Page 1

SERVING MAPLETON AND MINTO

THE

COMMUNITY NEWS VOLUME 52 ISSUE 49

1 Year GIC - 2.37% 3 Year GIC - 2.45% 5 Year GIC - 2.50%

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2019

Daily Interest 1.20%

638-3328

www.jackfinancial.ca

Mapleton council directs staff to prepare budget with 8.9% increase in local levy By Aryn Strickland

Christmas parade - Forty entries, including fire trucks, decorated vehicles, festive floats, singers, twirlers, drummers and Clifford the Big Red Dog all combined to create a festive atmosphere for the Santa Claus Parade in Clifford on Nov. 30. TOP: Rachael Douglas enjoyed a visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus at the fire hall after the parade. ABOVE LEFT: Tripp and Kohen Matthews handed out candy during the parade. ABOVE RIGHT: St. John’s Lutheran Church had a colourful entry. Photos by Bonnie Whitehead

MAPLETON - Council here has directed staff to prepare the 2020 township budget with an 8.91 per cent tax levy increase and a 4.18% tax increase. If passed, the average homeowner will pay an additional $77.58 in 2020. As part of Mapleton’s switch to a three-year budget plan, the 2020 levy increase front loads the tax impact to allow the tax levy increase to drop in 2021 and 2022 to 2.72% and 2.31% respectively. “I’ve looked at studies from enough AMO conferences where municipalities, using this approach, have actually, over time, they’ve had their multi-year living increases less than the assessment growth,” said finance director John Morrison. He told council on Nov. 26 it was about time the township made the switch to a three-year budget. “Some of the larger municipalities have been adopting this for at least a decade,” said Morrison. “Some of the smaller municipalities are now starting to engage in this process as well.” Morrison also presented council with other options, including placing the tax

levy increase at 2.89% as previously discussed and 2.88% and 2.44% in the subsequent years. However, Morrison suggested that option would not generate enough funding to meet a $9.6-million need in road reconstruction that extends beyond 2030. In a third option, Morrison outlined placing the 2020 tax levy increase at 4.82% and a consistent 4.6% and 4.8% for 2021 and 2022 respectively. The option would result in a slight tax increase of 0.26% in 2020 and would maintain discretionary reserves at the existing level, but it would also mean losing about $2.5 million in reserve funds. Councillors Paul Douglas and Michael Martin said they struggled to see the benefit of a three-year budget. “What does that look like, say a year from now, if we do have substantial cuts in provincial funding?” asked Douglas. According to Morrison, the three-year budget does not prevent council from increasing tax rates in any given year of their term. “Again, it’s a planning tool that we would engage in an ongoing conversation between ourselves,” said Morrison. While Martin said he

liked that the three-year plan would allow tenders to be sent out more quickly, he questioned whether council should introduce a three-year budget before the outcome of the water and wastewater project. “For this year I would probably prefer to see a oneyear budget, just until we get this RFP thing figured out,” said Martin. “It’s such a monetary value that it’s certainly nothing that I’ve had to make a decision on before in my term here on council.” He asked if council could continue with a single-year budget and then introduce a multi-year budget next year. Martin then reiterated the benefits of the 2.89% levy increase. “The number on the growth assessment [2.89%] for this year, I’m uncomfortable with that ... That kind of gives us a respite year and then we get the nice picture of where we’re at after this RFP process,” he added. Currently, the draft budget has $2 million set aside for next year to pay for the first phase of updates to the water and wastewater systems if the RFP process does not see a consortium take over the project. “I would caution lowering SEE MAPLETON » 3

Harriston setting for independent horror/thriller film HARRISTON – This community became a sort of Hollywood North Wellington for a few weeks last month, as an independent film crew featured the town and some area residents in an upcoming movie. Tailored Films and Makama Films were busy shooting scenes for a horror/thriller film in the area between Nov. 7 and 26. Godforsaken, written and directed by Ali Akbar Akbar Kamal, features locations in the town of Harriston and village of Clifford, several local residents in supporting roles, and a large crew of local extras. The film stars Harriston native Chad Tailor, a graduate and current faculty member of the Toronto Film School, who has collaborat-

ed with Kamal and Mariah MacDonald on several independent productions. Other productions filmed locally include A Done Deal (2013), and the short films The White Samurai (2014) and Arkham’s Journal (2015). The town of Minto approved a number of permits and “several individuals graciously opened up their doors” to facilitate the production, notes Tailor. “We’re filming here because the director has been with me on a couple of other projects here before and he loved Harriston when he was here and he actually wrote Harriston in when he was thinking of this film,” said Tailor in a Nov. 17 interview. “The town has opened up the doors and the response from the community has been amazing with all of the extras and the supporting

Bring the kids & enjoy this Christmas movie Dec. 6, 7 & 8

THE STAR

Rated G 86 mins

Friday & Saturday 8pm – all seats $5. Half price admission on Sunday 5pm matinee show only.

MAIN ST. W. PALMERSTON 519.343.3640 www.norgantheatre.com

roles and all of the locations. It’s what I love about this small town and this community is that they’re so open and so willing to help out on things like this.” Tailor credits Kamal as “the reason we are all here. “He has worked tirelessly on the script, character direction and his vision to make this all come together,” said Tailor. “Working with him has given me the ability to act at my best and discover things in the moment, and as a producing partner, he and his partner Mariah MacDonald have been dreams to work with.” In addition to main cast members, largely Toronto Film School alumni, Tailor said the film involves about 40 local residents as extras, and several members of the SEE MOVIE » 5

Local film shoot - Tailored Films and Makama Films were busy shooting scenes for a horror/thriller film in the Town of Minto between Nov. 7 and 26. Director Ali Akbar Akbar Kamal second from left, filming a scene in the basement of a Harriston home. Photo by Patrick Raftis

WEEKLY WAG

‘‘

By Patrick Raftis

“Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.” - Dr. Seuss

We want your

CARS, Kenilworth SCRAP Auto Recyclers Inc. TRUCKS, FARM

519-323-1113 We sell quality used auto parts for cars & trucks

MACHINERY, etc. Scrap metal bins avail. (14, 20, 30 & 40 cu. yd.)


2 | THE COMMUNITY NEWS | DECEMBER 5, 2019

Drayton blasts Bethel 6-1 goal by Tim Martin, assisted by Ryan Martin. DRAYTON 6 BETHEL 1 the opened Drayton game in the first period. Rob DeWeerd blasted a slap shot from the left boards to send the puck under the crossbar. Scott Nieuwland assisted. Bethel tied the game with Ian Martin jamming a loose puck into the short side. However, five unanswered goals in the third earned Drayton a convincing win. Third period goals were scored by Scott Nieuwland, Eric Decker, Dave Mulder, Rob and Mohle Cam DeWeerd. Assists were collected by DeWeerd (2), Colton Hoekstra (2), Brent Mulder, Jessie Keunan, Aaron

LISTOWEL 5 FLORADALE 1 Phil Shantz buried a rebound to register the first goal and give Listowel the lead after the first period. Brad Gratz assisted. Listowel added a goal in the second with a slapshot by Zach Gingrich that sent the puck through the goaltender's glove. Mike Gingrich assisted. Listowel added three in the third to put the game away. Shayne Martin, Josh Shantz and Mike Gingrich scored, assisted by Curtis Wagler, Trevor Kuepfer, Greg Kuepfer, Travis Bauman, Zach Gingrich and Kyle Streicher. Floradale stole the shut out bid with a power play

Good Old-fashioned

Christmas Wishes

We hope you and your loved ones cele brate a warm and happy holiday together. May health and good fortune follow you throughout the new year. Thanks for placing your trust in us. We look forward to a bright future toge ther.

Wishing you the peace and harmony of the season.

BROWN

Hoekstra, and Cam Mohle. COMMUNITY 5 MISSIONARY 2 Both teams traded a goal in the first to tie the game. Jeff Horst beat the net-minder with a wrist shot for the Community goal. John Horst and Brady Lane drew assists. responded Missionary with Pat Landman snapping the puck into the corner, assisted by Dylan Bults. The teams did the same in the second period. Joe Gerbe centred a pass from behind the net for Dustin Bults to snap the puck into the net for the Community goal. assisted also by Kevin Gingrich. Missionary evened the score with Tyson Robous snapping in a rebound. Dave Scholten assisted. Three late goals in the third earned Community the win. Jeff Horst scored his second of the night off a setup pass from John Horst. Dustin Bults rifled in a slap shot for the insurance goal, assisted by Gerbe and Gingrich. An empty net goal by Tony Martin sealed the win for Community. - Submitted by Willard Metzger

3 Hilwood Drive

519-638-3039

Please join us as Tonia-Joy sings some of your favourite Christmas Hymns and songs. If the school buses in North Wellington are cancelled so are our programs. People of all faiths welcome! Presentations are free and begin at 12:30 p.m. Come for lunch @ noon for just $12. Please register by calling 519-638-1000.

