER PRODUCTS COMPANY OREGON TRAIL GUN 541-447-7178; Excellent work! Over 50 you are looking for in the tage watches, dental cond., $ 900 . PO Box 1669, Medford OR 97501. yrs exp. Serving all of CO SHOWS, 541-347-2120 gold. Bill Fl e ming, 541-382-0217 or Craft Cats Timber Products /s an equal opportunity employer CLASSIFIEDS 541.385.5809 ccb 20010• 541-526-1973 or 541-404-1890 541-382-9419. 541-389-8420. supporting a drug and tobacco-free workplace. GENERATE SOME EXCITEMENT IN YOUR NEIGBORHOOD. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified!

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DAILY B R I D G E

CLU B

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9

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Fr iday,Augu st30, 2013

ACROSS 34 All-Star Martinez i First rock 3s "Guys band whose members and Dolls" received composer/ Kennedy lyricist Center Honors 37 Like dirty 7 Jiffy clothes, often ii Shade of black 3BSecondary: Abbr. i4 Flx, in 4o The muscle of carpentry a muscle car, is Undoubtedly maybe 27 Dropped a line? 42 Soup scoop ia Olympians' food 43 Fill ABFigures for 44 Abba's genre investors 4G"Alice" actress 2DAnimal that Linda catches 4e Kyrgyzstan's fish with Its second-largest forepaws city Zi Ward on a set 22 Shade of gray 49 Game discs 33 Uncopiable, say 24 Work ss Quick session 23 Annual with for a band deep-pink sr Sprlngsteen hlt flowers with the lyric 28 Miles off "Only you can 3DTailor cool my desire" 33 Part of the se Noted graffiti Dept. of Labor artist

Skinning a mule By FRANK STEWART Tribune Content Agency

With apologies to all the mulelovers in the world, there is more than one way toskin a mule. When you defend against 3NT, either of two approaches may work: win five tricks or stop declarer from winning nine. In today's deal, East took his ace of spades and defended as stubbornly as you-know-what by returning a spade. Declarer took the queen and led the jack of diamonds, winning, and a second diamond. East won and led a heart. South won, forced out East's last high diamond and c l a imed t h e r e s t. Making four.

ANSWER: Al m ost all e x perts would consider this a mandatory opening bid. The hand contains only 12 points in high cards, but three Quick Tricks (or defensive tricks). It's true you would prefer that more of the high cards were located within the long suit. A hand with a long, s trongmajorsuchasAK J6 5 , A 7 6 , 7 6 5, 3 2 would be more promising. Still, open one club. South dealer Neither side vulnerable

NORTH 4s52 i vi 84 3

MISSING POINTS

0 Q 1 09 8 6 2 AAK

East triedthe wrong approach. He had 12 points, dummy had nine and WEST EAST South's 1NT had promised at least 4 J 1098 6 4A4 16. West couldn't have the K-J of 9 Q 9 5 2 Q J76 spades; South surely held the K-Q. 03 0 AK5 East must forget about using the 4 874 4 106 5 3 2 spades and try instead to deprive declarer of his winners. If East shifts SOUTH to a club at Trick Two, killing one of 4KQ7 3 dummy's entries, he can lead another ci/i AK 10 c lub when he t akes the king o f O J74 d iamonds. South c an't u s e t h e 4Q J9 diamonds and ends up a trick short. South 1 NT

DAILY QUESTION

We s t Pass

Nor th 3 NT

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

East All Pass

You hold: 4s A 4 ~vi J 7 6 O p e ninglead — 4 J 0 AK 5 4 10 6 5 3 2 . Y o u arethe dealer. What is your opening call? (C) 2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

PA M U Z I T EX

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five gamesweekly at www.bendbridge.org. BIZARRO

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By Jeffrey Wechsler (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency

08/30/13


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

Employment Opportunities Add your web address to your ad and read-

ers on The Bulletin's web site, www.bendbulletin.com, will be able to click through automatically to your website.

THE BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 E5

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Office Now Hiring •Office Help •Customer Service Start immediately. Call 541-306-7681

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The Bulletin I Recommends extra ~

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caution when purchasing products or f services from out of ~

f the area. Sending f c ash, checks, o r f credit i n f o rmation

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573

648

Business Opportunities

Houses for Rent General

Extreme Value Advertising! 29 Daily newspapers $540/25-word classified 3-d a y s. Reach 3 million Pacific Noithwesterners. For more information call (916) 288-6019 or 514 email: Insurance elizabethOcnpa.com the Pacific NorthSAVE $$$ on AUTO for INSURANCE from the west Daily Connecm ajor names y o u tion. (PNDC) know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call

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PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate adver- RENTALS tising in this newspa- 603- Rental Alternatives per is subject to the 604 - Storage Rentals F air H o u sing A c t which makes it illegal 605 - RoommateWanted to a d v ertise "any 616-Want To Rent preference, limitation 627-Vacation Rentals& Exchanges or disc r imination 630-Rooms for Rent •

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682 - Farms, RanchesandAcreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REALESTATE 705- Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 -Tlmeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multlplexes for Sale 740 -Condos & Townhomesfor Sale 744 - OpenHouses 745- Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest BendHomes 747 - Southwest BendHomes 748- Northeast BendHomes 749 - Southeast BendHomes 750 - RedmondHomes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunrlver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson CountyHomes 757- Crook CountyHomes 762 - Homeswith Acreage 763 - Recreational HomesandProperty 764 - Farms andRanches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Moblle Homes with Land

Advertise your car! ~ may be subjected to ~ B2B Service Franchise FRAUD. Add A Picture! based on race, color, 631 - Condos &Townhomesfor Rent Promo, Digital Print Reach thousands of readers! For more informareligion, sex, handi& Advertising. Well Call 541 -385-5809 tion about an adver~ cap, familial status, 632 - Apt./Multlplex General Established, Owner The Bulletin Classlfieds / tiser, you may call marital status or na- 634 - Apt./Multiplex NEBend Retiring. No Exp. the Oregon State tional origin, or an in- 636- Apt./Multlplex NWBend Necessary! Financing I Attorney General's Plumber Wanted: tention to make any 638- Apt./Multiplex SEBend 8 Support Call: F O R MY C o n sumer x READY A 3rd or 4th year Ap- Office 1-800-796-3234 such pre f e rence, QUOTE now! CALL Protection hotline at I prentice or Journeylimitation or discrimi- 640- Apt./Multlplex SW Bend 1-888-706-8256. I 1-877-877-9392. man plumber to live in nation." Familial sta- 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond (PNDC) Executive Director tus includes children 646 - Apt./Multlplex Furnished Crook County Parks & John Day, Oregon. If LThe Bulletin married, the spouse 528 under the age of 18 648- Houses for RentGeneral Recreation is looking needs to WANT to live living with parents or 650- Houses for Rent NE for an Executive DiLoans & Mortgages Bend in John Day. legal cus t o dians, 652- Houses for Rent NW rector. This person is Wages Bend Take care of will depend on pregnant women, and responsible for overWARNING 627 Bend experience and level people securing cus- 654- Houses for Rent SE your investments all management and The Bulletin recomVacation Rentals of qualifications. tody of children under 656- Houses for Rent SW Bend operation of the Dismends you use cauwith the help from includes remodel, 18. This newspaper 658-Houses for Rent Redmond & Exchanges trict, and works un- Work tion when you proservice work and new will not knowingly acThe Bulletin's der the guidance of vide personal 659- Houses for Rent Sunrlver Insurance is any advertising 660-Houses for Rent La Pine an e lected b o ard. housing. information to compa"Call A Service Ocean front house, cept available. for real estate which is Refer to nies offering loans or each walk from town, in violation of the law. 661 - Houses for Rent Prlnevllle Professional" Directory w ww.ccprd.org f o r Call 541-575-2144 credit, especially 2 bdrm/2 bath, TV, salary, a p p lication those asking for adFireplace, BBQ. $95 O ur r e a ders ar e 662-Houses for Rent Sisters hereby informed that 663- Houses for Rent Madras procedure, c r iteria, vance loan fees or per night, 3 night MIN. all dwellings adver- 664- Houses for Rent Furnished benefit package, and Career 0 o r t u n i ties companies from out of 208-342-6999 tised in this newspa- 671 - Moblle/Mfd. for Rent job desc r iption. Night Pressman state. If you have per are available on Deadline to apply is The Bulletin, located in beautiful Bend, Orconcerns or ques632 egon. is seeking a night-time Pressman. Monday, September tions, we suggest you Apt./Multiplex General an equal opportunity 675- RV Parking basis. To complain of 676 - Moblle/Mfd. Space 1 6, 2013, 50 0 p m , We are part of Western Communications, Inc. consult your attorney discrimination cal l which is a small, family owned group consistPST. or call CONSUMER CHECK YOUR AD HUD t o l l -free at 746 775 ing of 7 newspapers - 5 in Oregon and 2 in HOTLINE, 1-800-877-0246. The California. Ideal candidate must be able to 1-877-877-9392. Northwest Bend Homes Manufactured/ FoodService-Server toll f ree t e lephone W hispering Wi n d s learn our equipment/processes quickly. A Mobile Homes TURNED YOU number for the hearRetirement is hiring a hands-on style is a requirement for our 3 t/s BANK DOWN? Private party ing im p a ired is p art-time Server & tower KBA press. In addition to our 7-day a Desirable Suntree Vil1-800-927-9275. will loan on real esweek newspaper, we have numerous compart-time Busser for lage 55+ park - Knotty tate equity. Credit, no on the first day it runs our dining room. Posi- mercial print clients as well. Competitive wage Pine cottage. 2 bdrm 2 Rented your problem, good equity to make sure it is cort ion i n cludes e v e- and benefit program, and potential for adbath + d en, b eautiful is all you need. Call Property? vancement in a stable work environment. If "Spellcheck" and nings 8 w e ekends. rect. c overed porch 8 e n Oregon Land M ort2 003 N W 4 t I 1 S t . , closed yard. By owner, human errors do oc- The Bulletin Classifieds Benefits after 90 days. you provide dependability, combined with a has an gage 541-388-4200. positive attitude and are a team player, we cur. If this happens to 745 Bend T raditional, 3 $29,900. 760-534-5792 Must be f riendly 8 "After Hours" Line. ad, please conbdrms, master bdrm. enjoy seniors. Please would like to hear from you. Homes for Sale Cut you r S T UDENT your Call 541-383-2371 o n main l evel 2 . 5 People Lookfor Information apply in person at tact us ASAP so that LOAN payments in 24 Hours to About Products and corrections and any baths, 1690 sq. ft ., 2920 N E Co n n ers For more information or to submit a resume, 4.63 Acre Gentlemens HALF or more Even if «I. Ave., Bend. Pre-em- please contact: Al Nelson, Pressroom Manadjustments can be R anch. H o use & family room, hobby Services Every Daythrough Late or in Default. Get made to your ad. ployment drug test re- ager, anelson@bendbulletin.com. Applicaguest house, paved room, gas fireplace, The Bulletin Classifieds Relief FAST. M u ch 650 tions are also available at the front desk at The 541-385-5809 quired. rd., exc. cond. Newer central air, 30 yrs. old, LOWER p a yments. The Bulletin Bulletin, 1777 Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. SPECIAL Classified Houses for Rent m etal r o ofs, B L M 2-car garage, c i ty FACTORY Call Student Hotline New Home, 3 bdrm, Pre-employment drug testing required. EOE view, 10,000 sq ft lot, across rd. In the big NE Bend 855-747-7784 $46,500 finished Horticulture Good classified ads tell pines. $159,000. Call Private cul de sac lo(PNDC) on your site. cation and sunroom Pat 541-420-9095. the essential facts in an S hort term r ental i n J and M Homes Sales Foliage C ompletely ref u r LOCALMONEyr We buy interesting Manner. Write park-like setting, 3/2 541-548-5511 bished paint, roof and Maintenance NOTICE secured trust deeds & from the readers view - not 1200 sf, dbl. garage, Independent Contractor Sales note,some hard money the seller's. Convert the w oodstove. $1 0 0 0 All real estate adver- driveway. LOT MODEL Specialist We are seeking dynamic individuals. loans. Call Pat Kelley tised here in is subOffered at$405,000 mo. 541-388-2159 LIQUIDATION facts into benefits. Show 541-382-3099 ext.13. ject to t h e F e deral 541-390-3442 Prices Slashed Huge Immediate opening the reader how the item will DOES THis SOUND LIKE YOU? F air H o using A c t , 652 Savings! 10 Year for part-/full-time pohelp them in someway. 748 • OUTGOING 8 COMPETITIVE which makes it illegal conditional warranty. sition. Requires What are you Houses for Rent This • PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC Northeast Bend Homes to advertise any prefFinished on your site. expert plant care advertising tip • CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED looking for? NW Bend erence, limitation or knowledge and ONLY 2 LEFT! brought to you by Gorgeous custom Tusdiscrimination based experience at You'll find it in Redmond, Oregon ice, 3 Awbrey Glen golf course on race, color, reli- cany 3 bdrm + off Our winning team of sales & promotion various project sites. 541-548-5511 The Bulletin 3br 2.5 ba home, granite gion, sex, handicap, bath, 1 level, quiet cul- JandMHomes.com Send resume & work The Bulletin Classifieds professionals are making an average of de-sac, designed landcounters, 2 f i replaces, familial status or nahistory via e-mail to: $400 - $800 per week doing special walk-in closet, 3-car gar, tional origin, or inten- scape, park-like setting, Rent IOwn info©evergreen 634 events, trade shows, retail 8 grocery $2695/mo. 858-292-1991 tion to make any such outstanding finish wk. On 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes plantscapes.com 541-385-5809 store promotions while representing .46 acre, 2910 sq ft. Must Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $2500 down, $750 mo. preferences, l i m itayou'll love it. 21420 OAC. J and M Homes THE BULLETIN newspaper tions or discrimination. see, 573 Belknap Dr. $595,000. Call for Specials! 541-548-5511 as an independent contractor Get your We will not knowingly 541-382-6731 Journeyman Electrician, Business Opportunities Limited numbers avail. accept any advertisOregon Lice n se, business 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. vI/EOFFER: ing for r ea l e state Portland area. Com763 Catt a Pro A Classified ad is an W/D hookups, patios mercial and Residen• Solid Income Opportunity * which is in violation of Recreational Homes EASY W A Y TO or decks. Whether you need a * this law. All persons tial. Fax Resume to *Complete Training Program REACH over 3 million MOUNTAIN GLEN, & Property fence fixed, hedges 503-981-4643 are hereby informed *No Selling Door to Door * Pacific Northwestern541-383-9313 that all dwellings adtrimmed or a house *No Telemarketing Involved* ers. $54 0 /25-word Professionally 637 Acres in forest vertised are available Medical "Great Advancement Opportunlty" c lassified ad i n 2 9 managed by Norris & with an ad jn built, you'll find west of Silver Lake, on an equal opportuRecords Coordinator * daily newspapers for * Full and Part Time Hours Stevens, Inc. OR, with recreation nity basis. The Bulleprofessional help in Exc. opportunity with The Bujjetjn'5 3-days. Call the Pacabin and stream. tin Classified b enefits. A lert a n d The Bulletin's "Call a cific Northwest Daily "Call A Service 541-480-721 5 FOR THE CHANCE OF A motivated individual. Connection Find It in (916) Service Professional" LIFETIME, TURN THE PAGE Up to $16 hour DOE. 2 88-6019 o r em a i l The Bulletin Classifieds! Professional" Find exactly what Directory Contact Pe r s onnel Call Adam Johnson For More Ads elizabeth Ocnpa.com you are looking for in the Directory 541-385-5809 Dept., 855-401-5350. 541-410-5521, TODAY! 541-385-5809 for more info (PNDC) T he B u l l e t i n C LAS S I F I E D S

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$29 $S9 $49 $S9

Includes up to 40 words of text, 2" in length, with border, full color photo, bold headline and price. • Daily publication in The Bulletin, an audience of over 70,000 potential customers. • Weekly publication in Central Oregon Marketplace —DELIVERED to over 30,000 households. • Weekly publication in The Central Oregon Nickel Ads with an audience of over 15,000 in Central and Eastern Oregon

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• Continuous Listing online, with photo, on bendbulletin.com Private party merchandise only - excludes pets & livestock, autos, Rvs, motorcycles, boats, airplanes, and garage sale categories. II

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E6 FRIDAY AUGUST 30 2013 • THE BULLETIN

To PLAGE AN AD cALL CLAssIFIED• 541-385-5809

NOTICE Midstate Electric Cooperative, Inc. Gives notice that Capital Credit payments are now and have been available since December 2, 2006 at the office of the Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Rd, PO Box 127, La Pine OR 97739, 541-536-2126 or 800-7227219; to the members named hereunder. Unless the members named, or their heirs, claim payment not later than Monday, December 9, 2013, the Capital Credits for patronage during the years 1989 through 1991 will be forfeited to the Cooperative. ABEENE,IVAN ABY,STEVE ACOSTA,JOSE ADAIR,TODD ADAMS,CHE TE ADAMS,FRANK ADAMS,LEE ADDY,PAULM ADKINS,TERRELL ADLER,DARLEN E ADLER, MICHAEL ADLETA,THOMASL ADRIAN,DAVID AFSETH,JACO BS AHRENS,MARJORIEH ALBERT,LAWE RENCEJ ALDRICH,STEPH EN ALEXANDE R,ARTHURD ALEXANDER,JB ALEXANDE R,STEPHEN B ALEY,JAMES ALFORD,TONY A ALLAN,STEPH ANIEL ALLEN,MAMIE ALLEN, RD ALLEN,ROBER TL ALLEN,SAMUE L ALLENBY,TERRE ALLIS,CHARLES ALLISON,CHARLESE ALLISON,DAVID B ALLISON,ROBERTH ALLISON,SCOTT ALLWOR TH,CLARK ALMOND, EDWIN A ALPINEPACIFIC CONSTRUC ALSUP,JOEL ALTENHO FEN,GREG ALTSTATT, ARTHUR ALTSTETTER, MARK ALTURA,ALANR AMACKER, DANIEL R AMADISTO, RHONDA AMERICAN PROPERTYMANAG AMES,ELDRE DL AMUNDSEN,ALF ANDERE GG,RICK ANDERSO N,CECELIA ANDERSO N,CHARLESE ANDERSON , CHRISMAN ANDERSON , CLARENCES ANDERSON , DENNISW ANDERSO N,DONALDF ANDERSO N,EMIL ANDERSO N,GREG ANDERSO N,HAYES ANDERSO N,KEN ANDERSO N,KEVIN ANDERSON , MICHAEL ANDERSON , MICHAELH ANDERSON , MICHAELS ANDERSON,MILDREDM ANDERSO N,N C ANDERSO N,NORMANA ANDERSO N,RONALDJ ANDREAS, JOHNJ ANDREASEN, STEVE ANDREWS,CAROL J ANDREWS,ERN ESTC ANKER,ARTHUR M ANTHONY, GREGORY A ANTHONYJAME , SK ANTHONY,ROB ERTL ANTONIOLI ,ROBERT AQUITAINEINC ARANDA,SONIA ARBUCKLEJR,ERNE STC ARBUCKLE,DAVID ARCHIBALD,THOMASE AREHART, ESTATE0 ARGYLE,JOHN ARMPRIEST, VIOLET ARMSTRO NG,J H ARNETT,LARR Y ARNOLD,JOHN R ARNOLD,NANC Y ARNOLD,RUDO LFC ARRINGTON, HENRY L ARVEY,DIANE ASCHOFF , WA ASHBURN JR, DOUG ASHBY,TEDL ASHER,DON ASHTON,ROBE RT ASLESON,DAVID ASPEL,JAMES AT&TCOMMUNICATIONS ATKIN,WILLIAML ATKINS,BO NITAB ATKINSON, DAVIDM ATTOLINI,FRAN CISCOJ ATWOOD,DONALD K AUDIA,ANN AULTOM, PAUL AUSTIN,DEREK AUSTIN,RICHARDH AUSTIN-POWELL, ANITAG AUTHIER,DANIEL D AYNES,KENNITHI BACH,JAMES BACHMAN,SAND RA BACHMEIER, EB BADGER,MICHAEL BAGWELL,GARYA BAILEY,CHARLES BAILEY,DAN BAILEY,DORIS L BAILEY,GAR YR BAILEY, JUDYK BAILEY,LEWIS BAILEY,RUTHC BAILOR, DONNA I BAILY,ROBINL BAIR, JAMES R BAIRD,DONALDA BAKER,CECIL BAKER, DARRIN BAKER, FREDJ BAKER,GERR Y BAKER,GORDONJ BAKER,JEFFREYA BAKER,JOHN BAKER,KEN BAKER,KENN ETHD BAKER,MARG ARETA BAKER,NELL M BAKER, PHILIP C BAKER,ROBER TN BAKER,SUSAN L BAKER, THOMAST BAKER, WILLARDE BAKERSDOZEN BAKKE-HUFF ,LINDAK BALCOM,DIJANE BALDWINFREEMAN & HICKS BALDWIN, WILLIAMJ BALL,ALTON BALL,DANIELH BALLARD,FRED E BALLARD, LOUISA BANDZI,JOE BANFIELDPROPERTIESLTD BANKS,JACK R BANKSTON & HARSHMAN BANNING,LLOYD BARBEE,RAND ALL BARBOUR,JOHN D BARCLAY SAMERICANI FINANC BARKALO,W JIM BARKHUR ST,DOROTHY BARKMAN,ROB ERTA

BARNARD,DAYMON BARNES,BILL BARNES,DONW BARNES,GEORGEW BARNES,HAZE L BARNES,TAMIA BARNETT,LOUISE R BARNHART, PHILIP N BARNHO USE,DEANB BARNWELL, ROBERTP BARRJR,JERRY L BARRETT ,CHERYL BARRETT,FJ BARRETT,MICHAEL W BARRY,HAROLD BARSOTTI,MARYB BARTHOLM AUS,C.D. BARTHOL OMEW,SAMUEL BARTON,DERRICK BARTON, I.P. BARTON, JIMMY BASSETT,IDAM BATCHM AN,RONALD0 BATDORF ,WAYNER BATESON,LARRY BATESON ,SHARRONG BATTELLE,IVAN M BAUGH,RITAL BAIJGHMAN, MARRITAA BAUMAN,MARTY BAUMANN,WH

BAXTER,BRUC E BAXTER,CHRIS BAZE,BILL BEALS,SCHONN R BEAN,ARTHUR BEARD,BOYCE R BEARDSLEY ,JAMESR BEARDSLE Y,STEPHEN BEASLEY,SHAR ON BEAUDRY ,RONALDD BEAUDRY ,STAN BEAVERS,EDWARDS BEBOUT, RALPHJ BECKER,ARTHUR K BECKER, HAROLDN BECKER, HENRYE BECKER, WILLIAM BECKETT ,ROBERTD BECKMANN ,DAVID BEEBER, MARLINL BEEMAN, TODD M BEGLEY, JUDITH BEHUNIN, GEORGE BELCHER, RICK BELCHER, RICKY BELLIN,ROBERT BELLINGER,BREND A BELLINGER, BRIAN F BELLINGER, LESLIE BELLIS,BERNARD BELT,ROBERT L BENFR ANKLINFEDERALSALN BENARO YA,NEIL BENARO YA,NEILW BENDER,GREG P BENDER,KARE N BENDTZEN ,FRED BENEDA,EVER ETT BENEFIEL, JOHND BENJFRAN DEVELOPMENTI BENJ FRANKLINSAVINGS BENNETT ,CHARLES E BENNETT ,LARRY BENNETT ,ROBERT BENNINGH OFF,BARBARAA BENSON,HAROLD P BENSON,LYLE M BENTLEY,LORN E BENTON,BEVE RLY BERG,TO BERGER, BILL BERGERONPROPERTIES BERGSTR OM,LARRY BERKOW ITZ,ALAN BERNERT, EDWARD BEROVIC,MIKE BERRETH, ALLENE BERRETT ,MARGARET BERRY,EARL BERRY,JOSEPH R BERRY,STEPH ANIEM BEST,DONNA A BEST,SHEILA G BEST,WALTERW BETZ,LEONARD B BEVEL,GREGORYA BEVERLY, ELMER R BICKELALLANE BICKFORD, JACK BIDABURA, AITOR BIDGOOD, DUANE A BIEDERMAN,J.C. BIGMO UNTAINENTERPRISES BIG RIVER DEVELOPMENTINC BIGGS, ROBERT BILLINGS, EE BIRD,BARB ARAJ BIRNEY,MICHAEL BISHOP, J.L. BIVENS, MARGUERITEA BIVENS,PAULN BIVENS,RUDIE BLACK,ERIC BLACK,NOEL BLAKE,ERLE G BLAKE,WARRENJ BLAKELEY,BOYD BLAKESLEE ,RUTH L BLANCHAR D,PAUL BLANCK,HERB ERTF BLANK,GREGORY R BLASZCZAK,STAN LEY BLEIL, RICHARD A BLEVINS,HAR VEY BLEYER,MAUR EEN BLIVEN,RONALDE BLIXSETH CO., THE BLOHM,PHILIPG BOAZ,BARBARA R BODINE,DONALDP BODLEY,THOMAS BODLEY, WAYNE BOECKM AN,GENEVA BOECKN ER,CHARLES BOEHM,RALPH BOETTC HER,FRED BOGDAN OFF,STEVENJ BOGGS, WILSON E BOHANNO N,JOHNA BOIES, GARYW BOLDEN OW,BRUCE BOLLER,GERALDINE BOLLMANN,JAMES D BOLSTER,ROD NEY BOND,GLENN E BOND,STEVE N BONDS,NANCY BONES,GREG BOODT, MIKE BOOEN,LARRY G BOOM,GREGG BOONE, CAROLYNR BOONE,MARGO BOOTH,HARRIETTP BORGES,LULA M BOTTOR FF,CHARLESM BOULDEN,WAUNITA BOURRET, BILL R BOUTTO TE, WL BOWDEN,LUTHERB BOWERS, CYNTHIA B

BOWERS,DON BOWERS,HARRY F BOWIE,LINDAM BOWLES,ROSSJ BOYDCYADEN,TRUSTEE BOYDCYADEN,TRUSTEE BOYD,CANDY C BOYD,LAURIEA BOYER,BRIAN BOYER,PEG GY BOYNTON,DAVID BOYUM,JENS BRACEY, JAMESC BRADFIELD, WANDA BRADFORD ,TERRY BRADLEY, JACK BRADSH AW,GARYD BRADY,JAMESL BRAIN,SUE BRALEY,CAROL L BRALEY,LENETT E BRANCH,BT BRANDON,FRAN CINE BRANDT,DANIEL A BRANDT,LUCILLE BRANOM,DUNCAN R BRATTAIN BROTHERS BRAWLEY, RICHARDD BRAY,ROBE RT BRECKE NFELDER,BESS BREEDEN,JOAN BREHMER,CAROL D BREICKLER,LESLIE M BREITENSTEIN ,ROBERTW BRELL,BERGEN K BRENEM AN,JOHNS BREWER, DANIEL J BREWER,FITZHUGH BREWER,JUDY A BREWER,MARKS BRIA,GARY BRIDGES, NORMAN

CAREY,MICHELLER CAREY,STEV EN CAREY,TOM CARLEY,ROYA CARLILE,DALER CARLILE,REBECCA R CARLSON CHEVROLET CO. CARLSON,KENNETHM CARLTON,RON CARLYLE,EOG AR CARMELIA,WILLIAMM CARMONA,VIRGINIA CARNAG EY,CLYDE CARNAG EY,TANYA D CAROTTA,SHIRLEY CARPEN TER,AARON CARPEN TER,DAVID CARPEN TER,JEAN CARPEN TER,RAYMOND R CARPEN TER,ROBERT CARR, S T CARRICK,DANIEL CARROLL,MARK CARSTENS, WMA CARTER,ALIENE CARTER,DONALDE CARTER,GRAC E CARTER,JOE CARTER,MICHELLES CARIJANA,JOHN T CASADELRIO CASE,ILA CASEYORCUS

CASS,LARRY CASSOU,LJ CASTANE DA,ALBERT CASTILLO,STEVE CASTLE,EDWIN CATANIA,ROGER CATE,STACE YK CAVA,GAILA CAVANAU GH,ARDITH BRIGGS,LESTERR CAVEN HAMFORESTINDUSTR BRIGHAM,BETTY R CENTRAL OR.LEASING&MGM BRIMBERR Y,SHELLEY CENTRA LOREGONCELLULAR BRISBEE,LANDON CENTRALOREGON MARINE BRITTON,HAROLDC CHAFFINS,ROBERT BROADLEY, DON B CHAMBER LAIN, RAY BROADLEY, JACKL CHAMBER LAIN, SYLVIAB BROCHTR UP,JENNIFER CHAMBERS, DANNYL BROCHTRUP, W ILLIAM CHAMBERS, LELANDR BROCKE LSBY,HAROLDC CHAMPIONSRESTAURANT BROCK WAY,DENNIS CHAN,KENGP BRODY,ARNOLD CHAPIN,AL BROMAN,SM CHAPIN,ROBERTM BRONLEEWE, GORDON CHAPIN-ELLER BROOKBROOKES, THOMAS B PECKANDROGE BROOKS,ELRO Y CHAPMAN,LAWRENCEG BROOKS,RAND Y CHAPMAN,ROBERT BROOKS,ROB ERT CHAPMAN,ROB ERT BROWN,BERNAR D CHARLTON ,FARRON BROWN,BRUC E CHASE,ANN BROWN, DALEK CHASE,JOHN BROWN,DAVID CHAVEZ, THOMASL BROWN, DENNIS F CHEMULTROD & GUNCLI JB BROWN,DENNIS M CHERANICH,BORIS BROWN,DONALDR CHESS,DAVID B BROWN,DOUGLAS A CHEVALIER, JERALDJ BROWN,G.L. CHILDERS,JERR Y BROWN,J D CHRISTEN SEN,STEVEN BROWN,JOE CHRISTENSON, W ILLIAM R BROWN,JOYCEE CHRISTIAN,JULIE BROWN,LARRYD CHRISTNER,ROBERTG BROWN,MALCOLM CHURCHOFGOD BROWN,MARYRUTH CINELLI, NR BROWN,MATTHEWP CIRCLE FOURRANCH DEVC BROWN, O.D CLARE,ALLEN BROWN,PAMELAJ CLARK,EDWARDJ BROWN,STAN CLARK,FLOYDA BROWN,THELMA CLARK,GORDONE BROWN,THEODORE G CLARK,JAMESL BROWNE,DAVENPORT CLARK,JOSEP H BROWNE,SCOTTH CLARK,JOYCE BROX,RANDI CLARK,KERRI BROYLES,ROB CLARK,KEVINW BRUMLEY, GARY CLARK,LEE BRUMMETT, PHILIPC CLARK,LORENM BRUMMOND,GERALD G CLARK,RENO BRUSSEAU,FRAN KY CLARK,RICKYL BRYAN,JACQUELIN CLAYCOMB, STANLEYJ BRYAN,WL CLEMANN,ROBE RTL BRYANT,DEAN CLEMENSEN,GEORGEN BRYANT, PARTIN CLEMMONS,LORA BRYANT,VERN CLEVELAND,EDWARD BRYSON,KATH Y CLEVELAND,JAMESA BUCHANAN, W ILLIAM CLEVELAND,RON ALDE BUCKINGHAMRESOURCESLTD CLEVENG ER,CATHERINES BUCKINGH AM,BENNY L CLINE,JAMESA BUCKLEY, PATRICIAA CLINE,RICHARDJ BUDIHAS,JOHNJ CLINKENB EARD, ROBERT BUELL,STACEY L CLINTON,DANIEL R BUFF, WC CLINTON,RUTHM BUFFAM,DAVID CLOSE,DUANE BUFORD, SAMUEL CLOUD,BETTYM BUGGE, MARY CLOUD,JAME S0 BULSON,ROBE RT CLOUGH,LINDA BUMGARNER,DWAINC CLOUGH,ROB ERT BUNDY,DEANF CLUM,NANCY BURBANK, BILLIE CLUM,ROSEM ARY BURCH,KACE Y COATES,C.P. BURDICK,CARL COBB,EDDIE BURGES ON,H W COBB,FRANCISL BURGESS, WC COCHRAN,WILLIAM R BURKS,JAMES K COE,DEN NIS L BURLEIGH,LECTA M COE,RUSSE LL BURNHAM&HOLT COGAN,JOHN J BURNS,JAMESROBERT COKER,DAVID BURNS,MARG ARETA COLBERT ,GLEN BURNS,ROBERTE COLBY,DERE K BURNSIDE,WILLIAM COLE,DARRELL A BURTON,FRE DM COLE,DONALD BURTON,LARRY COLE,KENNE TH BURWASS ER,JAMESA COLE,KENNE TH BUSCH,CATH ERINE M COLEMAN,CHAR LESC BUSH,ALVIN COLEMAN,DANIEL R BUSH,LEOJ COLEMAN,ROBERT BUTCHART, TED COLLIER,REN BUTCHINO,EDWARD COLLINS,CHERRYL BUTING, JOHNG COLLINS,GERALD BUTLER,RICHARDA COLLINS, JOHNG BUTTS,JOHN COLLINS,TAMRA BYRD,MARLA M COLTON,JOHN BYWATER, RON COLWELL,WES CAHILL,PAUL COMEAUX,JOSE PH CALAVAN,GRE G COMER,BUDDY CALAVAN,WENONAW COMMODORESAVINGSASSOC CALDWELL,BILL CONAW AY, KATHRYNA CALDWELL,KIMBERLYK CONN,BARBARA J CALHOON,JAMES CONOVE R,JERRY CALHOUN,HERB ERT CONVER SE,CHRIS CALIFORNIA ENERGY COOK,AUDRAI CALLAHAN,PATRICK COOK,BETTYA CALLENDER,CONNIE COOK,JOSEPH E CALLISON,PATRICKL COOK,RANDY G CALVERT, WADEH COOMBS, JAMES E CAMERON ,DON COON,ANNT CAMP,WALTER COON,DAVIDA CAMPBELL,JODI COONS,GLENN CAMPBELL, JUDITH F COOPER,CARO L CAMPBELL,LOIS COOPER,DANN CAMPBELL,RICHARDE COOPER,JACK CAMPBELL,SCOT COOPER,JACK C CAMPBELL, WILLIAM B COOPER,JOHN R CANADY,PATRICKK COOPER,PATR ICK L CANGIAMILLA, MICHAEL COOPER,RICHARD L CANNARD,EDW ARDL COOPER, WILLIAM G CANNON,WAYNEB COOTE, NORMAN E CANTONWINE, JOHN R COPE,RODG ER CAPPS,MIKEG CORBIN,STEPH EN CAPRI,LARRYM CORDERO,ROGELIOM CAPRON,STEVE CORLISS,BETTYJ CAREY,GARY CORNELIUS,GRANT

