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WORKFORCE PRIDE A DHR, ASAP, EAP WELL-BEING TEAM

Fort Sill Community Newsletter V O L U M E

PRODUCT

INSIDE THIS ISSUE ARE YOU CONSERVATIVE? 2 THE BIG ROCK AT THE CORNER OF RANDOLPH AND CURRY 3 WHAS UUUUPPPP??? ASAP AND ACS COMMUNITY EVENTS 4 SETTING GOALS FOR LIFE 5 DEAR FRAN, I CAN’T GET ANY SLEEP 6 3 STEPS TO A SOUND SLEEP 7 SPICY SELF-DEFINING AFFIRMATIONS 8 ME CAVEMAN OFFICE ETTIQUETTE 9 LEARN SOMETHING NEW EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AWAIT YOU 10 FIGHTING FOR YOUR FINANCIAL FITNESS 11 NO MORE SMALLING ME UP 12 SNEAK PEEK INTO NEXT MONTH 13

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A View from the Top: Winning Hearts and Minds From the DHR

During these times of limited resources, now more than ever it is critical that we make the most out of the our most important human resources. Two long-term Gallup Poll studies were conducted to examine what talented employees always need and what talented managers always did to optimize performance. The studies surveyed over a million employees and 80,000 managers to get at what talented managers consistently did to find, focus and keep engaged employees. An engaged employee was defined as an employee who possesses an intrinsic desire to perform at the highest levels because the employer is able to capture their hearts and minds. The engaged employee wants their organization to succeed because they feel connected intellectually and emotionally to its mission, vision, and purpose. Engaged employees, drive innovation, perform at higher levels, and produce higher quality products and services. They are also more customer-focused, and less likely to leave. The first insight they arrived at is that people do not change much. Anyone who has managed people for any length of time knows this to be true. Another thing the study concluded is the no two managers are the same and should not be expected to manage the same way. However, each leader can still be his or her own unique catalyst to unlocking the human potential of employees by turning the keys to four core activities; Key 1: Select a person for talent Many people are unaware of their true talents and their limitations. Talent, according to the study, was defined as a recurring pattern of thought, feeling, or behavior that can be productively applied. In this definition, talent is an innate ability and is not uncommon. Many of us have had someone say at sometime in our lives that we have a

―knack‖ for this, or that we are a ―natural‖ at that. Skills and knowledge can be taught, but talent cannot. It is our characteristic way of responding to the world. By understanding this key, outstanding performance then becomes is a matter of finding the match between a talent and a position that is being filled. People may be talented in a variety of ways, however, the study grouped them into three major categories; striving, thinking, and relating talents. Striving talents explain the why of a person. Does he or she want to stand out? Has he/she demonstrated the ability to overcome obstacles, and achieve objectives? Thinking talents explain the how of a person. Is he/she a linear thinker or does he/she like to strategize and play "what if" games? Is he or she structured or does he/she have the innate ability to adjust on the fly? Relating talents explains the who of a person. Whom does he or she trust? How has he/she dealt with problems with the boss or a colleague? Does he/she love confrontation or avoid it? A manager should consider the knowledge, skills, and abilities as well as the talents needed to be successful on the job before recruiting to fill a position. They may want to use an engaged employee already on staff to help them decide on the right talents needed for success.

Key 3: Motivate a person by focusing on strengths Great managers want to release each person's potential. They do not try to fix areas where they feel an employee is weak as much as support them becoming more of what they are naturally wired for, and where they are strong. To do this successful managers ensure that each worker is in a role that makes the most of his or her talents. Second, successful managers do not manage everyone the same and they reward and motivate them as they would like to be rewarded and motivated. Each person is different, with a unique set of talents, passions, yearnings, and patterns of behavior. Finally, successful managers focus on each employee's strengths and manage around weaknesses. Poor performance is confronted head on by giving employees the training, equipment and support needed to do the job. It may also means that personal problem are referred to an EAP or other helping agency. Managers may find that devising a support system to overcome the lack of talent will improve performance. The struggling worker may benefit from being matched with a work ―buddy‖ or in another role where talents are better suited.

Key 2: Set expectations by defining the right outcomes When a manager defines clearly what is expected based on the outcomes sought, they provide employees the freedom to find their own way to reach expectations. This method respects employee’s individuality and provides them a sense of ownership and responsibility for achieving the desired outcome. By focusing on outcome, employees will become more self-reliant and selfaware. The SMART acronym is a good tool for managers to concisely identify the outcomes they want in a clear and succinct way (see Page 4). DISCLAIMER: All employees must follow safety, accuracy, and industry standards for everyone's protection. Step-by-step instruction is only useful if the steps don't obscure the desired outcome.

Key 4: Develop a person by helping them find the right fit. According to the study, the best managers ensure employees are in roles that are a good match for the employee and the organization. This may mean a promotion, a lateral move, or even a move back to another position. Great managers always steer workers towards roles that provide them the best chance for personal and professional success and satisfaction. Managers who are able to consistently turn these four keys nurture an engaged workforce and are better able to turn talent into performance. For more information attend the monthly supervisory training conducted the last Friday of each month at the Graham Resiliency Training Center (GRTC) Marcy Road, 0900-1100.

Exploring the Extremes: From Heat to Health This month’s edition is geared towards increased awareness for a safer and healthier you. As temperatures remain steady in the triple digits, rain remains a stranger and our entire lives are continually impacted. Inside you will find tips to survive the extreme temperatures, hints to a better night’s sleep, in depth views into our ―ancient‖ beings, and the explanation to the caveman that still lives within us. This issue is sure to provide you with much pleasure, relaxation, and new ideas to increase your ability to cope during these EXTREMES.


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Are You Ready for Extremely Hot Weather?

Outdoor Water Conservation Tips

FEMA makes some excellent recommendations below when dealing with the extreme heat and conserving water during the droughts that follow. Here is what they advise:

General

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Check your well pump periodically. If the automatic pump turns on and off while water is not being used, you have a leak.

