Page 1

Serving Central Oregon since1903 75tgi

FRIDAY August9,2013

wemusic: unnver esiva H

<ytrggud ts, te ett e

/f n~iug

riiEE Einiir nriiEE,Eireer„,

Today BREWFEST GUIDE-

bendbulletin.com

LOCAL• B1

EMERGENCY RESPONSE

TODAY'S READERBOARD

In Bend, the wait

Dolphin pals —Theyrecognize the "voices" of former

tank mates, bolstering their reputation for intelligence.A3

for help The old Cline Falls Power Plant, a hydro-

Chocolate smarts?

electric site built between 1907 and 1912,

— The sweet treat maygive the elderly a boost.A3

was declared a historic resource, at least

is longer By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

in part, in 1992. Now that PacifiCorp's 100-

hl SpurtS —As the Bend Elks regular season comes to a close, players hopethe experi-

year leasehas ended, a dispute has arisen

ence will pay off.C1

over its standing as a landmark.

HOSpiCe —Use of the endof-life option is expected to

By Shelby R. King • The Bulletin

rise as boomers age.D1 Submitted photo

'Sandwichgeneration'

I

— Raising children and taking

I I '

care of aging parents, too.02

Yemen droneattacks

— Death toll reaches 34 in less than two weeks of strikes.A2

And a Web exclusiveEven after the Cold War, a

Washingtonto-Moscow hotline remains connected.

benddulletin.com/extras

EDITOR'5CHOICE

Detroit: a

lab for failed clreams from D.C. By Michael A. Fletcher The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — During the Nixon years, Detroit's business elite laid plans for the glittering Renaissance Center retail and office complex. The Ford and Carter administrations brought the "People Mover," an elevated rail loop around downtown that hardly anybody rides today. Other presidential administrations introduced enterprise zone tax breaks and empowerment zone development grants. President Barack Obama promised to save the Motor City by saving the auto industry. But none of it worked. Rather than becoming a showplaceforthe transformational power of urban policy, Detroit now stands mostly as a burial ground for good intentions — of both Democrats and Republicans. Last month, Detroit became the largest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy, offering sobering proof that decades of government and privatesector intervention was no m atch for decades of residential and business flight that eroded the city's once ample tax base. SeeDetroit /A4

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

he Deschutes County Commission on Wednesday decided it will hear an appeal regarding the historical standing of the Cline Falls Power Plant site. In July th e H i storic Landmarks Commission found PacifiCorp, which maintained the power plant on a 100year lease that was terminated in February, had violated county code when it removed power-generating equipment — generators, a turbine, governor, control board and relays — from inside the powerhouse. The equipment removal did not alter the powerhouse exterior,according to Jeffrey Lovinger of Lovinger Kaufmann LLC, an attorney repre-

T

senting PacifiCorp. PacifiCorp also removed a switchyard, which is a separate facility from those designated as historical landmarks, according to documents provided to the commission. Lovinger in July requested an appeals hearing based what he described as five errors in the Historic Landmarks Commission's determination that "the entire site of the Cline Falls Power Plant is the protected historic resource." "In 1992, when the board designated the dam, the penstock and the powerhouse as historic resources, the switchyard was not yet 50 years old and therefore was not old enough to qualify as ahistoric resource,"Lovinger wrote

to the commission. "PacifiCorp argued that it did not violate the historic protection ordinance because there is no requirement that PacifiCorp obtain (Historic L a ndmarks) C ommission approval before altering or removing a structure, such as the switchyard, which has not been designated as a historic resource." The Cline Falls Power Plant was built between 1907 and 1912 and was used to pump irrigation water from the DeschutesRiver to generate hydroelectric power. The Historical Landmarks Commission in 1992 designated the power plant as a protected historic resource due to its age. SeeCline Falls/A5

Fake service-doggear findsa market online By Kate Santich Orlando Sentinei

ORLANDO, Fla. — Public confusion, legal loopholes and shady Internet businesses have led to an "epidemic" of fake service-dog certificates, vests and harnesses for use on ordinary pets. And advocates for the dis-

TODAY'S WEATHER Chance of storms High 81, Low 56

Page B6

abled say the issue is creating big headaches for those who truly need the canines' assistance. The problem has gotten so bad that Canine Companions for Independence — the nation's largest breeding and training service-dog program-

launched an online petition this week asking the U.S. Department of Justice to take action. "Unfortunately, people are trading on the fact these harnesses and vests have become distinguishing marks of service dogs, so now you find unscrupulous

businesses who sell these things to people who want to take their dogs into the store or restaurant or in the passenger cabin of the plane," said Paul Mundell, national directorof canine programs for CCI. "It happens all the time." SeeDogs/A5

INDEX All Ages D1- 6 C lassified E1 - 6 D ear Abby D5 Ob i tuaries B5 C1-4 Busines s/Stocks C5-6 Comics/Puzzles E3-4 Horoscope D 5 Sports Calendar I n GO! Crosswords E4 L o cal/State B 1-6 TV/Movies D5, GO!

The Bulletin AnIndependent Newspaper

Vol. 110, No. 221, 62 pages, e sections

Bend fire officials agree with anemergency room physician who said this week that lengthy paramedic response times contributed to the deaths of three patients in the last year. Dr. William Reed, a doctor at St. Charles Bend who also advises the Bend Fire Department on medical care, raisedthe issue during a presentation to the City Council Wednesday on the department's need for additional money to hire more firefighters. Reed was unavailable for comment Thursday. He told the City Council that two of the cases involved respiratory problems. Battalion Chief Bob Madden said he was working during one of these respiratory emergency calls. The city has 19 firefighter paramedics working at any time including the battalion chief, and it typically sends a total of 14 to 16 to fight a fire, officials have said. But in Bend, emergency response still takes minutes longer than in comparable areas elsewhere in the state. See Bend Fire/A4

The next big leak: Swiss bank users? By Doreen Carvajal and Raphael Minder New York Times News Service

PARIS — Herve Falciani is a professed whistle-blower — the Edward Snowden of banking — who has been hunted by Swiss investigators and jailed by Spaniards, and claims to have been kidnapped by Israeli Mossad agentseager fora glimpse of the client data he stole while working for a major financial institution in Geneva. "I am weak andalone,"Falciani said, as three round-theclock bodyguards provided by the French government looked on with hard stares. The protection was needed, he insisted, because he faces constant risk as the sole key to decipher the encrypted data — five CD-ROMs containing a list of nearly 130,000 account holders that may be the biggest leak ever in the secretive world of Swiss banking. SeeBanks/A5

+ .4 We tjserecycled newsprint

:: IIIIIIII jl o

88 267 02329


A2 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 20'I3

The Bulletin How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Moni-er i.,6:30 a.m.-noon Sat-eon.

GENERAL INFORMATION

NATIoN 4% ORLD

rones in emen as aceo sri esrises

CunSulate eVaCuatlun — The State Department haswarned Americans not to travel to Pakistan andevacuated nonessential government personnel from the country's second largest city because of a specific threat to the consulate there, a U.S. official said Friday. The move was not related to the threat of an al-Qaida attack that prompted Washington to close temporarily 19 diplomatic posts in the Middle East and Africa. According to U.S. Embassy spokeswoman

Meghan Gregonis, the U.S. is shifting its nonessential staff from the consulate in the eastern Pakistani city of Lahore to the capital, Islam-

abad. Emergency personnel will stay in Lahore, andembassyofficials do not know whenthe consulate will reopen, she said.

541 -382-1811 By Carol J. Williams

ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com EMAIL

bulletin©bendbulletin.com N EW S R O O M AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-383-0367 N EW S R O O M

FAX

541-385-5804 N EW S R O O M

EM A IL

Business ..... business©bendbuiletin.com City Desk........... news©bendbullotin.com Community Life communitylife©bendbulletin.com Sports.............. sports©bendbullotin.com

OUR ADDRESS Street

177 7 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR97702 P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR97708 CaorSd0AVL

simuooAw.

DsciiutgsRs

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C.McCooi...........541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black ..................... Editor-in-Chief John Costa.........................541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS

and a reckless practice that at Los Angeles Times times kills innocents. As a security alert kept milThe latest drone strikes were lions on edge throughout the reported by the Yemen Post, Muslim world, suspected U.S. among othermedia. drone attacks in Yemen killed Yemeni authorities tolerate 12 alleged militants Thursday, the strikes as they work with and Saudi securityforces ar- U.S. special forces to drive out rested two foreign men they al-Qaida-affiliated m i l i tants said were plotting suicide at- who took refuge in the mountacks in the region. tainous hinterlands two years The drone strikes and the ago, when the country was arrests in Saudi Arabia of a racked by w i despread proYemeni and a Chadian — re- tests against then-President ported to have issued "messag- Ali Abdullah Saleh. The autoes of incitement and hatred" crat who ruled for more than through social media — re30 years was forced out early flected the intense vigilance last year and replaced by Abed pervading police and military Rabbo Mansour Hadi, who has forcesacross the Middle East, collaborated with U.S. forces Africa and South Asia at the in a campaign to eradicate the end of the Muslim holy month strongholds where terrorists of Ramadan. train and plot attacks on WestThe three drone strikes in ern targets. Yemen brought the total since C ounterterrorism eff o r t s July 27 to eight and the death have been directedat Yemen toll to 34. The stepped-up pace in recent days because of inof targeted killings may be tercepted militant "chatter" thinning the ranks of al-Qaida- that suggested terrorist attacks aligned extremists, but it has were being plotted between the also intensified anger among head of the global al-Qaida netYemeni citizens who consider work, Ayman al-Zawahri, who the aerial bombardments a is believed to be in Pakistan, violation of their sovereignty and its Yemeni affiliate, al-Qai-

da in the Arabian Peninsula. Intelligence sources have said that al-Zawahri has deputized AQAP leader Nasser Wuhayshi to carry out plots against U.S. and Western citizens and interestsin connection with W ednesday's end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and the Eid al-Fitr holiday. The U.S. State Department issued a worldwide terror alert last week and closed more than 20 embassies and consulates in the Muslim world to protect its staff in the event of an attack. American diplomats based in Yemen's capital, Sanaa, were evacuated from the country Monday, as were British and French nationals. Yemeni security o f f icials r eported W e dnesday t h a t they had foiled an al-Qaida plot to seize two port cities on the Gulf of Aden and blow up pipelines and other vital oil infrastructure. Few details were disclosed by authorities, and the claimed thwarting of the attack did little to ease fears of impending violence in the region.

Iran launChSite — Iran has built a previously undisclosed launching site and spacecenter near the northeastern city of Shahrud that could theoretically be used for testing ballistic missiles, accord-

ing to satellite imagery reported on Thursday by IHSJane's. Jane's said its analysis of the satellite imagery showedthat the new site, about 220 miles east of Tehran near the Caspian Sea, had been developed over the past three years. Iranian officials have said they are in-

tent on developing rockets capable of sending astronauts into space, and have alluded to the construction of a new site as part of that goal.

Kenya airpOrt — International passenger flights were slowly resuming from Nairobi's main international airport on Thursday, one day after a devastating fire ripped through its main arrivals hall and

disabled East Africa's busiest air transportation hub. Officials said they expected full operations to be restored by the end of the day. Several international departures and arrivals had been completed at

the airport, Jomo Kenyatta International, by middayThursdayand dozens were scheduled for late evening. Fort Hood trial — The judge overseeing the military trial of the Army psychiatrist charged in a deadly 2009 shooting rampage at the

Fort Hood basedenied on Thursday his former lawyers' request to limit their role in the case.Theruling in Killeen, Texas, came aday after the lawyers said they could no longer assist him because he was

seeking the samegoal as prosecutors — to be sentenced to death. The judge, Col. TaraOsborn, said the psychiatrist, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, was competent to represent himself, and the Constitution gave him the right to do so, but she ordered his three former lawyers

to continue to assist him. TaSer death — On Thursday, the parents of Israel HernandezLlach called for an independent investigation into the death of their 18-year-old son who was immobilized by a Miami Beach police Taser. Police used a Taser after Hernandez-Llach, a skateboarding graffiti

artist, fled on Tuesday. Anhour later, he was pronounced deadat a hospital. Raymond Martinez, the police chief, said the cause of death had not been determined. The family's lawyers said had Hernandez-

HOLIDAY OVERSHADOWED BY STRIFEIN EGYPT

Llach beenarrested, he likely would have beencharged with criminal

Advertising Jay Brandt..........................54t -383-0370 Circulation andOperations Keith Foutz .........................54t -385-5805 Finance Holly West ...........541-383-0321 Human Resources

mischief, a misdemeanor that seldom ends in jail time. "Those guilty of this must be brought to justice," the boy's father, Israel Hernandez

Bandera, said Thursday. Medal OfFreedOm — Bill Clinton, Oprah Winfreyand14 others will receive the Presidential Medal of Freedomthis year. The White

Traci Donaca ......................

House announced Thursday that President Barack Obama will bestow the nation's highest civilian honor on a class that includes Benjamin

TALK TO AN EDITOR Business Tim Doran..........541-363-0360 City DeskJoseph Ditzler.....541-383-0367 Community Life, Health Juiie Johnson.....................541-383-0308 Editorials Richard Coe......541-383-0353 GO! Magazine Ben Salmon........................541-383-0377 Home, All Ages AlandraJohnson................541-617-7860 News Editor Jan Jordan....541-383-0315 Photos DeanGuernsey......541-383-0366 Sports Bill Bigelow.............541-383-0359 State Projects Lily Raff McCauloo ............54t-410-9207

Bradlee, 91, the former executive editor of TheWashington Post, who led the paper during the Watergate era. More than 500 people have received the award since President John F. Kennedy created it 50

years ago byexecutive order. POWerballWinner — A Minnesota man claimed his third of a $448 million Powerball jackpot on Thursday, wasting no time before revealing his good fortune to the world and saying he had "been waiting for this day my entire life." Paul White, 45, a project engineer from

Ham Lake, said his family often gavehim ahard time for frequently playing the lottery, and he had a tough time convincing many of them that he had finally won. — From wire reports

TALK TO A REPORTER Bend Hillary Borrud ...........541-6t7-7829 Business Eion Glucklich ....................541-6t7-7820 Rachaei Rees.....................541-61 7-7816 Calendar............................54t-383-035t Crook County.....................541-383-0367 Deschutes County Shelby R. King ...................541-383-0376 Education Tyler Leeds .......541-633-2160 Family/All Ages Mac McLean......................541-617-7816 Fine Arts/Features David Jasper...................... Health Anne Aurand...................... 541-383-0304 Markian Hawryluk..............541-617-7814 Jefferson County...............541-383-0367 La Pine/Sunriver...............541-363-0367 Music BenSalmo n............54t-383-0377 Projects Sheila G.Miller....541-617-7831 Public Lands Dylan J. Darling..................541-617-7812 Public Safety Scott Hammers..................541-383-0387

Redmond/Sisters Lesiie Pogmire Hole...........541-548-2186 Salem LaurenDake...........541-554-1162 Washington, D.C. Andrew Clevenger...........i..202-662-7456

REDMOND BUREAU Street address.......226 N.W.Sixth St. Redmond, OR97756 Mailing address....P.O.Box788 Redmond, OR97756 Phone.................................541-504-2336 Fax .....................................54t -548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin's primary concern is that ali stories are accurate. If yoo know ofan error in a story, call us at 541-383-0356.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One mOnth: $1 7 IPrintonly:$16)

By mail in Deschutes County: One month: $14.50

By mail outside Deschutes County: Onemonth: $f 8 E-Edition only: One month: $13 TO PLACE AN AD Classified...........................54t-385-5809 Advertising fax ..................541-385-5802 Other information .............54t-362-181 t

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints....................541-383-0358 Obituaries..........................541-61 7-7825 Back issues .......................54t-385-5800 Ali Bulletin paymentsareacceptedatthe drop box atCity Hall. Checkpayments may he converted to anelectronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS P552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W.Chandler Ave., Bend, OR9770Z

Periodicals postagepaidat Bend, OR. Postmaste r Send addresschangesto The Bulletin circulation department, Po Box6020, Bend, OR97708. The Bulletin retains ownership andcopyright protection of all

staff-preparednewscopy,advertising copy and news oradilustrations. They maynot be reproducedwithout explicit prior approval.

Find It All Online

Khalil Hamra/The Associated Press

Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi celebrate the Eid al-Fitr holiday on Thursday, marking the end of the Muslim holy fasting

town center squares andMorsi's supporters marking the holiday with their own protest gatherings, including the two major sit-ins by the Islamists in Cairo.

month of Ramadanthat is traditionally celebrated

Meanwhile Morsi's wife NaglaaMahmoud, inher

with cookies, presents and new clothes, outside

first public appearance since the July 3 coup, told thousands of his supporters Thursday to remain defi-

Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, whereprotesters have installed a camp inCairo. This year's holiday is overshadowed bythe deep divisions in Egypt, with the interim government plan-

ning to celebrate the festival with outdoor prayers in

ant in the face of the military-backed government's

E LEVATIO N Klevation Capital Strategies

bendbulletin.com

warnings that security forces will clear the ongoing

775 SW BonnetWay Suite 120 Bend Main: 541-728-0321 www.elevationcapital.biz

protests, promising her husband "is coming back, God willing."

• vri

2 friends of bombing suspect indicted

SEVENTH MOUNTAIN RaSORT

Offeringturn key rentals or primary residence. Pools, spas, ice rink, golf next door or head to Mt. Bachelor.Sweeping views and a desirable lifestyle. Starting at $65,000 CALL LISA KIRBS

6.8 beautiful acres. Bring your horses or RV. 60x36 barn. All utilities to property. $334,000

cALL IANE F Loo D

A T 5 4 1-350-9993.

MLS: 201106061

AT 541-4e0-2576.

The Associated Press BOSTON — Tw o c ollege friends of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were indicted Thursd ay for a llegedly trying t o thwart investigators by throwing away fireworksand other items they found in Tsarnaev's dorm room the day before his capture. Authorities later discovered the fireworks in a New Bedford landfill, the federal indictment says. Dias K a d y rbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov, both 19 and nationals of Kazakhstan, face charges of conspiracy to obstruct justice. The two, who were in the U.S. attending college andshared an apartment in New Bedford, have been detainedsincethey were charged in a criminal complaint in May. If convicted, they face up to 20 years in prison. Both are scheduled for arraignment Tuesday. Also Thursday, a hearing scheduled for Monday for a third Tsarnaev friend charged in the case was canceled. Robel Phillipos is accused of lying to investigators about visiting Tsarnaev's dorm room.

I NN OF THE SEVEN T H M OUN T AI N C O N D O M I N I U M S

P RICED REDUC ED/BARN O R RY GARAGE

WARNER E NjOY T H E FA N T A S T I C YIEWS from your custom home. 3 b edroom, 2.5 bath, 2400 sq.ft.on corner lot. $335,000 CALL PETE VAN DEUSEN AT 541-480-3538.

LiII'— —.,

ttl ~

RIVER RIM BEAUT Y Enjoy this wonderful community. Master on main, Hickory hardwood floors, Alder cabinets, 2296 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, bonus room and located in a cul-de-sac.Excellent

'w't,'i»

condition. $391,500 CALL LARRYJACOBS AT 541-480-2329. MLS:201305644

MLS: 201206195

:„, Pjli,»a,

AWBREY BUTTE GEM

WESTERN STYLE GETAWAY 12 acres adjacent on 3 sides to BLM. 3 bedroom, ranch style home, bunkhouse, smallbarn,garage and shop. Fully fenced. Great place for outdoor

This 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 4170 sq. ft. home sits on .77 acres with lush landscaping providing a unique and peaceful setting. 3-car garage, bonus room and more. $749,000 CALL KIM WARNER AT 541-410-2475. MLS: 201307 I 25

adventures. $225,000 CALL KIM KAHL AT 541-480-1662. MLS:201300945

s

I

I. EQIIR HOUSNG WPCRIUNM

.

s

I

I .

I•

I

I

w

D UPLEX W I T H A SETTING

II

PARK

Ranch styleduplex with huge private fenced

backyards. 2 bedrooms and den, 1150 sq. ft. each. Off street parking. $299,900 CALL TAMMY SETTLEMIER AT 5 4 1 -410-6009. MLS: 201304573


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

M ART TODAY

TART • Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, namesin the news— the things you needto knowto start out your day

It's Friday, Aug. 9, the 221st day of 2013. There are144 days left in the year.

HAPPENINGS Obama SpeakS — The president has said hewill discuss relations with Russia ata

news conference.

Student lOanS — The

A3

STUDIES

Consume chocolate; stay sharp'?

o ins remem er eir rien s The study showed dolphins ignoring unfamiliar dolphins in favor of whistles from past tank mates,

president will also sign a bill

even if 20 years had passed, showing again that humans may not be the only creatures to retain

lowering interest rates that Congress passedearlier this

memories of others for long stretches of time.

By Melissa Pandika Los Angeles Times

month.

HISTORY Highlight:In 1974,Vice President Gerald Ford became the nation's 38th chief executive

as President Richard Nixon's resignation took effect. In1842, the United States

and Canadaresolved aborder dispute by signing the WebsterAshburton Treaty.

In1854, Henry DavidThoreau's "Walden," which described

Thoreau's experienceswhile living near WaldenPond in Massachusetts, was first published. In1862, during the Civil War,

Confederate forces droveback Union troops in the Battle of

Cedar Mountain in Culpeper County, Va. In1902, Edward Vll was

crowned king of Britain following the death of his mother, Queen Victoria. In 1936, Jesse Owens won his fourth gold medal at the Berlin Olympics as the United States took first place in the 400-meter relay. In1942, Britain arrested Indian

nationalist MohandasGandhi; he was released in1944. In 1944, 258 African-American sailors based at Port Chicago, Calif., refused to load a munitions ship following an explosion on another ship that killed 320 men, many of them black. (Fifty of the sailors were convicted of mutiny, fined and

imprisoned.)

By Meeri Kim The Washington Post

D olphins have l on g i m pressed people with their sharp minds and humanlike traits, such as calling each other by name, goofing offand even understanding numbers. Now a scientist has found that the m ammals can recognize an old friend's whistle, even after they have been apart for 20 yearsthe longest social memory ever recorded for a nonhuman. In a study released Tuesday,

dolphins largely ignored calls from other unfamiliar dolphins but responded when an old tank mate's signature whistle was played back to them. It didn't matter how much time had passed since the two had last seen each other or whether they had been tank mates for only a few months: The dolphins appearedto remember a familiar whistle. "The main implications of such findings is that humans are not the only mammals that retain memories ofothers for long periods," said SUNY-Buffalo psychologist Eduardo Mercado III, who was not involved in the research. Prior to the new study, published online in th e journal "Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B," much of what had been known about dolphin memory was anecdotaL This recorded feat o f l o n g-term memory puts dolphins in the same field as other highly intel-

The Assoaated Press file photo

Dolphins encode their identity in a signature whistle, according to University of Chicago scientist Jason Bruck. "If you took our names and our faces, merged them into one thing, that would be the best way to describe a signature whistle," Bruck says. ligent creatures, including some monkeys and elephants, both of which have been known to recognize unrelatedmembers of their species after time apart. University of Chicago scientist Jason Bruck studied 56 bottlenose dolphins that were moved between six different institutions — including Chicago's Brookfield Zoo, the Minnesota Zoo and an aquarium at Disney World in Orlando — over a period of 20 years. They were typically transferred for breeding purposes, which somewhat mimicked the shifts among pods of dolphins in the wild. That approach gave Bruck a record of the animals' social

Older chocoholics may have a new excuse to indulge their cravings: The dark stuff not only soothes the soul, but it might also sharpen the mind. In a s t u d y p u blished Wednesday in the journal Neurology, researchers reported that chocolate may help improve brain health and thinking skills in the elderly. The Boston-based team found that older people who initially performed

months and I year. The dolphins vocalize their whistles when they find themselves isolated from others, but they also can mimic a friend's whistle to call to another dolphin. The whistles, which can be heardup to a m ile away, help dolphins discern friend from foe. To make sure that the dolphins weren't reacting to random noises, Bruck first played a set of unfamiliar whistles. Once thedolphins were accustomed to the speaker, he played a familiar whistle, which resulted in a dolphin quickly approaching the speaker, even if it realized another dolphin wasn't there.

poorly on a memory and reasoning test and also had reduced blood flow to their brains showed improvement after drinking two cups of cocoa every day for a month. The researchers had set out to test whether chocolate could increase blood flow to the brain during problem solving, boosting performance, after finding in earlier studies that consuming chocolate high in the antioxidant flavanol was associated with better brain and blood vessel functioning. They randomly assigned subjects to drink either flavanol-rich or flavanol-poor hot chocolate. To the scientists' surprise, there weren't significant differences in the neurovascular or cognitive changes between the flavanol-rich and flavanol-poor groups — suggesting that something else in the chocolate was causing the improvements.

"Say you are walking along

histories, which would be nearly impossible to collect for wild dolphins. The dolphins studied were separated for as long as 20 years. Bruck stored all the dolphins' signature whistles on his iPod and broadcast them through an underwater speaker, taking note of the animals' reactions. A dolphin's identity is encoded in its signature whistle, Bruck sald. "If you took our names and our faces, merged them into one thing, that would be the best way to describe a signature whistle," he said. Dolphins choose this "name" for themselvesbetween the ages of 4

the street and someone projected a hologram of your grandmother in front of you," he said. "You'd turn and look." One female dolphin named Allie, currently at the Brookfield Zoo, last lived with Bailey, a female now in Bermuda, more than 20 years ago. But upon hearing Allie's whistle, Bailey recognized the sound, according to the research. Heidi Harley, who researches dolphin cognitive processes at the New College of Florida, called the study "interesting" and the number of dolphins studied "impressive." But she wondered whether their r esponses were to a f a m iliar sound rather than a connection to a dolphin they once knew.

In1945, three days after the

atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan, the United States ex-

ploded a nuclear device over Nagasaki, killing an estimated 74,000 people. In1969, actress Sharon Tate

and four other peoplewere found brutally slain at Tate's

Los Angeles home;cult leader Charles Mansonand a group of his followers were later convicted of the crime.

In1982, a federal judge in Washington ordered John Hinckley Jr., who'd been ac-

quitted of shooting President Ronald Reagan and three oth-

ers by reason of insanity, committed to a mental hospital. In1988, President Ronald Rea-

Dog yawns: more with owners than with strangers Los Angeles Times

ly when the human yawner L OS ANGELES — D o g is its owner than when it's a owners: Do you think your stranger, researchers said in a beloved animal has empathy study published Wednesday in for you when you come home the journal PLOS One. "Our study suggests that dog-tired, drop into a chair and let out a big, loud yawn? contagious yawning in dogs Scientists think dogs might is emotionally connected in a be feeling empathy for their way similar to humans," Tereowners when they do what sa Romero, who conducted the humans often do with one an- study with colleagues from other: contagious yawning. the University of Tokyo, said A dog yawns more frequent- in a statement.

gan nominated LauroCavazos to be secretary of education; Cavazos became the first His-

V

T

2007 TOY ~tt"'" rjggNg" 4RUNNE

DnlvOp

s,.. $gg4~

$$i~~64p"

SRS $22,99e 72 months 0 3.99% on approved credit, plus Title and License. 720 & above credit score. VIN¹ 124717 STK¹Ue909A

F+TP + i . T+TiT+T+T+TP+aTiT+TiT+TiT+TIT+TiT+T+T+~i5

panic to serve in the Cabinet.

In1995, Jerry Garcia, lead

-6~9~48 „„.

singer of the Grateful Dead, died in Forest Knolls, Calif., of a heart attack at age 53.

:

.

2008 JEEP NLIMITED SAHARA

I

Ten yearsago:TheArmy fired up its first chemical weapons incinerator located near a resi-

Only

dential area, outside Anniston, Ala., to destroy two rockets loaded with enough sarinnerve

$3

agent to wipe out acity. Dancer-actor Gregory Hinesdied in Los Angeles atage57. Five yearsago: ToddBach-

$2e,995

n0r mollth

e4 months © 3.99% on approved credit, plus Title and License 720 & above credit score.

VIN¹ 615157 STK¹Ueeeec

man, the father of 2004 volley-

ball Olympian Elisabeth "Wiz"

'

Bachman, was stabbed to

, onlV

'

death by aChinese manin Beijing in an apparently random

+T+T+T +

~c y7 0

.i+a +T+T+T+T+a+T+a+ak &

'"'"wg0,„2012 TOYOTA

$.60~~"" UNDRA GREw

attack just hours after the start

MAX LTQ

of the Olympic Games.(Theassailant took his own life.) One yearago:The United States began alandmark proj-

$44,995 I

ect to clean up dioxin left from

e4 months © 3.99% on approved credit, plus Title and License. 720 a above credit score.

$I

I

Agent Orange atthesite of a former U.S. air base inDanang

VIN¹ 2495e7 STK¹C6911A

in central Vietnam, 50 years after the defoliant was first

sprayed byAmerican planes on Vietnam's jungles to destroy

/~

@gsgg

enemy cover.

MOTORS

BIRTHDAYS Basketball Hall of FamerBob Cousy is 85. Actor Sam Elliott is 69. Hockey Hall of Famer Brett Hull is 49. Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Deion Sanders is 46. Actor

Eric Bana is 45.Actress Anna Kendrick is 28. — From wire reports

Great Selection.

K

ERICAN EXPRESS

4

Gre a t S e r v ice .

Great P r i c ing.

Electrolux

Lg~a g

"Limited exclusionsapply; 15962096oNervalid 7/22 8/16/2013;5100ff550offervalid8/17 9/7/2013""Whilesupplieslast N ' opurch asenecessaryOpentolegalresidentsoftheltS andPuertoRico18yearsandolderexceptemployeesofSponsorVoidwhereprohibited. Ends8/17/2013 .Completeoflicialrulesavailableat wwwmatys com/glampia. Sponsor Macy'sCorporateServ>ces,Ine ©2013 Macy'slncAll rightsreserved.CirqueduSoleil satrademarkownedbyCirqueduSole>llneandusedunderli cense.

6 4 1 -S S 2 - 2 2 2 2 All FinancingonApproved Credit. Prices goodthrough 8/15/13.


A4

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

IN FOCUS:ENVIRONMENT

Detroit

'Iron Man' jetpackssparkconcern

Continued from A1 "It is as if the tide is going out and I take a fire hydrant and pump as much water on the beach as possible," said Charles Ballard, a Michigan State University economist. "No matter how long I pump, there is still going to be more sand showing." Still, political leaders kept

By Audrey McAvoy The Associated Press

H ONOLULU — W an t t o fly like George Jetson or Iron Man? Thrill-seekers eager to try the next new watersport are rushing to strap on jetpacks that propel people into the air with the help of pumped water. But th e d evices are meeting calls for regulation in Hawaii, where fishermen, scientists and state officials are questioning their safety and how they may affect fish and coral in the state's heavily trafficked tropical waters. A device called the Jetlev can lift a person 30 feet high b y pumping water f ro m a backpack through a hose connected to a small, unmanned boat. A n other c o n traption called the Flyboard, which looks like a small snowboard attached to a hose, can propel riders 45 feet in the air. Promotional videos racking up millions of YouTube views show riders shooting out of the ocean into the sky, then diving back in the water like dolphins. The devices are starting to show up for recreational rental in San Diego, Key West, Fla., and Cancun, Mexico. But some in the Aloha State are far less enthusiastic about the m achines. C omplaints from f ishermen and o t h er ocean enthusiasts prompted the state Department of Land and Natural R esources to call a public meeting about the devices last month. The

Bend Fire Continued from A1 For that one incident in the past, Madden had already sent firefighters from all five stations to a large house that was ablaze in Tumalo, but he called off one engine that was en route and diverted it to the medical emergency. This forced Madden to call for aid from Cloverdale to fight the fire. "Basically, this other (medical) call was in the north end of our district, and it was the south fire station (crew) that got there," Madden said. "It was actually our farthest away fire station that got to that call." It can take roughly 10 minutes for a crew from the south station to reach the north station coverage area, according to Madden and Chief Larry Langston. Paramedics arrived too late to save this patient. "And this was a young person," Madden said. "It had a profound impact on all of us because we knew instinctively that had we had the resources, the outcome would havebeen different." Madden said he could not disclose details of the medical case due to patient confidentiality, but the reason paramedics believed they could have prevented the death is that "it's the type of medical emergency that if you respond quick enough, we have the medications to reverse those types of things. We carry a lot of medications that are really life-saving." Langston, who retired as chief five years ago, returned to the department in May, after former Chief Larry Huhn retired. Langston was not chief during some of the incidents Reed described, but Langston said based on his experience the doctor's statements were not surprising. "I'd heard about one (of the deaths) since I'd been back," Langston said. Eighty percent of the time, Bend firefighters respond to calls in nine minutes or less, according to city data. In contrast, the 80th percentile response time for Hillsboro firefighters is five minutes. It is just under seven minutes in G resham. Long responsetimes often occur when most or all stations are already out handling calls. The Fire Department operates out of five stations — south, north, east, west and Tumalo — and any time the firefighters from threestations are busy on calls, "we will have a long response time, an unacceptable response time," Langston said. In recent years, three stations were simultaneously out on calls nearly twice a day on average, according to the 2011D Bend Fire & Rescue Deployment Plan. Three stations were busy on average for a total of 11 hours each month in recent

Ripple effeCt —Two weeksafter Detroit declared bankruptcy, cities, counties and other local governments in Michigan are getting a cold shoulder in the municipal bond market. The judgment has been swift and brutal. Borrowing costs are

up around the state, in somecasesdrastically. OnThursday, Saginaw County became the latest casualty when it said it was delaying a $60 million bond sale that had been planned today. It

had hoped to put the proceeds into its pension fund. It was the third postponed bond sale in Michigan since Detroit dropped its bombshell July 18. — New York TimesNews Service

pumping.

Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press

Jordan Wayment demonstrates a Flyboardon the Jordanelle Reservoir in Utah. Such high-tech toys are the latest thing in waterspot'ts, but are raising safety and environmental concerns. department's t o p e n f o rcement officer, Randy Awo, expressed alarm about unsafe maneuvers, such a s r i d ers dive-bombing into the water next to moving boats. University of Hawaii coral scientist Bob Richmond told officials he was concerned about the noise the devices make, as fish avoid areas that are too loud. He's also worried fish and coral larvae could get pumped through some of the equipment the watercraft use and die. Fisherman C ar l J e l l ings said watercraftalready scare fish away from Oahu's bays, and he w orries these new machines will just add to the problem. "More and more and more these bays are being run over, taken over by other activities. The marine life that depend

on these places — they're being displaced," he said in an interview. The state may find a way to accommodate the devices, perhaps in selected places, said William Aila, chairman of the Board of Land and Natural Resources. But Aila said studies are needed examining how such watersports may affect fish and coral. " When you look at i t , i t looks fairly exciting," he said. "But you've got to look beyond the excitement." Thom H a ll , w h ose S alt Lake City company Rocky Mountain Flyboards has the rights to distribute the boards in Hawaii, said he wouldn't object to regulations, so long as he has input. "There's room for this device to be used and be used in a responsible way," Hall said.

Bend response times It takes longer for Bend firefighters to respond to medical calls

and fires than in several comparable Oregoncities. City officials say the Fire Department needsmore money to hire more firefighter paramedics in order to reduce response times.

SOTH PERCENTILERESPONSE TIME Eighty percent of the time, the departments below respond within x minutes. Bend Fire Dept. 6.93

Gresham Fire Dept.

to General Motors in 1996 for just $76 million. GM moved its headquarters to the development and invested heavily in renovations to make the space more inviting, but much of its retail space remains vacant. Since beginning operation in 1987 — 12 years after a federal competition launched the can psychology," said Henry project — the People Mover Cisneros, who served as sec- has stood out mostly as an retary of Housing and Urban economic albatross. It circles Development during Bill Clin- downtown in a 2.9 mile loop, ton's first term as president. carrying just a tiny fraction of Not only was Detroit the cen- the its projected ridership and ter of the automobile indus- costing taxpayers millions of try, but it was also one of the dollars a year in subsidies. major destinations for the vast Other initiatives, including migration of African-Ameri- the $100 million empowercans from the South in the ment zone and grants to refirst half of the 20th century, build public housing at a more he added. livable scale, have had mixed Detroit's u n i que s t atus success. made it an irresistible symbol for political leaders. For years, Federal funds one sure sign that a politician Still, the money flowed, was running for p r esident often because Detroit maywould be an appearance at ors forged tight relationships the Detroit Economic Club. with Democratic presidents.

enough to alter the bigger picture of massive job losses in auto manufacturing, the very industry that made Detroit famous. The downturn started in the 1950s, and it picked up speed in recent decades. "The problems of Detroit fundamentally are the prob-

lems of a changing American

manufacturing base," Cisneros said. Other cities, including Pittsburgh, which was once synonymous with steel, and Los Angeles, which grew with the aerospace and textile, were able to make the transition to other industries to one degree or another. But Detroit was not. In 1978, Wayne County, which includes Detroit, was home to 256,000 car industry jobs, according to the Center for A u tomotive R esearch. Now, there are an estimated 95,000 auto industry jobs in the county — a marked improvement since its nadir just "(Former Philadelphia) May- before the Obama administraUrbaninitiatives or Ed Rendell used to tease tion's auto industry bailouts in Nobody has done an acme miserably t ha t e v ery 2009, but far below its historic counting of the amount of time he turned around I was peak. money that has flowed to De- down in Washington getting These days, th e M o t or troit through the years in the money," said Dennis Archer, City is home to only one auto name of urban renewaL But who served as mayor of De- plant, a Chrysler factory that researchers note that the city troit from 1994 to 2001. "I'll turns out Jeep Grand Cherowas a major player in garner- tell you: I worked hard to do kees. (A second plant, run by ing federal money since the that." General Motors, s traddles Model Cities program was Archer also was able to the border with neighboring launched as part of Presi- pull together public financing Hamtramck.) dent Lyndon Johnson's Great to construct new downtown By the time Mayor Dave Society. stadiums for the Tigers, the Bing took office in 2009, the "Detroit has certainly seen city's major-league baseball city was reeling financially its share of urban initiatives," team, as well as the Lions, and was soon put under the said Eric Scorsone, Michigan its National Football League control of a state-appointed State University. franchise. emergency manager. Notably, Few have fared particuAtpoints, theefforts seemed whenthe emergency manager larly well. The $500 million to make a difference. Detroit Kevyn Orr filed for bankruptRenaissance Center, which made measurablestrides dur- cy, no prominent voices called was privately funded, was ing much of Archer's term, as forfederalhelp. "I think Detroit faced a tsuquicklyderided as a fortress crime and poverty declined that was not only difficult to and the city's alarming popu- nami of economic decline that navigate but also cut a key lation loss slowed to its lowest I do not think any amount of portion of downtown off from rate in decades. urban renewal could address," the Detroit River. It was sold But that progress was not Scorsone said.

6.7

Albany Fire Dept. Ashland Fire and Rescue

One reason was that the city symbolized a once uniquely American erawhen blue-collar people with high school educations, or less, could enjoy middle-class comforts as long as they were willing to work hard. "Detroit has always had a special place in the Ameri-

5.98

Medford Fire & Rescue

5.55

Eugene Fire andEMS

5.35

Salem Fire Dept.

5.06

Hillsboro Fire 8 Rescue

5.03

Bend Factory Stores

Source: City of Bend Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

years. now uses what is called High Four stations are simultane- Performance CPR. It can lead ously busy handling calls once to better outcomes for patients, a day on average, and all five but it requires more paramedstations are simultaneously out ics, Madden said. The Occuon calls five times per month, pational Safety and H ealth according to the deployment Administration also requires a plan. certain number of firefighters Although fires require alarge to work on every fire. amount of resources when they Langston told the City Counoccur, it is more likely that a cil Wednesday he hopes to ask resident in the department's voters for a temporary tax levy coveragearea will need medi- next year. City councilors said cal care due to a heart attack, they support the idea. Langston stroke or other problem. Bend said the city should ask voters firefighters are also trained as in May 2014 for a five-year loparamedics. cal option levy of 20 cents per "The likelihood in our com- $1,000 in assessed property valmunity of something bad hap- ue. The Fire Department curpening isn't a fire; it's a medical rently receives a cut of $1.18 per emergency," Madden said. "In $1,000, from the city's permathis day and age, not a lot of nenttax rate of$2.80 per$1,000 people die from fires but a lot in assessed property value. "I would recommend that the die from medical emergencies." "With our rising population biggest impact we can make to of retired people, that type of the system is to do more transsituation is b ecoming more port ambulance work, to put prevalent," M adden a d ded. more ambulances onthe street," "With ou r r e c reation-based Langston said Thursday. community, we still go to a lot In orderto lower the response of bike wrecks on Phil's Trail, rate to approximately six minthe river trail. We go to Mount utes on 80 percent of calls, Bachelor, which is a huge load Langston said the city needs on us in the wintertime." at least two more completely For example, on Thursday staffed transport ambulances. afternoon firefighters from two That means 14 more firefighter stations were busy respond- paramedics. "When we empty those and ing to a patient possibly having a heart attack on the Des- have to bring someone in from chutes River Trail, near Slough far away, the response times Meadow. naturally are going to go up," A private company, Cascade Langston said. Medical Transport, handles Even with additional staff, many of the prearranged, non- Langston and City Manager emergency patient transports, Eric King said the city would such as taking a nursing home not be able to guarantee that resident to an X-ray appoint- firefighters would be available ment, Madden said. The city 100 percent of the time. There providesall emergency medi- will also still be risks with fastcal transport and some of the er response times. "However, ifwe're able to nonemergency calls. Madden said the Fire Deadd ambulances onthe street, p artment has tried a lot o f then we start to have that stathings to increase efficiency, tion reliability go way, way up but those are not enough to rein compared with what it is today," in response times. Other fac- Langston said. tors can cancel out efficiencies. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, For example, the department hborrud@bendbulletin.com

NEW SCHOOL YEAR. NEW LOOK. •

Win a Back-to-School

Makeover i nclud in g o ve r $ 200 i n s alon serv ice s an d g i f t c a r d s . Enter a t

y o u r f a v o r i t e B e n d F a c t o r y S t o r e s A u g u s t 2 - 2 1.

Go fo be n d f a c f o r ysfores.com for d e t a i l s.

OUTLET SHOPPING . • • ELEVATED. Coach Factory Store Coa c h M e n's Factory Store Pendleton Outlet E d d i e Bauer Outlet Cla s sic Beauty Supply Columbia Sportswear Ni k e Factory Store


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • T HE BULLETIN A S

Banks Continued from A1 But as he settled into a deserted bistro for a t w o-hour lunch, Falciani, a former computer technician who has been on the run since 2008, seemed oddly relaxed for a f ugitive. And why not? He is in high demand these days, having cast himself as a crusader against the murky world of Swiss banking and money laundering. Once dismissed by many European authorities, he and other whistleblowers are now being courted as the region'sgovernments struggle to f ill t h eir coffers and to stem a populist uprising against tax evasion and corruption. "It's an economic war," said Falciani, 41. "In Switzerland, the banks are so organized that they are able to circumvent new rules and laws to continue to enable tax evasion." Critics, not least at his former employer HSBC, dismiss Falciani as a manipulator more dazzled by money than high ideals. The data he has leaked — some say sold — since 2008 has wreaked havoc within the banking world, as well as the moneyed and political classes of Europe. Falciani's infor m a tion formed the basis for the now famous "Lagarde list" that has roiled Greek politics with its revelations of oligarchs and politicians who avoided taxes by stashing millions in Switzerland. His data is also credited with helping Spain collect 260 million euros ($345 million) in taxes and identify more than 650 tax evaders, including the president of Banco Santander. In 2012, Falciani passed his information to U.S. authorities. They, in turn, used the data to pursue an investigation into whether HSBC flouted controls on money laundering, eventually forcing a $1.92 billion settlement with the bank in December. Since being released from jail this year after a Spanish judge denied a Swiss extra-

Dogs

Corentin Fohlen / International Herald Tribune via New York Times News Service

a bank spokesman, said in an email statement. "Only faced with the prospect of extradition and extended time behind bars, Falciani decided to cooperate with the Spanish authorities. A scheme he is now repeating with France and other countries." In 2012, Swiss authorities gave Falciani safe passage to meet in Switzerland to discuss a deal to plead guilty to data theft with a suspended sentence, provided that he stopped sharing the information. Falciani said he strung them along to protect his own safety, waiting for a new government in France that might take his claims more seriously. Now that the political tide has turned, Falciani wants to continue working with authorities. As the investigations play out, Falciani said he was holding down a day job, working for a European Union project as a computerresearcher to develop algorithms to detect abnormal behavior. But he worries about his long-term safety, wondering whether he will live another year. He notes that his house has been broken into and that his wife was recently fired from a job ata shoe store because of his notoriety. "This business represents thousands of billions of euros," he said. "From my side, I'm frightened."

SPECIAL 99.99

Cline Falls Continued from A1 The Cline Falls Power Plant is located just downstream from the waterfalls at Cline Falls State Park. The 9-acre site was originally given to the state parks division in the 1950s and a day-use area was

opened. In 1913 PacifiCorps' predecessor entered into a 100-year lease withthe predecessor of the Central Oregon Irrigation District. When PacifiCorp terminated its lease on the site in February, custody and control of the site reverted to the Central Oregon Irrigation District. C ynthia Smidt f r o m t h e county Community Development Department presented the appeal to the commission Wednesday, stating that department staff supported the commission hearing the appeal due to the ambiguous language of the county code cited by the Historic Landmarks Commission. "The issue is whether the board designated just specific structures at the power plant or was it the entire site," Smidt sard. T he c o m mission v o t e d unanimously to hear the appeal. Community D e velopment Director Nick L e lack

— Reporter: 541-383-0376, shing®bendbulletin.com

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

ClaSSifiedS

service dogs out there, and we will suffer for it." Already, in 2011, the Department of J u stice issued revisions to its ADA regulations singling out dogs as the only legally protected assistance animals. Before that,

some people were claiming monkeys, snakes and other creatures were helping them cope with d i sabilities. The department also clarified the definition of a s e rvice dog as one that is "individually trained to do work o r p erform tasks for a person with a disability." But w h il e s o m e s t a tes have laws against residents pretending to have a legally protected disability in order to gainaccess for their dogs, most do not. And there is no law against the sale of merchandise emblazoned with

phony "service dog" logos. A search of eBay under "service dog p a tches," for instance, reveals more than 22,000 sellers. While some can certainly be used for legitimate purposes,advocates forthe disabled say many are not. CCI.org is seeking to get 10,000 signers in t h e n ext week to s a y t h e p r o blem needs to be stopped. "That's the exact purpose of our petition," said Martha Johnson, a CCI spokeswoman for the Southeast region. "We want to go to the Department of Justice and say: 'Look at how many people agree this is a problem, and something needs to be done.'"

vPure. Coadk Co.

! dU a~ B~ Bend Redmond

John Day Burns Lakeview

SPECIAL 50% OFF

SPECIAL 16.99

SPECIAL 65% OFF

*Weblo 551084. Special continues until 8/11/2013.

By a famous American designer, Geoffrey Beene 5 our Alfani. Special continues until 8/11/2013.

From Elementz in prints or

solid colors. Misses

Honey, 2Bamboo s! more. Misses

SPECIAL 14.99

SPECIAL 7.99

SPECIAL 4.99 KIDS' CLEARANCE

DRESS SHIRTS & TIES Special 24.75-27.50. Reg. 49.50$55, after special 29.70-$33.

KENNETH COLE REACTIONs Reg. $350, after special 149.99. Slim-fit suits. For example:

CALVIN KLEIN JEANS FOR MEN Orig.* 34.50-69.50, after special 19.99. Clearance polos or shorts

DPESSES OR SHRUGS Reg. $40-$59, after special $20-29.50. OnlyatM acy's.

CLEARANCE Orig.* 14.50-$30, after special 9.99. Only at Macy's. Club Room and JA John Ashford tees & more. Special

in solid colors and prints. Cotton Special continues until 8/11/2013

SWIMWEAP SEPARATES Special 11.20-$56. Reg./Orig.* $32$160, after special $16-$80. From Hula 5 juniors. Shown: top (+ Weblo 825418)8<bikini(+764515).

BRAS, PANTIES & SLEEPWEAR Special4.25-19.75. Reg.8.50-39.50, after special bras: buy 1, get 1 at 60% off; panties: 3 for 19.99; sleepwear: 30% off. Shown: Warner's® Underwire bra

(+Weblo 607025) & hipster hlr 561758).

continues until 8/11/2013.

• • >

a • '

•a

• 0 .

• •

'

.

• •

g • •

SPECIAL 19.99

SPECIAL EXTPA 40% OFF

PRESTO CHOICES Reg. 49.99-59.99, after special 29.99. Griddle, ¹7030 (+ WeblD 136866) or skillet, ¹6626 (+ 548617).

SPECIAL 60% OFF

Special 159.99-199.99. Reg. $400$500, after special 199.99-249.99. Only at Macy's. Queen or king. Shown: Tempo.

SPECIAL 79.99

Marc Fisher, Alfani, Style 8< Co.

*Weblo 726874.

5-PC. SPINNER LUGGAGE SET Reg. $260, after special 129.99. Skyway Escape.

+ 740059) & more.

SPECIAL 3999

®~

SPECIAL 39.99

SANDALS OR SHOES Reg. $49-$69. From Nine West (+ WeblD 832652), Bandolino, Rampage (+ 481965), our

WHEN YOU BUY 2 OR MORE Special 2 for 4.20-134.10 ea. Orig.* $20-$298 ea., after special $6-223.50 ea. Clearance handbags 8.wallets.

ALL 22-PC. & 24-PC. ENSEMBLES

P-~

SPECIAL 50% OFF

Orig." $10-$25, after special 7.97-9.99. Tops or shorts for boys' 2-20 5 girls' 2-16.

BLACK & WHITE DIAMONDS** Reg. $160, after special $68.

SPECIAL 50% + 30% OFF

TfT

SPECIAL 65% OFF ALL 14K GOLD CHAINS Special $1 05-$770. Reg. $300-$2200, after special 127.50-$935.

CLEARANCE FASHION JEWELRY Special 3.50-$140. Orig." $10-$400, after special $5-$200.

1/4 ct. t.w.' ring in sterling silver by Victoria Townsend.

*Weblo 730066.

*WeblD 692388.

In yellow and white gold.

'

.

'

.

' •

suggested holding a w ork session during which the commissioners may ask questions to clarify county code and gain a better understanding of the situation. C ommission Cha i r m a n Alan Unger said the work session will likely take place in September, with an appeals hearing to be scheduled after that. No penalties are being leveled until t h e c o m mission makes an interpretation on county land use code for the site, though PacifiCorp was responsiblefor a $795 appeal fee and whatever fees were incurred by r etaining legal counsel for the appeal. "It's c ounty p o licy t h a t while we're going t h rough the process we put any code enforcement in abeyance," said Laurie Craghead, county legal counseL "The goal of the county code enforcement handbook is compliance, not penalization."

"It has become an epiContinued from A1 demic," said Kris Baker, 63, On a recent flight to Orwho lives in Orlando. "And lando, where CCI has its re- w hat we're getting is t h e gional headquarters, Munaftermath. Somebody will dell said he watched a man take Fluffy with them into a with a toy breed of dog walk restaurant, and the dog will off a flight to the baggage bark or snap at someone or area, remove the dog's ser- poop on the floor. So when vice-animal vest and leave we come in w ith a l egitithe airport. mate dog, we get the ques"It was quite clear that he tions and the resentment. was simply using the vest to It's harder for us." get cabin privileges," MunB aker, wh o h a d p o l i o dell said. as a child and has used a Under the federal Ameriwheelchair fo r 3 0 y e a r s, cans With Disabilities Act, needs her CCI dog to help state an d l o c a l g o v ern- pull her a long w hen she ments, businesses and non- gets fatigued. The dog also p rofit o r g anizations t h at opens and shuts doors, reserve the public generally trieves the phone, picks up must allow service animals objects she drops and helps to accompany those with open the refrigerator and disabilities in all areas of cabinets. So when people the facility where the public ask her in ignorance, "Hey, is normally allowed to go. where can I get one of those And inquiries are limited. vests for my dog?" she eduWhen it's not obvious what cates them. "This is no t s omething service an animal provides, workers may only ask if the that is for pets," she said. "This is a n i n d ication of service animal is required because of a disability and training that my dog and I what tasks the dog has been have been through. These trained to perform. dogs are the brain surgeons Legally, they can't a sk of the canine world." f or d o cumentation. A n d L uke McGregor, a 4 8 some say that fact is being y ear-old D e l r a y Be a c h exploited. r esident, also ha s t o d o "There's no penalty for his share of educating. On people in Florida who fraud- a flight home f rom N ew ulently claim their dog is a York this week, McGregor service animal," said Paul w itnessed a w o man w h o Edwards of M i ami, presiclaimed to have an "emodent of the Florida Count ional-support d o g " th a t cil of the Blind. "There are whined and s cratched at some of us who feel it isn't its cage throughout the trip unreasonable to ask folks — behavior considered unto carry i dentification for acceptable in a legitimately dogs that shows them to be trained service dog. a trained service animalA lthough h e c o ul d d o and most legitimate service- little more than roll his eyes dog organizations do issue at thescene, McGregor, who those. The danger is that uses a wheelchair and CCI you may throw the baby out dog, knows he'll be left to with the bathwater." deal with the fallout. "I'm already stopped in Some advocates, for instance, are concerned that restaurants an d g r o c ery doing so may put an unrea- stores sometimes by worksonable burden on t h o se ers who say (wrongly), 'You can't bring that dog in here,'" with disabilities to "prove" their dog is legitimate. But McGregor said. "There will others say that, because of be a time when the public is the fraud, humans are algoing to reach critical mass

Herve Faiciani, a former Swiss banker who claims his CD-ROMs have130,000 names of Swiss bank account holders, has roiled politicians in Greece and Spain. dition request, Falciani, who is married and has a young daughter, has resurfaced in France. Authorities here have offered protection in exchange for Falciani giving testimony to localprosecutors who are investigating whether HSBC helped French clientsdodge taxes. "My main objective is to help authorities develop a defense," Falciani said. "We are under attack and losing a lot of tax money," he said of the Swiss banking system. "If you have enemies who want to invade, laws are not enough and you need armies to build an economic defense." In a report from the French National Assembly issued in July, the lawmaker Christian Eckert chided authorities for being slow to use Falciani's list. According to Eckert, the information included 127,311 clients, including 6,313 from France who were suspected of tax evasion. HSBC dismisses Falciani's information as flawed, insisting that the small sample the bank has seen is filled with errors. At the time of his employment, the bank contends that it had only 100,000 customers and that the stolen data affected only 15,000 clients. "To our knowledge it has always been Falciani's intention to sell the data," David Brugger,

regarding all of the alleged

ready facingmore hassles.

*ITlGCyS WOW! PASS

I I

J • •

t

EXTRA SAVINGS ON ALL SALE 5 CLEARANCE APPAREL (EXCEPT SPECIALS & SUPER BUYS)

l •

•+

+

•+

CU •

O

I I

=:

& KIDS; PLUS, FINE 8( FASHION JEWELRY 8( SELECT =

O QO

I

lA

I

• s

'

I

' ' •

'

I

'

!

I

'

III !

I'

o

s

'I

!

I '

II

!

!

I I

O ! I

!

!

! '

!

'!

!

I I

I '

!

'!

!

!

! I

'

I I

!

I

I '

'

!

'!

!

'!

'

! !'

!

!

!

!

'!

I!

!

!

I !

'!

I,

'

!

'I

!

I

,

!

'

' ' ! !

'!

I!'

!

O

I '

O

!'

I l

o5

=

~ g ~O

:

P ~

I I I I

I ! '

I

-

• •

-

= =: - ' , =:„:- :extra 15'OFF := =

CU

5

I I I

~ y) i HOME ITEMS EXTRA 10% OFF ALL SALE 8. CLEARANCE WATCHES, COATS, SUITS, DRESSES, INTIMATES, — P ™ ~< IMPULSE; MEN'S SUIT SEPARATES & SPORTCOATS, E LECTRICS & ELECTRONICS AND SELECT SHOES R LU I Excludes;EverydayValues(HIV), Doorbusters, Deals of theDaIt furniture,mattresses, floor coverings,rugs, men's storeelectronics, cosmetics/fragrances,athletic shoesfor ~ CU ~ I h im, her & ki gidfts,cards,jewelry trunkshows, previouspurchases, special orders,

P~

selectedlicenseddepts., specialpurchases, services. Exclusions maydiffer at macys. Com.Cannot becombinedwith anysavings pass/coupon, extradiscount orcredit offer excep topeninganewMacy'saccount.EXTRASAVINGSroAPPLIEDTOREDUCEDPRICES.

TO GET A MOBILE PASS, TEXT "CPN" TO MACYS (62297)

You'll alsoreceivetextalerts aboutourlatest sales,events&more! Max3msgs/wk. Msg&data ratesmayapply. TextSTOP to62297to CanCelTerms . j conditionsat macys.com/mobilehelp Privacy policyat macys.com/priVaCypalicy

tEXCLUSIONS APPLY; SEE SAVINGS PASSES. MACY'S SAVINGS PASS DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO SPECIALS

the magic of

mg + QI

BEND RIYER PRoM E N A DE, BEND • 5 4 1 . 3 1 7 . 6 0 0 0 ~

.com

Fine jewelry speciais are only available at stores that carry fine jewelry. W REG . 5 ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. SUPER SATURDAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT 8/9-8/11/2013. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. tAII carat weights (ct. t.w.) are approximate; variance may be .05 carat. **May contain rose-cut diamonds. Jewelry photos may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores; log on to macys.com for locations. Almost all gemstones and black diamonds have been treated to enhance their beauty & require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or ask your sales professional. Specials and clearance items are available while supplies last. Advertised merchandise may not be carried at your localMacy's & selection may vary by store. Prices & merchandise may differ at macys.com. Electrics & luggage carry mfrs' warranties; to see a mfr's warranty at no charge before purchasing, visit a store or write to: Macy's Warranty Dept., PO Box 1026 Maryland Heights, MO 63043, attn: Consumer Warranties.*Enter the Weblo in the search box at MACYS.COM to order. N3070008. • OPEN A MACY'S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 15% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS, UP TO $100, WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. Macy'5 credit card is available subject to credit approval; new account savings valid the day your account is opened and the next day; excludes services, selected licensed departments, gift cards, restaurants, gourmet food & wine. The new account savings are limited to a total of $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible.


j

a

'%P Dm

I •

a

P

D

D

ma resseven So Comfortable, You'll Never Count These Guys Again.™

Serta perfec<sleeper

Serta

aJ, i'

1 )

