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AUGUST 13, 2012

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Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

INSIDE TODAY’S PAPER H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE Healthy Living in Central Oregon

Hiking, geocaching: In Central Oregon, 10,000 treasures await you

Cover story

Why medical research is so often

Depression: New (drug-free) treatments

WRONG

Bike wheels: Which size is right for you?

Deschutes OLCC decoys see sales to minors decrease By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — Before she turned 21, Melissa Chick walked into Central Oregon bars, liquor stores and restaurants to try to buy alcohol. About 70 percent of the time,

she said, it worked. “And I wanted to say, ‘People, really?’” said Chick, who got involved in the Oregon Liquor Control Commission program involving “minor decoys” through a friend. “Why aren’t enough people paying attention?”

She walked out of a liquor store with a bottle of Seagram’s, and the OLCC employee who accompanied her on these trips walked in to talk to the person who sold Chick the booze. Using so-called minor decoys is one of the OLCC’s most pow-

erful tools in cracking down on those who sell alcohol to minors. Since Chick took her turn as a decoy last summer, the number of establishments selling to minors in Deschutes County has decreased. See Decoys / A6

SKATING AGAINST CANCER

CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOLS

Online learning options expand By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

From left: Andy McIntosh, 31, of Bend; Ryan Blake, 25, of Berkeley, Calif.; Chris Lewis, 25, of Ashland; and Kyle Ohlson, 17, of Encinitas Calif., skateboard down Northeast First Street in Bend on Sunday afternoon toward a sendoff party at The Truck Stop Skate Park. These four skaters are joining Trevor Downing, 24, of Ashland, not pictured, on Longboard Oregon, a four-day skateboard trip through Oregon to raise money for cancer research. The five skaters will leave on their journey from Portland on Wednesday and

plan to complete the trip in Ashland on Saturday. Their goal is to raise $10,000 on the 450-mile expedition, with stops along the way in Corvallis and Eugene. All money raised goes to the Cancer Research Institute. For more information on Longboard Oregon or to learn how to donate, go to www.facebook.com/LongBoardOR, or visit The Truck Stop Skate Park during its business hours, 1 to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday.

Flood of credit card lawsuits yields flaws

In different shapes and forms, online instruction is taking root and growing in Central Oregon. Bend-La Pine Schools is offering an online program this fall that students of all grades can tap into, for full-time instruction or on a part-time basis to complement classroom instruction. In the Crook County School District, Insight School of Oregon is starting this fall as a charter school, offering online instruction to students of all grades. For Central Oregon students and parents, the additional programs add more choices to the array of education options. Those changes add another layer of decision-making when it’s time to enroll in school. These new programs have their differences. Insight is a charter school, marketing full-time online instruction to students across Oregon and hiring teachers who can live anywhere in the state. By comparison, Bend-La Pine Online Plus is a program within the district, not a separate charter school.

Insight Charter schools are public schools governed by their own boards. The Crook County School District approved the authorization for Insight to form a charter. Because of its online nature, the school’s reach will extend to any student in Oregon — not just those in the immediate school district. Teachers can be based anywhere in the state, working from home. See Online / A6

LONDON OLYMPICS

The Ryan pick: how it was kept a secret

By Jessica Silver-Greenberg New York Times News Service

By Philip Rucker

The same problems that plagued the foreclosure process — and prompted a multibillion-dollar settlement with big banks — are now emerging in the debt-collection practices of credit card companies. As they work through a glut of bad loans, companies like American Express, Citigroup and Discover Financial are going to court to recoup their money. But many of the lawsuits rely on erroneous documents, incomplete records and generic testimony, according to judges who oversee the cases. Lenders, the judges said, are churning out lawsuits without regard for accuracy and improperly collecting debts. See Credit / A6

The Washington Post

MON-SAT

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Ben Curtis / The Associated Press

Fireworks explode during the closing ceremony in London. For more coverage, see Pages D1 and D3-4.

A bit surprisingly, Britain cracks a smile By Campbell Robertson New York Times News Service

SHEFFIELD, England — All day, people line up here at an unexceptional corner of a town plaza called Barker’s Pool, sometimes a dozen or more at a time, waiting to have a photograph taken with

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 226, 94 pages, 6 sections

a mailbox. This is not just any mailbox, of course. It is a mailbox that has been given a coat of gold paint. “We live in West Yorkshire, about an hour away,” said Lisa Scranage, a 37-year-old civil servant who was with her 8-year-old

son, Ryan. “We’ve come especially to see the postbox.” While there may be little spectacular about the mailbox itself, it represents the heptathlon gold medal won by the Sheffield native Jessica Ennis. See Olympics / A6

TODAY’S WEATHER

INDEX Calendar Classified Comics

C3 E1-10 C4-5

Crosswords C5, E2 Editorials B4 Green, Etc. C1-8

Horoscope C3 Local News B1-6 Obituaries B5

Paul Ryan’s path to Saturday’s surprise announcement that he would be Mitt Romney’s running mate began with a walk in the woods. But these were not just any woods. No, these were the woods where the Wisconsin congressman grew up. To escape his Janesville home undetected on Friday, Ryan snuck out his back door, walked through the woods behind his house and Ryan past the old tree fort he built as a boy and the driveway of his childhood home. “I know those woods like the back of my hand, so it wasn’t too hard to walk through them,” Ryan told reporters. He recalled thinking, “It’s gone from the surreal to the real. … It was the biggest honor I’ve ever been given in my life.” See Ryan / A4

Sports D1-6 Sudoku C5 TV & Movies C2

Sunny High 93, Low 51 Page B6

TOP NEWS EGYPT: Generals pushed out, A3 SYRIA: Jets pound Aleppo, A3


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

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TODAY

Military on film: work and cost of a closeup

GENERAL INFORMATION ONLINE

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

WASHINGTON — In the background, in the aftermath of a horrific battle, uniformed men unload caskets from a truck. Philip Strub had to tut as he read the description. “That’s not how we do things,” the director of the Pentagon’s Entertainment Media office recalls telling filmmakers preparing to incorporate that scene into a movie. “Caskets aren’t just cargo. We always move them with full honors.” Strub was pleased when the director got the message, and the fallen warriors were treated with white gloves and respect. That was more than they’d gotten from their robot-monster killers, of course. That’s the nature of Strub’s role at the office that oversees the military’s relationship with the American movie industry, a department that dates to the year the first Hollywood studio opened and is far older than the Pentagon building itself. Strub laughingly describes the relationship as “mutually exploitive.” Certainly, it’s one that American moviegoers see all the time. The Pentagon doesn’t keep statistics, but private counts put the number of movies the Department of Defense has supported above 1,000. This relationship became very public and deeply partisan earlier this year, when some Republicans in Congress accused the Obama administration of giving special favors to Oscarwinning director Kathryn Bigelow’s upcoming “Zero Dark Thirty,” which tells the story of the mission to kill Osama bin Laden. The accusation was that

The Pentagon keeps a list handy of certain U.S. military aircraft available under controlled circumstances if film production companies request them, and pay the related operational costs, which can get pretty steep. Some examples:

Rates per hour in fiscal 2012

B-1B “Lancer”

• President Barack Obama and Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan are both set to make separate appearances in Iowa. A1

$72,225 50,529

E-4B Airborne command

B-1B Strategic bomber

11,306

10,181

8,201

99

AH-64 Army attack helicopter

F-16C Single-seat fighter

RQ-4A Air force drone

TG-10B Training glider

IN HISTORY

NOTE: Costs cover include operation, maintenance, personnel to operate aircraft; there is no similar list for ships and other hardware, which are handled on a case-by-case basis.

RQ-4A “Global Hawk”

F-16C “Falcon”

Source: McClatchy Washington Bureau, U.S. Dept. of Defense

the administration granted unusual access in the hope that the film, now expected to be released in December, would boost President Barack Obama’s re-election bid, including meetings with Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence Michael Vickers. The Pentagon confirms the meetings but says there was nothing unusual or improper in them. House Homeland Security Committee Chair Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., says he’s still concerned that the filmmakers got “special access” to “sensitive information” on a secret mission. Strub’s job is to nudge an industry devoted to fantasy and fiction toward an odd sort of cinema verite. He and others in his department pore over scripts of television shows such as “Hawaii Five-0,” even on weeks when the show isn’t

efits for recipients. Last month, the Department of Health “Under Obama’s plan, you and Human Services, without wouldn’t have to work and much fanfare, issued a memoyou wouldn’t have to train for randum saying that it was ena job. They just send you your couraging “states to consider welfare check.” new, more effective ways to — Mitt Romney campaign ad meet the goals of TANF, parreleased Aug. 7, 2012 ticularly helping parents suc“This is a common sense cessfully prepare for, find, and reform to give governors— in- retain employment.” As part of cluding some of Romney’s that, the HHS secretary would supporters— flexibilconsider issuing waivity to live up to the FACT CHECK ers to states concerngoals of the welfare ing worker participareform law. Romney tion targets. should know: He used to supRobert Rector, a welfare port these kinds of waivers. expert at the Heritage FoundaIn 2005, he joined other Re- tion, announced that “Obama publican governors in a letter Guts Welfare Reform” — a to Senator Frist, urging the headline featured in the RomSenate to move quickly on ‘in- ney ad. creased waiver authority’ for A more nuanced view the welfare program.” comes from Ron Haskins, who —Obama campaign defense was instrumental in crafting on its website the original law. He told our colleagues at Wonkblog that When Bill Clinton signed the concept of the waivers is a the bill overhauling welfare good one, though the process 16 years ago, the 42nd presi- used by the administration was dent declared: “After I sign my unfair. “It might not be illegal,” name to this bill, welfare will he said. “But (HHS) didn’t even no longer be a political issue. consult with the Republicans. The two parties cannot attack They knew the spirit of the law, each other over it. Politicians and they violated that.” cannot attack poor people over In other words, we are it. There are no encrusted hab- mainly talking about a proits, systems, and failures that cess foul and poor coordinacan be laid at the foot of some- tion with Congress. One of one else.” the main critics of the waivOops, guess he was wrong ers, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, about that. conceded as much when the In an effort to reopen the Salt Lake Tribune noted that welfare war, Mitt Romney this the administration said it was week began airing a tough ad responding to a request from that accuses President Barack the Republican governor of Obama of wanting to do away Hatch’s state. with the work requirements It is also important to note embedded in the Personal that no waivers have yet been Responsibility and Work Op- issued. The Romney camportunity Reconciliation Act paign ad goes much too far of 1996. In effect, Romney is when it suggests Obama has trying to suggest that Obama already taken action to “drop is such a left-winger that he work requirements.” The ad would undo a central achieve- further states that “under ment of a Democratic icon. Obama’s plan, you wouldn’t This is a complex issue, and have to work and you wouldn’t highly technical, which makes have to train for a job. They it ripe for spin and counterspin. just send you your welfare Neither side necessarily con- check.” ducts itself with glory here. Here, the Romney camTemporary Assistance for paign is asserting an extreme Needy Families (TANF), the interpretation of what might centerpiece of the 1996 legisla- happen under these rules, but tion, established work require- it is certainly not based on any ments and time-limited ben- specific “Obama plan.” The Washington Post

HAPPENINGS

Cue the B-1 flyover

Spin, counterspin on both sides of welfare debate By Glenn Kessler

It’s Monday, Aug. 13, the 226th day of 2012. There are 140 days left in the year.

featuring anything military in nature. That way, they can be familiar enough with the characters that when they make suggestions in the future, they’ll be able to fit them into the way a show works. Most of Strub’s work is with feature films. His push for a change in the way military dead were handled came in the filming of “Transformers” — or maybe the sequel, he isn’t quite sure. This summer, audiences can spot similar bits of military-approved detail in films about war with space aliens (“Battleship”) and by superheroes against otherworldly gods (“The Avengers”). The effectiveness of movies as a recruiting tool has never been quantified, but it’s no accident that many of the movies the Department of Defense supports are blockbusters,

AH-64 “Apache”

© 2012 MCT

which attract teenagers, many of them approaching or at the age at which they can volunteer for service. Strub emphasizes that what he pushes for is an accurate portrayal of the military, not a sugarcoated one. As evidence, he notes the Pentagon’s willingness to support a movie — as yet unmade — about the My Lai massacre in Vietnam, in which U.S. troops killed hundreds of apparently unarmed civilians, and the trial that followed. Some classic films were rejected for official support, such as “The Deer Hunter” and “Apocalypse Now,” both of which had an anti-war message, and “It’s a Wonderful Life,” the 1946 tale of a smalltown banker contemplating suicide that’s become a Christmas season staple on television.

Highlights: In 1521, Spanish conqueror Hernando Cortez captured Tenochtitlan, present-day Mexico City, from the Aztecs. In 1624, King Louis XIII of France appointed Cardinal Richelieu his first minister. In 1942, Walt Disney’s animated feature “Bambi” had its U.S. premiere at Radio City Music Hall in New York, five days after its world premiere in London. Ten years ago: Amid rising floodwaters, tens of thousands of people in the Czech Republic fled their historic capital, Prague, for higher ground. Five years ago: President George W. Bush’s political strategist, Karl Rove, announced his resignation. One year ago: In the Republican presidential race, Rep. Michele Bachmann won the Iowa straw poll; Texas Gov. Rick Perry officially declared his candidacy.

BIRTHDAYS Former Cuban President Fidel Castro is 86. Movie director Paul Greengrass is 57. TV host/weatherman Sam Champion (TV: “Good Morning America”) is 51. — From wire reports


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Syrian jets continue to strike Aleppo By Damien Cave New York Times News Service

BEIRUT — Syrian jets fired on areas in and around Aleppo again Sunday, continuing an escalation of force that has led activists and rebels to demand that foreign forces establish a no-fly zone to counter the government’s air superiority. Over the weekend, the United States and Turkey discussed a variety of measures to aid the opposition to President Bashar Assad, including a no-fly zone,

though no decisions were reached. While the fighting raged in Aleppo, Syria’s largest city, Syrian authorities Sunday reported two bomb attacks in Damascus, the capital. The bombings occurred in the Marjeh District of Damascus, suggesting the rebels were still active in the capital and were increasingly turning to explosives in their evolving guerrilla campaign. No one was wounded in the attacks on Sunday, Syria’s state

news agency said. The first blast was set off remotely as soldiers passed by in a vehicle. The device was hidden under a tree about 100 yards from the Four Seasons Hotel in Damascus, The Associated Press reported. The second blast went off around the same time near a soccer stadium half a mile away. Both explosions were followed by gunfire “to provoke panic,” the authorities said. Also on Sunday, Al Arabiya, an Arabic news channel, re-

ported that a journalist working with it was killed on Saturday by a bomb in a suburb north of Damascus. And in a video released Sunday, one of the rebel brigades in the capital said Syrian troops had launched two attacks in an effort to free dozens of Iranians kidnapped by the brigade last week. Iran says the captives are pilgrims who were in Damascus to visit a Shiite shrine, but the rebels say their hostages (45 are left after three were killed by shelling) are Iranian agents.

Egyptian military chiefs sacked; backlash feared

Drought-driven voters vent anger over farm bill By Jennifer Steinhauer New York Times News Service

THURMAN, Iowa — John Askew pulled at a soybean pod and revealed two anemic beans dappled with stem rot, the harvest of a too hot sun and too little rain. Rep. Tom Latham peered in and shook his head. “We need a farm bill — that’s the first thing,” said Askew, whose family has farmed here for six generations. Latham, a Republican, agrees. But House leaders, including Speaker John Boehner, who popped into Iowa on Friday night to promote Latham’s re-election campaign, have been unable to muster the votes. A summer drought that has destroyed crops, killed livestock and sent feed prices soaring is now extracting a political price from members of Congress, who failed to agree on a comprehensive agriculture bill or even limited emergency relief before leaving Washington for five weeks in their parched precincts. Farmers are complaining loudly to lawmakers back in their districts, editorial boards across the heartland have pounded Congress for inaction and incumbents from both parties have sparred with their challengers over agricultural policy.

In Minnesota, Sen. Amy Klobuchar and her Republican Party-endorsed opponent, Kurt Bills, disagreed sharply in their first faceto-face debate over what a farm bill should contain, and in Missouri, Sen. Claire McCaskill and her Republican challenger, Rep. Todd Akin, defended their positions before the state farm bureau’s political unit. “Every time I get out there,” said Rep. Leonard Boswell, Latham’s Democratic opponent in a newly drawn district, “people keep asking me: ‘What happened to the farm bill? Why don’t we have a farm bill?’” In Arkansas, the Democratic Party paid for an automated call made by a farmer imploring rural voters to pester Rep. Rick Crawford, a Republican, about the unfinished farm business. Rep. Kristi Noem, R-S.D., took heat back home for backing away from a petition sponsored by Democrats that would have forced the House Agriculture Committee’s farm bill to the floor. “We would have much preferred they pass the House bill,” said Michael Held, chief executive officer of the South Dakota Farm Bureau. “I think the attitude here is this is typical Washington, D.C., not getting its work done.”

Junk food laws are seen to help curb kids’ obesity By Lindsey Tanner The Associated Press

Amr Nabil / The Associated Press

Thousands of supporters raise a poster of Egypt’s Islamist President Mohammed Morsi as they celebrate Sunday in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, birthplace of the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak 18 months ago. Morsi ordered the retirement of the defense minister and chief of staff on Sunday and made the boldest move so far to seize back powers that the military stripped from his office right before he took over. By Ernesto Londoño The Washington Post

CAIRO — Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi forced out the country’s two top military chiefs Sunday, in a bold move to wrest power from the armed forces and marginalize key holdovers of ousted president Hosni Mubarak’s reign. Seizing on a brazen attack last week in north Sinai that killed 16 Egyptian security forces, Morsi on Sunday swore in a new defense minister, who will command the armed forces, and made additional major personnel moves. The president also announced that

he had suspended a constitutional amendment the generals passed on the eve of Morsi’s election giving themselves vast powers and weakening the presidency. The ousted military chiefs quietly stepped aside Sunday, but analysts said the move could trigger a backlash and further polarize a nation in which many are wary of the intentions of the country’s first Islamist president. Morsi ran as the candidate of the Muslim Brotherhood, an Islamist group that has yearned for decades to lead Egypt. “This is a big moment of

Afghan officials met with jailed Taliban leader

transformation in the history of Egypt,” said Zeinab AbulMagd, a history professor at the American University in Cairo who has studied the military closely. “Now, officially, it is a Brotherhood state. Now it is official they are in full control of state institutions.” Morsi’s election in June was hailed as a watershed for a nation that for six decades had been governed by military autocrats. But efforts by members of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces to cement their vast authority through legal maneuvers appeared to set the stage for a weak president.

U.S. Navy ship collides with oil tanker in Gulf By Michael Casey

The Associated Press KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan government representatives have met with a top-ranking Taliban member in his prison cell in Pakistan, an official said, suggesting a small step toward reopening stalled peace talks with the insurgent group. The confirmation Sunday came at the end of a bloody weekend that showed how unstable the country is, though NATO is aiming to hand over security responsibility to local forces at the end of 2014 after more than a decade of warfare against insurgents. Afghanistan’s international allies hope that bringing the Taliban to the negotiating table will ease the pressure on the Afghan government as international forces draw down. An official with the Afghan High Peace Council, which is tasked with starting talks, said the Pakistani government allowed Afghan government envoys access to Mullah Abdul

Ghani Baradar, a top-ranking Taliban official who was captured in Pakistan in 2010. His arrest reportedly angered Afghan President Hamid Karzai because Baradar had been in secret talks with the Afghan government. “Some members from our embassy in Pakistan, they met Mullah Baradar,” said Ismail Qasemyar, the council’s international relations adviser. He declined to give details of the discussions or say when they took place. Qasemyar said that members of the peace council had not met with Baradar. A Pakistani intelligence official confirmed the meeting, saying Pakistani authorities arranged it at the request of the Afghan Embassy in Islamabad. The official, who was not authorized to release the information and so spoke anonymously, said Baradar met with Afghan diplomats based in Islamabad without giving further details.

The ouster of Field Marshal Mohammed Hussein Tantawi — the defense minister and top military chief — and his deputy, army chief of staff Sami Anan, suggested the Brotherhood is willing to act more quickly and assertively in taking control of key institutions than analysts had predicted. Speaking late Sunday, Morsi said his decisions were not meant to “embarrass” any person or institution. “I want the armed forces to devote themselves to a mission that is holy to all of us, which is protecting the nation,” he said in a televised address.

The Associated Press

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — A U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer was left with a gaping hole on one side after it collided with an oil tanker early Sunday just outside the strategic Strait of Hormuz. The collision left a breach about 10 feet by 10 feet (three by three meters) in the starboard side of USS Porter. No one was injured on either vessel, the U.S. Navy said in a statement. The collision with the Panamanian-flagged and Japanese-owned bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan happened about 1 a.m. local time. Photos released by the Navy showed workers standing amid twisted metal and other debris hanging down from the hole. The cause of the incident is under investigation, the Navy said, though the collision was not “combat related.” There were no reports

of spills or leakages from either the USS Porter or the Otowasan, the Navy said. Navy spokesman Greg Raelson said the destroyer now is in port in Jebel Ali, Dubai. “We’re just happy there were no injuries,” he said. “An investigation is under way.” The USS Porter is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet, which is based in Bahrain, an island nation in the Gulf, near Iran. The Strait of Hormuz, at the mouth of the Gulf, is a crowded and tense waterway where one-fifth of the world’s oil is routed. Tensions have risen there over repeated Iranian threats to block tanker traffic in retaliation for tighter sanctions by the West. The sanctions are aimed at persuading Iran to abandon its uranium enrichment program, so far without success. Tensions in the Strait of Hormuz show no sign of abating.

CHICAGO — Laws strictly curbing school sales of junk food and sweetened drinks may play a role in slowing childhood obesity, according to a study that seems to offer the first evidence such efforts could pay off. The results come from the first large national look at the effectiveness of the state laws over time. They are not a slam-dunk, and even obesity experts who praised the study acknowledge the measures are a political hot potato, smacking of a “nanny state” and opposed by industry and cash-strapped schools relying on food processors’ money. But if the laws have even a tiny effect, “what are the downsides of improving the food environment for children today?” asked Dr. David Ludwig, an obesity specialist at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital. “You can’t get much worse than it already is.” Children in the study gained less weight from fifth through eighth grades if they lived in states with strong, consistent laws versus no laws governing snacks available in schools. For example, kids who were 5 feet tall and 100 pounds gained on average 2.2 fewer pounds if they lived in states with strong laws in the three

years studied. Also, children who were overweight or obese in fifth grade were more likely to reach a healthy weight by eighth grade if they lived in states with the strongest laws. The effects weren’t huge, and the study isn’t proof that the laws influenced kids’ weight. But the results raised optimism among obesity researchers and public health experts who generally applaud strong laws to get junk food out of schools. “This is the first real evidence that the laws are likely to have an impact,” said Dr. Virginia Stallings, director of the nutrition center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Stallings chaired an Institute of Medicine panel that urged standards for making snack foods and drinks sold in schools more healthful but was not involved in the new research. The authors of the study, released online today in the journal Pediatrics, analyzed data on 6,300 students in 40 states. Their heights and weights were measured in spring 2004, when they were finishing fifth grade and soon to enter middle school, and in 2007, during the spring of eighth grade.

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

Ryan

Kiyoshi Ota / Bloomberg News

Formerly mired in debt so deep that he tried to commit suicide after yakuza thugs hounded him to repay loans, Toyoki Yoshida now works as a debt counselor for chronic borrowers.

Japan fears yakuza-backed loans as it debates easing rules By Shigeru Sato Bloomberg News

TOKYO — Toyoki Yoshida recalls the winter day in 2002 when he tried to hang himself with a leather belt after yakuza thugs hounded him for weeks to pay back 500,000 yen ($6,300) in loans. The belt ripped as his neck strained the noose, saving his life. The loans, with interest rates as high as 5,000 percent annually, were among those Yoshida owed to 96 loan sharks — some with connections to organized crime. Working in the billing department of a Tokyo electronics company, he’d been borrowing from consumerfinance companies to entertain clients and colleagues and fell into a spiral of debt which cost him his job. It ended when lawyers helped Yoshida terminate his contracts

through a bankruptcy filing and partial payments. “I’d started to borrow money from illegal lenders only after legitimate companies began refusing to front me cash,” the 40-year-old said in an interview in a drab debtcounseling office in the Tokyo suburb of Okegawa. “I was panicking. I didn’t have time to think.” As Japanese committing suicide for “economic reasons” climbed to almost 9,000 a year by the mid-2000s, according to the National Police Agency, Japan’s Diet passed a law in late 2006 clamping down on predatory lending. Such suicides fell to 6,400 last year, lending crimes dropped 24 percent since the crackdown to 366 cases, and the involvement in them of yakuza, or crime syndicates, fell to 83 from 142, the police reported.

Now lawmakers who say the legislation went too far in cutting credit to small businesses in a stagnant economy want to ease restrictions on so-called non-bank lending. That’s sparking conflict with the financial regulator and consumer advocates who argue that any loosening will bring back excessive borrowing and yakuza lending, enriching gangsters and increasing the suicide rate once again. “It’d be going backward,” said Kenji Utsunomiya, a former head of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations who has won court battles against yakuza-affiliated lenders. “The non-bank lending market must stay regulated because borrowers desperate for cash aren’t equal to lenders and are often putty in their hands.”

Iranian quake toll raised to 300 New York Times News Service TEHRAN, Iran — Iranian relief workers saved more than 200 people from the rubble of dozens of villages destroyed when two powerful earthquakes struck Saturday in a wide area north of the city of Tabriz, an Iranian official said on Sunday. The official, Hassan Ghadami, Iran’s deputy interior minister, said that “all those under debris have been rescued and those affected are now being provided with their basic needs,” the semiofficial Fars news agency reported. The head of Iran’s Relief and Emergency Organization said

that rescues were continuing. Reza Sedighi, a relief official in the area, told Fars that at least 300 people were killed Saturday, and other officials reported more than 4,500 injured, some severely. Doctors on the scene predicted that more people would be found under destroyed houses, mosques and farms. In total, 133 villages were damaged. Shortages of water and food are being reported throughout the quake zone, a mountainous region near the border with Azerbaijan. The quakes struck in quick succession, with the more powerful one measuring a magni-

tude of 6.4, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. Iranian news media said that the epicenters were near four smaller cities north of Tabriz: Ahar, Heris, Mehraban and Varzaqan. The villages near Varzaqan were hit especially hard, with many mud brick houses collapsing and trapping those inside, many of them women and children, said the region’s governor, Moharram Foroughi. Helicopters had to suspend rescue operations during the night as Iran — under international sanctions over its nuclear program — is barred from purchasing night-vision materials.

Continued from A1 From his Janesville neighborhood, Ryan was ferried to an airport in nearby Waukegan, Ill., and was not spotted until Saturday morning, when he stepped down from the USS Wisconsin in Norfolk, Va., to the soundtrack of “Air Force One.” Ryan’s journey to Norfolk, detailed by Romney adviser Beth Myers, illustrates the elaborate lengths to which the Romney campaign went to keep the vice presidential selection under wraps in the 10 days between when Romney settled on Ryan and when the GOP ticket was revealed. “We just knew that we wanted to try to do this very quietly,” Myers said at a Saturday evening briefing with reporters in a hanger at Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C. Myers detailed Romney’s four-month confidential search process, which she helmed but described as “Mitt’s decision.” The process began once Romney secured the GOP nomination in April. Myers met with former Vice President Cheney and former Secretary of State James Baker, both of whom ran vice presidential vetting in past cycles, for advice. In April, she presented Romney with a background briefing on a “large” number of candidates, and by early May they had formed a short list. Myers would not disclose who was on the short list, but it is believed to have included former Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty and Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio), in addition to Ryan. Through May and June, a small team of lawyers worked in a secure room at the campaign’s Boston headquarters. They locked personal financial records — Myers said she reviewed “several” years of Ryan’s income tax returns — and other sensitive materials in a safe each night, and Myers said “no copies were ever made.” In mid-June, Myers met with Romney to go over preliminary vetting reports and later that month, at Romney’s donor retreat in Utah, she met with several candidates in person to go over issues that needed clarification. Romney periodically consulted a team of top advisers — strategists Stuart Stevens and Russ Schriefer, campaign manager Matt Rhoades, advisers Peter Flaherty, Eric Fehrnstrom, Ed Gillespie and Ron Kaufman, pollster Neil Newhouse and longtime friend Bob White. “Everyone was very candid with Mitt, they offered their input and perspective,” Myers said. “He also talked to a lot of people outside that group informally — a lot of people.” But Myers said she did not share her thoughts on whom Romney should pick because she thought it was important to maintain her impartiality. Although Romney had want-

d’s n e B f o n o i lect ts l n o a C r u A a t s e R Best

Ticket complete, crowds swell HIGH POINT, N.C. — On his second day as a vice-presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan emerged Sunday as a tough-talking sidekick and flattering biographer for Mitt Romney, playing roles that Romney, the presumptive Republican nominee, has sometimes struggled to master. Ryan, who has frequently clashed with President Barack Obama over the size and mission of the federal government as chairman of the House Budget Committee, denounced the president’s policies as failures and his governing style as corrosive. “President Obama came into office with hope and change,” Ryan said at a factory here. “His policies have been put in place. They are not working. They are failing us. He didn’t moderate one bit at all. So now he’s turned hope and change into attack and blame, and we’re not going to fall for it.” The crowds at Romney campaign stops have swelled significantly since he named Ryan as his running mate, breaking records for the candidate. There were 8,000 people at an outdoor rally in Manassas, Va., on Saturday, at which a number of attendees fainted because of long lines and humidity. Ryan’s burst of campaigning came as Democrats seized on his selection to try to define him as an extremist politician who would destroy Medicare and deprive women of abortion rights. “Congressman Ryan is a right-wing ideologue, and that is reflected in the positions that he’s taken,” said David Axelrod, a senior adviser to the Obama campaign. “He is quite extreme — good, good person, you know, genial person — but his views are quite harsh,” Axelrod said on the program “State of the Union” on CNN. — New York Times News Service

ed to consider naming a vice president earlier in the summer, he and Myers ended up deciding to make the announcement after he returned from his late July foreign trip. When he returned home to Boston on Aug. 1, Romney largely had made up his mind, Myers said. But first he gathered his top advisers for a final “gut check” meeting at campaign headquarters. Then Romney retired with Myers to her office, where after a long talk he told her his decision: Ryan. Romney picked up the phone to call Ryan, but did not yet offer him the job. They scheduled a face-to-face meeting for that Sunday, Aug. 5, in Boston. Speculation was swirling in the news media about Romney’s running mate, and Ryan was being followed by a campaign embed from NBC News. “We knew we had to be very diligent in throwing her off the scent,” Myers said. Myers wanted to ensure that Ryan would not be spotted making his way to Boston. So he told the congressman to dress casually for a flight between Chicago O’Hare to Hartford, Conn. Ryan, wearing jeans, a baseball hat and sunglasses, flew undetected to Hartford, where Myers’ 19-year-old son, Curt, picked him up in a rented sportutility vehicle and drove back to the family home in Brookline, Mass. After lunch with the Myerses, Romney drove down from his vacation home in Wolfeboro, N.H., where he was taking the day off the campaign trail, to see Ryan. They met alone in Myers’ dining room for more than an hour. That’s where Romney asked Ryan to be his vice presidential nominee, and Ryan accepted. “By the time we met in person I kind of knew it was going to happen,” Ryan recalled. “I

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was very humbled.” Romney told reporters, “We talked about the campaign and how it would be run and how we’d work together if we get the White House, what the relationship would be and how we’d interact and be involved in important decisions. We talked about our families and what this meant for them.” After accepting Romney’s offer, Ryan sat down with Rhoades, Gillespie, White and Spencer Zwick, the campaign’s national finance chairman. That was also when he learned of the deadly shooting at a Sikh temple in his Wisconsin district, Myers said. Meanwhile, Myers said, a handful of campaign officials, including Romney’s personal assistant, Kelli Harrison, began covertly planning the Ryan announcement for Friday in New Hampshire — which has become a symbolic base for Romney’s campaign. But those plans were scratched because the Sikh temple memorial service was Friday, and Ryan was going to attend it. So campaign officials turned to Plan B: A roll-out on Saturday at the start of Romney’s swing state bus tour. Hoping to maintain the element of surprise, the campaign went to elaborate lengths to keep Ryan’s movements undetected. After attending Friday’s memorial, Ryan returned home, where reporters had been staking him out. Ryan sneaked out the back door, through the woods and out to a waiting car driven by his chief of staff, Andy Speth. Ryan took a chartered flight from Waukegan, Ill., to Elizabeth City, N.C., where he was whisked to a Fairfield Inn to be reunited with his wife, Janna, and their three children. On Saturday, the Ryans drove to Norfolk for his debut on the USS Wisconsin.

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A6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

Credit Continued from A1 The concerns echo a recent abuse in the foreclosure system, a practice known as robo-signing in which banks produced similar documents for different homeowners and did not review them. “I would say that roughly 90 percent of the credit-card lawsuits are flawed and can’t prove the person owes the debt,” said Noach Dear, a state civil court judge in New York, who said he presides over as many as 100 such cases a day. Last year, American Express sued Felicia Tancreto, claiming that she had stopped making payments and owed more than $16,000 on her credit card. While Tancreto was behind on her payments, she contested owing the full amount, according to court records. In April, Dear dismissed the lawsuit, citing a lack of evidence. The American Express employee who testified, the judge noted, provided generic testimony about the way the company maintained its records. The same witness gave similar evidence in other cases, which the judge said amounted to “robo-testimony.”

Companies defend their actions American Express and other credit card companies defended their practices. Sonya Conway, a spokeswoman for American Express, said, “we strongly disagree with Judge Dear’s comments and believe that we have a strong process in place to ensure accuracy of testimony and affidavits provided to courts.” Interviews with dozens of state judges, regulators and lawyers, however, indicated that such flaws are increasingly common in credit card suits. In certain instances, lenders are trying to collect money from consumers who have already paid their bills or increasing the size of the debts by adding erroneous fees and interest costs. The scope of the lawsuits is vast. Some consumers dispute that they owe money at all. More commonly, borrowers are behind on their payments but contest the size of their debts. The problem, according to judges, is that credit card companies are not always following the proper legal procedures, even when they have the right to collect money. Certain cases hinge on mass-produced documents because the lenders do not provide proof of the outstanding debts, like the original contract or payment history. At times, lawsuits include falsified credit card statements, produced years after borrowers supposedly fell behind on their bills, according to the judges and others in the industry. “This is robo-signing redux,” Peter Holland, a lawyer who runs the Consumer Protection Clinic at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Lawsuits against credit

Online Continued from A1 As a public school, it’s free and required to accept all students. “We don’t limit who has the opportunity to attend,” J.D. McMahan, an agent for the school, said. “It’s a school of choice.” The school says students from a variety of backgrounds can find the flexibility a good fit. Examples include students who need extra attention in certain subjects, high school students who need to catch up on credits and students with health problems. Unlike a school building with set class times, students can work when it fits their schedules. “What it amounts to is the education wraps itself around the life of a child as opposed to a child having to report to a site every day,” McMahan said. “It’s tailored to the individual child.” Insight plans to also offer opportunities for students to gather for social activities like field trips.

Bend-La Pine Schools Bend-La Pine Online Plus,

card borrowers are flooding the courts, according to the judges. While the amount of bad debt has fallen since the financial crisis, lenders are trying to work through the soured loans and clean up their books. In all, borrowers are behind on $18.7 billion of credit card debt, or roughly 3 percent of the total, according to Equifax and Moody’s Analytics.

Decoys Continued from A1 Earlier this month, the OLCC went to 20 places to spot check who was selling to minors. Only two of the places, the Jackpot Food Mart and the Red Dragon Chinese Restaurant, both in Bend, sold to minors. Minor decoys present their valid driver’s licenses with their real birthdates

showing they are underage. In 2011, the statewide average compliance rate was 76 percent. In Deschutes County, the most recent check last month found a 90 percent compliance rate. Christie Scott, spokeswoman for the OLCC, said the goal is not to bust people, but prevent people from getting hurt. “If someone sells to a minor, they aren’t going to sell to

a minor again,” she said. “We don’t tell people that the person needs to be fired. We do tell the person selling to the minor that if that minor goes out and damages, injures or even causes a death ... the person who sold alcohol to them could be held responsible.” The protection, she said, is both for the minor and the server or seller. When Chick was a decoy,

she said, she took some flak from her friends who work in the restaurant and bar industry. But, she said, she felt like it was a public service. “I see it as keeping minors safe and me safe,” she said. The Bend OLCC office offers a free class on checking identifications. Contact the office at 541-388-6292. — Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

FTC taking steps The Federal Trade Commission is working with courts across the country to improve the process for pursuing borrowers who are behind on their credit card payments, mortgages and other bills. In a recent review of the consumer litigation system, the commission found that credit card issuers and other companies were basing some lawsuits on incomplete or false paperwork. “Our concerns center on the fact that debt collection lawsuits are a pure volume business,” said Tom Pahl, assistant director for the FTC’s division of financial practices. “The documentation is very bare bones.” The lenders disputed the suggestion that they file lawsuits that include flawed or inaccurate documentation. “We look at account records in our system to individually verify the accuracy of information before affidavits are filed and testimony is given,” said Conway, the American Express spokeswoman, who declined to comment on specific borrowers. The industry has faced similar criticism over practices stemming from the housing crisis. Amid a surge in foreclosures, state attorneys general accused the banks of using faulty documents without reviewing them and improperly seizing homes. In February, five big banks agreed to pay $26 billion to settle the matter. The errors in credit card suits often go undetected, according to the judges. Unlike in foreclosures, the borrowers typically do not show up in court to defend themselves. As a result, an estimated 95 percent of lawsuits result in default judgments in favor of lenders. With a default judgment, credit card companies can garnish a consumer’s wages or freeze bank accounts to get their money back. In 2010, Discover sued Taryn Gregory for more than $7,000 in credit card debt. Gregory, of Commerce, Ga., had fallen behind on her bills, but said she had only accumulated $4,000 in debt. After the suit was filed, Gregory, a 41-year-old childcare assistant, asked Discover for proof of the balance. The resulting documents, which were reviewed by The New York Times, have inconsistencies. One statement, for example, says it was produced in 2004, but advertisements on the bottom of the document bear a 2010 date. The lawsuit against Gregory is still pending. Discover declined to comment.

Find out more Bend-La Pine Online Plus will have two informational sessions on Monday, Aug. 20, at the Bend-La Pine Schools Education Center board room, 520 N.W. Wall St., in Bend. The first session will be from 1 to 2 p.m. The second session will be from 4 to 5 p.m. To find out more, call 541355-1050. To find out more about Insight School of Oregon, visit or.insightschools.net or call 855-710-0911.

the district’s new program, isn’t billing itself as a school. Instead, it’s a program within the school district that can be used in multiple ways. For Bend-La Pine Schools, which has already offered online courses for several years to high school students, the program builds upon that and makes online instruction available for all ages. For example, a student could take the program for a fulltime load of online courses, or only use it to gain additional

Olympics Continued from A1 She appears in gargantuan, Mao-size posters throughout the town. The mere mention of her inspires almost giddy delight in the residents of Sheffield, a long-hard-on-its-luck northern town perhaps best known to Americans as the setting of the blue-collar striptease film “The Full Monty.” In the words of Rachel Dempsey, the manager of the bar adjacent to the golden mailbox, “This town’s gone mental.” After months and months of high unemployment and stern austerity, crooked bankers and shady journalists, and the hangover of riots that set parts of London on fire, the idea of a national revel seemed almost laughable, even more preposterous than revelry would usually seem in this land of sang-froid. Among those whom Mayor Boris Johnson of London calls “the Olympo-skeptics and gloomadon poppers,” it was almost a sport in itself to point out every budget overrun and logistical hiccup as evidence of the disaster that would naturally follow on such an earnest enterprise as the Olympic Games.

‘At fever pitch’ Even after the opening ceremony, which surprised many for being properly spectacular and deeply, ironically and absurdly British, there were still expectations of a debacle, with incompetent security officials, traffic snarls, apocalyptic downpours, corporate bloat and an embarrassingly low berth in the medal table. Many of those outside of London considered the games a local phenomenon, and a wasteful one at that. And yet as the games come to a close, here in Sheffield as well as all over Britain, a patriotic delirium has descended. “The attitude was, ‘It has nothing to do with us up here,’” said Martyn Boardman, a consultant in town on business who with his phone had just snapped a photograph of the mailbox, one of more than two dozen around the country that were painted gold in honor of hometown Olympic champions. “But then one or two medals, and all of a sudden, we’re at fever pitch.” The perk-up began with the opening ceremony but took hold on Aug. 1, when the cyclist Bradley Wiggins, the first Briton to win the Tour de France, became the only rider to have won the Tour and an Olympic gold medal in the same year. “Whatever happens from here,” a columnist for The

instruction in an area while also attending classes at a local school. “It’s not an online school,” said Shay Mikalson, the district’s executive director of curriculum and instructional technology. “It’s technology resources we’re trying to provide all of our students.” Mikalson stressed that the program isn’t intended to replace schools — just add another option for the district’s students. It’s also a choice that’s wellsuited for nontraditional students, Mikalson said. Examples include students traveling with their parents, recovering from health problems or working day jobs to help their families. The program doesn’t force students and parents to decide between online and classroom instruction, though. For example, classroom teachers can provide the online curriculum to students as a supplemental resource to extend learning beyond the school day, Mikalson said.

National study A recent study calls into question the results of virtual schools in which students re-

Steve Forrest / New York Times News Service

Visitors take portraits next to a mailbox painted in gold in honor of Jessica Ennis, a gold medalwinning British heptathlete, in Sheffield, England. As the medal count kept rising, so did the country’s enthusiasm for the games.

Daily Mail wrote, “it will be hard to top this.” But the golds continued — seven more in cycling, four in rowing, three in equestrian. There have been British golds won in the cathedrals of English sport, like Andy Murray’s tennis victory at Wimbledon, and in events that most people would be hard-pressed to define, like men’s keirin. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have been seen at events displaying get-aroom levels of affection, and articles have appeared in the news media exploring why the British had not won gold medals in a given event rather than the more characteristic converse. But what had been a balmy Olympic fever became a roiling epidemic on Aug. 4, when the British had their greatest night of track success ever, with a gold in the long jump, Britain’s first gold in the 10,000 meters and Ennis’ golden smile coming across the finish line in the final event of the heptathlon. With that, the whole of Britain seemed nearly to come unglued. “I’ve been in the Millennium Stadium when Wales have clinched a last-gasp win against England in the Six Nations,” wrote a sports reporter for The Western Mail, a Welsh paper, describing a rugby triumph, “but I have never heard such a noise as that which erupted on Saturday.” This is saying something indeed. While England’s St. George’s cross, Wales’s red dragon and the Scottish saltire are all common sights

in soccer season, as the kingdom un-unites in rooting partisanship, a Union Jack is typically a rare find. That is no longer true. “I’ve never seen so many Union Jacks,” Rachel Dickens, a teacher in Sheffield, said. “They’re on cars and houses in people’s gardens.” The whole display has even prompted a small backlash, mostly in the person of Morrissey, the musician, who to a list of tour dates appended a statement disparaging the whole spectacle and questioning whether England had “ever been quite so foul with patriotism.”

ceive online instruction. The study, completed by the Colorado-based National Education Policy Center, found that virtual schools operated by K12 Inc., a for-profit company, have weaker academic results than brick-and-mortar schools. K12’s online curricula have caught on in Oregon and across the U.S. The Herndon, Va.-based company, started in 1999, operates virtual schools and also provides curricula to schools. (K12 doesn’t directly operate the Bend-La Pine Schools program or the Insight School of Oregon, but its curricula will be used by both.) The study found that just 27.4 percent of K12-operated schools made adequate yearly progress in 2010-11 under the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. Meanwhile, 52 percent of public schools made adequate yearly progress. On-time graduation rates were also low. K12-operated virtual schools graduated students at a rate of 49.1 percent. That falls short of the overall 79.4 percent graduation rate of public schools. Gary Miron, a professor of

education with Western Michigan University, is one of the study’s drafters. He says its findings point to broader challenges with virtual schools, not just those of K12 Inc. Miron said virtual education has a place in the future, but that parents also may need to invest more time into their children’s education if the learning happens outside a traditional classroom setting. “They need to know if a student’s going to succeed in this model, they have to be heavily involved,” Miron said. With lower grades, that’s easier, but it is more challenging for parents when their children are in higher grades and taking advanced math classes, he said. Miron drew a distinction between virtual schools with fulltime online instruction and other programs, such as those that combine classroom and online instruction. K12 disputes the findings of the study. In a statement, the company said the report relies on “static end-of-the-year test data” that doesn’t go far enough. For example, the report doesn’t look at similar student populations, only school-

County pride, too But Morrissey appears to be in the minority. The success of Britain is such that people are tallying up medals not only by country but by county, informing a reporter where Yorkshire alone would stand in the medal table (16th as of Friday night, but 11th in golds, ahead of Japan and the Netherlands and only one behind Australia). And some have asked whether it is time to finally move past this Victorian business of cheering for a good game rather than a victory, to becoming, as one English photographer said, “a bit more one-eyed about things.” “Britain’s sort of moved on from this stiff-upper-lip reserve to something a bit more aggressive, having a desire to win rather than just play fair and settle for second best,” said Stephan Richeux, a spokesman for the Notting-

ham City Council. As part of this new aggressive Britain, people are apparently even going to the gym. Richeux said yearly memberships to Nottingham-run fitness centers were up 127 percent over the same two-week period last year. (Then again, Olympian effort being what it is, queries about Lipoglaze, a nonsurgical fat reduction treatment performed at the LoveLite clinic in London, have “more than quadrupled” since the games began, said Debra Robson, one of the clinic’s directors.) In Sheffield, meanwhile, the line at the mailbox continues. “I’ve watched a lot more than I thought I would and I watched more diverse sport — some of it I don’t even know the rules,” said Richard Hill, who came to take a photograph of the mailbox despite being an employee of the Royal Mail and, one might imagine, having seen his share of mailboxes. “Before the games, it was the London games, and now it’s the British games,” Hill said. “It’s like we actually put on something well, which we don’t normally have a lot of confidence about doing.” Hill’s colleague Chris Sanderson declined to photograph the mailbox, however. Someone must stand for the old verities. “I think it’s still the London games and I think they should keep it,” he said. “There’s no way to get away from it. I’ve got to sit through two weeks of absolutely dire television. It’s even worse than normal.”

level data, the company said. K12 also said the study doesn’t take into account overall student growth, which isn’t evident on adequate yearly progress reports. Based on surveys, the company said 76 percent of parents cited concerns about the traditional school environment as their motivation for choosing K12 programs. Overall, more than 90 percent of parents said they were satisfied and 88 percent said they would recommend K12, the company said, citing its survey results. Mikalson said the K12 curriculum is just one of an assortment of tools and curricula for online learning in Bend-La Pine Schools, also noting that the study focused on K12-operated schools. Asked about the study’s assertion that more parent involvement is needed, McMahan said more parental input will help children regardless of their choice of school. “I think it’s the responsibility of a parent no matter how their child is educated to be involved,” McMahan said. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com.


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

HEALTH NOTIFICATION

Are You Hard of Hearing?

A major name brand hearing aid provider wishes to let you try a remarkable new digital hearing instrument in the area. This offer is FREE OF CHARGE and you are under no obligation. These revolutionary 100% Digital instruments use the latest technology to comfortably and almost invisibly help you hear more clearly. This technology solves the “stopped up ears”, and “head in a barrel” sensation some people experience. If you wish to try this new technology you will be required to have your hearing tested in our office FREE OF CHARGE** to determine candidacy and review the results with the hearing instruments with our hearing care specialist. Your trial will begin in the office, if you are satisfied with the improvement in your hearing and you wish to test the hearing aids further you will be allowed to try them RISK FREE*. If you wish to keep the instruments you may do so at a great savings. Benefits of hearing aids vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing test, and proper fit. This is a wonderful opportunity to determine if hearing help is available for your hearing loss while you evaluate your performance with this technology.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED AND YOU WISH TO BE INCLUDED CALL TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT! PEOPLE WILL BE SELECTED by August 22, 2012

Call Now For Your Appointment Bend River Promenade Shanelle Vega, AAS

3188 N Hwy. 97, Suite 118 next door to T.J. Maxx

(541) 389-3381

Hearing Aid Specialist, Owner

•Risk Free Offer-the aids must be returned in satisfactory condition within 45 days of the completion of fittings. If you are not completely satisfied 100% of your purchase price will be refunded. **Hearing tests are always free. Hearing test is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. Hearing aids do not restore natural hearing. Individual experiences vary depending on severity of loss, accuracy of evaluation, proper fit and ability to adapt to amplification.

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

Just 15 Minutes From Bend! There’s something for everyone at Sunriver. From World Class Shopping and Dining, to activities such as fishing, mini-golf, day spas, art faires, music festivals, ice skating, bike riding, golf, tennis, aquatic centers, marathons and so much more! You’ll be sure to find an activity you’re in the mood for! Sunriver is your vacation paradise, right at your back door! August 5-22 Sunriver Music Festival

General Information 541-585-5000

August 17 & 18 Live Music at the Owl’s Nest Bar & Grille

Aquatics Information

August 19 Brunch at the Meadows at the Lodge August 19 Woodstock Weekend* - 1pm - 3pm: Theatrical Presentation of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” accompanied by the music of Woodstock - 5pm - 8pm: Bart Hafeman (Tribute to the ’70s) August 19 Sunriver Music Festival Piano Recital, Great Hall August 20 Sunriver Music Festival Concert III, Great Hall August 20 - 23 AJGA Junior Open August 22 Sunriver Music Festival Concert IV, Great Hall August 23 - 25 Ghost Tree Invitational & Dinner on the Range August 24-26 Sunriver Stars Community Theater (SHARC) www.sunriverstars.com August 24 & 25 Live Music at the Owl’s Nest Bar & Grille August 26 Brunch at the Meadows at the Lodge August 26 Elliot (Motivational Pop Rock)* August 26 - 31 Pacific Amateur Golf Classic September 1 So Long for Summer September 1 Sunriver SunFest Wine Festival (SHARC) 12 noon – 7pm

September 1-2 Sunriver Marathon for a Cause (Boston Qualifier) September 2 Sunriver SunFest Wine Festival (SHARC) 11am – 6pm September 2 Michelle Van Handel Quartet* (Light Jazz/Latin) September 29 Fly Fishing Festival at Sunriver

*These are all FREE concerts in the SHARC Amphitheater from 5pm-8pm every Sunday through September 2nd. The SHARC Amphitheater provides grass seating where people are encouraged to bring a blanket or low profile beach chairs. (No dogs) No outside food or beverages.

Artists Gallery Sunriver 30 Local Artists Photography ~ Gourd Art Woodwork ~ Mixed Media Oils ~ Sculpture ~ Jewelry Fabric Art ~ Watercolors Pencil/Pen & Ink ~ Ceramics & More!

51700 Beaver Drive Sunriver Village, Building 19 Sunriver, Oregon (541) 593-4382 www.artistsgallerysunriver.com Reception Every Second Saturday!

MINI GOLF • ALPINE EXPRESS TR AIN • BUMPER CARS • AND MUCH MUCH MORE


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, B2 Editorials, B4

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Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

Stormy end likely for week

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Bend police expect they’ll take in around 100 reports through their online crime reporting system in the first month the system has been available. The system, provided by California company Coplogic, went live July 17.

The Bend Police Department paid Coplogic approximately $12,000 to set up the system, according to Lt. Paul Kansky, and will pay roughly $7,000 annually for software updates and maintenance. For now, Bend residents can use the system to report a limited range of common property crimes

Temperatures at or above 90 degrees are expected for most of this week, with a chance of showers and thunderstorms in Central Oregon starting on Friday, according to the National Weather Service. The high for today is expected to reach 93 degrees, with a low of 51. On Tuesday, the high should stay in the low 90s, with a low of 45. Wednesday is expected to be cooler, with the high dropping to 87 degrees and a low of 53. The temperatures are likely to edge back up Thursday, when a high of 90 to 91 is predicted. On Friday, the high is expected to stay around 90 degrees, with a low of about 51. There’s also a chance of showers and thunderstorms starting Friday and extending into Saturday and Sunday, when temperatures might dip as low as 83 degrees. There is a 20 to 30 percent chance of showers for the weekend, with the highest probability of rain on Friday evening and Saturday afternoon, said Douglas Weber, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Pendleton.

— e.g. criminal mischief, lost property, theft from a vehicle, basic theft and noninjury hit-and-run. So far, police have resolved two cases reported online, Kansky said, recovering a stolen bicycle and a solving a hit-and-run. See System / B2

Full house at the Faire

— Bulletin staff report

More briefing and News of Record, B2

FIRE UPDATE Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx.

Kelly Ensor, of Corvallis, checks out Cameron Kaseberg’s tent at the Sunriver Art Faire on Sunday. Kaseberg won best in show for his works, called The Art of Solvent Transfer.

• Sunriver Art Faire had to turn away about 70 interested artists for this year’s event slow her down, either. “Once you start painting, all you think about is what you’re doing,” she said. The art festival is gaining popularity as an annual event, despite its start just two years ago. At the first event in 2010, there were 29 artists. See Faire / B2

Bend

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events are the likely culprit. “The increasing warmth of the area might cause the cores of these moraines, the rubble and ice in there that binds (the dams) together, to melt a bit more,” Sherrod said. The Three Fingered Jack trailhead is located about 40 miles northwest of Bend, near the Santiam Pass. Circ Lake is about five miles from the trailhead, Willis said. See Debris flow / B2

Detour

EMPIRE AVENUE AND 18TH STREET

The intersection of 18th Street and Empire Avenue is closed through October for the construction of a new roundabout. Traffic will be detoured around the intersection.

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CENTURY DRIVE

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

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The Oregon Department of Transportation is doing major paving work on Century Drive. Contractor Knife River plans to pave from 3 p.m. to 7 a.m., Sunday through Friday, until the project is finished, according to ODOT. Drivers can expect delays of up to 20 minutes. Paving will begin at the Bend city limit and progress toward Mount Bachelor. Paving will stop during special events scheduled on the road. Sources: City of Bend, Oregon Department of Transportation

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BROOKSWOOD BOULEVARD AND POWERS ROAD

The intersection of Brookswood Boulevard and Powers Road is closed through October for the construction of a new roundabout. Traffic will be detoured around the intersection. 4

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Lakeview

1. Barry Point Fire • Acres: 23,048 • Containment: 25% • Cause: Lightning 2. Holloway Fire • Acres: 318,547 • Containment: 40% • Cause: Lightning 3. Ten Mile Complex • Acres: 14,036 • Containment: 60% • Cause: Lightning 4. Buckhead Complex • Acres: 136 • Containment: 15% • Cause: Lightning

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In a rare event that shows nature is still in charge, a wave of boulders, sand and mud slid down the mountain from Circ Lake near Three Fingered Jack in the Canyon Creek Meadow late last month. “Imagine very rocky, muddy slurries with sand and silt … something of the consistency of wet cement,” said David Sherrod, a scientist with

the U.S. Geological Survey. Debris flows, as they are called, are rare and unpredictable. This most recent case is believed to be the third or fourth documented debris flow from Canyon Creek’s mountain lakes in the latter half of the century, said Bart Willis, a geologist with the Deschutes National Forest. The exact causes are unknown, but geologists speculate that weather

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Debris flow reported near Three Fingered Jack By Holly Pablo

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SUNRIVER — Under the hot August sun, Bonnie Junell dabbed her paintbrush onto a canvas, painting a landscape in oil: reeds in water with ripples from a stone tossed into it. Junell, of Vancouver, Wash., was one of 60 artists who came to the third an-

nual Sunriver Art Faire, which ended Sunday. The three-day outdoor event, organized by the Sunriver Women’s Club, raises funds for local nonprofit groups and efforts. For Junell, working at her art booth in the Village at Sunriver is a way to show clients the work that goes into paintings. The hot temperatures didn’t

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By Ben Botkin

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— Lily Raff McCaulou is a columnist for The Bulletin. 541-617-7836, lraff@bendbulletin.com

Online crime reports rolling in

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lympic gold medalist Ashton Eaton was born in Portland, went to high school in Bend and lives in Eugene. But he’s from La Pine. At least, that’s if La Pine residents have any say in it. Eaton attended La Pine Elementary School. His grandparents still live there. He mentions his La Pine roots in media interviews sometimes. La Pine residents — who complain that their town is often overshadowed by Bend and Redmond — are basking in the glow of decathlon’s brightest star. As the Olympics approached, La Pine businesses posted messages such as “Go Get ’Em Ashton” and “Go Ashton Eaton — La Pine’s Olympian” on their letter boards. Thursday happened to be Eaton’s grandmother’s birthday, so the Olympian and his mother had flowers delivered to her house. But, as La Pine Elementary School principal Tammy Doty points out, the real gift was the gold medal that Eaton won in London that day. The medal might as well have been a gift to all of La Pine. “It shows that anyone can do anything,” Doty says. Teacher Jodie Breneman still remembers meeting little Ashton Eaton. He enrolled in her first-grade class a few weeks after the 1994-95 school year started. He walked in and flashed his wide grin, which was missing several teeth. Breneman was charmed on the spot. And she wasn’t alone. “The kids, the staff — everybody loved Ashton,” Doty says. Breneman says the boy was quiet but eager to participate. He gave his full effort to every task, she adds. When Breneman retired six years ago, Eaton came to her retirement party and brought flowers. “For most of us, he was truly special before this,” Breneman says. “If he had never gone on (to the Olympics), he would have been a student that I kept in touch with.” School officials say Eaton’s mother, Roz, set a good example of community involvement. A country music fan, she volunteered at the elementary school to teach line dancing to physical education classes. Even in grade school, there were hints that Eaton was a gifted athlete. “I remember having to tell him to walk in the hall. Good thing he didn’t listen,” Doty says with a laugh. Last week, school staff gathered around a computer in the front office to watch Eaton win the gold. In such a small town, locals predict that some of Eaton’s fame will rub off on his grandparents. “They’ll get a lot of high fives, I’d imagine,” says Brent Fisher, manager of Gordy’s Truck Stop Restaurant. Eaton now joins golfer Tom Watson and singer Kenny Rogers on his list of celebrities who have eaten at Gordy’s. Of course, La Pine isn’t the only place laying claim to Ashton Eaton. At Bend’s Tower Theatre on Thursday — where the decathlon’s final two events, the javelin throw and 1,500-meter race, aired live — the crowd looked like an ode to Eaton’s entire sporting career. Some, of course, wore red, white and blue, in honor of Eaton’s spot on Team USA. Others wore green and yellow, a nod to the University of Oregon, where Eaton earned his degree and won five NCAA championships. Some even donned red, white and black Mountain View High School regalia. The clothes seemed to be a way for fans to claim a piece of Eaton for themselves. “I’m an Oregon Duck, just like Eaton.” Or, “I’m a Mountain View Cougar and so is he.” That a champion like Eaton grew from the same rocky soil where all of us tread can’t help but make this place a little more special. Melissa Cooper, records secretary at La Pine Elementary School, says Eaton’s achievements are an inspiration. “Just because you’re in a small town,” she says, “doesn’t mean you can’t have success.”

