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September 7, 2012

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bendbulletin.com LAKE BILLY CHINOOK

AT THE CONVENTION

Father dies trying to save son Obama:

Problems can be solved By David Espo and Robert Furlow The Associated Press

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

The Bulletin

LAKE BILLY CHINOOK — The search for the body of a man who presumably drowned trying to save his son Thursday at Lake Billy Chinook will resume this morning with plans to use sonar technology, Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Adkins said. Mark Harris, 37, died after suffering a major head injury in the water, possibly from being hit by their boat or his own ski, and it appears Gene Harris, 73, drowned after jumping in to rescue his son, Adkins said. Search and rescue personnel recovered Mark Harris’ body Thursday. Efforts to find Gene Harris’ body were suspended Thursday evening, Adkins said. A sonar device that is pulled behind a boat and used to map the bottom of the lake is

scheduled to arrive from the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office this morning, Adkins said. Operators of the sonar device can pick out the body from other objects like rocks and logs and use GPS to mark the spot for divers. Both men were avid water skiers and frequented the lake, Adkins said. Mark Harris had recently bought a new ski and wanted to test it. Adkins said several of the search and rescue officers on the scene knew Gene and Mark Harris, members of a prominent farming family in the area. There were no witnesses to the initial incident. A man on shore about 100 yards away reported seeing a body floating in the water near a ski boat and Gene Harris swimming toward it. See Drowning / A3

Desc hutes River arm

By Joel Aschbrenner

ked River arm Croo

A pair of ski boats with volunteers (front) and three search and rescue boats move slowly under the Southwest Jordan Road bridge that spans the Crooked River branch of Lake Billy Chinook as they search for the missing body of a man who drowned in the lake Thursday afternoon.

Cove Palisades State Park

Area where Mark Harris’ body found

Madras

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — His re-election in doubt, President Barack Obama conceded only halting progress Thursday night toward fixing the nation’s stubborn economic woes but vowed in a Democratic National Convention finale, “Our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met.” “Yes, our path is harder — but it leads to a better place,” he declared in a prime-time speech to convention delegates and the nation, blending Obama resolve about rescuing the nation from near-economic catastrophe with stinging criticism of Republican rival Mitt Romney’s own proposals. Widely viewed as reserved, even aloof, Obama acknowledged “my own failings” as he asked for a second term, four years after taking office as the nation’s first black president. Citing progress toward recovery, he said, “After a decade that was defined by what we bought and borrowed, we’re getting back to basics and doing what America has always done best: We’re making things again.” “Four more years,” delegates chanted over and over as the 51-year-old Obama stepped to the podium, noticeably grayer than he was as a historymaking candidate for the White House in 2008. First Lady Michelle Obama and the couple’s daughters, Malia and Sasha, joined the president on stage in the moments after the speech, followed by other family members and Vice President Joe Biden and his wife. Strains of “Only in America” filled the hall as confetti filled the air. See Convention / A4

Lake Billy Chinook AREA OF DETAIL Deschutes River

Crooked River Culver

To Redmond, Bend 97

Andy Zeigert The Bulletin

Delegates say Obama lifting Central Oregon By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

TOP NEWS IRAQ: U.S. wants checks on flights to Syria, A3 JAPAN: Governments wants to buy islands, A3 TODAY’S WEATHER Sunny High 82, Low 45 Page C6

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Report says U.S. health care system wasting $750 billion every year By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. health care system squanders $750 billion a year — roughly 30 cents of every medical dollar — through unneeded care, byzantine paperwork, fraud and other waste, the influential Institute of Medicine said Thursday in a report that ties directly into the presidential campaign. President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney are accusing each other of trying to slash Medicare and put seniors

at risk. But the counterintuitive finding from the report is that deep cuts are possible without rationing, and a leaner system may even produce better quality. “Health care in America presents a fundamental paradox,” said the report from an 18-member panel of prominent experts, including doctors, business people, and public officials. “The past 50 years have seen an explosion in biomedical knowledge, dramatic innovation in therapies and surgical procedures, and management of

conditions that previously were fatal ... “Yet, American health care is falling short on basic dimensions of quality, outcomes, costs and equity,” the report concluded. If banking worked like health care, ATM transactions would take days, the report said. If home building were like health care, carpenters, electricians and plumbers would work from different blueprints and hardly talk to each other. See Health care / A4

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — After spending three days at the Democratic National Convention, members of Oregon’s delegation from Bend said they were excited to see President Obama’s policies help lift Central Oregon. John Mundy said the president’s acceptance speech was a good discussion of economic policy, and showed his honesty and integrity. “He’s a good man who I trust and want to move forward with,” he said. Mundy praised Obama’s plan to educate a workforce prepared for the employment needs of the 21st century, including more advanced technical training after high school. Thanks to Oregon State University’s plan to develop a four-year campus in Bend, the city will be poised to reap economic benefits of being both a resort town and a university town, he said. Bend is still recovering from the economic collapse that saw the housing market crash and unemployment skyrocket. Obama’s policies have helped turn things around, but the job isn’t finished, said delegate Adele McAfee. “Has he done enough? No, but now he needs four more years,” she said. See Oregon / A4

Archaeologists search for Richard III in parking lot By Henry Chu

Los Angeles Times

LEICESTER, England — A parking lot, a parking lot! His kingdom for a parking lot? OK, so those lines may not have quite the same ring as the immortal plea for a horse that Shakespeare gave Richard III

as the desperate king’s final cry on the battlefield. But they could well prove more accurate. Archaeologists have begun digging in the center of this historic city to locate Richard’s lost remains, in a quest to solve a mystery surrounding one of the most controversial and confound-

ing monarchs in British history. If their hunch is right, the last English king to die in battle wound up trading his throne for a final resting place beneath what is now a parking lot here in Leicester. Finding Richard’s bones, more than half a millennium after his death in 1485, could at last clear

up some of the nagging questions and fanciful legends that have grown as thick around him as ivy on a tree. Was he, for instance, truly the “deform’d, unfinish’d” figure, often played as a hunchback, that Shakespeare took such delight in portraying? See Richard / A3

Inside

• A version of Shakespeare’s Richard III opens tonight at the Second Street Theater in Bend. See GO! page 12


A2

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Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

THE TRAVEL SCENE

TODAY

Airport terminals upgrade to first class

It’s Friday, Sept. 7, the 251st day of 2012. There are 115 days left in the year.

By Curtis Tate

• The U.S. Labor Department releases its August employment report. • Most Lufthansa flights are canceled as cabin crew workers strike over wages.

McClatchy Newspapers

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A year ago, a dingy, cramped and aging terminal greeted travelers to Sacramento International Airport. The utilitarian, 44-year-old building was designed for another era in air travel, one without long security lines and with inflight dining. Now the old terminal is gone, replaced by a soaring structure filled with natural light and with restaurants, shops, artwork and a row of wooden rocking chairs where passengers can sit and watch planes take off and land. Airport terminals built half a century ago are wearing out, and no longer meet security or passenger needs. Some were tailored for airlines that no longer exist. And while the struggling economy has reduced travel demand, aviation experts say that now’s the time to modernize ahead of an expected increase in air travel. “As you can imagine, in the ’50s, air travel was not what it is today,” said Victor White, the director of airports for the Wichita Airport Authority, which expects to begin building a $200 million terminal in the next few weeks. Costly? Yes. Some of the larger makeovers run $1 billion or more. But airport officials claim the projects can pay off in the long run. The Federal Aviation Administration forecasts that annual passenger totals will pass the 1 billion mark in the next decade, assuming average growth in the economy and the population. “Short-term issues are short-term issues,” said David Magna, a spokesman for Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, which began a nearly $2 billion, seven-year renovation last year. “People are still going to travel.” Besides Dallas-Fort Worth, several major hubs have undergone upgrades in recent years, including Atlanta, Miami, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. Other busy airports have built modern new terminals, such as Indianapolis, Raleigh-Durham, N.C., and Sacramento. Wichita, Kan., and Myrtle Beach, S.C., are ready to break ground, and Kansas City, Mo., is drafting a blueprint to consolidate three 40year-old terminals into one. In 1960, 62 million domes-

HAPPENINGS

IN HISTORY

Jose Luis Villegas / Sacramento Bee

Sacramento International Airport’s Terminal B opened in October 2011. The $1 billion project, the largest public works effort in Sacramento County’s history, replaced an aging terminal that had become inadequate for security and passenger needs.

tic and international passengers boarded planes at U.S. airports, according to the federal Bureau of Transportation Statistics. In 2011, the count had risen to more than 800 million.

A touch of pleasantness The new terminals won’t improve on-time arrivals and departures. They won’t upgrade the nation’s antiquated air-traffic control system. Passengers will still have to take off their shoes at security checkpoints and pay extra to check their bags. But you can admire colorful sculptures, sip a fresh latte while charging up your iPad or buy that shirt you forgot to pack. “Sometimes with flight delays and things that happen, the experience can feel quite gruesome,” said Curtis Fentress, an architect involved in the design of the Sacramento and Raleigh terminals. “What we as architects try to do is make the experience as pleasant as possible.” Airlines and travelers help pay for the projects through increased fees, but the recession has taken its toll. Indianapolis opened its $1.1 billion terminal in 2008, only to see traffic drop from 8 million passengers to 7.2 million last year. When Sacramento’s

$1 billion Terminal B opened last year, the airport handled about 2 million fewer passengers than the 10.6 million in 2007. Raleigh-Durham saw nearly 9 million travelers last year when the $570 million Terminal 2 was finished, a million fewer than in 2007. It might take a decade or more from the initial design phase of a terminal to final construction, and conditions can change. Airlines can add or subtract planes, but airports can’t add or subtract gates. “Oftentimes, an airport will begin a project in a very different economic cycle,” said Debby McElroy, the executive vice president for policy and external affairs at Airports Council InternationalNorth America, an industry group. “Airlines can quickly respond. Airports have less flexibility.” She said airports could scale down projects to save money. Sacramento put plans for a parking garage and hotel on hold. When the recession hit, Wichita hit pause on its entire project. “There was a benefit,” White said. “Because the economy had been so poor, the construction costs are better than what they were two years ago. It helps stretch the dollars that much more.”

Making people proud

Wichita, called the Air Capital for its large concentration of aircraft manufacturers, got bad news in January when its largest employer, Boeing, announced that it was shutting down operations there. But White said the new terminal was less about economic development than about giving the city a portal worthy of its heritage. “Even the design of the building captures the history,” he said. “Those kinds of things will make people proud when we’re done.” Dallas-Fort Worth is updating its four original terminals, which date to 1974. Magna said the overhaul included more space for the comprehensive security screenings that have been a part of the travel routine since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and less space for ticket counters. Travelers print their boarding passes at home and check fewer bags because most airlines charge for it. He also said more space would be allotted to restaurants, cafes, coffee shops and bars, owing to the shift away from in-flight meal and beverage services. “A lot of that has reverted back to the airports,” he said. “Passengers are looking for choices.”

Highlights: In 1812, the Battle of Borodino took place during the Napoleonic Wars as French troops clashed with Russian forces outside Moscow; although France won a short-term victory, Russia was able to ultimately drive out Napoleon’s invaders. (The battle was commemorated by composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky with his “1812 Overture.”) In 1940, Nazi Germany began its eight-month blitz of Britain during World War II with the first air attack on London. In 1972, the International Olympic Committee banned Vince Matthews and Wayne Collett of the U.S. from further competition for talking to each other on the victory stand in Munich during the playing of the “Star-Spangled Banner” after winning the gold and silver medals in the 400meter run. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, meeting at Camp David, said the world had to act against Saddam Hussein, arguing that the Iraqi leader had defied the United Nations and reneged on promises to destroy weapons of mass destruction. Five years ago: Osama bin Laden appeared in a video for the first time in three years, telling Americans they should convert to Islam if they wanted the war in Iraq to end. One year ago: The latest in a series of Republican presidential debates brought together Mitt Romney, Michelle Bachmann, Rick Perry, Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich, Jon Huntsman, Ron Paul and Rick Santorum in Simi Valley, Calif.

BIRTHDAYS Jazz musician Sonny Rollins is 82. Singer Gloria Gaynor is 63. Rock singer Chrissie Hynde (The Pretenders) is 61. Actor Tom Everett Scott is 42. Actress Shannon Elizabeth is 39. — From wire reports

FOCUS: SCIENCE

Scientists can measure mass of 1 molecule By Sindya N. Bhanoo

New York Times News Service

For the first time, a device can measure the mass of a single molecule. Traditionally in mass spectrometry, tens of millions of particles are weighed to calculate the mass of a single molecule. But researchers from the United States and France have developed a device that can measure just one; they describe it in the journal Nature Nanotechnology as a vibrating, bridgelike structure that is only a couple of millionths of a meter in length. “One way to imagine it is like a violin string,” said Michael Roukes, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology and one of the study’s authors. “If you pluck a violin string it will vibrate at some frequency — so when a particle arrives on the resonator the frequency changes, and we’re measuring that change.” By measuring the change, the researchers are able to calculate a molecule’s mass, Roukes said. The instrument took the scientists 12 years to develop.

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T!" S#!$%&' X-rays may aggravate genetic breast cancer disposition By Maria Cheng

The Associated Press

LONDON — Mammograms aimed at finding breast cancer might actually raise the chances of developing it in young women whose genes put them at higher risk for the disease, a study by leading European cancer agencies suggests. The added radiation from mammograms and other types of tests with chest radiation might be especially harmful to them, and an MRI is probably a safer method of

screening women under 30 who are at high risk because of gene mutations, the authors conclude. The study can’t prove a link between the radiation and breast cancer, but is one of the biggest ever to look at the issue. The research was published Thursday in the journal BMJ. “This will raise questions and caution flags about how we treat women with (gene) mutations,” said Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer of the American Can-

cer Society. He and the society had no role in the research. Mammograms are most often used in women over 40, unless they are at high risk, like carrying a mutation of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Having such a mutation increases the risk of developing cancer fivefold. About one in 400 women has the gene abnormalities, which are more common in Eastern European Jewish populations. Unlike mammograms, an MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging scan, does not involve

radiation. The breast cancer screening tests have been proven to save lives and are clearly beneficial for women age 50 and over who have an average risk of breast cancer. Experts are divided about their value in women younger than 50. Some studies have suggested women with the genetic mutations could be more sensitive to radiation because the genes are involved in fixing DNA problems. If those genes are damaged by radiation, they may not be able to repair

DNA properly, raising the cancer risk. In several European countries including Britain, the Netherlands and Spain, doctors already advise women with BRCA mutations to get MRIs instead of mammograms before age 30. In the U.S., there is no specific advice from a leading task force of government advisers, but the American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms and MRIs from age 30 for women with BRCA gene mutations.

U.S. to Iraq: Look for arms on Iran flights to Syria By Karen DeYoung

The Washington Post

The Obama administration has called on Iraq to require Iranian planes transiting its airspace en route to Syria to land for inspections to prove they are not carrying weapons to Syrian military forces. Administration officials said Wednesday that they are certain that weapons and other military equipment are aboard the planes, in violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions prohibiting the export of Iranian weapons. “They are permitting overflights to deliver weapons . . . to support regime forces” of Syrian President Bashar alAssad, said an official who spoke on the condition of anonymity about the escalating U.S.-Iraqi tension. An Iraqi spokesman said his government has assurances from Iran that the cargo includes only humanitarian aid and that the United States should provide evidence if it believes otherwise. Iran is Assad’s princi-

pal backer in the region. Iraq’s Shiite-led government, which rejected a recent Arab League call for Assad to resign, has said it does not want to be drawn into a sectarian war in which majority Sunnis make up the bulk of the rebel forces fighting to oust Assad. Assad’s Alawite sect is a subgroup within Syria’s minority Shiite community. “All nations have a responsibility . . . to seek to prevent the export of Iranian arms,” U.S. National Security Council spokesman Tommy Vietor said. “Iraq has taken steps in the past to meet that obligation and it must continue to do so.” Three U.S. senators who met with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki on Wednesday said they told him that he risked damaging relations with the United States, as well as losing U.S. aid under a 2008 U.S.-Iraqi agreement signed before the final withdrawal of U.S. troops last year, the Associated Press reported from Baghdad.

Judge says suspect must shave Los Angeles Times A military judge in Texas ruled Thursday that Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, the Army psychiatrist charged in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting rampage, must be clean-shaven before his court martial, or he will be forcibly shaved. Army regulations ban beards, but Hasan, 41, who is still receiving military pay and benefits, objected on religious grounds, arguing that as a Muslim it would be a sin for

Richard Continued from A1 Beyond that, though, there’s a sense that a man synonymous with royal villainy, but who actually introduced important social reforms, deserves a lot better in death. Unlike most English monarchs, Richard III has neither an official tomb nor identified remains to his name. “It’s justice,” declared Richard Buckley of the University of Leicester, the chief archaeologist on the project, which is focused on what may be the ruins of a medieval friary bur-

Drowning

Continued from A1 The witness saw Gene Harris fight the waves, struggling to stay afloat before disappearing underwater, Adkins said. The two were boating in or around a slalom skiing course in the Crooked River arm of the lake just north of the Southwest Jordan Road bridge, near where the river widens and flows into the lake. About 25 search and rescue personnel from six agencies patrolled the water in eight boats, focusing on the area

him to shave. He appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, which last week ruled that Hasan’s appeal was premature because the military judge handling his case had not issued a definitive order. The court sent the case back to that judge. Col. Gregory Gross, the military judge at Fort Hood, issued his order Thursday after a hearing to determine whether a federal religious freedom law applied to Hasan’s case.

ied under the parking lot. His team is working with both limited time and limited space to unearth traces of the last of the Plantagenet kings, who reputedly locked up his two young nephews in the Tower of London and ordered their murder so that he could grab the throne for himself. As archaeological sites go, the parking lot is extremely small, paced off within a few seconds in either direction and hemmed in by buildings on all sides. But that even a tiny patch of open space exists in crowded downtown Leicester, let alone on the very spot the

around the course, looking for any sign of Gene Harris’ body. The small orange and yellow course buoys bobbed in the waves, the water green from algae blooms. The murky water has proved to be the most challenging aspect of the search, Detective Starla Green said. “The water clarity is the biggest issue,” she said. “You can maybe see four or five feet deep.” Divers from the Deschutes County Search and Rescue squad were in the water Thursday evening. For the

N&(' %) B$%&* Hurricane poised to hit Bermuda HAMILTON, Bermuda — Tourists postponed holidays in Bermuda and locals stocked up on emergency supplies as a stalled Hurricane Leslie spun over open ocean south of the wealthy British Atlantic territory Thursday. Hotel cancellations were reported across the territory, which is popular with tourists for its pink sand beaches and with businesspeople as an offshore financial haven. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Leslie was expected to intensify Friday and begin to drift north. Its center was forecast to pass to the east of Bermuda on Sunday morning, possibly as a Category 2 hurricane with winds of nearly 105 mph.

Peterson convicted of murdering wife

The Associated Press file photo

At stake in the territorial dispute between Japan and China is sovereignty over these three tiny islands in the East China Sea. Minamikojima, foreground, Kitakojima, middle right, and Uotsuri, background. In recent weeks, long-simmering tensions have returned to a boil, with violent protests in Chinese cities, a provocative island junket by South Korea’s lame-duck president, and Japan’s government reportedly ready to buy the disputed islands from their private owners.

Japan said to be ready to buy islands in dispute with China By Martin Fackler

New York Times News Service

KYOTO, Japan — The Japanese government has struck a tentative agreement to buy three uninhabited islands that are part of a chain at the center of a heated territorial dispute with China, a person close to the talks said Thursday. A government negotiator got a verbal agreement from the islands’ owners, a family living in suburban Tokyo, according to the person knowledgeable about the talks, who asked not to be identified because the negotiations were still in a sensitive stage. He said the particulars of the deal, including a price, had yet to be decided, and that the deal could still fall through. A deal would allow the government to nationalize three of the five major islands in the East China Sea chain, known as the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyu in China. It would not directly affect the more crucial issue of sovereignty

friary may have occupied, is an incredible stroke of luck. Still, discovering evidence of the vanished structure and possibly Richard’s grave remains a tall order in such a short span of time. Excavation began Aug. 25, exactly 527 years after Richard was first buried, and is scheduled to wrap up after just 21⁄2 weeks on Sunday. “It’s a long shot,” Buckley said. “It’s like a game of Battleship. You pick a square, H-3, and ‘Miss!’ ” His hopes have been boosted by the emergence of bits of medieval ruins in two 6-foot-

safety of the those on the water, the Sheriff’s Office called off the search as daylight faded, Green said. The water is about 120 feet deep in the area, Green estimated. Mark Harris’ body was recovered without a personal flotation device and it’s unknown if Gene Harris was wearing one, Green said. Mark and Gene Harris were the only two on the ski boat Thursday. The Sheriff’s Office recovered the boat, Adkins said. About 10 miles southwest of Madras and surrounded

over the islands, which are already administered by Japan but claimed by China and also Taiwan. While the dispute has been simmering for decades, emotions flared in April after Tokyo’s outspoken rightist governor, Shintaro Ishihara, proposed that his city buy the islands. That started a series of landings last month on the islands by nationalists, first from China and then Japan; the Japanese landing contributed to anti-Japanese protests in China. Ishihara’s proposal was apparently an effort to criticize Japan’s governing Democratic Party, which had sought closer ties with Beijing, for failing to take stronger action to defend against China’s increasingly assertive claims to the islands. Ishihara had said he wanted to bolster Japan’s control of the islands by erecting structures, like a communications station, on them. That prompted the national

deep trenches, but he isn’t drawing any conclusions yet. He isn’t taking any chances either. Just in case his team hits pay dirt, experts have already obtained a mouth swab from a man believed to be descended from Richard III’s sister, for use in comparing his DNA with that from any bones found on the site that might belong to the dead king. Historical accounts say that, after his defeat and death Aug. 22, 1485, by the forces of Henry Tudor (later Henry VII) at the Battle of Bosworth Field about 15 miles away, Richard’s enemies stripped his corpse and

by towering basalt cliffs, the lake is a popular spot for anglers and recreational boaters. There are accidents every year, Green said. Thursday marked the first fatality at the lake this year, she said. Assisting the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office and the Deschutes County Dive Team were the Oregon State Police, the Warm Springs Police Department, the Jefferson County Fire Department and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. — Reporter: 541-633-2184, jaschbrenner@bendbulletin.com

government to make a counteroffer to buy the islands, something that Japanese officials have cast as an effort to reduce tensions. Still, China responded critically Wednesday to earlier reports of a purchase deal. In Beijing, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, Hong Lei, called the sale “illegal and invalid,” according to The Associated Press. Major Japanese news media outlets had reported Wednesday that a formal agreement had been struck to sell the islands for 2.05 billion yen, or about $26 million. However, a spokesman for the islands’ owners, the Kurihara family, said that no formal agreement had been reached. The national government already owns one of the islands, and the fifth remains in private hands. While the islands themselves are little more than barren rocks, scientists say the seafloor around them could hold rich petroleum deposits.

paraded it in Leicester before allowing Franciscan brothers to bury it with no pomp or ceremony. As a person of exalted rank, Richard would probably have been interred close to the friary’s altar. Henry VII paid for an alabaster monument over the tomb, but both that and the friary were abandoned when his son, Henry VIII, shut down England’s monasteries. A later marker at the grave site also disappeared, and the repository of Richard III’s mortal coil was eventually forgotten.

JOLIET, Ill. — Drew Peterson, the former Illinois police officer who gained notoriety after his muchyounger wife vanished in 2007, was convicted Thursday of murdering a previous wife in a case centered on secondhand hearsay statements from both women. Peterson, 58, sat stoically looking straight ahead and did not react as the judge announced jurors had found him guilty of firstdegree murder in the death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio. Her relatives gasped, then hugged each other as they cried quietly. Illinois has no death penalty, and Peterson now faces a maximum 60-year prison term when sentenced Nov. 26.

Judge finds bishop guilty in abuse case KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A judge has found a Missouri bishop guilty of one misdemeanor count for failing to report suspected child abuse by a priest, and acquitted him on a second count. Robert Finn is the nation’s highest-ranking Catholic official charged with shielding an abusive priest. He received two years of probation, but that sentence was suspended. The charges stem from the child pornography case of Rev. Shawn Ratigan, in which Finn and other church officials knew about photos on the priest’s computer but didn’t turn him in for six months. Ratigan pleaded guilty in August to child porn charges. — From wire reports

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Education secretary makes a visit CHARLOTTE, N.C. — U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan stopped by the Oregon delegation’s final breakfast meeting Thursday, and described the beginnings of his friendship with President Obama. Duncan, a basketball standout who played professionally in Australia, was a childhood friend of Craig Robinson, the first lady’s brother who is now the basketball coach at Oregon State University. The president, Duncan said, is “amazingly passionate and committed to education reform.” Duncan, a former CEO of Chicago Public Schools, recalled taking the future president to visit a range of schools both good and bad. Unlike most politicians, who linger only long enough to greet the students, Duncan said, Obama would get so caught up in discussing with teachers and administrators what was working and what wasn’t that after an hour Duncan was forced to leave Obama behind to go to another appointment. • Jeremy Bird, the national field director of Obama for America, told delegates how the Obama camp has made an effort to keep its grass-roots organization from the last campaign intact. Bird said that rooms at the campaign’s Chicago headquarters are named after states to remind staffers to stay focused on winning the 270 electoral votes necessary to retain the presidency. The mailroom is named after Oregon, he said, a tribute to the state’s voting by mail. • Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., the first Muslim to be elected to Congress, said that after graduating from college in Michigan, he drove across the country to Oregon, where he traveled the coastline on a bicycle. Ellison said he was able to enjoy the majestic scenery because Oregon passed legislation that allows public access to the entire coast. “Thank you for that,” he said. He also praised the Democratic party platform adopted in Charlotte, in part because it contains a commitment to overturn Citizens United, the 2010 case in which the U.S. Supreme Court allowed unlimited spending on elections by independent organizations without disclosing their funding sources. Noting that Matt Groening, creator of “The Simpsons,” is from Oregon, Ellison quoted one of the show’s signature characters, billionaire C. Montgomery Burns: “What good is money if it can’t inspire terror in your fellow man?” When you think of Citizens United, remember Mr. Burns, Ellison said. • For the final night of the Democratic National Convention, the delegates decked themselves out in matching green T-shirts, making them easy to spot during the television broadcast. • All week long, many delegates proudly sported campaign buttons made by Bend “buttonista” Delia Paine, whose business took off after she made Obama buttons in 2008. Delegate Karen Schouten said a representative from the Smithsonian asked for one in Charlotte, so she gladly unhooked her “Oregon for Obama” button and gave it to her.

— Andrew Clevenger

Oregon Continued from A1 The Small Business Administration has also helped the recovery by giving loans to small startups, Mundy said. On Wednesday, Bill Butcher, who started the Port City Brewing Co. in Alexandria, Va., told the convention that he wouldn’t have been able to get his business off the ground without an SBA loan. The brewer’s comments naturally made Mundy think of Bend, with its community of microbreweries. “I would encourage local businesses to investigate those programs,” he said. Lori Dyce, an alternate attending her first national convention, said the lineup of speakers, interspersed with compelling videos and musical performances, kept delegates focused on the event’s message of uniting behind Obama. “There was not a boring moment in our convention,” she said. “I think we looked very organized.” Dyce said her main issue is preserving Medicare, and was particularly impressed with former President Bill Clinton’s explanation Wednesday night of how Obama plans to extend its funding for another eight years.

She also applauded the party platform’s positions on human rights, health care, education and continued scientific research and development of technology. “We must keep up with the global economy,” she said. “We can’t go back to the 1950s.” Mundy said he supports Obama’s plan to increase taxes on households with an annual income of more than $250,000. “It’s not class warfare to ask the wealthy to pay their fair share when this country is at war. It’s patriotism,” he said. The environmental portion of the Democratic platform also contains a commitment to conserve and restore publicly owned lands, keep water clean and preserve landscapes and ecosystems. Dyce said Obama has been appropriately moderate on environmental issues, with some business interests upset about overregulation and conservationists feeling he hadn’t gone far enough. Mundy concurred. “I’m not seeing anything in Central Oregon in terms of resource management that rubs me the wrong way,” he said. — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama waves to the crowd during his acceptance speech Thursday at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.

Convention Continued from A1 Obama’s speech was the final act of two highly scripted national political conventions in as many weeks, and the opening salvo of a two-month drive toward Election Day that pits Obama against Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts. Not only economic proposals will settle a tight contest for the White House in a dreary season of economic struggle for millions, but also campaign cash. There, Romney holds an advantage for sure. His campaign has purchased about $4.5 million in television advertising for the next several days, according to officials who track such spending. Obama, by contrast, emailed a fundraising appeal to supporters two hours before his convention speech.

‘Moving forward’ Biden preceded Obama at the convention podium and proclaimed, “America has turned the corner” after experiencing the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Obama didn’t go that far in his own remarks, but he said firmly, “We are not going back, we are moving forward, America.” With unemployment at 8.3 percent, the president said the task of recovering from the economic disaster of 2008 is exceeded in American history only by the challenge Franklin Delano Roosevelt faced when he took office in 1933. “It will require common effort, shared responsibility and the kind of bold, persistent experimentation” that FDR employed, Obama said. In an appeal to independent voters who might be considering a vote for Romney, he added that those who carry on Roosevelt’s legacy “should remember that not every problem can be remedied with another government program or dictate from Washington.” He said, “The truth is, it will take more than a few years for us to solve challenges that have built up over the decades.” The Romney campaign was dismissive as Democrats completed their convention. “Americans will hold Presi-

some regulations and call us in the morning,” he said. Mocking Romney for his overseas trip earlier this summer, Obama said, “You might not be ready for diplomacy with Beijing if you can’t visit the Olympics without insulting our closest ally.” That was a reference to a verbal gaffe the former Massachusetts governor committed while visiting London. David Goldman / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama are joined by their children, Sasha, left, and Malia, onstage after the president’s speech.

dent Obama accountable for his record — they know they’re not better off and that it’s time to change direction,” Matt Rhoades, the challenger’s campaign manager, said in a statement. In the run-up to Obama’s speech, delegates erupted in tumultuous cheers when former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, grievously wounded in a 2011 assassination attempt, walked onstage to lead the Pledge of Allegiance. The hall grew louder when she blew kisses to the crowd. And louder still when huge video screens inside the hall showed the face of Osama bin Laden, the terrorist mastermind killed in a daring raid on his Pakistani hideout by U.S. special operations forces “on a mission approved by the current commander in chief.”

A packed hall The hall was filled to capacity long before Obama stepped to the podium, and officials shut off the entrances because of a fear of overcrowding for a speech that the campaign had originally slated for the 74,000seat football stadium nearby. Aides said weather concerns prompted the move to the convention arena, capacity 15,000 or so. Obama’s campaign said the president would ask the country to rally around a “real, achievable plan that will create jobs, expand opportunity and ensure an economy built to last.” He added, “The truth is it will take more than a few years for us to solve challenges that have built up over a decade.” In convention parlance, both

Obama and Biden were delivering acceptance speeches before delegates who nominated them for new terms in office. But the political significance went far beyond that — the moment when the general election campaign begins in earnest even though Obama and Romney have been pointing toward a Nov. 6 showdown for months.

Retracing his steps To the cheers of delegates, Obama retraced his steps to halt the economic slide, including the auto bailout that Romney opposed. “After a decade of decline, this country created over a half-million manufacturing jobs in the last two and a half years,” he said. Turning to national security, he said he had promised to end the war in Iraq, and had done so. “We’ve blunted the Taliban’s momentum in Afghanistan, and in 2014 our longest war will be over,” he said. “A new tower rises above the New York skyline, al-Qaida is on the path to defeat and Osama bin Laden is dead,” he declared, one of the night’s repeated references to the special operations forces raid that resulted in the terrorist mastermind’s demise more than a year ago. He lampooned Romney’s own economic proposals. “Have a surplus? Try a tax cut. Deficit too high? Try another. Feel a cold coming on? Take two tax cuts, roll back

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Health care Continued from A1 If shopping were like health care, prices would not be posted and could vary widely within the same store, depending on who was paying. If airline travel were like health care, individual pilots would be free to design their own preflight safety checks — or not perform one at all. How much is $750 billion? The one-year estimate of health care waste is equal to more than 10 years of Medicare cuts in Obama’s health care law. It’s more than the Pentagon budget. It’s more than enough to care for the uninsured. Getting health care costs better controlled is one of the keys to reducing the deficit, the biggest domestic challenge facing the next president. The report did not lay out a policy prescription for Medicare and Medicaid but suggested there’s plenty of room for lawmakers to find a path. Both Obama and Romney agree there has to be a limit to Medicare spending, but they

differ on how to get that done. Obama would rely on a powerful board to cut payments to service providers, while gradually changing how hospitals and doctors are paid to reward results instead of volume. Romney would limit the amount of money future retirees can get from the government for medical insurance, relying on the private market to find an efficient solution. Each accuses of the other of jeopardizing the well-being of seniors. But panel members urged a frank discussion with the public about the value Americans are getting for their health care dollars. As a model, they cited “Choosing Wisely,” a campaign launched earlier this year by nine medical societies to challenge the widespread perception that more care is better. “Rationing to me is when we are denying medical care that is helpful to patients, on the basis of costs,” said cardiologist Dr. Rita Redberg, a medical school professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “We have a

lot of medical care that is not helpful to patients, and some of it is harmful. The problem is when you talk about getting rid of any type of health care, someone yells, ‘Rationing.’ ” More than 18 months in the making, the report identified six major areas of waste: unnecessary services ($210 billion annually); inefficient delivery of care ($130 billion); excess administrative costs ($190 billion); inflated prices ($105 billion); prevention failures ($55 billion); and fraud ($75 billion). Adjusting for some overlap among the categories, the panel settled on an estimate of $750 billion. Examples of wasteful care include most repeat colonoscopies within 10 years of a first such test, early imaging for most back pain, and brain scans for patients who fainted but didn’t have seizures. The report makes 10 recommendations, including payment reforms to reward quality results instead of reimbursing for each procedure, improving coordination among different kinds of service providers, leveraging

technology to reinforce sound clinical decisions and educating patients to become more savvy consumers. The report’s main message for government is to accelerate payment reforms, said panel chair Dr. Mark Smith, president of the California HealthCare Foundation, a research group. For employers, it’s to move beyond cost shifts to workers and start demanding accountability from hospitals and major medical groups. For doctors, it means getting beyond the bubble of solo practice and collaborating with peers and other clinicians. “It’s a huge hill to climb, and we’re not going to get out of this overnight,” said Smith. “The good news is that the very common notion that quality will suffer if less money is spent is simply not true. That should reassure people that the conversation about controlling costs is not necessarily about reducing quality.” The Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academy of Sciences, is an independent organization that advises the government.

Biden calls Obama ‘gutsy’ Biden told the convention in his own speech that he had watched as Obama “made one gutsy decision after another” to stop an economic free-fall after they took office in 2009. Now, he said, “we’re on a mission to move this nation forward from doubt and downturn to promise and prosperity. ... America has turned the corner.” Delegates were serenaded by singer James Taylor and rocked by R&B blues artist Mary J. Blige as they awaited Obama’s speech. There was no end to the jabs aimed at Romney and the Republicans. “Ask Osama bin Laden if he’s better off than four years ago,” said Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, who lost the 2004 election in a close contest with President George W. Bush. It was a mocking answer to the Republicans’ repeated question of whether Americans are better off than when Obama took office. The campaign focus was shifting quickly to politically sensitive monthly unemployment figures due out this morning and the first presidential debate on Oct. 3 in Denver. Wall Street hit a four-year high a few hours before Obama’s speech after the European Central Bank laid out a concrete plan to support the region’s struggling countries.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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FAMILY

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Dear Abby, B3

B

Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/family

IN BRIEF Share portraits with The Bulletin Have you taken your own family portraits? Did you shoot your student’s senior pictures yourself? If so, we would love to see them for possible inclusion in an upcoming story. Please send a copy of the picture by 5 p.m. today, including information on who is in it, when and where it was taken and a contact phone number, to ajohnson@bendbulletin.com. Questions? Contact: Alandra Johnson at 541617-7860.

Study: Marriage affects drinking

ISSUES IN AGING

&

CULTURE CARE • In the families of recent immigrants to the U.S., elderly relatives are often cared for at home, census figures show

Married men drink less alcohol; married women drink more. That’s the takeaway from a new study from the University of Cincinnati. Men who are married tend to consume fewer alcoholic drinks than men who are single, divorced or widowed. The authors of the study say this is in part due to the influence of their wives. But women who are married tend to drink more than women who are divorced or recently widowed, the study found, in part because they live with men who drink more.

Daily tantrums not the norm Most preschool-age children do not have daily temper tantrums, and those who do may be showing signs of a deeper problem, according to a new study that appeared in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Researchers from the Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine conducted the study with parents of children ages 3-5. Fewer than 10 percent reported the child throwing a tantrum each day. The study found that normal tantrums tended to happen when a child was tired — if the tantrum seemed to come out of nowhere, that was different. While all children throw some random tantrums, their frequency was important in determining deeper problems.

— Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

BEST BETS FOR FAMILY FUN Details, B3

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Elizabeth Garcia, right, dishes up a plate of food for her nephew Steven Garcia and her mother, Angelina Garcia. Elizabeth Garcia helps her siblings care for their mother, who is 84. “Hispanic people take care of their parents,” she says. By Mac McLean The Bulletin

E

lizabeth Garcia speaks to her 84-year-old mother, Angelina, in Spanish as she stirs a pot of cactus and potato stew that’s simmering on the stove at her brother’s house in southeast Bend. Her nephew Steven, 10, grabs some glasses from a cabinet and fills them with juice. “I always come here to watch my mother,” said Garcia, 51, who helps her siblings care for their mother, looking after her while they are at work. “I don’t live here, but I come by here every day.” Living arrangements like the Garcias’, in which an elderly parent lives with a son or daughter who doubles as their caretaker,

The Garcias are fairly common among with their ch Seniors who live Hispanics, Asians and Garcia only works at members of other ethnic her cleaning job a few groups who have recently days each week, so she immigrated to the United has plenty of time to States, according to the spend with her mother. U.S. Census Bureau. She helps Angelina cook Inside But studies have shown her meals, makes sure that these arrangements • A look at she takes her medicaseniors living start to disappear once tions and gives her a with their families settle into this ride to the store and her children, B6 country and start adoptdoctor’s office when she ing its way of life. needs it. “With each new gener“I stay with her most ation, they become more Ameri- of the time because she needs canized, and the less that (type my company,” Garcia said, addof living arrangement) becomes ing that she spends the night at the case,” said Robert Porterfield, her brother’s house if he or his executive director of the Latino wife have to work late or if she’s Community Association, a local had an especially long day with nonprofit that helps Latinos par- her mother and is too tired to go ticipate in their community. home. icans 65 or olde percent of Amer Though only 6 common among certain ethni practice is rather

26.7%

30%

25%

17.9%

20%

15%

7.5%

10%

5%

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Black

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Only 6.2 percent of the country’s senior citizens lived in a house headed by one of their children in 2010, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The rest lived in their own house, with their spouse, with a friend, or in a group setting such as a nursing home. But living with one’s adult children was much more common among ethnic groups such as Asians, where 26.7 percent of seniors lived with their children; those who listed their race as “other,” where 25.2 percent of seniors lived with their children; and Hispanics, where 17.8 percent of seniors lived with their children, according to the census. See Elder care / B6

Munch & Movies

This fun series concludes tonight with a free showing of “Hugo” in NorthWest Crossing’s Compass Park. And a little editorializing here — this movie is awesome! Although it may appeal more to parents than to kids, it is a film well worth watching for all ages.

Duck race

The Great Drake Park Duck Race is this weekend. Come watch those cute little rubber duckies race their way to the finish at Drake Park.

Day to Remember

Firefighter fans may want to check out this event in Powell Butte featuring all things firefighter. The event, which is free, includes a fire truck parade, an ax-throwing contest and much more — plus, benefits go to help the children of fallen firefighters.

“With each new generation, they become more Americanized, and the less that (type of living arrangement) becomes the case.” — Robert Porterfield, executive director, Latino Community Association

Librarian pens book about early literacy Picture books that win your vote KID CULTURE

Heather McNeil, the youth services manager for the Deschutes Public Library system, Parents who read books to outlines just how this works their kids are helping create — and offers plenty of building blocks for earexamples — in her new ly literacy. But did you book “Read, Rhyme, know that parents who and Romp: Early Litmake up silly songs eracy Skills and Acwith their kids are also tivities for Librarians, helping their little ones Teachers, and Parents.” learn to read? McNeil McNeil has been Learning to read working with kids in libraries isn’t just about memorizing for more than 30 years, so she the letters in the alphabet or has plenty of firsthand experieven about sitting down with ence with what works. “This a book. Some of the goofy, is what I’ve been doing for 35 fun stuff parents do at home years at the library,” she said. helps get kids’ brains ready to read, too. See Reading / B6

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids.

By Alandra Johnson

The Bulletin

The presidential election season is in full swing, so it is a wonderful time to introduce children to democracy in action through some great new books.

Submitted photos

“Vote For Me” By Ben Clanton This is a picture book for all ages that truthfully and humorously reveals how an election may devolve into mudslinging nonsense. Donkey and Elephant begin their election race with civility, but quickly

resort to name-calling and one-upmanship. While they are fighting it out, Mouse has been running his own campaign and wins the day to become “The Big Cheese.” “Amelia Bedelia’s First Vote” By Herman Parish Herman Parish, nephew of Peggy Parish, has continued the beloved Amelia Bedelia series, and his newest is “Amelia Bedelia’s First Vote.” This picture book introduces the process of voting to preschoolers with humor and some of Amelia Bedelia’s trademark literalness. See Books / B6


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

TV  M*+(#&

Find local movie times and film reviews inside today’s GO! Magazine.

5 new shows you have to watch By Chuck Barney

TV SPOTLIGHT

Contra Costa Times

It happens every fall: Our television sets suddenly burst at the seams with an overwhelming glut of new shows. But deciding which shows to bond with can be difficult. To help you out, we’ve sifted through broadcast TV’s massive freshman crop and homed in on five pilots that made us sit up and take notice. Keep in mind, however, TV shows are living things, unlike a movie. Can they sustain the distinctive qualities that seized our attention in the first place? How will they evolve? But for now, these five pilots have accomplished what all good ones should do: They’ve sucked us in and have us excited to see what comes next. 1. “Last Resort” ABC Not since the opening hour of “Lost” has a drama pilot delivered such a tense, twisty, thrilling ride. Andre Braugher is Marcus Chaplin, the captain of the USS Colorado, a nuclear submarine that receives orders to fire missiles on Pakistan. When he questions the validity of the directive and refuses, U.S. forces attack the Colorado. On the run with his crew (including Scott Speedman), Chaplin hightails it to an exotic but dangerous island. He then declares a nuclear standoff with his own government until he can figure out what the heck is going down in Washington. The remarkable Braugher is absolutely on fire here. But is his character a brave patriot, or an unhinged traitor? We’re not quite sure, but he’s definitely see-worthy. 2. “Nashville” ABC Think “All About Eve” done to a twangy country beat. Connie Britton is pitch-perfect as Rayna James, who, for

two decades, reigned as the top female vocalist in the business. Her career is starting to stall, and cunning young phenom Juliette Barnes (Hayden Panettiere) covets the throne. The claws come out when Rayna’s record label orders her to tour as an opener for Juliette. Offstage, there are other complications, including financial pressures, feelings for a past lover and a slimy political plot being hatched by Rayna’s estranged father (Powers Boothe). “Nashville” deftly blends soapy thrills with the kind of family drama, showbiz intrigue and catchy tunes that could have America singing its praises. 3. “The Mindy Project” Fox No longer content to just push paper and steal scenes on “The Office,” uber-talented Mindy Kaling not only stars in this aggressively quirky sitcom, but she created and wrote it. She plays a successful OBGYN who, after a humiliating arrest on the night of her exboyfriend’s wedding, pledges to take a more mature approach to her relationships. But that’s difficult to pull off when you’re so impulsive — and when life never seems to measure up to all those bigscreen romantic comedies you grew up watching. This pilot had an odd, somewhat uneven feel to it, but there’s a very promising concept here, and we admire how the show offsets the perky sweetness with some bite. Most of all, it has Kaling, who is both relatable and irresistible. 4. “Arrow” The CW A confession: Superhero sagas are not usually our thing, so we came with low expecta-

P!"#$%&’ G'()# %* M*+(#& This guide, compiled by Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

tions to this edgy comic-book adaptation and emerged pleasantly surprised. Buffed-up Stephen Amell shines as Oliver Queen, a billionaire playboy who, after being shipwrecked on an island for five years, morphs into a dashing vigilante with mad archery skills. Swiveling between flashbacks to the island and to present-day, crime-infested Starling City, the action-packed pilot does a terrific job of setting up lots of intriguing plots and possibilities while hinting that Oliver’s mother (Susanna Thompson) might know more about that shipwreck than she lets on. It looks like The CW may have found a worthy successor to “Smallville.” 5. “The New Normal” NBC Of our Top 5 shows, we’re the most leery of this one. Not because of its controversial premise — a gay couple (Andrew Rannells and Justin Bartha) enlists a surrogate (Georgia King) to have their baby — but because the pilot is so wobbly and erratic. Then again, it’s also hilarious and heartfelt. That’s how it generally works with a show from Ryan Murphy (“Glee,” “American Horror Story”). One moment you’re rolling your eyes at the overindulgence, the next you’re laughing ferociously at acerbic one-liners delivered by Ellen Barkin or NeNe Leakes, while admiring the refreshing, “All in the Family”-like boldness of the whole enterprise. Consider us cautiously optimistic.

THE WORDS Rating: PG-13 for brief strong language and smoking. What it’s about: A young writer finds fame and fortune by publishing another’s novel as his own. The kid attractor factor: Bradley Cooper, Zoe Saldana and Olivia Wilde are among its stars. Good lessons/ bad lessons: “Start taking responsibility for your life.” And when you make a mistake, make it right. Violence: None. Language: A smattering of profanity. Sex: Sexual situations. Drugs: Alcohol and cigarettes. Parents’ advisory: Any time your kids want to see a movie about reading and writing, that’s a good thing. OK for 12 and older.

‘PARANORMAN’ Rating: PG for scary action and images, thematic elements, some rude humor and language. What it’s about: A boy who hears and sees dead people is a town’s only hope when witch trial victims return to life to terrorize the place. The kid attractor factor: Stop motion animation, a “Coraline”/ “Corpse Bride” scary sensibility.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Bradley Cooper stars as Rory Jansen, left, and Jeremy Irons stars as The Old Man in “The Words.” See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine. Parents’ advisory: Too scary for the very young, but an edgy animated treat to anybody 8 and older.

‘PREMIUM RUSH’ Rating: PG-13 for some violence, intense action sequences and language. What it’s about: A gonzo bicycle messenger is chased by a crooked cop through the crowded streets of Manhattan. The kid attractor factor: Attractive, muscular young people

tearing through traffic in deathdefying bike sprints. Good lessons/ bad lessons: “Stay awake, stay alive.” And don’t try this bike stuff at home. Violence: Beatings, a shooting, and lots of bike accidents. Language: A tiny bit of mild swearing, here and there. Sex: Make-out sessions. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: As kid-friendly as thrillers get, this one is suitable for ages 11 and older.

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(6:50) High School Football Century at Mountain View (N) (Live) The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politics & Public Policy Today CSPAN 61 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ My Babysitter A.N.T. Farm (N) Jessie (N) ‘G’ Phineas, Ferb Gravity Falls ’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Good-Charlie Code 9 ’ ‘G’ Jessie ’ Å *DIS 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Yukon Men The Race for Fur ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold: Under the Ice Deep Dive Uncut (N) ’ Å Bering Sea Gold: Under the Ice Yukon Men Going for Broke ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold: Under the Ice *DISC 156 21 16 37 Yukon Men Hunt or Starve ‘PG’ Jonas Jonas Jonas The Soup ‘14’ E! News (N) Stand Up to Cancer (N) ’ ‘PG’ Jonas Jonas Fashion Police (N) ‘14’ Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å ESPN 21 23 22 23 NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Virginia 529 College Savings 250 NFL Live (N) Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å NFL Live Å E:60 QB Camp ESPN2 22 24 21 24 College Football Utah at Utah State (N) (Live) Friday Night Lights ‘14’ Å ››› “One Day in September” (1999) Ankie Spitzer. Å ››› “One Day in September” (1999) Ankie Spitzer. Å Summer Olympics ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Friday Night Lights ‘14’ Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Reba ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Princess Diaries” (2001, Comedy) Julie Andrews, Anne Hathaway. ›› “The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement” (2004) Anne Hathaway. The 700 Club ’ ‘PG’ Å FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Paula’s Cooking Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” (2009, Action) Hugh Jackman, Liev Schreiber. ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” (2009, Action) Hugh Jackman, Liev Schreiber. FX 131 Property Bro Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Kitchen Cousins Kitchen Cousins Kitchen Cousins ‘G’ Å House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 Property Bro American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å (11:02) American Pickers ‘PG’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Cults: Dangerous Devotion ‘PG’ Å Picked Off Outside the Box ‘PG’ Picked Off Cagey Strategy ‘PG’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted (N) ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ The Week the Women Went ‘PG’ LIFE 138 39 20 31 Picked Off Radio Fight ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: Raw Lockup: Raw Life and death. Lockup: Raw Hard Time Lockup: Indiana Lockup: Indiana Anonymous tip. MSNBC 59 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Snooki Jersey Shore: Gym, Tan 2012 VMA Pre-Show ’ 2012 MTV Video Music Awards ’ ‘14’ ››› “8 Mile” (2002, Drama) Eminem, Kim Basinger. ’ MTV 192 22 38 57 Snooki SpongeBob iCarly iBalls ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ (11:33) Friends NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob OWN 161 103 31 103 Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show Seahawks ROOT 20 45 28* 26 (3:30) High School Football Teams TBA (6:39) ›› “Without a Paddle” (2004, Comedy) Seth Green, Matthew Lillard. ’ ›› “Super Troopers” (2001, Comedy) Jay Chandrasekhar. ’ Å (11:15) Gangland Chicago. ’ ‘14’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (4:25) Gangland (5:32) Gangland Biker Wars 2 ‘14’ › “The Hills Have Eyes 2” (2007, Horror) Michael McMillian. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Lost Girl Into the Dark (N) Å Alphas Alphaville SYFY 133 35 133 45 (4:00) “The Seamstress” (2009) Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey ‘G’ The Harvest Perry Stone Praise the Lord Å Ever Increasing Israel: Journey of Light Å Creflo Dollar Miracles Around Us Å TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Stand Up to Cancer (N) ’ ‘PG’ Better Worse Better Worse Better Worse Better Worse ›› “Daddy’s Little Girls” (2007) *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ››› “Birdman of Alcatraz” (1962, Biography) Burt Lancaster, Karl Malden, Thelma Ritter. A (7:45) ›› “Cell 2455, Death Row” (1955, Drama) William (9:15) ›› “Convicts Four” (1963, Biography) Ben Gazzara, Stuart Whitman, (11:15) ››› “The Legend of Hell TCM 101 44 101 29 prison inmate becomes a world-famous authority on birds. Å Campbell, Robert Campbell, Kathryn Grant. Ray Walston. Story of convict artist John Resko. Å House” (1973, Horror) Å Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL I Found-Gown I Found-Gown Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL I Found-Gown I Found-Gown Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: ATL The Mentalist Redacted ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Inglourious Basterds” (2009, War) Brad Pitt. Soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. Å (DVS) Braveheart Å *TNT 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Disciple ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Annoying Regular Show Adventure Time Wrld, Gumball NinjaGo: Mstrs Dragons: Riders Level Up ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å The Dead Files ‘PG’ Å The Dead Files ‘PG’ Å *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ (6:32) M*A*S*H (7:05) M*A*S*H (7:43) M*A*S*H Mail Call ‘PG’ (8:21) M*A*S*H Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza Breed of Violence ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU CSI: Crime Scene Investigation USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU The Women of SNL ’ ‘14’ Å Stand Up to Cancer (N) ‘PG’ Saturday Night Live Featuring Jimmy Fallon. ’ ‘14’ Å T.I. and Tiny T.I. and Tiny VH1 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

››› “Holes” 2003, Adventure Sigourney Weaver. ’ ‘PG’ Å Stand Up to Cancer (N) ’ ‘PG’ ›› “The Green Hornet” 2011, Action Seth Rogen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “Shanghai Knights” 2003 ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:30) ›› “Mars Needs Moms” FXM Presents ›› “Dr. Dolittle 2” 2001, Comedy Eddie Murphy. ‘PG’ Å ›› “Dr. Dolittle 2” 2001, Comedy Eddie Murphy. ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Score” 2001 Robert De Niro. ‘R’ Å FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) ›› “Meet Dave” 2008 UFC Ultimate Knockouts 9 ‘14’ Forrest Griffin: The Ultimate Fighter UFC: In the Moment The Rise of Jon Jones ‘14’ UFC Bad Blood Chuck Liddell and Tito Ortiz. ‘14’ Matt Hughes FUEL 34 Golf Central (N) 19th Hole (N) PGA Tour Golf BMW Championship, Second Round GOLF 28 301 27 301 LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf BMW Championship, Second Round From Crooked Stick Golf Club in Carmel, Ind. Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ ›› “Elevator Girl” (2010) Lacey Chabert, Ryan Merriman. ‘PG’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Pearls ‘G’ Å (4:00) ›› “Monte Carlo” 2011 Selena ›› “The Dilemma” 2011, Comedy Vince Vaughn, Kevin James. A man sees Stand Up to Cancer (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Stand Up to Cancer ’ ‘PG’ Å Real Time With Bill Maher Political Real Time With Bill Maher Political HBO 425 501 425 501 Gomez. ’ ‘PG’ Å his best friend’s wife out with another guy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å strategist Steve Schmidt. ‘MA’ strategist Steve Schmidt. ‘MA’ ›› “The Gate” 1987 Stephen Dorff. ‘PG-13’ (6:45) ›› “Cursed” 2005, Horror Christina Ricci. ‘NR’ (8:45) ›› “The Gate” 1987, Horror Stephen Dorff. ‘PG-13’ ›› “Cursed” 2005, Horror Christina Ricci. ‘NR’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) › “Red Rid- (5:45) ›› “Cowboys & Aliens” 2011, Science Fiction Daniel Craig, Harrison Ford, Olivia Wilde. ››› “Collateral” 2004, Suspense Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx. A contract killer Strike Back Section 20 relocates to Skin to the Max Strike Back ’ MAX 400 508 508 ing Hood” Extraterrestrials attack a 19th-century Arizona town. ’ ‘NR’ Å uses a cabdriver for his jobs. ’ ‘R’ Å Cape Town. (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å (N) ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Doomsday Preppers ‘14’ Doomsday Preppers ‘14’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Doomsday Preppers ‘14’ Doomsday Preppers ‘14’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Wild Grinders Wild Grinders Planet Sheen Dragonball GT Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Wild Grinders Planet Sheen Dragonball GT Avatar: Air. Dragon Ball Z Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 115 Wild Grinders Outfitter Boot Sasquatch Driven TV Bassmasters Jimmy Big Time Hunt., Country Bone Collector Profess. Flyrod Magnum TV Huntin’ World OUTD 37 307 43 307 L.L. Bean Guide Fear No Evil (4:30) ››› “The Company Men” 2010, Drama Ben Af- (6:25) ››› “Source Code” 2011, Suspense Jake Gyllen- Stand Up to Cancer (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Our Idiot Brother” 2011, Comedy Paul Rudd, Eliza- ››› “The Big Lebowski” 1998, Comedy Jeff Bridges, SHO 500 500 fleck, Chris Cooper. ’ ‘R’ Å haal, Michelle Monaghan. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å beth Banks. ’ ‘R’ Å John Goodman. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Formula 1 Debrief (N) Mobil The Grid Formula One Racing Italian Grand Prix, Practice Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Australian V8 Supercars Sydney (5:50) ›› “How Do You Know” 2010 Reese Witherspoon. ‘PG-13’ Stand Up to Cancer (N) ’ ‘PG’ Boss Redemption (N) ‘MA’ Å Boss Redemption ’ ‘MA’ Å Camelot Lady of the Lake Å STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:10) “Resident Evil: Afterlife” (4:35) ›› “Tough Guys” 1986, Comedy-Drama Burt Lan- (6:25) ›› “Pete Smalls Is Dead” 2010, Comedy Peter ›› “Faster” 2010, Action Dwayne Johnson. An ex-con begins a race against ››› “Roadracers” 1994 David Arquette. A youth and his (11:35) “King of TMC 525 525 caster, Kirk Douglas. ’ ‘PG’ Å Dinklage, Tim Roth. Premiere. ’ ‘NR’ Å time to avenge his brother’s murder. ’ ‘R’ Å girlfriend seek to escape their small town. Paper Chasin’” CFL Football Calgary Stampeders at Edmonton Eskimos From Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton. (N) Caught Looking ‘PG’ Dream On: Journey Caught Looking ‘PG’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Caught Looking ‘PG’ My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å My Fair Wedding *WE 143 41 174 118 My Fair Wedding


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Waiter’s use of makeup, wig shocks mother of 2 Dear Abby: Last night at a restaurant, my husband and I were surprised to see a male server wearing a blond wig and full makeup. I was, to say the least, shocked and very glad we hadn’t brought the children, ages 11 and 14, with us. How do you explain something like that to an 11-yearold? The 14-year-old would be able to “get it.” What kind of policies are in place for restaurants in cases like this? What if customers are offended? Could I request a different server or just leave? Your comments would be appreciated. — Taken Aback in California Dear Taken Aback: In California, people have the legal right to dress in a style not typical of their gender without fear of discrimination or retaliation. That right is protected by state law. If customers find it offensive, they can either request a different server or take their business elsewhere. Presumably, the customer would pay for food that had already been prepared. Because children today grow up quickly and are less sheltered than in past decades, I recommend you explain to your 11-year-old that not all people are alike, and the importance of treating others with respect. It’s called reality. Dear Abby: My boyfriend, “Shane,” and I have been together more than a year. My problem lies in child support issues. I’m a college student and full-time employee at a major company. I make a pretty good living considering my age. Shane is an electrician, and half of every paycheck he earns is going to his child’s mother. I understand the money is being given to support the child, but every time we see him, the kid says his mommy is broke. Because my boyfriend’s check is half gone by the time he brings it home, I must pick

DEAR ABBY up the slack regarding the bills. Shane helps out any way he can, but it’s never enough, so I have to step in. I love him, he treats me like a queen and I have yet to have a major problem with him. But it’s the money situation. I feel a little guilty for feeling this way. What do I do in this situation? Please help. — Feeling Guilty in Colorado Dear Feeling Guilty: Stop feeling guilty. Your feelings are natural considering that Shane isn’t carrying his half of the load he shares with you financially. Talk to him about the way the inequity is making you feel because if you don’t, your resentment will only grow. He may need to find a second job so you have to “step in” less often. The alternative is to accept that the present will also be your future. Dear Abby: I have a pet peeve — people who make a big production out of yawning. It’s not enough to just yawn quietly. Noooo, they have to open wide, not cover their mouth and moan loudly. It annoys the heck out of me and I’m not sure it’s appropriate to say anything. People who do this seem to have several yawns in succession and want to make sure everyone notices. Any suggestions other than to grin and bear it? — Seeking Quiet in Georgia Dear Seeking Quiet: Yes. If it’s happening socially say, “I can see you’re getting tired, so maybe it’s time to end this visit.” If it’s happening at work, suggest the person take a break and go outside for some fresh air. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you tend to overthink. You could let that habit run rampant in your life, but know that talking and thinking will prevent you from feeling. Opportunities come to you when you’re out and about, whether you are involved in a community cause or working at your job. You get lucky in these situations. If you are single, you could meet someone who also overthinks. This trait reveals that there is a deep bond between you. You know how to build each other up. If you are attached, you relate far better, as you both commit to a mutual interest. You start enjoying being out and about more as a couple. GEMINI could use logic against you, even if you are extremely sensible. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You have a lot to say, and others seem to listen carefully. A gesture is well-intended, but unfortunately it results in confusion and uproar. You might scratch your head and wonder how this situation could have happened. Tonight: Catching up on a friend’s news. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You could be unusually possessive. You also might wonder what you need to do in order to secure a relationship or situation. The issue is not how to handle the discomfort in your favor, but how to root out your insecurity. Tonight: Your treat. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You are capable of beaming in exactly what you want. Do not let someone add confusion and throw you off your mission. Others respond to your efforts, especially a roommate or family member. Tonight: All smiles. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You might feel out of kilter. You cannot change how you feel, but you could decide to spend less time around people who could be quite dominating. You will need some time to revitalize and think. Tonight: Vanish ... hopefully for a good reason. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Listen to friends and/or associates. You will get many different perspectives. Your sense of direction will help you create a greater sense of well-being. You could lock on to someone’s ideas. Trust your

judgment that you are making the correct choice. Tonight: Time for fun. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Take charge and clear out errands. A partner or associate seems to be in another world; therefore, you must run with the ball on your own. Someone you look up makes a difference in your life. You could like what happens in the long run. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Keep reaching out for others who you care about enormously. Your creativity emerges with someone who often touches your daily life. You might want to reorganize your day and go with impulsiveness. Tonight: Read between the lines. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You work best on a one-on-one level with others right now. When in groups, you might not be able to express what you are thinking. An unusual financial opportunity could come out of left field. Be prepared to jump on it. Tonight: Talk over munchies. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might want to rethink plans, especially as the apple of your eye makes a significant gesture toward you. You might decide to take off for a special weekend out of the blue. Good will seems to surround you. Tonight: Do the unexpected. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Your focus remains on finishing tasks, despite distractions. You will enjoy the weekend far more and have a better time. Someone close to you in your daily life reveals the depth of his or her feelings. You could feel quite touched. Tonight: Do what comes naturally. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Try as you might, you could have difficulty staying on task, especially if it has to do with anything except the upcoming weekend. You need time off from your routine to continue being creative and vibrant. Tonight: Be a wild thing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH If you can stay close to home and do what you enjoy, most certainly make those plans. An offer comes to you as a result of your own positive attitude. Do not give credit to anyone else. You could see life far differently, even if you go with the flow. Tonight: Order in. Get cozy. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate

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A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon.

Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Find a full community events calendar inside today’s GO! Magazine.

FRIDAY GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help complete the reclaimed fence around the Kansas Ave. Learning Garden; free; 9 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmers market@gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Three-day folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier, Gregory Alan Isakov and more; SOLD OUT; 5:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival.org or www .sistersfolkfestival.org. YOGIS UNITE!: With yoga classes, social activities and dance performances; $25 for two days; 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; information@ yogisunitebend.com or www .yogisunitebend.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Hugo”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-3890995 or www.northwest crossing.com. “GREGORIAN, GOSPEL AND GERSHWIN”: Mark Oglesby presents an organ concert; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. RED ROCK SQUARE DANCE: Spectators and dancers welcome; $5, free for spectators; 7-10 p.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-923-8804. “RICHARD III”: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; with a champagne reception; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail. com or www.2ndstreettheater .com. SCREEN ON THE GREEN: Juggling performance followed by a screening of the PG-rated film “How to Train Your Dragon”; free; 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m. movie; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY HIGH DESERT SWAP MEET

Submitted photo

Families can watch “How to Train Your Dragon” free during the Screen on the Green event in Madras tonight.

& CAR SHOW: A sale of antiques and a car show; proceeds benefit local and regional charities; free admission; 7 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-4467 or bramsey@bend broadband.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prineville farmersmarket@gmail.com. GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help complete the reclaimed fence around the Kansas Ave. Learning Garden; free; 9 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908. HIGH DESERT SHOWDOWN: Event features quarter-mile drag boat races; $10-$12, $20 weekend pass; $10 Saturday, $12 Sunday; Haystack Reservoir, Southwest Haystack Reservoir Road, Culver; www.cd baracing.com. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. YOGIS UNITE!: An outdoor yoga event with classes, exhibitors, a raffle and more; registration requested; $25 for two days; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; information@yogisunitebend .com or www.yogisunitebend.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. A DAY TO REMEMBER: Featuring a fire truck parade, booths, axthrowing contests, demonstrations, races and more; proceeds benefit a scholarship fund for the children of fallen firefighters; free admission; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Big Al’s Firehouse Grill, state Highway 126 and Williams Road, Powell Butte; 541-548-1488. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier, Gregory Alan Isakov and more; SOLD OUT; 11-12:30 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5494979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. LA GUITARRA IN MEXICO: A lecture tracing the history of the guitar and its different transformations in Mexico; free; 3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121032, lizg@deschuteslibrary.org or

www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “RICHARD III”: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

SUNDAY HIGH DESERT SHOWDOWN: Event features quarter-mile drag boat races; $10-$12, $20 weekend pass; $10 Saturday, $12 Sunday; Haystack Reservoir, Southwest Haystack Reservoir Road, Culver; www.cd baracing.com. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier, Gregory Alan Isakov and more; SOLD OUT; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. ANNUAL GREAT DRAKE PARK DUCK RACE: Event includes live music, food, activity booths and duck races; proceeds from duck sales benefit local charities; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.theduckrace.com. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-647-4789. LA GUITARRA IN MEXICO: A lecture tracing the history of the guitar and its different transformations in Mexico; free; 2 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-3121032, lizg@deschuteslibrary.org or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “RICHARD III”: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

MONDAY “CAMP AMACHE — AN AMERICAN STORY”: Gordon Nagai talks about his family’s experiences in a Japanese internment camp in Colorado and Japanese volunteers who served in the army; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-4663.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@hotmail .com. BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541323-3370 or farmersmarket@ brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS: The ’80s rockers perform; $39 or $78 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The concert series finale; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www.musicinthecanyon.com.

THURSDAY TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. “RICHARD III”: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

S!"#$ T%&'( )*+ L%,#)#$ Y"-!. E/'*!( For the week of Sept. 7-13 Story times are free unless otherwise noted.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242

ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188

STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Thursday. Crook County Public Library 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday.

Downtown Bend Public Library 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11:30 a.m. Wednesday and 1:30 p.m. Thursday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday and 10:15 a.m. Wednesday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. Friday and 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. East Bend Public Library 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760

TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 0-3; 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 9:30 a.m. Thursday. SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 0-5; 10 a.m. Saturday.

treasure hunt; 12:30 p.m. to close Wednesday. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Ages 3-4; explore museum’s animal habitat, share stories and songs; 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday; $15 per child nonmembers, $10 per child members. TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; storytelling about animals and people of the High Desert; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. Jefferson County Public Library 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351

BABIES AND TODDLERS STORY TIME: 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. PRESCHOOL AND OLDER STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday.

High Desert Museum

La Pine Public Library

59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www. highdesertmuseum.org; 541-382-4754; unless noted, events included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger)

16425 First St.; 541-312-1090

WILD WEDNESDAYS: Ages 7-12;

FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. TECH LAB: Ages 12-17; 3 p.m. Monday.

Redmond Public Library 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Thursday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Thursday. TEEN TERRITORY: Ages 12-17; 2:30 to 4 p.m. Wednesday. Sisters Public Library 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Sunriver Area Public Library 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. GAME DAY: Ages 10-17; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday.


B4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


B5

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 Deschutes County Library system’s Youth Services Manager Heather McNeil talks with children during a back-toschool story time at the downtown Bend library. Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Seniors who live with their children

Though only 6 percent of Americans 65 or older as a whole live in their children’s homes, the practice is rather common among certain ethnic groups like Hispanics and Asians. 30%

26.7%

25.2%

25%

17.9%

20%

17.7%

15% 10% 5% 0

3.7% White

7.5%

Black

7.7%

Hispanic

Asian

11.3% 6.2%

American Native Two Indian/ Hawaiian/ or more Alaska Pacific races Native Islander

Source: 2010 U.S. Census

Reading Continued from B1 McNeil points out that Mother Goose rhymes and lullabies and making up singsong ditties in the car are all “important; they are not just filler.” For instance, rhyming can teach kids about how words are formed — the end of a word is what makes a rhyme (why “cat” rhymes with “bat” and not “car”). She says her goal with the book was to show the fun side of learning to read and to “bring literacy alive without DVDs, without spending much money.” McNeil focuses on talking, singing, storytelling and rhyming — these are the activities that “grow a reader.” This is the third book she has written; the first two focused on storytelling. The new book is jam-packed with activities for parents, educators and librarians — aimed at kids from birth to age 5 or 6. McNeil also dedicates lots of space to lists detailing her favorite books, broken into categories. She lists her favorite interactive picture books (“Snappy Little Pets” and “Peek-a-Moo!” are two), a dozen of the best poetry books for kids (“Bow Wow Meow Meow: It’s Rhyming Cats and Dogs” is one), and alphabet books for preschoolers (such as “The Bouncing, Dancing, Galloping ABC”). She includes lists of favorite books in specific categories like this in every chapter. “These are all books I know and love — surefire hits,” said McNeil, who said she got some help from fellow librarians. The book is packed with specific activities that parents, educators and librarians can do with young children. For instance, McNeil suggests having a letter of the day and celebrating that letter all day with 26 different activities. One of her favorite at-home activities is for parents and kids to make a book together. The subject can be simple:

McNeil’s favorites Although Heather McNeil describes dozens of her favorite books in her own new book, “Read, Rhyme, and Romp,” we asked her to highlight a few of her very special favorites. “The Feel Good Book” by Todd Parr “Magic Hat” by Mem Fox “Little Quack” by Lauren Thompson “Owl Babies” by Martin Waddell “Home for a Bird” by Philip Christian Stead McNeil’s book is available at Barnes & Noble Booksellers, by special order at local bookstores, through Amazon or at www.abc-clio.com (starting at $45). McNeil also says that if parents are interested in purchasing the book, they can contact her for a discount, at heatherm@dpls.lib.or.us.

what we did today, my favorite colors, dogs. Mom or Dad writes the words, as dictated by the child. Then the child draws the accompanying pictures. Finally, the parent punches holes in the pages and “binds” the book with yarn. McNeil also encourages parents and kids to make up stories together. She says sometimes parents can feel intimidated by the prospect of creating their own story, but she says it doesn’t have to be that complicated. She suggests making up a story with prompts for the child. The parent says, “Once upon a time there was a …” and the child fills in the word, maybe “duck.” Then the parent asks questions: What was the duck wearing? What was the duck doing? Where was she going? “When you create a story with a child … it becomes uniquely theirs,” McNeil said.

Books Continued from B1 When Mr. K, the principal, promises to implement whatever new rule the children vote on, Amelia Bedelia proposes no-homework Wednesdays. After a tie vote between Amelia’s rule and ice cream sandwiches for lunch, an absentee ballot decides the election. “See How They Run: Campaign Dreams, Election Schemes, and the Race to the White House” By Susan Goodman and Elwood Smith This book has been updated just in time for the 2012 election season. This wonderful nonfiction title for children in grades

Submitted photos

4-7 introduces the process of presidential elections through a blend of history and current events. Both text and illustrations are engaging and illuminating. Pithy quotes from Ben Franklin appear throughout the book and this is one is a keeper: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.”

Early literacy is important in order to help get children ready to read and ready for school. McNeil says these techniques can help build children’s vocabulary and help them understand how a book works (there’s a beginning, middle and end, for instance). Kids who live in homes with no or few books may spend most of kindergarten just trying to catch up. Vocabulary is also important. McNeil says it affects a child’s social life: “The more vocabulary they have, the more comfortable and confident they are.” One thing she thinks surprises some parents is her recommendation that they begin reading 20 minutes a day to their children when they are babies. There are reasons for this: It builds up a habit of reading, and it helps the infant learn the parent’s voice and learn to love books. Another thing parents often ask McNeil about concerns reading the same book over and over — at the request of their child — to the point where they feel as if they may lose their minds. “I tell them, read it one more time,” McNeil said. Children love predictability, and repetition will help them learn to “read” the book on their own. McNeil also suggests that sometimes, parents might try forgetting about the text and instead think about having a conversation with the book. What is the child interested in on the page? Can you tell a story about that object? “Let them guide you,” said McNeil. It will engage kids’ curiosity and help stimulate conversation. This can be especially helpful for children who are struggling to read. McNeil’s goal with her book is to give teachers, librarians and parents ideas to “make exploring literacy fun and to get a child ready to read.”

Other race

Total

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Elder care

Changing dynamics

Continued from B1 “Hispanic people take care of their parents,” said Garcia, who grew up in a household with three generations — children, parents and grandparents — in the same house. Her grandparents helped raise their grandchildren, and her parents took care of them as they aged. Garcia also said she feels a certain debt to her parents because they took care of her when she was growing up — they fed her, they put her through school, they paid for her college — and taking care of her mother is simply her way of paying that debt back. This type of familial obligation is common among many Hispanic families that have immigrated to the United States, said Porterfield. He said the bonds are especially strong among families that have just immigrated here from their home countries, so much so that they will send money to their parents if they cannot join them on the trip. But, Porterfield said, the longer a family has been in this country, the less likely it is to have a living arrangement that resembles the Garcias’. That’s because the structure of the family starts to change in ways that make these arrangements unsustainable.

Living arrangements like the Garcias’ play an important role in helping Mexican immigrants get used to life in the United States, argues Robert Alvarez, a professor emeritus with the University of California, San Diego’s Ethnic Studies department. “The strong sentiment towards family … provided a base of settlement for people in the United States,” Alvarez wrote in a 1994 study that looked at how family arrangements change among Latino cultures that come to the United States. “Migrants faced with strange and often threatening social environments naturally sought each other out and extended the relationships used in home environments.” However, Alvarez hints that these living arrangements are tenuous for a number of reasons, including the fact that while recent immigrants may rely on their extended families for basic social interactions, that’s not the case for their children. These children, who he said comprise second- and latter-generation immigrants, start to make friends outside their family and as a result “have less extended kin relations.” Living arrangements and strong family ties also face a changing dynamic when the

family, or its latest generation of offspring, advances economically. Issues like mobility can get in the way of the traditional family arrangement. “We tend to move around a lot,” said Porterfield. “You get an education, you get a career and you start to get away from that extended family culture.” Once all of these factors have been figured into the equation, Alvarez said, the obligations and family arrangements immigrants first brought with them to this country start to fade away. Their families start to resemble the American nuclear family — where children live with their parents only while they are young — and care is most often provided to the parents indirectly when they age and not in the children’s home. Even Garcia’s family arrangement is on the verge of changing. A few weeks ago, her mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, a degenerative mental condition that will eventually require specialized round-theclock care. “When she needs help every day,” said Garcia, who seemed unwilling to give up what little time she has to herself, “I will have to talk to my sisters and my brothers.” — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

— Reporter: 541-617-7860, ajohnson@bendbulletin.com

“Babymouse For President” By Jennifer Holm and Matthew Holm “Bad Kitty For President” By Nick Bruel The graphic novel “Babymouse For President” and the novel “Bad Kitty For President” are two hilarious series books for children in grades 2-5. These titles introduce the two candidates and their campaigns, which seem both ridiculous but also very familiar. While Babymouse regains her soul at the end of her unsuccessful campaign, curmudgeonly Bad Kitty swears revenge at the end of his. — Recommendations from Cheryl Weems, youth services collection development librarian with the Deschutes Public Library system

SMOLICH VOLVO 1865 North East Highway 20 | Bend, OR | (541) 389-1177 www.smolichvolvo.com

Expires 9/30/12


LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Jail expansion on agenda today The Deschutes County Board of Commissioners called a special work session at noon today to further discuss a proposal to expand the county jail at an estimated cost of $10 million. County Sheriff Larry Blanton said Wednesday the money, to be prospectively paid for by a county bond issue, would pay for a 144-bed addition to the south end of the jail on Jamison Road in Bend. The commissioners are scheduled to meet in the Allen Room, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend. They are also scheduled to meet Tuesday, with the jail proposal again on the agenda. Commissioner Tammy Baney at the regular session Wednesday questioned whether other options exist short of new construction that address what Blanton described as overcrowding at the 228-bed county lockup. The county juvenile detention facility on Britta Road may accommodate 88 adults, for example. Deschutes County rents jail beds from neighboring Jefferson County. A $10 million bond issue paid back over 2530 years could cost approximately $15 million, according to interim County Administrator Erik Kropp.

DESCHUTES COUNTY

Administrator finalists to visit Bend for round 2 Bulletin staff report Deschutes County will bring five finalists for its vacant county administrator position to Bend in two weeks for interviews and a community meet-and-greet. The position has been vacant since former County Administrator Dave Kanner was fired in August 2011. This will be the second round of interviews the county will conduct. No candidate was chosen from the first pool of finalists in March. The candidates are Donald Bohn, assistant county administrator in Washington County; Dana Hlavac, deputy

county manager in Mohave County, Ariz.; Michael McNees, chief operating officer for USA Track and Field; David Meriwether, county administrator in Hood River County; and Gail Shibley, administrator for the Center of Health Protection, a division of the Oregon Health Authority. The finalists were picked from a pool of 56 applicants. The meet-and-greet will be held at 4:30 p.m. Sept. 16 at the Deschutes Services Building, 1300 N.W. Wall Street, Bend, in the Barnes/Sawyer conference room. See Deschutes / C2

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Nurses set to picket at St. Charles Bend • Talks mired over 2 patient-safety issues By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Nurses plan to start informational picketing at St. Charles Bend on Monday after their union and the hospital failed to agree on a new contract. The picketing, which will not include a work stoppage or affect patient care, comes after the Oregon Nurses Association and the hospital concluded 17 meetings, including 11 bargaining sessions and six meetings with a federal mediator, without a final contract. Negotia-

tions began May 23. St. Charles’ Chief Nursing Officer Tim Eixenberger said the groups most recently met Wednesday and the hospital provided the nurses with what he called “a solid proposal.” He said hospital officials now must make sure the nurses know about and understand the most recent proposal. The parties have reached a variety of tentative agreements, Human Resources Director Rebecca Morgan said. But union representa-

tives said two patient-safety issues are standing in the way of a final contract. “Unfortunately none of those bargaining sessions or mediated meetings were successful, so the nurses do not have an agreement,” said Scott Palmer, the communications director for the Oregon Nurses Association. Palmer and Alison Hamway, the ONA local labor relations representative, said two sticking points stood in the way of a contract agreement: concerns for “patient safety and patient care.” See Nurses / C2

MASTERS OF THE ROAD

— Bulletin staff reports

More briefing and News of Record, C2

ELECTION CALENDAR • Candidate forum featuring Deschutes County Commissioner Position 2 candidates Tom Greene and Alan Unger; sponsored by the League of Women Voters; 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.; Sept. 25; Deschutes County Building, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-382-2724.

— Contact: 541-383-0354, news@bendbulletin.com. In emails, please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line. Include a contact name and number.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Riders participating in the USA Cycling Masters Road National Championship men’s 35-39 road race Thursday head down Century Drive from Mt. Bachelor Ski Area. For information about today’s cycling events, see Sports.

FIRE UPDATE Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx. Bend

1

Baker City Burns

Madras Bend

2

MILES 0

50

Lakeview 1. Waterfalls 2 Fire • Acres: 12,265 • Containment: 85% • Cause: Lightning 2. Parish Cabin Fire • Acres: 6,481 • Containment: 90% • Cause: Human

Correction A headline that appeared Wednesday, Sept. 5, on Page C3, misidentified Oregon’s newest city. La Pine is Oregon’s newest city, having been incorporated in 2006. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Bend High students set goals for year Redmond By Ben Botkin

Justin Schwarz set a high bar for himself Thursday as his sophomore year began at Bend High School. Schwarz, 15, is aiming for straight A’s. Last year, he came close with eight A’s and a B. He plans to participate more in study groups and not put off assignments. “This year, I’m a little more prepared,” he said. “Last year, I procrastinated a lot.” Class started Thursday for 10th- through 12th-graders in the Bend-La Pine Schools system. Freshman students attended orientation sessions Wednesday, making Thurs-

wants city manager by Nov. 1

BACK TO SCHOOL

The Bulletin

bendbulletin.com/back2school

day their first day to mingle with the upperclassmen. Bend High had an enrollment of 1,569 last fall. This year’s official enrollment figures weren’t available Thursday, said district spokeswoman Julianne Repman. School officials throughout the district are still tallying up final numbers. That entails finding out if absent but registered students have changed plans or will attend school. See Bend High / C2

The cuter, the better Submit photos of your favorite back-to-school kid to our gallery at bendbulletin .com/back2school/submitphotos.

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend High sophomores Khaida Gordon, left, Katie Corley and Alecsis Bridges, all 15, get the giggles Thursday while eating lunch together on the first day of school.

First day of school Wednesday was the first day of class for schools in the Bend La-Pine, Crook County and Culver school districts. Here are starting dates for other Central Oregon districts. Note: Parents of kindergartners should contact their elementary schools about start dates.

BEND-LA PINE

CULVER

• Wednesday, grades 1-9 • Thursday, grades 10-12

• Wednesday, grades 1-9 • Thursday, grades 10-12

CROOK COUNTY • Wednesday, grades 7-8 and 10-12

JEFFERSON COUNTY • Monday, grades 1-6 and 9 • Tuesday, grades 7, 8, and 10-12

REDMOND

• Monday, grades 2-6 and 9 at Redmond High, all grades at Ridgeview High • Tuesday, grades 7, 8 and 10-12 at Redmond High • Sept. 12, grade 1

The city of Redmond plans to hire a replacement for recently departed City Manager David Brandt by November, just in time to start work on the upcoming budget cycle. Brandt left last month after three years to take a similar position in Cupertino, Calif. Assistant City Manager Sharon Harris is serving as interim city manager, but says she isn’t interested in keeping the role. The City Council met in a closed session Tuesday night to whittle away at a list of 25 candidates. There is no official list of finalists, but an announcement is likely to be made soon. The city contracted with consultant Larry Patterson, Bend city manager from 1986 to 2001, to help with the search. See Redmond / C2


C2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from C1

Bend hiker rescued from South Sister A Bend hiker who was injured in a fall while hiking South Sister in the Three Sisters Wilderness on Wednesday was rescued Thursday morning. Ryan Kelly, 20, was descending South Sister on Wednesday evening with two hiking partners when he lost his footing and slid nearly 200 feet down an ice field. One of Kelly’s hiking partners called 911 because Kelly’s injuries prevented him from walking back to the group’s base camp near Green Lakes. About a dozen Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue volunteers responded to the call but were unable to locate Kelly in the darkness of night. Kelly was eventually airlifted to St. Charles Bend on Thursday morning with non-life-threatening injuries.

Pedestrian traffic sting in Redmond The Redmond Police Department will conduct a pedestrian traffic sting in southwest Redmond on Thursday. The sting will take place from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the intersection of Southwest Canal Boulevard and South-

Deschutes Continued from C1 Interim County Administrator Erik Kropp said the finalists will be interviewed Sept. 17 by panels made up of county commissioners, county staff members and community members. The county administrator

west Elkhorn Avenue near Ridgeview High School. Police will be looking for drivers violating pedestrian safety laws.

Cyclist injured on Funner Trail A mountain bike rider who crashed on the Funner trail off Century Drive suffered serious injuries Thursday afternoon Jesus Ramirez, 33, of Mexico, lost control of his bike and struck several rocks about 200 yards uphill from the intersection of the Funner Trail and the Storm King Trail about 3:10 p.m., said Deschutes County Sheriff’s Lt. Scott Shelton. His riding partner stayed with him and stabilized his injuries, while deputies, Forest Service officers and Search & Rescue personnel headed to the area. Ramirez was taken out of the woods on a wheeled litter and taken to St. Charles Bend.

— Bulletin staff reports

Submissions: • Letters and opinions: Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Details on the Editorials page inside. Contact: 541-383-0358, bulletin@bendbulletin.com

is the top management position in county government. The role is responsible for briefing county commissioners on most matters that come before the board. The starting salary is expected to be negotiated. Kanner earned an annual salary of just under $157,000 at the time of his termination.

Redmond

Bend High

Nurses

Continued from C1 “Our goal is to try and have someone by the first of November, given we can find someone that quick,” Mayor George Endicott said. City officials hope to find a candidate with many of Brandt’s attributes: a laidback personality and wellliked among staff and city partners. Endicott called him both a “teammate” and a “professional.” “I want two things in a city manager,” Endicott said. “One is someone who gets along with staff. David was like a mentor, and he did a good job of managing down. The other side is keeping the council happy and interfacing well with the public. And in the end, make sure we be direct with the public and do the right thing for the city. David always did that.” Redmond Chamber of Commerce Director Eric Sande said he hopes the next city manager will continue to work at job growth. “We have a lot going on, and we need someone who can break down the barriers that may exist in getting business in Redmond,” Sande said. “The city manager helps set the tone for that.” Jon Stark, director of Redmond Economic Development Inc., said he had “an extremely solid partnership” with Brandt. “We reached out to each other constantly to make sure nothing fell through the cracks,” Stark said. “Redmond has had this business-friendly reputation ... and they really earned that reputation and carried it forward through David’s three years here. We need a manager that continues that reputation.” The Redmond city website lists the city manager salary at $123,600 a year. Endicott said the job listing for city manager lists the salary as commensurate with experience.

Continued from C1 As the day unfolded, students greeted friends and newcomers started to find their way around. Those new to Bend High can turn to seniors like Mallory Edmunson, 17. She has a busy year ahead, but says upperclassmen should be willing to help freshmen. Her goals for the year include being a role model for younger students, seeking college athletic scholarships and helping her soccer team win the state championship. Her senior year also comes with a realization that the end of high school is in sight. “It’s sad that you’re leaving high school, but you’ve got to grow up sometime,” Edmunson said. “I’m pretty stoked.” Students at Bend High already were gathering in hallways and the cafeteria area half an hour before the 7:45 a.m. advisory period started. During the period, teachers briefed students on rules and expectations that prevail on campus. Topics covered included attendance, forbidden weapons and the dress code. Social studies teacher Bryan Tebeau started his advisory session by distributing school-year calenders. Make sure you mark my birthday, he told his students, so you don’t forget. On a serious note, Tebeau told the freshmen that the school has a zero-tolerance policy for harassment and encourages students to report problems to staff. “At this school, we have a culture of acceptance,” he said. Before the class wrapped up, he had the students stand and spend a couple of minutes visiting with their classmates about something fun they did during the summer. Students traded stories about vacations and camping. Jordan Young, 14, a freshman, said the Wednesday orientation sessions were only 10 minutes long and he’s looking forward to finding out more about his classes. “It’s fun,” he said. “My teachers are more laid-back.”

Continued from C1 First, the pair said, St. Charles management wants to redefine the charge nurses’ jobs. Charge nurses handle a variety of administrative and operational duties, and are resources for other nurses. Palmer said management wants to alter their responsibilities and make them carry a patient load. “That’s not good for patients, and it’s not good for nurses,” Palmer said. Eixenberger characterized the shift in a different way. Under the new model, he said, each unit would have a charge nurse providing more clinical support for — and serving as mentors to — the other nurses on the unit. A clinical supervisor would take over those administrative duties. The second issue, the union representatives said, is the hospital’s attempt to get rid of the critical-care float nurses, who move from floor to floor delivering emergency care when necessary. “The nurses have just said no. These are two issues that are line-in-the-sand issues,” Palmer said. Currently, one nurse serves as a rapid response nurse who moves among units for emergency cases. The new model, Eixenberger said, is one recommended by the National Institutes of Health in use by most hospitals around the country. In the new model, he said, a charge nurse on each unit would handle many of the pressing issues, and the charge nurse out of the intensive care unit would join the rapid response team during emergencies. Eixenberger said the model will “provide more support on each nursing unit,” but Palmer disagreed. “The nurses are feeling unheard. They don’t feel like the hospital is taking their concerns seriously,” Palmer said. “When a nurse says, ‘I am concerned about our ability to deliver the highest-quality patient care to my friends, my neighbors and community members,’ they expect the hospital to listen to that.” Hamway said both sides are interested in a three-year contract, but wages and insurance issues have not yet

— Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

N!"# $% R!&$'( POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 1:56 p.m. July 30, in the 900 block of Northwest Galveston Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:20 a.m. Aug. 21, in the 200 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:42 a.m. Aug. 21, in the 63100 block of Nels Anderson Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:33 p.m. Aug. 23, in the 1100 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:34 a.m. Aug. 30, in the 900 block of Northeast Francis Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:39 a.m. Aug. 30, in the 2700 block of Northeast Boyd Acres Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:48 p.m. Aug. 31, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:57 p.m. Sept. 1, in the 400 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:06 p.m. Sept. 1, in the 21200 block of Starlight Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:31 a.m. Sept. 2, in the 300 block of Northwest Georgia Avenue. DUII — Evan Charles Bryant, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:54 p.m. Sept. 2, in the area of Northwest Broadway Street and Northwest Carlon Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:32 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 100 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:50 p.m. Sept. 3, in the 1200 block of Northwest Jacksonville Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:46 a.m. Sept. 4, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:36 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 61400 block of Linton Loop. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:28 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 800 block of Northwest Bond Street.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:58 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 1700 block of Northeast Fourth Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:15 p.m. May 24, in the 600 block of Southeast Glengarry Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:13 p.m. Aug. 15, in the 1500 block of Northeast Second Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and an arrest made at 3:28 p.m. Aug. 23, in the 20700 block of Amber Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:42 p.m. Aug. 23, in the 700 block of Northwest Columbia Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:42 a.m. Aug. 24, in the 1000 block of Northwest Bond Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:37 p.m. Aug. 24, in the 1400 block of Southeast Reed Market Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:23 a.m. Aug. 28, in the 100 block of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:33 a.m. Aug. 29, in the 100 block of Southwest Scalehouse Loop. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:07 a.m. Aug. 29, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:48 p.m. Aug. 30, in the 61600 block of Cherrywood Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:39 p.m. Aug. 30, in the 400 block of Northwest Broadway Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:06 a.m. Aug. 31, in the 2400 block of Northwest Monterey Pines Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:42 a.m. Aug. 31, in the 600 block of Southeast Centennial Street. DUII — Patrick John Schaan, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:37 p.m. Aug. 31, in the 2500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:01 a.m. Sept. 1, in the 200 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:17 p.m. Sept. 2, in the 100 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:29 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 61200 block of Splendor Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:47 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 2000 block of Northwest

Deschutes Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:29 a.m. Sept. 5, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:24 a.m. Sept. 5, in the 400 block of Northwest State Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:38 p.m. Sept. 5, in the 2500 block of Northwest Awbrey Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 11:08 a.m. Sept. 3, in the 3000 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:51 a.m. Sept. 4, in the 600 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:25 a.m. Aug. 29, in the 1400 block of Northeast Tucson Way. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:49 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 2000 block of Northwest Deschutes Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:22 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 500 block of Northeast Dalton Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:54 p.m. Sept. 1, in the 400 block of Southeast Third Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 3:33 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 700 block of Northwest Broadway Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:24 p.m. Sept. 4, in the 100 block of Southwest Hayes Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:12 p.m. July 30, in the 1400 block of Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:38 a.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Southeast Dunham Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:16 a.m. Sept. 5, in the area of Northeast Timberwolf Loop. Oregon State Police

DUII — Trisha Marie Reece, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:24 a.m. Sept. 6, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Wilson Avenue in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 19 — Medical aid calls.

— Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

Find It All Online

been worked out. She said the hospital wants to make major changes to nurses’ health insurance. Morgan said the hospital will now offer two health insurance plan options, one a health savings account with a high deductible and the other a PPO with fewer offerings than in the past. She also noted the cost-sharing will change; the hospital previously paid 90 percent of the plan and the employee paid 10 percent. That will change to the employee paying 20 percent. And while the groups haven’t come to a final contract yet, Morgan and other hospital officials said negotiations have been productive. “The collaboration has been there,” Morgan said. “We want to work collaboratively, and we have had a lot of respect at the table.” Dr. Michel Boileau, the St. Charles chief clinical officer, pointed to a variety of awards the hospital has received in the past few years. “Those results are because of the care delivered by our nurses and physicians,” he said. “The caliber of nurses at St. Charles are second to none.” Informational picketing is scheduled at the main entrance of St. Charles Bend between 3:30 and 7:30 p.m. Monday. The nurses’ previous contract ended June 30. The contract stipulates that as long as negotiations continue, the terms of the contract remain in place. The hospital and nurses last settled on a two-year contract in July 2010. At that time, negotiations lasted several months. In the contract, wages increased at 3.5 percent over two years; a 2007 contract gave nurses 5 percent pay increases each year. This is the latest in a series of battles between St. Charles Bend and the unions that represent its employees. The Service Employees International Union, which represents about 600 St. Charles employees primarily working in service and maintenance positions, was voted into the hospital in early 2011 by a slim margin. Since then, negotiations between the labor union and management have gone 14 months without a contract or agreement on major issues. — Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

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O!"#$% N"&' Facebook friend persuades fugitives in child porn case to give selves up The Associated Press PORTLAND — A Salem couple accused of filming sex acts with their two schoolage daughters and trading those videos to people on the East Coast were confronted by a friend on Facebook who threatened to turn them in if they didn’t do so themselves. Salem police arrested the couple Tuesday. A federal indictment accuses them of manufacturing child pornography. The Associated Press is withholding their names to protect the identities of their daughters. The arrest ended a monthlong search that originated in Virginia for a woman known

only as “Jane Doe,” who was pictured in sex acts with children. The Department of Homeland Security’s investigations team sent out a nationwide news release Aug. 7 with pictures of the woman they were seeking — the woman they now believe is the female half of the couple. The federal public defender representing the couple did not immediately return a call seeking comment. Other people on Facebook saw the image of the woman and told investigators it was the female half of the couple arrested Tuesday. Homeland Security spokes-

man Andrew Munoz said the original release drew a tip from the Pacific Northwest, so agents focused their efforts there. A second round of emails and efforts to drum up tips on social media seemed to work: Someone who knew the couple wrote them a Facebook message late Monday night and said he or she would turn them in. “That pressured them to go ahead and turn themselves in,” Munoz said. “Late Monday night, tips started rolling in.” By Tuesday morning, Munoz said two other people contacted police, also identifying “Jane Doe” as a mem-

ber of the couple. The couple made an initial appearance Wednesday in federal court in Portland, where they were ordered held without bail. Their children have been turned over to state protective custody. The couple knew they were wanted for a federal crime, Munoz said, because they said in police interviews that they had seen the woman’s picture on television. The person with whom the couple was trading pictures on the East Coast is the subject of a separate investigation, Munoz said, and was not an undercover police officer.

Grants Pass vineyard a family effort By Janet Eastman

The Mail Tribune (Medford)

Cal Schmidt shakes his head when he thinks about how fast the region’s wine industry has grown. When the self-taught winemaker bought land in the Applegate Valley 12 years ago, there were only a handful of wineries. The next year, when he planted cabernet, syrah and merlot grapes, there was only one real tasting room, at Valley View Winery. On Aug. 25, 182 different wines made from grapes grown in the southern part of the state were celebrated at the Southern Oregon World of Wine Festival’s Grand Tasting. At the event, in which 700 people gathered in a tent the size of two baseball fields on the Bigham Knoll campus in Jacksonville, Schmidt — who owns Schmidt Family Vineyards — received special honors for producing two of the competition’s three Best of Show winners. He also received praise for launching WOW 10 years ago with Joe Ginet of Plaisance Ranch in Williams and Lee Mankin of Carpenter Hill Vineyard in Medford. Back then, the trio dreamed up the idea of having a summer party to promote grapes from the state’s lesser-known region. They financed it with personal credit cards, their wives made the food, and they invited all the wine producers they knew. At the tasting, those wine producers and many others were toasted for the rising quality of the region’s wines and for inventing an industry here that seems to have a prosperous future, if it doesn’t get too crowded. Schmidt Family Vineyards in Grants Pass has grown from producing 350 cases of wine a year in 2004 to 3,500 cases last year. All but about 70 cases are sold directly to customers visiting the Craftsman-style tasting room

Schmidt designed in 2006 on the former cattle ranch that is now on the popular Applegate Wine Trail. Schmidt’s grapes benefit from a growing season of dry, hot days and cool nights, as do wine neighbors Serra Vineyard, Rosella’s Vineyard, Soloro Vineyards, Troon Vineyard and Wooldridge Creek Winery. Chris Martin, who owns Troon and is president of the Southern Oregon Winery Association, says successful business people such as Schmidt sometimes take the easy route to owning a label. “He could have bought his way into the wine business and then paid others to do the work, but Cal does it all,” says Martin. “He has established a great business. It’s admirable that without a winemaking or grape-growing background he has done so well.”

Cabinet maker Schmidt’s winery is one of two businesses he created in a city known more for water sports. In 1992, Schmidt moved his cabinet-making business from Sonoma County, Calif., to Grants Pass. Today, Northwestern Design sells $8 million in cabinetry, cases and other mill work to libraries, hospitals, schools, courthouses and offices. Two years ago, Schmidt was asked to produce the woodwork for the Robert Mondavi Institute of Food & Wine Science building on the campus of the University of California, Davis — a small intersection of his two businesses. His son, Jim Schmidt, 50, runs the cabinet company, which has 50 employees. His daughter, Rene Brons, 48, manages the tasting room and assists him with the winemaking. All eight grandchildren work in one of the businesses. Grandson Duncan Brons, 26, is the assistant winemaker,

and his wife, Natasha, 26, works in the tasting room, selling $39 bottles of 2008 cabernet sauvignon and $34 bottles of 2008 syrah, both gold medal winners in the 2011 San Francisco Chronicle wine competition, which had more than 5,000 entries. Grandson Jesse Brons, 19, who will join the Marines in the fall, has helped his brother Duncan build the 1,440square-foot tasting room, which is open every day except Christmas, Thanksgiving and Easter. Easter is typically a busy day for tasting rooms, but not this one. “Those are family holidays,” says Cal Schmidt. Granddaughter Heather Carlino, 25, is the bookkeeper and manages the wine club, which has 900 members, one of the largest wine clubs in the area. Great-grandchildren work in the vineyard as their parents have since the first planting in 2001. “Right now we have two generations making wine and maybe we will be a three-generation winemaking family,” says Schmidt. Schmidt’s wife of 49 years, Judy, 68, is a Master Gardener who has converted four acres of the property into settings straight from van Gogh paintings. A horse-drawn carriage offers visitors views of trees, ponds and sunflower fields. Her herb and vegetable gardens supply ingredients for caprese salad, flatbread-pizza toppings and sauces offered on the tasting-room menu.

Everyone pitches in “I never expected to be this involved in the business,” says daughter Rene Brons, who clarifies that although family members have business titles, everyone pitches in as needed on the bottling line, harvesting and manning the tasting room. She says that although she has known since she was a child that her dad wanted to

grow grapes and make wine, no one knew it would become this big. “I am very proud of him,” she says. This success is something that the Kansas farm-boyturned-businessman couldn’t have planned on.

Medal-winning wines Cal Schmidt took enology classes at UC Davis, and in 2008 he took over as winemaker. Last year, he won seven medals in the 2011 San Francisco Chronicle wine competition. This year, the three outof-state judges in the WOW blind tasting awarded him top honors for two Spanish varietals — tempranillo and albarino — that grow well in Oregon’s so-called sunbelt. Another Applegate winemaker, Herb Quady, won a Best of Show for his 2012 Quady North Rose. Schmidt’s original plan was to grow grapes, but he soon realized that “the artistry and monetary value is more in the wine than grapes.” He added zinfandel, cab franc and malbec, and later viognier, sauvignon blanc, chardonnay and albarino. This year, he planted tempranillo to his existing 30 acres of vineyards. Grapes used in this year’s WOW Best of Show winner, Schmidt Family Vineyards’ 2009 Tempranillo, were grown at Dana Campbell Vineyards in Ashland. His other Best of Show, a 2011 Albarino, was made from estate-grown grapes. “It was a very nice surprise to win a medal, and not just one but two,” Schmidt said. “That will knock your socks off. It’s a high honor, and it shows that we can grow Spanish varietals well here.” Then he turned to congratulate his family. “We are all hard workers with high standards,” he said. “We do what it takes to get the job done. I’ve been very blessed.”

Pot growers sentenced after holding teen by force The Associated Press MEDFORD — Two Southern Oregon medical marijuana growers who made a citizen’s arrest when they caught a teenager sneaking into their patch crossed the line when he was whacked in the head with a hammer handle and made to dig a grave before being let go, a prosecutor said. The two did have a right to hold the teenager, even by force, said Jackson County prosecutor Beth Heckert, but, “The police would not have had the right to do the things these defendants did,” Heckert said. The pair also failed to report capturing an intruder. “If you make a citizen’s arrest, you have to call the police,” Heckert said. The incident happened in November 2010 in the Jackson County town of Eagle Point,

the Medford Mail Tribune reported. The two men were initially charged with kidnapping and assault. In court Wednesday, Nicholas R. Jackson, 34, of Medford, pleaded no contest to assault and was sentenced to 18 months, and Kekai Kuehu, 32, of Ashland, pleaded guilty to the lesser offense of coercion. He was given a 17-month suspended sentence. Investigators said Kuehu, hired to keep watch over the legal garden, caught one of a pair of teens before dawn and bound him with packaging tape and rope, eventually strapping him to a wheelchair until Jackson arrived hours later. The teen called the police after he was freed, barefoot, and walked four or five miles down the road to his friend’s house, investigators said.

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O!"#$% (% B!(") Man gets 2 years for meth ingredient PORTLAND — A man from Bangalore, India, has given the U.S. government a $2 million check and been sentenced to two years in prison after pleading guilty to conspiring to smuggle the key ingredient in methamphetamine. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Oregon says 34year-old Fabian Samuel is the sixth person convicted in the case. Samuel’s business produced extract products, some containing ephedrine, which is used to produce meth. The government said that from 2007 to 2009, the group imported into the United States 50 shipments of ephedrine-based products, sent on to Mexican meth labs. With Samuel’s check, the government says, forfeited assets total more than $6 million.

The demonstrators say they were kicked out of Lownsdale and Chapman squares to silence the movement, denying them their right of free speech. City leaders and police said the encampment had become a crime and health problem.

Ashland council votes against GMOs ASHLAND — The Ashland City Council voted Tuesday night to ask Jackson County commissioners to protect organic farming in the county from genetically modified crops. Organic farmers said their crops could be contaminated by pollen drifting from fields of crops that have been genetically modified to repel insects or withstand weed killers. The Mail Tribune reports a Jackson County committee is considering an ordinance that would ban genetically modified seeds in the county. — From wire reports

3 Occupy Portland protesters on trial PORTLAND — Three Occupy Portland demonstrators are on trial for their arrests last November when the group was evicted from downtown parks. KATU reports they include a man accused of throwing a firecracker at an officer on horseback.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

E!"#$%"&'( Compression hurts tax revenue

O

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

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regon tax law may cause trouble for the Madras pool, forcing voters to choose between money for the pool and money for the jail.

Even worse, there’s no way to know the dollar amounts involved, says County Assessor Jean McCloskey, either for the individual taxpayer’s bill or for the revenue that will come to the jail or the pool as a result. The Madras Aquatic Center has a permanent rate tax levy of 25 cents per $1,000 of assessed value, and voters are being asked to approve another 40 cents per thousand under a local option levy. If they approve it, the jail — and other local levies — could see less revenue. That’s because state law limits property taxes to $10 per $1,000 of real market value for local government and $5 per $1,000 for schools. If local levies add up to more than that for an individual property, local levies get cut. Bonds, such as those approved by voters for school construction, are not included in the calculations and are not affected by any cuts. The process, called compression, must be calculated for each individual property. It’s hitting Central Oregon communities because real market values have fallen in the economic downturn. Last year, 78 percent of the properties in Madras and 30 percent in Jefferson County were in compression, according to McCloskey. As a result, the Jefferson County jail received $1.2 million from its levy, which was $215,000 less than anticipated. Unless market values climb, an added levy for the pool could potentially mean more losses for the jail and other local levies. But because the calculations are made for

each property individually, there’s no way to say in advance what the overall impact would be. An additional oddity of the law: It’s possible for a property owner to vote for a levy that he won’t pay but others will. That happens if that taxpayer’s bill is already limited by compression, so it can’t increase. But other properties that haven’t reached the limits would pay more for the new levy. The problem is not limited to Jefferson County. For example, some Multnomah County taxpayers don’t pay levies supporting libraries and the Oregon Historical Societies, because compression has limited their tax bills. Compression is only one of many complications in Oregon’s tax law, some resulting from constitutional amendments passed by voters, such as Measures 5 and 50. If the Legislature decides in its 2013 session to make changes, voters would need to agree. One proposal from the League of Oregon Cities would specifically address the compression issue by removing local option levies from the limits of compression. If approved, it would allow local voters to authorize a tax and not have it cut back by compression. We’re great fans of the pool and would like to see it thrive. Madras area residents have made a big investment in the outstanding facility, and it would be a shame not to reap its full benefits. Still, the jail is critical. Sheriff Jim Adkins, who opposes the pool levy, will need to lay out his concerns for the community. Only then can voters make their decision.

Canola leads to conflict

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here will be no canola planted in the Willamette Valley this fall. If you’re a specialty seed crop grower, that’s good news. If you’re among the farmers who had hoped to plant canola in the next few weeks, not so much. Either way, the fight over canola shows just how difficult the Department of Agriculture’s job can be. Canola, or rapeseed, is a member of the brassica family that includes cabbages, mustards, broccoli and the like. Brassicas can be invasive, and canola has been banned in the Willamette Valley and Central Oregon since 2009. The Department of Agriculture hopes to open some land to canola, however, and had issued a temporary rule that would have made planting legal this fall. The temporary rule was put on hold in the face of a legal challenge, and late last month the state Court of Appeals upheld the decision to bar planting for the time being. Meanwhile, the Agriculture Department continues to work on a permanent

rule allowing some canola to be planted. Farmers on both sides of the canola argument have good reasons for their positions. Those who do not want canola point to the invasive nature of many brassicas, a problem anyone who has let a garden row of broccoli rabe go to seed can understand. That would mean serious problems for the specialty seed growers who farm in the same area. They worry, too, about the potential for cross pollination between canola and other brassicas grown in the valley. On the other side are farmers who see canola as a good cover crop to include in their crop rotation plans. They note, too, that with fuel prices at near-record highs, canola’s value to the biofuels industry can only grow. Knowing all that, officials at the Department of Agriculture continue to try to find a way to keep everyone happy. Unfortunately, the niceties of the law and the messiness of agriculture do not always mix.

Medicare plan requires seniors to pay more — and that’s good By Jeffrey Miron

Los Angeles Times

In the Obama campaign’s attack on the Romney-Ryan proposal to “voucherize” Medicare, one accusation is that the plan would force seniors to pay more of their health care costs: about $6,400 more per beneficiary, according to a recent TV ad known as “Facts.” Regardless of the “facts” in the ad, this attack takes as a given that any such outcome is undesirable. Yet asking seniors to pay substantially more is precisely the way to improve Medicare. Here’s why. The purpose of insurance is to protect against large, unforeseeable expenses. If everyone faces some risk of substantial health costs, but no individual can predict whether or when these will occur, everyone can benefit by pooling these risks via insurance. This argument does not apply, however, to small or predictable expenditures. It makes no sense to buy insurance against the “risk” of routine medical care, such as annual checkups, or against the risk of moderate expenses, such as many medication regimes, minor surgeries or treatments. These expenditures may well be worthwhile. For example, annual checkups might help avoid larger medical expenses in the future. In addition, insurance can make the health care market less efficient by reducing consumer incentive to economize on health costs. This “moral hazard” is a major reason behind escalating costs. When consumers are not paying for their care, the incentives for excessive utiliza-

tion are huge: unnecessary tests, too much surgery rather than watchful waiting, doctor visits with minimal value, brand name versus generic drugs, and more. The way to diminish moral hazard is with large deductibles. If the first, say, $6,400 of medical costs per year must be paid by the insured, people would economize on health care and shop for lower prices when care was needed. And such high-deductible policies still accomplish insurance’s main goal: protecting against catastrophic risks. Medicare, alas, makes minimal use of deductibles or copays. Patients are, therefore, insensitive to costs and demand ever more health care as technological progress yields new tests, drugs, devices, treatments and procedures. Costs therefore escalate. So Medicare should phase in a much higher deductible, starting now. The increase would presumably be small or zero for those already retired; somewhat higher for those nearing retirement; but gradually rise to a substantial value (e.g., $6,400) for those decades away from eligibility. The improvement in Medicare’s finances would be huge. Assume at least 40 million elderly beneficiaries pay an increased deductible of $6,400. That would reduce Medicare expenditure by roughly $250 billion per year once fully phased in. And this does not affect the poorest elderly, who are eligible for Medicaid rather than Medicare. This reduction in Medicare’s expenses is not the main benefit, however. The payoff is that beneficiaries

would be more price sensitive, so decisions about medical care would better balance benefits against costs. In short, the health care system would operate more efficiently, which is a true net benefit to the economy. President Obama’s approach to fixing Medicare has little hope of achieving these gains because it does nothing to put more consumer skin in the game. His approach, which consists mainly of regulating prices and quantities via the Independent Payment Advisory Board, can in theory slow expenditure but it would generate rationing, creative accounting and myriad distortions in the health care system. The Romney-Ryan proposal, which allows seniors to opt out of Medicare and get what is essentially a voucher to purchase health insurance, has some chance of improving Medicare, but the devil is in the details. In theory, consumers with vouchers would become price sensitive about their insurance policies, often choosing ones with high deductibles and thereby restoring consumer stake in the system. But that will happen only if the health insurance market becomes truly competitive, which depends crucially on how the government defines the vouchers and whom it allows to accept them. Generating a competitive marketplace will not be easy. — Jeffrey Miron is a senior lecturer and director of undergraduate studies at Harvard University and a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. He is the author of “Libertarianism, from A to Z.”

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Eating organic food offers benefits other than nutrition

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ews this week that a Stanford University study found no clear nutritional advantage to eating organic food missed the mark, at least for the people I live with. It’s not nutrition as much as a whole bunch of other things that making choosing organic worthwhile. I wasn’t particularly surprised to hear that the nutrients — the vitamins, minerals and the like — are pretty much the same whether the carrot you eat is organic or not. More important, according to carrot nutritionfacts.org, is the variety of carrot you chose. Some hybrids, the organization says, are less nutritious than traditional carrots. Too, freshness can affect nutrition, not only in carrots but in many fruits and vegetables — the older they are, the less of the good stuff they’re likely to have left. Why, then, pay the higher price it

takes to stock your home with organic food? Pesticides, for one thing. Those who eat organic fruits and vegetables are exposed to about 30 percent fewer pesticides than those who do not, the research says. Though pesticide exposure in both groups was within limits set by federal regulators, a soil scientist at Washington State University points out that we don’t know yet what prolonged exposure to many pesticides will mean two or three decades from now. Beyond that, pesticides and herbicides applied to plants have a habit of making their way into the soil and from there, into water supplies. In fact, according to the Oregon Health Authority, testing has turned up low levels of pesticides in the water of at least 12 rural schools in the state, including Bridges Academy, a private school located

JANET STEVENS between Bend and Sisters. Fouling the world’s waters for the sake of bug-free carrots just doesn’t make sense, it seems to me. And while organic growers can use conventional pesticides under certain limited conditions, what they use is a fraction of what is routinely applied to conventional crops. Organic food can help the planet in other ways, as well. If you shop carefully for your organics, and if you’re willing to forgo the pleasure of most out-of-season produce, you can often buy food raised not too far from home. Apples from Kimberly, as one example, must

travel only 132 miles to reach a local market, while apples from the Yakima Valley in Washington ride 218 miles to get here. Lettuce from the Salinas Valley in California, which is the largest lettuce-growing region in the nation, must travel almost 600 miles from field to table, if that table is in Bend. Mangos come from Mexico, and in winter those apples arrive from as far away as Australia. All that travel uses fuel, obviously, most of it petroleum-based, and that has an impact on global warming. In fact, local-ness is in many ways as important at my house as organicness, if there is such a word. The planet wins when we shop local, but so, too, do our friends and neighbors. Consider meat. Bend now has two butcher shops, each of which supplies meat grown less than 50 miles from their front doors. Both employ

butchers and clerks, both pay property taxes and payroll taxes. Just as important, both treat their animals humanely, without the factory farm systems predominant in the Midwest. And both make it possible for smallfarm farmers to sell what they grow without having to ship animals to Timbuktu to do so. There is a place for oranges from Florida, don’t get me wrong. Life without lemons and oranges would be pretty flat, it seems to me. In the end, however, the voluntary environmentalism that goes with choosing organic and local foods is more important than a supposed nutritional edge. I didn’t expect the latter, and, as the Stanford study shows, I won’t get much of it in the traditional sense. — Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O!"#$%&"'( D'%#) N,#"-'( Edwina "Winnie" Davis-Connell, of Bend

April 28, 1937 - Aug. 31, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A memorial gathering will be held in October and announced later. Contributions may be made to:

The American Cancer Society of the charity of your choice.

James Vandrew, of Eugene, OR

June 23, 1979 - Sept. 1, 2012 Arrangements: Lane Memorial Funeral Home, 1-541-343-1784 Services: No services are planned at this time.

John A. Kitinoja, of Bend

Sept. 12, 1932 - Sept. 5, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Gathering will be held in California at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Myra "Zoe" (Williams) Foley, of Bend

Mar. 15, 1929 - Sept. 3, 2012 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Private Graveside services will be held at Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville.

William James Sheldon, of Prineville

Sept. 18, 1947 - Sept. 2, 2012 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with his wishes no service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

To a charity of your choice.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D'%#)( E*('+)'&' Deaths of note from around the world: Laura Triest, 100: Former Washington debutante who worked during World War II for the Office of Strategic Services, the CIA’s predecessor. Died Aug. 24 in Maryland. The Rev. Herman Dennis, 96: Built a grocery store into a folk-art castle that became a roadside attraction in the Mississippi Delta. Died Tuesday in Vicksburg, Miss. — From wire reports

Songwriter, singer South known for ‘Games People Play’ The Associated Press ATLANTA — Singersongwriter Joe South, who performed hits in the late 1960s and early 1970s such as “Games People Play” and “Walk A Mile In My Shoes” and also penned songs including “Down in the Boondocks” for other artists, died Wednesday, his music publisher said. South was 72. South, whose real name was Joseph Souter, died at his home in Buford, Ga., northeast of Atlanta, according to Marion Merck of the Hall County Coroner’s office. Merck said South died after suffering a heart attack. “He’s one of the greatest songwriters of all time,” said Butch Lowery, president FEATURED of the Lowery OBITUARY Group, which published South’s music. “His songs have touched so many lives. He’s such a wonderful guy and loved by many.” South worked as a session guitar player on recordings of some of the biggest names of the 1960s — Aretha Franklin, Bob Dylan and Simon & Garfunkel, among others. But he had a string of hits of his own starting in the late 1960s that made his booming voice a familiar one on radio stations, with a style that some described as a mix of country and soul. He is perhaps best known for the song “Games People Play,” which reached No. 12 on the Billboard charts in 1969 and won him two Grammys — for Best Contemporary Song and Song of the Year. The opening lines evoked the message songs of the era: “Oh the games people play now, every night and every day now, never meaning what they say now, never saying what they mean.” The song, which was released on South’s debut album “Introspect,” spoke against hate, hypocrisy and inhumanity. He also had hits with “Walk A Mile In My Shoes” and “Don’t It Make You Want to Go Home,” and wrote the Grammy-nominated “(I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden” for country singer Lynn Anderson. Earlier, South’s song “Down in the Boondocks” was a 1965 hit for singer Billy Joe Royal. He performed on Aretha Franklin’s “Chain of Fools,” as well as on Bob Dylan’s 1966 classic “Blonde on Blonde,” a triumphant mix of rock, blues and folk that Rolling Stone magazine ranked No. 9 on its greatest-ever albums list. The magazine credits “expert local sessionmen” with helping to create “an almost contradictory magnificence: a tightly wound tension around Dylan’s quicksilver language and incisive singing.” According to billboard.com, South also backed up Eddy Arnold, Marty Robbins and Wilson Pickett. But his music career was struck by tragedy when his brother, Tommy Souter, committed suicide in 1971. A biography of South on billboard. com says he moved to Maui and retired from recording for a time starting in the mid-’70s, and that his career was complicated by a rough-around-theedges personality. South’s last album was “Classic Masters” in 2002. According to South’s website, he was born in Atlanta on Feb. 28, 1940. As a child he was interested in technology and developed his own radio station with a one-mile transmission area. In 1958, South recorded his debut single, a novelty song called, “The Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor.” South was an inductee in the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Georgia Music Hall of Fame.

NORTHWEST NEWS

Washington Department of Natural Resources / The Associated Press

Smoke rises from two wildfires Wednesday near White Salmon, Wash., that have burned more than 1,500 acres threatening at least 30 homes. The Klickitat County Sheriff’s Office told residents of those 30 homes to evacuate, said Debbie Robinson, a state Department of Natural Resources spokeswoman.

Gorge residents begin to flee as wildfire spreads in Washington By Shannon Dininny The Associated Press

YAKIMA, Wash. — Firefighters worked in hot weather and dry terrain Thursday to contain a wildfire that forced the evacuation of more than two dozen homes in a popular recreation area in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia River Gorge. The fire has burned across more than 2 square miles, or 1,500 acres, of trees and grass in southcentral Washington state, about 60 miles northeast of Portland, in a rural area known among outdoors enthusiasts for its whitewater rafting, salmon fishing and windsurfing. Low winds aided the effort Thursday, pushing the fire back toward areas that had already burned, and helped firefighters to fully contain two other wildfires that each burned across nearly a square mile in the state’s central region. The new blazes served as a reminder that with hot temperatures come increasing wildfire risks, even as summer gradually winds into fall. The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, has said continued dry conditions would cause the wildfire season to linger in much of the West, and that chances were low for a season-ending weather event with rain or snow in the Northwest. Near the Columbia River Gorge, residents of about 30 homes have been evacuated, said Stan Hinatsu of the U.S. Forest Service. A total of about 450 houses are threatened by the fire, and most of those residents have been told to be ready to flee if the fire heads their way. No homes have been lost, and no injuries have been reported. The fire started in multiple spots along Highway 141. The exact cause has not been determined, but authorities said it’s not necessarily suspicious. “Obviously it’s humancaused in some way,” Hinatsu said. “It could have been the wheel from a flat tire throwing off sparks.” Jaco Klinkenberg, one of the owners of Wet Plant Whitewater, could see smoke and flames peeking over the hillside from her business in Husum, north of White Salmon and on the edge of the fire. But she said the company was still in normal operations, with a large corporate rafting event planned Thursday afternoon. “The highway is open. The river is open. Our business is open, and we’re rafting,” she said. “For us, it’s still summer here, and it’s still busy.” The fire had burned to within a mile of Rusty Hicks’ home after it started Wednesday afternoon, but Hicks said he breathed a little easier Thursday morning when the winds shifted from the east. Hicks, who opened a guide service for fishermen nine months ago, saw flames along the highway

“That will be a (weather) system we’ll be watching, because it will bring in windy conditions and not a lot of precipitation. If there are still ongoing fires, it could make them a little harder to contain.” — Jeff Cote, National Weather Service meteorologist

as he drove to the nearby Klickitat River to fish with a few buddies. He said he doesn’t expect the fire to hurt his business and has clients lined up for the coming weekend. “We’re having a good day on the water today, out here catching a few salmon,” he said. “They’ll get ’er wrestled down today. They’ve got good people on the fire.” Temperatures in central Washington have been several degrees above average in recent days. They were expected to remain above average through Sunday, when a cold front could bring cooler temperatures but more wind. “That will be a system we’ll be watching, because it will bring in windy conditions and not a lot of precipitation,” said Jeff Cote, meteorologist with the National Weather Service. “If there are still ongoing fires, it could make them a little harder to contain.” At least 200 firefighters were on the scene Thursday, with more scheduled to arrive, Washington Department of Natural Resources spokeswoman Linda Hazlett said. Meanwhile, fire crews south of the Tri-Cities in Eastern Washington contained a blaze that burned between 700 and 800 acres near Paterson and temporarily closed Highway 14. The blade on a piece of heavy equipment struck a rock at a construction site Thursday morning, sparking the blaze. Crews to the north also fully contained a wildfire that started at about midnight Wednesday and blackened an estimated 700 acres near Ellensburg before firefighters contained it Thursday. Seventeen homes there had been threatened by the blaze, but all evacuation orders there had been lifted, Hazlett said. The cause of the fire was under investigation. No structures burned, and no injuries were reported, in either fire. Ellensburg sits in rural Kittitas County, where firefighters already battled another damaging wildfire this summer. Last month, the Taylor Bridge Fire burned across more than 36 square miles, destroying 61 homes and 35 outbuildings. That fire was declared completely contained at the end of August.

C5


C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 7

SATURDAY Tonight: Clear skies and mild conditions through the night.

Today: A great way to end the workweek.

HIGH

LOW

82

45

Astoria 77/56

90/55

Cannon Beach 89/53

Hillsboro Portland 91/61 92/52

Tillamook 84/52

Salem

71/51

91/56

92/57

Albany

Newport

78/50

Corvallis

Camp Sherman

91/53

Yachats

Prineville 81/45 Sisters Redmond Paulina 77/41 82/43 84/44 Sunriver Bend

64/53

Eugene

Florence

90/51

62/51

Coos Bay

81/43

89/51

Roseburg

57/51

57/52

Gold Beach

Crescent

Chemult

88/53

Silver Lake

79/38

56/52

Vale

87/54

Riley

CENTRAL Expect abundant sunshine and above-normal temperatures.

EAST Ontario Mostly sunny and 85/53 warm conditions will be the rule. Nyssa

Juntura

83/52

89/50

82/42

84/50

Jordan Valley

83/43

WEST Mostly cloudy and chilly in the south; sunny and very warm to the north.

83/48

Frenchglen 86/55

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 94°

88/48

Paisley

Medford

84/50

• 33°

84/45

Klamath Falls 82/46

Ashland

57/51

81/48

85/54

Christmas Valley

Chiloquin

Medford

95/57

Brookings

79/41

85/42

Grants Pass

92/50

81/46

Unity

Burns

Hampton

80/46

84/49

Baker City John Day

Brothers 81/40

Fort Rock 82/42

79/39

74/34

Bandon

82/45

La Pine 81/38

Crescent Lake

61/51

Port Orford

80/41

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Joseph

77/48

Mitchell 83/46

85/47

79/41

80/43

Union

Granite Spray 91/47

Madras

Enterprise

Meacham 85/52

82/54

86/48

77/42

La Grande

Condon

Willowdale

Wallowa

79/41

83/54

90/54

87/49

88/52

Ruggs

Maupin

Warm Springs

91/53

Pendleton

92/59

87/55

91/55

Hermiston 89/52

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 79/51

92/55

91/56

The Biggs Dalles 89/58

89/56

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

90/52

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

86/59

82/49

La Pine

87/44

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes

-10s

0s

Vancouver 82/58

10s Calgary 74/50

20s

30s

40s Winnipeg 63/46

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 63/35

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 78/60

Halifax 75/60 P ortland Billings Portland 81/64 74/46 91/61 St. Paul Green Bay To ronto Boston • 112° 67/51 80/61 69/49 Boise 81/69 Rapid City Death Valley, Calif. Detroit 87/49 Buffalo New York 69/51 78/61 83/64 88/73 Des Moines • 26° Cheyenne Philadelphia 71/50 Chicago Columbus 68/44 Stanley, Idaho 90/70 76/62 91/66 San Francisco Omaha Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. • 2.61” 63/53 72/47 City 91/71 Las Denver Chapel Hill, N.C. Louisville 85/61 Kansas City Vegas 71/51 86/68 76/53 St. Louis 101/82 Charlotte 85/59 92/70 Albuquerque Oklahoma City Nashville 94/62 98/59 92/66 Los Angeles Phoenix Atlanta 76/67 Little Rock 102/85 Honolulu 91/72 Birmingham 87/72 Dallas 95/68 Tijuana 94/73 103/70 79/65 New Orleans 92/76 Orlando Houston 92/73 Chihuahua 96/77 82/65 Miami 89/77 Monterrey La Paz 101/75 93/75 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/73 54/40 Juneau 54/45

(in the 48 contiguous states):

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

Bismarck 68/44

FRONTS

The wolf pack that has enchanted thousands of visitors at Alaska’s Denali National Park did not produce any pups this year and its members have dispersed widely throughout the park, says a petition seeking to ban hunting and trapping along the park’s northeastern boundary, where a female wolf was fatally snared this year. Visitors are likely to have substantially fewer chances to see wolves, which habitually denned close to the main road through the 6 million-acre park, says the petition, filed by the Alaska Wildlife Alliance, the National Parks Conservation Association and other groups. “To me — and I know probably 400,000 other people who

HIGH LOW

68 33

70 36

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:25 a.m. . . . . . 7:32 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:51 a.m. . . . . . 5:27 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:23 a.m. . . . . . 9:24 p.m. Jupiter. . . . .11:12 p.m. . . . . . 2:24 p.m. Saturn. . . . .10:05 a.m. . . . . . 9:05 p.m. Uranus . . . . .8:07 p.m. . . . . . 8:33 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77/50 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . 98 in 1955 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . 27 in 1961 Average month to date. . . 0.09” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Average year to date. . . . . 6.85” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.04 Record 24 hours . . .0.14 in 1978 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:36 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:29 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:37 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:27 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:13 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:48 p.m.