MOOREFIELD

Your Farm & Rural Insurance Specialist

SHELBURNE - Ontario Horticulture Association District 7 director Kathy Bouma welcomed 100 members and guests to the District 7 fall meeting held recently at the Royal Canadian Legion here. Shelburne and District Horticultural Society president Wayne Hannon noted the group was pleased to host the event with the assistance of the Grand Valley Horticultural Society. Guest speakers Viki Reynolds and Ian Payne of Not So Hollow Farm listed the 10 top reasons to plant native plants including that they produce food for pollinators and wildlife, adapt and thrive in local conditions, and are essential for a healthy planet. International show judge Roland Craig remarked that an excellent job was done by all who entered the competitions. Jane McDonald announced there were 32

Friday, December 13th • 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Drayton Reformed Church 74 Wellington Street S, Drayton

PALMERSTON

519-343-2420

By Bonnie Whitehead

“Tonia-Joy Skipper”

INSURANCE 195 Main Street

Yenssen wins Judge’s Choice award at OHA District 7 flower show

Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network

9 Wellington St. S., Drayton www.secureinsurance.ca Call for a quote

Consider us first!

519.638.3091 Licensed brokers for

Garett Hawkins

Dec 5

Drayton Skating Club Lasagna Dinner Fundraiser Fundraiser, PMD Arena Hall, 5-7pm. $15 per meal incl. lasagna, salad, roll & dessert. Take out only. Walk-ins welcome. Contact the club for tickets.

Dec 6

Drayton Santa Claus Parade at 7pm. Floats will line up at the Drayton Fairgrounds at 6:30pm. Families can head to the Drayton Fire Hall to meet Santa Claus and warm up with hot chocolate & cookies. Children will also receive bags of candy.

Dec 7

Breakfast with Santa at Gramma Jo’s Restaurant in Clifford. 8-11 am. Donations to the Children’s Wish Foundation of Canada.

Dec 7

Moorefield Optimist Club 2019 Christmas Dinner & Dance Party. Cocktails: 6pm, Dinner: 7pm. Dance follows. Tickets $50: Glenn 226-792-8537.

Dec 7

Moorefield Optimist Santa Clause parade, 2pm. Parade lineup at 1pm at The Murray Group. Meet santa after parade at corner of McGivern St. & Caroline St. Enterfloat: Dan 226-338-3434. Donations of non perishable food items accepted at KA Hammonds.

John Hagarty

Dec 7

Breakfast with Santa, 8-11am at Harry Stones, 19 Elora St. S, Harriston. By donation, all proceeds to Children's Burn Hospital and towards Children's disease. Presented by Pal Mocha Shriners.

Dec 7

Alma Christmas Tree Lighting at 7pm, Optimist Park Tree. Caroling, cookies & hot chocolate!

Dec 7

Alma Christmas Craft Market at Alma Community Centre 10am-2pm. Sponsored by the Alma Optimist Club. Warm lunch will be available.

Dec 7

Palmerston Santa Claus Parade at 7pm. Parade lines up at the Ashland Transport lot at 6pm. Palmerston Kinettes collecting non-perishable food items for local food bank along the route. Meet Santa & get candy at Legion after parade. Donations toward parade cost accepted by any firefighter. For info: Don Harrow 519-343-3488.

Dec 9

Donating blood is one of the most direct ways you can help someone. Donate blood in Drayton, book your appt online or call 1-888-2donate.

PMD ARENA SCHEDULE Dec. 6

8:00pm, Bantam LL vs South Bruce Blades

Dec. 7

10:00am, Sr Development Black vs Howick 10:00am, Sr Development Orange vs Mount Forest 5:30pm – 6:20pm, Stick and Puck 6:30pm – 7:50pm, Public Skating

Dec. 8

9:00am – 9:50am, Stick and Puck 2:00pm, Atom R vs Seaforth Stars 3:15pm, Major Novice R vs Wingham 3:15pm, Major Novice LL vs Walkerton Capitals 2

Dec. 11

11:00am – 12:00pm, Parent and Tot Skating 12:00pm – 1:00pm, Adult Skating 8:30pm, Midget R vs Mitchell Meteors AE

Dec. 12

11:00am – 12:00pm, Parent and Tot Skating 12:00pm – 1:00pm, Adult Skating

floral designs and 24 horticultural entries. Jean Yenssen won the Judge’s Choice award. Other winners were Irma Baumlisberger, Debbie Williams, Dorelene Anderson, Jean Gordon, and Michelle Goff. Guest speaker Amber Swidersky of Petals Flowers Company shared tips on how

to create a bouquet of flowers from your own garden. Hannon shared a workshop idea and his recipe for creating stepping stones and turning stuffed toys into statuary for your gardens. The annual meeting will be held April 18 hosted by the Orangeville and District Horticultural Society.

Mobile household waste depot in Riverston through December WELLINGTON NORTH The county’s mobile household hazardous waste depot is moving from the Elora waste facility to the Riverstown waste facility for the month of December. The mobile depot will be operational starting Dec. 5. The waste facility is locat-

ed at: 7254 Sideroad 5 West, Wellington North Township. The facility is open Tuesday through Saturday from 8am to 4pm and open to all Wellington County residents. For the full Mobile HHW Depot schedule visit www. wellington.ca/hhw

Correction

Casting on Dec. 9 and 10 EVENT CALENDAR

Brokers for all lines of insurance

District meeting - Flower Show convenor Jane McDonald, left, announced Jean Yenssen had won Judge’s Choice, selected by international show judge Roland Craig, at the Ontario Horticultural Association District 7 fall meeting in Shelburne. Photo by Bonnie Whitehead

Send your non-profit events to drayton@wellingtonadvertiser.com

An incorrect date was published for the Grey Wellington Theatre Guild casting for its spring production of comedy Five Alarm in an article on page 2 of the Nov. 28 issue of the Community News.

Castings are open to anyone interested and will be held at the Harriston Town Hall Theatre, 68 Elora Street South, Harriston, on Dec. 9 and 10 at 7:30pm. For information call 519338-3681.

Balanced Books Bookkeeping Services Tracey Goulding, Bookkeeper

519.638.2206

balancedbookstg@gmail.com

63 Andrews Drive, Drayton


DECEMBER 5, 2019 | THE COMMUNITY NEWS | 3

Township to offer free use of arena, community centres for service clubs, minor sports, seniors events By Aryn Strickland MAPLETON Use of the PMD Arena and Maryborough Community Centre for events will be free for not-for-profit groups, minor sport teams and seniors’ shuffleboard as of Jan. 1. The groups exempt from fees will save a combined total of about $14,513, based on fees collected in 2019. Council directed staff to make the change to the fees and charges bylaw on Nov. 26. In 2019 service clubs and minor sports teams paid $7,813 in rental fees while the seniors shuffleboard program paid $6,700. The decision to waive fees for these groups stemmed from public outcry. “We thought it was a good idea to create a report based on the feedback from the original fees and charges report that said we should recover some of our cost,” said CAO Manny Baron.

“Clearly there was some letters sent to council with concerns. So it caused public works and ourselves to take a deeper dive into what the actual impact is for nonprofit groups.” The report looked at how many times these groups rented the facilities and how much they paid each year. Service clubs include the Alma Optimist Club, Moorefield Optimist Club, Drayton Kinsmen and Drayton Kinettes, Drayton Rotary, 100 Women Who Care, Mapleton Historical Society and the township’s two firefighters associations. Minor sports organizations include Drayton Minor Hockey, Drayton Moorefield Minor Ball, Moorefield Athletic Association and Drayton District Figure Skating. “Are we comfortable with the organizations that are on here?” Mayor Gregg Davidson asked council. Councillor Marlene

Ottens requested the Community Craft Show be added to the list. “It’s run completely by volunteers and all the profits are donated back to local sports organizations. So the whole event is done for the betterment of the community ... this is their only thing they do,” she said. Davidson also suggested including the Mapleton Chamber of Commerce, which used the community centre in 2018 to host an all candidates meeting. “So that’s up in the air whether council wants to include that or not. If it’s something for the betterment of the community or our business community ... that’s up to council to decide,” said Davidson. Councillor Paul Douglas asked if the Drayton Kinsmen were already paying a reduced rate for the use of the facilities. Public works director Sam Mattina confirmed that

