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LAMPSTAND THE

THE ANNUAL MAGAZINE OF THE WELLINGTON COLLEGE OLD BOYS’ ASSOCIATION NOVEMBER, 2018 | ISSUE 28

WCOBA | PO Box 16073, Wellington, NZ 6242 | Tel: 04 802 2537 | Email: oldboys@wc.school.nz The LAMPSTAND | 2018


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Greetings from the President

“The support from our Old Boys towards the Building Campaign will leave a lasting legacy for Wellington College students into the future and I warmly thank you for assisting the College to grow.”

Old Boys’ Day, 1920

IT WAS 127 YEARS AGO that the WCOBA was

Several years of fundraising came to fruition

established for the perpetuation of memories,

with the Official Blessing and Opening

maintenance of friendship, enrichment of Old

Ceremony for the AGC. The Hall was officially

Boys and support of the School. Today, we are

opened on Monday, 5 November 2018 by the

a vibrant organisation that caters to 10,000

Prime Minister, Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern. Invited

registered members from some 32,000 on our

guests, donors, families, current students,

database. Since that time, the WCOBA has

staff and members of the Wellington College

always sought to work with the College for the

community were part of the opening. On behalf

betterment of the current community while

of the College, I thank all Old Boys who have

encouraging long-term relationships with

supported this building campaign. Your support

our Old Boys. The WCOBA is now looking to

will leave a lasting legacy for Wellington College

its future and what we can achieve. I am very

students into the future and I warmly thank you

happy to continue as President of this amazing

for assisting the College to grow.

Association that is really doing wonderful things in our school community. If you would like to be

For the past two years, the current student body

a part of our committee in any way please don’t

and staff have worked around an extensive

hesitate to contact the WCOBA Office.

demolition and construction site and I am sure they all agree how welcome it is to have

AGC Opening, 2018

With the 150th Celebrations well behind us,

their school back and fully operational. Things

Wellington College now embarks on its second

started to ‘get real’ when the Memorial Window

century as the school continues to thrive across

was put back into its rightful place at the

all areas, as evidenced in the glowing reports

head of the Hall – now our current and future

and posts issued by Principal, Gregor Fountain.

students will face this significant icon of the College’s history at each Assembly. The AGC is

The Alan Gibbs Memorial Hall and Performing

obviously going to be a considerable asset to

Arts Centre is designed with a specific focus

the school and the community. The WCOBA

being the heart of Wellington College in

look forward to hosting events in the new Hall

bringing together and celebrating our past,

and we will keep you informed when these

present, and our future. The vision of the project

details come to hand.

was to encompass the following aspects: minds at work, bodies in motion, community

Wellington College has changed in a hundred

connections, and the provision of learning

different ways, many too small to notice, but

spaces fostering a welcoming and warm

important all the same. Perhaps the most

atmosphere.

significant has been the diversification of cocurricular activities in which the majority of The LAMPSTAND | 2018


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our students participate. Not only is the range

us for their reunion in 2019. If you are still

remarkable, the standard is incredibly high.

wondering whether to make the commitment, I

There are over 40 different sports to choose

would encourage you to do so now as we would

from, and in the Arts, a first class Music and

be delighted to see you!

Drama programme is in place, plus Public Speaking and Debating as well as Outdoor

Lastly, with the ever-increasing costs of postage,

Education activities and well-being, student

to minimise costs and an ever-decreasing bank

mentoring and peer support. The plethora

account, the only postal mail issued in future

of activities offered means every student can

will be the annual Lampstand magazine.

indulge in his interest or passion. Wellington

Invitations to reunions and other gatherings

College is blessed to have many Old Boys who

such as WCOBA lunches, dinners, drinks etc

generously give their time to support and

will be by email [Mailchimp] and posted on our

help to the current student body as a coach,

Facebook Site. So I encourage you let us know

manager or mentor in these activities. Other

your email address if you wish to be kept in the

Old Boys have been most generous with their

loop on these occasions. It would be a shame

time, coming into the School to help with

to miss out on an event because we don’t have

Careers, giving professional advice and offering

your email address. However, if you are one

work experience opportunities. It’s wonderful

of those who hasn’t joined the cyber-world,

that Old Boys feel they can give back to their

we can make allowances, but you will need to

old school whether physically or financially.

inform us.

Three reunions have taken place this year

With many thanks for your continued support of

with the classes of 1968, 1978 and 1988 all

the Association and the College.

Academic Studies, 2018

Class of 1978 Reunion

returning to their old school. Many from the classes of 1969 and 1979 will already be making

MATT BEATTIE, President

arrangements with friendship groups to join

Who are we? THE WELLINGTON COLLEGE OLD BOYS’ ASSOCIATION

What do we do?

(WCOBA) was founded in 1885. The WCOBA seeks to foster

The WELLINGTON COLLEGE OLD BOYS’ ASSOCIATION was founded to:

a continued sense of belonging to the Wellington College

Further the interests of the College and its past and present members and keep former students in touch with each other and with the school.

Maintain a register of names of all who have passed through the College since 1867 and to record the addresses of all those alive.

Arrange reunions and other functions for Old Boys - at the College, nationwide or internationally.

up-to-date on news through their annual publication, The

Where needed, support current students at the College.

Lampstand.

THESE AIMS ARE MET BY THE ASSOCIATION BY UNDERTAKING THE FOLLOWING:

We ask that Old Boys keep in touch and inform us of their

Produce The Lampstand each year, covering activities of Old Boys and other relevant information.

Maintain a computerised database, giving details of all Old Boys and staff. This includes addresses where known. The Executive Officer will release addresses to bona fide Old Boys but will not allow any access for commercial purposes.

Provide financial support for College activities, including extracurricular, sponsorship and academic prizes, as well as supporting the Archives.

Administer charitable funds managed by the Association for current and past students, including assistance with fundraising appeals.

community, with all the social, networking and contributory opportunities inherent in that bond while sharing the common experience and connection for all 32,000 Old Boys who choose to maintain a link with the School's history and future. The WCOBA keeps their members and friends of the College

email and address changes to receive invitations for events, reunions as well as news. Opinions expressed in The Lampstand do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association or the College.

Have we got your email address? Don’t miss out on future news and invitations as we endeavour to minimise our printing and postal charges.

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Diary Dates

18/10/19

CLASS OF 1969 50 YEARS ON REUNION

CLASS OF 1979 40 YEARS ON REUNION

QUADRANGULAR TOURNAMENT @WELLINGTON COLLEGE WCOBA FUNCTION: 02/07/19

EDITORIAL and DESIGN

oldboys@wc.school.nz

Stephanie Kane | WCOBA Executive Officer PO Box 16073, Wellington, NZ 6242

www.wc.school.nz/wcoba

Tel: 04 802 2537 | oldboys@wc.school.nz Membership enquiries, feedback, letters, obituaries and updated contact details can be sent to the above address.

wellington college old boys wellington college new zealand

President

Matthew Beattie

Class of 1972

matthew.beattie@insteplimited.com

Immediate Past President

Brian Smythe

Class of 1958

briansmythe1940@gmail.com

Treasurer

Bob Slade

Class of 1958

bob@slade.co.nz

Executive Officer

Stephanie Kane

1998 -

oldboys@wc.school.nz

Centennial Trust Chair

Matthew Beattie

Class of 1972

matthew.beattie@insteplimited.com

Executive Committee

Robert Anderson

Class of 1973

r.anderson@wc.school.nz

Matthew Rewiti

Class of 1990

matthew.rewiti@gmail.com

Ernie Rosenthal

Class of 1961

ernie.r.rosenthal@googlemail.com

Your

EXECUTIVE

The

LAMPSTAND

29/03/19

BAY OF PLENTY LUNCH FRIDAY, 8 MARCH 2019

WHEN IS YOUR REUNION? CALCULATING YOUR COHORT

Example 1 • Started in Form 3 in 1975 and left in Form 6 in 1978 Form 3

Form 4

Form 5

Form 6

Form 7

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

3AB

4CD

5EF

6GH

7XX

Thus 1979 is your Cohort Year (ie the five years from Form 3 to Form 7/ Upper 6th) Example 2 • Started in Form 4 in 1976 and left in Form 7 in 1979 Form 3

Form 4

Form 5

Form 6

Form 7

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

3XX

4CD

5EF

6GH

7IJ

Thus 1979 is your Cohort Year (ie the five years from Form 3 to Form 7/ Upper 6th) 1979 is the year from which your anniversary of leaving school is calculated, by adding 10, 20, 40, 50, 60 years etc. Your cohort leaving year may not be the actual year you left Wellington College, but captures all those fellow students who you were at school with, irrespective of how many years you were at the College, or the years you actually started or left.

By joining the WCOBA, you can assist us to print and post the Lampstand, fund Old Boys’ events as well as support College awards, buildings, activities and the Archives. Life Membership $150.00 (Includes a Life Membership Certificate and Lapel Badge). Alternatively, you may just wish to make a donation to the WCOBA to help cover the above-mentioned costs. Details on page ??

Be sure to visit Wellington College’s Website for the latest news: www.wc.school.nz The LAMPSTAND | 2018


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the alan gibbs centre MEMORIAL HALL AND PERFORMING ARTS

‘OPEN FOR BUSINESS’ Honouring the Past and Looking to the Future THE WELLINGTON COLLEGE MEMORIAL HALL and Performing Arts Centre [The Alan Gibbs Centre] building project is over and it was with much pleasure that we celebrated with two formal events to mark this significant occasion - it was well worth the wait. Our vision from the beginning has been the development of an inspiring facility which enables all of our students to connect with Wellington College's history and develop the values and skills which will prepare them for the future. Our students and staff are very excited about moving in and taking up the numerous opportunities that the building will provide. The realisation of this vision has been a community effort, involving Old Boys, parents of current and former students, Board Members, school leaders, staff and friends of Wellington College. We are so grateful for your financial support, your hard work, and for your patience as we have worked our way through the various challenges which a project of this scale inevitably brings. Invitations were extended to all those who supported the building campaign over the past ten years as well as guests invited who have had an association with Wellington College to attend our Opening Celebrations - the Blessing on Wednesday, 31 October and the Celebration Assembly on Monday, 5 November. These events were the perfect way to acknowledge everybody’s support for Wellington College as we move into this exciting new phase of our history.

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Alan Gibbs Centre: The Blessing AT 6.00AM ON WEDNESDAY, 31 OCTOBER, around 200 members of the Wellington College community assembled outside the AGC for Dawn Blessing with Te Atiawa, led by Neavin Broughton [who faciliates cultural engagements such as our mihi whakatau]. Before guests could enter our new Hall, the unveiling of the pare, carved by Art Teacher, Tim Costello was unveiled. The carving depicts Rongoueroa, who was the mother of Awanuiarangi, ancestor of Te Āti Awa of Wellington. It also depicts Mrs Firth, who was the wife of the famous Headmaster, J P Firth. She saw many of the boys disappear to WWI. She saw the boys of the school as her own and was the mother to all of the students. Following the formalities, guests moved over to the Brierley Theatre for Breakfast.

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Alan Gibbs Centre: The Opening

B

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The Junior School face towards the stage and of course, the Memorial Window.

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The Kapa Haka, as part of the mihi, greet our guests as they made their way to the stage.

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Principal, Gregor Fountain delivers his address to our guests [See page 8]

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WCOBA President, Matt Beattie spoke on behalf of our Old Boys who supported the Hall Project, in which he thanked them for investing in the College’s future.

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Guests were treated to lively performances from Rock Band ‘Mustec’, the Jazz Band, conducted by HoD Music, Liam Boyle and the College Chorale conducted by Mark Stamper.

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The Prime Minister was presented with a token of the College’s appreciation - a Wellington College onesie for her daughter.

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In return, the Prime Minister was asked to unveil the plaque to declare the Hall open. MC’s and Deputy Head Prefects, Harry Crawford and Clement Kong look on.

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Gregor Fountain and the Prime Minister lead the procession out of the Hall and over to Morning Tea in the Brierley Theatre, catered by Sarah Searanke.

Special thanks to parent, city counsellor and professional photographer, Simon Woolf [Woolf Photography] for capturing these two special occasions. Visit our website to view all the photos.

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The Principal’s Address Tēnā koutou e āku manuhiri, tēnā koutou ngā

like a family to them. Mr Firth had a Wellington

whānau whānui o te kura

College postcard printed, and used this to handwrite personal messages to his former

Ki a Koutou ngā ākonga, ngā kaiwhakaako, ngā

students. These postcards kept Old Boys, serving

kaimahi, ngā kaitautoko, tena koutou te iwi

at the front, up-to-date with the latest events

kāinga.

at their school and provided them words of encouragement. Extracts from the replies Firth

Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.

received were regularly read in school assemblies as an inspiration to the boys of the school.

T

he Right Honourable Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, The Honourable Grant Robertson,

Firth also had the difficult task of writing letters

Member of Parliament for Wellington Central;

of condolence to the families of each of the

Paul Eagle, Member of Parliament for Rongotai;

more than 200 Old Boys who were killed. When

Old Boy, Rino Tirakatene, Member of Parliament

the armistice was declared, almost exactly 100

for Te Tai Tonga, (and more importantly my

years ago to the day, Mr Firth was seen standing

classmate in Y9 Te Reo Māori with Mrs Barry at

at the top of the terraces, possibly looking

Wellington College in 1986), Wellington College

towards Pukeahu where the National War

Kaumatua Rauru Kirikiri, Headmaster, Roger

Memorial was subsequently built, with tears

Moses, BOT Chair, Paul Retimanu and members

running down his cheeks.

from the Board; Matthew Beattie, President of our Old Boys’ Association, Foundation Chair,

As the scale of the war’s tragedy was becoming

Alan Langford and members of the Foundation;

apparent, the Firths started raising money

our generous donors to this project, guests,

for the Wellington College War Memorial Hall

whānau and parents, fellow Old Boys, friends of

which included this window as its centrepiece.

Wellington College, colleagues, staff and most

Like the construction of this building, the

importantly the students of Wellington College.

development of that Memorial Hall was a

It gives me great pleasure to speak to you today

very drawn out process. Mr Firth retired in

as we celebrate and open the Alan Gibbs Centre.

1920, but had to wait until 1928 to attend the building’s opening. By that stage, he was too

As I do so, I am inspired by our history, and

frail to finish his speech, with Mrs Firth doing

humbled by the great people who have been

this on his behalf. Perhaps the emotion of the

here before us. As I look at the WWI Memorial

occasion was too overwhelming for him. The

Window behind me and reflect on the lives

names on the memorial plaques, which we will

of hundreds of former students of this school

re-dedicate at next year’s ANZAC Assembly, are

which were changed or lost in this war and in

of interest to us, and sometimes the focus of

later tragedies, I am moved by a simple concept

research projects for Wellington College History

that like those who served and sacrificed their

students, but for Mr and Mrs Firth each name

lives, we too are servants of something bigger,

was a student they knew and loved. More than

something bolder, something grander than our

most, they must have understood the scale of

own individual achievements and needs. Each

the loss of potential, creativity and leadership

day, we come together as the Wellington College

which was a result of war.

community to develop values, knowledge and skills together, so that we can serve others.

Wellington College today would be almost unrecognisable to the Firths and their

Perhaps the most iconic building from

contemporaries. We are a large, diverse and

Wellington College’s history was the War

increasingly multi-cultural community with a

Memorial Hall, which stood on this spot and

vast range of sporting, cultural and leadership

was opened 90 years ago in 1928. It was

opportunities which our students enjoy every

demolished in 1968 due to concerns over its

day. We still value great teachers who provide

ability to withstand an earthquake. It was the

structure and inspiration but we have a more

vision of then Headmaster JP Firth. He and his

explicit focus on personal connection, care and

wife, Janet, had no children of their own. The

well-being. Unlike the Firths, we live in the

boys of Wellington College, and especially the

digital age, an age when teachers no longer

boarders of what was then a small school, were

control all the information, with students able

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The Principal’s Address to access knowledge at the click of a mouse.

whose son Tara gave his name to Wellington

Our students don’t simply consume knowledge

Harbour. It is known as Te Whanganui-a-Tara, the

to recall in exams, rather they create new

great harbour of Tara. Te Āti Awa in Wellington

knowledge and work together, and with their

trace their history back to the connection

teachers, solve actual problems that are facing

between Awanuiarangi and Whātonga.

our community and our planet. The pare also depicts Mrs Firth, grieving for This new building has been designed with 21st

the boys of Wellington College killed in WWI,

century Wellington College students in mind.

a war which was contentious for some Māori.

This stage will be used for assemblies, prize-

It was only 40 years after the end of the New

givings and other school events. We will honour

Zealand Land Wars. Many Māori were still

many of our Wellington College traditions from

reeling from these wars and the confiscation

here, as we have today. The furniture which

which accompanied and followed them. We are

sits on this stage is from the original Memorial

delighted to start developing a relationship with

Hall. It’s important to feel part of something

the Taranaki Whanui - Te Ati Awa o Whanganui

bigger than ourselves and our school history

a Tara. We look forward to learning more

and traditions play an important role in that.

about the history of this land and developing

Increasingly we see a range of students taking

new ways of working with Iwi to support the

part and leading different aspects of our

belonging, well-being and achievement of all

assemblies, just as Harry and Clement are doing

our students.

today. Our approach is less formal and less hierarchical than it was in the past.

Throughout its history, Wellington College, has focused on developing and upholding

The Performing Arts Stage at the other end

values. As our students refer to themselves

of this auditorium is all about our students.

as ‘Coll Boys’, this year we have been using the

This is your stage. At Wellington College we

acronym ‘COLL’, C-O-L-L as a way of linking and

value the Arts because they enrich students’

remembering these ideas.

sense of belonging, develop creativity, critical thinking and confidence and because of the

‘C’ stands for Community (or whanau).

way in which they embody school spirit and

Although we may come to Wellington College

encourage collaboration. The Arts also provide

as individuals, we are a community of learners,

opportunities for service to community both

learning from each other in everything that we

inside and outside of the school. We can’t

do, in and outside of the classroom. We learn

wait to turn these seats around to see how our

not just for personal achievement, but to serve

students use their stage to grow and display

our community, our nation and our planet and

their skills and enhance our community and our

to make it better for all.

understanding of our society and ourselves. ‘O’ stands for Oranga (or Well-being). We need At Wellington College in 2018, we also

to care for and help each other. We value

acknowledge that the land that our school

community, but this doesn’t mean that we all

sits on has a history prior to the establishing

have to be the same. The diversity of individuals

of Wellington College here on Matairangi or

within our school community is a strength

Mount Victoria in the late nineteenth century.

rather than a weakness. We work hard to

Last Wednesday this building was blessed at

ensure that our actions and words build people

dawn by Neavin Broughton and others from

up rather than put them down.

the Taranaki Whanui - Te Ati Awa o WhanganuiA-Tara. During this ceremony, the pare - the

The first ‘L’ stands for Learning Together (or ako).

beautiful carving which sits above the main

In the digital age students might be less reliant

entrance to this whare was also blessed. This

on their teachers for the facts and ideas, but

was carved by Art Teacher, Tim Costeloe, under

they are more reliant on them for developing

the guidance of representatives of Te Ati Awa.

the thinking and disciplinary skills required

It depicts Rongoueroa, who was the mother of

to solve problems and create new ideas. We

Awanuiarangi, ancestor of Te Āti Awa from this

acknowledge that like students, teachers, staff

area. Rongoueroa also gave birth to Whātonga,

and parents are learners too. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


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The Principal’s Address The second ‘L’ stands for Leadership. At Wellington College leadership is not just for the future or about getting a title or a badge. We can all be leaders now in our learning, in our interactions and conversations with others, and when we identify people who are on the edge of our community and include them through our actions and words. At Wellington College leadership is service to others. This building will be the hub of these values, a place of learning, community, inspiration and creativity. We are delighted to have many of the donors who have contributed so generously to this project with us today. You shared our vision for this building, a love for Wellington College and showed that you were committed to giving back to your community and providing opportunities for others. On behalf of current and future students and staff, I thank you. I must also acknowledge my friend and predecessor, Headmaster Roger Moses. This morning, I want to acknowledge that this building was conceived and constructed under your leadership and is a testament to your belief that connection with the past is a springboard for the future. As I remember you saying to me more than once, “Structure and creativity are friends not enemies”. There really is no doubt that this project wouldn’t have happened without you. Thank you Roger. Graeme Steven, Tony Robinson and Charlie Gallagher were key people who worked closely with Roger to build the connections and raise the money from our community to fund this project. Heather Benfield, Susan Quinn and Stephanie Kane also contributed significantly to the administration and completion of this project and the events which have celebrated its opening.

and the team from Architecture Plus had the tricky brief of developing a school building which was both modern and honoured the past. Congratulations on the final outcome. This is an inspiring space which hits that brief. The contractors, Maycroft Construction Ltd. were highly professional, excellent communicators and did a great job managing the complexity of having a construction site in the middle of a very busy school with 1800 students Over the past month, Kelwyn D’Souza and his amazing colleagues from the Wellington College Property Team have had the building in their hands and have done a terrific job completing some of the interior work and all of the pathways, garden and courtyard areas on exterior of the building. They have worked tirelessly to get to this day. Well done team. This has been a phenomenal effort. Thank you also to College Archivist, Mike Pallin who personally made and framed the images of the College’s building and location history. These now which hang in the new Reception. Prime Minister, my friend and former history and social studies student from Morrinsville College, thanks for honouring all of us by being part of this special occasion. It is great to have you with us. Finally, to my colleagues on the Wellington College staff and especially the students of the school, you have been paying it forward to future generations over the past two years. Thank you for your patience, for coping with the dissatisfaction and discomfort of assemblies and other events in the Sports Centre, the temporary staffroom, the lack of carparks, and the longer than usual walks as you circled the construction site to get to class. I think we can all agree that it has been worth the wait.

My colleagues, both past and present, on the Wellington College Board and the Wellington College Foundation had the vision, creativity, tenacity and commitment that this project needed. On our current Board, Karl White has played an instrumental role in leading us through the final tricky stages of the project.

Our challenge now is to use this building, to grow our community, and develop our values, knowledge and skills together, so that we can serve others.

The architects, Stuart Gardyne, Margot Bowen

GREGOR FOUNTAIN, Principal 5 November, 2018

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No reira, Tena Koutou, Tena Koutou, Tena Tatou Katoa.