Moon phases Last

New

First

Full

Sept. 8 Sept. 15 Sept. 22 Sept. 29

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Redmond/Madras.........Ext.

Astoria . . . . . . . .69/54/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .80/36/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .56/48/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .82/39/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .88/48/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .84/44/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .82/46/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .83/33/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .94/57/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 North Bend . . . . .61/55/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .80/50/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .90/57/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .79/44/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .81/39/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .90/55/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .89/50/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .81/43/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .88/55/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . .90/55/s . . . . . .66/52/c . . . . .81/46/s . . . . . .88/47/s . . . .57/51/pc . . . . . .61/51/c . . . . .84/50/s . . . . . .90/46/s . . . . .90/51/s . . . . .83/47/pc . . . . .82/46/s . . . . . .83/43/s . . . . .82/49/s . . . . . .85/47/s . . . . .81/38/s . . . . . .84/34/s . . . . .95/57/s . . . . . .91/54/s . . . .78/50/pc . . . . . .60/47/c . . . . .68/52/c . . . . . .65/51/c . . . . .85/53/s . . . . . .91/58/s . . . . .88/52/s . . . . . .93/52/s . . . . .91/61/s . . . . .85/57/pc . . . . .81/45/s . . . . . .87/47/s . . . . .87/49/s . . . . . .89/48/s . . . . .88/53/s . . . . . .86/51/s . . . . .91/55/s . . . . . .85/50/s . . . . .82/43/s . . . . . .87/39/s . . . . .92/57/s . . . . . .91/59/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .103/72/0.00 105/66/pc . 84/60/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . .86/63/pc . . .69/55/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .81/58/0.00 . .85/67/pc . . .80/54/t Albuquerque. . . . .93/69/0.00 . .94/62/pc . 81/60/pc Anchorage . . . . . .57/49/0.00 . .54/40/sh . . 53/43/c Atlanta . . . . . . . . .85/73/0.01 . .91/72/pc . . .85/65/t Atlantic City . . . . .83/68/0.02 . .85/73/pc . . .82/63/t Austin . . . . . . . . .101/70/0.00 . .102/73/s . 92/64/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .85/74/0.02 . .90/70/pc . . .84/60/t Billings . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . . 74/46/s . . 85/57/s Birmingham . . . . .90/75/0.00 . .94/73/pc . . .82/61/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .75/44/0.00 . . . 68/44/s . . 79/49/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .85/58/0.00 . . . 87/49/s . . 89/54/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .79/65/0.00 . .81/69/pc . . .81/67/t Bridgeport, CT. . . .77/69/0.00 . .82/71/pc . . .81/67/t Buffalo . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.01 . .83/64/pc . 71/55/sh Burlington, VT. . . .84/63/0.00 . .81/65/pc . . .76/52/t Caribou, ME . . . . .72/55/0.00 . .74/57/pc . . .74/57/t Charleston, SC . . .90/74/0.00 . .90/74/pc . . .90/73/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .87/71/0.01 . .92/70/pc . . .87/61/t Chattanooga. . . . .91/71/0.00 . .95/72/pc . . .82/61/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .86/52/0.00 . .68/44/pc . . 72/48/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . . 76/62/t . 71/62/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . . . 90/65/t . 72/57/sh Cleveland . . . . . . .84/66/0.10 . . . 82/65/t . . .70/58/t Colorado Springs .89/51/0.00 . .69/48/pc . . 74/50/s Columbia, MO . . 91/71/trace . . . 80/53/t . 74/53/pc Columbia, SC . . . .89/74/0.00 . .94/70/pc . . .90/66/t Columbus, GA. . . .90/74/0.06 . .92/73/pc . . .89/64/t Columbus, OH. . . .91/66/0.00 . . . 91/66/t . 72/56/sh Concord, NH. . . . .77/64/0.07 . .85/61/pc . . .81/56/t Corpus Christi. . .100/77/0.00 100/77/pc . 96/74/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .104/77/0.00 103/70/pc . 86/63/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .86/62/0.00 . . . 87/63/t . 71/55/sh Denver. . . . . . . . . .91/59/0.00 . .71/51/pc . . 78/53/s Des Moines. . . . . .87/58/0.00 . .71/50/pc . . 74/51/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .86/67/0.00 . . . 78/61/t . . .69/56/t Duluth. . . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . .63/46/pc . 69/50/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .94/69/0.02 . .96/70/pc . 83/63/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .49/45/0.12 . . .54/33/c . . 53/35/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . .67/43/pc . . 77/49/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . . 80/50/t . . .81/50/t

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Sisters ................................Ext. La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,923 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113,681 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 70,488 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 21,837 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99,895 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 419 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,450 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 70 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73.0 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,862 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 224 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 15.8 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 73.0 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 6

POLLEN COUNT

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .84/65/0.00 . . . 75/55/t . 69/52/sh Green Bay. . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . .69/49/sh . . 69/49/s Greensboro. . . . . .85/72/0.14 . .90/70/pc . . .84/61/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .84/67/0.00 . .87/68/pc . . .80/58/t Hartford, CT . . . . .81/66/0.00 . .85/68/pc . . .82/59/t Helena. . . . . . . . . .60/60/0.00 . . . 77/44/s . . 85/50/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . . 87/72/s . . 87/72/s Houston . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . .96/77/pc . 93/71/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . .93/70/pc . . .82/61/t Indianapolis . . . . .87/64/0.00 . . . 84/60/t . 71/54/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .96/77/0.00 . .95/73/pc . . .86/63/t Jacksonville. . . . . .92/71/0.00 . . . 90/72/t . . .91/74/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .60/49/0.11 . . . 54/45/r . . .54/45/r Kansas City. . . . . .89/64/0.00 . . . 76/53/t . . 74/53/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .84/62/0.00 . . . 76/55/t . 66/51/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .101/84/0.00 101/82/pc 101/84/pc Lexington . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . . 88/67/t . . .74/56/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .94/46/0.00 . .73/48/pc . . 76/52/s Little Rock. . . . . . .96/74/0.00 . . . 95/68/t . 82/59/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .83/68/0.00 . .76/67/pc . 79/68/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . . . 86/68/t . 75/56/pc Madison, WI . . . . .82/58/0.00 . .70/49/sh . 70/49/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .98/75/0.00 . .95/68/pc . . .79/59/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/76/0.95 . . . 89/77/t . 90/77/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . .71/58/sh . 69/56/pc Minneapolis . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .67/51/pc . . 73/51/s Nashville. . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . .92/66/pc . . .76/56/t New Orleans. . . . .92/79/0.00 . .92/76/pc . . .90/72/t New York . . . . . . .80/69/0.00 . .88/73/pc . . .84/66/t Newark, NJ . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . .89/74/pc . . .84/68/t Norfolk, VA . . . . . .89/73/0.46 . .90/72/pc . . .89/65/t Oklahoma City . . .98/77/0.00 . . . 98/59/t . . 79/55/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .90/51/0.00 . .72/47/pc . . 76/54/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .92/71/2.25 . . . 92/73/t . . .91/75/t Palm Springs. . . .105/80/0.00 103/82/pc . 105/84/t Peoria . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . . 78/55/t . 71/52/pc Philadelphia . . . . .81/70/0.00 . .90/70/pc . . .85/61/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .102/86/0.00 102/85/pc . 103/83/t Pittsburgh . . . . . . .87/67/0.00 . .86/65/pc . 72/50/sh Portland, ME. . . . .73/61/0.00 . .81/64/pc . . .77/60/t Providence . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .82/68/pc . . .82/62/t Raleigh . . . . . . . . .90/73/0.55 . .91/72/pc . . .90/64/t

Petition aims to protect wolves Los Angeles Times

HIGH LOW

80 42

ALASKA

By Kim Murphy

Staying on the chilly side, sunshine does return.

A big cooldown! Clouds throughout the day.

A few clouds, still in the 80s.

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Saskatoon 75/50

Seattle 89/56

TUESDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

MONDAY

Sunny and warm yet again, a very nice Saturday.

84 46

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

SUNDAY

visit Denali — these wolves are way more valuable alive than dead. I don’t know what they get for a wolf pelt, but it’s not much,” said Valerie Connor, conservation director for the Alaska Center for the Environment, which also joined in the petition. The proposal to the Alaska Board of Game for a hunting and trapping buffer on state lands around Denali has been a point of friction for years between conservationists and the board, which became so weary of the issue that it put a moratorium on any further consideration for the next several years. But the deaths of the Grant Creek pack’s two main breeding females this spring — one from the trapper, the other from natural causes — raised

concerns that have been partially realized. Bridget Borg, a biologist at the park, said the 15-member pack split up and the chief monitored group is down to five or six wolves. After not producing any surviving pups, she said, they abandoned the den that put the pack in viewing range. She said biologists had not determined that the pack has no breeding females and that there was a chance the pack could join up again over the fall and reproduce next spring. Marybeth Holleman, who is writing a book on Denali’s wolves and joined in the petition, said she traveled to the Grant Creek pack’s den over the summer and found no wolves there. “The Grant Creek pack was

the most visible pack in the park. People saw them hunting along the road. A bus driver told me about having the pups sitting in the road howling right in front of the bus — incredible sights,” Holleman said. “This summer, we saw one lone wolf near the visitors center. It was a solo wolf, out hunting by itself.” The problem, the petitioners say, is that pups are what hold a pack together: Some wolves remain at the den site to tend the young, while others make hunting forays and return to the den with food. “The loss of just one important breeding animal can lead to catastrophic impacts over the long term,” Alaska conservation biologist Rick Steiner, who led the drafting of the petition, said in a statement.

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .82/46/0.00 . . . 69/51/s . . 79/56/s Reno . . . . . . . . . . .86/60/0.01 . . . 91/60/s . 93/60/pc Richmond . . . . . . .80/71/1.03 . .92/71/pc . . .89/60/t Rochester, NY . . . .82/66/0.00 . .82/63/pc . . .72/52/t Sacramento. . . . . 88/59/trace . . . 92/60/s . . 96/59/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .92/72/0.00 . . . 85/59/t . 74/55/pc Salt Lake City . . . .88/63/0.00 . . . 85/61/s . . 87/62/s San Antonio . . . . .99/74/0.00 . .101/76/s . 95/68/pc San Diego . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . .77/69/pc . 78/70/pc San Francisco . . . .67/55/0.00 . .68/54/pc . 69/55/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .78/56/0.01 . .78/58/pc . 79/57/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .90/60/0.00 . .82/54/pc . 73/53/pc

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .91/74/0.00 . .90/74/pc . . .90/70/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .82/58/0.00 . . . 89/56/s . 81/54/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .86/48/0.00 . .70/44/pc . . 76/48/s Spokane . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . . 83/54/s . . 87/55/s Springfield, MO . 93/71/trace . . . 81/55/t . 73/52/pc Tampa. . . . . . . . . .96/75/0.91 . . . 90/77/t . . .90/77/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . . 94/74/t . . .95/74/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .98/77/0.00 . . . 88/58/t . . 80/58/s Washington, DC . .84/75/0.24 . .91/71/pc . . .84/61/t Wichita . . . . . . . . .96/71/0.00 . . . 78/55/t . . 75/55/s Yakima . . . . . . . . .84/56/0.00 . . . 87/53/s . . 90/56/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .101/84/0.00 100/83/pc . 100/81/t

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .111/84/0.00 108/85/pc . 105/83/s Mexico City. . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . . 75/54/t . . .74/54/t Montreal. . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . .82/62/pc . 73/56/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . .57/43/sh . 54/46/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . . 78/57/t . 72/55/pc Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . .89/76/pc . 88/76/pc New Delhi. . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 86/76/t . . .85/76/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 85/74/t . . .86/75/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .57/37/0.00 . . . 64/44/s . . 59/45/c Ottawa . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . .82/61/pc . 71/53/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . . 81/54/s . . 80/58/s Rio de Janeiro. . . .79/64/0.00 . . . 85/66/s . 88/68/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . . 85/66/s . . 86/65/s Santiago . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .60/42/pc . . 65/44/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . . 84/64/s . 90/64/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .75/73/0.00 . .80/62/pc . 81/64/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .81/61/pc . 79/61/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 83/77/t . . .88/77/t Singapore . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 86/78/t . . .86/77/t Stockholm. . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . .62/47/pc . 61/46/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . . 68/49/s . . 67/45/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . .90/78/pc . 90/79/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . . 90/75/s . . 88/75/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 88/75/t . . .87/73/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . .80/61/pc . 71/53/sh Vancouver. . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . . 82/58/s . . 76/57/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . . 70/55/s . . 78/57/s Warsaw. . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .61/52/sh . 64/48/pc

Amsterdam. . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .68/62/pc . 74/57/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .87/70/0.00 . .90/71/pc . . 84/72/s Auckland. . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .62/51/pc . 60/51/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .109/77/0.00 . .109/79/s . 106/76/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .81/77/0.00 . . . 87/78/t . . .88/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 80/66/t . 81/66/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 89/79/s . . 86/77/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . .66/59/c . 69/54/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .71/47/sh . 71/48/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . . 73/50/s . . 82/53/s Buenos Aires. . . . .61/48/0.00 . .66/56/sh . 71/49/pc Cabo San Lucas . .91/77/0.00 . .92/77/pc . 95/78/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . . 94/74/s . . 91/72/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . . . 74/50/s . . 81/56/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 88/78/t . . .87/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . . .65/55/c . 67/51/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . .59/51/sh . . 66/50/c Geneva . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . . . 79/55/s . . 79/57/s Harare. . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 78/57/s . 78/58/pc Hong Kong . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . .88/79/pc . . .85/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . . . 82/69/t . . 78/68/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .90/67/0.00 . . . 90/70/s . . 85/66/s Johannesburg. . . .52/45/0.00 . .58/42/sh . . 64/47/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . .66/61/pc . 66/60/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . .85/66/sh . 82/67/pc London . . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . . . 77/50/s . 78/54/pc Madrid . . . . . . . . .90/63/0.00 . .90/62/pc . 91/68/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 92/80/t . . .91/80/t

Denali’s wolves

Alaska conservation groups seek an emergency regulation prohibiting trapping and hunting of wolves on state lands along the northeastern edge of Denali National Park. Wolf pack range (and pack size) Proposed no-hunting and no-trapping zone

Alaska Hot Slough (9) Otter Lake (0)

Starr Lake (2)

Wolf killed in May

Bear Paw (6)

McKInley Slough (4) Iron Creek (9)

East Fork (8)

Healy Nenana River (4)

Grant Creek (Formerly 15)

8

20 miles

Kantishna River/ Somber (0)

Denali National Park 3

Alaska

Can. Detailed

Anchorage Source: U.S. National Park Service, ESRI Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times / © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Golf, D3 Tennis, D3 College football, D3

D

MLB, D4 Prep sports, D4 Adventure Sports, D6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

ADVENTURE SPORTS

COLLEGES

CYCLING: MASTERS ROAD NATIONALS

UO nears random drug testing EUGENE — The University of Oregon is implementing random drug testing of all its athletes, following a media report earlier this year that estimated from 40 to 60 percent of the football team smoked marijuana. Oregon’s previous drug policy allowed for testing when there was reasonable suspicion. A recent decision by the general counsel gives temporary permission for random testing effective this month. The policy still faces a public hearing in early October. ESPN The Magazine’s April report was based on interviews with 19 current or former Oregon players and officials, and it accompanied a larger piece that looked at marijuana use among college football players nationwide. In July, Oregon’s athletic department proposed the changes to strengthen its drug policy. Under it, studentathletes will be subject to random tests yearround, even in the summer. A number system will identify athletes for testing. The random tests have not begun, according to university officials. Oregon has not changed its penalties for positive tests. For illicit drugs, athletes receive counseling and education after a first positive test. A second results in a “behavior modification contract” between the student and the coach. Athletes are ineligible for half of a season following a third failed test, and will be dismissed from the team and lose their scholarship for the fourth. For performanceenhancing drugs like steroids, athletes face suspension after the first positive test and dismissal after the second.

Riders hit the road for second day of nationals • Champions are crowned in road races that began and ended at Mount Bachelor By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

MOUNT BACHELOR — Everyone loves a good comeback story. On Thursday morning, by winning the men’s 55-59 road race in the USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships, Charlie Holbrook provided one. Holbrook, 55, powered away from three other riders on the finishing straight at Mt. Bachelor ski area to take the 84-kilometer race in 2 hours, 20 minutes, 34 seconds, on the second day of the championships. “I had time to put my arms up and enjoy it,” the Oconomowoc, Wis., resident said, referring to the sprint to the finish line. “And enjoy I did, because I’m so happy. This has been on my bucket list for a long, long time.” See Nationals / D5

Airing it out By Mark Morical

D

The Bulletin

rugs were a way of life for Kirt Voreis’ parents. His father died in a motorcycle crash while high on cocaine when Kirt was just 5 years old. He recalls how his mother raised him among methamphetamine addicts in Fontana, Calif., and became addicted to the drug herself, working nights to support her son. Kirt remembers fighting off his mother’s heroin-addicted boyfriend when he was just 10 years old. He was determined not to follow the same tragic path as his parents. “I grew up around a lot of Hells Angels and stuff like that,” Voreis says. “Meth is big now, but when I was a kid it was life. My mom got hooked on it to work and feed me. Most of my adolescence, it was me going and finding things on my own. It was a crazy environment to grow up in. I wouldn’t change it for anything, but ... I put a lot of my effort into sport. For me, it was about jumping down streets on my skateboard.” See Voreis / D6

McIlroy, Woods in the mix

PREP VOLLEYBALL

Redmond rivalry opens with a Ridgeview victory By Grant Lucas The Bulletin

Highest remaining men’s seed survives test in quarterfinals, D3

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Matthew Carinio celebrates after winning the USA Cycling Masters Road Nationals Championships men’s 40-44 road race on Thursday at Mount Bachelor

• Bend’s Kirt Voreis overcame a troubled childhood to become an influential mountain biking ambassador

GOLF

Djokovic moves on at U.S. Open

• Road race: Men 60+, women 50+ and tandems, 8 a.m. (final race of day starts at 3:10 p.m.) Women 50 to 59, men 60 to 64 and all tandems will cover the same 84Kcourse used in Thursday’s road races. Women 60 and older and men 65 and older will ride a 62K route that starts at the northeast corner of Crane Prairie Reservoir. (See map, D5)

COMMENTARY

A story headlined “Summit looks to defend title with strong returning lineup” that appeared in Thursday’s Bulletin on Page D1 contained incorrect information about the Summit boys crosscountry team’s 2012 schedule. The Storm open the season Saturday at the Trask Mountain Assault just outside of McMinnville. The Bulletin regrets the error.

TENNIS

TODAY

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

CORRECTION

Novak Djokovic

The 2012 USA Cycling Masters Road Nationals started Wednesday and continue through Sunday in locations around Central Oregon. Visit www.usacycling.org for more information.

Bend’s Kirt Voreis launches a tabletop while riding at the slalom course near Phil’s Trail in Bend Tuesday morning. Voreis is considered one of the best all-around mountain bikers in the world and spends part of the year promoting the sport via the AllRide Tour.

— The Associated Press

Rory McIlroy is tied for the lead at the BMW Championship; Tiger Woods is a shot back, D3

Next up at nationals

The school year has yet to start, but the rivalry has already begun. The first intracity clash in any sport between Redmond and Ridgeview took place Thursday when the Panthers and Ravens met on the volleyball court at Ridgeview High. In three games, the first stone was cast, as Ridgeview rolled to a win in its volleyball home opener, 25-13, 25-14, 25-12. It was Ridgeview’s first match ever on its own court. Adding to the nerves that come with opening a building

was the matchup with crosstown rival Redmond. “It took on a life of its own almost,” Ridgeview coach Debi Dewey said about the rivalry contest. Chants of “Panther Nation” were met with “Raven Stomp” — which were conducted by Ridgeview principal Lee Loving — before the first serve was dealt. The heat within this rivalry took off early, so much so that it set off fire alarms midway through the second game — though it was later reported to be a malfunction by a popcorn machine. See Redmond / D4

NFL

Former Ravens, Browns owner Modell dies; legacy depends on perspective — Modell helped transform the NFL into America’s preBALTIMORE eminent sport. — Art Modell’s finThe former Ravens gerprints can still owner died early be found all over the Modell Thursday, leaving NFL. In Baltimore. In Cleveland. behind a legacy that was unblemished save for one On Monday night football. decision that hounded him On past labor agreements. the rest of his life: moving Along with colleagues his team from Cleveland to named Rozelle, Halas, Baltimore. Brown and Rooney — all pillars of a fledgling league See Modell / D5 By David Ginsburg

The Associated Press

Ridgeview outside hitter Casee Lantz, middle, gets blocked by Redmond defenders Shelby Bergum, left, and Lexie Ostrander during their game at Ridgeview High School on Thursday night. Pete Erickson / The Bulletin


D2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

O! "#$ A%& TELEVISION Today GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, KLM Open, second round, Golf Channel. 9:30 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Kingsmill Championship, second round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, BMW Championship, second round, Golf Channel. TENNIS 9:30 a.m.: U.S. Open, men’s doubles final, women’s semifinals, CBS. MOTOR SPORTS 1 p.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Virginia 529 College Savings 250, qualifying, ESPN2. 2:30 p.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Federated Auto Parts 400, qualifying, ESPN2. 4:30 p.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Virginia 529 College Savings 250, ESPN. FIELD HOCKEY 2:30 p.m.: College, Iowa at Stanford, Pac-12 Network. SOCCER 4:30 p.m.: Men’s college, Tulsa at UCLA, Pac-12 Network. 7 p.m.: Women’s college, Boston U. at Stanford, Pac-12 Network. 9 p.m.: Men’s college, Central Florida at California (same-day tape), Pac-12 Network. 11 p.m.: Women’s college, Loyola Marymount at UCLA (same-day tape), Pac-12 Network. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: College, Utah at Utah State, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: CFL, Calgary Stampeders at Edmonton Eskimos, NBC Sports Network. 7 p.m.: High school, Century at Mountain View, COTV. BASEBALL 7 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco Giants or Arizona Diamondbacks at San Diego Padres, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

Saturday GOLF 4 a.m.: European Tour, KLM Open, third round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Kingsmill Championship, third round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: PGA Tour, BMW Championship, third round, NBC. 12:30 p.m.: PGA Tour, BMW Championship, third round, Golf Channel. MOTOR SPORTS 5 a.m.: Formula One, Italian Grand Prix, qualifying, Speed. 4:30 p.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Federated Auto Parts 400, ABC. FOOTBALL 9 a.m.: College, Penn State at Virginia, ABC. 9 a.m.: College, Auburn at Mississippi State, ESPN. 9 a.m.: College, Central Florida at Ohio State, ESPN2. 9 a.m.: College, Miami at Kansas State, FX. 9 a.m.: College, Maryland at Temple, ESPNU. 9 a.m.: College, Tulane at Tulsa, Root Sports. Noon: College, Southern Utah at Cal, Pac-12 Network. 12:30 p.m.: College, South Florida at Nevada, CBS Sports Network. 12:30 p.m.: College, USC at Syracuse, ABC. 12:30 p.m.: College, Air Force at Michigan, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m.: College, Purdue at Notre Dame, NBC. 12:30 p.m.: College, Florida at Texas A&M, ESPN. 12:30 p.m.: College, Michigan State at Central Michigan, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m.: College, Delaware State at Delaware, NBC Sports Network. 12:30 p.m.: College, Rice at Kansas, Root Sports.

1 p.m.: College, Wisconsin at Oregon State, FX. 3:30 p.m.: College, Fresno State at Oregon, Pac-12 Network. 4 p.m.: College, Washington at LSU, ESPN. 4:30 p.m.: College, Nebraska at UCLA, Fox. 4:30 p.m.: College, Army at San Diego State, NBCSN. 4:45 p.m.: College, Georgia at Missouri, ESPN2. 5 p.m.: College, Vanderbilt at Northwestern, Big Ten Network. 5 p.m.: College, Louisiana Tech at Houston, CBS Sports Network. 7:30 p.m.: College, Illinois at Arizona State, ESPN. 7:30 p.m.: College, Oklahoma State at Arizona, Pac-12 Network. TENNIS 9 a.m.: U.S. Open, men’s semifinals, CBS. 5 p.m.: U.S. Open, women’s final, CBS. BASEBALL 1 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco Giants, Fox. 4 p.m.: MLB, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays or New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles, MLB Network. 6 p.m.: MLB, Oakland A’s at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

Sunday FOOTBALL Midnight: College, Eastern Washington at Washington State (same-day tape), Pac-12 Network. 3 a.m.: College, Sacramento State at Colorado (same-day tape), Pac-12 Network. 6 a.m.: College, Duke at Stanford (same-day tape), Pac12 Network. 10 a.m.: NFL, New England Patriots at Tennessee Titans, CBS. 10 a.m.: NFL, Washington Redskins at New Orleans Saints, Fox. 1:30 p.m.: NFL, Seattle Seahawks at Arizona Cardinals, Fox. 5:15 p.m.: NFL, Pittsburgh Steelers at Denver Broncos, NBC. SOCCER 12:30 a.m.: Major League Soccer, Chivas USA at Seattle Sounders (same-day tape), Root Sports. Noon: Women’s college, Georgetown at Stanford, Pac-12. 2 p.m.: Men’s college, UC Irvine at UCLA, Pac-12 Network. 4:30 p.m.: Women’s college, Tennessee at UCLA, Pac-12 Network. GOLF 3:30 a.m.: European Tour, KLM Open, final round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: PGA Tour, BMW Championship, final round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m.: PGA Tour, BMW Championship, final round, NBC. 11 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Kingsmill Championship, final round, Golf Channel. MOTOR SPORTS 4:30 a.m.: Formula One, Italian Grand Prix, Speed. Noon: National Hot Rod Association, U.S. Nationals, ESPN2. TENNIS 9:30 a.m.: U.S. Open, women’s doubles final, CBS. 1 p.m.: U.S. Open, men’s final, CBS. BASEBALL 10:30 a.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles, TBS. 1 p.m.: MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco Giants, ESPN.

RADIO Today

Saturday

FOOTBALL 7 p.m.: High school, Century at Mountain View, KBND-AM 1110, KICE-AM 940.

FOOTBALL 1 p.m.: College, Wisconsin at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940. 3:30 p.m.: College, Fresno State at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. 5 p.m. (approximately): College, Nebraska at UCLA (joined in progress after Oregon State postgame show), KICE-AM 940.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

SCOREBOARD ON DECK Today Football: Bend at Silverton, 7 p.m.; Century at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Eagle Point, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Madras, 7 p.m.; Klamath Union at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Cascade, 7 p.m.; Burns at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Oakridge at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Culver at Grant Union, 7 p.m.; Gilchrist at Elkton, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Mountain View at North Medford, 4 p.m.; Bend at South Medford, 4 p.m.; McLoughlin at Redmond, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: North Medford at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Willamette at Summit, 4 p.m.; South Medford at Bend, 4 p.m.; McLoughlin at Redmond, 3 p.m. Volleyball: Gilchrist at Prospect, 5 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Butte Falls, 1 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

SAINTS Patriots VIKINGS TEXANS LIONS Falcons PACKERS Panthers Seahawks BRONCOS RAVENS Chargers

Saturday Cross-country: Bend, Mountain View, Redmond, Sisters, La Pine, Ridgeview and Crook County at the Breese Ranch Stampede in Prineville, 8 a.m.; Summit, Madras at the Trask Mountain Assault in McMinnville, noon Volleyball: Summit at Central Catholic Invitational, 9 a.m.; Bend, Redmond, Ridgeview, Crook County at Mountain View tournament, TBA; Sisters, Madras at Cascade tourney, 8 a.m.; Culver at Heppner tournament, TBA; Trinity Lutheran at Prairie City tournament, TBA; Central Christian at Paisley, 2 p.m.. Boys soccer: Summit at Madras, 10 a.m.; Mountain View at South Medford, 11 a.m.; Bend at North Medford, 11 a.m.; Central Christian at Irrigon, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: North Medford at Bend, 11 a.m.

CYCLING USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships Thursday Mt. Bachelor ski area Road race Podium and Central Oregon finishers Men 110 kilometers 35-39 — 1, Rudolph Napolitano, Santa Monica, Calif., 2:47:41. 2, Karl Bordine, Carlsbad, Calif., 1:34 back. 3, Matthew Gates, same time. 4, Christopher Brown, Chattanooga, Tenn., 1:36. 5, Ben Thompson, Bend, 2:01. 8, Scott Gray, Bend, 2:04. 12, Josh LaGrange, Bend, 2:36. 38, Rob Angelo, Bend, 5:31. 40-44 — 1, Matthew Carinio, San Luis Obispo, Calif., 2:43:33. 2, Jeffrey Hartman, Boulder, Colo., :01 back. 3, Richard Feldman, Ketchum, Idaho, same time. 4, Daniel Bryant, Carmichael, Calif., s.t. 5, Christopher Phipps, San Francisco, :02. 8, Sloane Anderson, Bend, :41. 12, Kyle Wuepper, Bend, :53. 22, Andrew Sargent, Bend, 1:48. 23, Matt Williams, s.t. 28, Doug LaPlaca, Bend, 1:51. 48, Edward Micek, Bend, 3:56. 57, Jurgen Fennerl, Bend, 8:39. 84 kilometers 45-49 — 1, Brendan Sullivan, Atlanta, 2:08:47. 2, Jeffrey Konsmo, Manhattan Beach, Calif., 2:07. 3, James Parker, Saint Paul, Minn., 2:08. 4, Michael Tobin, Boise, Idaho, 2:10. 5, Eric Martin, Bend, 2:49. 33, Greg Canfield, Bend, 3:25. 56, Dan Packman, Bend, 4:24. 73, David Bjork, Bend, 6:12. 91, Steve Wursta, Bend, 8:33. 50-54 — 1, Kevin Metcalfe, Pleasant Hill, Calif., 2:12:05. 2, Richard Meeker, Corona del Mar, Calif., :27 back. 3, Roger Worthington, Capistrano Beach, Calif., :28. 4, Craig Hofer, Kittredge, Colo., same time. 5, David Gordon, Olympia, Wash., s.t. 16, Scott Seaton, Bend, 1:41. 43, Eric Schusterman, Bend, 3:04. 59, Doug Smith, Bend, 5:53. 65, Ambrose Su, Bend, 7:58. 75, Alan Thompson, Bend, 36:56. 55-59 — 1, Charles Holbrook, Oconomowoc, Wis., 2:20:23. 2, Zan Treasure, Odgen, Utah, same time. 3, Kevin Susco, Palo Alto, Calif., :01 back. 4, David Zimbelman, The Dalles, :01 back. 5, Steven Archer, Danville, Calif., :05. Women 84 kilometers 35-39 — 1, Anne Perry, Draper, Utah, 2:48:28. 2, Amy Thornquist, Reno, Nev., :03 back. 3, Rikke Preisler, Los Gatos, Calif., 1:02. 4, Tanya Grossman, San Leandro, Calif., 1:03. 5, Amy Phillips, Chattanooga, Tenn., same time. 40-44 — 1, Felicia Gomez, Fresno, Calif., 2:30:32. 2, Mindy Caruso, Albuquerque, N.M., 1:15 back. 3, Rebecca Rusch, Ketchum, Idaho, 1:26. 4, Kerry Martin, Bend, 2:00. 5, Ginny King, Dallas, Texas, 2:32. 10, Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend, 9:35. 45-49 — 1, Lisa Campbell, Newburypark, Calif., 2:45:59. 2, Tanya Fredricks, San Anselmo, Calif., 1:18 back. 3, Jennifer Slawta, Talent, 1:24. 4, Jodie Bolt, Lakewood, Wash., 1:26. 5, Elizabeth Gegner, Laguna Beach, Calif., 1:38. 7, Tawnie McDonald, Bend, 2:51. 14, Susanna Julber, Bend, 4:56.

GOLF PGA Tour BMW Championship Thursday At Crooked Stick Golf Club Course Carmel, Ind. Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,497; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Webb Simpson 33-31—64 Bo Van Pelt 31-33—64 Rory McIlroy 32-32—64 Graham DeLaet 32-32—64 Tiger Woods 33-32—65 Vijay Singh 34-31—65 Ryan Palmer 32-34—66 Ryan Moore 34-32—66 Luke Donald 34-32—66 Jimmy Walker 34-33—67 Zach Johnson 35-32—67 Robert Garrigus 33-34—67 Justin Rose 32-35—67 Rickie Fowler 34-33—67 Ben Crane 34-33—67 Ian Poulter 36-32—68 Adam Scott 33-35—68 Kyle Stanley 34-34—68 Matt Every 35-33—68 Chris Kirk 35-33—68 Seung-Yul Noh 34-34—68 Graeme McDowell 33-35—68 Lee Westwood 34-34—68 Louis Oosthuizen 35-33—68 Dustin Johnson 36-32—68 Steve Stricker 33-35—68 Ernie Els 34-34—68 Geoff Ogilvy 33-35—68 Jim Furyk 33-36—69 Phil Mickelson 33-36—69 Matt Kuchar 35-34—69 Sergio Garcia 37-32—69 David Hearn 34-35—69 Tom Gillis 35-34—69 Kevin Stadler 35-34—69 Bud Cauley 35-34—69 Bubba Watson 35-34—69 Brandt Snedeker 36-33—69 Martin Laird 35-34—69 Charl Schwartzel 35-34—69 Ben Curtis 36-34—70 John Senden 35-35—70 John Huh 35-35—70 Hunter Mahan 34-36—70 Nick Watney 33-37—70 Padraig Harrington 35-35—70 Troy Matteson 35-35—70 Charlie Wi 34-36—70 Johnson Wagner 36-34—70 J.B. Holmes 35-35—70 Tim Clark 35-36—71 Bill Haas 37-34—71 Bob Estes 36-35—71 Brendon de Jonge 36-35—71 Keegan Bradley 34-37—71 Mark Wilson 35-37—72 Scott Piercy 34-38—72 Jason Dufner 37-35—72 Pat Perez 36-36—72 Kevin Na 36-36—72 Brian Harman 35-38—73 Jeff Overton 37-37—74 Greg Chalmers 38-36—74 D.A. Points 33-41—74 Marc Leishman 37-38—75 Carl Pettersson 39-36—75 Charley Hoffman 38-37—75 Dicky Pride 39-37—76 Bryce Molder 38-39—77 William McGirt 40-37—77

LPGA Tour Kingsmill Championship Thursday At Kingsmill Resort, River Course Williamsburg, Va. Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,384; Par: 71 (36-35) Partial First Round Play was suspended and will be completed today

Jiyai Shin Paula Creamer Maria Hjorth Azahara Munoz Beatriz Recari Jennifer Johnson Christina Kim Mika Miyazato Jennifer Song Isabelle Beisiegel Chella Choi Katie Futcher Julieta Granada Natalie Gulbis Danielle Kang Amelia Lewis Catriona Matthew Ai Miyazato Gerina Piller Hee Kyung Seo Karin Sjodin Lexi Thompson Tanya Dergal Jodi Ewart Mitsuki Katahira Candie Kung Ilhee Lee Paola Moreno Hee Young Park Nicole Castrale Laura Diaz Sandra Gal Lorie Kane Haeji Kang P.K. Kongkraphan Jennie Lee Meena Lee Stacy Lewis Becky Morgan Angela Oh Pornanong Phatlum Samantha Richdale Angela Stanford Irene Cho Mi Jung Hur Karine Icher Stephanie Louden Paige Mackenzie Mo Martin Kristy McPherson Anna Nordqvist Jin Young Pak Jane Rah Lizette Salas Elisa Serramia Sarah Jane Smith Karen Stupples Victoria Tanco Mariajo Uribe Alison Walshe Lindsey Wright Karlin Beck Dori Carter Moira Dunn Veronica Felibert Katherine Hull Juli Inkster Tiffany Joh Cindy LaCrosse Belen Mozo Ji Young Oh Reilley Rankin Alena Sharp Wendy Ward Sandra Changkija Taylor Coutu Meredith Duncan Hee-Won Han Vicky Hurst Hanna Kang Cristie Kerr Mindy Kim Brittany Lang Jee Young Lee Giulia Sergas Sun Young Yoo Heather Bowie Young Hannah Yun Alexandra Casi Meaghan Francella Sophie Gustafson Mina Harigae Maria Hernandez Yoo Kyeong Kim Brittany Lincicome Sydnee Michaels Morgan Pressel Momoko Ueda Amanda Blumenherst Jimin Kang Beth Bader Cydney Clanton Anna Grzebien Juliana Murcia Ortiz Michelle Wie Tzu-Chi Lin Whitney Neuhauser Nicole Hage Rebecca Lee-Bentham Marcela Leon Jean Bartholomew

32-30—62 30-35—65 33-32—65 33-32—65 33-32—65 36-30—66 35-31—66 32-34—66 33-33—66 35-32—67 34-33—67 34-33—67 36-31—67 34-33—67 35-32—67 34-33—67 33-34—67 36-31—67 33-34—67 35-32—67 34-33—67 34-33—67 34-34—68 35-33—68 34-34—68 35-33—68 34-34—68 33-35—68 34-34—68 36-33—69 34-35—69 36-33—69 33-36—69 36-33—69 36-33—69 36-33—69 32-37—69 34-35—69 36-33—69 36-33—69 37-32—69 34-35—69 35-34—69 37-33—70 35-35—70 36-34—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 33-37—70 35-35—70 36-34—70 36-34—70 35-35—70 36-34—70 36-34—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 34-36—70 36-34—70 35-35—70 36-35—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 35-36—71 37-35—72 36-36—72 38-34—72 37-35—72 37-35—72 38-34—72 36-36—72 38-34—72 38-34—72 37-35—72 35-37—72 39-33—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 37-36—73 38-35—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 38-35—73 37-36—73 39-35—74 39-35—74 38-37—75 39-36—75 39-36—75 35-40—75 40-35—75 38-38—76 36-40—76 37-40—77 39-39—78 42-37—79 42-42—84

Leaderboard at time of suspended play SCORE THRU 1. Jiyai Shin -9 F 2. Dewi Claire Schreefel -7 16 3. Paula Creamer -6 F 3. Azahara Munoz -6 F 3. Maria Hjorth -6 F 3. Beatriz Recari -6 F 7. Jennifer Song -5 F 7. Christina Kim -5 F 7. Jennifer Johnson -5 F 7. Mika Miyazato -5 F

TENNIS Professional U.S. Open Thursday At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Purse: $25.5 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Quarterfinals David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 2-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Juan Martin del Potro (7), Argentina, 6-2, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Show Court Schedules

Today All Times PDT Play begins at 9 a.m. Men’s Doubles Final: Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (5), Czech Republic, vs. Bob and Mike Bryan (2), United States Women’s Singles Semifinal not before 10:45 a.m.: Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, vs. Maria Sharapova (3), Russia Women’s Singles Semifinal not before 12:45 p.m.: Serena Williams (4), United States, vs. Sara Errani (10), Italy

FOOTBALL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 0 Miami 0 0 0 .000 0 New England 0 0 0 .000 0 N.Y. Jets 0 0 0 .000 0 South W L T Pct PF Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0 Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 0 Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 0 0 0 .000 0 Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0 Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0 Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0 West W L T Pct PF Denver 0 0 0 .000 0 Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24 Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0 Washington 0 0 0 .000 0 N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 17 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 0 Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0 New Orleans 0 0 0 .000 0 Tampa Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0 Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0 St. Louis 0 0 0 .000 0 ——— Wednesday’s Game Dallas 24, N.Y. Giants 17 Sunday’s Games Indianapolis at Chicago, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Miami at Houston, 10 a.m. New England at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Washington at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Seattle at Arizona, 1:25 p.m. San Francisco at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m. Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Denver, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Games Cincinnati at Baltimore, 4 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 7:15 p.m.

MLS PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 17 0 0 24 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games SOUTH Tennessee Tech 42, North Greenville 14 MIDWEST Cincinnati 34, Pittsburgh 10 N. Michigan 24, Wis.-Lacrosse 6

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF Sporting Kansas City 15 7 5 50 34 New York 13 7 7 46 46 Houston 12 7 9 45 40 Chicago 13 8 5 44 35 Columbus 12 9 6 42 33 D.C. 12 10 5 41 43 Montreal 12 14 3 39 43 New England 7 14 7 28 35 Philadelphia 7 13 5 26 25 Toronto FC 5 16 6 21 30 Western Conference W L T Pts GF San Jose 16 6 5 53 56 Real Salt Lake 14 11 4 46 38 Seattle 12 6 8 44 41 Los Angeles 13 11 4 43 48 Vancouver 10 11 7 37 29 FC Dallas 8 12 9 33 34 Colorado 9 17 2 29 36 Chivas USA 7 11 7 28 20 Portland 7 14 6 27 27 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Game Houston 1, Real Salt Lake 0 Saturday’s Game Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12 Chicago at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14 Houston at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15 Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 10 a.m. Seattle FC at Portland, 12:30 p.m. Columbus at New York, 4 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Montreal at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.

GA 24 39 33 31 32 38 46 38 30 48 GA 33 33 27 40 37 38 41 39 46

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct GB x-Connecticut 20 7 .741 — x-Indiana 17 9 .654 2½ Atlanta 15 13 .536 5½ New York 11 16 .407 9 Chicago 10 16 .385 9½ Washington 5 22 .185 15 Western Conference W L Pct GB x-Minnesota 22 4 .846 — x-Los Angeles 19 9 .679 4 x-San Antonio 17 9 .654 5 Seattle 12 14 .462 10 Phoenix 6 20 .231 16 Tulsa 6 21 .222 16½ x-clinched playoff spot ——— Thursday’s Game Seattle 101, Tulsa 74 Today’s Games Phoenix at Connecticut, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Washington, 4 p.m. Chicago at New York, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Indiana at San Antonio, 5 p.m.

DEALS

Pac-12 Standings All Times PDT ——— North Conf. Overall Stanford 0-0 1-0 Oregon 0-0 1-0 Washington 0-0 1-0 Oregon State 0-0 0-0 California 0-0 0-1 Washington State 0-0 0-1 South Conf. Overall Arizona 0-0 1-0 Arizona State 0-0 1-0 UCLA 0-0 1-0 USC 0-0 1-0 Utah 0-0 1-0 Colorado 0-0 0-1 Today’s Game Utah at Utah State, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games Southern Utah at California, noon Sacramento State at Colorado, noon Eastern Washington at Washington State, noon USC at Syracuse, 12:30 p.m. Wisconsin at Oregon State, 1 p.m. Fresno State at Oregon, 3:30 p.m. Washington at LSU, 4 p.m. Nebraska at UCLA, 4:30 p.m. Illinois at Arizona State, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma State at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.

Betting line BEARS Eagles JETS

COLLEGE (Home teams in Caps) Today Utah 7 7.5 UTAH STATE Saturday VIRGINIA 9.5 10 Penn St Indiana 13.5 14 UMASS MICHIGAN 21.5 21.5 Air Force OHIO U 21 21 New Mexico St KENTUCKY 7 7 Kent St OHIO ST 17 18 C. Florida BOWLING GREEN 13.5 16 Idaho CLEMSON 26.5 27 Ball St KANSAS 10 10 Rice WYOMING 2.5 3 Toledo N. Carolina 7 10.5 WAKE FOREST Georgia 3 2.5 MISSOURI KANSAS ST 7 7 Miami (Fla.) Michigan St 23.5 20 C. MICHIGAN e-Usc 26 26 Syracuse NOTRE DAME 14.5 14.5 Purdue NEVADA PK 1.5 S. Florida Wisconsin 8 7 OREGON ST OREGON 33.5 35 Fresno St S. CAROLINA 23.5 22 E. Carolina IOWA 4 5 Iowa St LSU 24 24 Washington MISSISSIPPI 7.5 7.5 Utep MISSISSIPPI ST 3 3 Auburn Texas Tech 16 18 TEXAS ST TEMPLE 10.5 10 Maryland TEXAS 37.5 38 New Mexico TEXAS A&M 2 1 Florida Louisiana Tech 3.5 3.5 HOUSTON Nebraska 4.5 6 UCLA SAN DIEGO ST 4.5 6 Army NC State 4 5 CONNECTICUT TULSA 24.5 25 Tulane Vanderbilt 3 3.5 NORTHWESTERN STANFORD 14.5 15 Duke Oklahoma St 13.5 10.5 ARIZONA ARIZONA ST PK 3.5 Illinois FLORIDA INT’L 23.5 23.5 Akron TROY 2.5 3 UL-Lafayette MID TENN ST 7 8.5 Florida Atlantic AKRANSAS ST 21 23 Memphis l-ARKANSAS 30 30.5 UL-Monroe ALABAMA 40 39 W. Kentucky e-East Rutherford, N.J. l-Little Rock, Ark.

SOCCER

NFL

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Sunday 9.5 9.5 8 9 3 3

9.5 7 Redskins 6.5 5.5 TITANS 4.5 4 Jaguars 10.5 12 Dolphins 8.5 7 Rams 2 3 CHIEFS 5.5 5 49ers 2.5 2.5 BUCCANEERS 2 2.5 CARDINALS 1 1.5 Steelers Monday, Sept. 10 6 6 Bengals 1.5 1 RAIDERS

Colts BROWNS Bills

Transactions BASEBALL American Association GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS—Traded RHP John Brownell to Long Island (Atlantic) for future considerations. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS—Released LHP James Frisbee. SIOUX FALLS PHEASANTS—Released INF Andy Juday. Traded INF Cesar Nicolas to Southern Maryland (Atlantic) for a player to be named. ST. PAUL SAINTS—Traded C Jon Hurst to San Rafael (North American) to complete an Aug. 24 trade. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Re-signed CB Dominique Franks. Waived WR Tim Toone. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed WR Derek Hagan. Waived CB Coye Francies. COLLEGE RICE—Announced junior basketball C Omar Oraby will transfer.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 9,967 2,312 1,969 562 The Dalles 5,256 2,153 2,271 406 John Day 3,866 1,913 1,814 537 McNary 4,631 963 1,582 442 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 370,075 48,709 184,897 70,754 The Dalles 252,118 36,205 121,870 49,406 John Day 210,646 30,723 76,346 33,250 McNary 200,942 15,570 65,035 25,630


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

S!"#$% &' B#&()

GOLF ROUNDUP

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Ducks’ Thomas makes the most of his touches

Cycling • Contador keeps Vuelta lead: Overall leader Alberto Contador moved closer to winning the race for a second time, while Daniele Bennati won the 18th stage of the Spanish Vuelta on Thursday. Bennati edged Ben Swift by a tire to win the 127-mile leg in 4 hours, 17 minutes, 17 seconds. Contador leads Alejandro Valverde by 1:52 and Joaquin Rodriguez is 2:28 behind in third place. Contador finished 10 seconds behind Bennati, who won his seventh Vuelta stage. The 19th stage today is expected to favor sprinters. The 67th edition of the Spanish race ends Sunday in Madrid.

• U.S. soccer aims to extend firsts trend at Jamaica: It’s been a year of firsts for the Jurgen Klinsmann and the U.S. national team. There was the first win over Italy, after 78 years of trying. And then the first U.S. win at Mexico, 75 years after initially venturing down to play their neighbors to the south. Tonight, the U.S. plays a World Cup qualifying match at Jamaica. And while the Americans have never lost to the Reggae Boyz, they also have never won a World Cup qualifier in Kingston, tying on four previous trips. Klinsmann says the Americans should be confident. The team wants “to prove that we can get things done the right way.” The homeand-home series with Jamaica moves to Columbus, Ohio, on Sept. 11.

Tennis • Serbian player banned for match-fixing: Serbian tennis player David Savic was found guilty of match-fixing and had his life ban confirmed by world sport’s highest court on Thursday. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said its panel found it was proven that Savic “made invitations to another tennis player to fix the outcome” of matches. Savic will be “permanently ineligible to participate in any event organized or sanctioned by any tennis governing body,” the court ruled. Savic, who reached a career-high No. 363 ranking in 2009, claimed he was set up by a “current top player” who told the TIU that Savic asked him to fix a match in exchange for money. The player was not identified.

Football • Commish says replacement officials did well: The National Football League and its officials are probably $50 million to $70 million apart on terms of a new five- to seven-year contract, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said Thursday. The NFL started its season Wednesday night, with replacement officials from the lower college football levels working the Dallas Cowboys’ 24-17 win over the New York Giants.“Our officials did a more than adequate job last night,” Goodell said at the Bloomberg Sports Business Summit hosted by Bloomberg Link in New York. “I think we’ve proven we can train officials, get them up to NFL standards, and we’ve done that in a three-month period. These officials will get even better as time goes by. The game is not going to stop.” • Vikings RB Peterson says he wants to play: Adrian Peterson hasn’t wavered all summer: He says he is ready to play for Minnesota in the season opener. The star running back, recovering from a surgically repaired left knee, said Thursday he has “somewhat” of a gut feeling about whether the Vikings will let him suit up on Sunday for the game against Jacksonville. Peterson didn’t specify whether he’s expecting to play and knows the decision is out of his hands. • Jets top Patriots in highest average price for tix: The New York Jets are tops in the NFL — in average ticket prices. Team Marketing Report released its Fan Cost Index on Thursday, with the Jets having the highest average for nonpremium tickets at $117.94. They beat out their AFC East rivals, the New England Patriots, by 10 cents. The Jets lowered some ticket prices for this year, but the total remains much higher than the league average, which is $78.38 — a 2.5 percent increase from last season.

— From wire reports

314 all-purpose yards. After the game, Kelly joked: “I’ll see if next EUGENE — year we can get him an De’Anthony Thomas extra carry or two.” played less than a half To date, Thomas has in No. 4 Oregon’s sea21 touchdowns in 15 cason opener and still Next up reer games. He’s avermanaged to show that Fresno State at aging a score every 5.7 he’s the flash in the No. 4 Oregon touches. Ducks’ prolific offense. “I just feel a lot more Handling the ball • When: confident on the field just eight times, Thom- Saturday, now,” Thomas said. as managed 125 total 3:30 p.m. Thomas first offensive yards and • TV: Pac-12 grabbed attention when three touchdowns in Network Oregon’s 57-34 victory • Radio: KBND- he played for Snoop Dogg’s youth football over Arkansas State. AM 1110 league in Los Angeles. He retired to the bench The rapper, whose real midway through the name is Calvin Broadus, nicksecond quarter. Former Ducks running back named the young Thomas the and Heisman Trophy candi- “Black Mamba” because of his date LaMichael James assessed ability to change direction and Thomas from the sidelines, and slip through defenses. Thomas would graduate then went to Twitter with his from Snoop’s league to play for reaction. “Best college football athlete I Crenshaw High School. His senhave ever in my life seen! ... I’m a ior season he rushed for 1,299 yards and 18 touchdowns, while witness,” James posted. Thomas had three carries for also picking off five passes on 64 yards and a touchdown. He defense to lead the Cougars caught four passes from redshirt to their second straight city freshman Marcus Mariota for championship. Thomas also ran track, and at 55 yards and two scores. And he the state championships his jureturned a punt six yards. “Whenever 6 touches the ball nior year he ran the 200 meters you just kind of sit back,” said in a wind-aided 20.61 seconds, coach Chip Kelly, referring to the best time in the nation for a Thomas by his jersey number. prep athlete at the time. Thomas surprised many when he de“He’s a special player.” Thomas, a 5-foot-9, 173-pound cided to go to Oregon over USC, Los Angeles native, was already but Kelly’s uptempo offense was getting Heisman Trophy buzz perfect for the elusive sprinter. “There is a reason they call before the opener. Last season, he set an Oregon freshman re- him the Black Mamba: He just cord with 18 touchdowns, rush- strikes. I am always at a loss ing for seven, catching nine and for words,” receiver Josh Huff said. “It is so exciting to see him adding two on kickoff returns. He finished with 2,235 all-pur- with the ball and play for our pose yards, an average of 159.6 offense.” Thomas is not oblivious to the yards per game, and was named the Pac-12’s co-freshman of the attention he’s getting from teamyear on offense. He was the only mates like Huff — and beyond player in the nation with more Eugene. Thomas is already than 400 yards each in rushing, on numerous Heisman watch lists and the subject of several receiving and returns. In last season’s Rose Bowl vic- Facebook campaigns, includtory over Wisconsin, Thomas ing one appropriately entitled carried the ball just twice, once “De’Anthony for De’Heisman.” “I just use it as motivation to for 91 yards and a touchdown and then 64 yards for another work even harder and try to be score. He finished the game with the best,” he said. By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Charles Rex Arbogast / The Associated Press

Rory McIlroy hits his tee shot on the sixth hole during the first round of the PGA Tour’s BMW Championship at Crooked Stick Golf Club in Carmel, Ind., on Thursday.

Soccer

D3

McIlroy in tie for lead; Woods one behind The Associated Press CARMEL, Ind. — Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy seem to be spending a lot of time together lately. That includes the top of a busy leaderboard at the BMW Championship. The biggest star in golf and his heir apparent put on a dazzling show Thursday at Crooked Stick, where the gallery caught a glimpse of the best players in the world for the first time since the 1991 PGA Championship. McIlroy, flawless with his irons, birdied his last two holes for an 8-under 64 and was part of a four-way tie for the lead with Indiana native Bo Van Pelt, U.S. Open champion Webb Simpson and Graham DeLaet, the Canadian who is quietly becoming the Cinderella of these FedEx Cup playoffs. Just three days after McIlroy won the Deutsche Bank Championship, he looked just as impressive in the opening round at Crooked Stick. “He hits it great, putts it great and top of that, he’s just a really nice kid,” Woods said in some of his strongest praise ever for another player. “The game of golf is in great hands with him, and he’s here to stay.” Woods, who finished two shots behind Monday in Boston, isn’t going away quietly. He was only sharp when it came to scoring, making enough birdies to stay in the game, including a 30-foot chip-in on his last hole for a 65. McIlroy had every reason to be a little flat because of the short turnaround from the Labor Day finish. But that wasn’t the case at the BMW Championship, not with fans lined three-deep down the entire 10th hole to see him and Woods in the same group for the second time in three weeks. “It definitely gives you a little more of a lift, especially coming off a win and maybe being a little flat,” McIlroy said. “You’re focused from the get-go, and you want to go out and shoot a good number, and I was able to do that today.” They made it look easy, and Crooked Stick was every bit of that on a broiling afternoon north of Indianapolis. Because of heavy rains earlier in the week — so fierce on Wednesday that the course was briefly evacuated — players were able to lift, clean and place their golf

balls in the short grass before firing at the flags. Really, there was no other option in such soft conditions. Sixty players in the 70-man field were at par or better. Forty players were in the 60s. All but five holes played under par, and the average score was 69.47. “I think we all knew it was there for the taking today,” said Justin Rose, who opened with a 67 and was tied for 10th. Vijay Singh had a chance to join the leaders until he drove into the water on the 18th hole, though he escaped with par and was at 65. Luke Donald was in the group at 66. Phil Mickelson was at 69, worth noting because it looked as though he might quadruple bogey on his last hole. Instead, he made birdie. His second shot from the fairway on the par-5 ninth sailed toward the corporate tents, and Mickelson feared it was out-ofbounds. He hit a provisional that went onto the driving range, which definitely was outof-bounds. Before he could hit again, Mickelson discovered the first one was in play. Mickelson had a clear enough shot at the green, and he hasn’t lost his magic with the short game — his wedge settled 2 feet away for a birdie. “I got lucky,” Mickelson said. Also on Thursday: Shin’s 62 paces field at soggy Kingsmill WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — Jiyai Shin weathered a two-hour weather delay and shot a 9-under 62 to take the first-round lead in the LPGA Tour’s Kingsmill Championship. With 33 players still on the course when play was halted by darkness, the 24-year-old South Korean was two shots ahead of the field. Dewi Claire Schreefel of the Netherlands used an eagle on the par-5 seventh hole (her 16th) to reach 7 under before play was suspended. Storm fires 63 in Netherlands HILVERSUM, Netherlands — Graeme Storm of England shot a course record 7under 63 to lead the European Tour’s KLM Open by two shots in the opening round. Martin Kaymer, Frenchman Raphael Jacquelin and Paraguay’s Fabrizio Zanotti also surpassed the previous course record with their 5-under 65s to tie for second place.

TENNIS: U.S. OPEN

Djokovic wins, reaches semifinals By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Locked in a taut, thrilla-minute second set, Novak Djokovic and Juan Martin del Potro headed to a tiebreaker and promptly produced a 20-stroke masterpiece of a point befitting a pair of past U.S. Open champions. More than a dozen shots in, defending champion Djokovic tossed up a lob. Del Potro, the 2009 champion, sprinted with his back to the court, got to the ball and lofted a lob the other way. Djokovic slammed an overhead. Del Potro somehow kept the ball in play. Djokovic laced a drop shot. Again, del Potro got there, attempting another lob. It landed long. A point from a two-set lead, Djokovic threw his head back, roared “Come on!” and pumped his arms. Del Potro leaned his elbows atop the net, hunched over and rested his head on his arms. Close and compelling as their quarterfinal was, it might as well have been over right then and there. Djokovic’s down-theline backhand winner moments later ended the tiebreaker, gave him a commanding lead, and sent him on the way to a 6-2, 76 (3), 6-4 victory Thursday night that put him in his 10th consecutive Grand Slam semifinal. “We played some incredible rallies and incredible points,” Djokovic said. “It’s always entertaining, always so much fun, playing in these night sessions.” The second-seeded Serb will face fourthseeded David Ferrer of Spain on Saturday, with a spot in Sunday’s final at stake. Ferrer advanced to his fourth career major semifinal by using his high-energy brand of leg-churning, ball-chasing tennis to outlast

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

Novak Djokovic reacts after winning a point against Juan Martin del Potro during a quarterfinal match at the U.S. Open on Thursday in New York.

eighth-seeded Janko Tipsarevic of Serbia 6-3, 6-7 (5), 2-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4) in 4 hours, 31 minutes. Olympic champion Andy Murray and 2010 Wimbledon runner-up Tomas Berdych — who eliminated 17-time major champion Roger Federer — earned their semifinal berths Wednesday. Under the lights at night in Arthur Ashe Stadium, the showcase matchup of Djokovic’s squeaky-sneaker defense, reflex returns and line-catching groundstrokes against the seventh-seeded del Potro’s big-as-canbe forehands topping 100 mph lasted a few minutes past three hours. But it was tremendously good every step of the way, and the second set alone was 84 minutes long — 11 minutes more than Djokovic’s entire first-round match last week. In today’s women’s semifinals, 10th-seeded Sara Errani plays No. 4 Serena Williams, with top-seeded Victoria Azarenka meeting No. 3 Maria Sharapova in the other match. The winners play for the title Saturday.