LOCAL BRIEFING

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La Pine stakes its claim on Eaton’s past

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

System LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from B1

Pacific Crest Trail hiker found dead A hiker from California was found dead at his campsite near Charlton Lake on Saturday afternoon after he was reported missing, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office said. William Jeffery, 54, of San Marcos, Calif., appeared to have died of natural causes, the Sheriff’s Office said in a news release. The Sheriff’s Office received a report about the hiker Friday evening, when his wife reported him missing. Jeffery was hiking the Pacific Crest Trail after his wife dropped him off at Elk Lake on Tuesday. She reported him missing when he didn’t meet her at Odell Lake as agreed. Because it was getting dark and Jeffery was an experienced hiker and had food, water and shelter, deputies decided to check up on him in the morning to see if he had hiked out on his own. Deputies and Deschutes County Search and Rescue team members started looking for him on Saturday morning, and found him at 3:32 p.m. The Lane County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue team assisted in the effort.

Continued from B1 Kansky said police often don’t solve a large portion of the kinds of crimes that can be reported through the online system, but the reports are useful. Car break-ins or vandalism, for instance, often involve dozens of offenses by the same suspect or suspects, he said. When police do capture a suspect, reports can help link

additional acts to the suspect and return stolen property to its owner. Although police will continue taking reports over the phone and in person, moving some reporting online should free up officers to spend more time investigating crimes. Kansky said driving to a victim’s home, taking a report, and returning to the office to write the report generally takes 20 minutes to an hour of

an officer’s time. If, as projected, Bend police collect 1,200 reports online in the first year — at an average of 45 minutes per report — it adds up to 900 hours of officer time saved, he said, or nearly the equivalent of adding a half-time officer. The system should also save time for crime victims, who — during busy periods of the day — might have to wait more than an hour for an officer to come to their home.

“They’re going to spend just as much time telling an officer about this — and definitely more waiting for the officer — than they are just going online and doing it themselves,� Kansky said. To report a crime online, visit www.ci.bend.or.us, go to the “Departments� link and find “Online Police Report� under the “Police� subhead. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

N  R CIVIL SUITS Filed Aug. 1

12CV0756: Green Tree Servicing Inc. v. Chunyan Zhou, Yongyan Wang and RBS Citizens N.A., complaint, $144,720.36 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0757: The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as successor in interest to JP Morgan Chase Bank N.A. as trustee for structured asset mortgage investments II Inc. Bear Stearns Alt-A Trust 2005-8 Mortgage pass-through certificates, series 2005-8 v. Tracy Page, Benjamin Page and Wells Fargo Bank N.A., complaint, $185,751.02 12CV0758: Melissa Adams v. Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Inc. and Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 12CV0759: Leah Jensen, personal representative of the estate of Dean A. Jensen, deceased v. Dr. Michael E. Villano, MD and Dr. C. Christian Friess, MD, complaint, $838,000 Filed Aug. 2

12CV0760: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. v. Richard G. Cope, Kimberly A. Cope, state of Oregon and Tall Pines Fifth Addition, complaint, $363,719.65 12CV0761: Kevin Trent v. Jennifer Womack, complaint, $119,588.34 12CV0762: Anthony A. Timineri v. V.R. Inc. dba Jack-In-The-Box, Vinod Mehta and Alejandro Rendon, complaint, $98,000 12CV0763: Krea Fetters v. Jeffrey L. Atkinson Jr., complaint, $98,958.86 12CV0764: Capital One Bank N.A. v. Christopher Bryant and N.W. Garage Cabinet Co., complaint, $10,316.86

— Bulletin staff report

Filed Aug. 3

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................ 541-617-7829 Redmond ........ 541-977-7185 Sisters............. 541-977-7185 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7837 Crook ..............541-633-2184 Jefferson ........541-633-2184 Salem ..............541-554-1162 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Business ........ 541-383-0360 Education ....... 541-977-7185 Public lands .....541-617-7812 Public safety.....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Submissions: • Letters and opinions: Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Details on the Editorials page inside. Contact: 541-383-0358, bulletin@bendbulletin.com

• Civic Calendar notices: Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendarâ€? in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

• School news and notes: Email news items and notices of general interest to news@bendbulletin.com. Email announcements of teens’ academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. Email college notes, military graduations and reunion info to bulletin@bendbulletin .com. Details: School coverage runs Wednesday in this section. Contact: 541-383-0358

• Obituaries, Death Notices: Details on the Obituaries page inside. Contact: 541-617-7825, obits@bendbulletin.com

• Community events: Email event information to communitylife@bend bulletin.com or click on “Submit an Eventâ€? at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Details: The calendar appears on Page 3 in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0351

• Births, engagements, marriages, partnerships, anniversaries: Details: The Milestones page publishes Sunday in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0358

YOUNG RANCH HAND

Freeda Endicott, of Redmond, snapped this photo of “‘Tater,’ the little cowboy with a big attitude,� during a calf branding using a Canon ELPH. “He had a juice mustache, his boots were unzipped and on the wrong feet, his hat was as big as he was,� wrote Endicott. “He was great!�

Faire Continued from B1 This year, about 130 artists applied, and 60 were selected through a jury process. That meant a wide variety of artwork. Besides paintings, artists also brought sculptures, pottery and glasswork. Gil Harrison, a potter from Cottage Grove, had a mix of bowls, mugs and “ritual jars.� For those three-legged jars, Harrison leaves the use up to the owners. “I call them ritual jars waiting for a ritual,� he said. Kevin Budde, of Portland, brought glasswork created from wine bottles. To make them, he heats up old wine bottles to almost 1,600 degrees. From there, they take a new shape as a wine

Debris flow Continued from B1 There are a handful of these lakes in Central Oregon, which are products of the “Little Ice Age� from the 1800s to the 1930s, Willis said. When the glaciers began melting in the 1930s, lakes formed behind moraines and small dams that are susceptible to rupture. When the dam at Circ Lake widened and the lake lost about 4.3 cubic meters of height, water and silt dropped into the meadows 400 meters away, Sherrod said. He compared it to 500 dump trucks dumping their cargo at once. “These lakes have the capacity to burst suddenly and shed large flood events,� Sherrod said. The lake measured 20 feet

bottle — albeit a flat, decorative one. Budde, who left a banking career for glasswork 12 years ago, said he takes the craftsmanship seriously. “My name’s on it,� he said. For the youngsters, the Kids Art Center offered a chance to try their hands at art. Children made rain sticks out of paper towel tubes, decorating them with markers and stickers Betty Jo Simmons, chairwoman of the Women’s Club, estimated the event will raise $18,000 to $20,000. There was no entrance fee for attendees; the money comes primarily from business sponsors and the spaces that artists rent. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

P  O    For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin .com/officials.

CONGRESS U.S. Senate

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Bonnie Junell, of Vancouver, Wash., paints a pond scene using oils at the Sunriver Art Faire on Sunday.

“We don’t have a lot of features that change rapidly. These (debris flows) remind us that the Earth’s surface has a variety of time scales that we don’t even think about. It lets us know that we live in a very vibrant world.� — David Sherrod, scientist, U.S. Geological Survey

deep in the late 1990s. The abrupt widening of the dam in July made it less capable of holding water, so it’s now measuring at about half the depth of 15 years ago, Sherrod said. There is silt and milkylooking mud near the Three Fingered Jack meadow, but hikers and campers need not worry about the debris getting in the way of recreational activities. The trails weren’t affected and it is safe to continue rec-

12CV0765: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. v. Roselin L. Nickerson, complaint, $111,812.05 12CV0766: Green Tree Servicing LLC v. Diana C. Levey, The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as successor trustee to JP Morgan Chase Bank N.A. as trustee on behalf of the certificate holders of the CWHEW Inc. CWHEQ Revolving home equity loan trust series 2006-F, complaint, $333,265.59 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0767: Green Tree Servicing LLC v. Neiko D. Bernardo and Reena M. Bernardo, complaint, $178,227.04 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0768: Nationstar Mortgage LLC v. Michael A. Minor, Angela L. Minor and Monticello Estates Homeowner’s Association, complaint, $331,246.82 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0769: GMAC Mortgage LLC v. Michael Swofford and Nancy Swofford, complaint, $340,145.21 plus interest, costs and fees

reating in the area, said Willis. It is not likely to happen again soon, he said. Hikers likely won’t notice an immediate change in scenery, but Sherrod said the lakes may change into a valley under nature’s clock. “There are more than 50 species of wildflowers in bloom there,� Sherrod said. “A child who walks up there today to see the wildflowers, or to hike up and look at the lake, might not be able to see a lake there when they’re 60

years old.� Sherrod said geologists will again measure Circ Lake’s water levels by the end of the month and create new maps based on the changes. “We don’t have a lot of features that change rapidly,� Sherrod said. “These things remind us that the Earth’s surface has a variety of time scales that we don’t even think about. It lets us know that we live in a very vibrant world.� — Reporter: 541-633-2160, hpablo@bendbulletin.com

Rebecca Nonweiler, MD, Board Certified

(541) 318-7311

www.northwestmedispa.com

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 107 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-330-9142 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 1051 N.W. Bond St., Suite 400 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-389-4408 Fax: 541-389-4452 Web: http://walden.house.gov/


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B3

O N Holloway Fire growth slows, officials report

AGING IN OREGON

Photos by Dominique Fong / The Oregonian

The Wild Bunch members joke about the stigmas of Alzheimer’s disease Tuesday. The group of Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers gather each month in an effort to battle the loneliness surrounding the disease.

The Associated Press PORTLAND — The massive Holloway Fire in southeast Oregon continued to grow, but only marginally, wildfire managers said Sunday. The fire has burned 279 square miles of brush and sagebrush in Oregon and 218 square miles in Nevada. No occupied homes are threatened in the sparsely populated area, but the fire concerns a ranching community that lost much of its summer forage in the recent Long Draw Fire. Fire spokesman Jack deGolia said several abandoned homes are threatened. Another fire representative, Alexis West, said there was not much growth

in the blaze Sunday but added that a shift in wind expected later could test fire lines. Officials also said dry lightning was forecast overnight Sunday. Dry conditions and thick vegetation have made working on the fire difficult, according to officials.

Antelope hunters Antelope season opened Saturday, and the Bureau of Land Management closed land west of U.S. Highway 95 between Whitehorse Road and the Nevada state line to protect hunters. West said the closure remained in effect Sunday. The blaze, named for a mountain in northern Nevada, was 40 percent contained. In south-central Oregon, the Barry Point Fire remained ac-

tive Sunday and had burned about 48 square miles of timber, brush and grass southwest of Lakeview. Like the Holloway Fire, the blaze was ignited this week by lightning. Fire spokeswoman Renee Snyder said an evacuation notice remained in effect for about 15 homes near Drews Reservoir. Residents in another 30 homes have been advised they might receive such a notice and should have a plan in place if the situation worsens. Fire crews have contained 25 percent of the fire that’s burning on private and Fremont-Winema National Forest lands. The weather forecast for the area where Oregon, California and Nevada converge calls for hot, dry weather through Friday.

Alzheimer’s patients get a sense 3 wounded in shootout near Albany of community in Portland groups By Dominique Fong The Oregonian

PORTLAND — They used to call themselves I Forget, they joked. Until a few forgot the name, and they quickly scrapped it for the Wild Bunch. The group of Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers love to carry on like teenagers at their monthly potlucks, chuckling at the ironies of memory loss, losing track of how many glasses of wine they’ve had amid the laughs. “If we can talk about it and laugh about forgetfulness, it tends to lighten the load,” said Dave Caswell, a resident of the Oak Hills neighborhood north of Beaverton who started the social group of 12 people. They’ve banded together over the past two years against a brain disease that has no cure, only treatments that delay its worsening. A social taboo also lingers. The fear of growing old and “going crazy” keeps people from asking for help and contributes to feelings of isolation. Social meet-ups, such as the Wild Bunch and a monthly Alzheimer’s Cafe in Beaverton, have become crucial to overcoming the stigma and loneliness of Alzheimer’s disease. Oregon’s first statewide plan for Alzheimer’s disease, recently released, underscored the need for increased public awareness. The report called for more partnerships with advocacy groups, more training for medical and social service professionals and a central website about the disease and related dementias. About 76,000 Oregonians have Alzheimer’s, and more than 165,000 people are unpaid caregivers — often a spouse, relative or close friend — who report high emotional and physical stress. People often don’t know the difference between signs of normal aging — such as occasionally forgetting your keys — and Alzheimer’s disease. That feeds into a public fear similar to that surrounding cancer two decades ago, said Kristrun Grondal, the Oregon program director for the Alzheimer’s Association. “There’s a need for caregivers and people with the disease to have a place to go to socialize, to learn, to interact, to prevent some of that isolation and minimize some of that stress often for people with this disease,” Grondal said. “We’re very glad that people are taking some action and building some services to meet this need.” Lifelong friends Kappy Lundy, 71, and Barbara Thompson, 67, found support from other couples in their social group the Wild Bunch. After being married to the same man, their friendship grew stronger. Lundy stepped in as caregiver to Thompson, who has mild cognitive impairment. The Wild Bunch began as a motley group of strangers. During an eight-month series on memory loss, five mar-

Barbara Thompson and Candice Luis of the Wild Bunch share food at their monthly potluck Tuesday. Thompson has minor cognitive impairment from Alzheimer’s.

ried couples and two women shared some of the most intimate experiences of their lives. When the class ended, they weren’t about to let that go. “My wife and I were on our way home from that meeting, and we said, no, this can’t be,” said Caswell, 78. “We’ve really grown to love these people and care for each other. Let’s invite them all over to our house in Beaverton for a potluck.” Dinner parties became a respite from loneliness. Frank discussions over home-cooked chicken soothed daily frustrations. Giving up driving. Handing over cellphones. Running into the despair that the disease is only getting worse. After his wife, Hallie, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, Caswell recognized that he had to separate the disease from the woman he fell in love with, the enthusiastic horseback rider, the mother of their four children. “We’re in this together,” Caswell said. “Don’t get mad at the person. Get mad at the disease. Don’t get frustrated with your wife. Get frustrated with the doggone disease that she’s got, that she didn’t volunteer for.” They have their moments. She once broke down in sobs at Trader Joe’s. He pays the bills, cooks, drives, does the laundry, loads the dishwasher. Not that he didn’t do those before — there’s just nobody now to help him. Hallie Caswell, 75, knows it’s hard on her husband. “It’s not guilt, because I’m not trying to do it,” she said. “I just feel sad. Real sad.” She wouldn’t know what she’d do, she said, if the Wild Bunch broke up. The Wild Bunch stand by an unwritten pact. Help, whenever needed, is just a phone call away. Calls have led to meals for the sick, rides for Alzheimer’s patients who gave up their driver’s license and many a coffee chat. They hope others will find their own niche of companionship. “We, as a group, really clicked,” said Milton Amaral, a Lake Oswego caregiver who looks after his wife, Meme, who has Alzheimer’s. “We’ve just been doing that, sharing joys and heartaches.”

In Beaverton, a free monthly Alzheimer’s Cafe held in Southminster Presbyterian Church lifts the pressure off burdened caregivers. Kathy Ayers, a social worker for LifeWorks NW, and Suzanne Van Slyke, a nurse, modeled the first Alzheimer’s Cafe in Oregon after a similar concept popular in the Netherlands. Anyone can attend the meetings. Social mingling is followed by a short presentation from an expert, such as a representative for an assisted living community or a lawyer specializing in elder care. “There’s really not a lot of rules,” Ayers said. “It’s just an opportunity to ask questions and get answers. So if we see things that need help, we can give referrals.” Warren Aney, 76, of Metzger, showed up to stay abreast of the disease that has affected his wife, Joyce. He insisted on getting tested for his own memory, in case it starts decaying, too. He goes for walks with the dog, to keep from being lazy at home, he said. “The less you do, the less you find you’re able to do,” Aney said. Aney, a former state wildlife biologist with a love of science, resolved that his wife’s disease would not stop their adventures. They’ve been a team for 52 years, traveling to Tahiti and Bora Bora. The days are simpler now for the Aneys: eating, sleeping and going to aquatics class. “We’re not able to engage in deep conversations anymore,” Aney said. He paused, his voice labored. “Which ... I miss ... of course.” But that won’t stop him from treating her. The next destination may not be Australia, a place he’s dreamed of visiting since grade school, or faraway Sweden, as they’d once discussed. They’ll stay closer to home, visiting Steens Mountain and glacier-carved gorges. Like the Aneys, the Wild Bunch will keep moving onward. “Alzheimer’s can bring you together quite easily,” said Meme Amaral, 72, who lives with the disease. She calls it “a glue that keeps us all together.”

The Associated Press ALBANY — A Benton County sheriff’s sergeant, a Salem police officer and a fleeing suspect were wounded Saturday night after exchanging gunfire following a police chase that ended near Albany. The Benton County deputy and the suspect were seriously wounded, authorities said Sunday. The 32-year-old suspect was airlifted to Oregon Health & Sciences University in Portland. Authorities on Sunday withheld his name. Authorities said Benton County sergeant David Peterson was listed in serious

condition at a Corvallis hospital Sunday. Salem police officer Andrew Connolly, 46, was treated for a single gunshot wound and released. Authorities said the suspect was spotted Saturday night with a gun at Albany-area resident’s backyard. The resident, who told authorities she knew the man, called police. The man left her residence in a stolen vehicle.

Just before midnight, the man emerged from brush about 2 miles north of Adair Park just south of the BentonPolk County line, encountered a search team and gunfire was exchanged.

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

The Deschutes County 4-H would like to thank the following buyers for their support at the 2012 Deschutes County Fair Auction 4A Landscape Abbas Pump Service Abbas Well Drilling Advisory Services & Investments Auto Body Concept BBT Architects - Todd Turner Beaver Coach Sales & Service Ben Selznick Bend Animal Hospital Bend Research, Inc. Big R Blue Rock Trenching & Excavation Inc Bobcat of Central Oregon Brian & Reene Bouma Brian’s Cabinets - Todd Hakala Brightwood Corp Carl W. Hopp, Jr. Attorney at Law, LLC Carlson Sign Co. Central Electric Co-Op Cental Oregon Asphalt Sealing Central OR Ranch Supply & SMAF Environmental Central Oregon Heating & Cooling Central Oregon Truck Central Parts Connection Charlie Every Trucking Christine Olson Cinder Butte Meat Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic Country Feed & Pet Supply Country Financial CS Construction D & H Texaco Dairy Queen - South Bend David Kissler Davis Insulation Dee McNulty Deerfield Farm Del Barber Excav., Inc. Deschutes Co. Farm Bureau Deschutes Valley Equipment Don Penington Dr Eric Wattenburg Dustin Pick Ed Staub & Sons Propane & Heating Elizabeth & Vern Johnson

Floyd A. Boyd Tractor Co. Frank Waldbillig Gary Trent Gingers Kitchenware at the Old Mill Griffiths Tile J R Faulkner Excavation Jack Robinson & Sons Jackman Wagyu Beef Jason McKibbin John & Jeff Shelton John & Kay Tompkins John Goodman John Murphy Johns Hakala Wealth Management Ken Faulkner Kip & Christine Harris Kip Harris Klamath Basin Equip - Redmond Knife River Kruse Properties Laura, Jason & Cate Cuthbert LB Engineering INC Les Schwab - Cooley Rd. Les Schwab - Sisters Les Schwab - South Bend Les Schwab Tire - Bend Les Schwab Tire - Lapine Les Schwab Tire - Redmond Mc Pheeters Turf Midstate Electric Co-Op Midstate Fertilizer Midstate Power Products Miller Lumber Co. Newton Pump & Irrigation Nissen & Meyer, CPA NW Farm Credit Services Ochoco Feed & Ranch Oregon Feed & Irrigation Supply Pacific Fir Millwork Pacific Pine Products Pacific Truck Center Papa Murphy’s Pizza Kevin Lauinger Papé Machinery Paul Biskup Paul Cahill Pavement Protectors

Peak Performance Equipment Prineville Sawmill a Woodward Co. Quicksilver Contracting Co. Ray & Peggy Grimm Red Carpet Car Wash Redmond Grocery Outlet Redmond Smokehouse Rocking P Family Farm Round Butte Seed Growers Safeway - Redmond Safeway - West Safeway - 3rd Street Bend Savory Spice Shop at The Old Mill Scot Burgess DMD Pc Secure Storage Bend & Redmond SMAF Construction SMAF Enviromental Sno Vu Shorthorns SOS Employment Group South Valley Bank & Trust Springtime Landscape Stan Russell Construction Sun Country Engineering Sunriver Resort Sunset Plumbing - Julie Childress Swift Steel T&L Timber Co Taylor Northwest, LLC Terrebonne Thriftway The Bulletin Thomas Sales & Service Thompson Pump, Inc. Tim Davis Group Central Oregon Realty Timothy G. Elliott, P.C. Treasure Valley Coffee of C.O. Tri County Paving Twisted Scissors US Bank Bend Mortgage Department US Bank - Redmond Valladao Ranch Western Heavy Haul Wilderness Garbage Wright Ford


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Council should reject ordinance on false alarms

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t’s baaaack. On Wednesday, the Bend City Council again is scheduled to discuss a false alarm ordinance.

When the ordinance was last voted on, the council split 3-3, with one councilor absent. If the council is at all representative of the residents of Bend, that split should tell you that about half the people in Bend think it’s a bad idea. So do we. The city says it has a false alarm problem. It says police respond to an average of 2,167 false alarm calls per year. That’s nearly six a day. Based on that total number of alarms, the police department wastes $111,000 a year chasing false alarms. Bend Police Chief Jeff Sale says the 2,167 number is based on an actual count of calls police responded to that were identified as false alarms. His department estimated the costs based on assumptions that usually two officers respond to an alarm call and on the average time involved to track down the owner. Cities around the country are tussling with similar problems. We don’t like parts of Bend’s proposed solution. It starts off bad. One mistake, one false alarm and the city starts fining. It’s almost inevitable that an

alarm system will misfire. There are so many ways it can happen — the errant chewing of the lovable family pet, a howling storm or somebody just forgets the code. The city knows that’s going to happen. Why set up a policy designed to punish people for the first innocent mistake? Yes, there is a fine appeal process to the police chief, but why add such a hassle to people’s lives? The city fines for the third false alarm now, which is far more reasonable. Then there’s the fee embedded in the ordinance. The new policy does not include a registration fee for alarm owners. It allows one to be implemented. That’s got the concept of justice and punishment all wrong. The city should not be out to punish everyone by slapping fees on every alarm owner. It should adjust fines to, you know, punish the guilty and pay for the costs of responding to false alarms. The council should oppose the ordinance in its current form.

Transit financial troubles need long-term solutions

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s an article in Wednesday’s paper made painfully clear, Cascades East Transit faces the prospect of cutting services even as those who use its bus system would like to see those services expanded. Ultimately, balancing the service’s budget is a must, though the agency is looking hard at ways to be there for those who use its “demand response� (or, by reservation only) buses outside Bend. CET, which is operated by the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, has been in business for about six years, operating dial-aride services first, then shuttles between Central Oregon cities, and, most recently, the city of Bend’s fixed-route bus system, which it operates by agreement with the city. While the Bend system remains financially sound, the same cannot be said for services outside Bend. Scott Aycock, transportation planner for COIC, says that if CET spends what it did last year on the services, about $2.4 million, it will lose $313,000, unless something changes. Its problems are the result of such things as rising fuel prices and Public Employee Retirement System payments for drivers who

work outside Bend and are direct CET employees. In the short run, don’t be surprised if CET trims its demand response service in rural areas, at least for a time, though there’s been no decision made. If it does, it no doubt will work with groups like Volunteers in Action to try to assure that those who must travel from places like Sisters to Bend will be able to get from their homes outside the Sisters city limits to regularly scheduled buses within the city. The bigger issue is how to finance the system in the long run, however, and even as COIC works on CET’s immediate future, it is looking for more permanent sources of income for the system. Other systems have relied on everything from utility fees to payroll taxes, and CET officials no doubt will consider those and other ideas, as well. It should. Despite the rocky start public transit got in Bend, CET’s demand response and fixed-route buses are critical services for those who use them, the elderly, the disabled, those without cars and others. They cannot be allowed to disappear.

My Nickel’s Worth Bias shows in coverage of garments Last May, Ann Romney wore a $990 silk shirt. The Washington Post and other liberal mainstream media lambasted her for being “out of touch� with the average American. They felt she was flaunting her wealth, thus was unable to identify with the general public. Michelle Obama is in London attending the Olympics. She attended a reception at Buckingham Palace wearing a cap sleeve jacket valued at $6,800, considerably more than Romney’s garment. However, the Washington Post didn’t take Obama to task for the exorbitant cost of her wardrobe. Instead, they simply wrote a description of the intricacies of her jacket. There are approximately 25 million Americans unemployed. A question was raised: How many meals could be provided for the money Michelle Obama is spending? Another question that is asked: Are the mainstream media biased toward the Obamas? To borrow a line from Dan Rowan of TV’s “Laugh In,� “You can bet your sweet bippy on it.� John Sabo Bend

Capitalism drives success This letter is in response to Richard Belzer’s Aug. 5 In My View, “Business and a Romney presidency.� Progressive liberals such as Belzer have no leg to stand on so they resort to attacks on President

Obama’s opponent, Gov. Mitt Romney. Progressives and others of like ilk think that “unfettered capitalism� is a sin when, in fact, it is what drives the economic system of the United States. No other country in the world can outproduce Americans, but thanks to Obama, our GDP will soon be second only to China. Let’s compare the record of Romney’s free market with Obama’s socialism. Romney is responsible for the success of AMC movie theaters, Warner Music Group, Staples, Toys R Us, Dunkin’ Donuts, Domino’s Pizza, Burger King and Burlington Coat Factory, just to name a few. Obama is responsible for slashing the military budget to the point where we cannot defend ourselves. He is also responsible for the bankrupt firms of Solyndra, Ener 1, Eastern Energy, Beacon Power, Amonix Solar, Abound Solar, and Spectra Watt. All were big Obama campaign supporters. If that isn’t crony capitalism, I don’t know what is. The question is, do you want a president who has actually worked and made payrolls generating thousands of jobs that produced billions of dollars, or do you want to re-elect a socialist who continues to destroy American capitalism? William L. Logan, U. S. Army (Ret.) Bend

Support Buehler for secretary of state The Oregon secretary of state is responsible for 1) overseeing Oregon’s Corporation Division, 2) conducting thorough audits of state

departments, 3) managing Oregon’s Election Division and 4) participating as a member on the State Land Board. Dr. Knute Buehler has prescriptions for each of these four responsibilities. Buehler’s goal to make Oregon a top ten state for small-business owners will be achieved by responsibly transforming the Corporation Division, enforcing the five-year review of administrative rules and working to equitably reform the Public Employees Retirement System (PERS). As head of the audit division, Buehler will push to increase audits and make agencies accountable to taxpayers and will see to it that the recommendations from those audits are actually implemented. To increase voter participation and limit the influence of money on the voting process, Buehler has been active in election reform, helping place multiple initiatives on the ballot toward that end. As a member of the state land board, Buehler will push for a responsible, balanced, long-term plan for the sustainability of our state lands. Buehler is a solid business owner and physician, serves on the boards of the Ford Family Foundation and the St. Charles Health System and has worked for years on multiple initiatives to reform state election laws. He has the drive, initiative and experience critical to be an effective secretary of state. Please help in electing Knute Buehler as our new secretary of state. Dennis Tooley Redmond

Letters policy

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Will rude commenters seem quaint 20 years from now? By Michael Kinsley Bloomberg News

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couple of weeks ago, using same-sex marriage as an example, I wrote about how quickly moral perceptions can change. My point was that surely there is something in our culture — an attitude or policy — that we accept without thinking today, but will in 20 years seem as outrageous, cruel or absurd as overt anti-gay prejudice seems today. Then along came Mr. Chick-fil-A to provide an example. His company pledges “to treat every person with honor, dignity and respect — regardless of their belief, race, creed, sexual orientation or gender.� Twenty or 30 years ago, this would have placed Chick-fil-A on the forward edge of corporate tolerance. Now, because he has said a few words against same-sex marriage, Mr. Chick and his company are in the doghouse big-time. My Bloomberg View colleague Josh Barro argues persuasively that opposing gay marriage is unavoidably anti-gay. My only point was: Let’s not get too self-congratulatory. Who knows what shift in moral

attitudes will make us look back in horror and perplexity at some views we hold today? I offered a few obvious examples — using other animals as food was the main one — and invited some more creative suggestions from readers. This is a report on the response. First, thanks to everybody who offered an example. Many of them covered familiar ground, such as global warming or gun control or drug legalization or the Middle East. They amounted to assertions that, “In 20 years I will have been proved right about Topic X.� The notion that there are issues on which the other side will be drowned in a tidal wave of facts seems a bit naive at a time when millions of Americans still think President Barack Obama was born in Kenya. A new consensus also seems unlikely on issues — abortion, most obviously — where both sides are counting on the other side’s doubts to fall away at any moment. Some predictions lacked much of a sense of moral urgency. For example: “My nomination is the idea that TVs, phones and computers are separate

IN MY VIEW devices.� Yes, but will addressing this false trichotomy make us better people? My favorite suggestions were issues which, though perhaps small or unexpected, had a definite ethical or moral component and left me thinking, “My God, I never thought of that.� For example, someone suggested front lawns. In 20 years, will it be unthinkable that valuable water will be wasted on giving every house a small square of green to nurture? As I write, on a cold, rainy August day in the Pacific Northwest, this issue doesn’t seem all that pressing. It probably looks different in the rest of the country. Or how about women’s high-heeled shoes? The ancient Chinese practice of foot binding is regarded today as unbelievably barbaric. The corsets and suchlike Victorian devices to narrow a woman’s waistline don’t score much better on the moral hindsight scale. Yet fashion dictates to many women that they risk broken bones, endure pain or at least walk awkwardly in order

to squeeze their feet into somebody’s idea — often their own, if “Sex and the City� is to be believed — of a beautiful shoe. What were the 1960s all about if half the population still puts up with this? Here’s a great one: “voluntary submission to noise that ruins your hearing.� Or involuntary, for that matter. The level of ambient noise keeps rising; all those “shovel-ready� construction projects from the stimulus a few years ago seem to be operating at peak noise level. Baby boomers, now paying for a lifetime of rock concerts, are adding loud music to the long “Do as I say, not as I did� list for their children. Individual automobile ownership may not be illegal in 20 years, one reader suggests. But it may be rare and perhaps tainted with social disapproval as being hoggish and deeply ungreen. Telecommuting (that is, working at home) will increase. Public transportation will never take everybody wherever they need to go, or even close, but Internet-based pseudotaxi and short-term car rental services such as Uber Technologies and Zipcar will fill in the gap. Having your own

car will be something like having your own plane, or at least your own chauffeur, today. In 20 years, will we all be carrying a national identity card? This is one of those issues, like abortion, where some people see it as a utopian vision and some as a dystopian one. I’m closer to the first view. They can implant a chip in my thumb or scan my iris any day if in exchange I never have to deal with forgotten passwords, lost credit cards, long lines at airport security, complicated forms to get my birth certificate, and so on. One reader says that fiberglass insulation is as dangerous as asbestos and will be regarded as such in 20 years. Could this be true? Another says: “It could be that Mr. Kinsley will be completely discredited as a polemicist of any note whose ideas and questions for discussion will be forever ridiculed.� I wish I could predict that in 20 years, rudeness on the Internet will be considered just as impolite as rudeness to someone’s face. But I doubt it. — Michael Kinsley is a Bloomberg View columnist.


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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FEATURED OBITUARY

OREGON NEWS

Laika braces for ‘ParaNorman’ debut • Portland studio’s reputation, along with the city’s legacy of animation, rides on its 2nd film By Mike Rogoway The Oregonian

Ethel May Goodrich Van Tassel March 5, 1912 - August 7, 2012 Ethel May Van Tassel a long time resident of Central Oregon, died August 7, 2012, at the age 100. Ethel was born March 5, 1912, in Palmyra, Maine to Ariel and Helen (Decrow) Goodrich. Ethel In her Van Tassel early years her family relocated to the Sisters area, she graduated from high school in 1929, from Redmond High. On June 5, 1930, Ethel married Glenn F. Van Tassel in Cloverdale, the couple moved to Redmond in 1949. She worked as a homemaker for most of her life but also enjoyed working at the Redmond Library and being a member of the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Redmond. Ethel is survived by five sons, LeLand, Norman, Lamar, Lorance and Nicholas Van Tassel; two daughters, LaVonne Owen and Delmarie Null; 13 grandchildren; 20 greatgrandchildren; and seven great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Glenn in 1997. A private memorial service will be held. Please sign our guestbook at www.redmondmemorial.com.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Roy Bryce-Laporte, 78: Sociologist and scholar of the African diaspora and the black migration to and from the United States. Died July 31 in Sykesville, Md., after having suffered several small strokes. DeAndre McCullough, 35: Experiences as a 15-year-old drug dealer in Baltimore inspired the writer David Simon and the former police officer Edward Burns to feature him in the book “The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner City Neighborhood,� which later became an Emmy-winning mini-series on HBO. Found dead Aug. 1 in Woodlawn, Md. Jean Merrill, 89: Children’s author best known for her 1964 book, “The Pushcart War,� about street peddlers in New York who use (nonlethal) guerrilla tactics to fight back when Big Business threatens to banish their pushcarts from the streets. Died Aug. 2 in Randolph, Vt., of cancer. — From wire reports

Karl Fleming risked life to report on civil rights movement By Elaine Woo Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Karl Fleming, a former Newsweek reporter who helped draw national attention to the civil rights movement in the 1960s — and risked his life covering it with perceptive stories about its major figures and the inequalities that fueled it — died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84. The cause was related to a number of respiratory ailments, said his son Charles Fleming Fleming. Born and bred in the Jim Crow South, Fleming worked his way through small North Carolina newspapers to become chief of Newsweek’s Atlanta bureau in 1961. In the next few years, he covered some of the most dramatic clashes that churned the South as the fight over racial injustice escalated. He was nearly shot in 1962 during riots at the University of Mississippi after James Meredith’s admission as the first African-American student. He portrayed the “fastmoving phantasmagoria of grief, terror and hysteria� that enveloped Birmingham after the church bombing that killed four African-American girls in 1963. He was one of the first two reporters on the scene in 1964 when three civil rights workers taking part in the mobilization known as Freedom Summer disappeared near Philadelphia, Miss.; they were later found murdered. Fleming also covered the assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers and Gov. George Wallace’s symbolic stand in the schoolhouse door to block the desegregation of the University of Alabama. The reporter brazenly took notes at Ku Klux Klan rallies, had his phones tapped and was tailed by segregationists. He managed to escape serious harm in the South but was far less lucky when Newsweek assigned him to Los Angeles in 1965. At a tense rally after the Watts riots, he found himself the only white person in the room with Black Power leader Stokely Carmichael and a crowd of angry blacks. When Fleming fled to his car, he was attacked and severely beaten by a mob. A photograph of him lying in his own blood, his jaw broken and skull fractured, ran in newspapers across the country the next day. “Karl was one of these reporters who would go anywhere, any time, no matter what the danger, if the story was good enough,� said Gene Roberts, a former top editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer and The New York Times, whose book “The Race Beat,� co-written with Hank Klibanoff, examined the role of the press in the civil rights movement. “He was one of the great 20th-century reporters — in the right place at the right time.� His beating not only left him with a permanent limp but “jolted something loose in my heart,� he said. His first marriage collapsed. In 1972, he married an aspiring journalist, Anne Taylor, who was 22 to his 44. In addition to his wife and son Charles, an editor at the Los Angeles Times, he is survived by sons David, Russell and Mark; a sister, Ethel Gray; and eight grandchildren. As the psychedelic era wound down, Fleming began to drink excessively and smoke marijuana. Newsweek removed him as bureau chief, and he quit the magazine in 1972.

B5

Laika’s sets have gone silent for the summer, soundstages are vacant, workshops deserted. Characters from the Hillsboro animation studio’s sophomore feature, “ParaNorman,� sit frozen in time, fixed in poses from the film. Mute since production wrapped up last year, the characters roar to life Friday in movie houses across the country. Laika thinks it has a hit on its hands. A blockbuster, perhaps, with a “zombie film for kids.� The studio operates with a degree of ambition you don’t often see in Oregon, and its zeal is emblematic of the state’s resurgent animation community. It’s also a reflection of Laika’s owner and chairman, Nike’s billionaire cofounder Phil Knight, and his CEO son, Travis. Laika’s first feature, 2009’s “Coraline,� hit theaters in the winter doldrums and surprised the industry by emerging as the secondbiggest release ever from Laika’s distribution partner, Focus Features (trailing only “Brokeback Mountain�). Setting a higher bar this time, releasing “ParaNorman� in the summer blockbuster heat, only raises the chances that Laika won’t hit its mark. “ParaNorman� isn’t make-or-break for Laika. Oregon’s wealthiest family can afford to pursue its vision, no matter how this film performs with critics or at the box office. But “ParaNorman� will be a yardstick by which to measure the studio and its dreams of building a Pixarsize enterprise a thousand miles from Hollywood. “We always want to grow in every way possible,� Travis Knight said. “We fully expect that ‘ParaNorman’ will be a bigger, more commercially successful film than ‘Coraline.’� “ParaNorman� borrows from “The Sixth Sense� with an “I see dead people� protagonist. In this case, Norman is a tween social outcast in small-town Massachusetts who must use his supernatural skills to beat back a somewhat goofy zombie uprising. The film’s directors are a pair of Brits — Chris Butler and Sam Fell. Teen actor Kodi SmitMcPhee (who filmed part of “The Road� in Oregon) gives voice to the title character, with Anna Kendrick, Casey Affleck, Leslie Mann and John Goodman (among others) in supporting roles.

Stop-motion tradition Most contemporary animation emerges from a cubicle, where desk jockeys create their characters on a computer workstation. Stop motion, by contrast, remains an intensely physical practice. It’s a craft Laika inherited when Phil Knight took over the storied Vinton Studios nine years ago. Laika’s animators labor beneath dim lights in a Hillsboro warehouse, working one frame at a time. Crouching over puppets, they manipulate the characters, capture a single image with the camera, and then make almost imperceptible adjustments. Run all those tiny adjustments together on a movie reel and you have fluid, almost elegant motion that feels more tangible

Commercial division seeks to expand While Laika’s entertainment division strives to make a name for itself, its more established commercial side is preparing to expand. The company’s headquarters have moved to the Hillsboro warehouse where Laika makes its movies. Laika/house is still in Vinton Studios’ old offices in Northwest Portland. It continues to turn out animated fare for commercials, including a long-running M&Ms campaign that dates to the Vinton days and a newer one that casts Robert Downey Jr. as the voice of Planter’s Mr. Peanut. “Our stages have been consistently humming this year,� said Lourri Hammack, president of the commercial division. Animators sometimes move back and forth between the commercial and entertainment sides of the company, and veteran commercial director Mark Gustafson — who was animation director on Wes

than computer animation and somehow dreamier, too. Yet even a productive day gives the animator just a few seconds of film. Travis Knight, who started as rank-and-file animator when his father first invested in the old Vinton Studios in 1998, became CEO soon after “Coraline.� He worked as lead animator on both films. Chatting quietly with the son, you can’t help but make comparisons to his dad. Nike’s chairman still has his runner’s body at age 74, lean and angular. Travis, 38, plainly favors weights and muscle. The father is taciturn and remote in front of the media. He opens up just a crack to acknowledge a favorite film (“I liked ‘Batman’ — that’s the best of the new ones�) or satisfaction in his studio and his son. (“He’s brought in a quality film on budget.�) Travis, 38, is positively verbose by comparison. Perhaps that’s because he’s still building his company and recognizes that he must occasionally be its pitchman. Certainly he has the talking points down, drawing frequent comparisons between the oddball townsfolk who populate “ParaNorman� and the obsessive animators who gave life to its characters. “We are the outcasts. We are the misfits,� Travis Knight said. “But everyone here has an extraordinary gift.�

CEO animator If Travis Knight is well rehearsed, though, his commitment to the work is persuasive. He animated a pair of key scenes in “ParaNorman� himself, including the central episode where the zombies rise from the grave. And he’s occasionally unguarded, allowing that the weirdos working at Laika include him, too, and that he sees a bit of himself in the film’s socially outcast boy in “ParaNorman.� “I don’t know that I necessarily felt that I was strange. It’s only in retrospect when I look back and see how I didn’t quite fit in,� Knight said. “It didn’t really bother me as a kid. I spent most of my time alone as a child. It wasn’t something I was pained and tortured by. I just had different kinds of interests. Any kind of simple characteristic that people, particularly at that age, can kind of point to that sets you apart from everybody else is something that can be alienating. And I certainly had those.� Like what? He pauses. “My fascinations, my family,� Knight said. Pressed for

Anderson’s “Fantastic Mr. Fox� — is tentatively slated to direct a Laika feature called “Goblins.� Meanwhile, the commercial side has been quietly exploring the possibility of working on TV series. Earlier this year, Laika brought back former executive Al Cubillas to seek out such opportunities. Some within Portland’s animation community wonder whether it makes sense to pair Laika’s high-profile feature film division with its commercial side, working a historically low-margin segment of the industry. Hammack insists the two divisions play well together, sharing ideas and improvements, such as 3D printing technology that Laika deployed to give it more versatility in creating looks for its film characters. “Now is a blessed time for animators in Portland,� Hammack said. — Mike Rogoway, The Oregonian

specifics, he demurs. “There’s no shortage of things which kind of made me different from other people or have people look at me in a different way,� Knight said. “There’s a number of different ways you can respond to that. I kind of responded like Norman did, which is to withdraw.� OK. Moviemaking isn’t psychoanalysis. It’s a business. And it’s on those terms that “ParaNorman,� Laika and its chief will all be judged. So how will Phil Knight respond if “ParaNorman� bombs? “Not well,� the studio’s chairman deadpans. After a pause, and a chuckle, Knight affirms that both he and Travis are delighted with “ParaNorman.� The Knights are hopeful audiences will agree, but aware they’re still learning the vagaries the box office and the film industry. “We believe we’re in it for the long run,� Phil Knight said. “You try to learn from the mistakes and grow from them.�

Tight-lipped on cost A privately held company, Laika says little about its finances. Industry publications pegged the cost of “Coraline� at around $60 million or $70 million, but Travis Knight said the actual price tag was somewhat below that, and that “ParaNorman� cost no more than the first film. Regardless, marketing and distribution expenses mean that a film’s box office take must substantially exceed its production budget before it turns a profit. To that end, the Knights recruited Nike’s longtime ad firm, Wieden+Kennedy, to craft a marketing campaign for both “Coraline� and “ParaNorman.� Portland-based W+K doesn’t usually do films. Its specialty is building brands, like Coca-Cola and Nike. Distributors usually take the lead in marketing. But Phil Knight called up Dan Wieden before the first film and asked for something extra. “Distribution companies do an amazing job, but they have a lot of films come out every year,� said Ken Smith, W+K’s account director for Laika. “It’s a little bit like: If you want your child to get special attention, there’s stuff you can do to make that happen.� With “ParaNorman,� W+K is trying to broaden stop-motion’s appeal and bring a cult favorite to the mass market. If you watched the Olym-

pics, maybe you saw the lighthearted ads featuring the zombies from “ParaNorman.� There’s an undead gymnast on the pommel horse who nails his landing despite leaving his decaying arm behind. “I think it has the potential to be quite a big movie,� Smith said. “Is it going to make the 300 million, 400 million or whatever ‘Batman’ did? No. But I think it could make a pretty big dent.�

A lengthy process Laika took four years to bring “Coraline� to the screen, where it grossed $125 million worldwide. It took another three years to ready “ParaNorman.� Work starts in Hillsboro this fall on the third film, which Laika has yet to identify. The studio hopes to have that movie in theaters by the end of 2014, a little more than two years hence. After that, Laika hopes to match the annual release schedule of Pixar and other big-league animation studios. “If they were releasing a movie a year, I don’t see how they cannot double their size in terms of a workforce,� said Vince Porter, a former Showtime executive who’s now director of the Governor’s Office of Film & Television in Portland. Laika employs about 350, including 50 in its commercial division that makes ads for M&M’s, Planter’s Peanuts and many others. When film production is going full tilt, the studio adds another 75. Oregon is actively promoting film and TV, setting aside $7 million in tax incentives last year and $6 million this year to lure the industry. Laika received incentives worth a little more than $3 million last year, when “ParaNorman� was in production. Portland has long been one of a handful of animation hubs outside Hollywood, a cluster that dates to the 1970s and the early days of Vinton Studios. In addition to Laika, that cluster includes Hinge Digital, which is a small commercial shop founded by Laika alumni, and Bent Image Lab, which is busting out of its quarters in Southeast Portland. That firm, with ties to the old Vinton Studios, has recently broadened its portfolio to include specials for the Hallmark Channel and effects work on the Portland-based TV shows “Portlandia� and “Grimm.� Laika is certainly the biggest player in town, but Bent Image founder David Daniels said Laika’s growth is, to some degree, reflecting the community zeitgeist rather than driving it. “There’s a unique aspect to Portland. It isn’t happening in Austin, even though it’s a cool, groovy city. It isn’t happening in Minneapolis, even though it’s a cool, groovy city. It isn’t even happening in Seattle,� Daniels said. “There’s been an enormous amount of creative energy.� Back in Hillsboro, Travis Knight is quietly gearing up for the studio’s next feature and evaluating prospects for its fourth. The studio has at least three projects in active development and has stopped development on at least three others. “The absolute hardest thing, in any business, is coming to the determination that something’s not working or a project isn’t working, or people working on a project aren’t the right people. That’s not an anomaly. Those sorts of things happen all the time,� Knight said. “That has a human cost,� he said. “Those are the hardest things that eat you up inside.�

Laika’s timeline • 1976: Oregon animator Will Vinton founds Will Vinton Studios after winning an Oscar for his animated short, “Closed Mondays.â€? • 1986: Interest in the studio’s trademark Claymation stop-motion technique revived by California Raisins ad campaign. • 1998: Phil Knight

invests $5 million in Vinton Studios as it ramps up production on Fox’s animated TV series “The PJs.â€? Travis Knight joins the company as an animator. • 2002: The studio, facing financial pressure, seeks and receives additional funding from Phil Knight. • 2003: Amid financial

crisis at the studio, Knight wrests control of the company from Vinton. • 2005: Studio renamed Laika, taking the name of a Russian dog that was the first canine in space. • 2006: Laika signs with Focus Features to distribute its first movie, “Coraline,â€? directed by animation veteran Henry

Selick and starring Teri Hatcher. Studio announces plans for a campus in Tualatin (the campus is never built). • 2009: “Coralineâ€? wins warm reviews, an Oscar nomination and surprisingly strong box office receipts ($125 million worldwide, according to BoxOfficeMojo). Studio lays off 63

and abandons plans for a computer animation division. Travis Knight becomes CEO and Selick, director of “Coraline,â€? leaves the studio. • Aug. 17, 2012: Laika releasing its second feature, “ParaNorman.â€? It plans to announce its third feature soon afterward and to begin production this fall.


B 6 THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, AUGUST 13

TUESDAY

Today: A sunny and hot day is expected.

Tonight: A few high cirrus clouds overnight.

HIGH

LOW

93

51

HIGH LOW

Astoria

71/56

60/53

Cannon Beach 60/55

95/60

86/54

69/55

Lincoln City

Salem

64/53

Corvallis Florence 70/54

87/53

Coos Bay

91/48

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

92/50

89/52

Crescent

Roseburg

66/55

Chemult

90/55

73/54

Gold Beach

95/51

Paulina 88/48

Unity 94/54

95/52

Vale 103/64

Hampton 90/48

Juntura

Burns Riley

JordanValley Rome

Klamath Falls 94/53

Ashland

74/60

Medford

92/53

100/61

Brookings

• 105°

99/57

96/56

Chiloquin

Medford

75/53

Yesterday’s state extremes

99/57

Paisley

95/57

93/56

Frenchglen

94/46

Grants Pass

CENTRAL Partly to mostly sunny skies with warm temperatures.

EAST Ontario Partly to mostly 101/64 sunny skies with very warm to hot Nyssa temperatures. 99/62

96/54

94/50

Silver Lake

90/45

WEST Coastal fog and low clouds early; otherwise partly to mostly sunny.

103/57

93/49

Christmas Valley

Port Orford

92/50

Union

88/47

John Day

92/52

Fort Rock 93/49

90/46

85/41

Bandon

Joseph

Brothers 92/47

La Pine 92/47

Crescent Lake

67/54

93/51

91/46

Baker City

96/54

Prineville Sisters Redmond 93/50 95/51 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

Enterprise

93/52

Mitchell 94/53

90/48

65/55

94/56

Spray98/51

Madras

Camp Sherman

90/54

La Grande Granite

Warm Springs 98/56

88/48

Meacham

Condon 97/55

91/53

Yachats

91/55 90/55

Wallowa

88/41

96/55

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

98/56

Ruggs

Maupin

89/54

61/55

Pendleton

99/62

94/56

Government Camp 76/52

87/55

Hermiston97/60

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy 88/56

McMinnville

97/59

The Biggs Dalles 94/61

89/58

Hillsboro Portland 84/59

Tillamook

Umatilla

Hood River

93/57

• 40°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

99/62

94/58

Meacham

98/52

-30s

-20s

-10s

10s

Vancouver 75/64

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

0s

• 29°

Cheyenne 85/57 San Francisco 67/55

Sarasota, Fla.

Las Vegas 108/86

Salt Lak e City 95/71

Denver 90/61 Albuquerque 91/65

Los Angeles 77/65

Phoenix 113/90

Honolulu 88/75

Tijuana 98/73 Chihuahua 95/65

Anchorage 66/52

La Paz 96/77 Juneau 67/46

40s

FRONTS

60s

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 76/63

Halifax 80/61 Portland To ronto 85/63 80/65 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 79/57 73/58 86/70 Bufal o Rapid City Detroit 82/65 New York 86/62 80/66 88/72 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 80/61 Chicago Omaha 83/64 89/73 74/63 81/61 Washington, D. C. 89/71 Louisville Kansas City 87/66 83/66 St. Louis Charlotte 85/64 91/67 Oklahoma City Nashville 99/69 90/67 Atlanta 90/72 Little Rock Birmingham 97/68 Dallas 91/73 102/76 New Orleans 91/78 Orlando Houston 94/76 95/79

Monterrey 104/71 Mazatlan 93/80

50s

Winnipeg 73/53

Bismarck 76/55

Boise 97/60

Mesa, Ariz.

• 2.94”

Saskatoon 78/60

Billings 92/63

• 117° Stanley, Idaho

30s

Seattle 79/60 Portland 84/59

A sunny and slightly above average day.

HIGH LOW

87 53

More heat with lots of sunshine.

HIGH LOW

90 50

91 51

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .4:39 a.m. . . . . . 7:10 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:33 a.m. . . . . . 5:25 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:36 a.m. . . . . 10:25 p.m. Jupiter. . . . .12:43 a.m. . . . . . 3:48 p.m. Saturn. . . . .11:32 a.m. . . . . 10:39 p.m. Uranus . . . . .9:47 p.m. . . . . 10:15 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93/54 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.04” Record high . . . . . . . . 99 in 1981 Average month to date. . . 0.17” Record low. . . . . . . . . 34 in 1957 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Average year to date. . . . . 6.45” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.95 Record 24 hours . . .0.04 in 1965 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today. . . . . . 6:07 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:12 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:09 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:10 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:11 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:32 p.m.

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

Aug. 17 Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 8

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Redmond/Madras .........Ext.

Astoria . . . . . . . .71/57/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .95/45/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .64/51/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .96/49/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .95/54/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .96/46/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .95/43/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .97/40/0.00 Medford . . . . . .105/60/0.00 Newport . . . . . . 61/50/trace North Bend . . . . . .63/50/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .94/52/0.00 Pendleton . . . . .100/59/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .94/61/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .95/52/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .97/45/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .95/59/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .95/58/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .94/47/0.00 The Dalles . . . . .105/53/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .71/56/pc . . . . .69/57/sh . . . . .95/51/s . . . . . .91/51/s . . . .74/60/pc . . . . .70/53/pc . . . .96/53/pc . . . . . .92/53/s . . . . .87/53/s . . . . .82/56/pc . . . . .94/53/s . . . . . .91/50/s . . . . .94/58/s . . . . . .92/54/s . . . . .92/47/s . . . . . .87/39/s . . . .100/61/s . . . . . .98/61/s . . . .61/55/pc . . . . . .60/56/c . . . .67/55/pc . . . . .66/55/pc . . .101/64/pc . . . . . .98/65/s . . . . .98/56/s . . . . . .93/59/s . . . . .84/59/s . . . . .79/60/pc . . . . .92/52/s . . . . . .87/53/s . . . . .95/47/s . . . . . .89/51/s . . . . .90/55/s . . . . . .91/58/s . . . .89/54/pc . . . . .83/56/pc . . . . .93/50/s . . . . . .83/44/s . . . . .95/60/s . . . . . .89/63/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ................................Ext. La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,175 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136,870 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 73,881 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 27,224 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111,766 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 431 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,700 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 138 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90.9 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 2,162 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 214 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 17.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 90.9 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 8

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

20s

Calgary 85/53

HIGH LOW

FRIDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

THURSDAY

Mostly sunny and cooler.

Partly cloudy with a very minimal chance for evening thunder.