Plant native and/or drought-tolerant grasses, ground covers, shrubs, and trees. Once established, they do not need water as frequently and usually will survive a dry period without watering. Small plants require less water to become established. Group plants together based on similar water needs.

Install irrigation devices that are the most water efficient for each use. Micro and drip irrigation and soaker hoses are examples of efficient devices.

Use mulch to retain moisture in the soil. Mulch also helps control weeds that compete with landscape plants for water.

Avoid purchasing recreational water toys that require a constant stream of water. Avoid installing ornamental water features (such as fountains) unless they use recycled water. Car Washing

Use a shut-off nozzle that can be adjusted down to a fine spray on your hose. Use a commercial car wash that recycles water. If you wash your own car, park on the grass so that you will be watering it at the same time. Lawn Care

Avoid over watering your lawn. A heavy rain eliminates the need for watering for up to two weeks. Most of the year, lawns only need one inch of water per week.

Water in several short sessions rather than one long one, in order for your lawn to better absorb moisture.

Position sprinklers so water lands on the lawn and shrubs and not on paved areas.

Avoid sprinklers that spray a fine mist. Mist can evaporate before it reaches the lawn. Check sprinkler systems and timing devices regularly to be sure they operate properly.

Raise the lawn mower blade to at least three inches or to its highest level. A higher cut encourages grass roots to grow deeper, shades the root system, and holds soil moisture.

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Plant drought-resistant lawn seed.

Avoid over-fertilizing your lawn. Applying fertilizer increases the need for water. Apply fertilizers that contain slow-release, water-insoluble forms of nitrogen.

Use a broom or blower instead of a hose to clean leaves and other debris from your driveway or sidewalk and avoid leaving sprinklers or hoses unattended. A garden hose can pour out 600 gallons in only a few hours. Pool

Install a new water-saving pool filter. A

single back flushing with a traditional filter uses 180 to 250 gallons. Cover pools and spas to reduce evaporation of water.

Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun. Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.

Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.

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Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.

Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.

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Limit intake of alcoholic beverages. Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.

Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.

Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles. Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks. Drought can affect vast areas and large populations. Drought also creates environmental conditions that increase the risk of other hazards such as fire, and flash flood. An emergency water shortage can be caused by prolonged drought, poor water supply management, or contamination of a surface water supply source or aquifer. Conserving water means more water available for critical needs for everyone. Below contains detailed suggestions for conserving water both indoors and outdoors. Make these practices a part of your daily life and help preserve this essential resource.

Indoor Water Conservation Tips General

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Never pour water down the drain when there may be another use for it. Use it to water your indoor plants or garden. Repair dripping faucets by replacing washers. One drop per second wastes 2, 700 gallons of water per year! Check all plumbing for leaks. Have leaks repaired by a plumber. Retrofit all household faucets by installing aerators with flow restrictors. Install an instant hot water heater on your sink. Insulate your water pipes to reduce heat loss and prevent them from breaking.

Install a water-softening system only when the minerals in the water would damage your pipes. Turn the softener off while on vacation. Choose appliances that are more energy and water efficient. Bathroom

Consider purchasing a low-volume toilet that uses less than half the water of older models. Note: In many areas, low-volume units are required by law.

Install a toilet displacement device to cut down on the amount of water needed to flush. Place a one-gallon plastic jug of water into the tank to displace toilet flow (do not use a brick, it may dissolve and loose pieces may cause damage to the internal parts). Be sure installation does not interfere with the operating parts.

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Replace your showerhead with an ultra-low-flow version. Place a bucket in the shower to catch excess water for watering plants.

Avoid flushing the toilet unnecessarily. Dispose of tissues, insects, and other similar waste in the trash rather than the toilet.

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Avoid taking baths - take short showers - turn on water only to get wet and lather and then again to rinse off.

Avoid letting the water run while brushing your teeth, washing your face, or shaving. Kitchen

Operate automatic dishwashers only when they are fully loaded. Use the "light wash" feature, if available, to use less water.

Hand wash dishes by filling two containers - one with soapy water and the other with rinse water containing a small amount of chlorine bleach.

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Clean vegetables in a pan filled with water rather than running water from the tap.

Start a compost pile as an alternate method of disposing of food waste or simply dispose of food in the garbage. (Kitchen sink disposals require a lot of water to operate properly).

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Store drinking water in the refrigerator. Do not let the tap run while you are waiting for water to cool.

Avoid wasting water waiting for it to get hot. Capture it for other uses such as plant watering or heat it on the stove or in a microwave.

Avoid rinsing dishes before placing them in the dishwasher; just remove large particles of food. (Most dishwashers can clean soiled dishes very well, so dishes do not have to be rinsed before washing)

Avoid using running water to thaw meat or other frozen foods. Defrost food overnight in the refrigerator.


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Safety, History, and Health

Way To Go Team Sill! “Driving Responsibly” 3rd Quarter Traffic Violations Decline Traffic violations continue to be on the decline. Leaders, Soldiers and Family Members are driving to arrive. All efforts to keep Team Sill traffic violation to a minimum can be attributed to leaders taking an active role in Soldiers and Family members driving practices. Decrease in traffic violations indicate drivers are focused on driving, paying attention to other drivers and are aware of their surroundings. Risk Reduction Top Summer Safety Driving Tips;

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Don’t text and drive, stay focused Always wear seat belts Drive defensively Be aware of motorcycles Slow down Always use turn signals Obey all speed limits and signs

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Team Sill Traffic Violations 4

