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INSIDE TODAY’S PAPER H I G H

Cover story

Acupuncture: Get your ‘qi’ on; it’s now mainstream

When is one sport too much?

D E S E R T

PULSE Healthy Living in Central Oregon

Healthy eating: Portion control tips, right at your fingertips Profile: Bend’s world-class running king

Branching out, state plans Sisters car-charging station By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

An electric vehicle charging station to be installed in Sisters next year marks the start of Oregon’s eastward push with electric freeways.

The state is preparing to place 22 charging stations for electric cars across Oregon through a $2 million federal grant. The project specifically looks to branch out from Interstate 5, which currently has an abundance of charging

stations between Portland and Ashland. The Sisters station, currently being considered for two locations in town, will be one of the easternmost locations. Hood River will also receive a station

along Interstate 84. The Sisters station will be the only one the state will install in Central Oregon. The town was chosen over Bend and Redmond primarily due to distance. See Electric / A7

• Classroom cuts: Deschutes County’s juvenile detention center trims and consolidates

CROOK COUNTY

Schools aim young to teach English By Duffie Taylor The Bulletin

In a state Department of Education report released Tuesday, Crook County was the only Central Oregon school district to meet federal and state standards for students in English Language Development programs. Cathy Fall, an English language development teacher at Ochoco Elementary School, said the district’s success in this area has a lot to do with a push made by the district in 2006 to emphasize English proficiency in its youngest students. Currently, Fall said, the district has about 100 English language learners, or ELL students, most of whom attend Ochoco Elementary. That number has shrunk in recent years due to a large number of students becoming proficient in English and leaving the program. “We’re exiting students at a faster rate than we’re entering them into the program,” Fall said. Since 2006, the school has placed certified ELD teachers at the school, whereas before they were only present at middle and high school levels. “Since we were able to make that change, that’s when we really started improving,” she said. See English / A5

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

A classroom sits empty at the Deschutes County juvenile detention center, where managers consolidated two classes into one to deal with a funding cut that forced a reduction in teacher hours.

Amid grand resorts, a town ski hill suffers By Kirk Johnson New York Times News Service

Where the routine is key By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Earlier this year, Deschutes County’s juvenile detention center faced a large cut in education funding. School runs year-round at the Bend facility, and one way to absorb the cut would be to cancel classes for two months. Managers didn’t want to do that, and with the help of teachers and staff, they came up with a way to preserve class time and make the

daily routine a bit more normal for young offenders. The state cut spending on education for incarcerated youths by 25 percent in the current two-year budget to help close a budget shortfall, according to the Oregon Department of Education. By contrast, the state school fund budget remained flat and the Department of Education’s operations budget was cut 5.8 percent, said Crystal Greene, public affairs manager for the department.

In Deschutes County, the cuts are even worse than those statewide. Education funding for the local juvenile detention center was cut by 44 percent, and two teachers who instruct juvenile offenders were reduced to part-time in July. In response, managers at the detention center combined two classes into one and moved the classroom to a different cell unit, so youths have to leave their living units each day to attend school. See Juvenile / A5

JACKSON, Wyo. — The ski slope that rises up the mountain just off downtown, called Snow King, dates from the 1930s, when this corner of the West all but folded up in winter, isolated and dark, and local people needed something to do. Getting rich from the snows that fall early and deep on the edge of the Teton Range in western Wyoming did not factor in. “It was never meant to make money,” said Bill Ashley, 89, who owned and ran the Snow King ski school for many years and met his wife, Mary, at the top of the mountain in the early 1950s. “It was meant to be for the town.” The big ski areas that came later — Jackson Hole Mountain Resort and Grand Targhee — made winter tourism big business and Jackson Hole a winter destination. See Ski hills / A7

A world that is aging, sluggish and stubborn By David Leonhardt New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — With struggling Greece just agreeing to form a government to try to en-

force harsh austerity ANALYSIS then a couple of steps measures onto a weary backward. Washington, public, Europe is in usual meanwhile, is hoping form, taking a couple of steps to- that the latest deficit-reduction ward solving its fiscal crisis and committee in Congress can suc-

ceed where others have failed. This cycle of bureaucracy and gridlock has been repeating itself for months now. See Economy / A4

David Swift / New York Times News Service

A ticket office at the base of Wyoming Snow King Mountain, which dates from the 1930s.

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Correction Stories headlined “Oregon’s a hot spot for energy potential” and “Newberry drilling: Not the same risks as ‘fracking,’” which appeared Sunday, Nov. 6, on Page A1, gave an incorrect location for geothermal experimentation by Seattle-based AltaRock Energy, Inc. The project is on Deschutes National Forest land adjacent to Newberry National Volcanic Monument. The Bulletin regrets the error.

TOP NEWS GREECE: PM, opposition reach power-sharing deal, A3 IRAN: U.S. deferring to nuclear inspectors, A3


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

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Fatty foods’ addictive powers subject of growing research efforts

It’s Monday, Nov. 7, the 311th day of 2011. There are 54 days left in the year.

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By Robert Langreth and Duane D. Stanford Bloomberg News

Cupcakes may be addictive, just like cocaine. A growing body of medical research at leading universities and government laboratories suggests that processed foods and sugary drinks made by the likes of PepsiCo and Kraft Foods aren’t simply unhealthy. They can hijack the brain in ways that resemble addictions to cocaine, nicotine and other drugs. “The data is so overwhelming the field has to accept it,” said Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). “We are finding tremendous overlap between drugs in the brain and food in the brain.” The idea that food may be addictive was barely on scientists’ radar a decade ago. Now the field is heating up. Lab studies have found that sugary drinks and fatty foods can produce addictive behavior in animals. Brain scans of obese people and compulsive eaters, meanwhile, reveal disturbances in brain reward circuits similar to those experienced by drug abusers. Food company executives and lobbyists are quick to counter that nothing has been proven, that nothing is wrong with what PepsiCo Chief Executive Officer Indra Nooyi calls “funfor-you” foods, if eaten in moderation. If fatty foods and snacks and drinks sweetened with sugar and high fructose corn syrup are proven to be addictive, food companies may face the most drawn-out consumer safety battle since the anti-smoking movement took on the tobacco industry a generation ago. “This could change the legal landscape,” said Kelly Brownell, director of Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and a proponent of anti-obesity regulation. “People knew for a long time cigarettes

HAPPENINGS • Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou and conservative opposition head Antonis Samaras meet as part of a power-sharing deal to discuss who will become prime minister and the makeup of the Cabinet. A3 • Eurozone finance ministers meet in Brussels. • A report is released stating that nearly half of seventh- to 12th-graders experienced sexual harassment in the last school year. • Former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney returns to campaign in Iowa. • A suicide bomber detonates his explosives as a former government official greets others outside a mosque in northwestern Pakistan, killing the official and his guard, police say. • Venezuelan Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, better known as Carlos the Jackal and already serving a life sentence, stands trial for a series of bombings he is accused of orchestrating in France in the early 1980s.

The Associated Press file photo

Twenty-eight scientific studies and papers on food addiction have been published this year, according to a National Library of Medicine database.

were killing people, but it was only later they learned about nicotine and the intentional manipulation of it.” Twenty-eight scientific studies and papers on food addiction have been published this year, according to a National Library of Medicine database. As the evidence expands, the science of addiction could become a game changer for the $1 trillion food and beverage industries. A sampling of studies on the topic: • In one 2010 study, scientists at Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Fla., fed rats an array of fatty and sugary products including Hormel Foods bacon, Sara Lee pound cake, The Cheesecake Factory cheesecake and Pillsbury Creamy Supreme cake frosting. The rats that had access to these foods for one hour a day started binge eating, even when more nutritious food was available all day long. Other groups of rats that had access to the sweets and fatty foods for 18 to 23 hours per day became obese, Paul Kenny, the Scripps scientist heading the study wrote in the journal Nature

Neuroscience. The results produced the same brain pattern that occurs with escalating intake of cocaine, he wrote. • In one 2010 study conducted by researchers at the University of Texas in Austin and the Oregon Research Institute, a nonprofit group that studies human behavior, 26 overweight young women were given magnetic resonance imaging scans as they got sips of a milkshake made with Haagen-Dazs ice cream and Hershey’s chocolate syrup. The same women got repeat MRI scans six months later. Those who had gained weight showed reduced activity in the striatum, a region of the brain that registers reward, when they sipped milkshakes the second time, according to the study results, published last year in the Journal of Neuroscience. • A 2007 French experiment stunned researchers when it showed that rats prefer water sweetened with saccharine or sugar to hits of cocaine, exactly the opposite of what existing dogma would have suggested.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1911, Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, eight years after winning the Nobel Prize in Physics with her late husband, Pierre. In 1917, Russia’s Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky. Ten years ago: The Bush administration targeted Osama bin Laden’s multimillion-dollar financial networks, closing businesses in four states, detaining U.S. suspects and urging allies to help choke off money supplies in 40 nations. Five years ago: Democrats won control of the House and Senate, riding a wave of anger over the Iraq war and congressional scandals. One year ago: Scientists at the world’s largest atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, recreated the state of matter shortly after the Big Bang using collisions of lead ions.

BIRTHDAYS Evangelist Billy Graham is 93. Singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell is 68. CIA Director David Petraeus is 59. Rock musician Tommy Thayer (KISS) is 51. Rock musician Zach Myers (Shinedown) is 28. — From wire reports

DISCOVERY RUSSIA

ALASKA

150 km 150 miles

Bering Sea

Bristol Bay

Restless volcano Mount Cleveland s land Aleutian Is

Adak Atka Source: ESRI

Chuginidak Pacific Island Ocean

NMLS ID: 590587

NMLS ID: 590578

NMLS ID: 257721

NMLS ID: 590624

© 2011 MCT

In Earth’s far reaches, a better volcano alert By Casey Grove McClatchy-Tribune News Service

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Lightning flashes through a cloud of ash pouring out of a remote Alaskan volcano. A radio signal from the electrical discharge travels thousands of miles in milliseconds and gets picked up by dozens of antennas. A computer sends an alert to volcano researchers. The volcanologists warn pilots, and a plane traveling from Anchorage to Asia — with engines that will be choked out by the ash — steers clear of the plume. It’s a disaster averted. At least, that’s the theory, said Stephen McNutt, a research professor with the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the University of Alaska Fairbanks. McNutt says lightning detection might be the best way to confirm an explosive eruption at distant locations that lack better instruments. That would include Mount Cleveland, a volcano on an Aleutian island about 940 miles southwest of Anchorage and close enough to international air shipping routes to make pilots and volcanologists nervous. During its most recent unrest, lava has oozed inside Cleveland’s crater since July, suggesting a possible explosive eruption to come, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory. A growing lava dome reached the crater’s rim last month. So far, it

has apparently not toppled over the edge, increasing the possibility of an explosion, the observatory said. Unlike Redoubt Volcano, which is much closer to population centers and most recently erupted in 2009 after months of rumbling, Cleveland has no instruments like seismometers and microphones, used to sense magma moving within the volcano. Without seismometers on the volcano to feel its inner rumblings, the observatory said it might take hours for satellites to detect ash from an eruption. So for the last week or two, volcanologists have been using a global network of lightning sensors operated by the University of Washington to keep tabs on Cleveland, McNutt said. The network is composed of more than 50 sensors around the world that can pick up signals from most large lightning strikes, said network director Robert Holzworth. More recently, the network has been used to specifically monitor volcanoes, he said. It’s currently monitoring 262 volcanoes circling the Pacific Ocean, including Cleveland, for the Alaska Volcano Observatory, Holzworth said. Scientists like McNutt are still studying the effectiveness of using the system to detect eruptions, as well as the causes of volcanic lightning, Holzworth said.

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

T S Greek PM, opposition reach power-sharing deal By Elena Becatoros and Demetris Nellas The Associated Press

ATHENS, Greece — Greece’s embattled prime minister and main opposition leader agreed Sunday to form an interim government to ensure the country’s new European debt deal, capping a week of political turmoil that saw Greece face a catastrophic default that threatened its euro membership and roiled international markets. As part of the deal, Prime Minister George Papandreou agreed to step down halfway through his four-year term. He and conservative opposition head Antonis Samaras are to meet today to discuss

who will become prime minister and the makeup of the Cabinet. The new unity government’s main task will be to pass the European rescue package, reached after marathon negotiations between European leaders barely a week ago — a move considered crucial to shoring up the euro. The interim government will then lead the country into early elections, expected early next year. Officials had been anxious to reach some form of agreement before a meeting of eurozone finance ministers in Brussels today. “Of course it’s a breakthrough,” government spokes-

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man Elias Mossialos said. “It is a historical day for Greece, we will have a coalition government very soon, early next week. The prime minister and the leader of the opposition will discuss tomorrow the name of the new prime minister and the names of ministers.” Papandreou sparked the latest crisis by announcing last week that he was taking the hard-fought debt agreement to a referendum. That outraged European leaders, who said such a vote could raise the specter of Athens leaving the common currency — setting off an unpredictable chain reaction that could drag down other European countries.

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Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou, arriving for a cabinet meeting Sunday at the parliament in Athens, agreed to step down as part of a deal with the opposition.

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Wall Street’s comeback frustrates its claims, and Obama’s

U.S. hangs back as nuke inspectors prepare Iran report By David E. Sanger and William J. Broad New York Times News Service

By Zachary A. Goldfarb The Washington Post

President Barack Obama has called people who work on Wall Street “fat-cat bankers,” and his re-election campaign has sought to harness public frustration with Wall Street. Financial executives retort that the president’s pursuit of regulations is punitive and new rules may be “holding us back.” But both sides face an inconvenient fact: During Obama’s tenure, Wall Street has roared back, even as the broader economy has struggled. The largest banks are larger than they were when Obama took office and are nearing the level of profits they were making before the depths of the financial crisis in 2008, according to government data. Wall Street firms — independent companies and the securities-trading arms of banks — are doing even better. They earned more in the first 21⁄2 years of the Obama administration than they did during the eight years of the George W. Bush administration, industry data show. Behind this turnaround, in significant measure, are government policies that helped the financial sector avert collapse and then gave financial firms huge benefits on the path to recovery. For example, the federal government invested hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars in banks — low-cost money that the firms used for high-yielding investments on which they made big profits. Stabilizing the financial system was considered necessary to prevent an even deeper economic recession. But some critics say the Bush administration, which first moved to bail out Wall Street, and the Obama administration, which ultimately stabilized it, took a far less aggressive approach to helping the American people.

An imminent report by U.N. weapons inspectors includes the strongest evidence yet that Iran has worked in recent years on a kind of sophisticated explosives technology that is primarily used to trigger a nuclear weapon, according to Western officials who have been briefed on the intelligence. But the case is hardly conclusive. Iran’s restrictions on inspectors have muddied the picture. And however suggestive the evidence about what the International Atomic Energy Agency calls “possible military dimensions” of Iran’s program turns out to be, the only sure bet is that the mix of sleuthing, logic and intuition by nuclear investigators will be endlessly compared with the U.S. intelligence agencies’ huge mistakes in Iraq in 2003. Just as it was eight years ago, the IAEA, which was conceived as a purely technical organization insulated from politics, is about to

be sucked into the political whirlpool about how the world should respond to murky weapons intelligence. Except this time everything is backward: It is the IAEA, which punched holes in the Bush administration’s claims about Iraq’s nuclear progress, that today is escalating the case that Iran has resumed work on bomb-related technology, after years of frustration over questions that have gone unanswered by Iran. For its part, the Obama administration, acutely aware of how what happened in Iraq undercut U.S. credibility, is deliberately taking a back seat, eager to make the conclusions appear to be entirely the IAEA’s, even as it continues to press for more international sanctions against Iran. When the director of the agency, Yukia Amano, came to the White House 11 days ago to meet top officials of the National Security Council about the coming report, the administration declined to even confirm he had ever walked into the building.

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Early count: Ortega ahead in Nicaragua The Associated Press MANAGUA, Nicaragua — Election officials say president and former Sandinista revolutionary Daniel Ortega is winning big in Nicaragua’s presidential election. Nicaragua’s Supreme Electoral Council says Ortega has nearly 64 percent of the votes, compared to 29 percent for his nearest challenger, Fabio Gadea, with almost 7 percent of the votes counted.

But electoral council President Roberto Rivas says a parallel count representative of the entire vote gives Ortega a big advantage as well. Conservative Arnoldo Aleman, a former president and perennial candidate, was a distant third with 6 percent. Ortega is seeking third term, his second consecutive, after the Supreme Court overturned term limits in the constitution.

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

Catch limits debated for a small fish many call the world’s most important By Timothy B. Wheeler The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — A big fight is brewing over a little fish — a fish that no one wants to eat but that many regard as the most important in the sea. Catch restrictions loom on menhaden, which is too unsavory to grace a dinner plate but much sought by commercial fishermen. They catch them in staggering numbers to be ground into animal feed, to extract their heart-healthy oils for humans and to be used as bait to catch other fish, including Maryland’s iconic blue crabs. Menhaden also play a vital role in Chesapeake Bay’s ecosystem, feeding on plankton and serving themselves as food for many of the fish, birds and animals that people do eat or care about. “They’re a keystone species,” says biologist Paul Spitzer of Trappe. Besides feeding other fish, menhaden are a staple for seabirds such as ospreys, gannets and common loons. When the fish are scarce, he says, it affects the health and abundance of other creatures as well. Now, driven by a warning from scientists that menhaden levels are perilously low, an interstate panel that regulates fishing from Maine to Florida is weighing a range of actions that could reduce the commercial harvest of the fish by as much as 45 percent all along the coast. The proposal, to be taken up Wednesday at a meeting in Boston of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission,

Barbara Haddock Taylor / The Baltimore Sun

An interstate panel that regulates fishing from Maine to Florida is weighing a range of actions that could reduce the commercial harvest of menhaden by as much as 45 percent all along the coast. The fish is used as animal feed, bait for other fish and a source of heart-healthy oils.

is being hailed by recreational anglers and conservationists alike, who’ve long voiced concerns about menhaden levels, and say other animals that depend on them for food, such as highly prized striped bass, are suffering from malnourishment. “We fished the stock down many decades ago, and have maintained a heavy enough fishing pressure that we’ve held it at a fairly low level,” said William Goldsborough, senior scientist with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and one of three Maryland members on the fisheries commission. It’s time to leave more menhaden in the water and give them a chance to increase, he said. But the proposal before the commission has drawn pushback from commercial fishermen, who contend the science

shows there’s no cause for alarm and any cutback will hurt an already diminished livelihood. “This is the last thing we’ve got, is menhaden,” says Larry “Boo” Powley, of Hoopers Island, one of about 100 fishermen in Maryland who catch the fish in a pound net, a fencelike arrangement of anchored nets that lure them into a trap. A third-generation netter, Powley, 58, and his crew of four supply the bulk of their catch to crabbers on the island for bait. If rules cut his haul back by a fifth or more, as the panel is considering, Powley warns he’ll leave his boat at the dock because he won’t be able to make a go of it anymore. Nowhere is opposition more intense than in Virginia, home to a fleet that hauls in 80 percent of all the menha-

den caught along the Atlantic Coast. Bait fishermen such as Powley account for the other 20 percent. Reedville, the picturesque town on Virginia’s Northern Neck where Omega Protein Inc. processes its fleet’s harvest, is the second-busiest fishing port in the United States (after Dutch Harbor, Alaska) by the weight of the harvest landed there. Last year, Omega hauled in 183,000 metric tons of menhaden, according to fisheries commission data, an increase of 27 percent from the year before. About 40 percent came from the Virginia waters of the bay — the so-called “reduction” fishing fleet isn’t permitted to work in Maryland. “I think menhaden are already getting a high level of protection,” Ron Lukens, Omega’s chief fisheries biologist, said at a recent meeting in Anne Arundel County of a panel attempting to advise the commission on its decision. With representatives from Omega, Virginia and New Jersey insisting no change is needed, the group reached no consensus. A nationwide group of 75 scientists, however, says menhaden need greater protection, in part so they can fulfill their role as water filters and food source for other fish and animals. Scientists reviewing the fisheries commission’s latest assessment of the menhaden stock noted that the population has fallen over the last 25 years, to the point that they’re now only 8 percent of its historic level.

Ex-general wins Guatemalan vote By Sonia Perez The Associated Press

GUATEMALA CITY — In the end, tradition trumped rising enthusiasm for a youthful populist. Guatemalans have once again elected as their new leader the presidential candidate who lost the previous election, something they have done since democracy returned to the Central American country in 1986. Retired general and former intelligence director Otto Perez Molina of the conservative Patriotic Party won an easy and early victory on Sunday in a runoff race against tycoon-turnedpolitical populist Manuel Baldizon of the Democratic Freedom Revival party. Perez garnered 54 percent of the vote to Baldizon’s 46 percent. It was exactly as the polls had predicted, though many distrusted them and felt a surge by Baldizon would make the race tight. But analysts said it was Perez who surged in the final days. “At the end of the campaign, Otto Perez began to appeal to the idea of continuity and stability, while Baldizon tried to appear new and creative,” said Renso Rosal, political analyst with the University Rafael Landivar. “That doesn’t sit well with a conservative society like Guatemala.”

Voter turnout was nearly 60 percent, though early reports said it would be under 50 percent. Perez, 61, is the first former military leader elected president in Guatemala in the 25 years after the end of brutal military rule. While that concerns some international groups, Guatemala has a young population. Many don’t remember the 36-year war or its 200,000 dead, the vast majority of whom were Mayan and victims of army, police and paramilitary. Perez has said there were no massacres or genocide. He was never been charged with any atrocities and was one of the army’s chief representatives in negotiating the 1996 peace accords. “They talk a lot about the past, but there has been no case against him,” said Perez supporter Daniel Rustrian, 20. “I’m not saying there wasn’t genocide, but no one has demonstrated anything against him.”

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Economy Continued from A1 It is tempting to blame feckless politicians on both sides of the Atlantic, and that would not be entirely wrong. But the frailty of politicians is not the full story. The fact is that most of the industrialized world — Europe, the United States, Japan, too — is in a difficult economic bind. There are no simple solutions that would quickly win the approval of citizens if only politicians were willing to try them.

Reality check? Most voters in these places have yet to come to grips with the notion that they have promised themselves benefits that, at current tax rates, they cannot afford. Their economies have been growing too slowly, for too long, to pay for the coming bulge of retirees. “The U.S. and Europe have to make hard choices because of two things: slower growth and aging populations,” said Barry Eichengreen, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. “Europe’s choices are even harder than America’s, because the prospects for growth are more dubious.” By the end of last week, as the Greek Parliament took a big step toward approving a European deal to reduce the country’s debt, some reasons for hope had emerged. Yet the main dynamic had not changed. Europe still has not set aside enough money to cover its debts, with Italy now presenting the most immediate problems, many economists say. In the United States, a special congressional deficit committee appears to be making little progress, and some members of Congress have even begun talking about undoing the automatic Pentagon cuts set to take place if the committee deadlocks. On the most basic level, affluent countries are facing sharply increasing claims on their resources even as those resources are growing less quickly than they once were. The increasing claims come from the aging of the population, while the slowing growth of available resources comes from a slowdown of economic expansion over the last generation. A complex mix of factors, varying by country, has slowed growth, and the slowdown has been exacerbated everywhere by the worst financial crisis and

global recession in 70 years. The combination has left Europe and the United States with frustrated populations that still have more sacrifices ahead. “These are very difficult moral issues,” said Benjamin Friedman, an economic historian at Harvard. “We are really talking about the level at which we support the elderly retired population.” As Simon Tilford, chief economist of the Center for European Reform, a research group in London, said, “Countries will face tougher choices.” In the United States, the debates center on whether to let government grow as the population ages and whether the affluent, who have done very well in recent decades, should pay more taxes. In Europe, the issues revolve around whether to shrink government, which is bigger than it is here, and whether well-off northern countries like Germany should support poorer countries, like Greece and Italy, which also suffer from fiscal irresponsibility.

Basic philosophy Everywhere, though, the debate is about much more than just partisan advantage or the next election. It is a philosophical debate. “The country’s in such bad shape, and people wish Congress would do something about it,” Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, said in an interview last week. “And we have a big difference of opinion about what ought to be done.” He added, “That is what we do here — we have big debates about the future of the country.” Of course, politicians have also exposed themselves to legitimate criticism. McConnell and his fellow Republicans have blocked a short-term jobs bill proposed by President Barack Obama that has broad support from independent economists, and for the most part they have failed to level with voters about cuts to Medicare, Social Security and the military that a no-newtaxes pledge would require. Democrats, including Obama, have vowed not to raise taxes on households making less than $250,000, which seems impossible without larger benefit cuts than Democrats have acknowledged. Polls, however, suggest that there is little political advantage in explaining the reality of future budget math. “Ev-

erybody thinks, ‘My taxes are going to fund somebody else’s social programs,’” Eichengreen said, “making people even more resistant to solutions.” Playing to those sentiments, the presidential contenders in the United States and France seem unlikely to force austerity upon angry voters. The United States and Europe still have more than enough resources to solve their problems. They are among the richest societies the world has ever known, benefiting from skilled work forces, the rule of law and the political freedoms that often help produce economic innovations. The United States also continues to benefit from low interest rates, a signal of the bond market’s confidence.

Spiraling risks Yet the United States and Europe face the risk that their problems will feed on each other. Recent economic stagnation may make voters and policy makers unwilling to make hard choices, and the political paralysis might then worsen the economy by creating new financial turmoil. In an article in the current issue of the journal The National Interest, Friedman named this problem the “no-growth trap.” In the short term, this trap takes the form of resistance to emergency measures, like Germany’s distaste at bailing out more profligate countries, which may increase deficits. “The central paradox of financial crises,” Timothy Geithner, the Treasury secretary, said before leaving for the Group of 20 meetings in Europe last week, “is that what feels just and fair is the opposite of what’s required for a just and fair outcome.” Longer term, the trap is created by resistance to the higher taxes and reduced benefits necessary to return countries to financial stability. The resistance is understandable, given how weak income growth has been in the past decade, but it is not sustainable. With Europe facing a series of debt decisions in the coming weeks and the congressional deficit committee closing in on its Nov. 23 deadline, it is tempting to predict that policy makers will have to start making some big decisions soon. Then again, if history is a guide, they may well find ways to put off those decisions yet again.

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A5

San Francisco may elect first Atlanta police arrest lone protester Chinese-American mayor The Associated Press ATLANTA — The lone protester in an Atlanta park was arrested after refusing to leave by a Sunday night curfew, a day after 19 dem-

By Erik Eckholm New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — This city with the country’s oldest Chinatown appears likely to elect a Chinese-American mayor for the first time on Tuesday, and for many residents it is a milestone long overdue. “Chinese-Americans feel that they are making history,” said David Lee, executive director of the nonpartisan Chinese American Voters Education Committee here. “They feel they are on the cusp of achieving the holy grail of San Francisco politics, electing one of their own into the mayor’s office.” Edwin Lee, who was appointed to the office on an interim basis last fall after Mayor Gavin Newsom was elected lieutenant governor, is considered a strong favorite, although his support has dwindled in recent days as opponents in a scattered field of 16 seized on reports of campaign irregularities by some of his supporters. Drawn by the historic nature of the vote, though, the city’s ethnic Chinese, making up a quarter of the population and 16 percent of registered voters, are expected to turn out in unusually large numbers, David Lee said. Ed Lee, a trim man with a moustache, has spent years

Juvenile Continued from A1 Each of the detention center’s four units, referred to as pods, has its own classroom, and youths previously attended school in the pod where they lived. Chuck Puch, the Deschutes County Juvenile Community Justice facility manager, said the change created a more normal routine for the young offenders since they have to leave their pods each morning to attend school, even though class is just down the hall. “It’s been very helpful with keeping kids from wanting to hang out in their rooms all the time,” Puch said. While the teachers and detention staff found a way to deal with one problem that resulted from the cut, that level of funding is unsustainable, said Kevin Bradley, the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council youth programs manager who works with the teachers. The cut means there is no money for substitute teachers, new curricula and other things necessary to educate the inmates in the future.

Daily routine On Tuesday, there were about a dozen boys and girls at the detention center — there is a 10:2 boy-to-girl ratio — and most were in one classroom, quietly working on assignments or getting help from the two teachers. One boy was outside in the larger day room, working independently while a detention center staffer stood by in case he needed help. There are usually a dozen inmates, although the number can range as high as two dozen. This is the detention center’s new model, in which students who can work on their own do

English

Sarah Rice / New York Times News Service

Edwin Lee was appointed to the office of San Francisco mayor on an interim basis last fall and is running for the seat in the current election.

running city agencies, most recently as the city’s top administrator, when he was tapped for the interim mayor’s job. The city of 800,000 faced a large deficit and intense bickering between the mayor and the Board of Supervisors and was ready, many said, for a technocrat. Over the last year, Lee’s admirers say, he cut spending and reformed pensions with little acrimony, and has done of good job of promoting development. Although he had taken the interim job with a firm pledge that he would not run this fall, powerful backers formed a “Run, Ed, Run” committee and

he joined the race in August. He has endorsements from such heavyweights as Newsom, former Mayor Willie Brown and influential leaders in the Chinese-American community — and, to the chagrin of other candidates who had taken that no-run pledge seriously, he has learned to work the wards like any politician. In a city where political views tend to range from liberal to very liberal, the campaign has consisted less of ideological debates than of personal appeals and attacks. Lee, 59, stresses his competence, with posters declaring “Ed Lee Gets It Done.”

so with assistance from staff while most students stay in the classroom. With only one teacher working on Mondays and Fridays, it was necessary to consolidate students into one class. Community Justice Director Ken Hales said older juvenile detention facilities were built to minimize movement — for example, with a classroom in each cell unit, as at the county facility — because corrections officials believed that youths would act out more while going from one part of the facility to another. Now, many people who work in juvenile justice facilities believe that locked facilities for young people should be designed with separate classrooms so that inmates follow a routine of leaving their cell units to attend class, Hales said. “When it’s more normalized, kids enjoy it more,” Hales said. “It impacts behavior in a positive way by doing those things.” County detention staff and the teachers pitched in to make the new arrangement work. At the end of October, the detention staff nominated one of the teachers, Stephanie Franklin, for the county’s Stellar Employee Performance program. Franklin’s co-workers praised her for the way she implemented changes, for communicating well with staff and for thinking outside the box, according to an internal county newsletter.

committing more crimes. But earlier this year, local staff looked at proposed budget cuts and said they might have to cancel class for two months each year. Gov. John Kitzhaber proposed cutting education funding by 45 percent for youths incarcerated in county juvenile detention and Oregon Youth Authority facilities. Lawmakers restored some of the funding for education for incarcerated kids, but the cut to education at Deschutes County’s facility was close to the governor’s original proposal. Kevin Bradley, youth programs manager for the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, which employs the teachers, said education funding for the local detention center was cut from nearly $445,000 in the 2009-11 biennium, to approximately $250,000 in the current biennium. The cutback in teacher hours mainly affects the detention center when it is full, with 20 or more kids. Then, the teachers will have to depend more upon detention center staff to instruct kids. “And of course we have no dollars for curriculum, travel, professional development, anything,” Bradley said. “We have no dollars for substitutes, so if an instructor is out, we have just one.” As for what will happen in the future, Bradley said, “I honestly don’t think anyone knows at this point.” “We’re in the same shape as most school districts where you’re just kind of getting hit from all angles and reducing staff from all angles in order to continue to operate programs,” he said.

Budget cut still hurts The classroom change that detention center staff and teachers implemented was not their only option. School runs yearround at the county’s detention center in an effort to help kids succeed at school, reintegrate into the community and avoid

— Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

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Continued from A1 In addition, Fall said, the school has implemented a dual-language program at the kindergarten level. In the program, the school’s curriculum is taught in both Spanish and English, with the goal of having students achieve proficiency in both. “Parents love it,” Fall said of the bilingual instruction model. “We are able to work very closely with families who are really supportive.” But the Crook County School District’s success wasn’t replicated at the statewide level, at least in terms of how the Oregon education department determines a district’s overall rating. Whether a district meets these standards is based on how well its ELL students perform on the state’s annual English Language Proficiency Assessment and on Adequate Yearly Progress tests mandated by the federal No Child Left Behind law. A district’s rating is also assessed based on the percentage of ELL students who reach proficiency and exit English language development programs and the percentage of those who do so within five years. The Crook district met or surpassed the percentage thresholds in each of these categories, as did 34 others. But a majority of those assessed — 88 school districts — did not. Oregon Department of Education spokeswoman Crystal Greene said the high percentage of districts

onstrators were taken to jail by officers in riot gear when a rally spilled into the streets. The woman was draped in an American flag as dozens

not meeting state and federal standards is at least partially attributed to the state’s higher bar for success. Last year, the state required 50 percent of ELL students within a district to move up at least one level in proficiency. This year, that required percentage jumped to 53 percent, and next year it will increase again, to 57 percent. Greene said the increased target has a lot to do with the state making sure it aligns with federal mandates. “Scores haven’t gone down as much as the targets went up,” she said. “When you really raise the bar, it often has at least a temporary impact on student performance.” The leap in the number of ELL students reaching proficiency also suggests that dis-

more demonstrators stood behind barricades surrounding Woodruff Park, where police had warned they would enforce an 11 p.m. curfew.

tricts’ overall inability to meet standards has more to do with increased expectation than declining performance. Last year, 10,379 ELL students reached full English proficiency, a number that has more than doubled within two years, according to a Department of Education news release. The number of Oregon students enrolled in ELD programs has also leapt, increasing from 44,000 to 65,618 within the past 10 years. Greene said the marked increase of English language learners can also be detected at the national level. “I don’t know how our numbers compare with other states,” she said. “But nationally, there has been that trend.” — Reporter: 541-383-0376, dtaylor@bendbulletin.com


A6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Ski hills Continued from A1 But old Snow King, the first ski area in Wyoming and one of the oldest in the nation, soldiered on for the local residents, who could get in a run or two during lunch. The ski industry went upscale, and so did Jackson Hole, as the coastal glitterati came to nest in their humble ranchettes. But Snow King did not. Now the question is resonating here and across ski country, from upstate New York to Montana, where local hills and communities are struggling in the face of changed times and economic stress. What place do ski hills like Snow King have in the modern world? What are they worth to a community or an economy? Has the chemistry between town and town hill been changed by tough times? A small ski area called White Pine in Pinedale, Wyo., about 75 miles from Jackson, said this fall that it would not open for the season. In Bozeman, Mont., and Cody, Wyo., local skiers have banded together in recent years to create nonprofit organizations to run struggling town hills. In Saranac Lake, N.Y., residents rallied this year around their town hill, called Mount Pisgah, and raised money for a new T-bar lift. Here in Jackson, the owners of Snow King, while vowing to continue on this season, have quietly put the resort and its nearby hotel up for sale. A special discounted season pass for $149 — almost what some resorts charge for a daily ticket — comes with a plea on the Snow King website, “Show support for your town hill,” and with a raffle entry to win a 1950s-vintage chair from an old lift. “Communities are struggling to keep their town hills,” said Michael Berry, president of the National Ski Areas Association, “and they’re finding ways to do it.” Berry said that overall, the industry has held up fairly well through the economic downturn. What is different for town hills, he said, is that because they depend mostly on local residents, they reflect

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A chairlift sits idle at the base of Snow King Mountain, in Jackson, Wyo. Small ski hills and their communities, including Snow King, White Pine in Pinedale, Wyo., and hills in Bozeman, Mont., and Cody, Wyo., are facing changed times and economic stress. “Communities are struggling to keep their town hills,” says Michael Berry, president of the National Ski Areas Association, but, “... they’re finding ways to do it.”

“There’s the emotional appeal, and then there’s the practical reality.” — Mark Barron, mayor, Jackson, Wyo.

— more than the Strattons or Lake Tahoes of the world — local life and economics, for better or worse. Like most communities, Jackson Hole has taken economic hits, in tourism and real estate. And while there seems to be hardly anyone in Jackson Hole who wishes ill of Snow King or hopes to see it fail, that is not really the question, residents say. What price to save or rescue it, and whether the town or county should wade in at all, defines the issue. Jackson’s Town Council, which oversees a municipally owned recreation complex at Snow King’s base — managed by the resort until financial troubles worsened — reassigned the center’s management last month to a nonprofit organization, a step that town officials said could lead to a larger public role on the ski hill itself. A community group

also tried to step in this year to take over management at Snow King, but it failed to reach an agreement. “There’s the emotional appeal,” said Mayor Mark Barron, who has vowed to keep Snow King alive, “and then there’s the practical reality.” As for where the two might meet, he shrugged: “Who knows?” Some survivors of recreational skiing’s early days, like Alta, Utah, or Aspen, Colo., grew to great economic might. But Snow King, with only 400 acres of skiable terrain — challenging and steep, but tiny by modern resort standards — could not outgrow its roots, a gnawing competitive disadvantage in the age of limitless choice. “Unfortunately, size matters,” said Manuel Lopez, Snow King’s president. Lopez, who is 67 and thinking about retirement, said

the operation loses about $800,000 over the winter, partly subsidized by a yearround convention and hotel business and by summer moneymakers like an alpine slide. Prospective buyers have looked with interest at the hotel and convention trade, he said, but few want the ski hill and its losses as baggage. At downtown businesses like Teton Mountaineering, an outdoor clothing shop, the debate over Snow King, prompted by a reporter’s question, turned from economics to community to what Kathleen Crowley, a buyer for the store, described as “family coziness.” “Nothing against the big ski areas, because I spend a lot of time there,” Crowley said, “but there’s just that homey kind of safe feel about Snow King.” Chuck Schaap, the store’s owner, struck a practical note. “If it has such value,” he said, “why is it economically a failure?” Crowley paused. “That might be a whole other question,” she said.

s ’ d n e B f o n o i t c e s l t l n o a C r A au t s e R Best

The two Sisters locations under consideration by the state are Ray’s Food Place at 445 West U.S. Highway 20 and Sisters Mainline Station at 1001 Railway St. Sisters City Manager Eileen Stein says the city has little involvement in the project but is happy to hear of the development. “It makes sense to have a charging station just as you would a fueling station,” she said. “We’re one of the first stops over the mountains.” The state will make a final placement decision on the charging station on Nov. 16. Construction is tentatively planned for April.

Continued from A1 According to Ashley Horvat, Oregon’s transportation electrification projects grants and contract administrator, stations must be placed within 50 miles of one another. Sisters lies within that distance of a charging station planned for Detroit along state Highway 22. “We planned to get to Bend originally,” Horvat said. “We applied for $3.2 million from the Department of Transportation and we got $2 million. We wanted to go to Bend but didn’t get all the money. But from this, we still want to access the Bend area.”

— Reporter: 541-617-7837, ehidle@bendbulletin.com

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To advertise in this space, Call Justin Bronson at 541-617-7834


A8

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

Thank You for Making a Difference in 2011! The Central Oregon Make A Difference Day Committee would like to thank the following sponsors for their contributions: Ace Hardware

Hershey Cattle Company

Randy Povey Surveying

Baldy’s BBQ of Redmond

High Desert Disposal

Redmond Greenhouse &

Barry R. Smith, Architect

High Desert Farms Nursery

Best in the West

Sales

Bryant, Emerson & Fitch

Home Depot

Cascade Gypsum

Impact Signs

Cement Products

Jack Robinson

Cent Wise

Johnson Specialties

Central Electric

Knife River

Cooperative, Inc.

Landsystems Nursery

Central Oregon Redi Mix

Marvin Mix Co., Inc.

Clearwater Native Nursery Mark’s Roofing Cline Butte Rock Pit

McDonald’s of Redmond

Dana Sorum

Mike’s Concrete

Dave Kimmel Nursery

Mike’s Fence

Denfeld Paints

Miller Lumber

Deschutes County

Parr Lumber

Nursery Redmond Kiwanis Club Scott Wallace Environmental Shevlin Sand and Gravel Springtime Irrigation Sterling Technology, LLC SunWest Builders Swift Steel T-Mobile Three Peaks Coffee Co. United Rentals Vern Samples Landscaping Walker Structural Engineering, LLC

Department of Solid

Pepsi

Waste

Perma-Coat, Inc.

West Ridge Engineering

Deschutes Recycling

Peterson Rental Yard

Western Title Company

Eastside Gardens

Quality Heating

Willamette Graystone

Elite Electric

Progressive Screen Print

WinterCreek Restoration

2011 Committee Members Mary Ruby, Co-Chair, Newland Communities Val Shewell, Newland Communities Lisa Schauer, Co-Chair, MacKay & Sposito, Inc. Kaitlin Shrier, MacKay & Sposito, Inc.

Cheryl Howard Sean Tate, The Bulletin Mark Hobbs, BendBroadband Jamie Christman, Zolo Media

Save the Date for next year, October 20, 2012, to help another non-profit in Central Oregon.

the Redmond The Heart of Central Oregon

www.co-madd.com


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, B2 Editorials, B4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

LILY RAFF MCCAULOU

Bendites offer Iraqi a way out Editor’s Note: This is the last in a three-day series of columns about a soldier and his family’s fight to help an Iraqi interpreter immigrate to the U.S.

J

im Coon was in Bend while his son, Joe, served in Iraq between 2005 and 2006. But that didn’t stop the real estate broker from getting involved however he could. When Joe wrote home about Iraqi children running around in tattered garb, Jim launched a shoes and clothing drive for them. And more than a year after his son returned home safe, Jim jumped at the chance to help another Iraqi. Joe’s friend and interpreter, Bandar Hasan, was under threat from Iraqi insurgents because of his service to the U.S. So Jim tracked down a nonprofit called The Checkpoint One Foundation. Founded by Oregon National Guardsman Jason Faler, the group has helped more than 150 Iraqi and Afghan nationals. Faler offered guidance and put the Coons in touch with an immigration attorney in Portland. Jim held a barbecue fundraiser in his backyard. Central Oregonians donated thousands of dollars toward Hasan’s legal fees. Meanwhile, Hasan moved in with a friend in Baghdad to compile documents for his visa application. It turned out to be a full-time job. “If you’re walking in Baghdad and you have (forms) in your hand — in English and with an American flag on it — people are going to kill you,” he says. Each day he braced for someone on the streets to recognize him. “Probably,” he would tell himself, “this is the last day in my life.” One afternoon, he checked his email and saw a message from the lawyer. The subject line read: Congratulations. The email said he’d been granted a Special Immigration Visa. Congress created the program in 2006 to protect foreign interpreters. “That was the most wonderful day in my life,” Hasan recalls. “I love that day.” He reported to the U.S. Embassy, where a diplomat greeted him: “Congratulations, welcome to your country.” Hasan slipped his passport and visa under his shirt and tried to appear calm on his way home. He called Joe, who used money donated by John Stone, one of Jim’s Bend co-workers, to buy Hasan his first-ever airplane ticket. A week later, on March 21, 2009, Hasan arrived in Washington, D.C., where Joe — now 32 — lives and works for a libertarian think tank. They hugged and cried. It took more than 18 months and $8,000, but Hasan was safe. He moved into a small apartment with Joe and two other roommates. At first, Hasan struggled to acclimate to the cold and find a job. According to Falen, adjusting to life in the U.S. is often more difficult for Iraqis and Afghans than wading through the red tape to get here. Today, Hasan is 26 and thriving in San Diego. He works at a health care facility and is studying to earn a medical practitioner’s license. He has friends and he loves the weather. Twice, he has visited Jim in Bend. “I never saw my dad in my life,” Hasan says. “But Joe’s dad, he’s more than my dad. He’s wonderful.” Of course, Hasan misses his mother. And he worries about his best friend, another interpreter who served the U.S. under the code name Kimo. Kimo has been trying to get a U.S. visa since before Hasan started. The Coons fear for thousands of other Iraqis who have served the U.S. military but haven’t been able to escape. As the year-end troop withdrawal deadline looms, Jim says he is haunted by news images from the night in April 1975 when the last Americans were airlifted from the U.S. Embassy in Saigon. “All those Vietnamese,” he says, “we left them all there to get slaughtered. And we haven’t learned. We’re ready to turn our back on these Iraqis, too.” — Lily Raff McCaulou is a columnist for The Bulletin. 541-617-7836, lraff@bendbulletin.com

B

Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LA PINE

LOCAL BRIEFING

Event center nears halfway mark

Sunny days, cold nights this week

vation, which will add more amenities. “Everybody is excited about getting this far along,” said Justin Cutler, La Pine Park and Recreation District director. “At the end of phase one, we have a usable building that any community organization can use.” See Center / B2

By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

LA PINE — The million-dollar La Pine Community Center is nearing the end of its first phase of construction, and the public will soon be able to use the updated building. But more funds are needed to complete the second part of the reno-

The La Pine Community Center on Thursday afternoon. Phase one of the center’s remodel is almost finished. Andy Tullis The Bulletin

• ‘Kids Clay’ table at a Bend ceramics show offers parents the freedom to shop

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Three-year-old Cora Carroll, of Bend, smiles as visiting artist James DeRosso, 48, of Portland, shows her the clay monster they created together at the “Kids Clay” table at the Wildfire Pottery Showcase at Highland Magnet School in Bend on Sunday.

Playing in the mud By Dylan J. Darling • The Bulletin

W

anting to browse the booths at the seventh annual Wildfire Pottery Showcase on Sunday, Adam and

Molly Carroll left their son and daughter at the “Kids Clay” table. There, James DeRosso, a ceramics artist from Portland, kept the young Carrolls — Cora, 3, and her brother, Tommy, 6 — entertained, teaching them how to mold clay into their own creations. Having honed his lesson by volunteering in Portland schoolrooms, DeRosso said he doesn’t ask children to create animals bound by defining distinctions — instead, he has them make monsters. See Clay / B5

Rachael Weisgerber and her daughter, Reily, compare their creations — which Reily referred to as a skeleton monster made by her mom, left, and her own airplane monster — during the Wildfire Pottery Showcase at Highland Magnet School in Bend on Sunday.

October 2011 weather for Bend DAILY HIGHS AND LOWS DAY

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HI 84 66 63 59 61 52 52 65 67 67 64 58 63 56 61 67 67 68 64 68 68 69 70 70 51 48 55 58 66 64 66

Sunny days and partly cloudy nights are in store this week for Central Oregon. “It’s going to be fairly cold at night,” said Rob Brooks, a forecaster with the National Weather Service office in Pendleton. Low temperatures are expected to be in the 20s throughout the week in Bend, although daytime temperatures should steadily rise as the cloud cover becomes progressively thinner, according to the weather service. Today’s high is expected to be 46 degrees, Tuesday’s should be 47, and highs the rest of the week are expected to be around 50. A wintry storm system is expected to move into Central Oregon this weekend, starting with a slight chance of showers on Friday, Brooks said. The snow level Saturday night is expected to drop to 3,600 feet, with a chance of rain and snow falling in Bend. Rain also is expected to fall in Bend on Sunday as the snow level should rise to 4,100 feet. “It’s definitely here,” Brooks said. “Winter’s showed up.”

2 arrested in snow gear theft Two Portland men were arrested Saturday on suspicion of hauling stolen snowboards to Bend and trying to sell them to an outdoor gear shop. William Scott Maret, 29, is accused of burglary, theft and criminal mischief, according to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. He was being held at the Deschutes County jail Sunday in lieu of $60,000 bail. Russel Peter Woodruff, 19, is accused of conspiracy to commit theft. He was being held in lieu of $45,000 bail. Both men also are suspected of possessing and delivering heroin, according to the jail. A worker at the Gear Peddler in the 100 block of Greenwood Avenue called police Saturday just after noon to report that two men had come into the store and tried to sell seven brand-new snowboards, said Sgt. Devin Lewis of the Bend Police Department. Officers detained the men and, after obtaining search warrants, found thousands of dollars’ worth of snowboard and skateboard gear, as well as heroin, in their 1997 Cadillac Catera and hotel room, according to police. The gear was likely stolen during burglaries in Portland and Beaverton, Lewis said, including the Oct. 25 burglary of Sublimity Snow and Skate in Beaverton. — Bulletin staff reports

H

More briefing and News of Record, B2

80

60

40

STATE NEWS FREEZING

20 L

L

LO 48 42 42 42 39 30 30 32 39 32 45 40 31 32 35 38 33 29 28 38 38 41 40 39 21 21 24 29 39 41 37

PRECIPITATION TOTAL: .16” INCH

.11

Historical average precipitation for the month: .72”

• Eugene

T = Trace

.05

Medford •

ALMANAC Highest temperature

84°

Highest recorded temperature for Highest recorded the month: 90°

maximum for the monthOct. 6, 1979

Lowest temperature

35.3°

Lowest recorded temperature for the month: 32.1°

Average high

63.1°

Monthly average high temperature through the years: 63°

Average low

35.3°

Monthly average low temperature through the years: 32.1°

Oct. 31, 2002

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

• Medford: Criminals barred from public parks. • Eugene: Officer killed in 1971 honored. • Eugene: Mild autumn good for harvest. Stories on B3


B2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

N  R

Well sh t! RE A D ER PH OTOS

CIVIL SUITS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication.

Filed October 24

11CV0846: Onewest Bank F.S.B. v. Kenneth E. Thomas, Kristin L. Thomas, John C. Lattanza and DOES 1-5, complaint, $277,138.06 plus interest, fees, expenses, costs and disbursements 11CV0847: Federal National Mortgage Association v. Gina Detweiler and Zachary Detweiler, complaint, $195,031.76 plus interest, costs and fees 11CV0848: Selco Community Credit Union v. Jason R. Tucker, complaint, $10,193.90 plus filing fee of $240.00

Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from B1

Light fixture causes Bend house fire A bathroom light fixture ignited insulation in a downtown Bend home’s attic early Sunday morning, causing $6,000 in damage. The fire at the home of Sam Peters and Brian McKillop, in the 100 block of Northwest Broadway Street, was reported about 5:45 a.m., according to the Bend Fire Department.