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Alan Gibbs Centre: The Donors

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WELLINGTON COLLEGE THANKS THE FOLLOWING DONORS FOR THEIR WONDERFUL SUPPORT OF OUR MEMORIAL HALL AND PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE BUILDING CAMPAIGN PLATINUM DONORS J R (Jay) and J G E (John) Benton (Class of 1962) Sir Ron Brierley (Class of 1955) R G S (Rodney) Callender (Class of 1958) & G P Callender (Class of 1982) B J (Brian) Drake (Class of 1966) Violet Dunn in Memory of T K (Tom) Paul (Class of 1935) A T (Alan) Gibbs (Class of 1957) G R (Grant) Partridge (Class of 1977) J C Rutherford (Class of 1967) in memory of A K Holt (Staff Member) S L (Steve) Waller (Class of 1967) N (Nicki) & D J (Dave) Wilson (Class of 1978) FOUNDATIONS and GRANTS Four Winds Foundation Lion Foundation Stout Trust ANONYMOUS DONORS x 42 DONORS R I Aitken (Class of 2003) & T M Aitken (Class of 2008) G J Alecock (Class of 1948) J C Alexander (Class of 2011) A R Allan (Class of 1983) R E Allan (Class of 1957) R K & G C Allen (Parents) R K J Allen (Class of 1968) N S Ames (Class of 1962) A Anastasiadis (Class of 1966) M A Anderson (Staff Member) R W Anderson (Class of 1973), T W Anderson (Class of 2002) & J M Anderson (Class of 2006) M B Andrews (Class of 1949) A C Ansell (Class of 1961) H G Ansell (Class of 1951) N W Antcliff & V A Fabian (Parents) A G Archer (Class of 1974) D J Archer (Class of 1972) & S W Archer (Class of 2009) A H Armour (Class of 1932) J Armstrong & A Riley (Parents) W R Atkin (Class of 1967) M A Austin (Class of 1953) J C Baddiley (Class of 1989) D L Bade (Class of 1931) M E Baguley & K Fyfe (Parents) D R Bailey (Class of 1956) S & M Banerjee (Parents) R T Barber (Class of 1942) R & C Bava (Parents) M D Beattie (Class of 1972) G M & P G Bellam (Parents) D W M Bennett & L Baxter (Parents) F R Bernard (Class of 1949) A R Best (Class of 1948) S Best (Friend) B W R Betty & S Harichandran (Parents) D A & A J D Binnie (Parents) D J Blackwell (Parent) C J Blake (Class of 1948) K V Bliss (Staff Member) C L Blundell (Class of 2004), G T J Blundell (Class of 2006) & J H M Blundell (Class of 2008) A J M Bollard (Class of 2001) S & N Bomann (Parents) I A Borrin (Class of 1951) I G Bourne (Class of 1949) Bowkett Family J R Boyes (Class of 1964) T M Bradshaw (Class of 2010) & R Bradshaw (Class of 2015) M D & S L Brantley (Parents) R L & P A Brathwaite (Class of 1958) J B Brennan (Class of 1987) K E Brierley (Class of 1957) D H Briggs (Class of 1962) W J Bringans & Family (Class of 1955) A P & A Brodie (Parents) N T K & R J Bromley (Parents) B H Brooks (Class of 1950) J R Brown (Class of 1962) T I Brown (Class of 1975) P M R Browne (Class of 1957) R A Bruce (Class of 1958) G Bruce Smith (Class of 1969) T C C H F & R Buddle (1870-1959) R & D Budhia (Parents)

J R Burt (Class of 2000) & A T Burt (Class of 2009) R Butcher (Friend) J C Butchers (Class of 2010) M M Butchers (Class of 2011), S E Butchers (Class of 2014) & G A N Butchers (Class of 2022) Buttner Family M R Button (Class of 1971) C H Button (Class of 1942) A C Bycroft (Class of 1949) S L & R L Cable (Class of 1962) J & E A Cameron (Class of 1942) Campbell Family A J R Cantin-Buckley (Class of 2010) J R Carroll & S Hatfield (Parents) J R Carter (Parent) D B Cartwright (Class of 1951) F P Cass (Class of 1958) T J Castle Family Trust (Class of 1967) R H Cathie (Class of 1961) P D Cenek (Class of 1974) J W Chapman (Class of 1965) J U W Cheah (Class of 2010) W E Chegwidden (Class of 1943) I Cher (In Memory of 6A, 1945) S Chhotu (Class of 1965) K M & S Chiaroni (Parents) S Chong-Nee (Parent) V F & P B Clark (Class of 1957) W D C Clark (Class of 1959) J W & W J Clarke (Parents) R O C Pallot (Class of 2010) G M Cleland (Class of 1949) F W Coad (Class of 1947) W E Cole (Class of 1943) M G Colson & K Snook (Parents) G H Cook (Class of 1944) D N Cooke (Class of 1959) T J Cookson & R C Dodd (Parents) B S Coomber (Class of 1953) P A & A J Coop (Parents) C E & G E Coppersmith (Class of 1975) S & P H Cotter (Parents) P D & A L Cox (Parents) D & D D Cox (Class of 1964) T J & G M Cripps (Parents) G M Crist (Friend) W F Crist (Staff Member) M G Crocker (Class of 1946) H J S Cromie (Class of 1965) Crutchley Family M D Danaher (Class of 1945) W E Dasent (Class of 1943) R S Davey (Class of 1968) M J Davis (Class of 1979) J R Dawson (Class of 2006) P J Dawson (Class of 1959) S W Day (Class of 2011), J B Day (Class of 2013) & P F E Day (Class of 2016) G de Gruchy (Friend) F R & A C De Silva (Parents) T H Dean (Class of 1958) K T Dee (Class of 1945) Delany Family J B Denton (Class of 1949) G Dinamani (Class of 1987) M D Dobson (Class of 2003) & H A D Dobson (Class of 2009) T & P Dodd (Parents) R B Donovan (Class of 1948) S Donovan (Friend) D M Doriguzzi (Class of 2008) A Douglass (Class of 1973) M Douglass (Class of 1971) J G & C S Dowle (Parents) M J Dowse & B J M Murray (Parents) P Dragunis (Friend) J W Drake (Class of 1967) R K Dreyer (Class of 1955) & J K Dreyer (Class of 2001) C D'Souza (Parent) P C Dukes (Class of 1956) P W & S K Eady (Parents) R J Earles (Class of 1965) L J East (Class of 1967) R G Ebbett (Class of 1952) L W Edwards (Class of 1940) Egan & Cockburn Family P K Emanuel (Class of 1979) G O & J P Emyrs (Parents) D Eng (Class of 1966) G Q England (Class of 1945)

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

D M Evans (Class of 1947) T Farrar (Class of 1948) B Farrell (Class of 1951) Faull Family (Friends) P J Fehl (Class of 1962) C R Fenton (Class of 1944) D R Ferrier (Class of 1985) M Q Fine (Class of 1975) B T Foley (Class of 1950) D E Forsyth (Class of 1955) M E Forsyth (Class of 1985) I A N Fraser (Class of 1962) A T Freeman (Class of 1941) D A Friar (Class of 2009) G K Froggatt (Class of 1957) P G Fuller (Class of 1978) SM & C M Fyfe (Parents) M H Fyson (Class of 1965) J P Fyson (Class of 1968) G F Gair (Class of 1944) C M & S M Gallagher (Parents) Garrett Family A H J Gaskin (Class of 1944) J Gates (Class of 1962) D H P Gendall (Class of 2013) & W S Hopkirk (Class of 1908) T R Gibson (Class of 2009) & J D Gibson (Class of 2010) B N Gillespie (Class of 1956) G R Girvan (Staff Member) N J & A M Gluyas (Parents) A G W Gooch (Class of 1959) I M Gordon & J M Manthel (Parents) C H Gough (Class of 1975) W T P Grafton & C M Cowie (Parents) Graham Family M & J Grant (Parents) B V Gray & L M Dovey (Parents) R Gray & S Edge (Parents) C W Green (Class of 2011) W J Greenwood (Class of 1958) D K Grocott (Class of 1958) Haigh Family B P M Hamilton (Class of 1953) Hampson & Tyndall Family Hampton Family K H & B Han H S Hancock (Class of 1965) Harcourt Family Sir Michael Hardie Boys (Class of 1948) J G T & C L Harding (Parents) A & J Harper-Duff (Friend) B D Hart (Class of 1988) A F Hassed (Class of 1959) D I Hatfield (Class of 1975) J O Haworth (Class of 1937) R J Hay (Class of 1964) K D Haycock (Class of 1951) A B Heald (Class of 1985) D J G Heard (Parent) G & D Heard (Friends) G J Heather (Class of 1990) B A C Heather (Class of 1958) Herrick & Cottrell Family R Hettiarachchi (Parent) M J Higgs (Class of 1962) R D Hill (Class of 1952) N A Hill (Class of 1967) P B Hindle (Class of 1938) Hobbs Family R J Holdaway (Class of 1974) A H T Hollingsworth (Class of 2010) N V Holyoake (Class of 1949) J C Hooper (Class of 1953) M S P Hope (Class of 1966) A Hopkins (Friend) J S Hopkirk (Class of 1938) Horsley Family G Hosking (Friend) T J Hudson (Class of 1951) Hughson Family J M Hunn (Class of 1955) Hunn Family J M & G L Ingham (Class of 1953) C J Isaacs (Class of 1948) R B Jeffs (Class of 1959) A G Jenkins (Class of 2008) D G Jenks (Class of 1962) Joblin Family ZM & B D Jobson (Class of 1957) B S Johns (Class of 1959) B W & J A Johnson (Parents)


13 M & C B Johnson (Class of 1983) H A & K B Johnston (Class of 1975) R A Josephson (Class of 1966) J R I Judd (Class of 2004), S E I Judd (Class of 2000) &T A I Judd (Class of 1998) E Kalafatelis & C de Bonnaire (Parents) D P & S L Kale (Parents) S Kane (Staff Member) I R Kaywood (Class of 1946) P C Keall (Class of 1976) E M V Keisenberg (Class of 1939) R M Kellahan (Class of 2012) B J Kelly (Class 1960) C H Williams & D G Kember (Class of 1965) R L D Kerr (Class of 1986) M D Kerr (Class of 1959) T D Kerr (Class of 1966) P Kerr (Parent) N L Kerr (Class of 1989) & R C Kerr (Class of 1991) P N Keys (Class 1946) D P D Kibblewhite (Class of 2011), L W D Kibblewhite (Class of 2013) & J R D Kibblewhite (Class of 2015) G D Kilmister (Class of 1958) W R Kingston-Smith (Class of 1953) S & M Kladnitski (Parents) Knowledge Warehouse (Friend) S & J Kong (Parents) Kos & Afford Family Krause Family P A & L Kuhn Parents) V Kumar (Parent) I Kwok (Class of 1959) J Lai (Parent) D J Lamb (Class of 1967) M E Lambert (Class of 1944) Langdana Family T J Langridge (Class of 2011) J P Larkindale (Class of 1964) J A Laurenson (Class of 1955) S J & R C Laurenson (Class of 1966) S D Law (Class of 1987) R Lawrence (Friend) A & P Lee (Parents) Lee Family P N Leslie (Class of 1950) J P W Leslie (Class of 2007) I R Letica (Class of 1961) Q Laing & P Mo (Parents) J H Lidgard (Class of 1956) M J Limbrick (Class of 1949) D A Lingard (Class of 1964) E M & G B Little (Class of 1968) S G Lockhart (Class of 1952) Logan & Treuren Family K H Logie (Class of 1938) J D Lynch (Class of 1965) C J & M G Lynskey (Parents) D F MacCalman (Class of 1975) W J P Macdonald (Class of 1944) AM Main (Class of 1952) & G M P Main (Class of 1979) M & H Majic (Parents) F G Major (Class of 1946) U Malik (Class 2009) A A Marks (Parent) T & L Marks (Parents) G G T Marriott (Class of 2009) A R Marshall (Class of 1966) M W & J L Marshall (Class of 1964) R J Martin (Class of 1950) T B Martindale (Class of 1951) D Matangi (Class of 2011) & A Matangi (Class of 2015) B F Matchett (Class of 1968) R D & S L Matthews (Parents) M N Mayman (Class of 1950) J W McCay (Class of 1985) J G McCulloch (Class of 1957) D M McGuigan (Class of 1988) I R McGuire (Class of 1964) M W McHugh (Class of 1975) G R McIndoe & M L Schwass (Parents) D N McKenzie (Class of 1961) G W McLauchlan (Class of 1949) D J McLeod (Class of 1954), P J McLeod (Class of 1979), J K McLeod (Class of 2011) & K J McLeod (Class of 2014) H K & A A McNaughton (Parents) D J McNicoll (Class of 1962) A E McQueen (Class of 1953) Sir S Mead (Parent) A D Meek (Class of 1971) Melville Family T J Meo (Class of 1993) A R W Messenger (Class of 1958) D J Meuli (Parent)

M O Mexted (Class of 1949) F K Middleton (Parent) J F Mills (Class of 1956) D W Milne (Class of 1965) P J & C E Milne (Parents) R W Mitchell (Class of 1956) K A T Moresi (Class of 2009) L G Morrison (Class of 1961) P C Morrison (Class of 1975) R & B Morrow (Friends) B & K R Moses (Class of 1959) B S Mudge (Class of 1961) R I Murray (Class of 1950) J Grady & D Murray (Parents) S & D Naik (Class of 1977) P W Neely (Staff Member) Neill Family K S Ng (Class 1958) A Nicholls & L Trevelyan (Parents) R A Nimmo (Class of 1981) R B J Nodwell (Class of 1958) J L North (Class of 1955) J W O'Brien (Class of 1957) O'Brien Family P A O'Connell & E M Howe (Parents) R G O'Connor (Class of 1946) M W Olsen (Class of 1964) Olson Family T R O'Neale (Class of 2011) & C C O'Neale (Class of 2015) P D Oram (Class of 1969) S Ottrey (Parent) & R McNay (Class of 2015) Pasifika Parents’ Support Group V & A Paranjpe (Parents) R R Patel (Class of 1987) R O Partridge (Class of 1948) E & J E Pattison (Class of 1957) R L Pattison (Class of 1964) J S Patton (Class of 1987) Petersen Family J C F Phillipps (Class of 1947) M K Phillips (Class of 1953) S W Pillar (Class of 1953) I F Pinel (Class of 1942) Playle Family K E Pledger (Class of 1955) K P Pohl (Class of 1959) K & R C Pope (Class of 1942) J F & R L Porteous (Parents) K R Porter (Class of 1939) Powell Family E A & D L Powell (Class of 1964) J Poy (Class of 1963) M W Prout (Class of 1984) Quigley Family M F Quinn (Class of 1962) M Rabone (Friend) S G Radford (Class of 1930) S V Reese (Class of 2007) Reeve Family M T Reweti (Class of 1990) J C G Rhodes (Class of 1968) J P Rickman (Class of 1967) M J & K E Rigby (Parents) S Robertson (Class of 1947) R H Robinson (Class of 1951) A P S Robinson (Staff Member) S Robinson (Friend) T Robinson (Friend) G H Roper (Class of 1961) E R Rosenthal (Class of 1961) J C Ross (Class of 1956), J E Ross (Class of 2005) & A G Ross (Class of 2007) P D F Rumpit (Class of 1982) B Russell & S Harding (Parents) I H & N J Russon (Parents) Ryan Family R N Sadler & Family (Class of 1965) A D Salkeld (Class of 1948) S J & M A Sargentina (Parents) R L Sarten (Class of 1951) G & G Sathiyandra (Parents) P A Savage (Class of 1958) S R K & S A Sawrey (Parents) N J Scannell (Class of 2009) & C Scannell (Class 2011) G J Schmitt (Staff Member) J L Schmitt (Class of 2011) A T E Schroder (Class of 2005) & E M C Schroder (Class of 2008) J Schuyt (Class of 2011), S P Schuyt (Class of 2013), T Schuyt (Class of 2015) & M P Schuyt (Class of 2017) D A R Scott (Class of 2009), T J F Scott (Class of 2011) & J G L Scott (Class of 2017)

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

G H Scott (Class of 2008) & N D H Scott (Class of 2010) J & B F Scott (Class of 1958) J Selwood & M Unsworth (Parents) F M & L R Shanahan (Parents) Sharp Family J C Shennan (Class of 1963) S P Sherring (Class of 1960) D G Simmers (Class of 1951) K A Simpson (Class of 1969) E Sims (Parent) M & A Skoog (Parents) R D Slade (Class of 1958) S K Slater (Class of 1964) Smit Family S J Smith (Class of 1957) W K Smith H A Smith (Parent) D J Sole (Parent) J W & W S Sommerville (Class of 1965) B G & D C Speight (Parents) T A T M Williams (Class of 2016) E B B Steel (Class of 2011) & R P Steel (Class of 2014) B D Steele (Class of 1986) M & D C Stewart (Class of 1955) H J Stott (Class of 2009) Sullivan Family B C Sutton (Class of 1984) J R Sutton (Class of 1969) P D Swallow (Class of 1984) S & K Sweetman (Friend) D Sweetman (Friend) R D Sweetzer (Class of 1960) B A Swift (Class of 1962) T H Syddall (Class of 1956) Sygrove Family E C Tait (Class of 1935) B S Taylor (Class of 1963) I N Taylor (Class of 1956) E M & R Bradley (Staff Members) B L Thomas (Class of 1976) P & N K Thomas (Class of 1948) J E P Thomson (Class of 1953) M Thornton (Friend) A B M Tie (Class of 1967) E T Tierney (Class of 1955) J M & D J N Todd (Class of 1956) D L Tohill & L M Owen (Parents) M Toogood (Friend) R J Townsley (Class of 1955) M D Turner (Class of 2005) & P J Turner (Class of 2011) R B Twaddle (Class of 1941) J Tyler (Friend) M J van Zijl (Class of 2008) R L Vasan (Class of 1963) R C & J Vinjimoore (Parents) D R Wade (Class of 1967) D R Waller (Class of 1964) B E Ward (Class of 1952) A P & K B Washington (Parents) Watchman Family J R Watt (Class of 1960) H E Webber (Class of 1964) L A Webster Parent) J Webster (Friend) J A Wedde (Class of 1965) N P Wedde (Class of 1969) M R C Welch (Class of 2012) & N A Welch (Class of 2014) P C Wellings (Class of 1957) J T Wellington (Class of 2011) J L Wells (Class of 1963) Wells Family J W Welsh (Class of 1958) A M Were (Class of 1939) D V Weston (Class of 1966) G C Weston (Class of 1943) A & R G Whinam (Parents) T G & R Wiffen (Parents) K F & A J Wilkins (Parents) Williams Family Sir Hugh Williams (Class of 1957) B R Wilson (Class of 1958) B M Wilson (Class of 1966) W Wilson (Parent) I T Wilson (Class of 1951) D S & A Wood (Parents) R M Wood (Class of 1932) D M Woodbridge (Class of 1967) M D Woolley (Class of 2008) S A McIntosh & J W Wyeth (Parents) K L Won & K Y Yeo (Parents) S W Yiavasis (Class of 2011) C L & R Young (Parents) R W Young (Class of 1951)


14

The Donors’ Honour Boards THE TWO BOARDS ACKNOWLEDGING OUR DONORS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED at the forefront of our new Hall. While all donors were invited to the Opening Celebrations, we realise not everyone could attend, so if you wish to visit the school and take in a tour of the Hall, please get in touch with the Old Boys Office to make a time for a personal look at the new facilities.

WITH A MODERN STRUCTURE in a significant

golden foliage. In front of the entry path, the

position at the front of the school, and

two existing gardens that have established

composed of dominant vertical black and

Pohutukawa (Metrosideros excelsa) trees, have

silver panelling, it was important that the

been underplanted with lower growing shrubs

landscaping complement this design. Also, the

and ground covers.

school colours of black, gold and yellow were incorporated into the chosen plants, that were

With a greater predominance of shade and

predominantly native shrubs and plants or

low-positioned windows on the west side,

variegated forms of these.

plants selected were shade-preferring Chatham Island forget-me-nots, renga rengas, grasses

Immediately in front of the hall is a row of

and Hebes. Immediately behind the Wellington

Phormium (flax) with a variety ‘yellow wave’

College signage beside the entry, where there

alternating with ‘dark delight’. Then in front

are no windows, taller nikau palms have been

of these, are yellow variegated Pseudopanax

planted and interspersed with renga renga lilies.

grasses and low growing golf-ball Pittosporums

We are indebted to Simon Dearsley (Class of

are located beyond these. For contrast, in the

1981) of Leacroft Nurseries for the generous

very front of this garden, is an extended row

supply of plants [read his story on page 31].

of low-growing black Mondo grass plants

Also, some were kindly donated from a further

(Ophiopogon planiscapus).

source, following their propagation in Tawa.