a I

vda

GET a Serta'Queen Memory Foam Adjustable Set for as low as tq,'LNtI t) ~ ec~ ~

~en ~

~~~gg a

R

Queen Mattress

ww ileepfdvndaiien.drs

Model Greenquist. Limit 2 per customer.

ALSO EXPERIENCE the latest GEL-INFUSED MEMORY FOAM SLEEPSYSTEMS from SERTA® FEATURING

FEATURING Cool Action™ Gel Memory Foam +

Duet Coil-in-Coil t Support System

ee

e

Cool Action™ Gel Memory Foam

e

I I,

a •

• I

ee

I

ee

e

e

Cool Action™ Dual Effects™ Gel Memory Foam

• I

The Best Buy Seal and other licensed materiais are registered certification marks and trademarks of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under kcense For award information, visit ConsumersDigest.com

Local Delivery

•I

I

FREE

a

Shown here with the New Sertae Motion Custom'" Adjustable Foundation

I

e •

I

FEATURING •

FR E E

All iComforte, iComforte Directions'" and iSenese models are compatible

with Motion Perfect or Motion Custom" adjustable foundations.

FREE

FREE

Removal

Bed Frame

In-Home Set Up

eius!

Financing Available

WE MAKE

Serta -

-

-

"

SEST MATTRESS.™

Largest Selection of Serta in the area!

jRuael Free

www.mjacobsfamilyofstores.com

Statewide * Delivery

541-382-5900 • Toll Free 1-800-275-7214

Bend River Promenade Open Mon.-Fri. 10AM to 7PM • Sat. & Suna10AM-6PM **

$999 or more.

*Minimum payment is $18.00


Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

©

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

BRIEFING

Air quality listed as 'moderate' With the increase in Central Oregon fires, the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division and the Oregon Department of Environmental

Quality issued awarning to residents about the

smoke conditions. The DEQhas Bend's air quality listed as

"moderate." People with chronic respiratory conditions, the elderly and children

should avoid breathing smoke byclosing windows andavoiding strenuous exercise outside, said Bruce Gutelius, an epidemiologist for the

public health division. — Bulletin staff report

FIRE UPDATE Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LES SCHWAB AMPHITHEATER

BRIEFING

o more ree conce auess

A Tuesday service is planned for John Hammack, the firefighter who was killed late last month at a wildfire near Sisters.

By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

For nearly 11 summer concert seasons, the Old Mill District in Bend has allowed people to sit across the Deschutes River from Les Schwab Amphitheater to hear bands perform forfree. On Sunday, that will

The service is setfor 3 p.m.Tuesday atthe Deschutes County Fair 8 Expo Center at 3800 S.W. Airport Way in

Redmond, according to his family. It is open to

change. When Michael Franti sc Spearhead performs that evening, the Old Mill will restrict public access to the area on the east side of the river that sits closest to the amphitheater. The move will close patches of grass and the paved recreational path between the Deschutes and popular Old Mill restaurants Anthony's, Greg's Grill and Pastini Pastaria, among otherbusinesses. The closure will run from the footbridgeacross the rive ron the south to Hot Pond Loop on the north. The Old Mill is making the

Service planned for Hammack

the public and there is a potluck dinner.

Hammack, 58, who lived on a ranchnear Culver, died on July 31

after he was hit by a falling snag. A longtime

ks

logger, Hammackwas

"s Submitted photo

Spectators take in a Sugarland concert from the east side of the Deschutes River during a Les Schwab Amphitheater show in 2009. Starting with Sunday's performance by Michael Franti & Spearhead, the Old Mill will begin restricting public access to the area during concerts. move now to curb rumors in the touring industry that Les Schwab Amphitheater is not a secure venue, said the venue's manager, Marney

Smith. Monqui Presents, the Portland-based company that books bands at the amphitheater, has heard in recent conversations with potential 2014

bookings that Les Schwab Amphitheater "is not the right place to go," in Oregon, Smith sard. SeeAmphitheater/B6

on contract with the U.S. Forest Service to cut trees as part of

firefighting efforts. Another tree faller, Norman Crawford, 48, of

Sisters, was injured by the same tree. Crawford was treated and released that day from St. Charles Bend. In lieu of flowers.

The family is asking

firemap.aspx.

for donations to the 'Bend

t ormwater roect ro

ess

John HammackMemorial Fund atWells Fargo Bank. An online guestbook is available at

www.redmond memorial.com SeeBriefing/B2

Well shot! 0

reader photos

1. Green Ridge

• We want to seeyour photos of gardensfor another special version

A: ~

|

• Acres: 1,150 • Containment: 50% • Cause: Lightning

of Well shot! that will run in the Outdoors section. Submit your best workat

denddulletin.com /gardenandwe'll pick the

2. Grouse Mountain • Acres: 800 • Containment: 0% • Cause: Lightning

best for publication.

• Email other goodphotos ofthe greatoutdoors

to readerphotosO denddnlletin.com and

3. Coyote Gap • Acres: 500 • Containment: 10% • Cause: Lightning

tell us a bit about where and when you took them.

4. Mann • Acres: 500

Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

We'll choosethe best for publication.

• Containment: 25%

• Cause: Lightning 5. Grassy Mountain • Acres: 24,500 • Containment: 10%

• Cause: Lightning Nore state wildfire news on B3

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

stormwater detention pond near N.E. Scott Street and U.S. Highway 97 in

Portland

project, which includes construction of a series of drainage structures to help reduce the flooding that frequently overwhelms the drainage facilities at the

Central Oregon Incident Dispatch.

The areacurrently has 581 firefighters assigned to the fire, which is 50

percent contained.COID

Thir

Stre

llnle ass

underpass during storms and snowmelt.

ilson Ave.

As city crews do their work, the underpass will be closed from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. nightly throughout August. A signed detour will lead commuters to L

Franklin Avenue, Ninth Street and Wilson Avenue.

)R dMarketR . Greg Cross / The Bulletin

said firefighters made

Meacham

Detour

The detention pond is part of the city's Third Street underpass stormwater

The GreenRidge Fire, near CampSherman, acres, according to the

STATE NEWS

Franklin Ave.

Bend on Thursday.

Green RidgeFire still growing grew Thursday by 200

J Gre woodAv .

Employees from Jack Robinson 8 Sons Inc. work to complete the

• Portland:Patient sues

Portland hospital over molestation. • Meacham:Deli brings mountain community together. Stories on B3

progress ontheeastern flank of the fire, where heat has dramatically

dropped andcrews are largely mopping thearea. Firefighters lost ground on the south-

western front because of dry fuels and weather conditions. Firefighters

performed a burnout ahead of the fire along the bulldozer-made con-

tainment line. Thefire is about1,150 acres. — Bulletin staff report

Gorrection In an editorial titled

"COVOemployees' behavior must be above reproach," which appeared Thursday, Aug. 8, on Page B4, operation of a shower truck was incorrectly attributed. The truck is operated by Icon City. The Bulletin

regrets the error.

School shooting drill in Redmond State Republicans meet in Bendtoday preparesofficers for realthing By Lauren Dake

By Leslie Pugmire Hole The Bulletin

Casual listeners to 911 scanners Thursday morning may have been horrified to hear atone-out for emergency responders to Redmond's Ridgeview High School for a mass shooting. But the tennis players at the school and motorists passing by were nonplussed, having read the signs notifying them of police training in the area. "Our officers knew they were going to be participating in a training today, but we didn't let them know the

details, because we wanted it to be as real-life as possible," said Redmond Police Lt. Nathan Garibay. "At any moment we can turn a corner and something bad can happen; we need to be prepared to deal with that." Officers were checked — twice — to ensure none carried live rounds in their weapons as they arrived on scene, but otherwise they were told to respond to the drill as their training dictated. The exercise was a multiagency event, with law officers from Deschutes County, Oregon State Police,

Black Butte, Sunriver and Bend. In addition, paramedics from Redmond Fire and Rescue, Black Butte and Bend responded to the tone-out, depictedtoemergency responders as a shooter loose in

The Bulletin

a large high school.

possibly replacing its leader.

Nearly 40 students and Ridgeview staff members helped with the training exercise. Some students were designated to play the role of injured victims, while others went through the scenario of protection by school staff and evacuation by police. SeeDrill/B2

Oregon Republican Party Chairwoman Suzanne Gallagher, who did not return calls for comment, has been in the post for about six months. When the party internal central committee meets at the Riverhouse Hotel 8 Convention Center, Gallagher

SALEM — The Oregon Republican Party is slated to meet today and Saturday in Bend to tackle a range of topics, from the GOP's upcoming election platform to

will face cries to step down. John Philo, chairman of the Deschutes County Republican Central Committee, said he's hoping the issue can be resolved quickly, so the party can return to regular business. "It takes away from our main message," Philo said. "And it's always disturbing when you have to go through procedures like that and obviously it doesn't benefit

anyone." At least 19 county chairmen and chairwomen have to vote in favor of the recall. See Republicans/B2


62

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

NEWS OF RECORD Theft —A theft was reported at 2:15 p.m. July 24, in the 500 block of Northeast KearneyAvenue. Unlawful entry — Avehicle was reported entered at 9:47 p.m. July 24, in the1600 block of Northeast Heavenly Court. Theft —A theft was reported at 8:52 p.m. July 29, in the 2600 block of Northwest CollegeWay. Theft —A theft was reported at10:54 a.m. July 31, in the1800 block of Northeast Providence Drive. Unlawful entry — Avehicle was reported entered at1:13 p.m. Aug. 5, in the area ofNortheast Seward Avenue and13th Street. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 3:05 p.m. Aug. 5, in the area ofNorthwest Bond

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

BEND POLICE DEPARTMENT Theft —A theft was reported at 11:20 a.m. July18, in the 800 block of Northeast12th Street. Burglary —A burglary was reported at 746 a.m. July 22, in the100 block of Southeast Ninth Street.

Drill

BRIEFING

Street and Northwest OregonAvenue. Theft —Atheft was reported and an arrest made at9:02 p.m.Aug. 5, in the100 blockof Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Theft —Atheft was reported at10:41 p.m. Aug. 5, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Quimby Avenue. DUII —Tobias Ulrich Travis Bryan, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at12:19 a.m. Aug. 6, in the areaof Northeast Ross Roadand Northeast Butler Market Road. Unlawful entry —Avehicle was reported entered at10:15 a.m.Aug. 6, in the area ofSoutheast Second Street and Southeast Miller Avenue. Unlawful entry —Avehicle was

reported entered at10:57a.m. Aug. 7, in the 1500 block of Northwest Saginaw Avenue. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 11:28 a.m. Aug. 7, in the1100 block of Northwest Harmon Boulevard. Criminal mischief — Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 1:50 p.m. Aug. 7, in the100 block of Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive. Theft —Atheft was reported at 3:21 p.m. Aug. 7, in the 3700 block of Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Theft —Atheft was reported at 3:47 p.m. Aug. 7, in the 61300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 7:18 a.m. Aug. 5, in the1500 block of Northwest

reported entered at 3:59 p.m. Aug. 6, in the19300 block of Baker Road. Theft —A theft was reported at 5:10 p.m. Aug. 6, in the1700 block of Northwest PenceLane. Theft —A theft was reported at 5:12 p.m. Aug. 6, in the1100 block of Northwest Redfield Circle. Theft —Atheft was reported and an arrest made at 8:24 p.m. Aug. 6, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief wasreported at 8:38 p.m.Aug. 6, in the 20700 block ofWandalea Drive. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 10:43 a.m. Aug. 7, in the 300 block of Northwest DelawareAvenue. Unlawful entry —A vehicle was

up on the far side of Ridgeview's parking lot, as well as Continued from 61 a staging area for paramedic Because school is out for crews and first aid. "Command keeps in consummer, the drill u sed the scenario of an incident occurstant contact with the staging ring on a conference day when area if they are not in the same the building is lightly popuplace and let's them know lated, said JB Demaris, direcwhen they are needed and it's tor ofsupport services for the — Redmond Police Lt. safe," said Redmond Fire MarRedmond School District. Nathan Garibay shal Traci Cooper. "It was good forus to see Redmond police have not how this might all work in a conducted a m a ss-casualty real-life situation, and staff some i n volved p r ocedural drill on this scale in the 10 told me they appreciated be- modifications. years Garibay's been with the "Schools were not designed department, but that's going to ing able to understand what they might encounter in an to have a high level of security change, he said. "Officers in the region are actual intruder scenario," he in mind," said Demaris. sard. Early observers of the ex- very well trained, but what hasn't happened before is putThe district began a buildercisecould see officers from ing-by-building analysis of multiple agencies surround- ting them all together." security weaknesses last win- ing the school, scanning winFrom the original call-out ter, shortly after the Sandy dows and doors with auto- just after 8 a.m. to arrival of Hook shooting, said Demaris. matic weapons at the ready. A first"victims" at the St. Charles Most of the work to remedy group of students huddled in a Redmond emergency room those problems is complete, he deep swale in the parking lot, around 9:30, the exercise was added. where they'd been evacuated expected to take most of the W hile t h e ma j o rit y o f and were under supervision morning, including debriefing the changes were physical by an officer. with all of the participants. "Good practitioners of anyalterations to bui ld i ngs, A command center was set

Continued from Bt

3-vehicle crash south of Madras At least one person was transported via helicopter Thursday night in a three-

vehicle crash 3 miles south of Madras. A pickup, motorcycle and car were involved in the crash, which occurred around 3:20 p.m., said Oregon Department of Transportation spokesman RexHolloway. U.S. Highway 97 at Dover

Lane was closed for approximately 40 minutes, according to Holloway.

Holloway said he hadnot heard of any fatalities but said

the injuries were serious. Oregon State Police Lt. Gregg Hastings said an investigation into the cause of the

crash is ongoing. — From staff reports

Fourth Street.

PRINEVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 7:56 a.m. Aug. 7, in thearea of Northwest Madras Highway.

OREGON STATE POLICE DUII —Jo Anne Poil, 70, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 'I:32 p.m. Aug. 7, in the area ofWagon Trail Ranch and Madison Road.

thing should always be evaluating their performance and looking f o r im p r ovement," said Garibay, who coordinated the event. He used 12 evaluators during the drill, each charged with watching and evaluating a different aspect of the event, from evacuation of the building to the takedown of the shooter (a reserve Redmond officer) and patrol of the perimeter. A chaplain was on site at the drill as well. "There's a whole other level to taking care of s omeone who's been through something like this," said Garibay. "We're trying to cover all the bases." D ebriefing e v eryone i n volved will take a while but Garibay's first impression was a good one. "I'm proud of all the responders; our tactics were solid, our coordination was good."

"Officers in the region are very well trained, but what hasn't happened before is putting them all together."

— Reporter: 541-548-21 86; IpugmireC<bendbulletin.com

PUBLIC OFFICIALS For The Bulletin's full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www bendbulletirL

comlofficials.

CONGRESS U.S. Senate • Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. 107 Russell SenateOffice Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http:I/merkley.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W.Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 • Sen. RonWyden, D-Dre. 223 Dirksen SenateOffice Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http:I/wyden.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W.HawthorneAve., Suite107 Bend, OR97701 Phone: 541-330-9142

U.S. Houseof Representatives

Republicans

opportunity to speak and the person being challenged will Continued from 61 have the opportunity to rePhilo s ai d t h e m e e ting fute.... I don't know all the is closed to the public. He charges; I just know people declined to speak of the al- are concerned and that's what legations l e v i e d aga i n st initiated it." Gallagher. Gallagher replaced Chair"As I said, it's a private mat- man Allen Alley, who some ter," he said. "But everyone speculate c o ul d r un for (at the meeting) will have the governor.

I I

T he c h airmanship t e r m lasts two years. Gallagher has been a state legislative candidate and has a background in marketing and entrepreneurship, according to the GOP's website. She promised while camp aigning t o r e ach o u t t o women and minorities while in office.

Rep. Dennis Richardson, RCentral Point, a gubernatorial candidate in 2014, said he will attend the Oregon Republican Party meeting. "The position of the ORP chair is not an easy job, and it's entirely a volunteer position," he wrote in an email. " As a c a ndidate, I'll w o r k with Suzanne Gallagher or

whomever is chair as we look to share ideas and develop a plan for Oregon that will create jobs and boost education outcomes for our kids. That's the focus for 2014 and I believe that vision is shared by a majority of members in the ORP." — Reporter: 541-554-1162, Idake@bendbulletin.com

• Rep. GregWalden, R-HoodRiver 2182 Rayburn HouseOffice Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http:I/walden.house.gov Bend office: 1051 N.W.BondSt., Suite 400 Bend, OR97701 Phone: 541-389-4408 Fax: 541-389-4452

Find It All Onlin bendbulletin.com

I II

/

I

/

I

H IGH D E S E R T P U L S E

. 'The Bulletin

HELPING CENTRAL OREGONIANS STAY HEALTHY

PRESENTINGA COLLECTION OF ORIGINALLOCALLY WRITTEN,AWARD-WINNING MAGAZINESANDEVENT GUIDESPUBLISHEDBY THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin PubliCatiOnthat anSWerStOugh queStiOnSadDut lOCal healthCare tOPiCS . High Desert PULSE is a quarterly magazine created to help promote, encourage and maintain an active and healthful lifestyle. Each issue features local stories that seek answers to tough questions about local health topics, with in-depth reporting that Central Oregonians expect. The magazine is distributed in The Bulletin and at health outlets, medical offices and on area racks.

Navigatin the maze

WHEN TOLOOK FOR IT: publishing four editions ayear

IIOVER TISERS: LOOIIING FOR IjNIOUE , LOCIIL HIIYER TIBINIj :OPPORTUNITIES' ?

Monday, August 12 Monday, November 11

Reachyourtarget audience

C DNNEC TI D N S

with these well-read

FROM OFFERING HELPING HANDS TO INSPIRING CREATIVITY

I

A

publications. Call yourBulletin advertising representativefor acomplete marketing consultationand results-orientedplan.

The guidethat CO nneCtSPeOPle in needWiththOSeWho giVetheir deSt Connections is a guide that defines the scope of Central Oregon's nonprofit community. The publication contains a categorized nonprofit directory, briefs (•

describing the work of various nonprofit organizations, and human interest feature stories that demonstrate the outreach of these organizations. This guide provides readers with a wealth of options for giving, volunteering and serving their communities, as well as connecting them to needed services.

::S41-382-1811 TO GETACOPY OF

WHEN TO LOOK FORIT: publishesannually Wednesday, December 25, 2013

. '

ONE OF THESE PUBLICATIONSOR TO STARTA SUBSCRIPTION, CALL

S4I-38S-SBO O


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

B3

REGON Patient sLles

Missing children —A mansuspected of abducting a16-year-old

;.-'' C~dII g~

Portland

t

hospital over molestation

AROUND THE STATE

t

girl after setting his house ablaze with the girl's mother and possibly

her younger brother inside mayhave booby-trapped his car with homemadeexplosives,policesaidThursdayasasearchexpanded

f +>. 3

1

to four states, Mexico and Canada. Oregon State Police fielded more

i

than130 tips after authorities issued anAmberAlert for DiMaggio and

'W i

'

his car with California license plates. Police said an "unusual infatuation" with the teenager, Hannah Anderson, might have driven suspect

James LeeDiMaggio, 40, to flee with her from his burned home onthe

S

California-Mexico border. Evidence found in the rubble of the home suggested that DiMaggio may have fled with explosives, Fraser said,

The Associated Press

declining to elaborate onwhat was discovered. Investigators worried

PORTLAND — A w oman who says she was molested in the emergency room at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center is suing the Portland hospital for $2.5 million. The lawsuit filed Wednesday in Multnomah County accuses the hospital of neglect. The nurse accused in the February i n cident, 38-yearold Jeffrey N. McAllister, was charged with sexual abuse and has pleaded not guilty. He remains in custody on an indictment that also alleges he sexually abused three other women in the emergency room. The patient, identified as K.S. in the suit, accuses the hospital of neglect and battery and seeks $2.5 million in

that DiMaggio might abandon his blue Nissan Versa after rigging it to explode. "In the event that someone comes across the car, they

A firefighter uses a drip torch to remove excess forest fuels to block the spread of flames in the Douglas Complex Fires. Lightning bolts have touched off more large wildfires east of the Cascades.

damages.

By Tim Fought

Legacy Emanuel spokesman Brian Terrett said the hospital condemns any inappropriate conduct by employees and will investigate. T he patient said i n t h e lawsuit that she complained in detail to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center security officials on the day of her alleged abuse. But instead of investigating, the security officials escorted the woman out of the hospital immediately, even though she hadn't received appropriate care forher miscarriage, the lawsuit says. "They got her out of that hospital through the nearest exit," said her attorney, Greg Kafoury. "She wanted to make a phone call, and she wasn't allowed to." The state Nursing Board wants to revoke McAllister's license for reports of six inappropriate encounters with patients. B oard d o c u ments sa y McAllister offered a Legacy Emanuel patient a dditional pain medication in the April encounter in exchange for oral sex. In a w r itten statement to the board, McAllister denied acting inappropriately toward any patient.

The Associated Press

need to usecaution," Fraser said. On Sunday night, authorities found the body of 44-year-old Christina Anderson when they extinguished

flames at DiMaggio's rural home. A child's body also was discovered as they sifted through the rubble. Thebody may bethat of 8-year-old ~r .t

K

>

'

. s~: ',' C'

r

I

The Associated Press via Oregon Department of Forestry

Li htnin sparksroun o ires in EasternOregon PORTLAND — Lightning bolts have touched off another round of large wildfires in Oregon, this time east of the Cascade Range, and more strikes could occur through the weekend, officials said. A strike in Grant County touched off a fire on Wednesday that threatened 400 businesses and homes near the towns of John Day and Canyon City. Tankers dropped fire retardant and helicopters unloaded buckets of water, and by Thursday morning, the fire was contained to 400 smoldering acres. Another fire was burning a few miles north of John Day on what was estimated Thursday at 2,000 acres of grass and forestland. Fire center spokesman David Morman said the blaze threatened to spread to the north and east, so it wasn't an immediate threat to the city of about 1,700 people. No evacuation advisories had been issued. Lightning had struck in the middle of the fire area, but it wasn't immediately confirmed asthe cause,he said. Lightning was blamed for other Eastern Oregon fires,

including one that grew to 38 squaremiles — more than 24,000 acres, in the thinly populated southeastern corner of the state near Jordan Valley. Two more fires of less than a square milewere reported in the grass and sagebrush region. O fficials t r a ckin g f ir e weather say the number of strikes isn't remarkable. M ore t ha n 1 , 000 w e r e recorded statewide in a 24hour p e r io d We d nesday and Thursday, touching off 66 known fires, but Oregon sometimes sees3,000 strikes in a day, said Jeree Mills, a spokeswoman for the federal fire center in Portland. H owever, Mills said f i r e weather experts see the persistence ofthe barrages as unusual. "We expect to get more lightning today," she said Thursday. "They expect to get more lightning Friday. They expect more lightning Saturday." In Central O regon a nd the Blue Mountains of Eastern Oregon, the l i ghtning is expected to last through Sunday. That means initial attack crews assigned to snuff small fires will be busy, and fire spotters will be looking for

days afterward for fires in timbered areas that take longer to show up. A few miles southeast of John Day, visitors to a campground near the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness area were told to be ready to evacuate as"holdover fires" from Wednesday's lightning broke out. A round of lightning in late July touched off major fires in southwestern Oregon. Fire camps there reported progress Thursday in establishing containment l i nes, without setbacks. At the largest of them, the Douglas Complex, the firefighting force has grown to more than 3,100 and the fire area to more than 66 square miles. But evacuation advisories have been lifted for the last of the residents of 105 households advised to leave in the first days of the fire. At the Whiskey complex of fires in the Umpqua National Forest, fir e s p okeswoman Alexis West said crews had gotten lines around fire that raced out of a creek bottom on Tuesday, jumping roads and fire lines and forcing about 100 firefighters to retreat to safety zones. "It looked like a new run, and now it isn't," she said.

Deli bringssmall mountain mmmunity together By Natalie Wheeler East Oregonian

M EACHAM — T h er e i s one store in t h e m ountain community of Meacham, and it's an important one. Threeyears ago, Meacham's sole business, the Oregon Trail Store and Deli, had closed. The volunteer fire department was foundering, politics divided pockets of the community and residents felt isolated without a gathering space. "Let's just say ou r c o mmunity was, well, not a community," said D i x i e E a rle, Oregon Trail store owner, of the estimated 150 residents. "Nobody got together." But on t hi s w eek's Taco Tuesday at the deli, 57 people showed up to bond over Earle a nd husband Randy M o r ford's food. Meacham, between Pendlet on an d L a G r a n de, h a s changed considerably since its Old Highway 30 store reopened its doors. First, the Meacham Mountain Ladies Society — a group of about a d o zen w o m en — began meeting at the deli, bringing together some who had lived in the area for 30 years and didn't know a soul. Then, the volunteer fire department jumped from eight responders to 18. Then, the chapel reopened, and Dutch oven cook-offs and yard sales brought hundreds of people out. The deli is also home to the post office, concealed gun classes and two gallons of emergency gasoline, to name a few of its purposes. J an Caldwell owned t h e store formany years before closing it in 2010 after it be-

the divisions, but that's a hur-

'+tt)~tna@D

Ethan Anderson. Fraser said it could take several days to identify the badly burned remains. Investigators were unable to extract DNA.

dle we can conquer," Haggie said. "It's a matter of doing positive things and getting out there and introducing the

people." "We all have our Hatfields and McCoys, but even that, I think, is lessening over time," said Karen Edmonds, who started the Meacham Mountain Ladies Society. Edmonds, 63, grew up in Meacham, when the community had two restaurants, two taverns, a saw mill, bar and E.J., Harris / East Oregonian motel before Old Highway 30 Dixie Earle pours coffee for customers at the Oregon Trail Store closed down and much of the and Deliin Meacham on Wednesday. The community's lone busibusiness dried up. ness, which recently reopened, is also its meeting place. Edmonds knows and loves the town. She spoke of July 3, 1923, the day that Meacham "The locals justjumped in and embraced us. I was the capital of the United States because then-president think that's made the most difference." Warren H a r d in g s t o pped — Dixie Earle, owner of Oregon Trail Store and Deli in Meacham there with all of his Cabinet members. For Earleand Morford, the came too much to handle. tion, residents say there were community has been — literThat time between Caldwell divisions between p o ckets ally — healing. Morford sufand Earle was a strange one. of the c o mmunity; p eople fered ananeurysm five years Retired Hermiston police around Meacham Lake and ago that resulted in s even chief Grant A s her m o v ed those near Old Highway 30 strokes. to th e s n ow y c o m munity kept their distance. Doctors said he would die, five months before the The Meacham Lake area then he didn't. They said he deli reopened. He's called is regarded as more conser- would be brain dead, but his Meacham's "Wal-Mart greet- vative, while t h ose nearer brain woke up. er" now, thanks to his friend- t he h i ghway t e n d t o b e "Then for nine months he liness, but that wasn't always transplants and a bit m o re couldn't talk," Earle said. the case. progressive. He began to talk, but the "We didn't talk to people "I can't say it's always been creative part of his brain was for about five months," Asher that way, but the people didn't shattered. Residents rememsaid. "We had no interaction feelcomfortable around each bered him as quiet when he whatsoever." other," Haggie said. "The best and Earle moved from IdaThree years ago, Ken Hag- reason I could say was be- ho to run the store, but six gie said, he knew about five cause of politics." months later he was chatting people in the area he lived But the barriers are crum- up everyone. "It was unbelievable, the in since 1998. Now he knows bling. Residents all talked of h undreds, making hi s w ay good friends across dividing change in him," Earle said. "The locals just jumped in and downtown three to four times lines. "I'm sure we still have peo- embraced us. I think t h at's a week. More than just the isolaple who feel the isolation or made the most difference."

NeW OregOn rOad map —A newofficial Oregon state road map is out. It includes new highway and interchange construction since

2011 and features updated city insets. Freemaps areavailable at visitor centers, chambers of commerce, Driver and Motor Vehicle offices and ODOT offices.

Thief electrocuted —work crews have found the charred remains of a 36-year-old man in anabandoned Lyons plywood mill. Autopsy results show Dustin Harris died of electrocution while trying to steal copper wire from an electrical panel board at the mill, which

isowned by HoodLumber.A HoodLumber employeefoundHarris' body and asmall fire at the mill on Tuesday afternoon. Upon investigation, they found Harris' body16 feet from the panel and some articles of clothing 30 feet away.

Free SpeeCh ruling —A judge hasruled that Lane County improperly closed acourthouse plaza dedicated to free speech and has dismissed a trespassing chargeagainst a protester for homeless causes who refused to leave it. Municipal JudgeKaren Stenard ruled Wednesdaythe five-day closure in December wasn't based on any compelling government interest, so it was unconstitutional. The county administrator at the time, Liane Richardson, told protester Alley Valkyrie human feces were smelled in the plaza. Protesters denied

that, and a cleaning crew found noevidence. Man paWnS eX-Wife'S jeWelry —Prosecutors say a 45year-old Portland manpawned his ex-wife's wedding ring to cover a debt he owed. Brett Chauncey is accused of taking the ring and a diamondnecklacefrom thewoman's home in mid-July.Chauncey

was arraigned Thursday in Circuit Court on charges that included two counts of first-degree aggravated theft and one count of burglary.

Court papers say police found the inscribed wedding ring after checkingadatabaseofgoodssoldtopawnshops. — From wire reports

Federal judgerulesagainst veterans inICBRjudgment By Mlke Francls The Oregonian

A judge in the Washington, D.C.-based Court of Federal Claims has ruled against a set of Oregon National Guard soldiers and veterans who last year won an $81 million judgment against military contractor KBR Inc. A jury in Portland agreed with the soldiers' claims that KBR had knowinglyexposedthemto a known carcinogen while they provided security for contractors in Iraq in 2003. In a separate act>on >n Federal Claims Court, KBR is asking for the government to cover its legal costs and liabilities under the contract it signed to restore the flow of Iraq's oil following the U.S.led invasion in 2003. The government argues t h at KBR should responsible for claims arising from its operations at the site. As part of the proceeding, KBR and the government may negotiate for a settlement, enter m edia-

tion or other means of what's known as "alternative dispute resolution." Lawyers for the Oregon soldiers had asked to participate in such discussions, arguing that the soldiers have an interest in the outcome. Lawyers for KBR and the government objected. On W e d nesday, A DR Judge Eric Bruggink denied the soldiers' request, writing "the court ... could not force the parties, in the event they choose to mediate in the future, to involve the (soldiers) in their discussions."

Microwave Hood

Aseoaa. 220CFM Exhaust

$g 88

Bu wh ere the builders bu I

HNlsoN TV.APPLIANCE NEP'Lower Rates.y

Local Artist's Exhibition, Reception ck Live Music

Listen to Live Music and Meet the Artists! Artists: ... Band: ...

August 9'" • Friday • 4pm - 5pm RSVP Seating is Limited • ''

a. •

I


B4 T H E BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

The Bulletin

EDITORIALS

AN LNDEPENDENT NEWBPAPER

Bri e roecttoo

i' '' • '" i~ , ). Iii,'-

I

/ i ~) '~ ~ 'I

BETSY Mccooc

Chairaomnn

Goaoott BEAEE

Palll&lter

JHHH CosYA

Fditur in-Clnrf Editor of Edttorials

RICHAHD CoE

I > ' , I ;® i!iII I <> '• t c'too

im ortantto et ie

~

.P 7

I

HoN- IJ'lO YoU

RENMSER To

regon's legislators knew something this year that escaped their counterparts in Washington state.

P '~

The Interstate 5 bridge that connects Portland to

cm th

I!cK VI' A 91'ER WHENY0U

g$1

WB N T OIJTa

L

Vancouver, Wash., is barely up to the task it must perform, and if the two states grow, and they're expected to do so, the

I tl

situation will only get worse. Thus, news that the proposed

• (SI

e

EI

(

P

Columbia River Crossing bridge replacement project may not L

be dead is encouraging.

a -:

8 Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee apparently are discussing ways to keep the project alive. They're doing so in part because a group of businessmen asked them to. They're also aware that the two states already have spent $175 million on the project. And, most important, they're doing so because, unlike lawmakers in Washington state, they recognize that a new bridge is still needed. The original p roposal took what many thought was a fatal blow in June, when the Washington Legislature refused to put up its share, $450 million, of the then$3.4 billion cost of the project. Oregon lawmakers already agreed to a similar expenditure, though with several conditions. That money may be still available. We hope so. No matter what you think of light rail to Vancouver or tolling, or even whether or not automobiletrafficwill growasprojected, a new bridge remains important. Even at current traffic levels

ties to paganism.) The U.S. State Department's Chief Diversity Officer last year wrote that a host of expressions can be offensive, such as hold down the fort, going Dutch, handicap and rule of thumb. There are people, we have no doubt, who toss and turn at night fretting about such words and phrases. Theirminds churning with political correctness, they lament the ruin that may come if some miscreant dares to utter them. But if the tyranny of political correctness goes in one direction, the rules of common sensehead the other way. It becomes more than just being sensitive. It becomes politically subordinate to the absurd. Seattle's Office of Civil Rights does have some serious issues it is trying to address. It is helping former criminals who have served their time get jobs without being unfairly d i scriminated against. It is trying to protect the rights of women to breast-feed in public. It tries to ensure that people are not discriminated against in housing. We wouldn't suggest anyone surrender efforts to be sensitive. But don't presume Seattleites or other Americans are so fragile that such words should be an excuse for them to wilt.

~ ~ ~

~

: tEE

CwQ

— some 134,000 vehicles a day use the existing bridge — congestion is a problem. There's an average of one wreck a day, with resulting traffic backups. Raising the bridge for river traffic exacerbates traffic problems as well. And, perhaps most important, I-5 is the single most important freight corridor on the West Coast, and both states' economies rely more heavily on moving freight than do most other states. As traffic on the bridge is delayed, the cost of shipping increases, hurting both economies in the process. And unlike b usinessmen and sightseers, truckers cannot shift to public transportation. Talks between the two governors are in the most preliminary stages, though they're likely to come up with something less expensive than the original proposal, which may make the idea more palatable to some opponents. We hope so. Ne ither Oregon norWashington can afford to let the bridge project die without a fight.

~unEo'n,,tr M~

I ~ —Y

M

.@' ' %Ys -

AEttNvll M529fggt.ot9H(fttEttr9c ttE'rgA4EA

M Nickel's Worth PERS rate change is a joke

Seattle's crazy word choice e worry about Seattle. What if d inosaurs run amok devouring Seattle citizens on Halloween just as Seattleites are sitting down to enjoy a nice brown bag lunch? It's absurd, but no more absurd than the fact that the city might only be able to issue the most torturously worded warning. You see, the city's Office of Civil Rights has some new politically correct suggestions about what the city should not say. Elliott Bronstein, public information officer, suggested to his PR co-workers that "citizens" and "brown bag" can be no-nos. And thedocument leaked. "Citizens" is bad because not all of the people Seattle serves are citizens. "Brown bag" is bad because brown bags have served as a racial color gauge to filter out who could get in at events. This fear of words comes from the same place that prompted the New York Department of Education to avoid references to dinosaurs, birthdays and Halloween. (Dinosaurs may raise uncomfortable thoughts about evolution. Jehovah's Witnesses don't celebrate birthdays. Halloween has

~

such discriminatoryrates based on a secret deal it struck with some Recently, it was announced that homeowner associations back in our illustrious representatives in 2003. That secretagreement was Oregon agreed to "downgrade" the not signed by me or any individual arbitraryreturn on earnings from 8 city customers, yet it supposedly percent to 7.75 percent. What a joke! requiresus to pay higher ratesthan This is like taking someone who is customers elsewhere. $1,000-per-month overspending on For example, when the city detheir budget and saying we will fix cided to replace a water line in my this by cutting out potato chips ev- neighborhood, my neighbors and ery month. We citizens are being so I were singled out to pay the entire misled; it is sad. Nowhere in the arti- cost, which will amount to an adcle do we see what PERS has really ditional $26.06 for each of us to pay achieved as an annual rate of return. every month for the next 30 years. I know that several states have nev- Yet, when the city decides to replace er seen close to 8 percent, for the last a water line in any other neighbor20 years! So this unfunded liability hood in town, that cost is shared by just keeps on building. customers on a citywide basis. There is no political will to build In sum, the citymade abigmistake integrity into our nation's programs. when it thought it could take Juniper Detroit is a shining example. We need Utility for free. It is now making anto demand that our state politicians other big mistake by discriminating address the PERS issue and all oth- against Juniper's former customers. ers that utilize "flaky" accounting. Two wrongs don't make a right. Ken Egan Marion Paimateer Bend Bend

Two wrongs don't make a right The city made a big mistake when it took Jan Ward's private utility company, known as Juniper Utility, for its own use in 2002. The city told Juniper'scustomers and the press it would take Juniper's property in court without having to pay compensation. The court disagreed, and the city wound up paying more than $12 million for legal fees and compensation. Oops. The city is trying to pay for its mistake by charging higher water rates to former Juniper customers than it charges all its other customers. The city claims it can charge

ter supply. Bend has been using this water sourcefor more than 85 years, and the proposed project will actually reduce the amount withdrawn, leaving more instream. We all know that the county will start its road project in early 2015. So the pipe repair (with pipe that's custom-made and already paid for) must start early in 2014. Not much time, is there? The city would be remiss if it were to do anything to jeopardize our valuable water rights. So what is the problem'? Why all the litigation'? Opponents have never given one good argument against this project. Please write your elected council people and tell them you want this project to proceed. A very few people are costing the city millions of dollars in legal fees. If the council only hears from opponents, they might start to believe it is the will of the majority. And it is not.

Lynn Putnam Bend

Support water project

OSU board will create new pathways

The pipe repair project for Bend's surface water must be allowed to proceed.Bend needs reliable,clean (and cheap) surface water. It also needs dual-source watersupplies — one to back up the other when needed. Wells cost a lot to operate. Surface water uses gravity. The July 24 Bulletin editorial nailed it — it is in our and future generations' best interests to protect our surface water. A very few people who do not care what quality of water citizens are drinking (have "other agendas") are trying to put a stop to the new pipe installation that needs to be done to ensure our surface wa-

As a trustee of the Oregon State University Foundation, I am excited with the appointment of a new institutional board at OSU. The university will be poised to make an even bigger impact in Central Oregon. Our part of the state continues to work hard to create economic opportunity and to find new partnerships that take advantage of our unique strengths. This group of OSU leaders will create a new set of pathways and connectionsforourregion to explore, and I plan to be active in reaching out to them once they are appointed. Harold J. Ashford Bend

Letters policy

In My Viewpolicy How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer's phone number and address for verification.

should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer's signature, phone number

and address for verification. Weedit letters for brevity, grammar, taste

We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons.

and legal reasons. Wereject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters

We reject those published elsewhere.

submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one

the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are

letter or Op-Edpieceevery 30 days.

In My View pieces run routinely in

Please address your submission to either My Nickel's Worth or in My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel's Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin©bendbulletin.com

limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Cogen sex scandal 'small potatoes' by today's standards s political sex scandals go, the story of Jeff Cogen and Sonia Manhas is small potatoes. The chairman of the Multnomah County Commission (he) admitted recently to an 18-month affair with a policy adviser (she) in the county's health department. She lost her job as a result of the affair; he, an elected official, refuses to quit. When I was younger, I'd have sent the story to the "All Men Are Pigs" file. Today, the picture of this and similar — they involve sex — stories in the news is far less clear. As I age, it seems, the world is far less absolute than it used to be. Consider the case of Cogen and Manhas. Her firing is clearly unfair, itseems to me. Her bosses apparently refused to discuss her problems with her until she had signed a resignation letter; she was given no opportunity to make her case to them or to appeal their decision to ax her. He,

JANET STEVENS meanwhile, lost a 4-1 vote of his fellow commissioners to boot him from office — something they were unable to accomplish unless he agreed to go willingly. But after reading the various accounts of the Cogen/Manhas alliance, one comes away with the sense that if he used her, she equally used him. In a slew of emails, she asks him to push her boss on such things as tobacco policy; she lobbies hard for the creation of an office she wants to

(and finally does) head. And so on. His wife, meanwhile, so far has remained silent on the subject. Not so the wife of Anthony Weiner, former U.S. congressman from New York. He left the House of Repre-

sentatives after having been caught lying about what ABC News called "risque online behavior with multiple women." Now, running for mayor of New York, Weiner'sbeen forced to admit that risque behavior did not end with his stint in Congress. Rather than undo the damage he had done, he only made it worse, acknowledging last month that he had had at least three similar affairs after leaving Washington, and after a People magazine story last summer in which he talked glowingly of his happy married life. It's the behavior of his wife, Huma Abedin, that puzzles me. She is, by all accounts, a particularly bright and accomplished woman, one who works as a top aide to Hillary Clinton. But, like Clinton in similar circumstances, she publicly announced that, while things might have been tough, she stands by her man. I'd be less uncomfortable with her posture

if he hadn't publicly humiliated her not once but twice with his antics. Where, I wonder, is her own sense of self worth in this sorry story? Lucky New Yorkers. They have not one but two, and perhaps three, sets of scandalous behavior to keep them interested in their current election. Eliot Spitzer resigned as governor of New York in March 2008 after being caught during a federal wiretap confirming a date with a prostitute. Now he's running for comptrollerchief financial officer — of the city of New York. His decision naturally led to a thorough rehashing of his earlier problems. Spitzer is lucky, though, at least where one of his five opponents is concerned. Kristin Davis is a former madam, for one thing. For another, she was arrested earlier this week, suspected of the illegal sale of a prescription drug. The most recent polling information I saw, from late last

month, put Spitzer in a dead heat with a third candidate, Scott Springer, Manhattan borough president. Compare Oregon's Cogen with either Spitzer or Weiner and he comes off looking, if not like a paragon of virtue, not so completely terrible, either. He's certainlyno worse than Oregon's other two most scandalous officeholders. Bob Packwood was a fanny grabber of the old order and lost his seat in the U.S. Senate as a result. By today's standards, his behavior looks kind of sad. Worse, far worse, was the behavior of former Gov. Neil Goldschmidt, a politician who finally was forced to admit to the sex abuse of a 14-yearold girl, though the story was not cast in those terms initially. That's bad even by today's standards and is surely worse than all the other men's lack of control combined. — Janet Stevensis deputy editor of The Bulletin.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

BS

Sweepstakes open to legal U.S. reside ts age 18 and older

BITUARIES FEATURED OBITUARY

DEATH NOTICES

'Cow oy'Jac Cement epe to mo ernize country music

Billie "Bill" Rea Atteberry, of Redmond May 4, 1951 - July 30, 2013 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel 541-548-3219 please sign our online guestbook www.redmondmemorial.com Services: Celebration of life August 25, 2013 at Family residence 1-4 pm.

By Chris Talbott The Associated Press -

James E. Cherry, of Bend Feb. 11, 1931 - Aug. 6, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: The urn will be interred at Willamette National Cemetery. Contributions may be made to:

American Cancer Society www.americancancerfund.org

June M. Dodge, of Redmond June 24, 1919 - Aug. 5, 2013 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond, (541) 504-9485, www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A Graveside Service will be held Friday, August 9, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. at Powell Butte/PilgrimsRest Cemetery located in Powell Butte. A potluck and time of fellowship will immediately follow at 1602 NW Redwood Avenue in Redmond. Contributions may be made to:

Hospice of Redmond, 732 SW 23rd Street, Redmond, OR 97756, www.hospiceodredmond.org

Lola R. Young, of Roseburg, OR Mar. 3, 1952- July27, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A service will be held in Central Point, OR at a later date.

Richard "Bud" A. McGilvray, of Bend May 5, 1935 - Aug. 5, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services will be held per Bud's request. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org Robert nBud" F.

Byers, of La Pine Sept. 25, 1927 - Aug. 5, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life will take place on Monday, August 12, at 2:00PM at High Lakes Christian Church, located at 52620 Day Rd., in La Pine. Contributions may be made to:

Heart N' Home Hospice & Palliative Care, PO Box 1888, La Pine, OR 97739 or Humane Society of Central Oregon, www.hsco.org.

Robert Harold Barr, of Redmond

tl Farrno< Markcf boofh P'ck vv an 0 on ttov<o rnais af ovr NWX oafvtda Plck.

NASHVILLE , Tenn . "Cowboy" Jack Clement,

a producer, engineer, songwriter and beloved figure who helped birth rock 'n' roll and push country music into modern times, died Thursday at his home. He was 82. Dub Cornett, a close friend of Clement's, said his hospice nurse c o nfirmed C l ement passed away surrounded by family after declining treatment for liver cancer. His death came just months after he learned he would be joining the C ountry M u sic Hall of Fame, a fitting tip of the hat to the man whose personal story is entwined with the roots of modern music like few others. He was to be inducted at a ceremony this fall. "I've been walking around for the last hour thanking God for the privilege of knowing Cowboy Jack Clement," singer Marty Stuart said in an email. "He was one of my dearest friends. To know the Cowboy was to know one of the most original people to ever walk the Earth." At the top of hi s o f ficial Country Music Hall of Fame bio was one of Clement's favorite quotes: "We're in the fun business. If we're not having fun, we're not doing our

WIN A

TRAEGER®

All entries must be received by 3 p.m Aug. 31. Winner will be announced Sept. 7 at the NWX Farmers Market„

Lil' Tex Elite wood pellet grill

$799 VALUE

tktlfn'rtnrri r

@

. pPi

-

Mark Humphrey/The Associated Press

The artists who worked with Jack Clement, whose career as a producer, engineer, songwriter and arranger began in the early days of rock 'n' roll, included country stars like Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Charley Pride as well as noncountry bands like U2.

with something a little more upbeat. The result'? "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On." And how about this? He persuaded Kristofferson to move to town, changing just about everything i n M u s ic City. Kristofferson wrote in an email that Clement was the f irst person h e m e t w h e n he arrived in Nashville, still wearing his Army uniform. "He introduced me to Johnny Cash by showing him a letter my mother had written disowning me for resigning my job." commission to be a songwritC lement could c l aim a s er," he wrote. "To me, Jack will much fun as anyone after a always be the embodiment colorful career that left him of the Nashville songwriter's a famous figure in Nashville, love ofthe song, regardless of known as much for his color- who the writer was." ful personality and storytellSpeaking of Cash, it was ing as his formidable place in Clement who came up with music history. the idea of p u tting M ariaA tribute benefit concert chi horns on Cash's "Ring of to Clement last winter drew Fire," transforming a fairly sevideo salutes from first lady date love song into an ascenMichelle Obama, former Pres- dant pop culture moment that ident Bill Clinton, U2's Bono would endure time. "He was the maestro,the and pop star Taylor Swift, as well as performances and ap- ringleader of tomfoolery, and pearances by an all-star lineup I know Johnny Cash and Sam of fans including Kris Kristof- Phillips are ready to get back ferson, John Prine, Dan Au- to work now that he's in heaverbach from The Black Keys en," said Cornett, who proand Jakob Dylan. duced the benefit concert. Clement's career included Born in Memphis in 1931, stops in Memphis at Sun Re- Clement picked up music in cords as an engineer for Sam his late teens and continued to Phillips, where he discovered perform after joining the MaJerry Lee Lewis and recorded rines at 17. greats like Carl Perkins and He invited a young Elvis Roy Orbison. Presley to sit in his band ocHe a ls o c a m e t h r ough casionally after returning to Nashville, where he was a Memphis to attend college, close collaborator of Johnny where he picked up the nickname "Cowboy" for his role in Cash and many of his fellow Hall of Fame members, ina radio show. cluding fellow 2013 inductee He eventually built a garage Bobby Bare. recording studio with a partAs the Hall of Fame noted, ner. Hetook the first records he was a catalyst who always he made to Sun to master and seemed to bring the best out of was hired on the spot by Philthose he worked with. lips in 1956. For instance, he persuaded Like with the Lewis sesLewis to put aside the coun- sions, which were conducted try material he b rought to when Phillips was away, nimSun Records and stretch out ble thinking helped Clement

insert himself into another historic moment — the fleeting few hours when Presley, Cash, Lewis a n d P e r k ins found themselves together in the store-front Union Avenue studio and decided to mess around a little. The result was "The Million Dollar Quartet." "After a while, Sam went next door to Taylor's restaurant," Clement said in a 2010 interview with The Commercial Appeal of Memphis. "And I was sitting in the control room, turning up some knobs and I heard what they were doing. I remember I stood up and said, 'I'd be remiss if I didn't record this.' So I stuck a tape on, walked out in the studio and moved a few mics around, and I just let it run for about an hour and a half or so. Nobody seemed to object." He'd run across Elvis and Cash again i n Na s h ville, where he served as a producer, engineer and talent scout in Nashville for Chet Atkins during some of country music's most important years before going out on his own. Along the way, he boosted George Jones' career w i th his composition "She Thinks I Still Care" and had songs recorded by R a y C h a rles, Waylon Jennings, Tom Jones, Dolly P a r ton a n d P o r t er Wagoner. As a producer, he helped break through the color barrier in country music through his discovery of minor league

ing singer C h arley P r i de, e stablished Jennings w i t h their work on "Dreaming My D reams" and t o uched t h e legendary careers of L o uis Armstrong, A lbert C o l lins, Townes Van Zandt and Hank Williams Jr., among others. He also helped mark a turning point in the career of U2, recording th e I r i s h b a nd's multiplatinum r oots t r ibute "Rattle and Hum."

-

HOMES PRICED FROM

ORTH~EST

W

J

2341 NW Floyd Ln. • Sunny courtyard patio • Vaulted 8 1tr ceilings e Hardwood & tile finishes • Bright, cheerful interior • Priced al $429,900

'

gQ

1

DIRECTIONS:West on Skyliners Rd., nghton NW LemhiPass Dr ,nghton NW Floyd Ln.

2355 NW Floyd Ln. • Master on main level • Generous room sizes • Premium finishes • Upstairs loft • Priced al $549,900

'

DIRECTIONS:West on Skyliners Rd., nght on NW Lemhi Pass Dr., right on NW Floyd Ln.

'

,,)Ik.

A LL A R O U N D

Bend R Central O r e gon 63143 Beaufort Ct.

• Selection of 3-br plans • Gas fireplace, tile counters • Energy-saving construction • Energy Star, EA certified • Homes priced from $184,950

baseball player and aspir-

DIRECTIONS:From Empire Ave., north on woo

Boyd Acres Rd., left on NEGloucester Ln., right on NELancaster St., left on NE Avro Pl., cross NEDeHaviland St., turn right on NEBeaufort Ct.

r o t t tL a

- p A R tc-

62773 Promise Pl. • Open greatroom • Corner gas fireplace • Tile bath finishes • Near schools, hospital • Priced at$179,900 DIRECTIONS:From Hwy 20 east, north on NE 27th Stn right on NEWells Acres

Rd., right on NE Promise Pl.

DEATHS ELSEWHERE

the 124 Munchkins who gath- fiction books about ancient ered at MGM to help make Egypt. Died Thursday in Fredmovie history. Died Wednes- erick, Md. Margaret Pellegrini, 89: One day in Phoenix. Marilyn King, 82: Entertainer of the last t hree surviving Barbara Mertz, 85: An Egyp- who spent decades singing Munchkins from the 1939 film tologist who wrote dozens of with the King Sisters and also "The Wizard of Oz," Pellegrini mystery and suspense novels worked as a songwriter and was 15 and stood 3 feet,4inch- under two pen names, Mertz actress, King began her singes tall when she became one of wrote 29 suspense novels un- ing career at 13, eventually der thepen name Barbara Mi- joining her sisters' quartet, chaels and more than 35 un- which releasedmore than 150 der the name Elizabeth Peters, albums in the 1940s, '50s and '60s. Died Wednesday in Lamany of them set in Egypt and the Middle East. Under guna Niguel, Calif. Death Notices are free and will Deadlines: Death Notices are her own name, she wrote non— From wire reports be run for one day, but specific accepted until noon Monday guidelines must be followed. through Friday for next-day Local obituaries are paid publication and by 4:30 p.m. advertisements submitted by Friday for Sunday publication. families or funeral homes. Obituaries must be received Wayne Eugene Bryant They maybesubmitted by phone, by 5 p.m. Monday through February 28, 1921 - August 5, 2013 mail, email or fax. Thursday for publication The Bulletin reserves the right on the second day after Another of "The Greatest Generation" has to edit all submissions. Please submission, by1 p.m. Friday faded from the scene. A veteran of t)(/'t)(/II, include contact information for Sunday publication, and an era that changed the world, passed away in all correspondence. by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday peacefully in his sleep on August 5, 2013. He was the second son For information on any of these publication. Deadlines for of Claude Augustus Bryant and Geneva Sharp, born on February services or about the obituary display ads vary; please call policy, contact 541-617-7825. for details. 28, 1921 in Los Angeles, CA. He is survived by his wife, Carol Bryant; three stepchildren and four grandchildren. He will be laid to rest in the Wiliamette National Cemetery where his grave will be dedicated and consecrated by a member of the Phone: 541-617-7825 Mail:Obituaries priesthood of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter.day Saints. Email: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Fax: 541-322-7254 Bend, OR 97708

Nov. 14, 1950- July24, 2013 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel 541-548-3219 please sign our online guestbook www.redmondmemorial.com Services: No services will be held.

Visit any of our Saturday open houses during the month of August and fill out an entry form for your chance to win!

20917 Sage Creek Dr.

Deaths of note from around the world:

• Ridgewaler neighborhood • Beautiful cabinetry, buill-ins • Master on main level • Bonus room upstairs • Priced at $474,900 DIRECTIONS:From Bend Parkway, exit Reed Market Rd, eastbound, right on SE 15th St., left on SEFerguson Rd., right

on Sage CreekDr.

63780 Crooked Rocks Rd.

Obituary policy

• Elegant log home • 9.5 secluded acres • Masters on main, upstairs • Long paved driveway • Priced at $699,000 DIRECTIONS:Highway 20 west, right on Cooley Rd., left on Scenic Dr., right on

Crooked RocksRd.

FiH Llg

•I

' •

• e•

-

r•


B6

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

W EAT H E R Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central, LP ©2013.

'

k

i

'

I

Bge

iI

•B4

4

j SW W W

Today: Partly cloudy with a chance of thunderstorms

WIGH

Tonight: Partly to mostly cloudy with a chance of thunder-

LOW

storms

81 63/57

Hood

Seasideo Cannon Beach 61/55

68/55

~/

Rlver 62

HillsboroPort and ~~ 82/62

• L McMinnville 80/57 o

Sa n dy

• 81/58

Pf

Lincoln City

Umatilla

92/63

The 6iggs

Dag e s 89/64 &VErlington 87/65 • • oWaSCO 87/62

)

Maupin

Government 89/62 e CamP 72/eze e +

Salem

I

91/62 ~

87/61

82/5 1

CENTRAL A few showers

87/eo Union

8 4/55

88/59

: +++ e

arlp Sprlllgs, e ~

Albany~~

+ + + . • pray 9 869

.

.

Jordan Valley

e - Roseburg e e e Chbmult e e + We e Christmas Vagey e + + + + + + +84/59 + + + zx/de + e edjluek + 81/51 g'vey e e e e e e e e e e++ e Frenchglen

state extremes

85/52

+Port Orfor + + + + + e e e e e e e e e W kee e e e e e e e e e e + + +, ss/se euss oeeeee e a e e e e e e e e e + mrants~ww + +++ +e e' ee+e+e+e+e+ e e eo 8 - e e e e e e + e e e e e e e e e . i e e g e e e e e e + e Paisleye e++e e + + + e 7 8/sde e+eee e + + + eee + + + e + e e e ++ + e' e + + + e e+ +e+. +e+ + Fields• : e+ eWlamat

Rome

• 1QQ

87/55

Ontario

• 39'

.

McDermitt

e e e ALakeview'+y e -' ssiss e e e izz/53e e + + +

m»«e ege3 4 e 4 e79/Ss e e e + Pa ee eee e ee

eee e e

88/49 ~

Lakeview

~

I

Vancouver • 75/57

5 ' • Calgary Saskatoon 64/54 i 70/50

W.innipeg 68/54 •

/

• Seattle 80/61

eeeee'e ' x e

4n Bns T hunder 6ay 70/46 •

uebec "+ e e ee e e e e xd ee ee ~ , + + eeeee ee ' ee e ee e e e Hal i f ax eeeeeeee e ee e e ' + + e e 70/61 Cee e eeee

Bismarck . 73/52 ortland~ e e e eiee+ e e ee eBiHmgs e e++e + eee ee; "eeeee$ e e e 85/58 - 7O6St.Paul 1 Greenaay/ e eeee, e+++ .~ e Bojsee ee t e J ' •, 75/53

e • eIe

'Toronto e e + e

• 11Q' El Centro, Calif.

• 36' l~

Truckee, Calif.

g e~cneyenne•

~

San Francisco 63/

• 3.17" Rogers, Ark.

I

Salt Lake e e e e+ City g ee e e • ~ Denver V egas 9 4/70 • e , 9 9 / 53 98/78 • eee

•f

• ~

~$

ew 75/57 ee+ Ae

e

T •

Portland 76/62 ton 77/68

iladelphia n9ton, D.C.

e, e W

' ip

85/728 e, 79/64e e~e e e e , ee . « e e .Ke, e. . . e • Charlotte eee'eeee ~ ee~ BQS e e : eee • 87/Tt I Ouranoma Cit Little Rock 'e Nashvltt'& 89/66 89/72 • •

.

Honolulu ~ 91/76

• Bunafo ee

780 5 9 C h ;ca o Z Columbusee '

61/97 ~~-eee e ao ve e e e 83/69 e Kansas Cityeie, e e e •

.. '

,

m 96n4 pe ' e.87/7? ' "

~ C>

~ gos

Tijuana 73/55

103/76

HAW Ai i

1OOS Pg

Chihuahua

70

Anchorage 60/54

a Paz 99/73

c7'ALASKA

Amphitheater

lando . •

gsnS

3/76

Miami 89/79

Monterrey Mazatlan • 91/80',

Juneau

66/49

New Orleans 91/77 .

Housgn

92/70

60s

FRONTS Cold

Moonrise today.... 9:02 a.m Moonsettoday .... 9:21 p.m Aug.14 Aug. 20 Aug. 28 Sept. 5 •

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE PRECIPITATION

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury....4:46 a.m...... 7:40 p.m. Venus......9:06 a.m...... 9:40 p.m. Mars.......3:29 a.m...... 6:49 p.m. Jupiter......2:52 a.m...... 6;11 p.m. Satum.....1245 p m.....11:22 pm. Uranus....10:1 3p.m.....1054 a.m.

Yesterday's weather through 4 p.m. inBend High/Low.............. 84/55 24 hours endmg 4 p.m.*. . 0.00" Record high.......102 m1972 Month to date.......... 011" Recordlow......... 32 in1949 Average monthtodate... 0.11"

Average high.............. 83 Year to date............ 3.30" Average low .............. 48 Average year to date..... 6.39" 6arometric pressureat 4 p.m29.95 Record 24 hours ...1.06 in1948 *Melted liquid equivalent

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday F r iday Hi/Lo/Pcp H i/Lo/W

WATER REPORT

S aturdayBend,westoiHwy 97......Ext Si sters.............................High The following was compiled by the Central H i /Lo/WBend,eastoiHwy.97.....High La Pine................................Ext. Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as Redmond/Madras.........Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

Astoria ........66/57/0.00....63/57/pc......62/55/c Baker City......89/56/0.00....88/52/pc.....88/51/pc Brookings......59/50/0.00.....61/54/c.....61/53/pc 6urns..........84/47/0.00.....85/50/t.....86/48/sh Eugene........ 85/55/0.00..... 83/58/t.....81/53/pc Klamath Falls .. 77/45/000 ....76/49/t .. . 78/49/t Lakeview.......75/39/0.00 ....77/53/t..... 79/51/t La Pine........ 84/40/0.00..... 78/52/t...... 79/41/t Medford.......85/57/0.00.....86/62/t......85/61/t Newport.......61/52/0.00....58/53/pc......57/50/c North Bend..... 64/57/0.02..... 63/54/t.....63/53/pc Ontario.......100/73/0.00....95/63/pc......95/64/s Pendleton......94/64/0.00....91/62/pc.....89/57/pc Portland .......82/61/0.00....82/62/pc......81/58/t PrineviBe....... 85/53/0.00..... 84/57/t...... 84/54/t Redmond....... 87/52/0.00..... 85/58/t.....84/52/pc Roseburg....... 85/57/0.00..... 84/59/t...... 83/58/t Salem ....... 85/55/0 00 .... 83/59/1 ... 82/56/c Sisters......... 92/52/0.00..... 81/53/t...... 81/47/t The Dages......90/67/0.00.....87/65/c.....87/63/pc

Mod. = Moderate; Exi. = Extreme

a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet C a pacity Crane Prairie...... . . . . . . 28,332...... 55,000 Wickiup...... . . . . . . . . . . 77,053..... 200,000 Crescent Lake..... . . . . . . 66,547...... 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir 1 5 258 47 0 0 0 The higher the UV Index number, the greater Prineville...... . . . . . . . . 106,973.....153,777 the need for eye and skin protection. Index is R iver flow St at i on Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie ...... . 235 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup .... . . . . . . 1,530 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake ...... . 144 LOW MEDIUM HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine ...... . . . . . . . 73.0 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend .... . . . . . . . . . 130 Deschutes RiverAt 6enham Falls ..... . . . . 1,984 Crooked RiverAbove Prinevige Res..... . . . . . NA Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res..... . . . . 222 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow OchocoRes. .... . . . . . 20.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne ..... . . . . . . 73.0 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOIQ~ M E DIUM or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

IPOLLEN COUNT

g%g

TRAVELERS' FORECAST NATIONAL

o www m (in the 48 contiguous states):

85 55

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation,s-sun, pc-partial clouds,c-clouds,h-haze,sh-showers,r-rain, t-thunderstorms,sf-soowflurries, snsnow, i-ice,rs-rain-snowmix, w-wind,f-fog, dr-drizzle,tr-trace

INATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS

Yesterday's extremes

HIGH LOW

84 55

City Precipitationvaluesare24-hour totals through4 p.m.

e

HIGH LOW

83 55

EAST

Partly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

OREGON CITIES

Partly cloudy

81 55

and thunderstorms possible.

4 . e , e • ee BaerCI • +++ + e+8 9/es-e e e e adraseel6e Mitcheg'84/58 e Partly cloudy skies. e + "86/59 8$52 COrvalliS ee+ Ca mpshermanbeee . e+ e e e ' +++ + " e e e e + + + e z'Tm y h 1 'e e 'll Unity p +e ~ ed + e .Te+ e e Day sm54 ntano e e e e + e++e'+ ~ SISt e l S 95/63 '. + + e++ e e m/53+ e Redmnntf+ ' 'Paulina 83/54 86/58 + m 85/szt e Florencea eeEUgene • e ++++ e e e Valeo 61/51 e ~83/58 ++ + + + + + eounrlv'eR e Bend +++ + + e 96/64 • e +e +e+e++ ++e + +e +e e ev e 6ee P 99/548 - en / 56 x e'. •• Brothers so/sde Nyssa e e e e Cottage i + Oakridgee e e e e e 93/61 + e Juntura + + + Gru'Ve e e e e Te/sdee e + eoe + • + + + ' st~s e~+ '' ' ~ pine zs / szee Hamp«in +++• Burns+ee 92/56 CoosBaye e e e soms ' e83/ssee eo e et eCrescentaee e e 85/SO + e ' w".ee e e e e e e e e lake t e erescente • FortRoc'kj}i/47 ee e 6" y e e e e e e + + +e + '+ e 7 7 / 4 + • + e e e 82/53 + + e e e e e 22/49 e e e w e e e + e eo e+ • e e e e e e e e e+ Yesterday's 58/53

Ie

HIGH LOW

1

i La Grande•

ondon

e

Wallowa • Enterpris Meacham 85/52

• Pendleton 83/53

Ruggs

• Hermiston91/64

93/67

83/59•

NeWpnrt •

pi bi'

I e

Partly cloudy

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE WEST Sunrisetoday...... 6:03 a.m Moon phases A few showers today.... 818 p.m and thunderstorms Sunset First Full L a st Sunrise tomorrow .. 6i04 a.m possible. Sunset tomorrow... 8:17 p.m

As t oria

TiBamook•

Partly cloudy with a chance of thunderstorms

BEND ALMANAC

IFORECAST:STATE I,

109/7j

CONDITIONS . e+

.+e++

• +++ e ' e+

d 4 d

x d >

'' * * * * * ee

W ar m Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow

bottles and ... human waste," Smith said. "People, honestly, Continued from B1 are not even using the (toilets). With increased competition They're using the grass and for touring acts in Portland the landscaping." and Eugene, and from JackThe crowd also creates a sonville's Britt Festival, that's strain on parking for Old Mill not a reputation the Schwab businesses, e n v i r onmental can afford to have, she said, hazards in protected riparian especially iTTa music industry areas and general safety conwhere declining album sales cerns. The land being restrictare forcing bands to m ake ed, including the recreational their money on the road. path, is privately owned by the "(Bands and t heir r epre- Old Mill District. "The financial and safety sentatives are) looking at how they can make the most out of burden is on us and we don't each stop. And if they're look- feel like we can properly acing at Oregon ... they're going commodate that group of peoto pick the (place) that they can ple,n Smith said. "It's a doublesell the most tickets to and they edged sword, because they're can guarantee they can make having a good time and we the most money," Smith said. want the Old Mill District in "We're getting a r e putation general to be open and availthat we want to nip in the bud: able, but they're not buying a that we're a venue that people ticket and we're having to pay can see the music for free." for them to be there." The problem has intensiSafety is on e f actor, but fied this year as the throng on unquestionably so are ticket the east side of the river has sales. Smith said sales for the grown. The average east-side first four shows of this sumcrowd runs between 25 and mer were down 19 percent 40 percent of the number of from the first four last year, people inside the amphithe- and she projected that, unless aterand sometimes reaches as sales pick up, the 2013 season high as 50 percent of the ven- will come in roughly 33 perue's attendance, Smith said. cent under 2012. She estimated there have Bands and managers have been upwards of 3,000 for long noticed th e e a st-side certain shows, including Pink crowd, but as it has grown, it's Martini and the Steve Miller become a bigger problem, said Band this year, and ZZ Top Jamie McKillop, general manand Norah Jones last year. ager of Monqui Presents. "Many of the artists who During Pink Martini, "there was not an available inch of have performed here in the grass to add another chair," past and their managers have Smith said. commented about the 'free "Steve Miller Band's man- viewing zone' and see it as an ager walked over and had din- issue," he wrote in an email. ner at Anthony's and was as- nTO have (an area) with a view tounded and didn't like what and sound is not a good thing he saw,n Smith said. "That for the longevity of the venue. "The other venue options translates. It's a small world and they al l c o m municate in the state of Oregon do not with each other. have free viewing areas and it "It's becoming much more allows the artist to capture 100 of a problem than it was in percent of the potential ticket the past several years when sales. Artists and managers it wasn't a problem at all, n are making this an issue for she said. "And it's become a US. challenge now.n Said Smith: nWe've been For years, the Old Mill has trying to figure out ways to spent money on the east-side keep it as is, but ... it's just crowd, installing portable toi- become too difficult for us to lets and hiring security. The get shows, and without shows district closes its permanent there's no need for a music r estrooms d u r in g sh o w s, venue. The landscape of the Smith said. nWe can't stock concert industry has changed them fast enough." enough thatwe need to make Some people don't bother changes to be competitive." using th e p o r table t o ilets, The Old M i l l c o nsidered either. other options, including selling uWe pick up a lot of cans and tickets to sit on the east side of

Ice

the river. But they didn't feel comfortable rolling out a ticketing plan without being sure w hat buyers would receive for their money. nWe don't always have control over the sound system. Sometimes the a r tists do, u Smith said. The amphitheater received numerous complaints f r om people who sat for free on the east side of the river that they couldn't hear Diana Krall the last time she performed there, she said. Smith said the Old Mill will continue to look at the option of ticketing the east side, but that it is unlikely to ever return to an unrestricted area, barring changes in the concert industry. "It's something, honestly, that I'm kind of sad to do,n she said. "But we would be sadder if we closed the venue and we would be sadder if somebody got hurt over there. nWe're still i n t h e b r ainstorm stage for the right way to finally handle this area, but we know this is the right way to do it now to get bands for 2014,n Smith said. "We need to combat the rumors and we need to make it very clear to any artist who's looking to perform inOregon that we are a viable stop." To do that, Smith said, the amphitheater must convince some people who choose to sit freely on the east side that they should support the venue and btty a ticket. " People realize they c an have a good time over there. I heard one gentleman at Pink Martini say ... 'If they would just angle the stage differently nobody would have to buy a ticket,'" she said. "He's just not making the connection between how a venue stays

open."

She also knows the closure will be unpopular with some people who are Used to sitting on the east side. "It's been v ery n ic e t o have that area open," Smith said. uWe could find out after making this change that ticket sales don't increase and maybe that's Central Oregon saying, 'We're really not that excited about a music venue right here,'" she continued. "I hope that's not the case." — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmonCmbendbulletin.com.

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX.....101/75/001 ..99/72/pc. 95/73/pc Grandilapids....79/58/0.00 ..81/58/pc.. 77/56/s RapidCity.......81/57/000 ..78/59/pc.81/60/pc Savannah.......88/73/000..91I74/pc...91/76/t Akron..........83/71/006 ..82/62/pc. 79/57/pc Green Bay.......78/52/0.00..75/53/pc.. 73/56/s Reno...........87/58/000..84/57/pc. 86/58/pc Seattle..........82/58/000..80/61/pc...78/58/t Albany..........85/70/001 ... 80/62/t. 80/54/pc Greensboro......84/70/0.02...87/71/t...88/70/t Richmond.......90/74/0.01... 89/74/t...89/71/t Sioux Falls.......79/61/0.2577/53/pc...79/60/t .. Albuquerque.....88/64/000... 89/66/t...84/66/t Harusburg.......85/66/0 00... 86/68/t. 85/65/pc Rochester, NY....84/68/0.44..78/61/pc .. 76/56/s Spokane........91/60/0.00..94/62/pc...92/61/t Anchorage......68/55/0.06... 60/54/r...62/53/r Hartford,CT.....82/69/0.08... 81/65/t. 85/56/pc Sacramento......83/56/000..85/56/pc.87/58/pc SpringfieldMO , ..84/71/063... 86/69/t...sl/68/t Atlanta.........86/74/2.66... 88/73/t...88/73/t Helena..........86/58/0.00... 86/57/t. 89/55/pc St.Louis.........81/73/0.42... 83/69/t...82/66/t Tampa..........93/78/0.00... 92/78/t...91/78/t Atlantic City.....85/73/0.00... 88/75/t...87/68/t Honolulu........88/75/0.00... 91/76/s .. 90/77/s Salt Lake City....94/72/000 ..94/70/pc.. 95/70/s Tucson.........100/72/000... 99/72/s. 98/74/pc Austin.........105/77/000 102/76/pc.99/76/pc Houston ........99/78/000..98/78/pc...95/77/t SaoAntonio....104/79/000 102/76/pc. 98/76/pc Tulsa...........86/72/003 ..90/70/pc. 84/70/pc Baltimore .......86/71/0.09... 87/73/t...89/68/t Huntsville.......89/70/0.00... 88/73/t...89/72/t SaoDiego.......72/65/0.00... 71/63/s.. 73/65/s Washington,OC.88/75/0.00... 87/74/t...89/71/t 6illiogs.........83/56/000... 85/58/t. 88/58/pc Indianapolis.....86/73/0.12 ..83/64/pc. 82/63/pc SaoFrancisco....68/58/0.00... 68/55/c.. 69/55/c Wichita.........83/68/0.20... 78/65/t. 82/66/pc Birmingham .. 88/72/1 65... 87/73/t. 87/73/t Jackson,MS.... 99/76/0.01 . 96/75/t .. 93/74/t SaoJose........71/60/000..75/57/pc 76/57/pc Yakima.........95/64/000..91/63/pc.91/66/pc Bismarck........79/59/000 ..73/52/pc. 77/57/pc Jacksonvile......90/76/000..91/73/pc...93/74/t SantaFe........82/56/000 ..82/54/pc. 79/58/pc Yuma..........l08/77/000 ..102/75/s. 103/75/s Boise...........94/67/000..94/57/pc. 91/57/pc Juneau..........61/57/0.15..66/49/pc.. 71/50/s INTERNATIONAL Boston..........81/66/007... 77/68/t. 85/62/pc Kansas City......74/67/0.00... 79/64/t. 80/62/pc Bodgeport,CT....81/71/0.11... 80/68/t. 85/61/pc Lassing.........78/59/0.00 ..82/57/pc .. 77/57/s Amsterdam......70/55/000 ..74/61/pc 68/55/pc Mecca.........109/88/000 .106/84/s105/85/pc Buffalo.........83/66/0.51 ..73/64/pc.. 75/55/s LasVegas.......99/79/0.00...98/78/s .. 99/81/s AthenS..........91/77/0.00...94/Tt/5 .. 90/73/S MexiCO City .....77/59/022... 74/50/t.. 72/53/1 Burlington, VT....85/70/0.03... 79/60/t. 77/53/pc Lexington.......84/72/0.51... 83/70/t...81/69/t Auckland........64/46/000... 60/47/c. 59/51/sh Montreal........81/68/001 ..79/63/sh.. 73/55/s Caribou,ME.....63/54/0.16... 71/61/t. 74/47/pc Lincoln..........79/65/000 ..80/59/pc. 81/62/pc Baghdad.......107/82/000..110/87/s. 110/89/s Moscow........81/61/000...84/63/s .. 83/64/s Charleston,SC ...91/73/0.01..90/75/pc...91/76/t Little Rock.......96/77/0.00..96/74/pc...93/72/t Bangkok........93/79/0.00... 90/77/t...85/79/t Nairobi.........75/55/0.0071/52/pc. .. 74/55/pc Charlotte........86/73/0 00...87/71/t...89/72/t LosAngeles......71/62/0 00..73/63/pc..74/63/s Beiyng..........95/72/000..101/80/s.99/81/pc Nassau.........88/81/015...88/79/t.86/80/pc Chattanooga.....87/73/0.01...87/72/t...85/72/t Louisville........88/75/0.00...85/72/t...84/70/t Beirut..........88/79/000...85/72/s .. 85/72/s New Delhi.......88/81/000... 96/80/t...94/79/t Cheyenne.......73/55/000...74/52/t. 81/55/pc Madison VY I.....80/59/0 00..77/55/pc. 76/57/pc Berlin...........75/61/000..70/53/sh.77/61/pc Osaka..........97/79/000...97/73/s.. 99/73/s Chicago.........78/65/000 .80/64/pc. 76/63/pc Memphis....... 95/79/0 00 94/77/t.. 91/74/t Bogota .........68/45/000... 68/53/t...68/52/t Oslo............59/55/007 ..71/51/sh. 69/53/sh Cincinnati.......85/68/035..87/71/pc 85/66/pc Miami . . . . 90/81/0 00 89/79/t.. 90/80/1 Budapest.......100/66/000..103/71/s...77/60/t Ottawa.........81/63/01$..79/55/pc. 75/52/pc Cleveland.......80/72/0 03..80/66/pc. 73/63/pc Milwaukee......74/64/0 00..75/62/sh. 71/61/pc BuenosAires.....59/48/000... 54/39/s .. 56/42/c Paris............73/55/000... 79/55/c. 75/55/pc ColoradoSpnsgs.69/56/000..74/52/pc. 81/59/pc Minseapolis.....75/58/0.00..79/56/pc. 81/59/pc CabosaoLucas..97/77/000...95/79/c.95/81/pc RiodeJaneiro....90/68/000...82/64/c. 72/63/sh Columbia,MO...80/67/000... 81/66/t. 81/64/pc Nashville........79/73/028... 87/72/t...87/73/t Cairo...........95/79/000 .. 99/70/s. 100/72/s Rome...........95/68/000 ..85/71/pc .. 90/67/s Columbia,SC....91/72/0.00... 91/72/t...92/72/t New Orleans.....95/79/0.00... 91/77/t...91/76/t Calgary.........59/52/029..64/54/pc...64/54/t Santiago........52/37/061... 53/53/s.. 59/52/c Columbus, GA...89/74/0.00... 92/73/t. 92/74/pc New York.......81/70/0.46... 81/72/t. 86/66/pc Cancun.........88/73/0.00... 88/80/t...88/81/t Sao Paulo.......81/63/0.00... 80/57/c. 61/53/sh Columbus, OH....85/71/1.21 ..84/67/pc. 82/64/pc Newark, Nl......84/70/0.66...82/72/t. 87/64/pc Dublin..........72/55/0.00... 65/52/c. 59/53/pc Sapporo ........82/81/0.00... 75/71/t...81/64/t Concord,NH.....84/64/0.00... 79/60/t. 84/50/pc Norfolk, VA......87/73/0.00... 89/75/t...89/72/t Edinburgh.......68/48/000... 61/48/c. 64/48/sh Seoul...........91/81/000... 86/76/t...88/76/t CorpusChristi....98/79/000..88/80/pc...88/80/t OklahomaCity...90/72/027..89/72/pc. 88/73/pc Geneva.........73/61/060..73/58/pc.73/53/pc Shanghai.......104/88/000..97/79/pc.91/79/pc DallasFtWorth..l01/81/000 103/79/pc. 97/78/pc Omaha.........80/65/000..81/57/pc. 81/62/pc Harare..........73/52/000..75/51/pc.75/49/pc Singapore.......82/75/075... 89/79/t...89/79/t Dayton .........83/70/065 ..85/66/pc. 82/64/pc Orlando.........91/77/006... 93/76/t...93/76/t Hong Kong......91/82/000..85/78/pc. 86/76/pc Stockholm.......73/54/000..70/55/sh.69/55/sh Denver..........78/53/000 ..79/53/pc. 83/58/pc PalmSprings....105/73/0.00..102/72/s. 103/75/s Istanbul.........88/73/000... 87/74/s .. 83/73/s Sydney..........55/50/000 ..61/48/sh.72/48/pc DesMoines......83/64/000..78/59/pc. 79/60/pc Peoria ..........83/67/0.00..81/60/pc. 81/61/pc lerusalem.......89/68/0.00... 84/67/s .. 84/66/s Taipei...........97/84/0.00... 91/79/s. 90/80/pc Detroit..........79/66/000 ..81/63/pc.. 79/62/s Philadelphia.....87/71/036... 89/73/t. 88/69/pc Johannesburg....68/42/0.00.. 56/40/sh.. 62/44/s Tel Aviv.........90/75/0.00... 91/70/s .. 91/71/s Duluth..........73/57/001 ..72/53/pc. 7455/pc Phoesix........107/79/0.00 ..106/82/s106/83/pc Lima...........63/57/0.00... 70/58/s .. 70/58/s Tokyo...........95/79/0.00...90/78/t...93/7it El Paso..........96/68/000 ..96/75/pc.93/74/pc Pittsburgh.......84/66/000... 80/64/t. 80/59/pc Lisbon..........82/63/000 .. 96/71/s 94/66/s Toronto.........81/68/000 75/57/pc .. 73/54/s Fairbanks........80/55/000...75/49/c.. 76/52/c Portland,ME.....76/63/017... 76/62/t. 82/55/pc London.........77/55/0.00 .. 76/54/sh.. 74/56/c Vancouver.......75/57/0.00.. 75/57/pc.. 75/59/s Fargo...........77/57/000 ..73/51/pc...77/57/t Providence......81/69/000...80/67/t. 88/60/pc Madrid .........88/61/000... 92/63/s .. 99/67/s Vienna.........100/72/000 ..94/61/pc. 77/66/sh Flagstaff........78/44/000...79/47/s.79/49/pc Raleigh.........91/72/000...90/73/t...90/72/t Manila..........90/79/000... 92/79/t...93/77/t Warsaw.........99/68/000 ..82/65/pc. 68/56/sh

I.

(

Aaron Meyer Rock Violinist A nd Hi s T h r e e P i e c e B a n d at Broken Top Club

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15 " 7:00 — 9:00 pm Doors open at 6:00 pm • sunrise Patio General Admission Seating C oncert Rock Vi o l i n ist Aaron M e yer p e r f o r m s cu t t in g ed g e original m u sic and ar r a n g em e nts with vi r t u o sity ancI passion. Aaron br i ngs his fresh and i n v i g o r at ing i n st r u m e n tal style to the stage and genu i n ely con n e cts with au d i e n ces of all ages.

Tickets on Sale Now $15 — BTG Members • $2 2 — Non BTG Members

Everyone is Welcome Food and beverage will be available for purchase, beginning at 6:00 pm Tickets can be purchased by calling 541-383-8200 or emailing reception@brokentop.com


IN THE BACI4: BUSINESS Ee MARIKT NE%S > Scoreboard, C2 Colleges, C2 Sports in brief, C3

NBA, C3 MLB, C3

© www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

PREP SPORTS Bulletin invites

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

listing preseason meet-

Cooks movesinto top receiver spot for Beavs

ing and practice dates

By Anne M. Peterson

calendar items With the fall high

school sports season fast approaching, The Bulletin will be regularly

for area prep teams,as well as other important dates to remember, in a prep calendar that will

appear regularly in the sports section's Scoreboard. Athletic directors

and coaches whowish to have information

included in the calendar are encouraged to submit that information to

The Bulletin at sports© bendbulletin.com.

The Associated Press

CORVALLIS — Last football season, the comparison was made that Brandin Cooks was Robin to Markus Wheaton's Batman in Oregon State's dynamic receiving duo. Now, Wheaton has moved on to the NFL and Cooks is ready to shed his sidekick status. "It means I've got to work harder, to be honest. I can't rely on knowing I have Markus on the other side,"

Cooks said. "Now I've got to carry that load and make sure the younger guys make plays, too. I'd say my leadership ability has to be on top this year." The Beavers went 9-4 last season and finished third in the tough Pac-12 North, coming in at No. 20 in the final AP poll. It was a dramatic turnaround after the team went a disappointing 3-9 the year before. See Beavs /C4

.-- I(ic er romBen ~,returns orDuc s 8T' jr" =

:

= =;

By Mark Morical

guys, they don't care about scholarship, nonscholarship," Crook said last week. "If I'm kicking the ball farther with better hang time on kickoffs, then I'll be the guy. The better guy will win." Crook, a redshirt freshman from Bend, started his first preseason camp with the Ducks on Monday. SeeKicker /C4

The Bulletin

Eric Evans/ goducks.com, file

Bend's Hayden Crook is back with Oregon's football team as a walk-on kicker.

Hayden Crook learned much from former University of Oregon kicker Matt Beard. Perhaps the most important thing was this: His walk-on status will not restrict his chance to compete for playing time on the UO football team. "Matt Beard told me they (coaches) just take the best

The first prep calendar appears in today's Scoreboard onC2. — Bulletin staff report

•s

i

SOCCER

U.S. cracks top 20 in rankings A run of11 straight

victories, including winning the CONCACAF

GoldCup championship, has sent the U.S.men's national team into the top 20 of the latest FIFA

L

rankings, which were released Thursday. It is the first time since 2011 that the U.S. men have been ranked as high. The victory over

L

a

Panama in the final of the CONCACAFGold

• •

Cup moved the U.S.up three spots to No. 19, making the U.S. team the top-ranked nation

e • e

• •

• •

e

• e

• e •

By Beau Eastes

inthe region, one spot ahead of Mexico. (The U.S. faces Mexico in a World Cup qualifying

The Bulletin

Bend Elks outfielder Cullen O'Dwyer, pictured, will head back to Arizona State after a solid summer in the West Coast League — he is hitting .260 with 25 RBls. Teams like the Elks allow Division I players like O'Dwyer to gain experience over the summer.

match in Columbus,

Ohio, on Sept. 10). Elsewhere in the rankings, there was

no change amongthe top 12 nations, with Spain remaining at No.

1, Germany No. 2and Colombia No. 3.

Taylor Elman does not enjoy sitting. During his senior year of high school at Creighton Preparatory School in Omaha, Neb., the current Bend Elk battled through mononucleosis and appendicitis yet still earned all-state baseball honors as a pitcher and third baseman while leading his team to the 2012 Class A (large-school) state championship. This past spring was a different story, though. As a freshman at Creighton University, also in Omaha, Elman pitched in just 22 innings, posting a 4.50 earnedrun average in 13 appearances. Like many ballplayers making the jump from high school to college ball, Elman, for the first time in his baseball career, spent more time watching than playing. SeeElks/C4

Roh Kerr /The Bulletin file

— New York Times

NBA

LeBron reports for jury duty

Elks need onewinto reach playoffs The Bend Elkshost the Walla Walla Sweets for a

AKRON, Ohio-

three-game series at Vince Genna Stadium starting

LeBron Jamesreported ahead of schedule for jury duty Thursday morning at the Summit County Courthouse, but he and other members

today to wrap up the regular season, andthey need just one win to secure aspot in the West Coast League playoffs. Tonight's game starts at 6:35. The Elks are in second place in the WCL's South

It»

Division, ahead of third-place Medford; the top two teams in the WCL's two divisions make the

S,

of the pool weresent home after two potential

playoffs. Medford won its final regular-season game on Thursday night. If Bend loses all three of

criminal trials did not

its remaining games, Medford and Bend would be tied, and the Rogues would reach the playoffs via

take place.

a tiebreaker. If the Elks make the playoffs, they

While waiting to be

called for a possible jury seat, Jamessat "quietly and appreciatively" in

would start a three-game series with the -.'-,.—.==::- Corvallis Knights in Bend on Tuesday.

"XWt ? '

the ground-floor office of a court official who

Y

supervises the jury pool in a larger seating area nearby, Sheriff's Lt.

Kandy Fathereesaid. James, who lives in Bath Township, had

posted pictures of himself as hewas preparing to go to the courthouse. "Jury duty time. Time to serve my civic duty,"

James wrote on his Instagram photo account. Fatheree, head of

courthouse security, said it was fun to see the reactions of the jurors

when they sawJames. "As soon ashe walked in I just scanned

the room, andeveryone knew immediately who he was," she said. "It was kind of funny to

see the movements of everyone whispering to each other." — From wire reports

Blazers get Mo Portland officially

announcesthe signing of free agent Mo Williams,C3

GOLF: PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Scott, Furyk top PGA scoreboard in ripe conditions By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