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Bit of History At the intersection of Randolph and Curry Road on the way to the POL site and the old prison complex sits a large rock in the middle of the intersection. Difficult to reach in the middle of the road, most people drive past it and the wording and metal plates attached to it without further notice. If you were brave enough to approach the rock you would find a historical monument to Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma. During World War I, Camp Doniphan was home to the 35 th Infantry Division made up of National Guard units from Kansas and Missouri. The camp sat on 2,000 acres with 1,267 buildings and tents where thousands of Soldiers were given basic training prior to transfer to France. Four Field Artillery Regiments located at Camp Doniphan were a part of Fort Sill’s Field Artillery School. One of those units, The 129th Field Artillery Regiment, was a part of the 35th DiviCamp Doniphan, Oklahoma sion and would later fight in France. A young Captain assigned to the 129 th Regiment was in charge of the regimental canteen during its stay in Camp Doniphan and Stone at the corner of Randolph and Curry named after would later become Delta Battery Commander in France until the end of war. Captain Harry S. Truman was stationed at Camp Doniphan from September 1917 until March 1918 and would Alexander William Doniphan, hero of the Mexicanlater go on to become the 33rd President of the United States. American war of 1846

by Dale Keesee

Top 5 Summer Health and Wellness Tips 1. Sunscreen is important. This is not new information. However, make sure you choose sunscreen that does not have cancer causing ingredients in it. Recent studies warn against the ingredients PABA, benzophenone-3, homosalate, octyl-methoxycinnamate (OMC) and 4-methyl-benzylidene camphor (4- MBC) due to the possible link to skin cancer. 2. Summer is a great time to get the necessary amounts of Vitamin D. While you can get small amounts in your diet, the best way to reach your needed Vitamin D levels is by sun exposure to the skin. Make sure the skin does not have sunscreen because it may interfere with the absorption of Vitamin D. 15-30 minutes is adequate unprotected exposure for Vitamin D. Be sure to practice safe sun habits. If you have any questions consult with your physician. 3. Increase your intake of fruits and vegetables. Summer is a time of plenty when it comes to fruits and vegetables availability. Farmers markets are up and running. There are so many options available during this time of year that you can get creative and have fun! Vegetables and fruits have many properties for protecting your health from cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and much more! By eating more vegetables and fruits you can give your body the vitamins and minerals it craves and protect your cells from the damage free radicals cause. 4. Avoid long periods of vigorous activity during the heat of the summer. Make sure you take frequent breaks and drink lots of water to keep hydrated. Summer can be a dangerous time for long periods of activity outside in the sun and heat. Keep your family protected by offering shade, frequent breaks, and lots of fluids. Summer is hot and in a lot of places very humid. These factors can lead to dehydration very quickly. Remember to drinking water is by far better option than heat exhaustion, and even heat stroke. 5. Increase your social and activity calendar! Summer is an awesome time for getting together with friends which has shown to increase your happiness and fulfillment in life. It also offers a great time for increasing your activity level with offering many options for activities that get you moving from swimming to tennis to golf. What do you enjoy? What makes you happy in life? Studies have shown that people who are happy and active live longer, healthier, and happier lives. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4523478


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ASAP CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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Join Us On Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ pages/Lawton-OK/Fort-SillArmy-Substance-Abuse- Program/115638415119642 Visit our ASAP Website:

July 2011

http://sill-www.army.mil/USAG/ DHR/ASAP/

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Well-Being Center, ASAP

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July ASAP COMMUNITY TRAINING Wednesday, 27 July 2011 Location: RTC, Bldg 2871 Craig Road 1200-1400, Personalities in the Workplace 1400-1600, Habit #4 of Highly Effective People: Think Win-Win Thursday, 28 July 2011 Location: RTC, Bldg 2871 Craig Road 1200-1400, Suicide Prevention 1400-1600, Stress and the Workplace Friday, 29 July 2011 Location: RTC, Bldg 2871 Craig Road 0900-1100, Supervisory Workforce Engagement 1200-1400, Employee Assistance Program 1400-1600, Generational Workforce

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UPL Recert

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Life focus

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WHY FOCUS ON TRANSITIONS– LEADER RESOURCES Click the following link for this month’s prevention resource.

Lessons Learned

VIDEO PROFILES When a service member deploys, everyone around them is affected. These warriors and family members share their experiences and challenges of returning home and reintegrating with

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SUICIDE PREVENTION PROGRAM COORDINATOR (SPPM) ROBERT DODRILL

There is a new goal setting app designed to enhance the resiliency training you will or have received. It will help you to set goals to improve in any or all the five dimensions of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (emotional, spiritual, Family, physical, and social). Your ability to manage goals in your day-to-day life is critical; not only to you and your Family, but also to the overall success of the unit.

What Would You Do? I have a friend who has been talking about suicide. He has told me not to say anything. What should I do? Take all discussions about suicide seriously. Most people tell someone before they kill themselves because they WANT to talk about it. Use the Ask, Care, Escort method for a successful intervention.

Just because you have identified goals and developed a plan to reach those goals, doesn’t mean it will automatically happen. Only hard work, dedication, and perseverance will help you accomplish them. Everyone has areas in which we would like to improve, grow, or change. Use this tool to help develop a plan of attack which will get you to your objective; GOAL SETTING: Goals are a vital aspect of our lives. They provide purpose and direction, motivation and commitment, and clarity about the desired outcome. Use this acronym S.M.A.R.T. to help you develop goals that will push you over the finish line. Specific—This means that you must point out with clarity and detail exactly what is that you would like to achieve. Measurable—Spend time to develop criteria and tools you will use to measure your progress. Some wise businessman once said that if you can’t measure it you can’t make it better. Attainable—You must not only believe that you can achieve your goals, but they must be within reach. Realistic—This means that logically — given time, money, resources, and level of skill — you will be able to achieve these goals successfully. Time-bound—You must set deadline for the achievement of your goals. How do I get this goal setting app, If you are a owner of a iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad you can search for goal setting under your apps. Coming soon to Droid products. For more info contact me at 442-1644/4205/6069.


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Drug Awareness

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DEAR FRAN Dear Fran, Never in a million years did I think I would be writing you, but I am desperate, so here goes. I have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan on and off for the last five years and since my first deployment life has not been the same. I feel on edge all the time and wired. I am having difficulty relaxing and getting to sleep. I have done and seen things downrange that I can't get out of my mind. Actually, I think I feel less stressed when I am deployed and I get more sleep. But, I can never relax back here unless I can get a drink in me. Lately, I have been drinking more and more and my wife and kids are noticing. But I don't know how to stop. I wish I can cut back, but if I don't drink I can't get to sleep.

