Private Edition Issue 50 Sothebys Realty

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ISSUE 50








CONTENTS ISSUE

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2021

50 COVE R

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18 EDITOR’ S

LET TER

Thoughts from the editor PHOTOGRAPHY GETTY IMAGES

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BRIEFING

The latest news from the world of luxury and investment

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EFFECT

The world of fine jewellery meets punk-chic style

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LET

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GOOD

TIMES

ROLL

As travel stands still, escapism in hotel design has never been more necessary

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ELECTRIC

VEHIC LE

REVOLUTIO N

The future is now. We welcome in the era of electric vehicles

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FAILING

FORWARD

Life lessons from long-distance swimmer Ryan Stramrood

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STEP

INSIDE

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FUTU RE

More than just a home, House Haag in Melbourne is a power station that generates more energy than it uses

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64 O N

TOP

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PE R PETUAL

PL ANET

Explore the installation of the southern and western hemisphere’s highest weather station

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T HE

F L I GHT

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The evolution of pilot watchs has remained in sync with that of the innovators, pioneers and trailblazers who wear them

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U N I QUE LY

YOUR S

Gender parity is increasing in the world of watchmaking

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PE R F ECT I ON I ST

How a spray-gun and hairdryer create guess-the-flavour bonbons

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THE NEW ANCIENT ART OF WINEMAKING Cape winemakers look to 8 000-year-old technology

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SECR E T

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M ORITZ

Come inside Switzeland’s luxurious Suvretta House

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YE A R

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SAFARI

We explore the world’s most luxurious game lodges

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FROM THE EDITOR IS S UE

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202 1 EDITOR SUSAN NEWHAM-BLAKE snewham@tppsa.co.za CREATIVE DIRECTOR TARYN RHODA

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T SEEMS MY RECENT fondness for staring aimlessly into the middledistance, or staying up late to watch series on repeat, actually has a name. It’s called ‘languishing’ and it’s being touted as the most dominant emotion of 2021. Apparently, post the shock of Covid, we’ve entered into some kind of psychological slump. It’s that sense of just feeling ‘blah’ – not necessarily depressed, not burnt out but joyless and maybe plain bored. Apparently languishing can blunt motivation and focus, and can leave you feeling stagnant and empty. It’s not a mental illness but rather a lack of wellbeing and was first coined by the sociologist Corey Keyes who started noticing that a large number of us have entered into this new state of being. It appears, though, that some of us (myself included) are languishing more than others. In our endurance feature ‘Failing forward’ on page 28, Ryan Stramrood broke a world record by swimming the fastest time of eight hours and thirty-six seconds across False Bay. It was achieved in March this year. In ‘The briefing’ on page 10 we witness the launch of ‘the most ambitious car ever created’ by Rolls-Royce, a new luxury beauty brand, ARC, arriving on our soils and the Maldives government auctioning off private islands for the first time ever in an attempt to boost their floundering tourist-led economy. On page 18 in ‘Let the good times roll’ we explore the rise of the role of the designer in a new hotel’s conception. We enter unique design-led hotels, which encourage us to imagine, escape and anticipate a new age of travel post-pandemic. And this, apparently, is the antidote to languishing. Action. Small steps. Small wins. Doing something that can make you feel like you’re moving forward, even if it’s simply mastering one small goal - whether that be reaching out to a long-lost friend or simply starting an interesting project. It certainly doesn’t have to be traversing the icy seas by the stroke of your arms. Though it does help to imagine that even Ryan Stramrood, when he’s not breaking records, is also staring blankly into the middle distance like the rest of us. Maybe getting lost in the pages of this issue of Private Edition will also help. Happy reading!

COPY EDITOR WENDY MARITZ BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER CARMEN CLEGG cclegg@tppsa.co.za 071 499 8338 ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE BERNICE BLUNDELL bernice@adplacements.co.za 073 618 1882 ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR SHANTEL PESKIN speskin@tppsa.co.za 082 385 6534 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MARK BEARE MANAGING DIRECTOR SUSAN NEWHAM-BLAKE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR JOHN MORKEL HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER LIZ WOLFE FINANCIAL MANAGER NAEEMA ABRAHAMS

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Private Edition is published by The Publishing Partnership (Pty) Ltd, 9th Floor, Tarquin House, 81 Loop Street, Cape Town 8001. Copyright: The Publishing Partnership (Pty) Ltd 2021. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent from The Publishing Partnership or the authors. The publishers are not responsible for any unsolicited material. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of The Publishing Partnership or the editor. Editorial and advertising enquiries: PO Box 15054, Vlaeberg 8018 Tel: 021 424 3517 Email: privateedition@tppsa.co.za Visit: privateedition.co.za Printing: Novus Print ISSN: 2218-063X

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PHOTOGRAPHY GETTY IMAGES

SUSAN NEWHAM-BLAKE EDITOR


C EO’ S

LEW GEFFEN CHAIRMAN

LET TER

GLOBAL INVESTMENT – MEGATRENDS OF THE NEXT DECADE

YAEL GEFFEN CEO

THE PAST DECADE CAN BE DEFINED AS THE ERA OF DISRUPTION, STRIDENT TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES THAT HAVE TRANSFORMED THE WAY IN WHICH WE LIVE AND WORK, NUMEROUS SIGNIFICANT POWER AND SOCIAL SHIFTS, AND INFLUENTIAL EMERGENT TRENDS.

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OWEVER, THE MOST interesting times still lie ahead. Not only are we adjusting to a post-pandemic paradigm, the next 10 years have been pegged as a ‘peak decade’ with a number of megatrends further transforming our world and, thereby, also the real estate industry as we know it. Organisations like Bank of America and McKinsey & Company have pinpointed 10 megatrends that will shape the coming years, but those that will wield the most influence on the real estate industry are the following: THE ‘SMARTENING’ OF EVERYTHING It’s predicted that by the end of the next decade, another 3 billion people will have gained online access and, during this time, the next wave of innovation, advanced automation and artificial intelligence (AI), will become mainstream. Smart-home adoption, especially digital assistants and security cams, are already becoming increasingly common, but are set to become even more so with the rise of 5G. Other key areas of focus will be the multi-family sector, with companies developing new products to streamline home management and operations. And, in addition to the proliferation of iBuyers and new means to analyse and act on property data, ongoing investment in proptech will further digitise the home-selling process. MILLENNIAL VALUES AND PRINCIPLED INVESTMENTS Millennials recently overtook baby boomers globally as the largest property-buying demographic, and the unique values and priorities of this generation are set to become the norm. They have already begun to significantly impact the real estate industry in a number of ways, largely due to their preference for denser, mixed-use neighbourhoods in well-situated suburbs near major metros that have become vibrant live/ work/play districts. In fact, ‘hipsturbia’, has been identified as one of the major themes of the coming decade, transforming the very fabric of traditional suburban life, with ‘flipsters’ (hipsters who flip homes) making their unique mark in that sector.

And, as the first connected and truly global generation, millennials feel a much higher collective responsibility than previous generations with eco-awareness and sustainability being key watchwords in their approach to investment. THE SILVER ECONOMY – AN IMMINENT ECONOMIC FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH The 60-plus age group, known as baby boomers, is the fastestgrowing consumer group in the world and it is forecast that their numbers will have swelled by an additional billion by 2050 – an average of one in five of the population. And, being more active and working for longer than their predecessors, they are also armed with an increasingly higher spending power and a rising share of overall income, and will become key influencers for many corporations and industries. Organisations that are positioned to meet the core needs for senior-centric consumer goods, health-care services, housing and financial management will reap very attractive returns. THE WILD CARD – RECESSION FEARS Opinion is still divided, but a significant number of experts agree that another global recession is becoming an increasingly distinct possibility. This forecast is supported by numerous studies and reports, including a recent major report published by Bank of America’s Merrill Lynch Global Research which predicts that recession is likely to be one of the most influential megatrends of the next decade. And, in a rapidly changing and increasingly uncertain world, Greek philosopher, Heraclitus’s edict that ‘change is the only constant in life’ has never been more apt. However, with change comes opportunity and those who take a deep breath and buckle in for the ride will reap significant rewards. 

YAEL GEFFEN CEO

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THE BRIEFING COLLECTABLES | OBJETS D’ART | MOTORING | DESIGN | DEPARTURES | TASTINGS

DEPARTURES

First time for everything THE MALDIVES GOVERNMENT IS HOLDING THE FIRST AUCTION OF PRIVATE ISLANDS IN THE WORLD. THE PLAN IS TO AUCTION OFF 16 OF THE 1 190 ISLANDS THAT MAKE UP ITS ARCHIPELAGO TO PRIVATE DEVELOPERS.

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N A BID TO HELP revive its tourist-driven economy which has suffered because of the pandemic, the islands will be sold with 50-year leases to successful bidders. There is a catch, however: successful bidders must commit to building island resorts in order to help bring in tourists and contribute to the country’s dwindling economy. If you’ve missed the deadline to apply to for this auction (10 June, application fee $3 250), there might be a second chance on the horizon as the Maldives government is planning more auctions for another dozen of their islands in the near future. With some luck, perhaps future auctions will be open to those looking to build a private island holiday home. For more information and updates, head over to the Maldives Ministry of Tourism’s website at tourism.gov.mv

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BRIEFING

There is no short supply of Madiba paintings but Cyril Coetzee’s stand out

ART

The artist behind Mandela’s favourite portrait

PHOTOGRAPHY GETTY IMAGES; SUPPLIED

CYRIL COETZEE HAS FOUND HIMSELF, PAINTBRUSH POISED, READY TO CAPTURE SOME OF AFRICA’S MOST PROMINENT FIGURES AND MOMENTS. He was commissioned not once, but twice, to paint the portrait of the late Nelson Mandela for the former president’s private collection. The first of these portraits was completed during Mandela’s presidential term and deemed by Madiba himself as his favourite. This portrait was then sent to the rest of the world in the form of the International Commemorative Postage Stamp for Mandela’s 90th birthday. Flash forward twenty years, and Coetzee is again the artist of choice for dignitaries and prominent names in global affairs and commerce. This time, it’s Strive Masiyiwa, another African making his mark on the continent and the world, who has been

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captured on canvas. Why Coetzee was chosen by Mandela and now Masiyiwa is clear. His paintings are not just visual masterpieces, they are an intriguing encapsulation of the subject’s soul and essence. Coetzee conveys each subject in a way that says to the viewer: ‘I’m thinking something, but you don’t quite know what!’ creating a feeling of mystery and connection between subject and viewer. His portraits are emotional, enticing and personal. He has painted renowned academics, businesspeople, bankers and legal professionals, such as Matthew Phosa, Colin Bundy, Anton Rupert, Graça Machel, Conrad Strauss and George Bizos, to name but a few. Outside of South Africa, Coetzee’s talent has been recognised across the world. His works have been exhibited globally in a variety of public and private collections, including the Royal Ontario Museum, Standard Bank in London, School of Oriental and African Studies in London, Madiba Gallery in New York, Gallery 505 in Washington DC, and Lalit Kala Academy of Arts in New Delhi. For more information on Coetzee’s work, visit cyrilcoetzee.com or email info@cyrilcoetzee.com.

Luxury beauty THE NEW BEAUTY DESTINATION, ARC, HAS LAUNCHED. Offering the most-coveted luxury brands in fragrance, makeup and skincare, ARC opened its first store in Sandton City in June, with plans to open its doors at Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront later this year and Gateway, Durban in early 2022. Customers can look forward to shopping an ever-growing list of their favourite brands including CHANEL, Dior, La Mer and Givenchy; exclusives like Huda Beauty, Kayali and Atelier Versace and niche-finds such as Molton Brown, BlackUp and Lottie London. To find your favourites, visit their e-commerce store at arcstore.co.za

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A piece of mosaic WE MIGHT BE CURTAILED FROM TRAVELLING TO EXOTIC DESTINATIONS BUT IF YOU HAVE TO BE LOCKED DOWN DURING A GLOBAL PANDEMIC, SOUTH AFRICA IS THE PLACE TO BE. BY SUSAN NEWHAM-BLAKE

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A short drive from Cape Town delivers you to a dream getaway at Mosaic Lagoon Lodge

PHOTOGRAPHY SUPPLIED

If you and the sprogs are climbing the walls with boredom, getting away can be just the antidote. A favourite short-stay destination for a romantic weekend or a fun and homely family getaway, has to be the Mosaic Lagoon Lodge in Stanford, Western Cape. I had the recent pleasure of visiting the lodge and once we’d arrived, there was absolutely no good reason to leave. From warm beverages next to the fireplace overlooking spectacular views of Hermanus lagoon and towering mountains, to an exhilarating quad bike excursion with my boys through the beautiful fynbos sanctuary, the experience was just the thing to lift our lockdown spirits. Hidden amongst a grove of ancient Milkwoods, our secluded suite was one of only five villas constructed safari-style from stone and glass, opening onto a private deck with spectacular mountain views. The good news is the lodge is offering special rates for South Africans, inclusive of all meals, house beverages and a complimentary wine tasting at either Springfontein or Raka Wine Estate. Enjoy one spa treatment per person and two activities daily, ranging from guided walks and quad-bike tours around the wetlands, to a 4x4 excursion to Walker Bay Nature Reserve. There are also SUPs, kayaks, Fat Bikes and mountain bikes available to explore the scenery. More gentle pursuits include relaxing on the panoramic deck next to the swimming pool or a boat cruise. What’s not to love? mosaiclagoonlodge.co.za

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Winemaker Kiara Scott; Brookdale Estate in Paarl; Scott’s first Brookdale Chenin Blanc

TASTINGS

Winemaker to watch NEW WINEMAKER ON THE BLOCK, KIARA SCOTT, IS CERTAINLY NO STRANGER TO SHIFTING PERCEPTIONS. BY RICHARD HOLMES

‘‘‘Sometimes it seems like we’re the ugly step-sister of South African wine,’ laughs Kiara Scott from the Paarl winelands. ‘But I want to break boundaries, and change those perceptions of what wine from this region is like.’ As a young woman of colour, Scott has made astounding strides in her short career. Raised in an impoverished Cape Flats suburb, she excelled in her studies at Elsenburg Agricultural College and was accepted into the prestigious Cape Winemakers Guild Protégé Programme. Cue three years of working alongside leading lights of the local industry, and harvests abroad, before joining Duncan Savage at his urban winery in Cape Town.