PITTSFORD, N.Y.— Adam Scott began the final major of the year with a tee shot deep into the trees. He ended the opening round of the PGA Championship by having to gouge out of deep rough. It was the golf in between that was some of the best he has ever played, even for an Australian with a green jacket. Showing that he's not satisfied as only being a Masters champion, Scott ran off five straight birdies early in his round Thursday on soft and vulnerable Oak Hill, and a 15-foot par putt at the end gave him a 5-under 65 and a share of the lead with Jim Furyk. "Probably the best run I've ever had," Scott said of his five straight birdies. "I just hit really nice shots and didn't leave myself too much work. You have to take advantage of that if you're feeling that. It was a dream start after kind of a nervous first couple of holes."

It felt like an easy start to so many others. Oak Hill has such a strong reputation that ithas yielded only 10 scores under par over 72 holes in five previous major championships. The last time the PGA Championship was held on this Donald Ross design in 2003, there were only 12 rounds under par on the first day. But with overnight rain, humid conditions and a 71-minute delay for storms in the afternoon, Thursday might be as easy as it gets. Scott and Furyk had plenty of company, two of 35 players who broke par. Tiger Woods was not among them. The world's No. 1 player made only two birdies despite playing in the still of the morning, and he watched his round fall apart with

a bogey on par-5 fourth and a double bogey on his final hole when his flop shot out of deep rough floated into a bunker. SeePGA/C4

Patrick Semansky/The Associated Press

Adam Scott watches his putt on the10th hole during the first round of the PGA Championship at Oak Hill Country Club on Thursday in Pittsford, N.Y. Scott shot a 65 to tie for the lead with Jim Furyk.


C2

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

SPORTS ON THE AIR

COREBOARD

TODAY BASEBALL

Time

TV / Radio

Little League,World Series, Mid-Atlantic Regional, semifinal

8 a.m.

ESPN

1 0 a.m.

ESP N

Little League, World Series,

Midwest Regional, final Little League, World Series,

Mid-Atlantic Regional, semifinal

noon

ESPN

Little League, World Series,

West Regional, semifinal

2 p.m.

E S PN2

Southeast Regional, final

4 p.m.

ESP N

MLB, Detroit at New York Yankees Little League, World Series, West Regional, semifinal MLB, Milwaukee at Seattle TENNIS

4 p.m.

MLB

6 p.m. 7 p.m.

ESPN Root

Rogers Cup, men'sandwomen's quarterfinals Rogers Cup, men'sandwomen's quarterfinals

9 a.m. 5 p.m.

ESP N 2 ESP N 2

Little League, World Series,

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Cheez-it 355, practice NASCAR, Nationwide, Zippo 200, practice NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Cheez-it 355, practice GOLF PGA Tour, PGA Championship U.S. Women's Amateur FOOTBALL

9 a.m. Sp e ed 10:30 a.m. Speed 1 p.m. Sp e ed 10 a.m. 1 p.m.

TNT Golf

NFL NFL,preseason,New Englandvs.Philadelphia 4 :30 p.m. 6 p.m. NBC SN CFL, Saskatchewan atCalgary NFL, preseason, Dallas at Oakland BOXING

7 p.m.

Jose Hernandezvs. Rustam Nugaev

7 p.m.

NFL ESP N 2

SATURDAY MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR, Nationwide, Zippo 200, qualifying NASCAR, Cheez-it 355, qualifying

NASCAR,Nationwide,Zippo200 AMA, Unadilla National (taped)

Time

TV/Radio

6:30 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 11:15 a.m

noon

Grand-Am, VjsjtFlorjda.com Sports Car 250 Global Rallycross Championship SOFTBALL

2 p.m. 3:30 p.m.

Senior League,World Series, final 8 a.m. Senior League,World Series, final (jf necessary) noon GOLF PGA Tour, PGA Championship PGA Tour, PGA Championship U.S. Women's Amateur BASEBALL Little League, World Series,

8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m.

ESPN2 ESPN2 ABC NBCSN

Speed ESPN2 ESPN ESPN

PREP SPORTS Calendar To submiinformation t to theprepcalendar,email The Bulletin atsports@bendbuffetin.com Mountain View Fall sports information night: Aug. 14inthe auditorium at Mountain Viewat 6.30 p.mzafter brief openingsession,parentsandathletes wil bereleased to their speciiic sportmeetingsaroundcampus. For more information,call theathletics office at541-3554500. RedmondHigh Football camp: Football camp for players in third througheighth gradeis Aug.12-15, beginning at 9 a.m.andrunningthrough noon;highschoolcamp runs on thesame datesbutbeginsat 6p.m. andruns through9p.m. Physicals: Physicalexamsfor Redmond School District athletesinmiddle schoolandhighschool are availableAug.15 at6p.m.for $20 Fall practices: Fall practicesbeginAug.19; students needup-to-date physicals (al freshmen and juniors aswell as anystudent whohasnot had aphysical in thelasttwoyears), proof ofinsurance, signedtrainingrules, andpay-to-play teesin orderto participate. Summit Coachesclinic andcertification: HeadCoaches Clinic onAug.13from 11:30a.m.to 1:30 p.m.at The Centerboardroom;Bend-La Pine SDCoaches CertificationDayat Summit High School from7.30 a.m. to 30 5 pm Fall sports packets: Deadline ior fall sports packets isAug.16., last dayto join afall sport is Sept. 27 Sisters Fall sports registration: SistersHighwil hold fall sportsregistrationAug.12-16at theathletics office from noon to 4p.m.Student-athletesarerequiredto be fully cleared with paperwork, physicals,fees andfines belorethefirst dayofpracticesAug.19. Bingo night: The OutlawsTogetherAthletics FundraiserBingoNight is scheduledfor Aug 12 beginning at6:30p.m. in thecommonareaat Sisters High Sports physical night: Sportsphysicalexams will beheldatSisters HighAug.14-15 from5:30p.m. to 7 p.m. Preseason meetings: Fall sports preseason teammeetingsin theauditoriumat Sisters Highon Aug.14,6:30p.m.to 7:30p.m. Culver Culver Youth Pigskin Football Camp: Aug 12-15 irom 6 p.m. to 6 p.m.; aff fourth- through eighth-gradersarewelcome. Alumni game:Aug.17; Cuveralumni vs. Crook Countyalumni, 730p.m.at Culver Daily doubles: BeginAug. 19at 5 p.m.at the football stadium. Central Christian Sports physicals: Sports physicals offered at CentralChristianSchoolfor$25. OSA Aformswil be available.

BASEBALL

1 0 a.m.

MLB, Baltimore at San Francisco Little League, World Series, Northwest Regional, final MLB, Boston at Kansas City or San Diego at Cincinnati Little League, World Series, New England Regional, final Little League, World Series, West Regional, final MLB, Milwaukee at Seattle TENNIS

1 p.m.

ESP N Fox

2 p.m.

ESPN

4 p.m.

MLB

4 p.m.

ESPN

6 p.m. 6 p.m.

ESPN Root

Rogers Cup,women's semifinal Rogers Cup, men's semifinal Rogers Cup, men's semifinal

10 a.m. n oon 5 p.m.

E S P N2 ESPN 2 ESP N 2

World Championships (taped)

1 2:30 p.m.

NBC

2 p.m.

NBC

HORSE RAGING

Fourstardave Handicap

YACHTING America's Cup, Louis Vujtton Cup semifinal 3 p.m. NBC S N FOOTBALL NFL, preseason, New York Giants at Pittsburgh 4:30 p.m. NFL SOCCER MLS, D.C. at Philadelphia 5 p.m. NBC S N

MLS, Seattle at Toronto (tapedj

10:30 p.m. Root

MIXED MARTIALARTS World Series of Fighting 4

7:30 p.m. NBCSN

Listings arethemostaccurateavailable. The Bulletinis not responsible for late changesmade by Nor radio stations.

W 26 26 25 21

y-Wenatchee AppleSox y-WaffaWalla Sweets Be lingham Belis VictoriaHarbourcats KelownaFalcons 17 South Division

W x-Corvalis Knights 34 BendElks 30 MedfordRogues 30 KlamathFalls Gems 26 CowlitzBlackBears 25 KitsapBlueJackets 17 x-Clinched division; y-Clinchedplayoffberth Thursday's Games Medford 4, Kitsap3 Cowlitz10,KlamathFals 4 Victoria 3,Beffingham2 Today's Games WallaWallaatBend6:35p.m. Cowlitz atKitsap,635p.m. CorvaffisatKlamath Fals Gems, 635 p.m. WenatcheeatKelowna,6:35 p.m. Be lingham atVictoria, 7:05p.m.

L 22 22 26 30 34 L 17 21 24 25 26 34

FOOTBALL

TRACK & FIELD

NFL NATIONALFOOTBALL LEAGUE AH TimesPDT

Thursday's Games Baltimore44,TampaBay16 Washington22,Tennessee21 Cincinnati34,Atlanta10 Cleveland 27,St. Louis19 Denver10,SanFrancisco 6 Seattle31,SanDiego10 Today's Games N.Y.JetsatDetroit, 4:30p.m. Miami atJacksonvi le,4:30p.m. NewEnglandatPhiladelphia, 4:30p.m. HoustonatMinnesota, 5p.m. KansasCityatNewOrleans, 5p.m. Arizonaat GreenBay, 5p.m. Chicagoat Carolina, 5p.m. Dallas atOakland, 7p.m. Saturday's Game N.Y.Giantsat Pittsburgh,4:30p.m. Sunday's Game Buffalo atIndianapolis, 10:30a.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA

Star D-ll QB whowent

missingdiedof pneumonia By Greg Bishop New York Times News Service

Cullen Finnerty, the former starcollege quarterback found dead in the Michigan woods in late May, died from pneumonia, complicated by oxycodone toxicity and the degenerativebrain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, according to a summary of the autopsy findings released Thursday by the Lake County Sheriff's Department. Finnerty played at Grand Valley State University, a Division II powerhouse, where he was thought to have won more games than any quarterback in college football history. He w ent m i ssing after he went fishing by himself late on May 26 in Baldwin, Mich., and he was found nearly two days later, face down in a clearing about a half a mile west from where he docked his pontoon boat. Finnerty, 30, is survived by a wife and two children. How he died was not explained for more than two months. Finnerty had been taking oxycodone for severe back pain.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL "A l i k ely s e quence of events on the night of death includes anxiety, disorientation and paranoia from being alone in the woods," the report said. "Those emotions could have been exacerbated by an elevated oxycodone level combined with CTE." Finnerty, the report continued, became i n capacitated, vomited and inhaled the vomit, which caused the pneumonia. His brain was studied at th e Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University, which found he had Stage ii CTE. There are four stages. At Grand V alley State, Finnerty won three national titles. He later spent time with the Baltimore Ravens and the Denver Broncos and played football overseas. In recent years, after his playing career ended, he went into medical sales. Friends and family ar e hosting a memorial golf scramble in Brighton, Mich., his hometown, later this month.

WOMEN'SNATIONAL BASKETBALLASSOCIATION AH TimesPDT

Eastern Conference Chicago

Atlanta Indiana Washington NewYork

OL LUKE. >SEC <78!

YauR BoYHOST 4X. @T h'IMGELFA

gKEBqLTmzrEi

Uzbekistan, 2-6, 6-4,6-4.

WTARogers Cup Thursday At RexagCentre Toronto Purse: $2.369million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Third Round

W L 13 7 11 6 10 11

Pct GB . 6 50 . 6 47 '/z . 476 3H

10 13 9 12

. 435 4Ht . 429 4Ht

Agnieszka Radwanska(3), Poland,def.SloaneStephens(I4), UnitedStates,6-1,7-6(2). SaraErrani(5), Italy,def. AlizeCornet,France,7-5, 7-6 (3). Li Na (4), China,def. AnaIvanovic (16), Serbia, 3-6, 6-1,7-6 (5). SerenaWiliams(1), United States, def. Kirsten Flipkens(13),Belgium,6-0, 6-3. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia,def. Marion Bartoli (7), France,7-6(5),1-0 retirement. SoranaCirstea, Rom ania, def. JelenaJankovic (15), Serbia6-3, , 6-4. DominikaCibulkova,Slovakia, def. RobertaVinci (I0), Italy,6-3,7-6 (4). Petra Kvitova(6), CzechRepublic, def.Samantha Stosur(12),Australia, 6-3, 6-3.

Concussion-sniff ing dogs.

SOCCER Connecticut

Minnesota Los Angeles Phoenix Seattle SanAntonio Tulsa

6

1 3 .316 6Ht

Western Conference W 17 15 10 9 7 7

L 4 7 11 11 14 15

Pct GB .B10 662 2H .476 7 .450 7at .333 10 .31 6 10'/z

Thursday'sGames

Los Angeles74,Indiana64 Washington79,Minnesota75 Today's Games ChicagoatConnecticut, 4 p.m. Tulsa atPhoenix, 7p.m. SanAntonioatSeattle, 7 p.m.

PGA Tour

WESTCOAST LEAGUE

League standings North Division

In the Bleachers © 2013 Steve Moore. ihst. by Universal Uclicit www.gocomics.com/inthebleachers

GOLF

WCL

TNT CBS Golf

Great Lakes Regional, final

At Uniprix Stadium Montreal Purse: $3.496million (Masters 1000) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Third Round RafaelNadal(4), Spain,dei. JerzyJanowicz (15), Poland,7-6(6), 6-4. Marinko MatosevicAustral , ia, def. Benoit Paire, France, 7-6(7), 6-7(10),6-3. ErnestsGulbis, Latvia,def. AndyMurray(2), Britain, 6-4,6-3. VasekPospisil, Canada,def. TomasBerdych (5), Czech Republic, 7-5, 2-6,7-6(5). Nikola y Davydenko,Russia,def.Alex Bogomolov Jr., Russia6-4, , 6-3. Milos Raonic(11), Canada, def. JuanMartin Del Potro (6),Argentina,7-5,6-4. RichardGasquet (7), France,dei. KeiNishikori (9), Japan,1-6,6-3,6-3. Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def. Denis Istomin,

IN THE BLEACHERS

PGAChampionship Thursday At OakHill Country Club, East Course Pittsford, N.Y. Purse: TBA($9 million in 2012) Yardage:7,163; Par:70(36-35) First Round JimFuryk 32-33—65 AdamScott 30-35—65 DavidHearn 33-33M6 LeeWestwood 32-34—66 RobertGarrigus 33-34—67 Paul Casey 36-31—67 Matt Kuchar 34-33—67 MarcusFraser 34-33—67 Scott Piercy 35-32M7 JasonDay 34-33—67 KiradechAphibarnrat 34-34—66 SteveStricker 34-34—66 JasonDufner 36-32—66 Biff Haas 34-34—66 HenrikStenson 35-33MB RafaelCabrera-Beffo 34-34—66 JonasBlixt 34-34—66 RobertoCastro 36-32—66 MiguelAngelJimenez 32-36—66 Martin Kaym er 35-33—66 Justin Rose 32-36MB CharleyHoffman 35-34—69 Billy Horschel 36-33—69 TommyGainey 33-36—69 SergioGarcia 35-34—69 KeeganBradley 36-33—69 DavidLynn 34-35W9 ScottJamieson 35-34—69 Ryo Ishikawa 36-33—69 DarrenClarke 34-35—69 Tim Clark 32-37—69 RyanMoore 35-34—69 Rory Mcffroy 32-37W9 WoodyAustin 34-35—69 ZachJohnson 33-36—69 MarcLeishman 35-35—70 HunterMahan 34-36—70 RickieFowler 32-36—70 Graeme McDoweff 36-34 70 Thomas Bjorn 36-34—70 KevinStreelman 34-36—70 BerndWiesberger 34-36—70 BrandtSnedeker 34-36—70 BubbaWatson 34-36—70 ThongchaiJaidee 34-36 70 Vijay Singh 35-35—70 Brett Rumford 34-36—70 lan Poulter 35-35—70 GrahamDeLaet 36-32—70 ShaneLowry 36-35—71 Matt Every 36-35 71 LukeGuthrie 34-37—71 HiroyukiFujita 36-35—71 JoshTeater 37-34 — 71 RichBeem 35-36 — 71 J.J. Henry 36-35 — 71 DavidToms 32-39 71 Charl Schwartzel 36-35 — 71 TigerWoods 33-36 — 71 ThorbjornOlesen 36-35 — 71 BrandenGrace 37-34 — 71 BrooksKoepka 39-32 — 71 CharlesHowell III 34-37 71 JimmyWalker 36-35 — 71 Joost Luiten 34-37—71 NicolasColsaerts 33-36 — 71 LukeDonald 35-36 — 71

Martin Laird Phil Mickelson CharlieBeljan

BrendondeJonge Chris Stroud Chris Kirk John Senden HidekiMatsuyama MichaelThom pson RichardSterne Y.E.Yang PeterHanson DustinJohnson PaulLawrie MattJones John Huh DerekErnst MatteoManassero Kohki Idoki BooWeekley

Francesco Molinari WebbSimpson RichieRamsay BobSowards RyanPalmer MarcelSiem Scott Brown BenCurtis BrianGay RyanPolzin Scott Staffings Jeff Sorenson JC Anderson DannyBalin TomWa tson DannyWiffett D.A. Points Mikko ff onen Kyle Stanley GaryWoodland BobGaus EmieEls David Lingmerth DavisLoveIII David McNabb

JasonKokrak JacoVanZyl GeorgeCoetzee Harris English GeoffOgilvy GonzaloFernandez-Castano Jordan Spieth Carl Pettersson KevinStadler MarcWarren MarkSheftic StewartCink Stephe nGaff acher CaineFitzgerald KenDuke John Merrick Sang-MoonBae ChrisWood DavidMuttitt PabloLarrazabal

ShaunMicheel PadraigHarrington K.J. Choi NickWatney RussellHenley FreddieJacobson

Alex Noren LucasGlover Kirk Hanefeld Mike Small SonnySkinner

PeterUihlein MarkBrown Rob Labritz StuartSmith Jeff Martin Paul McGinley RodPerry

KevinChappeff Bo VanPelt AngelCabrera JamieDonaldson LeeRhind Chip Sullivan

37-34 — 71 37-34 — 71 37-34 — 71 36-35 — 71 34-37 71 34-37 — 71 36-36 — 72 36-36 — 72 37-35 — 72 37-35 — 72 36-36 72 36-36—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 33-39—72 35-37—72 37-35 72 36-36—72 32-40—72 37-35—72 37-35 — 72 40-32 — 72 37-35 72 36-35—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 36-35—73 36-37 — 73 36-35 73 36-37—73 35-36—73 34-39—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 35-36 73 36-35—73 36-35—73 37-36—73 36-37 — 73 35-36 — 73 36-36 74 37-37—74 36-36—74 37-37—74 36-36—74 36-36 — 74 36-36 74 37-37—74 36-36—74 36-36—74 36-36—74 39-35—74 36-36 74 37-37—74 36-36—74 37-36—75 37-36—75 37-36—75 37-36 75 37-36—75 36-37—75 39-36—75 36-37—75 36-39—75 36-36 76 37-39—76 40-36—76 35-41—76 39-37—76 39-37 — 76 36-40 76 41-35—76 36-40—76 37-39—76 41-35 — 76 39-37 — 76 41-36 77 42-35 — 77 43-35 — 76 39-39 — 76 37-41 — 76 37-41—76 41-37 76 40-39 — 79 41-39—60 40-40—60 42-36—60 39-42—61 41 43M4

TENNIS Professional ATP RogersCup Thursday

MLS MAJORLEAGUESOCCER AH TimesPDT

Saturday'sGames

Seattle FCatToronto FC,4p.m. NewYorkatColumbus,4:30p.m. SanJoseatVancouver,4:30p.m. D.C. United at Philadelphia, 5p.m. NewEnglandat Sporting KansasCity,5:30 p.m. Montrealat Chicago,5:30p.m. Houston at RealSalt l.ake, 6:30p.m. Sunday'sGames Los AngelesatFCDallas, 5 p.m. Colorado atChivasUSA 6 pm

Bend Premier Cup Sunday, August4 Women's U12GoldCascades WUSCLevanteWhite,2, vs.Washington Timbers FC G01Green,1.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL

AmericanLeague BDSTDNRED SOX— ActivatedOFDane Navafrom the paternityleavelist. OptionedRHPSteven Wright to Pawtucket (IL).

CLEVEL AND INDIANS —Designated 1B Mark Reynoldsfor assignment. Recalled RHPPreston Guilmet from Columbus(IL). KANSASCITYROYALS—Optioned LHPDanny Duffy to Omaha (PCL). Purchasedthe contract of LHP FrancisleyBuenofromOmaha. Waived CAdam Moore. NEW YORKYANKEES—Sent INFBrent Liffibridge outright toScranton/Wilkes-Barre(IL). DAKLANDATHLETICS—Claimed INFAdamRosales offwaiversfrom Texas. National League CHICAGO CLIBS—Placed RHP Mat Guerrier on the60-dayDLandOFThomas Nealonthe15-dayDL. RecalledRHPEduardo Sanchezfrom lowa(PCL). Selectedthecontract of CJ.C. Boscanfromlowa. COLOR ADOROCKIES—Purchased thecontract of RHPJeff ManshipfromColoradoSprings (PCL). Recalled LHP Christian Friedrich fromColoradoSprings andplacedhim onthe60-dayDL. PHILADEL PHIA PHILLIES Agreed to terms ona two-year contract with2BChaseUt eythrough2015. ST. LOUISCARDINALS—Recalled RHPCarlos MartinezandLHPSamFreemanfromMemphis (PCL). SAN FRAN CISCO GIANTS—Recalled C Hector Sanchezfrom Fresno (PCL). Designated CGuiffermo Quirozforassignment BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW YORKKNICKS—SignedGBeno IJdrih. PORTLANDTRAIL BLAZERS— Signed G MoWilliams. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONACARDINALS—Claimed DE Cordian Hagans fromPittsburgh. ReleasedCBJoshHil. INDIANAPOLI S COLTS— Si gned LB Shawn LoiseauandSAshanteWilliams.Waived-injured GJustin AndersonWaivedWRRodrickRumble. KANSASCITY CHIEFS— Signed OLHutch Ecker-

son.

TAMPA BAYBUCCANEERS— Waived CB Myron

Lewis.Waived-injuredLBMarvin Booker. SignedCB MasonRobinson.

FISH COUNT Upstream dadymovement ofadult chinook,jackchinook,steelheadandwild steelheadatselected Columbia River damslastupdatedonWednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wsllhd Bonneville 1,441 2 2 6 9 ,114 3,699 The Daffes 742 17 7 1 , 992 1,110 John Day 36 7 67 979 500 McNary 29 93 601 432 Upstream year-to-date movement ofadult chinook,

jack chinook,steelheadand wild steelheadat selected ColumbiaRiverdamslast updatedonWednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wsllhd

Bonnevi le 162,669 61,205 104,162 55,266 The Daffes 156,964 53,526 47,406 27,470 John Day 132,935 46,622 26,173 14,933 McNary 127,611 36,966 21,572 10,923

NCAA to quit selling memorabilia online O'Bannon and other plaintiffs are successful, it could Facing legal and public cause a dramatic shift in coiscrutiny over i t s b u s iness the organization's name. The lege sports that would require practices, th e N C A A on NCAA i s a l so f acing new student-athletes to receive a Thursday said it would stop questions about why its star share inthe proceeds of video selling player j erseys and players are not allowed to be games and broadcast rights. other memorabilia through compensated for such things The NCAA i s d e fending its website. as signing autographs. itself vigorously in the case, "The business of h aving Despite the N C A A's a c- maintaining it "has never lithe NCAA sell those kinds of tion, universities can continue censed the use of current stugoods is a mistake, and we are to sell the jerseys and other dent-athlete names, images going to exit that business im- memorabilia, and Electronic or likenesses to EA,n which is mediately," the organization's Arts plans to continue makalso a defendant in the case. president, Mark Emmert, said ing a college football video That case is pending before on a call with reporters. "It is game, with the licenses from a federal judge in Oakland, not something that is core to universities and without using Calif. "They would keep doing what the NCAA is about. it the trademarks of the NCAA. probably never should have P eople familiar w it h t h e what they are doing if they been in that business." NCAA say the moves appear didn't have the current litigaThe move came less than a to be motivated by mitigating tion going on," said Timothy month after the NCAA said it legal threats as the NCAA Epstein, a sports lawyer with would not renew its contract faces a seriouschallenge as the SmithAmundsen firm. with Electronic Arts, which a result of a lawsuit filed by He added: "There is a theme makes the college football the former U CL A b a sket- that i s b e i n g p e r petuated video game seriesthat bears ball player Ed O'Bannon. If from the national office that By Steve Eder

New York Times News Service

COLLEGES

says, 'This is what we are in the business of doing. If these ancillary things give us a bad name or impression, then why are we doing this?' " This week, a controversy over whether Johnny Manziei, the Texas A8 M q u arterback and one of the highest-profile athletes in college sports, had been paid a fee to sign autographs last year — which w o uld b e v i o l ation of NCAA rules — transformed into a debate about whether such activity should be allowed. That prompted Jay Biias, a former Duke basketball player and a prominent analyst for ESPN, to point out on Twitter that the NCAA's online shop

was selling jerseys bearing the No. 2 worn by Manziel, w hich could b e f o un d b y searching for his name.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

C3

SPORTS IN BRIEF FOOTBALL Seahawks roll —Tarvaris Jackson threw two touchdown

passes and Brady Quinn, also battling to be Russell Wilson's

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

lowa following the accident to clean and stabilize the injury. Stewart is out indefinitely, and Max Papis will drive his No. 14 Chevrolet this weekend at Wat-

Standings

backup, threw for another score as the Seattle Seahawks beat

Stewart is a five-time winner. It will bring Stewart's streak of

host San Diego 31-10Thursday

521 consecutive Cupstarts to an end.

night in Mike McCoy's debut as

Chargers coach. Wilson, who led the Seahawks to the playoffs last year as arookie, played the first three series. He threw for

23 yards and ran for 9. Quinn

TENNIS Murray eliminated in

threw an11-yard touchdown

Montreal —wimbledon

pass to Jermaine Kearse late in

champion Andy Murray tumbled

out of the Rogers Cup in Mon42-yard scoring pass to Stephen treal on Thursday, falling 6-4, the first half. Jackson threw a

Williams on the first play of the

6-3 to Latvia's Ernests Gulbis

fourth quarter and hit Derrick

in the third round. Thesecond-

Coleman on a 6-yarder in the final minutes. Jackson also threw

seeded Murray, a two-time

Rogers Cupchampion, was a 41-yard pass to Williams to set playing his second match since up Spencer Ware's 6-yard scor- his Wimbledon victory. The loss ing run late in the third quarter.

ended the Scot's winning streak

at13 matches. Rafael Nadal won

HOCKEY Devils close to heingsold

his third round match, beating Poland's Jerzy Janowicz 7-6

(6), 6-4.

— The three-time Stanley Cup

Serena advances —Top-

champion NewJersey Devils are for sale and adeal is expected

seeded SerenaWilliams advanced to the Rogers Cupquar-

before the start of the NHL

terfinals Thursday in Toronto,

season. A person familiar with

beating 13th-seeded Kirsten

the negotiations says several

Flipkens of Belgium 6-0, 6-3. Williams, coming off a tourna-

groups are vying to buy the financially strapped franchise and there is a chance adeal

ment victory 2/a weeksago in the Swedish Open, set up a match Friday against Slovakia's

might be done quickly. The

source spoke to TheAssociated Press Thursday and requested anonymity because the negotiations between Devils owner Jeff Vanderbeek andthe groups are

Magdalena Rybarikova. Wimbledon champion Marion Bartoli

retired because of anabdominal injury early in the second set of

still active. The team will not

her match against Rybarikova. Third-seeded Agnieszka Rad-

relocate, the source said, add-

wanska of Poland also advanced

ing that Vanberbeek will retain a minority ownership with the

to the quarterfinals, beating American Sloane Stephens 6-1,

Devils.

7-6 (2).

MOTOR SPORTS Another surgery for

CYCLING Aussie winsUtahstage

Stewart —Three-time NAS-

— Australia's Lachlan Morton

CAR champion Tony Stewart

won the third stage of the Tour of Utah on Thursday to take a

underwent a second surgery on his broken right leg in North Carolina on Thursday and remains hospitalized under observation. The surgery was

22-secondlead overBelgium's Greg Van Avermaet in the overall standings. Morton, riding for

Garmin-Sharp, completed the

to insert a metal rod inside the tibia, and Stewart-Haas Rac-

119.5-mile stage from Richfield to Payson in 4 hours, 20 min-

ing said a specialist pressed

utes, 21 seconds. VanAvermaet was second, 34 seconds back

the tibia to its correct position. Stewart broke both the tibia and

fibula in his right leg Monday

for BMC. American Lucas Euser,

riding for UnitedHealthcare, was

night in a sprint car race in lowa. He underwent a first surgery in

third — also 34 seconds behind. — From wire reports

NBA

Portland welcomes free-agent guard Mo Williams to roster By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The Portland Trail Blazers see guard Mo Williams as more than just a backup to D a mian Lillard. "You can look at me as a sixth starter," said the veteran free agent who was formally signed Thursday to a two-year deaL Williams has played 10 s easons in the NBA w i t h stops in Milwaukee, Cleveland, the Clippers and Utah, averaging 13.8 points, 2.9 rcbounds and 5 assists. Last season with the Jazz, the 6-foot-1 Williams averaged 12.9 points, 2.4 rebounds and 6.2 assists but he was hampered by surgery on his right thumb that sidelined him for two months. He will wear No. 7, Brandon Roy's former number, for the Blazers. He views himself as a "piece of the puzzle" in Portland. "I'm going into the 11th year in my career. I am who I am," he said. "The player you saw last year and the player you saw t h e y e ar before — I'm not going to diminish." The Jazz, 22-24 with Williams in the lineup, finished 43-39 and just out of the final Western Conferenceplayoff spot. Many of the players on that team were free agents, including Al Jefferson, who was signed to a three-year, $ 40.5 million deal by t h e Charlotte Bobcats, and Paul Millsap, who signed a twoyear, $19 million deal with the Atlanta Hawks. Terms of Williams' contract with the Trail Blazers

were not released, but it was reported to be a t w o-year deal wort h $ 5 . 6 m i l l ion, with a player option for the second year. Williams, who will be 31 in December, was one of the last major unrestricted free agents still a v ailable this summer. At season's end, he had expressed a desire to return to the Jazz. But Portland came calling, and Williams' previous relationships with g eneral manager Neil Olshey and coach Terry Stotts facilitated the deaL Olshey said Williams allows the Blazers to give maximum effort on both sides of the floor. Last season Lillard, who won the league's Rookie of the Year honors, played in all 82 games for Portland and led the league with 3,167 minutes. "I think we're better today than we were," Olshey said. "We're not where we want to be yet, but we're getting there." Williams' signing brings Portland's roster to 15. 01shey said he doesn't foresee any more moves this summer. An All-Star in 2009, Williams was taken by U t ah with the 47th overall pick in the 2003 draft out of Alabama. He returned to the J azz last summer i n t h e four-team deal that sent Lamar Odom to the Clippers. " I'm very excited to b e back with Mo again," said Stotts, who coached Will iams when both were in Milwaukee. "He adds versatility, scoring and veteran leadership to the team."

NOT AN OUT

All Times PDT

kins Glen lnternational, where

AMERICANLEAGUE East Division W L Boston 70 47 TampaBay 66 47 Baltimore 63 51 NewYork 57 56 Toronto 53 61 Central Division W L Detroit 68 45 Cleveland 62 53 Kansas City 59 53 Minnesota 49 62 Chicago 43 69 West Division W L Oakland 64 49 Texas 65 50 Seattle 53 61 Los Angeles 51 62 Houston 37 76

Pct GB 598 .584 2

.553 5'/z .504 11 ,465 15t/z

Pct GB .602 .539 7 ,527 8'/z .441 18 .384 24'/z

Pct GB .566 .565 .465 11'/z 451 13 .327 27

Thursday's Games

Detroit 10,Cleveland3

Kansas City5, Boston1 Today's Games Minnesota(Gibson2-3) at ChicagoWhite Sox(Joh. Oanks2-9), 11:10a.m.,1stgame Detroit (Porcello 8-6) at NY. Yankees(Nova 5-4), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels(Weaver6-5) at Cleveland(Kazmir 7-4), 4.05 p.m. Oakland(J.Parker7-6) at Toronto(Rogers3 6), 407 p.m. Boston(Peavy9-4) at KansasCity (E.Santana8-6), 5.10 p.m. Minnesota(Hendriks 0-1) at ChicagoWhite Sox (Leesman 0-0), 5:10p.m.,2ndgame Texas (Garza1-1) atHouston (Bedard3-8), 5:10p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse7-7)at Seatle (J.Saunders10-10), 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay(Price 6-5)at I..A. Dodgers(Capuano4-6), 7:10 p.m.

Baltimore (Tilman14-3) atSanFrancisco(Vogelsong 2-4), 7.15p.m. Saturday'sGames Detroit atN.Y.Yankees,10:05 a.m. OaklandatToronto,10:07 a.m. Baltimore atSanFrancisco,1:05 p.m. Minnesota at ChicagoWhite Sox,1:05 p.m. TampaBayat L.A.Dodgers,1:05 pm. L.A. AngelsatCleveland,4:05p.m. Bostonat KansasCity,4:10 p.m. Texas at Houston, 4:10p.m. Milwaukee at Seattle, 6:10p.m.

Atlanta Washington NewYork Philadelphia Miami Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati Chicago Milwaukee

NATIONALLEAGUE East Division W L 70 45 54 60 52 60 52 62 43 70 Central Division W L 70 44 66 48 63 51 50 64 49 66

West Division

Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado SanFrancisco

W 64 58 52 52 51

L 50 55 62 64 63

Pct GB .609 .474 15'/z .464 16'/z

,456 ln/z .381 26

Pct GB .614 579 4

.553 7 .439 20 .426 21'/z

Pct GB .561 .513 5'/z .456 12 .448 13 .447 13

Thursday's Games N.Y.Mets2, Colorado1 Pittsburgh5, Miami4, 10innings Philadelphia12,ChicagoCubs 1 San Francisco 4 Milwaukee1 L.A. Dodgers 5,St. Louis 1

Today'sGames Philadelphia(Lannan3-4) at Washington (Haren611), 4:05p.m. San Diego (Cashner 8-5) at Cincinnati (Arroyo9-9), 410 p.m. Miami (Ja.Tumer 3-3) at Atlanta (Beachy 0-0), 4:30 p.m. ChicagoCubs(Rusin 1-1) at St. Louis(Lynn13-5), 515 p.m. Pittsburgh(Liriano12-4) at Colorado(J.ce LaRosa 10-6), 5:40p.m. N.Y.Mets(Hefner 4-8) at Arizona(Corbin12-3), 6.40

Keith Srakoclc / The Assocrated Press

Pittsburgh Pirates right fielder Josh Harrison is unable to make the diving catch on an RBI double hit by the Miami Marlins' Giancarlo Stanton during the first inning of Thursday's game in Pittsburgh. The Pirates went on to win the game, 5-4 in 10 innings. Bowden 1 2 2 2 0 Philadelphia EMartinW11 5 4 1 1 3 Miner 2 0 0 0 1 C.Jimenez 1 2 0 0 0 Valdes 1 0 0 0 0 HBP —by Miner (Lake). WP—EMartin. BalkE.Sanchez. T—3:22(Raindelay.0.22).A—42,510(43,651).

in the bullpen, did not allow a

runner past first base until the

Poll: Yanks'fans don't likeA-Rod

eighth and retired11 in a row in one stretch. Boston

KansasCity ah r hhi ah r hhi E llsurycf 4 0 2 0 L.caincf 4 1 1 0 Victorn rf 4 0 0 0 Hosmer lb 4 0 0 0 Pedroia2b 3 0 0 0 BButlerdh 3 2 1 1 JGomslf 4 1 1 0 AGordnll 3 1 0 1 Drewss 4 0 2 1 MTelad2b 3 0 0 0 Napolidh 4 0 1 0 EJhnsn 2b 1 0 0 0 N ava lb 3 0 1 0 Maxwllrf 3 1 1 1 Sltl mchc 3 0 0 0 Mostks3b 4 0 2 2 H olt3b 3 0 0 0 Hayesc 3 0 0 0 AEscorss 3 0 1 0 T otals 3 2 1 7 1 Totals 3 15 6 5 Boston 0 00 000 001 — 1 Kansas City 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2x - 5

E—J.Gomes(1), Drew(4), Nava(3). OP —Kansas City l. LOB Boston5, KansasCity 5. 2B J.Gomes (14), L.cain (19). HR —B.Buter (10), Maxwell (4). SB — A.Escobar (13). CS—Ellsbury (4), Moustakas (4). SF —A.Gordon. Boston IP H R E R BB SD LesterL,10-7 R.De LaRosa 1

7

4 3 1 2 2 2 2 0

KansasCity B.chen W 5-0 7 2-3 5 0 0 1 HochevarS,2-4 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 T—2:38. A—21,121(37,903).

4 0

2 0

National League

Pirates 5, Marlins 4 (10 innings) PITTSBURGH — Russell Martin's pinch-hit single with two outs in the10th inning lifted Pittsburgh over Miami for the Pirates' fifth straight win. Martin delivered his fourth game-ending hit at PNC

Park this year for the NLCentral leaders. The Pirates swept the

NEW YORK — So will Alex Rodriguez's return to YankeeStadium today be met with cheers or jeers? According to a new poll of New York City residents, the jeers may win out. Just1 in 5 New York

majors.

NEW YORK — Dillon Gee followed Matt Harvey's first career shutout with an impressive outing of his own, helping New York beat

Yankees fans have a favorable opinion of Rodriguez,

Colorado. Gee(8-8) scattered eight hits withoutyielding a walk in 7z/s innings to win for the first time since July14.

and about tw ice as many view him unfavorably, according to a New York Times poll conducted from Friday through Wednesday, during which time Major

Colorado

Miami

Pittsburgh

ab r hhi ah r hhi Y elichlf 4 2 3 2 SMartecl 4 2 2 0 Lucas2b 5 0 0 0 Presleylf 2 1 1 0 Stantonrf 5 1 1 1 JGomzp 0 0 0 0 Morrsnlb 5 0 0 0 Mcctchph 1 0 1 0 Polanc3b 4 0 2 1 JuWlsnp 0 0 0 0 Hchvrrss 4 0 1 0 Mercerph 1 0 0 0 Ruggincl 3 0 00 Melncnp 0 0 0 0 Mathisc 4 1 2 0 JHughsp 0 0 0 0 Fmndzp 1 0 0 0 RMartnph 1 0 1 1 ARamsp 0 0 0 0 Walker2b 3 0 3 2 Dobbsph 1 0 0 0 PAlvrz3b 4 0 1 1

ah r hhi

New York

ah r hhi

B lckmnrf-If 4 0 1 0 EYonglf 4 0 0 0 LeMahi2b 4 0 3 0 Lagarscf 4 0 1 0 CDckrs cf-If 3 1 1 1 DnMrp 2b 4 1 1 0 T lwtzkph 0 0 0 0 Byrdrf 31 10 Beislep 0 0 0 0 I.Davislb 3 0 1 0 Cuddyrlb-rf 4 0 1 0 Flores3b 3 0 0 1 A renad3b 4 0 1 0 Hwknsp 0 0 0 0 C ulersnlf 3 0 0 0 Reckerc 2 0 1 1 Outmnp 0 0 0 0 Qunt nlss 2 0 0 0 H eltonlb 1 0 0 0 Geep 30 10 T orrealc 4 0 1 0 Ricep 00 0 0 J Herrrss 3 0 0 0 Ardsmp 0 0 0 0 Manshpp 2 0 0 0 JuTrnr3b 0 0 0 0 Francisp 0 0 0 0 Fowlercf 1 0 0 0 T otals 3 3 1 8 1 Totals 2 82 6 2 Colorado 0 00 100 000 — 1 New York 000 200 Dgx 2

League Baseball penalized Rodriguez with a 211-game

suspension and levied 50-game suspensions on a dozen other players connected to the Biogenesis anti-aging clinic. Over the three days after the penalties were announced, the poll found that Rodriguez's unfavorable rating had increased

E—Torrealba (3). OP—New York 1. LOBColorado 6, NewYork 7 HR Co.Dickerson (2).

among Yankeesfans, as more becameaware of the

SB — Culberson (1), Lagares(4). CS—Cuddyer (2). SF — Recker. Colorado IP H R E R BB SD

allegations. — New YorkTimes

ManshipL,0-1 5

Francis Outman

Siegrist 1 1 0 0 0 T—3;02.A—42,567(43,975).

4 2 1 1

Mets 2, Rockies1

three-game series and improved to 70-44, the best record in the

0

1

Giants 4, Brewers1 SAN FRANCISCO — Tim

Lincecum pitched another gem, allowing only one hit over eight shutout innings and leading San Francisco past Milwaukee.

1 1 1

4 1 1 0

2 0 0 0

Belisle New York 72-3 8 1 GeeW,B-B Rice 0 0 0 AardsmaH,4 13- 0 0 HawkinsS,2-4 1 0 0 Rice pitched to 1bater in the8th. T—2:44. A—26,618(41,922).

2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0

4 1 1 1

1 0 0 0

3 0 0 0

0 1 0 0

Leaders ThroughThursday's Games

AMERICANLEAGUE BATTING —Micabrera, Detroit, 359; Trout, Los Angeles, .333;OOrtiz, Boston,.332; ABeltre,Texas, .319;Mauer,Minnesota,.319; TorHunter, Detroit,.310; Loney,TampaBay, .307 7.10 p.m. justa double to JuanFrancisco Quags p 0 0 0 0 GJones lb 2 0 1 0 RUNS —Micabrera, Detroit, 81; CDavis, BaltiBaltimore(Tilman14-3) atSanFrancisco (Vogelsong MDunn p 0 0 0 0 GSnchzph-lb 1 0 1 1 leading off the third inning. more,80;Trout, LosAngeles,80; AJones, Baltimore, 2-4), 7:15 p.m. Webb p 0 0 0 0 TSnchzc 5 0 0 0 7 9; Bauti s ta,Toronto, 76;Ellsbury, Boston,71; EncarSaturday's Games Lincecum (6-11) struck out eight P ierreph 1 0 0 0 JHrrsnrf 5 1 1 0 nacion,Toronto,71. BaltimoreatSanFrancisco, 1:05p.m. Amesp 0 0 0 0 Barmesss 4 0 0 0 and walked one in eight innings RBI — CDavis, Baltimore,106; Micabrera, DeTampaBayatL.A. Dodgers, 1:05p.m. C olep 10 0 0 troit, 105;Encam acion, Toronto,89; Fielder,Detroit, before getting pulled for a pinchPhiladelphiaat Washington, 4:05p.m. Tabataph-If 3 1 0 0 80; AJones, Baltimore,79; Ncruz, Texas, 76; OOrtiz, Miami atAtlanta,4:10 p.m. Totals 3 7 4 9 4 Totals 3 75 125 hitter. Boston,73. San Diego atCincinnati, 4:10p.m. Miami 200 020 000 0 4 DOUBLES —Machado, Baltimore, 40; Mauer, Chicago Cubsat St.Louis, 4:15p.m. Pittsburgh 000 020 200 1 5 Milwaukee San Franci s co Minnesota,32; Trout, LosAngeles, 32; CD avis, BalNrY.MetsatArizona,5:10 p.m. Two outs whe n w inni n g run scored. ab r hhi ah r hhi t i more, 31; Jcastro, Houston,30; Lowrie, Oakland, PittsburghatColorado,5:10 p.m. E — H e cha v arri a (8), S.Marte (6). DP — M iam i Aokirf 4 0 0 0 Scutaro2b 5 2 3 0 29; JhPeralta, Detroit, 29; AIRamirez,Chicago, 29; Milwaukee at Seattle, 6:10p.m. 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB —Miami 7, Pittsburgh 13. Segurass 4 0 1 1 Bcrwfrss 4 1 3 1 CSantana, Cleveland, 29. 2B — Stanton (17), G.Sanchez(14). HR —Yelich (1) Lucroyc 4 0 0 0 Sandovl3b 3 0 0 0 TRIPLES —Ellsbury, Boston, 8; Trout, Los AnSB — S.Marte (33). S—Fernandez, Barmes. SFC Gomzcf 4 0 0 0 Beltlb 3113 American League geles, 8; Drew,Boston, 6; Gardner, NewYork, 5; Walker,G.Sanchez. G indllf 3 0 0 0 Pencerf 4 0 2 0 AGordon,KansasCity, 5; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 5; Miami IP H R E R BBSD B ianchi2b 2 0 0 0 Kschncll 3 0 1 0 LMartin,Texas,5. Fernandez 5 5 2 2 4 5 Tigers10, Indians 3 JFrncslb 3 0 1 0 HSnchzc 4 0 0 0 HOME RUNS —CDavis, Baltimore,41; MicaA.Ramos H,B 1 0 0 0 0 2 YBtncr3b 3 0 0 0GBlanccl 2 0 0 0 brera,Detroit, 33; Encarnacion,Toronto,30; Ncruz, Qualls 0 2 2 2 1 0 D.Handp 1 0 0 0 Linccmp 3 0 0 0 Texas, 27;ADunn,Chicago,26;Bautista,Toronto,25; CLEVELAND — Max Scherzer M.DunnH,15 13- 0 0 0 1 0 LSchlrph 1 0 0 0 AnTrrsph 1 0 0 0 ABelt re,Texas,25;Trumbo,LosAngeles,25. became baseball's first17-game WebbBS,2-2 12- 3 1 0 0 0 0 Axfordp 0 0 0 0 SRosarip 0 0 0 0 STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston,40; ROa vis, 12-3 4 1 1 1 0 L,0-1 Wootenp 0 0 0 0 J.l.opezp 0 0 0 0 Toron to,34,Andrus,Texas,30;Altuve,Houston,29; winner and Detroit posted its12th Ames Pittsburgh K Davisph 1 1 1 0 Romop 0 0 0 0 McLouth, Baltimore, 27; LMartin, Texas,26; Rios, straight victory, routing Cleveland. Cole 5 6 4 4 1 4 Totals 3 0 1 3 1 Totals 3 24 104 Chicago, 26. J.Gomez 2 2 0 0 0 2 M ilwaukee 000 0 0 0 0 0 1 — 1 Miguel Cabrera drove in three PITCHING —Scherzer, Detroit, 17-1; Tillman, Ju.Wilson 1 1 0 0 2 1 San Francisco 310 000 Dgx 4 Baltimore, 14-3; MMoore,Tampa Bay 14-3; Colon, runs as the AL Central leaders Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 2 OP — Milwaukeel. LOB—Milwaukee3, SanFranOakland,14-4; Masterson,Cleveland,13-8; Guthrie, J.Hughes W2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 cisco 9. 2B completed a four-gamesweep —J.Francisco (8), K.Davis(3), Scutaro Kansas City,12-7; Verlander,Detroit,12-8. Quagspitchedto 3baters in the7th. ERA—FHernandez, Seattle, 2.39; FHernande z, (19), B.crawford(20). HR—Bet (12). SB—Segura and opened aseven-game lead WP — Fernandez. (32), Bianchi(3). CS—Pence(1). Seattie, 2.39;Kuroda,NewYork, 2.45; AniSanchez, over the second-place Indians. T—3:45. A—33,646(38,362). Milwaukee I P H R E R BB SO Detroit, 2.58;Oarvish,Texas,2.72; Iwakuma,Seattle, D.HandL,0-4 5 7 4 4 4 4 2.75; Colon,Oakland,2.75. Scherzer (17-1) allowed two runs Axford 2 3 0 0 1 3 STRIKEDUTS —Darvish, Texas,192; Scherzer, Dodgers 5, Cardinals1 and four hits in seven innings. He Wooten 1 0 0 0 0 1 Detroit, 175; FHernandez,Seattle, 169, Masterson, helped the Tigers beat Cleveland San Francisco Cleveland,166;Sale,Chicago,161; Verlander,Detroit, ST. LOUIS — A.J. Ellis hit a threeLincecum W,6-11 8 1 0 0 1 8 145; DHolland,Texas, 145. forthe12th time in their past13 0 1 1 1 0 0 SAVES —JiJohnson, Baltimore, 39;MRivera, New run home run and rookie Hyun-Jin SRosario meetings. J.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 York, 35;Nathan,Texas, 33; GHolland, KansasCity, Ryu pitched sevenstellar innings Romo 2 3 1 0 0 0 1 30; Balfour, Oakland,29; Perkins, Minnesota, 27; to help red-hot Los Angeles beat SRosariopitchedto1batter in the9th. AReed,Chicago,27; Rodney,TampaBay, 27. Detroit Cleveland WP — O.Hand. NATIONALLEAGUE ah r hhi ah r hhi St. Louis. The Dodgers have won T — 2: 2 9. A — 41,219 (41, 9 15). BATTING —CJohnson,Atlanta,.339; YMolina, St. A Jcksncl 4 2 2 0 Bourncf 4 1 1 0 17 of their past18 games on the Louis,.330; Cuddyer,Colorado, 327;Votto, CincinDirkslf-rl 5 1 2 1 Swisher1b 4 0 0 0 nati,.324; CraigSt. , Louis,.318; Segura,Milwaukee, MiCarr3b 3 1 1 3 Kipnisdh 4 2 2 0 road, with the only loss coming Phillies12, Cubs1 .314; Mccutchen, Pittsburgh,.313. Fielderlb 5 1 2 2 Acarerss 4 0 2 2 Tuesday to St. Louis in the second RUNS — Mca rpe nter, St. Louis,83; Votto,CincinV Mrtnzdh 5 1 2 3 Brantlylf 4 0 1 0 PHILADELPHIA — Ethan Martin nati, 77; Choo, Ci ncinnati, 76; SMarte,Pittsburgh, D.Kellyrf-2b 4 0 0 0 CSantnc 3 0 0 0 game of the four-gameset. Los 75; Holliday,St. Louis,74;Goldschmidt, Arizona,73; Avilac 3 0 0 0 Chsnhll3b 4 0 0 0 Angeles returns home for a sixearned his first major leaguewin, Jupton,Atlanta,73. B.Penac 2 0 0 0 Aviles2b 3 0 0 0 Cody Asche hit his first home run HITS — Segura, Milwaukee,139; Votto, Cincinnati, RSantgss 3 2 1 0 Stubbsrf 3 0 0 0 game homestand againstTampa 135; Mcarpenter, St. Louis,134; Craig,St.Louis,134; Tuiasspph-If 1 0 0 0 and the New York Mets. Ryu (11and Philadelphia routed Chicago. Mccutchen,Pittsburgh, 131;DanMurphy, NewYork, HPerez2b-ss 5 2 2 0 Asche's two-run drive capped a 3) allowed oneunearned run on 128, DWright,NewYork,126. Totals 4 0 10129 Totals 3 3 3 6 2 DOUBLES —Mcarpenter, St. Louis, 34; Rizzo, Detroit 006 220 000 — 10 six-run burst in the fourth inning five hits while striking out seven Chicago, 32; Bruce, Cincinnati, 31; Mccutchen, C leveland 000 1 0 1 0 01 — 3 that made it10-1. He had three Pittsburgh,31; YMolina,St. Louis, 30; Posey,San E—Coke (1), Aviles (7), Stubbs(5). LOB —De- and walking no one. Franc isco,30,Desmond,Washington,28. troit 8, Cleveland 4. 2B—Dirks (10), Fielder 2(26), hits and fellow rookie Darin Ruf Los Angel e s St. Louis TRIPLES —CGomez,Milwaukee,9; SMarte, PittsV.Martinez(25), Kipnis (26), A.cabrera2 (26). 3B also homered. ab r hhi ah r hhi b urgh, 9;Segura,Milwaukee,8;Span,Washington, A.Jackson (3). 7; CGonzalez,Colorado, 6; DWright, NewYork, 6; 5 Detroit IP H R E R BB SD Crwfrdlf 5 1 2 0 Mcrpnt2b 4 0 2 0 Chicago Philadelphia tied at5. ScherzerW,17-1 7 4 2 2 1 5 M .Ellis 2b 5 0 1 0 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 ah r hhi ah r hhi A dGnzllb 3 1 0 1 Craiglb 4 0 0 0 HOME RUNS —PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 27;GoldAtburquerque 1 0 0 0 0 1 DeJesscf 4 0 1 0 Fmdsnlb 5 1 0 0 P uigrf 5 0 3 0 Hollidylf 4 1 2 0 schmidt, Arizona, 26; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; Coke 1 2 1 1 0 0 Lakelf 4 0 1 0 Ruizc 5221 Ethiercf 4 1 0 0 Freese3b 4 0 3 0 DBrown,Philadelphia,25; Bruce,Cincinnati, 24; UgCleveland R izzolb 5 0 1 0 Utley2b 3 2 2 1 4000 gla, Atlanta,21,Jupton, Atlanta,21. McAgisterL,4-7 2 1 -3 4 6 5 4 3 A.Ellisc 3 2 2 3 Jaycl Schrhltrl 4 1 1 1 JMconl2b 1 1 1 2 Uribe3b 4 0 0 0 RJhnsnc 3 0 0 0 STOLENBASES —Ecabrera, San Diego, 37; 22-3 6 4 4 1 0 Guilmet D Mrph3b 4 0 1 0 DBrwnlf 5 1 1 2 SMarte, Pittsburgh, 33; Segura, Milwaukee, 32; M.Albers 2 2 0 0 0 0 D Gordnss 3 0 1 0 Blazekp 0 0 0 0 4222 3 0 0 0 Siegristp 0 0 0 0 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 Rul rf CGomez, Milwaukee,29; Mccutchen,Pittsburgh, 24; Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 0 0 Ryup Stcastrss 3 0 1 0 Asche3b 5 2 3 2 EYoung, NewYork, 23; Revere,Philadelphia, 22. Rabum 1 0 0 0 0 1 HrstnJrph 1 0 1 1 Kozmass 3 0 0 0 PRdrgzp 0 0 0 0 CMrtnzp 1 0 0 0 Barney2b 3 0 0 0 Mayrrycl 4 0 1 1 P ITCHING —Lynn,St. Louis,13-5; Zimmermann, T—3:01.A—25,131(42,241). H Rndnp 0 0 0 0 Mrtnzss 4 1 2 1 Jansenp 0 0 0 0 Manessp 1 0 0 0 Washington, 13-6; Wainwright, St. Louis, 13-7; Gilespiph 1 0 0 0 EMartnp 1 0 0 0 SFrmnp 0 0 0 0 Corbin, Arizona, 12-3; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 12-4; RoyalS 5, Red SGX1 Bowdenp 0 0 0 0 DYongph 1 0 0 0 T .cruzc 1 0 0 0 Latos, Cincinnati,11-3;Ryu,LosAngeles,11-3; MiS mrdzip 2 0 0 0 Minerp 0 0 0 0 T otals 3 6 5 105 Totals 3 31 7 0 nor, Atlanta,11-5; Bumgarner, SanFrancisco, 11-7; E Snchzp 0 0 0 0 Kratzph 0 0 0 0 — Bruce Chen L os Angeles 0 0 1 0 3 0 010 — 5 SMiger, St.Louis, 11-7. KANSAS CITY, Mo. ERA—Kershaw, LosAngeles,1.91; Kershaw,Los St. Louis 0 00 100 000 — 1 Watkns2b 1 0 0 0CJimnzp 0 0 0 0 outdueled Jon Lester asKansas E—Ethier (2), Freese(7). OP—Los Angeles 1. Valdesp 0 0 0 0 Angeles,1.91,Harvey,NewYork, 2.09; Corbin,Are LOB — Los A nge l e s 9, St . L o ui s 5. 3B — P uig (2). H R Totals 3 4 1 6 1 Totals 3 8 121412 City defeated Boston. TheRoyals zona,2.33;Locke,Pittsburgh,2.47;Fernandez,Miami, Chicago 0 00 100 000 — 1 2.58;Wainwright,St. Louis,2.66. Ellis (6) SB —D.Gordon(6). SF—Ad.Gonzalez won for the16th time in 20 games A Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SD Philadelphia 0 2 2 6 0 0 02x — 12 STRIKEDUTS —Harvey, NewYork,178, Kershaw, since the All-Star break. The Red LOB —Chicago 11, Philadelphia 6. 2B—Rizzo Los Angeles,166,Samardziia, Chicago,158,WainRyuW,11-3 7 5 1 0 0 7 PRodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 0 (32), Oo.Murphy (2), utley 2(18), Asche(2). HRwright, St.Louis,156;Lincecum,SanFrancisco,150; Sox, who have the best record in Jansen 1 1 0 0 0 2 Schierholtz(15),Jo.McDonald (1), Ruf(5), Asche(1). Bumgarner,SanFrancisco, 150;HBaiey,Cincinnati, the American League, lost for only St. Louis S—E.Martin. 148. Ca.MartinezL,0-1 42-3 7 4 4 3 2 Chicago IP H R E R BB SO SAVES —Kimbrel, Atlanta, 36, Muiica, St. Louis, the third time in10 games. Chen 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Maness SamardziiaL,6-11 31-3 11 9 9 0 3 30; Grilli, Pittsburgh,30; RSoriano,Washington, 28; (5-0), who wasmaking his fifth 21-3 1 1 1 2 3 S.Freema n 1130 0 0 0 2 E.Sanchez Romo,SanFrancisco,27;Chapman,Cincinnati,27; start since beginning the season Blazek 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 H.Rondon 11-3 0 0 0 1 1 Gregg,Chicago,23; Cishek,Miami, 23.

p.m.

Milwaukee (Lohse7-7) at Seatt e(J.Saunders10-10), 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay(Price 6-5)at L.A.Dodgers(Capuano4-6),

Lincecum, who threw a no-hitter on July13at San Diego, permitted


C4

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Kicker Continued from C1 He called the invitation to camp the "next step" in his process to eventually earn a scholarship and playing time for Oregon, which is ranked No. 3 in the preseason USA Today coaches' poll. Crook — who was on the roster last season as a redshirt but did not attend preseason camp in 2012 — has stayed in Eugene most of the summer to train with last season's starting field-goal kicker for the Ducks, Alejandro M a ldonado, along w ith l o n g-snapper D r e w Howell and punter Dylan Ausherman. " The whole year I w a s working to try to get invited

to fall (preseason) camp," Crook said. "As a walk-on, especially a kicker, it's much harder to get invited to fall camp, because they have limited roster spots for that. They will actually look at me as competing for a job, instead of redshirting." The 19-year-old C r ook — who is 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs 158 pounds — is currently th e o nl y p l ayer from Central Oregon on the Ducks' 2013 roster. He was a first-team all-state kicker as a senior at Bend High in 2011, as well as an all-league point guard for the basketball team. He was also a midfielder on the Lava Bears' soccersquad. Last season as a redshirt, Crook's main role was to kick off to the return team during practice. This season might bring more of the same, but Crook says he hopes to eventually compete for playing time as a kickoff specialist, and later in his career to add

PGA

field goals and extra points to his duties as he continues to develop as a kicker. Crook is the second kicker from Bend High to play for the Ducks in recent years. Morgan Flint ( 2 005-2009) w orked his way u p f r o m w alk-on status to e arn a scholarship for h i s s enior year and become a reliable s tarting p l ace-kicker f o r

Oregon. "My goal is to also work on field goals," Crook said. "I'm sure I won't get as many reps on field goals as Alejandro, but I'll be filling in. Hopefully I can prove myself that way." As kickers, Maldonado, a senior, and Crook spend quite a bit of time together. The two often go fishing together, and Maldonado calls

Crook a "great guy." "As a kicker, he's him, I'm me," Maldonado said. "But he works really hard. His kickoffs are really nice." Incoming freshman kicker Matt Wogan, of Indian Trail, N.C., is on a full scholarship and reportedly has the strongest leg of any Oregon kicker in years. Wogan will add another leg to the competition for kickoffs and field goals/ extra points. "I'm not sure what they're going to do with Matt; he's

a big-leg guy," Crook said. "I'm just excited to be there, and hopefully prove myself a little bit. I'm just going at this fall camp with no worries. I'm just going to hopefully prove myself and see what happens from there. I'm not expecting to get a starting spot ... I just like competing with the guys. I think I can compete for a job."

— Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmoricaIC<bendbulletin.com.

15th, but he three-putted the next hole for bogey and was Continued from C1 pleased to walk away with Woods had a 71, not a bad par on the 18th. "I felt good out there tostart at Oak Hill, except on day," he said. "I felt like I this day. "The round realistically could swing freely and I was could have been under par hitting all the shots that I easily," Woods said. wanted to hit. When you get Furyk, who won his lone something going for you in a major at the U.S. Open in major, sometimes you have 2003 at Olympia Fields, has got to be not afraid to get out gone nearly three years of your own way and let go. I since his last win at the Tour did that at Lytham, and I did Championship to capture the that here for 10 or 11 holes." FedEx Cup and wi n P GA Just last month at MuirTour player of the year. Still field, the 31-year-old Ausfresh are the four close calls tralian had the outright lead from a year ago, including on the back nine in the Britthe U.S. Open. ish Open until he made four He was as steady as Scott, straight bogeys and couldn't r arely putting h i mself i n keep up with Phil Mickelson trouble until the end of the and his great finish. Even so, r ound. Furyk m i ssed t h e it was evident that Scott was fairway to the right and had serious about adding more to pitch out because of thick majors to that green jacket rough and trees blocking his he won at Augusta National way to the green. That led to in April. "I put a lot into my game his only bogey, but still his lowest first-round score in the last two years with a fo19 appearances at the PGA cus on the big tournaments," Championship. Scott said. "Everyone around "Usuallydisappointedwith me has had the same focus, ending the day on a bogey," as well. We come here to do Furyk said. "But you know, business." 65, PGA, is not so bad." Even Rory M c Ilroy g ot David Hearn of Canada, in on the act. The defending an alternate until a w e ek champion, at the end of a ago,had a 66 in the morning. major season that has been a Also at 66 was Lee West- major disappointment, came wood, who had his best score out firing with three birdies ever in the PGA and offered on the opening four holes evidence that there was no and made the turn in 32 unhangover from losing a 54- til back-to-back bogeys. He hole lead in the British Open wound up with a 69. last month. There were no A resurgent Paul Casey record scores at Oak Hill de- was in the group at 67, while spite the soft conditions, just U.S. Open champion Justin a lot of low rounds. Rose, British Open runner-up "If you don't hit it in the Henrik Stenson and the agefairways, then yo u w o n 't less Miguel Angel Jimenez score well," Westwood said. were among 11 players at 68. "These guys are good. There Mickelson wound up with are a lot of good players play- the same score as Woods, ing in the tournament. Some- only they arrived at 71 much body is going to hit it straight, differently. Woods had only and somebody is going to two birdies. Mickelson shot shoot a good score." 71 despite two double boScott certainly didn't start geys, including one on the out that way. He had to pitch 18th hole. On the par-5 fourth out from the trees on No. I, hole, he hooked his tee shot but managed toget up-and- out-of-bounds and nearly lost down from about 85 yards in the next tee shot in the same front of the green, and after place. "The first four holes was two more pars, he began his big run of birdies. like a shock to my system," "Just got on a bit of a roll Mickelson said. "Hitting it and hit a few shots close," out-of-bounds on 4 ... out-ofScott said. "I didn't have too bounds is not even in play. much putting to do. You've So I got off to a terrible start. got to take advantage when I was actually under par for a it happens, because it doesn't little while, but that took a lot happen toomuch in the ma- of fight. And unfortunately, jors. Nothing to c omplain I'm in a position where if I hit about in 65." a low round tomorrow, I can He felt similar to the open- get back in it." ing round at Royal Lytham He headed straight to the & St. Annes last year i n practice range, even sumthe British Open, when he moning coachButch Harmon flirted with a 63 and had to down from the Sky Sports settle for a course record-ty- television booth. Asked when ing 64. Scott was on pace to h e finished his work if h e tie the Oak Hill record for was worried about his game, majors when he holed an 18- Mickelson replied, "Not now. foot birdie putt on the par-3 I was."

Elks

a freshman in 2011, Benjamin spent the summer in Bend, where he hit .275 in L38 atbats. Benjamin went on to hit .322 in his sophomore year and .335 in his junior season for ASU — leading the Sun Devils in batting average both years — and this past June he was drafted in the 13th round by the Colorado Rockies. "I took that summer really serious with the goal being that I was going to come back

WCLstandings Elks standingont

Continued from C1 "It was tough," admits Elman, who has been solid this summer for the Elks of the summer collegiate West Coast League, going 4-2 in 10 starts w hile sporting a 33 3 E RA . "I'm used to being one of the top dogs. This summer has been all about getting innings, getting experience, and getting back to being one of those

Through Thursday's

Player of the week:Zach Close, a

games:

graduate of CrookCounty, hasseven hits, four runs scored andthree RBls

North Division W-L Wenatchee 28-22 Walla Walla 28-22 Bellingham 25-26 21-30 Victoria 17-34 Kelowna South Division W-L Corvallis 34-17 Bend 30-21 30-24 Medford Klamath Falls 26-25 Cowlitz 25-26 Kitsap 17-34

guys."

While the WCL boasts a number of experienced smallcollege standouts — Bend first baseman Derek Dixon of NCAA Division III George Fox University in Newberg, for example — and junior college players looking for four-year opportunities, the league is primarily a developmental circuit for Division I programs. Players like Elman, w ho saw limited playing time last spring, are usually champing at the bit to play during the summer and ideally put themselves into a position to compete for a starting job back at college in the falL " I'm just loving that I ' m

in his past seven games, providing the Elks with a spark from the leadoff spot

in the batting order. Pitcher of the week:Bend relief pitcher David Murillo recorded two saves over the past eight days, working

out of a bases-loaded Iam in theElks' 10-6 victory over Cowlitz on

Aug. 1 before preserving a 2-1 road win against Bellingham onAug. 3. Game of theweek:Bendedged Bellingham 2-1 onAug. 3 behind a

(to ASU) and play (more innings) my sophomore year,"

says Benjamin, who is now playing professionally for the strong start from Garrett Anderson. Tri-Cities (Wash.) Dust DevThe 6-foot-3 left-hander scattered ils, the Rockies' short-season seven hits over 5/~ innings while Single-A affiliate. "That's a allowing just one run. critical time (between a college player's freshman and sophomore seasons). A benefiweekend'sseries against Wal- college team in spring 2012. cial time." la Walla with a team-high five After a season with the Elks, Elman, who aims to be one home runs while hitting .260 in which he batted .291 over of Creighton's weekend pitchwith 25 RBIs in 42 games. 47 games, Ramage became a ing starters next spring, says "When you've been playstarter for St. Mary's this year he is already experiencing the ing your whole life, it's tough," and hit .261 with 41 hits in 51 benefits of consistent mound O'Dwyer says about being a games, the fourth-best mark time with the Elks. " My breaking b all's i m reserve for the first time last on the team. " That f reshman y ear i s proved a lot t hi s summer," spring. "But I still picked up a lot. It's a learning experience." d efinitely harder o n s o m e says Elman, who has pitched Over the years, the Elks guys," says ex-Elk standout a team-high 51'/3 innings so playing every day," says Bend have developed a reputation Mike Benjamin, who came to far this season for the Elks. outfielder Cullen O'Dwyer, a for helping turn inexperienced Bend between his freshman "I threw it quite a bit during sophomore-to-be at Ar izona underclassmen into everyday and sophomore years at Ari- high school, but I lost it over State. contributors. Regionally, forzona State. "It's just a matter the spring. And working with Highly recruited out of Almer Oregon State infielders of accepting the fact that the (16-year big-league veteran buquerque, N.M. — he was se- Tyler Smith and Ryan Dunn guys ahead of you are better and Bend assistant coach) lected out of high school in the both posted solid summers and they've been there. That Alan Embree has been pretty 39th round of the 2012 Major in Bend — Smith in 2010 and freshman year, you're trying incredible.... From him I've League Baseball draft by the Dunn in 2011 — that helped to learn what you can do ev- learned a lot about working Atlanta Braves — O'Dwyer t ransform t hem f r o m r o l e ery day to better yourself, and hitters and working counts. "We'll see what happens," had just nine at-bats for the players to key cogs in the Bea- when you do get that opportuSun Devils this past spring. vers' lineups. Darian Ramage, nity in a game, you better be Elman adds, "when I get back Over the summer, though, he a St. Mary's College infielder ready." to Omaha." — Reporter: 541-383-0305, has emerged as one of the Elks' who played in Bend last sumAfter appearing in just 12 top power hitters, entering this mer, had just 15 at-bats for his games for the Sun Devils as beastes@bendbulletin.com.

Beavs Continued from C1 Wheaton and Cooks were perhaps the highlights of Oregon State's offense, each with more than 1,000 yards receiving to become the second tandem in school history to hit those numbers. They w ere considered among the best wide-receiverduos in the conference, along with USC's Robert Woods and Marqise Lee. Cooks, then a sophomore, had 1,151 yards receiving to average 88.5 yards per game. He led the conference with an average of 17.2 yards per catch, ranked No. 2 nationally, and had five touchdowns. Wheaton, who was a thirdround selection in this year's NFL draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers, caught 11 touchdown passes and a v eraged 95.7

contest. But the 6-foot-5 quarterback injured his left knee and r equired a r t h roscopic surgery, giving Vaz the ass ignment for th e n ext t w o games. It went back and forth from there. In the end, Mannion passed for 2,446 yards and 15 touchdowns, with 13 interceptions, in 10 appearances. Vaz, who w as h ampered d ow n t h e stretch by an injury to his left ankle, passed for 1,480 yards and 11 touchdowns, with three interceptions, while appearing in seven games.

I

k l

III cari ~

said. "Frankly, with the stuff we do, he should get open." At p r actice, th e s p eedy Cooks even ran one of t he Beavers'signature plays, the fly sweep. Oregon State revived the fly sweep a couple of years back to utilize the talents of James Rodgers — one of Cooks' mentors. Rodgers is now with the Atlanta Falcons along with younger brother Jacquizz Rodgers. "It's fun," Cooks said of the play. "But that's just one thing I'm looking forward to this season."

I SMOLIC H

The Bend RadioGroup

yardsreceiving pergame. His total of 1,255 receiving yards for the season ranks sixth in Oregon State history. Cooks has been named to this season's watch list for the Biletnikoff Award, recognizing the top receiver in college football. He was also voted one of five team captains for the Beavers this season. He is one of 17 starters who are returning this season to Oregon State, which was sel ected to finish third in t h e Pac-12 North in a preseason poll of reporters who cover the league. Rival Oregon was expected to finish first and win the conference. "Last year a lot of people doubted us, and look what we showed," Cooks said. "We're still getting doubted. All that does is fuel the fire and makes us work harder. With that being said, I feel like we can go down and win the Rose Bowl and wi n th i s c o n f erence. That's something we're shooting for. We set our standards

Cooks said he has confidence in both quarterbacks, and he was diplomatic about the differences between the two. "Sean's taller," he joked. The Beavers opened preseason camp this week and it was noted that Cooks was often wide open during drills. While that could be an issue forthe defense to address, Riley said he expects nothing less from Cooks. "He's now coupling great ability w it h t h e k n owledge of how to run around," Riley

m oto r s

P " , „ >~+++ l@P 9P}Q F • •

SUMMER CLEARANCEEVENT

@! asaaa

Jeep

C H R Y S L E R

NEW2013DODGEDART 39 MPG Highway!

MSRP $17,785 -FACTORY REBATE $1,000-SMOLICH DISCOUNT $1,800.VIN:00292539 STKIID13073

NEW 2013 CHR YSLER200 2 9 MPG H i g h w a y

high."

While the Beavers' turnaround last season was rem arkable, Cooks s aid t h e Beavers fell short of two key goals, leaving them hungry this season. "We didn't win 10 games. We didn't win our bowl game. (Texas rallied to beat the Beavers 31-27 in the Alamo Bowl.) We lost some tough games that could have gone either way. That's what fuels us," Cooks said. "We gotta understand that we were right there. We were always in the mix. Now it's all about finish." So who will take on the role as Robin this season to Cooks' Batman? Among those in line are Richard Mullaney, Obum Gwacham and Malik Gilmore. The larger question at the moment is who will be Oregon State's quarterback. Coach Mike Riley is still undecided between Sean Mannion and Cody Vaz, who traded off at the position last season. Mannion started O regon State's first four games, averaging 339.5 yards passing per

MSRP $22,090 -FACTORY REBATE $2,500-SMOLICH DISCOUNT $2,605.VIII:DII767672 STK¹ C13012

IEW2013DODGECHARGER 300 HP 8 27 MPG

MSRP $28,380 - FACTORY REBATE $2,500-SMOLICH DISCOUNT $2,895.VIII:DH533867 STK¹ D13042

NEW 2013CHRYSLER300S Chrysler flagship with AWD AND 27 MPG Hwy!!

MSRP $40,830- FAGTORY REBATE $3,750-SMOLIGH DISGOUIIT $4,095.VIII:DH741550 STK¹ G13014

sMOLIGH ~

QQQ Pg

541.389.1177 1865 NE Highway 20 I Bend www.smolichmotors.com Expires 8/15/13


C5 © To look upindividual stocks, goto bendbulletin.comn/bueinss. Alsoseearecapin Sunday's Businesssection.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

+

NAsDAO ~ +15.11

+27.65

15,498.32

3,669.12

Toda+ Ordering fewer goods? L.S. wholesalers have been mostly cutting back on restocking in recent months despite solid sales gains. Wholesale companies' stockpiles shrank 0.5 percent in May, the most in 20 months and the third decline in five months. A steady gain in auto sales and other goods this year suggestscompanies may have to ramp up restocking in the coming months to keep up with demand. The Commerce Department reports on June wholesale stockpiles today.

Wholesale inventories Seasonally adjusted monthly percent change

4).4

15,400

1,750

16,000

1,700

15,500

1,650

F

M

A

StocksRecap

M

J

$26.90

$19.54 25

20 '13

Operating EPS

'13 •

51.08

est.

-S0.07

J

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

I

Change: 27.65 (0.2%)

'

A

HIGH LOW 15557.12 15418.60 6541.09 6477.99 506.97 502.92 9645.75 9575.79 3675.71 3649.64 1700.18 1688.38 1239.13 1231.04 18046.06 17921.81 1051.82 1044.38

F

M

CLOSE 15498.32 6521.29 505.67 9634.70 3669.12 1697.48 1237.08 18015.34 1049.47

A

CHG. +27.65 +52.08 +1.37 +66.44 $-15J 1

+6.57 +6.20 $-75.22

+5.13

J

A

%CHG. WK MO OTR YTD +0.18% L L +18.27% +0.81% +22.89% +0.27% L T +11.60% L L +14.11% +0.69% +0.41% L $-21 .51 % +0.39% L +19.02% +0.50% L L $-21.23% +0.42% L L +20.14% +0.49% L L +23.56%

NorthwestStocks

Planar Systms Plum Creek Prec Castparts Safeway Inc Schnitzer Steel Sherwin Wms Stancorp Fncl StarhucksCp Triquint Semi UmpquaHoldings US Bancorp WashingtonFedl Wells Fargo &Co Weyerhaeuser

0 0 0

$-$

0 0

0 0

o o

ty -

PLNR 1.12

PCL 39.80 ~ PCP 155.65 ~ SWY 15.00 ~ SCHN 230 7 ~ 3 S HW 134.97 ~ SFG 29.52 — 0 SBUX 43,46 — 0 TQNT 4.30 UMPQ 11,17 — 0 USB 30.96 WAFD 15,56 — o WFC 31.25 WY 2 3.30

68.00 61.9 2 +. 8 5 + 1 .4 w L 29,26 29 .11 + . 1 9 + 0,7 W L 15.03 14.61 +. 08 +0.6 w L 7349 71.79 -.37 -0.5 w L 1 09 49 105.84 -.58 -0.5 w w 718 6.01 +.05 +0.8 L V 25.5 9 24.53 -.09 -0.4 w w 66.69 60.85 -1.02 -1.6 V V 1 20.2 0 117.39 -1.95 -1.6 w L 10.00 9.53 -.46 -4.6 V 33.82 32.65 -.23 -0.7 w L 27,78 26.87 +.18 >0.7 V L 14 81 14.25 + . 24 c L7 26.90 22.45 -.25 -1.1 V V 12.63 12 .29 +.11 +0.9 w L 39.98 39 .60 +.61 +1.6 L L 5.71 5 .0 3 w w 22.55 17 .48 +.44 +2.6 L L 30.21 28 .94 -.15 -0.5 w L 21.25 20 .85 +.12 +0.6 V L 36.43 32 .89 +.83 +2.6 L w 66.85 66 .05 +.42 +0.6 V L 63.34 59 .60 +.70 +1.2 w w 50.80 43 .51 27 -0.6 W W 13.17 11.06 +. 06 + 0.5 w w 6 000 56.01 +.31 +0.6 V W 2.36 1.93 +.04 +2.1 L L L 54.62 47.16 -.19 - 0.4 V V 2 70.0 0 220.82 14 -0.1 w w 28.42 24.95 +.29 +1.2 W L 3 03 26.99 +.82 $.3.1 194. 5 6 177.15 +1.64 +0.9 V V 56.07 54 .60 -.06 -0.1 w L 74,27 72 .94 + . 75 +1,0 W L 8.30 7.7 2 +.0 4 +0 .5 w L 17.48 16 .98 + . 11 +0.7 V L 37.97 37 .35 + . 14 $.0.4 w L 22.76 22 .15 + . 0 8 +0.4 V L 44.79 43 .22 -.05 -0.1 w L 33.24 27 .32 -.28 -1.0 W W

L +43.7 +75 .9 98 0 1 4 0. 8 0 L +20, 7 +1 3 ,1 2 4 6 1 9 1, 2 2 L + 25. 8 +9 0 .0 8165026 0. 0 4 L +88. 5 + 1 83.5 2 2 35 0.5 2 L +40 . 4 + 4 6.13681 19 1 . 9 4 V -4.0 +19.2 7 40 L +36 . 7 + 3 8.3 1 0 6 2 0 0 . 4 0 V +14 . 0 + 1 4. 4 1 0 0 2 0 0 . 8 8 L +18. 9 $. 3 3.4 2 345 25 1. 2 4 L +47. 1 +1 7 .8 54 L +46 . 3 + 5 6.8 1069 2 1 0. 3 6 L +88. 6 +4 3 .6 9 864 d d 0. 5 8 +14.6 +41.9 6 cc 0.2 4 a V +8.9 -10.9 33647 12 0 .90 L +46.0 +50 .1 11130 14 0 .22f L +52.2 +76 . 0 2 7 28 1 4 0. 6 0

w +2 6 . 1 + 29.3 2 2 4 d d L -9.5 +44.3 2677 11 L +36. 3 +3 3 .3 5 0 1 c c 0. 6 9 L +22.5 +32 .6 3 8 3 2 2 0. 1 8 w +23. 1 +8. 9 5 7997 13 0 . 9 2 L + 28.0 +3 8 .2 2 4 63 2 5 0. 8 4 w +11. 4 +8. 7 1 6 00 1 7 1 . 2 0 L -1.6 -6.1 70 2 0 1.8 2 L +28. 3 +1 43.3 8 0 2 2 0.0 8 a L + 23. 9 +4 1 .3 9 2 1 2 0 0 . 80a +35.0 + 36 . 1 8 dd L + 6.3 +21. 4 56 9 3 2 1.7 6

w +16. 6

+3 8 .5 5 9 7 2 2 0. 1 2

L + 37. 9 +6 1 .7 3 8 21 1 1 0 . 80f -11.0 - 14.2 22 8 9 6 0 . 7 5 L +15 2 + 2 7 7 5 2 5 2 5 2 0 0 L +48.9 +8 3 .3 1 3 6 1 3 0. 9 3f L +36, 0 +6 1 ,2 2 876 3 5 0, 8 4 L +59.8 +33.8 1883 L +44.0 +41.3 298 1 8 0 .60f L + 16.9 +14.9 5166 13 0 . 92f L +31.3 + 38.8 177 1 6 0 . 36 L +26.4 +31.2 18450 12 1 . 20 W -1.8 +18.9 5323 25 0.80f

Company For the three months ended June 29, its net loss totaled $43.1 million, or 36 cents per share. That compares with net loss of $52.1 million, or 48 cents per share, last year. Excluding one-time items related to exiting some brands and acquiring others, it earned 12 cents per share. Analysts expected a loss of 10 cents per share, according to FactSet.

2Q '12 2 Q '13 Price-earnings ratio:

13

Fifth & Pacific(FNP) Thursday's close:$25.01

$10~

~

Total return YTD: 101% 1 - Y R : 107%

Dividend: $0.48 Div. Yield: 1.8%

AP

Source: FactSet

FundFocus

Penney

DxGldBII rs SPDR Fncl

Facebook

169.80 + . 62 14.61 + . 08 39.28 + . 74 26.00 +2.06 32.89 + . 83 13.66 + . 86 6.38 +1.30 20.49 +.05 38.54 -.33

SmartTc g Groupon Gain Cap DexCom BitautoH ChanAdv n

WageWrks

LAST 12.62 3.94 6.38 2.19 10.60 6.81 26.66 14.38 23.78 40.00

O4

Co $L

CC

+ 3 6 .7 + 3 1.3 «C + 2 5.6 99 + 2 5 .1 «C + 2 1 .6 Co + 2 1 .4 Morningstar OwnershipZone™ + 2 1.3 + 1 9 .8 O e Fund target represents weighted + 1 9 .7 average of stock holdings + 1 9.1 • Represents 75% offund'sstock holdings

CHG %CHG -4.07 -46.8 -3.25 -46.4 —.91 -26.6 -27.67 -26.1 -4.85 -24.4

Foreign Markets

GR OWTH

93

Losers NAME LAST Stereotx rsh 4.62 Cyclacel pf 3.75 Biolase 2.51 DirDGldBr 78.50 SilicGrln 15.05

99

BL EN D

cC

CHG %CHG +3.39 +.94 +1.30 + .44 +1.88 +1.20 +4.68 +2.38 +3.92 +6.42

VALUE

$L

Gainers NAME Orbitz Mattersight DxGldBII rs

FrankTemp-Franklin RisDvA m FRDPX

cC C

~

25

5-Y R* : 12%

Price-earnings ratio (trailing 12 months):lost money

Market value:$3.0 billion

*Annualized

Source: FactSet

SelectedMutualFunds

This fund often has a lower dividend yield than pure equityMarketSummary income offerings; its managers Most Active focus on a company's ability to NAME VOL (Ogs) LAST CHG raise its dividend, says MorningGroupon 859904 10.60 +1.88 star. 855331 816498 724333 580127 579974 497280 435520 416582 402988

~

3-Y R*: 67%

Total returns through Aug. 8

A. Veiga, J. Sohn • AP

S&P500ETF BkofAm iShEMkts MktVGold Microsoft

Ann. dividend: none

52-WEEK RANGE

based on past 12 months' results

CATEGORY Large Blend MORNINGSTAR RATING™ * * * f r f r ASSETS $7,640 million EXP RATIO 0.97% MANAGER William Lippman SINCE 1987-01-14 RETURNS3-MO +5.7

PERCENT RETURN Yr RANK N AV CHG YTD 1Y R 3 Y R 5YR 1 3 5 American Funds 22.89 +.08 +13.2 +17.3 +13.4 +8.0 A A A CaplncBuA m 56.50 +.18 +9.0 +11.7 $.10.2 $5.1 8 A 0 CpWldGrlA m 41.66 +.20 +13.7 +21.7 +10.8 +4.5 0 D D EurPacGrA m 44.37 +.19 $7.6 +1 7.5 +7.0 $3.1 D D A FnlnvA m 47.84 +.19 +18.0 +24.3 +15.2 +6.8 0 D 0 GrthAmA m 41.00 +.16 +19.4 +27.1 +15.6 +6.8 A C C IncAmerA m 19.74 +.07 +11.2 +15.2 $-12.4 $-7.7 8 A A InvCoAmA m 35.78 +.15 +19.6 +22.9 +14.7 +6.9 D D C NewPerspA m 35.70 +.11 +14.2 +22.7 +12.9 +6.8 C 8 8 WAMutlnvA m37.28 +.15 $-20.7 +23.3 $-17.4 $7.9 D A 8 Dodge 8 Cox Income 13.55 +.01 - 0.8 +1.4 +4.4 +6.9 A B 8 IntlStk 3 9.37 +.16 +13.7 +27.8 +8.9 +3.5 A B A Stock 151.77 +.58 +25.6 +33.0 +18.6 + 7.3 A A 0 Fidelity Contra 91.22 +.37 + 18.7 +22.0 +16.6 +8.3 0 B 8 GrowCo 114. 80 +.61+ 23.1 +25.3 +20.0+10.5 8 A A LowPriStk d 48 .41 +.27+ 22.6 +31.1 +18.6+11.1 8 B A Fidelity Spartan 500l d xAdvtg 60 .27 +.25+20.5 +23.8 +17.3 +7.9 C B 8 FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2. 3 6 +.01+8.1 +12.1 +10.1 +7.2 A A A IncomeA m 2.3 3 + .01 + 8.0 +12.3 +10.6 +7.7 A A A FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondAdv 12.93 +.07-0.9 + 4 .6 + 5 .6 +9.4 A A A Oppenheimer RisDivA m 20. 24 +.09+17.0 +20.2 +14.8 +5.9 E D D RisDivB m 18. 31 +.07+ 16.3 +19.1 +13.7 +4.9 E E E RisDivC m 18 . 22 +.07 + 16.4 +19.2 +13.9 +5.1 E D E SmMidValA m41.00 +.20 + 26.5 +36.6 +14.6 +5.4 A E E SmMidValB m34.44 +.17+25.8 +35.4+13.6 +4.5 A E E PIMCO TotRetA m 10 . 82 +.01 -2.5 + 0 .2 + 3.9 +6.9 B C B T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 31.52 + . 12+20.2 +25.8 +16.1 +7.8 C C 8 GrowStk 45.0 3 + .22+ 19.2 +23.1 +17.9 +8.9 8 A 8 HealthSci 55.2 0 + .12+ 33.9 +39.6 +30.9+17.1 8 A A Newlncome 9. 4 4 +.01-2.6 - 1.0 +3.2 +5.7 D D 0 Vanguard 500Adml 156.79 +.64 +20.5 +23.8 +17.3 +7.9 C 8 8 500lnv 156.77 +.64 +20.4 +23.6 +17.1 +7.8 0 8 8 CapOp 43.63 +.23 +29.8 +39.9 +18.1 +9.3 A A A Eqlnc 28.80 +.11 +20.9 +23.5 $.19.1 $9.5 D A A StratgcEq 27.00 +.16 +25.9 +34.1 $.21.3 $.9.2 A A 8 TgtRe2020 26.04 +.10 +9.3 +13.5+10.4 +6.3 A A A Tgtet2025 15.05 +.07 +10.7 +15.4 +11.2 +6.3 8 8 8 TotBdAdml 10.67 +.01 -2.2 -1.4 +3.1 $-5.2 D D D Totlntl 15.60 +.15 +5.8 +16.7 +5.9 +1.5 D E 0 TotStlAdm 42.84 +.19 +21.3 +25.6 +17.8 +8.5 8 A A TotStldx 42.82 +.19 +21.2 +25.4 +17.6 +8.4 8 A A USGro 25.30 +.12 +19.0 +24.3 +17.4 +7.6 8 8 C Welltn 37.78 +.12 +13.0 +16.7 +12.3 +8.2 8 A A FAMILY

FUND BalA m

YTD +20.7 LAST CHG %CHG 1-YR +25.2 + 25.83 + . 6 4 4,064.32 3-YR ANNL +16.7 London 6,529.68 + 18.47 + . 28 5-YR-ANNL +8.9 Frankfurt + 57.84 + . 7 0 8,318.32 Hong Kong 21,655.88 + 67.04 + . 3 1 TOP 5HOLDINGS PCT Mexico 42,712.05 $.465.55 +1.10 Johnson & Johnson 4.2 Milan 17,146.50 +308.31 +1.83 Chevron Corp 4.02 Tokyo -219.38 -1 .59 13,605.56 3.91 Stockholm 1,249.22 + 8.81 + . 7 1 Pentair Ltd Fund Footnotes. b - ree covering market costs ls paid from fund assets. d - Deferred sales charge, or redemption Sydney +50.50 +1.01 International Business Machines Corp 3.78 fee. f - front load (satescharges). m - Multiple fees arecharged, usually a marketing feeand either asales or 5,047.10 Zurich 7,955.29 -20.99 —.26 Dover Corporation 3.38 redemption fee. Source: Morclngstat.

NAME Paris

$103.40

+

EURO

+

' 97

0055

1.3388

StoryStocks

CTL Close:$34.36 V-2.03 or -5.6% The telecommunications company was the biggest decliner on the S&P 500 after cutting its outlook for the year. $38 36 34

Lowe's LOW Close:$46.16L1.86 or 4.2% The home improvement retailer hit a 52-week high following an upgrade from J.P. Morgan, which expects more consistent results. $50 45 40

M

J J 52-week range

$33.33~

A $43.43

M

J J 52-week range

$25. 97

A

$46. 25

Volz15.9m (3.1x avg.) PE: 24.4 Volz11.2m (1.5x avg.) PE: 26.4 Mkt. Cap:$20.93 b Yiel d : 6. 3% Mkt. Cap:$49.5 b Yiel d : 1. 6 %

Yingli Green Energy

Dividend Footnotes: 9-Extra dividends were paid, ttut are nct included. tt - Annual rate plus stock c - Liquidating dividend. 9 - Amount declared or paid in tast12 months. f - Current annual rate, wtttch was mcreased bymost recent dtuedendannouncement. i - Sum ot dividends patd after stock split, no regular rate. l - Sum cf dtvidends patd thls year. Most recent dtt9dend was omitted or deferred k - Declared or pald thls year, 9 cumulative issue with dividends marrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Imtiat dividend, annual rate not known, yteld not shown. 7 - Declared or paid in precedmg 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, apprctcmate cash value on ex-distrittution date.Fe Footnotes:q - Stock is 9 closed-end fund - nc P/E ratio shown. CC - P/Eexceeds 99. dd - Loss in last t2 months

The KateSpade brand helped clothing and accessories maker Fifth & Pacific narrow its second-quarter loss. Sales were weaker for the company's Juicy Couture and Lucky • Brand merchandise. Fifth & Pacific, formerly known as Liz Claiborne, has sold the weaker parts of its business over the past I few years, such as Claiborne, to cut debt and focus on improving the performance of its remaining brands.

RUDE IL

CenturyLink

52-WK RANGE oCLOSE Y TD 1Y R VO L TICKER LO Hl C LOSE CHG%CHG WK MO OTR %CHG %RTN (Thous)P/E DIV

ALK 32.69 ~ AVA 22,78 — J J A BAC 7 . 4 4 — BBSI 23 64 — BA 6903 ~ CascadeBancorp CACB 4 58 ~ Columbia Bnkg COLB 16.18 On its own Columbia Sporlswear COLM 47.72 ~ WhiteWave Foods expects that its CostcoWholesale COST 93.51 ~ latest earnings will trump its results Craft Brew Alliance BREW 5.62 ~ in the prior-year quarter. FLIR Systems FLIR 18.58 — The company, due to report Hewlett Packard HPQ 11,35 — second-quarter results, makes Home Federal BncpID HOME 9 66 ~ Horizon organic milk and Silk brand Intel Corp INTC 19.23 ~ KEY 7. 81 — foodand beverages. Itwas spun off Keycorp Kroger Co KR 2157 — by Dean Foods in October. Lattice Semi LSCC 3.46 WhiteWave's preliminary results, LPX 11.25 released last month, boasted an 11 LA Pacific MDU Resources MDU 19.59 percent jump in revenue, aided by MENT 13.21 — growth in North America and Europe Mentor Graphics Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 Nike Inc 8 NKE 44.83 — Nordstrom Inc JWN 50.94 I' Nwst Nat Gas NWN 41.01 I OfficeMax Inc OMX 4. 27 ~ O RGANI C PaccarInc PCAR 38 76 ~

58

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose Thursday for the first time this week, snapping its longest losing streak since June. Raw material producers had some of the day's biggest gains after an encouraging report on China's economy raised hopes for stronger demand of metals. A separate report said that fewer U.S. workers applied for unemployment benefits last week than economists expected. The average number of applications over the last four weeks is at its lowest level since November 2007. Thursday's market gain snaps a run of three straight losses, which were caused in part by worries about a pullback in stimulus by the Federal Reserve.

14,000

1 500

NAME

NRG

Cl o s e: 15,498.32

14,500

1,550

Alaska Air Group S 0 N Avista Corp Bank of America Source: FactSet Barrett Business Boeing Co

30

10 DAY S "

9

15,000

est. -0.1 -0.5 4).2

Power company NRG Energy reports its financial results for the second quarter today. The company,which sells power on the wholesale market and to retail customers in some states, has been hurt this year by a long and steep decline in wholesale power prices combined with the warmest winter on record. That contributed to reduced demand for heating across the country.

!

1,600

NYSE NASD

Improved demand?

i

1 0 DA Y S

Vol. (in mil.) 3,189 1,638 Pvs. Volume 2,950 1,628 Advanced 1992 1485 Declined 1058 1018 New Highs 1 54 133 New Lows 95 22

1.1%

I

15 540

Change: 6.57 (0.4%) 1,640 '

+

$20.18

Dow Jones industrials

.. C l ose: 1,397.43

339~

ILVER

$1 31070

S&P 500

Fnday, August 9, 2013

0.3

+

10 YR T NOTE 2.59%

557

1,697.48

YGE

Close:$3.87 %0.23 or 6.3%

The Chinese solar company announced a surge in shipments during the second quarter and fattening profit margins.

$5

Orbitz Worldwide OVVW Close: $12.62 X3.39 or 36.7% Shares of the online travel agency rose to a six-year high after the company reported revenue from hotel bookings is rising. $15 10

M

J J 52-week range

$1.23~

$4.93

Vol.:5.5m (1.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $605.98 m

M

A

J J 52-week range

A

$2.37 ~

$13.23

P E: .. . Vol.:10.1m (8.4x avg.) Yie l d: ... Mkt. Cap:$1.33 b

P E: .. Yield:..

Groupon

Tesla Motors

GRPN Close:$10.60 %1.88 or 21.6% The online deals company named its co-founderas CEO and topped almost everyone's expectations for the

TSLA Close:$1 53.48 %19.25 or 14.3% The electnc car company announced that it paid off a 2010 loan from the Department of Energy nine

second quarter. $12

years early. $200

10

150 100

M

52-week range $2.39~

$11.22

Vol.:91.2m (5.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$6.99 b

P E: .. Yield: ..

Crocs

CROX Close:$13.23 V-0.78 or -5.6% The shoemaker is downgraded by Sterne Agee, which said the departure of some key executives has left a lack of leadership. $18 16 14

J J 52-week range

$23.39 ~

A $133 .33

Vol.:27.2m (2.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$17.74 b

P E: . . . Yield: ...

Costco Wholesale

CO ST

Close:$117.39 V-1.95 or -1.6% The retailer's revenue from established stores rose 4 percent last month, but that fell short of Wall Street estimates. $130 120 110

M

J J 52-week range

A

M

$13.93~

$19.33

$93.31 ~

Vol.:5.2m (3.5x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.21 b

P E: 11 .2 Vol.:2.4m (1.4x avg.) P E: 25 .4 Yield: ... Mkt. Cap:$51.26 b Yiel d : 1. 1%

J J 52-week range

A $129 .20

AP

SOURCE: Sungard

InterestRates

NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG WK MO OTR AGO 3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 5 2-wk T-bill

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.59 percent Thursday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.

. 05 . 07 .10

.04 .07 .10

+0 .0 1 L ... ... V

2-year T-note . 31 .30 +0 . 0 1 V 5-year T-note 1 .36 1 .37 -0.01 W 10-year T-note 2.59 2.60 -0.01 W 30-year T-bond 3.67 3.69 -0.02 W

BONDS

The price of crude oil fell for a fifth straight day on worries that the Federal Reserve may taper its stimulus for the economy. It's the longest losing streak for crude in 2013.

Foreign Exchange The dollar fell against the euro, British pound and other major currencies. The dollar at one point during trading fell to its lowest level

against the euro since June.

h5N4 QG

L

L

-

-

W

~

V W L L

L L L L

.10 .14 .17 .27 .73 1.65 2.75

NET 1YR YEST PVS CHG WK MO OTR AGO

Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.39 3.41 -0.02 Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.12 5.12 . . . Barclays USAggregate 2.36 2.38 -0.02 PRIME FED Barclays US High Yield 6.20 6.18 +0.02 RATE FUNDS MoodysAAACorpldx 4.42 4.47 -0.05 YEST 3.25 .13 Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.54 1.55 -0.01 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Barclays US Corp 3 .24 3.26 -0.02 1 YR AGO3.25 .13

Commodities

-

W L L L L W L W L W W W

L L L L L

L L

2.45 4.25 1 8.4 6 6. 2 3.45 .98 3. 00

CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD Crude Oil (bbl) 103.40 104.37 -0.93 + 12.6 -0.4 Ethanol (gal) 2.18 2.18 +0.09 Heating Oil (gal) 2.96 2.96 -0.23 -2.9 -1.6 Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.30 3.25 $-1.54 Unleaded Gas(gal) 2.86 2.87 - 0.47 + 1 . 6 FUELS

METALS

Gold (oz) Silver (oz) Platinum (oz) Copper (Ib) Palladium (oz) AGRICULTURE

CLOSE PVS. 1310.70 1286.10 20.18 19.50 1491.60 1438.30 3.27 3.18 737.65 722.25

%CH. %YTD +1.91 -21.7 $-3.52 -33.1 $-3.71 -3.1 +2.93 -10.2 + 2.13 + 5 . 0

CLOSE 1.23 1.22

PVS. %CH. %YTD -5.6 1.21 +1.20 1.21 +0.83 -15.1 4.74 4.68 +1.12 -32.2 Corn (bu) Cotton (Ib) 0.89 0.88 +1.04 +18.8 Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 306.10 304.50 +0.53 -18.1 Orange Juice (Ib) 1.38 1.38 -0.04 +19.3 -4.4 Soybeans (bu) 13.56 13.28 +2.11 Wheat(bu) 6.41 6.44 -0.35 -17.6

Cattle (Ib) Coffee (Ib)

1YR. MAJORS CLOSE CHG. %CHG. AGO USD per British Pound 1.5546 +.0051 +.33% 1 .5650 C anadian Dollar 1.0 3 17 —.0104 -1.01% . 9 952 USD per Euro 1.3388 +.0056 +.42% 1 . 2356 Japanese Yen 9 6.52 +. 1 1 + . 11 % 78 . 5 2 Mexican Peso 12. 5 972 —.1437 -1.14% 13.1558 EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLEEAST Israeli Shekel 3.5308 —.0185 —.52% 3.9901 0038 —. 06% 5.8793 Norwegian Krone 5. 91 04 —. South African Rand 9.8162 —.1215 -1.24% 8.0990 6.4930 —. 0245 —. 38% 6.6923 Swedish Krona Swiss Franc .9196 —.0021 —.23% .9723 ASIA/PACIFIC Australian Dollar 1.0965 -.0158 -1.44% . 9 468 Chinese Yuan 6.1255 +.0015 +.02% 6 .3660 Hong Kong Dollar 7.7563 -.0006 -.01% 7.7556 Indian Rupee 60.732 -.493 -.81% 55.415 Singapore Dollar 1.2591 -.0079 -.63% 1.2455 South Korean Won 1108.54 -6.86 -.62% 1129.30 -.11 -.37% 3 0 .00 Taiwan Dollar 29.89


© www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Central Oregon fuel prices Price per gallon for regular unleaded gas and diesel, as posted Thursday at AAA Fuel Price Finder

(aaa.opisnet.comj. GASOLINE • Space Age,20635 Grandview Drive,

Bend............ $3.65 • FredMeyer, 61535 U.S. Highway 97,

Bend ........... $3.72 • Ron's Oil,62980 U.S. Highway 97,

Bend............ $3.75 • FredMeyer, 944 S.W. Ninth St.,

Redmond ....... $3.75 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave.,

Redmond ....... $3.80 • Chevron,1745 N.E. Third St., Bend... $3.80 • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond.... $3.80 • Chevron,2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond ....... $3.80

• Chevron,1095 S.E. Division St., Bend. $3.82 • Chevron,1210 U.S.

Highway 97, Madras ......... $3.86 • Texaco, 178 Fourth St.,

Madras ......... $3.88 • Chevron,398 N.W. Third St.,

Prineville........ $3.88 • Space Age,411W. CascadeAve., Sisters.......... $3.90 • Chevron,1001 Railway, Sisters .. $3.94

DIESEL • Chevron,398 N.W. Third St., Prineville........ $3.76 • Fred Meyer, 61535 U.S. Highway 97,

Bend ........... $3.83 • Chevron,1210 U.S. Highway 97,

Madras ......... $3.86 • Chevron,1001 Railway, Sisters .. $3.90 • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond.... $3.99 The Bulletin

BRIEFING GrOuPonStOCk On the riSe Groupon's stock soared Thursday after the beleaguered online deals company named co-founder Eric Lefkof-

sky permanent CEO and posted stronger-thanexpected revenue for the

second quarter. Groupon Inc. reported a 7 percent increasein quarterly revenue,to $608.7 million, inching past Wall Street's expectations. Lefkofsky,

who is Groupon's largest shareholder, replaces Andrew Mason,whowas fired in February amid

growing concernsabout Groupon's financial and stock performance.

i sers, a ine a By Rachael Rees

a total of six local managers dedicated to specific communities in Central Oregon. Lee said the model of having both regional and local offices is unique. Communities often create competing local organizations instead of working together. But, by having multiple local representatives working under the regional umbrella, he said, efforts won't be duplicated and resources can be shared.

The Bulletin

managers know how to navigate the local way of doing things to create a better job environment for job creation and to help attract and retain existing employers." Rick Allen, city manager of La Pine, said having a dedicated EDCO manager will get La Pine "in the game." "La Pine has probably some of the best industrial land that is developed, ready to go," Allen said. "We have a substation built with electricity in the middle of our industrial park that can supply any high-tech kind of firm ... like call centers and data centers." For the past 20 years, the La Pine Industrial Group has handledeconomic develop-

To help recruit new business and boost growth, both Sisters and La Pine are expected to have their own economic development managers by the end of summer. The city of La Pine contributed $20,000; the city of Sisters contributed $30,000; Deschutes County has chipped in a total of $40,000; and local businesses will pay $15,000 to fund the salaries "When a company is trying and operating expenses of the two part-time positions, said to locate, there are decisions Roger Lee,executive director that need to be made at the of Economic Development for local level. It's harder to have Central Oregon. close working relationships The positions will give with eight mayors and eight EDCO, the regional economic city managers than it is with one," Lee said. "Local EDCO development organization,

os s

in ment and sales at the industrial park but was limited to that area ofcounty land and could only sell to new businesses, he said. The new EDCO manager, who will be based in La Pine City Hall, will have the ability to help La Pine recruit new businesses and expand existing businesses in a much broader geographic area spanning from Sunriver to La Pine, Allen said. Andrew Gorayeb, city manager ofSisters,agreed having a local EDCO manager will be a benefit. "We need focused effort and energy with respect to supporting our existing business community and enhancing it with additional busi-

e inin na ura: om ies Bwsul OvBI 0 l s B B By Nicole Brochu South Florida Sun Sentinel

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — If you've bought Cheddar Goldfish snacks in the past four years, one fed-up Lake Worth, Fla., mom wants to

buildings." — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Profits up, Fannie will

payTreasury II10.2 billion By Clea Benson

LIYESA N T A C R g g

Bloomberg News

"--"- v @

help you get your money back. And her multimilliondollar effort has put South Florida on the forefront of a national debate over genetically modified foods. Disgusted by what her complaint calls false advertising, Palm Beach Countyelementaryschoolteacher Lisa Leo has takenPepperidge Farm to court, accusing the mammoth food manufacturer of mislabeling its popular fish-shaped crackers "natural" when she contends they contain genetically modified soybeans. Her lawsuit, filed June 11 in federalcourtin FortLauderdale, seeks class-action status, new labels and at least $5 million in damages to reimburse Florida consumers who purchased the snack since June 2009, claiming the product violates Florida's Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act. "Consumers have a right to know what they're putting in their bodies," said Joshua Eggnatz, Leo's Weston-based attorney. "You may not think GMOs are bad for you, but others may, and the consumer has a right to know and to choose." Genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, are plant or animal products that have been re-engineered in a lab with the DNA of bacteria, viruses or other plants and animals to increase crop yield or make them heartier, more tolerant of herbicides,and resis-

nesses," Gorayeb said."Sisters is definitely open for business, and we're willing to bend over backwards to accommodate any new business that wants to come to town." Gorayeb said Sisters has a need forbusiness in general: retail, manufacturing and commercial businesses. "I'm not a big believer in whale hunting.... I'm a great believer in diversity," he said. "I'd rather have 10 medium to small-sized business than one giant one that could blow out of town in a heartbeat. "Sisters needs diversity and jobs and lord knows we've got available land and available

' 'fiC "-"'~' T

Carl'toe Jean I SunSentinel

Whole Foods is the first supermarket chain to require its suppliers to put genetically modified organism (GMO) labels on their products, a mandate that must be met by 2018. GMO labeling is in the news after a Florida mom filed a lawsuit against Pepperidge Farm claiming it mislabeled its Goldfish snacks as "natural." tant to insects, drought and other environmental factors. General estimates are that about 90percent ofthe corn, cotton, soybeans and sugar beets grown in the United States are genetically altered, and they are most often used in highly processed foods like crackers and cereals. The FDA has not officially defined what "natural" means in terms of food labels, but its website says the agency "has not objected to the use of the term if the food does not contain added color, artificial flavors, or synthetic substances." Eggnatz said Leo did not want to comment for this story, and he offered few details

about why she filed the action. But according to the complaint, Leo purchased the snacks monthly from three stores in the suburban Boynton Beach area and "paid a premium" for them, believing that the "natural" label meant they contained no GMO ingredients. Pepperidge Farm officials did not return calls for comment. Though the complaint targets one product, it speaks to a growing concern over the long-term health consequences of America's ever-evolving food supply. Recent studies have suggested that re-engineered foods can create new unintended toxins and in-

crease the risk of allergies. But the body of evidence is limited and not considered definitive. Amid the uproar is a national outcry for mandatory food labels in the United States.Congress is considering a bill that would direct the Food and Drug Administration to "clearly label" genetically modified foods. Florida and 14 other states are seeking to require the labels at the state leveL The groundswell of public pressure has persuaded Whole Foods to become the first major supermarket chain to require suppliers add GMO labels to products, setting 2018 as the deadline.

WASHINGTON — Fannie Mae, the mortgage financier seized by U.S. regulators in 2008, will pay the Treasury Department $10.2 billion after reporting a sixth consecutive quarterly profit on continued housing market recovery. The government-sponsored enterprise, which is operating under federal conservatorship, had a net income of $10.1 billion for the three-month period that ended June 30, according to a statement released Thursday. The company's net worth was $13.2 billion, it said in the statement. After its latest payment, the Washington-basedcompany will have sent the Treasury a total of $105 billion, compared with the $117.1 billion of aid the company has received. FreddieMac ofMcLean, Va., which yesterday reported a $5 billion quarterly profit, will have paid about $41 billion after drawing $72 billion. Fannie Mae on Wednesday joined a group of investors that authorized Wells Fargo and Deutsche Bank to seek a court order blocking the city of Richmond, Calif., from