92 45

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

WEDNESDAY

Thunder Bay 79/52

Miami 91/79

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .108/80/0.00 100/73/pc 101/75/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .84/62/pc . . .73/61/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . .83/63/pc . . .85/65/t Albuquerque. . . . .97/69/0.00 . . . 91/65/t . . .93/67/t Anchorage . . . . . .67/54/0.00 . .66/52/pc . 66/52/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .85/63/0.00 . .90/72/pc . . .88/72/t Atlantic City . . . . .86/71/0.00 . .86/74/pc . . .87/75/t Austin . . . . . . . . .100/74/0.00 100/73/pc 100/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . .89/70/pc . . .89/69/t Billings . . . . . . . . .85/59/0.00 . .92/63/pc . 94/57/pc Birmingham . . . . .85/61/0.00 . .91/73/pc . . .92/69/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . .76/55/pc . 83/62/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .96/61/0.00 . .97/60/pc . . 93/58/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.01 . .86/70/pc . . 87/70/c Bridgeport, CT. . . .87/73/0.40 . .85/71/pc . . .86/70/t Buffalo . . . . . . . . .77/64/0.04 . .82/65/pc . . .81/65/t Burlington, VT. . . .84/66/0.00 . . . 82/62/t . . .84/65/t Caribou, ME . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . . 80/58/t . . 81/59/c Charleston, SC . . .90/74/0.00 . .91/73/pc . . .92/75/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .87/66/0.01 . .91/67/pc . . .90/67/t Chattanooga. . . . .85/60/0.00 . .90/69/pc . . .87/66/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . . 85/57/t . . 88/59/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .76/55/0.00 . . . 74/63/t . 78/66/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . . 85/66/t . 80/63/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .79/62/0.00 . .82/65/pc . 75/66/pc Colorado Springs .84/59/0.00 . . . 84/57/t . 88/58/pc Columbia, MO . . .86/66/0.01 . .81/62/pc . 89/65/pc Columbia, SC . . . .91/73/0.00 . .92/71/pc . . .91/71/t Columbus, GA. . . 88/70/trace . .93/70/pc . 90/72/pc Columbus, OH. . . .81/59/0.00 . .83/64/pc . . .79/62/t Concord, NH. . . . .83/66/0.28 . .86/60/pc . . 88/64/c Corpus Christi. . .100/76/0.00 . .98/77/pc . 97/77/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .105/76/0.00 102/76/pc 100/78/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . .82/65/pc . . .78/62/t Denver. . . . . . . . . .86/54/0.00 . . . 90/61/t . 93/62/pc Des Moines. . . . . .73/65/0.01 . .80/61/pc . 80/62/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . .80/66/pc . 76/65/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .78/53/0.00 . .76/57/pc . . 73/58/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .101/73/0.00 . . . 97/76/t . . .97/75/t Fairbanks. . . . . . . .71/52/0.00 . . . 74/48/s . . 78/51/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .77/60/0.00 . . . 78/53/s . . .78/64/t Flagstaff . . . . . . . .81/51/0.00 . . . 86/54/t . . .84/54/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 78/61/t . 77/60/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .76/53/0.00 . . . 73/58/t . . 78/58/s Greensboro. . . . . .85/65/0.00 . .88/67/pc . 89/67/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . .86/64/pc . . .84/65/t Hartford, CT . . . . .87/75/0.00 . .87/66/pc . . .89/67/t Helena. . . . . . . . . .90/60/0.00 . . . 90/59/s . 87/50/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .87/74/0.00 . .88/75/pc . 88/75/pc Houston . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . . . 95/79/t . 94/78/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .85/57/0.00 . .90/69/pc . . .89/64/t Indianapolis . . . . .83/58/0.00 . . . 80/64/t . 79/62/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .93/64/0.00 . . . 92/72/t . . .96/68/t Jacksonville. . . . . .89/73/0.19 . .93/73/pc . . .95/74/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .57/50/0.33 . .67/46/sh . . 75/44/s Kansas City. . . . . .95/66/0.02 . . . 83/66/s . 87/68/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .78/54/0.00 . . . 82/63/t . 77/61/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .109/87/0.00 108/86/pc . 107/84/t Lexington . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . .85/66/pc . 81/63/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . . 84/58/s . 88/65/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .94/65/0.00 . .97/68/pc . 90/68/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .80/70/0.00 . . . 77/65/s . 75/64/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .87/58/0.00 . . . 87/66/t . 83/65/pc Madison, WI . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . . 74/57/t . 79/58/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .93/63/0.00 . . . 91/71/t . 89/71/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.65 . . . 91/79/t . . .91/80/t Milwaukee . . . . . .78/61/0.00 . . . 71/64/t . 76/64/pc Minneapolis . . . . .68/64/0.00 . .79/57/pc . 80/62/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .85/57/0.00 . . . 90/67/t . 86/68/pc New Orleans. . . . .92/75/0.00 . . . 91/78/t . 92/77/pc New York . . . . . . .87/73/0.00 . .88/72/pc . . .89/71/t Newark, NJ . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . .88/71/pc . 89/70/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .83/72/0.01 . .91/71/pc . . .91/72/t Oklahoma City . .102/72/0.00 . . . 99/69/s . 94/74/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .85/66/0.00 . . . 81/61/s . 84/65/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .92/74/0.65 . . . 94/76/t . . .94/76/t Palm Springs. . . .116/89/0.00 . .113/88/s . 113/85/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 78/60/t . . 83/62/s Philadelphia . . . . .85/71/0.00 . .89/73/pc . . .88/74/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .115/91/0.00 . . 113/90/t 111/88/pc Pittsburgh. . . . . . .76/60/0.00 . .82/64/pc . . .75/61/t Portland, ME. . . . .77/69/0.29 . .85/63/pc . . 84/63/c Providence . . . . . .83/72/0.23 . .87/69/pc . . 88/68/c Raleigh . . . . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . .90/68/pc . . .91/69/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City. . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . .86/62/pc . 90/64/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .100/66/0.00 . . . 99/66/t . 98/61/pc Richmond . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . .90/68/pc . . .93/69/t Rochester, NY . . . .76/62/0.09 . .83/63/pc . . .83/65/t Sacramento. . . . .101/61/0.00 . .105/63/s . 105/62/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .85/65/0.00 . . . 85/64/t . 87/64/pc Salt Lake City . . . .98/65/0.00 . . . 95/71/t . . .94/70/t San Antonio . . . .101/78/0.00 100/76/pc . 99/76/pc San Diego . . . . . . .85/72/0.00 . . . 79/69/s . 78/68/pc San Francisco . . . .65/53/0.00 . .71/56/pc . 71/57/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .81/58/0.00 . . . 84/59/s . . 84/61/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .92/65/0.00 . .83/57/pc . 85/60/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .91/73/0.13 . .92/73/pc . . .92/74/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .87/59/0.00 . .79/60/pc . 76/58/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .68/59/0.04 . . . 81/58/s . . 83/64/s Spokane . . . . . . . .93/61/0.00 . . . 92/59/s . . 86/59/s Springfield, MO . .89/64/0.00 . .90/61/pc . 86/65/pc Tampa. . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.85 . . . 91/75/t . . .91/75/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .109/76/0.00 . . 109/80/t . 107/77/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .99/73/0.00 . . . 96/65/s . . .84/67/t Washington, DC . .88/72/0.00 . .89/71/pc . . .91/71/t Wichita . . . . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . . . 89/64/s . . .83/70/t Yakima . . . . . . . . .98/54/0.00 . . . 96/60/s . . 91/62/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .115/90/0.00 110/86/pc 110/84/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .75/57/0.00 . .68/58/sh . . .75/65/t Athens. . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . . 90/73/t . . 91/75/s Auckland. . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .62/47/sh . 56/50/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .114/86/0.00 . .111/83/s . 110/80/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . . 90/78/t . . .91/78/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . .85/72/pc . 83/71/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 91/78/s . . 89/79/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . .70/51/pc . . 72/55/s Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .61/53/sh . 59/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . . . 75/50/s . 77/56/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .61/50/0.00 . .59/50/pc . 60/56/sh Cabo San Lucas . .90/81/0.00 . . . 98/79/s . 93/79/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .99/79/0.00 . .100/79/s . 101/77/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . .85/53/pc . 70/42/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . .90/80/pc . 90/80/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . . . 70/52/t . 65/50/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .68/56/c . 69/52/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .76/58/pc . . .83/60/t Harare. . . . . . . . not available . .76/49/pc . . 74/48/s Hong Kong . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . . 89/80/t . . .90/84/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . . 86/74/s . . 84/72/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .87/71/0.00 . . . 89/70/s . . 88/69/s Johannesburg. . . .50/34/0.00 . . . 55/37/s . . 61/51/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . .66/61/pc . . 67/60/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . .75/66/pc . 84/69/pc London . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .69/64/sh . 70/59/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . . . 88/63/s . . 90/64/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . . 89/77/t . . .90/79/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .109/88/0.00 . .111/90/s . 109/89/s Mexico City. . . . . .68/59/0.05 . . . 70/55/t . . .69/55/t Montreal. . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . . 82/64/t . 85/70/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .77/58/c . 68/56/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . . 79/51/s . . 77/52/s Nassau . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 88/78/t . . .89/79/t New Delhi. . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . . 92/79/t . . .88/78/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . . 89/78/t . . .84/78/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . .70/55/sh . 71/55/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .84/62/pc . . .82/65/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .70/59/sh . . .80/64/t Rio de Janeiro. . . .86/68/0.00 . . . 82/62/s . 81/62/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . . 83/64/t . . 86/67/s Santiago . . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . . .57/40/c . 52/38/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . . 79/56/s . 76/58/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .79/79/0.00 . .73/66/sh . 80/63/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . .89/71/pc . . .91/76/t Shanghai. . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . . . 88/79/t . . .89/79/t Singapore . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .88/79/t Stockholm. . . . . . .68/57/0.04 . .70/52/pc . 71/57/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .57/52/0.00 . .61/49/pc . 66/42/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . . 93/77/t . 92/79/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . . 91/74/s . . 92/75/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . .88/76/pc . . .83/77/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . . 80/65/t . . .79/68/t Vancouver. . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . .75/64/pc . 70/61/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . . 71/52/s . . 74/57/s Warsaw. . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .64/57/sh . 59/54/sh

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GREEN, ETC.

TV/Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Dear Abby, C3 Horoscope, C3

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Comics, C4-5 Sudoku, C5 Daily Bridge, C5 Crossword, C5

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

Biomass strategy

As school nears, kids crave latest gadgets By Hiawatha Bray New York Times News Service

GREEN

The Bulletin file photos

Brush and small trees removed during forest thinning projects could be transported to a nearby plant for processing into wood pellets and bricks, then sold to customers in the community who use them as fuel for heat or to generate electricity. Bringing those components together into a cluster would create jobs and local markets for woody biomass in rural communities while improving forest health, officials believe.

• Clustering pellet makers, customers in areas near forests could fuel the industry’s growth By Rachael Rees

Biomass industry road map

The Bulletin

I

n John Day, Ochoco Lumber Company has used small trees and undergrowth

from nearby forests

Oregon’s Forest Biomass Working Group released a draft July 30 of its strategic road map to grow the biomass industry. It is accepting public comments through Sept. 30. To obtain a copy of the draft, visit http://cms.oregon.gov/energy/RENEW/ Biomass/docs/Forest_Strategy/draft_FBWG_strategy_073012.pdf. To comment on the draft, send an email to biomass.energy@state.or.us. For more information on the Forest Biomass Working Group, visit http://cms. oregon.gov/energy/RENEW/Biomass/Pages/forest_biomass_working_ group.aspx.

to create wood pellets and chips that heat the community’s schools, hospital and airport.

The Eastern Oregon city illustrates the promise of biomass: hire crews to cut down the brush, small trees and other undergrowth that turn small wildfires into infernos, then pay mill work-

ers to turn it into pellets or bricks that local institutions can burn to create heat. “It’s not just about energy,” said Bruce Daucsavage, the CEO of Ochoco Lumber Co. “You’re try-

ing to develop a business that is improving forest health, creating local jobs in the community and utilizing local resources to create a heat source.” State and federal officials would like to replicate the biomass hub created in John Day in other areas of the state. The idea is an element in the state’s biomass strategy plan, a draft of which was released July 30. Separately, the U.S. Forest Service awarded Oregon a $105,000 grant Aug. 2 for a wood energy cluster pilot project. Additional funds, from the Oregon Department of Energy, brought the total amount available for projects to $168,000. See Biomass / C6

If you sell personal computers for a living, the next best thing to Christmas is backto-school season. It means billions in sales for tech companies like Apple Inc., Dell Inc., and Microsoft Corp., as parents and their kids scoop up new computing hardware and software. A good deal of that money will go to waste, as people spend needlessly on the next big, expensive thing. TECH Sure, that tablet computer looks cool. But is it what your kid really needs for schoolwork? And yes, a supersleek new laptop with an ultrapowerful chip will awe your favorite student’s friends, but that extra power won’t show up on a report card. For homework, a laptop is the tool of choice. Good machines running Microsoft Windows cost around $500 to $800, while an entry-level Mac from Apple goes for $1,000. Any such machine offers plenty of power for most students. Tablet computers are a popular alternative. An April survey of 5,600 U.S. high school students by investment firm Piper Jaffray found that 34 percent already own a tablet computer, with 70 percent of those choosing the iPad. That may be because so many kids are using iPads in classrooms already. Apple reported that it sold 1 million of them to educational institutions in the three months ended June 30. In fact, iPads are superb teaching tools. They’re portable, they’ll run all day on one battery charge, and they can be stuffed with apps for every academic subject and age group. But students do a fair amount of writing. And while you can certainly find good external keyboards for tablet computers and decent wordprocessing apps like Apple’s Pages,the tablet is a secondrate device for serious typing. Besides, a laptop’s hard drive can stash a lot more data, from homework assignments to a kid’s favorite music albums and movies. Most laptops also give you an optical drive, handy for installing software or watching videos. And college students may need to run full-fledged software programs ranging from Microsoft Office to technical software like the mathematical programming language MATLAB. That’s probably why college students overwhelmingly opt for laptops. A 2011 survey from the research firm Student Monitor found that of those who had bought some kind of computer in the previous six months, 89 percent had purchased a laptop, but just 6 percent had bought a tablet. See Technology / C7

Mustard: from sandwiches to biofuel to fertilizer By Donna Jones Santa Cruz (Calif.) Sentinel

WATSONVILLE, Calif. — You can slather it on a ham sandwich, fuel up your pickup, maybe even kill the bugs in your garden. Ken Kimes has high hopes for mustard. Kimes is president of Farm Fuel Inc., which was founded in 2007 with the aim of growing mustard for biofuel. Five years later, the company is marketing mustard seed meal as an organic fertilizer and is looking into

its potential to replace Friday, Kimes was chemical fumigants in harvesting mustard on the production of straw45 acres in Pescadero, berries and other crops. Calif., with the help of a “It’s showing good 1960s vintage combine. SCIENCE After harvest, the muspromise at knocking back soil diseases,” said tard seed will be proKimes. “The alternatives cessed at the company’s for growers are narrowing and warehouse on Coward Road in nonchemical alternatives would Watsonville, Calif., to separate be acceptable to just about the oil from the meal. everyone.” Kimes estimated “if everyFarm Fuels hasn’t given up thing goes well” the harvest on biofuels, though it has perwould produce about 1,500 haps scaled back its ambitions pounds of seed, or about 60 galin that realm. lons of oil per acre.

In terms of energy, it’s a net gain, he said. Still, in the bigger scheme of the nation’s energy needs, “it’s a drop in the bucket,” he said. “It became clear to us the oil was not going to support (the business). We had to have value in the meal.” So while Farm Fuels board member Henry Smith runs his Ford pickup on the oil, the company is working with researchers looking into mustard seed’s potential as a pesticide. See Mustard / C7

Kevin Johnson / Santa Cruz (Calif.) Sentinel

Henry Smith feeds harvested mustard into a white container in Pescadero, Calif. Farm Fuel Inc. is marketing mustard seed meal as an organic fertilizer and is looking into its potential to replace chemical fumigants.


C2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

TV & M Creator Aaron Sorkin defends ‘Newsroom’

L M T  TAKE THIS WALTZ (R) 2:30, 5

FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13

EDITOR’S NOTES:

BEND

ally slip on a “banana peel� of a situation. (All this critic LOS ANGELES — The can say after watching the guy has some serious guts. first four episodes, is there That’s my measured critical sure are a lot of banana peels analysis after seeing Aaron lying around). Sorkin face down a room“The television in your ful of cranky TV critics in a home is kind of an extenrecent news consion of the dinference about his ner table,� noted TV SPOTLIGHT new series “The the Oscar- and Newsroom.� Emmy-winning HBO, which has seemed screenwriter, adding that nervous about the massive the show’s 10 episodes are critical backlash against the finished, so there’s no way to show since before it debuted, tweak them, anyhow. tried to cancel this session, The message was obvious, scheduled for the end of a if delivered politely: We’re not long day of news confer- changing “The Newsroom� to ences about upcoming cable suit what you critics want. But programs. thanks for talking about us. But Sorkin, mensch that Which is too bad. Because he is, insisted otherwise. I’m convinced one reason “I don’t want to have an some TV critics are so pasadversarial relationship with sionate about “The Newsthe press,� he told journal- room� is that they can sense ists at the annual Television this is a good show that Critics Association summer should be a great show. And press tour. “I get that there too many Sorkinist stumbles are people who don’t like are keeping it from getting the show and are writing there. honestly about it. But I don’t Sorkin, 51, dropped some want to have that adversari- other knowledge: The show’s al feeling. I’ve always had a second season will debut in great relationship with the June 2013, and likely will TCA and I want to continue include storylines relating to doing that.� the election season we’re exAfter a cordial, wide-rang- periencing right now. ing debate with critics, it was One thing he almost-sorobvious the accomplished ta-kinda admitted was that writer is sticking to his criti- he needs help fleshing out cal guns. Mostly, he was the conservative point of unwilling to accept the criti- view on the show. Storylines cism from others that wom- about taking on the tea party en on the show universally movement have felt a lot like act emotionally messy and GOP-bashing in disguise. worship the show’s men; the Sorkin acknowledged he male characters’ flaws are has hired several consultants more often seen as heroic. to help with the next season’s Instead, Sorkin insisted stories. the female characters are “I’m hiring some really shown as being competent bright, interesting conservaat their jobs, setting a strong tive minds that will help me foundation for the characters bolster some conservative that allows them to occasion- arguments,� he said.

Regal Pilot Butte 6

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2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:30 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6:15 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:15, 4, 7 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 12:30, 6 LOLA VERSUS (R) 1, 3:30, 6:45 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 2:30, 6:05, 9:30 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG) 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30

By Eric Deggans

Tampa Bay (Fla.) Times

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

REDMOND

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Columbia Pictures via The Associated Press

Colin Farrell stars in the action thriller “Total Recall.�

SISTERS TED (R) 2, 4:45, 7:50, 10:25 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 12:20, 1:30, 3:10, 4:35, 6:30, 7:35, 9:25, 10:20 THE WATCH (R) 12:35, 7:05

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 3:30, 9:50 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:05, 1:15, 3:15, 4, 4:30, 6:25, 7, 7:30, 9:35, 10 BRAVE (PG) 1:20, 3:50, 6:20, 9:05 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 12:15, 1:45, 4:10, 5, 6:40, 7:45, 9:10, 10:10 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) Noon, 3:40, 7:20, 9:20 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 12:45, 4:20, 7:55 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG) 1, 3:25, 6:05, 9 HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1:05, 3:55, 6:45, 9:15 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 12:30, 3, 6 NITRO CIRCUS: THE MOVIE 3-D (PG-13) 1:55, 4:55, 7:15, 9:45 STEP UP RESOLUTION (PG-13) 12:50

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 6 PROMETHEUS (R) 9 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 7 THE CAMPAIGN (PG-13) 5:15, 7:30 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 5 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 7:30 TO ROME WITH LOVE (R) 5 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 7:15

MADRAS

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

SHUT UP AND PLAY THE HITS (no MPAA) 7:30

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 4, 7 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (UPSTAIRS — PG) 6 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

Tin Pan Theater

9:10 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 4:15, 7:30 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG) 2:25, 4:30, 6:40, 9 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 2:20, 4:35, 6:50, 9:20

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 3:40, 6:30, 9:25 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 2:35, 4:45, 7,

Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

541-389-1505 400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

for appointments call 541-382-4900

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

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*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Lidia’s Italy

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Chefs A’Field

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens My Family ‘PG’ Time Goes By

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Bachelor Pad Contestants ask each other questions. (N) ‘14’ Ă… (10:01) The Glass House (N) ‘14’ Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Stars Earn Stripes Teams compete in a complicated mission. (N) ‘PG’ Grimm Bad Teeth (N) ‘14’ Ă… How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ How I Met 2 Broke Girls 2 Broke Girls Mike & Molly ’ Hawaii Five-0 Kupale ‘PG’ Ă… Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Bachelor Pad Contestants ask each other questions. (N) ‘14’ Ă… (10:01) The Glass House (N) ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Hotel Hell (N) ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) Hell’s Kitchen (N) ‘14’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Ă… The Amish: American Experience ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Stars Earn Stripes Teams compete in a complicated mission. (N) ‘PG’ Grimm Bad Teeth (N) ‘14’ Ă… Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Perez Hilton All Access ‘14’ Remodeled All in the Family ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Afterglow ‘G’ ››› “Rolling Stones: Live at the Maxâ€? (1991) World News Tavis Smiley ’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

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KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ History Detectives ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… Intervention ‘14’ Ă… Intervention Nichole (N) Ă… Intervention Elena (N) ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) Intervention Robby ‘14’ *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… (4:00) ›› “Commandoâ€? (1985) Arnold › “Exit Woundsâ€? (2001, Action) Steven Seagal, DMX. A cop encounters cor- ››› “Crocodile Dundeeâ€? (1986) Paul Hogan, Linda Kozlowski. An Australian ›› “Crocodile Dundee IIâ€? (1988, Comedy) Paul Hogan. Outback he-man and *AMC 102 40 39 Schwarzenegger. Ă… ruption in Detroit’s roughest precinct. Ă… hunting legend braves the wilds of Manhattan. Ă… girlfriend face Colombian drug dealers. Ă… Dirty Jobs Monkeys run wild. ‘14’ Call-Wildman Call-Wildman Call of Wildman Call-Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of the Wildman ‘PG’ Ă… Call of Wildman Call-Wildman *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Tanked: Unfiltered ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NYC Gallery Girls (N) Housewives/NYC BRAVO 137 44 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… ›››› “Unforgivenâ€? (1992, Western) Clint Eastwood, Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman. ’ CMT 190 32 42 53 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ 20 Under 20: Transforming Mad Money The Facebook Obsession 20 Under 20: Transforming Paid Program Hair Restoration CNBC 51 36 40 52 ››› “The Pixar Storyâ€? (2007) Narrated by Stacy Keach. Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… Always Sunny (6:24) Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily Show (7:56) Futurama (8:27) Futurama South Park ‘MA’ (9:28) The Comedy Central Roast Roseanne ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:50) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politics & Public Policy Today CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie ›› “High School Musicalâ€? (2006) Zac Efron. ’ ‘G’ Ă… Shake It Up! ’ ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Ultimate Air Jaws ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Shark Week’s Impossible Shot Air Jaws Apocalypse: Reloaded Sharkzilla (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:02) MythBusters (N) ’ ‘PG’ (11:05) Sharkzilla ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Air Jaws: Sharks of South Africa Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) Keeping Up With the Kardashians Opening Act (N) ‘PG’ Keeping Up With the Kardashians Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 NFL Preseason Football Dallas Cowboys at Oakland Raiders From O.co Coliseum in Oakland, Calif. (N) WTA Tennis U.S. Open Series: Rogers Cup, Final From Montreal. (N) NFL Live (N) (Live) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… Football Now NFL Yearbook ESPN2 22 24 21 24 (4:00) MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at New York Yankees (N) Ă… UWF Wrestling PBA Bowling 1974 Midas Open PBA Bowling AWA Wrestling Ă… College Football From Nov. 5, 2011. Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Battle of the Network Stars Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Bunheads Blank Up, It’s Time ‘14’ Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Bunheads (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Bunheads ’ ‘14’ Ă… The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Best Dishes Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Mystery Diners Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Star Trekâ€? (2009) Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto. Chronicles the early days of the starship Enterprise and her crew. ››› “Star Trekâ€? (2009) Chris Pine. FX 131 Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Love It or List It ‘G’ Ă… Love It or List It ‘G’ Ă… Love It or List It (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 Hunters Int’l Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Counting Cars (11:01) American Pickers ‘PG’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ ›› “My Sister’s Keeperâ€? (2009, Drama) Cameron Diaz. Ă… ››› “The Memory Keeper’s Daughterâ€? (2008, Drama) ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Frasier ’ ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) (7:49) Teen Wolf Fury ’ ‘14’ Teen Wolf Battlefield ’ ‘14’ Teen Wolf Master Plan (N) ’ ‘14’ Teen Wolf Rev. Teen Wolf ‘14’ MTV 192 22 38 57 Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness (7:14) Ridiculousness ’ ‘PG’ SpongeBob Big Time Rush Big Time Rush Dora Explorer Team Umizoomi Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ My Wife & Kids My Wife & Kids George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 Ball Up Street Ball World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ World’s Wildest Police Videos (N) World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 World’s Wildest Police Videos ’ ››› “Starship Troopersâ€? (1997, Science Fiction) Casper Van Dien, Dina Meyer, Denise Richards. Ă… Warehouse 13 (N) ’ Ă… Alphas (N) Warehouse 13 ’ Ă… SYFY 133 35 133 45 (4:00) “Star Trek: Insurrectionâ€? Behind Scenes Living Edge Kingdom Conn. Jesse Duplantis ›› “Saul and Davidâ€? (1968) Norman Wooland, Gianni Garko. Joel Osteen Manna-Fest Live-Holy Land Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan Jack McBrayer. Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “Black Narcissusâ€? (1947, Drama) Deborah Kerr, Sabu, David Farrar. ››› “Tea and Sympathyâ€? (1956, Drama) Deborah Kerr, John Kerr. A house- (9:15) ››› “From Here to Eternityâ€? (1953, Drama) Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, Deborah ›››› “The InTCM 101 44 101 29 Anglican nuns fight temptation at a Himalayan mission. Ă… master’s wife befriends a sensitive student. Ă… Kerr. Lives intertwine at a Pearl Harbor base before the attack. Ă… nocentsâ€? Ă… Here Comes Worst Tattoos Worst Tattoos Extreme Cheapskates ‘PG’ Ă… Bates Bates Big Tiny ‘PG’ Big Tiny ‘PG’ Extreme Cheapskates ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Here Comes The Closer Drug Fiend ‘14’ The Closer Last Rites ‘14’ The Closer Armed Response ‘14’ The Closer Last Word (N) ‘14’ (10:06) Major Crimes (N) ‘14’ (11:07) The Closer Last Word ‘14’ *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Closer Fool’s Gold ‘14’ Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Adventure Time Regular Show Annoying King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bizarre Foods America ‘PG’ Bizarre Foods America (N) ‘PG’ Hotel Impossible ‘PG’ Ă… Hotel Impossible ‘PG’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations (6:13) M*A*S*H Dear Peggy ‘PG’ (6:52) M*A*S*H (7:24) M*A*S*H Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Running Man ‘G’ NCIS Angel of Death ‘14’ Ă… NCIS: Los Angeles Burned ‘14’ WWE Monday Night RAW (N) ’ Ă… (11:05) ››› “The Mummyâ€? USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Trojan Horse ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (N) ‘14’ Single Ladies All or Nothing ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies All or Nothing ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 “The Last Days of Left Eyeâ€? ’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ›› “Step Up 3â€? 2010, Drama Rick Malambri. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “Silveradoâ€? 1985, Western Kevin Kline. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (10:15) › “Resident Evil: Afterlifeâ€? 2010 Milla Jovovich. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:45) ››› “Cry-Babyâ€? 1990 ›› “The Omenâ€? 2006, Horror Liev Schreiber, Julia Stiles. ‘R’ Ă… FXM Presents ›› “The Cellâ€? 2000, Suspense Jennifer Lopez. ‘R’ Ă… FXM Presents FMC 104 204 104 120 › “The Happeningâ€? 2008, Science Fiction Mark Wahlberg. ‘R’ Ă… Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC 150: Henderson vs. Edgar II - Prelims Strangers Shorthanded UFC Reloaded UFC 143: Diaz vs. Condit Nick Diaz takes on Carlos Condit. FUEL 34 American Triumvirate (N) American Triumvirate Golf Central American Triumvirate American Triumvirate The Golf Fix GOLF 28 301 27 301 Big Break Atlantis Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Captive ‘G’ (4:45) ››› “Another Earthâ€? 2011 Brit Marling. A woman › “The Art of Getting Byâ€? 2011 Freddie Highmore. A disaf- The Newsroom Ratings plummet. ’ ››› “Bridesmaidsâ€? 2011, Comedy Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph. A maid of (11:15) Hard Knocks: Training Camp HBO 425 501 425 501 seeks out the man whose life she shattered. fected teenager meets a kindred spirit. Ă… (Part 1 of 2) ‘MA’ Ă… honor’s life unravels as the big day approaches. ’ ‘R’ Ă… With the Miami Dolphins ›› “Ramboâ€? 2008, Action Sylvester Stallone. ‘R’ (6:45) ››› “Cop Landâ€? 1997, Crime Drama Sylvester Stallone, Harvey Keitel. ‘R’ Comedy Bang! Bunk ‘14’ ››› “Cop Landâ€? 1997, Crime Drama Sylvester Stallone. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:05) ››› “48 (5:45) ››› “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1â€? 2010 Daniel Radcliffe. Harry sets out (8:10) ››› “Grosse Pointe Blankâ€? 1997 John Cusack. An assassin on assign- Strike Back ’ (10:45) Strike Back ’ ‘MA’ Ă… “Baby Dolls BeMAX 400 508 508 HRS.â€? 1982 to destroy the secrets to Voldemort’s power. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ment attends his high-school reunion. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… hind Barsâ€? 2012 Wild Justice Bear Scare (N) ‘14’ Border Wars (N) ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad (N) ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Border Wars ‘14’ Wild Justice Bear Scare ‘14’ Wild Justice Fish & Meth ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents Profess. Fisher’s ATV Dirt Trax TV Destination Pol. PBR Outdoors Best of West Headhunters TV The Crush Fisher’s ATV Dirt Trax TV Destination Pol. Overhaul OUTD 37 307 43 307 Legends of Fall Hunt Masters ››› “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mindâ€? 2004, Romance Jim Carrey. A (6:55) ›› “Phenomenonâ€? 1996, Drama John Travolta. A small-town mechanic Kevin Nealon: Whelmed but Not Weeds Unfreeze Episodes ’ Web Therapy (N) Weeds Unfreeze SHO 500 500 couple erase the memories of their relationship. ’ ‘R’ Ă… is gifted with amazing mental powers. ’ ‘PG’ ‘MA’ Ă… ‘14’ Ă… Overly ’ ‘14’ Ă… ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Gearz ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘14’ Hot Rod TV ‘14’ Truck U (N) ‘G’ Truck U ‘G’ Gearz ‘PG’ Gearz ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘14’ Hot Rod TV ‘14’ Truck U ‘G’ Truck U ‘G’ Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Gearz ‘PG’ Boss Listen; Reflex A mayor has a serious medical condition. ‘MA’ › “Zookeeperâ€? 2011 Kevin James. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:45) ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010 Jeff Bridges. ’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:45) ›› “All the King’s Menâ€? 2006 Sean Penn. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (4:35) ››› “Car Washâ€? 1976 Richard (6:15) “Beware the Gonzoâ€? 2010, Comedy ZoĂŤ Kravitz, Jesse McCartney. Ed- › “Hellraiser: Infernoâ€? 2000, Horror Craig Sheffer, Doug (9:40) “Hellraiser: Hellworldâ€? 2005, Horror Doug Bradley, (11:15) “Dead Man Runningâ€? 2009 TMC 525 525 Pryor. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… die starts an underground movement. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Bradley, Nicholas Turturro. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Katheryn Winnick, Henry Cavill. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Danny Dyer. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Return to London: The Games of the XXX Olympiad Return to London: XXX Olympiad Return to London: XXX Olympiad NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Return to London: XXX Olympiad Return to London: The Games of the XXX Olympiad Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Shannen Says The Wedding Gift *WE 143 41 174 118 Golden Girls


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Wedding weekend fans old flames into an affair Dear Abby: “Jane,� the daughter of a lifelong friend, attended my son’s wedding with her husband. My son and Jane have known each other since childhood, and always flirted and acted as if they had a crush on each other. To make a long story short, after seeing each other during the weekend, my son left his wife of only one month and started a long-distance relationship with Jane. Jane continues to live with her husband. My son and Jane have been open about their relationship with everyone in our families except her father and her husband. Needless to say, those of us who know about this deceptive relationship are sick at heart and skeptical about who Jane’s true love is — her husband or my son. Jane’s sister is being married soon. If Jane is still keeping my son in a closet, I don’t want to see her at the upcoming wedding. There’s a chance Jane’s husband may not be going because there’s evidence he might have an idea that his marriage is not healthy. Should we attend the wedding to support my lifelong friend, or stay away to avoid the pain of seeing the woman who has kept my son on a roller-coaster ride for years? — To Go or Not To Go? Dear T.G. or Not T.G.: Let me get this straight. Your son dumped his wife of only one month for a married woman, and you’re worried about HIS pain? Stop involving yourself in this melodrama and let him work this out for himself. If Jane dumps her husband for him, he may have the girl of his childhood dreams. If she doesn’t, he will learn an important life lesson. As to whether you should attend Jane’s sister’s wedding, take a Dramamine and go. It’s going to be a thrill ride I wouldn’t miss if I could get

DEAR ABBY a ticket. Dear Abby: I am a frequent international traveler with a problem. I always pack food for myself to take onboard. My trips are often 20 hours or longer and involve several planes. I find many people neglect to pack any food and they wind up asking — or begging — me to give them some of mine. It’s very awkward for me. On one flight, I overheard a woman tell her son, “Go ask that man for some cookies,� and the kid did come over. How do I handle this? There are times I have to spend five or seven hours in an airport after midnight waiting for the next flight, and that food is my reserve. — Not Stingy in Florida Dear Not Stingy: I’m glad you have given me the chance to remind travelers that the food on airplanes isn’t what it was years ago — particularly for passengers flying coach. That’s why it’s important to plan ahead and bring something onboard — fruit, candy, a sandwich — particularly when traveling with children. Of course it’s hard to refuse someone in a situation like the one you described. I suppose you could have told the child, “Didn’t your mother warn you not to take food from strangers?� But then you’d have to live with the image of a hungry child sitting two rows back. Sometimes you do have to “just say no.� Explain that you have a long layover and need the emergency provisions for yourself. It may not win you many friends, but then, you are not running for office. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Monday, Aug. 13, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you become more resilient than ever before. You learn to go along with the unexpected, as you see it as exciting rather than a problem. You express your feelings in a vulnerable yet thrilling manner, and you touch many people in your life as a result. At the same time, you grow and transform to a more dynamic, easygoing personality. If you are single, you attract many people. Your job will be to choose the right person. Many of you will enjoy this process. If you are attached, the two of you relate on an even more positive level. Relax more together. A SCORPIO could play a significant role in your emotional life. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You have been maintaining a high level of activity and are full of spunk. Some people might be taken aback by your frenetic energy and wish you would slow down. Your vitality is nearly overwhelming. Tonight: Happily head home. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You could be a little overwhelmed by everything you need to do. You express gentleness when speaking through your expressions and body language. Be willing to revise your thinking and understand what might be going on with a loved one. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s news. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Realize what is happening, and take responsibility for your role. A friend or associate acts in a most unexpected manner. Buy a token of appreciation in order to demonstrate your support for this unpredictable person. Tonight: Pick up tickets to a game or concert. Make it a treat. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You wake up feeling great. Throw in an impromptu activity, and you won’t need your morning coffee. You feel as if you need to contain a situation. You cannot control someone, but you can choose to not be involved. Tonight: All smiles. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Please note what is happening behind the scenes. You could be surprised by forthcoming news. Clearly, a loved one cares. Be willing to have a long-overdue discussion with this person. Avoid getting involved in an associate’s control games. Tonight: Vanish. Do your thing.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Zero in on what is important. Do not sell yourself short. Others know, and are receptive to, your talents and ideas. Do nothing halfway. Pressure builds to return calls, but make it a priority to attend all of your meetings first. Tonight: Only where the action is. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Be aware of your limitations, and understand that you will need to take the lead anyway. You are juggling two very different interests right now. Understand that sometimes this is necessary. Think positively. Tonight: To the wee hours. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Read between the lines. Understand how someone might be too vulnerable to share his or her feelings. You see right through control games, but out of kindness, you’ll choose not to mention it. Rising energy levels could drive you. Tonight: Make sure music is playing wherever you are. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Deal with an associate or loved one directly. You might not be aware of what is happening with this person, but you’ll have an idea by the end of the day. Rebelliousness is connected to a need to have control. Try not to play into this type of behavior. Tonight: Opt for togetherness. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Defer to others with an understanding of what you want out of the situation, and be sure to explain those terms. Expect only a positive response. Someone still might be challenging and doesn’t realize that you aren’t the one to get into a control game with. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Dive into your day and clear out high-priority items early on. You might be surprised by a friend who pops in on you unexpectedly. Let an associate reveal more of his or her feelings. It might be important to know where this person is coming from. Tonight: A relaxing activity. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Be sensitive to the possibilities that surround a creative endeavor. You might decide to go for a different style or new way of handling this situation. What is important is that you express yourself. Tonight: So what if it is Monday? Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: C.J. Wurm reads from her book “Uppity�; free; 4-7 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062.

TUESDAY OREGON STAR PARTY: Gather at Indian Trail Spring for nightsky viewing, with speakers and more; registration required; directions to site available on website; $75, $25 ages 12-17, $15 ages 6-11; www .oregonstarparty.org. REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@ hotmail.com. TUESDAY FARMERS MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com. BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-3233370 or farmersmarket@ brookswoodmeadowplaza.com.

WEDNESDAY OREGON STAR PARTY: Gather at Indian Trail Spring for nightsky viewing, with speakers and more; registration required; directions to site available on website; $75, $25 ages 12-17, $15 ages 6-11; www .oregonstarparty.org. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail. com or http://bendfarmers market.com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The John Shipe Band performs rock music; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www .musicinthecanyon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance by cover band Design Band; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. NORAH JONES: The mellow pop artist performs; $39 or $60 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. THE MOONDOGGIES: The boogie and blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CLASSICAL CONCERT I: Featuring selections from Beethoven, with the Central Oregon Mastersingers; $30$60, $10 youth; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-593-9310, tickets@ sunrivermusic.org or www .sunrivermusic.org. HELLBOUND GLORY: The Reno, Nev.-based country act performs, with Johnny Outlaw and the Johnson Creek Stranglers; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

THURSDAY OREGON STAR PARTY: Gather at Indian Trail Spring for nightsky viewing, with speakers and more; registration required; directions to site available on website; $75, $25 ages 12-17, $15 ages 6-11; www .oregonstarparty.org. TREEHOUSE PUPPETS IN THE PARK: With a performance of “Princess Patty’s Silk Sheets�; followed by a coordinated activity; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Wildflower Park, 60955 River Rim Drive, Bend; 541-389-7275 or www.bendparksandrec.org. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Hearts of Horses� by Molly Gloss; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. BEND BREWFEST: Event includes tastings from more than 50 breweries, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for entry; free admission, must purchase mug and tasting tokens; 3-11 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510 or www.bendbrewfest.com. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and

Gary G. Newman / Spokesman file photo

Drifters Car Club is sponsoring the Harvest Run, a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more. The event begins at 6 p.m. Friday in downtown Redmond. Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by blues guitarist Tommy Castro, with FX Blues; with food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Dick Linford reads from his book “Halfway to Halfway and Other River Stories�; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. CONJUGAL VISITORS: The soulfolk act performs; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9122 or www.angelinesbakery.com. “RIFFTRAX LIVE, ‘MANOS’ THE HANDS OF FATE�: A screening of the film, with commentary by the comedians of “Mystery Science Theater 3000�; $12.50; 8 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www .fathomevents.com. BENYARO: The New York-based Americana act performs, with The Harmed Brothers; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand.

FRIDAY OREGON STAR PARTY: Gather at Indian Trail Spring for night-sky viewing, with speakers and more; registration required; directions to site available on website; $75, $25 ages 12-17, $15 ages 6-11; www .oregonstarparty.org. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; directions to venue, Runway Ranch in Bend, on website; $15 for weekend; 12:30-10 p.m.; www.hadbf.com. HIGH DESERT BRIDGE SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT: Central Oregon Bridge Club presents a duplicate bridge tournament; $9 or $8 ACBL members; 1 and 7 p.m.; 1 p.m. free for players with less than 5 MPS; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, South Sister, Three Sisters Conference and Convention Center, 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-9453 or pldouglas@ bendbroadband.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. BEND BREWFEST: Event includes tastings from more than 50 breweries, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for entry; free admission, must purchase mug and tasting tokens; 3-11 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510 or www .bendbrewfest.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www .sistersfarmersmarket.com. SUNRIVER FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 4-7 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; www .sunriverchamber.com. HARVEST RUN: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music and a barbecue; proceeds benefit MakeA-Wish Foundation of Oregon, Redmond-Sisters Hospice and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 6 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541548-6329. “HOW DID WE GET HERE?� LECTURE SERIES: Dennis Jenkins talks about “Oregon’s Earliest Inhabitants; Archaeological Investigations at the Paisley Caves�; $10, $8 Sunriver Nature Center members, $3 students, $50 for series; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Noah

Strycker talks about his book “Among Penguins: A Bird Man in Antarctica�; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541549-0866. “THE TEMPEST�: Innovation Theatre Works presents Shakespeare’s play about a sorcerer trapped on an island; free; 7 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St., Sisters; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. SHOW US YOUR SPOKES: Featuring a performance by Mosley Wotta and Cloaked Characters; proceeds benefit Commute Options; $5; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CLASSICAL CONCERT II: Featuring selections from Schubert and Beethoven, featuring Steven Moeckel; $30-$60, $10 youth; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-593-9310, tickets@ sunrivermusic.org or www .sunrivermusic.org. SARA JACKSON-HOLMAN: The Portland-based singer-songwriter performs a CD-release show; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803. HOOVES: The blues band performs, with Avery James and the Hillandales; $5; 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend.

SATURDAY OREGON STAR PARTY: Gather at Indian Trail Spring for night-sky viewing, with speakers and more; registration required; directions to site available on website; $75, $25 ages 12-17, $15 ages 6-11; www .oregonstarparty.org. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Motorcyclists of Central Oregon Toy Run; free admission; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; 22 N.W. Gordon Road, Bend; 541-350-2392. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. LA PINE COOP & GARDEN TOUR: Tour homes throughout La Pine and see hothouses, hen houses and gardens; proceeds benefit La Pine Little Deschutes Grange and the Newberry Habitat for Humanity ReStore; $10 per car; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; www.lapinecoopandgarden.com. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@ gmail.com. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the museum; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-3891813 or info@deschuteshistory.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. HARVEST RUN: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with

approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music, a show and shine and more; proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon, Redmond-Sisters Hospice and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 10 a.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-548-6329. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; directions to venue, Runway Ranch in Bend, on website; $15 for weekend; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; www.hadbf.com. HIGH DESERT BRIDGE SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT: Central Oregon Bridge Club presents a duplicate bridge tournament; $9 or $8 ACBL members; 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, South Sister, Three Sisters Conference and Convention Center, 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-9453 or pldouglas@ bendbroadband.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. QUILT SHOW IN THE PARK: Mount Bachelor Quilters Guild presents an outdoor quilt show, with demonstrations and a raffle; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 1525 Hill St., Bend; 541-728-1286. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BEND BREWFEST: Event includes tastings from more than 50 breweries, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for entry; free admission, must purchase mug and tasting tokens; noon-11 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510 or www .bendbrewfest.com. DINNER FUNDRAISER: A steak dinner and silent auction; proceeds benefit the Honor Flight of Eastern Oregon and Prineville’s Band of Brothers; $10 for dinner; 4 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 151 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-5451. HIGH DESERT RENDEZVOUS: A Western auction and gala featuring live music, games and dinner; proceeds benefit the High Desert Museum’s educational programs; $200, $150 for museum members; 4 p.m.; Horse Butte Equestrian Center, 60360 Horse Butte Road, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 365, hdr@highdesertmuseum.org or www.highdesertrendezvous.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Les Joslin talks about his book “Uncle Sam’s Cabins�; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

Class information: Aug. 17th 1pm or 6pm Shilo Inn: 3105 O.B. Riley Road Bend OR. 97701

Aug. 18th 1pm or 6pm Best Western: 2630 S.W. 17th Place Redmond OR. 97756


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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

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DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

Nature rebuilds Elwha River beach • Removal of dam aids restoration efforts near Seattle

“That was one of the questions we had, was would (dam removal) have a response on the beach. What this shows is that sediment can and will make it onto the beach. What I am seeing is sand, and it’s new sand.”

By Lynda V. Mapes The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — Every few weeks, scientist Ian Miller heads down to the delta of the Elwha River to have a close look at the beach. And what he saw beginning last April surprised him: a bit of sand. While that may not sound like much, Miller knew he was seeing something more. A month earlier, contractors had finished taking out the last of Elwha Dam. Now here it was on the beach: sediment set free along with the river. That bit of softness afoot on the eroded, cobble beach was a first taste of the restoration benefits of Elwha dam removal, and the sweep of its reach: all the way to the river’s mouth. By May and June — during some of the lowest daylight tides of this year — Miller saw even more sand on the beach, growing in a sweep to the east, with the prevailing current. A coastal-hazard specialist based in Port Angeles for Washington Sea Grant, Miller is continuing his work, to learn how, if and when this beach may be altered by sediment set loose by dam removal. Taking the dams out of the Elwha isn’t only about allowing fish to come back up river to their spawning grounds for the first time since two dams were built on the Elwha without fish passage, beginning in 1910. The $325 million Elwha River ecosystem restoration begun last September is also about allowing wood and sediment to flow down the river from its watershed. The dams strangled the river’s natural transport capacity, and hoarded the gleanings from its watershed in the dams’ reservoirs: logs, root wads and other woody debris, and about 24 million cubic yards of rocks, sand, gravel and fine sediment. As the dams come out, the river is expected to mobilize about one-quarter to onethird of that sand and gravel

Ian Miller, coastal-hazard specialist, Washington Sea Grant

Steve Ringman / Seattle Times

Ian Miller, coastal-hazard specialist for Washington Sea Grant, carries a GPS receiver as he surveys the new low-tide terrace at the mouth of the Elwha River, near Seattle, Wash. The sand has only been visible since April and is accumulating.

trapped in the reservoirs and about one-half to two-thirds of the fine sediment, according to Tim Randle of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which is directing management of the sediment during dam removal. It’s the largest ever controlled sediment release in a dam-removal project anywhere in the world. Some of the material will stay right in the lake beds. Some will settle in the river bottom. But some of it will be transported all the way to saltwater, and build up the beach and seafloor. And to some, it’s a welcome change. Today, the beach can erode 12 feet a year on average in some places, according to Miller. Members of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe talk about their elders clamming on beaches that have little or no sand today, and running cattle on land east of the river mouth that has since washed away. Jon Warrick, geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pacific Coastal and Marine

Science Center at Santa Cruz, Calif., notes the cobble beach exposed at low tide at the Elwha delta today is inconsistent with the tribe’s oral history of clamming on the beach. And that, Warrick notes, is probably the result of coastal erosion related to the impacts of the dams on sediment flowing to the coast. And the rate of erosion is increasing. Dam removal is expected to help reverse some of that trend. How much, nobody knows. The Strait of Juan de Fuca where the Elwha meets the saltwater has a ripping current. The river has also been channelized and diked in its lower reaches, altering its ability to move sand and other material naturally into the estuary and near shore. To track the changes already under way, scientists are trying a bit of everything. Farther offshore, scientific divers with the USGS, the tribe and Sea Grant were underwater last month, taking

tives and grant programs for facility development, equipment, harvesting and transportation. While the sawmill in John Day was built in 1983, Ochoco Lumber has been in the timber business since 1939, Daucsavage said. To adapt to the changing timber industry, he said, the company needed to find a way to profit from wood that wasn’t suitable to make lumber. The answer: a pellet plant. In 2010, the federal government awarded the company a grant to install a biomass plant to make wood pellets at its mill. Although a cluster has started to form as homes and buildings near the plant shift to biomass-fueled heating systems, and demand for Ochoco’s pellets has grown overseas, Daucsavage said more work needs to be done. “The market needs to be created beyond where it is today,” he said. “We need (more) facilities to burn these pellets and bricks.” It’s capital-intensive to construct and operate a pellet facility, he said. It’s also expensive for buildings to convert to biomass thermal heating. A boiler required for a school to use biomass can cost between $500,000-$750,000, he said. However, he noted, the longterm payback could be worth the initial costs. Saranich said the pilot program will not only determine potential biomass cluster locations, but also identify buildings in cluster areas that would be optimal for conversion. On Tuesday, representatives of agencies involved in the pilot project are scheduled to discuss the criteria for cluster sites and what will constitute a cluster. The first step is a broad market assessment, said Matt Krumenauer, senior policy analyst for the Oregon Department of Energy. Around mid-October, he said, poten-

tial clusters should begin to be identified. “We can’t create these clusters,” he said, “(but) we can identify where the potential is, help promote them and provide the assistance needed.” Central Oregon has the potential to be a cluster location, Saranich said. “We are going to try to focus our emphasis on areas where there’s large amounts of woody biomass that need hazardous fuel reduction,” he said. “Central Oregon is one of the most heavily used recreational areas in the Northwest. Hazardous fuel reduction fits in with what’s going on recreation-wise.” Phil Chang, program administrator for the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, said Central Oregon has the potential to be one of the biggest and best of these clusters in the state. “We have forests that are really out of whack, and we have the collaborative forest restoration efforts to do something about that,” he said. “A lot of that centers around thinning operations. “When we thin, instead of disposing of biomass by burning it in piles in the woods, we can use it as a fuel supply for heating.” Chang said the region has high heating demands. Instead of depending on traditional sources like natural gas and propane that are imported, Central Oregon could use biomass — a home-grown energy source. Along with the environmental efforts in the forests, he said, Central Oregon already has companies that make pellets and wood chips, as well as example projects — like Sisters High School, the Deschutes National Forest headquarters building and a proposed biomass heat and electricity generating plant at Mt. Bachelor.

stock of transects they set on the sea floor last year before dam removal began. They saw that portions of the underwater ecosystem were inundated by the sediment plume pouring from the Elwha; anemones and tube worms that before dam removal were surrounded by bare substrate last year are nestled amid soft sediment now. As for Miller, he is tracking the beach with a variety of approaches. Using digital photography, he can document the grain size of the beach, and how it is changing over time.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

He has also deployed fleets of what he calls “smart rocks” — river cobble, pebbles and small boulders tricked out with radio tags embedded in the rock — tossed overboard in the river or snugged in the beach. He dials in the signals with an antenna and receiving device he carries in a backpack to see where and

how far the rocks move under different weather conditions. Still to be seen are the results this first winter with the lower dam out, particularly if, unlike last winter, there is an active storm season. And yet to come is the big bang of sediment when Glines Canyon Dam, a few miles upriver, is completely out by next May. The real story on dam removal will only be revealed over time, Miller said: “We still don’t know the long-term effects.” But there’s no doubt change is already afoot. “It’s changing all the time,” Miller said of the beach. “That was one of the questions we had, was would (dam removal) have a response on the beach. What this shows is that sediment can and will make it onto the beach. What I am seeing is sand, and it’s new sand.”

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Saturdays, June 30 - Sept. 22 | 10am-2pm NorthWest Crossing Neighborhood Center

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PRESENTING THE BULLETIN’S

DESCHUTES COUNTY LAKES WORD SEARCH GAME

Biomass Continued from C1 The money will allow several agencies — including the Oregon Department of Energy, Sustainable Northwest, the Bureau of Land Management, the Oregon Department of Forestry and Business Oregon — to identify sections of the state where biomass clusters — multiple buildings using biomass near a biomass plant — could form, said Ron Saranich, Forest Service biomass coordinator for the Pacific Northwest. The goal: ignite the industry by driving up local demand for the pellets and other products biomass plants produce. It’s easier and cheaper if the collection, processing and market are all within a small radius, Saranich said. “In the old days, you’d put three to five large trees on the log truck and get them to the mills. … There was a lot of money there because there are a lot of 2-by-4s coming off a large tree,” Saranich said. “When you’re putting a lot of small trees on a truck to reduce the risk of hazardous fuel, the value of that log truck is worth considerably less because the trees can’t be used for structural lumber.” Attempts to grow a biomass market are not new. For more than a decade, efforts have been under way to make biomass a profitable industry in the United States. But they’ve run into barriers, including the high cost of cutting and transporting the material from the forest to the processing plant, the low market value of biomass, a lack of local markets for the processed product and low financial returns for the businesses involved, according to a study released this year by the Ecosystem Workforce Program at the University of Oregon. To promote biomass, the study suggests the government should enact tax incen-

— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

We’ve taken the names of a few of the over 100 lakes in Deschutes County and created a fun and challenging local game.

HERE’S HOW TO PLAY: First, find all the hidden lakes. Second, deliver your answers to our office (in person or by mail by August 24th) and you’ll be entered to win a

$30 GIFT CARD to Fred Meyer!

NAME:_____________________________________________ PHONE:___________________ ADDRESS:_____________________________________________________________________ EMAIL ADDRESS:_______________________________________________________________ YOU MUST COMPLETE FORM IN FULL TO BE ELIGIBLE TO WIN. WINNERS WILL BE NOTIFIED BY EMAIL. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY, EXTRA NEWSPRINT GAMES ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BULLETIN OFFICE. ENTRIES MUST BE ON ORIGINAL NEWSPRINT TO BE ELIGIBLE. WESCOM EMPLOYEES AND THEIR IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBERS ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO WIN.

WINNER WILL BE DRAWN ON AUGUST 27TH • FIND THESE DESCHUTES COUNTY LAKES: BARBIE, BARE, BARREN, BLAZE, BLOWDOWN, CULTUS, DAVIS, DEER, DEVILS, GREEN, GROUSE, HIDDEN, HOSMER, JAY, KERSHAW, LADY, LAVACAMP, LUCKY, MUSKRAT, PEEWEE, PHANTOM, REDSLIDE, SPARKS, TWIN, WESTHANKS, YAPOAH

Mail or deliver your game entry to: 1777 SW Chandler Avenue, Bend OR 97702 541-385-5800 • www.bendbulletin.com


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Mustard

Technology

Continued from C1 “That’s the most exciting part,” said Kimes, who owns New Natives, a Corralitos, Calif., organic farm. Farmers are running out of options because the ozonedepleting chemical methyl bromide, long used to fumigate berry fields before planting to fight pests, weeds and soil-borne pathogens, is being phased out under international treaty and the manufacturer of a proposed replacement, methyl iodide, pulled its product from the United States last year amidst controversy about potential risks to the environment and public health. Kimes envisions mustard seed meal as a nontoxic alternative. The glucosinolates that make mustard spicy also can help control agricultural pests, Kimes said. Stephanie Boucier, Farm Fuels’ chief executive officer and research coordinator, said trials of mustard seed meal are ongoing at Pajaro Valley test plots. The challenge has been finding the best way to utilize its potential, whether by combining it with other techniques or blending different mustard varieties, Boucier said. Interest is growing among

Continued from C1 Choosing a laptop is fairly easy because today’s computers are so similar. Even the traditional divide between machines that run Microsoft Corp.’s Windows operating system and Apple’s Mac computers doesn’t matter so much any more. Much of our work happens on the Internet, where the computer brand makes no difference. Besides, today’s Macs can run Windows software, using a feature called Boot Camp. Still, before buying anything, contact your school and find out about any special hardware requirements. Elementary and high-school parents should also inquire about the school’s bring-yourown-device policies. Are student laptops or tablets welcome on campus? A Boston school official told me the city lets principals decide on a case-by-case basis, so check with your school. Once that’s settled, start looking for something with a comfy keyboard, a big hard drive and a bright screen that looks good at a variety of viewing angles. You may be tempted by the new Ultrabook laptops. They’re deliciously thin and light, making them much easier to lug across

Kevin Johnson / Santa Cruz (Calif.) Sentinel

Ken Kimes stands atop a combine harvester in Pescadero, Calif., before heading out to harvest mustard plants. Kimes is president of Farm Fuel Inc., which was founded in 2007.

area farmers, she said. But for now, the company’s mustard seed meal is being marketed for use as a fertilizer in home gardens and commercial operations under the name Pescadero Gold at Mountain Feed and Farm Supply and Plantworks in Ben

Environmental groups buy 3,000 acres after developers default

Lomond, Staff of Life in Santa Cruz and Jacob’s Farm Farmstand in Pescadero. Demand is beginning to outstrip production capabilities, and Farm Fuel is developing plans to ramp up in the next six months, Boucier said. The company isn’t yet

More prairies being transformed into cropland, study says By Josephine Marcotty (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

By Hudson Sangree McClatchy-Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Nearly 3,000 acres of Sierra Nevada peaks, meadows and forests atop Donner Summit will be preserved from development under a deal announced last week. A coalition of environmental groups said they had reached an agreement to buy the Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Resort, which became available after would-be developers defaulted on their loans. It’s one of the most high-profile acquisitions to date by land trusts in California that have set out to acquire property slated for development. The real estate crash brought considerable bargains for those conservation groups that still have the money to act. “I think it’s the most significant conservation effort in the recent history of the Sierra Nevada,” Perry Norris, head of the Truckee Donner Land Trust, said of Royal Gorge. “It’s Donner Summit we’re talking about.” The summit has long been a gateway to Northern California, with the routes of Native Americans, emigrant wagon trains, the transcontinental railroad and Interstate 80 crossing the mountains, he said. The community of Serene Lakes, where many Sacramento residents own vacation homes, nestles in the midst of Royal Gorge. “We came awfully close to losing this landscape,” Norris said. In 2005, San Francisco Bay Area developers bought the property for a reported $35 million from Royal Gorge cofounder John Slouber. The resort, opened in 1971, introduced downhill-style ski amenities to cross-country skiers and featured miles of groomed trails. The developers, Kirk Syme and cousins Todd and Mark Foster, proposed building 950 condos and single-family houses on the summit. Their plan raised a howl of opposition from conservation groups and local residents, including owners at Serene Lakes. The plan ultimately fizzled. The developers defaulted on a $16.7 million loan from Armed Forces Bank in June 2011, and a judge placed the property in receivership. The receiver, Douglas Wilson Companies of San Diego, recently agreed to sell the 3,000 privately held acres of the ski resort to conservation groups The Trust for Public Land,

the Truckee Donner Land Trust and the Northern Sierra Partnership. The purchase price: $11.25 million. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get the last wellknown piece of the Sierra at what is really a very good price,” said Tom Mooers, head of Sierra Watch, a group that fought the proposed development and has helped broker purchases of other large properties. Now the groups have until December, when escrow closes, to raise the funds. Leaders expressed confidence in their ability to put together the purchase price and then some. They’re aiming to raise $13.5 million to cover needed upgrades, including trail improvements and forest maintenance. They intend to keep the ski area open under management by the nearby Sugar Bowl resort. Already, said Norris, the buyers have secured a $1 million pledge from Northern Sierra Partnership, which includes The Nature Conservancy and other conservation groups as members. Several donors have pledged $250,000 each, he said. Serene Lakes Property Owners Association President Ken Hall said residents have raised $1.4 million, and pledged $3 million, to keep the quiet of their community, which forbids power boats. “I’ve never seen the community respond so positively and enthusiastically to a fundraising drive,” Norris said. The Truckee Donner Land Trust was one of the groups involved in the $23.5 million dollar purchase in 2007 of the Waddle Ranch. The 1,500-acre property in the Martis Valley, south of Truckee, had been slated for hundreds of homes, a shopping center and golf courses before conservationists bought it and preserved it as public open space. It’s a model of conservation that has taken off in the past three decades as the number of national, state and local groups buying and protecting land has proliferated. There are about 1,700 such groups nationwide, according to the Land Trust Alliance, a Washington, D.C., group that conducts its National Land Trust Census every five years. Together, those groups had preserved about 47 million acres by the end of 2010. California had the most land trusts with 197, the group said.