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At the time Savage was consulting to Brookdale Estate in Paarl, and when they needed a full-time winemaker Scott was an obvious choice. Today she oversees two ranges for Brookdale. Mason Road is the everyday lifestyle range with a Chenin Blanc, Rosé and Syrah made from the fruit of younger estate vines, but it’s the Brookdale range that is turning heads. The Chenin Blanc, from 36-year-old vines, is making waves here and abroad. The 2019 vintage – the first with Scott at the helm – garnered high praise from UK-based critic Jancis Robinson: ‘Elegant and beautifully composed. This is a seriously classy, sophisticated-artisan Chenin.’ Scott has set her sights on more than Chenin Blanc though, with innovative field blends – 20 cultivars in a single vineyard – already planted out. ‘In Portugal it’s very common, but nobody else is doing something else like this here,’ says Scott. ‘We wanted to express the complexity of the vineyard and the terroir of Brookdale. In years to come there will be a beautiful synchronicity in that block.’ And while crafting fine wines is the priority for Scott, she’s not unaware of her new position as a role model. ‘It’s a privilege for me. There are many people of colour, and women, that feel it’s not the industry for us. But then they see someone like me and think maybe they can do it. So we don’t always do it for ourselves. We do it for the people who come after us’. brookdale-estate.com

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ACCELERATE

The most ambitious car ever created Rolls-Royce draws inspiration from the seas with its uber-exclusive new offering

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The Boat Tail, a luxury vehicle model has been built for three ‘hand-picked’ clients and is the first car to have been commissioned under the firm’s new Coachbuild program, an invitationonly division of Rolls-Royce. The Boat Tail is a four-seat car, measuring almost 5.8 meters long, with the rear of the vehicle shaped like a yacht deck. More than 1 800 new parts were developed for the Boat Tail, each of which has luxury features such as double refrigerators for vintage champagne and bespoke timepieces which can be worn or inserted into the car to be used as its clock. And the price? Apparently, and maybe not surprisingly, is not being publicised. rolls-roycemotorcars.com

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ROLLS-ROYCE SET SAIL ON A BRAND-NEW IDEA IN MAY EARLIER THIS YEAR.


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‘The new Cartier chronograph boosts the Pasha watch’s power and visibility’

OBJECTS OF DESIRE

Distinct, elegant, extraordinary SUCCESSFULLY RELAUNCHED IN 2020, THE NEW PASHA DE CARTIER 41MM CHRONONGRAPH WATCH IS SOPHISTICATED IN TERMS OF WATCHMAKING FUNCTIONS AND DESIGN DETAILS. With interchangeable straps, sapphire case back, a new crown and personalised engraving, the Pasha de Cartier’s repertoire is growing with a new key design: the masculine 41mm chronograph version. Made to measure records, the new Cartier chronograph boosts the Pasha watch’s power and visibility. A strong approach that further enhances the watch’s design, accentuated by the presence of a rotating bezel and two push-pieces. Faithful to the historic version of the first Pasha chronographs, these two buttons set with a cabochon, have kept the original design’s volume. A choice of both style and excess that is perfectly in line with the Pasha de Cartier spirit. cartier.com

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the earring effect While the fashion term ‘statement earrings’ has been bandied about for years, it’s recently taken on a whole new – and very cool – aesthetic. The world of fine jewellery has met punk chic style, and it’s oozing elegance.

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LAST YEAR FOR Chanel’s Fall/Winter 2020/2021 Haute Couture collection, the house unveiled a look inspired by an era that was perhaps a strange bedfellow for its fine jewellery: punk rock. The look, rooted in 1970s grunge with its dark style, body modification, and seemingly anti-social antics, is a fashion of subcultures and art movements, not investment earrings laden with flawless white diamonds. Fast-forward four decades, and now punk rock – it’s punk chic in today’s haute couture terms – translates in the fine jewellery world as feminine yet edgy. And very wearable too. In fact, Chanel described their collection as ‘romantic punk with a sophisticated twist’ (with ultra-luxe appeal of course). Candice Ilic is a personal stylist and also the managing director and partner at Verus Fine Jewellery. She believes the punk era not only never entirely left us, but also – way back – inspired the multiple piercing trend. ‘Fashion moves in cycles according to public stress, desires and emotions,’ she explains. ‘Some cycles are short and quick (like trendy fast fashion), and others are big, long evolutions.’ For Ilic, the multiple piercing trend –

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WORDS HELEN CLEMSON


FINE

worn in today’s punk chic manner - has been on a slow boil but is now hugely popular. So, how to wear the many precious pieces you’ve collected over the years? Or perhaps if you’re new to the multiple earring effect or need to add to your anthology? ‘For me, it’s earrings that matter the most,’ says Ilic when asked about why these accessories polish off an outfit so well. ‘And the ear has many options,’ she adds. For that second piercing, go with something classic and refined if you want to start slow. ‘A pair of solitaire diamonds have been a go-to piece for decades. The most popular studs are round brilliant cut diamonds set in four claw 18K white gold,’ says Heidi Wahl, brand and marketing manager for First Diamonds. If you’re looking for something slightly different yet still classic, opt for a modern tube setting or classic six claw. Invest in studs in yellow or rose gold, or look at shape; diamonds like cushion cut or square emerald cut will refresh your style, she says. Colour, too, is a great way of adding interest to your ears and value to your fine jewellery. Yellow diamonds are the most popular when it comes to fancy colour diamonds, and natural fancy coloured diamond earrings come at a premium as it’s more difficult to get two diamonds of the same shape, size and colour intensity, explains Wahl. As you up your earring ante, remember these words from Ilic: “It’s such fun playing mix and match with multiple earrings. I believe all ages can do it, if their personal style likes a bit of edge.’ 

J EWELLERY

THIS PAGE AND LEFT Pieces from Chanel’s Fall/Winter 2020/2021 Haute Couture collection

Five Must-Have Earrings

PHOTOGRAPHY SUPPLIED

BY YAIR SHIMANSKY, CEO AND FOUNDER OF SHIMANSKY. 1. Round brilliant cut diamonds studs set in platinum 1ct each, although 1.5 or 2ct each will have more impact. 2. Diamond hoops, pave or single row (30-50mm in diameter). 3. Drop earrings dangling with two diamonds each, round and pear shape or two pear shape point-to-point. 4. Fancy yellow diamonds halo studs in cushion shape or dangling pearshape halo. 5. Classic cluster studs 1+8 diamonds

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DESIGN

LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL In a world in which global travel has all but come to a standstill, escapism in hotel design has never been more necessary. The role of the designer in a new hotel’s conception encourages us to imagine, escape and anticipate a new age of travel. WORDS MARTIN JACOBS

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THIS PAGE AND RIGHT Celebrity designer Ken Fulk’s concept for The Goodtime Hotel channels the aesthetic of mid-century Central American resort towns like Havana and Acapulco. The pastel palette extends indoors, making a fantasy space of the library

‘The idea of a transformative hospitality experience isn’t a novel one, but it has been elevated to new heights by the role design plays.’

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OODTIME. IN MULTI-HYPHENATE

PHOTOGRAPHY ALICE GAO

Pharrell Williams’ lexicon, there’s an important distinction to be made between good time and goodtime. ‘It’s one word, by the way,’ the celebrity says of the name of his newly opened Miami Beach venture, The Goodtime Hotel. ‘Why? Because there’s just one vibration: good. You’re gonna come here one way, and you’re going to leave another.’ The idea of a transformative hospitality experience isn’t a novel one, but it has been elevated to new heights by the role design plays in a global array of new hotels. Since the start of the pandemic, a number of memorable and visually arresting luxury hotels have opened. Their collective common denominator? A sense of escapism and fantasy inherent to their design. While many of these projects were planned prior to Covid-19’s onset, their aggrandizement of escapist design isn’t simply fortuitous. We live in dark times. Right-wing extremism, floundering world leadership and climate change have marked the start of this decade. The positive vibrations the name The Goodtime Hotel stokes are indicative of a world desperate for optimism. And where better to find that than when entering doors that lead us from one reality to another? Be it through an evocation of the past, capturing a sense of place, or appealing to the personal, hotel design has never been this escapist, nor the role of the designer so appreciated.

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DESIGN

LEFT AND BELOW Key for Jacu Strauss, when establishing the design identity of the Riggs Washington DC, was honouring the building’s past. By marrying whimsical design with showstopper architectural detailing, Strauss injects modernity into the space

AMERICAN BEAUTY From Miami Beach’s Art Deco buildings to the historic facades of Washington’s architecture, American hotels pay homage to their past. ‘I have such a romantic notion of Miami and what it might have been like,’ says celebrity designer Ken Fulk in an interview with Forbes, of his design for The Goodtime Hotel. Channelling resort towns like Acapulco and Havana in their mid-century heyday, Fulk’s vision celebrates Central American and Caribbean design. Nowhere is this more apparent than poolside. The Strawberry Moon restaurant and pool club is a throwback of note, a modern embodiment of the Slim Aarons era of poolside hedonism. Two parallel pools separated by a ‘catwalk’ run almost the length of the roof deck and are surrounded by cabanas, loungers and palm sculptures. ‘Public pools have insane restrictions around what colour they can be. But, we got through that hurdle and we got a pink-and-white-striped pool, which may be my favourite single silly thing,’ says Fulk of the Instagram-worthy fantasy space. Pastel pink dominates, and characterises everything

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from the broad-stripe tiling and pinstripe awnings to the scalloped bar stools. Its signature status is prevalent indoors too, from the guestrooms’ rotary-dial phones to the library; a saccharine-sweet room decorated with tasselled sofas, offbeat wicker animal lamps and coffered ceilings. ‘I wanted it to be evocative of the past, but also something that people have never seen or experienced before, and that is the secret sauce,’ comments Fulk. ‘When you’re able to have people come somewhere and feel comfortable yet take their breath away.’ A nod to America’s golden ages equally characterises creative director Jacu Strauss’s design of the Riggs Washington DC. Built in 1891, the landmark building formerly housed the city’s Riggs

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PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF LORE GROUP

‘A nod to America’s golden ages characterises creative director Jacu Strauss’s design of the Riggs Washington DC.’


PHOTOGRAPHY STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

DESIGN

National Bank, famed for being the bank of 23 American presidents. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the building is one of the last remaining Richardsonian Romanesque Revival-styled buildings. Its dazzling historic interiors include a barrel-vaulted lobby, oversized chandeliers and ornate ceilings. For Lore Group’s South African-born Strauss, who admits to having a soft spot for Cape Town’s grande dame Mount Nelson Hotel, recognising this literal goldmine was key to his vision. ‘Rather than erase the past, I wanted to celebrate the wrinkles of another grande dame,’ he says. ‘I feel certain that a sense of escapism is going to become more important to guests. Post-pandemic, experience will be greater than just ticking boxes and seeing a hotel as a bed for the night. If done correctly, a hotel can provide a genuine, confident and thoughtful experience,’ says Strauss of his vision.