seizing mortgages through eminent domain. The Federal Housing Finance Agency, the U.S. regulator for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, said today it may direct the government-sponsored enterprises to stop doing business with cities that use the power of eminent domain for that purpose.

— From wire reports

DISPATCHES • Dr. RyanReesehas opened EcoWellness Counseling and Consulting LLC in Bend, an alternative practice to indoor counseling, where clients meet in andaround Bend's trailsystems. Reese, anationally certified counselor and approved clinical supervisor, hasalso accepted afaculty position at Oregon State UniversityCascades Campus in the masters of science in counseling program. • Ace's Kustom's and Rod Shop will celebrate its grand opening onSept. 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The new shop is located at 20748 CarmenLoop, No. 120, in Bend. Tolearn more, call 541-639-8144. • Circle of Friends and Art Academy will celebrate its grand opening on Saturdayfrom11 a.m. to 6 p.m., at 19889 Eighth St. The celebration will include food, live music and local artists.

Small companies hiring at higher rate than big ones By Alexandria Baca Btoomberg News

WASHINGTON — Chris Yura says it took about six months before he could afford to hire the first employee for the clothing company he started in June 2009. SustainU Clothing now has 20 work-

ers, about half part-time, with plans to hire three more fulltime staffers by year-end, he said. The company, which sells shirts made from recycled cotton and polyester, is among the small businesses behind much of the job creation in

the U.S. "For the first three years, I knew it would be really tough," because of the general economic climate, said Yura, 32. "People didn't think it was going to work. But for me, all it is is more motivation." Employment at companies

with fewer than 50 workers, such asSustainU, is stronger now than before the last recession, while larger businesses are still lagging behind, according to data from Automatic Data Processing Inc., a manager of employer payrolls. Establishments with less than

10 employees are hiring at a faster clip than before the downturn began in December 2007, Labor Department figures show. Businesses with fewer than 50 employees added 82,000 jobs in July and 85,000 the month before, ADP data show.

BEST OF THE BIZ CALENDAR TODAY • Cricket Trailer Tour: Representatives from the travel trailer company will demo four new Cricket Trailers; registration requested at www. crickettrailer.com; free; 4-7 p.m.; BeaverCoach Sales & Service, 62955 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 800-382-2597. SATURDAY • Cricket Trailer Tour (See above)

TUESDAY • Professional Enrichment Series: Mike Hollern, president of Brooks Resources Corp., and Troy Reinhart, partner with Northwest Quadrant Wealth Management, answer questions; registration required; members $20, or $30 for both August sessions; nonmembers $35, or $45 for both August sessions;

7:30 a.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 54 I-323-1881 or www. bendchamber.org. • Membership 101 — Driving Your Membership: Connecting new members of the Bend Chamber of Commerce with currentmembers; registration required; 10 a.m.; Charles Schwab 8 Co.,777 N.W. Wal l

St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-382-3221, shelley@ bendchamber.org or www.bendchamber.org. WEDNESDAY • Howto Starta Business: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; COCCChandler Building, 1027 N.W.Trenton Ave., Bend; 541-383-7290. THURSDAY • City Club's August

Forum: Former Portland Mayor SamAdams discusses the city as an economic force: what has worked, what has been learned andwhat would have been done differently; register before Aug. 13; $20 for first-time guests and members; $35 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend Center for Health & Learning, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-633-7163 or

www.cityclubco.org. •LunchwithLandWatch: Discussion of Bend's Urban Growth Boundary and otherlandissues; free, BYOL(buy your own lunch); noon-1 p.m.; Zydeco Kitchen and Cocktails, 919 N.W.Bond St., Bend; 541-647-2930, sherryn©centraloregon landwatch.org or www.centraloregonland watch.org/blog/329-lunch -with-landwatch.

FRIDAY • Sunriver and La Pine chambers breakfast: Presentation by Deschutes County, followed by Q 8A; $10; 7:30 a.m., table networking; starts at 7:45 a.m.; ThousandTrails, 17480 S. Century Drive; 541-536-9771.

For the complete calendar, pick up Sunday's Bulletin or visit bendbulletirt comlbizcal


IN THE BACI4: ADVICE 4 ENTERTAINMENT > 50-Plus, D2-3 Parents a Kids, D4 Pets, D4 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

O www.bendbulletin.com/allages

BRIEFING

Enjoy musicat local libraries The Brian Waite Band

will perform at a handful of Central Oregon locations next week during the final events of the Deschutes Public Li-

brary system's summer reading program "Dig Into Reading." The performance will include

comedy, dancing anda sing-along section.

Submitted photo

Zachary Henneous, 8, will

During the shows, the

serve as race marshal for

winners of the Bikes for

the inaugural Run for a Child 5K, to be held Sunday at Riverbend Park in Bend.

Books contest will be

announced. Eachlibrary is giving away two bikes to children 6-11 who read for at least three

Shriners

hours. TheCenter is also donating helmets and offering fittings. The events will be at: • Sisters Public Library, 2:30 p.m.

event

Wednesday. • Highland Magnet School in Bend, 6:30 p.m.

supports hospital

Wednesday. • Lynch Elementary School in Redmond,

11:30 a.m. Thursday. • La Pine Public Library, 2:30 p.m. Thursday. Contact: www

• 5IC, plucookout, s includesfree kids' health screening

.deschuteslibrary.org.

Dating violence too common About1 in 3 people ages14 to 20 in the U.S.

By David Jasper

has experienceddating

The Bulletin

violence and about the

same numberadmit to having committed dating violence, according to new research from the American Psychological Association.

The research was culled from more than 1,000 youths through a

national online survey conductedin 2011 and 2012. The survey

• Already high ratesof hospiceusewill expand asbaby boomers age

defined violence as physical, sexual or psy-

By Mac McLean • The Bulletin

chological/emotional. Rates were similar

ast week, Tom Ryder started a conversation about his mother with five words

across incomelevels,

that would make any human being take note.

race and ethnicity: Forty-

eShe passed away this morning," Ryder said less than six hours after Ma-

one percent of girls reported being victimized

bel Ryder died at Partners in Care's Hospice House in Bend.

and 35 percent reported committing dating vio-

lence. Amongboys, 37

Ryder, 69, credits his ability to calmly discuss the circumstances of his mother's death

percent said they had

been on thereceiving end of dating violence

so soon to the treatment she received from the facility and said there is "no question" he'd

and 29 percent reported committing dating vio-

want the same type of treatment during his final days.

lence. Girls were more

More than 1.6 million Americans were served by a hospice program in 2011, according to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization — more than twice the number of peoplewho used hospice services a decade ago,according to the organization's records. It also represents a nearly tenfold increase in the number of hospice patients since Medicare's hospice benefit was made permanent in 1986 and opened the door for terminally ill seniors to receive end-of-life palliative care at little or no cost if they'd been given less than six months to live. Local and national hospice administrators expect these figures to keep risingover the next 20 to 30 years as baby boomers — those born between 1946 and 1964, a generation that has developed a r eputation for b eing more engaged with its health care — start entering the final stages of their lives. "Boomers are going to want to know more about their o ptions," said Jon Radulovic, spokesman for the NHPCO. "They are educated and I'd like to think they are going to turn to hospice earlier than anybody else."

likely to be victims of

sexual violence but were also more likely than boys to say they had committed physical dating abuse.

Boomers turn to social media Baby boomers and seniors are turning to social network sites such as Facebook in increasing numbers, but have yet to fully embrace Twitter, according to a recent report by the

Pew ResearchCenter's Internet and the American Life Project.

According to the report, 60 percent of Internet users between

the ages of 50 and64 and 40 percent of those 65 or older said they

used a social networking site this spring.

These figures are up considerably from 2009, when only 25 percent of Internet users between

50 and 64 and 13percent of those who were 65 or older reported

using a social networking site. But while more than

half of older adults are using social networking sites, the report found

that only13 percent of online adults between 50and 64, and 5per-

cent of those whowere 65 or older, are using Twitter. — From staff reports

The care Mabel Ryder was 92 and suffering from late-stage Alzheimer's disease when she fell and broke her hip at the end of July. Tom Ryder said the trauma from this injury proved to be too much for his mother to handle in her already frail condition and ultimately led to her death. "When we were at the hospital, the palliative care physicians talked to us about putting her in hospice care," Ryder said. He found an available room for his mother at the Partners in Care Hospice House soon after this conversation. See Hospice/D3

Numberof hospicepatients The number of hospice patients has increased nearly tenfold since Congress madeMedicare's hospice benefit arrangement permanent in1986. It has morethan doubled over the past decade, and many people expect the increase will continue for years. 2M

1.65M 1.56M 1.3M

1.5M

885K 1M

540K 500K

18)~ 246

,'a"a I • 1986 '88 '90 '92 '94 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '09 '10 2011 Source: National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization

Greg Cross / Ttte Bulletin

Hospicecarebythenumders Oregon's hospice care providers served11,437 patients in 2011. Here is

Central Oregon Shrine Club will hold its inaugural Run for a Child 5K at 9 a.m. Sunday at Riverbend Park in Bend. All netproceeds from the event will go to the Shriners Hospital for Children in Portland, which treats orthopedic limitations, burns, spinal cord injuries and cleft lip and palate conditions regardless of the family or patient's ability to pay. The Shriners will also hold a screening clinic for area children who might benefit from treatment at the hospital. "The idea with this run was to generate interest regarding the Shriners, regarding the Shriners Hospital and, more importantly for our local people, regarding the screening chnic. We're trying to get as many kids in as possible " said race director Terry Griffith. Dr. James Hall, of The Center in Bend, will conduct the screenings. Griffith said an average of five Central Oregon children are referred to the hospital yearly through the Shriners' annual screening clinics. However, children may also be referred to the hospital through other doctors or medical centers, Griffith said, and in 2012, Shriners Hospital in Portland treated a total of 117 children from Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties. Honorary race marshal Zachary Henneous, 8, attended a screening in 2004, when he was 4 months old. Born with one leg shorter than the other, he was referred to the hospital. He's since had several surgeries and now wears a prosthetic leg, replaced annually due to his growth. SeeShriners /D4

some information about their treatment: LENGTH OFSERVICE •The averagepatient

PATIENT DEMOGRAPHIGS

received 55 days' worth

• 57 percent of

ofhospice services; • 30 percent received them for aweekor less; • 15 percent received

hospice patients were women and 43percent

them for eight to14

• 15 percent were

days; • 15 percent received them for 15 to 29 days;

and •40 percent received them for more than a month.

of hospice patients

were men. younger than 65; • 15 percent were ages 65 to 74;

• 26 percent were ages 75 to 84; and, • 44 percent were ages 85 or older.

DEATHS • 10,422 hospice patients died in 2011. • 56.7 percent of the patients died at home.

• The top three causes of death were cancer (37.4 percent), heart problems (13 percent) and dementia (11.3 percent). Source. Oregon Hospice Assootatton

If yougo What: Run for a Child 5K run/walk

When:Sunday; all-ages Fez Dash at 8:30 a.m., 5K at 9 a.m. Where:Riverbend Park, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend Gost:Dash, $15;

5K, $25 (T-shirtand barbecueincluded) Contact:shrinersrun forachild@gmail.com or 541-208-4454


D2

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Email information for the Activities Calendar at least 10days before publication to communitylife@bendbulietin.com, or click on "Submit an Event" at www.bendbulletin.com. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

0-PLUS

e' an wic

ACTIVITIES CALENDAR

TODAY BEND KNIT-UP:$2; 10 a.m.noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W.14th St.; 541-728-0050. THE GOLDEN AGECLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; Golden Age Club, 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. BINGO:6 p.m.; American Legion PostNo.44,704 S.W .Eighth St., Redmond; 541-548-5688.

SATURDAY UNITED SENIORCITIZENSOF BEND BINGO:Noon; Bend's Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069.

SUNDAY BINGO:12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post No. 44, 704 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGECLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; Golden Age Club, 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. OREGON OLDTIME FIDDLERS: Dance and listen, circle jam for those interested in playing, all ageswelcome, nonsmoking and alcohol free; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-647-4789.

MONDAY CRIBBAGE CLUB: Newcomers welcome; 6-8:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-317-9022.

TUESDAY LA PINECHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: 8-9 a.m.; Gordy's Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road; 541-771-9177. THE GOLDEN AGECLUB: Canasta; 9:45 a.m.-2 p.m.; Golden Age Club, 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTERS: Classroom D; noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Evangelical Church, 20080 S.W. Pinebrook Blvd., Bend; 541-382-6804. BEND KNIT-UP: 6-8 p.m.; Gossamer The Knitting Place, 550 S.W. Industrial Way; 541-728-0050. HIGH DESERTCORVETTE CLUB: 6 p.m. dinner, 7 p.m. meeting; Izzy's Pizza, 810 S.W.11th St., Redmond; 541-549-6175. PFLAG CENTRALOREGON: Bring a finger food to share; 6:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-317-2334 or www. pflagcentraloregon.org.

WEDNESDAY NEWCOMERS CLUBOF BEND: Hospitality coffee, call for directions; free, registration requested; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend; 541-610-5744. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave.; 541-383-2581. KIWANISCLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave.; 541-548-5935 or www. redmondkiwanis.org. REDMONDAREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Ray's Food Place, 900 S.W. 23rd St.; 541-905-0841. PRIME TIMETOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, 555 N.W. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6929. THE GOLDEN AGECLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; Golden Age Club, 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389- I752. BINGO:6 p.m.; American Legion Post No. 44, 704 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-548-5688.

THURSDAY THE GOLDEN AGECLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; Golden Age Club, 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30-7:45 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E.Bend River Mall Drive, Bend; 541-388-6146, ext. 2011.

enela ion'

• A growing number of peopleareparenting their children alongwith their aging parents, too By Theresa Walker

nothing at home, and I want to do for my husband. He is a wonderful person. We have

The Orange County Register

SANTA ANA, Calif. — Most Americans recognized July as the month when the nation shoots off fireworks and gathers at parades and patriotic ceremonies to celebrate Independence Day. Far fewer probably know that July was also National Sandwich Generation Month, a time to celebrate the growing numbers of men and women — and most are women — handling the dual responsi-

65 years (of marriage) and he always, always has been the same — a very good man. I wish I can get better. I want to come back to my normal life. Maria: My mom has high hopes of getting better. She wants to be able to do the stairs herself, the laundry, the cooking. She's been doing less and less. She doesn't like that because that was always her main purpose and job. She took care of all of us. For me, it's just to see them decline in any way, to see that she walks less. It's more challenging emotionally than it is anything else just knowing that she's in so much pain oftentimes and doesn't feel well and doesn't want to keep going. Sometimes she'll say, "I am done." That's challenging for me to hear, though I can only imagine.

bilities of caring for aging parents while still having children at home. Many also have fulltime or part-time jobs. "I knew that," Maria Zakich of Anaheim, Calif., said with a smile, "because I'm the turkey in between." Zakich, 49, is fairly typical of the sandwich generation. She is helping to care for her parents, Roger and Grace Rousset, 90 and 86, while welcoming home one daughter from college and seeing anotheroffto a four-year university this fall. She also helps out at her husband's company and does some occasional work as a hairstylist. According to a recent survey by Pew Research Center, the adults with children and a living parent age 65 or older who define the sandwich generation are more likely to be: •Middle-aged, between 40 and 59 • Married • H ispanic, r a t h er t h an white or black • Affluent, with an annual householdincome of $100,000 or more. A nd almost h alf o f t h e middle-aged adults — 4 in 10 — say both their parents and their adult children rely on them for emotional support. Zakich's parents are able to still live in their own home in Newport Beach, Calif., partly because one of Zakich's six siblings, brother Paul Rousset, moved from his home in the desert to stay with them. And her otherbrothers and sisters help out when and where they can. Z akich spends a l o t o f hands-on time with her parents. She takes them to doctor appointments, where she often is needed to translate complicated medical i ssues into Spanish, the language her parents grew up speaking in Argentina. She handles their finances. She does her mother's hair. Her in-laws recently moved to asenior center,and she visits her mother-in-law there to do her hair, too. Grace Rousset has difficulty walking, so three afternoons a week Zakich goes with her mother to the Rehabilitation Institute of S o uthern California in Orange, where they exercise together in the pool. M ostly he r m o t her w a l k s in the water and socializes with other adults in the pool, p rompting her h u sband t o joke that she does more talking than walking. Zakich has been providing some level of care to her parents for 10 years, while raising daughters Lauren, 22, and Emily, 18. But she says the past three years have been busier. Being part of the sandwich generation is a juggling act that comes with challenges and rewards. Not just for the caregiver, but also for the aging parent and for the children at home. Zakich, her mother and her oldest daughtereach offered their perspectives on a day last week when they visited the pool at the rehabilitation center. was unexpected'? Q • What Grace Rousset: I didn't expect to be doing this and bothering her so much. Maria Zakich: You're not bothering me . I p ro b ably didn't think this far in advance

/

/

/ /

photos by paul Bersebach/Orange County Register

Maria Zakich, center, poses with her 22-year-old daughter, Lauren, and her mom, Grace Rousset, 86, in Orange, Calif. Zakich is part of a generation that is caring for aging parents as well as children.

W hat's

where I wouldbe and my mom would be. We just do what we do. Like being here with her now, actually doing water therapy, exercising with her as often, you just don't think that that's ever going to be something that you're going to need to do. Lauren Zakich: When I was younger, I needed more help than my grandma didand now it's the other way around. I guess what I least expected was how much care and attention she (hermother) would need for my grandma as opposed to me becoming older and her having more time for herself.

the

• challenging'? QGrace: I c an d o

Zakich laughs with her mom while exercising at the Rehabilitation Institute of Southern California.

awnings, exterior solar screens, shade structures. Sun ehen you eantit, shade ehen you needit.

most al m o s t

A Ii I M I

Auoioaam

hard to watch them get older. I get emotional thinking of how difficult it is for them, too, to lose some control. So I need to be patient that she's frustrated.

& HEARING AID CUNIC

O

www,centraloregonaudiology.com

Ci

N DEM A N D

541-389-9983

Bend• Redmond• P-ville • Burns 541.647.2884

www.shadeondemand.com

What do people of your Q ..own generation need to know? Grace:All my life I thought that what we're supposed to take care of first is the spirit. If you take care of your spirit first, God will give you the natural things to be fine, to be loved. Maria: Our parents are living longer; we're living longer. Be there for them. Do what you can. Just be aware of all the associations out there that are helping the elderly, that are helping us help them. It's so important to be available for the elderly, whether they're your parents or not. Lauren:We should be aware that maybe our parents will need help. They're going to be fully supportive of our generation. I know that as soon as I have children, I'll be helping my kids out and then as soon as my kids are able to go to college or might be in high school with their own car, that I might be using my resources for my mom or my dad.

• 0

Explore your world

eX P I O r e 4

with four extraordinary offers

Receive ALL FOUR OFFERS when you book select 2014 sailings

and December 2013 Holiday cruisesl*

'

*

Q.

How do you see your . role? Grace: I obey. It's the only thing that I can do at this age. Maria: If we allowed her to, she would stay in bed most of the day. But she doesn't fight us. She knows that we're all trying to help her. We've joked about I'm now her parent and she's my child. I need to stay strong myself. I try to take ad-

vantage of being here (in the pool), as well. Keeping myself

I

' I

TheBulletin

I

I

/

I

I

I

I I

s

• Spacious, elegant ships • Gracious, award-winning service • Worldwide itineraries • Sophisticated five-star dining • Extensive activities and enrichment programs Additional amenities available on select voyages

fit and keeping myself healthy in every way. That gives me the strength — because it's

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate • •

Lauren:Probablyseeinghow

much work it is for my mom to have to devote that much time They have their moments, but to them. Now that I'm home she doesn't act out. and seeking a job, I n otice Mom's not around as much in Lauren: I find myself being less reliant on m y p a rents' the house because she's often time and attention and finding driving them to their doctor myself more u nderstanding appointments or taking them of my mom's commitment to to exercise centers. But at least her mom. She apparently did I know that my grandparents a pretty good job of balancing are alive and well. the work effort because I never felt that I didn't get enough See us for retractable attention or enough help.

Contact your travel experts at:

Holland

'/

/

America Line A Si/ r///// / / r e / / f sxcrll/://e/

541.388.3424 800.477.2363 644 NE Greenwood Ave Bend, OR 97701

JOURNEYS P EAK T R A V E L

www.peaktravelgroup.com/specials

'Explore4 available onselect sailings. Alaska Land+SeaJourneys receive Explore4 onthe cruise partion only. Somerestrictions apply. Signature Beverage Packageavailable on select sa/I///gs, appl/es to beverages up to $7per menupnce for avalue of up to $100 per dayper stateroom. Beverage Card applies to select Ca//bbeanand Mexico sail///gs. Free specialty restaurant dinner for the first and second guest per stateroom Guests in ocean//iew a//d above will receive one free dinner per person in the Pinnacle Grill Guests in interior stateroomwill receive onefreedinner per person at Canaletto. ** Taxes andfees are additional. Contact your PeakTravel Groupconsultant for full details. c/ Holland Ame//ca// Lmesh/ps' Reg/stry: The Netherlands. peakTravel Groupcsts2029626-40


5 0-PL U S

COMMENTARY

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • T HE BULLETIN D 3

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY

Leann and Bob Adams' bride and groom figurines on top of their 50-year-old wedding cake.

You've

We in ca een ures come a w it cou e or ea r s long way, ladies

By Rebecca Nappi The Spokesman-Review

In the early 1980s, at a reception at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in W a shington, D.C., I met astronaut Sally Ride, the first U.S. woman in space. She seemed extraordinarily shy, uncomfortable to be the focus of so much attention, and I was glad I was a journalist who could not ask for an

autograph. But I stood in a corner and watched her greet others at the small reception, in complete awe the entire time. In the Apollo space mission days of the 1960s and early '70s, there were no female astronauts, though

my g r ade-school gi rlfriends and I were as nuts about the space program as the boys in our class. And the only memorable women space adventurers in 1960s popular culture? Lieutenant Uhura, the chief communications of f i c er in the original "Star Trek" series. Even though June L ockhart's c haracter i n "Lost in Space" was a biochemist, her role in the serieswas "toprepare meals, tend the garden and help with l i gh t c o n struction, while adding a v oice of compassion," as Wikipedia so accurately put it. Russia had female cosmonauts, but t hey w e re as foreign to us as female d octors, rumored t o b e common i n t h e S o v i et Union. Recently, Anne McClain, who grew up in Spokane, Wash., was tapped to be one of NASA's eight newest astronaut trainees. The 34year-old West Point Academy graduate has degrees in aerospace engineering and in international security. Plus, she's a pilot. In m y g rad e -school years, in the 1960s in Spokane, I did not know one w oman engineer, nor a woman pilot, and though I later learned that six women doctors were in practice here, I never met any of them. My father was a lawyer, but I didn't know any women lawyers, either. In seventh grade, I realized one day that men's lives were so much more interesting than women's lives. They t r aveled for business to big cities, such as Chicago, and they traveled into space, leaving behind wives who placed their lives on hold until the h u sbands r e t urned — from Chicago or from the moon. I wanted to grow up to have a man's life, I said even then, but it seemed impossible in the late 1960s.

We aging baby boomers often marvel at how the technology found only in fiction in our childhood has become reality in our adulthood. The wristwatch walkie-talkies in "Dick Tracy" comics foreshadowed cellphones, for example. We should marvel, too, at how much opened up for women in just half a century. Anne McClain has succeeded in fields where women rarely ventured 50 years ago. She's living what used to be a man's life, but it's a life now open to all

girls who dream big. C ongratulations, A n n e McClain. We space-travelcrazy girls of t h e 1960s waited a long time for you. — Rebecca Nappi writes for and edits the weekly Boomer U sectionin The SpokesmanReview in Spokane, Wash.

in

By Terry Evans

Adamses, who were i ntroduced in Sunday school. Bob F ORT W O R TH , T e x a s says he had his eye on Leann — Bob and L eann A dams every time he w alked into expected the top of their wed- the downtown Leonard Bros. ding cake to be a hard, nasty store, where she worked. lump of black dough. She was a 16-year-old high The last time they had seen s chool student and he w as it was at their wedding recep- a 24-year-old Army veteran tion at North Fort Worth Bap- with a good job. It was 1961. "I was home from the Army tist Church on June 29, 1963. There was just enough cake and working at Preston Geren for the 250 or so guests that Associates as an architect," he day, so the happy couple de- said. "I would go to Leonard cided to save the top tier with Bros.for lunch and right after its tiny bride and groom, love- work. That's where everyone ly little flowers and all, wrap it went back then to hang out. in aluminum foil and put it in She worked in the jewelry dethe freezer. partment right inside the front Over 50 years, the cake has door." been stored in three freezers in Bob caught Leann's eye, three houses and has endured "because he was older, out of occasional defrosting during school and more interesting power outages and unrefriger- than the other boys," she said. ated transportation. After two years of dating, Imagine the couple's shock they wed. when they u n wrapped the Their golden anniversary cake last month and found it was celebrated this year with as beautiful as the day they an Alaskan c r uise. That's wrapped it up a half-century when they decided to check ago. out the 50-year cake. "We were amazed," Leann "We unwrapped it July 1," satd. Leann said. "The icing in t h e m i ddle The frozen cake is just one more happy memory forthe was so hard I couldn't cut it," Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Hospice

"Oregon is sixth in the nation when it comes to using hospice

Continued from 01 Even though she was unresponsive during her stay, care." Ryder said hospice staff mem— Deborah Jaques, Oregon bers talked to his mother and Hospice Association CEO e xplained everything t h ey were doing for her as if she w as mentally p r esent an d could understand. This recog- adding she hopes this means nition and a few other things they will also be using hospice the staff did made it possible services to their full benefit as for Ryder and his family to say well. goodbye "in a very passionate Boomer impact way" before she died on the morning of Aug. 2. When asked about how the "She was in there for so long boomers may impact hospice that by the time she passed care, Jaques discussed the we were able to make peace opposite end of the life-death with it," Ryder said. He said spectrum: t h e mat e r n ity his family received the same ward. "If you look at people our type of reception when his 28-year-old d aughter-in-law age then you see how we've and his 20-year-old daughter changed s o ciety," J a ques previously died under hospice said. She said one of the most care. significant c h anges b oomers made in the medical field The numbers affected how women in their According to the Oregon generation gave birth. Hospice Association, 10,422 Boomer men were some of patients died w h ile r eceiv- the first men to stay with their ing services from one of the wives in the maternity ward state's 31 Medicare-certified when theirchildren were born, hospice providers i n 2 0 11. she continued. They were also Another 812 patients trans- some of the first men to attend ferredout of hospice care are their partners' prenatal care considered to be carry-overs appointments. because they survived into In many respects, Jaques another year. said, it's likely boomers will "Oregon is sixth in the na- want to apply this same level tion when it comes to using of involvement to the circumhospice care," hospice asso- s tances surrounding t h e i r ciation CEO Deborah Jaques deaths and will turn to hossaid, citing one report that pice care because itmakes found 51.7 percent of the t he transition from l i f e t o state's Medicare patients redeath easier and more manceived hospice services at the ageable for them and their time of death. The national families. average is 42.9 percent, she Boomers are also being exadded. posed to hospice care more Jaques likened the state's than anyone else because above-average h o s pice-use their parents are of the genrates with higher rates of phy- eration that has been driving sician orders for life-sustain- the increase in hospice use ing treatment protocols, which that's been seen across the make sure a p erson's final country and make up a mawishes are followed, and with jority of the country's current Oregon's Death with Dignity hospice patients. " Baby b oomers r ea d a law, which gives the terminally ill access to physician- lot," said Becky Bryan, exassisted suicide. ecutive director of Hospice of "(Oregonians are) indepen- Redmond. "They investigate dent thinkers and we make a lot, and b ecause they're value-based decisions," she doing this research for their said, explaining the common parents, they'll be more fathread that links these policies miliar w it h i t ( w hen t h eir with a terminally ill person's time comes) and understand choice to enjoy a calm, peace- its benefits." ful death t h r ough h ospice Because most of Hospice care. of Redmond's services are ofJaques said baby boomers fered in the patient's home, share these c h aracteristics Bryant said, she doesn't have and that's why she's expecting any plans to expand the famore people will be turning to cility over the next 20 to 30 hospicecare over the coming years so it can be ready for decades. this influx of boomers when it "Baby boomers like myself comes. are apt to take more of a conShe does plan to recruit, hire trolling interest in health care and train more staff members just like we have with every- and volunteers over the long thing else," said Jaques, 62, term and is working to create

n ine

bendbulletin.com

Photos by Bob Booth / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Boband Leann Adams, of Fort Worth, Texas, were married on June 29,1963, and the top of their wedding cake has survived ever since. Bob said. "But the cake looked as fresh as if it was baked yesterday." The cake was rewrapped in its original foil wrapper and

put back in the freezer. Neither of the Adamses was tempted to take a taste. "We'll save it for the next 50," Bob said.

cally ones catering to veterans and using alternative treatments like acupuncture — to accommodate this new wave of hospice patients. "We're doing the homework now in terms of what this region might need in terms of beds for h o spice patients," Partners in Care CEO Eric Alexander said. " With t h e evidence of the demand that there is now and what's coming down the pipe, it's safe to say we're definitely going to be expanding."

70 SW Century Dr., Ste. 145 Bend, OR 97702 • 541-322-7337 complementshomeinteriors.com

•r

I

/

I

f• I

'

I

3p(f~~fa H ea ring Center

e ~ os 4@I-' 0, t> Advanced Technology• Best Prices• Personalized Service4 FREE Video EarExam • FREE Hearing Test FREE Hearing Aid Demonstration We Bill Insurances• Workers Compensation• 0% Financing <withapprovedcredit) 541-389-9690• 141 SE 3rd St. • Bend • (Corner of 3rd 8 Davis)

I

I

/

r

==g

=

— Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmcleanClbendbulletin.com

II

SiSlllRi VAEIIi PROMISE

mplements Vtlrrtr,e '3e1 Fer i lra"4

special programs — specifi-

I

lES SCHNIB

I

'

I'

I

I II

/

I

I

r I'

' il

I

r

I

I

r I I

I

i

e I

I

I

'

I

' I l

i

• •

I INSIQE: REDMOND eeayvllaeM sI

L

MAGAZINE

Walk IheAnBat

k g+ CNVRl»t raStlll sallll

RedwwlHolrtrahG de

W HEN TO LOOK FOR IT: pudlishing four editions ayear August 28, November 13

DISCOVER EVERYTHINGTHISCHARMING TOWNHASTOOFFER From itsheritage tothearts, there's somethingfor everyonein Redmond. Four times a year, Redmond Magazine is published to highlight the businesses and individuals who work to build a strong community. The publication features a calendar of community events, personality features and insight into "hidden treasures" around Redmond.

SISTERS M AGAZ I N E WELCOMETOTHECENTRAL OREGON TOWN OFSISTERS

Sisters Magazinehonorsthe uniquenessof this mountaintown. Sisters Magazine is the area's foremost resource for events, activities, artists and businessesthat make up the backbone of this small mountain town. In the coming year, each edition will highlight Sisters' events that draw thousands to the area.

-Ce l

/

(Q P

• ISTRRS CHMSTKkS CVXKXS ItOIJM T G I P l ' GUIOE

Evmrs cuxanaa

'r ...

'++ St~

rslsTEss $TJRRTNIQllls

W HEN TO LOOK FOR IT: pudlishing four editions ayear

August 23 (September in Sisters), November 15 (A Cowboy Christmas)


D4

TH E BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

PARENTS 4 ICIDS ADOPT ME

FAMILY CALENDAR Freeadmission;9 a.m .-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, 7th and B Streets; 541-489-4239. CROOK COUNTYFAIR: The theme CENTRALOREGON OFF-ROAD is"Boots, Chaps 8 Cowboy Hats," RACING: Thesecond of a four-series featuring a talent show, dance performances, live music, bull riding, race of trucks and buggies on a closed-loop course; $12, free for barbecue, kids' zoneandmore; free children 10 andyounger; 10 a.m., admission; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Crook gatesopenat8a.m .;Deschutes County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www. County Fair 8 ExpoCenter, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-410-8119 crookcountyfairgrounds.com. or www.centraloregonracepark.com. SISTERS FARMERSMARKET: CENTRALOREGONSATURDAY 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West MARKET:Featuring arts and Cascade Avenue andAsh Street; crafts from local artisans; free www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking SMART AT THE LIBRARY: Learn lot across from Bend Public what it takes to volunteer to read in Library, Parking Lot, 600 N.W. local elementary schools and create Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. a book-inspired art piece; free; centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. 4-6 p.m.; Crook County Library, COUNTRY FAIR& AR T SHOW: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Featuring a juried artshowand sale, Prineville; 541-355-5601 or www. silent auction, raffles, music, food getsmartoregon.org. and more; proceeds benefit local TWILIGHT CINEMA:Anoutdoor community support agencies; free; screening of "Homeward Bound:The 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Episcopal Church of Incredible Journey" (1993); bring the Transfiguration, 68825 N.Brooks low-profile chair or blanket, your Camp Road, Sisters; 541-549-7087. own picnic, no glass or pets, snacks CROOKCOUNTYFAIR: Thetheme available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver is"Boots, Chaps 8 Cowboy Hats," Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation featuring atalent show, dance Center, 57250Overlook Road;541585-3333 or www.sunriversharc.com. performances, live music, bull riding, barbecue, kids' zoneand more; free admission; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Crook SATURDAY County Fairgrounds, 1280 S.Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www. WINGS AND WHEELS:Features an crookcountyfairgrounds.com. airport open house, fly-in, pancake NORTHWEST CROSSING breakfast, aircraft displays, kids SATURDAYFARMERSMARKET: activities, classic cars, raffle and Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest more; raffle proceeds benefita local charity; free; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Prineville Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; Airport, 3 miles southwest of www.nwxevents.com. Prineville on state Highway126; 541SUMMERCARNIVAL:Featuring Bend 416-0805 or www.617.eaachapter. Circus Center performers, children's org/photos/flyer.png. games, Okule'aOhanaHawaiian PRINEVILLEFARMERS Dancers, food andmore; free MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 admission; 3-6p.m.;C.E.Lovejoy's p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 Brookswood Market, 19530 Amber N.E. Third St.; 541-447-6217 or Meadow Drive, Bend;541-388-1188 prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. or www.celovejoys.com. HIGH DESERT CELTICFESTIVAL AND SCOTTISHHIGHLAND GAMES: Event includes games, dancers, food, SUNDAY storytelling, live music and more; RUN FOR ACHILD: Featuring a Fez $10adults, $7 seniors and students Dash, 5Krun/walkfollowed bya age 6-17, free age 6and younger; 9 barbecue, booths, Shriner go-carts a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & and clowns; freescreening clinic for Expo Center, 3800 S.W.Airport Way, children up to18 for eligibility for care; Redmond; www.hdcs.net. net proceedsbenefit the Shriners MADRASSATURDAYMARKET: Hospitals for Children; $25,registration

requested; 8:30a.m. FezDash, 9a.m. for 5K walk/run; RiverbendPark,799 S.W. ColumbiaSt., Bend;541-2054484 or www.centraloregonshriners. org/run-for-a-child.

TODAY

Shriners Continued from D1 "The Shriners have been able to provide him with the care that maybe he wouldn't have o t herwise r e ceived," Griffith said. Griffith said when the Central Oregon Shrine Club invited Zachary and his family to its May meeting, "I talked to him about the race. And it was prettycute,because he wanted to give me his life savings, because (the race is) for the hospital. It was, like, $200. I told him, 'No, why don't you hold onto it and we'll find something else for you to do.'" Zachary had also hoped to participate in the race. Said Griffith, "When I first talked to him about (the 5K), he said, 'I want to run in it,' and I said, 'Well, sure, that's no problem, you can do that.'" However, since that conversation, "he outgrew his prosthesis, and he decided he can't

MONDAY POP-UP PICNIC:Live music with food and beverages; bring a blanket and canned food for Neighborlmpact; free admission; 57 p.m.;The CosmicDepot,342 N.E. Clay Ave., Bend; 541-385-7478 or www.thecosmicdepot.com.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmond farmersmarket1@hotmail.com. TUESDAYFARMERSMARKET:Free admission; 3-7 p.m.;Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541323-3370 or farmersmarket© brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. SMART ATTHELIBRARY: Learn what it takes to volunteer to read in local elementary schools and create a book-inspired art piece; free; 5-7 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-355-5601 or www.getsmartoregon.org. TWILIGHTCINEMA:Anoutdoor screening of "Cloudy With aChance of Meatballs" (2009); bring low-profile chair or blanket, your own picnic, no glass or pets, snacksavailable; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-585-3333 or www.sunriversharc.com.

WEDNESDAY DIG INTOBRIANWAITEBAND: Featuring musical theatre, imaginative storytelling and a rock concert; free; 2:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 54 I-312-1070. BEND FARMERSMARKET:Free admission; 3-7 p.m.;Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket©gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket.com.

will serve as official race starter, "and as participants come in at the end of the race, he'll be there to high-five them," G riffith said. Zachary w i l l also participate in the awards

Screening What:The Shrine Club

of Central Oregon will hold a screening clinic for children. A doctor will be on hand to look at orthopedic problems, cleft

ceremony. The entry fee for the race is $25. As of Wednesday, there were about 50 runners and walkers signed up. Initially, the Shrine Club had hoped to draw about 200 runners. "That was our pie-in-the-sky guess. If we could get up to 75 to 100, that would be perfect," he said. "This is obviously our first run, and from what my sources have told me, anytime you initially begin a run, if you can break even, you're doing well." Race day will also feature an 8:30 a.m. Fez Dash, open to all ages and abilities, "for people who can't do 3 miles but can do a dash," Griffith said. The entry fee for the dash is $15. Entrants in both races receive a T-shirt and entry to

lips and palates, burns and other childhood conditions to determine eligibility for care at Shriners Hospital

for Children in Portland. No appointment is necessary. When:9-11 a.m. Sunday

Where:Riverbend Park,799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend Contact:shrinersrunfor

achild©gmail.com or 541-208-4454

actually participate," Griffith said. Zachary is expected to be fitted Monday, the day after the race, for his new prosthesis at Shriners Hospital. As race marshal, Zachary

I i

:I I

I

I

:' II

I I I

19530 Amber MeadowDrive, Bend; 541-388-1188 • STORYTIME:All ages; 11a.m. Thursday. 'll

I

'

a

'

' '

175 S.W. MeadowLakesDrive, Prineville; 541-447-7978 • FINALE PARTY: All ages; free pizzafor kids who completed the summerreading program; at Library Park; 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

younger) • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Ages 7-12; treasure hunt; 12:30 p.m.to closeW ednesday. • BACKPACK EXPLORERS:Ages3-4; explore museum's animal habitat, sharestories andsongs;10to11 a m. Thursday; $15 per child nonmembers,$10per child members. • TOTALLYTOUCHABLE TALES:Ages 2-5; storytelling about animals andpeople of theHigh Desert;10:30a.m. Tuesday. I

I

I '

'

I

I

that will keep him active and take him on adventures. He loves treats and does well with cats and other dogs. Ifyou would like to meet Willie or any

other animalavailablefor adoption at theHumaneSociety of Central Oregon, visit 61170 S.E 27th St., Bend. All adoptions

include spayor neuter surgery, a free health exam at a local vet, microchip ID, collar, leash or

Submitted photo

carrying box, ID tag, training DVD and free food. Contact: 541-382-3537.

PETS CALENDAR BEGINNEROBEDIENCE:Basic skills, recall and leash manners; $110125; 6 p.m. Mondays or Tuesdays; BEND PETEXPRESS20TH preregister; call for directions; ANNIVERSARYCELEBRATION: Meredith Gage, 541-318-8459 or Fundraiser/party with local www.pawsitiveexperience.com. animal groups and clinics, OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Six-week, vendors and demonstrations; drop-in classes; $99.95; 4 and 5 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday; 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive and 133 p.m.Mondays,4 and 5 p.m .Fridays, and 12 p.m. Saturdays; Petco,3197 S.W. Century Drive. N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel BEHAVIORADJUSTMENT Jensen at 541-382-0510. TRAINING SEMINAR:Taught OBEDIENCE FORAGILITY: Six by certified instructor; free; 9 a.m.-noon Saturday; donations weeks; $120; 5 p.m. Mondays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 accepted; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling Morris at 541-633-6774 or www. desertsageagility.com. at 541-350-2869. PUPPY101:Socialization, basic DOG TRAININGSEMINAR: skills and playtime for puppies Author Suzanne Clothier; 8- to13-weeks old; $85; four$300; 9 a.m. Sept. 21-22; week class; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Friends for Life Dog Training, preregister; Dancin'Woofs; Kristin 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Kerner at 541-312-3766 or www. Redmond; Dennis Fehling at dancinwoofs.com. 541-350-2869. PUPPY BASIC MANNERSCLASS: Social skills for puppies up to 6 CLASSES months old; $110; seven-week BASIC COMPANIONSHIP:Basic class, cost includes materials; commands and skills; $120; six- 6-7 p.m. Mondays; preregister; week class; 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 or Wednesdays; preregister; S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dancin' Woofs; Kristin Kerner Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 at 541-312-3766 or www. or www.friendsforlifedogtraining. dancinwoofs.com. com.

EVENTS

Heartlaqd Paiqtiqg "Quality Painting Inside and Out"

in advance (see "If you go") or

4

Painting in Central Oregon for over 18 years

the morning of the race. "The more people we have signed up, the more money we can give to the hospital," Griffith said. — Reporter:541-383-0349, djasper@bendbufletin.com

Insured Bonded and Licensed¹156152 18633 Riverwoods Drive Bend, OR97702

Phone: 541-383-2927 EmaiL heartlandtlc@msn.com

Inquire about trading goods for services.

OSU-Cascades takes science out of the lab and into your local pub! No scientiftc background required — just bring your curiosity, sense of humor and appetite for food, drinks and knowledge!

.

0

• •

rowin r ea r a

A Balancing Act on the Vine

es

~

in your glass. How do growers coax a grapevine to develop fruit for optimum performance and produce an award-winning wine? Come learn how the art and science of grape

production is advancing Oregon as a world leader in pinot noir. Patty Skinkis j Associate Professor and Viticulture Extension Specialist, OSU Department of Horticulture; Oregon Wine Research Institute

'

• • J •

62080 DeanSwift Road; 541-330-3760 • TODDLIN' TALES:Ages0-3;9:30a.m.W ednesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE:Ages 3-5; 9:30 a.m. Thursday. • SATURDAY STORIES:All ages; 10a.m. Saturday. I

the post-race barbecue. Runners and walkers can register

energy dog who isseeking someone to provide a lifestyle

'

601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097 • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11:30 a.m. Wednesday and 1:30 p.m. Thursday. • TODDLIN' TALES:Ages18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesdayand10:15 a.m. Wednesday. • PRESCHOOLPARADE:Ages3-5;10:30a.m.Fridayand 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • NOT SORRY FORPARTY ROCKIN'. Ages12-17; 2:30 p.m. Thursday. I

I

241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351 • BABIESAND TODDLERS STORY TIME: 10:10a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOLAND OLDER STORY TIME:Ages 3-5;10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.Tuesday. • SPANISHSTORYTIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. J

I I

"DIG INTOBRIANWAITE BAND": Featuring musical theatre, imaginative storytelling and a rock concert; free; 11:30 a.m.; M.A. Lynch Elementary School, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. "DIG INTOBRIANWAITE BAND": Featuring musical theatre, imaginative storytelling and a rock concert; free; 2:30 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-312-1 090. MUNCH 8 MUSIC:The rock 'n' roll band Igor & Red Elvises performs; with food, arts and crafts booths, children's area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com. TWILIGHT CINEMA:An outdoor screening of "Despicable Me" (2010); bring low-profile chair or blanket, your own picnic, snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541585-3333 or www.sunriversharc. com.

Meet Willie, a 3-year-old Border Collie mix. He is a high-

you may not be aware of the science it took to develop the top-tier grapes

and library youth events

2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242 • ONCE UPON ASTORYTIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday.

THURSDAY

Active dogseeks active owner

While sipping your pinot and appreciating its fragrant bouquet,

STORY TIMES • For the week of Aug. 9-15. Story times are free unless othenvise noted.

MUSIC IN THECANYON: Featuring classic rock with Hangar 52; free; 5:30-8p.m.;American Legion CommunityPark,850 S.W . Rimrock Way, Redmond; www. musicint hecanyon.com. PICNIC IN THEPARK:Featuring freeform Americana with John Shipe; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909 or www. crookcountyfoundation.org/events. "DIG INTO BRIANWAITE BAND": Featuring musical theatre, imaginative storytelling and a rock concert; free; 6:30 p.m.; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-617-7050 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SUNRIVER MUSICFESTIVAL CLASSICALCONCERTII: "Mozart in Motion" featuring all Mozart music; $30-$60, $10 youth; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-593-93 IO, tickets©sunrivermusic.org or www. sunrivermusic.org.

16425 First St.; 541-312-1090 • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • TECH LAB:Ages12-17; 3 p.m. Monday. I

I

I '

I

• •

)

827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054 • BABY STEPS:Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Thursday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE:Ages3-5;1015a.m. and1:30 pm. Wednesday. • TODDLIN'TALES:Ages18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Thursday. • EXPRESSYOURSELF:Ages12-17; teens create journals and videos; 2:30 p.m.Wednesday. s

'

'

'

110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070 • FAMILYFUNSTORYTIME:Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m.Thursday.

59800S. U.S. Highway97, Bend;www.highdesertmuseum. org; 541-382-4754 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 • vn/ess noted, eventsincluded with admission ($15adu/ts, • FAMILY FUNSTORYTIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. $12 ages 65and older, $9 ages5-12, free ages 4and • FAMILYBLOCKPARTY:All ages, Legoparty; 2 p.m. Tuesday.

TUESDAY

McMenamins, Bend

AUG. 20

Full menu and no-host bar.Due to space, attendance limited to100. Doors open at 5:30 P.M. Presentation starts at 6:30 P.M.

5:30 P.M — 7:30 P.M.

Father Luke's Room

i RsYp

OSUcascades.edu facebook.com/osucascades 541-322-3100 Accommodations for disabilities may be made by calling 541-322-3100, preferably one week ahead.

REQUIRED:osucascades.edu/sciencepubs

e

e I '


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

DS

ADVICE 4 E N T ERTAINMENT

ite ueen'aro a rom,wit roses TV SPOTLIGHT "The WhiteQueen" 10tonight, Starz

By David Wiegand San Francisco Chronicle

Renaissancesisters are doin' it for themselves in the new limited series "The White Queen," based on Philippa Gregory's novels about England's War of the Roses in the 15th century. Given that those dynastic battles went on for 30 years,

pitting th e L a ncaster family against the York family for control of the British throne, with those pesky Tudors waiting in the wings to further muck things up, there should be more than enough drama to keep the series lively through its 10-part run, which kicks off today on Starz and moves to its regular time slot Aug. 17. The Wars of the Roses occurred from 1455 to 1485, between descendants of Edward III. Three kings of the Lancast-

er branch of the family, Henry IV, V and VI , occupied the throne first, after which power shifted to the Yorks with the reign of Edward IV. The dramatic heart of the series isn't about the men who sat on the throne — it's about the women who either helped put them there orhelped replace them. "The White Queen" of the title is commoner Elizabeth Woodville (Rebecca Ferguson, "A One-Way Trip to Antibes"),

a beautiful young widow who catches the eye of serial womanizer Edward IV (Max Irons, "The Host"). Unwilling to become just another notch on his bedpost, Elizabeth coyly maneuvers him into marriage. The fact that she is a commoner is reason enough for many in court to be appalled at the union, but what's worse is that her family is aligned with the Lancaster King Henry VI (David Shelley), who has lost his marbles and now his throne.

For both newlyweds, theirs is a love match, but there is dynastic business to be done and that means producing a male heir as soon as possible to solidify the York hold on the throne. Others are alreadyscheming to unseat Edward, including Lady Margaret Beaufort(AmandaHale,"The Crimson Petal and the White"), a half-mad religious zealot who insists God has told her that her young son, Henry Tudor, will be king. She'll stop at nothing to make sure that happens.

PARENTS'GUIDE TO MOVI ES g Iea

This guide, compiled by Orlando Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, is published here every Friday It should be used with the MPAA rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Films rated G, PG or PG-13areincluded, along with R-ratedfilms that may have entertainment or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

"PLANES"

"ELYSIUM"

Rating:PG for some mild action and rude humor. What it's about: The kid attractor factor: It's a Disney film set in Pixar's "Cars" universe — talking, flirting, wisecracking aircraft. Goodlessons/badlessons: You can be more than you were designed to be. Violence:A World War II recreation sequence. Nothing graphic. Language:Disney clean. Sex:A little Latin lover flirtation. Drugs:None. Parents' advisory: A toy commercial aimed at the VERY young. Suitable for all ages.

Rating:R for strong bloody violence and language throughout. What it's about: In the future, the very rich have moved off Earth and restrict access to clean air, nature and health care while the Earth hasbecome a crowded, alm ost unlivable Third World planet. The kid attractor factor:Sci-fi action, stuff blowing up and Matt Damon dressedin an exo-skeleton. Goodlessons/badlessons: Helping others is what gives us our humanity. Violence:Lots of it, and quite graphic. Language:Some profanity. Sex:None.

Drugs:Pot is still smoked100-plus years from now. Parents' advisory:Sci-fi in the "District 9" mold — quite bloody and violent. Suitable for15and older.

"THE SMURFS 2" Rating:PG for some rude humor and action. What it's about:More Smurf visits to the Real World — Paris, this time — to foil the wizard Gargamel's plans to steal Smurf Essence. The kid attractor factor:Smurfs, doing Smurf slapstick, Smurf singing, Smurf punning. Goodlessons/badlessons:"W e rise to the amount of love we

DisneyEnterprises, Inc. via The Associated Press

Dusty, center, voiced by Dane Cook, in a scene from the animated film "Planes." See the full review in today's GO! Magazine. show," "It doesn't matter where you came from; what matters is who you choose to be," and "You never give up on family." Violence:Pratfalls and slapstick, most of it involving a wizard andhis cat. Language:Smurf innuendo, Smurf

jokes. Sex:Smurf flirting, and not much of that. Drugs:None. Parents' advisory:Aimed at very young children. Suitable for all ages.

S m at owers rin eartac e

MOVIE TIMESTODAY

Dear Abby:My father-in-law died two weeks ago. The services were beautiful. Many people sent flowers, but one arrangement — a bouquet of white flowers — arrived anonymously. I didn't think much about it, just that someone wanted to e x press sympathy. My mothDEAR er-in-law sobs over ABBY n ot knowing w h o sent them and — we think — su s pects they came from an old flame. My in-laws were married for more than 50 years, and it is heartbreaking to see her compound her grief with these thoughts. We have suggested various reasons that someone might have sent the flowers anonymously,but she refuses to accept them. Is is my mother-in-law's reaction normal'? — Grieving in Georgetown, Texas Dear Grieving: Your mother-inlaw is grieving and possibly not thinking straight. A card may have been sent with the bouquet that was somehow lost in transit. That she was married to her husband for 50 years and now suspects he was unfaithful because of a bou-

Regal Old Mill Stadium16 8 IMAX,680 S.W.Powerhouse Drive, 541-382-6347 • 2 GUNS(R) 1, 3:45, 7:30, 10:05 • THE CONJURING (R) 1:05, 4:10, 7:45, 10:20 • DESPICABLE ME2 iPGi11:20 a.m., 2:10, 6:20, 9:05 • ELYSIUM(R) I2:25,3:05, 6:35, 9:30 • ELYSIUM IMAX(R) 12:45, 4:05, 7, 9:45 • GROWNUPS 2(PG-I3) 12:35, 3:35, 7:35, 10: I0 • THE HEAT (R) 12: I0, 3, 6:10, 9:20 • PACIFIC RIM(PG-13) 7:10, 10:10 • PERCYJACKSON: SEA OFM ONSTERS lPG)11:45a.m., 2:25, 6:05, 9:15 • PERCYJACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS3-D iPG) I2:05, 2:45, 6:45 • PLANES(PG)11:15 a.m., 1:35, 3:55, 6:25, 9 • PLANES 3-D (PG)11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:35 • RED 2(PG-13) 12:50, 3:30, 7:15, 9:55 • R.I.P.D.(PG-13) IO:25 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG) 11:50a.m., 2:35, 6 • THE SMURFS 23-D (PG)9:10 • TURBO (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:20 • WE'RE THE MILLERS(R) 12:15, 2:55, 6:50, 7:50, 9:35, 10:25 • THE WOLVERINE lPG-13) 11:55a.m., 3:15, 7:20, 10:15 • Accessibility devices are available for some movies.

• There may beanadditional fee for 3-D andIMAXmovies. • Movie times are subject to change after press time. t

quet of flowers is a sad reflection on their marriage. She should discuss this with her spiritual adviser, if she has one, or a grief therapist. Dear Abby:I am in my early 30s andhavebeen married for fiveyears. My husband and I decided to have a baby, and five months ago I found out I was pregnant. When I told my mom the great news, she wasn't happy to hear it. All she cares about is how "fat" I'm going to get. My mother never wants to talk about anything baby-related. If I complain about an ache or pain, she quickly says, "It's because you're fat!" The last time I went to the OB/GYN for a checkup, Mom didn't even ask if everything was OK. All she said was, "How much weight have you gained?" It hurts me so much that she treatsme and her future grandchild this way. I almost feel like having this baby was a mistake. — Almost in Tears in Ohio Dear Almost in Tears: Stop depending so much on your mother's approval and you'll have a happier pregnancy. The person you should talk to about your weight is your

HAPPY BIRTHDAYFORFRIDAY, AUG. 9, 2013:Thisyearyou couldbe more detail oriented than you have been in many years. Others might find you to be fussy. Ifyou aresingle, you could attract someone who is emotionally unavailable. If Stars showthe kind you are attached, of day you'll have th e two of you ** * * * D ynamic could get into ** * * P ositive pe t ty squabbles. ** * A verage You might opt ** S o-so to spend more * Difficult weekendstogether as a couple. VIRGO does not realize it, but he or she often rains on your parade.

ARIES (March 21-April19) ** * * W hateveryou feel and do,you feel and do with agreat amount of intensity. Others clearly understandyour determination, which prevents youfrom being met by any heavy resistance.Useit well. Consider finishing a project thatyou havebeenputting off. Tonight: Outwith afriend.

YOURHOROSCOPE By Jacqueline Bigar

CANCER (June21-July22)

OB/GYN. If your weight is such that it might affect your health or your baby's, you need to know it ASAP. Y our r elationship w it h y o u r mother doesn't appear to be particularly positive. As you grow closer to motherhood, talk more with your girlfriends, talk more to your husband and talk less to your mother. Dear Abby:I don't go to nightclubs often. Sometimes, in th e l adies' room, there is a woman there with toiletries, gum, cosmetics, etc. Before you can get your own, she puts soap in your hand and gives you a paper toweL There is a bowl on the counter for people to leave tips. The club manager says she isn't an employee of the club but simply looking to make tips. My question: Am I supposed to tip her just once for the evening, or each time I use the ladies' room? — Inquisitive Clubber in Florida Dear Clubber: Tip the attendant each time you use the bathroom and she hands you the soap and towel — the standard rate is 50 cents to a dollar. However, if you tip the person generously the first time, you shouldn't feel obligated to do it again if you need to return. — Write to Dear Abby at dearabby.com or P0. Box69440,Los Angeles, CA 90069

how everything seems to tumble into your lap. You know how hard you have worked, and now everything seems to be falling into place. A very assertive friend means well, but he or she can be controlling. Tonight: Whatever knocks your socks off.

** * * * Y ou could be taken aback by a personal matter, and perhaps you might even feel left out. You will funnel your frustration into a form of overindulgence. This escape might work for now, but what about later? Consider sharing your feelings instead. Tonight: Hang out with a pal.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.22-Dec.21)

LEO (July23-Aug. 22)

CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan. 19)

** * You might be ready for a change, but the question remains: Is everyone else? You might want to hold back for a while in order to find a new approach or a different way of thinking. Brainstorm with your buddies and look for more answers. Tonight: Say "yes" to an offer.

I

s

I

'

I

I

8 p.m. on E3, "Undercover Boss" —John Wilson, president and chief operating officer of Orkin parent company Rollins Inc., goes under cover as an employee of the pest-control operati on.As he accompanies workers on calls, he helps clean up a major cockroach infestation and deals with a swarm of bees. Afterward, he has some surprises for his rank-and-file colleagues. 8 p.m. on CW,"Perfect Score" —A pair of new episodes opens with Elizabeth and Gloria, who work together in banking. They have very similar tastes in men and have dated two different sets of twin brothers, so this could be a close one. Bp.m. on DISC,"The Great White Gauntlet" —This new special takes viewers to an area off the coast of South Australia where a rare sea snail called the abalone lives. These animals are worth thousands of dollars on the international market, but since these waters are also home to a feeding ground for white sharks, divers hoping to collect abalone put their lives on the line. 9 p.m. on CW,"America's Next Top Model" —The bad news: The runway that the models have to walk on in this new episode is vertical. The worse news: It's outdoors, and it's raining. The photo shoot has a wedding theme and brings back painful memories for one of the models, who is recently divorced. 9 p.m. on ANPL,"Tanked"When an Applebee's at Coney Island wants a tank that pays homage to the area's famous boardwalk and beach, Wayde and Brett reminisce about their younger days in search of inspiration. Back in Las Vegas, some of the ATM staff members learn they're better at aquarium design than cake decorating when they take on a bakery as a client in the new episode. 9 p.m. on STARZ,"Magic City" — As lke and Ben (Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Danny Huston) await the outcome of the gambling bill, Klein (Matt Ross) mulls Ike's offer involving the Butcher. The end is near for Stevie and Lily lSteven Strait, Jessica Marais). Vera (Olga Kurylenko) is overcome with grief in the new episode. ©Zap2it

srIs'rx'RI&g

t

Regal Pilot Butte 6, 2717N.E.U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-6347 • FRUITVALE STATION(R) 12: I5, 3: I5, 6:15, 8:35 • THEKINGS OF SUMMER (R)12:45,3:45,6:45,8:50 • THELONE RANGER (PG-13)11:30a.m.,2:30,5:30,8:30 • STAR TREK INTODARKNESS(PG-13) Noon,3, 6, 8:45 • THE WAY WAYBACK(PG-13112:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9 • WORLD WAR ( ZPG-13111:45a.m.,2:45,5:45,8:25

.v s»

I~ s D t

I

I

8 I O ", J-lllI j

e i c fetye

2! t

Retire with us Today! 541-312-9690

HIGH DESERT BANK

I

• •

McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W.Bond St., 541-330-8562 • THE BLING RING(R) 9:15 • STAR TREK INTODARKNESS(PG-13) 6 • After7 p.m., shows are 21 andolder only. Youngerthan 21 mayatt endscreeningsbefore 7pm.ifaccompaniedby a legalguardian. • j

I

Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W.Tin PanAlley, 541-241-2271 • BYZANTIUM(Ri 9:15 • FAROUT ISN'T FAR ENOUGH: THE TOMI UNGERER STORY(no MPAArating) 3 • THE WALL (noMPAArating) 5 I

I

Redmond Cinemas,1535 S.W.OdemMedo Road, 54 I -548-8777 • PERCYJACKSON: SEAOF MONSTERS lPG)11:30a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 • PLANES(PG)11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG) Noon, 2:15, Z:00, 6:45, 9 • WE'RE THE MILLERS (R)11:30a.m.,2,4:30,7,9:30

** * * K eep looking at what is happening. Seek out an expert or two to trigger new ideas or to give you feedback. This action will be a powerful alternative when you start to feel overwhelmed. Express your caring, even if the receiver is hostile. Tonight: Out late.

Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court, 541-549-8800 • 2 GUNS(R) 5:45, 8 • ELYSIUM(R) 5:15, 7:45 • PLANES (PG)5, 7:15 • RED 2(PG-13) 7:30 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG)5:15

VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept. 22)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.18)

Madras Cinema5,1101 S.W. U.S. Highway97, 541-475-3505 • 2 GUNS(R) Noon, 2:15, Z00, 7, 920 • ELYSIUM(R) 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40 • PERCYJACKSON: SEAOF MONSTERS (PG)11:50a.m., 4:25, 6:40 • PERCYJACKSON: SEA OFM ONSTERS 3-0iPG)2:10, 9:05 • PLANES(PG)12:50, 2:50, 4:50, 6:50, 9 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG) 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:10, 9:35 •

I II

I •

'

I

L. •

' •

.

SATURDAY

EARMERS

IvIARKET Presentedbythe GarnerGroup

saturdays, June29 - sept. 211loam-zpm NorthWestCrossing Neighborhood Center

I

** * * Y ou would like to see a situation develop in a more positive way; however, you also need to express your feelings. You might have been pushed way beyond what most people can and will tolerate. Share your thoughts in a way that can be heard. Tonight: Treat yourself well.

** * You generally are friendly and ** * * * Y ou tend to spend a lot of outgoing. When anassociate becomes energy on getting whatyou want most. TAURUS (April 20-May20) Start taking action. Afriend or an associate pushy, you might wonder what is going ** * * You might be quite determined to might be far more supportive than you on. Express your concern in a caring have someone hear your version of what thought possible. This person's caring will manner, and you'll get excellent results. is happening. You will do nearly whatever infuse you with optimism. Tonight: Know Know whatyou want from this situation. it takes in order to ensure thatyou are Tonight: Make and return calls. what you want, and then make it so. heard. Communication can be a little PISCES (Feb. 19-March20) LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) sarcastic if you are not careful. Tonight: ** * * You could be taken aback by ** * * M uch is going on behind the Join friends. Make it light and easy. someone's behavior. This person is likely scenes. You will have a strong sense GEMINI (May 21-June20) of what is happening; however, if you to be a new friend who is expressing his ** * You could be overwhelmed by or her caring in a way thatyou might not become too inquisitive, you could cause an unexpecte d andcostly problem;you get. Once you understand where this a problem with someone you look up to. might not be sure which wayyou want to Assume a holding position for the present person is coming from, you just need to go. Check out alternatives, and others will respond. Tonight: Celebrate the weekend! moment. Tonight: Make it an early night. respond well to your inquiries. Listen to 21) feedback, but trustyour judgment. Tonight: SCORPIO (Dct. 23-Nov. ** * * * Y ou might be dumbfounded by You need to let off a little steam. TGIF! © 2013 by King Features Syndicate

TV TODAY

(5

N ORTHWEST CROSSING

www,nwxfarmersmarket.com

• •

Pine Theater, 214 N. Main St., 541-416-1014 • PERCYJACKSON: SEAOF MONSTERS (UPSTAIRS — PG)1,4,7 • PLANES (PG)12:45, 3, 5:10, 7:30 • The upstairsscreeningroom haslimited accessibility. I

• Find a week's worth of movie times plus

film reviews inside today'sGD!Magazine.

a

• -.


D6 TH E BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 A

II JENN-AIR.

'

A

SAMSUNG

Ia Electrolux FRIGIDASIRE SO

N Y . K tt c h a n A A d

Fierr errAFrellker

AMrrS838USH8

tlt L G L 4Jo L F vDU"1884 fdeurrlyne/'

Thermarlr¹r M ~V

/p

UP

ON HllNDREDSDFSCRRTCHI DENT, CEOSEOIITS, OVERSTOCKS,I FEOORNODEES

SHOWN ARE IIIST A FEW... AI.I. WITH FIII.I. FACTORVWARRANTIES •

SAVE s331 -s2301 ¹ 11824451 4

$4 4 8

3.6 CU FT TOP LOAD WASHER ......

598

1 .3 CU FT ELEClRIC DRYER...... . . . . . . .

$998

7 .6 CU FT ELECTRIC DRYER ..... . . . . .

18.9 CU FT TOP FREEXER REFRIGERATOR. ¹ 1173534 37

Black, full width pantry drawer,humidity controlled crispers

2 4" OUTDOOR BEVERAGE CENTER..... . . . ¹ 1004134 56

Stainlesssteel, 2 tempered glassshelves, full auto defrost

I

SAVE S431-S1P201

15 CU FT TOP FREEZER REFRIGERATOR..... ......WAS SS99

White, wire shelves,ADAcompliant

I

/

¹ 2107765 38

Liquid silver, 5 temperaturesettings, steamenhancedcycles

..WASS139NOw $ 598 ¹ 2103791 20

Black, 11 dry cycles, steamrefresh AccuDry™sensor

24" 240V COMPACT WASHER......

1188 26.6 CU FT FRENCH DOOR REFRIGERATOR ......WASS2 599Now $1948 Black, touchscreen control panel, LEDinterior lighting 31 CU FT FRENCH DOOR REFRIGERATOR.. ......WASS429Now 2148 , Stainlesssteel, door-in-door, 4 compartmentcrisper 28 CU FT FRENCH DOOR REFRIGERATOR.. ......WASS3799 Now $ 2298 Stainlesssteel s aciousands lish climatekee ers stem

5.0 CU FT FRONT LOAD WASHER...

......WASS3149 Now $ ¹ 1004197 93

l 21.8 CU FT FRENCH DOOR REFRIGERATOR

......WASS399NOW ¹ 1322195 95

White, counterdepth, internal water dispenser,humidity controlled crisper

¹ 1323189 25

¹ 13242649 3 ¹ 1324211 90

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

III•

I

I

SAVE s181-s1151

..WASS1349 NOW $098 ¹2062752 51

White, 2.2 CU FT, 15 washprograms, touchcontrols

WA»1499.O $ yy 8 ¹206280 323

White, 11 cycles,allergen cycle, built in heater White, 8 cycles, 5temps, stainlessdrum

..WASS1499 NOW $798

5.1 CU FT FRONT LOAD WASHER...

.. WAS S2099Now

X.4 CU FT ELECTRIC DRYER ..........

¹ 2162888 20

..WAS S1999 Now $

8 .0 CU FT ELECTRIC DRYER ..... . . . . .

¹ 2162104 97

White LCD dis la anel steam o tion blue LEDlighting I'

I'

I~I

I

I

II

\

'

I

I

I

SAVE s321-s1911+ ~'~ ..WASS 579 Now $348

3 6» PRO-STYLE HOOD......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

..WASS 549 Now $308

30" SMOOTHTOP COOKTOP..................

P REMIUM DISHWASHER........... .

..WASS1 099Now $598

3 6" PRO-STYLE HOOD......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P REMIUM DISHWASHER.......... . .

..WASS1799 NOW $048

D ELUXE DISHWASHER......... . . . . .

¹230229 470

White, 4 washcycles, steamprewash, 54DBA

D ELUXE DISHWASHER......... . . . . .

¹230231 627

White, 4 washcycles, sanitize rinse, soft fooddisposer

Stainlesssteel, 4 washcycles, hardfooddisposer, 52DBA

¹2304591 74

Black, 5cycle, Extra(lean™sensor, hardfooddisposal

¹23031' 0295

WASS 1799 Now $008

P REMIUM DISHWASHER.......... . .

¹230467 412

l Stainlesssteel,touchcontrols,50DBA,5cycles

..WASS1 199 Now $598

P REMIUM DISHWASHER.......... . .

¹ 2303670 04

Black, 5 wash cycles, 48 DBA,triple filtration system II •

(

I

1 080P BLU RAY PLAYER.......... . . . . . . . .

4 2" PLASMA HDTV ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 0" 1080P 3D PLASMA....... . . . . . . . . . . 600 HZ subfield, slimframe,3Dready

5 5" 1080P LED HDTV......... . . . . . . . . . . . 3D, 120Hz,VIERA® technology for enhancedvisual performance Smart TV,captivating 3D full 1080P,slim design I

I

I

I

I

$1 8

I

l

l I

¹655765 277

I

l I

I'

I

I

I-

' I

-

I

WASSI29Uow

Gy P .

¹405365 556

...WASS329NOw $' ¹40S311 820

White, 1.8 CU FT1100Wsensor cooking, instant on controls

30" OVER-THE-RANGE MICROHOOD....... Black, 1000watts, 10powerlevels, Autocook/reheat/defrost

. .WASS579 o ¹400332 045

Stainlesssteel, 2.0 CUFTcapacity, Accuwave® cookingsystem

¹4004349 02

l+8

$198

NOW 248

...WASS 679 Now $ 398 ¹4400431 720

Stainlesssteel, 2.0 CUFTcapacity, 7 sensorcooking controls

WAS749 NOW $ 448

White, 4.8 CU FT Read -Select™ controls

¹3062311 97

I

II

I'~

•I

I

I '

30" SMOOTHTOP COOKTOP.............

I

..WASS1 599Now $+98

3 0" WARMING DRAWER........ . . . . . . . . .

..WAS S1299

Stainlesssteel, 1.8 CUFTcapacity, auto settings

¹ 6556843 26

White, 3.8 CU FT, Even-Heat™ true convection

I

e

I

A

I

598

Stainlesssteel, 4 heating elements, touch-activated controls

30" SMOOTHTOP COOKTOP.............

¹ 6514479 52

II

..WASS1549 Now $ ¹355493 603

Stainlesssteel, Flex-2-Fit™ elements, Glide-2-Set™touch controls

88 TwIN BEAUTYREsT woRLDcLAss ExTRA FIRM...WASS19 99 Now $ 398 Beautyrest pocketed coils for superior support andconformability OUEEN BEAUTYREsT ELITE PLUsH FIRM......... ..WASS2299Now $ 898 Beautyrest pocketedcoils enhancemotion separation for better sleep OUEEN BEAUTYREsT BLAcK PLUsH................WASS3999 Now $ 1998 »9486697 O Advancedpocketedcoils, knit fabric with Modal yarn for superior comfort oUEEN BEAUTYREsT BLAcK PLUsH................wAss5999 Now $ 2398 Air-cool design,advancedpocketed coils, air cool memoryfoamsfor a great nights' sleep «65'04' 6» It

II'

758 1598

SAVE s451 -s1801

Durable springdesignsupport anddurability

I

I

C OUNTERTOP MICROWAVE ......... . . . . . . . . .

I

OUEEN BEAUTYsLEEP FIRM.......-" " " - " . . . . . ..WASS599NOW Now $

I

¹3474172 41

Black, 0.7CUFT700W,auto cook, defrost, reheat

I

'I 7" MATTRESS PROTECTOR . ..........."" " " ".WASS79 Now ¹699350 450 NOW Premiumprotection from stains for you mattress

'

'I

I

30" FRH-STANDING ELECTRIC RANGE ....

I

WASS2 299Now $

Stainlesssteel, Multimode® convectionsystem, Eventhree™burner feature

..WAS S2099 NOW $1248

SAVE s$1 s3101

I'

3 0" SLIDE IN DUAL FUEL RANGE........ . . . . .

30" OVER-THE-RANGE MICROHOOD.......

¹513337 039

¹ 35545349 9

Stainlesssteel, 1 Customcontrol™dual element, 6" WarmingCenter™element

..WASS S919 Now $898 ¹513140 040

4 6" 3D 1080P LED......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I

30" SMOOTHTOP COOKTOP.................. WASS 129 Now $

30" OVER-THE-RANGE MICROHOOD.......

¹50229201 6

$588

wAss1049 Now $+38 ¹400471 001

Stainlesssteel, microwave/convection cooking, 2 position rack

..WASS1 499NOW $+48

¹5027430 75

720P,600Hzsubfield, slimframe

NOw 4 7 8

WAS S2 499

30" OVER-THE-RANGE MICROHOOD.........

C OUNTERTOP MICROWAVE .......... . . . . . . . . .

¹S52820 827

1080P 3DBlu Raysystem, 1000watts, wirelessinternet connectivity

¹355347 571 ¹288410 447

78 ..WASS 349 Now $ 1y8 ..WASS 549 Now $ 358 ¹S32691 272

5

Stainless steel, 600CFMinternal blower,hiddencontrol panel

SAVE s51 -s3$1 ..WASS149NOW $

5 .1 HOME THEATER SYSTEM ......... . . . .

¹208479 504

Black, 3 Quickstart™ radiant elements, 1CustomChoice™dual element

I

SAVE s11 -s1QQ1

WASS 1499Now $ NOW 398

Stainlesssteel, halogen lighting, variable speedcontrols

I

1080P for ultimate picturedetail, internet connectivity

898 998

¹2062946 29

White, 1300 rpm spinspeed, sanitize cycle, steamoption

'I

I

¹2002388 89

..WASS134NOW $ 498

15ys

30 CU FT SIDE-BY-SIDE REFRIGERATOR ... Stainlesssteel, 8" LCDdisplay panel, dual evaporators

..WASS S49 Now $418

White, stainlesstub, handwashcycle, 30 minsoakcycle

¹ 3554804 42

$848

¹3654759 80

2'1" SINGLE ELECTRIC WALL OVEN. .

.

.

.

.

.

WASS 2499Now $898 ¹ 3602130 32

Stainlesssteel, 600 CFMexhaust rating, top and rear venting

..WASS 2449Now $1O88

30" FULL INDUCTION COOKTOP ........

.. WAS S2349 NOW

36" WALL MOUNT RANGE HOOD .......

¹2884104 47

¹ 3574134 59

Black, PerfectSet™touchcontrols, hot surfaceindicator lights I

I I

I '

I I I

II

1388

I' I

5

WiLW

Simmon s

>

'

BEND 63736 PARAMOUNT DR• 541-388-0088 Mon-Sat 9-7 • Sun10-5 All prices 8offersvalid08/09/13 08/18/13unl@totherwisestated.Aliterrs availablefor 9ur<lwse,mayUIlwu dis9byatollstores,rr6mayhaveUu priorIo r6rundale.P irIrres arefor 8lustrave Iurpmesonlyan6arenottoIwemi6ere6prerrr re9resenta6ors Aloeewlimitedtostrk onhand,oneIehousehold.Oneofr kinditem, UdealersSavingsarefromouur everydayIow9ri<eIrgs,MSRPorother90wvalu6rnwlrrhmryreIhaveresule61nsales, IntheevenI of aretumof apro6uvIhae pro6uv)soldwithafreepromotiox6item,theoriginal, retail valueofthefreeitemorgift cardwil lwdeductedfrom0wetumofMlee pro6u0 I 0wfreeitemI notolsoreturnedunopened. Srestorefor<ompleteIUI of 6MII en6reslrtfensonall offers.

..


ON PAGES 3R4.COMICS & PUZZLES M The Bulletin

Create or find Classifieds at www.bendbulletin.com To place an ad call 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 205

Items for Free

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

208

212

Pets & Supplies

Antiques & Collectibles

FREE DeLaval Milker Donate deposit bottles/ Jack Russell/Lab mix Part-time dog walker, Vacuum pump No. 75 cans to local all volpuppy. m a le , 11 wanted, mornings, 17/s-2 HP, mounted on unteer, non-profit res- weeks old. $65 please in Cascade area. metal frame with H3/4 cue, to h elp w /cat call (541) 233-6872 or 541-317-5590. HP Dayton capacitor spay/neuter vet bills. email POODLE Toypups & motor, switch 8 cord. Cans for Cats trailer kayla.millard I hdesd. teens. Also,POMAPOOS OI'g Works. 541-383-8820. at Ray's Foods on Call 541-475-3889 Century Dr. Donate KITTENS! Fo s t ered, Stainless steel double Mon-Fri at Smith Sign, friendly, fixed, shots, QueenslandHeelers I Want to Buy or Rent sink w/disposal hook-up, 1515 NE 2nd; or at FREE! 541-548-4667 chip, more! Vari- Standard 8 Mini, $150 CRAFT i n T u m alo ID & up. 541-280-1537 ety of colors & perWanted: $Cash paid for anytime. 3 8 9 -8420. sonalities. Adopt from www.rightwayranch.wor vintage costume jew- Stepper, adjustable re- www.craftcats.org dpress.com easy to m ove, foster home - see elry. Top dollar paid for sistance, Gold/Silver.l buy by the needs hydraulic fluid, TomTom Motel Mgr, Wolf-Husky pups, $400. DO YOU HAVE Estate, Honest Artist Free! 541-388-9270 across from SonicOnly 4; reserve now! SOMETHING TO Elizabeth,541-633-7006 Sat. & Sun. 1-5 PM. 541-977-7019 VGA computer monitor SELL Just $25/kitten; adopt with cables 8 software. FOR $500 OR 2 for $40! 389-8420. Free! 541-280-4925 LESS? www.craftcats.org. Holiday Bazaar Non-commercial 208 & Craft Shows advertisers may Lab Pups, AKC, Black Pets & Supplies place an ad with $600. Call Steve @ oui' THIS SATURDAY 8/10: (541) 680-0009. Bengal purebred pa"QUICK CASH cabincreekgundogs.com Yorkie pups AKC, tiny, 1st Annual C.O. Sat. p ered male 6 m o . , health guar, Mkt. Classic Car Show! SPECIAL" Lab Pups AKC,black & short-nosed, neutered, shots, $500. 1 week 3 lines 12 UTD shots.541-777-7743 Vote for your favorite! yellow, Master Hunter Also kids can build their 503-860-8974. or 2 ~eaka 2 0 l sired, performance pedi210 own truck or planter at Ad must include gree, OFA cert hips & el- Furniture & Appliances B oxer, beautiful fawn AKC Home Depot's booth! price of single item bows, 541-771-2330 puppy, all shots, And, we now have Fresh male of $500 or less, or www.kinnamanreirievers.com $700. 541-325-3376 Producevendors, multiple items 5-pc. brown sectional, Labrador purebred pup- good shape, paid $1699 starting this week! whose total does pies, black, both females Plus, visit Healthy new; sell for $500 obo. notexceed $500. 8 males, ready now! 541-548-7126 Beginnings' Booth -a/l $200. 541-771-5511 across from the library, Call Classifieds at downtown Bend this 541-385-5809 Lovebird babies, hand- A1 Washers&Dryers Sat.! 541-420-9015 www.bendbulletin.com $150 ea. Full warIjt////¹f . ,/ fed, sweet, ready in 1-2 Chihuahua puppies, teaweeks. $60 each; taking ranty. Free Del. Also wanted, used W/D's cup, shots & dewormed, German Shepherds AKC deposits. 541-279-3578 541-280-7355 $250. 541-420-4403 I It e ms for Free www.sherman-ranch.us Maltese AKC champion 541-281-6829 b loodlines 7 wks , DAYBED, mattress 32" Mintek LCD wide Chihuahuas miniature $600. 541-420-1577 1M, 1F white w/tan screen'HDTV as is, sets, $75.

I

FREE. 541-388-9270

4I

541-408-7858

Bengal pure b red,CHIHUAHUA, very champion line female, f riendly 10 mo . o l d retiring from breeding, male, tri-colored, curGreat Danes Adoption fee is price rent on vaccines exAKC Blue 3/4 Euro to spay her. cept rabies. Free. Ap- 2 Males 2 Females left 503-860-8974 plicants wi l l be $1,500 (541)306 8391 interviewed to help in- Irish Wolfhound/Great Fallen apples, from our sure he goes to the D ane, 7 wks, 3 f e tree, Gravenstein, right home. male, XL, $ 500/ea. FREE! 541-548-2879 541-410-8783. 541-390-2830

I.

Mixed: Maltese/Chihuahua, 2 males born 2009. Also 1 female AKC Yorkshire Terrier, born 2007. All are small dogs. No A.M. calls, please! 541-350-5016

280

Estate Sales

ESTATE, FARM and GARAGE SALE!! Furniture, household items, horse tack, camping equipment and MUCH, MUCH MORE!! Sat and Sun 8:00 - 4:00. Off the Old Bend-Redmond Hwy. at 20521 Pohaku Road ... look for the big red barn!! 541-389-2239 HUGE ESTATE SALE! 21555 Modoc Ln, Bend

Furn, clothing & more! Fri. 8/9, 11am-6pm Sat. 8/10, 8am-4pm Sun. 8/11, 8am-2pm Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809 Look What I Found! You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains! Call Classifieds: 541-385-5809 or

email

classified@beodbullefio.com

PEDDLERS MARKET Aug. 10, 8-3, Tumalo Feed Co., hwy 20. Antiques, crafts, vintage, produce, more! 541-306-8016 copeddiersmarket©gma il.com

Estate Sales THE ALLEY OUTDOOR MARKET

Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend

Sat. Aug. 10th • 8 'til 3 Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 19th ANNUAL Sat. 10-6 pm. Alley of No early sales BOONESBOROUGH 2nd S t . bet w een 63615 Hughes Road, Neighborhood Sale. F ranklin 8 Gre e n- Tools, f i s hing gear, 20+ homes. Follow w ood. I n F r ont o f welding equip, housesigns on Deschutes Fabulous Finds Bou- hold items, furniture, Mkt. Rd. to Dale Rd. tique, Music, jewelry, b lack d i n in g se t , 290 furniture, rustic, vin- swing rocker, tables, tage.... 541-385-8921 recliner, yard tools 8 Sales Redmond Area garden tractor, patio furniture, dog crates, Estate/Yard Sale; Sales Northwest Bend serger, sewing maFri -Sat 8-3 chine, ceramic molds No Early Sales! Downsizing Sale! Tools, Furn. 8 more (over 100 sell as lot), Fri-Sun, 1436 NW Wil2016 NW Ivy Place doll molds, will sell liam Clark St, NWX (fol- separately, clothing, low bright colored signs). 50" TV, toys; Motor- Garage Sale! RV Parts, collectibles, dolls, clothSee craigslist for info. home, 440 Dodge en- ing, household items, Ig gine good, interior is lawnmower, etc. Fri-Sat GARAGE SALE Great selection of items not); 1987 4x4 Ford 8-4, 2348 SW 26th St. Bronco, 75k mi.Silent in excellent condition! Large Garage Sale! Fri & 8am-12 noon Sat. only, bids on some items. 310 NW Greyhawk Ave. Sat., 9-4, 850 NW 49th St. Furniture, pictures, 284 ** FREE ** glassware, utensils, & lots more; no clothes. Sales Southwest Bend Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Big Garage Sale! Fri-Sat, Bulletin for your gaRedmond 8am-2pm, DRW, 19399 rage sale and reAntique Mall I ndian S ummer R d . ceive a Garage Sale Is celebrating the Camping, tools, Coca Kit FREE! opening of it's newCola items, HO trains, est location at 535 h ousehold, SKS, A R KIT INCLUDES: SW S ixth S t r eet, mags & LOTS more! • 4 Garage Sale Signs (formerly Twin's JJ) • $2.00 Off Coupon To Garage Sale! Lots of Sat. Aug. 10th Use Toward Your furniture & misc. 1 to 5 p.m. Ad Fri-Sat, 8-2, 1106 SW •Next 10 Tips For "Garage Food and drinks proEllenhurst Place. Sale Success!" vided, live m u sic, Moving Sale! Tools, drawing for $100 gift appliances, furniture, certificate, i n -store PICK UP YOUR motorcycle, cars 8 specials, on-site anGARAGE SAIE KIT at more!! Fri-Sat-Sun, 8-4, tique I n d entifying. 1777 SW Chandler 60267 Cinder Butte Rd. P lease come s e e Ave., Bend, OR 97702 how a 1922 theatre Tools, guns, f i shing c ame t o l i f e a s e quip., some a n - The Bulletin Redmond's Newest tiques, furn., new tub Antique Mall! 8 shower, plus size clothes, and m o re.G.-SALE BONANZA! Fri/Sat. 8-5. 1 9 233 Sunrise t o su n s et St. Thomas Altar Shoshone Rd., DRW Society Annual Fri.-Sat.-Sun. F r e e Rummage Sale. world flag poster! 286 Parish Center Gym. 1935 NE Lotus Dr., Sales Northeast Bend 19th & Maple, 541-965-0663.

Deals! Shop Sale Fri., 8/9, & Sat. 8/10, 63330 N Hwy 97, next to U-Haul.

Jacque Renshaw

ESTATE SALE 60814 SCOTTS BLUFF DR. Bend Friday, August 9 • Saturday, August 10 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Crowd control admittance numbers issued at8:00 a.m. (Take BROOKSWOOD SOUTH TO AMBER MEADOW DRIVE — TURN WEST AND FOLLOW TO SCOTTS BLUFF DR.)

ESTATE SALE Fri. &

Fri. 8/09 9-3,

Sat. 08/10 9-12, Huge Moving Sale! Fri-Sat-Sun, 9-6, $1 Bag Sale (Sat. only) 23340 Bear Creek Rd. Guns, reloading, tools, all household goods. Sales Other Areas~ See craigslist under "Bear Creek Sale" Garage Sale Sat 8/1 0 thru Sun 8/11, 9-5, 25550 Huge Moving& Walker Rd (Alfalfa area). Storage Sale! 541-390-7778 UnbelievFri. 8 Sat. 8-4. able! Prices are flexible. 62988 Layton. Antiques, king bed, & North La Pine dressers, furniture, Garage Sale! tables, art/pictures, steSaturday August 10, reos, ski equip., new de9:00 a.m. to 4:00 pm signer cowboy boots, Sale features building restaurant dishes/glasstools, yard tools, ware, credenzas, tools 8 housewares, furniture, building materials, camping equipment, No Early Admittance. books, hunting suppliesand many home MOVING SALE S at. decor items. 8 /10, 7 - 1 . 63 1 3 9 15135 West Drive, Brookstone Lane. La Pine, OR A Lot of Everything! (503)730-3367

Antique Victorian chest w/marble top; Great king size bed w/oak frame; Oak dining table and 6 chairs and two leaves; Two Drexel chairs; Cherrywood endtables and coffee table;Oak bookcases; Cherry wood oriental-style chest; Wool Carved Oriental-style rug from 8' by 10' size to round throw rug-There are 14 rugs in total, all like new; Unique oak desk with folding top; Antique mirror; Three closets full of ladies clothing brands Chico-Coldwater Creek-Norm Thompson, etc., large, shoes 8.5. Flamingo with outfits; Baskets; 72-piece set of Denby stoneware; Large set of Dansk white dishes; Pots and pans * ESTATE/MOVING SALE! * and small electrical appliances; Hundreds of Beautiful home, immaculate near-new things! Christmas items from Hallmark; Upright freezer; Custom distressed oak dining set with 8 ebony King size feather bed topper; Cookbooks and Windsor chairs, side chair, teak armoire & other books; Corning and Lacruset cookware; dresser, Amish corner cabinet, small furn. Two oak end tables; CDs and DVDs; Sunflower pieces, Sony large screen TV, electronics, chair made with tiles; Two Rubbermaid storage bakers rack, lots of lodge -style decor, artwork, cabinets; Large white storage cabinet; Plastic kitchenware, beautiful antique china a nd and gorilla racks; Two sets of ladies golf clubs; glassware, silver, linens, jewelry, Toro recyBosch Tassimo coffee maker; Two Howard cler mower, Weber BBQ, bikes, chop saw, Miller Wall clocks; Two black metal bar stools; hand and power tools, wet/dry vac, yard and Oreck vacuum; Plastic ware and lots of coated outdoor, clothing, much more! metal storage units; Cleaning supplies; Plant Take Brookswood to River Rim Dr., 3rd left stands and planters; Lots of kitchen gadgets on Sugar Mill Loop to 19455 and tools; More and More!!!! Fri-Sat 9-4, numbers Fri. 8a.m.

Handled byDeedy's Estate Sales Co. LLC 541 -41 9-4742 days • 54/ -382-5950 eves vvvvvv. deeedysestatesafes.com

Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

TV, Stereo 8 Video

Medical Equipmen

Lost & Found