Filed October 25

11CV0849: Danette L. Nelson and Jacob C. Nelson v. Samuel A. Rottum, complaint, $220,000 11CV0850: U.S. Bank N.A. as trustee for the holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-FF10, through their loan servicing agent Select Portfolio Servicing Inc. v. Larry Hammack Jr., PNC Bank N.A. successor by merger to National City Bank, State of Oregon, Oregon Division of Child Support and any unknown persons claiming interest in Lot 11, Block RR of Deschutes River Woods, complaint, $222,476.69 11CV0851: U.S. Bank N.A. as trustee on behalf of the holders of the Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., Home Equity Pass Through Certificates, Series 2007-1, through their loan servicing agent Select Portfolio Servicing Inc. v. William Kenneth Mueters and any unknown persons claiming an interest in Lot 1, Block 1 of First Addition to Skyline Subdivision, complaint, $273,238.96 11CV0852: Federal National Mortgage Association v. Travis Skinner, complaint, $262,311.11 plus interest, costs and fees 11CV0853: Federal National Mortgage Association v. Bere Lindley and Kathleen Lindley, complaint, $249,739.16 plus interest, costs and fees 11CV0854: Federal National Mortgage Association v. Darwin Johnston and Sydney Johnston, complaint, $173,199.44 plus interest, costs and fees 11CV0855: Julia Oldham v. Ariel South Limited Partnership, Guardian Real Estate Services LLC and Guardian Management LLC, complaint, $418,364.65 11CV0858: Joyce Peterson v. 4 Seasonal Services LLC and Matt Matwich, complaint, $12,360 Filed October 26

11CV0860: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. v. Keith R. Billeter, Beverly J. Billeter and Westview Villas Owners Association, complaint, $245,784.94 11CV0861: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. v. Anthony S. Jones, complaint, $175,933.35 11CV0862: MTGLQ Investors LP v. Ronald S. Blaylock, Teresa K. Blaylock, R.S. Blaylock Building Co. and any unknown persons claiming interest in Lot 37, Block 9 of Newberry Estates Phase 2, complaint, $475,137.85 11CV0863: Michael M. Wolfgram and Marina Wolfgram v. Eugene Super Sales Center LLC, complaint, $26,343.00 Filed October 27

11CV0868: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. v. Jayne I. Heyne, complaint, $23,352.56 11CV0869: American Express Bank F.S.B. v. Betty Ganey, complaint, $24,506.04 11CV0870: Beneficial Oregon Inc. v. Robert Spear and Samra J. Spear, complaint, $11,625.04 11CV0874: Tracy Hartman v. Oregon Wholesale Hardware Inc. and Casey Fancher, complaint, $460,368.19 Filed October 28

11CV0876: Kaitlyn Farasyn v. Redmond School District 2J, complaint, $750,000 Filed October 31

11CV0880: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. v. Eric Wirfs, Desert Meadows Homeowners Association and Mountain Brook Homeowners Association, complaint, $245,706.08 11CV0881: U.S. Bank N.A. as trustee on behalf of the holders of The Terwin Mortgage Trust 2006-5, Asset-Backed Certificates, TMTS Series 2006-5 v. Caine M. Irwin, Katy M. Irwin, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. and Pacific Residential Mortgage LLC, complaint, $230,553.76

While the home’s smoke detector didn’t have a battery, Peters and McKillop noticed the smoke and were able to evacuate, according to the fire department. The fire caused $5,000 in damage to the building and $1,000 in damage to its contents. Firefighters broke through the ceiling and removed burning insulation to stop the smoldering fire. — Bulletin staff report

P  O    For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

STATE OF OREGON

A BIT OF FALL KAYAKING Lawana Wynne took this photo with her Fuji FinePix from her kayak near Drake Park in Bend.

“We’ve already had inquiries about using the center for gun shows, hunters shows, La Pine Frontier Days, the Crab Feed Fundraiser for (South County Outreach and Toy Run) and community school programs. I think we’re going to see that the building will bring business to this area and contribute a lot to La Pine’s economy.� — Justin Cutler, director, La Pine Park and Recreation District

Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872

Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us

Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us

Attorney General John Kroger, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400 Fax: 503-378-4017 Web: www.doj.state.or.us

Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo

Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

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Center Continued from B1 The first event planned in the renovated building is the Christmas Bazaar — Dec. 7 through Dec. 10 — followed by the Christmas Basket Association, Dec. 16 through Dec. 23. Fundraising for phase two continues, Cutler said, and phase two construction should start sometime in the spring — provided funding can be obtained. The projected cost is between $600,000 and $700,000, he said, and so far, about $400,000 has been raised. That includes a $200,000 grant from the Ford Foundation, a $150,000 grant from the Meyer Memorial Trust and $50,000 from The Collins Foundation. The district has written other grant proposals, he added, for which they are currently awaiting responses. The first phase of work started in September with a budget of $500,000 and was done by CS Construction of Bend, Cutler said. It included remodeling and upgrading restrooms, adding storage and installing a sprinkler system. Phase two will consist of extensive interior renovation, adding office and classroom space and a media room, installing windows and improving insulation, upgrading flooring, meeting Americans with Disabilities Act standards and adding a kitchen. The existing structure, at 16405 First St., was built with insurance settlement money received when the White School collapsed under a heavy snow load in 1994, Cutler said. The insurance money went to build the shell and the slab, he said, and because the park district had no taxbase funding, there were no funds for maintenance or improvements. All park district operations were funded by recycling aluminum cans, donations and fundraisers. Subsequently, the building sat vacant most of the time because there was inadequate heat and plumbing and the structure didn’t meet fire codes. Any event

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Antos Escobar, of Bend, an employee of Insulation by Davis, operates a scissor lift while installing new insulation in the La Pine Community Center on Thursday.

had to get a temporary occupancy permit from Deschutes County. In May 2009, voters approved a permanent tax rate to fund the park district. The district financed phaseone construction with loans it received through the Special District Association of Oregon, Cutler said. The loans will be paid back using a portion of the permanent tax rate. The renovation progress is being monitored closely by community members, Cutler said, and he anticipates the

building will host almost continuous activities. “We’ve already had inquiries about using the center for gun shows, hunters shows, La Pine Frontier Days, the Crab Feed Fundraiser for (South County Outreach and Toy Run) and community school programs,� Cutler said. “I think we’re going to see that the building will bring business to this area and contribute a lot to La Pine’s economy.� — Reporter: 541-382-1811, lpantenburg@bendbulletin.com

A Magazine Highlighting The Variety Of Organizations That Connect Your Community.

Publishing Sunday, December 11, 2011 in The Bulletin Central Oregon communities continue to grow due to a nationallyrecognized appreciation for the region’s quality of life. From providing the most basic needs of food, shelter and security, to creating and maintaining positive social, educational, recreational and professional environments, Central Oregon’s nonprofit community is a foundation for our area’s success and sustainability. Hundreds of organizations and thousands of volunteers make up this nonprofit network. Through the publication of Connections, The Bulletin will both define and profile the organizations that make up this network. Connections will provide readers with a thorough look at nonprofit organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook Counties.

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The Bulletin is in the process of verifying and compiling a comprehensive list of nonprofit entities in Central Oregon. Please fill out this form to verify information in order to be considered for publication in Connections. Mail back to: The Bulletin, Attn: Nicole Werner, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. E-mail information to nwerner@bendbulletin.com or call 541-382-1811 ext. 871

Name of Nonprofit Group ______________________________________ Contact Person ______________________________________________ Phone _______________ E-mail ________________________________ Nonprofit Mission Statement/Purpose_____________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________

311 SW CENTURY DR., BEND • 541-389-6234 • www.powderhousebend.com


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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O N Creswell honors officer killed in 1971 The Associated Press EUGENE — Forty years ago, Creswell police officer Curtis VanDerson became the first and only police officer to lose his life in the line of duty here. Today, after all this time, the city will formally thank him. VanDerson was killed on Nov. 5, 1971, as he responded to a robbery in progress at the Community Bank of Creswell — now Siuslaw Bank. Shortly after the officer arrived on scene, one of the bank’s customers fled the building. VanDerson assumed the man was one of the culprits, and stood from his crouched position by a parked car, drawing his pistol and ordering the man to put his hands on his head and sit down. Shots rang out. Two of the bank robbers’ accomplices, waiting in a nearby 1964 Oldsmobile getaway car, gunned VanDerson down. Despite several bystanders rushing to his aid, VanDerson died moments later, the police chief by his side. He was 31 years old. There’s a memorial at the Creswell Historical Society Museum dedicated to the officer, with news clippings from the shooting, but no formal memorial. The idea for a city proclamation and plaque came from City Councilor A.J. O’Connell, who grew up in Creswell and had often heard the tragic story of VanDerson, who left behind a wife and two young children. It was VanDerson’s wife, Atha, who had radioed her husband to let him know of the robbery, after a dispatcher from the Lane County Sheriff’s Office called the VanDerson home to notify the officer that a silent alarm had been tripped inside the bank. VanDerson was honored by a mile-long funeral procession, a 21-gun salute and a flag-draped casket. Because the city had no insurance policy to cover the fallen officer, the community raised at least $6,000 in the days after the shooting to help the family. VanDerson’s salary at the city was $5,400 a year — paltry even by 1971 standards. The city later hired Atha VanDerson to work as a police dispatcher. When O’Connell heard about the memorial planned for Eugene police officer Chris Kilcullen, he thought it fitting that a similar tribute should also be created on VanDerson’s behalf. “His sacrifice is in danger of becoming forgotten by our community,” O’Connell said. “It’s incredibly horrible, but at the same time, inspiring.” O’Connell said he recently spent about an hour in the Creswell Cemetery looking for VanDerson’s grave. “It was a simple headstone,” he said. “No mention of the sacrifice. At that point, I said, ‘We have to do something.’” O’Connell pitched the idea of a memorial to his colleagues on the council, which directed Creswell City Administrator Mark Shrives to come up with something. The result: a proclamation will be read tonight at the council meeting, followed by a moment of silence. And when a new City Hall is built — which could be as early as next year — the plaque will hang there.

Medford votes to bar criminals from city parks

PROTESTERS OCCUPY SILVERTON

Timothy Gonzalez / (Salem) Statesman Journal

People march through downtown Silverton during the one-day event “Occupy Silverton” on Saturday.

OREGON AGRICULTURE

Mild autumn makes up for rainy spring The Associated Press EUGENE — Oregon farmers say a mild autumn has partially made up for Oregon’s rainy spring, with late season sunshine bringing a happy ending to the 2011 growing season for most food crop farmers in the Willamette Valley. “Everything across the board ran two, three, four weeks later than usual because of the weather,” Geoff Horning, executive director of the Agri-business Council of Oregon, told The Eugene Register-Guard.

He said farmers were nervous but things turned out OK. Yields were down for a few crops, but higher prices made up for the lower yields. The state’s commercial sweet cherry crop is doing well for the second year in a row. In 2010, cherries broke into the top 10 of Oregon’s highestvalue crops, with a value of $77 million — up 113 percent over six years. Grapes were far behind in late September, but then a sunny October and early No-

vember saved grape growers, said state Department of Agriculture spokesman Bruce Pokarney. Blueberries continue to do well in the state, reaching an estimated 60 million pounds this year, up 155 percent since 2003, according to the state Blueberry Commission. Hazelnut growers are just now reaching the end of the season. Usually, picking begins Sept. 1; this year, it got under way the last week of September or later.

The Associated Press MEDFORD — People who break the law in Medford parks or on other city property can be excluded from the property for up to 180 days, according to a change to city code approved by the Medford City Council last week. Exclusions apply only to property where the law was broken, the Medford Mail Tribune reported. First-time offenders could be excluded for 30 days, and violators who return can be fined or jailed if cited for trespassing under the law. “We think it’s the right thing to do for those folks we have continual problems with,” police Chief Tim George told council members. The new law doesn’t apply to people who break camping laws. It allows for appeals of exclusions.

Most public violations occur in parks Police officials said most public violations occur in parks. Councilman Bob Strosser said families will benefit from the change. “The people who want to go to the park and not do things that are wrong aren’t going to have a problem,” Strosser said. “This is only going to apply to those people violating the law.”

Medford police took 3,097 calls about problems in city parks from 2008 to 2010. Complaints were related to drugs, liquor, noise, assaults, vandalism and harassment. “The reality of this whole thing is it kind of formalizes our ability to exclude people who have engaged in illegal or prohibited conduct,” deputy police Chief Tim Doney said. “A lot of other cities do this, and quite honestly, we’re one of the last large cities coming along that’s followed this.”

Friction with homeless The change has drawn complaints. John Sheppard said the change at Hawthorne Park will create more friction between police and the homeless. “It’s just going to create a larger barrier,” said Sheppard, who has been cited for park violations connected to his dog. Ashland resident Shane Smith said misdemeanor crimes, such as defacement of public property, should not be used to exclude people. “If you’re assaulting somebody or dealing drugs right here in the park, that makes sense, but the misdemeanor, absolutely not,” Smith said.

Self Referrals Welcome

OCCUPY PORTLAND

desertorthopedics.com

Protesters divided after vandalism The Associated Press PORTLAND — After a group that labeled itself “The Real Occupy Portland” claimed responsibility for vandalizing two banks in Portland on Saturday night, another group with the same name is denouncing the crimes. Portland police received an email at 3:01 a.m. Sunday from “The Real Occupy Portland and the 99%” that distanced itself from those who claimed responsibility for vandalism at the Chase Bank and Wells Fargo Bank branches. The Oregonian reports the email sent to police on Sunday says the group is a non-profit organization established five days ago. The group writes that it

does not condone either vandalism or violence. Meanwhile, five Portland protesters have locked themselves together and to a cement-filled barrel as they vow to remain in a downtown plaza. Police said late Saturday that two of the five Occupy Portland protesters are handcuffed to a piece of medal inside the barrel in Terry Schrunk Plaza, which is federal property. The others linked themselves together and to the men in handcuffs by using Ushaped bike locks. Police say federal officials do not plan enforcement action against the five. The Oregonian reports they were covered in blankets and an American flag late Saturday.

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B-1 bomber travels north on Interstate 5 SALEM — A decommissioned B-1 bomber is passing through Oregon this week on its way for testing at a Washington Boeing plant. The Salem Statesman Journal reports that a convoy is scheduled to haul the bomber through Salem on Interstate 5 on Tuesday night. The partially dismantled plane is 135 feet long, 29 feet wide and 15 feet high. Its wings have been removed. The convoy travels about 45 mph and only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. It takes up two lanes of traffic, occasionally pulling over to allow vehicles to pass. The jet is being moved from Tucson, Ariz., to Renton, Wash.

Shooting’s dismissal overturned by panel PORTLAND — The dismissal of a lawsuit against two sheriff’s deputies who fatally shot a teenager outside his home has been overturned after a panel of federal judges found that the facts in the case are in dispute. The case will return to Portland for a trial, the Oregonian

reports. Last year, a federal judge ruled that deputies acted reasonably and did not violate 18year-old Lukus Glenn’s civil rights when they used deadly force. Mosman said the deputies used deadly force to prevent Glenn, who was holding a knife, from hurting someone at his parents’ home in suburban Tigard in September 2006. Glenn’s family filed a federal wrongful death lawsuit in 2008 against the county and the two deputies involved in the shooting.

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Police suspect couple had suicide pact PORTLAND — Homicide detectives believe a couple suffering from mental health issues made a suicide pact they carried out at a Portland motel room on Friday. The bodies of 47-year-old Diane Bailey and 32-year-old Adam Ury were found by staff in a downtown motel room at about 2:30 p.m. on Friday. Investigators believe Ury shot Bailey as she lay in bed, then shot himself in the bathroom. — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

E Mistakes that cost millions shouldn’t be shrugged off

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The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

e hope members of the Bend City Council don’t take Eric King’s advice to heart. They shouldn’t get comfortable with an engineering fee esti-

mate that is off by more than half. King, Bend’s city manager, told council members Wednesday that the city had used a $2 million “placeholder� when estimating final design costs on a sewer plant upgrade currently in the works. The final figure came in at more than double that placeholder, some $4.2 million. Given the total cost of the project, more than $38 million, that might not seem like much at City Hall, and that’s disturbing. It’s shocking that city officials could so badly underestimate the cost of that final design. If the engineering firm with which they’re dealing led them to believe that the cost would be close to the placeholder amount only to present a bill for the larger figure, that’s one problem, and officials should address it. If the city lowballed the figure, that’s another problem, one the City Council must address. And if some city officials are simply incompetent, that’s a difficulty of an entirely different sort, though again, the City Council may have to get involved to solve it.

City residents are not a bottomless wallet to which officials may turn whenever they need money. City residents are not a bottomless wallet to which officials may turn whenever they need money. Bend residents already are due for huge increases in their water and sewer bills in the years ahead, both for the sewer plant upgrade and for a major overhaul of the city’s water system. That latter is set to drive water rates up 40 percent or so. Now comes the sewer engineering overrun, which could raise the sewer portion of city utility bills if construction costs do not come in below estimates. Even if they do, sewer rates will rise to pay for the project. With ratepayers on the hook, officials may feel they have nothing to worry about. They won’t pay; we will.

Drunk is drunk, no matter the language spoken by the driver

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he Oregon Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments this week in a case that could have important repercussions on how police deal with drunken driving with those who don’t understand English. The facts of the case aren’t really in dispute. Salem’s StatesmanJournal laid them out. Jose L. Nunez Cabanilla speaks Spanish and only has a rudimentary knowledge of English. He was arrested on June 28, 2008, by a Malheur County sheriff’s deputy. At the county jail, deputies read the consequences of the impliedconsent law and his rights in English. Cabanilla declined to take a breath test. Cabanilla was convicted of drunken driving, refusal to take a breath test and careless driving. During the trial, Cabanilla argued that his refusal should not be admissible because the warnings were only in English. The judge said it was. Cabanilla appealed to the Oregon Court of Appeals. That court upheld the conviction without opinion. Now the case is before the

Oregon Supreme Court. Oregon’s implied consent law says basically that people who are driving have implied they will consent to a breath, blood or urine test if a police officer requests they take it. The legal questions raised by the case are many: What does Oregon law mean when it requires those arrested to be “informed� of rights and consequences before police ask them to submit to a breath test? Do those arrested need a reasonable opportunity to understand? What is reasonable? We can’t speak to what the Oregon Supreme Court will decide. Some courts in other states require that officers read the rights and consequences to suspects in a language that they can understand. But it would be simply absurd when a person is stopped for drunk driving to require officers to determine what the person understands. They may be intoxicated. Officers are not equipped to measure language skills or comprehension.

Obama’s spending isn’t helping By Keith Sime n his August 31 In My View article “Don’t buy the economic policy the tea party is selling,â€? Les Lambert attempted to paraphrase tea party advocates by saying that they repeatedly proclaim “In three years, President Obama hasn’t shown leadership to balance the budget and create more jobs, but wants to impose job-killing taxes and regulations.â€? And then exclaims, “What a whopper!â€? Ironically, in an interview with Jake Tapper on Good Morning America on February 1, 2009, President Barack Obama stated, “One nice thing about the situation that I find myself in is that I will be held accountable ‌ If I don’t have this done in three years (referring to jobs), then there’s going to be a one-term proposition.â€? After 32 months in office backed by a near veto-proof Democratic Congress for his first two years, Obama has added $4 trillion to the debt. The debt is currently increasing at the rate of $4 billion per day, unemployment remains over 9 percent and Obamacare has been found to be unaffordable by his own administration. Also now beginning to see the light of day are the Solyndra solar panel and Fisker Karma sports car green job scams, that resulted from unfettered government spending spawned by the stimulus bill. Lambert decries the tea party and doesn’t yet appreciate the fact that it was only the tea party that helped prevent two more years of

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IN MY VIEW profligate spending thereby only piling up further debt. The president’s plans have failed because he does not understand that in order for us to have a prosperous economy, it’s the private sector and not the government sector that produces long-term jobs. Henry Morgenthau Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt’s treasury secretary, finally realized this when on May 9, 1939, before the House Ways and Means Committee, he said, “We have tried spending money. We are spending more than we have ever spent before and it does not work. ‌ I say after eight years of this administration we have just as much unemployment as when we started. ‌ and an enormous debt to boot!â€? President Warren G. Harding inherited a post-World War I depression. According to “Out of Work,â€? by authors and economists Richard Vetter and Lowell Gallaway, the 1920 depression was worse than the Great Depression for the first few quarters. The estimated gross national product plunged 24 percent and the number of unemployed more than doubled from 2.1 million to 4.9 million in the first year. Rather than trying to spend his way out of the depression and going further into debt, Harding cut federal spending by over 20 percent the first year and 36 percent in the second year. Federal taxes were cut by over 15 percent the first year and by over 18 percent the

second year. With Harding’s tax cuts, spending cuts and economic policy, the GNP rebounded and unemployment fell to 6.7 percent just a year and a half after he became president. By 1926, the unemployment rate had reached a low of 1.8 percent, a near-historic record. President Ronald Reagan, like Harding, did the exact opposite of Obama’s massive government spending infusions. Reagan’s approach rested on tax cuts, deregulation, reductions in the rate of government spending and a stable, carefully managed growth of the money supply. Foremost was a federal income tax reduction. He secured a 25 percent across-theboard reduction over a three-year period beginning in October 1981. The upper-income marginal tax rate was dropped from 70 percent to 28 percent by 1983 and three years into Reagan’s term, we had begun the longest peacetime economic expansion in history. The crucial lesson for today is that the best “stimulus� is one that relies on the tried and true American way; letting free individuals and entrepreneurs stimulate the economy through their own earnings and economic activity a la Harding, Reagan and the tea party. Wealth confiscation and redistribution by government collectivists and central planners never works, a la FDR, and has now been painfully redemonstrated by Obama. In his own words, he’s a “one-term proposition.� — Keith Sime lives in Sunriver.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

It would be a crime to squander the shale gas windfall

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he United States is a country that has received many blessings, and once upon a time you could assume that Americans would come together to take advantage of them. But you can no longer make that assumption. The country is more divided and more clogged by special interests. Now we groan to absorb even the most wondrous gifts. A few years ago, a business genius named George Mitchell helped offer such a gift. As Daniel Yergin writes in “The Quest,� his gripping history of energy innovation, Mitchell fought through waves of skepticism and opposition to extract natural gas from shale. The method he and his team used to release the trapped gas, called fracking, has paid off in the most immense way. In 2000, shale gas represented just 1 percent of American natural gas supplies. Today, it is 30 percent and rising. John Rowe, the chief executive of the utility Exelon, which derives al-

most all its power from nuclear plants, says that shale gas is one of the most important energy revolutions of his lifetime. It’s a clichÊ word, Yergin told me, but the fracking innovation is game-changing. It transforms the energy marketplace. The United States now seems to possess a 100-year supply of natural gas, which is the cleanest of the fossil fuels. This cleaner, cheaper energy source is already replacing dirtier coal-fired plants. It could serve as the ideal bridge, Amy Jaffe of Rice University says, until renewable sources like wind and solar mature. Already shale gas has produced more than half a million new jobs, not only in traditional areas like Texas but also in economically wounded places like western Pennsylvania and, soon, Ohio. If current trends continue, there are hundreds of thousands of new jobs to come. The French company Vallourec is building a $650 million plant in

DAVID BROOKS Youngstown, Ohio, to make steel tubes for the wells. States like Pennsylvania, Ohio and New York will reap billions in additional revenue. Consumers also benefit. Today, natural gas prices are less than half of what they were three years ago, lowering electricity prices. Meanwhile, America is less reliant on foreign suppliers. All of this is tremendously good news, but, of course, nothing is that simple. The U.S. is polarized between “drill, baby, drill� conservatives, who seem suspicious of most regulation, and some environmentalists, who seem to regard fossil fuels as morally corrupt and imagine we can switch to wind and solar overnight. The shale gas revolution challenges the coal industry, renders new nuclear

plants uneconomic and changes the economics for the renewable energy companies, which are now much further from viability. So forces have gathered against shale gas, with predictable results. The clashes between the industry and the environmentalists are now becoming brutal and totalistic, dehumanizing each side. Not-in-my-backyard activists are organizing to prevent exploration. Environmentalists and their publicists wax apocalyptic. Like every energy source, fracking has its dangers. The process involves injecting large amounts of water and chemicals deep underground. If done right, this should not contaminate freshwater supplies, but rogue companies have screwed up and there have been instances of contamination. The wells, which are sometimes beneath residential areas, are serviced by big trucks that damage the roads and alter the atmosphere in neighborhoods. A few sloppy companies could

discredit the whole sector. These problems are real, but not insurmountable. An exhaustive study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology concluded, “With 20,000 shale wells drilled in the last 10 years, the environmental record of shale-gas development is for the most part a good one.� In other words, the inherent risks can be managed if there is a reasonable regulatory regime, and if the general public has a balanced and realistic sense of the costs and benefits. A few weeks ago, I sat around with John Rowe, one of the most trusted people in the energy business, and listened to him talk enthusiastically about this windfall. He has no vested interest in this; indeed, his company might be hurt. But he knows how much shale gas could mean to America. It would be a crime if we squandered this blessing. — David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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OREGON NEWS

Saubel worked to preserve her Cahuilla culture By Elaine Woo Los Angeles Times

FEATURED OBITUARY

Katherine Siva Saubel, an elder of the Cahuilla Indian tribe of Southern California, once described herself as “just a voice in the wilderness all by myself.” She meant that she had few people with whom she could speak the Cahuilla language or sing the songs that conveyed her people’s ancient stories. “My race,” she told the Los Angeles Times in 2000, “is dying.” Now Saubel, long its feistiest guardian, has died. “It’s a huge loss ... the end of an era,” said Nathalie Colin, an ethno-historian at the Malki Museum near Banning, which Saubel co-founded more than 45 years ago to preserve Cahuilla history and traditions. Saubel, 91, died of natural causes Tuesday at her home on the Morongo Reservation near Banning, said her nephew, Kevin Siva. One of the last fluent speakers of the Cahuilla language, Saubel worked with linguists and anthropologists to produce a Cahuilla dictionary and grammar book as well as historical accounts and studies of medicinal plants known through tribal lore. In 1964, she helped launch the Malki Museum, the first nonprofit museum founded and managed by Native Americans on a reservation. She was also an activist, who in 1998 brought electricity to the Los Coyotes Reservation in San Diego County, where she was born and later served as tribal chairwoman. “Dr. Saubel was truly remarkable, both as a leader and as a fierce defender of Native American culture, from the preservation of the traditional Cahuilla language to the protection of sacred sites,” Robert Martin, chairman of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians, said in a statement last week. The Cahuilla, once one of the largest California Indian tribes, are concentrated in Riverside and San Diego counties. Among the more prominent Cahuilla bands are the Morongo and the Agua Caliente band in Palm Springs. Born on March 7, 1920, Saubel was the eighth of 11 children. She lived on the remote Los Coyotes Reservation until she was almost 4 and then moved with her family to Palm Springs, Calif. She entered public school there at 7, knowing not one

word of English. “I would speak to them in the Indian language,” she told the Los Angeles Times in 2000, “and they would answer me in English. I don’t remember when I began to understand what was being said to me. Maybe a year.” She was believed to be the first Native American woman to graduate from Palm Springs High School, in 1940. That year she married another Cahuilla Indian, Mariano Saubel. She is survived by their son, Allen; four grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Despite strong pressures to abandon her language and culture, Saubel worked on her own to maintain her ability to speak Cahuilla. She memorized sacred songs that traditionally were performed only by Cahuilla men. She also learned about native plants and their uses from her mother, a medicine woman, and recorded the information in a journal. But the post-World War II years brought unsettling changes. “Everything started happening after the 1940s,” she told the Press-Enterprise of Riverside in 2003. “We lost our language, and members started marrying outside our culture.” In 1958, she met Lowell Bean, a UCLA graduate student in ethnology and anthropology, who was sent by one of his professors to find out whether there was any viable Indian culture left in California. He found the proof in Saubel and her extended family. “She was an academic treasure,” Bean, who collaborated with Saubel on a number of major studies, said Friday. “She was the dominant interpreter of Cahuilla culture and history.” Saubel went on to work with other prominent linguists and anthropologists and lecture on Cahuilla culture at universities in the U.S., Japan and Germany. She co-wrote a Cahuilla dictionary with Jans Jacob Seiler and a Cahuilla grammar book with Pam Munroe. With Bean, she produced “Temalpakh: Cahuilla Indian Knowledge and Usage of Plants.” She also wrote a memoir, “A Dried Coyote’s Tail,” with Eric Elliott.

Obituary policy

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Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Deaths of note from around the world: Takeo Nishioka, 75: President of the Japanese House of Councillors. Died Saturday in Tokyo of pneumonia. Sid Melton, 94: Character actor best known for his regular roles in the television shows “Make Room for Daddy” and “Green Acres,” and as the comic relief in many sciencefiction and noir films of the 1950s. Died Wednesday in Burbank, Calif. Mary Hunt Kahlenberg, 71: Curator and collector of native textiles whose exhibition on Navajo blankets, organized at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1972, broke with tradition by presenting Navajo weaving as fine art. Died Oct. 27 in Santa Fe, N.M. Norman F. Ramsey, 96: Nobel Prize-winning physicist who developed a precise method to probe the structure of atoms and molecules and used it to devise an exact way to keep time. Died Friday in Wayland, Mass. Phyllis Love, 85: Played ingenues on Broadway in the 1950s and originated the part of Rosa Delle Rose in Tennessee Williams’ “Rose Tattoo.” Died Oct. 30 in Menifee, Calif. — From wire reports

Jessie Higgins / The (Coos Bay) World

Caslin Shoenclark, 10, logs onto Success-Maker — an online learning program sponsored by Hillcrest Elementary School, in North Bend — from her home in Coos Bay. Shoenclark used the program more than anyone else in her grade this summer. It was the first time the program was available to students at home.

Online lessons aid North Bend students By Jessie Higgins The (Coos Bay) World

NORTH BEND — Eightyear-old Natalie Cheal was on vacation the first month of summer, so when she got back she had some catching up to do. For the first time, her school — Hillcrest Elementary — was using an online educational program students could access at home. It wasn’t required, but the school was offering a $20 reward and ice cream party to the students who were on the program the most during the summer. “I heard all my friends were doing it, so I wanted to, as well,” Natalie said. She did two to three sessions a day of the program, called SuccessMaker. The idea was to limit student regression during the summer months when students generally don’t participate in much academic learning, Principal Bruce Martin said. To his delight, the students who utilized the program over the summer advanced. This week, Hillcrest plans to begin using the program for homework, not just optional work.

“I liked how ... it got me to my level really quickly. I’m happy it keeps me on a higher level.” — Eric Pringle, 9, Hillcrest Elementary

“I would like it to go to homework,” mother Mary ShoenClark said. Her daughter, Caslin Shoenclark, 10, used the program over the summer more than any other student in her grade. The program begins by accessing a student’s level, then working from there. It does not advance a student until he or she has mastered the current level. The students like that. “I liked how ... it got me to my level really quickly,” 9-year-old Eric Pringle said. “I’m happy it keeps me on a higher level.”

Extra lessons Pringle also read about Neil Armstrong on SuccessMaker this summer. Armstrong, Pringle said, worked at a bakery before becoming an astronaut. The odd job actually helped him in his career as an astronaut, Pringle explained. One of Armstrong’s duties was to wash out large

pots. To do this, he would climb inside the pot, which was a similar size to some areas of the spaceship he would later ride to the moon. “Then, at the end, it showed a Neil Armstrong video of him jumping out of the space station onto the moon,” Pringle said.

Working to help students without Internet access Students who don’t have a computer or Internet access at home are at a disadvantage, especially when the school begins using the program for required homework, Martin said. But the school is developing plans to compensate for that. It may open a computer lab after school, or work with students individually to find a system that works best for them. Teachers are adamant the program does not replace class instruction. Most of the kids that participated in the summer program

know a subject — such as multiplication or division — that the rest of the class has not learned yet. Once a student masters a subject, the program advances him or her to a new level. For example, in math a student may progress from multiplication to division. At each level, the program “teaches” the student the new subject. “If she’s having trouble it will show an example,” Natalie’s mother, Julie Bachelor, said. The program introduced Natalie to division for the first time Sunday afternoon. “Mom, what is this?” she said, turning from her laptop to her mother, who sat behind her on her bed. “The school encourages the kids to do it by themselves because then it will show what their level actually is,” Bachelor said. “Sometimes I help with the concept.” The program continually grades and accesses student progress, then gives their teachers reports on which areas the students are successful in and which areas they need additional help. Once all the students are participating, this will inform class instruction time, teachers say.

Clay Continued from B1 “I just kind of let them go wild,” DeRosso said. The two-day showcase likely drew about 1,500 people, said Linda Heisserman, spokeswoman for the Clay Guild of the Cascades. The efforts of artists like DeRosso, one of many who took a turn teaching at the Kids Clay table, kept the youngsters there distracted while their parents shopped. “It gives kids a chance to play,” Heisserman said. Cora made the most of her clay. “She made some sort of monster with teeth and bulging eyes,” said Molly Carroll, her 40-yearold mother. Living near Highland Magnet School, where the event is held inside the gym, the family has come to the showcase each year for the last four or five years. Each time, Carroll said she has left with a new piece of pottery, in part because she’s able to shop while her children are distracted with a demonstration. But kids weren’t the only ones making monsters Sunday, said Rachael Weisgerber, 38, of Bend, who was at the show with her 3year-old daughter, Reily. “She made one, I made one and I bought one that (James DeRosso) made,” Weisgerber said. DeRosso, 48, said he started making monsters while he was a student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, to jokingly create gargoyle-like guardians for

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ross Jesswein, left, of Grants Pass, and Arlene Abruzzo, of Madras, look over displays of ceramic art at the Wildfire Pottery Showcase at Highland Magnet School in Bend on Sunday.

Clay Guild of the Cascades Meeting every other month, the Clay Guild of the Cascades welcomes anyone with an interest in handmade pottery and ceramics. Annual dues are $20. For more information about the guild, which presents the annual Wildfire Pottery Showcase, go online to www .cascadesclayguild.com or call 541-419-1500.

the kiln. After other students kept taking the monsters, he realized there was a market for them and stopped making plates and bowls for sales like the showcase. “Now it’s just all monsters,”

If you go What: “Monster Making 101” workshop When: Today, 4 p.m. Where: Cindercone Clay Center, 50 N.E. Scott St. Cost: $20 For more information, call 503-381-1801 . For more about artist James DeRosso, go to http:// monster8all.com.

DeRosso said. He’ll be in Bend again today, leading a monster-making workshop this afternoon at Cindercone Clay Center. While the guild’s next showcase — featuring artists

from around the state — won’t be for another year, Heisserman said many of the artists are taking part in the upcoming Empty Bowls event to raise money for NeighborImpact’s food bank. The artists will have about 850 bowls for eventgoers to choose from, fill with gourmet soup and then take home with them after lunch and dessert. Empty Bowls has seatings at 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Sunday at Central Oregon Community College’s Campus Center, at 2600 N.W. College Way. Tickets are $18 plus service charges in advance at http://emptybowls.eventbrite .com and $20 at the door. For more information, go to http:// neighborimpact.org or call 541-280-0284. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

B6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, NOVEMBER 7

TUESDAY Tonight: Partly cloudy.

Today: Partly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

HIGH

LOW

46

26

51/44

56/42

Cannon Beach 52/43

Hillsboro Portland 51/44 50/38

Tillamook 54/39

Salem

53/41

50/37

50/36

Maupin

52/30

53/40 46/32

53/37

Coos Bay

Crescent

52/40

Silver Lake

45/17

Port Orford 55/42

Gold Beach 57/47

John Day

Unity 40/21

47/29

Vale 46/28

EAST Mostly cloudy to Ontario the north, partly 45/28 cloudy to the south. 45/28

Juntura

Burns Riley

44/25

47/21

38/20

Jordan Valley

48/22

Frenchglen

38/21

41/22

Yesterday’s state extremes

36/24

Chiloquin

Medford

37/19

Klamath Falls 38/19

Ashland

54/46

41/23

Paisley 48/33

Brookings

Baker City

39/17

Grants Pass 44/33

37/26

CENTRAL Partly to mostly cloudy with a chance for some patchy fog early.

Nyssa

Hampton 44/20

40/21

45/24

Christmas Valley

Chemult

48/38

Union

Brothers 46/19

Fort Rock 48/21

45/18

40/13

Roseburg

46/26

La Pine 47/19

Crescent Lake

54/42

Bandon

50/28

46/20

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Joseph

46/25

Mitchell 52/25

Prineville 51/24 Sisters Redmond Paulina 47/20 47/22 49/23 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

53/44

Spray 49/28

Enterprise 40/23

La Grande Granite

44/20

52/40

Florence

44/30

Madras

Camp Sherman

53/38

38/25

Condon

Warm Springs

Corvallis Yachats

47/31

49/32

51/29

53/39

Wallowa

50/31

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

52/33

48/34

53/39

54/44

Hermiston 49/31

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 32/20

51/39

48/30

The Biggs Dalles 50/40

50/40

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

46/30

Fields

Lakeview

• 54° The

McDermitt

41/25

34/18

31/23

Dalles

THURSDAY

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

47 28

WEST Partly cloudy with a chance of showers.

Astoria

Partly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

WEDNESDAY

FRIDAY Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

49 25

Mostly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

52 28

50 29

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .8:57 a.m. . . . . . 5:38 p.m. Venus . . . . . .8:49 a.m. . . . . . 5:50 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:04 a.m. . . . . . 1:58 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .4:14 p.m. . . . . . 5:53 a.m. Saturn. . . . . .4:49 a.m. . . . . . 4:00 p.m. Uranus . . . . .2:57 p.m. . . . . . 3:03 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . 0.07” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41/22 Record high . . . . . . . . 70 in 1997 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.08” Average month to date. . . 0.23” Record low. . . . . . . . . . 9 in 1971 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.17” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Average year to date. . . . . 8.72” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.98 Record 24 hours . . .1.49 in 1973 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:50 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:48 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:51 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:47 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:05 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:53 a.m.

Moon phases Full

Last

New

Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 24

OREGON CITIES City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Astoria . . . . . . . 52/33/trace Baker City . . . . . .33/26/0.01 Brookings . . . . . .47/47/1.48 Burns. . . . . . . . . .38/26/0.14 Eugene . . . . . . . .51/42/0.05 Klamath Falls . . .36/28/0.06 Lakeview. . . . . . .36/28/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .40/13/0.10 Medford . . . . . . .47/37/0.57 Newport . . . . . . .52/41/0.14 North Bend . . . . .54/41/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .40/32/0.01 Pendleton . . . . . .47/28/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .53/35/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .43/22/0.06 Redmond. . . . . . .41/23/0.03 Roseburg. . . . . . .49/43/0.04 Salem . . . . . . . . .54/43/0.17 Sisters . . . . . . . . .43/25/0.07 The Dalles . . . . . .54/39/0.00

Monday Hi/Lo/W

First

Dec. 2

FIRE INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97......Low Redmond/Madras ........Low

. . . .51/44/sh . . . . .53/45/sh . . . .41/23/pc . . . . .44/25/pc . . . . .54/46/c . . . . .56/50/sh . . . .39/19/pc . . . . .43/23/pc . . . .53/40/pc . . . . .56/43/sh . . . .38/19/pc . . . . .42/28/pc . . . .34/18/pc . . . . .42/25/pc . . . .47/19/pc . . . . .42/21/pc . . . .48/33/pc . . . . . .53/38/c . . . .54/44/sh . . . . .55/47/sh . . . .52/40/sh . . . . .56/47/sh . . . .45/28/pc . . . . .48/30/pc . . . . .50/31/c . . . . .53/30/pc . . . .51/44/sh . . . . .54/44/pc . . . .51/24/pc . . . . .49/26/pc . . . .46/24/pc . . . . .48/25/pc . . . .48/38/pc . . . . .55/41/sh . . . .53/39/sh . . . . .56/41/sh . . . .47/22/pc . . . . .45/27/sh . . . .50/36/pc . . . . .54/32/sh

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ...............................Low La Pine...............................Low Prineville..........................Low

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,413 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139,406 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 79,183 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 24,624 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92,684 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 228 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . 290 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 18 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75.4 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . 822 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 64 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 91.8 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 5.30 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 2

POLLEN COUNT

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

• 13° La Pine

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 91° Laredo, Texas

• -6° Butte, Mont.

• 1.51” Sexton Summit, Ore.

Honolulu 84/72

-10s

0s

Vancouver 46/39

10s Calgary 36/25

20s

30s

Saskatoon 33/10

Seattle 50/44

40s

Winnipeg 37/19

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 41/25

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 49/37

Halifax 52/41 P ortland Billings To ronto Portland 54/42 42/23 62/46 51/44 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 50/33 54/37 Boise 61/47 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 44/26 61/50 New York 43/27 58/50 Cheyenne 59/46 Des Moines 37/22 Philadelphia 58/41 Chicago Columbus 61/43 63/45 61/52 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 57/40 59/48 City 63/44 Las Kansas City Denver Louisville 37/28 Vegas 62/57 40/23 69/54 St. Louis 60/41 64/55 Charlotte Albuquerque Los Angeles 67/43 Nashville Little Rock 53/29 65/48 70/50 73/61 Oklahoma City Phoenix Atlanta 70/60 63/45 68/45 Birmingham Tijuana 70/53 Dallas 57/47 75/64 New Orleans 78/65 Orlando Houston 81/63 81/70 Chihuahua 78/39 Miami 80/69 Monterrey La Paz 86/65 78/65 Mazatlan Anchorage 85/63 28/12 Juneau 40/31 Bismarck 42/23

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . . 81/54/t . .68/38/w Akron . . . . . . . . . .61/33/0.00 . .60/45/pc . 64/45/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .53/22/0.00 . . . 62/41/s . . 64/45/s Albuquerque. . . . .52/29/0.00 . .53/29/sh . 50/26/pc Anchorage . . . . . .28/20/0.24 . .28/12/sn . . 22/7/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . . . 68/45/s . . 69/49/s Atlantic City . . . . .58/31/0.00 . . . 61/43/s . . 62/52/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .78/67/c . . .80/48/t Baltimore . . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . . . 62/46/s . . 65/46/s Billings . . . . . . . . .34/20/0.00 . . . 42/23/s . 47/21/pc Birmingham . . . . .69/45/0.00 . . . 70/53/s . . 75/58/s Bismarck. . . . . . . .40/33/0.00 . .42/23/pc . . 44/26/c Boise . . . . . . . . . . .44/30/0.00 . .44/26/pc . 47/29/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . . . 61/47/s . 67/46/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .56/31/0.00 . . . 56/41/s . . 65/46/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .62/30/0.00 . .61/50/pc . 62/52/pc Burlington, VT. . . .54/25/0.00 . . . 58/38/s . . 60/43/s Caribou, ME . . . . .53/25/0.00 . .45/34/pc . . 48/31/s Charleston, SC . . .71/46/0.00 . . . 71/54/s . 71/57/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .65/40/0.00 . . . 67/43/s . . 69/45/s Chattanooga. . . . .66/35/0.00 . . . 69/47/s . . 74/53/s Cheyenne . . . . . . .38/24/0.00 . . .37/22/c . . 37/21/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .61/52/c . . .66/56/r Cincinnati . . . . . . .62/31/0.00 . .65/46/pc . 70/52/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .62/39/0.00 . .61/50/pc . 65/49/pc Colorado Springs .50/25/0.00 . . . 39/23/t . 34/19/sn Columbia, MO . . .64/50/0.00 . . . 64/56/t . . .69/45/t Columbia, SC . . . .69/43/0.00 . . . 69/47/s . 72/49/pc Columbus, GA. . . .71/45/0.00 . . . 72/51/s . 74/54/pc Columbus, OH. . . .62/38/0.00 . .63/45/pc . 69/48/pc Concord, NH. . . . .58/18/0.00 . . . 60/35/s . 64/40/pc Corpus Christi. . . .83/75/0.00 . .80/71/pc . . .80/59/t Dallas Ft Worth. . .78/64/0.00 . . . 75/64/t . . .77/44/t Dayton . . . . . . . . .60/35/0.00 . .62/47/pc . 68/51/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .49/25/0.00 . . .40/23/c . 36/21/sn Des Moines. . . . . .59/49/0.00 . .58/41/pc . 44/35/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . . .65/35/0.00 . .58/50/sh . . 62/50/c Duluth. . . . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . .47/28/pc . 43/32/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . .66/38/pc . . 58/35/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .22/11/0.00 . . . 7/-3/sn . -2/-18/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .52/40/0.05 . .44/26/pc . 45/27/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .33/18/0.00 . .38/12/sn . . 42/11/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .65/35/0.00 . .59/46/pc . . .56/50/r Green Bay. . . . . . .58/43/0.00 . . . 54/37/s . . .44/40/r Greensboro. . . . . .62/38/0.00 . . . 65/41/s . . 66/49/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .56/28/0.00 . . . 56/35/s . 63/44/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .56/25/0.00 . . . 60/40/s . . 67/42/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .36/13/0.00 . .35/25/pc . . 40/22/c Honolulu. . . . . . . .87/76/0.00 . . . 84/72/s . . 84/72/s Houston . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .81/70/c . . .83/55/t Huntsville . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . . 71/48/s . . 74/57/s Indianapolis . . . . .63/41/0.00 . .63/51/sh . 68/53/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .74/47/0.00 . .77/57/pc . 81/65/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .73/60/sh . 72/61/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .39/35/0.30 . . 40/31/rs . .36/29/rs Kansas City. . . . . .65/51/0.00 . . . 62/57/t . . .59/37/t Lansing . . . . . . . . .63/37/0.00 . .59/47/pc . 58/50/sh Las Vegas . . . . . . .55/40/0.00 . . . 60/41/s . 60/43/pc Lexington . . . . . . .60/39/0.00 . .65/47/pc . 67/52/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .57/40/0.00 . . .58/37/c . .41/29/rs Little Rock. . . . . . .68/49/0.00 . . .73/61/c . . .75/49/t Los Angeles. . . . . .60/48/0.42 . . . 65/48/s . . 68/51/s Louisville. . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . .69/54/pc . . 75/60/s Madison, WI . . . . .61/44/0.00 . .57/40/pc . . .48/41/r Memphis. . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . .73/58/pc . . .77/59/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.07 . .80/69/pc . 81/71/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .58/46/0.00 . .55/46/pc . . .53/48/r Minneapolis . . . . .55/47/0.00 . . . 50/33/s . 43/32/sh Nashville. . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . .70/50/pc . . 75/60/s New Orleans. . . . .73/61/0.00 . .78/65/pc . 80/68/pc New York . . . . . . .54/38/0.00 . . . 59/46/s . . 67/49/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .57/32/0.00 . . . 60/44/s . . 67/47/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .61/51/0.00 . . . 65/48/s . 69/54/pc Oklahoma City . . .74/53/0.00 . . . 70/60/t . 63/39/sh Omaha . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . . .57/40/c . .40/31/rs Orlando. . . . . . . . .78/59/0.01 . .81/63/sh . 82/66/pc Palm Springs. . . . .65/44/0.02 . . . 65/44/s . . 66/48/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .61/52/sh . . .65/50/t Philadelphia . . . . .56/35/0.00 . . . 61/43/s . . 65/47/s Phoenix. . . . . . . . .67/48/0.00 . .63/45/sh . . 67/46/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .60/29/0.00 . . . 62/42/s . . 65/45/s Portland, ME. . . . .58/24/0.00 . . . 54/42/s . 58/48/pc Providence . . . . . .57/26/0.00 . . . 63/41/s . . 65/44/s Raleigh . . . . . . . . .65/40/0.00 . . . 66/44/s . 67/49/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .46/21/0.00 . .43/27/pc . . 46/30/c Reno . . . . . . . . . . .47/33/0.00 . .42/23/pc . 45/24/pc Richmond . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . . . 65/42/s . . 68/45/s Rochester, NY . . . .61/27/0.00 . .64/48/pc . 62/49/pc Sacramento. . . . . .57/47/0.20 . . . 60/38/s . 62/41/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . . .65/50/0.00 . . . 64/55/t . . .72/53/t Salt Lake City . . . .44/28/0.00 . .37/28/pc . . 38/29/s San Antonio . . . . .80/68/0.00 . . .79/67/c . . .81/45/t San Diego . . . . . . .61/53/0.05 . .66/53/pc . . 70/52/s San Francisco . . . .59/48/0.24 . .60/46/pc . 62/47/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .60/46/0.16 . .63/44/pc . . 65/46/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .47/23/0.00 . . . 43/26/r . 40/22/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . . 71/52/s . 73/55/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .49/32/0.00 . .50/44/sh . . 51/45/c Sioux Falls. . . . . . .51/39/0.00 . .52/31/pc . .42/31/rs Spokane . . . . . . . .41/20/0.00 . . .47/29/c . . 48/26/c Springfield, MO . .62/51/0.00 . . . 65/58/t . . .69/40/t Tampa. . . . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . .83/60/pc . 83/65/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .59/36/sh . . 60/37/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . . . 70/62/t . . .71/38/t Washington, DC . .59/37/0.00 . . . 63/44/s . . 65/46/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .66/41/0.00 . . . 63/50/t . 53/36/sh Yakima . . . . . . . . .49/26/0.00 . .48/28/pc . 50/27/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . . 68/43/s . . 70/45/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .55/48/0.00 . . .53/48/c . . 51/47/c Athens. . . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . . . 67/53/s . . 63/54/c Auckland. . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .65/58/sh . 67/57/pc Baghdad . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . . 73/50/s . . 68/45/s Bangkok . . . . . . not available . . . 91/81/t . . .90/80/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .54/43/c . 58/37/sh Beirut . . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . . . 73/57/s . . 75/58/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . . 56/42/s . . 54/40/s Bogota . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .63/52/sh . 61/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . .59/40/pc . . 55/37/s Buenos Aires. . . . .77/59/0.00 . .82/63/pc . . 85/69/c Cabo San Lucas . .86/64/0.00 . . . 82/61/s . . 85/62/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . . 78/60/s . . 79/61/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .36/14/0.00 . .36/25/pc . 34/14/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . .81/66/pc . 82/65/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . . .54/32/0.00 . .51/39/pc . . 52/45/c Edinburgh. . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . .49/40/pc . 50/39/pc Geneva . . . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . .58/48/sh . . 59/47/c Harare. . . . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . .81/64/pc . . 86/62/s Hong Kong . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 81/75/t . . .77/70/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . . 57/47/s . 58/48/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . . . 61/50/s . . 62/49/s Johannesburg. . . .77/48/0.00 . . . 79/59/s . . 81/56/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . .72/63/pc . 70/62/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . . 62/49/s . . 61/50/c London . . . . . . . . .54/46/0.00 . . .56/51/c . . 55/52/c Madrid . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.11 . .63/42/sh . 62/39/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . . 88/79/t . . .87/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . .100/74/s . 101/73/s Mexico City. . . . . .77/50/0.00 . .76/52/pc . 79/53/pc Montreal. . . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . .57/43/pc . . 52/43/s Moscow . . . . . . . .23/12/0.00 . .31/23/pc . . 34/28/c Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . . 79/64/t . . .77/62/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . .85/72/pc . 86/74/pc New Delhi. . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . . . 86/64/s . . 88/62/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . . . 67/55/s . 66/54/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .43/37/0.00 . .41/36/pc . . 44/37/c Ottawa . . . . . . . . .55/27/0.00 . .55/39/pc . . 54/41/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .57/54/0.00 . . .52/48/c . . 56/49/c Rio de Janeiro. . . .82/64/0.00 . . . 80/66/s . . 77/65/s Rome. . . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .68/54/sh . 69/50/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .84/54/0.00 . .86/51/pc . . 76/48/c Sao Paulo . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .77/61/sh . 78/62/sh Sapporo . . . . . . not available . . .49/44/c . . 50/36/s Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .66/48/pc . . 63/47/c Shanghai. . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . . .66/60/c . 64/59/sh Singapore . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .86/78/t Stockholm. . . . . . .48/46/0.00 . . .46/39/c . . 45/37/c Sydney. . . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . . 81/65/t . . .84/66/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . . 80/74/t . . .79/72/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . . 73/59/s . . 74/56/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .66/63/0.00 . .68/56/sh . . 62/55/c Toronto . . . . . . . . .57/30/0.00 . .62/46/pc . 54/50/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . . . 46/39/r . 48/45/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .54/45/pc . 51/42/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .46/37/0.00 . .51/31/pc . 52/30/pc


GREEN, ETC.