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ABOVE The rich jewel tones, tasselled seating and mythology-inspired collectibles of Bar Marilou in Maison de la Luz hotel are a quirky nod to New Orleans’s mystical past and French roots. Studio Shamshiri and Atelier Ace conceived the design

‘Many visitors I talked to when they came to look at Riggs came because they had a relative who worked for the bank, and there was a sense of pride about that. So I wanted to be sensitive to its heritage and at the same time inject modernity and fun into the interiors.’ Strauss drew on the parallels between the golden era of banking and hotels – both being public places for private affairs. His designs for the guestrooms reference this past. The billowing robes in Baroque artworks inspire the patterns on headboards and wall coverings. Minibars take on the form of bank safes. The four First Lady suites are inspired by visits Strauss made to the White House to learn more about how past first ladies added their decorating stamps to the building’s legacy. ‘I describe the rooms as safety deposit boxes, full of surprises that are not necessarily related to banking, but more about something precious and sentimental.’ Downstairs in Café Riggs, a bespoke two-storey glass display case is home to supersized paper flowers. ‘I collaborated with paper art studio Mio Gallery to make this happen – the arrangement is based on a still-life painting.’ Design surprises like these, that reference the past, are part of the appeal at New Orlean’s Maison de la Luz too. The first foray into luxury properties by Atelier Ace (the design team behind the youthful Ace Hotels), Maison de la Luz is a creative collaboration partnering the atelier with Pamela Shamshiri of multidisciplinary Studio Shamshiri. Referencing not only the city’s history but also its maritime significance on the Mississippi River, the hotel is a

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DESIGN

LEFT Multi-disciplinary designer Luke Edward Hall lists Wes Anderson’s films as an influence on his vision for Hotel Les Deux Gares. He imagined the interiors as a riotous explosion of colour in stark contrast to the stony palette of the Paris streets beyond

visual personification of the word madcap. ‘It’s almost like a quirky residence; there are aspects of it that really, truly do feel like a home,’ Shamshiri says of the offbeat collector-like approach to decorating, which draws inspiration from Southern folklore and mysticism, from all things astrological and from 99-year-old style icon Iris Apfel. PEOPLE PLEASERS The creative starting point for Adrien Gloaguen, the French hotelier behind Hotel Les Deux Gares in Paris, also began with an eccentric personality, English designer Luke Edward Hall. Gloaguen’s appointment of Hall as both interior designer and art director (the latter including designs for the logo, stationery and uniforms) reflects the hotelier’s conviction that a hotel can be strongly personalitydriven. Whilst the scale of this project is far smaller than its American counterparts, Hall’s loyal following and popularity act as a pull for the design-savvy who can’t get enough of his colour-rich work, which includes interior design, fashion collabs,

escapist antiquity and Riviera-inspired ceramics. ‘I think we need fantasy more than ever. Of course we have to be present in the real world, but I do believe that my job is to create spaces that take us away from the mundane and the grim,’ Hall says. ‘A good hotel should be a fantasy, a universe that feels complete and all-encompassing, and that gives consideration to the small things as well as the big.’ Similar to Shamshiri’s approach, Hall conceived of Hotel Les Deux Gares as the home of an eccentric Parisian collector. ‘I’ve never been a slave to a particular look; for me the best interiors are layered and multifaceted,’ he says of his juxtaposition

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PHOTOGRAPHY BENOIT LINERO

‘I think we need fantasy more than ever ... I do believe that my job is to create spaces that take us away from the mundane and the grim.’


PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF KLOÉ HOTEL

DESIGN

of bold colour, vintage posters, contemporary lighting and geometric, animal-print and Toile de Jouy patterns. He cites as influences on the project his design hero David Hicks as well as film director Wes Anderson (‘He’s my favourite director so of course I had to take inspiration from The Grand Budapest Hotel’s reception desk when thinking about our own little lobby’) and in doing so pays forward the myth of the personality. Across the globe, Kuala Lumpur’s Kloé Hotel adopts a different approach to the significance of the persona in design. The property offers five unique lofts, each outfitted to celebrate a creative pursuit – art, gardening, music, food and

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ABOVE Tailored to plant-loving guests, Room To Grow in Kuala Lumpur’s Kloé Hotel offers a guest-centric experience that includes a potting station with pots, soil and plants, terrariums and botanical-themed books and art

books – and the guests they’re likely to attract. The Kloé team appointed a well respected thought leader, particular to each field, to conceptualise each loft. Room To Draw, conceived as an art studio complete with paints, brushes, sketchbooks and canvas (designed by artist Joee Cheong), and Room To Grow, with its array of plants, potting equipment and floral artworks (designed by botanical artist Ronnie Khoo) are the standouts. Personality-themed suites, like the Book Collector’s Suite and the Music Collector’s Suite, are part of the offering at Amsterdam’s Pulitzer Hotel too, another of Jacu Strauss’s creative visions. ‘Discovering a place is a journey and there should always be thought given to the rhythm of a guest moving through, and stopping in, various spaces. Light to dark, loud to calm, expressive to reflective,’ he says of the key considerations that factor into his designs. Appealing to a design-savvy clientele and prioritising the guest experience take centre stage in the conceptual thinking of designers like Strauss, Hall, Shamshiri and Fulk. Their involvement in these hospitality ventures, and their design surprises both public and private, become the appeal of these luxury escapes. If this is the future of hotel design, let the ‘goodtimes’ roll. 

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ELECTRIC VEHICLE REVOLUTION The past is history. The present is the past. The future is now. Not all markets are ready for the electric revolution, but Richard Webb is certain electric vehicles are the future of cars.

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ERCEDES-BENZ NARROWLY pipped BMW for the accolade of the world’s best-selling luxury car brand last year, but there’s much more disruption on the way. Electric vehicle (EV) producers – and not just Tesla – are denting the sales of traditional luxury brands. The Covid-19 pandemic has focused minds on sustainable mobility and wellness, with memories being a predominant quest in the buying of luxury experiences. This trend is set to continue as more electric start-ups such as Chinese firm Nio – as well as the traditional firms like Bentley, Ferrari, Lamborghini (see sidebar) – promise the thrill of high-performance engineering combined with instant electric-motor torque. What’s not to like? Whilst performance captures the imagination, ultra-high-net-worth buyers want more. They are increasingly keen on reducing their carbon footprints too. And for the upper-end of the luxury market, price differences between internal combustionengined cars and EVs simply don’t matter. But it’s not all plain sailing. Car brands also have to identify technologies and solutions capable of

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Jaguar I-PACE; Stephan Winkelmann, President and CEO of Automobili Lamborghini; Bentley Bentayga Hybrid; MercedesBenz EQC 400 4MATIC

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combining top performance and driving dynamics with conversion to electric. The need to combine the reduction of CO2 and to keep the fundamentals of the car brand’s DNA unchanged is a challenge that keeps car-makers awake at night. What is clear, though, is that these brands will always follow customers, their segments and values. That means the bigger premium EV brands need more power. ‘You need 150kWh-plus to get a fullsize SUV to have the equivalent performance of a combustion-engined vehicle, which is why hybrids are so important in playing a part for bigger vehicles in the next five to 10 years,’ says Bentley’s chairman, Adrian Hallmark. From around 2025, 110kWh to 120kWh batteries should be available, which will enable even bigger cars to get a 400-500km range. That all means the driving range and the lack of charging infrastructure for many markets have become less of a concern as many barriers to EV mobility are steadily removed. So, let’s settle for the future being (nearly) now, after all. 

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Electric Lamborghini PART OF LAMBORGHINI’S DIRECTION COR TAURI STRATEGIC PLAN UNVEILED BY CEO STEPHAN WINKELMANN SEES THE COMPANY INVEST €1.5 BILLION OVER THE NEXT FOUR YEARS: THE LARGEST INVESTMENT EVER IN ITS HISTORY. But don’t lament the demise of the wailing V12 just yet. Until Lamborghini goes fully electric, it will celebrate the internal combustion engine with new 12-cylinder petrol-engined models in the next year, followed by the arrival of the first hybrid Lamborghini in 2023. The entire range migrates to hybrid power by 2024. The electric Lamborghini will then follow on from there. ‘Lamborghini’s electrification plan is a newlyplotted course, necessary in the context of a radically changing world, where we want to make our contribution by continuing to reduce environmental impact through concrete projects,’ said Winkelmann. ‘We imagine a 2 + 2 a little higher from the ground than our super sports cars: not an Aventador or a Huracan, but a car to be used every day for more than two people.’ Quite how Lamborghini will find a satisfactory replacement to the distinctive growl of the V12 engine is a bit of a mystery. ‘We do not know yet,’ Winklemann says. ‘Studies are in progress. What we do know is that it must not be a duplication of the noise of the combustion engine. It must have a particular sound, capable of moving as much as the roar of a V12.’

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IF YOU’VE EVER stood on the trailing tentacle of a bluebottle

on the beach or had one wrap itself around you while swimming, you’ll remember recoiling from the intense pain. But the damage is done. You’ll be in for at least an hour of torment when the welts form and the itching begins. When extreme long-distance and ice swimmer, 47-year-old Ryan Stramrood stepped off the slipway in the dark on 18 March 2021 at Miller’s Point, Simonstown, he was an hour away from encountering a colony of bluebottles stretching a few hundred metres. It would be only one of the obstacles he would face on his gruelling solo swim across False Bay, Cape Town. His course would take him to the distinctive shark-finshaped outcrop that looms over Rooi Els near Pringle Bay. By car, it’s a spectacular drive that snakes along the rocky coast. Point

‘You have to break through the mind’s default setting – one of self-preservation and comfort ... but if you unlock a new mindset that says self-explore and push yourself, it makes the “impossibles” achievable.’

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PHOTOGRAPHY CALEB BJERGFELT

to point on Stramrood’s swim route, it’s an intense 33km swim in cold waters. That’s 15 732 strokes per arm in a bay known for its capricious winds, swells, cross currents, jellyfish and the greatest predators in the ocean. Great whites have returned to the bay after an absence of almost a year. Regardless of how fit he was, Stramrood would need to overcome a greater threat than these opportunistic hunters – his own mental fitness. ‘Eighty percent of an endurance swim is mental attitude,’ he says. ‘You have to break through the mind’s default setting – one of self-preservation and comfort. These are the limitations evolution has set for survival, but if you unlock a new mindset that says self-explore and push yourself, it makes the “impossibles” achievable.’ He’s an inspirational speaker and uses the analogy of his almost superhuman feats in the water to encourage others to push boundaries in all aspects of their lives. He has the credentials. Eight years ago, Stramrood suffered a serious angina attack and had three stents surgically inserted

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failing forward Everyone fails on their journey to success. It’s what you do with it that counts. Long-distance swimmer Ryan Stramrood says the lessons he learns conquering open water can be applied elsewhere in life. WORDS KATHY MALHERBE

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‘Failing forward means looking deep into the failure, the what, the why, the how. Acknowledging the impact on your mind and what positive lessons emerged, then incorporating these into the next challenge.’

into his arteries. He swam himself to super-fitness but during one long-distance swim across a notoriously hostile stretch of icy sea between Scotland and Ireland, the North Channel, he was pulled out of the water by the support crew after 6.5 hours and 19.5 kilometres. He had been well-prepared mentally and physically and had not failed any swim before, but no mindset conquers swimming induced pulmonary oedema (SIPE). The long-distance swimmer’s lungs fill with fluid and blood, a sensation described as ‘drowning from the inside’. When his support crew pulled him out of the sea, his breathing sounded like a ‘death rattle’ and the coast guards were called to assist. ‘I had failed,’ he says. ‘I was not in control and it was a deeply unfamiliar and unsettling feeling.’ It took three years for Stramrood’s confidence to return and when he stepped off the slipway earlier this year, he had processed that fear of failure. He was fit, had a strong support team and was ready for the long-planned crossing.

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With nothing more than a speedo, cream for the chafe, sunblock, goggles and a swimming cap, he dived into what he calls relatively warm water (18.5°C). In the soft pre-dawn darkness, the green light on his swimming cap bobbed at a steady pace in a relatively flat ocean. After 2.5 kilometres, just as the sunrise swathed the Rooi Els mountains in a soft, titian hue and with 30.5 kilometres to go, he felt something brush down his arm… The sensation was familiar, and he knew what it was. Within two seconds the pain was going to hit and hit hard. A bluebottle’s long tentacle had wrapped itself around his body followed by more in quick succession. He had swum into an armada of bluebottles a few hundred metres wide. ‘After the pain of seven or eight of these stings, I was jolted right out of my positive mental state. It was brutal. Physically and mentally.’ After a deep breath he started to swim again but within seconds a tentacle had stung his tongue. ‘My face was throbbing, my tongue swollen.’ The stings under his nose made his eyes water

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THIS PAGE Ryan Stramrood completes his False Bay crossing in record-breaking time

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RIGHT The extreme swimmer signals to the swim officials that he has made land to end a challenge three years in the making

and goggles fill up. The rules were tough. No swimmer may hold onto the boat or receive any assistance from the support team. Stramrood was on his own as he repeated a mantra to himself, ‘This is a hurdle, just a hurdle.’ He describes the method as changing gears – going from automatic to manual mind control. ‘I have been stung before; it wasn’t an unknown, and I could get through the pain. The unknown was the next 30.5 kilometres. There was no question of pulling out. I just consciously said “brace yourself and harden up”.’ He put his head down and swam… And then a strong northwesterly started to pick up from the side, not from behind, as predicted. ‘It’s exhausting. You use different muscles to stabilise yourself and a random wave catches you at the pinnacle and unceremoniously dumps you.’ At 15 kilometres from the end point, it was at its worst. ‘You have to lift your head high out of the water to breathe but I was being broadsided which meant the wave was changing my direction sometimes by up to 45° and I had to keep self-correcting.’ He had calibrated he’d reach Rooi Els in around 13 hours and there was still a long way to go. But it had taken three years to finally push the button for the False Bay swim and Stramrood was there to finish it. He ascribes those three years of planning and preparation to ‘meticulous procrastination’. ‘I thought I had processed my North Channel failure and was talking a big game and planning it. So often everything was in place, but something always stopped me from taking the plunge both mentally and physically.’ His manager, Gill Attwood, forced him to admit to himself he was scared. Subconsciously he was being steered by fear. Still, he achieved incredible swims along the way, such as his 100th Robben Island crossing and a daunting 15km swim across the Bonificio Strait, France to Italy, to name a few. But all well within his ability. It was the start line of this mammoth challenge – 33kms across the cold, unfriendly and psychologically daunting False Bay – that he was avoiding. A challenge guaranteed to take him extremely far from any zone of comfort and with a high probability of failure. It would take a long, hard look at the failed Irish Sea crossing to change the game as well as adopting the catchphrase that would define his path: ‘Failing forward’. ‘Failing without taking the lessons on board and embracing them, is utterly limiting,’ he says. ‘Failing forward means looking deep into the failure, the what, the why, the how. Acknowledg-

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ing the impact on your mind and what positive lessons emerged, then incorporating these into the next challenge.’ Without this process, you’re unable to move forward and failure is simply that… failure. In every major extreme-sport challenge, there is a critical turning point. For Stramrood it was 15km into the swim. Suddenly, he was not entertaining any negative thoughts, focussing instead on his pace. It was at this point that the skipper, Derrick Frazer, said ‘If you keep this up, you will beat the record.’ ‘It threw me completely,’ Stramrood says, ‘I wasn’t interested in the record and didn’t want to think about it. Subconsciously it would make me go faster and derail my strategy. I am an endurance swimmer not out to make speed records.’ But the seed had been planted and he put his head down and gave it a push. The wind was dropping, and it wasn’t as wild as before. He swam the last 10 kilometres in 2 hours 37 minutes. He saw the waves breaking against the rocks directly ahead of him and decided to swim straight despite what was going to be a difficult exit with the risk of being bashed against the rocks. After 8 hours and 39 minutes of swimming, he pulled himself out of the water, his feet firmly on the exit rock. He’d made history. Guinness World Records officially marked his record-breaking swim, but it meant a great deal more to him. He had failed forward… spectacularly. 