Arts & Entertainment Every Friday

profitable. “It’s a labor of love,” Boucier said. “Of course we would like to make a profit, but as a group we’re more motivated by what we can do environmentally for farmers and gardeners. Profits are great too, and we’re getting there.”

MINNEAPOLIS — Prairie and other natural landscapes have been plowed up at an unprecedented rate across the nation’s midsection since 2008, especially in the Corn Belt, according to an analysis released last week by a leading conservation group. Between 2008 and 2011, some 37,000 square miles of grasslands, wetlands and shrublands were transformed into cropland across the nation, said the study by the Environmental Working Group, which uses data analysis to try to influence public policy on public health and conservation issues. In Minnesota, where half the total land mass is devoted to corn and soybeans, 2,000 square miles of native grassland and wetlands were converted to row crops, the study said. In the Dakotas, a major breeding ground for aquatic birds and grassland species, an area twice that size was plowed up for crops. Ken Cook, president of Environmental Working Group, said that the land conversion has been propelled by record high commodity prices, demand for ethanol and crop insurance programs that guarantee profits for farmers, even on marginal land. That means less habitat for wildlife and more water pollution from agricultural runoff, he said. “Land is being plowed up that hasn’t been plowed up for a generation,” he said during a briefing. “Farmers are planting in ditch rows and planting up against river banks and the damage is severe.” The situation will accelerate if a House version of the new farm bill is approved. It does not require farmers to follow good conservation practices on their land in order to obtain taxpayer subsidized crop insurance (the Senate version does). Congress could take up the bill as early as September. “There is a very, very strong correlation between those parts of the country where we are seeing the greatest loss of habitat, and those parts of the country where the government is providing the greatest

amount of insurance subsidies to farmers,” said Scott Faber, the group’s vice president of government affairs. Farm commodity and crop insurance groups did not respond to requests for comment, but they have urged Congress to sever the link between subsidy programs and how farmers choose to manage their land. In Minnesota, farm groups say that agricultural conservation practices have improved dramatically in recent decades, and that farmers have the greatest incentive of all to be good stewards of the land. Crop insurance subsidies in the next federal farm law are expected to replace price subsidies and other programs protecting farmers from severe financial risk. Crop insurance initially was designed to cushion farmers from the multitude of risks that come with making a living off the land, primarily weather. But now, about 80 percent of the nation’s crop insurance policies are revenue policies, protecting farmers from weather, drops in prices and yield losses. It shifts the risk of losses from farmers to taxpayers and insurance companies. Critics say the safety net gives farmers an incentive to farm where they shouldn’t — where it is too dry, too near water or too likely to erode — because they are protected from revenue losses.

C7

campus, but they generally cost $200 to $300 more than their thicker brethren. Suit yourself, but I’d rather keep the cash. Most laptops, including Macs, use Intel Corp.’s Core processors. The entry-level Core i3 is fine for your average English major, but an engineering or graphic arts student might pick a beefier Core i5 or i7. The same goes for memory; the more demanding the tasks, the more you should buy. Some more expensive laptops offer a special graphics processor chip; don’t bother unless there’s going to be lots of graphics work or video game play. Some laptops run processors from Advanced Micro Devices Inc. rather than Intel. Don’t worry; AMD chips work fine. Look for sales and discounts. Apple is giving out $100 gift cards to buyers of new Mac laptops and $50 for iPads. Other majors, like Dell and HP, are running their own back-to-school specials online. If you’re strapped for cash, look into buying used or refurbished hardware. Not so long ago, access to computers was a luxury for students; it’s a necessity now. But there’s no reason why it can’t be an affordable one.

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

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WE ACCEPT CARE CREDIT: 12 MONTHS NO INTEREST FINANCING We Bill Insurance


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 NFL, D2 Olympics, D3, D4

D

MLB, D5 Motor sports, D6 Cycling Central, D6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

CYCLING Tschopp wins Tour of Utah PARK CITY, Utah — Switzerland’s Johann Tschopp won the Tour of Utah on Sunday, finishing fourth in the final stage. Bend’s Ian Boswell finished in fifth place overall after completing Sunday’s sixth stage in eighth place. Chris Horner, also of Bend, took seventh overall with his 10th-place finish on Sunday. Levi Leipheimer won the stage, surviving a rugged climb through the Wasatch Mountains to finish the 76.8-mile ride in 3 hours, 6 minutes, 53 seconds. Steven Kruijswijk was second, and Leopold Koenig finished third — both 49 seconds behind Leipheimer. Tschopp finished with an overall time of 21:26:32. Six American riders placed in the top 10, led by second-place finisher Matthew Busche, 43 seconds behind Tschopp. The final stage featured the toughest climb in the entire race at Empire Pass. Riders climbed to an elevation of 8,913 feet on a trail featuring multiple switchbacks before descending into downtown Park City. Leipheimer seized control during the climb over Empire Pass. He built up a lead of 1:30 before finishing with a comfortable stage victory. His stage victory culminates a comeback from an accident in April when he broke his fibula after being hit by a car.

CYCLING CENTRAL

Giving a heads-up • Local mountain bikers put simple maps of area trails on bandannas to help riders find their way around By Elise Gross The Bulletin

When it comes to trail maps, sometimes less is more. Central Oregon is a mountain biker’s paradise, but navigating its labyrinth of trails using a trail map can be daunting. TrailRags, a local company that prints bandannas with simplified maps of individual mountain bike trails, provides riders an alternative. This past April, Bend resident Jeff Hahn put his 8-year-old idea for a trail map bandanna into action. Hahn, 58, enlisted the help of his friend and former co-worker at Kialoa Canoe Paddles in Bend, Brian Nelson, of

Redmond. Hahn and Nelson, both avid mountain bikers, said they drew from their small-business experience at Kialoa, where Hahn was the production manager and Nelson worked as a woodworker and general contractor. Together, Hahn and Nelson created TrailRags, based primarily out of Hahn’s southeast Bend home. Bandanna maps of Phil’s Trail and the Deschutes River Trail currently sell for $10 each on the company’s website, www. trailrags.com. The bandannas are also being sold in several local bike shops and via the Bend-based cycling shop WebCyclery’s online store. See Heads / D6

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Brian Nelson, left, and Jeff Hahn display some of their TrailRags bandannas with maps printed on them outside the Bend company’s headquarters last week. The men say that besides usability and convenience, they have taken extra steps to ensure accuracy in the trail marking.

Olympic Medals Table

LONDON OLYMPICS

— The Associated Press

NFL

Johnson let go by Dolphins DAVIE, Fla. — As the Miami Dolphins took the field for practice Sunday, Chad Johnson was getting out of jail. Hours later, he was out of work. The Dolphins terminated the former Oregon State and six-time Pro Bowl receiver’s contract about 24 hours after he was arrested in a domestic battery case involving his wife. Johnson was released from jail on $2,500 bond earlier Sunday after his wife accused him of head-butting her during an argument in front of their home. Johnson was charged with simple domestic battery, a misdemeanor. The confrontation came barely a month after Johnson married Evelyn Lozada, who is on the reality TV show “Basketball Wives.” The 34-year-old Johnson had been battling for a spot on the team after a disappointing season with the New England Patriots in 2011. Following Sunday’s practice, coach Joe Philbin said he would meet soon with Johnson. “We’re going to deal with this,” Philbin said before Johnson was released. “We’re not going to waste time. ... We’re all in this thing together. Everybody that sets foot in this building, we’re all held to a high standard.” Johnson’s defense attorney, Adam Swickle, said an order has been issued that prevents Johnson from contacting Lozada. Swickle declined to comment further. — The Associated Press

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

United States’ Ashton Eaton, of Bend, waves from the podium after being presented with a gold medal in the decathlon at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, Friday.

On center stage • Ashton Eaton conquered London and will likely be the man to beat in Rio By Curtis Anderson The (Eugene) Register-Guard

LONDON — Welcome, Ashton Eaton, to the spotlight as an emerging face of U.S. track and field. Now owner of both the world record and an Olympic gold medal in the decathlon, the 24-year-old from Bend is one of three front-runners for Track & Field News magazine’s 2012 male athlete of the year, along with Jamaican sprinter Usain

Rory McIlroy holds up the championship trophy after the final round of the PGA Championship on the Ocean Course of the Kiawah Island Golf Resort in Kiawah Island, S.C., Sunday. Chuck Burton / The Associated Press

Bolt and Kenya’s 800-meter star, David Rudisha. The case for Eaton: In the 100-year history of the decathlon, nobody has done it better. Eaton could not match his world record of 9,039 points in London, but he succeeded in making the event cool again as he became the 12th American to earn the title of “World’s Greatest Athlete.” See Eaton / D4

Final results: Nation G S B Tot United States 46 29 29 104 China 38 27 22 87 Russia 24 25 33 82 Great Britain 29 17 19 65 Germany 11 19 14 44 Japan 7 14 17 38 Australia 7 16 12 35 France 11 11 12 34 South Korea 13 8 7 28 Italy 8 9 11 28 Netherlands 6 6 8 20 Ukraine 6 5 9 20 Canada 1 5 12 18 Hungary 8 4 5 17 Spain 3 10 4 17 Brazil 3 5 9 17 Cuba 5 3 6 14 Kazakhstan 7 1 5 13 New Zealand 5 3 5 13 Belarus 3 5 5 13 Iran 4 5 3 12 Jamaica 4 4 4 12 Kenya 2 4 5 11 Czech Rep. 4 3 3 10 Poland 2 2 6 10 Azerbaijan 2 2 6 10 Romania 2 5 2 9 Denmark 2 4 3 9 Sweden 1 4 3 8 Colombia 1 3 4 8 Ethiopia 3 1 3 7 Georgia 1 3 3 7 Mexico 1 3 3 7 North Korea 4 0 2 6 South Africa 3 2 1 6 Croatia 3 1 2 6 India 0 2 4 6 Turkey 2 2 1 5 Lithuania 2 1 2 5 Ireland 1 1 3 5 Mongolia 0 2 3 5

More coverage • U.S. men’s basketball holds off Spain and defends its gold medal, D3. • Americans top the medal count once again, D4.

GOLF: PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Untouchable: McIlroy wins title by a record 8 strokes By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. — Right down to his red shirt, Rory McIlroy looked every bit the part of golf’s next star in another command performance at the PGA Championship. McIlroy validated his record-setting U.S. Open win last year by blowing away the field Sunday at Kiawah Island. One last birdie from 25 feet on the 18th hole gave him a 6-under 66 for an eight-shot victory, breaking the PGA Championship record for margin of victory that Jack Nicklaus set in 1980. The 23-year-old from Northern Ireland returned to No. 1 in the world, and he became the youngest player since Seve Ballesteros to win two majors. Tiger Woods was about four months older than McIlroy when he won his second major. Just like the U.S. Open, this one was never seriously in doubt. See McIlroy / D6

PGA Championship Final results At Kiawah Island Golf Resort Kiawah Island, S.C. Rory McIlroy 67-75-67-66—275 David Lynn 73-74-68-68—283 Justin Rose 69-79-70-66—284 Keegan Bradley 68-77-71-68—284 Ian Poulter 70-71-74-69—284 Carl Pettersson 66-74-72-72—284 Blake Adams 71-72-75-67—285 Jamie Donaldson 69-73-73-70—285 Peter Hanson 69-75-70-71—285 Steve Stricker 74-73-67-71—285


D2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, ESPN2. 7 p.m.: MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: NFL, preseason, Dallas Cowboys at Oakland Raiders, ESPN. TENNIS 7 p.m.: WTA, Rogers Cup, final (same-day tape), ESPN2.

Tuesday SOTBALL 4 p.m.: Little League, first semifinal, teams TBA, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m.: Little League, second semifinal, teams TBA, ESPN2. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees or Boston Red Sox at Baltimore Orioles, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Burress working out for Patriots: Plaxico Burress is in New England for a workout with the Patriots. A person with knowledge of the tryout tells The Associated Press that Burress had been invited to Foxborough, Mass., to work out for the AFC champions. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the tryout has not been publicly announced. Burress spent last season with the Jets after finishing a 20month prison sentence on a gun charge. New York did not re-sign Burress, who turned 35 on Sunday. He had 45 catches, eight for touchdowns, and 612 yards for the Jets last year.

PREPS Calendar ——— To submit information to the Prep Calendar, email The Bulletin at sports@bendbulletin.com ——— Bend High football Air Bear Camp: Aug. 13-16 at Bend High practice field, 5 to 8 p.m. each day. Cost is $100 for early registration and $110 for late registration. Contact Bend High head coach Matt Craven at matt.craven@bend. k12.or.us or go to www.bendfootball.com for more information. Daily doubles: Aug. 20-30 at Bend High; Varsity/ JV from 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7:30 p.m. Freshmen from 8 to 10:30 a.m. and 4 to 6:30 p.m. Equipment checkout: Aug. 14 for all players, freshmen, junior varsity and varsity, 8 a.m. to noon, Bend High. Note: Paperwork is available at the Bend High’s athletics office starting Aug. 6. Paperwork and fees are not necessary to check out equipment but must be completed before practice starts Aug. 20. Mountain View football Weightlifting/conditioning: Grades 9-12, Aug. 13-16, 9 to 10:30 a.m. Cougar Camp: Grades 9-12, Aug. 13-17 from 3 to 5:30 p.m.; cost is $65 at registration on Aug. 13 at 2 p.m. Daily doubles: Aug. 20-24; varsity/JV 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 3 to 5:30 p.m.; freshmen 8 to 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Paperwork: Will be available for final clearance starting Aug. 6 in the Mountain View High athletics office. All paperwork and physicals must be on file before Aug. 20. Summit football Conditioning camp: Aug. 13-14, 8 to 10 a.m., and Aug. 15, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Summit High; Aug. 16 at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 2:15 to 4:30 p.m. Cost $60. Daily doubles: Aug. 20-24, varsity/JV 8 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m.; freshmen 9 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 5:30 p.m. Paperwork: Available at the Summit High athletics office starting Aug. 6. Mountain View girls soccer Preseason training: Aug. 6-17 at Mountain View soccer fields; 6 to 7:30 p.m. each day with additional 9 a.m. workouts on Aug. 7, 9, 14 and 16; $70; for girls entering grades six through 12; for more information go to www.cougargirlssoccer.webs.com. Summit girls soccer Conditioning camp: Aug. 13-17, 8-10 a.m.; $30; meet at Summit Stadium. Tryouts: Aug. 20-24, 8-9:30 a.m. and 5-7 p.m. at Summit High. Players must fill out appropriate paperwork prior to Monday morning; paperwork is available in the athletics office at Summit. For more information go to http://www.road9sports.com/team/ SummitGirlsSoccer/. Mountain View boys soccer Conditioning camp: Aug. 13-16 at Mountain View High, 8 to 9:15 a.m. and 5:30 to 7 p.m. each day. For more information call coach Chris Rogers at 541-280-9393. Ridgeview boys soccer All incoming Ridgeview and Redmond Proficiency Academy students living within the Ridgeview boundary are welcome to attend all of the following events. For more information go to ridgeviewsoccer.com. Ridgeview physical and clearance night: Aug. 13, 5 to 8 p.m. (see specific time by last name at ridgeviewsoccer.com) at Obsidian Middle School. Parents need to accompany players to complete clearance process and submit pay-to-play fees. Physical exams are required for incoming freshmen and juniors; $30. Ravens daily-double tryouts: Aug. 20-24 at Ridgeview High; check-in Aug. 20, 9-10 a.m., in TV production lab inside school. Sessions run 10 to 11:45 a.m. each day. Players should bring shinguards and running shoes. Summit cross-country Practices: Aug. 13 and Aug. 16, 8:45 a.m. both days at the Summit High track. For more information contact head coach Carol McLatchie at 541-788-1577 or at mclcarol@msn.com, or see the Summit High Athletics XC link. Cascade Middle School football Contact camp: At Summit Stadium for incoming seventh-graders and eighth-graders; Aug. 20-23, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Cost $80 for two-week camp. Contact Summit High head coach Joe Padilla at joe.padilla@ bend.k12.0r.us or call 541-610-9866 to sign up or for more information.

Tennis

GOLF

• Djokovic wins second straight Rogers Cup title: Top-seeded Novak Djokovic won his second straight Rogers Cup title and third overall, beating Richard Gasquet 6-3, 6-2 in Toronto. The Serbian star, also the tournament winner in 2007, won for the first time since the ATP Masters stop in Miami four months back. American brothers Bob and Mike Bryan, fresh off their Olympic gold medal, won the doubles title with a 6-1, 4-6 (12-10) victory over Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez. • Li, Kvitova reach Montreal final: Tenth-seeded Li Na rallied to beat 16th-seeded Lucie Safarova 3-6, 6-3, 7-5 on Sunday to advance to the final in the Rogers Cup. Li, from China, will face fifthseeded Petra Kvitova, a 3-6, 6-2, 6-3 winner over seventhseeded Caroline Wozniacki. The final is today. — From wire reports

Becky Morgan, $6,033 Julieta Granada, $6,033 Samantha Richdale, $6,033 Victoria Tanco, $5,180 Momoko Ueda, $5,180 P.K. Kongkraphan, $5,180 Kathleen Ekey, $5,180 Tiffany Joh, $5,180 Veronica Felibert, $4,065 Leta Lindley, $4,065 Wendy Ward, $4,065 Sarah Jane Smith, $4,065 Christine Song, $4,065 Jimin Kang, $4,065 Ji Young Oh, $4,065 Irene Cho, $4,065 Brooke Pancake, $4,065 Moira Dunn, $3,301 Belen Mozo, $3,301 Meredith Duncan, $3,301 Nicole Hage, $3,082 Danielle Kang, $3,082 Valentine Derrey, $3,082 Ayaka Kaneko, $2,918 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $2,918 Maria Hernandez, $2,754 Ilhee Lee, $2,754 Jessica Korda, $2,754 Tzu-Chi Lin, $2,590 Danah Bordner, $2,590 Gerina Piller, $2,590 Dori Carter, $2,524 Jane Rah, $2,492

IN THE BLEACHERS

PGA Tour PGA Championship Sunday At Kiawah Island Golf Resort (Ocean Course) Kiawah Island, S.C. Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,676; Par: 72 Final Rory McIlroy, $1,445,000 67-75-67-66—275 David Lynn, $865,000 73-74-68-68—283 Justin Rose, $384,500 69-79-70-66—284 Keegan Bradley, $384,500 68-77-71-68—284 Ian Poulter, $384,500 70-71-74-69—284 Carl Pettersson, $384,500 66-74-72-72—284 Blake Adams, $226,000 71-72-75-67—285 Jamie Donaldson, $226,000 69-73-73-70—285 Peter Hanson, $226,000 69-75-70-71—285 Steve Stricker, $226,000 74-73-67-71—285 Ben Curtis, $143,286 69-76-73-67—286 Bubba Watson, $143,286 73-75-70-68—286 Tim Clark, $143,286 71-73-73-69—286 Geoff Ogilvy, $143,286 68-78-70-70—286 Graeme McDowell, $143,286 68-76-71-71—286 Tiger Woods, $143,286 69-71-74-72—286 Adam Scott, $143,286 68-75-70-73—286 John Daly, $99,667 68-77-73-69—287 Padraig Harrington, $99,667 70-76-69-72—287 Bo Van Pelt, $99,667 73-73-67-74—287 Seung-yul Noh, $72,667 74-75-74-65—288 Robert Garrigus, $72,667 74-73-74-67—288 Joost Luiten, $72,667 68-76-75-69—288 Louis Oosthuizen, $72,667 70-79-70-69—288 Pat Perez, $72,667 69-76-71-72—288 Jimmy Walker, $72,667 73-75-67-73—288 Thorbjorn Olesen, $51,900 75-74-71-69—289 Jason Dufner, $51,900 74-76-68-71—289 Miguel Angel Jimenez, $51,900 69-77-72-71—289 Marc Leishman, $51,900 74-72-71-72—289 Trevor Immelman, $51,900 71-72-70-76—289 Luke Donald, $42,625 74-76-74-66—290 John Senden, $42,625 73-74-72-71—290

69-72-70-71—282 70-72-68-72—282 69-69-70-74—282 72-69-74-68—283 69-73-71-70—283 69-71-72-71—283 69-68-74-72—283 71-69-69-74—283 70-71-76-67—284 70-71-74-69—284 71-69-74-70—284 71-71-71-71—284 69-69-75-71—284 70-71-71-72—284 71-70-71-72—284 70-70-71-73—284 68-73-69-74—284 69-73-73-70—285 71-69-73-72—285 66-72-74-73—285 69-71-74-72—286 68-71-74-73—286 69-71-72-74—286 67-73-75-72—287 68-69-74-76—287 71-70-74-73—288 67-74-73-74—288 73-65-74-76—288 70-71-77-71—289 68-73-73-75—289 67-74-71-77—289 70-70-74-77—291 68-74-77-74—293

FOOTBALL

30. (28) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 84, 46.4, 14, $108,735. 31. (27) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 81, 62.4, 13, $78,010. 32. (14) Joey Logano, Toyota, 71, 62.5, 12, $76,285. 33. (1) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, accident, 63, 99.8, 12, $101,526. 34. (23) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, engine, 57, 66.5, 10, $110,501. 35. (41) Jason Leffler, Toyota, engine, 42, 32.5, 0, $65,360. 36. (31) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, suspension, 41, 38.8, 8, $65,185. 37. (11) Michael McDowell, Ford, rear gear, 30, 45.4, 7, $65,055. 38. (38) Josh Wise, Ford, electrical, 25, 36.5, 6, $64,853. 39. (10) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 24, 69.9, 5, $93,008. 40. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 15, 33, 4, $61,845. 41. (40) Chris Cook, Toyota, brakes, 5, 31.9, 3, $61,680. 42. (43) Patrick Long, Toyota, brakes, 2, 32.4, 2, $61,555. 43. (33) Brian Vickers, Toyota, engine, 0, 30.8, 1, $61,930. ——— Race Statistics Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 777; 2. G.Biffle, 776; 3. M.Kenseth, 775; 4. D.Earnhardt Jr., 760; 5. B.Keselowski, 733; 6. M.Truex Jr., 728; 7. C.Bowyer, 719; 8. T.Stewart, 716; 9. K.Harvick, 710; 10. D.Hamlin, 693; 11. K.Kahne, 653; 12. C.Edwards, 650.

NFL

TENNIS

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE Preseason Glance All Times PDT ——— Sunday’s Game Indianapolis 38, St. Louis 3 Today’s Game Dallas at Oakland, 5 p.m.

Professional ATP Rogers Cup Sunday At Rexall Centre Toronto Purse: $3.2 million (Masters 1000) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Richard Gasquet (14), France, 6-3, 6-2.

SOCCER Greg Chalmers, $42,625 Bill Haas, $42,625 Y.E. Yang, $34,750 Rich Beem, $34,750 Fredrik Jacobson, $34,750 Phil Mickelson, $34,750 Marcel Siem, $34,750 Vijay Singh, $34,750 Martin Laird, $25,750 David Toms, $25,750 Gary Woodland, $25,750 J.J. Henry, $25,750 Jim Furyk, $25,750 Aaron Baddeley, $25,750 Scott Piercy, $18,625 Retief Goosen, $18,625 Thomas Bjorn, $18,625 Dustin Johnson, $18,625 Ernie Els, $18,625 Paul Lawrie, $18,625 Sang Moon Bae, $16,810 Brendon de Jonge, $16,810 Darren Clarke, $16,810 K.J. Choi, $16,810 Francesco Molinari, $16,810 Ryo Ishikawa, $16,100 Charl Schwartzel, $16,100 K.T. Kim, $15,900 George McNeill, $15,650 Chez Reavie, $15,650 Ken Duke, $15,650 G. Fernandez-Castano, $15,650 Marcus Fraser, $15,350 Alex Noren, $15,350 John Huh, $15,150 Toru Taniguchi, $15,150 Zach Johnson, $15,000 Matt Every, $14,900 Cameron Tringale, $14,800

70-76-72-72—290 75-73-69-73—290 73-74-74-70—291 72-76-72-71—291 71-75-73-72—291 73-71-73-74—291 72-73-71-75—291 71-69-74-77—291 71-74-79-68—292 72-78-72-70—292 67-79-75-71—292 72-77-70-73—292 72-77-70-73—292 68-75-74-75—292 68-78-78-69—293 73-74-75-70—293 70-79-74-70—293 71-79-72-71—293 72-75-73-73—293 73-75-71-74—293 72-78-71-73—294 71-78-72-73—294 73-76-72-73—294 69-77-75-73—294 70-75-74-75—294 69-77-79-70—295 70-77-74-74—295 69-77-77-73—296 71-76-80-70—297 74-76-73-74—297 71-78-74-74—297 67-78-75-77—297 74-75-78-71—298 67-80-73-78—298 72-78-79-70—299 72-76-78-73—299 72-73-76-79—300 72-76-74-82—304 69-78-77-82—306

PGA Championship Winners 2012 — Rory McIlroy 2011 — Keegan Bradley 2010 — Martin Kaymer 2009 — Y.E. Yang 2008 — Padraig Harrington 2007 — Tiger Woods 2006 — Tiger Woods 2005 — Phil Mickelson 2004 — Vijay Singh 2003 ��� Shaun Micheel 2002 — Rich Beem 2001 — David Toms 2000 — Tiger Woods 1999 — Tiger Woods 1998 — Vijay Singh 1997 — Davis Love III 1996 — Mark Brooks 1995 — Steve Elkington 1994 — Nick Price 1993 — Paul Azinger 1992 — Nick Price 1991 — John Daly 1990 — Wayne Grady 1989 — Payne Stewart 1988 — Jeff Sluman 1987 — Larry Nelson 1986 — Bob Tway 1985 — Hubert Green 1984 — Lee Trevino 1983 — Hal Sutton 1982 — Raymond Floyd 1981 — Larry Nelson 1980 — Jack Nicklaus 1979 — David Graham 1978 — John Mahaffey 1977 — Lanny Wadkins 1976 — Dave Stockton 1975 — Jack Nicklaus 1974 — Lee Trevino 1973 — Jack Nicklaus 1972 — Gary Player 1971 — Jack Nicklaus 1970 — Dave Stockton 1969 — Ray Floyd 1968 — Julius Boros 1967 — Don January 1966 — Al Geiberger 1965 — Dave Marr 1964 — Bobby Nichols 1963 — Jack Nicklaus 1962 — Gary Player 1961 — Jerry Barber 1960 — Jay Hebert

1959 — Bob Rosburg 1958 — Dow Finsterwald 1957 — Lionel Hebert 1956 — Jack Burke 1955 — Doug Ford 1954 — Chick Harbert 1953 — Walter Burkemo 1952 — Jim Turnesa 1951 — Sam Snead 1950 — Chandler Harper 1949 — Sam Snead 1948 — Ben Hogan 1947 — Jim Ferrier 1946 — Ben Hogan 1945 — Byron Nelson 1944 — Bob Hamilton 1943 — Not contested, WWII 1942 — Sam Snead 1941 — Vic Ghezzi 1940 — Byron Nelson 1939 — Henry Picard 1938 — Paul Runyan 1937 — Denny Shute 1936 — Denny Shute 1935 — Johnny Revolta 1934 — Paul Runyan 1933 — Gene Sarazen 1932 — Olin Dutra 1931 — Tom Creavy 1930 — Tommy Armour 1929 — Leo Diegel 1928 — Leo Diegel 1927 — Walter Hagen 1926 — Walter Hagen 1925 — Walter Hagen 1924 — Walter Hagen 1923 — Gene Sarazen 1922 — Gene Sarazen 1921 — Walter Hagen 1920 — Jock Hutchison 1919 — James M. Barnes 1917-18 — Not contested, WWI 1916 — James M. Barnes

MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF Sporting Kansas City 13 7 4 43 30 New York 12 7 5 41 40 Houston 11 6 7 40 35 Chicago 11 7 5 38 28 D.C. 11 8 3 36 36 Montreal 10 13 3 33 36 Columbus 8 8 4 28 20 Philadelphia 7 12 2 23 23 New England 6 12 5 23 26 Toronto FC 5 13 4 19 25 Western Conference W L T Pts GF San Jose 14 5 5 47 47 Real Salt Lake 13 9 3 42 36 Seattle 10 6 7 37 32 Vancouver 10 7 7 37 28 Los Angeles 11 11 3 36 43 FC Dallas 6 11 8 26 29 Chivas USA 7 9 5 26 14 Colorado 8 15 1 25 31 Portland 5 12 5 20 20 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday’s Games Chicago 3, Philadelphia 1 Montreal 1, New England 0 Los Angeles 4, Chivas USA 0 Wednesday’s Games Los Angeles at Columbus, 4 p.m. Portland at Toronto FC, 4:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

GA 22 34 27 25 29 43 21 27 29 40 GA 29 30 24 29 39 34 25 35 37

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR

LPGA Tour Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Sunday At Highland Meadows Golf Club Sylvania, Ohio Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,428; Par: 71 Final So Yeon Ryu, $195,000 67-68-67-62—264 Angela Stanford, $119,765 66-70-69-66—271 Chella Choi, $77,045 66-67-70-69—272 Inbee Park, $77,045 69-65-69-69—272 Jennie Lee, $49,178 69-70-67-67—273 I.K. Kim, $49,178 69-67-66-71—273 Mika Miyazato, $34,753 66-68-69-71—274 Jiyai Shin, $34,753 69-67-66-72—274 Beatriz Recari, $27,868 70-66-70-69—275 Hee Kyung Seo, $27,868 68-66-68-73—275 Stacy Lewis, $22,310 68-69-73-66—276 Karine Icher, $22,310 66-69-71-70—276 Jacqui Concolino, $22,310 68-68-69-71—276 Hee-Won Han, $22,310 68-67-70-71—276 Lindsey Wright, $18,010 69-68-73-67—277 Sandra Gal, $18,010 69-71-68-69—277 Jeong Jang, $18,010 68-70-69-70—277 Natalie Gulbis, $15,650 69-71-69-69—278 Karin Sjodin, $15,650 73-68-68-69—278 Pernilla Lindberg, $15,650 64-71-70-73—278 Na Yeon Choi, $13,770 70-71-70-68—279 Sydnee Michaels, $13,770 69-68-72-70—279 Amy Yang, $13,770 67-73-69-70—279 Mo Martin, $13,770 69-72-67-71—279 Taylor Coutu, $11,387 71-71-70-68—280 Kristy McPherson, $11,387 72-69-71-68—280 Janice Moodie, $11,387 68-72-72-68—280 Mi Jung Hur, $11,387 71-66-74-69—280 Brittany Lang, $11,387 70-71-70-69—280 Numa Gulyanamitta, $11,387 66-72-72-70—280 Jennifer Johnson, $8,119 70-68-74-69—281 Candie Kung, $8,119 69-70-73-69—281 Cindy LaCrosse, $8,119 69-72-71-69—281 Reilley Rankin, $8,119 72-70-70-69—281 Laura Davies, $8,119 68-74-69-70—281 Brittany Lincicome, $8,119 69-73-69-70—281 Jane Park, $8,119 68-71-72-70—281 Paula Creamer, $8,119 68-71-71-71—281 Jenny Shin, $8,119 67-73-70-71—281 Haeji Kang, $8,119 72-70-67-72—281 Jee Young Lee, $8,119 68-72-69-72—281

SPRINT CUP Finger Lakes 355 at The Glen Sunday At Watkins Glen International Watkins Glen, N.Y. Lap length: 2.45 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 90 laps, 128.5 rating, 47 points, $259,558. 2. (4) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 90, 129.1, 43, $187,180. 3. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 90, 111.3, 41, $166,821. 4. (8) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 90, 105.6, 40, $142,399. 5. (17) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 90, 94.5, 0, $141,935. 6. (15) Greg Biffle, Ford, 90, 88.9, 38, $109,610. 7. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 90, 133.7, 39, $140,968. 8. (24) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 90, 84.7, 36, $127,771. 9. (13) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 90, 86, 35, $107,568. 10. (9) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 90, 101.8, 34, $108,424. 11. (6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 90, 79.5, 33, $118,443. 12. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 90, 83.7, 32, $85,610. 13. (20) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 90, 83.3, 31, $83,935. 14. (18) Carl Edwards, Ford, 90, 98, 31, $116,576. 15. (19) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 90, 85.7, 29, $119,821. 16. (30) Casey Mears, Ford, 90, 67.1, 28, $89,093. 17. (21) Scott Speed, Ford, 90, 67, 27, $68,710. 18. (29) Aric Almirola, Ford, 90, 64.8, 26, $109,246. 19. (7) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 90, 89.4, 25, $121,260. 20. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 90, 58.4, 24, $87,068. 21. (12) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 90, 78.5, 23, $115,721. 22. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 90, 53.6, 22, $82,793. 23. (35) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 90, 44.9, 21, $97,155. 24. (42) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 90, 48.8, 20, $93,082. 25. (25) Boris Said, Ford, 90, 48.2, 19, $78,835. 26. (39) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 90, 39, 18, $79,560. 27. (26) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 90, 48, 17, $77,735. 28. (16) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 89, 73.9, 16, $77,485. 29. (36) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 88, 42.7, 0, $66,310.

WTA Rogers Cup Sunday At Uniprix Stadium Montreal Purse: $2.17 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Li Na (10), China, def. Lucie Safarova (16), Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5. Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, def. Caroline Wozniacki (7), Denmark, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. Western & Southern Open Sunday At The Lindner Family Tennis Center Mason, Ohio Purse: Men, $3.43 million (Masters 1000); Women, $2.17 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-4, 7-6 (5). James Blake, United States, def. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 7-5, 6-4.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Optioned RHP Miguel Socolovich to Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Optioned OF Jordan Danks to Charlotte (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Recalled RHP Ryota Igarashi from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). TEXAS RANGERS — Assigned C Robinzon Diaz to Round Rock (PCL). National League PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated RHP Juan Cruz from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Jared Hughes to Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with INF/ OF Mark Kotsay on a one-year contract through 2013. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS — Placed FB Bradie Ewing on injured reserve. Waived P Dawson Zimmerman and TE Adam Nissley. Signed RB Lousaka Polite and TE Chase Coffman. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed RB Cedric Benson. Placed TE Eric Lair on injured reserve. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Waived WR Lee Evans. Placed WR Taylor Price on the waived-injured list. Signed G/C Josh Beekman and WR Demetrius Williams. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Activated RB Adrian Peterson from the physically-unable-to-perform list. NEW YORK JETS — Waived P Travis Baltz. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Signed WR Brian Hernandez. Waived DT John Gill. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS — Waived QB Kevin O’Connell. COLLEGE KANSAS STATE — Named Drew Speraw men’s basketball video coordinator and Dustin Yoder men’s graduate assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 609 124 2,911 950 The Dalles 534 148 2,006 701 John Day 315 90 1,449 640 McNary 365 60 1,434 588 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 246,115 21,528 127,394 52,702 The Dalles 190,053 18,698 84,229 37,338 John Day 170,091 17,676 49,795 23,297 McNary 168,323 10,063 41,015 16,960

Oakland’s Pryor excited for exhibition opener By Josh Dubow The Associated Press

NAPA, Calif. — Terrelle Pryor has been waiting a long time to play in a football game. After an aborted rookie season with the Oakland Raiders that included no preseason games and a penalty before his only snap in the regular season, Pryor is more than ready for this season’s exhibition opener. Pryor will get that chance tonight when the Raiders play at home against the Dallas Cowboys. While Oakland coach Dennis Allen is not even telling his players how much or when they will play, he did say Pryor would get plenty of snaps at quarterback behind starter Carson Palmer and Matt Leinart. “I can’t wait,” Pryor said. “It’s been a long time for me to play football. It’s what I was born to do. God blessed me. He gave me great talent and I just want to try to ... use it again. It’s been a long time.” Pryor got very little out of a rookie

season that was doomed from the start. He didn’t decide to leave Ohio State until after the NFL draft following an investigation into the team’s memorabilia-for-cash scandal that cost coach Jim Tressel his job. Commissioner Roger Goodell allowed Pryor into the supplemental draft but ruled he must serve the fivegame suspension he would have faced in college. The Raiders used a thirdround pick on Aug. 22 to select Pryor and signed him three days later. Pryor got to participate in only three practices and no exhibition games before his suspension kicked in, limiting him to team meetings and individual drills without coaches. Even when Pryor was activated, he mostly was a scout-team quarterback as the third-stringer behind Palmer and Kyle Boller. Pryor got in once last season on Oct. 23 against Kansas City. He was sent in for a third-and-1 quarterback sneak. Pryor said he was told to call for a quick snap and go for the first

NFL down. Instead, he was penalized for a false start for not pausing a second under center before the snap. Boller threw an interception that was returned for a touchdown on the following play and Pryor never saw the field again that season. He figures to get much more time tonight. “I’m just going to go in and try to perfect the play, go through the read. Like coach says, my feet got to stay on time,” Pryor said. “When I go through the read, just keep the right read, and if I keep my feet on time, I’ll be good.” After getting little coaching last season because Oakland did not have a quarterbacks coach and head coach Hue Jackson and offensive coordinator Al Saunders spent most of their time preparing Palmer for each game, Pryor has been soaking in all the instruction he can get from coordinator Greg Knapp and position coach John

DeFilippo. The primary focus has been on improving Pryor’s footwork after he spent most of his college career playing out of the shotgun. The results have been uneven so far in camp, with Pryor mixing pinpoint throws with others wildly off-target as he strives for consistency. “Coming out of high school, I was just an athlete that just, whenever the guy was open, I didn’t know what I was reading,” he said. “When I saw a guy open, I threw the ball. Now, coming out of college, I learned to read defenses. I wasn’t blessed enough to be at a powerhouse that you learn that stuff as a quarterback. So, I’m working and I’m going to get good.” While Pryor said he prefers throwing touchdowns to running for them, his sprinter speed gives him an added dimension when the play breaks down. “He runs like a deer,” safety Mike Mitchell said. “It’s just what you saw in college. We’re all fast guys on defense,

but if you don’t get him in the first 10 yards ... put your head down and start running. I would like to see him run it a little bit more. He has scary speed.” While exhibition games can be tedious for proven veterans, they are a great opportunity for younger players to shine. This will also be the first chance for Oakland’s rookies to make an impression in a game setting. Fourth-round linebacker Miles Burris will likely start in place of injured Aaron Curry, third-round offensive lineman Tony Bergstrom should see plenty of time with the reserves and fifth-round receiver Juron Criner looks to show that his stellar play on the practice field can transfer to games. “I just have to go prove them right for picking me,” Burris said. “Play the way that I play the game, and that’s as hard as I can play, and try to make plays and be consistent like coach Allen talked about and just prove that I can play in the NFL and run with anybody.”


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

London2012

Top 10 memories of the London Olympics 1. Crowning the greatest Olympic athlete of all time Michael Phelps ended his remarkable swimming career by winning four gold and two silver medals in London. He is now the most decorated Olympian ever, with a career total of 22 medals, 18 of them gold. In his final swim, he helped the U.S. reclaim the lead in the 4x100-meter relay, and afterward he got a special trophy from swimming officials that said: “To Michael Phelps, the greatest Olympic athlete of all time.” 2. Bolt adds to the legend The speed. The medals. The poses. It could only be Usain Bolt, who electrified the London Games by becoming the first man to win the 100, 200 and 4x100 relay golds in backto-back Olympics. Even IOC President Jacques Rogge, who initially balked at giving him “living legend” status, conceded that the six-time gold medalist “is the best sprinter of all time.” 3. Gabby leads the Fierce Five Gabby Douglas rocked the O2 Arena with her electric floor routine, her vaults, her leaps high above the balance beam. The 16-year-old won two gold medals, including the all-around, and the rest of the Fierce Five — Jordyn Wieber, McKayla Maroney, Kyla Ross and Aly Raisman — gave the United States its first Olympic team title in women’s gymnastics since 1996. 4. Britain’s golden night Three British athletes won gold medals in Olympic Stadium in 44 minutes on Saturday, Aug. 4, to produce the signature night of the London Games: Jessica Ennis won the heptathlon, Greg Rutherford won the long jump, and Mo Farah won the 10,000 meters. (The Somali-born Farah also won the 5,000 meters on the final Saturday.) Counting two golds from the rowers and another from women’s track cycling, Britain’s total for the day was six. 5. Putting the bad in badminton They played to lose. The topseeded women’s badminton pair from China, two pairs from South Korea and one from Indonesia were disqualified from the Olympics after they intentionally lost their matches in order to secure a more favorable draw in the quarterfinals. Olympic officials wanted team coaches, trainers or officials of the four doubles pairs to be punished if they encouraged or ordered the eight players to lose intentionally. 6. The “Blade Runner” made them roar Oscar Pistorius described his journey from South Africa to the London Olympics as “amazing,” and it was. The double-amputee known as the “Blade Runner” because he runs on carbon-fiber blades had the 80,000-strong crowd roaring as he anchored the South African team in the 4x400-meter relay final. It didn’t matter that he finished eighth. 7. Women’s boxing a hit Women’s boxing was a big hit in its first Olympics, and it produced three memorable champions: Claressa Shields, the 17-year-old middleweight with the vicious right hand who established herself as the future of the sport; lightweight Katie Taylor of Ireland, the Bray Brawler whose bouts had thousands cheering with Irish pride; and Nicola Adams, the British flyweight who won the first gold medal. 8. Running on a broken leg American Manteo Mitchell heard a pop in his left leg with 200 meters to go in his segment of the 4x400 relay preliminaries, and the sprinter knew it was not good. If he stopped, he would lose the race, so he finished the lap, then limped to the side to watch his teammates complete the relay. 9. Historic Olympics for women It lasted only 82 seconds, but it will be long remembered: Young judo fighter Wojdan Ali Seraj Abdulrahim Shahrkhani became the first Saudi woman to compete at an Olympics. 10. The queen’s acting The Olympics kicked off with a royal command performance. At the opening ceremony, a short film on the stadium’s big screen showed actor Daniel Craig as James Bond driving to Buckingham Palace and meeting Queen Elizabeth II, who played herself. “Good evening, Mr. Bond,” she said. Next they were shown flying in a helicopter over Olympic Stadium, where stunt doubles parachuted in. — The Associated Press

D3

Games of the XXX Olympiad • July 27-August 12, 2012 • Coverage on D3-D5

ROUNDUP

James, Durant lead U.S. to Olympic gold By Jay Cohen The Associated Press

LONDON — LeBron James stood with both arms in the air, then hugged Kevin Durant before they headed to the bench. They were quite the combination all day long. James had a huge dunk and a three-pointer in the final 2:50 and Durant scored 30 points, helping the U.S. win its second straight Olympic title with a 107-100 victory over Spain on the final day of the London Games. “We knew it wasn’t going to be easy. We didn’t want it easy,” James said. “A lot of teams have won gold easy. We didn’t want it that way. We’re a competitive team and we love when it gets tight. That’s when our will and determination kind of shows. It was the same way in ’08.” Mike Krzyzewski, who has said he’s retiring as U.S. coach, emptied his bench in the final minute Sunday, then embraced James after the final horn sounded. The Americans hugged at midcourt, with guard James Harden holding a doll of the Olympic mascot. Four years after beating Spain 118-107 in the Beijing final, the U.S. found itself in another tight one, unable to truly slow the Spanish down until the closing minutes. James had 19 points on a day he joined Michael Jordan as the only players to win the NBA title, regular-season MVP, NBA Finals MVP and Olympic gold in the same year. For Kobe Bryant, it was his last Olympic moment. “This is it for me,” said Bryant, who scored 17 points and now has a second gold medal to go with his five NBA championships. “The other guys are good to go.” Britain finished its home Olympics with its biggest

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

United States’ LeBron James and Kevin Durant react during the men’s gold medal basketball game against Spain at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Sunday, in London. USA won 107-100.

medal haul since 1908, but the top of the table belonged to the United States. The Americans topped the chart with 46 golds and 104 overall, easily clearing China’s second-place total of 87. Part of the U.S. winning total belonged to the men’s wrestling team, which had multiple gold medalists for the first time since 1996. Jake Varner got the second one when he won four straight matches to take the 96-kilogram freestyle, beating Valerie Andriitsev of Ukraine 1-0, 1-0 in the final. Varner fell to his knees once the clock ticked to zero, soaking in the fact he had just accomplished the biggest goal of his life. He soon found Cael Sanderson, a gold medalist at the 2004 Athens Olympics who helped coach him to the title, and thanked him with a a leaping bear hug. Britain’s final gold of the games went to super heavy-

weight Anthony Joshua, who rallied from a late deficit to upset defending champ Roberto Cammarelle of Italy on a tiebreaker. Joshua’s big finish in the tournament’s glamour division allowed him to match the titles won by bantamweight Luke Campbell and women’s flyweight Nicola Adams, part of Britain’s five-medal boxing haul that included Freddie Evans’ welterweight silver from Sunday. Also winning divisions were: Ukrainian lightweight Vasyl Lomachenko, flyweight Robeisy Ramirez of Cuba, welterweight Serik Sapiyev of Kazakhstan and Russian light heavyweight Egor Mekhontsev. Sapiyev was honored as the tournament’s best boxer. Uganda picked up its first and only medal of the games when Stephen Kiprotich easily captured the Olympic marathon. Kiprotich finished in 2

hours, 8 minutes, 1 second, holding off the Kenyan duo of Abel Kirui and Wilson Kipsang. Kirui finished 26 seconds behind Kiprotich, while Kipsang, the leader much of the race, faded late but held on for bronze just ahead of American Meb Keflezighi. The rest of the Olympic action Sunday: VOLLEYBALL Russia won its first men’s volleyball gold in 32 years by rallying past Brazil in five sets. Second-ranked Russia dropped the first two sets and faced two match points before putting together an impressive comeback in a 19-25, 20-25, 29-27, 25-22, 159 victory, paced by 7-foot-2 middle blocker Dmitriy Muserskiy’s 31 points. The Russians thought they had won it on Muserskiy’s kill in the fifth set and began to celebrate, but the officials awarded the point to top-ranked Brazil. After regrouping, Muserskiy came

right back to spike match point. It was Russia’s fourth gold medal in the event, most of any nation. Italy won its fourth men’s volleyball medal in the last five Olympics by beating Bulgaria in four sets for the bronze. GYMNASTICS (RHYTHMIC) The Russians won their fourth straight Olympic gold medal in the group event, easily beating Belarus. With Evgeniya Kanaeva winning the individual all-around Saturday, Russia has now won both rhythmic titles at every Olympics since the 2000 Sydney Games. The Russians didn’t even bother waiting for the final standings, exchanging hugs and blowing kisses at the camera before the score of Ukraine, the last team to perform, was announced. Italy was third after appearing to make mistakes on both its routines. The group event involves five gymnasts using two sets of apparatuses — five balls, and three ribbons and two hoops — in routines designed to showcase unison, flexibility and artistic skill. CYCLING (MOUNTAIN BIKE) World champion Jaroslav Kulhavy of the Czech Republic won a two-man sprint to take the gold medal in the men’s mountain bike race. Kulhavy made the most of a final steep ascent on the technical circuit in the English countryside to move ahead of Nino Schurter of Switzerland and then sprinted to the line. Schurter won the silver medal and Marco Aurelio Fontana of Italy took bronze. Kulhavy, whose sole objective this season was the Olympic gold, put his hands on his head as if he couldn’t believe he won. He then tied a Czech flag around his neck like a cape while Schurter, a bronze medalist in Beijing four years ago, collapsed to the ground in exhaustion.

’Happy and glorious’ Games A smooth, safe Olympics come to rocking conclusion By Sarah Lyall

New York Times News Service

By Paul Haven Associated Press

LONDON — With a little British pomp and a lot of British pop, London brought the curtain down on a glorious Olympic Games on Sunday in a spectacular, technicolor pageant of landmarks, lightshows and lots of fun. The closing ceremony offered a sensory blast including rock ‘n’ roll rickshaws, dustbin percussionists, an exploding yellow car and a marching band in red tunics and bearskin hats. The Spice Girls staged a show-stopping reunion, and Monty Python’s Eric Idle sauntered through “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” — accompanied by Roman centurions, Scottish bagpipers and a human cannonball. It all made for a psychedelic mashup that had 80,000 fans at Olympic Stadium stomping, cheering and singing along. Organizers estimated 300 million or more were watching around the world. What a way to end a games far more successful than many Londoners expected. Security woes were overcome, and traffic nightmares never materialized. The weather held up, more or less, and British athletes overachieved. It all came with a price tag of $14 billion — three times the original estimate. But nobody wanted to spoil the fun with such mundane concerns, at least not on this night. “We lit the flame, and we lit up the world,” said London organizing committee chief Sebastian Coe. “When our time came, Britain, we did it right.” International Olympic Committee President

Matt Dunham / The Associated Press

The mayor of Rio de Janeiro Eduardo Paes waves the Olympic flag after it was handed to him by President of the International Olympic Committee Jacques Rogge, not seen, during the Closing Ceremony at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Sunday, in London.

Jacques Rogge declared the Olympics over with praise for the athletes. “Through your commitment to fair play, your respect for opponents, and your grace in defeat as well as in victory, you have earned the right to be called Olympians,” he said, adding: “These were happy and glorious games.” But the night was about splash more than speeches. Festive and fast-moving, the ceremony opened with pop bands Madness, Pet Shop Boys and One Direction, a shout-out to Winston Churchill and a tribute to the Union Jack — the floor of Olympic Stadium arranged to resemble the British flag. Monochrome recreations of London landmarks were covered in newsprint, from Big Ben’s clock tower and Tower Bridge to the London Eye ferris wheel and the chubby highrise known as the Gherkin. Street percussion group Stomp built the noise into a frenzy, and dancers brandished brooms, in a nod to the spontaneous popular

movement to clean up London after riots shook neighborhoods not far from Olympic Stadium just a year ago. Liam Gallagher performed “Wonderwall,” a 1990s hit by his former band, Oasis, Muse rocked the house with the hard-edged Olympic anthem “Survival,” and Queen guitarist Brian May was joined by singer Jessie J for a crowd-pleasing “We Will Rock You.” The headline performers were each paid a pound, a little more than $1.50. The night ended with the extinguishing of the multipetaled Olympic cauldron and a supercharged rendition of “My Generation” and other classics by The Who that had the crowd dancing in the aisles. Confetti rained down, and fireworks lit up the sky. Eight minutes were turned over to Brazil, host of the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro, which delivered an explosion of samba, sequins and Latin cool. Following tradition, the mayor of London handed the Olympic flag off to his Rio counterpart.

LONDON — Nobody blew anything up. Rain did not reduce Olympic Stadium to a soggy mess filled with waterlogged athletes and wretched spectators. London’s transportation system did not break down or seize up or become the world’s laughingstock. To the shock and then relief of a nation used to large events going awry, the Olympics instead went smoothly. People got to where they were meant to be. The food did not run out. Nobody attacked Wenlock the mascot. And everyone, from the most important official to the person whose job it was to confiscate our water and frisk for weapons, remained genuinely buoyant. On Saturday at the Olympic park, hundreds of mellow people stretched out on the banks of the newly unpolluted River Lea, watching a giant screen that showed women racewalking through central London. “Who knew there were such an array of sports?” said Dave Davies, 29, a Welshman who said that before the Olympics, he would never have touched a Union Jack. But there he was, wearing one as a cape. His friend Jodie Deveson, 37, said: “I had been thinking, ‘I don’t want to be in London; it’s going to be hell getting to work.’ But it hasn’t. Everyone at work has been huddling by the TV, watching the Olympics.” Sure, there were things that were irritating. I think we should have fewer McDonald’s in our lives, not more. I spent too much of my time fuming about the “We are proud to accept only Visa” signs at the cash registers. I found the park so large and unwieldy that half the time, I had only the vaguest idea of where I was.

But who cared, when there was so much good will? If the mood was blissedout by the river, it was electric inside Olympic Stadium a few hours later, when the track and field events featured two of the biggest stars of the games: the very confident Jamaican runner Usain Bolt and the much gentler British runner Mo Farah. I hadn’t realized how many things happen all at once. While Farah romped to victory, a large number of women were attempting high jumps at one end of the stadium, while at the other, an equally long parade of men were throwing javelins. Nobody cared much, although we worried that one of the javelins might go astray and hit Farah or one of the slower runners. But everything was too well organized for that. The javelins were retrieved by men in suits who hustled them off the field and sent them back via remotely controlled mini-Mini Coopers I love Mini Coopers, and I was even kind of loving javelins and the people who throw them. As I walked back, I passed Satellite Farm, where the world’s Olympic broadcasters had planted their satellite dishes. Someone sneezed. “Bless you,” I said. I always say it (I am from New York), while Britons generally keep themselves to themselves, as they say, in these situations. Not here, not in the Olympic park on a sultry Saturday night when the fastest man in Britain had just won another gold medal and a fleet of little toy cars helped keep the Olympic operation running smoothly. There were four other people, besides me, passing the sneezing person. “Bless you,” “bless you,” they all said, every one.


D4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

Eaton Continued from D1 Even Bolt, a triple gold medalist in these Olympics in the 100, 200 and 4x100 relay, was impressed. “I’m a great athlete, but to do 10 events, especially the 1,500, I’ve got to give it to him,” Bolt said. Since standing atop the victory podium in the gold medal ceremony at Olympic Stadium last Friday, the former standout from Bend’s Mountain View High School, five-time NCAA champion at the University of Oregon, and 2010 winner of The Bowerman award, has been on a whirlwind media blitz in London. For Eaton, however, the superlatives that mean the most are the ones that come from within the decathlon family. “He’s the best ever,” said Dan O’Brien, who watched his American record get washed away in Eaton’s emotional world-record performance in June at the U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials at Eugene’s Hayward Field. “I don’t think we’ve seen the last of 9,000 points. I think he’s going to do it once a year until Rio.” The 2016 Olympics will be held in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro. Bryan Clay, the 2008 Olympic gold medalist in the decathlon, said anybody who has competed against Eaton quickly recognized the rare combination of speed, strength and endurance. “We all knew he was going to be very dangerous,” Clay said. “I remember (former UO assistant coach) Dan Steele walking up to me at the 2008 Trials, and he said, ‘Hey Bryan, we just recruited this kid. He’s pretty much exactly the same as you, and

OLYMPIC COMMENTARY

Americans set gold standard in London By Helene Elliott Los Angeles Times

F Matt Dunham / The Associated Press

United States’ Ashton Eaton, fifth from right on bottom, poses with fellow decathlon athletes after he won gold at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Thursday.

he’s going to do some really great things.’ “Four years later, he’s breaking the world record. I don’t know that anybody has ever matured in the event as quickly as he has. It’s mindboggling to see how well he’s done in such a short amount of time.” Since his first decathlon as a UO freshman in March 2007, Eaton has become a student of the event. Going into London, he knew that Milt Campbell and Rafer Johnson were the last U.S. decathletes to win gold and silver, at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics — a feat that he and Trey Hardee matched last week. “The 1-2 finish is what we really wanted,” said Eaton, of Oregon Track Club Elite. Eaton’s coach, Harry Marra, said his star pupil came of age one year ago at the 2011 World Championships in Daegu, South Korea.

On that stage, Eaton allowed a few subpar events to affect his performance, needing a six-second personal record in the 1,500 to pull out a second-place finish by four points over Cuba’s Leonel Suarez, 8,505 points to 8,501. “He grew up in Daegu,” Marra said. “I think he showed that here.” Eaton’s gold was one of 29 medals won by Team USA in track and field at the London Olympics, its biggest haul since the 1992 Barcelona Games. U.S. track and field athletes won nine gold medals, 13 silver and seven bronze. The Oregon connection included a silver for UO alum Galen Rupp in the 10,000, the first medal by an American in that event since Billy Mills won gold in 1964; a gold for ex-Duck Keshia Baker as a member of the women’s 4x400 relay; and a silver for

Salem’s Ryan Bailey as the anchor of the men’s 4x100 relay. In addition, OTC Elite’s Sally Kipyego earned silver in the women’s 10,000 for Kenya, and Mo Farah, who trains with Rupp in Portland, became the greatest distance runner in British history with his double goldmedal performance in the 10,000 and 5,000. There were two close calls as former UO standout Matthew Centrowitz came up agonizingly short of a bronze in the 1,500 by .04 seconds, and a second medal eluded Kipyego in the 5,000 by .64. OTC Elite’s Nick Symmonds became the thirdfastest performer in U.S. history in the 800 meters with a PR of 1 minutes, 42.95 seconds, but he finished fifth as Rudisha broke his own world record at 1:40.91, the first man to ever run under 1:41.00.