Mapleton sets 2019 levy target » FROM PAGE 1

the tax burden without considering your growth for the next 10 years is a problematic exercise,” said Morrison. Mayor Gregg Davidson reminded council that as part of the strategic plan, council outlined the total debt-to-reserve ratio should not exceed 2:1. “Mr. Morrison, of the three options, which one is the best option to get the council’s goal of a two-to-one ratio?” asked Davidson. “Option two would move it the fastest, but option three really is a fairly conservative approach as well,” confirmed Morrison. Municipal growth Much of the discussion focused around growth. “In your one comment (you mentioned) the increasing pressures that growth places on the municipality, on infrastructure ... So if growth isn’t paying for growth and the overall levy isn’t decreasing for the average person, why do we even bother to grow then?” asked Martin. “I think some of the issues here is this municipality hasn’t seen enough growth. It’s been slow, almost non-

existent,” said Morrison. He added other municipalities have development charge funds that are much higher. “But their levies and their reserves are also paying for a lot of the intensive capital requirements that are necessary,” said Morrison. “I agree with Mr. Morrison that we need to look at growth and things were done in the past that didn’t help us grow good enough, like decisions were made,” said councillor Marlene Ottens. “So here we are. We need the growth now.” She asked whether council could introduce a threeyear budget next year if it overlaps with a municipal election. Morrison confirmed it could not. Martin said it could be a two-year budget instead. “I’m not sure because while it is important, I 100% agree with pretty much everything you’re saying, is it not also important to reflect back on say the previous 10 years and see where you’re coming from?” Martin asked. “Because at the end of the

day, whether it’s the taxes you guys are jacking at the county or whether we’re doing it here, it’s still the same person paying right, so ... that’s really where I’m torn,” he said. “I don’t think there’s one person around this table that wants to see their own taxes go up,” said Davidson. “Absolutely none of us want to see this but we have to look long term at what is best for the community and what is going to be good down the road. “If we can accomplish both goals, which I think we can with option two or three, the first tier of option two is high but for the next two are quite low and that said, that’s great for the rate payer.” Following the discussion Martin suggested placing the tax levy increase at 4.82% for 2020, which was supported by Douglas. A recorded vote resulted in a 3-2 split, with councillors Marlene Ottens and Dennis Craven and Mayor Davidson voting for placing the 2020 tax levy increase at 8.91% and councillors Douglas and Martin opposed. Council expects to pass the budget on Dec. 10.

Christmas Pet Food Drive EVEN PETS NEED OUR HELP THIS HOLIDAY SEASON!

NE W Patients Welcome

7294 Wellington St. N. Drayton | 519-638-3391

All monetary and pet food donations will be given to the local food banks to provide for pets in need during the holiday season.

a resolution from council was passed to discount the Drayton Farm Show. “I just don’t have the particular details right now,” he said. Councillors Dennis Craven, Michael Martin and Marlene Ottens supported waiving the fees for the organizations. “I’d certainly support a discount for service clubs and the minor sports organizations and seniors,” said Martin. “As far as the rest of the communities that pop up for certain events, maybe less ... as long as they are a registered group locally that puts their own time and energy into this type of thing as well. Like, I can see my way through that ... What that percentage looks like, I don’t know.” Ottens asked how the township would define which groups are eligible. Davidson clarified it would be organizations that rented facilities most often

over the years, as highlighted by township staff in their report. “This is not all the rentals that are taking place in our township,” said Davidson. “These are just pulled out as users that use it most frequently and we have a four-year look to make sure that we have a good understanding of who uses it more often, and what that impact would be to the community if we change the rates, not only for reducing the amount of income we bring into the township, but also what these groups can actually give back to the community. “I’m leaning towards 100 per cent for the seniors group just because that money can be used elsewhere and we certainly want to make sure that our seniors are active.” Council agreed it could decide whether or not to add other organizations to the list as requests come forward in the future. Douglas proposed a 100%

SERVICESNOTICE

fee reduction for service clubs and sports organizations for the first year followed by a 75% reduction afterwards. Martin and Davidson made other suggestions about how to prevent monopolization of the facilities. “Maybe the CAO can monitor it that if there’s one organization that books the hall for every Thursday, you know, maybe there needs to be some sort of monitoring log, even if the facility is used more because it’s now free,” said Martin. Conversely Davidson suggested making rentals free for these groups up to a certain amount of dollars, without council going into further detail. Martin also requested Reach Forth Hockey be added to the list. Davidson supported the addition. Council voted to approve waiving the rental fees for the organizations outlined; Douglas was opposed.

MORE NOTICES » PAGE 6

TOWNSHIP OF MAPLETON

7275 Sideroad 16, P.O. Box 160, Drayton, ON N0G 1P0 Phone: 519-638-3313, Fax: 519-638-5113, Toll Free: 1-800-385-7248 www.mapleton.ca

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING FOR AN AMENDMENT TO THE MAPLETON ZONING BY-LAW AND NOTICE OF COMPLETE APPLICATION ZBA 2019-18 TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Corporation of the Township of Mapleton has received a complete application to consider a proposed amendment to the Comprehensive Zoning By-law 2010-80, pursuant to Section 34 of the Planning Act, R.S.O. 1990, as amended. PUBLIC MEETING Mapleton Council will consider this application at their meeting scheduled for:

Tuesday, December 10, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Mapleton Township Municipal Offices, Council Chambers, 7275 Sideroad 16 Location of the Subject Land The property subject to the proposed amendment is legally described as Part of Lot 17, Plan 61R-20187 being Lots 17 to 24 on approved draft plan of subdivision 23T-10005. The property is approximately 0.46 ha (1.14 ac) and currently vacant. The location is shown on the map below. The Purpose and Effect of the Application The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to rezone the subject lands from Low Density Residential (R1C) to Medium Density Residential (R2) to facilitate the construction of 6 semi-detached dwellings (12 units total). Additional relief may be considered at this meeting. Oral or Written Submissions Any person or public body is entitled to attend the public meeting and make written or oral submissions in support of or in opposition to the proposed zoning by-law amendment. Written comments should be submitted to the Township Clerk at the address shown below. Power of the Tribunal to Dismiss Appeals If a person or public body would otherwise have an ability to appeal the decision of the Council of the Township of Mapleton to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal but the person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Township of Mapleton before the by-law is passed, the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision. If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting, or make written submissions to the Township of Mapleton before the by-law is passed, the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal unless, in the opinion of the Tribunal, there are reasonable grounds to do so. Request for Notice of Decision If you wish to be notified of the decision in respect of the proposed Township of Mapleton Zoning By-law Amendment, you must make a written request to the Clerk. Additional Information For more information about this matter, including information about appeal rights, please contact or visit the Municipal Office at the address shown below. O. Reg. 470/09, s. 2: 179/16, s. 2 The application and any additional information is available to the public for inspection at the Township of Mapleton Municipal Office during office hours. Dated at the Township of Mapleton This 19th day of November 2019. Barb Schellenberger, Clerk Township of Mapleton 7275 Sideroad 16 Drayton, ON N0G 1P0 Phone: 519.638.3313 Ext.023 Fax: 519.638.5113 bschellenberger@mapleton.ca


4 | THE COMMUNITY NEWS | DECEMBER 5, 2019 THE

COMMUNITY NEWS Published by W.H.A. Publications Limited P.O. Box 252, Fergus, Ontario, N1M 2W8 905 Gartshore Street, Fergus Telephone 1-844-843-5410 Fax 519-843-7607 drayton@wellingtonadvertiser.com Published on Thursdays Deadline: Monday at 10am Subscriptions $58.79 plus HST in Canada

CLIFFORD – Minto residents Dave and Jean Anderson will host their fourth annual community Christmas dinner here on Dec. 25. The Andersons, who celebrate Christmas with their families on days other than Dec. 25, hosted the dinner for the first time in 2016, having no idea what to expect. The first Andersons’ Community Christmas drew between 140 and 150 people, including volunteer helpers, who enjoyed a meal at the Harriston-Minto Community Centre, while another 25 meals were delivered to shutins or people working on Christmas Day. The 2017 event, also held in Harriston, attracted 225 to the communal dinner, with 50 takeout meals served to community members who

Ontario Community Newspaper Association

Canadian Community Newspaper Association

Publisher: Dave Adsett Editor: Chris Daponte Reporters: Patrick Raftis | Aryn Strickland Sales Representatives: Faye Craig | Crystal Seifried

Circulation: 7,406

Graphic Designer: Alicia Roza GENERAL POLICY: Persons wishing information regarding circulation, rates and additional service, etc. should feel free to contact the staff. The Publisher accepts responsibility for claims and honours agreements made by himself or by regular staff on his behalf. No responsibility is accepted for actions of persons not in the employ of the paper, or otherwise over whom the Publisher has no control. All advertising accepted is done so in good faith. Advertising is accepted on the condition that, in the event of typographical error, that portion of the advertising space occupied by the erroneous item, together with a reasonable allowances for signatures, will not be charged for, but the balance of the advertisements will be paid for at the applicable rate. In the event of a typographical error advertising goods or services at a wrong price, goods or services may not be sold. Advertising is merely an offer to sell, and may be withdrawn at any time.