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Comprising four architecturally distinct pavilions, most hidden from street view, this future-ready family home generates more energy than it uses, making it tomorrow’s greenest house today. . WORDS MARTIN JACOBS

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ABOVE Caboriandi comnis re, ex essum eos et aces aris excescium volupta di ad erum aut odicien duntiantur, quatur, ex erum ea sus aceprorum voluptatem. Ut pres ad quia volorepe cus

OPPOSITE Architects Andrew Maynard and Mark Austin honoured their client’s wish to build a home amid the trees of an existing garden LEFT Positioned on the south side of the plot, the home is designed to maximise the northerly sunlight. Large windows and retractable glass doors encourage a constant connection with the garden BELOW The shingled, pitched-roof pavilion – all that’s visible of the property from street view – houses a Tesla battery to power the couple’s electric car

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‘MORE THAN JUST a house, this is a power station,’ says

PHOTGRAPHY DEREK SWALWELL

architect Andrew Maynard of Austin Maynard Architects of the home he and partner architect Mark Austin recently completed. It’s a novel description for a suburban residence, but one we are likely to encounter with increasing frequency in years to come as architects forge ahead with sustainability innovation. The expected visuals the phrase evokes – skyline-dominating, smoke-billowing industrial eyesores from which multiple suburbs derive power – in this instance have been shattered. In their place, a welcome high-performance, entirely off-grid family home. A delightful series of four stylistically different pavilions that make up a home that is, currently, likely one of the word’s greenest buildings. One that is architecturally intriguing, yet modest and unassuming, given that it is almost entirely hidden from street view. The plots that border the narrow streets of Melbourne’s hip inner-city suburb Prahran are as long and narrow as the streets themselves. The property the homeowners had purchased for their family of five was no different. ‘They chose an unusual plot,’ explains Mark. ‘Facing the street was a tired, single-fronted cottage with a 1980s addition at the rear.’ Beyond this now-dated addition was a large, private garden filled with a number of impressive trees. ‘The couple wanted us to save as much of the existing garden as possible and build within it.

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RIGHT Interior designer Simone Haag’s earth-toned palette was chosen for its nostalgic value, calling to mind the landscape of the family’s former desert-town home. Low, modular furniture allows for uninterrupted flow across the open-plan space BELOW A ‘cloffice’ (closet office) is set into hoop pine plywood walls, and offers an in-sight, but concealable, space for the couple’s three children to complete homework

They regularly entertain and wanted a home that allowed for large-scale entertaining, and space for their three children to grow up,’ he adds. Yet key to the brief was the wish that the home didn’t feel like a big house. It was around this that much of the architects’ conceptual planning centred. The idea for a series of interconnecting pavilions, some of which would hover above the ground to protect tree roots, and all with the garden as a central focus, soon emerged. At street view, the garage – reworked as a whiteshingled, pitched-roof cottage – appears to be the house in its entirety (behind its door, a built-in Tesla battery for the family’s electric car is the first indication of the unusualness to come). But setting foot on a pedestrian pathway alongside the steel-clad structure, it becomes apparent that this pavilion is larger than it initially seemed, housing in its two storeys an office, workshop, bike room and living space. Beyond this, and through the home’s entrance, the residential pavilions await, separate buildings ‘invisibly’ connected via mirrored glass passageways that reflect the lush foliage. ‘The couple liked the way we dealt with visual bulk on a previous project, by breaking down the home into smaller components,’ says Andrew, ‘so the response here was much the same – we designed office, kitchen and

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PHOTGRAPHY DEREK SWALWELL

‘The idea for a series of interconnecting pavilions ... with the garden as a central focus soon emerged.’


Polished concrete screed flooring in the downstairs living spaces absorbs heat from sunlight in the winter months, warming the house from within. The homeowners opted for exposed recycled bricks reminiscent of the brickwork in their grandparents’ 1950’s homes


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living, dining and kids’ zones.’ Further to these zones, internal, concealed doors allow spaces to be opened or closed, not only allowing entertainment areas to be increased in size, but also regulating indoor temperatures. ‘It’s a multitasking house, doing four things at the same time,’ says the homeowner of the pavilions. ‘There’s logical space for it and it all works. It feels homely and cosy, like a little ecosystem.’ A self-professed ‘tech head’, the owner requested that in much the same way that user experience dominates the online realm, Andrew and Mark consider the design of personalised experiences within the home. To this end, the architects have included a muesli-making zone in the pantry, a netted play-stair for the children, and a ‘cloffice’ (or closet office) in the living space. These spaces, along with the rest of the home, are rich

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in natural materials, like recycled cream bricks, the pallets for which the couple personally chose to closely resemble the bricks from their grandparents’ 1950’s homes, along with the buildings of the University of Melbourne, where both spent their student days. Interior designer Simone Haag references this nostalgia in her selection of textured, earthy finishes, tone on tone to call to mind the desert town where the family once lived. Over and above the property’s compelling design and innovative use of space, it’s that their home is completely self-powered that leaves the couple most proud. ‘That’s achieved not through us sacrificing, as there’s a heated pool, hydronic heating, we even have an electric car that’s powered by the house,’ they exaplin. ‘We pay nothing for fuel or power. There’s no cost and no guilt.’ Now that’s power worth celebrating. 

PHOTGRAPHY DEREK SWALWELL

‘It’s a multitasking house, doing four things at the same time ... And it all works. It feels homely and cosy, like a little ecosystem.’


LEFT The open-plan kitchen’s gathering zone is a black porcelaintopped island RIGHT AND BELOW Timber-clad walls with integrated bedside pedestals add warmth to the master bedroom, which includes a living area that leads onto a private balcony

A Green Machine

FIVE KEY FACTORS THAT MAKE THIS HIGHPERFORMANCE FAMILY HOME SELF-POWERED.

1. ENERGY USAGE • Solar panels (facing north, east and west) generate all the power, which is stored within a battery. More electricity is generated daily than the family consumes, so excess electricity feeds back into the grid. • The property is free of fossil fuels; there are no gas connections and all cooking appliances are electric.

2. CLIMATE CONTROL • Floor-to-ceiling windows with awnings or eaves allow the sun to heat the concrete floors in winter, and act as passive solar protection in summer. • Automated, Venetian and retractable blinds encourage the family to moderate shading to suit their needs, be it working at a laptop or watching television. • Hydronic heating is installed on both storeys and is serviced by an electric heat pump. The heat pump also warms the pool.

3. INSULATION • Metal and brick-clad walls comprise double skins, creating a thermal envelope. • Double-glazed windows are fitted throughout, all with high-performance frames and insulating glass.

4. WATER CONSUMPTION • Harvested rainwater is used for flushing toilets as well as garden irrigation. • Water-efficient resilient plants were prioritised when landscaping.

5. REDUCED TRAVEL • Vegetable, herb and fruit gardens provide seasonal produce, reducing the need for travel. So too does teleconferencing equipment in the home office. • A Tesla Model 3 car charges on the property, effectively running the car for free. • A dedicated bicycle entrance off the pedestrian pathway makes the decision to travel by bike effortless.

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ON TOP OF OUR PERPETUAL PLANET National Geographic and Rolex have taken exploration to new heights since the installation of the world’s loftiest weather station in the Americas. WORDS DEBBIE HATHWAY


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The night sky above the Los Penitentes camp, at an altitude of 4 414 metres, during the ascent to Tupungato Volcano

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The expedition team installs the highest weather station in the southern and western hemispheres at 6 505 metres BELOW LEFT TO RIGHT Horses and mules were essential for carrying supplies on the 2021 expedition National Geographic explorer and expedition co-lead Gino Casassa prepares for the ascent on horseback to Tupungatito Bajo weather station Climate scientist Professor Baker Perry

‘With the installation of the highest weather station in the Americas, scientists will now have a window into atmospheric processes in the high Chilean Andes.’

PHOTGRAPHY ©ARMANDO VEGA/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

The highest weather station installed on the Tupungato Volcano

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IN MARCH 2021, a National Geographic team of explorers and scientists installed a weather station – the highest in the southern and western hemispheres – just below the summit of Tupungato Volcano in the Southern Andes. The goal? To collect data to analyse the effect of climate change on water resources supplied to billions of people. Under the Perpetual Planet Expeditions banner, National Geographic and Rolex combine scientific expertise with cutting-edge technology to discover more about the impacts of climate change on the natural systems that we cannot live without: mountains as the world’s water towers, rainforests as the planet’s lungs, and the ocean as its cooling system. Water towers are described as the most important as these mountainous and glacial regions serve as giant storage tanks for fresh water that billions of people depend on. The Tupungato Volcano project exists in cooperation with Chile’s government and builds on the National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Expedition to Mount Everest in 2019. The focus of that expedition was to learn more about the effects of climate change on the glaciers of the Hindu Kush-Himalaya. Located on Tupungato’s summit, at a height of 6 505m, the new weather station will now function alongside lower stations at the upper Aconcagua basin 70km northeast of Santiago at 4 400m and two on the neighbouring volcano, Tupungatito, at 4 400m and 5 750m. ‘With the installation of the highest weather station in the Americas, scientists will now have a window into atmospheric processes in the high Chilean Andes. One of the most vulnerable water towers in the world, this mountain range provides critical freshwater to more than six million inhabitants in nearby Santiago. The expedition is contributing to a Perpetual Planet by pushing the limits of scientific discovery and exploration to the highest reaches of the planet,’ says Profession Baker Perry, climate scientist at the Appalachian State University in North Carolina, US, and co-lead of the Tupungato Volcano expedition.

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PHOTGRAPHY ©ROLEX/ULYSSE FRÉCHELIN

EXPLORING NEW TERRITORIES Mountainous terrains and the adventurers that conquer them have provided Rolex with valuable information to evolve and improve the performance of their watches since the 1930s. Today Rolex champions exploration for the sake of safeguarding the planet through its Perpetual Planet initiative. Rolex timepieces are renowned for their excellent quality, elegance and prestige. The movements of the Oyster Perpetual watches are certified by the Official Swiss Chronometer Testing Institute (Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronomètres or COSC) before being tested again at the integrated and independent Swiss watch manufacturer. The Superlative Chronometer certification, symbolized by the green seal, confirms that each watch has passed the stringent Rolex quality checks for precision, performance and reliability. The Tupungato Volcano project team was equipped with the new Oyster Perpetual Explorer II, an essential exploration tool. Rolex previously supplied watches to the expedition that saw Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay summit the world’s highest peak, Mount Everest. The word ‘Perpetual’ is inscribed on every Rolex Oyster watch. 

TOP The 42mm Oyster Perpetual Explorer II is designed for the most fearless explorers. The Oystersteel steel tool watch features a redesigned case and strap, yet remains faithful to the original aesthetic ABOVE The new 36mm Oyster Perpetual Explorer in yellow Rolesor is the same size as the model launched after the Mount Everest ascent by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay

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‘Today Rolex champions exploration for the sake of safeguarding the planet through its Perpetual Planet initiative.’


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THE FLIGHT OF TIME The evolution of pilot watches has remained in sync with that of the innovators, pioneers and trailblazers who wear them.