OLYMPIC SCOREBOARD Medalists Sunday’s Olympic Medalists ATHLETICS Men Marathon GOLD—Stephen Kiprotich, Uganda. SILVER—Abel Kirui, Kenya. BRONZE—Wilson Kipsang Kiprotich, Kenya. BASKETBALL Men GOLD—United States (Tyson Chandler, Kevin Durant, Lebron James, Russell Westbrook, Deron Williams, Andre Iguodala, Kobe Bryant, Kevin Love, James Harden, Chris Paul, Anthony Davis, Carmelo Anthony). SILVER—Spain (Pau Gasol, Rudy Fernandez, Sergio Rodriguez, Juan-Carlos Navarro, Jose Calderon, Felipe Reyes, Victor Claver, Fernando San Emeterio, Sergio Llull, Marc Gasol, Serge Ibaka, Victor Sada). BRONZE—Russia (Alexey Shved, Timofey Mozgov, Sergey Karasev, Vitaliy Fridzon, Sasha Kaun, Evgeny Voronov, Victor Khryapa, Semen Antonov, Sergey Monya, Dmitry Khvostov, Anton Ponkrashov, Andrei Kirilenko). BOXING Men 52Kg GOLD—Robeisy Ramirez Carrazana, Cuba. SILVER—Tugstsogt Nyambayar, Mongolia. BRONZE—Misha Aloian, Russia. BRONZE—Michael Conlan, Ireland. 60Kg GOLD—Vasyl Lomachenko, Ukraine. SILVER—Han Soonchul, South Korea. BRONZE—Evaldas Petrauskas, Lithuania. BRONZE—Yasnier Toledo Lopez, Cuba. 69Kg GOLD—Serik Sapiyev, Kazakhstan. SILVER—Freddie Evans, Britain. BRONZE—Taras Shelestyuk, Ukraine. BRONZE—Andrey Zamkovoy, Russia. 81Kg GOLD—Egor Mekhontcev, Russia. SILVER—Adilbek Niyazymbetov, Kazakhstan. BRONZE—Yamaguchi Falcao Florentino, Brazil. BRONZE—Oleksandr Gvozdyk, Ukraine. 91+Kg GOLD—Anthony Joshua, Britain. SILVER—Roberto Cammarelle, Italy. BRONZE—Magomedrasul Medzhidov, Azerbaijan. BRONZE—Ivan Dychko, Kazakhstan. CYCLING MOUNTAIN BIKE Men Cross Country GOLD—Jaroslav Kulhavy, Czech Republic. SILVER—Nino Schurter, Switzerland. BRONZE—Marco Aurelio Fontana, Italy. GYMNASTICS RHYTHMIC Women Team GOLD—Russia (Anastasia Bliznyuk, Uliana Donskova, Ksenia Dudkina, Alina Makarenko, Anastasia Nazarenko, Karolina Sevastyanova). SILVER—Belarus (Maryna Hancharova, Anastasiya Ivankova, Nataliya Leshchyk, Aliaksandra Narkevich, Kseniya Sankovich, Alina Tumilovich). BRONZE—Italy (Elisa Blanchi, Romina Laurito, Marta Pagnini, Elisa Santoni, Anzhelika Savrayuk, Andreea Stefanescu). MODERN PENTATHLON Women GOLD—Laura Asadauskaite, Lithuania. SILVER—Samantha Murray, Britain. BRONZE—Yane Marques, Brazil. TEAM HANDBALL Men GOLD—France (Jerome Fernandez, Didier Dinart, Xavier Barachet, Guillaume Gille, Bertrand Gille, Daniel Narcisse, Guillaume Joli, Samuel Honrubia, Daouda Karaboue, Nikola Karabatic, Thierry Omeyer, William Accambray, Luc Abalo, Cedric Sorhaindo, Michael Guigou). SILVER—Sweden (Mattias Andersson, Mattias Gustafsson, Kim Andersson, Jonas Kallman, Magnus Jernemyr, Niclas Ekberg, Dalibor Doder, Jonas Larholm, Tobias Karlsson, Johan Jakobsson, Johan Sjostrand, Fredrik Petersen, Kim Ekdahl du Rietz, Mattias Zakrisson, Andreas Nilsson). BRONZE—Croatia (Venio Losert, Ivano Balic, Domagoj Duvnjak, Blazenko Lackovic, Marko Kopljar, Igor Vori, Jakov Gojun, Zlatko Horvat, Drago Vukovic, Damir Bicanic, Denis Buntic, Mirko Alilovic, Manuel Strlek, Ivan Cupic, Ivan Nincevic). VOLLEYBALL Men GOLD—Russia (Nikolay Apalikov, Taras Khtey, Sergey Grankin, Sergey Tetyukhin, Alexander Sokolov, Yury Berezhko, Alexander Butko, Dmitriy Muserskiy, Dmitriy Ilinykh, Maxim Mikhaylov, Alexander Volkov, Alexey Obmochaev). SILVER—Brazil (Bruno Rezende, Wallace de Souza, Sidnei dos Santos Junior, Leandro Vissotto Neves, Gilberto Godoy Filho, Murilo Endres, Sergio Santos, Thiago Soares Alves, Rodrigo Santana, Lucas Saatkamp, Ricardo Garcia, Dante Amaral). BRONZE—Italy (Luigi Mastrangelo, Simone Parodi, Samuele Papi, Michal Lasko, Ivan Zaytsev, Dante Boninfante, Cristian Savani, Dragan Travica, Alessandro Fei, Emanuele Birarelli, Andrea Bari, Andrea Giovi). WATER POLO

LONDON — reestyle wrestler Jordan Burroughs came to the Olympics with two objectives: to become the champion in the 163-pound weight class and to restore Team USA to what he considered its rightful place atop the goldmedal list. China had capitalized on its home-country advantage four years ago to win 51 gold medals, 15 more than the U.S. And although the U.S. won more medals overall in Beijing, 110100, some experts give greater weight to the number of gold medals when ranking Olympic performances. Burroughs was so determined to avoid a repeat that he downloaded an app to his smartphone that allowed him to track the daily medal count and vowed to do his part for Team USA. “I wanted to be the guy who helped us out,” said Burroughs, who did just that when he defeated Sadegh Saeed Goudarzi of Iran in the goldmedal match. “Even though China makes all our clothes, they can’t beat us in medals.” Thanks to Burroughs and 45 other triumphant team or individual performances, the U.S. had regained the top spot in both the gold-medal and overall tallies before Posh and the rest of the Spice Girls reunited to perform at Olympic Stadium during Sunday’s closing ceremony. The total of 46 gold medals was the highest for the U.S. in an Olympics contested on foreign soil. Those gold medals were supplemented by 29 silver medals and 29 bronze medals for a grand total of 104, giving Team USA the lead in the medal count for the fifth straight Games. China finished second in gold (38) and overall medals (87). Russia had 82 total medals, including 24 gold. Host Britain had more golds (29) but 65 overall. “We had very, very high expectations coming into the Games, and I think our expectations have been exceeded both on the field of play and off,” Scott Blackmun, chief executive of the U.S. Olympic Committee, said before Sunday’s final events. “One of our primary objectives is to get as many American athletes on the podium as we can. If you look at the team sports, we’re going to put more than 200 on the podium while we’re here, which is something that’s very, very important to us.” Swimmers won the most medals for Team USA, 31. That equaled the Beijing team’s total but the London swimmers won 16 gold medals, four more than the Beijing team. Michael Phelps dominated the pool here by winning six gold medals and eight overall to pad his career total to 22, the most in Olympic history. Missy Franklin, Ryan Lochte and Allison Schmitt each won five medals and U.S. swimmers set five world records, two by breaststroke specialist Rebecca Soni. The second-biggest contribution was 29 from a track and field team whose distance renaissance softened the sting of losing three of four individual sprint races to Jamaicans. Galen Rupp’s silver medal in the 10,000 meters was the

Men GOLD—Croatia (Josip Pavic, Damir Buric, Miho Boskovic, Niksa Dobud, Maro Jokovic, Ivan Buljubasic, Petar Muslim, Andro Buslje, Sandro Sukno, Samir Barac, Igor Hinic, Paulo Obradovic, Frano Vican). SILVER—Italy (Stefano Tempesti, Amaurys Perez, Niccolo’ Gitto, Pietro Figlioli, Alex Giorgetti, Maurizio Felugo, Massimo Giacoppo, Valentino Gallo, Christian Presciutti, Deni Fiorentini, Matteo Aicardi, Danijel Premus, Giacomo Pastorino). BRONZE—Serbia (Slobodan Soro, Aleksa Saponjic, Zivko Gocic, Vanja Udovicic, Dusan Mandic, Dusko Pijetlovic, Slobodan Nikic, Milan Aleksic, Nikola Raden, Filip Filipovic, Andrija Prlainovic, Stefan Mitrovic, Gojko Pijetlovic). WRESTLING Men 66Kg GOLD—Tatsuhiro Yonemitsu, Japan. SILVER—Sushil Kumar, India. BRONZE—Livan Lopez Azcuy, Cuba. BRONZE—Akzhurek Tanatarov, Kazakhstan. 96Kg GOLD—Jacob Stephen Varner, Bakersfield, Calif. SILVER—Valerii Andriitsev, Ukraine. BRONZE—Khetag Gazyumov, Azerbaijan. BRONZE—George Gogshelidze, Georgia.

Basketball Olympic Men’s Basketball Sunday, Aug. 12 Bronze Medal Russia 81, Argentina 77 Gold Medal United States 107, Spain 100

Cycling Sunday, Aug. 12 Men’s Cross Country 1. Jaroslav Kulhavy, Czech Republic, 1:29:07. 2. Nino Schurter, Switzerland, 1:29:08. 3. Marco Aurelio Fontana, Italy, 1:29:32. 4. Jose Antonio Hermida Ramos, Spain, 1:29:36. 5. Burry Stander, South Africa, 1:29:37. 6. Carlos Coloma Nicolas, Spain, 1:30:07. 7. Manuel Fumic, Germany, 1:30:31. 8. Geoff Kabush, Canada, 1:30:43. 9. Alexander Gehbauer, Austria, 1:31:16. 10. Todd Wells, Kingston, N.Y., 1:31:28. 11. Stephane Tempier, France, 1:31:30. 12. Jan Skarnitzl, Czech Republic, 1:31:48. 13. Gerhard Kerschbaumer, Italy, 1:32:02. 14. Ondrej Cink, Czech Republic, 1:32:16. 15. Samuel Schultz, Missoula, Mont., 1:32:29. 16. Marek Konwa, Poland, 1:32:41. 17. Rudi van Houts, Netherlands, 1:32:53. 18. Ralph Naef, Switzerland, 1:32:58. 19. Kevin van Hoovels, Belgium, 1:33:01. 20. Karl Markt, Austria, 1:33:18. 21. Daniel McConnell, Australia, 1:33:22. 22. Sergio Mantecon Gutierrez, Spain, 1:33:46. 23. David Joao Serralheiro Rosa, Portugal, 1:33:50. 24. Rubens Valeriano, Brazil, 1:34:23. 25. Florian Vogel, Switzerland, 1:34:36. 26. Catriel Andres Soto, Argentina, 1:35:13. 27. Kohei Yamamoto, Japan, 1:35:26. 28. Hector Leonardo Paez Leon, Colombia, 1:36:02. 29. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France, 1:37:07. 30. Marc Bassingthwaighte, Namibia, 1:37:17. 31. Sergji Rysenko, Ukraine, 1:37:32. 32. Piotr Brzozka, Poland, 1:38:37. 33. Periklis Ilias, Greece, 1:38:51. 34. Moritz Milatz, Germany, 1:38:59. 35. Philip Buys, South Africa, 1:40:11. 36. Paolo Cesar Montoya Cantillo, Costa Rica, 1:41:19. 37. Evgeniy Pechenin, Russia, 1:41:40. 38. Chun Hing Chan, Hong Kong, 1:41:59. 39. Adrien Niyonshuti, Rwanda, 1:42:46. 40. Marios Athanasiadis, Cyprus, 1:43:25. NR. Tong Weisong, China, LAP. NR. Derek Horton, Guam, LAP. NR. Sven Nys, Belgium, DNF. NR. Max Plaxton, Canada, DNF. NR. Andras Parti, Hungary, DNF. NR. Julien Absalon, France, DNF. NR. Liam Killeen, Britain, DNF. NR. Robert Forstemann, Germany, DNS. NR. Michael Vingerling, Netherlands, DNS. NR. Sam Bewley, New Zealand, DNS.

Sunday’s scores HANDBALL Men Gold Medal France 22, Sweden 21 Bronze Medal Croatia 33, Hungary 26 VOLLEYBALL Men Gold Medal Russia 3, Brazil 2 (19-25, 20-25, 29-27, 25-22, 15-9) Bronze Medal Italy 3, Bulgaria 1 (25-19, 23-25, 25-22, 25-21) WATER POLO Men

Gold Medal Croatia 8, Italy 6 Bronze Medal Serbia 12, Montenegro 11 5th Place Hungary 14, Spain 8 7th Place Australia 10, United States 9

Multi-Medalists MEN Six Michael Phelps, Baltimore, swimming, 4 gold, 2 silver. Five Ryan Lochte, Daytona Beach, Fla., swimming, 2 gold, 2 silver, 1 bronze. Four Sun Yang, China, swimming, 2 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Three Usain Bolt, Jamaica, athletics, 3 gold. Nathan Adrian, Bremerton, Wash., swimming, 2 gold, 1 silver. Matthew Grevers, Lake Forest, Ill., swimming, 2 gold, 1 silver. Yannick Agnel, France, swimming, 2 gold, 1 silver. Zou Kai, China, gymnastics artistic, 2 gold, 1 bronze. Cullen Jones, Bronx, N.Y., swimming, 1 gold, 2 silver. Yohan Blake, Jamaica, athletics, 1 gold, 2 silver. Kohei Uchimura, Japan, gymnastics artistic, 1 gold, 2 silver. Ryosuke Irie, Japan, swimming, 2 silver, 1 bronze. Two Zhang Jike, China, table tennis, 2 gold. Jin Jongoh, South Korea, shooting, 2 gold. Jason Kenny, Britain, cycling track, 2 gold. Mohamed Farah, Britain, athletics, 2 gold. Feng Zhe, China, gymnastics artistic, 2 gold. Michael Jung, Germany, equestrian, 2 gold. Chris Hoy, Britain, cycling track, 2 gold. Chad le Clos, South Africa, swimming, 1 gold, 1 silver. Nick Thoman, Cincinnati, swimming, 1 gold, 1 silver. Qin Kai, China, diving, 1 gold, 1 silver. Niccolo Campriani, Italy, shooting, 1 gold, 1 silver. Amaury Leveaux, France, swimming, 1 gold, 1 silver. Ricky Berens, Charlotte, N.C., swimming, 1 gold, 1 silver. Jeremy Stravius, France, swimming, 1 gold, 1 silver. Andy Murray, Britain, tennis, 1 gold, 1 silver. Wang Hao, China, table tennis, 1 gold, 1 silver. Ilya Zakharov, Russia, diving, 1 gold, 1 silver. Chen Yibing, China, gymnastics artistic, 1 gold, 1 silver. Clement Lefert, France, swimming, 1 gold, 1 silver. David Boudia, Noblesville, Ind., diving, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Oh Jin Hyek, South Korea, archery, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Oussama Mellouli, Tunisia, swimming, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Edward Clancy, Britain, cycling track, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Mike Bryan, Camarillo, Calif., tennis, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Brendan Hansen, Havertown, Pa., swimming, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Park Taehwan, South Korea, swimming, 2 silver. Gregory Bauge, France, cycling track, 2 silver. Gerco Schroder, Netherlands, equestrian, 2 silver. Marcel Nguyen, Germany, gymnastics artistic, 2 silver. Denis Ablyazin, Russia, gymnastics artistic, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Louis Smith, Britain, gymnastics artistic, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Takeshi Matsuda, Japan, swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Diego Occhiuzzi, Italy, fencing, 1 silver, 1 bronze. James Magnussen, Australia, swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Justin Gatlin, Pensacola, Fla., athletics, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Will Claye, Phoenix, athletics, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Maximilian Levy, Germany, cycling track, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Christian Sprenger, Australia, swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Max Whitlock, Britain, gymnastics artistic, 2 bronze. Lalonde Gordon, Trinidad & Tobago, athletics, 2 bronze. Dimitrij Ovtcharov, Germany, table tennis, 2 bronze. —— WOMEN Five Missy Franklin, Centennial, Colo., swimming, 4 gold, 1 bronze. Allison Schmitt, Canton, Mich., swimming, 3 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Alicia Coutts, Australia, swimming, 1 gold, 3 silver, 1 bronze. Four Aliya Mustafina, Russia, gymnastics artistic, 1 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze. Three Dana Vollmer, Granbury, Texas, swimming, 3 gold. Allyson Felix, Los Angeles, athletics, 3 gold.

Ranomi Kromowidjojo, Netherlands, swimming, 2 gold, 1 silver. Rebecca Soni, Plainsboro, N.J., swimming, 2 gold, 1 silver. Alexandra Raisman, Needham, Mass., gymnastics artistic, 2 gold, 1 bronze. Emily Seebohm, Australia, swimming, 1 gold, 2 silver. Brittany Elmslie, Australia, swimming, 1 gold, 2 silver. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Jamaica, athletics, 1 gold, 2 silver. Melanie Schlanger, Australia, swimming, 1 gold, 2 silver. Camille Muffat, France, swimming, 1 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Carmelita Jeter, Gardena, Calif., athletics, 1 gold, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Guo Shuang, China, cycling track, 2 silver, 1 bronze. Satomi Suzuki, Japan, swimming, 1 silver, 2 bronze. Two Elisa Di Francisca, Italy, fencing, 2 gold. Wu Minxia, China, diving, 2 gold. Serena Williams, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., tennis, 2 gold. Ye Shiwen, China, swimming, 2 gold. Chen Ruolin, China, diving, 2 gold. Zhao Yunlei, China, badminton, 2 gold. Svetlana Romashina, Russia, synchronized swimming, 2 gold. Sanya Richards-Ross, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., athletics, 2 gold. Gabrielle Douglas, Virginia Beach, Va., gymnastics artistic, 2 gold. Danuta Kozak, Hungary, canoe sprint, 2 gold. Li Xiaoxia, China, table tennis, 2 gold. Charlotte Dujardin, Britain, equestrian, 2 gold. Ki Bo Bae, South Korea, archery, 2 gold. Natalia Ishchenko, Russia, synchronized swimming, 2 gold. Laura Trott, Britain, cycling track, 2 gold. He Zi, China, diving, 1 gold, 1 silver. Natalya Antyukh, Russia, athletics, 1 gold, 1 silver. Franziska Weber, Germany, canoe sprint, 1 gold, 1 silver. Tina Dietze, Germany, canoe sprint, 1 gold, 1 silver. Mc Kayla Maroney, Long Beach, Calif., gymnastics artistic, 1 gold, 1 silver. Arianna Errigo, Italy, fencing, 1 gold, 1 silver. Katalin Kovacs, Hungary, canoe sprint, 1 gold, 1 silver. Ding Ning, China, table tennis, 1 gold, 1 silver. Victoria Pendleton, Britain, cycling track, 1 gold, 1 silver. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, tennis, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Sandra Auffarth, Germany, equestrian, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Sun Yujie, China, fencing, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Jessica Hardy, Long Beach, Calif., swimming, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Valentina Vezzali, Italy, fencing, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Anna Meares, Australia, cycling track, 1 gold, 1 bronze. DeeDee Trotter, Decatur, Ga., athletics, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Sandra Raluca Izbasa, Romania, gymnastics artistic, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Laura Bechtolsheimer, Britain, equestrian, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Tirunesh Dibaba, Ethiopia, athletics, 1 gold, 1 bronze. Aliaksandra Herasimenia, Belarus, swimming, 2 silver. Sarah Hammer, Temecula, Calif., cycling track, 2 silver. Mireia Belmonte Garcia, Spain, swimming, 2 silver. Victoria Komova, Russia, gymnastics artistic, 2 silver. Inna Osypenko-Radomska, Ukraine, canoe sprint, 2 silver. Marleen Veldhuis, Netherlands, swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Elizabeth Beisel, Saunderstown, R.I., swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Liu Ou, China, synchronized swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Ona Carbonell Ballestero, Spain, synchronized swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Adelinde Cornelissen, Netherlands, equestrian, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Andrea Fuentes Fache, Spain, synchronized swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Vivian Jepkemoi Cheruiyot, Kenya, athletics, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Veronica Campbell-Brown, Jamaica, athletics, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Kim Crow, Australia, rowing, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Huang Xuechen, China, synchronized swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Maria Paseka, Russia, gymnastics artistic, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Bronte Barratt, Australia, swimming, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Natasa Douchev-Janics, Hungary, canoe sprint, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Catalina Ponor, Romania, gymnastics artistic, 1 silver, 1 bronze. Aya Terakawa, Japan, swimming, 2 bronze. Olga Zabelinskaya, Russia, cycling road, 2 bronze. Olena Kostevych, Ukraine, shooting, 2 bronze. Rebecca Adlington, Britain, swimming, 2 bronze. Tianwei Feng, Singapore, table tennis, 2 bronze.

first by an American in that race since Billy Mills in 1964, and Leo Manzano’s silver in the men’s 1,500 was the first by an American at that distance since Jim Ryun won silver in 1968. Brigetta Barrett’s high-jump silver medal was the first for the U.S. in that event since Louise Ritter won gold in 1988. Allyson Felix of Los Angeles won three gold medals and Carmelita Jeter won gold, silver and bronze. Eighteen athletes or relays recorded national-best performances as the track and field team increased its medal total from 23 at Beijing and gave the overall U.S. total a big boost. “I personally feel like it’s important for us to take the title home because I feel like we’ve worked very hard and it’s part of our expectations,” said DeeDee Trotter, who won bronze in the 400 and gold with the dominant 1,600-meter relay team. “I think that it’s important in a way that we just want to maintain a level of talent and the level of medals that we’ve always been able to bring home, and to fall short of that would mean that we’re not bringing our ‘A’ game. And we always want to bring our ‘A’ game.” That happened in several other sports too. Divers won one gold medal and four overall after being shut out in Beijing, and Wimbledon provided a venerable backdrop for four tennis medals, up from two at Beijing. “I was there the day that Serena (Williams) played Maria Sharapova and that was the most dominating performance that I have ever seen by a female tennis player, ever,” Larry Probst, chair of the USOC board, said of the women’s final. “It was just unbelievable.” But that wasn’t true across the board. Gymnastics’ medal total dropped from 10 to six, though Gabby Douglas became the first American to win team and individual all-around gold medals. “Overall I think we’re happy with the way gymnastics turned out,” Probst said. Fencers won six medals at Beijing but only one here. Sailing was blanked for the first time since the 1936 Berlin Games. Most noticeably, the male boxers went home without a medal. In the Olympic debut of women’s boxing, middleweight Claressa Shields won gold and flyweight Marlen Esparza won bronze. “We’re disappointed in boxing. We want to do better, particularly in men’s boxing,” Blackmun said. “And by saying disappointed in boxing, I don’t mean in the people. We’re disappointed that we didn’t do better in boxing because I know we can do better and we have to focus on how we can do better.” Probst said Team USA’s success here can also be measured by athletes’ behavior away from the field, court, pool and track. On that score, he said, they all earned gold medals. “The other thing I would add is when we leave London, do people perceive our athletes as good ambassadors for the United States? And the answer is a resounding yes,” Probst said. “I think they have done an amazing job representing our country and we’re really proud of them.”

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

United States’ Michael Phelps displays his gold medal for the men’s 100-meter butterfly during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, Aug. 3. It was one of six medals Phelps won during the 2012 Olympics. The U.S. swimmers won 31 medals overall.


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D5

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Mariners 4, Angels 1 Seattle Ackley 2b-1b M.Saunders cf Seager 3b-2b Jaso dh J.Montero c Carp 1b a-Figgins ph-3b Thames rf T.Robinson lf Ryan ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 2 4 2 2 4 3 3 31

R 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

American League SO 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 10

Avg. .222 .242 .247 .290 .272 .206 .188 .235 .242 .199

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .340 Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .295 Pujols dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Trumbo 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .288 H.Kendrick 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .282 Aybar ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .271 V.Wells lf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .229 M.Izturis 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Bo.Wilson c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .230 Totals 32 1 7 1 1 6 Seattle 010 002 001 — 4 5 0 Los Angeles 010 000 000 — 1 7 0 a-singled for Carp in the 6th. LOB—Seattle 4, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Aybar (20). 3B—Figgins (2), H.Kendrick (3). HR—J.Montero 2 (12), off Weaver 2. SB—Jaso (3), T.Robinson (3), Aybar (9). DP—Seattle 1.

New York Tampa Bay Baltimore Boston Toronto

W 67 62 62 57 54

L 47 52 53 59 60

Chicago Detroit Cleveland Kansas City Minnesota

W 62 61 53 49 49

L 51 54 62 65 65

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 67 61 60 53

L 46 53 55 63

East Division Pct GB WCGB .588 — — .544 5 — .539 5½ — .491 11 5½ .474 13 7½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .549 — — .530 2 1 .461 10 9 .430 13½ 12½ .430 13½ 12½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .593 — — .535 6½ ½ .522 8 2 .457 15½ 9½

Sunday’s Games Boston 14, Cleveland 1 Toronto 10, N.Y. Yankees 7 Baltimore 5, Kansas City 3 Chicago White Sox 7, Oakland 3 Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 3, 10 innings Texas 8, Detroit 3 Seattle 4, L.A. Angels 1

Blue Jays 10, Yankees 7 New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Teixeira 1b Cano dh An.Jones lf Granderson cf McGehee 3b R.Martin c J.Nix 2b b-I.Suzuki ph Totals

AB 5 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 1 37

R 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 7

H 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 11

BI 2 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 0 6

Avg. .318 .262 .258 .315 .217 .240 .235 .196 .261 .262

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Davis lf 5 1 2 5 0 1 .261 McCoy 2b-ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .308 Encarnacion dh 4 2 3 2 1 0 .293 Cooper 1b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .282 Sierra rf 5 1 3 0 0 0 .345 Mathis c 4 2 1 1 0 0 .220 Y.Gomes 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .176 Gose cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .194 Hechavarria ss 3 1 1 0 0 2 .100 a-K.Johnson ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Totals 38 10 14 10 3 8 New York 000 013 300 — 7 11 0 Toronto 100 630 00x — 10 14 0 a-struck out for Hechavarria in the 7th. b-lined out for J.Nix in the 9th. LOB—New York 4, Toronto 7. 2B—Jeter (23), Teixeira (24), An.Jones (7), McGehee (3), J.Nix (9), R.Davis 2 (18), Encarnacion (22), Mathis (9). HR— Jeter (9), off Happ; Cano (25), off Happ; Encarnacion (30), off P.Hughes. SB—R.Davis (33). DP—Toronto 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes L, 11-10 4 9 7 7 1 4 80 4.44 Igarashi 2 3 3 3 1 1 35 18.00 Eppley 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 3 31 3.00 Rapada 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.87 Chamberlain 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 7.71 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ W, 1-1 5 2-3 6 4 4 0 4 88 6.35 Lincoln 1 4 3 3 0 0 23 3.86 Oliver H, 13 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 18 1.27 Janssen S, 15-16 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.22 Rapada pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:49. A—43,924 (49,260).

Red Sox 14, Indians 1 Boston AB Ellsbury cf 5 Mortensen p 1 Aceves p 0 C.Crawford lf 4 Podsednik lf 1 Pedroia 2b 3 Ciriaco 2b-cf 2 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 Punto 1b-2b 1 C.Ross rf 4 Saltalamacchia dh-1b5 Aviles ss 3 Valencia 3b 4 Shoppach c 4 Lavarnway c 1 Totals 41

R 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 14

H 2 0 0 3 0 2 1 2 0 1 1 3 0 1 0 16

BI 2 0 0 3 0 1 0 4 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 14

BB 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 8

Avg. .259 .000 --.280 .373 .278 .337 .309 .198 .275 .228 .257 .192 .250 .100

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Donald 2b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .190 As.Cabrera dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .280 Choo rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .285 Kotchman 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .223 C.Santana 1b-lf 2 0 1 1 1 1 .241 Duncan lf-rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .213 Lillibridge ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .195 Marson c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .243 Hannahan 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Carrera cf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .393 Totals 31 1 5 1 3 14 Boston 320 180 000 — 14 16 0 Cleveland 100 000 000 — 1 5 1 E—Donald (4). LOB—Boston 7, Cleveland 7. 2B—Ellsbury (13), C.Crawford 3 (8), Pedroia (23), Ad.Gonzalez (36), Aviles (25), Carrera (1). HR— Ad.Gonzalez (13), off Kluber. SB—Aviles (11). DP—Cleveland 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester W, 6-10 6 3 1 1 2 12 101 5.20 Tazawa 1 2 0 0 0 1 20 1.66 Mortensen 1 0 0 0 1 0 24 1.65 Aceves 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.14 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kluber L, 0-1 3 1-3 7 6 6 0 4 64 8.56 Tomlin 1 1-3 5 7 7 2 1 39 6.36 Herrmann 2 1-3 3 1 1 2 1 48 3.38 C.Allen 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 J.Smith 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 3.04 T—3:20. A—27,488 (43,429).

Orioles 5, Royals 3 Kansas City A.Gordon lf A.Escobar ss Moustakas 3b Butler dh L.Cain cf Francoeur rf Hosmer 1b B.Pena c Getz 2b Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 31

R 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 2 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 8

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 3

SO 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 5

Avg. .294 .298 .254 .302 .263 .244 .228 .255 .281

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Markakis rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .288 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .223 McLouth cf-lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .333 Ad.Jones dh-cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .298 Ford lf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .148 Ji.Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .211 Machado 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .375 Andino 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .223 Teagarden c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .097 Totals 29 5 6 4 4 7 Kansas City 000 210 000 — 3 8 0 Baltimore 020 011 01x — 5 6 0 LOB—Kansas City 6, Baltimore 5. 2B—Markakis (20). HR—Moustakas (18), off Tom.Hunter; Machado (3), off B.Chen; Markakis (13), off B.Chen. SB—McLouth (2). DP—Baltimore 2. Kansas City B.Chen L, 8-10 L.Coleman Bueno Crow Baltimore Tom.Hunter Ayala W, 4-3

IP 5 1-3 1 2-3 1 IP 5 1

H 4 1 0 1 H 8 0

R 4 0 1 0 R 3 0

ER BB SO NP 4 3 5 95 0 0 1 17 0 1 0 12 0 0 1 8 ER BB SO NP 3 2 2 94 0 0 0 8

ERA 5.56 3.96 3.38 3.61 ERA 5.54 2.56

National League

L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 4-6 3-7

Str Home Away L-1 34-22 33-25 W-6 32-27 30-25 W-1 30-28 32-25 W-1 29-34 28-25 W-1 29-25 25-35

L10 6-4 6-4 3-7 5-5 5-5

Str Home Away W-1 32-26 30-25 L-2 33-23 28-31 L-1 30-29 23-33 L-1 21-32 28-33 L-4 23-35 26-30

L10 7-3 5-5 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 36-22 31-24 L-1 34-26 27-27 L-2 31-24 29-31 W-2 25-29 28-34

Today’s Games Texas (Dempster 1-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 2-3), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 9-8) at Toronto (Villanueva 6-2), 4:07 p.m. Detroit (A.Sanchez 1-2) at Minnesota (Deduno 3-0), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 8-10) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 9-8), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 6-8) at Seattle (Beavan 7-6), 7:10 p.m.

Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vargas W, 13-8 8 1-3 7 1 1 1 5 96 3.56 Wilhelmsen S, 16-182-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.51 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver L, 15-2 7 4 3 3 3 5 108 2.22 Takahashi 1 0 0 0 0 3 17 4.50 Frieri 1 1 1 1 1 2 24 2.04 T—2:38. A—36,505 (45,957).

LOB—Cincinnati 6, Chicago 5. 2B—Cairo (5). HR—Bruce (22), off Raley; Ludwick (21), off Raley. SB—Cairo (3). DP—Cincinnati 1.

Washington Atlanta New York Philadelphia Miami

W 71 66 55 52 52

L 44 48 60 62 63

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 69 64 62 52 44 38

L 46 50 53 61 69 78

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 63 62 58 51 41

L 52 53 57 65 71

East Division Pct GB WCGB .617 — — .579 4½ — .478 16 9½ .456 18½ 12 .452 19 12½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .600 — — .561 4½ — .539 7 2½ .460 16 11½ .389 24 19½ .328 31½ 27 West Division Pct GB WCGB .548 — — .539 1 2½ .504 5 6½ .440 12½ 14 .366 20½ 22

Sunday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 5, Miami 0 Pittsburgh 11, San Diego 5 Philadelphia 8, St. Louis 7, 11 innings Milwaukee 5, Houston 3 Cincinnati 3, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 9, Colorado 6 Arizona 7, Washington 4 N.Y. Mets 6, Atlanta 5

L10 8-2 7-3 4-6 5-5 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 32-22 39-22 L-1 32-26 34-22 W-1 28-30 27-30 W-1 26-33 26-29 L-1 28-29 24-34

L10 5-5 4-6 6-4 5-5 1-9 3-7

Str Home Away W-3 36-20 33-26 W-1 36-20 28-30 L-1 34-23 28-30 W-1 33-26 19-35 L-3 28-27 16-42 L-1 27-32 11-46

L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 7-3 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 34-24 29-28 W-1 33-25 29-28 W-1 31-26 27-31 L-1 27-30 24-35 L-2 21-37 20-34

Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Harang 7-7) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 12-6) at Miami (Eovaldi 3-7), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Stults 2-2) at Atlanta (Minor 6-8), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Galarraga 0-2) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 7-10), 5:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Fiers 6-4) at Colorado (Francis 3-4), 5:40 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 14-6) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-5), 7:15 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Rangers 8, Tigers 3: ARLINGTON, Texas — Josh Hamilton hit his 32nd homer and drove in three runs, Yu Darvish struck out eight and Texas beat Detroit. Hamilton had a two-run drive in the first inning, taking the major league lead and matching his career high. He added an RBI single in the third to give him 99 RBIs, which is also tops in baseball. • Mariners 4, Angels 1: LOS ANGELES —Jesus Montero homered twice off major league ERA leader Jered Weaver, and Jason Vargas outpitched his former Long Beach State teammate to lift Seattle over Los Angeles. • Orioles 5, Royals 3: BALTIMORE — Manny Machado hit his third homer in four major league games, Nick Markakis also connected, and Baltimore got four hitless innings from its bullpen in a victory over Kansas City. • Blue Jays 10, Yankees 7: TORONTO — Rajai Davis doubled twice, matched a career high with five RBIs and made a sparkling catch as Toronto beat New York and snapped a five-game losing streak. • Red Sox 14, Indians 1: CLEVELAND — Jon Lester struck out 12 over six innings for his first win in six weeks and Boston salvaged a four-game split by routing Cleveland. • Rays 7, Twins 3: MINNEAPOLIS — Jeff Keppinger homered and doubled, then drove in the go-ahead run in the 10th inning as Tampa Bay beat Minnesota. • White Sox 7, Athletics 3: CHICAGO — Chris Sale struck out 11 in 6 2⁄3 innings, A.J. Pierzynski had a two-run home run in a five-run sixth inning and Chicago beat Oakland. Sale (14-3) reached double digits in strikeouts for the third time this season. He fanned 10 in the first five innings, allowed two runs on solo homers and walked none.

• Dodgers 5, Marlins 0: MIAMI — Chris Capuano held Miami hitless until the seventh inning and Hanley Ramirez drove in three runs against his former team, leading Los Angeles over the Marlins. • Reds 3, Cubs 0: CHICAGO — Johnny Cueto pitched three-hit ball for eight innings, Jay Bruce and Ryan Ludwick homered and Cincinnati beat Chicago. • Brewers 5, Astros 3: HOUSTON — Yovani Gallardo handled Houston once again and Corey Hart homered as Milwaukee broke an 11-game road skid. • Pirates 11, Padres 5: PITTSBURGH — Clint Barmes’ first career grand slam keyed a nine-run fourth inning and Neil Walker went five for five as Pittsburgh rallied past San Diego. • Phillies 8, Cardinals 7: PHILADELPHIA — Juan Pierre beat out a run-scoring infield single in the 11th inning, lifting Philadelphia to a win over St. Louis. • Diamondbacks 7, Nationals 4: PHOENIX — Rookie Patrick Corbin allowed four hits through seven innings and Arizona snapped Washington’s seasonhigh winning streak at eight games. • Giants 9, Rockies 6: SAN FRANCISCO — Hunter Pence hit a three-run homer during a five-run rally in the eighth inning that lifted San Francisco over Colorado. Buster Posey’s sacrifice fly in the eighth tied it. Melky Cabrera, who had an RBI single in the comeback, drove in three runs. • Mets 6, Braves 5: NEW YORK — Jonathon Niese pitched six-hit ball over eight innings, David Wright sparked the offense with a pair of doubles against Ben Sheets, and New York just hung on to beat Atlanta and salvage the finale of a three-game series. Niese (9-6) matched the second-longest outing of his big league career, allowing one run, striking out six and walking two.

Patton H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.58 Strop H, 19 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 1.22 Johnson S, 34-37 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.33 Bueno pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:44. A—20,935 (45,971).

Sale W, 14-3 6 2-3 6 2 2 0 11 114 2.60 N.Jones 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 26 3.35 A.Reed 1 1 1 1 0 2 15 3.95 Blevins pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:53. A—25,106 (40,615).

Rangers 8, Tigers 3

Rays 7, Twins 3 (10 innings)

Detroit A.Jackson cf Dirks lf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b Boesch rf a-Je.Baker ph-rf D.Young dh Avila c Jh.Peralta ss Infante 2b Totals

AB 5 4 3 2 3 1 4 2 4 4 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3

H 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 6

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 6

SO 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 10

Avg. .314 .335 .324 .310 .250 .286 .263 .265 .260 .308

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .275 Andrus ss 4 3 2 0 0 0 .297 Hamilton cf 3 2 2 3 1 1 .291 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .304 N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Mi.Young dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .271 Dav.Murphy lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .299 Soto c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .192 Moreland 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .291 Totals 34 8 11 5 2 4 Detroit 000 030 000 — 3 6 3 Texas 203 100 20x — 8 11 0 a-struck out for Boesch in the 8th. E—Boesch (2), Porcello (5), Avila (4). LOB—Detroit 8, Texas 5. 2B—Dirks (12), Mi.Cabrera (30), Infante (2), Kinsler (32), Moreland (10). HR—Hamilton (32), off Porcello. SB—Andrus (19), Hamilton (7), N.Cruz (8). DP—Detroit 1; Texas 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello L, 9-7 6 9 6 4 0 1 90 4.68 Villarreal 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 18 2.41 D.Downs 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 3 35 2.08 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish W, 12-8 6 2-3 6 3 3 5 8 120 4.54 R.Ross H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 1.81 Kirkman 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 4.98 Scheppers 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 5.06 T—3:05. A—45,752 (48,194).

White Sox 7, Athletics 3 Oakland Crisp cf J.Gomes dh Reddick rf Cespedes lf Carter 1b D.Norris c Rosales 3b Pennington ss J.Weeks 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 35

R 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3

H 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 1 8

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 13

Avg. .253 .259 .253 .306 .272 .211 .222 .203 .220

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .286 Beckham 2b 5 0 1 2 0 0 .228 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .203 Rios rf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .318 Pierzynski c 4 2 2 2 0 0 .299 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Viciedo dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .249 Wise lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .277 Olmedo 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Totals 35 7 11 6 3 3 Oakland 000 001 101 — 3 8 3 Chicago 001 005 10x — 7 11 0 E—Pennington 2 (9), Cespedes (2). LOB—Oakland 5, Chicago 8. 2B—Rios (28), Viciedo (12). HR— J.Gomes (14), off Sale; Rosales (2), off Sale; D.Norris (5), off A.Reed; Pierzynski (23), off B.Colon. Oakland B.Colon L, 9-9 Blevins Scribner Chicago

IP 5 2-3 1-3 2 IP

H 9 1 1 H

R 6 1 0 R

ER BB SO NP 5 2 2 93 1 1 0 10 0 0 1 28 ER BB SO NP

ERA 3.55 2.61 1.50 ERA

Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf B.Upton cf Zobrist rf Longoria dh 1-Fuld pr-dh Keppinger 3b C.Pena 1b R.Roberts 2b S.Rodriguez ss a-Joyce ph E.Johnson ss Lobaton c Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 0 5 4 4 3 1 0 4 36

R 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

H 2 0 2 1 0 2 0 3 1 1 0 0 12

BI 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 7

BB 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 8

Avg. .246 .243 .256 .314 .286 .323 .193 .216 .209 .275 .247 .231

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .287 Mastroianni rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Revere rf-cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .314 Mauer c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .316 Willingham dh 4 1 1 0 1 2 .261 Morneau 1b 4 1 2 2 1 1 .277 Doumit lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .292 A.Casilla 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Dozier ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .234 J.Carroll 3b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .244 Totals 38 3 7 3 4 4 Tampa Bay 110 010 000 4 — 7 12 3 Minnesota 021 000 000 0 — 3 7 0 a-doubled for S.Rodriguez in the 10th. 1-ran for Longoria in the 10th. E—Keppinger (2), S.Rodriguez (14), Zobrist (8). LOB—Tampa Bay 8, Minnesota 10. 2B—Zobrist (27), Keppinger (11), R.Roberts (3), S.Rodriguez (12), Joyce (13), Span (31), Willingham (23). HR—De.Jennings (9), off Diamond; Keppinger (5), off Diamond; Morneau (16), off Shields. SB—De.Jennings (21), B.Upton (22), Revere (28), Mauer (6). DP—Tampa Bay 1; Minnesota 3. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP Shields 7 5 3 2 1 2 99 Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 2 1 17 Farnsworth W, 1-3 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 Howell 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 18 Rodney S, 36-37 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP Diamond 7 8 3 3 2 6 95 Burton 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 Perkins 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 Al.Burnett L, 4-4 2-3 1 3 3 2 0 18 T.Robertson 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 Fien 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 11 T.Robertson pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. T—3:22. A—35,327 (39,500).

ERA 4.02 3.56 4.26 2.81 0.83 ERA 2.97 2.15 3.04 3.25 6.92 1.15

NL Boxscores Phillies 8, Cardinals 7 (11 innings) St. Louis Jay cf M.Carpenter 3b Holliday lf Beltran rf Craig 1b Descalso 2b T.Cruz c Furcal ss Lynn p a-Schumaker ph Salas p Mujica p c-Freese ph Rzepczynski p Boggs p f-S.Robinson ph Browning p Totals

AB 5 6 6 6 5 5 5 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 45

R 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

H 3 4 0 1 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14

BI 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 9

Avg. .312 .312 .315 .284 .301 .233 .226 .263 .077 .310 .000 --.300 ----.254 .000

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .307 Frandsen 3b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .326 Utley 2b 3 2 1 2 1 0 .248 Howard 1b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .230 1-Schierholtz pr-cf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .246 D.Brown rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .256 Mayberry cf-1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Kratz c 4 1 2 3 1 1 .333 M.Martinez ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .130 d-Rollins ph-ss 2 1 0 0 0 0 .245 Worley p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .088 Valdes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lindblom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-L.Nix ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Schwimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Wigginton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Horst p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-Schneider ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .216 Totals 38 8 7 8 6 5 St. Louis 101 200 030 00 — 7 14 1 Philadelphia 300 100 030 01 — 8 7 3 Two outs when winning run scored. a-reached on error for Lynn in the 6th. b-struck out for Lindblom in the 7th. c-walked for Mujica in the 8th. d-grounded out for M.Martinez in the 8th. e-popped out for Papelbon in the 9th. f-struck out for Boggs in the 10th. g-grounded out for Horst in the 11th. 1-ran for Howard in the 8th. E—Lynn (1), Utley (3), Kratz (1), Lindblom (1). LOB—St. Louis 11, Philadelphia 6. 2B—Jay (11), M.Carpenter (14), Beltran (20), T.Cruz (7), Kratz (6). 3B—Utley (2). HR—Howard (7), off Lynn; Kratz (5), off Boggs. SB—Rollins (18). DP—St. Louis 1; Philadelphia 1. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP Lynn 5 4 4 4 2 2 86 Salas 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 Rzepczynski 0 0 2 2 2 0 11 Boggs BS, 3-3 2 1 1 1 0 1 18 Browning L, 0-2 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 37 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Worley 5 1-3 9 4 4 2 4 91 Valdes 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 Lindblom 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 Schwimer 1 3 3 3 1 0 25 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 Horst W, 1-0 2 2 0 0 0 3 24 Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—3:53. A—42,877 (43,651).

ERA 3.65 4.54 3.89 5.02 2.29 4.24 ERA 3.97 3.20 3.33 4.13 2.87 1.13

Reds 3, Cubs 0 Cincinnati Cozart ss Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Ludwick lf Frazier 3b Bruce rf Cairo 1b Hanigan c Cueto p c-Paul ph Chapman p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 1 0 32

R 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2

SO 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .243 .228 .296 .266 .280 .243 .157 .277 .125 .344 ---

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeJesus rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .263 Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .290 A.Soriano lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .263 S.Castro ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Valbuena 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .204 B.Jackson cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Clevenger c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Raley p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Cardenas ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .220 Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Camp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-LaHair ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 0 4 0 2 4 Cincinnati 000 021 000 — 3 6 0 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 a-singled for Raley in the 6th. b-flied out for Camp in the 8th. c-grounded out for Cueto in the 9th.

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto W, 15-6 8 3 0 0 2 3 113 2.45 Chapman S, 28-32 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 1.26 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Raley L, 0-2 6 5 3 3 1 2 83 9.00 Corpas 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 3.68 Camp 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.72 Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 4.46 T—2:36. A—35,461 (41,009).

Diamondbacks 7, Nationals 4 Washington AB R Espinosa ss 3 1 Tracy 3b 0 0 Harper cf 4 0 Zimmerman 3b 3 0 1-C.Izturis pr-ss 1 2 Morse rf 4 1 LaRoche 1b 2 0 Storen p 0 0 b-Werth ph 1 0 T.Moore lf-1b 4 0 K.Suzuki c 4 0 Lombardozzi 2b 3 0 Detwiler p 1 0 Stammen p 1 0 a-Bernadina ph-lf 2 0 Totals 33 4

H 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 8

Avg. .244 .268 .249 .278 .244 .299 .266 --.308 .293 .143 .270 .069 .000 .283

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Young cf 2 2 1 0 2 0 .212 A.Hill 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .295 Kubel lf 3 1 0 0 0 2 .277 Goldschmidt 1b 4 2 2 3 0 0 .299 J.Upton rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .273 M.Montero c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .283 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .279 Jo.McDonald ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Corbin p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Albers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Saito p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 7 6 6 2 7 Washington 000 000 202 — 4 7 2 Arizona 012 040 00x — 7 6 1 a-popped out for Stammen in the 8th. b-grounded out for Storen in the 9th. 1-ran for Zimmerman in the 7th. E—K.Suzuki (1), Zimmerman (9), C.Johnson (17). LOB—Washington 5, Arizona 4. 2B—Espinosa (28), C.Izturis (7), Morse (14), C.Young (17), A.Hill (28), Goldschmidt (34), J.Upton (18), M.Montero (16). SB—Goldschmidt (11). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP Detwiler L, 6-5 4 2-3 3 5 4 1 2 93 Stammen 2 1-3 3 2 2 1 4 39 Storen 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP Corbin W, 4-4 7 4 2 2 0 7 88 Albers 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 Saito 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 14 Putz S, 22-25 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 T—2:50. A—27,345 (48,633).

ERA 3.18 2.48 2.00 ERA 3.41 0.00 6.14 3.35

Pirates 11, Padres 5 San Diego Denorfia lf Forsythe 2b Headley 3b Quentin rf Guzman 1b Maybin cf Ev.Cabrera ss Mikolas p Boxberger p b-Venable ph Hinshaw p Hundley c Ohlendorf p Burns p Amarista ss Totals

AB 4 3 5 4 3 4 3 0 0 1 0 3 2 0 2 34

R 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

SO 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 8

Avg. .281 .260 .275 .261 .249 .213 .231 ----.245 .000 .163 .063 .000 .269

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Marte lf 5 0 1 0 1 2 .268 Walker 2b 5 2 5 2 1 0 .294 A.McCutchen cf 6 1 2 2 0 0 .362 G.Jones rf 4 2 1 1 1 0 .273 G.Sanchez 1b 3 1 0 0 2 0 .213 P.Alvarez 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .233 McKenry c 3 1 1 2 1 1 .280 Barmes ss 5 1 2 4 0 1 .217 Bedard p 2 2 1 0 1 0 .121 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Snider ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .333 Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Mercer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 11 14 11 8 6 San Diego 410 000 000 — 5 6 1 Pittsburgh 001 900 10x — 11 14 2 a-walked for Resop in the 6th. b-grounded out for Boxberger in the 8th. c-popped out for J.Cruz in the 8th. E—Headley (10), Barmes 2 (11). LOB—San Diego 8, Pittsburgh 13. 2B—Forsythe (7), Walker (26), A.McCutchen (23), Bedard (1). 3B—G.Jones (3). HR—Denorfia (4), off Bedard; Barmes (6), off Ohlendorf; Walker (14), off Boxberger. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ohlendorf L, 4-3 3 5 7 6 3 1 70 6.41 Burns 1 1-3 5 3 3 2 1 36 9.00 Mikolas 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 33 3.50 Boxberger 1 2 1 1 1 2 29 2.92 Hinshaw 1 1 0 0 1 1 20 4.50 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bedard W, 7-12 5 5 5 3 4 6 104 4.56 Resop 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.42 Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.21 J.Cruz 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 2.53 Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 2.62 Ohlendorf pitched to 6 batters in the 4th. T—3:34. A—35,352 (38,362).

Dodgers 5, Marlins 0 Los Angeles Victorino lf M.Ellis 2b Kemp cf H.Ramirez ss Ethier rf J.Rivera 1b L.Cruz 3b Treanor c Capuano p b-A.Kennedy ph J.Wright p Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 0 38

R 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

H 1 3 1 2 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 12

BI 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .260 .262 .356 .253 .285 .242 .248 .186 .100 .255 .000

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .104 Ruggiano lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .339 Reyes ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .286 Ca.Lee 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .285 Kearns rf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .243 D.Solano 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .252 N.Green 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .174 Hayes c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .202 LeBlanc p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .200 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Stanton ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .285 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 27 0 2 0 3 11 Los Angeles 001 000 040 — 5 12 0 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 a-struck out for Hatcher in the 8th. b-singled for Capuano in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 8, Miami 3. 2B—Kemp (13), H.Ramirez (21), L.Cruz (10). DP—Los Angeles 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Capuano W, 11-8 8 2 0 0 3 10 102 3.11 J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.74 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc L, 1-2 7 6 1 1 0 4 102 1.45 H.Bell 1-3 4 4 4 0 0 19 6.07 Hatcher 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.70 Gaudin 1 1 0 0 1 2 23 4.24 T—2:42. A—28,388 (37,442).

Brewers 5, Astros 3 Milwaukee Aoki rf R.Weeks 2b Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b Hart 1b M.Maldonado c

AB 5 4 4 4 3 4

R 1 0 0 0 2 0

H 2 0 1 0 1 1

BI 0 1 1 0 1 1

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0

SO 0 2 0 0 0 2

Avg. .290 .216 .304 .292 .264 .278

C.Gomez cf Segura ss Gallardo p Veras p b-Ishikawa ph Loe p Totals

4 4 2 0 1 0 35

1 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 9 5 1 6

.248 .286 .140 --.242 ---

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Greene 2b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .228 Ma.Gonzalez ss 5 1 2 2 0 0 .246 Pearce 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .368 Maxwell cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .242 S.Moore 3b 3 0 1 1 1 2 .222 B.Francisco rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .260 F.Martinez lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .120 C.Snyder c 4 1 2 0 0 2 .177 Lyles p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .120 a-Wallace ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .307 Storey p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Bogusevic ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 35 3 10 3 2 11 Milwaukee 010 021 010 — 5 9 1 Houston 100 010 010 — 3 10 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Lyles in the 7th. b-flied out for Veras in the 9th. c-reached on error for Storey in the 9th. E—Loe (2), Ma.Gonzalez (5). LOB—Milwaukee 5, Houston 8. 2B—M.Maldonado (7), Greene (11), Ma.Gonzalez (10). HR—Hart (22), off Lyles. SB— Aoki 2 (16). DP—Milwaukee 1. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 11-8 7 2-3 9 3 3 2 8 114 3.78 Veras H, 11 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 4.66 Loe S, 1-6 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 3.78 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lyles L, 2-9 7 8 4 2 0 5 105 5.47 Storey 2 1 1 1 1 1 24 3.68 T—2:51. A—19,235 (40,981).

Giants 9, Rockies 6 Colorado E.Young rf Rutledge ss R.Betancourt p Ekstrom p Fowler cf C.Gonzalez lf W.Rosario c Pacheco 1b Nelson 3b LeMahieu 2b White p C.Torres p Belisle p J.Herrera ss Totals

AB 5 5 0 0 5 5 3 4 4 3 0 1 1 0 36

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 6

H 3 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 13

BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .306 .327 ----.292 .315 .237 .305 .260 .268 .105 .500 .000 .252

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pagan cf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .278 Scutaro 3b-2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .277 Me.Cabrera lf 5 2 2 3 0 0 .348 Posey c 1 0 1 1 3 0 .332 Pence rf 5 1 1 3 0 2 .258 Belt 1b 4 1 4 1 1 0 .260 Theriot 2b 5 0 2 1 0 1 .268 Ja.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --B.Crawford ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .241 Zito p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-G.Blanco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Hensley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-H.Sanchez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .278 1-Arias pr-3b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .262 Totals 36 9 14 9 6 6 Colorado 002 102 100 — 6 13 0 San Francisco 300 010 05x — 9 14 1 a-struck out for Kontos in the 6th. b-doubled for Hensley in the 8th. 1-ran for H.Sanchez in the 8th. E—Belt (3). LOB—Colorado 9, San Francisco 10. 2B—E.Young (5), Rutledge (10), Nelson (10), LeMahieu (5), Pagan (21), Belt 2 (18), Theriot (14), H.Sanchez (9). HR—Pence (18), off R.Betancourt. SB—Rutledge (4), Fowler (10), Pacheco (5). DP—Colorado 1; San Francisco 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP White 4 7 3 3 2 3 82 C.Torres 2 1 1 1 2 1 34 Belisle L, 3-4, 18 1 1-3 4 4 4 2 1 35 R.Betancourt, 5-25 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 16 Ekstrom 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP Zito 5 1-3 7 4 4 2 3 88 Kontos BS, 1-1 2-3 3 1 1 0 2 11 Hensley W, 4-3 2 3 1 1 1 1 35 Ja.Lopez H, 12 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Romo 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 T—3:26. A—41,492 (41,915).

ERA 5.82 4.39 3.34 2.83 6.32 ERA 4.29 2.42 3.40 2.92 2.00

Mets 6, Braves 5 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado lf Heyward rf C.Jones 3b F.Freeman 1b Uggla 2b McCann c Janish ss Sheets p Venters p a-Re.Johnson ph C.Martinez p c-Pastornicky ph d-J.Francisco ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 32

R 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

H 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

BI 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

BB 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

SO 1 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .291 .295 .268 .310 .282 .215 .237 .196 .000 --.306 .000 .261 .252

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tejada ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .320 Baxter rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .306 D.Wright 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .325 I.Davis 1b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .217 Dan.Murphy 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Valdespin lf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .257 An.Torres cf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .243 Ro.Johnson c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Niese p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .205 b-Ju.Turner ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Edgin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --F.Francisco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rauch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 6 10 6 2 6 Atlanta 010 000 004 — 5 7 1 New York 210 011 01x — 6 10 0 a-singled for Venters in the 8th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Niese in the 8th. c-was announced for C.Martinez in the 9th. d-walked for Pastornicky in the 9th. E—Heyward (4). LOB—Atlanta 7, New York 6. 2B—Bourn (21), Prado 2 (30), D.Wright 2 (35). HR— F.Freeman (15), off Niese; Valdespin (8), off Sheets. SB—Bourn (30), Valdespin (6). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sheets L, 4-2 6 8 5 4 1 5 107 2.13 Venters 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.69 C.Martinez 1 2 1 1 0 0 18 3.79 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese W, 9-6 8 6 1 1 2 6 106 3.67 Edgin 2-3 0 3 3 2 1 20 5.14 F.Francisco 0 1 1 1 2 0 19 5.52 Rauch S, 2-5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.21 T—2:46. A—24,891 (41,922).

Leaders Through Sunday’s games AMERICAN LEAGUE PITCHING—Weaver, Los Angeles, 15-2; Price, Tampa Bay, 15-4; Sale, Chicago, 14-3; MHarrison, Texas, 13-6; Vargas, Seattle, 13-8; Sabathia, New York, 12-3; Verlander, Detroit, 12-7; Darvish, Texas, 12-8. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 174; Scherzer, Detroit, 168; FHernandez, Seattle, 162; Darvish, Texas, 162; Shields, Tampa Bay, 153; Price, Tampa Bay, 151; Sabathia, New York, 140. SAVES—Rodney, Tampa Bay, 36; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 34; CPerez, Cleveland, 31; RSoriano, New York, 28; Broxton, Kansas City, 23; Aceves, Boston, 23; Nathan, Texas, 23. NATIONAL LEAGUE PITCHING—Dickey, New York, 15-3; Cueto, Cincinnati, 15-6; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 14-4; GGonzalez, Washington, 14-6; Strasburg, Washington, 13-5; Lynn, St. Louis, 13-5; 6 tied at 12. STRIKEOUTS—Dickey, New York, 166; Strasburg, Washington, 166; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 157; GGonzalez, Washington, 154; Hamels, Philadelphia, 153; MCain, San Francisco, 148; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 145. SAVES—Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 33; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 31; Chapman, Cincinnati, 28; Motte, St. Louis, 26; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 25; SCasilla, San Francisco, 24; Clippard, Washington, 24.