TV/Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Dear Abby, C3 Horoscope, C3

Comics, C4-5 Sudoku, C5 Daily Bridge, C5 Crossword, C5

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

C www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

Making clean energy

cleaner

Electronic junk pile gets bigger as new gadgets proliferate United Nations estimated that we threw away between 20 Apple sold 4 million units million and 50 million tons of the new iPhone 4S on its of e-waste globally, which release weekend, soundly constitutes 5 percent of total beating the previous iPhone municipal solid waste. The launch record of 1.7 million. developing world tripled its The device’s early success disposal of electronic junk in serves as a well-dethe last five years. served tribute to the late While the sheer volApple founder Steve ume of electronic garJobs. But it also raises bage is impressive on its some serious environown, it’s the chemicals mental concerns. As involved that concern TECH environmentalists. Apple and other smartphone manufacturers Electronic screens made churn out newer and inof glass can be up to 27 creasingly amazing gadgets, percent lead. Computer circuit consumers worldwide keep boards contain between 30 tossing out perfectly funcand 100 times the concentrational old phones. And all this tion of lead that is considered electronic refuse threatens hazardous by the EPA. The water, soil and air. metal can accumulate in The problem, of course, the soil and disrupt natural isn’t limited to smartphones. ecosystems. Plants take lead Americans trashed more in through their roots, and it than 20 million televisions, can be passed on to grazing 157 million computers and animals. While it’s not parcomputer accessories, and ticularly water-soluble, it can 126 million mobile phones in leach into the groundwater 2007, according to the most under the right conditions. See Waste / C8 recent EPA data. In 2006, the By Brian Palmer

Special to The Washington Post

McClatchy-Tribune News Service Submitted photo

This BioMCN plant in the Netherlands produces biomethanol, a key ingredient that powers IdaTech’s ElectraGen ME fuel cells. Compared to regular methanol, biomethanol reduces carbon emissions by 78 percent.

• Bend-based IdaTech has started using biomethanol, a renewable fuel, to power one of its fuel-cell generators By Tim Doran • The Bulletin

E

lectricity-generating fuel cells have always been considered green technology, but Bend-based IdaTech has taken them a shade further, recently introducing a renewable fuel to

power its products.

Last month, T-Mobile installed an IdaTech fuel cell in Northern California powered by Bio-HydroPlus, fuel made from biomethanol and deionized water. “Officials attending the installation witnessed the first use of Bio-HydroPlus in the state of California and saw the backup power fuel cell quietly start up and deliver 5,000 watts of clean power GREEN while operating on renewable fuel,” according to a news release from the company headquartered on Northeast 18th Street. As a renewable fuel, Bio-HydroPlus qualifies for some government incentives, IdaTech said, effectively lowering the cost of fuel cells and making them more competitive with traditional backup power systems, such as those powered by diesel. And IdaTech believes it will also help fuel its growth. Fuel cells have long held the promise of providing abundant clean energy and helping end the nation’s dependence on oil, according to the federal government. But the devices themselves, which produce electricity using hydrogen and oxygen, are not new. Sir William Grove developed the first fuel cell in England in 1839, according to the U.S. Defense

Photo courtesy of IdaTech

T-Mobile installed this IdaTech fuel cell last month in Northern California. The fuel cell, powered by Bio-HydroPlus renewable fuel, qualifies for some incentives.

Department’s Fuel Cell Test and Evaluation Center. Today, they serve as a replacement for batteries or other power-generating systems, such as those fueled by gasoline or diesel. IdaTech has concentrated on providing backup power to the telecommunications industry. For example, its fuel cells generate electricity to cell sites built in areas that face severe weather, natural disasters or unreliable electrical grids. See Fuel cells / C8

Shareholders vote to take IdaTech off stock market After Wednesday, Bendbased fuel-cell maker IdaTech will no longer sell shares in the company on the London Stock Exchange. On Nov. 1, shareholders approved resolutions to end trading and to register as a private company, making its cancellation of trading effective Wednesday, according to a news release. Taking IdaTech private will give the company more flexibility to raise funding, CEO Hal Koyama stated in the news release, and also will eliminate the time and expense associated with trading shares, which did not provide significant benefit to the company. Its largest shareholder, Investec Group Investments (UK) Limited, indicated it would not provide additional funding unless the company stopped trading on the AIM, the London Stock Exchange’s international market for smaller growing companies, according to IdaTech’s Oct. 7 notice to shareholders. See Private / C8

Astronauts Shannon Walker, of the U.S., and David SaintJacques, of Canada, test moving a probe in the waters off Key Largo, Fla. The training, part of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO), is meant to test equipment and man’s reactions for a human rendezvous with an asteroid.

NASA prepares for a rendezvous with an asteroid Abell said. “Dinosaurs were wiped out by a big asteroid KEY LARGO, Fla. — At 60 impact 65 million years ago. feet below the ocean’s surface, We don’t know when or where alongside coral, fish and a cuit will happen again, but it will rious goliath grouper, NASA happen again, and it would astronauts and scientists be nice to be prepared for that spent seven days testing batevent.” tery-powered jet packs, booms While the goal date to send with magnets, robotic astronauts to a neararms on one-man subs Earth asteroid is more and other ways to functhan a decade down the tion in zero gravity. road at 2025, to boldly The Florida Keys go where no man or underwater world is woman has gone before SCIENCE starts with baby steps helping NASA prepare for humankind’s first — of which some were trip to an asteroid. just taken in Key Largo. “It would be the first time About 70 people — includthat human beings have left ing NASA astronaut Shannon the Earth/moon system and Walker, who recently restarted to explore the solar turned from six months at the system, to explore Mars and International Space Station beyond,” said NASA asteroid — were in the Keys recently expert Paul Abell. “That’s a for the 15th NASA Extreme very exciting prospect for us.” Environment Mission OperaSuch an endeavor will take tions, known as NEEMO. The billions of dollars and years of underwater missions simulate effort to learn the unknowns the harsh and confined huand conquer the challenges man conditions of space. Six and risks. But Abell, based out of the crew live at the Aquarof the Johnson Space Center ius underwater laboratory, a in Houston, said the ambitious 400-square-foot habitat that program is worthwhile for rests on the sea bottom about many reasons, including this 3.5 miles offshore and has biggie: planet defense. been providing lodging and “Twenty percent of nearlife support for underwater Earth asteroids are considscientists since 1993. See NEEMO / C7 ered potentially hazardous,” By Cammy Clark

McClatchy-Tribune News Service


C2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

TV & M

New Sundance miniseries will pair ‘Mad Men’ star with ‘The Piano’ director wife, Rosemary, during the 1960s and ’70s. Emily WatLOS ANGELES — Is Sun- son (“Breaking the Waves�) dance Channel hoping to push plays Janet Leach, a woman into AMC and HBO territory? appointed by the court as an The cable network is bringing “appropriate adult� to look afmovie director Jane Campion ter his interests during police to the small screen for a six- questioning — with no idea of part miniseries starring Elisa- what she was getting herself beth Moss as part of its ongo- into. ing move into scripted drama. Earlier this week, Sundance In “Top of the also announced an Lake,� Moss will TV SPOTLIGHT original scripted take a quick break six-part drama, from her role as “Rectify,� created Peggy on “Mad Men� to play a by Academy Award winner detective on the case of a miss- Ray McKinnon (“The Accouning girl. The miniseries will tant�). Mark Johnson and Mealso air on BBC 2 in Britain. lissa Bernstein of production Campion (“The Piano,� “Por- company Gran Via will serve trait of a Lady�) will direct as executive producers along with Australian director Garth with McKinnon; they also proDavis, and write with Gerard duce “Breaking Bad� on AMC, Lee. Holly Hunter, David Wen- Sundance’s sister channel. ham (“The Lord of the Rings,� The series centers on a man “Australia�) and Peter Mullan being released after 19 years (“War Horse,� “Trainspotting�) on Georgia’s death row, havwill star along with Moss. The ing been convicted for the rape miniseries is scheduled to and killing of a teenage girl. start shooting in February in Sarah Barnett, the general Queenstown, New Zealand. manager and executive vice “Top of the Lake� comes president of Sundance Chanin the wake of “Carlos,� Sun- nel, said the new shows “redance’s first scripted drama, inforce Sundance Channel’s which nabbed two Emmy commitment to creating highnominations. quality scripted programming The network has greenlight- and becoming a home for projed a number of other scripted ects defined by risk-taking programs for the coming year, and character-driven storystarting with the Dec. 10 pre- telling. All of our scripted promiere of “Appropriate Adult.� grams have attracted top talBased on a real-life story, ent in front of and behind the the movie features Dominic camera, and we are excited to West (of “The Wire� and “The enter the scripted arena with Hour�) as British serial killer incredible partners who share Frederick West, who commit- our vision of telling distinctive ted horrifying acts with his and fresh stories.� By Joy Press

Los Angeles Times

L M T 

FOR MONDAY, NOV. 7

Martin Sheen stars as a father on a pilgrimage in Spain in “The Way,� a film written and directed by his son, Emilio Estevez.

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

CONTAGION (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7 THE HELP (PG-13) 2:30, 6:10 MONEYBALL (PG-13) 2:40, 6 THE RUM DIARY (R) 2:20, 6:40 SARAH’S KEY (PG-13) 1:50, 4:20, 6:50 THE WAY (PG-13) 2:10, 6:20

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

50/50 (R) 7:20, 9:55 THE BIG YEAR (PG) 1:20, 4:20, 6:55, 9:50 COURAGEOUS (PG-13) 12:10, 3:10, 6:10, 9:10 DOLPHIN TALE (PG) 12:45, 3:45 FOOTLOOSE (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 6:45, 9:40 THE IDES OF MARCH (R) 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:10 IN TIME (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 9:45 MONEYBALL (PG-13) 12:05, 3:05, 6:05, 9:05 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (R) 2, 5, 8, 10:15 PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) 1, 3:15, 4,

PUSS IN BOOTS 3-D (PG) Noon, 6:15 PUSS IN BOOTS IMAX (PG) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 REAL STEEL (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20 THE THREE MUSKETEERS (PG-13) 12:40, 6:40

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX tickets are $15.

PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) 6:15 THE RUM DIARY (R) 6:30

Courtesy David Alexanian

7, 9:15, 10

EDITOR’S NOTES:

attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5

REDMOND

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

Redmond Cinemas

IN TIME (PG-13) 4:40, 7:20 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (R) 5:10, 7:15

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE THREE MUSKETEERS 3-D (PG13) 3:40, 9:25

50/50 (R) 6:30

PUSS IN BOOTS 3-D (PG) 4:35, 6:50

IN TIME (PG-13) 5:15, 7:15

TOWER HEIST (PG-13) 4:50, 7:10

TOWER HEIST (PG-13) 12:35, 1:30, 3:35, 4:30, 6:35, 7:30, 9:15, 10:05

JOHNNY ENGLISH REBORN (PG13) 4

A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR CHRISTMAS (R) 5:25, 7:35

A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR CHRISTMAS 3-D (R) 1:50, 4:50, 7:50, 10:20

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (R) 5:15, 7:15

PRINEVILLE

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) 4:45, 7

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

SISTERS Sisters Movie House

Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown today. After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE GUARD (R) 7 IN TIME (PG-13) 6:45

PUSS IN BOOTS (UPSTAIRS – PG) 4:10, 6:30 THE THREE MUSKETEERS (PG-13) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

L TV L

 

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

MONDAY PRIME TIME 11/7/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. News That ’70s Show Ciao Italia ‘G’

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News That ’70s Show Perfect Day ‘G’

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. News News ’Til Death ‘PG’ King of Queens My Family Time Goes By

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Dancing With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune The Sing-Off The groups perform for the judges. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ How I Met 2 Broke Girls Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Big Bang Big Bang Terra Nova Nightfall (N) ‘14’ Ă… House The Confession (N) ‘14’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Antiques Roadshow (N) ‘G’ Ă… Antiques Roadshow ’ ‘G’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition The Sing-Off The groups perform for the judges. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Gossip Girl (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Hart of Dixie (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Great Performances: Miami City Ballet Dances Gallery: Nat’l World News Tavis Smiley (N)

10:00

10:30

(10:01) Castle (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Rock Center With Brian Williams Hawaii Five-0 Lapa’au (N) ’ ‘PG’ (10:01) Castle (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Martin Clunes: Horsepower ‘PG’ Rock Center With Brian Williams Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Angle of Attack ’ ‘G’ News Jay Leno King of Queens South Park ‘MA’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC E! ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK OWN ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… Hoarders Stacey; Roi ‘PG’ Ă… Hoarders Andrew; Lydia ‘PG’ Hoarders Judy; Jerry (N) ‘PG’ Monster Monster Intervention Marquel ‘14’ Ă… 130 28 18 32 The First 48 Winter Games ‘14’ (3:00) “Enter the ››› “Top Gunâ€? (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards. A hot-shot Navy ›››› “Rockyâ€? (1976, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. A heavyweight ››› “Rocky IIâ€? (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia 102 40 39 Dragonâ€? jet pilot downs MiGs and loves an astrophysicist. Ă… champ gives a club fighter a title shot. Ă… Shire, Burgess Meredith. Ă… Monsters Inside Me ‘PG’ Ă… The Tiger Next Door ‘14’ Ă… Fatal Attractions ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Fatal Attractions Big Cats ’ ‘14’ Fatal Attractions ’ ‘14’ Ă… 68 50 26 38 Monsters Inside Me ‘PG’ Ă… Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly What Happens Housewives/Atl. 137 44 Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad ’ ‘14’ Ă… CMT Music Awards 2011 ’ ‘PG’ 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad ’ ‘14’ Ă… Biography on CNBC J.W. Marriott American Greed Mad Money Biography on CNBC J.W. Marriott American Greed Paid Program Wealth-Trading 51 36 40 52 The Coffee Addiction Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. 11 Politics & Public Policy Today 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Jessie ‘G’ Ă… A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ ›› “Princess Protection Programâ€? (2009) ’ ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ 87 43 14 39 “Adventures of Sharkboyâ€? American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Guns (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 156 21 16 37 American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. (4:30) ››› “Knocked Upâ€? (2007) Seth Rogen, Katherine Heigl. E! News (N) Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex and the City ‘MA’ Ă… Kendra ‘14’ Kendra ‘14’ Chelsea Lately E! News 136 25 NFL Football Chicago Bears at Philadelphia Eagles (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… NFL PrimeTime (N) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… 21 23 22 23 Monday Night 2011 World Series of Poker Final Table From Las Vegas. SportsCenter Football Live SportsNation Ă… NFL Presents 2011 World Series of Poker Final Table 22 24 21 24 Interruption Up Close Ă… Homecoming With Rick Reilly SportsCentury Ă… Up Close Ă… College Football 1993 Army vs. Navy From Dec. 4, 1993. Ă… College Football 23 25 123 25 SportsCentury Ă… SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. 24 63 124 203 Pardon ››› “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Storyâ€? (2004) Vince Vaughn. The 700 Club (N) Ă… 67 29 19 41 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show America’s Funniest Home Videos ›› “Along Came Pollyâ€? (2004) Ben Stiller, Jennifer Aniston. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Best Dishes Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Throwdown Thanksgiving Feast Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (2:30) ››› “The Departedâ€? How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Live Free or Die Hardâ€? (2007) Bruce Willis, Justin Long. America’s computers fall under attack. “The Taking of Pelham 123â€? 131 Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Hunters Int’l Modern Marvels BBQ Tech ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Salt ‘PG’ Ă… Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Hairy Bikers Pawn Stars ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 American Eats ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Julie & Juliaâ€? (2009, Comedy-Drama) Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Stanley Tucci. Ă… 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Beavis That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Friendzone (N) Friendzone ’ Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Cuff’d (N) ‘14’ Death Valley (N) Ridiculousness 192 22 38 57 Beavis Kung Fu Panda SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Kung Fu Panda That ’70s Show That ’70s Show George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob The Oprah Winfrey Show ’ ‘PG’ The Rosie Show (N) ’ ‘PG’ Oprah’s Lifeclass (N) ’ ‘PG’ Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s ‘PG’ The Rosie Show ’ ‘PG’ Oprah’s Lifeclass ’ ‘PG’ 161 103 31 103 The Rosie Show ’ ‘PG’ Runnin’-PAC College Football Oregon at Washington After-Jay Glazer Bensinger The Dan Patrick Show 20 45 28* 26 College Basketball Seattle Pacific at Washington Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die ››› “The Fifth Elementâ€? (1997, Science Fiction) Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman. Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Urban Legends Urban Legends 133 35 133 45 › Red Planet Behind Scenes Mark Chironna Kingdom Conn. Jesse Duplantis Billy Graham Birthday Special Joel Osteen Perry Stone ‘G’ First to Know Fall Praise-A-Thon 205 60 130 Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ››› “This Gun for Hireâ€? (1942, Crime Drama) Alan Ladd, ››› “The Blue Dahliaâ€? (1946) Alan Ladd. A Navy pilot’s (8:15) ››› “The Postman Always Rings Twiceâ€? (1946) Lana Turner. A drifter (10:15) ››› “The Bad and the Beautifulâ€? (1952) Lana Turner, Kirk Douglas. 101 44 101 29 Veronica Lake, Robert Preston. wife is found shot with his gun. Ă… enters into a deadly love triangle. Ă… (DVS) People recall a hated Hollywood producer. Ă… (DVS) Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘G’ Ă… Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Lottery Changed My Life (N) ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Ă… Law & Order Hate ’ ‘14’ Law & Order DNR ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Vaya con Dios ‘14’ Law & Order Fallout ’ ‘14’ The Closer A Family Affair ‘14’ CSI: NY Consequences ‘14’ Ă… 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Looney Tunes Johnny Test ’ Johnny Test ’ Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time MAD (N) ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot, Cleveland Hot, Cleveland Hot, Cleveland Hot, Cleveland 65 47 29 35 Dick Van Dyke Dick Van Dyke M*A*S*H ‘PG’ NCIS Probie ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Murdered model. ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Boxed In ’ ‘PG’ Ă… WWE Monday Night RAW (N) ’ Ă… (11:05) ››› “Fridayâ€? (1995) 15 30 23 30 NCIS Frame-Up ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives LA (N) ’ ‘14’ ››› “Michael Jackson’s This Is Itâ€? (2009) Michael Jackson, Orianthi. Premiere. ’ Bask. Wives LA 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

››› “Waiting to Exhaleâ€? 1995 Whitney Houston. ’ ‘R’ Ă… (10:05) ›› “Chloeâ€? 2009 Julianne Moore. ‘R’ Ă… Navy SEALS ‘R’ ENCR 106 401 306 401 (3:40) The Babe (5:45) ›› “Heartbreak Ridgeâ€? 1986, War Clint Eastwood, Marsha Mason. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ››› “Kiss of Deathâ€? 1947, Crime Drama Victor Mature. ‘NR’ Ă… ››› “Kiss of Deathâ€? 1995, Crime Drama David Caruso. ‘R’ Ă… ›› “The Star Chamberâ€? 1983 FMC 104 204 104 120 ››› “Kiss of Deathâ€? 1947, Crime Drama Victor Mature. ‘NR’ Ă… X-Fighters 2011 Highlights (N) Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Red Bull Big Surf Chronicles The Daily Habit Strangers Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Red Bull Big Surf Chronicles The Daily Habit Strangers FUEL 34 Golf From Tulsa, Okla. (N) Top 10 Golf Now Golf Central Learning Center Golf From Tulsa, Okla. Top 10 Golf Now Golf Central Learning Center GOLF 28 301 27 301 Big Break Ireland Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Caretakers ‘G’ (4:30) “Sing Your Songâ€? 2011, Docu- Face off With 24/7 Pacquiao/ ›› “The Riteâ€? 2011, Horror Anthony Hopkins. A skeptical seminary student Bored to Death Enlightened (N) Boardwalk Empire Peg of Old Jimmy Enlightened ’ Bored to Death ’ HBO 425 501 425 501 mentary ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Max Kellerman Marquez ‘MA’ attends a school for exorcists. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (N) ‘MA’ Ă… faces a decision. ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ›› “Crankâ€? 2006, Action Jason Statham. ‘R’ (6:45) ››› “Monty Python’s Life of Brianâ€? 1979, Comedy ‘R’ Nosebleed ‘14’ ››› “Monty Python’s Life of Brianâ€? 1979 Graham Chapman. ‘R’ “Guide to Recog. Saintsâ€? IFC 105 105 (5:05) › “Jonah Hexâ€? 2010 Josh Brolin. A supernatural (11:40) Life on ›› “It’s Complicatedâ€? 2009, Romance-Comedy Meryl Streep. A divorcee is ››› “Ice Ageâ€? 2002, Comedy Voices of Ray Romano, ››› “Unstoppableâ€? 2010, Action Denzel Washington, MAX 400 508 508 gunslinger faces an old enemy. ‘PG-13’ Ă… caught between her ex and an architect. ’ ‘R’ Ă… John Leguizamo, Denis Leary. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Chris Pine. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Top ‘MA’ Ă… Lost Gold of the Dark Ages ‘PG’ Secrets of the Lost Gold (N) ‘PG’ Witch Doctor Will See You Lost Gold of the Dark Ages ‘PG’ Secrets of the Lost Gold ‘PG’ Witch Doctor Will See You Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Iron Man: Armor Iron Man: Armor SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Iron Man: Armor Iron Man: Armor Odd Parents Fisher’s ATV Destination Pol. Dirt Trax TV Mudslingers NASCAR Outd. Best of West Headhunters TV Wild and Raw Fisher’s ATV Dirt Trax TV Destination Pol. Mudslingers OUTD 37 307 43 307 Bone Collector Primitive (5:05) ›› “The Twilight Saga: Eclipseâ€? 2010 Kristen Stewart. iTV. Bella must (7:15) ›› “The Switchâ€? 2010 Jennifer Aniston. iTV. A woman uses a friend’s Dexter Just Let Go ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Homeland The Good Soldier The CIA Dexter Just Let Go ’ ‘MA’ Ă… SHO 500 500 choose between Edward and Jacob. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… sperm, unknowingly, to get pregnant. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… orders polygraphs. ’ ‘MA’ Pass Time ‘PG’ Pass Time ‘PG’ Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride Monster Jam Pass Time ‘PG’ Pass Time ‘PG’ Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 303 Monster Jam (7:40) › “Old Dogsâ€? 2009 John Travolta. ‘PG’ Ă… (9:15) ›› “The Touristâ€? 2010 Johnny Depp. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Boss Kane tries to adjust. ‘MA’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 Men Who Stare (5:45) ›› “Disney’s A Christmas Carolâ€? 2009 Voices of Jim Carrey. (4:45) “The Speed of Thoughtâ€? 2011, Suspense Nick (6:25) ››› “King of Californiaâ€? 2007, Drama Michael ›› “Extraordinary Measuresâ€? 2010, Drama Brendan Fraser. Two men join ›› “Love N’ Dancingâ€? 2008 Amy Smart. Dance partners (11:35) ››› “A TMC 525 525 Stahl, Mia Maestro. Premiere. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Douglas, Evan Rachel Wood. ‘PG-13’ forces to develop a life-saving drug. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… compete for a world title. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Single Manâ€? NHL Live Post NHL Overtime (N) (Live) College Football Talk Sports Talk Adventure Adventure Sports Talk NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 209 NHL Hockey New York Islanders at Boston Bruins Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Raising Sextuplets ‘G’ Ă… WE 143 41 174 118 Golden Girls


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Lonely boy needs woman’s sympathy, not suspicion

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY Dear Abby: Our neighbor’s son, “Donny,� has become a regular fixture in our home. His parents divorced years ago, and his father is terminally ill. Donny has “adopted� me as a father figure. We have spent a great deal of time together. Not having a son — I have daughters — I admit that being with him is a novelty. My wife, on the other hand, feels no one should “infiltrate� her family. There are few boys in our neighborhood, and Donny isn’t old enough to venture to other streets in search of playmates. I can’t bring myself to turn him away knowing how lonely he is and how difficult his life will become. I worry that he’s a prime candidate for a predator, or that he could start drinking or smoking at an early age. My wife says we can’t save everyone, and I know that. But when I hear about the bad things that happen to kids on the news, it makes me wonder where was someone who could have helped them. How can I get my wife to see this is a chance to make a difference in this boy’s life, and that he’s no threat to our family unit? — Friend of a Lonely Child Dear Friend: Your wife appears to be responding to Donny on an emotional rather than a rational level. Because she didn’t “produce� a son, she views the time or emotional nourishment that you give Donny as something being taken away from her daughters. That’s sad. It’s possible that a religious adviser could help her to view this differently, but if she can’t find sympathy in her heart for the boy, then I recommend you talk to Donny’s mother about finding a Big Brother for him, through her religious denomination. Dear Abby: My 16-year-old son, “Victor,� is hearing-impaired. He wears hearing aids in both ears. The aids are small

DEAR ABBY and not easily seen. Recently we were in a new doctor’s office, and the nurse was talking to my son but looking in another direction. When I explained that Victor is hearing-impaired and couldn’t hear her, she replied, “Oh, I know teenagers — selective hearing.� I said, “No, he is hearingimpaired and wears hearing aids.� The same thing happened at summer camp. My husband said Victor has a hearing problem, and the counselor responded with, “So I need to smack him on the side of his head to get him to listen?� Please inform your readers that hearing aids aren’t just for older people. My son has informed people he wears hearing aids because he can’t hear well, and he still gets the same smart-alecky retorts. Have you any suggestions? — Not Being Flippant in Pennsylvania Dear Not Being Flippant: Oh, yes. The nurse in your doctor’s office was tactless. If she didn’t apologize for her comment, you should have mentioned it to the doctor so he could educate her not only about hearing loss, but also about diplomacy. As to the ignorant camp counselor, your husband should have immediately reported it to the camp director. After reading your letter, I consulted Dr. Rick Friedman at the House Ear Clinic in Los Angeles, who told me that approximately one in 2,000 children is born with hearing problems. Being subjected to loud noises can also have a negative impact on hearing, and Dr. Friedman said studies are being conducted to determine to what extent. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 By JACQUELINE BIGAR This year you might feel that people are putting you under unusual pressure. You wonder why. Often there are mixed messages. Friends in general are angry, and it might have more to do with the circumstances than with you. If you are single, you could meet a potential suitor through a group event or happening. If you are attached, sometimes you could be confused by a certain vagueness from your sweetie. Clarify and confirm as much as you can. ARIES pushes you hard. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Anger could point to why some situations are backfiring. You often feel the frustration and irritation. Trying to identify what is going on could be futile at present, whereas you can control where you unleash your anger. Tonight: Whatever makes you smile. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH A vagueness surrounds plans or a goal. A special long-term goal could be more important than you realize. A friend could inspire you, but is this person all talk? A romantic tie isn’t satisfying. Tonight: Play it low-key. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Zero in on what counts. You could be exhausted by recent happenings. A vagueness surrounds a boss, which makes it difficult to please him or her, much less come out ahead of the game. Try to work through an issue within. Tonight: Keep your goal in mind. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH A boss knows how to trigger you and move you in his or her chosen direction. You could feel vague about alternatives, though you are sure there are quite a few. Relax rather than get absorbed mentally and cause yourself a problem or lose your temper. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Let your imagination wander. While someone might be vaguely upset with your lack of interest, you also could make a mistake financially. Try not to distort the here and now with your mental leaps. Tonight: Put on a good piece

of music. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might be losing your temper a bit more easily than in the past. You might wonder what is going on. Rest assured you are not the only person asking this question. Be direct. Tonight: Dinner for two. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Others steal the stage and interfere with what you see your message to be. As tension mounts, you worry. You know what you want and why. Now allow yourself to wait a few more days as others expound on their views. Tonight: Work out stress. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Be aware of your limits. A friend might push to get you more involved. A meeting could demand much more from you than you originally thought. Knowing your boundaries and how to say no could be more important than you realize. Tonight: When tired, call it a night. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Let your imagination flow. You could encounter some frustration when dealing with a boss, who seems irate and difficult to handle. You might be confused on a deep level as to what you did or how you triggered this person. Don’t push. Tonight: Ever playful. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Don’t push too hard to get an agreement. Before you know it, others could act strangely. Your sixth sense kicks in, giving you direction on what to do. Make phone calls to those you believe really understand the dynamics. Tonight: Give it time! AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Your words might not have the impact you desire. You don’t know what you want or where you are heading. Be careful with your finances, even in front of an expert. He or she might not have the same ideas as you. Tonight: Listen rather than offer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Someone comes on a little too strong for your taste. All you can do is be your gracious self. Your willingness to get past an immediate problem touches another person, even if he or she gives you flak. Understand what needs to happen. Tonight: Stay centered. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

C3

GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Unaccustomed Earth� by Jhumpa Lahiri; free; noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089. THE WORLD WE KNEW: A punk concert, with Inhale Exhale, Browning, Dead and Divine; $10; 6:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-977-5677. DR. ARTHUR TOGA: The brain scientist talks about the differences between healthy and diseased brains seen in MRI scans; free; 7 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 541-549-5900. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY FALL CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a fall concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring a performance by 3 Leg Torso; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541317-3941, info@cosymphony. com or www.cosymphony.com.

TUESDAY KO-NA FOSTER KALAMA: A Native American flute concert; free; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3782. JAM’N 4 JOSH: Featuring a performance by 2nd Hand Soldiers and a raffle; proceeds benefit Josh Reznick, who has leukemia; $10; 8 p.m.; Three Creeks Brewing, 721 Desperado Court, Sisters; 541-549-1963.

WEDNESDAY HARLEM AMBASSADORS: The basketball team plays the Sisters Rotary Rebounders; proceeds benefit Sisters Rotary Club; $7 in advance or $9 at the door, $5 in advance or $7 at the door for students and seniors, free ages 4 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541350-3085. SCOTT FISHER: The Los Angeles-based piano-pop singer performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. YOYA: The Los Angeles-based folktronic act performs; $10; 7:30 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804. COLLIE BUDDZ: The reggae artist performs, with Gappy Ranks, New Kingston and Medium Troy; $17.50 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com. KEITH ANDERSON: The country musician performs; $25; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541325-1886.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Little Bee� by Chris Cleave; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541312-1055 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. “ARMCHAIR TRAVELER — ISRAEL & PETRA�: Hear about a trip through Israel and Petra, learn about their history and more; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663, ruthh@ uoregon.edu or http://osher .uoregon.edu. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kenneth Fenter talks about his books “The Ruin� and “The Bee Tree�; free; 4-7 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jim Henson talks about his books “Pee Up a Tree� and “Satisfaction Guaranteed�; free; 4-7 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541385-3062. JAZZ ALL STARS: The young jazz musicians perform; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-382-6866 or www .cascadeschoolofmusic.org. ARCHEOLOGY: The Portlandbased pop quartet performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. PETE GEORGE: The Los Angeles-based comedian performs; $5; 7:30-9 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. SAPIENT: The Portland-based MC performs, with DJ Nykon,

Michael Gesme conducts during a Central Oregon Symphony rehearsal at Central Oregon Community College last month. A fall concert will be performed at 7:30 tonight. Pete Erickson The Bulletin file photo

Saint Warhead and Dopethought; $3 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-977-5677 or madhappymusik@ gmail.com.

FRIDAY BEND VETERANS DAY PARADE: Themed “Veterans are our heroes for life�; with a flyover; free for spectators; 11 a.m.; downtown Bend; 541-480-4516. CROOK COUNTY VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade begins behind the police department and continues to Ochoco Creek Park; followed by a ceremony and lunch; free; 11 a.m., 10:30 a.m. staging; downtown Prineville; 541-4476555. REDMOND VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade honoring veterans, followed by a chili feed for veterans and their families at the VFW post; free; 11 a.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-280-5161. WORLD HOOP DAY: Bring hula hoops for a community hooping jam; proceeds benefit Johanna Olsen, who is undergoing chemotherapy; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.worldhoopday.com. VFW OPEN HOUSE: Meet military service members and veterans in honor of Veterans Day; free; noon-6 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BETHLEHEM INN BENEFIT DINNER: The seventh annual dinner features gourmet dining, handcrafted beers and fun; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn; $80; 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-322-8768, ext. 21 or http://bethleheminndinner2011. eventbrite.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kurt Nelson talks about his book “Treaties and Treachery: The Northwest Indians’ Resistance to Conquest�; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541526-1491. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. MAIDEN BEND MUSIC FEST: Featuring performances by local female singer-songwriters; a portion of proceeds benefits Saving Grace; $15-$30; 7-9:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. TRAVEL SLIDE SHOW: See a slide show tour through the Alps and southern Africa; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia

St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266 or www.ccophoto.com. “SAVING PRIVATE RYAN�: A screening of the 1998 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.clashofthecomics.com. ATLANTIS RIZING: The San Diegobased hip-hop act performs; free; 9 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541977-5677. MARS RETRIEVAL UNIT: The Portland-based space-rock band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com.

SATURDAY MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY RUN/ WALK: Run 5K or walk one mile in honor of the Marine Corps; race begins outside city hall; registration required; proceeds benefit Disabled American Veterans’ Portland shuttle van; $21 with a shirt, $14 without; $20 with shirt or $13 without for CORK members; 9 a.m.; City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3838061, chandler@bendcable.com or www.vetsdayrun.homestead.com. COMMUNITY FAIR: Learn about community service programs, family resources, sewing, quilting and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; QuiltWorks, 926 N.E. Greeenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-0527 or www .quiltworks.com. BARBECUE FUNDRAISER: Registration requested; proceeds benefit Outward Bound; $5 minimum donation; noon-3 p.m.; Stone Lodge, 1460 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-318-0450 or www .holidaytouch.com/outwardbound. “FORKS OVER KNIVES�: A screening of the film about effects of animal products on health; followed by a discussion; free; 3 and 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017 or info@vegnetbend.org. AUDUBON SOCIETY EVENT: Featuring live music, a silent auction, and the program “Phylogeny is Phun�; free; 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133 or http://ecaudubon.org. “MURDER ON THE MENU�: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $45; 6 p.m.; Cafe 3456’, 63136 Powell Butte Highway, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www

.buckboardmysteries.com. “SLEDFILM 11�: A screening of the snowmobile film festival; $5; 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC BENEFIT GALA: Includes live music, dinner, a silent auction and a raffle; registration recommended; proceeds benefit High Desert Chamber Music programs; $85; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-306-3988, info@ highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchambermusic .com. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: 12 Gauge Rage play the Nerve Agents; $10 in advance, $12 at the door, $8 students, $5 children and seniors; 6 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend; 541-330-1183 or www.lava cityrollerdolls.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kurt Nelson talks about his book “Treaties and Treachery: The Northwest Indians’ Resistance to Conquest�; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541549-0866. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Rich Goss and music by the Steeltones; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “ROMEO AND JULIET�: The Eugene Ballet Company presents Shakespeare’s tragic love story; $20-$30; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.org. TRIAGE: The comedy improvisational troupe performs; $5; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803. THE BROCKS: The Provo, Utahbased pop rock act performs; $10; 8 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804. BROTHERS YOUNG: The Portlandbased indie rockers perform, with Rural Demons and Oldtimer; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. DINNER FOR WOLVES: The Portland-based rockers perform, with Shovelbelt, Sons of Dirt and Tentareign; free; 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-408-2599.

DEAL of the

DAY

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C4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

C5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


C6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NEEMO Continued from C1 It was the first NEEMO mission dedicated to asteroids, where the lack of gravity causes many challenges that lunar missions don’t have, starting with the inability to simply land a space vehicle on the rotating surface. “And you can’t just chip off a piece of rock that you want to analyze and put it in your pocket like you can on the moon,” added Steve Chappell, NEEMO’s Deputy Mission Manager. “On an asteroid, it would fly away.” In real missions, things can go wrong. And they did. The meticulously planned 13 days of operations were delayed three days by thunderstorms and cut short Oct. 26 due to the threat of Hurricane Rina. The crew that lived at the habitat needed 15 hours of decompression time and support staff needed several days to clean up the work site. Despite losing about half the mission, NEEMO Project Manager Bill Todd said much was learned about what works and doesn’t work — knowledge that will help the program make progress. Before Rina was a threat, Todd sat on a dock near NASA’s Mobile Mission Control, which arrived from Kennedy Space Center, talking about the uniqueness of this mission. “Going to an asteroid is really in its infancy,” he said. “Going to the moon was a huge challenge, and this is an even bigger challenge. But it’s fun and rewarding trying to figure out how we would do it.”

C7

different things. “To move a long distance, jet packs to fly from here to there are good,” she said. “But jet packs are not stable when arriving at a destination. We need some way of anchoring at a site.” One way is using a boom — a long, rigid telescopic pole — with heavy magnets. While the aquanauts had to move “like an inch worm,” it worked. As far as how to anchor a space vehicle to an asteroid, one wild concept is to wrap some kind of rope around the entire mass like a lasso. “The International Space Station is about 100 meters and the asteroid size we’re talking about going to is about maybe the same size,” Abell said.

Rare opportunities

McClatchy-Tribune News Service photos

Zeb Scoville gathers samples off a rock wall while attached to a DeepWorker sub piloted by NASA’s Mike Gernhardt.

The large asteroid Vesta is seen in this image taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft.

First asteroids, then Mars

American astronaut Andre Abercromby practices neutral buoyancy maneuvers in the waters off Key Largo, Fla.

In April 2010, the behindschedule Constellation program was scrapped just months before the last shuttle flight. In tough economic times, President Barack Obama redirected NASA to use limited resources to focus on going further into space. Some saw it as bold, while others saw it as leading to the end of the United States’ leadership in space. Obama tried to counter the criticism by setting specific deadlines, calling for the manned mission to a nearEarth asteroid by 2025. If all went according to plan, then it would be off to Mars, with a human mission to orbit the Red Planet by the mid-2030s, followed by a manned Mars landing that the 50-year-old president has said he expects to see in his lifetime. Exploration of asteroids, which orbit the sun but are too small to be considered planets, are important for scientists beyond planetary defense. “They are the leftover building

blocks, pristine material, that contain all the secrets of how the solar system was formed,” Abell said. Some asteroids are rich in water and organic material. Scientists would like to figure out how to mine those resources for life support and rocket fuel. “Asteroids could be like supply depots in space waiting for you on your way to Mars,” Abell said. And when it comes to planetary defense from asteroids heading for Earth, humans should not rely on last-minute heroics of blowing it up, as was the case in the blockbuster movie “Armageddon.” “I certainly would not want to be sent to an asteroid to blow myself up,” Abell said. Instead, he said humans should learn how to deflect them from Earth. And since asteroids can be solid metal or rubble piles, like big bags of

sand, different strategies are required for different kinds. In September, NASA unveiled plans for a super rocket called the Space Launch System that will be made to take astronauts to deep-space destinations millions of miles away. Also in September, NASA held its first simulation of a human mission to a near-Earth asteroid in northern Arizona during its 14th Desert Research and Technology Studies campaign, or D-RATS. It used the extreme conditions of the Black Point Lava Flow in northern elevations to test vehicles that could hover just off the surface of an asteroid. They were equipped with a 13-foot long robot arm that could support an astronaut.

Zero gravity No one extreme environment on Earth can simulate exactly what the situation would be like on an asteroid. The nec-

essary vehicles and equipment would be ruined in salt water. But the marine world outside of Aquarius is especially good for astronauts and scientists to simulate zero gravity. They do this by becoming neutrally buoyant and not using flippers. NEEMO 15’s mission was to test general concepts and equipment and conduct tasks that would be simple on Earth but tricky on an asteroid: anchoring, moving from point A to point B, communicating with a 50-second delay and

collecting scientific samples. The six-person submersed crew, which included astronauts from the United States, Japan and Canada and an expert on planetary exploration at Cornell University, quickly discovered that getting around without gravity was difficult. So was trying to perform a task, such as chipping a rock, without being stable. Walker, commander of the NEEMO mission, learned spacewalks on an asteroid differ from dealing with a lack of gravity at the space station. An asteroid does not come with handholds spaced to correspond with a person’s reach or manmade interfaces to connect with foot restraints. NASA needs to come up with innovative exploration techniques, some of which the NEEMO crew was testing. Speaking from Aquarius on day 5 of the mission, Walker said they have learned that different techniques are good for

The NEEMO mission also used two DeepWorker submersibles. They basically are small, one-man submarines that simulate the kind of Space Exploration Vehicle that may someday be used to explore the surface of an asteroid. “Whenever we plan to send astronauts anywhere we send robotic spacecraft ahead of them to look for potential dangerous places or hazards,” Abell said. During NEEMO, an astronaut was tethered by his feet to a robotic arm of the sub for scientific asteroid exploration, using coral and fish to represent rock and other materials found in space. They completed four days of these operations, as well as six spacewalks and a day of scientific research inside the habitat. Todd said it’s important to have the astronauts, the ultimate end-users, be involved early in the process to provide their input on what works and doesn’t work. Walker, who had the rare opportunity to view Earth from the International Space Station, said the experience underwater also has been fascinating. “You look out the window and have fish look back at you,” she said. “We also have a big grouper that likes to hang out and come out at night.”

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C8

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

CALIFORNIA

Waste

Study details effects of warming on delta

Continued from C1 Computers that are incinerated can also release lead into the air. Electronic waste also contains mercury, which is used in flat screens and can leach into groundwater if not properly collected by the lining systems in landfills. Eventually it could then make its way into the aquatic part of our food chain: fish. If consumed, mercury can cause nervous system damage. Cadmium and chromium, other metals used in electronics, are carcinogenic and can enter both the air and the water supply. The environmental watchdog group Greenpeace has been hounding electronics manufacturers for several years about brominated flame retardants and polyvinyl chloride, or PVC, both of which were once widely used in smartphones and other electronics. A few of the companies, including Apple, Samsung, Sony Ericsson and Nokia, have taken notice and eliminated the chemicals, while others have promised to do so in upcoming years. The European Union is leading the charge to deal with electronic waste. The

By Mike Taugher Contra Costa Times

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — California’s water problems and the ecological pressure on the West Coast’s largest estuary will intensify in a warming world, according to a firstof-its-kind scientific study. San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta will get warmer, saltier and clearer if global warming continues over the next several decades. That will increase the risk of extinction for some kinds of fish and could help unwanted species, including a toxic algae, to flourish. Flooding is likely to be more common upstream and along the coast, and water supplies will be stretched due to a shrinking snowpack, the researchers found. In the delta, already seeing a broad ecological decline, the probability of further ecological surprises will increase. “We’re going to enter a new

Fuel cells Continued from C1 The company, which has about 80 employees, has conducted research in other areas too. It recently demonstrated that its fuel cells could be integrated into off-road vehicles, according to the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2009 annual progress report. Testing took place at River’s Edge Golf Course and around the High Desert Museum, according to the document. IdaTech is also developing a liquid-petroleum gas fuel cell, which it expects to bring to market next year. Fuel cells generate few emissions, if any, according to the Energy Department. They also operate more efficiently and quietly than other methods. Historically, however, hydrogen fuel cells cost more than other methods. Moving cylinders of hydrogen around can be difficult, and many municipalities strictly regulate hydrogen use, requiring permits and large open spaces surrounding the equipment, according to an IdaTech briefing document. IdaTech, along with other companies and the federal government, has worked to reduce the cost of fuel cells over the years, and some of the results of IdaTech’s efforts — the ElectraGen ME, a fuel cell that creates hydrogen gas on-site by mixing methanol and water — began shipping in December. The U.S. Department of Energy called it unique in its lat-

era of environmental conditions,” said James Cloern, the study’s lead author and a phytoplankton ecologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park. Cloern said the seven-year study was the most complex research project he’s undertaken in 36 years at the USGS. The researchers said their paper appears to be the first multifaceted assessment of how the estuary could respond to climate change. “Everything that we looked at will change in response to global warming,” he said. The delta watershed is a source of drinking and irrigation water for 25 million Californians and 2.5 million acres of farmland. “The big motivation for us was to develop some plausible scenarios for what will change and at what rate,” Cloern said. He said the researchers hoped the results would be used by those writing plans for the delta’s future.

est market report, released in June. It requires about 20 times less surrounding space than hydrogen-fueled devices, the company says, and must meet fewer regulations. IdaTech, which was founded in 1996, expects the fuel cell to help lead it to profitable growth, CEO Hal Koyama said in the company’s 2010 annual report. While the methanol mix made IdaTech’s ElectraGen ME more cost competitive, the addition of Bio-HydroPlus makes it more environmentally friendly. Compared to regular methanol, biomethanol reduces carbon emissions by 78 percent, according to BioMCN, the first company to produce high-quality biomethanol in industrial quantities. The company, based in the Netherlands, has patented a technique for turning crude glycerin, a byproduct of biodiesel production, into biomethanol, according to its website. To finish its fuel, IdaTech turned to Brenntag Pacific, a company based in Santa Fe Springs, Calif. The company blends the biomethanol with deionized water to IdaTech’s specifications to make Bio-HydroPlus, which powers the IdaTech fuel cell T-Mobile installed. “Fuel cells have always provided clean energy,” IdaTech said in a news release last month. “And now they can be powered by renewable fuel, creating a sustainable power solution.” — Reporter: 541-383-0360 tdoran@bendbulletin.com

Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances rules came into force in 2006, sharply limiting the amount of certain hazardous chemicals such as lead, chromium and mercury that manufacturers could include in their products. Recycling is also on the rise. The EU’s Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment directive requires manufacturers to ensure that 8.8 pounds of electronic waste per inhabitant of each member state be collected for recycling. A proposed revision would change the requirement to 45 percent of the weight of electronic products put onto the country’s market, increasing to 65 percent in four years. California is the most active U.S. state in managing e-waste, seeking to model its regulations on the EU directives. Since the U.S. e-waste recycling rate is currently around 18 percent, we have a long way to go. Recycling requirements are difficult for manufacturers to manage, because they have little control over what happens to their phones, computers and televisions once they leave the warehouse. In the United States, waste management companies are only recently

springing up to help electronics manufacturers track their products from cradle to grave. “Nearly all of a smartphone is recyclable,” says Martin Nielsen, chief executive of Waste Systems, one of the many companies now offering to help manufacturers give old electronics new life. “The glass on an iPhone is recyclable. The plastic housing and metal parts can all be recovered.” Nielsen also notes that smelters and other reprocessing facilities are usually happy to accept the materials, because recycled material is cheaper and 17 times more energy-efficient than digging up new stuff. Several retailers, such as Best Buy, Radio Shack and Apple stores, will accept your unwanted electronics for recycling, whether purchased from their store or not. (Some may even offer you a modest store credit in exchange). Unfortunately, there have been reports from developing countries of child workers disassembling electronics using torches, which release a nasty haze of carcinogens. So ask a few questions when you trade in your old device, or better yet, don’t trade in until you absolutely must.

Private Continued from C1 Founded in 1996, IdaTech makes fuel cells, primarily for telecommunications companies that need backup power to supply their networks when the electrical grid goes down. The company’s newest fuel cell — the ElectraGen ME powered by hydrogen gas created on-site through a mixture of methanol and water — helped increase sales by 26 percent, to $2.4 million, for the first six months of this year, according to its interim financial results released Sept. 30. IdaTech, however, reported an operating loss of $11 million for the period, which was 10 percent better than in 2010, according to the financial results. For all of last year, it reported a gross margin loss of $3.2 million, an improvement over the $5 million gross margin loss in 2009, according to the 2010 annual report. Investec has indicated it will make an additional loan to IdaTech and extend the repayment date for current and future loans to October 2012, according to a statement from Koyama and Sir John Jennings in the interim financial results. — Tim Doran, The Bulletin


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Golf, D3 Motor sports, D3 NFL, D3, D4

D

College football, D5 College basketball, D6 Cycling Central, D6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: OREGON NOTEBOOK

COLLEGE FOOTBALL LSU, Oklahoma State lead BCS LSU and Oklahoma State took control of the race to the BCS championship game — but don’t count out Alabama yet. The day after the Tigers and Cowboys stayed unbeaten with their most difficult victories of the season, they also took the top two spots in the BCS standings. First-place LSU beat Alabama 9-6 in overtime Saturday night in Tuscaloosa, Ala., right about the time secondplace Oklahoma State held off Kansas State 52-45 in Stillwater, Okla. The Crimson Tide only slipped one spot to third. If the Tigers (9-0) and Cowboys (9-0) remain unbeaten, they should meet in New Orleans on Jan. 9. If either slip up, Alabama or fourth-place Stanford are in position to reach the title game as long as they keep winning. Unbeaten Boise State was fifth and again seems to be a long shot to reach the BCS championship game.

After win over Huskies, Ducks focus on Cardinal By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Next up Oregon at Stanford • When: Saturday, 5 p.m. • TV: ABC • Radio: KBND-AM 1110

Asked what he thinks of Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck, Oregon head coach Chip Kelly smiled and answered with an understatement like only he can. “He’s not bad,” Kelly said with a laugh after the Ducks’ 34-17 win over Washington Saturday night in Seattle. “Andrew Luck is what’s good about college football. Here’s a kid that had an opportunity to go out early and would have been the first pick in the NFL draft, and he decided he wanted to come back and stay with the guys he came in with and get his degree. “We’re excited about the challenge

of going to play him.” No. 6 Oregon will have its hands full with the Heisman Trophy candidate — and the Cardinal’s strong running game — when it plays at No. 3 Stanford this Saturday at 5 p.m. The game could decide who wins the Pac-12 North Division and will play in the first-ever Pac-12 Championship Game on Dec. 2. It also has national championship implications, mostly for Stanford. Stanford (7-0 Pac-12, 9-0 overall) is No. 4 in the BCS standings released Sunday, and Oregon (6-0, 8-1) is No. 7. ESPN’S College GameDay will broadcast live from Palo Alto, Calif., this Saturday. See Ducks / D5

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Washington’s Chris Polk runs into the Oregon defense in the first half of Saturday night’s game in Seattle. Oregon won the game, 34-17.