Christmas dinner - Minto residents Jean and David Anderson are organizing a community Christmas dinner at the Harriston-Minto Community Centre on Dec. 25. The event is free for anyone who wishes to join in a time of community fellowship. Community News file photo couldn’t attend. The third provided a holiday meal and social time for about 240 diners at the community centre in Palmerston.

is prepared to accept an “as is where is” offer of $130,000 plus HST for the 2010 John Deere 770GP with 6,000 hours. The report states the unit requires a retrofit of a snow wing and one-way plow to accommodate winter operations using existing implements and six new tires for around $40,000, bringing the total to $170,000 plus HST. Private sale of the town’s 2000 Champion grader is expected to produce $20,000 to $30,000 in revenue. The report notes other units that

By Patrick Raftis

EDITORIAL By Patrick Raftis

Hall subsidy returns Mapleton council appears to have turned back the clock in its method of handling requests from community groups to waive rental fees on township facilities. At the Nov. 26 meeting, council directed that use of the PMD Arena and Maryborough Community Centre for hosting events will be free for not-for-profit groups, minor sport teams and seniors’ shuffleboard as of Jan. 1. In total the groups exempt from the fees will save a combined estimate of $14,513, based on the groups’ fees in 2019. Council made the decision in response to complaints from the public. “We thought it was a good idea to create a report based on the feedback from the original fees and charges report that said we should recover some of our cost. Clearly there was some letters sent to council with concerns,” said CAO Manny Baron. “So it caused public works and ourselves to take a deeper dive into what the actual impact is for non-profit groups.” Part of the reasoning behind the blanket fee elimination is to take the pressure off council for deciding who does, and does not, get a discount. The move is pretty much a complete reversal of the approach taken in 2016, when the council of the day decided to stick to the fee schedule for all facility renters in order to avoid being drawn into the trap of choosing winners and losers, so to speak, among hall renters. It also means a return to an approach that compels every taxpayer to provide additional support for every fundraiser held in a township facility through an addition to the annual recreation deficit. Through the deficit, taxpayers already provide a measure of support for all events at the facility, charitable or otherwise. Fewer municipalities these days are choosing to subsidize facility use in this fashion, opting instead to insist groups pay the already-subsidized rates in existence. However, as long as ratepayers are fine with it, it’s not a problem. It’s to be hoped though, that at least those benefiting from subsidies will remember the gesture when they get their tax bill. That’s not always the case.

Em ail you r letter to the edit or to drayto n@ wel ling ton advert iser.com

The 2019 dinner will be held at the Clifford Community Centre at 1pm on Christmas Day and is open to everyone who would like

MINTO – Town council has authorized the purchase of a used grader for $130,000. At the Nov. 20 meeting, road and drainage manager Mike McIsaac reported the town is looking to replace a 19-year-old grader “which has been extended over the end of its useful life and in need of substantial repairs.” McIsaac’s report explains that Brandt Tractor (Nortrax) has obtained a grader unit that is well known to town staff as a trade-in. The dealer

Get Your Smile Back! Mount Forest Denture Clinic

Peter Feige DD, FCAD Your denture specialist

Tuesday, Wednesday & Saturday (by appointment only)

129 Main St. N., Mount Forest 519-323-2331

• All Dental Plans Accepted • Full & Partial Dentures • Problem Dentures • Same Day Repairs • Lab On Premises • Over 30 Year’s Experience

www.owensounddenturist.ca

Hey Kids!

PROOF OF YOUR AD for the April 12 issue, every other week TFN 3 columns x 3” - $189.00 + HST per issue plus colour charge

NTA SisAon his

PLEASE REPLY WITH YOUR APPROVAL AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

way!

Thank you, Helen Michel - Production Dept.

are currently available with similar hours are selling for approximately $265,000 and a new unit could be expected to cost up to $450,000. Treasurer/acting clerk Gordon Duff said the town’s equipment reserve contained sufficient funds for the purchase. “This grader was a tradein by the county and so it has 6,000 hours on it. Those 6,000 hours are summer hours, so it’s a pretty good deal … and we know it’s in good shape,” commented Mayor George Bridge.

HARRISTON - The entire community is invited to join the Grey Wellington Theatre Guild (GWTG) for an oldfashioned Christmas Carol Sing on Dec. 15 at 1:30pm at the Harriston Town Hall Theatre. “You are the singers and we are the hosts,” guild officials state. Musical GWTG The Troupe will perform to warm up the crowd before the open carol sing. Everyone is welcome, officials state - “Just bring pot luck snacks and Christmas spirit.”

PLEASE NOW OPEN READ: ames « Puzzles Toys « G

Please check to make sure that the information is correct. Mark any errors on this copy and email or fax back to (519) 843-7607 or call (519) 843-5410 by TUESDAY NOON.

44 Arthur St. E Harriston (519) 338-5050

IF WE DO NOT HEAR FROM YOU, YOUR AD WILL BE PRINTED IN THE NEWSPAPER AS IT IS HERE. DEADLINES: Our deadlines for ad submission is MONDAY AT 3:00 P.M. Our deadline for error corrections is TUESDAY AT NOON. Please feel free to call us to discuss your ad.

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

@kiddingaroundtoys

Bring this ad in and get

10% OFF any item in store

Ads are designed for our publication ONLY. We do not charge for design however if you would like a jpeg version of your ad for social media a nominal $20 charge will apply.

Frmeue nity om The

Moorefield Optimists

Santa Claus Parade! Sat. December 7, 2pm Parade Lineup: 1pm at The Murray Group

TO ENTER A FLOAT: Dan 226.338.3434

Meet Sa n after para ta d at corne e McGivern r of S Caroline t. & St.

Donations of non-perishable food items accepted at K.A. Hammonds.

Christmas

Wellington Advertiser

Co

Skate Fergus, Ont.

Please sign your APPROVAL

LCOME!

ALL WE

NOTE:

A CANCELLATION FEE OF

$50

Sponsored by:

applies to any ads cancelled after MONDAY AT 5PM.

Annual

The Kinette Club of Drayton’s

to attend. “Come and join for a time of fellowship,” the Andersons urge. There is no charge to attend the event, which features a traditional Christmas meal with all the trimmings. The event is not a fundraiser. However numerous cash donations were received, both before and at previous events, with the surplus split between local food banks. While meal delivery is also available for those who can’t attend, the Andersons encourage everyone interested to join them at the event. Rides are available for those who need transportation. To reserve a spot for the dinner, request a ride or a delivered meal, donate or volunteer, contact Jean at 519505-5914 or jeanurse1@gmail. com.

Purchase of used grader approved Carol sing

YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER

We wou ld lo ve to he ar yo ur op in io n.

Fourth Andersons’ Community Christmas to be held in Clifford hall on Dec. 25

TOY DRIVE

Shop local & drop off unwrapped gifts & stocking items at one of the following: Dobben’s Hardware, Drayton Freshmart, Drayton Chop House, Marspan Home Hardware, The Pretty Penny, & the Moorefield Diner.

We are accepting new toys for children and stocking stuffers for teens.

DEC. 14 7 - 9 pm

PMD ARE NA, DRAYTON


DECEMBER 5, 2019 | THE COMMUNITY NEWS | 5

Movie shot in Minto features local residents as extras and supporting cast » FROM PAGE 1

Harriston-based Grey Wellington Theatre Guild (GWTG) in supporting roles. Kamal said he has been impressed with the calibre of the local recruits. “They take direction really well and they’re not very shy … they’re awesome,” he stated. “It’s a beautiful town,” the director continued. “Chad also knows a lot of people, which helps us in the production and budget and the people are very nice and accommodating. So that’s a big thing for a movie production.” For local residents involved, the experience has been unique. “I think it’s fantastic. Each year I always tell my family I want to do something different and this is certainly it for this year, being able to be in front of the camera and actually take a character and develop it,” said Harriston resident Dan Bieman, who portrays a priest in the film. Bieman’s son Jake is currently studying film and television at Fanshawe College in London and appreciated the chance to be involved, both as an extra and a production assistant. “Chad called me up. He knew I was in the program and that I was passionate about film and thought it would be a great experience to be on set and experience a real live film production,” said Jake, who noted he learned a great deal from the professionals involved. “At school, we more or less use our own crews full of students and here it’s people working in the industry, so you really get a sense of all the work that we practice doing put into action, and how everyone is coming together as a community.” “It’s been such an incredible experience,” said Flora Burke of Mount Forest, who also plays a supporting role. The veteran of many GWTG stage productions,

Burke said this was her first opportunity to be involved with a motion picture. “I’ve had so much fun. Everybody’s been so kind to me and it’s a great crew to work with, really interesting stuff. Everybody’s been really professional too … Everybody’s doing exactly what they’re supposed to be doing, when they’re supposed to be doing it.” Acting is acting, but film offers one advantage over the stage, Burke notes. “You get a chance to do over … the multiple takes are different,” she pointed out. In addition to writing Godforsaken and directing the film, Kamal is also financing the independent production. “This is a documentarystyle horror film, and Ali wrote the lead very real and with me in mind,” said Tailor. “So basically I’m a filmmaker and I come back to my town for my high school friend’s funeral.” After some disturbing events at the funeral, Tailor

continues, “I go back to Toronto to get a couple of my filmmaker friends because we want to find out what happened, we want to make a documentary about this miracle, we want to know the facts.” Tailor said the plan is to enter Godforsaken in the Toronto After Dark Film Festival and other horror genre film festivals, then look for further distribution. “The big plan is always movie theatres. But in this day and age there’s always other stuff like Netflix, Hulu … we want to go as big as we can,” said Kamal. While the film shoot covered 18 days, Tailor said the team has been working on organizational aspects of production since June and is planning to take the next six months to work on postproduction. “Editing, sound mixing, visual effects and color correction takes time when collaborating with other creative specialists to produce the final cut,” he explained.