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POCKET WATCHES FOR men, and pendant, brooch and chatelaine-style watches for women were rare in the inventories and shop windows of esteemed watchmakers in the mid-19th century. But by the time Louis Cartier began working with his father in 1898, the fashion was beginning to change. Intent on producing watches that were pieces of jewellery first, with technical brilliance a close second, he sought out manufacturers of movements who could meet his stylistic demands. These collaborations led to the invention of new timepieces that met his aesthetic and technical standards. The Santos was the first watch designed with a truly modern case that had attaches intégrées (incorporated lugs). Cartier made the first Santos prototype in 1904 at the request of his friend, the Brazilian aviation pioneer Alberto SantosDumont, who wanted to be able to time his performance in flight more accurately than he could with his pocket watch. That meant being able to see the dial while he kept both hands on the controls. Cartier responded with the first purpose-designed watch that could be strapped to the wrist with a leather band and small buckle. The Santos-Dumont watches being released this year echo the aviator’s drive to ‘go further’, consistently pushing the

OPPOSITE Breitling Aviation Pioneers squad member Scott Kelly wears the Super Avenger Chronograph 48 Night Mission RIGHT Breitling Super Avenger Chronograph 48 Night Mission FAR RIGHT Breitling Avenger Chronograph 45 Night Mission

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THIS PAGE TMario iactum sena, unulius vivit. Equam iae ne novente ssent, que mo es et quamquam popon te denihilicur acrei ex sessesigna, quam omantempl. O te conunu intiore in di, cae nos oc, Ti. Quit, qua nos nos et, Ti. Ibus perfes audam simis locrum

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Breitling Avenger Swiss Air Force Team Limited Edition; Breitling Aviation Pioneers Squad member Rocío González Torres wears the Avenger Chronograph 43; Breitling Avenger Automatic 45 Seawolf

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LEFT TO RIGHT Bell & Ross BR03 92 HUD; IWC Big Pilot’s Watch Top Gun Edition Mojave Desert; IWC Big Pilot’s Watch Perpetual Calendar Top Gun Edition Mojave Desert

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limits as he persisted in inventing flying machines for his own pleasure as well as the entertainment of his Parisian spectators. Each new Santos-Dumont watch beats to the rhythm of the 430 MC mechanical movement with manual winding. Santos-Dumont’s original drawings are engraved on the case back. Meanwhile, Breitling’s redesign of the Avenger connects it to two other collections – the Aviator 8 and the iconic Navitimer – to mark an evolution of the brand’s pilot’s watches. The Avenger is equally at home on the wrist of a drone specialist, supersonic jet pilot or astronaut. Breitling provided onboard clocks and other equipment for airplanes in the 1930s and 1940s. They also have the honour of being the first Swiss wrist chronograph in space. On 24 May 1962, US astronaut Scott Carpenter wore a Breitling Navitimer Cosmonaute on his Mercury space flight.

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‘Many of the Bell & Ross collections have been inspired by aeronautical instruments and pay tribute to timekeepers used by the military throughout history.’

This year, Longines re-issued a chronograph inspired by a 1930s design. The Longines Avigation BigEye, notable for its dial clarity and oversized 30-minute counter, is now available in titanium with a petrol-blue dial. It is powered by an exclusive chronograph movement fitted with a silicon balance spring, and comes with a five-year warranty. The brand’s association with aviation dates back to 1919, when it was appointed official supplier to the International Aeronautical Federation. It was then that Longines began to develop accurate and reliable instruments so that aviation pioneers could time their record-setting feats. Many of the Bell & Ross collections have been inspired by aeronautical instruments and pay tribute to timekeepers used by the military throughout history. In addition, the company customises watches for elite units. These tool watches adapt the circle-square-style clock design from an airplane cockpit for wearability on the wrist. The BR 03-92 HUD by Bell & Ross features the Head Up Display (HUD), which is a transparent glass screen that displays all the visual detail a pilot needs to complete a mission. There have been many wonderful iterations of the IWC pilot’s watch since the first was revealed in the 1930s. One of the latest to catch the eye at this year’s Watches & Wonders Geneva was the Big Pilot’s Watch Top Gun Mojave Desert Edition. The Top Gun Edition watches are engineered for the most extreme aviation conditions and reflect the colour of the most unforgiving desert terrain. The cases are made with specially formulated sand-coloured ceramic, which boasts a Vickers rating second only to that of diamonds. 

ABOVE Longines Avigation BigEye LEFT Cartier SantosDumont Precious Set, a limited, numbered edition of 100 pieces, crown set with a ruby cabochon and engraved case back BELOW Cartier Santos-Dumont’s extra-large model is a limited edition of 500 pieces, engraved with Santos-Dumont’s flying machine ‘N°19’

Top performers Richemont (which owns Cartier and IWC, among others) remains in fourth place on the FY2019 luxury goods sales ranking published by Deloitte in its Global Powers of Luxury Goods 2020 report. Breitling moved up five places to rank 67th. The company also ranks 19th among the top 20 fastest-growing luxury goods companies, FY2016-2019.

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New watch launches are no longer a his-and-hers scenario. Gender parity is increasing in the world of watchmaking. WORDS DEBBIE HATHWAY

WATCHES & WONDERS, the world’s most prestigious annual watch fair, usually reveals watchmaking trends for the year even though these emerge more by chance than predetermination. This year’s virtual event accommodated product presentations and exclusive interviews arranged for select media as well as a daily broadcast from Geneva, Switzerland, in which host Belle Donati and guests explored topical issues. One of them was gender parity in watchmaking. In recent years, brands such as Roger Dubuis and Purnell have positioned themselves as manufacturers of unisex timepieces differentiated by case size rather than design for men or women. Jaeger-LeCoultre CEO Catherine Renier wore the magnificent Reverso Hybris Mechanica Calibre 185 on her wrist during an interview. The point was to show that the world’s first timepiece with four faces is not necessarily for men, despite measuring 51.2mm by 31mm with a 15.15mm overall thickness to neatly contain 11 complications. Chris Hall, senior watch editor at Mr Porter, says the conversation around gender parity in watchmaking is moving in line with what is being discussed in wider culture. He references Vacheron Constantin’s Historiques American 1921, available in two case sizes, which previously would have been explicitly referred to as having a smaller women’s case size and a larger one for men. ‘A lot of men are coming onto our platform and actively shopping for the 36.5mm version,’ he says. While women have been wearing oversized watches for a while now, considerations around buyers’ preferences for

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uniquely yours PRIVATE EDITION


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OPPOSITE Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Hybris Mechanica Calibre 185 CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Vacheron Constantin Historiques American 1921 40mm; IWC Pilot’s Watch Chronograph 41mm; Panerai Piccolo Due Madreperla 38mm; Roger Dubuis Excalibur Single Flying Tourbillon Glow Me 42mm; Purnell Escape II Icy Blue 48mm in platinum

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jewelled watches needs further definition. Charlie Boyd, fine jewellery and watch editor at Net-A-Porter, points out that having a watch with diamonds around the dial is very different from a high-jewellery piece, for example. ‘The genderless element is very much within daywear watches. The high-jewellery offering will always be there and is just as valid for its beautiful artistry and craftsmanship that has to be preserved and continued,’ she says. Personalisation of watches is another key trend and can manifest in numerous ways beyond the traditional engraving or inscription. Some buyers are drawn to manufacturers who offer a configurator programme that allows them to choose their own material, dial and strap. Or they may fall in love with a bronze watch that will develop a unique patina over time or one with a hard stone dial that, by nature, is one of a kind. Several mainstream manufacturers, such as IWC, are offering interchangeability of straps to suit different moods, needs and styles. ‘Brands offer different types of bracelets (that you can change yourself) to really adapt your watch to the purpose. Today it’s a huge trend – nearly a must,’ says Gianfranco Ritschel, watchmaking expert and master trainer at the Fondation Haute Horlogerie Academy. ‘This brings a new way to judge, to love, to appreciate watches… another way to have more and more fun.’ 

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LEFT Chef Gregory Czarnecki with a selection of his famous creations FAR LEFT A bright orange cocoa butter shell conceals a pineapple and tonka ganache

NIST

Rock-star chef Gregory Czarnecki has secret skills that only a select few know about. Anyone lucky enough to try his mindblowing ‘guess-the-flavour’ bonbons will never go back to eating just any chocolate. WORDS MICHELLE COBURN

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PRODUCTION SVEN ALBERDING/ BUREAUX PHOTOGRAPHS WARREN HEATH/ BUREAUX

SPRAY-GUN AND a hairdryer. They don’t sound like usual tools in the arsenal of a professional chocolatier, but then again, ‘usual’ is not a word anyone who knows or works with Gregory Czarnecki would use to describe him. In fact, the award-winning French-born chef doesn’t even call himself a chocolatier. ‘I didn’t study it, it’s not my job,’ he explains as he sprays a fine mist of vivid orange cocoa butter into a chocolate mould, occasionally using the hairdryer to warm up the mixture when it becomes too thick. This is how he creates the delicate shells of his bonbons, but he says a home cook could use a small paint brush to thinly paint the cocoa butter onto the moulds, then use a toothpick to create any pattern, zigag or swirl, followed by a second layer of cocoa butter in another colour to fill in the lines. So if making chocolate is not his job, it must be a passion then? A calling? Gregory headed up the kitchen at The Restaurant at Waterkloof (which closed its doors in 2020) for ten years but it was only four years ago that he decided to start making the edible works of art that had become a fixture at the end of his 15-course degustation menu at the restaurant. ‘I was one of the first people to bring the bonbon to this country – I wanted to offer diners something different,’ he says. ‘I am self-taught. Yes, I did work with chocolate when I was an apprentice but now I

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RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM Orange cocoa butter; Chef Gregory Czarnecki uses a spray gun to create the cocoa butter shells MIDDLE, TOP TO BOTTOM Delicate shells are formed, into which the ganache will be poured; a spatula is used to smooth the tempered chocolate over the ganache filling FAR RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM An acetate sheet is placed over the mould and a spatula is run over it to smooth the chocolate base; the bonbons consist of three components: the cocoa butter shell, hand-tempered couverture chocolate, and a chocolate or fruit ganache filling

‘I always make sure that the colour on the outside doesn’t match the flavour on the inside’

PRODUCTION SVEN ALBERDING/ BUREAUX PHOTOGRAPHS WARREN HEATH/ BUREAUX

guess I have more knowledge, more patience, less arrogance. And I decided that if I was going to make chocolates, they would have to be the best-looking ones I could possibly make. I want to look at them and be proud to have spent so much time on it. For me, it’s the results that matter.’ And it’s the imaginative results of his experiments in colour and flavour that almost defy description. His themed collections of five bonbons per table of two changed constantly, and often included gleaming black pyramids and gemstones; marble-like stones in neutral hues; swirls of yellow, turquoise and purple. Concealed beneath their mirror-like cocoa butter shells are ganache fillings in some rather way-out flavour combinations: if, for some reason, the hazelnut and Parmesan or passion fruit and basil oil do not fascinate you, perhaps the crème fraiche and raspberry vinegar will. What’s more, their creator takes great delight in tricking the senses – the exteriors of Czarnecki’s bonbons give no clue to what diners’ taste buds will experience. ‘I always make sure that the colour on the outside doesn’t match the flavour. Why do yellow if it’s lemon, you know? You want people to be intrigued, to have to figure it out.’

Cocoa loco

CZARNECKI’S EXPERIMENTS IN FLAVOUR HAVE RESULTED IN MIND-BLOWING FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS:

‘You can go really crazy, like with guava and goat’s cheese, or salted hazelnut and Parmesan, where the saltiness comes from infusing Parmesan in the cream we use to make the ganache,’ he says. Some of his other famous combinations: Burnt lemon and jasmine; crème fraiche and kalamansi; grapefruit and pink peppercorn; clementine and masala; white peach and saffron; mango and piment d’espelette; blood peach and verbena.

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FROM LEFT TO RIGHT Bonbons as works of art: Some look like polished stones or marbles, and others like pyramids

Czarnecki’s meticulously created bonbons are demoulded and stored in a special room at 7˚C until two hours before they are to be served

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How to temper chocolate like a pro A no-limits attitude, a powerful streak of perfectionism, and using only the best-quality chocolate as the star ingredient – which he works with at precisely controlled temperatures – are the key to his edible works of art. ‘If you just melt chocolate, like people do when they want to dip strawberries, you’re not going to end up with a snappy chocolate. You have to bring it to a higher temperature, quickly lower it, then warm it up again so that you can work with it. There are specific temperatures, depending on the amount of bitterness, origin and type of chocolate you are using.’ (See box: How to temper chocolate like a pro.) When the chocolate has been expertly tempered, it is poured into the moulds over the set cocoa butter shells. Once the chocolate has had a chance to set, Czarnecki uses a piping bag to add the ganache filling, taking care not to overfill each mould. The ganache is then left to set at room temperature for 24 hours. Now comes the final touch – a last layer of tempered chocolate to seal the deal. Czarnecki’s meticulously created bonbons are then demoulded and stored in a special room at 7˚C until two hours before they are to be served, at which point they are transferred to another room at 14˚C – this is his advice on the perfect temperature at which chocolate should be served for maximum flavour. ‘I even bought the machine that makes the thermoplastic sheets the bonbons are arranged on. Sure, there are places that can make the sheets for me, but they want you to order thousands and maybe I just want 100. Now that I have the machine, I can do anything with it, you know.’ Indeed he can! 