CORNUTT ,PRESTON CORWIN,DAVE COTTERM AN, JAMES M COULTER,BEULAH COUNI'R YBOYSMOBILEHOM COUNTS,EDGAR K COURTN EY,ROBERTR COUTURE,IRENE COVEAU,EDMUND E COX,JOHN D COX,MARGA RETA COX,THOMASC COX,THOMASC COX,THOMASH COY, GUYD CRABTRE E,JUANITA L CRAIGHILL,ERNIE CRANE,EUG ENEH CRATER DRIVE-IN CRATER LAKELUMBERCO CRAWFO RD, JAMESA CRAWFO RD, RICK CRAWFORD, TONID CRESCEN TDENTAL CLINIC CREWS, EARLD CROCKER ,CHRISL CROFOOT, SHANNON CRONIN,EILEENB CROSBY, CARLISLE CROSBY, TOMJ CROSIER, LEEA CROSS, MARJORIEM CROSSAN,THO MAS CROWELL, CHARLES0 CRUMP,BRUC E CRUMPA CKER,CAROLINEB CRUSON, JULIA R CRUTHIRDS, STEPHEN CULBERT SON, JAMESF CULLER,KATHLEE NM CULP,MARISSAS CUNNIFF, LJ CUNNINGHAM, BRIAN CUNNINGHAM, DORN E CUNNINGHAM,EUGENE CURL,DAVID E CURRENT, ALBERTL CURRIE,HUGH W CURRY, JAMESE CURRY, MICHAEL L CURTI,MARK CURTIS,ROBERT F CUSHMAN,GLADYS CUTTER&MCCORMICK CZARNOWSKY, VICTORE D& D INVE STMENTS DAEGLING, MARYM DAGGETT,GEORGEE DAHACK,EVE RETTV DAHL,DORO THYE DAHLKE, NEILE DAILEY,GLENN DAIMLER,GENE DAIN,TOM DAINS,ROBER TE DAKIN, CU DAL SOGLIO, VALERIEJ DALTON, BILLYJ DANARACONST DANCER,DON W DANFOR TH,RADA R DANFOR TH,ROLANDW DANIELS,SCOTT R DANLEY,DAVID M DANNEN, MARSHALLW DANNER, WILLIAM DARON,STEPH EN DASH,BARRE TT DAVIDSON, HAROLD DAVIDSON, JOHN DAVIDSON, JON DAVIDSON, SCOT DAVIS,ALBERTL DAVIS,BARBARAJ DAVIS,BEVERLYB DAVIS,CHARLESW DAVIS,DC DAVIS,DONN AR DAVIS,HELEN M DAVIS,LINDA DAVIS,MARKE DAVIS,NELDA DAVIS,RICHARDL DAVIS,RONALDA DAVIS,WILLIAMK DAVISON,STENNITT DAVISSON, MARCENE DAVY,AL DE CELLES,CARLA DEJAGER,SHER RY DE KAT,GARYH DE LATORRE,CAMILLE DE MEULES,CLEOC DE NINO,PENNY L DE SHAZER, THOMASJ DE WAIDE, STEVER DEAL,MELVING DEAN,JONELL D DEAN,LEE R DEARDO RFF,JIM DEARDO RFF,LORENA DEASON,DAVID DEATON,KARAN DEATON,SHERYL R DECKER,DON ALD DECKER,EARL A DEFORR EST,DONALDL DELAHOIJSS AYE,ALLENE DELAHOU SSAYE,STEVE DELANEY, JERRYB DELANEY, JOHND DELASHMU TT,ALAN DELASHMU TT,DARRELL DELUCA, RICK DENADEL,JERR Y DENDAUW , RONALDJ DENOVITZ,KAREN DEPEEL, DONALD L DEPTOFVETERANS ' AFFAIR DEPUE,STEVE NJ DERFLINGER, WILLIAM T DERSHAM, H.H. DERWIN,WILLIAM DEWAR, ERICH DI MECO,MB DIBAVAND,NASSER DICKINSON, CHARLESW DICUS, WILLIAMJ DIETERLE,PAULF DIETRICH, JOHNH DIETRICHS, RUDY A DIETZ,JOHN DILLABOUGH, CANDICEC DILLON,CHARLESR DILLON,SUSAN DIMIT, GC DINKINS,PATRICK DINNEEN, PAUL R DINSDALE,RICHARD F DINSMORE, BILL DINSMORE,DONALD DIVERSIFIEDINVESTMENT DIXON,RANDY DOBKIN,DAVIDS DOCKERY ,HOMER DODD,RALPHA DODGE, EDNAB DODGION, ORVILLE DODSON, DARRELL B DODSON,RUBIN E DOGGE TT,KENNETH DOLAN,DEBBIEJ DOLE,ALLAN DOLLARH YDE,JESSIE DOLLARH YDE,KEVIN DONAHUE,FRAN K DONAHUE, MARIAN E DONALDSO N,DARYELW DONOV AN,PATRICKJ DOOLING, JAMES DOOLITTLE,DAREN A DOPP, AUDREY L DOSTIE,GERARD DOTY, IVANJ DOIJGLAS,BRUC E DOUGLAS,EDW ARDL DOUGLAS, MARKS DOW,DEBBIE DOW,DONALD D DOWE LL, THEODOREEDWARD

DOWLER, WILLIAM R DOWNES, VA DOWNING, LILLIAN DOWNING, REXG DOYLE,MIKE DRAKE,BARB ARA DRAKE,EDW ARD DRAKE,SHARON DREDGE,DEN NIS DREESSEN, WILLIAM DRENNAN,MICHAE LE DREW,MARTHA W DREWITZ, WILBUR B DREXLER,WALT DRGASTINPAGE,KRISTY DRIVER,ELBERT DRULINER, WAYNE DRUMWRIH GT, RUBYM DRWALL,MICHAELP DRYER,TRAVE RS DUDEK,ROBERT DUDLEY, PAULH DUERR,HR DUEY,DAN DUFF,MICHAELG DUFRESNE ,TOM DULANY,DARA DULEY, WILLIAM DUNCAN,CHURC H0 DUNCAN,JAMES E DUNFORD ,EARLG DUNHAM,JL DUNHAM,LYNDAK DUNKLEE, THOMAS DUNLAP,DOLORESJ DUNN,BILLYJ DUNN,LLOYD0 DUNNING,DAVID D DURAN,FRANK DURHAM,KENN ETHW DUTTON,STEVE DUVICK, JOHNR DWYER,DON DYE,DARRIN DYER,BARRY DYKEMAN,ROY W EAGLEMOUNTAIN CONSTRU CTI EARL,DEANNE N EARL,ROBER TD EARLE,THOMASB EARLS,JOHN EARNEST,EDWARD W EASTHAM,PERRY F EATON, FRANCISM EBEL,MARGARETE ECKL,JOHNA ECKLES,HARLEY B EDDY,ELIZABE TH EDELBRO CK,GAY H EDGIL,JAMESG EDGIL,PATRICIA EDIN,CHRISTOPHER D EDISON,DELBERT EDMONDS, MARCR EDMONDSON, VIRGIL EDWARDS,BOB EDWARDS,CHAR LESW EDWARDS, DAVID L EDWARDS, DIONA EDWARDS,DON NA EDWARDS, ESTATE0 EDWARDS,LARR Y EDWARDS, RUSSELL B EGGER,ROBE RT EIKUM, LM EISENBEIS, JAYP ELDER,DALE R ELDER,DENNIS ELDER,GARY A ELDER,MARYV ELFORD,GER TRUDE ELI, EUNICE ELIASON,ELWARDP ELLER,RODNEY ELLER,SW ELLIOTT,CHAD ELLIOTT, DIANEE ELLIOTT, JOANM ELLIS, C J ELLIS,JAMESS ELLIS,KENTM ELLIS,ROBERTE ELLISON,D0 ELLISON,HAROLDF EMAD,BRUCE EMERSON,ROB ERT EMERY,EUNICE EMMONS,DANNY ENGELKE,ALBERT ENGLESON, DON ENSIGN, CHARLES ERB,DENNIS ERBLAND,JEFF ERDLE,ROBE RT ERHARDT,BRIJCE W ERICKSON, MARYC ESCALLE, JAMESE ESMOND, JR ESPINOZA,TERESA M ESSER,JOHN ESTATE OFARTHURADILLON ESTATE OFJOHNWBUCHANAN ESTATE OFLARRYHENNINGSG ESTATEOFRICHARD GSIM ESTELEYOUR$10 STORE ESTEP,TERESAA EUBANKS, WILBERTK EVANS,DONALD EVANS,HELEN S EVANS, JACKC EVENOFF , LEO EVERETT, DAVID G EVES,WAYNEP EVICK,MORRIS EVJENE,VERN EVONS,THOMAS H EWELL,MARLA EX, FRANK EZELLE,GLENN D FABER,JOHN R FADDEN,EDG AR FADEL,DAN FADENR ECHT, RON FAITH,JEANNINE FALK,JOEJ FALK,RYANK FARWESTFEDERAL BANK FARLEY,HARRY FARR-WE THERELL, DREAMA FASSETT,MAUDEG FAULKNER ,BARBARA R FAVA,PAUL FAWNS, JAMESD FAXON,LOREN FEE,JAMESP FEENER,MARKS FEHR,JEAN FEIL, MICHAE L FELT,RICHARDA FENWICK,JAMESJ FERGUS ON,ALANL FERGUS ON, DANIEL R FERGUSON,IZOLA L FERGUSON,KIMRA FERRARI,GERALD FERRERA, ALBERTB FETCH,JOSEPHW FETTIG,JOHNC FIDDY,GARY FIELDS,GR FIELDS,MELISSA FIELDS,ROYD FIFIELD,GE FIFTHSEASONS FILBY,WALT FILLMORE, ROLLIN FINDLEY,CHRISTINE FINLEY, JH FINLEY,OMAR FINNEY, FM FIRSTINTERSTATEBANK FISCHER,ANNE FISCHLER, WILLIAM FISH,ARTHURL FISHER,BREN T FISHER,CHARLE S FISHER,DARR YL FISHER,EUG ENE

FISHER,LEONARD,G FISHER,MAXINEP FISHER,TONY FISK,DAVID FISKE,NIKKIEM FITCH,JAMESW FITTING, DOUGLAS FITTS,ROBER TL FJELD,GORD ON FLANAGAN ,PATRICK FLANARY,FRED H FLANDE,LUELLA J FLEENOR ,ALAN FLEISCHA UER,DANIEL H FLEMING,IRIS FLETCHE R,HUGH FLETCHE R,JOHN FLETCHER, KIMBERLY FLETCHER, MICHAEL J FLETCHE R,STAN FLINT,KEITH FLINTSTONECRUSHING FLODEEN ,ROBERTT FLOGST AD,SP FLOOD,JOSEP H FLORES,JOSEPH L FLORES,MURIEL FLORES,ROBE RT FLOYD, JEFF FLOYD,RANDYL FLURY,PAULW FLYNN,KERR YP FOGELSO N,JERRY FOLSOM,DARLE NE FOLSTON,JAMES FOOTE, THOMAS FOPPE,JACKIE FORBERT, MORGAN S FORD,GEORGEW FORD,MICHAE L FORD,NEWTON FORSYTH,LANCE FOSTER,GARYF FOSTER,PAMELA M FOSTER,STEP HEN FOSTER, WILLIAM FOUTS,DAN FOWLER, JOHNF FOWLER,STEVE FOX,ROBER TD FOX,WARREN FRALEY,GAR Y FRANCIS,GENED FRANCK,JAMES FRANK,GOR DON FRANK,JIM FRANKLIN,JASON FRANKLIN,THOMAS FRASHOU R,RON FRAZIER, JP FRAZIER,MIKEH FRAZIER,ROBYNA FREAUFF ,DONALDC FREAIJFF ,DONALDM FREBEL,NORMAN FREDA MOORE INC FREDERICK,BETTY FREEDOM FEDERAL SAVINGS FREEMAN,FRAN CIS M FREEMAN,NATHAN A FREEMAN,ROB ERTL FREEMAN,ROB ERTS FREESE,DICK FRENCH,JAMES R FREUND,RICHARDD FRIBERG, RICHARDW FRISCHMAN, SCOTT FRISTROM, RG FRONTIER FEDERALSAVING FROST,LINDA FRUMENTI,SALVATORE FRY,DANIELW FRY,WESLEY FRYE,HERB ERT FRYE,JULIE G FULLER,JOHN P FULLER,REBE CCA FULLERTO N,CAROL S FULLMAN CO FULTON, ROBERTA FULTON, ROBERTA FUNK,ROBE RT FURMAN,ILENA FURRER, DANIEL FUTTER,RUSSE LL GA INVESTMENTCO GABRIELE, VIDAK GAGE,DAVID GAGE, WILLIEL GAHRES,SCO TT GAILING,STEPHANIE GALLAGHER,DAVID GALLAGHER, DAVID L GALLAGHER,MARY GALLAGHE R,R L GALLANT,ALFREDJ GALLAWAY ,J M GALLOW AY, DALEE GALLOWAY, MICHAELJ GAMAUNT, LEONE GAMBLE,DARRELL K GAMBLE, JACQUELINS GAMBLE,MW GANLEY,GRACEE GARBER,BRUCEL GARDNER,BYRO NJ GARDNER, MARILYNE GARDNER,RAYM OND GARDNER,THO MASC GARMON,MICHAEL GARNICK, C.D GARNIER,MARKE GARRETT,JERR Y GARRICK, GREGORY J GARRISON,DOROTHY E GARVIN, GEORGE GARZON,JANE D GASSNER, CHRISTIAN M GATES,DAVID GATES, MARIA ILONA GATES, MARIA-ILO GATES, RICKA GATTI,RICHARD GAVE,TAMARA GAY,DONALD GEBHART, LINDAL GEDDE, MELVINE GEDDES,BEVERLY GEHRING,SUZANNE GEIGERPOINDEXTER & GEI GEIS,PAULG GENERALELECTRICGEMS GENTRY,LEEE GENTRY,LEMUEL E GERALDE,RAMO NA GERARD,RON ALDD GERLICHER,ANDREWJ GERLITZ,CHRIS GETTINGER ,SARAH GETZ, MJ GHERARDINI ,JOE GIBBONS,JAY D GIBBS,LYNN GIBSON,CHARLES GIBSON,JIMMY GIFFIN,ALVAH GIFFORD, ALLANH GILBERT,BRUC E GILBERT,EVELYN K GILBERT, NORMAN M GILCHRIST GARDEN CLUB GILCHRIST ,WALLACE GILL, ROY C GILLIAM, STANLEYR GILLIL AND,NORMAN GILLINGHAM, WALTER GILMER,DONAJ GINGLES, TIM GINGRICH, J. L GINTER, DAVIDW GINTHER, VERGIEC GIRARD, GEORGE GIRODSHILLTOPSUPERMAR GHJDICE,FRED GLANDER, KEVIN S GLANDER,TON Y GLASS,GEORGEM GLEBE,MARSH ALL GLIMM,DIANAR

GLUM,GARY L GODBEY, HILDAR GOEHLER, MICHAELE GOIN,DOROTHY N GOLD,JOHN C GOLD, MARJORIEV GOLDING, BENJAMINA GOLDSTEIN, MELVYN GOLSIE,BRETTC GOMES, SYNDEY GOMEZ, JOHN GOMEZ, TONI GONYA, WILLIAM GOODALL, PATRICK GOODELL,PAUL GOODMAN, DAVID GOODMAN,DOUGLASE GOODMAN,REGENA GOODWIN, STEVENW GOOSLYRESOURCES LTD GOOTEE, MARJORIEB GORDON,AJ GORDON, ALOYSUISC GORDON,ERROLW GORDON,HC GORDON, RICKA GORE,TERES AM GORMAN, JAMES T GOTT,DONALD GOUDSMIT,A GOUGH,DONALDW GOULD,DAVIDS GOULD, WILLIAM GRAHAM,ML GRAHAM,ROBERT L GRANNIS,STE VE GRANT,KARENL GRANT,PAMELAD GRANT,THOMASH GRAVES, WILLIAM0 GRAY,DONM GRAY,EDWARDA GRAY,JOYR GRAY,PATSY GRAY,ROBERTW GRAY,RODNEY GRAYDON, ROBERT GREATWOOD, FRED E GREELEY, WILLIAMB GREEN,EARL W GREEN,HOWARD GREEN,PA TRICK GREEN,RICHARDD GREEN, STANLEYA GREENA WALD,JERRY GREENE, NIM ROD T GREENSIDES, WILLIAM GREENW ALT, JAMES GREFSRU D,BRAD GREGOR YAFFILIATES GREGORY, HAROLD R GREGORY, JOHN GREGO RY,PAUL J GRIBLING, RAYMOND G GRIER,ROBERTE GRIFFIN, GERARD R GRIFFI TH,ROBERTE GRIMES,KARLJ GRIMES,RENEE GRONBE RG,DALE GRONEMYER,ROBERTW GROSS,SIDNEY GSCHEIDLE,WE GUARDALAB ENE,GINA GUENTHE R,T H GUILBERT,JOHN GUITTE AU-NEWLAND LUMBER GUJRAL,PERR Y GULICK,K.C. GURNEY, KATHIE GUSTAF SON,JOHN GUSTAFSON, W ILLIAM H GUTZWA,MARK GUYETTE, LEONARD HAAS,STAN HAASE,LISA HADDEN,SHIRLEYL HAFDAHL,RAYMOND0 HAGEN,DANIEL R HAGENB UCH,WALTERD HAGEST AD, MARSHA HAID, ROB ERT HAINES,BETTY HAINES,ELIZABETH B HAINES,JENNY R HAINES,KENN ETH HAIT,LARA HAIT,PAUL HALE,STEPHE NC HALEY,DIANA K HALEY,MICHAEL HALEY,MICHAEL S HALFORD,DAVID HALL, CD HALL, IVORY L HALL, JIMMYD HALL, L R HALL,LAWRENCEL HALL,PETER B HALLER,ELSIEM HALLIBURTON, EMILIEJ HALLIDAY,LEIGHA HALLIWILL,ANITAK HALLSTAFF ,THOMAS HALVERSON,GEORGE HAMBERG ER,KARENM HAMILTON,BRUCE HAMILTON, CARLA L HAMILTON, CHARLESW HAMILTON, MARTHA L HAMILTON,VERNV HAMILTON, VIRGINIA L HAMILTON, WILLIAM HAMM,CRAIGS HAMM,WILLIAM HAMMERS LEY, DR HAMMETT,JOHNB HAMPSON,LARRY E HAMPSON,PATRICIA L HANCOC K,JUDY E HANDYDOUGLASC HANFORD ,KATHLEEN L HANKS,DUNNIE HANNA,SHEILA B HANNAH,CARO L HANNIGAN,CHE STER HANSEN,BRUCE D HANSEN,EVA HANSEN,GRE G HANSEN, JAMESA HANSEN, JANICEN HANSEN,LANCE HANSEN,LESA HANSEN,RAYMOND HANSEN, WOODROW R HANSHEW,E G HANSON,GEORGE HANSON,KENN ETHP HANSON,STEP HENW HARDCAS TLE,DARLAS HARDER,CHAR LESE HARDIE,KATHY HARDING,ROY HARDS,BOBE HARNISCH FEGER,HEATHER HARP,GREGORY M HARPER,DOU GLAS HARPER,RON HARPER ,STEVENSON,MCCA HARRIES,SUSAN HARRINGT ON, EVERETT HARRIS,CARLUS HARRIS,GERALYN HARRIS,IRWINC HARRIS,JACK HARRIS,ROGER D HARRIS,WAYNEL HARRISON,MAXE HARRISON,ROBERTB HARSAN YMDPC,ROBERTM HART,CHARLESD HART,DONALDD HARTMANN, WILLIAM A HARUDA,FRED HARVEY,DAW SONC HARVEY,ROSS L HARVEY, WADEE HASLAM,WILLIAM R HASTAY,RICHARD F HATFIELD,JAY

HATFIELD, LEWIS HATFIELD,SHANE HATLEY,HAROLD HAIJCK,FRED R HAUETER,DAVID HAUGAN,BRAD HAWKEYECONSTRUCTI ONIN HAWKINS, MARVIN HAWOR TH,RAYL HAYES, JAMESB HAYS,ALBERT AM HAYS,GARR YR HAYTER,CATHY D HAZEL,HARRY D HEATH,FLOYD J HEBERT,EDW ARD L HECKMAN,SANN A HEDGE,ROG ER HEDGES,F R HEDRICK, ROYA HEGEW ALDINC HEIECK,PENNYF HEIM,LOLA HEININGE, SCOT HEINKE,BARBARA HEINTZ, ANNAB HELDING, MARYL HELIN, ML HELVEY, MICHAELD HENDER SON,CAROLYN HENDERSON,GEORGEE HENDERSON,GEORGEH HENDER SON,JOEY D HENDER SON, KIMBERELY HENDLEY, ANGELA G HENDRICKS, JOHN HENDRICKS, LORRAINE HENRY, EARL L HENRY, LADDIE HENRY-LONG, DOROTHY B HENSCH EL, JILLISON HERAUF,ALLAN HERMAND SON,RUSSELL HERMANS,RHONDA HERNAND EZ,FRANKR HERNAND EZ,MARGARET HERNAND EZ,VICTOR HERR,WILLIAM HERRICK,ROBERTF HERRINGTON, LEIF HERRLE,JOSEPH H HERSH,JOHN HERZOG,DAVID

HESS,GREG HESS, WILLIAM HEUSER,PETER E HEYDON,LORIA HIATT,GEORGEE HICKEY,CHARLES HICKS,BRENT HIGGINBOTHAM, EARLE HIGHT,RICHARDB HILBRAND,DENNIS HILEMAN,BERDA HILGER,STEVEJ HILL, ALMA HILL, ARCHIE HILL, DAVID C HILL,E. C HILL, GENE E HILL, HARO LD HILL, LAWR ENCE HILL, PATRICK W HILLMAN,JOANA HILLS,ALVIN F HILTON,MARK HINDS,JOHNA HINDS,TON YA HINES,FRANKLIND HIROMURA, RONALD E HOAGLIN, ROBERT HOBIN,GARYR HOCKEN BERRY,C W HOCKETT C,LYDEJ HODGE,DONA N HODGE,GER ALD HODGES, CHRISM HODGES, KEVENC HODGSON , ALLANL HOEKSTRA, JAMESJ HOERSTE R,JOHNK HOFF,DELO RESC HOFFMAN, DANIELM HOFFMAN, G

LEHMAN,LAURA LEHMKUHL,RON LEIS-HOG AN,CHERYL LEITCH,DEWITT LEMON,BOYDS LENIHAN,RAYMOND LENTFER,FRANKL LEONARD, JAMESS LEONARD,LYNNE LEONARD, ROSEM LEOPOLD, LORRAINEM LEROUX,JEAN G LESLIERANCHES LEVIN,MICHAE L LEW,EDITH LEWIS,DAPHNE P LEWIS,GWEN LEWIS,JANE LEWIS,MARJORIE LEWIS, RL LEWIS,WE SLEY LEWMAN, ALVA LIBBY, MILTONA LICHTY,KARL LIDDIC,HO LIEBER,MARYE LIGHT,ROBERT LIGON,RICHARD LIIKANE,MART LILKE,ADOLPHL LIND, DIXIE LIND,TRINITY LINDER,JOA LINDQUIST,VICKI LINDSAY,SAMG LINDSTROM,GM LINGENF ELTER,JAMESA LINKLATER, KENNETH LINSON, JOHNM LITTLE,CLAUDETTES LITTLE,LORENJ LITTLETON, RICKC LIVINGSTON, KAYW LLOYD,CAROL LOER,PAUL LOFQUIST, MARTIN LOFTIN,REES ED LOFTSGARDCONSTRUCTION LOGUE,GERALDINE LOKEN,KENN ETHR LONG,BILLIE LONG,JERRY E LONG,ORVILLEW LONGAC RE,ROBERT LONGWE LL, PAULS LOPER, MARTHAV LORD,GARY LORENZ,RANDALL LORTON,DENNIS LOVE,MARRYE LOWE,DAVID LOWE, WILLIAM LOWE, WILLIAMA LOWELL,ROGER D LOWE-SEV ERSON, MARTHETT AE LUBOTSKY ,JOHNS LUBY,STEVE LUCAS, LR LUCIA,GLORIAJ LUHER, ALANW LUMMIS,CATHERINE LUMMIS,LARRY LUND,DEMETRIAE LUNDIN,LEORAJ LUNDY,PAUL LUQUIN,ANTHONY LUSCH,EDGAR A LUSHIA,CHARLES W LUTES,WILLIAMR LUX,HARRY LYDGATE ,CHARLESM LYNCH,GARY LYNCH,KATHLEEN LYNCH, NICHOLASP LYNN,CLAUDIA LYNN,JOHNM LYNN,LAURENCEE LYON,BARBARA LYONS,CARR OLL LYONS, JIM M & MENTERPRISES INC MAC CORKINDAL, JOHN MACDONALD, CURTIS MACK,BERTHA M MACKEY JR, WAYNE MACMILLAN, DONALDA MACY,JOHNM MADROS EN,JOHN C MADTSON,ROGER MAGRUDER , FLORENCEC MAGUIRE,JOHN MAHONEY ,FRANK MAHONEY, TIMOTHY MAITLAND,RITAR MAKI, TILLIES MALINKY,GREGGORYA MALONEY, CHRISTINE MALTBY,JOSEPH MANCIU, VICTOR MANDIBERG, JOSEPH MANG,SHELLEY A MANGAN,TIM MANGURAY, JOHNM MANHATANINVESTMENTS MANLEY,DAVID MANN,DOUG LASE MANNING, TIM R MANNING, WG MANNLEIN,GENEB MANUEL,RONLAD MARCOT TE,STEPHENA MARCUM,LANELL MARGES ON, R.C. MARINELUMBER CO MARING, JOHN MARKEY,BARRY MARKOWITZ,MILTON0 MARKS,DAVIDW MARLATT,WANDAR MARNEY,GUR MANV MARRA,RONALD MARSH,JEAN MARSH,LARRY MARSHALLCHARLES MARTIN, BP MARTIN,CARO LL MARTIN,CHERYL MARTIN,FRANCISA MARTIN,JOE MARTIN,JONC MARTIN,PENNY MARTIN,WESLEYT MARTINEZ, AURELIO MARTINEZ,NOEL MARTINEZ,PEDRO MARTINEZ, ROSIE MARTINEZ,SYLVIA MARTINO, DONALD MARTINSON, JIM MARY,JEANNEM MASER, LORING MASLOFF, MARIA MASON,JOANE MASON,KEITH MASON,LYMAN MASON,WILLIAMM MASTEN,LOUISC MATHER,RICHARDW MATHEWS,JOHNT MATHIASEN,ARDENR MATHIS,JACK MATHIS,WAYNE MATHISEN,LYNNEM MATHISEN,MARKE MATSLER,AM MATSON,JIM MATTHEWS, COLLEEN MATTHEWS,EDGAR MATTHEWS, KENNETH MATTSON,GREGORY J MAXWELL,EDWARDC MAY,DER WIN MAYER,DON ALDR MAYER,LAURA MAYFIELD,JAMESM MAYS,MAXH MC ALISTER,DEBORAH MC ARTHUR,STEPHENW MC BRIDE,FRANK


E8 FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9

1000

I

L e gal Notices FDIC and are available for public ins pection duri n g

Legal Notices

be eligible to appeal the decision pursuant to 36 CFR part 215 regulations.

regular b u s iness hours. Photocopies of the nonconfiden- How to Comment and t ial portion of t h e Timeframe application will be Written, fac s imile, made ava i lable hand-delivered, oral, upon request. and electronic comments concerning LEGAL NOTICE t his action w il l b e NOTICE OF accepted f o r 30 FORECLOSURE calendar days S ALE O F PER following the S ONAL PROP p ublication o f thi s ERTY. High Desert notice in the The Self-Storage, 52650 Bulletin. The publicaHwy. 97, La Pine, tion date in the newsOR, shall sell the paper of record is the personal property of exclusive means for Betty Smeltzer A2, calculating the David Alexander B8, comment period for L yndsey More this analysis. Those house C9 and C14, wishing to comment Mary Manning D6, should not rely upon Pauline L egassey dates or t i meframe D8, Mack Smith D9, information provided F rank Baker P 4 , by any other source. Kevin Smith A 1 0, The regulations Kevin Langlois B13, prohibit extending the Mary Ann Furtado length of the comment C11, for failure to period. I t is the pay rental and deresponsibility of f ault fees. A P r i persons pr o v iding vate Sale will be at comments to submit High Desert Selfthem by the close of Storage on the comment period. 10/1/2013 at 8am.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Opportunity to Comment 2013 Small Diameter Tree Thinning Project 2013 Odell Creek Riparian Maintenance Project Crescent Ranger District, Deschutes National Forest

The Crescent Ranger District is p r eparing two preliminary Decis ion M e mos a n d would like to provide t his o pportunity t o comment 2013 Small Diameter Tree Thinnin Pro'ect The first preliminary Decision Memo is the 2013 Small Diameter Tree Thinning Project that would e n com-

pass a pproximately 175 acres in seven u nits.