Local talent - LEFT: Harriston native Chad Tailor, left, stars in the locally-filmed movie Godforsaken, while Harriston resident Dan Bieman, right, plays a clergyman in the film. RIGHT: Special effects makeup artist Sara Feehan prepares Kes Battams of Listowel for a scene. Photos by Patrick Raftis

Crowd scene - Director Ali Akbar Akbar Kamal right, gets set to film a crowd scene populated by a large group of local extras.

Seasonn’sgs G r e e ti

Hey kids ! Have yo ur photo ta ke with San n ta!

Our Honey is available at our farm, Alpaca Time, Harriston Co-op, Harriston Packing Co., Scoop It, Meat the Butcher (Mount Forest), Harriston & Palmerston Foodland and Mapleton’s Organic

a t n a S Christmas Ideas 6105 12th Line, Harriston cedarwoodhoney.com | 519.994.4400

! g n i m o is c

Saturday, December 7th 11:30am-1:30pm Customer ti Apprecia on Day

Start here! Housewares and Small Appliances

One of our gift car ds make the perfect

GIFT!

December 7 FREE DRAW for a gift card

and

Dewallt & Milwaukee tools

Ertl & Bruder Toys

MAR-SPAN

Home Hardware Building Centre 7873 WELLINGTON ROAD 8, 1KM EAST OF DRAYTON 519-638-2420 | www.marspan.com Mon-Fri: 7:00am - 6:00pm | Sat: 8:00am - 4:00pm

Puzzles and Games

5% OFF over $25 our Order y as Christm day. to Baking starts Pricing 5! at $1

Drayton

Party trays

Large veggie Large fruit Cream cheese pinwheels Med cheese and crackers

$4999

$5999 $4999 $4799

90 WELLINGTON ST. S, DRAYTON | 519.638.2041

HOURS: Monday-Wednesday 8-8, HOURS EFFECTIVE MARCH 26: Thursday-Friday 8-9, Saturday 11-5 Mon-Wed 8-8, Thu-Fri 8-9, Sat8-6, 8-6,Sunday Sun 11-5

Drayton Freshmart


6 | THE COMMUNITY NEWS | DECEMBER 5, 2019

By Rev. Calvin Brown

The best of friends The article read: The fallout from Prince Andrew’s disastrous interview about his friendship with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein has seen his official royal role collapse to almost nothing in 10 days. Just days after Andrew, 59, announced he was stepping away from public duties for the “foreseeable future” on Nov. 20 ... “His entire public existence has been wiped

out.” Our culture has been growing more and more intolerant and less and less merciful in this last decade. Some refer to it as political correctness and when people are not on the latest bandwagon or try to point out there is another point of view then they are lambasted as out of touch. They are often accused unfairly of not being in complete sympathy with something that is generally conceded as wrong and which they also condemn as unacceptable behaviour. If

Monday, December 9th

Community Christian School, 35 High St., Drayton, 3:30-7:30pm

blood.ca or 1-888-2-DONATE

Group appts (3+): tara.gutscher@blood.ca, 519-884-5646 x4883

you do not come across as 100% against the wrong action by showing your abhorrence through banishing and abandoning all including a friend who may have gotten caught up in the act, then you are yourself considered guilty by association. Indeed it is not even required that the case be proven. It is enough to be accused. The old axiom of law that a person is considered innocent until proven guilty is gone by the board and to avoid ostracism one must present proof of their innocence up front before a hearing is held. Andrew’s crime it seems is that he didn’t jump off the bandwagon of condemning and abandoning his friend soon enough. He even dared to visit the friend who had

SERVICESNOTICE TOWNSHIP OF MAPLETON

7275 Sideroad 16, P.O. Box 160, Drayton, ON N0G 1P0 Phone: 519-638-3313, Fax: 519-638-5113, Toll Free: 1-800-385-7248 www.mapleton.ca

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING FOR AN AMENDMENT TO THE MAPLETON ZONING BY-LAW AND NOTICE OF COMPLETE APPLICATION ZBA 2019-19 TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Corporation of the Township of Mapleton has received a complete application to consider a proposed amendment to the Comprehensive Zoning By-law 2010-80, pursuant to Section 34 of the Planning Act, R.S.O. 1990, as amended. PUBLIC MEETING Mapleton Council will consider this application at their meeting scheduled for:

Tuesday, December 10, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Mapleton Township Municipal Offices, Council Chambers, 7275 Sideroad 16 Location of the Subject Land The property subject to the proposed amendment is legally described as Part Lot 17, Concession 11 (Maryborough) with a civic address of 25 Industrial Drive, Drayton. The property is approximately 0.54 ha (1.34 ac) and currently vacant. The location is shown on the map below. The Purpose and Effect of the Application The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to rezone the subject lands to permit the construction of an approximately 585 m2 (6300 ft2) building to be used as a fitness facility and commercial/retail rental space. The applicants are also proposing to double the size of the building in the future for additional commercial/retail rental spaces. The subject property is currently vacant and zoned General Industrial (M1). Additional relief may be considered at this meeting Oral or Written Submissions Any person or public body is entitled to attend the public meeting and make written or oral submissions in support of or in opposition to the proposed zoning by-law amendment. Written comments should be submitted to the Township Clerk at the address shown below. Power of Tribunal to Dismiss Appeals If a person or public body would otherwise have an ability to appeal the decision of the Council of the Township of Mapleton to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal but the person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Township of Mapleton before the by-law is passed, the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision. If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting, or make written submissions to the Township of Mapleton before the by-law is passed, the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal unless, in the opinion of the Tribunal, there are reasonable grounds to do so. Request for Notice of Decision If you wish to be notified of the decision in respect of the proposed Township of Mapleton Zoning By-law Amendment, you must make a written request to the Clerk. Additional Information For more information about this matter, including information about appeal rights, please contact or visit the Municipal Office at the address shown below. O. Reg. 470/09, s. 2: 179/16, s. 2 The application and any additional information is available to the public for inspection at the Township of Mapleton Municipal Office during office hours. Dated at the Township of Mapleton This 20th day of November 2019. Barb Schellenberger, Clerk Township of Mapleton 7275 Sideroad 16 Drayton, ON N0G 1P0 Phone: 519.638.3313 Ext.023 Fax: 519.638.5113 bschellenberger@mapleton.ca

been a great help to him in the past in business and social connections. The question I want to raise is how should a friend act? When I was growing up my mother instructed me about what she called “fair weather” friends. The term referred to people who stood with you in the good times but when trouble came they abandoned you and fled in the opposite direction. The implication was that “fairweather friends” were moral defectives. They lacked the courage of standing by their friends if it was unpopular. That does not mean that they were to deny the trouble or support their friend in wrongdoing. In fact a truly good friend would be the first to confront the bad behaviour and call for repentance (a hasty change of behaviour). In Psalm 1 we read the counsel to the wise which advises: Blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked or stand in the way of sinners or sit in the seat of mockers. But his delight is in

the law of the Lord and on his law he meditates day and night. We are to be good influences not bad but we can only influence when we stand beside them as they go through trouble and advise them always to take the way of righteousness and wisdom. What kind of friend was Jesus? He stood with his friends even when to do so led to his death. Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. John 15:13

He is a friend who sticks closer than a brother. One who has unreliable friends soon comes to ruin, but there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother. Prov.18: 24

If either of them falls down, one can help the other up. But pity anyone who falls and has no one to help them up. Ecclesiastes 4:10 He is a friend who shares his secrets. John 15:1517 New International Version (NIV) 15 I no longer call you ser-

vants, because a servant does not know his master’s busi-

ness. Instead, I have called you friends, for everything that I learned from my Father I have made known to you. 16 You did not choose me, but I chose you and appointed you so that you might go and bear fruit—fruit that will last— and so that whatever you ask in my name the Father will give you. 17 This is my command: Love each other. Jesus is the friend who promises to never leave us or forsake us. Matthew 28:20 New International Version (NIV): 20 teach them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” It would be a better world if we all were friends like Jesus and most importantly of all it would be the best world possible if we all had Jesus as our friend. Let us keep this in mind as we recall that old Canadian gospel hymn: What a friend we have in Jesus all our sins and griefs to bear, What a privilege to carry everything to God in prayer.