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THE KEY TO ACHIEVING THE GLOSSIEST BONBONS WITH THE PERFECT SNAP AND MELT-IN-THEMOUTH TEXTURE LIES IN CAREFULLY TEMPERING THE CHOCOLATE. CHEF GREGORY CZARNECKI SHARES HIS TIPS:

1. START WITH A PREMIER COUVERTURE CHOCOLATE such as the Valrhona Manjari 64%. 2. PLACE THE CHOCOLATE IN A HEATPROOF BOWL over a pan of simmering water to create a bain-marie. The base of the bowl should sit above the water without touching it. 3. GENTLY MELT THE CHOCOLATE to a temperature of exactly 55˚C. Once you have checked the temperature with a thermometer, remove the bowl containing the chocolate from the bain-marie. 4. NEXT, YOU HAVE TO COOL IT DOWN as quickly as possible. Czarnecki uses the tabling method: Pour the melted chocolate onto a cool marble surface and use a spatula to work it into an even layer to speed up the process. 5. CHECK THE TEMPERATURE CONTINUALLY until it is at 29˚C. Scrape the chocolate back into the mixing bowl. Gently reheat it to a temperature of 32˚C. It’s now ready to use.

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Pioneers and trendsetters often look to modern innovation to push the boundaries of their craft. But for a handful of Cape winemakers, inspiration is to be found in technology dating back more than 8 000 years.

THE OLD NEW ART OF WINEMAKING WORDS RICHARD HOLMES

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Avondale became the first cellar in South Africa to start using qvevri, large egg-shaped earthenware vessels used for fermenting and maturing wine

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ANDWICHED BETWEEN THE Black Sea and the Caucasus Mountains, the Eastern European country of Georgia is widely acknowledged as the cradle of modern winemaking. And key to the winemaking tradition here is the use of qvevri (pronounced kwe-vree), large egg-shaped earthenware vessels long used for fermenting and maturing wine. In fact, such is the importance of the Georgian winemaking tradition, that in 2013, UNESCO added the qvevri to its Intangible Cultural Heritage list Johnathan Grieve, proprietor of Avondale Estate outside Paarl in the Western Cape, is a man with a passion for natural winemaking, stripping away intervention to let the grape’s true character shine through. In 2018 Avondale became the first cellar in South Africa to start fermenting wine in qvevri. ‘The qvevri is really an extension of our clay project,’ explains Grieve, who began working with clay amphorae, made with clay from the farm, a decade ago. ‘We were looking for vessels that breathe like a barrel does,’ he adds. ‘We love barrels but we don’t want the oak influence. We are after micro-oxygenation, that subtle breath of life that comes into the wine.’

‘The use of clay fits into our philosophy of farming for grape-driven flavours ...’

PHOTOGRAPHY GETTYIMAGES.COM AND SUPPLIED

Avondale sourced their 24 qvevri from Nodari Kapanadze, a respected qvevri master in Georgia’s Imeretian Mountains. ‘What’s been exciting for us is that because these are handmade by master craftsmen, each qvevri has its own character. Over time we’ll learn the traits that make each of our qvevri unique,’ says Grieve. Qvevri are traditionally handcrafted, ranging in size from 800 to 1 500 litres. Fired at a low heat, the clay has a higher porosity than the more common clay amphorae, so craftsmen line the qvevri with beeswax to limit the amount of oxygenation that takes place. And, due to their porosity and size, the qvevri are buried in soil in the cellar, lending structural strength and regulating both temperature and oxygenation. For Grieve that oxygenation is ‘the life force that comes into the wine’. ‘The use of clay fits into our philosophy of farming for grape-driven flavours, putting them on a pedestal in the wine, rather than over-manipulating in the cellar,’ he says. Today Avondale’s Qvevri range includes a Chenin Blanc and Rhône-inspired red blend, both made using organic fruit grown to biodynamic principles on the estate. The Qvevri Chenin Blanc includes a healthy proportion of whole-bunches in the fermentation, contributing elegant grapedriven tannins into a wine brimming with lively acidity.

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The Qvevri Red Blend – Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre – is just as lively, made in a Beaujolais style with plenty of freshness and bright fruit character. ‘It’s lighter in style, but it still has incredible depth,’ says Grieve. ‘That micro-oxygenation from the qvevri, and the subtle influence on the texture of the wine, really improves the overall complexity.’ From a commercial perspective this new approach using ancient technology dovetails perfectly with the existing Avondale portfolio. ‘Ultimately there was a gap in our offering, and this lighter style, which still has complexity and depth, was something that the market is moving towards,’ adds Grieve. Just down the road at Spice Route, whose tasting room sits on the flanks of Paarl Mountain, owner Charles Back has also never been one to let an opportunity for innovation pass him by.

‘Micro-oxygenation from the qvevri, and the subtle influence on the texture, really improves the overall complexity’

Avondale’s 24 qvevri vessels were sourced from Nodari Kapanadze, a respected qvevri master in Georgia’s Imeretian Mountains

But the qvevri really stamps its identity on white wine, with extended skin contact contributing antioxidants, phenolic components and grape tannin to the wine. ‘Particularly when young, the white wines have a lot of grip from the time spent on the skins,’ says Du Plessis. ‘There’s a lot of complexity, so they’re definitely food wines, they need time to evolve in the bottle.’ And for wine connoisseurs with a taste for the unique, it should be worth the wait. After all, the qvevri has been instrumental in creating memorable wines for 8 000 years. Leaving yours in the cellar for a few more doesn’t seem too much to ask. 

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Owner of the Fairview cheese brand, Back first travelled to Georgia to investigate the culture of cheese-making, but quickly fell in love with the unique wines of the region. Winemaker Charl du Plessis followed up with a visit in 2017, travelling to Georgia to visit qvevri craftsmen and learn the intricacies of winemaking the Georgian way. The first of Spice Route’s 20 qvevri arrived just in time for the 2018 harvest, with Du Plessis overseeing the delicate process of installing the qvevri in the Spice Route cellar. ‘You can’t have a shallow water table. They must be planted a metre apart under the ground, and preferably not in clay soil because the expansion of the clay will crack the qvevri,’ he explains. Today, Spice Route bottles their qvevri wines under their innovative Obscura label, with a Semillon, Rhône-style red blend, and multifaceted white blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Semillon and Viognier. The Spice Route Obscura Red Blend 2020 is the latest vintage in the range, blended from two qvevri of whole-bunch Shiraz, one of destalked Carignan and a qvevri of whole berry Mourvèdre, all naturally fermented.

PRIVATE EDITION



The icy wonderworld that is St Maritz is a peak of perfection for skiiers and holidaymakers alike

THE

SECRET OF ST MORITZ

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Skiing in one of the world’s top ten ski resorts is on the bucket list of any serious skier. For Kathy Malherbe, it became a reality when she spent time at Suvretta House in St Moritz in Switzerland early in 2020.

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FROM PERFECTLY GROOMED pistes, enough powder snow for a daily fix of ‘powder giggles’, ski– in/ski–out facilities, Michelin-star restaurants, impeccable service, après ski and pampering, fairy-tale castle Suvretta House in St Moritz is straight out the pages of a glossy travel magazine. It is no surprise, then, that this hotel is an A-list escape, where celebs are secreted away from the paparazzi and prying eyes. The seclusion is by nature and design – a steep and winding road leading to the Chasella’s plateau gives no inkling of the private sylvan property. The Belle Époque, grace and splendour of Suvretta House lies within a private estate overlooking the lakes and mountains. It’s as if an invisible, frozen moat ensures absolute privacy. It’s clear that the establishment is an exclusive club for the global HNWI’s looking for peace and quiet. And impeccable discretion. It’s no surprise that most guests are returns – with two or three generations travelling together. Suvretta House was the brainchild of Swiss ski hotel pioneer Anton Bon. Since it was built, owners and management have spared nothing to make and keep it, arguably, one of the top hotels in the world. Although most of the patrons are Swiss, German or from the UK, South Africans too have found the secret of Suvretta House. St Moritz was the birthplace of Winter Tourism and home to the Winter Olympics in 2017. It is also home to the Snow Polo World Cup and Frozen Turf horse racing on the lake in winter. The resort epitomises what a hangout should be for the champagne quaffing, thrill seekers of the world but Suvretta House is a cocoon of luxury with unobtrusive, anticipatory service. You may be close to the village but a chauffeur service departs every 30 minutes, and the ski lift is for guests use only. In fact, Suvretta has absolutely

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The resort epitomises what a hangout should be for the champagne quaffing, thrill seekers of the world

TOP TO BOTTOM A restaurant with a magnificent view is a must for any holiday; soak away in a hot tub surrounded by dramatic landscapes

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everything you need, no more than a few paces away. A ski hire centre, access to ski passes, a ski school and, of course, a high-end boutique. It has a private ice–skating rink and is the only hotel in the area with a ski–in/ski–out facility to the upper Engadine area. There’s a heated pool enclosed by double glazing and a piping hot outdoor jacuzzi cocooned in fresh snow. It also houses Soubrette sports school which offers private and group ski classes and 217 miles of pistes. It’s the perfect place from which to ski from Piz Nair (3 056 metres) overlooking St Moritz. You reach it in a gondola which takes a rather gutlurching trip up a cliff face to the viewing platform and restaurant but once there, you’re left breathless, literally and figuratively, at this altitude – almost a third of the height that a Boeing flies. It’s also bitterly cold, but the restaurant with its glass windows and panoramic view of the snow laden peaks is warm and welcoming. You can test your mettle - off or on piste – from Piz Nair – there are several slopes from challenging black to meandering blue which take you back to the resort. If you are not skiing around Corvigligia, Diavolezza and Coravatsch, you can try your hand at the sport of curling on the obsessively polished house ice rink. The private ski lift links you to the main gondola and if the button lift is not your thing, the hotel chauffeur will happily drive you to literally within a few metres of the house lift. Suvretta House is known for its legendary breakfast spreads and it lives up to expectation, as does The Hall, steeped in tradition and of unprecedented grandeur. The head chef, Fabrizio Zanetti, creates seasonal French cuisine using produce fresh from the market to be enjoyed in the hand-carved oak panelled dining area. In keeping with the hotel’s heritage and charm, there is a dinner jacket code for male guests. It’s no surprise that The Hall won 15 Gault Millau cuisine points (the maximum is 20 which has never been given under the editorial of the original founders). For a less formal meal there is the Suvretta Stube, it is here you can enjoy a traditional Swiss fondue or the Raclette, the traditional Swiss cheese dish. Since 2014, husband-and-wife team Esther and Peter Elgi’s dedication and standards keep attracting return guests. They are dedicated and hands-on and Peter says that generations of families come back, bringing additional family members to their ‘home away from home’ with many storing their ski or hiking equipment at the hotel for multiple trips during the year. If there were such a thing as 10 stars, Suvretta House would have them. 

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Suvretta House is known for its legendary breakfast spreads and it lives up to expectation, as does The Hall


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THIS PAGE The hotel chaffeur is at your beck and call, always in a stylish ride OPPOSITE The dining hall lives up to its status of 15 Gault Milau cuisine; a night of luxury awaits in the hotel’s suites

PAOLA PIVI, It’s not fair, 2013, 248 x 60 x 114 cm. At the Arken, Coppenhagen, Denmark.

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Visitors to Xigera Safari Lodge will enjoy breathtaking views of the Okavango Delta’s bushveld and floodplains

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THE YEAR OF THE

SAFARI If nothing else, this past year has offered access to some of the world’s most luxurious game lodges and safari experiences, all on our doorstep. WORDS RICHARD HOLMES

PAOLA PIVI, It’s not fair, 2013, 248 x 60 x 114 cm. At the Arken, Coppenhagen, Denmark.

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Botswana XI GE R A

SA FA R I

LODGE

There is no shortage of luxury safari lodges across Botswana, and with each new opening it becomes harder to tell them apart. Let’s be honest, there’s only so far percale linen and plunge pools will get you. Which is why Xigera Safari Lodge has turned to African creativity as its raison d’être, celebrating the art and craftsmanship of the continent. In partnership with the award-winning Southern Guild, the lodge is envisioned as a living gallery of African art, featuring work by the likes of Ardmore Ceramics, Madoda Fani, Porky Hefer and Adam Birch, amongst many others. Alongside this eye-catching African aesthetic, Xigera’s 12 spacious suites are spread across two islands to offer the last word in wilderness luxury. That’s put on particularly playful display in The Baobab Treehouse, which offers an unforgettable sleep-out surrounded by the Delta bushveld. Lodge luxury aside, guests fill their days with mokoro trips along crystal-clear Delta channels, game drives in the company of local guides, bush walks, and the chance to reboot in the spacious spa. Xigera is also no slouch when it comes to sustainability, with 95% of the lodge’s energy from solar-power. xigera.com

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THIS PAGE AND BELOW OKU Kos in Marmari, Greece, offers the ultimate spa getaway experience

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LEFT Xigera Safari Lodge is a celebration of African design, as seen here in its shared spaces and the unique Baobab Treehouse RIGHT The old-world luxurious charm of Jack’s Camp is reminiscent of a bygone era

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JAC K ’ S

CA M P

In the world of African safaris, Jack’s Camp is nothing short of an icon. Named after explorer Jack Bousfield, who pioneered safaris into the Makgadikgadi Pans of Botswana in the 1960s, a major refurbishment has seen this whimsical wilderness destination thoroughly rebooted. The opulent campaign-style décor – of plush furnishings, family heirlooms and antique furniture – remains, but has been given a welcome contemporary polish. The nine safari tents have doubled in size, and now offer over-bed air-conditioning as well as private plunge pools. The pool pavilion has also been upgraded, with the famous pool – and a new sundeck – offering endless Makgadikgadi views. A few steps away, the ‘mess tent’ is the heart of the lodge, where guests gather for pre-dinner drinks, or settle in with a book from the library between nature excursions. Filled with art, photography and a cabinet of curiosities collected by the Bousfield family over the decades, the mess tent has been designated a Natural History Museum in Botswana. You’ll discover the natural landscape up close on daily excursions, from meeting families of habituated wild meerkats, to nature walks, to quad biking (oh-so-carefully) out into the saltpans. However you choose to explore, you’ll find a timeless landscape matched by a lodge that is as relevant now as it was when Bousfield first pitched camp here all those decades ago. naturalselection.travel/

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Mozambique S USSUR R O Mozambique has been in the news for all the wrong reasons this year, but in one quiet corner – far from the troubles – an inspiring new eco-lodge is attempting to rehabilitate the environment, uplift local communities and offer an unforgettable travel experience. Set on the narrow Nhamabue peninsula 90-kilometres north of Vilanculos, Sussurro is a design-led boutique hotel that champions home-grown design, with décor and craft sourced entirely from Africa. The lodge is powered purely on renewables, and there are solid efforts to rejuvenate local mangrove forests. With your conscience clear, enjoy lazy days of yoga sessions, snorkelling and dhow safaris, or explore further on multi-day trips to Gorongosa National Park.