SAVE on Cable TV-In- Ambulalarm method for ternet-Digital Phone- fall prevention. Alarm Satellite. You've Got will sound automatiA C hoice! O ptions cally when p e rson $60. 541-388-9270 from ALL major sermoves toward standThe Bulletin reserves vice providers. Call us i ng, k n eeling, o r the right to publish all to learn more! CALL crawling pos i tion, Lost: Tan/White ads from The Bulletin Today. 888-757-5943. summoning immedi- ChihuahuaFriday night newspaper onto The (PNDC) ate assistance. Never (8/2) in Crooked River Bulletin Internet webused. $150.00 OBO Ranch near Ermine Rd. site. 5 41-408-5092 cio - Male, 8 years old, about 7 lbs. $500reward, no • Computers ciekelly©yahoo.com questions asked. for photos. genlng Central Oregon onre 7203 Call 503-805-3833. T HE B U L LETIN r e Alert for SeVintage Japanese glass quires computer ad- Medical - 24/7 monitor- Just bought a new boat? floats, asst. sizes, $20 vertisers with multiple niors ing. FREE Equipment. Sell your old one in the & up. 541-388-9270 ad schedules orthose FREE Shipping. Na- classifieds! Ask about our Seller rates! selling multiple systionwide Ser v i ce. Super 240 541-385-5809 tems/ software, to dis$ 29.95/Month C A LL Crafts & Hobbies close the name of the Medical Guardian To- L ost w o men's p i n k business or the term 85 5 - 345-7286. heather f r on t zip A L arge n umber o f "dealer" in their ads. day fleece, along r i ver Stampin' Up s t amp Private party advertis- (PNDC) t rail, n e a r Ar c h ie sets and accessories. ers are defined as Briggs. Call most l i ghtly u s e d, those who sell one 541-419-7368 Commercial/Office some new and a few computer. Equipment & Fixtures p urchased use d . Jim Beam 1970s collector bottle in original case,

The Bulletin

541-678-8878

Commercial s t ainless Ifyou s teel 30x30 x 30 REMEMBER: have lost an animal, Open Jury cooler, pre v iously don't forget to check Sat., Aug. 17, 9:30 a.m. 2 burial plots, sect C ¹945 used b y b e v erage The Humane Society &946 Redmond Memorial, Highland Baptist distributor. Also $500 each. 509-630-8348 Bend Church, Redmond. smaller cooler avail541-382-3537 Tina 541-447-1640 or Advertise V A CATION able. 541-749-0724. Redmond www.snowflakebouflque.org SPECIALS to 3 m i l541-923-0882 lion P acific N o rth241 nl westerners! 29 daily Tools 541-447-7170; Bicycles & newspapers, six or Craft Cats Accessories states. 25-word clas10' contractors ladder 541-389-8420. sified $540 for a 3-day rack for a pickup, has 6' Ca l l Electra Cruiser b i k e, a d. (916) toolboxes each side, vis i t $475. 541-416-9686 very gd cond., asking 2 88-6019 o r www.pnna.com for the 10' roller panels for feed$150. 541-420-4624 541-317-5590 Pacific Nor t hwest cut-off saws /moving 245 Daily Con n ection.ing heavy objects. Rollers 8" (PNDC) Golf Equipment long; spacing 5 4/2".15 O $20 ea. 541-416-9686 Bend Indoor Swap CHECK YOUR AD Meet - A Mini-Mall full 20' alum. e xtension 4 of Unique Treasures! l adder. Wern e r . 3rd St. & Wilson Ave. $75503-860-8974 o 10-5 Thurs-Fri-Sat. Dining table 42 nx58 Generac 5000W geno n Farm Equipment (42 x94 with three Buying Diamonds erator, new! Tecumseh 12 n leaf extensions), & Machinery /Gold for Cash 10hp engine, 5 gal fuel on the first day it runs 4 straight back & 2 Saxon's Fine Jewelers tank, 120/240V plug-ins, to make sure it is corarm chairs. 25+ yr. 541-389-6655 m anual, $ 35 0 ob o . rect. nSpellcheckn and old set has had but 2 541-480-7024, anytime. human errors do ocBUYING owners. cur. If this happens to Lionel/American Flyer Asking $185 obo your ad, please contrains, accessories. 25-ft 3 axle pintle 541-419-5060 Building Materialsg tact us ASAP so that 541-408-2191. hitch trailer, corrections and any $2500. Dryer, Frigidaire Gallery BUYING & SE L LING 500 Used Red Bricks adjustments can be $200 for all. HD, stackable, exlnt, Call 541-480-8009 All gold jewelry, silver made to your ad. 541-388-8198 $150. 541-549-6036 and gold coins, bars, 541-385-5809 rounds, wedding sets, La Pine Habitat Dryer, LG, elec., white, The Bulletin Classified class rings, sterling silRESTORE exc. c o nd., c l ean, Hay, Grain & Feed 246 ver, coin collect, vin- Building Supply Resale tage watches, dental Guns, Hunting Quality at 1st quality grass hay, gold. Bill Fl e ming, GENERATE S OM E LOW PRICES & Fishing 70-lb. bales, barn stored, 541-382-9419. EXCITEMENT in your 52684 Hwy 97 $250/ton. 750-Ib bales, neighborhood! Plan a Bend local pays CASH!! GENERATE SOME 541-536-3234 $240/ton. Patterson Ranch garage sale and don't EXCITEMENT Open to the public . for all firearms 8 Sisters, 541-549-3831 forget to advertise in IN YOUR ammo. 541-526-0617 Prineville Habitat Barn stored 2 string 100 classified! NEIGBORHOOD. lb. orchard grass, 541-385-5809. CASH!! Plan a garage sale and BuildingReStore Supply Resale clover mix, exc. horse For Guns, Ammo 8 don't forget to adver1427 NW Murphy Ct. feed. $220/ton. Reloading Supplies. tise in classified! 541-447-6934 541-408-6900. Delivery available. 541-385-5809. Open to the public. 541-350-8515 or Competition series XDm GET FREE OF CREDIT 541-447-4815 267 Springfield Armory 40 CARD DEBT NOW! 7/4n SBW, 5 match bbl, adj Cut payments by up Grass hay, e x cellent Fuel & Wood sights, 3 16-rd mags, un- to q uality, $ 20 0 to n . High Quality King half. Stop creditors fired, $750. 503-789-3971 541-788-4539 Bedroom Set with from calling. All Year Dependable Storage - 1 yr old, in C Sharp 1874 45/70, 866-775-9621. Firewood: Seasoned FIND IT! PERFECT condition! Lodgepole, Split, Del. (PNDC) REM model 8 3030, BUY /7' Beautiful medium oak BRWG Bar300 WIN, Bend: 1 for $175 or 2 SELL ITr hardwood bedframe How to avoid scam for $335. Cash, Check Citori OU 20 ga., MAR with storage drawers, 3 08 MX, W B Y l e f t and fraud attempts or Credit Card OK. The Bulletin Classifieds 541-420-3484. king pillow-top math and 2 7 0 , CO L T YBe aware of internaHay tarps, G.l. 35 oz tress, 2 night stands, tional fraud. Deal lo- Seasoned Juniper fire- treated canvas, 20' x 40', Trooper 357, 1911 US 2 lamps, 1 5-drawer Army, Automag CL 44 cally whenever posw ood d elivered i n $200 ea. 541-480-8009 dresser, 1 dresser+ sible. Glock 26 9mm. C entral Ore . $ 1 7 5 mirror, ALL for only Tmag, ORCHARD GRASS aurus 85 3 8 S P L , Y Watch for buyers cord. 541-419-9859 1st cutting, no rain, $3000. 541-410-1010 Barretta Silver Hawk who offer more than Young man willing to split $205/ton; or $200/ton SXS 12 ga. your asking price and /stack firewood. Wage for 15 ton. Powell Leather couch 8 otH & H Firearms 8 Tack who ask to have negotiable. 541-419-6651 Butte, 541-350-3164 toman, dark brown, 541-382-9352 money wired or $ 450, large g o l d handed back to them. Kimber 1911 carry framed mirror, $50, Fake cashier checks Looking for your Gardening Supplieg package, $850. make o f f e r on and money orders next employee? 541-610-3287 8 Equipment dresser with n ight are common. Place a Bulletin stand. VNever give out perhelp wanted ad M auser M odelo A r 541-389-8813. sonal financial infortoday and entino 1891, 7.65mm BarkTurfSoil.com mation. 150. 541-948-3382 reach over YTrust your instincts Mattress queen, 60,000 readers PROMPT D E LIVERY excellent cond, $75. Mossberg 3-06 b o lt, and be wary of each week. Leupold 3x9x40, sling, 541-389-9663 someone using an 541-549-0805 Your classified ad bi-pod, ammo, sleeve escrow service or will also $475. 334-477-2354 agent to pick up your appear on For newspaper merchandise. S &W 9mm auto, ¹6906, bendbulletin.com delivery, call the stainless, extra clip, 6 which currently Circulation Dept. at boxes ammo, $650 obo. 541-385-5800 receives over 541-306-0280 1.5 million page Juicer, Jack L a lanne To place an ad, call MOVING, MUST SELL. 541-385-5809 views every delx. stainless, Ik new Wanted: Collector Two recliners $500 for or email month at no $40. 541-389-8134 seeks high quality classified 0 beodbulletln.com both. Custom made extra cost. fishing items. s ectional an d o t t o- Call 541-678-5753, or New Coleman Bug ZapBulletin man $850. L eather per w/rechargable batt, 5ennng CentralOregon 4 nre l903 503-351-2746 Classifieds $30 obo. 541-388-9270 sofa $650. C o ffee Get Results! table $100. See Bul- Weatherby 12 ga. pump Just bought a new boat? Call 541-385-5809 letin web ad for more Model PA459, Home Old car collector stuff, Sell your old one in the or place your ad photos. Call Steve at Defense, new, never 50th anniv. Ford Horn classifieds! Ask about our on-line at etc. Call for info 503-585-5000. fired, $500. ring, Super Seller rates! 541-598-7636 bendbulletin.com 541-350-9336 541-385-5809 NEED TO CANCEL *REDUCE YOUR YOUR AD? SUPER TOP SOIL Weatherby 300 W. CABLE BILL! Get an www.faersfae soflgndbark.com The Bulletin All-Digital Sat e l lite Mag, Mark V EuroScreened, soil 8 comHorses & Equipment I Classifieds has an mark, Leupold system installed for post m i x ed , no "After Hours"Line Vari-X-III 3.5-10 FREE and program- rocks/clods. High hu- 2 quality Arabian mares Call 541-383-2371 scope, muz break, ming s t a rting at mus level, exc. f or free t o app r oved 24 hrs. to cancel sling, some ammo, $ 24.99/mo. FRE E flower beds, lawns, homes. 541-447-1522 your ad! $1250. 541-604-6099 HD/DVR upgrade for gardens, straight new callers, SO CALL s creened to p s o i l .Vintage sleigh b e lls Pine Trestle Table w/2 leather strap, 30 bells benches, made by ForNOW (877)366-4508. Bark. Clean fill. Deest Furniture of LaPine. Winchester Mod. 94 (PNDC) liver/you haul. $195. 541-508-0207 Paid $1000; like new, sell 32 Special Ser. 541-548-3949. The Bulletin Offers $750. 541-531-7903 or ¹1213708, Redfield 541-282-2356 Peep Sight, 2 Boxes Free Private Party Ads Meat & Animal Processing Hornaday Ammo • 3 lines - 3 days Lost & Found • Refrigerator, 26 cf Frigid- $499 541-604-6099 • Private Party Only A ngus l o cker b e e f , aire, water/ice in door, • Total of items advergrass-fed, no adrena$250 obo. 541-379-3530 tised must equal $200 line butchered at Cin253 or Less der Butte Meats, $3/lb. Washer, Frigidaire GalFOR DETAILS or to cut & wrapped to your lery HD, stackable, exlnt, TV, Stereo & Video PLACE AN AD, specs. 541-350-2737 $200. 541-549-6036 D irecTV - O v e r 1 4 0 Call 541-385-5809 $400 Reward for Fax 541-385-5802 channels only $29.99 'Miley' 4-mo. female The Bulletin a month. Call Now! Produce & Food Springer Spaniel, liver recommends extra ' Tiffany Lamp, blues & Triple savings! & white, has tags. ) caution when purreens, 24" tall, pretty! $636.00 in Savings, ORCHARDS Lost 7/24 on Shum- THOMAS chasing products or, 80. 541-548-0248 Free upgrade to GeKimberly,Oregon way Rd., in Powell services from out of I nie 8 2013 NFL Sunu - lok& ~ ~ the area. Sending ~ day ticket free!! Start Wanted- paying cash Butte. 541-604-6232 Hi-fi audio & stu- F ound 8/1 o n B e a r R000 -PiCked cash, checks, o r ~ saving ~ today! for dio equip. Mclntosh, • Freestone canning f credit i n f o rmation 1-800-259-5140. Creek Road, east of J BL, Marantz, D y may be subjected to Road, o l der peaches (Sunbright) (PNDC) naco, Heathkit, San- Ward f FRAUD. For more Border Collie, friendly. • Santa Rosa Plums Carver, NAD, etc. female 541-420-7450 information about an ~ DISH T V • Early nectarines Ret a i ler. sui, advertiser, you may I Starting ai Call 541-261-1808 Found backpack with call t h e Or e gon / $19.99/month (for 12 BRING CONTAINERS ~ State Attor ney ' mos.) 8 High Speed Washington state for U-PICK!!! identification. Call to f General's O f f i c e I nternet starting a t Open 7 days week, 8 Consumer P r otec- • $14.95/month (where identify, 541-388-9017 a.m. to 6 p.m. ONLY! t ion ho t l in e at I available.) SAVE! Ask Just bought a new boat? 541-934-2870 i 1-877-877-9392. About SAME DAY InSell your old one in the Look for updates on Fastallation! CALL Now! Water Fountain. lovely classifieds! Ask about our cebook. We are at the 1-800-308-1563. for patio or inside Super Seller rates! Bend Farmers Market on $199 541-382-9295. Wednesdays, 3-7 p.m. (PNDC) 541-385-5809 Crafters Wanted

Misc. Items

The Bullctin

The Bulletin

r

J

I

f f

I

f

I

LThe Bulleting


E2 FRIDAY AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9 476

Employment Opportunities

Q0000

Chemical Handling Technician

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Wildland Firefighters

. Pjl~

0 DEHRM@

K00 ~O

Janitorial

To fight forest fires. Must be 18 years old & drug free. Apply between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Mon. thru Thurs. Bring two forms of ID fill out Federal 1-9 form. No ID =No Application.

o.

Job Opening

Q

ATVs

k

oQ00

B o ats & Accessories I 20' 1993 Sea Nympf Fish & Ski, 50 hrs on new engine, fish finder, chart plotter & VHF radio with

antenna. Good shape,

full cover, heavy duty Microsemi CorporaA full time Janitorial Honda TRX 450R sport trailer, kicker and electric tion in B end, O rposition is available quad 2008, low hrs, new motors. 514 745 421 egon has an immeat The Bulletin's wheels & DNC perf. pipe $7500 or best offer. diate opening for a Insurance Homes for Sale • Sn o wmobiles Building Services 541-292-1834 Schools & Training $4250. 541-647-8931 chemical h a ndling Department. Cleantechnician. ResponSAVE $$$ on AUTO • 1994 Arctic Cat 580 870 ing and janitorial exOregon Medical TrainNOTICE INSURANCE from the All real estate adversibilities incl u de EXT, $1000. perience are rePRCFRFOUCEO/' ing PCS - Phlebotomy Boats & Accessories set-up of chemical m ajor names y o u • Yamaha 750 1999 classes begin Sept. 3, quired. Successful tised here in is sub20.5' Seaswirl Spyknow and trust. No Mountain Max, SOLD! process baths, dis2013. Registration now candidates will be to t h e F e deral der 1989 H.O. 302, posal of waste prodforms. No hassle. No ject 4-place self-motivated, have oe o o :~ F air H o using A c t , • Zieman P ATR l c K 285 hrs., exc. cond., obligation. Call which ucts, monitoring gas keen attention to medicaltrainin .com makes it illegal trailer, SOLD! stored indoors for and liquid usage as READY F O R MY to advertise any pref- All in good condition. 541-343-3100 detail, and must be 1199 NE Hemlock, life $9900 OBO. QUOTE now! CALL erence, limitation or Located in La Pine. well a s cle a ning able to lift up to 50 Redmond, OR 541-379-3530 1-888-706-8256. production process pounds. Hours are Call 541-408-6149. 476 (541) 923-0703 discrimination based 10 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. (PNDC) equipment. Some on race, color, reli- 2 ) 2000 A r ctic C a t 12~/~' HiLaker fishing Employment relevant experience HOTEL/RESORT Sunday through boat with trailer and gion, sex, handicap, L 580's EFI with n e w Opportunities Thursday. a nd education i n The Riverhousefamilial status or na- covers, electric start w/ newly overhauled 18 Loans & Mortgages chemical handling is Bend's largest Hotel and tional origin, or inten- reverse, low miles, both h.p. Johnston o u tSend an updated rehighly desired. Inter- Convention Center, is tion to make any such excellent; with new 2009 b oard, $ 85 0 ob o . CAUTION: sume and/or applicaWARNING ested c a n didates seeking a quality-minded preferences, l i mita- Trac-Pac 2-place trailer, Eves 541-383-5043, 20' Seaswirl 1992, 4.3L Ads published in tion form to Ben The Bulletin recomshould visit our web- Night Auditor to join the tions or discrimination. drive off/on w/double tilt, days 541-322-4843 "Employment O p mends you use cauV6 w/OMC outdrive, open site a t www . m i- Riverhouse Team. Appli- Anderson, Building We will not knowingly lots of accys. Selling due portunities" in clude c rosemi.com a n d cants must have strong Services Manager, at rt tion when you probow, Shorelander trlr, nds to m edical r e asons. accept any advertisemployee and indevide personal some interior trim work. please apply on-line. accounting 8 computer PO Box 6020, Bend $6000 all. 541-536-8130 ing for r eal e state pendent p ositions. OR 97708 or email information to compa- which is in violation of $4500. 541-639-3209 skills; requires some cusAds fo r p o s itions Customer Service Arctic Cat ZL800, 2001, banderson@bendnies offering loans or this law. All persons tomer service interaction. that require a fee or short track, variable 9.5' Old Town Kayak with bulletin.com. credit, especially We offer c o mpetitive are hereby informed exhaust valves, elec- 14'8 o upfront i nvestment paddles & life jacket, those asking for adROBBERSON compensation as well as boat, 40hp Merthat all dwellings admust be stated. With tric s t art, r e verse,cury outboard (4-stroke, $190. 541-593-5312 free golf and use of the All hiring is continvance loan fees or vertised are available any independentjob re c o rds,electric trim, EFI, less pool facilities. Bring re- gent on passing a companies from out of on an equal opportu- manuals, opportunity, please new spare belt, cover, than 10 hrs) + electric Ads published in the We arelooking for a sume & complete appli- drug test. EOE. state. If you have "Boats" classification nity basis. The Bullei nvestigate tho r heated hand g r ips, trolling motor, fish finder, cation in person at The concerns or quesqualified internet include: Speed, fishoughly. Use e xtra Riverhouse, 3075 N Hwy nice, fast, $999. Call $5000 obo. 541-548-2173 customer service tions, we suggest you tin Classified The Bulletin ing, drift, canoe, c aution when a p Tom, 541-385-7932, 97, Bend, OR. Or apply representati ve. consult your attorney house and sail boats. plying for jobs on- Must have a positive at- 8 submit resume/cover or call CONSUMER FOR SALE 660 For all other types of +Cf'= line and never proHOTLINE, titude with a w illing- letter online at: BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS watercraft, please go vide personal inforness to learn. We will www.riverhouse.com 1-877-877-9392. When buying a home, Motorcycles & Accessories Search the area's most to Class 875. mation to any source train the r i ght i ndi- PRE-EMPLOYMENT 83% of Central comprehensive listing of BANK TURNED YOU 541-385-5809 you may not have DRUG SCREENING vidual. The ideal canOregonians turn to P ' 5 R classified advertising... DOWN? Private party HDFatBo 1996 14' IS REQUIRED. researched and didate will have strong a luminum bo a t real estate to automotive, will loan on real esdeemed to be repuverbal an d w r i tten w/trailer, 2009 Mercury Seteing Central Oregon stoce t903 merchandise to sporting tate equity. Credit, no table. Use extreme communication skills, 15hp motor, fish finder, goods. Bulletin Classifieds problem, good equity c aution when r e strong c o mputer/inCall 541-385-5809 to $2500. 541-815-8797 appear every day in the is all you need. Call s ponding to A N Y ternet skills, and ex- C • F. • N • T • ra • R place your print or on line. Oregon Land Mortonline employment ceptional o r g aniza- hkr C~ ' Ilvme ke Cordon Real Estate ad. gage 541-388-4200. Call 541-385-5809 ad from out-of-state. Housekeeping / tional skills. 748 Completely We suggest you call www.bendbulletin.com Cut y ou r S T UDENT Environmental Please call Mark at Rebuilt/Customized the State of Oregon LOAN payments in Northeast Bend Homes 541-420-9670. Services Beautiful h o u seboat, 2012/2013 Award Consumer H o tline HALF or more Even if Robberson Ford is a (Part-time,20 hrs eeteogCeotreiOtegoo eoce feet $85,000. 541-390-4693 at 1-503-378-4320 Winner Late or in Default. Get '07 custom Tuscany drug free workplace. Mon-Fri, 5-9:30pm with 14' LAZER 1993 sailwww.centraloregon For Equal OpportuEOE. availability to f/exinto MOTEL- Housekeeping Relief FAST. M uch style 1 level, .46 acre, Showroom Condition boat with trailer, exc. houseboat.com. Staff, Full-time.Apply in LOWER p a yments. 2910 sq.ft. 3 bdrm, 3 Many Extras nity Laws c o ntact 40 hrs as needed) cond., $2000 o b o. Low Miles. Oregon Bureau of Disbursement Agent- We are looking for a person at front desk, Call Student Hotline bath, quiet cul de sac, GENERATE SOME exCall 503-312-4168 Mo u ntain 855-747-7784 Labor & I n d ustry, A leading provider of motivated team player Sugarloaf RV prkg, fenced, gas $17,000 citement in your neigCivil Rights Division, construction risk man- with an eye for detail Motel 62980 N. High- (PNDC) 541-548-4807 heat, exc. Iandscaped borhood. Plan a gaa gement services i s 971-673- 0764. join our team at way 97, in Bend. finish work. $595,000 rage sale and don't LOCAL MONEY:Webuy & seeking a qualified indi- to 541-382-6731 Surgery Center. PARTS MANAGER HD Screaming Eagle forget to advertise in secured trustdeeds 8 The Bulletin vidual in its Sunriver, Bend E nvironmental s e r Electra Glide 2005, classified! 385-5809. Oregon office. 2 years vices is responsible Big Country RV has note,some hard money o 750 103 motor, two tone 541-385-5809 loans. Call Pat Kellev minimum experience in for daily housekeep- immediate opening for 541-382-3099 ext.13. Redmond Homes candy teal, new tires, c onstruction or c o m - ing functions as well a F/ T E x perienced Seadoo 1997 boat, Serving Central Oregon since 1903 23K miles, CD player 14' Parts Manager who 573 twin modified engines. Add your web address m ercial l e nding r e - as maintaining a high will share our comhydraulic clutch, ex210hp/1200lbs, fast. to your ad and read- quired, and proficiency level of quality. Can- mitment to customers. Business Opportunities Looking for your next cellent condition. Excel e xpected. didate must have reliemployee? $5500. 541-390-7035 Watercraft ers on The Bulietin's with Highest offer takes it. Competitive pay, and Place a Bulletin help web site, www.bend- Job offers a competi- able A Classified ad is an tr a nsportation 541-480-8080. benefit package. an d g reat a nd be able t o l i ft ad today and Find exactly what Ads published in eWabulletin.com, will be tive wagePlease EASY W A Y TO wanted send 25lbs. High S c hool Apply in person at reach over 60,000 REACH over 3 million you are looking for in the tercraft" include: Kayable to click through benefits. 3500 North Hwy 97, resume to: readers each week. aks, rafts and motorautomatically to your Diploma req u ired. Bend, Oregon; email Pacific NorthwesternCLASSIFIEDS matthew.guthrie@ website. ers. $54 0 /25-word Your classified ad Ized personal Prior experience in resume to tetratech.com will also appear on watercrafts. For medical cleaning a c lassified ad i n 2 9 bcrvhireO mail.com bendbulletin.com "boats" please see Just bought a new boat? plus, but not required. or call Rick Breeden at daily newspapers for 17.5' Glastron 2002, which currently reSell your old one in the Class 870. resume with 3-days. Call the PaHonda Shadow/Aero Chevy eng., Volvo 541-419-8680 ATTENTION classifieds! Ask about our Submit ceives over cific Northwest Daily cover letter to 750, 2007 Black, 11K outdrive, open bow, 541-385-5809 1.5 million page Super Seller rates! Elk obs©bendsur e .com PHARMACIST Connection (916) mi, 60 mpg, new destereo sink/live well Staff pharmacist position 2 88-6019 o r em a i l views every month 541-385-5809 tachable windshield, Open until w/glastron tr a i ler, Hunters! at no extra cost. at independentcommuMustang seat & tires; August 7 1, 2013. elizabethOcnpa.com incl. b oa t c o v e r, Colorado Outfitters EDUCATION Bulletin Classifieds nity pharmacy, in Des- for more info (PNDC) detachable Paladin Like new, $ 8 500. Gilchrist School is curnow hiring experichutes County. Full-time; Get Results! backrest & luggage 541-447-4876 rently hiring (1) Paraproe nced hunters t o no nights, no Sundays. Extreme Value AdverCall 385-5809 or rack w/keylock.VanceMotorhomes work as Elk hunting fessional — Child Specific Professional se t t ing, tising! 29 Daily news- place your ad on-line Hines pipes, great guides for 2013 Ar- 5.5 hours per day / stu- BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS competitive wage / ben- papers $540/25-word at sound. Cruise control, chery and Rifle sea- dent contact days; and Search the area's most efits. Call 541-419-4688. classified 3-d a y s. bendbulletin.com audible turn signals sons. No guide ex- (1) Paraprofessional Reach 3 million Pafor safety. $4495 obo. comprehensive listing of Tutor 5.5 hours per day / classified advertising... SALES perience required. cific Northwesterners. People Look for Information Jack, 541-549-4949 student contact days. Bow hunters Growing dealership For more information estate to automotive, About Products and Both include a competi- real seeking s alespeople call (916) 288-6019 or preferred. merchandise to sporting tive benefits package. Services Every Daythrough Street Glide 2006 black 17' Cris Craft Scorpion, Brougham 1978 motor looking for a perfor- email: Call (800) goods. Bulletin Classifieds & ready to fish! I/O & For job description and to appear every day in the mance-based pay plan, elizabethOcnpa.com The Bulletin Classifieds cherry metal f l ake, fast Dodge chassis, 342-7016 good extras, 8 ,100 trolling motor. Lots of ex- home, apply for either position potential commissions for the Pacific Northprint or on line. miles, will take some tras! $5000. 541-318-7473 17' coach, sleeps 4, go to www.kcsd.k12.or.us of up to 35% equaling west Daily Connec763 rear dining. $4500. trade of firearms or Call 541-385-5809 Call 541-433-2295 for $100,000+, Retirement tion. (PNDC) Recreational Homes 541-602-8652. small ironhead. www.bendbulletin.com Plan, Paid Vacation, more information. & Property Bookkeeper and a com p etitive $14,000. Check out the W e need a Pa r t 541-306-8812 medical benefit packclassifieds online -time dynamic, full 637 Acres in forest age. Looking for team Need help fixing stuff? cycle, bookkeeper in Call A ServiceProfessional west of Silver Lake, www.bendbulfefin.com player with a positive our energetic, OR, with recreation Instructional attitude to operate with 18'Maxum skiboat,2000, Updated daily find the help you need. cabin and stream. w omen ru n c o m - www.bendbulletin.com energy and to be cusTechnology inboard motor, g r eat 541-480-7215 tomer service oriented. pany. D u ties are Coordinator cond, well maintained, • I I AR/AP, answering Will provide training. This person will lead $8995 obo. 541-350-7755 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Facilities Send resume' to: customers & vendor and facilitate InstrucbcrvhireO mail.com Search the area's most Victory TC 2002, questions , as s i st Maintenance tional Technology in Meet singles right now! with GL. 1 yr. exp., comprehensive listing of runs great, many Mechanic the dev e lopment, 605 No paid o p erators, classified advertising... AA in A c counting; Microsemi Corporaaccessories, new i mplementation, s u Roommate Wanted just real people like real estate to automotive, tires, under 40K Quickbooks, Office tion in B end, O rpervision and m a nyou. Browse greetmerchandise to sporting Suites and Google egon has an immeagement of m e d ia Retired on d i s ability,goods. Bullet>n Classifieds miles, well kept. ings, exchange mesdocs/calendar exp. diate opening for a chasing products or ~ services, online edu$5500 or P artial 19.5' Bluewater '88 I/O, sages and c o nnect armed security appear every day in the Attention t o d e t ail facilities mai n t e- cational options, and services from out of I female 58, new upholstery, new elec- live. Try it free. Call looking for Trade/firearms and or g a nization nance print or on line. m e c hanic. the District I nstruc- f the area. Sending officer, tronics, winch, much more. now: 8 7 7-955-5505. ranch caretaker, cook/ 541-647-4232 skills are essential to Responsibilities inCall 541-385-5809 tional Tec h nology c ash, c hecks, o r housekeeper position $9500. 541-306-0280 (PNDC) keep us creative & clude maintenance i n f ormation or share rent. Inside www.bendbulletin.com Program; as well as / credit sales folks o r ga- and repair of plant assist teaching media, ~ may be subjected to ~ Border Collie, clean nized. Flexible with HVAC, process pipFRAUD. computer and t echwell mannered. Referthe part time hours ing, waste treatment, nology clas s es. For more i nformaences. 541-383-8820. Mon. - Fri. Please and e nvironmental tion about an adver~ Teaching Lic e nse 771 email resume and control sys t ems. NOT required. Go to f tiser, you may call 627 Lots cover letter to cenCurrent experience the Oregon State https://culver.cloud.tal Vacation Rentals traloregonjobs©bbin HVAC systems is entedk12.com/hire/In- I Attorney General's 3438 NW Bryce Canyon Call 54I 3855809 to tramoteyourservice Advertise for 28 doysstarting at 'I4) rmitspecial pockogersearototlobleooooreebsitei & Exchanges sihq.com or fax it to a must. I nterested Office Co n s umerg dex.aspx for detailed Lane, Lot ¹111 541.388.1984 candidates s hould description and to ap- Protection hotline at I Awbrey Park. visit our website at Ocean front house, ply. Deadline 9/4/13. I 1-877-877-9392. $167,000. www.microsemi.com Culver School District each walk from town, Concrete Construction LandscapingNard Care LandscapingNard Care 541-382-8559 and please apply LTlze Bulletin 541-546-7506 2 bdrm/2 bath, TV, I tkeee Reteette Meeeeeeeet (emeeet on-line. Fireplace, BBQ. $95 775 JJ 8 B Construction, Nelson per night, 3 night MIN. quality concrete work. Manufactured/ Landscaping & Night Pressman 208-342-6999 Over 30 Years Exp. Mobile Homes Maintenance IS Zor/dtz gaaErip The Bulletin, located in beautiful Bend, OrSidewalks; RV pads; 632 Serving Central Network Operations egon. is seeking a night-time Pressman. Driveways; Color & Za~g gu-~ i,. Oregon Since 2003 Center: We are part of Western Communications, Inc. Apt./Multiplex General Delivered and Set up Stamp wor k a v a il. More ThanService gs SGH WII8 Residental/Commercial '02 3/4 bd, 2 ba. 42,900 Computer Operator which is a small, family owned group consistAlso Hardwood floorPeace Of Mind '10 2/3 bd, 2 ba. 47,900 ing of 7 newspapers - 5 in Oregon and 2 in CHECK YOUR AD ing a t aff o rdable Sprinkler 541-350-1782 Runs and monitors scheduled jobs, prepares California. Our ideal candidate must be able to prices. 541-279-31 83 Activation/Repair Fire Protection Smart Housing LLC and monitors data c e nter i n frastructure learn our equipment/processes quickly. A CCB¹190612 Back Flow Testing Fuels Reductlon equipment, maintains proper documentation hands-on style is a requirement for our 3 t/2 FACTORY SPECIAL •Tall Grass tower KBA press. In addition to our 7-day a and performs routine equipment installation Maintenance New Home, 3 bdrm, •Low Limbs and m a i ntenance. P e r forms ne t work week newspaper, we have numerous com• D e bris Removal • Thatch & Aerate $46,500 finished • Brush and Debris monitoring and basic configuration tasks. mercial print clients as well. In addition to a on your site. • Spring Clean up on the first day it runs Responds touser and system support issues, competitive wage and benefit program, we JUNK BE GONE J and M Homes •Weekly Mowing to make sure it iso coralso provide potential opportunity for ado Protect your home trouble shoots problems and works with other 541-548-5511 I Haul Away FREE 8 Edging rect. Spellcheck and vancement. with defensible space g roups on project or support work. L e s •Bi-Monthly & Monthly For Salvage. Also human errors do ocLOT MODEL Schwab has a re p utation o f e x c ellent If you provide dependability combined with a Cleanups & Cleanouts Maintenance cur. If this happens to LIQUIDATION customer service and over 400 stores in the positive attitude and are a team player, we •Bark, Rock, Etc. Mel, 541-389-8107 Landscape your ad, please conPrices Slashed Huge would like to hear from you. If you seek a Northwest. We offer a competitive salary, tact us ASAP so that MaIntenance Savings! 10 Year e xcellent benefits, retirement, and c a s h stable work environment that provides a great ~Leodeoe io corrections and any Full or Partial Service •Landscape conditional warranty. Concrete/Paving bonus. Visit us at: www.LesSchwab.com. place to live and raise a family, let us hear adjustments can be • Mowing eEdging Finished on your site. from you. Construction made to your ad. • Pruning eWeeding Doug Strain Contact Al Nelson, Pressroom Manager at ONLY 2 LEFT! Feature Resumes will be accepted through 541 -385-5809 Sprinkler Adjustments •Water Redmond, Oregon Construction, Inc. August 15, 2013. Please send resume and anelson©wescompapers.com with your com- The Bulletin Installation/Maint. Classified 541-548-5511 Concrete Division •Pavers salary requirements to: plete resume, references and salary history/ Fertilizer included Residential & JandMHomes.com •Renovations ZYLSHuman.Resources Olesschwab.com. requirements. No phone calls please. 634 with monthly program Commercial concrete; • Irngations Installation Emails must state "Computer Operator" in the Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Rent /Own foundations, driveways, subject line. No phone calls please. Drug test is required prior to employment. EOE 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes Senior Discounts sidewalks & curbs. Its not too late Call for Specials! $2500 down, $750 mo. Bonded & Insured Call Chris for appt. EOE for a beautiful Limited numbers avail. OAC. J and M Homes 541-815-4458 Sales 541-280-0581 landscape 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. 541-548-5511 LCB¹8759 CCB¹109532 W/D hookups, patios •Lawn Restoration Independent Contractor Sales ALLEN REINSCH or decks. FIND YOUR FUTURE •Weed Free beds We are seeking dynamic individuals. Yard maintenance & MOUNTAIN GLEN, • Bark Installation HOME IN THE BULLETIN • Ad ServIces AdmIn clean-up, thatching, 541 -383-93f 3 The Bulletin is seeking an individual to play a DOES THIS SOUNDLIKE YOU? plugging & much more! Professionally Your future is just a page Oregon Decks & Fencing EXPERIENCED vital role on the Ad Services team. The Ad Ser•OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE Call 541-536-1294 managed by Norris & away. Whether you're looking Expert installation,all types Commercial vices Admin position is 32 hours per week and • PERSONABLE 8 ENTHUSIASTIC Stevens, Inc. for a hat or a place to hangit, Excellent work! Over 50 Villanueva Lawn Care. & Residential is eligible for benefits. An Ad Services Admin •CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED The Bulletin Classified is yrs exp. Serving all of CO Maintenance,clean-up, works closely with others on the Ad Services Senior Discounts 646 ccb 20010• 541-526-1973 your best source. thatching + more! team to coordinate and track ads though our 541-390-1466 Our winning team of sales & promotion Houses for Free estimates. production system. At times taking corrections Every day thousands of Same Day Response 541-981-8386 professionals are making an average of Rent General from customers via phone, faxing ads to cus• Han d yman buyers and sellers of goods $400 - $800 per week doing special tomers, and ensuring all corrections have been and services do business in Painting/Wall Covering events, trade shows, retail & grocery Rented your made prior to printing. In addition, this position I DO THAT! these pages.Theyknow will include training for a path to page composstore promotions while representing Property? Home/Rental repairs you can't beat TheBulletin WESTERN PAINTING ing responsibilities. The ideal candidate will be The Bulletin Classifieds Small jobs to remodels THE BULLET?N newspaper Classified Section for CO. Richard Hayman, computer literate, have outstanding customer has an selection and convenience Honest, guaranteed as an independent contractor a semi-retired paintservice skills, above average grammar skills, "After Hours" Line. work. CCB¹151573 - every item isjust a phone ing contractor of 45 the ability to multi-task and a desire to work at a Call 541-383-2371 call away. Dennis 541-317-9768 yi/E OFFER: years. S m al l J obs successful company. 24 Hours to •Solid Income Opportunity * Welcome. Interior & The Classified Section is «I. ERIC REEVE HANDY *Complete Training Program* Exterior. c c b ¹ 5184. easy to use. Every item To apply, submit a resume by Friday, August * SERVICES. Home & 541-388-6910 *No Selling Door to Door 9th, with qualifications, skills, experience and a 693 is categorized andevery Commercial Repairs, cartegory is indexed onthe past employment history to The Bulletin, atten*No Telemarketing Involved* Find them in Office/Retail Space Carpentry-Painting, Remodeling/Carpentry tion:James Baisinger, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR section's front page. *Great Advancement Opportunity* for Rent Pressure-washing, The Bulletin 97708-6020. Pre-employment druq screening is * * Full and Part Time Hours Whether you are l o oking for Honey Do's. On-t i me required prior to hiring. The Bulletin is an equal SILVER LINING Classifieds! Spectrum Profession a home orneed aservice, promise. Senior CONSTRUCTION opportunity employer. FOR THE CHANCE OF A al Bldg. several of- your future is in the pagesof Discount. Work guarResidential const., LIFETIME, fices for r e nt. C a ll The Bulletin Classified. anteed. 541-389-3361 remodels, maint. Andy, 541-385-6732 or 541-771-4463 & repair. CCB ¹199645 Call Adam Johnson or Jim at Exit Realty, Bonded & Insured Cody Aschenbrenner The Bulletin 541-410-5521, TODAY! 541-480-8835 CCB¹181595 541-263-1268

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

B~ S URGmv

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

50000

r.=.-"-,.— .a I

f /

The Bulletin

I

f f

I

I

J

Career Opportunity!

GarageSales

GarageSales

GarageSales

The Bulletin

541-385-5809


THE BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 E3

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE THE ONLY 5AT(5FACTION I &ET (5 KNOWING THAT I 5PIT IN HI5 HONEY.

WBRF- IN PLRNTY OF

THIS ISF( BUSY FI(f(P0%,

TI(MIE-MICHF(EL'S PL(9NE

LIZ TRKE.IMIIF/ f((9ND So

LFINDS IN w FIN HQUR.

YOU (A(ON T GET LOSl!

LIZZ(E-. E 0 0

0

8

4L 0

O

Iotef

0

IUR Ae4.

0'

Us 0

8-9

+HXI

©TzrrrouaRO/5

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

Loo(C, TFIE Da$' To THE BASEAAEAIT(S TOTACL+LOCICE P AAIP hlOBOPr 'STR(EP To OITEAI (T FoR PECAPES!

BLIT I- FOLJAIP A $EQKT

...AAI OLP,

IILSSAclEu/AV THAT ~

HIDOEYL! I-4UAIWY CHUTE!

ICA(D CUS ABGLIT„. 2

YOU CAN'T SPEND YOUR TIME WORRYING ABOUT WHAT' YOU MIGHT MISS, HIL.BECAUSE THEN YOU JUST END UP MISSING EVERYTHING...

IAIPIoA!

B

E 0

g

WELl, I WAS THINKING OVERALL, BUT IF YOU WANT ME TO NAME A SPECIFICROLLER COASTER WE CAN RIDE...

I'M GONNA BE REAL SAD TOO AT THE END OF SUMMER. I ALWAYS AM. BUT TO JUST FOCUS ON THAT WILL ROB US OF ALL THE FUN WE CAN HAVE RIGHT NOW.

MAKE SURE

It INVOLVES BOTH A

rr

E 8

WHAT>

00 0

(

SLIPERHERO'5 NAME AND AT LEAST 16 OF SOME'THING

TERRIFYING.

0

ot

0

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE ORAY. NOW WE OVST NEED

To CET THE WO'RDOVT.

(TOLDMR.+( ELAI, AILD HETHW(CS IT'S A DVMlt IDEA.

so wE'RE JEHLovsE(C UIAPY GRDI

GO ES(PS I T((E

OR'IGWAL SOC(AL HETWORK.

R'C(&E...I PON'T(IAVST 'O 4P tCH TCISC(AME.

I't WLISR H'SNt

PATSNWT, OK. AV,I ! 7LPN' T

Q0ALIT(('t((tAE (!(IITCI c(OLj.

%8 TO &aE, AHVMON CUS

( CAWS.T PA+

HAUS

0

N4tITI

t0 0

N 0

e et e

0

2 0 la rtt

0

itoiefMallettr Re at U

STONE SOUP i • Pl IV Q ——

0

t e salUCI

LUANN

(/ig +

(-

„,AND QUII.I.'5 GQNNA THAT'5 A HUGE QR TALK TQ H(5 PAQENT5 DEC(5(QN, 15 HE FQRH(5 ABQU'T FIN(5HINGHI'5 DQING TH(5 5ENIQRYEAR HERE! FQ R YQUP

Q

BOTH! HE QEAL(2EDTHAT EVERYTHINGTHAT'5 IMPQQTANT 'TQ = ' HIM 15h'ERE. HE EVENTAL.Y,EDTQ: GUNTHEQ ABQUTQQQMING AT H(5:. HQU5E.5Q THERE'5 NQTHING TQ WORRY ABOUT!

89

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

GRIMIYIS I FINALLLTL FOUND A HAHA, NO,RALPH,QXJ I'(VI 8OIVCo Ta HAVK ~ gPT hh'tNOTAUR,A WISEAI4WRU5TEP MIEAN CT'OUFOUNPA '(ICIU GOLBOB. hhBNTOR,AMINOTAU!9,' APVLSER WHOCANHELPME ISAMCH(GALR.ESHMAKE SlS PEQSION5INL'IFK BATIN8 MO~ tA I! TH

SO I'M BOR,R.OldING A ZAPANESE MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUE AND TR.ANSFER.R,ING YOU TO A BANISHMENT R.OOM UNTIL YOU GET SO BOR.ED YOU QUIT.

TED, I DON'T WANT (o TO FIR.E YOU BECAUSE E THAT LAJOULD BE I( EXPENSIVE. ta 0 2 N

A HGAtrT OFA BUU.AgD

A BOPQ OFA MAILI

O tlt

U 0

LOOKS LIKE SOMEONE UNDER.ESTIMATED MY TOLER.ANCE FOR. BOR.EDOM.

et

E la 0

IO

to

es tGl 0

ei B/9

CB S

OONESBURY

PICKLES

POP, THERE'5 ONLY ONE ARGVMENT AGALN5T TE/LA5 5ECE55/ONAU5TIN!

ELIT THERE'5 AL50 THE AV5TIN OF RICK PERRY AND THE TE/TA5 5TATE LEG/5LATURE.

YOL/'DHATE TO LO5E THE AU5TLN OF LIYE MV5/C, HIGHTECH, VT AV5TIN,5/L5W, 5OCO ANP GENERAL WEIRDNE55.

WHEN I Po gHAT

WHBY POVOG KEEP 51'ICKING VOLiR FINGER IN VOOR fAR, GR4MPA+

RIGHT. OR

5OVNP5 LIKE COLP WAR SERLIN.

CTERU5ALEM LUITHOLLT CHECK" POLNT5.

I

I'M AP JILLSTINGPA'V HEARING AIO 5O I CAN HEAR SETTER,

WODO! THAT15 COOL!

THfRE'5 A KIP A1 MV SCHooL IA)Ho POES TI-IAT (A!ITI H(5 NOSE, } I/MIONPER IC THAT HELP5 Hth/I SAAELL SETTER,

SNcaZI trrA t

8/U/13

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

WE HEARP YOUR. (HRTHPAY WAS IA AK(NCIYOUFEEL OLP.

TNTSSF HICS~T

SUTWE WANTEP TOLET YOU KNOWYOUN THEI EAST HATURE PERQN WEKNOUI.

: TNN6 ANOHC SFIIS!T. SAIP TOII!E!

,p

OH.A HUNPR EP

POESEUERYOOPY OETWEIRPWHEN THEYgOWUP? /

I ty!BEP YOU TO &IUB /t(E THB EYE OF

WIZ, I'/ti

&C(IN&INTO IMTTLE

PERC ENT

WHAT THEP...

I 0!V&

STORY

THB TIKK

I C

go CC 0

0

ito

DIST BY CAFATOBS

B.C.

WIZABDDFID COM

SHOE

A5 SELF-Appo(AITED A(AYo@ I . ENoUC H To AccEPI AM HUM(SLE'(OUR. FEE-DERIISCK..

IAC5(DE- THAT HILL oF F IR F A/t(T5 ,

IN FAcTr IVE IAL<TALLED A 5U&&EST(og EsoX FoR SJLI T' THAT FURpeo5E,

tr 0 R

DANG!I'VE GOTTAGOAGAIN!

cr E

0 lt

NI0 0

0

YYHERE.

THE SPIRIT ISWILLING, BUT THE BLADDERIS WEAK!

I YUISH I COULD ZUST GOBACK TO SLEEP.

4

0

0

C t

(5 ll P

0

POIEOBI

NY

E N 0

cr

%9

0

Dist. by Creators

ARFIELD

oa ((Ese((IHTR

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

( WISH LIZ WERE HERE

HEYPIG, Hf(OCKfPH(MSECF INYOUR HAVE PRA4I(HG STUPIO. I TH(NNHf'S YOU UPSf STOUT A YOU OFFSR(NG

ANP YOO WEREN'T

FOR ONCE, WE AGREE!

ANPY OU (BT Y EA H . HIMHAVf'ACCB SS WHAT TO MYSTUP(O>P COUCP HE PO.D

SffN HIP(UPFORAPOPT(OIUIN

RA1 .D YOUR S ' HSCTSRSTOR(fS'STR(PS.

HELTER 0

E 0er

0

te et

IL

0 E

0

s se

groRIES

0

0

Hi. Ttell sToo III PUnsanSIPick mY nose.

et 0

ts

,II, ar

I

o

oo

*0

ttr 0

I

0 0

IS

0

C

U STEPHAN

0

EANUTS

MARY WORTH THE (LORLD (LYLRI FLVIN6 ACE CLIMB5INTQH(5 5OPIL)ITHCAMEL,. TH(5 I5 H(5 MO5TDAH6EROU5M(55(ON! AN AMMUH (TIONTRAINMU5T BEE55TII/EOANDONELONE PLANEMU5l DOtHEJOB!

IT'5 DA(UN...A FINEM(5TCOYER5 THE FRENCH COUN TRV5(DE

MOMEH TG LATER I AM

"5((ltTCII OFF WLL5 THE MECH ANIC.".COUPEZ"I REPL V.. LY YIHGL~ "COKTACf?""CONTACT FQ tT (5!"THEMOTO R CATCHE5 (d(TH A ROAR!

AFTER SEVERAL

~~gRR

MAYSE I LL CHECK O(jT

DAYS OF A CTIVITIE S . . .

LESS PHYSICAL

CLASSES!...TO

Hgrst(

CLASSO S

HMNI...OPEN tALKS, SHARING CIRCLES, DISCUSSION GROLIPS

START)ISO

THIS strsb.

V IIHY N O T ' ?

TAKE A BREAK

0

0 0

gRRRe

FOUROCLOCK IN THE IHO RNIN6..HOIII DO' h3UEXPLAINTHI5 tD THENEI6HOOR5 T

0

GIIGSI UP Nosr

BB

GET FUZZY COME, PoG IIIHTNESS AS

HEGARo(D CRUSHES THE PERRET MEN/UCE.

NON SEQUITUR RDS f' UT THE CHAIN ON tHE

ro

DooR.

AW FE('.... All TOU PLE((S"WHO STAND IN THE WAY Cf MEGARoID WllL PAY. DLL TOSS TDU APDUND LIKE ttm WERE MY PoLlS '

HA HA'. TOU PLAY

it

WAS A

THREAT

WilH DOLLS, MEGARO(D

'":,:

Ic(OT If

I DON'T UND ERSTAND IT, IT'S NOT.

'I

S E

eteetoeo

I

00

co

00

'o 8E

Ct 0

0

0

'or UBUEA Y,

.

-

Ii j f li i j l l, . M (

Mrtoeo tveR er g<tetcrr M, Froor


E4 FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

DAILY B R I D G E

CLU B

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Will Sh ortz

F r iday,Augu t9,2013 s

ACROSS

3s Date shown on the tablet of the Statue of Liberty 39 Blood-typing system 4o Converses 41 Situated near the middle line of the body 43 Formed a junction 44 Gypsy people 4e $2 to $2,000, in Monopoly 49 Actor Hamm of "Mad Men" so "The accuser of our brethren," per Revelation sa Digital imaging brand sz oil s4 Port vessel 37 "That ss University of stupid!" Cincinnati zs Richard Gere athlete title role s7 Former Colts zo Addresses arena shrilly 31 1980s TV ouffit so Bend backward soJ,ForK 34 "Am blame?" sx Turner backers

Flying high

x Utah's Range s Snatches is Where to check for prints? as Kind of pie 37 What a blog provides as Cornish knight of the Round Table ao Bud of Nancy zo "Ghost" character Brown 33 The working girl in "Working Girl" 23 Euro dispenser zs Freshwater predator 26 Semester, e.g.

By FRANK STEWART Tribune MediaServices

Here's a m athematical puzzle. (Solve it in your head and you'll have no trouble finding the best percentage play in today's deal.) Two planes 440 miles apart are heading toward each other. One flies at 240 mph, the other at 360 mph. How far apart are they four minutes before they meet? At si x s p ades, South p layed dummy's ten on the first heart, and East's jack covered. South took the ace, drew trumps and cashed the A-K of clubs to discard a heart. He next took the k in g o f d i a monds and finessed with his jack, but West produced thequeen and led another heart for down one.

diamonds and he bids three clubs. What do you say? ANSWER: Your partner's three clubs is a"high reverse" and suggests substantial extra strength. For the moment, bid three hearts to confirm the trump suit. Even if he bids only four hearts next, you'll continue with a cue bid of five clubs to try for slam.

His hand may be A K 4, A K 9 7 5, 4, QJ7 6. North dealer Both sides vulnerable NORTH 4 1052 9 Q10 6 0 K85 3 2 4AK

BETTER PLAY South gave himself about a 53 percent chance but could do better with a different approach in diamonds. South takes the A-K of trumps and then the A-K o f d i amonds. When both defenders play low, South cashes the top clubs to pitch his jack of diamonds and ruffs a diamond. He can go to the ten of trumps to discard two hearts on the good diamonds, making seven. Puzzle answer: 40 miles.

DAILY QUESTION

WEST 4 964 987 0 Q1 09 4 J 87 4 2

EAST 48 9 K J9 5 4 076 4 10 9 6 5 3

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

SOUTH 4 AK Q J 7 3 9A32 OAJ4 4Q N orth 1 0 2 NT 44

Eas t Pass Pass Pass

S outh

We s t

2 41 P

34 6 4

A M B I E S T R A T T H O M A A O K S GOA E D W A R

A R P

T O Y

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five gamesweekly at www.bendbridge.org. IIIII.

J P E EW RE C L H E E R DS

AM E T I R E S I D O P F O U F L F A

SMO US C A EN T R I C R T H O R RO

GN U

N R O E A N Y N A L O G Y HRE H A S I S O F J U L Y S EA R L E PU R EE S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

16

DOWN

17

3 Condiment that can make your eyes water 3 Coffee and fresh-baked cookies have them 3 Adds color to 4 "Antony and Cleopatra" prop s Banned s Lug 7 "I Ching" figures s Orange dwarf 9 German possessive pronoun ao " ever!" tx Jet wing warning tz When to wear a cocktail dress, traditionally 33 Sports bar feature 14Aid and abet: Abbr. za Oscar winner once named Sexiest Man Alive by People 34 20th-century French leader zs Record label for the Miracles and Stevie Wonder ze Massachusetts governor Patrick zo Entry in an annual international sports competition since 1851 3o French pronoun

19

20

24

23

26

25

27

28

31 35

22

21

36

30

29

32

33

34

37

38

39

40

42

41

44

43

48

49

51

52

53

56

55

45

46

47

50 54

57

59

60

61

62

58

Puzzle by PAULA GAMACHE

32 Drum kit part 4 s 33 Odd

3s Preserves, perhaps 36 Epithet for a computer whiz 37 Eat crow

H oly Roman s t Sh e lter dug emperor known in t o a hillside as "the Red" sz Pitching stat 46 Fighters

for Kenyan independence 47 Little dears

s3 Middle school marks?

3e Bonus, in ads

49 Early invaders of Britain

ss Monitor, for short

43 Mired

so Slow racer

ss Shakes

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscrlptlons are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT8T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytlmes.com/mobllexword for more information. Online subscrlptlons: Today's puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytlmes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

DENNIS THE MENACE

lreaI Ioi SIL

SUDOKU

Iazebo og.eom/Bizarrocomi64

Hi, l'm Mike. l b.ave a uriyLaraJ tradt

Complete the grid so that

iyLfedtioyL, mvJ familvJ b.ateg me, ayLd l like t,o wear yLaJloyL< oyL th.e weekeyLd,

every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from1 to 9 inclusively.

r

/ p

H U R T L I R R J OH N A D A M S D I O P E N I T

B o I TA N O

ass

Pass All P a s s

You hold: 4 1 0 5 2 9 Q 1 06 Opening lead — 9 8 <> K 8 5 3 2 4 A K . Y our partner opens one heart, you respond two (C1 2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

BIZARRO

N A F R O G S T A L I E N A T E S j E F F E R S O N

ez Scale often used in a laboratory

No. 0705

/

// I

e

OPEN MIKE NIGHT

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY'S SUDOKU ,nl,

34' 65 29 1 61 87, j 42

IO

ol

IL

Z2

"IT' WA5N'T /yfY FAULT! M'IZ.WILGON NEED5 rO IyUT lN GIIAALLER. WINPOWS Ii'

581

CO Ct

tu

CANDORVILLE

oo

F/NP PICTI/EEPOF I'OI/

/ I/ANTyo// ro FOLLOII/ ri/EK EXERC/KPro rl/E LETTER...

DIFFICULTY RATING: ** *

rl/AT'0 I/OII/ / CAN LEARN To TAKE CI/ ARCE OF My L/FEF

TELL TI/O PICTURE

"I LovE yo//."

AP AsABK TAPErkPf ALLOVERto//g APAETMEIvr

JUer po /T.

LOS ANGELES TIMESCROSSWORD

. ~"'".,":r M.4.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce NicholsLewis

7,.

I/I/ENEI/ER YOI/KE OIE OF rkEM, PTOPAND TELL rkE P/CTI/RE Yof/ AREA PPECIAL, VNIQI/E PERPON."

po EXACTLYA4 / JUPT PAIP, UNTIL / rELL yo//

yo(/cANplog

SAFE HAVENS IEEAl-lA, JgyIA'f? gov WANT l~'I> SP 1 ' r JVST r1EED To !3AM&l XO 8AD(j(zS A PRII4F1/L, LyizeA< FH 4 D 5aIVIE051E EIvloTIaHAuuY 5CA(zizII4& FOIL HEIZ I' I VAIuASL&'(4IkoI/'-VF JU&1 Ta (a)IZITE gAA CAkegIE! 1 I4'110i/0! &ct4&5 ASOU1 iT?77

© 2013 by King Features Syndicate, Ioo World oubto reserve

40, JNI1Y... IioHE. OP IYI'f IIFA 1EANtMATE& ...,,o HA5 IEECElgLY 88BN DUNIPP' 8 II' A gAIZDA5HI A yi.

6-mall. bbolbrookI@umall com

hup Itwww oafebaveneooeoc com

SIX CHIX W ELL, WH O 1 O L D Y OU T O ST E P OUT O P Y O U R

COjvIFOR I ZONE '2

54 571W

ZITS WWOLSFTTHFSEFjL%if'

5OCI4'G DNTHE COFFEE

I PON'F ~Ilf!

ON'( TlfEV'tzE /I'IIAINF" PEFINITEL

TPBLET

WHAT CDTHGII'

rhhELL LIKE'?

ACROSS 8 Sound from a 1 Beachgoer's shelter download 9 Pro vote 6 "Saving Private 10 S he was Adrian Ryan" Setting in "Rocky" 10 Oz. Sextet 11 Batter's rough 14 Does a patch Photoshop task 12 S kin features 15 Became frayed 13 C o rdwood 16 Heaps measure 17 Crash 18 Casual shirts 19" take a 20 Cut off 21 "The Book of miracle!" Denzel 24 Big wins Washington film 2 5 Continued, with u » 22 Cook's aid up 23 Crash 26 Chan portrayer 28 Garden tools 27 Like most 29 Modern joke Michener novels 30 '60s hallucinogen response u 31 " Caught ya! 30 Eagerly accept, as praise 32 Strength 32 f l a kes 33 T i n Tin 34 Angle iron 34 Lite 38 Crash 35 Foremost 41 Some code tones 36 Mad-hatter 42 A line may be connection drawn in it 37 Hardly a Yankee 43 Gift fan? 44 Handle clumsily 3 9 Old Testament 45 Bibliog. term twin 40 'You've got the 46 Crash 53 Reagan's second wro n g person"

attorney general 54

g r a tia

55 Road service org.

HERMAN

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

3>L ~ u ~ X

OIMaTIC~ cf ...,5 p

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Kourek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, 10 form four ordinary words. E

PONIA

8 I heard about ~., this. It's better than I ihought.

02013 Tnbune Media Services, Iec. All Rights Reserved.

DEEUL

8'4 40

blg and

beeuuluu

4

I

BLADLA

0

YONWAH

a WHEN THBFIR5T 5ErrLeiz5 5AW THE czRANr7 CANYDN, THEY 5AIP —Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, ae suggested by the above cartoon.

: "CXX3" CXX3 "She wants something that you don't use."

* *

Yesterday'8

(Anowere tomorrow) J umbles: REBEL ST A S H PAR A D E PIG L E T Answer: The weightliftere new world recordRAISED THE BAR

57 Crash 62 Acronymic French artist 63 Caboose 64 One never seen in "Peanuts" 65 French 66 Its Old World Style label has a gondola on it 67 Art of verse

1

2

3

44 Bk. intro 45 Songwriter Sands 46 Add to a website, as a video clip 47 Prefix with ophthalmology 4B A bit before the hour 49 Glacial ridge 50 Conference attendee's wear

51 Indian independence leader 52 Writer Roald and others 56 Court fig. 58 "Catch-22" pilot 59 Belfast-born actor Stephen 60 Day break'? 61 Words often said in front of a priest

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE: A R O BO Z R A Z A D I S E

B A R R O N E A M A T A Z U E L O T I N R E N N A S T A B S P A R S L O P J E E R A T O L L S S O RO B E D G O C Y A S I R K F A T S C O N S A C R E H O O T C H A D A V I A T Y P O T E R R xwordeditorieaol.com 6

4

14

D O Z E N S

7

8

9

15 18

19

20

21

22

24

25

26

28 30

10 1 1

12

13

36

37

T E N A M

Y E N T A

L Y O N 08/09/13

27

29

31

32

33

34 3 5

38

39

40

41

42

43

DOWN 1 "To every thing there is a 48 49 season" Bible bk. 46 4 7 2 Cleaning tool 53 3 Rhythmic song from "Oliver!" 57 4 Something for 62 nothing?: Abbr. 5 Sch. near Topeka 65 6 Resided 7 Greek column By Matt Skoezen style

H A M I P E S P N S T D Y F T S I N A T U N S T E

16

17

23

E S L P Z E I E E A D H E F A R S S T S O ED P D U A R E N A N N E T

44 50

52

51

ss

54 58

59

60

63

64

66

67

(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

56

61

08/09/13


THE BULLETIN• FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 2013 E5

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809 Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

~ i

0

eaelittt

s

Alfa See Ya 2005 40' excellent cond, 1 owner, 4-dr frig w/icemaker, gas stove/oven, convection oven, washer/dryer combo, flatscreen TV, all electronics, new tires, many extras. 7.5 diesel

Arctic Fox 2004 29V,

Fifth Wheels

CAMEO LXI 2003, 35 ft. O nan g e n . 36 0 0 , wired 8 plumbed for W/D, 3 slides, Fan-

tastic fan, ice maker, r ange top & o v e n (never been u sed) very nice; $29,500. 541-548-0625.

e D

I

916

932

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Antique & Classic Autos

I

Chrysler 30 0 C o u pe 1967, 44 0 e n g ine, a uto. trans p s a i r frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, Peterbilt 359 p o table original blue interior, water t ruck, 1 9 90, original hub caps, exc. 3200 gal. tank, 5hp chrome, asking $9000 p ump, 4 - 3 n hoses, or make offer. camlocks, $ 2 5,000. 541-385-9350

935

• S p ort Utility Vehicles I

Pickups

Antique & Classic Autos

CRAMPED FOR CASH?

I

Use classified to sell those items you no longer need.

Pl

Call 541-385-5809

Nissan Pathfinder SE

one owner, perfect for MGA 1959 - $19,999 Seresng Central Oregonsince 1903 snowbirds, very l ivAircraft, Parts Convertible. O r igitires, very good cond, able, A/ C / furnace, $5400. 503 334 7345 nal body/motor. No & Service CHECK YOUR AD added catalytic heatrust. 541-549-3838 er, front kitchen large 541-820-3724 fridge, sep a rated • CLASSIC CARSR Automobiles ~OO bath, awning, spare 931 wanted for gen, lots of storage, tire, Hensley h itch, 1st Annual C.O. Sat. MorePixatBendbuletin,com Ford F250 S uperCabBuick Century Limited Automotive Parts, basement freezer, 350 storage, outside Market Car Show! 2000, r u n s gr e at, Cat Freightliner chassis. great Service & Accessories 2001, Triton V8, May '15 beautiful car. $3400. s hower, v er y w e l l This Sat. Au ust10th on the first day it runs Asking $86,500. See at maintained. $13,800 tags, ONLY 89K miles, in downtown Bend. 541-312-3085 Crook County RV Park, to make sure it is cor- 1/3 interest in Columbia Hitches: 3 ball mount $6495 obo 541-610-6150 541-410-6561 People's Choice Awards rect. nSpellcheckn and ¹43. 520-609-6372 400, $150,000 (located 1n 4" deep Buick Lucerne CXS Entry fees donated to lohuman errors do ocI Bend.) Also: Sunri- $10,shank Call The Bulletin At 8" deep $20, 2006 Sports sedan, cal "Words for Wheels" cur. If this happens to ver hangar available for n BOUNDER 1993 11 d eep $ 3 0 ; 544 -885-5809 acceptable miles, all Info: 541-420-9015 your ad, please con- sale at $155K, or lease, H usky 10,000 l b . k~,";,~e";~ ~ -' 34.6', 43k miles, the nice features you'll Place Your Ad Or E-Mail I nternational Fla t tact us ASAP so that O $400/mo. Mustang 1966 2 dr. loaded, $13,900. hitch, spring bars want, truly an exc. buy At: www.bendbulletin.com 541-948-2963 Bed Pickup 1963, 1 corrections and any coupe, 200 cu. in. 6 Info - Call not included, $50. at $8000. Come & see ton dually, 4 s pd. adjustments can be 541-536-881 6. cyl. Over $12,000 in541-504-7483. no charge for looking. trans., great MPG, made to your ad. vested, asking $9000 Ask Buick Bob, could be exc. wood 541-385-5809 " ~ N ei a a Winter l i k e new All receipts, runs 541-318-9999 studded tires 6-hole hauler, runs great, The Bulletin Classified good. 541-420-5011 new brakes, $1950. Cadillac E l rims, P235 75/R15, Corvette Coupe 1964 D o r ado 541-41 9-5480. $425. 541-317-8991 1994, T otal C re a m 530 miles since frame Puff! Body, paint, trunk 1/3 interest i n w e l loff restoration. Runs 932 Toyota Tacoma 4x4, as s howroom, b l ue equipped IFR Beech BoCougar 33 ff. 2006, and drives as new. Antique & 1996 reg. cab, exc. leather, $1700 wheels nanza A36, new 10-550/ Satin Silver color with Fleetwood D i s covery 14 ft. slide, awning, glass 8 u p holstery, w/snow tires although prop, located KBDN. 40' 2003, diesel moeasy lift, stability bar, Classic Autos black leather interior, AM/FM/disc, 4 cyl. 5 car has not been wet in mint dash. PS, P B, Must Sell! Health forces torhome w/all bumper extends for Fleetwood Prowler 32' $65,000. 541-419-9510 $5,150. La Pine, 8 years. On t rip t o AC, 4 speed. Knock sale. Buick Riviera 1991, spd, options-3 slide outs, extra cargo, all ac2001, many upgrade 541-306-1 021 Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., offs. New tires. Fresh classic low-mileage car, satellite, 2 TV's,W/D, cess. incl., like new options, $14,500 obo. $5400, 541-593-4016. garaged, pampered, 541-480-1687, Dick. 327 N.O.M. All Coretc. 3 2 ,000 m i l es. condition, stored in vette restoration parts non-smoker, exclnt cond, Sport Utility Vehicles Wintered i n h e ated RV barn, used less 1921 Model T in and out. $64,500. $4300 obo 541-389-0049 shop. $89,900 O.B.O. than 10 t imes l oDelivery Truck 541-447-8664 c ally, no p ets o r Call: 541 410-2870 Restored 8 Runs smoking. $20,000 Chevrolet Suburban 1/5th interest in 1973 $9000. Ford Mustang Coupe obo. 541-536-2709. 2003, LT1500, Auto 541-389-8963 Cessna 150 LLC 1966, original owner, 4WD, Sunroof, 63K 150hp conversion, low VS, automatic, great m iles, very g o o d Chevrolet Corvette Keystone Ch allenger time on air frame and 1952 Ford Customline shape, $9000 OBO. condition, $ 9 , 0 00 Coupe 2007, 20,700 2004 CH34TLB04 34' engine, hangared in Coupe, project car, flat- 530-515-81 99 Plymouth B a r racuda 0BO, 541-480-2448 mi., beautiful cond. Bend. Excellent per- head V-8, 3 spd extra fully S/C, w/d hookups, 3LT loaded, victory 1966, original car! 300 new 18' Dometic awformance & affordG ulfstream S u n parts, & materials, $2000 I'ed, two-tone hp, 360 VS, centerFord Ranchero ning, 4 new tires, new sport 30' Class A able flying! $6,500. obo. 541-410-7473 Ford Bronco 1981 leather, powerseats, lines, 541-593-2597 1979 1988 ne w f r i dge, Kubota 7000w marine 541-410-6007 4 speed 4x4, 302 with logos, memory, with 351 Cleveland diesel generator, 3 TV, solar panel, new PROJECT CARS: Chevy engine, low miles, headsupdisplay, Jayco Eagle ss, modified engine. slides, exc. cond. inrefrigerator, wheel2-dr FB 1949-(SOLD) 8 h eaders, roll b a r , nav., XM, Bose, tilt, 26.6 ft long, 2000 s ide & o ut . 27 " T V Body is in c hair l i ft . 4 0 0 0 W L~ qg Chevy Coupe 1950 hitch kit, good tires, chrome wheels, upexcellent condition, dvd/cd/am/fm ent. g enerator, Goo d - n4+ ~ ~ rolling chassis's $1750 straight body, runs graded drilled slotSleeps 6, 14-ft slide, center. Call for more $2500 obo. condition! $1 8,000 ea., Chevy 4-dr 1949, great, $950. ted b rake r o tors, awning, Eaz-Lift details. Only used 4 541-420-4677 obo 541-447-5504 complete car, $ 1949; 541-350-7176 extra insulation, alChevy C-20 Pickup stabilizer bars, heat times total in last 5 i/~ N Cadillac Series 61 1950, ways garaged, seri1969, all orig. Turbo 44; & air, queen years.. No pets, no 2 dr. hard top, complete 1974 Bellanca H onda CR V E X - L ous only $36,500. walk-around bed, smoking. High r etail auto 4-spd, 396, model JAMEE 1982 20', w /spare f r on t c l i p ., 1730A A WD 2 0 0 9 , 3 3 K 541-771-2852. CST /all options, orig. very good condition, $27,700. Will sell for low miles on it, $3950, 541-382-7391 m iles, 1 own e r , owner, $19,950, $24,000 including slid$10,000 obo. self-contained. Runs 2180 TT, 440 SMO, leather, moon roof, Chevy Impala LT 2012, 541-923-6049 i ng hitch that fits i n 541-595-2003 Great, everything flat-tow ready. 180 mph, excellent 5136 mi, Rear spoiler. your truck. Call 8 a.m. works. $3,000. Ford T-Bird, 1966, 390 • Chevy 1955 PROJECT Pick u p s Loaded! $ 2 1 ,995. ¹121191. $15,299 condition, always to 10 p.m. for appt to 541-382-6494 engine power everycar. 2 door wgn, 350 Vin¹007655. hangared, 1 owner Mallard 22' 19 9 5 , see. 541-330-5527. small block w/Weiand thing, new paint, 54K 541-480-3265 for 35 years. $60K. ready for hunting seadual quad tunnel ram original m i les, runs Oregon son, sleeps 7, fully with 450 Holleys. T-10 great, excellent condiANtnSnurce equipped, very clean, In Madras, 4-speed, 12-bolt posi, tion in 8 out. Asking 541-598-3750 good cond, $5000; or call 541-475-6302 Weld Prostar wheels, $8,500. 541-480-3179 www. aaaoregonautotrade for Subaru Outextra rolling chassis + source.com back or PT Cruiser, extras. $6500 for all. Chevy 2500 HD 2003 Executive Hangar obo. 541-678-5575 541-389-7669. 4 WD w o r k tru c k , Need to get an at Bend Airport (KBDN) KOUNTRY AIRE 60' wide x 50' d eep, 140,000 miles, $7000 Jeep Grand Keystone Montana ad in ASAP? 1994 37.5' motorobo. 541-408-4994. 2955 RL 2008, w/55' wide x 17' high biC herokee 1 9 9 9 , home, with awning, You can place it 2 slides, arctic fold dr. Natural gas heat, 1 59,970 mil e s . and one slide-out, insulation, loaded, offc, bathroom. Adjacent online at: 4WD, au t o matic Only 47k miles Ford Thunderbird excellent never used to Frontage Rd; great transmission, cloth www.bendbulletin.com and good condition. 1955, new white soft visibility for aviation busicondition. $29,900 interior, power ev$25,000. ness. Financing avail- I top, tonneau cover 541-923-4707 erything, A/C, Chevy Nova - 1976, 541-548-0318 Monte Carlo 2012 Limand upholstery. New 541-385-5809 able. 541-948-2126 or $3,400. iphoto above is of a ited Edition, 2 slides, 2 chrome. B e a utiful Chevy Silverado 2004 trailer hitch. Well email 1jetjock@q.com Rebuilt 327 engine. maintained & runs similar model ft not the Chrysler Concord 2001 A/Cs, 2 bdrm, sleeps $25,0 0 0 . HD 2500 2WD autoPiper A rcher 1 9 8 0,Call Matt 541-280-9463. Car. actual vehicle) great. $3850. 4 door sedan, good 6-8 comfortably, has 541-548-1422 matic V-S, 6.0L, exbased in Madras, al541-385-5286 cond., 63k mi., $2900. w/d, dishwasher, many tended cab, canopy, ways hangared since 541-548-6860 extras, fully l o aded. AC, Cruise, G reat USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! $29,600 obo. Located new. New annual, auto Nissan 2011 Juke awd T ow P k g. ! P o w e r pilot, IFR, one piece t inted windows & NAV, moonroof, Door-to-door selling with in Bend. 682-777-8039 MONTANA 3585 2008, windshield. Fastest Ar$2 0 , 995 l ocks, AM/FM C D , ¹016566 exc. cond., 3 slides, cher around. 1750 tofast results! It's the easiest Fully carpeted bed king bed, Irg LR, tal t i me . $ 6 8 ,500. way in the world to sell. canopy. Only 26,345 Arctic insulation, all 541-475-6947, ask for Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, GMC Vgton 1971, Only miles. $18,000. Oregorg Chrysler Newport options $35,000 obo. Rob Berg. The Bulletin Classified 541-546-5512 $7,000 OBO / trades. $19,700! Original low 541-420-3250 AutoSource (2) 1962 4 door sedans, 541-385-5809 leave message on Please call mile, exceptional, 3rd $2500 and $5500. 541-598-3750 541-389-6998 owner. 951-699-7171 Answering machine NuWa 297LK Hitchaaaoregonautosource.com La Pine, 541-602-8652. Orbit 21'2007, used Hiker 2007, All seaonly 8 times, A/C, sons, 3 slides, 32' oven, tub s hower, perfect for snow birds, micro, load leveler left kitchen, rear hitch, awning, dual Superhavvk lounge, extras, must batteries, sleeps 4-5, see. Prineville Ownership Share Monaco Windsor, 2001, EXCELLENT CON541-447-5502 days 8 Available! loaded! (was $234,000 DITION. All acces541-447-1641 eves. Economical flying new) Solid-surface sories are included. in your own counters, convection/ $15,000 OBO. IFR equipped rg~ i micro, 4-dr, fridge, 541-382-9441 Cessna 172/180 HP for washer/dryer, ceramic only $13,500! New tile & carpet, TV, DVD, Garmin Touchscreen ll • I satellite dish, leveling, • RV avionics center stack! 8-airbags, power cord CONSIGNMENTS Exceptionally clean! reel, 2 full pass-thru Pilgrim 27', 2007 5th WANTED Hangared at BDN. trays, Cummins ISO 8.3 wheel, 1 s lide, AC, We Do The Work ... Call 541 -728-0773 350hp turbo Diesel, 7.5 TV,full awning, excelYou Keep The Cash! Diesel gen set. $85,000 lent shape, $23,900. On-site credit obo. 503-799-2950 TURN THE PAGE 541-350-8629 approval team, stS For More Ads web site presence. "Little Red Corvette" We Take Trade-Ins! The Bulletin •5 Free Advertising. T-Hangar for rent BIG COUNTRY RV at Bend airport. Bend: 541-330-2495 Call 541-382-8998. Redmond: 541-548-5254 NATIONAL DOLPHIN Recreation by Design 37' 1997, loaded! 1 2013 Monte Carlo, 38-ft. glonaco Dynasty slide, Corian surfaces, Trucks & Top living room 5th orvette wood floors (kitchen), ooa LOADED' ~ Heavy Equipment wheel, has 3 slideouts, 2 onvert b 2-dr fridge, convection solid A/Cs, entertainment Features inctude "pe, 350 microwave, Vizio TV & rs, 4 « center, fireplace, W/D, roof satellite, walk-in Surface counte, lcro ith 132 garden tub/shower, in shower, new queen bed. frid,gs,convectlo™r cegreat condition. $42,500 mPg. Ad White leather hide-a- WEEKEND WARRIOR or best offer. Call Peter, built irt washer/dryer bed & chair, all records, Toy hauler/travel trailer. scriPtlcnand 307-221-2422, no pets or s moking. 24' with 21' interior. ramic tile floor, TU,DUD, " ereshngf a-'-e ( in La Pine ) $28,450. WILL DELIVER 1987 Freightliner COE 3satellite dish, air leveiing, Sleeps 6. Self-con"o'w mtrch storage Call 541-771-4600 axle truck, Cummins entained. Systems/ pass-through girl cpuid h gine, 10-spd, runs! $3900 king size bed appearancein good Roadmaster RM3477 tow da' Your auto, RV, motorcycle, RV tray, an «cal llketh. '" obo. 541-419-2713 dolly, like new, elect. brks, condition. Smoke-free. CONSIGNMENTS - Anfor only Tow with s/g-ton. Strong $1500. 541-504-7483 boat, or airplane $)2 5po WANTED $149,000 suspension; can haul We Do The Work ... 54I-Qpo p 541-000-000 ATVs snowmobiles, ad runs until it sells RV You Keep The Cash! even a small car! Great CONSIGNMENTS On-site credit price - $8900. or up to 12 months WANTED approval team, Call 541-593-6266 We Do The Work ... web site presence. (whichever comes first!) You Keep The Cash! We Take Trade-Ins! Backhoe On-site credit Free Advertising. Looking for your 2007 John Deere Includes up to 40 words of text, 2" in length, with border, approval team, BIG COUNTRY RV next employee? 310SG, cab 4x4, web site presence. Bend: 541-330-2495 Place a Bulletin help 4-in-1 bucket full color photo, bold headline and price. Redmond: We Take Trade-Ins! wanted ad today and Extendahoe, 541-548-5254 Free Advertising. reach over 60,000 hydraulic thumb, • Daily publication in The Bulletin, an audience of over 70,000. BIG COUNTRY RV readers each week. loaded, like new, Bend: 541-330-2495 Your classified ad 500 hours. 865 Redmond: • Weekly publication in Central Oregon Marketplace —DELIVERED will also appear on New $105,000. 541-548-5254 Canopies & Campersi bendbulletin.com Sell $75,000. to over 30,000 households. which currently re541-350-3393 ceives over 1.5 mil• Weekly publication in The Central Oregon Nickel Ads with an audience of over lion page views ev30,000 in Central and Eastern Oregon ery month at no Mitsubishi Fuso extra cost. Bulletin 1995 14' box truck • Continuous listing with photo on Bendbulletin.com Classifieds Get Rewith lift gate, Lance 8s/g' camper, 1991 Winnebaqo Suncruiser34' sults! Call 385-5809 184,000 miles, Great cond; toilet & full2004, only 34K, loaded, or place your ad needs turbo seal. * A $290 value based on an ad with the same extra features, publishing 28-ad days in the size bed. Lightly used. too much to list, ext'd on-line at $3500 or best offer. Recently serviced, above publications. Private party ads only. warr. thru 2014, $54,900 bendbulletin.com 541-420-2323 $4500. 503-307-8571 Dennis, 541-589-3243

fg (geel

~!

f'gg ~~r

FOR ONLY

00+

~gppgg ggIWAfC~

QUiPER gggLiflt

ypfCNL

R

a

R

- '- pgI N . t)II +

eB

Updatedsingle level SlarwoodHome,motivated sellers! Newsiding, new roof,newfireplace,freshexterior paint, loadsof kitchen cabinets and extra storage.The list goeson andon. Enjoy living iir lovely Starwoodwith ils walking trails, parksandopenspaces. RV,boat and toy storage.Homeis impeccably maintained, backsto openspacew/ soothingwaterfeature.64762sarosLane, Bend97701, e259,900

Karen Malaisga, a oae

541-Bslo-3326

~ t— ;.,t "

'

'

'

'

"

I


E6 FRIDAY AUGUST 9, 2013 • THE BULLETIN Automobiles

uMy little red Corvette" Coupe

Automobiles

Automobiles

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9 Automobiles •

Honda Civic EXL2012 sedan, Nav., 20k mi., ¹ 349483. $20,995

SOLD!

I

Oregou

1996, 350 auto, 132,000 miles. Non-ethanol fuel & synthetic oil only,

garaged, premium Bose stereo,

$11,000.

541-923-1781 Where can you find a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it's all here in The Bulletin's "Call A Service Professional" Directory

CORVETTE Convertible2005 Automatic LS2 high performance motor, only 29k miles, Sterling S ilver, b l ack leather interior, Bose premium sound stereo, new quality tires and battery, car and

CORVETTE COUPE Glasstop 2010 Grand Sport - 4 LT loaded, clear bra hood & fenders. New Michelin Super

Sports, G.S. floor mats, 17,000 miles, Crystal red. $42,000.

seat covers, many 503-358-1164. extras. Rec e ntly factory serviced. Garaged. Beautiful Need help fixing stuff? car, Perfect cond. Call A Service Professional $29,700 find the help you need. SOLD! www.bendbulletin.com

AutoSource

L e gal Notices

Legal Notices

L e g al Notices •

1978, IN CABINET A, lic sale by competiP AGE 1 7 9 , DE S - t ive bidding on t h e CHUTES C O UNTY, 24th day of August, 2013 at 1 1:00 a.m., TO INTE R ESTED OREGON. on t h e pre m ises P E RSONS. Case No: Commonly known as: where said property 13PB0083. No t i ce: 22960 Yucca Court, has been stored and The Circuit Court of Oregon which are located at the State of Oregon, Bend, for the County of Des- 9 7701.NOTICE T O Bend Sentry Storage, 1 291 S E Wil s o n, chutes, h a s ap- DEFENDANTS: p ointed M a rtin A . R EAD THESE P A - B end, State of O r egon, the f ollowing: Duncan as Personal PERS CAREFULLY! Representative of the A lawsuit has b e en Unit ¹25 Robyn Sunstarted against you in flower, Unit ¹171 Brett Estate of Nancy M. abo v e-entitled B allman, Unit ¹ 1 8 1 Chapman, deceased. the Su n Trust Andrew We l c ome, All persons having court b y Mortgage, Inc., plain- Unit ¹383 Kurt Cutlip, claims against said Unit ¹319 Karen Norestate are required to tiff. P l aintiff's claims present the s a me, are stated in the writ- I'I s . with proper vouchers ten complaint, a copy LEGAL NOTICE to Martin A. Duncan, of which was filed with NOTICE OF SEIZURE the abo v e-entitled c/o ANDREA SHARFOR CIVIL Court. TEL, ATTY AT LAW, FORFEITURE PO Box 688, Bend, You must "appear" in TO ALL POTENTIAL OR 97709 within four this case or the other CLAIMANTS months from the date side will win automatiAND TO ALL of first publication of c ally. T o "appear" UNKNOWN PERSONS this notice as stated you must file with the READ THIS below, or they may be court a l egal docuCAREFULLY ment called a "motion" barred. All p e rsons The If you have any interest whose rights may be or "answer." affected by this pro- "motion" or "answer" in the seized property ceeding may obtain (or "reply") must be described below, you additional information given to t h e c o u rt must claim that interclerk or administrator est or you will autofrom the records of the court, the P e r- within 30 days of the matically lose that insonal Representative, date of first publica- terest. If you do not tion specified herein file a c laim for t he or the Attorney for Personal Representa- a long with t h e r e - property, the property q uired filing fee. I t may be forfeited even tive. Dated and first p ublished July 2 6 , must be i n p r o per if you are not con2013. Personal repre- form and have proof victed of any crime. o f service o n t h e To claim an interest, sentative: Martin A. D uncan, 140 0 W . plaintiff's attorney or, you must file a written 25th, ¹10, Anchorage, if the plaintiff does not claim with the forfeiat t orney, ture counsel named AK 99503. Attorney have a n for Personal Repre- proof of service on the below, Th e w r i tten s entative: And r e a plaintiff. claim must be signed Shartel, OSB¹96178, If you have any ques- by you, sworn to untions, you should see der penalty of perjury PO Box 688, Bend, O R 9 7 709, T e l e - an attorney immedi- before a notary public, phone: (541) ately. I f y o u n e ed and state: (a) Your 330-1704, Fax: (541) help in finding an at- true name; (b) The torney, you may con- address at which you 330-1844, Email: andrea©shartellaw.com tact the Oregon State will a c cept f u t u re Bar's Lawyer Referral m ailings f ro m th e LEGAL NOTICE Service o n line a t court and f o rfeiture Former students who www.oregonstatebar. counsel; and (3) A were served by the org or by calling (503) H igh Desert E S D , 684-3763 ( in t h e s tatement that y o u Central Oregon Re- Portland metropolitan have an interest in the gional Program, may area) or toll-free else- seized property. Your deadline for filing the request their records. where in Oregon at claim document with Records will remain (800) 452-7636. forfeiture cou n s el confidentially filed unThis summons is isn amed below is 2 1 til the age of 26, at sued pursuant to days from the last day which time they will be ORCP 7. of publication of this destroyed. C o ntact RCO LEGAL, P.C. notice. Where to file 541-693-5700.

LEGAL NOTICE Estate of NANCY M. CHAPMAN. NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, V.

UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JANIS CLAIRE ADAMS-ISSAK; DAVID

ADAMS; REBECCA ADAMS-GAGE; STATE OF OREGON; OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES; AND THE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED AT 22960 YUCCA COURT, BEND, OREGON 97701,

Defendants. Case No. 13CV0591 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

TO THE DEFENDANTS: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JANIS CLAIRE ADAMSISSAK:

In the name of the State of Oregon, you are h ereby required t o

appear and answer

the c omplaint f iled a gainst you i n t h e above-entitled C ourt

and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publica-

Michael Botthof, OSB ¹113337

mbotthoforcolegal.com Attorneys for Plaintiff 511 SW 10th Ave.,

Ste. 400 Portland, OR 97205 P: (503) 977-7840 F: (503) 977-7963

a claim and for more i nformation: Da i n a Vitolins, Crook County D istrict Attor n ey Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754.

Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiLEGAL NOTICE IN T H E CIR C U IT ture because it: (1) COURT O F T HE Constitutes the proSTATE OF OREGON ceeds of the violation of, solicitation to vioFOR THE COUNTY OF DES C H UTES late, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to PROBATE DEPARTMENT. In the Matter violates, the criminal of t h e Es t at e o f laws of the State of LOUISE BLASQUEZ, Oregon regarding the Decedent. Case No. manufacture, distribution, or possession of 13PB0071. NOTICE TO INT E RESTED controlled substances (ORS C hapter475); PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN

that the undersigned has been appointed

personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to p resent them, w i t h vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative in care of David W. Smiley, D a vid W. Smiley,P.C., 70 SW Century Drive, Ste. 100-333, Bend, Or-

and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or f a cilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of

the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or p ossession of c o ntrolled su b stances (ORS Chapter 475).

IN THE MATTER OF: egon 97702, w ithin four months after the (1) One 2006 Honda VIN date of first publica- Accord, 1HGCM66506A05453 tion of this notice, or 1, Case No 12-2200 the claims may be barred. All p e rsons and 12-1481, seized December 19, 2012 whose rights may be affected by the pro- from Jeffrey Paxton. ceedings may obtain LEGAL NOTICE additional information The Crooked River from the records of Watershed Council is the Court, the p ercurrently see k i ng

Automobiles

r-,;„;..;,.v

sonal representative, q ualifications fr o m or the lawyers for the qualified e x cavation personal representa- contractors to remove tive, David W. Smiley, Stearns Dam from the tion in this matter is P.C. Dated and first Crooked River. More July 19, 2013. If you published on July 26, i nformation can b e fail timely to appear 2 013. B ERN I C E found at and answer, plaintiff BLASQUEZ, Per- www.crwc.info in the will a pply t o the sonal Representative, Job Opp o rtunities above-entitled c o u rt PO Box 2208, Terrefor the relief prayed bonne, O R 9 7 7 60, section. for in its c omplaint. LEGAL NOTICE This is a judicial fore- (541) 678-3988. TRUSTEE'S NOTICE closure of a deed of LEGAL NOTICE OF SALE t rust i n w h ic h t h e NOTICE IS HEREBY The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to plaintiff requests that GIVEN that the u nt he plaintiff b e a l - dersigned intends to O regon law i s r e lowed t o f o r eclose sell personal property ferred to as f ollows y our interest in t he from unit(s) listed be- (the "Trust Deed"): following d e s cribed low to enforce a lien G rantor: LINDA D real property: imposed o n sai d HAVILL-CHASE, LOT TWENTY-THREE p roperty under t h e TITLE VESTED AS: DIANE (23), BLOCK FOUR Oregon Self Storage LINDA Trus t ee: (4), CIM A R RON F acilities Act ( O RS HAVILL. CITY, R E CORDED 87.685). The underBRAD WIL L IAMS. NOVEMEBER 26, signed will sell at pub- Beneficiary: STER-

Legal Notices •

Au t o mobiles

541-322-6928

Automo b iles Porsche 911 Turbo t

and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers

Porsche Carrera 911 2003 convertible with hardtop. 50K miles, new factory Porsche motor 6 mos ago with 18 mo factory warranty remaining. $37,500.

Automobiles •

Porsche 911 Carrera 993 cou e

Vehicle? Call The Bulletin

6

ru

Nissan 350Z 2005 Black, excellent condition, 22,531 gently driven miles, 1 owner, non-smoker, $14,000.

L'"" " " ' J

541-389-9569

Automobiles

( The Bulletin (

1000

I

975

Newmar Scottsdale 33-ft., 2005 www.aaaoregonautoGMC 8.1L Vortec engine, source.com Allison transmission, Workhorse frame, 2 slides. All upgrades! 3 Mustang GT 1995 red awnings, skylight, rain 133k miles, Boss 302 sensor vent, 32" flat motor, custom pipes, screen TV, solar panel, 5 s p ee d m a n ual, back-up camera, HWH The Bulletin power windows, cusjacks, plumbed for towTo Subscribe call tom stereo, very fast. ing bar & hitch. 19K $5800. 541-280-791 0 541-385-5800 or go to miles, in excellent cond. www.bendbulletin.com $45,000.541-520-6450 541-598-3750

Toyota Camrysi 1984, SOLD; 1985 SOLD; 1986 parts car Ford Taurus 2003 SSE only one left! $500 Bendhomes.com s edan, e xc . c o n d Call for details, for Complete Listings of 6 3 , 000 miles. $5,000 541-548-6592

Area Real Estate for Sale

975

541-480-9822

Just too many collectibles?

Olds Aurora 2001, V-6 Sedan, white diamond, gold pkg. Sell them in Leather, 80K miles, The Bulletin Classifieds exc. cond. $6995. Vin ¹121190. 541-480-3265

541-385-5809

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

L ING SAVI N G S tice, th e m a sculine fees and expenses of gender includes the sale, including a reaBANK. Date: April 5, feminine a n d the sonable charge by the 2010. Recording neuter, the s ingular Trustee. NOTICE OF Date: April 8, 2 010. Recording Reference: includes the p l ural, R IGHT T O C U R E : the word "Grantor" in- The right exists for 2010-14136. County of Recording: Des- cludes any successor any person named the under ORS 86.753, at c hutes. The Tru s t in i nterest t o Grantor as well as any any time that is not Deed covers the following described real other person owing an later than five days property in the County obligation, the perfor- before the date last mance of which is se- set for the s ale, to o f D eschutes a n d State of Oregon, to- cured by th e T r ust have this foreclosure Deed, and the words proceeding dismissed gether with all personal property and "Trustee" and "Ben- and the Trust Deed eficiary" include their reinstated by doing all rents, as defined in s u c ces- of the following: 1. the Trust Deed (col- respective lectively "the Prop- sors in interest, if any. Paying the B e nefi15, c iary t he enti r e erty"): Lot Ten (10) DATED: M a y Block Two (2) CHOC- 2013. Gary L. Black- a mount t he n du e lidge, Successor (other than such porTAW VILLAGE, recorded July 1, 1977, Trustee, 1515 SW 5th tion of the principal as Ave., Suite 600, Portwould not then be due in Cabinet B, Page 245, Desc h utes l and, O R 972 0 1 , had no d efault ocTelephone: (503) curred); 2.Curing any County, Oregon. The Grantor or other per- 295-2668, Facsimile: other default c o mplained of herein that son owing the debt (503) 224-8434. is capable of being has defaulted as procured by tendering the vided under the Trust LEGAL NOTICE performance required Deed, and both the TRUSTEE'S NOTICE u nder the d eb t o r Beneficiary and t he OF SALE T rust Deed; and 3 . Trustee have elected The trust deed to be to foreclose the Trust foreclosed pursuant to Paying all costs and D eed and s ell t h e O regon law i s r e - expenses actually inProperty to satisfy the ferred to as follows curred in enforcing the obligations secured by (the "Trust Deed"): debt and Trust Deed, with the Trust Deed. The Grantor: LINDA D together Trustee's and attordefault for which fore- HAVILL-CHASE, ney fees not exceedclosure is permitted is TITLE VESTED AS: the Grantor's failure to LINDA D . H A V I LL. ing the amounts prop ay when du e t h e Trustee: BRAD WIL- vided by ORS 86.753. In construing this nofollowing sums: Final LIAMS. Beneficiary: payment of all out- STERLING SAV- tice, th e m a sculine gender includes the standing principal and INGS BANK. Date: feminine a n d the accrued interest due April 5, 2010. Reneuter, the s ingular April 1, 2012, plus un- cording Date: April 8, includes the p l ural, paid taxes with inter- 2010. Recording Refest and penalties, city erence: 2010-14137. the word "Grantor" inliens, assessments, if County of Recording: cludes any successor t he any. By reason of the Deschutes. The Trust in i nterest t o default, the B e nefi- Deed covers the fol- Grantor as well as any ciary has declared all lowing described real other person owing an sums owing on t he property in the County obligation, the perforobligation secured by o f D e schutes a n d mance of which is sethe Trust Deed imme- State of Oregon, to- cured by th e T rust Deed, and the words diately due and pay- gether with all per"Trustee" and "Benable as foll o ws: sonal property and eficiary" include their $160,000 tog e ther rents, as defined in with interest thereon the Trust Deed (col- respective s u ccesat the rate of 6 per- lectively "the Prop- sors in interest, if any. DATED: Ma y 15, cent per annum from erty"): Lot Four (4) March 1, 2012 B lock Fo u r (4) 2013. Gary L. Blacklidge, Succ e ssor t hrough March 3 1 , CHOCTAW VILLAGE, Trustee, 1515 SW 5th 2012, then continuing recorded July 1 1977 Ave., Suite 600, Portto accrue at the dein Cabinet B, Page fault interest rate of 11 245, Desc h u tes l and, O R 972 0 1 , Telephone: (503) percent per annum County, Oregon. The from April 1 , 2 0 12, Grantor or other per- 295-2668, Facsimile: (503) 224-8434. until paid, t o gether son owing the debt with Trustee's fees, has defaulted as proattorney's fees, fore- vided under the Trust LEGAL NOTICE closure costs and any Deed, and both the TRUSTEE'S NOTICE sums advanced by B eneficiary and t h e OF SALE the Beneficiary pursu- Trustee have elected The Trust Deed to be ant to the Trust Deed, to foreclose the Trust foreclosed pursuant to l ess reserves a n d D eed and s el l t h e O regon law i s r e credits, if any. NOProperty to satisfy the ferred to as f ollows TICE: The Trustee will obligations secured by (the "Trust Deed"): 1. on October 2, 2013, at the Trust Deed. The T RUST DEED I N t he hour o f 1 0 : 00 default for which fore- FORMATION: o'clock, A.M., at the closure is permitted is Grantor: Curtis S. Front West Entrance the Grantor's failure to Swanson, 63903 of t h e De s c hutes p ay when due t h e Quail Haven D rive, County Courthouse, following sums: Final B end, O R 977 0 1 . 1164 NW Bond, in the payment of al l o ut- Beneficiary: GenCity of Bend, County standing principal and eral Electric Capital of Deschutes, State of accrued interest due Corporation, G E D IOregon, sell at public April 1, 2012, plus un- RECT, 635 Maryville auction to the highest paid taxes with inter- Centre Drive, Suite bidder for cash the est and penalties, city 120, St. Louis, MO interest in the Prop- liens, assessments, if 633141. Tru s t ee: erty which the Grantor any. By reason of the Western Title & Eshad or had power to default, th e B e nefi- crow Company, 1345 convey at the time of ciary has declared all NW Wall Street, Suite t he e x ecution b y sums owing on the 200, Bend, OR Grantor of the Trust obligation secured by 97701. Suc c essor Deed, together with the Trust Deed imme- Trustee: Alex I. Poust any interest which the diately due and pay- 1211 SW 5th Avenue, Grantor acquired af- able a s foll o ws: Suite 1900, Portland, ter the execution of $160,000 to g e ther OR 97204, (503) t he Trust Deed, t o with interest thereon 222-9981. Recording satisfy the obligations at the rate of 6 perD ate: December 2 9 , hereby secured and cent per annum from 2006. Recording Refthe costs, a ttorney March 1, 2012 erence:2006-84849. fees and expenses of t hrough March 3 1 , County of Recording: sale, including a rea- 2012, then continuing Deschutes C o u nty. sonable charge by the to accrue at the de- The Beneficial interTrustee. NOTICE OF fault interest rate of 11 est in the Trust Deed RIGHT TO C U R E: percent per a nnum was assigned to BusiThe right exists for from April 1 , 2 0 12, ness Property Lendany person named until paid, t o gether ing, Inc., by i nstruunder ORS 86.753, at with Trustee's fees, m ent recorded o n any time that is not attorney's fees, foreNovember 7, 2012, as later than five days closure costs and any Document No. before the date last sums advanced by 2012-044842, in t he set for the sale, to the Beneficiary pursu- official records of Dehave this foreclosure ant to the Trust Deed, schutes County, Orproceeding dismissed l ess r eserves a n d egon. 2.LEGAL DEand the Trust Deed credits, if any. NO- SCRIPTION OF reinstated by doing all TICE: The Trustee will PROPERTY (the "Property"): Parcel 1 of the following: 1. on October 2, 2013, at Paying th e B e nefi- t he h ou r o f 3:0 0 of Partition Plat No. c iary t he ent i r e o'clock, P.M., at the 1994-46, located in a mount t h e n du e Front West Entrance the Southwest Quar(other than such por- of t h e De s c hutes ter of the Northeast tion of the principal as County C ourthouse, Quarter (SW1/4 would not then be due 1164 NW Bond, in the NE1/4) of Section 9, had no default ocCity of Bend, County Township 17 South, curred); 2.Curing any of Deschutes, State of Range 12 East of the other default c o m- Oregon, sell at public Willamette Meridian, plained of herein that auction to the highest Deschutes C o unty, is capable of being bidder for cash the Oregon. 3.DEFAULT: cured by tendering the interest in the Prop- The Grantor or any performance required erty which the Grantor other person owing an u nder the d eb t o r had or had power to obligation, the perforT rust Deed; and 3 . convey at the time of mance of which is sePaying all costs and t he e x e cution b y cured by th e T rust expenses actually in- Grantor of the Trust Deed, is in default and curred in enforcing the Deed, together with the Beneficiary seeks debt and Trust Deed, any interest which the to foreclose the Trust together with Grantor acquired afDeed. The default for Trustee's and attor- ter the execution of which foreclosure is ney fees not exceed- t he Trust Deed, to made i s G r a ntor's ing the amounts pro- satisfy the obligations failure to do the folvided by ORS 86.753. hereby secured and l owing: F a ilure t o In construing this no- the costs, a t torney make monthly pay-

L e g al Notices

2003 6 speed, X50 added power pkg., 530 HP! Under 10k miles, Arctic silver, gray leather interior new quality t i res, and battery, Bose premium sound stereo, moon/sunroof, car and seat covers. Many extras. Garaged, perfect condition $5 9 ,700.

1996, 73k miles, Tiptronic auto.

transmission. Silver, blue leather interior, moon/sunroof, new quality tires and battery, car and seat covers, many extras. Recently fully serviced, garaged, looks and runs like new. Excellent condition $29,700

541-322-9647

541-322-9647

FIND IT! IBIIT IT' SELL ITI

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds The Bulletin Classifieds

Legal Notices •