Local residents recognized with Green Legacy Award GUELPH - Liz and Reg Samis of Mapleton were recognized with the Green Legacy Agricultural Award of Excellence at the Nov. 28 Wellington County council meeting. With the award, Green Legacy aims to recognize farmers who have demonstrated strong environmental leadership by promoting the value of trees on farms and re-examining their farm practices to engage in up-to date methods that support good land stewardship. In the last 40 years, Liz and Reg Samis have planted over 25,000 trees on the farms they have owned. The couple planted trees on an estimated 30 to 40 acres of the 550 acres farmed in windbreaks, stream buffers and forested lands, while acting as leaders in their community to endorse healthy farming practices. Self-proclaimed “conventional farmers” the Samis’ have owned four farms, including a commercial farrow to finish hog operation

Tree huggers - Liz and Reg Samis of Mapleton have been recognized with the Agricultural Award of Excellence. County of Wellington photo producing 6,000 hogs per year as well as the cropping operations. For a period of time they had beef cows and a small feedlot. Understanding the toll that farming takes on the land early in their farming careers, they were open to looking at the benefits of trees for protecting their top soil and waterways. Adding trees to their farms resulted in decommissioning two pas-

Drayton Kinsmen

Top Quality Christmas Trees FOR SALE

at

Dobben’s True Value in Drayton

FIR & SPRUCE

45

$

Per Tree, Tax Inc.

Have a Merry Christmas!

January 4, 2020 Foodbank Tree-Drive: Curbside pickup in Drayton and Moorefield or Drop-Off at Kin-Room, by 9:00 a.m. with foodbank donation attached.

Proceeds to Cystic Fibrosis Research

tures along the Conestoga tributary and installing a riparian buffer. Trees now shade the water, prevent runoff and livestock from entering and contaminating the stream. The five windbreaks planted on their farms have contributed to average or better than average annual yields and they have plans to install two more. To manage existing forests, the Samis’ hired professional foresters, Williams and Associates, who were also employed to increase and create additional naturalized areas. They reduced their tillage well over 20 years ago when Reg attended a soil conservation training. Their new practices resulted in becoming one of the earlier farms with residue left in their fields and more trees on their farm and led to conversations about evolving farm practices with members of their community. “We must also commend Liz and Reg for their activity within community,” states a press release from Green Legacy. Liz, who is a University of Guelph Graduate in Animal Science was a member of Trees for Mapleton at its inception in 2006, served for a time as its chair and has continued to sit on the committee for the past 15 years. She was the provincial director representing Wellington County and sat on the environmental committee for Ontario Pork. She was the business development workshop leader for Growing Forward and presented Environmental Farm Plan workshops, programs administered by the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association. She was the national chair of the Quality Assurance Program for Food Safety for the Canadian Pork Council and is presently active with the local historical society. SEE GREEN LEGACY » 8


credits the success of the proand found it through MYC. Ms. Tanis recognized the gram to the parents of her stuprogram’s potential since it had dents. “I am the teacher once a never been offered in Drayton, DECEMBER 5, 2019 | THE COMMUNITY NEWS | 7 it was fun for students, parents week; they are the at-home and teacher, and it offered a ‘coach’ several days a week,” TRADES AND SERVICES Festive fun - Students at Music for Young Children enjoy a piano-keyboard program for she said. submitted photo An initial goal for each of Christmas concert every year. children as young as 3½ in a Ms. Tanis’ students is to develgroup setting. “I loved the idea of group op the happy habit of practic- paper mittens for five happy spring. Of course, special holiSALES & INSTALLATION lessons, since it’s always more ing. She encourages her stu- practices. The mittens were days are incorporated into Ms. 24 HOUR SERVICE Ltd. fun to explore and learn in a dents to practice by giving a placed on the studio wall in the Tanis’ MYC classes, such as TRADES AND special SERVICES “super duper” sticker shape of group, regardless of the topic,” Canada Music Week, the 5 Olympic rings. & Air-conditioning each week. explained Ms. Tanis. When the rings were com- Christmas, Valentine’s Day and “Practicing does not need to plete students enjoyed an Easter.Furnaces She also liked that it was a Theme• Fireplaces days are program that was tested, tried be long; 10 to 15 minutes a day Olympics music class.Hot well.• Barbecues This Waterplanned Tanks as • HRV and true, being taught by more to start,” she said. Throughout the year her past year Ms. Tanis encouraged info@metzgerheating.ca Ms. Tanis’ creativity shines than 800 teachers to over students participate in a the students not only to pracMOE WE DO: Certifiedthrough by offering several 24,000 students on three differtice but also to think of others, Christmas concert, and a spring Water Well Drilling, Drilling ent continents and, touting extra practice incentives by practicing for pennies. Once recital and have the option to GENERAL Cleaning,origins, Extensions, Canadian being found- throughout the year to ensure the pennies were all collected participate inCONTRACTOR the Palmerston & Inspection by Camera. students attain their musical they were donated to Camp Canada Music Week Festival edRepair in 1980. goals. Once students have col- Bucko, for burn victims. MYC’s mission statement and the Drayton Music Cable & Rotary Equipment, Pumps, RESIDENTIAL stickers on their isPressure to “provide theDecommissions. best quality lected For the upcoming year she Festival. Lenenough (Alma) 519-846-9162 Tanks, practice thermome- is planning two new incentives; music education to young chil- “happy “Children are so receptive 519-846-1993 Jeff (Arthur) Water COMMERCIAL they have519-638-8928 a party. This a DAVID dren by Treatment blending the pleasure ters,” to music that it makes sense to “Tree of Thanks” Pincentive 519-638-5462 MARTIN Mike (Drayton) (Iron filters, water softeners, UV lamps, year, to celebrate the 2010 and the joy of music making use this medium to spark their around Thanksgiving time and 8012 8th Line reverse osmosis, inline filters & water tests) www.martinwelldrilling.com with sound instruction.” Olympics, students earned a RR#2 develop their “Seed Incentive”C 519-895-6234 in the creativity and AGRICULTURAL F 519-638-3833 Drayton, ON N0G 1P0 NEW BUILDINGS Check out our website: GENERAL RENOVATIONS www.stirtonconstruction.ca CONTRACTOR

SERVICES CLASSIFIEDS

+HDWLQJ &RROLQJ +HDWLQJ &RROLQJ

APARTMENT FOR RENT

TRUCKS

1 BDRM ADULT APT. for rent in Moorefield. Heat/hydro Incl., laundry facility on site. (No pets/ smoking). Available midDec. $800. 519-638-3054.

2017 FORD EDGE Titanium FWD! 93,000 kms, comes with Bluetooth, Power Sun/Moonroof, GPS Navigation, Back-Up Camera, Driver Memory Seating, Power Driver & Passenger Seat, Heated Front and Rear Seats, Cooled Front Seats, Leather Interior, and a set of winter tires, Certified Priced at $24,750. 519-343-2874

MAPLETON’S MUSIC FOR YOUNG CHILDREN on FB, Instagram or at myc.com. Connect with taniscowan.myc@gmail.com. Piano/music programs for all ages.

Water... a Source of Life!

BODYWORKS FAMILY FITNESS

HELP WANTED

FITNESS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 1 Year and 6 Month Memberships 12 Visit and Day Passes Available

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

is looking for a

Must be able to work alone with minimum guidance, knowledge in boilers and boiler systems and a G2 gas ticket is an asset but not required.

Email resume to gleesonplumbinginc@outlook.com TRADES AND SERVICES

MULDER'S TRUCKING 519.638.3682 519.301.6867

ECRA/ESA LIC 7004134

NEW BUILDINGS RENOVATIONS

KLAASSEN MECHANICAL PLUMBING Serving Mapleton Township & Area

Commercial

“A nostalgic taste of the past...into tomorrow”

Phone 638-2106

Farm Equipment, Hay, Straw, etc.

DRAYTON, ONTARIO

AGRICULTURAL

Residential

MULDER'S TRUCKING

• Repairs • Hot Water Heating • Water Softeners “FREE ESTIMATES” CALL FOR EXPERT SERVICE Moorefield, Ont. (519) 638-2106

TOTAL

Servicing all your Electrical Needs

Full Co-ed Gym, 30 Minute Circuit Classes for All Ages, Personal Training 89 Wellington St. S., DRAYTON N0G 1P0, (519) 638-2100 www.bodyworksdrayton.ca bodyworks@execulink.com

HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS INC.

e e f f o C t u o e k a T $1.25

Discover the Joy of MYC with FREE Summer Try it Classes!