Of the 175

acres, 131 acres in five units are managed plantations and 44 acres in two units for post and pole opportunities. The purpose of the project is to red u c e the over-crowded stands a nd i n crease t h e growth and health of the young trees in the plantations and to accelerate their development into s tands that can serve future social and biological needs. The project is located i n K l a math County, Oregon, with a legal description of T22S, R7E, Sec. 3, 4, 9 & 10; T24S, R7E, Sec. 33 an d T 25S, R7E, Sec. 4, 17; Willamette Meridian. 2013 Odell Creek Ri arian Maintenance Pro'ect ~ The second preliminary Decision Memo is the 2 0 1 3 O d eII Creek Riparian Maintenance Project that w ould t h i n yo u n g

Written com m ents must be submitted to the Resp o nsible Official, District Ranger Holly Jewkes at PO Box 208 , Crescent, Or e g on, 9 7733, o r F A X a t (541) 433-3224. The officebusiness hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are: 8:00 AM t o 4: 3 0 PM M onday thro u g h Friday, excluding holidays. Oral c omments ca n b e p rovided t o Hol l y Jewkes, only during normal busi n ess hours via telephone (541) 433-3200 or in person. Those submitting electronic copies must put the project name in the subject line, and must either submit comments as part of the e-mail message or as an attachment only in one of the following formats: three Microsoft Word, rich t ext format (rtf) o r A dobe Port a b le Document For m at (pdf) and must do so only to the following e-mail address comments-pacificnort hwest-deschutescrescentlfs.fed.us. In cases where no i dentifiable name i s attached to a comment, a verification of identity will be r equired for a ppeal eligibility. I f using an e l ectronic

L e g al Notices • following sums: Final payment of al l o utstanding principal and accrued interest due April 1, 2012, plus unpaid taxes with interest and penalties, city liens, assessments, if any. By reason of the default, th e B e neficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable a s foll ows: $160,000 t o g ether with interest thereon at the rate of 6 percent per annum from March 1, 2012 t hrough March 3 1 , 2012, then continuing to accrue at the default interest rate of 11 percent per a nnum from April 1 , 2 0 12, until paid, t o gether with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed, l ess r eserves a n d credits, if any. NOTICE: The Trustee will on October 2, 2013, at t he hour o f 1 0 : 0 0 o'clock, A.M., at the Front West Entrance of t h e De s c hutes County C ourthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the Property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of t he e x e cution b y Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations hereby secured and the costs, a t torney

fees and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. NOTICE OF

R IGHT T O C U R E : The right exists for any person named under ORS 86.753, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the s ale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following: 1. Paying the B e nefic iary t he enti r e a mount t h e n du e (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no d efault oc-

curred); 2.Curing any other default c o mplained of herein that is capable of being message, a scanned cured by tendering the signature is one way performance required to provide verification. u nder the d eb t o r E-mails submitted to T rust Deed; and 3 . e-mail add r esses Paying all costs and o ther than the o n e expenses actually inlisted above, in other curred in enforcing the formats than t h o se listed, or c o ntaining viruses wi l l be r ejected. I t is th e responsibility of

debt and Trust Deed, together with

Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, th e m a sculine gender includes the feminine a n d the neuter, the singular includes the p l ural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor i n i nterest t o th e Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by th e T r ust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective s u c cessors in interest, if any. DATED: M a y 15, 2013. Gary L. Blacklidge, Successor Trustee, 1515 SW 5th Ave., Suite 600, PortI and, O R 972 0 1 , Telephone: (503) 295-2668, Facsimile: (503) 224-8434.

persons pr o v iding comments by electronic means to lodgepole pine e ncroachment along the e nsure t h a t the i r comments have been r iparian corridor o f lower Odell Creek and received. Individuals org a nizations p lanting o f nat i v e and grasses, sedges and wishing to be eligible hardwood s p e cies. to appeal must meet information T he Davis F ire i n the 2003 successfully re- r equirements of 3 6 moved p i n e en- CFR 215.6. croachment from the LEGAL NOTICE riparian area allowing Public to be for colonization by ri- held onauction S eptember parian dep e ndent 14, 2013 at 9:00 a.m., species such as wil- Wickiup Stor a ge, low. Since that time Skidgel Rd., La lodgepole pine trees 52419 The unit to be have begun to re-es- Pine. s old i s U n i t A - 1 8 , tablish. It is the goal Elvia Allino-Ramirez. of the project to cut all young trees (<6" dbh) LEGAL NOTICE to promote further ri- TRUSTEE'S NOTICE parian development. OF SALE The project area is The trust deed to be a pproximately 1 2 0 foreclosed pursuant to acres within the burn O regon law i s r e area boundary (FS ferred to as f ollows 4660 Road to Davis (the "Trust Deed"): Lake). Ground distur- Grantor: LINDA D LEGAL NOTICE bance will be limited HAVILL-CHASE, TRUSTEE'S NOTICE t o f o o tprints a n d TITLE VESTED AS: OF SALE leaving the small trees LINDA DIANE The Trust Deed to be w here they f al l o r HAVILL. Tru s t ee: foreclosed pursuant to tossing some into the BRAD WIL L IAMS. O regon law i s r e creek. Beneficiary: STERferred to as f ollows L ING SAV IN G S (the "Trust Deed"): 1. The project is located BANK. Date: April 5, T RUST DEED I N in Klamath County, 2010. Recording FORMATION: Oregon, with a legal Date: April 8, 2010. Grantor: Curtis S. description of T23S, Recording Reference: Swanson, 63903 R7E, Sec. 14 and 15, 2010-14136. County Quail Haven D rive, Willamette Meridian. of Recording: DesB end, O R 977 0 1 . c hutes. The Tru s t Beneficiary: GenThe prel i minary Deed covers the fol- eral Electric Capital Decision M em o lowing described real Corporation, G E D Idocuments, including property in the County RECT, 635 Maryville greater detail on the o f D e schutes a n d Centre Drive, Suite projects, c a n be State of Oregon, to120, St. Louis, MO accessed o n the gether with all per- 633141. Tru s t ee: Forest Service sonal property and Western Title & EsWebsite at: rents, as defined in crow Company, 1345 http://www.fs.usda.go the Trust Deed (colNW Wall Street, Suite v/detail/centraloregon/ lectively "the Prop- 200, Bend, OR landmanagement/proj erty"): Lot Ten (10) 97701. Suc c essor ects or paper copy Block Two (2) CHOC- Trustee:Alex I. Poust, can b e se n t by TAW VILLAGE, re1211 SW 5th Avenue, r equesting i t fr o m corded July 1, 1977, Suite 1900, Portland, Lillian Cross, Phone in Cabinet B, Page OR 97204, (503) (541) 433-3200, or by 245, Desch u tes 222-9981. Recording s ending a l e tter of County, Oregon. The D ate: December 2 9 , request to: Crescent Grantor or other per- 2006. Recording RefRanger District, PO son owing the debt erence:2006-84849. Box 208, C rescent, has defaulted as pro- County of Recording: OR 9 7733 . This vided under the Trust Deschutes C o u nty. c omment period i s Deed, and both the The Beneficial interintended to p r ovide B eneficiary and t h e est in the Trust Deed those interested in or Trustee have elected was assigned to Busiaffected by this to foreclose the Trust ness Property Lendactivity an opportunity D eed and sell t h e ing, Inc., by instruto make their Property to satisfy the m ent recorded o n c oncerns know n . obligations secured by November 7, 2012, as Only t h o s e who the Trust Deed. The Document No. provide comment or default for which fore- 2012-044842, in t he express interest in this closure is permitted is official records of Deproposal during this the Grantor's failure to schutes County, Orcomment period will p ay when due t h e egon. 2.LEGAL D E-

Legal Notices •

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

1000

L e g al Notices

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OF foreclosures and help curred); 2.Curing any the Trust Deed, toestablished by ORS LEGAL NOTICE other default c o mgether with any in187.110, at the folPROPERTY (the you decide what to TRUSTEE'S NOTICE "Property"): Parcel 1 do. For the name and plained of herein that t erest w h ic h t h e lowing place: 20 OF SALE phone number of an is capable of being grantor or grantor's of Partition Plat No. Reference is made organization near you, cured by tendering the successors in inter1 994-46, located i n to that certain Trust the Southwest Quar- please call the state- performance required est acquired aft the Deed m ad e by ter of the Northeast wide phone contact u nder the d eb t o r e xecution o f th e Bruce Marvin Whitat T rust Deed; and 3 . Trust Deed, to satQuarter (SW1/4 number more and Kathleen 1-800-SAFENET Paying all costs and isfy the f oregoing Ann Whitmore, as NE1/4) of Section 9, expenses actually in- obligations thereby Township 17 South, (1-800-723-3638). In tenants by the enRange 12 East of the construing this notice, curred in enforcing the s ecured an d t h e t irety, grantor, t o the masculine gender debt and Trust Deed, costs and expenses Willamette Meridian, A merititle, a n O r with of sale, including a Deschutes C o u nty, includes the feminine together egon corporation, as and the neuter, the Trustee's and attorreasonable charge Oregon. 3.DEFAULT: trustee, in favor of The Grantor or any singular includes the ney fees not exceed- by the Trustee. NoPatrick M . G i s ler t h e word ing the amounts pro- tice is further given other person owing an plural, and Joel T. Gisler, obligation, the perfor- "Grantor" includes any vided by ORS 86.753. that an y p e r son as tenants in comORS mance of which is se- successor in interest In construing this no- named i n mon, b e n eficiary, cured by th e T r ust to the Grantor as well tice, th e m a sculine 86.753 has the right, dated October 11, as any other person gender includes the at any time that is Deed, is in default and 2003, and recorded the not later than five the Beneficiary seeks owing an obligation, feminine a n d o n O c tober 1 7 , neuter, the s ingular (5) days before the to foreclose the Trust the performance of 2003, i n V o l ume Deed. The default for which is secured by includes the p l ural, date last set for the M03, Page 77503, the Trust Deed, and the word "Grantor" in- sale, to have this which foreclosure is K lamath Cou n t y made i s Gr a ntor's the words "Trustee" cludes any successor f oreclosure pro Records, O r egon and "Beneficiary" inin i nterest t o t he ceeding dismissed failure to do the folcovering the followl owing: F a ilure t o clude their respective Grantor as well as any and the Trust Deed ing described real successors in interest, other person owing an reinstated by paymake monthly payproperty (the "Propments as required in if any. We are a debt obligation, the perfor- ing Beneficiary the erty"), to-wit: Lot 10 t he note an d a n y collector attempting to mance of which is se- entire amount then in Block 1 Op Tract modifications, in t he collect a debt and any cured by th e T rust due ( other t h a n 1098 Split Rail Ranamount of information we obtain Deed, and the words such portion of the chos, according to $14,212.00, per will be used to collect "Trustee" and "Ben- pnncipal as would ( lie o f f icial p l a t notthen be due had month, for the months the d e bt . D A T ED: eficiary" include their thereof on file in the December 2012 May 24, 2013. /s/ Alex respective s u c ces- no default occurred) office of the County Poust. ALEX sors in interest, if any. and by curing any through May 2 0 13; Clerk o f K l a math 15, other default comunpaid late charges in POUST, S uccessor DATED: M a y County, Or e gon. 2013. Gary L. Blackplained of in the nothe amo u n t of Trustee. The trust deed is lidge, Succ e ssor tice of default that is $4,263.60 as of May security for a PromTrustee, 1515 SW 5th capable of b e i ng 21, 2013; an unpaid LEGAL NOTICE i ssory N ot e ex NSF fee of $50.00; an TRUSTEE'S NOTICE Ave., Suite 600, Port- cured by tendering ecuted b y the l and, O R 972 0 1 , the performance reunpaid Appraisal Fee OF SALE grantor in favor of i n th e a m ount o f The trust deed to be Telephone: (503) quired under the obthe beneficiary on or $4,500.00, and failure foreclosed pursuant to 295-2668, Facsimile: ligation t h a t the a bout October 9 , to pay real property O regon law i s r e - (503) 224-8434. Trust Deed secures, 2003 in the princiand in addition to taxes for the years ferred to as follows pal a m o unt of 2012-13 when due. 4. (the "Trust Deed"): LEGAL NOTICE paying said sums or $17,500. By instrutendering the perA MOUNT DUE: B y Grantor: LINDA D TRUSTEE'S NOTICE ment dated January formance n e ces- 20, 2009, the benreason of the default HAVILL-CHASE, OF SALE sary to cure the dejust described, the TITLE VESTED AS: Reference is made eficiary a p pointed Beneficiary has deLINDA D . H A V I LL. to that certain Trust fault by paying all Jim N. Slothower as costs and expenses clared all sums owing Trustee: BRAD WILDeed m a d e by successor t rustee, on the obligation se- LIAMS. Beneficiary: Henley Farms, LLC, actually incurred in with such assignenforcing the oblicured by the T rust STERLING SAV- an Oregon limited ment recorded in Deed immediately due INGS BANK. Date: liability c o m pany, gation that the Trust the Klamath County Deed secures, toand payable, those April 5, 2010. Regrantor, to A m erRecords on Februsums being the folcording Date: April 8, ititle, Inc . , as gether w i t h the a ry 26, 2 00 9 a s Trustee's and attorlowing: Principal bal- 2010. Recording Ref- trustee, in favor of Document Number ance of erence: 2010-14137. Gary Henley, benn ey fees not e x 2009-002955. After ceeding the $1,516,331.94, to- County of Recording: eficiary, dated Nodefault, on June 1, Deschutes. The Trust vember 20, 2 0 07, amounts p rovided gether with u n paid 2009 th e b e n efiby O R S 8 6 . 753. ciary executed a interest of $68,753.02 Deed covers the fol- a nd recorded o n through M a y 21, lowing described real November 29, 2007, You may reach the new pro m issory Oregon State Bar's 2013, base prepay- property in the County as R e c or d No . note in favor of the Lawyer Ref e rral ment premium in the o f D e schutes a n d 2 007-61910, D e s beneficiary secured Service a t 503 amount of State of Oregon, to- c hutes Coun t y by the trust deed in 684-3763 or toll-free Records, O r egon $15,163.32, u n paid gether with all perthe principal amount in Or e go n at late f e e s in the sonal property and c overing th e r e a l of $19,137.54. By 800-452-7636 or amount of $4,263.60 rents, as defined in property (the "Propi nstrument d a ted y ou may v isit i t s as of May 21, 2013, the Trust Deed (col- e rty") a t 629 7 5 October 13, 2009, and continuing until lectively "the PropPowell Butte Highwebsite at: www.osPatrick M . G i s ler erty"): Lot Four (4) way, B e nd , OR bar.org. Legal asreinstatement or t he assigned all of his date of sale, unpaid B lock Fo u r s istance may b e (4) 97701, described as beneficial i n terest available if you have NSF f e e in the CHOCTA W VILLAG E, follows: The E a st under the trust deed amount of $ 5 0 .00, recorded July 1 1977 759.00 feet of the a low income and to Joel T . G i sler, meet federal povunpaid appraisal fee in Cabinet B, Page Northeast Quarter of with such a ssigni n th e a m ount o f 245, the Sout h e ast erty guidelines. For Desc h u tes ment recorded in more in f o rmation the Klamath County $4,500.00, un p a id County, Oregon. The Quarter (NE1/4 and a directory of processing fee in the Grantor or other per- SE1/4) of S ection Records on July 12, legal aid programs, a mount o f $40 0 , son owing the debt Nineteen 2013 as Document (19), Trustee's fees, has defaulted as pro- Township S e v en- contact the Oregon Number 2013 S tate Bar a t t h e attorney's fees, costs vided under the Trust teen (17) S o uth, 0 07904. Both t h e of foreclosure and any Deed, and both the Range Thirteen (13) phone numbers inBeneficiary and the dicated above or go sums advanced by B eneficiary and t h e E ast of t h e W i l Trustee have the Beneficiary pursu- Trustee have elected lamette M e r idian, to htt p ://www.or- elected to sell the egonlawhelp.org. ant to the terms of the to foreclose the Trust Deschutes County, real property to satTrust Deed. Interest D eed and s el l t h e Oregon. E X CEPT Dated: J u l y 15, isfy the obligations 2013. C h ristopher continues to a ccrue Property to satisfy the that portion l ying that the Trust Deed M. Heaps, Succeson the unpaid princi- obligations secured by within Nelson Road secures and a nos or T rustee. F o r p al balance at t h e the Trust Deed. The and Powell B utte tice of default has default ra te of default for which fore- Secondary R o ad. further information, been recorded purplease con t act: 1 1.140% per annum closure is permitted is Christopher M. suant t o Or e gon Christopher M. from May 22, 2013, the Grantor's failure to Heaps, 20 5 NW Revised S t a tutes Heaps, Successor until paid. 5.ELECp ay when due t h e Franklin Ave., Bend, 86.735(3). The deTION TO SELL: The following sums: Final OR 97701 was subTrustee, Bend Orfaults for which the egon Lawyers, LLC, Beneficiary h e r e by payment of al l o ut- sequently apforeclosure is made 205 N W F r a nklin include: (1) Failure elects to foreclose the standing principal and pointed Successor A ve., B e nd, O R Trust Deed by adver- accrued interest due T rustee. Both t h e to pay monthly intisement and sale as April 1, 2012, plus un- Beneficiary and the 97701, (541) stallments under the 3 89-7001. S T A T E provided under ORS paid taxes with inter- Trustee have p romissory not e OF OREGON ss. 86.705 to 86.795, and est and penalties, city elected to sell the when due; (2) FailC ounty o f Des to cause the property liens, assessments, if real property to sature to pay monthly to be sold at public any. By reason of the isfy the obligations chutes - On July 15, t axes when d u e ; 2013, before m e , auction to the highest default, th e B e nefi- that the Trust Deed and (3) Allowing atbidder for cash, the ciary has declared all secures and a noSusan M. B o tich, tachment of a l ien notary public, perGrantor's interest in sums owing on the tice of default has by the Oregon Dethe described prop- obligation secured by been recorded pursonally a p p eared p artment of C o n Christopher M. erty which the Grantor the Trust Deed imme- suant t o Or e gon sumer an d B u s iRevised S t a t utes Heaps, Successor had, or had the power diately due and payness Services. By Trustee, personally to convey, at the time able a s foll o ws: 86.735(3). The dereason of said deof the execution by known to me, to be $160,000 to g e ther faults for which the faults th e B e nefithe person whose t he Grantor o f t h e with interest thereon foreclosure is made ciary has declared name is subscribed Trust Deed, together at the rate of 6 perarc: (1) Allowing atall sums owing on to the within instruwith any interest the cent per annum from tachment of a lien the obligation that Grantor or Grantor's March 1, 2012 by State Accident ment and acknowlthe Trust Deed seedged to me that he successor in interest t hrough March 3 1 , Insurance Fun d cures i mmediately acquired after the ex- 2012, then continuing Corporation; (2) Alexecuted the same due and payable, in hi s a u t horized said sums being the ecution of the Trust to accrue at the delowing a ttachment fault interest rate of 11 of a lien by the Orcapacity, and that Deed, to satisfy the following, to-wit: The his signature on the obligations secured by percent per a nnum egon Department of o utstanding bal instrument the perthe Trust Deed, infrom April 1 , 2 0 12, Consumer and ance owing on the son, or th e e ntity cluding the expenses until paid, t o gether Business Services; promissory note seof the sale, compen- with Trustee's fees, and (3) Failure to upon b e h alf of cured by the trust which the p e rson sation of the Trustee attorney's fees, fore- p ay t a xes w h e n deed of $18,876.59 as provided by law closure costs and any due. By reason of acted, executed the through December instrument. S usan and the reasonable sums advanced by s aid defaults t h e 31, 2012, together fees of the Trustee's the Beneficiary pursu- Beneficiary has deM. Botich, Notary with a l l int e rest Public of O regon. attorneys. 6.DATE ant to the Trust Deed, clared all sums owthereafter accruing My Commission ExAND TIME OF SALE: l ess r eserves a n d ing on the obligaa t the rate of 8% pires Feb. 25, 2017. Date: October 8, credits, if any. NO- tion that the Trust until paid, title ex2013. Time: 10:00 TICE: The Trustee will Deed secures impenses, costs, and A.M. (in accord with on October 2, 2013, at mediately due and trustee's and The Bulletin is your the standard of time t he h ou r o f 3:0 0 payable, said sums attorney's fees inestablished by ORS o'clock, P.M., at the being the following, c urred herein by Employment 187.110). L o cation: Front West Entrance to-wit: The principal reason of said deOutside the Main En- of t h e De s c hutes sum owing on the fault, and any sums Marketplace trance, of th e D es- County C ourthouse, promissory note sea dvanced by t h e chutes County Court- 1164 NW Bond, in the cured by the trust beneficiary for the house, 1 1 6 4 NW City of Bend, County deed of Call p rotection o f th e Bond St., Bend, OR of Deschutes, State of $337,779.11, toabove Property and 97701. 7.RIGHT T O Oregon, sell at public gether with all interits interest therein. 541 -385-5809 REINSTATE: Any auction to the highest est thereafter acWHEREFORE, nocruing at the rate of person named in ORS bidder for cash the tice is hereby given to advertise. 86.753 has the right, interest in the Prop- 7% until paid, title that Jim N. at any time prior to erty which the Grantor e xpenses, c o s t s, Slothower, the unfive days before the had or had power to and trustee's and www.bendbulletin.com dersigned SuccesTrustee conducts the convey at the time of attorney's fees insor Trustee, will, on s ale, t o h a v e t h i s t he e x e cution b y c urred herein b y November 27, 2013, foreclosure dismissed Grantor of the Trust reason of said deat the hour of 10:00 and the Trust Deed Deed, together with fault, and any sums AM in accord with ServrngCentral Oregon s>nce 1903 reinstated by doing all any interest which the a dvanced by t h e the standard of time 541-385-5809 of the f ollowing: a. Grantor acquired afbeneficiary for the payment to the Ben- ter the execution of p rotection o f th e eficiary of the entire t he Trust Deed, to above Property and a mount t he n d u e , satisfy the obligations its interest therein. l LRE P U B L I C other than such por- hereby secured and WHEREFORE, notion of the principal as the costs, a t torney tice is hereby given NOTICES would not then be due fees and expenses of that Christopher M. had no default ocINPORTANT+ sale, including a rea- Heaps, the undercurred; b.curing any sonable charge by the signed S uccessor other default that is Trustee. NOTICE OF Trustee, will, on NoAn important premise upon which the principle of c apable o f be i n g RIGHT TO C U R E: vember 26, 2013, at cured, by t endering The right exists for the hour of 1 0:00 democracy is based is thatinformation about the performance re- any person named AM in accord with under ORS 86.753, at the standard of time government activities must be accessible in order quired under the obligation or Trust Deed; any time that is not established by ORS for the electorate to make well-informed decisions and c.paying all costs later than five days 187.110, at the folPublic notices provide this sort of accessibility fo and expenses actu- before the date last lowing place: 205 a lly incurred in e nset for the sale, to N W Franklin A v citizens who want fo know more about government forcing the obligation have this foreclosure enue. Bend, Desactivities. and Trust Deed, toproceeding dismissed chutes County, Orgether wi t h the and the Trust Deed egon 97701, sell at Trustee's and reinstated by doing all public auction to the Read your Public Notices daily in The Bulletin a ttorney's fees n o t of the following: 1. highest bidder for classifieds or go fowww.bendbulletin.com and exceedingthe amount Paying th e B e nefi- cash the interest in provided i n ORS c iary t he enti r e the described real click on "Classified Ads" 8 6.753. T here a r e a mount t h e n du e property which the government agencies (other than such por- grantor bad power and nonprofit organi- tion of the principal as t o convey at t h e zations that can give would not then be due time of the execuThe Bulletin tion by grantor of you information about had no d efault ocSCRIPTION

The Bulletin


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 E9 882

Boats & Accessories •

Mot o r homes

Travel Trailers •

Fifth Wheels

•it

o 0o

o •

Snowmobiles • 1994 Arctic Cat 580 EXT, $1000. • Yamaha 750 1999 Mountain Max, SOLD!

• Zieman 4-place trailer, SOLD! All in good condition. Located in La Pine. Call 541-408-6149.

19.5' Bluewater '88 I/O, new upholstery, new electronics, winch, much more. $9500. 541-306-0280

PRCFREOUCEki

KOUNTRY AIRE 1994 37.5' motorhome, with awning, and one slide-out, Only 47k miles and good condition.

20.5' Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for l ife $ 9 90 0 O B O .

(phcto aboveis of a similar model & not the actual vehicle)

$25,000.

541-548-0318

Motorcycles &Accessories

heated grips, f uel injected, three stor-

age bags, new bat-

batteries, sleeps 4-5, EXCELLENT CONDITION. All accessories are included. $15,000 OBO. 541-382-9441

541-379-3530

860

BMW 1 1 5 0 RTP 2004, 31K mi., electric windshield,

Orbit 21' 2007, used only 8 times, A/C, oven, tub s hower, micro, load leveler hitch, awning, dual

20' Seaswirl 1992, 4.3L Monaco Windsor, 2001, V6 w/OMC outdrive, open loaded! (was $234,000 new) Solid-surface bow, Shorelander trlr, nds some interior trim work. counters, convection/ micro, 4-dr, fridge, $4500. 541-639-3209

t eries, $4000. 541-389-7691.

21' Crownline Cuddy Cabin, 1995, only 325 hrs on the boat, Buell 1125R, 2008 15k 5.7 Merc engine with miles, reg. s e rvice, outdrive. Bimini top well cared for. factory & moorage cover, Buell optional fairing $7500 obo. kit, Michelin 2cc tires, 541-382-2577 will trade for ie: Enduro DR 650, $5700 obo. 541-536-7924. Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishHDFatBo 1996 ing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please go to Class 875. 541-385-5809 Completely Rebuilt/Customized servtng central o~egonsrnce o903 2012/2013 Award Winner Showroom Condition Many Extras Low Miles.

washer/dryer, ceramic tile & carpet, TV, DVD, satellite dish, leveling, 8-airbags, power cord reel, 2 full pass-thru trays, Cummins ISO 8.3 350hp turbo Diesel, 7.5 Diesel gen set. $85,000 obo. 503-799-2950

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work ... You Keep The Cash! On-site credit

approval team, web site presence. We Take Trade-Ins! Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV

Bend: 541-330-2495 Redmond: 541-548-5254

II e ~ 'i"-l~ r

MONTANA 3585 2008

exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, Irg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $35,000 obo. 541-420-3250

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

NuWa 297LK HitchHiker2007, All sea-

sons, 3 slides, 32' perfect for snow birds, left kitchen, rear lounge, extras, must see. Prineville 541-447-5502 days & 541-447-1641 eves.

1/3 interest in Columbia

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The Bulletin

The Bulletin

AUTOS &TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts andService 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 -Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique andClassic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

400, $150,000 (located © Bend.) Also: Sunriver hangar available for sale at $155K, or lease, @ $400/mo. 541-948-2963

Piper A rcher 1 9 8 0, based in Madras, always hangared since new. New annual, auto Pilgrim 27', 2007 5th pilot, IFR, one piece wheel, 1 s lide, AC, windshield. Fastest ArTV,full awning, excelaround. 1750 tolent shape, $23,900. 1/3 interest i n w e l l- cher tal t i me . $ 6 8 ,500. 541-350-8629 equipped IFR Beech Bo- 541-475-6947, ask for nanza A36, new 10-550/ Rob Berg. r„ prop, located KBDN. g• $65,000. 541-419-9510

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Recreation by Design WEEKEND WARRIOR Monte Carlo, 38-ft. Toy hauler/travel trailer. 2013 Top living room 5th 24' with 21' interior. wheel, has 3 slideouts, 2 Fax it to 541-322-7253 Sleeps 6. Self-conA/Cs, entertainment tained. Systems/ center, fireplace, W/D, The Bulletin Classifieds appearancein good NATIONAL DOLPHIN garden tub/shower, in 37' 1997, loaded! 1 condition. Smoke-free. great condition. $42,500 slide, Corian surfaces, Tow with ~/2-ton. Strong or best offer. Call Peter, wood floors (kitchen), suspension; can haul 307-221-2422, 2-dr fridge, convection ATVs snowmobiles, ( in La Pine ) microwave, Vizio TV & even a small car! Great WILL DELIVER roof satellite, walk-in price - $8900. shower, new queen bed. Call 541-593-6266 RV White leather hide-aCONSIGNMENTS bed & chair, all records, 1/5th interest in 1973 Looking for your WANTED no pets or s moking. next employee? Cessna 150 LLC We Do The Work ... $28,450. 150hp conversion, low Place a Bulletin help You Keep The Cash! Call 541-771-4800 $77,000 time on air frame and wanted ad today and On-site credit 541-548-4807 Beautiful h o u seboat, engine, hangared in reach over 60,000 approval team, $85,000. 541-390-4693 Bend. Exce//ent perreaders each week. web site presence. www.centraloregon formance & affordYour classified ad We Take Trade-Ins! houseboat.com able flying! $6,500. will also appear on Free Advertising. 541-410-6007 GENERATE SOME exbendbulletin.com BIG COUNTRY RV citement in your neig- Pontiac G6 2007, low which currently reBend: 541-330-2495 borhood. Plan a ga- miles, excellent tow car, ceives over 1.5 milRedmond: rage sale and don't has Brake Buddy, shield, Honda Shadow/Aero lion page views ev541-548-5254 forget to advertise in T owmaster to w ery month at no 750, 2007 Black, 11K b ar, ole classified! 385-5809. $10,000. 541-548-1422 mi, 60 mpg, new deextra cost. Bulletin 885 tachable windshield, Classifieds Get ReMustang seat & tires; Canopies & Campers sults! Call 385-5809 Serv>no central oregon jmce 1903 RV detachable Paladin or place your ad 1974 Bellanca CONSIGNMENTS backrest & luggage on-line at Eagle Cap'04camper 8'/o', 875 1730A WANTED rack w/keylock.Vance$1200 of recent wk done. bendbulletin.com Watercraft Hines pipes, great We Do The Work ... $5300. 541-530-7930 2 I 80 TT, 440 SMO, sound. Cruise control, Ads published in "Wa- You Keep The Cash! 180 mph, excellent On-site credit audible turn signals tercraft" include: KayFifth Wheels • condition, always approval team, for safety. $3,995. aks, rafts and motorhangared, 1 owner Jack, 541-549-4949 web site presence. Ized personal We Take Trade-Ins! for 35 years. $60K. Alpenlite 2002, 31' For Free Advertising. Street Glide 2006 black watercrafts. with 2 slides, rear "boats" please see Lance 8/o' camper, 1991 BIG COUNTRY RV In Madras, cherry metal f l ake, Class 870. kitchen, very good Great cond; toilet & fullBend: 541-330-2495 good extras, 8 ,100 541-385-5809 call 541-475-6302 condition. size bed. Lightly used. Redmond: miles, will take some Non-smokers, Recently serviced, 541-548-5254 trade of firearms or no pets. $19,500 $4500. 503-307-8571 Executive Hangar small ironhead. or best offer. at Bend Airport (KBDN) $14,000. 541-382-2577 60' Want to impress the wide x 50' deep, 880 541-306-8812 relatives? Remodel w/55' wide x 17' high biMotorhomes CAMEO LXI 2003,35 ff. fold dr. Natural gas heat, O nan g en . 3 6 0 0 , your home with the offc, bathroom. Adjacent help of a professional wired & plumbed for to Frontage Rd; great W/D, 3 slides, Fanfrom The Bulletin's visibility for aviation busiTIFFIN PHAETON QSH ness. Financing availtastic fan, ice maker, "Call A Service 2007 with 4 slides, CAT r ange top & o v e n 541-948-2126 or 350hp diesel engine, Professional" Directory able. email 1jetjockIN q.com (never been u sed) $129,900. 30,900 miles, very nice; $29,500. Victory TC 2002, Brougham 1978 motor great condition! 541-548-0625. Extended warranty, runs great, many home, Dodge chassis, dishwasher, washer/ 17' coach, sleeps 4, accessories, new Call The Bulletin At rear dining. $4500. dryer, central vac, roof tires, under 40K 541-385-5809 satellite, aluminum 541-602-8652. miles, well kept. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail wheels, 2 full slide-thru $5000. basement trays & 3 TV's. At: www.bendbulletin.com 541-647-4232 Falcon-2 towbar and CHECKYOUR AD Even-Brake included. Call 541-977-4150 o ATVs Alfa See Ya 2005 40' o excellent cond, 1 owner, 4-dr frig w/icemaker, gas on the first day it runs stove/oven, convection to make sure it is coroven, washer/dryer Winnebaqo Suncruiser34' rect. "Spellcheck" and combo, flatscreen TV, all 2004, on1y 34K, loaded, human errors do ocelectronics, new tires, too much to list, ext'd Suzuki powered custom many extras. 7.5 diesel warr. thru 2014, $54,900 cur. If this happens to your ad, please conDune Buggy, twin 650 cc gen, lots of storage, Dennis, 541-589-3243 tact us ASAP so that motor, 5-spd, with trailer, basement freezer, 350 corrections and any $3500. 541-389-3890 Cat Freightliner chassis. adjustments can be Asking $86,500. See at Yamaha Badger 1992 • T r a vel Trailers • made to your ad. 4-wheeler, YFM80, $450. Crook County RV Park, 541-385-5809 ¹43. 520-609-6372 541-312-8879 or The Bulletin Classified 541-350-4622 BOUNDER 1993 34.6', 43k miles, loaded, $13,900. •e Info - Call

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BOATS &RVs 805- Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - MotorcyclesAndAccessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885- Canopies and Campers 890 - RVs for Rent

Need to get an ad in ASAP?