CYCLING CENTRAL

BEAU EASTES

Taking the ride

Play-in games make way for state playoffs

INSIDE

— The Associated Press

BCS standings A look at the standings for the Bowl Championship Series after Saturday’s games: Rank Team Average 1. LSU 0.9931 2. Okla. St. 0.9447 3. Alabama 0.8836 4. Stanford 0.8749 5. Boise St. 0.8473 6. Oklahoma 0.7978 7. Oregon 0.7708 8. Arkansas 0.7452 9. Clemson 0.6435 10. Virginia Tech 0.5913

W

NFL Ravens Steelers

23 20

Jets Bills

27 11

Cowboys Seahawks

23 13

Falcons Colts

31 7

Dolphins Chiefs

31 3

Saints Buccaneers

27 16

49ers Redskins

19 11

Texans Browns

30 12

Bengals Titans

24 17

Broncos Raiders

38 24

Giants Patriots

24 20

Cardinals Rams

19 13

Packers Chargers

45 38

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Instructor Shellie Heggenberger leads a group of cyclists during an indoor training session Thursday evening at Fleet Feet Sports. Riding on an indoor trainer is one way to stay in cycling shape over the winter.

• Central Oregon cyclists have indoor training options they can explore in the winter By Laura Winberry

COMMENTARY

For The Bulletin

D

aylight is growing shorter, temperatures are dropping, and soon our trails and streets will be laden with ice and snow. For cyclists who want to ride through winter but are not too keen on three inches of neoprene and spandex in order to do so, alternative solutions do exist. Among them: an indoor trainer — a freestanding piece of equipment that enables a cyclist to ride while remaining stationary. Panned by many cyclists as being tedious, indoor trainers can and do serve a purpose in certain situations.

When winter winds blow and storms come in sideways, an indoor trainer is one of the most efficient, productive and relatively inexpensive ways to keep the legs turning. Riders can choose from at least four different kinds of indoor trainers: wind and magnetic (or “mag”) trainers, virtual cycling trainers and rollers. Wind trainers have been around the longest and offer a realistically smooth ride. Through a system of small fans, the trainer creates resistance for the rider, which increases

as speed increases — just as a bike would on the road. Essentially, the cyclist generates his or her own amount of resistance as a direct result of how much effort he or she exerts. Although not as sophisticated as other options, and rather noisy, wind trainers operate fluidly and are among the least expensive trainers. “Wind trainers are a little more realistic feeling than mag (magnetic) trainers,” says Damian Schmitt, an employee at Sunnyside Sports of Bend. “But they’re also pretty loud, and if you live with other people, the noise (of a wind trainer) tends to get annoying.” See Inside / D6

ith the play-in rounds finally over, it is officially state playoff

time. Volleyball steals the prep spotlight this week with the Class 6A, 5A, 4A, 3A, 2A and 1A state tournaments held across the state Friday and Saturday. Central Oregon has five teams still competing for state titles, with the possibility of three state champions. At the Class 5A state tournament at Hillsboro’s Liberty High, crosstown rivals Mountain View and Summit face one another in Friday’s quarterfinal round at 1:15 p.m. The 5A Intermountain Conference champion Storm (18-7 overall) have defeated the Cougars both times they have played, but Mountain View (11-9) has won six of its past seven matches. While Central Oregon’s two best 5A teams will meet in the state quarterfinal round, the area’s top 4A programs could square off in the state final. Five-time defending state champion Crook County (24-3) and Sky-Em League champion Sisters (20-4) are on opposite sides of the 4A state bracket and would see one another in the state final at Lane Community College in Eugene if they both win quarterfinal and semifinal matches. The Cowgirls open the state tournament against Siuslaw (18-3), and the Outlaws start tournament play against La Grande (15-4). See Playoffs / D5

Inside • A look at upcoming playoff games and matches for Central Oregon teams, D5

Giants stun Patriots late Quarterback Eli Manning leads New York past New England on the road, D3

COMMENTARY

NBA needs drastically different approach By William C. Rhoden New York Times News Service

T

Eli Manning throws during the fourth quarter on Sunday.

he NBA has long been known as a league of innovation. The NBA has exported its product to every corner of the world. The league, more than any other, has made rock stars out of its players, who are among the most recognized athletes on the planet. But by missing one innovation — forging a true partnership with its players — the league threatens to choke its growth. Commissioner David Stern likes to talk about partnerships,

but in the rough-and-tumble world of stalled labor negotiations, the fundamental relationship is anything but. Shame on the league for not pushing for true partnership, but shame on the players for not insisting that equity in the league become a nonnegotiable plank in the labor talks. Instead, the stalled negotiations have involved the same wage-based scuffles between employer and employees: we give you a piece of the pie, and we’ll fight over the size of the slice every few years. See NBA / D4

NBA PLAYERS IN PORTLAND Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant, left, drives on Portland’s Wesley Matthews during the Rip City Basketball Classic in Portland, Sunday. The showcases of various NBA Players was put together by Portland forward LaMarcus Aldridge. Don Ryan / The Associated Press


D2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today SOCCER Noon: English Premier League, Blackburn vs. Chelsea (taped), Root Sports. HOCKEY 4 p.m.: NHL, New York Islanders at Boston Bruins, Versus network. FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m.: NFL, Chicago Bears at Philadelphia Eagles, ESPN.

Tuesday SOCCER 2:30 p.m.: UEFA Champions League, Villareal vs. Manchester City (taped), Root Sports. HOCKEY 4:30 p.m.: NHL, Carolina Hurricanes at New Jersey Devils, Versus network. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: College, Northern Illinois at Bowling Green, ESPN2.

NHL ROUNDUP

Power play goals lift Canucks to victory The Associated Press CHICAGO — Henrik Sedin had a goal and three assists and Vancouver converted five of six power plays to lift the Canucks to a 6-2 win over Chicago. David Booth, Aaron Rome, Daniel Sedin and Dan Hamhuis each added power-play goals and Jannik Hansen had Vancouver’s only even-strength score as the Canucks (7-71) handed the Blackhawks their first regulation home loss. Michael Frolik and Marcus Kruger scored for Chicago (8-3-3), which went zero-for-five on the power play and has scored just once in its last 26 chances. Vancouver’s Roberto Luongo made 38 saves to help the Canucks end a twogame slide. Chicago’s Corey Crawford blocked 32 shots. Also on Sunday: Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Panthers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SUNRISE, Fla. — Dominic Moore scored the shootout winner to lift Tampa Bay to a win over Florida. Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Hurricanes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 RALEIGH, N.C. — Jamie Benn scored twice, including a shorthanded goal, to lead Dallas to a win over Carolina. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 NEW YORK — Marian Gaborik scored on an odd-man rush and into an empty net in the third period and Derek Stepan had a goal and an assist to help the New York beat Winnipeg. Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DENVER — Miikka Kiprusoff stopped 32 shots, Mark Giordano and Curtis Glencross each had a goal and Calgary beat Colorado.

ON DECK Tuesday Boys soccer: Class 5A state playoffs: Corvallis at Mountain View, 2 p.m.; Wilsonville at Summit, 2 p.m.; Class 4A state playoffs: Sisters at Philomath, TBA Girls soccer: Class 5A state playoffs: Liberty at Bend, TBA; Wilsonville at Summit, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Corvallis, TBA; Class 4A state playoffs: Sutherlin at Sisters, 1 p.m.

Chinnarat Phadungsil, $47,500 Darren Clarke, $47,500 Jim Herman, $47,500 Miguel Jimenez, $47,500 Thomas Bjorn, $43,500 Bill Haas, $43,500 Scott Stallings, $43,500 Stuart Appleby, $43,500 Keith Horne, $40,500 Hiroyuki Fujita, $40,500 Ben Crane, $40,500 Alexander Noren, $38,000 Jung-gon Hwang, $38,000 Ashun Wu, $38,000 Siddikur Rahman, $38,000 Alvaro Quiros, $38,000 Paul Lawrie, $38,000 Kyung-tae Kim, $38,000 Geoff Ogilvy, $35,500 Robert Karlsson, $35,500 Mark Wilsonv, $35,500 Tetsuji Hiratsuka, $34,000 David Toms, $34,000 Michio Matsumura, $34,000 Wen-Chong Liang, $32,500 Jim Furyk, $32,500 Michael Hoey, $32,500 S.S.P. Chowrasia, $31,500 D.A. Points, $30,750 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, $30,750 Chez Reavie, $30,000 Matteo Manassero, $29,500 Thomas Aiken, $29,000 David Gleeson, $28,500 Alistair Presnell, $27,750 Chan Yih-shin, $27,750 Hao Yuan, $27,000 Pablo Martin, $26,500 Tom Lewis, $26,000 Adam Bland, $25,500 Bobby Gates, $25,000

IN THE BLEACHERS

Friday Football: Class 5A state playoffs: Liberty at Bend, 7 p.m.; Jefferson at Mountain View, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Class 5A state tournament in Hillsboro: Summit vs. Mountain View, 1:15 p.m.; Class 4A state tournament in Eugene: Crook County vs. Siuslaw, 8 a.m.; La Grande vs. Sisters, 10 a.m.; Class 2A state tournament in Forest Grove: Culver vs. Days Creek, 8 a.m. Saturday Volleyball: Class 5A, 4A, 2A state tournament finals Boys soccer: Class 5A, 4A state quarterfinals Girls soccer: Class 5A, 4A state quarterfinals

FOOTBALL Betting Line Favorite EAGLES

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today 7 8 Bears

College Polls The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 5, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. LSU (59) 9-0 1,499 1 2. Oklahoma St. 9-0 1,398 3 3. Stanford 9-0 1,369 4 4. Alabama 8-1 1,334 2 5. Boise St. (1) 8-0 1,288 5 6. Oregon 8-1 1,184 6 7. Oklahoma 8-1 1,138 7 8. Arkansas 8-1 1,107 8 9. Clemson 8-1 979 11 10. Virginia Tech 8-1 885 12 11. Houston 9-0 804 14 12. Penn St. 8-1 725 16 13. Michigan St. 7-2 718 15 14. Georgia 7-2 657 18 15. South Carolina 7-2 654 10 16. Wisconsin 7-2 602 19 17. Kansas St. 7-2 546 17 18. Southern Cal 7-2 502 21 19. Nebraska 7-2 491 9 20. Georgia Tech 7-2 340 22 21. Texas 6-2 313 NR 22. Michigan 7-2 264 13 23. Cincinnati 7-1 206 23 24. Auburn 6-3 181 25 25. Southern Miss. 8-1 161 NR Others receiving votes: TCU 56, Ohio St. 50, Arizona St. 15, Florida St. 12, Washington 8, Iowa 4, Notre Dame 4, Baylor 3, Tulsa 1, Virginia 1, West Virginia 1. USA Today Top 25 Poll The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 5, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. LSU (59) 9-0 1,475 1 2. Stanford 9-0 1,378 3 3. Oklahoma State 9-0 1,359 4 4. Alabama 8-1 1,286 2 5. Boise State 8-0 1,242 5 6. Oregon 8-1 1,180 6 7. Oklahoma 8-1 1,141 7 8. Arkansas 8-1 1,075 8 9. Virginia Tech 8-1 955 11 10. Clemson 8-1 946 12 11. Houston 9-0 828 14 12. Penn State 8-1 799 15 13. Michigan State 7-2 696 16 14. Wisconsin 7-2 654 17 15. South Carolina 7-2 618 10 16. Georgia 7-2 572 20 17. Nebraska 7-2 530 9 18. Cincinnati 7-1 386 22 19. Georgia Tech 7-2 354 23 20. Texas 6-2 339 25 21. Michigan 7-2 334 13 22. Kansas State 7-2 328 19 23. Southern Mississippi 8-1 301 24 24. TCU 7-2 115 NR 25. Auburn 6-3 109 NR Others receiving votes: Arizona State 49; Florida State 44; Notre Dame 22; Ohio State 22; Washington 10; Iowa 8; Texas A&M 6; West Virginia 6; Baylor 3; Rutgers 2; Arkansas State 1; Miami (Fla.) 1; Virginia 1. Harris Top 25 The Top 25 teams in the Harris Interactive College Football Poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 5, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. LSU (112) 9-0 2,848 1 2. Oklahoma State 9-0 2,658 3 3. Stanford (2) 9-0 2,623 4 4. Alabama 8-1 2,505 2 5. Boise State 8-0 2,422 5 6. Oregon 8-1 2,258 6 7. Oklahoma 8-1 2,194 7 8. Arkansas 8-1 2,071 8 9. Clemson 8-1 1,850 10 10. Virginia Tech 8-1 1,785 12 11. Houston 9-0 1,629 14 12. Penn State 8-1 1,453 16 13. Michigan State 7-2 1,310 17 14. Wisconsin 7-2 1,284 18 15. Georgia 7-2 1,114 20 16. South Carolina 7-2 1,110 11 17. Nebraska 7-2 1,050 9 18. Kansas State 7-2 855 15 19. Georgia Tech 7-2 793 21 20. Texas 6-2 739 24 21. Michigan 7-2 638 13 22. Cincinnati 7-1 596 23 23. Southern Miss 8-1 449 NR 24. Auburn 6-3 357 25 25. TCU 7-2 181 NR Other teams receiving votes: Ohio State 85; Arizona State 84; West Virginia 31; Florida State 23; Virginia 16; Notre Dame 14; Iowa 8; Washington 8; Louisville 3; Texas A&M 2; Arkansas State 1; Baylor 1; Mississippi State 1; Tulsa 1.

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR

71-69-74-71—285 73-76-67-69—285 74-70-73-68—285 72-68-68-77—285 72-71-71-73—287 74-69-68-76—287 70-74-72-71—287 77-70-71-69—287 71-70-73-74—288 74-71-70-73—288 75-71-74-68—288 67-75-70-77—289 72-72-70-75—289 72-69-70-78—289 75-73-67-74—289 72-67-71-79—289 72-71-72-74—289 73-77-71-68—289 75-69-69-77—290 74-75-68-73—290 71-73-77-69—290 72-70-72-77—291 68-76-71-76—291 74-71-71-75—291 72-73-71-76—292 78-68-73-73—292 76-70-74-72—292 73-74-73-73—293 73-71-73-77—294 79-72-71-72—294 70-75-68-82—295 82-71-70-73—296 76-75-69-77—297 71-70-76-81—298 75-75-73-76—299 75-74-76-74—299 72-78-74-76—300 76-71-74-80—301 78-71-72-83—304 75-76-81-80—312 75-68-69—WD

LPGA Tour

SPRINT CUP ——— AAA Texas 500 Sunday At Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 334 laps, 144 rating, 48 points, $484,783. 2. (7) Carl Edwards, Ford, 334, 120.9, 43, $361,566. 3. (9) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 334, 113.5, 42, $231,883. 4. (3) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 334, 124.1, 41, $227,461. 5. (1) Greg Biffle, Ford, 334, 107.1, 40, $196,125. 6. (23) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 334, 104.8, 38, $190,661. 7. (16) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 334, 88.3, 37, $144,475. 8. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 334, 89.7, 36, $134,325. 9. (18) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 334, 88.3, 35, $164,433. 10. (26) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 334, 91.6, 34, $157,736. 11. (12) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 334, 103.3, 33, $140,366. 12. (2) David Ragan, Ford, 334, 105.2, 32, $116,625. 13. (21) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334, 89.7, 31, $150,511. 14. (11) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 334, 94, 31, $151,011. 15. (4) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 334, 79.6, 30, $108,200. 16. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334, 73.5, 29, $140,100. 17. (13) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 334, 73.6, 0, $98,550. 18. (15) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 334, 71.4, 26, $135,533. 19. (30) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 334, 67.9, 25, $105,725. 20. (28) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 333, 64.1, 24, $143,075. 21. (20) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 333, 67.5, 23, $124,364. 22. (6) David Reutimann, Toyota, 333, 64.4, 22, $124,683. 23. (10) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 333, 77.1, 21, $122,820. 24. (8) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 333, 80.9, 21, $121,633. 25. (33) Casey Mears, Toyota, 333, 54.7, 19, $96,400. 26. (29) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 332, 57.3, 0, $110,083. 27. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 332, 69.8, 18, $104,375. 28. (32) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 332, 50.2, 16, $121,020. 29. (43) Andy Lally, Ford, 332, 37.5, 15, $101,475. 30. (14) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 331, 59.2, 14, $137,340. 31. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 331, 40.2, 0, $103,708. 32. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 331, 42.7, 12, $100,872. 33. (17) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 331, 45.3, 11, $139,916. 34. (37) Mike Bliss, Ford, 329, 35.7, 0, $90,925. 35. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 316, 41.6, 9, $90,725. 36. (22) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 295, 51.9, 8, $129,114. 37. (25) Joey Logano, Toyota, engine, 258, 47.4, 7, $98,300. 38. (42) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet, vibration, 215, 31, 6, $90,100. 39. (39) Scott Speed, Ford, rear gear, 30, 31.5, 0, $89,900. 40. (35) Josh Wise, Toyota, rear gear, 23, 32.7, 0, $89,700. 41. (38) Mike Skinner, Ford, brakes, 19, 29.9, 0, $89,475. 42. (40) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, clutch, 14, 27.4, 0, $89,275. 43. (27) J.J. Yeley, Ford, fuel pressure, 10, 27.6, 1, $89,561. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 152.705 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 16 minutes, 51 seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.092 seconds. Caution Flags: 5 for 21 laps. Lead Changes: 23 among 10 drivers. Lap Leaders: G.Biffle 1-23; M.Kenseth 24-42; T.Stewart 43-45; M.Kenseth 46-88; C.Edwards 89-90; M.Kenseth 91-112; C.Edwards 113; P.Menard 114; M.Kenseth 115-116; T.Stewart 117; M.Kenseth 118; T.Stewart 119-158; J.Johnson 159; B.Keselowski 160-161; T.Stewart 162-202; K.Kahne 203-206; T.Stewart 207-263; C.Edwards 264-274; T.Stewart 275-300; K.Kahne 301; J.Burton 302-319; R.Newman 320-323; J.Burton 324-329; T.Stewart 330-334. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): T.Stewart, 7 times for 173 laps; M.Kenseth, 5 times for 87 laps; J.Burton, 2 times for 24 laps; G.Biffle, 1 time for 23 laps; C.Edwards, 3 times for 14 laps; K.Kahne, 2 times for 5 laps; R.Newman,

1 time for 4 laps; B.Keselowski, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Johnson, 1 time for 1 lap; P.Menard, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. C.Edwards, 2,316; 2. T.Stewart, 2,313; 3. K.Harvick, 2,283; 4. M.Kenseth, 2,278; 5. Bra.Keselowski, 2,267; 6. J.Johnson, 2,261; 7. D.Earnhardt Jr., 2,237; 8. J.Gordon, 2,235; 9. Ku.Busch, 2,229; 10. D.Hamlin, 2,217; 11. Ky.Busch, 2,216; 12. R.Newman, 2,213. ——— NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

GOLF Champions Tour Charles Schwab Cup Championship Sunday At TPC Harding Park GC San Francisco Purse: $2.5 million Yardage: 7,135; Par 71 Final Jay Don Blake (880), $440,000 71-68-66-71—276 Michael Allen (392), $195,750 69-69-69-71—278 M Calcavecchia (392), $195,750 71-68-70-69—278 Jay Haas (392), $195,750 68-72-67-71—278 Loren Roberts (392), $195,750 72-71-65-70—278 David Frost (234), $117,000 69-69-69-72—279 Russ Cochran (170), $85,200 74-69-69-68—280 Fred Couples (170), $85,200 68-70-74-68—280 David Eger (170), $85,200 73-72-66-69—280 Kenny Perry (170), $85,200 70-69-71-70—280 Joey Sindelar (170), $85,200 71-70-68-71—280 Tom Pernice, Jr. (118), $59,333 71-71-72-69—283 Olin Browne (118), $59,333 73-70-69-71—283 Jeff Sluman (118), $59,333 75-69-68-71—283 John Huston (102), $50,500 75-69-67-73—284 Nick Price (102), $50,500 73-68-70-73—284 Peter Senior (92), $46,000 71-76-70-68—285 Bernhard Langer (84), $41,750 71-68-75-72—286 Tom Lehman (84), $41,750 70-72-72-72—286 John Cook (72), $36,000 73-73-70-71—287 Rod Spittle (72), $36,000 70-72-72-73—287 Mark Wiebe (72), $36,000 74-70-74-69—287 Chip Beck (62), $31,000 76-72-71-70—289 Mark O’Meara (62), $31,000 76-74-70-69—289 Brad Bryant (58), $29,000 77-70-69-74—290 Hale Irwin (52), $26,000 74-74-70-73—291 Chien Soon Lu (52), $26,000 72-74-72-73—291 Corey Pavin (52), $26,000 72-74-74-71—291 Tom Watson (50), $24,500 74-75-69-74—292 Tommy Armour III (48), $24,000 78-74-69-73—294

WGC WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS ——— HSBC Champions Sunday At Sheshan International Golf Club Shanghai Purse: $7 million Yardage: 7,266; Par: 72 Final Martin Kaymer, $1,200,000 69-68-68-63—268 Fredrik Jacobson, $675,000 67-66-67-71—271 Graeme McDowell, $430,000 69-69-67-67—272 Charl Schwartzel, $258,333 70-69-69-65—273 Paul Casey, $258,333 70-66-70-67—273 Rory McIlroy, $258,333 70-69-65-69—273 Justin Rose, $155,000 68-70-70-66—274 Hunter Mahan, $155,000 71-67-69-67—274 Louis Oosthuizen, $155,000 71-63-68-72—274 Jhonattan Vegas, $125,000 69-73-65-68—275 Bo Van Pelt, $110,000 67-69-70-70—276 Adam Scott, $110,000 69-65-69-73—276 Ian Poulter, $90,000 70-68-69-71—278 Xin-jun Zhang, $90,000 74-68-64-72—278 Lee Westwood, $90,000 69-68-67-74—278 K.J. Choi, $79,333 68-70-72-69—279 Simon Dyson, $79,333 69-69-70-71—279 Keegan Bradley, $79,333 65-70-72-72—279 John Senden, $75,000 72-68-70-70—280 Nicolas Colsaerts, $71,000 74-69-68-70—281 Lucas Glover, $71,000 76-68-71-66—281 Pablo Larrazabal, $71,000 70-69-70-72—281 Jeev Milkha Singh, $62,500 72-73-69-68—282 Francesco Molinari, $62,500 70-70-71-71—282 Aaron Baddeley, $62,500 69-68-73-72—282 Anders Hansen, $62,500 71-69-70-72—282 Jonathan Byrd, $62,500 71-68-70-73—282 Jbe’ Kruger, $62,500 70-70-68-74—282 Rory Sabbatini, $56,500 69-71-71-72—283 Thongchai Jaidee, $56,500 68-69-72-74—283 Harrison Frazar, $56,500 70-75-64-74—283 Yuta Ikeda, $56,500 70-71-68-74—283 Peter Hanson, $52,000 69-73-71-71—284 Robert Rock, $52,000 70-70-71-73—284 Lee Slattery, $52,000 76-71-68-69—284 Ernie Els, $52,000 75-69-72-68—284 Nick Watney, $52,000 71-75-71-67—284

Mizuno Classic Sunday At Kintetsu Kashikojima Country Club Shima, Japan Purse: $1.2 million Yardage: 6,506; Par: 72 Final x-won on third playoff hole Momoko Ueda, $180,000 67-64-69—200 Feng Shanshan, $109,523 68-67-65—200 Na Yeon Choi, $79,451 69-68-64—201 Teresa Lu, $55,466 66-70-67—203 Catriona Matthew, $55,466 68-68-67—203 Stacy Lewis, $34,679 68-71-65—204 Mina Harigae, $34,679 68-67-69—204 Sakura Yokomine, $34,679 71-63-70—204 Christel Boeljon, $23,610 70-71-65—206 Jiyai Shin, $23,610 69-71-66—206 Esther Lee, $23,610 70-69-67—206 In Kyung Kim, $23,610 68-68-70—206 Karrie Webb, $19,667 71-69-67—207 Mika Miyazato, $16,969 70-70-68—208 Pornanong Phatlum, $16,969 69-70-69—208 Azahara Munoz, $16,969 68-70-70—208 Mayu Hattori, $16,969 69-66-73—208 Sun Ju Ahn, $13,329 70-71-68—209 Christina Kim, $13,329 71-70-68—209 Eun A Lim, $13,329 69-71-69—209 Li Ying Ye, $13,329 72-67-70—209 Asoko Fujimoto, $13,329 69-69-71—209 Chie Arimura, $13,329 71-66-72—209 Akane Iijima, $13,329 66-71-72—209 Hyun Ju Shin, $9,841 69-72-69—210 Candie Kung, $9,841 70-71-69—210 Hee Young Park, $9,841 71-69-70—210 Meena Lee, $9,841 72-67-71—210 Hee Won Han, $9,841 69-70-71—210 Ryann O’Toole, $9,841 69-69-72—210 Ayako Uehara, $9,841 68-70-72—210 Na Ri Kim, $9,841 69-68-73—210 Hee Kyung Seo, $9,841 70-67-73—210 Rikako Morita, $7,225 71-73-67—211 Amanda Blumenherst, $7,225 73-71-67—211 Ritsuko Ryu, $7,225 69-73-69—211 Beatriz Recari, $7,225 73-67-71—211 Vicky Hurst, $7,225 69-71-71—211 Shinobu Moromizato, $7,225 70-69-72—211 Kyeong Bae, $5,647 72-76-64—212 Mindy Kim, $5,647 72-73-67—212 Shiho Oyama, $5,647 70-73-69—212 Na Ri Lee, $5,647 71-70-71—212 Amy Hung, $5,647 70-71-71—212 Nachiyo Ohtani, $5,647 71-70-71—212 Inbee Park, $4,197 73-71-69—213 Yukari Baba, $4,197 70-73-70—213 Mi Jeong Jeon, $4,197 71-71-71—213 Chella Choi, $4,197 73-69-71—213 Julieta Granada, $4,197 74-68-71—213 Mi Hyun Kim, $4,197 72-69-72—213 Rui Kitada, $4,197 71-70-72—213 Hiromi Mogi, $4,197 70-71-72—213 Nikki Campbell, $4,197 70-70-73—213 Ah Reum Hwang, $4,197 66-73-74—213 Ji Woo Lee, $3,298 73-71-70—214 Kristy McPherson, $3,298 72-71-71—214 Yumiko Yoshida, $3,298 70-72-72—214 Eun Hee Ji, $3,298 74-68-72—214 Heather Bowie Young, $2,878 73-72-70—215 Kumiko Kaneda, $2,878 74-71-70—215 Tiffany Joh, $2,878 71-73-71—215 Soo Yun Kang, $2,878 71-72-72—215 Eun Bi Jang, $2,878 71-71-73—215 Jennifer Johnson, $2,638 72-74-70—216 Kaori Aoyama, $2,638 72-73-71—216 Saiki Fujita, $2,638 70-72-74—216 Jimin Kang, $2,458 77-69-71—217 Paige Mackenzie, $2,458 73-71-73—217 Junko Omote, $2,458 74-68-75—217 Cindy Lacrosse, $2,369 71-74-73—218 Gerina Piller, $2,280 71-77-71—219 Jenny Shin, $2,280 73-73-73—219 Miki Saiki, $2,280 73-73-73—219 Young Kim, $2,280 74-70-75—219 Song-Hee Kim, $2,280 74-70-75—219 Ai Miyazato, $2,194 73-75-72—220 Becky Morgan, $2,166 73-74-75—222

HOCKEY

Florida Carolina Winnipeg

13 6 4 3 15 34 36 14 5 6 3 13 35 47 14 5 7 2 12 35 45 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 14 8 3 3 19 46 42 Nashville 13 7 4 2 16 35 34 Detroit 12 6 5 1 13 29 29 St. Louis 13 6 7 0 12 32 35 Columbus 14 2 11 1 5 31 53 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Edmonton 13 8 3 2 18 30 22 Minnesota 13 7 3 3 17 30 26 Colorado 14 7 6 1 15 40 42 Vancouver 15 7 7 1 15 45 44 Calgary 13 6 6 1 13 30 32 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 13 10 3 0 20 40 31 Phoenix 13 7 4 2 16 38 36 San Jose 12 7 4 1 15 37 33 Los Angeles 13 6 4 3 15 28 28 Anaheim 14 5 6 3 13 27 40 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games Tampa Bay 4, Florida 3, SO Dallas 5, Carolina 2 N.Y. Rangers 3, Winnipeg 0 Vancouver 6, Chicago 2 Calgary 2, Colorado 1 Today’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Winnipeg at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 4 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 4 p.m. Carolina at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Edmonton at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Nashville at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Valencia Open 500 Sunday At Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencas Valencia Valencia, Spain Purse: $2.8 million (WT500) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (3). Swiss Indoors Sunday At St. Jakobshalle Basel, Switzerland Purse: $2.6 million (WT500) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 6-1, 6-3.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Fed Cup World Group Final At Olympic Stadium Moscow Surface: Hard-Indoor Czech Republic 3, Russia 2 Singles Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, def. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, 6-2, 6-2. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-3. Reverse Singles Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-4. Doubles Lucie Hradecka and Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, def. Maria Kirilenko and Elena Vesnina, Russia, 6-4, 6-2. Tournament of Champions Sunday At The Bali International Convention Centre Nusa Dua, Indonesia Purse: $600,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-3, 6-0.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PST ——— Playoffs EASTERN CONFERENCE Championship Sunday, Nov. 6: Houston 2, Sporting Kansas City 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE Championship Sunday, Nov. 6: Los Angeles 3, Real Salt Lake 1 MLS CUP Sunday, Nov. 20: Houston vs. Los Angeles at Carson, California

DEALS

NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Pittsburgh 15 9 3 3 21 Philadelphia 14 8 4 2 18 N.Y. Rangers 13 7 3 3 17 New Jersey 12 6 5 1 13 N.Y. Islanders 11 4 5 2 10 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Toronto 14 9 4 1 19 Buffalo 13 8 5 0 16 Ottawa 15 7 7 1 15 Montreal 13 5 6 2 12 Boston 12 5 7 0 10 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Washington 12 9 3 0 18 Tampa Bay 14 7 5 2 16

Transactions GF 45 56 35 30 23

GA 34 44 29 34 29

GF 45 36 45 34 34

GA 46 28 55 36 28

GF GA 48 33 44 46

HOCKEY National Hockey League SAN JOSE SHARKS—Reassigned F Benn Ferriero to Worcester (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Assigned F D.J. King to Hershey (AHL).

FISH COUNT Updated daily counts were not available. Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 676,036 185,702 367,207 128,386 The Dalles 440,862 151,007 299,007 103,123 John Day 359,180 138,591 257,345 89,873 McNary 338,057 102,371 246,069 76,560

S   B Soccer • Dynamo reach MLS Cup final: Andre Hainault scored his second goal of the postseason, and the Houston Dynamo reached the MLS Cup final by beating Sporting Kansas City 2-0 on Sunday in the Eastern Conference title game played in Kansas City, Kan. Carlo Costly added a late insurance goal for Houston, which extended its unbeaten streak to nine and reached the league final for the first time since winning back-to-back championships in 2006 and 2007. • L.A. Galaxy tops Real Salt Lake: Mike Magee scored the go-ahead goal on a pass from David Beckham in the 58th minute, and Landon Donovan and Robbie Keane also scored as the Los Angeles

Galaxy advanced to the MLS Cup with a 3-1 victory over Real Salt Lake on Sunday night in Carson, Calif., in the Western Conference final. Beckham will play for his first MLS title in the final game of his fiveyear contract with the Galaxy.

Tennis • Czechs top Russia for Fed Cup title: The Czech Republic won its first Fed Cup title in 23 years on Sunday after Lucie Hradecka and Kveta Peschke beat Maria Kirilenko and Elena Vesnina 6-4, 6-2 in the decisive doubles match to secure a 3-2 win over Russia in the final in Moscow. • Federer wins at Basel: Defending champion Roger Federer beat Kei Nishikori 6-1, 6-3 in the Swiss Indoors final on

Sunday in Basel, Switzerland, to win his first title in 10 months. • Serbia’s Ivanovic wins Tournament of Champions: Ana Ivanovic successfully defended her WTA Tournament of Champions title with a 6-3, 6-0 win over Anabel Medina-Garigues on Sunday in Nusa Dua, Indonesia. • Granollers beats Monaco to win Valencia Open: Marcel Granollers defeated Juan Monaco 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (3) in the Valencia Open final in Spain on Sunday for his third career win.

Football • Missouri to SEC is done deal: The Southeastern Conference says it will add Missouri to the league, starting next

football season. The SEC released a statement Sunday saying the conference’s presidents and chancellors, acting unanimously, announced Missouri will join the league effective July 1, 2012.

crushing the previous mark of 2:07:43 set by Tesfaye Jifar, of Ethiopia, a decade earlier.

Running

• Blues fire Payne, hire Hitchcock: The St. Louis Blues have changed coaches after a disappointing 6-7 start, firing Davis Payne and hiring Ken Hitchcock to a contract through next season. The 40year-old Payne was the second-youngest coach in the NHL but got only one full season with St. Louis after being hired in January 2010. The 59-year-old Hitchcock is 534-350-88-70, winning a Stanley Cup with Dallas in 1999-2000 and also coaching at Philadelphia and Columbus.

• Mutai, Dado win at NYC Marathon: Geoffrey Mutai shattered the course record in the New York City Marathon on Sunday, no surprise after he ran the fastest marathon ever earlier this year. Firehiwot Dado wasn’t a favorite coming into the women’s race and victory seemed impossible with even a few miles left. But the Ethiopian made a stunning comeback for her first major marathon title. Mutai finished in 2 hours, 5 minutes, 6 seconds,

Hockey

— The Associated Press


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

GOLF ROUNDUP

D3

NFL ROUNDUP

Blake wins Champions finale, Lehman takes points title The Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO — Jay Don Blake quietly celebrated his first victory in 20 years with his wife and a close friend in South Korea. His second win in less than two months drew a much larger crowd of supporters. With nearly two dozen family and friends in attendance, including several grandchildren, Blake put an emphatic stamp on his year, shooting an even-par 71 to win the Charles Schwab Cup Championship on Sunday. “That means a lot, to have my whole family here,” Blake said. “Sometimes, I’m a little worried about it because you get a little nervous trying to play well and perform for them. Sometimes, I put too much pressure and stress on myself worrying about that.” Not that he showed it. Almost two months after surviving a fivehole playoff to win the Songdo Championship in South Korea for his first win since 1991, Blake calmly worked his way through the final round while a crowd of contenders took turns making brief runs at the lead. Blake hit 12 of 14 fairways, made a pair of nice par saves out of the sand on the back nine then made the tournament-winning par on 18 after taking a bogey on the par-3 17th. The only time the normally stoic Blake showed any emotion came after he made the six-foot putt for par on the final hole for a two-stroke victory in the Champions Tour’s season finale. He finished at 8-under 276 at TPC Harding Park. “I was nervous, tense, stressed, the whole thing,” Blake said. “But I still tried to stay patient and play my game and just hoped that I could make some birdies and stay out on top.” Tom Lehman managed to stay on top of the points standings and won a $1 million annuity despite not playing well this week. He shot a 72 to tie for 18th at 2 over, just enough to hold off Mark Calcavecchia by 74 points. Calcavecchia (69), Loren Roberts (70), Michael Allen (71) and Jay Haas (71) tied for second. Lehman took the points lead after winning the Allianz Championship in February and never relinquished it. In other events on Sunday: Kaymer shoots 63 to win HSBC Champions SHANGHAI — Martin Kaymer, of Germany, made nine birdies over his last 12 holes and closed with a 9-under 63 to win the HSBC Champions for the biggest comeback ever in a World Golf Championship. Starting the final round five shots behind Fredrik Jacobson, with a host of stars around him, Kaymer ran off four straight birdies to start the back nine at Sheshan International. He finally caught Jacobson with a birdie on the 13th, and then poured it on. Japan’s Ueda wins Mizuno Classic SHIMA, Japan — Japan’s Momoko Ueda won the Mizuno Classic for the second time in five seasons, beating China’s Shanshan Feng with a 15-foot birdie putt on the third hole of the playoff. Ueda, also the 2007 winner in the event sanctioned by the LPGA Tour and Japan LPGA, closed with a 3-under 69 to match Feng at 16 under at Kintetsu Kashikojima.

Eric Risberg / The Associated Press

Jay Don Blake, left, and Tom Lehman pose with their trophies on the 18th green at the end of the Charles Schwab Cup Championship in San Francisco, Sunday. Blake won the tournament and Lehman won the season points title.

Giants come back to beat Pats The Associated Press FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Super Bowl or midseason game, Eli Manning and the New York Giants are masters of the last-minute comeback against the New England Patriots. Manning capped a decisive drive eerily similar to the one in the 2008 Super Bowl, throwing a 1-yard touchdown pass to Jake Ballard with 15 seconds left and giving the Giants a 24-20 win on Sunday. “I knew we would win,” Giants running back Brandon Jacobs said. “It definitely took me back to the Super Bowl.” In that 17-14 victory, Manning threw a 13yard scoring pass to Plaxico Burress with 35 seconds to go. Four plays earlier, David Tyree trapped Manning’s third-down pass over the middle on top of his helmet for a 32-yard gain. On Sunday, the teams met in a meaningful game for the first time since then. And Manning threw another completion over the middle to an unheralded receiver on third down, connecting with a leaping Ballard for a 28yard gain. Five plays later, they hooked up for the winning pass. “If it was thrown anywhere else, I wouldn’t have caught it,” Ballard said. “You dream about making catches like that.” And Ballard’s number? The same as Tyree’s, 85. Manning, of course, threw all those passes, outplaying Tom Brady, who is known for his fourth-quarter comebacks. “I’d rather be down by three with a minutethirty (left) than up by four with a minute-thirty with Tom Brady, with their offense on the field,” Manning said. “You like those situations where you have an opportunity to go win the game.” The Giants (6-2) kept their two-game lead in the NFC East over the Dallas Cowboys. The Patriots (5-3) are tied with the Buffalo Bills and New York Jets, next week’s opponent, atop the AFC East. “We’ve got half the season to go,” Brady said. “We’ll see what our team’s made of this week.” The loss ended several impressive streaks: wins in an NFL record 31 regular-season starts at home for Brady and in 20 regular-season home games for the Patriots. Brady did throw a touchdown pass for the 24th straight regular-season home game. But the Patriots lost consecutive games for just the third time since the start of the 2003 season. The Giants won for the sixth time in seven games. “We got a little carried away,” defensive end Justin Tuck said when asked about players lifting coach Tom Coughlin on their shoulders in the locker room. “Considering how good that team is and what they’ve done here in the last 20 games, it was a big win, and to win it in the fashion that we won it, it brings back memories.” For a while, it looked like the Patriots would win with a comeback when Brady threw a 14yard pass to Rob Gronkowski, making it 20-17 with 1:36 to go. But the Giants had enough time. And they had Manning. Also on Sunday: Dolphins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Miami Dolphins are no longer winless. Former Oregon State quarterback Matt Moore threw for 244 yards and three touchdowns, Reggie Bush had 92 yards rushing and another score and the Dolphins walloped Kansas City. Moore became the first Dolphins quarterback since Chad Pennington in 2008 to throw three TD passes. Falcons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 INDIANAPOLIS — Julio Jones caught touchdown passes of 50 and 80 yards for Atlanta to keep Indianapolis winless. The Falcons (5-3) won their third straight and earned their first road victory in a series that dates to 1966. The Colts have lost five straight home games for the first time since 2001, and this defeat was every bit as lopsided as the score. Packers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Chargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 SAN DIEGO — Aaron Rodgers threw touchdown passes to four receivers, Green Bay returned two Philip Rivers interceptions for scores and the Packers withstood a wild finish to remain the NFL’s only undefeated team. The Packers improved to 8-0 behind Rodgers, who completed 21 of 26 passes for 247 yards. He has an NFL-high 24 TD passes.

Michael Dwyer / The Associated Press

New York Giants tight end Jake Ballard (85) makes a reception in front of New England Patriots linebacker Tracy White (58) in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game in Foxborough, Mass., Sunday. Ballard had a game-winning touchdown reception later on the drive, as the Giants won 24-20.

49ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Redskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 LANDOVER, Md. — Frank Gore ran for 107 yards, and the NFL’s stingiest scoring defense forced three turnovers as San Francisco ran its winning streak to six games. The 49ers improved to 7-1 and have their longest winning streak since 1997. They are also 4-0 on the road for the first time since 1992 and hold a commanding lead in the NFC West. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Mark Sanchez threw a touchdown to Santonio Holmes, and the Jets’ sturdy defense forced three turnovers in a key AFC East midseason showdown. Sanchez’s 8-yard pass to Holmes with 3:27 left in the third quarter helped blow open the game as the Jets (5-3) won their third straight — and first on the road — to move into a tie with the Bills (5-3). Bengals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Andy Dalton threw for three touchdowns and 217 yards, and Cincinnati rallied from a 10-point deficit for its fifth straight victory. The Bengals (6-2) last won five in a row in 1988 when they won the AFC championship and went to their second Super Bowl. They also improved to 4-1 on the road with the rookie quarterback leading the Bengals to 17 unanswered points as he tossed TD passes to three different receivers. Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Rams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Rookie Patrick Peterson returned a punt 99 yards for a touchdown in overtime to lift Arizona. Peterson fielded the ball at the 1. He evaded and bounced off tacklers over the next 30 yards or so, then outran everyone, striding the last few yards in celebration of his third punt return TD of the season as Arizona (2-6) snapped a six-game losing streak. Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Raiders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 OAKLAND, Calif. — Eddie Royal returned

a punt 85 yards for the tiebreaking score, Willis McGahee ran for 163 yards and Tim Tebow threw two touchdown passes. McGahee had a 60-yard touchdown run that tied the game on the first play after Carson Palmer threw his second of three interceptions for the Raiders (4-4). McGahee then added a 24-yarder to ice it. Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Buccaneers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 NEW ORLEANS — Drew Brees passed for 258 yards and two touchdowns, and New Orleans running backs combined for 195 yards rushing. Brees’ scoring passes went for 3 yards to Lance Moore and 21 yards to Darren Sproles. Pierre Thomas added a tackle-breaking 9-yard score for the Saints (6-3), who saw their running game bounce back after gaining only 56 yards in a humbling loss at St. Louis a week earlier. Cowboys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Seahawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 ARLINGTON, Texas — Tony Romo shook off an inefficient first half to throw for a pair of touchdowns. Tied at 6 coming out for the second half, Dallas pulled away behind Romo’s touchdown passes of 33 yards to Jason Witten and 6 yards to Laurent Robinson. Texans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Browns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 HOUSTON — Arian Foster rushed for 124 yards and Ben Tate ran for 115 as Houston set a franchise record with 261 yards on the ground. The Texans (6-3) had a pair of 100-yard rushers for the second time in three weeks and moved three games over .500 for the first time. Ravens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Steelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 PITTSBURGH — Joe Flacco hit Torrey Smith for a 26-yard touchdown pass with 8 seconds to go, lifting Baltimore past Pittsburgh. Five plays after letting a sure touchdown toss tip off his hands, Smith capped Baltimore’s game-winning 92-yard drive by beating William Gay down the right sideline as the Ravens (6-2) snapped Pittsburgh’s fourgame winning streak.

MOTOR SPORTS: NASCAR

Stewart closes gap on Edwards with victory at Texas By Stephen Hawkins The Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas — Another round to Tony Stewart, and quite a fight for the Cup title with two races left. Stewart raced to his second consecutive victory, and won for the fourth time in eight NASCAR Chase for the Sprint Cup races, finishing just ahead of points leader Carl Edwards in the so-called “Texas Title Fight” that fully lived up to its billing Sunday. And Stewart backed up his challenge. After winning last week at Martinsville, Stewart got out of his car in Victory Lane and said Edwards “better be worried. That’s all I’m saying.” Now it appears to be a two-driver fight for the championship with two races left after they finished 1-2 at the 1½-mile, high-banked Texas track. Stewart cut his points deficit from eight points to three with an average speed of

152.705 mph, the fastest Cup race at Texas, and a 1.092-second margin over Edwards. “We’re set on it, man. This is just the way it’s going to be,” Stewart said. “I don’t think we have to say anything (else). I think our performance today speaks for itself. He knows already, trust me.” The series returns next week to Phoenix, where the track has been reconfigured and resurfaced since Stewart was seventh and Edwards 28th there in February in the second race this season, and then to Homestead-Miami Speedway for the finale. Edwards won both races at the end of last season. Stewart led seven times for a race-high 173 of 334 laps. On a restart with 60 laps to go after the second caution in a matter of laps, Edwards was the leader and on the inside of Stewart. Coming out of turn 2, Stewart shot by onto the backstretch and charged back to

the lead. “He timed it just right,” said Edwards, who led three times for 14 laps. Stewart stayed in front until both made their final stops with 31 laps left. Though they dropped out of the 1-2 spots on the track during the cycle of green-flag stops, more importantly for Stewart was that he stayed ahead of Edwards. The last lead change came with five laps left when Jeff Burton, who was trying to match Edwards as a three-time Cup winner at Texas, ran out of fuel. Burton had been the only car not to make a late stop, and was trying to stretch his last tank to the end. During the first of those two cautions in a span of only six laps, Edwards had taken his first lead in more than 150 laps when he got only two tires and jumped from third to first out of the pits. Stewart also took only two tires on that stop, but came out second.

Mike Fuentes / The Associated Press

Tony Stewart takes the checked flag to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas, Sunday.


D4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

NFL SCOREBOARD Summaries Sunday’s Games

Broncos 38, Raiders 24 Denver Oakland

7 0 17 14 — 38 3 14 7 0 — 24 First Quarter Oak—FG Janikowski 48, 7:35. Den—Decker 27 pass from Tebow (Prater kick), 1:11. Second Quarter Oak—Bush 11 pass from Palmer (Janikowski kick), 10:42. Oak—Reece 40 pass from Palmer (Janikowski kick), 1:30. Third Quarter Den—Royal 26 pass from Tebow (Prater kick), 10:48. Oak—Ford 18 pass from Palmer (Janikowski kick), 6:41. Den—FG Prater 43, 2:52. Den—McGahee 60 run (Prater kick), :00. Fourth Quarter Den—Royal 85 punt return (Prater kick), 5:53. Den—McGahee 24 run (Prater kick), 1:53. A—58,125. ——— Den Oak First downs 20 21 Total Net Yards 412 416 Rushes-yards 38-299 26-100 Passing 113 316 Punt Returns 4-108 4-43 Kickoff Returns 4-95 3-59 Interceptions Ret. 3-15 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 10-22-0 19-35-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-11 2-16 Punts 5-47.6 6-50.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 11-93 15-130 Time of Possession 31:51 28:09 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Denver: McGahee 20-163, Tebow 12-118, Ball 4-14, Moreno 2-4. Oakland: Bush 1996, Palmer 5-3, T.Jones 2-1. PASSING—Denver: Tebow 10-21-0-124, Colquitt 0-1-0-0. Oakland: Palmer 19-35-3-332. RECEIVING—Denver: Decker 3-47, Royal 2-25, Moreno 2-4, D.Thomas 1-29, Rosario 1-13, Fells 1-6. Oakland: Ford 5-105, Moore 4-61, Reece 3-51, Bush 2-33, Schilens 2-20, Houshmandzadeh 1-28, Murphy 1-23, Myers 1-11. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Denver: Prater 43 (WL).

Cardinals 19, Rams 13 (OT) 3 6 4 0 0 — 13 3 0 3 7 6 — 19 First Quarter Ari—FG Feely 27, 10:51. StL—FG Jo.Brown 48, 4:38. Second Quarter StL—FG Jo.Brown 37, 7:02. StL—FG Jo.Brown 41, :00. Third Quarter Ari—FG Feely 38, 10:30. StL—Hall safety, 7:24. StL—Team safety, 3:31. Fourth Quarter Ari—Fitzgerald 13 pass from Skelton (Feely kick), 4:51. Overtime Ari—Peterson 99 punt return, 13:03. A—60,628. ——— StL Ari First downs 23 16 Total Net Yards 383 262 Rushes-yards 35-150 17-70 Passing 233 192 Punt Returns 3-26 4-127 Kickoff Returns 5-98 3-73 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 23-36-1 20-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-22 3-30 Punts 7-50.3 6-46.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 9-71 6-45 Time of Possession 36:58 24:59 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—St. Louis: S.Jackson 29-130, Williams 3-17, Bradford 1-2, Miller 2-1. Arizona: Skelton 4-38, Wells 10-20, Taylor 2-8, Stephens-Howling 1-4. PASSING—St. Louis: Bradford 23-36-1-255. Arizona: Skelton 20-35-0-222. RECEIVING—St. Louis: Salas 7-59, Lloyd 5-80, B.Gibson 5-54, Pettis 4-43, S.Jackson 1-12, Kendricks 1-7. Arizona: Doucet 6-78, Roberts 5-55, Fitzgerald 4-43, Dray 2-25, Wells 2-13, Taylor 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—St. Louis: Jo.Brown 42 (BK).

American Conference East New England N.Y. Jets Buffalo Miami South Houston Tennessee Jacksonville Indianapolis North Cincinnati Baltimore Pittsburgh Cleveland West Kansas City San Diego Oakland Denver

W 5 5 5 1 W 6 4 2 0 W 6 6 6 3 W 4 4 4 3

L 3 3 3 7 L 3 4 6 9 L 2 2 3 5 L 4 4 4 5

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .625 .625 .625 .125 Pct .667 .500 .250 .000 Pct .750 .750 .667 .375 Pct .500 .500 .500 .375

PF 222 199 222 138 PF 236 156 98 128 PF 195 208 196 119 PF 131 199 184 171

PA 184 163 174 169 PA 157 169 163 283 PA 140 130 162 170 PA 201 204 216 224

Green Bay San Diego

21 7 3 14 — 45 7 10 7 14 — 38 First Quarter SD—Jackson 23 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 10:32. GB—Finley 5 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 5:40. GB—Peprah 40 interception return (Crosby kick), 4:33. GB—T.Williams 43 interception return (Crosby kick), 1:52. Second Quarter SD—Tolbert 8 run (Novak kick), 14:08. SD—FG Novak 52, 5:48. GB—Nelson 16 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), :18. Third Quarter GB—FG Crosby 47, 8:25. SD—Gates 11 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 1:58. Fourth Quarter GB—J.Jones 21 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 13:00.