D6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012

Heads

MOTOR SPORTS

Nigel Kinrade / The Associated Press

Marcos Ambrose performs a burnout after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Watkins Glen International, Sunday, in Watkins Glen, N.Y.

Ambrose wins at Watkins Glen By John Kekis The Associated Press

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. — Slipping and sliding around oil-spattered Watkins Glen International on the last lap and fighting for the lead, Marcos Ambrose and Brad Keselowski didn’t know what lay around the next turn. “It was absolutely chaos at the end,” Ambrose said. “I had really burned off the brakes. I couldn’t figure out where it (the oil) was coming from. It was just absolutely crazy at the end.” Ambrose finally passed Keselowski heading to the final turn in a stunning fenderbanging duel to win the Sprint Cup race at Watkins Glen International for the second straight time. The oil had been spewing from the No. 47 of Bobby Labonte and ruined the day for Kyle Busch, who seemingly held a commanding lead heading to the white flag of the Finger Lakes 355. “In the end, nobody knew what was going on,” said Richard Petty, owner of Ambrose’s No. 9 Ford. “They were slipping and sliding off the race

track. Marcos might have known a little bit about it, but the rest of us didn’t. Marcos stayed with it all day. Everything fell our way.” It didn’t for Busch, who led 43 laps. “Kyle hit the oil,” said Dave Rogers, crew chief of Busch’s No. 18 Toyota. “The 47 broke. You can see him, he just went by smoking. He left oil down all over the track. Kyle hit the oil and it allowed the 2 (Keselowski) to get to us.” Desperate for a win to move back into contention for the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship, Busch skidded sideways coming out of the first turn of the final lap. Keselowski’s No. 2 Dodge caromed off the side of Busch heading uphill through the high-speed esses and Ambrose followed Keselowski through as Busch spun to the side. “Busch slipped up big in turn one,” said Keselowski, who suffered damage to the front of his car. “There was nothing he could do. We all checked up and Marcos was right on my bumper. We all just about spun out. We got to the inner loop, and again noth-

ing but oil.” Skidding around the 11-turn, 2.45-mile layout, Ambrose and Keselowski battled side by side nearly all the way around. Both even went into the grass in the inner loop at the top of the esses but kept charging. “I knew there was oil all over the bus stop (inner loop),” winning crew chief Todd Parrott said. “It looked like the cars went through the grass because there wasn’t any oil.” Ambrose slipped again in turn 10, but Keselowski couldn’t drive past. Neither gave ground, and Ambrose forged ahead on the final turn, another hard right-hander, and turned away Keselowski’s final charge on the outside. “I must have hit the oil one more time and he didn’t,” Keselowski said. “I thought I had him.” Busch was not available for comment after the race. Entering the race, Ambrose had one win and had never finished lower than third in four starts at The Glen for an average finish of 2.3 and an average green flag speed of nearly 120 mph. Both were tops in the series.

CAMPS/CLASSES/CLINICS CX KICKOFF CLINIC: Saturday, Aug. 25; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; for beginners and experienced cyclocross riders; work on mounting, dismounting, cornering, and negotiating barriers and run-ups; $45; 541-5851500; poweredbybowen.com. JUNIORS AND BEGINNERS CYCLOCROSS CLINICS: Tuesdays, Aug. 28-Sept. 18; 4:45 p.m.-5:45 p.m.; Powered by Bowen, Bend; skills and techniques for novices in mounting, dismounting, and negotiating barriers and run-ups; $50 for all four clinics or $15 per clinic; 541-585-1500; powered by bowen.com. INTERMEDIATE CYCLOCROSS CLINICS: Tuesdays, Aug. 28-Sept. 18; 6 p.m.-7 p.m.; Powered by Bowen, Bend; work on mounting, dismounting, speed drills, and negotiating barriers and run-ups; $50 for all four clinics or $15 per clinic; 541-585-1500; powered by bowen.com. DIRT DIVAS MOUNTAIN BIKING PROGRAM INSTORE CLINIC: Thursday, Aug. 30; 7 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, Bend; learn about mountain bike racing, how to prepare for an event, what to expect, clothing, nutrition, training and more; free; snacks and socializing at 6:30 p.m.; contact Leanna with questions and register at 541-385-8080.

MBSEF CRITERIUM SERIES: Wednesday, Aug. 22; Summit High School, Bend; A, B and junior races; riders will earn points in each race that count toward overall series standings; Molly Cogswell-Kelley; 541388-0002; molly@mbsef.org. INDOOR MASTERS NATIONALS TIME TRIALS: Wednesdays, Aug. 15 and 29; 4:15 p.m. and 5:15 p.m. each day, Bend; 20K simulated time trial on CompuTrainer for USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships coming to Bend in September; duathlon with 3K and 5K run options available; $10 or 10 points on Power Pass; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive; 541-585-1500. HIGH CASCADES 24: Saturday, Sept. 8-Sunday, Sept. 9; Wanoga Sno-park, Bend; 24-hour mountain bike race; can ride solo or in teams of two to six riders;

CYCLING SCOREBOARD Criterium

Lynne Sladky / The Associated Press

Rory McIlroy reacts as his putt drops for a birdie to win the final round of the PGA Championship in Kiawah Island, S.C., Sunday.

Ryu’s birdie string gives her win in Jamie Farr Toledo Classic SYLVANIA, Ohio — Even though it had only been more than a year since her victory in the U.S. Women’s Open, So Yeon Ryu was already feeling the pressure to win again. She lapped the field to end the drought Sunday. Ryu rode a string of six straight birdies in the middle of her round to a 9-under 62 and a seven-stroke victory in the Jamie Farr Toledo Classic. “This is just my turning point,” she said. “I want to win again.” Ryu began the day locked in a four-player logjam — all South Koreans — for first place. She took the lead by herself for the first time with an 8-foot birdie putt at the third hole and gradually stretched her advantage until pulling away with birdies on Nos. 9-14. “On hole No. 9, I made a really long putt and my confidence level went up,” she said. Angela Stanford made a long birdie putt on the final hole for 66 to finish second at 13-under 271. South Koreans Inbee Park and Chella Choi each shot 69 and shared third place at 12 under. — The Associated Press

Reporter: 541-383-0305, egross@bendbulletin.com.

C C  C 

RACES

McIlroy Continued from D1 McIlroy seized control with back-to-back birdies Sunday morning to complete the stormdelayed third round with a 67 and build a threeshot lead. No one got closer than two shots the rest of the way, and McIlroy closed out a remarkable week by playing bogey-free over the final 23 holes of a demanding Ocean Course. David Lynn, a 38-year-old from England who was playing in America for the first time, won the B-flight. He closed with a 68 and was the runner-up. Woods, who shared the 36-hole lead for the second time this year in a major, was never a serious factor. He tossed away his chances Saturday before the storm blew in and never could get closer than four shots. He closed with a 72, failing to break par on the weekend in any of the four majors for the first time in his career. If there was a signature shot for McIlroy at Kiawah Island, it might have been Saturday when his tee shot lodged into a tree on the third hole. He only found it with help from the TV crew, took his penalty shot and fired a wedge into 6 feet to save par. He was on his way, and he never let up. McIlroy also won the U.S. Open by eight shots, the kind of dominance that Woods has displayed over so many years. By winning the PGA Championship, he is halfway home to the career Grand Slam. “It was a great round of golf. I’m speechless,” said McIlroy after hoisting the Wanamaker Trophy, the heaviest of the four majors. “It’s just been incredible. I had a good feeling about it at the start. I never imagined to do this.” Winning the final major of the year ends what had been a tumultuous season for McIlroy. Despite winning the Honda Classic in early March, he went into a tail spin by missing four cuts over five tournaments, as questions swirled that his romance with tennis star Caroline Wozniacki was hurting his game. Instead, McIlroy put a big hurt on the strongest field of the year. “He’s very good. We all know the talent he has,” Woods said. “He went through a little spell this year, and I think that was good for him. We all go through those spells in our careers. He’s got all the talent in the world to do what he’s doing. And this is the way that Rory can play. When he gets it going, it’s pretty impressive to watch.” McIlroy finished on 13-under 275. Ian Poulter put up the stiffest challenge, though not for long. Poulter, who started the final round six shots behind, made six birdies through seven holes to get within two shots. He made three straight bogeys on the back nine and had to settle for a 69. He tied for third at 4under 284, along with Justin Rose (66) and defending champion Keegan Bradley (68). In the final qualifying event for the U.S. Ryder Cup team, nothing changed. Phil Mickelson was holding down the eighth and final spot, and he stayed there when neither Bo Van Pelt nor Steve Stricker could make a move on the back nine. Davis Love III will announce four captain’s picks in three weeks. McIlroy was tied for the lead with Vijay Singh when he returned Sunday. Twenty-seven holes later, he had no peer in the final major of the year.

Continued from D1 Hahn said that even though the business is still just starting up (TrailRags have been on store shelves for roughly five weeks), sales are steady, adding that six more maps of other popular Bend-area mountain biking trails are in the works. TrailRags maps aim to be functional for locals and tourists alike, said Nelson, 43. “There are great maps out there that are overviews of the area, but they give you a lot more information than you usually need for a ride,” said Nelson. “We try to keep (our maps) simple and usable.” In addition to serving as a map, the bandannas can be used in a variety of ways: “It’s a sling in a pinch, or a tourniquet,” said Nelson, citing a couple of worst-case-scenario applications. Also, he added, “you can use it to clean your bike, or as artwork. Or as a memento.” TrailRags are not only for cyclists. They can be used by runners, hikers, or anyone using the trails, said Hahn. Unlike a paper map, Hahn observed, TrailRags are made of 100 percent cotton and can be thrown in the laundry. And at about 22 square inches, they are easy to stuff into a back pocket — no folding required. The bandannas come in an array of seven bright colors. And while the maps are fairly simple in design, the production process is more complex.

The first step, said Nelson, involves riding each trail multiple times while mapping it on his GPS watch. “It’s not just a map we pulled off the Internet, it’s from our own experience,” said Nelson. “We try to draw a map with highly accurate contours.” Nelson said that, for each map, he spends an average of roughly 40 hours on the trail doing fieldwork, and about the same amount of time in front of the computer in Photoshop mapping the track log recorded on his GPS. “You have to decide which elements (of the trail) are necessary,” he explained. In addition to common navigational aids like roads and bridges, Hahn said, TrailRags include landmarks that a typical map might not show, like the “flaming chicken” roundabout located in the Phil’s Trail complex. Hahn said he and Nelson are committed to utilizing local vendors. “When Bend succeeds,” Hahn said, “we succeed.” “I can find (vendors) cheaper, but I’m not interested,” Hahn added. “It’s so nice to work with locals.” The feeling is mutual, according to the owner of WebCyclery, Kevin Gorman: “I like supporting local guys … I can tell customers, ‘This (product) was made here in Bend.’” Eventually, Hahn and Nelson said, they would like their company to become a “fulltime, nationwide venture.” Said Hahn: “It’s kind of limitless.”

OBRA Criterium Championships Aug. 11, Bend Top-five finishers Men Senior — 1, Connor McCutcheon, Bend. 2, Eric Martin, Bend. 3, Sam Schartz, Eugene. 4, Adam Artner, Central Point. 5, Paul Bourcier, Eugene. Category 3 — 1, Cole Hilton, Corvallis. 2, Jake Perrin, Bend. 3, Todd Berger, Bend. 4, T.J. Paskewich, Bend. 5, Tony Broadman, Bend. Category 4 — 1, Seth Taylor, Bend. 2, Brandon Gallagher, Bend. 3, Rob Bingham, Eugene. 4, Brad Kent, Eugene. 5, Lance Haidet, Bend. Category 5 — 1, Jason Oman, Bend. 2, Paul Hynes, Bend. 3, Dan Grabski, Portland. Master 30-39 — 1, Luke Demoe, Eugene. 2, Nick Skenzick, Eugene. 3, Billy Truelove, Eugene. Master 40-49 — 1, Eric Martin, Bend. 2, Christian Tresser, Portland. 3, Dave Campbell, Newport. 4, Bart Bowen, Bend. 5, Matt Williams, Bend. Master 50-59 — 1, Chauncey Curl, Portland. 2, Alan Whitney, Tualatin. 3, Richard Desmond, Portland. 4, David McCasker, Portland. 5, Jay Palubeski, Bend. Master 60 and older — 1, Ken Rogers, Eugene. 2, Steve Troseth, Corvallis. 3, Dale Harless, Bellvue, Wash. 4, Daniel Caldwell, Bend. 5, Dale Allen, Bend. Junior 10-12 — 1, Jonathan Wimberly, Bend. 2, Lukas Strauss-Wise. 3, April Bardy, Eugene. 4, Kyler Ervin, Gaston. Junior 13-14 — 1, Cameron Beard, Bend. 2, Braden Fridell, Milwaukie. 3, Alex Martin, Bend. 4, Justin Ziehnert, Tigard. 5, Levi Kramer, Bend. Junior 15-16 — 1, Jake Perrin, Bend. 2, Lance Heidet, Bend. 3, Will Reinking, Bend. Women Category 1/2 — 1, Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend. 2, Tina Brubaker, Keizer. 3, Jen Levo, Portland. 4, Kristina Lackner, Sherwood. 5, Michelle Bazemore, Bend. Category 3 — 1, Amanda Atwill, Bend. 2, Amy Shepard, Portland. 3, Helen Grogan, Bend. 4, Jan Moss, Portland. 5, Alynda Lingwood, Portland. Category 4/5 — 1, Laura Hagen, Bend. 2, Lara Kessler, Portland. 3, Lynda Palubeski, Bend. 4, Vivian Satterfield, Portland. 5, Molly Cogswell-Kelley, Bend. Master 30-39 — 1, Amanda Atwill, Bend. 2, Stacy Westbrook, Portland. 3, Courtney Gould, Portland. 4, Lindsay Felker, Seattle. Master 40-49 — 1, Mary Ramos, Bend. 2, Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend. 3, Kristina Lackner, Sherwood. 4, Sarah Tisdale, Sherwood. 5, Cary Schwarz, Bend. Master 50 and older —1, Helen Grogan, Bend. 2, Jan Moss, Portland. 3, Meg Mautner, Portland. 4, Flo Leibowitz, Corvallis. Junior 10-12 — 1, Laura Ziehnert, Tigard. 2, Emma Kissel. 3, Haley Mullane. Junior 13-14 — 1, Taye Nakamura-Koyama, Bend. 2, Ivy Taylor, Bend. 3, Emma Huntsman. 4, Amy Ziehnert, Tigard. Junior 15-16 — 1, Hannah McDade, Tigard.

$250-$620; 541-225-7946; mike@mudslingerevents. com; highcascades24.com. USA CYCLING MASTERS ROAD NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: Wednesday, Sept. 5Sunday, Sept. 9; Bend and Prineville; for rides age 35 and older; road race, criterium, time trial and tandem events; $85-$120; usacycling. org/2012/masters-road-nationals.

RIDES DIRT DIVAS MOUNTAIN BIKE PROGRAM: Womenonly rides held twice per month based out of Pine Mountain Sports in Bend; next ride is Monday, Aug. 20; 5:30 p.m.; free rentals available (show up 30 minutes early if taking out a rental); free; all ability levels welcome; 541-385-8080; www. pinemountainsports.com.

OUT OF TOWN GIRO DI PORTLAND: Saturday; 3:30 p.m.; Portland; criterium races in the Pearl District; $20-$25; online registration available at obra.org; steven @giroevents. com; 503-272-1710. PORTLAND CENTURY: Sunday; ride options of 40, 80 and 100 miles; fully supported, breakfast, lunch, snacks and dinner; $10-$71.50; portlandcentury. com. BIKE OREGON WINE COUNTRY: Sundays, Aug. 19 and Aug. 26; 8 a.m.; Eola Hills Wine Cellars, Rickreall; ride through the Eola Hills and mid-Willamette Valley wine country; routes options between 45 and 70 miles; fully supported; $75; 800-291-6730; eolahillswinery. com/events.php#bike. BEAVERTON, BANKS AND BEYOND BICYCLE TOUR: Saturday, Aug. 25; 7 a.m.; Beaverton; ride options of 32, 64, 84 and 100 miles; rest stops and lunch provided; $30; http://bbbbt2012.eventbrite.com. EUGENE CELEBRATION: Friday, Aug. 31-Sunday, Sept. 2; Eugene; prologue first day, road race second day, time trial and criterium third day; $80, or $350 for five-rider team ($90 day of race); 541-521-6529; comotionclassic@comcast.net; obra.org.

C  B  Road cycling • Central Oregonians successful at criterium championships: Thirteen Bend residents won a total of 14 titles at the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association criterium championships, staged on Saturday in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood. Local men’s winners were Connor McCutcheon (senior men), Seth Taylor (men Category 4), Jason Oman (men Category 5), Eric Martin (master men 40-49), Jake Perrin (junior men 15-16), Cameron Beard (junior men 13-14) and Jonathan Wimberly (junior men 10-12). Women’s winners were Brenna Lopez-

Otero (women Category 1/2), Amanda Atwill (women Category 3 and master women 30-39), Laura Hagen (women Category 4/5), Mary Ramos (master women 4049), Helen Grogan (master women 50 and older) and Taye NakamuraKoyama (junior women 13-14). Results of the top five finishers in Saturday’s races are available in Cycling Central Scoreboard, left. Complete results can be found at obra.org. —Bulletin staff report


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Barn/shop cats FREE, some tame, some not. We deliver! Fixed, shots, etc. 541- 389-8420

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 WANTED: RAZORS, Double or singleedged, straight razors, shaving brushes, mugs & scuttles, strops, shaving accessories & memorabilia. Fair prices paid. Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm.

Buddha needs a home! Contact Jefferson Co. Kennels (541-475-6889) or visit Buddha's Facebook page (Wanted: A Home for Buddha the Pit Bull) to learn more about this sweet, playful boy. CAT free to good home, adult male 541-318-1060.

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2 male, 1 female, $10 ea., only to a good home! Very playful & cute, 8 wks. old, please call for more info! 541-290-9395

Aquarium Reef 90-gal, oak stand, skimmer, overflow, pumps, lights, live rock, corals, fish, premium equip. $495. (541) 548-7947 Aussie's mini AKC, red tri's/merle's, males / females parents on site some toy size. Call 541-598-5314/788-7799

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2004 TREK 4900 MB, $200. 541-383-7636

Lab Pups AKC, black Yorkie male 7 mo. & yellow, Master neutered & microHunter sired, perforchipped, $250. mance pedigree, OFA 541-419-8938. cert hips & elbows, Yorkie male pup AKC Call 541-771-2330 potty trained, loves kids, www.kinnamanretrievers.com shots, heath guaranteed. Labradoodle Puppies! $650. 541-316-0005. Gorgeous multi-gen. Yorkie male puppy, 6 pups. 541-953-4487 mos, shots, vet check, Labradoodles - Mini & $600. 541-792-0375 med size, several colors Yorkie Puppies, ready 541-504-2662 now, 1 little male left! www.alpen-ridge.com $600, 541-536-3108 Labradors, AKC Reg., 210 choc & black, 2 females, 3 males, 7 wks, svc dog Furniture & Appliances trainable. 541-536-5385 http://www.welcomelabs.com

Maltese Toy AKC (1), Champ bloodlines, 1.75 lb, $685. 541-420-1577

Papillon Pups, AKC Reg, 2 males left! Parents on site, $550. Call 541-771-8739. Poodle, miniature, registered adult stud, proven breeder, $450. Gina, 541-390-1015 POODLE (TOY) PUPS Well-socialized & lovable. 541-475-3889

Queensland Heelers GIANT yard sale to ben- standard & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http:// efit rescued animals! Every Sat/Sun in Aug, 10-4. rightwayranch.wordpress.com Nonprofit, no-kill, all vol- Schnauzer Miniature unteer, all proceeds for puppies. Family vet bills. Tax ded. 8950 raised, parents on Hwy 97, Redmond, 2 mi. site, 1st/2nd vaccinaN of Tumalo Rd overtions, males & fepass. 541-788-4170, or males available, $350 541-389-8420. each. 541-771-1830. www.craftcats.org kittens, raised Goldendoodle, miniature Siamese in home. Gorgeous! adult female. Perfect only $15. 541-977-7019 companion dog, $450. THANKS to Dr. Peterson Gina, 541-390-1015 & staff of Companion Jack Russell puppies, Pet Clinic, Bend, for the purebred, born 7/2, $350 long- time support & ea. 541-420-0739 expert guidance given to Cat Rescue, AdopKittens/cats avail. thru tion & Foster Team rescue group. Tame, while they help the forshots, altered, ID chip, gotten & abused cats & more. Sat/Sun 1-5, kittens of Central OR. other days by appt. www.craftcats.org 65480 78th Bend, 541-389-8420; visit Wolf-Husky Pup, smart www.craftcats.org for gentle loyal male photos & more. $400. 541-977-7019

The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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$150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also wanted, used W/D’s 541-280-7355 Coffee and two end tables, exc. cond. $75 for all. 541-382-1029 Curio cabinet, new dark oak $250. 818-523-1884 DESK: roll top, new oak & brass , $450. 818-523-1884 Freezer: Sears frostless 13 c.f. exc cond $75. 541-593-8400 Need to get an ad in ASAP? You can place it online at: www.bendbulletin.com

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DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

Attn: ELK HUNTERS Elk Guide Jobs avail in CO & NM for 2012 Call Classifieds at season, Sept-Oct -Nov. 541-385-5809 Must have at least 3 www.bendbulletin.com yrs archery elk hunting & calling experience. No guide license required. All fair chase Gamo Hunter Extreme .177 pellet rifle. private land hunting. 3-9x50 scope. Near Must have 6-12 wks new. List $550, ask availability. $300. 541-389-7379 Call 800-697-9881

Antiques wanted: tools, Retiring from 20 yrs of stained glass hobby. furniture, fishing, marbles, old signs, Lots of glass, grindtoys, costume jewelry. ers, came; lead, brass Bend local pays CASH!! Gun cabinet, wood w/ Call 541-389-1578 and zink. Glass bevel, for Guns, Knives & glass drs, good cond, saws, tools and red Ammo. 541-526-0617 $125. 541-480-1337 Sale of very, VERY old oak framing. Call for books - hundreds at $1 CASH!! inventory & prices. Gun Safe, 60”H x29” W each! Sat-Sun 9-2; For Guns, Ammo & Everything must Go. 19½” deep, holds 23, will be ongoing! Reloading Supplies. Frank 541-923-2345. $500. 541-504-9747 60734 Bristol Way, Bend 541-408-6900.

541-385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Refrigerator/freezer, compact Apt. size. $50 541-593-8400 Refrigerator, GE very clean, 14 cu ft, $225. 541-383-2035 SOFA 10x8’ sectional, microfiber/cloth, $650. 541-647-2611 TV cabinet, medium oak, glass doors, 2 drawers, exc. cond., $250 818-523-1884

Chihuahua Pups, assorted colors, teacup, 1st shots, wormed, $250,541-977-0035 Chi-Pom female, 6 yrs needs new home. $150. 541-639-7279. Chi-pom puppies, three adorable males, 5 weeks old. $165 cash. 541-480-2824 Dachshund AKC mini piebald male, $375. Pix. 541-447-3060 Dachshund AKC mini puppy, ready 8/25, $350. www.bendweenies.com 541-508-4558 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

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A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 246

260

267

290

476

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Misc. Items

Fuel & Wood

Sales Redmond Area

TWO burial plots and two concrete grave boxes in Garden of Devotion, Deschutes Memorial Gardens. $1200 ea. or two for $2200. 541-475-6210.

WE BUY FIREWOOD LOGS Juniper, Pine, Tamarack, 500+ cords. 503-519-5918

Garage Sale, 1800 NW Newell Ave, in Terrebonne, Sat - Sun - Mon, Aug 11-13, 9-5. Furniture, toys, etc.

Employment Opportunities

Remington Woodsmaster 6mm 742 semi-automatic with 2x7 Redfield wide-angle scope; has sling, recoil pad, checkered sock with beautiful engraving, 95%. 2 boxes of Federal ammo & case. $700 all. 541-318-2219

Wanted Hearing Aid, needed now, $50 cash. (I’m a Vet.) 541-410-5349

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Employment

400

HUGE yard sale to benefit animal rescue 421 group. 8950 Hwy 97, 2 Schools & Training mi N of Tumalo Rd overpass. Each Sat/ Sun in August, 10-4. Oregon Medical TrainFurniture, toys, sporting PCS Phlebotomy classes begin August ing goods, art, more!

Banking

We are excited to announce an available position in Bend, Oregon. Branch Supervisor Salary Range: $ 29,000 - $40,000 EOE. For more details, please apply online: www.sofcu.com

Ruger M77 .338 Win For newspaper Mag, 3x9x Redfielddelivery, call the Tracker scope, $1500. Wanted- paying cash Circulation Dept. at for Hi-fi audio & stu27. Registration now or best reasonable 541-385-5800 open: www.oregondio equip. McIntosh, offer. 541-382-1772. To place an ad, call medicaltraining.com JBL, Marantz, DyFarm Take the Rifleman's 541-385-5809 541-343-3100 naco, Heathkit, SanMarket Challenge! Place a or email sui, Carver, NAD, etc. classified@bendbulletin.com TRUCK SCHOOL one-inch black square Call 541-261-1808 www.IITR.net down range at 25 Beauty/Barber Redmond Campus 261 meters and put 10 Supercuts now hiring Student Loans/Job rounds inside the Medical Equipment stylists for Bend, Waiting Toll Free black, can you do it? If Poulan riding lawnRedmond & Prineville. 1-888-438-2235 not, come join us at PaceSaver scooter with mower, 42”, 19hp, 6Apply at all 5 locaThe Appleseed auto battery charger speed, w/grass catcher 325 476 tions or fax resume to Project at Redmond $700. Custom built & trailer, top shape, 541-923-7640. Hay, Grain & Feed Rod and Gun Club, Employment carrier for sale, $200 $700. 541-548-8452 Sat. & Sunday, Au(920)-960-1445 Opportunities SUPER TOP SOIL Wheat Straw: Certified & gust 25 & 26. Visit DO YOU NEED www.hersheysoilandbark.com Bedding Straw & Garden www.appleseedinfo.org 263 A GREAT Screened, soil & com- Straw;Compost.546-6171 for more info. Call Paul CAUTION READERS: EMPLOYEE Tools post mixed, no at 360-953-3232 RIGHT NOW? rocks/clods. High huCheck out the Ads published in "EmCall The Bulletin mus level, exc. for UTAH + OR CCW: Or- Attn: Hunters & RV’ers classiieds online ployment OpportuniLike new Yamaha before 11 a.m. and flower beds, lawns, egon & Utah Conwww.bendbulletin.com ties" include emgenerator get an ad in to pubgardens, straight cealed License Class. EF3000 Updated daily ployee and lish the next day! screened top soil. Sat. Aug 25, 9:30 am, w/cover, electric start, independent posiBark. Clean fill. De541-385-5809. Madras Range. Utah - quiet running. New 341 $2250; asking $1500 tions. Ads for posiliver/you haul. VIEW the $65, OR+UT - $100. obo. 541-815-5409 tions that require a fee Horses & Equipment 541-548-3949. Classifieds at: Incl photo for Utah, or upfront investment www.bendbulletin.com Call Paul Sumner Scaffolding: Safeway 270 must be stated. With 541-475-7277 for pre- light-weight, 3 sections any independent job Lost & Found reg, email, map, info Electrician high, all attachments & 4 opportunity, please planks incl. $3200 new; Winchester model 42, sell $950. 541-419-9233. FOUND: Bicycle, Wall investigate thor410 1933 1st year oughly. St. area. Call to idenproduction ex. cond. 265 tify 541-388-3645. $1650. 541-504-4384 Excelsior genuine Aus- Use extra caution when Building Materials Plant Supervising Found commercial tralian stock saddle, 7” applying for jobs on247 Electrician knee pad, 5” thigh grade backpack line and never proMADRAS Habitat Applications are being pads, 14” seat, exblower. 541-610-8471 Sporting Goods vide personal inforRESTORE tremely well built, will accepted for a limation to any source - Misc. dog, Heeler, Building Supply Resale Found last a lifetime! $950. censed full-time plant you may not have rehealthy younger male Quality at 541-617-9260 supervising electrisearched and deemed 4 life jackets, 2 youth, 2 carmel & white, Tumalo LOW PRICES cian. Position reto be reputable. Use adult, $30 all. Minn Kota area. 541-771-9993 345 84 SW K St. quires minimum 5 extreme caution when electric trolling motor, 30541-475-9722 years journeyman exFound pair of Oakley Livestock & Equipment thrust, exlnt cond $80. responding to ANY Open to the public. perience, preferably in sunglasses on Cen541-504-3833 online employment a manufacturing or intury Dr. 541-388-8897 ad from out-of-state. Prineville Habitat 253 dustrial plant. Must ReStore REMEMBER: If you have strong troubleTV, Stereo & Video We suggest you call Building Supply Resale have lost an animal, shooting skills. PLC the State of Oregon 1427 NW Murphy Ct. don't forget to check programming and TV - table top with Consumer Hotline at 541-447-6934 The Humane Society trouble-shooting remote. $40 1-503-378-4320 Open to the public. in Bend 541-382-3537 1977 14' Blake Trailer, (Allen-Bradley) skills 541-593-8400 Redmond, refurbished by For Equal Opportunity associated a plus. We 266 541-923-0882 Frenchglen Black255 offer competitive Laws: Oregon BuHeating & Stoves Prineville, smiths, a Classy Claswages and benefits. Computers reau of Labor & In541-447-7178; sic. Great design for Mail resume’ to: dustry, Civil Rights NOTICE TO OR Craft Cats, multiple uses. OverWoodgrain Millwork: THE BULLETIN reDivision, ADVERTISER 541-389-8420. head tack box (bunk1948 N Main St., quires computer ad971-673-0764 Since September 29, house) with side and Prineville, OR 97754, vertisers with multiple 286 1991, advertising for easy pickup bed acor email resume to: ad schedules or those used woodstoves has Sales Northeast Bend cess; manger with left If you have any ques- bbarron@woodgrain.com selling multiple systions, concerns or been limited to modside access, windows 541-447-4177 tems/ software, to discomments, contact: and head divider. Toyo els which have been EEO Drug Testing close the name of the Kevin O’Connell radial tires & spare; certified by the OrHH FREE HH Required business or the term new floor with mats; Classified Department egon Department of "dealer" in their ads. Manager center partition panel; Environmental Qual- Garage Sale Kit Field Service Private party advertisThe Bulletin bed liner coated in key ity (DEQ) and the fed- Place an ad in The Hoffmeyer Co. is Bulletin for your gaers are defined as areas, 6.5 K torsion 541-383-0398 eral Environmental seeking an energetic rage sale and rethose who sell one axles with electric Protection Agency person for long-term ceive a Garage Sale brakes, and new paint, computer. (EPA) as having met employment, Will asKit FREE! $7500 OBO! Call smoke emission stansist with conveyor 258 John at 541-589-0777. dards. A certified belting installs, shipKIT INCLUDES: Call a Pro Travel/Tickets woodstove may be • 4 Garage Sale Signs ping, receiving, cusidentified by its certifi- • $2.00 Off Coupon To Whether you need a Stock Tank, aluminum, tomer service. Job reDUCK TICKETS (4), cation label, which is barely used, $150. Use Toward Your quires flexible work fence ixed, hedges great seats, $125 & permanently attached Next Ad 541-480-1337 schedule including trimmed or a house up. 541-573-1100. to the stove. The Bul- • 10 Tips For “Garage nights & weekends; Sale Success!” letin will not knowbuilt, you’ll ind 375 some overnight travel. 260 ingly accept advertisNo experience reprofessional help in Meat & Animal Processing Misc. Items ing for the sale of quired; will train. ODL The Bulletin’s “Call a PICK UP YOUR uncertified REQUIRED. $9-$12/ Angus beef ready end GARAGE SALE KIT at 22’ alum. semi-truck trlr, woodstoves. Service Professional” hr. Application necesof Aug. $3.25 lb. in1777 SW Chandler best used for storage, sary. Please apply in Directory cludes cut & wrap. Ave., Bend, OR 97702 $500. 541-447-4405 267 person: 20575 PaintCall 541-548-7271. 541-385-5809 Fuel & Wood ers Ct., Bend, OR. Buying Diamonds Historic J Spear Ranch /Gold for Cash grass-fed, totally natuSaxon’s Fine Jewelers WHEN BUYING ral locker beef. Only 9 E l e c t r i c i a n G e n e r a l J o u r n e y m a n 541-389-6655 Find exactly what head left @ $2.89/lb, Warm Springs Composite Products is looking FIREWOOD... for an individual to help a growing innovative BUYING you are looking for in the incl cut & wrap, sold in To avoid fraud, light manufacturing plant. whole or 1/2; 50% deLionel/American Flyer CLASSIFIEDS The Bulletin posit reqd.541-573-2677 B a s i c D u t i e s : Assist in troubleshooting and trains, accessories. recommends payrepairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and 541-408-2191. ment for Firewood maintain all electrical and electronic equipBUYING & SELLING only upon delivery ment. Able to read and revise electrical scheAll gold jewelry, silver and inspection. Data Center Network matics, Must be able to perform both electriand gold coins, bars, • A cord is 128 cu. ft. Technicians cal and mechanical preventive maintenance rounds, wedding sets, 4’ x 4’ x 8’ requirements and report, PLC experience. class rings, sterling sil- • Receipts should Facebook is hiring! We’re seeking a highly M i n i m u m S k i l l s : A minimum of 5 years in the ver, coin collect, vininclude name, motivated Data Center Network Technician industrial maintenance field with a valid Ortage watches, dental phone, price and to help us build a world-class facility at our egon State Electricians License in Manufacgold. Bill Fleming, kind of wood purPrineville, Oregon location. turing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the 541-382-9419. chased. ability to perform light welding and fabrication Pedestal bed with • Firewood ads duties. Successful applicant shall supply the The ideal candidate will have 3+ years’ MUST include spedrawers and 2 twin normal hand tools required for both electrical experience in data center network deploycies and cost per mattress, oak. $200. and mechanical maintenance. ment, strong troubleshooting skills, a solid cord to better serve Solid Mahogany comunderstanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 B e n e f ti s : Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, our customers. puter cabinet/desk, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company network switching/routing, and experience $300. 541-815-1828 Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company in configuring and supporting Cisco, Poulan Pro riding lawn Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Juniper, and F5 devices. mower 42” 18½ hp Please remit resume to: good shape. $700 W a r m S p r i n g s C o m p o s ti e P r o d u c t s For more information Dry Lodgepole: $175 OBO. 541-389-9268 PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 cord rounds; $210 cord please visit our careers page Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Steven King book collec- split.1½ Cord Minimum https://www.facebook.com/career tion, soft & hard cover, 37 yrs service to Cent. Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com or email ristine@fb.com. Ore. 541-350-2859 $40 obo. 541-548-6642

300

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Human Resource Generalist Woodgrain Millwork is seeking a highly motivated Human Resource Generalist at the Prineville, Oregon, location. In this role you will be responsible for providing comprehensive HR expertise as well as ensuring compliance with laws, policies, and procedures. Monitor and administer workers’ comp claims and OSHA record keeping. Must possess excellent communication, interpersonal and decision making skills. Experience in recruiting, interviewing, new hire orientation, benefit coordination, payroll. Proficient in Microsoft office (Word, Excel, Outlook), SAP experience a plus. Bachelor’s degree in related field preferred. Minimum of 3 years experience in Human Resources, ideally in a Generalist capacity. We offer competitive salary, benefits including medical, life, and dental insurance, and 401k. To apply, please send resume to jtoholsky@woodgrain. com. We are an equal opportunity employer. Just too many collectibles? Sell them in The Bulletin Classiieds

TRUCK DRIVER

Finance & Business

500 EXPERIENCED transfer truck driver for top quality company. Two years CDL driving experience required with acceptable DMV record. Successful candidate will maintain a quality, professional service oriented attitude while working in a fast, safe, efficient team manner. Benefits include medical, dental, 401k, paid vacation and holidays. Will normally work spring, summer, fall. EOE/AAE. Please email resume to cmcginley@hookercreek.net or fax to 541-749-2024.

528

Loans & Mortgages LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716 Call to learn more.

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending NMLS98161

573

Business Opportunities

541-385-5809 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

In small friendly North Central Oregon town on John Day River. 2800 sq. ft. commercial bldg. on state hwy in Spray. Has been bar & restaurant, could be anything. $125,000 by owner, 541-468-3201 or 541-468-2071

Independent Contractor

HS u p p l e m e n t Y o u r I n c o m e H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted Share cozy mobile home in Terrebonne, $275 + utilities. 1-503-679-7496 630

Rooms for Rent Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885

personals I have a lot of questions about God. Can anyone help? www.iconfessit.com

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

638

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

A sharp, clean 2Bdrm, 1½ bath apt, NEW $299 1st month’s rent! * CARPETS, neutral colors, great storage, pri2 bdrm, 1 bath vate patio, no pets/ $530 & 540 smkg. $555 incl w/s/g. Carports & A/C incl! Call 541-633-0663 Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 SHARP Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease* 2 BEDROOM $585 61545 Parrell Road 636 Classy new exterior, Apt./Multiplex NW Bend small quiet complex, lots of upgrades, beauFully furnished loft Apt tiful new kitchen cabion Wall Street in nets and countertops, Bend, with parking. All dishwasher and microutilities paid. Call wave, large master with closets, private 541-389-2389 for appt 3 fenced patio, laundry RIVER FALLS APTS on site, includes W/S/G LIVE ON THE RIVER no smoking/no pets. Call 541-633-0663 WALK DOWNTOWN 1 bdrm. apt. fully fur642 nished in fine 50s style. 1546 NW 1st St., Apt./Multiplex Redmond $790 + $690 dep. Nice pets welcomed. Duplex, very clean & pri541-382-0117 vate, large 1300 sq ft 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage Small studio downtown w/opener, fenced backarea, all util. pd. $550, yard, deck, fridge, DW, $525 dep. No pets/ W/D hkup, extra parksmoking. 541-330ing, w/s/g paid, $710 + 9769 or 541-480-7870 dep. 541-604-0338

CHECK OUT THIS HOT DEAL!

CALL A SERVICE PROFESSIONAL Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service

Building/Contracting

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state NOTICE: OREGON law requires anyLandscape Contracone who contracts tors Law (ORS 671) for construction work requires all busito be licensed with the nesses that advertise Construction Conto perform Landtractors Board (CCB). scape Construction An active license which includes: means the contractor planting, decks, is bonded and infences, arbors, sured. Verify the water-features, and contractor’s CCB liinstallation, repair of cense through the irrigation systems to CCB Consumer be licensed with the Website Landscape Contracwww.hirealicensedcontractor. tors Board. This com 4-digit number is to be or call 503-378-4621. included in all adverThe Bulletin recomtisements which indimends checking with cate the business has the CCB prior to cona bond, insurance and tracting with anyone. workers compensaSome other trades tion for their employalso require addiees. For your protectional licenses and tion call 503-378-5909 certifications. or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to People Look for Information check license status About Products and before contracting Services Every Day through with the business. The Bulletin Classifieds Persons doing landscape maintenance High Standard Const. do not require a LCB Full Service general license. contractor, post frame construction #181477 Nelson Landscape 541-389-4622 Maintenance Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial •Sprinkler Repair •Sprinkler Installation •Back Flow Testing •Fire Prevention, Lot Clearing • Summer Clean up •Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinBULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS kler blowouts, water Search the area’s most features, more! comprehensive listing of Allen 541-536-1294 classiied advertising... LCB 5012 real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW! goods. Bulletin Classiieds Weekly / one-time service appear every day in the avail. Bonded, insured, print or on line. free estimates! Call 541-385-5809 COLLINS Lawn Maint. www.bendbulletin.com Call 541-480-9714 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain I DO THAT! saw work & more! Home/Rental repairs LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Small jobs to remodels Holmes Landscape Maint Honest, guaranteed • Clean-up • Aerate work. CCB#151573 • De-thatch • Free Est. Dennis 541-317-9768 • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 Home Improvement Painting/Wall Covering Kelly Kerfoot Const. 28 yrs exp in Central OR! WESTERN PAINTING Quality & honesty, from CO. Richard Hayman, carpentry & handyman a semi-retired paintjobs, to expert wall coving contractor of 45 ering install / removal. years. Small Jobs Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Welcome. Interior & Licensed/bonded/insured Exterior. ccb#5184. 541-389-1413 / 410-2422 541-388-6910 Picasso Painting: Mendoza Contracting Affordable, Reliable & Home Inspection Repairs Decks, Pressure Wash, Quality, repaints, decks, Stain/paint interior/ext. more! 541-280-9081.

541-548-5226 CCB80653

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 E3

CCB#194351

648

Houses for Rent General

687

870

870

880

880

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Warehouse - Industrial unit for rent. 5600 sq.ft., $2250/month, near Bend High. 541-389-8794.

800 860

Real Estate For Sale

700 732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale Biz Opp. North Central Oregon on John Day River, 2800 sq. ft. commercial bldg. on state hwy Spray. Has been bar & restaurant, could be anything. $125,000 541-4683201 or 541-468-2071 745

Homes for Sale BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

Motorcycles & Accessories Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188. Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

12’ Porta-Bote, GenGENERATE SOME exesis III, $600. citement in your neig10’ Pelican Scorpio dinborhood. Plan a gaghy, $350. rage sale and don't 541-280-0514. forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

16’ Crestliner fiberglass with trailer, no motor, extra stuff, nice boat. A Steal @ $300! 541-876-7029 or 541-536-1395. 17’ 1984 Chris Craft - Scorpion, 140 HP inboard/outboard, 2 depth finders, trolling motor, full cover, EZ - Load trailer, $3500 OBO. 541-382-3728.

17’

Seaswirl,

175HP in/ outboard, open bow, new upholster, $2900, 541-389-9684.

HD FAT BOY 1996 Completely rebuilt/ customized, low miles. Accepting offers. 541-548-4807

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, HD Heritage Classic $17,500, 541-330-3939 2003, 100 yr. Anniv. model. 10,905 Miles, 18.5’ Bayliner 185 new tires, battery, 2008. 3.0L, open bow, loaded w/ custom exslim deck, custom tras, exhaust & cover & trailer, exc. GOVERNMENT chrome. Hard/soft cond., 30-35 total hrs., PROPERTY bags & much more. incl. 4 life vests, SEALED BID SALE $11,995, ropes, anchor, stereo, OFF-SITE REMOVAL 541-306-6505 or depth finder, $12,000, House with attached 503-819-8100. 541-729-9860. garage 1,560 sq. ft., 3 bed, 1bath, Rager 865 Ranger Station, ATVs 7615 Rageor Rd., Paulina, OR 97751 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner Bid opening: 8/23/12 205 Run About, 220 https://propertydisposal. HP, V8, open bow, gsa.gov exc. cond., very fast 253-931-7556 w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. Honda TRX300 EX 2005 tower, Bimini & sport quad w/Rev, runs custom trailer, & rides great, new pipe & $19,500. paddles incl. $1700 obo. 541-389-1413 541-647-8931

NOTICE:

Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ 4WD, black w/EPS, fuel injection, independent rear suspension winch w/handle controls & remote, ps, auto, large racks, exc. cond., $7850, 541-322-0215

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such Yamaha Kodiak 400, preferences, limita- 2005 4x4, 2500 lb winch, tions or discrimination. gun rack & alum loading We will not knowingly ramp, only 542 miles, accept any advertis- show room cond, $4800. ing for real estate 541-280-9401 which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an in750 tention to make any Redmond Homes such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children Looking for your next employee? under the age of 18 living with parents or Place a Bulletin help legal custodians, wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 pregnant women, and readers each week. people securing cusYour classified ad tody of children under will also appear on 18. This newspaper bendbulletin.com will not knowingly acwhich currently recept any advertising ceives over for real estate which is 1.5 million page in violation of the law. views every month Our readers are at no extra cost. hereby informed that Bulletin Classifieds all dwellings adverGet Results! tised in this newspaCall 385-5809 or per are available on place your ad on-line an equal opportunity at basis. To complain of bendbulletin.com discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The 764 toll free telephone Farms & Ranches number for the hearing impaired is WANTED: Ranch, will 1-800-927-9275. work trade for finished, Mt./Columbia 650 River View, gated, Houses for Rent residential development in the Columbia NE Bend River Gorge, 509-767-1539. 3 bedroom 2 bath home near St. Charles, $1150 773 + dep. Pet free/smoke free. Central air, ceiling Acreages fans, bonus room, new carpet, fresh interior *** paint, fully fenced park- CHECK YOUR AD like backyard. 2357 NE Please check your ad Moonlight Drive. Call on the first day it runs 541-678-5628 to make sure it is correct. Sometimes inLuxury Home, 2450 structions over the sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 phone are misunderbath, office, 3 car gastood and an error rage, mtn views., avail can occur in your ad. 7/20. 2641 NE Jill Ct. If this happens to your $1650/mo. + dep. ad, please contact us 541-420-3557. the first day your ad appears and we will Spotless, Light, Bright ! be happy to fix it as 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, dbl. gar, soon as we can. gas fireplace, fenced, Deadlines are: Weeklarge patio, RV parking. days 11:00 noon for $1095. 541-480-7653 next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. Looking for your next 541-385-5809 employee? Thank you! Place a Bulletin help The Bulletin Classified wanted ad today and *** reach over 60,000 readers each week. Powell Butte 6 acres, Your classified ad 360 views, great horse will also appear on property, 10223 Housbendbulletin.com, ton Lake Rd. $99,900. currently receiving 541-350-4684 over 1.5 million page views, every month Get your at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds business Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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With an ad in

Houses for Rent NW Bend

The Bulletin's

Amazing golf course views, 4250 sq.ft., 4/3.5, 1st mo. $200. off. $2400/mo. Appt. 541-480-0612.

Boats & RV’s

"Call A Service Professional" Directory

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Allegro 2002, 2 slides, 22K mi, workhorse chassis, 8.1 Chev engine, like new, $41,900 obo. 541-420-9346

Immaculate!

Beaver Coach Marquis 40’ 1987. New cover, new paint (2004), new inverter (2007). Onan 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, parked covered $35,000 obo. 541-419-9859 or 541-280-2014

Country Coach Intrigue 2002, 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins DieWatercraft sel. Two slide-outs. 41,000 miles. Most Monaco Dynasty 2004, Ads published in "Waoptions. $110,000 loaded, 3 slides, dietercraft" include: KayOBO 541-678-5712 sel, Reduced - now aks, rafts and motor$129,900, 541-923ized personal 8572 or 541-749-0037 watercrafts. For CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you "boats" please see buy, below market Class 870. value! Size & mile541-385-5809 age DOES matter! Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all National Sea Breeze amenities, Ford V10, 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, lthr, cherry, slides, 2 power slides, uplike new! New low graded queen matprice, $54,900. tress, hyd. leveling 541-548-5216 system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. Hand-crafted Kenosha Scenic canoe, built from West- Gulfstream Reduced to $41,300! Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, ern Red Cedar/African 541-480-0617 Cummins 330 hp dieribbon strip Mahogany & RV CONSIGNMENTS Alaska yellow cedar, 16x sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 WANTED 36, 54lbs, a work of art! in. kitchen slide out, $5800. 541-617-9260 new tires,under cover, We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, hwy. miles only,4 door On-Site Credit fridge/freezer iceApproval Team, maker, W/D combo, Web Site Presence, Interbath tub & We Take Trade-Ins. shower, 50 amp proFree Advertising. pane gen & more! Kawasaki 900 STS BIG COUNTRY RV $55,000. 2001 3-man jet ski, low Bend 541-330-2495 541-948-2310 hours, Ready for fun! Redmond: 541-548-5254 $2900. 541-617-0077 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the Say “goodbuy” classii eds! Ask about our Hunter’s Delight! PackSuper Seller rates! to that unused age deal! 1988 Win541-385-5809 nebago Super Chief, item by placing it in 38K miles, great The Bulletin Classiieds shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K mostly towed miles, 541-385-5809 nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave Southwind 35.5’ Triton, msg. 2008,V10, 2 slides, DuItasca Sun Cruiser pont UV coat, 7500 mi. 1997, 460 Ford, Class Avg NADA ret.114,343; Kayak, Eddyline asking $99,000. A, 26K mi., 37’, living Sandpiper, 12’, like Call 541-923-2774 room slide, new awnew, $975, nings, new fridge, 8 541-420-3277. new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 Tow car cover for HHR, by Coastline, new, Onan Gen., new bat$150. 541-728-1265 teries, tow pkg., rear towing TV, 2 tv’s, new hydraulic jack springs, tandem axel, $15,000, 541-385-1782 875

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fish- Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind ing, drift, canoe, Dancers,17’, fiberglass house and sail boats. boats, all equip incl., For all other types of paddles, personal flowatercraft, please see tation devices,dry bags, Class 875. spray skirts,roof rack w/ 541-385-5809 towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1250/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Winnebago Outlook 32’ 2008, Ford V10 engine, Wineguard sat, TV, surround sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 or 541-728-6793


E4 MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

881

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Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Cardinal 33’ 2007, year round living, 8’ closet, 2 slides, 2 TVs, surround sound, $22,800. In Prineville, 509-521-0369

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 slide, AC, TV, awning. NEW: tires, converter, batteries. Hardly used. $19,500. 541-923-2595

Autos & Transportation

900

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $26,995. 541-420-9964

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

Terry 23’ 1990

self-contained, sleeps 6, in good condition, $3495. Please call 541-419-5495

Viking Tent trailer 2008, clean, self contained, sleep 5, easy to tow, great cond. $6500. 541-383-7150.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, fuel station, exc cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $24,999. 541-389-9188 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 882

Fifth Wheels Alfa Ideal 2001, 31’, 3 slides, island kitchen, AC/heat pump, generator, satellite system, 2 flatscreen TVs, hitch & awning incl. $16,000. (Dodge 3500 1 ton also available) 541-388-1529;408-4877

SPRINTER 36’ 5th wheel, 2005, dual slides, queen bed air mattress, fold out couch. $10,500 obo. 541-382-0865, leave message! SPRINTER 36’ 5th wheel, 2005, dual slides, bunk, 2 baths, queen bed air mattress, fold out couch. Very clean! $10,500 obo. 541-382-0865, leave message!

Taurus 27.5’ 1988 Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

24’ van box, 8.3L 210 HP eng. in good cond. $9000, 541-749-0724.

Hyster H25E, runs well, 2982 Hours, $3500, call 541-749-0724

Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724 925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. UTILITY TRAILER Single axle, $150. 541-480-1337 931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Every day thousands of buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away. The Classiied Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every cartegory is indexed on the section’s front page. Whether you are looking for a home or need a service, your future is in the pages of The Bulletin Classiied.

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Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd, 1995

NISSAN QUEST 1996, 3-seat mini van, extra nice in and out $3,400. Sold my Windstar, need another van! 541-318-9999, ask for Bob. Ask about free trip to D.C. for WWII vets.

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top. Just reduced to $3,750. 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford Ranchero 1979 with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition, $2500 obo. 541-420-4677

GMC ½ ton 1971, Only $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171 Mercedes 380SL 1983, 107,830 actual miles, 1 owner, purchased from factory in Germany, $10,500/offer. Phone 541-382-5063 / 280-2005

Chevrolet 2500, 1991, 2WD, ext’d cab, full size bed, 61,400 mi. 454 V8, spray-on bedliner, electric windows & door locks, cruise, AC, set up for 5th wheel or hitch trailer, wired for lights, exlnt cond, runs great, $3250. 541-382-6028 Chevy 1 ton 1968 dual tires, 11’ flatbed, 327 engine, 58k miles, $1000. 541-548-4774

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

80K miles, 4WD, excellent cond, has extra snow tires/ rims. $3000 obo. 541-420-4677

Honda Accord 1981 parts car, $250. 541-447-4405 932

Antique & Classic Autos

Chev Corvair Monza convertible,1964, new top & tranny, runs great, exlnt cruising car! $5500 obo. 541-420-5205 Chevy 1954, 5 window, 350 V-8, auto/ps, needs minor mechanical work, exterior good, new paint; needs some gauges, gun metal grey, $6100 obo. 503-504-2764, CRR.

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

PORSCHE 914 1974, Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

REDUCED! Ford 1978 truck, $1100 obo. V8 4 spd, runs good, new battery, spark plugs, rebuilt carb. Ex U-Haul,

Jeep Willys 1947,custom, Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, small block Chevy, PS, 1995, extended cab, Toyota Tacoma 2003, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap 541-548-7171 long box, grill guard, SR5 PreRunner, 2WD, for backhoe.No am calls running boards, bed auto, ARE canopy, silplease. 541-389-6990 rails & canopy, 178K ver, 73.5K miles, great 975 miles, $4800 obo. condition, $10,000 firm. 208-301-3321 (Bend) 541-306-9055 Automobiles Chevy Silverado 1998, 935 black and silver, pro lifted, loaded, new 33” Sport Utility Vehicles tires, aluminum slot Jeep Wrangler 1999, TJ wheels, tow pkg., drop Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 Sahara Ed., 4.0L, exlnt 4x4. 120K mi, Power hitch, diamond plate seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd tires, body & paint. 32MPG! $7900 obo tool box, $12,000, or row seating, extra 69,700+ mi, hardtop + Hyundai Accent 2008 Volvo 740 ‘87, 4-cyl,auto possible trade for newer 86k on eng.,exc. maint. tires, CD, privacy tint- new full buckskin soft & Hatchback, 47,800 Tacoma. 541-460-9127 $2895, 541-301-1185. ing, upgraded rims. bikini tops, Warn winch, mi., A/C, one 0wner, motorhome tow pkg, Fantastic cond. $7995 Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 Clean, 5 Spd Manual. www.youtu.be/yc0n6zVIbAc stinger, alum wheels, Contact Timm at sport, red, loaded, 541-550-9935 541-408-2393 for info $13,000. 541-617-9176 rollbar, AND 2011 or to view vehicle. Looking for your Moped Trike used 3 next employee? months, street legal. Buick LeSabre LimPlace a Bulletin help call 541-433-2384 ited 1997 111,000 Chevy Trailblazer wanted ad today and miles, blue, new tires, 2005, gold, LS 4X4, Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD reach over 60,000 brakes and air, $2900 6 cyl., auto, A/C, pdl, auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, readers each week. firm. Others available, new tires, keyless 8600 GVW, white,178K Your classified ad like a 1996 Regal with entry, 66K mi., exc. Nissan Murano mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, will also appear on 84,000 miles, only cond. $8950. SL-AWD 2004, 75k, tow pkg., bedliner, bed $2750. Call Bob bendbulletin.com 541-598-5111 all-weather tires, tow rail caps, rear slide 541-318-9999. which currently repkg, gold metallic, window, new tires, raceives over 1.5 milbeige leather int., diator, water pump, Ford Escape Limited Chryser LeBaron 1990 lion page views hoses, brakes, more, moonroof, $14,990. 2006. #B87410. convertible, 5 spd, every month at $5200, 541-322-0215 541-317-5693 $15,995. new paint, top, tires no extra cost. Bulleand rims. $1800. tin Classifieds 541-416-9566 Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place Ford Thunderbird 1988, your ad on-line at 3.8 V-6, 35K actual mi., bendbulletin.com new hoses, belts, tires, 541-598-3750 battery, pb, ps, cruise, aaaoregonautosource.com Porsche Cayenne 2004, Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, A/C, CD, exc. cond. in 71K, X-cab, XLT, 86k, immac, dealer & out, 2nd owner, auto, 4.0L, $7900 maint’d, loaded, now maint. records, must The Bulletin recomOBO. 541-388-0232 mends extra caution $17000. 503-459-1580 see & drive! Ford Excursion when purchasing Reduced! Now $3500, Ford Ranger XLT 2005, 4WD, diesel, products or services obo. 541-330-0733 1998 X-cab exc. cond., $19,900, from out of the area. 2.5L 4-cyl engine, call 541-923-0231. Sending cash, 5-spd standard trans, checks, or credit inlong bed, newer moformation may be tor & paint, new clutch GMC Denali 2003 subject to FRAUD. Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, & tires, excellent conloaded with options. For more informa2006, Salsa Red pearl, dition, clean, $4500. Exc. cond., snow tion about an adver49,990 miles, exlnt cond, INFINITI M30 1991 ConCall 541-447-6552 tires and rims intiser, you may call professionally detailed, vertible, always gacluded. 130k hwy the Oregon State $24,599. 541-390-7649 raged, Most options: miles. $12,000. Attorney General’s $2,900. 541-350-3353 541-419-4890. Office Consumer 940 or 541-923-1096 Protection hotline at Vans 1-877-877-9392. GMC Yukon SLT 2003 one owner, 4WD, 3rd Ford Super Duty F-250 Astro row seats, leather, Chevy 2001, 4X4, very good Cargo Van 2001, towing, $9,000. shape, V10 eng, $8800 pw, pdl, great cond., 541-382-4316 OBO. 541-815-9939 Mercedes E320 2004, business car, well 71K miles, silver/silver, Wanted: 2000-2005 maint, regular oil Get your exc. cond, below Blue GMC 3/4 ton Diesel changes, $4500, business Book, $13,500 Call Pickup. 541-447-7807 please call 541-788-4229 541-633-5149

916

885

Lance 945 1995, 11’3”, all appl., solar panel, Alpha “See Ya” 30’ new battery, exc. cond., 1996, 2 slides, A/C, $5995, 541-977-3181 heat pump, exc. cond. solid oak cabs, day & FIND YOUR FUTURE night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $9750 HOME IN THE BULLETIN OBO/trade for small Your future is just a page trailer, 541-923-3417 away. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, The Bulletin Classiied is your best source.