ments as required in exceedingthe amount ORS t he note a n d a n y provided i n 8 6.753. There a r e modifications, in the amount of government agencies $14,212.00, per and nonprofit organimonth, for the months zations that can give December 2012 you information about through May 2 0 13; foreclosures and help unpaid late charges in you decide what to do. For the name and t he amo u n t of $4,263.60 as of May phone number of an organization near you, 21, 2013; an unpaid NSF fee of $50.00; an please call the stateunpaid Appraisal Fee wide phone contact at i n th e a m ount o f number $4,500.00, and failure 1-800-SAFENET to pay real property (1-800-723-3638). In construing this notice, taxes for the y ears 2012-13 when due. 4. the masculine gender A MOUNT DUE: B y includes the feminine reason of the default and the neuter, the singular includes the just described, t he plural, t h e word Beneficiary has declared all sums owing "Grantor" includes any successor in interest on the obligation secured by th e T rust to the Grantor as well Deed immediately due as any other person and payable, those owing an obligation, the performance of sums being the following: Principal bal- which is secured by and ance of the Trust Deed, "Trustee" $1,516,331.94, t o- the words gether with u n paid and "Beneficiary" ininterest of $68,753.02 clude their respective through M a y 21, successors in interest, 2013, base prepay- if any. We are a debt ment premium in the collector attempting to amount of collect a debt and any $15,163.32, u n paid information we obtain late f ee s in the will be used to collect amount of $4,263.60 the d e bt . D A T ED: May 24, 2013. /s/ Alex as of May 21, 2013, Poust. ALEX and continuing until POUST, S u ccessor reinstatement or the date of sale, unpaid Trustee. NSF f e e in the amount o f $ 5 0 .00, LEGAL NOTICE unpaid appraisal fee TS No i n th e a m ount o f 0R08000024-13-1 APN 140634 TO No $ 4,500.00, unp a id processing fee in the 8202726 TRUSTEE'S a mount o f $40 0 , N OTICE O F S A L E Trustee's fees, Reference is made to attorney's fees, costs that certain Deed of of foreclosure and any Trust made by: Bevsums advanced by erly Arline Highfill, as the Beneficiary pursu- Grantor to Firs t ant to the terms of the American Title Ins Co. Trust Deed. Interest as Trustee, in favor of continues to accrue Seattle Mor t gage on the unpaid princiCompany, as Benefip al balance at t h e ciary, and recorded on default ra te of February 18, 1998 in 1 1.140% per annum Book 480, on Page from May 22, 2013, 2373 of offi c i al until paid. 5.ELECrecords in the Office TION TO SELL: The of the Recorder of Beneficiary h e r eby Deschutes C o unty, elects to foreclose the Oregon to-wit: APN: Trust Deed by adver- 1 40634 L O T 1 0 I N tisement and sale as BLOCK 7 OF FORprovided under ORS E ST V I EW , DE S 86.705 to 86.795, and CHUTES COUNTY, to cause the property O REGON . C om to be sold at public m only k nown a s : auction to the highest 52900 Sunrise Boulebidder for cash, the v ard, L a Pine, O R Grantor's interest in 97739 Both the Benthe described prop- eficiary a n d the erty which the Grantor Trustee have elected had, or had the power to sell the said real to convey, at the time property to satisfy the of the execution by obligations secured by t he Grantor of t h e said Trust Deed and Trust Deed, together notice has been rewith any interest the corded pursuant to Grantor or Grantor's Section 86.735(3) of successor in interest Oregon Revised Statacquired after the ex- utes. The default for ecution of the Trust which the foreclosure Deed, to satisfy the is m ad e is the obligations secured by G rantor's failure t o the Trust Deed, inp ay: failed t o p a y cluding the expenses payments which beof the sale, compen- came due Monthly sation of the Trustee Payment $0 Monthly as provided by l aw Late Charge $0 By and the r easonable this reason of s a id fees of the Trustee's default th e B e nefiattorneys. 6.DATE ciary has declared all AND TIME OF SALE: obligations secured by Date: October 8, said Trust Deed im2013. Time: 10:00 m ediately due a n d A.M. (in accord with payable, said sums the standard of time being the f ollowing, established by ORS t o-wit: The s u m o f 187.110). L o cation: $0.00 together with Outside the Main En- interest thereon at the trance, of th e D es- rate of 0.00000% per chutes County Court- annum from Decemhouse, 1 16 4 NW b er 2 7 2 0 1 2 u n t il Bond St., Bend, OR paid; plus all accrued 97701. 7.RIGHT TO late charges thereon; REINSTATE: Any and all Trustee's fees, person named in ORS foreclosure costs and 86.753 has the right, any sums advanced at any time prior to by th e B e n eficiary five days before the pursuant to the terms Trustee conducts the of said Trust Deed. s ale, to h a v e t h i s Wherefore, notice is foreclosure dismissed hereby given that, the and the Trust Deed undersigned Trustee reinstated by doing all will on November 20, of the f ollowing: a. 2013 at the hour of payment to the Ben- 01:00 PM, Standard eficiary of the entire of Time, a s e s taba mount t he n d u e , lished b y Se c t ion other than such por- 187.110, Oregon Retion of the principal as vised Statues, at the would not then be due front entrance to the had no default ocDeschutes C o u nty curred; b.curing any Courthouse, 1164 NW other default that is Bond St., Bend, OR c apable o f bei n g 97701 County of Descured, by t endering chutes, sell at public the performance reauction to the highest quired under the obli- bidder for cash the gation or Trust Deed; i nterest in t h e s a id

and c.paying all costs and expenses actua lly incurred in e n forcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together wi t h the Trustee's and a ttorney's fees n o t

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Reach thousands of readers!

described real property w

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE On July 26, 2013, an application was filed with t h e Fed e ral Communications Commission in Washington, DC, for c onsent to t h e a s signment of license of Station KOHD, operating on Channel 51 at Bend, Oregon, from Three Sisters Broadcasting, LLC to Central Oregon Cable Advertising, LLC. The ultimate parent company of T h r ee Sisters Broadcasting, LLC is Pleasant Hill Corp., whose officers, directors and/or 10% or greater shareholders a r e Wil l i am Chambers, Silva Sullivan, Scott C h ambers and the Carolyn S. Chambers Trust. T he manager a n d majority member of Central Oregon Cable A dvertising, LLC i s Cable Ad v e rtising, Inc., whose officers, directors and/or 10% or greater shareholders are Donald Tykeson, Amy Tykeson, Thomas Palmer, Kay Olsen, the Donald E. Tykeson Trust and the Amy Tykeson Trust. A copy of the application and related materials are available for public inspection during regular business hours at 63049 Lower Meadow Drive, Bend, Oregon, 97701.


W~

is , is a n

THU 3-11,FRI 3-11,4 SATNOON-ll FAIIIIILY FRIENDLY UNTIL VPN

ATTHEEESSCHWABIMPHITHEATER

FREE EN7B7 MUGPURGHASEREQUIREOFORTASTIHGS

BENDBREWFEST.COM

-


Bk~

MCLM~&<W<E:1v'

Comm ilmenl Io

available af C p Lovejol s. WE'REPROUD TO OFFER A OeschuleB srelerrl

Sjjperior Prodjjcrs

Cascade LakesBreluerfl 10 Barrel PIlramid EIIlsian

Customer Service

SELECTION

G oodLifeBreming NinkasiBreming RogueRles

EYE8YE81OIIY &BRTIIRIIIIV

Full Sail Breluing

TI—6PM FROM

Widmer Brolhers Laurelluood BendBrefuingCo.

ThreeCreeks SilverMo on Oakshire

I' I II I I I '

'

Tl'

' ' l l I

I''

I

I I ' I II

I IIII

I •

R

NefuBelgiumBreluing THEOLDMILL DMTRI(T

SierraNe vada HlamalhBasin

cD CD

SoulhernOregonBreming Old SchoolHouseBreluerll

M AR K E T

Caldera HopfuorksUrbanBrefuerfl

W ineSremard on sile. Come enioq sampleof s some of the finest mines I beersavailable!

Burnside Breluerrl W alkabourBreming HopVallerl

OoublM eounlain Fearless Pelican I 2 1 Bend Brewfest2013 1 Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

I

I


HOW ITWORKS:

2013 RREWFE ST

Tasting Package:$12, includes Souvenir Mug 8FourTasting Tokens A one-time purchaseof asouvenir mug isrequiredfor tasting. Mugs from previous years will not befilled. Tasting tokensare requiredfor beer purchase. Tokens cost $1per —sold in packets of five —andequals a4-ounce taste. Avariety of food isavailable fromoutstanding local vendors listed onpage4. Cash is required.There is anATMon site. All ages arewelcomeuntil 7 p.m. eachnight with a parent or guardian inattendance. Parent/guardian is required tosign apledgeacknowledging the responsibility of preventing children fromconsumingalcohol andthe penalties for the parent and child. Readmittance ispermitted. The BendBrewfest is organized by NoLine, LLC,TheLes SchwabAmphitheater, Monqui PresentsandShowcall EventServices. Tocontact us, call 541-312-8510or e-mail info©bendbrewfest.com.

I.ES SCHWAB AMPHITHE ATER BENQ,IIREQIIN THURSDAY,AUGUST15TH 3 P.M.- 11 P.M. FRIDAY, AUGUST16TH 3 P.M.- 11 P.M.

SATURD AY, AUGUST 17TH NOON - 11 P.M. •

www.facebook.com/bend rewfest

PARTICIPATINGBREWERIESAND Safety, Parking 8FoodVendors. Brewfest Merchandise OSUFermentation Science. Brewfest Map Beer StylesDefined. The BrewsbyStyle Brewers andBeer.

BROWSINGTHE BREWS: PAGES 12-28

4 7

8 . 9 .10 .11

:' :, ::

.12-28: :

X-TapPourSchedule.. Meet theBrewers - Brewtality Tent Inte rview with Homebrew Leaders A NoteAbootthe Beneficiaries. From theBlogger -TheState of Beer..... ComeOn,GetHoppy! . Sco recard 8 PeoplChoice e's Voting .....

.13 .19 22

30 ........ 31 33 .... 34-38

BendBrewfest2013i Les SchwabAmphitheateri

3


0 IIIglE

THEREIS PLENTV OFBIKEPARKINGATAND AROUND THELESSCHWAB AMPHITHEATEH.PI.EjLSEUSEIT. 322 SWShevlin-Hixon Drive,Bend,OR 97702

Don't drink anddrive. IJsea designateddriver or call a cab. GET IT SHHTTLE: 541-610-6103 OWLTAXI: 541-382-3311 TWIUGHTTAXI:541-728-9222 CHECXE RCABCENIAL OREBON: 541-647-2099 BENDCABCOMPANV:

54 I-389-8090 DESllNA TIONTRANSPORTATION: 541-550-8055 ALLENS OFBEND,TAXI SERVICE: 541-410-8915 CASCAD ETOWNCARSHNICE: 541-526-5938reservation

required SOBER DIIIES: 541-636-0101

D RIK K R R S P O K S I B L Y : We've all heard this before, but it's important. Even a small amount of beercanimpair your judgement, sodon't put yourself in a position where youcanharm yourself, others, or turn into a complete fool. Hereare somewaysto achievethis:

DRINKBETTER.DRINKLESS. There's plenty of beer to behad, with plenty of time, so paceyourself. Drink for flavor, not just for impact. Alwayspractice moderation whendrinking. Get to knowyour limits, and don't exceedthem. If you feel that moment of absolute cheer,take abreak andgrab some water andfood.

HVDRATE SE EAT. Water is your friend. Drink plenty of it to help detoxify and counteract the alcohol

stripping water from yoursystem. Eatingalso replenishes thesystem, slows downyour rate of consumption, andhelps to absorb alcohol so you don't find yourself inebriated after a fewbeers. However,thougheating will slow the absorption of alcohol, it won't necessarily stop its impact. T h a n h y ou !

www.beeradvocate.com

SOIj P X H l X E ® X H X C X G % 5 WHERE TO GO FOR KEGS!

III •

I

L

I I

I' I I

I

r

I'

I II r

I I

I

I

I

I

'

III

I

I

III

' ' •

• I'

I

Askandyoushallrecei ve.Wehaveadded anawesomevendor lineup to the 2013Bend Brewfest. Just inside the entry to the

SUPP LYINGNEW ANDUSEDBEERKEGSTDTHECIFTBREW I NDUSTRY

W W W .G DPHERKEGS.CDM~e-~ownl 4 I Bend Brewfest2013 I Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

venue,youwill find a psychic, a massagetherapist offering 5-minut emassages,Dawg Grog,WomenEnjoying Beer,Bend City Bones, TheBeerAngles, corn hole games, andgeneral

tom-foolery. Enjoy!


IHNl P> P~ggttl iiII+

fMttI httII

Q +

STEVE HARTIN A N D T WI

F E AT U R I N G

9219FM RF fd 4 Q +d + RF+d 4 Q + d 4 4 d 4 P 4 dO P 4 d 4 P 4 d4 P

D

0 4

: :LO~S f : I- I

:

I

p

D

0

I O~S! LO~IILT! SO~VS:.

tr I0

0

9+ d O A F fd f RF+dOQ f d f

fd f P Gd+ P fdf P Od OP

F RIDRY O C T O B E R 4 ALL AGES • GENERAL ADMISSION 4 RESERVED SEATING

BendBrewfest2013( Les SchwabAmphitheater( 5


Vl V

EAST SIDE

W%ST SIDE 33 TAPS OF CRAFT 10 Barrel Brewing Co Angry Orchard Cider Atlas Cider Co Boneyard Beer Co

48 TAPS OF CR.AFT 10 Barrel Brewing Co 2 1st A m e n d m en t B r e w e r y A tlas Ci de r C o

Base Camp Brewery Bend Brewing Co Boneyard Beer Co Cascade Lakes Brewing Co

C rux Fe r m e n t a t i o n P r o j e c t

Deschutes Brewery D ouble M o u n t a i n B r e w e r y

C rux Fe r m e n t a t i o n P r o j e c t D eschutes B r e w e r y

Georgetown Brewing Co GoodLife Brewing Co Heathen Brewing Co Hop Valley Brewing Co . Klamath Basin Brewing Co Mac Sr. Jacks Brewery Mad River Brewing Co Maui Brewing Co New Belgium Brewing Co Ninkasi Brewing Co Red Tank Cider Co Rouge Brewery Silver Moon Brewery

Firestone Walker Brewing Co GoodLife Brewing Co Heathen Brewing Co Klamath Basin Brewing Co Lagunitas Brewing Co New Belgium Brewing Co Ninkasi Brewing Co R ed Tank C i d e r C o

Rouge Brewery Sierra Nevada Silver Moon Brewery Solstice Brewing Co Stone Brewing Co Terminal Gravity Brewing Three Creeks Brewing Co Volcano Vineyard Worthy Brewing

T wo Riv ers C i de r C o

' Volcano Vineyard

e

1400 NW College Way• Bend, OR 97701 Chevron

+ *& Newport. Ave

ZsoOFF r ow e r

i

www.thegrowlerguy.com

% 8 0~ 8 Coupon required. Restrictions may apply. Cannot combine w/other offers.

6 ) BendBrewfest2013 ~ Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

e

2699 NE Highway 20• Bend, OR 97701 «>

.rlrf .: : er.gr 27th Street


re

es ere an ise

We have hats, I's, sweatshirts, hoodies, pint glassesand more from our visiting breweries as well as Bend Brewfest-specific gear. Come visit us at the merch tent!

B uying a Car from so m e o n e

you T R U S T .

1 Arrange financing with super low rates Pay top dollar for your trade-in Saveyou time and money Provide you with all customer factory rebates available whenapplicable Avoid the hassle of shopping and the "Showroom Runaround"

New,Used,Trade-InsWelcome,FinancingAvailadle

Oregon A UtQ5QUN'~

C al l B o b t o d a y . Bob Hoffman, Sales Consultant

5 4 1 - 5 9 8 -3 7 5 0 A AAOregon Autoeource I 2 0 3 50 E m pire Blvd.,A5 I B e n d , O R All advertised vehicles are subject to prior sale. Visit aaa.com for important disclosures OR DLR e0225.

BendBrewfest2013 l LesSchwabAmphitheaterl 7


BOASTING ONEOFTHENORTHWEST'S LEADING FERMENTATION SCIENCEPROGRAMS Maybe it's the water. Or the hops. Or the numerous links people here have to a European ancestry. Whatever the cause, the Pacific Northwest has a reputation as the microbrew capital of the world. Oregon State University has played no smallpart in building this image, thanks to the hard work and talents of graduates of its fermentation science program in the Department of Food Science and Technology. With one of the nation's only teaching breweries, OSU offers students the opportunity to develop new brews while they learn subtle chemistry of taste and the innovations of business.

Thomas H.Shellhammer Nor'WesterProfessorof FermentationScience, OregonState University

Cheers to the Bend Brewfest breweries who count graduates of Oregon State University's Fermentation Science program within their ranks: Boneyard Beer, Bridgeport, Cascade Lakes, Deschutes, Double Mountain, Fire Mountain, Full Sail, Hopworks Urban, McMenamins,

Jeff Clawson BreweryManager, OregonState University

Ninkasi, Pelican Pub, Redhook and Widmer Brothers.

NEW' LARGER LOCATIONf

I

PAILV SPECIALS IX>'RW8D> KKo ORIMIRM

PUB FUSIO> N P I N I N 6 MAQ IsK0 0"tjt00IIGVDtkM l3R M P %

,lm S~UN=DRENCHEOIPAT~LO

m

0V'iGR (QQD>~IIfl,MID> I8 IIÃC8D>IIDilf5'vHR70

• • I

h

OO

33

~l iIR'Il hi i

OL MILL BREW WERKS •

• • •

• •

I

e,

.

~ •

8 I Bend Brewfest2013 I Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

~


1. BELOW GRADE 2. CRUX FERMENTATION 3. RATHOLE 4. LAGUNITAS 5. SIERRA NEVADA 6. DESCHU TES 7. LOSTCOAST 8.ROGUE 9.CASCADE LAKES 10. GEORGETOWN 11. BEND BREWING 12. ELYSIAN 13. MCMENAMINS 14. HOPWO RKS 15.WOODCH UCK

6. BRIDGEP ORT 17. WORTH Y 18.NEW BELGIUM 19. NECTAR OFTHEGODS 20. THREE CREEKS 21. LOGSDO NFARMHOUSEALES 22. SHADE TREE 23.RUSTYTRUCK 24.BELLEVUE 25. BREW WERKS 26. NECTAR CREEKHONEYWINE 27. RED TANK 28. SUNRIVER 29.GOODLIFE 30. 21STAMENDEMENT

31. BASE CAMP 32. FIREMOUNTAIN 33. BIGSKY 34. HOP VALLEY 35. ALAMEDA 36. SEVEN BRIDES 37. KONA 38. NINKASI 39.COLUMBIA RIVER 40.WANDERING AENGUS 41.DOUBLE MOUNTAIN 42. KLAMATH BASIN 43. BACKWO ODS 44.WALKINGMAN 45. BONEY ARD

46.EVERYBODY'SBREWING 47. ANDER SONVALLEY 48. SPEAKE ASYALES 49. PFRIENFAMILY 50. WIDMER 51. FIRESTONE WALKER 52.10 BARREL 53. OAKSHIRE 54.FORTGEORGE 55. BREAKSIDE 56. PELICAN 57. 2 TOWNS CIDER 58. PHATMATT'S 59. BURNSIDE 60. OSKAR BLUES

BendBrewfest2013I Les SchwabAmphitheaterI

9


)

II

By 1Voel Blake, reprinted Courtesy fothe Oregon Breuers Festival

BROWh7 ALES are malty, with a coffeelike flavor and apleasing nuttiness.They may also besomewhatsweetor hoppy.

AEBER ALE is a general term used to describe copper-colored ales orlagers, which are more full-bodied than golden ales,often with a medium maltinessand moderate to strong, hoppy bitterness.

CREASK ALES are generally light colored and mild, lagered atcold temperaturesor combined with a lager. ESB stands for Extra Special Bitter. These traditional English-style alesfeature a wellbalanced hoppinessand sweet maltiness.

BELGIhX AI E S are an entire universe of beer from the mostdiverse brewing tradition in the world. Theyare typically complex and harmoniously balanced.

FRUIT A EONEY BEERS are usually very light-bodied aleswith fresh fruit or honey added.They should bedelicate and therefore low in hops.The fruit flavor should be fresh, vibrant and easily identifiable. Honeyadds subtle flowery undertonesand a honey flavor. Fruit and honeyferment very well, so thesebeers should not beoverly sweet, but maypresent some malt flavor and apparent sweetness due to low bitterness.

BOCES are somewhat strong lagers with a pronounced malt character. Amailbock is pale in color and has asomewhat morepronounced hop character than the dark, rich doppelbock.

.O~~.i> u

ru. r '

'.);

i . ::

')) )~i

IKDIA PALE ALES, usually

*

)

)

s 'I) )

))

'I

I

)

known as IPAs,wereoriginally pale ales brewedextra strong and hoppyfor shipment to the English colonies in India, American brewersarenotorious hopheads, and they often usethe IPAto showoff their hopping prowess.IPAsshould have a pronounced fruity or earthy hop aroma and flavor. A rich bodyfrom the palemalts and sometimescaramel malts should be present as afoil for the hop flavor. They are often intensely bitter and have a dry finish. EOLSCH is a pale, dry German ale that originated in the city of Cologne (Koln). They are light-bodied and refreshing. Although they are not bitter, Kolsch maypresent flowery flavors from subtle useof noble hops. Themalt flavors aredelicate andsometimes reminiscent of Chardonnay.

r

I

)

I

r r

I

I

II

LAGERS are malty and light-bodied with predominant flavors of toast andcaramel.

I

I

I

)

I

) )

')

I

I '

' 1

I

I I

I I

I

')

) ' )

I

I I

' I

I

I

PALE ALES are based on the English bitter style and areoften not all that pale. They may encompass awide range of typessuch as Golden, Amber,Redor ESB.PaleAles are characterized byyeast varieties that give fruity aromas and may beeither mildly or well hopped. Hops are usually apparent in the aroma, flavor and the bittemess.Darker versions havecaramel

flavors from dark malts and areusually more hopped than golden ales. PII SK ERS are pale straw to deep gold in color. The traditional German or Czechstyles represented at thefestival are crip lagerswith a smooth, malty flavor. Theyareoften well hopped with German (often the floweryHallertaul or Czech (the spicier Saaz) hops.However, the hops should not overwhelm the malt flavor. The finish is clean and often fairly bitter. PORTERS are complex, dark, strongly flavored alesthat are said to take their name from the dockhandswhooriginally brewed this style. Porters aresimilar to stouts butwithout the bitterness.

Va Ell Da RP

He

Irn

Brt

Fre Ou

CO

Ta Gu Un 3-4

Alp

IPt

Tl'i

Wa STOUTS are dark brown to inky black ales that feature the rich flavors of roastedmalts that include chocolate, coffee, toffeeand charcoal. They can belight-bodied such asdraft Guinness, or rich and thick. Although hop flavor and aroma are low, theysometimes display a noticeable bittemess from both hopsandroasted grains. STROR6 ALE is a catchall category for beers from 7 percent alcohol byvolume and above. Characteristics will vary greatly, with some sharing similarities with Barleywines and Old Ales.Barrel aging is certainly not out of the question. WEEAT BEERS are either in the Bavarian or American style. Comparedto a Belgian Wit, the useof malted wheat in a Bavarian Weizengives amorepronounced bready wheat flavor, and theyarenot spiced. They may be filtered andclear ("kristall"J or unfiltered and hazy ("hefe"J. Themost remarkable aspect of thesebeers is the traditional yeast, which gives pronounced flavors ofcloveand banana. American interpretations maysubstitute hop flavors for the Bavarian yeast flavors.American wheat beershaveaneutral yeast character which is often replaced by agentle hoparoma. WIT is a wonderful summer wheat ale style from Belgium, sometimesreferred to as a "white beer." The useof unmalted wheat gives it a light body and a hazy,whitish color. They are usually spiced with coriander, with its characteristic grainy, citrus and minty undertones, andorange peel, which gives aslightly bitter, tea-like palate.

SB

Im Sib

Re

Ra Wo Wl OG Blc Ev

Jef

Bo Wo

Lui

De Ho Ma

Pa

Bn Ch Do Ho

Pt Kli CR

Biti

Va Ma Mc

CO

Gr; Ala Alc


IPk Validation, BelowGrade Elk Lake, BendBrewing Dangerous Kate,Below Grade RPM, BoneyardBeer Heelch O'HopsDouble, Anderson Valley Irreverence,BrewWerks Breakside IPA,Breakside French Aramis, NewBelgium Outcast, Crux Fermentation Project Country Boy,Everybody's Brewing Tan Line, Fire Mountain Gubna Imperial IPA,OskarBlues Union Jack, FirestoneWalker 3-Way IPA,Fort George Alpha Centauri, HopValley IPA, Lagunitas TricerahopsDouble, Ninkasi Watershed, Oakshire SBC Triple Double IPA,Sunriver Imperial IPA, ThreeCreeks Silverspot, Pelican Red IPA,Sierra Nevada Raptor Rye,Three Creeks Worthy IPA,Worthy White IPA,Phat Matt's OG, 10Barrel Blonde IPA,pFriem Family Brewers Evil Sister, GoodLife Jefferson Park, CascadeLakes Bogart Northwest, Fire Mountain WookeyJack, FirestoneWalker Lucille, Georgetown Descender,GoodLife Hopworks IPA,Hopworks Maiden the Shade,Ninkasi Pacific Northwest IPA,Phat Matt's Brutal, RogueAles Challenger SmokedIPA, ShadeTree Double Hook Imperial, Sunriver Homo Erectus,Walking Man

PkhEkI E Klickitat, Alameda CRB, Columbia River Bitter American, 21stAmendment Vaporizer, DoubleMountain Manny's PaleAle, Georgetown Mustang PaleAle, ShadeTree Corvette, ShadeTree Grandma's PaleAle, Sunriver Alan From theWood, Breakside Alchemy Ale,Widmer Brothers

Tallulah, SpeakeasyAles Long Ball Ale, Bridgeport Loser, Elysian Brewing Line Dry Rye,Oakshire 3rd Bridge Rye, Walkingman Surfer's SummerAle, Pelican Little Sister, Everybody's Bone Light, Boneyard Aged Hairy Eyeball, Lagunitas

PORTER/STOUT/ BROWK BBC Oatmeal Stout, Bellevue Five Pine Chocolate, ThreeCreeks SweaterWeather Barrel Aged Oatmeal Stout, Smith Rock Moose Drool, Big Sky Vanilla Porter, Klamath Basin Fence Post,RatHole Hazelnut Brown, Rogue Wild Turkey Bourbon Barrel Aged Stout, AndersonValley Solstice Stout, Cascade Lakes Steam Fired Stout, Fire Mountain Bourbon PepperBrown, GoodLife Army of Darkness,Hopworks Haystack Hazelnut, Rat Hole

REDS Rabble RouserImperial, BrewWerks Belgian Baronness,Deschutes Waldo Hills IRA, SevenBrides Kingpin, Bridgeport G'Knight, Oskar Blues Rotation, Rat Hole Fair WestVlaming, Logsdon Farmhouse

PII SKER Paulina Lake, CascadeLakes My Sunshine's Pilsner, McMenaminis Old St. Francis Mama's Little Yella Pils, OskarBlues Breakside Pilsner, Breakside Pilsner, Crux Fermentation Project P-Town Pilsner, Alameda Foam, Sierra Nevada Czech YourHead,HopValley

WEEkT/6OLDEK Hell or High Watermelon, 21st Amendment Summer Solstice, AndersonValley Sweet Heat, Burnside

See what category your fave beers fall under:

es Š TH<

BigWave Golden,Kona Summer Squeeze,Bridgeport Worthy HellesBock, Worthy Nelscott Hempeweizen, RustyTruck Mary'nberry Wheat,SevenBrides Check YerCoffeepot, McMenaminis Old St. Francis Tangerine Wheat, LostCoast DeschutesRiver Ale, Deschutes Rose CityWheat, Columbia River

RRISOR Seizoen Bretta, LogsdonFarmhouse Saison, pFriem Family Brewers Peace RCarrots, HopValley Brewing Special Saison,Worthy

SPECIAI TY

Ching Ching, BendBrewing Funky Bunch, Boneyard Brahfinger, BrewWerks Plum Line SourBeer, Deschutes

Beacon RockBitter, Backwoods In-Tents India PaleLager, Base Camp Hopside DownIndia Pale Lager, Widmer Brothers Swill, 10 Barrel (German Radler) BBC Extra Special Bitter, Bellevue Heavy HorseScotch Ale, BigSky Butchertown Black Ale,Speakeasy Ales Bier de Mars,Oakshire Beer Camp 99India Farmhouse, Brew Shop/Platypus Pub

ARBER

CIDER

VIVI' Kili Wit, LogsdonFarmhouse Great White, LostCoast Quick Wit, Fort George MeridiWit, BaseCamp

SOURS

Ginja Ninja, 10Barrel The BadApple, ZTowns Ciderhouse Rhubarbarian, Z TownsCiderhouse FRUIT/VESETkBLE/ Amber Cider,Woodchuck HardCider RERB/SPICE Raspberry Cider,WoodchuckCherry Night Owl Pumpkin Ale, Elysian Cider, Wandering Aengus Moonlight Ride Blackberry Ale, Rusty Hops Cider,Wandering Aengus Truck Oak Dry, Wandering Aengus Pumpkick, NewBelgium Roughneck Cider,RedTank Oddland SpicedPear PaleAle 425 Cider, RedTank Hellcat, Fort George READ Tres Peppers Jalapeno, Phat Matt's Peach SessionMead, Nectar Creek KOI SCH Ginger SessionMead,Nectar Creek Kolsch, DoubleMountain Apricot Meduna, Nectar of theGods Lime Kolsch, Burnside Valhalla Rising, Nectar of theGods Prohibition Ale, SpeakeasyAles Copperline, Backwoods

LILSER

NorthwestFest,BaseCamp Black Diamond Dark, BendBrewing Linkville Lager, Klamath Basin Longboard Lager,KonaBrewing Organic Hub Lager,Hopworks

WINE Naked Winery will be pouring a variety of delicious selections!

Bend Brewfest 2013 j Les SchwabAmphitheater j 11


P-]

Ou cri

((

offi

ba A]

Sn

Ot I r TR E XJx'AP

Cr(

sm A]

He

Ar(

10BARRELBREWINGCOMPHNV

21STHMENOMENT BREWERV

Bend, OR• unnv.10barrel.com

San Francisco,CA• 21st-amendmenl.com

Swill

21'*

.

wo on A]

.

Our Swill was designed to throw down. We started with a base of a German Berliner Weiss, and then added multiple layers of citrus. Swill is fun, delicious, and unbelievably easy to drink. A BV: 4.5% I BU : 1 3

Hell or HighWatermelon Wheat

X-1

We start by brewing a classic American Wheat beer, which undergoes a traditional second fermentation using fresh watermelons — strawcolored, refreshing beer with watermelon aroma and flavor. A BV: 4.9% I BU: 1 7

Ou pr( Ba A]

OG

Bitter American

OG Wheat IPA gives props to the "original gangsters" of the scene here in the Northwest. Wheat beers and]PAs are generally considered to beon opposite sides of the spectrum, but we beg to differ. Time for old school to meet the newschool. A BV: 6.5% I BU : 7 5

This extra pale session ale has lower alcohol but the flavor and hop aroma you expect from a much bigger beer. A BV: 4.4% I BU: 4 2

Ca

HLHMEOHBREWING COMPHNV

Be

Porhand, OR• alamedabewing com

Ag cri A]

2TOWNSCIOERHOUSE C~a~is, OR• 2kensciderborzse.com

The BadApple Hand crafted in Oregon with all Northwest ingredients, The Bad Apple is a rich and bold 2 T O W N S CIDERIIOUSE cider with notes of fruit and vanilla. This complex cider is aged on brandy-cured Oregon white oak. The BadApple is surely a cider to savor. ABV: 10.5%

Klickitat PaleAle

X-TAP:Ginja Ninja Our redheaded cider samurai sliced hundreds of pounds of fresh apples and pure ginger root to craft the Ginja Ninja. Take a sip grasshopper and learn the Ginja Warrior Way. ABV: 6% 12 j Bend Brewfest 2013 j Thursday-Saturday, August 15-17

CO Bre No A]

BH

Po

Rhndardarian Like a barbarian horde, the crew at 2 Towns Ciderhouse raided a local rhubarb patch to create this fearsome hard cider. Tangy, wild and not for the faint of heart, the Rhubarbarian will bring out the barbarian in you. Give your taste buds plus-5 for sour-ability! ABV: 6.9%

e

With an appealing copper color, this brew has a perfect balance of caramel malt and spicy hop flavors. The Munich malt in this recipe lends a rich mouth feel, while generous additions of Pacific-Northwest hops complete the balance. ABV: 5% IBU: 36

BH CO

PESPLE' 8 CHSICEAWARO! I

Klamath Basin Brewing Company lVanilla Porter) and GoodLife Brewing (Mountain RescuePale Ale) split the People's Choice prize in 2012. Votefor your favorite beer in the 2013Bend Brewfest at the merch tent or Brewtality Tent. Castyour vote and wewill announce the winner on Facebook the Mondayafter Brewfest. Find your tearand-vote ballot on page 38 of this Brewfest guide. I I I

I

I '

I l

ba

In-

Ou th; ba on IP flo its A]


)es IW-

IOP

)ps

P-TownPilsner Our house session lager is your quintessential dry, clean and crisp German pilsner with a clean and refreshing aroma, offering great pilsner malt flavor with a slight hop finish for balance — the perfect beer for summer heat. ABV: 4% IBU: 20 +V+SONVW rr

RNOER SONVRLLEV

<Qsoonmz

Boonville,CA• avbc.com

+Ir)IVC co)NVw

Brewers like to experiment, and the X-Tapsgive you the rare opportunity to sample the fermented fruits of their labors. Throughout the BendBrewfest, the twoX-Taps will offer tastes from a rotation of special, low-production beer from local and regional brewers. Here'swhat's on tap on the X-Taps lget 'em while you can):

SummerSolstice Creamy golden ale with notes of honey and vanilla. Creamy, smooth body with slightly spiced finish. A BV: 5.5% I B U: 8

Thijrsdaq, Hijgijsl 1S Brewtatity X-Tap 4p.m.

Heetcdo'HopsDouble IPA Aromas of pink grapefruit, caramel, redwood needles and woodruff greet the nose. Beautiful balance of malt and hops on the palate with a dry herbal finish. ABV: 7.6% I B U: 10 0

X-TAP:BourdonBarrel Stout Our special partnership with the Wild Turkey Distillery has produced this velvety smooth, rich, supple stout. Made with Barney Flats Oatmeal Stout. Superb! A BV: 6.9 % I B U: 1 4

BRCRWOOOSBREWING CONPR NV

~ g( ~~

Carson,tlzA• backueodsbrewingcompanycom

BeaconRockBitter A good summer brew for your taste buds, slightly hoppy and crisp for your ale needs, A BV: 4.6 % I B U: 4 1 . 8

Coppert ine Amder Ate Brewed with strong malty flavors and true to the tradition of a Northwestamberale. A BV: 5.P% I B U: 3 2

B BGE CBMPBREWINGCBMPBNV F & Poriiand, OR • basecampbrewr'ngco.com

E

F LI N

RNNRWNRG N:RMPARV

In-TentsIndiaPaleLager Our flagship India Pale Lager showcases a copper color that gives way to a crisp, clean lager beer perfectly balanced in its massive complexity. Dry-hopped and aged on an in-house toasted blend of white and red oaks. The IPL finishes clean and smooth, with hop aromas of wild flowers and pine, and a unique maltiness highlighted by its subtle oak character. A BV: 6.8 % I B U: 5 5

6 p.m. 8 P.m.

Be er Camp99, Brew Shop/Playtypus Pub Oa kAngel IPA, Bellevue lo wer case ipa, Burnside

Main X-Tap 4 p.m. OddlandicSp edPearPale Ale, Elysian Brewing; Far West Flaming, Logsdon 6 p.m. He llcat Belgian Trippel, Fort George;Ginja Ninja, Z Towns Ciderhouse 8 p.m. Bi er de Mars, Oakshire Brewing; ShowMethe Honey Wheat,Solstice Brewing Company 9:30 p.m. Steam Fired Stout, Fire Mountain Brewery; Jalepeno 'TresPeppers,' Phat Matt's Brewing

Fridaq, Hijgijsl 16 Brewtatity X-Tau 4 p.m. 6 p.m. 8 p.m.

Me rid)Wit, Base Camp Brewing Sp ecial Saison, Worthy Brewing Company Be er Camp 99, Brew Shop/ Platypus Pub

Main X-Tap 4 p.m.

6 P.m.

Wi ld Turkey Bourbon Barrel Stout, Anderson Valley; 4Z5Cider, RedTank Cider Co. Lo ng Ball Ale, Bridgeport Brewing Company; Sweater Weather Barrel Aged Oatmeal Imperial Stout, Smith Rock Brewing

8 p.m.

Ai an from the Wood, Breakside Brewing; Haystack Hazelnut Brown, Rat Hole Brewing 9:30 P.m. Brahfinger, BiewWerks Brewing; PlumLineSour, DeschutesBmvery

: :Satijrdaq, Hijgijsl17 Brewtatity X-Tap 1p.m. Bourbon PepperBrown Ale, GoodLife

2:30p.m Dangerous Kate,Below 4p.m

Grade Brewing Beer Camp99, BrewShop/ Platypus Pub

Main X-Tap 1p.m. Gubna Imperial IPA, Oskar BluesBrewery; Butchertown Black Ale, SpeakeasyAlesiL Lagers 2:30p.m Aged Hairy Eyeball, Lagunitas Brewing Company; Ching Ching, Bend Brewing Company 4p.m Army of Darkness, Hopworks UrbanBrewery; Corvette StrongAle, Shade Tree Brewing 6p.m Peace iLCarrots, Hop Valley Brewing Co.;Funky Bunch, BoneyardBeer 8p.m SBC Triple Double IPA, Sunriver Brewing Company; OakDry Cider, Wandering Aengus Ciderworks 9:30p.m Imperial IPA, ThreeCreeks Brewing Co.,Solstice Stout, CascadeLakesBrewing Co.

Bend Brewfest 2013 j Les SchwabAmphitheater j 13


Northwest Fest

X-TAP:ChingChing

Br

Our take on the malt-forward fest biers of Bavaria, extensive malt aroma and taste trials over the last twoyears led us in crafting this recipe, a subtlyhopped amber lager that walks the line betweendry and full-bodied — not too sweet but definitely not lacking in malty goodness.Lagered on our inhouse toasted oak to run out this brew's flavor profile. A BV: 5.6% I B U: 2 8

A 2012 World Beer Cup Gold winner brewed with pomegranate and hibiscus, Ching Ching is tart yet refreshing, and may just change your ideas of what a beer can be. ABV: 4.5% I BU : 5

Trr A]

BIGSHVBREWING

X-1

Ar srx A]

Missoufa M'. bigskybrerecom

BELLEVUEBREWINGCOMPRNV Belleene,WA. belleerrebr~'ngcom

BBCOatmealStout Big, silky, roasty-toasty character with hints of molasses, licorice, cocoa nibs and coffee. ABV: 5.8%

BBCExtra SpecialBitter Balanced hop bitterness with subtle hazelnut notes and a hint of caramel sweetness. A BV: 5.6% I B U: 3 3

X-TAP:BBCOak AgedIPA A special version of our well-balanced IPA that's been aged 60days in an American oak, rye whiskey barrel. ABV: 7.9% I B U: 6 9

BELOWGRROEBREWING Bend, OR • bei~gradebreuing com

Validation Rich copper color; the blend of German Pilsner, Vienna, Chrapics, British Maris Otter and Carastan and GWM two-Row Provide a complex malt base with Apollo, Bravo and Summit Hops for intense hop character. ABV: 7.9% IBU: 100+/-

X-TAP:Dangerous Kate A complex malt base with malt from the U.K., Germany and the U.S. are transformed with midnight wheat malt R copious quantities of Cascade, Apollo, Summit and Bravo hops. A BV: 8.6 % I B U: 1 0 0

BENDBREWINGCOMPRNV Bend, OR • benc&mingco.com

MooseDrool

BR

Extremely drinkable Brown Ale, brewed with four different malts and four hop additions including East Kent Goldings, Liberty and Willamette. ABV: 5.1% I BU : 2 6

X-1

Heavy HorseScotchAle A full-bodied, full flavored Scotch Ale. Deep garnet red in color with a dense creamy head, HeavyHorse isfermented at a lower temperature and the water is softened to be closer to that found in Scotland. It's smooth and easy to drink. ABV: 6.7% I BU : 2 0

Black Diamond Dark Lager This American-style dark lager won a gold at the 2008 World Beer Cup. Though dark in color, this beer is light and crisp, perfect for summer days. It finishes with a hint of roast and bready aroma. A BV: 4.8 % I B U: 2 8 14 I BendBrewfest2013 j Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

BR

Be

Ra

Qu

BONEV RRDBEER Bend, OR• brmeFardbeercom

im ket

RPM IPA

ani

Brewed using six different Northwest varieties of hops at more than 2.5 pounds per barrel, RPM IPA focuses on extreme hoppiness rather than bitterness. Golden to copper in color with a complex malt profile that will not overshadow the hops, our flagship RPM will satisfy any opinionated, hop-focused IPAconsumer. ABV: 6.5% I BU : 5 0

A]

BoneLight This is a single-hop, blonde ale showcasing Mosaic hops. Brewed with pale and pilsner malts, it is light bodied and golden in color — perfect to quench your summer thirst! ABV: 4% I BU : 20

X-TAP:FunkyBunch Funky Bunch is a blend of a few of our seasonal beers that have been re-fermented with Brettanomyces (wild yeast), cherries and raspberries, then aged in French oak for one year. This Flanders-style sour ale crosses the palate and finishes dry and a bit tingly. Get funked! ABV: 6% IBU: 15

Elk Lake IPA A classic Northwest-style IPA with a clean, bright hop bitterness, a light malt profile and a huge citrus aroma. A BV: 6.5% I B U: 7 0

Sie A!e fre A]

BRERIISIOE BREWING Porlland, OR• ~ .

com

Breakside IPA BreaksideisaclassicNorthwestIPAshowcasing Citra, Chinook and Columbus hops. A BV: 6.8 % I BU : 7 0

BREAKSIDE ~

B R EW E R Y ~ P OR T L A I I D , O R


,nd )ur

clts .nd

1a

Breaksige Pilsner

Irreverence

Traditional German-style lager — hoppy, crisp and refreshing. A BV: 5.2 % I B U: 3 8

The hop blend is designed to bring crisp grapefruit notes to the very drinkable IPA that is the Irreverence — always a crowd pleaser. A BV: 8.7 % I BU : 7 4

X-TAP: Alanfrom the Wood

X-TAP:Brahfinger

A malty, smoked strong ale aged in rye whiskey barrels for more than six months. A BV: 11.8 % I B U: 4 5

A sour blonde ale aged with pears and dry hopped created by the mind of Michael McMahon. A BV: 5 % I B U : 20

BREW SHOPI PLRTVPUSPUB Bend, OR• thebr~shopbend.com

BRIOGEPORT BREWINGCOMPRNV

X-TAP:Beer Camp99

Por&nd, OR • bridgeportbrew.com

sierra Nevada Brewing camp India Farmhouse w r' Ale is single-hopped with Nelson Sauvin hops freshly flown in from NewZealand. A BV: 6 . 0 % IBU: 45

RIII

cill ecl,

Bridgeport Brewing is bringing relief to all those hot summer nights. Summer Squeeze is infused with yuzu, an exotic Asian citrus fruit with a mild lemon flavor. A crisp, citrus finish creates a wonderful note. A BV: 4.5 % I BU : 1 9

BREW WERHSBREWING

Kingpin

Bend, OR • bredcdc perksbrewingcom

Raddle Rouser Imperial Red

Kingpin is a triple-hopped double-red ale that doesn't take any lip. Crafted using the unique flavor of rye malt and a generous amount of hops, Kingpin's unique dry character is derived from Willamette Valley liberty hops. ABV: 7.5%

33

QuicklybecomingoneofBend'sfavoritebeers,this oo +, RR<~ imperial just keepsgetting better. Our direct fire kettle allows our brewer tocontrol carmelization, and the resulting depth of flavor complexity is a reward weall enjoy. A BV: 8.5 % I B U: 6 0

Illgl

.m

'" ' Ojft ',j'pt,

3

4 4 „ -

. : ~

'~~

j,~

gnlpGEPGny

Summer Spueeze

,ncl )th

an original style

.'(e =

3'

.

3 -

j

i % fR - 3 ~ '

$~

.-

4

4

- g»Uy 33

ith tto

.en es, ses

"'4'IPB'

RlNISTIR "'

'"'""' HOP IIVP'ljjj '

IIBIF "-"'"-"

.

"

'@ Q Iy f

I

r.

MU'B l a

M UB M U B I •

3

.

I'

Igj

.

S

B • '

I

3

4

I

BendBrewfest2013 j LesSchwabAmphitheater j 15


X-TAP:LongBall Ale

COLUMBIRRIVERBREWING

X-1

Triple-hopped light-bodied summertime-style brew with the body of the beer completely from BridgePort's regular high-color pale malt which gives a subtle, pleasant, biscuit-like malt flavor. Beer maintains a smooth, bittering profile at an easy-to-drink 28 IBUs. The Meridian dry hops create an aroma and flavor that is very distinctive and reminiscent of sweet Meyer lemons. ABV: 5%

Porlland, OR• columbfariverbr~. c o m

Th

CRBPaleAle

LaI roi

German style wheat beer made with German winter wheat and two-row barley plus crystal malt, British ale yeast and Oregon raspberries. A BV: 5.5% I BU : 1 8

Porliand, OR • burnekbreuyco.com

Sweet Heat

QURNSIDE 'BICEwfNGCo. portlana Oregon

A traditional German style Kolsch brewedwith lime zest, kaffir lime leaf and lemon grass fermented at lager temperatures. A BV: 5.81% I B U: 2 4

~scADE LAg<ES

Bend, OR• cascadelakes.com

CRUXFERMENTATIONPROJECT i on. c om

crux

fermentation project

Outcast A Galaxy-hopped IPA. ABV: 8%

JeffersonPark IPA Citra hops deliver many citrus-like flavors and aromas to this Cascade Lakes IPA. It is designed to deliver big hop flavor and aroma with a balanced bitterness. Cheers! A BV: 6.4 % I B U: 9 6

X-TAP:Solstice Stout Brewed to celebrate the return of the long summer days and warmer temps that come with them, this stout features eight different specialty malts to create a substantial yet smooth malt profile that provides layers of complexity balanced by generous additions of two hop varieties. A BV: 6.5% I B U: 4 5

fg'P I

dof

Th arr ho Ya It's

Pilsner

Ko

A crisp, clean refreshing beer that prominently features noble German hop bitterness. ABV: 5% IBU: 20

In fru

OESC NUTESBREWERV Bend, OR • devcbulesbreuyerjy.com

The BelgianBaroness

D ES CH UT E S

p R fIin9~ ®ERIi pSTo

9SS

First she seduces your taste buds with a fruit-forward kiss of four different hops: Bravo, Delta, Strisselpalt and Mosaics. Then thirst lures your soul with an attractive balance of six different malts. This spicy redhead from Belgium holds nothing back. Fermented warm with a Belgian strain, the esters from the yeast engage the fruitiness of the hops in a tempting dance of sweet and spice. ABV: 6.7% I BU : 5 0

DeschutesRiver Ale Once called Riviere des Chutes by French Trappers, the Deschutes River feeds our beers and souls alike. Merci. Here's one that's clean and refreshing enough for the long haul, but fully graced with hop aroma, malt heft and clear craft passion. Sit back, relax and let the subtle pleasures reveal. ABV: 4%

Shareyourfavoritebeers, a gorgeoussunset pictures ofour Sgsriance off yourbigwin atConnect Fouroryour

favorite volunteer and more at this year's BendBrewfest. Tweet your favorite highlights throughout the Bend Brewfest event, tag us onFacebook or frame us in Instagram. Howeveryou do it, make it fun!

Tweet yourfavorite highlights throughout the BendBrewfest eventat ¹BBF13 orrecommendyour favorites at ¹BBFreview.

Ha

AI

PaulinaLakePilsner g'" ' oR Paulina Lake Pilsner is a classic German style pilsner. Light straw in color and well hopped with European noble hops, this beer is fermented to a low final gravity. A BV: 4.5% I B U: 3 4

O AN

Va Bend, OR• cruxf~

Lime Kolsch

CASCRDELANESBREWING COMPRNV

wil th< A]

Rose CityWheat

BURNSIOE BREWING COMPRNV

An American wheat ale madewith apricots and Scotch bonnet peppers. A BV: 5.93% I B U: 2 1

Our pale ale is golden in color, made with a fivemaltblend and Chinook, Cascades,Centennial and Amarillo hops. It's hop-backed and dry-hopped to give a big hop presence. ABV: 6.7% I BU : 5 2

Check in for the lateston Facebook/bendbrewfest.

Share on Instagram at¹bendbrewfest.

CO

th; A]


ow

X-TAP:PlumLine Sour Beer

ELVSIRN BREWING COMPRNV

This light-bodied brew is infected with Brettanomyces Bruxellensis and Lambicus in oak casks. Italian tart plum was added to complete the roundness of the sour flavor and to add a hint of color. The oak, fruit and wild yeast combine together to give a delightful and funky sour beer for the hot days of summer. IBU: 15 ABV: 5%

Seatk, ItzA• wly~nbrewingcom

DOUBLEMOUNTRIN BREWERV RNDTRPROOM

~ ~~

D O UBLE

VOVO» »

aaaw r a v E v a r a o o a

<f+4i MO UNTAIN

Hood Rikv; OR• doublevoura'ainbrewerycom

Brewed with more than seven pounds of pumpkin per barrel and includes seven different malt varieties, green and roasted pumpkin seeds, and pumpkin in the mash, boil and fermenter. It's bittered with Magnum hops and spiced in conditioning with nutmeg, clove, cinnamon, ginger and allspice. A BV: 5.9% I BU : 18

aoo o a l v • a oa r o o a

Loser Pale Ale

Vaporizer The Vaporizer is a golden-hued pale ale that features a beautifully hoppy aroma and flavor. The malt is 100 percent Gambrinus Pilsner, and the hops are primarily of the Challenger variety, grown on a single farm in the Yakima Valley. Wedry-hop the Vaporizer to pump up the hoppy goodness. It's an appetizingly dry, clean and pure-tasting take on a hoppypale ale. ABV: 6% IBU: 50

Koisch an

Night Bwl Pumpkin Ale

In Cologne, many a brewery produces a light-bodied ale with a delicate fruitiness and rounded maltiness, attributable to the unique yeast strain commonly used. Our Kolsch is unfiltered and more generously hopped than its German cousin. A BV: 5.2 % I B U: 4 0

Light tropical flavors balanced with a crisp malt-hop finish, Loser Pale Ale celebrates more than 20 years of Sub Pop Records with beer. Specifically, this beer is brewed with Pale, Munich, Crystal and Cara-hell malts, bittered with Sorachi Ace and finished with Crystal hops. ABV: 7% IBU: 50

X-TAP:Spiceli Pear Pale Ale This unique ale wasbrewed with pears, Yakima Cascade and Czech Saaz hops, and finished with a bit of cumin and cardamom for an exotic, Asian-fusion flavor. ABV: 6.25%

nt lul in,

ng

e • I ver ,nd

la )tle

• •

-

0

0

-

• •

lur

•I •

I

I II

I '

'

I

r I

I

Bend Brewfest 2013 ~ LesSchwabAmphitheater ( 17


EVERVBOOV' S BREWING

FORTGEORGEBREWERVB PUBLICHOUSE

HO

WbiieSainln, WA• eeerybodysbr~'ng.com

Asioria, OR• forigeorgebr~erycom

Sp

Country BoyIPA

I

••I Dry, clean, crisp and very citrusy, this beer is made for hop lovers. Centennial, Amarillo and cluster hops provide a wonderful hop aroma and flavor in this beer. A BV: 6.2 % I B U: 8 0

Little Sister Little Sister is grassy and dry with a light malt bill. It delivers a flowery aroma with a bitter bite. A BV: 4.5% I B U: 6 0

FIREMOUNTRIN BREWERV

3-Way IPA

J it

• I l

, O R • O O II

A collaboration with Fort George, Lompoc and Gigantic Brewing, 3-Way IPA is a pale IPAfermented crisp and clean with California Common Ale yeast — hopped to make it very hoppy. ABV: 6.69%

Quick Wit A wit beer using lemon grass, coriander and elderflower, Quick Wit is very good summer drinking. I should have another. ABV: 5.2%

TanLine Summer IPA Czech Saaz ... what a great summer hop for our Tan Line Summer IPA. Pilsner and two-row malts give this ale a light, refreshing flavor. A BV: 5.2 % I B U: 8 2

Bogart NWIPA Bogart, a truly great Northwest IPA, uses Maris Otter and four other malts, including Canadian pils, to give it a smooth malt balance. Hops in the kettle include Cascade (true to the cause) along with Centennial, Simcoe, Hercules and Willamette. Bogart is dry-hopped with Cascade, of course, and five other Northwest varieties to bring a balance of hop aromas to life. So don't bogart the Bogart. Share this great IPA with your Friends! A BV: 6.9 % I B U: 9 9

X-TAP:SteamFired Stout A delightful, aged, roasty stout, smooth and rich yet light bodied and dry with a sweet and pleasing aftertaste of coffee and chocolate. ABV: 7.6% I B U: 6 8 () R

e

FIRESTON EWRLHER PasoRobies CA jiresionebeercom

UnionJack UnionJack abounds with hop aroma and character. This well-balanced, West Coast IPA is a double dry-hopped, giving it more and more of the grapefruit citrus hop aroma it is known for. Overall, it utilizes more than four pounds of Pacific Northwest hops per barrel. ABV: 7.5% I B U: 70

WookeyJack Wookey Jack is our first foray into the dark outer world of black IPAs. Rich dark malts and spicy rye careen into bold, citrus-laden hops, creating a new dimension in IPA flavor. This brew has been left unfiltered and unrefined to retain all its texture and character. Wookey Jack is gnarly on the outside yet complex and refined on the inside. A BV: 8.5% I B U: 3 . 1 5

Four types ofpeppers arehand-roasted and added to the boil, contributing to a sweet aroma that is balanced with a spicy yeast and wildly warming pepper flavor. ABV: 8.2%

Big ke( let A]

Ca

Fe in

pil

A]

AE A]

HO

Or

GEORGETOWNBREWING COMPRNV Seaiile,WA g~gehnvnbeercom

All

X-1

X-TAP:Hellcat

CarlSn, OR .firenxerdainbmzv~.com

18 j Bend Brewfest2013 j Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

FORT CEORCE

• nn

I

I '

I

Manny'sPaleAle A careful selection of Northwest hops, premium barley and our unique yeast give this unfiltered pale ale a rich and complex malty middle with a snappy hop finish — crisp, clean and smooth with hints of citrus and fruit. ABV: 5.2 % I BU : 3 8

De no La A]

Ho

Wii

thi

cltj

Lucille IPA Unfiltered, floral, citrusy and awesome, anything so innocent and built like this has just gotta be named Lucille. ABV: 6.8 % I BU : 8 5

GOOOLIFE BREWING COMPRNV

$00DLIFP

Bend, OR gooalifebr~ngcom

Evil Sister Harkening back to the days when your sister torturedyou with endless pinching, wet Willies and e„Re~ '+e. cP Indian burns, Evil Sister's flavors of strong citrus and floral hops balance this beer, but at B percent, it will have you cryin' for your mama! ABV: 8% IBU: 30

Descender IPA This beer is a well-balanced hop lover's dream. Wecreated it so you can toast to the peaks of life and relax in a valley full of hops. ABV: 7% I BU : 70

ou A]

X-1

Bl; do fin A]

HL

Va

Va

ch(

po thi coI A]

X-TAP:BourbonPepper BrownAle

Llh Be thi

ABV: NA

ani

fla A]


HOPVHLLEVBREWING CO Springfield, OR • hopvalleybr~'ng.com

AlphaCentauri iay Ale

Big flavor, intense pine and citrus aroma. We keep the malt profile clean in this imperial IPA to let the love lights shine on the fine Oregon hops. IBU: 100 ABV: 9%

VAuEV

Featuring 100 percent German malts, hops andCzech lager, yeast dance in harmony in this lager, creating a perfectly balances, traditional pilsner. A BV: 5.2 % I B U: 4 0

F

BEER i.

X-TAP:PeaceandCarrots ng ng

" 44lrs

— ~~ IPIiAtlIE AIN?

CzechYourHeal :ry

Qs'

,

A Belgian saison with grains of paradise and carrot-blossom honey. ABV: 5% IBU: 20

HOPWORII SURBHNBREWERV P~land, OR . hopuorksbeercom

OrganicHuhlager

BELE%'Tk,I XTT

Delicate honey malt body, classic herbal hop notes and a clean, dry finish, Organic Hub Lager is Portland's only year-round Pilsner. A BV: 5.1% I B U: 3 2

'py

Hopworks IPA With a medium body thanks to toasty Munich and light caramel malts, this IPA features an organic, five-hop medley with resinous flavors of citrus and pine. Hopped in the kettle, hop-back and fermenter, this is our all time best seller! A BV: 6.6 % I B U: 75

X-TAP:Armyof Darkness Black as a moonless night, chocolatey and smooth, caramel and vanilla dominate the nose while the bourbon barrels impart a mildly drying finish in Army of Darkness. A BV: 11.1% I B U: 6 3

S XEET TRE BR E W E R S ! Hosted by the BrewShop/Platypus Pub and Central Oregon Homebrewers, the Brewtality Tent is hospitality, craft beer

style (get it?). X-Tapbrewers and other beer industry and beer-related guests will be in the Brewtality tent for meet and greets, to talk about their beers and breweries, and just drink great beer with awesome people. Highlights of the 2013 Brewtality tent include: • Meet and greets with X-Tap brewers.

in'

RLHMHTHBfISINBREWINGCOMPHNV

• OSLI Cascades and Central Oregon Community College

Namalh Falls OR• kbbreiiiingcom

(COCC) will be on hand to discuss their brewing and fermentation courses.

Vanilla Porter

BREWING COMPANY

Vanilla is in perfect harmony with the SrlamasrrFalls, Orag<s„ chocolate and coffee flavors of this robust >~ porter. Brewed with real vanilla beans, this delicious porter is sure to please both the beer novice and the beer connoisseur. A BV: 6.7% I B U: 4 5

Meet the members of Women Enjoying Beers (WEB) and Central Oregon Beer Angels.

linkville lager

• Visit Bend will talk about beer tourism, the Bend Ale

Before it was Klamath Falls, this community was known as Linkville and this is our tribute to our heritage. It is a golden lager with a fruity nose and a bit of a malty backbone from the heavy use of Munich malts. It is flavorful and very crisp and refreshing on a hot summer day. A BV: 5.1% I B U: 3 0

Trail and the economic impact of breweries.

• Tom Gilles from the Brew Shop will talk about his experience at Sierra Nevada Brew Camp. • TBD Agency will discuss branding a brewery.

Come over and check out the daily schedule posted outside the Brewtality Tent. We promise you'll have a good time.

Bend Brewfest 2013 ~ LesSchwabAmphitheater ~ 19

9

4 I I l ',Ia


IIONHBREWINGCOMPHNV

LOSTCOHSTBREWERV

Kailua-IConaI • konabr~'ngco.com

Eureka, Q •losicoasi.com

e

Bie eeeeeGeldeeAle

NE cS'

Great White

Fri Ma Ar;

Big WaveGolden Ale is alighter-bodied golden ale with a tropical hop aroma and flavor a smooth, easy drinking, refreshing ale. The use of caramel malt contributes to the golden hue of this beer, and our special blend of hopsprovides a bright quenching finish. A BV: 4.4 % I B U: 2 1

A fusion of American wheat and Belgian wit styles, this unfiltered beer has a strikingly bright, translucent, golden color. It's topped with a hint of coriander and a secret blend of herbs. A BV: 4.8 % I BU : 1 8

LongdoardLager Longboard Lager is a crisp, pale gold lager made with a few choice malts and aromatic hops brewed in a traditional lager style. Longboard is a smooth and easygoing brew that you can enjoy time and time again. A BV: 4.8 % I B U: 1 8

A refreshing citrus ale that combines our Harvest Wheat with natural tangerine essence for exemplary aromatics while maintaining light, crisp and refreshing flavors, Tangerine Wheat is brewed with a combination of wheat and crystal malts. ABV: 5% IBU: 17

LHGUNITHS BREWINGCO.

MCMENHMINS OLD ST.FRHNCISSCHOOL

PetalumaC4• lagunia.com

gg~

yag ggug

gl't

Kit dri A]

TangerineWheat

degddT dey

Wl un sea cin len A]

Iv/lddede ddll]

Eu

P'

Bend, OR • mcmmemins.com

IPA

My Sunshi ne's Pilsner

A sessionable, all-day IPA, a bit of caramel malt barley provides this beer with the richness that mellows out the acidity of the hops. A BV: 6.2 % I B U: 5 1 . 5

Brewed with Gambrinus pilsner malt and Challenger hops. ABV: 4.9% I BU : 4 0

NH 0

Little Sumpin'Wild

CheckVer Coffeepot

Fermented from our Belgian yeast strain and huge doses of wheat and pale malt, Little Sumpin' Wild is then massively dry-hopped for even more crazy flavors and aromas. A BV: 8.8 % I B U: 6 5

A golden coffee ale with the depth of a porter and coffee flavors that bring forth a harmonizing blend of flavors. ABV: 6.5% I BU : 6 2

X-TAP:AgedHairy Eyeball

NECTHR CREEHHONEVWINE

A roasty, toasty, malty, smoothish hair-of-the-dog hangover-halting beer, Aged Hairy Eyeball is typically available in six-packs in January, so this may be your only chance to try this beer before 2014. ABV: NA I B U: 5 6 .7

C~allis, OR• nedarcreekkmywinecom

PeachSessionMead

HoodRicer, OR fannkesebeer.com

Oregon grown and crafted, our Peach Session Mead is a tribute to the summer. Flavors of luscious Oregon peachesand Willamette Valley honey combine to make the ideal summer beverage truly delicious. ABV: 5.5%

IOH Wit

GingerSessionMead

An unfiltered "white beer" with settled yeast and organic African spice that is bottle-conditioned using organic pear juice as the primer. A BV: 5.5% I B U: 8

Pure Oregon honey and fresh ginger make this exquisite golden mead. The ginger session mead is defined by a sting of warmth, a tease of sweetness and a dry finish. It's refreshing every time! ABV: 6.2%

LOGSDONFHRMHOUSE HLES

SeizoenBretta An unfiltered Seizoen that is naturally fermented with select yeast strains, producing fruity and spicy fiavors that are balanced by hopsand soft malt character. Brettanomycesyeastprovides addeddrynessand crisp complexity. A BV: 8 % I B U: 3 5

X-TAP:Fair West Vlaming Fair West Vlaming is an organic red ale brewed in traditional West Flanders style. A combination of light, crystal and dark barley malt, wheat and oats are brewed with local whole-cone organic hops and a variety of select yeasts and lactic bacteria, then aged in oak barrels. A BV: 6.5% I B U: 9 20 I BendBrewfest2013 j Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

Pu

NECTAROFTHEGODS MERDERV Bend, OR• nedarojthegodsmeadery com

Valhalla Rising Atraditional semi-sweet meadusing only PNWHigh Desert Honey, water and specialty yeast strains. ABV: 13.5%

Apricot Meduna A traditional mead, flavored with a secondary fermentation on apricots. ABV: 13.5%

Tr

Tn lov an

A]


ral ht, a

NEWBELGIUN

Maiden the Shade

For' Collins CO• nelcbelgium.com

A salute to the playful side of summer, we had fun with this beer! Maiden the Shade has a big, robust hop character from the liberal use of seven varieties of hops. It is completed with a light-colored malt backbone to stay in balance. Kick back and enjoy!! A BV: 6.8 % I BU : 72

French Aramis IPA Made with Bravo, Czech Saaz and French Aramis hops, French Aramis IPA is the latest great beer brewed up in the New Belgium Hop Kitchen. This dry IPA is perfect for refreshing afternoons of summertime drinking. ABV: 6.7% I B U: 74

ORHSHIRE BREWING Eugene, OR oukbreuIcom

Pumpkick

Watershed IPA

What's that bite of tartness doing in a pumpkin beer? Adding the unexpected kick of cranberry juice brightens this traditionally spiced seasonal ale. Pumpkick is brewed with plenty of pumpkin juice, cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice, but it's the cranberries and touch of lemongrass that send your tastebuds sailing. ABV: 6% I B U: 18

A Northwest style IPA highlights the flavors and aromas of our region's best hops. Crisp, dry and refreshing, this dry-hopped IPA is very smooth and easy to drink. A BV: 6.7% I BU : 70

B QEW I N G E UG E N E . ORE G O N

Line Dry RyePale Ale A honey-orange-colored pale ale, crafted with 10 percent rye malt and 10 percent flaked rye for a complex malt profile, American hops give Line Dry Rye a crisp bitterness and a slight citrusy flavor. Clean and refreshing, it ends with just a small note ofblackberry honey in the finish that brings all the elements together. ABV: 6.3% I B U : 70

NINHRSIBREWINGCO Eugene OR• n in~ '

QAKSHIR E

ngc o m

Tricerahops DoubleIPA Tricerahops is double everything you already love in an IPA. More hops, more malt body and a higher gravity define this double IPA — fiercely flavorful; guaranteed to satisfy. ABV: 8.8% I B U: 1 0 0

X-TAP: Bier de Mars A BV: 5. 3

I

• •

I BU : 3 5

~ y~ D O U B L E ai MOUNTAIN B REW E R Y * T A P R O O M H OOD R I V E R O R E G O N

Ike

ad. of

ts.

I

N~N

P4

Nge

E

rl

BOTTI.ED! WWW.DOUBLEMOUNTAINBREWERY.COM

Bend Brewfest2013 j Les SchwabAmphitheater I 21


I I

I

MI Cz

get be A]

G'I

The Bend Brewfest Brewtality Tent is hosted this year bythe Brew Shop/Platypus Pub and Central Oregon Homebrewers. Leading the charge are Tom Brohammer andTim Koesterwith COHO, and Tom Gilles of the Brew Shop. Here is a peek at the interview we conducted with these boys in July over a pint of Beer Camp g9 India Farmhouse Ale. For the full QRA, visit our website www.bendbrewfest.com.

Ad to, A]

X-1

Ou wit ba A]

PE Bend Brewfest (BBF) — Tom, you were recently invited to the highly sought-after experience of brewing beer at the Sierra Nevada Brew Camp. Doyou care to enlighten us about your experience? I know that's a heavy question, but if you can give us abrief summary of your adventure, we'd love to hear it. The Brew Shop (TBS) — The opportunity to go to Sierra Nevada Brewing Camp is extremely rare, and when you get asked to go,you don't say no you make our life work around it. It was a phenomenal experience. The brewery itself is just an unbelievably classy operation. Amazing equipment and people; they treated us like kings put us up, fed us ... we drank soooo much beer. Wegot to meet Ken Grossman, and the next day when wemet in the boardroom and discussedrecipe ideasand formulated what wewanted to do, which was a challenge with 12 people. We came up with an interesting combination of India Farmhouse Ale, which is not a true style but it's tasty. Wewere fortunate to have, freshly flown in from New Zealand, some Nelson Sauvin hops. Wewere the first people in North America to brew with them. They were literally flown in the day before, and as soon as we heard those hopswere available, we said, "OK, we havegot to do a single hop with those." Some folks really wanted to do aBelgian style something different so we chose the French Saison, which is pretty tame compared

to some of the Belgian strains, and we fermented it cool to kind of hide the hop profile... I think it turned out pretty nice. We will be serving that on the X-Tap at the Brewfest. BBF — COHO, tell us about your membership process. Cananyone join? There are a lot of folks who are intimidated to jump into home brewing out there. CentralOregon Homebrewers Organization (COHO - Tom Brohammer) — Come to a meeting, and be over 21years old. Meetings are the third Wednesdayofeverym onth.Checkoutwww. cohomebrewers.org and you can find all the contact and meeting information you mII need to join us. We encourage people of all brewing levels to come. Wehave members that are brand new, never brewed in their lives to members that are pro brewers here in town. It works really well because everyone is willing to share somuch information, which makes the learning curve a lot nicer. There are educational aspects to every meeting ranging from fairly elementary to complex. A lot of pro brewers come in and share what they are doing and talk to everyone about recipes and styles which is so cool. Also, once a month we hold a Group Brew at somebody's house. It is a great way to come and see what different people are doing and get exposed to it.

BBF — It seemslike the pro brewers and homebrewers in town have a great relationship. COHO (Tim Koester) — It's a really brewfriendly town. The professional brewers are really supportive of the club. TBS/PP — All the way up to Gary Fish [of Deschutes Brewery]. He'sbeen supportive all the way. BBF — You guys have beenour "Ask Me About Beer" hosts for many years now.Any FAQsor experiences that stand out'? TBS — One thing that I would really like to stress that might help people: I know that the more Brewfests you attend, the more you understand, but one thing I notice every year is that people get their mug and tokens, go up to the volunteers pouring the beer and assume they know everything about the beer and the brewery they are pouring for. Go to the Brewtality Tent, meet the brewers and owners and representatives and ask them the questions. Those are the people with answers. tnterview with COHO und The Brew Shop

6 Platypus Pub wus held ontuly 16 2013 andincluded Tom Brohammer, president of COHO, Tim Koester, VP fo

COHO and Tom Cilles, owner foThe Brew Shop 6 Platypus Pub.

Sil

Sil Pe ass Da foc thi A]

Su

Th Su he tas m ful Su A]

PF

Bk

Th No brc for bo c]b to, A]


OSHRR BLUESBREWERV Longmonl, CO •oskarblues.com

Mama'sLittle VellaPils

,• g

ggg-lNSPlRS

Czech-style pilsner made with a» malt and generous Saaz hops make this refreshing beer a must-go for the great weather. A BV: 5.3 % I B U: 3 5

G'Knight A deep, copper-colored, sticky sweet hoppy masterpiece brewed in tribute to a craft brewing pioneer, Gordan Knight, this beer is our favorite here. A BV: 8.7% I B U: 6 0

X-TAP:GuhnaImperial IPA Our spring-summer seasonal, this is a massive imperial IPA made with just three malts and hopped with Summit and Cascades — wellbalanced and drinkable. A BV: 10 % I B U: 10 0

PELICRN BREWINGCO. Paci ~C~ OR ~urlNlebeu& Nvn.com Ip.

ar

Silverspot IPA holds a permanent slot in the Pelican lineup with its brilliant gold color and assertively complex hop aroma. Brewmaster Darron Welch selected the blend of Sterling, Fuggle and Meridian hops, focusing on herbal, floral, spicy and tangerine-like characters to create this highly drinkable English-style IPA. A BV: 6 % I B U: 5 5 The summer ales of England inspired our well-loved seasonal beer, Surfer's Summer Ale. With brilliant gold color and a fruity, floral and herbal aroma from Glacier hops, Surfer's Summer Ale is a refreshing, tasty treat. A sweet, toasted malt flavor comes from the Golden Promise malt and combines with bread-like wheat character to give this beer a full-bodied, rounded malt aspect. Finishing smooth and clean, Surfer's Summer Ale exhibits a wonderful balance and character. A BV: 5.3 % I B U: 2 5

er

PFRIEMFRMILV BREWERS HoodRiver, OR•

BlondeIPA

op 'of he

Red RocksHickerif Smoke 5 Beer BBg Sauce INGREDIENTS:6 Tbsp. Red Rocks Hickory Smoke Seasoning, I/2 cup white wine vinegar, 4 Tbsp. vegetable oil, 2/3 cup beer and 6 Tbsp. ketchup. Directions: Stir ingredients together in a saucepan. Bring to a boil then simmer for 7-10 minutes. Serving suggestions: Try on beef, chicken or pork. YIELDS:I cup.

Silverspot IPA

Surfer' s Summer Ale

)u

Savorq Spice Shop„Ih,»I«,»»,I„,I

The great brewmasters of the Pacific Northwest are reverent of the past and its brewing traditions but never cease to look forward, tinkering and experimenting to create flavors that are uniquely bold and new. Case in point: Pfriem's Blonde IPA. Its refreshing blast of citrus and its secret ingredient (sunshine) will have you looking forward to another before evenenjoying its just-bitter-enough finish. A BV: 6.2 % I B U: 5 0

Saison Back in the early 20th century, farmhouses in Wallonia, the Frenchspeaking region of Belgium, would brew this beer in the winter, only to be consumed in the summer by their farm hands called Saisoners. These beers are known for being tart, light on the palate, dry, fruity and complex. ABV: 6.5% I BU : 3 2

PHRTMRTT'S BREWING Redmond, OR .PbrrlnMRsbreiv.com

White IPA Traditional Belgium wit hopped up! Pilsner malt, red wheat, oats and unmalted wheat ~ % C0. give the White IPA a creamy body. It's thenhopped with Magnum, Galena and Antanum hops. The yeast adds lemon and orange notes to make this ale Phat, like the days of summer. ABV: 4.7% I BU : 6 0

Pacific Northwest IPA Brewed with Perle hops. ABV: 7% IBU: 75

X-TAP:Jalapeno"Tres Peppers" Spicy up front with a smooth finish, this is an American summer beer with more than a kick! ABV: 5% I BU : N A

rb. BendBrewfest2013 j LesSchwabAmphitheater j 23


RAT H~LE

RRTHOLEBREWING Bend, OR

FencePost

Fence Post Porter offers the beer drinker a soft, creamy mouthful with a hint of chocolate in the finish. This is achieved by using six malts, high-quality chocolate and flaked oats. A BV: 6.1% I B U: 3 2

RotationRed Rotation Red offers an alternative to beer drinkers seeking more flower and less bite. This mild, delicate, English-type ale has a hint of sweetness complemented by a profile of Cascade and Golding hops. ABV: 5%

X-TAP:Haystack Hazelnut Brown Haystack Hazelnut is an American brown ale exhibiting a dark brown hue and an agreeable hazelnut aroma. You will experience a rich, nutty flavor with a smooth, malty finish. A BV: 6.6 % A BV : 2 0

REOTRNHCIOERCO.

RH!

Bend, OR• ~nkcidercom

TANK

HappyCider

GKEER BEND. 0((

A sorta sweet hard Northwest cider. ABV: 5.5%

RoughneckCider A sorta dry hard Northwest cider. ABV: 5.8%

ROGUEBREWINGCOMPRNV Portlnnd, OR •rogue.com

n *

HazelnutBrown A nutty twist on the traditional European brown ale, this 2011 and 2012 GABF gold medal winner offers a rich flavor and smooth, malty finish. It is one of three beers to earn this distinction at the GABF. ABV: 5.5% I BU : 3 3

Brutal IPA Brutal offers a stupendous hop aroma with a citrus hoppy flavor. It's the official beer of the RogueNation. ABV: 6% IBU: 59

A]

Ch

MoonlightRideBlackherry Ale Oki((ON COA5T The aroma of r i pened Oregon blackberries on a c r isp moonlit September night is what inspired our blackberry ale. We think we got it just right. Aged on 126 pounds of pureed blackberries per 10-barrel batch, this ale features subtle hints of blackberry. Enjoy the ride. A BV: 5.5% I BU : 1 5

Nelscott Hempeweizen This name called for a bit of hemp seed in the mash, which imparts a nutty flavor on the back of the palate. This is a traditional German-style hefeweizen with the addition of the hemp seed, made with the skill and love our brewers put into every Rusty Truck brew. A BV: 5.55% I BU : 1 5

A dry-Hopped hard Northwest cider. ABV: 5.8%

Waldo Hills IRA

SEVEN BRIDES

Waldo Hills IRA combines Northwest two-row and chocolate malt to provide a light-bodied India red ale. Kettle additions of Magnum, Centennial and Crystal hop varieties bring a bold, citrus hop punch. A BV: 5.5% I BU : 77 P%X%XX%X X%XX%XX%XX%X%XXX%Xi%X%XXXX%XX%XX%%XXXX%XX%%XX%XX%XX%X%XX%XX%XXXXXXiXXXXX%% %%% %%%% &%% %%X AWXAXXXÃhhkii%%%%%% %%% %0 y

Anything so innocent and built like that just gotta be named Lucille.

c-

T4' W

BICKWQODS": „ , " :

' — Ieee

a. Amarillo Hops b. Simcoe Hops c. Centeniai Hops d. Cascade Hops e. Columbus Hops

www.georgetownbeer.com

24 I Bend Brewfest2013I Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

Ml

qu

Lmoln City, OR• rtrstytruckbrereing.com

SEVENBRIOES BREWING

4'4'+

SH

An

RUSTVTRUCHBREWINGCO.

Silmrhon, OR• s~bruksbrewing com

b. -

Wi Bri an fro da A]

A(

X-TAP: 425 Cider

~ ee e

MI

Located in Carson -ng Washington next to the Carson General Store! 1162 B WIND RIVER RD. CARSON, WA 986]0 ; 509-427-34]2• WWW.BACK WOODSBREWINGCOMPANY.COM ANXXXXXX XXNKXNXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXNXXXNXXXXXi'NNNX%%X%XXNXXX%X%XXXNXXXXXXXXXXXXXX%XXXXXXXXXXNNXXNXXX%XXNN%XXXXX%XNNNwwNNXXNNW%%%%%%%%%iNAXKXXXNXNNNW:

Srr pa A]

X-1

Str an A]


)12 . It

the

got rel

Mary'nherry Wheat Ale

SIERRANEVRDR

With harvest around the corner, Mary'nberry Wheat from Seven Brides Brewing is back as a summer favorite! Light-malted barley and wheat are paired with Willamette Valley hops and marionberries from right around the corner. A pint is a refreshing taste to end any day's work with. IBU: 20 ABV: 5%

Chico,Q • srerranevada.com

Red IPA This is a new addition to the Sierra Nevada portfolio. Bend Brewfestwill debut our Oregon Red! ABV: 6.2%

Foam

SHRDE TREEBREWING Redmond, OR• shadeir eebrew.com

A German-Style pilsner, light bodied and easy drinking yet loaded with flavor, Foam is brewedwith a mix of European and American malts and balanced by a spicy, herbal hop kick. A BV: 4.8 % I BU : 34

B REW I N G

Mustang PaleAle A daily driver, moderately hopped with Amarillo and Cascade, this ale is light but quick and corners well around the tongue. A BV: 5.7 % I B U: 4 0

SMITHROI:H BREWING Redmond, OR• smilhrockbr eruingcom

Chall enger SmokedIPA Smoky like a drag strip burnout using German Rausch malt, Challenger pairs well with foods like BBQ,wings, smoked cheeseand crackers. A BV: 7.1% I B U: 70

X-TAP:Corvette Strong Ale Strong, powerful yet very smooth and sleek with two dark crystal malts and five hops varieties, Corvette is also known as "Beer candy." A BV: 10 % I B U: 70

X-TAP: Sweater WeatherBarrelAged Oatmeal Imperial Stout This rich, dark stout is easy drinking for a large beer. Its clean malt backbone is balanced by a well-rounded hop profile. Expect hints of chocolate and oak as well as a. little alcohol heat, all combined to offer a smooth finish. A BV: 8.1 % I B U : 52

sa

yle ,nd

,nil

I

A

y

1 H

4p

V)

O..„

'G •

'

.I ,

'0,

USDA • I

' I

.

• '

I

e

I

• 2 Convenient Locations

I

A Sustainable Cup - Drink it up!%

I

• I

'

Iat fdaadlr NIRN

aaasaala

• •

www. s t rictlyorganic.com

6SWBond St O Arizona 450 Powerhouse @ The Old Mill

I

I

• Freshly-Roasted, ..Sustainable Coffees • Support Your Favorite Non-Profits

I

*"'

COFFEE CO.

I

=.,: 0

+ '" GA

o

I il

q( C P~ ., ( ~

I

8

® •

• Bend Brewfest 2013 ~ LesSchwabAmphitheater ~ 25


SOLSTICE

FivePineChocolate Porter

Frinerille, OR• solsliubrewingcom

Arobustporter thatfeaturestwopoundsperbarrelofthefinest Belgianchocolate, creating a slightly roastypint with underlying chocolatesweetness. ABV: 6.2 % I BU : 5 5

X-TAP: Show Me the Honey Wheat

'O®~ 4@ ~

Solstice wascreated with red wheat malt, tworow malted barley and our secret ingredients to deliver anAmericanWheatAle with an essenceofbanana andclovereleasedby the yeastduring fermentation, all of which coalesceinto a ray of summersuns. A BV: 4. 7 I B U: 4 0

X-TAP: Imperial IPA This is an Imperial IPA that we will be brewing to celebrate our fifth anniversary in July. ABV: NA I BU : N A

SPEHIIEHSV HLESB.LHGERS

WHLRIN GMHNBREWING

San Fra~isco,CA .gm&eer.com

Slevenson, WA walkingman~'ng com

ProhiditionAle

3rd BridgeRye

Prohibition Ale is a boldly hopped amber ale that strikes aperfect balance betweencaramel maltiness and its aggressivehopping. A BV: 6.4 % I B U: 4 5

A crisp, light ale with hints of rye andAmerican hops, perfect for the active summer drinker! ABV: 5.5% I BU : 4 5

HomoErectus

Tagulah XPA Tallulah mesmerizeswith tropical fruit aromas and a radiant golden glow. This show-stopper is dry-hoppedwith Calypso and EI Dorado hopsandwill leave you begging for an encore. A BV: 5.6% I B U: NA

A bulky IPA with a citrusy hop character and caramel undertones. ABV: 9 % I BU : 8 4

BEE lNSPlIES

SUNRIVER BREWINGCOMPHNV 'ngcompanycom

Grandma's PaleAle Light golden in color with a restrained caramel malt character, this features citrus notes and a fruity profile comefrom ablend of Northwestand Australian hops — adry-hoppedpale alethat is clean, light and easyto drink A BV: 5.3 % I B U: 37

DouhleHookImperial IPA This beer is aggressively hopped with five Northwest hop varieties. Fruity, resiny and dry, Double Hook is big beer yet dangerously drinkable. A BV: 8.3 % I B U: 1 0 0 +

X-TAP:SBCTriple DouhleIPA This version of SBC's Double Hook Imperial IPA is dry hopped a second time in the conditioning tank and a third time in a keg. A BV: 8.3 % I B U: 1 0 0 + +

Siskrs,OR• lhreecreeks~'ngcom

Ta

cid wo A]

Ho

Ho glt th;

ctti

A]

Ba

Ab spt A]

Ak

This black ale beguiles you with its light body and soft maltiness, just before it unloads the hops and its clean finish. A BV: 8.2 % I B U: NA

THREECREEIISBREWINGCOMPHNV

Ch

W

X-TAP:Butchertown BlackAle

Sunriver, OR •sunriver~

W

+ R R.R @ C R,K K K Q

Raptor RyeIPA ThisryeIPAattacksyourpalatewithafull-onhopassaultofAmarillo, Bravo and Centennial hops. Twenty percent rye malt provides a spicy balance to the intense citrus notes, while a clean and dry finish begsanother pint. A BV: 6.2 % I B U: 8 0 26 j Bend Brewfest 2013 j Thursday-Saturday, August 15-17

Ginger'S HilChenmare„fh 0«~IIB, I, I

ManCookie INGREDIENTS:3/4 cup unsalted butter, softened; I/2 cup sugar; I/2 cup light brown sugar, packed; 1 largeegg; 1/4 cup beer; I tablespoon lime zest; 3cups all-purpose flour; I/2 teaspoon baking powder; I/4 teaspoon baking soda; 1/2 teaspoonsalt; 1 cup Slim Jim, sliced or chopped (about 2 Slim Jim sticks); 1 1/4 cupsdry-roasted sunflower kemels (non-dry roasted aretoo oily). DIRECTIONS:Preheat ovento 350degrees. 1. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, cream together butter and sugars until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes; mix in egg, beerand lime zestand beat until well-blended; 2. Whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda andsalt in a small bowl and add to butter mixture; beat until just incorporated; and fold in Slim Jim pieces and sunflower kemels; 3. Scoopdough by I rounded tablespoon portions (I I/2 inches apart) on a parchment or nonstick baking sheet; bakefor 8-10 minutes or until bottoms are golden. Recipefrom Cookiesfor Crown-Ups, Aelly Cooper, RedRockPress2012,

Alc Br< ho


WRNDERING RENGUSCIDERWORHS Salm, OR •wanrkingaengus.com

Cherry Cider Tart pie andsweetbingcherries sharpen Anthem cider's tartness and add a rich background of woody, dark undertone — semi-dry. A BV: 5.5% I B U: 0

yP~(N3' • /~h ERWO

HopsCider Hops is a tribute to the Northwest's love of hops. Antthem Hops is a gluten-free cider dry-hopped with Oregon-grown Cascadehops for more than three weeks. Hops is a light, organic cider with all the beautiful citrus and floral aromas of Cascadehops. ABV: 5.5%

Dak DryCider A blend of bittersweet and sharp cider apples that offers rich tannins and spicy aromas with a mild oak finish. ABV: 6.9%

WIDNERBROTHERSBREWING Portland, OR• widmerbrothers.com

AlchemyAle Alchemy Ale is the newest pale ale in the Widmer Brothers lineup. Alchemy is a celebration of hops: our use of the proprietary Alchemy hop

W

that is laced throughout our beers as well as our intimate knowledge and understanding of hops through our hop development programs. The result is a malty beer with hints of caramel and a noticeable hop character unique to the Widmer Brothers brand. ABV: 5.8 % I BU : 4 0

Hopside Down IndiaPaleLager Hopside Down is a departure from your standard IPA because weused a lager yeast to ferment this beer instead of an ale yeast. By doing so, the beer has a clean hop aroma and sharp crispness in the finish. You won't find a lot of fruity esters in this beer, either. The beer has a big, bold hop aroma from the use of Cascadehops and just enough malt sweetness to balance it out. ABV: 6.7%

WOODCHUCH HARDCIDER Mu&ebury, Vf ueaachuck.com

WoodchuckHardAmher Cider Crisp and refreshing with a nice, golden hue, Woodchuck is expertly crafted with a medium body and clean apple finish. ABV: 5%

WoodchuckHardRaspberry Cider Light and delicious with a little extra zip, our raspberry cider is topped off with a sweet, refreshing raspberry finish. ABV: 4%

W E LIVE THE G O O D L I F E EVERYDAY. NOW YOU

CAN, TOO! B R E W I N G F OOD W IT H A

SO UT HW E S T F L A I R

1

n

CALLING ALL RIVER RATS, TRAIL RATS, DIRT RATS, GYM RATS, TECH RATS, MALL RATS AND OF COURSE ... MICRO BREW RATS!

gl e

384 SW UPPER TERRACE DR., SUITE 108, BEND • I

w ww. a t

o e r ew u . co m

G O O D L I FE BR EW IN G C O M

P A N Y . BEND, O R E G O

BendBrewfest2013 j LesSchwabAmphitheater j 27


WORTHVBREWINGCO.

gre%6>~-

Bend, ORâ&#x20AC;˘ worky~~ng com

Worthy IPA A well-balanced beer that focuses on hop NL~p flavor and aroma more than bitterness, this IPA offers a hop aroma reminiscent of pineapple, mango and lemon. A BV: 6.'P% I BU : 6 9

a endar o eer Events

BendBrewfestis

Worthy HeBesBock In German, "Helles" means light, though this copper-colored lager is anything but. Medium-bodied with a robust malt breadiness, Helles Bock finishes with a spry, peppery hop punch. ABV: 6.3 % I BU : 2 0

S-TAP:Special Saiaaa

August21-23, 2014 Fermentation Celebration, a beer walk in the Old Mill District featuring all 22-plus of our fine Central Oregon fermenters, will be held June 19, 2014, from 5-10 p.m.

One whiff of our Farm Out and you'll find yourself uncaging and uncorking a Belgian ale, redolent with deep-yellow fruity esters. The aroma ranges from freshly cut pineapple to lemon citrus, with a pleasant ethanol overtone. ABV: 7.3% I BU : 22

NRHEB WINERV HoodRiver, ORâ&#x20AC;˘ tmk~nerycom Visit the wine tent for selections!

~

A K E D I N E R Y" tt!..c

i. 3 . . . , ! "

restaurants gc shops! an outdooramphitheater! art galleries! a i6-screen cinema IMAX scenic river trails! it all adds up to a one-of-a-kind Central Oregon experience. O LD M I L L D I S T R I C T

28 I BendBrewfest2013 ~ Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

theoldmill.com! S4I.3ta.ot3! g old mill district ~L @oldmilldistrict


~P WqTETHEROW I LJ/

RIGHTA T T H E H E A RT

BEND BREWING CO.

SILVER MOON BREWING

DESCHUTES BREWERY PUBLIC HOUSE

WORTHY BREWING CO.

10 BARREL BREWING CO. BONEYARD BEER

GOODLIFE BREWING CRUX FERMENTATION DESCHUTES BREWERY TASTING ROOM

OLD MILL BREW WERKS

CASCADE LAKES BREWING CO.

TETHEROW

~P,W'

4J

fi

A

!

WORLD-CLASS GOLF SURROUNDED BY WORLD-CLASS BEER. DOES LIFE GET ANY BETTER THAN THIS? Living at Tetherow will give you a front row seat to all of the world-class festivals and events that happen in Bend. Just don't forget that right outside your door is also a championship style, Scottish links golf course designed by one of the world's most revered course architects. Lots start at $190,000.

Tetherow.com/live


i

I

• I The Bend Brewfest community partners are Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon, Neighborlmpact, and the Deschutes River Conservancy. You can visit them at the Bend Brewfest to find out more about each organization. We believe in community, and the folks who are involved with each of these organizations touch the lives of many Central Oregonians every day. They make Central Oregon a better place, as do you for supporting them. •

by

Ne

BIGBROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF CENTRALOREGON

By

inf.

Big Brothers Big Sisters has been making a significant impact in the lives of children for 17 years in Central Oregon. The Bend Brewfest is used to create awareness and recruit potential Big Brothers and Big Sisters to join the organization. wwu.bbbsco.org Big Brothers Big Sisters

of Central Oregon

cr' ba in br< an br<

Stg

NEIGHBORIMPACT Neighborlmpact has been offering services to feed, shelter and educate the most vulnerable populations in Crook, Deschutes andJefferson counties since 1985. They focus on empowering individuals and families to succeed and become engaged citizens in our community. Services range from basic human needs of food and shelter, to Head Start programs and housing. wwu.neighborimpact.org

+f g Nyb

Neighborlmpact

Be ha

gr( On thr

OP

do

Ye an ov(

tut

an

adl •

OESCHUTESRIVERCONSERVANCY The Deschutes River Conservancy is a nonprofit organization with the mission to restore streamflow and improvewaterquality in the Deschutes River Basin. Foundedin 1996 as a collaborative, multi-stakeholder organization, the DRC'sBoard of Directors makes decisions by consensus and is comprised of ~ a key public and private interests including farming, ranching, timber, development, hydro-power, recreation, tribes and DESC H UTES RIVER environment.uww.deschutesriver org CONSERVANCY

pr( th( rig

Ho in( ar<

pr( im tht

ap

sot

Fir cr' 30 j BendBrewfest2013 ~ Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17


We've been avid readers foThe New School Beer Blog here in the Bend Brew fest offices. The blog, founded by Samurai Artist and featuring a crew of contributors including "SNOB" Ritch, El Gordo and many talented others,focuses on fresh beer neus, opinio%riticism of beers and trends in the craft beer industry. It's a great uindow into the craft beer industry. Thisisthe latestfrom New School writer Ezra JohnsonGreenough.Youcan read more on their website, wwwnewschoolbeercom.

by Ezra Johnson-Greenough, New School Beer Blog By all accounts, the craft beer industry is booming. Sales of craft beer rose to 1.3 million barrels brewed just in Oregon in 2012, and the number of breweries in the country soared to an all-time high 2,416, with new brewery openings showing no sign of slowing down. Bend, along with Portland, has long been a leader of this growing industry in both Oregon and the nation, and as the number of new breweries opening up continue to surge, so does the chatter of the naysayers. Years ago, critics in Portland and Bend began discussing an oversaturation of breweries. It has turned out that the market can and does support the continual addition of new breweries and probably will for some time into the future, if we handle ourselves right. However, like any fledgling industry, some craft brewers are having growing pains. New problems are cropping up to impede growth and change the sometimes lackadaisical approach to the industry that some startups have. First and foremost, being a craft brewer is fun, but it is

PQ schonl also hard work. The industry is transitioning from one where all a startup brewer had to worry about was the quality of their beer to a more grown-up industry that requires the navigation of distributors, branding, lawsuits and lawyers. Bend paints a picture of a successful microcosm for this new frontier of beer. Bend is home to more breweries than anyone could imagine would exist in such a small city and has thus far avoided the pitfalls of a maturing industry. Beer was once such a staple to some cultures that a dinner table or breakfast, for that matter would not be set without a glass. So, while 1 believe no bubble is about to burst, there are inevitable growing pains. The first sign is an increasing number of legal battles over names and trademarks. Brewers arebeingforced tobecome more sophisticated in business and branding and, unfortunately, lawyers sometimes get involved.

shelf space for craft beer, even if it requires eating into macro beers slots. Still, this can only go so far, and some brewers might find themselves left out, which is why 1believe the brewpub model is the most sustainable. A brewpub is both a restaurant and a bar, and you cannot have too many of either of those. Like businesses in any industry, some will fail but many will succeed. Third, we need to stop fighting among ourselves about relatively irrelevant issues like what constitutes a "craft brewer" and what is a faux or "crafty" brewer, a la Molson-Coors-owned Blue Moon. The point is: who cares as

long as a brewery is making good beer? Let's worry about our own businessesbefore concerning ourselves with what others are dolng. Craft brewing's successdepends on how it matures as awhole. Will new brewers continue to walk into this industry w'th a chip on their shoulders ready to fight it out with the macrobrewers or each other, or will they do their best to represent the art form as compatriots and collaborators? The most successful craft brewers have come so far in large part because they didn't concern themselves with what others were doing; they just wanted to enjoy good beer with friends. As Bay Area artist Tom Marioni says, "The highest form of art is drinking beer with friends." Let's keep that in mind and toast to another year of beer.

I 8

i I

8

The next sign is a shrinking amount of shelf space at local supermarkets. Many stores can and will continue to expand the Bend Brewfest 2013 ~ LesSchwabAmphitheater ~ 31


as ar

Draft Beer

Disp e n sing Systems . !f' $ ; ..C Q l l l l t

lllig,

I 1

f•

• •

• 0 •

-

ie

-

• •

J •

Fresh Northwest Seafood is Our Priority, Providing a Truly Northwest Dining Experience is Our Pleasure.

PC % T~T

%~ %

TX E4~

k i l % I I M LP I & 4 A T TH E

O L D M IL L D I ST R I CT

475 SW Powerhouse Drive • Bend 541-389-8998

www.anthonys.com 32 ( Bend Brewfest 2013 ~ Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

Anthony'sopened our own seafood company in 1984 for the sole purpose of ensuring our guests only the highest quality Northwest seafood. Complementing our seafood, Anthony's family-owned restaurants offer fresh seasonal produce from local farms, local microbrews and Northwest wines, enhanced with a backdrop of the scenic Deschutes River.


Forcenturies,hopshavebeen abelovedcomponentofbeer. Theyare anatural preservative,helptodearbeerby acting as anatural hlter, lendahand in head retention, bringbalanceto sweetmalts, andactastheprlmary contributor to flavor and aroma (phewi).Describedasfloral, herbal, spicyorcitrus, hops arecapableofimpartingnearlyanyflavor the"spiceofbeer."

Sa@y, m hopsuere consumed

tbisar5d'e

More than 30 varietals of hopsexist on an ever-growing list. Thisisashort listofsome of the mostcommon varieties used in Northwest brewing;

'

WedOym credil io uvou.

CASCADEis a very popular U.S, varietywith a moderate bttterness level andfragrant, floweryaroma. Cascade is often used in highly hoppedWestCoast ales that have a citrusfloral hop character.

beeradvmk COOnduuu'

~

+.~ ~

p;

" jtij' .(

CENTENNIAl is described by someas a"Super Cascade," but it's not nearly as citrusy. This type can beusedfor aroma as well as bittering. Bitterness is quite clean and can have floral notes, depending on the boil time. CHINOOKis described as a pine forest washed with exotic spice and infused with grapefruit. Chinook hops offer an alluring aroma and a high bittering value. CITRAhas made a quick impact on the worldwide beer scene. It's a very fruity hop, specifically: citrus, peach, apricot, passionfruit, grapefruit, lime, melon, gooseberry, lychee fruit, pineapple, mango, papaya and other tropical fruit flavors and aromas. MOUNT HOODis an aromatic variety derived from Hallertau with a refined, spicy aroma and clean bittering. "Clean" commonly describes it. A goodchoice for lagers.

'

WH.LAMETTEis the king of aroma hops in the U.S. with its modest bittering value and the joyous harmony of flowers, fruit, earth and spice. Willamette offers a quality aroma hop with a smooth, soft flavor.

M

P

W

®

• •

~

• 0

0

• •

i i'

0

Bend Brewfest2013 j Les SchwabAmphitheater j 33


CZ: O

CZ: O CZ:

0 CIU

IJJ

CZ5 CZI

g

LIJ LIJ

Z

CZ

Ccc

CZI

Ccl

C I CU

o

CC

5C CJ J

55C

o

CZI

X

Co

CZ I

CCI

Co

IJJ CZ: CZI K LIJ CZI

LIJ

cC

«Z

CZ. LIJ

O

K:

CU

CZI CZI

CcC

Cll

J=

CPI

CU CC

ZD

o

IJJ LIJ CZI

CU

CZ

CO

o UJ

a

CU

CL

I ZI

O o

IZ I

I— ,

O O

K

O CIZ

X

CZ' CZI

0

CZ:

X IJJ CPI

OD O

cC

LIJ

CU

IJJ

CZI

LJ CP5

IJJ

OL

O-

O

LIJ

C

b lj

CL

IJJ CZ: CZI CU

E cC Co

c5

cC

ClJ UZ

34 ( BendBrewfest2013 ~ Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

CPI

O

CU

IJJ

LIJ

ZO

o

OD LJ

CI O

E

CZI

O

IJJ

CZ:

CZ:

CZ:

CcC J

o

CZ: CCI

l

CP5

LJ IJJ

CI5

OD IJJ CZ:

I

IZI

CZ:

CZ:

CU

CJ

CU

Ccl O

CPI CZ

o

IU

LIJ

CU

Gl

CX

E E

O

Zi v OO O

CU

CZI O

CU

IJJ CZ:

l

CID

CU

C55

E

«C O CZI

j LJ

Co

c

O CCI

CO

CU OL

O

CcU Ul

CL

O CZ I

X


LIJ

IJJ CZ' Q

Q

IJJ

j

CZ:

l1l

IJJ

CZ:

CIJ

UJ I

UJ U

na had

1

1

CPI LIJ

hc'

Q

ID

o

CIJ

IJJ

da

CI

E

0 v

CZI

r4

CD

(1

I-

CI cd

CPI

ID

U

Q DZ

CZI

LIJ

K

CCI

IJJ CPI

CZ: UJ

d, QI

o

Q

O

o

nl

ccl IZI

CPJ

X

LIJ

IZI

cc

) LU

da Q

dl

K UJ CZ:

da •-

Q dl D-

I—

CO

IJJ

Q

CO

U

CPI

cct

cd

o

o

O

O

Ch Q

UJ

E nl

LJ

dJ 1

dl

CPI

Chd Ctl

I

1

1

nd

dl

Ctl

E Q

CO

ID

o

CIZ

Q

CZ: CZI

2

IJJ

Q

Q

IJJ

Cal

0

Q CPI

I-

O

CI

cd dJ

1

m

CZI CPJ

CL

cad

co

UJ CZI CZI

LIJ

D Q

LIJ

CPI

UJ

nl

dl

CZI

CZ:

ct l E Q

CZI

IJJ

o

dl

I:

CZ:

ccl

Q

UJ hc

Oh

CZ! CZI

CIJ

IZI

E E

'Q

cad

C'L'

I

mC •

nd

cd dJ

D

O Chl

CZ! CZI CZ! UJ

CZ:

nl

Ccl

'P1J

Ch-

O

CZI

dl

LIJ

dJ

I,

1

O

IJJ CPJ

Cal

IJJ

nd

CZ: CZI CPJ

LIJ CZ QD

IJJ

IJJ

CIJ

E

CZ: CPI CZ:

nl

C

ID dl

cd

O

O

lle dhmwfeatIOII ( LCCSchwahhmpththeate ( 35


LJ

CPI

O

CZ'

CZ:

W JD

C4

CPI

O

cd E

LII

CZ: CZ: U

CZI CPI CZ: \ Ol

CPI

54

C

ccc

O Cl

CCC

ccl

W LIJ

CU

O

u I

W CPJ

Pv

g

CPI

dl c

LJ

cd dc

O I

C

ccl

W

cd cd

dc d4

O

W

K

E

Cll

CC

CIJ

4

cd

b4

C O

)

LJ

d4

Pl

W

K

~

'cd

cu

4

CZ:

LIJ LIJ

CD 4

LIJ CZ: CZI

ICld

cd dc CO

5

CZ: LIJ

dc

LIJ

W

IJJ

W

dc

O-

4

cC

Cl

cC

O

CZ: W LD CZ: CIJ

W CZ! CZI W

LIJ

ccl

Cl

g

Z

CP

dc

W

CV

4

cd K

CD

CII

i% LII

36 ~ Bend Brewfest 2013 ~ Thursday-Saturday, August 15-17

CII

5

CO

O

Cld

O

cd

c

dc

) CD O

C O 'LJ

CCC

Cd

Cd

dc

CZ:

CZ:

W O

E O

dc

u

LIJ O

CZI

dc

d4 ccl

CZ:

LI

O

cd

CZI

cd c

CD

CZI

CZ: CZI W U

CZ: LIJ C

cd

LIJ

CZI

CZ! W

W CZ: CD

CO

W O

C III

g

CD

D=

O

CL

X

cd

CZ:

cll

O CZ CZI CZ

CI

CD )

cd

CU

O

C

CH


CU

CU

CZ:

o LIJ

w O

CZ:

CXI

w

u K

Cz Cz! w

CPI

u

CU

PV

w O

co

ZD

CCI

CU

E

Czl

CZ

«C

o

O

C

2

CC!

I

CPI

cz-

Uz

C

O

K

Czl

o CD

LIJ CU IU CU

O

Cz

X

CJ

I-

o

o

CU 1

CU

E c

LIJ

CXI LO

oO

CU

CU

CU

O E

w W

Cz: I-

OD

LIJ OD CZ:

O

lJ V

CPI

X

g

CCI

CPI

o 5Q

u

CZ' CZ!

Cz:

IU 1

CU

w O 'LJ

CZ: CL

w

CCI

CP!

CL

E CCI

C PI

O

X

OL

E

CZ:

Cz:

o

C

O

w

I— ,

o

OD CPI

IU E ID

X

o CPI CZ

w

w w

CI

CZ

CU

Z

CU O

CZ OD

O

w

CZ!

CID

CU

w

CU

CZ

o

I-

CU

iZI

IEU I —

w

CU I:

OD CZ: CPl

CU

K

E

CPI

co

LIJ CZ OD

E o O

ca CU

X

o

CU

ID 1

CU

CPl

CCI

CCI

O

CU!

w o

CU

w Cz! Czl

Cl LIJ CZ: CXI CPI

E LIJ CZ

lU

o Io

CU

g

w o

o

Czl

«C CD IC

Cz:

CU CU

CU

Cz:

w

O

CU 1

O

Cll CU

CCI

w

CZ CZI

o

w

O

LE UC

CCI

C!

«C X

Cz:

LI

CU

IU

CU

O

CCI

K 0

X

Bend Brewfest 2013 ~ LesSchwabAmphitheater ~ 37


CP'

+>+ +j + ~

Q~>

~It I

qCtI,~Q I t , ~4 ~< ~W <,q<

P.

CQ' +QI

,+ ~'.e e~g ct&

~QI

~~+++ g+

g4 ! Q

ccl

CQ I

CZI

«C CPJ LJJ

I«C

CD

CPI CZ: CID CZ LIJ

LIJ QD

ccc CID LIJ

Q

LIJ

CZ: IJJ

ZD

IJJ

CZ: IJ

I:

CZI CZ

CCI CI Q

«C

CID Q CL

I—

K

E IC

O v ccl

CCI

IQ

IZI

E

co

JD

CPI

ccl Q

CZ:

O

CZ:

CPJ CZ:

CZ CD

E

Q CQ

«C

IJJ

CZ: CZI CPI CZ:

IJJ O CID CI

CZ CZI CID LIJ IJJ CZ CD LIJ IJJ

Q-

CCI

cc Q

38 ( BendBrewfest2013 ~ Thursday-Saturday,August 15-17

IC Cl

IcZ

u

E

Q

n5

I IZ

CX

CCI

I

K

CQ

Cl IJ J

Q

CZ LIJ

IC

CD QD

CZ: CZ:

ccl

E

I

IQ Q

I

CZI CCD

ICZ Q I

IC

O

IJJ

LIJ CZ: CI

K

Q

CZ: I-

IJJ CZ CZI

LJ

CZ LIJ

u

Q

IZI IJJ

Z

CD

E Cll

v «C

CL

IC

IC

IJ

IJ

CJ

IJ

Q

Q


GOOD FO O D

G.OOD BEE R

P LATY PU S P U B 1203 NE 3rd St. B end, Or 9770 1 5 41-323-32 8 2

IL' 2xlVA

./

r

platypuspubbend.com Tuesday-Sunday at noon

I

Home of Bend's Most Unique Beer Selection with 15 RotatingTaps

over 600 Varieties of Bottled Beers in The Brew Shop Upstairs

Pub Menu Featuring: Clam Chowder Every Day Fish and Chips House Cut Fries And Much More

Happy Hour 4-6:30 Every Day

g

i-j

f

r +qW

0,-

0

A•

Real Dart Boards

Itl;:Ij '"jjg:j

glhlg~'PU'9 ijtlfl G OO D F O O D . GOO D B E E R .

0

0

' . ' 'ns

o

off

Offer Expires Sept 30, 2013• Not Valid With Any Other Offer.

II /ef


Rick Settersten l Professor and Endowed Director Hallie E. Ford Center For Healthy Children and Families

0

'Q%®

CUL .RE Since2009, Oregon State and OSU-Cascades faculty have been taking their research into the community through Science Pub events held in Bend, Sisters and Redmond. These informal, yet informative events cover topics ranging from delayed adulthood to how ancient floods made possible the hne wines and beers of the Pacihc Northwest, to the role of hre in healthy forest ecosystems. Expanding OSU-Cascades to a 4-year university will create more opportunities for programs like Science Pub — and draw more writers, artists and musicians to Central Oregon.

4 Central Oregon OSUcascades.edu/4

QSU Cascades


i OREGON EVENTS, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT YOUR WEEKLY GUIDE TO CENTRAL

/

M U S I C:Whiskey M 0 V I E S: 'Planes,"Elysium' and Shivers plays at Silver three oth r open, PAGE25 Moon, PAGE3

Qr

MAGAZ M ~ EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN AUGUST 9, 2013 ~

%K

PAGE13 =


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE

C ON T A C T

US

EDITOR

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

insi e

Cover design by Althea Borck/The Bulletin

Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377

bsalmon ©bendbulletin.com

REPORTERS Beau Eastes, 541-383-0305 beastesObendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper©bendbulletin.com Megan Kehoe, 541-383-0354 mkehoe O bendbulletin.com Karen Koppel, 541-383-0351 kkoppelObendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck©bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. Email to: events©bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804,

Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Take advantage of the full line of Bulletin products. Call 541-385-5800. ull

.

"lrn eere • rea eee •eeeo es

RESTAURANTS • 10

OUT OF TOWN • 20

• A review of Drake in downtown Bend • News from the local dining scene

• Eugene Celebration includes music, vendors, film festival and more • A guide to out of town events

DRINKS • 12

MUSIC • 3 • Whiskey Shivers visits the Moon • Feedback: Bend Roots works to get Pakit ready • Say hello to The Deadly Gentlemen • Michael Franti 8 Spearhead return • Igor 8 Red Elvises close out Munch & Music • John Shipe plays in Prineville park • Truth gt Salvage Co.plays Blue Pine