NBA Continued from D1 The NBA and the players are engaged in another season-threatening battle over the distribution of what has become about $4 billion a year in revenue. This is not what a partnership looks like. If the NBA and the players were actually partners, with players having an ownership stake in the league, we might be watching basketball instead of owners against players, owners against owners and players against players. The concept of players’ equity would probably be met with great resistance from the owners and take years to work out. But given the tangled state of current negotiations, why not strategize now for the next contract? “There’s not a better time than now,” said Steve Stoute, the founder and chief executive of Translation Consultation and Brand Imaging. Stoute works closely with entertainers and athletes,

Away 2-2-0 1-3-0 1-2-0 1-4-0 Away 2-2-0 1-2-0 0-4-0 0-5-0 Away 4-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0 Away 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-1-0 2-2-0

AFC 4-2-0 4-3-0 3-2-0 1-6-0 AFC 6-2-0 4-4-0 2-4-0 0-6-0 AFC 5-1-0 4-2-0 4-3-0 2-4-0 AFC 3-3-0 3-3-0 4-4-0 3-3-0

NFC 1-1-0 1-0-0 2-1-0 0-1-0 NFC 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-2-0 0-3-0 NFC 1-1-0 2-0-0 2-0-0 1-1-0 NFC 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-0-0 0-2-0

Div 2-2-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 Div 3-0-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 0-3-0 Div 1-0-0 2-0-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 Div 2-1-0 2-1-0 1-2-0 1-2-0

NFC 3-2-0 4-2-0 3-3-0 3-4-0 NFC 3-3-0 4-3-0 3-4-0 1-6-0 NFC 6-0-0 4-2-0 4-3-0 2-4-0 NFC 5-1-0 2-3-0 2-4-0 1-6-0

AFC 3-0-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-1-0 AFC 3-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 AFC 2-0-0 2-0-0 0-0-0 0-2-0 AFC 2-0-0 0-3-0 0-2-0 0-1-0

Div 2-1-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 1-2-0 Div 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 Div 2-0-0 2-0-0 1-2-0 0-3-0 Div 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0

National Conference East N.Y. Giants Dallas Philadelphia Washington South New Orleans Atlanta Tampa Bay Carolina North Green Bay Detroit Chicago Minnesota West San Francisco Seattle Arizona St. Louis

W 6 4 3 3 W 6 5 4 2 W 8 6 4 2 W 7 2 2 1

L 2 4 4 5 L 3 3 4 6 L 0 2 3 6 L 1 6 6 7

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .500 .429 .375 Pct .667 .625 .500 .250 Pct 1.000 .750 .571 .250 Pct .875 .250 .250 .125

PF 198 179 179 127 PF 287 189 147 187 PF 275 239 170 172 PF 206 122 162 100

PA 184 175 152 158 PA 205 170 196 207 PA 179 147 150 199 PA 118 185 196 211

Sunday’s Games Dallas 23, Seattle 13 Miami 31, Kansas City 3 New Orleans 27, Tampa Bay 16 Houston 30, Cleveland 12 San Francisco 19, Washington 11 N.Y. Jets 27, Buffalo 11 Atlanta 31, Indianapolis 7 Denver 38, Oakland 24 Cincinnati 24, Tennessee 17 Green Bay 45, San Diego 38 Arizona 19, St. Louis 13, OT N.Y. Giants 24, New England 20 Baltimore 23, Pittsburgh 20 Open: Carolina, Detroit, Jacksonville, Minnesota Monday’s Game Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.

Home 3-1-0 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 Home 4-0-0 2-1-0 3-2-0 2-3-0 Home 3-0-0 2-2-0 3-1-0 1-3-0 Home 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Away 3-1-0 1-3-0 2-2-0 1-3-0 Away 2-3-0 3-2-0 1-2-0 0-3-0 Away 5-0-0 4-0-0 1-2-0 1-3-0 Away 4-0-0 1-4-0 0-4-0 0-4-0

Thursday’s Game Oakland at San Diego, 5:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 13 Buffalo at Dallas, 10 a.m. Denver at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Washington at Miami, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Carolina, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. New England at N.Y. Jets, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14 Minnesota at Green Bay, 5:30 p.m.

St. Louis Arizona

Packers 45, Chargers 38

Home 3-1-0 4-0-0 4-1-0 0-3-0 Home 4-1-0 3-2-0 2-2-0 0-4-0 Home 2-1-0 4-0-0 4-1-0 2-2-0 Home 2-2-0 3-1-0 2-3-0 1-3-0

Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

20-39-1 0-0 8-43.1 2-1 6-50 30:17

28-49-2 2-10 5-45.0 2-2 7-81 29:43

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Giants: Jacobs 18-72, Ware 7-23, Manning 3-11, Scott 1-5. New England: Green-Ellis 12-52, Woodhead 7-26, Welker 1-13, Ridley 3-10, Brady 1-5. PASSING—N.Y. Giants: Manning 20-39-1-250. New England: Brady 28-49-2-342. RECEIVING—N.Y. Giants: Cruz 6-91, Ballard 4-67, Jacobs 4-28, Manningham 3-33, Barden 2-24, Pascoe 1-7. New England: Welker 9-136, R.Gronkowski 8-101, Hernandez 4-35, Woodhead 334, Branch 2-21, Green-Ellis 1-11, Ridley 1-2, Edelman 0-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—New England: Gostkowski 27 (WL).

Bengals 24, Titans 17

0 0 10 14 — 24 0 0 3 17 — 20 Third Quarter NYG—FG Tynes 22, 10:09. NYG—Jacobs 10 run (Tynes kick), 9:10. NE—FG Gostkowski 32, 5:29. Fourth Quarter NE—Hernandez 5 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 14:28. NE—FG Gostkowski 45, 7:08. NYG—Manningham 10 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 3:03. NE—R.Gronkowski 14 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 1:36. NYG—Ballard 1 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), :15. A—68,756. ——— NYG NE First downs 23 23 Total Net Yards 361 438 Rushes-yards 29-111 24-106 Passing 250 332 Punt Returns 1-0 5-17 Kickoff Returns 4-61 5-97 Interceptions Ret. 2-9 1-0

including Jay-Z and LeBron James, to help Fortune 500 corporations extend the companies’ marketing reach. He has written a book, “The Tanning of America: How HipHop Created a Culture That Rewrote the Rules of the New Economy.” He thinks that players — like many star actors — should have been negotiating for equity stakes a long time ago. He pointed out that in James’ involvement with Beats by Dr. Dre headphones, Cannondale Bicycles and a new company, Sheets, which sells energy gel strips that include caffeine, James’ services are used for little up-front money in return for future payoffs. Athletes would be open to that arrangement with franchises “if ownership and value and equity are discussed,” Stoute said. “They’re asking for a piece of value,” he said. “Players will take less money and get a percentage of the value based off their contribution; they invest by taking less money

in advance. Sandra Bullock takes less money up front in ‘The Blind Side’ but gets a huge back end. It’s apples and oranges in the arrangement but not in the concept: The more you invest, meaning the less you take up front, the more you get as a result of success.” In the end, the NBA would benefit because players would be sharing the risk. Under the current system, owners take all of the risks; players, whose contracts are guaranteed, take very few. Under an equity arrangement, players would give up some of the money that is now guaranteed. In return for smaller guarantees, players would receive a share of the league’s profits — including a percentage of profits from the sale of NBA franchises. Taking less guaranteed money would be a risk for the players but would have a big upside. And the equity model would help sports owners — and the overall health of the league — because players

N.Y. Giants New England

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San Francisco Washington

0 13 3 3 — 19 0 3 0 8 — 11 Second Quarter SF—FG Akers 52, 12:43. SF—FG Akers 34, 1:50. SF—Miller 30 pass from Ale.Smith (Akers kick), 1:03. Was—FG Gano 59, :00. Third Quarter SF—FG Akers 45, 4:23. Fourth Quarter SF—FG Akers 20, 7:41. Was—Gaffney 9 pass from Beck (Hankerson pass from Beck), 1:10. A—78,032. ——— SF Was First downs 15 17 Total Net Yards 326 303 Rushes-yards 32-138 15-52 Passing 188 251 Punt Returns 5-47 2-0 Kickoff Returns 1-20 5-108 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-24-0 30-47-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-12 1-3 Punts 5-44.6 5-48.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 4-2 Penalties-Yards 9-55 3-35 Time of Possession 32:19 27:41 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Francisco: Gore 19-107, Hunter 8-25, Ale.Smith 4-9, Walker 1-(minus 3). Washington: Helu 10-41, Beck 4-9, Torain 1-2. PASSING—San Francisco: Ale.Smith 17-24-0200. Washington: Beck 30-47-1-254. RECEIVING—San Francisco: Crabtree 5-51, V.Davis 4-41, Edwards 2-30, Walker 2-15, Miller 1-30, Ginn Jr. 1-14, K.Williams 1-12, Gore 1-7. Washington: Helu 14-105, Davis 4-42, Gaffney 4-40, Hankerson 4-34, Austin 2-14, Young 1-12, Torain 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Seattle Dallas

0 7 7 10 — 24 3 14 0 0 — 17 First Quarter Ten—FG Bironas 43, 7:20. Second Quarter Cin—Cochart 1 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 10:41. Ten—Williams 8 pass from Hasselbeck (Bironas kick), 5:18. Ten—L.Hawkins 16 pass from Hasselbeck (Bironas kick), :08. Third Quarter Cin—Simpson 15 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 6:33. Fourth Quarter Cin—Caldwell 5 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 10:52. Cin—FG Nugent 36, 1:55. A—69,143. ——— Cin Ten First downs 20 19 Total Net Yards 319 328 Rushes-yards 30-109 20-78 Passing 210 250 Punt Returns 5-9 2-8 Kickoff Returns 3-51 1-27 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 22-39-0 24-41-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 2-22 Punts 7-44.0 7-45.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 9-87 7-100 Time of Possession 32:55 27:05 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cincinnati: Benson 20-78, Scott 6-24, Dalton 3-4, Leonard 1-3. Tennessee: Johnson 14-64, Ringer 4-11, Hasselbeck 2-3.

Giants 24, Patriots 20

49ers 19, Redskins 11

Cowboys 23, Seahawks 13

All Times PST

GB—G.Jennings 4 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 10:27. SD—Jackson 5 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 7:32. SD—Jackson 29 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 6:25. A—68,908. ——— GB SD First downs 21 28 Total Net Yards 368 460 Rushes-yards 26-136 21-85 Passing 232 375 Punt Returns 1-11 2-23 Kickoff Returns 6-137 3-89 Interceptions Ret. 3-159 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-26-0 26-46-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-15 2-10 Punts 2-54.0 2-49.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 5-33 8-64 Time of Possession 29:45 30:15 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Green Bay: Starks 13-66, Rodgers 8-52, Grant 4-16, Kuhn 1-2. San Diego: Tolbert 1983, Hester 1-3, Rivers 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Green Bay: Rodgers 21-26-0-247. San Diego: Rivers 26-46-3-385. RECEIVING—Green Bay: G.Jennings 6-46, Nelson 5-105, Finley 5-44, Driver 2-18, J.Jones 121, Starks 1-9, Kuhn 1-4. San Diego: Gates 8-96, Jackson 7-141, V.Brown 4-79, Tolbert 4-59, Crayton 1-5, McMichael 1-3, Hester 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

PASSING—Cincinnati: Dalton 22-39-0-217. Tennessee: Hasselbeck 24-41-0-272. RECEIVING—Cincinnati: Green 7-83, Caldwell 5-22, Lee 3-49, Simpson 3-43, Pressley 2-13, Cochart 2-7. Tennessee: L.Hawkins 5-63, Cook 4-47, Johnson 4-46, Williams 4-34, Washington 3-28, Stevens 1-25, Ringer 1-14, Hall 1-9, Mariani 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

3 3 0 7 — 13 3 3 7 10 — 23 First Quarter Dal—FG Bailey 20, 4:25. Sea—FG Hauschka 45, :04. Second Quarter Dal—FG Bailey 20, 10:23. Sea—FG Hauschka 32, 1:03. Third Quarter Dal—Witten 33 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 8:39. Fourth Quarter Dal—Robinson 6 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 14:10. Dal—FG Bailey 42, 11:22. Sea—Lynch 4 run (Hauschka kick), 6:12. A—81,510. ——— Sea Dal First downs 18 18 Total Net Yards 381 442 Rushes-yards 30-162 29-163 Passing 219 279 Punt Returns 0-0 2-8 Kickoff Returns 3-50 2-39 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-33 Comp-Att-Int 17-30-3 19-31-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-2 0-0 Punts 3-61.0 4-43.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 10-88 7-82 Time of Possession 30:33 29:27 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle: Lynch 23-135, Washington 3-16, Forsett 2-8, Jackson 2-3. Dallas: Murray 22139, Romo 3-13, Tanner 4-11. PASSING—Seattle: Jackson 17-30-3-221. Dallas: Romo 19-31-0-279. RECEIVING—Seattle: Rice 3-69, Williams 3-41, Baldwin 3-31, A.McCoy 2-44, Forsett 2-14, Obomanu 2-6, Lynch 1-8, Tate 1-8. Dallas: Robinson 5-32, Bryant 4-76, Witten 4-71, Murray 4-47, Austin 2-53. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Seattle: Hauschka 41 (BK).

Jets 27, Bills 11 N.Y. Jets Buffalo

0 3 17 7 — 27 0 0 3 8 — 11 Second Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 49, 2:55. Third Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 50, 10:16. NYJ—Tomlinson 1 run (Folk kick), 8:34. Buf—FG Lindell 24, 4:47. NYJ—Holmes 8 pass from Sanchez (Folk kick), 3:27. Fourth Quarter NYJ—Conner 1 run (Folk kick), 6:27. Buf—Nelson 7 pass from Fitzpatrick (Fitzpatrick run), 3:14. A—70,133. ——— NYJ Buf First downs 24 14 Total Net Yards 348 287 Rushes-yards 39-126 22-96 Passing 222 191 Punt Returns 2-16 0-0 Kickoff Returns 3-86 4-76 Interceptions Ret. 2-8 1-29 Comp-Att-Int 20-28-1 15-31-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 0-0

would have additional incentive to maximize their efforts, on and off the court, and understand how onerous, longterm contracts and franchisehopping can hurt their teams. Shortly after the NFL and its players ended their feud earlier this year, DeMaurice Smith, the executive director of the players association, said he had made an equity proposal to owners. “One of the proposals we had was, ‘OK, if you want money back, fine; just give us a share of the National Football League,’ ” he told a group of black lawyers in Baltimore in August. The proposal went nowhere, but Smith said equity-based relationships could be “one of the more creative models going forward in sports.” This new model would

Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

2-35.5 3-1 9-60 37:52

4-47.5 2-1 6-84 22:08

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Jets: Greene 19-76, McKnight 9-27, Tomlinson 5-18, Conner 2-8, Sanchez 4-(minus 3). Buffalo: Jackson 18-82, Fitzpatrick 2-9, Spiller 2-5. PASSING—N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 20-28-1-230. Buffalo: Fitzpatrick 15-31-2-191. RECEIVING—N.Y. Jets: Burress 5-79, Keller 4-64, Kerley 4-23, Tomlinson 3-30, Holmes 3-29, Baker 1-5. Buffalo: Nelson 4-36, St.Johnson 3-84, Jackson 3-38, Chandler 3-24, Jones 1-6, Roosevelt 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—N.Y. Jets: Folk 50 (WR).

Falcons 31, Colts 7 Atlanta Indianapolis

14 7 7 3 — 31 0 7 0 0 — 7 First Quarter Atl—Turner 1 run (Bryant kick), 11:38. Atl—Jones 50 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 2:51. Second Quarter Atl—Jones 80 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 11:55. Ind—Powers 6 interception return (Vinatieri kick), 7:47. Third Quarter Atl—Gonzalez 1 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 2:50. Fourth Quarter Atl—FG Bryant 20, 10:15. A—65,218. ——— Atl Ind First downs 21 10 Total Net Yards 432 186 Rushes-yards 41-163 21-83 Passing 269 103 Punt Returns 3-19 3-(-1) Kickoff Returns 0-0 3-45 Interceptions Ret. 1-1 1-6 Comp-Att-Int 14-24-1 17-33-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-6 2-15 Punts 7-45.9 9-50.1 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 1-10 6-32 Time of Possession 37:46 22:14 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Atlanta: Turner 19-71, Rodgers 1044, Jones 2-33, Snelling 8-15, Ryan 2-0. Indianapolis: D.Brown 16-70, Carter 4-8, Painter 1-5. PASSING—Atlanta: Ryan 14-24-1-275. Indianapolis: Painter 13-27-1-98, Orlovsky 4-6-0-20. RECEIVING—Atlanta: White 4-76, Gonzalez 436, Jones 3-131, Rodgers 1-16, Palmer 1-9, Turner 1-7. Indianapolis: Collie 4-32, Wayne 4-30, Garcon 3-22, Clark 2-21, Tamme 2-6, Eldridge 1-6, D.Brown 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Dolphins 31, Chiefs 3 Miami Kansas City

7 7 14 3 — 31 3 0 0 0 — 3 First Quarter KC—FG Succop 43, 7:11. Mia—Fasano 3 pass from Mat.Moore (Carpenter kick), :46. Second Quarter Mia—Fasano 35 pass from Mat.Moore (Carpenter kick), 9:41. Third Quarter Mia—Marshall 14 pass from Mat.Moore (Carpenter kick), 8:38. Mia—Bush 28 run (Carpenter kick), 6:41. Fourth Quarter Mia—FG Carpenter 42, 8:08. A—72,263. ——— Mia KC First downs 17 20 Total Net Yards 351 343 Rushes-yards 24-107 34-116 Passing 244 227 Punt Returns 4-51 2-30 Kickoff Returns 0-0 4-65 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-23-0 20-39-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 5-26 Punts 5-44.2 5-45.8 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 7-49 8-70 Time of Possession 25:21 34:39 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Miami: Bush 13-92, Thomas 7-12, Mat.Moore 4-3. Kansas City: Battle 14-40, Cassel 9-38, McCluster 7-36, Jones 3-5, Colquitt 1-(minus 3). PASSING—Miami: Mat.Moore 17-23-0-244. Kansas City: Cassel 20-39-0-253. RECEIVING—Miami: Marshall 8-106, Bush 350, Clay 3-50, Fasano 2-38, Bess 1-0. Kansas City: Breaston 7-115, Bowe 6-88, Baldwin 1-12, Battle 1-9, Pope 1-9, McCluster 1-8, Colbert 1-5, McClain 1-4, O’Connell 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

5:33. NO—FG Kasay 34, 1:17. A—73,043. ——— First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

TB 18 365 20-84 281 2-16 1-45 1-0 27-37-0 1-0 3-39.7 3-0 9-80 29:56

NO 25 453 28-195 258 1-15 2-54 0-0 27-36-1 0-0 2-56.5 0-0 8-63 30:04

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tampa Bay: Blount 13-72, Freeman 3-8, Lumpkin 2-7, J.Johnson 1-1, Benn 1-(minus 4). New Orleans: Ivory 15-67, P.Thomas 8-66, Sproles 4-42, Brees 1-20. PASSING—Tampa Bay: Freeman 27-37-0-281. New Orleans: Brees 27-36-1-258. RECEIVING—Tampa Bay: Williams 6-46, Lumpkin 4-31, Winslow 4-29, Parker 3-56, Pianalto 224, Benn 2-22, Lorig 2-12, Blount 2-8, Briscoe 1-46, Spurlock 1-7. New Orleans: Graham 6-78, Sproles 5-57, Colston 5-52, P.Thomas 4-25, Moore 3-20, Henderson 2-13, Gilmore 1-9, D.Thomas 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—New Orleans: Kasay 42 (WR).

Texans 30, Browns 12 Cleveland Houston

3 0 3 6 — 12 14 10 3 3 — 30 First Quarter Hou—Tate 27 run (Rackers kick), 9:50. Hou—Schaub 2 run (Rackers kick), 7:11. Cle—FG Dawson 50, 3:43. Second Quarter Hou—Foster 19 run (Rackers kick), 8:06. Hou—FG Rackers 28, :00. Third Quarter Hou—FG Rackers 21, 5:45. Cle—FG Dawson 51, 2:08. Fourth Quarter Hou—FG Rackers 50, 10:35. Cle—Cribbs 2 pass from McCoy (pass failed), 4:47. A—71,511. ——— Cle Hou First downs 10 21 Total Net Yards 172 380 Rushes-yards 21-44 40-261 Passing 128 119 Punt Returns 1-3 2-56 Kickoff Returns 6-144 4-67 Interceptions Ret. 1-24 1-42 Comp-Att-Int 14-22-1 14-23-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-18 0-0 Punts 4-43.8 2-47.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 4-35 2-15 Time of Possession 24:45 35:15 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cleveland: Ogbonnaya 13-28, Clayton 5-10, McCoy 3-6. Houston: Foster 19-124, Tate 12-115, Ward 6-22, Schaub 3-0. PASSING—Cleveland: McCoy 14-22-1-146. Houston: Schaub 14-23-1-119. RECEIVING—Cleveland: Cribbs 5-50, Little 2-33, Watson 2-26, Moore 2-11, Ogbonnaya 1-13, Cameron 1-7, Norwood 1-6. Houston: Foster 5-26, Daniels 3-32, Jones 2-28, Dreessen 2-27, Walter 1-5, Casey 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Ravens 23, Steelers 20

0 3 3 10 — 16 7 10 7 3 — 27 First Quarter NO—Moore 3 pass from Brees (Kasay kick), 2:27. Second Quarter NO—Sproles 21 pass from Brees (Kasay kick), 8:34. TB—FG Barth 40, 1:39. NO—FG Kasay 21, :00. Third Quarter TB—FG Barth 48, 9:29. NO—P.Thomas 9 run (Kasay kick), 3:11. Fourth Quarter TB—FG Barth 25, 11:08. TB—Winslow 5 pass from Freeman (Barth kick),

3 6 7 7 — 23 0 6 0 14 — 20 First Quarter Bal—FG Cundiff 18, 8:10. Second Quarter Pit—FG Suisham 36, 14:05. Bal—FG Cundiff 43, 9:28. Pit—FG Suisham 30, 1:05. Bal—FG Cundiff 51, :00. Third Quarter Bal—Rice 4 run (Cundiff kick), 4:59. Fourth Quarter Pit—Mendenhall 1 run (Suisham kick), 14:32. Pit—Wallace 25 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 4:59. Bal—T.Smith 26 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), :08. A—64,851. ——— Bal Pit First downs 23 20 Total Net Yards 356 392 Rushes-yards 27-67 20-70 Passing 289 322 Punt Returns 1-3 2-21 Kickoff Returns 4-129 1-25 Interceptions Ret. 1-9 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 28-47-0 20-37-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-11 1-8 Punts 2-45.0 3-33.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-20 6-69 Time of Possession 33:59 26:01 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Baltimore: Rice 18-43, R.Williams 9-24. Pittsburgh: Mendenhall 13-52, Roethlisberger 3-13, Cotchery 1-3, Redman 3-2. PASSING—Baltimore: Flacco 28-47-0-300. Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 20-37-1-330. RECEIVING—Baltimore: Boldin 7-88, T.Smith 5-71, Pitta 5-46, Rice 5-43, L.Williams 2-28, Dickson 2-8, R.Williams 1-11, Leach 1-5. Pittsburgh: A.Brown 5-109, Miller 5-73, Wallace 4-68, Cotchery 3-44, Johnson 1-25, Redman 1-8, Mendenhall 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Baltimore: Cundiff 40 (WR).

involve a drastic change of thinking by players and owners. For all of the talk about player-owner partnerships and owners’ platitudes about the importance of the players, the one thing owners will never easily give up is something they cherish: total ownership. Andrew Zimbalist, an economist at Smith College who has worked for the NBA players and ownership interests, put it more bluntly. “One of the reasons why people like to own things is because they get control with it,” and the ability to make decisions, he said. Formal employee stock ownership plans have been used in many industries, but players may be reluctant to challenge for a stake in ownership because of the risk. In the here and now, how-

ever, and in the face of yet another ultimatum from the commissioner, players must understand in no uncertain terms that they are the NBA. The league was built on the backs of players who came before and will be carried forth on the shoulders of the players who follow. It makes sense for players to have equity in the league. Committed soldiers in the players association must get them to see beyond the dream of playing in the NBA and look at a new reality that would include power and control. Equity — equality — is a multifaceted proposition that begins with a concept and a commitment by players, and owners, to the idea of collective prosperity, in the present and the future.

Saints 27, Buccaneers 16 Tampa Bay New Orleans

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Scandal means uncertainty at Penn State B y Ralph D. Russo The Associated Press

T

he future of Penn State football, a program that has thrived on stability and consistency, has never seemed so unclear. The never-ending speculation about when Joe Paterno will retire has hovered over the program for years, but the Nittany Lions have remained strong. Now charges of sexual abuse against a former assistant of Paterno’s have threatened upheaval in the school’s hierarchy and will lead to even more questions about how much longer JoePa will lead the Nittany Lions. On Saturday, former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky was charged with sexually assaulting eight boys over 15 years. Penn State Athletic Director Tim Curley and another school official were also charged with perjury in the case. Paterno, the winningest coach in Division I college football history with 409 victories, was not accused of any wrongdoing by prosecutors. The 84-year-old Paterno is in the last year of his contract, which doesn’t seem to matter much. He says he’ll be happy

Ducks Continued from D1 Luck threw for 206 yards, three touchdowns and one interception in a 38-13 win over Oregon State on Saturday. Most experts see Luck as a lock to be the No. 1 pick in next year’s NFL draft. Luck has shown recently that he can make the occasional mistake, and the Oregon defense has shown the ability to take advantage of errors by quarterbacks. Luck threw an interception returned for a touchdown in Stanford’s 56-48 triple overtime win over USC on Oct. 29; the Ducks have intercepted seven passes in their past four games. Safety Eddie Pleasant had two in the first half against the Huskies. “When you can create the pressure that we can create on the quarterback, then sometimes the ball is going to sail, and our guys are there to make those catches,” Kelly said. Oregon held Washington quarterback Keith Price to just 143 yards passing, and they sacked him six times. Going up against the experienced Stanford offensive line should be more of a test, however. “I feel good about our defense,” Kelly said. “But it really means nothing if we don’t go back out and work on Monday. If they thought they were challenged this week, then crank

Playoffs Continued from D1 Just to the west of Hillsboro in Forest Grove, Culver hopes to earn its first trophy at the Class 2A state tournament since placing third in 2002. The Bulldogs (18-5), the TriRiver Conference champions, face Days Creek in the 2A quarterfinal round at Pacific University. The Wolves (23-2) are the top-rated 2A team in the Oregon School Activities Association’s rankings. The soccer playoffs are also in full swing this week as the first round of the postseason is scheduled for Tuesday. Three

COLLEGE FOOTBALL COMMENTARY to coach without one. And Penn State is challenging for another Big Ten title. The Nittany Lions are 8-1, 5-0 in conference, even though Paterno has spent much of this season watching the team from a coaches’ box on game day as he recovers from hip and shoulder injuries sustained when a player ran into him at practice. With so many longtime assistants on his staff, such as defensive coordinator Tom Bradley — the coach who was promoted to replace Sandusky and has been with Penn State for 33 years — the Nittany Lions operate just fine with Paterno laid up. However, there are some Penn State fans and supporters who long for a coaching change. Some who believe that Penn State should regularly contend for national titles and that another coach could help the program realize that potential. But at this point it seemed that everyone involved with Penn State had become resigned to the fact that Paterno would leave when he wanted.

it up a couple notches because we’re going to get challenged again next week.”

James and Thomas Oregon running back LaMichael James was back in form against Washington, rushing for 156 yards and one touchdown on 25 carries. He had just 53 yards rushing against Washington State the week before, when he returned from an elbow injury suffered Oct. 6 against Cal. “I feel like things were clicking,” James said of his performance against the Huskies. “We weren’t looking ahead. Washington’s a great team and we’re happy with the win.” Against Washington, James ran his season rushing total to 1,061 yards, making him the first Duck to record three 1,000-yard seasons on the ground. “We’re going to ride 21 as much as we can,” Kelly said, referring to James’ jersey number. Oregon quarterback Darron Thomas completed 13 of 25 passes for 169 yards, one touchdown, and no interceptions against UW. He admitted after the game to still feeling somewhat limited in his mobility, because of a knee injury suffered against Arizona State on Oct. 15. “I’m thinking it will get better and better,” Thomas said. “As more games go, I’ll get

Central Oregon boys teams and four local girls teams, all at the 5A and 4A levels, are still alive. While some game times are still being decided by athletic directors today, opponents and location have been determined. One of the better matches could be Corvallis (7-5-3) at IMC champion Mountain View. The Cougars (10-1-2) are one of two No. 1 seeds in the 16-team bracket, but they drew the No. 8 seeded Spartans, a team that had to forfeit three wins this season because of an ineligible player. Corvallis was the 5A state runner-up a year ago and Mountain View finished sec-

Paterno embodies the Penn State brand and in many ways that has become more important than his influence on game plans and who plays quarterback. At one time Sandusky was considered first in line to replace Paterno. When Sandusky stepped down in 1999, the story was he got tired of waiting for Paterno to retire. Now there could be sweeping changes at Penn State that go beyond the football team. The charges against Sandusky dwarf the scandals that have rocked college sports in the past couple years. This is not about losing scholarships and postseason appearances. This is about people possibly going to jail. If a new administration comes in, will Paterno want to stay? Will he be allowed to stay? Whenever the Penn State job comes open, it has been assumed that quality candidates would be plentiful. Would that change now? Can the program remain one of the jewels of college football? We’ve spent years wondering when and how Paterno’s career would end. Could this be it?

healthier and healthier.” Bryan Bennett, the backup quarterback who filled in for Thomas in a victory over Colorado and in the second half against Washington State, did not take a snap against the Huskies. “I thought Darron did a really nice job,” Kelly said. “He really understands how to manage the game.”

A kicker change? Oregon kicker Alejandro Maldonado was two for four on field goals against Washington, missing from 45 yards in the second quarter and 46 yards in the fourth quarter. He made a career-long 40-yard field goal in the first quarter. Maldonado is now five for nine on field goals for the season, filling in for Rob Beard, who was injured earlier in the season. Beard has been handling kickoff duties for Oregon, but has not attempted a field goal since the season opening loss to LSU, when he was two for two. “We really got to take a look at it this week in practice and figure it out,” Kelly said of the kicker situation. “We’ve got to convert points. We have two kids that have done it, and we’ll just have to see how it goes.” — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

ond in state in 2009. In football, Mountain View and Bend High are Central Oregon’s only teams still playing after last week’s play-in round. What the area lacks in overall football depth, though, it hopes to make up in quality. The Cougars (8-1) are a No. 2 seed in the 5A football bracket, and the Lava Bears (7-2) are a No. 3. Mountain View hosts 5A Portland Interscholastic League champion Jefferson on Friday, and Bend High entertains Liberty (6-4), which placed third in the Northwest Oregon Conference. — Reporter: 541-383-0305. beastes@bendbulletin.com.

Playoffs at a glance A look at the soccer, volleyball and football state playoffs involving Central Oregon teams:

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Boys soccer • Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Corvallis at Mountain View, 2 p.m.; Wilsonville at Summit, 2 p.m. • Class 4A state playoffs, first round: Sisters at Philomath, TBA

Volleyball • Class 5A state tournament at Liberty High in Hillsboro, quarterfinals: Summit vs. Mountain View, 1:15 p.m. • Class 4A state tournament at Lane Community College in Eugene, quarterfinals: Crook County vs. Siuslaw, 8 a.m.; La Grande vs. Sisters, 10 a.m. • Class 2A state tournament at Pacific University in Forest Grove, quarterfinals: Culver vs. Days Creek, 8 a.m.

Girls soccer • Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Liberty at Bend, TBA; Wilsonville at Summit, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Corvallis, TBA • Class 4A state playoffs, first round: Sutherlin at Sisters, 1 p.m. Note: Admission to all soccer games Tuesday is $6 for adults and $4 for students.

Note: Admission for all quarterfinal volleyball matches is $7 for adults and $4 for students. Admission for semifinal matches, which will also be held Friday, and Saturday’s finals, is $8 for adults and $5 for students. Football • Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Liberty at Bend, 7 p.m.; Jefferson at Mountain View, 7 p.m. Note: Admission for the first round of state football is $6 for adults and $4 for students.

bendbulletin.com/b boocoo

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Heading overseas helps hoops teams By John Marshall The Associated Press

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Indoor bicycle trainers allows riders to build bicycle skills and power very efficiently in a highly controlled environment.

Inside Continued from D1 The magnetic trainer is less noisy, which uses a magnetic flywheel to generate resistance on the rear wheel during workouts, thus allowing for a greater range of resistance than the wind trainer. Although quieter, the mag trainer is not as smooth. And unlike the wind trainer, resistance increases linearly with a linear rise in speed, which means the trainer’s resistance is unaffected by the cyclist’s effort output. Basically, workouts on a mag trainer do not have as realistic a feel as those done on a wind trainer, but they do allow for greater increases in resistance. Another option is the fluid trainer, which operates under the same magnetic flywheel system but is paired with fluid chambers to allow for the highest possible resistance as well as the most quiet running sound. “Magnetic trainers are a good alternative if you don’t want to spend over $300, and you want it to be a little quieter,” says Schmitt. “But if money isn’t an issue, a fluid trainer gives the most realistic feel and pretty much makes no noise.” Depending on model and make, wind trainers cost about $115 to $300, while magnetic trainers range from $170 to several hundred dollars. Fluid trainers, on the other hand, run a little higher, with top models retailing

at well beyond $300. But the top-end product in indoor cycling is the virtual cycling trainer, whose price is its only drawback. Most commonly associated with the brand name CompuTrainer, basic models of these computer-based trainers run upward of $1,000. CompuTrainers, however, bring indoor cycling to a level of interactive experience. On a virtual trainer, cyclists can complete self-tests and determine specific capacities and heart rates, as well as train with power — a power meter allows riders to quantitatively track fitness changes. “The beautiful thing about the CompuTrainer is that it can be as specific as you want it to be,” says Bart Bowen of Powered by Bowen in Bend (formerly Rebound Sports Performance). “You can pretty much design any workout you can think of. Some like to use the workouts that come with it, while others get creative and make their own.” Cycling outdoors, workouts are often more sporadic as far as highs and lows in a rider’s power output. But with a CompuTrainer, as Bowen explains, workouts are constant and cyclists get an optimal workout by having to spin consistently against at least some degree of resistance. There’s no coasting. “One hour inside on a CompuTrainer can be equivalent to two hours outside,” says Bowen. “It’s the best bang for your buck and the most efficient way to train, especially

come wintertime.” Power meters, electronics, magnets and fans aside, the simplest trainer remains the rollers. Where other trainers are stationary and intended to build strength and power, rollers are not entirely immobile and provide skill-based workouts that will hone a cyclist’s form and pedaling efficiency. “Rollers are a little more old school and can be tricky for people to learn, but they teach good leg speed and a smooth pedal stroke,” says Schmitt. Rollers operate as three cylindrical drums housed on axles inside a rectangular frame. Two drums support the back wheel, while a third supports the front, and all three are connected by a rubber belt. Because a cyclist must rely on his or her own balance and core strength, riding rollers requires much greater sensitivity and concentration than any of the stationary trainers — greater even than road riding, for that matter. Rollers are available at prices ranging from $100 to $1,000, depending on specifics, company and design. With rollers, it’s all or nothing. As Schmitt puts it: “There’s no zoning out.”

DePaul’s basketball team spent 10 days touring France, playing a few games, taking in the sights, even finishing a school course on university namesake Saint Vincent de Paul by retracing his footsteps. Fun, hoops and a little learning — summer trips don’t get much better than that. “It was a great way to learn and the basketball, they love to play basketball, so that was a nice diversion,” DePaul coach Oliver Purnell said. “At the same time, they had enough time off that they could hang out at the city and play at the beach. In terms of bonding and relationship building, I thought it was a real nice trip.” The memorable trip also served another purpose. It gave the Blue Demons, like more than a dozen other teams that played overseas during the summer, a big head start on the upcoming season. The NCAA allows teams to take overseas trips once every four years. They are allowed to practice up to 10 days before leaving and can play as many as 10 games, though most teams play about half that. The trips have to take place at least 30 days after the championship game of the previous season and 30 days before the start of practice for the next season. Most teams raise money for the trips through fundraisers. By going overseas, coaches get an early look at how their team will react in game situations, usually against professional teams from other countries. They also get a chance to experiment with lineups and schemes they might not have time to tinker with once the season starts. The players get a head start

Ducks win final exhibition game EUGENE — The University of Oregon men’s basketball team defeated Lewis and Clark College, 100-58, to pick up a victory in its second and final exhibition of the season on Sunday afternoon at Matthew Knight Arena. The Ducks had four players post double figures in scoring, with newcomers Olu Ashaolu and Jabari Brown leading the team with 16 points each. Tony Woods and Jeremy Jacob chipped in 13 apiece. Brown also added 11 rebounds to notch the game’s only double-double. Oregon opens the regularseason schedule at Vanderbilt on Nov. 11. — From wire reports

on forming bonds with each other and their coaches, and understanding the team’s system. There’s even a little culture, too. The trips are, in most cases, beneficial in almost every aspect. “It allows your incoming players a tremendous opportunity to get their feet wet and get adjusted to the intensity and physicality of college basketball long before your first practice in October,” said Creighton coach Greg McDermott, whose team played four games in the Bahamas in August. It’s not all fun and victories for teams, however. Some of the teams that play overseas are thrown into tough circumstances on the court, playing in unfamiliar places against seasoned professional teams.

Villanova played against professional teams from Israel, Georgia and The Netherlands. Stanford didn’t win a single game during its 11day trip through Spain while playing against six top professional teams from the ACB League — Real Madrid and FC Barcelona Regal among them — but took a lot away from the tests. “I thought it was important to really challenge ourselves,” Stanford coach Johnny Dawkins said. “We discussed the benefits of playing such high-level opponents as opposed to maybe playing at another level down or so. We all agreed for our group, at our stage of development, it was really good to face some teams that were really challenging and put us in position to where we had to play great in order to win.” These before-the-preseason trips certainly give teams an advantage heading into the season. Many of the teams that go overseas together get off to quick starts, and for some it carries the entire way through. Last season, a Kentucky team that lost five first-round NBA picks made it to the Final Four after taking a tour of Canada during the summer. Michigan, coming off a lackluster 2009-10 season, used a summer trip to Belgium to make a deep run in the NCAA Tournament last season. These trips don’t always turn into more wins, but they certainly don’t hurt. “You’re just further ahead,” Purnell said. “Most of the time you get off to a pretty good start because you are further ahead. Most of the other teams you’re going to play didn’t go on a foreign tour or have 19 days of practice in August, which isn’t that far removed from the season. It’s a big advantage.”

HEATING UP THE HIGH DESERT!

—Laura Winberry is a freelance journalist who lives in Bend. She can be reached at laura@ organicasana.com or at 201-8194017. For other cycling questions, comments or information directed to The Bulletin, email to sports@bendbulletin.com.

C C    C    Please email Cycling Central event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/CLASSES/CLINICS INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; limited to eight riders per class; sessions at noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; at 6:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays; and at 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Saturdays; $12-$18 per class; www.ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500.

MISCELLANEOUS THE ART OF CYCLOCROSS PHOTOGRAPHY: Thursday, Nov. 17; 6 p.m; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; showcase of local cyclocross photographers, who will present their work and answer questions; 541-585-1500.

RACES CROSSAFLIXION CUP: Third and final race in series is Saturday, Nov. 12; Seventh Mountain Resort; $22 adults, $5 juniors; complete race schedule available online; for all ages and abilities; www.crossaflixioncup.com.

RIDES MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE: Start at Eurosports in Sisters, 182 E. Hood St.; 10 a.m. on Saturdays and 5:30 p.m. on Wednesdays; take along lights for evening rides; 541-549-2471. HUTCH’S MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE: Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m.; meet at 6 p.m. at the Phil’s Trail trailhead west of Bend; rides will be 90 minutes to two hours in duration; carry lights and wear appropriate clothing; 541-382-6248. TRINITY BIKES RIDE: All-comers group road and mountain bike rides leave from Trinity Bikes, 811 S.W. 13th St., Redmond; road rides

at 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays; mountain bike rides 6 p.m. Wednesdays; free; 541-923-5650. PINE MOUNTAIN SPORTS BIKE RIDE: Twice-monthly guided mountain bike rides hosted by Pine Mountain Sports and open to all riders; 5:30 p.m. on the first and third Wednesdays of each month; free; rental and demo bikes available at no charge (be at the shop at 5 p.m.); meet at 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080; www.pinemountainsports.com. WORKING WOMEN’S ROAD RIDE: Casual-paced road bike ride for women from 90 minutes to two hours; 5:30 p.m., Mondays; meet at Sunnyside Sports, 930 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-382-8018. EUROSPORTS RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Sisters from Eurosports, 182 E. Hood St.; at 9 a.m. on Saturdays; at 11 a.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays; all riders welcome; 541-549-2471; www.eurosports.us. HUTCH’S NOON RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St., at noon on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays; and from Hutch’s west-side location, 725 N.W. Columbia St., at noon on Tuesdays, Thursdays; pace varies; 541-382-6248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. HUTCH’S SATURDAY RIDE: Group road bike ride begins at 9 a.m. Saturdays in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 40 miles; vigorous pace; 541-382-6248; www.hutchsbicycles.com.

OUT OF TOWN PSYCHO SERIES CROSS: Part of the Grand Prix Molly Cameron series; OBRA cyclocross state championship; Saturday, Nov. 19; Camp Harlow, Eugene; first race begins at 10 a.m.; $20; OBRA membership required; www.obra.org/flyers/2011/obra_cx_champs.html. CROSS CRUSADE: Eighth and final race of series is Sunday; Portland International Raceway; first race begins at 8:50 a.m.; $5-$30; OBRA membership required; www.crosscrusade.com.

• Photography night on tap: A showcase of cyclocross photographic art will be on display in Bend later this month. The Art of Cyclocross Pho-

AT THE DESCHUTES COUNTY EXPO HOOKER CREEK EVENT CENTER INDOOR ARENA, IN REDMOND

TRAILS COTA TRAIL BUILDING DAY: Brushing and tread work at Tumalo Creek Trail; Saturday; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; meet at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., to carpool; for a list of required protective gear, go to cotamtb.com.

tography will be staged on Thursday, Nov. 17, at Powered by Bowen, located at 143 S.W. Century Drive. Cyclocross art created by local photographers will be on display, and the art-

2011 TICKET PRICES: FRIDAY: $14 | SATURDAY: $8 SATURDAY NIGHT: $16 | 3 & UNDER FREE

C  B

Miscellaneous

PRESENTED BY:

ists will be on hand to answer questions about their work and technique. For questions, call 541-5851500. — Bulletin staff reports

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:

BIG R, DESCHUTES COUNTY EXPO CENTER, SADDLE UP SADDLERY, PRINEVILLE MENS WEAR, HIGH DESERT RANCH & HOME, BOOT BARN OR ONLINE AT: wwwcolumbiarivercircuitfinals.com You can also call our WILLCALL 888-849-2723


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 E1

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Labrador puppies, AKC black, starting at $300. Raised with love! 541-280-5292 Maltese mix puppies, male, $150, females $200. CASH. 541-546-7909 PUPPIES: 1/2 Maltese 1/2 Poodle- blonde fur balls! Male $150, female $200, CASH. 541-546-7909. Mini-Schnauzer pups, 1 male,4 females, black, ready 11/13, $350+, 541-617-6296, 536-4369 Mini/Toy Aussie AKC, red/black, tri's, blue merle's w/ blue eyes 541-598-5314/788-7799

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store. Near Costco in the Forum Center 2660 NE Hwy. 20 541-330-0420

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Bearded Dragon, free to good home only. Call A Box of Chocolates! for info: 541-548-0747 AKC mini longhaired Pitbull Bully Pups, 3, Dachshunds. Males, 10 weeks, 1/2 Ra$500; female, $600. Beautiful registered zors Edge Blue541-598-7417 brindle male Pug, nose & 1/2 Staff year old. Paid $550, Pitbull. $175 ea call/ sell $350 Serious intxt 541-977-6625 DO YOU HAVE quiries only. For more SOMETHING TO information call SELL 541-548-0747 or FOR $500 OR 541-279-3588 LESS? Non-commercial Border Collie smoothadvertisers may coat, tri, female, 3 yrs place an ad with registered, not spayed Poodle or Pom toy our $250 541-948-7997 pups for SALE. Res"QUICK CASH Border Collie, smooth cued Poodle Adults SPECIAL" coat, female, 8 weeks for adoption for small 1 week 3 lines, $12 wormed/shots, $250 fee. 541-475-3889 or 2 weeks, $18! 541-948-7997 Ad must include Queensland Heelers price of single item Cat, Orange tabby feStandards & mini,$150 of $500 or less, or male,loves dogs,10 mo & up. 541-280-1537 multiple items shots, spayed, wormed http://rightwayranch. whose total does $20, 541-548-5516. wordpress.com/ not exceed $500. Chihuahua puppy 8 wks Rescued adult comCall Classifieds at $200.Chi-weiner 9wks panion cats FREE to 541-385-5809 dapple, $300. Beauseniors, disabled and www.bendbulletin.com tiful! 541-362-5485 veterans! Enhance your life with a new Chi-pom, rare blue male furry friend. Tame, puppy, $250. Tiny Flemish Giant Rabbit, altered, shots, ID chip, fawn Chihuahua male free to apprvd home, more. Will always take puppy, $250. not for snake/human back if circumstances 541-420-3374 food! 541-548-0747 change. Photos, info at www.craftcats.org. Coonhound, Black and Free Cat, 2 yrs, beauti389-8420, 647-2181. Tan, 2 yrs, FREE to a ful gray & white feSat/Sun 1-5, other wonderful pet loving male, very lovable, to days by appt. 65480 home with room to run good home. only. 78th St., Bend. and play. He is neu541-923-7134 tered and all shots are Rescued kittens/cats to up to date. Please adopt! 65480 78th email for more inforSt., Bend, 1-5 Sat/ mation and pics, Sun, other days by Jfraga06@gmail.com appt, 541-647-2181. or call (541)221-2524. Altered, shots, ID chip, carrier. Low Dachshund mini AKC fees. Info: 541-389pups, blk/tan females, Golden-Bernese Moun8420. Map, photos at tain Dog pups,beautishorthair, $375. Pix www.craftcats.org. ful! Only 6 left. Call avail. 541-420-6044 Angie today - very Rodents? FREE barn/ cute! 541-803-7004 shop cats, we deliver! Altered, shots. Some friendly, some not so much, but will provide expert rodent control in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. 389-8420, leave msg. Gucci Still Needs a girl-

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Nov. 12th & 13th Deschutes Fairgrounds. Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 • SUN. 10-3 $8 Admission, 12 under free. OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120

Sofa, 7’, Bassett, mission style, brown tapestry, $100, Oak TV Stand & component console,lots of storage, HANDGUN SAFETY $50, 541-526-5477 CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. The Bulletin Gary DeKorte Wed., r ecommends extra Nov 16th 6:30-10:30 caution when purpm. Call Kevin Centchasing products or wise, for reservations services from out of $40. 541-548-4422 the area. Sending cash, checks, or Wanted: Collector credit information seeks high quality may be subjected to fishing items. FRAUD. For more Call 541-678-5753, or information about an 503-351-2746 advertiser, you may call the Oregon Find exactly what State Attorney you are looking for in the General’s Office Consumer ProtecCLASSIFIEDS tion hotline at 1-877-877-9392. Wanted: WWII M1 Carbine, Garand, Colt 1911, Colt Commando, S&W Victory. 541-389-9836.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer THE BULLETIN retrains, accessories. quires computer ad541-408-2191. vertisers with multiple ad schedules or those Dollhouse, large, $45, selling multiple sysmetal garden arbor, tems/ software, to dis$50, 541-389-5408 close the name of the business or the term Memorial plot at Red"dealer" in their ads. mond Cemetery LOT Private party advertis840 SECTION B,$325 ers are defined as firm 541-480-3018 those who sell one computer. 259

Memberships

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com

Guns, Hunting & Fishing 20 Ga. Belgian Browning, Auto 5. Bent rib, 1966, in original box, nice condition, Redmond, Mark Angel, 503-869-2504 $2250.

Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-389-6655

Computers

Bid Now!

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your www.bendbulletin.com neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't Franchi Renaissance forget to advertise in Classic, (New!) over/ classified! under, 12 ga., 28” bar541-385-5809. rel, w/choke tubes, $1600, 541-504-8224 Kirby Vacumn/Shampoo Sentria 2010, Used 3 Franchi Spas Law 12, times, Paid $1800 Sac$400. GMC Liberator, rifice at only $1200 $1600. H&R Reising 541-803-7004. Class 3, $2400 + transfer.541-678-3249

Second Hand & Rebuilt Mattresses -

255

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com

Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Exhale Spa Package for Two $210 Value at Exhale Spa and Laser Center (Bidding ends Nov. 15, at 8pm)

Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Family Season Pass $1,610 Value at Hoodoo Ski Area (Bidding ends Nov. 15, at 8pm)

253

TV, Stereo & Video

260

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129

www.cleaningclinicinc.com

Wanted diabetic test strips - will pay up to $25/box. Sharon, 503-679-3605.

Misc. Items 13” Magnavox TV with Wanted- paying cash remote, $25. 2 cemetery plots, side for Hi-fi audio & stuby side, Masonic Sec541-383-4231 dio equip. McIntosh, tion, Deschutes MeJBL, Marantz, Dymorial Gardens.$1095 Mitsubishi 52” HD-ready naco, Heathkit, Saneach; seller to pay flat screen TV & sui, Carver, NAD, etc. transfer fee. Lv msg: matching stand, $500 Call 541-261-1808 360-425-0534 obo. 541-480-7090

Advertise with a full-color photo in The Bulletin Classifieds and online.

Easy, flexible, and affordable ad packages are also available on our Web site. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps: a category, choose a classification, 1. Choose and then select your ad package. Write your ad and upload your digital

2. photo.

your account with any major 3. Create credit card. All ads appear in both print and online Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online. To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E2 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $17.50 7 days .................................................. $23.00 14 days .................................................$32.50 28 days .................................................$60.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 261

266

269

Medical Equipment

Heating & Stoves

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Brand new scooter cost Gas fireplace 36” vent$1300, SELL $500. less, w/logs, by NewSUPER TOP SOIL 520-891-0258. buck Corp. $200. www.hersheysoilandbark.com 541-480-9883 Screened, soil & com265 post mixed, no NOTICE TO Building Materials rocks/clods. High huADVERTISER mus level, exc. for Since September 29, flower beds, lawns, Bid Now! 1991, advertising for gardens, straight www.BulletinBidnBuy.com used woodstoves has screened top soil. been limited to modBark. Clean fill. Deels which have been liver/you haul. certified by the Or541-548-3949. egon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the fedBuy New...Buy Local eral Environmental You Can Bid On: Protection Agency Your Backyard Premium Storage (EPA) as having met Birdfeeding Building 10’X10’ smoke emission stanwith Peaked Roof. dards. A certified Specialists! $5,375 Value at woodstove may be identified by its certifiHiLine Homes (Bidding ends cation label, which is Nov. 15, at 8pm) permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertisForum Center, ing for the sale of Bend uncertified 541-617-8840 woodstoves. www.wbu.com/bend

476

Farm Market

300 400 308

421

Farm Equipment & Machinery

Schools & Training

1992 Case 580K 4WD, 5500 hrs, cab heat, extend-a-hoe, 2nd owner, clean & tight, tires 60% tread. $24,900 or best offer. Call 541-419-2713 325

Hay, Grain & Feed Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171

267

Fuel & Wood

270

Lost & Found Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K St. 541-475-9722 Open to the public. Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541-447-6934 Open to the public.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Found Lady’s Ring, NE 27th Safeway parking lot, call to ID, 541-389-5429 Found Rx Sunglasses, 3 Creeks Lake,10/31, call to ID, 541-388-1533 Lost Cat - white female named Lucy, 13 yrs old, declawed, ran from car crash on 8/11/11, on Hwy 97 at Highland, Redmond. If seen, please call 541-504-4194.