The Bulletin

Superhawk Ownership Share Available!

Backhoe 2007 John Deere 310SG, cab 4x4, 4-in-1 bucket Extendahoe, hydraulic thumb, loaded, like new, 500 hours. New $105,000. Sell $75,000. 541-350-3393

1929 Ford Phaeton in beautiful condition. Cover for top when down. Some extras. $25,000. 541-420-5303. Serious inquiries only. 1952 Ford Customline Coupe, project car, flathead V-8, 3 spd extra parts, & materiais, $2000 obo. 541-410-7473

Look at: Need help fixing stuff? Bendhomes.com Call A ServiceProfessional Economical flying for Complete Listings of find the help you need. in your own Area Real Estate for Sale www.bendbulletin.com IFR equipped Cessna 172/180 HP for Mitsubishi Fuso only $13,500! New 30th Annual Oregon Garmin Touchscreen 1995 14' box truck High Desert Swap with lift gate, avionics center stack! Meet 8 Car Show Exceptionally clean! 184,000 miles, Saturday, S e ptember, needs turbo seal. Hangared at BDN. 7th. Starts 7 a.m. $3500 or best offer. Vendors 6:30 a . m. Call 541-728-0773 541-420-2323 The Desch u tes County F a irgrounds T-Hangar for rent and Expo C e nter, at Bend airport. Redmond, O r egon. Call 541-382-8998. Free admission to the public. S p ecial antique section indoors Trucks & Peterbilt 359 p o table with many d e alers Heavy Equipment t h e Pac i f ic water t r uck, 1 9 9 0, from Northwest. No dogs 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" h o ses, please. Contact Butch camlocks, $ 2 5,000. R amsey for info & 541-820-3724 reservations p hone: ( 541)548-4467 o n line: bramsey@bendAutomotive Parts, • broadband.com Service & Accessories 1979 580C Case Backhoe Enclosed heated cab, (4) Yokohama snow tires on rims, 80" front bucket, 18" hoe bucket, exc. 2 25/60R16, $40 0 . 541-536-1080 rubber, plumbed for hammer, hardly used Pickup - 5th wheel tailChevy C-20 Pickup during 12 yrs I've fits Ford, Chev, like 1969, all orig. Turbo 44; owned it. Extra hoses, gate, new $225. 541-504-8666 auto 4-spd, 396, model parts & 8' screen inCST /all options, orig. cluded. $10,500 obo. owner, $19,950, 541-389-4092 Antique & 541-923-6049 Classic Autos Chevy 1955 PROJECT car. 2 door wgn, 350 small block w/Weiand dual quad tunnel ram with 450 Holleys. T-10 1921 Model T 4-speed 12-bolt posi Delivery Truck 1987 Freightliner COE 3- Restored & Runs Weld Prostar wheels, axle truck, Cummins enextra rolling chassis + $9000. gine, 10-spd, runs! $3900 extras. $6500 for all. 541-389-8963 obo. 541-419-2713 541-389-7669.

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541-536-8816.

Check out the Yamaha Banshee 2001 classifieds online 350 custom sports quad $4500 obo. www.bendbotlletin.com 541-647-8931 Updated daily

~Boats & Accessories 13'4" Gregor, 15 hp Johnson, 3 hp Evinrude great cond.,

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$1750. 541-420-5855

Cougar 33 lt. 2006, 14 ft. slide, awning, easy lift, stability bar, bumper extends for extra cargo, all access. incl., like new condition, stored in RV barn, used less t han 10 t i mes l o c ally, no p ets o r smoking. $20,000 obo. 541-536-2709.

Fleetwood D i s covery 40' 2003, diesel mo.4 BL torhome w/all options-3 slide outs, satellite, 2 TV's,W/D, etc. 3 2 ,000 m i les. i n h e a ted 14'8" boat, 40hp Mer- Wintered $89,900 O.B.O. cury outboard (4-stroke, shop. 541-447-8664 Jayco Eagle electric trim, EFI, less than 10 hrs) + electric 26.6 ft long, 2000 trolling motor, fish finder, $5000 obo. 541-548-2173 Sleeps 6, 14-ft slide, awning, Eaz-Lift stabilizer bars, heat L .

G ulfstream S u n sport 30' Class A 1988 ne w f r i dge, 14' LAZER 1993 sail- TV, solar panel, new boat with trailer, exc. refrigerator, wheelc ond., $2000 o b o . c hair l i ft . 4 0 0 0W Call 503-312-4168 g enerator, Goo d condition! $18,000 obo 541-447-5504 17.5' Glastron 2002, Chevy eng., Volvo outdrive, open bow, JAMEE 1982 20', stereo, sink/live well, low miles on it, w/glastron tr a i ler, self-contained. Runs incl. b oa t c o v e r, Great, everything Like new, $ 8 500. works. $3,000. 541-447-4876 541-382-6494

GarageSales 17' Cris Craft Scorpion, fast & ready to fish! I/O & trolling motor. Lots of extras! $5000. 541-318-7473

GarageSales

GarageSales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

18'Maxum skiboat,2000, inboard motor, g r eat

cond, well maintained, $8995 obo. 541-350-7755

54$ -385-58Q9

& air, queen walk-around bed, very good condition, $10,000 obo. 541-595-2003

Fleetwood Prowler 32' 2001, many upgrade options, $14,500 obo. 541-480-1687, Dick.

Keystone Challenger 2004 CH34TLB04 34'

fully S/C, w/d hookups, new 18' Dometic awning, 4 new tires, new Kubota 7000w marine diesel generator, 3 slides, exc. cond. ins ide 8 o ut . 27 " T V dvd/cd/am/fm entertain center. Call for more details. Only used 4 times total in last 5~/~

years.. No pets, no smoking. High r etail $27,700. Will sell for

$24,000 including slidi ng hitch that fits i n your truck. Call 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. for appt to see. 541-330-5527.

Add a photo to your Bulletin classified ad for just $15 per week.

V isit w w w . b e n d b u l l e t i n . c o m , c lick o n " P L A C E A N A D " a n d f o l l o w t he e a s y s t e p s . All ads appear in both print and online. Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

KeystoneLaredo 31' RV

2 0 06 w i th 1 2 '

slide-out. Sleeps 6, queen w alk-around bed w/storage underneath. Tub & shower. 2 swivel rockers. TV. Air cond. Gas stove & refrigerator/freezer. Microwave. Awning. Outside shower. Slide through stora ge, E a s y Lif t . $29,000 new; Asking $18,600 541-447-4805

Mallard 22' 1995, ready for hunting

season!Sleeps 7, two twin beds, fully equipped, very good cond,$4800 obo. 541-678-5575

Keystone Montana 2955 RL 2008,

2 slides, arctic insulation, loaded, excellent never used condition. $29,900 541-923-4707

The Bulletin www.bendbulletin.com

Monaco Lakota 2004 5th Wheel 34 ft.; 3 s l ides; immaculate c o ndition; l arge screen TV w / entertainment center; reclining chairs; center kitchen; air; queen bed; complete hitch and new fabric cover. $22,900 OBO. (541) 548-5886

To placeyour photoad,visit us online at ww w . b e n d b u l l e t i n . c o m or call with questions,

5 41 -3 8 5 - 5 8 0 9


E10 FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013• THE BULLETIN Antique & Classic Autos

Antique & Classic Autos

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9

Pickups

Pickups

Sp o rt Utility Vehicles Sport Utility Vehicles •

Aut o m obiles

Automobiles •

Automo b iles

Buick Lucerne CXS 2006 - 93K, silver, black leather, Northstar engine, $36,000 new; no doubt Buick's best! Seeing's worth a thousand words. Under $10,000. Buick Bob's car, 541-318-9999

I nternational Fla t Bed Pickup 1963, 1 t on dually, 4 s p d. trans., great MPG, Chevrolet Chevy Colorado ExTahoe tended Cab LS 2005, could be exc. wood 2002, V8, auto, 4WD, 5 Cyl, 5 speed, 4WD, hauler, runs great, leather, third row seat, b ed li n e r , all o y new brakes, $1950. t ow pkg . , allo y 541-41 9-5480. wheels. VIN ¹170983 wheels. VIN ¹148836

Porsche 911 Turbo

CORVETTE COUPE Jeep Grand CheroGlasstop 2010 kee 1996 4x4, auto2003 6 speed, X50 Grand Sport - 4 LT matic, 135,000 miles. added power pkg., loaded, clear bra Great shape - exc. 530 HP! Under 10k hood & fenders. 541-382-7515. cond.,$3,600. Cadillac E l D o r ado New miles, Arctic silver, Michelin Super $12,988 $9,988 541-815-9939 1994, T otal C r e a m Sports, G.S. floor gray leather interior j ~a'.f' ~ 4t ~ Puff! Body, paint, trunk 4g®SUBARU. new quality t i res, ~ OO S UBA R U . mats, 17,000 miles, Nissan XE Pickup as showroom, blue and battery, Bose Crystal red. MorePixatBendbolletio.com 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 1995. $3,000 Red 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. leather, $1700 wheels premium sound ste$42,000. with five spd. and w/snow tires although 877-266-3821 877-266-3821 reo, moon/sunroof, 503-358-1164. a/c. N e w c l utch. car has not been wet in Dlr ¹0354 Dlr ¹0354 car and seat covers. Reasonable m iles 8 years. On t rip t o Many extras. GaChevy Wagon 1957, and runs well. Call Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., Advertise your car! The Bulletin 4-dr., complete, Need to get an raged, perfect conJeep Wrangler X Sport $5400, 541-593-4016. 541-549-6896 Add A Picture! dition $5 9 ,700. $7,000 OBO / trades. To Subscribe call 2004, 6 Cyl., 5 speed, ad in ASAP? Reach thousands of readers! Please call 541-322-9647 541-385-5800 or go to 4WD, hard top, alloy Call 541-385-5809 You can place it 541-389-6998 wheels. VIN ¹749542 CHECK YOUR AD The Bulletin Classifieds www.bendbulletin.com Mustang 1966 2 dr. online at: Please check your ad $15,988 coupe, 200 cu. in. 6 on the first day it runs Mustang convrtble 1994, Porsche Carrera 911 www.bendbulletin.com convertible with cyl. Over $12,000 inmake sure it is cor- economic V6, 2nd owner, 2003 4+ i S U B A R U . torect. vested, asking $9000 $2200 obo. 541-633-6662 hardtop. 50K miles, Sometimes in541-385-5809 factory Porsche All receipts, runs 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. s tructions over t h e Ford Taurus 2003 SSE new motor 6 mos ago with good. 541-420-5011 877-266-3821 Toyota Tundra Crewphone are misunder- s edan, e xc . c o n d 18 mo factory warDlr ¹0354 stood and an e rror Max 2012, V8, auto, miles. $5,000 ranty remaining. Corvette Coupe 1964 can occur in your ad. 63,000 4WD, moonroof, alloy $37,500. Chevy Silverado 1500 530 miles since frame If this happens to your 541-389-9569 wheels, VIN ¹261814 srf~ 541-322-6928 Crew Cab 2012, V8, off restoration. Runs ad, please contact us Honda Prelude, 1991, $38,888 auto, 4WD, p o w er and drives as new. the first day your ad clean car, tinted win- Subaru Outback 2008 seats, bed liner, alloy gg S UBA R U Satin Silver color with I appears and we will dows, 5-spd, bad clutch. Ford Explorer 1995 EdImmaculate! SUBARUOPSRNO COU wheels. VIN ¹218620 black leather interior, Must Sell! Health forces happy to fix it as $850 obo. Call/text for Original owner. 82K 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. dieo Bauer V6 4.0Ltr Nissan Pathfinder SE sbe $32,888 mint dash. PS, P B, sale. Buick Riviera 1991, oon as w e c a n . pix: 541-279-9995 16 whls 13 0 0 00mi miles, 2 new sets of 877-266-3821 AC, 4 speed. Knock classic low-mileage car, 1998, 150K mi, 5 spd Deadlines are: WeekS UBA RU. tires, service records, BlueBook C o nd:VG 4x4, Dlr ¹0354 offs. New tires. Fresh garaged, pampered, SUBARUOPBUNOCON loaded, very good days 12:00 noon for Mercedes-Benz E320 RV tow ready: base- tires, very good cond, new brakes & struts, 327 N.O.M. All Cor- non-smoker, exclnt cond, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. CDI 2005 68K miles. next day, Sat. 11:00 plate, S M I br a k e,$4800. 503-334-7345 leather seats, loaded! vette restoration parts $4300 obo 541-389-0049 877-266-3821 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. Loaded with optional d rive-discon $ 4 7 5 0 $16,900. in & out. Reduced to equipment. $24,700. Dlr ¹0354 12:00 for Monday. If 541-693-3975 OBO 650-465-5936 541-647-1110 $59,500. 541-410-2870 we can assist you, please call us: CRAMPED FOR Mustang GT 1995 red Looking for your 541-385-5809 Ford Ranchero 1965 CASH? 133k miles, Boss 302 next employee? The Bulletin Classified fPhoio for illustration only) Use classified to sell Rhino bedliner cusmotor, custom pipes, Place a Bulletin help tom wheels, 302V-8 those items you no Toyota Tundra Double wanted ad today and 5 s p ee d m a n ual, Cab 2009, V8, auto, longer need. a uto. Runs g o od Plymouth B a r racuda Toyota RAV4 2010, V6, power windows, cusreach over 60,000 4WD, tow pkg., cusCall 541-385-5809 $9,995. 1966, original car! 300 a uto, 4 W D , al l o y tom stereo, very fast. readers each week. t om b u mper, V I N Infiniti FX35ias 541-771-4778 hp, 360 V8, center2 012, wheels, heated seats, $5800. 541-280-7910 Your classified ad ¹015272 lines, 541-593-2597 Platinum silver, VIN ¹096913 will also appear on $21,988 24,000 miles, with $23,888 bendbulletin.com Chrysler Newport +© SUBARU factory war r anty, PROJECT CARS:Chevy which currently reFord Ranchero S UBA R U . (2) 1962 4 door sedans, Vehicle? 2-dr FB 1949-(SOLD) & f ully l o aded, A l l ceives over 1.5 mil$2500 and $5500. 1979 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. Wheel Drive, GPS, Call The Bulletin Chevy Coupe 1950 lion page views with 351 Cleveland 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. La Pine, 541-602-8652. 877-266-3821 and place an ad rolling chassis's $1750 sunroof, etc. every month at 877-266-3821 modified engine. Dlr ¹0354 today! ea., Chevy 4-dr 1949, $37,500. no extra cost. BulleBody is in Dlr ¹0354 Ask about our complete car, $ 1949; Garage Sales 541-550-7189 tin Classifieds excellent condition, "Wheel Deal"! Cadillac Series 61 1950, The Bulletin's 975 Get Results! Call $2500 obo. Dodge Dakota Club Garage Sales for private party 2 dr. hard top, complete "Call A Service 385-5809 or place 541-420-4677 Automobiles advertisers w/spare f r on t cl i p ., Cab 1998, V 8 ,5 Professional" Directory Isuzu Axiom 2004 your ad on-line at Garage Sales speed, 4WD, tow pkg, $3950, 541-382-7391 4wd, auto trans, new l".~ I • bendbulletin.com a lloy w h eels. V I N is all about meeting gg tires & brakes. New Find them ¹511766 your needs. luggage rack. Silver $8,988 in Find It in with silver w/leather Call on one of the interior. 77K miles & S UBA R U The Bulletin The Bulletin Classifieds! professionals today! in excellent condiVolkswagen Karmann Porsche 911 541-385-5809 Classifieds 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. tion $7000. Ghia 1970 convertible, Carrera 993 cou e GMC Yaton 1971, Only 877-266-3821 935 541-419-6433 very rare, new top 8 inteWilly's Jeepster 1950, 3 $19,700! Original low 541-385-5809 Dlr ¹0354 rior upholstery, $7500. I The Bulletin recoml Sport Utility Vehicles mile, exceptional, 3rd on the tree, Hurricane 6 541-389-2636 mends extra caution f engine, like new top & owner. 951-699-7171 when p u r chasing ~ tires. Car runs & drives nMy little red AUDI 1990 V8 Quatf products or services great! $ 16,500 o b o. tro. Perfect Ski Car. Corvette" Coupe from out of the area. 541-420-5855 LOW MILES. $3,995 J S ending c ash , 1996, 73k miles, obo. 541-480-9200. checks, or credit inTiptronic auto. 933 B' formation may be I X5 2007, 1 owner, transmission. Silver, Grand BMW Pickups Dodge Dakota Quad B uick Enclave C XL Jeep exc. 30K mi., sunroof, blue leather interior, / subject to FRAUD. C herokee 1 9 9 9 , Cab SLT 2006, V8, 6 2009, V6, atuo, AWD, For more informa$27,500. 541-389-1128 Mercedes-Benz SL380 moon/sunroof, new mile s . speed, 4WD, a l loy N av., l eather, t o w 1 59,970 f tion about an adver1 983 Roadster. V - 8 . quality tires and 4WD, au t omatic Buick Century Limited wheels, tow pkg., bed 1996, 350 auto, tiser, you may call Lots of power in this pkg., alloy w heels, transmission, cloth battery, car and seat 2000, r un s g r e at, liner. VIN ¹627033 beautiful car with hard 132,000 miles. I the Oregon Statef VIN ¹186577 covers, many extras. beautiful car. $3400. interior, power evand soft t o ps, A l so Non-ethanol fuel 8 Attorney General's f $15,988 $26,588 Recently fully ser541-312-3085 erything, A/C, synthetic oil only, c omes with hard t op Office C o nsumer viced, garaged, S UBA R U . stand. 5 4 0 0 0 m iles. Chevy 2500 HD 2003 trailer hitch. Well garaged, premium Qi f S U SUBARUOPBBNOCON B A RU. f Protection hotline at looks and runs like FIND ITl $14,000. 429 NW 24th Bose stereo, 1-877-877-9392. new. Excellent conNE Hwy 20, Bend. 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. maintained & runs SUY IT! Pl, Redmond. 4 WD w o r k t ru c k , 2060 877-266-3821 great. $3850. $11,000. dition $29,700 877-266-3821 541-420-5303. Serious 140,000 miles, $7000 SELL IT! 541-385-5286 541-322-9647 541-923-1781 obo. 541-408-4994. Dlr ¹0354 Serving Central Oregon smce1903 Dlr ¹0354 inquiries ONLY! The Bulletin Classifieds

Chevy Stepside 1963 /s ton One owner, good inside 8 out. $9,999

MGA 1959 - $19,999 Convertible. O r iginal body/motor. No rust. 541-549-3838

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'

' TIRNIEEKLYtUIDE TO CENTRAL OREGON EVENTPARTS ANDWNTERT

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AT LESSCHWABAMPHITHEATER, PAGE3

MAGAZINE EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN AUGUST 30, 2013

' :* -

-

D R I N K S:Little Woody Barrel brew festival and more! PAGE10 A R T S: 'Jungle Book' musical in Sunriver PAGE 12


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE

C ON T A C T

US

EDITOR

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

insi e

Cover photo courtesy Danny Clinch; cover design by Althea Borck/The Bulletin

Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377

bsalmon ©bendbulletin.com

REPORTERS Beau Eastes, 541-383-0305 beastesObendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 diasper©bendbulletin.com Megan Kehoe, 541-383-0354 mkehoe O bendbulletin.com Karen Koppel, 541-383-0351 kkoppelObendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck©bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. Email to: events©bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804,

Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Take advantage of the full line of Bulletin products. Call 541-385-5800. ull

>©N

'

DRINKS • 10

OUT OF TOWN • 22

• Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew and Whiskey Fest returns • Sunriver Sunfest Wine Festival returns • Maragas hosts Grape Stomp

• Time-Based Art Festival in Portland • A guide to out of town events

ARTS • 12

MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: MGMT plays Les Schwab Amphitheater • Isles plays CD-release show • lanMcFeronBandatMcMenamins • Dixieland jazz returns to La Pine • Domino Room hosts The Acacia Strain • House concert will be home to Americana, folk-pop

• "The Jungle Book — The Musical" is in Sunriver • Central Oregon Etsy dealers to meet • Book-based quilts shown in Redmond • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

GOING OUT • 8

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• Lots of music options this week • A listing of live music, DJs,karaoke, open mics and more

MUSIC RELEASES • 9 • John Mayer, SamPhilips, Earl Sweatshirt and more

f) first community

MOVIES • 26 • A week full of Central Oregon events • A listing of upcoming events • Talks and classes listing

DVD

• A review of Wubba's BBQ Shack • News from the local dining scene

Credit Union

OnPOlnt C OM M U N I T Y

eg Purchase Ducks from: Bend Area Rotarians First Community Credit Union Mid Oregon Credit Union OnPoint Community Credit Union SELCO Community Credit Union

M or e t h a n e v e r b e f o r e .

The Bulletin bendbulletin.com

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SELCO COMMDNITT CREDIT IINION

C R EDIT U N I O N

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plus more fantasticprizes!

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September 8, 20 I 3 Fun startsat II:00 a.m.

• Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

RESTAURANTS • 20

MidOre on

24'"Annual Great Drake Park

• "Getaway,""One Direction: This is Us," "The Act of Killing" and "20 Feet From Stardom" open in Central Oregon • "At Any Price,""The Great Gatsby," "Pain & Gain" and "The Reluctant Fundamentalist" are out on Blu-ray and

CALENDAR • 16

bendbroadband" we're the local dog. we better be good.


GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 3

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

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Courtesy Danny Clinch

MGMT includes, from left, Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden.

• PsychedelicpopbandMGMTis at LesSchwabAmphitheater By David Jasper The Bulletin

idsgrow up so fastthese days. Seems like only y esterday that M GMT, the psychedelic band playing Les Schwab Amphitheater on Saturday (see "If you go"), came at us straight outta Wesleyan University. The band then was Benjamin Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden, who would

later be joined by Will Berman, Matthew Asti and James Richardson after the first album, 2007's "Oracular Spectacular." And spectacular it was, containing the highly original synthtastic earworm "Time to Pretend," which playfully ruminated upon the life cycle of the rock star. Or maybe it was a career guide. Either way, it pretty much went like this: Step 1. Make some music. 2. Make some money. 3.

Move to a big city. 4. Maybe do some drugs. 5. Meet and marry models. 6. Impregnate models.7.D ivorce models. 8.Repeat Step 5. 9. Choke on one's own vomit. As career advice, it's wanting, sure, but as send-up of rock star ambitions, it made a point. It also had a cool hook. With two more strong singles — "Electric Feel" and "Kids" — "Oracular Spectacular" was a bona fide hit. Everyone gobbled it up like so much miley in Molly Cyrus' bathroom, or whatever.

Continued Page 5

If yougo What: MGMT, with Black Bananas and

Kuroma When:6:30p.m.Saturday,gatesopen5p.m. Where:Les SchwabAmphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend

Cost:$35 plus fees, available at TheTicket Mill (541-318-5457) in Bend or the website below

Contact:www.bendconcerts.com


music

PAGE 4 + GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Submitted photo

Isles is, from left, Allyn Dubief, Elijah Lee and Tyson Vandenbroucke.

• Bend art rock band Islecel s ebrates its new album at TheWorkhouse on Saturday

sets, crafting a hip and mysterious visual presence online, and focusing on recording its debut release "Viracocha," which it will celebrate with a show Saturday

If yougo What:Isles album release

When:Improv set at 7 p.m. By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

or fans of music-makingnot the playing of sounds, but the true nuts-and-bolts creation of songs — Isles is like the perfect band. For several months late last year and early this year, the local trio — Elijah Lee, Tyson Vandenbroucke and A l ly n D u bief — played purely improvisational shows, providing onlookers a window into its process: forming an idea, setting a foundation, building an arrangement, finish-

ing the work. These gigs were, essentially, public jam sessions. "It was almost just kind of like

a group of people getting to see what it looks like when we all get together in a room and rehearse," Lee, 27, said in an interview last week. Those early Isles shows were improvised not because of lack of material, Lee said, but because the band thought that what it had was special enough to attempt such a high-wire act. " We felt th e c hemistry b e-

Saturday, album set at 9 p.m. Where:The Workhouse, 50 S.E. Scott St., Bend

in Bend (see "If you go").

Cost:Free Contact:www.isles.cc

tween all of us was so good (that) the shows would carry their own weight based off that chemistry alone," he said. "If you throw three or four people into a room that are r e ally e x cited about something, t he n i t be c o mes contagious."

Said Dubief: "We knew where e verything was g oing, and i t was just so easy to come up with stuff." Isles' final improv show was in March. Sincethen, the band has been playing more structured

A couple of the six songs on "Viracocha" grew out of the public jams, Lee and Dubief said. All are instrumental or close to it, sometimes featuring shapeshifting singing parts that work more as a component in Isles' wall of sound than in any sort of traditional vocal way. That said, the trio balks at being called an instrumental band. In fact, it has already begun incorporating more conventional vocals into its newer music.

Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Isles

music

GO! MAGAZINEs PAGE 5

sional shows, including a few in the Old Ironworks district, an art-exFrom previous page hibit opening at Bend's tbd loft and "('Viracocha') was meant to kind on the roof of a downtown building. of mirror what we had been doing The band also organized the inauwith the improv sets," Dubief, 26, gural Cascadia Festival, featuring said. "So that's why we didn't refour local bands performing in the ally write lyrics for it, because we woods last month. "One of our goals is to do fairly wanted it to translate to what people had already seen." unusual things," Lee said. "We've Lee and V a ndenbroucke, 25, tried to come up with creative ideas formed Isles last fall after years for shows." of playing music together off and Nearly two m onths ago, they on. (Allthree members grew up spent aweek creating "Viracocha." in Bend.) After a month or so, they As of last week, they were still waitrealized they had something worth ing on the final, mastered version of pursuing. the songs to arrive in their mailbox, "The chemistry was really imbut two songs provided to The Bulportant to us," Lee said. "I mean, letin illuminate the band's aesthetic. "Bay of Giants" begins with a genwe were excited about some of the songs, but it was more the fact that tly pulsing guitar line, blooms into a ... it was just really naturaL I didn't shower of six-stringed sparks, then even have to say anything and nei- crescendos into a chorus of whoather did Tyson. We just knew where oh-ohs before falling back to Earth the other was going." amid a crash of cymbals. "Paragonia" is a slower burn; ambient By Christmas, they wanted to add a bassist. Dubief, who had seen noodling takes up more than half the other two play an improv set, its 7-minute running time. Eventuwas already planning on asking if ally, drum-fueled momentum takes he could join in the fun. hold and cabalistic chanting breaks "Just watching them, I was envi- through the aural fog before the sioning things that I could be add- song withers into noisy hiss. ing to it," he said. "I was just like, 'I At times, Isles' music sounds like have to jump on board.'" a more melodictake on The MerThe trio started playing occa- cury Program's post-rock plod, or a

more relaxed version of Maserati's futuristic psychedelic space-rock. It's like if Sigur Ros came out of the shadows and turned toward the sun, or Peter Gabriel fully embraced his New Age interests. I n conversation, Lee and D u bief cite as influences elegant indie b ands like E fterklang and B a lmorhea, the bubbly noise-pop of Foals and Suuns and the sprawling metal of Russian Circles, as well as outliers like modern R&B. Radiohead gets a shout-out on the Isles Facebook. It all adds up to something Lee describes as "etherealart rock." And he's right. "We have a lot of ideas bouncing

MGMT

I'll probably stick to "Time to Pretend" as far as my iPod is concerned, but it's still a relief to know there are bands out there eschewing the slick commercial gloss that permeates everything (and by everything, I mean pop radio), making the music that they want. Say what you will about some of MGMT's choices, but at least their stuff doesn't sound like it was cloned from Pharrell's latest guest spot or spat out of AutoTune. Oh sure,there are lots of bands like that, at least 437 such acts in Oregon alone. We all grok that. But are their songs played on the radio'? Do they have the guile to do what they do and still get high scores from those Pitchfork snobs'? Did they just play "Your Life is a Lie" last week on "Late Show with David Letterman" — with, it should be noted, a giant cowbell on the stage? Didn't think so. Hey, MGMT! You're OK! And just because I can't resist: More cowbell.