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LEFT Sussurro is an elegant blend of authentic African style and eco-friendly luxury RIGHT Familiar home comforts and a hint of opulence is essential for a family safari – andBeyond Kirkman’s Kamp is it

South Africa

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A N DBEYOND K I R KM A N’ S KA M P Refurbishing a much-loved classic is a delicate balance, of retaining the innate character of the original while updating it for a new era in travel. But the team at Fox Browne Creative hit all the right notes in their recent revamp of andBeyond Kirkman’s Kamp in the Sabi Sand Game Reserve, bordering the Kruger National Park. One of the most spacious camps in the Sabi Sand, Kirkman’s is split between the private guest cottages overlooking the Sand River and the charming 1920s hilltop homestead. The revamp adds subtle changes to both of these spaces, infusing a touch of glamour while retaining the historic character of this family-friendly lodge. Guest suites have been beautifully refreshed with striking wallpaper murals and outdoor seating, alongside a complete overhaul of the en-suite bathrooms. In the historic homestead, adorned with photographs and memorabilia, contemporary touches brighten the space, while a refit of the popular lodge bar has made it a convivial focal point for guests after sunset. A safari classic just got even better. andbeyond.com

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A desert oasis unlike anything you’ve ever experienced, Little Kulala promises unmatched terrain and luxury at its best

Namibia KUL AL A

Over the past year we’ve all been craving a little space, and that’s one thing never in short supply at Little Kulala. Set in the 37 000-hectare private Kulala Wilderness Reserve, adjacent to the vast Namib-Naukluft National Park, Little Kulala offers easy access to the towering dunes of Sossusvlei, the ethereal Deadvlei and the rugged terrain of Sesriem Canyon. The lodge has long been a favourite for travellers to Sossusvlei, and a major refurbishment in 2020 now has Little Kulala looking better than ever. Light, contemporary and fresh is the new aesthetic, with a design palette inspired by the textures and colours of the surrounding deserts. The 11 desert suites have each been expanded to include a spacious deck, shady sala and private plunge pool. The rooftop area in each suite, once used for sleep-outs, is now a perfect location for private dining and sundowners, with a rollout day-bed for guests looking to sleep beneath the stars after a day of desert adventure. wilderness-safaris.com 

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CONSTANTIA, CAPE TOWN

HOUT BAY, WESTERN CAPE

Asking R60 million | 7 bedrooms | 7 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R17.5 million | 5 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

Prestigious mansion-style villa, located in a unique and elevated mountainside location with breathtaking Northerly views across the Constantia Valley and beyond to Table Mountain. Currently operating as a luxury private retreat offering sleek, modern interiors, luxury fittings and finishes throughout the property plus relaxing outdoor areas with exquisite entertainment features and a solar-heated infinity pool. Jo Thomas 084 404 4120, Rouvaun McKirby 071 671 0821, Jacques Fourie 072 304 7957 Office 021 701 2446 Web ref: 4645047

We have pleasure in presenting this exceptionally bright and sunny spectacular home in a private mountain security estate. The culinary gourmet kitchen that flows into the family room which leads to the oversized entertainment patio. The elevated pool deck to rim flow swimming pool. The second level offers 3 en-suite bedrooms with ocean views all the way to Kommetjie Lighthouse. This modern contemporary home is set to win the most discerning buyer’s attention. Enjoy panoramic mountain and sea views from virtually every window in the home! No details was forgotten in the creation of this masterpiece! Indulge in the peace & tranquility of the Estate. Terri Steyn 082 777 0748 Web ref: 3239256

NEWLANDS, CAPE TOWN

UPPER KENILWORTH, CAPE TOWN

Asking R16.95 million | 5 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R6.95 million | 4 bedrooms | 3 bathrooms | 1 garage

Country manor style house in the heart of Newlands surrounded by mature trees and with views of the mountains. Warm and inviting gracious reception rooms that flow to the covered patio, pool and landscaped garden. The home is equipped with an open plan kitchen for informal entertaining and a full chef’s kitchen for elegant dining with wood burning fireplaces to compliment the ambiance. Generous accommodation with four large bedrooms in the main house and a self-contained cottage for guest with garaging and parking for six cars. Brandon Challis 084 491 0906

Charm abounds in this gracious 4 bedroomed home in Upper Kenilworth. Grand proportions include high ceilings, originals wooden floors and sash windows with pretty blue shutters. The home has a simple and easy flow and opens onto a long veranda. An additional undercover patio with built-in braai is the perfect spot for family and friends to entertain. The garden is truly beautiful and completely private and wraps around a good-sized swimming pool. A spacious guest suite with gorgeous views of the mountain completes the picture. Anne Goddard 082 777 7107, Ruth Leach 082 323 7550 Office 021 701 2446 Web ref: 4592956 To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


SILVERHURST ESTATE, CAPE TOWN

DE GOEDE HOOP ESTATE, NOORDHOEK, CAPE TOWN

Asking R29 million | 4 bedrooms | 5 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R32.9 million | 8 bedrooms | 5 bathrooms | 4 garages

A completely understated, modern executive home of distinction, whilst affording all aspects of spacious, secure living within acres of parkland only a short drive away from the heart of Constantia, the business districts and the CBD. Silverhurst Estate was created in the late 1980’s, maturing like a good wine, and remains today, as it was initially planned to be, one of the most exclusive parkland residential estates in the City of Cape Town - nestled, as it is, on the prestigious upper slopes of the Constantia Valley and Table Mountain - retaining it’s rural roots. Steve Thomas 084 471 4722, David Burger 083 458 3333 Web ref: 3684819

Set on over 5 acres this beautifully appointed home exudes timeless elegance, style and serenity and is located in exclusive, private and secure De Goede Hoop Estate. Embedded in a beautiful scenic setting of sprawling gardens, established trees, ponds and a backdrop of the Silvermine and Chapman’s Peak mountains, creating a tranquil space of untold beauty, this home of distinction proudly boasts a main residence which superbly retains a distinctly traditional touch & a spacious separate cottage with private access. Linette Kempster 064 582 7087 Office 021 784 2260 Web ref: 3757303

UPPER KENILWORTH, CAPE TOWN

RONDEBOSCH, CAPE TOWN

Asking R16.9 million | 5 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R8.15 million | 7 bedrooms | 7 bathrooms | 2 garages

A rare find! This unique home was originally the official residence of admiral Elphinstone, Senior British Naval Officer based in Cape Town. Superbly modified and extended by architect Paul Righini, this home now forms the hub of a small gated estate of only four properties. Accommodation comprises four attractive bedrooms, a separate downstairs guest suite and a spacious reception area leading out to the landscaped garden (1451m²) with beautiful views and pool. It is conveniently located for leading schools and all work amenities. Barbara Manning 083 407 3656 Web ref: 4652555

Position and versatility in this landmark residence. Prime school belt, easy access to arterial routes, UCT, airport & the City and yet in a leafy, pretty, sought-after pocket in Rondebosch. Tremendous opportunity and versatility to live and work from this substantial home, whilst earning an income from the existing guest suites. This home has been running successfully as a 4 Star Guest House and family home for more than a decade with repeat business from loyal travellers - from up country and abroad. Jane Stirton 083 613 7863 Bridget Proudfoot 083 635 8088 Web ref: 4685521

To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


BOSCHENMEER GOLF AND COUNTRY ESTATE

PEARL VALLEY AT VAL DE VIE, WESTERN CAPE

Asking R10 million | 6 bedrooms | 5 bathrooms | 3 garages

Asking R16.995 million | 5 bedrooms | 7 bathrooms | 3 garages

Warm colours of gleaming wood and rich fabrics transports you to a country house in the Tuscan countryside with its feeling of casual elegance and surrounded by beautiful sceneries of the Cape Winelands. The clink of glass on glass, red wine, crispy bread and exotic cheese enjoyed with friends and family in a vibrant celebration are all conjured into the mind in this highly desirable home. Marilize Breytenbach 083 241 1580, Marinda de Jongh 082 573 2204 Office 021 870 1011 Web ref: 4285104

Newly renovated! A stylish and sleek, classic contemporary home with the very best finishes, awaits you! This well-positioned 5 bedroomed family home has superb views over the green fairways towards the majestic Simonsberg Mountains. The location of this property is sought after due to it being in a quiet crescent with a landscaped park on the roadside and the uninterrupted views from the outdoor living spaces. Desiré Crowther 082 576 4962 Office 021 867 0161 Web ref: 3439392

STELLENBOSCH, WESTERN CAPE

GORDON’S BAY, WESTERN CAPE

Asking R9.995 million | 5 bedrooms | 5 bathrooms | 1 garage

Asking R7.95 million | 5 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

This elegant and inviting home located in sought after Brandwacht is well positioned on a corner plot at the foot of the Stellenbosch mountain in a quiet and peaceful yet exclusive upmarket area. This home has a wonderful flow for entertaining on a grand scale featuring gracious reception rooms designed with extra detail. Marelise Visagie 072 776 2645 Office 021 809 2760 Web ref: 4638626

Architectural designed, north facing, dual living with unsurpassed ocean and mountain views. Designed for breath taking views from almost every room, easy living, low maintenance and ideal for lock up an go. Chantal Botes 083 702 5460 Office 021 851 4450 Web ref: 4614868

To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


WELLINGTON FARM, WESTERN CAPE

STELLENBOSCH, WESTERN CAPE

Asking R14.5 million | 3 bedrooms | 2 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R7.9 million | 4 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

A well planned 25 hectare farm, developed according to modern and sustainable agriculture principles. The choice of orchards, vineyards and rosemary plantations were carefully done, according to the specific micro climate conditions. The farm borders the Berg River - the source of the 10ha of water use rights. Soon this immaculate farm will reach full production. A top agricultural consultant keeps an eye and manages the farming program: Almonds, Wine grapes, Nectarines, Olives, Oats and Rosemary.Danie Hauptfleisch 083 627 2148 Office 021 873 0260 Web ref: 4563117

This property is located in a sought after Longlands Country Estate and family friendly address. The house meets the highest standards in terms of design and quality. The spacious and light flooded living areas with its large window frontage affords superb views of the vineyards and Stellenbosch Mountains. Maggie Smit 083 712 5716 Marelise Visagie 072 776 2645 Office 021 809 2760 Web ref: 4461021

DIEMERSFONTEIN WINE & COUNTRY ESTATE, WELLINGTON

VAL DE VIE ESTATE, WESTERN CAPE

Asking R12.95 million | 3 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R8.3 million | 3 bedrooms | 3 bathrooms | 2 garages

Live tranquil in this exquisite well-designed residence. On entering this home you are struck by the views through the glass doors, over the swimming pool on to panoramic views. The estate has his own private school, pet & horse friendly with mountain bike & walking trails. This is an invitation to genteel wine country living in the best of wine country architecture that effortlessly blends indoor with outdoor living. Eddie van Pachtenbeke 071 003 0363 Office 021 873 0260 Web ref: 4628056

Stunning family home in a quiet and picturesque setting. Offering exquisite open plan living with a contemporary design. This beautiful home has superb finishes throughout with a warm and inviting tone. Its light-filled entrance hall leads into the open plan dining area , lounge and spacious kitchen with its separate scullery ideal for entertaining family and friends. Suritha van Tonder 084 440 4283, Marisna Rheeder 073 454 0400 Office 021 770 0230 Web ref: 4665497