Dry Juniper Firewood $190 per cord, split. 1/2 cords available. Immediate delivery! 541-408-6193

Lodgepole seasoned rounds, $140-160/ cord; split, $170/cord, Lost diamond ring, Storage Shed, 10’x12’, Cash. Delivery availsomewhere in Redmetal shelving, good mond Tues. 11/2. Reable. 541-771-0800 cond, $1000, Please ward! 541-923-5897 call 541-480-5097 for Split, Dry Lodgepole more info. $200/Cord, Lost Green Santa Delivery included! Cruz Heckler mtn Call for ½-cord prices. The bike, Oct. 28, Tenino 541-923-6987, lv msg. Hardwood Outlet boat launch-Wickiup Wood Floor Super Rd-Burgess-Bend. We buy Chip Logs, Store pgt@bendcable.com Green wood, $35/ton 541-508-2456 into La Pine, Dry Wood, $40 /ton, into LaPine,360-936-5408. Lost: Women’s RX Glasses, in black case, 269 last week of Oct., AlGardening Supplies falfa Mkt Rd or ? Re• Laminate from ward, 541-383-1919. & Equipment

.79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 266

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. Bulk Garden Materials Wholesale Peat Moss Sales 541-389-9663

Heating & Stoves 3 large zero-clearance fireplaces, showroom models, 1 right corner, 2 flat wall, $500 ea, OBO. 1 newer woodstove, $1200 firm. Several gas & pellet stoves, $800 each OBO. All warrantied for 1 season. Call 541-548-8081

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

classified@bendbulletin.com

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets. d WARM CLOTHING: Rain Gear, Boots d Please drop off your tax-deductible donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE 5th St., Bend, Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (541-312-2069). For special pick/ups, call Ken Boyer, 541-389-3296 Please help -You can make a difference!

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Employment

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION READERS: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Driver Moving company needs MENTAL HEALTH class A driver. Pack, A Circle of Care for load, & haul experi- Children & Families ence necessary. A treatment program for emotionally, beContact Bill at haviorally disturbed 541-383-3362. children and their families has openings in its ITS program for: Executive Director: Bend Non-Profit agency supporting • Behavioral the developmenSupport Specialist Redmond School District tally disabled is reBA or BS degree. Excruiting to fill the perience with special position of execuneeds children retive director. Miniquired. Eligible for mum of BS in Socertification as a cial Services & “QMHA”. Salary range Management exp. $20,027 to $22,016, 1 required. Salaried FTE. position incl. full time benefits. Please mail re• Child / Family sume to: ResidenTherapist tial Assistance ProRedmond School District gram, Attn. HR Minimum qualifications Dept., 1334 NE 2nd MA or MS degree in St., Bend 97701 or psychology, educae-mail to: tion or allied field. rap.director@bendSalary range $31,056 broadband.com to $34,280, 1 FTE.

JOB FAIR

Generous employee benefit package: Medical, dental, vision, prescription, life, TSA-employer sponsored, vacation.

Finance & Business

500

Service Writer Mercedes Benz of Bend has an immediate opening for an energetic & enthusiastic, customer/ sales oriented individual to write service in our service department. Experience preferred but not required. Must pass drug test, have valid driver’s license. Full benefit pkg. & 401(K). Apply at 61430 S. Hwy. 97, Bend. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392. BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Tues., Nov. 8, 2011 2 pm - 5 pm

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

Moulder Operator

Multiple set-ups with speed and precision are a must.

HH FREE HH

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

541-385-5809.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Operate Your Own Business

Garage Sale Kit

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

H Supplement Your Income H

286

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

email: FREE For Equal Opportunity 63207 Nels Anderson Rd lcbmsw@earthlink.net BANKRUPTCY OR Send resume to: Laws: Oregon BuBend, OR EVALUATION Attn: LCB reau of Labor & InLooking for your next visit our The Child Center dustry, Civil Rights We are seeking: employee? 3995 Marcola Road, website at Division, Satellite Installers Place a Bulletin help www.oregonfreshstart.com Springfield, OR 97477 503-731-4075 wanted ad today and EOE All candidates must reach over 60,000 If you have any quesprovide recent copy of readers each week. tions, concerns or DMV report. Check out the Your classified ad comments, contact: classiieds online will also appear on Kevin O’Connell Please apply prior to www.bendbulletin.com bendbulletin.com Classified Department job fair at which currently Updated daily Manager www.LinkUsCorp.com receives over 1.5 The Bulletin million page views 541-383-0398 Remember.... every month at 541-382-3402 Add your web adno extra cost. dress to your ad and Bulletin Classifieds readers on The Get Results! LOCAL MONEY:We buy Bulletin' s web site Call 385-5809 Billing secured trust deeds & will be able to click or place Administrator note,some hard money through automatically your ad on-line at Partners In Care Home loans. Call Pat Kelley to your site. bendbulletin.com 541-382-3099 ext.13. Health and Hospice is seeking applicants for a full-time Billing AdIndependent Contractor ministrator (32 hrs/wk) to join the six person Finance Team. Job duties include Billing and Accounts Receivable. Experience with Accounting Software and Patient Care Software is a plus as well as working within a team structure. Qualified candidates are asked to FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF MANUFACTURING submit a resume to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Local mill in Central OrBend OR 97701 Attn: egon is accepting reHR, or via email to sumes for a full-time HR@partnersbend.org

Sales Northeast Bend

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Employment Opportunities

Business Manager Crook County SD has opening for Dir. of Bus. & Fin. Serv. See Vacancy Announcement, application and job description on district website at www.crookcounty. k12.or.us . Salary range - $76,041 $93,476, depending upon educ. & exp. Position closes Nov.30, 2011, and starts January 3, 2012.

We offer an excellent benefits package. Pay is D.O.E. Please mail resume to: Box 20019186, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras and Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 636

Rentals

600

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend SHEVLIN APT’s: Near COCC! Newer 2 bdrm 1 bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $650 541-480-3666

630

642

Rooms for Rent

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Studios & Kitchenettes Like New Duplex. Nice Furnished room, TV w/ area, 2 Bdrm 2 bath, cable, micro & fridge. garage, fenced, central Utils & linens. New heat/AC. landscaped, owners.$145-$165/wk $700, 541-545-1825 541-382-1885 631

Condo/Townhomes for Rent

NOW

LEASING!!!

Reserves at Pilot Butte 1 Bedroom, luxury condo. Price reduction, Stop by today! $775/mo. Avail Now! Office Hours: Mon- Fri., 9-5 541-318-4268

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, parklike setting. No smkg. Near St. Charles. W/S/G pd; both W/D hkup + laundry facil. $595-$650/ mo; Free mo with 12-mo lease! 541-385-6928.

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 E3

Winter Specials Studios $400 1 Bdrm $425 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid

THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks!

541-548-8735

Managed by GSL Properties

650

659

870

880

882

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

3 bdrm, 2 bath, gas A 3/1.5,1376 sq ft, wood stove, brand new carheat, fenced yard, dbl. pet/oak floors, w/s pd, garage with opener, $795. 541-480-3393 close to hospital, no or 541-610-7803 smoking/pets. 541388-2250. 815-7094 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

660

850

Snowmobiles

1996 Range snowmobile/ATV tilt bed RENT TO OWN, ultitrailer, with spare tire mate value, high-end and wheel. $650. Wildriver subdivision. 541-419-5060 Newer 1700sf 3/2 + offc, 2 car + 28 ft RV Polaris Indy Trail, 1989, gar $1200/mo; $300/ $750. 1998 Polaris mo cred. 541-598-2127 RMK500, $1200. 2000 Polaris RMK700 Have an item to $1500. 541-419-4890

sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 682

Farms, Ranches & Acreage

541-385-5809

Handyman

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers • Carpentry • Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Home Improvement

Home is Where the Dirt Is! - 10 yrs exp. Clean Vacant residences & businesses. Refs. Crecenia & Norma, 541-306-7426

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613 541-390-8085

Drywall

Irrigation Equipment

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Excavating Levi’s Dirt Works: Residential/Commercial General Contractor: For all your dirt & excavation needs. • Snow Removal • Subcontracting • Public Works • Concrete • Small & large jobs for contractors/home owners by job or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost-get rid of pot holes &smooth out your drive) • Custom pads large/small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet/dry utils. CCB#194077 541-639-5282

Landscaping/Yard Care

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or Take these steps for large jobs. On-time HEALTHY TURF promise. Next Spring Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Fall Aeration 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded •Improve turf health & Insured CCB#181595 •Improve root growth

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades I DO THAT! also require additional licenses and Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels certifications. Fall jobs before Winter CB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Debris Removal

Domestic Services

2001 Honda XR400, $1750. Honda XR50, $500. Yamaha TT90, $750. 541-419-4890

HARLEY CUSTOM 2007 Dyna Super Glide FXDI loaded, all options, bags, exhaust, wheels, 2 helmets, low mi., beautiful, Must sell, $9995. 541-408-7908

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 875

881

Travel Trailers

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

•Sprinkler Winterization & Repair •Trimming •Fall Clean up •Snow Removal

•Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Sprinkler Blowouts Discounts available. Call Kent for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097• LCB #8451

•Enhance fertilizer

Fall Fertilizer

Your most important fertilizer application

HHH Standard and organic options

Compost Application

Landscaping/Yard Care

Sprinkler Blowouts Discounts available. Call Kent for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097• LCB #8451 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Bend Landscaping

Sprinkler Blowouts, Lawn Aerating, Fall Cleanup 541-382-1655 LCB# 7990

•Use less water

$$$ SAVE $$$ •Improve soil

Fall Cleanup

Don't track it in all Winter • leaves • needles • debris H gutters and more H

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response Call Today!

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945 Painting/Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. ccb#5184. 541-388-6910

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape ContracPicasso Painting tors Law (ORS 671) Interior/Exterior. Ask requires all busi- about a Holiday Spruce nesses that advertise up! Affordable, Relito perform Land- able. 25 yrs exp. CCB# scape Construction 194351, Bruce Teague which includes: 541-280-9081. planting, decks, fences, arbors, Tile/Ceramic water-features, and installation, repair of Steve Lahey irrigation systems to Construction be licensed with the Tile Installation Landscape ContracOver 20 Yrs. Exp. tors Board. This 4-digit number is to be Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826 included in all adverCCB#166678 tisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

865

ATVs

The Bulletin NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified 750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 773

Acreages

***

Polaris 330 Trail Bosses (2), used very little, like new, $1800 ea. OBO, 541-420-1598

Polaris Phoenix, 2005, 2+4 200cc, like new, low hours, runs great, $1700 or best offer. Call 541-388-3833

Four Winds Chateau M-31F 2006, 2 power slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, great cond. $43,900. 541-419-7099

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slideouts, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. $47,000. 541-317-9185

Forest River 26’ Sur- Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. veyor 2011, Echo throughout, arctic light model, alumiwinter pkg., new num construction, 10-ply tires, W/D used 1 time, flat ready, $25,000, screen TV, DVD & CD 541-948-5793 player, outside speakers, 1 slide out, cherry cabinets, power awning, power tongue lift, can be towed by most autos, $19,500, call now at MONTANA 3585 2008, 541-977-5358. exc. cond., 3 slides, Kit Sportsman 26ft. king bed, lrg LR, Arc1997, camp trailer, tic insulation, all opsolar panel, catalytic tions $37,500. heater, furnace, sleep 541-420-3250 6-7, self contained, good cond., a must see. $4500. 541-388-6846. SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629 885

Canopies & Campers

Arctic Fox 10’ 2005, 990 Camper, A/C, 2500 Watt prop gen. Springdale 29’ 2007, $17,500. 541.325.1956 slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent Hunters, condition, $16,900, Take a Look!! 541-390-2504 1978 Dynacruiser 9½’ camper, fully selfcontained, no leaks, clean, everything works, will fit 1988 or older pickup. $2500 firm. 541-420-6846 Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 Lance-Legend 990 29’, weatherized, like 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, new, furnished & exc. cond., generator, ready to go, incl Winesolar-cell, large refrig, gard Satellite dish, AC, micro., magic fan, $28,800. 541-420-9964 bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/steWeekend Warrior Toy reo/4’ stinger. $9500. Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Bend, 541.279.0458 fuel station, exc. cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $27,500. 541-389-9188. 882

When ONLY the BEST will do! Gulfstream Scenic 2003 Lance 1030 DeCruiser 36 ft. 1999, luxe Model Camper, Cummins 330 hp. dieloaded, phenomenal sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 condition. $17,500. in. kitchen slide out, 2007 Dodge 6.7 new tires,under cover, Cummins Diesel 3500 hwy. miles only,4 door Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, fridge/freezer ice$34,900. Or buy as 1996, 2 slides, A/C, maker, W/D combo, unit, $48,500. heat pump, exc. cond. Interbath tub & 541-331-1160 for Snowbirds, solid shower, 50 amp. prooak cabs day & night pane gen & more! shades, Corian, tile, $55,000. Autos & hardwood. $14,900. 541-948-2310 541-923-3417. Fifth Wheels

Transportation

Polaris Sportsman Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Win500, 2007, 2-seater, nebago Super Chief, snow plow, wind38K miles, great shield, includes trailer, shape; 1988 Bronco II 130 hrs, great condi4x4 to tow, 130K tion! $5,500. mostly towed miles, 541-480-9883 nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave msg.

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

Itasca Spirit Class C 2007, 20K mi., front entertainment center, all bells & whistles, extremely good cond., 2 slides, 2 HDTV’s, $52,000 OBO, 541-447-5484

870

Boats & Accessories

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

19-ft Mastercraft Pro-Star 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified ***

Winnebago Sightseer 2008 30B Class A, Top-of-the-line RV located at our home in southeast Bend. $79,500 OBO. Cell # 805-368-1575.

Watercraft

700

Building/Contracting

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

860

Motorcycles & Accessories

Ads published in the Holiday Rambler custom Aluma-Lite 1996, "Boats" classification 34’, heat pump, AC, include: Speed, fishnewer W/D combo, ing, drift, canoe, rear kitchen/living rm house and sail boats. w/slide-out & bedrm For all other types of w/slideout, California watercraft, please see Winnebago Access 31J Room, more! Great 2008, Class C, Near Class 875. condition. $12,000. Low Retail Price! One 541-385-5809 Call 541-419-3090 owner, non- smoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded GENERATE SOME exqueen bed,bunk beds, citement in your neigmicrowave, 3-burner borhood. Plan a garange/oven, (3) TVs, rage sale and don't and sleeps 10! Lots of Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ forget to advertise in slide, fully loaded,never storage, maintained, classified! 385-5809. used since buying, and very clean! Only $9700, 541-923-0854. $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Ads published in "Wa1700 sq ft. 3 lg bed- HORSE PROPERTY tercraft" include: Kay3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 5 rooms, 2 bath, 2 car 648 aks, rafts and motoracres, CRR. Private garage, family room, Houses for ized personal well, wood stove. living room, new paint, watercrafts. For Lease option possible, Rent General easy care yard, like "boats" please see $875. 541-771-7750 new! Free cable with Class 870. PUBLISHER'S lease, No pets/no 687 Harley Davidson 541-385-5809 NOTICE smoke.Poe Sholes Dr. Ultra Classic 2008 Commercial for All real estate adver$1095/mo + $1000 Too many uptising in this newspadep. 503-449-5658 Rent/Lease grades to list, imper is subject to the maculate cond., 658 880 Fair Housing Act Office / Warehouse clean, 15K miles. Houses for Rent which makes it illegal 1792 sq.ft., 827 Motorhomes $14,900 to advertise "any Business Way, Bend. Redmond 541-693-3975 preference, limitation 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + or discrimination 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, fenced A-Class Hurricane $300/dep. by Four Winds 32’, based on race, color, 541-678-1404 back yard,dbl. garage, 2007, 12K miles, religion, sex, handigreat room, gas heat, Office/Warehouse locherry wood, leather, cap, familial status, A/C, avail now, $995+ cated in SE Bend. Up queen, sleeps 6, 2 marital status or nadep., 541-410-0671. to 30,000 sq.ft., comslides, 2 TVs, 2 roof tional origin, or an inpetitive rate, airs, jacks, camera, tention to make any Charming, spacious 3 bedroom 2 bath 541-382-3678. Price Reduced - 2010 new condition, nonsuch preference, country house, beauCustom Harley smoker, $59,900 limitation or discrimi693 tiful yard, $1100/mo. DNA Pro-street swing OBO. 541-548-5216. nation." Familial sta541-548-1409 Ofi ce/Retail Space arm frame, Ultima tus includes children 107, Ultima 6-spd under the age of 18 Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 for Rent over $23,000 in parts A-Class Hurricane living with parents or bath, 14920 SW Mavby Four Winds 32’, alone; 100s of man legal custodians, erick Rd., CRR. No An Office with bath, 2007, 12K miles, hours into custom fabpregnant women, and various sizes and losmkg; pets nego. cherry wood, leather, rication. Priced for people securing cuscations from $200 per $900/mo + deposits. queen, sleeps 6, 2 quick sale, now, tody of children under month, including utili541-504-8545 or slides, 2 TVs, 2 roof $15,000 OBO 18. This newspaper ties. 541-317-8717 541- 350-1660 airs, jacks, camera, 541-408-3317 will not knowingly acApproximately 1800 new condition, noncept any advertising sq. ft., perfect for ofsmoker, $59,900 for real estate which is fice or church. South OBO. 541-548-5216. in violation of the law. end of Bend. Ample Our readers are parking. $575. hereby informed that 541-408-2318. all dwellings advertised in this newspaChiropractic office for Honda 750 Ace 2003 per are available on w/windscreen and more than 20 yrs. 1440 an equal opportunity LeatherLyke bags. sq ft., 3 exam rooms, basis. To complain of Home on 2 acres, 3 lead-lined xray room, & Only 909 miles, orig discrimination call more! 541-420-4418 owner, $4000 OBO. Beaver Patriot 2000, bdrms, 2 baths, overWalnut cabinets, soHUD toll-free at 541-771-7275. sized double garage, lar, Bose, Corian, tile, 1-800-877-0246. The very private, $950/mo. 4 door fridge., 1 slide, toll free telephone Real Estate 541-480-9883 W/D. $85,000 number for the hear541-215-5355 For Sale ing impaired is HORSE PROPERTY Honda VT700 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 5 1-800-927-9275. Shadow 1984, 23K, acres, CRR. Private many new parts, well, wood stove. battery charger, Lease option possible, good condition, Call The Bulletin At $875. 541-771-7750 $3000 OBO. 541-385-5809. Small farmhouse, 1 541-382-1891 Beaver Santiam 2002, Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 745 bdrm, 1 bath, non40’, 2 slides, 48K, At: www.bendbulletin.com smkg, 8 miles west of Homes for Sale immaculate, 330 KAWASAKI 750 2005 Terrebonne. $600/mo Cummins diesel, like new, 2400 miles, + dep. 541-419-6542 BANK OWNED HOMES! $63,500 OBO, must stored 5 years. New FREE List w/Pics! sell.541-504-0874 battery, sports shield, www.BendRepos.com shaft drive, $3400 bend and beyond real estate firm. 541-447-6552. 20967 yeoman, bend or

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

JUNK BE GONE

800

Houses for Rent La Pine

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

Boats & RV’s

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $54,000, 541-480-8648

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $89,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Cardinal 34.5 RL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $48,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech scrn TVs. $60,000. Bonanza A36, lo541-480-3923 cated KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

COACHMAN 1997 Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 541-548-1422.

Executive Hangar

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126 Companion 26’ 1992, Done RV’ing, nonT-Hangar for rent smoker, exc. cond, at Bend airport. some extras incl., Call 541-382-8998. $4500, 503-951-0447, Redmond 916 Trucks & Need help ixing stuff around the house? Heavy Equipment Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Phoenix Cruiser 2001, Fleetwood Wilderness 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bath, bed & kitchen. bdrm, fireplace, AC, Seats 6-8. Awning. W/D hkup beautiful $30,950. unit! $30,500. 541-923-4211 541-815-2380

1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank with pump and hose. Everything works, $8,500 OBO. 541-977-8988


E4MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item $ 00

Under 200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item to be sold.

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To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 E5

916

932

933

935

975

975

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed Cadillac Eldorado Con1975, 454 eng., 2-spd vertible 1976 exc trans, tires 60%, cond, 80K, beautiful, Runs/drives well, AC, cruise, power evmotor runs great, erything, leather inte$1650. 541-771-5535 rior, fuel inj V8, $7500. 541-815-5600 MUST SELL GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low mi., good condition, new tires! ONLY $3500 OBO. 541-593-3072

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $4,500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Chevrolet Corvette 1967 Convertible with removable hard top. #'s matching, 4 speed, 327-350 hp, black leather interior. $58,500 541-306-6290

MUST SELL

For Memorial 70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $4000 OBO. 541-593-3072

Mac Mid Liner 1991, with cabin chassis, air brakes, power steering, auto transmission, diesel, near new recap rear tires, 30% front tires, new starter, PTO & hydraulic pump. Will take Visa or Mastercard, $2500, Chevy Chevelle 1967, 541-923-0411. 283 & Powerglide, very clean, quality updates, $21,000, 541-420-1600 Pette Bone Mercury Fork Lift, 6000 lb., 2 stage, propane, hardrubber tires, $3500, 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $6500 OBO. Call 541-390-1466. 925

Utility Trailers

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

1950 CHEVY CLUB COUPE, Cobalt Blue, Great condition, runs well, lots of spare parts. $9995. Call 541-419-7828

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. Equipment Trailer, Towmaster, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $3995. Call 541-420-1846.

Interstate West Enclosed Trailer, 20’ Car hauler, cabinets, tile floor, $4995, 541-595-5363.

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr. , complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Dodge pickup D100 classic, nal 318 wide 4 Cooper studded 17-inch push button snow tires 265/70R-17 straight, runs for Tahoe/Yukon, used $1250 firm. 1 season, $200 cash 831-295-4903 only. 541-617-1286

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com

1962 origiblock, trans, good, Bend,

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Remote Car Starter With Keyless Entry $324 Value at In Tune Audio (Bidding ends Nov. 15, at 8pm)

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $30,000. 541-548-1422

Fresh 400 Turbo Trans w/torque converter,fits Monterrey Buick, Cadillac, Olds, Mercury 1965, Exc. All original, $500 541-420-6215; 4-dr. sedan, in stor541-536-3889 age last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression Tires, (4) 205/70R15, engine, new tires & listudded tires & wheels, cense, reduced to little use, $250; $2850, 541-410-3425. (4) 205/70R15,Michelin, Hwy tread, great snow FIND IT! tires, like new, $225; BUY IT! (4), 225/60R16 StudSELL IT! ded tires & wheels, $250, 541-383-1811 The Bulletin Classiieds or 541-420-6753-Cell. Tires, 4 Bridgestone Blizzaks, mounted, chrome VW rims -fits all new Beetles, used 2 mo, $800 obo541-508-9707 Tires,(4) good Studded Snows, 195/65R15 on American Racing aluminium wheels, $495, 541-617-1589 Tires,studded, on 5 hole rims,185/60R15, $200 OBO, 541-388-3983 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10ea Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

VW BAJA BUG 1974 1776cc en-

gine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat black. $4900 OBO; over $7000 invested. 541-322-9529.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Mini Cooper Clubman Chevy 4x4 1970, short Chevy Tahoe 2003 pwr. S, 2009, larger than drs, windows, driver's wide box, canopy, typical mini, 24K seat; CD; tow pkg; 30K mi on premium miles, 6-spd manual, upgraded wheels; 3rd 350 motor; RV cam, heated leather seats, row seats; cloth; 1 electronic ignition, tow loaded. Avg 30+mpg, owner;166K;exc.cond, pkg, new paint/detailexlnt cond, must see! $9900. 360-701-9462 ing inside & out, 1 $22,900. owner since 1987. 541-504-7741 $4500. 541-923-5911 Chevy Tahoe LT 2001, Taupe, very clean, 102K miles, 1 Mitsubishi 3000 GT owner, garaged, 1999, auto., pearl maint. records prowhite, very low mi. vided, new brakes, $9500. 541-788-8218. 975 975 975 new battery, extra Automobiles Automobiles Automobiles BMW 323i Convertible, tires incl., lots of ex1999.MUST SELL,91K, DODGE DAKOTA SLT tras, $9500, PORSCHE 914, 1974 great cond, beautiful 1999 EX cab short 541-504-4224 Roller (no engine), car, incredibly fun ride! bed 4X4 with V6 and lowered, full roll cage, Was $9300; make of5 speed, Lear canopy, 5-pt harnesses, racfer. 541-419-1763. fully loaded, only ing seats, 911 dash & 74,000 miles. One instruments, decent owner. Like new! Buick Riviera 1995, Ford Excursion Pontiac Fiero, 1987 2dr, shape, very cool! VW Beetle TDI, 2002 $7200 541-420-3952 56K, 1 owner, super 45 mpg, silver, 5-spd, 2005, 4WD, diesel, 4-cyl, manual trans. $1699. 541-678-3249 charged V-6, pwr. + snow tires, exlnt! exc. cond., $24,000, Purchased in ‘87. Exeverything, looks, $8650. 541-546-4921 call 541-923-0231. lnt cond inside/out. All runs great, new original 79,900 miles. tires, $3900, Nissan Rogue SL 2008, Ford F-250 1986, New brakes. $4900 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Find exactly what 541-475-2114. $20,000, 34K mi., Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, obo. 541-388-3957 or Ford Explorer LTD convertible, 2 door, you are looking for in the AWD, CVT Trans. auto, gas or pro541-604-0597 1994, 4X4, 107K, 6K Navy with black soft w/paddle & stick man CLASSIFIEDS pane, 20K orig. mi., on new trans., Buicks ‘02 LeSabre, top, tan interior, very ual, cruise, A/C, pwr. new tires, $5000, 102k, $4950; ‘06 loaded, leather good condition. People Look for Information locks & windows, 541-480-8009. Lucerne CX, stunJust bought a new boat? seats, pwr doors, $5200 firm. 6-CD deck, new all About Products and Services Sell your old one in the ning black, 70k, windows & drivers 541-317-2929. weather tires, silver, Every Day through classii eds! Ask about our $7900; ‘06 Lucerne seat, good cond., Ford F250 1995, 4x4, 541-504-1197 Super Seller rates! CXL 58k, white, The Bulletin Classifieds $2700,541-382-0771 Powerstroke auto,exc. 541-385-5809 $12,500; ‘98 LeSabre, cond, lots of extras, 93k, $3900; ‘99 Re$7995, 541-548-4459 gal GS V-6 superJeep CJ-7 1984 charged $3500; Call 4WD. New Bob 541-318-9999 or Snow/Mud tires, Sam 541-815-3639. runs Great and has Free trip to DC for a custom installed WWII vets. 2nd rear axle. Great for hunting and Ford F250 1997 X-cab Cadillac DeVille Sefishing. Soft Top, dan 1993, leather in4x4, auto, 112K, 460, Clean $5,500 terior, all pwr., 4 new AC, PW, PL, Split (541) 447-4570 1000 1000 1000 1000 tires w/chrome rims, window, factory tow dark green, CD/radio, Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices pkg, receiver hitches, under 100K mi., runs front & rear, incl. 5th exc. $2500 OBO, JEEP GRAND wheel platform, Unit LEGAL NOTICE 541-805-1342 CHEROKEE incl. cloth interior, exc. TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE LIMITED 2001 cond. $6800. Please Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. 4x4, 90k, leather. A call: 541-546-9821, Find It in Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-113576 cream puff! One nice Culver The Bulletin Classifieds! lady’s car. $7,900 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS AT541-385-5809 Sam, 541-815-3639, TEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED or Bob, 318-9999 FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DONALD TIMFORD F250 4x4 MER, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor 1994 of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC 460 engine, cab and BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, Cadillac SedanDeVille a half, 4-spd stick as beneficiary, dated 8/15/2007, recorded 8/23/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-46377, records of 2002, loaded, Northshift,5th wheel hitch, DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations star motor, FWD, ex181K miles. $1950. secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the follnt in snow, new tires, Call 541-389-9764 lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Champagne w/tan Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 LOT SEVENTY-SIX (76), TOLLGATE SECOND ADDITION, leather, Bose stereo. 2006, AT, 76K, good DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Looks / runs / drives all-weather tires, The street address or other common designation, perfect, showroom $13,500 obo. if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: condition!!$7100 OBO 858-345-0084 14987 SADDLEBAG SISTERS, OR 97759 206-458-2603 (Bend) The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real Chevy Corvette 1988 property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been 4-spd manual with Ford F250 SuperDuty recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is 3-spd O/D. Sharp, Crew Cab 2008, diemade is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 19, 2011 loaded, 2 tops, (tinted sel, low mi., Almost Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2011 3 payments at $751.56 each $2,254.68 6 payments at & metal. New AC, every option, heated $731.25 each $4,387.50 1 payments at $710.94 each $710.94 (01-01-11 through 10-19-11) Late water pump, brake & power seats, sun roof, Porsche Cayenne 2004, Charges: $367.65 Beneficiary Advances: $1,311.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,031.77 clutch, master cylinLeer topper, etc. 86k, immac.,loaded, ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other der & clutch slave cyl. $38,499 OBO. Call dealer maint, $19,500. senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist $6500 OBO. 541-306-7835. 503-459-1580. that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a 541-419-0251. condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior Ford F250 XLT 4x4, liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for 1985, 4-speed, reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, gooseneck hitch, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed good work truck! immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $1450 or best offer. $194,999.92, PLUS interest thereon at 4.625% per annum from 12/01/10 to 4/1/2011, 4.625% per Call 541-923-0442 Porsche Cayenne S annum from 04/01/11 to 10/01/11, 4.625% per annum from 10/1/2011, until paid, together with Chrysler PT Cruiser ‘08, 2008 Nearly every escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of $9600, 51k+ mi., auto, option: 20" wheels, the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is A/C, cruise, PDL/PW, navigation, Bi-Xenon FORD Pickup 1977, given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 23, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord tilt, CD, moon wheels lights, thermally insustep side, 351 Windwith the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE & caps, 70K mi. all lated glass, tow pkg, sor, 115,000 miles, DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of weather tires, great stainless steel nose MUST SEE! DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in cond., 541-504-1197. trim, moonroof, Bose $3800 OBO. the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the sys, heated seats. Dodge Neon SXT 2005, 541-350-1686 execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his 66K mi. MSRP was 2.0L cyl., 5 spd, 1 successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing over $75K; $34,900. owner, 104K, great obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by cond., $5200 OBO, 541-954-0230 the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time 541-593-3557. prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other Toyota FJ-40 than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing Landcruiser any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance 1966, 350 Chev, required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the Ford Sport Trac Ltd. Downey conversion, performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in Ed. 2007 4x4, many 4-spd, 4” lift, 33’s, enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the extras inch. new tires, three tops! $8000. amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the 107K., perfect winter Ford Mustang Con541-388-2875. feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor SUB, $13,995. vertible LX 1989, V8 in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which 541-306-7546 engine, white w/red is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective interior, 44K mi., exc. 940 successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever cond., $5995, GMC Sierra 3/4-ton Vans will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain 541-389-9188. 4WD, A/C, 1997 the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in cruise, AM/ FM, bedforeclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for February 23, 2012. Unless the lender who is liner, $4200, CHEVY ASTRO EXT Ford Taurus 1996 foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this 541-573-5390. 1993 AWD mini van, 115k, white, full size property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a 3 seats, rear barn sedan, it’s just okay. residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you doors, white, good You’ll not need to Advertise your car! own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business tires/wheels. Pretty spend anything to Add A Picture! or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. interior, clean, no Reach thousands of readers! use it. I need $2000. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must rips or tears. Drives Call 541-385-5809 Bob, 541-318-9999 move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do exc! $2950. Free The Bulletin Classifieds Sam, 541-815-3639 not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property trip to D.C. for WWII after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU Vets! (541) Honda CRV 2005, 79K TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A 318-9999 or mi., Nokian tires, RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW (541) 815-3639 $10,000, 541-350-2496 REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS GMC ½-ton Pickup, BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT 1972, LWB, 350hi REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, motor, mechanically Chevy Gladiator 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring A-1, interior great; 1993, great shape, you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month body needs some great mileage, full or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and TLC. $4000 OBO. pwr., all leather, use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require Call 541-382-9441 auto, 4 captains you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. chairs, fold down Mazda Speed 3, 2007, STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, black, orig owner, gabed, fully loaded, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE raged, non-smoker. $3950 OBO, call REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY Great cond, 77K mi, 541-536-6223. AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER $12,500. 541-610-5885 International Flat EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL Bed Pickup 1963, 1 Mercedes ML-500 2006 APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a black w/tan interior, ton dually, 4 spd. six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before 52K mi, fully loaded trans., great MPG, requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary w/all options, 2 sets could be exc. wood Dodge Grand Cararesidence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if wheels/tires- 1 road, 1 hauler, runs great, van SXT 2005: you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month snow, $26,000, new brakes, $1950. StoNGo, 141k miles, or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before 541-388-6854 541-419-5480. power doors/trunk requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state $7850. law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are Call 541-639-9960 occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. Toyota 4x4 1989, 5spd, The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown 4-cyl, X-cab w/ bench on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than seat, 68K miles on 1/24/2012 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing engine, new util box & and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental bedliner, 4 extra tires agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR w/rims, Kenwood CD, Mercury Cougar SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in AudioBahn speakers, 1994, XR7 V8, advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in new paint, exc. cond. 77K miles, excellent writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent in & out, must see, condition, $4695. payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do $6500. 541-385-4790 541-526-1443 so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT 935 YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this Sport Utility Vehicles property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring Dodge Ram you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Van 1990 4-WHEELER’S OR Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with Customized to carry HUNTER’S SPECIAL! you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you livestock such as Jeep 4-dr wagon, 1987 must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, Alpacas, Sheep, 1980 Classic Mini 4x4, silver, nice the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and Goats etc. Runs Cooper wheels, 183K, lots of you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO Great, Needs a All original, rust-free, miles left yet! Off-road PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS paint job. classic Mini Cooper in or on. Under $1000. OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT 78K miles, $2,000. perfect cond. $10,000 Call 541-318-9999 or PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A (541) 447-4570 OBO. 541-408-3317 541-815-3639. DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT Free trip to D.C. OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY for WWII Vets! NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR Nissan Quest 1996 YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO 150k; Ford Windstar LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE 1995 138k, you will INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you like what you see, believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer bring money, one look referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do will do! $3000-$5000. MINI COOPER 2004, not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal Close to Costco. EXCELLENT, SUassistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained CHEVY SUBURBAN LT Phone Bob, Sr. PER CLEAN, low mi., through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee 541-318-9999, or 2005 72,000 miles, Manual trans, AC, DATED: 10/19/2011 By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORlZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Sam, son new shocks, rear ALWAYS GARAGED, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com 541-815-3639. brakes, one owner, Nav System, Leather REDUCED - $15,995, Free trip to DC for Seats. $11,900. ASAP# 4114771 10/31/2011, 11/07/2011, 11/14/2011, 11/21/2011 541-480-0828. WWII vets. 541-728-8675.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E6 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Notice is hereby given that Deschutes County Adult Jail is requesting sealed proposals from vendors to provide combined food and commissary services for the inmates and authorized staff. This proposal includes preparing meals for a work center and juvenile detention facility. PROPOSALS Proposals must be received by Lieutenant Brook Van der Zwiep, Deschutes County Adult Jail, 63333 West Highway 20, Bend, Oregon 97701 by 2:00 PM, Friday, December 9, 2011. Proposals received after the designated time and date will be returned unopened. An Informational Pre-proposal Conference and facility tour will be held at 2:00 PM, Friday, November 18, 2011, at the Deschutes County Adult Jail, 63333 West Highway 20, Bend, Oregon 97701. Only companies attending the informational conference will be eligible to respond to this RFP. The County may reject any proposal not in compliance with all prescribed public bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all proposals upon a finding of the County it is in the public interest to do so. Each proposal submitted must contain a statement as to whether the proposer is a resident bidder, as defined in ORS 279.029. Copies of the Request for Proposals document are available by calling Lt. Brook Van der Zwiep at the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office (541) 322-4812 or emailing a request to: brookv@deschutes.or g. Copies of the proposal are also available online at www.sheriff.deschutes.org The County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals not in compliance with prescribed procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause all proposals upon a finding by the Board it is in the public interest to do so. The County reserves the right to change the terms and conditions of the RFP prior to the award of the contract. The County will notify potential contractors of all changes. Proposer will not base its proposal on any past practices that are not clearly defined/ described within the RFP. LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction Public Auction to be held on Saturday, November 12th, 2011 at 11:30 a.m. at A-1 Westside Storage, 317 SW Columbia St., Bend, Oregon 97701. (Unit E-074, K-133).

LEGAL NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS North Unit Irrigation District Canal Lining Project Sealed Bids to provide construction services for the North Unit Irrigation District Canal Lining Project shall be received at the office of the North Unit Irrigation District, 2024 NW Beech Street, Madras, Oregon 97741 until 2:00 p.m. local time on November 22, 2011. Any bids received after the specified time will not be considered. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at the specified time given above. The work is to construct an approximate 4.9-mile long canal lining project including mobilization and demobilization, staging, clearing, grubbing, sediment removal, excavation, backfill, compaction, reinforced fabric application, furnishing and applying fiber-mesh shotcrete, staging area and other disturbed area restoration and all associated work and ancilliary work necessary to furnish and install a complete canal lining project as specified in the Contract Documents. Bid documents may be examined in Owner's office, North Unit Irrigation District, 2024 NW Beech St., Madras, OR 97741 (541) 475-3625, Fax (541) 475-3905. Bid documents may be purchased (upon prior notice by calling 541-480-6257) from the Owner's Representative, Black Rock Consulting, at 20380 Halfway Road #1, Bend, Oregon 97701 upon payment (check, cash or money order only) of: • $45 for each set of specifications including a CD of the plans (PDF format)+Shipping • $85 for each set of 24x36 plans+Shipping (payable to Black Rock Consulting). Return of the documents is not required, and the amount paid for the documents is non-refundable. Each Bid must comply with and be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and accompanied by Bid security as prescribed. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish additional bonds prescribed in the Bid Documents. Prior to submission of its Bid, the Bidder shall be required to provide proof that the Bidder is duly licensed with the Oregon Construction Contractors Board. No Bid will be received or considered by Owner unless the Bid contains, or is accompanied by, a statement by Bidder that Bidder accepts prevailing wage rate provisions required by ORS 279C.840 and Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276a to 276a-7). For information concerning the proposed Work, contact Kevin L. Crew, P.E., (541) 480-6257. Attendance at a pre-bid conference will be a mandatory requirement of submitting a Bid for this Project. Refer to Instructions to Bidders for additional information. Owner reserves the right to reject all Bids or any Bid not conforming to the intent and purpose of the Bid documents. Dated this 7th day of November, 2011.

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Mike Britton Manager North Unit Irrigation District LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1926 T.S. No.: 1340618-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason Rodgers A Single Person, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated July 22, 2005, recorded July 27, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No.

xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-48277 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 14, block 1, Newberry Estates Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 52393 Ammon Rd La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $693.19 Monthly Late Charge $29.17. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust

immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $90,704.02 together with interest thereon at 6.305% per annum from August 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 10, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after

the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which

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is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 05, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-393853 11/07, 11/14, 11/21, 11/28

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Terry Seal, as grantor, to Paul S. Cosgrove, Esq., as trustee, in favor of Budget Finance Company, as beneficiary, dated February 16, 2007, recorded February 27, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2007-11753, the beneficial interest thereafter being assigned to Budget Funding I, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, by instrument recorded April 2, 2007, as No. 2007-18951, covering the following described real property situated in the above mentioned county and state, to wit: Lot 3, Block 2, Crawford's Corner II, Deschutes County, Oregon. (The title company advises the property address is 9502 NW 19th St., Terrebonne, Oregon.) Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments due December 1, 2010 through August 1, 2011, for a total of $4,685.31, plus late charges of $486.83, plus corporate advances of $10,735.26, plus that portion of real property taxes now due for 2008-9, 2009-10 and 2010-11. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: As of December 1, 2010, the principal sum of $107,388.01, plus interest; plus any sums advanced by the beneficiary or beneficiary's successor in interest for the protection of the above described property, plus attorney and trustee's fees incurred by reason of said default. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on January 4, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at inside main lobby of Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act requires we state: This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. DATED August 19, 2011. /s/ Paul S. Cosgrove, Esq., Trustee, Lindsay, Hart, Neil & Weigler, LLP, 220 NW Skyline Blvd., Portland, OR 97210. For information call (503) 291-6700 or (503) 956-8139. Sale #66025-276

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-109754

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1842 T.S. No.: 1315478-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jimmy A Glenn and Marsha L Glenn Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 01, 2007, recorded March 09, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-14295* covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The southeast quarter of the northwest quarter of the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of section 27, township 16 south, range 12, east of the Willamette, Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. * re-recorded 8-30-07 2007-47675 Commonly known as: 64859 Half Mile Ln Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,404.04 Monthly Late Charge $57.54. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $309,847.03 together with interest thereon at 2.000% per annum from October 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 06, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 29, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TROY PRICE AND JULIE PRICE, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 12/26/2007, recorded 1/2/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-00008, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOTS TWELVE (12) THROUGH TWENTY-ONE (21) OF BLOCK THIRTY-SEVEN (37), HILLMAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1400 A AVENUE TERREBONNE, OR 97760 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 24, 2011 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2011 8 payments at $ 1,661.60 each $ 13,292.80 (03-01-11 through 10-24-11) Late Charges: $ 770.34 Beneficiary Advances: $ 151.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 14,214.14 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $224,283.46, PLUS interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from 2/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 27, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for February 27, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 1/27/2012 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 10/24/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st AvenuerSuite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

R-393187 10/31/11, 11/07, 11/14, 11/21

ASAP# FNMA4119886 11/07/2011, 11/14/2011, 11/21/2011, 11/28/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1477 T.S. No.: 1339694-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Thomas E Bernhardt Married Rosalee Bernhardt, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated November 19, 2003, recorded November 24, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-81095 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 1, Whisper Ridge, Deschutes County, Oregon. *doing business as Commonwealth United Mortgage Company Commonly known as: 1200 NE Whisper Ridge Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2011 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,089.43 Monthly Late Charge $83.43. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $236,701.54 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from May 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 23, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 15, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-392090 10/17, 10/24, 10/31, 11/07 1000

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FALL / WINTER 2011

H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE

• Acupuncture goes mainstream • Meet Bend’s running King • The dirty face of cyclocross • Flexible spending accounts

Healthy Living in Central Oregon

When is one sport too much? Overtraining and the single-sport kid


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H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE Healthy Living in Central Oregon

FALL / WINTER 2011 VOLUME 3, NO. 4

How to reach us Denise Costa | Editor 541-383-0356 or dcosta@bendbulletin.com Sheila Timony | Associate editor 541-383-0355 or stimony@bendbulletin.com • Reporting Anne Aurand 541-383-0304 or aaurand@bendbulletin.com Betsy Q. Cliff 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com Markian Hawryluk 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com Lily Raff McCaulou 541-617-7836 or lraff@bendbulletin.com • Design / Production Greg Cross Mugs Scherer • Photography Ryan Brennecke Pete Erickson Dean Guernsey

David Wray Andy Zeigert Rob Kerr Andy Tullis

• Corrections High Desert Pulse’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0356 or email pulse@bendbulletin.com. • Advertising Jay Brandt, Advertising director 541-383-0370 or jbrandt@bendbulletin.com Sean Tate, Advertising manager 541-383-0386 or state@bendbulletin.com Kristin Morris, Advertising representative 541-617-7855 or kmorris@bendbulletin.com On the Web: www.bendbulletin.com/pulse

The Bulletin All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval. Published: 11/7/2011

Write to us Send your letters of 250 words or less to pulse@bendbulletin.com. Please include a phone number for verification.

HIGH DESERT PULSE

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Contents |

HIGH DESERT PULSE

COVER STORY

8

18

SINGLE-SPORT KIDS Younger and younger, our kids play one sport, year-round. Do we understand the impact?

FEATURES

18

ACUPUNCTURE Coming soon to an office near you?

DEPARTMENTS

6 7 14 25 26 28 30 34 36 38 53 54

LETTERS Response from our readers.

14

UPDATES What’s new since we last reported. GET READY: CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING The sport to make you fall in love with winter. PICTURE THIS: HOW BIG IS A PORTION? Use a handy tool that’s always with you. SORTING IT OUT: FLEXIBLE SPENDING Setting money aside can save you plenty. GET GEAR: SPORT WATCHES Choosing the right face for your wrist. HOW DOES HE DO IT? Bend’s running ambassador is Max King. ON THE JOB: DOSIMETRISTS The strategists behind radiation treatment.

25

HEALTHY EATING Oh, sweet holiday treats! GET ACTIVE A look at down-and-dirty cyclocross. POP QUIZ: TRIGLYCERIDES We have them, but do we want them? ONE VOICE: A PERSONAL ESSAY Losing weight. Again. COVER PHOTO: PETE ERICKSON; COVER DESIGN: ANDY ZEIGERT CONTENTS PHOTOS, FROM TOP: DEAN GUERNSEY, ROB KERR, ANDY ZEIGERT, RYAN BRENNECKE

HIGH DESERT PULSE • SUMMER / FALL 2011

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30


Letters |

Hospice Care

RESPONSE FROM OUR READERS

doesn’t mean giving up ... Does it work? |

Bed rest

... but it can mean a better quality of life for you and those you care most about. Ask your doctor about hospice services and how we can help.

BED REST

I read a troubling article in High Desert Pulse (“Bed rest: often used, never proven,” Summer/Fall 2011). At my 12-week One in five pregnant Am erican wome That may be n are put to doing more ultrasound, my husbed annually harm than . go B e d rest: often useod. band and I found that d, never prov en we had twins! The A discovery went from total elation to complete devastation in a matter of minutes. One twin had almost no amniotic fluid. Our OB-GYN privately told my husband, John, “you probably won’t even want to pick out a name for Twin B, as she has about a 5 percent chance of living.” A day later, we were in the perinatologist’s office. She believed the twins had a common blood source and if one died, they both died. She immediately put me on strict bed rest. My first question: Can I give my life for my babies? It wasn’t a question, really, it was a visceral response to the needs of my twins. The answer came swiftly: The only thing you can do for the survival of your babies is to lie flat and make certain that all the blood and nutrients possible were going to the babies and not to other parts of my body through physical activity. I could take one shower a day, sit up three times for meals and walk to the bathroom when needed. I believe the Pulse article on bed rest does not represent all pregnant mothers and that statements made by some medical personnel appear to be misinformed. My bed rest ended up being four months total. Indeed, my muscles atrophied and I experienced a bulging disc in my neck. It was an extremely challenging time, but a small price to pay for the viability of your own babies. Our girls turned 12 years old on Aug. 30. I am forever grateful that our doctors didn’t have the philosophy of the medical persons quoted in the Pulse article. Otherwise we would probably be visiting graves instead of taking our twins to soccer, piano and sleepovers. — Lena Land, Redmond Amanda Sheff ield, of Bend , was on bed rest for 10 week an experienc s, e that she said made her ques tion she wants more whether kids.

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physically and psycholog manda Sheff ield had a ically. Sheff said the expe nancy. She hard preg ield, 20, rience has - whether Gynecolog was made her y, a profession she wants question deal with cervi put on bed rest to more kids. al organizat sets guidelines cal problems But she, like have been ion that for medical that may exacerbat most other rest does not practice, says women, went with the recom The Bend wom ed by carrying twins reduce the bed along and . rate of prete who wouldn’t mendation willingly. “should not those 10 week an cried as she reme rm birth After all, be routinely endure sever mbered s when she Studies have recommend to have a healt al weeks of bed, even couldn’t get ed.” failed to find misery the hy baby? to shower. out of any difference Some outcomes But as dropping of women in a tube of Chap thing as simple that here’s the thing: Ther who are on when comp brought her e’s no evide bed rest helps stick out of bed rest ared with to tears nce reach preg prevent comp those who nancy or impr went abou Up to 1 millio , she said. lications from their regular lives. t oves the healt n women So why is it And here’s on bed rest, each year h of babies. still used? the are put and many Good ques cian likely know other thing: Your find it diffic tion, say expe obstetriult, both s that. rts. “Without The American ques tion,” it’s College of said Dr. Robe Page 30 overprescr Obstetrics rt Goldenbe ibed, and obste rg, a profe trics and gyne ssor of cology at Drex el UniversiSUMMER / FA

Reporter Betsy Q. Cliff responds: Women who are put on bed rest make amazing sacrifices for their babies. Many of the women I spoke to expressed a similar sentiment, that those sacrifices are a small price to pay for a healthy baby. The fact remains, however, that bed rest is not a proven intervention. There is no scientific evidence that, by ordering mothers to bed, a doctor can influence the outcome of most pregnancies in one way or the other. I hope the article will spur more research in this area so women will know the factors that can help them have healthy pregnancies.

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FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Updates |

NEW SINCE WE LAST REPORTED

Evaluating for ADHD Since our article “Kids with ADHD learn to focus” (Summer/Fall 2010), the American Academy of Pediatrics issued new guidance calling for ADHD screening and intervention as early as age 4. The report expressed concern that most children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder aren’t being evaluated and treated until they reach school age. “Treating children at a young age is important because when we can identify them earlier and provide appropriate treatment, we can increase their chance of suc-

Colette Whelan at a mobile medical unit in northeastern Kenya, near the Somali border in August.