From Page 3 The follow-up record, "Congratulations," followed three years later, in 2010. It was hardly a single-filled hit, but it charted well both here and abroad. Critics were mostly kind, and the influential music website Pitchfork even gave it a 6.8 out of 10, which for Pitchfork is like getting a kiss on the lips from the best-looking snob at schooL Nevertheless, I had to look up Wikipedia's page for " Congratulations" because I couldn't recall one songfrom the record. The first single, "Flash Delirium," peaked at Nos. 81 and 87 on the charts in Japan and Canada, respectively. Then there was the 12-minute tune called "Siberian Breaks." The third single was the poppy "It's Working." The videos to these songs fall somewhere between art-school experiments and the low budget, slapdash videos played back in the early days of MTV. But what has MGMT been up to lately'? Well, they have a new re-

cord coming out in September, and a fine, promising video in "Your Life is a Lie," which features a split-second cameo by Henry Winkler and is the weirdest song to come down the pop-music pike since ... since ... Dang. I don't know. Has there ever been a song like this one'? "Here's the deal, open your eyes, your life is a lie," go the lyrics, the clonk of a cowbell punctuating each line. It's two minutes of awesome subversiveness, with more cowbell than everyone's favorite "Saturday Night Live" sketch. Those who head to the Schwab on Saturday will presumably get even more tastes of "MGMT," the new, obviously self-titled album set to drop Sept. 17. I think MGMT might be brilliant. Yes, they look a bit like they got lost ontheir wayto or from Burning Man, but maybe that's part of the trick. Maybe thefirst record's pop charm was just the Trojan Horse that allowed MGMT to slip past the guards at the gates of mainstream music, and that has enabled them keep the mainstream a little less bland.

SAN K O F

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around up here," he said, including Isles'second release, an already written concept album about the destruction of an indigenous population by natural disaster, split into three partsand presented via four different voices. But that's for later. For now, Isles is playing it close to the vest. "We've flown under the radar purposely," Lee said. "Right now we're sort of the local band of mystery, and I think we're OK keeping it that way for a little while."

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PAGE 6 + GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

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www.redchairgajjerydend.com MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY 869 NW WALL ST. • 541-388-2107

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www. patilscottfjneart. com

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CALLING ALL RIVER RATS, TRAIL RATS, DIRT RATS, GYM RATS, TECH RATS, MALL RATS AND OF C RSE ... MICRO BREW RATS!

384 SW UPPER TERRACE DR., SUITE,108, BEND

w ww. a t H o e r e w u . C o m

Seattle-based s i nger-songwriter Ian McFeron will bring his band back to Bend on Wednesday, this time to McMenamins Old St. Francis School. Makes me wonder if perhaps this is the gig that will have people buzzing the next day — and will propel McFeron back to Bend regularly in the future. Here's why I say that: This guy is great. He's a solid roots-pop-bluesrock singer-songwriterwho reminds me of "Gold"-era Ryan Adams, popular West Coast troubadour Jackie Greene, The FeliceBrothers when they're not being weird, or, to go oldschool, Bob Dylan and The Band. The Bend crowd that loves this kind of stuff should get a faceful next week. McFeron stopped in town in March for a show at The Sound Garden, which is a fine place to see live music, but it's a bit off the beaten path. About once a month, I mention The Sound Garden tosomeone and the response isalways the same: "Oh yeah ... where is that place'?" Wednesday night at McMenamins, on the other hand, is squarely on the

beaten path, and I could see folks streaming out of t h ere with sore dancing feet and a new fave. Find more about McFeron at www .ianmcferon.com. lan McFeron Band; 7 p.m. Wednesday; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700NW. Bond St., Bend; www .mcmenamins.com or 541-382-5174.

Three full days of Dixieland jazz Once a year,the La Pine Moose Lodge transforms into the best Dixieland jazz party in Central Oregon — way more fun than all those other Dixieland jazz parties in the region. Anyway, it's t hat t i me! Today through Sunday, the Dixieland Party Band and its friends from across the Northwest and California will gather at the Moose Lodge for some

organized jamming. For those who don't know, Dixieland is an upbeat style of jazz that developed in New Orleans in the early 20th century and then spread to other cities, most notably Chicago. The best-known Dixieland song is probably "When the Saints Go Marching In."

Continued next page

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Sept. 6 —Michael Waite (folk),The HideawayTavern, 939S.E. Second Street, Bend, 541-312-9898. Sept. 6-8 —Sisters FolkFestival (folksplosion),various spots in Sisters, www.sistersfolkfestival.org. Sept. 7 —LosLobosandLos Lonely Boys(rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www. bendconcerts.com. Sept. 7 —III-esha (electronic), The Warehouse, Bend. Sept. 11 —LowHums(hypnojams),Volcanic Theatre Pub, Bend, www.volcanictheatrepub. com. Sept. 11 —TheNorthstar Session (pop-rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 12 —Worth (folksoul),McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 12 —Robert Walter's 20th Congress (souljazz), Liquid Lounge, Bend, www.p44p.biz. Sept. 14 —OneF(indie rock), Volcanic Theatre Pub, Bend,www. volcanictheatrepub.com. Sept. 18 —Water Tower (bluegrass),McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 18 —Midori 8 Ezra Boy (rock),Volcanic Theatre Pub, Bend, www.volcanictheatrepub. com. Sept. 21 —McDoEE gall (altblues),McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 21 —TonySmiley (oneman rock band),McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins.com. Sept. 25 —Kris Orlowski (indie-folk),McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 26 —Satriarch (blackened deathmetal),Third Street Pub, Bend, 541-306-3017. Sept. 26 —Buck65 (hiphop),The Annex, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Sept. 28 —Steve Earle 8 The Dukes (Americana),Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre. olg. Sept. 28 —Headless Pez(power thrash),Third Street Pub, Bend, 541-306-3017. Oct. 1 —Robert Earl Keen (Americana),Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre.org.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

music

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Point your favorite onlineportal to TheBulletin's music blog to find local musicnewsandconcert announcements, photos andvideos of shows, MP3sto downloadandother fun stuff! Follow along inthewaythat best suits your style:

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From previous page Anyway, details are below. Go to La Pine and get yer Dixieland on! Dixieland Party Band and Friends; 1-10 p.m. today, noon-10 p.m. Saturday, 11 a . m .-8 p . m. Su n day; free, donations accepted; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679.

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Nyman, Johnsons play houseconcert As summer winds down, so does the opportunity to gather in someone's backyard, share some food and drink, and listen to live music. JoAn Mann's house concerts have become an under-the-radar staple of Bend's musicscene, and she'll host a good one Sunday night, featuring the songs of Abigail Nyman, Janelle Johnson and Lindsey Johnson. Nyman is from Prineville but is now based in Music City, U.S.A., aka Nashville, where she is pursuing her career in music and (apparently) film; she was recently cast as Domino Room hosts a rising musician in a movie called The Acacia Strain "Route 65 Nashville." Janelle and Linsey Johnson are The modest surge in heavy musisters from Sisters, and both prod- sic coming to/through Bend conucts of the Sisters High School's tinues Sunday with a show by East Americana P r oject s o n gwriting Coast hardcore metal band The program. Acacia Strain. Expect an evening of pretty folkFormed in M assachusetts, the pop 'n' Americana floating around band has gone through a ton of in the air. Also, bring a dish or bev- lineup changes over the past dozen erage to share, OK? Oh, and $10; or so years, but one member has Mann gives the money to the artists. remained constant: vocalist VinAbigail Nyman, Janelle Johnson cent Bennett, whose sharp, gutand Lindsey Johnson; 6 p.m. Sun- tural growl just happens to also be day, doors open 5 p.m.; $10suggest- the most distinctive feature of The ed donation; The Glen at Newport Acacia Strain's music. Hills, 1019 NW. Stannium Drive, O therwise, t hi s b a n d b r i n g s B end; j a @prep-profiles.com o r thunderous drums, a wall of gui541-480-8830. tars and, in a bit of a twist from

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some of their metal bros, the occasionalsample. There's some death metal here, some d oom, s ome noisecore; add it all up and you've got something l oud, a ggressive and nasty. The rest of the bill consists of one-man folk singers and tweepop bands. Just kidding, the whole night is going to be brutally heavy. The Acacia Strain, with American Me, Within the Ruins, Fit for an Autopsy and Funerals; 7:30 p.m. Sunday, doors open 6:30 p.m.; $13plus fees in advance at the website below, $15 at the door; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .j.mp/acaciabend or 541-408-4329. — Ben Salmon

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FRIDAY OC T 4 Tickets atBENDCON C E R T S.com, TICKETFLY.com, 83?-438-9849, and at the Ticket Mill in Bend's Old Mill District.


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

going out Looking for something to do? Check out our listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more happening at local nightspots. Find lots more at www.bendbulletin.com/events.

+QLQCALS,LQCALS, LQCALS EVERYWHERE!

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to support local musicians by attending their

gigs. Tonight at Country Catering, it's going to be party time with popular reggae-rockers 2nd Hand Soldiers. The barbecue starts around 4:30 p.m., 'D W 3

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TODAY PAUL EDDY: Twang-pop;10 a.m.; Chow, 1110N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-728-0256. PARTY ON THEPATIO: 2ndHand Soldiers play reggae at 6 p.m; free; 4:30 p.m.; Country Catering Co., 900 S.E.Wilson Ave., Bend; 541-383-5014 or www. bendcatering.com. JIM CORNELIUSAND MIKE BIGGERS: Folk; $5; 6-9 p.m.; Faith, Hopeand Charity Vineyards,70455 N.W. Lower Bridge Way, Terrebonne. MC MYSTIC:6 p.m.; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. BondSt., Bend; 541-388-0116 or www.astroloungebend.com. OUT OFTHE BLUE:Rock;6 p.m.;W ubba's BBQ Shack, 63055 Layton Ave., Bend; 541-2 I3-2 I21. THE PRAIRIEROCKETS:Americana; 6-8 p.m.; Jackson's Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-647-2198. EDWARDHERDA:Indie-folk; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse,19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite190, Bend; 541-728-0095. COMEDYNIGHT:A night of improv with Bend's improv group, BIG,andlocal comedians; for mature audiences; 8 p.m., doors at 7 p.m.; $8 in advance, $10at the door; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. BOBBY LINDSTROM ANDED SHARLET: Rock and blues; 7 p.m.; Brassie's Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. BRENTALANANDHIS FUNKYFRIENDS: Pop-rock; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; Angeline's Bakery & Cafe,121 W.MainAve., Sisters; 541-549-9122 or www.angelinesbakery. com. NICK DANGER: Classic rock; 7 p.m.; Hardtails Bar andGrill, 175 N. Larch St., Sisters; 541-549-6114.

PATTHOMAS: Country; 7-10 p.m.; Tumalo FeedCo.,64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. DJ CHRIS:7:30-11 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W.Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. DON QUIXOTEAND QUIET CULTURE: Indie rock; 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-3231881 or www.volcanictheatrepub.com. ANIMAL ANDTHE BADLANDS BOOGIE BAND:Rock andblues; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar 8 Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889 or www. northsidebarfun.com. DJ STEELE: 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon 8 Stage,125N.W.OregonAve., Bend; 541-749-2440. PATRICKHAMMOND: Soul-pop;$5;9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing 8 Taproom, 24 N.W. GreenwoodAve., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

and the band at 6p.m. Later, at Volcanic Theatre Pub, check out two relatively new acts on the scene:

garage-blazers DonQuixote andindie-rockers Quiet Culture. If you like White Stripes, you need tohear Don Quixote. Also tonight, in Sisters, Brent Alan and His Funky Friends will turn Angeline's Bakery's

backyard into a dancefloor. Saturday night at

CLAIR CLARKE:Blues; 7 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W.Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777 or www. portellowinecafe.com. DENNISMCGREGORAND THE SPOILERS:Folk-rock;$5-$10;7p.m .; Angeline's Bakery & Cafe,121 W.Main Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9122 or www. angelinesbakery.com. MOSLEY WOTTA: Hip-hop;$5;7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W.14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. NICK DANGER: Classic rock; 7 p.m.; Hardtails Bar andGrill,175 N. Larch St., Sisters; 541-549-6114. PATTHOMAS: Country; 7-10 p.m.; Tumalo FeedCo.,64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. ISLES:Ambient post-rock, album release; 7 p.m. improv set, 9 p.m. album set; The W orkhouse, 50 S.E.ScottSt.,Bend; www.isles.cc. (Pg. 4) CHARLESBUTTONBAND: Blues and rock; 7:30 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. ERICOREN:Comedy;$10;8 p.m.;Kayo's Dinner Houseand Lounge,415 N.E.Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. ANIMAL ANDTHE BADLANDS BOOGIE BAND:Rock and blues; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889 or www. northsidebarfun.com. DJ STEELE: 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon 8 Stage,125N.W.OregonAve.,Bend; 541-749-2440. PH3R: Electronica; 10 p.m.; TheAstro Lounge, 939 N.W.Bond St., Bend; 541388-0116 or www.astroloungebend.com.

Angeline's is the big end-of-summer, pre-folk fest shindig with Dennis McGregor (pictured at left) and friends. Other Saturday stuff: Moon Mountain

Ramblers will do their eclectic Americana thing at Elk Lake Resort, while funk-hoppers Mosley Wotta will wrap up Parrilla Grill's Show Us Your Spokes

concert series. Jumpahead to Thursday andyou'll find Hilst & Coffey's collision of classical and roots music at Volcanic Theatre, as well as the pub-filling

folk-rock of TheRumand TheSeaat McMenamins Old St. Francis School. Whew! And that's just a

small percentage of the stuff happening this week. Find details on all of it and morebelow.

Jazz standards; 5-7:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. HOUSE CONCERT: AbigailNyman performs, with Janelle and Lindsey Johnson; $10 suggested dontation; 6 p.m.; The Glen atNewport Hills,1019 N.W. Stannium Dr ive, Bend; 541-4808830.(Pg.7) MATT COLEMAN: Acoustic guitar; 7-9 p.m.; Broken TopBottle Shop 8 Ale Cafe, 1740 N.W. Pence Lane, Suite1, Bend; 541-728-0703. THEACACIASTRAIN: Metal, with American Me and more; $13-$15; 7:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-408-4329 or www.j.mp/acaciabend. (Pg. 7)

— Sen Salmon

Coffeehouse, 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite190, Bend; 541-728-0095. IAN MCFERONBAND:Roots-rock;7-10 p.m.; McMenamins OldSt. Francis School, 700 N.W. BondSt., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. (Pg. 6) BOBBY LINDSTROM ANDDEREK MICHAEL MARC:Rock and blues; 8 p.m.; Northside Bar 8 Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. LOCALMICNIGHT: Hosted by Tall Adam; 8 p.m.; VolcanicTheatrePub,70 S.W . Century Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881.

THURSDAY

CINDERBLUE:Bluesand country; 5-8 p.m.; Faith, Hope andCharity Vineyards, 70455 N.W. Lower Bridge Way, MONDAY Terrebonne. TEXAS HOLD'EM OR OMAHA: 4 p.m .; TEXAS HOLD'EM BOUNTY Rivals Sports Bar, Grill 8 Poker, 2650 TOURNAMENT:6 p.m .;RivalsSports N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E.Division St., SATURDAY Bend; 541-550-7771. OPEN MIC:8 p.m., signups at 7:30 p.m; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., FRANCHOT TONE: Reggae and rock, MARK RANSOM ANDTHE MOSTEST: Bend; 541-388-0116. with Reed Thomas Lawrence; 6 p.m.; Folk-pop; 11 a.m.; Chow,1110N.W. Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 Newport Ave., Bend; 541-728-0256. TUESDAY N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. MOON MOUNTAINRAMBLERS: silvermoonbrewing.com. Americana; 5-8 p.m .;ElkLake TEXAS HOLD'EM BOUNTY COMEDY NIGHT: $5;6:30-8 p.m.;River Resort, 60000 Century Drive, Bend; TOURNAMENT:6 p.m.;RivalsSports 541-480-7378. Bar, Grill 8 Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Rim Coffeehouse, 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite190, Bend; 541-728-0095. Bend; 541-550-7771. DAVE JONESAND SCOTT WEGNER OF THE RUMANDTHESEA: Folk-rock; STRINGSATTACHED:Acousticcovers; FRANCHOT TONE: Rock and reggae; 7-10 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis 6:30-8:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 7 p.m.;GoodLife Brewing Co.,70 S.W . School, 700 N.W.BondSt., Bend; 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Century Drive, Bend; 541-728-0749. 541-382-5174. Bend; 541-728-0095. HILST 8 COFFEY: Chamber-folk; 9 p.m.; MGMT:Psych-pop, with Black Bananas WEDNESDAY Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W.Century and Kuroma; $35; 6:30 p.m.; Les Schwab OUT OFTHEBLUE:Rock; 6-10 p.m.; Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881. Amphitheater, 344 S.W.Shevlin Hixon Pronghorn Resort, 65600 Pronghorn Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www. SUNDAY LADIESNIGHT WITH SOUL BROTHER: 9 Club Drive, Bend; 541-312-9424. bendconcerts.com. (Pg. 3) p.m.; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W.Bond KC FLYNN:Country rock; 5-8 p.m.; Elk TEXAS HOLD'EM OR OMAHA: 6 p.m.; BOBBY LINDSTROM ANDED SHARLET: St., Bend; 541-388-0116. Lake Resort,60000 Century Drive, Bend; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker,2650 Rock and blues; 7 p.m.; Brassie's Bar at • TO SUBMIT:Email eVents@bendbulletin.COm. N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. Eagle Crest Resort,1522 Cline Falls Road, 541-480-7378. Deadline is 10 dayS befOre PubliCatian. PleaSe Redmond; 541-548-4220. LISADAEAND THE ROBERT LEE TRIO: OPEN MIC:6:30-8:30 p.m.; River Rim include date, venue, time and cost


GO! MAGAZINE ~ PAGE 9

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

musie releases Tedeschi TrucksBand

cluding a very good live release — are tragic in this way. "Do I "MADE UP MIND" Look Worried" is Tedeschi in full Sony Music Masterworks sass mode, and "Misunderstood" When Susan Tedeschi has is her flaunting anguish. She is a target, she shines. When the a determined,aggressive blues target is herself, no one is safe. singer, and she only sounds right On "Sweet and Low," from the around pain, taking it in or dolnew Tedeschi Trucks Band al- ing it out. bum "Made Up Mind," she tries "Made Up Mind" is another to slither her way back into the strong effort f rom th e g r oup good graces of someone she's headed by Tedeschi and her huswronged. band, the virtuoso blues guitarist "I w a sn't a l w ay s a r ound, Derek Trucks, though not quite when you felt so low down/ She as enlivening as its 2011 debut, was your shoulder you cried on, "Revelator." It's a convincing when I weighed you down," she band that jumps from rugged confesses, her voice pulpy with blues to Memphis soul to Muscle regret. But she has a plan: Plead Shoals to Motown, full of technilong enough,and "maybe you'll cal savvy meted out judiciously. crave a b i t tersweet melody." While Tedeschi has a nasty She can't right the wrong, and howl, she's not as effective when she can't make herself right. It is restrained;her power is in her what it is. texture, and her fearlessness in T he best moments of t h i s deploying it. Too often on this album — the group's third, inalbum, she aims to be gentle; it

Sam Phillips TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND MADE UP MIND

hinders her, and by extension, the band, which is built for live i mprovisation and j a ms, b u t which on record too often paints by numbers. That dynamic dulls a pair of loosely political songs — "It's So Heavy," about the depressing state of the republic, and "The Storm," which is in part about Hurricane Sandy. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

"PUSH ANY BUTTON" Lit tlebox Recordings Although she had been putting out albums since the early '80s, Sam Phillips retreated from the corporate music business after 2008's "Don't Do Anything," choosing instead to make songs available via a private subscription program she called the Long Play and toserve as music director for Amy Sherman-Palladino's TV series "Bunheads," as she had for "Gilmore Girls." In 2011, she released a sampler of a dozen of the 44 Long Play songs, but the self-released "Push Any Button" is her first publicly available new album in five years. Clocking in at 29 minutes, it's a compact set of 10 fun, barbed, clattering songs that integrate upbeat rockabilly guitars and sweet

«':

Pure Bathing Culture

keyboards buoying Versprille's pretty vocals. The Portland duo draws on a similar set of colors as Baltimore's Beach House, but with a strongersense of melody. "Pendulum," the standout opening track, is a beautiful slice of summery pop thatrefreshes like a gentle breeze on a warm day, and "Dream the Dare," with its buoyant chorus, is similarly ingratiating. "Moon Tides" ebbs a bit in its second half, but this is a

"MOON TIDES" Partisan Records Although Pure Bathing Culture began when guitarist Daniel Hindman and k eyboardist

Sarah Versprille were playing in Vetiver, their debut album shares little with V etiver's indie-folk aside from its predilection for

languid tempos and easygoing, gently flowing melodies. Instead, "Moon Tides" takes cues from the dreamy pop of Britain in the early '90s — the Sundays and Cocteau Twins, in

John Mayer

particular — with clear, singlenote guitar lines ringing with reverb and t r ebly w ashes of

beguiling debut. — Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

what you need to say about Mayer, he is a gifted guitarist "PARADISE VALLEY" and a skillful interpreter of the Columbia Records blues. Maybe John Mayer is finally And he makes the most of catching on. those talents here, starting with H e launches his s i xt h a l - the folk-tinged blues of "Wildbum, "Paradise Valley" — the fire" and " B adge and G un," first since undergoing voicewhich would fit nicely on Bob threatening surgery to remove Dylan's latest albums. The lovely a granuloma on one of his vo- Americana closer "On the Way cal cords and the second since Home" puts Mayer in the same his career-threatening i n terradio-friendly folk category as view with Playboy, when he Mumford and Sons and Phillip offered what some considered Phillips. Ocean sings "Wildfire" and racist an d s e xist c o mments The album's most effective Mayer backs him up. — with what he does best. Say — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday song, though, is when Frank

cl' «a,

PUSHANVBUITON

a'8 , NI RJ countrypolitan strings into the artful torch-song style she has mined since 2001's "Fan Dance." "When I'm Alone" and"You Won't Know" rock more than anything she's done since her baroque-pop period in the '90s, and ballads such as "No Time Like Now" and "Going" rank with her best. — Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Ok

paddy-caking with mannequins" while a spooky organ hums out ~~«."J,« a carouselmelody on "20 Wave Caps," for instance — and the moments of joy I've discovered are notable. Some are tiny, but part of huge narratives: Of one weed-smoking character, Earl raps: "Kept the sticky in the Stussy pouch." Autobiographical t i dbits b l o ssom with linguistically acrobatic lines. "Hide away in the shade of his maimed innocence/ Suitcase Earl Sweatshirt scented with haze and f i lleted sentences," raps Earl on "Whoa." "DORIS" Surprisingly, these moments Columbia Records are both musical and lyrical and Musicalobsessions are some of feature grand appearances by a life's great pleasures, and "Doris," roster including Vince Staples, the latest album by Los Angeles the Neptunes, Casey Veggies and rapper and Odd Future member Frank Ocean (the latter on the Earl Sweatshirt, 19, has l ived album's best track, "Sunday"). in my car at huge volume for a Earl, b or n T h eb e K g ositsile, month now. might be best known for his preI'll confess to crawling up next cocious way around a rhyme, but "Doris" f e atures i n strumental to cars blasting "Molasses," a dubby, reggae-rolling jam co- interludes, expanded mid-song produced by RZA and Christian diversions and enough surprise Rich, s o ni c h u m ble-bragging to warrantrepeated — obsessive my way through L.A. I know the — evaluation. — Randall Roberts, nooks and crannies of this baby — Earl rapping "new patterns, Los Angeles Times

®

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet •

'

• • Classifieds


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

rinks heads up Sunriver Sunfest is back The Sunriver Sunfest WineFestival

• Beer and whiskey festival featuresan array of uniquedrinks to pleaseyour palate

— now two decades old — will take

By Megan Kehoe

Vineyards 8 Winery, Henry Estate Winery, HVCellars, J. Scott Cellars,

place this weekendat Fort RockPark in Sunriver. The event will run noon-7 p.m. Saturday and11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. It is

family and dogfriendly. This year, 20 wineries will participate, including Ancient Cellars Wines, Daisy

Creek Vineyards, Elianawines, Girardet

The Bulletin

f you notice gnomes roaming the streets of Bend this weekend, there's no need to worry. You're not h allucinating. In fact, it's actually a good thing that you're seeing those little bearded creatures,as they come bearing gifts. Today marks the start of the fifth annual Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew an d W h i skey Fest (see "If you go"), Bend's specialty beer festival known for its gnome mascot. The festival runs 5-10 p.m. today and noon-10 p.m. Saturday in the parking lot and lawn of the Des Chutes Historical Museum and features unique barrel-aged beer from 22 breweries, as well as whiskey from eight distilleries. A portion of the event's proceeds benefits the museum. "We ask the breweries for something special and unique," said Kate Mitchell, account representative with festival organizer Lay It Out Events. "It isn't made in mass quantities. In r eturn, we get lessbeer and a smaller festival." But just because you won't find grocery-store beer here doesn't mean heavyweight breweries aren't showing up to the event. In addition to usual participants such as Deschutes Brewery and Cascade Lakes Brewing C o., this year's festival will feature the likes of Colorado's New Belgium Brewing Company, and Stone Brewing Co. and Lagunitas Brewing Company, both of California. " Traditionally, we've kept it limited to just breweries in Central Oregon if not within Oregon," Mitchell said. "We're really excited this year to include these other breweries, too. I think everyone can say nice things about their beers."

t

Macindoe FamilyCellars, MethvenFamily Vineyards, Merrill Cellars, Namaste

Vineyards, NehalemBayWinery and Noble EstateVineyard andWinery, according to Sunfest. There will be live music both days. On Saturday,

Bobby Lindstrom will perform at1 p.m., JazCru at 3 p.m. and Tentareign at 5

p.m. OnSunday, BrokenDownGuitars will perform at noon,AndyWarr at 2 p.m. and Summit Express at4 p.m.

Attendees mustpurchase a$10 Sunfest wine glass toparticipate in wine tastings. Bottles and cases of wine will

also be available for purchase.Thereis no event parking atFort RockPark,so Photos courtesy of Elena Presspnch Photography

The Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew and Whiskey Fest has mostly hometown breweries, but also a few from out of state.

attendees must park at Three Rivers School and take a free red trolley shuttle to the festival. For more information about the event, including directions and infor-

mation about purchasing awine glass

If yougo What:Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew and Whiskey Fest When:5-10 p.m. today,

"We hope that in future years, it grows to be the biggest and best barrel-aged festival in the nation." — Kate Mitchell, Lay It Out Events

noon-10 p.m. Saturday Where:Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend

Cost:$7, includes commemorative glass. Tastes cost between two and

five $1 tokens each.Tasting pack (glass plus 10tokens) available for $15.

Contact:www.woodybeer .com/little

There will also be more hometown representation at this year's Little Woody. Crux Fermentation Project, Below Grade Brewing and The Ale Apothecary are all joining in the festivities. Aside from beer, festival-goers can enjoy the complex flavors of small-batch bourbon and rye

online, visit www.sunriversunfest.com.

Organizers arestill looking for volunteers, andpeoplewhoare interested can email info@sunriversunfest.com.

Jubelale '13 hits stores, taps DeschutesBrewery's fes-

whiskey at a tasting station inside a classroom in the historical museum. "You get a chance to feel a little rebellious by drinking whiskey in a classroom," Mitchell said. Despite the fact that the festival has added to its offerings, organizersdon'texpect an increase over last year's 3,000 festival attendees.But,they don't necessarily see that as a bad thing. "We're okay with it," Mitchell said. "We're not trying to make it a big festival. We don't feel like we need to grow." Though there are no expansion plans for the Little Woody, the festival is getting a big brother in January. The Big Woody Barrel Aged Brew & Whiskey Festival, inspired by Bend's event, will

take place in Portland, Jan. 17-18. Organizers have great ambitions for the festival. "We hope that in future years, it grows to be the biggest and best barrel-aged festival in the nation," Mitchell said. If you're attending the Little Woody this weekend, organizers ask that you leave your kids and dogs at home. In the spirit of the event, attendees are encouraged to bring garden gnomes. The first 75 who do so will receive a free festival snifter glass. And, if you're feeling particularly festive and want to dress up as a gnome, Mitchell says nobody will stop you. — Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoelbendbulletin.com

tive winter ale, Jubelale, will

be available insix-packs,12packs and on draft from September through December.

The breweryselects an artist to design a new label

each year.Thisyear, Bend artist Avlis Leumas illustrated the label, which shows an

owl overlooking thesnowy banks of theDeschutes River. In the background are the brewery and the Old Mill District. The dark, malty brew will be available in all 21 states where

Deschutesbeer issold, according toa press release from thecompany.Jubelale was the first seasonal beer the brewery

producedbackin1988, according toa company history of the beer. — Bulletin staff


drinks

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 11

event spotlight

what's happening?

It's stomping time at Maragas t's time to get your stomp on. Maragas Winery will hold its annual Grape Stomp this

t

central Oregon

TODAY THE LITTLEWOODY BARRELAGED BREWAND WHISKEYFEST:Craft beer and whiskeytastings from 30 breweries anddistilleries, with live music; ages 21and older only; $7 entry with glass, $15tasting package with glass and10 tokens; 5-10p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum,129N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend;www.woodybeer. com/little. SATURDAY GRAPE STOMPAND GRAPE STOMP ROMP:Featuring a general stomp, kids stomp, stomp competition, romp (walk or stroll through the vineyard), music andmore; $8 in advance,$10at the door, free for children with adult, $5 for romp;11 a.m. romp, gatesopenat 10:30a.m.,12:30 p.m .stomp;Maragas Winery, 15523S.W. U.S.Highway 97, Culver; 541-546-5464 or www. maragaswinery.com. SUNRIVERSUNFESTWINE FESTIVAL:Featuring wine from 20

weekend at its vineyard just (15523 S.W.U.S. Highway 97, Culver). The event starts at12:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $8

in advance at www.maragaswinery.com or $10 at the door. The price includes aMaragas wine glass.

-I

In addition to the wonderfulness that is stomping Cen-

tral Oregon grapes with your own toes, Maragas is also offering what it calls the Grape Stomp Romp this year. For an additional $5, wine enthusiasts will be able to partici-

pate in a blind wine tasting to take place in Maragas' newly expanded vineyard. The Romp begins at11 a.m.— it's like

a pregame before the Stomp —with the vineyard's gates opening at10:30 a.m. A meal is not included in admission, but food, beer and, of course, wine will be available for purchase at the all-day

event. If you want to bring you own grub for a picnic, that's OK, too. The winery just asks that no outside beverages be brought in.

The 2013 GrapeStomp is family friendly with a kids-

Submitted photo

Attendees stomp grapes at the 2010 Grape Stomp at Maragas Winery in Culver. This year's event takes place Sunday. get into the event for free with a paying adult.

For more information, visit www.maragaswinery.com.

only stomp and music throughout the day. In fact, children

— Beau Eastes

I

I

I

vineyards or wineries, beer from Sunriver Brewing andvendors; free shuttle service to site from several Sunriver locations; $10for atasting glass; noon-7 p.m.; Fort Rock Park, EastCascadeDrive; www. sunriversunfest.com. THE LITTLEWOODY BARRELAGED BREWAND WHISKEYFEST:Noon10 p.m. at theDesChutes Historical Museum; seeToday's listing for details. SUNDAY SUNRIVERSUNFESTWINE FESTIVAL:11a.m.-6 p.m. at Fort Rock Park; seeSaturday's listing for details. WEDNESDAY

WINE TASTING:Featuring five to six wines of both white and redvarietals; $1 each; 3-6 p.m.; Silver Leaf Cafe (Eagle Crest), 7535 Falcon Crest Dr., Suite 300, Redmond; 541-604-0446. • SUBMIT AN EVENTby emailing drinks© bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-3830377.

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PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

arts

L

Joe Kline/The Bulletin

Susan Evans Inman, as Shere Khan, rehearses with the cast of the "The Jungle Book — The Musical" on Monday in Sunriver.

• Community theatercompanystages musical based onRudyardI(ipling's classictale of Mowgli By David Jasper

end in Sunriver (see "If you go").