Beavers ready to play first game a week late for the second straight season. Wisconsin went 11Coach Mike Riley 3 last season and lost jokes that Oregon State to Oregon in the Rose has been in the longest Bowl. training camp ever. The Badgers opened The Beavers, who Next up this season with a 26started camp back on Wisconsin at 21 victory at home over Aug. 6, didn’t play their Oregon State FCS power Northern opener on Saturday Iowa. against Nicholls State • When: Coach Bret Bielema because Hurricane Saturday, said he was pleased Isaac swept through the 1 p.m. to get the win but said Colonels’ Thibodaux, • TV: FX • Radio: there were things the La., campus. Badgers needed to imOfficials from Or- KICE-AM 940 prove before facing the egon State and Nicholls Beavers. State jointly decided “I know we’re going to see a last Wednesday night that it was in the best interests of the much improved football team students to postpone the game, going out there this year than possibly until the first weekend we faced last year at Camp Randall,” Bielema said. “And obviin December. The result is that Oregon ously anytime you travel for the State will finally open its season first time it’s got its own set of this Saturday at home against issues. Tuesday is the first day of classes as well. So a lot of big No. 13 Wisconsin. It is the first time a Big Ten firsts coming this week for this team has ventured to Corvallis team to take on.” There was some gamesmansince 1971, when the Beavers ship going on this week when defeated Iowa 33-19. “I’ve been saying it’s as big a Bielema decided not to give Ornonconference game that Or- egon State the Northern Iowa egon State has ever hosted,” Ri- game film because the Beavers had no game film to offer in ley said. “I think it’s awesome.” After the Nicholls State game return. Riley was able to get ahold of was called off last week, Riley gave the Beavers a day off before the film anyway, although he getting back to work. He thought kept his source anonymous. Saturday’s game will be the there might be a letdown among the players because they had al- Beavers’ latest season opener ready started their preparations since a Sept. 9, 1989, game against Stanford. for the Colonels. As for the Nicholls State “We tried to look at the silver lining: We get in a little more game, officials from both work, we might get a couple of schools are still mulling options guys healthy, we practice the for rescheduling. Because the routine of a game week,” Riley teams have different off dates, said. “Hopefully all those things the game could be scheduled are good. I think you find out the for the weekend of Dec. 1, but most about your team when you there could be a conflict if the play a game, which we didn’t Colonels reach the FCS playoffs get to do. But we’ve tried to spin or the Beavers go to the Pac-12 the positives from this and get championship. Pac-12 officials also will be involved in reschedready for a big game.” Last year the Beavers trav- uling the game. On Tuesday, Oregon State eled to Madison and fell 35-0 to the Badgers. The loss was the announced that ticket holders second of a four-game losing could either hold on to them streak to start the season for for the rescheduled game, or Oregon State. The Beavers fin- exchange them for tickets to a ished the season a disappointing Pac-12 home game based on 3-9, and out of the postseason availability. By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press


D4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Orioles 10, Yankees 6 New York AB R H Jeter ss 5 0 1 Swisher 1b 3 1 0 Cano 2b 5 1 2 Al.Rodriguez dh 4 1 1 Er.Chavez 3b 4 1 0 Granderson cf 4 1 2 R.Martin c 3 1 1 Ibanez lf 2 0 0 a-An.Jones ph-lf 0 0 0 b-Dickerson ph-lf 0 0 0 I.Suzuki rf 4 0 3 Totals 34 6 10

BI 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 6

BB 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 6

SO 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .318 .263 .302 .274 .282 .233 .203 .228 .203 .286 .267

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Markakis rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Hardy ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .231 McLouth lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .248 Ad.Jones cf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .289 Wieters c 4 2 2 3 0 1 .241 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 2 2 3 1 0 .235 C.Davis dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .259 Machado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Andino 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .220 Totals 35 10 11 10 2 7 New York 000 100 050 — 6 10 0 Baltimore 400 101 04x — 10 11 0 a-was hit by a pitch for Ibanez in the 7th. b-walked for An.Jones in the 8th. LOB—New York 8, Baltimore 3. 2B—Al.Rodriguez (16). HR—Wieters (19), off D.Phelps; Andino (6), off D.Phelps; Mar.Reynolds (19), off Chamberlain; Ad.Jones (28), off D.Robertson; Mar.Reynolds (20), off D.Robertson; C.Davis (24), off Logan. SB—I.Suzuki (20). DP—Baltimore 3. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Phelps 4 6 5 5 2 3 73 Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 Chamberlain 1 2-3 1 1 1 0 2 23 J.Thomas 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 Robertson L, 1-6 0 3 3 3 0 0 13 Logan 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 D.Lowe 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP Hammel 5 6 1 1 2 6 82 Wolf 2 2-3 1 3 3 2 0 37 Strop BS, 6-9 0 2 2 2 2 0 15 O’Day W, 7-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Ji.Johnson 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 Hammel pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Strop pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. D.Robertson pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:09. A—46,298 (45,971).

ERA 3.55 2.86 8.71 6.00 2.77 3.86 5.50 ERA 3.46 6.00 2.14 2.29 2.83

Rangers 5, Royals 4 (10 innings) Texas Kinsler 2b Mi.Young ss Andrus ss Hamilton dh Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf Soto c Moreland 1b Gentry cf Totals

AB 5 5 0 4 4 4 4 5 2 4 37

R 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

H 1 2 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 9

BI 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 5

SO 1 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 2 9

Avg. .267 .269 .298 .291 .320 .260 .316 .221 .286 .304

American League Baltimore New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 77 77 75 63 61

L 60 60 62 75 75

Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota

W 74 73 61 58 56

L 62 63 76 79 81

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 82 76 74 67

L 55 60 63 71

East Division Pct GB WCGB .562 — — .562 — — .547 2 1½ .457 14½ 14 .449 15½ 15 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .544 — — .537 1 3 .445 13½ 15½ .423 16½ 18½ .409 18½ 20½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .599 — — .559 5½ — .540 8 2½ .486 15½ 10

Thursday’s Games Baltimore 10, N.Y. Yankees 6 Texas 5, Kansas City 4, 10 innings

National League

L10 7-3 3-7 5-5 2-8 5-5

Str Home Away W-1 38-30 39-30 L-1 41-28 36-32 L-1 37-31 38-31 L-1 32-38 31-37 W-1 34-34 27-41

L10 3-7 5-5 5-5 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 40-27 34-35 W-1 43-28 30-35 L-2 31-38 30-38 L-1 32-37 26-42 L-1 25-40 31-41

L10 7-3 7-3 8-2 6-4

Str Home Away W-2 43-25 39-30 L-3 42-30 34-30 W-3 36-29 38-34 W-1 36-33 31-38

Washington Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami

W 85 78 66 65 61

L 52 60 71 72 77

Cincinnati St. Louis Pittsburgh Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 83 74 72 67 51 42

L 55 63 64 70 86 95

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 77 73 68 64 56

L 60 65 70 74 80

Thursday’s Games Atlanta 1, Colorado 0 Miami 6, Milwaukee 2 Washington 9, Chicago Cubs 2

Today’s Games N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 13-12) at Baltimore (W.Chen 12-8), 4:05 p.m. Texas (D.Holland 10-6) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 8-10), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (H.Alvarez 7-12) at Boston (Doubront 10-7), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (J.Gomez 5-7) at Minnesota (Hendriks 0-7), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (Mendoza 7-9) at Chicago White Sox (Liriano 5-11), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 15-6) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 8-11), 7:05 p.m. Oakland (Griffin 4-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 13-6), 7:10 p.m.

NL Boxscores Nationals 9, Cubs 2 Chicago DeJesus rf d-Mather ph-rf Valbuena 3b e-Vitters ph-3b Rizzo 1b A.Soriano lf S.Castro ss Clevenger c W.Castillo c B.Jackson cf Barney 2b Germano p a-Campana ph L.Castillo p Beliveau p b-LaHair ph Socolovich p Bowden p Totals

AB 3 1 3 1 4 4 4 2 2 3 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 33

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 11

Avg. .265 .201 .226 .075 .298 .257 .278 .215 .269 .187 .256 .083 .253 ----.255 --.000

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Werth rf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .318 Harper cf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .260 Zimmerman 3b 4 1 2 3 1 0 .284 LaRoche 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .270 Tracy 1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .282 Morse lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .288 1-E.Perez pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Desmond ss 3 1 1 0 2 0 .288 Espinosa 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .258 K.Suzuki c 5 2 3 3 0 0 .266 Zimmermann p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .184 c-Lombardozzi ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Gorzelanny p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .400 C.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 9 12 8 7 6 Chicago 110 000 000 — 2 7 2 Washington 130 302 00x — 9 12 0 a-grounded out for Germano in the 5th. b-struck out for Beliveau in the 7th. c-flied out for Zimmermann in the 7th. d-popped out for DeJesus in the 8th. estruck out for Valbuena in the 8th. 1-ran for Morse in the 8th. E—A.Soriano (1), S.Castro (22). LOB—Chicago 5, Washington 11. 2B—S.Castro (21), B.Jackson (6),

Redmond Continued from D1 In the end, one program was going to attain an early upper hand in the allRedmond rivalry. Behind 14 kills from sophomore Katrina Johnson and seven aces by junior Rhian Sage, that advantage went to the Ravens. “I think the girls were just really excited to have a home match in the gym,” said Dewey, who coached at Redmond High the previous 15 years. “They’re starting to establish what Raven volleyball really

L10 8-2 5-5 6-4 7-3 4-6

Str Home Away W-5 43-25 42-27 W-2 40-32 38-28 W-1 32-37 34-34 W-1 30-35 35-37 W-1 32-37 29-40

L10 6-4 4-6 4-6 7-3 2-8 2-8

Str Home Away L-1 43-26 40-29 L-1 42-27 32-36 W-2 42-27 30-37 L-1 41-28 26-42 L-6 34-34 17-52 L-2 28-40 14-55

L10 6-4 4-6 4-6 6-4 5-5

Str Home Away L-2 38-30 39-30 L-2 38-33 35-32 W-2 33-34 35-36 W-2 33-33 31-41 L-2 30-41 26-39

Today’s Games Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 4-11) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 15-5), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Francis 5-4) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 4-7), 4:05 p.m. Miami (Ja.Turner 0-2) at Washington (Strasburg 15-6), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Maholm 11-9) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 10-8), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Harrell 10-9) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 10-9), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 14-8) at St. Louis (Lohse 14-2), 5:15 p.m. Arizona (Skaggs 1-1) at San Diego (Cashner 3-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 1-1) at San Francisco (Lincecum 8-14), 7:15 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Orioles 10, Yankees 6: BALTIMORE — Mark Reynolds hit two of Baltimore’s season-high six home runs — three in a wild eighth inning — and the Orioles climbed back into a first-place tie with New York in the AL East. Adam Jones’ leadoff homer in the eighth off David Robertson (1-6) put Baltimore ahead 7-6 after the Yankees had rallied from a fiverun deficit in the top half. Matt Wieters followed with a single and Reynolds hit a drive into the seats in left. Chris Davis followed with another home run. • Rangers 5, Royals 4: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Ian Kinsler hit a leadoff triple in the 10th inning for Texas and scored on Michael Young’s single.

• Nationals 9, Cubs 2: WASHINGTON — Adam LaRoche added to his home run tear with a two-run shot and Washington beat Chicago in a fight-filled game to finish a lopsided four-game sweep. • Braves 1, Rockies 0: ATLANTA — Tim Hudson pitched seven sharp innings and Atlanta posted its second straight 1-0 victory over Colorado, winning both times with an unearned run. • Marlins 6, Brewers 2: MIAMI — Josh Johnson pitched seven solid innings and ended his careerworst four-game losing streak, leading Miami past Milwaukee.

THROUGH THE WICKET

McCann c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .224 Janish ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .189 T.Hudson p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .234 Moylan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 1 7 0 3 8 Colorado 000 000 000 — 0 7 1 Atlanta 010 000 00x — 1 7 0 a-grounded out for Moscoso in the 7th. b-grounded out for J.Francisco in the 8th. c-struck out for J.Herrera in the 9th. d-struck out for Belisle in the 9th. E—Chacin (3). LOB—Colorado 9, Atlanta 9. 2B—Blackmon (4), Uggla (23).

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. L.Cain cf 5 1 3 0 0 1 .253 A.Escobar ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .291 A.Gordon lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .297 Butler dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .310 S.Perez c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .308 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .252 Francoeur rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .233 Hosmer 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .243 T.Abreu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Totals 38 4 10 4 0 8 Texas 000 300 100 1 — 5 9 0 Kansas City 012 000 100 0 — 4 10 0 LOB—Texas 8, Kansas City 4. 2B—Soto (4), L.Cain (7). 3B—Kinsler (5), A.Gordon (4). HR— Hamilton (39), off Hochevar; Beltre (30), off Hochevar; Francoeur (12), off Feldman; Hosmer (13), off Kirkman. SB—L.Cain 2 (9), A.Gordon (9). DP—Texas 2; Kansas City 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Feldman 6 1-3 6 3 3 0 6 97 4.97 Kirkman BS, 2-2 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 7 3.86 Scheppers 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 13 4.18 Mi.Adams W, 4-3 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 2.68 Nathan S, 30-31 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.48 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar 6 1-3 6 4 4 2 5 101 5.36 K.Herrera 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 19 2.45 Collins 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 14 3.25 G.Holland L, 6-4 1 2 1 1 1 3 24 2.84 Bueno 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.64 Crow 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.42 Bueno pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. T—3:20. A—15,332 (37,903).

East Division Pct GB WCGB .620 — — .565 7½ — .482 19 8 .474 20 9 .442 24½ 13½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .601 — — .540 8½ — .529 10 1½ .489 15½ 7 .372 31½ 23 .307 40½ 32 West Division Pct GB WCGB .562 — — .529 4½ 1½ .493 9½ 6½ .464 13½ 10½ .412 20½ 17½

Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin L, 2-5 3 1-3 7 1 0 3 3 78 4.50 Mat.Reynolds 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.42 Moscoso 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 23 6.93 Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.13 Belisle 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.03 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Hudson W, 14-5 7 6 0 0 2 2 102 3.59 Moylan H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 O’Flaherty H, 24 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.08 Kimbrel S, 34-37 1 1 0 0 0 2 10 1.23 T—2:52. A—19,313 (49,586).

Leaders Charlie Riedel / The Associated Press

Texas Rangers’ Ian Kinsler, bottom, beats the tag by Kansas City Royals third baseman Mike Moustakas after hitting a triple during the 10th inning of Thursday’s game in Kansas City, Mo. Desmond (27). 3B—S.Castro (11), Barney (4), Harper (7). HR—Rizzo (12), off Zimmermann; K.Suzuki (3), off Germano; LaRoche (29), off Beliveau. SB—Desmond (16), Espinosa (19). DP—Chicago 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Germano L, 2-6 4 7 7 6 2 2 80 6.95 L.Castillo 1 1-3 2 1 1 2 1 37 10.22 Beliveau 2-3 1 1 1 1 1 11 4.50 Socolovich 1 1 0 0 0 1 24 3.00 Bowden 1 1 0 0 2 1 23 4.38 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zmmrmnn W, 10-8 7 5 2 2 1 9 96 2.99 Gorzelanny 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.16 C.Garcia 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 T—3:21. A—22,447 (41,487).

Marlins 6, Brewers 2 Milwaukee Aoki rf R.Weeks 2b Braun lf Hart 1b Lucroy c C.Gomez cf Bianchi 3b Segura ss d-Morgan ph Estrada p Li.Hernandez p a-Ishikawa ph Kintzler p M.Parra p Stinson p e-L.Schafer ph Totals

AB 3 4 3 2 4 3 3 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 30

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

BI 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .288 .229 .311 .273 .321 .252 .231 .210 .243 .094 .000 .252 --.000 --1.000

Miami Petersen lf D.Solano 2b Reyes ss Stanton rf Dobbs 1b Ruggiano cf Brantly c Do.Murphy 3b Jo.Johnson p b-Kearns ph H.Bell p c-Ca.Lee ph Cishek p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 2 1 0 1 0 35

R 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 12

BI 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .215 .289 .282 .284 .297 .319 .261 .206 .085 .242 --.275 .000

means, and the adrenaline was flowing. They needed to calm it down a bit. When they got control of it, things started to happen.” For Ridgeview junior Kayla Jackson — one of six Ravens who less than four months ago were clad in maroon and gold — seeing former teammates on the other side of the net was tough, even sad. The result, however, that newborn rivalry, pumped up her and the rest of the Ravens. “There’s a lot of competition,” Jackson said. “It’s pretty big. It makes you play a lot

Milwaukee 001 000 100 — 2 6 1 Miami 310 000 02x — 6 12 0 a-struck out for Li.Hernandez in the 7th. b-grounded out for Jo.Johnson in the 7th. c-flied out for H.Bell in the 8th. d-struck out for Segura in the 9th. e-singled for Stinson in the 9th. E—R.Weeks (15). LOB—Milwaukee 8, Miami 6. 2B—Petersen (5), Reyes (31), Stanton (28), Dobbs (10), Brantly (4), Do.Murphy (4). 3B—Aoki (4). SB—Aoki (23), Braun (23), Segura (4), Petersen (7), Ruggiano (12). DP—Miami 1. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP Estrada L, 2-6 5 7 4 4 0 5 97 Li.Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 Kintzler 1 1-3 3 2 2 0 1 22 M.Parra 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 Stinson 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP Johnson W, 8-11 7 4 2 2 3 7 98 H.Bell H, 12 1 1 0 0 1 1 30 Cishek 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 T—2:53. A—18,707 (37,442).

ERA 3.99 5.26 7.71 4.67 0.00 ERA 3.81 5.56 2.44

Through Thursday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .330; Trout, Los Angeles, .330; Beltre, Texas, .320; Jeter, New York, .318; DavMurphy, Texas, .316; Mauer, Minnesota, .315; Fielder, Detroit, .314. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 116; Hamilton, Texas, 116; Willingham, Minnesota, 98; Encarnacion, Toronto, 95; Fielder, Detroit, 94; Pujols, Los Angeles, 93; Beltre, Texas, 89. HOME RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 39; ADunn, Chicago, 38; Encarnacion, Toronto, 37; MiCabrera, Detroit, 35; Granderson, New York, 34; Willingham, Minnesota, 33; Beltre, Texas, 30; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 30. STOLEN BASES—Trout, Los Angeles, 44; RDavis, Toronto, 40; Revere, Minnesota, 32; Crisp, Oakland, 31; AEscobar, Kansas City, 27; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 27; Kipnis, Cleveland, 26. PITCHING—Price, Tampa Bay, 17-5; Weaver, Los Angeles, 16-4; Scherzer, Detroit, 15-6; Sale, Chicago, 15-6; MHarrison, Texas, 15-9; Darvish, Texas, 14-9; Vargas, Seattle, 14-9. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 209; Scherzer, Detroit, 204; FHernandez, Seattle, 191; Darvish, Texas, 188; Shields, Tampa Bay, 181; Price, Tampa Bay, 175; Peavy, Chicago, 162; Sale, Chicago, 162. SAVES—Rodney, Tampa Bay, 42; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 41; RSoriano, New York, 36; CPerez, Cleveland, 34; Nathan, Texas, 30; Valverde, Detroit, 28; Aceves, Boston, 25; Reed, Chicago, 25.

AB 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 1 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .306 .327 .311 .251 .288 .160 .213 .245 .310 .200 .000 .250 .244 .000 .000 .245

Atlanta AB Bourn cf 3 Prado lf-3b 4 Heyward rf 4 F.Freeman 1b 3 J.Francisco 3b 3 b-Re.Johnson ph-lf 1 Uggla 2b 4

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

H 0 2 2 0 1 0 1

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 1 2 0 0

Avg. .283 .298 .275 .266 .250 .305 .207

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—MeCabrera, San Francisco, .346; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .345; Posey, San Francisco, .325; YMolina, St. Louis, .323; DWright, New York, .313; Braun, Milwaukee, .311; CGonzalez, Colorado, .310. RBI—Braun, Milwaukee, 99; Headley, San Diego, 94; Bruce, Cincinnati, 93; Holliday, St. Louis, 92; LaRoche, Washington, 92; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 89; ASoriano, Chicago, 88. HOME RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 37; Bruce, Cincinnati, 32; Stanton, Miami, 30; LaRoche, Washington, 29; Beltran, St. Louis, 28; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 27; Hart, Milwaukee, 27; Kubel, Arizona, 27. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Atlanta, 38; Reyes, Miami, 34; Pierre, Philadelphia, 32; Victorino, Los Angeles, 32; Bonifacio, Miami, 30; CGomez, Milwaukee, 30; DGordon, Los Angeles, 30. PITCHING—Dickey, New York, 18-4; GGonzalez, Washington, 18-7; Cueto, Cincinnati, 17-7; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 15-5; Strasburg, Washington, 15-6; 6 tied at 14. STRIKEOUTS—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 201; Dickey, New York, 195; Strasburg, Washington, 195; GGonzalez, Washington, 185; Hamels, Philadelphia, 178; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 176; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 173. SAVES—AChapman, Cincinnati, 35; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 34; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 34; Motte, St. Louis, 33; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 31; Clippard, Washington, 30; Putz, Arizona, 28.

harder.” On Redmond’s side, senior Johanna Bailey, who led the Panthers with seven kills, said that it was weird playing against girls whom most of the Redmond High upperclassmen call friends. “Ultimately, when it comes to the game, you have to play them,” Bailey said. “It’s rough, but what are you going to do?” On the floor, temperatures began to rise. The intensity level dialed up, which surprised first-year Redmond coach Kimber Beers.

“That’s something I didn’t expect,” Beers said. “I thought it would be more friendly than I guess it was … It’ll be a fun rivalry to have right down the road from each other.” The Ravens are not sorry they won, Dewey said. She and her team hold no animosity toward Redmond. In fact, they wish Panthers all the best, with one exception. “Not when we’re playing each other,” Dewey said. “That brief moment in time when we’re across the court opposite them and all bets are off.”

Braves 1, Rockies 0 Colorado Fowler cf Rutledge 2b Pacheco 3b W.Rosario c Colvin 1b McBride rf Blackmon lf J.Herrera ss c-C.Gonzalez ph Chacin p Mat.Reynolds p Moscoso p a-Giambi ph Brothers p Belisle p d-A.Brown ph Totals

PREP ROUNDUP

Madras shuts out Redmond in boys soccer Bulletin staff report REDMOND — Madras senior Carlos Garcia opened the 2012 season with a monster game Thursday, scoring twice and recording three assists as the White Buffaloes cruised past host Redmond 5-0. Gustavo Pecheco added two scores and Maylo Urieta posted two assists and a goal in the nonconference win for Madras. “We had a lot of kids step up and do some things they don’t normally do since we were playing with only 12 players,” White Buffalo coach Clark Jones said. “People that don’t normally play defense dropped back and played defense. … We looked solid.” Senior goalkeeper Jesus Vasquez earned the shutout for Madras. The Buffs continue nonleague play on Saturday when they host Summit. The Panthers (0-2) entertain Milton-Freewater’s McLoughlin High today in another nonleague match. In other prep events Thursday: BOYS SOCCER Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Molalla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 SISTERS — The Outlaws knocked off the Class 4A defending state champion, scoring in stoppage time for the victory. With the score tied 1-1, Sisters’ Justin Harrer put in a free kick from almost 50 yards out in the second minute of stoppage time. A Molalla defender deflected the ball into his own goal for the decisive score, according to Sisters coach Rob Jensen. After a scoreless first half, Sisters opened the scoring in the 51st minute on a goal on a free kick by Jake McAllister. “It’s a great win for us,” Jensen said. “They’re the defending state champs, and we’re right there with them.” Sisters (2-0) hosts Madras on Tuesday. Ridgeview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Mazama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 REDMOND — The Ravens came back after allowing an early goal to salvage the nonconference home draw and remain undefeated at 1-0-1 on the season. Mazama, which advanced to the Class 4A state playoffs last season, grabbed a 1-0 lead after a goal in the 15th minute, but Malachi Stalberg evened the score 1-1 in the 39th minute after converting a Zack Dyck pass into a goal. Neither team scored in the second half. “There was opportunities for both teams after halftime,” Ridgeview coach Keith Bleyer said. “We did a much better job of passing the ball.” Bleyer heaped praise on goalkeeper Dakota Curtis, who stopped a point-blank shot in the second half to preserve the tie. “He was phenomenal,” Bleyer said about his sophomore keeper. The Ravens are off until Sept. 20 when they host Bend High. East Linn Christian . . . . . . . .6 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CULVER — The Bulldogs fell to 0-2 on the season after giving up three first-half goals to East Linn Christian. Misael Morales scored Culver’s lone goal with Gerson Gonzalez recording the assist. The Bulldogs are at Mountain View on Monday to play the Cougars’ junior

From the coaching aspects, neither Dewey nor Beers would inject more life into the rivalry. Beers said that when she walks into a gym, she just wants her team to play well and come out with a win, regardless of the opponent. Thinking about it, though, this intracity competition has its benefits, said Beers. “This is a team they’re going to want to beat every year, every game,” Beers said. “It’s good for my girls. It gives them a little motivation. They’re going to look forward to this game every year.”

varsity II team. GIRLS SOCCER Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 MADRAS — The Panthers picked up their first win of the season, recording six straight goals after giving up an early score to the White Buffaloes. Mariah Stacona gave Madras a 1-0 lead in the sixth minute, but Redmond’s Kelly Whitt, Jesse Stevens, Damaris Estrada and Sommer Kirk responded with goals before the break to give the Panthers a 4-1 halftime lead. Whitt and Estrada added scores in the second half to secure the nonleague victory. Redmond (1-1) hosts McLoughlin of Milton-Freewater today in another nonleague match. Madras (0-1) entertains Ridgeview in nonconference play on Tuesday. Mazama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Ridgeview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 REDMOND — The Ravens dropped their season opener to the Vikings, a team that advanced to the Class 4A state semifinals last year. Junior Bailey Simmons created the best scoring opportunity for Ridgeview, according to Ravens coach Oliver Stretz, but did not convert. Ridgeview (0-1) is at Madras on Tuesday. Molalla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SISTERS — The Outlaws, last year’s Class 4A state runners-up, dropped their season opener to the Indians. No statistics were called in. Sisters (0-1) hosts Redmond on Tuesday. VOLLEYBALL Cascade . . . . . .18-25-19-25-16 Madras . . . . . . .25-18-25-21-14 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes dropped a heartbreaker to the visiting Cougars, winning two of the first three games before falling in five. Cascade survived a strong all-around effort by Madras sophomore Shelby Mauritson, who ended the match with 24 kills and 26 digs. Fellow sophomore Elle Renault contributed 58 assists and 19 digs for the Buffs and Alexis Urbach added 19 digs for Madras. The Buffs could have another shot at the Cougars on Saturday when they play in the Cascade tournament. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 East Linn Christian . .19-11-14 CULVER — The Bulldogs continued their perfect start to the season with a rout of East Linn at home. Shealene Little led the offense with 18 kills, while Gabrielle Alley added eight kills and eight digs. Jahnie Cleveland had 24 assists for Culver (2-0 Tri-River Conference), and Cassie Fulton registered five aces from the service line. Culver is at the Heppner tournament on Saturday. CROSS-COUNTRY Buffs compete at Cascade Invite TURNER — Madras junior J’Von Smith placed 54th overall in the boys race at the Darrel Deedon Cascade Cross-Country Invitational to pace the four-man White Buffalo squad. Madras, which fielded an incomplete team, did not figure into the team results. Brandon Hawes placed 71st and Isaac Fisher finished 75th for the White Buffaloes. Madras did not have any runners in the varsity girls race.

The intensity has already been born, so much so that Redmond’s Bailey doesn’t think it can be eclipsed. “I think if it did, everyone would implode,” she said. The heat has been already been pumped into this regular clash in northern Deschutes County. The only thing lacking is a title. “It’ll be a fun rivalry to have right down the road from each other,” Beers said. “I’m sure it’ll be one of the better ones.” — Reporter : 541-383-0305; glucas@bendbulletin.com


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Modell

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Matthew Gates, left, and Karl Bordine sprint to the finish for second place during the USA Cycling Masters Road Nationals Championships men’s 35-39 race on Thursday at Mount Bachelor. Bordine took second in the race. Bend

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Crane 4270 Prairie Reservoir

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Mt. Bachelor Road Races Races will be staged from 8 a.m. to about 5:30 p.m.97today MILES

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La Pine Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Nationals Continued from D1 Holbrook started bicycle racing in the 1970s, he said, and even reached the professional level — racing on the United States team at the 1984 UCI Road World Championships in Barcelona, Spain, with eventual threetime Tour de France winner Greg LeMond. But the married father of three eventually gave up the sport for 12 years while raising his family. Now a leather salesman, he decided to return to racing two years ago. Heading into Thursday morning’s race, he was not high on his chances of success. “I drove out (on Wednesday) and kind of did a little recon on the course and kind of decided I didn’t have a chance because I’m a flatlander kid from Wisconsin and train really on flat roads at basically sea level,” Holbrook explained. “And here I am coming out to altitude and riding these Tour de France-type climbs. So I really didn’t think I had much of a chance.” But as the field approached the challenging final grade on the Cascade Lakes Highway, a pack of about six riders broke away. Holbrook made sure he was in that pack, and he fought to stay there when he started struggling with about two miles remaining. “I was actually mentally starting to crack,” Holbrook recalled. “I was going to ease up and let them go. And then we came around the corner and I saw what looked like the top of something. And I just told myself, ‘No way. You stay on. You just have to gut it out.’ And I’m so glad I did. I can’t believe it. I finally didn’t wuss out.” Zan Treasure, of Ogden, Utah, was credited with the same time as Holbrook in second place. Kevin Susco, of Palo Alto, Calif., and David Zimbelman, of The Dalles, took third and fourth, respectively, both one second behind. Course lengths in

the eight races staged on Wednesday were either 84K or 110K, depending on the division. Kevin Metcalfe completed a comeback of his own when he won the men’s 50-54 division just minutes prior to Holbrook’s finish. The Pleasant Hills, Calif., resident rebounded from a disappointing time trial result on Wednesday by blitzing the rest of the road race field late in the race and posting a definitive 27-second victory. Metcalfe entered these championships as the reigning champion in his age group in both the time trial and road race. He crossed the time trial finish line on Wednesday believing he had turned in a quick enough effort to repeat, only to find out that Boulder, Colo., resident Jeffrey Hartmann had bested him. “I very much planned on repeating, and that’s why I was kind of gutted when I got second,” said Metcalfe, who works in software project management for the U.S. Army. “I just had to realize that I did a good ride for me, and that guy was so fast. There was no way I could say, ‘If I did this, if I did that.’ He was just better than me.” The win is perhaps even more notable for Metcalfe given that he broke his left collarbone only four weeks ago in a criterium race. Fortunately, the break did not require surgery and Metcalfe was able to maintain his fitness by spending some time on an indoor trainer. He was sound enough, at least, to drop the rest of the riders around him during the final climb to the finish line, which he crossed with no competitors in sight. A bit later in the day, Rudolph Napolitano recorded a similarly dominating victory in the men’s 35-39 division. The 38-year-old Santa Monica, Calif., cycling coach bridged up to a breakaway group midway through the race. When the peloton began closing the gap, Napolitano attacked, dropped the riders

around him, and rode the last 20 miles by himself, winning his first masters national title in his first attempt. “I kind of knew what to expect. I was hoping to win, to be honest with you,” Napolitano admitted. “I wanted to come here and do well, and it kind of played out in my favor. I thought that if I was at least in a small group at the end, I’d have a shot coming up those climbs.” Five other champions were crowned on Thursday: Anne Perry, of Draper, Utah (women’s 35-39); Felicia Gomez, of Fresno, Calif. (women’s 4044); Matthew Carinio, of San Luis Obispo, Calif. (men’s 4044); Lisa Campbell, of Newburypark, Calif., (women’s 45-49); and Brendan Sullivan, of Atlanta (men’s 45-49). Part-time Bend resident Roger Worthington posted the highest finish among Central Oregon residents, taking third in the men’s 50-54 race behind Metcalfe. Kerry Martin (fourth, women’s 40-44), Ben Thompson (fifth, men’s 35-39) and Eric Martin (fifth, men’s 45-49), all of Bend, also made the podium in their respective events. The masters nationals return to Mt. Bachelor ski area today with more age group and tandems racing. The first race of the day begins at 8 a.m., and the final race begins at 3:10 p.m. Race distances are 62K and 84K, depending on the division. As for Holbrook, he said he has “one more big goal” in cycling racing, one that has lasted since he was 19 and first learned about masters racing: He said he wants to win a masters world championship when he is 80. “It’s a life sport. That’s why you can take off 12 years and come back and do well,” he said about cycling. “I hope to be world champion when I’m 80 rather than going to the clinic all the time. Because if I’m good enough to be world champion at 80, I’ll be pretty healthy, I think, and if you have your health you have everything.” — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Continued from D1 David Modell said he and his brother, John, were at their father’s side when he “died peacefully of natural causes.” He was 87. “The game of football lost one of its all-time greats,” Detroit Lions owner William Clay Ford Sr. said. “Art’s contributions to the NFL during his five decades in the game are immeasurable. I believe that Art did as much as any owner to help make the NFL what it is today. Art was a pioneer, a visionary and a selfless owner who always saw the big picture and did the right thing. “Our game would not be what it is today if it weren’t for Art Modell.” Modell spent 43 years as an NFL owner, overseeing the Browns from 1961 until he moved the team to Baltimore in 1996. He served as league president from 196769, helped finalize the first collective bargaining agreement with the players in 1968 and was the point man for the NFL’s lucrative contracts with television networks. Long before his Ravens won the Vince Lombardi Trophy in 2001, Modell teamed with Lombardi, Commissioner Pete Rozelle and others to lay the foundation for the league’s success. “Art Modell was a most influential member of commissioner Rozelle’s ‘Kitchen Cabinet’ for many years, along with Dan Rooney and the late Tex Schramm,” said Joe Browne, the longest-tenured player in the league’s front office. “Ironically, Art is the only member of that group who is not enshrined in Canton. Hopefully, the Hall of Fame media selectors will rectify that oversight in the near future — not as an emotional reaction to Art’s death, but as a rightful reflection of his longtime contributions to the NFL.” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell praised Modell’s work within the league as it was gaining momentum a half century ago. “Art Modell’s leadership was an important part of the NFL’s success during the

league’s explosive growth during the 1960s and beyond,” Goodell said in a statement. “Art was a visionary who understood the critical role that mass viewing of NFL games on broadcast television could play in growing the NFL.” But Modell’s reputation took a hit from which it could not recover when he pulled the Browns out of Cleveland following a round of secret negotiations with Baltimore city officials. The move was made not because of poor attendance in Cleveland, but because Baltimore provided him with a better business opportunity. It’s widely believed that the move is the main reason Modell died without gaining entry into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was a pariah in Cleveland and a hero in Baltimore. When the Colts left Baltimore for Indianapolis in 1984, Baltimore went 12 years pining for another team. After the Browns left, Cleveland got an expansion team, a new stadium and retained its team colors and history, thanks in no small part to Modell. But from the day he left to the day he died, he never got much love from the city he left behind. “I have a great legacy, tarnished somewhat by the move,” he said in 1999. “The politicians and the bureaucrats saw fit to cover their own rear ends by blaming it on me.” Browns fans became even angrier after Modell won his only Super Bowl. “If Art could have given the trophy to Cleveland, I believe he would have,” former Browns coach Sam Ratigliano said. After that Super Bowl win, Modell did a little dance as part of an agreement with linebacker Ray Lewis, the second player selected by the Ravens in their inaugural draft in 1996. Lewis considers that moment to be among his most memorable during his 17-year relationship with a man he considered to be an owner in name only. “Us on that stage, I told him that if we win it, he’s going to have to try to do my dance,” Lewis recalled Thursday,

his voice cracking with emotion during a somber day at the team complex in Owings Mills. “We got on stage and he did the dance. It capped off exactly the way it was supposed to end. We were able to bring him what his true dream was, the Lombardi Trophy.” Brian Billick, coach of that Super Bowl team, said of Modell: “It was a joy to come to work for him. He accomplished so much as an owner: championships, playoffs, the TV contracts, the leadership in the NFL. They are all great and deserving of the Hall of Fame. Those who worked with Art will all say the same thing. He was a Hall of Fame person.” Modell’s Browns were among the best teams of the 1960s, led for a time by sensational running back Jim Brown. Cleveland won the NFL championship in 1964 — Modell’s only title with the Browns — and played in the title game in 1965, 1968 and 1969. But his early years with Cleveland also were marked by controversy when he fired the team’s only coach to that point, Hall of Famer Paul Brown, after the 1962 season. Brown then went on to cofound and coach the Cincinnati Bengals. Modell said he lost millions of dollars operating the Browns in Cleveland and cited the state of Maryland’s financial package, including construction of a $200 million stadium, as his reasons for leaving Ohio. “This has been a very, very tough road for my family and me,” Modell said at the time of the Browns move. “I leave my heart and part of my soul in Cleveland. But frankly, it came down to a simple proposition: I had no choice.” Some NFL owners have several other sources of income. Modell had his football team. Period. And although the move to Baltimore helped keep him afloat for a while, he ultimately had to broker a deal that made Steve Bisciotti a minority owner. Part of the arrangement was that Bisciotti could assume majority ownership, and that’s what happened in April 2004.

2012 BRASADA CANYONS

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9:00 am shotgun

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The first 128 players who register Four person scramble

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D5

First come first serve, so make your reservations now. Call Brasada Canyons at 541-526-6380.

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D6

A DV EN T U R E SP ORTS

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Voreis Continued from D1 Voreis — who is now 38 and has lived in Bend for seven years — took up skateboarding at the age of 15, and dabbled in biking when he could find a friend’s bike to ride. “I broke a lot of kids’ bikes,” Voreis recalls. That can happen when you attempt things on bikes that have never been done before. Those early days on borrowed bikes were the start of Voreis’ path to becoming a pioneer of downhill and freeride mountain biking. He is now known as one of the best all-around mountain bikers in the world, and a driving force in the rapid evolution of the sport. Voreis travels across the nation each spring and summer on his AllRide Tour, promoting all disciplines of mountain biking and introducing kids to the sport. He also volunteers more than 100 hours a year helping build and maintain trails here with the Central Oregon Trail Alliance. When Kirt was still a teenager, his mother remarried, and his stepfather encouraged Kirt to follow his passions and escape his troubled childhood. “He changed me,” Kirt recalls. “With his tutelage and him opening my mind, he had passion. I didn’t realize I had passion for these sports.” By the age of 17, Voreis had moved on from skateboarding competitions to cross-country mountain bike racing. He became a professional downhill racer in 1994 after sending a tape of himself performing back flips on his BMX bike to the owner of Yeti Cycles. In 1996, Kirt had blossomed into a

Voreis travels across the nation each spring and summer on his AllRide Tour, promoting all disciplines of mountain biking and introducing kids to the sport. He also volunteers more than 100 hours a year helping build and maintain trails here with the Central Oregon Trail Alliance.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Kirt Voreis flies through the air while speeding down the slalom course near Phil’s Trailhead in Bend on Tuesday.

top World Cup downhill and dual slalom racer. (Downhill races are time trials held on steep terrain, with highspeed descents and extended air time off jumps and other obstacles. Dual slalom races are head-to-head competitions down a course of berms, jumps and drops.) From 1998 to 2000, Voreis raced for the Mountain Dew/Specialized team alongside his friend and freeride legend Shaun Palmer. The two created a rabid following with their colorful personalities. By 2001, mountain bike racing had grown stale for Voreis. “I thought those guys didn’t have

skills, they just pedal,” he says. He reinvented himself by making a video called “Evolution,” which features him racing on the World Cup circuit AND performing freeride tricks. It was released before freeride videos became commonplace. As mountain biking began to shift toward freestyle riding in 2002, Voreis won several freestyle/dirt jump events and was filmed in many cutting-edge videos. Evolving with the sport, he re-branded himself as a freerider while he continued to race World Cup events. “By 2002, I was racing and travel-

ing the world and making a lot of money,” Voreis says. In 2003, Voreis started the AllRide Tour. The tour is now sponsored by Specialized, and Voreis says he averages more than 30,000 miles on the tour’s van each May through September. The goal of AllRide is to promote Specialized products — but also to get people into mountain biking. “Each year I get 400 to 600 people on bikes to test my products, and we have a junior racing team,” says Voreis, who quit racing in 2005. That same year Voreis and his wife

Lindsey moved to Bend from Southern California. Lindsey — who handles most of the business behind the AllRide Tour and guides rides for Cog Wild Mountain Bike Tours in Bend — was raised in Portland, and would travel to Black Butte for vacation when she was growing up. When she introduced Kirt to Central Oregon, he knew he had found home. “I realized what mountain biking should be — it was accessible to people,” Voreis says. “Other places are too steep. The trails ... we all work together and there’s a community.” Voreis is still an avid skateboarder, and he also enjoys snowboarding and kayaking. His favorite mountain bike trails include the McKenzie River Trail, South Fork, Flagline, and the slalom play loop at Phil’s Trailhead, which he builds and maintains. “There’s something about Bend, with everything here,” Voreis says. “I change my mind a lot, so it’s good.” — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

A!"#$%&'# S()'%* C+,#$!+'

CELEBRATION!: Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 to 7 p.m., at Skyliner Lodge, 10 miles up Skyliner Road toward Tumalo Falls; activities include informative hikes and bike rides, a short program about forest restoration, followed by music and refreshments; learn about forest restoration and collaboration; get involved in the Deschutes Collaborative Forest Project; contact 541-322-7129; klighthall@bendcable.com; www. deschutescollaborativeforest.org.

professionally coached dryland training sessions; contact ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org, www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org or 541-678-3864. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY COMPETITION PROGRAM: Tuesdays through Sundays through May 1, times vary; ages 14-23; athletes are instructed in varying activities to improve their strength, technique, coordination, agility, aerobic and anaerobic capacities with the end goal being to successfully apply these skills to ski racing; transportation provided; contact ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org, www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org or 541-678-3864.

MULTISPORT

PADDLING

LEADMAN TRI: Saturday, Sept. 22; 7 a.m.; Bend; 250K distance is 5K swim, 223K bike, 22K run; 125 distance is 2.5K swim, 106K bike, 16.5K run; relay team option available; leadmantri.com. RIDE ROW RUN: Sunday, Sept. 23; in Maupin; 1-mile run, 26-mile loop bike ride in north Central Oregon, 3½-mile kayak down the Deschutes River, and then 5-mile run along the river to finish; solo event costs $60, relay is $85; starts at Imperial River Company; xdog@xdogevents.com; www.riderowrun.com. THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-9622862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ SUMMER MUSIC SERIES: Wednesday, Sept. 19; boat and stand-up paddleboard demos available 4 to 7 p.m.; music begins at 7 p.m. at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in Bend; fundraisers for the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; 541-317-9407; laurel@tumalocreek. com. KAYAKING CLASSES: Sundays, 4-6 p.m.; for all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org

Please email Adventure Sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a spaceavailability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CLIMBING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM: Wednesdays, 1:30 to 4 p.m., through Nov. 14; 10-week program designed for middle schoolers with little to no previous rock climbing experience; focus on proper climbing techniques and safety; transportation provided from area middle schools; contact mike@ bendenduranceacademy.org or www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY COMPETITION TEAM: Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 4 to 6 p.m., through June 27; ages 10-18; focuses on bouldering with opportunities to compete in USA Climbing’s Bouldering Series; contact mike@ bendenduranceacademy.org or www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY DEVELOPMENT TEAM: Mondays and Wednesdays, 4 to 6 p.m., through Jan. 30; ages 10-18; for the climber looking to develop a solid foundation of movement and technical climbing skills; contact mike@bendenduranceacademy.org or www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org

CYCLING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS CAMP: Sept. 14-16; ages 11-18; run in combination with the Hood River Double Cross Races for a full weekend of skills, training and racing in the Gorge; $125 includes coaching, clinics, lodging, meals, race support and transportation; designed for riders of all abilities; contact bill@ bendenduranceacademy.org or www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY AFTER-SCHOOL MOUNTAIN BIKING: Wednesdays through Oct. 10; 2:45 to 4:15 p.m. for grades 3-5; 1 to 4:15 p.m. for grades 6-8; program encourages elementary and middle school kids to explore the trails and improve their cycling fitness and skills; contact bill@ bendenduranceacademy.org or www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org.

HIKING FOREST RESTORATION

NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY FALL CONDITIONING PROGRAM: Wednesdays, 1 to 4:15 p.m., Oct. 10 to Nov. 11; ages 11-14; five-week program aims to improve strength, coordination and flexibility for the upcoming nordic ski season; transportation provided from area middle schools; contact ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org, www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org or 541-678-3864. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC FALL LADIES: Tuesdays, 9:15 to 11:45 a.m., Sept. 18 to Nov. 6; for women ages 18 and older; designed for women who wish to improve their overall ski fitness this winter through organized and

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; drop-in fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@ lavacityrollerdolls.com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING BIGFOOT ROAD RACE: Sunday, Sept. 16; 9 a.m.; Bend; Bigfoot 10K road race and Dirtyfoot 10K trail race both start at Seventh Mountain Resort and finish in Old Mill District; Littlefoot kids run; proceeds to Bend and La Pine high school cross-country teams; $30-$40 ($10 suggested donation for Littlefoot run); karistrang@gmail.com. FLAGLINE TRAIL FEST: Saturday,

Sept. 22; Flagline 50K, 8 a.m., USA Track & Field 50K Trail Championships, $60-$65; High Alpine Half, 9 a.m., $35-$45; Trail Fox Kids Run, $5; all races start and finish at Mt. Bachelor ski area; flaglinetrailfest.com. NOON TACO RUN: Wednesdays at noon; meet at FootZone; order a Taco Stand burrito before leaving and it will be ready upon return; teague@footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: Wednesdays at 6 p.m.; Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 3 to 5 miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP:

5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays; with Max King; locations will vary; max@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Weekly runs on Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m.; meet at 314 S.W. Seventh St. in Redmond for runs of 3 to 5 miles; all abilities welcome; free; pia@runaroundsports.com; 541-639-5953.

TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662.

REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB (RORK): Weekly run/walk; Saturdays at 8 a.m.; all levels welcome; free; for more information and to be added to a weekly email list, email Dan Edwards at rundanorun19@yahoo.com; follow Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook.

CENTRAL OREGON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

Remodeling, Design, & Outdoor Living

SHOW September 22nd & 23rd

Century Events Center | 70 SW Century Drive | Bend, Oregon

Saturday, September 22nd • 9:00 a.m to 5:00 p.m. Sunday, September 23rd • 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Presented by:

Supporting Sponsors

A!"#$%&'# S()'%* -$ B'-#. Boating • Drag boat races scheduled for this weekend: The High Desert Showdown drag boat event is set for this Saturday and Sunday at Haystack Reservoir near Culver. The High Desert Showdown is part of the Columbia Drag Boat Association’s annual race schedule. Races begin at 9 a.m. each day. Admission is $10 on Saturday and $12 on Sunday, or $20 for a weekend pass. Coupons for $2 off admission are available at BiMart. Parking is $3 per day or $5

for the weekend. The CDBA gives competitors the opportunity to compete in closed-course, sanctioned drag boat racing at many of the finest racing facilities in Oregon, according to the organization’s website. The CDBA’s Northwest Nationals are scheduled for Dexter Reservoir in Lowell Sept. 22-23.

Climbing • Climbing event set for Smith Rock: The Northwest Region Craggin’ Classic is scheduled for Smith Rock State Park Sept. 14-16.

The event will be hosted by the American Alpine Club and Redpoint Climbers Supply. Friday, Sept. 14, will be registration and happy hour at The Depot in Terrebonne at 5 p.m. Saturday will include clinics and tours, and the Reel Rock Film Tour at 8 p.m. Sunday will include the CAMP USA Crushfest Comp, as well as a stewardship project. Entry fees range from $10 to $35. For more information, visit americanalpineclub.org and click on “events.” —Bulletin staff reports

FREE ADMISSION

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN THE SHOW GUIDE

Guide Publishes Friday, Sept. 21 • Advertising Deadline: 5:00 p.m., Monday, Sept. 10 The Show Guide is an Advertising Supplement of

For more show information, visit:

To reserve your advertising space, call:

www.connectiondepot.com

The Bulletin 541-382-1811


BUSINESS

Calendar, E4 Dispatches, E4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 3,135.81 CHANGE +66.54 +2.17%

IN BRIEF Hillsboro firm keeps jobs here SALEM — Gov. John Kitzhaber announced that a Hillsboro semiconductor firm, Jireh Semiconductor Inc., recently decided to “onshore” its proprietary technology, keeping 250 manufacturing jobs here in lieu of contracting production in Asia. Jireh Semiconductor is a newly established and wholly-owned subsidiary of Alpha and Omega Semiconductor Inc., which acquired the 8-inch wafer fabrication facility in Hillsboro with plans to retrain the employees on Jireh’s production processes. Earlier this year, Kitzhaber approved a $250,000 forgivable loan from the Governor’s Strategic Reserve Fund to help the company with its workforce retraining costs associated with the move.

s

DOW JONES

CLOSE 13,292.00 CHANGE +244.52 +1.87%

www.bendbulletin.com/business

s

S&P 500

CLOSE 1,432.12 CHANGE +28.68 +2.04%

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BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.68 CHANGE +5.00%

s

$1702.60 s SILVER GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$11.80

THREE SISTERS IRRIGATION DISTRICT

— From wire reports

Central Oregon fuel prices Price per gallon for regular unleaded gas and diesel, as posted Thursday at AAA Fuel Price Finder (www.aaaorid.com).

GASOLINE

• Fred Meyer, 61535 U.S. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . . . . . . $3.98 • Space Age, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $3.89 • Ron’s Oil, 62980 U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $3.95 • Chevron, 1095 S.E. Division St., Bend. $4.08 • Texaco, 718 N.W. Columbia St., Bend $4.09 • La Pine Mini Mart, 52530 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine. . . . . . . . . . .$4.19 • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . $4.09 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville $4.09 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond . . . . . . . $4.04 • Chevron, 1001 Railway, Sisters . . $4.09

DIESEL

• Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St. Madras . . . . . . .$4.34 • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . $4.46 Ashley Brothers / The Bulletin

CLOSE $32.619 CHANGE +$0.347

EUROPE

Canal power moving forward Central Bank unveils bond program By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The Three Sisters Irrigation District is moving forward with planning for a project to generate hydroelectric power at Watson Reservoir. The district filed land-use applications for the hydroelectric project with Deschutes County last week. It’s expected to generate 700 kilo-

watts — enough electricity for about 300 homes — seven months of the year, according to the district’s website. Water currently being diverted from Whychus Creek will go through the proposed plant, at the eastern edge of the reservoir, and then flow into the reservoir, according to documents submitted with the land-use applications. It will

not use additional water. PacifiCorp, parent company of Pacific Power, has agreed to buy the power, said Marc Thalacker, the district’s manager. To prepare for the hydroelectric project, the district — formerly known as the Squaw Creek Irrigation District — has piped more than 20,000 feet, or 3.7 miles, of

the main canal in three phases during the past three years. The piping project, paid for with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, increased flows to Whychus Creek, which contributes to the Deschutes River southwest of Culver. See Hydroelectric / E3

BUSHELS FOR BREWING

Ford unveils 15 cars for Europe MILAN — Ford Motor Co. on Thursday unveiled 15 new or restyled vehicles for the European market that it will launch over five years to revive slumping sales. While other carmakers are holding back on new car launches because of tanking European demand, Ford executives announced that the Detroit carmaker will accelerate new car launches in Europe, expanding its lineup of SUVs, restyling the hot-selling Fiesta, redesigning its commercial vehicles and bringing the iconic Mustang sports cars across the Atlantic. Ford Europe CEO Stephen Odell said improvements in the “brutal” European market are not expected soon. Ford’s first-half European sales dropped 10 percent to 517,094 units, a 7.8 percent market share for the fifth-largest carmaker in Europe.

E

Auto News, E4 Stock listings, E2-3

By Jack Ewing and Melissa Eddy New York Times News Service

FRANKFURT, Germany — The European Central Bank on Thursday announced a sweeping program for buying the bonds of troubled eurozone countries, giving the bank potentially unprecedented power. While the bank’s president, Inside Mario Draghi, • Germany’s insisted that the economic central bank forecast was not violatbleak, E3 ing a prohibition on its financing governments, it was effectively becoming lender of last resort to countries as well as banks. “We will have a fully effective backstop to avoid destructive scenarios with potentially severe challenges for price stability in the euro area,” Draghi said during a news conference. “The euro is irreversible.”

Germany’s dissent

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

From left, Gary Wyatt, Roger Janson and Mary Janson pick hops off of vines while harvesting in the field behind their homes northwest of Tumalo on Thursday. The Jansons, Wyatt, and Wyatt’s wife, Susan, grow several varieties of hops and sell them through their company — Tumalo Hops Co. LLC. Most of the company’s custom-

ers are home brewers. Harvesting began Saturday and will continue for another few days. The Wyatts and the Jansons expect to harvest about 800 pounds of hops. The company has seen increased yields every year since it was founded six years ago.

Amazon unveils new Kindle Fire models The Associated Press SANTA MONICA, Calif. — Amazon unveiled four new Kindle Fire tablet computers Thursday, including ones with larger color screens, as the online retailer steps up competition with Apple ahead of the holiday shopping season. Amazon.com Inc. showed off the larger Kindle Fire

amid expectations that Apple Inc. will introduce a smaller iPad as early as next week. The larger Fires will have screens that measure 8.9 inches diagonally, compared with 9.7 inches for the iPad. The original Fire had 7-inch screens. The basic version of the larger Fire will sell for $299, or $100 less than the

cheapest iPad. The basic, 7-inch Fire model will cost $159, down from $199 for the original model, which sold out last month. Amazon says it’s 40 percent faster, has twice the memory and a longer battery life than the old version. It will start shipping next Friday. See Kindles / E3

Reed Saxon / The Associated Press

An Amazon Kindle Fire HD is displayed in Santa Monica, Calif., on Thursday.

Germany’s chancellor, Angela Merkel, affirmed after a meeting with the Spanish prime minister, Mariano Rajoy, in Madrid on Thursday that the central bank acted “with independence and within the framework of its mandate.” But in fact, Germany’s Bundesbank was the lone vote against the central bank’s bond plan, arguing that it was “tantamount to financing governments by printing banknotes.” The program was designed to reduce the borrowing costs of Spain and Italy, to help them roll over their debts and get their economies moving again after two years of crisis. But such aid would not be automatic. In essence, the central bank left the next step to the beleaguered governments. They would be required to ask the central bank formally to start buying their bonds in the open market and would have to agree to follow detailed conditions for paying down their debt and hewing to fiscal discipline. See Europe / E3

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Properties moving quickly as buyers take to market By Mary Ellen Podmolik

Jamie Blondin, right, and Brian McCord stand outside of their Chicago two-flat Aug. 26.

Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — If it wasn’t the two failed offers or the missed opportunities, it was a tape measure that convinced potential homebuyers Brian McCord and Jamie Blondin that they just weren’t moving fast enough. When they went to see a two-flat in Chicago’s Bucktown neighborhood earlier this summer, they liked everything they saw, except for the other potential buyers also looking at the house. “Not only were they looking, they had a measuring tape,” McCord said. “And that made us much more nervous,” Blondin added. The couple promptly offered $626,000 for the $649,000

Now more than ever...