To feature the centrally positioned Memorial

On Saturday, 20 October, a well-supported

Window, golden totaras (Podocarpus totara

group of about 50 people, comprising parents,

‘Aurea’) have been positioned to the left and

staff, students and Old Boys completed the

right sides of the window.

majority of the planting in front of the hall in

(Gold Splash) shrubs. Clumps of different yellow

time for them to become established before the To provide a focus and perspective to to the

opening.

main office entry area, the two sides have rows of wharangi (Melicope ternata) trees with their The LAMPSTAND | 2018

GIL ROPER, Landscaping Convenor (Class of 1961)


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The LAMPSTAND | 2018


16

‘Buy a Pane’ Campaign ALL OLD BOYS and current students know the Memorial Window that is an enduring symbol of pride, tradition and service and uniquely made for Wellington College. Our new Memorial Hall and Performing Arts Centre now has the iconic stained glass window back in its rightful place at the head of the building and where the school will now face towards at each Assembly. Wellington College acknowledges those donors recorded below who supported the building campaign by purchasing a pane and accordingly adding their name to a piece of history. D G Wearing Class of 1976

1

D J McLeod Class of 1954

41

A W Lazarevic Class of 2012

2

M M Lazarevic Class of 2008

42

3

M S Conway Class of 1975 P L Conway Class of 1971 G S Robinson Class of 1921 J E Robinson Class of 1923

45

I G Trotman Class of 1958

54

7

N A Robinson Class of 1949 P D Robinson Class of 1952

59

8

M D Danaher Class of 1945

68

9

D H Spoor Class of 1972

73

R K Dreyer Class of 1955 J K Dreyer Class of 2001

77

A W Pillar Class of 1928 S W Pillar Class of 1953 M J Pillar Class of 1982 K C Pillar Class of 1985 I R Murray Class of 1961 I R Murray Class of 1961 H C Wong Class of 1957

4

Form Class 6A 1948

14

I R Murray Class of 1961

21

I R Murray Class of 1961

22

H A Sherring Class of 1918 E J Sherring Class of 1946 S P Sherring Class of 1960

25

K J McLeod Class of 2014

26

J K McLeod Class of 2011

27

D H P Walpole Class of 1949

28

G T Robinson Class of 1888

31

I R Letica Class of 1961 S L Letica Class of 1964 M S Letica Class of 1993

33

H J C Egan Class of 2011 H P C Egan Class of 2014

35

V E Neall MNZM Class of 1964

36

D A Friar Class of 2009

37

D R Wade Class of 1967

38

P J McLeod Class of 1979

40

D E Snell Class of 2011 T E Snell Class of 2014

78

J I & M I Deterte Class of 1945

82

W M Deterte Class of 1969 R A Deterte Class of 1972 I D de Terte Class of 1980 B A D Leggett Class of 2003 M J D de Terte Class of 2010 F B Deterte Class of 2011 Z J de Terte Class of 2018

83

84

D S Hancock Class of 2007

87

D E Forsyth Class of 1955

89

D G Kember Class of 1965 H M Kember Class of 1999

90

D A Egley Class of 1956

91

D H P Walpole Class of 1949

92

G K Ritson Class of 1968 S G Ritson Class of 1992 M P Ritson Class of 1994

93

P & R Leslie (Parents)

94

R H Cathie Class of 1961 A R Cathie Class of 1988

98

R Wedde, A A Wedde, F Wedde & H E Wedde 1892 - 1903 J A Wedde 1965 N P Wedde 1969 P D M Wedde Class of 1997

99

H R Hancock Class of 2009

S J Kember Class of 1972

133

B A N Ayto Class of 2013

156

D M Golding Class of 1964 M J Golding Class of 1967

134

K B Johnston Class of 1975 R H D Johnston Class of 2009

157

W F Crist Staff Member: 1947 – 1961

160

D D CourtneyO'Connor Class of 1967

161

R J Holmes Class of 1967

162

Smol Family 2007 – 2012

163

R B Kelliher Class of 2012

166

M P Kelliher Class of 2015

167

E R Thompson Class of 1978

170

J L Schmitt Class of 2012

171

R G O'Connor Class of 1946

174

Sir Ron Brierley Class of 1955

175

Wellington College Mothers' Assoc. 2013

176

C M CarbonattoBowkett Class of 2009 D CarbonattoBowkett Class of 2013

177

D N J Todd Class of 1956

180

W R Atkin Class of 1967

181

G C Edgar Class of 1942 D M Edgar Class of 1946 J V Edgar Class of 1952 A J Edgar Class of 1983

182

N On Class of 2012 S On Class of 2016

183

H E Webber Class of 1964

184

B P Waddell Class of 1963

185

A L Carter Class of 2011 E T Carter Class of 2015 N T Carter Class of 2018

135

M J Limbrick Class of 1949

137

M G Crocker Class of 1946

138

139

101

R H Wilson Class of 1962 J C Wilson Class of 1959 J L Wilson Class of 1957

B T Foley Class of 1950

105

F R Bernard Class of 1949

140

B T Foley Class of 1950

106

A G Davis Class of 1974

141

S K Slater Class of 1964 & Staff Member

110

142

J E Pattison Class of 1957

112

G J Oosterbaan Class of 1979 E P Oosterbaan Class of 2005

B L Isaacs Class of 2009 D H Isaacs Class of 2005

143

113

A N Oosterbaan Class of 2010 B H Oosterbaan Class of 2013

D F Roche Class of 1963

146

114

Day Family 2007 – 2016

S A Hancock Class of 2011

115

R A Bruce Class of 1958

147

119

Dysart Family Class of 2014

120

J M Hunn Class of 1955 A P Hunn Class of 1978 N J Hunn Class of 1980 L F Hunn Class of 2016

S F Clark-Rayner Class of 2017 N M P ClarkRayner Class of 2019

D J Dowden Class of 1974

148

124

M D Small Class of 1963

152

P M Carroll Class of 1962 C D Carroll Class of 1966

153

127

A B Burrowes Class of 2013 R Burrowes Class of 2015

M C Carroll Class of 1931 L B Murray Class of 1914

128

A A Hancock Class of 2013

129

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

R A Nimmo Class of 1981 H J Nimmo Class of 2015 I G Nimmo Class of 2017 J A Nimmo Class of 2021

154

D Patching Class of 1947

155


17

S J Dearsly Class of 1981 S J Dearsly Class of 2016 A M Dearsly Class of 2019

187

B H Helson Class of 1960

188

H P O Delany Class of 2015 R G O Delany Class of 2015

217

J G E Benton Class of 1962

218

J F Mills Class of 1956

219

189

A J F Bishell Class of 1954

222

Sir Michael Hardie Boys Class of 1948

190

W N B Vickers Class of 1959

191

G Q England Class of 1945 J C C England Class of 1984 R M D England Class of 1988

Y H J Fam Class of 2017

192

W E McKeich Class of 1952

194

D E Bydder Class of 1963

195

D V Weston Class of 1966

196

M R Button Class of 1971

197

F M Scott Class of 2012

198

D C Scott Class of 1972

199

R P Martell Class of 1932 P A Martell Class of 1963

A A Gawith Class of 1933

202

S J Petersen Class of 2013 T W Petersen Class of 2015 O R Petersen Class of 2018

203

B R Smythe Class of 1958

204

DJP Kibblewhite Class of 2011 LWD Kibblewhite Class of 2013 JRD Kibblewhite Class of 2015

205

T H Kane Class of 2007

208

T J B Leggat Class of 2012

209

P L Cooper Class of 1942

210

K Joeng Class of 2013

211

D M Dome Class of 1986 A J Dome Class of 1988

212

N T AsofaSolomona Class of 2013

213

R D Mahon Class of 2011 F J J Mahon Class of 2013

216

223

D B Stevenson Class of 1931 P J Stevenson Class of 1959 R B Stevenson Class of 1961 B D Stevenson Class of 1965 N D Stevenson Class of 1968

224

M Selig Class of 1956

225

N T Kitto Class of 1950

226

E Aspey Class of 1963

227

R T Feist Class of 1951

230

H L Phillips Class of 2014

231

L G Phillips Class of 2011

232

P J Jobson Class of 1949 K W Jobson Class of 1952 B D Jobson Class of 1957 D R Jobson Class of 1987 S B Jobson Class of 1991

233

H J Freeman Class of 1895 C J Freeman Class of 1904 H J Freeman Class of 1923

248

A T Freeman Class of 1941 E G Freeman Class of 1945

249

J L J Cummins Class of 2010

250

M K A Rhodes Class of 1966 J C G Rhodes Class of 1968

251

R R Patel Class of 1987 B R Patel Class of 1992

252

L H Teagle Class of 1921 R F Teagle Class of 2015 C G Teagle Class of 2017 G W Teagle Class of 2021

253

P D Swallow Class of 1984 S J Swallow Class of 1992 Swallow Family 1980 - 1992

255

F J Brooker Class of 1935

259

J L Marshall Class of 1964 A R Marshall Class of 1966 J M Marshall Class of 1996 E J N Marshall Class of 2011

260

Birkett Sandison Whanau

262

J D Crawford Class of 2013

264

H B Crawford Class of 2018

B E Ward Class of 1952

292

D A S King Class of 1962

360

R D Slade Class of 1958

301

R H S King Class of 1964

361

A G S King Class of 1965

362

M G S King Class of 1967

363

A S King Class of 1970

364

Haigh Family

369

A E Anderson Class of 1943 R W Anderson Class of 1973 T W Anderson Class of 2002 J M Anderson Class of 2006

370

371

E G Corleison Class of 2002 L D F Corleison Class of 2004 R W G Corleison Class of 2008

302

A G Harcourt Class of 1973 H J Harcourt Class of 2009 O J Harcourt Class of 2011

303

I J G Reid Class of 1956 G A R Sims Class of 2020

311

P G Bramley Class of 1984 T G Bramley Class of 2017 C J Bramley Class of 2019

315

S R Budhia Class of 2014

J R A Spinks Class of 1993 J C Spinks Class of 1995 S E Spinks Class of 1997

320

373

W K Smith Class of 2011

T Schulpen Class of 2016

334

T J J Stewart Class of 2017

348

R L D Kerr Class of 1986 A G R Kerr Class of 2019

374

P B Davenport Class of 1950

379

384

M R Deck Class of 1954 G J Deck Class of 1992 C G Deck Class of 2011

353

Dinamani Family

354

P J Farmer Class of 1963

356

G F Lyall Class of 1935 D G Lyall Class of 1968 T L Simmons Class of 2016 Q L Simmons Class of 2021

R Langdana Class of 2009 A Langdana Class of 2016

355

P T Newsam Class of 2006

385 386

357

265

P Osvath Class of 1970

P Sanguankaew Class of 2003

358

391

Class of 1975 40 Years On Reunion 2015

E J H Barnard Class of 1944

N B Trendle Class of 1964 M W Trendle Class of 1965

267

King Boys 1958-1970

359

M R Styles Class of 1940

392

Class of 1975 40 Years On Reunion 2015

268

Class of 1975 40 Years On Reunion 2015

269

A A Neale Class of 1945 S J Neale Class of 1979 T A A Neale Class of 2016 K J S Neale Class of 2019

236

D K Lu Class of 2017

237

A F Hassed Class of 1959

238

G McPherson Class of 2016 S McPherson Class of 2016

A L Hutchison Class of 1956

273

239

A L Hutchison Class of 1956

274

J Christie Class of 1992 R J Christie Class of 1995

278

241

H R J Cummins Class of 2013

281

J Hunt Class of 1946

245

A E ScottHowman Class of 1986

M O Conibear Class of 1948

287

246

G J Pohlen Class of 1959 G E Walpole Class of 1955

288

‘Buy a Pane’ Campaign The LAMPSTAND | 2018

There are still opportunities to BUY A PANE. We have three tiers of pricing, the highest value allocated to the centre. Your purchase is considered as a donation. You can buy a pane on-line: www.wellingtoncollege.school.nz/development/memorial-windowappeal If you wish to pay by internet banking or cheque or require further information, please contact Glenda Schmitt at g.schmitt@wc.school.nz or (04) 803 0307.

$1,000

$3,000

$5,000

Your opportunity to support Wellington College and put your name and/or your family’s name to a piece of history.


18

WWI memories collected, new ones made, at Wellington College demolish that hall punctured it twice. It was reburied when the second hall was built in 1973, and discovered again in 2016 when that building was demolished. This time the decision was made to open the capsule before the newest iteration of the memorial hall was opened on Monday. The Alan Gibbs Memorial Hall and Performing Arts Centre, named in honour of Old Boy, businessman, and College benefactor Alan Gibbs, will also have a new time capsule. It will contain the current prefect badges and service badge, photos of the 1926 capsule's WELLINGTON COLLEGE DEPUTY PRINCIPAL,

contents, and an edition of The Dominion and

ROB ANDERSON (CLASS OF 1973) has opened a

The Evening Post's successor newspaper, The

time capsule from 1926 filled with newspapers

Dominion Post.

and school magazines.

Rob said students were fascinated by the

In 1926, the first of three memorial halls was built at Wellington College to commemorate

contents of the newspapers from 1926.

soldiers killed in WWI.

International news from the time included a

In the foundation stone, two Wellingtonian

Jack Dempsey on September 23, 1926. A

from that year, and the 1919 WWI Memorial

would be one of the most controversial boxing

boxing match where Gene Tunney had beaten

magazines, the College's annual magazine - one edition - were buried within a time capsule. It also contained editions of The Dominion, and

year later, the two would fight again in what matches of the time, The Long Count Fight.

The Evening Post.

Students noticed that the logo for Griffiths

The capsule was accidentally rediscovered in

not changed to this day, Rob said.

biscuits, as advertised in the newspapers, had

1968, when a pneumatic drill being used to

There was also news of German reparation payments for WW1. In History classes, the students covered the Treaty of Versailles - how the Germans had to pay these reparations, which were exorbitant, and kind of broke Germany. There was an article in there, saying that the Germans are up to date with their repayments, which may or may not be true. That resonated with students, Rob said.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


19

Restoring History: Lest we Forget I AM WRITING THIS ON

in the hall and rededicated at the 2019

THE WEEKEND THAT WE

ANZAC Service. There are five such

COMMEMORATE THE 100

plaques; one for the Boer War, one for

TH

ANNIVERSARY OF THE ENDING OF

WWI, two for WWII and one for Jack

WWI. This weekend, one of our old

Howard who was killed in Afghanistan

boys, Hāmi Grace who was killed at

in December 2010. These plaques are an

Gallipoli, has featured extensively in these

integral part of Wellington College’s history

commemorations. The Dominion Post

and we will continue to tell the stories of the

College’s sharp shooter. Three of our Y10

memories down the generations.

featured a story on him entitled: Wellington

Old Boys inscribed on them and honour their

students were also featured on ‘Stuff’

reading extracts from Hāmi’s diary. Hāmi

The plaques have been in storage for two-

is also featured as one of Māori Television’s

and-a-half years. When we inspected them

Armistice Day stories.

recently, we realised just how tarnished they

had become. The decision has been made to

This weekend I am also reminded of the story

restore them to their original condition, put a

recounted in Sir James Elliot’s biography on

protective coat on them and place them in the

J P Firth, Firth of Wellington: On the morning

new hall adjacent to the Memorial Window.

of Armistice Day, a senior assistant master very dear to the Boss, stood beside him on the steps overlooking the lower playing field. The assistant knew full well what was passing in the mind of his headmaster, as the guns boomed, the bells rang and the flags waved in the breeze. Firth turned to his friend and convulsively clasped his hand. Then was seen by the one observer what has been seldom seen, Firth’s tears streaming unashamedly

This is not a cheap undertaking. We are trying to source funds for this task, but if Old Boys are able to assist in meeting the costs of restoration and placing them in the hall this would be immensely appreciated. ROB ANDERSON, Deputy Principal r.anderson@wc.school.nz (Class of 1973)

On the Monday prior to Armistice Day, we officially opened the Alan Gibbs Centre It was a splendid occasion. No doubt the opening will feature elsewhere in this edition of The Lampstand. At the opening, Principal Gregor Fountain mentioned that

the Memorial Plaques commemorating those Old Boys killed in war, will be restored, hung

Wellington College ANZAC Service 11.30am

Alan Gibbs Centre

Donations can be paid by Internet Banking: 06-0561-0137023-00 Ref: WWP Initials/ Surname. Queries on other payment options to the Bursar, Chris Tait: c.tait@wc.school.nz

LEST WE FORGET

down his face.

Memorial Hall and Performing Arts Centre.

12/04/19

If you wish to attend the 2019 ANZAC Service at the College on 12 April, please email: oldboys@wc.school.nz so details can be sent to you.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

Please email Rob Anderson to confirm your donation and so a receipt for your donation can be issued. r.anderson@wc.school. nz


20

Roger, Over and Out

HIGHLY RESPECTED AND WELL LOVED by

Roger’s retirement and the ultimate event was a

his students over 23 years as well as teachers,

hero’s send off on the last day of term attended

Headmaster, Roger Moses’ last day at

by current students, parents and former parents,

Wellington College was truly an emotional affair.

staff and former staff, Old Boys and friends of the school which concluded with a full school

There was an outpouring of praise and gratitude

haka in honour of his service to the College.

for Roger but even so, words could not encapsulate the successes and positive change

Roger leaves the school in good spirits, with a

he brought to the school throughout his years

clear focus and a strong and experienced Senior

of his service here.

Management Team and staff. He now intends to spend his retirement, with his wife Ros who

Farewell functions with our Old Boys were held

retired at the same time as a Primary School

in Auckland and Wellington, plus a further one

teacher, travelling and spending time with their

in Wellington for educational colleagues of

extended family.

Roger. The current staff gathered on the eve of

ABOVE: AUCKLAND GET-TOGETHER: Left: Rahan Langdana, Roger Moses, Tom Leggat, Centre/Right: Roger addresses our guests. BELOW: WELLINGTON GET-TOGETHER: Left: Tupou Sopoaga, Roger Moses, Zac Sopoaga. Centre: Gregor Fountain, John Green, Matthew Beattie, Roger Moses. Right: Geoff Walpole, Ian Taylor, Roger Moses, Derek Pope

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


21

Who is Gregor Fountain? ON 30 APRIL 2018, WE WELCOMED NEW PRINCIPAL, Gregor Fountain to Wellington College. We invited him to answer a few questions to tell us all a bit about himself. You are an Old Boy of Wellington College, but which primary school did you attend? Yes, I was a student here between 1986 and 1990 and then on the staff between 2003 and 2012. Before coming to Wellington College as a student, I attended Wilton School (now Otari School). My Mum and Dad still live in Wilton in the same house I lived in when I was a student at Otari School and Wellington College. My Dad volunteers at OtariWilton’s Bush. You’ll see him weeding, planting, picking up rubbish and guiding people around the beautiful reserve. And beyond Wellington College, what further study did you do? I love history. I am a graduate of Victoria University’s History Department. I completed my Diploma of Teaching through the Christchurch College of Education. I also have a Masters of Education, which I completed when I was teaching at Wellington College. I went back to Victoria University part-time to complete this study. The main focus of my Masters research was the impact of educational reform on the teaching of history. Other than Wellington College, where else have you taught? I started teaching history at Morrinsville College and then went to St Paul’s Collegiate School in Hamilton and Rosehill College in Papakura. I then had ten years at Wellington College and for the past five years, I have had the privilege of being the Principal at Paraparaumu College. What was your first job? One of my first jobs was as a carer for young men with cerebral palsy. When I was a university student, I used to support these guys in their homes with their morning and afternoon routines. This was a fun and a really rewarding job. Favourite subject at Wellington College? All the humanities: History, English and Classics. I particularly remember my Year 13 Classical Studies teacher, Mr Tattersall. I wasn’t a great student, but he has always been a fabulous teacher. Favourite book you like to read to your boys? I have three boys, who are 8, 6 and 6. My favourite books to read to them are ‘How Tom Beat Captain Najork and His Hired Sportsmen’ by Russell Hoban and Roald Dahl’s ‘Danny the Champion of the World’.

Favourite film of all time? Gandhi. This movie kick-started my interest in India and Indian history. Favourite food? Indian or Malaysian. I can’t wait to reconnect with the Roti Chenai from the restaurant by the same name on Victoria Street! Favourite TV programme of all time? West Wing. This is a big favourite in our family. My partner and I (and sometimes my mum) refer to scenes and quote dialogue from West Wing. Love it, no matter how often I watch it. Favourite Band of all time? The Police What was the last book you finished reading? This was a biography of former Australian Treasurer and Prime Minister, called ‘Paul Keating – a Big Picture Leader’, by Troy Bramston. What’s a place that you would you like to visit? My partner and I travelled for a while in India about 15 years ago and we would love to return there. Visiting Kolkata and Shimla will be key places on our next India itinerary. My Dad was born in India and recently returned there for his 80th birthday. I was pretty jealous and sad to miss this trip! What is the best thing about being a teacher? Seeing students use the skills and knowledge they gained at school and elsewhere, to make our community and planet better for all of us. Do you have a favourite quote? My experience in school leadership has made me realise that Gandhi was right when he said that “happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony”. To me this underlines the importance of having a clear set of shared values in our schools and communities. How does it feel returning to Wellington City? It’s great to be back. We loved living in Kāpiti, but it is exciting to return to what Lauris Edmond called “the world headquarters of the verb”. There are so many interesting places for kids and their parents. It’s a city of conversation, debate and new ideas. It does feel like coming home.

You can follow Gregor’s weekly newsletter and interview blog by visiting the College’s website: www.wc.school.nz He’s also on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WC_Principal The LAMPSTAND | 2018

The Class of 2018’s parting gift was to name a new drinking fountain in Gregor’s honour!

Retiring Head of Classical Studies, Kim Tattersall (left) was Gregor’s Latin teacher when Gregor started at Wellington College in Form 3 in 1986.


22

Class of 1968: 50 Years On THE CLASS OF 1968 CAME TOGETHER for their

FRIDAY, 6 APRIL

The Class of 1968 Dinner at the Wellington Club

50th reunion with great anticipation of meeting

that evening saw guests settle into catching

old friends and renewing ties with Wellington

up and reminiscing, and to hear everyone’s

College. The cohort enjoyed connecting with

stories. The evening was MC’d by Rob Anderson

classmates from ‘before’.

and Bruce Little gave a Toast to the College reflecting on former Masters and Absent Friends

Assembling in the Archives for Morning Tea with

amongst his tribute.

an opportunity to view the exhibitions set up in

Back Row: Second Row: Front Row: Absent:

the museum, the group were then escorted on

The weekend rekindled many memories of

a tour of the College by outgoing Headmaster,

their journey through Wellington College and

Roger Moses (his last tour of some 26 previous

guests were pleased to see that the spirit lives

class reunions) with many noting how much

on. Thanks to all those who attended - your

things had changed, and yet everything still felt

participation enriched the event and renewed

comfortingly familiar.

the joy of being an Old Boy.

The cohort were also able to visit the ‘almost

CLASS OF 1969 REUNION:

completed’ Hall and see the progress.

FRIDAY, 29 MARCH 2019

Jeremy Rhodes, Richard Keeling, Gordon Ritson, Rowan Renouf, Jim Tait, Mike Burns, David Graves, Don Abbott, Brian Matchett, Graeme Remington John Fyson, Malcolm McLean, Bruce Little, Craig Wylie, Greig Cunnimgham, Paul Myers, Phillip Yee, Stephen Kappatos Gary Shearer, Steve Chong, Ian Wong, Graeme Warring, Mike Pallin (Staff), Roger Moses (Headmaster), Gary Girvan (Staff), Ted Clayton (Staff) Andrew Wilson, Kevin Moss, Tony Hayman Fraser Clark, Ross Davey, Mark de Berry, John Langford, Derek Tyler The LAMPSTAND | 2018


23

Class of 1978: 40 Years On WHEN THE CLASS OF 1978 returned to the

Dinner that evening was at the Wellington

College, old connections were re-made and

Club, MC’d again by Robert Anderson. The

old memories revived; reminding everyone

conversation was, as usual, stimulating and

that being part of a student group can be

enjoyable, inspiring many great memories most

fundamental part of who we grow up to be.

of which were surrounded by mirth. The years

FRIDAY, 19 OCTOBER

may have greyed the hair but not the wit! Ross The day started with a warm welcome and

Hanning gave the Toast to the College, and

a tour of the school by new Principal, Gregor

Gregor responded.

Fountain. It was quite an eye-opener for those who hadn’t seen the College since 1978. The

It was a great day and a wonderful celebration

Class of 1978 were the first cohort to go through

of the fact that 40 years on, the Class of 1978

full five years of the previous Memorial Hall as

are still enjoying life and still remember their

third formers in 1974.

time at Wellington College with great affection.

Then it was to an arranged lunch by Ross

CLASS OF 1979 REUNION:

Hanning - a perfect background to their happy

FRIDAY, 18 OCTOBER 2019

gathering.

Back Row: Second Row: Front Row:

Lawrence Field, Andrew Currie, Robert Park, Dave Wilson, Richard Hermans, Jon Beere, Mark Bosson, Chris Faulls, Philip Langridge, Ross Hanning Graeme Sayer, Bruce Darwin, Michael Anastasiadis, Alastair Campbell, Steve Strain, Scott Tingey, Tony Hunn, Richard Heald, Andrew McFarlane, Al Murray Dave Scott, Ewen Thompson, Paul Guthrie, Graeme Hough, Gregor Fountain (Principal), Martin Fowler, Malcolm Hart, Geoff Mitchell, John Roberts The LAMPSTAND | 2018


24

Class of 1988: 30 Years On

Back Row: Second Row: Front Row:

SATURDAY, 15 SEPTEMBER

Danny Eagleton, Peter Barrett, Mark Clare, David McGuigan, Cris Stephen, Glenn Wilkinson, Michael Boddy Ian Tulloch, Greg Binning, Chris Nicholls, Hugh Stevens, Toby Beaglehole, Richard Christie, Dean Harland, Aaron Tait-Jones Nick Moen, Grant Halliday, Rob Anderson, Gregor Fountain, Andrew Dome, Cadell Bradnock, Mario Juran, Adrian Boutel

TWENTY-ONE OLD BOYS from the Class of 1988 assembled at Te Wharewaka o Poneke on the waterfront for a 30th school reunion. This was a much more relaxed event compared to the 20th reunion ten years earlier which included a Saturday Night Black Tie Dinner event with partners at Brierley Theatre. None the less, the group were in excellent form this year. We were joined on this most auspicious of occasions by Gregor Fountain, the new Principal (I did ask him the difference between Headmaster and Principal but to this day I still don't know), and Rob Anderson, the current Deputy Principal, and for many of us a teacher we had back in 1988! Unfortunately, Headmaster from 1988, Harvey Rees-Thomas could not attend. However I am expecting him to attend our 40th in ten years time! I did notice on the school walk earlier in the day, that only the 40th and 50th year reunion photographs reach the lofty heights of the WCOBA office wall, so that is a stretch target we can all aim for. The afternoon flew by and there were many tales of sporting success told (with a number of members from the 1st XV Rugby, 1st XI Cricket, and 1st XI Soccer in attendance) - in the case of our own ‘Sport Billy’ for the year, Glenn Wilkinson, he covered 1st XV Rugby and 1st XI Cricket and would have been 1st XI Soccer if he had continued down that route!