Fran Alltizer, LCSW, ASAP Counselor

Signed, Drowsy or Drunk in Duncan Dear Drowsy or Drunk, You have a common problem shared by many Soldiers after deployment, but it can feel like you are the only one experiencing this dilemma. Many soldiers return from deployment to find they cannot re-adjust into the "normal" world they left behind. Not only does your return home require special patience and skills to adjust to relationships, it requires even more to make the transition from "full throttle hyper-vigilance to a more slow-paced environment. Your brain has made drastic changes during deployment to keep you alive, but it does not always make the transition back as quickly, so you attempt to help the process by self-medicating. Self-medicating is a common practice of avoiding physical or mental issues by using mood-altering drugs such as alcohol or over-the-counter sleep aids. Self-medicating is very common, not just with Soldiers, but with many who cannot sleep or find themselves depressed. Sleeplessness may lead to many other problems, including irritability, weight gain, decreased ability to concentrate/focus and over-all feeling of weariness. The number one reason to avoid alcohol as a self-medicating tool is because of its addictive properties. Tolerance is when the same amount of alcohol cannot get the same results, and more alcohol is needed over time. Eventually, the alcohol does what it is intended to do: induce you to drink more, resulting in negative consequences, uncontrollable drinking, and non-productive sleep. Your friends and loved ones often see you better than anyone else and will notice first. When we at ASAP conduct an intake assessment, we are trained to recognize the difference between self-medicating and other kinds of alcohol problems. We have a doctor, who understands the dilemma and can prescribe the right kind of medication to stabilize your system and return you to normal sleep patterns. If other issues are revealed, you have access to someone who understands the unwelcome behavior patterns that return home with the Soldier. You can get help from many sources, but we are here for you. If you have any questions or concerns that you would like Come by and have an on-the-spot assessment to identify the real issues. At the Well-Being Center, we Fran to address, please contact Fran through our ASAP Faceare all about sharing skills to help you return to pre-deployment functioning. If you want to feel right, book page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lawton-OK/Fort you can't go wrong. Come by and ask to speak to me or any of our great counselors.

-Sill-Army-Substance-Abuse- Program/115638415119642

Write me again or call me at ASAP/Well-Being Center, 442-6069.

Alcohol Testing: Is it

ASAP Testimonial

Necessary?

“Binge Break”

We continuously get asked the question ―Is alcohol testing necessary?‖ AR 600-85, chapter 1-7a states ―The Command role in substance abuse prevention, drug AND By Jamie Montegut, ALCOHOL testing, early ID of problems, rehaADTC bilitation, and administrative or judicial actions is essential.‖ In fact AR 600-85 consistently outlines ―alcohol AND drug abuse‖, with Chapter 3 being solely dedicated to alcohol. Alcohol is the most abused drug in the Army and studies have shown that alcohol tends to precede cannabis use, and it is rare for those who have used hard drugs to not have used alcohol first. Compared with lifetime nondrinkers, adults who had consumed alcohol were statistically much more likely to use illicit drugs and/or abuse prescription drugs. Effects were strongest for cocaine (26 times more likely), cannabis (14 times more likely), and psychedelics (13 times more likely). In addition, lifetime drinkers were also six times more likely to abuse or be dependent on illicit drugs than lifetime nondrinkers. Although no testing rate is currently mandated, Commanders may conduct alcohol screening tests on the whole (or a part) of their Units. Alcohol screening and confirmation tests should only be performed during duty hours when the Soldiers is selected for testing have prior knowledge that they should be on duty. For this purpose the Fort Sill ASAP Drug Testing Coordinator’s have, and continue to, issue breathalyzers to the Battalion Unit Prevention Leaders. Remember, abuse of alcohol or the use of illicit drugs by both military and civilian personnel is inconsistent with Army Values, the Warrior Ethos, and the standards of performance, discipline, and readiness necessary to accomplish the Army’s mission. Therefore, an active and aggressive drug and alcohol testing program serves as an effective deterrent against not just drug abuse, but alcohol abuse as well.

I referred myself to the Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP) after almost totaling my truck in the driveway after binging on 32 beers! Through group and individual sessions, ASAP has taught me that alcohol is not healthy. It impairs my judgment and can be harsh on my organs. And, if I am not careful, it will screw up my career. They saved me from destroying my career by helping me figure out my triggers, and teaching me how to relax and meditate. ASAP also allowed me to let others in and tell them what I’m going through so that they can provide support. I am not sure I could have remained sober this long without the love and support of my family who has been there every step of the way throughout the process. Four months sober and counting!!! Specialist, USA, Ft Sill

Come out to have a BLAST!! The next Team Sill on Target Civilian Staff Ride is scheduled for Thursday, 11 Aug 2011. We will be departing from Bldg 4700 at 0900. To make reservations, please contact RaShonda Labrador at 442-4205/6306 or at Rashonda.labrador@us.army.mil . Click the following link for more information: TSOT


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Mind Expansion

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EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT Melanie Langford, Training Technician 434th FAB, S3 What is your favorite phrase? Armageddon SSG Joshua Ferrier, What is your HQ least A 3/6favorite word? Hate What turns you on? My family What turns you off? Ignorance What sound or noise do you love? Baby coos and farm animals What sound or noise do you hate? Tornados howling What profession other than your own would you like to attempt? Smokejumper What profession would you not like to do? Oil Field worker What is your ideal vacation? Bahamas cruise with my family

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July’s Brainteaser Ft. Sill Talks Back During a visit to a mental asylum, a visitor asked the Director what the criteria is that defines if a patient should be institutionalized. "Well," said the Director, "we fill up a bathtub. Then we offer a teaspoon, a teacup, and a bucket to the patient and ask the patient to empty the bathtub." Okay, here's your test: 1. Would you use the spoon? 2. Would you use the teacup? 3. Would you use the bucket? "A normal person would choose the bucket, as it is larger than the spoon." right, asked the visitor. What was the director's response?