Read us

SERVING MAPLETON AND MINTO

THE

COMMUNITY NEWS VOLUME 52 ISSUE 33

1 Year GIC - 2.25% 3 Year GIC - 2.40% 5 Year GIC - 2.55%

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2019

By Patrick Raftis

Horsing around at the 163rd annual Drayton Fair

SALES

|

SERVICE

|

I N S TA L L AT I O N

*** 24-hour Emergency Service ***

MINTO – Krosinski Enterprises has been granted a second extension on a deadline to obtain a building permit for a planned marijuana production facility in the Palmerston Industrial Park. In July of 2017, town council approved an offer from Jack Krosinski of Krosinski Enterprises Ltd. to purchase 15 acres in the park for a medical cannabis production facility and, “as the law permits,” recreational cannabis. Krosinski paid the full asking price of $15,000 per acre and was also granted first refusal on an additional three acres for possible future expansion. The original agreement required the purchaser to obtain a building permit within one year of the closing of the sale for a structure covering 15% of the lot. On Sept. 18, 2018 council granted a one-year extension on that provision. Last week, at its Aug. 6 meeting, council received

Not all horses show their respect to the judge by bowing, but Leah Everson and Beau successfully competed at the Drayton Fair Horse Show on Saturday, and couldn’t resist showing off. More fair photos on pages 6, 7 and 9. Photo by Sue Hogenkamp

By Patrick Raftis MINTO – Town council will turn operation of money-losing arena concession booths in Harriston and Palmerston over to a private operator for the coming winter season, despite the objections of one councillor. The town currently operates concession booths in the lobby of both the Harriston and Palmerston arenas. The Clifford Recreation Association operates the town-owned concession booth at the Clifford Arena as part of its fundraising program. In 2016 operation of booths in Harriston and Palmerston was offered at no charge to community service clubs, sports groups and businesses, explained recreation services manager Matt Lubbers in a report presented at the Aug. 7 council meeting. “There was no interest at

that time and they continued to be town-operated at a deficit,” the report states. Lubbers explained that Shawn Weppler, a local caterer and operator of BBQ Bite in Clifford, has expressed interest in operating the booths and town-owned vending machines this upcoming ice season. The proposed agreement is for one season, September to March, and contains an opt-out clause for both parties in November of 2019 as well as a carryover clause for future ice seasons. Under the agreement, the operator would pay no rent and the town would cover capital equipment and appliance replacement as well as heat and hydro costs. Lubbers predicted utility costs would be minor and said the existing equipment is in good condition and unlikely to need replacement. The report notes similar

SHOWING AUGUST 16, 17 AND 18

HOBBS AND SHAW Friday & Saturday 8pm and Sunday 7pm RATED PG AND 136 MINUTES

519-664-2008

638-3328

www.jackfinancial.ca

a letter from Krosinski indicating that on May 2, Health Canada issued Krosinski Enterprises Ltd. a Confirmation of Readiness (CoR) letter for the Palmerston Cannabis Cultivation and Processing Facility, confirming the company had requirements for licensing based on submitted facility plans. However, on June 14, Health Canada unveiled its latest set of regulations pertaining to the manufacturing and distribution of cannabis derived edibles, concentrates and topicals. “Somewhat unexpectedly, the integration of secondary product processing under the unveiled regulations came with new technical provisions that now call for major design changes to the facility,” explained Krosinski in his letter. “These redesigns, due to the new and onerous regulatory burdens, take a great amount of time, coordination and additional capital SEE CANNABIS » 3

Minto turning arena concession booths over to private operator

MAIN ST. W. PALMERSTON 519.343.3640 www.norgantheatre.com

robdeweerdelectric@hotmail.com 519.638.2229

Daily Interest 1.25%

Town grants extension on permit requirement for planned cannabis facility

TM

Your Oil, Propane and Natural Gas Experts

agreement are in place with businesses in some neighboring municipalities, while others with new facilities do not provide concession services, strictly vending machines. Lubbers said the Steve Kerr Memorial Complex in Listowel, which opened in 2017, does not contain townoperated concessions as the municipality of North Perth “identified it as something they didn’t want to support through tax dollars.” Councillor Mark MacKenzie questioned the town’s pricing practices and said he would like to see the municipality take a closer look at why the booths were losing money. “The last two years we’ve lost thousands of dollars. I’m just talking on product. It’s impossible to buy $13,000 worth of product and only get $14,800 out of it in revenue. That’s unheard of,” said MacKenzie . “What’s happening here?

It doesn’t makes sense to me and to just wash your hands and give it up, let somebody else come in ... Nine or 10 per cent profit on a product is ridiculous; you should be making 100 or 200,” MacKenzie continued. “You want to aim for about 100 per cent markup on certain items,” Lubbers agreed, noting “a lot of our expenses are in staff wages.” While pointing out “we’ve looked at it as providing a service in the past,” Lubbers said the town is not receiving enough income to cover the product costs and staff wages. In regard to the figures cited by MacKenzie, Lubbers said he would like to go back over the general ledger to ensure everything expensed to the concession booths was actually booth supplies. He noted the town often purchases large amounts of soft drinks, but most of that is fused with town-operated

WEEKLY WAG

“Until you value yourself, you won’t value your time. Until you value your time, you won’t do anything with it.” - M. Scott Peck

liquor licensed events. Councillor Dave Turton pointed out the issue has been discussed at the committee level over the past few years. “The one in Clifford, I’m not sure how much they’re making, but it definitely is all volunteer (labour),” said Turton. “I agree with what you’re saying, Matt. Wages are a big thing, I know that we’ve talked about this and I know that we’re offering a service to our people in the community and here we’ve got a guy coming forward to say that he wants to give it a shot … He’s a business guy. Maybe he’s got some strategies that we haven’t thought of,” said Turton. Mayor George Bridge agreed with the idea of letting a private operator try and make the concessions work. “Otherwise we close them down and we put the

machines in. I mean that’s the other option, you know. We’ve done this for four years and made no money,” Bridge stated. Councillor Ron Elliott said the booth business has never paid off for municipalities, either before or after amalgamation. However, he said, over the years he’s seen some private operators be able to turn a profit. “It seems when it’s a community running it, we can’t make any money on it,” Elliott stated. MacKenzie proposed a motion to defer a decision on the proposal pending further review of concession operations. However, the motion was not seconded. A resolution to proceed with the agreement with Weppler was approved with Bridge, Turton, Elliott and councillors Geoff Gunson, Judy Dirksen and Jean Anderson in favour and Mackenzie opposed.

We want your

SCRAP CARS, Kenilworth TRUCKS, FARM

Auto Recyclers Inc.

519-323-1113 We sell quality used auto parts for cars & trucks

MACHINERY, etc. Scrap metal bins avail. (14, 20, 30 & 40 cu. yd.)

ONLINE

Sunrise (ages 2-4) MYC Classes (ages 3-9)

Anytime

To register, contact

Tanis Cowan 519.638.5715 UNDER DIGITAL PUBLICATIONS AT

taniscowan.myc@sympatico.ca www.wellington * Music advertiser.com Pups also available

11 Henry St. Unit 9, St. Jacobs

EXTEND YOUR REACH - ADVERTISE PROVINCIALLY OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY! For more information visit www.ocna.org/network-advertising-program

FINANCIAL SERVICES

MORTGAGES

BUSINESS OPPS.

HOME OWNER LOANS FOR ANY PURPOSE!! Pay down other high interest debt! Bank turn downs, Tax or Mortgage arrears, Self-Employed, Bad Credit, Bankruptcy - We Can Help! Even in extreme situations of bad credit. Borrow: $50,000 $100,000

Pay Monthly: $268 $537

LARGER AMOUNTS AVAILABLE !!Decrease monthly payments up to 75%!! Based on 5% APR. OAC FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO APPLY NOW BY PHONE OR ONLINE: 1-888-307-7799 www.ontario-widefinancial.com

AUTOMOTIVE

HEALTH

"Providing Transportation Services” WANTED CLASSIC CARS - Quality Any DISABILITY? ADHD? PREVIOUSLY Condition: Porsche 356-912-911-930; D E N I E D D I S A B I L I T Y C L A I M ? Mercedes 190-230-250-280-300; J We can help you get up to a g u a r X K E , X K 1 2 0 / 1 4 0 / 1 5 0 ; $50,000 back from the Canadian Wellington G o v eSt. r n mDrayton, e n t . B B B ON Rated A+. Split Window Corvette23 OR any European/British Cars. Rusty, Rotten FOR DETAILS CALL US TODAY 519-638-3395 www.cherreybuslines.com or Show Car. FINDER FEE PAID Toll-Free 1-888-875-4787 or Visit us $$$$! CALL Chris 613-894-1141 or at: disabilitygroupcanada.com. carhunter472@gmail.com.

Since 1953

$$ CONSOLIDATE YOUR DEBT NOW $$ LOWER YOUR MONTHLY PAYMENTS AND

ATTN: ONTARIO INVENTORS!!