The Bulletin

The Sunriver Stars Community Theater production is being staged by folks living — some of them only part-time residents — in the Sunriver area. It's just the fourth production by the relatively new company, notes directorand company founder Vic-

he lovable b ea r B a l oo, t reacherous t i ger S h e r e Khan an d t h e m a n -cub Mowgli from Rudyard Kipling's classic stories come to the stage in "The Jungle Book — The Musical," in production this week-

T

toria Kristy-Zalewski, and "The Jungle Book" i nvolves a c a st ranging from 4-year-old Maximillian Turbyne (a wolf cub) to a pair of 80-year-olds in Bob Vogel (Baloo) and Jerry Inman (Father

Wolf). Some of the players in this cast of 18 are seasoned thespians; others have just a few plays under their belts. Some are retirees commendably trying their hand at something new, or returning to something they first got a taste

of a few decades ago in school productions. A few parents have even taken on small roles in order to appear in the show with their children. The play stars Nic Abanto, an incoming freshman at Bend High School, who with black hair and jungle-appropriate clothing imbues Mowgli with a convincing air as he prowls the stage and proclaims himself "keeper of the law and guardian of the jungle."

Continued next page

If yougo What:"The Jungle Book

— The Musical" When:7 p.m. Friday, 6 p.m. Saturday and 2p.m. Sunday Where:Sunriver Homeowners Aquatics 8 Recreation Center

(SHARC),57250 Overlook Road Cost:$5, $15 for dinner theater Contact:www.sunriverstars .org or 541-593-4150


arts

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 13

From previous page

Submitted photo

This art quilt by Cindy O'Neal is part of the Undercover Quilters Book Club's display at Bank of America in Redmond. This year, the group made quilts based on Jane Kirkpatrick's "Love to Water My Soul."

New Etsy team to meet in September

women whose love of reading is second only to their love of quilting, creates quilts based The Central Oregon Etsy on books they've read. Team will meet for the first Each year, they read 11 time at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 12 at books, then vote on one to the East Bend Public Library, devote their quilts to. Since 62080 Dean Swift Road. it formed in 2009, the group Etsy is a n o n l ine global has read more than 50 books, m arketplace for s e llers o f and members have made 48 handmade or vintage items, unique quilts based on four of along with arts and craft sup- those books. plies. The focus of the meetThe group has so far made ing is to help Etsy shop ownquilts based on Sy Montgomers create successful online ery's, "The Good Good Pig"; businesses. Kaya McLaren's "On The DiSince its start in 2005, Etsy vinity of Second Chances" and has grown to more than 30 more recently Central Oregon million members and 18 mil- author J an e K i r k p atrick's lion listed items. Sales reached "Love to Water My Soul." $895.1 million in 2012. The latest quilts based on Etsy encourages its shop Kirkpatrick's book are on disowners to work together in play through October in the teams to provide community lobby of Bank of America, 552 support. Anyone i nterested S.W. SixthSt.,Redmond. The in learning about starting an group welcomes the public to Etsy shop is welcome to at- view the quilts and read about tend the meeting. the inspiration for each of the More than 150 Central Ore- quilts by the makers. gonians own Etsy shops, sellThe next book the group ing handmade items including will honor with quilts is "Lanart, jewelry, soap, accessories, guage of Flowers," by Vanessa gourmet dog treats, jewelry Diffenbach. The quilts will be and more. unveiled in August 2014. Contact: w ww . etsy.com/ Contact: 541-504-8342. — David Jasper teams/8051/central-oregonetsy.

Book-based quilts display in Redmond The Undercover Quilters B ook Club, a g r oup o f 1 2

While it is a musical, don't confuse this adaptation with Disney's 1967 classic film. Playwright Vera M o rris adapted the musical Sunriver Stars is performing based on not just "The Jungle Book" and its sequel, "The Second Jungle Book," but also other Mowgli stories Kipling wrote between 1893 and 1895. Some of the character traits and incidents have an air of f amiliarity, such as Shere Khan's intertwining fear and hatred of Mowgli, or the serpentine hisssss of Kaa (Janice Dost), but you'll be forgivenfornot recognizing songs. These tunes were written by Gerald Castle with lyrics by Michael Vigilant. J omarie Carlson i s t h e show's choreographer while K risty-Zalewski w ear s still another hat as its set designer.

has gotten better than the one before. We're not ready for Broadway yet or even the Tower Theatre, but we have formed a family of talented people who love to entertain." — Victoria Kristy-Zalewski. director and founder, Sunriver Stars Community Theater

one before. We're not ready for Broadway yet or even the Tower Theatre, but we

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— Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

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have formed a family of talented people who love to entertain." Past shows include "The Brementown Mus i c ians" and "An E vening w i t h Ebenezer." Proceeds from this weekend's production will benefit scholarships for children to attend Fun A f t e r S c hool Time Camp at Three Rivers School. To date,the company has donated more than $2,400 to the program. From 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Sunriver Stars wil l h o l d a u ditions for its next production, the dark comedy "Arsenic and Old Lace," at Sunriver Homeowners Aquatics & Recreation Center.

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arts

PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

ART E XHI B I T S

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AMBIANCE ART CO-OP:Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W.Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ARTISTS' GALLERYSUNRIVER: Featuring local artists; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building19; www. artistsgallerysunriver.com or 541-593-4382. ATELIER6000:Featuring "Icons of the Northwest," an exhibit of invited artists expressing their interpretation of the region; through September; 389 S.W. ScalehouseCourt, Suite 120, Bend; www.atelier6000.org or 541-330-8759. BEND CITYHALL:Featuring the work of young artists who have utilized children's foundations in our community; through September; 710 N.W.Wall St.; 541-388-5505 or rchristie@bendoregon.gov. Submitted photo BLUE PINEKITCHENANDBAR: "Trickster" is showing at Karen Bandy Design Jeweler in Bend Featuring acrylic works by Brenda through Sept. 20. Reid Irwin; through Saturday; 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring W. CascadeAve., Sisters; www.artmore than 200 artists; 222 W.Hood lorenzo.com or 541-549-8683. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring "3 Points Ave., Sisters; 541-549-1299 or of View," a continually changing JENNIFERLAKEGALLERY: www.donterra.com. exhibit of photographs by Diane Featuring paintings by Jennifer Reed, Ric Ergenbrightand John DOWNTOWN BENDPUBLIC Lake; 220 W.CascadeAve., Sisters; Vito; 1024 N.W.BondSt., Bend; LIBRARY:Featuring "Community," www.jenniferlakegallery.com or 541-382-8004. athemed exhibit in various wall54 I-549-7200. hanging media; through Nov. 4; 601 JILL'S CANYONCREEKPOTTERY: WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; N.W. Wall St.; 541-389-9846. WAREHOUSE: Featuring works 310 N. CedarSt., Sisters; www. DRY CANYON FORGE:Featuring byJil lHaney-Neal;Tuesdaysand canyoncreekpotteryllc.com or jewelry by Waylon Rhoads; through Wednesdays only; 601 North 541-549-0366. Saturday; 37 N.W.GreenwoodAve., Larch St., Suite B, Sisters; www. Bend;541-382-2725. jillnealgallery.com or 541-617-6078. CIRCLE OF FRIENDSART& ACADEMY:Featuring mixed media, FRANKLINCROSSING: JOHN PAUL DESIGNS: Featuring furniture, jewelry and more; 19889 Photography by VernBartley, custom jewelry and signature series Eighth St., Tumalo; 541-706-9025. Dorothy Freudenberg, Dave with unique pieces; 1006 N.W.Bond Kamperman and Larry Turner, St., Bend;www.johnpauldesigns. DESCHUTES BREWERY:Landscape with workfrom the estate of Jason com or 541-318-5645. photography by Mike Putnam; Mitchell Photography; through through Saturday; 1044 N.W.Bond JUDI'S ARTGALLERY:Featuring Saturday; 550 N.W.Franklin Ave., St., Bend; 541-382-9242. works by Judi Meusborn Williamson; 336 N.E.Hemlock St., DOJO RESTAURANTAND LOUNGE: Bend; 541-382-9398. GHIGLIERIGALLERY:Featuring Suite13, Redmond; 360-325-6230. Rise Up International presents original Western-themed and the artwork of Soundani "VA-JO" KARENBANDYDESIGNJEWELER: Jawher; through Saturday; 852 N.W. African-inspired paintings and Featuring "Field Guide," jewelry and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 contemporary paintings of animals Brooks St., Bend; 541-706-9091. by Karen Bandy; today through Sept. 20; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; www.karenbandy.com or 54 I-388-0 I55.

POMEGRANATE home & garden

summer sale threedays only: sat,sun,mon 8/31-9/2 A rare sale at Pomegranate' Lots of poodies on sale, up to 50% off.Open 10-5 saturday R: monday; 12-4 on suzday. •

intrepid hunters will find us slightly off the beaten path (just across from the north side of macy's): xzo ri vermallavenue,bend ~ 541.383.3713 •

www.pomegranate-home.com

LOCALWORKS: Featuring local artists and craftsmen; 151 S.Elm St., Sisters; 541-306-7344. LORISALISBURY FINEART GALLERY:Featuring a co-op of local artists; 391 W.CascadeAve., Sisters; 541-508-8884 or www. lorisalisburygallery.com. LUBBESMEYERFIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Bend; www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com or 541-330-0840. MARCELLO'SITALIANCUISINE AND PIZZERIA:Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring "Exhibition of NewWorks — Delbert Gish"; through Saturday; "Animal Impressions" opens Thursday with a reception 5-8 p.m. 869 N.W.Wall St., Bend; www.mockingbird-gallery. com or 541-388-2107. MOSAICMEDICAL:Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S.U.S. Highway 97, Suite101, Madras; 541-475-7800. ONE STREETDOWNCAFE: Featuring watercolors by Gillian Burton; through September; 124 S.W.SeventhSt.,Redmond; 541-647-2341. THE OXFORD HOTEL: Photography by Vern Bartley, Dorothy Freudenberg, DaveKamperman and Larry Turner, with work from the estate of Jason Mitchell Photography; through Saturday; 10 N.W.MinnesotaAve.,Bend; 54 I-382-9398. PATAGONIA © BEND:Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 1000 N.W.Wall St., Suite 140; 54 I-382-6694. PAUL SCOTTGALLERY: Featuring painti ngsbyJeanieTomanek and Mike Moran; through Tuesday; 869 N.W.Wall St., Bend; www.paulscottfineart.com or 54 I-330-6000. PRONGHORNCLUBHOUSE:"Works in Oil," featuring Janice Druian and Vicki Shuck; through Sept. 30; 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; 541-693-5300. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts by Sarah Kaufman, with the group exhibit of "Prayers for Sale"; through Wednesday; 926 N.E.Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend;541-728-0527. RED CHAIRGALLERY:Featuring "The Art of August," multimedia paintings by Kim McClain, mosaics by Joanie Callen andwoodwork by Will Nash; through Saturday; 103 N.W. OregonAve., Bend; www.redchairgallerybend.com or 54 I-306-3 I76. REDMOND PUBLICLIBRARY: Featuring "Our Best to You!" an exhibition by members of the

Sagebrushers Art Society; through Oct. 4; "Wilderness-Oregon" continues in Silent Reading Room; through September; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. SAGEBRUSHERS ARTSOCIETY: Featuring an all-members juried exhibition; through Aug. 27; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY:Featuring pastel landscapes by Lise HoffmanMcCabe andSueLyon-Manely; through Saturday; 834 N.W.Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERSAREACHAMBEROF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E.Main Ave.; 541-549-0251. SISTERSGALLERY& FRAME SHOP:Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave.; www.garyalbertson. com or 541-549-9552. SISTERSPUBLICLIBRARY: Featuring pointillist oil paintings by Patty Bentley; through Saturday; 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070. ST. CHARLES BEND: Featuring "Caregiver Art," watercolors, jewelry and more; through Sept. 30; 2500 N.E.Neff Road; 541-382-4321. ST. CHARLESREDMOND: Featuring landscape andwildlife photography by Douglas Berg; through Sept. 30;1253 N.W.Canal Boulevard; 541-548-8131. STRICTLYORGANIC:Featuring acrylic works by Brenda Reid Irwin; through September; 6 S.W.Bond St.; 541-330-6061. SUNRIVERAREAPUBLIC LIBRARY:Featuring "Artists of 97707," works by residents within the ZIP code; through Oct. 26; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVERLODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring oil paintings by Joanne Donaca, Marilyn Higginson, Steve Maker, Barbara Slater and pastels by Leslie Cain; through Sept. 8; 17600 Center Drive; 541-382-9398. TOWNSHEND'SBENDTEAHOUSE: Featuring "Memory Catchers," works by Taylor Rose; through Saturday; 835 N.W.BondSt., Bend; 541-312-2001 or www. townshendstea.com. TUMALOARTCO.:Featuring "Flui d,"handblown glassby Nancy Becker and paintings by Susan Luckey Higdon; through Saturday; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; www.tumaloartco.com or 541-385-9144. VISTABONITA GLASS ART STUDIO AND GALLERY:Featuring glass art, photography, painting, metal sculptur eand more;222 W .Hood St., Sisters; 541-549-4527 or www. vistabonitaglass.com.


THE HARDEST PART OF LIYING AT TETHEROW IS FIGURING OUT WHERE TO PUT YOUR LIYING ROOM WINDOW

TETHEROW RIGHT AT TH E H EA RT

Living at Tetherow might turn you into a mountain biking, skiing, slip and sliding, brewery hopping, fine food eating, rock climbing Central Oregonian. Just don't forget that right outside your door is a championship style, Scottish links golf course designed by one of the world's most revered course architects. Check us out at Tetherow.com.


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

TODAY DIXIELANDPARTYBANDANDFRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform in an organized jam session; refreshments available; free, donations accepted; 1-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541548-0679. (Story, Page6) SISTERSFARMERS MARKET:3-6 p.m .; Barclay Park, West CascadeAvenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket. com. THE LITTLEWOODY BARREL AGED BREWAND WHISKEYFEST:Craftbeerand whiskey tastings from 30 breweries and distilleries, with live music; ages 21and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $7 entry with glass, $15 tasting package with glass and 10tokens; 5-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W.Idaho Ave., Bend; www.woodybeer.com/little. (Story, Page 10) MUNCH &MOVIES:An outdoor screening of "Life of Pi" (2012); with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W.Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1662 or www. northwestcrossing.com. (Story, Page28) AUTHOR PRESENTATION: GregoryNokes will present from his book, "Breaking Chains: Slavery on Trial in the Oregon Territory," with a slideshow; $5; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina SpringsBooks,252W .HoodAve., Sisters; 541-540-0866. "THEJUNGLE BOOK — THE MUSICAL": The play is presented bythe Sunriver Stars Community Theater; proceeds benefit scholarships for children to FunAfter School Time Camp; $5general admission, $15 dinner theater; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-593-4150 or www.sunriverstars.org. (Story, Page12) PATRICKHAMMOND:Thesoul and pop singer-songwriter performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY ABR;31 SUNRIVER MARATHON FORA CAUSE: A half-marathon, 10K and 5K run/walks starting in front of the lodge; proceeds benefit Susan G. Komen for the Cure; free for spectators, $40-$105; 8:45 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-2342 or www.sunrivermarathon. com. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET:Free admission; 9a.m.-2 p.m.;Sahalee Park,

THE BULLETIN • FRID

Seventh and B streets; 541-489-4239. OREGON TRAIL GUNSHOW: Featuring guns for show and sale; $8, free for children 12 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-347-2120. PRINEVILLEFARMERS MARKET: Free; 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-447-6217 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. CENTRAL OREGONSATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Downtown Bend Public Library, Parking Lot, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. NORTHWEST CROSSINGSATURDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free;10a.m.-2 p.m .; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www. nwxevents.com. GRAPE STOMP ANDGRAPE STOMP ROMP:Featuring a general stomp, kids stomp, stomp competition, romp (walk or stroll through the vineyard), music and more; proceeds of the romp and competition benefit Terrebonne Community School and Tom McCall School; $8 in advance, $10at the door, free for children with adult, $5 for romp and tasting;11 a.m. romp, gates open at 10:30a.m.,12:30 p.m .stomp; Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver; 541-546-5464 or www. maragaswinery.com. (Story, Page 11) DIXIELANDPARTYBANDANDFRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform in an organized jam session; refreshments available; free, donations accepted;noon-10 p.m.;La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. SUNRIVERSUNFEST WINE FESTIVAL: Featuring wine from 20 vineyards or wineries, beer from Sunriver Brewing and vendors; free shuttle service to site from several Sunriver locations; $10 for a tasting glass; noon-7 p.m.; Fort Rock Park, East Cascade Drive; www. sunriversunfest.com. (Story, Page10) THE LITTLEWOODY BARREL AGED BREWANDWHISKEY FEST:Craft beer and whiskey tastings from 30 breweries and distilleries, with live music; ages 21and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $7 entry with glass, $15 tasting package with glass and10 tokens; noon-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum,129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www.woodybeer.com/little. "THE JUNGLEBOOK — THE MUSICAL": The play is presented by the Sunriver Stars Community Theater; proceeds benefit scholarships for children to Fun

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After School Time Camp; $5 general admission, $15 dinner theater; 6 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-593-4150 or www.sunriverstars.org. LAST SATURDAY:Event includes art exhibit openings, live music, food and drinks and a patio and fire pit; free; 6-10 p.m.; The Old Ironworks Arts District, 50 Scott St., Bend; www.j.mp/lastsat. MGMT:The alt-pop band performs; $35 plusfees;6:30 p.m.,gatesopenat5 p.m.; LesSchwab Amphitheater,344 S.W.

Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. (Story, Page3) TWILIGHT CINEMA:An outdoor screening of "Life of Pi" (2012); bring lowprofile chair or blanket, your own picnic, snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-585-3333 or www.sunriversharc. com. (Story, Page 28) CASINO NIGHT: Featuring blackjack, craps, Texas hold 'em ,auction and more; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch Lions Club Sight and Hearing Foundation,

scouting organizations and children with diabetes; $15; 7-11 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-570-5565 or jay.nordin@hotmail.com. ERIC OREN:The Chicago-based (but formerly local) comedian performs; $10; 8 p.m.; Kayo's Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. PH3R:The Portland electronica act performs; free; 10 p.m.; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541388-0116 or www.astroloungebend.com.

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GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 17

5Y, AUGUST 30, 2013

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GregoryNokes:Slavery in Central Oregon

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at Paulina Springs Books in Sisters.

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Overlook Road; 541-585-3333 or www. sunriversharc.com. (Story, Page28) THE ACACIASTRAIN: The Massachusetts metal band performs, with American Me, Within the Ruins, Fitfor an Autopsy and Funerals; $13 in advance, $15 at the door; 7:30p.m.,doorsopen 6:30 p.m .;Dom ino Room, 51 N.W.Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-408-4329 or www.j.mp/acaciabend. (Story, Page 7)

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MONDAY Sept. 2 NO EVENTSLISTED I

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TODAY L SATURDAY Little Woody BrewandWhiskey Fest: A barrel of fun at thehistorical museum

TODAY-SUNDAY Dixieland Party Band:Tapyour toes to

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REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@hotmail.com. GREEN TEAM MOVIENIGHT:A screening of the documentary "Living Downstream" about Sandra Steingraber's efforts to break the silence about cancer and its environmental links; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 54 I-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 4

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SATURDAY Grape Stomp: A stomp, a romp with a

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SUNDAY Sept. 1 SUNRIVERMARATHON FOR A CAUSE: A half- and full-marathon run/walks starting in front of the lodge; proceeds benefit Susan G. Komenfor the Cure; free for spectators; 7:45 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or www.sunrivermarathon.com. OREGONTRAIL GUNSHOW:Featuring guns for show and sale; $8, free for

children12 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & ExpoCenter, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-347-2120. DIXIELANDPARTYBANDAND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and California perform in an organized jam session; refreshments available; free, donations accepted;11 a.m.-8 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-548-0679. SUNRIVERSUNFEST WINE FESTIVAL: Featuring wine from 20 vineyards or

wineries, beer from Sunriver Brewing and vendors; free shuttle service to site from several Sunriver locations; $10 for a tasting glass;11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fort Rock Park, East Cascade Drive; www.sunriversunfest.com. "THEJUNGLE BOOK — THE MUSICAL": The play is presented by the Sunriver Stars Community Theater; proceeds benefit scholarships for children to FunAfter School Time Camp; $5 general admission, $15 dinner theater; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-593-4150 or www.sunriverstars.org.

HOUSECONCERT: Nashville, Tenn.based Abigail Nyman performs, with Janell eand LindseyJohnson;bringa dish or beverage to share; $10 suggested dontation; 6 p.m., doors open at 5 p.m. for barbecue potluck; The Glen at Newport Hills, 1019 N.W. Stannium Drive, Bend; 541-480-8830. (Story, Page 7) TWILIGHT CINEMA:Anoutdoor screening of "Oz the Great andPowerful" (2013); bring low-profile chair or blanket, your own picnic, no glass or pets, snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250

BEND FARMERSMARKET:Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket©gmail.com or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC ONTHE GREEN:A summer concert series featuring the Hokulea Dancers; food, crafts, retail and more; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, S.W. 15th St. and S.W.Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-923-5191 or http:// visitredmondoregon.com. IAN MCFERON BAND: The Seattle-based Americana band performs; free; 7-10 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 6)

THURSDAY Sept. 5 NO EVENTSLISTED • SUBMIT AN EVENTat www bendbulletin. com/submitinfo or email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-383-0351.


PAGE 18 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

planning ahea SEPT. 6-12 SEPT. 6-8 — SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL:Featuring multiple stages of live music, workshops, visual art and more; $115, $50 youth 5-18, plus fees for three-day festival pass, free children 5 and younger; throughout Sisters; www.sistersfolkfestival.org. SEPT. 7-8 — THE FALLWOOL GATHERING:Featuring around 50 booths, llama fleece show, demonstrations, food and entertainment; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 8; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; www.fallwoolgathering.com. SEPT. 6 — SISTERSFARMERS MARKET:3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. SEPT. 6 — AUTHORPRESENTATION: Portland poet Margaret Chula reads from her latest poetry collections; free; 5-8 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or www.thenatureofwords.org. SEPT. 6 — FIRST FRIDAYGALLERY WALK:Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, w ineand food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. SEPT.6— MUNCH 8 MOVIES: An outdoor screening of "Oz the Great and Powerful" (2013); with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-3821662 or www.northwestcrossing.com. SEPT. 6 — "SPAMALOT" SNEAK PEEK:The cast and crew share songs, scenesand dance numbers from the upcoming show; free; 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 6 — SCREEN ON THE GREEN: A screening of the 2010 animated film, "Tangled" with pre-show entertainment; bring snacks, chairs and blankets; food donations benefit the Jefferson County Food Bank; free, boxed or canned food donations accepted; 7:30 p.m.,m ovie at8 p.m .; Sahalee Park, Seventh and B streets, Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld. org. SEPT. 7 — HIGH DESERTSWAP MEET & CARSHOW: A car show and sale of automotive collectibles, antiques and more; proceeds benefit local and regional charities; free admission; 7 a.m.;Deschutes County Fair 8 Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-4467 or www.coocc.org/swapmeet.htm. SEPT. 7 — PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET:Free; 9 a.m.-12:30

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Submitted photo

Sage Clegg talks about her adventures on the Oregon Desert Trail at 7 p.m. Wednesday at FootZone in Bend. See below for details.

Talks 8 classes WATER BATHCANNING FRUIT AND TOMATOES:Learn about the selection and steps to safely can fruit and tomatoes, recipes and tips on entering the county fair; $15, registration required by Tuesday; 9 a.m.-noon Thursday; OSUExtension Service, 3893 S.W. Airport Way,

p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-447-6217 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. SEPT.7 — NORTHWEST CROSSING SATURDAYFARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www. nwxevents.com. SEPT. 7 — YOGIS UNITE!:An outdoor yoga event followed by a potluck picnic; proceeds benefit local charities; $12, $10 for a special kid's class; 10 a.m.-noon; Bikram Yoga, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-8599, information© yogisunitebend.com or www. yogisunitebend.com. SEPT. 7 — BENDFILM FUTURE FILMMAKERS:Screen films made by aspiring filmmakers in grades 5-12; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121032 or www.bendfilm.org. SEPT.7 — LOS LOBOS AND LOS LONELY BOYS:A night of rootsy Mexican-American rock and blues; $34-$59plusfees;6 p.m.,gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts. com.

Redmond; 541-548-6088 or glenda. hyde©oregonstate.edu. 800 MILES LATER:Sage Clegg, the first person to hike the 800mile Oregon Desert Trail, gives a talk on her adventures; free; 7 p.m. Wednesday;FootZone,842 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-3568 or www.onda.org.

SEPT. 7 — TWILIGHT CINEMA:An outdoor screening of "Cool Runnings" (1993); bring low-profile chair or blanket, your own picnic, snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541585-3333 or www.sunriversharc. com. SEPT.7 — NORTH PACIFICSTRING BAND: The California bluegrass band performs; free;10 p.m.; Blue Pine Kitchen and Bar, 25 S.W. Century Dr., Bend; 541-389-2558 or www. bluepinebar.com. SEPT. 8 — ANNUALGREATDRAKE PARK DUCK RACE: Event includes live music, food, activity booths and duck races; proceeds from duck sales benefit local charities; free admission, $5 duck race tickets; 11 a.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.theduckrace.com. SEPT. 8 — SECONDSUNDAY: Peter Rock reads from "The Shelter Cycle," his most recent novel; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or lizgO deschuteslibrary.org. SEPT. 10 — MUSEUM OPENING: The Redmond Museum opens with History Day events; exhibits, games, live music, free ice cream, raffles

and prizes; free; noon; Redmond Museum, 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541316-1777 or redmondmuseum@ bendbroadband.com. SEPT. 10 — REDMONDFARMERS MARKET:Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@hotmail. com. SEPT. 10 — "PROMISEDLAND": A screening of the 2012 film about a small town grappling with the promise of money in exchange for drilling rights; free; 6:15 p.m. gathering, 6:45 p.m. program; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. SEPT. 10 — "THE HARVEST/LA COSECHA:THESTORYOFTHE CHILDREN WHO FEEDAMERICA": A screening of the film about American children who are migrant farm workers; $5 suggested donation; 6:30 p.m.,doors open at6 p.m .;Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-350-6055 or bendorfryO gmail.com. SEPT.10 — KNOW ENDS: MOVIE SCREENINGS:A screening of "Road Warrior" (1981) starring Mel Gibson; free; 7:30 p.m.; Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend; 541-3121032 or lizg©deschuteslibrary.org. SEPT. 11 — BENDFARMERS MARKET:Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. SEPT. 11 — THENORTHSTAR SESSION:The Southern California rock band performs; free; 7-10 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 12 — WORTH:The Portlandbasedfolk-soulband plays an album-release show; free; 7-10 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

from Trading Post, Southwest Chinook Drive and Commercial Loop Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-388-2135 or www.steelstampede.org. SEPT. 14-15 — SISTERSFALL STREET FESTIVAL:Featuring arts, crafts, food and silent auction; proceeds benefit Sisters High School Art Department; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 15; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-549-8905 or www.centraloregonshows.com. SEPT. 14 — CARSFORCARE:A boat, car and RV show; $5, free for children 12 and younger; 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-610-8281. SEPT. 14 — FESTIVAL OFCULTURES: Features booths representing different cultures, a community-based official citizenship oath ceremony, dance and music performers, food vendors, kids area and more; free; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541382-4366 or www.festivalofcultures. info. SEPT. 14 — HALFWAYTO ST. PATRICK'S DAY: A celebration with Portland Americana band Tapwater (6 p.m.) and local acts throughout the day; free; 1:30 p.m.-9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 16 — MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES:"Add a Player," featuring a performance by Central Oregon Symphony musicians; free; 1 p.m.; Lava Lands Visitor Center, 58201 U.S. Highway 97; 541-317-3941 or www. cosymphony.com. SEPT. 18 — MIDORI & EZRA BOY: The California rock group performs, with Voodoo Highway; $5; 9 p.m., doors open at 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881 or www. volcanictheatrepub.com. SEPT. 19 — SMART ART: SHOW, SALE, SOCIAL:Featuring an art contest, raffles, live auction and music; proceeds benefit Start Making SEPT. 13-19 A Reader Today programs; $10 or SEPT. 13-15, 19 — MONTY PYTHON'S a new hardcover children's book, "SPAMALOT":The Tony-winning reservation recommended; 5:30 musical is performed by Stage Right p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Productions; $24-$29 plus fees; 8 Park Road, Bend; 541-355-5600 or p.m., doors open at 7 p.m.; Tower dturnbull@getsmartoregon.org. Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541- SEPT. 19 — "FULLY CHARGED": 317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Ringling Bros. and Barnum 8 Bailey SEPT. 14-15 — PREMIERAND presents performers from around CLASSIC EVENT: A vintage motorcycle the world for a circus experience; rally for riders and spectators; dinner free face-time with performers and entertainment on Sept. 14; one hour before show; $20-$40; 7 proceeds benefit Crooked River Ranch p.m.;Deschutes County Fair& Expo community; $10, $20 dinner; 9 a.m. Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Sept. 14, 7 a.m. Sept. 15; field across Redmond; 541-548-2711.


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DIRECTIONS: Mt Washington Dr to west at Awbrey Glen, south on ,. Champion Cir, left on Collett Way. 2714 NW Collett Way. I '

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3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1501 sq.ft. new construction. Winner of 6 out of 8 Tour Of Homes™ Awards! Prices Starting at $249,000 DIRECTIONS: South 3rd St. to east on Murphy Rd., south on Parrell Rd., right on Grand Targhee, 1st house on right. 60983 SE Geary Dr.

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Custom single level on 3.59 acres with 1.3 irrigated in city limits. DIRECTIONS: North Hwy 97 to east on Cooley Rd, south on Boyd Acres. 63535 Boyd Acres.

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PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

restaurants

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Diners have drinks and dinner in the bar section of Wubba's BBQ Shack in Bend.

• New northeastBendbarbecuejoint specializesinthe I<ansasCity style By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

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entral Oregon is blessed with a pair of well-establishedbarbecue restaurants.Baldy's Barbeque,established on Century Drive in 2005, has expanded its Chicago-style offerings to Bend's east side and to Redmond. Slick's Que Co., which began servingTexas-style barbecue in Sisters in 2009, planted itself in the heart of Bend two years ago. Now, Baldy and Slick have a new rival — competition that, ironically, has been around longer than either one of them. Wubba's BBQ Shack opened inMay on Empire Way in northeast Bend. But the restaurant has been a fixture in Klamath Falls for more than a decade, since it was established by brothers Aaron "Wubba" Webb and Travis "T-Dog" Webb.

"Wubba" had grown to love Midwest barbecue during a stint as golf pro in Kansas City, Mo., home of such renowned barbecue restaurants as Gates and Arthur Bryant's. He returned to his hometown in 2002 with a pocketful of recipes and an urge to bring K.C. to K-Falls. Early this year, Aaron Webb cast his eyes northward to Bend. He took over the former Beach Side Bar & Grill and transformed its pseudo-tropical decor into a modern-rustic room more suitable to barbecue than to pineapple-topped burgers. Today, Wubba's BBQ Shack is anything but a "shack." Sixty diners may be accommodated inthe main dining room, with its simple, handsome wood furnishings. Blackand-white photographs, Americana posters and other signs share the walls with a trio of televisions.