―I would do things that I would like to do instead of things that are socially acceptable. For example, I would probably have sex in a crazy place or drink more than I should.‖

Answer in next month’s issue June’s Brainteaser and Answer: A lecturer using only basic arithmetic operations (+ - x /) can you get 98 using only 7 sevens? Each 7 may only be used once and you must use all 7 sevens. 7777777 Answer: (7x7x(7+7)/7)+7-7 equals 98

- SGT Lombard D 3/2 ADA

―I would enjoy going around town without any clothes. Obviously I would have to invest in some sunscreen!‖ - SSG Staggs ACO 168 BSB

EAP Mental Health Minute

Sleep Hygiene: Helpful Hints to Help you Sleep 1. Your Personal Habits:

2. Your Sleeping Environment:

- Fix a bedtime and an awakening time - Avoid napping during the day - Avoid alcohol 4-6 hours before bedtime - Avoid caffeine 4-6 hours before bedtime - Avoid heavy, spicy, or sugary foods 4-6 hours before bedtime

- Use comfortable bedding - Find a comfortable temperature setting for sleep and keep the room well ventilated - Block out all distracting noise - Reserve the bed for sleep and sex. Lose the TV and computer

3. Getting Ready for Bed - Try a warm glass of milk or a light snack before bed - Practice relaxation techniques before bed - Don’t take your worries to bed - Establish a pre-sleep ritual - Get into your favorite sleeping position


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Think, Cook, and Relax with Excellence

What do You have in Mind?

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Cooking Excellence with JB

by Lisa Jansen-Rees Family Advocacy Program Manager In my humble opinion, one of the best things about being connected with the Army is that we are a values based organization. Having a values base means we all speak a common language and share a set of guideposts pointing us in the same general direction. Ask anyone the Army values and they will immediately talk about Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage. How we live those values is outlined in the various creeds. Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers, Warrant Officers and Army Civilians all have a creed. For those who weren’t aware, the Army Civilian Creed is I am an Army Civilian, a member of the Army Team I am dedicated to our Army, our Soldiers and Civilians I will always support the mission I support and defend the Constitution of the United States and consider it an honor to serve our Nation and our Army I live the Army values of Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage I am an Army Civilian Creeds are great ―go to‖ bits of wisdom to ponder just before tackling a tough decision. They also serve as a great mirror to reflect upon after handling a particularly challenging experience. Do you have a personal creed, or mission statement, that sums up how you want to handle life, what you want to stand for, and the reputation you want to develop with those around you? What about your organization? Is there a mission statement that fits nicely within the Civilian Creed and supports the Army Values? What about your family? That’s also a values based organization. What mission statement does your family use before and after challenging experiences? If you can easily put your hands on your organization’s mission statement but haven’t yet fully flushed out your personal and family mission statements you will find Habit 2, Begin with the End in Mind, of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families and the 8 Habits of Successful Marriages extremely helpful. All are offered, free of charge, to military connected individuals on the installation on a regular basis. In fact, this set of classes based on Dr. Stephen Covey’s bestselling books are so helpful that educators from Employee Assistance, Army Community Service, the Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program, Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Child Youth and School Services and the Chaplains Office all received Franklin Covey certification to teach it. Developing an organizational mission statement takes a lot of work, but Fortune 500 companies all over the world have recognized it’s integral to their success. If you are interested in developing a personal mission statement or finding out more about any of the 7 Habits to help you succeed at work and in your personal life, attend one of the monthly EAP trainings or one of the quarterly seminars offered by Army Community Service.

Hello Fort Sill Family and welcome to our new segment on Culinary Excellence practices in which we will explore together how well we can exploit our spices and bring more flavor on our table enhance readiness and help us maintain a healthy life. The idea is to place an emphasis on sharing different methods and skills to prepare our foods in an efficient way while enhancing the flavor to bring more variety and enthusiasm to our diets. Since this is the introduction, the field is wide open in terms of suggestions and expectations. Feel free to voice your opinions and we will do everything in our reach to satisfy you. After all, we want this to be a reflection of you. So, don't be shy about your thoughts. In the next publication, we will explore with great emphasis spices, and its evolution in our daily living. Also, we will detail taste, combinations and the differences they make when being mixed in a variety of ways. Until next time, Army Strong!

PEACEFUL PLAZA Take Control of Your Life and Use Affirmations The idea behind affirmations is pretty simple. Most of us grow up learning to put ourselves down for any real or imagined reasons. We grow up believing certain things about ourselves or comparing ourselves negatively to others. The use of positive affirmations is a technique to change that negative self-talk into something more positive. The following technique can be used anywhere and is simple to start at this very moment. Please note that there is a level of dedication necessary for the technique to gain effectiveness. Anywhere technique: Whenever you catch yourself thinking something you would rather not, here is a technique that works rather well. Hear the phrase you said diminish in volume until it disappears. Then replace it with something more positive and let it grow louder. Or, you can see the "picture" of what you didn't like go spin away from you and have the picture of what you do want spin towards you. In this way we lessen the defuse the negative thought and give greater importance to the positive thought. Guided Imagery: Belleruth Naparstek has a great segment on affirmations. Click the following link to enjoy a moment of positive self-talk and relaxing peacefulness.

AFFIRMATIONS

Click AFFIRMATIONS to relax and enjoy this month’s featured ―Peaceful Plaza Guided Imagery segment as provided through healthjourneys.com


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Etiquette and Manager’s Memo