Stacey Wescott Chicago Tribune

house, 96 percent of the asking price. This time, they were successful. The transaction closed earlier this month. The circumstances that McCord and Blondin encountered can create anxious home shoppers forced out of their comfort zones. A confluence of factors is ac-

celerating the pace of transactions in both choice and more stressed neighborhoods. Mortgage interest rates, while they have ticked up the past four weeks, remain well under 4 percent for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage. More sellers are setting realistic list prices. See Anxiety / E3

Know who you bank with. We are your community bank. Our board of directors are local and we are proud to know each of our clients personally. Now more than ever, it is good to know who you bank with. 1000 SW Disk Dr. Bend, OR 97702

541-848-4444

www.highdesertbank.com

“Local Service – Local Knowledge”


E2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.92 AES Corp 0.16 AFLAC 1.32 AG MtgeIT 2.80 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel AMC Net AMN Hlth AOL 5.15 ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 AU Optron AVG Tch n AVX Cp 0.30 Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActiveNet ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Actuate Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch Aegerion Aegon 0.25 Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexREE 2.04 AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza rs AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.85 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AllisonT n 0.24 AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AllyFn pfB 2.13 AlnylamP AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.40 AlterraCap 0.64 Altria 1.76 Alumina 0.24 AlumChina AmBev 1.15 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL 0.28 AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AIG wt AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.72 AmSupr AmTower 0.88 AVangrd 0.10 AmWtrWks 1.00 Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AngioDyn AnglogldA 0.61 ABInBev 1.57 Ann Inc Annaly 2.27 Annaly pfC 1.91 Ansys AntaresP Anworth 0.83 Aon plc 0.63 A123 Sys h Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.80 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM 3.00 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach Aptargrp 0.88 AquaAm 0.70 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArenaPhm AresCap h 1.52 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.18 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv 0.08 ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSolr Ashland 0.90 AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AssistLiv AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.85 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasPpln 2.24 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtriCure AtwoodOcn AudCodes AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 2.00 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.64 AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08

16.19 17.91 19.40 75.13 11.37 47.41 23.62 43.00 41.00 5.37 40.62 9.13 33.77 57.87 37.44 3.23 10.11 10.41 30.85 1.78 66.92 36.13 7.77 23.29 2.01 27.00 1.75 63.87 6.57 13.35 6.54 5.25 7.21 19.17 24.91 12.34 12.23 29.50 7.10 68.16 18.18 32.79 20.60 71.32 13.47 3.66 3.83 .69 20.84 20.34 15.02 5.40 14.61 22.68 .50 38.37 119.99 19.01 3.80 37.48 48.33 100.61 22.40 83.52 11.69 84.58 39.21 14.83 34.36 2.13 55.75 1.11 8.76 18.78 74.96 3.86 109.03 4.69 37.37 18.99 30.84 88.98 140.60 2.91 8.49 14.39 45.33 49.59 33.50 18.01 10.79 38.46 24.59 18.37 13.80 5.91 7.11 4.48 16.35 38.03 23.58 34.59 3.12 9.57 37.93 14.62 251.38 32.96 15.76 33.18 91.14 25.76 1.18 11.93 46.55 34.90 11.24 25.06 22.94 43.52 11.70 57.41 38.26 15.35 13.42 34.22 12.20 3.72 71.64 31.06 37.68 56.01 38.64 35.23 84.81 4.55 61.75 3.23 71.07 1.22 40.34 30.85 9.50 12.17 33.29 87.54 38.54 17.63 25.49 72.46 3.97 6.92 52.17 .20 86.55 26.95 30.39 8.20 20.66 676.27 43.31 11.91 5.53 30.67 50.80 25.52 5.50 14.97 40.10 6.10 27.36 13.50 8.70 17.36 22.09 44.75 8.80 26.27 7.56 5.68 13.86 37.31 3.16 20.00 29.34 20.57 1.80 75.50 29.69 24.59 7.63 13.08 15.36 36.42 14.53 3.10 10.41 46.99 92.98 14.38 53.59 35.36 6.30 35.70 6.77 47.46 1.69 5.71 4.43 8.03 42.04 32.77 60.23 59.36 368.72 24.40 36.61 143.48 3.39 10.04 30.81 2.29 16.65 25.72 32.80 15.73 .99 34.94 29.87

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32.29 25.50 12.70 45.23 40.50 4.65 65.25 58.69 43.49 41.18 87.45 2.58 50.77 16.19 25.17 112.74 45.29 42.69 45.78 58.69 8.04 16.60 12.97 7.50 7.74 15.25 8.35 3.40 .72 47.66 5.54 58.68 23.03 53.81 18.49 24.71 43.40 23.10 25.70 12.31 9.98 38.59 100.76 12.07 39.00 11.17 59.04 47.05 15.11 28.19 61.34 3.10 77.20 69.67 37.62 7.65 30.76 38.22 86.47 36.86 18.24 30.60 23.80 5.61 4.20 2.85 152.19 38.89 18.91 1.36 8.48 34.75 10.02 24.13 180.18 12.77 4.38 13.24 7.42 13.50 7.50 13.70 16.25 14.41 13.61 15.90 27.20 72.82 7.87 12.75 12.24 69.67 9.80 112.95 5.55 6.33 6.04 28.61 12.43 14.20 18.51 10.81 17.92 12.58 8.97 .92 35.25 23.31 33.50 49.61 36.12 24.05 38.04 6.17 22.79 35.01 34.77 17.11 8.59 8.07 26.49 15.53 66.79 12.53 23.82 48.87 44.83 35.49 81.94 4.75 64.08 13.72 19.79 26.74 22.10 28.71 8.72 17.48 36.71 212.88 57.06 39.26 42.12 56.39 23.40 9.67 184.80 22.74 21.80 22.06 8.61 12.21 32.79 46.50 14.43 50.90 15.44 36.75 41.58 53.80 3.87 13.48 7.02 1.66 12.42 8.35 10.06 7.62 14.21 5.10 5.81 4.39 5.68 18.53 28.85 12.60 69.66 21.81 54.78 35.18 10.98 91.54 30.62 83.90 2.68 32.33 57.16 24.97 13.15 7.10 11.97 5.06 14.37 1.01 39.19 .24 29.00 26.78 3.61 13.83 53.38 32.76 12.28 35.93 48.30 27.19 57.44 56.91 39.00 12.65 1.33 91.27 84.79 17.17 33.67 5.77 .32 38.31 7.60 74.49 1.79 7.35 5.97 4.40 7.92 17.57 17.26 33.85 41.85 20.99 6.49

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0.20

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C 13.80 +.34 22.43 +.50 18.63 +.36 432.60 +10.50 10.40 -1.11 23.18 +.50 35.64 +.88 32.45 +1.68 .88 -.04 28.09 +1.02 6.64 +.49 8.00 +.22 6.25 +.04 63.41 +1.01 11.18 +.23 90.67 +1.61 52.86 +1.07 89.44 +.79 12.97 +.32 4.10 +.19 75.70 -.25 7.76 +.20 29.29 +.49 6.06 +.36 2.42 +.11 17.58 +.32 10.78 +.26 26.61 +.22 43.55 +.01 108.62 +1.19 13.33 71.87 +.47 41.58 +.73 11.90 +.41 119.93 +1.96 37.79 +5.95 17.04 +.01 82.14 +2.27 44.24 +.80 33.87 +.58 3.54 +.32 38.29 +1.05 4.62 +.22 8.14 +.19 14.22 +.29 34.96 +.95 68.80 +1.46 10.50 -.30 10.06 +.22 8.48 +.37 55.50 +2.52 10.42 +.50 34.93 +.85 6.68 +.49 52.15 +1.04 20.42 +.53 31.34 +.96 2.66 -.11 1.36 +.02 11.50 -.01 4.75 +.09 20.01 +.11 35.06 +.19 16.52 +.92 4.65 -.04 4.57 +.10 3.27 +.10 17.15 -.01 19.42 +.54 74.21 +.94 26.97 +.78 24.50 +.21 45.73 +.86 11.38 +.06 14.66 +.33 21.03 +.80 15.31 -.42 36.36 +1.49 89.44 +1.89 58.07 +2.51 7.90 +.35 22.06 +.37 41.25 +1.36 16.25 +.57 61.05 +2.24 49.12 +1.42 .49 +.02 36.75 +.54 8.41 +.22 4.13 +.08 51.40 +1.37 24.07 +.28 26.69 +.31 23.26 +.54 38.61 +1.38 15.00 +.18 31.63 +.68 6.52 +.26 7.70 +.04 7.74 -.11 22.33 +.97 16.60 -.04 18.07 +.32 24.47 +1.24 25.96 +.57 15.14 +.45 10.21 -1.03 3.34 +.08 23.73 +.45 1.80 15.03 -.11 15.00 +.27 51.47 +.49 55.69 +.58 25.73 +.88 79.66 +1.09 9.34 +.20 31.27 -.02 28.56 -.01 3.67 -.03 11.76 +.39 3.69 -.01 14.97 +.10 23.97 +3.56 8.49 -.04 .71 +.03 3.48 -.23 4.29 -.06 35.56 +1.01 49.69 +.39 56.65 +1.69 25.23 +.30 9.42 +.18 56.92 +1.09 .65 +.03 8.10 +.34 39.23 +.65 4.54 +.11 11.38 +.10 14.69 +.15 13.99 +.42 13.57 +.20 6.94 +.01 9.53 +.25 7.86 +.20 18.59 +.51 33.04 +.62 50.90 +1.28 7.49 +.22 24.50 +.75 24.66 +.78 25.50 +.34 6.77 +.16 67.41 +.26 25.44 +.52 28.62 +.04 99.46 +2.11 22.89 +.14 37.03 +.24 89.37 +3.17 2.46 +.08 6.09 +.24 11.33 +.02 10.69 +.19 62.12 +1.91 57.96 +.89 72.02 +1.94 1.93 -.02 38.16 +.48 3.58 +.19 17.21 +.47 20.74 +.84 47.91 +1.17 67.69 +1.17 5.95 +.05 12.39 +.14 1.25 +.01 8.00 +.17 4.75 +.02 59.87 +.77 1.99 +.01 42.98 +1.29 21.31 +.19 24.30 +.85 38.09 +1.09 48.72 +.06 9.48 +.02

D

NuvMuVal 0.44 NvPfdInco 0.76 NuvQPf2 0.66 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OCZ Tech OGE Engy 1.57 OM Group OReillyAu OasisPet ObagiMed OcciPet 2.16 Oceaneerg 0.72 Och-Ziff 0.47 Oclaro OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax 0.08 Oi SA s 2.01 OilStates OldDomFrt OldNBcp 0.36 OldRepub 0.71 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.68 Omncre 0.28 Omnicom 1.20 OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncothyr ONEOK s 1.32 OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTble h OpkoHlth OptimerPh Oracle 0.24 OraSure Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OshkoshCp OvShip OwensMin 0.88 OwensCorn OwensIll PDC Engy PDF Sol PDL Bio 0.60 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp PimcoTR 1.09 PimShMat 1.54 PLX Tch PMC Sra PNC 1.60 PNM Res 0.58 PPG 2.36 PPL Corp 1.44 PRGX Glbl PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 PVR Ptrs 2.12 Paccar 0.80 PacerIntl PacDrill n PacEthan h PacSunwr PackAmer 1.00 PainTher PallCorp 0.84 PanASlv 0.20 Pandora PaneraBrd ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.64 ParkerVsn PrtnrCm 0.50 PartnerRe 2.48 Patterson 0.56 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pebblebrk 0.48 Pendrell Pengrth g 0.48 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennWst g 1.08 PennantPk 1.12 Penney PennaRE 0.64 PennyMac 2.20 Penske 0.48 Pentair 0.88 PeopUtdF 0.64 PepBoy PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.15 PeregrinP PerfectWld 2.00 PerkElm 0.28 Prmian 1.26 Perrigo 0.32 PetSmart 0.66 PetrbrsA 1.03 Petrobras 1.03 PtroqstE Pfizer 0.88 PhrmAth Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor 3.08 PhilipsEl 1.00 Phillips66 n 0.80 PhxNMda PhotrIn PhysnsFm PiedmOfc 0.80 Pier 1 0.16 PilgrimsP PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinWst 2.10 PionEnSvc PioNtrl 0.08 PitnyBw 1.50 PlainsAA 4.26 PlainsEx Plantron 0.40 PlugPower PlumCrk 1.68 PluristemT Polaris s 1.48 Polycom PolyOne 0.20 Polypore Pool Corp 0.64 Popular rs PortGE 1.08 PortglTel 0.85 PostHldg n PostPrp 1.00 Potash 0.56 PwrInteg 0.20 Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS PrcMet PS Agri PS BasMet PS USDBull PwSClnEn 0.25 PwShHiYD 0.32 PSTechLdr 0.08 PSPrivEq 0.05 PSFinPf 1.24 PSBldABd 1.49 PS SP LwV 0.82 PShNatMu 1.09 PSHYCpBd 1.09 PwShPfd 0.93 PShEMSov 1.49 PSIndia 0.05 PwShs QQQ 0.51 PSS&PBW 2.24 Praxair 2.20 PrecMxNik 0.20 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill Presstek h Prestige PriceTR 1.36 priceline Primerica 0.28 Primero g PrinFncl 0.84 PrivateB 0.04 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow 0.25 ProUltMC PrUltQQQ s PrUShQQQ ProUltSP 0.29 PrUShtFin ProUShL20 PrUltSCh25 ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltFin 0.34 ProUPShD30 ProUltO&G 0.07 PrUPR2K 0.01 ProShtR2K PrUPQQQ s ProUltR2K 0.01 ProSht20Tr PrUltSP500 0.06 PrUSSilv rs PrSUltNG rs PrUVxST rs PrShtVixST PrUltCrude PrUShCrde ProVixSTF ProUltSGld ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro ProctGam 2.25 PrognicsPh ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp 0.41 PUShDow rs ProUSR2K PrUShEur PUSSP500 rs PUPSR2K rs PUShQQQ rs ProspctCap 1.22 ProspBcsh 0.78

C 10.39 -.02 9.80 +.13 9.30 -.06 13.73 +.41 13.45 +.63 3.62 +.07 4.35 -1.01 54.78 +.94 19.05 +1.37 83.66 -.32 30.51 +.42 13.35 -.09 84.30 +2.19 54.68 +.62 8.80 +.37 2.68 +.14 26.26 +.17 3.64 -.01 1.86 -.06 6.25 +.21 3.83 +.12 80.47 +1.41 45.60 +.34 13.58 +.26 9.16 +.22 22.17 +.58 24.67 +.28 33.51 +.54 52.84 +1.17 16.49 +.17 8.42 +.38 6.45 +.32 5.28 +.08 45.58 +.70 77.87 +2.85 55.97 +2.05 46.46 +2.74 4.50 +.03 16.43 +.78 32.63 +.56 9.74 +.30 2.76 +.01 5.73 +.82 9.03 +.25 26.20 +.72 6.10 +.21 28.58 +.03 33.18 +.26 18.78 +1.53 30.36 +1.27 12.52 +.04 7.44 +.08 43.19 +.21 18.10 +.03 107.42 -.17 101.34 -.03 5.95 +.27 6.03 +.31 63.01 +1.17 21.42 +.33 113.00 +4.23 29.21 -.07 8.23 +.14 21.86 +.17 94.56 +1.56 24.08 -.15 41.01 +1.79 3.98 -.09 9.79 +.24 .35 +.01 2.39 +.04 32.90 +.56 4.12 +.13 56.69 +1.43 18.58 +.56 12.57 +.30 155.36 +2.36 49.87 +.06 22.65 +.81 2.75 +.13 30.08 +.55 4.34 +.11 82.29 +2.86 2.24 +.01 4.46 +.09 74.75 +.17 34.41 +.48 15.73 +.49 34.22 +.72 21.40 +.20 24.18 +.42 1.16 -.04 6.71 +.20 39.02 +.45 6.17 +.16 14.45 +.55 10.89 +.12 27.97 +1.54 16.37 +.35 22.04 +.07 28.50 +1.10 43.45 +.56 12.16 +.19 9.90 +.15 19.32 +.20 72.15 +.61 3.07 +.02 10.98 +.10 28.29 +.71 14.86 +.02 111.96 +1.63 71.34 +.37 20.75 +.55 21.44 +.61 6.34 +.17 24.34 +.42 1.24 -.02 65.90 +1.02 12.99 +.42 89.48 +.39 24.11 +1.06 43.42 +1.68 3.54 -.06 5.76 +.03 4.83 +.46 17.17 +.10 19.37 +.50 5.06 +.09 14.06 -.07 11.45 +.27 52.56 +.68 7.30 -.02 99.31 +3.29 13.76 +.41 87.03 +.92 39.76 +.32 36.45 +.73 .88 -.07 41.22 +.24 4.61 -.01 78.27 +2.89 10.77 +.09 15.55 +.19 34.44 +1.23 40.57 +.61 16.66 +.72 27.49 +.39 4.94 +.11 30.05 +.01 51.29 +.08 42.05 +.84 36.09 +1.79 6.03 -.48 41.25 +.62 28.65 -.01 58.97 +.35 30.21 +.02 18.37 +.03 22.25 -.06 4.21 +.11 9.62 +.14 27.77 +.43 9.33 +.21 18.43 -.01 30.11 -.27 28.18 +.38 25.62 -.10 19.09 +.01 14.82 +.02 30.42 +.04 17.13 +.35 69.53 +1.51 20.98 +.25 106.56 +2.13 13.39 +.14 163.82 +5.42 7.82 +.28 .49 16.45 +.29 63.29 +1.97 604.00 +8.82 29.72 +.36 5.06 +.27 28.03 +.50 16.70 +.57 35.36 +.78 34.45 -.66 24.42 -.54 34.38 -.70 13.87 -.58 72.17 +2.61 71.17 +2.64 62.18 +2.61 27.14 -1.25 60.54 +2.37 38.43 -1.70 15.54 +.48 28.42 -1.05 21.37 -.93 15.40 -.88 61.63 +2.48 17.31 -1.04 46.91 +1.84 68.40 +3.47 25.07 -.48 62.74 +3.89 44.12 +1.52 29.04 +.46 88.72 +5.03 45.98 -1.24 39.65 -.97 3.92 -1.03 126.58 +12.11 33.39 -.60 38.55 +.62 21.24 -2.44 15.44 -.14 52.85 +1.32 20.85 -.16 68.24 +.95 3.52 -.09 20.32 +.69 19.47 +.06 48.02 -1.86 27.12 -1.00 32.09 -2.04 39.44 -2.52 37.75 -2.08 35.90 -2.54 11.68 +.10 44.34 +.99

N m

D

ProtLife Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PulseElec PulteGrp PPrIT

0.72 1.45 1.42 4.40 0.10

C

27.98 +.46 56.26 +1.59 31.72 +.45 147.48 +1.03 1.15 +.03 14.61 +.57 0.36 5.69

Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 QIAGEN QR Energy 1.95 Qihoo360 QlikTech Qlogic QuadGrph 1.00 Qualcom 1.00 QualityS s 0.70 QuantaSvc QntmDSS QstDiag 0.68 QuestSft Questar 0.65 Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr RAIT Fin 0.32 RBS pfG RF MicD RLJ LodgT 0.66 RPC s 0.32 RPM 0.86 RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk Radware Ralcorp RLauren 1.60 Rambus Randgold 0.40 RangeRs 0.16 RaptorPhm RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier 1.76 Raytheon 2.00 RealD RltyInco 1.81 RedHat RedwdTr 1.00 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.84 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.96 RelStlAl 1.00 ReneSola Renren RentACt 0.64 Rentech 1.06 RentechN n 4.68 ReprosTh RepubAir RepubSvc 0.94 RschMotn ResMed 0.68 ResoluteEn ResoluteF ResrceCap 0.80 Responsys RetailPrp n 0.66 RexEnergy ReynAmer 2.36 Richmnt g RigelPh RioTinto 1.64 RitchieBr 0.49 RiteAid RiverbedT RobbMyer 0.20 RobtHalf 0.60 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.88 RockColl 1.20 RockwdH 1.40 RogCm gs 1.58 Roper 0.55 RosttaG rs RosettaR RossStrs s 0.56 Roundys n 0.92 Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.40 RBScotlnd RBSct prS RBSct prT RylCarb 0.40 RoyDShllB 3.44 RoyDShllA 3.44 RoyGld 0.60 Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Rudolph rue21 Ryanair Ryder 1.24 Ryland 0.12 SAIC 0.48 SAP AG 1.48 SBA Com SCANA 1.98 SEI Inv 0.30 SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLGrn pfC 1.91 SLM Cp 0.50 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.60 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.31 SpdrIUtil 0.75 SpdrIntDiv 3.56 SpdrIntRE 1.51 SP Mid 1.69 S&P500ETF 2.70 Spdr Div 1.79 SpdrHome 0.23 SpdrS&PBk 0.41 SpdrBarcCv 1.89 SpdrEMBd 0.60 SpdrLehHY 3.60 SPLeIntTB 1.93 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.48 SpdrRetl 0.58 SpdrOGEx 0.45 SpdrMetM 0.56 SPS Cmce SPX Cp 1.00 SS&C Tech STEC STMicro 0.40 SVB FnGp SabraHltc 1.32 Safeway 0.70 StJoe StJude 0.92 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SJuanB 1.24 SanchezE n SanderFm 0.68 SanDisk SandRdge SandRMiss 3.13 Sandst g rs SangBio Sanmina Sanofi 1.76 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient 0.35 Sarepta rs Sasol 2.11 SavientPh Schlmbrg 1.10 Schnitzer 0.75 SchwUSMkt 0.61 SchwIntEq 0.75 Schwab 0.24 SciClone SciGames Scotts 1.30 ScrippsNet 0.48 ScrippsEW SeaBrght 0.20 SeaChange SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd 3.36 SeagateT 1.28 SealAir 0.52 Sealy SearsHldgs 0.33 SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemGroup SempraEn 2.40 Semtech Senesco SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sequenom ServiceCp 0.24 ServNow n SvcSource ShandaG s 1.02 ShawGrp Sherwin 1.56 ShipFin 1.56 Shire 0.46 ShoreTel ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.43 Siemens 4.04 SigmaDsg SigmaAld 0.80 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.48 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilicnMotn Slcnware 0.24 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.37 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 4.20 Sina Sinclair 0.60 SiriusXM SironaDent SixFlags 2.40

28.51 18.36 18.74 23.88 23.80 12.61 18.34 62.62 18.97 24.78 1.57 62.47 27.96 20.10 50.29 2.97 3.74 3.06 4.94 17.58 3.88 18.17 12.50 28.33 22.50 63.85 4.04 2.84 33.47 73.19 158.85 4.59 108.70 65.84 5.04 36.69 50.01 57.98 10.56 42.21 59.10 14.75 13.84 49.71 22.35 152.45 7.22 18.65 59.49 52.35 1.34 3.69 35.91 2.29 34.31 15.02 4.70 28.02 6.72 39.53 9.23 12.64 6.10 9.39 11.23 12.40 45.23 4.30 10.59 45.56 18.72 1.26 21.19 59.65 27.06 68.26 71.61 49.78 48.17 41.11 104.91 5.48 44.84 69.25 7.20 15.48 35.65 56.89 7.50 21.04 22.82 28.72 73.28 70.96 90.16 3.75 8.95 7.05 9.85 30.15 31.37 41.02 28.02 12.24 68.15 60.68 48.43 22.32 14.87 81.99 25.33 15.78 50.96 132.82 164.89 31.38 16.28 46.03 39.14 182.21 143.77 58.15 24.35 23.25 39.04 31.73 40.08 60.39 45.82 28.62 63.37 54.24 41.78 34.01 62.90 22.51 7.90 5.71 60.73 19.60 16.49 19.40 39.11 11.61 148.89 42.46 27.99 14.10 19.51 45.45 44.01 6.87 24.50 9.86 5.80 8.98 42.28 1.72 7.41 10.49 14.55 44.53 1.26 72.46 28.59 34.52 25.52 13.96 4.83 7.76 42.62 60.66 11.15 11.00 8.13 17.22 1.59 39.89 31.70 14.99 1.64 57.37 29.68 31.27 10.48 35.67 66.79 25.35 .20 22.43 30.99 3.80 13.68 36.06 9.62 3.83 42.84 144.16 17.25 94.39 4.06 15.28 30.98 5.18 96.45 6.17 71.40 64.62 47.17 9.20 4.93 14.56 5.67 15.10 35.71 6.26 158.85 61.93 12.00 2.54 54.26 58.14

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Skechers Skullcandy SkyWest 0.16 SkywksSol SmartBal SmithWes SmithAO 0.80 SmithfF Smucker 2.08 SnapOn 1.36 SnydLance 0.64 SocQ&M 1.04 SodaStrm Sohu.cm SolarCap 2.40 SolarWinds Solazyme Solera 0.50 SoltaMed Somaxon h SonicAut 0.10 SonicCorp SonocoP 1.20 Sonus SonyCp 0.32 Sothebys 0.32 Sourcefire SouthnCo 1.96 SthnCopper 1.66 SwstAirl 0.04 SwstBc SwstnEngy Spansion SpectraEn 1.12 SpectrmB 1.00 SpectPh SpiritAero SpiritAir Splunk n Spreadtrm 0.40 SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold STAG Indl 1.08 StageStrs 0.40 StancrpFn 0.89 SP Matls 0.74 SP HlthC 0.74 SP CnSt 0.91 SP Consum 0.64 SP Engy 1.15 SPDR Fncl 0.23 SP Inds 0.74 SP Tech 0.40 SP Util 1.41 StdPac StanBlkDk 1.96 Staples 0.44 StarBulk h 0.06 StarScient Starbucks 0.68 StarwdHtl 0.50 StarwdPT 1.76 StateStr 0.96 StateSt pfC Statoil ASA 1.12 StlDynam 0.40 Steelcse 0.36 StemCells Stericycle Steris 0.76 SterlF WA 0.60 Sterlite 0.15 SMadden StewEnt 0.16 StifelFin StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels Stryker 0.85 SturmRug 1.05 SubPpne 3.41 SumitMitsu SunLfFn g 1.44 SunCokeE Suncor gs 0.52 SunesisPh Sunoco 0.80 SunOpta SunPower SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst 0.20 SupEnrgy Supvalu 0.35 support.cm SurModic SusqBnc 0.24 SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrans SwisherH lf Symantec SymetraF 0.28 Synacor n Synaptics Synchron Synopsys Synovus 0.04 SyntaPhm Syntrolm h Sysco 1.08 TAL Intl 2.40 TCF Fncl 0.20 TD Ameritr 0.24 TE Connect 0.84 TECO 0.88 TFS Fncl THL Credit 1.28 TICC Cap 1.16 TIM Part TJX s 0.46 TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi 0.50 TakeTwo TalismE g 0.27 TangerFac 0.84 Tangoe TanzRy g Targacept Target 1.44 Taseko TASER TataMotors 0.36 Taubmn 1.85 TeamHlth TearLab TechData TeckRes g 0.80 Teekay 1.27 TeekLNG 2.70 TeekayTnk 0.53 TlCmSys TlcmArg 0.93 TelefBrasil 1.86 TelefEsp TelData 0.49 Tellabs 0.08 TmpGlb 0.42 TempurP Tenaris 0.76 TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium 0.75 TescoCp TeslaMot Tesoro 0.48 TesseraTch 0.40 TetraTech TevaPhrm 0.99 TxCapBsh Texas Inds TexInst 0.68 TexRdhse 0.36 Textron 0.08 Theravnce ThermoFis 0.52 Thermon TheStreet 0.10 ThomCrk g ThomsonR 1.28 Thor Inds 0.60 Thoratec 3D Sys 3M Co 2.36 ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr 1.00 Tiffany 1.28 TW Cable 2.24 TimeWarn 1.04 Timken 0.92 Titan Intl 0.02 TitanMach TitanMet 0.30 TiVo Inc TollBros

C 21.53 15.80 9.05 31.18 11.93 9.00 55.57 20.34 86.62 72.98 25.11 62.39 37.64 41.09 23.37 59.75 11.54 42.34 3.19 .30 18.70 9.91 31.13 1.97 11.22 33.43 57.28 46.07 32.59 9.21 11.02 32.35 12.65 28.62 38.37 12.60 25.40 19.60 37.23 20.59 4.96 13.38 15.06 15.77 21.56 31.85 36.24 39.55 36.05 46.53 72.20 15.52 36.69 31.14 36.74 6.92 71.38 11.47 .51 3.78 50.84 56.79 23.74 42.86 25.18 25.72 11.94 9.68 2.13 93.40 35.08 21.35 6.96 44.78 7.98 34.25 10.95 24.56 63.99 6.26 54.19 46.72 38.05 6.21 23.52 16.97 32.38 3.32 47.67 6.21 4.38 14.35 11.00 .78 26.68 21.19 2.36 3.34 19.68 10.80 8.87 19.40 8.31 1.72 18.95 12.76 8.26 29.64 23.58 34.10 2.37 8.12 .72 30.62 33.39 11.49 17.45 35.59 17.60 8.84 13.95 10.79 19.58 46.28 45.30 10.80 25.58 14.41 10.34 14.05 33.40 15.97 4.58 5.12 64.86 3.03 5.42 21.39 81.34 29.41 3.73 49.35 27.46 31.54 38.05 4.02 2.19 10.19 22.48 13.73 25.18 3.67 9.20 33.19 42.00 5.41 31.58 80.62 15.96 22.03 19.71 10.02 28.55 39.56 15.16 6.49 39.85 47.14 39.01 29.56 17.92 27.06 24.19 58.23 24.50 1.36 2.91 28.51 32.00 35.58 42.72 93.28 8.45 32.13 48.77 60.74 90.66 43.22 40.34 20.65 23.74 12.11 9.75

+.06 +.42 -.01 +1.98 +.38 +.28 +.94 +.49 +.63 +3.02 +2.61 +.87 -.09 +1.46 +.06 +1.86 -.17 +.79 +.03 -.01 +.78 +.17 +.23 +.07 +.15 +.82 +.92 +.70 +.60 +.12 +.04 +.83 +.65 +.32 +.77 +.08 +.78 +.08 +.21 +1.26 +.01 +.11 -.01 +.05 +.30 +.31 +.89 +.62 +.44 +1.02 +1.49 +.36 +.81 +.68 +.41 +.06 +5.32 +.37 +.02 +.03 +1.04 +2.61 +.19 +.91 +.10 +.52 +.25 +.09 -.01 +1.43 +.46 +.20 +.15 +1.28 +.37 +1.21 +.25 +.67 -.87 +.19 +1.07 +.75 -.31 +.15 +.52 +.57 +.71 +.17 -.05 +.16 +.18 +.46 -.04 +1.23 +.51 +.08 +.13 +.94 +.14 +.01 +.65 +.19 +.05 +1.02 +.19 -.01 +.21 +.76 +.41 +.17 +.47 +.03 +.46 +.26 +.07 +.45 +1.13 +.24 +.06 +.03 +.09 +.40 +.65 +1.94 +.20 +.22 +.23 +.40 +.30 -.03 -1.03 +.03 +.37 +1.13 +.04 +.07 +.67 +.86 +.68 -.12 +1.03 +.72 +.95 +.15 +.06 +.03 -.60 +.61 +.71 +.68 +.11 -.03 +1.44 +.97 +.14 +1.18 +2.27 +.53 +1.18 +.62 +.13 +.61 +.47 +.18 +.10 +.34 +1.45 +.58 +1.04 +.44 +.74 -.04 +1.19 +.75 +.01 +.07 +.30 +.86 +.65 -.28 +1.53 -.04 +1.07 +1.25 +1.43 +1.29 +.97 +1.75 +.14 +.30 +.27 +.37

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E3

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

German economy forecast to shrink in 3rd, 4th quarters By Stephen Castle

New York Times News Service

LONDON — A stark new prediction that Germany will plunge into recession in the second half of 2012 added significant pressure on the European Central Bank as it took decisive action Thursday to stem the euro debt crisis. A report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development suggests that the German economy — the powerhouse of the eurozone — will contract 0.5 percent in the third quarter and 0.8 percent in the fourth quarter. Because of Germany’s much stronger performance in the first half of the year, the OECD estimates that, overall, the German economy will grow by 0.8 percent in 2012. But by highlighting the extent to which the slowdown in the wider European economy is beginning to affect Germany, the estimates by the Parisbased OECD — which groups 34 developed economies — suggest that the eurozone crisis might have reached a significant moment. Until recently, Germany had avoided the worst effects felt in many other nations in the

Europe Continued from E1 While such programs will be overseen by other EU governments, it would ultimately be up to the central bank to determine whether the terms of the agreement were acceptable, and whether the government was meeting those conditions over time. By forcing governments to impose fiscal discipline on each other and remake their economies along lines dictated by the ECB, power will inevitably drift from national capitals to Frankfurt, where the central bank is based, and Brussels, the administrative seat of the European Union. Draghi did not give an exact starting date for the bond purchase program, saying it depended on action by governments. A government must request help and agree to a “macroeconomic adjustment

currency area. The report underlined the need for greater coordination at the European level to stem the two-year debt crisis in the currency zone. “With the euro area crisis still the most important risk for the global economy, further policy action is needed to instill more confidence in the monetary union,” said the report, prepared by Pier Carlo Padoan, the OECD’s deputy secretary-general and chief economist. Janet Henry, chief European economist at HSBC in London, said the OECD estimates were in line with the growing body of evidence indicating that the third quarter of the year would bring the crisis to Germany’s door. “It’s hard to argue strongly against this type of forecast,” she said. “It is increasingly clear that Germany will see a contraction in the third quarter.” “We would hope to see strengthening demand from outside the eurozone,” she added. “If not, then the likelihood is of continued weakening in Germany through to the end of the year.”

program” with the European rescue fund, the European Stability Mechanism. But the central bank said this could be a so-called precautionary program, implying that it would be less onerous than the programs agreed to by countries like Portugal or Ireland. The central bank will buy bonds with maturities of three years or less, and it will withdraw as much money from circulation as it adds by buying bonds. This so-called sterilization is intended to forestall inflation. The bank will not treat itself as a preferred creditor, entitled to get paid before other bondholders if a country defaults. But it will not take losses on Greek bonds it already holds, even though private creditors were required to do so. The European Central Bank also announced it would hold interest rates at their recordlow level of 0.75 percent.

Hydroelectric Continued from E1 “Now we’re just finishing up all the last few regulatory hurdles,” Thalacker said of the hydroelectric project, which will cost around $2 million. In recent years, the Swalley and Central Oregon irrigation districts have installed hydroelectric projects on irrigation canals. More hydroelectric projects could pop up on Central Oregon canals in the future. A March report from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation showed 39 spots along the North Unit Irrigation District’s main canal where power could be produced. The Central Oregon and North Unit districts could install as many as six new hydroelectric projects in canals in the next two years, said Steve Johnson, manager of the Central Oregon Irrigation District. Such projects create new renewable energy, lead to water conservation and offer an additional revenue stream for irrigation districts, Johnson said. Last year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture gave a $7.2 million loan guarantee to EBD Hydro — a Bend company — for developing a hydroelectric project east of Culver along the North Unit Irrigation District’s main canal, according to The Bulletin’s archives. A regulatory filing PacifiCorp submitted to the Oregon Public Utility Commission in March showed the utility was willing to pay less than the Three Sisters Irrigation District was expecting, Thalacker said. That’s when the com-

Div PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .24f .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

34.36 25.72 8.35 25.65 72.82 5.50 51.94 51.81 99.98 8.08 20.45 17.59 10.76 25.10 8.51 23.10 3.90 14.03 22.38 17.04 31.34

12 16 9 36 13 ... 11 18 28 54 14 6 ... 11 9 22 10 ... 20 15 16

+.53 +.18 +.40 +.02 +.90 +.13 +1.06 -.16 +1.76 +.14 +.58 +.32 +.12 +.71 +.20 +.54 +.10 +.38 +.40 +.01 +.96

-8.5 -.1 +50.2 +28.5 -.7 +25.6 +10.1 +11.3 +20.0 +34.2 -18.4 -31.7 +3.5 +3.5 +10.7 -4.6 -34.3 +73.9 +4.3 +25.6 +20.7

Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1702.00 $1702.60 $32.619

Continued from E1 Six years into the housing crisis, consumers who have sat on the sidelines are trying to take advantage of it all, as are investors who are scouring the market for properties to turn into rentals. The market trends are forcing a re-education of clients and real estate agents alike. It used to be that when agents told each other there were competing aggressive offers on a listing, the agents might call each other’s bluff. But at least three times this year, clients of Warren Davis, a real estate consultant at Urban Real Estate in Chicago, have lost deals to offers that he thought were just bluffs. Now Davis has taken to role-playing with clients, pretending that they find a property and training them to make a decision quickly. “No one likes to rush,” Davis said. “I tell them when you find a good opportunity, you have to pounce. You can’t hesitate. When you go back and see it under contract, you go through an emotional loss.” Some of the quickened sales pace is seasonal, but it’s also because of a lack of

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70 .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36 .78 .32 .88 ... .60

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Continued from E1 “I want one,” BGC Partners analyst Colin Gillis said about the $159 Kindle Fire. “It’s a great price, and it’s certainly not something that’s going to be making money for them initially.” Amazon signaled Thursday that it is going headto-head with Apple when it unveiled its high-end Kindle Fire HD. It will have two Wi-Fi channels for faster transfers. That will be crucial for high-definition

21 99.46 +2.11 +3.2 18 57.96 +.89 +16.6 21 49.23 -.05 +2.7 14 6.25 +.21 +37.7 12 41.01 +1.79 +9.4 ... 1.36 +.06 -28.8 38 41.22 +.24 +12.7 19 163.82 +5.42 -.6 9 16.49 -.01 -21.6 12 28.59 +1.51 -32.4 29 144.16 +2.13 +61.5 10 31.85 +.31 -13.3 28 50.84 +1.04 +10.5 ... 5.88 +.35 +20.6 16 12.92 +.32 +4.3 12 33.93 +.85 +25.4 13 16.41 +.20 +17.3 12 34.84 +1.09 +26.4 12 20.32 +.50 +30.3 39 25.50 +.44 +36.6

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1692.00 $1690.80 $32.272

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF NokiaCp Bar iPVix FordM

1945501 8.35 +.40 1326668 143.77 +2.86 1160704 2.46 +.08 697984 9.98 -1.15 670538 9.92 +.35

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

RadianGrp MensW Navistar AmbwEd SunTr wtB

4.04 +.74 +22.4 37.79 +5.95 +18.7 23.97 +3.56 +17.4 2.59 +.32 +14.1 2.85 +.32 +12.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

iP SESPX 11.22 -4.02 -26.4 iP SXR1K 11.91 -3.42 -22.3 PrUVxST rs 3.92 -1.03 -20.8 CSVS2xVxS 2.01 -.45 -18.3 BarcShtC 17.25 -3.15 -15.4

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g CheniereEn Rentech VantageDrl Vringo

Last Chg

45706 1.53 +.02 41408 15.04 +.25 30119 2.29 ... 28747 1.70 +.13 27484 3.29 +.09

Gainers ($2 or more)

Indexes Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

Cisco Microsoft MicronT Facebook n ARltyCT n

Last Chg

19.73 31.34 6.68 18.96 12.20

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

ImmunoCll CCA Inds MidsthBcp DocuSec USAntimny

3.23 4.72 14.10 4.00 2.60

+.33 +11.4 +.36 +8.3 +.89 +6.7 +.23 +6.1 +.14 +5.7

Orexigen BeasleyB EducMgmt InnovSol SnydLance

5.73 +.82 5.28 +.65 3.48 +.37 4.24 +.44 25.11 +2.61

Losers ($2 or more)

+.83 +.96 +.49 +.38 +.24

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg +16.7 +14.0 +11.9 +11.6 +11.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Ellomay Vicon WizrdSft rs MeetMe HMG

4.25 2.85 4.70 2.29 4.90

-.60 -12.4 -.30 -9.5 -.38 -7.5 -.17 -6.9 -.35 -6.7

RusSCGr RurbanFn MktAxess Vitran g WarnerCh

54.00 -7.29 -11.9 6.53 -.82 -11.1 30.40 -3.60 -10.6 3.85 -.43 -10.0 12.80 -1.39 -9.8

Diary 2,394 631 103 3,128 309 11

584365 474056 453294 450469 435299

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

inventory. Housing inventory in July was nearly 24 percent lower than the same month last year, according to the National Association of Realtors. Some homeowners who would like to sell their homes can’t do so because they are underwater, owing more on their mortgage than the property is worth. Others may be waiting for true appreciation in the market to net a real profit. The median time a home was listed for sale was 69 days in July, a 29.6 percent plunge from the same month just a year ago, according to data from the National Association of Realtors. “The serious buyers are all looking at the same thing,” said Mark Reitman, regional manager at Redfin. “A couple of years ago, there was more inventory so there was more choice.” Some listings come onto the market and are gone within days. A Naperville, Ill., homeowner let Kay Russell, an agent at Keller Williams Fox Valley, place his home on the multiple-listing service on a recent Saturday evening but didn’t want any showings until Monday so he could finish a few last projects. “My phone starting ringing off the wall Sunday,” Russell said. “People were hopping all over their agents, saying, ‘We want to see that house.’ ”

movies and other large files, CEO Jeff Bezos told reporters. An 8.9-inch model will go for $299 and start shipping Nov. 20. That means a device nearly as big as the iPad will sell for at least $100 less. A 7inch HD model will sell for $199, starting next Friday. A premium Kindle Fire HD model, one with the ability to connect to the 4G cellular networks that phone companies are building, will cost $499. It will come with 32 gigabytes of memory and an 8.9-inch screen. A data plan will cost $50 a year.

Market recap

Name

Precious metals

Anxiety

— Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

Kindles

Northwest stocks Name

pany started looking for a way to generate additional revenue to compensate for the loss of anticipated revenue from electricity generation. The district is working with the Deschutes River Conservancy to receive money from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, based in Washington, D.C., for taking less water from Whychus Creek, Thalacker said. He said the district was planning to start making power with its hydroelectric facility in 2013, but PacifiCorp’s release of new rates prompted the district to slow down the time line. The district should finish constructing and testing the plant by September 2013 and start producing and selling power in March 2014, Thalacker said. Making money off the hydroelectric project isn’t the main goal, he said. “Ultimately, our business model is more about Endangered Species (Act) and Clean Water Act mitigation and protecting our farmers’ water rights, as well as delivering water on farms, than it is about creating profit,” Thalacker said. Still, he said he’s glad to help PacifiCorp add to its supply of renewable energy. Oregon’s renewable-energy portfolio standard requires that 25 percent of utility companies’ energy comes from renewable resources by 2025. The revenues from generating power will help pay off a loan the district took out to build a penstock for the hydroelectric project, Thalacker said. In about six years, the district could build a second hydroelectric project, which would generate 300 kilowatts at McKenzie Reservoir, he said.

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Diary 275 151 36 462 13 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,931 535 113 2,579 194 28

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 411.54 8,327.67 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,426.68 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,292.00 5,044.63 472.53 8,160.56 2,428.52 3,135.81 1,432.12 14,975.51 837.95

+244.52 +93.56 +6.10 +168.55 +23.64 +66.54 +28.68 +292.86 +16.72

+1.87 +1.89 +1.31 +2.11 +.98 +2.17 +2.04 +1.99 +2.04

+8.79 +.50 +1.69 +9.14 +6.59 +20.37 +13.88 +13.54 +13.10

+17.67 +12.79 +10.09 +12.45 +7.69 +23.99 +20.76 +19.90 +20.58

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

336.43 2,397.79 3,509.88 5,777.34 7,167.33 19,209.30 39,987.02 15,780.32 3,693.54 8,680.57 1,881.24 2,989.26 4,331.64 6,028.21

+2.31 +2.20 +3.06 +2.11 +2.91 +.34 +1.04 +4.31 +.65 +.01 +.38 -.22 +.79 +1.57

s s s s s s s s s s s t s s

1.0291 1.5936 1.0181 .002081 .1576 1.2643 .1289 .012678 .076580 .0313 .000882 .1484 1.0492 .0335

1.0194 1.5904 1.0095 .002076 .1575 1.2599 .1289 .012753 .076300 .0310 .000880 .1485 1.0464 .0335

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.98 +0.11 +11.0 GrowthI 28.52 +0.57 +16.1 Ultra 26.56 +0.54 +15.9 American Funds A: AmcpA p 21.23 +0.38 +13.2 AMutlA p 28.46 +0.47 +11.3 BalA p 20.20 +0.28 +12.0 BondA p 12.91 -0.03 +4.7 CapIBA p 53.15 +0.57 +10.0 CapWGA p 35.77 +0.69 +13.2 CapWA p 21.33 -0.03 +5.5 EupacA p 38.84 +0.80 +10.5 FdInvA p 39.95 +0.83 +13.6 GovtA p 14.59 -0.03 +2.0 GwthA p 33.38 +0.67 +16.2 HI TrA p 11.13 +0.02 +9.6 IncoA p 18.00 +0.21 +9.5 IntBdA p 13.77 -0.02 +2.3 ICAA p 30.66 +0.57 +14.2 NEcoA p 27.85 +0.42 +17.1 N PerA p 30.13 +0.61 +15.2 NwWrldA 51.10 +0.82 +10.8 SmCpA p 38.51 +0.66 +16.1 TxExA p 13.07 -0.01 +7.0 WshA p 31.39 +0.57 +11.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.16 +0.43 +16.8 IntlVal r 28.65 +0.61 +14.2 MidCap 39.23 +0.93 +19.1 MidCapVal 21.25 +0.38 +7.9 Baron Funds: Growth 58.15 +0.94 +14.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.17 -0.04 +4.2 DivMu 14.87 -0.01 +2.4 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.88 +0.35 +10.6 GlAlA r 19.34 +0.22 +7.2 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.99 +0.20 +6.6 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 19.93 +0.35 GlbAlloc r 19.43 +0.22 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 70.25 +0.67 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.31 +0.69 AcornIntZ 38.69 +0.57 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.41 +0.02 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.83 +0.22 USCorEq1 12.26 +0.25 USCorEq2 12.07 +0.26 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.08 +0.72 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 36.51 +0.73 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.42 -0.03 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.41 +0.31 EmMktV 27.35 +0.50 IntSmVa 14.58 +0.29 LargeCo 11.34 +0.23 USLgVa 22.08 +0.52 US Small 23.41 +0.46 US SmVa 26.76 +0.54 IntlSmCo 14.77 +0.26 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 15.31 +0.41 Glb5FxInc 11.29 -0.02 2YGlFxd 10.13 -0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 76.53 +1.38 Income 13.85 -0.02 IntlStk 32.04 +0.89 Stock 118.73 +2.90 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.34 TRBd N p 11.34 Dreyfus: Aprec 45.11 +0.77 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.05

+10.7 +7.4 +16.8 +15.0 +13.4 +2.8 +8.2 +14.7 +14.7 +11.0 +11.2 +5.5 +7.5 +5.9 +8.9 +15.5 +16.3 +14.6 +15.9 +8.3 +0.8 +6.1 +3.9 +0.8 +14.9 +6.1 +9.6 +18.0 NA NA +12.2 +5.9

FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.33 +0.31 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.67 FPACres 28.74 +0.39 Fairholme 30.66 +0.31 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.57 -0.02 StrValDvIS 5.15 +0.06 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.98 +0.46 StrInA 12.65 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 23.30 +0.47 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.23 +0.11 FF2010K 13.04 +0.11 FF2015 11.90 +0.10 FF2015K 13.11 +0.11 FF2020 14.41 +0.14 FF2020K 13.53 +0.13 FF2025 12.01 +0.15 FF2025K 13.69 +0.17 FF2030 14.30 +0.18 FF2030K 13.84 +0.18 FF2035 11.85 +0.17 FF2035K 13.93 +0.21 FF2040 8.27 +0.12 FF2040K 13.97 +0.21 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.02 +0.27 AMgr50 16.29 +0.12 AMgr20 r 13.34 +0.02 Balanc 20.20 +0.26 BalancedK 20.20 +0.26 BlueChGr 50.36 +1.11 CapAp 29.77 +0.56 CpInc r 9.31 +0.03 Contra 78.89 +1.59 ContraK 78.89 +1.58 DisEq 24.73 +0.49 DivIntl 28.48 +0.58 DivrsIntK r 28.46 +0.58 DivGth 30.16 +0.62

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Eq Inc 46.79 +0.88 EQII 19.66 +0.38 Fidel 35.96 +0.70 FltRateHi r 9.91 +0.01 GNMA 11.99 -0.01 GovtInc 10.92 -0.03 GroCo 98.56 +2.22 GroInc 21.08 +0.44 GrowCoF 98.57 +2.23 GrowthCoK98.56 +2.23 HighInc r 9.22 +0.02 IntBd 11.10 -0.02 IntmMu 10.63 -0.02 IntlDisc 31.20 +0.69 InvGrBd 12.01 -0.04 InvGB 7.96 -0.02 LgCapVal 11.29 +0.23 LowP r 40.95 +0.64 LowPriK r 40.96 +0.65 Magelln 74.05 +1.57 MidCap 30.18 +0.59 MuniInc 13.49 -0.03 NwMkt r 17.54 +0.05 OTC 62.92 +1.40 100Index 10.32 +0.21 Puritn 19.75 +0.24 PuritanK 19.75 +0.24 SAllSecEqF13.04 +0.27 SCmdtyStrt 9.24 SCmdtyStrF 9.27 +0.01 SrsIntGrw 11.46 +0.21 SrsIntVal 8.95 +0.21 SrInvGrdF 12.02 -0.03 STBF 8.58 -0.01 StratInc 11.32 TotalBd 11.26 -0.03 USBI 12.00 -0.03 Value 73.83 +1.47 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 50.94 +1.03 500Idx I 50.95 +1.03 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 40.38 +0.78 500IdxAdv 50.94 +1.02

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TotMktAd r 41.60 +0.83 +15.5 USBond I 11.99 -0.04 +3.6 First Eagle: GlblA 48.81 +0.59 +8.2 OverseasA 21.78 +0.18 +7.0 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.26 +1.9 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.68 -0.02 +7.2 HYTFA p 10.88 -0.01 +9.0 IncomA p 2.21 +0.03 +10.4 RisDvA p 37.48 +0.60 +7.7 StratInc p 10.57 +0.02 +8.3 USGovA p 6.89 -0.01 +1.9 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.13 +0.07 +9.7 IncmeAd 2.19 +0.02 +10.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.23 +0.03 +9.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.36 +0.35 +12.9 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.17 +0.07 +9.5 GrwthA p 18.45 +0.48 +13.3 WorldA p 15.38 +0.37 +11.9 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.19 +0.06 +9.1 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 44.96 +0.92 +16.0 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.88 +0.41 +14.5 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.76 +0.48 +5.7 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.96 +0.24 +6.3 Quality 23.89 +0.41 +14.5 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.29 +0.02 +11.0 MidCapV 38.53 +0.67 +14.8 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.90 -0.02 +7.2 CapApInst 43.09 +0.99 +16.8 IntlInv t 57.53 +1.28 +10.6 Intl r 58.18 +1.29 +10.9

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.41 +0.70 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.06 +0.94 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.00 -0.07 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.04 +0.17 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.84 +0.31 CmstkA 17.24 +0.37 EqIncA 9.16 +0.13 GrIncA p 20.84 +0.43 HYMuA 10.04 -0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.90 +0.37 AssetStA p 24.72 +0.38 AssetStrI r 24.96 +0.38 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.09 -0.03 JP Morgan Instl: MdCpVal 27.78 +0.52 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.09 -0.03 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.08 -0.03 HighYld 8.05 +0.02 ShtDurBd 11.01 -0.01 USLCCrPls 23.06 +0.52 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T22.02 +0.39 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.43 +0.15 LSGrwth 13.34 +0.22 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.90 +0.35 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.90 +0.48 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.85 +0.07 StrInc C 15.27 +0.13 LSBondR 14.79 +0.07 StrIncA 15.18 +0.13 Loomis Sayles Inv:

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InvGrBdY 12.57 +0.03 +8.5 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.83 +0.26 +13.1 BdDebA p 8.01 +0.02 +9.3 ShDurIncA p4.62 +4.6 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 +4.1 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.62 +4.7 MFS Funds A: TotRA 15.10 +0.17 +9.4 ValueA 25.37 +0.52 +14.3 MFS Funds I: ValueI 25.49 +0.52 +14.5 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.05 +0.01 +9.3 Managers Funds: Yacktman p19.16 +0.34 +10.8 YacktFoc 20.63 +0.35 +10.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.43 +0.17 +12.1 MergerFd 15.99 +0.03 +2.6 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.92 -0.01 +8.2 TotRtBdI 10.91 -0.02 +8.3 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 35.28 +0.83 +7.2 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.98 +0.47 +10.5 GlbDiscZ 30.40 +0.48 +10.7 SharesZ 22.57 +0.35 +13.1 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 50.01 +0.86 +7.7 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.40 +0.02 +10.4 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.95 +0.40 +7.0 Intl I r 18.63 +0.45 +12.6 Oakmark 48.95 +1.06 +17.4 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.40 +0.06 +10.1 GlbSMdCap14.61 +0.24 +10.4 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 32.72 +0.59 +11.6

GlobA p 60.25 +1.51 GblStrIncA 4.28 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.49 +0.01 MnStFdA 37.34 +0.70 RisingDivA 17.47 +0.38 S&MdCpVl30.87 +0.68 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.78 +0.34 S&MdCpVl26.11 +0.57 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.72 +0.33 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.50 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.41 +0.59 IntlBdY 6.49 +0.01 IntGrowY 28.87 +0.55 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.48 -0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.06 +0.03 AllAsset 12.52 +0.05 ComodRR 7.01 DivInc 12.11 EmgMkCur10.34 +0.05 EmMkBd 12.23 +0.03 HiYld 9.47 +0.01 InvGrCp 11.13 -0.04 LowDu 10.59 -0.01 RealRtnI 12.43 -0.06 ShortT 9.86 -0.01 TotRt 11.48 -0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.43 -0.06 TotRtA 11.48 -0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.48 -0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.48 -0.02 PIMCO Funds P: AstAllAuthP11.04 +0.03 TotRtnP 11.48 -0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.77 +0.41

+11.5 +9.4 +7.3 +16.1 +12.1 +4.2 +11.4 +3.6 +11.5 +14.5 +11.9 +7.7 +13.1 +7.8 +11.9 +10.2 +8.9 +10.8 +5.3 +12.0 +10.0 +10.7 +4.7 +7.0 +2.6 +7.9 +6.7 +7.7 +7.1 +7.8 +11.8 +7.9 +5.8

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.19 +0.85 Price Funds: BlChip 45.82 +1.00 CapApp 23.11 +0.27 EmMktS 30.78 +0.55 EqInc 25.99 +0.52 EqIndex 38.72 +0.78 Growth 38.04 +0.79 HlthSci 43.38 +0.82 HiYield 6.83 +0.01 InstlCpG 18.98 +0.47 IntlBond 9.99 -0.01 Intl G&I 12.33 +0.26 IntlStk 13.59 +0.28 MidCap 59.42 +1.27 MCapVal 24.86 +0.46 N Asia 15.47 +0.19 New Era 42.89 +0.98 N Horiz 36.57 +0.76 N Inc 9.90 -0.03 OverS SF 8.06 +0.18 R2010 16.50 +0.17 R2015 12.84 +0.16 R2020 17.79 +0.26 R2025 13.03 +0.21 R2030 18.72 +0.33 R2035 13.24 +0.25 R2040 18.84 +0.36 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 36.39 +0.72 SmCapVal 38.82 +0.76 SpecIn 12.90 +0.02 Value 25.93 +0.60 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 10.41 +0.24 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.35 +0.34 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.84 +0.26 PremierI r 19.84 +0.43 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 40.75 +0.81 S&P Sel 22.62 +0.46

+9.9 +18.6 +12.1 +8.0 +13.9 +15.4 +19.5 +33.1 +10.3 +17.7 +4.2 +7.0 +10.6 +12.7 +16.2 +11.2 +2.0 +17.9 +4.5 +10.1 +9.9 +10.9 +11.8 +12.5 +13.2 +13.6 +13.7 +2.5 +16.4 +12.6 +7.6 +15.0 +17.2 +13.8 +10.0 +7.1 +15.2 +15.6

Scout Funds: Intl 30.94 +0.59 Sequoia 163.68 +2.22 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.11 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.48 +0.42 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.61 +0.42 IncBuildC p18.78 +0.21 IntValue I 26.20 +0.44 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.66 +0.31 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.87 +0.26 CAITAdm 11.68 -0.01 CpOpAdl 77.80 +1.96 EMAdmr r 33.74 +0.64 Energy 112.77 +2.52 EqInAdm n 50.94 +0.97 ExtdAdm 45.34 +0.88 500Adml 132.56 +2.67 GNMA Ad 11.08 -0.02 GrwAdm 37.31 +0.74 HlthCr 61.37 +0.77 HiYldCp 6.00 +0.01 InfProAd 29.02 -0.13 ITBdAdml 12.10 -0.05 ITsryAdml 11.79 -0.04 IntGrAdm 57.17 +1.32 ITAdml 14.34 -0.02 ITGrAdm 10.36 -0.03 LtdTrAd 11.18 LTGrAdml 10.87 -0.12 LT Adml 11.74 -0.02 MCpAdml100.71 +2.08 MuHYAdm 11.21 -0.02 PrmCap r 72.41 +1.58 ReitAdm r 95.88 +0.80 STsyAdml 10.79 -0.01 STBdAdml 10.66 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.93 STIGrAd 10.83 -0.01 SmCAdm 38.50 +0.74

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TtlBAdml 11.17 TStkAdm 35.83 WellslAdm 59.33 WelltnAdm 58.96 Windsor 49.28 WdsrIIAd 51.75 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 33.67 DivdGro 16.84 Energy 60.05 EqInc 24.30 Explr 80.52 GNMA 11.08 HYCorp 6.00 HlthCre 145.41 InflaPro 14.77 IntlGr 17.96 IntlVal 29.04 ITIGrade 10.36 LifeCon 17.26 LifeGro 23.33 LifeMod 20.79 LTIGrade 10.87 Morg 20.36 MuInt 14.34 PrmcpCor 15.12 Prmcp r 69.76 SelValu r 20.73 STAR 20.51 STIGrade 10.83 StratEq 21.20 TgtRetInc 12.20 TgRe2010 24.26 TgtRe2015 13.42 TgRe2020 23.84 TgtRe2025 13.57 TgRe2030 23.29 TgtRe2035 14.02 TgtRe2040 23.03 TgtRe2045 14.46 USGro 21.24 Wellsly 24.49 Welltn 34.14 Wndsr 14.61

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WndsII 29.16 +0.57 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 111.91 +2.17 MidCpIstPl109.73 +2.25 TotIntAdm r23.67 +0.51 TotIntlInst r94.69 +2.06 TotIntlIP r 94.72 +2.07 500 132.54 +2.67 MidCap 22.18 +0.46 TotBnd 11.17 -0.03 TotlIntl 14.15 +0.31 TotStk 35.81 +0.71 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.87 +0.26 DevMkInst 9.19 +0.21 ExtIn 45.34 +0.88 GrwthIst 37.31 +0.74 InfProInst 11.82 -0.05 InstIdx 131.71 +2.65 InsPl 131.72 +2.65 InsTStPlus 32.43 +0.65 MidCpIst 22.25 +0.46 STIGrInst 10.83 -0.01 SCInst 38.50 +0.74 TBIst 11.17 -0.03 TSInst 35.83 +0.71 ValueIst 22.83 +0.46 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 109.50 +2.21 MidCpIdx 31.78 +0.65 STBdIdx 10.66 -0.01 TotBdSgl 11.17 -0.03 TotStkSgl 34.58 +0.69 Virtus Funds I: EmMktI 9.62 +0.10 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.59 -0.03

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E4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B)"!*("" C$+(*,$TODAY COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-383-7290. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290.

SATURDAY HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309.

MONDAY KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-383-7290.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. KNOW DIGITAL DOWNLOADS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290. SMALL-BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. OVERCOME THE FEAR OF PUBLIC SPEAKING: Reservations encouraged; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.bendchamber.org. FOR WHAT AM I PAYING?: Learn about the costs of various, investment-related products; free; 8:30-10 a.m.; Starbucks, 61470 U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-639-8055. UPGRADE YOUR SALES TEAM IN 2012: Dennis Hungerford, President of Sandler Training Oregon, presents; registration required; free; 8:30-11 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-382-4316 or www.hcc.sandler.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 9:30-11 a.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-383-7290. BUSINESS AFTER HOURS REDMOND’S BAZAAR: 4:30-5:30

p.m.; Redmond’s Bazaar, 2145 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-1367. ARE YOU READY TO BE IN BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7290.

floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

THURSDAY

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FORECLOSURE CLASS: Call 541-318-7506 extension 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@ neighborimpact.org or www .homeownershipcenter.org.

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS ANNUAL CELEBRATION: An evening of networking with associates from the Bend business community. Member of the Year and Facilitator of the Year for 2012 will be recognized. Free required annual meeting prior to the main event; $15 includes one drink; 5:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; The Point at Shevlin Corporate Park, 929 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend. FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. EXPLORE THE BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Sept. 14 FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. CENTRAL OREGON BUSINESS EDUCATION & NETWORKING MEETUP GROUP: Launch meeting, COCC learning center, lunch provided, registration requested; $5; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-848-3600, kmuinch@hotmail.com or http:// www.meetup.com/COBEN12/. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 1-2:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290.

SATURDAY Sept. 15 FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

SUNDAY Sept. 16 FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new

MONDAY Sept. 17

TUESDAY Sept. 18 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541383-7290. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 34:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3837290. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: You do not have to be a Chamber member to attend. Call Hope Johnson at (541) 9232679 or check out the website at www.crrchamber.com for more information; free; 5:30 p.m.; Juniper Realty, 14290 S.W. Chinook Road. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 19 CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division encourages workers and employers to attend the event to help improve safety and health performance. Keynote speaker Jake French. Registration required; $125, with optional pre-conference workshops for $40; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 503-378-3272 or www.orosha.org/conferences. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. HR AND THE GREAT LEGAL ROUNDUP: Registration required at www.hrcentraloregon.org/ calendarevents.aspx#rsvpform; $30 for HRACO members, $40 for nonmembers; 7:30-11 a.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-389-9600. KNOW EXCEL FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 1:30-3 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-3837290.

AUTO NEWS

GM struggles to stay out of the campaign

Canadian auto union members set to strike By Alisa Priddle

Detroit Free Press

By Nathan Bomey Detroit Free Press

DETROIT — Despite its intention to avoid the political fray, General Motors will report third-quarter financial results on Oct. 31, or six days before voters go to the polls. GM recently said it had banned both major presidential candidates from its plants for the rest of the campaign. But it can’t control what others say on the campaign trail. Vice President Joe Biden, who spoke Monday at Detroit’s annual Labor Day rally, has often repeated the bumper-sticker slogan “Osama bin Laden is dead and General Motors is alive.” Robust profits in the U.S. and Canada, however, are diluted by losses in Europe, where an economic crisis is driving new car sales to the lowest level since at least 1995. GM shares closed Wednesday at $21.76. That is well below the $33 at which it sold shares in an initial public offering in November 2009. For the U.S. Treasury to shed its 500 million GM shares — a 32 percent stake — and break even, it would need to sell at an average price of nearly $54, more than twice the current market price. GM earned $7.6 billion in 2011, and another $3.25 billion in the first half of 2012, largely on the strength of its leaner North American operations. The government-backed bankruptcy removed billions of dollars of debt and the cost of unused factories. The company also has been disciplined in producing enough vehicles to meet demand, but not so many that it has to offer expensive rebates and other incentives to clear inventories. A strong third-quar-

ter profit would bolster the Obama administration’s argument that rescuing GM was a sound investment. A poor financial performance could help Republican nominee Mitt Romney, who has criticized the bailout as a “sweetheart deal” for the UAW and a distortion of the free market. Regardless of its motive, GM is reporting results sooner this year. Last year, it disclosed third-quarter financials on Nov. 9. The date varies from year to year depending on executives’ schedules and other internal factors. “Generally best practice is to release your earnings as soon as you’ve completed and validated all the accounting,” GM spokesman Jim Cain said. “So we didn’t see any sense in making the market and our investors wait any longer than necessary.” As both major candidates and their parties debate the merits of the 2009 restructurings of GM and Chrysler, GM strives to remain neutral. “We have friends — very strong friends — on both sides of the aisle,” Bob Ferguson, GM’s vice president of global public policy, said in a recent interview. “I don’t think there is much we can do about that other than to tell our story, tell it as politely but as forcefully as possible and keep all the channels of communication to policymakers open and not be defensive and be very accessible.”

DETROIT — The Canadian Auto Workers union is breaking with past practice and not immediately announcing a target company as it works to negotiate new national labor agreements with General Motors, Ford and Chrysler. Traditionally, one company is chosen after Labor Day to set the pattern agreement the others are expected to match. The union on Wednesday distributed leaflets in Canadian auto plants, saying the different approach is because “none of the three companies have demonstrated that they are serious about reaching an agreement.” As a result, local unions have been asked to start preparing for a strike when the agreements expire Sept. 17.

‘Must be prepared’ “We must be prepared though to shut down operations at all three, should we be unable to reach an agreement,” union leaders have told members. The Detroit automakers have said Canada has become the most expensive place to make vehicles, in part because the union has not adopted a two-tier wage system and in part because the strong Canadian dollar has made manufacturing more expensive in Canada.

THE 2012

GREEN & SOLAR HOMES TOUR P R O D U C E D B Y T H E H I G H D E S E R T B R A N C H O F CA S CA D I A

SATURDAY OCTOBER 6th | 9 AM - 5 PM FEATURING CENTRAL OREGON HOMES PACKED WITH GREEN AND SOLAR FEATURES

D!"#$%&'(" Azillion Beads has relocated to the Boomtown Building at 910 N.W. Harriman, Suite 110, in Bend. With the addition of Azillion Beads, the building is at 100 percent occupancy. For information visit www .azillionbeads.net. Echo Ridge Music in Sisters has composed a new jingle for the Bend Park & Recreation District. Composers Brent Alan and Jim Goodwin — with lyricist Cam Davis, producer Tim Underwood and singer Jim Cornelius — created the jingle that the district will begin broadcasting this month. Alan and Goodwin launched Echo Ridge Music last September as a music house providing original music for all media. For information contact

www.echoridgemusic.com. Steele Associates Architects earned recognition for several clients’ projects in the Daily Journal of Commerce Top Projects 2012 issue. Central Oregon Community College Crook County Open Campus received second place in the public buildings $1 million to $5 million category. Other projects were finalists in various categories, including: Innovation Center Laboratory Building 1B; COCC Madras Education Center; Innovation Center Office Building 20-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; U.S. Forest Service Bend Pine Administration Building; and the Clatskanie People’s Utility District Campus. For information contact 541-382-9867 or visit

www.steele-arch.com. Aaron and Rebecca Borror, of Terrebonne, own one bull listed in the 2012 Fall Sire Evaluation Report published by the American Angus Association. The new report features the latest performance information available on 6,067 sires and is available at www.angussire research.com. Advisory Services and Investments LLC, in Bend, has been selected as No. 48 of the nation’s Top 100 Registered Investment Advisors of 2012 by REP. ASI manages $1 billion in assets across four offices in Washington and Oregon and is led by founder and managing director Randy Miller. For information, visit www.advisoryservices.com.

For space reservations please call your Bulletin Sales Representative today!

541.382.1811

The guide will feature homes in Central Oregon that demonstrate the latest innovations in green building and solar energy.


CLASSIFIEDS

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 F1

The Bulletin

LEGAL NOTICES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

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Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

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202

Want to Buy or Rent

208

208

Pets & Supplies

Australian Shepherd Mix Pups, 1 week old, reserve now, 4 left, $100, 541-815-9257

Japanese Chin females, 2 avail., 2 yrs, black & white. $175-$275. 541-788-0326 Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue group. Tame, shots, altered, ID chip, more. Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt. 65480 78th Bend, 541-389-8420; visit www.craftcats.org for photos & more. Lab Pups AKC, black & yellow, Master Hunter sired, performance pedigree, OFA cert hips & elbows, Call 541-771-2330

Barn/shop cats FREE, some tame, some not. We deliver! Fixed, shots, etc. 389-8420

Boxer puppies AKC Wanted: $Cash paid for fawn & brindles, $550 vintage costume jewto $700 541-280-6677 elry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the CHIHUAHUAS Estate, Honest Artist 1st shots/dewormers Elizabeth,541-633-7006 *Blue (male) 3.8lbs Wanted! *Black (female) 3.2lbs, Pellet stove 5 months old, potty 541-382-4144 trained on pee pads. $500. William, WANTED: RAZORS, (541) 350-4810 Double or singleedged, straight Chihuahuas, 2 males, razors, shaving light brown, 8 wks, brushes, mugs & $160/ea. 541-385-6167 scuttles, strops, shaving accessories Chihuahua, teacups (2), & memorabilia. shots & dewormed, Fair prices paid. $250 ea,541-977-0035 Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm. Chi-pom mix pups, males & females, 6 205 weeks old. Females Items for Free $200 males $175. Cash only. Free moving boxes, all 541-480-2824 sizes, you haul. Call 541-306-6599. Dog Houses, Large Igloo, $60, Smaller one, Iris’s, many colors, lots $25, 541-593-4456. available, free you dig & haul, 541-504-1791 Doxie AKC mini pups, all Playhouse/Chicken colors inc wheaton &dapl, coop, 4’x5’x5’, win$375-425. 541-508-4558 dows, doors and www.bendweenies.com composite roof. Must see! You haul! DO YOU HAVE 541-389-2028 SOMETHING TO 208 SELL FOR $500 OR Pets & Supplies LESS? Non-commercial The Bulletin recomadvertisers may mends extra caution place an ad with when purchasour ing products or ser"QUICK CASH vices from out of the SPECIAL" area. Sending cash, 1 week 3 lines, $12 checks, or credit inor 2 weeks, $20! formation may be Ad must include subjected to fraud. price of single item For more informaof $500 or less, or tion about an advermultiple items tiser, you may call whose total does the Oregon State not exceed $500. Attorney General’s Office Consumer Call Classifieds at Protection hotline at 541-385-5809 1-877-877-9392. www.bendbulletin.com

Aussies,Mini/Toy's AKC all colors parents on site 1st shots,wormed 541-598-5314/788-7799

German Shepherd purebred, spayed female, 4 yrs, current shots, very sweet, great w/ people. $400 firm. 541-383-3349.

www.kinnamanretrievers.com

Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

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O r e g o n

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240

246

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Crafts & Hobbies

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Musical Instruments

$150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also wanted, used W/D’s 541-280-7355

Crafters Wanted Open Jury Sat., Sept. 8, 9:30 a.m. Highland Baptist Church, Redmond. Tina 541-447-1640 or www.snowflakeboutique.org

Craft Vendors: Spaces Avail.-BeeCrafty Holiday Show,11/9-10; Redmond Fairgrounds. 536-5655 or beecrafty@hotmail.com

Couch and Love Seat for Sale!!