Call Davison!!

1st, 2nd, 3rd MORTGAGES Debt Consolidation Refinancing, Renovations Tax Arrears, No CMHC Fees

Ideas Wanted!

$50K YOU PAY: $208.33 / MONTH (OAC) No Income, Bad Credit Power of Sale Stopped!!!

CALL DAVISON TODAY: 1-800-256-0429 OR VISIT US AT: Inventing.Davison.com/Ontario FREE Inventor's Guide!!

BETTER OPTION MORTGAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL TODAY TOLL-FREE: 1-800-282-1169

ONTARIO-WIDE FINANCIAL 1801347inc FSCO Licence #12456

www.mortgageontario.com

!! WE ARE HERE TO HELP !!

(Licence # 10969)

ADVERTISING

Need Inventing Help?

CONSOLIDATE YOUR DEBT NOW!!!

STEEL BUILDINGS STEEL BUILDING CLEARANCE ... "FALL BLOWOUT - PRICED TO CLEAR!" 20X25 $6,687. 25X29 $7,459. 28X29 $8,196. 30X35 $9840. 32X37 $9,898. One End Wall Included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036 www.pioneersteel.ca

B

Te

taxes 195 Street, 3 Hilwood Drive GiftMain certificates available included Palmerston ON N0G 2P0Drayton Moorefield ON N0G 2K0 21 Wellington St., S. 519-343-2420 519-638-3039 519-638-2001

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Residential/Custom Homes | Agricultural Commercial | Service | Generators

0012-836 )915(

JOURNEYMAN PLUMBER AND 4th or 5th YEAR APPRENTICE

DAVID MARTIN P 519-638-5462 8012 8th Line C 519-895-6234 RR#2 Drayton, ON F 519-638-3833 N0G 1P0

‘‘

MUSIC

0HW]JHU·V519-510-4368 0HW]JHU·V

S mus that throu gam child ops moto conf Chil a gra sibli well T prog child Sunb towa Moo is fo three grat rhyth and child sion P class

REACH MILLIONS OF CUSTOMERS IN ONTARIO WITH ONE EASY CALL! Your Classified Ad or Display Ad would appear in weekly newspapers each week across Ontario in urban, suburban and rural areas. For more information Call Today 647-350-2558.

AUCTIONS

BUD HAYNES & WARD'S FALL F I R E A R M S A u c t i o n , S a t u r d a y, Dec. 7th at 10 AM. 11802-145 Street, Edmonton, AB. Over 700 Lots, On-Line bidding Antique & Modern Firearms, www.WardsAuctions.com. To c o n s i g n , c a l l B r a d Wa r d 780-940-8378; Linda Baggaley 403597-1095.

B is

fo

Lu (W

GR IN

MON 519

F

“Co

N A

M


8 | THE COMMUNITY NEWS | DECEMBER 5, 2019

35th annual Canada Music Week Festival in Palmerston

Reg, who has completed every edition of their environmental farm plans, is the director of the Senior Citizens Association for the Conestoga Crest Retirement Home and a member of the Wellington County Soil and Crop Improvement Association. The Samis’ explained the value of being active lies not only in giving back to your community, but also in connecting with other farmers and learning from one another. Being a part of groups like Soil and Crop Association has been a real benefit to them. When planting trees on their farms, they recruited and engaged the community,

SAT

SUN

9-9 9-9 9-6 10-5

LAMINATE

VINYL

Music festival - From left: Owen VanderLaan, Rayna Erb, Nicholas Pfanner, Michael Pfanner, Kalista Rae, Talia Erb, Nathan Pfanner peformed for adjudicator Cameron Streicher at the Palmerston Canada Music Week Festival on Nov. 22. Submitted photos

4.5MM THICK CLICK

AC4- 12MM THICK

LAMINATE

1

VINYL PLANKS

FROM

TILE

1

$ 57

$ 57 / SQ FT

FROM

REG 3.99

HARDWOOD

/ SQ FT

REG 3.99

Beginner class - Beginner class performers with adjudicator Cameron Streicher at the Palmerston Canada Music Week Festival on Nov. 22, from left: Amaya Meyers, Bastian Dirksen, George Menzies, Bradley Wouters and Gideon Dirksen.

7”WIDE x ¾” THICK TONGUE & GROOVE

4x16 OR 3x12 WALL TILE

1

WHITE OAK

$ 87 FROM

Young composers - Adjudicator Lois Gingrich with Young Composers Class students Jadyn Addley, Dante Reist and Emma Westendorp at the Palmerston Canada Music Week Festival on Nov. 22. of self-discipline, teamwork, and excellence. Organizers thanked Palmerston United Church for the use the facility, and all those who support students with scholarships. The committee also thanked donors who make these scholarships possible: Dale Connell, Conestogo Agri

inviting the local Scouts and Guides to come out and plant with them. They expressed the importance of children planting trees in their community and the joy that they get from seeing the kids undertake the work and pride in watching the trees grow. The couple say it was their own kids that got them going and now their grandchildren are enjoying the trees that they planted. Their daughter’s family now owns and operates one of the farms and receives the benefit of trees planted early in Liz and Reg’s career. “We have a part to play and I think we can do more,” says Liz, when considering

CARPET

Systems, The Piano Shop in Elmira, Neville Leake Tuning and Repair, Palmerston Eastern Star Peach Chapter, Hanover-Walkerton Branch of Ontario Registered Music Teachers’ Association, Lorraine Ballard, Pauline Horst Studio, Beryl Martin, Town of Minto, and Palmerston Lions Club.

Green Legacy Award of Excellence presented to Mapleton residents Liz and Reg Samis » FROM PAGE 6

DEALS!

4 DAYS ONLY!

the environmental protection projects that they have accomplished on their farms. Explaining that each farm is unique and “it is each farmer’s job to evaluate their own farm and find solutions that benefit both the environment and their operation,” Liz and Reg are still farming two farms and rent land. “The trees on our farm are our legacy,” said Liz. “The County of Wellington’s Green Legacy Program, applauds Liz and Reg of Samis Farms for their commitment to good agricultural practices and information sharing with a long-term vision to produce healthy food and protect our environment,” officials state.

FROM

REG 6.99

NO TAX

2-TONE FRIEZE CARPET

3

$ 99

/ SQ FT

TILE

/ SQ FT

REG 10.99

NO TAX

MODERN LEDGESTONE

4 1 AREA RUGS $ 87 / SQ FT

FROM

REG 3.99

$ 99 FROM

/ SQ FT

MANY REGSTYLES 8.99 TO CHOO

NO TAX! 5’x8’

$

FROM

69

99

MORE SIZES AVAILABLE! OVER 1,000 IN STOCK!

1362 VICTORIA ST N. KITCHENER

MON-FRI 9AM-9PM SAT 9AM-6PM SUN 10AM-5PM

*products may not be exactly as shown. limited supply. no tax only applies to a area rugs

PALMERSTON - The 35th annual Palmerston Canada Music Week Festival was held on Nov. 22. Over 120 performers played piano pieces by Canadian Composers. This year the festival featured Saskatchewan composers Lynette Sawatsky and Janet Gieck. Sawatsky was able to connect with some of the students through videos on the day of the festival, and also adjudicated the music for the Young Composers class. Adjudicators were Cameron Streicher from Milverton, and Lois Gingrich from Newton. Both have studied piano at the university level, performed internationally, teach piano, and are also founder and directors of community choral groups: Village Voices, and Heidelberg Chorale for Christ, respectively. “It felt very special to invite these adjudicators back to Palmerston, because they competed in the festival when they were children. The committee was delighted to have them share their expertise with local students, parents, and teachers,” organizers note. The festival is organized by a volunteer committee of local piano teachers consisting of Tanis Cowan, Drayton; Laura Gray, Harriston; Pauline Horst, Millbank; Anne Grobbo, Fordwich; April Martin, Palmerston; Heidi Martin, Linwood; and Cheryl Weber, Wallace. The festival features Canadian music for piano solo, duet, and composition classes. There is a non-competitive adult class. The Canada Music Week Festival is open to all piano teachers in the area, and welcomes new participants. Canada Music week was established in 1960 by the Canadian Federation of Music Teachers’ Associations, and is celebrated the third week of November, in honour of St. Cecilia, the patron saint of music. Students, teachers and their families gather for events across Canada, to learn and celebrate all aspects of Canadian music. Music Festivals encourage young people to develop a love and understanding of the arts, and foster the values

DECEMBER 5 - 8 THIS WEEKS THUR FRI

Profile for WHA Publications Ltd.

Drayton Community News December 5, 2019  

Drayton newspaper, Mapleton Township, Community News, Sister publication of the Wellington Advertiser.

Drayton Community News December 5, 2019  

Drayton newspaper, Mapleton Township, Community News, Sister publication of the Wellington Advertiser.