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9

Manager’s Memo: A Caveman and A Gentleman Knowing our brain and understanding how it works may seem like a daunting task. Many publications will overwhelm and overcomplicate the brain leaving us feeling intimidated. However, I have always been fascinated with the brain I would like to share with you my understanding of the brain in the hope that the information may help us improve our relationships, both at work, and at home. Your inner caveman and cavewoman The Limbic System or what many refer to as our ―Caveman‖ (or Cavewoman) brain is the older and more primitive part of our brain. The caveman never sleeps, keeping routine and life essential bodily functions operating without us having to consider them. It is where our survival instincts and emotions reside. Long term memories are stored here with emotions to mark behaviors with positive or negative feelings. This area of the brain is fully functional at birth and because of the Caveman’s seniority, he can override more complex and thoughtful parts of the brain. He is reactive and designed for speed. The Caveman is always on the look-out for danger. The Caveman decides what to fear and where to focus attention. He keeps us safe when snap decisions are necessary and more deliberation may result in injury or worse. The Caveman allows us to jump By Jay Khalifeh out of the way of a speeding car, or quickly pull our hands away from something hot without pause. That is why we can go from totally relaxed to total vigilance in a matter of seconds. Because of the Caveman’s quick response, he may respond even before he is aware that he has reacted. 2/3rds of the rest of our brain envelops and houses the caveman brain like a helmet. This area of the brain is commonly referred to as the neocortex. I like to think of the neocortex as our Gentleman (or Lady) brain. The gentleman brain is divided into two sides, right and left. Among other things the neocortex helps us reason, solve problems, and suppress our Caveman impulses. It helps us keep the Caveman is his cave. Humans are different from animals in that our Gentleman brain is larger and more developed. This is where we find the gray matter to develop language, abstract thought, and imagination. The neocortex has made us king of the jungle and is responsible for our rise up the food chain. When not facing a real or imagined threat, the Caveman is calm, allowing the Gentleman to be creative, analyze, judge, and make well thought out decisions. When the Gentleman is calling the shots we feel secure enough to be playful and open and vulnerable to someone. However, when we feel threatened our Caveman brain overrides our Gentleman in an effort to protect itself. There are generally two types of protective postures the Caveman takes in the face of adversity; fight or run. When the Caveman Wants to Fight When threatened the Caveman floods the body with stress hormones to prepare the body to fight or run. To ward off a threat, the Caveman may choose to react by intentionally causing pain in others. The fighting Caveman may yell, blame, criticize, or become physically aggressive. Never forget that to the Caveman, fighting is always a reasonable response to someone that he determines wants to harm him. The Caveman will stop fighting only when he begins to feel safe. Once the Caveman is out of the cave it may take some time and repetition to calm and reassure him that he (or she) is safe. When the Caveman Runs Away When some animals feel threatened its old brain sends the message to run. A horse or deer have little or no other defense mechanism except to run. Today’s Caveman, on the other hand, cannot always run away and may respond by;

           

Watching too much television Reading romance novels Spending lots of time in the garage Avoiding eye contact Volunteering for every community activity Keeping separate bank accounts Being workaholics or staying at work Surfing the web to the extreme Constantly change the subject Spending a great deal of time gambling on the slot machines

Workplace Etiquette 101: “Anger” We all find ourselves at a point of losing our temper or at least having feelings of anger at work. Remember these tips for the next time you feel upset:

     

Ask for a break if you need one Silently count to 10 Use relaxation techniques Vent your frustrations to a trusted friend If you are angry at an email, cool down before sending a response If your anger persists, contact EAP

Numbing themselves with too much alcohol

Consuming too much food It is important to remember that the Caveman runs to avoid danger. To pursue the Caveman is counterproductive. If the Caveman knows he won’t be chased, he will eventually stop running. The Caveman will go back into his cave and allow the Gentleman to return. How to Calm a Caveman or Cavewoman If our Caveman brain is activated only safe behaviors will get him to calm down. We should never try to demand or force the Caveman away. This may work in the short-term, but this tactic will probably result in long-term damage. Criticizing or judging the actions of another are behaviors that are indicative of a Caveman who is fighting back to feel safe. Avoiding or ignoring the issue is an example of the caveman running away from the situation. To soothe a fearful Caveman (or Cavewoman) we must demonstrates with our words and actions that we are interested in their safety and well-being. Things like active listening, words of appreciation and affirmation, compliments, thoughtful actions, physical touch, quality time, and small gifts all may help to calm the Caveman. In the book, “How to Improve Your Relationship Without Talking About It” the authors Steven Stosney and Pat Love share research that indicates that we cannot communicate until first there is a connection. When we feel connected we feel secure enough to effectively communicate. They make a distinction with how the male and female primitive brain is activated. Men will turn into Caveman when they are shamed or made to feel guilty. This means that they are in survival mode when they hear things like ...I told you that yesterday! Why don't you remember? How many times do I have to tell you? or You are acting like a child! Women, on the other hand, go into Cavewoman mode when they feel that they are emotionally or physically threatened. For women, non-fear-inducing behaviors will keep the Cavewoman at bay. The Lady will engage in meaningful conversation only when she feels her emotional and physical safety needs are met. To change behavior we must focus and ask questions about the behavior. Using statements that begin with the word “I” rather than “you” should help us single out the behavior that is causing problems. The Gentleman and the Lady meet they remember what is important and what we value. Sydney J. Harris once said, ―You cannot reason a person our of something they have never been reasoned into‖. There is no reasoning when unless the Lady and Gentleman are present for the meeting. Healthy relationships depend on us acting in control rather than reacting when we feel threaten. It also depends on us knowing how to avoid triggering the Caveman or Cavewoman in others. Whether at work or at home the goal is to make requests for behavioral changes in others only when we are talking to the Lady or the Gentleman. Otherwise, it seems we may be wasting our breath.


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Education and Leadership Academy Fall Term Class Schedule

Cameron University 19 Aug-17 October: M-F 11:40-12:40

11:40-12:30* M/W T/TR

5:30-8:15 P.M.

M/W

5:00-7:30 P.M.

T/TR

5:00-8:30 P.M.* 5:00-7:30 P.M.

Sat

9 A.M.-2 P.M.

Composition I U.S. History I Western Civilization I Fundamentals of Writing II American Government I College Algebra Business Principles Introductory Algebra Music Appreciation Introduction to Computing Learning Framework Public Speaking

Columbia College 15 Aug-8 October M 5:00-10:00 P.M. T W TR

Western Civilization II Beginning Algebra Human Resource Development Microeconomics Intro to Computer Info Systems Intro to Criminal Justice Admin

Upper Iowa University 29 Aug-23 October M 5:00-10:00 P.M T W TR

Personality Management Principles Substance Abuse General Psychology Business Communications

Oklahoma University F, Sat, Sun Sep 9-11 & 16-18 Sep 16-18 & 23-25 tion

Problems in Compara Govt Seminar in Mass Communica-

Current Problems in HR *Friday classes meet 5:30 P.M.-9:30 P.M. Saturday 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. Sunday 12:00 P.M.4:00 P.M.