Continued next page

Wudda'sBBQShack Location:63055 Layton Ave. (at Empire Wayi, Bend Hours:11a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 11a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price range:Starters $5.49 to $11.99,

sandwiches $8.49 to $12.99, entrees $8.99 to $25.99 Credit cards:American Express, MasterCard, Visa Kids' menu: Yes Vegetarian menu:Stick to the salads

and deep-fried veggies Alcoholic deverages:Full bar Outdoorseating: Spacious covered patio Reservations:Requested of large

groups; otherwise, no Contact:www.wubbasbbqshack.com or 541-213-2121

Scorecard OVERALL:AFood:B+. Meats are mainly tender and

very tasty despite a tendency toward overcooking. Service:A-. Casual but consistently friendly and efficient, with orders

delivered speedily. Atmosphere:A-. Modern rustic ambience might benefit from a splash of color here and there.

Value:A-. Lunch prices are modest; dinner entrees aren't cheap, but quality meat never is.


restaurants

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

From previous page

the Whistle Stop Business Center. The bakery and cafe serves a range of pastries

downtown Bend's Franklin Crossing Building. The cafe alsoserves gourmetsandwich($2.50 to $3.50), breakfast es; bagels and pastries from sandwiches an d e m p ana- such local bakeries as Rockin' das ($5.25 to $7) and lunch- Dave's, Sparrow, La Magie time salads and sandwiches and Fearless; and a small but (around $7). Open 7 a.m. to 2 careful selection of fine wines p.m. Wednesday to Sunday. by the glass and bottle. Open 1900 N.E. Division St., Suite 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to 102, Bend; 541-508-7469. Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. SatSince opening June 5, De- urday. Facing Bond Street at lene and Ponciano Montoya's 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Suite Bluebird Coffee Co.has served 168, Bend; 541-330-2100, www roasted beans and teas in .facebook.com.

Another 60 may be comfortably seated in an adjoin-

ing bar — featuring a giant flat-screen and an often-open garage door — and a spacious covered front patio.

Two lunches Kansas City-style barbecue is marked by its dry-rubbed meats and its spicy sauces. Wubba's has the smoky secret down — for pork, for beef, for chicken. I've eaten here three times in recent weeks, twice for lunch and once for dinner. On each occasion, I was thoroughly impressed with the main courses, although the side dishes sometimes fell short. Service, while casual, was consistently friendly and efficient; I have always been quickly greeted and seated, and my orders taken and delivered speedily. M y first meal was a r i b lunch special, featuring four meaty ribs for th e m odest price of just $10.99. I enjoyed my quartet of tender St. Louisstyle ribs (saving an alternative choice for a later date) with garlic toast and an unmemorable side of coleslaw. On my second lunch visit, I opted for a salad and sandwich. My Smoke ShackSalad

($8.99) — amix of fresh greens with diced tomato, salty bacon bits and shredded cheddar cheese — was topped with bite-size pieces of chicken and tangy blue-cheese dressing. My sandwich, the Porkin'

Joe Kline/The Bulletin

A pulledpork sandwich atWubba's BBQ Shack inBend. The restaurant specializes in Kansas City-style barbecue.

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Next week:Dang's Vietnamese Restaurant Visit www.benddulletin

.com/restaurantsfor readers' ratings of more than150 Central Oregon

restaurants.

dining companion, we were delighted to discover that we had arrived on one of only two nights (Saturday is the other) when Wubba's serves prime rib. My friend leaped at the opportunity fo r f i n e b e ef. Her 10-ounce cut of Angus

($19.99) had been rubbed

with fresh garlic, pepper and otherspices,then smoked for liberal serving of pulled pork hours in a pit of smoldering mixed in a mildly spicy barbe- wood. She found it so tender cue sauce, on a soft and tasty and delicious, I wouldn't be stadium roll. Topped w ith surprised if she returns to melted pepper-jack cheese Wubba's the next time she and grilled mushrooms and craves prime rib. onions, it was delicious. I chose the combination My choice of side at this plate of r ib s an d c h icken meal, however, was more dis($16.99). appointing than the slaw had A half-rack of baby back been: Green beans with bacon ribs were smoked and glazed were seriously overcooked. w ith a sauce that was as sweet and sticky as adverA fine dinner tised. Although they weren't When I visited on a Friperfect — parts of two of the day night with my r egular ribs had been flamed to card-

Hottie (also $8.99), offered a

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 21

board consistency — most of the meat was excellent. And the smoked quarter-chicken that accompanied was twice delicious; I took some home as a leftover. With two entrees, we selected four side dishes. The best of t h e m w er e g a rlic mashed potatoes, their red skins still on, m ixed w ith sour cream; and pit-smoked beans, sweet w it h m o lasses. Fried okra was tasty, although the Southern vegetables were cut so s mall that they w ere dominated by the corn batter. Neither of us particularly liked a dish called "cheesy corn," which seemed to bea sort of cross between creamed corn and macaroni-and-cheese. Diners d o n' t p a t r onize b arbecue r e staurants f o r their corn and okra, however. They come for meat, slow-cooked for tenderness and flavor, served with tangy sauces and served by a staff that delivers what they want. Wubba's fills the bill on all counts. — Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

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PAGE 22 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

outo town * Theater, Portland; TF Sept. 11 —Why?, Wonder Ballroom, * Portland; TF CONCERTS Sept. 13 —Andre Nickatina/Krayzie Bone,Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Through Sept. 1 —Dave Matthews Sept. 13 —Led Zepagaiu, Aladdin Baud,Gorge Amphitheater, George, * Theater, Portland; TF Wash.; www.livenation.com. Sept. 13 —REOSpeedwagou, Britt Aug. 30 —The Breeders, Wonder Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org Ballroom, Portland; SOLDOUT; TF* or 800-882-7488. Aug. 30 —REOSpeedwagou/Loverdoy, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. Sept. 14 —Jake Shimabukuro/Jeff Pevar,Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 30 —Richard Marx, Aladdin * Sept. 14 —The Mission UK,Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF * Theater, Portland; TF Aug. 30 —Taylor Swift, Moda Center, Sept. 16 —Lee Fields and the Portland; www.rosequarter.com or Expressions,Aladdin Theater, Portland; 877-789-7673. * TF Aug. 30 —Tegau & Sara, Britt Pavilion, Sept. 16 —The Orriu EvansTrio Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or featuring Eric Revis audDonald 800-882-7488. Edwards,Jimmy Mak's, Portland; www. Aug. 31 —Bridgit Mendler/Shane tickettomato.com or 503-432-9477. Harper,Oregon State Fairgrounds, Sept. 17 —Hem,Aladdin Theater, Salem; www.oregonstatefair.org or * Portland; TF 877-840-0457. Sept. 18 —Edward Sharpe & The Aug. 31 —Death Cad ForCutie, Magnetic Zeros/Thievery Corporatiou, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; * Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW SOLD OUT;CT* Sept. 18 —Five Finger Death Punch, Sept. 1 —Gary Numan,Wonder * * McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW Ballroom, Portland; TF Sept. 18 —Jars of Clay,Aladdin Sept. 1 —Martiua McBride, Britt * Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org Theater, Portland; TF or 800-882-7488. Sept. 19 —Aaron Neviiie Duu, Craterian Theater at The Collier Center Sept. 1 —MGMT,McMenamins for the Performing Arts, Medford; www. Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Sept. 2 —Martiua McBride, Oregon Sept. 19 —Beu Rector, Aladdin State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. * Theater, Portland; TF oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. Sept. 19 —Neku Case/The Head & The Sept. 2 —ZZWard, Aladdin Theater, * Heart, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; Portland; TF * TW Sept. 3 —Ait-J, McMenamins Crystal Sept. 20 —Haiesturm, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; SOLDOUT; CT* * Ballroom, Portland; TF Sept. 4 —Deerhunter, McMenamins Sept. 20 —Matt Nathauson/Jushua Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Radin,McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, * Sept. 4 —Icoua Pop, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; CT * Portland; TF Sept. 21 —The National/Frightened Sept. 5 —The Doodie Brothers, Britt Rabbit,McMenamins Edgefield, Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org Troutdale; SOLDOUT; CT* or 800-882-7488. Sept. 21 —Riders in the Sky, Aladdin * Sept. 6 —The Doobie Brothers, Oregon Theater, Portland; TF Zoo, Portland; www.zooconcerts.com Sept. 21 —The Royalty Tridute or 503-226-1561. Concert:Justin Shandor as Elvis, Sept. 6 —OneRepudHc/Sara Bareilles, Michael Knight as Michael Jackson and * McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT Julie Meyers as Stevie Nicks; Salem Sept. 7 —Glass Candy/Chromatics, Armory, Salem; TW* Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 22 —The Lumineers, Veterans Sept. 8 —Adam Aut, Roseland Theater, Memorial Coliseum, Portland; www. Portland; TW* rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 9 —JimmyCliff, Wonder Sept. 22 —A Sungversatiun with India. * * Ballroom, Portland; TF Arie, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF Sept. 10 —Beth Ortou,Alberta Sept. 25 —Drake, Moda Center, Rose Theatre, Portland;www. Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. albertarosetheatre.com or 503-764-4131. Sept. 25 —Further, Cuthbert * Sept. 11 —Jason Isbell, Aladdin Amphitheater, Eugene; TW

The following is a list of other events "Out of Town."

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Submitted photo

Moroccan choregrapher Bouchra Ouizguen presents, "Ha!," inspired by the poems of Rumi. The performances run Sept. 18-20 at the Imago Theatre in Portland.

• Festival in Portland featuresexhibits, live perIormancesand more By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

his September, contemporary artists from around the world are converging on the City of Roses for the 11th annual Time-Based Art Festival. Presented by the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, the festival features visual installations, live performances, workshops, talks and late-night happenings. The festival runs Sept. 12-22 at various locations around Portland. "Our intent is to build an immersive platform that celebrates creativity and imagination, where artistic risk-taking and new experiences are embraced," said artistic director Angela Mattox in the festival's guidebook. Here are a few 2013 highlights: • Suniti Dernovsek: Choreographer Dernovsek's Portland-based contemporary dance company Bobbevy will p resent the world premiere of "This is how we Disappear." Two dancers explore the complexities and fragility of human relationships. The performance runs Sept. 13-16 at the BodyVox Dance Center. • Third Angle New Music: The Portland group

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will perform Georg Friedrich's String Quartet No. 3 in total darkness. The event runs Sept. 17-19 at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's Kendall Planetarium.

• Bouchra Ouizguen: Moroccan choreogra-

pher Ouizguen presents "Ha!," an exploration of madness, obsession and ritual, inspired by the poems of Rumi. The performances run Sept. 18-20 at the Imago Theatre. • Lucy Raven: Artist Raven's "Room Tone" is an instruction piece for voice and electromagnetic tape to be performed live by one or more people. The installation runs at Con-Way in Northwest Portland. Individual tickets range from $8 to $30, depending on the event. Festival passes are also

available ranging from The Works (10 days of late-night shows) for $60 to the unlimited access Patron pass for $500 ($250 is tax-deductible). Out-of-town visitors, including Central Oregon residents with a current driver's license, will receive $5 off tickets and approximately $30 to $50 off passes. For more information, visit www.pica.org or contact 503-242-1419. — Reporter: 541-383-0350, jwasson@bendbulletin.com


out of town

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Sept. 25 —Savages, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 26 —Billy Cobham's "Spectrum 40,"Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 26 —Peter Hook 8 The Light,Wonder Ballroom, Portland; *

TF

Sept. 27 —Molly Ringwald, Newmark Theatre, Portland; www. pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 27 —Tech Ngne, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 28 —HANSON— ANTHEM World Tour,Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 28 —Jake Bugg,Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 28 —Maroon 5/KeHy Clarkson,Gorge Amphitheater, George, Wash.; www.livenation. com. Sept. 29 — Noah and the W hale, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 30 —Citizen Cope, Aladdin * Theater, Portland; TF Oct. 3 —ZEDD,McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Oct. 4 —Pet ShopBoys, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Oct. 5 —Stereophonics, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 5-6 —Dark Star Orchestra, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Oct. 7 —Father John Misty, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Oct. 7 — Mark Lanegan,Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 8 — John M edeski, McMenamins Mission Theater, * Portland; CT Oct. 8 —Michael Franti & Spearhead,McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Oct. 8 — Shovels& Rope,Wo nder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 10 —The Waterboys, Aladdin * Theater, Portland; TF Oct.11 —Greg Brown,The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd. org or 541-434-7000. Oct. 11 —Langhorne Slim, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 11 —Pepper, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Oct. 12 —All-Star Tribute to The Wall and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club,Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 12 —Bonnie Raitt, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Oct. 15 —KTTunstaH, Aladdin * Theater, Portland; TF Oct. 16 —Holy Ghost!, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 17 — Zeds Dead,Mc Donald Theatre, Eugene; TW*

Oct.18 —John McCutcheon,The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or541-434-7000. Oct. 19 —Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls,Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF*

LECTURES 5 COMEDY Aug. 31 —Russell Brand, Newmark Theatre, Portland; www. pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 5 —Fred Armisen, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 7 — "An Evening with Lily Tomlin,"Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 8 —Dennis Miller, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; CANCELED;www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 13-14 —Sylvia Browne, Chinooks Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; www. chinookwindscasino.com or 888-624-6228. Sept. 14 —Jo Koy,Newmark Theatre, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 21 —Brian Regan, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 25 —Jim Breuer, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 26 —Dane Cook,Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 28 —"An Evening with Bob and David":Featuring David Cross and Bob Odenkirk; Newmark Theatre, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 29 —Ralphie May, Newmark Theatre, Portland; www. pcpa.com or 800-273-1530.

Sept. 28-30 —"Kahane Plays Beethoven":Featuring pianist Jeffrey Kahane; music by Bartok, Beethoven, Haydn and Johann Strauss Jr.; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

THEATER 8cDANCE Through Oct.11 —Oregon Shakespeare Festival:"A Streetcar Named Desire" (through Nov. 2), "The Tenth Muse," (through Nov. 2),

"My Fair Lady" (through Nov. 3) and "The Taming of the Shrew" (through Nov. 3) are currently running at the Angus Bowmer Theatre; "The Unfortunates" (through Nov. 2), "King Lear" (through Nov. 3) and "The Liquid Plain" (through Nov. 3) are currently running atThomas Theatre; "Cymbeline" (through Oct. 11), "The Heart of Robin Hood" (through Oct. 12) and "AMidsummer Night's Dream" (through Oct.13) are currently running on the Elizabethan Stage; Ashland; www.osfashland. org or 800-219-8161.

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*Tickets TM:Ticketmaster, www

.ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000 TW:TicketsWest, www .ticketswest.com or 800992-8499 TF:Ticketfly, www.ticket fly.com or 877-435-9849 CT:Cascade Tickets, www

.cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849

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SYMPHONY 5 OPERA Sept. 6 —"ABBA— The Concert":Featuring an ABBA tribute band and the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 12 —Lang Lang:Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 21 —"Big Night Concert": A night of opera's most beloved repertoire; Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; www.portlandopera.org or 866-739-6737. Sept. 21, 23 —"Scheherazade": Music by Takemitsu and RimskyKorsakov; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 23

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PAGE 24 . GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

From previous page

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ESCAPE ON A WEEKEND GETAWAY

EXHIBITS

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Sept. 3-Oct. 6 —"The Big Meal": Play by Dan LeFranc; West coast premiere; Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; www.artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278. Sept. 17-Oct. 20 —"Mistakes Were Made": Play by Craig Wright; Northwest premiere; Artists Repertory Theatre; Morrison Stage, Portland; www.artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278. Sept. 20-Oct. 12 —"August: Osage County": Play by Tracy Letts; winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama; Oregon Contemporary Theatre; The Lord/Leebrick Playhouse, Eugene; www.octtheatre.org or 541-465-1506. Sept. 25 — Aspen Santa Fe Ballet: The dance company kicks off the16th season of the White Bird Dance Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.whitebird.org or 503-245-1600. Oct. 5-6 —"Peter Pan": Featuring choreography by Bruce Steivel; Eugene Ballet Company; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000.

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563 SW 13th St. ¹103 • Bend OR • 5 41-317-1274 info@getawaystravel.net • www.getawaystravel.net

ThroughSept.8— Oregon Museum of Science and Industry:The following exhibits are currently on display: "Mummies of the World: The Exhibition" (through Sept. 8), "What I Eat" (through Sept. 20); Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Through Aug.19 —Mike Fogin:Living history interpreter recreates a traveling frontier medicine show; National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City; www.blm.gov/ or/oregontrail or 541-523-1843. Through Aug. 25 —Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: "Fierce: Animal Life from the Collection" (through Aug. 25), "Cyclepedia: Iconic Bicycle Design" (through Sept. 8), "Man/Woman: Gaston Lachaise" (through Sept. 8) and "Ceramics of the Islamic World: The Ottis Collection" (through Oct. 27); Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through Sept. 1 —"A Glass Act: Explore, Engage, Enjoy":Featuring 40 glass artists from all over the country; Columbia Center for the Arts, Hood River; www.columbiaarts.org or 541-387-8877. Through Sept. 8 —"Behind the Shoji": Show and sale of Japanese-inspired arts and crafts; Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; www. japanesegarden.com or 503-223-1321. Through Sept. 9 —"Sinners 8 Saints: Indelicate Stories of Emigrants in the West": A collection of stories drawn from first-person accounts are woven into narratives that highlight the morals and values of pioneers, early settlers and early inhabitants of the Columbia Plateau; National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City; www.blm. gov/or/oregontrail or 541-523-1843. Through Sept. 21 —Museum of Contemporary Craft:The following exhibits are currently on display: "Object Focus: The Bowl" (through Sept. 21), "Soundforge" (through Sept. 21) and "Quality is Contagious: John Economaki and Bridge City Tool Works" (through Feb. 8); Portland; www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Through Sept. 25 —Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art:The following exhibits are

currently on display: "Celebrating Oregon Artists: Recent Additions to the Collection" (through Sept. 25) and "New American Acquisitions" (through Dec. 8); Eugene; jsma. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Through Oct. 6 —Maryhill Museum of Art:The following exhibits are currently on display: "Eanger Irving Couse on the Columbia River" (through Sept.15), "Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition" (through Oct. 6), "Kenneth Standhardt: Impressions" (through Nov. 15) and "Arthur Higgins: Prints" (through Nov.15); Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Through December —"The Sea & Me": A new children's interactive exhibit; Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org or 541-867-3474. Aug. 31-Sept. 1 —Labor OayWeekend Wagon Encampment:Featuring historic re-enactors; National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City; www.blm.gov/ or/oregontrail or 541-523-1843. Sept. 12-22 —Time-Based Art Festival: Featuring visual installations, live performances, workshops, talks and late-night happenings; various locations in Portland; www.pica.org or contact 503-242-1419. Sept. 14 —Watzek HouseTours: Oregon's newest National Historic Landmark; one of John Yeon's most renowned architectural works; Portland; 541-346-4363. Sept. 14-15 —Portland Mini Maker Faire, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or800-955-6674. Sept. 14-Nov. 15 —"Windows to Heaven: Treasures from the Museum ofRussian Icons":Featuring 25 historically significant Russian icons that date from 1590 to the present; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Sept. 18-20 —0-Tsukimi (Moonviewing Festival):Featuring a candle-lit tea ceremony, live music, samples of tea and saki and seasonal foods; Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; www.japanesegarden.com or 503-542-0280. Sept. 21 —The Shire Tours:A unique landscape in the Columbia River Gorge; created by architect John Yeon; Portland; 541-346-4363.

MISCELLANY Through Sept. 2 —OregonState Fair, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Aug.30 — 2013Summer Documentary Series:Presented by POWFestand NW Documentary; McMenamins Mission Theater, Portland; CT* Sept. 2 —RoyWebster Cross-Channel Swim,Hood River; www.hoodriver.org or 541-386-2000. Sept. 14 —Portland Dollhouse & Miniature Show,Holiday Inn-Portland Airport, Portland; www.portlandminiatureshow.com or 503-362-6012. Sept. 14-15 —Commerical Fishermen's Festival:Featuring stars of Discovery Channel's "Deadliest Catch"; www. commercialfishermensfestival.com or 503-791-8703.


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PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

movies

Simon Varsano / Warner Bros. Pictures /The Associated Press

SelenaGomez and Ethan Hawke team up in "Getaway."

nd thus does a summer that started with a silly car chase picture end with a sillier one. "Getaway" has some of the elements of a good gear grinder — a B -movie where acar takes a pivotal role in the cast. It's got Ethan Hawke, doing enough of his own driving to pass muster with the likes of Ryan Gos-

sidekick dragged along for a long, Christmas season chase through the not-quite-generic (tramlines, traintracks) mean streets of Sofia. That's where the silly kicks in. Things turn pulse-pounding in the third act, but that's entirely too late to rescue this end-of-summer orphan. The improbable setup: Disgraced racing driver Brent Magna's Bulgarian wife (Rebecca Bu-

and Run"), or Paul Walker ("Fast 8r Furious"). It's got a cool car — a Shelby Super Snake version of the Ford Mustang. It has an unusual city setting — Sofia, Bulgaria. And then Selena Gomez shows up as th e m outhy, tech-savvy

dig) has been kidnapped. He gets

ling ("Drive"), Dax Shepard ("Hit

a call and is told to steal a particular armored, camera-packed Mustang that he will drive on a series of "tasks." The villain, whose chin stubble and martini-slurping lips are all we see, is played by Jon Voight with a German accent.

ROGERMOORE

"Getaway" 88 minutes PG-13, for intense action, violence

andmayhem throughout,some rude gestures and language " You're runnink out off t i me — tic toc, tic toc," he purrs, and we're off. Having a car covered with cameras raises the variety of shots and sometimes amps up the pulsepounding nature of the chases,

choreographed by Charlie Picerni. Until you notice that door mirrors that popped off the Mustang in the last chase magically return in the next scene. "I can't believe that worked," Magna confessesafterone escape. Too often, neither can we, despite the non-digital / real-cars-havingreal-crashes nature of the beast. A guy whose wife has been kidnapped and threatened with death should be a lot more worked up and manic than Hawke plays this fellow. And one would think that a young woman snatched for a ridealong would be freaking at this or that hair-raising chase, the streets filling with w r ecked Bulgarian cop cars, the machine-gunning motorcyclists and what not. The

leads don't turn up the requisite adrenalin-jacked pitch of t h eir voices or their acting. They're really in that car, but they're entirely too calm about all this mayhem. Director C ourtney S olomon ( "An A m erican H aunting") i s plainly out of his depth, and when the always reliable Hawke plays a character in the w r ong key, that points back to a director who doesn't have the stature or standing to "direct" him. Maybe they all took a gander at that random, ridiculous scenario and hoped thatthe car would be cool enough to bail them out. It isn't. — Roger Moore is a film critic for McClatchy-Trkbune tjietvs Service.


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

'Act of Killing' replays Indonesian horror of 1960s o describe "The Act of Killing" as a riveting documentary about Indonesian death squads that terrorized that country's citizens in the 1960s might be factually accurate. But it doesn't get nearly to the heart of it. This audacious, horrifying, boldly experimental plunge into the mindset ofmurderers and the culture of impunity breaks so many rules of documentary decorum that it virtually creates its own genre: investigative improv, perhaps. Or, better yet, Brechtian nonfiction. Whatever you call it, "The Act of Killing" is a must-see. Using blunt stagecraft, probing p sychological insight, elegant interrogation of narrative truth and characters steeped in a particularly terrifying brand of self-mythologizing, director Joshua Oppenheimer has succeeded in turning "The Act of Killing" into both a sharply confrontational vehicle for bearing witness and a craftily layered meditation on the cinematic medium itself. "The Act of Killing" focuses on the years 1965 and '66, when a young man named Anwar Congo became a legendary death-squad leader in North Sumatra, murdering communists, ethnic Chinese and intellectuals following the military coup that brought longtime authoritarian leader Suharto to power. It's estimated that 1 million people died during those purges, which were carried out with the help of a paramilitary organization called the Pancasila Youth, an organization that thrives even 15 years after Suharto's resignation. Despite its historical context, "The Act of Killing" contains none of the expected stock footage or newsreels of atrocities and trials. Rather, Oppenheimer catches up with Congo, his cronies and Pancasila Youth leaders in the present day, as they proudly recall their actions 50 years ago. What becomes unnervingly clear as Oppenheimer films t h ese m e n s w a ggering through city streets, shaking down shopkeepers and bullying citizens who nervously laugh along with them, is that not only have they not been prosecutedfor their crimes, but they're also lionized for them.

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 27

.

ANNHORNADAY

"The Act of Killing" 122 minutes No MPAA rating; contains violence,

profanity, drug references, smoking and disturbing material Congo is so proud of his past deeds that he eagerly shows Oppenheimer how he preferredto dispatch his victims, strangling them with a taut piece of wire so they would bleed less. As "The Act of K i lling" progresses, Congo and his f ellow criminals explain that they learned most of their postures and methods from Hollywood crime movies, for which they were scalping tickets when they were enlisted to become freelance domestic terrorists in the 1960s. Citing Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as role models, they call themselves "gangsters" throughout the film, reminding anyone who will listen that the word for "gangster" in Indonesian has its roots in the term for "free man" in Dutch. In time, Congo and his colleagues are donning garish costumes and bloody makeup to reenact the torture and murders they committed, staged like cheap film noir knockoffs with chillingly bad dialogue. "The Act of K i l ling" records such perversity, such venal cruelty and vile narcissism, that it's often difficult not to shudder and turn away. With its subtle connections of screen violence and real-life violence,"free men" and free markets,

and the ongoing cultural legacy of colonialism, "The Act of Killing" is a brilliant, powerful reckoning with the wages of history, mendacity and denial. Killing is always an act, as the film suggests — physical, theatrical and ethical. And its own fascinatingly ambiguous final sequence leads viewers to question when repentance can be one, too. — AnnHornaday is a film critic for The Washington Post.

Courtesy Sony Pictures

One Direction — Liam Payne, from left, Louis Tomlinson, Zayn Malik, Harry Styles and Niall Horan — are the focus of a new concert documentary.

'One Direction' is really iust for those teen fans ou could be forgiven for rolling your eyes last summer at the news that last summer's flashy pre-fab pop phenomenon One Direction would be releasing a concert documentary this summer. Forgiven by everyone save their fans, who might pout for suggesting that one summer's boy band craze is the next summer's old news. But "One Direction: This is Us" still has a popularity wave to ride a full year after "What Makes You're Beautiful" and "Live While W e're Y oung" dominated the airwaves. So stop the eye-rolling. This film captures the five British lads hand-picked by Simon Cowell to go where New Kids on the Block, Boyz II Men, Backstreet Boys and 'N Sync h ave gone before — up t he charts and into arenas around the world. Caught at their peak, they come off as the clean-cut fulfillment of millions of teen and tweenage girl fantasies. It's not that different from the JustinBieber doc, or the Jonas Brothers and Miley Cyrus concert films — sanitized, packaged — presenting these five British or Irish boys, ages 19-21, as paragons of pop virtue while others vouchforwhat"rebels" they are, and that they have "edge." Yeah, they've got vast tattoo collections and they're not

Y

us how 1D were recruited by Cowell on Britain's "X-Factor" talent ROGERMOORE show, how a cadre of hard-core first generation fans amped up enthusiasm for them in the UK before they even had a record out and how much they'vechanged their "One Direction: This is Us" parents' lives (buying them houses, etc.) and how much fun they have 93 minutes together as mates on what one dePG, for mild language scribes as a "Benjamin Button" journey — peaking at 20, realizing shy about losing a shirt and yank- it's all "backward" and downhill ing each other's trousers down on from here, lads. It's a chipper, cheerful portrait stage in choreographed bits of tomfoolery. We see Harry, Liam, Louis, with nary a discouraging word in Zyan and Niall bonding on a tour it. And after Katy Perry's much bus across Europe, a camping trip more revealing and dramatic "Part in Sweden and the occasional stroll of Me" film, it's disappointing that down a public street — until they're Spurlock didn't have the access, the recognized and mobbed. footage or the spine to depict any They marvel at their sudden of thecynicism behind such crefame, don disguises and work as ations, which are manufactured by ushers at a venue here and there. pop Svengalis like Maurice Starr "One Direction?" Irish prankster (New Kids on the Block, et al), Lou Niaii Horan, in fake nose, beard Pearlman (Backstreet Boys, 'N and wig tells a couple of fans he's Sync) and Cowell. escorted to their seats. "I think The tunes are catchy, and the they're crap!" ID boys have charm, a little wit Theytravelto Africato showtheir about them, and some stage prescharitable side. Harry Styles goes ence even if their shows have all back to the Cheshire bakery where the spontaneity of a McDonald's he used to work the counter to serve menu. a few customers. And being all of 21 Not that their fans want to hear or so, they reminisce: "Remember that, or hear that they have a limwhen we met at Boot Camp?" That ited shelf life. Oh no. They never was where they were brought to- let us forget that it's a teenage girls' gether, rehearsed and trained to be world. We're all just wearing earpop stars by Cowell & co. plugs in it. — Roger Moore is a film critic for Indie filmmaker sell-out Morgan

Spurlock ("Super Size Me") shows

McClatchy-Tribune tvettrs Service.


movies

PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

O N LOCA L S CRE E N S

LITERDUOSALE

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"Life of Pi" — A miraculous achievement of storytelling and alandmark of visual mastery. Inspired by aworldwide best-seller that seemed unfilmable, it is atriumph over its difficulties. It is also a moving spiritual achievement, a moviewhosetitle could have been shortened to "Life." The story involves the 227 days that its teenage hero (Suraj Sharma) spends drifting across the Pacific in the same lifeboatasa Bengaltiger. Themovie quietly combines various religious traditions to enfold its story in the wonder of life. One of the best films of 2012. Part of the Munch & Movies series, the film screens at dusk tonight at NorthWest Crossing's Compass Park in Bend. It also screens at dusk Saturday at The Village at Sunriver, as part of the Twilight Cinemaseries. Both events are free and open to the public. Rating: Four stars. 125 minutes. (PG) —Ebert "Oz the Great and Powerful" — Like "The Phantom Menace" trilogy, "Ozthe Great and Powerful" precedes abeloved classic on the fictional timeline, but makes full use of moderndaytechnology,which means everything's grander andmore spectacular. Director SamRaimi andhis army of specialeffects wizards havecreated avisually stunning film that makes good use of 3-D, at least in the first hour or so. Thefilm finally breaks free of its beautiful but artificial trappings and becomes astory with heart in the final act. Part of the Twilight Cinema series, this 2013 film screens at dusk Sunday at the Sunriver HomeownersAquatic & Recreation Center. Gamesand activities begin at 6:30 p.m. This free event is open to the public. For more information, contact 541585-3333. Rating: Twoand ahalf stars. 130 minutes. (PG) —Roeper "Riddicke — Riddick, the latest chapter of the groundbreaking sagathat beganwith 2000's hit sci-fi film "Pitch Black" reunites writer/director David Twohyand star Vin Diesel. Diesel reprises his role asthe antihero Riddick, adangerous,escapedconvictwanted by every bounty hunter in the knowngalaxy. The infamous Riddick has beenleft for dead on a sun-scorched planet that appears to be lifeless. Soon, however, hefinds himself fighting for survival against alien predators more lethal thanany human he's encountered. The film opens Sept. 6 with a fewscreenings Thursday night and isavailable in IMAX. (R) — Synopsis from film's website e "Star Trek Into Darkness"/"World War Z Double Feature — RegalOldMill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bendwill screen "Star Trek lnto Darkness" and "World War Z" as adouble feature this week. Both films will be screened in 3-D. Cost is $11.50 or $13.75, depending on the time of the show. (PG-13)

WHAT'S NEW

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Reviews by RogerEbe/f, Richard Roeper or Roger Moore, unless otherwise noted.