Oversized & coffee color. 5 years old & good cond!! $400, Kelly, 541-318-0663

241

Bicycles & Accessories Bike trailer, Bob Yack, never used, $280 firm, 541-617-9260.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

Couch & loveseat, traditional, oak trim, very nice Mtn. Bike, Jamiz Full Suspension new $200. 541-595-2003 tires, & just tuned up, Call Classifieds at GENERATE SOME exexc. cond., $500 541-385-5809 citement in your OBO, 541-410-6242. www.bendbulletin.com neighborhood! Plan a 245 garage sale and don't forget to advertise in Golf Equipment FNAR, semi-auto .308, classified! $1200, please call 541-385-5809. Taylor Made Rocket 541-571-9833. Balls Irons, 4-Pitching Mattress and box wedge, $435, leave Howa 30-06, $300; Italsprings, dbl, $100. msg at 541-480-1014 ian coach gun 20 ga., 541-639-6656. $300 + 7 boxes ammo; 246 five game winches, NEED TO CANCEL never lift an animal in Guns, Hunting YOUR AD? your pickup again! At & Fishing The Bulletin my cost $220 each; Classifieds has an Leer canopy, missBrowning Midas Com- 8’ "After Hours" Line ing rear door, $250 pound Bow, many exCall 541-383-2371 541-480-1536 tras, soft case, new 24 hrs. to cancel arrows, hunt ready, HUNTERS in Silvies your ad! exc. cond., $250, Hunt Unit. Cabin in Refrigerator, Roper with 541-410-6242. the pines with runicemaker, exlnt cond, ning water and $200. 541-419-1317 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS amenities, green yard. Search the area’s most Tempurpedic mattress comprehensive listing of Or, looking for a private place to set up your topper, queen, new classified advertising... camp trailers? Mul$200. 541-639-6656. real estate to automotive, tiple night discounts. merchandise to sporting Call (541) 589-1130 Vacuum, Kirby, Gengoods. Bulletin Classifi eds View at eration 3, $80. appear every day in the www.elkridgecabin.com 541-639-6656 print or on line. People Look for Information Washer, Kenmore heavy Call 541-385-5809 duty, 7 yrs, exlnt cond, www.bendbulletin.com About Products and $200. 541-447-4078 Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds The Bulletin Browning Stalker S.S. Hunting rifles, with r ecommends extra 375 H&H $800. BAR scopes, 2 @ $375 ea. caution when pur7mm mag $700. Rem541-817-3954 chasing products or ington auto 243 $400. services from out of La Pine Sportsman 541-280-2815 the area. Sending Jamboree Gun-Knife cash, checks, or Where can you find a Archery-Coin credit information Collectible Show! helping hand? may be subjected to (Sponsored by La Pine FRAUD. For more From contractors to Senior Activity Ctr & information about an La Pine Park & Rec Dist) yard care, it’s all here advertiser, you may Exhibits, Antique & in The Bulletin’s call the Oregon Modern Firearms - Trade, State Attorney “Call A Service Swap, Sell or Buy! General’s Office Professional” Directory Sat 9/8, 9-5; Sun 9/9, 9-3 Consumer ProtecLaPine Parks&Rec Bldg tion hotline at (corner 1st & Morson) CASH!! 1-877-877-9392. Adults $5 ($4 w/trade gun) For Guns, Ammo & Children 12 & under free! Reloading Supplies. Call Andi, 541-536-6237 541-408-6900.

Lionhead mix baby bunnies, 4 @ $15 each. Full adult female Lionhead, $15. 541-548-0747 Yorkie-Maltese pups, 1 white female, $300, 1 white male, $250, 1 black & gold male, $250, Cash, 541-546-7909 Maltese Toy AKC, champ lines, extra small, 541-420-1577 Pit bull terrier puppy, Beautiful Purebred, 7 212 mo, neutered, all Antiques & shots. Great with small kids & cats! Collectibles $250, 541 306 8640 Collectible POODLE (TOY) PUPS Breyer horses, vintage from Well-socialized & lov1975-1980 + stables, able. 541-475-3889 541-948-9520 Queensland Heelers standard & mini,$150 & Skipper Doll, vintage up. 541-280-1537 http:// 1967 + some clothes/ rightwayranch.wordpress.com shoes, $25, 948-9520 Schnauzer Miniature The Bulletin reserves male puppy. Family the right to publish all raised, vaccinations & ads from The Bulletin groomed. $350. newspaper onto The 541-771-1830. Bulletin Internet webShiba Inu/Pom/Rat site. Terrier Puppies for sale. Asking $200 each. Call 541-977-7935. Shih-Tzu male puppy, Just bought a new boat? $300. Photos available. Sell your old one in the www.oregonshihtzu.com classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-788-0090 Whippet Puppies, 1st shots. Amazing pets. $350. 541-280-1975.

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Yorkie male 11 weeks, UTD. Will be on the Private collector buying big side. $400. Call postage stamp al541-280-2400. Redbums & collections, mond. Bottle raised. world-wide and U.S. He is very friendly and 573-286-4343 (local, sweet. cell #)

Upright studio piano, ‘30s Weatherby 7mm Mags vintage, great cond, just (2), 1 left hand, 1 right tuned $700 541-815-5029 hand,scope,slink, case, exc. new cond., $1095 Find exactly what each 541-593-8294. you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Win Model 70 LightLEARN TO SHOOT weight, RMEF SponLIKE THE COPS sor Rifle, 30.06 cal., plus UTAH Permit 260 Nikon 3-9 Variable class. $99. Sisters, Misc. Items scope, bore sighted, 1 p.m. Sun. Sept. 9. but never fired, $700, Call 817-789-5395 incl. 1 box premium Bend’s Indoor Swap www.reacttrainingsysshells, 541-410-6242 Meet - A Mini-Mall full tems.com of Treasures! 248 3rd St. & Wilson Ave. Male black hunting Lab 10-5 Thurs-Fri-Sat. Health & looking for AKC female to breed. My lab is Beauty Items Buying Diamonds pointing, hi-power, hand /Gold for Cash signals, AKC pending, Over 30 Million Women Saxon’s Fine Jewelers good hunter. Let’s talk! Suffer From Hair 541-389-6655 541-408-4528 Loss! Do you? If So We Have a Solution! BUYING OREGON’S LARGEST CALL KERANIQUE Lionel/American Flyer GUN & KNIFE SHOW TO FIND OUT MORE trains, accessories. Sept. 8 & 9 877-475-2521. 541-408-2191. Sat. 9-6 • Sun. 9-4 (PNDC) ADM: $9 BUYING & SELLING Portland Expo Center 255 All gold jewelry, silver I-5 Exit 306B and gold coins, bars, Computers For Info: 503-363-9564 rounds, wedding sets, www.wesknodelgunclass rings, sterling silTHE BULLETIN reshows.com ver, coin collect, vinquires computer adtage watches, dental Remington 243 788 carvertisers with multiple gold. Bill Fleming, bine, scope, sling, nice! ad schedules or those 541-382-9419. $500. 541-788-8137 selling multiple systems/ software, to disCOWGIRL CASH Remington 521T .22 w/ close the name of the Weaver K4 scope,$100 business or the term We pay cash for boots, buckles, jewelry & Tasco 6x24x42 scope, "dealer" in their ads. more! 924 Brooks St. $50, 541-548-3610. Private party advertis541-678-5162 ers are defined as Remington 721, 300 those who sell one www.getcowgirlcash.com H&H $695. computer. GENERATE SOME 541-548-4774 EXCITEMENT 256 IN YOUR Ruger, M77 30.06, w/ Photography NEIGBORHOOD. 3x9 Leupold Vari-X II, Plan a garage sale and $400, 541-548-3610 75 mm Minolta XG7 w/ don't forget to adver50 & 200 mm lenses, tise in classified! Taurus Model 66, w/flash & tripod. $160. 541-385-5809. stainless 3”,.357, NIB, Larry 541-706-1051 wood grips, $400, GET FREE OF CREDIT Norm, 541-318-1619 257 CARD DEBT NOW! Cut payments by up Musical Instruments Wanted: Collector to half. Stop creditors seeks high quality from calling. Crate Electra Guitar, w/ fishing items. 866-775-9621. Call 541-678-5753, or amplifier, $75, 503-351-2746 (PNDC) 541-593-4398.

Advertise with a full-color photo in The Bulletin Classifieds and online.

Estate Auction

52890 Lowell Way, LaPine, OR Sat., Sept. 8, 2012 Preview at 9:00 am, Auction at 11:00 am

Complete Estate to be sold. Items include numerous aviation pictures, signed Eagle of Columbia print, 2005 Ford 500, 14 ft. aluminum boat with Mercury outboard, Winchester model 94 30/30 #AG16055, #LL14657, #98L29, Marlin .22 with Bushnell scope, handcrafted 12 drawer dresser, antique rocker, 6 drawer tall chest, lithographs, signed watercolors, entertainment center, 5 drawer high boy chest, 5 drawer dresser w/night stands, Western decor, native American decor, Duncan Fife table, Winchester mirror, wine cabinet, liquor cabinet with false bottom, teak silverware cabinet, Noritake silverware for 8 from Korean war, bone dominoes, handcrafted kitchen island, trailer w/rough cut pine, 2007 10,000 lb. capacity tandem axle trailer, lumber pile, two cords of seasoned oak firewood, hand tools, wood working tools, radial arm saw, Dewalt power planer, propane tanks, enamelware, Senco/Craftsman nail and finish gun, Wagner airless paint sprayer, pressure washer, Honda generator, 295 amp welder, shop vac, ATV mounted 25 gallon sprayer, yard decor, handcrafted benches, flower pots and much more!

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F2 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

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Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines

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OVER $500 in total merchandise

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4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

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(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

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Estate Sales

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

HESTATE SALE H

Home full of beatiful antiques from 92 year old! Two Victorian parlor sets, other furniture, all kinds of glass and china, Lladros silver, jewelry, furs, pictures, china cabinet, curio, plus regular household items, garage and more 532 S. Pine Meadow off Hood in Sisters

HH FREE HH

Garage Sale Kit

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

Fri. & Sat. 9-4;

crowd control numbers PICK UP YOUR Fri. at 8 a.m. GARAGE SALE KIT at 1777 SW Chandler www.atticestatesanAve., Bend, OR 97702 dappraisals.com Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 Estate Sale - Sat 8-4pm Furniture, TV'S, Re- Garage Sale: Sat.-Sun. fridge, household 9-3, 1303 NE Thompitems 3337 NE Crysson, furniture, LOTS tal Springs Dr. Bend of unique collectibles. Look What I Found! HUGE Downsizing Sale You'll find a little bit of Sept. 7th & 8th, 7 am. everything in Years of collecting, The Bulletin's daily Great stuff for everygarage and yard sale one! FREE Cookies, section. From clothes 20660 Boulderfield. to collectibles, from housewares to hard- Mega Sale: See Craig’s ware, classified is List, Fri. & Sat., 8-4, always the first stop for Furniture, decor,more! cost-conscious 63565 Hughes Rd. consumers. And if you're planning your Moving Sale own garage or yard Fri. & Sat, 9 to 4, sale, look to the clas3155 NE Nathan Dr. sifieds to bring in the 541-948-3670 buyers. You won't find NO EARLY BIRDS a better place for bargains! Call Classifieds: SALE 9/7-9/8, 10 to 4. 541-385-5809 or 63217 Logan Ave, email Tools, Gaming equip, classified@bendbulletin.com PS3, DVDs, Guitar, decor,snowboard/skis, 282 Tents, Books, AppliSales Northwest Bend ances. 541-388-1780

Crooked River Ranch Homeowners’ Yard Sale Over 40 homes! Maps at CRR. Sept. 7-8-9, 8-4

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Misc. Items

Fuel & Wood

MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year MoneyBack Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877-357-5647. (PNDC) Minora, cast iron, $40. 541-639-6656.

Large Garage Sale: Fri., Moving Boxes, 4 sizes, 200 total, cost $300, Sat., Sun, 9-5, 5888 Asking $100 OBO. NW Zamia, men’s & 541-306-4181 women’s clothes, all household, tools colThe Bulletin Offers lectibles, ATV, travel Free Private Party Ads trailer, many special • 3 lines - 3 days treasures. • Private Party Only • Total of items adverNeed to get an tised must equal $200 or Less ad in ASAP? • Limit 1 ad per month You can place it • 3-ad limit for same online at: item advertised within 3 months www.bendbulletin.com Call 541-385-5809 Fax 541-385-5802 541-385-5809 Wilson Leather Jacket, Multi-family Garage Sale! zip in liner, XXL. Fri & Sat, 8-6, 2340 NW $175. 541-706-1051 Antler Ct. Boys & girls clothes in excellent cond, 261 pool table, side x side Medical Equipment fridge, kitchen items, X-box games, knickknacks, tools, lawn- ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. mower, and furniture! Get a FREE talking SATURDAY ONLY 9-5 meter and diabetic 305 SW 11th. Tons of testing supplies at NO clothes - many brand COST, plus FREE name & like new, home delivery! Best plus miscellaneous. of all, this meter eliminates painful finger Call a Pro pricking! Call 888-739-7199. Whether you need a (PNDC) fence fixed, hedges Golden Power Wheeltrimmed or a house chair, like new, bright built, you’ll find red, exc. cond., used only 3 mo, orig. professional help in $3500, sacrifice at The Bulletin’s “Call a $2000, 541-848-7755 Service Professional” or 541-948-7518. or dorene@quailbend.com Directory Lift Recliner Chair, w/ 541-385-5809 attached remote control, taupe color, exc. 292 cond., used 1 yr., Sales Other Areas $1000 new, now $400,541-848-7755 or 232 SW Meadowlakes 541-948-7518. or Dr., Prineville. Tools, dorene@quailbend.com power equipment, hardwood lumber, fish- Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring gear, women’s stuff. Thurs-Fri-Sat, 8-5. ing. FREE Equipment. 541-815-0665 FREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. Antiques, furn, clothes, $29.95/Month CALL tools, guns, potted trees, Medical Guardian Tohousehold items, scafday 888-842-0760. folding, 3 trailers, etc. (PNDC) Fri-Sat, 8-4, 8385 SW Copley Rd, Powell Butte. 263

Awbrey Butte, Moving Yard/Estate Sale! Snowsale, Fri. & Sat., 8-3, blower, engine parts, 3381 NW Panoramic men’s suits, women’s Dr. Mini fridge, skill dress clothes, lots of saw, household items, household items. On alglassware, dishes & ley off Eagle Rd, betons of misc. tween Oakview & Beal Roads, Sat 9/8, 8-4; Sun Estate Sale, Fri-Sat 9/9, 8-12 noon. 9/7-8, 8am-3pm. Furn, W/D, desk, much more! 288 931 NW Milwaukie. Sales Southeast Bend Fri.-Sat. 8-3, 1630 NW 11th St, antiques, de2 FAMILY SALE!! Get your signer clothes, books, 911 SE Polaris Ct. art, children’s, decor. business Sat. & Sun, 8-5. A lot of quality items! Giant 3-Family Garage Sale! Furniture, elec- First Ever Fri. Only, 9-4, GROW tronics, jewelry, books, 2256 SE Velocette Ln, clothes, music, toys, Motorcycle, generator, with an ad in tools, etc. Sat 9/8 & Sun tools, furniture, col9/9, 9am-1pm 950 NW The Bulletin’s lectibles, books, Yosemite Dr (off Mt. household items, wo“Call A Service Washington Dr.) in Awmens clothes; sizes brey Park. No early birds Professional” 2-4, toys & more. Directory Large Multi-Family & Neighborhood Yard Huge Craft Supplies Sale! Everything Must GARAGE SALE Sale. Get ready for 61258 Mt Vista Drive Go! Furniture, householiday bazaars. FloSaturday, Sept. 8th hold items, artwork, 8:00 am - 3:00 pm ral, fabric & more. Fri. area rugs, antiques, Antique gas generator, & Sat., 9:30-4, 18238 etc. 1142 NW KnoxElectric dryer, Propane Fadjur Ln., Sisters. ville, Fri 8-4, Sat. 8-3. Camp Oven/Range, MultiIndoor-Outdoor Computer desk/Enter284 Family Sale! Fri-Sat, tainment Center, Chain Sales Southwest Bend Sept. 7-8, 8am-5pm, saw, tent, Riot Slice 2565 SW Bear Dr., MaWhitewater kayak. Huge Moving Sale: Fri.dras. Desk, file cabinet, Sat.8-3:30,18973 Baker tires, area rugs, furniRd, a large variety of Garage Sale, Sat. & ture, household items, items, clothes & more Sun., 8-3, 61357 linens, bedding, vanity Keelally Ct., Don’t cabinet, portable 12-volt Multi-Family Sale! 61451 3000-lb winch, mechanmiss! Rock Bluff Lane, Fri-Sat, creeper, fishing gear, 9-3. Dressers, tables & Garage Sale: Sat.-Sun., ics horse tack, Schwinn chairs, furniture, house8-4, 20139 Veryl Ct, bike, collectibles, Savhold misc., lots of stuff! Golfside mobile park, age 308, Remington exercise equip., can- 700, 30-06, ammo & SALE! 8AM - 2PM SAT ning supplies, camp much more! Sept 8, 19530 Meadstove, pwr. tools, Moving Sale: Fri. & Sat. owbrook Dr. camping, household & clothes. toddler, guitar, yakima 8-4, 69900 Holmes Rd, Beautiful teak patio set, 286 290 custom carriage door Sales Northeast Bend Sales Redmond Area w/opener, LaserDiscs & player & many Community Sale - Sat., Big Sale! China hutch, unique items! 9-3, 2755 NE Boyd 2 recliners, computer Acres Rd. Items ga- desk, mirror, coffee pots Multi-Family Sale - Fri.lore, loads of stuff! Sat. 9-4, large variety, & dishes, gas heater, Corner of Boyd Acres good stuff,69200 Lariat lots more! Fri-Sat, 8-5, 837 SW 26th Ct. & Butler Market. (Tollgate Sub) Sisters.

ING

Tools Delta 10” tablesaw, $350. Grizzly ½” drill press, $100. Lathe tools, $45. 541-815-0665 Just too many collectibles? Sell them in The Bulletin Classifieds

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Farm Market

300 325

Hay, Grain & Feed Premium 1st cutting Orchard Grass hay, shed stored, 70-lb bales, $225/ton. Call Ten Barr Ranch, 541-389-1165 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171 Wheat straw, small 50-lb bales, in stack, $1.00 ea. 541-546-9821 341

Dry Juniper Firewood $225 per cord, split. 1/2 cords available. Immediate delivery! 541-408-6193 Dry Lodgepole: $175 cord rounds; $210 cord split.1½ Cord Minimum 37 yrs service to Cent. Ore. 541-350-2859 269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training

Horses & Equipment

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if quali345 fied - Housing availLivestock & Equipment able. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC)

Mini ponies, mares and studs, $250 and up. 541-923-3530.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.c om (PNDC)

1977 14' Blake Trailer, refurbished by Frenchglen BlackBarkTurfSoil.com smiths, a Classy ClasInstant Landscaping Co. sic. Great design for PROMPT DELIVERY multiple uses. Over541-389-9663 head tack box (bunkhouse) with side and easy pickup bed acFor newspaper cess; manger with left side access, windows delivery, call the and head divider. Toyo Circulation Dept. at TRUCK SCHOOL radial tires & spare; 541-385-5800 www.IITR.net new floor with mats; To place an ad, call Redmond Campus center partition panel; 541-385-5809 Student Loans/Job bed liner coated in key or email Waiting Toll Free classified@bendbulletin.com areas, 6.5 K torsion 1-888-387-9252 axles with electric brakes, and new paint, $7500 OBO! Call Take care of John at 541-589-0777. your investments McPheeters Turf Fall 383 Nursery Sale: Trees with the help from & Shrubs Only, Sept. Produce & Food The Bulletin’s 7th-15th, closed Sun. Cash & Check Only. THOMAS ORCHARDS “Call A Service All Sales Final. Kimberly, OR Professional” Directory 541-546-9081 U-Pick & Ready Picked: Freestone Canning SUPER TOP SOIL 454 peaches: Suncrest, Lorwww.hersheysoilandbark.com ing, Elberta, Angelus, Looking for Employment Screened, soil & compost mixed, no Necarines, Plums, BarPears, Gala Apples Experienced couple rocks/clods. High hu- tlett BRING CONTAINERS avail. for housesitting mus level, exc. for Open 7 days a week Oct. 1. 541-410-4794 flower beds, lawns, 8am-6 pm only gardens, straight 541-934-2870. screened top soil. Visit us on Facebook In Home Care Service, 10 yrs exp. w/ the latBark. Clean fill. Defor updates est training offered by liver/you haul. Also we are at Bend the state of Oregon. If 541-548-3949. Farmer’s Mkt at Drake you need care in your Park & St. Charles home for you or a 270 loved one, call Kathy Good classified ads tell Lost & Found Cooper 541-410-9872 the essential facts in an (Prefer Sisters Area) Found mens wedding interesting Manner. Write ring on golf course. from the readers view - not 476 Call to describe. the seller’s. Convert the Employment 541-359-9197 facts into benefits. Show Opportunities the reader how the item will Found Set of Car Keys, help them in some way. Bend or LaPine, for Banking Volvo, sometime in Aug., 541-771-1832

Data Center Network Technicians Facebook is hiring! We’re seeking a highly motivated Data Center Network Technician to help us build a world-class facility at our Prineville, Oregon location. The ideal candidate will have 3+ years’ experience in data center network deployment, strong troubleshooting skills, a solid understanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 network switching/routing, and experience in configuring and supporting Cisco, Juniper, and F5 devices. For more information please visit our careers page https://www.facebook.com/career or email ristine@fb.com. Community Sports Reporter A 102-year-old weekly published in the high desert paradise of Central Oregon, is looking for a reporter with a passion for high school and community sports, with the ability to be adept at both feature writing and game coverage. The ideal candidate will be accurate, stay on deadline and go beyond the scoreboard to find the story. Applicants should be creative, energetic and innovative, both in print and online. The job includes both feature and game stories, sports agate, and the ability to manage coverage of multiple sport and recreational subjects and a network of sources. The position will also require occasional editing tasks and the creation of regular news and business features. Candidates with photography and social media skills will rise to the top of the list. Prior experience or recent journalism students only. All hiring is contingent on passing a drug test. To apply, send a cover letter, resume and clips by mail to: Box 20194605, c/o Western Communications, Inc., PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Equal opportunity employer. SOCIAL SERVICES

Central Oregon Veterans Outreach Job Announcements

Central Oregon Veterans Outreach (COVO) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit which advocates for veterans of all generations. COVO is seeking dynamic leadership to run its expanding programs and to lead two major components of its operations. Veteran status is preferred although not a technical job requirement.

Executive Director

COVO has grown from an organization with an annual budget of $140,000 annually and two employees to more than $500,000 and 11 employees. The successful applicant will be an individual capable of managing change and consolidating COVO’s operations, the ability to forge and maintain community relationships at the local, state and national level, manage major grants with federal agencies and oversee the operations of a dynamic and fast-paced organization. Salary range: $35,000 - $45,000.

Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program Manager

COVO has received a $230,000 grant from the Veterans Administration to provide supportive Found set of Keys in services for homeless veteran families in Central early August, near Oregon. Duties include outreach to communities Meerkat, Call to idenRouter, Craftsman, 1.5 and agencies throughout Central Oregon to loWe are excited to tify. 541-382-5772 hp, $30, cate and enroll eligible families, conduct case announce an availFIND YOUR FUTURE management of participants, ensuring VA grant 541-593-4398 able position in Injured bicycle found HOME IN THE BULLETIN requirements and timelines are met and managBend, Oregon. 265 tied to a tree. Old ing two employees. Salary Range: $33,000 Branch Supervisor Your future is just a page Bend-Redmond Hwy $37,000. Building Materials Salary Range: away. Whether you’re looking and 93rd St., Call to $ 29,000 - $40,000 for a hat or a place to hang it, ID 541-312-8955 Homeless Veterans Reintegration La Pine Habitat EOE. The Bulletin Classified is RESTORE Program Manager For more details, your best source. Lost: 8/29, Blue Surf-Tec Building Supply Resale COVO is in the second year of a $195,000 Deplease apply online: stand up paddle board, Quality at Every day thousands of partment of Labor grant to provide job training www.sofcu.com corner of Columbia & buyers and sellers of goods LOW PRICES services for eligible homeless veterans. Duties Shevlin Hixon Dr., and services do business in include outreach to communities, agencies and 52684 Hwy 97 541-610-4086 Caregiver – All Shifts employers throughout Central Oregon to locate 541-536-3234 these pages. They know avail. Apply in person. and enroll eligible veterans, oversee developOpen to the public . Lost Siamese cat near you can’t beat The Bulletin Interviews this week. ment and implementation of individual employClassified Section for COCC. She’s a Seal Prineville Habitat 1099 NE Watt Way, ment plans for participants, ensure that DOL selection and convenience Point with blue eyes ReStore grant requirements are met and managing two Bend. - every item is just a phone and white feet. $100 Building Supply Resale employees. Salary Range: $33,000 - $37,000. call away. reward if found call. 1427 NW Murphy Ct. DO YOU NEED 541-306-3078. The Classified Section is 541-447-6934 Email covo.org@gmail.com to request a job apA GREAT easy to use. Every item Open to the public. plication and job description for each of these poREMEMBER: If you EMPLOYEE is categorized and every sitions or call (541) 383-2793. Window, Milgard 4’x6’, have lost an animal, RIGHT NOW? cartegory is indexed on the new, $85, call don't forget to check Call The Bulletin Applications for these 3 positions will be acsection’s front page. 541-593-4398. The Humane Society cepted until 5 p.m., Tuesday, September 11, before 11 a.m. and in Bend 541-382-3537 Whether you are looking for 2012. Applicants must submit a cover letter idenget an ad in to pub266 a home or need a service, Redmond, tifying which position is being applied for and why lish the next day! your future is in the pages of 541-923-0882 Heating & Stoves they should be selected, a resume and a com541-385-5809. The Bulletin Classifi ed. Prineville, pleted job application. Applications may be VIEW the 541-447-7178; Wanted! emailed to covo.org@gmail.com or mailed or Classifieds at: Pellet stove OR Craft Cats, hand-delivered to COVO’s offices at 117 NW www.bendbulletin.com 541-382-4144 541-389-8420. LaFayette Avenue, Bend, OR 97701.

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 476

476

476

573

634

671

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Business Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

Relief Pharmacist (Part -time)

RN Partners In Care Home Health and Hospice is seeking applicants for a full-time RN to respond to the needs of our hospice and home health patients Monday through Friday nights / 5pm – 8am. Hospice experience preferred. Applicants MUST have a current Oregon RN license. This is a benefits eligible position that includes shift pay differential for working night time hours. Qualified candidates are asked to submit a resume to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend OR 97701 Attn: HR, or via email to HR@partnersbend. org. to HR@partnersbend.org.

Field Service

Hoffmeyer Co. is seeking an energetic person for long-term employment, Will assist with conveyor belting installs, shipping, receiving, customer service. Job requires flexible work schedule including nights & weekends; some overnight travel. No experience required; will train. ODL REQUIRED. $9-$12/ hr. Application necessary. Please apply in person: 20575 Painters Ct., Bend, OR. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Medical/ OR Nurse

Full-Time, 4-10 hr. shifts, Mon.-Fri. Applicant must have scrub and circulating experience. Job offers excellent benefit package. Interested persons should email their resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Open until filled.

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

personals Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now: 877-955-5505. (PNDC)

C&K Express, LLC is a family and employee owned company based in Brookings, Oregon. We are currently recruiting for a Part-time Pharmacist for our Pharmacy Express location in Redmond, OR. Applicant must have a current OBOP license in good standing. This position is responsible for providing pharmaceutical care to patients in the community while assisting with all aspects of daily operations. Competitive pay. Information is available on our website www.ckmarket.com. Must pass drug test and background check. If interested, email resume and application to jobs@ckmarket.com or fax to 541-412-0002. EOE Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. Resort Housekeeping The Pines at Sunriver, call 541-593-2160.

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today!

CALL A SERVICE PROFESSIONAL Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service

Building/Contracting

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Debris Removal

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial •Sprinkler Repair •Sprinkler Installation •Back Flow Testing •Fire Prevention, Lot Clearing •Fall Clean up •Weekly Mowing •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts Reserving spots for sprinkler winterization & snow removal Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Serving Central Oregon Residential BANK TURNED YOU For Salvage. Also & Commercial DOWN? Private party Cleanups & Cleanouts •Sprinkler Repair will loan on real esMel, 541-389-8107 tate equity. Credit, no •Sprinkler problem, good equity Installation Handyman is all you need. Call •Back Flow Testing now. Oregon Land •Fire Prevention, ERIC REEVE HANDY Mortgage 388-4200. Lot Clearing SERVICES. Home & • Summer Clean up Ever Consider a ReCommercial Repairs, •Weekly Mowing Carpentry-Painting, verse Mortgage? At •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Pressure-washing, least 62 years old? Maintenance Honey Do's. On-time Stay in your home & promise. Senior increase cash flow! •Flower Bed Clean Up Discount. Work guarSafe & Effective! Call •Bark, Rock, Etc. anteed. 541-389-3361 Now for your FREE •Senior Discounts JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels Honest, guaranteed work. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Home Improvement

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classified

Kelly Kerfoot Const.

541-385-5809

Quality & honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal.

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

28 yrs exp in Central OR!

Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Licensed/bonded/insured 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

Landscaping/Yard Care NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Landscape Construction which includes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-features, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Aeration/Fall Clean-up BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714

DVD! Call 888-785-5938. (PNDC)

Now

LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716 Call to learn more.

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending NMLS98161

Independent Contractor

A Classified ad is an Call for Specials! EASY WAY TO Limited numbers avail. 2 bdrm, 1 bath, wood REACH over 3 million 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. stove, fridge, w/d. Pacific NorthwesternW/D hookups, patios SW Bend, $675 RENTALS 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage ers. $525/25-word or decks. month, $725 deposit. 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 603 - Rental Alternatives classified ad in 30 MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-382-8244 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent daily newspapers for 604 - Storage Rentals 541-383-9313 675 3-days. Call the PaProfessionally REAL ESTATE 605 - Roommate Wanted cific Northwest Daily managed by Norris & RV Parking 616 - Want To Rent 705 - Real Estate Services Connection (916) Stevens, Inc. 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 713 - Real Estate Wanted 288-6019 or email Don’t rent when you 642 719 - Real Estate Trades elizabeth@cnpa.com can own! 48’x14’ Ga- 630 - Rooms for Rent Apt./Multiplex Redmond rajMahal, pvt upgraded 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent for more info (PNDC) 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings Advertise VACATION Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, RV storage suite w/pro- 632 - Apt./Multiplex General fessionally installed ex732 - Commercial Properties for Sale SPECIALS to 3 mil1260 sq.ft., 1 story, ga- poxy floor, 30 & 50-amp 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend lion Pacific North738 - Multiplexes for Sale rage w/opener, fenced pwr, 12’x14’ door, elect. 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend westerners! 30 daily yard, RV/Boat parking, opener w/outside key- 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale newspapers, six fridge, dishwasher, mi- pad, RV dump, gas heat, 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 744 - Open Houses states. 25-word clascro, walk-in laundry, security gate access, 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 745 - Homes for Sale sified $525 for a 3-day W/S/G paid, front gard- owners’ clubhouse, 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 746 - Northwest Bend Homes ad. Call (916) ner paid, $775+dep., $59,500. 541-480-7837 288-6019 or visit 541-604-0338 648 - Houses for Rent General 747 - Southwest Bend Homes www.pnna.com/advert 693 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 648 ising_pndc.cfm for the Office/Retail Space 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 749 - Southeast Bend Homes Pacific Northwest Houses for for Rent 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 750 - Redmond Homes Daily Connection. Rent General 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 753 - Sisters Homes (PNDC) Office space, high vis- 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes PUBLISHER'S Extreme Value Adveribility on Highland Ave. NOTICE 756 - Jefferson County Homes tising! 30 Daily newsin Redmond. $425 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver All real estate adverpapers $525/25-word 757 - Crook County Homes mo., incl. W/S/G, call 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine tising in this newspaclassified, 3-days. 541-419-1917. 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 762 - Homes with Acreage per is subject to the Reach 3 million Pa662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 763 - Recreational Homes and Property Fair Housing Act cific Northwesterners. 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 764 - Farms and Ranches which makes it illegal For more information Real Estate to advertise "any 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 771 - Lots call (916) 288-6019 or preference, limitation email: For Sale 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 773 - Acreages or discrimination elizabeth@cnpa.com 675 - RV Parking 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes based on race, color, for the Pacific North676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land religion, sex, handiwest Daily Conneccap, familial status, tion. (PNDC) 860 870 marital status or naSOCIAL SECURITY Motorcycles & Accessories Boats & Accessories tional origin, or an inDISABILITY BENBoats & RV’s tention to make any 732 EFITS. WIN or Pay such preference, Nothing! Start Your Commercial/Investment Softail Deluxe limitation or discrimiApplication In Under Properties for Sale nation." Familial sta2010, 805 miles, 60 Seconds. Call Totus includes children Black Chameleon. day! Contact Disabilunder the age of 18 Existing & operating $17,000 ity Group, Inc. Lisports bar in Burns, OR. living with parents or Call Don @ 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 censed Attorneys & legal custodians, My loss, your gain! P & L 541-410-3823 Volvo Penta, 270HP, BBB Accredited. Call 860 pregnant women, and in the plus. Call Krysta, low hrs., must see, 888-782-4075. people securing cus- 619-866-1415, for info. Motorcycles & Accessories $15,000, 541-330-3939 (PNDC) Suzuki Blvd, 2006, less tody of children under 744 than 6K miles, exc cond, 18. This newspaper 18.5’ Bayliner 185 CRAMPED FOR Looking for your $3895 obo 541-410-7075 Open Houses will not knowingly ac2008. 3.0L, open bow, CASH? next employee? cept any advertising slim deck, custom 865 Use classified to sell Place a Bulletin help for real estate which is Open Sat. & Sun. 10-3 cover & trailer, exc. those items you no wanted ad today and ATVs 19426 Cartmill Dr., in violation of the law. cond., 30-35 total hrs., longer need. reach over 60,000 Bend • $925,000. Our readers are incl. 4 life vests, Call 541-385-5809 readers each week. hereby informed that ropes, anchor, stereo, Your classified ad all dwellings adverdepth finder, $12,000, will also appear on tised in this newspa541-729-9860. bendbulletin.com per are available on Harley Davidson Softwhich currently rean equal opportunity Tail Deluxe 2007, ceives over 1.5 milbasis. To complain of white/cobalt, w/pas- Honda TRX300 EX 2005 lion page views discrimination call Spectacular 4,362 +/20.5’ 2004 Bayliner senger kit, Vance & sport quad w/Rev, runs every month at sq.ft. view home on HUD toll-free at 205 Run About, 220 Hines muffler system & rides great, new pipe & no extra cost. the Westside of Bend 1-800-877-0246. The HP, V8, open bow, & kit, 1045 mi., exc. paddles incl. $1700 obo. Bulletin Classifieds overlooking Tetherow toll free telephone exc. cond., very fast cond, $19,999, 541-647-8931 Get Results! Call and Broken Top Golf number for the hearw/very low hours, 541-389-9188. Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI 385-5809 or place Courses, Cascade ing impaired is lots of extras incl. 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ your ad on-line at mtn range, 3 bdrm/3.5 1-800-927-9275. Harley Heritage tower, Bimini & 4WD, black w/EPS, bendbulletin.com bath, 3 car garage. Softail, 2003 Crooked River Ranch, custom trailer, fuel injection, indepenToo many amenities $5,000+ in extras, 1350 sq.ft. ranch home, $19,500. dent rear suspension to list. FSBO $2000 paint job, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. 541-389-1413 winch w/handle conDirections: Follow the 30K mi. 1 owner, garage, cement patio, trols & remote, ps, signs. Century Dr. to For more information mtn. views, no smokRentals auto, large racks, exc. E. Campbell, go please call ing, 1 small pet neg., cond., $7850, Need help fixing stuff? straight on Kemple, 541-385-8090 $795, 541-548-4225. Call A Service Professional 541-322-0215 turn right on Cartmill. or 209-605-5537 find the help you need. Rented your propFirst on the Hill area. www.bendbulletin.com erty? The Bulletin Casey & Kim Jones, Classifieds HD FAT BOY 541-419-9766 has an "After Hours" 1996 541-419-1243 Line. Call Completely rebuilt/ 605 541-383-2371 24 customized, low Have an item to Roommate Wanted Yamaha Kodiak 400, 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyhours to miles. Accepting ofder 1989 H.O. 302, sell quick? 2005 4x4, 2500 lb winch, cancel your ad! fers. 541-548-4807 285 hrs., exc. cond., gun rack & alum loading Roommate needed, avail. If it’s under stored indoors for 650 ramp, only 542 miles, 9/15. Own bath, quiet $ life $11,900 OBO. HD Screaming Eagle show room cond, $4800. duplex, $350 mo., $200 500 you can place it in Houses for Rent 541-379-3530 Electra Glide 2005, 541-280-9401 dep.+½ util., internet NE Bend The Bulletin 103” motor, two tone incl. 541-728-5731. 870 candy teal, new tires, Classifieds for: Ads published in the Roommate wanted, male 3 bedroom 2 bath, plus 23K miles, CD player, Boats & Accessories "Boats" classification or female, call Jennifer, office, 3-car garage. $ hydraulic clutch, exinclude: Speed, fish10 - 3 lines, 7 days 541-876-5106 La Pine $1500/mo., available cellent condition. ing, drift, canoe, $ for lease Sept. 10th. 17’ 1984 Chris Craft 16 - 3 lines, 14 days Highest offer takes it. 630 house and sail boats. 541-317-9341 - Scorpion, 140 HP (Private Party ads only) 541-480-8080. For all other types of Rooms for Rent inboard/outboard, 2 4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq watercraft, please see depth finders, trollHonda Elite 80 2001, Class 875. Mt. Bachelor Motel has ft, appls, fenced yd, on Open Sat & Sun 12-4 ing motor, full cover, 1400 mi., absolutely Newport Landing 541-385-5809 rooms, starting $150/ culdesac. No smoking. EZ Load trailer, like new., comes w/ Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo Bends Newest Westweek or $35/nt. Incl $3500 OBO. carrying rack for 2” near hospital. side neighborhood! guest laundry, cable & Ct., 541-382-3728. receiver, ideal for use $1050. 503-680-9590 1800 NW Element WiFi. 541-382-6365 w/motorhome, $995, GENERATE SOME exQuiet 2-1/2 bath, 2 bed- 8 Floor Plans to choose 541-546-6920 Studios & Kitchenettes from! Tour one today. citement in your neigroom Duplex.Fire17’ Seaswirl 1988 Furnished room, TV w/ Karen Malanga, borhood. Plan a gaplace, single car gaHonda Valkyrie 2001, open bow, rebuilt cable, micro & fridge. Broker rage sale and don't rage, water & $7000; Kawasaki Chevy V6 engine, Utils & linens. New 541-390-3326 forget to advertise in landscaping paid. KLR650 2008, $4500; owners.$145-$165/wk new upholstery, classified! 385-5809. $725/mo. with $1000 Hasson Co. Realtors Kawasaki Ninja 250 541-382-1885 $4500 or best offer. security. No smoking/ 2007, $2500, all in exc. 707-688-4523 745 631 pets. 541 460-3010 cond., 541-388-1699. Homes for Sale Condo/Townhomes When buying a home, 83% of Central for Rent 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, Oregonians turn to 4-car, corner, .83 acre Next to Pilot Butte Park mtn view, by owner. 1962 NE Sams Lp. #2 $590,000 541-390-0886 2 master bdrms each w/ See: bloomkey.com/8779 2 full baths, + ½ bath Call 541-385-5809 to BANK OWNED HOMES! downstairs. Fully appl’d place your FREE List w/Pics! kitchen, gas fireplace, Real Estate ad. www.BendRepos.com deck, garage w/opener. Look at: bend and beyond real estate $725/mo. + $725 dep; 20967 yeoman, bend or Bendhomes.com incl. w/s/yard care, no pets. Call Jim or Do- for Complete Listings of 750 lores, 541-389-3761 or Area Real Estate for Sale Redmond Homes 541-408-0260 (Jim is licensed real estate brkr.) 652 Looking for your next Houses for Rent TURN THE PAGE employee? NW Bend For More Ads Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and The Bulletin Clean, quiet 2 bdrm, reach over 60,000 nice yard, $800 mo. + readers each week. 634 last + dep. lease. No Your classified ad pets. Local reference. Apt./Multiplex NE Bend will also appear on 1977 NW 2nd. bendbulletin.com CHECK OUT THIS 663 which currently reHOT DEAL! ceives over Houses for Rent $299 1st month’s rent! * 1.5 million page Madras 2 bdrm, 1 bath views every month $530 & 540 at no extra cost. 3 bedroom, 1 bath, wood Carports & A/C incl! Bulletin Classifieds stove, possible garage, Fox Hollow Apts. Get Results! greenhouse, lots of (541) 383-3152 Call 385-5809 or Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co ground, $500 mo. Call place your ad on-line 541-475-3519 *Upstairs only with lease* at bendbulletin.com

700

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H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

Holmes Landscape Maint

& Call Today &

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 Pet Services

Gentle Giant Animal Care

Central Oregon Best in-home animal care service. Going on vacation? We provide compassionate and loving in-home animal care. Make it a vacation for your pet too! Call today!

Tamron Stone 541-215-5372

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 F3

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville, Sunriver/La Pine H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes Ranch-style 3 bdrm, 2 bath, open floorplan, DRRH area, ½ ac., adjoining ½ ac. view lot can be purchased separately. 509-585-9050. 773

Acreages Powell Butte 6 acres, 360 views, great horse property, 10223 Houston Lake Rd. $99,900. 541-350-4684 775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

FACTORY SPECIAL

New Home, 3 bdrm,1026 sq.ft., $46,900 finished on your site,541.548.5511 www.JandMHomes.com

www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809


F4 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

932

935

975

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Antique & Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Executive Hangar

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

870

880

882

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 875

Watercraft 2007 SeaDoo 2004 Waverunner, excellent condition, LOW hours. Double trailer, lots of extras.

$10,000 541-719-8444 The Bulletin

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Eddyline carbonlite Sky 10 Kayak and roller roof rack, like new. $895 OBO. 541-420-3277.

Immaculate!

Beaver Coach Marquis 40’ 1987. New cover, new paint (2004), new inverter (2007). Onan 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, parked covered $35,000 obo. 541-419-9859 or 541-280-2014

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 slides, no smokers or pets, limited usage, 5500 watt Onan gen, solar panel, fireplace, Econoline National Sea Breeze trailer 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, dual A/C, central vac, 16-Ton 29’ Bed, elect. awning w/sun2 power slides, upw/fold up ramps, elec. screen arctic pkg, rear graded queen matbrakes, Pintlehitch, receiver, alum wheels, 2 tress, hyd. leveling $4900, 541-548-6812 TVs, many extras. system, rear camera $35,500. 541-416-8087 & monitor, only 6k mi. Reduced to $41,300! 541-480-0617

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp MONTANA 3585 2008, pump, 4-3" hoses, exc. cond., 3 slides, camlocks, $25,000. king bed, lrg LR, Arc541-820-3724 tic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250 Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers,17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th paddles, personal flowheel, 1 slide, AC, tation devices,dry bags, TV,full awning, excelspray skirts,roof rack w/ Southwind 35.5’ Triton, lent shape, $23,900. towers & cradles -- Just 2008,V10, 2 slides, Du541-350-8629 add water, $1250/boat pont UV coat, 7500 mi. Firm. 541-504-8557. Bought new at $132,913; 880 asking $94,900. Call 541-923-2774 Motorhomes

Allegro 2002, 2 slides, 22K mi, workhorse chassis, 8.1 Chev engine, like new, $41,900 obo. 541-420-9346

Country Coach Intrigue 2002, 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Diesel. two slide-outs. 41,000 miles, new tires & batteries. Most options. $95,000 OBO 541-678-5712

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2008 40k mi. #C2246956 $19,995

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high Nissan Altima 3.5SR bi-fold door. Natural 2012, 13,200 mi., exc. gas heat, office, bath- FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, 541-598-3750 cond., 6-cyl., 270HP, door panels w/flowers aaaoregonautosource.com room. Parking for 6 8-way power driver & hummingbirds, cars. Adjacent to seat, 60/40 rear seat, white soft top & hard Jeep Grand Cherokee, Frontage Rd; great leather steering wheel 2006, GREAT COND, top. Just reduced to visibility for aviation with audio controls, black exterior, auto, $3,750. 541-317-9319 bus. 1jetjock@q.com AM/FM/CD/AUX with V6, Quadra-Trac, or 541-647-8483 541-948-2126 Bose speakers, A/C, premium audio, 88K Bluetooth, USB, back mi, $11,000 OBO. ½ Interest in RV-9A up camera, heated 541-389-8093 300 Hrs. RDM, $40K front seats, power OBO. 541-923-2318 moonroof & more. In Bend, below Blue Book at $24,000, (317) 966-2189 Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, Nissen Sentra 2010 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Jeep Willys 1947,custom, 4 dr. sedan, great fuel saver. #651104 small block Chevy, PS, ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP Ford Mustang Coupe $14,695 OD,mags+ trailer.Swap SHARE LEFT! 1966, original owner, for backhoe.No am calls Economical flying in V8, automatic, great please. 541-389-6990 your own Cessna shape, $9000 OBO. 172/180 HP for only 541-647-2822 530-515-8199 $10,000! Based at HertzBend.com BDN. Call Gabe at DLR4821 Ford Ranchero Professional Air! PORSCHE 914 1974, 1979 541-388-0019 Roller (no engine), with 351 Cleveland 916 lowered, full roll cage, Porsche Cayenne 2004, modified engine. 5-pt harnesses, rac86k, immac, dealer Body is in Trucks & ing seats, 911 dash & maint’d, loaded, now excellent condition, Heavy Equipment instruments, decent $17000. 503-459-1580 $2500 obo. shape, very cool! 541-420-4677 $1699. 541-678-3249

Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 slide, AC, TV, awning. NEW: tires, converter, batteries. Hardly used. Monaco Dynasty 2004, $16,500. 541-923-2595 Diamond Reo Dump loaded, 3 slides, dieTruck 1974, 12-14 sel, Reduced - now yard box, runs good, $119,000, 541-923$7900, 541-548-6812 8572 or 541-749-0037

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Ford T-Bird 1966 390 engine, power everything, new paint, 54K original miles, runs great, excellent cond. in & out. Asking $8,500. 541-480-3179

Toyota 4Runner 4WD 1986, auto, 2 dr., $1200, 541-923-7384

Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, GMC ½ ton 1971, Only 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, $19,700! Original low professionally detailed, mile, exceptional, 3rd $22,900. 541-390-7649 owner. 951-699-7171 940

Vans Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

Chevy Astro Cargo Van 2001, pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well maint, regular oil changes, $4500, please call 541-633-5149 NISSAN QUEST 1996, 3-seat mini van, extra nice in and out $3,400. Sold my Windstar, need another van! 541-318-9999, ask for Bob. Ask about free trip to D.C. for WWII vets.

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975

Pickups

Automobiles Buicks! 1996 Regal, 87k; 1997 LeSabre, 112k; and others! You’ll not find nicer Buicks $4000 & up. One look’s worth a thousand words. Call Bob, 541-318-9999. for an appt. and take a drive in a 30 mpg. car

Porsche Carrera 1999 black metallic, 46k careful mi, beautiful, upgrades, Tiptronic. $20,000. 541-593-2394

Toyota Camry’s 1984, $1200 OBO, 1985 $1400 OBO, 1986 parts car, $500; call for details, 541-548-6592 Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory Toyotas: 1999 Avalon 254k; 1996 Camry, 98k, 4 cyl. Lots of miles left in these cars. Price? You tell me! I’d guess $2000-$4000. Your servant, Bob at 541-318-9999, no charge for looking.

VOLVO S40 2006 AWD, 66k miles,

Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, Pilgrim Open Road 1995, extended cab, $11,500 2005, 36’, 3 slides, long box, grill guard, 931 w/d hookup, upor best offer! running boards, bed grades, $24,440. 541-678-3913 Automotive Parts, rails & canopy, 178K 541-312-4466 Winnebago Class C 27’ miles, $4800 obo. Service & Accessories Volvo V70XC 2000, 208-301-3321 (Bend) 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K 3rd row seat, mounted mi., good cond., $7000 Set of 4 Enkei alloy Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD studs, tow pkg, extras, OBO 541-678-5575 wheels, silver & black, Cadillac CTS Sedan auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, $5000, 541.693.4764 w/studded snow tires. 2007, 29K, auto, exc. 8600 GVW, white,178K 881 fits Audi bolt pattern. cond, loaded, $19 ,000. Just bought a new boat? mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, $250. 541-408-5350 Travel Trailers Sell your old one in the 541-549-8828 tow pkg., bedliner, bed Regal Prowler AX6 Exclassifi eds! Ask about our rail caps, rear slide treme Edition 38’ ‘05, Wheels (4), new, 20x7.5, Super Seller rates! window, new tires, ra- Cadillac El Dorado GM,chrome, aluminum, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all 1994, Total cream 541-385-5809 diator, water pump, 6x132 $125, 390-8386 maple cabs, king bed/ puff, body, paint, trunk hoses, brakes, more, bdrm separated w/slide as showroom, blue $5200, 541-322-0215 932 glass dr,loaded,always leather, $1700 wheels Antique & garaged,lived in only 3 w/snow tires although mo,brand new $54,000, Komfort 20’ Trailblazer, Classic Autos car has not been wet THE BETTER WAY still like new, $28,500, 2004, with all the extras, in 8 years. On trip to will deliver,see rvt.com, 29th Annual Oregon from new tires & chrome Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., TO BUY A CAR! ad#4957646 for pics. wheels to A/C! $8495. $5400, 541-593-4016. High Desert Swap Cory, 541-580-7334 541-447-3342, Prineville ’10 Chevy Cobalt

Meet & Car Show

September Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, Cadillac Seville STS ROUA Digorgio 1971 Roadranger 27’ 1993, Saturday, 71K, X-cab, XLT, fridge, heater, propane 8th. Starts 7 a.m. – A/C, awning, sleeps 6, 2003 - just finished auto, 4.0L, $7900 & elec. lights, awning, Vendors 6:30 a.m. exc. cond., used little, $4900 engine work OBO. 541-388-0232 2 spares, extra insuThe Deschutes $4,495 OBO. by Certified GM melation for late season County Fairgrounds 541-389-8963 chanic. Has everyhunting/cold weather and Expo Center, thing but navigation. camping, well maint, Redmond Oregon. Too many bells and very roomy, sleeps 5, SPRINTER 36’ 2005, Econoline RV 1989, Free admission to whistles to list. I $10,500 obo. Two great for hunting, fully loaded, exc. cond, the public. Special bought a new one. slides, sleeps 5, $3200, 541-410-6561 35K orig. mi., $19,750. antique section in$6900 firm. queen air mattress, Call 541-546-6133. doors with many Ford Super Duty F-250 541-420-1283 small sgl. bed, couch dealers from the Pa2001, 4X4, very good folds out. 1.5 baths, cific Northwest. No shape, V10 eng, $8500 CAN’T BEAT THIS! 541-382-0865, Chevy Cobalt 2010 Dogs Please. Contact OBO. 541-815-9939 Look before you leave message! VIN #110478A Butch Ramsey for info buy, below market $12,495 value! Size & mile& reservations age DOES matter! Springdale 29’ 2007, phone: (541)548-4467 Class A 32’ Hurrionline: slide,Bunkhouse style, bramsey@bendbroadband.com cane by Four Winds, GMC ½-ton Pickup, sleeps 7-8, excellent 541-647-2822 2007. 12,500 mi, all 1972, LWB, 350hi condition, $16,900, amenities, Ford V10, HertzBend.com motor, mechanically Taurus 27.5’ 1988 541-390-2504 DLR4821 lthr, cherry, slides, A-1, interior great; Everything works, like new! New low body needs some Chrysler 300 C SRT8 $1750/partial trade for price, $54,900. TLC. $3131 OBO. car. 541-460-9127 2006, exc. cond., 541-548-5216 Call 541-382-9441 43,800 mi.,, loaded, Chev Corvair Monza conno DVD, $25,000, Advertise your car! Gulfstream Scenic vertible,1964, new top & 541-977-4921. Add A Picture! Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, tranny, runs great, exlnt Reach thousands of readers! Cummins 330 hp die- Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 Call 541-385-5809 cruising car! $5500 obo. Ford Focus 2010, 29’, weatherized, like The Bulletin Classifieds 541-420-5205 sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 #293446. $14,995 International Flat new, furnished & in. kitchen slide out, Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ready to go, incl Winenew tires,under cover, 885 ton dually, 4 spd. gard Satellite dish, Canopies & Campers hwy. miles only,4 door trans., great MPG, $26,995. 541-420-9964 fridge/freezer ice541-647-2822 could be exc. wood maker, W/D combo, HertzBend.com hauler, runs great, Interbath tub & DLR4821 new brakes, $1950. shower, 50 amp pro541-419-5480. ‘69 Chevy C-20 Pickup, Hyundai Accent GLS pane gen & more! all orig.Tubro 44; auto 2011, automatic. $55,000. 4-spd,396, model CST 935 541-948-2310 #619037. $13,995 Weekend Warrior Toy w/all options, orig. owner, Sport Utility Vehicles Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Lance 945 1995, 11’3”, $24,000, 541-923-6049 all appl., solar panel, fuel station, exc cond. new battery, exc. cond., Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 sleeps 8, black/gray $5995, 541-977-3181 541-647-2822 4x4. 120K mi, Power interior, used 3X, Hunter’s Delight! PackHertzBend.com seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd $24,999. age deal! 1988 Winrow seating, extra DLR4821 541-389-9188 nebago Super Chief, tires, CD, privacy tint38K miles, great Autos & 882 ing, upgraded rims. shape; 1988 Bronco II Transportation Chevy Wagon 1957, Fantastic cond. $7995 Fifth Wheels 4x4 to tow, 130K 4-dr., complete, Contact Timm at mostly towed miles, $15,000 OBO, trades, 541-408-2393 for info nice rig! $15,000 both. 16K Reese 5th wheel please call or to view vehicle. hitch with Kwik-Slide. 541-382-3964, leave Mercedes E320 2004, 541-420-5453. $1284 new will sell for msg. 72K miles, silver/silver, $684. 50 amp SurgeChrysler 300 Coupe Ford Escape 2006, V6, front wheel drive. Itasca Sun Cruiser guard $449 new will Limited edition, 57K 1967, 440 engine, Exc. cond. $12,900 Call 1997, 460 Ford, Class sell for $220. Call Bill mi, $10,950 OBO, call 908 auto. trans, ps, air, 541-788-4229 @ 541-788-1974 A, 26K mi., 37’, living Rod at 541-647-1650. frame on rebuild, reAircraft, Parts room slide, new awMitsubishi 3000 GT painted original blue, nings, new fridge, 8 FIND IT! & Service 1999, auto., pearl original blue interior, BUY IT! new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 white, very low mi. original hub caps, exc. Onan Gen., new batSELL IT! $9500. 541-788-8218. chrome, asking $9000 teries, tow pkg., rear The Bulletin Classifieds or make offer. Ford Excursion towing TV, 2 tv’s, new 541-385-9350. 2005, 4WD, diesel, Need to sell a hydraulic jack springs, exc. cond., $19,900, Vehicle? tandem axel, $15,000, Call The Bulletin call 541-923-0231. 541-385-1782 and place an ad to1/3 interest in Columday! bia 400, located at Chrysler SD 4-Door Ask about our GMC Denali 2003 Sunriver. $138,500. 1930, CDS Royal "Wheel Deal"! Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 loaded with options. Call 541-647-3718 Jayco Greyhawk Standard, 8-cylinder, for private party by Carriage, 4 slideExc. cond., snow 2004, 31’ Class C, body is good, needs advertisers outs, inverter, satel- 1/3 interest in welltires and rims in6800 mi., hyd. jacks, some restoration, equipped IFR Beech lite sys, fireplace, 2 cluded. 130k hwy new tires, slide out, runs, taking bids, Bonanza A36, lo- 541-383-3888, flat screen TVs. miles. $12,000. exc. cond, $49,900, cated KBDN. $55,000. $60,000. 541-419-4890. 541-480-8648 541-815-3318 541-385-5809 541-419-9510 541-480-3923

900

#110478A .......... $12,495

’11 Hyundai Accent GLS Automatic #619037 ............. $13,995

’10 Toyota Corolla AT, “Fuel Saver”

#400886 ............. $13,995

’10 Nissan Sentra

4 DR Sedan, Great Fuel Saver #651104 ............. $14,695

’10 Chevy Malibu

4 Dr, LT Sedan #246671 ............. $14,980

’10 Ford Focus

#293446.............. $14,995

’11 Suzuki SX-4

33 MPG! #302264 ............. $14,995

’10 Dodge Avenger R/T Sedan

37K Miles, Loaded! #177898 ............. $15,495

’10 Mazda 6

Automatic, Loaded #M05673A ......... $15,995

’12 Nissan Versa

Automatic, 5-Door HB, Fuel Saver

#358909A .......... $16,556

’10 Honda Civic LX Sedan 4 Dr, Automatic

#527652 ............. $16,722

’11 Chrysler 200 Sedan

Touring #553592 ............. $17,995

’11 Subaru Impreza

AWD #511600A .......... $17,995

’09 Toyota Matrix AWD

Only 28K Miles #009276A .......... $18,495

’11 KIA Sedona

4 Dr, Blue #371299 ............. $18,650

’12 Hyundai Sonata

4 Dr Sedan, AT, Loaded #320628 ............. $19,461

’09 Subaru Legacy Sedan

H4 Special Edition #235780 ............. $19,995

’10 Toyota Tundra Loaded - Nice!

#15740B ............ $29,995

’07 Toyota F-J Cruiser

Auto, Loaded, Only 44K Miles! #085835 ............. $26,995

’11 Toyota Tacoma D-Cab V6, 4x4, Only 16k miles #078811 ............. $32,715

Through 9/12/12 All vehicles subject to prior sale, does not include tax, license or title and registration processing fee of $100. Vin#’s posted at dealership. See Hertz Car Sales of Bend for details. Dealer #4821

541-647-2822 535 NE Savannah Dr, Bend HertzBend.com

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the Matter of the Estate of Richard Arlen Keen, Jr., Deceased. Case No. 12PB0065. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Administrator. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Administrator's attorney at 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months afterthe date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, the Adminstrator, or the lawyers for the Adminstrator, Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP. Dated and first published on August 24, 2012. Jeffrey S. Patterson, OSB No. 024193, Attorney for Administrator. Administrator: Portland D. Keen, 1221 NW Odem, Terrebonne, OR 97760, (541) 419-3559. Attorney for Administrator: Jeffrey S. Patterson, OSB #024193, Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP, 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101, Bend, Oregon 97702, Ph.: (541) 318-3330, Fax: (541) 323-1030, e-mail: jeff@bendlawgroup.com LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the Matter of the Trust Administration of ROBERT F. FLEGE, JR., REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, Deceased, Case No. 12PB0081. NOTICE TO CLAIMANTS ORS 130.365. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned is the Successor Trustee for the Robert F. Flege, Jr., Revocable Living Trust, dated September 24, 2007, of which Robert F. Flege, Jr. was the Trustor. All persons having claims against the trust estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Successor Trustee at 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the trustee, or the lawyers for the trustee, DANIEL C. RE. Dated and first published on August 24, 2012. TEKLA E. WOLLECK, Successor Trustee. LEGAL NOTICE NATIONAL FOREST TIMBER FOR SALE DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST The Bugs Sale is located within T.25S., R.7E., Sections 15, 16, 17, 20, 21, 28, 29; W.M., Surveyed, Klamath County, Oregon. The Forest Service will receive sealed and oral bids in public at Deschutes National Forest Supervisor's Office, 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, OR, 97701 at 11:00 AM local time on 10/09/2012 for an estimated volume of 4867 CCF of Lodgepole Pine sawtimber, 722 CCF of Shasta Red Fir and other coniferous species sawtimber, and 2637 CCF of All Species grn bio cv marked or otherwise designated for cutting. The Forest Service reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Interested parties may obtain a prospectus from the office listed below. A prospectus, bid form, and complete information concerning the timber, the conditions of sale, and submission of bids is available to the public from the Crescent Ranger District, 136471 Hwy 97 N., PO Box 208, Crescent OR 97733, 541-433-3246; or the Deschutes National Forest

Supervisor's Office, 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, OR, 97701, 541-383-5586; or www.fs.usda.gov/go to/centraloregon/tim bersales. The USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Permit Amendment T-11324 T-11324 filed by Avion Water Co. Inc., 60813 Parrell Road, Bend, OR 97702, proposes additional points of appropriation under Permit G-9284. The permit allows the use of 165 gallons per minute from the Conestoga Well in Sec. 22, T 18 S, R 13 E, W.M. for quasi-municipal use in Sects. 21 and 22, T 18 S, R 13 E, W.M. The applicant proposes additional points of appropriation in Sects. 14, 17, 19, 21, 29, and 30, T 18 S, R 12 E, W.M. and Sects. 20 and 31, T 18 S, R 13 E, W.M. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed permit amendment appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS 537.211. The last date of newspaper publication is September 7, 2012. LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction Public Auction will be held on Saturday September 29, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. at Old Mill Self Storage, 150 SW Industrial Way, Bend, Oregon 97702. (Unit # 342). LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction Public Auction to be held on Saturday, September 15th, 2012 at 11:30am at A-1 Westside Storage, 317 SW Columbia St., Bend, Oregon 97702. (Unit E-074 Kirsten Lippy and D-170 April Gipson). LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LEGAL SERVICES The City of Madras is currently in the process of accepting "Requests for Proposals" for legal services. Proposals must be received by the office of the City Administrator of the City of Madras by no later than 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 19, 2012. Respondents must provide (9) hard copies of their submittals clearly marked as "CITY OF MADRAS LEGAL SERVICES PROPOSAL" to the City of Madras, 71 S.E. "D" Street, Madras, Oregon 97741-1605. A copy of the RFP information packet outlining the services being sought by the City can be obtained at the Madras City Hall between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, or will be placed in the mail by the City Recorder, upon request. The City Recorder can be contacted by calling (541) 475-2344 or by sending an e-mail to kcoleman@ci.madras. or.us. Publish Date: August 29, 2012 (The Bulletin) September 7, 2012 (The Bulletin) LEGAL NOTICE SEALED BID AUCTION: Sat., Sept. 8, 10am at Prineville Self Storage, 1350 Harwood, Prineville OR. CASH ONLY. Public Welcome. 7+ units. Email inquiries to sealedbidauction@hotmail.com. No phone calls. LEGAL NOTICE Swalley Irrigation District Notice of Election Swalley Irrigation District (SID) is holding a vote-by-mail election November 13, 2012. SID has one position on its Board of Directors for a one year term (2013). This is an at-large position. Qualifications: 18 years or older, Oregon resident with a Swalley water right. Candidates must file a District Nomination Petition no later than October 9, 2012 by 3:30 p.m. at the District office to be on the ballot. Contact SID to pick up a petition or for information: 64672 Cook Ave., Suite One (Tumalo), Bend, OR 97701, Phone: 541-388-0658.