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

There was also a lot of talk around what is such and such doing now, or where is Old boy what’s his name living now? It certainly was a great walk down memory lane. Post lunch, a number of us who had booked tickets to the All Blacks versus the Springboks headed off in that direction with a short stop off at a popular watering hole on the way (incidentally the bouncer was also an Old Boy from 1988, who would have thought)? Clearly the All Black test result didn't go to plan, but as one that has witnessed the 1999 France RWC Semi-Final loss at ‘Twickers’ and the 2007 RWC Quarter-Final loss to France at Cardiff, I'll take ownership of that one too! No more live AB tests for me! The night finished up back at the said watering hole of earlier, for post-game analysis, beers and tales of old. This was an excellent day catching up with classmates, most of us hadn't see for ten years or longer. Great company, great yarns and for many, it felt like we were together just yesterday. Thanks to Steph Kane for once again arranging and helping facilitate an awesome reunion. And for the rest of the Old Boys from 1988, I will be hunting you down for the 40th in ten years time. That you can count on! Lumen Accipe et Imperti ANDREW DOME


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The ‘Quad Boys’ meet in Melbourne EARLIER THIS YEAR, a small group of Old Boys gathered in Melbourne. This group of Old Boys were better known as the ‘QUAD BOYS’ from the mid 1990s. The Quad was located at the outdoor basketball court and where a big proportion of the Polynesian students would meet before, during and after school. We would spend our time

reminiscing over old times. We even had our

there chatting and laughing, playing Basketball

own unique uniform made for the occasion.

or Cricket and epic games of Rugby. It was truly a weekend we will never forget. A good number of these OId Boys now live in

For myself, it was so important to renew

Australia and a big proportion in Melbourne.

friendships and see the guys again and pretty

Some of us hadn't seen each other for over 20

much, we all seemed to be the same - maybe

years. So a Facebook Messenger group was

some just a little louder and a few kilos heavier.

started in New Zealand by some of the guys living there.

It was great to hear each others stories and memories, many we had forgotten and to

They thought it was long overdue to get

reminisce - it felt just like yesterday. The best

together. Thus it was decided by us all to come

thing for me about the reunion was to realise

to Melbourne and spend three days together to

we all still had that special connection that had

catch up. We all stayed in a hotel in Melbourne’s

brought us together over 20 years ago.

CBD. We still had a brotherhood that I believe was After the boys all checked-in, we had lunch at

made possible by the unique and great school

the Victoria Markets. We then headed out to the

Wellington College.

Crown Casino for a wonderful dinner, drinks and a catch up with 30 Old Boys in attendance.

We are all still in contact via Facebook and are

now planning to get together every three years. We decided that we would base ourselves at the hotel the other two nights, as we were

GUL POHATU, Class of 1995

all having such a great time catching up and

gpohatu@yahoo.com

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

There’s no reason why you can’t have a reunion marking your ten, twenty, thirty years on. It’s just a matter of expressing interest and having people put their hands up to help coordinate. Please get in touch with the Old Boys’ Office with your feedback.


26

News from WELLINGTON COLLEGE c

M Evedy Fourpeat

WELLINGTON COLLEGE WON THE MCEVEDY

Captain, Dylan Lynch won a slow, but stirring

SHIELD four years in a row after capturing the

victory in the open 3000m. Cam and Tim

annual prize at Newtown Park by 38 points in

Robinson backed up their Nationals form

March 2018.

by cleaning up the U16 and Open Javelin respectively. Jack Julian and Lachlan Bruce

In overcast and humid conditions, interrupted

scored multiple victories on the track.

by occasional showers, Wellington fought off a much stronger challenge than expected from

McEvedy Shield takes place at newtown park on tuesday, 5 march 2019.

The following records tumbled:

the two St Patrick’s Colleges to triumph for the 52nd time overall.

U15: Sautia Misa (Stream), High Jump - 1.92m U15: Sautia Misa (Stream), Long Jump - 6.47m

The telling difference for Wellington College

U15: Wellington College, 4x100m Relay

was their performance in the U15 age group,

U15: Harley Patel-Muxlow (Wellington College),

winning nine of the 14 events. Wellington was

Triple Jump - 12.61m

also dominant in the long distance track events

U15: Joshua Williams (Wellington College),

sweeping the 1500m.

100m dash - 10.98s U16: Xander Manktelow (Wellington College),

Overall, Wellington College won 26 of the 55

High Jump - 1.88m

events. Silverstream won 15 events and Town

Open: Cam Robertson (Wellington College),

14. Disturbingly Rongotai College didn’t win a

Javelin - 65.50m

single event - the day belonged to the black and

Open: Matthew Sutcliffe (Wellington College),

yellow of Wellington College.

1500m - 4:03:29

College Sport Wellington Awards WELLINGTON COLLEGE enjoyed a very

The Swim team took out the Team of the Year

successful evening at the CSW Sports Awards.

and the following were winners in individual sports: Cam Robinson, Athletics; Tiany Xie,

Seven pennants were awarded for winning

Badminton; Max Wickens, Mountain Biking;

the Premier Division in Cross-Country, Futsal,

Ricky Kiddle, Rowing; Thomas Watkins,

Floorball, Rowing, Swimming, Tennis, and

Swimming; Toshiaki Yasuda, Table Tennis; Isaac

Volleyball (2017).

Becroft, Tennis and William Murphy, Waterpolo.

From 20 finalists in the various categories, we

Retiring at the end of the year, Neville Paul (left)

came away with ten winners making this the

deservedly won Volunteer of the Year.

most successful year for some years. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


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News from WELLINGTON COLLEGE

The College’s BARBERSHOP CHORUS came It was a terrific victory in November for the 1ST XI CRICKETERS against St Patrick’s (Silverstream)

third in the national Young Men in Harmony section at the National Finals in September.

earning them the Heathcoate Williams Shield (the Ranfurly Shield of NZ Secondary School Cricket). They had a gutsy win by 14 runs. The 1st XI were also named as Wellington College

On ANZAC Day, Wellington College was represented by Head Prefect, Ollie Petersen and Deputy Head Prefect, Harry Crawford at the Wreath Laying Ceremony at the Cenotaph.

Sports Team of the Year.

THE CHORALE won Silver at the National Big Sing Competition. We were delighted to have Nigel Evans (left) from the Woolf Fisher Trust with us to present a Fellowship to Deputy Principal, Dave Thorp. Dave will travel to the USA to visit schools and meet with other educational leaders.

Wellington College - NATIONAL SWIMMING CHAMPIONS for 2018! Scoring 830 points, beating St Andrew’s College on 766 and Pakuranga College on 571. National List MP for

It was KIM TATTERSALL’s final senior class in

Wellington Central, Nicola

October before he retires. Kim has been an

Willis announced

inspiration to many Languages and Classical

Clement Kong as her

Studies students (including the Principal back

YOUTH MP FOR 2019.

in 1990!) and has been at the College since

Clement is a Deputy Head Prefect. He is an active member of his community with strong principles and a clear vision for what New Zealand needs to succeed. He is the first member of his family to be born in New Zealand and values the important role our education system has played in his success. Nicola’s brother Jono Willis is in the Class of 2004 cohort.

1981. Past and present students presented him with a beautiful watch. BUDDY HOLLY - the musical featured as the College’s major production for 2018 and their superb effort paid off, winning the Wellington College Arts Group of the Year Award. Buddy, played by Deputy Head Prefect, Harry Crawford was supported by some very talented musicians, technicians and dancers, enthralling the five night sell-out show audiences. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


28

News from WELLINGTON COLLEGE

A TOUCHING MOMENT in our end of year

handful of fellow students also spoke on various

calendar is the Leavers’ Lunch. This year was no

components of life at Wellington College and

different when our CLASS OF 2018 shared their

their efforts were very much appreciated and

favourite memories of their time at school. It

received.

was a happy, relaxed event, full of humour and perhaps a few tears as students prepared to

Y13 Dean, Patrick Smith also spoke, in which he

go their separate ways and of course, join the

looked back on his years as Dean of this cohort

brotherhood of Wellington College Old Boys.

with affection and humour, saying it had been a privilege to get to know the students. Principal,

Deputy Head Prefects, Harry Crawford, Clement

Gregor Fountain wished the students well

Kong and Geordie Bean MC’d the event and

for the future, assuring them the school had

together with Head Prefect, Ollie Petersen,

prepared them well for life beyond Wellington

tailored their words for their fellow students. A

College.

It has been a good season for the SENIOR A FUTSAL team that won the CSW Regionals, beating St Patrick’s (Town) 3-2 in the final. They went on to take out the National title for the first time. They were coached by Old Boys, Luc

It has been great to see our students supporting charities in the community. Above: Senior students collecting for Youthline. Below: Junior students collecting for the Wellington Soup Kitchen.

Saker and Tom Withnall and managed by Stu Beresford.

BAN THE BULLYING: While there are all sorts of wonderful aspects of New Zealand society that we can be immensely proud of, our history of bullying is not one of them. The NZ Mental Health Foundation in partnership with a host of other organisations has got in behind the global phenomenon that is the Pink Shirt Day (Speak Up, Stand Together, Stop Bullying) and Wellington College helped to acknowledge and raise awareness for this movement for the second consecutive year. As the conclusion of the Bullying Free NZ Week, on Friday, 18 May, a large number of Wellington College staff and students dressed in pink to express support for a culture free from bullying. A collection amongst staff and students raised a generous amount that we donated to the cause.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


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News from WELLINGTON COLLEGE QUADRANGULAR TOURNAMENT: A well-drilled

The last time Wanganui Collegiate won the

Christ’s College forward pack executing equally

Quadrangular was when it posted back-to-back

well-drilled set pieces denied hosts Wanganui

victories in 1990 and 1991.

Collegiate their first win in the 92nd annual Quadrangular Rugby Tournament in more than

The WCOBA hosted a get-together on the

two decades in July.

Tuesday of the Tournament and welcomed team members and staff of the current 1st XV,

The visitors dominated from the front to

together with Principal, Gregor Fountain. A

beat a brave Collegiate 1st XV 33-7, with the

good number of both local and out-of-town Old

homeside's converted try perhaps controversial.

Boys also attended and special mention was made in memory of ‘Quad Stalwart’ Malcolm

On Monday, Collegiate bullocked their way into

Perrett, who was a regular feature on the

the final after a 19-13 upset over defending

sidelines before he passed away last year.

champions Nelson College. That left Nelson to scrap it out for third and fourth with Wellington

Alas, all the black and yellow support on the

College in Wednesday's curtain raiser which

sidelines couldn’t impel our team to come away

Nelson won 47-0.

with a win but there is much excitement and anticipation for 2018, when Wellington College

The Christ’s College XV did have an edge with

host the Tournament.

former All Blacks captain, Reuben Thorne as coach.

QUAD 2019: 1 - 3 JULY

ACADEMIC SUCCESS: The results from the

tribute to the dedication of both our students

NZ Scholarship examinations for 2017 again

and staff. A further exceptional outcome for

demonstrated the top academic calibre of

Michael O’Brien was his award as the ‘Top

our senior students. In 2016, three of our

Subject Scholarship’ winner in Classical Studies.

The WCOBA and the WCRFC will co-host a function on Tuesday, 2 July for Old Boys, supporters and friends of the College. Keep in touch if you would like more information.

students were among the ten top scholars in the country and this was repeated in 2017 when Roman Dunford, Michael O’Brien and Barnard Patel were all ‘Premier Scholars’. To have two successive years with three of the top ten scholars in New Zealand from Wellington

Michael (left), with Roman and Barnard.

College is a noteworthy attainment and a The LAMPSTAND | 2018


30

News from WELLINGTON COLLEGE SEEKING RUGBY COACHES, MANAGERS AND TRAINERS OLD BOYS PLAY A SIGNIFICANT ROLE in the development of Rugby at Wellington College. In 2018, Ian Tulloch (Class of 1998) coached the 1st XV while Steve Guiney (Class of 1987), Adrian Shaw (Class of 2000), Chris Wells (Class of 1975), Jimmy Lawler (Class of 2008), Manaia Opai (Class of 1990) and Peteli Siolo (Class of 1986) either coached or managed teams across the grades. Jeff To’omaga Allen (Class of 2008), Disake (Wellington College Coach) Julian Savea, Nehe Milner Skudder, Mania Opai (Class of 1990).

We are seeking volunteer coaches across all of our ten teams, from weight restricted sides to our open weight teams for the 2019 season. Specifically, we are looking for a 1st XV (Backs Coach). This is a fantastic opportunity reconnect with your old school and develop your coaching at one of the top rugby colleges in the country. Successful applicants will work with and alongside young athletes and coaching staff from the school's supportive community. If you are interested please send your CV with an explanation of your coaching philosophy and all relevant coaching experience. Please specify the team that you believe your skills and experience would be best suited for. We hope to have our coaching roster filled by early December 2018.

Wellington College U65kg Gold win Division 1 supported by U55kg Black and U55kg Gold who earlier played the final of U55 Division 1.

Contact: LINCOLN RAWLES, Director of Rugby Wellington College l.rawles@wc.school.nz

Our WELLINGTON COLLEGE ROWERS won the McLachlan Shield for 2018. In February, the Rowing boys put on a fantastic team effort to win back the McLachlan Shield, which is awarded to the top rowing school in the Wellington region. Wellington College raced against eight other boys’ schools in the region and won on head to head points making Wellington College the overall winner of the Shield. AT THE END OF TERM FOUR, 2018,

around the College, both as a relief

the College will farewell a number of

teacher and keeping involved with

long-serving staff. Three in particular

Swimming.

(and amounting to around 112 years total service) are Neville Paul, Martin

Kim Tattersall, appointed in 1981 in the

Vaughan and Kim Tattersall.

Classical Studies Department, rose to Head of Department some years ago.

Neville, appointed as a Science and

Kim’s retirement includes travelling

Physics teacher in 1986, is probably

around the world.

better known as a Coach with the Athletics team, specialising in

Two other staff members with 15 years

Cross-Country. Neville is retiring to

service and known to more recent Old

Christchurch.

Boys are also leaving. Head of Maths, Ian Clark is taking a HOD position at

Maths Teacher and ‘Mr Swimming’,

another school while Technology, PE

Martin Vaughan was appointed in

and Waterpolo Coach, Boris Kipnis is

1983. While retiring, he will still be seen

retiring.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

(L-R): Neville Paul, Martin Vaughan, Kim Tattersall with Principal, Gregor Fountain. Gregor was a student when these three staff members joined the College.


31

News from WELLINGTON COLLEGE

Christopher Aubrey Print

WELLINGTON COLLEGE ARCHIVES is offering for sale, prints of this historic watercolour by Christopher Aubrey. Painted in 1889, the original is held by Wellington College. 1,100 were printed and each print is individually numbered. These were first offered for sale in 1984 and following a tidy up in the Archives, we found a good number in storage. Hence sales will assist the Archives in on-going upkeep and recording the photographs and memorabilia collections. The coloured area is 38cm x 21.5cm and shows Wellington College and St Mark’s Church from the Basin Reserve. You can order a numbered copy of the print by completing the form on the opposite page. The price in 1984 was $25.00 - we are pleased to say the price will remain the same, however to post out in domestic mail, in a secure tube the total cost for print, postage and packaging is $35.00. Please contact us for International postage rates.

WELLINGTON COLLEGE’S ANNUAL Year 10 Volunteer Day proved to be a great opportunity to serve our wonderful Wellington community and support people in need. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


32

Wellington College Muse The A&M team (L-R): Ted Clayton, Alison Girvan, Gary Girvan, Mike Pallin.

IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE that a year has passed since the wonderful 150th Celebrations in October 2017. October 17 marks Wellington College Foundation Day. Interestingly, this is not the date for the start of Wellington College in Michael Stace

Woodward Street in 1867 but is instead the date the College began on its present site in 1874.

five times Premier of New Zealand, given the name William Fox and taken to Wellington. This remarkable story can be read in Peter Walker’s The Fox Boy. In previous years and on significant anniversaries, Foundation Day has been marked with much celebration and with the presence of dignitaries. This series of photos from the Auckland

Weekly News shows the College’s 50th Jubilee celebrations in 1924 with Staff, Old Boys and The photo above of the East School, possibly

the students in cadet uniform parading through

taken on 17 October, 1874 (but certainly in

the streets of Wellington.

1874), appears in Frank Leckie’s book, The Early

Photo courtesy Auckland Libraries Heritage Images.

of the College from 1876 and he names most of

Work at the Archives and the Museum have

the students.

been another busy year with three Old Boys’

History of Wellington College. He was a student

reunions, Classes of 68, 78 and 88, recorded Richard Kirby

In the photo in the next column, the student

elsewhere in the magazine. Also, numerous

standing fourth from the left with a white hat

family history enquiries and visits from a

is William Fox, a Māori student, possibly the

number of Old Boys among whom included

College’s first. William Fox (Ngatau Omahuru)

Michael Stace, Class of 1961 [pictured above

has a remarkable story having been kidnapped

left]. Michael visited us in July to further

as a six-year-old during the 1868 battle at Te

his study of his great great grandfather

Ngutu o te Manu, the Beak of the Bird, in South

William Smith Hamilton who was Wellington

Taranaki. He was ‘adopted’ by Sir William Fox,

College’s first Headmaster 1867-1868, with co

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


33

eum and Archives News Headmaster Rev H E Tuckey, when the school

In June, we received a visit from Adrienne

was in Woodward Street

Hewitt whose grandfather, Arthur Vincent Hewitt (1899-1901) was a friend of Foster

Richard Kirby (Class of 1949) [pictured below

Brooke Crouch, (Old Boy 1898). For the last

left]. and his wife, Jan, visited in May and he was

98 years, the College has awarded the Foster

interested in information and photos about his

Brooke Crouch Prize for Junior Literature. Foster

time at the College for a family history that he

was a Lieutenant with the Duke of Cornwall’s

was putting together. Richard was very involved

Light Infantry and was killed in action on 23

in gymnastics during his time at College and

March, 1918 in France. He is remembered with

won the Thomson Gymnastics Trophy in 1947

honour at the Arras Memorial.

and 1948. Gymnastics was a significant sport at the College for many decades but the Trophy appears to have been last presented in 1965. Phil Thomson was a Phys Ed teacher at the College for many years. November marked 100 years since the end of WWI. During this year, we have worked on many stories relating to Old Boys and staff who served during this war and assisted the Library staff in preparing a display of memorabilia relating to Wellington College and WWI.

Adrienne has presented the College with In February, we assisted with the display for the

Foster’s medals and her research on Foster

Ministry of Heritage and Culture and the launch

which are now displayed [as per above image]

of their WWI History Resource for schools

in the College Archives. Adrienne’s father,

attended by the Prime Minister and a group of

Geoffrey Foster Hewitt (named after Foster

Wellington College students.

Crouch) was also an Old Boy, (1931-1936). During May, we were in email contact with Rosemary Cornish whose father Norman Matheson was an Old Boy, 1912-1916. Norman served with the 35th New Zealand Reinforcements and fought at Le Quesnoy which was the last major action of the New Zealanders in November 1918 in the Great War. Rosemary has provided us with a copy of Norman’s diary where he describes his time during the battle for Le Quesnoy.

College students with the Prime Minister study the diary of Old Boy, Hami Grace, who died at Gallipoli

We subsequently discovered that Norman’s

in WWI. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


34

Wellington College Museum and Archives News oldest trophies displayed in the Archives which

Sergeant Turner’s Section, competition winners, Wellington College 1914. Norman Matheson back row second from right.

was won by George Bishop in 1874 Old Boys race, valued then at 25 shillings. Five Bishop brothers attended Wellington College between 1867 and 1877. Only Allan, Andrew and Henry would have attended the College at its present site. George and John were foundation students when the College started in Woodward Street in 1867, moving to Thorndon Flat in 1868 and then to Clifton Terrace in November of that year. George Fyfe Bishop 1867-68 John Clunie Bishop 1867-71 Allan Bishop 1870-75*

father, Major Dugald Matheson, was a College

Andrew Clunie Bishop 1873-77*

Staff member for 12 years from 1902-1913 where he also commanded the school battalion and was in charge of the College’s shooting Influenza Epidemic 1918 • The caption below was reported in the Wellingtonian, December, 1918.

Henry August Bishop 1873-77* * These 3 appear in the 1874 photo at the start of this article.

team often gaining distinction in ‘foreign matches’. Major Matheson was the officer in charge on Somes/Matiu Island in Wellington Harbour where interned Germans were held during WWI.

All brothers were capable athletes and a number represented Wellington in Football (Rugby). The first athletics sports meeting was held on the College grounds in conjunction with the opening ceremonies of the new College on its present site on October 17, 1874. A feature of the College annual athletics was the involvement of Old Boys in the competitions. In 1874, the main school ground was still manuka scrub and swamp so the sports probably took place on the rough flat just in front of the East School

The Bishop Boys and Wellington College’s Earliest Trophies: During the year, the old wooden trophy mug shown below was returned to the College. This mug was won by Andrew Clunie Bishop in 1882, winner of the 220 yds Old Boys’ race held during the school sports that year. This mug is similar to one of the College’s

Another early cup, shown bottom right is the Champion Cup first won by Edward Epsy Martin (1870 – 1876) in 1875. When he died in 1932, he left £500 to the Board of Governors to fund a scholarship. The Edward Epsy Martin prize for First in Y11 Science is still awarded today. With the opening of the new Memorial Hall we have arranged a photographic display showing a time-line of the buildings where students would have assembled since 1867. These are displayed in the entrance to the new building.