To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


BRYANSTON EAST, SANDTON

DUNKELD, JOHANNESBURG

Asking R19.5 million | 4 bedrooms | 4½ bathrooms | 3 garages

Asking R10.5 million | 4 bedrooms | 3½ bathrooms | 2 garages

Luxurious Cluster in millionaires row. Rich architectural splendor, chic and sophisticated home designed for ease of entertaining. A stunning masterpiece with walls of glass. Superb open plan kitchen with top of the range fittings, flowing to stunning open plan receptions to pool deck, splash pool and landscaped garden. Study, 4 luxurious bedroom suites with dream bathrooms and a self-contained flatlet for guests or staff accommodation. 3 Auto garages. Fully automated home featuring top of the range security and easy-living technologies. Manuela 082 552 7119 Office 011 886 8070 Web ref: 4559969

Classic Dunkeld double storey house. In immaculate condition with pool and court – for extended families. Situated in the middle block. Main house 4 bedrooms, 3½ bathrooms, open plan reception rooms. One bedroom cottage. Two bedroom cottage with a double garage and its own entrance. Di Kuhlenthal 082 960 5353, Debbie Parkinson 083 326 7739 Office 011 886 8070 Web ref: 4425871

SAXONWOLD, JOHANNESBURG

LINKSFIELD, JOHANNESBURG

Asking R9.95 million | 4 bedrooms | 3½ bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R6.8 million | 3 bedrooms | 3 bathrooms | 4 garages

This gorgeous double-storey Saxonwold home has been re-modelled with a Scandinavian flair, and boasts a tennis court, self-sustaining power system and spring-grade quality borehole water. The reception rooms follow clean lines, accentuated by powder-coated white aluminium windows and doors and complementary Plantation shutters. Wide Oak floor planks and free-standing fire-places enhance the easy flow of an uncompromised lifestyle. Upstairs, are four bedrooms, two en-suite with pyjama lounge. Elsabe 082 414 6655, Kim 082 551 5486 Office 011 886 8070 Web ref: 4677968

Unique Character - Modern and Charming! 3/4 Spacious bedrooms or (gym plus bathroom), 3 bathrooms, the master bedroom with his / hers designer walk in cupboards. Upstairs billiard room / games room and cinema lounge. Study North facing onto exquisite courtyard. Wooden Teak deck pool in a magnificent treed garden with sprinkler system. Outside laundry, 4 garages, staff acc. Charlene 082 448 0440, Robby 083 717 2365 Office 011 886 8070 Web ref: 1835182

To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


PLETTENBERG BAY, GARDEN ROUTE

KEURBOOMS RIVER, GARDEN ROUTE

Asking R8.2 million | 4 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R8.995 million | 5 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 2 garages

Beautifully maintained double-storey family home in the Whale Rock area with views of Robberg Peninsula and the ocean from both levels. Entrance hall leading to open-plan lounge, dining room and well-appointed kitchen with Caesarstone tops and central island, laundry and scullery, 2 large covered patios, TV lounge, study, 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, manicured fully-enclosed garden, sparkling swimming pool, ample storage, 6 water tanks, good alarm system, spacious double garage with internal access. Electrical connection exists which can be linked to an auto-start generator. Come and see this quality home for yourself. Hein Pretorius 083 701 3159 Office: 044 533 2529 Web ref: 4679714

New country lifestyle Cape Dutch style home in secure and popular riverfront estate with ultimate off-the-grid living, an indigenous forested garden overlooking a green belt, a kitchen garden and home-orchard. The beautiful Keurbooms river is a couple of meters away for fishing, swimming and boating. Open-plan living area, kitchen and scullery, informal dining area, lounge with a large fireplace, dining room, TV room, bar, entertainment area, courtyard deck, covered patio, two oversized garages, study/studio, large loft room, laundry, borehole, fenced for pets, grid-tied solar system, solar geysers, free-roaming Springbok, etc. Bea Armstrong 082 940 6616 Office: 044 533 2529 Web ref: 4577507

PLETTENBERG BAY, GARDEN ROUTE

PLETTENBERG BAY, GARDEN ROUTE

Asking 19.9 million | 3 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms

Asking R4.5 million | 4 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms

A unique property, nestled in the forested “Boschrivier” valley. The property boasts a spectacular Wedding Venue, main residence (3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms all en-suite, dining room and 2 lounges), a 2 bedroom manager’s cottage, 2 one-bedroom cottages, an old laboratory, reception room for the signing of the registrar and Bell Tower, coffee shop and several other additional buildings which serve as stores, ablutions, staff facilities and the like, all of which have been modelled in the same authentic Cape Karoo and Cape Georgian architectural vernacular. Sue Harvey 083 306 7499, Paul Jordaan 082 876 0577 Office: 044 533 2529

Beautifully appointed 4 bedroom, 4 bathroom apartment. Doors of glass invite the lovely sea and mountain views into the open plan living area, which flows onto a generous patio with jacuzzi. A modern kitchen awaits with all appliances. Upstairs is the spacious main bedroom with ensuite bathroom leading onto a spacious patio. The apartment offers a further 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms and is well furnished and pleasing to the eye. Single garage. Access controlled complex with pretty gardens, walkways and large communal pool. Thulana Hill is only a few minutes to shops, beaches and all amenities. Furniture included. Desré Reck 079 497 0008 Office: 044 533 2529

To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


WILLARD BEACH, BALLITO, KWAZULU NATAL

ZINKWAZI BEACH, KWAZULU NATAL

Asking R15.95 million | 4 bedrooms | 6 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R19.5 million | 5 bedrooms | 3 bathrooms | 5 garages

180° Ocean view - spectacular sunsets! Nestled high at the end of a private cul-de-sac, with an unrivalled setting. Indoors and the outdoors are perfectly blurred with glass stack doors creating the perfect Alfresco living year round. Two pools and large expanding decks with breaker views to watch the dolphins and the whales swim and frolick past. The attention to detail is apparent inside, where each room’s layout and décor has been carefully arranged for comfort as much as aesthetic appeal. A home theatre fitted with the latest state of the art equipment. Famous North Coast lifestyle living. Erika Naude 083 457 5930 Office 032 946 1818 Web ref: H1371

Prime location. Exquisite attention to every detail. Entertainers dream and fishermen’s heaven. Entire home is fully automated with Control 4 systems which can be controlled remotely off site such as 16 CCTV cameras and lighting. Modern fully fitted kitchen with separate scullery, laundry and pantry. Glass feature staircase and scenic lift. Steam room, jacuzzi, games room, custom built solid wood bar. A massive boat house. Separate double garage. Maintenance contracts in place for high end equipment. Designer furniture and fittings can be purchased separately as an option for R1.5 million. Jeanette Geach 083 417 1180 Office 032 946 1818 Web ref: Z124

SOUTHDOWNS ESTATE, CENTURION, GAUTENG

ELDORAIGNE EXT 3, CENTURION, GAUTENG

Asking R11.3 million | 5 bedrooms | 8 bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R4.3 million | 5 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 3 garages

This home inspires, energizes, renews, and it gives hope. You will be drawn by the tranquil living this home has to offer. In an area so rarefied, where vast luxurious residences nestle, a perfect balance of indoor-outdoor living is envied. The attention to detail is apparent as you enter this home with luxurious touches that you will love. Every detail in the home was well thought out and would make a great place to entertain friends and family. The master suite has a private patio to enjoy morning coffee and the incredible sunrises. And the entire pasture is yours! Lisa Kelly 082 559 1395 Office 012 492 5635

Designed for convenience, comfort and personal enjoyment. Situated on one of the highest points in Centurion, in a boomed off security village. This home is spacious and has lots to offer. Make your own new memories in this beautiful, large family home, equipped with a stunning kitchen and large living spaces. Natural light flows in freely and gives the home the warmth your family deserves. This home is the perfect home for the master entertainer and offers enough space for the extended family. True value for your money. Cisca Swanepoel 0823072365 Office 012 460 9261 Web reb: 4652406 To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


WATERKLOOF GOLF ESTATE, STERREWAG, PRETORIA

STEYN CITY, MIDRAND

Asking R15 million | 5 bedrooms | 5 bathrooms | 4 garages

Asking R13.5 million | 4 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 4 garages

The welcoming entrance leads to various reception areas, including a dining room with access to the veranda overlooking the golf course. Open plan flow to the lounge and family room with fireplace in-between sets the tone for cozy winters. The quality shutters in the windows add to the comfort and style of the home and open up with the large folding doors onto the entertainment area and open veranda towards the swimming pool and boma. Juanita du Plessis 082 322 3407 Office: 012 460 9261 Web ref: 4662767

The outstanding 540m² home offers 4 bedrooms and baths include a luxurious master suite with walk in dressing room and spa-inspired bathroom. The foyer opens to a double volume living room and adjoining formal dining room. French doors open to a light filled entertainment braai patio with solar heated pool and trampoline. Gourmet kitchen with integrated Smeg appliances, breakfast room and cellar wall. This home also includes a home office, TV lounge with fireplace, pajama lounge, staff acc and 2 x double automated garages with storage and direct access into the home. Features a Breeze Air conditioning system, Oak wood flooring, inverter, irrigation system as well as a professionally landscaped garden. Selma Kinghorn 076 886 4007 Office 010 823 2205 Web ref: 4692093

SILVER LAKES GOLF ESTATE, PRETORIA

SILVER LAKES GOLF ESTATE, PRETORIA

Asking R33 million | 11 bedrooms | 12 bathrooms | 11 garages

Asking R12 million | 5 bedrooms | 5½ bathrooms | 8 garages

It comes as no surprise that the property has been successfully run as a Five Star Guesthouse / Boutique Hotel favoured by many overseas guests as well as local visitors and corporate clients including embassies. The Links is an upmarket establishment emphasizing the needs of their clients to make the experience an unforgettable one. Special attention was given to the interior decorating and design and portrays an unknown elegance with a vast variety of Persian carpets & leather couches to create a style one of a kind to ensure that your stay is a pleasant one. Juanita du Plessis 082 322 3407 Office 012 460 9261 Web ref: 4686857

The concrete and glass elements complement the minimalistic approach while the entrance hall flows easily to the spacious reception areas all invited to the outside veranda, a lounge area next to the swimming pool. Your own sky lounge, bar, and dining room all in one. The reception areas are all on one level with a stunning kitchen in easy reach, also an ideal family hot spot complemented by a wood burner, breakfast table, and separate scullery, laundry, and huge pantry!Juanita du Plessis 082 322 3407 Office 012 460 9261 Web ref: 4312825

To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


ROBINHILLS, RANDBURG

EAGLE CANYON GOLF ESTATE, RANDBURG

Asking R4.95 | 4 bedrooms | 3½ bathrooms | 3 garages

Asking R9.95 million | 6 bedrooms | 4 bathrooms | 4 garages

This luxury architectural marvel by Gardiol Bergentuin in access controlled upmarket enclave subtly combines modernist influences and sophisticated enclosure of space expanding in the outdoors and nature. From entrance hall by luminous atrium adorned with ethereal Marike Prinsloo sculpture, high ceilinged lounge, dining and family rooms flooded by natural light, marble floor kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, home office/study, the aesthetic excellence of this home extends to entertainment patio and pool surrounded by sculptural artwork, serene lawns and slender leopard trees. Staff quarters/cottage, strong room and wine cellar. Melinda Odendaal 083 399 4113 Office 011 476 8303 Web ref: 4617846

North facing architectural designed home positioned opposite a dam and views of the golf course. Open plan living area downstairs leading to kitchen. Downstairs, guest bedroom with en-suite bathroom and a study with a door opening to the garden! Upstairs, five bedrooms, three are en-suite bathrooms, two bedrooms with separate bathroom. The main bedroom has a magnificent view of the Estate. Lovely spacious garden with swimming pool that borders onto the greenbelt. Additional features are a back-up power invertor, wine cellar, under-floor heating. Staff accommodation and two double garages. Debby Woodward 082 889 7903 Office 011 476 8303 Web ref: 4489991

OLIVE CREST ECO ESTATE, RANDBURG

BROOKLANDS ESTATE, NORTHCLIFF

Asking R4.95 million | 5 bedrooms | 3½ bathrooms | 2 garages

Asking R5.299 million | 3 bedrooms | 2 bathrooms | 2 garages

Fall in love with tranquility and peace of mind, a must view for the decerning family. Wonderful flow from house to garden with a wraparound covered entertainment patio and private garden with stunning rock pool. The well organized kitchen has a pantry, scullery, and breakfast nook. This home moves seamlessly through to the open plan guest suite, formal lounge, bar, study, guest loo, family, and dining rooms. Upstairs, the master en suite with its own balcony can be used as an outside gym. 3 extremely well-crafted bedrooms with 2 patios and a modern bathroom finish the second level of this home. Zona Coetzee 084 626 6119 Office 011 476 8303 Web ref: 4518885

Welcomed by the airy reception area with stacking doors all opening up to the majestic garden. Living area with bay window and real log burning fireplace for memorable winter evenings. Open plan dining area, separated by the breakfast bar from the granite kitchen and Separate scullery. Light and airy passage with French sliding doors opens to undercover patio. Luxurious master bedroom with sliders onto the patio and lavish en-suite private bath and dressing room. Spacious 2nd & 3rd bedroom with ample cupboard space and en-suite bathroom, with a two way entrance from the corridor. Outside toilet and basin, inverter, underfloor heating, solar. Ria de Wet 082 824 6925 Office 011 476 8303 Web ref: 4667111 To view these properties visit www.sothebysrealty.co.za


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