GOING OUT • 8 • Hello Dollface at Silver Moon • A listing of live music, DJs,karaoke, open mics and more

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

GAMING • 23

• What's coming up at Silver Moon • Bend Brewfest kicks off Thursday • More news on the brew scene

• A review of "Shadowrun Returns" •W hat's hotonthegaming scene

ARTS • 13 • COVER STORY: Sunriver Music Festival opens with Western-themed concert • Season Showcaseat 2nd Street Theater • Sunriver Art Faire this weekend • Play reading at Volcanic Theatre Pub • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

MOVIES • 25

• "Elysium,""Percy Jackson:Seaof Monsters," "Planes,""We're the Millers" and "Byzantium" open in Central Oregon • "Mud,""Oblivion,""On the Road," "The Place BeyondThePines," "The Sapphires,""TotheWonder" and "West of Memphis" are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • A listing of upcoming events • Talks and classes listing

•Dumpstaphunk,MarcAnthonyandmore

f) first community

MidOre on Credit Union

24'"Annual Great Drake Park

OnPOlnt C OM M U N I T Y

eg Purchase Ducks from: Bend Area Rotarians First Community Credit Union Mid Oregon Credit Union OnPoint Community Credit Union SELCO Community Credit Union

M or e t h a n e v e r b e f o r e .

The Bulletin bendbulletin.com

fFd'o1 www.theduckrace.com

COMMDNITT CREDIT IINION

VYin a '

< < < < auto voucher

ROBBERSON LINco L N ~

~

r

tttaZQQ

plus more fantasticprizes!

FREE Kids Race

I 2:00 p.m.

September 8, 20 I 3 Fun startsat II:00 a.m.

SELCO

C R EDIT U N I O N

bendbroadband" we're the local dog. we better be good.


GO! MAGAZINE ~ PAGE 3

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

musie ' f".I illIItf"i '

,

n,

r

r

r: I I I F

I'

'. II I

f(f

fl fff flf II - Irl III

III

1 'C

Ogg

EII

•)

L')

-x~tjtr~4es ."' -At'. Submitted photo

Whiskey Shivers are, frornleft, Jeff "Horti" Hortillosa, James Bookert, Andrew VanVoorhees, Bobby Fitzgerald and Joe Deuce.

• Texas punkgrass band Whiskey Shivers rolls into Bend's Silver Moon By David Jasper The Buttetin

f you were to make a bluegrass and punk smoothie, Whiskey Shivers is what might come spilling out of yourblender. Prineville's own Andrew VanVoorhees plays upright bass in the whirling string-band dervish that

t

is Whiskey Shivers. The Austin, Texas-based quintet, formed in 2009, will play Tuesday at Silver Moon Brewing k T a proom in

Bend (see"If you go"). The video for the Shivers' song "Gimme All Your Lovin'" — a twangy tale of love and jealousy off the 2011 album "Batholith"

— has beenviewed nearly half a million times on YouTube. Of the video and song, the "men's magazine" FHM wrote, "This is crazyassed Redneck music with atwisted music video that turns dark as the deepest night right at the end." VanVoorhees said the group expects to release a live record in the

fall, to be followed in the spring by another studio record.Meanwhile, the group is touring extensively this summer. We caught up with him as he and his band/van mates rolled out of Scottsdale, Ariz. "I love it. It's great," he said when asked if he likes life on the road or gets sick of it. "I mean, it's cramped, tiring and kind of weird, but it's cool."

Continued Page5

If yougo What:Whiskey Shivers, with Wild Child

When:9 p.rn. Tuesday Where:Silver Moon Brewing 8 Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave.,

Bend Cost:$5 Contact:www.silvermoonbrewing. com or 541-388-8331


music

PAGE 4 + GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

•t

s/

n

8 I Leilani Rapaport/The Bulletin

ISI

Roh Kerr/The Bulletin

eJ

Leilani Rapaport/The Bulletin

At left, Norman Smith helps clean up Bend's Pakit Liquidators in July. At right, two photos show the massive job ahead for Bend Roots Revival supporters, who hope to hold the annual localmusic-and-more festival there in late September.

• Music festival's organizers want to moveto Pakit Liquidators, but there'swork left to do olks,t i~let's get right to t he 1 t point: It's crunch time for one of the most important components of Central Oregon's ~ t music scene, the Bend Roots Revival. Whether you're a musician who has playedthe three-day celebration of local arts in the past, or a vendor who has sold food or goods at a Revival, or someone who has simply attended the event, if you love the spirit of this thing, you owe it to yourself to dial in the attention span for a minute and read on. Put simply, we are less than 50 days from thescheduled 2013 Bend Roots Revival, and founder Mark Ransom remains confident it will happen. But he's also getting ~

~

~

a little bit nervous. Here's the q u ick b a ckstory: Ransom, a veteran local musician, started the Revival in 2006 as a small gathering of local bands around Parrilla Grill and the Victorian Cafe on Bend's west side. The thing exploded in size, scope and popularity, outgrew that intersection and moved to the Century Center in 2010. It lasted two years there but was canceled at the last minute in 2012 amid noise concerns from neighbors and a land-use dispute with a nearby business. After that disappointment, Ransom and his partner, Jesse Roberts of Bend-based humanitarian nonprofit Rise Up International, went

FEEDBACKBY BEN SALMON ,f~~Ai'ri.

r

looking for a new venue. They stumbled upon it last fall when Church of Neil — an annual underground concert that pays tribute to Neil Young — happened at Pakit Liquidators, the vast home improvement resale yard at Ninth Street and W i lson Avenue in Bend. Both Ransom and Roberts liked Pakit's vibe at Church of Neil, and they thought the location — in a commercial area of town with no adjacent residential neighborswould be a good fit for the event. Of course, "vibe" is just one word for it. If you've been to Pakit,

you know that it's ... well, let's just say that part of its charm is that it's a mess. A serious mess. And so, Ransom, Pakit owner Matt Korish and a hodgepodge crew have been working to clean it up and get it ready — and safe — for Roots, scheduled to begin Sept. 27. More immediately, they need to apply for the necessary permits to hold the event in the next week to 10 days, Ransom told me Tuesday. I called Ransom to talk about his progress and the timeline and how he's feeling and all that kind of stuff. And I was driving across town while we chatted (don't tell

the cops). So I didn't take notes. But here's a summary of the situation: • Things are starting to take shape at Pakit, he said. Progress can be seenin some areas of the property, where Roots plans to

erect six stages for live music, plus areas for food and drinks, general gathering, and other stuff that comes with such an event. • The festival p r o g ramming — the lineup, who'll play when, f unding, other details — is a s "tight" as it has ever been, he said. In case that's not clear, that's a good thing. Ransom is excited about what's planned. • His excitement about those plans heightens the stress over whatneedstobe done inthe next 50 days. Ransom said he has received from various agencies a checklist of things he needs to take care of ahead of the permitting process, ranging from simple stuff to more complicated things, such as parking arrangements, a site plan and technical drawings for the stages approved by an engineer.

Continued next page


music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Feedback

i

ltS SCIIIIIIP I

From previous page He feels good about the things a fire marshal will inspect, such as entrances, exits and other access issues. • Here's R an s o m's b igg e s t challenge right now: He is hesitant to ask people — especially musicians who are going to play the event — to come to Pakit and help out until he can assure them that permits are in place and that the event is 100-percent definitely happening. And he won't know for at least another couple of weeks. Which means that he's spending a lot of time at the place right now, working with a small group of volunteers to get to that point. And once he does, then he'll start calling for reinforcements to help out with the final push. T hat's admirable of h i m . B u t Mark has a family at home, and a

"real job" playing gigs that provide

IIMPIITHE RTER

i~-fE'1l • e

S

• •

tl

The Bulletin is tracking efforts to get Pakit Liquidators cleaned upand ready to host the

FOLLOW ALONGAT

on a whim, went down to Austin because I like playing country and

From Page 3

folk music. (Those styles get) a lot

Here's the rest of that chat, slightly edited.

more attention in Austin than in Portland. GO!: Andthen you met these guys,

s tuff like B il l M o nroe and D o c Watson. We tend to incorporate that in the music, doing kind of genre-bending,

Oregon? AVV: Yeah, most of my immediate family — in fact, all of my immediate family — is still there. My parents still live in Prineville, and my brother lives in Bend. GO!: Will you have a lot of family at the show? AVV: I will .. . they'd better be there!

GO!: How did you end up going from Prineville to Austin? AVV: It's just kind of, you know, taking music around. I lived in Seattle, I was there for a couple of years, and I moved down to Portland for a few years. Yeah, and I just kind of,

I II

WWW.BENDBULLETIN. COM/BENDROOTS

Whiskey Shivers

AVV: Yeah, I've played music off and on most of my life. GO!: Are your folks still in Central

I

J

video series is up, andanother comes out today.

more at www.bendroots.net. Or visit www.facebook.com/bendroots and see what you find. Bend Roots Revival can return in 2013, to a home that I believe has not only tremendous potential but also the original spirit of the event. But there's work to be done.

GO!: Were youplaying music then?

ll'

Bend Roots Revival. The first installment in the

pen but succeed at Pakit Liquidators this year, and you have a little time to spare or skill to share, get in touch with Mark and let him know. I'm not going to print his number in the newspaper; some of you probably already have it. But you can find an email address at www .markransom.com, and a c o uple

GO! Magazine: You grew up in

I

d's •

his income. He has alot of workto do (or at least direct) at Pakit, and is trying to squeeze it in around the rest of his life. More accurately, the Roots work is overrunning parts of the rest of his life. Bend Roots started out as Mark Ransom's baby. But seven years in, it's a charming, creative kid now, and it belongs to all of us. It takes a village, you know'? So if you love Bend Roots and you want to see it not only hap-

Prineville? Andrew VanVoorhees: Yeahyeah. I was there for 18 years.

GO! MAGAZINE e PAGE 5

or did you play in other bands? AVV: I played in a lot of bands, and I took out an ad on Craigslist and just kind of said, "I'm a good bass player and I need a band real bad." I played with a lot of people and just slowly pared them down.

Like (when) things stopped working out, (or they) stopped doing things I liked, I just kind of stopped playing with them. Whiskey Shivers ended up top of the heap. GO!: Why do you think this project stuck while the others went away? AVV: Well, I get to play music I love with my best friends (laughter). Yeah, it's a win-win. I can't have a bad time. GO!: Who are some of the band's

influences? AVV: We're kind of all across the board, from punk rock and The Replacements and Uncle Tupelo to The Dillards, to more traditional

rgRS

ggl4R

TIX AVAIL IIOW A AT OOOII

I

s

— Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsatmon@bendbultetin.com

like "We're going to play this song with bluegrass instruments, but it's not really bluegrass."

GO!: What can people expect from the show? AVV: They can expect a lot of things. They can expect jokes, oneliners. We're pretty good with the one-liners. They can expect a lot of really fast bluegrass music.

GO!: If you guys could share a bill with any act in history, who would you

pick? AVV: Ooh. I'm going to posit this to the group really quick. (A brief discussion follows. One a n swer that rises from the laughter-filled din sounds like "Frank Zeppelin.") We're going to go with Tiny Tim. GO!: Why Tiny Tim? AVV: Well, I'm not sure why Tiny Tim. He's funny, and small? (More discussionensues.)Frank Zeppelin. We're changing our answer. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbultetin.com

c

:: LOI I

:

I

'I '

I

' L®I-.:i heIILT :-:jI $0 i

v

SO O et e St O d e sO e d O Ct e d O O er e P O d O P e d O P O er O P

STEVE

MART N F EJ T U P I | G

FRIDAY OCT 4 Tickets at BENDCONCERTS.com, TICICETFIY.com, SI'?-439-9849, aad at the Ticket Mill ia Bead's Old Mill D i strict.


musie

PAGE 6 + GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

+411!tt "'~ •t

S

I

hen you read down the list of members of t h e B o ston-based bluegrass-ish band The Deadly Gentlemen, two last names jump out. One is bassist Sam Grisman, who is, in fact, the son of mandolinist and newgrass pioneer David Grisman. The other is Greg Liszt. Whether he's related to the composer Franz Liszt is unclear, but his resume is quite strong regardless. He must be the only person on the planet who has a doctorate in molecular biology from MIT and also toured with Bruce Springsteen on banjo. He's also a member of the well-known newgrass band Crooked Still, and he wrote and produced all three Deadly Gentlemen albums. The newest, by the way, is called "Roll Me, Tumble Me," and it's a glistening collection of sleek, modern, nontraditional bluegrass,

.

where beautiful melodies and harmonies are as important (and plentiful) as tight, lightning-fast picking. This is a band that can do both"real"bluegrass andprogressive stringband pop with equal grace. As of press time, you could hear the entire album at www

.j.mp/deadlygents. Tonight, The Deadly Gentlemen will play at Crow's Feet Commons in Bend. And if that sounds like a good place to see some music, be aware that Portland's junkyardblues-punk duo Hillstomp will play there for freeat 7 p.m. Monday. A sign of more shows to come at Crow's Feet'? Let's hope so! The Deadly G entlemen; 7 ton i g ht; free; Crow's Feet Co mmons, 875 N W . Brooks St., B end; w w w .facebook.com/ crowsfeetcommons. — Ben Salmon

Michael Franti

.

Submitted photo

Michael Franti worked with several powerhouse pop-music songwriters on his new album "All People," which came out July 30.

returns to Bend lmost exactly a year ago, Michael Franti & S pearhead played Les Schwab A mphitheater in B e nd, an d I wrote a brief about the evolution of his music and his apparent outlook on life. Here's the gist:

"Today, he's a long way from

/

:;. ~/ /

his glowering, confrontational work in the Beatnigs and the Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy, his two politically charged industrialpunk-hop bands from more than two decades ago. That's probably just as well. As Franti has aged, he has found a way to express his firmly held beliefs through a more positive and accessible style of music, a bouncy fusion of funk, rock, hiphop, blues and reggae that's hard to resist ..." One year and one album release later, Franti seems to be aiming more at the masses than ever before.His new album "All People,"released July 30, marks "the first time that he has reached out to collaborate with other writers and producers," according to

his publicity company. Those others include pop music production team The Matrix, global hitmaker Adrian Newman and a guy who has worked with One Direction and Katy Perry. The results leap from the speakers in the album's first single "I'm Alive (Life Sounds Like)," a sugarrush amalgam of Coldplay-esque "whoa-oh-oh"-ing, EDM thumpthump and a whistled hook that sounds like every commercial on TV right now. It also quotes the Train song "Hey Soul Sister." It's ... catchy, yeah. Irresistible? You can decide for yourself Sunday when Franti brings Spearhead to Bend's Les Schwab Amphitheater for the third time in four years. Michael Franti & Spearhead; 6:30 p.m. Sunday, gates open 5 p.m.; $36 plusfees, available at thewebsite below or The Ticket Mill (541318-5457) in Bend; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; www.bend concerts.com. — Ben Salmon


music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

I

I

I

I

Aug. 17 —Jackson Price (soul-pop),Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www. silvermoonbrewing.com Aug. 18 —Bond& Bentley (rock),Silver Moon Brewing 8 Taproom, www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Aug. 20 —CocoMontoya (bluus),The Sound Garden, Bend, www. thesoundgardenstudio.com. Aug. 21 —Cattle Decapitation (duath metal), The Sound Garden, Bend, www.thesoundgardenstudio. com. Aug. 21 —Arden Park Roots(reggae),Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www. silvermoonbrewing.com Aug. 22 —Insentient (blackunud death metal), Third Street Pub, Bend, 541-306-3017. Aug. 22 —LuuKoch(soulful Americana),Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www. silvermoonbrewing.com Aug. 22 —Plow United (punk),The Astro Lounge, Bend, www.astroloungebend. com. Aug. 23 —Live Undead (Slayur tribute),The Sound Garden, Bend, www. thesoundgardenstudio.com. Aug. 24 —The Quick & Easy Boys(indiurock),The Belfry, Sisters, www.belfryevents. com. Aug. 24 —Live Undead (Slayur tributu),Big T's, Redmond, www.reverbnation. com/venue/bigts. Aug. 24 —LusClaypool's Duo duTwang (twang times two,I guess), Century Center Courtyard, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Aug. 25 —Joshua Radin and Gregory Alan Isakov(folkpop),Athletic Club of Bend, www.c3events.com. Aug. 25 —Afroman (rap), Domino Room, www. randompresents.com. Aug. 28 —Craig Carothurs (folk),McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Aug.28—Rudhands Blackfeet (post-rock, Third Street Pub, Bend, 541-306-3017. Aug.30 — Patrick Hammond (soul-pop),Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

GO! MAGAZINE + PAGE 7

Igor & Red Elvises wraps Munch &Music

Southern soul that sounds

both ragged and polished at

It's hard t o b e lieve, but Thursday's concert by Igor & Red Elvises is the final Munch & Music of the 2013 season. Over thepast 23 years, the eclectic series — held in Drake Park, with food vendors and kids' playthings and whatnot — has become an iconic part of the local music scene, a true community gathering in Bend's grassy living room, if you will. And each year, it seems to fly by faster and faster. Or maybe that's just my life. (Insert smiley face here.) T his year, Munch & M u sic will be capped by a band well-suited to play an all-out party. Igor & Red Elvises are a campy, cosmopolitan band that plays throwback rock 'n' roll, surf music, lounge-pop and more. Led by Germanborn but Soviet-raised Igor Yuzov, the Elvises actually got their start i n S outhern California nearly two decades ago and have been spreading the good times across the globe ever since. Here's an easier way to say it: This band is fun. Super fun. And great for dancing. What better place could there be to see them besides Drake Park in August? (Besides maybe Moscow, Idaho, on Aug. 26. I bet they have some great jokes planned for that one.) Igor & Red Elvises; 5:30 p.m. Thursday; free; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Ri verside Bl vd., Bend; wwwmunchandmusic .com.

John Shipe plays Prineville park If you've paid attention to the greater Oregon music scene over the past, oh, couple of decades, you probably recognizethe name John Shipe. The veteran singer-songwriter and f o rmer Eugene residentwas a member of one of the state's not-quite-nextbig-things, Th e R e n egade

Saints, before leaving to pursue life as a solo artist. Since

then, he's been busy gigging and settling into a s o u nd he describes as "Freeform Americana." As genre names go, that's a good one. In two words, it paints a picture of Shipe's work, which is based around an acoustic guitar, a voice and a melody, but also pulls in a wide array of instrumental accompaniment and the artist's own wandering, folk/

+

— Ben Salmon

i]

Above all, Shipe is a pro with a knack for memorable tunes, strong work ethic and stories to tell. Dig into him and his music at wwwjohnshipe .com, and/or check him out Wednesday in Prineville as part of the Picnic in the Park outdoor concert series.

J ohn Shipe; 6- 8

p . m.

Wednesday; f ree; P i oneer Park, 450 N .E. Th i rd S t . , Prineville; www.crookcounty foundation.org/events or 541-447-6909.

Blue Pine hoststhe Truth & Salvage Co. When Truth & S a l v age Co. last rolled through Bend, back in the spring of 2011, I wrote that the band's selftitled debut album would "fit

vsr

nicely among anyone's record C3

collection, or at least anyone who appreciates The Band,

bendbulletin.com 8

tg

pop/blues-loving muse.

Find It All Online 8

The Byrds, the Rolling Stones and Neil Young. Or, for the young'uns: The Black Crowes and The Avett Brothers." Two-plus years later, the Nashville, Tenn.-based band's sophomore album is out, and little has changed. "Pick Me Up" is a solid collection of '70si nspired country-rock a n d

the same time, like a new pair of jeans you buy from The Gap that comes with holes already in the knees. Truth & . S a lvage C o.'s strength is in its numbers. All five members of the group write songs, and four sing. The result i s a h a r monyheavy sound that'll make you feel like growing your hair long, grabbing an acoustic guitar and joining the jam session that has enveloped your head. And the band's MVP might just be A dam Grace, whose work on t h e keys gives the whole thing a convincingly vintage vibe. The album i s st r e ami ng in fu ll at www .j.mp/salvagestream. Truth & Salvage Co.; 9 p.m. Wednesday; $5; Blue Pine Kitchen and B ar, 25 S. W. Century Drive, Bend; www .bluepinebarcom.

R.

heBulletin

ruu mu

C/I •

u


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

going out Looking for something to do? Check out our listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more happening at local nightspots. Find lots more at www.bendbulletin.com/events.

DHELLO DOLLFACEAT SILVER MOON The globe- and genre-trotting first paragraph

of Hello Dollface's bio pretty much sums upthe sound of this easygoing quartet from Durango, Colo. Thedrummer honedhischopsinascene heavy with reggaeand Latin music. The bassist previously played electro-jazz-funk here in Oregon. The guitarist studied classical guitar playing in

college. And the singer/keyboardist is a world D. 0

E

shores, Chineseand Vietnamese marketplaces." How they gathered in southwestern Colorado is

M

a bit of a mystery, but their sound is not. Hello

13

TODAY PARTY ON THE PATIO: Jones Road plays hard rock at 6 p.m; free; doors open at 4:30 p.m.; Country Catering Co., 900 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend; 541-383-5014. STRING JUNKIES: Americana and folk; 6-8 p.m.; Jackson's Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-647-2198. TEXAS HOLD'EM: $40;6 p.m .;Rivals Sports Bar, Grill 8 Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. TIM ALEXANDER:Jazz, indie and folk; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 19570Amber Meadow Drive, Suite190, Bend; 541-728-0095. BOBBY LINDSTROM AND EDSHARLET: Rockand blues;7 p.m.;Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. NOAH CHARLESSTROUP:Acousti c rock; 7 p.m.; The Blacksmith, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. bendblacksmith.com or 541-318-0588. SHIREENAMINI ANDCHIRINGA: LiveLatin dancemu sic;$5;7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600.

THE RIVERPIGS: Rock;9:15 p.m.;Owl's Nestat Sunriver Lodge, Sunriver Resort; 541-593-3730. BUCK N'THEDIGGS: Rock;9:30 p.m .; $5; Silver Moon Brewing 8 Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. ELI LIEBERMAN:Solo set from Strive Roots' songwriter; 10 p.m.; Dojo, 852 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-706-9091.

SATURDAY

BOBBY LINDSTROM AND EDSHARLET: Rock and blues; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Chow, 1110 N.W.Newport Ave., Bend; 541-728-0256. NECKTIE KILLERS: Ska, with Strive Roots and more; noon; Jersey Boys Pizzeria, 527 N.W. ElmAvenue, Redmond; 541-548-5232. DOC RYAN'SROADSHOW:Texas-style blues; 5-8 p.m.;ElkLakeResort,60000 Century Drive, Bend; 541-480-7378. DA CHARA DUO:Celtic, pop and jazz; 6-8 p.m.; Scanlon's, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, Bend; 541-316-1289 or nprf970@ bendbroadband.com. MUCKRACKERS: Bluegrass; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse,19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite190, Bend; THE DEADLYGENTLEMEN: Bluegrass; 541-728-0095. 7 p.m.; Crow's Feet Commons, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541BOBBY LINDSTROM AND EDSHARLET: 728-0066 or www.facebook.com/ Rockand blues;7 p.m.;Tumalo Feed crowsfeetcommons. (Pg. 6) Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. THE JZ BAND:Rock; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; Angeline's Bakery & Cafe,121 W. Main OUT OFTHE BLUE: Rock; 7:30 p.m.; Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9122. Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. SLICK SIDE DOWN:Jazz and funk; 8 p.m.; Dojo, 852 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; HOBBS:Blues-rock; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; 541-706-9091. Angeline's Bakery 8 Cafe, 121 W. Main Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9122 or www. THE ROCKHOUNDS: Rock; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar 8 Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres belfryevents.com. Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. THE ROCKHOUNDS: Rock; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres HOBBS:Blues-rock; 9 p.m., doors open at 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. Century Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881. NAKED FOR SAFETY: Rock, with Failure

traveler, from "the Spanish coast to Scandinavian

Machine and Edewaard;free;9 p.m., doors open at 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541323-1881 or www.volcanictheatrepub. com. THE RIVERPIGS: Rock;9:15 p.m.;Owl's Nest at Sunriver Lodge, Sunriver Resort; 541-593-3730. JIVE COULIS:Funk-rock; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. STRONGHOLD:Funk, jazz and more; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

SUNDAY LISADAE AND THE ROBERT LEE TRIO: Jazz standards; 5-7:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill,62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. TURF TUNES:Featuring live music with Parlour, food and beverage vendors; bring a low-profile chair; free; 5-7 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; www.sunriversharc.com. CHARLESBUTTONBAND: Blues and rock; 5:30-8 p.m.; The Lodge at Suttle Lake, 13300 U.S. Highway 20, Sisters; 54 I-595-2628. MICHAELFRANTI & SPEARHEAD:Popreggae;$36 plusfees;6:30 p.m.,gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.

com. (Pg. 6) JIVE COULIS:Funk-rock; 7-9 p.m.; Broken Top Bottle Shop 8 Ale Cafe, 1740 N.W. Pence Lane, Suite1, Bend; 541-728-0703. TROPICANTEBANDANDDACHARA DUO:Latin/calypso and Celtic, pop and jazz; 7-9 p.m.; Brand 33, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-316-1289. INHALE:Reggae-rock; 8 p.m.;

Dollface's 2012 album "Virtue" — streamable at www.hellodollfacemusic.com — is a likeable, laid-back potpourri of its makers' backgrounds

and influences, ambling back andforth from airy indie-folk to cosmopolitan lounge-pop, working in touches of jazz and soul along the way. This would

be the perfect soundtrack to anevening where your goal is to sit and chill out. And that sounds like a good goal, right? Your opportunity to reach

it comes Thursday at Silver Moon Brewing 8 Taproom in Bend. Details below.

Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W.Century Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881 or www. volcanictheatrepub.com.

— Sen Salmon

S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www. musicint hecanyon com PICNIC IN THE PARK:Americana music by John Shipe; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer MONDAY Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541447-6909 or www.crookcounty TEXAS HOLD'EMOR OMAHA: 4 p.m .; foundation.org/events. (Pg. 7) Rivals Sports Bar, Grill 8 Poker, 2650 KC FLYNN:Country-rock; free; 6N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. 10 p.m.; Pronghorn Resort, 65600 KARAOKE: 6:30-9 p.m.; Northside Bar Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-312-9424. 541-383-0889. TEXAS HOLD'EMOR OMAHA: 6 p.m .; HILLSTOMP:Punk-blues; 7 p.m.; Crow's Rivals Sports Bar, Grill 8 Poker, 2650 FeetCommons, 875 N.W. BrooksSt., N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. Bend; 541-728-0066 or www.facebook. OPEN MIC:6:30-8:30 p.m.; River Rim com/crowsfeetcommons. Coffeehouse, 19570 Amber Meadow OPEN MIC:8 p.m., signups at 7:30 p.m.; Drive, Suite190, Bend; 541-728-0095. The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., COOPERANDTHEJAM: Soul; 7 p.m.; Bend; 541-388-0116. McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 TUESDAY or www.mcmenamins.com. TRUTH &SALVAGECO.: TheTennessee TEXAS HOLD'EMBOUNTY TOURNAMENT:6 p.m.;RivalsSports country-rock band performs; 9 p.m.; $5; Bar, Grill 8 Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Blue Pine KitchenandBar, 25S.W. Century Bend; 541-550-7771. Drive, Bend;www.bluepinebar.com. (Pg. 7) BOBBY LINDSTROM ANDDEREK MICHAEL MARC: Rockand blues;7 THURSDAY p.m.; Northside Bar 8 Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. IGOR & RED ELVISES: The Russian rock 'n' roll band plays Munch & Music; dogs MISS LONELY HEARTS BAND:Twangprohibited; free; 5:30 p.m.; Drake Park, rock; 9 p.m.; Blue Pine Kitchen and Bar, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www. 25 S.W. Century Dr., Bend; 541-389munchandmusic. com. (Pg.7) 2558 or www.bluepinebar.com. TEXAS HOLD'EM BOUNTY TAARKA:Gypsy-jazzand roots music; TOURNAMENT:6 p.m.;RivalsSports 9 p.m.;GoodLife Brewing Co.,70 S.W . Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Century Drive, Bend; 541-728-0749. Bend; 541-550-7771. WHISKEY SHIVERS:Bluegrass, HELLO DOLLFACE:Soul-pop; $5; 9 p.m.; with Wild Child; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Silver Moon Brewing 8 Taproom, 24 N.W. Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. www.silvermoonbrewing.com. silvermoonbrewing com (Pg 3) LADIESNIGHT WITH SOUL BROTHER: 9 p.m.; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. WEDNESDAY Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Classic • TO SUBMIT:Email events@bendbulletim.com. rock by Hangar 52; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Deadline is 10 days before publication. Please American Legion Community Park, 850 include date, venue, time and cost


GO! MAGAZINE ~ PAGE 9

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

musie releases Marc Anthony ((

3p

Five Finger Death Punch

R

Sony Music Latin Marc Anthony has remained his own man. He married Jennifer Lopez and never got a stupid hybrid title (no J-Arc or Ma-Lo). He sang "God Bless America" at baseball's All-Star Game and got Twitter grief for it ("How dare immigrants sing our song?"). But he brushed it off, went on TV, and reminded audiences he was of Puerto Rican descent and born in New York. As a singer, he's rarely succumbed to slick, gringo pop. But salsa is where Anthony lives, where he made his bones, a nd where hi s p o i ntedly ex p ressive v o ic e s e t tles m o s t handsomely. It is thrilling, then, that "3.0" is his first original tropical recording in eons (he covered salsa sensation Hector Lavoe for his 2007 film "El Cantante"). Make no mis-

Q:g4:3f

take: There is lush pop in ballads such as "Espera." For all the beauty of his voice and the rocky romanticism conveyed throughout "3.0,"there is swagger."Hipocresia" is as gutsy as it is graceful. The guaguanco grooves of " Flor Palida" open wide for Anthony's warning that an untended flower is a dead one. Impresionante. — A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Here and there

"THE WRONG SIDE OF HEAVEN AND THE RIGHTEOUS SIDE OF HELL, VOLUME 1" Prospect Park Records Tense, muscled songs of defiance and resentment: These are the stock in trade of the pummeling Los Angeles metal band Five Finger Death Punch, now four albums into a surprisingly resilient career. "The Wrong Side of Heaven and the Righteous Side of Hell, Volume 1" — Volume 2 is scheduled to arrive later this year — isn't quite the anarchic blast that this band's previous album "American Capitalist" was, and it lacks some of that album's pseudopolitical punch. H ere, mostly, s inger I v a n Moody sticks with hostility as a mode. He sings huskily and with clear aggression — although he's no match for the guest Rob Halford (of Judas Priest) on "Lift Me Up" — and sometimes dips into soft singing that o ccasionally serves as ecstatic release but is mostly just a breather. In a couple of places, Halford veers from the

Here and there Sept. 17 —Medford Armory, Medford; www.ticketmaster .com or 800-745-3000. Sept. 18 —McDonald

Theater, Eugene;www.tickets west.com or 800-992-8499.

pneumatic script: On "Wrong Side of Heaven," he talks about God as a woman, and on "Diary of a Deadman," he speaks about abandonment by someone he expected better of. Most of the contemplation on this album, though, takes place in the body: This is intensely physical music, inelegant and powerful, coming off like soundtracks to mixed m artial a rt s b outs and military invasions. There are welcome flashes ofspeedmetal and less welcome flashes of melodic hard rock that are a direct rejection of this band's strengths. G uitarist Zoltan Bathory i s

bursts, and d r ummer Jeremy Spencer plays with density and force, holding things together. Sometimes the group is sludgy when it should be terse, and sometimes its parroting of 1980s metal modes is overwhelming. But as was more clear on its last album, Five Finger Death Punch is interested in rubbing against the grain too, heard here in a cover of LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out," a slice of meathead raprock that suggests this band may have been studying up on the "Judgment Night" soundtrack.

flashy, adding quick filigree solos

— Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

that compress mayhem into small

Aug. 24 —Part of the Eugene

Celebration, Eugene;www .eugenecelebration.com or 541-681-41 08.

Dumpstaphunk "DIRTY WORD" Louisiana Red Hot Records New Orleans never needed a soul revival. Funk, soul and oldfashioned R&B are still live dance music in the city's clubs. And while many New Orleans funk bands rely on the city's trove of oldies, some are generating new material — including Dumpstaphunk, the band that plays the city's hardesthitting funk. "Dirty Word" is its second full-length album. Dumpstaphunk operates less like a funk machine locking into a pattern, more like a finely coordinated organism in motion. Bass lines lope and skulk, the drums sputter with offbeats, and rhythm guitar and keyboards share a flippant, cackling crosstalk. Wahwah pedals get plenty of action.

Since its 2010 debut album, "Everybody Wants Sum," Dumpstaphunk has moved from writing grooves to shaping songs: bridges, choruses and all. "Dirty Word" holds socially conscious messages ("Dancin' to the Truth," "They Don't Care," "Reality of the Situation"); a snappy lovers' quarrel ("I Know You Know"); and good excuses to hear the band steaming along — like the title track, which gets to its lyrics three minutes into the song. Art Neville shows up, along with the Rebirth Brass Band, forthe second-line party of the album's finale, "Raise the House." Outside New Orleans, "Dirty Word" could sound like a throwback to t h e 1970s: performed instead of p r ogrammed, community-minded instead of selfabsorbed. But for New Orleans music, it's simple continuity, done right. I don't expect to hear anything funkier this year. — Jon Pareles, The New York Times

Buddy Guy "RHYTHM &BLUES" RCA Records Buddy Guy's musical integrity is not going anywhere. It's firmly cemented in the earth, as sturdy as Chicago's oldest buildings. "Rhythm 5 Blues" is split into — get ready for it — discs called "Rhythm" and "Blues." T his feels arbitrary for t h e m ost part, w it h m ost o f t h e songs fitting t h e b l u es/rock mold nicely with plenty of mean guitar licks bolstered by Guy's

Robin Thicke "BLURRED LINES" Interscope Records R&B singer Robin Thicke has sold well in the past and even topped thecharts,but he's never made the difficult jump f r om genre success topop ubiquity until now. For his newest album, "Blurred

Here and there Nov. 2 —Roseland Theater, Portland; www.ticketswest .com or 800-992-8499.

BgDDV RHYTHM

8 6LUEs

sonorous voice. Many tracks are co-written with d r u mmer/producer Tom Hambridge, but room is made for some standards like "Messin' With the Kid," "Poison Ivy" and "Well I Done Got Over It." — John Garratt, PopMatters.com

Lines," Thicke decided that the yearning ballads and light bossa nova he's been making since 2003 aren't doing the trick. So he brought in some of the biggest pop producersofthe lastdecade, including Pharrell and Dr. Luke, to make music he has described in interviews as "escapist." — Elias Leight, PopMatters.com

' •


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

restaurants

z~~.' +:~~M~ / +,~~

.~+. + /- +

+.

/

Joe Kline iThe Bulletin

Drake in downtown Bend offers gourmet comfort food at the corner of Wall Street and Franklin Avenue.

• Drake extends the notion of comfort cuisine in downtown Bend By John Gottberg Anderson

and plates small and large. This is For The Bulletin gourmet comfort food in a style airing tw o a c complished previously unseen in Central Orchefs in the same restau- egon. The ingredients are for the rant is a strategy that might most part familiar; the way they sometimes backfire, as each one are assembled is not. steps on the other's toes. There's no N amed fo r n e arby D r a k e such problem, however, at Drake, Park and, by association, for city Bend's new downtown diner. founder Alexander Drake, the Executive chef Ryley Eckersley, diner sits at the corner of Bond a native of London, and sous chef Street and Franklin Avenue, a Asa Kenney, formerly of Aus- place previously held by the El tin, Texas, play one off the other, Jimador M exican r e staurant. sometimes sharing th e s tage, Since opening April 29, the resother times going solo. They are at taurant has welcomed a steady their best when they work togeth- stream of patrons for lunch and er, impressing diners with creative dinner, seven days a week. versions of soups, salads, burgers The atmosphere created by

p

owner Ted Swigert i s m a r kedly different from its previous incarnation. Although long, narrow Drake seats only 60 guests indoors, 18 of them at barstools, it somehow feels more spacious,thanks no doubt to a black-and-white color scheme that extends from a freshly tiled, checkerboard floor to its walls and upholstery. The inner wall — that is, the one opposite the Franklin Avenue windows — is divided between an open, stainless-steel kitchen and a handsome wooden back bar against a brushed-brick barrier.

Continued next page

Drake

Reservations:By phone or at www.

Location:801 N.W. Wall St. (at

Contact:541-306-3366, www.

Franklin Avenue), Bend Hours:11a.m.to10 p.m. Mondayto Thursday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday

and Saturday, 11a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday Price range:Lunch $10 to $16; dinner small plates $8 to $13, large plates $13 to $34 Credit cards:American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids' menu: A half-dozen options are priced $6 to $8 Vegetarian menu:Choices include grilled kale salad and pan-fried tofu with beet-apple slaw

Alcoholic deverages:Full bar Outdoorseating: Yes

opentable.com drakebend.com

Scorecard OVERALL:AFood:B+. Great comfort food,

although creative edgewon't please everyone all the time. Service:A. Playful but efficient, each

server picks up whereanother leaves off. Atmosphere:A. Black-and-white

color scheme lends itself to classy and classic diner mood. Value:A-. Prices are a little on the high side, but diners can always opt

for small plates.


restaurants

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 11

From previous page

Next week: El ReyAzteca

Like the cooks, the wait staffhas perfected the art of tag-teaming. Playful but efficient, each server picks up where another leaves off, taking and delivering orders with speedy smiles from the moment the first bag of seasoned popcorn — D r a ke's answer to bread on the table — is offered with glasses of ice water.

Visit www.dendbulletin

.com/restaurantsfor readers' ratings of more than150 Central Oregon restaurants.

Midday meal If Drake has a signature dish, it must be the cheeseburger. Chef Eckersley, keenly aware that his next-door neighbor is the Bend Burger Co., insisted that his diner had to feature a burger. But it had to be different. The Drake cheeseburger is just that. Served open-faced atop a thick slice of grilled brioche, the thick patty of hand-rolled beef is cooked in duck fat and topped with cheddar cheese that has been foamed with nitrous oxide. Eckersley calls it " swanky Cheez Whiz." Side garnishes include cornichons, two mustards, aioli sauce and

beef jus.

1

4

Joe Kline i The Bulletin

A recent daily special at Drake was pistachio-crusted ahi with shaved apple, red onion and radish slaw and Dijon vin. p referred i t c o a rser. T h e herbs and spices were a fine complement, but a topping of popcorn, popular in Latin American soups, might well have been replaced by toasted corn nuts. A c r eamy r i s otto w i t h grilled s h r i mp , h o w ever, was perfect. Roasted tomatoes gave it a slightly smoky taste, while chevre and basil rounded out the flavor. And another side dish of a halfdozen a sparagus s p ears, g rilled w i t h ba c o n a n d topped with pimento cheese, was delicious. Although I love calamari, Drake's version was not my favorite. My companion, on the other hand, thoroughly enjoyed the dish, which was breaded, fried in parsley oil, and drizzled with barbecue sauce and Chinese hoisin sauce. For my taste, it was a little too heavy and border-

To be sure, th e b u rger isn't a vegetarian option. But Drake has several of those on the menu, headed by a grilled kale sandwich. The green, leafy vegetable is basically flash-fried, making it crispy without overcooking. Tossed in a Green Goddess dressing (with parsley, tarragon, chives and sour cream), it is served with roasted fingerling potatoes, pistachios and tomatoes. My companion said she could be a Drake regular if only for this one dish. Both lunch an d d i n n er menus offer numerous blackboard specials. One of my recent favorites was a tempura-battered half avocado, s erved wit h k e r nel c o r n , minced tomato, ribbons of line greasy. basil an d c h e vr e c h eese I did like my entree, howev— then topped with a unique er, ofbraised Draper Valley cucumber sauce. chicken. As with everything at Drake, it was a u n ique Evening fare presentation. With the assisOther daily specials intance of a single toothpick, clude soup, risotto, pasta and a leg was balanced atop a fish. My companion and I thigh, itself stacked upon a indulged in two of those on a pair of chilled salads — one subsequent dinner visit. of thinly sliced zucchini and I thought chilled gazpacho yellow squash, the other a "carpaccio" of heirloom towas tasty enough, but I have had better. The tomato-based matoes. Roasted tomato vinbroth was thin; I would have aigrette with chevre cheese

purchased th e o w n ership stake previously owned by Howie Long, who has chosen to pursue other business interests. Kim, who trained earlier this year at California's French Laundry and Chicago's CCX restaurants, p artners wit h L i l ia n C h u in continuing a tradition of monthly charity dinners at the downtown Bend restaurant. 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-323-2328, www.5fusion .com. Sage Cafeclosed in NorthWest Crossing on Aug. 1, j oining Pisano's Pizza a s departures from that neighborhood's dining scene in recent weeks. That leaves La Rosa, Thai Thai and Tate & Tate Catering as the area's best dining options.

finished the dish. SMALL BITES My companion found her meatloaf, a blend of minced lamb an d p o r k s h o ulder, Executive chef Joe Kim Jr., to be too dense for her palis now also a co-owner of 5 ate. Indeed, unlike mother's Fusion and Sushi Bar. Kim meatloaf, there was no filler h ere. But I t hought it w a s very tasty, if indeed heavy. Peas pureed with mint, almost like a thick pesto, made a more refreshing sauce acc ompaniment than b r ow n gravy with r oasted onions and a little bacon. T here ar e d i n er s w h o might l ov e t h e f l o u r less chocolate torte with peanutB ROKE N T O P C L U B buttermousse, one ofseveral dessert menu selections, but we were not among them, On your selection as a e specially after a m eal as lVine Spectator Restaurant rich as ours had been. By and l a rge, however, Award Winn er '. Drake's cuisine compares very favorably w it h o t her American-style restaurants in Central Oregon. And the total package is a great fit for downtown Bend.

h „g g

Congratulations!

— Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletinicom

Find Your

Dream Home In

Real Estate TheBulletin

F CI N

:uo g, C6 B ~

0 r

M


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

rinks event spotlight Bend Brewfest begins Thursday

• Silver Moon is slated to get a major face-lift under newownership

August in Central Oregonmeans many thi ngs.Hikes,crowds, con-

struction ... hazy, smoky days. But if you're a beer lover, then August here in the High Desert essentially boils down to one thing:

By Beau Eastes

Bend Brewfest. The three-day beer-vanabegins

The Bulletin

ne of Bend's oldest brewe ries is about t o ge t a face-lift. Better known for its beer and live music scene than its brewpub, Silver Moon Brewing 8 Taproom, under the direction of new owners Matt Barrett and James Watts, is scheduled to go through a complete rebranding over the next few weeks. While the name of the brewery will stay the same, Barrett and Watts plan to overhaul the interior of the brewpub on Northwest Greenwood Avenue

'5b.

Submitted photo

Thursday and runs through Aug. 17

— from 3 to11 p.m. eachday — at LesSchwab Amphitheater (344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend). This is the10th Bend Brewfest, and it promises to be the biggest one yet, with more than140 craft beers on tap provided by

over 60 breweries. Therewill also be anexpanded selection of limited-release "X-Tap" beers over the course of the three days. No longer limited to beer, this year's Brewfest will also feature cider, wine,

and even mead Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin file photo

The inside of Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom as it looked in early 2012. New owners are planning on giving the Bend pub a facelift beginning in the next few weeks.

Aside from the drinks, Brewfest '13 will also feature more interactive

booths, said ChelseaWoodmansee, the event's volunteer coordinator. Those will include a massagebooth, a booth with take-homedoggy treats like Dawg Grog, and even abooth featuring a local psychic. Admission to Brewfest is free, but participants will need to buy a souvenir

mug, which costs $12, to fill up on beer.Thesouvenir mug comes with five

and change the company's logo

Cycle Pub, five years ago at Silver while amping up beer production. Moon as part of a beer club. "One thing we loved about this The two new owners also are business is that w hatever you planning a complete revamp of might say about (Silver Moon's) the front of the house — an upimage or its logo is they make dated bar, new paint, more casual great beer and always have," says seating, a liquor license, additionBarrett, who also owns a pair of al taps, and the death of the disco Snap Fitnessfranchises in Bend. ball — w i thout sacrificing the "We knew if we could take that pub's well-deserved reputation as beer and make more ofit, we'd a destination for live music. have something." Barrett says music will conRunning on a 10-barrel system, tinue Thursday through Sunday Barrett says the brewery currently with a n e m phasis on p r ovidproduces approximately 1,400bar- ing more freeconcerts. He and rels— or 43,400 gallons — ofbeer, Watts also would like to add extra but in the future aims to turn out shows earlier in the evening, posalmost three times that amount. sibly an acoustic set for the dinner "In the back of the house, there'll crowd beforethe more rambuncbe an increase in production and tious bands take the stage later at a huge emphasis on distribution night. "We plan to keep our roots," and getting our beers out there," says Barrett, 44, who coinciden- Barrett says. "We've got a great tally met Watts, owner of Bend's music scene and we want to keep

heads up

available at Sidelines Sports Bar and Grill, as well as the bottle shop. He is

New brewery couldget its first tap by nextweek

Platypus Pub on Third Street, where it might be on tap by the end of next

also working on getting Oblivion into week, he said.

Growler Phil's, The Growler Guys and Tumalo Country Store will also Oblivion Brewing Co., is gearing up for an Aug. 24 release event at Broken Top carry the beer, hesaid. Butschy said he has brewed beer Bottle Shop. Bend's newest craft brewery,

Owner and brewmaster Darin Butschy said his beer will soon be

ti;t

for 20 years, including six years in the1990s for San Luis Obispo,

that heritage, but with a new, updated look that'll m ake Silver Moon a player again. It's the thirdo ldest brewery in Bend — i t 's been around for 12 years — but you look how fast this market has grown in the last three and four years and Silver Moon kind of got lost in the shuffle." While Silver Moon's interior still remains largely the same since Barrett and Watts bought the brewery, patrons should expect changes by the first week of September. "Overall, all the stuff we want to tweak and fix, they're easy knobs to turn," Barrett says. "The tough

stuff, like having the right (people,) a production facility and a quality product, that's all already

in place." — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.corn

Calif.-based SLO Brewing, until the

company was purchased byFirestone Walker Brewing Co. Butschy's operation is in a north-

east Bend warehouse. Hehopesto begin producing 16-ounce cans to sell in four-packs by the end of the year. The Broken Top Bottle Shop release

event is from 5-7p.m. Aug. 24,and will likely include an ale, an IPA and a stout, Butschy said. — Bulletin staff

tokens, each good for a taste. Additional tokens are sold in packs of five for

$5. Check out next week's GO!Magazine for more detail or visit www .bendbrewfest.com — Megan Kehoe

what's happening? TODAY

SCOTCH &CIGAR DINNER: McMenamins pairs Islay, Highland and Speyside and more scotches with a multicourse dinner followed by cigars; $60, reservations required; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St.FrancisSchool,700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. MONDAY

PUB RUN:A group run to Worthy Brewing followed by $1 off a pint; free run, registration requested; 5:30 p.m.; Footzone, 842 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-3568 or www.footzonebend.com/events / footzone-pub-run-to-worthybrewing. WEDNESDAY BATTLE OF THE BEERCITIES: An IPA festival featuring breweries from Bend, Portland, Seattle and San Diego; 4-10 p.m.; 10 Barrel Brewing Co., 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541678-5228 or www.facebook. com/10BarrelBrewingCompany.

WINE TASTING:Taste wine from Westery Wines from McMinnville, Oregon; free; during quilt show; Cork Cellars Wine Bar & Bottle Shop, 160 S. Fir St., Sisters; 541-549-2675. BEER TASTING:Firestone Walker Brewing Co. will be on hand for beer samples; free admission; 6-9 p.m.; Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Cafe,1740N.W. Pence Lane,Suite 1, Bend; 541-728-0703 or www. btbsbend.com. THURSDAY

BEND BREWFEST:Event includes tastings from multiple brewers, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for entry; free admission, must purchase mug and tasting tokens to drink; 3-11 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510 or www.bendbrewfest.com. • SUBMIT ANEVENT by emaihng dnnkeO bendbuiietin.com. Deadline ie 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-383-0377.


GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 13

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

arts uti

,C

p/r i

Submitted photo

The Bill Ganz Western Band of Tucson, Ariz., left, will join George Hanson, right, and the Sunriver Festival Orchestra for tonight's season-opening Pops Concert at Summit High School in Bend.

• Sunriver MusicFestival kicks off with a Western-themedPopsConcert

By David Jasper

the program, as is AFron Copland's "Bucka-

The Bulletin

If yougo

roo Holiday" from the 1942 ballet "Rodeo." Ganz and Hanson have teamed twice before, the first time a three-night stint in 2010 for which they worked up the "Saddle Up: Music of the West" program being performed tonight. "We sold out all three nights," Ganz said in a recent phone interview. "(It was) a huge success. Then the second one we were back by popular demand and we did another whole 'nother series of concerts with the symphony. Now we have the opportunity to do it up in Bend and hopefully do it (later) in other places as well."

What:Sunriver Music Festival When:Tonight through Aug. 21; all

on'tbe surprised if you see Stetsons at Sunriver Music Festival's Pops Concert tonight at Summit H i gh School in Bend. The festival's 36th season gets underway with the 7:30 p.m. concert (see "If you go"), and this year, the series has a unifying theme revolving around dance, says George Hanson, who is in his second full year as conductor and artistic director of the festival. "We chose dance because it' s obviously very flexible," he said. "It's more fun putting together concerts that make sense both

D

standing alone and in a series like this." For tonight's concert, the maestro is pairing the 40-member Festival Orchestra with the Bill Ganz Western Band, a four-piece group from Tucson, Ariz., for a program featuring orchestral arrangements of classic and contemporary Western songs. It includes classics of the Western repertoire such as "Tumbling Tumbleweeds," "Cool Water," "Ghost Riders in the Sky" and "Back in the Saddle Again." Rex Allen Sr.'s "Arizona Waltz" and "Cattle Call," a tune made famous by Eddie Arnold, are also on

Continued next page

concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. Where:Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17600 Center Drive; and Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend

Cost:Tickets range from $10 foryouth tickets to $60 for box andpremier seats Contact:www.sunrivermusic.org or 541593-9310

Background illustration via Thinkstock


arts

PAGE 14 • GO!MAGAZINE

Season Showcase Saturday at 2ndStreet

CO

CD

O .-g •e CO

bo

0 •e

O

B. g M M CO CD

~

O . 'a -

93 '„

K s

will also be on hand. Contact: w ww . 2ndstreet theater.com, 2ndstreettheater Stage Right P r oductions @gmail.com or 541-312-9626. will host the 2013-14 Season Showcase at 7 p.m. Saturday Sunriver Art Faire at 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. takes over the Village Lafayette Ave., in Bend. Along with a silent auction, The fourth annual Sunriver the two-hour event includes Art Faire is being held today improv from B end I m prov through Sunday at the VilGroup and play scenes and lage at Sunriver (57100 Beaver songs, including several tunes Drive). The 65 juried artists from the upcoming Central will be displaying and sellOregon premier of Monty Py- ing glass, jewelry, metalwork, thon's "Spamalot," opening in painting, photography, sculpSeptember at the Tower The- ture, woodwork and more. atre in Bend. The event also features live The three finalist plays of music by S ummit E x press the Playwrights Platform will Jazz Band, Quincy Street, also be announced, one of Bill Keale, The Notables and which will be staged during others. the upcoming season. Hours are from 9:30 a.m. Proceeds from Saturday's to 7 p.m. today and Saturday, event will go to support "Spa- and 9:30 a.m. to4p.m. Sunday. Submitted photo malot," as well as the upcom- Admission is free, and all net Jeanne and Derek Sitter will give a reading of the Rajiv Joseph play "Gruesome Playground Injuries." ing season. Tickets are $10 in proceeds from the event will advance or $15 at the door. help support Central Oregon The silent auction will take nonprofits. faire.com, sunriverartfaire@ juries," about two childhood of which he'll direct. The third placefrom 7-8p.m. A cash bar Contact: www.sunriverart yahoo.com or 877-269-2580. friends whose lives intersect is Sam Shepard's "True West," over the course of 30 years, starring Sitter an d W a yne 'GruesomePlayground at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Tickets Newcome. are $5. Volcanic Theatre Pub is loInjuries'at Volcanic Derek Sitter also tells GO! cated in the Century Center, H usband an d w i f e a c - that Volcanic Theatre Pub has 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend. tors Derek and Jeanne Sitter three plays coming up during Contact: w ww vo l canic will give a reading of Rajiv the season, including Harold theatrepub.com or 541-323-1881. Joseph's award-winning play Pinter's "The Dumb Waiter" " Gruesome Playground I n and "A Kind of Alaska," both — David Jasper I

w)

Q

From previous page

P E A K T GP E A K resta u r a n t

0

8c l o u n g e

NEW MENU! VALUEPRICING SEASONAL ITEMS

•W

Mini-Buffet Daily 11 am - 2 pm

ba 0

•W

',$3 FREESLOTPLAY ,' GOUPON I

I

I

Valid for Bend, La Pine & Redmondquests only: Local zip codes donot apply. Limit One CouponPerPerson, Per visit. Coupon Expires: September 9th, 20t3

I

h

G O Q

r

II J

LEAVE THEDRIVING TO US! Call for reservations locations & times: 541 -783-7528 ext 209

A

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

25 Miles North of Klamath Falls• 35 Miles South of Crater Lake 38333Hwy 97 •Chiloquin,Oregon

541-783-7529 • 888-KLAMOYA

program as well." When the two put the show The seriesmoves to Sunrivtogether for the Tucson Sym- er for Sunday's "Music Moves phony, "it was such a smash You — Come Dance With the h it," Hanson told t h i s r e - Great Classical Composers" porter in July. "It was really concert featuring the music of exciting. I'm a true believer Verdi, Rossini, Dvorak, Bernin there being only two kinds stein and Lutoslawski. of music: good music and bad The rest of the season isas music." follows. (All concerts begin at A musician and songwriter 7:30 p.m.) • Wednesday: " Mozart I n in Tucson did the classical arrangements of t h ese old Motion — Wolfgang Light chestnuts. on His Feet," Tower Theatre, "A lot of this music lends it- Bend. The program will apself really well to symphonic peal to Mozart lovers and inarrangement because it's very cludes Overture to the Magic melodic and just works really Flute, German Dances and well with that," Ganz said. Mozart Symphony No. 39. • Aug. 16: " Tango F i r e He describes Hanson as being "easy" to work with. "He's Sunriver Music Festival respectful to us as musicians Brings Heat And Passion To and is a true pro. A great inter- The Tower," Tower Theatre, preter of this music as well." B end. Featuring w orks b y Said Hanson, "If you love composers Ginastera and Piamusic, you're going to love this zolla. Guest bandoneon player

Daniel Binelli, of Buenos Aires, Argentina, will join the orchestra. • Aug. 18: Solo piano recital featuring 2013 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition gold medalist Vadym Kholodenko, Sunriver Resort Great Hall. • Aug. 1 9 : "Hungarian Spice — Stories told through Dance," Sunriver Resort Great Hall. O r egon S y m phony's Principal Trumpeter Jeffrey Work is a guest soloist in this concert featuring works by Haydn, Handl, Kodaly and Stravinsky. • Aug. 21: "Beethoven's Eroica — With a Tribute to Van Cliburn," Sunriver Resort Great Hall. Featuring works b y Jacobsen, Mozart a n d Beethoven. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbufletin.com

Find It All Onlinebendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

arts

ART E XHI B I T S AMBIANCE ARTCO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W.Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ARTISTS' GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring local artists; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19; www. artistsgallerysunriver.com or 541-593-4382. ATELIER6000: Featuring "Icons of the Northwest," an exhibit of invited artists expressing their interpretation of the region; through September; 389S.W. ScalehouseCourt, Suite 120, Bend; www.atelier6000.org or 541-330-8759. BEND CITYHALL:Featuring the work of young artists who have utilized children'sfoundations in our community; through September; 710 N.W.Wall St.; 541-388-5505 or rchristie©bendoregon.gov. BLUE PINEKITCHENANDBAR: Featuring acrylic works by Brenda Reid Irwin; through August; 25 S.W. Century Dr., Bend; 541-389-2558. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring "3 Points of View," a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbrightand John Vito;1024 N.W. BondSt., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYONCREEKPOTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. CedarSt., Sisters; www. canyoncreekpotteryllc.com or 541-549-0366. CIRCLEOFFRIENDSART& ACADEMY:Featuring mixed media, furniture, jewelry and more; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. grand opening Saturday; 19889 Eighth St., Tumalo; 541-706-9025. DESCHUTES BREWERY:Landscape photography by Mike Putnam; through August; 1044 N.W.Bond Street, Bend; 541-382-9242. DISCOVER SUNRIVER: Featuring "Color & Texture," works by Karen Bandy and HelenBrown; through Monday; 57198 BeaverDr., Sunriver; 541-388-0155. DOJO RESTAURANTAND LOUNGE: Rise Up International presents the artwork of Soundani "VA-JO" Jawher; through August; 852 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-706-9091. DON TERRAARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W.Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-1299 or www.donterra.com. DOWNTOWN BENDPUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring "Community," a themed exhibit in various wallhanging media; through Nov. 4; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-389-9846. DRY CANYON FORGE:Featuring jewelry by Waylon Rhoads; through August; 37 N.W.Greenwood, Bend; 541-382-2725.

Submitted photo

"Bear Grass," by Dave Kamperman, is showing at Franklin Crossing through August. FRANKLINCROSSING: Photography featuring Vern Bartley, Dorothy Freudenberg, DaveKampermanand Larry Turner, with work from the estate of Jason Mitchell Photography; through Aug. 31;550N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend;541-382-9398. FURNISH.:Featuring works by Sue Smith; 761 N.W.Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-891 I. GHIGLIERIGALLERY:Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by LorenzoGhiglieri; 200 W. CascadeAve., Sisters; www.artlorenzo.com or 541-549-8683. HELPINGYOUTAX& ACCOUNTING:Featuring paintings by Carol Armstrong; 632 S.W. Sixth St., Suite 2, Redmond; 541-504-5422. HIGHDESERT MUSEUM: Featuring 21 paintings from Western artists; through Aug. 17; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97,Bend; www.highdesertmuseum.org or 541-382-4754. JENNIFERLAKEGALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W.CascadeAve., Sisters; www.jenniferlakegallery.com or 541-549-7200. JILL'S WILD (TASTEFUL)WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jil lHaney-Neal;Tuesdaysand Wednesdays only; 601 North Larch St., Suite B, Sisters; www. jillnealgallery.com or 541-617-6078. JOHN PAULDESIGNS: Featuring custom jewelry and signature series with unique one-of-a-kind pieces;1006 N.W.Bond St., Bend; www.johnpauldesigns.com or 541-318-5645. JUDI'S ARTGALLERY:Featuring works by Judi Meusborn Williamson; 336 N.E.Hemlock St., Suite13, Redmond; 360-325-6230. KARENBANDYDESIGNJEWELER: Featuring "Vineyards andVessels" with paintings and jewelry by Karen Bandy; through Aug. 16; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend;www.

karenbandy.com or 541-388-0155. LOCALWORKS: Featuring local artists and craftsmen; 151 S.Elm St., Sisters; 541-306-7344. LORISALISBURY FINE ART GALLERY:Featuring a co-op of local artists; 391 W.CascadeAve., Sisters; 541-508-8884 or www. lorisalisburygallery.com. LUBBESMEYERFIBERSTUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Bend; www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com or 541-330-0840. MARCELLO'SITALIANCUISINE AND PIZZERIA:Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRDGALLERY:Featuring "Exhibition of NewWorks — Delbert Gish," the artist's works are displayed; through August; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www.mockingbirdgallery.com or 541-388-2107. MOSAICMEDICAL:Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S.U.S. Highway 97, Suite101, Madras; 541-475-7800. THE OXFORDHOTEL:Photography, featuring Vern Bartley, Dorothy Freudenberg, DaveKampermanand Larry Turner, with workfrom the estate of Jason Mitchell Photography; through Aug. 31; 10N.W.Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. PATAGONIA O BEND:Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 1000 N.W.Wall St., Suite140; 54 I-382-6694. PAULSCOTT GALLERY: Featuring paint ingsbyJeanieTomanekand Mike Moran; through Sept. 3;869N.W. Wall St., Bend;www.paulscottfineart. com or 541-330-6000. PRONGHORNCLUBHOUSE:"Works in Oil," featuring Janice Druian and Vicki Shuck; through Sept. 30; 65600 Pronghorn Club Dr., Bend; 541-693-5300. QUILTWORKS:Featuring quilts by

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 15 Sarah Kaufman, with the Coverto-Cover Group exhibit of "Prayers for Sale"; through Sept. 4; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY:Featuring "The Art of August," multimedia paintings by Kim McClain, mosaics byJoanie Callen andwoodwork byWill Nash; through August;103 N.W.Oregon Ave., Bend;www.redchairgallerybend. com or 541-306-3176. REDMONDAIRPORT:Featuring a juried exhibition of work created during an art event at Smith Rock State Park; through Aug. 18; 2522 Jesse Butler Circle; 541-548-0646. REDMOND PUBLICLIBRARY: Featuring "Wilderness-Oregon," paintings by Carol Jacquet; through September; 827 S.W.Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. SAGEBRUSHERS ARTSOCIETY: Featuring anall-members juried exhibition; through Aug.27; 117S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend;541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY:Featuring pastel landscapes by Lise HoffmanMcCabe andSueLyon-Manely; through August; 834 N.W.Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERSAREACHAMBEROF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E.Main Ave.; 541-549-0251. SISTERSGALLERY& FRAME SHOP:Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave.; www.garyalbertson. com or 541-549-9552. SISTERSPUBLICLIBRARY: Featuring pointillist oil paintings by Patty Bentley; through August; 110

N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070. ST. CHARLES BEND:Featuring "Caregiver Art," watercolors, jewelry and more; through Sept. 30; 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321. ST.CHARLES REDMOND: Featuring landscape andwildlife photography by Douglas Berg; through Sept. 30; 1253 N.W.Canal Boulevard; 541-548-8131. STRICTLY ORGANIC:Featuring acrylic works by BrendaReid Irwin; through September; 6 S.W.Bond St.; 541-330-6061. SUNRIVERAREAPUBLIC LIBRARY:Featuring the Watercolor Society of Oregon's Traveling Show; through Aug. 24; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVERLODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY:Featuring oil paintings by Joanne Donaca, Marilyn Higginson, Steve Maker, Barbara Slater and pastels by Leslie Cain; through Sept. 8; 17600 Center Drive; 541-382-9398. TOWNSHEND'SBENDTEAHOUSE: Featuring "Memory Catchers," works by Taylor Rose;through August; 835 N.W. BondSt., Bend;541-312-2001 or www.townshendstea.com. TUMALOARTCO.: Featuring "Flui d,"handblown glass by Nancy Becker and paintings by Susan Luckey Higdon; through August; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; www.tumaloartco.com or 541-385-9144. VISTABONITA GLASS ART STUDIO AND GALLERY:Featuring glass art, photography, painting, metal sculptur eand more;222W .Hood St., Sisters; 541-549-4527 or www. vistabonitaglass.com.

Presented by the Sunriver Women's Club

U,l1VlVCV

vt

aive

4th Annual Sunriver Art Faire V V V V V V

Ea® J

tO

0 t0 NO

0

0'

0 NO

4,®,tlt!

5MS

v vr r r v

In the Village at Sunriver Artist Village Hours: Friday a Saturday 9:30-7:00 Sunday 9:30-4:00 At the Faire: 65 luried Artist Booths Fine Arts & Crafts Entertainment • Food Court Art Activity Center

(forKidstt Demos)

More details and Current Schedules: www.sunriverartfaire.com

SaturdayStreetDance Sunday Breakfast

O

z


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRID

I COUNTRYFAIR 8 ARTSHOW: Featuring ajuried art showand sale, silent auction, raffles, music, food and more; proceeds RUMMAGE SALEFUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit local community support agencies; SATURDAY benefit the St. ThomasAltar Society; free free;10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Episcopal Church of admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; St. Thomas the Transfiguration,68825 N. Brooks Camp Aug. 10 Parish Center Gym, 1755N.W. MapleAve., Road, Sisters; 541-549-7087. Redmond; 541-923-3390. MOTORCYCLE POKERRUN: Oregon Vets CROOKCOUNTYFAIR: 10a.m.-10 p.m. Motorcycle Association and VFW hosts SUNRIVER ARTFAIRE:Anart show with at Crook County Fairgrounds; seeToday's more than 65 booths featuring fine arts and poker, a 300-mile motorcycle ride and listing for details. an after-party with raffles, live music and crafts; entertainment and food; proceeds JIMDUNCANMEMORIALGOLF barbecue dinner; $15 poker hand, $20 for benefit nonprofits in Central Oregon; free TOURNAMENT:Features a two person two hands, $7 barbecue dinner; 8 a.m., last admission; 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Village at scramble, a barbecuedinner and prizes; bike out at10 a m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S W. Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 877-269proceeds benefit Wendy's Wish andHarvest Veterans Way,Redmond; 541-280-5161 or 2580, sunriverartfaire©yahoo.com or of Hope; $99;10a.m.; River's EdgeGolf crazyhorse@coinet.com. www.sunriverartfaire.com. (Story, Page14) Course, 400 ProShopDrive, Bend; 503TUMALOPEDDLER'S FLEAMARKET:Free CROOK COUNTYFAIR:Thethemeis 209-0022 or tduncan@ironplanet.com. admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Tumalo FeedCo., "Boots, Chaps 8 Cowboy Hats," featuring NORTHWEST CROSSINGSATURDAY 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-306a talent show, danceperformances, live FARMERS MARKET: Free;10 a.m.-2 p.m .; 8016 or copeddlersmarket@gmail.com. music, bull riding, barbecue, kids zoneand NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and more; free admission;10 a.m.-10 p.m.; WINGS AND WHEELS: Features an airport Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www. Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S.Main open house, fly-in, pancake breakfast, nwxevents.com. St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www. aircraft displays, kids activities, classic cars, RELAYFORLIFE:A 24-hour walking event; crookcountyfairgrounds.com. raffle and more; raffle proceeds benefit a proceeds benefit the American Cancer local charity; free; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Prineville SISTERSFARMERS MARKET:3-6 p.m.; Society; free for spectators, donations Airport, three miles southwest of Prineville Barclay Park, West CascadeAvenue and accepted; 10 a.m.; High Desert Middle on state Highway126; 541-416-0805 or Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket. School, 61111S.E.27th St., Bend; 541-693www.617.eaachapter.org/photos/flyer.png. com. 9860 or www.bendrelay.org. PRINEVILLEFARMERS MARKET: Free; SMART AT THELIBRARY: Learn what SUMMERCARNIVAL:Featuring Bend 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, it takes to volunteer to read in local Circus Center performers, children's 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-447-6217 or elementary schools and create abookgames, Okule'a OhanaHawaiian Dancers, prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. inspired art piece; free; 4-6 p.m.; Crook food and more; free admission; 3-6 p.m.; County Library, 175 N.W.Meadow Lakes HIGHDESERT CELTIC FESTIVALAND C.E. Lovejoy's Brookswood Market,19530 Drive, Prineville; 541-355-5601 or www. SCOTTISHHIGHLANDGAMES: Event Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188 getsmartoregon.org. includes games, dancers, food, storytelling, or www.celovejoys.com. COUNTRY FAIR & AR TSHOW RECEPTION: live music and more; $10adults, $7 seniors BETHLEHEM INNAUCTION: Old treasures and students age 6-17,free age 6and A preview of the following day's fair; for sale; all proceeds benefit the Bethlehem younger; 9 a.m .-6 p.m.;DeschutesCounty free; 5-8 p.m.; Episcopal Church of the Inn; taking donations from 7 a.m.-3 p.m; free Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W.Airport Way, Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp admission; 3:30 p.m.; A-1Westside Storage, Redmond; www.hdcs.net. Road, Sisters; 541-549-7087. 317 S.W.Columbia St., Bend; 541-317-5700 MADRASSATURDAYMARKET: Free AUTHORPRESENTATION:Bend author or www.bethleheminn.org. admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; SahaleePark, 7th Kim McCarrel presents her newbook POTTERYGAMES:Potters compete for and B Streets; 541-489-4239. "Riding Northwest Oregon HorseTrails" medals as they create bowls for future with a slideshow; $5; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina RUMMAGE SALEFUNDRAISER: Proceeds use in the Empty Bowls fundraiser for Springs Books,252W .HoodAve.,Sisters; benefit the St. ThomasAltar Society; Neighborlmpact; free; 5-8 p.m.; Art Station, 541-549-0866. free admission; 9 a.m.-noon; St. Thomas 313 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541Parish Center Gym,1755 N.W.Maple Ave., TWILIGHTCINEMA:Anoutdoor screening 617-1317 or www.neighborimpact.org. Redmond; 541-923-3390. of "Homeward Bound: The Incredible SEASON SHOWCASE:Atwo-hour show Journey" (1993); bring low-profile chair or SUNRIVERART FAIRE:9:30a.m.-7 p.m.at featuring scenes from BendImprov Group blanket, your own picnic, no glass or pets, Village at Sunriver; seeToday's listing for and songsfrom the upcoming "Spamalot" snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver details. at the TowerTheatre; proceeds benefit Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, CENTRAL OREGONOFF-ROAD RACING: future productions; $10 inadvance, $15at 57250 Overlook Road; 541-585-3333 or the door; 7 p.m.; 2ndStreet Theater, 220 The second of a four-series race of trucks www.sunriversharc.com. (Story, Page28) N.E. Lafayette Ave.,Bend;541-312-9626 or and buggies on aclosed-loop course; $12, www.2ndstreettheater com. (Story, Page14) THE DEADLYGENTLEMEN:The Boston free for children 10 andyounger; 10 a.m., bluegrass band performs; free; 7 p.m.; gatesopen at8 a.m .;Deschutes County NAKEDFORSAFETY:The Reno, Nev., Crow'sFeetCommons, 875 N.W .Brooks Fair 8 Expo Center, 3800 S.W.Airport rock band performs, with Failure Machine St., Bend; 541-728-0066 or www.facebook. Way, Redmond; 541-410-8119 or www. and Edewaard; free; 9 p.m., doors open com/crowsfeetcommons. (Story, Page6) centraloregonracepark.com. at 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70S.W. SUNRIVERMUSIC FESTIVAL POPS Century Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881 or CENTRAL OREGONSATURDAY MARKET: www.volcanictheatrepub.com. CONCERT: TheFestival Orchestra performs Featuring arts and crafts from local with the Bill GanzWestern Band; "Come artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; JIVE COULIS:TheAshland funk-rock Dance With Us, Let the Music MoveYou" is parking lotacross from Downtown band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon thetheme;$26-$42,$10youth;7:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Parking Lot, 600 Brewing 8 Taproom, 24 N.W.Greenwood Summit High School, 2855 N.W.Clearwater N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. Drive, Bend; 541-593-9310, tickets© centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. silvermoonbrewing.com.

TODAY

sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic. org. (Story, Page13)

e

I• TODAY 8r SATURDAY Crook CountyFair: Pull on your boots, strap on your chapsandtip your hat!

I I I

' I

'

I '

g •

I ,

I

I I I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I I

'

I I

'

I

I I

I

I

SATURDAY 'lP ~~

Celtic Festival andScottish Games: Caber tossing is sort of a dance,eh?

Q

SATURDAY Relay for Life:Walk with purpose at

1

High Desert Middle School.

SATURDAY Season Showcase:Snippets and song at 2nd Street Theater.

MONDAY 8( TUESDAY The Hidden Caves of Oregon:Find out what you're missing — at the library.

THURSDAY Bend Brewfest:Brewers bring the beer to the Les Schwab Amphitheater.

SUNDAY Aug. 11 RUN FOR A CHILD: Featuring a Fez Dash, 5K run/walk followed by a barbecue, booths, Shriner go-carts and clowns; net proceeds benefit the Shriners Hospitals for Children; $25, registration requested; 8:30 a.m. FezDash, 9 a.m. for 5K walk/run; Riverbend Park, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend; 541-2054484 or www.centraloregonshriners. org/run-for-a-child/.

SUNRIVERART FAIRE:9:30a.m .-4 p.m. at Village at Sunriver; see Today's listing for details. LEV HALLEL:A dance symposium and concert featuring Messianic artist Jonathan Settel; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www. houseofcovenant.org. SECONDSUNDAY:Featuring poet, artist and musical performer Mosley Wotta; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org.


GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 17

AY, AUGUST 9, 2013

I I I'

323-1881 or www volcanictheatrepub.com.

MONDAY

J'

Aug. 12

'L

*

TURF TUNESCONCERT:Featuring live music with Parlour, food and beverage vendors; bring a low-profile chair; free; 5-7 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; www.sunriversharc.com. "SPIRIT OF '45 DAY":A public ceremony to commemorate the WWII generation, featuring a reading of the "Spirit of '45 Day" proclamation; free; 6 p.m.; Brooks Park, Bend Heroes Memorial, 35 N.W. Drake Road,Bend;541-390-9932. MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD:The pop-reggae star performs; $36 plus

fees;6:30 p.m.,gatesopen 5 p.m.;Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. (Story, Page 6) SUNRIVER MUSICFESTIVAL CLASSICAL CONCERT I:Featuring selections from Verdi, Ravel, Bernstein andmore; $30$60, $10 youth; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall,17600 Center Drive; 541-593-9310, tickets©sunrivermusic. org or www.sunrivermusic.org. INHALE:TheCalifornia reggae-rock band performs; free; 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W.Century Drive, Bend; 541-

POP-UP PICNIC:Live music with food and beverages; bring a blanket and canned food for Neighborlmpact; free admission; 5-7 p.m.; The Cosmic Depot, 342 N.E. Clay Ave., Bend; 541-385-7478 or www. thecosmicdepot.com. THE HIDDENCAVES OF OREGON: An in-depth account of Oregon's hidden caves with Brent McGregor; free; 6 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org. HILLSTOMP:The Portland punk-blues duo performs; free; 7 p.m.; Crow's Feet Commons,875 N.W. Brooks St.,Bend; 541-728-0066 or www.facebook.com/ crowsfeetcommons. (Story, Page 7)

"LOSTANGELS: SKID ROW IS MY HOME": A screening of the film about people living on the street; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W.Century Drive, Bend; 541323-1881 or www.volcanictheatrepub.com. (Story, Page 28) "ERICCLAPTON'S CROSSROADS GUITAR FESTIVAL 2013": A screening of the film about guitar legends joining Eric Clapton for a jam session; $15; 7:30 p.m.; RegalOldMill Stadium16 & IMAX,680 S.W.Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. (Story, Page28) MISS LONELY HEARTS BAND:The California country and rockabilly band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Blue PineKitchen and Bar,25S.W. Century Dr., Bend;541389-2558 or www.bluepinebar.com. WHISKEYSHIVERS:The bluegrass band performs, with Wild Child; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. (Story, Page 3)

I

I

I

II

541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org. TRUTH &SALVAGECO.: TheTennessee country-rock band performs; 9 p.m.; $5; Blue Pine Kitchen andBar, 25S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.bluepinebar.com. (Story, Page7)

THURSDAY Aug. 15

"DIG INTOBRIANWAITEBAND": Featuring musicaltheatre, imaginative storytelling and a rock concert; free;11:30 a.m.; M.A. Lynch Elementary School,1314 S.W. KalamaAve., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. "DIG INTOBRIANWAITEBAND": Featuring musical theatre, storytelling and a rock concert; free; 2:30 p.m.; La PinePublic Library,16425 First St.; 541-312-1090. BENDBREWFEST:Beertastings, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m., ID required for entry; free admission, TUESDAY must purchase mugandtokens to drink; 3-1 I p.m.; Les SchwabAmphitheater, WEDNESDAY 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; www. Aug. 13 bendbrewfest.com. (Story, Page12) Aug. 14 REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free MUNCH &MUSIC:The rock band Igor 8 admission; 3-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, "DIG INTOBRIANWAITE BAND": Red Elvises performs; with kids' play area Seventh Street and EvergreenAvenue; 541Featuring musical theatre, imaginative and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30 p.m.; 550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1© storytelling and a rock concert; free; 2:30 Drake Park, 777 N.W.Riverside Blvd., Bend; hotmail.com. p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N.Cedar www.munchandmusic.com. (Story, Page7) TUESDAY FARMERSMARKET: Free St.; 54 I-3 I2-1070. TWILIGHTCINEMA: An outdoor screening admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow BEND FARMERS MARKET:Free of "Despicable Me" (2010); bring low-profile Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, chair or blanket, your own picnic, snacks Bend; 541-323-3370 or farmersmarketO between Northwest Franklin Avenueand available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-585-3333 or SMART AT THELIBRARY: Learn what it bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www. www.sunriversharc.com. (Story, Page28) takes to volunteer to read in local elementary bendfarmersmarket.com. PLAY READINGSERIES:Derek and schools and create abook-inspired art piece; MUSIC INTHECANYON:Featuring classic Jeanne Sitter read "Gruesome Playground free; 5-7 p.m.; Sunriver AreaPublic Library, rock with Hangar 52; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Injuries," Rajiv Joseph's award-winning 56855 Venture Lane;541-355-5601 or American Legion Community Park, 850 play; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, www.getsmartoregon.org. S.W. Rimrock Way,Redmond; www. 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-323THE HIDDENCAVES OF OREGON: An musicin thecanyon.com. 1881 or www.volcanictheatrepub.com. in-depth account of Oregon's hidden (Story, Page 14) PICNIC INTHEPARK: Featuring freeform caves with Brent McGregor; free; 6 p.m.; Americana with John Shipe; free; 6-8 p.m.; "RIFFTRAXLIVE:STARSHIPTROOPERS": Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 Pioneer Park, 450 N.E.Third St., Prineville; A screening of the1997 science-fiction N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. 541-447-6909 or www.crookcounty movie, with humorous commentary; $12.50; deschuteslibrary.org. foundation.org/events. (Story, Page7) 8 p.m.; RegalOldMill Stadium16 & IMAX, TUMALO TUMAL00BENEFITCONCERT: 680 S.W.PowerhouseDrive, Bend;541-382"DIG INTOBRIANWAITE BAND": Live Americana music, a potluck picnic and Featuring musical theatre, imaginative 6347. (Story, Page28) pie auction; proceeds benefit maintenance storytelling and a rock concert; free; 6:30 "REVEALTHEPATH": A screening of the and sanitation services along the Deschutes p.m.; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. film about exploring four continents on River in Tumalo; $10 suggested donation; Newport Ave., Bend; 541-617-7050 or a bike; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. 6-9 p.m.; Tumalo GardenMarket, 19879 www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. Francis School,700 N.W .Bond St.,Bend; Eighth St.; 541-728-0088 or earthsart© 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. COOPER AND THE JAM: The Nashvi l le, gmail.com. (Story, Page28) Tenn.-based soul artist performs; free; 7 TWILIGHTCINEMA:Anoutdoor screening p.m., doors open 6p.m.; McMenamins Old HELLODOLLFACE:Soul-pop from of "Cloudy With a Chance ofMeatballs" St.FrancisSchool,700 N.W. Bond St.,Bend; Colorado; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing (2009); bring low-profile chair or blanket, 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. 8 Taproom, 24 N.W.Greenwood Ave., Bend; your own picnic, no glass or pets, snacks www.silvermoonbrewing.com, SUNRIVERMUSIC FESTIVAL CLASSICAL available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver CONCERT II: "Mozart in Motion" featuring Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, • SUBMIT AN EVENTat www bendbulletin. all Mozart music; $30-$60, $10youth; 7:30 Cam/SubmItinfO Or email eVentS@bendbulletin.COm. 57250 Overlook Road; 541-585-3333 or p.m.; TowerTheatre, 835 N.W.Wall St., Bend; Deadhne IS 10 dayS befOre PubhCatIOn. QueStiOnS? www.sunriversharc.com. (Story, Page28) Contact 541-383-0351.


PAGE 18 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

planning ahea 385-7478 or www.thecosmicdepot.com. AUG. 19 — SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVALCLASSICAL CONCERT IV: AUG.16-18 — HIGH &DRY "Hungarian Spice," featuring music of BLUEGRASSFESTIVAL: The three-day Kodaly, Haydn,HandelandStravinsky; festival includes live music, workshops, $30-$60, $10 youth; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver food and more; $15, free for children Resort Great Hall,17600 Center Drive; younger than12; $10camping fee per 541-593-9310, ticketsosunrivermusic. vehicl e;1:30 p.m.,gatesopen noon org or www.sunrivermusic.org. Aug. 15 for campsites; last performance is 4:25 p.m. Aug. 18; Runway Ranch, AUG. 20 — REDMOND FARMERS 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www.hadbf. MARKET: Freeadmission; 3-6 p.m.; com. Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or AUG. 16-17 — BENDBREWFEST: Event redmondfarmersmarket1©hotmail.com. includes tastings from multiple brewers, food vendors and more; children AUG. 20 — TUESDAYFARMERS admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for a' MARKET: Freeadmission; 3-7 entry; free admission, must purchase p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, mug and tasting tokens to drink; 3-11 19530Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; p.m. Aug. 16, noon-11 p.m. Aug. 17; Les 541-323-3370 or farmersmarketo Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510 or www. AUG. 20 — SMARTATTHELIBRARY: bendbrewfest.com. Learn what it takes to volunteer to read AUG. 16-17 — HARVESTRUN: in local elementary schools and create a Featuring the Drifter's Car Club book-inspired art piece; free; 4-6 p.m.; Joe Kline/The Bulletin file photo annual car show near the park with Debra Lucas, right, hands a sample from Wandering Aengus Ciderworks to Anna Williams, of New Jersey, during Jefferson County Library, 241 S.E. barbecue, music, raffle, games and Seventh St., Madras; 541-355-5601 or last year's Bend Brewfest. The popular event returns Thursday through Aug. 17 at Les Schwab Amphitheater. more; proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish www.getsmartoregon.org. Foundati on,Hospice ofRedmond AUG. 20— AUTHOR PRESENTATION and Sisters, and Sparrow Clubs; free MARKET: Freeadmission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; proceeds benefit needy veterans in the tournament with prizes for best hat AND BARBECUEFUNDRAISER: admission; 6 p.m. Aug. 16, 10 a.m. Aug. Sahalee Park, Seventh and B streets; and best tailgate party; $10, free ages area; free, $7 barbecue; noon silent Featuring author and storyteller Rick 17; Centennial Park, Seventh Street 541-489-4239. auction, 3 p.m .barbecue;ElksLodge, 12 and younger; $40 per car; 2 p.m., Steber, live music and barbecue; and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 151 N. Main St.; 541-420-6477 or gates open a t noon; Camp Fr al e y Ranch, AUG. 17 — PIONEER SUMMER proceeds benefit scholarships provided 541-548-6329. 60580 Gosney Road, Bend; www. FESTIVAL: Featuring games, chili cook- ptranchocrestviewcable.com. by American Association of University cascadepoloclub.com. AUG. 16 — SISTERSFARMERS off, vendors and music; free; 9 a.m.-6 AUG. 17 — THEHIGH DESERT W omen to young women graduates MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third RENDEZVOUS: A fundraiser featuring AUG. 18 — TONYSMILEY: The oneof Redmond's high schools; tickets Cascade Avenue andAsh Street; www. St., Prineville; 541-633-3654 or ezpz. the artwork from "Art of the West Show"; man rock band performs as part of the available at Paulina Springs Books; $65; sistersfarmersmarket.com. zebraogmail.com. live music, live and silent auctions; $200 Turf Tunes concert series; donations 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Faith, Hope andCharity (includes an individual membership), benefit Neighborlmpact food bank; AUG. 16 — MUNCH 8 MOVIES:An Vineyards, 70455 N.W. Lower Bridge AUG. 17 — CENTRAL OREGON $300 per couple (includes a family nonperishable food and monetary outdoor screening of "Brave" (2012); SATURDAYMARKET: Featuring arts Way, Terrebonne; 541-788-6385 or membership), $150 members; 4 p.m.; donations accepted; 5-7 p.m.; Sunriver with food vendors and live music; and crafts from local artisans; free pbmsreckobendnet.com. HighDesertM useum, 59800 S.U.S. Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking AUG. 20— CATTLE DECAPITATION: Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. Center, 57250 Overlook Road; www. Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing lot across from Downtown Bend The SanDiegodeath m etalband 365 or www.highdesertrendezvous.org. Drive, Bend; 541-382-1662 or www. sunriversharc.com. Public Library, Parking Lot, 600 N.W. performs, with Existential Depression, northwestcrossing.com. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. AUG. 17 — TWILIGHTCINEMA: An AUG. 18 — SUNRIVER MUSIC Thorns of Creation and more; $10 in centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. outdoor screening of "How to Train Your FESTIVALSOLO PIANO CONCERT: AUG. 16 — TAARKA: The global advance plus fees, $12 day of show; Dragon" (2010); bring low-profile chair Americana band performs; $5-$10; 7 Featuring the 2013 VanCliburn gold AUG. 17 — CRAWDADFESTIVAL: 5:30 p.m.; The Sound Garden,1279 N.E. p.m.; Angeline's Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. medalist winner; $30-$50, $10youth; Featuring a parade, Dutch oven cook-off, or blanket, your own picnic, snacks Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804 or available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Village at Main Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9122. 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, entertainment, music, crawdad dinner www.j.mp/cattlebend. Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-58517600 Center Drive; 541-593-9310, and other activities; free admission, AUG. 16— SUNRIVER MUSIC AUG. 20— BEND STORYTELLING 3333 or www.sunriversharc.com. ticketsosunrivermusic.org or www. FESTIVALCLASSICALCONCERT $8 for crawdad dinner; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; CIRCLE: Features a group of people sunrivermusic.org. III: "Tango Fire," featuring the music Culver City Park, East D Street and AUG. 17 — THE GOTHARD SISTERS: telling and listening to stories; bring a Lakeshore Drive; 541-546-6494 or The all-female Irish music and dance of Ginastera, Piazzolla, Vivaldi and AUG.18 — BOND &BENTLEY: The story under 10 minutes; free; 6-7:45 cityhallocityofculver.net. Marquez; $30-$60, $10 youth; group performs; $18 plus fees; 7:30 p.m., Maryland indie-rock band performs; $5; p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, doors open at 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-389-1713 or 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. AUG. 17 — NORTHWEST CROSSING Wall St., Bend; 541-593-9310, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700. 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541bendstorytelling@gmail.com. SATURDAY FARMERSMARKET: Free; tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www. 388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. AUG. 17 — SLATERSMITH ANDTHE AUG. 20 — TWILIGHTCINEMA: An sunrivermusic.org. com. Washington and Northwest Crossing WEATHERMACHINE: The Portland outdoor screening of "Shrek" (2001); drives, Bend; www.nwxevents.com. folk-rock band performs; $5-$10; 8 p.m., AUG. 19 — SMARTATTHE LIBRARY: AUG. 17— CENTRAL OREGON GREAT bring low-profile chair or blanket, your doors open at 7 p.m.; Angeline's Bakery GIVEAWAY: Freeclothing and household AUG. 17 — PASSPORTTOTHE ARTS: Learn what it takes to volunteer to read own picnic, no glass or pets, snacks items; free; 8 a.m.-noon; Church of 8 Cafe, 121 W. Main Ave., Sisters; 541in local elementary schools and create a available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver An outdoor public art gallery with 549-9122 or www.belfryevents.com. Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2555 book-inspired art piece; free; 4-6 p.m.; exhibits and vendors; passports benefit Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-383- public art purchases; free; 10 a.m.-4 AUG.17 — STAIRWAYDENIED: The Led Sisters Public Library,110 N. Cedar St.; Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-5854240 or www.cogga.org. 541-355-5601 or www.getsmartoregon. 3333 or www.sunriversharc.com. p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street Zeppelin tribute band performs; $7 in ol'g. and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors AUG. 17 — PRINEVILLE FARMERS AUG. 20 — CO CO MONTOYA: The MARKET:Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 923-7763 or jaclyn.abslagoci.redmond. open at 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 AUG. 19 — POP-UPPICNIC: Live music blues guitarist performs; $20 in ol'.Us. p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-323-1881 with food and beverages; bring a blanket advance, $25 day of show; 7 p.m.; N.E. Third St.; 541-447-6217 or or www.bendticket.com. AUG. 17— THE PRINEVILLE BAND OF and canned food for Neighborlmpact; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. BROTHERS FUNDRAISER: Featuring a AUG. 18 — CASCADE POLOCLUB'S free admission; 5-7 p.m.; The Cosmic St., Bend; 541-633-6804 or www. AUG.17 —MADRASSATURDAY barbecue, silentauction and live music; MIDSUMMER CLASSIC: A polo Depot, 342 N.E. ClayAve., Bend; 541thesoundgardenstudio.com.