YOUR WEEK LY GUIDE TO CENTR AL OREGON E VENTS, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT F I N E A R T S : ’Richard III’ at 2nd Street Theater, PAGE 12 MOVIES: ‘The Words’ and three others open, PAGE 27 EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

HIP TO BE SQUARE

D1

IF THIS IS IT

D2

Doing It All For My Baby

PERFECT WORLD

E1

B2

HEART AND SOUL

Walking On A Thin Line

E2

C1

The Heart of Rock & Roll

STUCK WITH YOU

F1

C2

BACK IN TIME

Do You Believe In Love

F2

A1

THE POWER OF LOVE

A2

Jacob’s Ladder

B1

PAGE 3

HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

inside

REPORTERS

MUSIC RELEASES • 10

Elise Gross, 541-383-0351 egross@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0375 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. Email to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Take advantage of the full line of Bulletin products. Call 541-385-5800.

The Bulletin

Cover design by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

• Alanis Morissette, Yeasayer and more

FINE ARTS • 12

MUSIC • 3

• COVER STORY: Huey Lewis and the News bring the hits to Les Schwab Amphitheater • Everything you need to enjoy this weekend’s Sisters Folk Festival • Buckethead’s skills and eccentricities • The White Buffalo roams back into town • Black Beast Revival plays Liquid Lounge • McMenamins hosts Casey Neill • Another busy week at The Horned Hand • Necktie Killer ends Music in the Canyon

GOING OUT • 9

• Four nights of fun at Silver Moon • A listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more

• “Richard III” opens at 2nd Street • Party for “Demons” zine tonight • Innovation auditioning for two shows • It’s First Friday Gallery Walk time! • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

OUTDOORS • 15

• Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16

• A week full of Central Oregon events

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • A listing of upcoming events • Talks and classes listing

RESTAURANTS • 20

• A review of McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend

OUT OF TOWN • 22

• Portland Center Stage celebrates 25 years with “Sweeney Todd” • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 25

• A review of “Madden NFL 13” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 27

• “The Words,” “Killer Joe,” “Branded” and “The Cold Light of Day” open in Central Oregon • “The Five-Year Engagement,” “Safe,” “Piranha 3DD” and “For the Love of Money” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

PAGE 3

music

ONE COOL CAT

Submitted photo

Huey Lewis and the News formed in the Bay Area of California in 1979. Lewis is at left.

• Huey Lewis and the News bring their ample quiver of hits to Bend By David Jasper The Bulletin

H

uey Lewis thinks Bend is rad. Touring rock stars are known for shamelessly pandering to audiences when playing live. “It’s great to be here in Kalamazoo!” one might say. All a rocker needs to do is get the name of the town right, and the crowd lights up like it’s homecoming. But something tells me that if Lewis says something nice about Bend during his Tuesday concert

here with longtime backing band the News (see “If you go”), he’ll mean it. Or, to paraphrase one of his singles from the 1980s, some of his lies will be true. “I love Bend, Oregon. It’s one of the great places on Earth, I think,” Lewis said by telephone last week. “I live in Montana, in the Bitterroot Valley, which is not dissimilar, but actually Bend is a little more upscale. Your bagels are better than ours.” Wait. How does Lewis know so much about Bend and its bagels?

Because the man who crooned on “Jacob’s Ladder” also knows his salmon ladders: He’s a fly-fisherman. In effect, Lewis knows the power of love and the power of the mighty Deschutes. In fact, he believes Bend is up there with Los Angeles and San Francisco in their primes. “Imagine L.A. in the ’30s and ’40s. No traffic, no pollution, these winding streets,” he said. “It was the best place on the planet in the ’30s and ’40s. Best weather in the world in L.A.”

San Francisco was great in the ’50s and ’60s, Lewis said, but “the population keeps getting more and more crowded, and they keep moving — and now it’s Bend, Oregon.” Are we blushing? Is it, like, homecoming or something? Eventually, Lewis and I did discuss something other than his fondness for Bend. Namely, his music career. Do not tell Lewis that you read (on Wikipedia) that he and the News are semi-retired, because if you do, you may get the response I did, which was an incredulous, “Not by a longshot. Really? We’re doing 85 shows this year.” Continued Page 5

If you go What: Huey Lewis and the News, with Franchot Tone When: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, gates open 5 p.m. Where: Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend Cost: $39 general or $78 reserved, plus fees, available in advance at the website below or The Ticket Mill (541-318-5457) in Bend Contact: www.bend concerts.com


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE The White Buffalo is back in town Roots-rock singer-songwriter extraordinaire The White Buffalo will return to Bend on Tuesday for a show at The Horned Hand. Known to his parents (who live in our area) as Jake Smith, the Buffalo is a big biker-lookin’ guy with long hair, a full beard and a voice as deep and sturdy as any you’ll hear. Even more impressive are his songs, rollicking country-rock tunes about hard drinking, hard travelling, and whatever else life has to offer. Sample songs from his newest album “Once Upon A Time in the West” at www .thewhitebuffalo.com. The White Buffalo, with Lisa C. Pollock; 9 p.m. Tuesday; $7 plus fees in advance at www.bendticket.com, $12 at the door; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave.,

music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Bend; www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

Casey Neill & the Norway Rats return A couple years ago, I called Casey Neill & the Norway Rats “one of the most elegant and underrated acts in Portland’s bustling scene,” and nothing has happened to change my mind. The Rats still boast an amazing array of players who’ve spent time with an impressive roster of other acts, including The Decemberists, Eels, The Minus 5 and Lucinda Williams. And they’re still led by Neill, a talented singer-songwriter who seamlessly brings together folk, rock, punk and a little Celtic influence. In that same story, I said he sounds like Jay Farrar leading Uncle Tupelo sometimes and The Pogues at others. I stand by that, too. Hear it for yourself at www.caseyneill.org.

BLACK BEAST REVIVAL Sarah Day Photography

Casey Neill & the Norway Rats; 7 p.m. Wednesday; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.mcmenamins .com or 541-382-5174.

Horned Hand hosts a bit of everything It’s starting to feel like we should have a regular feature in GO! Magazine called “It’s a busy week at The Horned Hand!” Because boy has that place hosted a bunch of shows this summer. Here’s what’s on tap this week: • Tonight is a night for harddrivin’, heartfelt folk-blues courtesy Californians Wesley Jensen and The Ragged Jubilee, plus locals Avery James and the Hillandales. Bring your beards and broken spirits. 8 p.m. $5. • On Saturday, the pedal gets a little closer to the metal with Tennessee thrashgrassers Jason and the Punknecks and local old-school punks The Confederats. 8 p.m. $5. • Tuesday brings in The White Buffalo. See elsewhere on this page for more. • Portland indie rock invades the Hand on Thursday as Animal Eyes and Fanno Creek roll into town looking

to celebrate their new releases. Animal Eyes does globally influenced pop-rock, while Fanno Creek is a bit more of a folk-rock rambler. Both good. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Keep up with the Hand (507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend) if you can: www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

we don’t get tons of this kind of stuff around here, so check ’em out. Black Beast Revival, with Strive Roots; 8:30 tonight; $5; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.liquid club.net.

Black Beast Revival plays Liquid Lounge

There is no denying it: Summer is coming to an end. Which means outdoor concerts are starting to wind down. On Wednesday, Redmond’s Music in the Canyon series will wrap up with local favorites Necktie Killer, who play fun, upbeat punk, reggae and ska. OK, reggae plus punk equals ska. But you know what we mean. Lines are blurry! The fun begins around 5:30 p.m. with Necktie taking the stage around 6:30 p.m. There’ll be lots of grass to stretch out on, food to purchase and eat, etc., etc. Music in the Canyon, with Necktie Killer and Kayleb James; 5:30 p.m. Wednesday; free; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www .musicinthecanyon.com.

The fledgling Northwest Best concert series will dip deep into some heavy riffs tonight as Black Beast Revival comes to town. This handsome quartet has been kicking around Bellingham, Wash., since early 2011, but got a boost in late May when it won that town’s version of Last Band Standing. Voters were no doubt swayed by BBR’s ominous amalgam of thunderous stoner-rock and deep, dark, churning blues. It sounds impossible for a little melodic light to shine through, doesn’t it? But somehow, it does. Black Beast Revival counts The Black Keys, Social Distortion, Murder By Death and Queens of the Stone Age among its influences. If you like those bands, you know

Necktie Killer wraps Music in the Canyon

— Ben Salmon

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In


music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

FREQUENCY IS YOUR BEST BET FOR KEEPING UP WITH CENTRAL OREGON’S MUSIC SCENE. Point your favorite online portal to The Bulletin’s music blog to find local music news and concert announcements, photos and videos of shows, MP3s to download and other fun stuff! Follow along in the way that best suits your style: www.facebook.com/frequencyblog

www.youtube.com/frequencyblog

www.twitter.com/frequencyblog

www.bendbulletin.com/frequency

From Page 3 Of course, in my and Wikipedia’s favor, Lewis did add, “We did 200 shows a year in our salad days.” “But, believe me, 85 is plenty,” he continued with a giggle. “Some of those are one-offs — we do corporate work. We’re, um, musical prostitutes, really. If you have enough money, we’ll set up on your lawn. “We’ll play for anybody. So will anyone else in our business as well, by the way. You know, if you got enough money, Bob Dylan will play on your lawn, too,” Lewis said. “And why not? Right? Somebody offers you money to play music, what’s wrong with that? You know what I’m sayin’?” Indeed. Back in the 1960s, Lewis and his eventual band mates in the News were too young for the psychedelic rock scene, which was more the domain of “our older brothers,” Lewis said. Growing up in Marin County, California, he and “about three or four of the guys in my band, we listened to KAID in Oakland, which was the great soul station,” he said. “We kind of backlashed against (psychedelic rock). We played in long-haired bands that played soul music.” In the early 1970s, Lewis joined a country-rock band named Clover, in which he played harmonica and did a little singing. It was when Clover was signed and sent to London to record with Nick Lowe later in the decade that the signposts for his eventual success started to come into view. “Over there, I saw (the British rock band) Rockpile, and the neat thing about Rockpile and Graham Parker and The Rumour and bands like this is that they were playing American

“I love Bend, Oregon. It’s one of the great places on Earth, I think.” — Huey Lewis

R&B-based stuff,” Lewis said. “And I went, ‘Wow, wait a second, this is my bag. I can do this.’ And so that’s when I hatched the idea to do my own thing.” He headed home to the Bay Area and formed Huey Lewis and the News in 1979. And with a soulful blend of blues and new wave and a working man’s baritone, Lewis quickly went from obscurity to the top of the music charts, scoring a whopping 12 Top 10 hits in the 1980s. Lewis has also acted in films including “Back to the Future,” which needs no introduction, and “Cruisin’,” the 2000 karaoke movie in which he starred alongside Gwyneth Paltrow. As his band’s charting prowess began to wane in the 1990s, Lewis and the News slowed their recorded output, but hardly stopped altogether. Their 2010 release, “Soulsville,” was a tribute to R&B and Stax Records artists who influenced them back in the 1970s. Lewis said it was “an unbelievable experience” recording the album in Memphis with producer Jim Gaines, “our old engineer and a Stax engineer to begin with.” “We had a record release party at the old Stax Museum; (Stax coowner) Al Bell came by, and (Isaac Hayes collaborator) David Porter and (Memphis Horns member)

Wayne Jackson, and it was really awesome.” But one of his current musical interests is jam music. “If we were around today, we’d be a jam band, I think,” said Lewis, who has shared a stage with his buddies in Umphrey’s McGee. “Love the jam bands,” he said. “I like the whole idea, I like the mindset. ‘We just play.’” As the band has aged, so too has the audience, but Lewis and the News have also picked up some younger listeners. “You’d think they’d all be our age, but they’re not,” he said. “Some of them are curiously young, oddly enough. We’ve got some college kids who like us again — for some odd reason.” Is that a surprise to him? “Absolutely.” Lewis waxed even funnier when I asked what songs people most often request. “Well, you know, all the hits. They like the hits. They like, ‘Power of Love,’ ‘If This Is It,’ ‘Heart of Rock & Roll,’ ‘Want a New Drug,’ ‘Jacob’s Ladder,’ ‘Perfect World,’ ‘Heart and Soul.’ These things (from) back when you could have a lot of hits.” I tried to ask him another question, to which he replied, “Wait a minute. I’m not done, OK?” he said. “‘Walking on a Thin Line,’ ‘Hip to Be Square,’ ‘Doing It All for My Baby,’ ‘Stuck with You.’” More giggling. I started to ask my question again, but he cut me off with another hit: “Back in Time,” which seems like a pretty good stopping point for this article. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

GO! MAGAZINE •

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D TO E L U HED RESC NE 2013 JU


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL Sisters Folk Festival stages and venues

Hood Ave.

2

4

Washington Ave.

Jefferson Ave.

1

Larch St.

Elm St.

Pine St.

242

3

8 6

7 5 Cascade Ave.

Spruce St.

126

Main Ave.

Fir St.

20

Oak St.

9 Adams Ave.

20

126

Village Green Park

Stages and venues

Courtesy Patricia Lumme

From left (front of stage), Eliza Gilkyson, Slaid Cleaves, Jimmy LaFave and Terri Hendrix (who will not appear in Sisters) perform “Walking Woody’s Road” in January. At top is a photo of Woody Guthrie.

Walk Woody’s road with Jimmy LaFave & friends By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

O

ne of the headlining performances of this year’s Sisters Folk Festival is “Walking Woody’s Road,” a musical tribute to legendary folk singer Woody Guthrie to celebrate what would have been his 100th birthday. The program — which has toured all over the country this year — was developed by Austin, Texas singer-songwriter Jimmy LaFave, a man with a longstanding connection to the icon. LaFave spent formative years in Guthrie’s home state of Oklahoma and counts him as a major influence on his own music. In fact, for the past decade, LaFave steered a similar Guthrie tribute called “Ribbon of Highway, Endless Skyway.” But he took the opportunity of the centennial birthday to tweak the program a bit and rename it. The result features a rotating

cast of musicians alongside La Fave. Tonight’s performance in Sisters will include Slaid Cleaves, Eliza Gilkyson, and Guthrie’s granddaughter Sarah Lee Guthrie with her husband Johnny Irion. Finding folks to join the cast was no problem, LaFave said in a telephone interview Monday. “Everyone loves Woody Guthrie’s music,” he said. “He’s really the godhead of singer-songwriters.” The show will incorporate not only Guthrie’s songs, but also his writings on all kinds of topics, from politics and spirituality to music, love and beyond. “We just try to educate people a little bit about Woody’s thoughts. He had some comments that are all still pretty valid today,” LaFave said. “And he was such a populist. It’s really not a Democrat and Republican show. It’s just about Woody and what he said.” The musicians also trade off lead duties on various songs, building

toward a big “This Land Is Your Land” finale. Guthrie’s music has experienced a rebirth in recent years, thanks in part to his daughter Nora’s efforts to turn his unused lyrics into new songs. LaFave — who is currently setting about 20 lyrics to music — said Guthrie wrote about 3,000 songs, but only 70 were really known in his day. And beyond music, he painted and wrote poetry, wrote novels (including one about sustainable living in sod houses), and was fascinated by science and nature. “He was a total sponge,” LaFave said. “The guy was not just talking about riding the rails. He was talking about quantum physics. He was so far beyond his time, they must’ve thought he was nuts. “There’s no one,” he said, “that lived 20 different lifetimes like Woody Guthrie.” — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

1. Village Green Main Stage 2. Sisters Coffee Co. 3. Clearwater Gallery 4. Melvin’s Fir Street Market 5. Depot Café

6. Slick’s Que Co. 7. Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe 8. Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce Pickin’ Central stage 9. Sisters Art Works

Food vendors are located at the Village Green Park and Sisters Art Works. Greg Cross / The Bulletin

If you go What: Sisters Folk Festival When: Today through Sunday Where: All over Sisters Cost: All-event passes are sold

Do folk fest for free! For the first time ever, all-event passes to the Sisters Folk Festival have sold out in advance. Beginning at 1 p.m. today, organizers will sell $55 day passes for Sunday until they’re gone, but beyond that, the time to buy your way into the fest has passed. But that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy music in Sisters this weekend. There are a few stages and shows at the event that are free and open to the public. Below is a roundup of how you can do Sisters Folk Festival for free; for exact times, visit www.sistersfolkfestival.org. • On Saturday, the Depot Cafe stage is free in the afternoon, with performances by Jack Martin, Lisa C. Pollock, Gwyneth & Monko

out. Day passes for Sunday will be available for $55 at the “will call” table at 1 p.m. today near the Village Green stage. Contact: www.sistersfolkfestival .org or 541-549-4979

and Anna and the Underbelly, plus students in the local Americana Project songwriting program. • The Sisters Coffee Co. stage is free all day Saturday. That means you can catch workshops by bluegrass band Town Mountain, bluesman David Jacobs-Strain, jazz great Brian Blade and folk singer Mary Gauthier, as well as performances by finalists in the festival’s songwriting contest. • On Saturday evening around 9:30 p.m., Pickin’ Central (at the corner of Main Avenue and Spruce Street) will turn into one big ol’ jam session. Bring your instruments! • Finally, on Sunday morning from 10-11:15 a.m., Oregon folk singer Beth Wood will host a community celebration at the Village Green main stage.

— Ben Salmon


music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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HIGHLIGHTS OF THE FESTIVAL

JAMES MCMURTRY

9:15-10:15 tonight, Village Green James McMurtry seems like an ornery fella, the type of imposing, burr-in-his-saddle singer-songwriter Texas is known for producing. One scan of his Facebook profile finds a photo of his autograph on a drawing of a middle finger and a caustic warning against videotaping his shows, plus dozens of photos of McMurtry, not one featuring a smile. Accordingly, McMurtry’s flatland folkrock carries a certain weight that is rooted in his Lone Star soul and the vivid storytelling skills he learned from his father, noted novelist Larry McMurtry.

GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV

7:30-8:15 tonight, Sisters Art Works 2-2:45 p.m. Saturday, Melvin’s Market (workshop) 6:15-7 p.m. Saturday, Village Green 1-1:45 p.m. Sunday, Depot Cafe It’s fitting that just after the appearance of a bright blue moon in Central Oregon, Gregory Colorado troubadour Gregory Alan Isakov returns to shine in Sisters. An enormous, if understated talent, Isakov’s graceful sense of melody is on full display on his gorgeous 2009 album “The Empty Northern Hemisphere,” which is packed top to bottom with songs that will sparkle and sigh their way into your heart. Live, he’s no slouch, either; Isakov’s intimate April 2011 set at Bend’s PoetHouse Art was one of last year’s best local concerts.

JOHN FULLBRIGHT

6-6:45 tonight, Village Green 1:15-2 p.m. Saturday, Sisters Art Works 8:45-9:45 p.m. Saturday, Melvin’s Market The first thing most folks notice about John Fullbright is his music, but his hometown isn’t far behind. That’s because he comes from Okemah, Okla., where they’ve painted “Home Of Woody Guthrie” on a faded yellow tower in town. Fullbright doesn’t sound like Guthrie, necessarily, but his debut full-length, 2012’s “From the Ground Up,” does sound schooled in the gruff, bluesy drawl of modern-outlaw troubadours like Steve Earle.

ABIGAIL WASHBURN WITH KAI WELCH

8:30-9:15 tonight, Sisters Art Works 7:15-8 p.m. Saturday, Village Green 2-2:45 p.m. Sunday, Depot Cafe Abigail Washburn plays the banjo, but she’s far from a traditionalist. Alongside her penchant for American folk music sits a passion for Asian culture; she has fused the two on her own albums and with her side project The Sparrow Quartet, in which she sings in fluent Chinese. More recently, Washburn explored indie-folk-pop on her 2011 album “City of Refuge,” which features the playing of a wide range of musicians, from members of The Decemberists, My Morning Jacket and Turtle Island Quartet to space-jazz guitarist Bill Frisell and Hanggai, a Mongolian string band. As if that’s not enough, Washburn is married to none other than Bela Fleck, one of the few people on the planet whose banjo adventures exceed her own.

Submitted photos; John Fullbright photo courtesy Vicki Farmer

JOHN JORGENSON QUINTET

9:30-10:30 tonight, Sisters Art Works 3-3:45 p.m. Saturday, Melvin’s Market (workshop) 9:30-10:30 p.m. Saturday, Village Green As the Sisters Folk Festival has grown over the past several years, so has its artistic horizons. One of the best examples of this stylistic expansion at this year’s event is the appearance of the John Jorgenson Quintet, a virtuoso gypsy-jazz band led by its namesake guitarist, one of the finest pickers in the genre. Following the footsteps of the famed 20th-century hot-jazz pioneer Django Reinhardt, the JJQ plays acoustic music at a breakneck pace, blending in European, classical and rock influences on the fly, with stunning results.

BRIAN BLADE’S MAMA ROSA BAND

1 p.m. Saturday, Sisters Coffee Co. (solo workshop) 8:15-9 p.m. Saturday, Village Green 2:15-3 p.m. Sunday, Sisters Art Works What’s the last thing a drummer says before he’s fired by his band? “How ‘bout we try one of my songs?” It’s an old joke, but it doesn’t apply to Brian Blade, one of the world’s great jazz drummers who made his name alongside artists like Joshua Redman, Wayne Shorter, Bob Dylan and Daniel Lanois and in his own Fellowship band. In Sisters, Blade will showcase his singer-songwriter side, playing from his 2009 “Mama Rosa” album, a batch of sublimely gentle pop songs that reveal previously uncharted corners of the man’s incredible abilities.

BIG SANDY AND HIS FLY-RITE BOYS

10:45 p.m.-midnight Saturday, Slick’s Que Co. 2-2:45 p.m. Sunday, Village Green A show by Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys is like a trip back to the mid-20th century, when rockabilly, Western swing, soul and true country music poured from radios and turntables in living rooms across America. Led by the gregarious and honey-voiced Big Sandy, this California quartet’s precisely played retro sound is so instantly engaging that it can rise above its niche and find a comfortable home just about anywhere, from the Grand Ole Opry to “Late Night with Conan O’Brien.”

FOR THE FULL SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL SCHEDULE, VISIT WWW.J.MP/SFFSCHEDULE


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music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Upcoming Concerts

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

BUCKETHEAD

Courtesy Alan Ralph, PhotographN.com

a singular

shredder • Guitarist Buckethead visits the Domino Room By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

T

rying to write about Buckethead makes one’s head swim. Seriously. Do you talk about his tireless work ethic? The man has cut nearly 40 albums (both solo and with various bands), including, apparently, one out last month called “The Shores of Molokai,” and has collaborated with a ridiculous list of artists, from Bill Laswell and Mike Patton to Bootsy Collins and Bernie Worrell to the actor Viggo Mortensen. And yes, he filled Slash’s spot in Guns N’ Roses from 2000 to 2004. Do you talk about his massive and multifaceted musical skill set? Buckethead is one of the fastest and best guitar players on Earth, able to take on metal, funk, jazz, ambient music and beyond without missing a fret. Those skills have won him all kinds of accolades from guitar-nerd magazines you’ve never heard of unless you’re a guitar nerd. And he does it all with a KFC chicken bucket on his head and a creepy Michael Myers mask over his face, while also showing off his martial arts moves and dancing like a robot.

If you go What: Buckethead, with DJ Samples When: 9 p.m. Wednesday, doors open 8 p.m. Where: Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $20 plus fees in advance (ticket outlets at website below), $25 at the door Contact: www.randompresents .com

Oh, right: The guy is odd. He claims to have been raised by chickens. He’s obsessed with Disneyland and is forever working on his own imaginary theme park, Bucketheadland. When he does talk, nonmusically, he does so through a freaky rubber puppet named Herbie. Right now, the entrance to his website is adorned with an image of some sort of cyborg LeBron James — called LeBrontron — and a majestic six-minute song featuring plenty of thunderous riffage and skyscraping solos. And honestly, that’s what really matters about Buckethead: The jawdropping things he can do on a stage with a guitar in his hands. — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

Sept. 14 — Shadows On Stars (pop), Liquid Lounge, Bend, www.liquidclub.net. Sept. 18 — Scott H. Biram (blues), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. Sept. 18 — Polecat (bluegrass), GoodLife Brewing Co., Bend, www.goodlifebrewing.com. Sept. 19 — Craig Carothers (folk), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 19 — Polecat (bluegrass), Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, Bend, www.tumalocreek.com. Sept. 19 — The Good Hurt (poprock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Sept. 20 — The Defibulators (roots-rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 21 — The Ames (folkpop), Liquid Lounge, Bend, www.liquidclub.net. Sept. 21 — M. Ward (indiefolk), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Sept. 21 — Andy Frasco (party blues), The Astro Lounge, Bend, www.astroloungebend.com. Sept. 22 — Andy Frasco (party blues), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 25 — George Winston (pastoral piano), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre.org. Sept. 26 — Rose’s Pawn Shop (Americana), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Sept. 28 — Todd Agnew and Jason Gray (Christian), The Sound Garden, Bend, www. thesoundgardenstudio.com. Sept. 28 — Klover Jane (hard rock), Liquid Lounge, Bend, www.liquidclub.net. Sept. 30 — Capitol Steps (political satire), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 4 — Greg Brown (folk), North Rim Lodge, Bend, www. northrimbend.com. Oct. 5 — Hank Shreve Band (soul-jazz), Liquid Lounge, Bend, www.liquidclub.net. Oct. 6 — Steve Kimock (rock) at Bend Fall Festival, downtown Bend, www.randompresents. com. Oct. 6 — Fred Eaglesmith (folk tales), HarmonyHouse, Sisters, 541-548-2209.


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going out Looking for something to do? Check out our listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more happening at local nightspots. Find lots more at www.bendbulletin.com/events.

TODAY PAUL EDDY: Twang-pop; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Chow, 1110 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-728-0256. FIVE PINT MARY: Celtic rock; 4:30 p.m.; Country Catering Co., 900 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend; 541-383-5014. PAUL EDDY: Twang-pop; 6-8 p.m.; Pisano’s Pizza, 2755 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-312-9349. SYNRGY: Reggae; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery & Public House, 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-9242. THE ACOUSTIC BAZAAR: with Chris Novak; free; 6-9 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. NIGHT UNDER THE COVERS: Elvis and Sun Records artists; 6 p.m.; Hola, 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0069. BURNIN’ MOONLIGHT: Acoustic; 6:308:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. GBOTS AND THE JOURNEYMAN: Jampop; 7 p.m.; Velvet, 805 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-728-0303. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Tumalo; 541-382-2202. RENO HOLLER: Pop; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. AVERY JAMES AND THE HILLANDALES: Blues, with Wesley Jensen and The Ragged Jubilee; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. (Pg. 4) CHARLES BUTTON BAND: Blues; 8 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner

Submitted photo

HIGHLIGHTS

4 SHOWS IN 7 NIGHTS AT SILVER MOON

House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-8655. BLACK BEAST REVIVAL: Hard rock, with Strive Roots; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. (Pg. 4) HANGAR 52: Classic rock; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. DJ ATL: 9 p.m.; Seven Nightclub, 1033 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-760-9412. DJ HARLO: 9 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116. SCOTT WYATT: Rock; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. DJ STEELE: 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

SATURDAY ALLAN BYER: Folk; 10 a.m.; Chow, 1110 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-728-0256. BEACH PARTY WITH THE ROCKHOUNDS: Classic rock and blues; 4 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. ACOUSTIC CAFE WITH AUZZIE MARK: 6-8:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. MICHAEL MARTINEZ: Pop; 7 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Tumalo; 541-382-2202. RENO HOLLER: Pop; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. CHARLES BUTTON BAND: Blues; 8 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. JASON & THE PUNKNECKS:

Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom will be poppin’ this week, as the kids say, with four shows over the next seven nights. First up tonight is veteran local rocker Scott Wyatt, a versatile musician who always seems to have something new on his plate. That show is free, and you can’t beat free. Then on Saturday, The Hoons will roll in and inject the Moon with some good old-fashioned rock ’n’ roll. See that photo to the left? That’s The Hoons: a little bit pretty, a little bit gritty and (not pictured),

Punkgrass, with The Confederats; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. (Pg. 4) KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-8655. A.M. INTERSTATE: Rock, with The Hooligans and The Punctuals; $3; 8 p.m.; Big T’s, 412 S.W. Glacier Ave., Redmond; 541-504-3864. ALL YOU ALL: Rock, with DJ sets by T-Money, Zee and more; 8 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804.

a whole lot of crunchy guitar tone. Mmm boy. OK, so then on Tuesday comes Brothers Gow, a San Diego outfit that mixes funk, rock, reggae and jammy jams into its sonic cocktail. Finally, Thursday at the Moon will feature Erin & the Project, a California combo that touts its music as “indie/soul-ternative.” Local pop chanteuse Lauren Kershner will play an opening set. Get the details for all four shows below or at www.silvermoonbrewing .com.

LISA DAE AND ROBERT LEE TRIO: Jazz; 5 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. CHRIS BELAND: Folk; 6 p.m.; 5 Fusion & Sushi Bar, 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-323-2328. AMITIE WITH HARLEE CASE: Acoustic; 7 p.m.; Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Cafe, 1740 N.W. Pence Lane, Suite 1, Bend; 541-728-0703.

MONDAY KARAOKE: 6:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889.

KARAOKE WITH BIG JOHN: 8 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771.

CITY FAIRE: Rock ‘n’ soul; 7:30-10:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.astroloungebend.com.

41EAST: Classic rock; 8:30 p.m.; Wickiup Station Sports Pub, 52600 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine; 541-536-7577.

TUESDAY

HANGAR 52: Classic rock; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. TIFFANY KUENZI: Country; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar & Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-382-4270. THE HOONS: Rock; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. DJ STEELE: 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440. THE QUICK & EASY BOYS: Funk-rock; 10 p.m.; $5; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.astroloungebend.com.

SUNDAY HILST & COFFEY: Chamber-folk; 10 a.m.; Chow, 1110 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-728-0256. SIXOFNINE: Rock; free; 3-7 p.m.; Riverside Market, 285 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-389-0646.

ALLEY CATS JAZZ ENSEMBLE: dance and lunch; 10:30 a.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. UKULELE JAM: 6:30 p.m.; Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Cafe, 1740 N.W. Pence Lane, Suite 1, Bend; 541-728-0703. BEATS & RHYMES: Local hip-hop; 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. THE WHITE BUFFALO: Folk-rock, with Lisa C. Pollock; $7-$10; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. (Pg. 4) BROTHERS GOW: Funk-rock; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com.

WEDNESDAY ALLAN BYER: Folk; 5:30 p.m.; Level 2, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-323-5382.

— Ben Salmon

OPEN MIC: 6:30 p.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541-389-1410. CASEY NEILL & THE NORWAY RATS: Americana; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Pg. 4) DJ AND KARAOKE: 7 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-8655. BUCKETHEAD: Guitar wizardry, with DJ Samples; $20-$25; 9 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com. (Pg. 8) KARAOKE: 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. REGGAE NIGHT W/ MC MYSTIC: Music; 9 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

THURSDAY OPEN MIC: 6:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. THE ROCKHOUNDS: Acoustic; 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. TONE RED: Americana; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. OPEN MIC: 8 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. ANIMAL EYES: Indie rock, with Fanno Creek; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. (Pg. 4) DISCOTHEQUE DJS: Alt-electroncia; with Critical Hit and more; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. n TO SUBMIT: Email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Please include date, venue, time and cost.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

music releases Six Organs of Admittance

Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti

“ASCENT” Drag City Records Guitarist and singer Ben Chasny, leader of Six Organs of Admittance, is attentive to form and style. He works in acoustic drones, boiled-down folk ideas, distressed ragas, and hard meditative electric-guitar soloing, in which the resonance of the note and the power of the gesture trumps instrumental technique. There’s more than 40 years of this for him to be influenced by, and you can guess at a family tree: Neil Young’s “Cortez the Killer” or Led Zeppelin’s “Four Sticks”; certainly the cumulative lessons of John Fahey and Keiji Haino. But he’s also attentive to sound, and some of the best moments of “Ascent,” Six Organs’ 14th album, come at the very end of tracks like “Solar Ascent,” or “Even if You Knew,” when the last note or chord cuts off, and as it decays you can size up the tower of reverb and sonic space that Chasny has built. Amplifiers are important to this record.

“MATURE THEMES” 4AD “Step into my time warp now,” Ariel Pink sings on “Is This the Best Spot?” from “Mature Themes.” That time warp leads directly to a phantasmagoric mishmash of 1970s radio memories, both FM and AM, that is as indebted to Frank Zappa as it is to Hall & Oates, to Sparks as to Gary Numan, to Brian Eno as to Curtis Mayfield. The album whiplashes among

Yeasayer “FRAGRANT WORLD” Secretly Canadian Beyond human voices, natural sounds are scarce on Yeasayer’s third album, “Fragrant World.” Synthesizers and programmed beats define every song, using tones that flaunt their artificial attacks and ricocheting stereo placements. Even the vocals often arrive haloed in effects or surrounded by computer-tuned harmonies. It’s hermetically sealed pop, very deliberately keeping its distance from everyday physicality,

Here and there Oct. 4 — Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; www.ticketfly.com or 877-435-9849.

Chasny’s extended solos — particularly on “Close to the Sky,” “Waswasa” and “Even if You Knew” — are scrabbling, circular, slightly heroic, pulmonary with wah-wah and squalid with distortion. They’re exciting, but they’re also good for the head: they shove you into long-form listening mode. — Ben Ratliff, The New York Times

and it suggests not an artificial paradise but a well-guarded isolation chamber. On a first listen, the music sounds aloof and arty — and it is, full of conceptual wiles. But the next time around, pop hooks sink in; more often than not, “Fragrant World” is a snappy synth-pop album. The songs are suffused with misgivings about humanity. Yeasayer has always had them. Back on its 2007 debut album, “All Hour Cymbals,” the band sang, “I can’t sleep when I think about the future I was born into,” though the music willed itself toward optimism. Not this time. “Wish I could tell you that we’re all all right, but in truth we’re doomed,” the album concludes in “Glass of the Microscope,” a dire song about environmental pollution. The music places disembodied, altered voices within a sparse, throbbing track that sounds like it has been bounced off a distant satellite. — Jon Pareles, The New York Times

Alanis Morissette “HAVOC AND BRIGHT LIGHTS” Collective Sounds Alanis Morissette is happier now. (Thank you, India. Thank you, frailty.) Of course, Alanis Happiness — thanks to marriage and motherhood — is slightly less stable and far more wordy than, you know, regular folks’ happiness. But she is more than eager to discuss this on “Havoc and Bright Lights,” her eighth studio album and most cohesive effort in years. Not “Jagged Little Pill” cohesive, mind you, but far more focused than her recent musical walkabouts. The opener “Guardian” is as straightforward and upbeat as Morissette gets, declaring her everlasting love and guardianship. It’s a signal that she’s still

styles, from goofy ephemera (with proudly immature themes) such as the trudging, distorted “Schnit-

— Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Here and there Oct. 7 — McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; www.cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849.

in touch with her determined “Hand in My Pocket” self, even if that rebelliousness has run out. She gets sappy on the love ballad “Til You,” which is wrapped in Carpenters-like ’70s gauze and delivered so tamely it makes Sarah McLachlan sound ferocious. The sweetness is all the more jarring since it follows “Woman Down,” a snarling litigation of a man’s missteps that lacks the bite of Morissette’s earlier work. Unfortunately, the tales of domesticity are where Morissette is on the firmest ground. When she

Divine Fits “A THING CALLED DIVINE FITS” Merge Records Divine Fits is a patchwork of other patchworks, three indie rock musicians who sometimes seem like rock fans above all else: Britt Daniel from Spoon, Dan Boeckner from Wolf Parade, and Sam Brown from the New Bomb Turks. Which is to say that if their own bands are kind of metarock, this band is kind of metameta-rock. Depending on the track, Divine Fits sounds like a new-wave guitar band, a synthpop act, a garage band or an ear-

zel Boogie” and the synth-popmeets-spaghetti-western “Symphony of the Nymph” to catchy, irresistible keepers like the shimmering, harmony-rich “Only in My Dreams” and the slinky, soulful “Baby,” an obscure cover of a Donnie and Joe Emerson non-hit. Pink has left behind his lofi roots, even more so than on 2010’s “Before Today,” but he hasn’t abandoned his unpredictability. Coherent it’s not: It’s head-scratchingly diverse, but it’s a time warp worth exploring.

ly ’70s drone-rock experiment. This could, and maybe should, be a band that hedges its bets. But “A Thing Called Divine Fits,” the threesome’s first record to-

starts going on about the problems of fame in “Celebrity” over a vaguely Eastern-influenced backdrop, it gets hard not to want to tune her out. (“I display the perfect amount of ennui,” her publicity-hungry character declares, seemingly without irony.) Morissette still has plenty to say and a distinctive way to say it on “Havoc” but, too often, it feels like a lecture rather than a song. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

gether feels taut and right. It’s concentrated on the thing itself — a collection of shared songs, not the pile of individual wills. Having two singers doesn’t split the record in half; there seems to be an almost brotherly relationship here. Boeckner and Daniel each sings his own songs, and occasionally each other’s. But there’s a funny continuity between Boeckner and Daniel, like Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane on Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue.” Each can sound like a modified version of the other. Somehow, on deeper levels, they overlap. — Ben Ratliff, The New York Times


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

This Week’s Featured Business Bend’s newest sweet shoppe is now open in the Old Mill District. Come on in and experience this delightful, one-of-a-kind candy shoppe! Your sweet tooth will thank you!

PAGE 11

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FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK TONIGHT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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W W W. M I O S U S H I . C O M


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

fine arts

Updating ‘Richard III’

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

The cast of Shakespeare’s “Richard III” rehearses last week at 2nd Street Theater in Bend. Staging and costuming will be from the 1940s.

• Thoroughly Modern Productions brings Shakespeare’s classic to 2nd Street Theater By David Jasper The Bulletin

T

horoughly Modern Productions lives up to its name with its fresh take on “Richard III,” Shakespeare’s historical epic about one man’s relentless mission to secure the throne for himself by any means necessary, up to and including murder. The play opens tonight at 2nd Street Theater with a champagne reception (see “If you go”). About three years ago, David

DaCosta, artistic director of Thoroughly Modern, began his own cutting of the script of “Richard III,” one of Shakespeare’s longer works. The original play as written also demands a sizeable cast. However, in addition to pruning its length, DaCosta has eliminated or pieced together composites of a number of characters. Others that were originally written as males have been redrawn as female roles: for instance, Lord

Stanley, played here by Felicia Ridings. But that’s not all that makes Thoroughly Modern’s “Richard III” different from the original. The play’s setting is more reminiscent of the 20th century than the 15th, with Richard and his henchwoman brandishing guns and a jazz soundtrack put together by cast member and real-life radio DJ Mike Ficher, who plays the Earl of Richmond. And if all this is not enough for DaCosta, who serves as the play’s director, he is also one of its main stars, portraying the throne-chasing Richard of Gloucester. “The name of the show is ‘Rich-

ard III,’ so I obviously spend quite a bit of time on stage, and a lot of things my character does forwards the action and people are responding to,” DaCosta told GO! Magazine after a rehearsal earlier this week. “In all honesty, if I hadn’t … had the background I do with Shakespeare in general and then the last 20 years of my life as a performer, I wouldn’t even conceive of taking on something like this,” he said. Part of what made DaCosta’s dual roles with the production possible was the lengthy workshop process that began back in June. Continued next page

If you go What: “Richard III” When: Opens with champagne reception at 7:30 tonight; additional performances at 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays through Sept. 22 and 3 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 16 Where: 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend Cost: $18, $15 for students and seniors Contact: www.2ndstreet theater.com or 541-312-9626


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

‘Fighting with Demons’ zine release show set The folks behind “Fighting with Demons,” a compilation zine about demons featuring work by a variety of writers, artists and interviewers, will hold a zine release and variety show at 7 tonight at Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley in downtown Bend. Zine contributors include David Nave, Sydney Leonard, Hanna Berry, Joel Sousa, c.vance, Shanan Kelley, Megan McGuinness, Bridget McGinn and many others. You can preview some of the zine’s pieces at fightingwithdemons.blogspot .com. The evening will include slide show storytelling by Rachel LeeCarman, select readings from the zine, music by Rinnah & Rio, Renee, and Old Man, as well as a screening of the 2005 documentary “The Devil and Daniel Johnston.” Zines will be available for $10 along with merchandise by a variety of the artists. Admission is by donation.

From previous page “We were able to just sit around and discuss the nuances of each character,” he said. “It’s been three months now that we’ve been living with it.” Despite the character tweaks, the cast is still quite large: some 16 players, some of whom play multiple roles. DaCosta speaks highly of his very involved cast, including Rick Jenkins, who plays the Duke of Buckingham. “This is his first go at Shakespeare, which I didn’t realize (beforehand). You would never know it to hear the man speak,” DaCosta said. “(He’s a) wonderful actor (who) knows this character inside and out and has really helped me a great deal in translating this story and formulating this story.” DaCosta, who says he plans to do Shakespeare plays annually, has performed in other Shakespeare plays in his career, including the title role of “Macbeth.” In that play, we see Macbeth go from noble and good to suffering an all-consuming madness that leaves him “wholly evil by the end,” DaCosta said. “Another piece that I like about ‘Richard III,’ as opposed to a show like ‘Macbeth,’ is that Richard connects with (the) audience from the get-go,” he said. “They’re an active participant in what he’s doing; they’re not just observers.” He was still living in Boston when he began his cut of “Richard III,” and he’s been discussing the role of Rich-

Contact: fightingwithdemons .blogspot.com or www.facebook .com/events/392001694186375.

ITW holds auditions for 2 upcoming shows Innovation Theatre Works in Bend is holding auditions for its next two productions. First is “Masque of the Red Death: An Evening in the World of Edgar Allan Poe,” for which three or four actors will perform live adaptations of three Poe stories. Actors of all ages and genders are welcome. Rehearsal and show dates are from Sept. 24 through Nov. 3. ITW also seeks actors for its Christmas production of “It’s A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play.” Needs are for three men and two women. Rehearsal and show dates are from Oct. 29 through Dec. 23. Actors interested in auditioning are asked to prepare a monologue or be prepared to cold read from material provided. For an appointment time, contact 541-977-5677 or brad@innovationtw .org.

fine arts

GO! MAGAZINE •

First Friday Gallery Walk exhibits are plentiful Tonight is First Friday Gallery Walk, when downtown Bend galleries and cafes keep their doors open from 5 till 9 p.m. to share art, snacks, wine and music with the public. At Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, “Texture and Constructionist,” featuring the art of Ellen McFadden, Galen Ruud, Randy Smithey and Holly Rodes, opens with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Art in the Atrium at Franklin Crossing, 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., will hold a reception for “East Meets West,” featuring works by 11 artists. “Color Fusion,” with mosaics by Joanie Callen, jewelry by Anne von Heideken and pastels by Sue LyonManley, opens tonight at Red Chair Gallery, 103 N.W. Oregon Ave. Townshend’s Bend Teahouse, 835 N.W. Bond St., will host “Printed Big! Really Big,” created at the annual Under Pressure printmaking event at Atelier 6000. —David Jasper

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Rick Jenkins plays the Duke of Buckingham, who’s involved in a plot for the throne, in Shakespeare’s “Richard III.”

ard with a director friend back east. “I’m having a dialog (with him) … and everything is questions,” DaCosta said. “He never really gives you anything. You ask him a question, and he gives you 20 questions back. He asked me how I view the character.” What he and his director friend are getting at is the large number of ways an actor can approach the role of Richard. Is the wannabe king motivated by a physical disability? Is he just a warmonger? Could he be the way he is because no one loves him? Or does he just enjoy seeing how effectively he can manipulate people? Given the bent of all those options, the challenge for DaCosta is humanizing Richard.

“My wife said to me last night that she was sad that I die at the end, that Richard dies at the end,” he said. “That’s what I’ve always seen in this character. It’s a challenge to make him, at best, sympathetic, but at least have some empathy for him. “I don’t think that you ever really hate Richard because he’s very convincing. He’s very convincing in his arguments,” he added. As for purists who might balk at the idea of tweaking Shakespeare or modernizing it in any way, DaCosta said, “It’s Shakespeare’s story. It’s the essence of ‘Richard III.’ It’s just that our company is telling it in a more modern way.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

PAGE 13

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PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring “Farewell to Summer”; through September, reception from 4-7 p.m. Saturday; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19; 541-593-4382 or www. artistsgallerysunriver.com. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Texture and Constructionist,” works by Ellen McFadden, Galen Ruud, Randy Smithey and Holly Rodes; through Sept. 28; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www. atelier6000.org BEND CITY HALL: Featuring “INSIDE:: OUT” works exploring how Bend’s external environment inspires its internal environment; through Sept. 28; 710 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-5505. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www. canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541549-1299 or www.donterra.com.

FEATURED ARTIST FOR SEPTEMBER

Paul Carew Photography

Join us on First Friday

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fine arts

Submitted photo

Metal work by Midge Thomas will be on display through September at Artists’ Gallery Sunriver. DOWNTOWN BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Portraits”; through Nov. 4; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “East Meets West”; through Sept. 28, reception from 5-8 tonight; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-8683 or www.artlorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HAWTHORN HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring paintings by Teresa Leigh Ander; reception at 6 tonight; 39 N.W. Lousiana Ave., Bend; 541-330-0334. HELPING YOU TAX AND ACCOUNTING: Featuring paintings by Carol Armstrong; 632 S.W.

Sixth St., Suite 2, Redmond; 541-504-5422. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; Tuesdays and Wednesdays only; 601 North Larch St, Suite B, Sisters; 541617-6078 or www.jillnealgallery. com. JOHN PAUL DESIGNS: Featuring custom jewelry and signature series; 1006 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-318-5645. JUDI’S ART GALLERY: Featuring works by Judi Meusborn Williamson; 336 N.E. Hemlock St., Suite 13, Redmond; 360-325-6230. KAREN BANDY DESIGN JEWELER: Featuring “A Sense of Place”; through September, reception from 5-9 tonight; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; www.karenbandy.com or 541-388-0155. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO:

Art Walk & BBQ at: CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING 834 NW Brooks Street Bend, Oregon 97701 Behind the Tower Theatre

541.382.5884

Our feature artist is

Beer & Brats from 5–9, Sept. 7th Come Join the Real Estate Revolution! LOHR Real Estate • 790 SW Industrial Way

Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Wild Spirit, Run Free,” works by Lindsay Scott and Mick Doellinger; through September, reception from 5-9 tonight; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. NANCY P’S BAKING COMPANY: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; through September; 1054 N.W. Milwaukee Ave., Bend; 541-322-8778. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St.; 541-382-6694. PAUL SCOTT GALLERY: Featuring ceramic works by Sheryl Zacharia and Bill Evans; reception from 5-9 tonight; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www.paulscottfineart.com or 541-330-6000. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts by Betty Anne Guadalupe and a group show of quilts inspired by Jane Kirkpatrick’s novel

Food, Home & Garden In AT HOME Every Tuesday

“Love to Water my Soul”; through September, reception from 5-7 tonight; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “Color Fusions,” works by Sue Lyon-Manley, Joanie Callen and Anne von Heideken; through September, reception from 5-9 tonight; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176 or www. redchairgallerybend.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring “Then and Now,” works by Rosalyn Kliot; through Sept. 27; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring photography by Paul Carew; through Sept. 29, reception from 5-9 tonight; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E. Main Ave.; 541-549-0251. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring the fourth annual Dog Show; through September; 204 W. Adams St.; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave.; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Margie Latham; through September; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar Ave.; 541-312-1070. ST. CHARLES BEND: Featuring “Arts in the Hospital”; through September; 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-382-4321. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “The Quilted Life,” works by Nancy Cotton, Betty Vincent, Carol Webb and Joe Glassford; through Saturday; new exhibit, “Artists of 97707,” opens Tuesday; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring “Watercolor Society of Oregon 47th Annual Aqueous Media Traveling Exhibition”; through Sept. 27; 17600 Center Drive; 541-382-9398. TOWNSHEND’S BEND TEAHOUSE: Featuring “Printed Big! Really Big”; through September; 835 N.W. Bond St.; 541-312-2001 or www. townshendstea.com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring works by Tracy Leagjeld and Carla Spence; through September; reception from 5-9 tonight; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Pine Mountain Observatory

Hiking and swimming at Horse Lake

L

ocated about an hour east of Bend, Pine Mountain Observatory gives science nerds

and non-science nerds alike the chance to spend hours gazing at the millions of stars that light up the sky on a cool summer night. Don’t forget to dress warmly and bring whatever binoculars, telescopes or spotter scopes you’ll need to look at the sky. — Bulletin staff

If you go Getting there: From Bend, head east on U.S. Highway 20 for about 26 miles until you reach the old Millican Store. Turn right at a gravel road that runs behind this store and drive another eight miles until you reach the observatory.

Hours: Pine Mountain Observatory is open to the public on Friday and Saturday nights between Memorial Day and the end of September. Programs start at dark. Cost: Suggested donation of $5 Contact: 541-382-8331, pmosun.uoregon.edu

David Jasper / The Bulletin file photo

Horse Lake is as beautiful as any Cascades lake, and as secluded.

the rapidly fading season at

il st Tra

Horse Lake

Colt Lake

Horse Lake. Make an eight-

Cascade Lakes 46 Highway

Sunset Lake

trails 3514, 3516, 3515.1 and the

Trailhead Elk Lake Resort

Pacific Crest Trail. — Bulletin staff

Getting there: From Bend, take Cascade Lakes Highway approximately 33 miles to the Elk Lake Trailhead, on the right, or west side, of the highway. Difficulty: Moderate Cost: Northwest Forest Pass or $5 day-use fee Contact: 541-383-5300

To Bend

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Pine Mountain Observatory Horse Ridge

Old Millican Store 20 2017

Pine Mountain 6,405 ft. Greg Cross / The Bulletin

97 46 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 • FRIDA THE BULLETIN

event calendar s TODAY GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help complete the reclaimed fence around the Kansas Ave. Learning Garden; free; 9 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908. RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes live music, jousting, charity poker, classic cars, a tattoo expo and more; a portion of proceeds benefit local charities; $15 day pass, $25 for weekend; 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.runtothecascades.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket. com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. (Story, Page 13) SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Three-day folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier and more; SOLD OUT; 5:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, www. sistersfolkfestival.org. (Story, Page 6) YOGIS UNITE!: With yoga classes, social activities and dance performances; $25 for two days; 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; information@yogisunitebend.com or www.yogisunitebend.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Hugo”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www. northwestcrossing.com. SYNRGY: The Ashland-based reggae band performs; free; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery & Public House, 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-9242. “GREGORIAN, GOSPEL AND GERSHWIN”: Mark Oglesby presents an organ concert; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. “FIGHTING WITH DEMONS”: Zine release and variety show featuring work by a variety of artists; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley; fightingwithdemons.blogspot.com. (Story, Page 12) RED ROCK SQUARE DANCE: Spectators and dancers welcome; $5, free for

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spectators; 7-10 p.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-923-8804. “RICHARD III”: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; with a champagne reception; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@ gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater. com. (Story, Page 12) SCREEN ON THE GREEN: Juggling performance followed by a screening of the PG-rated film “How to Train Your Dragon”; free; 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m. movie; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

BLACK BEAST REVIVAL: The rock band performs, with Strive Roots; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.liquidclub.net. (Story, Page 4)

SATURDAY Sept. 8 HIGH DESERT SWAP MEET & CAR SHOW: A sale of antiques and a car show; proceeds benefit local and regional charities; free admission; 7 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-4467 or bramsey@ bendbroadband.com. RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes live music, jousting, charity poker, classic cars, a tattoo

expo and more; a portion of proceeds benefit local charities; $15 day pass, $25 for weekend; 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www. runtothecascades.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help complete the reclaimed fence around the Kansas Ave. Learning Garden; free; 9 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a

trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. YOGIS UNITE!: An outdoor yoga event with classes, exhibitors, a raffle and more; registration requested; $25 for two days; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; information@yogisunitebend.com or www. yogisunitebend.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@brooksresources.com or www. nwxfarmersmarket.com. A DAY TO REMEMBER: Featuring a fire truck parade, booths, ax-throwing contests,


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN AY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012• FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

sept. 7-13

LIVE MUSIC & MORE

See Going Out on Page 9 for what’s happening at local night spots.

Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.theduckrace.com. LA GUITARRA IN MEXICO: A lecture tracing the history of the guitar; free; 2 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1032, lizg@deschuteslibrary. org or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SECOND SUNDAY: Carl Adamshick reads from a selection of his works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “RICHARD III”: 3 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details.

N’T MISS ...

Y

e Cascades: A motorcycle a 5K fun run.

S UNITE!

Y & SATURDAY

e of limbs when group d Dog goes awry. A nt works on her breathing and uring last year’s Yogis Unite! Drake Park.

MONDAY Sept. 10

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

“CAMP AMACHE — AN AMERICAN STORY”: Gordon Nagai talks about his family’s experiences in a Japanese internment camp; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-4663. CITY FAIRE: The Seattle-based rock band performs; free; 7:30-10:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3880116, www.astroloungebend.com.

Y

Movies: “Hugo” somehow ing in a wall look exciting.

Y THRU SUNDAY

olk Festival: A gathering of s, not just, like, folks.

TUESDAY

AT DRAKE PARK K RACE

Sept. 11

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athtub rubber duck races to nce 1989. Crowds gather to thousands of plastic ducks ed into the Deschutes River 0 duck race. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

demonstrations, races and more; proceeds benefit a scholarship fund for the children of fallen firefighters; free admission; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Big Al’s Firehouse Grill, state Highway 126 and Williams Road, Powell Butte; 541-548-1488. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: SOLD OUT; 11-12:30 a.m. in downtown Sisters; see Today’s listing for details. VFW DINNER: A 9/11 barbecue, with a poker run; free; 1-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. LA GUITARRA IN MEXICO: A lecture tracing the history of the guitar and its different transformations in Mexico; free; 3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032, lizg@deschuteslibrary.org or www.

deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “RICHARD III”: 7:30 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. JASON & THE PUNKNECKS: The country punk band performs, with The Confederats; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. (Story, Page 4) THE HOONS: The indie rock band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

PAGE 17

SUNDAY Sept. 9 SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-6237. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: SOLD OUT; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in downtown Sisters; see Today’s listing for details. ANNUAL GREAT DRAKE PARK DUCK RACE: Event includes live music, food, activity booths and duck races; proceeds from duck sales benefit local charities; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake

REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@ hotmail.com. HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS: The ’80s rockers perform; $39 or $78 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www. bendconcerts.com. (Story, Page 3) “LIFE WITH AN INDIAN PRINCE”: A screening of the documentary; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “WILD VERSUS WALL”: A screening of the film about how the Mexican border wall affects desert animals and life; followed by a discussion; free; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. reception; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. THE WHITE BUFFALO: Folk-rock music, with Lisa C. Pollock; $7 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www. reverbnation.com/venue/thehornedhand. (Story, Page 4) BROTHERS GOW: The funk-rock band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood

Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 12 BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The concert series finale, with Necktie Killer; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www. musicinthecanyon.com. (Story, Page 4) CASEY NEILL & THE NORWAY RATS: The Americana group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 4) BUCKETHEAD: Rock guitar wizardry, with DJ Samples; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. (Story, Page 8)

THURSDAY Sept. 13 FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Tuesdays with Morrie” by Mitch Albom; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Have a Little Faith” by Mitch Albom; free; noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail. com or http://tumalogardenmarket.com. MAPS OF EARLY MEXICO: A slide show presentation and discussion of maps of early Mexico; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-312-1032. “RICHARD III”: 7:30 p.m. at 2nd Street Theater; see Today’s listing for details. ANIMAL EYES: Indie rock music, with Fanno Creek; free; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www. reverbnation.com/venue/thehornedhand. (Story, Page 4) n SUBMIT AN EVENT at www.bendbulletin. com/submitinfo or email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-383-0351.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

planning ahead SEPT. 14-20 SEPT. 14-16 — FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. SEPT. 14-16, 20 — “RICHARD III”: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14-15, 20; 3 p.m. Sept. 16; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail. com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. SEPT. 14-16,19-22 — “THE PRODUCERS”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical satire about two people who set out to produce the worst show in Broadway history; $30 or $35; 8 p.m. Sept. 14-15, 19-22; 4 p.m. Sept. 16; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 14 — MYTHS AND REALITIES OF THE SPANISH CONQUEST OF MEXICO: Robert Haskett explores myths and realities of what happened after Cortes arrived in Mexico; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 451-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. SEPT. 14 — BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-4084998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. SEPT. 14 — SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. SEPT. 14 — “HUGO”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld.org. SEPT. 14 — SHADOWS ON STARS: The musical duo performs, with Cadence; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. SEPT. 15-16 — MODEL RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE: Ride trains and view a scale railroad layout at the open house hosted by the Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Club and the Central Oregon Area Live Steamers; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Clubhouse, 21520 Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545 or www.ecmrr.org. SEPT. 15-16 — SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Arts and crafts fair with silent auction benefiting the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. SEPT. 15-16 — UNDER PRESSURE: Watch artists use road equipment to

Submitted photo

Artist Ron Schultz gets his first look after the “press” runs over the plate at last year’s Under Pressure steamroller printing event. This year’s event takes place Sept. 15-16. make art prints; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www. atelier6000.org. SEPT. 15 — PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. SEPT. 15 — ROAD TO RECOVERY: A 5K run/walk, followed by live music; registration required; proceeds benefit National Alliance on Mental Illness; $20 or $30; 9 a.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3223100, apendygraft@telecarecorp.com or http://namicentraloregon.org. SEPT. 15 — YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-306-8665. SEPT. 15 — BIG RIG CELEBRATION: Children can watch and climb on big rigs and play in the sand with their own toy rigs; proceeds benefit Together for Children; $5 per child, first 100 free; parents free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Knife River Co., 64500 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541280-9686 or www.together-for-children. org. SEPT. 15 — EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FAIR: Featuring demonstrations for emergency

preparations, displays of emergency kits and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; www.sisterscountrypreparedandready. org. SEPT. 15 — FESTIVAL OF CULTURES: With cultural booths, dance troupes, live music, food and more; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-3824366 or www.festivalofcultures.info. SEPT. 15 — MUTT STRUT & MORE: Featuring a 1.3-mile dog walk, games, contests and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon. Online registration; free, $20 for walk; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-382-3537 or www.hsco.org. SEPT. 15 — NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@brooksresources. com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. SEPT. 15 — SENSATIONAL SATURDAY: Learn how bison altered the High Desert landscape and became cultural icons throughout the West; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway

97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. SEPT. 15 — AUTHOR! AUTHOR!: Mitch Albom, author of “Tuesdays with Morrie” and “Five People You’ll Meet in Heaven” speaks; $20-$75; 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-312-1027 or www.dplfoundation.org. SEPT. 17 — “YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN”: A screening of the PG-rated comedy about a young scientist who experiments with reanimation; $9, free with ticket to “The Producers”; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 18 — “THE HISTORY OF MADRAS”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Steve Lent; free; 10 a.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. SEPT. 18 — THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “For One More Day” by Mitch Albom; free; noon; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3764 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SEPT. 18 — BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-323-3370 or farmersmarket@ brookswoodmeadowplaza.com.

SEPT. 18 — “BLAZING SADDLES”: A screening of the R-rated Western film spoof; $9, free with ticket to “The Producers”; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 19 — BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. SEPT. 19 — PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River and music by Americana act Polecat; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 4-7 p.m. demonstrations, 7-10 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. SEPT. 19 — “THE BIRDS”: A screening of the Alfred Hitchcock film, with an introduction by Robert Osborne; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www. fathomevents.com. SEPT. 19 — CRAIG CAROTHERS: The Nashville-based singer-songwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 19 — THE GOOD HURT: The Seattle-based rock band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. SEPT. 20 — THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Tuesdays with Morrie” by Mitch Albom; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SEPT. 20 — WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of films to inspire and inform; proceeds benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association; $10; 6:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-3302638, katya@onda.org or www.onda. org/wildandscenic. SEPT. 20 — THE DEFIBULATORS: The Brooklyn, N.Y.-based honky-tonk band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 20 — “INHERIT THE WIND”: Preview night of Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of the fictionalized story of the Scopes Monkey Trial; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org.


planning ahead

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Talks & classes

Submitted photo

Chris Kraybill plays with his daughter, Emily, as she pretends to operate a soil compactor during last year’s Big Rig Celebration. This year’s event takes place Sept. 15. SEPT. 20 — “WRONG WINDOW”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org/.