"20 Feet From Stardom" — A rocking doc about the unsung singers standing just to the right and left of Mick Jagger, Bette Midler, Bruce Springsteen, Sting and other music superstars. Backup vocalists finally get

Patti Perret/Universal Pictures/The Associated Press

Denzel Washington, left, and Mark Wahlberg star in the action filme2 Guns." their due. Rating: Threeand ahalf stars. 90 minutes. (PG-13) — Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer "The Act of Killing" — To describe "The Act of Killing" as a riveting documentary about Indonesian death squads that terrorized that country's citizens in the1960s might be factually accurate. But it doesn't get nearly to the heart of it. This audacious, horrifying, boldly experimental plunge into the mind-set of murderers and theculture of impunity breaks so manyrules of documentary decorum that it virtually creates its own genre: investigative improv, perhaps. Or, betteryet, Brechtian nonfiction. Whatever you call it, "The Act of Killing" is a must-see. Using bluntstagecraft, probing psychological insight, elegant interrogation of narrative truth and characters steeped in aparticularly terrifying brand of self-mythologizing, director JoshuaOppenheimerhassucceeded in turning "The Act of Killing" into both a sharply confrontational vehicle for bearing witness and acraftily layered meditation on the cinematic medium itself. Rating: Four stars. 122 minutes. No MPAArating. — Ann Hornaday, TheWashingtonPost "Getaway" — "Getaway" has some ofthe elements of a goodgear grinder — aB-movie where a car takes apivotal role in the cast. It's got Ethan Hawke,doing enough of his own driving to pass muster with the likes of Ryan Gosling ("Drive"), Dax Shepard ("Hit and Run"), or PaulWalker ("Fast & Furious"). It's got a cool car — aShelby SuperSnake version of the Ford Mustang. It has an unusual city setting — Sofia, Bulgaria. And thenSelenaGomezshows upasthemouthy, tech-savvy sidekick draggedalong for a long, chase through the not-quite-generic (tramlines, train tracks) meanstreets of Sofia. That's where the silly kicks in. Things turn pulse-pounding in the third act, but that's entirely too late to rescuethis end-of-summer orphan. Maybe they all took a gander at the random, ridiculous scenario andhoped that the car would becool enough to bail them out. It isn't. Rating: Oneand a half stars. 88 minutes. (PG-13) —Moore "One Direction: This is Usu — This film captures the five British lads handpicked by Simon Cowell to go whereNewKids on the Block, Boyz II Men, Backstreet Boys and 'N Sync havegone before — up the charts and into arenasaround the world. Caught at their peak, they comeoff as the clean-cut fulfillment of millions of teen andtween girl fantasies. Indie filmmaker sell-out Morgan Spurlock ("Super SizeMe") shows ushow One Direction was recruited by Cowell on Britain's "X-Factor" talent show, how acadre

of hard-core first generation fans ampedup enthusiasm for them in England before they even had arecord out and how muchthey've changed their parents' lives (buying them houses, etc.)andhow muchfuntheyhave together as mates onwhat onedescribes as a "Benjamin Button" journey — peaking at 20, realizing it's all "backward" and downhill from here, lads. It's a chipper, cheerful portrait with nary a discouraging word in it. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Twostars. 93 minutes.(PG) —Moore

STILL SHOWING "2 Guns" — A hot messthat's cool fun. Funny-as-hell DenzelWashington andMark Wahlberg are undercover lawmenposing as criminalsto each other until they have to team upagainst common adversaries. With slick pacing and asharp if implausible script, "2 Guns" rises abovestandard action fare. Rating: Threestars. 109 minutes. (R) — Roeper "Blue Jasmine" — Cate Blanchett dives into a showcase role and knocks it out of the park. In Woody Allen's latest, the upper-crust world of an investment guru's wife falls apart, and she moves in with her working-class sister. One of the liveliest, funniest and sharpest movies of the year. With Alec Baldwin and Sally Hawkins. Rating: Three and ahalf stars. 98 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper "The Conjuring" — "The Conjuring" is like a prequel to 40 years of demonic possession thrillers, a movie about the original ghost hunters, EdandLorraine Warren, and an early case this "Amityville Horror" couple found so terrifying they never talked about it — "until now!" JamesWan, who madehis horror bones with "Saw" and outgrewtorture porn with the superbly spooky "Insidious," reunites with his "Insidious" star Patrick Wilson for this solid and sometimes hair-raising thriller about a haunted house, the family of seven haunted by it. It conjures up afew frights, but "The Conjuring" is more solid than sensational and spine-tingling. Rating: Two and a half stars. 112minutes. (R) — Moore "Crystal Fairy" — To saythat drug use is central to the plot of "Crystal Fairy" is not only a gross understatement but also entirely beside the point. Directed with a loose, haphazard style by Chilean filmmaker Sebastian Silva, the film centers around an example of the proverbial ugly American, played by Michael Cera.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

From previous page Cera's Jamie is aboorish, privileged slacker living in Chile, where hehas convinced his friend Champa(Juan Andres Silva) to chauffeur him on the road trip. Accompanying them are Champa's brothers Lel andPilo (brothers Jose Miguel andAgustin Silva, who, like JuanAndres, are the director's real-life siblings). What catalyzes the action of the movie is not the mescaline drug that they ultimately procure and take, but the arrival of the film's title character, a young American hippie traveler (Gaby Hoffmann) whomJamie meets at a party and unwittingly invites along. Rating: Threeand ahalf stars. 98 minutes. (no MPAArating) — Michael O'Sullivan, The Washington Post "Despicable Me 2" — There's afizzy silliness to "Despicable Me 2" that will make it a hugeword-of-mouth hit among keydemographics. That would be 2- to 6-year-olds, and parents who enjoy seeing their kids curled into balls of uncontrollable laughter. You need to haveseen the original 2010 comedy toget the most out of this sequel. Luckily, a lot of people have. "Despicable Me," Universal Studios' first venture into computer-animated cartooning, was a smash. It offered a nifty novelty, with a would-be supervillain as the central character. Gru (SteveCarell with a larynx-twisting Hungarian accent) was aperversely winning mashup ofDr.Seuss'Grinchand Charles Addams' UncleFester. The roster of grown-up characters is smallerthan in the first outing to make more roomfor the Minions' accident-prone antics and gobbledygook versions of platinumselling pop hits. It's all as bright and bouncy as aroller-coaster ride. Rating: Three stars. 98 minutes. (PG) — Colin Covert, Minneapolis Star Tribune "Elysium" — It's amazing howbad Jodie Foster is in this movie, and how little it matters in the grand, rabidly schizoid scheme ofthings. Matt Damon stars as acriminal on dystopian 2154 Earth trying to get to a utopian spacestation in one of the most entertaining action films of the year. This film is available locally in IMAX. Rating: Threeand ahalf stars. 109 minutes. (R) —Roeper "Fast 5 Furious 6" — Against all odds, the "Fast 8 Furious" franchise is actually picking up momentum, with "FF6" clocking in as the fastest, funniest and most outlandish chapter yet. Whether we're seeing stunt work or special effects or a comboplatter, director Justin Lin keeps raising the bar, going for intentional laughs and thrilling moments as cars pull off impossibl emaneuversand humans keep flying in the air and landing with thuds. "Furious 6" couldn't be any less plausible if it were animated, but that's sort of the point. Rating: Three and a half stars. 130 minutes. (PG13) —Roeper "Fruitvale Station" — "Fruitvale Station" is a tragedy asfresh as today's headlines,asmovingas losingsomeone closetoyou.A re-telling of the last day in the life of Oscar Grant, ayoung black man gunned down by transit a cop in front of scores of witnesses inOakland

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Gru (voiced by Steve Careii) and Lucy (voiced by Kristen Wiig) learn to get along in "Despicable Me 2." on NewYear's Day in 2009, Ryan Coogler's often wrenching film begins with that death — captured on cel lphonevideo— andtakesus backthrough a life of hot-tempered blunders but compassionate potential, an ex-con who might have turned the corner just as it all came to an end for him. Michael B.Jordan ("Red Tails") is never less than riveting as Oscar, and hehas to be. Rating: Three stars. 90 minutes. (R) — Moore "Grown Ups 2" — Whatever comedic fires and bursts of genuinely inspired humor AdamSandler once possessed haveburned out long ago. Case in point: this toothless sequel, which presents a number of potential conflicts but doesn't have theenergy to pursue any of them. Over the last 10 years, Sandler hasheadlined more terrible comedies thananyonein Hollywood. You have to beREALLY successful to be able to keep churning out so manymediocrities over such a longperiod. Rating: One and a half stars. 101 minutes. (PG13) —Roeper "The Heat" — Onpaper(and in the ads), "The Heat" looks like ahighconceptpitch:acop-buddy mo vie, only the buddies are —wait for it — dames! Thegoodnews is this Sandra Bullock-Melissa McCarthy vehicle clicks on all cylinders. Thanks to standout performancesfrom the enormously appealing leads, excellent workfrom the supporting cast, a smart and brilliantlyfunny script by Katie Dippold and nimble direction from PaulFeig, this is oneof the most entertaining movies of the year. Rating: Threeand a half stars. 1 l7 minutes. (R) —Roeper "The Internship" — Youwon't be surprised by asingle moment in "The lnternship." Fifteen minutes in, you'll know exactly where it's going.

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Vince VaughnandOwenWilson are 40ish salesmensuddenly out of a job who decide to reinvent themselves as trainees atGoogle. Thestory's so sunny even the villain seems like a half-hearted caricature who's more twit than threat. But the script is funny and cheerfully offbeat, and the cast is uniformly likable. I found myself rooting for the underdogs even as I wasaware of the strings being pulled. Rating: Threestars.119 minutes. (PG-13) —Roeper "Jobs" — In a competently made biopic, Ashton Kutcher, one of the least complex actor/personalities of his generation, is tasked with playing SteveJobs, one of themost complicated and accomplished visionaries of our time, andhe's in over his head. Rating: Twoand a half stars. 122 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper "Lee Daniels'The Butler" — Forest Whitaker gives one of the signature performances of his brilliant career as aWhite Housebutler witnessing decades of history. This is an important film presented as mainstream entertainment, not a history assignment. It's a great American story. Rating: Threeand a half stars. 132 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper "The Lone Ranger" — In the unholy messthatis "TheLoneRanger,"we finally have amovie that combines the slapstick antics of a live-action "Road Runner" cartoon with a villain so bloodthirsty, he literally cuts out the heart of a vanquished foe and eats it. Everything that could go wrong with this movie does go wrong, from a rarebad performance from the great Johnny Depp, who playsTonto as acrazy desert vaudeville performer, to the decidedly unmemorable work from the promising talent Armie

MORRIS REAL ESTATE

Hammer as the title character, to a script that feels like somesort of mash-up of every attempt to reboot a storied franchise. Somefilms are for everyone. This film is for just about no one. Rating: Oneand ahalf stars. 149 minutes.(PG-13) — Roeper "Monsters University" — A slight and underwhelming prequel that isn't nearly as inventive, funny or involving as the original, "Monsters lnc." (2001). Though colorful and sweetnatured and occasionally capable of producing the mild chuckle, this is a safe, predictable, edge-free, nearly bland effort from Pixar, a studio that rarely hedges its bets. It's betterthan "Cars 2," but not in the sameleague as the "Toy Story" sequels. Rating: Two and ahalf stars. 110minutes. (G) — Roeper "More Than Honey" — Thebee documentary"MoreThanHoney"is filled with gorgeous cinematography and fascinating details about bees' complexbehaviorandanatomy. It's an informative, if slightly unstructured, narrative, yet it plays more like a horror story. And it's not because of the frequent close-up shots, often in slo-mo, that show the film's hairy, bug-eyed subjects writhing in heapsoneminute and swarming the camera the next. What's reallyfrightening about "Honey" isn't what a hive ofangry

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bees might do to us, but what we've done to them. Director Markus Imhoof, who comesfrom a long line of Swiss beekeepers, looks at the mysterious phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder (CCD), which is killing honeybees around the world, and concludes that it's no mystery. If the scientific world is still undecided about whether beesare dying from the use of agricultural chemicals and antibiotics, destructive mites, careless interbreeding or stress — eachofwhichhas beenposited as an explanation for CCD, and each of which lmhoof considers — the filmmaker is certain of one thing: It's our fault. Rating: Threestars. 96 minutes. (no MPAArating) — Michael O'Sullivan, The Washington Post "The Mortal Instruments: City ef Bones" — Sony Pictures didn't wait for the release of "The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones" to announce plans for a sequel. Let's hope the filmmakers learn at least a few lessons from this first adaptation of the popular teen fantasy series of novels. To befair, there are elements worth celebrating. Themovie is thankfully less self-serious than the mopey "Twilight" films.

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PAGE 30. GO! MAGAZINE

NEW

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

DVD

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"At Any Price" — The gifted director Ramin Bahrani is working on an"American Gothic" canvas with a half-dozen recognizable actors and some big-picture themesabout the plight of the 21st-century farmer, astold through the perspective of a Willy Loman-esque character and his dysfunctional family. It's beautifully photographed andsolidly acted, but it's all over the place. With Dennis Quaid, ZacEfron, Red West. DVDand Blu-ray Extras: Rehearsal footage, Toronto lnternational Film Festival Q-and-Asegmentand audiocommentary. Rating: Twostars. 105 minutes. (R) — Roeper "The Great Gatsby" — Big andbold and brassy, BazLuhrmann's "Gatsby" fills every second of its142-minute running time with images designed totakeyour breath away, but it is first and foremost F.Scott Fitzgerald's "Gatsby." Leonardo DiCaprio stars asGatsby, in perhaps themost overtly vulnerable version of the character, andCarey Mulligan gives a delicate, intricately crafted performanceas Daisy Buchanan.Luhrmann'sdazzlingsenseof visual style is perfectly suited to the first half of the movie, butwhenthe story becomes more about confrontations, youcanalmost sense Luhrmann fidgeting as hetries to figure out how to keep the plates spinning. DVDExtras: Six featurettes anddeleted scenes; Blu-ray Extras: Two additional featurettes. Rating: Threeand a half stars. 142minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper

Warner Bros Pictures/The Associated Press

Leonardo DiCaprio is Jay Gatsby and Carey Mulligan portrays Daisy Buchanan in the movie adaptation of "The Great Gatsby." "Pain & Gain" — Themostly true story of three idiot bodybuilders who went on a steroids-fueled, tragicomic crime spree in South Florida in the1990s, directed by Michael Baywith hard-R, turn-your-headaway violence. Eventhough the film does mine laughs from real-life tragedy, it refuses to glamorize thesemeatheads. Kudos to Bay and his screenwriters for making surewe're laughing at them, not with them. No "Extras" were listed with this film. Rating: Three stars. 130 minutes. (R) —Roeper "The Reluctant Fundamentalist" — A Pakistani professor (Riz Ahmed)who once embraced theAmerican dreamwith gusto explains to anAmerican journalist (Liev

Schreiber) how theaftermath of the 9/11 attacks led him to radical Islam in this provocative film. Director Mira Nair skillfully tells a story that's not so much ripped from today's headlines but instead provides contextfor why so many of theseheadlines exist. DVD andBlu-ray Extras: Onefeaturette. Rating: Threeand a half stars. 130 minutes. (R) —Roeper

eye between them —but it's a pure Potter picture moment. The quest, which takes our heroes to the Sea of Monsters, aka The Bermuda Triangle, is generic in the extreme. Rating: Two stars. 106 minutes. (PG) — Moore "Planes" — Almost instantly forgettable, Disney's "Planes" takes the all-too-familiar flight pattern of the underdog that dreams of doing something his kind never does. The animation is first-rate, but it's nearly impossible to infuse planes with enough personality to earn a place alongside lions and toys and fish. Rating: Two stars. 92 minutes. (PG) —Roeper "RED 2" — Thejoy of "RED" wasseeing a cast packed with Oscar winners (Helen Mirren, Morgan Freeman, Richard Dreyfuss, Ernest Borgnine) andvery good actors (John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker, Brian Cox and Karl Urban) flesh out and class up a Bruce Willis action film. "Codgers make the coolest killers" was its motto. And if anything, this "Retired, Extremely Dangerous" sequel ups theante. There's a new acronym — "ICE: Incarcerated, Cannot Execute." They've replaced killed-off Oscar winners with Anthony Hopkins as anaddled old scientist and Catherine Zeta-Jones as a Russian agent and one-time lady love of Frank's. And the change in directors to comedy-specialist Dean Parisot ("Galaxy Quest") means there's a laugh a minute amid all this mayhem. Rating: Twoand ahalf stars. 108 minutes. (PG-13) —Moore "Star Trek Into Darkness" — Director J.J. Abrams is a true talent, and he's also apopculture savant who has great respectfor the legacy of this franchise aswell as a keen understanding of the mega-importance of box-office figures. There's no better choice

to make the best, the purest ANDthe most accessible big-budget "Star Trek" movie possible. Yet with all the futuristic splendor and fine performances, "Into Darkness" only occasionally soars, mostly settling for being a solid but unspectacular effort that sets the stage for the next chapter(s). With Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Benedict Cumberbatch. Rating: Three stars. 132 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper "Turbo" — In animation shorthand,"Turbo" is "'Cars' with snails." It's light on the jokes, but cute, with animation so vivid it looks photo-real. It's another "impossible dream" tale, this time of a motorhead mollusk who has a needfor "terrifying, blinding speed." Theo (RyanReynolds) is an autoracing obsessed garden snail who longs to escape his colony of tomato-munchers. The situations are moreamusing than the dialogue. For all the horsepower "Turbo" boasts about, the movie tends toward the sluggish — as in "slow as a slug." Rating: Two and ahalf stars. (PG) — Moore "The Way WayBack" — "The WayWay Back" is a semi-nostalgic coming-of-age dramedy from the folks who wrote "The Descendants. "It'sabouta shy,putupon lad, his long-suffering mother, the mom's difficult new beauand the vacation where a lot of these issues come to ahead. "The Way WayBack" tries too hard to beall things to all audiences — kids learning about love and life, adults seeing themselves, boozily nostalgic for their youth. But the performances andthe ready supply of oneliners make this anamusing look at a new generation getting lost down memory lane. Rating: Three stars. 103 minutes. (PG-13) — Moore

COMINGUP: Movies scheduled for national release Sept. 3 include "TheEnglish Teacher," "From Up onPoppy Hill " "The Iceman" and "Now You SeeMe." — "DIID and Blu-ray Extras" fromwireandonlinesources

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"The Mortal lnstruments" revels in its own camp. But there is plenty of room for improvement. The main protagonist is Clary (Lily Collins), a seemingly typical teenager who begins drawing strange symbols in her sleep and seeing violent imagesthat her best friend, Simon (Robert Sheehan), cannot. It turns out Clary is a shadow hunter, or a halfhuman, half-angel predestined to track andkill demons. Therewere loads of laughs during an early screening of the film, but it was difficult to tell whether the movie wasvying for them or not. This film is available locally in IMAX. Rating: Twostars. 130 minutes. (PG-13) — Stephen Merry, TheWashington Post "Pacific Rim" — This ridiculously entertaining (and often just plain ridiculous) monster-robot movie plays like a gigantic version of that Rock'Em, Sock'Em Robots game from the1960s, combined with the cheesy wonderfulness of black-and-white Japanese monster movies from the1950s. Director Guillermo del Toro has aweirdly beautiful visual style, and there's rarely an uninteresting shot in "Pacific Rim." He and the cast do a fine job of selling this madness, even as the talk of neural bridges and other scientific claptrap grows increasingly dense and meaningless. Rating: Three stars. 131 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper "Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters" — Any thoughtsthatasecond PercyJackson and the Olympians film would drag Rick Riordan's "Greek Godchildren" franchise out of the shadow of Harry Potter are dashed the moment Percy and his "half-blood" friends pile into a supernatural taxi in "Sea of Monsters." The cabmay bedriven by the three haggling, wisecracking Graeae of Greek myth — blind women with one

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From previous page "We're the Millersw — o We're the Millers," about a pot dealer andhis acquaintances posing as afamilyto haul a shipmentfrom Mexico, is just goodenoughtokeepyouentertained, butnotgoodenoughtokeepyourmind from wandering from time to time. This is an aggressively funny comedythat takes a lot of chances, and connects just often enough. Rating: Threestars. 110 minutes. (R) —Roeper "The Wolverine" — Dramatically ambitious and deliberately paced, "The Wolverine" is one of the better comicbook movies of 2013, thanks in large part to an electric performance by HughJackman asthenewlyvulnerable mutant. Rating: Three stars.126 minutes. (PG-13) —Roeper "World War Z" — If you're as zombie' d outasIam by now,andyou feel"The Walking Dead" cable TV series has set the all-time standard for popular culture entertainment about the flesh-chomping undead, your reluctance to see"World War Z" is understandable. All I can tell you is, there's fresh blood here. "World War Z" traffics in a lot of familiar territory, but thanks to the wickedly vibrant source material (Max Brooks'2006 horror novel), some slick anddarkly funny directorial choices by Marc Forster and terrific performancesfrom Brad Pitt and the supporting cast, it's entertaining as hell. Rating: Three and a half stars. 116 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper "TheWorld's End" — In the best film yetfrom director Edgar Wright and writer-actor Simon Pegg, old friends converge for a 20th-anniversary pub crawl that takes an unexpected turn. "The World's End" succeeds first as a reunion movie andthen as ascifi satire with some of the funniest stunts and battle sequences in recent memory. Starring Peggandthe invaluable Nick Frost. Rating: Three and a half stars. 109 minutes. (R) — Roeper "You're Next" — Frequently, horror movies send someuseful idiots to a remote location, and then hackthem up victim by victim. But what might happen if one of the potential corpses hadsome self-defensesavvy? Nothing especially surprising, as "You're Next" demonstrates. But the latest genre exercise from slasher-flick prodigy Adam Wingard ("A Horrible Wayto Die") is at times bloodily entertaining. And if the central plot twist isn't all that clever, at least the movie offers some motivation for its mayhem. Rating: Two stars. (R) — MarkJenkins,The WashingtonPost

TV SHOW SCREENINGS "Breaking Bad" — AMC'sEmmy Award-winning drama returns for its final eight episodes. Theseries explores how afatal diagnosis releases atypical man from thedaily concerns and constraints of normal society and follows Walter White's (Bryan Cranston) transformation from mild family man to akingpin of the drug trade. Fans cancatch a screening at 6 p.m. Sunday at theVolcanic Theatre Pub in Bend. Cost is free. — Synopsis from AMClvebsite

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GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 31

T I M E S • For the zoeekof Aug. 30

• There may be an additional fee for 3-D and IMAXmovies. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

• Accessibility devices are available for some movies at RegalOld Mill StadiumfG tt IMAX.

~A ' uoiotoGtr 8r HEARING AID CUNK

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Regal Old Mill Stadium16 8 IMAX, 680S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347 • 2 GUNS(R) Fri-Thu: 2:20, 6:55, 9:30 • BLUE JASMINE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:10, 3:45, 6:45, 9:15 • DESPICABLE ME2 (PG) Fri-Wed: 12:20, 2:55, 6, 9:10 Thu: 12:20, 2:55, 6 • ELYSIUM(R) Fri-Thu: 12:10, 3:15 • ELYSIUM IMAX(R) Fri-Wed: 7, 9:40 • GETAWAY (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:45, 3:35, 7:20, 9:45 • THE HEAT (R) Fri-Thu: 12:15, 6:20 • JOBS(PG- l3) Fri-Wed: 8:40 • LEE DANIELS'THEBUTLER(PG- I3) Fri-Thu: 12:05, 3:10, 6:10, 9:05 • MONSTERSUNIVERSITY (G) Fri-Thu: Noon, 2:40 • THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 6:40, 9:35 • THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES IMAX(PG-13) Fri-Thu:1, 4 • ONE DIRECTION:THIS IS US(PG) Fri-Thu: 5:20, 10:10 • ONE DIRECTION:THIS ISUS3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 2, 4:25, 7:30, 9:55 • PERCY JACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS (PG) Fri-Wed: Noon, 2:30, 6 Thu: Noon, 2:30 • PLANES(PG) Fri-Thu: 12:25, 2:45, 6:30, 9 • RIDDICK(R) Thu:8,9,10 • RIDDICK IMAX(R) Thu:8 • STAR TREKINTODARKNESS3-D / WORLD WAR Z3-D DOUBLE FEATURE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:15, 6:15 • WE'RE THEMILLERS(R) Fri-Thu: 12:55, 3:55, 7:40, 10:15 • THE WOLVERINE(PG-13) Fri-Wed: 3, 9:20 Thu: 3 • THE WORLD'SEND(R) Fri-Thu: 12:35, 3:25, 7:10, 10:05 • YOU'RENEXT(R) Fri-Thu: 1:05, 4:10, 7:55, 10:20 I

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Regal Pilot Butte 6, 2717 N.E.U.S.Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347 • FRUITVALESTATION(R) Fri-Sun: 3, 8:45 Mon: 3:30 • THE LONE RANGER(PG-13) Fri-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2:30, 5:30, 8:30 Mon: Noon,3 • PACIFIC RIM(PG-13) Fri-Sun: 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 5:45, 8:25 Mon: 12:15, 3:15 • RED 2(PG-13) Fri-Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9 Mon:1,4 • STAR TREKINTODARKNESS(PG-13) Fri-Sun: Noon, 6 Mon:12:30 • THE WAY WAYBACK(PG-13) Fri-Sun: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9 Mon: 1:15, 4:15 • WORLDWARZ (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 8:50 Mon: 12:45, 3:45

Reminder:Pilot Butte cinema's last days The Regal Pilot Butte 6 is closing its doors Monday. The theater will only be open for 4

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matinee shows that day. (The last screening is at 4:15 p.m.) Located on U.S. Highway 20, the theater originally opened Dec. 24, 1994. It concentrated on art and independent films

Giles Keyte / Universal Pictures via AP

Jordana Brewster and Paul Walker star in "Fast & Furious 6." r

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McMenamins OldSt. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562 • FAST S FURIOUS 6 (PG-13) Fri-Wed: 6 • THE INTERNSHIP(R) Fri-Wed: 9:15 • MONSTERSUNIVERSITY (G) Sat-Mon: 11:30 a.m. • TURBO(G) Sat-Mon, Wed: 2:30 • Oue to a conversion to digital, no movies will be shown Thursday. • After 7 p.m., shows are 21and older only. Younger than 21mayattend screenings before 7pm.ifaccompaniedbya legal guardian. •

• r

I

Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W.Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271 • THE ACTOFKILLING (no MPAA rating) Fri-Sat: 6 Sun:5 Mon-Thu: 8:15 • CRYSTALFAIRY(no MPAA rating) Fri-Sat: 8:30 Sun: 7:30 Mon-Thu: 6 • MORE THANHONEY(no MPAArating) Fri-Sat: 3:30 Sun: 2:30 I

I

I

Redmond Cinemas,1535 S.W.Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777 • ELYSIUM(R) Fri-Mon: 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 Tue-Thu: 4, 6:30, 9 • LEEDANIELS'THEBUTLER(PG- I3) Fri-Mon: 12:15, 3, 5:45, 8:30 Tue-Thu: 4, 6:45, 9:30 • PLANES(PG) Fri-Mon: 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 Tue-Thu: 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 • WE'RE THE MILLERS (R) Fri-Mon: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Tue-Thu: 4:30, 7, 9:30 Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800 • 20 FEET FROM STARDOM (PG-13) Fri: 5:45, 7:30 Sat-Sun: 5, 7:30 Mon: 4, 6:30 Tue-Thu: 6:45 • BLUE JASMINE (PG-13) Fri: 5:45, 8 Sat-Sun: 3:15, 5:30, 7:45

Bend• Redmond• P-ville • Burns 541.647.2884 NORTR W

M~n On and

MoVieS a

as well as screening the blockbusters. Mon: 4:15, 6:30 Tue-Thu: 6:30 • LEE DANIELS'THEBUTLER(PG- I3) Fri: 5, 7:30 Sat-Sun: 2:30, 5, 7:30 Mon: 3:30, 6:15 Tue-Thu: 6:15 • PLANES (PG) Fri: 5:30 Sat-Sun: 3:30, 5:30 Mon: 4:30 • THE WAY WAYBACK(PG-13) Fri: 7:45 Sat-Sun: 2:45, 7 Mon:6 Tue-Thu: 6:30 aI •

a

Madras Cinema 5,1101S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505 • THE CONJURING (R) Fri-Sun: 4:45, 7:10, 9:35 Mon-Thu: 4:45, 7:10 • ELYSIUM(R) Fri-Sun:9 • THEMORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 1:10, 4, 6:40, 9:25 Mon: 1:10, 4, 6:40 Tue-Thu: 4, 6:40 • ONE DIRECTION: THIS ISUS3-D (PG) Fri-Mon: 12:45, 3, 7:20 Tue-Thu: 7:20 • ONE DIRECTION: THIS ISUS(PG) Fri-Sun: 5:10, 9:20 Mon-Thu: 5:10 • PERCY JACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS (PG) Fri-Mon: Noon, 2:20 • PLANES (PG) Fri-Mon: 12:50, 2:50, 4:50, 6:50 Tue-Thu: 4:50, 6:50 • WE'RE THE MILLERS(R) Fri-Sun: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Mon:2,4:30,7 Tue-Thu: 4:30, 7 •

Pine Theater, 214 N.MainSt., Prineville, 541-416-1014 • DESPICABLE ME2 (PG) Fri:4,7 Sat-Sun: 1, 4, 7 Mon-Thu: 6:15 • GROWN UPS 2 (Upstairs — PG-13) Fri: 4:10, 7:15 Sat-Sun: 1:10, 4:10, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 6:30 • The upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

R S T CR O SSING

s I

I • • •

-,.Alec . Cate Louis Bobby Baldwin Blanchett C.IL Cannat aley Andrew' Sally Peter Michael DiceClay HawkmsSarsgaard Stiihlbarg

Grade A (Hiithest Aatinit)

"Powerful." -OwenCieiberman,

ENTEEYAINM ENT WEEKLY

Blue

Ja,smtne www.sgyiyclAsslcs.cM O PG-13 ~soNYplcttiyrE5 cLty5lcs

NOW PLAYING REGALOLD MILL16 SISTERS MOVIEHOUSE 680 SWPowerhouse Dr, 720 DesperadoCourt, Bend (800)FANDANGO Bend (541)549-8800

kYebel BBQ &ills

CLEARANCE

swLE Pa/to kVorld 222 SE Reed Mar ket Road 541-388-0022


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

WE'RE GIIIIIIIGAWAY M AGAZ I N E

TI

ICETS

ILESSCHW OO i 1 B

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D

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0

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ONLY INTHE BULLETIN'S GO!MAGAZINE

S RTURD R V

RUGUST 31

LOSLOO OSO LOS LOHELVHOVS SRTURDRY

SEPTEMBER 7

STEVE MARTIN Q Qgi su}(AksD eu ~

$

This summer your ticket to the season's best concerts may be inside your GOI MAGAZINE. Look for it every Friday in The Bulletin.

W IN C TI KETSFQRTHECQNCERT QFYQURCHQICE! Make sure you get a copy of The Bulletin every Friday for your chance to WIN! Any Friday GO! Magazine can hold a winning ticket! Look inside home delivery, store

copies andracks throughout Central Oregon!Winners receivetwo concert tickets. Golden tickets must be redeemed a minimum of1 day prior to the concert of your FRIDRY OCTOBER 4

choice. Goldentickets are only good during the 2013Concert Series. Goldentickets must be redeemed at the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District, Mon — Sat10-6, Sun11-5.

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL:

541-385-5800

Original GoldenTicket must bepresented. GoldenTickets havenocash value. BROUGHT TOYOU BY:

The Bulletin b e n d bulletin.com

iii O LD MI L LDIsTRIcT

FQR THE LATEsT GQNGERT INFQvlslT WWW.bendCOnCertS.COm

Bulletin Daily Paper 8-30-13  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday August 30, 2013

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