935

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Canopies & Campers Arctic Fox Silver Edition 1140, 2005. 5 hrs on gen; air, slideout, dry bath, like new, loaded! $16,900. Also 2004 Dodge Ram 3500 quad cab dually 4x4, 11,800 mi, SuperHitch, $26,950. OR both for $39,850. Call 541-382-6708

933

ONLY 2 OWNERSHIP SHARES LEFT! Economical flying in your own Cessna Monterrey 172/180 HP for only Mercury 1965, Exc. All original, $10,000! Based at 4-dr. sedan, in storBDN. Call Gabe at age last 15 yrs., 390 Professional Air! High Compression 541-388-0019 engine, new tires & liRedmond large exec. cense, reduced to hangar for lease: $2850, 541-410-3425. Pvt. bath, heat, office, lights. Call Ben, 541-350-9729

Freightliner 2000,

Regal Prowler AX6 Extreme Edition 38’ ‘05, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all maple cabs, king bed/ bdrm separated w/slide glass dr,loaded,always garaged,lived in only 3 mo,brand new $54,000, still like new, $28,500, will deliver,see rvt.com, ad#4957646 for pics. Cory, 541-580-7334

933

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps 6, walk-around bed with Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 new mattress; power slides, no smokers or 1/3 interest in Columhitch, very clean pets, limited usage, bia 400, located at $11,500. Please call 5500 watt Onan gen, Sunriver. $138,500. 541-548-4284. solar panel, fireplace, Call 541-647-3718 dual A/C, central vac, elect. awning w/sun- 1/3 interest in wellscreen arctic pkg, rear equipped IFR Beech receiver, alum wheels, 2 Bonanza A36, loTVs, many extras. cated KBDN. $55,000. $35,500. 541-416-8087 541-419-9510 Funfinder189 2008,slide, Executive Hangar Find exactly what A/C, awning, furnace,self at Bend Airport contained, queen, sleeps you are looking for in the (KBDN) 5, $11,500,541-610-5702 CLASSIFIEDS 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation Springdale 29’ 2007, MONTANA 3585 2008, bus. 1jetjock@q.com slide,Bunkhouse style, exc. cond., 3 slides, 541-948-2126 sleeps 7-8, excellent king bed, lrg LR, Arccondition, $16,900, tic insulation, all op541-390-2504 tions $37,500. 541-420-3250 Open Road 37' 2004 3 slides, W/D hookup, large LR w/rear window. Desk area. Asking $19,750 OBO Call (541) 280-7879 visit rvt.com ad#104243920 for pics

932

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $3131 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & tires, exlnt set snow tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149 Jeep Compass 2009, 25K, 5-spd, 1-owner, $13,400, 541-280-5866

Dodge Caravan Sport 2003

134,278 miles, great cond, very comfortable, $5000 OBO. 541-848-8539.

guera_blt@yahoo.com

Mercury Grand Marquis 2004, runs excellent, very clean, 1 owner, clear title, $4800. 360-508-8748 (in Bend) Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 E5

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LEGAL NOTICE Arnold Irrigation District Monthly Board Meeting Notice The Board of Directors of Arnold Irrigation District will hold their monthly board meeting on Tuesday, August 14, 2012 at 3:00 pm at 19604 Buck Canyon Rd. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the Matter of the Estate of, DARRELL JUSTIN PLAUNTY, Deceased. Case No.: 12PB0067. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the Estate of Darrell Justin Plaunty. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at 19435 Comanche Circle, Bend, OR 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Timothy G. Elliott, Anderson, Riquelme & Wilson, LLP, 1558 SW

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Legal Notices g from consulting firms for professional solid waste services in the completion of a groundwater assessment at the closed Demolition Landfill, this will include the development of a work plan and a Phase II Site Characterization Study, including the installation of ground water monitoring wells, and the development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan.

Nancy Way, Ste. 101, Bend OR 97702, (541) 383-3755, Fax: (541) 330-1480. Dated and first published on July 30, 2012. Teri L. Plaunty, Personal Representative. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. CHRISTOPHER J. ECKBERG has been appointed Administrator of the Estate of ERIC MICHAEL ECKBERG, Deceased, by the Circuit The preparation of all reports and the perCourt, State of Orformance of all tasks egon, Deschutes must follow the forCounty, under Case mat outlined in the Number 12PB0069. Oregon Department of All persons having a Environmental Qualclaim against the esity (DEQ) Solid Waste tate must present the Landfill Guidance claim within four Document months of the first (http://www.deq.state. publication date of this or.us/lq/sw/disposal/la notice to Hendrix, ndfillguidance.htm), Brinich & Bertalan, specifically Section 3: LLP at 716 NW HarPhase II Site Charriman Street, Bend, acterization. DesOregon 97701, chutes County reATTN.: Lisa N. Berserves the right to talan, or they may be reject any Proposal barred. Additional innot following that forformation may be obmat. tained from the court records, the adminisA copy of this Retrator or the followingquest for Proposals named attorney for and supporting docuthe administrator. mentation can be acDate of first publicacessed at tion: July 30, 2012. http://www.deschutes. LISA N. BERTALAN org/solidwaste/project OSB #912122, HENs.aspx DRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP, 716 Questions regarding NW HARRIMAN, this solicitation can be BEND, OR 97701, directed to: 541-382-4980. LEGAL NOTICE Timm Schimke, Director Request for Proposals Deschutes County for Department of Solid Groundwater Waste Assessment at 61050 SE 27th Street Demolition Landfill Bend, OR 97702 in Bend, Oregon Phone: (541) 317-3177 Fax: (541) 317-3959 I.INTRODUCTION Email: timm.schimke@deschutes.org

The Deschutes County Department of Solid Waste is requesting Proposals

Five (5) copies of the Proposal must be received by 4:00 p.m.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DANIEL B. HAMLET AND KIMBERLY A. HAMLET, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 04/14/2005, recorded 04/18/2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2005-23132, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 37 OF PARKVIEW TERRACE - PHASES I AND II, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: LOT 37 OF PARKVIEW TERRACE BEND, OR 97701 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $318.01 beginning 06/01/2011; plus late charges of $15.90 each month beginning with the 06/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-47.70; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $64,375.81 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.13 percent per annum beginning 05/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 13, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0100532) 1006.144609-FEI Publication Dates: July 30, Aug. 6, 13 and 20, 2012 1006.144609

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Legal Notices y on Thursday, September 6, 2012 at the Deschutes County Department of Solid Waste, 61050 SE 27th Street, Bend, OR 97702. Proposals should be addressed to Timm Schimke, Director. Facsimile or electronically submitted Proposals are not acceptable. Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8805 T.S. No.: 1362123-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Jodi Lei Patching and Daniel William Patching, as Tenants by the Entirety, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated December 22, 2006, recorded December 28, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 84244, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association, as Trustee, as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank, National Association, as trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-HY3 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot 7, Block 19, SECOND ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 65340 - 93rd Place, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $3,100.00, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $620,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will appear on August 15, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continue the Trustee's Sale to September 17, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 08-02-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-107866.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Harris Hai Huynh An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated August 03, 2005, recorded August 05, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-51436 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 69 of Desert Skies, Phases 3, 4 and 5, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61726 Borealis Ln Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2012 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,713.83 Monthly Late Charge $69.43. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $213,123.53 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from December 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 05, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curPUBLIC NOTICE ing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RICHARD M. KAthe masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular GAN, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMincludes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the PANY, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary, grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perfordated 01/05/2004, recorded 01/14/2004, in the mortgage records of Desmance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and chutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/recep"beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: tion Number 2004-02012, covering the following described real property June 27, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main situated in said county and state, to wit: Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird LOT 78, ESTATES AT PRONGHORN, PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. R-414018 07/30/12, 08/06, 08/13, 08/20 1000

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PROPERTY ADDRESS: LOT 78, ESTATES AT PRONG BEND, OR 97701

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,870.83 beginning Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rick A Karvasales and 03/01/2012; plus late charges of $93.54 each month beginning with the Denise Karvasales Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to First American, 03/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-187.08; plus adas Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of Navances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attional City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated May 25, 2005, recorded torney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further June 02, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volsums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above deume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. scribed real property and its interest therein. 2005-34316 covering the following described real property situated in said By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on County and State, to-wit: the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payLot 2 of Shadow Glen Estates Phase I, City of Redmond, able, said sums being the following to wit: $348,277.48 with interest Deschutes County, Oregon. thereon at the rate of 3.38 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2012 until Commonly known as: paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, 441 NW 17th St Redmond OR 97756. costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecproperty to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, November 05, 2012 at the Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2012 of principal, interhour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS est and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary purCounty Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at suant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described $1,914.61 Monthly Late Charge $77.94. By this reason of said default the real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust imthe execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest mediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the exof $234,616.16 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby seFebruary 01, 2012 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the benefiby the Trustee. ciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corpo- Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the ration the undersigned trustee will on November 02, 2012 at the hour of sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unthe said described real property which the grantor had or had power to der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonnot exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. able charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perforeclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payson owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words ment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default if any. occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering Dated: June 26, 2012 the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the For further information, please contact: grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perforRECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. mance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 June 27, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main (800)-281-8219 Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Recon(TS# 12-0056537) 1006.162474-FEI veyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4462 T.S. No.: 1363568-09.

R-414020 07/30/12, 08/06, 08/13, 08/20

Publication Dates: Aug. 13, 20, 27 and Sept. 3, 2012 1006.162474

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E6 MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by BONNIE J ARIAS, Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by EVAN P. BRAUDE as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE AND JENNIFER L. BRAUDE, as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated in favor of IMPAC FUNDING CORP. D/B/A IMPAC LENDING GROUP, A 06/01/2009, recorded 06/03/2009, in the mortgage records of Deschutes CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 05/02/2003, reCounty, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception corded 05/14/2003, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, OrNumber 2009-23254, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, egon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, 2003-32211, covering the following described real property situated in said LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP by Assignment county and state, to wit: recorded 11/09/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-39903, covering the folA PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SE1/4SW1/4) OF SECTION THIRTY (30), TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE THIRTEEN (13), PARCEL TWO (2), PARTITION PLAT 2006-51, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, RECORDED AUGUST 8, 2006, IN CABINET 3, PAGE 319, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCRIBED AS PARCEL 2 OF MP-92- 20 AND FILED SEPTEMBER 23, 1992 IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK PROPERTY ADDRESS: AS PLAT PARTITION 1992-47. APN: 17 13 30 00 01500 1848 SW SALMON AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 PROPERTY ADDRESS: Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to 22188 NEFF ROAD BEND, OR 97701 satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default due the following sums: monthly payments of $871.18 beginning has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the 07/01/2011; plus late charges of $33.25 each month beginning with the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when 07/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-137.43; plus addue the following sums: monthly payments of $2,221.95 beginning vances of $165.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and 09/01/2010; plus late charges of $.00 each month beginning with the attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further 09/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-111.10; plus adsums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above devances of $90.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and scribed real property and its interest therein. attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above dethe obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payscribed real property and its interest therein. able, said sums being the following to wit: $117,000.33 with interest By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on thereon at the rate of 5.25 percent per annum beginning 06/01/2011 until the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and paypaid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, able, said sums being the following to wit: $330,828.78 with interest costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said thereon at the rate of 5.99 percent per annum beginning 08/01/2010 until default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecpaid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecN.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the DesN.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, October 12, 2012 at the hour chutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired afreal property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of ter the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonwhich the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the exable charge by the Trustee. ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby seNotice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the by the Trustee. sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unthan such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unpaying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other pernot exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. son owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perif any. son owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, Dated: June 20, 2012 if any. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

LOT SIXTY-SEVEN (67), HAYDEN VIEW PHASE TWO, RECORDED AUGUST 11, 1999, IN CABINET E, PAGE 287, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3313 SW METOLIUS PL REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,695.16 beginning 03/01/2010; plus late charges of $67.81 each month beginning with the 03/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-203.43; plus advances of $230.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $215,541.23 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, October 25, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 14, 2012

Dated: June 11, 2012

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0128065) 1006.147854-FEI Publication Dates: Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012 1006.147854 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ARTHUR FARRIS, MARIE MANSFIELD AND JOHN J MANSFIELD, as grantor(s), to REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORP., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 06/18/2008, recorded 06/19/2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2008-26483, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP by Assignment recorded 08/02/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-26980, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit:

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0034219) 1006.136260-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0053558) 1006.161826-FEI

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.136260

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Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RACHEL HAMILTON, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as BenPUBLIC NOTICE eficiary, dated 10/06/2009, recorded 10/08/2009, in the mortgage records TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2009-43182, and subse- Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RUTH HARRISON, quently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY A SINGLE WOMAN, as grantor(s), to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYCOMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP by Assignment recorded TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03/22/2012 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as recorder's fee/file/in02/01/2007, recorded 02/05/2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes strument/microfilm/reception No. 2012-010315 covering the following deCounty, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Number 2007-07536, and re-recorded 02/06/2007 and as fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-07720 and subsequently asLOT 24 OF SUMMIT CREST PHASE 1, CITY OF REDMOND, signed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. by Assignment recorded 05/17/2012 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2012-018754, covering the folPROPERTY ADDRESS: lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: 2943 SW 50TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 LOT NINE (9), SUNSCAPE, Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the PROPERTY ADDRESS: default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when NW 28TH ST LOT 9 REDMOND, OR 97756 due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,287.21 beginning 02/01/2012; plus late charges of $50.29 each month beginning with the Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to 02/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-151.62; plus adsatisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default vances of $15.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above dedue the following sums: monthly payments of $398.89 beginning scribed real property and its interest therein. 02/01/2012; plus late charges of $19.94 each month beginning with the By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on 02/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-59.82; plus adthe obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payvances of $30.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and able, said sums being the following to wit: $169,604.90 with interest attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further thereon at the rate of 4.25 percent per annum beginning 01/01/2012 until sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above depaid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, scribed real property and its interest therein. costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecthe obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and paytion of the above described real property and its interests therein. able, said sums being the following to wit: $100,772.79 with interest WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, thereon at the rate of 4.75 percent per annum beginning 01/01/2012 until N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, October 26, 2012 at the hour paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecCounty Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, October 15, 2012 at the the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the ex187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby seCounty Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described by the Trustee. real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the exsale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby sereinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default by the Trustee. occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unat any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unIn construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persaid sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by son owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees if any. not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" Dated: June 20, 2012 includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. Dated: June 08, 2012 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0055377) 1006.162094-FEI For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. Publication Dates: Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012 1006.162094 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 The Bulletin Need help ixing stuff? (800)-281-8219 Find It in To Subscribe call Call A Service Professional (TS# 12-0050724) 1006.161464-FEI The Bulletin Classifieds! ind the help you need. 541-385-5800 or go to 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.161464 www.bendbulletin.com

Publication Dates: Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012 1006.161826 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JONATHAN D ELEK AS A SINGLE MAN, as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05/15/2008, recorded 05/20/2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book/Reel/Volume No. N/A at Page No. N/A as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2008-21908, and subsequently assigned to BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP by Assignment recorded 07/20/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-028230, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWO (2), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE (141), SECOND ADDITION TO BEND PARK, CITY OF BEND, RECORDED AUGUST 1, 1918, IN CABINET A, PAGE 13, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 117 SW TAFT AVENUE BEND, OR 97702 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,770.35 beginning 03/01/2010; plus late charges of $72.04 each month beginning with the 03/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-288.16; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $299,648.78 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.88 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 13, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 10-0079473) 1006.106844-FEI Publication Dates: July 30, Aug. 6, 13 and 20, 2012 1006.106844


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 E7

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DENISE LANDA., as Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DAWN E MILLER, Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MARO A PAZ AND grantor(s), to AMERITITLE., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECAND FRANK E MILLER, as grantor(s), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE, as KAREN L MYHREPAZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor(s), to WESTTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGIS12/29/2009, recorded 12/30/2009, in the mortgage records of Deschutes TEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 10/25/2007, recorded 11/06/2007, in TRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 10/04/2004, recorded County, Oregon, in Book/Reel/Volume No. n/a at Page No. n/a as the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's 10/08/2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2009-54990, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-58492, and subseRecorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2004-60658, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR quently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY and subsequently assigned to DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP by Assignment MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYCOMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2004-11 recorded 12/03/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as recorder's WIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP by Assignment recorded by Assignment recorded 09/13/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-48174, covering the fol11/02/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-35936, lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-038743, covering the folcovering the following described real property situated in said county and lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: state, to wit: LOT TWENTY (20), VISTA DORADO, RECORDED MAY 10, 2007, IN CABINET H, PAGE 323, LOT NINETEEN (19) IN BLOCK ZZ OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, LOT 3, NEGUS VILLAS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2645 NE 3RD STREET REDMOND, OR 97756

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 18929 BAKER RD BEND, OR 97702-7917

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1536 NE 5TH ST REDMOND, OR 97756

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $810.42 beginning 08/01/2010; plus late charges of $33.27 each month beginning with the 08/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-66.54; plus advances of $1,486.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $123,051.04 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00 percent per annum beginning 07/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,094.58 beginning 09/01/2011; plus late charges of $.00 each month beginning with the 09/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $.00; plus advances of $.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $158,125.46 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.13 percent per annum beginning 08/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, October 11, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,356.48 beginning 04/01/2010; plus late charges of $75.88 each month beginning with the 04/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-151.76; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $299,738.70 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.63 percent per annum beginning 03/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Wednesday, October 31, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: June 08, 2012

Dated: June 05, 2012

Dated: June 21, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 10-0154827) 1006.121515-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0045537) 1006.161095-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 10-0111908) 1006.112246-FEI

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.121515

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.161095

Publication Dates: Aug. 13, 20, 27 and Sept. 3, 2012 1006.112246

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ELIN BULLMANN Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by PHILIP L CONNER Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DENVER L DORMAN AND KATHERINE E DORMAN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, SR, A SINGLE MAN, as grantor(s), to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE AND KEN F. BULLMANN, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INas grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., TRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 11/24/2004, recorded as Beneficiary, dated 01/30/2007, recorded 02/08/2007, in the mortgage as Beneficiary, dated 08/03/2007, recorded 08/10/2007, in the mortgage 11/30/2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2004-71522, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-08149, and subsefee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-43990, and subseand subsequently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA quently assigned to U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS quently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATETRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, FUNDING CORPORATION, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFIWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP by Assignment recorded SERIES 2004-15 by Assignment recorded 05/03/2011 in Book/Reel/VolCATES, SERIES 2007-B by Assignment recorded 06/04/2012 in 03/01/2012 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's ume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/mifee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2012-007145, covering the folNo. 2011-16356, covering the following described real property situated in crofilm/reception No. 2012-021462, covering the following described real lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: said county and state, to wit: property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWO (2) OF AWBREY BUTTE HOMESITES, PHASE TWENTY-NINE, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

PARCEL 2 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2002-50, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

LOT 21, RIDGEWATER, PHASES 1 AND 2, P.U.D., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1795 NORTHWEST REMARKABLE DRIVE BEND, OR 97701

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 239 SOUTHWEST CANYON DRIVE REDMOND, OR 97756

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 61185 RIDGEWATER LOOP BEND, OR 97702

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,179.30 beginning 01/01/2012; plus late charges of $108.97 each month beginning with the 01/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-326.91; plus advances of $45.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $515,351.53 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.90 percent per annum beginning 12/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, October 11, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,868.39 beginning 03/01/2010; plus late charges of $75.74 each month beginning with the 03/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-151.48; plus advances of $330.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $242,380.56 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.65 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $3,581.00 beginning 10/01/2011; plus late charges of $158.43 each month beginning with the 10/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-316.86; plus advances of $90.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $454,252.37 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.00 percent per annum beginning 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, October 18, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: June 05, 2012

Dated: June 20, 2012

Dated: June 11, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0046900) 1006.161091-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0049687) 1006.139205-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0053557) 1006.161596-FEI

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.161091

Publication Dates: Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012 1006.139205

Publication Dates: July 30, Aug. 6, 13 and 20, 2012 1006.161596


E8 MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by BLAKE D JOHNS- Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ANNA E. SIMPSON Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RONALD E. WELLS, GARD, AND TERESA J JOHNSGARD, AS TENANTS BY THE ENAND LESLIE L. SIMPSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as AND SARA L. WELLS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor(s), to KEY TIRETY, as grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as grantor(s), to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICA'S WHOLESALE Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSfavor of ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, as Beneficiary, dated LENDER, as Beneficiary, dated 05/13/1998, recorded 05/19/1998, in the TEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05/14/2009, recorded 05/21/2009, in 06/22/2004, recorded 06/29/2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book/Reel/Volume the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 494 at Page No. 0298 as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/refee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2009-21220, and subseNumber 2004-38317, and subsequently assigned to WELLS FARGO ception Number 98-20813, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF quently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF PARK PLACE SEAMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYCURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. by AssignWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP by Assignment recorded SERIES 2004-WCW2 by Assignment recorded 06/27/2011 in ment recorded 10/11/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as 04/05/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as recorder's fee/file/inBook/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/miRecorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-035711, covstrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-12578, covering the following decrofilm/reception No. 2011-22849, covering the following described real ering the following described real property situated in said county and scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: property situated in said county and state, to wit: state, to wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 22, TALL PINES FOURTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

LOT EIGHT IN BLOCK ELEVEN OF LAKE PARK ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

LOT 13, BLOCK 47, OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 15973 DAWN RD LA PINE, OR 97739-9793

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2425 NORTHEAST UPAS AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 17454 EGRET DRIVE BEND, OR 97707

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,559.59 beginning 11/01/2010; plus late charges of $62.38 each month beginning with the 11/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-242.23; plus advances of $270.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $225,080.29 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00 percent per annum beginning 10/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,218.03 beginning 01/01/2012; plus late charges of $51.32 each month beginning with the 01/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-102.64; plus advances of $60.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $131,777.75 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.65 percent per annum beginning 12/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $720.16 beginning 05/01/2011; plus late charges of $29.87 each month beginning with the 05/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-59.74; plus advances of $1,269.03; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $67,305.51 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.88 percent per annum beginning 04/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: June 08, 2012

Dated: June 08, 2012

Dated: June 08, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0024905) 1006.132343-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0047591) 1006.161488-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0052265) 1006.161451-FEI

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.132343 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by LISA M BLOCKHUS, AND CRAIG BLOCKHUS, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 09/20/2006, recorded 09/25/2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2006-64531, and subsequently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWMBS, INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2007-4, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-17 by Assignment recorded 08/09/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-27881, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit:

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.161488 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by CHRISTOPHER ROBINSON AND ONIRIA ROBINSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 01/19/2007, recorded 01/24/2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-04799, and subsequently assigned to U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO LASALLE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE MERRILL LYNCH FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-FF2 by Assignment recorded 05/23/2008 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-22542, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit:

LOT TWO (2), BLOCK TWENTY-FIVE (25), FAIRWAY CREST VILLAGE, PHASE V, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

LOT 7, GOLDEN-MANTLE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2 RED ALDER SUNRIVER, OR 97707

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 60874 GRANITE DR BEND, OR 97702

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $3,607.54 beginning 09/01/2010; plus late charges of $158.80 each month beginning with the 09/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-476.40; plus advances of $5,302.58; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $471,835.63 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.63 percent per annum beginning 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, October 12, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,438.68 beginning 06/01/2009; plus late charges of $111.40 each month beginning with the 06/01/2009 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-1,448.20; plus advances of $2,498.84; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $222,212.74 with interest thereon at the rate of 10.40 percent per annum beginning 05/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: June 08, 2012

Dated: June 13, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0083796) 1006.143394-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0049936) 1006.161777-FEI

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.143394

Publication Dates: July 30, Aug. 6, 13 and 20, 2012 1006.161597

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.161451

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-500953-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by CAROL JACOBS, as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, dated 11/7/2007, recorded 11/26/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2007-61207,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 101219 LOT 29 IN BLOCK 2 OF AUBREY HEIGHTS, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2234 NW 5TH ST, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 3/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,399.17 Monthly Late Charge $69.96 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $292,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.7500 per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 11/13/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 7/6/12 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 A-4270239 07/23/2012, 07/30/2012, 08/06/2012, 08/13/2012


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 E9

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MICHAEL BENTZ, A Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MARVIN L GRIF- Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by GREGORY J WILSINGLE MAN, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in FITHS AND CHERYL L OLIVER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as SON, NANCY WILSON, JOSHUA D WILSON, as grantor(s), to AMERfavor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in faITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRAas Beneficiary, dated 05/01/2007, recorded 05/07/2007, in the mortgage vor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as TION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03/13/2006, recorded records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's Beneficiary, dated 01/26/2009, recorded 01/29/2009, in the mortgage 03/16/2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-25954, and subserecords of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2006-18178, quently assigned to U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCfee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2009-04101, and subseand subsequently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA CESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR quently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE CERTIFICATETO LASALLE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MERRILL LYNCH MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYHOLDERS OF THE GSC CAPITAL CORP MORTGAGE TRUST 2006-2, FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP by Assignment recorded GSC ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST NOTES, SERIES 2006-2 by AssignSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-4 by Assignment recorded 03/08/2012 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's ment recorded 08/02/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as 08/04/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2012-008150, covering the folRecorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-26964, coverfee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-27235, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: ing the following described real property situated in said county and state, lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: to wit: LOT 7 IN BLOCK 122 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 8, PART III, LOT 7 OF CESSNA ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, LOT EIGHTY-SIX (86), NI-LAH-SHA-PHASE 2 AND 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON PROPERTY ADDRESS: 168 SE RICE WAY BEND, OR 97702

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 54640 HUSKY LN BEND, OR 97707-2655

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2238 NE ARAPAHOE COURT REDMOND, OR 97756

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,839.70 beginning 01/01/2010; plus late charges of $76.70 each month beginning with the 01/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-767.00; plus advances of $135.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $264,932.56 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.65 percent per annum beginning 12/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, October 25, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $821.69 beginning 11/01/2011; plus late charges of $32.87 each month beginning with the 11/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-131.48; plus advances of $15.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $104,299.61 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25 percent per annum beginning 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, October 18, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,262.95 beginning 07/01/2010; plus late charges of $55.16 each month beginning with the 07/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $235.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $147,471.46 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75 percent per annum beginning 06/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, November 02, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: June 20, 2012

Dated: June 11, 2012

Dated: June 25, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0092376) 1006.143945-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0053519) 1006.161598-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0055602) 1006.162361-FEI

Publication Dates: Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012 1006.143945 1000

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Publication Dates: July 30, Aug. 6, 13 and 20, 2012 1006.161598

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Publication Dates: Aug. 13, 20, 27 and Sept. 3, 2012 1006.162361 Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

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541-385-5809

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PUBLIC NOTICE 1000 1000 1000 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DENNIS C POWTRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE ELL, AND EDNA E POWELL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELEC- Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MELISSA A RATERMAN AND STEPHEN J RATERMAN, as grantor(s), to STEWART TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated TITLE OF OREGON, INC., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELEC07/22/2005, recorded 07/27/2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes PUBLIC NOTICE TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 11/30/2006, recorded 12/05/2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes Number 2005-48215, and subsequently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RUSSELL D ROBYORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR Number 2006-79526, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC. ASSET-BACKED CERERTS, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMN.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, TIFICATES, SERIES 2005-9 by Assignment recorded 08/13/2010 in PANY, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP by Assignment Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as recorder's fee/file/instrument/midated 05/03/2005, recorded 05/09/2005, in the mortgage records of Desrecorded 11/04/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's crofilm/reception No. 2010-31607, covering the following described real chutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/recepfee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-39277, covering the folproperty situated in said county and state, to wit: tion Number 2005-28350, covering the following described real property lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWO (2) IN BLOCK FIVE (5), FIRST ADDITION TO LOT FIVE (5), BLOCK THREE (3), FAIRVIEW ACRES, MEADOW VIEW ESTATES, CITY OF BEND, LOT 36 OF PARKVIEW TERRACE - PHASES I AND II, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1633 NE WATSON DRIVE BEND, OR 97701

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 61144 TAPADERA STREET BEND, OR 97702

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2969 NORTHEAST CANOE BEND, OR 97701

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $950.27 beginning 02/01/2012; plus late charges of $29.59 each month beginning with the 02/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $120.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $128,029.64 with interest thereon at the rate of 2.38 percent per annum beginning 01/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, November 05, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,911.85 beginning 07/01/2011; plus late charges of $81.27 each month beginning with the 07/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-162.54; plus advances of $40.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $247,382.88 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 06/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Wednesday, October 31, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $318.15 beginning 01/01/2012; plus late charges of $15.91 each month beginning with the 01/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-47.73; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $63,480.81 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.13 percent per annum beginning 12/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, October 18, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: June 26, 2012

Dated: June 21, 2012

Dated: June 11, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0056534) 1006.162476-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 11-0125964) 1006.147239-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0053524) 1006.161597-FEI

Publication Dates: Aug. 13, 20, 27 and Sept. 3, 2012 1006.162476

Publication Dates: Aug. 13, 20, 27 and Sept. 3, 2012 1006.147239

Publication Dates: July 30, Aug. 6, 13 and 20, 2012 1006.161597


E10 MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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% PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by VINCENT P Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by REID M. BARUDONI, as grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTLODUCA, AND DAIDRI L LODUCA, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor(s), GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in fadated 10/16/2006, recorded 10/23/2006, in the mortgage records of Desvor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as chutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/recepBeneficiary, dated 08/12/2004, recorded 08/24/2004, in the mortgage tion Number 2006-70597, covering the following described real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's situated in said county and state, to wit: fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2004-50629, and subsequently assigned to DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, LOT 16, QUAIL PINE ESTATES XII, AS TRUSTEE FOR HOLDERS OF THE HARBORVIEW 2004-9 TRUST DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. by Assignment recorded 01/27/2012 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2012-002398, covering the following described real property situated in 61332 SPARROW COURT BEND, OR 97702 said county and state, to wit:

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 53 SE TAFT AVENUE BEND, OR 97702-1229 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,104.46 beginning 10/01/2011; plus late charges of $40.38 each month beginning with the 10/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-56.71; plus advances of $135.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $138,697.49 with interest thereon at the rate of 4.50 percent per annum beginning 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, October 29, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 20, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0031768) 1006.162111-FEI Publication Dates: Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012 1006.162111 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-509976-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by DAVID M. BARRY, SINGLE MAN, as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INS, CO, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP, as Beneficiary, dated 7/6/2007, recorded 7/20/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2007-40171, , covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 202675 ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OR, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, CITY OF BEND, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 27 OF PAINTED RIDGE AT BROKEN TOP, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. APN NO. 202675 Commonly known as: 19521 PAINTED RIDGE LOOP, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 1/1/2012, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,464.67 Monthly Late Charge $123.23 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $358,146.77 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.7500 per annum from 12/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 11/13/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 7/6/12 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 A-4270234 07/23/2012, 07/30/2012, 08/06/2012, 08/13/2012

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,055.49 beginning 11/01/2011; plus late charges of $70.81 each month beginning with the 11/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $255.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $309,006.68 with interest Just bought a new boat? FIND IT! thereon at the rate of 5.50 percent per annum beginning 10/01/2011 until Call The Bulletin At Sell your old one in the BUY IT! 541-385-5809 paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, classii eds! Ask about our costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said Place Your Ad Or E-Mail SELL IT! Super Seller rates! default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protec- At: www.bendbulletin.com The Bulletin Classiieds 541-385-5809 tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, 1000 1000 1000 N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, November 05, 2012 at the Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at PUBLIC NOTICE public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the ex- Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by REX A. PETERSON AND BETTY A. PETERSON, as grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby seINSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTcured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by the Trustee. dated 05/04/2006, recorded 05/15/2006, in the mortgage records of DesNotice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, chutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/recepat any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the tion Number 2006-33576, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default by Assignment recorded 02/16/2012 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required un2012-005397, covering the following described real property situated in der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said county and state, to wit: said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation LEGAL DESCRIPTION: that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. QUARTER (NW1/4) OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perDESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; THENCE ALONG THE WEST son owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW1/4) NORTH "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, 00 DEGREES 13'00" WEST, 208.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH if any. 89 DEGREES 54'43" EAST, PARALLEL WITH THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW1/4), 208.00 FEET; Dated: June 27, 2012 THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13'00" EAST, PARALLEL WITH THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW1/4), RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 208.00 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW1/4); THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54'43" WEST For further information, please contact: ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. (NW1/4), 208.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION DESCRIBED IN BARGAIN SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 AND SALE DEED TO THE CITY OF REDMOND, RECORDED (800)-281-8219 JUNE 9, 1975 IN BOOK 219, PAGE 370 OF DEED RECORDS. (TS# 12-0047616) 1006.162577-FEI ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SAID Publication Dates: Aug. 13, 20, 27 and Sept. 3, 2012 1006.162577 NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 21; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE SAID NW1/4, NORTH 00 DEGREES 13'00" WEST, 130.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST LINE AND RUNNING PARALLEL WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SAID NW 1/4, NORTH 89 DEGREES 54'43" EAST, 30.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE PUBLIC NOTICE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF 19TH STREET, A PUBLIC ROAD TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING PARALLEL WITH THE SAID SOUTH LINE, NORTH 89 DEGREES Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DAWN L HIGGINS, 54'43" EAST, 89.00 FEET; THENCE PARALLEL WITH THE SAID as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE WEST LINE, SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13'00" EAST, 100.00 FEET TO ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS. INC, as Beneficiary, dated A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF 07/09/2007, recorded 07/13/2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes SALMON AVENUE, A PUBLIC ROAD; THENCE PARALLEL WITH County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception THE SAID SOUTH LINE AND ALONG THE SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT Number 2007-38660, and subsequently assigned to GREENPOINT OF WAY LINE, SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54'43" WEST, 89.00 FEET TO MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC by Assignment recorded 03/08/2010 in THE INTERSECTION OF THE SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/miLINE WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF crofilm/reception No. 2010-9734, covering the following described real 19TH STREET; THENCE PARALLEL WITH THE SAID WEST LINE AND property situated in said county and state, to wit: RUNNING ALONG THE SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF 19TH STREET, NORTH 00 DEGREES 13'00" WEST, 100.00 FEET TO LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THAT PORTION DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER (W1/2NW1/4SE1/4) OF SECTION THIRTY (30), TOWNSHIP FIFTEEN (15) (NW1/4) OF SAID SECTION 21; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SOUTH, RANGE ELEVEN (11) EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, THE SAID NW1/4, NORTH 00 DEGREES 13'00" WEST, 130.00 FEET; DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, PROCEED EASTERLY ALONG THE THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST LINE AND RUNNING PARALLEL WITH NORTH PROPERTY LINE NORTH 88 DEGREES 50'35' EAST 1318.14 THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SAID NW1/4, NORTH 89 DEGREES FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 41'23" EAST 864.92 FEET TO THE 54'43" EAST, 119.00 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; NORTHEAST CORNER OF THIS SOUTH PARCEL AND THE TRUE THENCE CONTINUING PARALLEL WITH THE SAID SOUTH LINE, POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 41'23" EAST NORTH 89 DEGREES 54'43" EAST, 89.00 FEET; THENCE PARALLEL 432.46 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER; THENCE ALONG THE WITH THE SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13'00" EAST, NORTH BOUNDARY OF CASCADE ESTATES DRIVE SOUTH 100.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE 88 DEGREES 52'43" WEST 981.95 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST OF SALMON AVENUE, A PUBLIC ROAD; THENCE PARALLEL WITH THE CORNER; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 41'42" WEST 432.24 FEET SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE NW1/4 AND ALONG THE SAID NORTHERLY TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES RIGHT OF WAY LINE, SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54'43" WEST, 89.00 FEET; 52'06" EAST 981.99 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER AND THENCE PARALLEL WITH THE SAID WEST LINE OF THE NW1/4, THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPT THOSE PORTIONS DEDICATED NORTH 00 DEGREES 13'00" WEST, 100.00 FEET TO THE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC FOR ROADWAY, TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. RECORDED JUNE 19, 1963, IN BOOK 135, PAGE 370, DEED RECORDS. S41026 kk

PARCEL 3 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2004-44 BEING A PORTION OF LOTS 3, 4 AND 5 IN BLOCK 143 OF SECOND ADDITION TO BEND PARK LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 17440 CASCADE ESTATES DRIVE BEND, OR 97701

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2236 SW 19TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $3,312.51 beginning 03/01/2009; plus late charges of $165.63 each month beginning with the 03/01/2009 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-331.26; plus advances of $375.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $636,000.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, October 12, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,455.63 beginning 11/01/2011; plus late charges of $61.57 each month beginning with the 11/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-184.71; plus advances of $35.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $185,629.95 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Thursday, November 01, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Dated: June 08, 2012

Dated: June 25, 2012

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 10-0020636) 1006.89720-FEI

For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0056081) 1006.162358-FEI

Publication Dates: July 23, 30, Aug. 6 and 13, 2012 1006.89720

Publication Dates: Aug. 13, 20, 27 and Sept. 3, 2012 1006.162358


SUMMER / FALL 2012

H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE

Depression: Stimulating new drug-free treatments

Healthy Living in Central Oregon

From fact to fallacy 26 or 29: Which size bike wheel is right for you?

Why most medical research is wrong

Geocaching: Hike with a treasure of an ending


H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE Healthy Living in Central Oregon

SUMMER / FALL 2012 VOLUME 4, NO. 3

How to reach us Julie Johnson | Editor 541-383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com Sheila Timony | Associate editor 541-383-0355 or stimony@bendbulletin.com • Reporting Anne Aurand 541-383-0304 or aaurand@bendbulletin.com Heidi Hagemeier 541-617-7828 or hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com Markian Hawryluk 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com • Design / Production Greg Cross Lara Milton Andy Zeigert • Photography Pete Erickson Rob Kerr Andy Tullis • Corrections High Desert Pulse’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0308 or email pulse@bendbulletin.com. • Advertising Jay Brandt, Advertising director 541-383-0370 or jbrandt@bendbulletin.com Sean Tate, Advertising manager 541-383-0386 or state@bendbulletin.com Lorraine Starodub, Health & medical account executive 541-617-7855 or lstarodub@bendbulletin.com On the Web: www.bendbulletin.com/pulse

The Bulletin All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval. Published: 8/13/2012

Write to us Send your letters of 250 words or less to pulse@bendbulletin.com. Please include a phone number for verification.

Page 4


Contents |

HIGH DESERT PULSE

COVER STORY

8

FROM FACT TO FALLACY Why do new medical studies so often prove the old studies wrong?

14

FEATURE

30

BEYOND ANTIDEPRESSANTS Working with new therapies to stimulate the brain.

DEPARTMENTS

7 14

UPDATES What’s new since we last reported.

18 20

SNAPSHOT: BEACH VOLLEYBALL Sand courts, open for play.

24 28 36 53 54

ON THE JOB: MISSION MEDICINE Bend surgeon moves to operate in Kenya.

20

HOW DOES SHE DO IT? Evidence shows Deputy District Attorney Mary Anderson likes working out.

GET READY: GEOCACHING The search is its own reward. Then there’s the treasure.

GET GEAR: THE GREAT WHEEL DEBATE 26ers and 29ers face off. SORTING IT OUT: WELL-CHILD VISITS Not just for infants anymore. BODY OF KNOWLEDGE: POP QUIZ How long can you expect to live?

28

ONE VOICE: A PERSONAL ESSAY Running with dad.

COVER PHOTO: ROB KERR; COVER DESIGN: ANDY ZEIGERT CONTENTS PHOTOS, FROM TOP: SUBMITTED, PETE ERICKSON, ANDY TULLIS (2)

HIGH DESERT PULSE • SUMMER / FALL 2012

Page 5

36


Updates | 2011 SUMMER / FALL

H I G H

R T D E S E

PULSE

NEW SINCE WE LAST REPORTED The Human Microbiome Project

Pregnancy Overtraining bed rest The fine line Often used, Aspirin between but never or Advil fitness and proven or what? fanaticism right The one for you

Oregon g in Central Healthy Livin

Cancer survival rates have never been higher d you then But what cure r can kill you late

Chest radiation can increase cancer risks The Summer/Fall 2011 issue explored the higher risk of cancer faced by those who have undergone cancer treatment (“Living with the Cure”). New data released at the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology found that women who received chest radiation for childhood cancer face a similar risk of breast cancer to those who have genetic mutations known as BRCA 1 or 2. “While most women are aware that hereditary mutations can increase their risk of breast cancer, few are aware that radiation to the chest can also increase this risk, including the women who themselves were treated,” said Dr. Chaya Moskowitz, a biostatistician with Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and lead author of the study. “It’s not just survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma who are at risk of developing breast cancer, but survivors of other childhood cancers typically treated with more moderate doses of radiation.” The Children’s Oncology Group recommends that women who received 20 grays of radiation exposure during their treatment start mammography as early as age 25 or eight years after treatment, whichever is later. The Sloan-Kettering research suggested women who received 10 grays or more could also benefit from early breast cancer screening. — Markian Hawryluk

In the Spring/Summer 2011 issue, we told you about efforts to study the collection of microbes living in the human body, known as the microbiome (“The War Within”). This summer, the first major effort to describe the microbiome was completed and published. The Human Microbiome Project, as it was called, involved hundreds of scientists and volunteers who collected bacteria living on a normal, healthy human body with the hope of gaining a baseline picture of the number of microbes that call us home. What they found was astonishing. There are more than 10,000 species of microbes that inhabit the human ecosystem, making up several pounds of each person’s body weight. Moreover, the scientists found that each person contains millions of microbial genes compared to a mere 22,000 human genes. These microbes, the scientists think, perform a variety of functions in the body, including some very beneficial ones such as helping with digestion. They now plan to study the microbiome further to see if different microbes are present in people with certain diseases. — Betsy Q. Cliff

Alternative donor screening protocols Since we reported on the blood donation pipeline and concerns over a shrinking pool of blood donors (“Blood Relations,” Winter/ Spring 2012), officials from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services signaled they were exploring alternatives to the lifetime ban on gay men donating blood. The agency issued a request for proposals on how to design pilot studies that could test alternative screening protocols and was reviewing the comments submitted. In June, 62 members of Congress signed a letter supporting the agency’s consideration of other approaches, and urged HHS to explore ways to differentiate between gay men engaging in high-risk sexual activity and those who pose little or no risk to the blood supply. — Markian Hawryluk

PLEASE WELCOME...

DR. JACK E. BERNDT, MD Pain Management Specialist to Central Oregon DR. BERNDT is a board certified Anesthesiologist and certified in age management medicine. DR. BERNDT has joined the Central Oregon office of Pinnacle Pain Center where he is practicing in comprehensive pain management medicine. Dr. Berndt’s approach includes interventional spine and joint procedures and multi-modality medical management.

1693 SW Chandler Ave. Ste. 260, Bend, OR 97702

DR. BERNDT is now accepting new patients by physician referrals. You can reach his office at:

541.323.3363

W W W . P I N N A C L E P A I N C E N T E R . C O M HIGH DESERT PULSE • SUMMER / FALL 2012

Page 7


Cover story

When science gets it

PHOTOS BY ROB

KERR

wrong Page 8


How is it that medical researchers can be so often misled or so easily mistaken that they conclude that drugs, treatments or interventions work when they really don’t? For one, it’s the nature of medical research. BY MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

I

n the 1990s, research conclusively showed that when patients had a sudden blockage of a coronary artery resulting in a heart attack, the best course of action was to clear the blockage with a tiny balloon and to implant a stent, a small mesh tube used to prop open clogged arteries. The treatment was better than clot-busting drugs at restoring blood flow to the heart, resulting in more patients surviving heart attacks and fewer patients left with debilitating heart failure. The intervention was so effective at saving lives that doctors began to use stents for other patients who weren’t in the throes of a heart attack. Why wait until a heart attack happened? A stent could keep arteries from getting completely blocked in the first place, they reasoned. By the early 2000s, doctors were implanting about a quarter of a million stents each year, 85 percent of them in patients who weren’t having a heart attack. Patients needed only complain of chest pain upon exertion or have a scan that showed narrowed arteries — even if they didn’t have any symptoms — and doctors would recommend a stent. But in 2007, a randomized controlled trial known by the acronym COURAGE found that individuals with stable heart disease did no better after a $15,000 stent implantation than they did taking medications that prevented chest pain and protected the heart and blood vessels. Somehow a treatment that carried more risk and a higher cost for patients with no additional benefit had become standard practice until better research proved otherwise. Doctors will tell you they’re scientists. Trained in biology and chemistry, schooled in the analysis of statistics and the scientific method, they act on the basis of research, implementing the findings of rigorously controlled medical studies that provide decisive evidence about the best course of treatment. Yet there’s a growing realization even among doctors themselves that medical research isn’t nearly as reliable as we’d like to think. Over the past decade, concerns have emerged that half, maybe

HIGH DESERT PULSE • SUMMER / FALL 2012

more, of published medical research findings could be flat wrong. This realization comes at a time when the push to adhere to proven strategies, to rein in doctors from freelancing in the care of patients, is being inextricably woven into the fabric of the medical system. There is at the same time a concern that the tapestry of medicine has more than a few loose threads. Last year, three physicians from the University of Chicago and Northwestern University reviewed the 212 original articles published in a single year of the New England Journal of Medicine, arguably the most prestigious medical journal in the world. Slightly more than half of the articles published a claim about some medical treatment, whether newly proposed or established practice. And of those, 13 percent overturned what was previously considered standard medical practice. Of the 35 studies that tested one of the established clinical practices — things doctors routinely do now — 16 confirmed the practice and 16 contradicted it. The remaining three studies were inconclusive. “They’re no more accurate than a flip of a coin,” said Dr. Vinay Prasad, one of the researchers who conducted the review. Prasad maintains that much of medical practice is unproven. “We don’t know if it works or if it doesn’t work, but it came into practice for a lot of reasons,” he said. “It seemed to make sense, and it became so ingrained in the culture that we do it every day. From time to time, people have had the courage to test some really wellestablished truths or the sacred cows of medicine.” Occasionally they find out what we had been doing for years was instituted in error. “It wasn’t wrong like ‘It was fine years ago, and we have something better.’ It was wrong in the sense that it was no better than what came before it, and no better than doing nothing,” Prasad said. “We call that medical reversal.” At best, a reversal means that patients have been getting ineffective treatment, accepting all the potential risks and side effects without realizing any benefits. At worst, it means that patients are being harmed

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Cover story | WHY MOST MEDICAL RESEARCH IS WRONG

Coffee and pancreatic cancer A 1981 study in the New England Journal of Medicine linked coffee to a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. The researchers, who were gastroenterologists, had identified patients in the hospital with pancreatic cancer and then asked them how much coffee they had consumed on a daily basis. The doctors then asked their other patients how much coffee they drank. Those with pancreatic cancer drank much more coffee . The flaw: Pancreatic cancer generally has few symptoms until its latter stages. So patients continued to live normal lifestyles — including drinking coffee — until they were hospitalized. The gastroenterologists’ other hospitalized patients, however, were mainly those with chronic gut conditions, who hadn’t been able to tolerate coffee for years.

by the treatment or by the lack of an alternate treatment that could have saved their lives.

Challenging the status quo No single researcher has challenged the status quo of medical research more than Dr. John Ioannidis, a Greek researcher now at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. It was Ioannidis’ groundbreaking 2005 article, “Why Most Published Research Findings are False,” that has served as a clarion call for skeptics challenging the medical research establishment. Ioannidis maintains that up to 90 percent of research is flawed. It is a shocking statement for many — as much today as when he first raised the issue seven years ago — but it’s based on more than just the numbers of medical reversals. There’s a simple logic behind the claim as well. Consider a researcher trying to uncover a treatment for a condition. There are an infinite number of possible interventions, but only a handful that might actually work. We might grant a researcher the benefit of the doubt, that he or she is likely to limit the research to the interventions that are scientifically plausible. Perhaps that would reduce the odds of finding something that works to one in a thousand, or one in a hundred. Are researchers so good at picking effective interventions that they could be right in more than half of their cases? Yet that’s exactly the scenario playing out in published medical research. The vast majority of published research findings show a positive effect; that is, the study proved a treatment worked. It’s just the opposite of what would have been expected. And that wasn’t just the impact of the marginal studies published in little-known journals that had little impact on medical practice. Ioannidis looked at studies that been cited more than 1,000 times by the authors of other research. Citations are a reflection of the atten-

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tion a study has garnered, good or bad, and of the impact a research article has had on the field. Ioannidis found that 45 of the 49 most-cited studies had a positive finding. Of those 45, the conclusions of 16 percent were contradicted by later studies. Another 16 percent were found to have overstated the benefit. Less than half — 44 percent — of the most high-impact findings were confirmed by subsequent research. “He hit the nail on the head,” Prasad said. “If we think of all the questions that could be asked, isn’t it shocking that what is published is consistently 70 to 80 percent positive findings? It’s too good to be true.”

The nature of research How is it that medical researchers can be so often misled or so easily mistaken that they conclude that drugs, treatments or interventions work when they really don’t? For one, it’s the nature of medical research. Most people think of research as being like the discovery of penicillin: It either works or it doesn’t. It either cures the disease or it doesn’t. There’s little doubt. Some discoveries are still like that. The discovery of the drug Gleevac by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University in the late 1990s, for example, changed the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia from a disease with a 30 percent survival rate to one that nearly 90 percent of patients survive. But Gleevac-type breakthroughs are few and far between. Most research deals with more subtle effects, incremental changes in risk that might not show a benefit until years into the future. Say you’re an average 45-year-old man. You have a 1.4 percent chance of having a heart attack or stroke by age 80. Your doctor prescribes a drug that research suggests will cut your risk of a heart attack in half. Even if your doctor could follow you for 35 years until you turned 80, there would be no way to know whether the drug truly prevented a heart attack or you were never going to have one anyway. Was it the drug or diet, exercise and genetics that kept you from having a heart attack? Only one in 71 of those 45-year-old men will have a heart attack or stroke. If the drug works, more than 140 men would have to be treated to prevent a single heart attack. It’s only when doctors can compare a large number of patients taking the drug to a large number of patients not taking the drug, and see the difference in heart attack rates, that they can link the drug to a benefit. Even then the doctors would have to be sure that there weren’t other important differences between the groups that led to more heart attacks in the group not taking the drug. “We see this over and over again,” said Dr. Roger Chou, scientific director for the Oregon Evidence-Based Practice Center, which reviews the quality of evidence behind various medical tests and treatments. “When you’re looking at complex things like health, and

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you’re trying to isolate the effects of a single component — say your diet — it’s very difficult. And it’s difficult because there are so many other factors that affect health; our ability to control for these other factors is often limited.”

Psychology of medicine It’s not enough for researchers to show that people get better after treatment. They must show that the treatment is the reason patients got better by designing studies that rule out the effects of all those other factors. When patients improve, the natural inclination is to believe the treatment made the difference. But medical research is fraught with complexities that can mislead us. For one, the patient may have gotten better due to the natural progression of the illness. Many conditions — such as a cold or the flu — are self-limiting. Eventually the body’s immune system gets the upper hand and clears the body of the virus or bacteria causing the sickness. But patients often seek treatment when their symptoms are at their worst. They get a treatment and begin to feel better, concluding it’s the treatment that changed the course of their disease. But in reality, they may have recovered just as quickly on their own. Patients also tend to get better just because they’re being studied, a phenomenon known as the Hawthorne effect. It’s named after a famous series of studies in the 1920s and 1930s at the Western Electrical Company’s Hawthorne Works in Chicago. Researchers were testing what working conditions would improve productivity. When they tried brighter lights, productivity went up. When they tried dimming the lights, productivity went up. Whatever they tried, productivity went up. When they concluded their study and left, productivity dropped. The same happens in health care. Patients who get a lot of attention from doctors doing research tend to do better. It’s similar to the placebo effect. Giving patients a sugar pill with no medicine in it sometimes has a therapeutic effect just because patients believe they are getting a medication. Particularly when studies use a subjective measure — such as reducing pain — it’s easy for researchers to be misled. Over the years, dozens of interventions — spinal manipulation, epidural blocks, exercise programs, fusion surgery — have all been shown to be effective for treating lower back pain in about 80 percent of cases. On the other hand, 80 percent of lower back pain resolves on its own within six to seven weeks. More recently, spine surgeons took a shine to vertebroplasty, a procedure in which a cement was injected into spinal vertebrae with compression fractures. Again, 80 percent of patients got better. “This is a procedure that was very enthusiastically taken up. There were neurosurgeons here in Portland where you could call them and get the patient in the next day,” Chou said. Then in 2009, doctors tested vertebroplasty against a fake pro-

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Vioxx and heart risk Vioxx was introduced in 1999 and quickly became a popular drug to treat arthritis and chronic pain. A randomized clinical trial funded by Merck showed the drug was safer than naproxen because it caused less internal bleeding and other gastrointestinal side effects. The flaw: While Vioxx did cause less bleeding than naproxen, the 2000 study comparing the two drugs showed a higher number of heart attacks and strokes among those taking Vioxx. Merck published the findings anyway, touting the reduced risk of bleeding. To explain away the higher risk of cardiac events, Merck said that naproxen must protect against heart attacks and strokes, a previously unrecognized effect of the drug. It was another four years before an independent study highlighted the higher cardiac risk and forced the company to pull the drug from the market. By that time, more than 2 million patients had taken Vioxx, producing annual sales of $2.5 billion.

cedure, in which doctors went through the same process with patients, taking them into the surgery room and inserting a needle but injecting no cement. Two trials found the sham procedure had the same rate of relieving pain as the actual procedure. “It is just a reliance on (knowledge of the disease) without any real clinical trials,” said Dr. Adam Cifu, an internist at the University of Chicago Medical School. “We’ve done this to a few people and they feel better, so we’re going to do it. That makes no sense. That’s what we were doing 300 years ago with snake oil. This person got better, so it must work. That’s just wrong.”