SEPT. 21-27 SEPT. 21-22 — NPRA FINALS RODEO: A Northwest Professional Rodeo Association performance, with roping and pageants; $10, $5 ages 6-11, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; ccrodeo@hotmail.com or www. nwprorodeo.com. SEPT. 21 — “EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www. jcld.org. SEPT. 21 — THE AMES: The folk band performs, with Broken Down Guitars; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. SEPT. 22-23 — AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ponderosa Elementary School, 3790 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-3234300 or www.benddogagility.com.

SEPT. 22 — MCMENAMINS OKTOBERFEST: Featuring food, beer and live music; free; 1 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 22 — BRIANNE KATHLEEN: The Portland-based folk-pop act performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. SEPT. 23 — FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-647-4789. SEPT. 24 — GEORGE WINSTON: The Grammy Award-winning pianist performs; $29 plus fees; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 26 — FURBALL: Themed “Tux & Tails,” with food, music, dancing a silent auction and a raffle; registration requested; proceeds benefit Bend Spay & Neuter Project; $30; 6-9 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-6171010 or www.bendsnip.org. SEPT. 26 — ROSE’S PAWN SHOP: The Los Angeles-based bluegrass band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com.

HAWK WATCH AND MIGRATION COUNTING: Count raptors that are migrating south; free; 9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday, Thursday, Sept. 15-16, Sept. 19-21 and Sept. 27; Indian Ford Campground, five miles northwest of Sisters; www. highdesertmuseum.org. UNIQUELY OREGON: Tracy Prince talks about Native American art in Oregon; free; 6 p.m. Saturday; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; aarbow@ highdesertmuseum.org or 541382-4754, ext. 241, to register. SUICIDE PREVENTION TRAINING: Learn the warning signs of suicide and three simple steps that may save a life; free; 6-8 p.m. Monday; First Presbyterian Church, 230 NE 9th St., Bend; 541-330-4606. THE RIGHT TO THINK: A panel discussion of questions raised in the play “Inherit the Wind”; free; 6:30 p.m. Monday; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-504-6721. BOOKWORKS OPEN STUDIO: Bring supplies and join a collaborative bookmaking experience; $15; 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Tuesday; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759.

A SPIRITUAL GATHERING: Featuring a screening of “3 Magic Words”; registration required; donations accepted; 6-9 p.m. Tuesday; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; www. aspiritualgathering.com. PRESSURE CANNING WORKSHOPS: Learn to safely can meats, fish, poultry, game and vegetables; registration required by Monday; $15; 8:30 a.m. Wednesday or Sept. 19; OSU Extension Service, 3893 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; glenda.hyde@oregonstate.edu or 541-548-6088. SOCIAL SECURITY 101: Learn about benefits, eligibility, early retirement and more; free; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133 to RSVP. SUICIDE PREVENTION TRAINING: Learn the warning signs of suicide and three simple steps that may save a life; free; 6-7 p.m. Wednesday; Deschutes County Services Center, 1300 NW Wall St., Bend; 541-330-4606. COOKING CLASS WITH CHEF BETTE FRASER: Learn to make fresh pasta; registration

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required; $50; 6-9 p.m. Thursday; register for Bend location; www. welltraveledfork.com, chefbette@ welltraveledfork.com or 541-312-0097. NEW VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION: Learn ways to assist the museum giving talks, tours and more; free; 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Sept. 14; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; volunteer@highdesertmuseum. org to RSVP. OIL PAINTING CLASS: Bonnie Junell leads a class; registration required; $40; 4:30-7 p.m. Sept. 14; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-593-4382. BREAKING INTO THE ART WORLD: Penny O’Halloran shares tips and ideas for artists wanting to display their work in public venues; free; 2 p.m. Sept. 16; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar or 541-312-1034. INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING: Rediscover printmaking processes, including relief, collagraph and engraving; $70 plus $35 studio fee; 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 18-Oct. 16; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759.

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PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

restaurants

Mediocre McMenamins Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Patrons eat dinner in the main dining room at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend.

• Food and service ‘not that good’ at the Old St. Francis School in Bend By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

T

his is how an online dictionary defines the word “mediocre”: “Of only ordinary or moderate quality; neither good nor bad; barely adequate.” That’s exactly how I describe my recent dining experiences at McMenamins Old St. Francis School pub and restaurant in Bend. I had three late-August meals there — a sit-down breakfast and dinner, plus a take-out lunch and dessert sampler — and invariably found the food inconsistent and very ordinary, and the service inexperienced. That wasn’t a whole lot differ-

ent than the last time I reviewed the Central Oregon installment of the Portland-based hospitality group, back in January 2007. Then, I wrote: “It’s not that the food and service are bad; it’s just that they’re not that good.” More than 5½ years later, not a lot has changed.

Breakfast with Bach My dining companion and I were initially charmed when we arrived for breakfast. The strains of Johann Sebastian Bach wafted through the room. Our coffee was presented on saucers with cubes of sugar. Antique signs might have come from London or Paris. Live

plants, hanging above an eclectic variety of tables and booths, were illuminated by subtle white, red and yellow lights. But there was nothing subtle about my Southwest omelet. At least three eggs, probably four, were whipped into the omelet and wrapped around ground chorizo sausage, with pepper-jack cheese and diced green chiles of the sort widely available in Hispanic food aisles of grocery stores. It was topped with sour cream, minced green onions and thick, blended red salsa that the menu gallantly described as “chipotle pico de gallo.” Continued next page

McMenamins Old St. Francis School Location: 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend Hours: 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday to Thursday, 7 a.m.-1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Breakfast till 11 a.m. Monday to Saturday and to noon on Sunday. Price range: Breakfast $6.75 to $12.75; lunch $9.25 to $16.25; dinner $9.25 to $19.50; pizzas $10.95 to $29.75 Credit cards: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Yes Vegetarian menu: Numerous choices including the brown-rice Santa Fe Bowl Alcoholic beverages: Full bar

Outdoor seating: Large street-side patio Reservations: Large groups only Contact: www.mcmenamins.com, 541-382-5174

Scorecard OVERALL: BFood: B-. Inconsistent preparations; try the salmon Caesar or the Baja chicken sandwich. Service: B-. Generally friendly but inexperience is obvious on many levels. Atmosphere: B+. Dark but quirky: International antiques draw attention away from food. Value: B-. Prices are on the high side for the quality of food and service provided.


restaurants

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 From previous page The omelet was presented with the pub’s tasty version of cottage potatoes — coarsely chopped and roasted red potatoes. My companion returned her order of house-made corned-beef hash with poached eggs because she has a dietary aversion to green bell peppers, which were liberally sauteed into the meatand-potato concoction. The server initially indicated that a new hash could be made without peppers, but soon returned from the kitchen with the news that the hash had been made ahead of time, and a pepper-free hash would not be forthcoming. So my friend changed her order to classic eggs Benedict — poached eggs with Canadian bacon on an English muffin. For $12.75, she expected better. The Hollandaise sauce that can make or break a Benedict was very heavy with butter, and lacked even the subtle flavor of lemon. We both liked the homemade bread, available as wheat or sourdough toast. Moist and yeasty, it was best when buttered and spread with huckleberry jam. But our server initially forgot my toast when she delivered my omelet. She never apologized for the omission, but brought an order along with my companion’s Benedict … after initially being a little defensive about returning the corned-beef hash order.

Dinner with Dylan Service was noticeably less competent at our evening meal, when the sounds of Bob Dylan and Stevie Wonder had replaced the morning classical music. Our server pounced on our table immediately upon our arrival to take our drink orders — on this evening, glasses of water. But more than five minutes passed before she returned to take our meal orders, and she still didn’t have our water. She did express regret for that oversight. But over the course of the dinner, she was woefully bad at checking back on our level of satisfaction with food, even when she was attending tables next to ours. My companion this time

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

The BBQ shrimp tostada salad at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend.

Next week: Prineville’s Solstice Brewing Company Visit www.bendbulletin .com/restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

made the best meal choice — a salmon Caesar salad. The romaine lettuce was fresh and crisp, and the Cajun-seasoned wild salmon, grilled just to moist and flaky, was excellent. It wasn’t so good that I would come back to McMenamins just for this salad, but it was something I would feel comfortable ordering if I were to return. I started with a cup of the soup du jour, a beef-barley blend with lots of barley and smaller amounts of beef, carrots, celery and onion. But the broth was far too salty for my taste; I pushed the bowl aside and looked for the server to bring some butter for my

bread. To her credit, she did not charge me for the soup, but I never did get the butter, and the bowl remained on the table for the balance of the meal. My main course was listed on the menu as smoked chicken pesto pasta. But pesto is a sauce made of fresh basil leaves with olive oil, garlic and pine nuts, and there were no such ingredients on the plate I was presented. The chicken was good — a tender sliced breast with a savory, smoky flavor — but it was merely served upon macaroni and cheese. The macaroni, in this case, was penne pasta, as the menu had promised. But the “sundried tomato pesto” seemed to have been nothing more than tomatoes blended into a cheese sauce. I would have complained to our server had we seen her again before she came to present the final bill.

Lunch and dessert On other visits, between my friend and her teenage son, we were able to try McMenamins’ pizza, sand-

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One Free Kids Meal, per Adult Entree with this coupon.

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wiches and desserts. The Fireside Special pizza was a hit. Canadian bacon, pepperoni, fennel sausage, onions and artichoke hearts were served on a thin crust with just the right amount of cheese. I think it could only have been improved with a little more tomato paste. The Baja chicken sandwich was very good. A mesquiteseasoned chicken breast, perfectly cooked, was topped with melted pepper-jack cheese and lots of sliced avocado upon a cilantro-jalapeño Kaiser roll spread with roasted red-pepper aioli. Again, I wouldn’t make a special trip here for this sandwich, but it’s something I could eat again. Two other sandwiches were disappointing because the buns were dry, without any sort of spread. The hamburger with cheddar cheese, lettuce, tomato and onions supposedly had a “secret sauce,” but it must have been very sparingly applied. The housesmoked pulled pork in a beerbased barbecue sauce was delicious, but again, the bun was untouched. And the coleslaw that is meant to be part of the order was overlooked. From a dessert sampler plate, we gave thumbs-up to two choices but agreed that the third didn’t cut it. We liked both a mixed berry crumble, made with several Oregon berries, and a black-and-tan brownie. Both were presented with housemade vanilla ice cream. But the Hogshead Whiskey bread pudding reminded us more of a cinnamon roll, despite the whiskey-spiked

9 TVs

golden raisins. It was improved with a caramel-ale sauce and whipped cream, but still earned that same label: mediocre. — Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

SMALL BITES The BigBelly Burger Deli is now serving soups, salads and sandwiches — including cheesesteak and barbecued pulled pork — at its location just off Spring River Road in Sunriver. Everything, including breakfasts, is priced under $10. The new restaurant, which opened in late July, is fully licensed and open 7 a.m.4 p.m. Monday to Friday. 56815 Venture Lane, Suite 501, Sunriver; www.bigbellyburger deli.com, 541-382-3354. Al Edwards, the former firefighter who owns Big Al’s Fire House Grill in Powell Butte, will host fire squads from throughout Central Oregon Saturday in a benefit event for the 9/11 Fallen Firefighters Scholarship Fund. A series of events, including a parade of fire trucks, a smoke-jumping demonstration and an axe-throwing contest, is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. According to Edwards, the fund is intended “to enhance the education and future of children who want to become firefighters.” State Highway 126 at South Williams Road, Powell Butte; 541-548-1488.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Daily Specials

Football Season is here!

JOIN US FOR ALL THE DUCK FOOTBALL GAMES AS WELL AS NFL GAMES! J

927 NW BOND ST. • 541.382.4592 NOW TAKING VISA & MASTER CARD

PAGE 21


PAGE 22 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

CONCERTS

Courtesy Patrick Weishampel

Mrs. Lovett (Gretchen Rumbaugh) and Sweeney Todd (Aloysius Gigl) plot gruesome revenge in “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.”

Thriller theater • Portland Center Stage marks 25 years with ‘Sweeney Todd’ By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

P

ortland Center Stage is turning 25 years old. Just be wary of any pie served at the celebration, especially the meat pies. In honor of its silver anniversary, the company is producing Stephen Sondheim’s “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.” The award-winning musical thriller runs Sept. 21 to Oct. 21 at the Gerding Theater at the Armory in Portland. Preview performances begin Sept. 18. In 1988, Portland Center Stage produced its first play: “Heartbreak House” by Bernard Shaw. At the time it was called OSF Portland, a branch of Ashland’s critically acclaimed Oregon Shakespeare Festival. After five seasons of successful productions, Portland Center Stage became an independent entity in 1994. For 25 years, the group has brought “a blend of classical, contemporary and premiere works” to the City of Roses, according to its website. “Sweeney Todd” premiered at the Uri The-

atre on Broadway in 1979 and is considered “Sondheim’s musical masterpiece,” according to a news release. “Combining comic turns and chilling drama, music hall-style numbers and hauntingly beautiful romantic songs, ‘Sweeney Todd’ offers a fascinating portrait of a man driven to madness by injustice.” The musical won eight Tony Awards in 1979, including Best Musical, Best Book and Best Score. This is the first Sondheim play produced by Portland Center Stage. His other famous works include “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” “A Little Night Music,” “Sunday in the Park with George” and “Into the Woods.” Ticket prices range from $44 to $70, depending on seat location and day of performance. Preview performances range from $39 to $43. Student tickets are available for $30. To purchase tickets and for more information, visit www.pcs.org or call 503-445-3700. — Reporter: 541-383-0350, jwasson@bendbulletin.com

Through Sept. 9 — MusicfestNW: Featuring Silversun Pickups, Passion Pit, Beirut, Dinosaur Jr., Girl Talk, A-Trak and The Hives; various locations in Portland; www.musicfestnw.com. Sept. 6 — Beirut, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 6 — Slightly Stoopid, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 7 — Bonnie Raitt, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; TW* Sept. 7 — Silversun Pickups, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; VENUE CHANGE; TW* Sept. 8 — My Morning Jacket, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 9 — Al Stewart, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 9 — Don Omar, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 11 — Crosby, Stills & Nash, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 11 — Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 11 — Heart, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 11 — Pat Metheny Unity Band, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 12 — Crosby, Stills & Nash, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 12 — Dwight Yoakam, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 12 — Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 13 — Buckethead, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 13 — Hot Chip/YACHT, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 13 — Pretty Lights, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 14 — Buckethead, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 14 — Chicago, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Sept. 14 — Dillon Francis, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 14 — Huey Lewis and the News, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 14-15 — The Be Good Tanyas, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 15 — Anthrax, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 15 — Blame Sally, Unitarian Fellowship, Ashland; www.stclairevents.

com or 541-535-3562. Sept. 15 — Huey Lewis and the News, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillwinery.com or 877-627-9445. Sept. 16 — Atmosphere, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 17 — The Gourds/James McMurtry, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 18 — Big Time Rush, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 19 — Bob Mould Plays Copper Blue & Silver Age, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 20 — Animal Collective, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 20 — Father John/Misty, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 20 — Serj Tankian, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 22 — Dispatch, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 22 — Matisyahu/Dirty Heads, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 22 — Portland Cello Project, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 22 — Train, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT* Sept. 22-23 — The Doobie Brothers, Chinook Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; www.chinookwindscasino.com or 888-244-6665. Sept. 25 — Chevelle, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 25 — Grouplove, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 25 — Wilco, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 26 — Hatebreed, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 26 — Odd Future, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 26 — The Shins, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 26 — Train, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 27 — Charlie Daniels Band, The Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; www.rrtheater.org or 541-884-5483. Sept. 27 — Garbage, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 27 — Kimbra, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 27-29 — Furthur featuring Phil Lesh & Bob Weir, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; only Thursday tickets are still available; CT* Sept. 28 — Amanda Palmer & The Grand Theft Orchestra, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF*


Sept. 8 — Jim Gaffigan, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 9 — Ira Glass, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 11 — Henry Rollins, Elsinore Theatre, Salem; TW* Sept. 11 — Ralphie May, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 14 — Ralphie May, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Sept. 20 — Mark Bittman, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 21 — Lisa Lampanelli, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 28 — San Francisco Int’l Comedy Competition, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Oct. 6 — Kathy Griffin, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

SYMPHONY & OPERA Sept. 8 — “Opening with a Bang!”: Featuring percussionist Colin Currie; music by Sibelius, Aho and Respighi; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 15 — “Here to Stay: The Gershwins”: Featuring pianist Kevin Cole; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 20 — “Rhapsody in Blue”: Featuring pianist Jon Nakamatsu; music by Bernstein,

TM: Ticketmaster, www .ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000 TW: TicketsWest, www .ticketswest.com or 800992-8499 TF: Ticketfly, www.ticket fly.com or 877-435-9849 CT: Cascade Tickets, www .cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849 Ravel, Gershwin and de Falla; Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Sept. 22 — “An Evening with John Williams”: Featuring music from “Harry Potter,” “Schindler’s List” and “Star Wars”; Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Sept. 22-24 — “Parker Plays Mozart”: Featuring pianist Jon Kimura Parker; Music by Alfvén, Mozart, Andrew Norman and Rachmaninoff; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Oct. 7 — “Trains, Trams, Trolleys and More”: Part of the Kids Series Concert; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

EXHIBITS Through Sept. 9 — “Tough by Nature: Portraits of Cowgirls and Ranch Women of the American West,” Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027.

Through Sept. 16 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum” (through Sept. 16), “Ellsworth Kelly/Prints” (through Sept. 16) and “Cornerstones of a Great Civilization: Masterworks of Ancient Chinese Art” (through Nov. 11); Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through Sept. 16 — Time-Based Art Festival: A convergence of contemporary performance and visual arts; various locations, Portland; www.pica.org/tba or 503-242-1419. Through Oct. 7 — Maryhill Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition” (through Oct. 7), “British Painting from the Permanent Collection” (through Nov. 15) and “Ceramics from the Permanent Collection” (through Nov. 15); Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Through Dec. 31 — “Good Grief! A Selection from 50 Years of Original Art from Charles M. Schulz’ Peanuts”: Featuring 25 original strips; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene; jsma. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027.

Continued next page

THEATER & DANCE Through Sept. 8 — “3 Viewings”: Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher explores love, money and loss in a trio of mordantly witty narratives; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Through Oct. 7 — “And So It Goes”: Play by Aaron Posner; world premiere; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; www.artistsrep. org or 503-241-1278. Through Oct. 12 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: “Party People” (through Nov. 3) and “Troilus and Cressida” (through Nov. 4) are currently running in the New Theatre. “All the Way” (through Nov. 3), “Medea/ Macbeth/Cinderella” (through Nov. 3), “Animal Crackers” (through Nov. 4) and “Romeo and Juliet” (through Nov. 4) are currently in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre. “Henry V” (through Oct. 12), “The Very Merry Wives of Windsor, Iowa” (through Oct. 13) and “As You Like It” (through Oct. 14) are currently running at the

TM

LECTURES & COMEDY

*Tickets

Elizabethan Stage; Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Sept. 11-16 — “Memphis”: Musical features a book by Joe DiPietro; Keller Auditorium, Portland; www.pcpa.com or 503-248-4335. Sept. 13-16 — Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 18-Oct. 21 — “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street”: Musical thriller by Stephen Sondheim; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; preview performances run Sept. 18-20; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700. Sept. 26 — L.A. Dance Project: Part of the White Bird Dance Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.whitebird.org or 503-245-1600. Oct. 11-13 — Trisha Brown Dance Company: Part of the White Bird Dance Series; Newmark Theatre, Portland; www.whitebird.org or 503-245-1600.

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October 1

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON PER VISIT • COUPON EXPIRES 10/21/12

LIVE UNITED

Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 7 — Alanis Morissette, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Oct. 7 — Alfie Boe, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 7 — Carrie Underwood, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Oct. 7 — The XX, Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* Oct. 8 — Justin Bieber, Rose Garden, Portland; SOLD OUT; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Oct. 9 — Tom Rush, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 10 — Gossip, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Oct. 10 — The Head & The Heart/ Blitzen Trapper, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW*

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Sept. 28 — Joss Stone, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 28 — The Shins, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 28 — Willy Porter, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 29 — Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Sept. 29 — Beach House/Dustin Wong, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 29 — George Thorogood, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 30 — Beach House, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 30 — Citizen Cope, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 30 — George Thorogood & The Destroyers, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Sept. 30 — Patrick Wolf, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 2 — Aimee Mann, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 2 — Nightwish, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Oct. 2 — Stephen Marley, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 3 — Shpongle, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Oct. 4 — Ben Howard, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 4 — Glen Hansard, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Oct. 4 — Grizzly Bear, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Oct. 4 — Natalie Merchant: Performing with the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343 Oct. 4 — Psychedelic Furs, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 4 — Six Organs of Admittance, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* Oct. 5 — Calobo, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Oct. 5 — Greg Brown, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 5 — Ed Sheeran, Roseland Theater, Portland; VENUE CHANGE; TW* Oct. 5 — Phoenix Blues, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Oct. 5 — Steve Kimock, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 6 — An Evening of Bollywood Music, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Oct. 6 — Michael Kiwanuka, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Oct. 6 — Steve Vai, Roseland

out of town

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012


PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

out of town

DOWNTOWN ART DISTRICT O R I G I N A L F I N E A RT

KAREN BANDY GALLERY | 25 NW MINNESOTA AVE. | 541-388-0155 | www.karenbandy-gallery.com

JOIN KAREN BANDY FOR HER SHOW “A SENSE OF PLACE” Fine Jewelry and Fine Art

First Friday September 7, 5-9pm

Tucked between Thump and Alleda PAUL SCOTT GALLERY | 869 NW WALL ST. STE 104 | 541-330-6000 | www.paulscottfineart.com

NEW WORKS BY CERAMIC ARTISTS, BILL EVANS AND SHERYL ZACHARIA

Featuring national and international artists, styles ranging from realism to abstract. We are just down the breezeway opposite Boken Restaurant.

Come Celebrate, Sept. 7, 5-9pm

MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY | 869 NW WALL ST. STE 100 | 541-388-2107 | www.mockingbird-gallery.com

“WILD SPIRIT, RUN FREE” Two person show for LINDSAY SCOTT & MICK DOELLINGER Friday, Sept. 7th, 5-9pm

“ECHO ACROSS THE VALLEY” 27x40 Oil - Lindsay Scott “THINK TANK” Bronze Ed. 30 - Mick Doellinger RED CHAIR GALLERY | 103 NW OREGON AVE. | 541-306-3176 | www.redchairgallerybend.com

“COLOR FUSION” Featuring new works by Sue Lyon-Manley, Anne vonHeideken, and Joanie Callen Opens on Friday, Sept. 7th, 5-9pm Show runs Sept. 4 to Oct. 2. SAGE FRAMING & GALLERY | 834 NW BROOKS ST. | 541-382-5884 | www.sageframing-gallery.com

SEPTEMBER’S FEATURED ARTIST

Paul Carew

Photography Show runs Sept. 4 - Sept. 29

Reception - First Friday, September 7th, 5-9pm VISIT US DURING THIS FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK OR FIND US ON FACEBOOK.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 From previous page Through Dec. 31 — “Timberrr! A Nostalgic Look Back at Working in the Woods”: Featuring vintage photographs and rare motion picture films; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www. worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Through Jan. 5 — “Design with the Other 90%: Cities”: Exhibit explores design solutions that address the challenges created by rapid urban growth in informal settlements; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Through Feb. 10 — “Simply Beautiful: Photographs from National Geographic,” Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Through Feb. 16 — “Reflecting on Eric Gronborg”: Works employ archetypes of functional ceramic traditions as conceptual vehicles to explore contemporary culture; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Through Dec. 2013 — “The Sea & Me”: A new children’s interactive exhibit; Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org or 541-867-3474. Sept. 15-Nov. 15 — “David Hockney: Six Fairy Tales”: A compilation of 39 etchings inspired by the works of the Brothers Grimm; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Sept. 22 — Jellyfish Jubilee: A Celebration of Food and Wine, Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www. aquarium.org or 541-867-3474. Sept. 22-23 — Corvallis Fall Festival, Corvallis Central Park, Corvallis; www.corvallisfallfestival.com or 541-752-9655. Sept. 29 — Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Live: Free admission at participating venues; various locations in Oregon; www.smithsonianmag.com/ museumday or 800-766-2149. Sept. 29-Dec. 9 — “Lesley Dill: Poetic Visions”: Featuring Dill’s wall sculptures and art installation; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene; jsma. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Sept. 29-Jan. 1 — “RACE: Are We So Different,” Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Sept. 29-Jan. 6 — “Grossology: The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body,” Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Oct. 6-Jan. 27 — “The Body Beautiful”: Featuring Greek and Roman sculpture from British Museum; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811.

MISCELLANY Sept. 8-9 — Homesteader’s Reunion, Fork Rock Grange Hall, Fort Rock; 541-576-2236. Sept. 8-9 — Shrewsbury Renaissance Faire, Kings Valley; www.shrewfaire.com. Sept. 13-16 — Oktoberfest, Mount Angel; www. oktoberfest.org or 855-899-6338. Sept. 20-23 — Feast Portland: A celebration of food, drink and everything else that makes Portland awesome; presented by Bon Appétit; www.feastportland.com. Sept. 22 — Tour of Gymnastics Champions: Featuring members of the 2012 U.S. Olympic Team and Nastia Liukin; Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 29 — Hood River Hops Fest, Hood River; www. hoodriver.org or 541-386-2000.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

PAGE 25

gaming TOP 10 ACROSS THE BOARD The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top games for September: 1. “Borderlands 2” (PS3, X360, PC) 2. “Darksiders II” (PS3, X360) 3. “Sound Shapes” (Vita) 4. “Transformers: Fall of Cybertron” (PS3, X360) 5. “Dust: An Elysian Tail” (X360) 6. “Persona 4: Arena” (PS3, X360) 7. “Madden NFL 13” (PS3, X360) 8. “Deadlight” (X360) 9. “New Super Mario Bros. 2” (3DS) 10. “Orcs Must Die 2” (PC) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Gaming news McClatchy-Tribune News Service

After years of mediocre releases, “Madden NFL 13” puts the video game franchise in the best position it’s been all generation.

Are you ready for some football? • After a few shaky seasons, ‘Madden’ turns the corner

able to call your own plays), and injects year-round drama into your franchise. The XP system is great because it lets you progress your players in the areas of your choosing (the CPU also does a decent job if you By Matthew Kato Game Informer Magazine auto-upgrade), while also incorhey say football is a game porating natural player progress/ of inches, and this is true regression and rewarding great for “Madden NFL 13.” Fans performances and hard work at judge the series by so many details practices. It’s a well-done system that it’s hard to point to any one in that invests you in your team in a particular that makes or breaks way that makes sense. My critithe game. This year’s title attempts cism of the XP upgrades is that they could do a better job to cover a lot of ground letting coaches influence for the franchise, and the REVIEW of their team. outcome is akin to a QB EA Tiburon also overthrowing for 400 yards and hauled scouting and free still not winning the game. A lot went right even if it wasn’t a agency, with the former vastly imresounding victory. In the case of proved from last year. I like being “Madden 13,” there is such a thing able to choose which attributes and traits to scout, and with the scoutas a moral victory. Connected Careers is a brilliant ing upgrade (a must-buy) the draft mode that in one fell swoop makes actually functions. The entire draft the online franchise feature set the process is fun because of the little same as the normal offline one, surprises that pop up during scoutintroduces XP to upgrade players ing and Trey Wingo’s draft-day and coaches, bolsters the stagnant audio profiles on draftees. Maybe Superstar mode (including being a potential draft pick goes back to

T

‘MADDEN NFL 13’ 8.25 (out of 10)

PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 EA Sports, EA Tiburon ESRB rating: E for Everyone

college or drops due to character concerns. Stories like these and many more (in one playthrough, Kurt Warner came out of retirement) surface in a news hub that’s augmented by media tweets, and they add a texture to each season that has been missing in past franchise modes. As much as I like Connected Careers, some things are missing or unnecessarily frustrating. The lack of an overarching calendar makes it hard to know how many scouting periods are left before the draft and how many times you can bid on players in free agency. Furthermore, you can’t see all of a player’s info when you try to sign or trade them, and other useful info is needlessly buried (although there is a

SNAFU in the Team Needs screen that lets you see the actual overall ratings for some potential draft picks). Restricted free agents, variable contract structures, practice squads and other franchise features are still absent. For some reason EA even removed the Combine and pro days. If there’s one glaring mistake that brings “Madden 13” down, it’s the new Infinity physics engine. It sometimes makes good on its intent to bring more realistic physics, varied hits, and multiple contact points on the body, but the effects of player collision are inconsistent. You never know if you’re going to unexpectedly trip during inside runs. Both “Madden 12” and “Madden 13” are incomplete experiences, but in different ways. The former wasn’t a good game, whereas this year’s title introduces several aspects that need to be improved instead of scrapped. We haven’t seen the best “Madden” has to offer, but it’s a lot easier to rebuild when you have the right pieces in place.

‘LITTLEBIGPLANET PS VITA’ GIVES CREATORS NEW TOOLS

“LittleBigPlanet” has warmed hearts and frustrated platform gaming fans since 2008, and the franchise’s latest jaunt to the Sony PlayStation Vita handheld proves no different. The Vita adaptation of the popular side-scrolling puzzle game is now in beta testing. Like the PlayStation 3 version, the levels in “LittleBigPlanet PS Vita” are slick and gorgeous, while providing all the tools creative types crave to build their own courses. The full game is expected to debut Sept. 25. “LittleBigPlanet PS Vita” brings a host of special tools to the Vita platform, and it’s obvious that game developers Double Eleven and Tarsier intend to demonstrate all the hand-held console is capable of. Out of the gate, you’ll note that the entire toolset from the Vita iteration’s big brothers (and the PlayStation Portable release) have returned. If you’ve ever resized an image on a smartphone or tapped to zoom in on small website text on a tablet computer, selecting and repositioning in-game props and items in “LittleBigPlanet PS Vita” will feel as natural as ever, thanks to the Vita’s touch capabilities. If you’re looking for what could possibly become the next portable system killer app, “LittleBigPlanet PS Vita” has the makings of a classic.

— Brittany Vincent, Gamerlive.tv


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

OPEN SATURDAY 12-3

OPEN SATURDAY 12-2

THE PARKS AT BROKEN TOP - Former model with upgraded finishes, across from park. Community pool and park. MLS#201204528 $349,000 DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington Dr to Metolius. Metolius to left on Devils Lake. Home on left across from park. 61582 Devils Lake Dr

Powell Butte Estate home, views from every room. Remodeled kitchen, open great room & travertine floors. Master bedroom with balconies. Lovely 2 bedroom casita. MLS#201203177 $430,000 DIRECTIONS: Hwy 126 east to south on Copley Rd. approx. 4 miles east of intersection of Hwy 126 & Powell Butte Hwy. 8338 SW Copley Rd

SUE CONRAD, BROKER, CRS 541-480-6621

OPEN SATURDAY 1-4

OPEN HOUSE

LYNNE CONNELLEY, ECOBROKER, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

OPEN SUNDAY 12-3

CUL-DE-SAC

541-382-4123 Overlooking the Deschutes River from the back & River’s Edge golf course from the front. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2612 sq. ft. Master suite sitting area opens to river view. MLS#201204300 $499,900 DIRECTIONS: 3rd St. to west on NW Mt. Washington Dr, north on Golf View Dr. 3120 NW Golf View Dr

ROSEMARY GOODWIN, BROKER, CERTIFIED NEGOTIATOR 541-706-1897

OPEN SAT & SUN 11-6

Come visit the new model home for Group PacWest Homes in Gardenside. MLS#201205995 $224,950 DIRECITONS: 27th street south, East, (left) on Starlight, left on Camellia St, right on Daylily. 21279 Daylily Ave

Thousands Of Listings At www.bendproperty.com 486 SW Bluff Dr., Old Mill District Bend, OR 97702 or find us at: youtube.com/coldwellbankermorris facebook.com/bendproperty twitter/buybend

DON KELLEHER, BROKER THE KELLEHER GROUP 541-480-1911

THE PARKS AT BROKEN TOP - Former model with upgraded finishes, across from park. Community pool and park. MLS#201204528 $349,000 DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington Dr to Metolius. Metolius to left on Devils Lake. Home on left across from park. 61582 Devils Lake Dr

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OPEN SUNDAY 1-4

AWBREY BUTTE- 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 4288 sq. ft. home. Flat .82 acre lot on cul-de-sac. Master on main. Shop with concrete floor MLS#201206297 $700,000 DIRECTIONS: Summit Dr to south on NW Promontory Ct 1053 NW Promontory Court

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OPEN SATURDAY 12-3

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Come see this neighborhood; Cambria Estates! Elegantly finished great room plan, bonus/media room. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1/4 acre. Fenced backyard. MLS#201205757 $330,000 DIRECTIONS: HWY 97 east on Reed Market, south/ right on Baptist Way to Cambria Subdivision. 61527 Baptist Way

Beautiful Schumacher built home in River Rim. 2583 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 3 bath on one level. One owner, like new, many amenities! MLS#201108147 $539,000 DIRECTIONS: Follow signs off River Rim Dr. 19465 Golden Meadow Loop

Come visit the new model home for Group PacWest Homes in Gardenside. MLS#201205995 $224,950 DIRECITONS: 27th street south, East, (left) on Starlight, left on Camellia St, right on Daylily. 21279 Daylily Ave

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ANGIE MOMBERT, BROKER THE KELLEHER GROUP 541-408-3543


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

PAGE 27

movies

‘The Words’ is just so-so • Performances are stellar, but this film is not a work of genius

A

lmost every word Ernest Hemingway wrote in the years immediately before 1922 was lost by his first wife, Hadley, who packed the pages in a briefcase and lost it on a train. Hardly an American lit student lives who has not heard this story. Hemingway’s lost prose lives on, in a sense, in the movie “The Words,” which opens with a writer named Clayton Hammond (Dennis Quaid) reading from his new novel in a Manhattan bookstore. But hold on. Don’t get ahead of the story. I know you’re thinking Hammond’s book is actually the long-lost Hemingway manuscript. But the movie adds another level. His book is ABOUT another novelist who finds the lost briefcase in a Paris antique shop. Most of the movie is about him. His name is Rory Jansen (Bradley Cooper), and he has a wife named Dora (Zoe Saldana). Dora is a famous name among novelists’ wives, but never mind. Her purpose here is to shoehorn a beautiful woman into the movie, which includes two others: Celia (Nora Arnezeder), a Parisian mistress, who is the one who leaves the briefcase on the train, and Danielle (Olivia Wilde), a graduate student who falls for Clayton Hammond at his reading. The original novelist at the beginning of this series of events is known only as The Old Man (Jeremy Irons), and he is seen only when already old. If you’re thinking of “The Old Man and the Sea,” don’t blame me. After Rory Jansen finds the novel and publishes it as his own, he finds himself in the park one day, having a conversation with The Old Man, who tells him the story of how he came to write the novel and lose it. I doubt if either one of us could pass a quiz on that plot. It’s a level too many, and sidesteps a more promising approach: What if the movie were about the real Ernest Hemingway discovering that his

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Bradley Cooper stars as Rory Jansen, left, and Jeremy Irons stars as The Old Man in “The Words.”

ROGER EBERT

“The Words” 96 minutes PG-13, for brief strong language and smoking

lost manuscript had been found and published by a stranger? That would eliminate the need for the Dennis Quaid and Olivia Wilde characters, provide an opening for some juicy Hemingway

dialogue, and create an excuse for a passionate affair between Hemingway and the succulent Dora. Of course you’d need some time compression, because the various events in the movie seem to span perhaps 90 years. “The Words,” written and directed by Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal, may sound like a movie about literature, but it isn’t. It ingeniously avoids quoting more than a few words from the Hemingwayesque novel, and although Clayton Hammond reads more from his novel, there’s no suggestion that we’re dealing with Son of Hemingway, or even Cousin Of. The movie does, however, slyly leave open the possibility that his novel is the story of his own life.

Watching the movie, I enjoyed the settings, the periods and the acting. I can’t go so far as to say I cared about the story, particularly after it became clear that its structure was too clever by half. What does work are the performances, especially Jeremy Irons as The Old Man. He’s not as angry about Jansen’s plagiarism as you might assume, and indeed the real Hemingway considered his

lost manuscripts “juvenile work.” (In life, Hadley did save a few carbons, one of which was the short story “Up in Michigan,” which is a work of genius. We can only wonder what was lost.) Watching the movie, I enjoyed the settings, the periods and the acting. I can’t go so far as to say I cared about the story, particularly after it became clear that its structure was too clever by half. There’s also an appearance by J.K. Simmons as Jansen’s father, not a very necessary character, but it’s funny how often you see Simmons playing someone in a movie and wish the whole movie was about him. — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 31.

Reviews by Roger Ebert unless otherwise noted.

HEADS UP

Independent Pictures / The Associated Press

Juno Temple and Matthew McConaughey star in “Killer Joe.”

‘Killer Joe’ is brutal, disgusting and funny W

illiam Friedkin’s “Killer Joe” is one hell of a movie. It left me speechless. I can’t say I loved it. I can’t say I hated it. It is expertly directed, flawlessly cast, and written with merciless black humor by Tracy Letts. It’s about the Smiths, the stupidest family I’ve ever seen in a movie that’s not a comedy. The Smiths live in a trailer that is apparently somewhere near Dallas, although we never see a street or a skyline suggesting the city. Our clue is the Dallas Police car used by Killer Joe. Whoever painted it must have known where he was. Killer Joe is not stupid, but he makes the mistake of never realizing just how dumb the Smiths are. He’s played by Matthew McConaughey, soon after “Magic Mike,” and both films take advantage of his reptilian charm and his snaky, hunky, me-first aura. This is one of his best performances. Killer Joe is known as a cop who sometimes hires out as a contract killer. His reputation is passed along to Chris Smith (Emile Hirsch), a witless young man who desperately needs to find money to pay drug dealers before they kill him. He suggests to his father, Ansel (Thomas Haden Church), that they hire Joe to kill Chris’ mother (Ansel’s first wife) so they can collect on her life insurance policy. We never meet the intended victim, but

ROGER EBERT

“Killer Joe” 103 minutes NC-17, for graphic disturbing content involving violence and sexuality, and a scene of brutality

she will obviously not be missed; when kid sister Dottie (Juno Temple), the youngest in the film, overhears them, she says it sounds like a good idea. “What good is she doing anyone?” Chris asks, begging the question of what good he, Ansel and Dottie are doing anyone. There is one more Smith, Sharla (Gina Gershon), who is Ansel’s current wife and Chris and Dottie’s stepmother. Falling out of her dress, her mascara often smudged, she could be the poster child for that underused word “slattern.” She not only goes along with the scheme, but may have more to do with it than anyone realizes. The film depicts a world that is holding onto habitability by its fingernails. Filmed by the great cinematographer Caleb Deschanel, it is a place where a billiard parlor

has one table, fires burn all night in empty oil drums, chained pit bulls bark and slather, the nights are dark and stormy, and the flatscreen TV seems to be playing the same video about monster trucks over and over again. Striking a blow for good taste, Killer Joe eventually lifts the TV over his head and smashes it to the floor. Almost everyone gets smashed to the floor in this movie — Chris twice, by drug dealers and Killer Joe. There are a lot of broken noses, swollen purple cheekbones and bloody faces. There is also a lot of nudity and sex, and McConaughey has an eerie power in one scene where he smoothly stage-manages Dottie in her deflowering, and another where fellatio is performed on a fried chicken drumstick. The movie is rated NC-17 and rightly so, and answers the question of how much sex and violence a mainstream movie requires to earn that rating. In my opinion, the MPAA should set the bar lower. The rating cautions, “graphic disturbing content involving violence and sexuality, and a scene of brutality.” A scene of brutality — singular? I counted six. As a film, it’s something else. The audience laughed at the right places, applauded at the end and walked out talking about how disgusting it was. — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

“First Position” — This documentary follows six young dancers as they prepare for and compete in the Youth America Grand Prix, a prestigious ballet competition. With Aran Bell, Michaela DePrince and Joan Sebastian Zamora. This film was not given a star rating. 90 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from Los Angeles Times

“Gerhard Richter Painting” — This documentary about the German artist Gerhard Richter chronicles his creative process as he paints a series of large-scale abstract images. In German and English, with English subtitles. This film was not given a star rating. 97 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from Los Angeles Times

“The Goonies” — The 1985 cult classic returns to the silver screen. When a group of ordinary kids discover a secret treasure map, their sleepy seaport lives are suddenly transformed into a fun-filled, roller-coaster ride filled with heartpounding adventure and peril. The film screens at the Tin Pan Theater in Bend. 115 minutes. (PG) — Synopsis from Warner Bros. Pictures

“Hugo” — Unlike any other film Martin Scorsese has ever made, and yet possibly the closest to his heart. The young hero (Asa Butterfield) lives secretly in a cavernous Parisian train station, where his late father maintained the clockworks. Now he maintains the clocks and dreams of completing his father’s project, a mechanical man. Part of Munch & Movies, the film screens tonight at dusk at Compass Park in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood. Pre-movie entertainment will be provided by Chris Beland. This event is free. Rating: Four stars. 130 minutes. (PG) “Raiders of the Lost Ark” — For one week only, the 1981 classic that introduced our favorite archeologist Indiana Jones, returns to the big screen. Directed by Steven Spielberg, “Raiders of the Lost Ark” has undergone a complete restoration for the IMAX format, according to its website. This film screens in IMAX at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. 115 minutes. (PG) — Information from official website

WHAT’S NEW “Branded” — In a dystopian future ruled by mega-corporations, a man tries to unravel a global mind-control conspiracy based on subliminal advertising. With Ed Stoppard, Leelee Sobieski and Jeffrey Tambor. This film was not reviewed in advance for critics. 106 minutes. (R) — Synopsis from Los Angeles Times

“The Cold Light of Day” — While on a sailing vacation in Spain, a man has his world turned upside down when his family is kidnapped by intelligence agents searching for a mysterious briefcase. With Henry Cavill, Sigourney Weaver and Bruce Willis. This film was not reviewed in advance for critics. 93 minutes. (PG-13) — Synopsis from Los Angeles Times

“Killer Joe” — Very dark, violent and sex-drenched film about the stupidest family I’ve ever seen in a movie that’s not a comedy. Set amid trailer trash in Dallas, it’s about a life insurance fraud that goes horribly wrong in every possible way. Starring Matthew McConaughey in an eerie performance as a cop who moonlights as a contract killer. The four members of the family he becomes involved with are played by Thomas Haden Church, Emile Hirsch, Gina Gershon and Juno Temple. Rating: Three stars. 103 minutes. (NC-17) “The Words” — A movie inspired by the famous story of how Hemingway’s first wife lost a briefcase of his early works on a train. That story is enfolded into another story based on it, written by a contemporary novelist (Dennis Quaid). Bradley Cooper finds the missing briefcase in the Quaid novel and is later visited by a mysterious Jeremy Irons. The real Hemingway could have told this with infinitely more economy. The plot opens room for three beautiful women (Zoe Saldana, Olivia Wilde and Nora Arnezeder), for which we can be grateful. Rating: Two stars. 96 minutes. (PG-13)

STILL SHOWING “2016: Obama’s America” — Dinesh D’Souza — the author of the best-seller “The Roots of Obama’s Rage” and a former American Enterprise Institute fellow — is not a fan of President Obama. The strident documentary “2016: Obama’s America” (co-directed with John Sullivan) builds on D’Souza’s 2010 cover article for Forbes, which asserts that Mr. Obama pursues his father’s left-leaning, “anticolonial” ideals. Here they are presented as flaws consistent with the senior Obama’s multiple relationships, alcoholism and fatal auto accident in 1982. Not interviewed by the filmmakers are Obama’s political supporters, but this isn’t that kind of documentary. This film wasn’t given a star rating. 89 minutes. (PG) — Andy Webster, The New York Times

Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

movies

GO! MAGAZINE •

From previous page

“The Amazing Spider-Man” — The Spider-Man franchise is back for a reboot only 10 years after its first picture and five years after the most recent one. This is a more thoughtful and carefully written remake of the 2002 original with more attention to the origin story of Peter Parker/Spider-Man. Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone have warm chemistry as Spidey and Gwen, and this new-generation Spidey is more impulsive and takes more chances; sometimes he leaps from buildings with no clear plan in mind. Co-starring Rhys Ifans as the city-destroying Lizard, Denis Leary as Gwen’s father the police captain, and Sally Field and Martin Sheen as Aunt May and Uncle Ben. Rating: Three and a half stars. 136 minutes. (PG-13) “Beasts of the Southern Wild” — Cut off from the Louisiana mainland, surrounded by rising waters, the Bathtub is a desolate wilderness of poverty where a small community struggles to survive. A small girl named Hushpuppy (Quvenzhane Wallis) fiercely asserts herself in this wasteland, in a film of great imagination and beauty. One of the year’s best films. Directed by Benh Zeitlin. Rating: Four stars. 93 minutes. (PG-13) “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” — A charming, funny, heartwarming movie making good use of seven superb veteran actors. They’re Brits on limited incomes who have taken their chances on a retirement hotel in India, run on a shoestring with boundless optimism by Dev Patel (he was the quiz show contestant in “Slumdog Millionaire”). An amazing cast, including Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy, Penelope Wilton and, in the best, most surprisingly moving role, Tom Wilkinson. Rating: Three and a half stars. 124 minutes. (PG-13) “The Bourne Legacy” — Jeremy Renner plays another secret super agent like Jason Bourne, who realizes he’s been targeted for elimination. To save himself and the experimental medication that gives him great physical and mental power, he travels from Alaska to Manila, fighting off wolves, drone missiles and assassination, while hooking up with Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), a biochemist who knows all about the medication. The action scenes are gripping in the moment, but go on too long and don’t add up; the dialogue scenes (with Edward Norton, Stacy Keach and Scott Glenn), are well-acted; the plot is a murky muddle. Rating: Two and a half stars. 135 minutes. (PG-13) “Brave” — The new animation from Pixar poaches on traditional Disney territory. Instead of such inventive stories as “Up” and “WALL-E,” we get a spunky princess, her mum the queen, her dad the gruff king, an old witch who lives in the woods and so on. The artistry looks wonderful. Kids will probably love it, but parents will be disappointed if they’re hoping for another Pixar ground-breaker. With

PAGE 29

colors, silly 3-D gimmicks, big, broad kid-friendly gags — and those professionally pesky penguins. And for adults, there’s the charming spectacle of Oscar winner Frances McDormand as a French-accented animal control officer. The third film in this unlikely animated franchise takes those New York refugees from remote Africa, where they’ve been stranded, to Monte Carlo and other points in the Eurozone as they try to get back to the friendly and confining Central Park Zoo. Rating: Two and a half stars. 90 minutes. (PG) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Courtesy Summit Entertainment

Henry Cavill and Veronica Echegui join forces in the action film “The Cold Light of Day.” the voices of Kelly Macdonald, Billy Connolly and Emma Thompson. Rating: Three stars. 100 minutes. (PG) “The Campaign” — Raucous, bawdy comedy starring Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis as opponents in a North Carolina GOP congressional primary. Ferrell is the incumbent, and Galifianakis is a doofus bankrolled by billionaire brothers who want to buy the district and resell it to China. The movie uses their campaign as a showcase of political scandals and dirty tricks that have become familiar in both parties. Sad fact: Some of the scandals in the movie would have been hard to believe until recent years, when — well, they’ve happened. Rating: Three stars. 85 minutes. (R) “Celeste and Jesse Forever” — Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg star as an appealing couple, married six years, who decide to stop living in the same house. To be sure, he only moves into his backyard studio and they remain “best friends.” Their own best friends are deeply upset by this change in a relationship they all thought was stable. The couple gets along smoothly in their new lifestyle, until they receive an unexpected jolt of reality. Good-hearted romantic comedy, avoiding the usual formulas. Rating: Three and a half stars. 91 minutes. (R) “The Dark Knight Rises” — Leaves the fanciful early days of the superhero genre far behind and moves into a doom-shrouded, apocalyptic future that’s close to today’s headlines. As urban terrorism and class warfare envelop Gotham, and its infrastructure is ripped apart, Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) emerges reluctantly from years

of seclusion in Wayne Manor and faces a soulless villain named Bane (Tom Hardy), as powerful as he is. The film begins slowly with a murky plot and too many new characters, but builds to a sensational climax. It lacks the nearperfection of “The Dark Knight” (2008); it needs more clarity and a better villain, but it’s an honorable finale. Rating: Three stars. 164 minutes. (PG-13) “The Expendables 2” — Of course, “The Expendables 2” is all good fun and games and recycled catchphrases. Until somebody gets hurt. A lot of somebodies. When you’re filling the screen with every big-screen action star of the past 25 years — except for Mel Gibson, Wesley Snipes and Steven Seagal — and every one of them needs his own body count, you see the problem. You run smack up against the Maximum Mayhem Threshold. “Expendables 2” is a sillier wallow in excess, a too-cute trip down ’80s Action-Film Lane with one past-hisexpiration-date action hero too many for its own good. It’s a “Road Runner” cartoon for the bloody-minded, a wise-cracking cavalcade of carnage that hurls bullet-proof heroes at the huddled masses of villains, defies the laws of physics and treats us to so much bloodshed that it’s only natural that some of it should spatter on the lens. Rating: One and a half stars. 102 minutes. (R) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Hit and Run” — A lot more fun than the title suggests. How many chase comedies have you seen where the hero’s sexy girlfriend has a doctorate in nonviolent conflict resolution? Dax

Shepard and Kristen Bell co-star as a loving couple in a bucolic Northern California town, who are plunged into adventure when it’s revealed he’s in the federal witness protection program. He volunteers to drive her to LA, the very place where he needs protection the most. Tom Arnold is very funny as a U.S. marshal whose gun is a danger to himself and everyone in gunshot range. Ever so much better than a film titled “Hit and Run” has any right to be. Rating: Three and a half stars. 100 minutes. (R) “Hope Springs” — Tommy Lee Jones and Meryl Streep play a couple whose marriage has frozen into a routine. Every day starts with his nose buried in the newspaper and ends with him asleep in front of the Golf Channel. They haven’t slept in the same room for years. She convinces him over his own dead body to attend a couples therapy session at a Maine clinic run by Steve Carell. The movie contains few surprises, but one of them is Jones’ excellent performance — vulnerable, touchy and shy. Rating: Three stars. 100 minutes. (PG-13) “Lawless” — Based on a real-life, blood-soaked war between moonshiners and the law in Franklin County, Va., in 1931. The three Bondurant brothers (Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy and Jason Clarke) fearlessly rule their turf, until a foppish federal agent (Guy Pearce) arrives from Chicago. A well-made film about ignorant and violent people. It’s not so much that the movie is too long, as that too many people must be killed before it can end. Rating: Two and a half stars. 115 minutes. (R) “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” — “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” is a riot of splashy

“Marvel’s The Avengers” — A threat to Earth from the smirking Loki, resentful adoptive brother of the Norse god Thor, causes Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) to assemble all of the Avengers: Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner). The result is sort of like an All Star Game for Marvel superheroes. Exactly what you’d expect, although more of the same. Gets the job done. Rating: Three stars. 142 minutes. (PG-13) “The Odd Life of Timothy Green” — A warm and lovely fantasy, the kind of full-bodied family film that’s being pushed aside in favor of franchises and slam-bang confusion. On a picturepostcard farm in the middle of endlessly rolling hills where it is always Indian summer, a lovable boy comes into the life of a childless couple and brings along great joy and wisdom. Jennifer Garner, Joel Edgerton, young CJ Adams and a rich supporting cast. Written and directed by Peter Hedges (“What’s Eating Gilbert Grape”). Accessible for all but the youngest children, and I suspect their parents will enjoy it, too. Rating: Three and a half stars. 104 minutes. (PG) “ParaNorman” — “ParaNorman” is a stop-motion animated marvel from some of the same folks who gave us “Coraline” and “Corpse Bride,” and it wears its bloodlines with pride. It’s that rare kids’ movie with edge, a witchy, witty romp that could frighten the very youngest moviegoers and makes parents blanch at some of the jokes. This isn’t “Ice Age,” children. “ParaNorman,” written by Chris Butler, an artist who worked on “Corpse Bride” and “Coraline,” and co-directed by Butler and Sam Fell (“Flushed Away”), wears its anarchy well. It’s a spooky picture with a morbid sense of humor. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Three stars. 93 minutes. (PG) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“The Possession” — The possession of the title is a dark wood box with a carved inscription in Hebrew informing the finder that it entraps a dybbuk, an evil spirit that will cleave to the soul of anyone unlucky enough to release it.

Continued next page


PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES

www.mountainriver.redcross.org

When You Give To The Red Cross, You Help Our Community.

The following movies were released the week of Sept. 4.

“The Five-Year Engagement” — A running sight gag has Jason Segel dressed in a pink bunny suit, which his character, Tom, wore to the New Year’s Eve party where he met Violet (Emily Blunt). She’s dressed as Princess Di, and it’s no wonder the two hit it off. One year later, Tom proposes to Violet in one of the cutest marry-me sequences staged in recent movie history. The film hits a speed bump after Tom and Violet move to Michigan for Violet’s post-doctorate appointment. Tom can’t find a job and winds up making sandwiches; Violet comes under the sway of a flashy psych professor, and the two begin to grow apart. Because it’s so willing to drill down into Tom’s and Violet’s misery, “The Five-Year Engagement” involves a higher

Glen Wilson / Universal Pictures / The Associated Press

Jason Segel and Emily Blunt star in the romantic comedy “The Five-Year Engagement.” grim-to-grin ratio than its fluffier brethren. There’s an unmistakable ring of truth to the couple’s conflicts and mixed feelings. Blu-ray Extras: Three featurettes, deleted/ extended/alternate scenes, gag

reels and audio commentary (no extras were listed for the DVD). This film was not given a star rating. 124 minutes. (R) “Safe”— In 2011, more than 500 people were slain in New York City.

“Safe,” the latest Jason Statham stab-and-shoot-’em-up, rivals that toll in barely 90 minutes. The actor usually plays terse loners, yet they’re always the kind of guys who pick up strays. So it’s

From previous page This box turns up in a yard sale and is purchased by a young girl named Em (Natasha Calis). Her divorced parents are played by Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Kyra Sedgwick, Matisyahu is effective as a Hasidic exorcist. The people are persuasive, the box is scary. Rating: Three and a half stars. 92 minutes. (PG-13) “Premium Rush” — A breakneck chase movie about the high-risk daredevils who work as Manhattan bicycle messengers. With a map of the city imprinted in their brains, they hurtle down sidewalks, run red lights, go against traffic, jump obstacles and use bikes without brakes. Joseph-Gordon Levitt stars as a messenger for whom one envelope delivery becomes a matter of life and death. Michael Shannon is the rotten cop who wants the envelope, too. Dania Ramirez and Wole Parks co-star as messengers who’d have gold medals if these were the Olympics. An impressive film that credits about a dozen stunt riders and is never less than convincing as it shows messengers threading their way through trucks that could flatten them. Directed by David Koepp. Rating: Three and a half stars. 91 minutes. (PG-13)

Oregon Mountain River Chapter

“Robot and Frank” — The story of a retired burglar and a household appliance more relentless than an alarm clock. Frank Langella stars as a retired jewel thief whose worrywart son supplies him with a robot caregiver (voice by Peter

no surprise when Luke rescues 11-year-old Mei, a math prodigy transported by gangsters from China to Chinatown because of her photographic recall of numbers. Aside from providing an alternate meaning for the movie’s title, the numbers Mei has memorized don’t provide much of a payoff. But then, “Safe” isn’t very interested in mental processes. It’s more concerned with impossibly fluid fisticuffs. Morally, “Safe” is inexcusable; narratively, it’s absurd. But it’s great fun. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Three featurettes and audio commentary. This film was not given a star rating. 94 minutes. (R) ALSO THIS WEEK: “Piranha 3DD” and “For the Love of Money.” COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release Sept. 11 include “Snow White and the Huntsman,” “For Greater Glory,” “October Baby,” “Girl in Progress” and “What to Expect When You’re Expecting.” — The Washington Post (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)

Sarsgaard). Frank begins to explore the robot’s abilities in lock-picking and safecracking, and the movie sweetly deals with his affection for the local librarian (Susan Sarandon). But the movie could have benefitted from more irony and complexity. Rating: Two and a half stars. 90 minutes. (PG-13) “Ruby Sparks” — Paul Dano plays a novelist who wrote a great best-seller as a teenager and has been blocked ever since. Through unexplained magic, he creates the woman of his dreams (Zoe Kazan) on the page, and she materializes in flesh and blood. This turns out to be a confusing development, because he can either control her or live with her, but not both. Co-starring Annette Bening, Antonio Banderas and Steve Coogan. Written by Kazan, directed by the “Little Miss Sunshine” duo of Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris. Rating: Three stars. 104 minutes. (R) “Ted” — The funniest movie character so far this year is a stuffed teddy bear. And the best comedy screenplay so far is “Ted,” the saga of the bear’s friendship with a 35year-old man-child. Mark Wahlberg stars as the teddy’s best friend, Mila Kunis is his long-suffering girlfriend, and director Seth MacFarlane (“Family Guy”) does Ted’s pottymouthed Beantown accent. The movie doesn’t run out of steam. (Definitely not for kids. Trust me on this.) Rating: Three and a half stars. 106 minutes. (R)


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

GO! MAGAZINE •

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of Sept. 7

PAGE 31

EDITOR’S NOTES:

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

CASCADE Warehouse Prices

MATTRESS

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

Universal Pictures / The Associated Press

Mark Wahlberg, right, is best friends with a talking bear named Ted (voiced by Seth MacFarlane) in the comedy “Ted.”

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 1:15, 3:45, 6:45, 9 Sun-Thu: 1:15, 3:45, 6:45 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 8:55 Sun-Thu: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) Fri-Thu: Noon, 5:45 BRANDED (R) Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3, 6, 8:30 Sun-Thu: 12:30, 3, 6 CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R) Fri-Sat: 1, 4, 7, 9:10 Sun-Thu: 1, 4, 7 KILLER JOE (NC-17) Fri-Sat: 12:45, 3:30, 6:30, 8:50 Sun-Thu: 12:45, 3:30, 6:30 ROBOT AND FRANK (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 2:50, 8:40 Sun-Thu: 2:50

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) Fri-Thu: Noon, 3, 6, 9 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:05, 3:25, 6:30, 9:35 THE CAMPAIGN (R) Fri: 2, 5, 8, 10:15 Sat: 2, 5, 8, 10:15 Sun: 2, 5, 8, 10:15 Mon, Wed: 2, 5, 8, 10:15 Tue, Thu: 2, 5, 8, 10:15

THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY (PG13) Fri-Thu: 12:55, 3:15, 7:40, 10:10 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:20, 4:05, 7:45 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) Fri-Thu: 1:15, 4:25, 6:55, 9:30 HIT AND RUN (R) Fri-Thu: 1:35, 4:35, 7:25, 10 HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:10, 3:55, 6:35, 9:05 LAWLESS (R) Fri-Thu: 12:15, 3:05, 6:20, 9:20 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:40, 4:15, 7:55 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:45, 3:30, 6:10, 9:10 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 1, 6:45 PARANORMAN (PG) Fri-Thu: 3:40, 9:15 THE POSSESSION (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:55, 4:55, 7:30, 9:55 PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:45, 4:45, 7:20, 9:40 RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK IMAX (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:30, 3:45, 7, 9:45 THE WORDS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:25, 3:50, 7:10, 9:50

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG-13) Fri, Tue-Thu: 6 Sat-Sun: 2:30, 6

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) Sat-Sun: Noon Wed: 3 TED (R) Fri-Sun, Tue-Thu: 9:10 Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown Monday. After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

FIRST POSITION (no MPAA rating) Sat-Sun: 6, 8 GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING (no MPAA rating) Fri-Sun: 3:30 THE GOONIES (PG) Sat-Sun: 1 As of press time, complete movie times for Monday through Thursday at the Tin Pan Theater were unavailable. Check The Bulletin’s Community Life section those days for the complete movie listings or visit www. tinpantheater.com.

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE CAMPAIGN (R) Fri: 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 11:15 a.m., 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 Mon-Thu: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15

THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) Fri: 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 Sat-Sun: Noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 Mon-Thu: 4:30, 6:45, 9 LAWLESS (R) Fri: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Sat-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Mon-Thu: 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) Fri: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

SISTERS Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 5, 7 Mon-Thu: 7 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 7 LAWLESS (R) Fri: 7:15 Sat-Sun: 4:45, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 6:30 PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 7:30 Mon-Thu: 6:45 RUBY SPARKS (R) Fri-Sun: 5:15 Mon-Thu: 6:45

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) Fri: 6:30, 9:25 Sat: 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:25 Sun: 12:50, 3:40, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 6:30 BRAVE (PG) Sat-Sun: 12:20, 2:25 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) Fri: 4:55, 7:20, 9:35 Sat: 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:35 Sun: 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20 Mon-Thu: 4:55, 7:20 HIT AND RUN (R) Fri-Sat: 4:40, 6:50, 9 Sun-Thu: 4:40, 6:50 LAWLESS (R) Fri: 4:35, 7, 9:25 Sat: 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:25 Sun: 2:10, 4:35, 7 Mon-Thu: 4:35, 7 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) Fri: 5, 7:10, 9:20 Sat: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:10, 9:20 Sun: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:10 Mon-Thu: 5, 7:10

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT. 541-382-4171 541-548-7707

2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

for appointments call 541-382-4900

Saturdays, June 30 - Sept. 22 | 10am-2pm NorthWest Crossing Neighborhood Center

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

LAWLESS (R) Fri-Sun: 4, 7 Mon-Thu: 6 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) Fri: 3:40, 6, 8:30 Sat-Sun: 1, 3:40, 6, 8:30 Mon-Thu: 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

www.nwxfarmersmarket.com


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

The Bulletin Daily Paper 9/7/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday September 7, 2012

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