Mike Pallin, College Archivist Tel: 04 382 9411 Email: m.pallin@wc.school.nz The Museum and Archives are open on most Mondays and Wednesdays 9.00am- 2.00pm or at other times by arrangement. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


35

Old Boys IN THE NEWS

Let the fun beGIN with the Reid Brothers WHEN REID+REID CO-FOUNDERS, brothers

Reid Brothers Distilling is

Chris [Class of 2007] and Stew Reid [Class

located on the Reid family

of 2004] took a trip through Scotland in

vineyard in Martinborough. Chris’

2013, they were somewhat enthralled by

winemaking background, Stew tells us,

the thriving craft distilling market. This

played a huge part in shaping the flavour

appreciation turned into a business idea a

of Reid+Reid Gin: The concept of a product

few drams later (as is so often the case with

with a ‘sense of place’ is ingrained in his

budding ginsmiths), when the duo decided

outlook, and we’ve sought to apply this in

it was time to take some of that buzz back

creating a uniquely Kiwi gin. We felt we

to New Zealand.

could offer the world something different by releasing a gin that not only uses, but

Of course – up in Scotland they were

highlights, native New Zealand botanicals.

supping on whisky, but gin stood out to them as something that could excite

The very first batch of Reid+Reid was released

their fellow Kiwis. What we love about

in late 2015 and the brothers currently

gin is its versatility: as far as spirits go, gin

produce over 10,000 bottles per year with

can lend itself to a wide range of styles,

over 60% of their production being exported

and it manages a good balance between

to the United Kingdom, Australia and Japan.

traditional and modern. This gives rise to

The gin is available at a good number of

plenty of opportunity to experiment, which

Wellington and nation-wide bars and bottle

we find exciting, Stew explained. And we’re

stores and feedback from fellow Old Boys

both big gin drinkers, so we knew we’d have

have voted Reid+Reid Gin as their favourite.

at least two customers. The next milestone for the Reid+Reid The idea didn’t come to much of anything

Gin is to expand their profile in the UK

until Chris returned to New Zealand in 2014,

and Australia. Stew is currently based

wherein he began working on distillery

in Melbourne, which should help open

premises. While this was happening – and

some doors there, while in the UK with

from opposite sides of the world, the

its seemingly unquenchable thirst for

brothers began to work on the recipe for

gin – especially those that are a little

Reid+Reid Gin, exchanging and trialling

unusual, there will be many who would

recipes created on small home stills.

welcome their arrival.

With their backgrounds in

So, when life gives you lemons -

engineering and winemaking,

make a gin and tonic. Visit their

Stew and Chris set up Reid+Reid to

website for more information: www.

challenge the perception of a ‘classic’

reidbrothersdistilling.com/the-

gin and promote New Zealand's

brothers.

unique natural flora. The result: Reid+Reid, New Zealand native gin.

Above: The Reid Brothers; Chris at the rear and Stew in front.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


36

Old Boys IN THE NEWS

AS MENTIONED EARLIER IN THIS MAGAZINE,

native and exotic trees, shrubs and perennials,

the school is indebted to Simon Dearsly (Class

selling direct to the public, and to landscapers,

of 1981) and his family for their generous

property developers and local councils.

donation of a selection of native plants that they gave to beautify the gardens surrounding the

The plants are used mostly in residential,

new Alan Gibbs Centre. The selection of plants

commercial and amenity plantings, as well as

that Simon donated were coordinated into the

in riparian and vegetation programmes. The

idea of having the College’s colours featured in

maritime climate, typical of Wellington, means

the gardens.

that their plants are well hardened off at time of sale.

Simon established the family-owned nursery in 1995 on his parent’s Pauatahanui property after returning from overseas. It is now Wellington’s largest production wholesale/retail nursery,

Open Daily - 9.00am to 5.00pm 169 Paekakariki Hill Road, R D 1, Porirua (1.5kms north of the Pauatahanui Village)

covering over five acres.

www.leacroft.co.nz Tel: (04) 237 988 • Email: sales@leacroft.co.nz

At Leacroft, they grow over 600 varieties of OUR HEALTH AND PE DEPARTMENT welcomed David Howman CNZM, (Class of 1966), prominent barrister, former Director General of WADA and the current head of the IAAF International Integrity Unit, for a talk on the issues associated with integrity and corruption in sport.

acknowledgement that corruption of sport is happening right on our doorsteps. Jaws dropped when it was acknowledged that because of live streaming of youth sport, international organised crime had the capacity to influence outcomes of games, and moments within games.

The audience of staff and students were given direct insight into the complicated and at times corrupted world of international sport. To put things in perspective, David is firmly of the belief that 25% of all international sport is severely tainted with some degree of corruption, and that this corruption is always based upon money.

While the students will have taken so much from this talk, the key message to all members of our community is that integrity is key for all people to lead a life of character. What we want to be instilling in our young men is a sense that doing the little things right, even when no-one is watching, is so important in terms of their development as functioning, ethical members of our society.

The audience was given first hand knowledge of major international corruption cases including the Russian state sponsored doping scandal, Lance Armstrong’s abuse of power and Pakistani cricket spot-fixing.

Our thanks again to David for his willingness to give of his time, energy and insight in order to enlighten and engage our students. His openness to give of himself now and in the future is so deeply appreciated.

However, what captured the attention of most was the

DAVID COURNANE, Head of Health and PE

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


37

Old Boys IN THE NEWS

We were delighted to host Cameron Stephen (above left) CAREERS WEEK at the College this year included a presentation by three Old Boys who returned to share

from Robert Gordon’s College in Aberdeen, Scotland at Wellington College. He is the 2018 ŌTAKI SCHOLAR who

noteworthy insights of their personal career journeys.

is retracing the NZ steps of the original Ōtaki Scholar in

We were delighted to welcome (above L-R), Will Barber

Prefect, Harry Crawford for morning tea.

(Class of 2012), Paul Ballentyne (Class of 1991) and Sam

1937. Robert joined Gregor Fountain and Deputy Head

O’Leary (Class of 2005).

At the same time of Robert’s visit, an exhibition was

Will spoke on his passion for design which has led him

photographs from the visit to Wellington College in

held at Otaki Museum. Part of the exhibition included

to work as a graphic designer for Garage Project, Paul is a director of his own company; Moana Road and Sam is

1952 by the 1952 scholar, Robin MacLachlan.

a Constable with the NZ Police.

Subsequent to Robin’s visit and to promote better

If you have a story to share on your career path that

and Aberdeen schools, the Wellington Education Board

understanding and relationships between Wellington

could benefit our current students, please contact Anna Sims in our Careers’ Department - a.sims@wc.school.nz

launched a fundraising appeal for food parcels for Aberdeen pensioners. Twenty-seven primary schools in the Wellington District raised £200 for 240 food parcels and they were sent on the Rangitata with Robin on his return home. The following year, the 1953 Otaki Scholar

MARK GRANTHAM QSM (Class of

David Mackay visited Wellington schools and thanked

1994) has been a familiar sight

the school children on behalf of the pensioners.

to Newmarket shoppers in Auckland for more than 20

Robin went on to

years, selling chocolate bars

train as a Doctor and

for World Vision from his

he returned to New

wheelchair. He has sold over

Zealand to practice

50,000 bars and raised over $40,000

as a GP in Wanganui.

for his five sponsored children in India

Robin still attends all

and Tanzania. He is incredibly passionate about

Otaki Scholar events

supporting these kids.

in New Zealand.

Mark suffers from cerebral palsy and recently, was diagnosed with bowel cancer. He is currently undergoing surgery and chemotherapy. Wellington College students voted to support Mark through this time by covering the cost of two of Mark’s child sponsorships. These kids are extremely important to Mark, but as he recovers he was unable to raise the money needed to support them. Our students raised $1,300 in record time through the World Vision site.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

LEFT: 1952 Otaki Scholar, Robin MacLachlan (right) with Wellington College Head Prefect, Peter Jones at Wellington College.


38

Old Boys IN THE NEWS WHILE FOUAD MAJOR (Class of 1946) left Wellington College some 72 years ago and now resides in the State of Maryland in the USA, he continues to remain a constant supporter of the College and keeps in regular contact with the Old Boys Office. I was intrigued to hear of his story, which he has kindly shared with fellow Old Boys. My family belongs to the Majais clan from the mountain village of Shweir, in what is now called the Republic of Lebanon. At the time of my birth in 1929, in the Lebanese village of Kfar Habou, Mount Lebanon was part of Syria, which was administered by France under a League of Nations mandate. My father, George Majais, excelled academically and his fluency in the English language was to play a vital role in the family’s ability to emigrate to New Zealand as the signs of immanent war became real. My aunt had emigrated to New Zealand back in the first decade of the 19th century and it was therefore decided that we should join her in New Zealand. So a passage was booked on the P&O Liner the Strathnaver to Wellington by way of Suez. I was eight years old at the time. The family moved in with my aunt in Wellington in a house on the side of Tinakori Hill. My brother Alfred (RIP) and I attended Thorndon School where we were initially placed in the primers. We knew only a few words of English, in spite of my father’s best efforts to teach us the language. Thanks to the encouragement of the Headmaster Mr Melody, and the kindly Mr Downey, my brother and I finished school in our own age group. I was ‘Proxime Accessit’ of the school in 1941. I entered Form 3 at Wellington College in 1942 at a time of great world upheaval as Germany and Italy had without provocation unleashed the destructive power of modern warfare in 1939. The younger male teaching staff members at Wellington College had mostly ‘joined up’ and their places were taken up by retired teachers and (mostly) young women, to the delight of third formers. I had done well at Thorndon and was accepted into Form 3A. I was not aware of having to pay any fees so presumably I was on some sort of scholarship. I remember that our third form classes were held in the neighbouring girls’ college since the army had occupied some of our College buildings. I have fond memories of the staff, particularly ‘Jimmy’ Hall, who memorably caught me talking in class, which earned me several strokes with a belt on my hand much to the amusement of the rest of the class. I also fondly remember ‘Gary’ Lomas, the mathematics teacher and and Mr MacAloon, the modern languages teacher and Mr Beard the English teacher, who sadly passed away. I remember the weekly cadet parades with Mr Hogben occasionally appearing on horseback, and some cadet invariably passing out. The LAMPSTAND | 2018

Three years later I passed School Certificate in several subjects, including Latin! I then earned the Higher Leaving Certificate and matriculated at Victoria which was then a constituent college of the University of NZ. I graduated with a BSc then a MSc (Hons) in 1952. I then joined George Page’s Lab. at the Dominion Physical Laboratory in Lower Hutt, while working at night on an MSc project at Victoria, My MSc thesis topic was A Sequence control Unit for a Wilson Cloud Chamber. It was to be a digital clock using vacuum tubes (triodes). This was approximately forty years before the ‘digital revolution’. About this time I felt I needed a change. I applied for a three-year teaching job at the American University of Beirut. My father had returned to Lebanon to be with his ailing brother. I met my future wife in Beirut where she taught Art at the American Community School. From Beirut, I applied for graduate study for a PhD at the University of Washington in Seattle, in my wife’s home state. It happened that the university had just hired an eccentric but brilliant German Professor by the name Hans Dehmelt, who would later share the Nobel Prize in Physics. I did an experimental thesis to demonstrate magnetic resonance in helium ions suspended in vacuum. Upon graduating with a PhD, I assumed an instructorship at Yale University in Connecticut. After two years, I accepted a visiting professorship at Professor Paul’s Physical Institute in Bonn, Germany. Professor Paul’s group had invented the RF quadrupole mass filter and the ‘ion cage’ which I had used to confine helium 3 isotope ions to observe their microwave spectrum. The group worked on the precise g-factor of free electrons. After two years in Germany, I took up a position at The Goddard Spaceflight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland. I set up the experiment to observe the microwave hyperfine transition in mercury ions (199 isotope), which is today the reference for the most accurate atomic clock. At the end of the Apollo programme, there was a general ‘RIF’ (reduction in force) at NASA and I decided to accept a professorship in physics at Kuwait University. At the end of my contract in Kuwait, I found time to write books, The one I am most proud of, among others, is Quantum Beat (second edition), which treats the workings of atomic clocks. The last book I have written deals with the history and evolution of modern Navigation, called Quo Vadis and is about the evolution of modern. navigational techniques.


39

Old Boys IN THE NEWS A TAURANGA NAVAL RESERVIST'S CHILDHOOD DREAM of exploring Antarctica has led to the winner's podium in a national technology competition. Lieutenant John Ahearn (Class of 1977), a GPS technology expert and founder of GPS Control Systems Ltd, was the grand final winner in the NZ Space Challenge in May, receiving $40,000, six months of desk space at a local business incubator, and mentoring access. John and his team tackled the problem of transporting large-scale science projects across

John in front of Mount Erebus, Antarctica

the Antarctic ice shelf. They designed a satellite navigation and self-steering system to help heavy tracked vehicles detect and avoid perilous ice shelf crevasses. John had a particular route in mind - the hot water drilling site 350km out from Scott Base, on the Ross Ice shelf. Hot water is used to create bore holes to collect water samples deep in the ice and sediment. However, the journey to the site could be fraught. The constraint is ice shelf crevasses. The ice shelf is moving constantly, up to three metres a day. You get shear zones, and that’s where the danger is. Crevasses open up randomly and are often covered by snow, you can’t see them. John said, Other benefits were minimising crew stress and fatigue and getting equipment where it needs to be, safely and on time. A convoy travelling on the ice is more desirable than travelling by air because heavy tracked vehicles can drag many more tonnes of equipment than a plane can carry, and can travel in almost any weather. Fuel usage is significantly reduced and there is less environmental impact. GPS Control Systems beat other applicants from Northland, Auckland and the Bay of Plenty to emerge as one of the five NZ Space Challenge regional finalists. John said he may have had a competitive advantage over other teams as he recently visited the Antarctic on a field trip as part of a Post Graduate Certificate in Antarctic studies at Canterbury University. It helped ground him in the requirements of the Antarctic Treaty - what

you could do, and what you couldn’t. He had also seen that equipment and vehicles needed to be very simple in Antarctica, and easy to repair. Whatever you propose, it has to be easily implemented. You had to approach it from a very simplistic basis. You need something that works now, not what might work in the future. John hopes his win will result in the opportunity to return to Antarctica with his workmates to install the technology. Having been down there. I like to think it was my creative and innovative mind at work but maybe it was just very good luck, he says.

John joined the Naval Reserves and HMNZS NGAPONA (Tauranga branch) as a specialist officer six years ago, after meeting a recruiter on a plane. The recruiter thought the Navy could gain value from a person with his skills. John has since trained in the Maritime Trade Operations branch, a requirement of Naval Reserves. I’ve had a great time, he says. I’ve done a lot of hard work,

a lot of courses. It’s been a wonderful experience. We’re a small unit and we get out and we do a lot. His father was a Naval Reservist in the Fleet Air Arm during WWII.

As well as real-life experience in the Antarctic, John says he’s been a fan of the icy continent for a very long time. My interest in the Antarctic comes from reading the stories of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration when I was about 8-years-old. The journeys of Scott, Amundsen, Shackleton and others were absolutely amazing. Not only did they explore but they did science on the way. Navy Today

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


40

Old Boys IN THE NEWS STAPLE 175 Victoria Street Te Aro, Wellington https://m.facebook.com/ Staple175/

Q: What do you call two octopuses that look the same? A: Itenticle.

This is just one of the many dad jokes barista Nik O’Connell (Class of 1998) has inflicted on his loyal customers recently by way of the nowlegendary sandwich board outside his Victoria Street coffee shop, Staple. He’s the first to admit the jokes are terrible – but that’s kind of the point. When he launched Staple 14 months ago with co-owner Rewi McIntyre, he didn’t give the board too much thought. Then this lady came in and said, ‘Every morning, I come into work and I read your signs and they make me smile.’ After that, I thought, ‘All right, if that’s the impact it’s having, I’m going to do something every day.’ If I can put a smile on someone’s face, I’m happy.

coffee for a long time, and I learnt a lot from him. One thing he told me that has stuck with me to this day is, ‘Less is more.’ I’ve used that philosophy in everything I’ve done. Indeed, the interior of Staple is purposely

stripped back, with all-white walls and all-black joinery and furniture. That’s partly an aesthetic

That focus on customer experience is one reason Nik has been nominated for the prestigious Outstanding Barista title in this

thing (I don’t really like colour, eh, Nik observes), but it’s also a conscious effort to keep the focus where it should be: on the coffee.

year’s Felix Wellington Hospitality Awards. He doesn’t expect to hear his name called out at

Because, yes, the coffee is outstandingly good.

the ceremony but he’s pleased to be recognised.

The less is more approach applies here, too –

Well, mostly pleased.I’m shy about it because I

Nik tries not to keep too many sugary syrups

don’t like anyone making a fuss over me, but it’s

in the shop, and he doesn’t go crazy with

cool.

experimental equipment or techniques. For the most part, he takes his roasters’ advice on the

Nik fell into the coffee game by accident. He

best way to treat each variety, and he tastes his

grew up in Wellington but chose Hamilton for

coffee throughout the day to make sure it’s as

university, because his girlfriend at the time

good as it can be. Simple. He’s also blessed with

was studying there. Keen to get part-time work

a good memory, which comes in handy with

during his communications degree, he walked

the regulars.

into a café that he quite liked the look of. I didn’t really want to make coffee, he admits. But I thought, ‘Well, I may as well learn as much as I can in the short time I’m here.’ I was really fortunate to meet this guy who’d been making

I do remember what people have quite often. I probably won’t remember their names, but I’ll remember their faces, and if I see them out, I’ll say Hi to them. ‘Hey, flat white two sugars, I can’t believe you’re here!’ Stuff

LETTER FROM DARWIN: Peter Stewart (Class

- only to be knocked down by a passing car

of 1949) has asked to share a story about his

climbing off the rear of a truck bringing rehab

brother Paul (Class of 1950/Firth House) by way

personnel into Darwin and severely injured. Paul

of a letter that Paul wrote to his family. The

was flown to Sydney hospital, but unfortunately

letter was written when Paul was living and

after three months on life support, he passed

working in Darwin over the Christmas period

away at the end of March 1975.

of 1974/75 when Cyclone Tracey struck the northern territories of Australia. He was house-

Paul’s letter in full can be read in full on our

sitting for friends when the cyclone struck, but

website: www.wellington-college.school.nz/

managed to survive the ordeal and stayed in the

wcoba/wcoba-news-publications

area to help with clean up and rehabilitation The LAMPSTAND | 2018


41

Old Boys IN THE NEWS TIM BROWN, FROM ALL WHITES FOOTBALLER TO CAPTAIN OF $2 BILLION COMPANY Leonardo DiCaprio may be an investor in $2 billion woollen shoe company Allbirds, but he isn't on first-name terms yet with the company's New Zealand co-founder. Tim Brown (Class of 1998), the former All Whites captain who is now co-chief executive of San Francisco-based Allbirds, says DiCaprio stumbled across the company himself. I wouldn't say he's a friend, that might be overplaying it, says Tim, laughing. He's one of the pre-eminent environmental spokespeople and he found the brand rather organically ... through one of his cousins, randomly enough, and he has become an investor and backed us, which has been pretty neat.

known, it hasn't gone unnoticed. The star made his backing public knowledge when he told his 18.9 million Twitter followers. [DiCaprio] is selective in the companies he backs so it was pretty cool to be able to get that across the line, Tim says. Hopefully, we can continue to use him to help tell [our] story. At $2b, Allbirds' value has been assessed at twice that of space powerhouse Rocket Lab and way more than merino clothing company Icebreaker, which was valued at $288m when it sold in April. That valuation follows Allbirds' announcement last month that it had raised US$50m ($72.5m), a price which would value the entire company at US$1.4b ($2.03b). The full NZ Herald interview with Tim can be found on our website: www.wellington-college.school.

Though the size of DiCaprio's investment isn't

nz/wcoba/wcoba-news-publications

BEING PREPARED TO FAIL AT SUPER LEVEL

on this year, which sounds easier said than

HAS MADE JAMES BLACKWELL THE PRIDE OF

done. In practice, it means potentially falling flat

THE LIONS

on your face for a while.

It takes a big man to be vulnerable. A smart one too. At 1.90-metres tall, Hurricanes and

When James first became a Hurricane, in 2017,

Wellington lock James Blackwell (Class of

he assumed everything that team-mates such

2012/2013) isn't the biggest bloke in the physical

as Beauden Barrett touched, turned to gold. In

sense. But the size of his heart and depth of

time, he realised the best players have just as

his contribution to both teams are harder to

many things to work on as he does.

measure. As for intelligence, there's few more impressive and articulate players around. Where it all leads remains to be seen. At 23, James has served a good apprenticeship. Three years in the Wellington College 1st XV, the last as Captain, were followed by a stint in the NZ U20s, before Mitre 10 Cup and Super Rugby contracts. He's much admired within both professional outfits, receiving the Hurricanes' Hunters Award for 2018, which goes to someone who rarely plays but whose attitude, attention to detail and ability to prepare the top 23 each week are

Their ability, first, to recognise what they need to develop, even if it's by watching themselves or getting advice from their coaches, that's the first step. That's something quite a lot of people have already, in that they have that bit of selfawareness and they know they can get advice from coaches. The difference, I've learned, is their mindset and going and applying it relentlessly. It's not something they do once and think it's sorted. They address it constantly every day and that's how they can actually develop what they're doing and see the results, says James. Stuff

deemed to be exemplary. James then backed that up by being named Wellington's player of the year at the end of the season. He'd now like to kick on and become a very good Hurricane. If he doesn't it won't be because he hasn't worked hard at his deficiencies. Becoming more explosive with, and without the ball, has been his main work-

NB: The Wellington Development Team Player of the Year was Luke Tau’alupe (Class of 2013). The Al Keown Memorial Cup for the best performing player in the 2018 Wellington Rugby Academy was awarded to Naitoa Ah Kuoi (Class of 2017) and Northern United’s Matt Poutoa (Class of 2000) was named coach of the year.

A ‘shout out’ to Jeff To'omaga-Allen (Class of 2008) who in July, became the 15th man to play 100 games for the Hurricanes. He was the second prop, after Neemia Tialata (Class of 2000), with hookers Andrew Hore and Dane Coles (Class of 2004) the other frontrowers to reach the mark.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


42

Old Boys IN THE NEWS COLD PLUNGE FOR A HEARTY CAUSE The HeartKids heart-stopper challenge in Midland Park Wellington raised funds for kids with heart trouble. James (Jimmy) Lawler's (Class of 2008) blood runs red. Canterbury red, that is. He's mad about sport, and coaches junior cricket as well as rugby at Wellington College. He'd watch grass grow in Canterbury if you told him it was a sport, his mum Emma Lawler said.

Her son was only ever expected to live a year. His first surgery was at just five days old. Jimmy was born with a heart defect known as 'tetralogy of fallot.' He also lives with pulmonary atresia and stenoses. Basically, his mum says, his heart couldn't oxygenate his blood. She says she and husband Lance had ten ‘treasured’ hours of ignorance about James' condition, ten hours of what felt like a normal beginning to parenthood

(L-R): Emma Lawler, James Lawler and Jacq McNeill. Jacq, a former 'heart kid' herself, was James' first one-on-one preschool teacher.