Mission to Somalia We told you earlier this year in “Catastrophic care” (Summer/Fall 2011) about Colette Whelan, a disaster relief worker who had been on emergency missions in Haiti, Pakistan and Indonesia. Just after our story published at the beginning of August, she went

End-of-life decisions In 2009, we wrote about decisions affecting how people spend the end of their lives in “The decision of a lifetime” (Summer/Fall 2009). This year, a study concluded that recently people have been turning more toward hospice care with fewer people dying in hospitals. The study was published by the Dartmouth Atlas project, an initiative of Dartmouth College that looks at regional and local variations in health care. Dartmouth’s study found that in 2007,

cess in school,” said Dr. Mark Wolraich, a pediatrician who authored the updated guidelines. The changes were based in part on a new study that showed that the drug methylphenidate (Ritalin and Concerta) was effective in treating preschool children with moderate and severe symptoms. The guidelines recommend that doctors first try behavioral intervention and turn to medication at the lowest possible doses only if behavioral strategies don’t result in noticeable improvement. — MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

on another mission, this time to Somalia. Somalia is in the midst of one of the worst famines in decades, complicated by years of brutal fighting for political control. Just before Whelan arrived, the Al Shabab, a militant Islamic group that had been in power, left the capital Mogadishu, creating further turmoil. For safety, Whelan and other members of the Medical Teams International group based themselves in Kenya, just over the southern border of Somalia, Whelan said. A security escort took them across the border into Somalia where they ran mobile clinics, providing primary care, including treatment for chronic diseases and pregnancy. The situation was different from others she had been in, Whelan said, in that it was a political as opposed to environmental disaster. That meant there were more complicated considerations of how to move around, she said, and where they could go to help.

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about 28 percent of people on Medicare died in hospitals compared with 32 percent four years earlier. Central Oregon, however, had a much larger decrease of about 9 percentage points. Hospital deaths have often been associated with intensive treatments near the end of a person’s life. Though this is sometimes warranted or wanted, experts say that people can sacrifice quality of life in their final days for treatments that may not extend their life, or do so only artificially. — BETSY Q. CLIFF

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Page 7


Cover story | SINGLE-SPORT KIDS

Single-sport kids What’s the harm in year-round? BY ANNE AURAND PHOTOS BY ROB KERR

O

n an 82-degree late-August day when many teens were traveling the country or floating the river, Bend High senior Maryn Beutler was dribbling around an opponent at tryouts for the high school soccer team. Beutler has been kicking soccer balls around since kindergarten. She has competed in club soccer and competitive development programs since middle school. Now, at 18, she is a standout midfielder who has landed

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a soccer scholarship to the University of Oregon. She didn’t get there by default. She made sacrifices. Sometimes she played on more than one team at a time. She played 10 months of the year. She consistently traveled for soccer camps and tournaments, missing school, social events and family holidays, because “it’s a good way to get looked at for college.” She didn’t pursue theater, art or other hobbies in her later teen years. “I didn’t have time for anything else.” She had time for a boyfriend, she said, “but he plays soccer, so that’s all we do — ha.”


Bend High School soccer player Maryn Beutler scores a penalty kick in an early-season game in September. Beutler is the face of a trend in youth sports. Driven by hopes of a scholarship or professional career, a growing number of teenagers across a spectrum of sports are training hard, year-round. This level of intensity can come at a cost. Overuse injuries and emotional burnout are becoming more common in young athletes. Beutler has broken an ankle and weathered storms of burnout, but she’s played on. She said she could never quit soccer, even when she was playing in a cutthroat program she hated. She is too invested. Soccer completes her. “I don’t care if it’s not fun. I’ve just wanted to get bet-

ter,” she said. “A lot of people crack.” The one-sport trend is attracting the attention and concern of sports medicine researchers and national policy leaders. One recent study by Dr. Neeru Jayanthi, medical director of Primary Care Sports Medicine at Loyola University Chicago, said kids who train intensively in one sport have a higher injury risk than kids who play multiple sports. In tennis, for example, it’s 1.5 times higher. Another study was conducted in England and published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. It said almost one-third of young athletes have experiPage 9


Scholarship probability:

4% The dream of an athletic scholarship motivates many high school athletes to specialize in one sport. But the odds of snagging those scholarships are exceptionally slim. “The percent of high school senior student athletes who receive a Division I or Division II athletic scholarship from a college or university is less than 4 percent,” said Bruce Whitehead, executive director of the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association in Indiana, though “it will vary by sport.” Using Division I basketball as an example, Whitehead illustrates the odds: About 350 Division I basketball universities give, on average, four full scholarships annually, roughly 1,400. Whitehead estimates that 60,000 high school basketball players are competing for those. So, 2.3 percent of graduating senior basketball players get a Division I scholarship. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I schools offer the highest level of intercollegiate athletics, with the biggest budgets and more athletic scholarships than Division II schools, which cannot give athletic scholarships; they can give only academic scholarships, Whitehead said.

Cover story | SINGLE-SPORT KIDS enced injuries or burnout from overtraining. And overuse injuries are said to be responsible for nearly half of all sports injuries to middle and high school students, according to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. This direction in the youth sports industry is a significant factor behind the recent creation of The National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute in Washington, D.C., (www.nyshsi.org) which will, among other things, discourage early specialization in children in an attempt to prevent injuries, burnout and dropout. The American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness also discourages the practice of high-level training for youth, and blames glorified media attention on talented young competitors for promoting the trend. Think Tiger Woods. Andre Agassi. Serena Williams. The effort to outdo predecessors and outperform contemporaries — the very nature of competitive sports — requires an intense, intelligent, adult level of training, and children shouldn’t face such physical and psychological demands, according to the academy. Parents often blame coaches for pressuring teens to specialize, saying coaches’ job security is linked to winning. Coaches say it’s driven by parents who want their kids to be the best, who have delusions of grandeur about their young athletes. In the middle is the young athlete, trying to define his or her own goals. “I think it’s insidious, unhealthy. I think it’s not the fault of any one coach or any one parent, but we as a culture have gotten ourselves into this situation. It’s very complex, because we idolize certain professionals. We idolize some collegiate athletes,” said Dave Hood, athletic director at Mountain View High School in Bend. “There really is a perception, a belief of some people — parents and kids — that if you’re really good at a particu-

lar sport, you’ll get your college paid for.” Yet a student’s odds of a sports scholarship are actually pretty dismal. Less than 4 percent of high school athletes get them. “Bottom line, specializing in one sport to obtain a college scholarship is a real gamble unless the student is in the top 2 to 3 percent in his or her sport” nationally, said Bruce Whitehead, executive director of the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association in Indiana. One-sport specialization is more prevalent in bigger cities, but it is happening in Central Oregon, particularly within a growing number of private and often pricey clubs, camps and teams that operate outside the regular high school seasons for sports, including soccer, volleyball, baseball and swimming. College recruiters are most likely to discover outstanding athletes

Estimated probability of competing in athletics beyond high school Men’s Women’s Men’s Men’s basketball basketball Football Baseball ice hockey soccer Number of high school athletes. . . . . . . . . . . . . .540,207. . . . . . . . . . .439,550 . . . . . . . . . 1,109,278 . . . . . . . . . .472,644 . . . . . . . . . . . .36,475 . . . . . . . . . . 391,839 Those who go on to the NCAA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1%. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6% . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.4% . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.8% . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.6% Those who go on to play professionally. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.03%. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03% . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.08% . . . . . . . . . . . .0.44% . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.32% . . . . . . . . . . . .0.07% Source: National Collegiate Athletic Association

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ANDY ZEIGERT

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Athletic aptitude:

Is it in your child’s DNA?

Former U.S. Olympic cross-country skier Ben Husaby, behind, coaches crosscountry skiers Nick St. Clair, left, and Ryan St. Clair during an offseason roller-ski workout along Century Drive. Husaby didn’t specialize early on, but he recognizes that for some athletes, specialization is necessary.

at competitive tournaments outside of traditional school sports seasons. As more kids train intensively, the level of competition escalates. This affects the kids who didn’t join a specialized club at an early age with goals of a scholarship. “Many believe they cannot participate or be a very good player in high school because they didn’t play a sport in the sixth grade,” said Matt Craven, a track and football coach at Bend High School. “They quit early.” Craven doesn’t believe kids need to focus on one sport at an early age to become great players. “The truth of the matter is that natural athleticism is a gift, and a kid can be a phenomenal player if he or she has those gifts,” he said. Craven estimates that about half of Bend’s soccer players are specializing as they reach their later years in high school. In football, he said, it’s probably closer to 10 percent. “We love to get our football players out for wrestling,” he said. “It keeps them in a competitive environment. Doing football drills for eight more months doesn’t make you a better football player, but learning the toughness it takes to be a wrestler carries over to the football field, and we see a correlation with success on the football field.” There’s always going to be an emphasis on winning, he said, but trying different sports provides an overall more positive relationship with exercise and athletics. Look at Ben Husaby. Like many great athletes of his generation, the 45-year-old Husaby didn’t get an athletic scholarship or make it to the Olympics in cross-country skiing by specializing early on. He was a three-sport athlete in high school, two in college. He hasn’t suffered

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

At-home genetic tests to predict a child’s athletic talent are already on the market — and they’ve raised ethical concerns with sports medicine professionals. Several companies are selling sports performance tests that parents can administer at home. Parents swab a child’s cheek to collect DNA and then send the cell collections to a lab that looks for genes connected to elite athleticism. A panel of tests provides information that the companies say can help predict a child’s athletic strengths and weaknesses. A score is provided to help determine the child’s genetic propensity for power or endurance activities. Some genes are weighted higher for power, others for endurance. Some have both. Test makers say genetic testing can make children’s sports choices more appropriate, workouts more effective and awareness of potential risk factors more precise. Critics say it’s a bad idea. “The tests are in their infancy. Our knowledge of the genetic contribution to sport performance is shaky at best. Kids are being targeted, which is rife with concerns, and there’s no evidence that these tests do what they claim to do,” said Stephen Roth, director of the physical performance genetics laboratory at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. Because genetic counselors are not on hand to deliver the results, there is a risk of misinterpretation and misuse. And some believe testing could impair the enjoyment of youth sports. Roth worries that parents, who might use the test results as a tool to try to raise their child’s odds of an athletic scholarship, could push their kids into a certain, and perhaps inappropriate, sport. “I envision parents using these tests to best select sports for their children rather than having that be a child-led experience,” said Roth. “Genetic factors do contribute to sport performance,” Roth said. The tests should be used for top athletes looking to tailor their workouts, not for directing elementary-age children’s interests, he said. Testing DNA for medical purposes is not new. However, genetics tests can rarely say with certainty that someone will develop a certain disease. And at-home genetic medical tests are still shrouded in controversy, as illustrated by recent warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to a handful of manufacturers for marketing such tests without appropriate review and approval. American International Biotechnology Services, which recently released the Sports X Factor test for $200, said the athletic predictor tests can also identify health risks, such as undiagnosed heart conditions or the length of time an athlete should rest after a concussion. Bill Miller, CEO of the company, said the tests enable “… understanding the athlete from the inside out.”

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Cover story | SINGLE-SPORT KIDS

Specializing in a single sport year-round, especially for kids who start their sport young, increases the risk of repetitive stress injuries. Common over-use injuries associated with various sports: Volleyball

Shoulder impingement, which occurs when the arm lifts and the space between the acromion bone and rotator cuff narrows, rubbing or impinging the tendons, causing irritation and pain Basketball

Patellar tendonitis, (the tendon connecting knee cap to shin bone) patellofemoral (back of kneecap) pain Baseball

Little Leaguer’s shoulder (when the growth plate of the arm bone close to the shoulder is inflamed); Little Leaguer’s elbow (when the growth plate on the inside of the elbow is inflamed); Tommy John injuries (injuries to the ulnar collateral ligament on the inside of the elbow joint)

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Running

Stress fractures of the foot, ankle, leg and hip; iliotibial band syndrome (IT band runs on outside of leg between hip and knee), patellofemoral (back of kneecap) pain Soccer

Stress fractures of the foot and leg; hamstring and groin strains

Gymnastics

Stress fractures or injuries of the elbow and wrist (the weight-bearing joints in gymnasts); low back pain

Golf

Low back pain, lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow), shoulder impingement

Tennis

Shoulder impingement, lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow)

Swimming

Shoulder impingement, medial knee pain in breaststroke, low back pain

Sources: Dr. David Geier, director of the Medical University of South Carolina Sports Medicine; assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina; chairman of the Public Relations Committee, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


1999

2001

2006

Maryn Beutler’s dad, Keith Beutler, coached her when she first played soccer on Bend Park & Recreation District teams (above left and center). She later played on private club teams, such as the DAFC club team, a Rush Soccer predecessor in Bend, (above right). overuse injuries in his career or felt burnout. He still loves his sport, long after his competitive career peaked. However, as the director of Bend Endurance Academy, he’s now coaching competitive cross-country skiers in the offseason to perfect their skill. “I’m pretty conflicted about this as a coach,” he admitted. But “I realize the reality is, if kids want to make it to a higher level, they have to specialize.” And, he said, there are life skills to be gained within the framework of year-round training. Notably, teammates seem to value a “close-knit, family-like feeling … in today’s quick-change society,” he said. Nick and Ryan St. Clair, twin seniors at Bend’s Summit High School who train with Husaby during the offseason, said they’ve learned concepts of teamwork in that setting: Such as the need to pitch in and load up the van before a ski trip without handholding by the coach, or supporting and encouraging a teammate — their family — who was down and on the verge of quitting. John O’Sullivan is the executive director of the Oregon branch of Rush Soccer, a private player-development club program that trains kids as young as 4 and helps older teens navigate the college process. O’Sullivan said much can be gained by aiming high. Dedication and practice are required to achieve greatness in everything from music to sports. “There’s nothing wrong with setting high

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

goals for yourself and falling short. You’ll have achieved many other things along the way. Maybe you didn’t become a professional soccer player but maybe you were a college player. I think a far bigger problem is young adults who don’t have high goals, who aren’t pushed to try to achieve something … or are told that mediocrity is acceptable. I think that where on the outside it might look like kids are putting all their eggs in one basket, that basket is filled with things other than soccer. Such as, the ability to work with others, such as, there’s no such thing as luck … that hard work pays off.” Sometimes, O’Sullivan said, it can be easier for teens to balance busy lives when they can focus on just one sport, because there’s so much else heaped on them: relationships, jobs, advanced course work. However, both Husaby and O’Sullivan said generally they would encourage kids, including their own, to engage in multiple sports. “I have to tiptoe around that carefully because I’m certainly completely understanding of a coach who sees talent and says, ‘Hey, you should do this sport,’” O’Sullivan said.

Overuse injuries Sport specialization can start as young as age 8, said Dr. David Geier, a sports medicine surgeon and director of the Medical University of South Carolina Sports Medicine Department. That concerns him. Overuse injuries accumulate over time,

when the same body part gets stressed over and over without enough rest, especially when the repetitive motion starts at a young age. “The repetitive stress creates microscopic damage, and the lack of rest keeps that bone or other structure from healing,” Geier said. “(Body) structures fail at the point of least resistance, and that is a good way to look at these problems. Kids who are still growing have open growth plates, and these growth plates are areas where the bone can fail. The growth plates can’t withstand the same stresses that fully formed adult bones can,” Geier said. “Also, younger athletes do not often have the full muscle strength to take some of the pressure off of the growing bones and joints, putting them at more risk for overuse injuries.” To try to prevent such problems, Geier said young athletes should couple sports such as baseball and tennis with ones that use alternate body parts, such as soccer or running. This generation of one-sport athletes is sort of an experiment. “In theory, you could do permanent damage. Problem is, we haven’t studied this long enough,” Geier said. “There isn’t 20year, follow-up data on these kids who get hurt … They might be at risk for osteoporosis and stress fractures when they’re older.” Studies show that joint injuries, such as knee ligament tears that are common on the Continued on Page 48

Page 13


If you’re a beginner looking for gentle trails, check out these cross-country ski areas:

Where to learn 1 Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center

(541-382-2442, ext. 2909) offers one-hour group lessons ($35 on weekdays; $45 on weekends or holidays) for adults and children ages six and up. A lesson package ($50 on weekdays; $60 on weekends or holidays) includes equipment rental and trail pass as well as a one-hour lesson. Private lessons are also available. 2 Hoodoo ski area (541-822-3799) offers

private and one-hour group lessons. Call for details.

Where to practice 3 Virginia Meissner Sno-park* features

a handful of groomed trails. To start, try the Lodgepole Loops (or 8 Ball) trail, a 1.8 mile figure-eight, rated easy. Dogs are not allowed. * 4 Skyliner Sno-park has 5.8 miles of easy

trails, which are not groomed. Experienced skiers usually break the trail within a few hours of snowfall, so if you’re comfortable venturing off groomed surfaces, head here to glide in the tracks of other skiers. Wellbehaved dogs are allowed. 5 Wanoga Sno-park* offers one

sporadically groomed 2-mile loop where well-behaved dogs are allowed. *A permit must be displayed in any vehicle at an Oregon sno-park between Nov. 1 and April 30. Permits cost $4 for one day, $9 for three days or $25 for the entire season. They’re sold at all DMV offices and many sporting goods stores and other retailers. Permits issued in California and Idaho are honored here, and Oregon permits are honored at sno-parks in California and Idaho.

ANDY ZEIGERT

LINN COUNTY 126 20

Hoodoo ski area Trails groomed daily 2

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Tumalo Falls is the reward that awaits you at the back of the Skyliner Sno-park loop.

Skyliner Sno-park Wanoga Sno-park Trails groomed 1

Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center

Trails groomed daily

Trails not groomed Bend

4

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Virginia Meissner Sno-park Trails groomed

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ANDY TULLIS


Get ready | NORDIC SKIING

Classic winter fun You’re just a lesson away from praying for snow BY LILY RAFF MCCAULOU

T

here aren’t a lot of sports where you can invest in one lesson, then reap a lifetime of reward. A one-hour cross-country skiing lesson, followed by practice, could yield a fun and healthy activity for life. Also called nordic skiing, the sport uses every major muscle group and is easy on the joints, so it’s great exercise for nearly all ages and fitness levels. And here in Central Oregon, the season is long enough that if you get started soon, you could cover miles and miles by spring. That doesn’t mean you should dust off Grandpa’s old skis and hit the trail immediately. “When I was in high school, in the 1970s and 1980s, there was a campaign: ‘If you can walk, you can cross-country ski,’” recalls Dan Simoneau, nordic director for Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation. “It got a lot of people to try skiing. And it got a lot of people to conclude that skiing was too hard.” J.D. Downing, coach and founder of XC Oregon, offers three golden rules for the first time — or, ideally, the first few times — that you strap on a pair of skis: 1. Go to a well-groomed trail. 2. Use equipment that fits you well and is appropriate to the conditions. 3. Take a professional lesson. Special trucks smooth the trails at Hoodoo ski area and the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

on a daily basis, which means the snow is as consistent as possible. “When you’re learning for the first time, you want to be on the most reliable surface you can find,” Downing says. That way, you can practice basic technique without having to adjust to various snow textures. On an ungroomed surface, for example, a skier could encounter patches of ice, deep snow drifts and slush all in one short stretch. The Deschutes and Ochoco national forests are laced with hundreds of miles of ski trails. Some, like those at Virginia Meissner Sno-park and Wanoga Sno-park, are groomed, though not always as regularly as at commercial ski areas.

The right stuff Cross-country skis are long and narrow, to distribute a skier’s weight across the snow. The skis are bowed so the smooth front and back of the ski glide across the snow. When flexed, a fish scale texture in the center of the ski grips the snow. Hoodoo and Mt. Bachelor both offer equipment rentals. Ski shops in town also rent ski packages, which include boots, skis and poles. If you later decide to buy your own gear, some stores will deduct from the purchase price the cost of up to three prior rentals. Beginners should make sure to get “classic” instead of “skate” skis. Before leaving the shop, try on the boots and verify that the skis and poles are an ap-

Recognizing trail symbols

&"4*&3

.03&%*''*$6-5

.045%*''*$6-5

In some cases, a one-word label provides additional information. If two beginner trails intersect, for example, one might bear a sign that reads “easiest.”

propriate length. Your comfort will encourage proper mechanics and help you enjoy the experience. Dress appropriately. Avoid cotton, which gets heavy and fails to insulate when wet. Make sure to wear gloves or mittens and a hat. If it’s snowing, consider donning goggles. Don’t forget to wear plenty of layers. Even in bitter cold, you’ll work up a sweat once you start moving.

Master the basics Experts are adamant that one or two professional lessons will provide a foundation that’s worth the money. “You’d be amazed how many people teach themselves how to ski, and after two years of skiing they’re still putting their poles on wrong,” Downing says. At Hoodoo (541-822-3799) or Mt. Bachelor (541-382-2442, ext. 2909), a family can buy trail passes, rent equipment and take lessons for less than the cost of downhill

Page 15


Get ready | NORDIC SKIING

Tips for beginners • Start on even ground. With your skis parallel and shoulder-width apart, use the toes of your right foot to push off from the ground and glide forward on your left ski. Now, use your left foot to push off and glide forward on your right ski. As you get comfortable, you’ll find a rhythm to this kick-and-glide movement. • Even a surface that looks flat to the naked eye has some humps and divots. To ski downhill, keep your knees bent and loose, as if you were sitting on the edge of a chair. Put your hands in front of you, with your elbows slightly bent and your poles lifted and pointing behind you. • Brake by pointing the tips of your skis toward each other, in a ‘V’, and pressing your heels outward. • There are several ways to get uphill. Keep your weight back and stomp to grip the snow with the scaled undersides of your skis. Or try the herringbone technique: Spread the tips of your skis apart, close the heels of your skis together and “duck walk” up the hill. In a pinch, turn both skis perpendicular to the hill and step sideways up the slope.

Page 16

lift tickets. Central Oregon Community College (541-383-7270) and the Bend Park & Recreation District (541-389-7275) also offer classes. A couple of times a year, Meissner Nordic volunteers offer free lessons at Virginia Meissner Sno-park (MeissnerNordic@gmail.com). Some ski shops offer free rentals on those dates. Many parents have no trouble teaching their young children to ski. But Downing discourages parents from teaching their teens. Likewise, he doesn’t think significant others should teach each other. “One of the worst things you can do in a relationship is try to teach something that’s skill-based,” he says. “When one person teaches another to ski, it helps not to have an emotional connection.” Simoneau offers another tip for parents who want to turn their children into skiing enthusiasts: Make it social. “If you get a group of friends out there and they’re having fun, they just want to keep coming back,” he says. When you venture out on your own, check maps and trail signs and opt for the shortest, easiest route to start. Don’t be embarrassed to sidestep up or down intimidating hills. And head inside in time to enjoy another nordic tradition: hot chocolate in front of a crackling fire. “Don’t overdo it,” Downing says. “If you have a positive experience the first time you ski, you’re more likely to try it again.” •

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


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Alternative medicine |

ACUPUNCTURE

What’s new in mainstream medicine? Acupuncture.

East meets West BY BETSY Q. CLIFF PHOTOS BY DEAN GUERNSEY

L

ast year, Bend Memorial Clinic did something that just a few years ago would have been rare in a mainstream medical practice. The area’s largest multi-specialty medical practice converted an office into an acupuncture room. There, on a recent day, Eric O’Malley lay face down on an acupuncture table under fluorescent lights softened by a layer of loosely draped sheets. Paper lanterns hung from the ceiling. Dr. Charlotte Lin, O’Malley’s primary care physician who is also an acupuncturist, stuck needles into his back, trying to alleviate his back pain. The 39-year-old Bend man said he hoped his back, worn from years of a “work hard, play hard” lifestyle, would feel less tense after the session. O’Malley doesn’t like taking medications, he said, but couldn’t stand the pain. He has friends who have felt better through acupuncture, and wanted to give it a try. “I went into it with a neutral point of view, but it turned out pretty good,” O’Malley said. He said he feels more relaxed, and his back much less tense, after each session.

His appointment demonstrates a phenomenon happening across Central Oregon and the nation. Over the past decade, and particularly the past five years, acupuncture has been moving from an alternative treatment to a part of mainstream medicine. In Central Oregon, it seems it’s popping up in unlikely places. For several years, an acupuncture practice has held space amid other medical practices in the same building as The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research. Central Oregon Acupuncture, a local clinic, opened an office there last year and often gets referrals from physicians in the building, said Jennifer Cochrane, an acupuncturist at the clinic. St. Charles Health System, which operates most of the hospitals in the region, has two acupuncturists on staff in its rehabilitation department and is running a clinical trial to assess whether acupuncture helps ameliorate the side effects of chemotherapy for some cancer patients. “I’ve been in Bend for nine years, and I’ve seen a huge shift” in attitude, said Cochrane. She said it used to be that when she said she was an acupuncturist, people would look at her askance. “I’ve been called a witch a couple times.” These days, that reaction is rare. “Now it’s more like, ‘Oh my girlfriend did that, she had good results.’ Or, ‘I’ve been reading about that.’” Part of the shift no doubt has to do with the skyrocketing popular-

“If (patients) are doing it, we have some responsibility to make sure that what they are doing has some benefits. ... I think that’s the main driving force in traditional medicine looking at this.” Dr. Russ Omizo, a radiation oncologist at St. Charles Bend RIGHT: Shelly Hopple gets treatment for headache pain from Jennifer Cochrane.

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Meridians and qi

• In traditional Chinese medicine, the body’s energy, or “qi” (chee), is believed to run through the body along pathways called meridians. • Blockages along these meridians are thought to cause disease due to an imbalance of qi. • The body has at least 2,000 acupuncture points through which a practitioner is able to access blocked qi.

Meridian channels

Some conditions acupuncture treats: • Fibromyalgia • Headaches • Labor pains • Back pain • Menstrual cramps • Osteoarthritis • Postoperative dental pain • Tennis elbow

Alternative medicine | ACUPUNCTURE ity of acupuncture. Between 1997 and 2007, the number of patient visits to an acupuncturist nearly tripled nationally, according to a recent publication from the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2007, more than 3 million people said they saw an acupuncturist, spending $827 million out-of-pocket on visits. The big questions are why, and whether it has helped improve people’s health.

Changing attitudes Judy Harbin, a 63-year-old Bend resident, has been using acupuncture on and off for eight years. She has a number of medical problems, including fibromyalgia and joint pain. Her right ankle degraded so far that it has been replaced by an artificial joint. She couldn’t walk well, she said, and was uncomfortable nearly all the time. Eventually, she said, she just got tired of taking pain pills. “They just make your head fuzzy; they don’t make the pain disappear,” she said. She went looking for something else. She was not initially drawn to acupuncture. “I thought it was New Agey, kind of woo woo, and I’m really pretty conservative,” she said. “But when you’ve tried all the other things … ” She gave it a shot and said it worked. She said it helps with her mood and the pain, especially in her ankles. She’s using it to try to avoid getting another ankle surgery, and she said she no longer takes pain medications. Harbin’s experience of getting results from acupuncture has been repeated by other patients thousands of times over. It’s this kind of success story, relayed over coffee or cocktails, that brings in more patients. And it gets doctors to start thinking about the practice. Dr. Russ Omizo, a radiation oncologist at St. Charles Bend, said he “had some resistance to it,” when he was first exposed to the idea of acupuncture to treat side effects in oncology. He said hearing anecdotal experiences and reading about evidence of its efficacy helped change his mind. “I’ve had some patients who have been happy.” He is now the principal investigator in the St. Charles clinical trial looking at whether acupuncture may help chemotherapy patients. The increase in popularity of acupuncture has really been “consumer driven,” said Rob Mills, an acupuncturist at Bend Community Acupuncture. It’s grown in popularity, he said, “not because doctors were referring, but because people were wanting it, and they were the ones taking it to their doctors.” As acupuncture gained acceptance, more insurance companies started paying for it, sometimes seeing it as a cheaper alternative to expensive medications. That brought more people through the doors. And mainstream medical researchers started to pay attention. “More and more we are all realizing that our patients are doing it, so if they are doing it, we have some responsibility to make sure that what they are doing has some benefits and doesn’t have any side effects,” said Omizo. “I think that’s the main driving force in traditional medicine looking at this.”

Does it work? Acupuncture is generally thought to have originated thousands of years ago in China. It’s based on the principle that the body is healthy when its energy, sometimes called qi or chi, is in a balanced state. Source: Mayo Clinic, U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

© 2011 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Choosing an acupuncturist • Check license. To practice in Oregon, acupuncturists must be licensed by the state, unless they have another medical professional license, such as an M.D. You can verify someone’s license by searching by last name on the Oregon Medical Board’s website, www.oregon. gov/OMB. • Check certifications. The National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine certifies that acupuncturists have met minimum competencies for the profession. It is required to get a state license, and you can check to see if a practitioner is certified on the organization’s website, www.nccaom.org. • Ask what school the acupuncturist went to. All licensed acupuncturists who began practicing after 1998 must have graduated from an accredited program. Most schools have websites you can look at to understand the program. • Word of mouth. As with finding a physician, ask around. • Don’t trust a miracle worker. Acupuncture doesn’t work for all people or every problem. If someone suggests that acupuncture may treat a major disease, such as heart disease or cancer, he or she might be less than trustworthy.

An acupuncturist inserts small needles at specific points in the body, typically along meridians, lines along the body thought to channel energy. Acupuncturists say the needles stimulate the body to be able to heal itself. Because of the popularity of acupuncture, many researchers have spent considerable effort using Western scientific methods to try to determine if it works. Over the past 15 years, more than 600 clinical trials have been published on acupuncture, said Dr. Lixing Lao, director of the Program in Traditional Chinese Medicine Research at the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine. For most conditions, Lao said, the research is mixed. Only for nausea and vomiting, particularly as a result of medical treatment, is the evidence definitively positive, he said. Nevertheless, Lao is an advocate for acupuncture, particularly for certain conditions such as pain, which is a notoriously intractable problem for many patients and the most common reason they see an acupuncturist. “Acupuncture works better (than pain medications) and has no side effects,” he said. Many of the mixed results, he said, come from issues inherent in the acupuncture

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

Dr. Charlotte Lin, a physician and acupuncturist at Bend Memorial Clinic, works on patient Eric O’Malley’s back during a recent acupuncture session.

studies. Most studies are set up with patients randomized to one of three categories: acupuncture, sham acupuncture or no treatment. Sham acupuncture might be done by inserting needles at non-acupuncture points or by pricking the skin but not inserting needles. In one study, toothpicks were twirled on the skin to simulate acupuncture. Often such studies will find that there is no difference in the sham versus real acupuncture groups. This may be the biggest criticism leveled against the practice. “I originally thought there might be something to it,” said Dr. David Gorski, a surgeon at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit and managing editor of the blog Science-Based Medicine. “The more I read about it, the more I research, the more I think (acupuncture is) nothing more than a fancy placebo.” But Lao maintains that when the sham controls are well done, studies show a difference. He said sham treatments that use needles are not appropriate, because a needle placed anywhere stimulates the body in some way. When nothing is stuck in the body, he said, more studies show a difference between the real and sham treatments.

He said research has only just matured to the point where study protocols are standardized. And there is still a lot of research into whether acupuncture works for certain conditions. The St. Charles clinical trial, being conducted on head and neck cancer patients, is one example. During radiation treatment, Omizo said, head and neck cancer patients sometimes sustain damage to the glands that produce saliva. That can lead to a range of problems, from dry mouth to trouble swallowing, speaking and even kissing. The trial is meant to look at whether acupuncture could prevent or at least lessen this side effect. The study isn’t going well so far. In the year that it’s been open, only two patients have signed up. “Patients want to be on acupuncture,” said Dr. Archie Bleyer, an oncologist and medical director of clinical research for St. Charles Health System, who is also involved in the study. In other words, he said, they don’t want to take their chance in a study where they may be placed in the control group and therefore not receive acupuncture. The reaction shows how far public attitudes have come. Rather than being biased

Page 21


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about the dubious nature of the treatment, Bleyer said, patients don’t want to miss out.

Beyond meridians The other focus of research has been trying to explain exactly how acupuncture works. Beyond the Chinese explanation of meridians and energy flow, many Western physicians and patients have wanted an explanation based on scientific principles. Here, too, success has been incomplete, though there have been some interesting findings. “There have been some pretty good studies that show that when you put needles in someone, it stimulates nerves,” said Dr. Larry Paulson, a physician and licensed acupuncturist at The Center. Those nerves, he said, send signals to the brain, which then releases chemicals that mitigate pain. It produces a similar effect to giving opioid pain relievers. In one experiment, researchers gave people medications that blocked the effect of opioids on the brain. Acupuncture did not produce any pain relief in those people. Studies using brain scans have found activity in areas that mediate pain during and after acupuncture treatments, further bolstering the case that the practice somehow acts on that system in the body. Acupuncture proponents also say it can decrease inflammation and boost hormones that fight depression. Here, however, the evidence is weaker, and researchers in large part have to answer that they really don’t know exactly how acupuncture works or why. The mechanism of acupuncture is “a tough question,” said Lao. Research is in the early stages, he said. That we cannot describe a clear mechanism of action bothers skeptics like Gorski. In most other areas of medicine, physicians and scientists have a fairly clear idea of why one intervention or one medication might work. “How can it work for so many diseases that have so many different mechanisms?” Gorski said, citing claims that acupuncture helps everything from infertility to inflammation. “The plausibility is being stretched to the breaking point.” Objections aside, the practice is unlikely to get less popular. The movement began at a time when it was even less well-studied than it is now, and shows no signs of abating. Shelly Hopple, a 31-year-old Bend resident, is a prime example. She began doing acupuncture about five years ago, when she started working as the office manager at Central Oregon Acupuncture. She used to get terrible migraines associated with her menstrual cycle, she said. It’s so bad that “I have to stay in bed. I can’t have light; I can’t have noise; I just sleep all day.” Medications knocked her out, she said, and gave her a hangover that lasted into the next day. Acupuncture offered relief. Now, she gets regular acupuncture, and the migraines have largely stopped. “It kind of regulates everything to where I just don’t get them,” she said. She said the acupuncture has helped her tremendously. “Patients vote with their feet,” said Lao. “In the last few years, acupuncture has gotten more popular with very little evidence. Now we have more evidence, there’s no reason to go back.” •

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FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Picture this |

HOW BIG IS A PORTION?

Quick measure Give yourself a hand with portion control

End of a finger = about 1 teaspoon of butter

BY ANDY ZEIGERT

F

or most eaters, measuring or weighing every morsel is impractical. To keep from over- or undereating, many experts suggest comparing food portions to everyday objects. And what’s more everyday than the human hand? Because hand sizes can vary wildly, remember that these are general estimates. Practice comparing your own hand dimensions to measured amounts. Soon you’ll be portioning like a pro. •

One handful = about 1-2 ounces of chips or nuts Palm of a hand (minus fingers) = about 3 ounces of meat

End of a thumb = about 1 tablespoon of salad dressing Whole thumb = about 1 ounce of cheese

A closed fist = about 1 cup of fruits or vegetables Source: WeightWatchers Image: Thinkstock

HIGH DESERT PULSE

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Sorting it out |

FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNTS

BY BETSY Q. CLIFF

F

all is a crucial time for planning to use a flexible spending account for medical expenses. At the end of the year, employees are asked to sign up and to decide how much money to set aside from their take-home pay for the next calendar year. Local experts say a growing number of employers are using flexible spending accounts to help employees pay for out-of-pocket health costs. If you have never used this type of account, or if you’re wondering how to make the best use of it, here are some tips.

Flex

What is a flexible spending account? Often called an FSA, these accounts are essentially your agreement as an employee to have a portion of each paycheck withheld to pay for upcoming medical costs. And you won’t be taxed on the amount you have deducted. • How does it work? Money is withheld regularly throughout the year but is available as soon as you need it to cover qualifying expenses. That means you can ask for reimbursement for up to the entire annual amount as early as January (if you have medical expenses) though it won’t all come out of your paychecks until December.

your medical spending muscle

• Can I sign up? It’s not something just anyone can sign up for; your employer must choose to offer an FSA. Why should I use

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FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


an FSA? Carolyn Jarschke, president of the local benefit administrator QVI Risk Solutions, tells people an FSA should be used by anyone who spends money on health care and who wants to pay less in taxes. • Should I worry about a smaller paycheck? Jarschke is surprised by how few people use FSAs — typically only 10 to 12 percent of employees. She thinks people worry about the initial reduction in pay. But because of the tax savings, an FSA can actually result in more money in your pocket. Though savings would vary by tax situation, let’s take the example of a married person with no kids. If the gross income for that couple is $50,000, and they put $2,000 into an FSA, their taxable income is now $48,000 and their federal tax bill will decrease by about $450, according to a calculator from the health insurer Aetna.

amount extra for an unexpected injury. Even if you put in too little, you will have saved some money by paying for part of your medical expenses through the FSA. • What can I expense? In general, an FSA is for medical expenses. That includes deductibles and co-pays required by your insurance, though not monthly insurance premiums. The list of what the Internal Revenue Service considers a qualified medical expense is long and includes artificial limbs, acupuncture, crutches, orthodontic services, modifications to a home for someone who is disabled and even lodging when the purpose of the trip is medical. (Before this year, over-the-counter medications qualified for reimbursement, but now only those OTC medications that are also prescribed qualify.)

How do I get my money? How much should I save in my FSA? No one can know exactly how much medical care will cost, and one surprise sickness or injury can cost thousands of dollars. “You have to look at your history,” said Patrick O’Keefe, an owner at Cascade Insurance Center in Bend. If you know you need an eye exam, or you pay out of pocket for routine dental care, figure out those expenses. You can use an FSA for medical costs incurred by a spouse or dependents, so figure in their costs, too. • What about the leftover money? Any funds left in the FSA at the end of the year stays with the employer, so experts said not to go overboard. “You do want to be conservative,” said O’Keefe, who suggests totaling the expenses you’re pretty sure about, and perhaps putting in a small

Most times all you’ll need to do is submit a receipt for the service or purchase to the plan administrator and you will be reimbursed. But each employer can have different rules, so the best thing to do is check with your benefits administrator or human resources department about the particulars of your plan. • What if I still have a lot left over? Well before the end of the year, go back over receipts and make sure you’ve submitted all expenses. If it looks as if you’ll still have money left over, consider getting that backup pair of eyeglasses you’ve been wanting or that dental crown you’ve been putting off. Even if you don’t spend all of it, don’t worry. If you spend most of it, there’s a good chance you’ll at least break even because of the tax savings.•

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Page 27


Get gear |

SPORT WATCHES

Which workout watch? BY MARKIAN HAWRYLUK, PHOTOS BY RYAN BRENNECKE

I

t used to be watches had only two functions to help athletes measure their performance: time for the faster athletes, and date for the slower ones. Today’s sport watches have become so sophisticated, they can tell you not only how long you’ve been at it, but how far you’ve come, both literally and fig-

uratively. These new wrist-top computers can wirelessly collect information from a heart rate monitor, a bike cadence sensor or even satellites orbiting the earth. It’s also allowed watch makers to tailor watches to your particular sport of choice. Now that’s a real sign of the times.

MOUNTAINEERING » Suunto Core Multifunction, REI, $249

Alpinists will appreciate this combination of an altimeter, barometer and compass to help you track your progress and find your way. A unique “start from zero” feature simplifies the use of the altimeter to track elevation gain, eliminating the need to set your starting altitude from a known reference point. The watch senses when you’ve stopped moving and switches automatically from altimeter to barometer mode, warning you of impending changes in weather. Check the sunrise and sunset times, ensuring you don’t run out of daylight before you make it back to base camp.

WATER SPORTS » Casio Pathfinder PAW1500-1V Multifunction Watch, REI, $310

This watch automatically calibrates with the atomic clock time signals and recharges with solar power. That should keep you on top of high and low tides, which it provides for you as well. Not just waterproof, this watch functions underwater to a depth of 200 meters. With a compass, altimeters, barometer and thermometer, it can handle your dry land adventures as well. Page 28

HIGH DESERT PULSE


« TRIATHLON Timex Ironman Global Trainer GPS Sport Watch, REI, $169.93

A GPS-enabled watch specifically designed for the triathlete, this timepiece automatically shifts from one display to another as you start each leg of the triathlon. The watch connects wirelessly to a heart-rate monitor and a bike cadence and speed monitor to help guide your workouts and track your progress. GPS tracking includes a “bread crumb” mode that records your route and tells you how to get back to your starting point.

« RUNNING Garmin Forerunner 610, FootZone, $399

Don’t have a partner to compete with? This watch allows you to run against a virtual race partner. Enter your times from your last run and check to see whether you’re running faster or slower than your former self. A touch bezel around the watch makes scrolling through the various screens easy and is designed to work well even when your fingers get a touch sweaty. Track your time and route with GPS and your calories burned based on heart rate changes. And when you’re done, download the data wirelessly and use Garmin’s website to analyze and track your training.

« CYCLING Polar Cycling Computer Heart Rate Monitor CS300, $220, Sunnyside Sports

No need to keep raising your arm to check your watch while cycling; this watch straps onto a bracket on your handlebars, providing bike computer-type functionality that doubles as a fitness timepiece after you unclip from the pedals. Monitor your heart rate or cadence, track your speed and distance, and estimate how long till you reach the brewpub with an estimated time of arrival function. And in case you’re training for the Tour de France, it will display messages in French, Italian or Spanish. Vive le tour! • • FALL / WINTER 2011

Page 29


RUNNING PAST ALL OTHERS

Max King’s running accolades in recent years include these victories: • World Mountain Running Championships in Albania • Xterra Trail Run World Championships on Oahu • USATF National Trail Marathon in Ashland • USATF National Trail 50K in Bend race in Colorado • American River 50-miler in California. FIRST PLACE, AGAIN

King also took 40th in the World Cross Country Championship in Spain

The World Mountain Running Championships in September in Albania, where King placed first.

A year in the life: Max King’s 2011 race touring schedule Jan. 15: 8K (San Francisco) Feb. 5: 12K (San Diego) March 20: 12K (Spain) April 9: 10-mile (Medford) April 17: Marathon, pacer (London) April 23: 15K (Gates, Ore.) May 2: 10-mile (Syracuse, N.Y.) May 14: 50K (Corvallis) June 4-5: 10K, 13-mile (Vail, Colo.) June 26: 12K (North Conway, N.H.)

— widely considered one of the most competitive distance races in the world ...

July 9: 50K (Ashland) July 17-23: Running Camp (Steens Mountain) Aug. 14: 17-mile (Switzerland) Aug. 21-26: 120-mile, six-day Stage Race (Colorado) Sept. 11: 12K (Albania) Sept. 24: 50K (Bend) Sept. 25: 13-mile (Ogden, Utah) Oct. 2: 10-mile (Minneapolis) Dec. 4: 13-mile (Oahu, Hawaii) Dec. 10: 10K (Portland)

Goal: Jan. 14, 2012: Olympic Trials in Houston

SUBMITTED PHOTO BY RICHARD BOLT

• TransRockies six-day


How does he do it? |

MAX KING

Bend’s running King BY ANNE AURAND

H

ere’s how most people see Max King: a 31-year-old, 5-foot-6-inch, 135-pound blur of muscles and veins, feet churning over boulders and grassy tussocks, arms like propellers, leading a pack of runners. Here’s how King supports his running: balancing atop a stepladder, stacking athletic shoes into vacant spots on ceiling-high shelves at FootZone. Last winter, the nationally ranked running phenom quit his job as a biochemical engineer for Bend Research and took a job at the running shoe store “to make it so my life revolved around running,” he said. Until then, the 2002 Cornell University graduate’s work had involved growing cells. “It’s really kind of interesting,” he said, as though that were surprising. But it certainly wasn’t his passion, and he wanted to focus more on training, to reach new heights in his running. “I never really liked math that much,” he said. “A career in engineering? What was I thinking?” King said he doesn’t miss the mental stimulation of the engineering job, because he’s still researching a lot. Now he’s studying nutrition and training, for personal use and to share with other runners. He loves this life. But “running doesn’t pay well,” he said. A professional road racer might earn $30,000 a year from a running career, but a trail runner — his specialty — earns less, he said. So he pieces together prize money, financial sponsorships by two high-profile gear companies, Montrail and Mountain Hardware, and some income from private coaching.

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

Besides the fact that his wife, Dory King, still works at Bend Research, what makes ends meet is his part-time job at FootZone as a footwear buyer and “community running ambassador.” The job allows him the flexibility to train, travel and race. Training alone can consume some 30 hours a week. King admits that he’s tired. And it’s hard sometimes to be away from his family so much. He and Dory have a 2-year-old son, Micah. Last summer, King was gone four weeks, plus many weekends, traveling to races. He’s been to Europe four times this year. “I feel way busier than when I had a fulltime job,” he said. “It sounds one-dimensional,” he said of his life. “But I think of it as different aspects of something that I’m passionate about,” King said. “Some of my job is community-based, some competition-based, and some helping to run a business, but it all relates back to running.” Locals might see the soft-spoken, boyish, brown-haired runner discussing therapy techniques with FootZone customers suffering from foot pain. Or they might learn techniques from him at his free, weekly performance training group, open to anyone who wants to get faster. King also volunteers for the Central Oregon Running Klub’s (CORK) youth group a couple of nights a week when he’s not traveling. Peter Hatton, a CORK coach, said King, who has traveled to races to support

the young runners, helps at practices and inspires the kids immensely. “You don’t find a lot of world-class runners running beside middle schoolers,” Hatton said. “While they look up to him, I don’t think they hold him in awe. They treat him as a friend. In some ways, he’s just a big kid.” King’s lighthearted laughter permeated a CORK practice at Riverbend Park on a latesummer evening. Joining about 18 runners who appeared between 7 and 14 years old, he pointed to an older girl. “You lead. Go!” They ran a warm-up lap. Then they circled up, and King led stretches and strengthening drills. The smallest guy in the group claimed the space next to King. With knees bent into a squat, the runners tossed a football around the circle, but the boy next to King fumbled it. He picked it up and tossed to Max, who feigned clumsiness and dropped the ball too. Laughter erupted. Everyone dropped into a plank pose, a tough strength-building exercise, held for 90 seconds. The boy complained. King called playfully: “When there’s whining my watch stops!” Then he reached over and pushed the boy to the ground. The kid was beaming. Jessica Cornett, a ninth-grader at Summit High School, said in the three years King has coached her, she’s learned what to eat and drink before practices and races. She’s learned about form and strategy. “He is such a fun coach,” Cornett said. King shares his time and knowledge with young runners because he remembers how

See Max run Watch a short (but spectacular) video of “Max King, soul runner,” flying over trails in the French Alps at www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTOeBy9V-bk. Page 31


How does he do it? | MAX KING valuable a similar program was for him when he was that age, growing up in Central Point, in Southern Oregon. And, he remembers how running success boosted his confidence at what can be a sensitive age. So, if he got picked on — when people teased him with the nickname “maxi-pad,” for example — “it didn’t really matter,” he said. “I was a quiet kid in middle school,” he said. “In high school, I was a runner and good at it, and that gave me confidence to talk to people and make friends that I might not have made without running.” His career launched in seventh grade, when, he said with a demure smile, “I ran a P.E. mile and crushed everyone.” He was terrible at baseball and basketball — no hand-eye coordination, he said. He had been on the C-team in basketball, and they lost every game. He said he was a “so-so” runner in high school and college, until his last year at Cornell when he earned All-America honors in the 3,000-meter steeplechase, a long track run with hurdles and a water jump. However, by graduation, he was burned out on running. So he took a year off, moved to Bend, started his engineering career and married Dory, whom he had met in engineering school. It took only a year to miss running. So he started his comeback, experimenting with different kinds of races, such as off-road triathlons and adventure races, which can be

When he’s not halfway around the world, Max King volunteers for the Central Oregon Running Klub’s youth group. Says a CORK coach: “You don’t find a lot of world-class runners running beside middle schoolers.” Here, King works with young runners at Riverbend Park in August.

any number of distances and include other activities such as biking, kayaking or rope climbing. And that’s when his running really started to peak. What King is best known for is his strength over so many disciplines, said FootZone owner Teague Hatfield. He doesn’t specialize in any one kind of race; he’ll compete in cross-country runs, track and road races and dirt-trail ultramarathons. He’s got an impressive three-page list of running accolades in a potpourri of events. Right now he’s training for the Olympic marathon trials in Janu-

ary, aiming for the 2012 London Olympics. “I’m betting it’s going to take 2:10 or better to make the team,” King said. His best marathon time was 2:15 — two hours and 15 minutes — when he placed sixth in the Baltimore Marathon last year. Hatfield said King is not just a good runner — he’s an all-around good guy, too. He goes to church. He doesn’t swear. He’s nice to customers. “He’s just such a relatively mellow, kind person. I don’t think people expect that from someone who competes as hard as he does.

Dr. Peter M. Yonan, DMD

Page 32

Dr. Anne Scott, DMD

Dr. David Dunscombe, DDS

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


PHOTOS BY ROB KERR

“He runs like it’s the last day he’ll get to run. Every day he does it because he loves it.” Katie Caba, a friend and fellow runner

King was a biochemical engineer for Bend Research until he took a part-time job at FootZone, the running shoe store downtown, last year. Part of his job is passing on what he knows about the sport to his customers.

You’d expect him to have a harsher side. I’ve seen no sign of that,” Hatfield said. “Also, he obviously really enjoys … a bustling life and a crazy traveling schedule, and … he’s just tough.” Jeff and Katie Caba, a couple of successful local runners who know King socially, have taken his performance training sessions and have competed in many of the same races he has. They admire King’s generosity with his knowledge. They’re also intrigued by what they describe as his unconventional approach to training. For example, on the

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

night before a half-marathon last summer, he competed in a 5K and 10K track race, which is unheard of, Jeff said. “He wants to win, but not at the expense of having a good time or experiencing something else,” Jeff said. “It was a new challenge for him and allowed him to run some other races, and he still came back and won the half-marathon.” “He runs like it’s the last day he’ll get to run. Every day he does it because he loves it,” Katie said. And, he doesn’t take himself too seriously,

she added. He wore a pink running skort in the TransRockies in the summer. “That’s just Max being Max,” Katie said. “He doesn’t want the rest of us to take him too seriously, either.” One year, he ran (and won) the Horse Butte 10-mile trail run, southeast of Bend, in cutoff jeans and a cowboy hat. “I couldn’t figure out how to make the cowboy boots work,” King said, a glimmer of his inner engineer surfacing. “I warmed up in the cowboy boots, and it didn’t work so well. I’m trying to figure out how to put a rubber sole on a bottom, remove the heel. Then I think it would work.” Why would he even want to try? “You can’t take things so seriously,” he said. In the venues where he trains and competes, people are pretty intense. “I like to make it fun.” King said what motivates him “is simply being faster than other people … This was the talent that I was given and am trying to do the best I can with. I love competition and finding out what I’m made out of and what I’m capable of.” •

Page 33


On the job |

DOSIMETRISTS

Going after the body’s bad guys In radiation therapy for cancer, the trick is to get the dose just right BY BETSY Q. CLIFF PHOTOS BY RYAN BRENNECKE

“T

his is the war room,” says Deb Clevenger about her office at St. Charles Bend. It doesn’t look like it. We’re inside a nondescript room in the hospital’s cancer center. The computers are state-of-the-art, but otherwise we might well be in any one of the thousands of offices in Central Oregon.

Yet for cancer patients who need radiation treatment, Clevenger and her co-worker Bonnie Geohagan are like battlefield generals. They are the hospital’s two medical dosimetrists. Their job is to figure out how best to deliver a radiation dose to kill a patient’s cancer with as little collateral damage as possible. “This is where the strategic planning takes place for going after someone’s tumor” with radiation, Clevenger said. In the body, “you’ve got good guys and bad guys. And

Dosimetrist Bonnie Geohagan examines a patient’s file and calculates the radiation dose for the next round of therapy. “It’s fairly high stress,” says her colleague at St. Charles Bend, Deb Clevenger. “You can’t make a mistake.”