  

10

Wayland Baptist Fri 5:30 P.M.-9:40 P.M.; Sat 9A.M.-4:30 P.M.

Fundamentals of Speech English Comp I College Algebra Beginning Spanish I Intro to Environmental Science (*Meets 16 Weeks 8/19-12/17) Exploring Multiculturalism U.S. History to 1865

Central Texas College 13 Aug-12 October: 11:40-12:40

PAGE

Classes are available and open to all military and civilian adults. All students are eligible for favorable in-state or negotiated on-post tuition rates. For additional information, visit the Harry S Truman Army Education Center at B3281 NW Koehler Loop (across the parking lot from the Sheridan Road Theater) or call 442-3201/5393.

MGMT-*Organizational theory –Hybrid Course meets 20 Aug, 10 Sep. 1 Oct and 22 Oct w/additional coursework on line HIST-**Studies in 19th Century America-The Civil War CNSL-**Counseling Theories **Theories & Techniques in Marital & Family Counseling **Classes meet Aug 19-20, Sep 9-10, Sep 30-Oct1, Oct 21-22

Webster University 6:00-10:00 P.M. Management Mgmt & Strategy Training & Dev InfoTech Mgmt Current Econ Analysis Org Behavior Applied Bus Statistics TR Org, Dev & Change

M W M T W

Aug 1-Sep 30 Aug 15-Oct 14

Team Sill Leadership Academy * open and free to Military and DA Civilians


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Financial Fitness

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11

Staying Financially Fit During Deployments

Unusual expenses and special pays and entitlements before, during, and after a deployment can make it hard to budget. But if you take the time to understand your finances and plan your family's spending, you can stay financially fit during deployment. The following information can help. Your spouse's deployment entitlements If you know and understand your spouse's deployment pays and entitlements you'll be in a much better position to budget and stay financially fit. Remember to use these extra pays wisely -- for instance, to pay down debt and to save with the Savings Deposit Program available during combat deployments. Be sure to go to MyPay at https://mypay.dfas.mil/mypay.aspx to check your spouse's Leave and Earning Statements (LES). You will need your spouse's Social Security number and password to access the LES. Make sure you get this information before the deployment. And remember to keep security in mind when using your spouse's PIN to access financial accounts. If your spouse is deployed for more than 30 days, he will be eligible for certain entitlements. If your spouse is on a combat deployment, short or long, depending on the unit, your spouse will receive other compensation for his hardships. The deployment entitlements include Family Separation Allowance (FSA), the Combat Zone Tax Exclusion, Hostile Fire/Imminent Danger Pays (HFD/ IDP), and Hardship Duty Location Pay. Getting into a savings routine during deployment Juggling bills that you may not ordinarily see can be nerve-racking. If you prepare before the deployment, it will be easier to get into a simple routine during deployment. Here are some ways to help keep your bills in check:

Discuss the bills before your spouse leaves. Make a list of all of your combined bills and when they're due. Are any bills paid through automatic checking? For which bills will you need to send out checks? Also make sure that you have the necessary Powers of Attorney in place in case you have to make a purchase on behalf of your service member. ( Ft Sill Legal Assistance Office can help.)

Don't overspend before the deployment. Make a budget for deployment spending. Be sure not to go overboard with electronics and equipment that you don't need.

Keep an ongoing checklist of your bills. Check your bank statement regularly to make sure that checks are clearing on time. If you need help balancing your checkbook, be sure to ask for help at your Family Support Center.

Always keep some extra in savings. Make sure you keep some extra savings for emergencies, even if it's just a few dollars from each paycheck. The Military Saves program at www.militarysaves.org can help you set savings goals, put them in writing, and stick to them.

Live off of your pre-deployment income. Sometimes extra pays mean that you have more income than you did before your spouse was deployed, and you may be tempted to spend more. If this is your situation, try to live off of your usual pre-deployment combined income, and use extra income to pay down debt or to put more into savings. Take advantage of extra savings during deployment The Department of Defense (DoD) offers unique savings plans during deployment. If you take advantage of these higher-rate savings you can build a nice nest egg for your family. Here are a few options:

Thrift Savings Plan (TSP). If you don't invest regularly in this DoD safety net, definitely start during deployment. You're not likely to miss the money coming out every month and you'll enjoy the benefits later on. Go to the TSP site at www.tsp.gov for more information.

Savings Deposit Program. At the very high rate of 10 percent interest, this is an excellent way to grow your savings. The program is only available during deployment. Go to www.dfas.mil/dfas/militarymembers/payentitlements/sdp.html to find out more.

Your Military Star Card offers special lower interest rates during deployment. Make sure you or your spouse contacts your Exchange Credit Services before the deployment. If you have other credit cards with a very high interest rate, look at the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA). A legal assistance attorney can help you understand the SCRA and how its protections may apply to you. You can find a legal assistance attorney by using the Armed Forces legal assistance locator at legalassistance.law.af.mil. Homecoming and overspending

Homecoming is an exciting time, and it can be tempting to overspend when you celebrate. So be careful -- otherwise you may be paying the price for a long time. Here are some ways to keep your homecoming debt free:

During the deployment, take some of your savings and set it aside for a special occasion. Even $50 a month adds up.

If you want to plan a vacation, go to your installation travel office for special post-deployment deals. Also, if you're going to a family resort, be sure to ask whether special rates are available for service members returning from deployment and their families.

Shop at your installation Exchange and Commissary for post-deployment celebrations. The tax break and special sales can save you a bundle.

Put some of your money where you can't get to it. If you have some extra money each month, ask your financial institution about the possibility of investing a small amount each month. This is your best option for "hiding" your money so you won't be tempted to spend it, and means that you'll have some extra cash later on. For more help go to Defense Finance and Accounting Services at www.dod.mil/dfas/ or to Army Community Services (ACS) Financial Readiness Program at www.myarmyonesource.com(Go to "Family Programs and Services," then "Family Programs," then "Financial Readiness.")