In October, Jimmy shared an icy bath with Mayor Justin Lester to help raise money for HeartKids, a charity that supports 'heart families' as they navigate the challenges of living with a heart defect. A crowd of 100 shivered in sympathy as twelve groups took the plunge into the eight-degrees Celsius water - the temperature a child's heart is cooled to during

‘before all hell broke loose’.

open-heart surgery. Each bath was limited

We were told that there'd never be a time when

$23,128 for Heart Kids by the end of the day.

he didn't have open-heart surgery ahead of him. To his credit, he walks everywhere, he keeps up his exercise and somehow, his heart and lungs have almost reinvented themselves. We were told about 10 years ago that his heart functions

to 360 seconds. Together, the groups raised

Jimmy is so ensconced with rugby at Wellington College that a trophy is named in his honour ‘The Jimmy Lawler Trophy’ is played at the end of the season in a fixture with Palmerston North

normally and his doctors believe he may never

Boys’ High School with the non-travelling teams,

need more open heart surgery, Emma said.

the U55s coached by Jimmy of course. Stuff

IT’S NOT OFTEN THAT AN ALL BLACKS

Selected for his debut against South Africa, he

INTERNATIONAL BECOMES AVAILABLE,

again delivered a striking display – scoring 12

ESPECIALLY NOT IN THE FORM OF A FLY-HALF

points in the 27-20 win against South Africa.

OF LIMA SOPOAGA’S (Class of 2008) STATURE. Despite not being selected for the 2015 World The 27-year-old, who has 18 New Zealand caps

Cup winning side, Lima became a mainstay

and 61 international points to his name, made

internationally following Dan Carters retirement

his way to Wasps [England] this summer from

– sharing fly-half duties with Beauden Barrett.

Super Rugby side Highlanders. But with first-team opportunities restricted And after the departure of Danny Cipriani to

Lima announced his decision to move to the

Gloucester Rugby in the summer, the Kiwi will

Gallagher Premiership Rugby in January.

look to fill the England international’s boots at the Ricoh Arena.

Upon making the move, Lima said: It was

Hailed as a major coup by Wasps when the Wellington-born back’s signing was announced

one of the hardest decisions I’ve ever had to make but it’s one I’m at peace with it.

in January – fans can finally see their man in

Delighted with the transfer, Wasps director

action on the opening day of the season against

of rugby Dai Young added: When a world-class

Worcester Warriors.

fly-half became available we jumped at the chance, as that doesn’t happen very often. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


43

Old Boys IN THE NEWS WORLD-LEADING ELECTRICAL ENGINEER

Canterbury in 1975 and in 1981 gained his PhD

WINS UC RESEARCH MEDAL

in Electrical Engineering, also at UC.

Ground-breaking Engineering Professor Rick Millane (Class of 1971) was announced as

He worked at Purdue University in the United

the recipient of the University of Canterbury's

States for 20 years where he did foundation

Research Medal 2018, one of the highest awards

work in x-ray fibre diffraction analysis and

the University’s Council can bestow.

phase retrieval – work which was supported by the US National Science Foundation. On

Professor Millane, of UC’s Department of

returning to UC, he built on this work and has

Electrical and Computer Engineering, is an

been awarded three Marsden Grants and a

international leader in the development of

James Cook Research Fellowship. Last year, he

methods for macromolecular imaging for

was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society

structural biology. Over the past three decades,

Te Apārangi. Also last year he was awarded,

he has been instrumental in developing

together with three international colleagues,

new theory and computational algorithms

a three-year grant from the Human Frontier

for imaging the structures of biological

Science Program.

macromolecules using x-ray diffraction. His work has had particular impact in the

Professor Millane was awarded the Royal

application of new x-ray free-electron lasers to

Society of New Zealand T.K. Sidey Medal in 2016

study the structures of biological molecules.

for his wide ranging and fundamental work in

His methods are used by structural biologists to

x-ray diffraction imaging, diffraction theory, and

help understand disease processes and for drug

optical diffusion imaging, and their application

design. His recent work contributes towards our

in biology and medicine. (The T.K. Sidey Medal

understanding the structures of amyloids, mis-

is awarded once every three years, its first

folded protein aggregates that are implicated in

recipient being Nobel Prize-winner Ernest

neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s

Rutherford, UC’s most distinguished alumnus.)

and Parkinson’s.

Professor Millane is a Fellow of the Optical Society, the International Society for Optics and

Professor Millane is an internationally acclaimed researcher whose work has wide impact, and of whom the University can be proud, as both an academic and a graduate of

Photonics, and Engineering New Zealand. At UC, Professor Millane directs a highly regarded research group in computational

UC. He is a fitting recipient of the University of

imaging, and has directed 21 PhD students

Wood says.

have gone on to a wide variety of positions of

Canterbury Research Medal, UC Chancellor, Dr

and 12 postdoctoral fellows, many of whom responsibility as researchers and managers, with

After finishing near the top of his class while at

key positions in universities, companies and

Wellington College, Rick went on to earn his BE

federal research laboratories in North America,

(Electrical) (First Class Hons) at the University of

Europe, Asia and Australasia. Scoop

WASPS’ KIWI CONTINGENT increased to four

Shields, Ambrose launched his professional

with the signing of Ambrose Curtis (Class of

career with Wellington Lions, during which time

2009) who joins the Club for the 2018/19 season

he was also selected for his country at U20 level.

from Mitre 10 Cup Club Manawatu. In 2015, Ambrose left Wellington for the Ambrose arrived in England with an

Palmerston North home of Manawatu since

impressive rugby CV which includes a spell

when he has scored a number of eye-catching

on the international sevens circuit with New

tries.

Zealand. The 6ft-4 powerhouse, has also been capped by Like his Wellington College schoolmates and

the historic Māori All Blacks, is also a more than

new Wasps teammates Lima Sopoaga and Brad

capable performer at full back.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


44

Old Boys IN THE NEWS TWO FORMER WELLINGTON secondary school students were members of the winning team

made the whole experience better.

in a prestigious national American university

Kiranpal was appreciative of the support his

tennis tournament this month.

parents have given him growing up and playing

Kiranpal Pannu, (Class of 2014) 21, and Zach Whaanga, also 21, formerly of Paraparaumu College, played for Columbus State University,

tennis. It’s not a cheap sport, and it’s not overly huge in New Zealand so you’ve got to travel a lot. Definitely time, money, emotion. He said their support had got him to where he was,

Georgia, which won its first NCAA Division II

including paying for and accompanying him

Tennis Championship in May.

to training with elite coach Rakesh Rai in New Plymouth for six months as a 13-year-old and in

Kiranpal was the last to finish his singles match

training programmes and tournaments at the

with the teams locked at 4/4 against top ranked,

Renouf Centre.

private, Barry University of Florida. He won the match with a cross-court winner for a score of

Kiranpal has continued to have a successful

6-7 (7-2), 6-2, 6-1 in front of all of his teammates,

season, playing in matches around the states.

who joined his parents, Jane and Utam Pannu,

He won the won the BB&T Atlanta Open

to watch the last minutes of his match.

Wildcard Playoffs in July but fell in a hard fought match to Thanasi Kokkinakis of Australia.

He said, to do it in front of mum and dad was special, to say the least. Having been in that moment, and achieving that is what our goal has been for two years. To have your family come all the way across the world to watch the tournament, and winning it all, and clinching it

Kiranpal also made the Columbus State University Dean’s List for 2018 which recognises students who excelled in the classroom by earning a 3.60 (GPA) (on a 4.00 scale) in at least twelve semester credit hours). He majored in

in front of them. It was motivation, but really, it

General Business.

AT THE BASKETBALL NZ AWARDS, John

During the mid-70s, John became involved with

Grocott (Class of 1955) was recognised for the

Basketball New Zealand when the office was

long service outstanding achievement award.

based in Christchurch. In 1980 he was elected onto the Executive and remained in that role for

John has given 50 years of service to Basketball.

ten years.

He began playing at Wellington College in the mid 1950s before he moved to attend

John was also involved with the National

Canterbury University.

Coaches Association as well as the National Referees Association, which were both located

He started playing at Canterbury Basketball in

in Christchurch. In the late 90s, John was

1956 and took up the role of Club Treasurer in

the Auditor of Basketball New Zealand and

the early 60s. During that period, he was elected

is currently the auditor of the New Zealand

to the Committee of the Canterbury Men’s

Basketball Foundation.

Basketball Association. John was President in 1970 when the mens and womens associations

In 1993, John was honoured with the Sir

combined to form the Canterbury Basketball

Lance Cross Memorial Award. He was made

Association.

a Life Member of the Canterbury Basketball Association in 1999 as well as the now

In 1967, John attained his National Refereeing

disestablished Canterbury Officials Association.

badge and refereed in local Christchurch

He was also made a Life Member of Basketball

competitions for the next 40 years. From 1970

New Zealand in 2007.

through until 1980, he organised the Canterbury Secondary Schools Friday night competition.

At the same evening, Justin Toebes was

The competition grew from 24 teams in 1970 to

inducted into the Hall of Fame for his

just over 100 teams in 1980.

contribution to Basketball. Justin’s obituary is included at the end of this magazine.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


45

Old Boys IN THE NEWS

FRED BROOKER'S MILESTONE MOMENT

Fred keeps active interacting with his son,

It was a special day for Fred Brooker (Class of

reading, doing tapestry, Tai Chi, wrestling with

1935) in July, one that not many people will get

cryptic crosswords and meeting people.

to. The Waikanae Lodge resident celebrated his 100th birthday among family, friends and staff with a roast lunch, cake, speeches and even a bagpipe performance. It was a special time for Fred who said the celebration was a marvellous way to celebrate his 100 years. Born in 1918 on July 13, Fred grew up in Wellington, attended Wellington College and Victoria University, gaining his masters and training as a primary school teacher.

I think one of the sad things about our lives is that they're becoming less personal. Computers and cell phones are taking over and I don't think that kids are interacting enough and learning social skills. When I was teaching in primary schools I loved making my class like a big family and interacting in that way. It's a shame because social interaction is very important and it's becoming less and less. Fred told a story of doing his shopping the

With WWII raging, he enlisted in the Air Force

day before his 100th birthday. He went to the

and trained as a navigator in Canada and the

supermarket, library, bank and a coffee shop

United Kingdom before being posted to a

and at all the places people recognised him

Beaufighter squadron in the Far East. He was in

and knew that it was his 100th birthday the

Burma when the war ended.

next day. I like to go to the supermarket and

Fred then returned to New Zealand after three years away and began teaching in Wellington schools. He spent time overseas holding teaching and education positions in Rarotonga, Borneo and Western Samoa bringing education to schools in remote areas. Speaking at the birthday celebration Fred's

talk to the checkout girl, same with the bank. I like to get my money from the teller rather than pressing buttons. Word gets around somehow. All these people were so nice to me — there are some very nice people around if you would only get to know them.

main message to everyone was to remain active.

This is the social interaction Fred was talking

Sometimes people ask me what the great

about. I've had a rough life in many ways, lots

secret to living to be 100 is. I say, I don't think

of ups and downs but I can't say it hasn't been

there's any great secret but some things do

interesting.

contribute. You've got to keep yourself active —

Kapiti News

mentally, physically and socially. The LAMPSTAND | 2018


46

Old Boys IN THE NEWS AT THE ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE

toured the major work Tiki Taane Mahuta. He

WELLINGTONIAN Awards Ceremony in June, 13

is also dedicated to keeping Wellington as the

recipients were presented with their certificates

centre of creativity in New Zealand.

by Mayor Justin Lester. Congratulations to Old Boy recipient, Tānemahuta Gray (Class of 1992)

Also recognised at the same event was recently

who has made an enduring contribution to

retired Headmaster, Roger Moses. Under

performing arts in Wellington since starting

his leadership, Wellington College built a

ballet as a six-year-old and studying the dance

remarkable record in national examinations.

form alongside kapa haka. He is the Kahukura

The school always shone in NCEA and was even

of Taki Rua Productions and has transformed

more impressive in Scholarship, often being the

the once struggling company, which last year

country’s leading school. Scoop

GOING OFF THE RAILS: Wellington railways

from Auckland, they'd go to the dining room.

stalwart Keith Nicoll (Class of 1967) retired after

You got big meals in there. Big cups of tea.

50 years working for the service in Wellington in

We had a great big safe... You wouldn't dream

1966. The words ‘Farewell Keith’ hung across the ticket counter at Porirua Station. The former station master, cashier, ticket seller - the list goes on was just 16 and barely out of Wellington College when he started working in the suburban ticket office at Wellington Railway

of doing it now but at night we would go over to where the ticket office was and we'd have this big Gladstone bag, like a big briefcase, and you'd go and put all the money that they'd taken during the day and walk out the door and around the side and down to the cashier's office.

Station in December, 1966. That was the year of

It wasn't until the 1980s when Keith became

the Wahine's maiden voyage.

Porirua's last station master. After years of living in Aro Valley, Keith had settled into Ascot Park.

Keith’s story began at Wellington Railway Station from the end of the Wahine's when she went down just two years later in 1968. I can remember there were lots of people because of where they brought in the survivors. Next to the ticket office, there was a door, and in there was the dining room. In those days we had a dining room. A hairdresser. A fruit stall. A bookstore. The post office. We were our own

From then it all went downhill, he joked. Aside from a year or so out running a kiosk at Johnsonville Station, Keith built the friendly relationships - the things he'll miss most from the job - with the workers and customers at Porirua Station. Keith doesn't plan to stop selling tickets just

little community, said Keith.

yet. He'll still be a regular looking after the mini

So if people, say, came off the overnight train

Railway at Aotea Lagoon. Stuff

CONGRATULATIONS TO GAVIN ANDREWS

psychiatry; the first National Survey of Mental

(Class of 1944) of Sydney who was announced

Disorders; and a range of online courses for

as Joint winner of this year’s Australian Mental

people with common mental disorders. Gavin

Health Prize - the awards are to recognise the

thinks that the field is poised to offer cures to

major contributions from both professionals

half the people who develop a mental disorder.

and community advocates in mental health

Given good diagnosis and treatment, he says

care.

the person who is not improving in 30 days

charity train run by the Lions Club of Aotea

should “ask their doctor why”. In a 60-year career in mental health Emeritus Professor Gavin Andrews has been an innovator,

Gavin also pioneered online treatment courses,

clinician, teacher and researcher. He is among

called THISWAYUP, for a range of issues

the world’s most highly cited scientists in

including panic, depression, social phobia and

this field. He is responsible for preparing the

generalised anxiety disorder.

first ever set of clinical practice guidelines in The LAMPSTAND | 2018


47

Old Boys IN THE NEWS CHESS CHAMPION: Candidate

devastating form of Australian

Master Stanley Yee (Class of 1975)

Leon Kempen in this year's Major

becomes the New Zealand Major

Open. He finished with 7.5 out of 9,

Open Chess Champion.

without losing a game. He prepared well for each game, won six and was

The 125th New Zealand Chess

never in trouble in the three drawn

Congress was held in Palmerston

games, and had winning chances in

North from 1 - 9 January 2018, and

them all. A masterly performance,

featured the NZ Open and the NZ

said Stanley.

Major Open, with the two tournaments running concurrently. The NZ Open, being the more senior

Stanley was the top New Zealander in the

tournament, had two French Grandmasters,

Major Open, losing just one game (to John

several International Masters and numerous

Packenham), and neatly destroying the hopes

World Chess Federation Masters in a tournament

of Martin Post in round eight, who had been

of 38 players. The NZ Major Open had several

leading the tournament after six rounds, but

Candidate Masters, as the fourth master level, in a

who finished with three losses, to bring him

tournament of 44 players.

down to earth with a thud. Stanley finished with seven out of nine wins but took the title as the

As a participant in, and former winner of

top New Zealander.

the Major Open, I was surprised to see the

WELLINGTON COLLEGE

ART COLLECTION

EXHIBITION A celebration of Creativity and Visual Art

Featuring works from past and present students, Art teachers and for the first time ever, exhibition of the Wellington College Art Collection

OPENING NIGHT

Friday March 8th 2019 6pm-8pm

All welcome, refreshments provided $25 Tickets available for purchase from February 2019

OPEN DAY

Saturday 9th March 2019 10am - 4pm Entry by koha

VENUE - ALAN GIBBS CENTRE Wellington College Campus Dufferin St, Basin Reserve, Wellington

Proudly supported by the Wellington College Parents’ Association Selected artworks and prints will be available for sale

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


48

Old Boys IN THE NEWS IT HAS BEEN A COUPLE OF GOOD SEASONS for rower, Phillip Wilson (Class of 2014). In 2017, he competed as part of the U23 Men's eight that raced at the U23 World Rowing Championships in Bulgaria. On returning to New Zealand and basing DOUBLE HAPPY: Congratulations to two of our former Head Prefects, TP Katene (Class of 2002) and Michael Hobbs (Class of 2005) who in June, graduated (a long way from Wellington, NZ) from the School of Business at Stanford

himself at Karapiro for the summer, Phillip was invited to the Elite World Championship selection trials where he was named in the reserve pair with Joe Wright. The pair raced in the spares races at World Champs in Florida.

University and thus become the Class of 2018.

WELLINGTON ARTIST TAKES HIS ABSTRACT

interested in his style. As it turned out, his art

AESTHETIC TO THE WORLD:

was a hit overseas too.

A spark of inspiration in Scotland led Wellington designer and artist Tim Christie (Class of 1993)

Edinburgh's Castle Fine Art gallery asked

to an exhibition in England.

him to send some art over, as well as a CV and It wasn't long before his art was picked

While mucking around on his laptop a couple

up by the gallery's publishing company

of years ago, the Wellington designer and

partner Washington Green Fine Arts - an arts

artist knew he was on to a winning idea. Two

organisation that has represented Bob Dylan

years on, Tim's work has sold out in Kiwi art

and comic book legend Stan Lee.

exhibitions and been picked up by an overseas gallery. What I've done is combine a very geometric, almost abstract aesthetic to faces and objects - but mainly faces, that has a

As an emerging artist, he was invited to take part in the Summer Exhibition in Manchester. His work will be displayed alongside 19 other

completely unique feel to it.

artists from around the world, with a chance

Tim will be heading over to Manchester to see

People's Choice title. Christie is the only Kiwi

his work displayed alongside artists from around

showing at the exhibition.

to secure a publishing contract, or take out the

the world. He described his MONOMOKO series as a hybrid between design and art, Digital art isn't a conventional art form but there's a

Tim has been a designer for the last 20 years or so and spent the last decade freelancing which,

growing demand.

he said, gave him some time to explore try out

Encouraged by his success at last year's New

redesigning and redeveloping the Invercargill

Zealand Art Show - where his work sold out

brand, working with big New Zealand brands

on opening night, Tim turned his attention

such as the Interislander and Radio New

overseas. His Scottish father-in-law knew a few

Zealand and even creating a fart-themed game

people in galleries and Tim figured he could

with a friend. Stuff

a few different creative paths. That included

at least get in touch, just to see if anyone was We are always looking for news to include in the Lampstand and via social media about our Old Boys. Contributions, feedback and suggestions are always welcome and can be sent to us by post or by email, care of the WCOBA Office.

We appreciate hearing news and success stories as well as memories and feedback - we encourage you to be involved.

The LAMPSTAND | 2018


49

Old Boys IN THE NEWS FRIENDSHIPS FORMED going through Karori

then a day boy. A keen yachtsman from an

School in the 1950s continue today for Jonathan

early age, much of his working life has been

Boyes, Ross Murray and Stuart Slater (all Class of

spent in close association with companies in

1964). The three, along with many other Karori

the boating and yachting sphere. In the 90s,

Boys, went on to Wellington College in 1960.

Ross helped coach Wellington College yachting

They meet up three times a year to celebrate

crews and has taught yachting too many young

their birthdays and to catch up on what’s been

Wellingtonians. An ex Commodore of the

going on with their respective lives.

Paremata Club, Ross now lives up the coast.

After leaving College in 1964, Jonathan went

At the end of his third form, Stuart left

to university to study Law and Liberal Arts.

Wellington College as his father was transferred

After a year he felt the call to a ‘higher law’ and

to Auckland. After leaving Selwyn College in

completed a two-year post graduate course in

Auckland, Stuart was educated at Auckland

Social Science and a two-year course in Theology.

Teachers College, Massey University, Auckland

He was ordained in the Anglican Church and

University and Curtin University (WA).

then spent 14 years in parish ministry in the lower North Island. In 1986, Jonathan underwent

He stayed in touch with many of his Wellington

a career change and became a Chaplain

friends and returned to Wellington College in

specialising in mental health. He retired from

1991 when Harvey Rees-Thomas appointed him

chaplaincy in 2012 and now lives in Tawa. He

to the position of Guidance Counsellor. He is

rejoices in family and friends. Leisure activities

still at the College, though now in a part time

include caring for and planting native trees,

role as Assistant Counsellor. When he returned

tramping and social concerns.

in 1991, Stuart was also able to continue his love of Hockey and coached the U15s until the

Ross was a Firth House boarder for three years,

Association disbanded that grade.

CONGRATULATIONS TO SOFTBALLER, Joel

WELLINGTON QUEEN’S COUNSEL, KENNETH

Evans (Class of 2009), [pictured below centre],

JOHNSTON (Class of 1975) has been appointed

the Supreme Winner of the 2018 WHG Hutt

an Associate Judge of the High Court.

Valley Sports Awards! Kenneth graduated BA/LLB from Victoria Joels’ vintage softball year continued when the

University in 1979. He also holds a Graduate

Black Sox slugger led Hutt Valley to their first

Diploma in Human Resources management

New Zealand men’s softball title for 18 years.

from Victoria University, and an LLM(Dist) from the College of Law of England and Wales.

Joel - whose grand slam home run earned the Black Sox a seventh world championship gold

Kenneth was admitted as a barrister and

medal in 2017 - was the National Fastpitch

solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand in

Championship tournament MVP as Hutt Valley

February 1980. After periods at the Crown Law

beat Auckland 6-1 in Sunday’s grand final at

Office in Wellington a practising criminal law in

Albany.

London, he joined the Wellington office of Watts & Paterson, now part of MinterEllisonRuddWatts. After 17 years at MinterEllisonRuddWatts, Kenneth joined the independent bar in September 1997. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in July 2016. He was chair of the New Zealand Teachers' Disciplinary Tribunal from 2005 to 2016 and a Deputy Chair of the Health Practitioners Disciplinary tribunal from mid-2014. Kenneth was sworn in, in February and will sit in Wellington. The LAMPSTAND | 2018

ABOVE: Jonathan (left) and Stuart.


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Vale WE WISH TO ACKNOWLEDGE the passing of the following Old Boys. Our deepest sympathies and condolences are extended to their families and friends. An obituary is provided for those indicated by a 8. 1937 8 McLEOD, Norman Colin CMG, Capt 2 NZEF 1921 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1933 - 1937 Former Commissioner of Works.

1946 8 BARCHAM, Robert Kenneth [Bob] 1929 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1942 - 1945

1938 MILLAR, Patrick Winfird 1920 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1934 - 1937

FRCS (London) FRACS FRACO FCOphth(UK).