Page 34

our job is figure out how to go after the bad guys and not the good guys.” Dosimetrists (pronounced doe-SIM-i-trists) are part of the radiation oncology team that also includes a radiation oncologist who directs the treatment, a medical physicist who is in charge of technical aspects of radiation, and the radiation therapist who actually administers the radiation to the patient. Dosimetrists take recommendations from the radiation oncologist and plan how the radiation equipment will be used to target a person’s cancer. They must calculate the dose of radiation as well as how it will be beamed into the body. It’s an obscure but growing profession. There are about 3,100 certified medical dosimetrists in the United States, according to the Medical Dosimetry Certification Board. Ten years ago, there were just over 1,000. The average starting salary is about $90,000 per year. The job requires at least an associate degree and work experience, though many people go through training in one of 16 postgraduate programs scattered around the country. The standards are becoming more rigid. In 2013, anyone who wants to sit for a certifying exam will need a bachelor’s degree, and by 2017 candidates will need to complete an accredited postgraduate program. The closest program to Central Oregon is at Bellevue College in Washington state. Courses for the degree include algebra, precalculus, anatomy, bioethics and several physics courses. “You really do have to like your math and science,” Clevenger said. Clevenger, now 55, was a college student working in a hospital radiology department

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Gene McMullen receives radiation therapy for rectal cancer at St. Charles Bend recently. A dosimetrist plans out the dosage and method for delivering radiation to cancer patients. They aim to hit the cancer directly with as little damage as possible to surrounding organs.

when a physician “plucked me out of cellular biology class,” she said. Back then, radiation therapists did dosimetry as well, and the specialized training programs or certifications did not exist. She got most of her training on the job and was officially certified in 1993. She moved to Bend about seven years ago to work at St. Charles Bend. Dosimetrists need to understand how the body handles radiation. One of their primary roles is to know how much radiation each part of the body can tolerate so that the radiation can be directed away from more sensitive areas. Every part of the body has different limitations, Geohagan said. “The radiation that the spinal cord can get and not be damaged is much less than what the (bladder) can get.” Then, they have to factor in how a patient’s movements could affect the targeting of radiation. The chest, for example, will

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

“This is where the strategic planning takes place for going after someone’s tumor. ... Our job is figure out how to go after the (body’s) bad guys and not the good guys.” Deb Clevenger, St. Charles dosimetrist

move by fractions of an inch each time a patient breathes. Dosimetrists need to know how that will alter the position of the tumor and how to compensate for that. They need to do it exactly right for each patient. Though there are various checks in the process, a slip could risk ineffective treatment or even harm. “It’s fairly high stress,” Clevenger said.

“You can’t make a mistake.” Both St. Charles dosimetrists said it’s ultimately rewarding. “You actually see the changes that are happening” in people as they are treated, Geohagan said. In the past few years, radiation technology has improved, which has made a dosimetrist’s job better and more complex. “We are able to drive our doses, get higher doses to the tumor areas and spare the normal areas by doing a lot of multi-beams,” Geohagan said. “We are able to offer them a better course of treatment.” That means, she said, that they spend more time planning each patient’s course and calibrating the sophisticated equipment now at their disposal. “It’s given us a lot of ways of approaching the problem that we didn’t have before,” Clevenger said. “You can be quite clever with how you get something. It’s changed the whole battlefield.” •

Page 35


Healthy eating |

CALORIE-CONSCIOUS RECIPES

Holiday desserts (Hold the weight gain) BY ANNE AURAND

I

t’s getting close to that social and festive time of year when responsible eating becomes challenging. The holidays are notorious for indulgent parties and fattening desserts. Research shows the average weight gain this time of year is between 1 and 5 pounds — or more. It’s important to stay healthy, but it’s also important to enjoy what the season has to offer. RanDee Anshutz, a registered dietitian at St. Charles Bend, says the holidays are not the time to try to lose weight. Instead, she recommends setting a goal to enjoy time with friends and family and avoid gaining weight. Next time you’re in charge of dessert, try one of these lighter alternatives to help you meet both goals. •

Page 36

Pumpkin Rolls Makes 10 servings. Nuts are often included in this recipe provided by registered dietitian RanDee Anshutz, because they contain nutrients and healthy fats. “But after a holiday dinner, it’s not necessary to try and get additional protein or healthy fats. So the lower-calorie yet delicious recipe is more ideal.” ⁄4 C powdered sugar ⁄4 C all-purpose whole wheat flour 1 ⁄2 tsp baking soda 1 ⁄2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 ⁄2 tsp ground cloves 1 ⁄4 tsp salt 1 lg egg 3 egg whites 1 3

⁄4 C sugar 1 C pure canned pumpkin 6 oz Neufchatel, or low-fat cream cheese 1 ⁄2 C powdered sugar 3 TBS butter 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 C raisins 3

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cover jelly roll pan (a flat, rimmed baking sheet) with parchment paper. Sprinkle a clean kitchen towel with 1⁄4 C powdered sugar. Set aside. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves and salt in small bowl. Set aside. Beat egg, egg whites and sugar in large mixing bowl until medium thick foam builds. Beat in pumpkin. Stir in flour mixture. Spread evenly onto the parchment paper. Bake 13-15 minutes. Remove cake from oven and turn it onto the towel with the powdered sugar. Peel off the parchment paper. Roll the cake and the towel lengthwise. Set aside to cool. Beat Neufchatel, remaining powdered sugar, butter and vanilla extract in small bowl until smooth. Carefully unroll the cake; remove the towel. Spread Neufchatel mixture over the cake. Sprinkle on the raisins. Re-roll the cake. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 1 hour. Slice, serve, enjoy! Nutrition per serving: calories 252.5; fat 8.3 g; saturated fat 4.9 g; cholesterol 40.8 mg; sodium 240.6 mg; carbohydrate 41.8 g; protein 5.5 g

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Berry Cheesecake Parfait Makes 4 servings. A healthy alternative to cheesecake, easy to prepare and meant for those on low-sugar diets. It’s one of many recipes suggested as part of Bend Memorial Clinic’s TotalCare ENERGY weight loss program. Adapted from a recipe in Diabetes Forecast magazine. 1 (1 oz) pkg sugar-free, fat-free cheesecake pudding mix 2 C nonfat milk 11⁄2 C raspberries and/or blueberries 4 TBS fat-free whipped topping 4 TBS sliced almonds, toasted

Mint Fudge Tart “I have made this recipe many times for my family, and it is always a big hit,” says Eris Craven, a registered dietitian at Bend Memorial Clinic. “I usually get more than 10 servings from it, which cuts the calories per serving even more.” Adapted from a recipe in Cooking Light.

Crust: 32 reduced-fat chocolate wafer cookies, finely crushed 2 TBS butter or stick margarine, melted 1 lg egg white

Filling: ⁄3 C unsweetened cocoa 1 (14 oz) can fat-free sweetened condensed milk 1 ⁄2 C (4 oz) 1⁄3-less-fat cream cheese, softened 1 ⁄4 C fat-free chocolate sundae syrup (such as Smucker’s) 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 ⁄4 tsp mint extract 2 lg eggs 1

PHOTOS BY RYAN BRENNECKE

Topping: 8 crème de menthe chocolaty mint thins (such as Andes) 11⁄2 C frozen reduced-calorie whipped topping, thawed

In a medium bowl, whisk together pudding mix and milk for 2 minutes. In a parfait dish, layer 1⁄4 C pudding and 2 TBS berries. Repeat process once more and top with 1 TBS whipped topping and 1 TBS toasted almonds. Repeat this procedure for remaining three parfaits. Chill and serve.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. To prepare the crust, combine the first 3 ingredients in a bowl, and toss with a fork until moist. Firmly press the mixture into the bottom of a 9-inch springform pan. To prepare filling, beat cocoa and milk at medium speed of a mixer until blended. Add cream cheese; beat well. Add syrup, extracts and eggs; beat just until smooth. Pour mixture into prepared crust. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes or until set. (Do not overbake.) Cool completely on a wire rack. Cover and chill 4 hours. To prepare topping, shave long edge of mint thins using a vegetable peeler. Spread whipped topping over top and sprinkle with shaved mint thins.

Nutrition per serving: calories 135; fat 3 g; saturated fat 0.3 g; cholesterol 0 mg; sodium 400 mg; carbohydrate 22 g; protein 6 g

Nutrition per serving: calories 301; fat 9.9 g ; saturated fat 5.1 g; cholesterol 63 mg; sodium 185 mg; carbohydrate 44.5 g; protein 7.8 g

Fatigued? Stressed? Anxious? • Acupuncture • Naturopathic Primary Care • Intuitive Counseling • Massage Therapy • Self-Care Classes and Workshops

INTEGRATIVE CARE FOR YOUR MIND & BODY For Advertising Information Contact Kristin Morris, Account Executive

Most Insurance Accepted

Call for relief and a PLAN! 541-330-0334

Call 541.617.7855 kmorris@bendbulletin.com HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

Page 37


Get active |

CYCLOCROSS

PHOTOS BY ROB KERR

B

end hosted the 2010 and 2011 Cyclocross National Championships (pictured). Cyclocross is a spectator-friendly, multi-lap bike race on paved and unpaved terrain, featuring obstacles that require the rider to dismount and carry the bike across. The Nationals course, behind the Deschutes Brewery in the Old Mill District, will be the site of the U.S. Gran Prix of Cyclocross, Dec. 10-11. Ryan Trebon, of Bend, (see photos above and at right) will try to better his two-time second-place Nationals performance in this year’s Gran Prix. •

Page 38


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

2011 CENTRAL OREGON

ME DI C A L D IR E CTORY Yo u r S o u r c e f o r L o c a l H e a l t h S e r v i c e s a n d E x p e r t M e d i c a l P r o f e s s i o n a l s To list your medical office and/or physicians in the PULSE/Connections Medical Directory contact…

Kristin Morris, Account Executive The Bulletin 541.617.7855 • kmorris@bendbulletin.com Paid Advertising Supplement - Next Issue Deadlines November 14th, 2011

M E D I C A L B U S I N E S S E S B Y S P E C I A LT Y ADULT FOSTER CARE

Absolute Serenity Adult Foster Care

AESTHETIC SERVICES

DermaSpa at Bend Dermatology

ALZHEIMERS & DEMENTIA CARE

Clare Bridge Brookdale Senior Living

ASSISTED LIVING

Brookside Place

CANCER CARE

St. Charles Cancer Center

CARDIOLOGY

The Heart Center

CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY

Serenity Lane Treatment Center

COUNSELING & WELLNESS

Juniper Mountain Counseling & Wellness

DERMATOLOGY

Bend Dermatology Clinic

ENDOCRINOLOGY

Endocrinology Services NW

FAMILY MEDICINE

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

FAMILY MEDICINE

St. Charles Family Care - Sisters

FAMILY MEDICINE

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

FAMILY MEDICINE

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

FAMILY PRACTICE

Blue Star Naturopathic Clinic

FAMILY PRACTICE

High Lakes Health Care

GENERAL DENTISTRY

Coombe and Jones Dentistry

GENERAL DENTISTRY GENERAL SURGERY

119 N Rope Street • Sisters

541-588-6119

www.absoluteserenity.info

2705 NE Conners Drive • Bend

541-330-9139

www.bendderm.com

1099 NE Watt Way • Bend

541-385-4717

www.brookdaleliving.com

3550 SW Canal Blvd • Redmond

541-504-1600

www.ccliving.com

2100 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-6900

www.heartcentercardiology.com

601 NW Harmon Blvd • Bend

541-383-0844

www.serenitylane.org

334 NE Irving Ave, Ste 102 • Bend

541-617-0377

www.junipermountaincounseling.com

2747 NE Conners Drive • Bend

541-382-5712

www.bendderm.com

2084 NW Professional Court • Bend

541-317-5600

n/a

2695 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealth.org

615 Arrowleaf Trail • Sisters

541-549-1318

www.stcharleshealth.org

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

497 SW Century Drive, Ste 120 • Bend

541-389-6935

www.bluestarclinic.com

Locations in Bend & Sisters

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

774 SW Rimrock Way • Redmond

541-923-7633

www.coombe-jones.com

Masters of Dentistry

628 NW York Drive, Suite 101 • Bend

541-389-2300

www.mastersofdentistry.com

Surgical Associates of the Cascades

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

www.cosurgery.com

GENERAL SURGERY & OBESITY CARE

Cascade Obesity and General Surgery

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

www.cosurgery.com

GENERAL SURGERY, BARIATRICS, VEIN CARE

Advanced Specialty Care

2084 NE Professional Ct • Bend

541-322-5753

www.advancedspecialtycare.com

GYNECOLOGY

The Women’s Center of Central Oregon

1001 NW Canal Blvd • Redmond

541-504-7635

www.womenthatcare.com

HOSPICE/HOME HEALTH

Partners In Care

2075 NE Wyatt Ct. • Bend

541-382-5882

www.partnersbend.org

HOSPITAL

Mountain View Hospital

470 NE “A” Street • Madras

541-475-3882

www.mvhd.org

HOSPITAL

Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1201 NE Elm St • Prineville

541-447-6254

www.scmc.org

HOSPITAL

St. Charles Bend

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4321

www.stcharleshealth.org

HOSPITAL

St. Charles Redmond

1253 NE Canal Blvd • Redmond

541-548-8131

www.stcharleshealth.org

INTEGRATED MEDICINE

Center for Integrated Medicine

INTERNAL MEDICINE

Internal Medicine Associates of Redmond

INTERNAL MEDICINE

High Lakes Health Care

MEDICAL CLINIC

Bend Memorial Clinic

NEONATOLOGY

St. Charles Medical Group

NEUROLOGY

NorthStar Neurology

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

East Cascade Women’s Group, P.C.

ONCOLOGY–MEDICAL

St. Charles Medical Oncology

ONCOLOGY–RADIATION

St. Charles Radiation Oncology

916 SW 17th St, Ste 202 • Redmond

541-504-0250

www.centerforintegratedmed.com

236 NW Kingwood Avenue • Redmond

541-548-7134

www.imredmond.com

Locations in Bend & Sisters

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

Locations in Bend, Redmond & Sisters

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

2275 NE Doctors Drive, Ste 9 • Bend

541-330-6463

www.northstarneurology.com

213 NW Larch Ave, Suite B • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealth.org

2400 NE Neff Road, Ste A • Bend

541-389-3300

www.eastcascadewomensgroup.com

2100 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-7793

www.stcharleshealth.org


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

2011 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY M E D I C A L B U S I N E S S E S B Y S P E C I A L T Y C O N T. ORTHOPEDICS

Desert Orthopedics

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

ORTHOPEDICS, NEUROSURGERY & PHYSICAL MEDICINE

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

OSTEOPOROSIS

Deschutes Osteoporosis Center

2200 NE Neff Road, Suite 302 • Bend

541-388-3978

www.deschutesosteoporosiscenter.com

PALLIATIVE MEDICINE

St. Charles Medical Group

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

Deschutes Pediatric Dentistry

1475 SW Chandler Ave, Ste 202 • Bend

541-389-3073

www.deschuteskids.com

PHARMACY

HomeCare IV/CustomCare Rx

2065 NE williamson Court, Suite B • Bend

541-382-0287

www.homecareiv.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Alpine Physical Therapy & Spine Care

2275 NE Doctors Dr, #3 & 336 SW Cyber Dr, Ste 107

541-382-5500

www.alpinephysicaltherapy.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Healing Bridge Physical Therapy

PODIATRY

Cascade Foot Clinic

PODIATRY

Deschutes Foot & Ankle

PULMONARY CLINIC

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

RADIOLOGY

Central Oregon Radiology Associates, P.C.

REHABILITATION

St. Charles Medical Group

RHEUMATOLOGY

404 NE Penn Avenue • Bend

541-318-7041

www.healingbridge.com

Offices in Bend, Redmond & Prineville

541-388-2861

n/a

2084 NE Professional Ct • Bend

541-504-1400

wwww.deschutesfootandankle.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealth.org

1460 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-9383

www.corapc.com

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

Deschutes Rheumatology

2200 NE Neff Road, Suite 302 • Bend

541-388-3978

n/a

SENIOR CARE HOME

Central Oregon Adult Foster Care

1532 NW Jackpine Avenue • Redmond

541-548-6631

n/a

SLEEP MEDICINE

St. Charles Sleep Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-6905

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

VEIN SPECIALTY

Inovia Vein Specialty Center

2200 NE Neff Road, Ste 204 • Bend

541-382-8346

www.bendvein.com

M E D I C A L P R O F E S S I O N A L S B Y S P E C I A LT Y ALLERGY & ASTHMA

ADAM WILLIAMS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

2275 NE Doctors Drive, Ste 9 • Bend

541-330-6463

www.northstarneurology.com

ALZHEIMERS/DEMENTIA & GERIATRIC NEUROLOGY

FRANCENA ABENDROTH, MD

NorthStar Neurology

BARIATRIC & GENERAL SURGERY

STEPHEN ARCHER, MD, FACS

Advanced Specialty Care

2084 NE Professional Court • Bend

541-322-5753

www.advancedspecialtycare.com

D. SCOTT DIAMOND, MD, FACS

Advanced Specialty Care

2084 NE Professional Court • Bend

541-322-5753

www.advancedspecialtycare.com

NGOCTHUY HUGHES, DO, PC

Cascade Obesity and General Surgery

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

www.cosurgery.com

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

JEAN BROWN, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

THOMAS COMBS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

HEIDI CRUISE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICK KOCH, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GAVIN L. NOBLE, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

STEPHANIE SCOTT, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JASON WEST, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

1345 NW Wall St, Ste 202 • Bend

541-318-1000

www.bendwellnessdoctor.com

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

RYAN C. DIX, PsyD CARDIOLOGY

CHIROPRACTIC

JASON M. KREMER, DC, CCSP, CSCS

Wellness Doctor

DERMATOLOGY

ALYSSA ABBEY, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JAMES M. HOESLY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GERALD E. PETERS, MD, DS (Mohs)

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANN M. REITAN, PA-C (Mohs)

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ENDOCRINOLOGY

MARY F. CARROLL, MD


2011 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

ENDOCRINOLOGY CONT.

RICK N. GOLDSTEIN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

TONYA KOOPMAN, FNP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PATRICK McCARTHY, MD

Endocrinology Services NW

2084 NW Professional Court • Bend

541-317-5600

n/a

TRAVIS MONCHAMP, MD

Endocrinology Services NW

2084 NW Professional Court • Bend

541-317-5600

n/a

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

FAMILY MEDICINE

CAREY ALLEN, MD

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

HEIDI ALLEN, MD

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

THOMAS L. ALLUMBAUGH, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

KATHLEEN C. ANTOLAK, MD

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SADIE ARRINGTON, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

865 SW Veterans Way • Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JOSEPH BACHTOLD, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2695 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealth.org

JOSEPH BACHTOLD, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Sisters

615 Arrowleaf Trail • Sisters

541-549-1318

www.stcharleshealth.org

EDWARD BIGLER, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7714

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

JEFFREY P. BOGGESS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BRANDON W. BRASHER, PA-C

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

SHANNON K. BRASHER, PA-C

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

MEGAN BRECKE, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2695 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealth.org

NANCY BRENNAN, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2695 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealth.org

WILLIAM C. CLARIDGE, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

LINDA C. CRASKA, MD

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

AMY DELOUGHREY, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JAMES K. DETWILER, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

MAREN J. DUNN, DO

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

THOMAS N. ERNST, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

MAY S. FAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

231 East Cascades Avenue • Sisters

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JAMIE FREEMAN, PA-C

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7714

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

STUART G. GARRETT, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MARK GONSKY, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2695 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealth.org

STEVE GREER, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2695 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealth.org

STEVE GREER, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Sisters

615 Arrowleaf Trail • Sisters

541-549-1318

www.stcharleshealth.org

ALAN C. HILLES, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

865 SW Veterans Way • Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PAMELA J. IRBY, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

MARGARET J. KING, MD

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

CHARLOTTE LIN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

STEVE MANN, DO

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7714

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

JOE T. MCCOOK, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

EDEN MILLER, DO

High Lakes Health Care - Sisters

354 W. Adams Avenue • Sisters

541-549-9609

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

KEVIN MILLER, DO

High Lakes Health Care - Sisters

354 W. Adams Avenue • Sisters

541-549-9609

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

JESSICA MORGAN, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7714

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

DANIEL J. MURPHY, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

SHERYL L. NORRIS, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

AUBREY PERKINS, FNP

High Lakes Health Care East

MARGAREY J. PHILP, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

DANA M. RHODE, DO

Bend Memorial Clinic

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

1247 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-318-4249

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com


2011 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

FAMILY MEDICINE CONT.

KEVIN RUETER, MD

High Lakes Health Care East

1247 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-318-4249

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

HANS G. RUSSELL, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ERIC J. SCHNEIDER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

CINDY SHUMAN, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

COLIN SOARES, PA-C

High Lakes Health Care East

1247 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-318-4249

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

JENNIFER SURBER, MD

High Lakes Health Care East

1247 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-318-4249

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

EDWARD M. TARBET, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JOHN D. TELLER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

NATHAN R. THOMPSON, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

LISA URI, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

MARK A. VALENTI, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

THOMAS A. WARLICK, MD

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7714

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealth.org

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BILL WIGNALL, MD

High Lakes Health Care East

1247 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-318-4249

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

BRUCE N. WILLIAMS, MD

Rural Health Clinic at Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealth.org

RICHARD H. BOCHNER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ELLEN BORLAND, FNP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ARTHUR S. CANTOR, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SIDNEY E. HENDERSON III, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SANDRA K. HOLLOWAY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JENNIFER SEMMELROTH, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GAYLE E. VANDERFORD, RN, MS, ANP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANDY HIMSWORTH, DMD

Masters of Dentistry

628 NW York Drive, Ste 101 • Bend

541-389-2300

www.mastersofdentistry.com

TAD HODGERT, DMD

Masters of Dentistry

628 NW York Drive, Ste 101 • Bend

541-389-2300

www.mastersofdentistry.com

BRADLEY E. JOHNSON, DMD

Contemporary Family Dentistry

1016 NW Newport Avenue • Bend

541-389-1107

www.contemporaryfamilydentistry.com

ROD BUZZAS, MD

Advanced Specialty Care

2084 NE Professional Court • Bend

541-322-5753

www.advancedspecialtycare.com

DAN COSGRO, PA

Advanced Specialty Care

2084 NE Professional Court • Bend

541-322-5753

www.advancedspecialtycare.com

NICOLLE O’NEIL, PA

Advanced Specialty Care

2084 NE Professional Court • Bend

541-322-5753

www.advancedspecialtycare.com

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

1001 NW Canal Blvd • Redmond

541-504-7635

www.womenthatcare.com

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GASTROENTEROLOGY

GENERAL DENTISTRY

GENERAL SURGERY

GYNECOLOGY

MARIA M. EMERSON, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

SUSAN GORMAN, MD

The Women’s Center of Central Oregon

ELIZABETH MCCORKLE, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

HEMATOLOGY/ONCOLOGY

ROBERT F. BOONE, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

CORALIA BONATSOS CALOMENI, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

CAROLYN S. DOEDYNS, FNP

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

STEPHEN B. KORNFELD, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

WILLIAM G. MARTIN, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

HOSPITALIST JOHN R. ALLEN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MICHAEL GOLOB, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ADRIAN KRUEGER, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SUZANN KRUSE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PHONG NGO, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com


2011 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

INFECTIOUS DISEASE JON LUTZ, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

INTERNAL MEDICINE JENESS CHRISTENSEN, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7714

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

JOHN CORSO, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

BROOKE HALL, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

MICHAEL N. HARRIS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANNE KILLINGBECK, MD

Internal Medicine Associates of Redmond

236 NW Kingwood Ave • Redmond

541-548-7134

www.imredmond.com

ANITA D. KOLISCH, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MATTHEW R. LASALA, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MADELINE LEMEE, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

MARY MANFREDI, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

KAREN L. OPPENHEIMER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MATTHEW REED, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

M. SEAN ROGERS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MARK STERNFELD, MD

Internal Medicine Associates of Redmond

DAN SULLIVAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

DAVID TRETHEWAY, MD RANDY VISSER, DO

236 NW Kingwood Ave • Redmond

541-548-7134

www.imredmond.com

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Internal Medicine Associates of Redmond

236 NW Kingwood Ave • Redmond

541-548-7134

www.imredmond.com

Internal Medicine Associates of Redmond

236 NW Kingwood Ave • Redmond

541-548-7134

www.imredmond.com

CAROL A. CRAIG, NNP

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

JOHN O. EVERED, MD

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

SARAH E. REYES, NNP

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

FREDERICK J. RUBNER, MD

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

MICHAEL E. FELDMAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICHARD S. KEBLER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RUSSELL E. MASSINE, MD, FACP

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ROBERT V. PINNICK, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

2275 NE Doctors Drive • Bend 2863 NW Crossing Dr, Ste 100 • Bend

541-330-6463

www.northstarneurology.com

NEONATOLOGY

NEPHROLOGY

NEUROMUSCULAR, NEUROPHYSIOLOGY CRAIGAN GRIFFIN, MD

NorthStar Neurology NorthStar Neck & Back Clinic

NEUROSURGERY MARK BELZA, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

RAY TIEN, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

BRAD WARD, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

NUTRITION ERIS CRAVEN, MS, RD, LD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANNIE WILLIAMSON, RD, LD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

OBSTETRICS/GYNECOLOGY WILLIAM H. BARSTOW, MD

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste B • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealth.org

CRAIG P. EBERLE, MD

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste B • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealth.org

AMY B. MCELROY, NP-C

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste B • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealth.org

TODD W. MONROE, MD

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste B • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealth.org

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE THEODORE KRUSE, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research


2011 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

ONCOLOGY – MEDICAL ROB BOONE, MD

St. Charles Medical Oncology

2100 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

THEODORE A. BRAICH, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Westside

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

CORA CALOMENI, MD

St. Charles Medical Oncology

2100 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

SUSIE DOEDYNS, FNP

St. Charles Medical Oncology

2100 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

KATIE FIFER, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

STEVE KORNFELD, MD

St. Charles Medical Oncology

2100 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

BILL MARTIN, MD

St. Charles Medical Oncology

2100 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-706-4701

www.stcharleshealth.org

WILLIAM SCHMIDT, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

HEATHER WEST, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ONCOLOGY – RADIATION LINYEE CHANG, MD

St. Charles Radiation Oncology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-7793

www.stcharleshealth.org

TOM COMERFORD, MD

St. Charles Radiation Oncology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-7793

www.stcharleshealth.org

RUSS OMIZO, MD

St. Charles Radiation Oncology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-7793

www.stcharleshealth.org

BRIAN P. DESMOND, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

THOMAS D. FITZSIMMONS, MD, MPH

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ROBERT C. MATHEWS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SCOTT T. O’CONNER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BRIAN ARVIDSON, OD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Westside

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DARCY C. BALCER, OD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Westside

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

1475 SW Chandler, Ste 101 • Bend

541-617-3993

www.drkeithkrueger.com

OPHTHAMOLOGY

OPTOMETRY

ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY KEITH E. KRUEGER, DMD, PC

Keith E. Krueger, DMD, PC

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, FOOT & ANKLE ANTHONY HINZ, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

JEFFREY P. HOLMBOE, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

JOEL MOORE, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, JOINT REPLACEMENT KNUTE BUEHLER, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

MICHAEL CARAVELLI, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

JAMES HALL, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, SPORTS MEDICINE TIMOTHY BOLLOM, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

SCOTT T. JACOBSON, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

BLAKE NONWEILER, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, UPPER EXTREMITY MICHAEL COE, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

SOMA LILLY, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

JAMES VERHEYDEN, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

2200 NE Neff Road, Ste 302 • Bend

541-388-3978

www.deschutesosteoporosiscenter.com

OSTEOPOROSIS & BONE HEALTH MOLLY OMIZO, MD

Deschutes Osteoporosis Center

PALLIATIVE MEDICINE LISA LEWIS, MD

Partners in Care

2075 NE Wyatt Ct • Bend

541-382-5882

www.partnersbend.org

LAURA K. MAVITY, MD

St. Charles Medical Group - Palliative Medicine

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org


2011 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY STEPHANIE CHRISTENSEN, DMD

Deschutes Pediatric Dentistry

1475 SW Chandler Ave, Ste • Bend

541-389-3073

www.deschuteskids.com

STEVE CHRISTENSEN, DMD

Deschutes Pediatric Dentistry

1475 SW Chandler Ave, Ste • Bend

541-389-3073

www.deschuteskids.com

PEDIATRICS KATHLEEN BAUMANN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

865 SW Veterans Way • Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

KATE L. BROADMAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICK G. CUDDIHY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

KATHRYN LEIN, CPNP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MICHELLE MILLS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JB WARTON, DO

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION LINDA CARROLL, MD TIM HILL, MD NANCY H. MALONEY, MD

High Lakes Health Care West The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research Bend Memorial Clinic

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JAMES NELSON, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

LARRY PAULSON, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

DAVID STEWART, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

JON SWIFT, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

VIVIANE UGALDE, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

MARC WAGNER, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

2084 NE Professional Ct. • Bend

541-504-1400

www.deschutesfootandankle.com

39 NW Louisiana Avenue • Bend

541-382-8862

www.lifeworksofbend.com

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PODIATRY DEAN NAKADATE, DPM

Deschutes Foot & Ankle

PSYCHIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER NICK CAMPO, PMHNP

Life Works of Central Oregon

PULMONOLOGY JONATHON BREWER, DO

Bend Memorial Clinic

JAMIE CONKLIN, MD

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealth.org

ERIC S. DILDINE, PA

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealth.org

ROD L. ELLIOT-MULLENS, DO

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

RODNEY GARRISON, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

KEITH W. HARLESS, MD

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

T. CHRISTOPHER KELLEY, DO

Bend Memorial Clinic

RICHARD J. MAUNDER, MD

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

JONATHON MCFADYEN, NP

Bend Memorial Clinic

THOMAS R. MURPHY, MD

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

LYNETTE SPJUT, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealth.org

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealth.org

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealth.org

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealth.org

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

St. Charles Medical Group - Rehabilitation

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-526-6556

www.stcharleshealth.org

GREG BORSTAD, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MATTHEW COOK, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DAN FOHRMAN, MD

Deschutes Rheumatology

2200 NE Neff Road, Suite 302 • Bend

541-388-3978

n/a

TIANNA WELCH, PA

Deschutes Rheumatology

2200 NE Neff Road, Suite 302 • Bend

541-388-3978

n/a

THERESA L. BUCKLEY, MD

St. Charles Sleep Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-6905

www.stcharleshealth.org

ARTHUR K. CONRAD, MD

St. Charles Sleep Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-6905

www.stcharleshealth.org

REHABILITATION NOREEN C. MILLER, MD RHEUMATOLOGY

SLEEP MEDICINE


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

2011 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY SLEEP MEDICINE CONT. Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-6905

www.stcharleshealth.org

1655 SW Highland Ave, Ste 6 • Redmond

541-923-2019

www.drherrin.com

929 SW Simpson Ave • Bend

541-389-7741

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

NorthStar Neurology NorthStar Neck & Back Clinic

2275 NE Doctors Drive • Bend 2863 NW Crossing Dr, Ste 100 • Bend

541-330-6463

www.northstarneurology.com

TIMOTHY L. BEARD, MD, FACS

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GARY J. FREI, MD, FACS

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JACK W. HARTLEY, MD, FACS

Surgical Associates of the Cascades

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

www.cosurgery.com

DARREN M. KOWALSKI, MD, FACS

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JOHN C. LAND, MD, FACS

Surgical Associates of the Cascades

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

www.cosurgery.com

ANDREW SARGENT, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GEORGE T. TSAI, MD, FACS

Surgical Associates of the Cascades

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

www.cosurgery.com

JENNIFER TURK, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JEANNE WADSWORTH, MS, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ERIN WALLING, MD, FACS

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JEFF CABA, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANN CLEMENS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

TERESA COUSINEAU, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

J. RANDALL JACOBS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

AMEE KOCH, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JIM MCCAULEY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JAY O’BRIEN, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

CASEY OSBORNE-RODHOUSE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

LAURIE D. PONTE, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PATRICK L. SIMNING, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SEAN SUTTLE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ERIC J. WATTENBURG, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

THOMAS H. WENDEL, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BRENT C. WESENBERG, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DAVID L. DEDRICK, MD

St. Charles Sleep Center

SPINAL DECOMPRESSION, AUTO ACCIDENTS DAVID HERRIN, DC

Redmond Wellness & Chiropractic

SPORTS MEDICINE, FAMILY MEDICINE DAVID KELLY, MD

High Lakes Health Care West

STROKE AND NECK & BACK RICHARD L. KOLLER, MD SURGICAL SPECIALIST

URGENT CARE

VARICOSE VEIN & GENERAL SURGERY ROD BUZZAS, MD

Advanced Specialty Care

2084 NE Professional Court • Bend

541-322-5753

www.advancedspecialtycare.com

EDWARD M. BOYLE, JR., MD, FACS

Inovia Vein Specialty Center

2200 NE Neff Road, Ste 204 • Bend

541-382-8346

www.bendvein.com

ANDREW JONES, MD, FACS

Inovia Vein Specialty Center

2200 NE Neff Road, Ste 204 • Bend

541-382-8346

www.bendvein.com

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

VASCULAR SURGERY JOSEPH COLELLA, MD

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T

To be included in the next issue of the PULSE/Connections Medical Directory, contact: Kristin Morris, Account Executive by November 14th 541.617.7855 • kmorris@bendbulletin.com


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Cover story | SINGLE-SPORT KIDS

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Continued from Page 13 soccer field, predispose young adults to early osteoarthritis. It’s something Maryn Beutler’s mother, Sandi Beutler, worries about for her daughter. A year ago, Maryn blew an ankle while playing soccer in Florida. It stole seven months of playing time. Sandi said it was heartbreaking. Maryn had trained so hard on four different teams to play at that tournament, and then she broke her right ankle in the first 20 minutes of the game. “I think it was overtraining,” said Sandi. “She could have stiffness and pain there forever. I do worry about when she’s 40 what she’ll feel like.” Kids don’t think that far into the future, Sandi said. Each sport is associated with specific overuse injuries, based on the body part that’s used most. Some sports are lowerrisk. Football, for example, tends to be the highest-injury sport in terms of impact, but not from year-round training and overuse, Geier said. He didn’t know of injuries associated with cross-country skiing. Baseball pitching has garnered a reputation. One pitch or one season is not inherently dangerous, said Geier. “It’s doing it for one or two teams at the same time with no real break in seasons and travel teams. All those pitches wear out the same body parts over time — the shoulder and elbow,” he said. Since 2000, there has been a fivefold increase in the number of serious shoulder and elbow injuries among young baseball and softball players, according to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Alex Robinett, now playing baseball at West Point Military Academy, started Little League at age 5, said his father, Mike Robinett. When Alex was a freshman at Mountain View High School, his arm was overused, Mike said. The following summer, while pitching at a tournament, he felt a pop in his elbow. The pain wasn’t extreme but his velocity tanked. An MRI diagnosed a classic baseball overuse injury — the ulnar collateral ligament on the inside of the elbow. During his sophomore year, Alex had what’s known as “Tommy John” surgery,

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Alex Robinett, now playing baseball at West Point Military Academy, started Little League at age 5. In high school in Bend, he had a classic baseball overuse injury to his elbow ligament, wound up in surgery and missed a year of training. named after a former pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Yankees, among other teams. Alex missed his sophomore year of sports, and his dad wonders if other prospective colleges might have overlooked him because of his injury. With growing awareness of overuse injuries, Little League has established and continually revises rules in an attempt to prevent them, said Brad Morris, Bend South Little League president. A child’s age determines the number of pitches he is allowed to throw in a game. For example, the 11- to 12-year-olds, Morris said, can’t throw more than 85 pitches in one day, and if they reach that threshold they’re required to rest for four days. Jim Richards, owner of the Bend Elks summer collegiate baseball club, said young arms shouldn’t be throwing curveballs because of the way the pitch stresses the elbow. “Curveballs are probably the biggest threat to a young kid’s arm, as is just throwing so much,” he said. College recruiters, he said, discourage high school players from specialization so their arms are healthier and better rested. Kristin Parr, a 17-year-old Summit High senior who hopes for some degree of a soccer scholarship to the University of Oregon next year, said college coaches have encouraged her to play other sports. It’s better for her body, she said. She happens to be talented enough to play a variety of sports and still get recruited for soccer. She needs the diversity. “I figured if I didn’t play basketball and golf I’d be so burnt out on soccer that I would have quit it years ago.”

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Burnout Burnout in young athletes, though hard to diagnose authoritatively, is not uncommon. Also referred to as “overtraining” in the study from England, burnout can include any number of symptoms such as anxiety, increased perception of training effort, weight loss, sleep problems, depression. Overtraining can happen in sports with lower physical demands,

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What to watch for in teen athletes Overtraining and burnout look different for every young athlete. Mainly, look for a change in behavior. Typical signs include: fatigue, irritability, depression, lower energy, sleep problems, increased occurrence of illness, inconsistent athletic performance, helplessness, anger, anxiety. If parental involvement doesn’t help and the behavior continues, see a mental health professional. Source: Nancy Hoffman, a licensed clinical social worker in Bend and Redmond who works with kids, teens and families and has a specialty in athletics

Alby Larson, a 17-year-old senior at Bend High, said he started feeling soccer burnout after a bout of year-round play. “I was just on autopilot every day. It wasn’t as fun.” With the support of his parents, he cut his soccer schedule way back, dabbled in other sports, and got a job at the family restaurant, which he said has been fun and taught him new skills.

Page 50

Cover story | SINGLE-SPORT KIDS such as golf, as much as in rigorous sports, such as running, because of “training time commitments, multiple back-to-back competitions, travel schedules, and at the elite level, pressure for financial rewards, professional contracts or sponsorship deals,” the study said. Compared with athletes who are not as highly trained, the athletes in the overtrained set in the study were significantly more likely to feel apathy, intimidation and sadness associated with their sport. Overtrained athletes were more likely to consider their sport the most important thing in their lives, according to the study, and they were more likely to struggle with balancing schoolwork and other hobbies. Overtraining can steal an athlete’s inspiration; 62 percent of the overtrained athletes in the study lost motivation to keep going when they were feeling burnout. This happened to Alby Larson, a 17-yearold senior at Bend High who started yearround club soccer in fifth grade. “I would just be in a mental state,” he said of

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


his soccer experience by the time he got into high school. “The same thing every day and I knew it was coming. I was just on autopilot every day. It wasn’t as fun. I got so tired of doing the same thing. I got way too burned out. “My grades were suffering so my mom would ask: ‘Do we need to change something? Do we need to stop?’” Now he plays only high school team soccer in the fall. By all accounts, high school sports are less intense than the private club and travel teams. Dropping year-round club soccer allowed Larson to try basketball his junior year, he said. He started working at his parents’ restaurant, Cheerleaders Grill, where he’s learning to cook and gaining some professional social skills. He snowmobiles with his friends in the winter.

A singular identity Nancy Hoffman, a licensed clinical social worker in Bend and Redmond who counsels teens and specializes in athletes, said wheth-

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

er they play one sport or three, teens need rest from competition. They need down time to themselves and social time to connect with peers and their families. “Sports can build self-esteem, a sense of mastery and confidence, and teach so many important life lessons,” Hoffman said. “If parents have conversations regularly with their children to help everyone keep perspective about what’s valuable about sports, and start those conversations early, then we’ll create teens who becomes active adults. We want that to carry over to adulthood. My worry is that when kids get burned out they close the door and don’t become lifelong athletes.” They may also express more severe reactions to their focused intensity. Hoffman occasionally sees clients with eating disorders, which appear across the spectrum of sports. Some girls also experience amenorrhea, when menstruation stops. Weight loss, stress and extreme exercise can all contribute to the delayed onset of a girl’s cycle. Certain sports are more conducive to that level

of behavior, such as gymnastics and running, she said. Bottom line: “I think it is important to identify interests outside of their sport,” Hoffman said. Intensively trained athletes are at risk of having a unidimensional identity, the English study said. “Self-esteem, identity and selfworth become intertwined and become dependent on sporting success, which is fine when success is forthcoming but can lead to stress and anxiety when failure/injury are present.” Having a more complex identity provides a cushion, the authors wrote, and can dampen swings of self-doubt. That’s how semipro snowboarder Ben Watts, an 18-year-old Summit High senior, has been able to excel in his sport and stay physically and mentally healthy: He turns to music, songwriting and painting. As a young kid he tried tennis, baseball, swimming, skateboarding. Around age 14 his talents crystallized, and he focused on snowboarding. He spends as much time at

Page 51


Cover story | SINGLE-SPORT KIDS

Semipro snowboarder Ben Watts, an 18-year-old Summit High senior, turns to music, songwriting and painting to ward off the burnout that creeps in by the end of each exhausting snowboarding season, he said. Experts say it’s crucial for teens to have a variety of interests, so their identities and self-worth are not solely entwined with one sport.

the mountain as possible, and in the offseason he skateboards and cross-trains to stay in shape. Burnout, by the end of each exhausting season, is very real to him, he said. “You’re second-guessing, you’re doubting yourself. You just have to convince yourself that you’re doing the right thing,” he said. When he starts feeling overwhelmed by continual, mounting pressure to improve each year, by growing expectations from sponsors who pay for his races, having other interests has helped. “I can get in touch with other things, like my music. I’m excited about that.” Having a multidimensional life and having some control over that life are important. Coaches say kids will thrive if they have an understanding of why they’re doing their sport, and a voice in the decision to play. Here’s a common narrative: “The young athlete shows talent/aptitude in a particular sport and achieves early success; the opportunity to become an elite youth athlete presents itself and the child agrees; from this point forward the young athlete’s life is controlled by adults (coaches/parents) in an effort to achieve these goals,” wrote Richard Winsley, director of education and associate director of the Children’s Health and Exercise Research Centre at the University of Exeter in England, and a lead author of the English study about overtraining. “Although this is often done with the best intentions and well meaning, the control that the adults assume for managing the young athlete’s training programme, competition schedules, travel plans, diet, free time, school work load, disempowers the child, leaving them frustrated, impotent, and stressed.” Maryn Beutler said no one makes her play. Her competitive drive comes from within. “I just want to play soccer.” And, her mom, Sandi, said, “We’ve been careful to keep asking, ‘Are you still having fun? If not, it’s a huge time and financial commitment to us. If it’s not fun, you don’t have to do it.’” But, Sandi said, it’s kept Maryn energized, healthy and out of trouble. She seems like a balanced-enough person, Sandi said. “I think kids are happier when they have purpose.” •

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HIGH DESERT PULSE


Body of knowledge | POP QUIZ BY MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

D

o you know your cholesterol number? How about your blood pressure? OK, now for the tough one: triglycerides? Chances are, you’ve probably stopped paying attention after your doctor told you your cholesterol level was high or low. Bad idea. Your triglyceride level may be just as important, yet most people don’t know a thing about them. Think you do? Test your knowledge with the quiz below.

GREG CROSS

Warning: elevated triglycerides! What are they — and how scared should you be?

1

Triglycerides are: A. A type of fat that circulates in your

4

blood. B. Chains of three glycerin molecules. C. Dinosaurs with three horns.

2

Triglycerides come from: A. The fat in foods like red meat. B. Excess calories your body doesn’t need right away. C. The breakdown of muscles after a hard workout.

3

True or false: Triglycerides are fat; cholesterol is not.

ANSWERS 1. A. Triglycerides consist of three fatty acid molecules combined with a glycerol. 2. B. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn’t immediately use into triglycerides and stores them in your fat cells. When your body needs more energy, hormones release triglycerides for the muscle cells to burn. The brain, on the other hand, uses glucose for fuel. It cannot use fatty acids as an energy source, but the body can convert the glycerol in triglycerides into glucose for brain fuel. 3. True. Triglycerides and cholesterol are both substances known as lipids. But triglycerides are fats, while cholesterol is a waxy, odorless substance made by the liver that is an essential part of cell walls and nerves. As fats, triglycerides can be broken down to use as energy; choles-

HIGH DESERT PULSE • FALL / WINTER 2011

Which of the following increases triglyceride levels? A. Carbs, especially simple sugars. B. Alcohol. C. Drugs including beta blockers, birth control pills and diuretics. D. All of the above.

5

What’s a normal triglyceride score from a blood test? A. Lower than100 milligrams per decaliter. B. Lower than 150 mg/dl. C. Lower than 200 mg/dl. D. Lower than your age.

terol cannot. Pure cholesterol cannot mix with or dissolve in the blood, so the liver packages cholesterol with triglycerides and proteins in carriers called lipoproteins, which transport the bundle to sites throughout the body. 4. D. Carbohydrates, particularly simple sugars, can wreak havoc on triglyceride levels, and they’re no help to your overall health either. Alcohol in moderation may reduce the risk of heart disease, but it can raise triglyceride levels, as can the medications listed above. 5. B. Any level under 150 mg/dl is considered in the normal range, but doctors recommend shooting for under 100 mg/dl. A level of 150 to 199 is considered borderline high, and anything over 200 is considered high. Results over 500 indicate a very high risk for heart problems.

6

True or false: High triglycerides levels have been proven to cause heart attacks and stroke.

7

The American Heart Association recommends which of the following as the best way to reduce triglyceride levels in most people? A. Improved diet and exercise. B. Statins. C. Weight-loss surgery. D. Meditation.

8

True or false: You can’t lower bad cholesterol and high triglycerides at once.

6. False. High levels of triglycerides in the blood stream have been linked to atherosclerosis, which, in turn, increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. But researchers are unsure of the role triglycerides play in the process. High triglycerides are often accompanied by other risk factors including obesity, high blood sugar and high cholesterol, and it’s difficult for doctors to parse out whether triglycerides alone will cause heart problems. Some people have a genetic condition that results in high triglyceride levels but don’t seem to have an increased risk of heart disease. Nonetheless, doctors do feel that triglycerides are an important factor contributing to your overall risk for heart disease or stroke. 7. A. The AHA recommends changes in lifestyle habits as the main therapy for

high triglyceride levels. Eat a high-fiber diet, low in saturated and trans fat and cholesterol. Exercise regularly and limit your alcohol intake. Unsaturated fats, especially omega-3 fats found in fish, lower triglycerides. Drugs such as niacin and statins can lower triglycerides as well, although doctors will likely reserve those for patients with very high levels or other conditions such as high cholesterol. 8. False. Fortunately, many of the same strategies used to reduce cholesterol levels — including healthy diet and exercise — apply to improving your triglyceride levels as well. But just because your cholesterol is OK doesn’t mean your triglycerides are in check. If you haven’t had a lipid profile done in the past five years, ask your doctor to order one for you and update you on the results.

Page 53


One voice |

A PERSONAL ESSAY

Scaling back and feeling good BY DUSTIN GOUKER

W

My training runs stopped for fear of causing the pain to become worse. I pulled out of the marathon. After that, all of the good habits I had introduced into my life began eroding, and I slowly started gaining weight and getting out of shape. Having lost a bunch of weight once, I could learn from my experience the first time. So when I outlined a plan for myself, I hoped it would put me in a position to succeed from the start. Here’s what I decided: • Don’t make myself suffer. Doing the Atkins diet isn’t easy. In retrospect, I have no idea how I stuck to it. So I decided to do something that I thought would work for me, but at the same time wouldn’t make me miserable. I used some of the principles of Atkins — more protein and fewer carbs — and crafted a diet of my own. I cut out pretty much all sugar (no more ice cream) and starches (no pasta, bread, potatoes, etc.). I could eat pretty much any green or leafy vegetables I wanted. And I allowed myself to have an occasional beer. That may sound like suffering, but I knew it was something I could do without starving myself. • Lose some weight, then ramp up exercise. From experience, I knew how difficult it is to just start exercising a lot when you weigh too much. It’s a lot easier to do meaningful exercise when you are already at a manageable weight. So I kept my expectations down for how much I would run at the start, and I have built up to running more

hen I weighed myself this February, and I saw 244 pounds on the scale, I was pretty depressed. It was the most I had ever weighed. I had been finding in recent weeks that some of my jeans and shirts no longer fit me. Eight years ago, I had been training for a marathon. Eight years later, I was an overweight 30-something who couldn’t jog much of anywhere without being out of breath. It was at that moment, standing on the scale, that I thought back to the first time I lost a lot of weight. The memory was both encouraging and disheartening. I knew that I could lose the weight if I put my mind to it — I had dropped more than 50 pounds in a year at one point in my mid-20s. I also knew that it wasn’t very easy the first time, and I couldn’t really fathom why I let myself get to this point. So, in that moment of clarity, I decided to lose weight rather than to buy larger clothes. Now I just had to figure out how, and to convince myself that I could do it again. I can trace the reason for my most recent diet back to one day in 2003. After successfully doing the Atkins diet (a regimented system consisting RYAN BRENNECKE of high-protein and low-carbohydrate food that was in vogue in the early 2000s), I weighed about Dustin Gouker is assistant sports 175 pounds (I am 5 feet, 11 inches tall). And I had editor of The Bulletin. been running for a year, inspired by a co-worker of mine at The Washington Post who had twice won the Marine Corps in recent months. Marathon. • Have a partner to diet with. I couldn’t persuade my wife, Jenn, So, from a baseline of nothing, I decided I wanted to run and later to do my made-up diet. But she did want to lose some weight, too, decided I wanted to do the Marine Corps Marathon. After losing the and she took up Nutrisystem, which has worked for her. Being able weight and becoming a decent if not prolific runner, I was a month to keep each other motivated and to share our successes has made away from the race. I was out on a training run, and I started get- losing weight a lot easier. ting a shooting pain in my lower back. I had previously had flareTogether, we have lost about 120 pounds. I have lost about 60 ups of sciatica — a painful condition caused when the sciatic nerve pounds myself, and I weigh about 183 pounds now. I am not quite becomes irritated — but this was worse than most. I walked slowly to my target and I am not ready to run a marathon, but hope to run back to my apartment after cutting my run short, crying in pain dur- a half-marathon next spring. ing some of the trip. But I feel like I am pretty healthy again. And I am hopeful I won’t find Over the next few weeks, the pain subsided, but it was still there. myself trying to lose weight for a third time eight years from now. •

Page 54

FALL / WINTER 2011 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Heart Center Cardiology St. Charles-Bend Cardiothoracic Surgeons Pediatric Heart Center of Central Oregon

The Heart Center wishes you a happy and heart-healthy 2011.


Bulletin Daily Paper 11/7/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday, November 7, 2011

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