Study design Researchers try to prevent these types of missteps by including a control group of patients, similar in every way to the test subjects, except that they don’t get the intervention. But even in controlled studies, there are plenty of pitfalls. Medical research is subject to the influence of various factors that can intentionally or unintentionally bias the results. In some cases, it’s the way patients are recruited for the trials or how they are assigned to receive the intervention or be in the control group, a problem known as selection bias. In one famous case, a nurse who felt sorry for sicker patients assigned them to the treatment group, while steering healthier patients to the placebo group. Not surprisingly, the treatment group had much worse results. Better study design can help. The most reliable type of research is the large, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, where patients are randomly assigned to either the treatment or the control group, and neither the test subjects nor those treating them know which group is which. And when these types of trials are significantly large, they rule out findings that might be due to chance, rather than

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Cover story | WHY MOST MEDICAL RESEARCH IS WRONG

Avandia and heart risk Approved in 1999, Avandia was marketed as a safer, more effective way to treat diabetes. The drug was approved on the basis of studies that showed it was effective at lowering blood sugar levels of those with Type 2 diabetes. It quickly became the best-selling diabetes drug. The flaw: In 2007, a researcher from the Cleveland Clinic analyzed data posted online by GlaxoSmithKline, Avandia’s manufacturer, as part of a legal settlement over a case involving a different drug. The analysis showed that patients taking Avandia had a 43 percent higher risk of heart problems than those taking other medications or a placebo. Much of the research that showed a higher risk had never been published. Avandia remains on the market, but under strict restrictions.

a real effect. While randomized controlled trials, or RCTs, aren’t infallible, they have the highest batting average of any type of study. The findings of large, well-designed RCTs hold up 85 percent of the time. But RCTs are difficult and expensive to conduct, and because they start with the intervention being tested, it can take years if not decades to get meaningful results. Instead, researchers have opted for study designs that are easier, faster and less expensive, but at the cost of reliability. When researchers turn to observational studies — where they observe what is happening rather than setting the parameters of the study themselves — their findings hold only 20 percent of the time. The problem in observational studies is that the researchers aren’t setting up the experiment. Other people — the test subjects themselves or their doctors — are deciding whether a patient gets a treatment or not. Researchers can try to create a control group by finding individuals who are similar in every conceivable way to those who got the treatment, but who didn’t get the treatment being studied. But the approach is ripe for selection error. There’s no way to ensure there’s only one difference between the groups. “Observational studies are great at outlining the prognosis of a certain group, a certain cohort with a disease, and they generally give us really good information about the treatment that these people are getting,” Cifu said. “But we’ve been burned on those, dating back to the Nurses Health Study with estrogen replacement. We’ve been burned on those a lot.” The Nurses Health Study enrolled more than 120,000 female registered nurses in 1976, and the surveyed them every two years about their diet, lifestyle and health. One of the major findings of the study was that women who took hormone replacement therapy reduced their risk of a heart attack by two-thirds. On the basis of the finding in 1985, thousands of women were prescribed hormones, not only

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to treat symptoms of menopause but to protect them against future heart attacks and death. But two RCTs, one in 1998 and the second in 2002, conclusively proved that giving women estrogen increased, not decreased, their risk of heart attacks. The entire debacle became the poster child for the unreliability of observational studies. “If you think about why observational studies go wrong, there’s probably nothing better than the Nurses Health Study example,” Cifu said. “The two groups are clearly different. The people who chose to take estrogen made all sorts of other healthy choices.” It was only in hindsight that researchers identified what went wrong. Some critics have argued that the researchers made a huge blunder in deciding not to factor in the socioeconomic status of the nurses in the study. Those who chose hormone replacement therapy, it was later discovered, were better off financially than those who did not. And other studies have linked financial status with better health outcomes. The researchers, however, believed they didn’t need to adjust for income. After all, these were all nurses and seemingly should have similar income levels. “It’s easy to go back later and say we should have adjusted for that, but these were very smart people who said, ‘We adjusted for the 20 to 30 other things we thought were important,’” Chou said. “It’s so difficult to know ahead of time what you’re doing is wrong.” Most nutritional studies are observational, simply because it’s so difficult to get two groups of people to eat the exact same thing. Some nutritional studies have attempted to do this by confining patients to a hospital and providing them with all their meals. But you couldn’t conduct a study like that long enough to provide meaningful results over a lifetime of dietary choices. Additionally, you’d have the problem that when the control group isn’t eating something, they must eat something else, introducing a second variable to the study. Increasingly, observational studies are conducted by analyzing databases, looking for associations between behaviors or medications and certain outcomes. These types of studies can suggest a link between two things, but can’t prove a causal connection. It’s why so many vitamin studies have failed to show any benefit. An observational study crunches the data and finds that people who consume lots of a particular type of vitamin have a lower risk of heart disease or cancer. But once the notion is tested in an randomized controlled trial, no effect is found. Last year, two separate groups of researchers analyzed the same database of patients taking medications for osteoporosis to see if the drugs raised the risk of cancer. Neither group knew the other was conducting the same research. Despite dealing with the same group of patients and the same outcome, they came up with the opposite conclusions. One study, published in the British Medical Journal, identified patients

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with cancer, then looked back to see how many of them had taken the drugs. The other study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, identified patients who were taking the drugs, then matched them with a similar group of patients who weren’t taking the drug and counted up how many cancers occurred in each group. The first study found that those with cancer were nearly twice as likely to have filled at least 10 prescriptions for oral bisphosphonates than a control group of patients who did not have cancer. The second found little difference in the risk of cancer between the two groups. “Those are cheap, simple things to do,” Cifu said. “You don’t have to recruit patients and you don’t have to get someone to fund them.” While well-designed RCTs are considered the gold standard, the only type of study that can prove a causal connection, their difficulty has led researchers to cut corners. It could take decades for a trial to determine whether a heart drug prevents heart attacks and saves lives. Instead, researchers rely on surrogate endpoints, such as lowering cholesterol or high blood pressure. High cholesterol and blood pressure have been shown to increase the risk of heart attacks. Such changes can show up in weeks or months rather than years or decades. Last year, researchers from the medical schools at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Harvard analyzed all of the randomized medication trials published in the six most influential medical journals over a two-year period. They found that 37 percent used such surrogate markers. “Patients and doctors care less about whether a medication lowers blood pressure than they do about whether it prevents heart attacks and strokes or decreases the risk of premature death,” said Dr. Michael Hochman, the lead author of the study. “Similarly, patients don’t care if a medication prevents deaths from heart disease if it leads to an equivalent increase in deaths from cancer.” Yet the researchers found that 27 percent of studies measured only whether a drug prevents a single type of death. Dr. Danny McCormick, a Harvard Medical School professor and coauthor of the analysis, said that studies using surrogate markers or disease-specific mortality data were much more likely to be funded by pharmaceutical companies or other commercial ventures. Some 45 percent of industry-funded studies relied on surrogate endpoints, compared with 29 percent of those with no commercial funding. “It may be easier to show that a commercial product has a beneficial effect on a surrogate marker like blood pressure than on a hard outcome like heart attacks,” McCormick said. “In fact, studies in our analysis using surrogate outcomes were more likely to report positive results than those using hard outcomes like heart attacks.”

The business of research The higher use of less-reliable study designs by pharmaceutical manufacturers is perhaps not surprising given the billions of dollars

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Appendectomy and selection bias A randomized controlled trial published in 1996 in the World Journal of Surgery found that laparoscopic appendectomy had similar outcomes to open appendectomy, but had lower infection rates and a shorter recovery time. The flaw: It was later discovered that the researchers’ attempts at randomizing patients to one group or the other were circumvented by the staff carrying out the study. When a patient required an appendectomy, staff members were to pull an envelope at random from a stack, and open it to determine whether the patients should get laparoscopic or open surgery. The trial ran as designed during the day, but at night, staff had to wake the attending surgeon if a laparoscopic surgery was required. The staff members were hesitant to call on those surgeons in the middle of night — particular those with difficult personalities. So the staff came up with a simple solution. When they didn’t want to wake the surgeon, they held the envelopes up to the light, finding one that assigned the patient in question to an open procedure. That meant patients with worse cases who couldn’t wait till the morning tended to get open procedures, while those who could wait till the morning tended to get laparoscopic surgery.

at stake in pharmaceutical research. A new drug’s patent protection starts at the moment the patent is filed, starting the clock for a limited window before generic competition can eat into the company’s profits. But it may take additional time for the company to secure market approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The shorter the research phase, the more the company can profit. In many cases, those motivations have led not just to unreliable studies, but to outright fraud. In 2004, Warner-Lambert, a pharmaceutical company that had been purchased by Pfizer, pled guilty to violating rules regarding marketing of unapproved uses of the epilepsy drug Neurontin. A subsequent class-action suit led to the release of 8,000 pages of corporate documents describing how pharmaceutical companies can skew the research to make their drugs look more effective. The strategies included companies writing research articles on behalf of researchers, quashing the publication of negative research and changing the parameters of the study after seeing the results. Perhaps what was most concerning about the Neurontin case was that the actions the company took were only illegal because they promoted unapproved, or off-label, uses of the drug. Had the company used the same strategies to promote the approved use of the drug, it would have been fair game. Equally frightening was that most of the players involved considered the tactics standard practice. “What’s great about the Neurontin case was that the report became Continued on Page 47

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How does she do it? MARY ANDERSON

Mary Anderson, the county’s chief deputy district attorney, stands in front of the Deschutes County Courthouse in July.

100% in court BY HEIDI HAGEMEIER PHOTOS BY PETE ERIC K S O N

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or much of Mary Anderson’s life, exercising was just another thing on the to-do list. She regularly logged her time on the elliptical between raising two sons and working long hours as a Deschutes County prosecutor. She watched the scale to make sure her weight stayed in check. “In the past, working out was a chore,” she said recently. “I went to the gym to do cardio. I never really liked it.” Then about four years ago, Anderson’s perception of exercise changed. Friends coaxed her to try new activities with them. She began sampling sports like hors d’oeuvres from a platter. Today the Central Oregon native is as busy as ever — Anderson, 42, became the county’s chief deputy district attorney in 2011 and is a single mom. But now, not only does she eagerly await that next workout, she also seeks out new athletic challenges. In the past two years, she has run

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Deschutes County prosecutor Mary Anderson once thought of exercise as work, but now sees it as play

several half-marathons and in June completed a grueling race featuring military-style obstacles. The difference, she said, has been finding sports she loves and doing them with family and friends. “Now it’s more of a reward,” she said. “My friends are there and we encourage each other. It’s my social time.”

Learning to love exercise Musing recently over tea and half an almond croissant, Anderson said she played tennis in high school, but at that age she was really more into her family’s horses than sports. Anderson said she approached exercise as something she had to do for health and calorie control. Then a friend asked her to join an indoor soccer team. She noticed that exercise became play. The real turning point, she said, was in 2008. Another friend invited her to Bikram yoga, a form of yoga in which the room’s temperature is cranked up over 100 degrees.

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Mary Anderson trains at Pilot Butte State Park in June for the Tough Mudder, a grueling 10-mile race featuring military-style obstacles.

100% on the course While she doesn’t do as much yoga now, it struck her at the time that she found it a positive experience. “It was the first time I was doing something for me instead of just doing my time,” she said. It encouraged her to try more and do more. Last year, a third friend asked her to try out a learn-to-run class. Although she admits running still isn’t her first preference, she signed up to spend time with her pal. Now, Anderson’s passions are stand-up paddleboarding — which she calls a great core workout — and CrossFit. CrossFit is often done in a gym setting and focuses on strength and conditioning. It goes for high intensity, varying exercises throughout the workout to target different areas of the body. Anderson started a little more than a year ago and said she is hooked on the combination of intense training and camaraderie. “I’m going to sound like one of the people who has drunk the Kool-Aid, but CrossFit has changed my perspective on working out,” she said. “It’s the most supportive community of people,” she added. “It’s

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not who’s first or a competition, because everyone is helping everybody else.”

Taking on new challenges Anderson regularly squeezes in exercise at lunch or after work with colleagues from the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office. Or she meets her dad, Alex Robertson, who at 65 is also into CrossFit. She talks of her workout partners as teammates; they motivate and encourage each other, as well as hold each other accountable. In a town of elite athletes, Anderson laughs at the idea that she is doing anything special. Yet in the past several years, she has taken on some tough athletic challenges. Brandi Shroyer, a friend, running partner and fellow county prosecutor, described Anderson as a “very strong athlete.” “I think Mary approaches working out just like she does everything else,” Shroyer said. “She’s committed, she’s a hard worker, she works well with the team and she has fun.” Anderson accomplished last year’s goal of running her first half-

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SUBMITTED PHOTO

Mary Anderson, bottom right, celebrates with her teammates after finishing the Tough Mudder obstacle course race in Vancouver, B.C., in June. Anderson is joined by, from left to right in the back row: Brandi Shroyer, Sarah Foreman, Stacy Neil, Kandy Gies, Brigid Turner, Jenn Potts and Katie Clason. Kari Hathorn sits with Anderson in the front. The women helped each other throughout the course and finished together.

marathon, the Happy Girls Half Marathon. This year it was the Tough Mudder in Vancouver, B.C.: a 10-plus-mile race punctuated by 25 obstacles designed by British special forces that involve climbing, swimming and hauling. While the distance isn’t terribly long, it takes on average at least three hours to complete. And each course is different. Anderson said she hauled herself over wooden structures dubbed Berlin Walls, sloshed through pools of mud and ran uphill carrying a log. One obstacle called the Arctic Enema required racers to plunge into water so cold that ice chunks floated on top. “The cold water obstacles were shocking,” she said. “In the middle of one there’s a wall, so you had to go under. It was so cold I couldn’t breathe, I couldn’t talk. “You get out and you start running again and within a few minutes you don’t even remember that you were in cold water.” Yet the point of the event, Anderson said, is the essence of what she loves about

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How does she do it? | MARY ANDERSON working out: It’s about pulling together and team spirit. Everyone helps each other. She and her eight teammates finished the race together in roughly three-and-a-half hours. “We killed the obstacles,” she said. “I was so proud of us. We had so much fun and we were so happy when we were done.” Friends say Anderson is fit and competitive, regularly pushing herself to the limit. But she does it with good humor. Colin Richards, owner and head coach at Bend’s CrossFit All-Terrain, was her team’s personal trainer for the Tough Mudder. He said Anderson was the ringleader in getting the team together and kept them coordinated and motivated through six months of training. They did aerobic and anaerobic training, with plenty of legwork, running and weight-bearing resistance moves. “When she shows up it might seem like it’s a 75 percent day, and then she gets going and she goes for it 100 percent,” he said. “It’s very hard for her to not go 100 percent. She really loves to push herself.”

Maintaining balance For all the intensity, Anderson’s attitude about exercise remains laid back. She takes that stance in part because of her busy life. When her boys are with her, Anderson said she makes them the priority. Max is 15 and Charlie is 11. Anderson’s job is normally less than 50 hours a week but once in awhile can push into 60 or 70 hours. Like all prosecutors, she on occa-

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sion gets called to crime scenes in the middle of the night. She said she tries to reserve one day a week in which she doesn’t work at all. These pressures make working out with friends all the more important: It’s Anderson’s stress relief and social life. So she squeezes it in at lunch with colleagues, on a weekend morning with a girlfriend and even at times includes her children. Max sometimes does CrossFit with her — she said even though he doesn’t work out regularly, he can easily top his mom in the gym. She likes to get in four sessions a week, yet she doesn’t beat herself up if she can only manage one. Asked if she mountain bikes, she smiled and said, “I do socially.” “People shouldn’t be so hard on themselves,” she said. “If you miss a workout, no big deal.” These days, she rarely gets on a scale. “Now I have different goals,” she said. “It’s all about what I can do, what I can lift, what workout I can complete.” She advises people to try new sports — at some point, something might click. “If you aren’t looking forward to what you’re doing,” she said, “then you shouldn’t be doing it.” For the next challenge, she’s talking with her teammates about doing another race, perhaps a second Tough Mudder. And she’s excited. “I hope I never have to do time on an elliptical again.” •

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Sn apsh ot | BEACH VOLLEYBALL

PH OTO BY PETE ERICKSON

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on Bardeschewski, of Portland (left), and Matt Greenleaf, of Bend, wait for the spike by Ben Tustin, of Bend, during a tournament at the beach volleyball courts in Bend’s Old Mill District. The four sand courts — located just south of the Les Schwab Amphitheater — are open for play throughout the summer except during tournaments or league play. The courts are free to use during open play, but can be rented in advance for guaranteed access. Contact: www.bendbeachvolleyball.com.

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Get ready | GEOCACHING

Judson Brown, of Bend, goes geocaching near Lava Butte in June.

Seek and ye shall find Nearly 10,000 geocaches hide in Central Oregon. What are you waiting for? Page 20

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Resources • Check out the following websites for more information on GPS units: www.gpsinformation.net or shop.geocaching.com • Several local organizations periodically offer classes on how to operate GPS units. For information contact: Central Oregon Community College Community Learning: noncredit.cocc.edu, email ceinfo@cocc.edu or 541-383-7270 REI: www.rei.com/stores/96 or 541-385-0594

BY HEIDI HAGEMEIER PHOTOS BY ANDY TULLIS

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ven in the cool June morning, the black lava flow through the Newberry National Volcanic Monument was heating up. I was starting to sweat while leading a small band over razor-sharp rock and deep fissures in the volcanic landscape. Lava Butte, with its visitor center, roads and trails, loomed to the southeast and U.S. Highway 97 not far beyond it. Yet we traveled slowly through what seemed like wilderness, over

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jagged terrain without trails, guided by the GPS device in the palm of my hand. It was one of my first trips geocaching, a sport that requires a healthy dose of brain and at times some brawn. It involves using longitude and latitude coordinates plugged into a GPS device to find a cache, an object large or small hidden in the wild. But what I was fast learning is geocaching can be about more than that. The GPS delivered us to an island in the lava, home to a handful of ancient junipers with gnarled, lichen-covered limbs and ponderosa pines standing as sentinels. Ahead lay the Cascades coated in white. It was obvious why this cache is named “Forest in the Flow.” The man who designed the cache, Bend resident Judson Brown, smiled as we experienced our “ah-ha” moment. This was definitely about the journey. “Look at that,” he said, appreciating the view. “It’s like a little garden in the lava. Most people don’t even know it’s out here.” Geocaching is a relatively new outdoor pursuit, and it’s perhaps one of the most versatile. As on this day, it can require miles of hiking over terrain guaranteed to bring on a sweat. Or it can be as mild as a stroll through a city park. Caches can be as big as an ammo can or as small as a button-size magnet stuck to a rail. They can include puzzles and riddles that would confound the Sphinx. Or they might be simple enough to charm young children. And geocaching can be enjoyed yearround, since caches are hidden everywhere from national forests to urban Bend to the desert. Getting into geocaching is as simple as

owning and learning how to operate a GPSenabled device. From there, just about the only limitation is enthusiasm. “I like doing the more adventurous ones,” Brown said. “Ones that take me to a place I’ve never been before, ones that are really beautiful, ones where I have something to figure out.”

A new pursuit Geocaching blossomed in the wake of a major development. On May 2, 2000, the U.S. government removed what is called “selective availability.” Blake Miller, a GPS expert who teaches courses for Central Oregon Community College Community Learning, said until then, the government had deliberately scrambled satellite signals. It did so to make GPS units less accurate for average citizens out of concern that the technology might be used for criminal activity. President Bill Clinton ordered selective availability removed as soon as the military developed ways to selectively block GPS transmissions in the event of a national security threat. The change improved GPS accuracy for the general public by tenfold overnight. Miller said it was the difference between accuracy within about 300 feet to about 50 feet. That same month, according to the dominant website for geocachers, Geocaching.com, Oregon resident Dave Ulmer wanted to test the new GPS accuracy. He hid a container in the woods outside Portland, including a logbook and pencil. He broadcasted the idea and container coordinates online. Within days several people had found it and reported back on their

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Get ready | GEOCACHING

experiences. Soon others were replicating the experiment, hiding their own caches. Geocaching.com emerged by September of that year. Then there were 75 caches; now more than 1 million are hidden all over the world. The website has been the sport’s hub ever since. Participants use the site to find out about caches, report their experiences and relate the norms of the pastime to newcomers.

Getting started When getting going, the first step is to pick a cache at Geocaching.com. There are now nearly 10,000 caches hidden within 100 miles of Bend. Each cache has descriptions listed on Geocaching.com determined by its creator. One description characterizes the difficulty of the find and another the difficulty of the terrain. A third shows the size of the cache. There is also a map showing general location, a comment section for feedback from other geocachers and other pertinent information. The rules of geocaching are relatively simple: Don’t move the cache. Only place caches on land where you have permission. Don’t alter the landscape in any way. Share what you learn online with the geocaching community. There is an array of cache types out there. For a traditional cache, the coordinates provide the exact location of a container with at minimum a logbook to sign and date. Some larger containers also hold trinkets ranging from small toys to tools. Geocache culture allows for taking an item as long as it’s replaced with an item of equal or greater value. A nano- or micro-cache is a tiny container that holds only a logsheet. There are others: Multi-caches include several “waypoints” on the journey — spots to be found that offer coordinates of the next destination — before

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reaching the cache. Then there those that contain puzzles, riddles or math problems to solve to get the cache’s coordinates. Some caches can be found relatively quickly. It’s worth doing a few simple ones when starting out.

Searching the lava As we slowly moved through the lava, I reguarly stopped to shift my eyes between my feet and the GPS unit. But the device provides the most accurate data when moving, so my pauses would cause us to go in the wrong direction. Also, even the most expensive GPS device is only so good. As I sought one of the three waypoints on this adventure, the device told me I was getting warmer until I was about 20 feet away. Beyond that radius, it couldn’t pinpoint the destination. “That’s when geo-sense takes over,” Brown said, advising me to switch from using the device to using my senses. I thought about the clue — get to the base of a lone, large ponderosa pine — scanned the landscape and scrambled across the lava to the most likely spot. Brown, a math and science teacher at Seven Peaks School and longtime outdoor recreationist, went from geocaching novice to creating his own caches within a few years. He stumbled across geocaching online and decided to give it a try. After logging a number of caches, creating them seemed a natural extension. “One of the things that I like about it is it’s forced me to explore,” he said. “I get away from the crowds.” Since geocaching by design leads off the beaten path, Miller advised that people read their GPS device manuals and know how they work before heading out. Geocachers need to know the device well enough to get back to the car or trailhead, particularly if the most direct route is not possible due to

terrain or obstacles. “The key thing when you get a GPS is to get out and use it and develop that muscle memory,” he said. Geocachers also are urged to respect private property and to leave no trace on their outings. In fact, permission from the property owners, from private individuals to those responsible for public lands, is a requirement of creating a cache.

Enjoying the journey A geocache need not be in the wild, however. In fact, it can prompt a new perspective in a crowd. On a sunny day near Farewell Bend Park, Bend resident Jen Michaelson, her two sons, ages 16 and 11, and her dog climbed through brush toward the cliffs above the trail in search of a cache. Runners, bikers and dog walkers zipped by, but none saw this view of river and trees from 30 feet above. Michaelson said she always wears pants and sturdy shoes when geocaching, since the whole point is often to leave the trail behind. She also carries water, a spare GPS unit, extra batteries and a snake bite kit — which she has never used but considers essential. The Michaelsons go out as a family — she is presently attempting to seek a cache a day for an entire year. They have found caches embedded in rocks, fake bolts and magnets. Michaelson said she enjoys the challenge of a find. “Every once in a while you’re digging around and you can’t find it,” she said, “but you never give up.” And since people are constantly creating new ones, there is always a fresh pursuit. “We have been to some beautiful places geocaching,” she said. “It always leaves you excited.” •

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Judson Brown seeks a clue to finding a geocache on an island of green in the lava. Below, from left, he finds the container, examines the clue with GPS coordinates and discovers the cache.

Tech savvy Geocachers use Global Positioning Satellite, or GPS, technology to find objects with latitude and longitude coordinates. Each GPS device receives signals broadcast by satellites. A device needs signals from at least three satellites at a time to calculate its general location and four to get an accurate fix that includes altitude, time, longitude and latitude. A GPS device can range in price from $80 to $500. Some now come with geocaching-specific features. Also, some GPS-enabled smartphones and apps can

be used for geocaching. Several features to consider when looking to buy a GPS device include: • Base maps. A base map is a basic set of map data included with a GPS device, principally road maps of major highways and city streets. Various GPS device brands offer more detailed map data for a price. Buying detailed topographic maps is highly recommended by Geocaching.com. • Memory. Detailed maps can use a lot of memory on your device. Higher-end devices usually accept a memory card for additional storage.

• Channels. Multiple channels help the device find satellites more quickly and accurately. Most units today have 12 channels. • Interface. Many newer units have a USB port to make it easy to connect to your computer to download cache data. • Power source. Most units are powered by AA, AAA or lithium batteries. Some can plug into an external source, like a cigarette lighter. • Water-resistant. Look for a device that is at least water-resistant.


On the job |

MISSION MEDICINE

ANDY TULLIS

Dr. Michael Mara, center, and his wife, Ann, talk with their friend Robert Andrews, of Bend, during a going-away party for them at 10 Barrel Brewing Co. in Bend in June.

A journey of conscience Bend surgeon Michael Mara will teach doctors in Kenya for five years BY MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

S

itting in a luxurious hotel room in Maui on Jan. 12, 2010, Dr. Michael Mara switched on the flatscreen television. He was there with his wife, Ann, to celebrate their shared birthday the next day. The images that flickered on the screen changed the demeanor of their trip. A massive earthquake had hit Haiti, killing more than 300,000 and injuring 300,000 more. “It just broke my heart,” he said. “All those people were dying for

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the lack of an orthopedic surgeon.” It was a turning point for the Maras, a critical event that pushed them toward a journey they had always talked about. By the end of the year, the Bend surgeon had resigned from his job at Desert Orthopedics and committed to a five-year post teaching orthopedic surgery at a missionary hospital in Kenya. “We’ve always kind of had the idea that that was a possibility for us, and then kind of gradually, that urge got stronger and stronger, where I kind of felt I was in the wrong place,” Mike Mara said. The Maras had met in Africa in 2001. Mike was in Tanzania teaching

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The Maras’ mission

KENYA Kjabe Nairobi Atlantic Ocean

Indian Ocean

MILES 0

1,000 ANDY ZEIGERT

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Dr. Michael Mara holds a Haitian boy during a medical mission to the earthquake-ravaged country in 2010.

hand surgery for six weeks, while Ann was doing missionary work. under tarps. A million people … ” Mike had heard about Ann, and took a six-hour bus ride to attend a Less then two miles from the hospital where he operated, 200,000 Thanksgiving Day party thrown by a friend in the Peace Corps, know- Haitians were buried in a mass grave. “They had to get rid of the ing she would be there as well. He left Africa two weeks later, but soon bodies for infection control,” he said. caught up with Ann in her native Ireland. The two married in 2003 But Mike also saw profound hope in the patients he treated. and he convinced Ann they should return to Bend, closing the deal by “There were people who were thanking God for what they do telling her it doesn’t really snow all that much in Central Oregon. have, very actively, very vocally in just the worst setting I can imagRuse accomplished, Mike resumed his practice at ine,” he said. “It was incredibly moving to be able to Desert Orthopedics, but always had in the back of his go into a situation like that and just love people. You’re On mind the idea of returning to Africa. Although specialfixing their bones but you’re also just there for them.” the Web izing in hand surgery, he continued to take trauma and If there was any lingering doubt it was time to move Follow the Maras’ orthopedic cases at the hospital, anticipating a need on, the Haiti trip sealed it. for those skills if he went abroad again. Ann worked adventure on their blog, “It was a huge thing. If there’s a way I can do that for www.marasafari.org for The Justice Conference, a two-day annual event to my career, why would I not do that?” he said. “I came promote dialogue around issues such as human trafhome and the die was cast.” ficking, slavery, poverty and AIDS. Ann, meanwhile, took no convincing. “I’ve been waiting for nine They settled into the community, buying a house near Drake Park, years,” she said. “I was ready.” and had two children, Michael, now 7, and Jane, 5. In December, the two spent an evening talking and praying But dreams of returning to Africa continued to simmer. about their decision. There would never be a perfect time to go, When Mike returned from Maui in 2010, he signed on with a re- and once their kids got older, it would be much more complilief effort in Haiti. About a month before he was due to arrive, the cated to uproot their lives. The next day, Mike told Pat Hansen, hospital where he was to operate was shut down due to rampant the CEO at Desert Orthopedics, he was leaving and planned to go infections. The entire building had to be decontaminated and they to Africa. told him there was no point in coming. Not to be deterred, he found Hansen replied, “What took you so long?” another hospital at which he could work. Mike, 48, will teach orthopedic surgery at the Kijabe Hospital, a mis“I’d seen it before in other countries. I’d seen that kind of suffer- sion hospital with more than 100 beds on the edge of the Great Rift ing, but not to that magnitude,” he said. “Lots of people who were Valley, some 30 miles northwest of Nairobi. It’s a teaching hospital and injured and nobody to take care of them.” he will help train 15 mostly Kenyan doctors — a few Somalis, some The conditions were staggering. Millions of displaced people were Sudanese — who have completed medical school and two years of living in tent cities that “stretched to the horizon,” he said. “It was additional training. Each year, three new doctors are admitted to the people living like rats. People who had jobs and education and all five-year program at the hospital to become orthopedic surgeons. of a sudden there’s no clean water, no sewage facilities, just living “There’s 40 orthopedic surgeons for 40 million people in Kenya. We

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On the job | MISSION MEDICINE have 20 orthopedic surgeons in Bend,” Mike said. “I could go over there and work day and night and not make a dent. If we train Kenyans in orthopedic surgery, we can start to make a dent there.” Successful surgery requires a sterile operating environment, anesthesia and the proper equipment. The hospital may not be up to Western standards but it’s close, Mike said. “Sterility and anesthesia are nearly the equivalent of what we have here at St. Charles or the Bend Surgery Center,” he said. “The main limitations are senior leadership and equipment. It’s very much making do, MacGyvering, making the best of what you have.” The demand for care is overwhelming. Most of the people who come to the hospital are trauma patients. Traffic accidents are common, seat belts and air bags are not. Pedestrians, especially children, are frequently hit by cars. About 20 percent of his case load will be children with birth defects, a consequence of the nutritional challenges in the region. And because it’s a mission hospital, which turns away no one, the vast majority of patients will be poor. Kijabe does attract a fair amount of wealthier Kenyans as well, drawn to the high quality of care provided at the hospital or seeking care when the doctors or nurses at government-run hospitals go on strike. “I think the biggest challenge is going to be avoiding despair,” Mike said. “The problems are so bad and so insurmountable, if you go in with the idea that you’re going to fix everything, you’re going

to be crushed under the weight of it all. I think you have to be happy with small victories.” If the Maras had any doubts about their chosen path, they were dispelled by a chance encounter at Antioch Church in Bend. A fellow parishioner introduced the Maras to his son and daughter-in-law, who had just returned from Africa, where they had been working at the hospital in Kijabe. He, a dentist, and she, an obstetrician, were there with their two young children. “We just dove on them,” Mike said. “We pulled every detail from them.” Then a year ago, Mike went to Kijabe to meet the surgeons and the staff, and work there for two weeks. “He called me and said, ‘The only reason I’m coming home is you and the kids,’” Ann recalled. Their kids are equally excited about the trip. Michael has told his father he wants to get a spear for hunting. “What are you going to hunt?” Mike asked him. “Fruit,” he replied. Jane wants a pet giraffe. “They’ve grown up with the idea of moving, because they know that’s where Mummy and Daddy met and where they fell in love,” Ann, 39, said. “I think we’ve raised them with a sense of adventure.” The Maras’ colleagues in Bend are sad to see them leave, but know the opportunity to help the less fortunate will make them happy.

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Hansen called Mike the “heart and soul” of Desert Orthopedics. “He leads with his heart, not his mind,” he said. “If the people were honest and willing on their side, there’s nothing Dr. Mara wouldn’t do for them.” Mike willingly gave up two days each month — and the payments that came along with that — to volunteer at the Volunteers in Medicine clinic in Bend. “We live off of people’s goodwill,” said Dr. Jim Ritzenthaler, co-medical director of the VIM clinic. “And Dr. Mara, as long as I’ve been here, has probably been one of our great contributors, especially given that his contributions were in the context of a full-time practice.” Dr. Randall Jacobs, an urgent-care physician with Bend Memorial Clinic and a close friend of the Maras, said he wasn’t surprised the Maras decided to move, although he was a little stunned to hear it was for five years. “They are motivated in two ways,” he explained. “One is just a heart to serve, for those that don’t have access to the resource that he can provide. And number two, they’re both very strong Christian people, and they have really resonated and accepted the call to go serve, and (they’re) giving up a lot of their potential personal things, like wealth and security.” Mike said his world view has changed a lot since he first became a physician. “I used to have a really fancy car, a fancy house. I went down that

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road about as far as I can go down it,” he said. “It was all right, there was nothing wrong. But I knew there had to be more to life.” The Maras believe their good fortune, skills and ability to help people are blessings that come with responsibility. “My role is to steward those gifts. I don’t own those gifts. I don’t own the money. I don’t own the ability to do orthopedics,” Mike said. “I don’t feel like, ‘The great white doctor is here.’ It’s more like, ‘Wow, it’s really humbling to be the tip of the spear, to be able to make a difference.’” The organization that he will be working with in Kijabe requires them to raise the money they will need for day-to-day living expenses. They were not permitted to pay for any of the trip themselves, or even to book a flight until the money had been raised. “We’ve been fundraising since January and we have over 55 families who have come alongside, who are pledging a monthly amount,” Ann said. “Anywhere from, our lowest is $10 a month, to $1,000 a month.” Those families have pledged to support them not only financially but spiritually as well. The Maras have committed to being in Kijabe for five years and say they have no idea what they will do at the end of that time. “We don’t have a plan B yet,” Mike said. “We’ll just go and see what happens.” •

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Get gear |

THE GREAT WHEEL DEBATE

v

BY HEIDI HAGEMEIER PHOTO BY PETE ERICKSON

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he great wheel debate — long simmering among bike geeks — has made its way to the weekend warriors: Which to buy, 26 or 29? Twenty-six-inch wheels have been the standard for mountain bikes since Gary Fisher pedaled his cruiser off-road in the 1970s. But 29-inch wheels, in evolution for the past decade, have now come of age. Shops across the region are filled with new 29er mountain bikes. The best bike for you, experts say, depends on how you ride.

Want adrenaline? Go 26. Riding rocks, roots and tight descents? Travis Lucas, a former Mountain Bike World Cup mechanic and avid biker, says stick to the 26. The 26er is lighter, usually by a few pounds, and therefore more manueverable on technical trails. The shorter diameter also means the wheels are sturdier, which matters when taking big drops. “You get into technical kinds of rocky, slippery situations and you see those people

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Jeff Clausen 29-inch rider:

“A 29er just rolls over stuff easier, unquestionably. Some of the things that will jostle you or throw you off a 26er will not even faze you on a 29er.”

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v s . walking their bikes down,” Lucas said of 29 riders. Another word continually pops up with the 26: Fast. Less weight means it starts and stops faster. “You’ll learn skills on a 26er that you can’t really learn on a 29er,” said Jeff Clausen, a biking aficionado who owns 26ers and a 29er. “I make it a point every season to go out on every bike once. I’m like, ‘Wow, this thing is like a hummingbird on cocaine.’”

Want all-in-one? Go 29.

Travis Lucas 26-inch rider:

“A 29 is great for getting from A to B fast. But a 26 is a lot more fun on those spots in between. It does wheelies, it’s more playful. I’d rather ride my bike than drive my bike.”

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Those who own just one bike might want to make it a 29er. The smooth, less technical riding of Central Oregon lends itself to a 29er. The bike acts as if it has a bit more suspension, smoothing out obstacles. Compare rolling over a root with a skateboard wheel versus a truck tire — the smaller tire just can’t absorb as much shock. The 29er also makes for comfortable uphill climbs, as it grips trails well and doesn’t lose as much momentum on bumps and rocks. Clausen says the extra weight of a 29er need not be an issue, even though it entails a bit more exertion. “The average person can just downshift as long as you have a good selection of gears,” he said. And $600 to $2,000 can buy a decent front suspension 29er that can serve multiple purposes. “If you’re trying to use your one bike for more than one purpose — commute on your mountain bike and ride trails — I think it makes sense,” Lucas said. •

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Mike, a 22-year-old student at the University of Oregon, said he has battled depression since he was in middle school. Talk therapy has helped, but Mike hopes to stop taking antidepressants someday. In June, Mike received transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy, one of several new treatments doctors are using as an alternative to drugs, at Samaritan Mental Health Outpatient Services in Corvallis. The therapy is delivered daily over 5-6 weeks. Each 40-minute session involves 3,000 magnetic pulses delivered to specific areas of the brain.

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Treating depression |

NEW TECHNIQUES

Beyond antidepressants Doctors go straight to the brain with new treatments BY ANNE AU R AND PHOTOS BY JOHN KLICKER

O

n a midweek afternoon in June, Mike, a 22-year-old college student from Eugene, reclined in what looked like a dentist’s chair. He dug an iPhone from his jeans pocket and held it on his thigh, settling in for his 18th treatment of transcranial magnetic stimulation — magnetic pulses into his brain intended to treat major depression. Megan Hogland, the TMS technician at Samaritan Mental Health in Corvallis, secured a padded bar against the right side of Mike’s head to immobilize it. She aligned the casing of the machine’s magnetic coil directly over his dorsolateral prefrontal cortex — the left front part of his brain, thought to be involved with mood regulation. Then she activated the treatment from a computer screen. When the magnetic pulses started hammering on his skull, the device sounded like a machine gun. Mike wore earplugs to protect his hearing. Ten pulses clicked for four seconds. Then a silent, 26-second rest interval. Then the next 10-pulse series. This repeated for 40 minutes. “It’s like a woodpecker on your head,” said Mike, who preferred not to have his last name used. “Uncomfortable, but bearable.” TMS is a non-invasive therapy that doesn’t require the patient to use anesthesia or pain medications. The rapid-fire magnetic pulses feel like hot, deep zaps. They are not painful, but are intense and annoying. The stimulation can trigger twitches in the facial muscles or make a body sweat, especially the first time. It’s a relief when it’s over, Mike said. The Food and Drug Administration approved TMS in 2008 for the treatment of major depressive disorder in patients for whom antidepressant medications didn’t work. Samaritan Mental Health in Corvallis started providing the treatment in 2010 and is the only facility in Oregon to offer it. TMS is just one of a handful of cutting-edge approaches in the

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evolving landscape of depression treatment, intended for patients who have severe, disabling depression that other treatments haven’t helped. Antidepressant medications are the front-line weapon against depression, along with psychotherapy, also known as talk therapy, and in extreme cases, electroconvulsive therapy, which electrically induces seizures in the brain. But those methods are either only moderately effective or come with health risks and undesirable side effects.

Dissatisfaction with antidepressants In 2010, antidepressants were the second most commonly prescribed class of drugs in the U.S., according to IMS Health, a health-care information company. Antidepressants alter important neurotransmitters — chemicals such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine that brain cells use to communicate — that are associated with mood. Antidepressant use along with psychotherapy can cure many people, but there’s still a significant population for whom those treatments don’t work, according to Dr. George Keepers, chair of the Oregon Health & Science University psychiatry department. “Even if you do everything right with (antidepressants and psychotherapy) you have a large number of people … about 30 percent … who do not get over it,” Keepers said. “We’re not satisfied with how our current treatments work,” he said. Besides, antidepressants can bring their own set of problems. A group of researchers who examined previous studies on the benefits and effects of antidepressant medications concluded that their benefits don’t typically outweigh their risks. “We need to be much more cautious about the widespread use of these drugs,” said Paul Andrews, an evolutionary biologist at McMaster University in Canada and lead author of the article published

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Treating depression | NEW TECHNIQUES recently in the online journal Frontiers in Psychology. Studies have shown that antidepressants can create problems with digestion and sexual stimulation and function. They can also cause abnormal bleeding and stroke. Most people who take antidepressants experience side effects such as headaches, night sweats, nausea, agitation, dry mouth or constipation. Studies have shown associations between antidepressant use and higher rates of death than among non-users. Despite a growing dissatisfaction with antidepressants, their use has been steadily increasing. In the United States, doctors wrote about 264 million prescriptions for antidepressants in 2011, according to IMS Health.

What is depression? Major depression, also known as clinical depression or unipolar depression, goes beyond ordinary ups and downs, becoming a serious medical condition and health concern that interferes with someone’s ability to function in life. Experts believe that major depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental and psychological factors. It’s considered a disorder of the brain, and most theories suggest that neurotransmitter chemicals are out of balance in a depressed person. Keepers said that during episodes of depression, a brain functions differently. Researchers have measured a decrease in metabolic activity in various regions of the brain when a person is depressed. Medications, psychotherapy and electroconvulsive therapy can reverse those metabolic changes. Even the experts don’t definitively understand all the mechanisms behind depression, Keepers said. But it is known that a strong genetic predisposition coupled with stress or traumatic events can greatly increase a person’s risk, he said. People with one variation of the serotonin transporter gene, for example, are more prone to the development of depression under stress, said Keepers. A genetically predisposed person who lost a parent at a young age is more likely to develop depression than one who didn’t lose the parent. Absent the trauma or stress, that person’s risk might have matched the

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Tran scran ial magnetic stimulation therapy A modern and milder variant of electroconvulsive therapy, non-invasive TMS uses magnetic pulses to stimulate parts of the brain thought to be involved with mood regulation. A magnetic transmission penetrates the skull to a shallow depth in a focused area. It induces electrical currents through brain circuits to connected, deeper regions of the brain. The current activates a massive release of serotonin, dopamine and norephinephrine — neurotransmitters whose imbalances are linked to major depressive disorder. The outcome is similar to that of antidepressant medications, but to more speciic areas of the brain and without unwanted systemic efects of drugs. 1

Prefrontal cortex Concentration, pleasure, interests, mental fatigue

2

Anterior cingulate cortex Guilt, suicidality, worthlessness

3

Striatum Physical fatigue, pleasure, interests

4

Hypothalamus Mood, pleasure

5

Thalamus Sensory perception, sleep cycles

6

Amygdala Guilt, suicidality, worthlessness, mood

7

Hippocampus Emotions, memories Brainstem neurotransmitter centers

8

1 2

3 4 6

5

7 8

Sources: “Mechanism of Action,” courtesy Neuronetics, the manufacturer of the transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment system; Dr. George Keepers, chair of the Oregon Health & Science University psychiatry department ANDY ZEIGERT

rest of the population that does not have the gene variant. Depression can feel different to every individual who has it. For James Hayes, of Redmond, it’s physical. He hurts all over, he said, and he carries with him a pervasive, intense feeling of being down. At 61, Hayes has spent most of his life feeling depressed and about 30 years actively trying to treat it. Medications and therapy have “knocked the edge off,” he said, but have never resolved it. Hayes’ life was probably a perfect storm for depression. He said many of his relatives have been diagnosed with major depression and bipolar disorder, which is characterized by more extreme mood swings. This suggests a genetic component. He also had a tough childhood in Texas, during which he

said bad things happened to him. He has post-traumatic stress disorder. He declined to provide specific details. “For me, I think depression is irreversible. I’ve resigned myself to the fact that it’s going to be a monkey on my back for the rest of my life,” he said. He has thought about suicide, and his adult sons have at times removed his guns from his home. Every now and then, when he’s in urgent need of a safe place, he checks himself into Sage View Psychiatric Center at St. Charles Bend. When told about transcranial magnetic stimulation, he said it sounded like something he might be willing to try. “I keep telling myself I should be able to overcome this, but I am acknowledging that I can’t on my own,” he said.

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Major depressive disorder: beyond the blues Clinically-diagnosed major depressive disorder, or major depression, according to the National Institutes of Mental Health, is characterized by a combination of symptoms that interfere with a person’s ability to work, sleep, study, eat, and enjoy oncepleasurable activities. About one in 10 adults, or 10 percent of adults in the United States, deals with depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Oregon’s rates are slightly lower, with between 7 percent and 8 percent of adults having it. It’s more common in women than in men. Most who experience it need treatment to heal.

Major depression, such as what Hayes experiences, is different than grief or sadness. “A significant part of what we see is grief and loss — loss of a loved one, loss of health function. That can lead to symptoms (of major depression),” said Brian Evans, a licensed psychologist with the St. Charles Sleep Center in Bend who specializes in mental health patients whose depression is a component of a medical illness. “It’s important to tease out: Is it grief? Or depression? That may affect treatment. We don’t want to medicalize a normal life process of grieving,” Grief doesn’t call for antidepressant medications or brain stimulation, but more likely, some kind of therapy to teach the coping skills required to process the grief. “Depressed people feel worthless, have awful self-esteem,” Evans said. “That’s not the case with grief. But unresolved grief can turn into full-on depression.”

Stimulating the brain The prevalence and severity of depression, coupled with dissatisfaction about medications available to treat it, has opened the door to new methods of treating the brain, an electrochemical organ. Some of the newer approaches — TMS, vagus nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation — are gentler derivatives of their predecessor, electroconvulsive therapy, which has been used for decades. Brain stimulation techniques, generally speaking, produce a massive release of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine into the brain. “When you stimulate the brain electrically — with a big seizure or a milder one over a longer period of time — you are causing the neurons in the brain to do a bunch of things, one of which is to produce a lot of neurotransmitters all at once,” Keepers said. The result is similar to that of antidepressant medications, but more focused. Electroconvulsive therapy, a well-tested treatment, comes with a high success rate — 70 to 80 percent — but also with some harsh side effects. It was first developed in 1938. Known as “shock” therapy, it garnered a negative reputation, but the procedure has improved

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Treating depression | NEW TECHNIQUES over the years and is comparatively effective in quickly improving depression. In electroconvulsive therapy, a patient is both sedated and given a muscle relaxant while electrical currents pass through electrodes on the head, causing a seizure in the brain that typically lasts less than a minute. Patients undergo this treatment about three times a week for a couple of weeks. But side effects can include severe memory loss, headaches, upset stomach and muscle aches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation, such as that performed at Samaritan in Corvallis, is a modern variant of electroconvulsive therapy, but without the seizure, the side effects, hospitalization or anesthesia, Keepers said. Instead of electrical currents, magnetic pulses penetrate to a shallow depth and induce an electrical current in the brain. The stimulation goes to a more specific region than in electroconvulsive therapy. Only 11 patients have completed the treatment protocol — five to six weeks of daily, 40-minute sessions — of TMS treatment at Samaritan. Three more people were in treatment this summer. Dr. Scott Babe, who specializes in general psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine for Samaritan Health Services and is the main doctor in Oregon now providing transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy, said he believes TMS is underused because most insurance companies still consider it experimental and won’t pay for it. Out of pocket, it costs $9,085 for five weeks, and for those who need a sixth week, an

extra $1,750. Mike said he was lucky — his parents’ insurance helped. He stumbled upon TMS while searching the Internet for an alternative to antidepressant drugs, which hadn’t eradicated his depression and came with undesirable side effects. He was unwilling to try electroconvulsive therapy because of its potential to erase memory. So he spent several weeks this summer driving between Eugene and Corvallis daily for the treatment. It was worth it, he said, “because depression affects the whole realm of life and it sucks having it. You’ll go to such lengths (to resolve it).” Originally from Alaska, Mike said he’s felt depression and indifference since middle school. “I didn’t want to do much,” he said. “I had no ambition, motivation.” It’s become more severe recently, since he’s been in college. It degenerates his mood and shatters his attention span. When it’s really bad, his memory falters. The effects of TMS are cumulative. The treatment takes time. About halfway into Mike’s treatment, family members told him his mood seemed better. As he faced finals in June, he said he felt more confident than usual. Once completed, he said finals had gone well. After the multi-week treatment protocol ended, Mike said, “TMS helped and I feel much better.” Since the treatment is so new, long-term effects are yet unknown.

Where to get help Feeling depressed? Need help? Concerned about a friend? Crisis hotlines and information: • Deschutes County Behavioral Health: 541-322-7500 • Oregon Suicide and Crisis hotline: www.suicidehotlines.com/oregon.html This site offers emergency phone numbers for various towns across the state. In Central Oregon: 1-888-232-7192.

Studies on TMS suggest that it’s as effective as antidepressants, said Babe. As with patients who first try a new antidepressant, TMS patients have about a 30 percent chance of being cured and about a 50 percent chance of some measure of improvement, he said.

Oth er new techniques Another rarely used treatment is called vagus nerve stimulation. It is performed at OHSU. A device called a pulse generator is surgically implanted under the skin in the upper left chest. A wire connects the generator to the vagus nerve, which runs from the brainstem through the neck, down the side of the chest and to the abdomen. The generator sends continual, regular, brief electrical pulses to the nerve, which reaches areas of the brain that control mood, sleep and more. Originally developed to treat epilepsy,

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SUMMER / FALL 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


vagus nerve stimulation was found to alter neurotransmitters associated with depressive symptoms. In 2005, the FDA approved it to treat patients who had severe and recurring depression that hadn’t been helped by other treatments. It remains controversial, according to the National Institutes of Mental Health, because studies on its effectiveness have been mixed. Some insurance companies, such as Regence BlueCross BlueShield, consider it “investigational” and not medically necessary for the treatment of depression, and therefore don’t cover it. The cost of the device and its implantation can be around $25,000. OHSU was one site of a big study on the effectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation. About 25 “very sick patients,” the type for whom electroconvulsive therapy was not effective, got implants several years ago, Keepers said. About a quarter of the patients improved dramatically, he said. This therapy takes time to work. “It’s not a life-saving treatment for someone who is suicidal,” he said. And it has drawbacks; because the device affects a nerve in the neck, it can cause discomfort in the neck or throat, hoarseness and breathing and swallowing problems. Another technique is deep brain stimulation, in which electrodes are surgically implanted in the brain and controlled by a generator implanted in the chest. It works somewhat like a pacemaker, except instead

of sending pulses to the heart, the currents hit small, targeted areas in the brain that are dysfunctional in depression and mood disorders. Deep brain stimulation is used on an experimental basis only and is the subject of current trials. Some small trials have shown promising results, and researchers are hopeful that this might be something that can help people for whom other treatments have failed. Scientists believe that the pulses help “reset” malfunctioning brain areas, according to the National Institutes of Mental Health. As with any type of brain surgery, it’s risky. There’s a chance of bleeding in the brain, or stroke or infection. The stimulation can create disorientation, unwanted mood changes or sleeping problems. It’s likely that other side effects haven’t yet been identified, and long-term benefits and side effects are unknown.

Deep brain stimulation In deep brain stimulation, electrodes are surgically implanted in areas of the brain involved with depression and other mood disorders. They are controlled by a generator implanted in the chest. Stimulation is Electrode continuous and its frequency and level is customized to the Probe individual. DBS is available on an experimental basis only. A few small studies suggest promising results for treating depression. Source: National Institutes of Mental Health

Pulse generator

When time is of the essence: Different drugs

ANDY ZEIGERT

Normally, patients take antidepressants for weeks before they start to work. TMS and vagus nerve stimulation also take time to be effective. So researchers are looking for better ways to save the severely depressed patient who is suicidal, someone who can’t afford to wait a few weeks to see if any particular type of treatment might help. One drug therapy that’s purely experi-

Thank you,

mental but showing some promise is ketamine, which is approved by the FDA as an anesthetic. It’s also a recreational club drug, sometimes called Special K, which can be found in powder, pill or liquid forms. Ketamine has been used on battlefields and in emergency rooms as an anesthetic, with injections of about 2 milligrams at a Continued on Page 50

Thanks to you, we have added new availability for walk in appointments, online ability to register as a new patient, and new ways to access your health care team anytime, anywhere.

Visit our new website and get connected to your health. Bend Upper Mill 541.389.7741 Bend Eastside. 541.318.4249 Sisters 541.549.9609 H I G H L A K E S H E A LT H CA R E . C O M HIGH DESERT PULSE • SUMMER / FALL 2012

Page 35


Sorting it out |

WELL-CHILD CHECKUPS

Kristi Nix, a pediatrician with Mosaic Medical in Bend, gives Dakota House, 7, a regular well-child checkup in June.

Regular maintenance Assessing development from sleep to sociability, wellness visits provide a safety net for kids and a sense of security for their parents BY ANNE AURAND PH O TO BY ANDY TULLIS

B

arring illness or injury, many children stop seeing their pediatricians regularly when they no longer need routine vaccines, around age 6. “With older kids, parents can see they’re running around and know they can tell you when things are wrong. So parents are less concerned. And kids get busy. Well-child checkups get low on the list,” said Kristi Nix, a pediatrician with Mosaic Medical in Bend. But local pediatricians and national organizations recommend school-aged children continue to visit a health-care provider regularly to monitor everything from physical health to social development.

Well-child checkups A well-child checkup is a visit to a doctor in the absence of an illness or injury. Such visits provide opportunities for doctors to screen

Page 36

for potential problems that a parent might not realize exist, such as vision problems, heart murmurs and high cholesterol. The recommended frequency of well-child visits varies from clinic to clinic, but generally, children without underlying health problems should go annually between ages 2 and 5 and at least every other year during grade school. Visits should be annual again during puberty and adolescence, when children experience more physical, emotional and social changes, according to Kim Wollmuth, a pediatrician at Central Oregon Pediatric Associates. At well-child visits, doctors can screen for anxiety and depression, and discuss sleep habits, healthy eating, school performance and risks for sports injuries. Immunizations get updated. School-aged kids may be checked for cholesterol levels, and adolescent girls may need to be checked for anemia after menstruation begins. Doctors review growth and development over time. Obesity and weight-related complications are more prevalent these days, and they start young. Nix said she sees kids as young as 4 who

SUMMER / FALL 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Recommended checkup schedule The American Academy of Pediatrics developed this ambitious “Bright Futures” guideline, considered a gold standard for health supervision. In the past, many insurance companies covered one checkup every two years for school-aged children and teens. Newer policies are now required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to cover checkups according to this preventive health care schedule, said Kim Wollmuth, a pediatrian at Central Oregon Pediatric Associates. A well-child checkup includes: l To be performed J Risk assessment to be performed, action to follow if positive Age

5

6

7

8

9

Height and weight

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Body mass index

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Blood pressure

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Vision

l l J l J l J l J J l J J l J J J

Hearing

l l J l J l J J J J J J J J J J J

Developmental surveillance

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Psychosocial/behavioral assessment

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Alcohol and drug use assessment

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

J J J J J J J J J J J

Physical examination

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Immunization

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Hematocrit or hemoglobin screening

J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J

Tuberculin test

J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J

Sexually transmitted infection screening

J J J J J J J J J J J

Cervical dysplasia screening (girls)

J J J J J J J J J J J

Anticipatory guidance

l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Source: Bright Futures/The American Academy of Pediatrics

are at risk for high cholesterol and diabetes. In Central Oregon, 24 percent of kids are overweight by eighth grade, with 10 percent of them falling into the obese category, Nix said. “Obesity sneaks up on families quietly,” she said. “Our perception of how kids should look has changed so we don’t often look at an at-risk kid and feel like he’s got a weight problem. We are all used to looking at heavy kids.” Ongoing height and weight checks are important, she said. But another less tangible benefit of regular checkups, both pediatricians said, is establishing a relationship with a doctor. “If a child comes in for annual visits, they have less anxiety and more comfort with doctors, so when I start asking about sex and drugs in adolescence, there is at least an expectation that we’ll go over issues like that. I feel like that enhances adolescent care,” Nix said. Bend mom Rachel Schaedler takes her six children, who range in age from 15 months to 19 years, for annual checkups to see how much they’ve grown and if everything is on track. “I just think it’s important. You might find something,” she said. For example, her 13-year-old daughter Larissa Maguire had pain and swelling in her right knee one day when she was running. She happened to have a well-child checkup scheduled at Mosaic Medical the next day, so Schaedler suggested Larissa talk to a doctor about it there. Turned out it was a common knee condition that goes away with time. “It’s always nice to know, ‘Oh, that’s why,’” Schaedler said. She was

HIGH DESERT PULSE • SUMMER / FALL 2012

ANDY ZEIGERT

relieved it wasn’t an injury and didn’t need treatment.

Sports physicals Well-child checkups are more comprehensive than sports physicals, which are required biannually for children from seventh grade up who join extracurricular school sports programs. Sports physicals require a medical provider to clear the child to play a sport after examining the patient’s cardiovascular and musculoskeletal health. But sports physicals are not a substitute for more inclusive wellchild checks, which delve deeper than the question of the child’s ability to play, Wollmuth said. Some athletes participate in convenient, mass sports physical clinics that rotate kids through various health stations, Wollmuth said. Screening questions are asked about prior injuries, asthma, fainting, concussions, seizures and family history of heart disease or sudden death. Sometimes orthopedic and cardiac care specialists are involved. But, she said, this method provides a snapshot in time. Care providers don’t usually have a patient’s records or growth charts to review. For those who get routine well-child checks, making an additional sports physical appointment is not necessary. “When you get a wellchild check, ask for a sports physical as part of it,” Nix said. “It’s just a form to fill out. We’ve done everything we need to for sports physical in a well-child checkup. Bring a form or make sure we have it.” •

Page 37


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GENERAL SURGERY

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RYAN C. DIX, PsyD

St. Charles Family Care

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

BRIAN T. EVANS, PsyD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

EUGENE KRANZ, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SONDRA MARSHALL, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

NATHAN OSBORN, MD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MIKALA SACCOMAN, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

LEAH SCHOCK, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

REBECCA SCRAFFORD, PsyD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

KIMBERLY SWANSON, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

CARDIOLOGY

JEAN BROWN, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICK KOCH, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GAVIN L. NOBLE, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

STEPHANIE SCOTT, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JASON WEST, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

JOHN D. BLIZZARD, MD

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

DARIN CLEMENT, PA-C

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

CARL E. MILLER, PA-C

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

ANGELO A. VLESSIS, MD

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

TIMOTHY J. ZERGER, PA-C

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

1345 NW Wall St, Ste 202 • Bend

541-318-1000

www.bendwellnessdoctor.com

CHIROPRACTIC

JASON M. KREMER, DC, CCSP, CSCS

Wellness Doctor

DENTISTRY

MICHAEL R. HALL, DDS

Central Oregon Dental Center

1563 NW Newport Ave • Bend

541-389-0300

www.centraloregondentalcenter.net

BRADLEY E. JOHNSON, DMD

Contemporary Family Dentistry

1016 NW Newport Ave • Bend

541-389-1107

www.contemporaryfamilydentistry.com

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DERMATOLOGY

ALYSSA ABBEY, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

ANGELA COVINGTON, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MARK HALL, MD

Central Oregon Dermatology

388 SW Bluff Dr • Bend

541-678-0020

www.centraloregondermatology.com

JAMES M. HOESLY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GERALD E. PETERS, MD, DS (Mohs)

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANN M. REITAN, PA-C (Mohs)

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MARY F. CARROLL, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICK N. GOLDSTEIN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

TONYA KOOPMAN, MSN, FNP-BC

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PATRICK MCCARTHY, MD

Endocrinology Services NW

2084 NW Professional Court • Bend

541-317-5600

n/a

TRAVIS MONCHAMP, MD

Endocrinology Services NW

2084 NW Professional Court • Bend

541-317-5600

n/a

ENDOCRINOLOGY


2012 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

FAMILY MEDICINE

CAREY ALLEN, MD

St. Charles Family Care

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

HEIDI ALLEN, MD

St. Charles Family Care

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

THOMAS L. ALLUMBAUGH, MD

St. Charles Family Care

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

KATHLEEN C. ANTOLAK, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SADIE ARRINGTON, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

865 SW Veterans Way • Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JOSEPH BACHTOLD, DO

St. Charles Family Care

615 Arrowleaf Trail • Sisters

541-549-1318

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

EDWARD BIGLER, MD

High Lakes Health Care Upper Mill

929 SW Simpson Avenue • Bend

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

JEFFREY P. BOGGESS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BRANDON W. BRASHER, PA-C

St. Charles Family Care

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SHANNON K. BRASHER, PA-C

St. Charles Family Care

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MEGHAN BRECKE, DO

St. Charles Family Care

2965 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

NANCY BRENNAN, DO

St. Charles Family Care

2965 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

WILLIAM C. CLARIDGE, MD

St. Charles Family Care

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MATTHEW CLAUSEN, MD

St. Charles Family Care

2965 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

LINDA C. CRASKA, MD