1941 SHARPE, Francis Stephen WWII RNZAF 1924 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1937 - 1939 Life Member Assoc. of Accountants 8 TWADDLE QSM, Robert Bruce [Bob] 1924 - 2018 Late of Hawkes Bay Wellington College: 1939 - 1941 Prefect 1941. 1st XV 1941 1942 BATTERSBY, James Richard [Jim] [The Reverend] MA, BD, Minister Emeritus 1925 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1938 - 1942 1st XV 1942, McEvedy Team 1942 1943 MATTHEWS, Albert Edward [Albie] 1924 - 2018 Late of Nelson Wellington College: 1939 - 1942 1944 LAURENSON, Ian Walker BA 1927 - 2017 Late of Wanganui Wellington College: 1940 - 1944 Former Senior Lecturer in English at Monash University, Australia MAYO, Arthur William [Bill] 1926 - 2018 Late of Hawkes Bay Wellington College: 1940 - 1941 Firth House SUTHERLAND, Raymond Daniel 1926 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1940 - 1944 1945 BROOKS, Graeme Hudson 1928 - 2018 Late of Victoria Wellington College: 1941 - 1944

CHER, Ivan MB BS NZ DO RCP&S, London, FRCS (Edinburgh)

8 PROSSER, Melton James 1931 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1944 - 1948 8 SMITH, Eldred Bruce 1930 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1944 - 1947

Honorary Fellow of the University of Sydney

1927 - 2018 Late of Victoria Wellington College: 1941 - 1946 Dux 1945 CROCKER, Mervyn Gordon 1929 - 2018 Late of Bay of Plenty Wellington College: 1942 - 1946 Firth House ROBERTSON, Glen Struan 1928 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1942 - 1946 1947 BROOKING, Ernest Keith 1929 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1943 - 1945 McNICKLE, Peter Ramsay 1928 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1943 - 1947 MILES, Geoffrey Keith 1929 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1943 - 1945 PHILLIPPS, John Charles Francis 1929 - 2018 Late of Nelson Wellington College: 1943 - 1946 1948 8 GRAY, Douglas [Professor] FBA, Honorary Fellow of the Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford

1930 - 2017 Late of England Wellington College: 1944 - 1948 Dux: 1948 HILDRETH, Herbert Coventry [Peter] 1931 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1944 - 1948 KEMP, Peter George Ridgeway 1931 - 2018 Late of Manawatu Wellington College: 1944 - 1945 MOODY, Kenneth Charlton 1931 - 2018 Late of Manawatu Wellington College: 1944 - 1947 The LAMPSTAND | 2018

1949 THORNTON, Ronald George 1931 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1945 - 1948 8 WERRY, Nigel Wingent QSM, ARSCM, JP 1932 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1945 - 1949 1951 GIBBS, John Lewis 1934 - 2018 Late of Horowhenua Wellington College: 1947 - 1950 MONCRIEFF, James [Jim] 1934 - 2018 Late of Taranaki Wellington College: 1947 - 1951 Firth House 1952 JONES, Montague [Monty] 1934 - 2016 Late of Queensland Wellington College: 1948 - 1951 1953 LEWIS, Peter Michael 1935 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1949 - 1952 MORRISON, James Barrie [Jim] 1936 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1949 - 1953 Wellington Cricket: 1958/59 - 1959/60 1st XI 1952/1953 1954 BECK, Donald Eugene Blackburn 1937 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1950 - 1954 MURDOCH, William Muir [Bill] 1936 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1950 - 1954 ROBERTSON, David James Wood 1936 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1950 - 1952


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STUBBS, Rodney Peter Firth House 1935 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1950 - 1952 1955 GUDSELL, Donald John 1937 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1951 - 1954 8 LOVE NZOM, QSO, Ralph Heberley Ngatata 1937 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1951 - 1954 STYLES, Barry Roland 1938 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1951 - 1954 8 SWAIN, David Noel [Reverend] 1936 - 2018 Late of England Wellington College: 1951 - 1955 1956 KIDD, Thomas Jamieson [Jim] 1937 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1952 - 1952 TODD, David Noel John 1939 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1952 - 1956 1957 ARBUCKLE, Raymond James 1939 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1953 - 1957 WCOBA Executive COUCHMAN, Gary Charles 1939 - 2017 Late of Queensland Wellington College 1953 - 1957 SMITH, Clifton Bridge (Cliff) 1938 - 2018 Late of Marlborough Wellington College: 1953 - 1954 1958 GILLESPIE, Kenneth Ross 1941 - 2018 Late of Tasmania Wellington College: 1954 - 1958 8 HEERDEGEN, Richard Gregory 1941 - 2018 Late of Horowhenua Wellington College: 1958 - 1958 PARKER, Anthony Leonard Hope [Tony] 1940 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1954 - 1957 1959 8 MARTIN, Neville Hassell 1941 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1955 - 1958 SHIRLEY, Graham Thomas 1940 - 2018 Late of Nelson Wellington College: 1955 - 1956

WILSON, John Crawford Verger of Holy Trinity Cathedral, Parnell

1941 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1955 - 1959 1960 HARPER, Colin Clive Sgt, 22(D) Bty, RNZA 1942 - 2018 Late of Wairarapa Wellington College: 1956 - 1958 KENNY, Alan Gilbert 1942 - 2018 Late of Waikato Wellington College: 1956 - 1960 Firth House McCONKEY, Terence [Terry] 1942 - 2018 Late of Bay of Plenty Wellington College: 1956 - 1958 TANTEMSAPYA, Somchair [Col]. 1942 - 2018 Late of Thailand Wellington College: 1957 - 1960 1961 ARNOLD, Terence James [Terry] 1943 - 2018 Late of New South Wales Wellington College: 1957 - 1961 BOSHIER, James Arthur (Jim) 1943 - 2018 Late of Bay of Plenty Wellington College: 1958 - 1959 DUNCAN, Bryan William Dalgan 1942 - 2018 Late of Marlborough Wellington College: 1957 - 1959 FORBES, Murray Lane 1942 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1957 - 1960 1st XV 1960 8 LETICA, Ivan Russell 1943 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1957 - 1960 1962 KERSE, Terence McKenzie (Terry) 1944 - 2018 Late of Bay of Plenty Wellington College: 1958 - 1960 Former Managing Director at Wairarapa Times-Age

8 NICHOLSON, Bruce Clayton 1947 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1962 - 1965 PICKERING, William Graham [Bill] 1947 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1962 - 1964 1967 ARCHBOLD, Douglas Gerald 1949 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1963 - 1966 COUPER, Frederick John 1949 - 2018 Late of Wairarapa Wellington College: 1963 - 1967 FREEMAN, Ross Leslie 1949 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1963 - 1966 VOICE, Ian Frank 1949 - 2018 Late of Bay of Plenty Wellington College: 1965 - 1966 Firth House 1972 BERG, Leonard Arthur 1954 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1969 - 1969 8 HARRISON, Geoffrey Lloyd 1954 - 2018 Late of Auckland Wellington College: 1968 - 1971 8 TOEBES MNZM, Gerard Justin 1954 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1968 - 1972 Liverton Prize for History 1975 DRAKEFORD Richard David Matthew 1957 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1971 - 1975 1976 McKENZIE, Timothy Paul, Dr. 1958 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1972 - 1976 GP at Newlands Medical Centre

1966 ALLISON, Raymond 1949 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1962 - 1964

VALLANCE, Ronald James 1958 - 2018 Late of Horowhenua Wellington College: 1972 - 1972 Firth House

FORTUNE, Denis Joseph Spencer 1948 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 1962 - 1965

1977 FELDWICK, Ian Colin 1959 - 2018 Late of Kapiti Wellington College: 1973 - 1977

MacGREGOR, Frederick Roy 1949 - 2018 Late of Bay of Plenty Wellington College: 1962 - 1965

The LAMPSTAND | 2018

2016 CONROY, Lewis Edon John 1999 - 2018 Late of Wellington Wellington College: 2012 - 2016


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Obituaries  BARCHAM, Bob Bob Barcham began playing professionally in the late 1940s and was still doing regular gigs with the X7s Dance Band. Name a musical instrument, and chances are Barcham has played it. As a boy aged ten, he was entertaining listeners to 2ZB on the piano accordion. At Wellington College, he played double bass in the school orchestra, having switched from the cello. He went on to play the E-flat bass (a brass instrument) and trumpet in the Wellington Regiment Band – which he also conducted – and even toured with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra as a percussionist. There was no doubt, though, about his preferred instruments. If people ask me what instruments I play, I say the piano and the organ. It was as a pianist that he became a fixture at the Majestic Cabaret during its golden era in the 1950s and 60s. His services were also in demand for recording sessions – he was a ‘sight reader’, able to play anything without rehearsing – and he toured with artistes as diverse as the British comedian Jimmy Edwards and Welsh torch singer Shirley Bassey. Bob simultaneously pursued a career as a music teacher, tutoring an average 80 students a week for 40 years in brass and musical theory as well as keyboard skills. On top of all that, he was Secretary of the Musicians’ Union. Bob was also an Honorary Member of the Wellington Jazz Club. Throughout his career, Bob was loyally supported by his wife Jean and their family. Sadly, Jean predeceased Bob last Christmas, after 69 years of marriage. He was a father, grandfather, great and great, great grandfather.  GRAY, Douglas Doug Gray came to College from Mount Cook Primary School in 1944 and was placed in Form 3C. By the end of the year, he had been moved to Form 3A. In 1948, he was in Form 6A and was Dux. By then he had won prizes in English, French, German and Latin, and in Speech and Debating. Perhaps surprisingly, he became a staff-sergeant in the Cadet Corps and less surprisingly was appointed Head Librarian. He was one of three boys in 6A

to win a much-coveted University Entrance Scholarship. He enrolled at Victoria College, as it was then, majored in English, and was awarded one of two Senior Scholarships, with which he achieved an MA with First Class Honours and was awarded a postgraduate Travelling Scholarship. That took him to the University of Oxford, and there he stayed for the rest of his life. His consuming interest was medieval English literature, a subject in which he became preeminent among his peers and in which he achieved many academic honours. But he also wrote widely and extensively on all European medieval literatures. For example, he was a most distinguished critic and editor of Older Scots literature. The Oxford Book of Late Medieval Verse and Prose and The Oxford Companion to Chaucer both of which he edited and A Selection of Religious Lyrics are but examples that demonstrate the range and the depth of his scholarship. After gaining an Oxford MA (interestingly one of his lecturers was the great linguist JRR Tolkien), Doug was appointed a Lecturer at Pembroke and Lincoln Colleges, and then a University Lecturer in English Language. In due course, he was elected a Fellow of Pembroke and then a professorial Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy, an honour accorded to world leading scholars and researchers in the humanities and social sciences. Then in 1980, he was appointed the first J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Literature and Language, a position he held until his retirement in 1997. He was then elected an Honorary Fellow of the College. Retirement just gave more time for working and he continued to read and write copiously until he died. He was described as A deeply modest, wry, and self-effacing giant of his field. He had not only read everything, but had seemingly remembered everything he had read. I had first visited him when he was at Pembroke. He took me to his rooms and as we passed the bathroom I saw that the bath was full of books. Don’t worry, he said. I don’t live here. In fact he lived with his wife Judy in a cottage in Tackley, a village on the outskirts of Oxford. He had married Judy Campbell, who was a music teacher; and they had had one child, Nick, who gained a doctorate in music and anthropology (one of his specialities was the gamelan). In Who’s Who he gave his recreations as food, wine and travel and his gastronomical expeditions to France (of course he spoke French fluently) became well-known. But otherwise he and Judy lived very simply. One of his colleagues wrote, Despite the many honours he gained he was unmarked The LAMPSTAND | 2018

by personal vanity, signalled to the world by a succession of progressively more ragged jumpers and increasingly disreputable trousers. Doug returned to New Zealand several times. He was welcomed at a Wellington College Assembly, and his classmates were delighted to see him receive an Honorary Doctorate of Literature from Victoria; even though his doctoral lecture about a medieval woman poet was rather beyond us. Late in 2017 Judy became very ill and was hospitalised. Doug battled on alone. One morning his neighbours noticed that he had not brought in his milk and his paper. They went inside and found Doug sitting in his armchair with an open book on his knee. He was 87. Judy died a few days later. Sir Michael Hardie Boys [Class of 1948]  HARRISON, Geoff Auckland barrister, Geoff Harrison’s legal career followed a different path to that of his brother, retired Court of Appeal Judge Rhys Harrison. Geoff was admitted to the bar in 1983, on completion of his law studies at Auckland University. Since 1992, he had been a sole barrister at Southern Cross Chambers specialising in family law. He had been on the Lawyer for Child approved list, with Family Courts throughout the Auckland area, since 1986. Geoff was also a contributing writer for Fisher on Matrimonial Property (LexisNexis 3rd edition). It is considered the most authoritative and extensive publication ever written on this subject. Geoff was passionate about his work, particularly Lawyer for Child. He was also a charitable man and at his funeral, people were encouraged to donate to his favourite cause, the Women’s Refuge. Southern Cross Chambers barrister Andrew Gilchrist knew Geoff Harrison for nearly 30 years, and they were colleagues in Chambers for 19 years of those years. It was a huge shock to all of us in Chambers. He had gone into hospital for what we thought was a relatively routine operation and regrettably he never came out of hospital. He had been unwell about a year before that, but none of us saw this coming, he says. Mr Gilchrist describes Geoff as a great communicator and a people person to the core. He was a wonderfully caring person. He had a wicked sense of humour, a great smile and he really cared about the people


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Obituaries around him. He was a great colleague and always willing to share his views or discuss legal issues or other matters. In his personal life, he was a great lover of films and music. He had a really keen ear. He was a little idiosyncratic but then most people are, he was a real character, Mr Gilchrist says. Geoff has two daughters, one of whom works in advertising and the other is studying law in Melbourne. The NZ Herald notice describes Geoff as Champion of the Underdog and a Beach Boys super fan. He was also equally a major Steely Dan fan and like many avid music lovers, he mourned the loss of Walter Becker when the guitarist died last year. NZ Law Society  HEERDEGEN, Richard A Manawatū geographer with a passion for people, weather and the land, Richard Heerdegen wrote the Weather Watch column for the Manawatū Standard for about 20 years until 2002. He spent more than 40 years studying, researching and teaching with the Massey University geography department and spent six years as chairman of the board behind NZ Geographic magazine. Managing the Manawatū River and its people, Richard’s studies in geography led him to delve into a side-interest in the climate and weather and how they affect people, which he began to share with the wider community through the Weather Watch column in 1984. He had a network of people who willingly took rainfall measurements on their own properties and submitted them to Dad monthly, so he could report what was going on in more detail throughout the region, son Greg Heerdegen said. This meant he could report on patterns in different parts of the Manawatū, how they fit into wider climate and weather patterns, and how this affected farmers and the community. Standard reporter Richard Mays said he remembered Richard provoking interesting conversations through the column and monthly radio segments, including the naming of a new season. He was a real enthusiast and I will always remember him for coining the term ‘sprautumn’. He would describe Palmerston North as a place that only had two annual seasons

– winter and ‘sprautumn’ – his amalgam of spring summer and autumn. It was an extended season that perfectly epitomised the not overly hot, not overly cold, not overly calm, somewhat tepid, cloudy, windy and watery weather conditions that seemed to prevail in the city for nine months of the year. Greg Heerdegen said he remembered an adventurous childhood where the family was able to live in and explore Fiji, the United States and United Kingdom, during his father’s placements. Dad was massively dedicated to his family. The experiences we had as kids exposed us to the world beyond New Zealand and everything that offered. After his retirement in 2002, Richard continued to use his expertise to benefit the community as a resource consent hearings commissioner, including as part of the board of inquiry into whether Mighty River Power would gain permission to build a wind farm in Turitea, near Palmerston North. Conditional consent was granted in 2011. In his retirement he divided his time between homes in Ōtaki and Queensland, where partner Johanna Rosier taught as associate professor in regional and urban planning and design. He continued to find an outlet for his passion for the environment, volunteering for native tree growing and regeneration community projects in both Australia and Ōtaki. Stuff  LETICA, Ivan Ivan passed away in May this year. He was born and raised in Wellington and attended Wellington College between 1957 and 1960. Ivan remained an active Old Boy in the College after one of his brothers, Steve, who attended the College was a prominent member of the 1st XV and Junior All Blacks. Steve passed away at age 20 and following this, the Steve Letica Cup was played in his memory and it remains one of the first games of the Wellington College rugby calendar. Ivan would often attend these matches and present the trophy from time to time. Ivan married his wife Raewyn in 1968 and they would have celebrated fifty years of marriage in August 2018. Ivan and Raewyn had three children, Andrea, Joanna and Mark. Ivan had six grandchildren that he treasured dearly. He lived the majority of his life in a family

home which had previously been that of his grandmother and mother. Ivan worked across a number of different professional sectors including finance and commercial real estate. His personal interests including property investment and travel with Ivan and Raewyn often spending time with their children and grandchildren who lived in Wellington, Brisbane and London. Ivan will be sadly missed by his family who have supported him through his life including in later years when he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis which was compounded with a stroke that he suffered one year prior to his passing. Trina Letica  LOVE, Ngatata Te Ati Awa leader, Sir Ngatata Love passed away at the age of 81 from the result of an illness. Sir Ngatata was a Treaty of Waitangi Negotiator, academic and educationalist who spent time working at Massey and Victoria Universities. He was also the chief executive of Te Puni Kokiri from 1995 and played a significant role in overseeing Treaty of Waitangi settlements. Sir Ngātata’s lifetime commitment to te ao Māori was recognised nationally when he was made a Companion of the Queen’s Service Order (QSO) in 2001 and a Knight Grand Companion of The New Zealand Order of Merit (GNZM) in 2008. Sir Ngatata has been a Commissioner with the New Zealand Law Commission, a Senior Fellow of the East West Center in Hawaii, Chair of the New Zealand Natural Heritage Foundation, Trustee of the Futures Focus Foundation, Trustee of the Crown Forest Rental Trust and Trustee of the Westpac Stadium in Wellington. 11/9/2018

Straight-shooting PR man with an irreverent side

 MARTIN, NEVILLE Neville Martin, who had what he called one of the best PR jobs in the country with the New Zealand Dairy Board (NZDB) for 30 years, was universally acknowledged by journalists as being far from your average spin doctor. Rare in the hyperbolic field of public relations, he won enormous respect

The LAMPSTAND | 2018 http://fairfaxmedia.pressreader.com/the-dominion-post/20181103

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Obituaries for his integrity, honesty and refusal to mislead, even if reporters were working on a story he might prefer them not to have. Murray Gough, NZDB chief executive from 1985-92, goes so far as to say: Neville Martin was a hero of the New Zealand dairy industry. He was an extraordinary example of how to conduct public relations – thoughtful, open and honest, rather than spin and blah. Neville also had a legendary irreverent and self-deprecating sense of humour that survived, despite increasing attacks of what he called AWD - Acute Wellness Deficiency – until he died in hospital at the age of 77. His funeral service at Old St Paul’s, rang with laughter as friends and relatives recalled his witticisms and wry observations. He would have approved, for, as he wrote in a hilarious memoir, By the Seat of My Pants, One of life’s greatest pleasures is laughter, we could laugh a hell of a lot more than we do. Gough said dairying was being written off as a sunset industry when the economic reforms of the 1980s followed dark days of price collapse and dumping after losing the British market when UK entered the EEC. Yet through all those hard years the Dairy Board and the industry received almost universally positive media coverage. Neville was the reason. He earned the respect of journalists by providing a stream of accurate information, thinking ahead to give context and background to complicated issues, and making directors and executives readily available for questions. He succeeded by informing rather than brow beating. Jon Morgan, longtime farming editor of The Dominion, said: Neville was a straight-shooter who didn’t try to finesse the facts. Such integrity was and is rare in communications positions. His view was that by treating journalists with respect the Dairy Board would earn its own respect. Neville wrote in his memoir: If I could be accused of trying to put a spin on anything it was to point out the crucial importance of the industry’s co-operative structure to the farmers – and to the country. Apart from that, it was a case of letting the facts speak for themselves. In 2002, Neville’s style earned him the title of Communicator of the Year from the NZ Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators, of which he was a life member and president in 2006-07. Morgan recalls meeting him for the first time in 1971 when his typewriter bore a sticker reading I’m backing New Zealand – a popular slogan among government departments and major exporters at the

time. Underneath, Martin had added: I’ve got it with Japan in the second leg. It was an introduction to me of Neville’s brand of sly ironical humour that he found hard to repress in all aspects of his daily life. His son Geoff recalled his father as something of an innovator. He was convinced the problem of cold New Zealand homes could be resolved by lining houses with slices of tomato, his logic based on how well they retain heat in a toasted sandwich. Neville freely admitted that fits of inexcusable irresponsibility have dogged me down the years and his books recount that he worked for three political parties (two at the same election) and used his irreverent sense of humour to write some stage revues, a couple of pantomimes and articles for the anarchistic satirical magazine Cock. Cock was seen as highly subversive in the 1960s and some of his articles attracted the attention of the SIS. On applying for his SIS file, he found them along with newspaper clippings quoting him on Dairy Board sales to the Soviet Union, Cuba and Iran. Brilliant espionage work, he wrote. How the hell did the West win the Cold War? Neville began his working life as a cadet reporter on the Evening Post in 1959, after leaving Wellington College the year before, then leaving in 1965 to join the government’s Tourism and Publicity Department. He was press secretary to Agriculture Minister Brian Talboys and Deputy Prime Minister Sir John Marshall from 1967-70 before joining the Dairy Board. He took up distance running in his thirties and was proud of his best time of 30 minutes for 10,000 metres. I sometimes wonder what might have been achieved if I had taken it up about 10 years and 20,000 cigarettes earlier, he wrote. He is survived by his wife Janet, their children Jo, Kate and Geoff and four grandchildren. Dominon Post  McLEOD, Colin Colin McLeod CMG was a civil engineer, who served as the Commissioner of Works between 1973 and 1981. Colin was born in Auckland in August 1921, the son of Norman John Murdoch McLeod, also an engineer. Raised in the Wellington suburb of Karori, he was educated at Wellington College, and went on to study civil engineering at Canterbury University College, graduating BE in 1942. Following graduation, Colin initially worked in the Public Works Department, designing coastal defences. In April 1943, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in The LAMPSTAND | 2018

the Corps of New Zealand Engineers, but was decommissioned and sent overseas in January 1944 as a sapper, serving in Italy. He was again commissioned as a second lieutenant in February 1945, and served as adjutant to Brigadier Fred Hanson. In March 1946, he went to Japan with the 5th Engineer Company as part of J Force. Returning to New Zealand in September 1946, Colin married Ella Margaret McEwan, and the couple went on to have three children. Colin resumed his career with the Ministry of Works, and in 1949 moved to Mangakino, where he rose to become the project engineer for construction of the Waikato River dams. In 1962, Colin became district commissioner of works in Wanganui and then, from 1964 to 1966, district commissioner of Works in Hamilton. After an Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship in the United States in 1966, Colin served as director of the National Water and Soil Conservation Authority from 1966 to 1971. He was appointed Commissioner of Works, succeeding Jim Macky, in 1973, and served in that capacity until his retirement in 1981. In the 1981 Queen’s Birthday Honours, Colin was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George, in recognition of his service as commissioner.  NICHOLSON, Bruce Bruce was born in 1947 in Wellington and over his journey developed a passion and love for many things including family, farming, business and sports – especially rugby, water skiing, golf, and fishing. Bruce was an extremely intelligent, motivating and loyal character who had core values around friendships, family and business. These traits formed the foundation for both his success and happiness. Bruce started work at age 14 as a baker for his father and then qualified as a meat inspector at the age of 22. He established his first cattle and sheep farm located in Foxton in 1977 and from then owned and ran cattle and sheep farms. He also farmed deer during the 1980’s and owned farms in Foxton, Wellington region, Wairarapa, Whanganui, Taranaki, Palmerston North and Hawkes Bay. Bruce married Wynne in 1973 and together they had three children, Amanda, Jarrod and Todd. Bruce moved to Whanganui in 1996 to join The Land Meat Company and established


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Obituaries the Horizon Trust in the same year. Twelve months later, Rotongaio Station was purchased by Horizon Trust for the purpose of farming sheep and cattle. Bruce had a passion for the land and received great satisfaction from developing and improving it for future generations. Bruce had a strong ethos around responsible and sustainable practices in all his farming and business interests.

and her two children. It was there Bruce formed new interests in floristry and, most recently, farming bees with Tracey.