AUG. 16-22


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Talks 8 classes PAINT WORKSHOP:Learn to select the paint palettes, special effects and faux finishes for interior rooms; free;10-11:30 a.m. Saturday; Home Depot, 63465 U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-1020. CALDERATOURS: Learn what Caldera is all about and experience music and art as they are being created; free, reservations requested; 11 a.m. Saturday; Caldera Arts Center, 31500 Blue Lake Drive, off of U.S. Highway 20, west of Black Butte Ranch; 503-937-3071. WRITE NOW!:Brainstorm, play word games and enjoy the written word in a casual setting; free; 1 p.m. Saturday; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or sheilag© descuteslibrary.org. AARP DRIVERSAFETYCLASSES: Learn

AUG. 21 — BENDFARMERSMARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarketOgmail.com or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. AUG. 21 — MUSIC ON THEGREEN: Asummer concert series featuring Lori Fletcher with the Rock Hounds performing classic rock and blues; food, crafts, retail and more; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Streetand Southwest Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or http:// visitredmondoregon.com. AUG. 21 — PICNIC INTHEPARK:A tribute to Creedence Clearwater Revival featuring the Randy Linder Band; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541447-6909 or www.crookcountyfoundation. org/events. AUG. 21— "THE ED FORMAN SHOW": A late-night talk show hosted by the boozy, polyester-clad alter-ego of actor/comedian Aaron Ross; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. AUG. 21— SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CLASSICAL CONCERTV: "Beethoven's Eroica," featuring music of Jacobsen, Mozart and Beethoven; $30-$60, $10 youth; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall,17600 Center Drive; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic. org or www.sunrivermusic.org. AUG. 22 — TWILIGHTCINEMA:An outdoor screening of "Rise of the Guardians" (2012); bring low-profile chair or blanket, your own picnic, snacks available; free; 6:30 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-5853333 or www.sunriversharc.com. AUG. 22 — WEATHERSIDE WHISKEY BAND: The Seattle alt-country band performs; free; 8 p.m.; Blue Pine Kitchen and Bar, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www. bluepinebar.com. AUG. 22 — LEEKOCH:The California Americana band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

planning ahead

the current rules of the road and defensive driving techniques; $14, $12 for AARP members; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, with a lunch hour; Redmond Senior Center,325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. MAKING THEMOST OF YOUR COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE:Learn how to use the vegetables from your CSAwith chef Bette Fraser; includes meal; Bend location provided upon registration by Tuesday; $55; 6 p.m. Wednesday; 541-312-0097 or www.welltraveledfork.com. PREDATORS AND PREY: Learn about these critters through games and activities as part of Discover Nature Days; free; 11 a.m.-noon Thursday; Hillside Park, Northwest12th Street and Northwest Vicksburg Avenue, Bend; 541-383-5592 or www. deschuteschildrensforest.org.

AUG. 23-29 AUG. 23-24 — AIRSHOW OF THE CASCADES: Includes a display of classic cars and aircraft, an aerobatics show, food, music and more; $10, free ages 12and younger and veterans; 4-10 p.m. Aug. 23, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 24; Madras Airport, 2028 N.W. Airport Way; 541475-6947 or www.cascadeairshow.com. AUG. 23-24 — SHAKESPEAREIN THEPARK: Featuring a performance of "Much Ado About Nothing" by Portland's Northwest Classical Theatre Company; proceeds benefit Arts Central ;$22-$77;6 p.m .,doors openat5 p.m .; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.shakespearebend.com. AUG. 24-25 — SISTERS WILD WEST SHOW: Features Old West demonstrations, Native American and Western entertainment, arts and crafts; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 25; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-549-8905 or www. centraloregonshows.com. AUG. 24-25 — BACKYARD FARMTOUR:Tour backyard farms and gardens throughout Bend and speak with owners; free map book, or buy to support a charity; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend locations; www.backyardfarmtour.com. AUG. 23 — ROD AND CUSTOM CAR SHOW: A display of vintage vehicles, with food, music and more; registration requested; proceeds benefit the Bethlehem Inn programs; $15 suggested donation for participants and guests; 5-8 p.m.;Bethlehem Inn,3705 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-322-8768, gaz@ bendbroadband.comorwww.bet hleheminn. org. AUG. 25 — THEBLACKLILLIES: The Tennessee Americana band performs; $15, $10 children 6-12, plus fees; 5 p.m., gates open 4:15 p.m.; Black Butte Ranch Welcome Center, 13899 Bishops Cap; 541-595-1252 or www. blackbutteranch.com. AUG. 25 — JOSHUA RADIN:The LosAngeles singer-songwriter performs, with Gregory Alan Isakov; $28 at Newport Market, $68 (dinner and show) at the Athletic Club of Bend; 6:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-3853062 or www.c3events.com.

GO! MAGAZINE • PAGE 19

R

R

I I On Thursday, August 29th, The Bulletin will help kick off the NCAA and NFL football seasons withan entertaining and informative preview

section prepared by The Bulletin's award winning sports news department.

FEATURING: COLLEGE • U of 0 and OSU season previews and players to watch • Pac- l2/Oregonl Oregon State team schedules, and Pac-l2 outlook • National college team-by-team schedules and national outlook THE PROS • AFC and NFC

SPRCE RESERVRTION RND COPYDERDI INE: I

I

I

PUBLISH DATE:

Thc Bullctin

season previews

and players to watch • NFL: team-byteam schedules Distributed to The Bulletin's

70,000 readers, this will be a section local football fans will keep next to the TV

and refer to throughout the season, so as to not miss their favorite team in action. For advertisers, that means

ongoing exposure for your brand and promotional message.

I

I

l


PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

outo town The following is a list of other events "Out of Town."

ra

.=r

lu I I

Courtesy Dylan Maddux

>rq ttr"f *o.

«g$$4

I IV~

Submitted photo

TIME TO • Eugene Celebration eventreturnsfor 3daysof music, arts andfun By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

s Kool & The Gang says, "Celebrate good times, come on!" As one of Eugene'sbiggest events, the Eugene Celebration has a lot to rejoice. Created in 1983, the three-day festival features a diverse musical lineup, a classic car show, a film festival, a parade and food and craft vendors. The event runs Aug. 23-25 in downtown Eugene. "The Eugene Celebration has always been about bringing the community together to have fun," said director of operations Brendan Relaford in a news release. This year's theme is "Get.Down.Town," reflecting on the positive changes and growth of Eugene's downtown area. Music is a major component of the festivitieswith more than 45 performers. This year's lineup includes Midnite, Dumpstaphunk, Floy-

A

dian Slips, Lyrics Born, The Shook Twins, New Monsoon, Tony Furtado, Hillstomp, Marv Ellis and The Quick & Easy Boys. New this year, the kid's Fun Run will be held Aug. 24 before the popular parade. Proceeds benefit Kidsports, a nonprofit organization that provides youth sports programs for children in Eugene and Springfield. The celebration runs 5 p.m. to midnight Aug. 23, 11 a.m. to midnight Aug. 24 and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 25. Tickets for the Eugene Celebration are $15 in advance or $18 at the gates on Aug. 23-24. The tickets give access to the entire weekend. On Aug. 25, tickets drop to $8 at the gate only. To purchase tickets, visit www.ticketswest .com orcall800-992-8499. For more information, visit www.eugenecelebration.com or contact 541-681-4108. — Reporter: 541-383-0350, jwasson@bendbulletin.com

www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Aug.18 —"Nothin' but the Blues" benefit concert:Featuring Esperanza Spalding; Gerding Theater at the CONCERTS Armory, Portland; www.tickettomato. Through Aug. 11 —OregonFestival com or 800-820-9884. of American Music:Entitled "Hooray Aug. 18 —Steven Curtis Chapman, For Hollywood: The Songbook at the Craterian Theater at The Collier Center Movies,1930-48," the festival kicks for the Performing Arts, Medford; www. off a two year celebration of the classic craterian.org or 541-779-3000. American Songbook in Hollywood;The Wonder Ballroom, Shedd Institute and Hult Center, Eugene; Aug. 20 —Melvins, * Portland; TF www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Aug. 20 —Rebelution/Matisyahu/ Through Aug. 12 —Beloved Sacred Collie Buddz,Britt Pavilion, Arts and Music Festival,Tidewater Jacksonville; SOLDOUT;www.brittfest. Falls, Tidewater; www.belovedfestival. org or 800-882-7488. com. Aug. 20 —SummerSlaughter Tour, Aug. 9 —Five Iron Frenzy, Wonder * * Roseland Theater, Portland; TW Ballroom, Portland; TF Aug. 21 —Brandi Carlile, Britt Pavilion, Aug. 10 —Michael Franti & Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or Spearhead,McMenamins Edgefield, * 800-882-7488. Troutdale; SOLDOUT;CT Doyle, Roseland Aug. 10 —ToddSnider's Traveling Folk Aug. 22 —Danzig with Theater, Portland; TW* Show: Featuring HayesCarll, Shawn Aug. 22 —Selah Sue, Wonder MuHins & Sarah Jarosz,Oregon Zoo, * Portland; www.zooconcerts.com or Ballroom, Portland; TF 503-226-1561. Aug. 23 —Brantley Gilbert, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. Aug. 11 —LeonRussell, Aladdin oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. Theater, Portland; TF* Aug. 23 —E-40, Roseland Theater, Aug. 13 —Reckless Kelly, Portland; TW* McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, * Portland; CT Aug. 23 —Regeneration Tour 2013: A Flock of Seagulls, Erasure's Andy Aug. 13 —Steely Dan, McMenamins Bell and HowardJones, Britt Pavilion, Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLDOUT; CT* Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or Aug. 14 —Yeah Yeah Yeahs, * 800-882-7488. McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT Aug. 23-25 —Eugene Celebration, Aug. 16 —LosLobosand Los Lonely downtown Eugene; www. Boys,Oregon Zoo, Portland; www. eugenecelebration.com or zooconcerts.com or 503-226-1561. 541-681-4108. Aug. 16 —Rebelution/Matisyahu, Aug. 24 —Cake, Britt Pavilion, * Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or Aug. 16-17 —RandyTravis, Chinook 800-882-7488. Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; Aug. 24 —Willie Nelson & Family, CANCELED;www.chinookwindscasino. Maryhill Winery & Amphitheater, com or 888-624-6228. Goldendale, Wash.; www. Aug. 16-17 —Ronnie Dunn, Chinook maryhillwinery.com or 877-627-9445. Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; Aug. 25 —Chris Isaak, Oregon Zoo, www.chinookwindscasino.com or Portland; www.zooconcerts.com or 888-624-6228. 503-226-1561. Aug. 16-18 —WiHamette Country Aug. 25 —The OakRidge Boys, Music Festival:Lineup includes Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. Carrie Underwood, Brad Paisley and oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. Darius Rucker; Brownsville; www. Wonder Ballroom, willamettecountrymusicfestival.com or Aug. 25 —Pinback, * Portland; TF 541-345-9263. Aug. 27 —Chris Isaak, Britt Pavilion, Aug. 17 —Daryl Hall and JohnOates, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or Maryhill Winery 8 Amphitheater, 800-882-7488. Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillwinery.com or 877-627-9445. Aug. 27 —SnoopDoggaka SnoopLion, * Roseland Theater, Portland; TW Aug. 17 —MOLOTOV,Roseland Theater, * Portland; TW Aug. 29 —fun./Tegan & Sara, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; Aug. 17 —The Polyphonic Spree, * SOLD OUT;CT Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug.29 — TheZom bies,Aladdin Aug. 18 —"A Midsummer's Night * Theater, Portland; TF with The Monkees":Featuring Michael Nesmith, Micky Dolenzand Peter York; Aug. 30 —The Breeders, Wonder Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; Ballroom, Portland; SOLDOUT;TF*


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Aug. 30 —REOSpeedwagon/ Loverboy,Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. Aug. 30 —Richard Marx, Aladdin * Theater, Portland; TF Aug. 30 —Taylor Swift, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Aug. 30 —Tegan & Sara, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 30-Sept. 1 —Dave Matthews Band,Gorge Amphitheater, George, Wash.; www.livenation. com. Aug. 31 —Bridgit Mendler/Shane Harper,Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. Aug. 31 —Death Cab ForCutie, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT;CT* Sept. 1 —Gary Numan,Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 1 —Martina McBride, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 1 —MGMT,McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 2 —Martina McBride, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. Sept. 2 —ZZWard, Aladdin * Theater, Portland; TF Sept. 3 —Alt-J, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; SOLD * OUT; CT Sept. 4 —Deerhunter, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 4 —Icona Pop, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 5 —The Doobie Brothers, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 6 —The Doobie Brothers, Oregon Zoo, Portland; www. zooconcerts.com or 503-226-1561. Sept. 6 —OneRepublic/Sara BareiHes,McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 7 —Glass Candy/ Chromatics,Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 8 —Adam Ant, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 9 —JimmyCliff, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 10 —Beth Orton,Alberta Rose Theatre, Portland;www. albertarosetheatre.com or 503-764-4131. Sept. 11 —Jason Isbell, Aladdin * Theater, Portland; TF Sept. 11 —Why?, Wonder * Ballroom, Portland; TF Sept. 13 —Andre Nickatina/ Krayzie Bone,Roseland Theater,

*Tickets TM: Ticketmaster, www

.ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000 TW:TicketsWest, www .ticketswest.com or 800992-8499 TF:Ticketfly, www.ticket fly.com or 877-435-9849 CT:Cascade Tickets, www

.cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849 *

Portland; TW Sept. 13 —Led Zepagain, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 13 —REOSpeedwagon, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 14 —Jake Shimabukuro/ Jeff Pevar,Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 14 —The Mission UK, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 16 —Lee Fields and the Expressions,Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 17 —Hem,Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 18 —Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros/Thievery Corporation,Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 18 —Five Finger Death Punch,McDonald Theatre, Eugene TW

*

Sept. 18 —Jars of Clay, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 19 —Aaron Neville Duo, Craterian Theater at The Collier Center for the Performing Arts, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Sept. 19 —Ben Rector, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 19 —Neko Case/The Head & TheHeart, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 20 —Halestorm, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 20 —Matt Nathanson/ JoshuaRadin,McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 21 —TheNational/ Frightened Rabbit,McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLDOUT;CT* Sept. 21 —Riders in the Sky, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 21 —The Royalty Tribute Concert:Justin Shandor as Elvis, Michael Knight as Michael Jackson and Julie Meyers as Stevie Nicks; Salem Armory, Salem; TW* Sept. 22 —The Lumineers, Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673.

out of town Sept. 22 —A Songversation with India.Arie,Aladdin Theater, Portland; TF* Sept. 25 —Drake, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 25 —Further, Cuthbert * Amphitheater, Eugene; TW Sept. 25 —Savages, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF*

LECTURES

5 COMEDY Through Aug. 10 —Williams 8 Ree,Chinooks Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; www. chinookwindscasino.com or 888-624-6228. Aug. 24 —Terry Fator, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair.org or 877-840-0457. Aug. 31 —Russell Brand, Newmark Theatre, Portland; www. pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 5 —Fred Armisen, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 7 —"An Evening with Lily Tomlin,"Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 8 —Dennis Miller, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; CANCELED;www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 13-14 —Sylvia Browne, Chinooks Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; www. chinookwindscasino.com or 888-624-6228. Sept. 14 —Jo Koy, Newmark Theatre, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Sept. 21 —Brian Regan, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 25 —Jim Breuer, Aladdin * Theater, Portland; TF

SYMPHONY 8c OPERA Aug. 9 —TeddyAbrams/Yuja Wang/Britt Orchestra,Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 10 —TeddyAbrams/ Augustin Hadelich/Britt Orchestra,Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 16 —David Danzmayr/Lisa Smirnova/Britt Orchestra,Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 17 —David Dansmayr/ Jennifer Koh/Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 18 —SymphonyPops/ Project Trio/Britt Orchestra,

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 21

Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 6 —"ABBA— The Concert":Featuring an ABBA tribute band and the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 12 —Lang Lang:Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 21 —"Big Night Concert": A night of opera's most beloved repertoire; Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; www.portlandopera.org or 866-739-6737. Sept. 21, 23 —"Scheherazade": Music by Takemitsu and RimskyKorsakov; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

THEATER 5 DANCE Through Aug. 11 —"The Music Man":1957 musical by Meredith

.

Wilson; part of the 2013 Shedd Theatricals season; The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd. org or 541-434-7000. Through Oct. 11 —Oregon Shakespeare Festival:"A Streetcar Named Desire" (through Nov. 2), "The Tenth Muse," (through Nov. 2), "My Fair Lady" (through Nov. 3) and "The Taming of the Shrew" (through Nov. 3) are currently running at the Angus Bowmer Theatre; "The Unfortunates" (through Nov. 2), "King Lear" (through Nov. 3) and "The Liquid Plain" (through Nov. 3) are currently running at Thomas Theatre; "Cymbeline" (through Oct. 11), "The Heart of Robin Hood" (through Oct. 12) and "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (through Oct. 13) are currently running on the Elizabethan Stage; Ashland; www.osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Oct. 12 —The Broadway Dolls, Craterian Theater at The Collier Center for the Performing Arts, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000.

Continued next page

. BRIGIITwcm GETTHIS YEAR'5eEST eACK-TO-SCHOOL SUPPLY

Forget those new jeans and super hero lunchboxes. Confidence is

the best school supply you can give your kids to setthem up for school success.

Bend, OR 97701

s'fl->l1-'Il 52 bendsylvanOqwest.net

.

.

Start this year strong with Sylvan. Our proven approach blendsamazing teachers with SylvanSync'" technologyon the IPad' for a truly engaging learning experience.

Bend Main Center 2150 NE Studio Rd Suite 10

NWX

2863 Northwest Crossing Drive Sulte 110

Bend, OR 97701

91-0l'I-'f$52 bendsylvanOqwest.net

Don't wait untilit's too late. Start now.


out of town

PAGE 22 • GO! MAGAZINE

©>tn 0 fJy V 0 • eI

CL I

From previous page Oct. 17 —"Ring of Fire — The MusicofJohnny Cash":More than three dozen tunes made famousby Johnny Cash form the backdrop of an endearing portrayal of the universal themes of struggle, success, faith, heartache and home; Craterian Theater at The Collier Center for the Performing Arts, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Oct. 27 —Bernadette Peters: Performing a selection of Broadway hits from her extensive songbook,including music by Rodgers and Hammerstein, Stephen Sondheim and more; Craterian Theater at The Collier Center for the Performing Arts, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Oct. 28 —Bernadette Peters: Performing a selection of Broadway hits from her extensive songbook,including music by Rodgers and Hammerstein, Stephen Sondheim and more; The Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Dec. 5-22 —"Cameiot": Lerner and Loewe's 1960 musical recounts the tragic and morallyrich story of King Arthur, Queen Guinevere, Lancelot and the Knights of the Round Table; part of the 2013 Shedd Theatricals season; The Shedd Institute,

o~ P CL m' Ql to

O Q)

R 4a

-R go rc g

Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000.

EKHIBITS Through Aug. 11 —Jordan Schnitzer Museum ofArt: The following exhibits are currently on display: "Historic Russian Orthodox Cathedrals and Churches from the11th to the 20th Centuries" (through Aug.11),"Piero Dorazio 8 the Responsive Eye" (through Aug. 18), "Celebrating Oregon Artists: Recent Additions to the Collection" (through Sept. 25) and "New American Acquisitions" (through Dec. 8); Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Through Aug. 18 —Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: "Desert Air: Photographs by George Steinmetz" (through Aug. 18) and "Mummies of the World: The Exhibition" (through Sept. 8); Portland; www. omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Through Aug. 25 —Portland Art Museum:The following exhibits are currently on display: "Fierce: Animal Life from the Collection" (through Aug. 25), "Cyclepedia: Iconic Bicycle Design" (through Sept. 8), "Man/Woman: Gaston Lachaise" (through Sept. 8) and "Ceramics of the Islamic

o C4

POU%gl08 TS19EATSgETlC

Vl Ul

e vvl

i= a

Q a0) U

0 A (D

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

C

i

h

'

'

Submitted photo

Tickets are currently on sale for the 2013-14 season at the Craterian Theater at The Collier Center for the Performing Arts in Medford. Contemporary Christian musician Steven Curtis Chapman performs Aug. 18. World: The Ottis Collection" (through Oct. 27); Portland; www.portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through Sept. 8 —"Behind the Shoji". Show and sale ofJapaneseinspired arts and crafts; Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; www.japanesegarden.com or 503-223-132 I. Through Sept. 9 —"Sinners 8 Saints: Indelicate Stories of Emigrants in theWest": A collection of stories drawn from first-person accounts are woven into narratives that highlight the morals and values of pioneers, early settlers and early inhabitants of the Columbia Plateau; National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City; www.blm.gov/or/ oregontrail or 541-523-1843. Through Sept. 21 —Museumof Contemporary Craft:The following exhibits are currently on display: "Object Focus:The Bowl"and "Soundforge"; Portland; www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Through Oct. 6 —Maryhiii Museum ofArt: The following exhibits are currently on display: "Eanger Irving Couse onthe Columbia River" (through Sept. 15), "Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition" (through Oct. 6), "Kenneth Standhardt: Impressions" (through Nov. 15) and "Arthur Higgins: Prints" (through Nov. 15); Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Through December —"The Sea& Me":A new children's interactive exhibit; Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org or

541-867-3474. Aug.10 and Sept. 21 —The Shire Tours:A unique landscape in the Columbia River Gorge; created byarchitect John Yeon; Portland; 541-346-4363. Aug. 16-Feb. 8 —"Quality is Contagious: John Economaki and BridgeCity ToolWorks": Featuring Bridge City Tool Works' products, sketches and tools from the past thirty years; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Aug. 17 and Sept. 14 —Watzek House Tours:Oregon's newest National Historic Landmark; one of John Yeon's most renowned architectural works; Portland; 541-346-4363. Sept. 14-Nov. 15 —"Windows to Heaven: Treasures fromthe Museum of RussianIcons": Featuring 25 historically significant Russian icons that date from 1590 to the present; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Sept. 18-20 —0-Tsukimi (MoonviewingFestival): Featuring a candle-lit tea ceremony, live music, samplesofteaand sakiand seasonal foods; Portland JapaneseGarden, Portland; www.japanesegarden.com or503-542-0280.

MISCELLANY Through Aug. 10 —Kiamath Falls Great Northwest PRCA Rodeo,Hancock Event Center, Klamath Falls; www. greatnorthwestprcarodeo.com or 541-884-3280.

Through Aug. 29 —TopDown: Rooftop Cinema:Movies screen Thursdays atop the Hotel deLuxe's parking structure; Portland; www. nwfilm.org or 503-221-1156. Aug. 17 —"Peaks 8 Valleys: A Square Dance,"Flora School Education Center, Flora; www. floraschool.org or 541-828-7010. Aug. 23-Sept. 2 —Oregon State Fair,Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. FAREWaikf "' " " " " y Memorial p Wilsonville; www.foodallergywalk. org or424-672-3261. Aug. 25 —Car Showat The Oregon Garden:Featuring valuable classic and custom automobiles from private collectors throughout the Northwest, live music, beer, wineandfood;The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www.oregongarden.org or 503-874-8100. Sept. 2 —RoyWehster CrossChannel Swim,Hood River; www. hoodriver.org or 541-386-2000. Sept. 14 —Portland Dollhouse & Miniature Show,Holiday InnPortland Airport, Portland; www. portlandminiatureshow.com or 503-362-6012. Sept. 25 —The Price is Right Live!,Keller Auditorium, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 800-273-1530. Oct. 18-20 —Astoria International Film Festival, Liberty Theater; www.goaiff.com or 503-325-5922. Nov. 12-15 —Ringiing Bros. and Barnum 8 Bailey,Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673.


GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 23

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

gaming

ame,mO erns een

BSSlc • 'Shadowrun Returns' harkensbackto the glory daysof RPGs with room toexpand

Nintendo/The Associated Press

TOP 10

t

from the shadows and gifted individuals wove spells and summoned elementals. By 2054, magic and technology are playing in concert.Magic-fueled megacorps run governments and technomancers work the shadows between the virtual and mystical realms. "Shadowrun Returns" d r ops players headfirst into this richly realized fiction, combining classic role-playing storytelling with modern tactical battles. The production values are more modest than many contemporary RPGs and the breadth and length of the adventure is limited, but running the shadows has never been more fun. "Shadowrun Returns'" isometric view, turn-based combat, pointand-click controls and text-driven dialogue deliver a jolt of

'

"Pikmin 3" for Wii U ranks third in the Top 10 games for August.

Game informer Magazine

man parents, dragons reemerged

,~, If"~$.'":-j':,":

Qi j=:CAfj,eM:

By Matt Miller n the first decade of the 21st century, the world was humming along to the accelerating tune of technology, knowing little about the dramatic change of beat about to hit. The awakening brought magic back to the world; elven and orcish children were born to hu-

' u .

I:

ACROSSTHEBOARD The editors of Game Informer

r

Magazine rank the top gamesfor the month of August:

1. "Plants vs. Zombies 2" (iOS) +~7+ ~ r<

2."Civilization V: Brave New

r

World" (PC)

'c

3. "Pikmin 3" (Wii U)

(

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

One of the most unusual and original fantasy settings around finally has a worthy digital entry for the first time in nearly 20 years withuBhadowrun Returns."

recognize their significance or not. 'SHADOWRUNRETURNS' With original "Shadowrun" de8.5 (out of 10) signer Jordan Weisman guiding the shipat Harebrained Schemes, t hose same devoted fans w i l l PC find a faithful presentation of the Harebrained Schemes world. The story plays and reads ESRB rating: Not rated like a hard-boiled detective novel, from your Marlowe-esque hero to the mysterious woman in the red dress. Investigating a friend's found myself looking forward to murder escalates into high-stake the different twists combat would corporate espionage and throw at me. Players of the recent nostalgia for longtime PC R E VI EW w o rld-threatening cults. "XCOM: Enemy Unknown" will gamers.Fifteen years ago, Part of the thrill of "Shad- instantly grasp the fundamentals, games like this established the owrun" is the vocabulary and tight- which are heavily emulated here. foundations of t oday's western knit culture of these wry, some- Characterstake turns spending RPGs. Even so, there's nothing times-misanthropic heroes. Those action points to maneuver into here that should turn away new- elements come through loud and flanking positions, duck into cover comers thanks to smart updates to clear without distracting from the and fire off bullets or spells. Your the formula. The challenge level is plot. The gorgeous backgrounds main character levels up as the accessible, with a steady ramp up and mildly exaggerated character story continues, but every mission in difficulty that may be too easy art accentuate the setting's charm, involves you hiring other shadowfor experienced tacticians. The which lies somewhere between the runners to join you. Each characleveling system is flexible and easy neon lights of "Blade Runner" and ter class brings something exciting to grasp, letting you shape your the spellcasting and sword swing- to the table, from the rigger's abilcharacter by doubling down on ing of high fantasy. ity to control robotic drones to the "Shadowrun Returns" moves at mage's wide variety of lightning one or two skill sets, or by becoming a jack of all trades. While the a deliberate pace, with the expec- bolts, healing spells and mana story is rooted in the established tation that players take the time to blasts. lore of the "Shadowrun" universe, talk to characters, read dialogue Battles often provide intriguthis is a fresh jumping-on point; the and solve some simple puzzles. ing choices and opportunities. Did locations and characters that nod That makes the battles feel all the you obtain the zebra meat from to fans are enjoyable whether you more exciting when they occur; I earlier in the level'? Maybe you can

distract the hellhounds that would otherwise attack you. Those turrets bringing you down? A welldefended decker can jack into the cyber-landscape of the Matrix and take control of the guns. The fights are always interesting, even with some occasional problems. Some ofthese problems include enemy artificial intelligence sometimes leaving itself far too vulnerable, and missing opportunities to exploit your mistakes. Moreover, despite how pretty they are, the two-dimensional ba c k grounds oftenobscure characters,making it hard to see what you're doing. A limited breadth of spell and character animations also compromises some of the excitement. Ultimately, thesequibblesaremodest concerns when placed beside the varied objectives and surprising locations of each combat scene. The initial campaign offers a great adventure, but it's easy to feel hungry for more when you're done. Thankfully, Harebrained Schemes has included a highly-useable editor to let players create their own content. Enterprising module creators are already digging into the toolset, and I'm hopeful about the potential for expansion.

4. "Dota 2" (PC) 5. "Towerfall" (Ouya) 6. "Shadowrun Returns" (PC) 7."Mario 8 Luigi: Dream Team"

(3DS) 8. "Shin MegamiTensei IV" (3DS) 9. "Rogue Legacy" (PC) 10. "NCAA Football 14" (X360,

PS3) Game lnformer Magazine

TOP PAID APPS ANDROID 1. "Riptide GP2"

2. "The Walking Dead" 3. "Prince of Persia

Shadowa Flame" 4. "Crazy Taxi" 5. "Tiny Thief" APPLE 1. "Minecraft — Pocket Edition" 2. "Where's My Mickey? XL" 3. "dlay 2" 4. "Pl antsvs.Zombies HD" 5. "Riptide GP2" Mcclatchy-TnbuneNews Service


PAGE 24 . GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

II • o• •'

I SLI4 -ISY~S

„:.,"'"" =-'. =R =

•,<

.

-

.

: Im

LI<L<'4

\

I'4Iit .

-(

a. !•

'

'

'

• •

'

4I

;

'

»

',I

I

• •

I

II I

I

' •

I

'

I

I

I '

' •

I

4

Rg

IU •

:

'

'

'

'

'

' l l l o'

4 •

'

'

:

'

I III

I

I

I I

' •

I

l

' •

I'

4

I

4

„S>. '

I4

iQ

N •

.' 'v<'gp

I:. ' • ' ' •

III I

I•

I I

'

'

4

.' I

I

' •

I

EHRI

I

' •

' •

You

MORRIS REAL ESTATE

~ • •

-

• •

Qgi )


GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 25

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

movies

y

y

e

4 pj'

,"e4

Kimberley French/Sony Columbia Pictures/The Associated Press

Matt Damon stars as Max, a career criminal attempting to live the straight life, in the thriller "Elysium."

sium anene ainin J

odie Fosterdelivers an unbelievably terrible performance in "Elysium." Maybe the worst acting ever done by a two-time Oscar winner. A performance so awful I found myself keenly anticipating Foster's next scene to see if she would keep on bringing the dreadful. I say this as a HUGE fan of Jodie Foster. I'm telling you, it's amazing how bad she is in this movie. And how little it mattered in the grand, rabidly schizoid scheme of things. The Summer of Futuristic Doom

RICHARDROEPER

"Elysium" 109 minutes

R, for strong bloodyviolence andlanguage continues with "Elysium," written and directed by Neill Blomkamp,

who showed such great promise with the claptrap minor classic "District 9" and announces himself here as an "event" filmmakerthat rare breed whose very name preceding a title should inspire smiles of anticipation. Set in a predictably dystopian future (for most of the film, the year is 2154), "Elysium" tells us Earth has become a vast wasteland of pollution and corruption, with the .001 percent having fled to a utopian space station that hovers above the planet like a second, heavenly,

taunting moon. Elysium is like a giant high-class suburban enclave, with the added benefit of nifty machines that can cure just about anything that ails you. (Lost opportunity: Blomkamp gives us only glimpses of life on Elysium, with b eautiful people lounging poolside and perfect little children eating anything they want. Is Elysium really paradise â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or a beautiful hell'?) Meanwhile, Earth is essentially a slave colony, run by heartless bureaucrats from Elysium that oc-

eo casionally visit the filthy planet, which is monitored by ruthlessly efficient, emotion-free robot police officers. If you thought "District 9" was a thinly veiled allegory about apartheid, "Elysium" is a thinly veiled allegory about nearly every environmental, political and social issue imaginable. Subtlety isn't on the menu. (If Fox News DOESN'T do a segment about how "Elysium" is propaganda in favor of Obamacare, it'll be an upset.)

Continued next page


movies

PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

T ere's not muc atsta eint e ' ea o onsters' ny thoughts that a second P ercy Jackson and t h e O lympians f i l m w o u l d drag R ic k R i o r dan's "Greek G odchildren" franchise out o f the shadow of Harry Potter are dashed the moment Percy and his "half-blood" friends pile into a supernatural taxi i n " Sea of Monsters." The cab may be driven by the three h a ggling, w i s ecracking Graeae of Greek myth — blind women with one eye between them — but it's a pure Potter picture moment. And witheverymagical creature that turns up, which one of these half-human sons and daughters of Poseidon or Athena then identifies — "Look, it's a Hippocampi!" "Oh no! It's a Charybdis!" — the comparisons to Harry & Co. grows. But "Percy Jackson: Sea of M onsters," the sequel to " T h e Lightning Thief," is never less than a workmanlike and likable substitute for kids who like their entertainment magical. Good effects, an adequate young cast (Logan Lerman, Alexandra Daddario and Brandon T. Jackson return) and the amusing presence of Stanley Tucci and Nathan Fillion lift this otherwise warmed-over myth mush movie. A prologue remembers a death, years ago, at Camp Half-Blood, t he woodsy Hogwarts of t h i s

A

From previous page Matt Damon's as good as anyone's ever been at playing the antihero, and he's true to form as our guy here, who gets knocked down again and again and again but keeps getting up, determined to see things through. Head shaved, muscled torso covered with tattoos, Damon's Max is a career criminal trying to live the straight life working the assembly line in a factory. (In one of the film's many ironies, Max helps build the very robots that terrorize and abuse humans on Earth.) After Max is exposed to a dose of radiation that will kill him in

ROGERMOORE

"Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters" 106 minutes PG, for fantasy action violence, some

scary images andmild language mythic world. The brave dead demi-god who sacrificed herself back then lives on as a magical tree that guards the camp from attacks by outsiders. But someone has poisoned the tree. Percy (Lerman), the kid who saved Olympus last time around, isn't the first choice to save it now. He's outclassed by the sporty, trash-talking C l a risse ( L even Rambin). Clarisse is given the job of fetching a cure for the treethe Golden Fleece, the same talisman Jason and the Argonauts once sought. But Percy, Annabeth (Daddario) and the Satyr Grover

(Jackson) sneak off on a quest of their own to see if they're the ones destined to fetch the fleece and save Olympus. Again. They're joined by Percy's dorky new half-brother, Tyson (Douglas

Smith). Tyson is a Cyclops, you know, the one-eyed fellows who gave Odysseus so much trouble in

five days, he agrees to take on a seemingly impossible mission that will transport him up to Elysium and those magical machines that can cure anything. Which bringsus to Foster's Defense Secretary Delacourt,who

speaks a variety of languages, wears impeccably tailored outfits as she monitors life on Elysium, runs roughshod over Elysium's figurehead of a president — and plans a coup that will eventually depend onher accessing the information that's literally been downloaded into Max's brain. (Don't ask. Just know it's a really bloody explanation.)

Courtesy Murray Close

Tyson (Douglas Smith), Clarisse (Leven Rambin), Grover (Brandon T. Jackson), Annabeth (Alexandra Daddario) and Percy (Logan Lerman) are shocked by their latest discovery in "Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters."

The fights/escapes all lack any sense of

urgency and peril. "The Odyssey." The one-eyed kid is accident prone, a screwup. "Is it your lack of depth perception, maybe'?" The movie starts out promisingly with the comical introduction of camp guru "Mr. D.," Dionysus, the witty Greek god of wine. Stanley Tucci is hilarious in the part, a god who loves his vino but is being punished by Zeus so every vintage bottle he opens with

The problem is, Foster/Delacourt delivers every line as if she's lost a bet. Which makes it oddly

compelling. She walks ramrod straight and affects an accent that makes her sound like a young person imitating an old person. Perhaps she's trying to look and sound like the droids that enforce her genocidal views, but it's all just terribly, terribly off. This is a classic example of a great actor making all the wrong choices. As for Damon's Max, rarely has a leading man in an action film spent so much time either limping, passed out, trying to stem wounds

care turns to water in his glass. eYou know, the Christians have a guy who can do this in REVERSE. Now THAT's a god!" The always amusing Nathan F illion shows up , r u n n ing a UPS store as Hermes,father of the villainous Luke (Jake Abel) whom we thought Percy had disposed of in the first film but who is back and striving to end the world. Again. Not to worry, says Hermes. "Rome wasn't built in a d ay. Take it from me, I was there." That gets at the central failing in this film. There's no life-anddeath weight to it, no "Cedric Diggory's dead and we can't bring

him back" moment aside from that opening tree-girl flashback. The quest, which takes our heroes tothe Sea of Monsters, aka The Bermuda Triangle, is generic in the extreme. The fights/escapes all lack any sense of urgency and

or collapsing in a heap of pain. Of course the heroes in these films almost always sustain a serious wound or two, but not at this level. Max's quest to reach Elysium brings him into the path of his childhood best friend Frey (Alice Braga), now a nurse whose young daughter has terminal leukemia;

nade keep him from hunting down Max. The special effects in "Elysium" are breathtaking, whether somebody's face is getting blown off or we're getting those tantalizingly brief looks at life on Elysium. Damon's everyman workhorse is tragically sympathetic, plodding

Spider (Wagner Moura), a Los

ahead against all odds. Copley is

Angeles revolutionary who keeps sending rogue spacecraft across the Elysium border even though it almost always results in the mass slaughterof the passengers; and the mercenary Kruger ("District 9" hero Sharlto Copley), who doesn't let a little thing like eating a gre-

brilliant as the sadistic villain. Foster is ... well, you gotta see it to believe it. In the meantime, you'll be treated to one of the most entertaining action films of the year.

peril. The first Percy Jackson movie wasn't a blockbuster and yet this one setsus up for further adventures with t hese 20-something teenagers and their training camp. But until they have the guts to kill somebody, to give us a real sense that there's something truly at stake, why should we invest in it'? — Roger Mooreis a film critic for McClatchy-Tribune News Service.

— Richard Roeper is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

S LlS

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 27

a ou

00 enou t times, "We're the Millers" almost dares you not to like it, taking you out of the movie with scenes that have you musing about the behind-thescenes machinations. Here is Jennifer Aniston, who is 44 and in amazing shape, playing one ofthose movie strippers who never quite get naked. You watch

A

her gyrating and pole-grasping and spinning about, and you can't help but think, "Wow, that Jennifer Aniston surelooks great for her age!" Or for any age, for that matter. Then there's the scene where the characters played by Aniston and Emma Roberts take turns making out with the young English actor Will Poulter, all in the name of teaching him how to kiss, and you think, "Gee, THAT must have been a good day on the set for Will Poulter!" With a better movie, you'd be too involved to ponder such things. "We're the Millers" is just good enough to keep you entertained, but not goodenough tokeep your mind from wandering from time to time. This is an aggressively funny comedy that takes a lot of chances and connects just often enough. Playing the kind of role that might have appealedto Bill Murray circa 1985, Jason Sudeikis is David Clark, a disenfranchised loner who deals pot and isn't interested in any human connection deeper than weed-for-cash. When David runs into an old college buddy who's now married with children, he's not the least bit embarrassed to acknowledge he's basically living the same lif e he led 20 years ago. But then David has a rare moment of humanity and tries to intervene on behalf of a neighbor kid named Kenny (Poulter) and a smartasshomeless girlnamed Casey (Emma Roberts) who have run afoul of some hooligans, and it backfires big-time. Suddenly deep in debt to drug

kingpin Brad Gurdlinger (Ed Helms, and no, that's not a typo), David has no choice but to accept Brad's proposition: If David can transport a huge shipment of pot across the Mexican border, Brad will forgive the debt and also not kill David. David comes up with a plan. It's

RICHARDROEPER

"We're the Millers" 110 minutes

R, for crude sexual content, pervasive language, drug material and brief graphic nudity not a great plan, but it's a plan. David rents a huge motor home, and persuades Rose the stripper, Kenny the kidwhose mother doesn'tcare about him, and Casey the runaway to join him. Rose will pretend to be his wife; Kenny and Casey will be their teenage children. They're the Millers! Who's going to suspect a dorky family of being drug mules? It's a funky road trip, with the "Millers" bickering in a way that makes them seem like a real family, even as they encounter multiple roadblocks to their mission while Brad keeps the Bluetooth pressure on David to deliver. (In one of the film's best visual running gags, Brad has the ultimate drug kingpin aquarium. It contains a whale. "I don't like cars," Brad explains.) At various times, Rose, Kenny and Casey actually buy into the family dynamic. It's up to David to remind them none of this is real.

They're being paid to do a job, and if they screw it up, it's quite possible they're all going to die. We pretty much know how this road trip is going to end. It's all about the journey. The script is uneven but occasionally hilarious. Nick Offerman and Kathryn Hahn provide terrific spark as the Fitzgeralds, a cornpone couple who befriend the Millers. Helms is wildly miscast as the ruthless drug kingpin, but I suppose that's the point. Which brings us to the blooper reel. You know those outtakes that run a longside the closing credits of some comedies? Where the actorsare way more amused by the foul-ups and practical jokes than the audience? You should stick around for the "We're the Millers" bloopers reel. — Richard Roeperis a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

Disney via The Associated Press

Dusty (voiced by Dane Cook) is the heroic cropduster in "Planes."

anes'isa o s insearc o a e er T

here are funnier cartoons than the "Cars" universe of movies, and smarter ones and animated films with more heart. But there's nothing like the "World of 'Cars'" for toy tie-ins, or so the reasoning must have been for "Planes," the worst of the animated blockbusters to come our way this summer. A bland, joyless plucky-little-plane race comedy, it's even m ore starved of jokes than Pixar's "Monsters University," as if that was possible. "Planes" is about a crop duster named Dusty who longs to be more "than just what I was built for. I've flown thousands of miles and I've never been anywhere." His elders (Cedric the Entertainer) might remind him that "You were built for seed, not speed." But Dusty longs to escape Propwash Junction, and with the help of his fuel truck pal (Brad Garrett) and t rusty mechanic forklift (Teri Hatcher), he might just get into the round-the-world race and win fame and glory. So it's "Cars II" with planes. Or "Turbo" without the snail.

ROGERMOORE

"Planes"

"Planes" looks, sounds and feels like a directto-video project.

women. Nobody was there to tell him that wonderfully detailed animated airplanes — "Skipper," the Corsair, remembers his comand rude humor bat days in a vivid recreation of World War II at one point — do They cast salty comic Dane not a movie make. A p erfect Cook as the voice of Dusty, and 1930s Gee Bee racer replica isn't gave him nothing funny to say. funny, even when it's given a Garrett, Hatcher, Stacy Keach Mexican accent. (playing a grizzled World War Casting two actors from "Top II F4U Corsair), funnymen John Gun" to voice Navy jets? Giving Cleese and Cedric the Enter- sports announcers Brett Mustainer, funny woman Julia Lou- berger and Colin Cowherd (as a is-Dreyfus (as a French-Cana- blimp) race coverage announcdian race plane), all great voices ing jobs? Real side splitters. "Planes" looks, sounds and playing trucks or planes, none of them with anything amusing to feels like a direct-to-video projwork with. ect, which i n a n e a r lier age A few n ational stereotypes when people still bought DVDs it — stuck-up Brit, Latin Loverwould have been. In theaters, it's don't deliver laughs either. nothing more than a laughless Like "Cars," this was based 90 minute commercial for toys on an idea from studio head available at a retailer near you. — Roger Moore is a film critic for John Lasseter, who apparently is surrounded by "Yes" men and McClatchy-Tribune tvettrs Service. 90 minutes PG, for some mild action


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

O N LOCA L S CRE E N S Here's what's showing onCentral Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page31.

Reviews by RogerEbert, Richard Roeper or Roger Moore, unless otherwise noted.

HEADS UP "Cloudy With a Chance ofMeatballs" — An animated comedy aboutakidwho invents a machine that will turn water into food. It goes wild, floods his island with food, and attacks it with a spaghetti and meatballs tornado. Haven't seen that before. Part of the Twilight Cinema series, this 2009 film screens at duskTuesday at the Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center. Gamesand activities begin at 6:30 p.m. This free event is open to the public. For more information, contact 541-585-3333.Rating:Twoanda half stars. 90 minutes. (PG) —Ebert "Despicable Me" — A villain instead of a hero. That's rare in ananimated comedy, but the villain is worth his starring role. He's Gru (voice bySteve Carell), who hatches a dastardly scheme tosteal the moon. Supported by countless little yellow Minions and challenged by three plucky orphan girls, he doesbattle with his archnemesis, Vector (Jason Segel). Funny, energetic, teeth-gnashingly venomous, and animated with an eye toexploiting the 3-D process with such sure-fire techniques as a roller coaster. But 3-D dims the brightness, and the film will look and feel better if you can find it in 2-D. Part of the Twilight Cinema series, this 2010 film screens at dusk Thursday at TheVillage at Sunriver. Gamesand activities begin at 6:30 p.m. This freeevent is open to the public. For more information, contact 541-585-3333. Rating: Threestars. 95 minutes. (PG) —Ebert "Eric Claptoo's Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013" — This special, one-night event will feature the best performances andbackstageaccessfrom Clapton's Crossroads Guitar Festival pre-recorded over two nights at Madison SquareGarden this past April. Musicians featured in the cinema event include the Allman Brothers Band, Blake Mills, BookerT., BuddyGuy, DerekTrucks, Doyle Bramhall II, Eric Clapton, Gary Clark Jr., GreggAllman, Jeff Beck, John Mayer, Keith Richards, Keith Urban, Los Lobos, Robert Cray,Sonny Landreth, Vince Gill and Warren Haynes. Theeventscreensat7:30 p.m.Tuesdayat Regal Old Mill Stadium16 & IMAX inBend. Cost is $15. 150minutes. (no MPAArating) — SynopsisfromNational CineMedia "Homeward Bound: TheIncredible Journey" — Theadventure begins when the loving owners of Chance, Sassy and Shadowareforced to leave them in the temporary care of afriend who lives hundreds of miles away. But after several days, the worried animals begin to thinktheir family must be in trouble, so they decide to headfor home. On their incredible journeyacross the ruggedly beautiful Sierras, they encounter unexpected surprises from man,beast, and nature alike. Part of the Twilight Cinema series, this1993 film screens at dusktoday at the Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center. Gamesand activities begin at 6:30 p.m. This free event is open to the public. For more information,

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

with the help of his fuel truck pal (Brad Garrett) and trusty mechanicforklift (Teri Hatcher), he might just get into the round-the-world race andwin fameand glory. "Planes" looks, sounds andfeels like a direct-to-video project, which in an earlier age whenpeople still bought DVDs it would havebeen. In theaters, it's nothing more than alaughless 90-minute commercial for toys available at a retailer near you. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Oneand ahalf stars. 90 minutes. (PG) —Moore "We're the Millers" — "We're the Millers," about a pot dealer andhis acquaintances posing as afamilyto haul a shipmentfrom Mexico, is just good enough to keepyou entertained, but not good enough to keepyour mind from wandering from time to time. This is an aggressively funny comedythat takes a lot of chances, and connects just often enough. Rating: Threestars. 110 minutes. (R) — Roeper

STILL SHOWING "2 Guns" — A hot mess that's cool fun. Funny-ashellDenzelW ashingtonand Patrick Redmond / IFC Films/The Associated Press Mark Wahlberg are undercover lawmen Thure Lindhardt, left, Url Gavrlel, Gemma Arterton and Sam Riley star ln "Byzantium." posing as criminals to each other until they have to team upagainst common adversaries. With slick pacing and asharp contact 541-585-3333. McMenamins OldSt. Francis School in matters in the grand, rabidly schizoid if implausible script, "2 Guns" rises above scheme of things. Matt Damon stars as a standard action fare. Rating: Threestars. — Synopsis from Walt DisneyPictures Bend. Cost is $5. (no MPAArating) on dystopian 2154Earth trying 109 minutes. (R) —Roeper — Synopsis from the film's website criminal "Kick-Ass 2" — Kick-Ass, Hit Girl and to get to a utopian spacestation in one "The Conjuring" — "TheConjuring" is like a Red Mist return for the follow-up to 2010's "RiffTraxLive: Starship Troopers" of the most entertaining action films of prequel to 40years of demonic possession irreverent global hit. After Kick-Ass' (Aaron — Thanks to a successful Kickstarter the year. This film is available locally in thrillers, a movieabout the original ghost Taylor-Johnson) insane bravery inspires a campaign, RiffTrax Live returns to the big IMAX. Rating: Threeand ahalf stars. 109 hunters, Edand Lorraine Warren, and an new waveofself-mademasked crusaders, screen with a never-before-seen takeon minutes. (R) —Roeper early casethis "Amityville Horror" couple the king of modern sci-fi epics: "Starship led by Colonel Stars andStripes (Jim "Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters" — Any found so terrifying theynevertalkedabout it Troopers." This1997 giant-alien-bug war Carrey), our hero joins them on patrol. thoughts thatasecondPercyJackson — "until now!" JamesWan, who madehis When these amateur superheroes are flick is an adaptation of Robert Heinlein's horror boneswith "Saw" andoutgrewtorture classic1950's novel of the samename,but and the Olympians film would drag Rick hunted down by RedMist (Christopher Riordan's "Greek Godchildren" franchise porn with thesuperbly spooky "Insidious," Mintz-Plasse), only the blade-wielding Hit with bigger, juicier bugs. Thefilm is known out of the shadow of Harry Potter are reunites with his "Insidious" star Patrick for its groundbreaking visual effects, Girl (Chloe GraceMoretz) can prevent their dashed the moment Percy and his "halfWilson for this solid andsometimes hairincluding large-scale CG battle scenes with annihilation. This film opens locally Aug. blood" friends pile into a supernatural raising thriller about ahaunted house, the 16 with a fewearly screenings Thursday. menacing alien bug warriors. The event taxi in "Sea of Monsters." Thecab may be family of sevenhaunted by it. It conjures upa screens at 8 p.m.Thursday at Regal Old (R) driven bythe three haggling, wisecracking fewfrights, but"The Conjuring" is moresolid — Synopsis from the film's website Mill Stadium16 & IMAX in Bend.Cost is Graeae ofGreekmyth — blind womenwith than sensational andspine-tingling. Think $12.50. 120 minutes. (no MPAA rating) one eye between them —but it's a pure "Lost Angels: Skid Row is MyHome" of itas a horror history lesson, theoriginal — Synopsis from National CineMedia Potter picture moment. And with every — Narrated byCatherine Keener,the film "based onatrue story" to explain those magical creature that turns up, which one things that gobump inthe night. Rating: Two takes an uncompromising yet life-affirming of these half-human sons anddaughters look at the lives of eight remarkable and a half stars. 112minutes. (R) —Moore of Poseidon or Athenathen identifies individuals — peoplewho havefound a "Despicable Me 2" — There's afizzy WHAT'S NEW — "Look, it's a Hippocampii" "Oh noi way to make alife for themselves within silliness to "Despicable Me 2" that will It's a Charybdis!" — the comparisons to the community of homelessness. Thefilm make it a hugeword-of-mouth hit among "Byzantium" — "Byzantium" doesn't Harry & Co. grows. Thequest, which takes shows how their descent into society's key demographics. That would be 2-to breathe new life into the weary vampiresour heroes to the Sea of Monsters, aka basementhasbeen exacerbated bythe 6-year-olds, and parents whoenjoy seeing on-the-run/young-vampires-in-love The Bermuda Tri a ngle, is generic in the forces of gentrification and the increasing formulas. But Neil Jordan ("Interview with their kids curled into balls of uncontrollable extreme. The fights/escapes all lack any criminalization of homeless people, while laughter. Youneedto haveseenthe the Vampire,""The Crying Game") still sense of urgency and peril. Until they have exposing the draconian changes to the original 2010 comedy to get the most manages to return this sort of tale to the the guts to kill somebody, to give us areal mental health care system that have of this sequel. Luckily, a lot of people realm of adults, with the meatythemes sense that there's something truly at stake, out brought us here. Thisfilm is presented by and have."Despicable Me," Universal Studios' grim, gory violence that "Twilight" why should we invest in it? This film is the Justice Film Circle. The film screens at scrubbed out. Saoirse Ronan is our first venture into computer-animated available locally in 3-D. Rating: Two stars. 7 p.m. Tuesday at theVolcanic Theatre Pub heroine, the youngwomanwho narrates cartooning, was asmash. It offered a nifty 106 minutes. (PG) — Moore in Bend. Cost is a $5suggested donation. novelty, with a would-be supervillain as the tale in snippets of memoir that she "Planes" — Therearefunnier cartoons the central character. Gru (SteveCarell — Synopsis from the film's website writes and then throws away.Andwhat than the "Cars" universe of movies, and with a larynx-twisting Hungarian accent) young Eleanor remembers is her decades smarter ones andanimated films with "Reveal the Path" — "Reveal the was a perversely winning mashup of Dr. of travel with Clara (GemmaArterton), her Path" is a genre-defying adventure more heart. But there's nothing like the Seuss' Grinch andCharles Addams' Uncle ruthless and sexy protector. Clara is quick "World of 'Cars'" for toy tie-ins, or so the film that contemplates what it means Fester. The roster of grown-up characters to take up pole dancing or prostitution to to live an inspired life using the bicycle reasoning must havebeenfor "Planes," is smallerthan in the first outing to make help them make ends meet. And if things as a mechanism to explore, dreamand the worst of the animated blockbusters more room for the Minions' accidentget out of hand, if those stalking them get discover. Regions explored include to come our way this summer. A bland, prone antics and gobbledygook versions of too close, Clara is morethan willing to bite Scotland's lush valleys, Europe's snow joyless plucky-little-plane racecomedy, platinum-selling pop hits. It's all as bright capped mountains, Morocco's high desert and behead any threat to their survival. it's even more starved of jokes than Pixar's and bouncy as aroller-coaster ride. Pretty They're vampires.There'snotmuch new "Monsters University," as if that was landscapes, Nepal's rural countryside muchanygag thatwould gooverthe head here, but at least "Byzantium" has welland Alaska's rugged coastal beaches. possible. "Planes" is about a crop duster of a 7-year-old has beenremoved. Foran acted, compelling characterstelling its Ride along and get lost in the wonders of namedDusty (Dane Cook)who longsto adult, the predictability could turn you time-worn tale with style. That's the best the world. Filmed across four continents be more "than just what I was built for. I've blase. For kids, revisiting these jokes is a we can hopefor these days from this genre flown thousands of miles and I've never and featuring Tour Divide race legends, howl. Pinkie promise. Rating: Threestars. that will not die.Rating: Twoand a half Matthew Lee & Kurt Refsnider, this been anywhere." His elders (Cedric the 98 minutes. (PG) stars. 113 minutes. (R) — Moore immersive film is sure to ignite the Entertainer) might remind him that "You — Colin Covert, Minneapolis Star Tribune dream in you. Part of COTA Movie Night, "Elysium" — It's amazing howbadJodie were built for seed, not speed." But Dusty this film screens at 9 p.m.Thursday at Foster is in this movie, and how little it longsto escapePropwash Junction,and Continued next page


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

From previous page "Far Dut Isn't FarEnough:TheTomi Ungerer Story" —Fewartists are as far removed in personafrom the art that made them famous asTomi Ungerer, the French-born illustrator and writer came tofame inthe 1950s and '60s with award-winning children's picture books — "The Three Robbers," "One,TwoWhere's My Shoe?" "FlatStanley"and many others. But he had a sideline career — erotica. And once it became known that this beloved children's bookauthor — contemporary of Maurice SendakandJules Feiffer, and almost asfamous — hadwritten "The Underground Sketchbook" and the like, Americans in particular were shocked. Andhis kid-lit career fizzled out. "Far Out Isn't Far Enough" is an engaging documentary about this playful artist, his career andhis determination to go his ownway. Filmmaker Brad Bernstein reveals a survivor of the Germanoccupation of his Alsatian town (his own house barracked Germantroops), a hip artist who migrated to NewYork during the Golden Age of lllustration (the1950s) and conquered children's lit but was neversatisfied with the pablum that the medium seemedto demand. Bernstein usesanimation to spice up afairly routine artist's biography documentary. Like many such films, the subject seemsmore fascinating than "Far Out Isn't Far Enough's" treatment of him. Rating: Two and ahalf stars. 98 minutes. (no MPAA rating) —Moore "Fruitvale Station" —"Fruitvale Station" is a tragedy as fresh as today's headlines,asmovingas losingsomeone closetoyou.A re-telling of the last day in the life of Oscar Grant, ayoung black man gunned down by transit a cop in front of scores of witnesses inOakland on New Year's Day in2009, Ryan Coogler's often wrenching film begins with that death — captured on cel lphonevideo— andtakes us back through a life of hot-tempered blunders but compassionate potential, an ex-con who might have turned the corner just as it all came to anendfor him. Michael B. Jordan ("RedTails") is never less than riveting asOscar, and he has to be. Coogler's film is built on the mundane, routine actions of an ordinary NewYear's Eve. It touches on the myriad of accidental circumstances andunderlying causes that underpin anawful event like this one — alifetime of bad choices, wrong place/wrong time, racial profiling, high stress situations that spiral out of control and simple "testosterone poisoning." But Coogler and Jordan's greatest achievements are in humanizing a statistic, putting blemishes onan icon— Oscarandhiscasebecame notorious — andletting us grieve for the tragedy that happenedand the potential that was lost that fateful New Year's at Oakland's Fruitvale Station. Rating: Three stars. 90 minutes. (R) —Moore "GrownUps2" — Whatever comedicfires and bursts of genuinely inspired humor Adam Sandler once possessed haveburned outlong ago. Case in point: this toothless sequel, which presents a number of potential conflicts but doesn't have the energy to pursue any of them.Overthe last

' 4y/pg m~r' " > <)pt

e

I

Tracy Bennett/ Sony Columbia Pictures/The Associated Press

Saima Hayek and Adam Sandier star in "Grown Ups 2." 10 years, Sandler has headlined more terrible comedies thananyonein Hollywood. Youhaveto be REALLY successful to be able to keep churning out so manymediocrities over such a longperiod. Rating: One and a half stars. 101 minutes. (PG13) — Roeper "The Heat" —Onpaper (and in the ads), "The Heat" looks like ahighconcept pitch:acop-buddy movie, only the buddies are —wait for it — dames! Thegoodnews is this Sandra Bullock-Melissa McCarthy vehicle clicks on all cylinders. Thanks to standout performancesfrom the enormously appealing leads, excellent work from the supporting cast, a smart and brilliantlyfunny script by Katie Dippold and nimble direction from PaulFeig, this is oneof the most entertaining movies of the year. Rating: Threeand a half stars. 117 minutes. (R) —Roeper "The KingsofSummer" — ATV writer and anonline Funny or Dievet concocted this amusing, sentimental "Superbad" with less edge, ateen boys' fantasy, roughing it, impressing the girls and coming of age.For an R-rated teen comedy, "Kings of Summer" is anawfully nostalgic one, with old fashioned comic rituals (the boys take anoath to eachother, they turn an abandonedpipeline into a percussion instrument), an "Our Gang"/"Andy Griffith Show" style kids' construction project and parents who havethe sameproblems as their kids, but eventually realize it. "Kings"adds uptoasummer movie that staggers down thatfine line between sentimental and snarky, a tale of nature and nurture and first love that managesmore charm than any R-rated movie about horny teens has a right to. Rating: Three stars. 93 minutes. (R) —Moore "The LoneRanger" — In the unholy messthatis"The Lone Ranger,"we finally have amovie that combines the slapstick antics of a live-action "Road Runner" cartoon with a villain so bloodthirsty, he literally cuts out the heart of a vanquished foe and eats it. Everything that could go wrong with this movie does go wrong, from a rarebad performance from the great Johnny Depp, who playsTonto as acrazy desert vaudeville performer, to the decidedly unmemorable work from the promising talent Armie

Hammer as the title character, to a script that feels like somesort of mash-up of every attempt to reboot a storied franchise. Somefilms are for everyone. This film is for just about no one. Rating: Oneand a half stars. 149 minutes. (PG-13) —Roeper "Pacific Rim" —This ridiculously entertaining (and often just plain ridiculous) monster-robot movie plays like a gigantic version of that Rock'Em, Sock'EmRobots game from the1960s, combined with the cheesy wonderfulness of black-andwhite Japanesemonster movies from the1950s. Director Guillermo del Toro has aweirdly beautiful visual style, and there's rarely an uninteresting shot in "Pacific Rim." He and thecastdo afine job of selling this madness, evenasthe talk of neural bridges and other scientific claptrap grows increasingly denseand meaningless.Rating: Three stars.131 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper "RED 2" —Thejoy of "RED" was seeing a cast packed with Oscar winners (Helen Mirren, Morgan Freeman, Richard Dreyfuss, Ernest Borgnine) andvery good actors (John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker, Brian Coxand Karl Urban) flesh out and class up aBruce Willis action film. "Codgers makethe coolest killers" was its motto. And if anything, this "Retired, Extremely Dangerous" sequelupsthe ante. There's a newacronym — "ICE: Incarcerated, Cannot Execute." They've replaced killed-off Oscar winners with Anthony Hopkins asan addled old scientist and Catherine Zeta-Jones as aRussian agent and one-time lady love of Frank's. And the change in directors to comedyspecialist DeanParisot ("Galaxy Quest") means there's a laugha minute amid all this mayhem. It's all ground we've sort of covered before and things do tend to dragbefore the too-violent third act turns too-bloody. But "RED 2"goesdown easily, from Malkovich's demented moments of relationship advice to DameHelen's tender and amusing "Hitchcock" reunion with Sir Anthony. There's a knowing twinkle in their eyes, andin everybody else's. Rating: Twoand a half stars. 108 minutes. (PG-13) — Moore "R.I.P.D."— Jeff Bridges collects a big paycheckbut burns through a

GO! MAGAZ!NE PAGE 29 good chunk of his reservoir of Oscarwinning good will with "R.I.P.D.," the worst comic bookadaptation since "JonahHex." I'd say hedrags Ryan Reynolds down with him, but Reynolds is anold hand at mediocre movies adapted from that medium.As Nick, he's a blandand generic Boston cop — morally tested bytemptation, murdered by his immoral partner (Kevin Bacon). It's Bridges, doing a sort of Wild Bill-Rooster Cogburnby-way-of -TheDude,whosticks his neck out. And asfaintly amusing and reminiscent of TommyLeeJones' "Men in Black" turn as this might be, there's no waythese two smart guys didn't see this was piffle on the page. Whatever "RED"and "Flightplan" director Robert Schwentke might have promised, this is a movie with no depth, no intellectual heft and zero ambition. There's not an original thought, action, character or situation in between thebig, expensiveand generic effects. Rating: Oneand ahalf stars. 95 minutes.(PG-13) — Moore "The Smurfs 2" —Getyourself into a Smurfy frame of mind, hum afew notes of "The Smurf Song" and try to remember your cartoon-watching primary school years. Cross your fingers that actors Neil Patrick Harris, Hank Azaria, JaymaMays and Brendan Gleesonwill find something funny to do. Nevermind. Filled with Smurf wholesomeness, Smurf puns andposi-Smurfmessagesabout never giving up "on family," "The Smurfs 2" still sucks Smurfberries. There are five credited writers in this retread, and the best line sounds as if it was improvised by Lopez,as Grouchy Smurf: "Every time aSmurf toots, somebody smiles."Thepuns

are feebler ("I was Meryl Smurfing Streep in there!"), the animation passable, the special effects quite good and the 3-Dutterly pointless. But if your tiny-tyke target audience has to seesomething, at least it's harmless. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Oneand a half stars. 95 minutes.(PG) —Moore "Star TrekIntoDarkness" — Director J.J. Abrams is atrue talent, and he's also apop-culture savant who has great respect for the legacy of this franchise aswell as a keen understanding of the mega-importance of box-office figures. There's no better choice to make the best, the purest ANDthe most accessible big-budget"Star Trek" movie possible. Yetwith all the futuristic splendor and fine performances, "Into Darkness" only occasionally soars, mostly settling for being a solid but unspectacular effort that sets the stage for the next chapter(s). With Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Benedict Cumberbatch. Rating: Three stars. 132 minutes. (PG-13) —Roeper "Turbo" —In animation shorthand, "Turbo" is "'Cars' with snails." It's light on the jokes, but cute, with animation so vivid it looks photo-real. It's another "impossible dream" tale, this time of a motorhead mollusk who has a need for "terrifying, blinding speed." Theo (Ryan Reynolds) is an auto-racing obsessed garden snail who longs to escape his colony of tomato-munchers. The situations are more amusing than the dialogue.

rX CD

rb rb

rb 0

0 Ol

( d

z I e ®

Continued Page 31

goW •

3

OPI

0

Z N

Z

II CJI GO QO ~

B R E W I N G F OOD W IT H A

SO UTH W E S T F L A I R

M Q () CL

a I A CALLING ALL RIVER RATS, TRAIL RATS, DIRT RATS, GYM RATS, TECH RATS, MALL RATS AND OF C RSE ... MICRO BREW RATS!

0 C

384 SW UPPER TERRACE DR., SUITE,l08, BEND

w ww.

a t H o e i e w u .C o m

Z

E


movies

PAGE 30. GO! MAGAZINE

. ~,. +epq < ~gg 1aA 0@ s

NEW D V D B LU- R A Y R EL E A S E S The following movies were released the

week of Aug. 6.

o

s

( t

f i

4

'jyi i gji r 'i ' i j~< i (

Publishes in The,Bul)etin Whdnes'day,' August 14th

e u eti

Serving Central Oregon since 1903

( ~~

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

"Mud" — Perhaps themost remarkable thing about "Mud" isthat its main character — its namesake, no less — could fully not even exist and this still could easily be agreat movie. And that isn't a slamagainst Mud (Matthew McConaughey), whom two boys(TyeSheridan andJacob LoflandasEllisand Neckbone, respectively) discover plundering and hiding inside an abandonedboat they groundlessly believed wastheir boat alone to plunder. Mud isn't hiding by accident. But there's a reason he can't just run away,andthat reason's name is Juniper (ReeseWitherspoon). There's more to it than that, but it's a messy predicament overall, and perhaps it's justifiably messy. But to a point, all we know about Mud is the story as he chooses to tell it, and "Mud" deftly blurs every moral line on thepaper in such away that it's perfectly acceptable to take it on faith that he's telling it straight (or at least straight enough). In part, that's becausethis feels like a story about Neckbone andespecially Ellis more than it is a story about Mud. Though "Mud" doesn't play its audience for fools, it still is through Ellis's eyes that the movie shapes its narrative. And while our titular might-be hero is the movie's most charismatic force, it's the kid who buys into that charisma — andall the stories about him that "Mud" weaves through this main thread —that ultimately make this one special. DVDand Blu-ray Extras: Four featurettes andaudio commentary. This film was not given astar rating. 130 minutes. (PG-13) — Billy O'Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune NewsService "Oblivion" — An extremely well-crafted, at times engrossing but ultimately standardissue futuristic epic with some big ideas and spiritual touches separated bysomevery loud and explosive chasescenes, high-powered gunbattlesandevensome goodold-fashioned hand-to-hand combat involving TomCruise. It's the sci-fi movie equivalent of a pretty darn good cover band.You're not getting the real deal, but you're getting a medley of hits performed by some talented artists who clearly have great affection for the original material. DVDExtras: Three featurettes, deleted scenesandaudio commentary; Blu-ray Extras: Three additional featurettes. Rating: Three stars. 126 minutes. (PG-13) —Roeper "On the Road" — Thestench of cliche is powerful and never easily dissipated, and once it ensnares "On the Road" into its clutches, all the pretty and thoughtful details in the world aren't enough to set it as free as it wants its audience to believe it is. Based on the1957 Jack Kerouac novel ofthesamename,"Road" is the story of Sal Paradise (SamRiley), a writer whose life gets upended andturned into a cross-county journey of self-discovery with the help of some free-spirited new friends (Garrett Hedlund, Kristen Stewart, Tom Sturridge, Danny Morgan) who just want to wring free every last drop of vitality and excitement the wet dish towel of life has to offer."Road"makes no bones aboutthis. Really, it cannot shut up about it as it constantly hurtles its characters into speeches about how exciting the world is and how badly they want to experience it on their own terms and live life to

Submitted photo

Tom Cruise stars in the sci-fi thriller "Oblivion." the fullest."Road's" palpable, verbal yearning is so relentless early on that its characters often cease being characters and form instead into a Voltron-esque vessel for that yearning. The desire to be different and exciting is so overt that "Road" emerges as dull and derivative — yetanother road trip/period piece/memoir that confuses tense andawkwardly positions its characters as nostalgic for a moment that hasn't yet happenedandmaynever happen. Emotions eventually level out and "Road" rallies with regard to character development and storytelling that better reconciles itself with the exciting world around it. But even then, "Road" wants to be profound in away it simply hasn't earned the wisdom and right to be. Amy Adams, Elisabeth Moss, Alice Bragaand Viggo Mortensen, among others, also star. DVDand Blu-ray Extras were not listed for this film. "On the Road" was not given a star rating. 124 minutes. (R) — Billy O'Keefe,McCtatchy-TnbuneNewsService "The Place BeyondThe Pines" — Shaking up the cinematic doldrums of early spring, "The Place Beyond thePines" is aself-confident, selfaware, almost cocky piece of filmmaking from the immensely gifted DerekCianfrance. It is an epicfilm centered on pivotal moments in the lives of working-class and fringe-society types who wake up every morningandgoto bedeach night with the samequestion hanging over their heads: How are they goingto makeendsmeet?The music, the cinematography, theacting choices, the daring plot leaps —not asingle element is timid or safe. There aresmall coincidences with huge consequences, ascharacters struggle to escape their past, to change their seemingly inevitable fates. DVDand Blu-ray Extras were not listed for this film. Rating: Four stars. 140 minutes. (R) —Roeper ALSO THISWEEK:"The Sapphires," "To the Wonder" and "West of Memphis" COMINGUP: Movies scheduled for national release Aug. 13 include "ABand Called Death," "TheBigW edding""TheCompany You Keep" "Emperor," "Olympus HasFallen" and "What Maisie Knew." — "OI/Oand Blu-ray Extras" from wir eandonlinesources

O

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate •

••

Thenul e tin


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

From Page 29 And as vivid as the race scenes are — zooming over, through and under lndy cars — if we want to watch photo-real auto-racing we can turn on the TV. Sowhile small children may beenchanted by this little gastropod that could, adults will be more sorely tested. For all the horsepower "Turbo" boasts about, the movie tendstoward the sluggish — as in "slow as a slug." Rating: Two and a half stars. (PG) —Moore "The Wall" — AnAustrian woman vacationing in theAlpsfinds herself inexplicably cut off from therest of the world by aninvisible, impenetrable wall and must survive onher ownin this adaptation of theMarlen Haushofer novel. With Martina Gedeck,Wolfganf M. Bauerand Ulrike Beimpold. Written and directed byJulian RomanPolsler. In English andGerman,with English subtitles. A review ofthis film wasnot available.108 minutes. (noMPAArating) — Synopsis from LosAngeles Times "The WayWayBack" — "The Way Way Back" is asemi-nostalgic comingof-age dramedyfrom thefolks who wrote "The Descendants." It's about a shy, put upon lad, his long-suffering mother, the mom's difficult new beau and the vacation where alot of these issuescome toa head."TheWayW ay Back" tries too hard to beall things to all audiences — kids learning about love and life, adults seeing themselves, boozily nostalgic for their youth. But the performancesandthe readysupply of one-liners make this an amusing look at a newgeneration getting lost downmemory lane. Rating: Three stars. 103 minutes. (PG-13) —Moore "The Wolverine" — Dramatically ambitious and deliberately paced, "The Wolverine" is one of thebetter comicbook movies of 2013, thanks in large part to an electric performance by HughJackman asthenewlyvulnerable mutant. Rating: Three stars.126 minutes.(PG-13) — Roeper "World War Z" — If you're aszombie'd outas Iam by now,andyoufeel"The Walking Dead"cable TVseries has set the all-time standard for popular culture entertainment about the fleshchomping undead,your reluctance to see "World War Z" is understandable. All I can tell you is, there's fresh blood here. "World War Z" traffics in a lot offamiliarterritory, but thankstothe wickedly vibrant sourcematerial (Max Brooks'2006 horror novel), someslick and darklyfunny directorial choices by Marc Forster andterrific performances from Brad Pitt and thesupporting cast, it's entertaining as hell. Rating: Three and a half stars.116 minutes. (PG-13) — Roeper

TV SHOW

SCREENINGS "Breaking Bad" — AMC'sEmmy Award-winning drama returns for its final eight episodes. Theseries explores how afatal diagnosis releases atypical man from the daily concerns and constraints of normal society and follows Walter White's (Bryan Cranston) transformation from mild family man to akingpin of the drug trade. Fans cancatch a screening at 6 p.m. Sunday at theVolcanic Theatre Pub in Bend.Cost is free. — Synopsis from AMCwebsite

GO! MAGAZINE PAGE 31

T I M E S • FOr theZveekof Aug.9

MO V I E

• There may be an additional fee for 3-D and IMAXmovies. • Movie times are subj ect to changeafter press time.

• Accessibility devices are available for some movies at RegalOld Mill Stadium16 tl IMAX.

EVERGREEN

In-Home Care Servlces

Care for loved ones. Comfort for an.

I

I

541-389-OOOG www.evergreeninhome.rom

I

Regal Old Mill Stadium16 8 IMAX, 680S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347 • 2 GUNS (R) Fri-Thu: 1, 3:45, 7:30, 10:05 • THE CONJURING (R) Fri-Thu: 1:05, 4:10, 7:45, 10:20 • DESPICABLE ME2 (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:20 a.m., 2:10, 6:20, 9:05 • ELYSIUM (R) Fri-Thu: 12:25, 3:05, 6:35, 9:30 • ELYSIUM IMAX (R) Fri-Thu: 12:45, 4:05, 7, 9:45 • ERICCLAPTON'S CROSSROADS GUITAR FESTIVAL 2013 (no MPAArating) Tue: 7:30 • GROWN UPS 2 (PG-13) Fri-Mon, Wed: 12:35, 3:35, 7:35, 10:10 Tue, Thu:12:35,3:35 • THE HEAT (R) Fri-Thu: 12:10, 3, 6:10, 9:20 • PACIFIC RIM (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 7:10, 10:10 • PERCY JACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 6:05, 9:15 • PERCY JACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:05, 2:45, 6:45 • PLANES (PG) Fri-Thu:11:15 a.m.,1:35, 3:55, 6:25, 9 • PLANES 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:35 • RED 2 (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:50, 3:30, 7:15, 9:55 • RIFFTRAX LIVE: STARSHIP TROOPERS (no MPAArating) Thu:8 • R.I.P.D. (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 10:25 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 6 • THE SMURFS 23-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 9:10 • TURBO (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:20 • WE'RE THE MILLERS (R) Fri-Thu: 12:15, 2:55, 6:50, 7:50, 9:35, IO:25 • THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:55 a.m., 3:15, 7:20, 10:15 I

'

I

Regal Pilot Butte 6, 2717 N.E.U.S.Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347 • FRUITVALE STATION (R) Fri-Sat: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 8:35 Sun-Thu: 1, 4, 7 • THE KINGS OF SUMMER (R) Fri-Sat: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 8:50 Sun-Thu: 1:15, 4:15, 7 • THE LONE RANGER(PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:30 a.m., 2:30, 5:30, 8:30 Sun-Thu: Noon, 3, 6 • STAR TREK INTODARKNESS(PG-13) Fri-Sat: Noon, 3, 6, 8:45 Sun-Thu: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 • THE WAY WAYBACK(PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9 Sun-Thu: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 • WORLD WAR (PG-13) Z Fri-Sat: 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 5:45, 8:25 Sun-Thu: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 I

t

McMenamins OldSt. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562 • THE BLING RING (R) Fri-Wed: 9:15 • MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G) Sat-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2:30 Wed: 3

icrowaves

Close-out Pricesl while inventory lasts! $ HNSON -APPLIANCE

SROTHERS

johnsonbrotherstvcom 5

I All

WILSONS ofRedmond Disney Pixar/The Associated Press

Mike (voiced by Billy Crystal) studies up for his next class in "Monsters University." • STAR TREK INTODARKNESS(PG-13) Fri-Thu: 6 • "RevealthePath"screensat9p.m. Thursday. • After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21mayattend screenings before 7pm ifaccompaniedbyalegal guardian. I

• t

I

Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W.Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271 • BYZANTIUM (R) Fri: 9:15 Sat: 4:30, 9: l5 Sun: 7:15 Mon-Thu: 7:45 • FAR OUTISN'TFAR ENOUGH: THE TOMI UNGERER STORY(no MPAArating) Fri, Sun:3 Sat: 2:30 • THE WALL (no MPAA rating) Fri, Sun:5 Sat:7 Mon-Thu: 5:30 I

I

I

Redmond Cinemas,1535 S.W.Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777 • KICK-ASS 2 (R) Thu:9 • PERCY JACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS (PG) Fri-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 Mon-Thu: 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 • PLANES (PG) Fri-Sun: 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 Mon-Thu: 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG) Fri-Sun: Noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 Mon-Wed: 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 Thu: 2:15, 4:30, 6:45 • WE'RE THE MILLERS (R) Fri-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Mon-Thu: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Sisters Movie House,720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800 • 2 GUNS (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:45, 8 Sat-Sun: 3:30, 5:45, 8

7

• ELYSIUM (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5: I5, 7:45 Sat-Sun: 3, 5: l5, 7:45 • PLANES (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5, 7:15 Sat-Sun: 2:45, 5, 7: l5 • RED 2 (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 7:30 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:15 Sat-Sun: 3, 5:15

MXtTREss

G allery- B e n d 541-330-5084

SAVE $50 Dr $100 Per unit On SeleCt mOtariZed

Madras Cinema 5,1101S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505 • 2 GUNS (R) Fri-Thu: Noon, 2:15, 4:30, 7, 9:20 • ELYSIUM (R) Fri-Thu: 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40 • PERCY JACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:50 a.m., 4:25, 6:40 • PERCY JACKSON:SEAOF MONSTERS 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 2:10, 9:05 • PLANES (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:50, 2:50, 4:50, 6:50, 9 • THE SMURFS 2 (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:10, 9:35 •

541-548-2066 Adjustable Beds

Pine Theater, 214 N.Main St., Prineville, 541-416- I 014 • PERCY JACKSON: SEAOF MONSTERS (UPSTAIRS —PG) Fri-Sun:1,4,7 • PLANES (PG) Fri-Sun: 12:45, 3, 5:10, 7:30 • The upstairs screening room has limited accessibility. • As of press time, complete movie times for Monday through Thursdaywere unavailable. Visit www pinetheatercom for moreinformation.

Hunter Douglas products With POWerRISBI

dya g4ASSIP COVERINGS

541-388-4418 www.classic-coverings.com

"++**" -GloediP ooig. CL5AIDAY

IJgl'' ,

r'n

, 'jg4 ' If'Rt 4P ~

'ie'

Find Your Dream Home

in Real Estate

"j'„I-"'-gAg " K EXC LUSIVEENGAG EMENT I<No

.

• S TheBulletin

NOW PLAYING(8()O)FANDANGO¹311


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

WE'!IEGIVI!I!GAWAY M AGAZ I N E

T ICK E T S

LES SI:BIBB B

E

PHITHE aICI N

D ~

0

R

E

G 0

N

ONLY INTHE BULLETIN'S GO!MAGAZINE

Sid&~~% K~W~~WW 4 4 PORTION OF PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE EDUCATION FOUNDATION FOR BEND-LAPINE SCHOOLS

S RTURD R Y

RUGUST 31 This summer your ticket to the season's best concerts may be inside your GOI MAGAZINE. Look for it every Friday in The Bulletin.

STEVE MARTIN P Q~ IIIrNw,ed~

Make sure you get a copy of The Bulletin every Friday for your chance to WIN!

LOS LOBOS& LOS LO HELVBOVS

Any Friday GO! Magazine can hold a winning ticket! Look inside home delivery, store

SRTURDRY SEPTEMBER 7

W IN C TI KETSFQRTHECQNCERT QFYQURCHQICE!

FRI D R Y ocTQBER 4

copies andracks throughout Central Oregon!Winners receivetwo concert tickets. Golden tickets must be redeemed a minimum of1 day prior to the concert of your

choice. Goldentickets are only good during the 2013Concert Series. Goldentickets

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL:

541-385-5800

must be redeemed at the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District, Mon — Sat10-6, Sun11-5.

Original GoldenTicket must bepresented. GoldenTickets havenocash value. BROUGHT TOYOU BY:

iii

The Bulletin bendbulletin.com Id!IIrolOLD MILL DIsTRIcT FQR THE LATEsT GQNGERT INFQvlslT WWW.bendCOnCertS.COm


Bulletin Daily Paper 8-9-13  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday August 9, 2013

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you