Older Workers Report Gloomy Financial Self Assessment More than half (52.7%) of adults aged 50+ who had worked for pay during the three years prior to October 2010 rated their family's financial well-being as "only fair or even poor in October 2010." More than 2 in 5 (45%) assessed their family's financial well-being as "at least good," and only a few (5.2 %) said it was "excellent," according to a 2011 AARP survey. Rix, S. E. (2011). Recovering from the great recession: Long struggle ahead for older Americans. (p. 9) (Insight on the Issues No. 50). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute.


VOLUME

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Inspire and Encourage

No More Smalling Up of Me

No more 'smalling up' of me Pretending I am not here No more running from the music And the spotlight's glare No more living in this prison Barricaded by my fears No more turning and retreating In the face of new frontiers Even as I am speaking I am taking shape and form Harnessing my powers Like a gathering storm There's no obstacle so bold As to dare stand in my way I am taking back my life. And I am doing it today.

12

Building Spiritual Strength Comforting Sorrow By: Dave Rauls 1SG (RET)

By Jean Wilson No more meekly saying 'yes' When my heart is screaming 'no' No more taming of my feelings So my power won't show No more hiding my exuberance From disapproving eyes No more watering down myself So my spirit won't rise

PAGE

Dave Rauls and son, Nicholas

Blessed be the God and father of our lord Jesus Christ, the father of mercies and God of all comfort; who comforted us in all our affliction, that we may be able to comfort them that are in any affliction, through the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God. -II Corinthians 1:3-4

Paul seemed to possess much of the knowledge of modern psychology even though the word was unknown in his day. Intuitively he knew if one received comfort in the hour of sorrow and selfishly prized the healing which had come to his heart, without any effort to comfort others, he would soon lose the very thing in which he rejoiced. We are comforted not to just ―rise above‖ our own tribulation, but that we may help others. Thus George Matheson counsels: ―Thou canst not cure thine own sorrow by nursing it; the longer it is nursed, the more inveterate it grows. It will be harder for thee to go out tomorrow than it is today; It will be still harder the day after. Thou cannot cure thy sorrow by nursing it; but thou can cure it by nursing another’s sorrow.‖ It appears God comforts us not to make us comfortable, but to make us comforters. Indeed, we can never completely understand our sorrow unless we seek an answer to this question, What good to others is meant to come through me, by this?? There is much suffering in the

world and as God provides the laughter of newborn babes he provides persons to comfort those whom suffer.

"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which

enables us to count our blessings." -Eric Hoffer

EAP INSPIRATION STATION Local Hero Joseph Krachinsky HABITAT FOR HUMANITY ADVISOR Mr. Krachinsky’s journey to Habitat for Humanity president started when he was active duty in the US Army. Upon his stops prior to Ft. Sill, he found himself stationed in Karlsruhe, Germany 90-92, with 79th Engineers, stationed at Ft Gordon, Georgia 92-94 with the 92nd Engineers, and then stationed at Ft Sill from 1994-2000 with the 62nd Engineers. While on active duty, he became involved with Habitat for Humanity in 1997. As a squad leader he was afforded the opportunity to take young engineers to the Habitat Sites to keep their construction skills sharp. While in the military Mr. Krachinsky has received the Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal. In 2000, he left the military service and became an Construction Inspector for the City of Lawton until 2005. Presently, Krachinsky is the Construction Representative for DPW, Construction Branch. He held the title as President of the Lawton/ Ft Sill Habitat for Humanity 3 terms from 2008-2010, and he is currently construction Advisor to the Board of Directors for Habitat.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO VOLUNTEER? Contact Habitat for Humanity at 580-250-1700 for volunteer opportunities!!

EAP FUNNY CORNER


YOUR EAP IS READY TO SERVE

COME VISIT US AT:

Well-Being Center, ASAP 3415 Miner Road Ft. ill, OK 73503 Phone: 580-442-4205 Fax: 580-442-5704

EAP Services to Employees and Supervisors:

  

Assessment, problem identification, and short-term counseling/intervention. Referral for treatment and rehabilitation to appropriate community counseling/treatment resources. Follow-up services to aid an employee in achieving an effective readjustment to his or her job after treatment. Training and education for supervisors and employees about alcohol and drugs.

E-mail: rashonda.labrador@us.army.mil  Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ Lawton-OK/Fort-Sill-Army-SubstanceEAP Services to the Installation Organization: Abuse- Program/115638415119642 Website: http://sill-www.army.mil/USAG/  Training and consultation for supervisors and managers on how and when to make proper use of EAP services for improving employee performance and conduct. DHR/ASAP/  Consultation to management about trends in employee needs, work groups, and related concerns dealing with work/life/wellness support programs.

Sneak Peek: What to Expect Next Month AUGUST + SCHOOL = ROUTINE

Summer break is coming to an end rapidly. Therefore, next month’s edition will provide information regarding how to get our routines back in order. Time management is important at any time of year, but during transitional periods it is of utmost importance. Take control of our time so that we can have healthier and happier days that are full of goal oriented excitement!! Those with school aged children may want to start today with sleeping habits, supply shopping, and continuous school work review.

FEEL STUCK IN THE OFFICE?

WE WANT YOU...

TO SHARE YOUR GIFT! Come out to next month’s community training! Don’t pass the opportunity to GOT A STORY, POEM OR PICTURE expand your boundaries exponentially YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE?? or miss out on the outstanding trainings I would love to hear from you! Any suggesthat next month will bring. I look fortions regarding training topics, newsletter ward to seeing everyone at the upcomarticles or pictures, please contact me at ing trainings. ASAP Community Train580-442-4205 or ing is an open event and the public is rashonda.labrador@us.army.mil. welcome to attend. Please invite your family, friends, and co-workers. An ex- I look forward to hearing from you!! perience is always more memorable when you share it with a loved one!!

July Workforce Pride Newsletter  

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