In the late 90’s when Bruce began to settle in Whanganui, he fell in love with the Wiritoa Lakes district on its outskirts in the south. He purchased 150 acres there which became his home and first Whanganui farm. During the early 2000’s Bruce spent his leisure time farming and improving his Rotongaio and Wiritoa properties and in 2006, he undertook a major renovation on the farmhouse at Rotongaio Station. This was the birth of Rotongaio Lodge.

 PROSSER, Melton Melton Prosser, who died in May 2018 aged 86, was one of those lawyers who just seemed to keep on going. In his early eighties he was still serving the clients who had followed him for decades. Four years ago, in a typically self-deprecating remark, Melton told Council Brief: There’s nothing remarkable in it. I have been a lawyer for over 60 years and I’ve made all the mistakes – but fortunately I’ve only made them once! Melton was born in Wellington in 1931. He grew up in Wadestown and at school he was known for his prowess in tennis and swimming.

In 2007, Maxwell Quarry was born. Bruce, together with his son Jarrod, set up a small shell rock quarry operation located 25kms north of Whanganui. Then, in November of 2016, they decided to expand the business and purchased two other quarries located further up the coast in Hawera and Opunake. Today, all three quarries operate under South Taranaki Quarries Ltd and supply quality aggregates to the contracting and forestry industries across the Manawatu and Taranaki regions. Bruce’s youngest son Todd is a golf professional and qualified golf coach who was based in Melbourne from 2003 to 2017. In 2009, Todd established Horizon Golf which initially offered unique golfing holiday experiences. It has since evolved to be a diverse brand for growing the game of golf though coaching, golfing holidays and special golfing events. Today Todd is based back in New Zealand working with the family on the Trusts interests. In 2012, Horizon Trust purchased the Seaview Meat Company and Bruce, together with his daughter Amanda, re-modelled it to be both a boutique trading company and producer. Seaview was initially established over 20 years ago as a local market trading company but with no production or brand. Today, Seaview has a strong brand focused on delivering high-quality products to niche markets both domestically and abroad. Bruce had many business interests during his entrepreneurial journey including Whanganui Helicopters Ltd which operated from 2005 to 2013. Whanganui Helicopters served as a mode of transport for many lucky golfing travellers as well being used for spraying and top-dressing farms. In his last years, Bruce resided in Palmerston North on a 50-acre farm with partner Tracey

Sadly, Bruce passed away suddenly in February at the age of 70. He was a transcendent man who was loved and respected by many and will be sorely missed. Horizon Trust

After secondary education at Wellington College, he made an early start to his work in the legal profession, joining the firm of EAR Jones and Vickerman straight out of school. He spent the next nine years learning the basics of conveyancing, company law, taxation and estate planning under the watchful eye of partner Brian Vickerman who Melton recalled as wonderfully helpful and friendly. Melton met his future wife Jeannette while they were both still at school. They played tennis together in the same Wadestown Tennis Club and belonged to the same circle of friends. They married in their early twenties while Melton was still studying law part-time at Victoria University. He finished his degree at the end of 1957 and was admitted to the bar in February 1958, the same year in which he was made a partner at Jones and Vickerman. In the early 1950s the firm had opened a branch office in Wainuiomata,. The suburb was then beginning a period of rapid development as an area of affordable housing. It is an indication of the esteem in which he was held by the firm’s partners that he was given the responsibility for opening and maintaining this branch office while still a young and unqualified lawyer. Speaking four years ago, Melton said that he drove over the hill to the new suburb once a week and brought back dozens The LAMPSTAND | 2018

of files, a practice he was to continue for over 30 years. Wainuiomata was a huge development at the time. Most of the properties were bought through cheap State Advances Corporation loans, the government’s capitalised family benefit scheme and deferred payment licences for sections. I probably did 90% of the subdivision work over there. Melton left Jones and Vickerman in 1982 and joined Castle Pope, which became Castle Pope Prosser and Lynn, and he continued his commercial and general practice. The partnership ended in 1990 and Melton joined the then firm of Morrison Morpeth as a consultant. He went out on his own as a sole practitioner in 1992, working from his Wilton home until retiring in his 84th year in 2014. Amidst this relatively conventional career Melton did something rather unusual. While he was in Wainuiomata he met a German engineer named Frank Brugger, a clever and enterprising man who had emigrated to New Zealand in the early 1950s and started his own business. The decades of the 1950s and 1960s were the heyday of manufacturing in New Zealand including the car assembly industry producing many models of popular cars. Brugger took advantage of this and manufactured a range of automobile components such as car seats, door panels and reclining mechanisms. The company was also the first manufacturer of the Pyroclastic wood stove. Melton and Frank Brugger hit it off and they became close associates, to the extent that Melton became part-owner of the Brugger Industries factory in Wainuiomata, and the firm’s export manager. He remained a partowner for 36 years until the company was sold in 1986. He was still practising as a lawyer during this time and he worked most nights and weekends to keep up. He said, My partner Brian Vickerman was a lovely man, very helpful, and he carried the can when I was away. Melton was a man who lived life to the full. In the early 1950s he and Jeannette built their own house in Cecil Road in Wadestown. He loved cars as well. “He was probably the original boy racer of Warwick Street. Every car had to be a big grumbly, noisy V8 that also had to be big enough to fit us all in.” He gave a lot of his time and money to charities of various kinds. He’d give money away left right and centre – sometimes to a fault. He worked on produce stalls, at school fairs, on committees and boards, and officiated at sports days.


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Obituaries Melton Prosser was an endearing and ebullient man, deeply involved in all aspects of his life. He loved his family which was the centre of his existence, and his connection to his clients was sincere and personal. He is survived by Jeannette, his wife of 62 years, five children and four grandchildren. NZ Law Society

were killed and 14 survived. The plane had stalled in the air, fell 100m to the ground and broke apart. Pilot error was blamed, investigators pointing at an engine antiicing device not being used, despite winter conditions, the accidental deployment of a landing spoiler mechanism, and the excessive nose-up angle of the plane.

 SMITH, Bruce Eldred Bruce Smith was a wealthy Auckland businessman who gave millions of dollars to religious and welfare groups, including one run by a former Soviet secret police agent.

Bruce survived, suffering a fractured back. He had surgery in a Russian hospital and spent months in a full-body cast.

Preferring to be known as E. Bruce Smith, the retired textile industry giant died earlier this year aged 87. He stipulated that twothirds of the money donated by the charity he founded should go to the Third World. He had suffered mild strokes for some years and at the end was having heart trouble, said friend Graeme Cameron, a member of the charitable trust set up by Smith. Bruce was raised in a Salvation Army family in Wellington and later Christchurch. His mother ran boarding houses - two at once. He got a start in the textile industry and by the early 1960s had founded his own business and was building strong relationships with overseas suppliers, including in Japan. Bruce ran a large and profitable business at a time when the New Zealand textiles industry was at its peak, employing tens of thousands of people - far more than today after decades of free trade policies. Neil Morrison worked for Bruce and some years after his boss sold the business, Morrison and colleagues acquired it in a management buy-out. Morrison remembers his former employer as a business leader: He was instrumental in introducing the textile industry of New Zealand to the dyed yarn trade. And he had very large government contracts for supplying the Defence Force for fabric. In its later years, Bruce’s Auckland-based operation diversified into importing cassette tapes for home video players. In November 1972, Bruce was involved in a plane crash that would change his life. The Japan Airlines DC-8, on flight 446, crashed 30 seconds after taking off from Moscow, 150m beyond the runway and on its way to Tokyo. Of the 76 people on the plane, 62

Cameron said he met Bruce through the Youth for Christ organisation about five years after the crash, by which time he was more or less fully recovered and walking again. Bruce had wavered from his Salvation Army roots by his early 20s, but his near-death experience over Moscow jolted him back to his Christian faith. It was a story he seems to have shared widely, including with Morrison. He told me this, Morrison recalled: Lord, if I survive this, I will serve you for the rest of my days’ - and that is exactly what he did. After Bruce sold his main business in 1993 to Ross [Thompson, a nephew] he concentrated on the charitable trust. He doubled its value while giving at the same time - and personally investigating every request for money. Bruce was always determined to build up the equity in order to protect the future giving. He achieved his aim. The trust, which he left to others to run seven years ago, by last June held net assets of more than $18 million, of which $9.564 million was the rent-generating Henderson land and buildings that serve as a base for public mental health and addiction services in West Auckland. The trust made donations of $728,000 in the 2017 financial year, and $788,000 the previous year. Its stated aim is to support people or organisations engaged in the promotion of the gospel of Jesus Christ whether by preaching the gospel or providing educational, welfare or social support and training. Recipients had included Youth for Christ, World Vision, Tear Fund, Women’s Refuge, Family Life, Bible in Schools, Parents Inc, and Christian broadcasting. Married twice, Bruce was described in a Herald death notice as the father of three children and the poppa of two. NZ Herald  SWAIN, David Born in 1936, David was a member of the St Mary’s Karori family, and attended Wellington College and Victoria University, graduating BA in 1963 and MA (Hons) in 1967. After teaching for a while, he went to England to study for the ministry at the The LAMPSTAND | 2018

College of the Resurrection, Mirfield. He was made deacon in 1967 and ordained priest in 1968, and served his curacy at Holy Trinity, Clapham Common, London, in the Diocese of Southwark. David returned to New Zealand in 1970 to be Priest Assistant in Paraparaumu (Kapiti) parish, before moving to VUW as Anglican Chaplain from 1972 to 1974. In 1975 he returned to UK where he served in parishes until he retired in 1994 including Vicar of Hermitage with Hampstead Norreys (1976-80); Team Rector in the Hermitage and Hampstead Norreys, Cold Ash and Yattendon with Frilsham Team Ministry (1980-82) and Rector of Bingham (1982-94). David married Catherine (Cally), the daughter of the Bishop of London, the Right Reverend Robert Stopford, in a wellpublicised ceremony in St Paul’s Cathedral London. He is survived by his wife, and a son and daughter.  TOEBES, Justin MNZM It was fitting that Justin Toebes was farewelled at the ASB Sports Centre in Kilbirnie, Wellington. To those who knew him well, the facility will stand as a testament to both his passion and his craft, even if you’ll struggle to find a public acknowledgement of Justin anywhere at the centre. But that’s exactly how he would have wanted it. A lawyer by profession, one of his loves was basketball, although his true contribution to the game in New Zealand will never be known due to his desire to work in the background and not seek acknowledgement of his deeds. Take the sports centre project as an example, which both Wellington Saints owner Nick Mills and longtime Wellington sports administrator Paul Cameron said would never have happened without Justin. The planning for the centre started in 2000, one year after fire destroyed Wellington Basketball’s headquarters at Newtown, with Justin front and centre, ready to apply his skills to the project. It took eleven years to complete, but in 2011 it opened, complete with twelve sprung-floor courts, a cafe, meeting rooms, a running track and ample parking. Without Justin, this stadium wouldn’t be here, I don’t care what anyone says and I’ll argue that to the end of the day, Mills said. It was going to be smaller and he flew to Australia and showed them that it had to be bigger, had


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Obituaries to be better, had to have the right floor, had to have the right facilities. He met with mayors, he met with committees, he met with anybody that he possibly could. Come hell or high water, this stadium was going to happen. There is no photo of Justin as you walk in here, there’s no name on the door, but those of us who knew Justin know he didn’t want any of that. He wanted a facility for people to be able to play and become better. Every time I drive past, this stadium will mean one thing to me, it will mean Justin Toebes. It was that no-nonsense, get-it-done approach that Toebes took to life. Justin was born in Whangarei to Dutch immigrant hydrologist father Kees and Kiwi science teacher mother Heather. His family moved to Wellington in 1961, with his parents divorcing in 1970. Justin went to live with his father, but he was away working overseas through those formative teenage years at Wellington College, meaning he had to develop an independent streak. He taught himself to drive, which grew into a love of cars, especially Minis, which became an exercise in physical comedy when his frame eventually grew to stand at 6ft 8in. His driving could be terrifying for his passengers and he picked up quite a few speeding tickets, but always knew just how many demerit points he had left before he would lose his licence. Justin studied law at Victoria University and was often seen barefoot around the campus. In 1981, while working cleaning dishes at a French restaurant in Wellington, he met his partner of 37 years, Ayliffe Maddever, who was a chef. They had a son, Finn, and daughter, Olivia. He had held a practising certificate as a barrister and solicitor of the High Court since 1978. A litigation partner in the Wellington firm of Rainey Collins until 1989, he moved on to Buddle Findlay in Wellington, where he was on the board and head of its credit recoveries and insolvency law practice. In 2010, he set up his own boutique law firm, JT Law, but had to close it in 2016 after the diagnosis of motor neurone disease. Throughout his career, he represented the likes of ANZ, BNZ, Kiwibank, Resene, Strait Shipping, PricewaterhouseCoopers and Deloitte. Sport was never far away either in his legal work as he represented former Wellington Phoenix owner and bankrupt property developer Terry Serepisos, as well as one

of David Tua’s former managers, Martin Pugh. Banker Derek Williams said he was highly respected throughout the law community and banking industry. In an age of increasing specialisation, he was one of the few true generalists left in law. He had a ferocious pace of work and earned a reputation and respect for his direct, no-nonsense, cost-effective legal advice that achieved expeditious and numerous successful outcomes, Williams said. Throughout Justin’s life, basketball was ever present. He played for Wellington College, but admitted I wasn’t anything fancy. That was backed up by masters basketball teammate Phil Hartley, who said he rarely saw Justin take a shot from outside the ‘paint’ (the area nearest to the hoop), until one fateful night at a Wellington Saints game. It was about 2000, or 2001, at a Saints game and sometimes you have people shooting from halfway. Justin has the lucky ticket and we’re thinking ‘He doesn’t shoot, it’s not in the paint, it’s from halfway’. Justin went straight out on the court, I think he was barefoot as well, in front of everybody, picks up the ball, throws it onto the backboard and straight into the hoop – $500 richer. I don’t think he would have kept that money. I’m sure there is some kid out there who would have benefited from it. Justin helped young basketballers financially to attend camps and trips away, Hartley said. The number of times he put his hand in his pocket for young kids going away on trips and tours. “There was always one or two kids struggling for money and I would just have to go to Justin and say ‘I’m $600 short’, and he would say ‘no problem’. His family never knew of this generosity until players he had helped out through the years came to visit him during his illness to say thank you. It all comes from ... when you see these kids at school and they get selected for their under-13 or under-15 rep team. It’s just so fantastic they can be recognised and their self-esteem just accelerates, he said in 2016 of his willingness to lend a hand. Motor neurone disease is cruel. It causes the death of the nerve cells that control the muscles that enable people to move, speak, swallow and breathe. Justin was diagnosed in mid-2014 and given a life expectancy of 21/2 years. In 2016, when he had issues with Air NZ about getting down to the Saints’ finalfour tilt in Invercargill with his motorised wheelchair, he said he anticipated it would be his last NBL finals. But he made it to two more, watching on from his wheelchair courtside as the Saints went down in a lastgasp finish to the Southland Sharks in the final earlier this year. The LAMPSTAND | 2018

The Saints had been dear to his heart since he first became involved with them in 1991. He was a director for a time, and a longtime chairman. Mills said, there was not a major decision made at the organisation over the past 20 years in which Justin did not have a role. A life member of Basketball New Zealand and Wellington Basketball, he was made a member of the NZ Order of Merit for services to basketball in 2016. His total contribution to the sport was immense, the scale of which is unlikely to ever be known. Stuff  TWADDLE, Bob QSM Gisborne was the birthplace of Robert Twaddle, in 1924. He attended Primary School at Ormond 1929 - 32; Hihitahi 1932 - 33 and Woodville 1933 - 36. At Palmerston North Boys’ High School, he commenced his secondary education (1937 - 38) but changed to Wellington College in 1939. He was a Prefect in his last year there in 1941. From 1942 to 1945, Bob attended Victoria University graduating with a BA, and in 1946 he gained MA (Hons), in English. He also gained a John Tinline Scholarship from the University of New Zealand at Otago. At Auckland Teachers’ College, he gained his Teacher’s Certificate. Bob’s first appointment was to Wanganui Technical College, teaching English, French, Science, Maths and Geography (1947 1952). His next move was to PNBHS in 1953 as Head of French, but transferred to Freyberg High School, as a member of the foundation staff when it opened in 1955. There he was Head of English, French and Social Studies at various times; in charge of the Library, School Magazine and Drama. By 1959, he was Acting First Assistant, being permanently appointed to this position in 1961. Also in 1961, Bob was involved as a part-time lecturer in French during Term One, setting up a new course at Massey University pending the appointment of a permanent full-time lecturer. Bob was appointed Principal of Paeroa College from 1965, and immediately took an active role in community affairs, being involved with the Paeroa Community and Arts Council; Paeroa Road Safety Committee, of which he was foundation Chairman; Paeroa District Scout Committee; Athletic Club and Rotary. However Bob will be best remembered for his infectious enthusiasm in securing the Gymnasium. The ‘Whirlwind’ Queen Carnival of April


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Obituaries 1968 stands out as a highlight in raising funds for the Gym (so-named because of the ‘Wahine’ storm at the same time), of which construction started late in 1969. The school roll exceeded 400 in the late 1960s, with an extensive building programme being undertaken. From 1970, Bob was inaugural Principal of Taradale High School, until he retired in December 1984. Bob returned to officially open the Gymnasium in 1970. Current Taradale High School Principal and Hawke’s Bay Secondary Principals’ Association chairman, Stephen Hensman said his retirement did not mean disinterest in the school. He remained a faithful follower of ours to the end, reading every newsletter from cover to cover and participating in prizegivings until his health no longer allowed it. He made a huge impact as the first Principal of THS, quickly filling the school to capacity. Throughout his years, he wrote letters of encouragement to his successors and to the school, replete with pride and congratulations for the school’s progress, something that has been valued by us, and by me personally. It’s only other principals who know what it’s like to be in the role, so his letters were a great encouragement to this fledgling Principal, written from the perspective of one who had considerable experience, and the empathy to match. While his retirement came as a shock to many, following the death of his wife and strongest supporter, Nancy, Bob’s involvement with the wider Taradale community did not dwindle. He soon became the Taradale Business Association’s public relations officer, using his management and literary skills to benefit the community. Outside of his education portfolio, he had been a member of Rotary since his days in Paeroa. He was a lifelong member of the Taradale Rotary Club, becoming the President in 1978-1979 and was awarded Rotary’s highest award, the Paul Harris Fellowship, in 1987. In other spheres of interest, Bob was a foundation member of the Taradale Development Association and was at the forefront of those responsible for the Taradale Library relocation and refurbishment project. He also used his considerable advocacy skills to both battle with and support the Napier City Council in the community project to restore the Taradale Clock Tower. He was also a driving force behind the effort to retain the Taradale Community Policing Centre, collecting signatures, organising public meetings and raising community

awareness and support. Bob has six children, 18 grandchildren, and a number of great grandchildren.  WERRY, Nigel QSM, ARSCM, JP

Nigel Werry passed away early May 2018. He served as NZ Secretary for RSCM (The Royal School of Church Music NZ) for numerous years during the 20th Century. He will be remembered by many members as the brilliant organiser of annual Summer Choir Schools. He was also custodian of the RSCM Library at his Khandallah home until its move firstly to St Mark’s and then to its current home in the crypt of Wellington Cathedral of St Paul. Revd. Alison Pitts, current National Secretary, RSCMNZ, recalls her first Choir School, January 1987, and expects some with longer memories will remember it and earlier ones. It was in Napier with Barry Ferguson as director. Nigel was an extremely good organiser and stood for no nonsense. He was also an accomplished organist and choir director. He taught us well, specially about choir behaviour, and processing was one of his ‘things’. At the 1994 Nelson Choir School, his last before retiring, he had us all processing up the street from the Girls’ College where we were based. Strictly in line with no wiggles or bulges, and always at an arm’s length between you and the one in front. Dave Brookes, now of the Waikato Branch, recalls Nigel had the task of organising the annual RSCM Summer Schools in New Zealand. This entailed traveling all over the country, and liaising with Branch Chairpersons in the task of finding suitable venues, including accommodation.

I have fond memories of Nigel, and his excellent organisational skills. I witnessed them in three Summer Schools I attended. These were in Lower Hutt Wellington 1965, Sacred Heart College, Auckland, and Hamilton 1983. It was always a great pleasure to meet him in these Summer Schools, and share choral music with him in the Summer School choirs.  ANDERSON, Sir John KBE It was a sad day for Wellington College in November, 2018 when we received the news that Sir John Anderson passed away. Sir John was Chair of the Wellington College Board of Trustees, guiding the school superbly through the early years of the ‘Tomorrow’s Schools’ era. He continued to be a great supporter of Wellington College. An accountant by profession, Sir John Anderson built a highly successful career in banking. He helped form the merchant bank Southpac in 1972 and by the time he retired in 2005, he was the CEO of ANZ National Bank. Sir John, who was knighted in 1994, also served as the New Zealand Chairman of the World Wide Fund for Nature and was on its international board for four years. He was made Chairman of New Zealand Cricket in 1995 and subsequently became his country’s representative on the ICC board. Sir John played a key role in restructuring the ICC’s internal make-up and rewrote its articles and committee manual. He stepped down from his post in 2008 after 13 years in the position, also relinquishing his role as New Zealand’s representative on the ICC board. Sir John’s son Robbie attended Wellington College from 1989-1993.

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Are you an Old Boy or former staff member of Wellington College? Do you have any relatives or know friends who are? If so, you may be able to help the Museum and Archives obtain some of the following. Please get in touch if you have items you wish to donate. oldboys@wc.school.nz Memoirs

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Expiry Date: |........|........ / ........|........| Signature:..................................................................................................................

and postage costs we incur when we notify Old Boys of forthcoming events.

Wellington College Old Boys’ Association

Do you have news for the Lampstand? Please send us

your news or news of fellow Old Boys. Your feedback and support is much appreciated.

PO Box 16073, Wellington, NZ 6242 Telephone: + 64 4 802 2537 oldboys@wc.school.nz wellington college old boys

Thank you for your support.

www.wc.school.nz/wcoba The LAMPSTAND | 2018


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Freepost Number 62795

2018

Wellington College Old Boys’ Association PO Box 16073 Wellington 6242 New Zealand

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The LAMPSTAND | 2018

Profile for Wellington College

The WCOBA Lampstand  

Annual Magazine for Old Boys of Wellington College.

The WCOBA Lampstand  

Annual Magazine for Old Boys of Wellington College.